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Sample records for supraceliac aortic cross-clamping

  1. Vascular relaxation of canine visceral arteries after ischemia by means of supraceliac aortic cross-clamping followed by reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The supraceliac aortic cross-clamping can be an option to save patients with hipovolemic shock due to abdominal trauma. However, this maneuver is associated with ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury strongly related to oxidative stress and reduction of nitric oxide bioavailability. Moreover, several studies demonstrated impairment in relaxation after I/R, but the time course of I/R necessary to induce vascular dysfunction is still controversial. We investigated whether 60 minutes of ischemia followed by 30 minutes of reperfusion do not change the relaxation of visceral arteries nor the plasma and renal levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitrite plus nitrate (NOx). Methods Male mongrel dogs (n = 27) were randomly allocated in one of the three groups: sham (no clamping, n = 9), ischemia (supraceliac aortic cross-clamping for 60 minutes, n = 9), and I/R (60 minutes of ischemia followed by reperfusion for 30 minutes, n = 9). Relaxation of visceral arteries (celiac trunk, renal and superior mesenteric arteries) was studied in organ chambers. MDA and NOx concentrations were determined using a commercially available kit and an ozone-based chemiluminescence assay, respectively. Results Both acetylcholine and calcium ionophore caused relaxation in endothelium-intact rings and no statistical differences were observed among the three groups. Sodium nitroprusside promoted relaxation in endothelium-denuded rings, and there were no inter-group statistical differences. Both plasma and renal concentrations of MDA and NOx showed no significant difference among the groups. Conclusion Supraceliac aortic cross-clamping for 60 minutes alone and followed by 30 minutes of reperfusion did not impair relaxation of canine visceral arteries nor evoke biochemical alterations in plasma or renal tissue. PMID:20642850

  2. Remote Ischemic Preconditioning Decreases the Magnitude of Hepatic Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury on a Swine Model of Supraceliac Aortic Cross-Clamping.

    PubMed

    Martikos, G; Kapelouzou, A; Peroulis, M; Paspala, A; Athanasiadis, D; Maheras, A; Liakakos, T D; Moulakakis, K; Vasdekis, S; Lazaris, A M

    2017-09-05

    Temporary hepatic ischemia is inevitable during open aortic surgery when supraceliac clamping is necessary, as in thoracoabdominal or pararenal aneurysms. Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) has been described as a potential protective means against ischemia - reperfusion injury (IRI) in various tissues including the liver. The aim of this experimental study was to detect the effect of RIPC on liver IRI in a model of supraceliac aortic cross-clamping. An animal study was performed. Four groups of 6 swines each were examined: the control (Sham) group, the ischemia-reperfusion (IR) group, and 2 remote ischemic preconditioning groups (RIPC I and RIPC II group). In the IR group, the animals underwent a complete cessation of the splanchnic arterial circulation for 30 min by a concomitant occlusion of the supraceliac and the infrarenal aorta. In the RIPC groups a remote preconditioning was applied before the splanchnic ischemia. This consisted of a temporary occlusion of the infrarenal aorta for 15 min followed by 15 min of reperfusion (RIPC I group), and 3 cycles of 5 min similar ischemia, followed by 5 min of reperfusion each (RIPC II group). All animals were followed for 24 hr after the ischemia (reperfusion period). The liver ischemia-reperfusion injury was assessed by examining specific serum biomarkers indicating the magnitude of metabolic injury from selective blood samples of the hepatic circulation. In particular, the following parameters were examined: C-reactive protein, Interleukin-6, Tumor Necrosis Factor a, Ferritin and L-arginine. All parameters were affected in the IR group as compared to the sham group. Both RIPC groups developed a less serious change as compared to the IR group, in all examined parameters. In an animal study of splanchnic ischemia produced in a way to this produced during a supraceliac aortic aneurysm open repair, the remote ischemic preconditioning seemed to attenuate the effect of hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury. Remote

  3. The pathophysiology of aortic cross-clamping.

    PubMed

    Zammert, Martin; Gelman, Simon

    2016-09-01

    During open aortic surgery, interrupting the blood flow through the aorta by applying a cross-clamp is often a key step to allow for surgical repair. As a consequence, ischemia is induced in parts of the body distal to the clamp site. This significant alteration in the blood flow is almost always associated with hemodynamic changes. Upon release of the cross-clamp, the blood flow is restored, triggering an ischemia-reperfusion response, leading to many pathophysiological processes such as inflammation, humoral changes, and metabolite circulation that could lead to injury in many organ systems and may significantly influence the postoperative outcome. It is therefore important to understand these processes and how they can be treated in order to allow for safe surgical aortic repairs while ensuring the best possible outcomes.

  4. Myocardial protection in operations requiring more than 2 h of aortic cross-clamping.

    PubMed

    Bar-El, Y; Adler, Z; Kophit, A; Kertzman, V; Sawaed, S; Ross, A; Cohen, O; Milo, S

    1999-03-01

    Long periods of aortic cross-clamping time during cardiac surgery are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality because of damage to the myocardium. Recently, we have used a method of myocardial protection based on the principles of hyperkalemic cardioplegic arrest. We use antegrade administration of warm, undiluted blood followed by continuous retrograde infusion of tepid, undiluted blood supplemented with potassium and magnesium. In this study, we have retrospectively reviewed our experience with this method of cardioprotection in operations requiring more than 2 h of cross-clamp time. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 1280 patients who underwent myocardial revascularization, valve repair or replacement, or a combination of both operations between January 1, 1994 and December 31, 1997. Patients were divided into two groups: the short cross-clamp group (SXC) (n = 1144) had cross-clamp times < 120 min (mean, 78 +/- 20 min; range, 35-119 min) and the long cross-clamp group (LXC) (n = 136) had cross-clamp times > 120 min (mean, 154 +/- 31 min; range, 120-277 min). We compared preoperative, operative, and postoperative variables between the two groups. Significantly more patients in the long cross-clamp group (43.4%) underwent the combined operation than in the short cross-clamp group (2.3%), and the rate of reoperation was significantly higher in the long cross-clamp group (12%) than in the short cross-clamp group (5%). Despite these differences in operative complexity, we found no difference in hospital mortality rates between the two groups. The only significant postoperative differences were that the long cross-clamp group had a greater need for inotropic agents (43 vs. 29%), higher serum levels of creatine kinase (880 +/- 583 vs. 613 +/- 418) and CK-MB (10.9 +/- 6.4 vs. 5.9 +/- 5.2), and a longer hospital stay (9.6 vs. 6.1 days). Long, complex operations requiring more than 2 h of cross-clamping can be performed safely with our method

  5. A Brief Period of Hypothermia Induced by Total Liquid Ventilation Decreases End-Organ Damage and Multiorgan Failure Induced by Aortic Cross-Clamping.

    PubMed

    Mongardon, Nicolas; Kohlhauer, Matthias; Lidouren, Fanny; Hauet, Thierry; Giraud, Sébastien; Hutin, Alice; Costes, Bruno; Barau, Caroline; Bruneval, Patrick; Micheau, Philippe; Cariou, Alain; Dhonneur, Gilles; Berdeaux, Alain; Ghaleh, Bijan; Tissier, Renaud

    2016-09-01

    In animal models, whole-body cooling reduces end-organ injury after cardiac arrest and other hypoperfusion states. The benefits of cooling in humans, however, are uncertain, possibly because detrimental effects of prolonged cooling may offset any potential benefit. Total liquid ventilation (TLV) provides both ultrafast cooling and rewarming. In previous reports, ultrafast cooling with TLV potently reduced neurological injury after experimental cardiac arrest in animals. We hypothesized that a brief period of rapid cooling and rewarming via TLV could also mitigate multiorgan failure (MOF) after ischemia-reperfusion induced by aortic cross-clamping. Anesthetized rabbits were submitted to 30 minutes of supraceliac aortic cross-clamping followed by 300 minutes of reperfusion. They were allocated either to a normothermic procedure with conventional ventilation (control group) or to hypothermic TLV (33°C) before, during, and after cross-clamping (pre-clamp, per-clamp, and post-clamp groups, respectively). In all TLV groups, hypothermia was maintained for 75 minutes and switched to a rewarming mode before resumption to conventional mechanical ventilation. End points included cardiovascular, renal, liver, and inflammatory parameters measured 300 minutes after reperfusion. In the normothermic (control) group, ischemia-reperfusion injury produced evidence of MOF including severe vasoplegia, low cardiac output, acute kidney injury, and liver failure. In the TLV group, we observed gradual improvements in cardiac output in post-clamp, per-clamp, and pre-clamp groups versus control (53 ± 8, 64 ± 12, and 90 ± 24 vs 36 ± 23 mL/min/kg after 300 minutes of reperfusion, respectively). Liver biomarker levels were also lower in pre-clamp and per-clamp groups versus control. However, acute kidney injury was prevented in pre-clamp, and to a limited extent in per-clamp groups, but not in the post-clamp group. For instance, creatinine clearance was 4.8 ± 3.1 and 0.5 ± 0.6 m

  6. Aortic and mitral valve surgery on the beating heart is lowering cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross clamp time.

    PubMed

    Gersak, Borut; Sutlic, Zeljko

    2002-01-01

    The concept of cardiac surgery on the beating heart is acceptable rationale for the cardiac surgery in the next millenium. Beating heart (off-pump) coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) techniques have led us to consider the possibility for performing the aortic and mitral valve surgery (mitral valve repairs and replacements - with or without CABG) on the beating heart with the technique of retrograde oxygenated coronary sinus perfusion. We used the technique of retrograde oxygenated blood coronary sinus perfusion in 78 patients (Group All) - (36 patients were with extremely low ejection fraction (Group X) - 62% of whom were in New York Heart Association (NYHA) class 4 and 34% of whom were in NYHA class 3). The procedures for the patients were: aortic, mitral and tricuspid valve surgery, in combination with CABG in ischemic patients. CABG was done in all the cases off-pump. In addition, we performed a case match study for 37 patients with good ejection fraction (51.65 +/- 11.88) (Beating Heart Group) operated on the beating heart with most appropriate group of patients (No. 37) operated in our institutions on arrested heart (ejection fraction 51.07 +/- 12.93) (Arrested Heart Group). The case match selection criteria were: gender, left ventricular ejection fraction, atrial fibrillation, hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, and diabetes. The selected beating heart group and selected arrested heart groups were without statistically significant differences for the mentioned criteria. There were statistically significant differences between Beating Heart Group and Arrested Heart Group in the duration of Cardiopulmonary Bypass Time (69.35 +/- 13.52 min. versus 93.59 +/- 28.54 min.), p<0.001, and statistically significant differences in Aortic Cross Clamp Time (46.5 +/- 8.95 min. versus 61.5 +/- 18.34 min.), p<0.001. The values for Creatinin Kinase (CK) and LDH were not statistically different, however the absolute values for Beating Heart Group were lower. There was no

  7. Physiologic Responses to Infrarenal Aortic Cross-Clamping during Laparoscopic or Conventional Vascular Surgery in Experimental Animal Model: Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Cancho, María F.; Crisóstomo, Verónica; Soria, Federico; Calles, Carmen; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco M.; Díaz-Güemes, Idoia; Usón-Gargallo, Jesús

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the hemodynamic and ventilatory effects of prolonged infrarenal aortic cross-clamping in pigs undergoing either laparotomy or laparoscopy. 18 pigs were used for this study. Infrarenal aortic crossclamping was performed for 60 minutes in groups I (laparotomy, n = 6) and II (laparoscopy, n = 6). Group III (laparoscopy, n = 6) underwent a 120-minute long pneumoperitoneum in absence of aortic clamping (sham group). Ventilatory and hemodynamic parameters and renal function were serially determined in all groups. A significant decrease in pH and significant increase in PaCO2 were observed in group II, whereas no changes in these parameters were seen in group I and III. All variables returned to values similar to baseline in groups I and II 60 minutes after declamping. A significant increase in renal resistive index was evidenced during laparoscopy, with significantly higher values seen in Group II. Thus a synergic effect of pneumoperitoneum and aortic cross-clamping was seen in this study. These two factors together cause decreased renal perfusion and acidosis, thus negatively affecting the patient's general state during this type of surgery. PMID:21197458

  8. Modified technique for aortic cross-clamping during liver donor procurement.

    PubMed

    Desai, Chirag S; Girlanda, Raffaele; Hawksworth, Jason; Fishbein, Thomas M

    2014-05-01

    Undue tension on the donor vessels during organ procurement is associated with intimal dissection, which can form the nidus for the thrombosis of the hepatic artery (HA) and graft loss. According to the US OPTN database, 143 grafts were discarded in the last 15 yr due to vascular damage during procurement. The most common technique to expose the supraceliac aorta is dissection between the left lateral segment of the liver and the esophagus-stomach. In obese donors, due to restricted space and in pediatric donors where the vessels are very delicate and this space is very small, the replaced or accessory left HA(R/A LHA) is prone to damage if approached conventionally. We describe a technique for the exposure of the supraceliac aorta in which the aorta is approached from the left side behind the gastroesophageal junction that does not require division of the gastrohepatic ligament. From May 2007 to May 2013, 104 liver procurements were performed. Eighty-nine (85.6%) were adults, and 15 (14.4%) were pediatric donors. Twenty-three (22.1%) had R/A LHA. No donor organ suffered any damage. One adult recipient with R/A LHA suffered HA thrombosis not related to it. In summary, this technical modification offers improved safety during cadaveric procurement and increases the ease.

  9. Design and finite element analysis of a novel smart clamper for aortic cross-clamping in minimally invasive surgery.

    PubMed

    Hajizadeh Farkoush, Siamak; Abolfathi, Nabiollah; Mehmanesh, Hormoz; Najarian, Siamak

    2016-01-01

    Aortic cross-clamping is a critical action during heart surgeries which may cause some injuries to the wall of the artery. These injuries may have both short-term and long-term adverse effects on the artery function. Appropriate clampers can properly occlude the artery and decrease the extent of injury. Thus, developing a model for evaluation of such clampers is inevitable. In this paper, a finite element model of the aorta is presented; then, different mechanisms of clamping are investigated. In this regard, a numerical model of aortic cross-clamping by three types of clampers has been implemented with consideration of nonlinear behavior of two-layer artery, residual stress in aorta, and calcification. These three clamper models are commercial Chitwood clamper and linear mechanism clamper with and without balloon. Using the obtained results, comparative analysis was performed between the proposed clamper design and the commercial one. Based upon the analysis, it was concluded that the designed clamper, linear mechanism clamper with balloon, helps to distribute the stress uniformly in different layers of the aorta, which results in better performance of the clamping procedure and causes less injury in the aorta, especially when there is calcification.

  10. Intermittent aortic cross-clamping for isolated CABG can save lives and money: experience with 15307 patients.

    PubMed

    Boethig, D; Minami, K; Lueth, J-U; El-Banayosy, A; Breymann, T; Koerfer, R

    2004-06-01

    The ideal myocardial protection during isolated CABG is still a matter of debate. Cardioplegia versus intermittent aortic cross-clamping (IACC) are the main opponents; the following article shows that IACC can be safe, efficient and might be cheaper than cardioplegia. Demographics and co-morbidities of 15307 CABG only patients consecutively operated on between January 1993 and October 2001 in the Heart Center in Bad Oeynhausen were assessed by the German Quality Assurance data set and risk-stratified using the EuroSCORE. Outcome (30-day or in-hospital mortality) was compared to the expected EuroSCORE estimation. Expected mortality was 3.25 %, observed mortality was 1.3 %, being significantly lower in the low, medium as well as high risk patients subgroup. Complication rates increased steadily with expected mortality rates. Stroke and myocardial infarction rates for patients with peripheral vessel disease were not higher than in comparable studies. More than 1000000 EUR were saved by lower cardioplegia bills. Myocardial protection with intermittent aortic cross-clamping for isolated CABG can be safe, effective, and economically advantageous when compared to cardioplegic solutions.

  11. Aortic cross-clamping and reperfusion in pigs reduces microvascular oxygenation by altered systemic and regional blood flow distribution.

    PubMed

    Siegemund, Martin; van Bommel, Jasper; Stegenga, Michiel E; Studer, Wolfgang; van Iterson, Mat; Annaheim, Sandra; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Ince, Can

    2010-08-01

    In this study, we tested the hypothesis that aortic cross-clamping (ACC) and reperfusion cause distributive alterations of oxygenation and perfusion in the microcirculation of the gut and kidneys despite normal systemic hemodynamics and oxygenation. Fifteen anesthetized pigs were randomized between an ACC group (n = 10), undergoing 45 minutes of aortic clamping above the superior mesenteric artery, and a time-matched sham surgery control group (n = 5). Systemic, intestinal, and renal hemodynamics and oxygenation variables were monitored during 4 hours of reperfusion. Microvascular oxygen partial pressure (microPo(2)) was measured in the intestinal serosa and mucosa and the renal cortex, using the Pd-porphyrin phosphorescence technique. Intestinal luminal Pco(2) was determined by air tonometry and the serosal microvascular flow by orthogonal polarization spectral imaging. Organ blood flow and renal and intestinal microPo(2) decreased significantly during ACC, whereas the intestinal oxygen extraction and Pco(2) gap increased. The intestinal response to reperfusion after ACC was a sustained reactive hyperemia but no such effect was seen in the kidney. Despite a sustained high intestinal O(2) delivery, serosal microPo(2) (median [range], 49 mm Hg [41-67 mm Hg] versus 37 mm Hg [27-41 mm Hg]; P < 0.05 baseline versus 4 hours reperfusion) and the absolute number of perfused microvessels decreased along with an increased intestinal Pco(2) gap (17 mm Hg [10-19 mm Hg] versus 23 mm Hg [19-30 mm Hg]; P < 0.05). In contrast, the kidney showed a progressive O(2) delivery decrease accompanied by a decrease in renal cortex oxygenation (70 mm Hg [52-93 mm Hg] versus 57 mm Hg [33-64 mm Hg]; P < 0.05). Increased systemic and regional blood flow and oxygen supply after ACC does not ensure adequate regional blood flow and microcirculatory oxygenation in all organs.

  12. Alterations in cerebrospinal fluid PO(2), PCO(2), and pH measurements during and after experimental thoracic aortic cross-clamping.

    PubMed

    Ulus, Fatma; Hellberg, Anders; Ulus, A Tulga; Karacagil, Sadettin

    2009-01-01

    In a model of aortic cross-clamping, we studied the use of a multiparameter sensor for measurement of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) PO(2), PCO(2), and pH during and after aortic cross-clamping. The present study addressed the above-mentioned alterations and their relation according to time intervals. In 31 pigs, a sensor was introduced into the intrathecal space and epidural laser Doppler was used to measure spinal cord blood flow (SCF). By placing the aortic clamp at different levels, three different spinal cord ischemia groups were obtained (mild, moderate, and severe). CSF variables with SCF were studied for 25%, 50%, and 100% changes according to baseline level. In the clamping period, SCF decreased 71.5%, 40.0%, and 33.3% in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. CSF O(2) tension reached 0 in group 1, decreased 74.8% in group 2, and was 12.7% in group 3. CSF CO(2) tension increased 247.2% and 202.0% in groups 1 and 2, respectively, but slightly increased in group 3. The maximum reaction time of CSF O(2) tension was about 16.7-26.9min, although this range was 34.5-49.8min in CSF CO(2) tension. We recognized that O(2) tension reacts faster than PCO(2) and pH. It is possible for O(2) tension to be used faster than produced CO(2) in the ischemic medium, although it is known that the diffusion rate of CO(2) is much higher. Spinal cord O(2) tension monitoring is an important method to detect ischemic changes.

  13. Rewarming Rate of the Myocardium During the Aortic Cross-Clamp Time: Variations with Different Levels of Body Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Juffé, Alberto; Burgos, Raul; Montero, Carlos Garcia; Tellez, Gaberiel; Prades, Gonzalo; Lloves, Eduardo; Figuera, Diego

    1985-01-01

    Twenty patients underwent elective cardiac valve replacement at 20° C of body hypothermia. Temperatures of the ventricles of both walls were monitored on 12 different sites. Distribution of myocardial temperature ranged between 24.3 and 29.3° C for patients of Group I before cardioplegia delivery and 13.2° C in the septum after cardioplegic infusion. Average temperatures for the anterior and posterior wall were 13.6 C and 15° C in the left ventricle and 14.7 and 15° C in the right ventricle. Myocardial temperatures ranged from 26 to 28.7° C for patients of Group II. After cardioplegic arrest, septal temperatures averaged 14.9° C. The recorded sites of the anterior and posterior left ventricle were 14.1 and 13.1° C. The effects of rewarming on the different myocardial areas occurred according to a logarithmic equation, which is faster in the first 10 minutes. The data suggest that the myocardium can be adequately protected with 25° C hypothermia when the cross-clamp period is shorter than 60 minutes. When longer ischemic periods are expected, myocardial protection is best accomplished with 20° C hypothermia. PMID:15227003

  14. The Effect of Infrarenal Aortic Balloon Occlusion on Weaning from Supraceliac Aortic Balloon Occlusion in a Porcine Model (Sus scrofa) of Hemorrhagic Shock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-15

    all animals , and continued for six hours. Half of the animals were randomly assigned to Zone-3 REBOA for an additional 45 minutes following Zone-1...concentration or resuscitation requirements.Conclusion: In an animal model of hemorrhagic shock and Zone-1 REBOA, subsequent Zone-3 aortic occlusion did not add

  15. Endovascular Repair of Supra-Celiac and Abdominal Aortic Pseudo Aneurysms Concomitant with a Right Atrial Mass in a Patient with Behçet’s Disease: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kassaian, Seyed Ebrahim; Abbasi, Kyomars; Shirzad, Mahmood; Anvari, Maryam Sotoudeh; Shahrzad, Maryam; Molavi, Behnam

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Behcet’s disease is a rare immune mediated systemic vasculitis which besides it’s more frequent involvement of eyes and skin, sometimes present with aortic pseudo aneurysm and more rarely cardiac inflammatory masses.A 51-year-old patient with Behçet’s Disease presented with two symptomatic aortic pseudoaneurysms concomitant with a right atrial mass. Computed tomography (CT) revealed one supra-celiac and another infrarenal aortic pseudoaneurysms. Echocardiography showed a large mobile mass in the right atrium. Both pseudoaneurysms were successfully excluded simultaneously via endovascular approach with Zenith stent-grafts, and the atrial mass was surgically removed 10 days later. Post-implant CT showed successful exclusion of both pseudo-aneurysms, patency of all relevant arteries, and patient is now asymptomatic and has returned to normal lifestyle. Multiple pseudoaneurysms concomitant with a right atrial mass can be an initial manifestation of Behçet’s disease. Endovascular repair can be a good treatment option for the pseudoaneurysms. PMID:25870643

  16. Cardiac and renal responses to cross-clamping of the descending thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Roberts, A J; Nora, J D; Hughes, W A; Quintanilla, A P; Ganote, C E; Sanders, J H; Moran, J M; Michaelis, L L

    1983-11-01

    The present study was performed to document the relative efficacy of commonly applied techniques used adjunctively during 1 hour of descending thoracic aortic cross-clamping. Renal and cardiac responses were determined by standard laboratory methods. There were four experimental groups: (1) heparin-bonded shunt; (2) partial femoral-femoral bypass; (3) sodium nitroprusside; (4) control. Each of the experimental groups showed abnormal hemodynamic responses during cross-clamping. Elevations in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) and systolic blood pressure were common events during clamping, and cardiac output often decreased. Nevertheless, left ventricular performance curves after cross-clamping showed similar increases in left ventricular stroke work (LVSW) with increasing preload. In addition, left ventricular biopsy specimens showed preservation of myocardial high-energy phosphate stores and essentially normal ultrastructural integrity. Radioactive microspheres generally showed increased myocardial blood flow during and after cross-clamping, but no evidence of preferential subendocardial ischemia. Examination of renal function showed a marked decrease in urine output, glomerular filtration rate, and renal plasma flow during cross-clamping. Following the release of the cross-clamp, renal function returned to 50% to 85% of baseline status. Since we could find no major advantage of any of the techniques employed under the present experimental conditions, we suggest that all of the techniques should be part of the surgical armamentarium and the particular preoperative and/or intraoperative findings in a specific case should determine which technique is most appropriate for a given patient.

  17. [Ascending aorta-supraceliac++ aorta bypass. Correction of a case of atypical coarctation in the adult].

    PubMed

    Vaquero, F; Zorita, A; Samos, R F; Vázquez, J G; Ortega, J M; Morán, C F

    1993-01-01

    A case of atypic coarctation at the aortic arch in an adult patient is described. Coarctation was surgically treated by a retrosternal bypass from the ascendant aorta to the supra-celiac aorta. After a short prelude the clinical case is summarized. Furthermore, the etiopathogenic features of the disease, the different diagnostic methods and the multiple surgical procedures are discussed. Finally, we briefly review the literature.

  18. Does intermittent cross-clamp fibrillation provide equivalent myocardial protection compared to cardioplegia in patients undergoing bypass graft revascularisation?

    PubMed

    Scarci, Marco; Fallouh, Hazem B; Young, Christopher P; Chambers, David J

    2009-11-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: does intermittent cross-clamp fibrillation provide equivalent myocardial protection compared to cardioplegia in patients undergoing bypass graft revascularisation? Altogether, 58 papers were found using the reported search, of which 13 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. We identified 13 studies, of which eight were randomised prospective trials. None of these studies found increased mortality, seven analyzed serum cardiac enzymes and showed that intermittent ischemic arrest provides equal or better protection compared to cardioplegic techniques. Two studies found an increased usage of inotropes and intra aortic balloon pump (IABP) in the intermittent ischemic arrest group. We conclude that intermittent cross-clamp fibrillation is a versatile and cost-effective method of myocardial protection, with the immediate postoperative outcome comparable to cardioplegic arrest in first-time coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). The ischaemic duration associated with intermittent cross-clamp fibrillation is invariably shorter than that associated with cardioplegic arrest, and this may be one explanation for the comparable outcomes. There may also be an element of preconditioning protection during the intermittent cross-clamp fibrillation method, as has been shown experimentally. During elective CABG in patients with no clinical evidence of aortic or cerebro-vascular disease, the incidence of peri-operative microemboli (ME) and postoperative neuropsychological disturbances are shown to be comparable with both techniques of myocardial preservation.

  19. Incidence and Progression of Cardiac Surgery-associated Acute Kidney Injury and its Relationship with Bypass and Cross Clamp Time

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Habib Md Reazaul; Yunus, Mohd; Saikia, Manuj Kumar; Kalita, Jyoti Prasad; Mandal, Mrinal

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiac surgery-associated kidney injury (CSA-AKI) is common but relatively less is known about its progression. The present study is aimed at evaluating the incidence and course of CSA-AKI and its relationship with the different durations of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and cross clamp times. Materials and Methods: Occurrences of CSA-AKI are evaluated as per the Akin Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) criteria over the course of 5 postoperative day (POD) in 100 patients. The relationship of different durations of CPB and aortic cross clamp time with CSA-AKI is analyzed by Chi-squared test for trend and other appropriate tests using INSTAT software. Results: One hundred (43 male, 57 female; mean age of 37.01 ± 12.28 years, and baseline mean serum creatinine 0.99 ± 0.20 mg %) patients undergone mostly valve replacement, and congenital heart disease correction was evaluated. Nearly 49% suffered CSA-AKI (81.63% AKIN Class I) with maximum numbers on 2nd POD. Serum creatinine followed a falling trend 3rd POD onward except in 8.16% cases of CSA-AKI. Oliguria was absent even in AKIN Class II. The CPB time >70 min and cross clamp time >60 min increase CSA-AKI risk by an OR of 4.76 and 2.84, respectively (P < 0.05). Conclusion: CSA-AKI is very prevalent; mostly of AKIN Class I and increases with increasing CPB and cross clamp time. Urine output is not a reliable indicator of CSA-AKI. The AKIN Class II on the very 1st POD or increasing trend of serum creatinine beyond 3rd POD should alert for early intervention. PMID:28074790

  20. Single-stage repair of aortic coarctation and multiple concomitant cardiac lesions through a median sternotomy.

    PubMed

    Kervan, Umit; Yurdakok, Okan; Genc, Bahadir; Ozen, Anil; Saritas, Ahmet; Kucuker, Seref Alp; Pac, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Through a median sternotomy, we performed a single-stage repair of severe aortic coarctation, ventricular septal defect, patent foramen ovale, and mitral valve insufficiency. The severe aortic coarctation was repaired by interposing a synthetic graft between the distal ascending aorta and the descending aorta. We first repaired the coarctation with the 38-year-old man on cardiopulmonary bypass, before aortic cross-clamping, in order to shorten the cross-clamp time.

  1. Avoiding Liver Injury with Papaverine and Ascorbic Acid Due to Infrarenal Cross-Clamping: an Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Huseyin, Serhat; Guclu, Orkut; Yüksel, Volkan; Erkul, Gulen Sezer Alptekin; Can, Nuray; Turan, Fatma Nesrin; Canbaz, Suat

    2017-01-01

    Objective Ischemia-reperfusion injury after acute ischemia treatment is a serious condition with high mortality and morbidity. Ischemia-reperfusion injury may result in organ failure particularly in kidney, lung, liver, and heart. In our study, we investigated the effects of papaverine and vitamin C on ischemia-reperfusion injury developed in the rat liver after occlusion-reperfusion of rat aorta. Methods 32 Sprague-Dawley female rats were randomized into four groups (n=8). Ischemia was induced with infrarenal aortic cross-clamping for 60 minutes; then the clamp was removed and reperfusion was allowed for 120 minutes. While the control group and the ischemia-reperfusion group did not receive any supplementary agent, two other groups received vitamin C and papaverine hydrochloride (papaverine HCL). Liver tissues were evaluated under the light microscope. Histopathological examination was assessed by Suzuki's criteria and results were compared between groups. Results In ischemia-reperfusion group, severe congestion, severe cytoplasmic vacuolization, and parenchymal necrosis over 60% (score 4) were observed. In vitamin C group, mild congestion, mild cytoplasmic vacuolization and parenchymal necrosis below 30% (score 2) were found. In papaverine group, moderate congestion, moderate cytoplasmic vacuolization and parenchymal necrosis below 60% (score 3) were observed. Conclusion An ischemia of 60 minutes induced on lower extremities causes damaging effects on hepatic tissue. Vitamin C and papaverine are helpful in reducing liver injury after acute ischemia reperfusion and may partially avoid related negative conditions. PMID:28832798

  2. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Patient with Renal Transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, M.; Arya, N. Lee, B.; Hannon, R.J.; Loan, W.; Soong, C.V.

    2004-09-15

    Patients with functioning renal transplant who develop abdominal aortic aneurysm can safely be treated with endovascular repair. Endovascular repair of aneurysm avoids renal ischemia associated with cross-clamping of aorta.

  3. Intraoperative monitoring during carotid cross-clamping with near-infrared spectroscopy: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Nobuyoshi; Miyake, Hidenori; Ogata, Kayoko; Wieser, H. G.; Imhof, Hans-Georg; Yonekawa, Yasuhiro

    1996-10-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a noninvasive and real- time method for monitoring oxy-(HbO2) and deoxyhemoglobin (Hb) in tissue, an is suitable for intraoperative monitoring. In this study, NIRS monitoring was performed on 10 patients during carotid cross-clamping. The data were analyzed with a theoretical cerebral hemoglobin model developed to identify an ischemic pattern using NIRS parameters. Temporal profiles of changes in HbO2 and Hb were divided into three phases: initial, second, and last phase. In the initial phase, HbO2 decreased and Hb increased in all the cases. In the second phase, recovery patterns of HbO2 were classified into three groups: complete, incomplete, and on recovery. In the last phase, the HbO2 increased and Hb decreased. Relative changes in HbO2 and Hb measured by NIRS were correlated with changes in blood flow of the internal carotid artery (ICA) measured by a magnetic flowmeter and stump pressure of the internal carotid arteries. The degree of HbO2 decrease in the initial phase was significantly correlated with ICA blood flow before clamping. Three of the 4 patients with ICA stump pressure over 50 mmHg showed a complete recovery pattern in the second phase, while all 4 patients with ICA stump pressure over 50 mmHg showed an incomplete recovery or no recovery pattern with NIRS. These results suggest that NIRS is useful in evaluating changes in cerebral blood flow and the extent of hemodynamic reserve during carotid cross- clamping.

  4. Temporary Percutaneous Aortic Balloon Occlusion to Enhance Fluid Resuscitation Prior to Definitive Embolization of Post-Traumatic Liver Hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, Shin; Uchiyama, Katsuhiro; Shima, Hideki; Ohishi, Sonomi; Nojiri, Yoko; Ogata, Hitoshi

    2001-07-15

    We successfully stabilized severe hemorrhagic shock following traumatic liver injury by percutaneous transcarotid supraceliac aortic occlusion with a 5 Fr balloon catheter. Then we were able to perform transfemoral embolization therapy of the hepatic arterial bleeding source. Transient aortic occlusion using a balloon catheter appears to be a useful adjunct in select cases where stabilization of the patient is necessary to allow successful selective embolization of the bleeding source.

  5. Immediate conversion to CAS after neurological intolerance at cross-clamping test during CEA: a preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Guy Bianchi, P; Tolva, V; Dalainas, I; Bertoni, G; Cireni, L; Trimarchi, S; Rampoldi, V; Casana, R

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this preliminary study is to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of CAS as treatment option to endarterectomy when carotid shunt cannot be used safely. The medical records concerning 469 carotid stenosis treated between January 2006 and December 2009 were retrospectively reviewed, focusing on cross-clamp intolerance during CEA. Patients with cross-clamping intolerance were divided in two groups. Group 1: those that concluded the open procedure with the use of a shunt, and Group 2: those who experience immediate brain intolerance and coma and were immediately converted to an endovascular procedure. Mortality and neurological adverse event rate were compared between shunted CEA and cross-clamping intolerant cases converted into CAS. The secondary end-point was long-term survival. Carotid cross-clamp intolerance occurred in 30 cases (8.7%). CEA with Pruitt-Inahara's shunt was performed in 17 cases with a perioperative neurological adverse event rate of 23.5%. In 13 cases limitations to shunting due to quick onset of coma and/or an unfavorable anatomy were encountered. In these 13 cases the open intervention was immediately converted into endovascular procedure. Technical success was achieved in all the converted to CAS cases (100%), with a perioperative neurological adverse event rate of 7.7% (P=0.35 between the two groups). No significant difference emerges comparing patient's survival between the cases Nevertheless, the small dimension of this survey, immediate conversion to CAS resulted feasible with a lower risk of neurological adverse events if compared to CEA with shunt, and could be considered as an alternative to CEA when carotid shunt cannot be used safely.

  6. Cerebral ischemia during carotid artery cross-clamping: predictive value of phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Bagan, Patrick; Vidal, Renaud; Martinod, Emmanuel; Destable, Marie-Dominique; Tremblay, Bruno; Dumas, Jean Luc; Azorin, Jacques F

    2006-11-01

    The goal of this prospective study was to determine the utility of preoperative cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in predicting cerebral ischemia during carotid artery cross-clamping for endarterectomy. Between January 2000 and December 2003, a total of 121 patients (95 men, 26 women) underwent three-dimensional phase-contrast MRI to assess collateral function prior to carotid endarterectomy. During regional anesthesia, patients were monitored to detect ischemic events and their timing in relation to cross-clamping and to determine mean intraoperative arterial pressure. These findings were then correlated with the collateral variations observed in the circle of Willis on preoperative MRI. Patients were classified into three groups according to neurological tolerance: normal tolerance (n = 106), immediate severe deficit (n = 9), and late deficit associated with arterial hypotension (n = 6). In the second group, a significant correlation was found between the absence of collateral circulation and neurological deficit (p < .0001). These results indicated that three-dimensional phase-contrast MRI is useful for predicting cerebral ischemia during carotid cross-clamping and selecting indications for shunting. Absence of visible collaterals of the circle of Willis on MRI is significantly predictive of early ischemia and an indication for systematic shunt placement.

  7. [Late paraparesis as a postoperative complication in a patient undergoing the repair of a double aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Bonome González, C; Alvarez Refojo, F; Fernández Carballal, F; Rodríguez Alvarez, R

    1993-01-01

    We report a case of a fifty-seven (57)-years old man undergoing elective surgery of a thoracoabdominal and aortoiliac aneurysm in a single surgical time. The patients is operated undergoing general anesthetic combined with thoracic epidural blockade, and it was done two aortic cross-clamping: one to five cm of the aortic arch and the other to the infrarenal level. The most important intraoperative complications were during the thoracic aortic cross-clamping and the most important postoperative complication was related 48 hours later, to paraparesis after a hypotension episode what improved with rehabilitation treatment.

  8. Sutureless aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The increasing incidence of aortic stenosis and greater co-morbidities and risk profiles of the contemporary patient population has driven the development of minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) techniques to reduce surgical trauma. Recent technological developments have led to an alternative minimally invasive option which avoids the placement and tying of sutures, known as “sutureless” or rapid deployment aortic valves. Potential advantages for sutureless aortic prostheses include reducing cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) duration, facilitating minimally invasive surgery and complex cardiac interventions, whilst maintaining satisfactory hemodynamic outcomes and low paravalvular leak rates. However, given its recent developments, the majority of evidence regarding sutureless aortic valve replacement (SU-AVR) is limited to observational studies and there is a paucity of adequately-powered randomized studies. Recently, the International Valvular Surgery Study Group (IVSSG) has formulated to conduct the Sutureless Projects, set to be the largest international collaborative group to investigate this technology. This keynote lecture will overview the use, the potential advantages, the caveats, and current evidence of sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valve replacement (AVR). PMID:25870807

  9. Endovascular management of a thoracic aortic disruption following failure of deployment of a parachute.

    PubMed

    Kpodonu, Jacques; Wheatley, Grayson H; Ramaiah, Venkatesh G; Diethrich, Edward B

    2007-12-01

    Traumatic thoracic aortic disruption is a life-threatening lesion associated with a high surgical mortality. Endovascular stent graft repair is a minimal invasive approach that does not require a thoracotomy, aortic cross clamping and cardiopulmonary bypass. We report the use of an endoluminal graft to treat a 58-year-old male, who sustained multiple injuries including thoracic aortic disruption in a sky-diving accident due to failure of deployment of his parachute.

  10. Sutureless Medtronic 3f Enable aortic valve replacement in a heavily calcified aortic root.

    PubMed

    Vola, Marco; Fuzellier, Jean-Francois; Kasra, Azarnoush; Morel, Jérôme; Campisi, Salvatore; Ruggeri, Gianvito; Favre, Jean Pierre

    2013-05-01

    The case is reported of a surgical aortic valvular stenosis with a severely calcified ascending aortic root in a 76-year-old woman. The morphology and size of the aortic annulus were unsuitable for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI); thus, surgery was scheduled. Aortic calcifications allowed a transverse aortotomy 4 cm superior to the sinotubular junction, with a remote endoaortic view of the valve. A Medtronic 3f Enable sutureless bioprosthesis was then implanted after aortic annular decalcification. Sutureless bioprostheses are new tools that promise to reduce technical difficulties and cross-clamp times in minimally invasive aortic valve replacement surgery. In addition, sutureless techniques may have other possible advantages in special circumstances requiring full sternotomy access, such as in the present case.

  11. Aortic compressor for aortic occlusion in hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, B D; Gerdes, D; Roller, B; Ruiz, E

    1984-01-01

    The aortic compressor is a device that allows rapid, simple, immediately reversible occlusion of the thoracic aorta, without the aortic dissection required to use an aortic cross-clamp. We evaluated the aortic compressor in a controlled study using a canine hemorrhagic shock model. Twelve mongrel dogs were exsanguinated to a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 47 mm Hg and maintained at that level for 20 minutes. At that point, all animals had a left lateral thoracotomy. Six study animals had the thoracic aorta occluded at the diaphragm using the compressor. Five minutes after thoracotomy, with or without occlusion, the shed blood was reinfused. Application of the aortic compressor was the only variable. Use of the aortic compressor led to an immediate and statistically significant doubling of the study animals' MAP. The increased afterload of aortic occlusion did not impair cardiac output. The cardiac index of the study animals rose slightly, while that of the control animals fell. At the same time the compressor prevented blood flow to the abdominal aorta. If the canine model can be extrapolated to human application, then the aortic compressor would be expected to enhance perfusion of the heart and brain during hemorrhagic shock, prevent further arterial blood loss from intra-abdominal injury or ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, and preserve already diminished cardiac output. Because the aorta does not need to be dissected out to use the compressor, there is no risk of injury to nearby vascular structures.

  12. Aortic transection and diverting bypass as treatment of repetitive recurrent abdominal aortic false aneurysm rupture in a patient with Behcet's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Dong; Won, Yong-Sung; Yun, Sang-Seob; Park, Sun-Cheol; Kim, Ji-Il; Moon, In-Sung; Koh, Yong-Bok

    2011-02-01

    Abdominal aortic false aneurysms in patients with Behcet's disease have been reported frequently and repaired successfully by various procedures; however, anastomotic false aneurysms have often been reported to occur after the operation. In this article, we report a case of four-time repetitive, recurrent suprarenal abdominal aortic false aneurysm ruptures that lasted for 7 years. The location of this aneurysm was not easy to repair not only by open surgical procedures but by endovascular stent because the aortic defect was too close to the visceral arterial branches. The last operation consisted of primary repair of aortic defect, transection of abdominal aorta at the level of supraceliac aorta with end closure, and a thoracic aorta to abdominal aorta bypass with Dacron graft. An 8-year follow-up revealed no more abdominal aortic aneurysm recurrence.

  13. Abdominal Aortic Surgery: Anesthetic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of the review are to highlight the clinical characteristics of the patient population; to assess multivariate risk factor analysis and the invasive/non-invasive techniques available for risk factor identification and management in this high-risk surgical population; to assess the major hemodynamic, metabolic, and regional blood flow changes associated with aortic cross-clamping/unclamping procedures and techniques for their modification or attenuation; and to assess the influence of perioperative anesthetic techniques and management on patient outcome. PMID:1814052

  14. [MINIMALLY INVASIVE AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT].

    PubMed

    Tabata, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) is defined as aortic valve replacement avoiding full sternotomy. Common approaches include a partial sternotomy right thoracotomy, and a parasternal approach. MIAVR has been shown to have advantages over conventional AVR such as shorter length of stay and smaller amount of blood transfusion and better cosmesis. However, it is also known to have disadvantages such as longer cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times and potential complications related to peripheral cannulation. Appropriate patient selection is very important. Since the procedure is more complex than conventional AVR, more intensive teamwork in the operating room is essential. Additionally, a team approach during postoperative management is critical to maximize the benefits of MIAVR.

  15. A stepwise aortic clamp procedure to treat porcelain aorta associated with aortic valve stenosis and hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Isoda, Susumu; Osako, Motohiko; Kimura, Tamizo; Nishimura, Kenji; Yamanaka, Nozomu; Nakamura, Shingo; Maehara, Tadaaki

    2014-01-01

    A 62-year-old man was referred for an aortic-valve surgery because of severe aortic stenosis. Thirty years ago, he had undergone a mitral valve commissurotomy and after 9 years, the valve had been replaced by a mechanical valve. He had been undergoing hemodialysis for the past 8 years. A computed tomographic (CT) scan of the chest and abdomen showed a dense circumferential calcification in the wall of the entire thoracic and abdominal aorta, pulmonary artery, and left and right atrium. A conventional aortic-valve replacement was performed. To avoid an embolic event, a "stepwise aortic clamp" procedure was attempted and involved the following: (1) brief circulatory arrest and aortotomy during moderate hypothermia; (2) balloon occlusion at the ascending aorta during low-flow cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB); (3) endoarterectomy by using an ultrasonic surgical aspirator to enable aortic cross-clamping; and (4) a cross-clamp reinforced with felt and full-flow CPB. The patient recovered without any thromboembolic events. Using this procedure to treat a porcelain aorta seemed to reduce the time limit and reduced the risk of brain injury during cardiac surgery.

  16. Aortic angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... problem with the aorta or its branches, including: Aortic aneurysm Aortic dissection Congenital (present from birth) problems AV ... Mean Abnormal results may be due to: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Aortic dissection Aortic regurgitation Aortic stenosis Congenital (present ...

  17. Centrifugal pump support for distal aortic perfusion during repair of traumatic thoracic aortic injury.

    PubMed

    Walls, Joseph T; Curtis, Jack J; McKenney-Knox, Charlotte A; Schmaltz, Richard A

    2002-11-01

    Paraplegia from ischemic injury of the spinal cord and renal failure from inadequate perfusion of the kidneys may occur from aortic cross-clamping during repair of traumatic thoracic aortic injuries. After Institutional Review Board approval, we retrospectively reviewed the charts of 26 patients surgically treated for traumatic transection of the descending thoracic aorta during a 14 year period (1987-2001), using centrifugal pump (Sarns) support for distal aortic perfusion. The study group comprised 19 males and 7 females, whose ages ranged from 15 to 69 years. For all but 1 patient, who fell from a flagpole, the injuries were incurred in motor vehicle accidents. Aortic cross-clamp time lasted between 5 to 78 min (median = 40 min). Mean arterial pressure ranged from 50 to 80 mm Hg (median = 70 mm Hg). All patients survived operation without developing paraplegia or renal failure. Distal centrifugal pump perfusion during repair of traumatic injury of the descending thoracic aorta is a valuable adjunct during surgical treatment and aids in preservation of spinal cord and renal function.

  18. Selective aortic arch perfusion enables to avoid deep hypothermic circulatory arrest for extirpation of renal cell carcinoma with tumour thrombus extension into the right atrium.

    PubMed

    Zacek, Pavel; Dominik, Jan; Brodak, Milos; Louda, Miroslav

    2014-04-01

    Renal cell carcinoma with a tumour thrombus extending into the right heart chambers necessitates extensive combined urological and cardiac surgery. Maximum safety and exactness in extirpation of the caval and intracardiac thrombus is achieved under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, at a price of its non-physiological burden and time constraints. We propose a simple surgical manoeuvre enabling selective arch perfusion allowing for a milder hypothermia and liberal interval of circulatory arrest. On a routine cardiopulmonary bypass via median sternotomy, the dissection is extended along the aortic arch to identify the origins of the supra-aortic vessels. After standard aortic cross-clamping and cardioplegic cardiac arrest at moderate hypothermia, a second cross-clamp is applied at the aortic arch beyond the left carotid artery. A selective closed aortic arch perfusion is started while the extirpation of the tumour thrombus from the right atriotomy and abdominal cavotomy is being performed under conditions of circulatory arrest. Using selective aortic arch perfusion, successful and uncomplicated extirpation of voluminous caval and intracardiac tumour thrombi was accomplished in 3 presented patients. Unexpectedly difficult thrombus adhering to hepatic veins in 1 patient required 42 min of circulatory arrest. Postoperative courses were uneventful in all 3 patients. Second aortic cross-clamp to start selective closed aortic arch perfusion provides excellent surgical control of the operative field over a liberal time interval during circulatory arrest under milder hypothermia.

  19. Growing cava vein anastomosis: comparison of cross-clamping and suture times using VCS metallic clips, interrupted nonabsorbable, or continuous absorbable suturing techniques.

    PubMed

    Calles-Vázquez, Mari Carmen; Abellán Rubio, Elena; Ayala, Verónica Crisóstomo; Usón Gargallo, Jesús; Sánchez Margallo, Francisco Miguel

    2013-10-01

    The latest generation in titanium clip application systems, the AnastoClip Vessel Closure System (VCS; LeMaitre Vascular, Burlington, MA), allows surgeons to perform vascular anastomosis more easily and faster than conventional sutures. This system may become the option of choice for vascular reconstruction in pediatric surgery where, as in the case transplant surgery, decreasing vascular occlusion times may influence outcome. The aim of this study was to determine whether VCS metallic clips would allow shorter anastomosis times than conventional interrupted polypropylene or running polyglycolic acid suturing in end-to-end anastomosis performed in the abdominal cava of young pigs. Thirty-two domestic swine, 45 days old, were used for this study. All animals were subjected to an end-to-end anastomosis in the abdominal cava. VCS clips are easier to use for the surgeon, significantly decreasing cross-clamping time in caval anastomosis (VCS 10.33 ± 1.75 min vs. interrupted polypropylene sutures 46.00 ± 6.16 min vs. continuous polyglycolic acid sutures 18.16 ± 1.47 min). VCS clips significantly decrease the time needed for performing an end-to-end anastomosis in the abdominal cava, decreasing cross-clamping time when compared to interrupted polypropylene or running polyglycolic acid sutures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Minimally invasive "pocket incision" aortic valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Yakub, M A; Pau, K K; Awang, Y

    1999-02-01

    A minimally invasive approach to aortic valve surgery through a transverse incision ("pocket incision") at the right second intercostal space was examined. Sixteen patients with a mean age of 30 years underwent this approach. The third costal cartilage was either excised (n = 5) or dislocated (n = 11). The right internal mammary artery was preserved. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) was established with aortic-right atrial cannulation in all except the first case. Aortic valve replacements (AVR) were performed in 15 patients and one had aortic valve repair with concomitant ventricular septal defect closure. There was no mortality and no major complications. The aortic cross-clamp, CPB and operative times were 72 +/- 19 mins, 105 +/- 26 mins and 3 hrs 00 min +/- 29 mins respectively. The mean time to extubation was 5.7 +/- 4.0 hrs, ICU stay of 27 +/- 9 hrs and postoperative hospital stay of 5.1 +/- 1.2 days. Minimally invasive "pocket incision" aortic valve surgery is technically feasible and safe. It has the advantages of central cannulation for CPB, preservation of the internal mammary artery and avoiding sternotomy. This approach is cosmetically acceptable and allows rapid patient recovery.

  1. Aortic Dissection

    MedlinePlus

    ... arteries (atherosclerosis) Weakened and bulging artery (pre-existing aortic aneurysm) An aortic valve defect (bicuspid aortic valve) A ... valve, tell your doctor. If you have an aortic aneurysm, find out how often you need monitoring and ...

  2. The impact of surgical strategy on survival after repair of type A aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Lawton, Jennifer S; Liu, Jingxia; Kulshrestha, Kevin; Moon, Marc R; Damiano, Ralph J; Maniar, Hersh; Pasque, Michael K

    2015-08-01

    A diverse group of operative strategies are utilized for treatment of acute Stanford type A aortic dissection. We hypothesized that a surgical strategy to prevent cross-clamp injury or false lumen pressurization would be associated with reduced morbidity, mortality, persistent false lumen patency, and improved survival. This study was designed to determine the differences in outcomes between operative techniques. Outcomes and postoperative imaging were compared in patients who underwent surgery for acute type A aortic dissection. Two groups were compared, based on operative strategy. The surgical strategy for group 1 consisted of no aortic cross-clamp use, use of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, and use of only antegrade perfusion after aortic replacement. The surgical strategy for group 2 consisted of any other combination that lacked 1 of these 3 technical steps. Between January 1, 1996, and December 31, 2012, a total of 196 patients underwent surgery for acute type A aortic dissection. Operative mortality and postoperative morbidity were not statistically different between groups. Mean follow-up time was 3.95 (range: 0-15.4) years. Persistence of a false lumen was not statistically different between groups (P = .78). Overall survival was significantly better in group 1, versus group 2 (P = .0020). Multivariate Cox regression identified preoperative renal failure, chronic lung disease, greater number of packed red blood cells transfused, and being in group 2 as risk factors for poor long-term survival. The operative strategy of group 1 (no cross-clamp, use of DHCA and antegrade perfusion) was associated with a highly significant improvement in survival, despite a lack of statistical difference in the incidence of persistent false aortic lumen between groups. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Arch-first technique via clamshell incision: successful surgical reoperation for aortic arch dissection.

    PubMed

    Ozkara, Ahmet; Cetin, Gurkan; Mert, Murat; Akinci, Okan; Erdem, Can Caglar; Suzer, Kaya

    2005-01-01

    We report a case of successful reoperation for aortic arch dissection with use of the "arch-first" technique in a patient who had Marfan syndrome. Extracorporeal circulation was initiated via right subclavian artery cannulation, and the chest was entered through a clamshell incision for the best exposure. When the patient was cooled to 18 degrees C, the perfusion was stopped. After the 1st aortic arch anastomosis to a 30-mm Dacron graft, cerebral perfusion was reestablished via the right subclavian artery. The aortic repair was then completed. The cerebral ischemic time was 18 minutes, the aortic cross-clamp time was 69 minutes, and the total extracorporeal circulation time was 334 minutes. The patient was discharged from the hospital on postoperative day 10 with no neurologic impairment. The arch-first technique shortens the duration of brain ischemia. When combined with a clamshell incision, the technique is particularly helpful for reoperation of the aortic arch and thoracic aorta.

  4. Sutureless Aortic Prosthesis Implantation: the First Brazilian Experience with Perceval Device

    PubMed Central

    Tagliari, Ana Paula; de Moura, Leandro; Dussin, Luiz Henrique; Saadi, Eduardo Keller

    2016-01-01

    This is a report of the first Brazilian experience with the Perceval sutureless aortic prosthesis in two patients with severe aortic stenosis. Transesophageal echocardiography was used during the procedure. The aortotomy was performed 1 cm above the sinotubular junction, followed by leaflets removal and decalcification. Correct valve size was selected, device released and an accommodation balloon used. The cardiopulmonary bypass times were 47 and 38 min and the cross-clamp times were 38 and 30 min. There was a significant decrease in mean gradients (41 and 75 mmHg preoperatively; 7 and 8 mmHg postoperatively). There was no major complication or paravalvular leak. PMID:27849308

  5. Minimally Invasive Versus Conventional Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Attia, Rizwan Q.; Hickey, Graeme L.; Grant, Stuart W.; Bridgewater, Ben; Roxburgh, James C.; Kumar, Pankaj; Ridley, Paul; Bhabra, Moninder; Millner, Russell W. J.; Athanasiou, Thanos; Casula, Roberto; Chukwuemka, Andrew; Pillay, Thasee; Young, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) has been demonstrated as a safe and effective option but remains underused. We aimed to evaluate outcomes of isolated MIAVR compared with conventional aortic valve replacement (CAVR). Methods Data from The National Institute for Cardiovascular Outcomes Research (NICOR) were analyzed at seven volunteer centers (2006–2012). Primary outcomes were in-hospital mortality and midterm survival. Secondary outcomes were postoperative length of stay as well as cumulative bypass and cross-clamp times. Propensity modeling with matched cohort analysis was used. Results Of 307 consecutive MIAVR patients, 151 (49%) were performed during the last 2 years of study with a continued increase in numbers. The 307 MIAVR patients were matched on a 1:1 ratio. In the matched CAVR group, there was no statistically significant difference in in-hospital mortality [MIAVR, 4/307,(1.3%); 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.4%–3.4% vs CAVR, 6/307 (2.0%); 95% CI, 0.8%–4.3%; P = 0.752]. One-year survival rates in the MIAVR and CAVR groups were 94.4% and 94.6%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in midterm survival (P = 0.677; hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.56–1.46). Median postoperative length of stay was lower in the MIAVR patients by 1 day (P = 0.009). The mean cumulative bypass time (94.8 vs 91.3 minutes; P = 0.333) and cross-clamp time (74.6 vs 68.4 minutes; P = 0.006) were longer in the MIAVR group; however, this was significant only in the cross-clamp time comparison. Conclusions Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement is a safe alternative to CAVR with respect to operative and 1-year mortality and is associated with a shorter postoperative stay. Further studies are required in high-risk (logistic EuroSCORE > 10) patients to define the role of MIAVR. PMID:26926521

  6. Aortic valve replacement in geriatric patients with small aortic roots: are sutureless valves the future? †

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Malakh; Maeding, Ilona; Höffler, Klaus; Koigeldiyev, Nurbol; Marsch, Georg; Siemeni, Thierry; Fleissner, Felix; Haverich, Axel

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Aortic valve replacement (AVR) in geriatric patients (>75 years) with small aortic roots is a challenge. Patient–prosthesis mismatch and the long cross-clamp time necessary for stentless valves or root enlargement are matters of concern. We compared the results of AVR with sutureless valves (Sorin Perceval), against those with conventional biological valves. METHODS Between April 2007 and December 2012, 120 isolated AVRs were performed in patients with a small annulus (<22 mm) at our centre. In 70 patients (68 females, age 77.4 ± 5.5 years), conventional valves (C group) and in 50 patients (47 females, age 79.8 ± 4.5 years), sutureless valves (P group) were implanted. The Logistic EuroSCORE of the C group was 16.7 ± 10.4 and that of the P group 20.4 ± 10.7, (P = 0.054). Minimal-access surgery was performed in 4.3% (3/70) patients in the C group and 72% (36/50) patients in the P group. RESULTS The cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and cross-clamp times of the C group were 75.3 ± 23 and 50.3 ± 14.2 min vs 58.7 ± 20.9 and 30.1 ± 9 min in the P group, (P < 0.001). In the C group, two annulus enlargements were performed. Thirty-day mortality was 4.3% (n = 3) in the C group and 0 in the P group, (n.s.). At follow-up (up to 5 years), mortalities were 17.4% (n = 12) in the C group and 14% (n = 7) in the P group, (n.s.). CONCLUSIONS This study highlights the advantages of sutureless valves for geriatric patients with small aortic roots reflected by shorter cross-clamp and CPB times, even though most of these patients were operated on via a minimally invasive access. Moreover, due to the absence of a sewing ring, these valves are also almost stentless, with greater effective orifice area (EOA) for any given size. This may potentially result in better haemodynamics even without the root enlargement. This is of advantage, as several studies have shown that aortic root enlargement can significantly increase the risks of AVR. Moreover, as seen in this series

  7. Aortic valve replacement in geriatric patients with small aortic roots: are sutureless valves the future?

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Malakh; Maeding, Ilona; Höffler, Klaus; Koigeldiyev, Nurbol; Marsch, Georg; Siemeni, Thierry; Fleissner, Felix; Haverich, Axel

    2013-11-01

    Aortic valve replacement (AVR) in geriatric patients (>75 years) with small aortic roots is a challenge. Patient-prosthesis mismatch and the long cross-clamp time necessary for stentless valves or root enlargement are matters of concern. We compared the results of AVR with sutureless valves (Sorin Perceval), against those with conventional biological valves. Between April 2007 and December 2012, 120 isolated AVRs were performed in patients with a small annulus (<22 mm) at our centre. In 70 patients (68 females, age 77.4 ± 5.5 years), conventional valves (C group) and in 50 patients (47 females, age 79.8 ± 4.5 years), sutureless valves (P group) were implanted. The Logistic EuroSCORE of the C group was 16.7 ± 10.4 and that of the P group 20.4 ± 10.7, (P = 0.054). Minimal-access surgery was performed in 4.3% (3/70) patients in the C group and 72% (36/50) patients in the P group. The cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and cross-clamp times of the C group were 75.3 ± 23 and 50.3 ± 14.2 min vs 58.7 ± 20.9 and 30.1 ± 9 min in the P group, (P < 0.001). In the C group, two annulus enlargements were performed. Thirty-day mortality was 4.3% (n = 3) in the C group and 0 in the P group, (n.s.). At follow-up (up to 5 years), mortalities were 17.4% (n = 12) in the C group and 14% (n = 7) in the P group, (n.s.). This study highlights the advantages of sutureless valves for geriatric patients with small aortic roots reflected by shorter cross-clamp and CPB times, even though most of these patients were operated on via a minimally invasive access. Moreover, due to the absence of a sewing ring, these valves are also almost stentless, with greater effective orifice area (EOA) for any given size. This may potentially result in better haemodynamics even without the root enlargement. This is of advantage, as several studies have shown that aortic root enlargement can significantly increase the risks of AVR. Moreover, as seen in this series, these valves may also enable a broader

  8. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in a patient with a congenital solitary pelvic kidney. A case report.

    PubMed

    Murakami, T; Makino, Y; Suto, Y; Yasuda, K

    2004-10-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is rarely associated witha congenital pelvic kidney. To date only 11 cases have been reported in the literature in which a solitary pelvic' kidney was associated in only 1 patient. Repair of thesaneurysm is technically demanding because the abnormal origin of the renal arteries presents the problem of renal ischemia duringaortic cross-clamping. We report a case of a 77-year-old man who was found to have an AAA associated with a congenital solitary pelvic kidney. An abdominal aortography dearly showed 2 aberrant renal arteries, one of which originated from the aortic wall just above the aortic bifurcation and the other from the left common iliac artery. At surgery, we found other associated anomalies including malrotation of the gut and a left undescended testis. The surgical procedure consisted of an aneurysmorrhaphy followed by a tube graft replacement with therenal arteries being left intact to the distal aortic wall or below. Renal preservation during aortic cross-clamping was achieved by direct perfusion of the upper renal artery with cold lactated Ringer's solution together with topical cooling with ice slush. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. Urinary output was satisfactory and serum creatinine level remained unchanged throughout his hospital stay. The renal preservation method used in this case was simple and effective.

  9. Aortic dissection

    MedlinePlus

    Aortic aneurysm - dissecting; Chest pain - aortic dissection; Thoracic aortic aneurysm - dissection ... also cause abnormal widening or ballooning of the aorta ( aneurysm ). The exact cause is unknown, but more common ...

  10. Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest and abdomen. There are two types of aortic aneurysm: Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) - these occur in the part of the ...

  11. Retrograde coronary sinus versus aortic root perfusion with cold cardioplegia: randomized study of levels of cardiac enzymes in 40 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Guiraudon, G.M.; Campbell, C.S.; McLellan, D.G.; Kostuk, W.J.; Purves, P.D.; MacDonald, J.L.; Cleland, A.G.; Tadros, N.B.

    1986-11-01

    Myocardial injury was assessed with the use of enzyme indexes in 40 patients randomly assigned to one of two groups undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery. Twenty patients received cold cardioplegia delivered by retrograde coronary sinus perfusion and 20 received cardioplegic solution by anterograde aortic root perfusion. Creatine kinase isoenzyme MB and lactate dehydrogenese isoenzyme 1 and isoenzyme 2 assays were carried out on blood samples obtained from the coronary sinus before aortic cross-clamping and 0, 5, and 30 min after aortic unclamping. Levels of these enzymes were also obtained from venous blood samples before aortic cross-clamping and 3, 8, 14, and 20 hr after aortic unclamping and 2, 3, 4, and 5 days after surgery. Preoperative and postoperative hemodynamic measurements (Swan-Ganz catheter) and radionuclide wall motion studies were also obtained for comparison. There was no overall significant difference between the two groups postoperatively in terms of enzyme indexes, hemodynamic measurements, or results of wall motion studies. We conclude that retrograde coronary sinus perfusion is an alternative to aortic root perfusion in delivering cold cardioplegia. More studies are required to determine which subgroup of patients with coronary artery disease may benefit from retrograde coronary perfusion.

  12. Interleukin-10 appearance following thoraco-abdominal and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair is associated with the duration of visceral ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, H S; Burress Welborn, M; Pruitt, J H; Boelens, P G; Seeger, J M; Martin, T D; Wesdorp, R I; Rauwerda, J A; van Leeuwen, P A; Moldawer, L L

    2000-08-01

    to evaluate the plasma IL-10 levels during elective operative repair of thoraco-abdominal and abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. To study whether IL-10 plasma levels are associated with the duration of cross-clamping (ischaemia) and clinical outcome. fifteen consecutive patients undergoing surgery for TAAA and 10 consecutive patients undergoing surgical repair of AAA were included. plasma concentrations of IL-10 were measured by ELISA technique. Clinical outcome of the TAAA patients was prospectively analysed. during aortic clamping IL-10 was produced in both populations. The plasma IL-10 peak (934+/-172 pg/ml) of the TAAA group was seen at 4 h after declamping and remained detectable after 48 h. The plasma IL-10 peak (212+/-32 pg/ml) of the AAA group was seen 30 min after declamping and fell to undetectable levels by 24 h. These data show that the peak IL-10 plasma levels in TAAA repair are significantly (p<0.05) higher compared to the peak IL-10 plasma levels as seen during AAA repair. A positive correlation was seen between cross-clamping and peak plasma IL-10 and organ dysfunction. IL-10 plasma concentrations appear higher, later and are longer detectable in patients undergoing TAAA. Correlations were seen with duration of cross-clamping and MSOD. Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  13. Thoracoabdominal aortic replacement for Crawford extent II aneurysm after thoracic endovascular aortic repair

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Haiou; Zheng, Tie; Zhu, Junming; Liu, Yongmin; Qi, Ruidong

    2017-01-01

    Background The surgical treatment of Crawford extent II aneurysms after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) remains challenging, because of the need to remove the failed endograft and the complexity of the aortic reconstruction. We retrospectively reviewed our experience with surgical management of Crawford extent II aneurysms after TEVAR using thoracoabdominal aortic replacement (TAAR). Methods Eleven patients (10 males, 1 female) with Crawford extent II aneurysm after TEVAR were treated with TAAR between August 2012 and May 2015. The indications included: diameter >5.0 cm; persistent pain; size increase >0.5 cm/year; and no suitable landing zone for re-TEVAR. Five patients underwent surgery under deep hypothermic cardiac arrest, two under mild hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass, and four under direct aortic cross-clamping under normothermia. Two patients had Marfan syndrome. Results There were no in-hospital deaths. Continuous renal replacement therapy was required in three patients. One patient needed re-intubation, and two patients had prolonged intubation (>72 h). One patient sustained paraplegia after surgery but recovered during follow-up. Cerebrospinal fluid drainage were used in four patients (3 immediately in the operation room, and 1 in the intensive care unit when the patient suffered paraplegia). One patient died during follow-up. Conclusions TAAR represents a feasible option for the treatment of Crawford extent II aneurysms after TEVAR, with acceptable surgical risks and favorable results. PMID:28203407

  14. Selective cerebral perfusion with aortic cannulation and short-term hypothermic circulatory arrest in aortic arch reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Turkoz, R; Saritas, B; Ozker, E; Vuran, C; Yoruker, U; Balci, S; Altun, D; Turkoz, A

    2014-01-01

    The deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) technique has been used in aortic arch and isthmus hypoplasia for many years. However, with the demonstration of the deleterious effects of prolonged DHCA, selective cerebral perfusion (SCP) has started to be used in aortic arch repair. For SCP, perfusion via the innominate artery route is generally preferred (either direct innominate artery cannulation or re-routing of the cannula in the aorta is used). Herein, we describe our technique and the result of arch reconstruction in combination with selective cerebral and myocardial perfusion (SCMP) and short-term total circulatory arrest (TCA) (5-10 min) through ascending aortic cannulation. Thirty-seven cases with aortic arch and isthmus hypoplasia accompanying cardiac defects were operated on with SCMP and short TCA in Baskent University Istanbul Research and Training Hospital between January 2007 and Sep 2012. There were 17 cases with ventricular septal defect (VSD)-coarctation with aortic arch hypoplasia (CoAAH), 4 cases of transposition of the great arteries-VSD-CoAAH, 4 cases of Taussing Bing Anomaly-CoAAH, 2 cases complete atrioventricular canal defect-CoAAH, 3 cases single ventricle-CoAAH, 3 cases of type A interruption-VSD, 2 subvalvular aortic stenosis-CoAAH and 2 cases of isolated CoAAH. The aorta was cannulated in the middle of the ascending aorta in all cases. The cross-clamp was applied to the aortic arch distal to either the innominate artery or the left carotid artery. In addition, a side-biting clamp was applied to the descending aorta. The aorta between these two clamps was reconstructed with gluteraldehyde-treated autogeneous pericardium, using SCMP. The proximal arch and distal ascending aorta reconstructions were carried out under short TCA. The mean age of the patients was 2.5 ± 2 months. The mean cardiopulmonary bypass and cross-clamp times were 144 ± 58 and 43 ± 27 minutes, respectively. The mean SCMP and descending aorta ischemia times were 22

  15. Endovascular Management of Concomitant Thoracic and Abdominal Aortic Ruptures Resulting from Brucellosis Aortitis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Samuel L; Kuo, Isabella J; Fujitani, Roy M; Kabutey, Nii-Kabu

    2017-01-01

    Acute aortic symptomatology is an unusual manifestation of Brucella melitensis infection. We present a rare case of acute multifocal thoracic and abdominal aortic ruptures arising from Brucellosis aortitis managed exclusively with endovascular surgery. A 71-year-old Hispanic male with a history of atrial fibrillation and prior stroke on chronic anticoagulation presented with shortness of breath and malaise. In addition, he had been treated approximately 1 year previously in Mexico for B. melitensis bacteremia after eating fresh unpasteurized cheese. Computed tomography (CT) angiography demonstrated an acute rupture of the descending thoracic aorta just proximal to the celiac trunk and synchronous rupture at the abdominal aortic bifurctation. The patient was taken emergently to the hybrid operating room, where synchronous supraceliac thoracic aorta and abdominal aortoiliac stent grafts were deployed under local anesthesia. Completion angiography demonstrated total exclusion of the thoracic and abdominal extravasation with no evidence of endoleak. Twenty hours postoperatively, the patient became acutely obtunded and hypotensive. Repeat CT angiography demonstrated contrast extravasation at the level of the excluded aortic bifurcation. Emergent angiography confirmed a type II endoleak with free extraluminal rupture. Multiple coils were placed at the level of the aortic bifurcation between the left limb of the stent graft and the aortic wall to tamponade the endoleak. No further extravasation was noted on final aortography. Postoperatively, blood cultures confirmed the diagnosis of B. melitensis. The patient was treated with systemic doxycycline, gentamicin, and rifampin. Resolution of the acute event occurred without additional sequelae and he was discharged from the hospital to a rehabilitation facility. Concomitant multifocal aortic ruptures arising from Brucellosis aortic infection is a very rare event. In this case, the patient was successfully treated with

  16. Trends in Aortic Clamp Use During Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery: The Effect of Aortic Clamping Strategies on Neurologic Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, William T.; Kilgo, Patrick; Puskas, John D.; Thourani, Vinod H.; Lattouf, Omar M.; Guyton, Robert A.; Halkos, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of different clamping strategies during CABG on the incidence of postoperative stroke. Methods In this case-control study, all patients at Emory hospitals from 2002–2009 with postoperative stroke after isolated CABG (N=141) were matched 1:4 to a contemporaneous cohort of patients without postoperative stroke (N=565). Patients were matched according to the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) Predicted Risk of Postoperative Stroke (PROPS), which is based on 26 variables. On- (ONCAB) and off-pump (OPCAB) patients were matched separately. Multiple logistic regression analysis with adjusted odds ratios (OR) was performed to identify operative variables associated with postoperative stroke. Results Among the ONCAB cohort, the single cross-clamp technique was associated with a decreased risk of stroke compared to the double clamp (cross clamp + partial clamp) technique (OR=0.385, p=0.044). Within the OPCAB cohort, there was no significant difference in stroke according to clamp use. Epiaortic ultrasound of the ascending aorta increased from 45.3% in 2002 to 89.4% in 2009. From 2002–2009, clamp use decreased from 97.7% of cases to 72.7%. Conclusions During ONCAB, the use of a single cross-clamp compared to the double clamp technique decreases the risk of postoperative stroke. The use of any aortic clamp has decreased and epiaortic ultrasound use has increased from 2002–2009, indicating a change in operative technique and surgeon awareness of the potential complications associated with manipulation of the aorta. PMID:23477689

  17. Reproducibility of aortic pulsatility measurements from ECG-gated abdominal CTA in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manduca, Armando; Fletcher, Joel G.; Wentz, Robert J.; Shields, Raymond C.; Vrtiska, Terri J.; Siddiki, Hassan; Nielson, Theresa

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: ECG-gated abdominal CT angiography with reconstruction of multiple, temporally overlapping CT angiography datasets has been proposed for measuring aortic pulsatility. The purpose of this work is to develop algorithms to segment the aorta from surrounding structures from CTA datasets across cardiac phases, calculate registered centerlines and measurements of regional aortic pulsatility in patients with AAA, and to assess the reproducibility of these measurements. Methods: ECG-gated CTA was performed with a temporal resolution of 165 ms, reconstructed to 1 mm slices ranging at 14 cardiac phase points. Data sets were obtained from 17 patients on which two such scans were performed 6 to 12 months apart. Automated segmentation, centerline generation, and registration of centerlines between phases was performed, followed by calculation of cross-sectional areas and regional and local pulsatility. Results: Pulsatility calculations for the supraceliac region were very reproducible between earlier and later scans of the same patient, with average differences less than 1% for pulsatility values ranging from 2% to 13%. Local radial pulsatilities were also reproducible to within ~1%. Aneurysm volume changes between scans can also be quantified. Conclusion: Automated segmentation, centerline generation, and registration of temporally resolved CTA datasets permit measurements of regional changes in cross-sectional area over the course of the cardiac cycle (i.e., regional aortic pulsatility). These measurements are reproducible between scans 6-12 months apart, with differences in aortic areas reflecting both aneurysm remodeling and changes in blood pressure. Regional pulsatilities ranged from 2 to 13% but were reproducible at the 1% level.

  18. Avoiding aortic clamping during CABG reduces postoperative stroke

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Emmanuel; Puskas, John D; Thourani, Vinod H; Kilgo, Patrick; Chen, Edward P; Leshnower, Bradley G; Lattouf, Omar M; Guyton, Robert A.; Glas, Kathryn E; Halkos, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether the incidence of postoperative stroke (PS) could be reduced by eliminating aortic clamping during CABG. Methods From 2002–2013, 12,079 patients underwent primary, isolated CABG at a single US academic institution. Aortic manipulation was completely avoided by using in-situ internal mammary arteries for inflow in 1,552 (12.9%) patients (no-touch), a clampless facilitating device (CFD) was used for proximal anastomoses in 1,548 (12.8%) patients, and aortic clamping was used in 8,979 (74.3%) patients. These strategies were assessed in a logistic regression model controlling for relevant variables. Results The overall incidence of PS was 1.4% (n=165), with an unadjusted incidence of 0.6% (n=10) in the no-touch group, 1.2% (n=18) in the CFD group, and 1.5% (n=137) in the clamp group (p<0.01 for no-touch vs clamp). The ratio of observed to expected stroke rate increased as the degree of aortic manipulation increased, from 0.48 in the no-touch group, to 0.61 in the CFD group, and 0.95 in the clamp group. Aortic clamping was independently associated with an increase in PS compared to a no-touch technique (AOR 2.50, p<0.01). When separated by CPB utilization, both the off-pump partial clamp and on-pump cross-clamp techniques increased the risk of PS compared to no-touch (AOR 2.52, p<0.01 and AOR 4.25, p<0.001, respectively). Conclusion A no-aortic touch technique has the lowest risk for postoperative stroke for patients undergoing CABG. Clamping the aorta during CABG increases the risk of PS, regardless of the severity of aortic disease. PMID:25293356

  19. [Late reoperations after repaired Stanford type A aortic dissection].

    PubMed

    Huang, F H; Li, L P; Su, C H; Qin, W; Xu, M; Wang, L M; Jiang, Y S; Qiu, Z B; Xiao, L Q; Zhang, C; Shi, H W; Chen, X

    2017-04-01

    Objective: To summarize the experience of reoperations on patients who had late complications related to previous aortic surgery for Stanford type A dissection. Methods: From August 2008 to October 2016, 14 patients (10 male and 4 female patients) who underwent previous cardiac surgery for Stanford type A aortic dissection accepted reoperations on the late complications at Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Nanjing Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University. The range of age was from 41 to 76 years, the mean age was (57±12) years. In these patients, first time operations were ascending aorta replacement procedure in 3 patients, ascending aorta combined with partial aortic arch replacement in 4 patients, aortic root replacement (Bentall) associated with Marfan syndrome in 3 patients, aortic valve combined with ascending aorta replacement (Wheat) in 1 patient, ascending aorta combined with Sun's procedure in 1 patient, Wheat combined with Sun's procedure in 1 patient, Bentall combined with Sun's procedure in 1 patient. The interval between two operations averaged 0.3 to 10.0 years with a mean of (4.8±3.1) years. The reasons for reoperations included part anastomotic split, aortic valve insufficiency, false aneurysm formation, enlargement of remant aortal and false cavity. The selection of reoperation included anastomotic repair, aortic valve replacement, total arch replacement and Sun's procedure. Results: Of the 14 patients, the cardiopulmonary bypass times were 107 to 409 minutes with a mean of (204±51) minutes, cross clamp times were 60 to 212 minutes with a mean of (108±35) minutes, selective cerebral perfusion times were 16 to 38 minutes with a mean of (21±11) minutes. All patients survived from the operation, one patient died from severe pulmonary infection 50 days after operation. Three patients had postoperative complications, including acute renal failure of 2 patients and pulmonary infection of 1 patient, and these patients were

  20. Newborn aortic arch reconstruction with descending aortic cannulation improves postoperative renal function.

    PubMed

    Hammel, James M; Deptula, Joseph J; Karamlou, Tara; Wedemeyer, Elesa; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Duncan, Kim F

    2013-11-01

    A clinically driven transition in perfusion technique occurred at Children's Hospital and Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, from primarily selective cerebral perfusion bracketed by brief periods of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest to a technique of dual arterial perfusion including innominate artery and descending aortic cannulation (DAC), with continuous mildly hypothermic (>30 °C) full-flow cardiopulmonary bypass to the entire body. This study retrospectively compared outcomes in a recent cohort of neonates undergoing aortic arch reconstruction with the two techniques. The clinical records of 142 consecutive neonates undergoing operations involving aortic arch reconstruction at a single institution between April 2004 and September 2012 were reviewed. Renal function changes were graded according to the pediatric RIFLE score (based on risk, injury, failure, loss, and end-stage kidney disease). Sixteen patients, 8 supported with selective cerebral perfusion bracketed by brief periods of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and 8 with DAC, required immediate postoperative extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and were excluded from renal function analysis. Multivariable regression models evaluated predictors of pediatric RIFLE score. Patients with DAC had shorter median bypass support (113 versus 172 minutes; p < 0.001) and myocardial ischemic time (43 versus 81 minutes; p < 0.001). Patients with DAC had less median fluid gain at 24 hours (37 versus 69 mL/kg; p < 0.001), and lower incidence of acute kidney injury (5% versus 31%; p < 0.001). Fewer patients with DAC (31% versus 58%; p = 0.001) required open chest. Use of selective cerebral perfusion bracketed by brief periods of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, single-ventricular physiology, and aortic cross-clamp time were found to be multivariable predictors of serious kidney dysfunction. Multisite arterial perfusion, including DAC, and maintenance of continuous mildly hypothermic full-flow cardiopulmonary bypass

  1. Characterization of renal parenchymal perfusion during experimental infrarenal aortic clamping and declamping with enhanced thermodiffusion electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kraus, T; Mehrabi, A; Angelescu, M; Golling, M; Allenberg, J R; Klar, E

    2001-07-01

    Despite multiple previous experimental and clinical investigations, it has not been fully clarified until now whether infrarenal aortic cross-clamping (IRAC) induces a significant disturbance of renal parenchymal perfusion. Most renal cortical flow data collected thus far have been heterogenous because of inherent limitations of available measurement technology. The enhanced thermal diffusion (TD) electrode is a newly developed and previously validated prototype device that allows continuous quantification of parenchymal kidney perfusion after local probe implantation. We monitored renal perfusion during experimental IRAC with TD for the first time, thereby also evaluating the potential applicability of the method in clinical aortic surgery. IRAC (20 min) followed by sudden declamping was performed in pigs under general anesthesia (n = 14). Renal cortical blood flow (RCBF) was continuously quantified by TD, total aortic flow (TABF) and renal artery flow (RABF) were measured by ultrasonic flow probes, and parameters of systemic circulation were determined by Swan-Ganz catheter. Our results showed that kidney perfusion can be continuously quantified using TD electrodes during experimental aortic surgery in a porcine model. IRAC does not lead to a significant impairment of RCBF in young pigs as measured by TD. Renal perfusion appears to be predominantly pressure driven. Consequently, abrubt aortic declamping can bring about prolonged renal ischemia. Transfer of the TD method to RCBF monitoring during clinical aortic surgery appears to be feasible and should be investigated in selected cases.

  2. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in a patient with bilateral autotransplanted kidneys.

    PubMed

    Neelakandhan, K S; Muralidhar, R; Unnikrishnan, M; Ravimandalam, K

    1994-04-01

    The case is presented of a 38-year-old male who presented with a large 10 cm x 8 cm pulsatile swelling in his abdomen. Thirteen years before, internal iliac arteries had been used to treat long segment occlusions and diseased state of both renal arteries. At the same time both kidneys had been transplanted to the iliac fossae. Digital subtraction angiography revealed a huge abdominal aortic aneurysm. Both kidneys were fully functional. As the renal transplants had been done extraperitoneally an easy transperitoneal approach was now possible. The maximum diameter of the aneurysm was 12 cm. An inclusion graft repair was carried out using a 16-mm woven Dacron graft. In the light of the favourable circumstances it was decided not to take any special protective measures against renal ischemia apart from keeping the aortic cross-clamp time short. The patient could be discharged with patent and normally functioning kidneys 10 days after surgery.

  3. Aortic Valve Replacement With the Stentless Freedom SOLO Bioprosthesis: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Wollersheim, Laurens W; Li, Wilson W; Bouma, Berto J; Repossini, Alberto; van der Meulen, Jan; de Mol, Bas A

    2015-10-01

    This systematic review examined the clinical and hemodynamic performance of the stentless Freedom SOLO (Sorin Group, Milan, Italy) aortic bioprosthesis. The occurrence of postoperative thrombocytopenia was also analyzed. The Freedom SOLO is safe to use in everyday practice, with short cross-clamp times, and postoperative pacemaker implantation is notably lower. Valvular gradients are low and remain stable during short-term follow-up. Thrombocytopenia is more severe than in other aortic prostheses; however, this is without clinical consequences. Within a few years, the 15-year follow-up of this bioprosthesis will be known, which will be key to evaluating its long-term durability. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Aortic sutureless bioprosthesis implantation following degeneration of a SOLO stentless valve.

    PubMed

    Vola, Marco; Gerbay, Antoine; Campisi, Salvatore; Thulane, Claire; Fuzellier, François

    2015-03-01

    A case is presented of the early degeneration of a 21 mm SOLO stentless valve concomitant with severe mitral regurgitation (MR). Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation was considered in this high-risk case (logistic EuroSCORE 29.3%), but was dismissed because of the risk of coronary occlusion, an absence of visual landmarks, and the impossibility to treat the MR. Following the implantation of a 27 mm Medtronic Hancock II mitral bioprosthesis, the leaflets of the SOLO valve were removed, and a 19 mm 3f Enable sutureless bioprosthesis delivered into the remaining sewing belt of the stentless valve. The total cross-clamp time was 64 min. No aortic paravalvular leakage was detected at discharge and early follow up (four months); the mean and peak transvalvular aortic gradients were 13 and 23 mmHg, respectively, and the left ventricular ejection fraction 60%. A sutureless strategy simplified the management of this high-risk case.

  5. Anesthesia Management in Aortic Dissection in Patients Undergoing Kidney Transplant.

    PubMed

    Ucar, Muharrem; Erdil, Feray; Sanlı, Mukadder; Aydogan, Mustafa Said; Durmus, Mahmut

    2016-04-01

    Kidney transplant is a last resort to increase the life expectancy and quality of life in patients with renal failure. Aortic dissection is a disease that requires emergency intervention; it is characterized by sudden life-threatening back or abdominal pain. In the case described, constant chest pain that increased with respiration was present on examination of a 28-year-old man (85 kg, 173 cm) who presented at our emergency department complaining of severe back pain. He had undergone a kidney transplant in 2004 from his mother (live donor). He was diagnosed with acute Type II aortic dissection and was scheduled for emergent surgery. Because there were no surgical or anesthetic complications, the patient with 79 and 89 minutes aortic cross-clamping and cardiopulmonary bypass durations was sent, intubated, to intensive care unit. When nephrotoxic agents are avoided and blood flow is stabilized, cardiovascular surgery with cardio-pulmonary bypass may be performed seamlessly in patients who have undergone a kidney transplant.

  6. Single access for minimally invasive aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Minale, C; Reifschneider, H J; Schmitz, E; Uckmann, F P

    1997-07-01

    The method of replacing the aortic valve via a minithoracotomy has been reported in the recent literature. Although this strategy has clear advantages, further refinements of the process make the procedure even less invasive. Aortic valve replacement was performed in 27 patients via a right parasternal minithoracotomy without rib resection. Cardiopulmonary bypass was connected through the same access site. Standard surgical technique and equipment were employed. There were no intraoperative complications. All patients survived and could be discharged home within 1 week, except 1. Cardiopulmonary bypass time, aortic cross-clamp time, and total operating time averaged 114 +/- 26, 76 +/- 19, and 190 +/- 40 minutes, respectively. Three patients could be extubated in the operative theater, the others in the intensive care unit at an average of 10 +/- 7 hours postoperatively. Chest drainage lost averaged 430 +/- 380 mL. The advantages of this method include further reduction of surgical trauma, early mobilization, and rehabilitation of the patient. Surgical technical improvements include avoidance of groin cannulation, simpler equipment, safe venting of the left ventricle, and preservation of chest wall integrity.

  7. Robot assisted Aortic and Non-aortic Vascular Operations.

    PubMed

    Štádler, P; Dvořáček, L; Vitásek, P; Matouš, P

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical experience with 310 robot assisted vascular procedures. The da Vinci system has been used by a variety of disciplines for laparoscopic procedures but the use of robots in vascular surgery is still relatively uncommon. From November 2005 to May 2014, 310 robot assisted vascular operations were performed. Two hundred and twenty four patients were prospectively evaluated for occlusive disease, 61 patients for abdominal aortic aneurysm, four for a common iliac artery aneurysm, four for a splenic artery aneurysm, one for a internal mammary artery aneurysm, and after the unsuccessful endovascular treatment five for hybrid procedures, two patients for median arcuate ligament release and nine for endoleak II treatment post EVAR. Among these patients, 224 underwent robotic occlusive disease treatment (Group I), 65 robotic aorto-iliac aneurysm surgery (Group II) and 21 other robotic procedures (Group III). A total of 298 cases (96.1%) were successfully completed robotically. In 10 patients (3.2%) conversion was necessary. The 30 day mortality was 0.3%, and two (0.6%) late prosthetic infections were seen. Targeted Group I and Group II patients were compared. Robotic ilio-femoral bypass, aorto-femoral bypass, or aorto-iliac thrombo-endarterectomy with prosthetic patch (Group I) required an operative time of 194 (range, 127-315) minutes and robotic aorto-iliac aneurysm surgery (Group II), 253 (range, 185-360) minutes. The mean aortic cross clamping time was 37 minutes in Group I and 93 minutes in Group II. The mean blood loss was more significant in Group II (1,210 mL) than in Group I (320 mL). From a practical point of view, the greatest advantage of the robot assisted procedure has been the speed and relative simplicity of construction of the vascular anastomosis. This experience with robot assisted laparoscopic surgery has demonstrated the feasibility of this technique in different areas of vascular surgery. Copyright

  8. Computational evaluation of aortic occlusion and the proposal of a novel, improved occluder: Constrained endo-aortic balloon occlusion.

    PubMed

    de Vaal, M H; Gee, M W; Stock, U A; Wall, W A

    2016-12-01

    Because aortic occlusion is arguably one of the most dangerous aortic manipulation maneuvers during cardiac surgery in terms of perioperative ischemic neurological injury, the purpose of this investigation is to assess the structural mechanical impact resulting from the use of existing and newly proposed occluders. Existing (clinically used) occluders considered include different cross-clamps (CCs) and endo-aortic balloon occlusion (EABO). A novel occluder is also introduced, namely, constrained EABO (CEABO), which consists of applying a constrainer externally around the aorta when performing EABO. Computational solid mechanics are employed to investigate each occluder according to a comprehensive list of functional requirements. The potential of a state of occlusion is also considered for the first time. Three different constrainer designs are evaluated for CEABO. Although the CCs were responsible for the highest strains, largest deformation, and most inefficient increase of the occlusion potential, it remains the most stable, simplest, and cheapest occluder. The different CC hinge geometries resulted in poorer performance of CC used for minimally invasive procedures than conventional ones. CEABO with a profiled constrainer successfully addresses the EABO shortcomings of safety, stability, and positioning accuracy, while maintaining its complexities of operation (disadvantage) and yielding additional functionalities (advantage). Moreover, CEABO is able to achieve the previously unattainable potential to provide a clinically determinable state of occlusion. CEABO offers an attractive alternative to the shortcomings of existing occluders, with its design rooted in achieving the highest patient safety. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Quantification of hemodynamics in abdominal aortic aneurysms during rest and exercise using magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Les, Andrea S; Shadden, Shawn C; Figueroa, C Alberto; Park, Jinha M; Tedesco, Maureen M; Herfkens, Robert J; Dalman, Ronald L; Taylor, Charles A

    2010-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) affect 5-7% of older Americans. We hypothesize that exercise may slow AAA growth by decreasing inflammatory burden, peripheral resistance, and adverse hemodynamic conditions such as low, oscillatory shear stress. In this study, we use magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics to describe hemodynamics in eight AAAs during rest and exercise using patient-specific geometric models, flow waveforms, and pressures as well as appropriately resolved finite-element meshes. We report mean wall shear stress (MWSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI) at four aortic locations (supraceliac, infrarenal, mid-aneurysm, and suprabifurcation) and turbulent kinetic energy over the entire computational domain on meshes containing more than an order of magnitude more elements than previously reported results (mean: 9.0-million elements; SD: 2.3 M; range: 5.7-12.0 M). MWSS was lowest in the aneurysm during rest 2.5 dyn/cm(2) (SD: 2.1; range: 0.9-6.5), and MWSS increased and OSI decreased at all four locations during exercise. Mild turbulence existed at rest, while moderate aneurysmal turbulence was present during exercise. During both rest and exercise, aortic turbulence was virtually zero superior to the AAA for seven out of eight patients. We postulate that the increased MWSS, decreased OSI, and moderate turbulence present during exercise may attenuate AAA growth.

  10. Long-term evaluation of direct repair of traumatic isthmic aortic transection.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, G; Fontan, F; Deville, C; Madonna, F; Thibaud, D

    1989-01-01

    Direct repair of traumatic aortic isthmic transection eliminates the late complications of prosthetic graft repair. This study evaluates the long-term fate of direct aortic repair to which little attention has been paid. Among 32 patients operated upon from 1965 to 1987, 27 (84%) underwent direct repair. The tear was circumferential in 15 patients and partial in 12. Multiple traumatic lesions were present in 26 patients, including intracranial injury in 19. Partial cardiopulmonary bypass was used in 15 patients and simple aortic cross-clamping in 12. No paraplegia was observed. There were 4 deaths from associated lesions among the 14 patients operated upon for acute traumatic isthmic transection and no deaths in the others. Among the 23 survivors, 4 were lost to follow-up; the other 19 patients have excellent clinical results. Intravenous digital aortic angiography performed in 14 patients at a mean delay of 5 years 3 months showed excellent aortic reconstruction in all cases. Technically more demanding and faster than a graft interposition, direct repair is recommended as the procedure of choice in the surgical treatment of traumatic isthmic transection, particularly in young patients, the group most at risk from this lesion.

  11. Posterior enlargement of the small annulus during aortic valve replacement versus implantation of a small prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, P; Bernabei, M; Santi, C; Pasqué, A; Eufrate, S

    1984-07-01

    Twenty-two patients with a small aortic annulus were identified among 196 consecutive patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR). The 11 patients in Group 1 underwent posterior enlargement aortic annuloplasty, and the 11 in Group 2 received a small aortic prosthesis (less than or equal to 21 mm). The two groups were unselected. Core hypothermia, cardioplegia, and local cooling were employed for all operations. Isolated AVR was performed in 3 patients in each group. In Group 1, the mean increase in diameter of the annulus was 4.82 mm, which resulted in a mean area increase of 169.91 mm2 (51.7%). Mean aortic cross-clamp times were 140.4 minutes and 93.5 minutes in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. There were 2 operative deaths in Group 1, and 1 operative and 1 late death in Group 2. Mean follow-up was 26.5 months for Group 1 and 43.4 months for Group 2. No thomboembolic or bleeding episodes have been recorded. Considerations and conclusions are offered from the study of this small series of patients.

  12. [Aortic dissection].

    PubMed

    Ogino, Hitoshi

    2011-07-01

    Acute aortic dissection suddenly occurrs and results in a variety of catastrophic sequelae including cardiac tamponade, rupture, and organ malperfusion. In acute stage (< 2 weeks), according to the classifications on the region of aortic dissection, the condition of the false channel and the onset, appropriate medical, surgical, or endovascular treatments including endovascular aneurysm repair followed by the rapid and accurate diagnosis of aortic dissection using computed tomography and ultrasound should be performed without delay. In the chronic stage (> 2 weeks), the behavior of the chronic dissection or residual distal dissection after the initial treatment should be followed-up carefully with best medical treatment at the regular intervals. If necessary, appropriate surgical and endovascular treatment should be carried out in the proper timing before rupture.

  13. [Aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Villar, Fernando; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Vila, Ramón; Lahoz, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Aortic aneurysm is one important cause of death in our country. The prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurism (AAA) is around 5% for men older than 50 years of age. Some factors are associated with increased risk for AAA: age, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, cardiovascular disease and, in particular, smoking. The medical management of patients with an AAA includes cardiovascular risk treatment, particularly smoking cessation. Most of major societies guidelines recommend ultrasonography screening for AAA in men aged 65 to 75 years who have ever smoked because it leads to decreased AAA-specific mortality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEA. All rights reserved.

  14. The "stable" ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm gives a false sense of security.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, E S; Cooper, M; Hammond, S; Carlson, R; Guber, M; Maloy, J

    1999-08-01

    Operative mortality for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms (rAAA) has not changed over the past 4 decades. Previous studies have attempted to identify preoperative risk factors that impact upon survival. A retrospective review of 25 patients with rAAA treated during a 2-year period was performed. Patients were divided into groups based upon the presence (GpI), absence (GpIIa), or subsequent development of preoperative hypotension (GpIIb). Time intervals from initial presentation to arrival in the operating room (IP-OR), to cross clamp application (IP-XC), and from observed hypotension to cross clamp (HYPO-XC) were recorded. Average time intervals for IP-OR and IP-XC were significantly shorter for GpI compared with GpIIa and GpIIb. No difference in HYPO-XC was noted between GpI and GpIIb. Mortality was 33% for GpI, 25% for GpIIa, and 87.5% for GpIIb. Normal admission blood pressure led to a decreased sense of urgency, creating avoidable delays and missed opportunities for salvage.

  15. Beneficial effects of modern perfusion concepts in aortic valve and aortic root surgery.

    PubMed

    Kutschka, I; Skorpil, J; El Essawi, A; Hajek, T; Harringer, W

    2009-01-01

    Minimized perfusion circuits (MPC) were found to reduce side effects of standard extracorporeal circulation (ECC). We evaluated the safety and efficacy of the ROCsafe MPC for aortic valve and aortic root surgery. One hundred and seventy patients were randomized for surgery using either MPC [n = 85, 30 female/55 male, mean age: 69.8 +/- 11.8 years; aortic valve replacement (AVR): n = 40; AVR + coronary artery bypass graft (CABG): n = 31; David operation: n = 3; aortic root replacement (ARR): n = 11] or ECC [n = 85, 29 female/56 male, mean age: 67.7 +/- 9.5 years; AVR: n = 39; AVR+CABG: n = 35, David operation: n = 2; ARR: n = 9]. Neurological status, length of ICU stay, C-reactive protein (CRP), blood count, transfusion requirements and bleeding volume were analyzed. The MPC system provided ultrasound-controlled de-airing. A small roller pump and a flexible reservoir were used for left ventricular venting. As a control, we used a standard ECC with cardiotomy suction and hard-shell reservoir. Cross-clamp time (MPC: 76.5 +/- 29.5; ECC: 79.0 +/- 34.0 min) and bypass time (MPC: 103.0 +/- 37.9; ECC: 106.9 +/- 44.9 min) were comparable between groups. Transfusion requirements (red blood cells: MPC: 1.5 +/- 1.5 vs. ECC: 2.2 +/- 2.1 units [p = 0.05], frozen plasma: MPC: 1.2 +/- 1.8 vs. ECC: 1.9 +/- 2.4 units [p = 0.03]), postoperative bleeding (MPC: 521 +/- 283 vs. ECC: 615 +/- 326 ml/24 h, p = 0.09) were lower using MPC. ICU stay was shorter with MPC (1.6 +/- 1.6 days) compared to ECC (2.4 +/- 2.8 days, p = 0.001). One stroke occurred in each group. The ROCsafe MPC provides safe circulatory support for a wide range of aortic valve surgeries. Transfusion requirements, postoperative bleeding and length of ICU stay were markedly reduced compared to standard extracorporeal perfusion.

  16. Evolving strategies for treatment of acute aortic dissection type A.

    PubMed

    Kallenbach, Klaus; Oelze, Timm; Salcher, Rolf; Hagl, Christian; Karck, Matthias; Leyh, Rainer G; Haverich, Axel

    2004-09-14

    To assess the outcome of 3 different surgical approaches for treatment of acute aortic dissection type A (AADA). Between October 1990 and October 2003, we operated on 295 patients (pts) for AADA. Follow-up was complete for 257 pts (87%). Supracommissural replacement (SCR) of the ascending aorta was applied to 145 pts, 64 pts received a composite replacement (comp), and 48 pts were treated with the aorta valve-sparing (AVS) reimplantation technique. Pts in SCR were older compared with AVS and comp (P=0.002), gender (overall 65% male, P=0.143) and presence of Marfan syndrome (overall 5%, P=0.109) were comparable. Cannulation of the aorta was performed more often in AVS (58%) than in comp (19%) or SCR (22%; P<0.001). Mean operation time, extracorporeal circulation time, and aortic cross-clamp time differ significantly between groups (P<0.001, respectively). Stay in the intensive care unit (P=0.12) and time of hospitalization (P=0.32) were comparable. Overall perioperative mortality was 24% and did not show significant differences between groups (AVS 10.4% versus comp 28% versus SCR 26%; P=0.053). Incidence of neurological complications was similar between groups (P=0.95). Mean time of follow-up was shorter for AVS (19+/-20 months) compared with comp (48+/-48 months) and SCR (46+/-45 months). Survival at 5 years was comparable with 89% for AVS, 85% for comp, and 80% for SCR (P=0.61). Two patients from AVS (4.1%) required reoperation for failure of the reconstructed valve. Pts in comp required less aortic reoperations than pts in SCR (comp 6.3% versus SCR 22%; P=0.005). In acute aortic dissection type A, the reimplantation technique leads to results comparable to established techniques. Complete removal of diseased tissue, low incidence of reoperation, and lack of anticoagulation may favor this approach in selected patients.

  17. Acute Aortic Syndromes and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Ramanath, Vijay S.; Oh, Jae K.; Sundt, Thoralf M.; Eagle, Kim A.

    2009-01-01

    Acute and chronic aortic diseases have been diagnosed and studied by physicians for centuries. Both the diagnosis and treatment of aortic diseases have been steadily improving over time, largely because of increased physician awareness and improvements in diagnostic modalities. This comprehensive review discusses the pathophysiology and risk factors, classification schemes, epidemiology, clinical presentations, diagnostic modalities, management options, and outcomes of various aortic conditions, including acute aortic dissection (and its variants intramural hematoma and penetrating aortic ulcers) and thoracic aortic aneurysms. Literature searches of the PubMed database were conducted using the following keywords: aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, aortic ulcer, and thoracic aortic aneurysm. Retrospective and prospective studies performed within the past 20 years were included in the review; however, most data are from the past 15 years. PMID:19411444

  18. Aortic Valve Regurgitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... valve. Also, a narrowing of the aortic valve (aortic stenosis) can be associated with leaking. High blood pressure (hypertension). High blood pressure may stretch the root of the aorta where the aortic valve sits. The valve flaps ( ...

  19. Thoracic aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    Aortic aneurysm - thoracic; Syphilitic aneurysm; Aneurysm - thoracic aortic ... The most common cause of a thoracic aortic aneurysm is hardening of ... high cholesterol, long-term high blood pressure, or who smoke. ...

  20. Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Bakaeen, Faisal G; Rosengart, Todd K; Carabello, Blase A

    2017-01-03

    This issue provides a clinical overview of aortic stenosis, focusing on screening, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  1. Early results of minimally invasive aortic valve replacement. Experience with the first 34 cases.

    PubMed

    Minale, C; Reifschneider, H J; Schmitz, E; Uckmann, F P

    1997-05-01

    The method of replacing the aortic valve via a minithoracotomy has been reported in the recent literature. This strategy has clear advantages. However, further refinements of the process make the procedure even less invasive. Aortic valve replacement was performed in 34 patients whose age ranged from 49 to 82 years, averaging 69 +/- 8 years. As access route, a right parasternal minithoracotomy about eight cm long and without rib resection was used. Cardiopulmonary bypass was connected through the same access. The standard surgical technique and equipment were employed. There were neither intraoperative complications nor hospital death. All patients, except two could be discharged home within one week. Cardiopulmonary bypass time, aortic cross-clamp time, and total operation time averaged 110 +/- 25, 73 +/- 19, and 183 +/- 38 minutes, respectively. Three patients could be extubated in the operating theater, and the others on the intensive care units at an average of 9 +/- 7 hours postoperatively. One patient had to be re-entered immediately after extubation because of a bleeding from the aortic cannulation site. A second patient, who was initially operated because of a florid aortitis, had a limited periprosthetic leak two months postoperatively which was repaired thereafter. The advantages of the present method include further reduction of surgical trauma, preservation of chest wall integrity, early mobilization, recovery and rehabilitation of the patient. Improvements in the surgical technique include avoidance of groin cannulation, simpler equipment, and an easy access through a mid-sternotomy in case of reoperation.

  2. [Operative results of distal aortic arch aneurysms--approaching methods, bypass techniques and complications].

    PubMed

    Ueda, T; Hayashi, I; Kurosaka, Y; Izeki, H; Onoguchi, K; Taguchi, S; Kawada, K

    1990-06-01

    Ten patients underwent repair of aneurysms of the distal aortic arch from 1985 to 1989. There were 8 men and 2 women: aged 58 to 77 (average age 67 years). Seven patients had sacciform aneurysms which were closed by graft patch aortoplasty, and three patients had fusiform aneurysms which were corrected by inserting tube grafts. Seven aneurysms operated since 1988 were approached through median sternotomy continued with left anterior thoracotomy, so called door open method. This approach presented good view of the diseased aorta, and effective for preventing recurrent and phrenic nerve palsy. We used temporary bypass for 4 patients, cardiopulmonary bypass for 4 patients (separate carotid artery perfusion for 2 patients) and centrifugal pump for 2 patients during aortic cross clamping. One patient died intraoperatively from intractable bleeding and two patients died postoperatively from brain damage due to embolic episodes during the operations. These patients showed the severely irregular intima in the aortic arch and were complicated with rupture of the aneurysm or dissections arising from the aneurysms. It should be noticed that careless manipulation of the aortic arch and the brachiocephalic vessels cause cerebral complications in such cases.

  3. Temporary extracorporeal axillo-iliac vascular prosthesis shunt in open repair of a pararenal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Dregelid, Einar

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION When a long aortic clamp time is expected or when upper body to lower body collateral arteries are sparse, temporary lower body perfusion may be needed to reduce ischemic injury during supraceliac clamping in open repair of pararenal aortic aneurysms. The use of conventional extracorporeal perfusion techniques carry extra risks and is not in the armamentarium of most vascular surgeons. An axillo-femoral or -iliac shunt using a vascular prosthesis does not require the same degree of anticoagulation and causes less activation of blood components. PRESENTATION OF CASE A patient, who had extensive vascular stenotic disease and large bowel ischemia, was operated on for a pararenal aortic aneurysm while the lower body was perfused via a temporary extracorporeal vascular prosthesis axillo-iliac shunt. Copious backbleeding encountered while suturing the proximal anastomosis testified to the efficacy of the temporary shunt. A left hemicolectomy had to be performed for gangrene of the sigmoid colon and he needed 2 days of respiratory support; otherwise the postoperative course was uneventful. DISCUSSION In our case more ischemic injury than that observed might have been expected without the temporary bypass but significant backbleeding may have negated some of the beneficial effect of the shunt. CONCLUSION A temporary axillo-femoral or -iliac shunt prevents lower limb ischemia and provides an ample amount of collateral blood flow to the torso. It does not need to be buried subcutaneously as previously described. Occlusive balloons should be used where possible to prevent backbleeding and to further increase available collateral blood supply. PMID:23500740

  4. Abdominal Aortic Hemodynamics in Intermittent Claudication Patients at Rest and During Dynamic Pedaling Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Christopher P.; Taylor, Charles A.; Dalman, Ronald L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Lower extremity exercise has been shown to eliminate adverse hemodynamics conditions, such as low and oscillating blood flow and wall shear stress, in the abdominal aortas of healthy young and older adults. Methods We use cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging and a custom MRI-compatible exercise cycle to quantify hemodynamic changes due to pedaling exercise in patients diagnosed with intermittent claudication. Results and Conclusions With only an average heart increase of 35±18% and exercise workload of 36±16 Watts, the patients experienced approximately 3- and 6-fold increases in blood flow, and 4- and 16-fold increases in wall shear stress at the supraceliac and infrarenal aortic locations, respectively. Also, all oscillations in flow and shear stress at rest were eliminated with exercise. Claudication patients experience 3 to 4-fold lower oscillations in flow and shear stress at rest as compared to healthy age-matched controls, likely due to reduced distal arterial compliance as a result of distal atherosclerosis. The magnitude of flow and shear oscillatory indices may be good indicators of distal arterial compliance and health, and may provide predictive power for the efficacy of focal interventions. PMID:26315797

  5. Do we need sutureless or self-anchoring aortic valve prostheses?

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Malakh

    2015-03-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) is the 'gold standard' for the treatment of aortic valve stenosis. Due to the increasing age of the patient population (reflecting the demographic changes), the use of biological valves has increased over the past years. At the same time, a large proportion of these patients require concomitant surgical procedures in addition to AVR. Although trans-apical or trans-femoral aortic valve implantations (TAVI) have been introduced for high risk patients, they are limited to patients with isolated aortic valve pathology. Therefore, strategies for avoiding long ischemia times, as well as long periods of extra-corporeal circulation (ECC) resulting in reduced peri-operative risks should be welcomed among the surgical community. Modern 'sutureless valves' with reduced cross-clamp and cardio-pulmonary bypass times as a result of the absence of sutures, combined with excellent hemodynamics in the short and mid-term, may be an ideal solution for geriatric patients. Additionally, 'self-anchoring' valves will increase the armament of surgeons in treating 'technically difficult' group of patients needing AVR who have small calcified aortic roots and those coming back after aortic root replacement with homografts. These valves should also expand the application of minimally access AVR. Therefore, the question of whether we need 'self-anchoring valves' is not only redundant, but the time may have come for these type of valves to be considered as the 'valve of choice' for higher risk geriatric patients who may be 'high risk' for conventional valves but not ineligible for TAVIs.

  6. Neonatal aortic arch hemodynamics and perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Pekkan, Kerem; Dur, Onur; Sundareswaran, Kartik; Kanter, Kirk; Fogel, Mark; Yoganathan, Ajit; Undar, Akif

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this study is to quantify the detailed three-dimensional (3D) pulsatile hemodynamics, mechanical loading, and perfusion characteristics of a patient-specific neonatal aortic arch during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). The 3D cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reconstruction of a pediatric patient with a normal aortic arch is modified based on clinical literature to represent the neonatal morphology and flow conditions. The anatomical dimensions are verified from several literature sources. The CPB is created virtually in the computer by clamping the ascending aorta and inserting the computer-aided design model of the 10 Fr tapered generic cannula. Pulsatile (130 bpm) 3D blood flow velocities and pressures are computed using the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. Second order accurate CFD settings are validated against particle image velocimetry experiments in an earlier study with a complex cardiovascular unsteady benchmark. CFD results in this manuscript are further compared with the in vivo physiological CPB pressure waveforms and demonstrated excellent agreement. Cannula inlet flow waveforms are measured from in vivo PC-MRI and 3 kg piglet neonatal animal model physiological experiments, distributed equally between the head-neck vessels and the descending aorta. Neonatal 3D aortic hemodynamics is also compared with that of the pediatric and fetal aortic stages. Detailed 3D flow fields, blood damage, wall shear stress (WSS), pressure drop, perfusion, and hemodynamic parameters describing the pulsatile energetics are calculated for both the physiological neonatal aorta and for the CPB aorta assembly. The primary flow structure is the high-speed canulla jet flow (approximately 3.0 m/s at peak flow), which eventually stagnates at the anterior aortic arch wall and low velocity flow in the cross-clamp pouch. These structures contributed to the reduced flow pulsatility (85%), increased WSS (50%), power loss (28%), and blood

  7. Robot-assisted aortic valve replacement using a novel sutureless bovine pericardial prosthesis: proof of concept as an alternative to percutaneous implantation.

    PubMed

    Suri, Rakesh M; Burkhart, Harold M; Schaff, Hartzell V

    2010-11-01

    : Percutaneous aortic valve implantation within native valve calcium has progressed to clinical use despite the absence of data proving equivalence to complete surgical excision and prosthetic valve replacement. A novel self-expanding sutureless bovine pericardial prosthesis (Sorin Perceval) derived from a proven stented valve has been successfully used in humans recently through an open transaortic approach. We sought to develop a minimally invasive technique for native aortic valve excision and sutureless prosthetic aortic valve replacement using robot assistance. : The da Vinci S-HD system was used to open and suspend the pericardium anterior to the phrenic nerve in cadavers. A transthoracic cross-clamp was placed across the midascending aorta, following which a transverse aortotomy was made. The native aortic valve cusps were excised, and annular calcium was removed with robotic instruments. After placement of three guide sutures, the Perceval self-expanding pericardial prosthesis mounted on a flexible delivery system was inserted through a working port and lowered into the aortic annulus. : Successful implantation of all valves was possible using a 3-cm right second intercostal space working port, along with two additional 1-cm instrument ports. A standard transverse aortotomy was sufficient for examination/debridement of the native aortic valve cusps, sizing of the annulus, and deployment of the nitinol-stented, bovine pericardial prosthesis. Delivery, seating, and stability of the device were easily confirmed above and below the aortic valve annulus using the robotic camera. : Complete excision of diseased native aortic valve cusps with robot assistance facilitates accurate and reproducible aortic valve replacement using a novel self-expanding sutureless version of a proven bovine pericardial prosthesis. This approach is comparable to the current surgical gold standard and is ready for clinical use as an alternative to percutaneous aortic valve implantation.

  8. Reduction of gaseous microembolism during aortic valve replacement using a dynamic bubble trap.

    PubMed

    Schönburg, M; Ziegelhoeffer, T; Kraus, B; Mühling, A; Heidt, M; Taborski, U; Gerriets, T; Roth, M; Hein, S; Urbanek, S; Klövekorn, W P

    2006-06-01

    Serious postoperative psycho-neurological dysfunction is at least partially attributed to the occurrence of gaseous microbubbles in the arterial line of extracorporeal circulation (ECC). Therefore, we investigated in a prospective randomized double blind study whether the usage of dynamic bubble trap (DBT) will reduce microbubble load of patients undergoing aortic valve replacement. Patients (n = 41) were divided into group I (GI, n = 22) with DBT introduced into the arterial line of ECC and group II (GII, n = 19) with placebo-DBT instead. Doppler ultrasonography was used for detection of microbubbles before and after DBT, and for detection of high intensity transient signals (HITS) within the middle cerebral artery. The recording time during ECC was divided into period 1 (P1, until aortic clamp removal) and period 2 (P2, clamp removal until the end of ECC). A significant reduction of microbubble load was found in GI only (p < 0.0001 for ECC; p < 0.0001 for P1; p < 0.0025 for P2). A significant difference in number of HITS between the groups was observed in P1 only (p < 0.002 left middle cerebral artery, p < 0.005 right middle cerebral artery), since in P2 the trapped air in left chamber can go to the supraaortal vessels without passing ECC. In conclusion the use of DBT cannot substitute careful venting after aortic declamping. Nevertheless, reduction of HITS in the cross-clamped period of ECC justifies the use of DBT in patients undergoing open chamber surgery.

  9. Aortic valve replacement in rheumatoid aortic incompetence.

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, A B; Goldstraw, P; Caves, P K

    1978-01-01

    Rheumatoid aortic valve disease is uncommon. and there are few reports of valve replacement in this condition. Aortic valve replacement and partial pericardiectomy was performed in a patient with acute rheumatoid aortitis and aortic incompetence. Previous reports suggest that any patient with rheumatoid arthritis who develops cardiac symptoms should be carefully assessed for surgically treatable involvement of the pericardium or heart valves. Images PMID:725829

  10. International Expert Consensus on Sutureless and Rapid Deployment Valves in Aortic Valve Replacement Using Minimally Invasive Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Glauber, Mattia; Moten, Simon C.; Quaini, Eugenio; Solinas, Marco; Folliguet, Thierry A.; Meuris, Bart; Miceli, Antonio; Oberwalder, Peter J.; Rambaldini, Manfredo; Teoh, Kevin H. T.; Bhatnagar, Gopal; Borger, Michael A.; Bouchard, Denis; Bouchot, Olivier; Clark, Stephen C.; Dapunt, Otto E.; Ferrarini, Matteo; Fischlein, Theodor J. M.; Laufer, Guenther; Mignosa, Carmelo; Millner, Russell; Noirhomme, Philippe; Pfeiffer, Steffen; Ruyra-Baliarda, Xavier; Shrestha, Malakh Lal; Suri, Rakesh M.; Troise, Giovanni; Gersak, Borut

    2016-01-01

    Objective To define the benefit of sutureless and rapid deployment valves in current minimally invasive approaches in isolated aortic valve replacement. Methods A panel of 28 international experts with expertise in both minimally invasive aortic valve replacement and rapid deployment valves was constituted. After thorough literature review, the experts rated evidence-based recommendations in a modified Delphi approach. Results No guideline could be retrieved. Thirty-three clinical trials and 9 systematic reviews could be identified for detailed text analysis to obtain a total of 24 recommendations. After rating by the experts 12, final recommendations were identified: preoperative computed tomographic scan as well as intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography are highly recommended. Suitable annular sizes are 19 to 27 mm. There is a contraindication for bicuspid valves only for type 0 and for annular abscess or destruction due to infective endocarditis. The use of sutureless and rapid deployment valves reduces extracorporeal circulation and aortic cross-clamp time and leads to less early complications as prolonged ventilation, blood transfusion, atrial fibrillation, pleural effusions, paravalvular leakages and aortic regurgitation, and renal replacement therapy, respectively. These clinical outcomes result in reduced intensive care unit and hospital stay and reduced costs. The use of sutureless and rapid deployment valves will lead to a higher adoption rate of minimally invasive approaches in aortic valve replacement. Respect should be taken to a necessary short learning curve for both sutureless and minimally invasive programs. Conclusions Sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valve replacement together with minimally invasive approaches offers an attractive option in aortic valve placement for patients requiring biological valve replacement. PMID:27540996

  11. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... Endovascular aneurysm repair - aorta; AAA repair - endovascular; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular ... leaking or bleeding. You may have an abdominal aortic aneurysm that is not causing any symptoms or problems. ...

  12. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000162.htm Abdominal aortic aneurysm To use the sharing features on this page, ... to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs when an area of the aorta becomes ...

  13. CT in aortic trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Heiberg, E.; Wolverson, M.K.; Sundaram, M.; Shields, J.B.

    1983-06-01

    A diagnosis of aortic transection was made at computed tomography (CT) in four of 10 patients with acute multiple trauma suspected of having thoracic aortic injuries. There were no false-negative or false-positive examinations. The CT findings of an injured aorta were (1) false aneurysm, (2) linear lucency within the opacified aortic lumen caused by the torn edge of the aortic wall, (3) marginal irregularity of the opacified aortic lumen, (4) periaortic or intramural aortic hematoma, and (5) dissection. The extent of associated mediastinal hemorrhage and the amount of blood in the pleural space were not useful as indicators of aortic injury. Similarly, shift of the trachea and esophagus or absence thereof was found in patients with or without aortic tear.

  14. Aortic dissection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Aortic dissection is a condition in which there is bleeding into and along the wall of the aorta (the ... the inner wall of the artery. Although aortic dissection can affect anybody, it is most often seen ...

  15. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis or plaque buildup causes the ... weak and bulge outward like a balloon. An AAA develops slowly over time and has few noticeable ...

  16. Aortic valve replacement and concomitant right coronary artery bypass grafting performed via a right minithoracotomy approach.

    PubMed

    Mihos, Christos G; Santana, Orlando; Pineda, Andres M; La Pietra, Angelo; Lamelas, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    We present our experience of concomitant right coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and aortic valve replacement performed via a right minithoracotomy in patients with coronary lesions not amenable to percutaneous intervention. A total of 17 patients underwent concomitant aortic valve replacement and right CABG between April 2008 and July 2013. A 5- to 6-cm minithoracotomy incision was made over the right second or third intercostal space, and the costochondral cartilage was transected. A saphenous vein bypass to the right coronary artery was then performed, initiating the anastomosis from the toe of the graft. Subsequently, the aortic valve was replaced using standard techniques. There were 6 men and 11 women. The median European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation II score mortality risk was 5% [interquartile range (IQR), 2%-8%]. The mean (SD) age was 77 (10) years, the left ventricular ejection fraction was 59% (8%), and the New York Heart Association functional class was 2.4 (0.8). One patient had a history of CABG. The mean (SD) cardiopulmonary bypass time was 168 (57) minutes, and the aortic cross-clamp time was 133 (36) minutes. Three patients underwent concomitant mitral valve surgery (replacement, 2; repair, 1). The median intensive care unit and hospital lengths of stay were 47 hours (IQR, 24-90) and 9 days (IQR, 5-13), respectively. There was one reoperation for bleeding, and there was one postoperative stroke. All patients were alive at a mean (SD) follow-up of 2 (1.1) years. Aortic valve replacement with concomitant CABG performed via a right minithoracotomy approach is feasible.

  17. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement without sternotomy. Experience with the first 50 cases.

    PubMed

    Minale, C; Reifschneider, H J; Schmitz, E; Uckmann, F P

    1998-10-01

    The method of replacing the aortic valve via a mini-thoracotomy has been reported in the recent literature. Although this strategy has clear advantages, further refinements of the process make the procedure even less invasive. Aortic valve replacement was performed in 50 patients whose age ranged between 49 and 82 years, averaging 68+/-8.3 years. As access route, a right parasternal mini-thoracotomy of about 8 cm, without rib resection was used. Cardiopulmonary bypass was connected through the same access. Standard surgical techniques and equipment were employed. In all patients a mechanical prosthesis was implanted. There were neither intraoperative complications nor hospital death. All patients could be discharged home at an average of 10+/-3 days postoperatively. Cardiopulmonary bypass time, aortic cross-clamp time, total operation time averaged 118+/-32, 70+/-21, 180+/-45 min, respectively. Four patients could be extubated in the operative theater, the others on the intensive care units at an average of 12+/-6 h, postoperatively. One patient with a very thin aortic wall sustained a severe bleeding from the aortic cannulation site during an hypertensive crisis, just after extubation. He had to be re-entered immediately via a median sternotomy. A second patient, who was initially operated on because of a floride aortitis, had a limited periprosthetic leak 2 months postoperatively. The leak was repaired via a median sternotomy. Drainage lost and blood substitution averaged 751+/-400 and 274+/-390, respectively. The advantages of the present method include further reduction of hospital trauma, preservation of chest wall integrity, early mobilization and rehabilitation of the patient. Surgical technical improvements include avoidance of groin cannulation, simpler equipment, and an easy access in case of reoperation.

  18. Transperitoneal repair of a juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm and co-existent horseshoe kidney with division of the renal isthmus

    PubMed Central

    Hajibandeh, Shahin; Hajibandeh, Shahab; Johnpulle, Michelle; Perricone, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    The co-existence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and horseshoe kidney (HSK) is rare. We report a 67-year-old man with an expanding juxtarenal AAA associated with a HSK. The aneurysm had a severely angulated neck and contained a significant amount of mural thrombus. The isthmus of HSK closely lied over the aneurysm, making its exposure extremely difficult. The aneurysm was successfully repaired using transperitoneal approach with division of the renal isthmus and without any need for the renal artery reconstruction. Despite the potential complications, particularly renal insufficiency, associated with division of the renal isthmus and suprarenal cross-clamping of the abdominal aorta, in our case, post-operative period was uneventful and the patient's recovery was satisfactory. PMID:26511935

  19. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... fully will restrict blood flow. This is called aortic stenosis. If there is also a leak, it is ... TAVR is used for people with severe aortic stenosis who aren't ... valve . In adults, aortic stenosis usually occurs due to calcium ...

  20. Analysis of early and long-term outcomes of acute type A aortic dissection according to the new international aortic arch surgery study group recommendations.

    PubMed

    Colli, Andrea; Carrozzini, Massimiliano; Galuppo, Marco; Comisso, Marina; Toto, Francesca; Gregori, Dario; Gerosa, Gino

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate predictors of early and long-term outcomes of surgical repair of acute Type A aortic dissection. Retrospective single-centre study evaluating patients surgically treated between 1998 and 2013. Clinical follow-up was performed. Complications were classified according to the International Aortic Arch Surgery Study Group recommendations. Statistical analysis included univariate and multivariate analysis of preoperative and operative data. One hundred eighty-five patients were evaluated. The follow-up was complete for 180 patients (97 %). Mean age was 63 years, 82 % had a DeBakey type I aortic dissection, 18 % a type II. Eleven patients (6 %) died intraoperatively, 119 of the remaining (68 %) had postoperative complications. Thirty-day mortality was 21 % (38 patients). Average ICU and hospital stay were 6 and 14 days, respectively. During a mean follow-up time of 6 ± 4 years we observed 44 deaths (31 %). Twenty patients (14 %) needed late thoracic aorta reoperation. Results from the multivariate analysis are as follows. Thirty-day mortality was associated with abdominal pain at presentation (p < 0.01). The incidence of postoperative complications was related to older age at intervention (p < 0.01) and longer cross-clamp time (p < 0.01). Mortality at follow-up was significantly increased by older age at intervention (p < 0.01), with a logarithmic growth after 60 years, female sex (p < 0.01), preoperative limb ischemia (p = 0.02) and DHCA (p < 0.01). The surgical results of type A aortic dissection are affected by age at intervention with a logarithmic increase of late mortality in patients older than 60 years.

  1. Non-invasive spinal cord oxygenation monitoring: validating collateral network near-infrared spectroscopy for thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    von Aspern, Konstantin; Haunschild, Josephina; Hoyer, Alexandro; Luehr, Maximilian; Bakhtiary, Farhad; Misfeld, Martin; Mohr, Friedrich W; Etz, Christian D

    2016-10-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy of the collateral network (cnNIRS) has recently been trialled to monitor real-time tissue oxygenation of the paraspinous vasculature as a surrogate for spinal cord tissue oxygenation. This large animal study was designed to investigate the correlation between cnNIRS and spinal cord oxygenation by comparing it to laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF), a proven method for direct oxygenation and flow assessment. Measurements were performed in seven animals. Four paravertebral cnNIRS optodes were positioned bilaterally at thoracic and lumbar levels to assess tissue oxygenation of the paraspinous vasculature. Paravertebral muscle and spinal cord oxygenation and microcirculatory flow were measured directly using LDF probes. LDF and cnNIRS were compared during consecutive repeated periods of descending aortic cross-clamping for 8 min and recovery by clamp release. Following aortic cross-clamping, lumbar cnNIRS signals instantaneously responded with a decrease to 85 ± 4% within 30 s, and to a minimum of 69 ± 6% after 8 min, returning to baseline values after clamp release within 40 s. Direct lumbar muscle and spinal cord oxygenation assessed by LDF responded analogously to cnNIRS (muscle and spinal cord oxygenation after cross-clamping 11.3 ± 6 and 37.6 ± 22% after 5 and 8 min, respectively). Comparison between lumbar cnNIRS and LDF muscle and spinal cord measurements showed a significant positive correlation (r = 0.51-0.52, P < 0.001). Thoracic cnNIRS signals remained relatively stable throughout the procedure. Lumbar paraspinous muscle oxygenation corresponded to direct spinal cord oxygenation (no significant difference, P = 0.296). These experiments confirm that the paraspinous vasculature in the presented large animal model is directly linked to spinal cord microcirculation and that the regional paraspinous muscle oxygenation status reflects spinal cord tissue oxygenation. As lumbar cnNIRS reproducibly depicts tissue oxygenation of the

  2. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Oliemy, Ahmed; Al-Attar, Nawwar

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was developed to offer a therapeutic solution to patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who are not candidates for conventional aortic valve replacement. The improvement in transcatheter aortic valve implantation outcomes is still of concern in the areas of stroke, vascular injury, heart block, paravalvular regurgitation and valve durability. Concomitantly, the progress, both technical and in terms of material advances of transcatheter valve systems, as well as in patient selection, renders transcatheter aortic valve implantation an increasingly viable treatment for more and more patients with structural heart disease.

  3. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement: 12-year single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Solinas, Marco; Farneti, Pier Andrea; Cerillo, Alfredo Giuseppe; Kallushi, Enkel; Santarelli, Filippo; Glauber, Mattia

    2015-01-01

    Background This study reports the single center experience on minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR), performed through a right anterior minithoracotomy or ministernotomy (MS). Methods Eight hundred and fifty-three patients, who underwent MIAVR from 2002 to 2014, were retrospectively analyzed. Survival was evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The Cox multivariable proportional hazards regression model was developed to identify independent predictors of follow-up mortality. Results Median age was 73.8, and 405 (47.5%) of patients were female. The overall 30-day mortality was 1.9%. Four hundred and forty-three (51.9%) and 368 (43.1%) patients received biological and sutureless prostheses, respectively. Median cardiopulmonary bypass time and aortic cross-clamping time were 108 and 75 minutes, respectively. Nineteen (2.2%) cases required conversion to full median sternotomy. Thirty-seven (4.3%) patients required re-exploration for bleeding. Perioperative stroke occurred in 15 (1.8%) patients, while transient ischemic attack occurred postoperative in 11 (1.3%). New onset atrial fibrillation was reported for 243 (28.5%) patients. After a median follow-up of 29.1 months (2,676.0 patient-years), survival rates at 1 and 5 years were 96%±1% and 80%±3%, respectively. Cox multivariable analysis showed that advanced age, history of cardiac arrhythmia, preoperative chronic renal failure, MS approach, prolonged mechanical ventilation and hospital stay as well as wound revision were associated with higher mortality. Conclusions MIAVR via both approaches is safe and feasible with excellent outcomes, and is associated with low conversion rate and low perioperative morbidity. Long term survival is at least comparable to that reported for conventional sternotomy AVR. PMID:25870812

  4. Supravalvular aortic stenosis in adult with anomalies of aortic arch vessels and aortic regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Acrisio Sales; Alencar, Polyanna; Santos, Alana Neiva; Lobo, Roberto Augusto de Mesquita; de Mesquita, Fernando Antônio; Guimarães, Aloyra Guedis

    2013-01-01

    The supravalvular aortic stenosis is a rare congenital heart defect being very uncommon in adults. We present a case of supravalvular aortic stenosis in adult associated with anomalies of the aortic arch vessels and aortic regurgitation, which was submitted to aortic valve replacement and arterioplasty of the ascending aorta with a good postoperative course. PMID:24598962

  5. Clinical outcomes of valve-sparing root replacement in acute type A aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heemoon; Cho, Yang Hyun; Sung, Kiick; Kim, Wook Sung; Park, Kay-Hyun; Park, Pyo Won; Lee, Young Tak

    2015-01-01

    The early and late outcomes of valve-sparing root replacement (VSR) in type A aortic dissection (AAD) are unknown. The aim of this study was to review the outcomes of VSR in AAD. We also compared the outcomes of VSR with the Bentall operation, which served as a standard reference technique. We retrospectively reviewed 52 patients who underwent surgery for AAD and concomitant root replacement between 1998 and 2013 at Samsung Medical Center. Patients were divided into two groups: Bentall (n = 34) and VSR (n = 18). Two out of six surgeons performed VSR. The mean follow-up duration was 62.3 ± 46.5 months. Preoperative characteristics were similar between the two groups except age (Bentall, 48 ± 11 years; VSR, 37 ± 11 years, p = 0.011). The aortic cross-clamping time was longer in the VSR group (Bentall, 185.8 ± 63.8; VSR, 241.4 ± 44.3 min, p = 0.002). There was no early death in the VSR group, but there was one in the Bentall group (p = 1.000). Despite the higher reoperation rate for aortic valve in the VSR group (Three reoperations) than in the Bentall group (no reoperation), major valve-related events and overall mortality did not differ between the two groups(p = 0.876 and 0.119, respectively). In multivariable analysis, the root replacement technique was not a risk factor for major valve-related events. VSR seems to be equivalent to the Bentall procedure for AAD in terms of early and late outcomes. VSR can be considered as a viable option, particularly for young patients with favorable aortic valve leaflets undergoing surgery at an experienced center.

  6. Characterization of neonatal aortic cannula jet flow regimes for improved cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Menon, Prahlad G; Teslovich, Nikola; Chen, Chia-Yuan; Undar, Akif; Pekkan, Kerem

    2013-01-18

    During pediatric and neonatal cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), tiny aortic outflow cannulae (2-3 mm inner diameter), with micro-scale blood-wetting features transport relatively large blood volumes (0.3 to 1.0 L/min) resulting in high blood flow velocities (2 to 5 m/s). These severe flow conditions are likely to complement platelet activation, release pro-inflammatory cytokines, and further result in vascular and blood damage. Hemodynamically efficient aortic outflow cannulae are required to provide high blood volume flow rates at low exit force. In addition, optimal aortic insertion strategies are necessary in order to alleviate hemolytic risk, post-surgical neurological complications and developmental defects, by improving cerebral perfusion in the young patient. The methodology and results presented in this study serve as a baseline for design of superior aortic outflow cannulae. In this study, direct numerical simulation (DNS) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was employed to delineate baseline hemodynamic performance of jet wakes emanating from microCT scanned state-of-the-art pediatric cannula tips in a cuboidal test rig operating at physiologically relevant laminar and turbulent Reynolds numbers (Re: 650-2150 , steady inflow). Qualitative and quantitative validation of CFD simulated device-specific jet wakes was established using time-resolved flow visualization and particle image velocimetry (PIV). For the standard end-hole cannula tip design, blood damage indices were further numerically assessed in a subject-specific cross-clamped neonatal aorta model for different cannula insertion configurations. Based on these results, a novel diffuser type cannula tip is proposed for improved jet flow-control, decreased blood damage and exit force and increased permissible flow rates. This study also suggests that surgically relevant cannula orientation parameters such as outflow angle and insertion depth may be important for improved hemodynamic performance. The jet

  7. [Hiatal hernia incarceration during cardiopulmonary bypass in patient with acute aortic dissection--a case report].

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Y; Saito, T; Horimi, H; Kato, M; Kawashima, T; Fuse, K

    1995-09-01

    A 67-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital under diagnosis of Stanford type A acute aortic dissection. Chest CT showed aortic dissection from the ascending to descending aorta, and large hiatal hernia. Operation was undergone under cardiopulmonary bypass and circulatory arrest with retrograde cerebral perfusion. A graft replacement was carried out from the ascending to transverse arch aorta. After the release of the cross-clamping of aorta, the heart was gradually oppressed anteriorly by extrapericardial mass, so that the patient could not be weaned from the cardiopulmonary bypass. The mass was revealed incarcerated hiatal hernia by ultrasonography. After laparotomy, diaphragm and hiatus were incised, the incarceration was relieved and the diaphgragm was repaired with a Goretex sheet. Then the patient could be weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass. Her postoperative course was uneventful except for acute renal failure, and she was discharged 60 days after the operation. The incarceration of hiatal hernia was thought to be caused by tissue edema and small bleeding during cardiopulmonary bypass. This is the first reported case with the incarceration of hiatal hernia which occurred during cardiopulmonary bypass.

  8. Erdosteine ameliorates lung injury induced by transient aortic occlusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Kurtoglu, Tunay; Sacar, Mustafa; Inan, Bilal Kaan; Duver, M Harun; Guler, Adem; Ucak, Alper; Us, Melih Hulusi; Yilmaz, Ahmet Turan

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to evaluate the protective effect of erdosteine on lung injury induced by ischaemia-reperfusion (IR) of the lower extremities of rats. Wistar albino rats (n = 21) were divided into three groups. In the IR group (n = 7), the aorta was cross-clamped for two hours, followed by one hour of reperfusion. In the erdosteine group (n = 7), animals were pretreated with erdosteine 100 mg/kg daily via gastric lavage, starting three days before aortic occlusion. In the control group (n 5 7), the lungs were removed and blood samples were taken immediately after sternotomy. No treatment was given in the control and IR groups. After both lungs were removed, biochemical parameters were measured and broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL ) assessment was made. MDA levels and MPO activities in the lung tissue were significantly reduced in the erdosteine group compared to the IR group. BAL assessment revealed decreased neutrophil counts in the erdosteine-treated group. Pretreatment of animals with erdosteine significantly attenuated transient aortic occlusion-induced remote lung injury, characterised by leukocyte accumulation and lipid peroxidation. The results suggest that erdosteine may be beneficial in amelioration of lung injury caused by IR.

  9. Aortic valve surgery - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the heart is reduced. This is called aortic stenosis. The aortic valve can be replaced using: Minimally ... RN, Wang A. Percutaneous heart valve replacement for aortic stenosis: state of the evidence. Ann Intern Med . 2010; ...

  10. Pig specific vascular anatomy allows acute infrarenal aortic occlusion without hind limb ischemia and stepwise occlusion without clinical signs.

    PubMed

    Haacke, N; Unger, J K; Haidenhein, C; Russ, M; Hiebl, B; Niehues, S M

    2011-01-01

    EGAs for a partial collateral support of an infrarenal aortic occlusion the pig's EGA is a naturally sufficient collateral system capable to cover immediately for an acute infrarenal aortic occlusion. Further collateral enlargement even provides a permanent, sufficient hind limb perfusion in pigs. As the sufficient collateral system probably reduce pressure and shear rates in the infrarenal aortic segment after cross clamping, pigs might have a higher predisposition to produce early thrombosis related graft occlusions tan humans.

  11. Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    Schnell E, Wollenek G, Maurer G, Baumgartner H, Lang IM. Mechanisms underlying aortic dilatation in congenital aortic valve malformation . Circulation...1999; 99(16):2138-2143. 10. Roberts CS, Roberts WC. Dissection of the aorta associated with congenital malformation of the aortic valve. J Am Coll... congenital heart defect, often diagnosed incidentally or as a consequence of an associated condition. Patients with this anomaly are at increased risk

  12. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Schramm, René; Kupatt, Christian; Becker, Christoph; Bombien, René; Reichart, Bruno; Sodian, Ralf; Schmitz, Christoph

    2013-06-01

    A 77-year-old male patient was scheduled for transcatheter aortic valve implantation for symptomatic and severe aortic valve stenosis. Severe multidirectional kinking of the aorta based on aortic coarctation did not allow for the transfemoral, but only for the transapical approach. The procedure was complicated because of the technically challenging retrograde passage of the transfemorally inserted pig-tail catheter required for intraoperative angiography of the aortic root. Correct positioning of the pig-tail catheter into the ascending aorta was accomplished by use of a loop snare, which was advanced into the descending aorta via the antegrade route, passing the cardiac apex, the stenotic aortic valve, and the coarctation-associated kinking. The pig-tail catheter tip was manipulated into the loop snare, pulled traverse the coarctation, and released within the proximal ascending aorta. Subsequent procedures were uneventful and followed the standardized protocol. A 29 mm Edwards Lifescience transcatheter Sapien bioprosthesis was successfully implanted. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Use of two parallel oxygenators in a very large patient (2.76 m2) for an acute "A" dissecting aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Lonský, Vladimir; Mand'ák, Jiri; Kubícek, Jaroslav; Volt, Martin; Procházka, Egon; Dominik, Jan

    2005-01-01

    The very large patient (weight 142 kg, height 197 cm, body surface 2.76 m2) was referred to acute operation with dissecting type A ascending aortic aneurysm. The calculated blood flow was 6.63 l/min. To anticipate potential difficulties with perfusion and oxygenation two oxygenators connected in parallel were incorporated into the circuit. Bentall procedure with ACB to the RCA was performed. The perfusion was uneventful. Bypass time was 259 minutes, cross clamp time 141 minutes, circulatory arrest 7 minutes. The highest oxygenators gas flow was 2.6 l/min with maximum FiO2 0.42. The use of two in parallel connected oxygenators is a very effective, easy and safe method in such extreme perfusions, offering to the perfusionist a great reserve of oxygenator output.

  14. A patent ductus arteriosus complicating cardiopulmonary bypass for combined coronary artery bypass grafting and aortic valve replacement only discovered by computed tomography 3D reconstruction.

    PubMed

    van Middendorp, Lars B; Maessen, Jos G; Sardari Nia, Peyman

    2014-12-01

    We describe the case of a 59-year old male patient undergoing combined coronary artery bypass grafting and aortic valve replacement. Manipulation of the heart during cardiopulmonary bypass significantly decreased venous return. Several measures were necessary to improve venous return to a level at which continuation of the procedure was safe. Based on the initial troubles with venous return, we decided to selectively cross-clamp the aorta. This resulted in a large amount of backflow of oxygenated blood from the left ventricle, necessitating additional vents in the pulmonary artery and directly in the left ventricle. The procedure was continued uneventfully, and postoperative recovery was without significant complications. Postoperative 2D computed tomography did not show any signs of a shunt, but 3D reconstruction showed a small patent ductus arteriosus.

  15. Aortic Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... body Watch the video below as Dr. Robbin Cohen describes aortic stenosis Video of Robbin G. Cohen, MD on Aortic Stenosis Causes and Symptoms Causes ... when having dental work. Reviewed by: Robbin G. Cohen, MD, with assistance from John Hallsten and Travis ...

  16. Ascending Aorta to Hepatic and Mesenteric Artery Bypassing, in Patients with Chronic Mesenteric Ischemia and Extensive Aortic Disease-A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Barr, James; Kokotsakis, John; Tsipas, Pantelis; Papapavlou, Prodromos; Velissarios, Konstantinos; Kratimenos, Theodoros; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2017-02-01

    Chronic mesenteric ischemia (CMI) is a rare disorder caused by severe stenosis of the mesenteric arterial supply that results in postprandial pain and weight loss. Treatment options are surgical or endovascular. Surgical bypass can be performed in an antegrade fashion from the supraceliac abdominal aorta (AA) or the distal descending thoracic aorta or in a retrograde fashion from the infrarenal aorta or the common iliac artery. However, in some patients with disease of the descending thoracic aorta or the AA, another site for the proximal anastomosis needs to be found. In this article, we report the case of a 69-year-old man with a thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm and CMI in whom we performed bypass grafts to the hepatic and superior mesenteric arteries using the ascending aorta as the site for the proximal anastomoses via a median sternolaparotomy. In addition, we performed a literature review of all similar cases and provide an analysis of this technique and an assessment of the success rates.

  17. Comparison of different surgical techniques in 112 consecutive patients with aortic root operations: when should the valve be spared?

    PubMed

    Blehm, Alexander; Schurr, Paulus; Sorokin, Vitaly A; Zianikal, Ioanna; Kamiya, Hiroyuki; Albert, Alexander; Lichtenberg, Artur

    2014-01-01

    The benefit of valve-sparing aortic root replacement compared to conventional aortic root replacement surgery remains unclear. Between February 2009 and November 2010, a total of 112 patients underwent aortic root surgery at the Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Heinrich-Heine-University, Dusseldorf, Germany. The valve-sparing technique was used when leaflets were grossly normal. In cases where the valve could not be saved, a prosthetic or biological substitute was used for the aortic root, according to existing guidelines. The patients were allocated to three groups: (i) valve-sparing aortic root replacement group using the David technique (VSR-David; n = 47); (ii) valve-replacing aortic root surgery with a prosthetic conduit using the Bentall-Kuchucus technique (VRR-Prosthetic; n = 31); and (iii) valve-replacing aortic root surgery with a biological stentless valve with the full root technique (VRR-Bio; n = 34). Intraoperative data revealed that, in the VSR-David group, the cardiopulmonary bypass and cross-clamp times were significantly longer (207 +/- 68 min and 140 +/- 38 min respectively; both p = 0.001). The VRR-Prosthetic patients were at highest risk (mean EuroSCORE 15.9%) compared to the VSR-David and VRR-Bio groups (10.8% and 10.4%, respectively). Postoperative analysis showed that patients in the VRR-Bio group had the lowest number of perioperative heart failures (p = 0.004). The perioperative 30-day mortality was significantly higher in the VRR-Prosthetic group (22.6%; p = 0.004). Transaortic flow velocities were significantly lower in the VSR-David group, followed by the VRR-Bio group and VRR-Prosthetic group (1.66 +/- 0.54, 1.98 +/- 0.45, and 2.29 +/- 0.39 m/s, respectively; p = 0.012). The univariate and multivariate analyses of perioperative risk factors showed that only open distal anastomosis was strongly associated with negative results, but not the valve-sparing technique. Aortic valve-sparing root replacement must be considered

  18. Replacement of the transverse aortic arch during emergency operations for type A acute aortic dissection. Report of 26 cases.

    PubMed

    Bachet, J; Teodori, G; Goudot, B; Diaz, F; el Kerdany, A; Dubois, C; Brodaty, D; de Lentdecker, P; Guilmet, D

    1988-12-01

    In type A aortic dissection, the intimal disruption is located on or extends to the transverse arch in about 20% of patients. Replacement of the arch may then be necessary to avoid leaving an unresected, acutely dissected aorta and to prevent bleeding, progression of aneurysm, rupture, and ultimately reoperation or death. From 1970 to September 1987, 119 patients were operated on for type A acute dissection. Starting in January 1977, gelatin-resorcin-formaldehyde biologic glue was used in 91 patients to reinforce the dissected tissues at the suture sites. Among these 119 patients, 26 (ages 32 to 76 years) underwent replacement of the transverse aortic arch in addition to replacement of the ascending aorta. In 20 patients cerebral protection was achieved by profound hypothermia (16 degrees to 20 degrees C) associated with circulatory arrest (15 to 40 minutes, mean 27 minutes) during the distal anastomosis. In six patients the carotid arteries were selectively perfused with cold blood (6 degrees C) during moderate core hypothermia (28 degrees C) while cardiopulmonary bypass was discontinued (19 to 34 minutes, mean 25 minutes) to allow the prosthesis to be sutured without the distal aorta being cross-clamped. Moderate hypothermia avoided the long rewarming time necessitated by profound hypothermia. The hospital mortality rate was 34% (9/26). Two of the 20 patients subjected to profound hypothermia and circulatory arrest died during the operation and seven patients died of postoperative complications. No deaths or major complication were observed in the other six patients. Follow-up of the 17 survivors ranges from 3 to 90 months (mean 39). One patient died 6 months after the operation of cerebral hemorrhage. One patient is disabled by neurologic sequelae. Fifteen patients are in good clinical condition (New York Heart Association class I or II). Postoperative aortograms in 12 patients, and computed tomographic scans in all, have shown a stable repair of the transverse

  19. Bovine aortic arch with supravalvular aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Idhrees, Mohammed; Cherian, Vijay Thomas; Menon, Sabarinath; Mathew, Thomas; Dharan, Baiju S; Jayakumar, K

    2016-09-01

    A 5-year-old boy was diagnosed to have supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS). On evaluation of CT angiogram, there was associated bovine aortic arch (BAA). Association of BAA with SVAS has not been previously reported in literature, and to best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of SVAS with BAA. Recent studies show BAA as a marker for aortopathy. SVAS is also an arteriopathy. In light of this, SVAS can also possibly be a manifestation of aortopathy associated with BAA.

  20. Comparison of Transcranial Motor Evoked Potentials and Somatosensory Evoked Potentials During Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Meylaerts, Sven A.; Jacobs, Michael J.; van Iterson, Vincent; De Haan, Peter; Kalkman, Cor J.

    1999-01-01

    Objective To compare transcranial motor evoked potentials (tc-MEPs) and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) as indicators of spinal cord function during thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Summary Background Data Somatosensory evoked potentials reflect conduction in dorsal columns. tc-MEPs represent anterior horn motor neuron function. This is the first study to compare the techniques directly during thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Methods In 38 patients, thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair (type I, n = 10, type II, n = 14, type III, n = 6, type IV, n = 8) was performed using left heart bypass and segmental artery reimplantation. tc-MEP amplitudes <25% and SSEP amplitudes <50% and/or latencies >110% were considered indicators of cord ischemia. The authors compared the response of both methods to interventions and correlated the responses at the end of surgery to neurologic outcomes. Results Ischemic tc-MEP changes occurred in 18/38 patients and could be restored by segmental artery reperfusion (n = 12) or by increasing blood pressure (n = 6). Significant SSEP changes accompanied these tc-MEP events in only 5/18 patients, with a delay of 2 to 34 minutes. SSEPs recovered in only two patients. In another 11 patients, SSEP amplitudes fell progressively to <50% of control without parallel tc-MEP changes or association with cross-clamp events or pressure decreases. At the end of the procedure, tc-MEP amplitudes were 84 ± 46% of control. In contrast, SSEP amplitudes were <50% of control in 15 patients (39%). No paraplegia occurred. Conclusion In all patients, tc-MEP events could be corrected by applying protective strategies. No patient awoke paraplegic. SSEPs showed delayed ischemia detection and a high rate of false-positive results. PMID:10615928

  1. Aortic root stiffness affects the kinematics of bioprosthetic aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Jahren, Silje Ekroll; Winkler, Bernhard Michael; Heinisch, Paul Philipp; Wirz, Jessica; Carrel, Thierry; Obrist, Dominik

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the influence of aortic root distensibility on the haemodynamic parameters and valve kinematics of a bioprosthetic aortic valve was investigated in a controlled in vitro experiment. An Edwards INTUITY Elite 21 mm sutureless aortic valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) was inserted in three transparent aortic root phantoms with different wall thicknesses (0.55, 0.85 and 1.50 mm) mimicking different physiological distensibilities. Haemodynamic measurements were performed in an in vitro flow loop at heart rates of 60, 80 and 100 bpm with corresponding cardiac outputs of 3.5, 4.0 and 5.0 l/min and aortic pressures of 100/60, 120/90 and 145/110 mmHg, respectively. Aortic valve kinematics were assessed using a high-speed camera. The geometric orifice area (GOA) was measured by counting pixels in the lumen of the open aortic valve. The effective orifice area (EOA) was calculated from the root-mean-square value of the systolic aortic valve flow rate and the mean systolic trans-valvular pressure gradient. The tested aortic root phantoms reproduce physiological distensibilities of healthy individuals in age groups ranging from 40 to 70 years (±10 years). The haemodynamic results show only minor differences between the aortic root phantoms: the trans-valvular pressure gradient tends to increase for stiffer aortic roots, whereas the systolic aortic valve flow rate remains constant. As a consequence, the EOA decreased slightly for less distensible aortic roots. The GOA and the aortic valve opening and closing velocities increase significantly with reduced distensibility for all haemodynamic measurements. The resulting mean systolic flow velocity in the aortic valve orifice is lower for the stiffer aortic root. Aortic root distensibility may influence GOA and aortic valve kinematics, which affects the mechanical load on the aortic valve cusps. Whether these changes have a significant effect on the onset of structural valve deterioration of bioprosthetic

  2. Optimal Surgical Therapy in a Porcine (Sus scrofa) Model of Extra-Thoracic Penetrating Trauma Resulting in Hemorrhagic Shock: ED Thoracotomy vs. Immediate Trans-Abdominal Vascular Control. A Porcine Model for Evaluating the Management of Non-Compressible Torso Hemorrhage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-08

    between groups. After model development (n=6), treatment animals underwent non-compressible hemorrhage with Jioracic aortic clamping (n=6), supra...celiac aortic clamping (n=6), direct vascular control (n=6), and endovascular aortic occlusion n=6). This study presents a large animal model of class...including thoracic aortic clamping , supra-celiac aortic clamping , direct vascular control, and proximal endovascular balloon occlusion. Following vascular

  3. Stent valve implantation in conventional redo aortic valve surgery to prevent patient-prosthesis mismatch.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Enrico; Franciosi, Giorgio; Clivio, Sara; Faletra, Francesco; Moccetti, Marco; Moccetti, Tiziano; Pedrazzini, Giovanni; Demertzis, Stefanos

    2017-03-01

    The goal was to show the technical details, feasibility and clinical results of balloon-expandable stent valve implantation in the aortic position during conventional redo open-heart surgery in selected obese patients with a small aortic prosthesis and severe patient-prosthesis mismatch. Two symptomatic overweight patients (body mass index of 31 and 38), each with a small aortic prosthesis (a 4-year-old, 21-mm Hancock II biological valve and a 29-year-old, 23-mm Duromedic mechanical valve), increased transvalvular gradients (59/31 and 74/44 mmHg) and a reduced indexed effective orifice area (0.50 and 0.43 cm 2 /m 2 ) underwent implantation of two 26-mm balloon-expandable Sapien 3 valves during standard on-pump redo valve surgery. Using full re-sternotomy, cardiopulmonary bypass and cardioplegic arrest, the two balloon-expandable stent valves were implanted under direct view using a standard aortotomy, after prosthesis removal and without annulus enlargement. Aortic cross-clamp times were 162 and 126 min; cardiopulmonary bypass times were 178 and 180 min; total surgical times were 360 and 318 min. At discharge, echocardiograms showed transvalvular peak and mean gradients of 13/9 and 23/13 mmHg and indexed effective orifice areas of 0.64 and 1.08 cm 2 /m 2 . The 3-month echocardiographic follow-up showed transvalvular peak and mean gradients of 18/9 and 19/11 mmHg and indexed effective orifice areas of 0.78 cm 2 /m 2 and 0.84 cm 2 /m 2 , with improved symptoms (New York Heart Association class 1). Implantation of a balloon-expandable stent valve during redo aortic valve surgery is feasible in selected cases and prevents patient-prosthesis mismatch in obese patients without need for aortic annulus enlargement. Moreover, in the case of stent valve degeneration, this approach permits additional valve-in-valve procedures with large stent valves and prevents re-redo surgery.

  4. Selective cerebro-myocardial perfusion in complex congenital aortic arch pathology: a novel technique.

    PubMed

    De Rita, Fabrizio; Lucchese, Gianluca; Barozzi, Luca; Menon, Tiziano; Faggian, Giuseppe; Mazzucco, Alessandro; Luciani, Giovanni Battista

    2011-11-01

    Simultaneous cerebro-myocardial perfusion has been described in neonatal and infant arch surgery, suggesting a reduction in cardiac morbidity. Here reported is a novel technique for selective cerebral perfusion combined with controlled and independent myocardial perfusion during surgery for complex or recurrent aortic arch lesions. From April 2008 to April 2011, 10 patients with arch pathology underwent surgery (two hypoplastic left heart syndrome [HLHS], four recurrent arch obstruction, two aortic arch hypoplasia + ventricular septal defect [VSD], one single ventricle + transposition of the great arteries + arch hypoplasia, one interrupted aortic arch type B + VSD). Median age was 63 days (6 days-36 years) and median weight 4.0 kg (1.6-52). Via midline sternotomy, an arterial cannula (6 or 8 Fr for infants) was directly inserted into the innominate artery or through a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft (for neonates <2.0 kg). A cardioplegia delivery system was inserted into the aortic root. Under moderate hypothermia, ascending and descending aorta were cross-clamped, and "beating heart and brain" aortic arch repair was performed. Arch repair was composed of patch augmentation in five, end-to-side anastomosis in three, and replacement in two patients. Average cardiopulmonary bypass time was 163 ± 68 min (71-310). In two patients only (one HLHS, one complex single ventricle), a period of cardiac arrest was required to complete intracardiac repair. In such cases, antegrade blood cardioplegia was delivered directly via the same catheter used for selective myocardial perfusion. Average time of splanchnic ischemia during cerebro-myocardial perfusion was 39 ± 18 min (17-69). Weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass was achieved without inotropic support in three and with low dose in seven patients. One patient required veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Four patients, body weight <3.0 kg, needed delayed sternal closure. No neurologic dysfunction was noted

  5. Laparoscopy-assisted abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: early and middle-term results of a consecutive series of 122 cases.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Mauro; Adami, Daniele; Del Corso, Andrea; Berchiolli, Raffaella; Pietrabissa, Andrea; Romagnani, Francesco; Mosca, Franco

    2006-04-01

    Endoaneurysmorrhaphy with intraluminal graft placement, described by Creech, is the gold standard for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair. Endovascular aneurysm repair has gained popularity for its minimal invasiveness and satisfying short-term results, but there are still many concerns about the long-term success of the procedure. Since 1998, laparoscopic surgery has been proposed for AAA treatment. The potential benefits of a minimally invasive procedure reproducing the endoaneurysmorrhaphy results over time have been advocated. In our experience, hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery (HALS) has been routinely used for the open-surgery transperitoneal/retroperitoneal approach and for endovascular aneurysm repair. After 4 years, we are able to define the early and middle-term results of such laparoscopic-assisted treatment. From October 2000 to March 2004, 604 consecutive nonurgent AAAs were treated at our institution. Of these, 122 (20.2%) were treated by HALS. Exclusion criteria for HALS were hostile abdomen (previous major abdominal or aortic surgery), bilateral diffuse common iliac and/or hypogastric aneurysms, massive aortoiliac calcifications, and severe cardiac (ejection fraction <35%) and respiratory (P(O2) <60 mm Hg or carbon dioxide >50 mm Hg) insufficiency. Juxtarenal and proximal iliac aneurysms were not a contraindication, nor was obesity. In all patients, we performed a minilaparotomy (7-8 cm) both for laparoscopic hand-assisted dissection and for endoaneurysmorrhaphy. All perioperative data were prospectively recorded. Follow-up consisted of ultrasonography and clinical evaluation after 6 and 12 months and then every year after surgery. The mean laparoscopic and total operative times were respectively 64 +/- 32 minutes and 257 +/- 70 minutes, the mean aortic cross-clamping time was 76 +/- 26 minutes, and the mean autotransfused blood volume was 1136 +/- 711 mL. The overall mortality and morbidity were respectively 0% and 12.2%. Morbidity was surgery

  6. Aortic Valve Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... evaluation of aortic stenosis in adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 29, 2014. Mohty D, ... Valvular heart disease in elderly adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 2, 2014. Bonow RO, ...

  7. Aortic Aneurysm Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... to Prevent and Control Chronic Diseases Million Hearts® Web Sites with More Information About Aortic Aneurysm For ...

  8. Aortic Valve Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... pulmonary valve and aortic valve. Each valve has flaps (cusps or leaflets) that open and close once ... valve consists of three tightly fitting, triangular-shaped flaps of tissue called cusps. Some children are born ...

  9. Whole body perfusion for hybrid aortic arch repair: evolution of selective regional perfusion with a modified extracorporeal circuit.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Philip; Walsh, Graham; Walsh, Stephanie; O'Neil, Michael; Gelinas, Jill; Chu, Michael W A

    2017-04-01

    Patients undergoing hybrid aortic arch reconstruction require careful protection of vital organs. We believe that whole body perfusion with tailored dual circuitry may help to achieve optimal patient outcomes. Our circuit has evolved from a secondary circuit utilizing a cardioplegia delivery device for lower body perfusion to a dual-oxygenator circuit. This allows individually controlled regional perfusion with ease of switching from secondary to primary circuit for total body flow. The re-design allows for separate flow and temperature regulation with two oxygenators in parallel. All patients underwent a single-stage operation for simultaneous treatment of arch and descending aortic pathology via a sternotomy, using a hybrid frozen elephant trunk technique. We report six consecutive patients undergoing hybrid arch and frozen elephant trunk reconstruction using a dual-oxygenator circuit. Five patients underwent elective surgery and one was emergent. One patient had an acute dissection while three underwent concomitant procedures, including a Ross procedure and two valve-sparing root reconstructions. Three cases were redo sternotomies. The mean pump time was 358 ± 131 min, the aortic cross clamp time 243 ± 135 min, the cardioplegia volume of 33,208 ml ± 16,173, cerebral ischemia 0 min, lower body ischemia 76 ± 34 min and the average lower body perfusion time was 142 min. Two patients did not require any donor blood products. The median intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital lengths of stay (LOS) were two days and 10 days, respectively. The average peak serum lactate on CPB was 7.47 mmol/L and, at admission to the ICU, it was 3.37 mmol/L. Renal and respiratory failure developed in the salvage acute type A dissection patient. No other complications occurred in this series. Whole body perfusion as delivered through individually controlled dual-oxygenator circuitry allows maximum flexibility for hybrid aortic arch reconstruction. A modified circuit perfusion

  10. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Ziaja, K; Sedlak, L; Urbanek, T; Kostyra, J; Ludyga, T

    2000-01-01

    The reported incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is from 2% to 14% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and the etiology of this disease is still discussed--according to the literature several pathogenic theories have been proposed. From 1992 to 1997 32 patients with IAAA were operated on. The patients were mostly symptomatic--abdominal pain was present in 68.75% cases, back pain in 31.25%, fever in 12.5% and weight loss in 6.25% of the operated patients. In all the patients ultrasound examination was performed, in 4 patients CT and in 3 cases urography. All the patients were operated on and characteristic signs of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm like: thickened aortic wall, perianeurysmal infiltration or retroperitoneal fibrosis with involvement of retroperitoneal structures were found. In all cases surgery was performed using transperitoneal approach; in three cases intraoperatively contiguous abdominal organs were injured, which was connected with their involvement into periaortic inflammation. In 4 cases clamping of the aorta was done at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus. 3 patients (9.37%) died (one patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm). Authors present diagnostic procedures and the differences in the surgical tactic, emphasizing the necessity of the surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  11. Are Aortic Stent Grafts Safe in Pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Khandanpour, Nader; Mehta, Tapan A.; Adiseshiah, M.; Meyer, Felicity J.

    2015-01-01

    Aortic stent grafts are increasingly used to treat aortic aneurysms and also other aortic pathologies. The safety of aortic stent grafts in pregnancy has never been studied or reported. We report on two cases of aortic stent grafts in pregnant women and discuss the effect of pregnancy on these aortic stent grafts. PMID:26229702

  12. Aortic involvement in relapsing polychondritis.

    PubMed

    Le Besnerais, Maëlle; Arnaud, Laurent; Boutémy, Jonathan; Bienvenu, Boris; Lévesque, Hervé; Amoura, Zahir; Marie, Isabelle

    2017-05-17

    To assess prevalence of aortic involvement in relapsing polychondritis (RP) patients; to evaluate clinical features and long-term outcome of RP patients exhibiting aortitis, aortic ectasia and/or aneurysm. One hundred and seventy-two RP patients underwent aortic computed tomography (CT)-scan; they were seen in 3 medical centers. Eleven patients (6.4%) had aortic involvement, occurring within a median time of 2 years after RP diagnosis. CT-scan showed isolated aortitis (n=2); the 9 other patients exhibited: aortitis and aortic aneurysm (n=2) or ectasia (n=1), isolated aortic aneurysm (n=4) or ectasia (n=2); aortic localizations were as follows: thoracic (n=6), abdominal (n=2), thoracic and abdominal (n=4) aorta. Patients exhibited: resolution (n=3) improvement (n=3), stabilization (n=4) or deterioration (n=1) of aortic localization. Five patients experienced recurrence of aortic localization; one patient died of aortic abdominal aneurysm rupture. Predictive factors of death related to aortic complications were: aortitis on CT-scan, higher median levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Predictive parameters of aortic relapses were: aortitis on CT-scan and involvement of the abdominal aorta. This study underlines that aortic involvement is severe in RP. Furthermore, we suggest that RP patients exhibiting poor prognostic factors, including panaortitis and higher values of ESR, may require more aggressive therapy. Copyright © 2017 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Successful transfemoral aortic valve implantation through aortic stent graft after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kozuma, Ken

    2017-04-01

    The patient was a 91-year-old woman presenting with severe aortic valve stenosis. Pre-procedural computed tomography scan revealed a 45-mm abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TF-TAVI) was performed after endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) of the AAA. The 23-mm Edwards Sapien XT system passed through the aortic stent graft smoothly. This is the first case report showing that successful TF-TAVI can be performed through a prior abdominal aortic stent graft. TF-TAVI after EVAR of AAA is a feasible option for patients with extremely poor access.

  14. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular- discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... MRI scan Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular Aortic angiography Hardening of ... Center-Shreveport, Shreveport, LA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla ...

  15. [Congenital aortic stenosis].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, M

    2001-08-01

    Recent advances in and controversies concerning the management of children with congenital valvular aortic stenosis are discussed. In neonates with critical aortic stenosis, improved survival has recently been reported after surgical open valvotomy and balloon valvuloplasty, although it is difficult at this point to compare the results of the two procedures and determine their differential indications. Good results have also been achieved after extended aortic valvuloplasty for recurrent aortic stenosis and/or insufficiency, but the length of follow-up in these patients is still short. The technique first reported in 1991 for bilateral enlargement fo a small annulus permits the insertion of an aortic valve 3-4 sizes larger than the native annulus. It entails no risk of distorting the mitral valve, damaging the conduction system or important branches of the coronary arteries, or resulting in left ventricular dysfunction. The Ross procedure is now widely applied in the West, with reports of early mortality rates of less than 5% and event-free survival rates of 80-90% during follow-up of 4-8 years. Longer follow-up and continued careful evaluation are required to resolve the issue of possible dilatation and subsequent neoaortic valve dysfunction and pulmonary stenosis due to allograft degeneration after pulmonary autograft root replacement in children.

  16. Robotic aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Duran, Cassidy; Kashef, Elika; El-Sayed, Hosam F; Bismuth, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Surgical robotics was first utilized to facilitate neurosurgical biopsies in 1985, and it has since found application in orthopedics, urology, gynecology, and cardiothoracic, general, and vascular surgery. Surgical assistance systems provide intelligent, versatile tools that augment the physician's ability to treat patients by eliminating hand tremor and enabling dexterous operation inside the patient's body. Surgical robotics systems have enabled surgeons to treat otherwise untreatable conditions while also reducing morbidity and error rates, shortening operative times, reducing radiation exposure, and improving overall workflow. These capabilities have begun to be realized in two important realms of aortic vascular surgery, namely, flexible robotics for exclusion of complex aortic aneurysms using branched endografts, and robot-assisted laparoscopic aortic surgery for occlusive and aneurysmal disease.

  17. Aortic hammer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Komen, Niels; Vercauteren, Sven; de Roover, Dominique

    2011-08-01

    To present a case of penetrating aortic ulcer with extraordinary etiology. A 57-year-old man was admitted with acute retrosternal and interscapular pain. He was a demolition worker and often used a pneumatic drill to which he pressed his chest as he drilled. Clinical examination showed previously undiagnosed hypertension. Computed tomographic angiography disclosed a penetrating aortic ulcer in the descending thoracic aorta without any sign of atherosclerosis. Initial treatment consisted of blood pressure control. However, due to progression of the lesion, endovascular treatment was performed to implant a covered endoprosthesis. We hypothesize that the etiology of the ulcer was the shear forces developed by incorrect, repetitive use of the pneumatic hammer in combination with the untreated hypertension. This is analogous to the hypothenar hammer syndrome, and we propose naming this the "aortic hammer syndrome."

  18. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Mikami, Y; Kyogoku, M

    1994-08-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is a distinct clinicopathological entity, characterized by: (1) clinical presentation, such as back pain, weight loss, and increased ESR, (2) patchy and/or diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, and (3) marked periaortic fibrosis resulting in thickening of the aneurysmal wall and occasional retroperitoneal fibrosis. Its pathogenesis is unknown, but some authors support the theory that IAAA is a subtype of atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm because of close relationship between IAAA and atherosclerotic change. In this article, we describe clinical and histological features of IAAA on the basis of the literature and our review of 6 cases of IAAA, emphasizing the similarity and difference between IAAA and atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm. Our review supports that marked lamellar fibrosis completely replacing the media and adventitia, patchy lymphocytic infiltration (mostly B cells) and endarteritis obliterans are characteristic features of IAAA.

  19. Chronic Type A Aortic Dissection and Giant Aortic Root Aneurysm After Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Puga, Andrés Enríquez; Rodríguez, Sara Castaño; Pañero, Blanca Mateos; Moreira, Beatriz Castaño; López Almodóvar, Luis Fernando

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 61-year-old male with a giant aortic root aneurysm associated with chronic aortic Type A dissection. The patient had been operated on 16 years before due to aortic annuloectasia with mechanical valve replacement. The patient underwent revision aortic surgery with a Bentall-De Bono operation with Svensson modification, using a #21 On-X Valsalva mechanical valve conduit. The postoperative course was uneventful. PMID:28097190

  20. Aortic Valve Adaptation to Aortic Root Dilatation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae-Hee; Handschumacher, Mark D.; Levine, Robert A.; Sun, Byung Joo; Jang, Jeong Yoon; Yang, Dong Hyun; Kang, Joon-Won; Song, Jong-Min; Kang, Duk-Hyun; Lim, Tae-Hwan; Song, Jae-Kwan

    2015-01-01

    Background The 3-dimensional relationship between aortic root and cusp is essential to understand the mechanism of aortic regurgitation (AR) because of aortic root dilatation (ARD). We sought to test the hypothesis that the stretched cusps in ARD enlarge to compensate for ARD. Methods and Results Computed tomography imaged 92 patients (57 with ARD, 29 with moderate to severe AR, 28 without significant AR) and 35 normal controls. Specialized 3-dimensional software measured individual cusp surface areas relative to maximal mid-sinus cross-sectional area and minimal 3-dimensional annular area, coaptation area fraction, and asymmetry of sinus volumes and intercommissural distances. Total open cusp surface area increased (P<0.001) from 7.6±1.4 cm2/m2 in normals to 12.9±2.2 cm2/m2 in AR-negative and 15.2±3.3 cm2/m2 in AR-positive patients. However, the ratio of closed cusp surface area to maximal mid-sinus area, reflecting cusp adaptation, decreased from normals to AR-negative to AR-positive patients (1.38±0.20, 1.15±0.15, 0.88±0.15; P<0.001), creating the lowest coaptation area fraction. Cusp distensibility (closed diastolic versus open area) decreased from 20% in controls and AR-negative patients to 5% in AR-positive patients (P<0.001). Multivariate determinants of AR and coaptation area fraction reflected both sinus size and cusp-to-annular adaptation. ARD was also progressively asymmetrical with root size, and individual cusp surface areas failed to match this asymmetry. Conclusions Aortic cusp enlargement occurs in ARD, but cusp adaptation and distensibility become limited in prominent, asymmetrical ARD, leading to AR. Optimal AR repair tailored to individual patient anatomy can benefit from appreciating valve adaptation and 3-dimensional relationships; understanding cusp adaptation mechanisms may ultimately provide therapeutic opportunities to improve such compensation. PMID:25051951

  1. Minimal access aortic valve replacement using a minimal extracorporeal circulatory system.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Alaadin; Rehman, Atiq; Sonker, Uday; Kloppenburg, Geoffrey T L

    2009-03-01

    Minimal access aortic valve replacement (mAVR) has been demonstrated to be beneficial over standard median sternotomy. Similarly, minimal extracorporeal circulation (MECC) has been shown to have less deleterious effects than conventional cardiopulmonary bypass. We report a previously undescribed technique for AVR in combination with MECC by minimal access. We prospectively collected data including one-month postoperative follow-up of the first 50 patients who underwent mAVR utilizing MECC. A temporary Cordis Ventricor (Cordis Corp, Miami, FL) ventricular pacemaker and external defibrillation pads were placed at induction. A J-shaped partial upper sternotomy ending in the third intercostal space was performed. Cannulation was performed in the groin using the Seldinger technique. A vent was introduced directly in the pulmonary artery. Warm blood cardioplegia and carbon dioxide field flooding were used. Fifty consecutive patients (24 male) with a mean age of 68 (range, 34 to 89) were operated between May and December 2007. Operating time was 147 +/- 20 minutes, cross-clamp time was 64 +/- 10 minutes, and perfusion time was 84 +/- 17 minutes. There were no conversions to median sternotomy. Only one peroperative blood transfusion was required and postoperative blood loss was 372 +/- 170 cc. Intensive care unit stay was uneventful (average stay 2 days, range 1 to 8). One patient required a permanent pacemaker and other complications included pneumothorax, superficial wound infection, a late transient postoperative neurologic deficit, and excessive postoperative blood loss requiring mediastinal reexploration. Renal failure and major cerebral accidents did not occur. There was a 100% survival at one-month follow-up. We have shown that minimal access aortic valve replacement using minimal extracorporeal circulation is feasible and provides excellent clinical and cosmetic results.

  2. Advantages of Minimal Access Versus Conventional Aortic Valve Replacement in Elderly or Severely Obese Patients.

    PubMed

    Pisano, Calogera; Totaro, Pasquale; Triolo, Oreste Fabio; Argano, Vincenzo

    The aim of our study was to investigate potential clinical advantages of minimal access versus conventional surgical approach in older and severely obese patients undergoing isolated aortic valve replacement (AVR). One hundred thirty-five patients undergoing isolated primary AVR were enrolled. Propensity score matching was used to compare 42 selected patients operated on ministernotomy (MS, group B) with 42 selected patients operated on full sternotomy (FS, group A). After propensity score matching, the two groups were comparable in terms of preoperative characteristics. Cardiopulmonary bypass time was significantly longer in MS group compared with the FS group [median (95% confidence level or CL), 103 (98.7-106.4) vs 94 (83.6-99) minutes, respectively; P = 0.0019]. No significant difference was observed in aortic cross-clamp time [median (95% CL), 73 (71.1-78.2) vs 69.5 (62.7-83) minutes; P = 0.4]. Significantly shorter ventilation time [median (95% CL), 13 (12-16.4) vs 24 (22-25) hours; P = 0.00018], intensive care unit stay [median (95% CL), 1 vs 2 days; P = 0.00017], and hospital stay [median (95% CL), 8.5 (8-10.8) vs 13.5 (11.1-14) days; P = 0.00030] were shown in the MS group. The age subgroup analysis showed that statistical significance for mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit, and hospital stay was specific for patients older than 75 years. The analysis of body mass index quartile showed that statistical significance for mechanical ventilation was specific for patients in the fourth quartile. Minimal access AVR is a reproducible, safe, and effective surgical option in patients candidate for isolated AVR, and our study suggests a faster recovery when used in severely obese or older patients.

  3. Technical Aspects of Open Repair for Degenerative Aneurysmal Evolution Despite Early Thoracic Endovascular Repair of Type B Aortic Dissection.

    PubMed

    Aguir, Sonia; El Batti, Salma; Achouh, Paul; Julia, Pierre; Bel, Alain; Fabiani, Jean-Noël; Alsac, Jean-Marc

    2017-04-01

    Closure of the proximal tear by thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) at the acute phase appears to be a safe effective treatment to prevent aneurysmal degeneration type B dissection. However, it appears to be inefficient in up to a third of the patient. We report the technical aspects of our experience with patients undergoing secondary open repair after TEVAR for dissecting thoracoabdominal aneurysm despite early closure proximal tear by TEVAR. During a period of 5 years, 96 patients presenting acute type B aortic dissections were treated by TEVAR and followed-up in our institution. Among them, 5 patients experienced an evolution to a dissecting thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm. Their demographic data and initial medical conditions, delay to reintervention, operative technical details, perioperative and mid-term outcomes were collected and analyzed. All 5 patients (4 male, mean age 58 ± 9) were operated under peripheral normothermic bypass without deep circulatory arrest using the thoracic stent graft as an elephant trunk for completion of the proximal anastomosis. In cases of patency, the false lumen was reapproximated in the anastomosis, 6 visceral arteries were revascularized selectively. One patient died at day 1 of perioperative ventricular fibrillation due to an acute myocardial infarction. The 4 others are alive without complication after a median of 30 months, range (13-22). In our experience, TEVAR was not only efficient at the acute phase to deal with complications, but in cases of subsequent aneurysmal evolution, it made open repair even easier by avoiding very proximal cross-clamping/anastomosis and circulatory arrest. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Savarese, R P; Rosenfeld, J C; DeLaurentis, D A

    1986-05-01

    Between January 1976 and December 1982, 181 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms were treated surgically, and in 13 patients the aneurysms were found to be inflammatory. Inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta (IAAA) share important characteristics with typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysms. Diagnosis and surgical management of IAAA are distinctive which suggests that IAAA should be considered separately, as a varient of typical abdominal aortic aneurysms. IAAA occur predominantly in males. The presenting symptoms are often idiosyncratic and include severe abdominal or back pain, or both, and ureteral obstruction; the diagnosis of IAAA should be considered when these symptoms are present. Although grossly and microscopically, the perianeurysmal fibrosis resembles idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis, the two conditions can be differentiated. At the present time, ultrasonography and computed tomography appear to offer reliable means for diagnosing IAAA. The presence of IAAA, whether established preoperatively or discovered unexpectedly at operation, necessitate certain modifications in the surgical approach, in order to avoid injuring the duodenum and the venous structures. Most patients can be successfully treated by resection and graft replacement. Rupture of the aneurysm in IAAA appears to be less frequent than in typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  5. The Impact of Deep Versus Moderate Hypothermia on Postoperative Kidney Function After Elective Aortic Hemiarch Repair.

    PubMed

    Arnaoutakis, George J; Vallabhajosyula, Prashanth; Bavaria, Joseph E; Sultan, Ibrahim; Siki, Mary; Naidu, Suveeksha; Milewski, Rita K; Williams, Matthew L; Hargrove, W Clark; Desai, Nimesh D; Szeto, Wilson Y

    2016-10-01

    There remains concern that moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest (MHCA) with antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) may provide suboptimal distal organ protection compared with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) with retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP). We compared postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI) in in patients who underwent elective hemiarch repair with either DHCA/RCP or MHCA/ACP. This was a retrospective review of all patients undergoing elective aortic hemiarch reconstruction for aneurysmal disease between 2009 and 2014. Patients were stratified according to the use of DHCA/RCP versus MHCA/ACP. The primary outcome was the occurrence of AKI at 48 hours, as defined by the Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss, End-Stage (RIFLE ) criteria. A multivariable logistic regression identified risk factors for AKI. One hundred eighteen patients who underwent ACP and 471 patients who underwent RCP were included. The mean lowest temperature was 26.4°C in patients who underwent MHCA/ACP and 17.5°C in patients who underwent DHCA/RCP. Baseline demographics were similar except that patients who underwent DHCA/RCP were more likely to have peripheral arterial disease or bicuspid aortic valves. Cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times were shorter in the MHCA/ACP group. AKI occurred in 19 (16.2%) patients who underwent MHCA/ACP and 67 (14.3%) patients who underwent DHCA/RCP. Four (0.8%) patients who underwent DHCA/RCP required postoperative dialysis. In-hospital mortality tended to increase with increasing RIFLE classification (RIFLE class-0 (No AKI) = 0.41%; Risk = 1.35%, and Injury = 10.0%; p = 0.09). On multivariable analysis, the lowest temperature and cerebral perfusion strategy were not significant predictors of AKI. Lower baseline glomerular filtration rate (GFR), lower preoperative ejection fraction, and longer cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) time were independently associated with higher AKI. We applied the sensitive RIFLE criteria to examine AKI in

  6. There's an app for that: A handheld smartphone-based infrared imaging device to assess adequacy and level of aortic occlusion during REBOA.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Kyle K; Black, George E; Willey, Sandra B; Kniery, Kevin; Marko, Shannon T; Eckert, Matthew J; Martin, Matthew J

    2017-01-01

    Advances in thermal imaging devices have made them an appealing noninvasive point-of-care imaging adjunct in the trauma setting. We sought to assess whether a smartphone-based infrared imaging device (SBIR) could determine presence and location of aortic occlusion in a swine model. We hypothesized that various levels of aortic occlusion would transmit significantly different heat signatures at various anatomical points. Six swine (35-50 kg) underwent sequential zone 1 (Z1) aortic cross clamping as well as zone 3 (Z3) aortic balloon occlusion (resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta [REBOA]). SBIR images and readings (FLIR One) were taken at five anatomic points (axilla [A], subcostal [S], umbilical [U], inguinal [I], medial malleolar [M]) and were used to determine significant thermal trends 5 minutes to 10 minutes after Z1 and Z3 occlusion. Significant (p ≤ 0.05) thermal ratio patterns were identified and compared among groups, and images were reviewed for obvious qualitative differences at the various levels of occlusion. Body temperatures were similar during control (CON), Z1 occlusion, and Z3 occlusion, ranging from 94.0 °F to 100.9 °F (p = 0.126). No significant temperature differences were found among A, S, U, I, M points prior to and after aortic occlusions. Among the anatomical 2-point ratios evaluated, A/M and S/M ratios were the best predictors of aortic occlusion, whether at Z1 (8.2 °F, p < 0.01; 10.9 °F, p < 0.01) or Z3 (7.3 °F, p < 0.01; 8.4 °F, p < 0.01), respectively. The best predictor of Z1 versus Z3 level of occlusion was the S/I ratio (5.2 °F, p < 0.05 vs. 3.4 °F, p = 0.27). SBIR generated qualitatively different thermal signatures among groups. SBIR was capable of detecting thermal trends during Z1 and Z3 aortic occlusion by using an anatomical 2-point thermal ratio. There were also easily recognized qualitative differences between control and occlusion images that would allow immediate determination of adequate

  7. Efficacy of Stentless Aortic Bioprosthesis Implantation for Aortic Stenosis with Small Aortic Annulus.

    PubMed

    Murashita, Takashi; Okada, Yukikatsu; Kanemitsu, Hideo; Fukunaga, Naoto; Konishi, Yasunobu; Nakamura, Ken; Koyama, Tadaaki

    2015-09-01

    In patients with small aortic annulus, sufficient size of stented aortic bioprosthesis cannot be implanted without additional procedures. In such cases, we use stentless aortic bioprosthesis to obtain sufficient effective orifice area. In this study, we investigated long-term impact of stentless aortic bioprosthesis on clinical outcomes, compared with stented aortic bioprosthesis. We retrospectively investigated 140 patients who underwent aortic valve replacement (AVR) with porcine bioprosthesis for severe aortic stenosis between 1999 and 2010. Patients who had moderate or more aortic regurgitation and who underwent concomitant mitral procedures were excluded. A total of 69 patients (49%) were implanted stentless bioprosthesis (Freestyle group; Medtronic Inc, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States) and 71 patients (51%) were implanted stented bioprosthesis (Mosaic group; Medtronic Inc). Follow-up was complete in 97.9% patients. Median follow-up period was 4.2 years. Patients in Freestyle group had smaller body surface area, smaller aortic annulus diameter, smaller aortic valve area, larger mean pressure gradient, higher peak velocity across aortic valve, larger left ventricular mass index (LVMI), and lower left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Mean size of implanted prosthesis was larger in Freestyle group. In-hospital mortality was 1.4% in Freestyle group and 2.8% in Mosaic group (p = 0.980). Five-year survival rate was not different between two groups (5-year survival rate was 87.5 ± 4.7% in Freestyle group and 84.1 ± 7.5% in Mosaic group; log rank, p = 0.619). Late New York Heart Association functional class was lower in Freestyle group. Late LVMI and LVEF became similar between two groups. Stentless aortic bioprosthesis is superior in left ventricular remodeling after AVR for aortic stenosis and is especially effective for small aortic annulus. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Aortic coarctation with persistent fifth left aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Giuseppe; Caianiello, Giuseppe; Palladino, Maria Teresa; Iacono, Carola; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Calabrò, Raffaele

    2009-08-14

    A neonate with severe aortic coarctation showed a double lumen transverse aorta (persistent fifth aortic arch) with both channels joining at the isthmus where the obstruction was confirmed by echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. Surgical repair was performed with a pantaloon-shaped patch. Persistent fifth aortic arch does not result in a vascular ring and, per se, is not hemodynamically significant unless associated with other cardiac malformations.

  9. Sutureless Aortic Valve Replacement International Registry (SU-AVR-IR): design and rationale from the International Valvular Surgery Study Group (IVSSG).

    PubMed

    Di Eusanio, Marco; Phan, Kevin; Bouchard, Denis; Carrel, Thierry P; Dapunt, Otto E; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto; Eichstaedt, Harald C; Fischlein, Theodor; Folliguet, Thierry; Gersak, Borut; Glauber, Mattia; Haverich, Axel; Misfeld, Martin; Oberwalder, Peter J; Santarpino, Giuseppe; Shrestha, Malakh Lal; Solinas, Marco; Vola, Marco; Alamanni, Francesco; Albertini, Alberto; Bhatnagar, Gopal; Carrier, Michel; Clark, Stephen; Collart, Federic; Kappert, Utz; Kocher, Alfred; Meuris, Bart; Mignosa, Carmelo; Ouda, Ahmed; Pelletier, Marc; Rahmanian, Parwis Baradaran; Reineke, David; Teoh, Kevin; Troise, Giovanni; Villa, Emmanuel; Wahlers, Thorsten; Yan, Tristan D

    2015-03-01

    Sutureless aortic valve replacement (SU-AVR) is an innovative approach which shortens cardiopulmonary bypass and cross-clamp durations and may facilitate minimally invasive approach. Evidence outlining its safety, efficacy, hemodynamic profile and potential complications is replete with small-volume observational studies and few comparative publications. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and high-volume SU-AVR replacement centers were contacted for recruitment into a global collaborative coalition dedicated to sutureless valve research. A Research Steering Committee was formulated to direct research and support the mission of providing registry evidence warranted for SU-AVR. The International Valvular Surgery Study Group (IVSSG) was formed under the auspices of the Research Steering Committee, comprised of 36 expert valvular surgeons from 27 major centers across the globe. IVSSG Sutureless Projects currently proceeding include the Retrospective and Prospective Phases of the SU-AVR International Registry (SU-AVR-IR). The global pooling of data by the IVSSG Sutureless Projects will provide required robust clinical evidence on the safety, efficacy and hemodynamic outcomes of SU-AVR.

  10. Limited versus full sternotomy for aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Kirmani, Bilal H; Jones, Sion G; Malaisrie, S C; Chung, Darryl A; Williams, Richard Jnn

    2017-04-10

    , assess quality, and identify risk of bias. A third review author provided arbitration where required. The quality of evidence was determined using the GRADE methodology and results of patient-relevant outcomes were summarised in a 'Summary of findings' table. The review included seven trials with 511 participants. These included adults from centres in Austria, Spain, Italy, Germany, France, and Egypt. We performed 12 comparisons investigating the effects of minimally invasive limited upper hemi-sternotomy on aortic valve replacement as compared to surgery performed via full median sternotomy.There was no evidence of any effect of upper hemi-sternotomy on mortality versus full median sternotomy (risk ratio (RR) 1.01, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.36 to 2.82; participants = 511; studies = 7; moderate quality). There was no evidence of an increase in cardiopulmonary bypass time with aortic valve replacement performed via an upper hemi-sternotomy (mean difference (MD) 3.02 minutes, 95% CI -4.10 to 10.14; participants = 311; studies = 5; low quality). There was no evidence of an increase in aortic cross-clamp time (MD 0.95 minutes, 95% CI -3.45 to 5.35; participants = 391; studies = 6; low quality). None of the included studies reported major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events as a composite end point.There was no evidence of an effect on length of hospital stay through limited hemi-sternotomy (MD -1.31 days, 95% CI -2.63 to 0.01; participants = 297; studies = 5; I(2) = 89%; very low quality). Postoperative blood loss was lower in the upper hemi-sternotomy group (MD -158.00 mL, 95% CI -303.24 to -12.76; participants = 297; studies = 5; moderate quality). The evidence did not support a reduction in deep sternal wound infections (RR 0.71, 95% CI 0.22 to 2.30; participants = 511; studies = 7; moderate quality) or re-exploration (RR 1.01, 95% CI 0.48 to 2.13; participants = 511; studies = 7; moderate quality). There was no change in pain scores by upper hemi

  11. Genetics Home Reference: supravalvular aortic stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions supravalvular aortic stenosis supravalvular aortic stenosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) is a heart defect that develops before ...

  12. [Stent Grafting for Aortic Dissection].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naomichi

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of stent graft for aortic dissection is to terminate antegrade blood flow into the false lumen through primary entry. Early intervention for primary entry makes excellent aortic remodeling and emergent stent grafting for complicated acute type B aortic dissection is supported as a class I. On the other hand stent grafting for chronic aortic dissection is controversial. Early stent grafting is considered with in 6 months after on-set if the diameter of the descending aorta is more than 40 mm. Additional interventions for residual false lumen on the downstream aorta are still required. Stent graft for re-entry, candy-plug technique, and double stenting, other effective re-interventions were reported. Best treatment on the basis of each anatomical and physical characteristics should be selected in each institution. Frozen elephant trunk is alternative procedure for aortic dissection without the need to take account of proximal anatomical limitation and effective for acute type A aortic dissection.

  13. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Sachs, T; Schermerhorn, M

    2010-06-01

    Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) continues to be one of the most lethal vascular pathologies we encounter. Its management demands prompt and efficient evaluation and repair. Open repair has traditionally been the mainstay of treatment. However, the introduction of endovascular techniques has altered the treatment algorithm for ruptured AAA in most major medical centers. We present recent literature and techniques for ruptured AAA and its surgical management.

  14. Aortic dimensions in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Quezada, Emilio; Lapidus, Jodi; Shaughnessy, Robin; Chen, Zunqiu; Silberbach, Michael

    2015-11-01

    In Turner syndrome, linear growth is less than the general population. Consequently, to assess stature in Turner syndrome, condition-specific comparators have been employed. Similar reference curves for cardiac structures in Turner syndrome are currently unavailable. Accurate assessment of the aorta is particularly critical in Turner syndrome because aortic dissection and rupture occur more frequently than in the general population. Furthermore, comparisons to references calculated from the taller general population with the shorter Turner syndrome population can lead to over-estimation of aortic size causing stigmatization, medicalization, and potentially over-treatment. We used echocardiography to measure aortic diameters at eight levels of the thoracic aorta in 481 healthy girls and women with Turner syndrome who ranged in age from two to seventy years. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to assess the influence of karyotype, age, body mass index, bicuspid aortic valve, blood pressure, history of renal disease, thyroid disease, or growth hormone therapy. Because only bicuspid aortic valve was found to independently affect aortic size, subjects with bicuspid aortic valve were excluded from the analysis. Regression equations for aortic diameters were calculated and Z-scores corresponding to 1, 2, and 3 standard deviations from the mean were plotted against body surface area. The information presented here will allow clinicians and other caregivers to calculate aortic Z-scores using a Turner-based reference population. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Management of Acute Aortic Syndrome and Chronic Aortic Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Nordon, Ian M. Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Loftus, Ian M.; Morgan, Robert A.; Thompson, Matt M.

    2011-10-15

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) describes several life-threatening aortic pathologies. These include intramural hematoma, penetrating aortic ulcer, and acute aortic dissection (AAD). Advances in both imaging and endovascular treatment have led to an increase in diagnosis and improved management of these often catastrophic pathologies. Patients, who were previously consigned to medical management or high-risk open surgical repair, can now be offered minimally invasive solutions with reduced morbidity and mortality. Information from the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection (IRAD) database demonstrates how in selected patients with complicated AAD the 30-day mortality from open surgery is 17% and endovascular stenting is 6%. Despite these improvements in perioperative deaths, the risks of stroke and paraplegia remain with endovascular treatment (combined outcome risk 4%). The pathophysiology of each aspect of AAS is described. The best imaging techniques and the evolving role of endovascular techniques in the definitive management of AAS are discussed incorporating strategies to reduce perioperative morbidity.

  16. Spectrum of aortic valve abnormalities associated with aortic dilation across age groups in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Laura J; Baba, Ridhwan Y; Arai, Andrew E; Bandettini, W Patricia; Rosing, Douglas R; Bakalov, Vladimir; Sachdev, Vandana; Bondy, Carolyn A

    2013-11-01

    Congenital aortic valve fusion is associated with aortic dilation, aneurysm, and rupture in girls and women with Turner syndrome. Our objective was to characterize aortic valve structure in subjects with Turner syndrome and to determine the prevalence of aortic dilation and valve dysfunction associated with different types of aortic valves. The aortic valve and thoracic aorta were characterized by cardiovascular MRI in 208 subjects with Turner syndrome in an institutional review board-approved natural history study. Echocardiography was used to measure peak velocities across the aortic valve and the degree of aortic regurgitation. Four distinct valve morphologies were identified: tricuspid aortic valve, 64% (n=133); partially fused aortic valve, 12% (n=25); bicuspid aortic valve, 23% (n=47); and unicuspid aortic valve, 1% (n=3). Age and body surface area were similar in the 4 valve morphology groups. There was a significant trend, independent of age, toward larger body surface area-indexed ascending aortic diameters with increasing valve fusion. Ascending aortic diameters were (mean±SD) 16.9±3.3, 18.3±3.3, and 19.8±3.9 mm/m(2) (P<0.0001) for tricuspid aortic valve, partially fused aortic valve, and bicuspid aortic valve+unicuspid aortic valve, respectively. Partially fused aortic valve, bicuspid aortic valve, and unicuspid aortic valve were significantly associated with mild aortic regurgitation and elevated peak velocities across the aortic valve. Aortic valve abnormalities in Turner syndrome occur with a spectrum of severity and are associated with aortic root dilation across age groups. Partial fusion of the aortic valve, traditionally regarded as an acquired valve problem, had an equal age distribution and was associated with an increased ascending aortic diameters.

  17. [Aortic valve replacement for the small aortic annulus].

    PubMed

    Oshima, H; Usui, A; Akita, T; Ueda, Y

    2006-04-01

    Aortic valve surgery for the small aortic annulus is still challenging for surgeons. Recently, the new types of high performance prosthesis have been developed and the chance of an aortic root enlargement (ARE) is decreasing. In this study, we propose the ideal strategy of the aortic surgery for the small aortic annulus. We analyzed the clinical records of 158 patients who underwent aortic valve replacement from August 1999 to October 2005 in our institution. The small aortic annulus was observed in 38 patients (24%). Fourteen patients of this group underwent ARE. Patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) was less frequently observed in patients with ARE compared to those without ARE. The additional time required for ARE was not considerable, and neither ischemic time nor cardiopulmonary bypass time was significantly prolonged by ARE. In conclusion, we have to select a prosthesis with sufficient orifice area to avoid PPM, otherwise we should choose an option of ARE. For this consideration, we definitely need the chart that demonstrates the relationship between the nominal size of various types of prostheses and the size of a patient's annulus that those prostheses actually fit.

  18. Pentacuspid aortic valve diagnosed by transoesophageal echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Cemri, M; Cengel, A; Timurkaynak, T

    2000-01-01

    Congenital aortic valve anomalies are quite a rare finding in echocardiographic examinations. A case of a 19 year old man with a pentacuspid aortic valve without aortic stenosis and regurgitation, detected by transoesophageal echocardiography, is presented.


Keywords: pentacuspid aortic valve; echocardiography PMID:10995427

  19. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty as a bridge to aortic valve replacement in a patient with severe calcific aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Swinkels, B M; Jaarsma, W; Wely, L Relik-van; van Swieten, H A; Ernst, J M P G; Plokker, H W M

    2003-03-01

    This case report describes a patient with severe calcific aortic stenosis who was initially considered inoperable because of a very poor left ventricular function and severe pulmonary hypertension. After balloon aortic valvuloplasty, the clinical and haemodynamic status of the patient improved to such an extent that subsequent aortic valve replacement was considered possible and eventually proved to be successful. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty has value as a potential bridge to aortic valve replacement when the risks for surgery are considered to be too high.

  20. Aortic biomechanics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Badran, Hala Mahfouz; Soltan, Ghada; Faheem, Nagla; Elnoamany, Mohamed Fahmy; Tawfik, Mohamed; Yacoub, Magdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ventricular-vascular coupling is an important phenomenon in many cardiovascular diseases. The association between aortic mechanical dysfunction and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction is well characterized in many disease entities, but no data are available on how these changes are related in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Aim of the work: This study examined whether HCM alone is associated with an impaired aortic mechanical function in patients without cardiovascular risk factors and the relation of these changes, if any, to LV deformation and cardiac phenotype. Methods: 141 patients with HCM were recruited and compared to 66 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects as control group. Pulse pressure, aortic strain, stiffness and distensibility were calculated from the aortic diameters measured by M-mode echocardiography and blood pressure obtained by sphygmomanometer. Aortic wall systolic and diastolic velocities were measured using pulsed wave Doppler tissue imaging (DTI). Cardiac assessment included geometric parameters and myocardial deformation (strain and strain rate) and mechanical dyssynchrony. Results: The pulsatile change in the aortic diameter, distensibility and aortic wall systolic velocity (AWS') were significantly decreased and aortic stiffness index was increased in HCM compared to control (P < .001) In HCM AWS' was inversely correlated to age(r = − .32, P < .0001), MWT (r = − .22, P < .008), LVMI (r = − .20, P < .02), E/Ea (r = − .16, P < .03) LVOT gradient (r = − 19, P < .02) and severity of mitral regurg (r = − .18, P < .03) but not to the concealed LV deformation abnormalities or mechanical dyssynchrony. On multivariate analysis, the key determinant of aortic stiffness was LV mass index and LVOT obstruction while the role LV dysfunction in aortic stiffness is not evident in this population. Conclusion: HCM is associated with abnormal aortic mechanical properties. The severity of cardiac

  1. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair for blunt thoracic aortic injuries in complex aortic arch vessels anatomies.

    PubMed

    Piffaretti, Gabriele; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Ierardi, Anna Maria; Mariscalco, Giovanni; Macchi, Edoardo; Castelli, Patrizio; Tozzi, Matteo; Franchin, Marco

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to report the use of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in blunt thoracic aortic injuries (BTAIs) presenting with complex anatomies of the aortic arch vessels. Two patients were admitted to our hospital for the management of BTAI. Anomalies were as follow: aberrant right subclavian artery (n = 1) and right-sided aortic arch with 5 vessels anatomy variant (n = 1). TEVAR was accomplished using parallel graft with periscope configuration in the patient with the aberrant right subclavian artery. At 12-month follow-up, computed tomography angiographies confirmed the exclusion of the BTAI, the stability of the endograft, the resolution of the pseudoaneurysm, and the patency of the parallel endograft. Aortic arch vessels variants and anomalies are not rare, and should be recognized and studied precisely to plan the most appropriate operative treatment. TEVAR proved to be effective even in complex anatomies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Prosthesis-preserving aortic root repair after aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Masaki; Kobayashi, Taira; Kodama, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    We describe a new technique of prosthesis-preserving aortic root replacement for patients who have previously undergone aortic valve replacement. With preservation of the mechanical prosthesis, we implant a Gelweave Valsalva graft using double suture lines. The first suture line is made between the sewing cuff of the mechanical valve and the graft, with mattress sutures of 2/0 braided polyester with pledgets. After the first sutures are tied, the second suture line is created between the graft collar and the aortic root remnant with continuous 4/0 polypropylene sutures.

  3. The excluder aortic endograft.

    PubMed

    Alterman, Daniel M; Stevens, Scott L

    2008-06-01

    Since its introduction, more than 59000 patients have been treated with Gore Excluder endoprosthesis (GORE) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in the past 11 years. It has become clearer that differences in device delivery and design provide certain advantages that may favor one anatomical milieu over another. Behavior of the aneurysm sac also seems to be graft dependent as more long-term data become available. The currently available low-permeability GORE seems to have addressed the problem of endotension noted with previous designs. Cumulative data are reviewed, and the data demonstrate very low perioperative morbidity and mortality and excellent protection from aneurysm-related complications with the GORE device. Superior ease of use, excellent trackability, and rare failures requiring acute open conversion characterize the GORE device. By addressing clinical demands of aortic endografting, Gore has eclipsed other endografts in the industry to now dominate the US market. The aim of this review is to describe the history, experience, advantages, and future goals with the GORE for the treatment of AAA.

  4. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Siebenmann, R; Schneider, K; von Segesser, L; Turina, M

    1988-06-11

    348 cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm were reviewed for typical features of inflammatory aneurysm (IAAA) (marked thickening of aneurysm wall, retroperitoneal fibrosis and rigid adherence of adjacent structures). IAAA was present in 15 cases (14 male, 1 female). When compared with patients who had ordinary aneurysms, significantly more patients complained of back or abdominal pain (p less than 0.01). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was highly elevated. Diagnosis was established in 7 of 10 computed tomographies. 2 patients underwent emergency repair for ruptured aneurysm. Unilateral ureteral obstruction was present in 4 cases and bilateral in 1. Repair of IAAA was performed by a modified technique. Histological examination revealed thickening of the aortic wall, mainly of the adventitial layer, infiltrated by plasma cells and lymphocytes. One 71-year-old patient operated on for rupture of IAAA died early, and another 78-year-old patient after 5 1/2 months. Control computed tomographies revealed spontaneous regression of inflammatory infiltration after repair. Equally, hydronephrosis due to ureteral obstruction could be shown to disappear or at least to decrease. IAAA can be diagnosed by computed tomography with high sensitivity. Repair involves low risk, but modification of technique is necessary. The etiology of IAAA remains unclear.

  5. An Important but Forgotten Technique: Aortic Fenestration.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, Mihriban; Tayfur, Kaptan Derya; Urkmez, Melih

    2016-10-01

    Aortic fenestration is a technique that treats organ ischemia in descending aortic dissection. Open surgical aortic fenestration is an effective yet uncommonly used and widely forgotten procedure. Here, we describe 2 patients suffering from chronic thoracoabdominal aortic dissection, and we aimed to identify under what circumstances surgical aortic fenestration should be applied, to assess its safety and efficacy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Castrovinci, Sebastiano; Emmanuel, Sam; Moscarelli, Marco; Murana, Giacomo; Caccamo, Giuseppa; Bertolino, Emanuela Clara; Nasso, Giuseppe; Speziale, Giuseppe; Fattouch, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve disease is a prevalent disorder that affects approximately 2% of the general adult population. Surgical aortic valve replacement is the gold standard treatment for symptomatic patients. This treatment has demonstrably proven to be both safe and effective. Over the last few decades, in an attempt to reduce surgical trauma, different minimally invasive approaches for aortic valve replacement have been developed and are now being increasingly utilized. A narrative review of the literature was carried out to describe the surgical techniques for minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and report the results from different experienced centers. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement is associated with low perioperative morbidity, mortality and a low conversion rate to full sternotomy. Long-term survival appears to be at least comparable to that reported for conventional full sternotomy. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery, either with a partial upper sternotomy or a right anterior minithoracotomy provides early- and long-term benefits. Given these benefits, it may be considered the standard of care for isolated aortic valve disease. PMID:27582764

  7. Fenestrated Endovascular Grafts for the Repair of Juxtarenal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    determine if it can provide better outcomes than open surgical repair (OSR). In an OSR approach, aortic clamping above one or both renal arteries, or above the visceral arteries, is required. The higher the level of aortic clamping, the greater the risk of cardiac stress and renal or visceral ischemia. During suprarenal or supraceliac aortic clamping, strain-induced myocardial ischemia may also occur due to concomitant rise in cardiac afterload and a decrease in cardiac output. Reports indicate that 6% of patients undergoing surgical repair develop myocardial infarction. The ideal level of clamp location remains controversial with conflicting views having been reported. Method A search of electronic databases (OVID MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, and the International Agency for Health Technology Assessment [INAHTA] database was undertaken to identify evidence published from January 1, 2004 to December 19, 2008. The search was limited to English-language articles and human studies. The automatic search alerts were received and reviewed up to March 23, 2009. The literature search and automatic search update identified 320 citations, of which 13 met inclusion/exclusion criteria. One comparative study presented at an international seminar, five single-arm studies on f—EVAR, and 7 studies on OSR (one prospective and six retrospective) were considered for this analysis. To grade the strength of the body of evidence, the grading system formulated by the GRADE working group and adopted by MAS, was applied. The GRADE system classifies evidence quality as high (Grade A), moderate (Grade B), or low (Grade C) according to four key elements: study design, study quality, consistency across studies, and directness. A summary of the characteristics of the f—EVAR and OSR studies found through the literature search is shown in Table ES-1. ES-1. Patient Characteristics: f–EVAR Studies versus OSR Studies Technique Number of

  8. Clinical and biochemical outcomes for additive mesenteric and lower body perfusion during hypothermic circulatory arrest for complex total aortic arch replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, P; Cleland, A; Adams, C; Chu, M W A

    2012-11-01

    Surgical repair of transverse aortic arch aneurysms frequently employ hypothermia and antegrade cerebral perfusion as protective strategies during circulatory arrest. However, prolonged mesenteric and lower limb ischemia can lead to significant lactic acidosis and end organ dysfunction, which remains a significant cause of post-operative morbidity and mortality. We report our experience with additive warm mesenteric and lower body perfusion (1-3 L/min, 30°C) in addition to continuous cerebral and myocardial perfusion in 5 patients who underwent total aortic arch replacement with trifurcated head vessel re-implantation and distal elephant trunk reconstruction. Concomitant surgical procedures included re-operations (2), aortic root operations (2), coronary artery bypass (2) and descending thoracic aortic replacement (1). Serum lactate levels demonstrated a rapid decline from a peak 9.9 ± 2.6 post circulatory arrest to 3.4 ± 2.0 in the intensive care unit (ICU). The lowest serum bicarbonate levels were 19.3 ± 3.5 mmol/L, intra-operatively, which normalized to 28.4 ± 2.4 mmol/L on return to the ICU. The lowest pH levels were 7.25 ± 0.10, corrected to 7.43 ± 0.04 on return to the ICU. Mean cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times were 361 ± 104 and 253 ± 85 minutes, respectively. Mean cerebral and lower body circulatory arrest times were 0 (0) and 50 ± 35 minutes, respectively. The mean time required for systemic rewarming was 95 ± 66 minutes. There were no in-hospital mortalities and no patient experienced any neurological, mesenteric, renal or lower limb ischemic complications. Two patients required mechanical ventilation >24 hours, and one patient returned for reoperation for bleeding. Median intensive care unit and total hospital lengths of stay were 5 and 16 days, respectively. Our results suggest early serum lactate clearance, normalization of acidosis, and metabolic recovery when utilizing a simultaneous cerebral perfusion and warm body

  9. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open

    MedlinePlus

    AAA - open; Repair - aortic aneurysm - open ... Open surgery to repair an AAA is sometimes done as an emergency procedure when there is bleeding inside your body from the aneurysm. You may have an ...

  10. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... signs or symptoms of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The final recommendation statement summarizes what the Task ... the potential benefits and harms of screening for AAA: (1) Men ages 65 to 75 who smoke ...

  11. Misconceptions and Facts About Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Argulian, Edgar; Windecker, Stephan; Messerli, Franz H

    2017-04-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease leading to intervention, and it is typically a disease of the elderly. Recent clinical advances have expanded the role of transcatheter aortic valve intervention in patients with severe aortic stenosis, making aortic valve intervention feasible and effective even in patients at intermediate, high, and prohibitive surgical risk. With the rapid advances in treatment, proper diagnosis becomes crucial for a wide range of patients with aortic stenosis: from "concordant" high-gradient aortic stenosis to "discordant" low-gradient aortic stenosis. The latter group commonly presents a clinical challenge requiring thoughtful and comprehensive evaluation to determine eligibility for aortic valve intervention. Providers at all levels should be familiar with basic diagnostic caveats and misconceptions when evaluating patients with possible aortic stenosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [New aspects in aortic valve disease].

    PubMed

    Tornos, P

    2001-01-01

    Renewed interest for aortic valve disease has evolved in recent years. Aortic valve replacement has become the second most frequent cause of cardiac surgery, following coronary bypass surgery. In addition, the etiologic and physiopathologic knowledge of this disorder has improved. In the present paper we analyze three aspects of the disease which are, at present, the subject of study and controversy: first, we discuss the possible relationship between degenerative aortic stenosis and atherosclerosis; second, the involvement of the aortic root in cases of bicuspid aortic valve; and third, the surgical indications in asymptomatic patients with either aortic stenosis or regurgitation.

  13. Rare or unusual causes of chronic, isolated, pure aortic regurgitation

    SciTech Connect

    Waller, B.F.; Taliercio, C.P.; Dickos, D.K.; Howard, J.; Adlam, J.H.; Jolly, W. )

    1990-08-01

    Six patients undergoing aortic valve replacement had rare or unusual causes of isolated, pure aortic regurgitation. Two patients had congenitally bicuspid aortic valves with a false commissure (raphe) displaced to the aortic wall (tethered bicuspid aortic valve), two had floppy aortic valves, one had a congenital quadricuspid valve, and one had radiation-induced valve damage.

  14. Is cold blood cardioplegia absolutely superior to cold crystalloid cardioplegia in aortic valve surgery?

    PubMed

    Lerman, Daniel A; Otero-Losada, Matilde; Ume, Kiddy; Salgado, Pablo A; Prasad, Sai; Lim, Kelvin; Péault, Bruno; Alotti, Nasri

    2017-05-26

    Experimental evidence suggests that blood cardioplegia (BCP) may be superior to cold crystalloid cardioplegia (CCP) for myocardial protection. However, robust clinical data are lacking. We compared post-operative outcome of patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR) using cold anterograde-retrograde intermittent BCP versus anterograde (CCP). Adult consecutive isolated AVR performed between April 2006 and February 2011 at the Royal Infirmary Hospital of Edinburgh were retrospectively analyzed. The use of anterograde CCP was compared with that of intermittent anterograde-retrograde cold BCP. End points were intra-operative mortality, 30-day hospital re-admission, need for RBC or platelet transfusion, mechanical ventilation time and renal failure. Of total 774 cases analyzed, 592 cases of BCP and 182 cases of CCP were identified. Demographics did not differ between groups (mean patient age in years): 67±12 CCP and 69±12 BCP. Groups (BCP vs CCP) were indistinguishable (p > 0.05, NS) based on: average aortic cross clamp time (min) 77.01±14.47 vs 75.78±18.78, cardiopulmonary bypass time (min) 104.07±43.70 vs 100.34±25.90, surgery time (min) 190.53±61.80 vs 204.04±51.09 and post-operative total blood consumption (units) 1.38±2.11 vs 1.61±2.4. The percentage of patients who required platelets' transfusion was similar: 12.8% BCP and 18.7% CCP (Fisher exact test, p=0.053). Prevalence of respiratory failure was lower in BCP than in CCP: 2.6% vs 6.3% (p=0.028). Admission time (days) at ICU was 3.63± 21.90 in BCP and 3.07 ± 8.04 in CCP (NS). Intra-hospital mortality, 30-day hospital re-admission, renal failure, sepsis, wound healing and stroke did not differ between groups. BCP was strictly not superior to CCP in every aspect. In particular it was definitely not superior in terms of post-operative ventricular function. Our results question the absolute superiority of BCP over CCP in terms of hard outcomes. Likelihood of serious complications should be

  15. [Transcatheter aortic valve implantation for aortic stenosis. Initial experience].

    PubMed

    Careaga-Reyna, Guillermo; Lázaro-Castillo, José Luis; Lezama-Urtecho, Carlos Alberto; Macías-Miranda, Enriqueta; Dosta-Herrera, Juan José; Galván Díaz, José

    2016-12-09

    Aortic stenosis is a frequent disease in the elderly, and is associated with other systemic pathologies that may contraindicate the surgical procedure. Another option for these patients is percutaneous aortic valve implantation, which is less invasive. We present our initial experience with this procedure. Patients with aortic stenosis were included once selection criteria were accomplished. Under general anaesthesia and echocardiographic and fluosocopic control, a transcatheter aortic valve was implanted following s valvuloplasty. Once concluded the procedure, angiographic and pressure control was realized in order to confirm the valve function. Between November 2014 and May 2015, 6 patients were treated (4 males and 2 females), with a mean age of 78.83±5.66 years-old. The preoperative transvalvular gradient was 90.16±28.53mmHg and posterior to valve implant was 3.33±2.92mmHg (P<.05). Two patients had concomitant coronary artery disease which had been treated previously. One patient presented with acute right coronary artery occlusion which was immediately treated. However due to previous renal failure, postoperative sepsis and respiratory failure, the patient died one month later. It was concluded that our preliminary results showed that in selected patients percutaneous aortic valve implantation is a safe procedure with clinical improvement for treated patients. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  16. Coronary Flow Impacts Aortic Leaflet Mechanics and Aortic Sinus Hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brandon L; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2015-09-01

    Mechanical stresses on aortic valve leaflets are well-known mediators for initiating processes leading to calcific aortic valve disease. Given that non-coronary leaflets calcify first, it may be hypothesized that coronary flow originating from the ostia significantly influences aortic leaflet mechanics and sinus hemodynamics. High resolution time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were conducted to map the spatiotemporal characteristics of aortic sinus blood flow and leaflet motion with and without physiological coronary flow in a well-controlled in vitro setup. The in vitro setup consists of a porcine aortic valve mounted in a physiological aorta sinus chamber with dynamically controlled coronary resistance to emulate physiological coronary flow. Results were analyzed using qualitative streak plots illustrating the spatiotemporal complexity of blood flow patterns, and quantitative velocity vector and shear stress contour plots to show differences in the mechanical environments between the coronary and non-coronary sinuses. It is shown that the presence of coronary flow pulls the classical sinus vorticity deeper into the sinus and increases flow velocity near the leaflet base. This creates a beneficial increase in shear stress and washout near the leaflet that is not seen in the non-coronary sinus. Further, leaflet opens approximately 10% farther into the sinus with coronary flow case indicating superior valve opening area. The presence of coronary flow significantly improves leaflet mechanics and sinus hemodynamics in a manner that would reduce low wall shear stress conditions while improving washout at the base of the leaflet.

  17. Aortic root replacement with a valve-sparing technique for quadricuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Katsuhiro; Okada, Kenji; Okita, Yutaka

    2015-04-01

    A 67-year old man with ascending aortic aneurysm was referred because of a quadricuspid aortic valve. He underwent aortic root replacement with a valve-sparing technique. Under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, replacement of the ascending aorta was successfully performed. The postoperative course was uneventful without recurrence of aortic regurgitation.

  18. Spontaneous aortic dissection within an infrarenal AAA.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Kathryn J; Bailey, Marc A; McAree, Barry; Mekako, Anthony; Berridge, David C; Nicholson, Tony; Scott, D Julian A

    2012-12-01

    Aortic dissection occurring in the infrarenal abdominal aorta is uncommon. We present the case of a patient presenting with an enlarging abdominal aortic aneurysm and concurrent dissection (with associated radiological imaging) and briefly discuss the literature relating to this phenomenon.

  19. Abdominal aortic feminism.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-11-14

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  20. Aortic Arch Interruption and Persistent Fifth Aortic Arch in Phace Syndrome: Prenatal Diagnosis and Postnatal Course.

    PubMed

    Chiappa, Enrico; Greco, Antonella; Fainardi, Valentina; Passantino, Silvia; Serranti, Daniele; Favilli, Silvia

    2015-09-01

    PHACE is a rare congenital neurocutaneous syndrome where posterior fossa malformations, hemangiomas, cerebrovascular anomalies, aortic arch anomalies, cardiac defects, and eye abnormalities are variably associated. We describe the prenatal detection and the postnatal course of a child with PHACE syndrome with a unique type of aortic arch anomaly consisting of proximal interruption of the aortic arch and persistence of the fifth aortic arch. The fifth aortic arch represented in this case a vital systemic-to-systemic connection between the ascending aorta and the transverse portion of the aortic arch allowing adequate forward flow through the aortic arch without surgical treatment.

  1. Current aortic endografts for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Colvard, Benjamin; Georg, Yannick; Chakfe, Nabil; Swanstrom, Lee

    2016-05-01

    Endovascular Aneurysm Repair is a widely adopted method of treatment for patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. The minimally invasive approach offered with EVAR has become popular not only among physicians and patients, but in the medical device industry as well. Over the past 25 years the global market for aortic endografts has increased rapidly, resulting in a wide range of devices from various companies. Currently, there are seven endografts approved by the FDA for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms. These devices offer a wide range of designs intended to increase inclusion criteria while decreasing technical complications such as endoleak and migration. Despite advances in device design, secondary interventions and follow-up requirements remain a significant issue. New devices are currently being studied in the U.S. and abroad and may significantly reduce complications and secondary interventions.

  2. Management of bicuspid aortic valve with or without involvement of ascending aorta and aortic root.

    PubMed

    Neragi-Miandoab, S

    2014-06-01

    Patients with a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) constitute a heterogeneous population with variable clinical presentation and complications. More than 50% of the patients who require aortic valve replacement have a BAV, a condition that may be associated with dilation of ascending aorta and aortic insufficiency caused by cusp disease or aortic root pathology. Of the potential BAV-related complications, dilation of the aortic root and ascending aorta are among the most serious. The dilation of ascending aorta and aortic root have been the subject of controversy. Whereas some surgeons believe that the dilation of the aorta is caused by the hemodynamic properties of the BAV, others believe that the dilation of the aortic root is secondary to genetic defects associated with the BAV. Management of a BAV should be tailored to each patient's clinical condition. The surgical approach varies from aortic valve replacement to combined aortic valve and root replacement to aortic-valve-sparing root replacement.

  3. Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm from Chronic Antiestrogen Therapy.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Rishi; Sainathan, Sandeep; Ziganshin, Bulat A; Elefteriades, John A

    2017-03-01

    Aortic aneurysms are a common but often undetected pathology prevalent in the population. They are often detected as incidental findings on imaging studies performed for unrelated pathologies. Estrogens have been shown to exert a protective influence on aortic tissue. Pharmacological agents blocking the actions of estrogens may thus be implicated in causing aortic pathologies. We present the case of an elderly woman with breast carcinoma treated for 18 years with antiestrogen therapy who subsequently developed acute thoracic aortic deterioration (enlargement and wall disruption).

  4. Surgical Repair of Retrograde Type A Aortic Dissection after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Young; Kim, Yeon Soo; Ryoo, Ji Yoon

    2014-01-01

    It is expected that the stent graft will become an alternative method for treating aortic diseases or reducing the extent of surgery; therefore, thoracic endovascular aortic repair has widened its indications. However, it can have rare but serious complications such as paraplegia and retrograde type A aortic dissection. Here, we report a surgical repair of retrograde type A aortic dissection that was performed after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. PMID:24570865

  5. Aortic or Mitral Valve Replacement With the Biocor and Biocor Supra

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-09

    Aortic Valve Insufficiency; Aortic Valve Regurgitation; Aortic Valve Stenosis; Aortic Valve Incompetence; Mitral Valve Insufficiency; Mitral Valve Regurgitation; Mitral Valve Stenosis; Mitral Valve Incompetence

  6. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty as a bridge to aortic valve replacement in a patient with severe calcific aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Swinkels, B.M.; Jaarsma, W.; Wely, L. Relik-van; van Swieten, H.A.; Ernst, J.M.P.G.; Plokker, H.W.M.

    2003-01-01

    This case report describes a patient with severe calcific aortic stenosis who was initially considered inoperable because of a very poor left ventricular function and severe pulmonary hypertension. After balloon aortic valvuloplasty, the clinical and haemodynamic status of the patient improved to such an extent that subsequent aortic valve replacement was considered possible and eventually proved to be successful. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty has value as a potential bridge to aortic valve replacement when the risks for surgery are considered to be too high. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:25696195

  7. Pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuan-Qiang; Yao, Feng; Shang, An-Dong; Pan, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch is uncommonly associated with cancer, and is extremely rare in pulmonary cancer. Here, we report an unusual and successfully treated case of aortic arch pseudoaneurysm in a male patient with lung squamous cell carcinoma. Methods: A 64-year-old male patient was admitted to the Emergency Department, presenting with massive hemoptysis (>500 mL blood during the 12 hours prior to treatment). The diagnosis of aortic arch pseudoaneurysm was confirmed after inspection of computed tomographic angiography and three-dimensional reconstruction. We processed the immediate endovascular stent-grafting for this patient. Results: This patient recovered with no filling or enlargement of the pseudoaneurysm, no episodes of hemoptysis, and no neurological complications during the 4-week follow-up period. Conclusion: Herein, we compare our case with other cancer-related pseudoaneurysms in the medical literature and summarize the clinical features and treatment of this unusual case. PMID:27495079

  8. Severe aortic stenosis: forgotten associations.

    PubMed

    Godinho, Ana Rita; Amorim, Sandra; Campelo, Manuel; Martins, Elisabete; Lopez Rodriguez, Elisa; Coelho, Rosa; Macedo, Guilherme; Maciel, Maria Júlia

    2014-09-01

    The authors present the case of a 68-year-old man with predominantly right heart failure in the context of severe aortic stenosis associated with pulmonary hypertension. Anemia was diagnosed which, after endoscopic study, was considered to be secondary to angiodysplasia and a diagnosis of Heyde syndrome was made. After valve replacement surgery the patient's heart failure improved and hemoglobin levels stabilized. We present this case to show the need to recognize less common associations of severe aortic stenosis, in order to provide immediate and appropriate treatment.

  9. Aortic and other arterial injuries.

    PubMed

    Hardy, J D; Raju, S; Neely, W A; Berry, D W

    1975-05-01

    Three hundred sixty arterial injuries in 353 patients are reviewed. They covered a wide spectrum of injuries and included 36 aortic injuries and 19 cases of carotid truama. The mortality rate of 12% was in large part due to aortic injuries. Shock was the predominant cause of death. Infection was the most frequent non-fatal complication. Pulmonary complications were surprisingly uncommon. With methods and techniques discussed in the paper, 90% satisfactory end results were achieved. The amputation rate was 6% where extremity injuries were involved.

  10. Aortic and other arterial injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, J D; Raju, S; Neely, W A; Berry, D W

    1975-01-01

    Three hundred sixty arterial injuries in 353 patients are reviewed. They covered a wide spectrum of injuries and included 36 aortic injuries and 19 cases of carotid truama. The mortality rate of 12% was in large part due to aortic injuries. Shock was the predominant cause of death. Infection was the most frequent non-fatal complication. Pulmonary complications were surprisingly uncommon. With methods and techniques discussed in the paper, 90% satisfactory end results were achieved. The amputation rate was 6% where extremity injuries were involved. Images Fig. 11. Fig. 13. PMID:1130881

  11. Predictive risk models for proximal aortic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Rocío; Pascual, Isaac; Álvarez, Rubén; Alperi, Alberto; Rozado, Jose; Morales, Carlos; Silva, Jacobo; Morís, César

    2017-01-01

    Predictive risk models help improve decision making, information to our patients and quality control comparing results between surgeons and between institutions. The use of these models promotes competitiveness and led to increasingly better results. All these virtues are of utmost importance when the surgical operation entails high-risk. Although proximal aortic surgery is less frequent than other cardiac surgery operations, this procedure itself is more challenging and technically demanding than other common cardiac surgery techniques. The aim of this study is to review the current status of predictive risk models for patients who undergo proximal aortic surgery, which means aortic root replacement, supracoronary ascending aortic replacement or aortic arch surgery. PMID:28616348

  12. Predictive risk models for proximal aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Vaquero, Daniel; Díaz, Rocío; Pascual, Isaac; Álvarez, Rubén; Alperi, Alberto; Rozado, Jose; Morales, Carlos; Silva, Jacobo; Morís, César

    2017-05-01

    Predictive risk models help improve decision making, information to our patients and quality control comparing results between surgeons and between institutions. The use of these models promotes competitiveness and led to increasingly better results. All these virtues are of utmost importance when the surgical operation entails high-risk. Although proximal aortic surgery is less frequent than other cardiac surgery operations, this procedure itself is more challenging and technically demanding than other common cardiac surgery techniques. The aim of this study is to review the current status of predictive risk models for patients who undergo proximal aortic surgery, which means aortic root replacement, supracoronary ascending aortic replacement or aortic arch surgery.

  13. Acute aortic dissection at two extreme ages.

    PubMed

    Ramzisham, A R M; Arief, H; Ngoo, K S; Zamrin, D M; Joanna, O S M

    2011-01-01

    Acute aortic dissection is a life-threatening condition, warranting prompt diagnosis and treatment. Management of which incorporates multidisciplinary expertise from the medical, surgical and intensive care. If left untreated, the mortality rate of acute aortic disease exceeds 50% within 48 hours and 80% within two weeks, with a 5-year survival rate of 19%. The most common cause of death in untreated acute aortic dissection, regardless of aetiology, is aortic rupture. We would like to share our successful experience of cases at the two extreme ages of acute aortic dissection. Literature review with their pathogenesis are discussed.

  14. MMP-2 Isoforms in Aortic Tissue and Serum of Patients with Ascending Aortic Aneurysms and Aortic Root Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Tscheuschler, Anke; Meffert, Philipp; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Heilmann, Claudia; Kocher, Nadja; Uffelmann, Xenia; Discher, Philipp; Siepe, Matthias; Kari, Fabian A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The need for biological markers of aortic wall stress and risk of rupture or dissection of ascending aortic aneurysms is obvious. To date, wall stress cannot be related to a certain biological marker. We analyzed aortic tissue and serum for the presence of different MMP-2 isoforms to find a connection between serum and tissue MMP-2 and to evaluate the potential of different MMP-2 isoforms as markers of high wall stress. Methods Serum and aortic tissue from n = 24 patients and serum from n = 19 healthy controls was analyzed by ELISA and gelatin zymography. 24 patients had ascending aortic aneurysms, 10 of them also had aortic root aneurysms. Three patients had normally functioning valves, 12 had regurgitation alone, eight had regurgitation and stenosis and one had only stenosis. Patients had bicuspid and tricuspid aortic valves (9/15). Serum samples were taken preoperatively, and the aortic wall specimen collected during surgical aortic repair. Results Pro-MMP-2 was identified in all serum and tissue samples. Pro-MMP-2 was detected in all tissue and serum samples from patients with ascending aortic/aortic root aneurysms, irrespective of valve morphology or other clinical parameters and in serum from healthy controls. We also identified active MMP-2 in all tissue samples from patients with ascending aortic/aortic root aneurysms. None of the analyzed serum samples revealed signals relatable to active MMP-2. No correlation between aortic tissue total MMP-2 or tissue pro-MMP-2 or tissue active MMP-2 and serum MMP-2 was found and tissue MMP-2/pro-MMP-2/active MMP-2 did not correlate with aortic diameter. This evidence shows that pro-MMP-2 is the predominant MMP-2 species in serum of patients and healthy individuals and in aneurysmatic aortic tissue, irrespective of aortic valve configuration. Active MMP-2 species are either not released into systemic circulation or not detectable in serum. There is no reliable connection between aortic tissue—and serum MMP-2

  15. Transcatheter aortic-valve replacement for inoperable severe aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Makkar, Raj R; Fontana, Gregory P; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Kapadia, Samir; Pichard, Augusto D; Douglas, Pamela S; Thourani, Vinod H; Babaliaros, Vasilis C; Webb, John G; Herrmann, Howard C; Bavaria, Joseph E; Kodali, Susheel; Brown, David L; Bowers, Bruce; Dewey, Todd M; Svensson, Lars G; Tuzcu, Murat; Moses, Jeffrey W; Williams, Matthew R; Siegel, Robert J; Akin, Jodi J; Anderson, William N; Pocock, Stuart; Smith, Craig R; Leon, Martin B

    2012-05-03

    Transcatheter aortic-valve replacement (TAVR) is the recommended therapy for patients with severe aortic stenosis who are not suitable candidates for surgery. The outcomes beyond 1 year in such patients are not known. We randomly assigned patients to transfemoral TAVR or to standard therapy (which often included balloon aortic valvuloplasty). Data on 2-year outcomes were analyzed. A total of 358 patients underwent randomization at 21 centers. The rates of death at 2 years were 43.3% in the TAVR group and 68.0% in the standard-therapy group (P<0.001), and the corresponding rates of cardiac death were 31.0% and 62.4% (P<0.001). The survival advantage associated with TAVR that was seen at 1 year remained significant among patients who survived beyond the first year (hazard ratio, 0.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.36 to 0.92; P=0.02 with the use of the log-rank test). The rate of stroke was higher after TAVR than with standard therapy (13.8% vs. 5.5%, P=0.01), owing, in the first 30 days, to the occurrence of more ischemic events in the TAVR group (6.7% vs. 1.7%, P=0.02) and, beyond 30 days, to the occurrence of more hemorrhagic strokes in the TAVR group (2.2% vs. 0.6%, P=0.16). At 2 years, the rate of rehospitalization was 35.0% in the TAVR group and 72.5% in the standard-therapy group (P<0.001). TAVR, as compared with standard therapy, was also associated with improved functional status (P<0.001). The data suggest that the mortality benefit after TAVR may be limited to patients who do not have extensive coexisting conditions. Echocardiographic analysis showed a sustained increase in aortic-valve area and a decrease in aortic-valve gradient, with no worsening of paravalvular aortic regurgitation. Among appropriately selected patients with severe aortic stenosis who were not suitable candidates for surgery, TAVR reduced the rates of death and hospitalization, with a decrease in symptoms and an improvement in valve hemodynamics that were sustained at 2 years of

  16. Aortic Wall Injury Related to Endovascular Therapy for Aortic Coarctation.

    PubMed

    Tretter, Justin T; Jones, Thomas K; McElhinney, Doff B

    2015-09-01

    Aortic wall complications can occur in unrepaired aortic coarctation (CoA) and after surgical repair or endovascular treatment. This review summarizes the available literature and current understanding of aortic wall injury (AWI) surrounding the management of CoA, focusing specifically on acute and follow-up AWI after endovascular treatment. There have been 23 reported cases of aortic rupture after endovascular treatment for CoA, including angioplasty alone, bare metal stenting, and primary covered stent therapy. Even if these published cases represent only a minority of ruptures that have actually occurred, the incidence is substantially <1%. The incidence of acute aneurysm formation was 0% to 13% after angioplasty, 0% to 5% after bare metal stent placement, and <1% after covered stent placement. The reported incidence and natural history of both acute and new AWI during follow-up after endovascular therapy for CoA varies considerably, likely secondary to ascertainment and reporting biases and inconsistent definitions. Although important AWI after endovascular treatment of CoA seems to be declining in frequency with increasing experience and improving technology, it remains one of the most important potential adverse outcomes. Long-term surveillance for new AWI and monitoring of existing AWI is mandatory, with institution of appropriate treatment when necessary. A central research focus in this population should be determination of the appropriate treatment for both native and recurrent CoA across various ages with regard to limiting recurrent CoA and preventing associated aortic wall complications, in addition to determining the appropriate treatment of various AWI. Consistent definitions and reporting are necessary to truly understand the incidence of, risk factors for, and measures protective against AWI after angioplasty or stent implantation for CoA.

  17. Genetic and Epigenetic Regulation of Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ha Won

    2017-01-01

    Aneurysms are characterized by structural deterioration of the vascular wall leading to progressive dilatation and, potentially, rupture of the aorta. While aortic aneurysms often remain clinically silent, the morbidity and mortality associated with aneurysm expansion and rupture are considerable. Over 13,000 deaths annually in the United States are attributable to aortic aneurysm rupture with less than 1 in 3 persons with aortic aneurysm rupture surviving to surgical intervention. Environmental and epidemiologic risk factors including smoking, male gender, hypertension, older age, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis, and family history are highly associated with abdominal aortic aneurysms, while heritable genetic mutations are commonly associated with aneurysms of the thoracic aorta. Similar to other forms of cardiovascular disease, family history, genetic variation, and heritable mutations modify the risk of aortic aneurysm formation and provide mechanistic insight into the pathogenesis of human aortic aneurysms. This review will examine the relationship between heritable genetic and epigenetic influences on thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysm formation and rupture. PMID:28116311

  18. Aortic Root Enlargement or Sutureless Valve Implantation?

    PubMed Central

    Baikoussis, Nikolaos G.; Dedeilias, Panagiotis; Argiriou, Michalis

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement (AVR) in patients with a small aortic annulus is a challenging issue. The importance of prosthesis–patient mismatch (PPM) post aortic valve replacement (AVR) is controversial but has to be avoided. Many studies support the fact that PPM has a negative impact on short and long term survival. In order to avoid PPM, aortic root enlargement may be performed. Alternatively and keeping in mind that often some comorbidities are present in old patients with small aortic root, the Perceval S suturelles valve implantation could be a perfect solution. The Perceval sutureless bioprosthesis provides reasonable hemodynamic performance avoiding the PPM and providing the maximum of aortic orifice area. We would like to see in the near future the role of the aortic root enlargement techniques in the era of surgical implantation of the sutureless valve (SAVR) and the transcatheter valve implantation (TAVI). PMID:28028424

  19. Notch-dependent EMT is attenuated in patients with aortic aneurysm and bicuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Kostina, Aleksandra S; Uspensky, Vladimir Е; Irtyuga, Olga B; Ignatieva, Elena V; Freylikhman, Olga; Gavriliuk, Natalia D; Moiseeva, Olga M; Zhuk, Sergey; Tomilin, Alexey; Kostareva, Аnna А; Malashicheva, Anna B

    2016-04-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve is the most common congenital heart malformation and the reasons for the aortopathies associated with bicuspid aortic valve remain unclear. NOTCH1 mutations are associated with bicuspid aortic valve and have been found in individuals with various left ventricular outflow tract abnormalities. Notch is a key signaling during cardiac valve formation that promotes the endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition. We address the role of Notch signaling in human aortic endothelial cells from patients with bicuspid aortic valve and aortic aneurysm. Aortic endothelial cells were isolated from tissue fragments of bicuspid aortic valve-associated thoracic aortic aneurysm patients and from healthy donors. Endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition was induced by activation of Notch signaling. Effectiveness of the transition was estimated by loss of endothelial and gain of mesenchymal markers by immunocytochemistry and qPCR. We show that aortic endothelial cells from the patients with aortic aneurysm and bicuspid aortic valve have down regulated Notch signaling and fail to activate Notch-dependent endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition in response to its stimulation by different Notch ligands. Our findings support the idea that bicuspid aortic valve and associated aortic aneurysm is associated with dysregulation of the entire Notch signaling pathway independently on the specific gene mutation.

  20. Prognostic significance of mild aortic regurgitation in predicting mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Jones, Brandon M; Tuzcu, E Murat; Krishnaswamy, Amar; Popovic, Zoran; Mick, Stephanie; Roselli, Eric E; Gul, Sajjad; Devgun, Jasneet; Mistry, Sohi; Jaber, Wael A; Svensson, Lars G; Kapadia, Samir R

    2016-09-01

    Moderate to severe aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement is associated with worse outcomes. The impact of mild aortic regurgitation has been less clear, possibly because of the broad categories that have been used in clinical trials, but holds increasing importance in the study of next-generation devices in low- and intermediate-risk cohorts. A more granular scheme, which is common in clinical practice and proposed for future trials, may add prognostic value. We evaluated all patients undergoing transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve replacement at the Cleveland Clinic from 2006 to 2012. The degree of aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement was reported from the echocardiography database based on a clinical, transthoracic echocardiogram performed within 30 days of the procedure. Aortic regurgitation was finely discriminated on the basis of a multiwindow, multiparametric, integrative approach using our usual clinical scale: none, trivial to 1+, 1+, 1 to 2+, 2+, 2 to 3+, 3+, 3 to 4+, or 4+. There were 237 patients included in the analysis. By controlling for age, gender, Society of Thoracic Surgeons score, baseline ejection fraction, and aortic regurgitation before transcatheter aortic valve replacement, there was a significant increase in mortality for each half grade of aortic regurgitation compared with the complete absence of aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement. The unit hazard ratio for each 1+ increase in aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement was 2.26 (95% confidence interval, 1.48-3.43; P < .001) considering aortic regurgitation as a continuous variable. Other clinical variables did not significantly affect mortality. Even mild aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement is associated with worse long-term mortality. There may be prognostic value in reporting milder categories of aortic regurgitation with more granular

  1. Visceral Infarction Following Aortic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Willard C.; Nabseth, Donald C.

    1974-01-01

    An experience with aortic surgery is reported which reveals that visceral ischemia is more frequent than expected and significantly contributes to operative mortality. Two of five deaths among 84 patients who had aorto-iliac occlusive disease and four of 40 deaths among 103 aneurysmectomies (both ruptured and elective) were related to visceral ischemia. A review of the literature reveals 99 cases of colonic ischemia in more than 6,100 cases of aortic surgery, an incidence of 1.5%. Only 10 cases of small bowel ischemia were recorded. The present experience with 9 cases of colon ischemia and one of small bowel ischemia is presented particularly with reference to pathophysiology and prevention. It is concluded that patients should be identified by appropriate angiography if considered a risk for visceral infarction, and, if present, visceral arterial reconstruction should be performed in addition to aortic reconstructive surgery. Colon infarction following aortic aneurysmal surgery is directly related to ligation of a patent IMA. Thus re-implantation of the patent IMA should be considered. ImagesFig. 1a. PMID:4277757

  2. [Early and long term results of mechanical aortic valve replacement at the Instituto Nacional del Torax in Chile].

    PubMed

    Villavicencio, Mauricio; Turner, Eduardo; Naranjo, Lorenzo

    2005-10-01

    Mechanical aortic valve replacement (AVR) results have been published extensively in industrialized countries. To assess our immediate and late results in patients subjected to AVR. We retrospectively studied 194 patients subjected to isolated AVR between 1995 and 2003. Mean age was 57 +/- 13 years and 119 (61%) were male. One hundred thirty nine (73%) were in functional class III-IV, 20 (10%) had a previous cardiac operation and 25 (13%) were operated as an emergency. Surgical indication was stenosis in 110 (58%), regurgitation in 49 (26%) and stenosis/regurgitation in 31 (16%). Etiology was bicuspid valve 56 (29%), degenerative lesions 55 (28%), rheumatic valve disease 38 (20%) and endocarditis 27 (14%). Medtronic Hall was the most common prosthesis used in 157 patients (81%). Mean cardiopulmonary bypass time 97 +/- 29 min and mean cross clamp time was 69 +/- 21 min. Operative mortality was 4.6% (3% in elective surgery, 16% in emergency surgery and 0% in reoperations). Follow-up was complete in 100% of cases, totalizing 636 patients-year. Survival was 91 +/- 2%, 80 +/- 4% and 73 +/- 6%, at 1, 5 and 7 years, respectively. Multivariate risk analysis identified renal failure and endocarditis as predictors of early and late mortality. During follow up, the linear incidence rate for hemorrhage was 3.29% /patients-year, thromboembolism 2.04% patients-year and endocarditis 1.1% patients-year. AVR has low overall and elective mortality. Midterm survival is good but linear event rates related to anticoagulant treatment are higher than those previously published in industrialized countries. Renal failure and endocarditis were risk factors for early and late death.

  3. Critical aortic stenosis and acute ascending aortic penetrating ulcer managed utilizing transapical TAVR and TEVAR.

    PubMed

    Allen, Keith B; Davis, J Russell; Cohen, David J

    2015-10-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) of acute ascending aortic pathology is feasible; however, the unique features of this aortic segment in addition to access challenges restricts its use to a select, high-risk subset of patients. With the advent of TAVR, large device delivery using transapical access has become a well-defined technique. We report a patient with critical aortic stenosis and an acute ascending aortic penetrating ulcer with tamponade managed successfully utilizing transapical TAVR and TEVAR. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a hybrid single-stage TAVR and ascending aortic TEVAR using transapical access.

  4. Aortic biomechanics by magnetic resonance: early markers of aortic disease in Marfan syndrome regardless of aortic dilatation?

    PubMed

    Teixido-Tura, Gisela; Redheuil, Alban; Rodríguez-Palomares, Jose; Gutiérrez, Laura; Sánchez, Violeta; Forteza, Alberto; Lima, Joao A C; García-Dorado, David; Evangelista, Artur

    2014-01-15

    Previous studies demonstrated the usefulness of MRI in the evaluation of aortic biomechanics in Marfan patients with aortic dilatation. However, these parameters have not been well studied in earlier stages of aortic disease. The present work aimed to study aortic biomechanics: aortic distensibility (AD) and pulse wave velocity (PWV), by MRI in Marfan patients without advanced aortic disease. Eighty consecutive Marfan patients were compared with 36 age- and sex-matched controls. MRI images at the level of ascending, descending and abdominal aorta were used to determine AD and PWV. Marfan patients (27 men; age: 32.0 ± 10.5 years; mean aortic root diameter: 37.2 ± 4.6mm) had lower AD at all levels (ascending 2.6 ± 2.1 vs. 6.2 ± 3.7 mm Hg(-1)·10(-3), p<0.001; descending 3.1 ± 2.0 vs. 8.3 ± 4.2, p<0.001; and abdominal 4.5 ± 2.2 vs. 14.0 ± 5.2, p<0.001), higher aortic arch PWV (8.1 ± 6.5 vs. 4.3 ± 1.8m/s, p<0.01) and ascending-to-abdominal PWV (6.1 ± 3.0 vs. 4.7 ± 1.5m/s, p<0.01) compared with controls. Thirty-five Marfan patients had a non-dilated aortic root (mean aortic root diameter: 34.5 ± 3.8 mm). In multivariable analyses, after adjustment for age, pulse pressure and aortic dimensions, AD remained lower and PWV higher in Marfan patients; even Marfan patients with non-dilated aortic root showed impaired aortic biomechanics compared with controls. Z-score for ascending AD<-3.5 distinguished Marfan patients from controls with 82.5% sensitivity and 86.1% specificity. Aortic biomechanics by MRI were abnormal in the entire aorta in Marfan patients. Moreover, Marfan patients without dilated aortic root showed clear impairment of aortic biomechanics, which suggests that they may be used as early markers of aortic involvement in these patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Decreased expression of fibulin-4 in aortic wall of aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Huawei, P; Qian, C; Chuan, T; Lei, L; Laing, W; Wenlong, X; Wenzhi, L

    2014-02-01

    In this research, we will examine the expression of Fibulin-4 in aortic wall to find out its role in aortic dissection development. The samples of aortic wall were obtained from 10 patients operated for acute ascending aortic dissection and five patients for chronic ascending aortic dissection. Another 15 pieces of samples from patients who had coronary artery bypass were as controls. The aortic samples were stained with aldehyde magenta dyeing to evaluate the arrangement of elastic fibers. The Fibulin-4 protein and mRNA expression were both determined by Western blot and realtime quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Compared with the control group, both in acute and chronic ascending aortic dissection, elastic fiber fragments increased and the expression of fibulin-4 protein significantly decreased (P= 0.045 < 0.05). The level of fibulin-4 mRNA decreased in acute ascending aortic dissection (P= 0.034 < 0.05), while it increased in chronic ascending aortic dissection (P=0.004 < 0.05). The increased amounts of elastic fiber fragments were negatively correlated with the expression of fibulin-4 mRNA in acute ascending aortic dissection. In conclusion, in aortic wall of ascending aortic dissection, the expression of fibulin-4 protein decreased and the expression of fibulin-4 mRNA was abnormal. Fibulin-4 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of aortic dissection.

  6. One stage surgical treatment of aortic valve disease and aortic coarctation with aortic bypass grafting through the diaphragm and aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zipu; Wu, Shengjun; Li, Chengchen; Zou, Yu; Ma, Liang

    2015-11-10

    To validate ascending aorta-lower abdominal aorta bypass grafting treatment for patients with descending aortic coarctation and an aortic valve disease. The three patients in whom a descending atypical aortic coarctation was associated with an aortic valve disease were treated with one stage surgical treatment with aortic bypass grafting through the diaphragm and aortic valve replacement in our heart center. Operative technique consisted of performing ascending aorta-lower abdominal aorta bypass grafting through diaphragm muscle and implementing aortic valve replacement. The mean time for extracorporeal circulation and occluding clamp of aorta was recorded. Blood pressure data for pre- and post-operation was measured in the limbs. Computer-enhanced transvenous angiograms of pre- and post-operation were applied for detection of aortic stenosis. The other adverse events were noticed in outpatient service during a follow-up period. The mean extracorporeal circulation time was 54 ± 11 min. The mean time for occluding clamp of aorta was 34 ± 6 min. An arterial pressure gradient was totally corrected after surgical treatment. Post-operation computer-enhanced transvenous angiograms showed the grafts to be open with a fluent flow. The patients had no gastrointestinal tract complications. No adverse event was noticed during a follow-up period in outpatient service. Treatment of ascending aorta-lower abdominal aorta bypass is advisable for patients with descending aortic coarctation and an aortic valve disease.

  7. Abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal

    2010-12-01

    Although the number of elective operations for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is increasing, the sex- and age-standardised mortality rate of AAAs continues to rise, especially among men aged 65 years or more. The lethality of ruptured AAA continues to be 80-95%, compared with 5-7% by elective surgery of symptomfree AAA. In order to fulfil all WHO, European, and Danish criteria for screening, a randomised hospitalbased screening trial of 12,639 65-73 year old men in Viborg County (Denmark) was initiated in 1994. It seemed that US screening is a valid, suitable and acceptable method of screening. The acceptance rate was 77%, and 95% accept control scans. Furthermore, persons at the highest risk of having an AAA attend screening more frequently. We found that 97% of the interval cases developed from aortas that initially measured 2.5-2.9 cm - i.e. approx. only 5% attenders need re-screening at 5-year intervals. Two large RCTs have given clear indications of operation. Survivors of surgery enjoy the same quality of life as the background population, and only 2-5% of patients refuse an offer of surgery. Early detection seems relevant since the cardiovascular mortality is more than 4 times higher in AAA patients without previous hospital discharge diagnoses due to cardiovascular disease than among similar men without AAA. The absolute risk difference after 5 years was 16%. So, they will benefit from general cardiovascular preventive action as smoking cessation, statins and low-dose aspirin, which could inhibit further AAA progression. All 4 existing RCTs point in the same direction, viz. in favour of screening of men aged 65 and above. We found that screening significantly reduced AAA-related mortality by 67% within the first five years (NNT = 352). Restriction of screening to men with previous cardiovascular or pulmonary hospital discharge diagnoses would request only 27% of the relevant male population study to be invited, but would only have prevented 46.7% of the

  8. Moderate aortic enlargement and bicuspid aortic valve are associated with aortic dissection in Turner syndrome: report of the international turner syndrome aortic dissection registry.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Misty; Airhart, Nathan; Lopez, Leo; Silberbach, Michael

    2012-10-30

    Girls and women with Turner syndrome are at risk for aortic dissection and rupture. However, the size of the aorta and the clinical characteristics among those with Turner syndrome and dissection have received little attention. We obtained medical records from 20 individuals who voluntarily participated in the International Turner Syndrome Aortic Dissection Registry. Type A dissections occurred in 17 of 20 (85%) cases, and type B occurred in 3 cases of which 1 occurred after coarctation stent placement. Of those with spontaneous aortic dissections, 18 of 19 (95%) had an associated cardiac malformation that included a bicuspid aortic valve. In 1 individual there was no predisposing finding other than the presence of Turner syndrome. Associated pregnancy was documented in 1 of 19 (5%). More than half (13/19, 68%) came to medical attention >24 hours after the onset of symptoms. For those with type A dissections, the mean ascending aortic size index was 2.7±0.6 cm/m(2) (n=9). Aortic dissection in Turner syndrome occurs in young individuals at smaller aortic diameters than in the general population or other forms of genetically triggered aortopathy. The absence of aortic valve or other cardiac malformations appears to markedly reduce the risk of aortic dissection However, aortic dissection can occur in Turner syndrome without cardiac malformations or hypertension. Individuals with Turner syndrome who are >18 years of age with an ascending aortic size index >2.5 cm/m(2) should be considered for an aortic operation to prevent aortic dissection.

  9. Measurement of effective aortic valve area using three-dimensional echocardiography in children undergoing aortic balloon valvuloplasty for aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Bharucha, Tara; Fernandes, Fernanda; Slorach, Cameron; Mertens, Luc; Friedberg, Mark Kevin

    2012-04-01

    Pressure gradient is used for timing of balloon aortic valvuloplasty for aortic stenosis (AS) in children, but does not correlate well with outcome and is limited if ventricular function is poor. In adults, effective orifice area (EOA) is used to assess AS severity, but EOA by continuity equation or 2D echo is unreliable in children. Three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) may reliably assess EOA but has not been studied in children. We assessed measurement of aortic valve EOA by 3DE in children with AS before and after balloon aortic valvuloplasty and compared results with change in aortic valve gradient. 3DE was performed at time of catheterization before and after balloon aortic valvuloplasty. Using 3DE multiplanar review mode, valve annulus diameter, area, and EOA were measured and compared with change in aortic gradient and degree of aortic insufficiency. Twenty-four 3DE studies in 12 children (mean age 4.4 ± 5.0 years) were analyzed. EOA was measurable in all. Catheter peak gradient decreased from 45 ± 10 to 26 ± 17 mmHg (P = 0.0018). 3DE EOA increased after balloon aortic valvuloplasty (0.59 ± 0.52 cm(2) vs 0.80 ± 0.70 cm(2) ; P = 0.03), without change in valve diameter. EOA change correlated with change in peak (r = 0.77; P = 0.005) and mean (r = 0.60; P = 0.03) aortic valve gradient post balloon aortic valvuloplasty. 3DE facilitates EOA measurement in pediatric AS and correlates with change in aortic valve gradient after balloon valvuloplasty. © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. [Surgical technique of aortic valve replacement for small aortic annulus in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Hata, T; Fujiwara, K; Furukawa, H; Tsushima, Y; Yoshitaka, H; Kuinose, M; Minami, H; Ishida, A; Tamura, K; Totsugawa, T; Kanemitsu, H; Ozawa, M

    2006-04-01

    Recent reports have shown that aortic valve replacement in elderly patients over 65 years with atherosclerotic aortic stenosis and a small aortic annulus is possible by using a small sized bioprosthesis (Carpentier-Edwards pericardial valve). Here we present out surgical technique. Firstly, the native calcified aortic valve was removed completely to gain total exposure of the surrounding aortic root and sinus of Valsalva like Bentall procedure. Secondly, a small sized bioprosthesis was implanted with intermittent noneverting mattress 2-0 sutures with spaghetti and small polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) felt. Aortic annulus is the dilated by inserting Hegar dilator sizing from 25 to 27 mm. Therefore, aortic valve replacement for small aortic annulus in intra- or supra-annular position should be easily accomplished. Good surgical results and hemodynamic state were achieved in 25 consecutive cases using this technique.

  11. Hypertensive Emergency in Aortic Dissection and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm—A Review of Management

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Prateek K.; Gupta, Himani; Khoynezhad, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Over the last few decades, treatment for aortic dissection and thoracic aortic aneurysms has evolved significantly with improvement in outcomes. Treatment paradigms include medical, endovascular and surgical options. As aortic dissection presents as a hypertensive emergency, diligent control of BP is of utmost importance in order to reduce the progression of dissection with possible aortic branch malperfusion. Treatment should begin on arrival to the emergency department and continues in the intensive care unit, endovascular suite or the operating room. Novel antihypertensive medications with improved pharmacological profile and improved surgical techniques, have improved the prognosis of patients with aortic aneurysm and/or aortic dissection. Nevertheless, morbidity and mortality remain high and hypertensive emergency poses a significant challenge in aortic dissection and thoracic aortic aneurysms. PMID:27713224

  12. The Relationship between Tension and Length of the Aortic Adventitia Resected from the Aortic Wall of Acute Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Kitano, Mitsuru; Teranishi, Hiroo; Kudo, Masahumi; Matsuura, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To our knowledge, no previous study has described the measurement of the tensile strength of the human aortic adventitia. In the present study, we examined the relationship between the tension and length of the aortic adventitia resected from the aortic wall of patients with acute aortic dissection. Methods: We obtained rectangular specimens from the aortic adventitia that was resected in patients with acute aortic dissection during surgery. The specimens were placed on a tension meter (Digital Force Gauge FGS-10, SHIMPO, Kyoto, Japan) within 15 min after resection and stretched until they were pulled apart, and the tension and length were recorded. Results: We obtained 18 specimens during surgery from 11 cases of acute aortic dissection. When the specimen was being pulled apart, the mean tension recorded was 10.2 ± 4.9 N/cm specimen width, whereas the mean elongated length recorded was 4.2 ± 1.1 mm/cm specimen length. Discussion: We determined that the aortic adventitia is elastic and expandable up to 140% of its original length. This indicates that dilation of the aorta to >4.2 cm in diameter may result in a rupture if the original aortic diameter prior to dissection was 3 cm. (*English translation of J Jpn Coll Angiol 2013; 53: 77-81) PMID:25298826

  13. Severe Aortic Stenosis Associated with Unicommissural Unicuspid Aortic Valve in a Middle Aged Male

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hee-Jin; Kim, Song Soo; Sun, Byung Joo; Jin, Sun Ah; Kim, Jun-Hyung; Lee, Jae-Hwan; Choi, Siwan; Jeong, Jin-Ok; Seong, In-Whan

    2016-01-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve (UAV) is an extremely rare form of congenital aortic valvular abnormality. Although UAV shows similar clinical characteristics to bicuspid aortic valve, the clinical symptoms develop at earlier age and progress at a faster pace in UAV. In this report, we are presenting a 42-year-old male with severe aortic stenosis associated with unicommissural UAV. The patients underwent a successful Bentall operation. PMID:27721957

  14. Aortic Stenosis: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jessica; Naqvi, Syed Yaseen; Giri, Jay; Goldberg, Sheldon

    2017-03-01

    The incidence of aortic stenosis increases with age, affecting up to 10% of the population by the eighth decade. Once symptoms develop, aortic stenosis is rapidly fatal. Proper management requires an understanding of the physiology and criteria used to define disease severity. There is no effective pharmacologic treatment. Surgical aortic valve replacement has been the gold standard treatment for decades. However, over the last 10 years transcatheter aortic valve replacement has emerged as an attractive, less-invasive option for appropriately selected patients. Refinements in valve design and delivery systems have led to widespread use of this breakthrough technology in selected patients. We review the pathophysiology, criteria for valve replacement, and the results of the trials comparing transcatheter aortic valve replacement with surgical aortic valve replacement.

  15. Aortic root vasculitis associated with Cogan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gasparovic, Hrvoje; Djuric, Zeljko; Bosnic, Dubravka; Petricevic, Mate; Brida, Margita; Dotlic, Snjezana; Biocina, Bojan

    2011-07-01

    Cogan's syndrome is characterized by nonsyphilitic interstitial keratitis and an audiovestibular disorder resembling Meniere disease. We report a patient with progressive congestive heart failure due to massive aortic and mitral insufficiency coupled with aortitis leading to an ascending aortic aneurysm. The patient underwent successful aortic root replacement and mitral valve repair. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Traumatic aortic incompetence following road traffic accident

    PubMed Central

    Irving, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    This case report describes the presentation and treatment of a case of aortic incompetence, resulting from a road traffic accident. The relevant literature is briefly reviewed. Aortic incompetence due to trauma has been described following non-penetrating chest injuries, such as kicks from horses (Barie, 1881), falls from heights and crushing accidents (Kissane, Koons and Clark, 1948; Levine, Roberts and Morrow, 1962). Despite the frequency of road traffic accidents, there have been no recent reports of traumatic aortic valve damage. PMID:4467876

  17. Association Between Gout and Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kevin; Yokose, Chio; Tenner, Craig; Oh, Cheongeun; Donnino, Robert; Choy-Shan, Alana; Pike, Virginia C; Shah, Binita D; Lorin, Jeffrey D; Krasnokutsky, Svetlana; Sedlis, Steven P; Pillinger, Michael H

    2017-02-01

    An independent association between gout and coronary artery disease is well established. The relationship between gout and valvular heart disease, however, is unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the association between gout and aortic stenosis. We performed a retrospective case-control study. Aortic stenosis cases were identified through a review of outpatient transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) reports. Age-matched controls were randomly selected from patients who had undergone TTE and did not have aortic stenosis. Charts were reviewed to identify diagnoses of gout and the earliest dates of gout and aortic stenosis diagnosis. Among 1085 patients who underwent TTE, 112 aortic stenosis cases were identified. Cases and nonaortic stenosis controls (n = 224) were similar in age and cardiovascular comorbidities. A history of gout was present in 21.4% (n = 24) of aortic stenosis subjects compared with 12.5% (n = 28) of controls (unadjusted odds ratio 1.90, 95% confidence interval 1.05-3.48, P = .038). Multivariate analysis retained significance only for gout (adjusted odds ratio 2.08, 95% confidence interval 1.00-4.32, P = .049). Among subjects with aortic stenosis and gout, gout diagnosis preceded aortic stenosis diagnosis by 5.8 ± 1.6 years. The age at onset of aortic stenosis was similar among patients with and without gout (78.7 ± 1.8 vs 75.8 ± 1.0 years old, P = .16). Aortic stenosis patients had a markedly higher prevalence of precedent gout than age-matched controls. Whether gout is a marker of, or a risk factor for, the development of aortic stenosis remains uncertain. Studies investigating the potential role of gout in the pathophysiology of aortic stenosis are warranted and could have therapeutic implications. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement for bicuspid aortic stenosis 13years post heart transplant.

    PubMed

    Julien, Maureen B; Desai, Nimesh; Brozena, Susan; Herrmann, Howard C

    2016-12-16

    Despite the widespread use of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) for moderate and high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis, it is utilized less frequently in patients with bicuspid aortic valves (BAV). Orthotopic heart transplant (OHT) donors tend to be younger and may have undiagnosed BAV. We present a case of successful TAVR in a patient with BAV thirteen years after OHT.

  19. Low-gradient aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Marie-Annick; Magne, Julien; Pibarot, Philippe

    2016-09-07

    An important proportion of patients with aortic stenosis (AS) have a 'low-gradient' AS, i.e. a small aortic valve area (AVA <1.0 cm(2)) consistent with severe AS but a low mean transvalvular gradient (<40 mmHg) consistent with non-severe AS. The management of this subset of patients is particularly challenging because the AVA-gradient discrepancy raises uncertainty about the actual stenosis severity and thus about the indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR) if the patient has symptoms and/or left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction. The most frequent cause of low-gradient (LG) AS is the presence of a low LV outflow state, which may occur with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), i.e. classical low-flow, low-gradient (LF-LG), or preserved LVEF, i.e. paradoxical LF-LG. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of patients with AS may have a normal-flow, low-gradient (NF-LG) AS: i.e. a small AVA-low-gradient combination but with a normal flow. One of the most important clinical challenges in these three categories of patients with LG AS (classical LF-LG, paradoxical LF-LG, and NF-LG) is to differentiate a true-severe AS that generally benefits from AVR vs. a pseudo-severe AS that should be managed conservatively. A low-dose dobutamine stress echocardiography may be used for this purpose in patients with classical LF-LG AS, whereas aortic valve calcium scoring by multi-detector computed tomography is the preferred modality in those with paradoxical LF-LG or NF-LG AS. Although patients with LF-LG severe AS have worse outcomes than those with high-gradient AS following AVR, they nonetheless display an important survival benefit with this intervention. Some studies suggest that transcatheter AVR may be superior to surgical AVR in patients with LF-LG AS.

  20. Aortic root dilatation in young men with normally functioning bicuspid aortic valves

    PubMed Central

    Nistri, S; Sorbo, M; Marin, M; Palisi, M; Scognamiglio, R; Thiene, G

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate the dimensions of the aortic root in a selected population of young males with isolated normally functioning bicuspid aortic valve.
DESIGN AND SETTING—Echocardiographic and Doppler evaluation of conscripts with bicuspid aortic valve at the time of military pre-enrolment screening in two military hospitals.
SUBJECTS AND METHODS—66 consecutive young men with a normally functioning bicuspid aortic valve were studied to assess aortic size at four aortic levels: annulus, sinuses of Valsalva, supra-aortic ridge, and proximal ascending aorta; 70 consecutive normal young subjects, matched for age and body surface area, were used as controls.
RESULTS—In men with a bicuspid aortic valve, the diameter of the aortic root was significantly larger than in controls at the sinuses (3.16 (0.37) v 2.87 (0.31) cm, p < 0.001), at the supra-aortic ridge (2.64 (0.46) v 2.47 (0.28) cm, p = 0.01), and at the level of the proximal ascending aorta (3.12 (0.48) v 2.69 (0.28) cm, p < 0.001). The prevalence of aortic root dilatation was 7.5% at the annulus (5/66), 19.6% at the sinuses (13/66), 15% at the supra-aortic ridge (10/66), and 43.9% at the ascending aorta (29/66); 32 subjects (48%) had aortic root dimensions comparable with controls, while 34 (52%) had definitely abnormal aortic root dimensions.
CONCLUSIONS—Aortic root enlargement in people with a bicuspid aortic valve occurs independently of haemodynamic abnormalities, age, and body size. However, there appear to be different subgroups of young adults with bicuspid aortic valves, one of which is characterised by aortic dilatation, possibly caused by a congenital abnormality of the aortic wall.


Keywords: bicuspid aortic valve; aortic root dilatation PMID:10377302

  1. Aortic dilatation in children with systemic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gupta-Malhotra, Monesha; Devereux, Richard B; Dave, Archana; Bell, Cynthia; Portman, Ronald; Milewicz, Diana

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the presence of aortic dilatation in hypertensive children, the prevalence of which is 4% to 10% in hypertensive adults. Prospectively enrolled multiethnic children, untreated for their hypertension, underwent an echocardiogram to exclude congenital heart disease and evaluate for end-organ damage and aortic size. The aorta was measured in the parasternal long-axis view at three levels: the sinus of Valsalva, supra-tubular junction, and the ascending aorta. Aortic dilatation was determined by z-score >2 at any one of the levels measured. Hypertension was defined as blood pressure above the 95th percentile based on the Fourth Working Group criteria confirmed by 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Among 142 consecutive hypertensive children (median age, 14 years; 45% females) aortic dilatation was detected in 2.8% (95% confidence interval, 1%-7%; median age, 16 years; 100% females). Children with aortic dilatation, when compared with those without, had significantly more aortic valve insufficiency (P = .005) and left ventricular hypertrophy (P = .018). Prevalence of aortic dilatation was 2.8% and was associated with significantly more aortic insufficiency and left ventricular hypertrophy in comparison to those without aortic dilatation.

  2. Aortic Dilatation in Children with Systemic Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gupta-Malhotra, Monesha; Devereux, Richard B.; Dave, Archana; Bell, Cynthia; Portman, Ronald; Milewicz, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to determine presence of aortic dilatation in hypertensive children, the prevalence of which is 4–10% in hypertensive adults. Methods Prospectively enrolled multiethnic children untreated for their hypertension, underwent an echocardiogram to exclude congenital heart disease and evaluate for end-organ damage and aortic size. The aorta was measured in the parasternal long-axis view at 3 levels: the sinus of Valsalva, supra-tubular junction and the ascending aorta. Aortic dilatation was determined by z-score > 2 at any 1 of the levels measured. Hypertension was defined as blood pressure above the 95th percentile based on the Fourth Working Group criteria confirmed by 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Results Among 142 consecutive hypertensive children (median age 14 years, 45% females) aortic dilatation was detected in 2.8% (95% CI 1% to 7%, median age 16 years, 100% females). Children with aortic dilatation, when compared to those without, had significantly more aortic valve insufficiency (p = 0.005) and left ventricular hypertrophy (p = 0.018). Conclusions Prevalence of aortic dilatation was 2.8% and was associated with significantly more aortic insufficiency and left ventricular hypertrophy in comparison to those without aortic dilatation. PMID:24507486

  3. [Surgery of aortic dissection: for which patient?].

    PubMed

    Verhoye, Jean-Philippe; Abouliatim, Issam; Larralde, Antoine; Beneux, Xavier; Heautot, Jean-François

    2011-01-01

    In the acute stage (less than two weeks), surgery is indicated for Stanford type A aortic dissections. With respect to the initial work-up, surgery consists in replacing the ascending aorta, sometimes the aortic arch (with supra aortic vessels reimplantation), and aortic valve replacement (valve replacement, Bentall valved tube or valve sparing Tyron David technique). Ischemic visceral complications must be searched for and treated by endovascular techniques or surgery. Aneurismal evolution of chronic dissections must be treated surgically. Replacement can encompass the entire aorta. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  4. Aortic Aneurysm: Etiopathogenesis and Clinicopathologic Correlations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Aortic aneurysm (AA) is one of the life-threatening aortic diseases, leading to aortic rupture of any cause including atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic diseases. AA is diagnosed in a variable proportion of patients with dilated aorta by imaging modality. The etiopathogenesis of AA remains unclear in many aortic diseases. Furthermore, although it may be difficult to explain all phenotypes of patients even if genetic mutation could be identified in some proteins such as smooth muscle cell α-actin (ACTA2), myosin heavy chain 11 (MYH11) or SMAD3, individualized consideration of these factors in each patient is essential on the basis of clinicopathological characteristics. PMID:27375798

  5. Bacillus licheniformis prosthetic aortic valve endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Santini, F; Borghetti, V; Amalfitano, G; Mazzucco, A

    1995-01-01

    A 73-year old man developed an acute prosthetic aortic valve dehiscence for which emergent operation was undertaken. The intraoperative evidence of an aortic annular disruption and of a subannular abscess led to the hypothesis that an endocarditis process was involved. The aortic valve was replaced with a stentless porcine bioprosthesis. Cultures taken intraoperatively from the aortic area had a pure growth of aerobic, spore-forming, gram-positive bacilli identified as Bacillus licheniformis. The patient responded to specific antibiotic therapy with no relapse at a 20-month follow-up. The potentiality of B. licheniformis as a pathogen should be reconsidered. PMID:8576381

  6. Hypoplasia of the aortic root 1

    PubMed Central

    Nicks, Rowan; Cartmill, T.; Bernstein, L.

    1970-01-01

    We report a technique for the enlargement of a hypoplastic aortic root by an operation whereby the hypoplastic aortic root has been so enlarged by the insertion of a Dacron fabric gusset that it will accommodate a size 9A or larger Starr-Edwards prosthesis. Our experience in five patients is described. No matter what type of valve is used for replacement of a diseased aortic valve, and no matter what improved designs of valvular prosthesis are ultimately developed, it will be necessary (in the particular group described) to enlarge the aortic ring to accommodate a size which will function correctly without causing left ventricular outflow obstruction. Images PMID:5452289

  7. Aortic Stenosis: Changing Disease Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Rashedi, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) occurs in almost 10% of adults over age 80 years with a mortality about 50% at 2 years unless outflow obstruction is relieved by aortic valve replacement (AVR). Development of AS is associated with anatomic, clinical and genetic risk factors including a bicuspid valve in 50%; clinical factors that include older age, hypertension, smoking, diabetes and elevated serum lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels; and genetic factors such as a polymorphism in the Lp(a) locus. Early stages of AS are characterized by focal areas of leaflet thickening and calcification. The rate of hemodynamic progression is variable but eventual severe AS is inevitable once even mild valve obstruction is present. There is no specific medical therapy to prevent leaflet calcification. Basic principles of medical therapy for asymptomatic AS are patient education, periodic echocardiographic and clinical monitoring, standard cardiac risk factor evaluation and modification and treatment of hypertension or other comorbid conditions. When severe AS is present, a careful evaluation for symptoms is needed, often with an exercise test to document symptom status and cardiac reserve. In symptomatic patients with severe AS, AVR improves survival and relieves symptoms. In asymptomatic patients with severe AS, AVR also is appropriate if ejection fraction is < 50%, disease progression is rapid or AS is very severe (aortic velocity > 5 m/s). The choice of surgical or transcatheter AVR depends on the estimated surgical risk plus other factors such as frailty, other organ system disease and procedural specific impediments. PMID:26140146

  8. Cocking of a poppet-disc prosthesis in the aortic position. A cause of intermittent aortic regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Hammer, W J; Hearne, M J; Roberts, W C

    1976-02-01

    Intermittent aortic regurgitation due to cocking is described for the first time after replacement of the aortic valve with a poppet-disc prosthesis. A combination of disc grooving and strut thrombus produced the cocking with resultant aortic regurgitation.

  9. The concept of aortic replacement based on computational fluid dynamic analysis: patient-directed aortic replacement†

    PubMed Central

    Heim, Laurant; Poole, Robert J.; Warwick, Richard; Poullis, Michael

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Aortic replacement is based on the aortic diameter in the absence of dissection or connective tissue diseases. Frequently, a number of different aortic-to-prosthetic anastomotic positions are possible depending on patient factors and surgeon preferences. High stress on residual aortic tissue may result in aneurysm formation or aneurysmal dilatation. Utilizing a computational fluid dynamic evaluation, we aimed to define possible optimal operative interventions with regard to the extent of aortic replacement. METHODS For proof of principle, a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis, using Fluent 6.2 (Ansys UK Ltd, Sheffield, UK), was performed on a simplified ascending arch and descending aortic geometry. Wall shear stress in three dimensions was assessed for the standard operations: ascending aortic replacement, arch replacement and proximal descending aortic replacement. RESULTS Hermiarch replacement is superior to isolated ascending aortic replacement with regard to residual stress analysis on tissues (up to a 10-fold reduction). Aortic arch replacement with island implantation of the supra-aortic vessels may potentially result in high stress on the residual aorta (10-fold increase). Aortic arch replacement with individual supra-aortic vessel implantation may result in areas of high stress (10-fold increase) on native vessels if an inadequate length of supra-aortic tissue is not resected, regardless of it being aneurysmal. CONCLUSIONS Computational fluid dynamic evaluation, which will have to be patient-specific, 3D anatomical and physiological, potentially has enormous implications for operative strategy in aortic replacement surgery. CFD analysis may direct the replacement of normal-diameter aortas in the future. PMID:23407695

  10. [Emergent transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a patient with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis in cardiogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Pizzighini, S; Finet, G; Obadia, J-F; Revel, D; Bresson, D; Rioufol, G

    2015-02-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a therapeutic option for high-risk patients with severe aortic valve stenosis and with cardiac symptoms. This procedure requires the preliminary evaluation by a "heart team" and presents some contraindications. We report the case of a 58-year-old man with severe bicuspid aortic valve stenosis and cardiogenic shock. In spite of contraindications and because of the failure of balloon aortic valvuloplasty, transcatheter aortic valve implantation was performed in emergency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis with a small aortic annulus in a patient having Werner's syndrome and liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Sogawa, M; Kasuya, S; Yamamoto, K; Koshika, M; Oguma, F; Hayashi, J

    2001-12-01

    Werner's syndrome is a rare genetic disease characterized by premature aging and scleroderma-like involvement of the skin. We report a case of aortic valve replacement for severely calcified aortic valve stenosis with a small annulus in a patient suffering from Werner's syndrome and liver cirrhosis

  12. Dislocation of a transapically implanted aortic valve prosthesis with a functionally bicuspid aortic valve and ascending aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Schroeter, T; Subramanian, S; Lehmann, S; Kempfert, J; Misfeld, M; Mohr, F W; Borger, M A

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, catheter-based aortic valve interventions have become established procedures for the treatment of high-risk and advanced age patients with aortic valve pathologies. One of the limitations of the widespread applicability of this procedure is the annulus size. Until recently, no prosthesis was available to treat patients with a large annulus. We report on a patient with high-grade aortic stenosis (AS) and a 27-mm annulus, who underwent transapical implantation (TAP) of an Edwards SAPIEN® 29-mm prosthesis (Edwards LifeScience, Irvine, CA, USA). Due to insufficient dilation of his heavily calcified, functionally bicuspid aortic valve leaflets during balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV), the TAP prosthesis did not anchor adequately. This was determined during follow-up as he developed progressive aortic insufficiency and orthopnea, and an echocardiography revealed that the valve had been displaced into the LVOT. A conventional aortic valve replacement and ascending aorta replacement were performed, at which time the TAP prosthesis was removed. The patient recovered uneventfully, and was discharged with a well-functioning aortic bioprosthetic valve and in good general condition. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Aortic Stiffness, Cerebrovascular Dysfunction, and Memory

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Leroy L.; Mitchell, Gary F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Aortic stiffness is associated with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events and cognitive decline. This mini-review focuses on relations of aortic stiffness with microvascular dysfunction and discusses the contribution of abnormal pulsatile hemodynamics to cerebrovascular damage and cognitive decline. We also provide a rationale for considering aortic stiffness as a putative and important contributor to memory impairment in older individuals. Summary Aging is associated with stiffening of the aorta but not the muscular arteries, which reduces wave reflection and increases the transmission of pulsatility into the periphery. Aortic stiffening thereby impairs a protective mechanism that shields the peripheral microcirculation from excessive pulsatility within downstream target organs. Beyond midlife, aortic stiffness increases rapidly and exposes the cerebral microcirculation to abnormal pulsatile mechanical forces that are associated with microvascular damage and remodeling in the brain. Aortic stiffening and high-flow pulsatility are associated with alterations in the microvasculature of the brain; however, a mechanistic link between aortic stiffness and memory has not been established. We showed that in a community-based sample of older individuals, cerebrovascular resistance and white matter hyperintensities - markers of cerebrovascular remodeling and damage - mediated the relation between higher aortic stiffness and lower performance on memory function tests. These data suggest that microvascular and white matter damage associated with excessive aortic stiffness contribute to impaired memory function with advancing age. Key Messages Increasing evidence suggests that vascular etiologies - including aortic stiffness and microvascular damage - contribute to memory impairment and the pathogenesis of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease. Interventions that reduce aortic stiffness may delay memory decline among older individuals. PMID:27752478

  14. Mitral and aortic regurgitation following transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Szymański, Piotr; Hryniewiecki, Tomasz; Dąbrowski, Maciej; Sorysz, Danuta; Kochman, Janusz; Jastrzębski, Jan; Kukulski, Tomasz; Zembala, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyse the impact of postprocedural mitral regurgitation (MR), in an interaction with aortic regurgitation (AR), on mortality following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Methods To assess the interaction between MR and AR, we compared the survival rate of patients (i) without both significant MR and AR versus (ii) those with either significant MR or significant AR versus (iii) with significant MR and AR, all postprocedure. 381 participants of the Polish Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation Registry (166 males (43.6%) and 215 females (56.4%), age 78.8±7.4 years) were analysed. Follow-up was 94.1±96.5 days. Results Inhospital and midterm mortality were 6.6% and 10.2%, respectively. Significant MR and AR were present in 16% and 8.1% patients, including 3.1% patients with both significant MR and AR. Patients with significant versus insignificant AR differed with respect to mortality (log rank p=0.009). This difference was not apparent in a subgroup of patients without significant MR (log rank p=0.80). In a subgroup of patients without significant AR, there were no significant differences in mortality between individuals with versus without significant MR (log rank p=0.44). Significant MR and AR had a significant impact on mortality only when associated with each other (log rank p<0.0001). At multivariate Cox regression modelling concomitant significant MR and AR were independently associated with mortality (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.54 to 5.71, p=0.002). Conclusions Significant MR or AR postprocedure, when isolated, had no impact on survival. Combined MR and AR had a significant impact on a patient's prognosis. PMID:26908096

  15. Aortic annuloplasty with aortic root reconstruction to prevent patient-prosthesis mismatch.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Richard A

    2006-07-01

    Part of the ongoing argument concerning patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) following aortic valve replacement (AVR) is due to the perception that aortic annulus enlargement procedures increase the risk and technical difficulty of aortic valve surgery. Here, an aortic root reconstruction that involves enlargement of the annulus and tailoring of the aortic root to accommodate larger stented prostheses is presented that has been personally performed in 196 patients with no technique-related surgical deaths or complications, and thus can be carried out without additional risk. This aortic root enlargement aortoplasty and annuloplasty method can be calibrated to all AVRs involving stented manufactured prostheses when these are deemed the prosthesis of choice for the patient with a relatively small annulus and/or aortic root, severe left ventricular hypertrophy, compromised LV function or a very active lifestyle, to achieve predicted EOA values > or = 1.00 cm2/m2.

  16. [Unicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis Combined with Aortic Coarctation;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Kubota, Takehiro; Wakasa, Satoru; Shingu, Yasushige; Matsui, Yoshiro

    2016-06-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve in an adult is extremely rare. In addition, 90% of the patients with aortic coarctation are reported to die before the age 50. A 60-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for further examination of exertional dyspnea which had begun one year before. She had been under medical treatment for hypertension since early thirties, and had been also diagnosed with moderate aortic stenosis at 50 years of age. She was at 1st diagnosed with aortic coarctation combined with bicuspid aortic valve stenosis. The aortic valve was then found unicuspid and was replaced under cardiopulmonary bypass with perfusion to both the ascending aorta and the femoral artery. Repair of aortic coarctation was performed 3 months later through left thoracotomy without extracorporeal circulation due to the rich collateral circulation. She had no postoperative complications, and hypertension as well as ankle-brachial index improved to the normal levels.

  17. Recent advances in aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Adhami, Ahmed; Al-Attar, Nawwar

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement is no longer an operation that is approached solely through a median sternotomy. Recent advances in the fields of transcatheter valves have expanded the proportion of patients eligible for intervention. Comparisons between transcatheter valves and conventional surgery have shown non-inferiority of transcatheter valve implants in patients with a high or intermediate pre-operative predictive risk. With advances in our understanding of sutureless valves and their applicability to minimally invasive surgery, the invasiveness and trauma of surgery can be reduced with potential improvements in outcome. The strategy of care has radically changed over the last decade. PMID:27803800

  18. Biomechanical characterization of ascending aortic aneurysm with concomitant bicuspid aortic valve and bovine aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Pham, T; Martin, C; Elefteriades, J; Sun, W

    2013-08-01

    Studies have shown that patients harboring bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) or bovine aortic arch (BAA) are more likely than the general population to develop ascending aortic aneurysm (AsAA). A thorough quantification of the AsAA tissue properties for these patient groups may offer insights into the underlying mechanisms of AsAA development. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate and compare the mechanical and microstructural properties of aortic tissues from AsAA patients with and without concomitant BAV or BAA. AsAA (n=20), BAV (n=20) and BAA (n=15) human tissues were obtained from patients who underwent elective AsAA surgery. Planar biaxial and uniaxial failure tests were used to characterize the mechanical and failure properties of the tissues, respectively. Histological analysis was performed to detect medial degenerative characteristics of aortic aneurysm. Individual layer thickness and composition were quantified for each patient group. The circumferential stress-strain response of the BAV samples was stiffer than both AsAA (p=0.473) and BAA (p=0.152) tissues at a low load. The BAV samples were nearly isotropic, while AsAA and BAA samples were anisotropic. The areal strain of BAV samples was significantly less than that of AsAA (p=0.041) and BAA (p=0.004) samples at a low load. The BAA samples were similar to the AsAA samples in both mechanical and failure properties. On the microstructural level, all samples displayed moderate medial degeneration, characterized by elastin fragmentation, cell loss, mucoid accumulation and fibrosis. The ultimate tensile strength of BAV and BAA sampleswere also found to decrease with age. Overall, the BAV samples were stiffer than both AsAA and BAA samples, and the BAA samples were similar to the AsAA samples. The BAV samples were thinnest, with less elastin than AsAA and BAA samples, which may be attributed to the loss of extensibility of these tissues at a low load. No apparent difference in failure mechanics among

  19. Endovascular approach to acute aortic trauma

    PubMed Central

    Karmy-Jones, Riyad; Teso, Desarom; Jackson, Nicole; Ferigno, Lisa; Bloch, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic thoracic aortic injury remains a major cause of death following motor vehicle accidents. Endovascular approaches have begun to supersede open repair, offering the hope of reduced morbidity and mortality. The available endovascular technology is associated with specific anatomic considerations and complications. This paper will review the current status of endovascular management of traumatic thoracic aortic injuries. PMID:21160721

  20. Aortic Valve Calcification in Mild Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Shinichi; Walker, Marcella Donovan; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Hyodo, Eiichi; Jin, Zhezhen; Liu, Rui; Sacco, Ralph L.; Homma, Shunichi

    2012-01-01

    Context: It is unclear whether cardiovascular disease is present in primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). Objective: Aortic valve structure and function were compared in PHPT patients and population-based controls. Design: This is a case-control study. Setting: The study was conducted in a university hospital metabolic bone disease unit. Participants: We studied 51 patients with PHPT and 49 controls. Outcome Measures: We measured the aortic valve calcification area and the transaortic pressure gradient. Results: Aortic valve calcification area was significantly higher in PHPT (0.24 ± 0.02 vs. 0.17 ± 0.02 cm2, p<0.01), although there was no difference in the peak transaortic pressure gradient, a functional measure of valvular calcification (5.6 ± 0.3 vs. 6.0 ± 0.3 mm Hg, P = 0.39). Aortic valve calcification area was positively associated with PTH (r = 0.34; P < 0.05) but not with serum calcium, phosphorus, or 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels or with calcium-phosphate product. Serum PTH level remained an independent predictor of aortic valve calcification area after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, smoking status, history of hypercholesterolemia and hypertension, and estimated glomerular filtration rate. Conclusions: Mild PHPT is associated with subclinical aortic valve calcification. PTH, but not serum calcium concentration, predicted aortic valve calcification. PTH was a more important predictor of aortic valve calcification than well-accepted cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:22031523

  1. Late complication after repair of aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Anaïs; Cuttone, Fabio; Desgué, Julien; Ivascau, Calin; Caprio, Sabino; Saplacan, Vladimir; Belin, Annette; Babatasi, Gérard

    2015-05-01

    Coarctation of the aorta is a congenital malformation that has long been considered completely correctable with appropriate surgery in childhood. However, with the aging of these patients, many late complications have been reported, and this notion must be reevaluated. We retrospectively reviewed all patients who underwent reoperation between 1992 and 2012 in our adult cardiac surgery department following surgical correction of coarctation in childhood; 18 patients over 15-years old were included in the study. The median time from coarctation repair to reoperation was 25 years. Patients were reoperated on for several late complications: aortic valve disease secondary to bicuspid aortic valve, ascending aortic aneurysm, recoarctation, aortic arch hypoplasia, pseudoaneurysm, associated recoarctation and pseudoaneurysm, subvalvular aortic obstruction, and descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. One patient died due to an intraoperative complication. In the other cases, the surgical results were satisfactory at the 6-month follow-up. According to literature data, age at coarctation repair and surgical technique appear to be essential factors in late complications: older age and surgical repair with prosthesis interposition are associated with a higher rate of reintervention. Patients who have undergone repair of aortic coarctation frequently remain asymptomatic for a long time. Late complications can be appropriately treated when diagnosed early. Consequently, all coarctation patients need careful lifelong follow-up, especially those with congenital aortic valve disease or surgery in childhood with interposition of prosthetic material. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  2. [Acute aortic syndromes and sleep apnea].

    PubMed

    Baguet, Jean-Philippe

    2016-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disease, often present in "cardiovascular or metabolic patients". OSA favours the occurrence of arterial lesions, all the more if severe. There is a strong relationship between OSA and acute aortic syndromes (AAS). This relationship is in part explained by aortic dilatation linked to OSA. The presence of repeated episodes of sudden variation of transmural pressure applied on aortic wall seems to play a major role in this dilatation. All OSA patients should have a search of aortic dilatation by ultrasound (at a thoracic and abdominal level). Also, screening of OSA should be systematically performed in patients with aortic disease. The effect of continuous positive airway pressure in apneic patients with AAS has not been studied.

  3. Valvular and aortic diseases in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Lamanna, Arvin; Fayers, Trevor; Clarke, Sophie; Parsonage, William

    2013-10-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inheritable connective tissue disorder caused by defective collagen synthesis with the principal manifestations of bone fragility. OI has been associated with left sided valvular regurgitation and aortic dilation. Valve and aortic surgery are technically feasible in patients with OI but are inherently high risk due to the underlying connective tissue defect. This report reviews the valvular and aortic pathology associated with OI and their management. We describe two cases of patients with OI who have significant aortic and mitral valve regurgitation, one of whom has been managed conservatively and the other who has undergone successful mitral valve repair and aortic valve replacement. The latter case represents the fifth case of mitral valve repair in a patient with OI reported in the medical literature. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Low-gradient aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Clavel, Marie-Annick; Magne, Julien; Pibarot, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    An important proportion of patients with aortic stenosis (AS) have a ‘low-gradient’ AS, i.e. a small aortic valve area (AVA <1.0 cm2) consistent with severe AS but a low mean transvalvular gradient (<40 mmHg) consistent with non-severe AS. The management of this subset of patients is particularly challenging because the AVA-gradient discrepancy raises uncertainty about the actual stenosis severity and thus about the indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR) if the patient has symptoms and/or left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction. The most frequent cause of low-gradient (LG) AS is the presence of a low LV outflow state, which may occur with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), i.e. classical low-flow, low-gradient (LF-LG), or preserved LVEF, i.e. paradoxical LF-LG. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of patients with AS may have a normal-flow, low-gradient (NF-LG) AS: i.e. a small AVA—low-gradient combination but with a normal flow. One of the most important clinical challenges in these three categories of patients with LG AS (classical LF-LG, paradoxical LF-LG, and NF-LG) is to differentiate a true-severe AS that generally benefits from AVR vs. a pseudo-severe AS that should be managed conservatively. A low-dose dobutamine stress echocardiography may be used for this purpose in patients with classical LF-LG AS, whereas aortic valve calcium scoring by multi-detector computed tomography is the preferred modality in those with paradoxical LF-LG or NF-LG AS. Although patients with LF-LG severe AS have worse outcomes than those with high-gradient AS following AVR, they nonetheless display an important survival benefit with this intervention. Some studies suggest that transcatheter AVR may be superior to surgical AVR in patients with LF-LG AS. PMID:27190103

  5. Diagnostic imaging for aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Kapustin, Andrew J; Litt, Harold I

    2005-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging for aortic dissection has dramatically changed in recent years. Previously, imaging consisted of conventional X-ray radiography, followed by invasive catheter angiography. Now imaging of dissection is performed primarily with multidetector CT, and to a lesser extent, with ultrasound and MRI. Catheter angiography is used primarily as a means of treating complications. Which modality to choose depends on patient factors, physician preference, and differences in availability of state-of-the-art equipment. All three modalities are highly accurate in experienced hands and have revolutionized the detection and evaluation of this condition.

  6. [Non-aneurysmatic aortic dysphagia].

    PubMed

    Rivera, P; Ferrer, L; Tuset, J A; Pamos, S; López Mut, J; Luján, M; Tomé, A; Medina, E

    1999-01-01

    Esophageal compression by a vascular structure is a rare cause of dysphagia, the aberrant right subclavian artery being the most common congenital abnormality. Aortica dysphagia is usually observed in the elderly, especially in hypertensive women with cardiopathy and degenerative osteopathy. We report a 73-year-old woman with dysphagia, caused by a non-aneurysmatic aortic elongation, who presented progressive dysphagia, which ended in aphagia associated with heart failure. The diagnostic approach to these patients is discussed. The patient received cinitapride and, following treatment for heart failure, remains asymptomatic after a 3-year follow-up period, although manometric alterations persist.

  7. [Modern aortic surgery in Marfan syndrome--2011].

    PubMed

    Kallenbach, K; Schwill, S; Karck, M

    2011-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a hereditary disease with a prevalence of 2-3 in 10,000 births, leading to a fibrillin connective tissue disorder with manifestations in the skeleton, eye, skin, dura mater and in particular the cardiovascular system. Since other syndromes demonstrate similar vascular manifestations, but therapy may differ significantly, diagnosis should be established using the revised Ghent nosology in combination with genotypic analysis in specialized Marfan centres. The formation of aortic root aneurysms with the subsequent risk of acute aortic dissection type A (AADA) or aortic rupture limits life expectancy in patients with Marfan syndrome. Therefore, prophylactic replacement of the aortic root needs to be performed before the catastrophic event of AADA can occur. The goal of surgery is the complete resection of pathological aortic tissue. This can be achieved with excellent results by using a (mechanically) valved conduit that replaces both the aortic valve and the aortic root (Bentall operation). However, the need for lifelong anticoagulation with Coumadin can be avoided using the aortic valve sparing reimplantation technique according to David. The long-term durability of the reconstructed valve is favourable, and further technical improvements may improve longevity. Although results of prospective randomised long-term studies comparing surgical techniques are lacking, the David operation has become the surgical method of choice for aortic root aneurysms, not only at the Heidelberg Marfan Centre. Replacement of the aneurysmal dilated aortic arch is performed under moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest combined with antegrade cerebral perfusion using a heart-lung machine, which we also use in thoracic or thoracoabdominal aneurysms. Close post-operative follow-up in a Marfan centre is pivotal for the early detection of pathological changes on the diseased aorta.

  8. Risk of rupture or dissection in descending thoracic aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Bum; Kim, Kibeom; Lindsay, Mark E; MacGillivray, Thomas; Isselbacher, Eric M; Cambria, Richard P; Sundt, Thoralf M

    2015-10-27

    Current practice guidelines recommend surgical repair of large thoracic aortic aneurysms to prevent fatal aortic dissection or rupture, but limited natural history data exist to support clinical criteria for timely intervention. Of 3247 patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm registered in our institutional Thoracic Aortic Center Database, we identified and reviewed 257 nonsyndromic patients (age, 72.4±10.5 years; 143 female) with descending thoracic or thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm without a history of aortic dissection in whom surgical intervention was not undertaken. The primary end point was a composite of aortic dissection/rupture and sudden death. Baseline mean maximal aortic diameter was 52.4±10.8 mm, with 103 patients having diameters ≥55 mm. During a median follow-up of 25.1 months (quartiles 1-3, 8.3-56.4 months), definite and possible aortic events occurred in 19 (7.4%) and 31 (12.1%) patients, respectively. On multivariable analyses, maximal aortic diameter at baseline emerged as the only significant predictor of aortic events (hazard ratio=1.12; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.15). Estimated rates of definite aortic events within 1 year were 5.5%, 7.2%, and 9.3% for aortic diameters of 50, 55, and 60 mm, respectively. Receiver-operating characteristic curves for discriminating aortic events were higher for indexed aortic sizes referenced by body size (area under the curve=0.832-0.889) but not significantly different from absolute maximal aortic diameter (area under the curve=0.805). Aortic size was the principal factor related to aortic events in unrepaired descending thoracic or thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm. Although the risk of aortic events started to increase with a diameter >5.0 to 5.5 cm, it is uncertain whether repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms in this range leads to overall benefit, and the threshold for repair requires further evaluation. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Role of Cardiac CT Before Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI).

    PubMed

    Marwan, Mohamed; Achenbach, Stephan

    2016-02-01

    Catheter-based aortic valve implantation is increasingly being performed in high-risk patients with symptomatic aortic valve stenosis. For successful planning of the procedure, CT has been shown to provide crucial information concerning the aortic root as well as the peripheral access vessels. This article illustrates the increasing role of CT before transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

  10. Improved technique of transapical aortic valve implantation: "the Berlin addition".

    PubMed

    Pasic, Miralem; Dreysse, Stephan; Drews, Thorsten; Buz, Semih; Unbehaun, Axel; Kukucka, Marian; Mladenow, Alexandar; Hetzer, Roland

    2010-06-01

    Transapical aortic valve implantation carries some degree of uncertainty regarding the definitive valve position. We added angiographic visualization of the aortic root while the prosthetic valve is being slowly deployed. It enables easy correction of the position of the valve so that perfect alignment can be achieved of the relationships between the prosthetic valve, aortic valve annulus, aortic cusps, and the coronary arteries.

  11. Aortic valve and ascending aortic root modeling from 3D and 3D+t CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grbic, Saša; Ionasec, Razvan I.; Zäuner, Dominik; Zheng, Yefeng; Georgescu, Bogdan; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2010-02-01

    Aortic valve disorders are the most frequent form of valvular heart disorders (VHD) affecting nearly 3% of the global population. A large fraction among them are aortic root diseases, such as aortic root aneurysm, often requiring surgical procedures (valve-sparing) as a treatment. Visual non-invasive assessment techniques could assist during pre-selection of adequate patients, planning procedures and afterward evaluation of the same. However state of the art approaches try to model a rather short part of the aortic root, insufficient to assist the physician during intervention planning. In this paper we propose a novel approach for morphological and functional quantification of both the aortic valve and the ascending aortic root. A novel physiological shape model is introduced, consisting of the aortic valve root, leaflets and the ascending aortic root. The model parameters are hierarchically estimated using robust and fast learning-based methods. Experiments performed on 63 CT sequences (630 Volumes) and 20 single phase CT volumes demonstrated an accuracy of 1.45mm and an performance of 30 seconds (3D+t) for this approach. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time a complete model of the aortic valve (including leaflets) and the ascending aortic root, estimated from CT, has been proposed.

  12. Nontraumatic avulsion of aortic valve commissure as a cause of acute aortic valve regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Rei-Yeuh; Chen, Chien-Chang; Hsu, Wei-Pang; Hsiao, Pei-Ching; Tsai, Han-Lin; Hsiao, Ping-Gune; Wu, Jiann-Der; Guo, How-Ran

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Avulsion of the aortic valve commissure as a cause of acute aortic valve regurgitation is mostly due to trauma, infective endocarditis, or ascending aortic dissection. Nontraumatic avulsion of the aortic valve commissure is very rare. We reviewed the literature and analyzed potential risk factors of nontraumatic avulsion. Case presentation: An 80-year-old male with hypertension was seen in the emergency department with acute onset dyspnea. Echocardiogram revealed left ventricular hypertrophy with adequate systolic function, prolapse of the noncoronary cusp, and incomplete coaptation of the right coronary and noncoronary cusps with severe aortic valve regurgitation. Surgery revealed an avulsion between the left coronary and noncoronary cusps. Histopathology examination of the aortic valve showed myxoid degeneration, fibrosis, and calcification. Examination of the ascending aorta revealed myxoid degeneration and fragmentation of elastic fibers. Aortic valve replacement was performed, and the patient was alive and well 4 years after surgery. A review of the literature showed that more than three-fourths of the similar cases occurred in males, and about half in patients with hypertension and those 60 years of age or older. Conclusions: In the case of acute aortic regurgitation without a history of trauma, infection, or valvotomy, when 2 prolapsed aortic cusps are observed by echocardiography in the absence of an intimal tear of the ascending aorta, an avulsion of the aortic commissure should be suspected, especially in males with hypertension who are 60 years of age or older. PMID:27749570

  13. The association between aortic regurgitation and undetermined embolic infarction with aortic complex plaque.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Won; Cho, Jung Sun; Cho, Jae Yeong; Kim, Kye Hun; Sun, Byung Joo; Park, Jae-Hyeong

    2017-01-01

    Background Retrograde embolism from the descending thoracic aorta is one possible cause of undetermined ischemic stroke. Significant aortic regurgitation can increase the amount of reversed flow in the thoracic aorta and thus is associated with an increased incidence of stroke. Aims This study aimed to examine the association between significant aortic regurgitation and undetermined embolic infarction with aortic complex plaques. Methods This study included 380 patients with undetermined embolic stroke who did not have abnormal flow such as atrial septal defect, patent foramen ovale determined by agitated saline bubble test, intracardiac thrombi on transesophageal echocardiography, atrial fibrillation, or small vessel stroke, cerebral artery, and carotid stenosis on the brain magnetic resonance imaging. The patients were divided into the complex aortic plaques group (n = 63), which was defined as having plaque with >4 mm in thickness, ulceration, or high mobility, and the no complex aortic plaques group (n = 317). Results Transesophageal echocardiography with a bubble study, brain MRI, and laboratory tests were performed for all subjects. Significant aortic regurgitation was more prevalent in patients with undetermined embolic stroke and complex aortic plaques than in patients without complex aortic plaques (adjusted OR = 4.981; 95% CI = 1.323-18.876, P = 0.028). In addition, the distribution of complex aortic plaques according to the severity of aortic regurgitation in patients with undetermined embolic stroke had a tendency toward the ascending thoracic aorta and proximal aortic arch. Conclusions Significant aortic regurgitation may affect undetermined embolic stroke in patients with complex aortic plaques.

  14. Aortic disease in patients with Marfan syndrome: aortic volume assessment for surveillance.

    PubMed

    den Hartog, Alexander W; Franken, Romy; de Witte, Piet; Radonic, Teodora; Marquering, Henk A; van der Steen, Wessel E; Timmermans, Janneke; Scholte, Arthur J; van den Berg, Maarten P; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Mulder, Barbara J M; Groenink, Maarten

    2013-11-01

    To assess the reproducibility of aortic volume estimates and to serially test their use in patients with Marfan syndrome. The study was approved by the medical ethics committee and all subjects gave written informed consent. In 81 patients with Marfan syndrome and seven healthy control subjects, aortic volumes and diameters at baseline were estimated by means of contrast material-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. At 3 years of follow-up, aortic expansion rate were calculated in a subgroup of 22 patients with Marfan syndrome. Total aortic volume was defined as volume measurement from the level of the aortic annulus to the aortic bifurcation. Intra- and interobserver agreement of aortic volume were calculated by using the intraclass correlation coefficient. Differences in variables were analyzed with the Student t test and logistic regression. Effect size was calculated. Intra- and interobserver agreement of aortic volume calculation was 0.996 and 0.980, respectively. Mean aortic volume was significantly greater in patients with Marfan syndrome than in control subjects (104 mL/m(2); 95% confidence interval [CI]: 95, 114 mL/m(2) vs 74 mL/m(2); 95% CI: 62, 87 mL/m(2); P < .001). In 22 patients with Marfan syndrome, mean aortic volume was increased at 3 years of follow-up (17 mL; 95% CI: 8, 26 mL; P = .001; effect size, 0.29), while mean aortic diameter did not increase significantly (0.4 mm; 95% CI: 0.0, 0.9 mm; P = .171; effect size, 0.13). Assessment of aortic volume is highly reproducible and may be suited for use in the detection of aortic expansion in patients with Marfan syndrome. http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.13122310/-/DC1. RSNA, 2013

  15. High pacing rates for management of aortic insufficiency after balloon aortic valvuloplasty or transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Ali, Omar; Salinger, Michael H; Levisay, Justin P; Feldman, Ted

    2014-01-01

    Aortic insufficiency (AI) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is difficult to manage when associated with congestive heart failure. AI after balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) may be catastrophic, especially in patients who are not candidates for TAVR. We describe the use of urgent temporary pacing, followed by permanent pacing, to increase the heart rate to diminish diastolic filling time for the short term management of AI after BAV or TAVR. The strategy is particularly useful in patients who already have permanent pacemakers, which are common in this population.

  16. Long-Term Risk for Aortic Complications After Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients With Bicuspid Aortic Valve Versus Marfan Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Itagaki, Shinobu; Chikwe, Joanna P; Chiang, Yuting P; Egorova, Natalia N; Adams, David H

    2015-06-09

    Bicuspid aortic valves are associated with valve dysfunction, ascending aortic aneurysm and dissection. Management of the ascending aorta at the time of aortic valve replacement (AVR) in these patients is controversial and has been extrapolated from experience with Marfan syndrome, despite the absence of comparative long-term outcome data. This study sought to assess whether the natural history of thoracic aortopathy after AVR in patients with bicuspid aortic valve disease is substantially different from that seen in patients with Marfan syndrome. In this retrospective comparison, outcomes of 13,205 adults (2,079 with bicuspid aortic valves, 73 with Marfan syndrome, and 11,053 control patients with acquired aortic valve disease) who underwent primary AVR without replacement of the ascending aorta in New York State between 1995 and 2010 were compared. The median follow-up time was 6.6 years. The long-term incidence of thoracic aortic dissection was significantly higher in patients with Marfan syndrome (5.5 ± 2.7%) compared with those with bicuspid valves (0.55 ± 0.21%) and control group patients (0.41 ± 0.08%, p < 0.001). Thoracic aortic aneurysms were significantly more likely to be diagnosed in late follow-up in patients with Marfan syndrome (10.8 ± 4.4%) compared with those with bicuspid valves (4.8 ± 0.8%) and control group patients (1.4 ± 0.2%) (p < 0.001). Patients with Marfan syndrome were significantly more likely to undergo thoracic aortic surgery in late follow-up (10.4 ± 4.3%) compared with those with bicuspid valves (2.5 ± 0.6%) and control group patients (0.50 ± 0.09%) (p < 0.001). The much higher long-term rates of aortic complications after AVR observed in patients with Marfan syndrome compared with those with bicuspid aortic valves confirm that operative management of patients with bicuspid aortic valves should not be extrapolated from Marfan syndrome and support discrete treatment algorithms for these different clinical entities

  17. Severe Aortic Coarctation in a 75-Year-Old Woman: Total Simultaneous Repair of Aortic Coarctation and Severe Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ju Hyun; Song, Sung Gook; Kim, Jeong Su; Park, Yong Hyun; Kim, Jun; Choo, Ki Seuk; Kim, June Hong; Lee, Sang Kwon

    2012-01-01

    Aortic coarctation is usually diagnosed and repaired in childhood and early adulthood. Survival of a patient with an uncorrected coarctation to more than 70 years of age is extremely unusual, and management strategies for these cases remain controversial. We present a case of a 75-year-old woman who was first diagnosed with aortic coarctation and severe aortic valve stenosis 5 years ago and who underwent a successful one-stage repair involving valve replacement and insertion of an extra-anatomical bypass graft from the ascending to the descending aorta. PMID:22363387

  18. Lipedema is associated with increased aortic stiffness.

    PubMed

    Szolnoky, G; Nemes, A; Gavallér, H; Forster, T; Kemény, L

    2012-06-01

    Lipedema is a disproportional obesity due to unknown pathomechanism. Its major hallmark is frequent hematoma formation related to increased capillary fragility and reduced venoarterial reflex. Beyond microangiopathy, both venous and lymphatic dysfunction have also been documented. However, arterial circulation in lipedema has not been examined, and therefore we explored aortic elastic properties by echocardiography. Fourteen women with and 14 without lipedema were included in the study. Each subject consented to blood pressure measurement, physical examination, and transthoracic echocardiography. Aortic stiffness index (beta), distensibility, and strain were evaluated from aortic diameter and blood pressure data. Mean systolic (30.0 +/- 3.2 vs. 25.5 +/- 3.6, P < 0.05) and diastolic (27.8 +/- 3.3 vs. 22.3 +/- 3.1) aortic diameters (in mm) and aortic stiffness index (9.05 +/- 7.45 vs. 3.76 +/- 1.22, P < 0.05) were significantly higher, while aortic strain (0.082 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.143 +/- 0.038, P < 0.05) and distensibility (2.24 +/- 1.07 vs. 4.38 +/- 1.61, P < 0.05) were significantly lower in lipedematous patients compared to controls. Thus, lipedema is characterized with increased aortic stiffness.

  19. Repair for acquired aortic valve disease.

    PubMed

    Antunes, M J

    1996-10-01

    The favorable results of mitral valvuloplasty when compared with valve replacement have renewed the interest of many surgeons in aortic valve repair. However, these efforts have, for the most part, been unsuccessful. Also, the results of aortic valve replacement are usually better than those of mitral valve replacement. Yet, some patients appear to derive benefit from a conservative aortic valve procedure. The best examples are mild or moderate aortic valve disease associated with mitral valve or coronary artery disease, which constitute the primary indication for operation, where "prophylactic" aortic valve replacement does not appear justifiable. Other possible indications for aortic valvuloplasty includes patient's lack of compliance or contraindication to anticoagulation in young patients. Senile aortic stenosis, in very old patients with a small annulus, preserved leaflet morphology and nonsignificant commissural fusion should be considered for repair. However, since the procedure is not easily reproducible and the results not uniformly predictable, it cannot be recommended for generalized use. Nonetheless, experienced surgeons should be encouraged to continue these efforts.

  20. Aortic Stenosis and Vascular Calcifications in Alkaptonuria

    PubMed Central

    Hannoush, Hwaida; Introne, Wendy J.; Chen, Marcus Y.; Lee, Sook-Jin; O'Brien, Kevin; Suwannarat, Pim; Kayser, Michael A.; Gahl, William A.; Sachdev, Vandana

    2011-01-01

    Alkaptonuria is a rare metabolic disorder of tyrosine catabolism in which homogentisic acid (HGA) accumulates and is deposited throughout the spine, large joints, cardiovascular system, and various tissues throughout the body. In the cardiovascular system, pigment deposition has been described in the heart valves, endocardium, pericardium, aortic intima and coronary arteries. The prevalence of cardiovascular disease in patients with alkaptonuria varies in previous reports . We present a series of 76 consecutive adult patients with alkaptonuria who underwent transthoracic echocardiography between 2000 and 2009. A subgroup of 40 patients enrolled in a treatment study underwent non-contrast CT scans and these were assessed for vascular calcifications. Six of the 76 patients had aortic valve replacement. In the remaining 70 patients, 12 patients had aortic sclerosis and 7 patients had aortic stenosis. Unlike degenerative aortic valve disease, we found no correlation with standard cardiac risk factors. There was a modest association between the severity of aortic valve disease and joint involvement, however, we saw no correlation with urine HGA levels. Vascular calcifications were seen in the coronaries, cardiac valves, aortic root, descending aorta and iliac arteries. These findings suggest an important role for echocardiographic screening of alkaptonuria patients to detect valvular heart disease and cardiac CT to detect coronary artery calcifications. PMID:22100375

  1. Medical management of thoracic aortic aneurysm disease.

    PubMed

    Braverman, Alan C

    2013-03-01

    The patient with thoracic aortic aneurysm disease requires careful evaluation and management over his or her lifetime. This includes assessment for the presence of an underlying genetic disorder, such as Marfan syndrome, bicuspid aortic valve disease, or a familial aortic aneurysm syndrome. Screening family members is necessary, inasmuch as up to 20% of first-degree relatives of the patient with a thoracic aortic aneurysm will also have aneurysm disease. Medical therapy is often prescribed, and beta-blocker therapy to reduce the stress on the aortic wall is usually recommended. However, very few clinical trials of pharmacologic therapy in humans with thoracic aortic aneurysm disease have been conducted. Mouse models have led to important discoveries and insight into the pathogenesis of aneurysm syndromes, and there is hope these may lead to effective therapy in people. Several studies are ongoing that examine the role of angiotensin receptor blockers in Marfan syndrome. Lifestyle modification is also important for patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm, including restrictions on physical activity, weight lifting, and recommendations about the management of pregnancy. Long-term surveillance of the aorta, even after successful surgery, is necessary for timing of prophylactic surgery and to evaluate for late complications. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Age and Aortic Diameters in Pilots.

    PubMed

    Akın, Ahmet; Ozturk, Cengiz; Aparci, Mustafa; Cakmak, Tolga; Metin, Suleyman; Balta, Sevket; Sen, Ahmet

    2015-12-01

    Pilots are exposed to various physical and hemodynamic stresses during flight. Aortic dilatation may be one of the important consequences of flight-related stress. In this study, we evaluated whether or not variation in aortic diameter was associated with the type of aircraft and the age of pilots. Medical records of 87 jet aircraft pilots (JP) (mean age = 30.0 ± 7.0 years) and 65 non-jet aircraft pilots (NJP) (mean age = 32.63 ± 5.7) were reviewed. Echocardiographic diameters of the aortic sinus (AoS) and ascending aorta (AoAsc) were measured using standard echo probe positions. Aortic diameters were not statistically different between JP and NJP. Regression analysis revealed that the diameters of the AoS (R = 0.484, R(2) = 0.234, p < 0.001) and AoAsc (R = 0.514, R(2) = 0.264, p < 0.001) were significantly associated with age in the JP group. Whereas, there was not any relationship found between age and the diameters of the AoS and AoAsc in the NJP group. Jet pilots had aortic enlargement as they became older in contrast to the NJP group. Although the aortic diameters were not within the critical ranges in the JP group, these results could suggest that flight-related stresses might result in acute aortic syndromes in the long term. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  3. Neonatal aortic thrombosis: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Nagel, K; Tuckuviene, R; Paes, B; Chan, A K

    2010-05-01

    Neonatal aortic thrombosis is a rare occurrence, but can be fatal. Treatment of this condition is hampered by the lack of large studies involving this pediatric population. Reporting of this condition is also not standardized. The purpose of this review is to collate available literature on the incidence, risk factors, presentation, treatment and outcome of neonatal aortic thrombosis as well as suggest a treatment model. A Medline search of PubMed, OVID and Cochrane databases was undertaken using the key words "neonatal", "infant", "aorta", "aortic", "thrombosis", "thrombus" and "clot". Limits were set for articles that were English language only and published between 1980 and September 2009. Following review of all articles using predetermined search words and criteria, 38 were found with sufficient data for our purpose. The reported total number of neonatal patients with aortic thrombosis was 148 and 78% of the aortic thromboses in this review were related to arterial umbilical catheterization. We have suggested a classification system to standardize reporting of neonatal aortic thrombosis, as well as a treatment decision tree, and a clinical guide for the treatment of thrombosis in children. As always, clinicians should balance the risks and benefits of their decision to treat with the level of local expertise. This guide may specifically serve the neonatal population with line-related aortic thrombosis.

  4. Concealed primary aortic sarcoma induced hypertensive encephalopathy resulting from a thoracic aortic occlusion: a case report.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyunmin; Yoon, Hee-Jeoung; Jang, Woo-Ik; Kim, Chang-Young; Doh, Joon-Hyung

    2013-04-18

    Primary aortic sarcoma is a rare condition that is frequently associated with distal embolization. In addition, growth characteristics of primary aortic sarcoma lead to the narrowing of the involved aortic lumen. A 72-year-old Korean male with primary aortic sarcoma showed progressive unexplained blood pressure elevation that didn't improve with additional antihypertensive drug therapy. Because follow-up measures were not taken, the patient ultimately developed hypertensive encephalopathy with concurrent embolic dissemination. Although we successfully performed open transcatheter embolectomy in both legs, the patient died because of multiple organ failure 3 days after surgery. Given the ominous prognosis for this condition, this case report highlights the fact that the value of early detection and prompt evaluation of altered vital signs should not be overemphasized. We describe a rare case of primary aortic sarcoma that showed hypertensive encephalopathy caused by thoracic aortic occlusion and also had embolic metastases to the lower extremities.

  5. Left coronary ostial obstruction after aortic valve replacement with a supra-annular aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Kanji; Unno, Hideya; Konishi, Taisuke; Shigeta, Osamu

    2006-05-01

    We report a rare case of left coronary ostial obstruction after aortic valve replacement with a Top Hat supra-annular aortic valve, which was diagnosed with intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography and successfully treated with an unplanned coronary bypass. The patient was a 76-year-old woman (height 143 cm, weight 44 kg) with aortic stenosis and regurgitation. A 19-mm Top Hat valve was implanted in the supra-annular position because of a small aortic annulus. There was a possibility that the high profile of this prosthesis might block the left coronary ostium. There may be a problem with the use of this prosthesis in patients with small and rigid aortic roots with little compliance. Although the Top Hat valve has a great advantage for small aortic annuli, care in its use should be taken due to possible interference with the coronary ostia.

  6. CT diagnosis of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, A.; Korobkin, M.; Silverman, P.M.; Moore, A.V. Jr.; Dunnick, N.R.

    1984-08-01

    Abdominal computed tomography was performed in six patients with suspected ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm but in whom an alternate clinical diagnosis was seriously considered. In each patient, a large aortic aneurysm was demonstrated in association with a retroperitoneal accumulation of high-density blood. The retroperitoneal blood was primarily confined to the extracapsular perinephric space. In four of the six patients, a focal area of the aortic wall was indistinct on the side of the retroperitoneal hemorrhage at the presumed site of rupture. Five of the six patients underwent emergency surgery, which confirmed the site of aneurysm, presence of rupture and the location of fresh retroperitoneal blood.

  7. Bacillus cereus endocarditis in native aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Ngow, H A; Wan Khairina, W M N

    2013-02-01

    Bacillus cereus endocarditis is rare. It has been implicated in immunocompromised individuals, especially in intravenous drug users as well as in those with a cardiac prosthesis. The patient was a 31-year-old ex-intravenous drug addict with a past history of staphylococcal pulmonary valve endocarditis, who presented with symptoms of decompensated cardiac failure. Echocardiography showed severe aortic regurgitation with an oscillating vegetation seen on the right coronary cusp of the aortic valve. The blood cultures grew Bacillus cereus. We report this as a rare case of Bacillus cereus endocarditis affecting a native aortic valve.

  8. Aortic root abscess presenting as alternating bundle branch block: Infective endocarditis of bicuspid aortic valve

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rakesh; Kader, Muneer; Sajeev, C.G.; Krishnan, M.N.

    2015-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve is the most common congenital cardiac malformation, affecting 1%–2% of the population. Among various complications, incidence of infective endocarditis (IE) in the bicuspid aortic valve population is high with higher rate of periannular extension resulting in conduction disturbances. Here we are reporting a rare case of infective endocarditis of bicuspid aortic valve presented with alternating bundle branch block. PMID:26138186

  9. Structural valve deterioration after aortic valve replacement with Medtronic freestyle stentless porcine aortic root bioprostheses.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Hidefumi; Komiya, Tatsuhiko; Sakaguchi, Genichi; Shimamoto, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    The Medtronic freestyle aortic root bioprosthesis (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA) is a stentless valve with an effective orifice area that is larger than that observed on other bioprostheses. However, there have been sporadic reports of structural valve deterioration (SVD), such as aortic root wall rupture, leaflet tearing, and pseudoaneurysm formation. We report five cases of SVD of freestyle aortic root bioprostheses. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Cardiac Surgery Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Acute Type B Aortic Dissection in a Patient with Previous Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Hun; Rha, Seung-Woon

    2017-01-01

    Endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) was relatively safe, and became a widely performed procedure. If aortic dissection (AD) occurred in patient with previous EVAR, it could cause fatal complications like endograft collapse. Surgical treatment was limited in this situation for comorbidities and complex anatomies. Here we report a rare case of acute type B AD developed following trans-radial coronary intervention in a patient with previous EVAR of abdominal aortic aneurysm, which was treated with thoracic EVAR. PMID:28377913

  11. Simulations of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation – Implications for Aortic Root Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Kodali, Susheel; Primiano, Charles; Sun, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Aortic root rupture is one of the most severe complications of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The mechanism of this adverse event remains mostly unknown. The purpose of this study was to obtain a better understanding of the biomechanical interaction between the tissue and stent for patients with a high risk of aortic rupture. Methods We simulated the stent deployment process of three TAVI patients with high aortic rupture risk using finite element method. The first case was a retrospective analysis of an aortic rupture case, while the other two cases were prospective studies, which ended with one cancelled procedure and one successful TAVI. Simulation results were evaluated for the risk of aortic root rupture, as well as coronary artery occlusion, and paravalvular leak. Results For Case 1, the simulated aortic rupture location was the same as clinical observations. From the simulation results, it can be seen that the large calcified spot on the interior of the left coronary sinus between coronary ostium and the aortic annulus was pushed by the stent, causing the aortic rupture. For Case 2 and Case 3, predicated results from the simulations were presented to the clinicians at pre-procedure meetings; and they were in agreement with clinician’s observations and decisions. Conclusions Our results indicated that the engineering analysis could provide additional information to help clinicians evaluate complicated, high risk aortic rupture cases. Since a systematic study of a large patient cohort of aortic rupture is currently not available (due to the low occurrence rate) to clearly understand underlying rupture mechanisms, case by case engineering analysis is recommended for evaluating patient-specific aortic rupture risk. PMID:24736808

  12. Temporal changes of aortic neck morphology in abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Propper, Brandon W; Rasmussen, Todd E; Jones, W Tracey; Gifford, Shaun M; Burkhardt, Gabriel E; Clouse, W Darrin

    2010-05-01

    This study characterized temporal changes in the infrarenal aortic aneurysm neck in patients with small, untreated abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Patients with infrarenal AAA who had contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scans separated by >6 months were identified and their images reviewed. Infrarenal neck diameter and length were measured along with aneurysm diameter. Comparisons between the interval CT scans were made and analysis of factors affecting neck changes performed. Sixty patients met inclusion criteria with an imaging interval of 3.8 years (median, 3.4 years; range, 0.75-9.6 years). During the interval, there was an increase in proximal and distal neck diameters of 1.1 mm (SD, 2.2) (0.28 mm/y) and 1.0 mm (SD, 3.0) (0.26 mm/y), respectively. During the same interval, the neck length decreased by 4 mm (SD, 11) (1 mm/y). A neck length of <15 mm was present in 10 patients (17%) at the initial imaging. Four of the remaining 50 patients experienced an interval decrease in neck length to <15 mm, all of whom had initial lengths of 15 to 20 mm. Medications had no association with changes in neck morphology; however, diabetes correlated with a slower rate of neck shortening (P = .001). The natural history of the aneurysm neck is one of expansion and shortening that will not affect most patients under surveillance. Patients with marginal neck lengths (range, 15-20 mm) at the initial imaging are more likely to experience loss of neck length that may negatively affect endovascular suitability. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  13. Stent graft implantation in an aortic pseudoaneurysm associated with a fractured Cheatham-Platinum stent in aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Kuhelj, Dimitrij; Berden, Pavel; Podnar, Tomaž

    2016-03-01

    We report a case of aortic pseudoaneurysm associated with a fractured bare Cheatham-Platinum stent following stenting for aortic coarctation. These complications were recognised 6 years after the implantation procedure and were successfully managed by percutaneous stent graft implantation. Staged approach for stent dilatation might prevent development of aortic pseudoaneurysms. In addition, careful follow-up is warranted after stenting for aortic coarctation, particularly in patients with recognised aortic wall injury.

  14. Heparin-Induced-Thrombocytopenia Causing Massive Aortic Thrombosis after Ascending Aortic Replacement for Type A Acute Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Imoto, Kiyotaka; Uchida, Keiji; Isoda, Susumu; Karube, Norihisa; Yasuda, Shota; Masuda, Munetaka

    2016-01-01

    A 77-year-old woman underwent emergency ascending aortic replacement for type A acute aortic dissection. Fifteen days after the operation, she had motor and sensory disturbances in the lower limbs. Computed tomography revealed multiple aortic thrombi and disrupted blood flow in the right external iliac and left common iliac arteries. She underwent an emergency thrombectomy for acute limb ischemia. Because heparin- induced-thrombocytopenia (HIT) was suspected to have caused the multiple aortic thrombi, we postoperatively changed the anticoagulant therapy from heparin to argatroban. Seventeen days after the first operation, gastrointestinal bleeding developed, and the patient died of mesenteric ischemia caused by HIT. Arterial embolization caused by HIT after cardiovascular surgery is a rare, but fatal event. To avoid fatal complications, early diagnosis and early treatment are essential. Use of a scoring system would probably facilitate early diagnosis. PMID:26780951

  15. Patient-prosthesis mismatch: surgical aortic valve replacement versus transcatheter aortic valve replacement in high risk patients with aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kron, Irving L.

    2016-01-01

    Patient prosthesis mismatch (PPM) can occur when a prosthetic aortic valve has an effective orifice area (EOA) less than that of a native valve. A recent study by Zorn and colleagues evaluated the incidence and significance of PPM in high risk patients with severe aortic stenosis who were randomized to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). TAVR is associated with decreased incidence of severe PPM compared to traditional SAVR valves. Severe PPM increases risk for death at 1 year postoperatively in high risk patients. The increased incidence of PPM is largely due to differences in valve design and should encourage development of newer SAVR valves to reduce risk for PPM. In addition more vigorous approaches to root enlargement in small annulus should be performed with SAVR to prevent PPM. PMID:27867654

  16. Patient-prosthesis mismatch: surgical aortic valve replacement versus transcatheter aortic valve replacement in high risk patients with aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Ghanta, Ravi K; Kron, Irving L

    2016-10-01

    Patient prosthesis mismatch (PPM) can occur when a prosthetic aortic valve has an effective orifice area (EOA) less than that of a native valve. A recent study by Zorn and colleagues evaluated the incidence and significance of PPM in high risk patients with severe aortic stenosis who were randomized to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) or surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). TAVR is associated with decreased incidence of severe PPM compared to traditional SAVR valves. Severe PPM increases risk for death at 1 year postoperatively in high risk patients. The increased incidence of PPM is largely due to differences in valve design and should encourage development of newer SAVR valves to reduce risk for PPM. In addition more vigorous approaches to root enlargement in small annulus should be performed with SAVR to prevent PPM.

  17. Management of concomitant large aortic aneurysm and severe stenosis of aortic arc.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shiyan; Sun, Guang; Yang, Yuguang; Liu, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Primary large saccular aortic aneurysm with high grade stenosis of aortic arc is rare, and no standard therapy is available. We have encountered one case and successfully treated using a hybrid interventional approach. A 59-year-old woman with a 7-day history of headache, dizziness and chest pain, and a 5-year history of hypertension admitted and was diagnosed with transverse aortic aneurysm with sever aortic stenosis, the huge saccular aneurysm was located behind the transverse aortic arc. During surgery, a bypass with graft from ascending aorta to left external iliac artery was made initially in order to ensure the blood supply to the left leg, afterward, a 40 mm × 160 mm covered stent was implanted to cover the orifice of aneurysm and was used as a supporting anchorage in the descending aorta, a second covered stent (20 mm × 100 mm) was implanted to expand the stenosis of aortic arc. Follow-up at 1.5-year after surgery, the patient has been doing well without any surgical complication. A collateral pathway between internal mammary artery and inferior epigastric artery via the superior epigastric artery was found on3-dimensional reconstruction before surgery. Interruption of the compensatory arterial collateral pathway in the patient with severe stenosis of aortic arc should be prevented if possible in order to ensure the satisfactory perfusion of the lower limbs of the body.In conclusion, a patient with transverse aortic aneurysm accompanied with severe aortic stenosis can be treated by hybrid surgery.

  18. [Surgery of aortic coarctation with aneurysm of the ascending aorta and aortic coronary fistula].

    PubMed

    Ben Jmaà, H; Abdennadher, M; Hadj Kacem, A; Masmoudi, S; Kammoun, S; Karoui, A; Frikha, I

    2009-11-01

    Aortic coarctation is rarely associated with an aneurysm of the ascending aorta and an aortic coronary fistula. In this study, we report the case of a 52-year-old man undergoing surgery for an isthmic coarctation who also had an aneurysm of the initial portion of the aorta and an aortic coronary fistula. The diagnosis was clinically suspected and confirmed by vascular catheterism. The first operative stage consisted of treating the coarctation. The second stage was performed two months later to remove the aneurysm and replace the ascending aorta and the aortic valve with a prosthesis. The coronary arteries were then reimplanted. The postoperative results were quite favourable.

  19. Management of Traumatic Aortic and Splenic Rupture in a Patient With Ascending Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Topcu, Ahmet Can; Ciloglu, Ufuk; Bolukcu, Ahmet; Dagsali, Sabri

    2016-08-01

    Traumatic aortic rupture is rupture of all or part of the aortic wall, mostly resulting from blunt trauma to the chest. The most common site of rupture is the aortic isthmus. Traumatic rupture of the ascending aorta is rare. A 62-year-old man with a family history of ascending aortic aneurysm was referred to our hospital after a motor vehicle accident. He had symptoms of cardiogenic shock. A contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan revealed rupture of the proximal ascending aorta and an ascending aortic aneurysm with a diameter of 55 mm at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva. Transthoracic echocardiography at the bedside revealed severe aortic valvular insufficiency. We performed a successful Bentall procedure. During postoperative recovery, the patient experienced a cerebrovascular accident. Transesophageal echocardiography did not reveal thrombosis of the mechanical prosthesis. The patient's symptoms resolved in time, and he was discharged from the hospital on postoperative day 47 without any sequelae. He has been symptom free during a 6-month follow-up period. We suggest that individuals who have experienced blunt trauma to the chest and have symptoms of traumatic aortic rupture and a known medical history of ascending aortic aneurysm should be evaluated for a rupture at the ascending aorta and the aortic isthmus.

  20. Liverpool Aortic Surgery Symposium V: New Frontiers in Aortic Disease and Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Mohamad; Fok, Matthew; Shaw, Matthew; Field, Mark; Kuduvalli, Manoj; Desmond, Michael; Harrington, Deborah; Rashid, Abbas; Oo, Aung

    2014-06-01

    Aortic aneurysm disease is a complex condition that requires a multidisciplinary approach in management. The innovation and collaboration among vascular surgery, cardiothoracic surgery, interventional radiology, and other related specialties is essential for progress in the management of aortic aneurysms. The Fifth Liverpool Aortic Surgery Symposium that was held in May 2013 aimed at bringing national and international experts from across the United Kingdom and the globe to deliver their thoughts, applications, and advances in aortic and vascular surgery. In this report, we present a selected short synopsis of the key topics presented at this symposium.

  1. The significance of aortic valve calcification in patients with bicuspid aortic valve disease.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xinshuang; Zhang, Minghui; Liu, Kun; Hou, Zhihui; Gao, Yang; Yin, Weihua; Wang, Zhiqiang; Li, Zhennan; Lu, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is a common congenital heart disease. Our study was to analyze clinical features of BAV and evaluate whether aortic valve calcium score (AVCS) was a reliable marker for aortic stenosis (AS) in patients with BAV. 101 patients with BAV who both underwent echocardiology and cardiac computed tomography (CT) scan in our institution were included. Basic clinical data, haemodynamic feature, aortic valve and coronary calcium score were collected and compared among patients with different valve function and different degree of AS. Risk factors related to severe AS were evaluated by logistic regression, and a receiver operative characteristic curve was used to determine the cutoff calcium score greater than which the diagnosis of severe AS was optimized. Patients with aortic regurgitation (AR) were younger and demonstrated larger aortic annulus and sinus compared with patients with other valve dysfunction. Aortic valve calcium score was higher in patients with AS than with AR. For patients with different degree of AS, there were statistical significances in the value of age, aortic valve calcium score and coronary calcium score. AVCS was positively related to severe AS with an odd ratio of 1.286 (95% CI 1.099-1.504) by every 300 points increase. AVCS was also a strong predictor for severe AS with area under the curve 0.855 with a cutoff value of 897 (sensitivity 86.7%, specificity 72.2%). Conclusively, aortic calcium score calculated by quantitative CT is a reliable marker in evaluating severity of AS.

  2. Emergency Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation for Acute and Early Failure of Sutureless Perceval Aortic Valve.

    PubMed

    Durand, Eric; Tron, Christophe; Eltchaninoff, Hélène

    2015-09-01

    We report the case of a 78-year-old woman admitted for cardiogenic shock related to acute and early failure (severe aortic regurgitation) of a Perceval sutureless aortic bioprosthesis (Sorin Group, Saluggia, Italy). Clinical stability was achieved using rescue transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve-in-valve implantation with an Edwards SAPIEN 3 prosthesis (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA). To our knowledge, we report herein the first case of successful valve-in-valve implantation using a SAPIEN 3 transcatheter heart valve in a sutureless bioprosthetic aortic valve with acute and early deterioration.

  3. Liverpool Aortic Surgery Symposium V: New Frontiers in Aortic Disease and Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Mohamad; Fok, Matthew; Shaw, Matthew; Field, Mark; Kuduvalli, Manoj; Desmond, Michael; Harrington, Deborah; Rashid, Abbas; Oo, Aung

    2014-01-01

    Aortic aneurysm disease is a complex condition that requires a multidisciplinary approach in management. The innovation and collaboration among vascular surgery, cardiothoracic surgery, interventional radiology, and other related specialties is essential for progress in the management of aortic aneurysms. The Fifth Liverpool Aortic Surgery Symposium that was held in May 2013 aimed at bringing national and international experts from across the United Kingdom and the globe to deliver their thoughts, applications, and advances in aortic and vascular surgery. In this report, we present a selected short synopsis of the key topics presented at this symposium. PMID:26798724

  4. Hybrid Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair for Intercostal Patch Aneurysm after Thoracoabdominal Aortic Replacement.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, Hiroto; Yoshitake, Akihiro; Hachiya, Takashi; Okamoto, Kazuma; Hirano, Akinori; Kasai, Mio; Akamatsu, Yuta; Oka, Hidetoshi; Shimizu, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of hybrid thoracic endovascular aortic repair for intercostal patch aneurysm after thoracoabdominal aortic replacement. Eighteen years ago, a 63-year-old woman with Marfan syndrome had undergone thoracoabdominal aortic replacement with reimplantation of the intercostal artery in an island fashion. Follow-up computed tomography (CT) revealed a remaining intercostal patch aneurysm of diameter 60 mm 17 years after the last operation. Hybrid thoracic endovascular aortic repair for exclusion of this intercostal patch aneurysm was successfully performed, with visceral artery bypasses. Postoperative CT showed no anastomotic stenosis or endoleak.

  5. Management of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Dehlin, Jennifer M; Upchurch, Gilbert R

    2005-06-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are a lethal disease. Ultrasound is the modality of choice for screening patients for AAAs. It is reasonable to screen patients over age 60, particularly men, women with cardiovascular risk factors, smokers, and patients with a family history of AAAs. Patients with small (< 5.5 cm) AAAs should be followed with serial ultrasound. Medical management should focus on treating comorbidities, particularly those that put patients at risk for other cardiovascular diseases. Smoking cessation is mandatory in these patients. Patients with large or symptomatic AAAs should be evaluated for surgery; this includes careful imaging of the abdomen, aggressive treatment of comorbidities, and perioperative beta blockade. Endovascular repair has lower short-term morbidity compared with conventional open repair. Trials assessing long-term results are in progress. Basic science and translational research focusing on the underlying pathogenesis of AAAs will likely pave the way for medical therapies in the future.

  6. Abdominal aortic aneurysms in women

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Ruby C.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) has long been recognized as a condition predominantly afflicting males, with sex-associated differences described for almost every aspect of the disease from pathophysiology and epidemiology to morbidity and mortality. Women are generally spared from AAA formation by the immunomodulating effects of estrogen but once they develop, the natural history of AAAs in women appears to be more aggressive, with more rapid expansion, a higher tendency to rupture at smaller diameters, and higher mortality following rupture. However, simply repairing AAA at smaller diameters in women is a debatable solution, as even elective endovascular AAA repair (EVAR) is fraught with higher morbidity and mortality in women compared to men. The goal of this review is to summarize what is currently known about the effect of gender on AAA presentation, treatment, and outcomes. Additionally, we aim to review current controversies over screening recommendations and threshold for repair in women. PMID:26747679

  7. Surveillance after endovascular aortic repair.

    PubMed

    Zaiem, Feras; Almasri, Jehad; Tello, Mouaffaa; Prokop, Larry J; Chaikof, Elliot L; Murad, Mohammad Hassan

    2017-06-26

    The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the optimal modality and frequency of surveillance after endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) in adult patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. We searched for studies of post-EVAR surveillance in MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Scopus through May 10, 2016. The outcomes of interest were endoleaks, mortality, limb ischemia, renal complications, late rupture, and aneurysm-related mortality. Outcomes were pooled using a random-effects model and were reported as incidence rate and 95% confidence interval. Of 1099 candidate references, we included 6 meta-analyses and 52 observational studies. Complication rates were common after EVAR, particularly in the first year. Magnetic resonance imaging had a higher detection rate of endoleaks than computed tomography angiography. Doppler ultrasound had lower diagnostic accuracy, whereas contrast-enhanced ultrasound was likely to be as sensitive as computed tomography angiography. The highest endoleak detection rates were in surveillance approaches that used combined tests. There were no studies that compared different surveillance intervals to determine optimal intervals; however, most studies reported detection rates of patient-important outcomes at 1, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months. Data were insufficient to provide comparative inferences about the best strategy to reduce the risk of patient-important outcomes, such as mortality, limb ischemia, rupture, and renal complications. Several tests with reasonable diagnostic accuracy are available for surveillance after EVAR. The available evidence suggests a high complication rate, particularly in the first year, and provides a rationale for surveillance. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Computational analysis of an aortic valve jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadden, Shawn C.; Astorino, Matteo; Gerbeau, Jean-Frédéric

    2009-11-01

    In this work we employ a coupled FSI scheme using an immersed boundary method to simulate flow through a realistic deformable, 3D aortic valve model. This data was used to compute Lagrangian coherent structures, which revealed flow separation from the valve leaflets during systole, and correspondingly, the boundary between the jet of ejected fluid and the regions of separated, recirculating flow. Advantages of computing LCS in multi-dimensional FSI models of the aortic valve are twofold. For one, the quality and effectiveness of existing clinical indices used to measure aortic jet size can be tested by taking advantage of the accurate measure of the jet area derived from LCS. Secondly, as an ultimate goal, a reliable computational framework for the assessment of the aortic valve stenosis could be developed.

  9. Gallium localization in dissecting aortic aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Haden, H.T.; Lippman, H.R.

    1988-08-01

    Gallium concentration was demonstrated in a dissecting aneurysm of the aortic arch, imaged approximately 2 weeks after dissection. Concentration of gallium was apparently due to the inflammatory reaction associated with the organizing intramural hematoma.

  10. Aortic Dissection and Rupture in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Yun Ju; Lee, Eun Jeong; Oh, Jin Won; Moon, Chang Min; Cho, Deok Kyu; Cho, Yun Hyeong; Byun, Ki Hyun

    2011-01-01

    After developing sudden severe chest pain, an 11-year-old boy presented to the emergency room with chest pain and palpitations and was unable to stand up. The sudden onset of chest pain was first reported while swimming at school about 30 minutes prior to presentation. Arterial blood pressure (BP) was 150/90 mmHg, heart rate was 120/minute, and the chest pain was combined with shortness of breath and diaphoresis. During the evaluation in the emergency room, the chest pain worsened and abdominal pain developed. An aortic dissection was suspected and a chest and abdomen CT was obtained. The diagnosis of aortic dissection type B was established by CT imaging. The patient went to surgery immediately with BP control. He died prior to surgery due to aortic rupture. Here we present this rare case of aortic dissection type B with rupture, reported in an 11-year-old Korean child. PMID:21519516

  11. Understanding the pathogenesis of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kuivaniemi, Helena; Ryer, Evan J.; Elmore, James R.; Tromp, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Summary An aortic aneurysm is a dilatation in which the aortic diameter is ≥ 3.0 cm. If left untreated, the aortic wall continues to weaken and becomes unable to withstand the forces of the luminal blood pressure resulting in progressive dilatation and rupture, a catastrophic event associated with a mortality of 50 – 80%. Smoking and positive family history are important risk factors for the development of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Several genetic risk factors have also been identified. On the histological level, visible hallmarks of AAA pathogenesis include inflammation, smooth muscle cell apoptosis, extracellular matrix degradation, and oxidative stress. We expect that large genetic, genomic, epigenetic, proteomic and metabolomic studies will be undertaken by international consortia to identify additional risk factors and biomarkers, and to enhance our understanding of the pathobiology of AAA. Collaboration between different research groups will be important in overcoming the challenges to develop pharmacological treatments for AAA. PMID:26308600

  12. Minimally Invasive Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR)

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Watch a Broward Health surgeon perform a minimally invasive Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2017 BroadcastMed, Inc. ...

  13. Treating calcific aortic stenosis: an evolving science.

    PubMed

    Hull, Christine L

    2012-01-01

    Calcific aortic stenosis is a common valvular disease, but its pathophysiology remains undetermined and important considerations exist for treatment. Pathophysiology, treatment by the advanced practice nurse, and literature review are discussed in the context of a case study.

  14. Valve selection in aortic valve endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Zubrytska, Yana

    2016-01-01

    Aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) is a potentially life-threatening disease. Mortality and incidence of infective endocarditis have been reduced in the past 30 years. Medical treatment of aortic PVE may be successful in patients who have a prompt response after antibiotic treatment and who do not have prosthetic dysfunction. In advanced stages, antibiotic therapy alone is insufficient to control the disease, and surgical intervention is necessary. Surgical treatment may be lifesaving, but it is still associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. The aim of surgery is to perform a radical excision of all infected and necrotic tissue, reconstruction of the left ventricle outflow tract, and replacement of the aortic valve. There is no unanimous consensus on which is the optimal prosthesis to implant in this context, and several surgical techniques have been suggested. We aim to analyze the efficacy of the surgical treatment and discuss the issue of valve selection in patients with aortic valve endocarditis. PMID:27785132

  15. Aortic intramural hematoma: an unpredictable evolution.

    PubMed

    Ponte, Marta; Dias Ferreira, Nuno; Bettencourt, Nuno; Caeiro, Daniel; Fonseca, Marlene; Albuquerque, Aníbal; Vouga, Luís; Gama, Vasco

    2014-01-01

    Aortic intramural hematoma (IMH) is an acute aortic syndrome characterized by bleeding into the media of the aortic wall without intimal disruption or the classic flap formation. Its natural history is variable and still poorly understood, so strategies for therapeutic management are not fully established. In some cases there is partial or complete regression of the hematoma under medical treatment, but most progress to dissection, aneurysmal dilatation or aortic rupture. The authors present the case of a 44-year-old hypertensive male patient admitted with a diagnosis of IMH of the descending aorta. Despite initial symptom resolution and optimal medical therapy, the IMH evolved to a pseudoaneurysm, which was successfully treated by an endovascular approach. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Anterior longitudinal aortotomy in aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Kanji; Kudo, Yohei; Ikeda, Akihiko; Konishi, Taisuke; Jikuya, Tomoaki

    2016-02-01

    We adopted an anterior longitudinal aortotomy in some cases of aortic valve replacement (AVR), and report them here. The potential of this method is also discussed. We analyzed the data on 24 patients (75.5 ± 7.8 years of age) who had undergone AVR through anterior longitudinal aortotomy. The indications for surgery were prosthetic valve complication in 5 patients, aortic stenosis (AS) with left ventricular outflow tract stenosis (LVOTS) in 16 patients, and aortic regurgitation with moderately dilated ascending aorta in 3 patients. The Konno procedure was performed in 6 cases with small aortic annuli. A longitudinal aortotomy was made at the aortic root along the left side of the right coronary ostium, and extended beyond the right coronary annulus to the interventricular septum as needed. Bioprostheses (21.1 ± 1.7 mm) were used in 23 patients and a 21-mm mechanical valve for one (a 59-year-old man). One high-risk patient died of low output syndrome, leading to a mortality rate of 4.2 %. All other patients recovered well, though atrioventricular block occurred in 2 cases. Anterior longitudinal aortotomy provides a good field of vision at the aortic annulus and the flexibility to develop into anterior annular enlargement. Major indications for this approach are small sino-tubular junction and very small aortic annulus. This approach could be an attractive option in AVR for cases of AS with small aortic annuli and LVOTS. It could also be useful for AVR cases with moderately dilated ascending aorta requiring aortoplasty.

  17. Aortic coarctation repair in the adult.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Goncalo; Abecasis, Miguel; Anjos, Rui; Marques, Marta; Koukoulis, Giovanna; Aguiar, Carlos; Neves, José Pedro

    2014-07-01

    Aortic coarctation can be repaired surgically or percutaneously. The decision should be made according to the anatomy and location of the coarctation, age of the patient, presence of other cardiac lesions, and other anatomic determinants (extensive collaterals or aortic calcification). This article reviews the different therapeutic options available, explaining the differences between children and adults, describing different approaches to the same disease, exemplified by three cases of nonclassic surgical approach and one percutaneous treatment.

  18. Regional aortic distensibility and its relationship with age and aortic stenosis: a computed tomography study.

    PubMed

    Wong, Dennis T L; Narayan, Om; Leong, Darryl P; Bertaso, Angela G; Maia, Murilo G; Ko, Brian S H; Baillie, Timothy; Seneviratne, Sujith K; Worthley, Matthew I; Meredith, Ian T; Cameron, James D

    2015-06-01

    Aortic distensibility (AD) decreases with age and increased aortic stiffness is independently associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The association of severe aortic stenosis (AS) with AD in different aortic regions has not been evaluated. Elderly subjects with severe AS and a cohort of patients without AS of similar age were studied. Proximal aortic cross-sectional-area changes during the cardiac cycle were determined using retrospective-ECG-gating on 128-detector row computed-tomography. Using oscillometric-brachial-blood-pressure measurements, the AD at the ascending-aorta (AA), proximal-descending-aorta (PDA) and distal-descending-aorta (DDA) was determined. Linear mixed effects modelling was used to determine the association of age and aortic stenosis on regional AD. 102 patients were evaluated: 36 AS patients (70-85 years), 24 AS patients (>85 years) and 42 patients without AS (9 patients <50 years, 20 patients between 51-70 years and 13 patients 70-85 years). When comparing patients 70-85 years, AA distensibility was significantly lower in those with AS compared to those without AS (0.9 ± 0.9 vs. 1.4 ± 1.1, P = 0.03) while there was no difference in the PDA (1.0 ± 1.1 vs. 1.0 ± 1.2, P = 0.26) and DDA (1.1 ± 1.2 vs. 1.2 ± 0.8, P = 0.97). In patients without AS, AD decreased with age in all aortic regions (P < 0.001). The AA in patients <50 years were the most distensible compared to other aortic regions. There is regional variation in aortic distensibility with aging. Patients with aortic stenosis demonstrated regional differences in aortic distensibility with lower distensibility demonstrated in the proximal ascending aorta compared to an age-matched cohort.

  19. Long-term durability of preserved aortic root after repair of acute type A aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Kamohara, Keiji; Koga, Shugo; Takaki, Jun; Yoshida, Nozomi; Furukawa, Kojiro; Morita, Shigeki

    2017-08-01

    Optimal management of aortic root in type A aortic dissection (AAD) is controversial. To determine the most appropriate strategy, we studied the late outcomes after conservative repair of aortic root. 234 AAD patients (mean age 68 ± 12 years) underwent surgical repair using supracommissural replacement (SCR) for aortic root reconstruction from 1989 to 2014. Ascending aortic replacement or hemi-arch replacement was performed in 180 patients (non-arch group), whereas total arch replacement (TAR) was performed in 54 patients. In both groups, proper and firm reapproximation of proximal edge was performed exactly at the sinotubular junction (STJ). The long-term durability of preserved aortic root (mean follow-up 89 months) was evaluated. Hospital mortality occurred in 25 of 234 patients (10.6%). Aorta-related deaths occurred in five patients (four in non-arch; one in TAR), with over 90% 10-year actuarial survival rate in each group. Among 19 aorta-related events, there were only four proximal events (three in non-arch; one in TAR). The 10-year freedom rate from proximal aorta-related events exceeded 90%, with no significant difference in both groups. Freedom rate from moderate aortic regurgitation at 10 years was statistically similar between non-arch (86.3%) and TAR (85.7%) groups. The long-term durability of SCR with proximal aortic reapproximation exactly at the STJ was acceptable with low rates of proximal aortic events. This technique can be the standard technique for aortic root reconstruction in AAD patients, except those with aortic root pathology.

  20. Semi-automatic aortic aneurysm analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodur, Osman; Grady, Leo; Stillman, Arthur; Setser, Randolph; Funka-Lea, Gareth; O'Donnell, Thomas

    2007-03-01

    Aortic aneurysms are the 13 th leading cause of death in the United States. In standard clinical practice, assessing the progression of disease in the aorta, as well as the risk of aneurysm rupture, is based on measurements of aortic diameter. We propose a method for automatically segmenting the aortic vessel border allowing the calculation of aortic diameters on CTA acquisitions which is accurate and fast, allowing clinicians more time for their evaluations. While segmentation of aortic lumen is straightforward in CTA, segmentation of the outer vessel wall (epithelial layer) in a diseased aorta is difficult; furthermore, no clinical tool currently exists to perform this task. The difficulties are due to the similarities in intensity of surrounding tissue (and thrombus due to lack of contrast agent uptake), as well as the complications from bright calcium deposits. Our overall method makes use of a centerline for the purpose of resampling the image volume into slices orthogonal to the vessel path. This centerline is computed semi-automatically via a distance transform. The difficult task of automatically segmenting the aortic border on the orthogonal slices is performed via a novel variation of the isoperimetric algorithm which incorporates circular constraints (priors). Our method is embodied in a prototype which allows the loading and registration of two datasets simultaneously, facilitating longitudinal comparisons. Both the centerline and border segmentation algorithms were evaluated on four patients, each with two volumes acquired 6 months to 1.5 years apart, for a total of eight datasets. Results showed good agreement with clinicians' findings.

  1. Quantification of abdominal aortic deformation after EVAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirci, Stefanie; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode; Navab, Nassir

    2009-02-01

    Quantification of abdominal aortic deformation is an important requirement for the evaluation of endovascular stenting procedures and the further refinement of stent graft design. During endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) treatment, the aortic shape is subject to severe deformation that is imposed by medical instruments such as guide wires, catheters, and, the stent graft. This deformation can affect the flow characteristics and morphology of the aorta which have been shown to be elicitors for stent graft failures and be reason for reappearance of aneurysms. We present a method for quantifying the deformation of an aneurysmatic aorta imposed by an inserted stent graft device. The outline of the procedure includes initial rigid alignment of the two abdominal scans, segmentation of abdominal vessel trees, and automatic reduction of their centerline structures to one specified region of interest around the aorta. This is accomplished by preprocessing and remodeling of the pre- and postoperative aortic shapes before performing a non-rigid registration. We further narrow the resulting displacement fields to only include local non-rigid deformation and therefore, eliminate all remaining global rigid transformations. Finally, deformations for specified locations can be calculated from the resulting displacement fields. In order to evaluate our method, experiments for the extraction of aortic deformation fields are conducted on 15 patient datasets from endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) treatment. A visual assessment of the registration results and evaluation of the usage of deformation quantification were performed by two vascular surgeons and one interventional radiologist who are all experts in EVAR procedures.

  2. Gender Differences in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Hannawa, Kevin K.; Eliason, Jonathan L.; Upchurch, Gilbert R.

    2010-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) comprise the 10th leading cause of death in Caucasian males 65–74 years of age, and accounted for nearly 16,000 deaths overall in the year 2000. Therefore, understanding the pathophysiology of AAAs is an important undertaking. Clinically, multiple risk factors are associated with the development of AAAs, including increasing age, positive smoking history, and hypertension. Male gender is also a well-established risk factor for the development of an AAA with a 4:1 male to female ratio. The reason for this gender disparity is unknown. The pathogenesis of AAAs formation is complex and multifactorial. Histologically, AAAs are characterized by early chemokine driven leukocyte infiltration into the aortic wall. Subsequent destruction of elastin and collagen in the media and adventitia ensues due to excessive local production of matrix degrading enzymes, and is accompanied by smooth muscle cell loss and thinning of the aortic wall. At present, there are no medical therapies available to treat patients with aortic aneurysms, using only the crude measurement of aortic diameter as a threshold for which patients must undergo life-threatening and costly surgery. Defining the early mechanisms underlying gender-related differences in AAA formation are critical, as understanding differences in disease patterns based on gender may allow us to develop new translational approaches to the prevention and treatment of patients with aortic aneurysms. PMID:19426607

  3. Gender differences in abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Hannawa, Kevin K; Eliason, Jonathan L; Upchurch, Gilbert R

    2009-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) comprise the tenth leading cause of death in Caucasian males 65 to 74 years of age and accounted for nearly 16,000 deaths overall in 2000. Therefore, understanding the pathophysiology of AAAs is an important undertaking. Clinically, multiple risk factors are associated with the development of AAAs, including increasing age, positive smoking history, and hypertension. Male gender is also a well-established risk factor for the development of an AAA, with a 4:1 male to female ratio. The reason for this gender disparity is unknown. The pathogenesis of AAAs formation is complex and multifactorial. Histologically, AAAs are characterized by early chemokine-driven leukocyte infiltration into the aortic wall. Subsequent destruction of elastin and collagen in the media and adventitia ensues owing to excessive local production of matrix-degrading enzymes and is accompanied by smooth muscle cell loss and thinning of the aortic wall. At present, no medical therapies are available to treat patients with aortic aneurysms, using only the crude measurement of aortic diameter as a threshold for which patients must undergo life-threatening and costly surgery. Defining the early mechanisms underlying gender-related differences in AAA formation is critical as understanding differences in disease patterns based on gender may allow us to develop new translational approaches to the prevention and treatment of patients with aortic aneurysms.

  4. Fetal sonographic diagnosis of aortic arch anomalies.

    PubMed

    Yoo, S-J; Min, J-Y; Lee, Y-H; Roman, K; Jaeggi, E; Smallhorn, J

    2003-11-01

    Aortic arch anomalies refer to congenital abnormalities of the position or branching pattern, or both of the aortic arch. Although aortic arch anomalies are not uncommon, reports on their prenatal diagnosis are scarce. Insight into the hypothetical arch model is crucial to understanding anomalies of the aortic arch in the fetus. Recognition of the trachea, three major vessels, ductus arteriosus and descending aorta in the axial views of the upper mediastinum is necessary for a complete fetal cardiac assessment. Clues to aortic arch anomalies include abnormal position of the descending aorta, absence of the normal 'V'-shaped confluence of the ductal and aortic arches, a gap between the ascending aorta and main pulmonary artery in the three-vessel view, and an abnormal vessel behind the trachea with or without a vascular loop or ring around the trachea. Meticulous attention to anatomic landmarks will lead to successful prenatal diagnosis of important vascular rings making early postnatal management possible. Copyright 2003 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Measurement of aortic regurgitation by Doppler echocardiography.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y; Nitter-Hauge, S; Ihlen, H; Rootwelt, K; Myhre, E

    1986-01-01

    In an attempt to develop a new approach to the non-invasive measurement of aortic regurgitation, transmitral volumetric flow (MF) and left ventricular total stroke volume (SV) were measured by Doppler and cross sectional echocardiography in 23 patients without aortic valve disease (group A) and in 26 patients with aortic regurgitation (group B). The transmitral volumetric flow was obtained by multiplying the corrected mitral orifice area by the diastolic velocity integral, and the left ventricular total stroke volume was derived by subtracting the left ventricular end systolic volume from the end diastolic volume. The aortic regurgitant fraction (RF) was calculated as: RF = 1 - MF/SV. In group A there was a close agreement between the transmitral volumetric flow and the left ventricular total stroke volume, and the difference between the two measurements did not differ significantly from zero. In group B the left ventricular total stroke volume was significantly larger than the transmitral volumetric flow, and there was good agreement between the regurgitant fractions determined by Doppler echocardiography and radionuclide ventriculography. Discrepancies between the two techniques were found in patients with combined aortic and mitral regurgitation or a low angiographic left ventricular ejection fraction (less than 35%). The effective cardiac output measured by Doppler echocardiography accorded well with that measured by the Fick method. Doppler echocardiography provides a new and promising approach to the non-invasive measurement of aortic regurgitation. PMID:3947478

  6. Cellular Mechanisms of Aortic Valve Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jane A.

    2012-01-01

    Acquired aortic valve disease and valvular calcification is highly prevalent in adult populations worldwide and is associated with significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. At present, there are no medical therapies that will prevent or regress aortic valve calcification or stenosis and surgical or transcatheter aortic valve replacement remain the only effective therapies for treating this disease. In the setting of valve injury as a result of exposure to biochemical mediators or hemodynamic forces, normal homeostatic processes are disrupted resulting in extracellular matrix degradation, aberrant matrix deposition and fibrosis, inflammatory cell infiltration, lipid accumulation, and neoangiogenesis of the valve tissue and, ultimately, calcification of the valve. Calcification of the aortic valve is now understood to be an active process that involves the coordinated actions of resident valve endothelial and interstitial cells, circulating inflammatory and immune cells, and bone marrow-derived cells. These cells may undergo a phenotype transition to become osteoblast-like cells and elaborate bone matrix, endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and form matrix vesicles that serve as a nidus for microcalcifications. Each of these mechanisms has been shown to contribute to aortic valve calcification suggesting that strategies that target these cellular events may lead to novel therapeutic interventions to halt the progression or reverse aortic valve calcification. PMID:22896576

  7. Aortic Dissection Type A in Alpine Skiers

    PubMed Central

    Schachner, Thomas; Fischler, Nikolaus; Dumfarth, Julia; Bonaros, Nikolaos; Krapf, Christoph; Schobersberger, Wolfgang; Grimm, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Patients and Methods. 140 patients with aortic dissection type A were admitted for cardiac surgery. Seventy-seven patients experienced their dissection in the winter season (from November to April). We analyzed cases of ascending aortic dissection associated with alpine skiing. Results. In 17 patients we found skiing-related aortic dissections. Skiers were taller (180 (172–200) cm versus 175 (157–191) cm, P = 0.008) and heavier (90 (68–125) kg versus 80 (45–110) kg, P = 0.002) than nonskiers. An extension of aortic dissection into the aortic arch, the descending thoracic aorta, and the abdominal aorta was found in 91%, 74%, and 69%, respectively, with no significant difference between skiers and nonskiers. Skiers experienced RCA ostium dissection requiring CABG in 17.6% while this was true for 5% of nonskiers (P = 0.086). Hospital mortality of skiers was 6% versus 13% in nonskiers (P = 0.399). The skiers live at an altitude of 170 (0–853) m.a.s.l. and experience their dissection at 1602 (1185–3105; P < 0.001) m.a.s.l. In 82% symptom start was during recreational skiing without any trauma. Conclusion. Skiing associated aortic dissection type A is usually nontraumatic. The persons affected live at low altitudes and practice an outdoor sport at unusual high altitude at cold temperatures. Postoperative outcome is good. PMID:23971024

  8. Early aortic valve cusp rupture in relapsing polychondritis.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, D A; Jackson, R; Rae, A P; Capell, H A

    1992-01-01

    Aortic regurgitation associated with relapsing polychondritis usually occurs late in the disease as a result of aortic root dilatation. A case where aortic regurgitation occurred early and was due to cusp rupture with a normal aortic root is reported. The patient required urgent aortic valve replacement within six weeks of developing a murmur despite apparent control of inflammation with immunosuppressive treatment. The possibility of cusp rupture with sudden haemodynamic deterioration should be considered in patients with relapsing polychondritis who develop aortic regurgitation. Images PMID:1575597

  9. Valve sparing: aortic root replacement with the reimplantation technique.

    PubMed

    Mastrobuoni, Stefano; Tamer, Sadallah; de Kerchove, Laurent; El Khoury, Gebrine

    2015-01-01

    Aortic valve-sparing procedures are alternative options to aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic root aneurysm and/or severe aortic regurgitation reducing the risk of prosthesis-related complications, such as thromboembolism, and have no need for long-term oral anticoagulation. However, these techniques are technically demanding and long-term results are highly dependent on perfect intraoperative restoration of valve function. We describe a systematic approach to aortic valve-sparing aortic root replacement with the reimplantation technique the way it is currently performed in our institution.

  10. Aortic assessment of bicuspid aortic valve patients and their first-degree relatives.

    PubMed

    Straneo, Pablo; Parma, Gabriel; Lluberas, Natalia; Marichal, Alvaro; Soca, Gerardo; Cura, Leandro; Paganini, Juan J; Brusich, Daniel; Florio, Lucia; Dayan, Victor

    2017-03-01

    Background Bicuspid aortic valve patients have an increased risk of aortic dilatation. A deficit of nitric oxide synthase has been proposed as the causative factor. No correlation between flow-mediated dilation and aortic diameter has been performed in patients with bicuspid aortic valves and normal aortic diameters. Being a hereditary disease, we compared echocardiographic features and endothelial function in these patients and their first-degree relatives. Methods Comprehensive physical examinations, routine laboratory tests, transthoracic echocardiography, and measurements of endothelium-dependent and non-dependent flow-mediated vasodilatation were performed in 18 bicuspid aortic valve patients (14 type 1 and 4 type 2) and 19 of their first-degree relatives. Results The first-degree relatives were younger (36.7 ± 18.8 vs. 50.5 ± 13.9 years, p = 0.019) with higher ejection fractions (64.6% ± 1.7% vs. 58.4% ± 9.5%, p = 0.015). Aortic diameters indexed to body surface area were similar in both groups, the except the tubular aorta which was larger in bicuspid aortic valve patients (19.3 ± 2.7 vs. 17.4 ± 2.2 mm·m(-2), p = 0.033). Flow-dependent vasodilation was similar in both groups. A significant inverse correlation was found between non-flow-dependent vasodilation and aortic root diameter in patients with bicuspid aortic valve ( R = -0.57, p = 0.05). Conclusions Bicuspid aortic valve patients without aortopathy have larger ascending aortic diameters than their first-degree relatives. Endothelial function is similar in both groups, and there is no correlation with ascending aorta diameter. Nonetheless, an inverse correlation exists between non-endothelial-dependent dilation and aortic root diameter in bicuspid aortic valve patients.

  11. Aortic Dissection in Patients With Bicuspid Aortic Valve–Associated Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Wojnarski, Charles M.; Svensson, Lars G.; Roselli, Eric E.; Idrees, Jay J.; Lowry, Ashley M.; Ehrlinger, John; Pettersson, Gösta B.; Gillinov, A. Marc; Johnston, Douglas R.; Soltesz, Edward G.; Navia, Jose L.; Hammer, Donald F.; Griffin, Brian; Thamilarasan, Maran; Kalahasti, Vidyasagar; Sabik, Joseph F.; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Lytle, Bruce W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Data regarding the risk of aortic dissection in patients with bicuspid aortic valve and large ascending aortic diameter are limited, and appropriate timing of prophylactic ascending aortic replacement lacks consensus. Thus our objectives were to determine the risk of aortic dissection based on initial cross-sectional imaging data and clinical variables and to isolate predictors of aortic intervention in those initially prescribed serial surveillance imaging. Methods From January 1995 to January 2014, 1,181 patients with bicuspid aortic valve underwent cross-sectional computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to ascertain sinus or tubular ascending aortic diameter greater than or equal to 4.7 cm. Random Forest classification was used to identify risk factors for aortic dissection, and among patients undergoing surveillance, time-related analysis was used to identify risk factors for aortic intervention. Results Prevalence of type A dissection that was detected by imaging or was found at operation or on follow-up was 5.3% (n = 63). Probability of type A dissection increased gradually at a sinus diameter of 5.0 cm—from 4.1% to 13% at 7.2 cm—and then increased steeply at an ascending aortic diameter of 5.3 cm—from 3.8% to 35% at 8.4 cm—corresponding to a cross-sectional area to height ratio of 10 cm2/m for sinuses of Valsalva and 13 cm2/m for the tubular ascending aorta. Cross-sectional area to height ratio was the best predictor of type A dissection (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.73). Conclusions Early prophylactic ascending aortic replacement in patients with bicuspid aortic valve should be considered at high-volume aortic centers to reduce the high risk of preventable type A dissection in those with aortas larger than approximately 5.0 cm or with a cross-sectional area to height ratio greater than approximately 10 cm2/m. PMID:26209494

  12. Increased aortic tortuosity indicates a more severe aortic phenotype in adults with Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Franken, Romy; El Morabit, Abdelali; de Waard, Vivian; Timmermans, Janneke; Scholte, Arthur J; van den Berg, Maarten P; Marquering, Henk; Planken, Nils R N; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Mulder, Barbara J M; Groenink, Maarten

    2015-09-01

    Patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) have a highly variable occurrence of aortic complications. Aortic tortuosity is often present in MFS and may help to identify patients at risk for aortic complications. 3D-visualization of the total aorta by MR imaging was performed in 211 adult MFS patients (28% with prior aortic root replacement) and 20 controls. A method to assess aortic tortuosity (aortic tortuosity index: ATI) was developed and reproducibility was tested. The relation between ATI and age, and body size and aortic dimensions at baseline was investigated. Relations between ATI at baseline and the occurrence of a clinical endpoint (aortic dissection, and/or aortic surgery) and aortic dilatation rate during 3 years of follow-up were investigated. ATI intra- and interobserver agreements were excellent (ICC: 0.968 and 0.955, respectively). Mean ATI was higher in 28 age-matched MFS patients than in the controls (1.92 ± 0.2 vs. 1.82 ± 0.1, p=0.048). In the total MFS cohort, mean ATI was 1.87 ± 0.20, and correlated with age (r=0.281, p<0.001), aortic root diameter (r=0.223, p=0.006), and aortic volume expansion rate (r=0.177, p=0.026). After 49.3 ± 8.8 months follow-up, 33 patients met the combined clinical endpoint (7 dissections) with a significantly higher ATI at baseline than patients without endpoint (1.98 ± 0.2 vs. 1.86 ± 0.2, p=0.002). Patients with an ATI>1.95 had a 12.8 times higher probability of meeting the combined endpoint (log rank-test, p<0.001) and a 12.1 times higher probability of developing an aortic dissection (log rank-test, p=0.003) compared to patients with an ATI<1.95. Increased ATI is associated with a more severe aortic phenotype in MFS patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Percutaneous balloon aortic valvuloplasty in the era of transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Keeble, Thomas R; Khokhar, Arif; Akhtar, Mohammed Majid; Mathur, Anthony; Weerackody, Roshan; Kennon, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The role of percutaneous balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) in the management of severe symptomatic aortic stenosis has come under the spotlight following the development of the transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) technique. Previous indications for BAV were limited to symptom palliation and as a bridge to definitive therapy for patients undergoing conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR). In the TAVI era, BAV may also be undertaken to assess the ‘therapeutic response’ of a reduction in aortic gradient in borderline patients often with multiple comorbidities, to assess symptomatic improvement prior to consideration of definitive TAVI intervention. This narrative review aims to update the reader on the current indications and practical techniques involved in undertaking a BAV procedure. In addition, a summary of the haemodynamic and clinical outcomes, as well as the frequently encountered procedural complications is presented for BAV procedures conducted during both the pre-TAVI and post-TAVI era. PMID:28008354

  14. Aortobronchial Fistula after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair (TEVAR) for Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Melvan, John Nicholas; DeLaRosa, Jacob; Vasquez, Julio C

    2017-03-07

    Continued enlargement of the aneurysm sac after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) is a known risk after endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms. For this reason, periodic outpatient follow-up is required to identify situations that require repair. Here, we describe an aortobronchial fistula (ABF) in a patient lost to follow-up, that presented 3 years after an elective TEVAR done for a primary, descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. Our patient arrived in extremis and suffered massive hemoptysis leading to her demise. Computed tomography (CT) angiogram near the time of her death demonstrated a bleeding ABF immediately distal to her previous TEVAR repair. Aortic aneurysmal disease remains life threatening even after repair. Improved endovascular techniques and devices have resulted in decreased need for reintervention. However, this case demonstrates the risk of thoracic aortic disease progression and highlights the importance of establishing consistent, long-term follow-up after TEVAR.

  15. Percutaneous balloon aortic valvuloplasty in the era of transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Keeble, Thomas R; Khokhar, Arif; Akhtar, Mohammed Majid; Mathur, Anthony; Weerackody, Roshan; Kennon, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The role of percutaneous balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) in the management of severe symptomatic aortic stenosis has come under the spotlight following the development of the transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) technique. Previous indications for BAV were limited to symptom palliation and as a bridge to definitive therapy for patients undergoing conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR). In the TAVI era, BAV may also be undertaken to assess the 'therapeutic response' of a reduction in aortic gradient in borderline patients often with multiple comorbidities, to assess symptomatic improvement prior to consideration of definitive TAVI intervention. This narrative review aims to update the reader on the current indications and practical techniques involved in undertaking a BAV procedure. In addition, a summary of the haemodynamic and clinical outcomes, as well as the frequently encountered procedural complications is presented for BAV procedures conducted during both the pre-TAVI and post-TAVI era.

  16. The aortic valve: structure, complications and implications for transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Rozeik, Mm; Wheatley, Dj; Gourlay, T

    2014-07-01

    The aortic valve operates in a complex haemodynamic environment, opening and closing over 100,000 times a day. When complications arise, such as aortic stenosis, prognosis can be very poor, leading to death within the first few years. Surgical valve replacement is currently the standard treatment for aortic stenosis. A thorough understanding of the anatomy and function of the native valve is imperative when developing a prosthetic replacement that can withstand the complex demands of the heart. This review focuses on the anatomy, structure and disease of the aortic valve and the implications for a transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Current complications with TAVR, such as major vascular bleeding, conduction disturbances and patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM), can be overcome by reducing the delivery profile and through the use of more accurate imaging technologies to work towards a fully functional and durable prosthesis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. The Freedom SOLO valve: mid-term clinical results with a stentless pericardial valve for aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Horst, Michael; Easo, Jerry; Hölzl, Philipp P F; Eichstaedt, Harald C; Kronberg, Kay; Nordmeyer, Peter; Dapunt, Otto E

    2011-11-01

    The study aim was to evaluate the Freedom SOLO pericardial stentless valve prosthesis implanted in a subcoronary or supra-annular position, using a single running suture, over a follow up period of up to five years. The clinical data obtained after aortic valve replacement (AVR) were analyzed retrospectively for validation. Between April 2004 and September 2009, a total of 143 patients (81 males, 62 females; mean age 71 +/- 7 years; range: 41-87 years) underwent primary AVR using the Freedom SOLO valve, implanted with a supra-annular subcoronary technique. Isolated AVR was performed on 120 patients, while 23 patients required additional surgery that included coronary artery bypass grafting (n = 5), ascending aorta replacement (n = 1), atrial fibrillation surgery (n = 9), and mitral valve repair (n = 1). Clinical investigations were performed before, during and after surgery; the follow up was 100% complete. A subgroup of patients (70%) was investigated echocardiographically during the follow up period to analyze the hemodynamic performance of the prosthesis. For all procedures the mean ischemia time was 66 +/- 15 min, and the mean cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) time 88 +/- 20 min. For isolated AVR, the mean cross-clamp time was 65 +/- 14 min, and the mean CPB time 85 +/- 17 min. The predominant implanted valve size was 25 mm (42%). Operative mortality was 4.9% (7/143), with an overall mortality of 10.5% (15/143) at 4.7 years of follow up. The mean follow up was 1.8 +/- 1.4 years, and the total follow up 257 patient-years. At postoperative follow up the mean valve gradient was 10.6 mmHg, while the effective orifice area was 1.9 +/- 0.6 cm2 at one month and 1.9 +/- 0.6 cm2 at 12 months. The Freedom SOLO valve was implanted in a cohort of patients, using a simplified, supra-annular subcoronary technique, with no technical problems. Subsequently, the valve demonstrated an excellent clinical performance for up to five years. Further long-term follow up will be required to

  18. Patch annulo-aortoplasty in an adult patient with congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis and a small aortic annulus.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Naoto; Morimoto, Keisuke; Morimoto, Yoshihisa; Tanaka, Akiko; Sakamoto, Toshihito; Okada, Kenji; Okita, Yutaka

    2011-08-01

    A 39-year-old woman with familial homozygous hypercholesterolemia had supravalvular and valvular aortic stenosis. Modified Nick's procedure and aortic valve replacement was performed to relieve both the supravalvular and annular stenoses. At surgery, the ascending aorta was found to be narrowing at the level of the sinotubular junction, which was compatible with congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis. Histological examination of the aortic cusps showed sclerotic change due to hypercholesterolemia. These findings indicated that familial homozygous hypercholesterolemia caused valvular aortic stenosis and exacerbated congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis.

  19. Endovascular Repair for Type A Aortic Dissection After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement With a Medtronic CoreValve.

    PubMed

    Berfield, Kathleen K S; Sweet, Matthew P; McCabe, James M; Reisman, Mark; Mackensen, G Burkhard; Mokadam, Nahush A; Dean, Larry S; Smith, Jason W

    2015-10-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement is being used with increasing frequency in patients with severe aortic stenosis who are otherwise deemed to be at high surgical risk. Aortic dissection is a rare complication of transcatheter aortic valve replacement and poses a unique management dilemma. We describe the treatment of an acute Stanford type A aortic dissection after transcatheter aortic valve replacement with a modified thoracic endovascular stent graft in a 95-year-old woman. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Aortic Disease Presentation and Outcome Associated with ACTA2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Regalado, Ellen S.; Guo, Dongchuan; Prakash, Siddharth; Bensend, Tracy A.; Flynn, Kelly; Estrera, Anthony; Safi, Hazim; Liang, David; Hyland, James; Child, Anne; Arno, Gavin; Boileau, Catherine; Jondeau, Guillaume; Braverman, Alan; Moran, Rocio; Morisaki, Takayuki; Morisaki, Hiroko; Consortium, Montalcino Aortic; Pyeritz, Reed; Coselli, Joseph; LeMaire, Scott; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2015-01-01

    Background ACTA2 mutations are the major cause of familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections. We sought to characterize these aortic diseases in a large case series of individuals with ACTA2 mutations. Methods and Results Aortic disease, management, and outcome associated with the first aortic event (aortic dissection or aneurysm repair) were abstracted from the medical records of 277 individuals with 41 various ACTA2 mutations. Aortic events occurred in 48% of these individuals, with the vast majority presenting with thoracic aortic dissections (88%) associated with 25% mortality. Type A dissections were more common than type B dissections (54% versus 21%), but the median age of onset of type B dissections was significantly younger than type A dissections (27 years, IQR 18–41 versus 36 years, IQR 26–45). Only 12% of aortic events were repair of ascending aortic aneurysms, which variably involved the aortic root, ascending aorta and aortic arch. Overall cumulative risk of an aortic event at age 85 years was 0.76 (95% CI 0.64, 0.86). After adjustment for intra-familial correlation, gender and race, mutations disrupting p.R179 and p.R258 were associated with significantly increased risk for aortic events, whereas p.R185Q and p.R118Q mutations showed significantly lower risk of aortic events compared to other mutations. Conclusions ACTA2 mutations are associated with high risk of presentation with an acute aortic dissection. The lifetime risk for an aortic event is only 76%, suggesting that additional environmental or genetic factors play a role in expression of aortic disease in individuals with ACTA2 mutations. PMID:25759435

  1. Aortic Valve Calcification is Mediated by a Differential Response of Aortic Valve Interstitial Cells to Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Venardos, Neil; Nadlonek, Nicole A.; Zhan, Qiong; Weyant, Michael J.; Reece, T. Brett; Meng, Xianzhong; Fullerton, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Background While calcific aortic stenosis is common, calcification of the other three heart valves is not. The aortic valve interstitial cell (VIC) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of aortic stenosis. Pro-inflammatory stimulation of aortic VICs induces an osteogenic and inflammatory phenotypic change. We hypothesized that the VICs of the other heart valves do not undergo these changes. Using isolated human VICs from normal aortic, mitral, pulmonary and tricuspid valves, our purpose was to compare the osteogenic response to pro-inflammatory stimulation via TLR-4. Materials And Methods Aortic, pulmonic, mitral, and tricuspid (n=4 for each valve type) VICs were isolated from hearts valves explanted from patients undergoing cardiac transplantation. Cells were cultured and grown to confluence in passage 2-6 before treatment with LPS (100-200ng/mL) for 24 or 48 hours. Cells were characterized by immunofluorescent staining. TLR-4 expression was analyzed (immunoblotting, flow cytometry). BMP-2 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) production were determined (immunoblotting). Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels were determined by ELISA. Statistics were by Mann-Whitney U test. Results TLR-4 stimulation induced BMP-2 production only in aortic VICs (p<0.05). ICAM-1 production and MCP-1 secretion increased in a similar fashion among TLR4-stimulated VICs from all four valves. Conclusions Pro-inflammatory stimulation induces an osteogenic phenotype in aortic VICs but not mitral, pulmonic, or tricuspid VICs. We conclude that this differential osteogenic response of aortic VICs contributes to the pathogenesis of calcific aortic stenosis. PMID:24746950

  2. Classification of blunt aortic injuries a new systematic overview of aortic trauma.

    PubMed

    Prijon, Ticijana; Ermenc, Branko

    2010-02-25

    Blunt (non-penetrating) aortic injuries, in which the arterial wall is damaged in the direction from the intima towards the adventitia, are most commonly the result of a traffic accident. The various forms of blunt aortic injuries, from limited laceration of the intima to complete transection of the aorta, depend on the morphological structure of the arterial wall and the strength of forces causing the trauma. An overview of the literature and medical documentation reveals that different terms, including tear, laceration, disruption, transection, rupture and pseudoaneurysm, are used to describe certain forms of traumatic aortic injuries, which can lead to misinterpretation of findings or diagnoses. We therefore, propose a classification that would enable uniform systematic screening of all forms of blunt aortic injuries. In a retrospective examination of autopsy reports from 1999 to 2006, all those who had died in traffic accidents and who had blunt aortic injuries were selected from the archive at the Institute of Forensic Medicine of the Medical Faculty of the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia. Blunt aortic injuries (ruptures) were classified into three basic types and corresponding subtypes: type I (intramural), type II (transmural) and type III (multiple) aortic ruptures. The study included 230 deceased persons with 355 aortic ruptures. According to our classification, type I ruptures were observed in 25 (11%), type II ruptures in 131 (57%) and type III ruptures in 74 (32%) cases. The new classification we propose allows simple and systematic screening of all types of blunt aortic injuries. It prevents misinterpretation of various types of aortic injury in medical practice. 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [New technique of concomitant replacement of the aortic valve and the ascending aorta with enlargement of the aortic annulus for congenital bicuspid aortic valve].

    PubMed

    Takahara, Shingo; Fukasawa, Manabu; Kawahara, Yu; Suzuki, Kotaro; Kobayashi, Yuriko

    2012-12-01

    Congenital bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is one of the most common congenital heart diseases, with a high incidence of associated valvular lesions and aortic abnormalities including aortic stenosis( AS), aortic regurgitation, aortic dilatation, and aortic dissection. Patients with BAV and AS often have a small aortic annulus. We encountered a case of BAV in which a 51-year-old woman with severe AS having a small aortic annulus and a dilated ascending aorta required surgical intervention. We performed the surgery using new technique that involved concomitant replacement of the aortic valve and the ascending aorta with enlargement of the aortic annulus using a single uniquely-shaped graft to avoid prosthesis patient mismatch. We trimmed the proximal end of the straight graft in shape of 2 teardrops hanging on it to fit the cut annulus. It requires only a single suture line to replace the ascending aorta and enlarge the aortic annulus, which entails a decreased risk of bleeding during surgery. We believe that it could be applicable to many cases requiring concomitant surgery.

  4. Conduction disturbance after isolated surgical aortic valve replacement in degenerative aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, You Mi; Kim, Jun; Lee, Ji Hyun; Kim, Minsu; Hwang, Jongmin; Kim, Joon Bum; Jung, Sung-Ho; Choo, Suk Jung; Nam, Gi Byoung; Choi, Kee Joon; Chung, Cheol Hyun; Lee, Jae Won; Kim, You Ho

    2017-06-15

    Conduction disturbances are common in patients with aortic stenosis. We investigated the incidence, reversibility, and prognosis of conduction disorders requiring permanent pacemaker implantation in patients with degenerative aortic stenosis after isolated aortic valve replacement. This was a retrospective study conducted at a tertiary care center. We evaluated the incidence of conduction disturbances in patients who underwent isolated surgical aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis between January 2005 and May 2015. Relevant clinical information was obtained from the patients' medical records. We reviewed results of 663 patients with pathologically proven degenerative aortic stenosis (bicuspid aortic valve, n = 285 [43.0%]) who underwent isolated aortic valve replacement (mechanical valve, n = 310 [46.8%]). Patients' mean age was 67.1 ± 8.1 years, and 362 were male (54.6%). Immediate postoperative intraventricular conduction disorders occurred in 56 patients (8.4%), and atrioventricular block occurred in 68 patients (10.3%). Ten patients with symptomatic second-degree or third-degree atrioventricular block underwent permanent pacemaker implantation within 30 days of aortic valve replacement. During the mean follow-up period of 1288 ± 1122 days, 64 patients (9.7%) developed irreversible conduction disorders (bundle branch block n = 24 and first-degree atrioventricular block n = 42). Of the 10 patients requiring permanent pacemakers, 4 remained depend on the permanent pacemaker during follow-up. Beyond 30 days after aortic valve replacement, 1 patient underwent permanent pacemaker implantation for de novo conduction disturbance 44 months postoperatively. After isolated aortic valve replacement, permanent pacemaker implantation for conduction disturbance is rare (n = 10/663, 1.5%). Isolated aortic valve replacement for degenerative aortic stenosis has a low risk of conduction disturbances during long-term follow-up. Copyright © 2017 The

  5. MicroRNAs, fibrotic remodeling, and aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2012-01-01

    Aortic aneurysms are a common clinical condition that can cause death due to aortic dissection or rupture. The association between aortic aneurysm pathogenesis and altered TGF-β signaling has been the subject of numerous investigations. Recently, a TGF-β–responsive microRNA (miR), miR-29, has been identified to play a role in cellular phenotypic modulation during aortic development and aging. In this issue of JCI, Maegdefessel and colleagues demonstrate that decreasing the levels of miR-29b in the aortic wall can attenuate aortic aneurysm progression in two different mouse models of abdominal aortic aneurysms. This study highlights the relevance of miR-29b in aortic disease but also raises questions about its specific role. PMID:22269322

  6. Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... En español Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Browse Sections The Basics Overview What is AAA? ... your doctor about getting screened (tested) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Am I at risk for AAA? Men ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions familial TAAD familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... PDF Open All Close All Description Familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection ( familial TAAD ) involves problems with the ...

  8. Acute thoracic aortic dissection: how to defuse a time bomb.

    PubMed

    McClarren-Curry, C; Shaughnessy, K

    1999-01-01

    Acute thoracic aortic dissection is frequently misdiagnosed, and even with surgical intervention, the mortality rate is 50%. This article focuses on assessment, interventions, and postoperative care of patients with aortic dissection.

  9. Intra-aortic balloon pumps.

    PubMed

    1997-05-01

    Intra-aortic balloon pumps (IABPs) are circulatory assist devices used to treat a number of cardiovascular conditions. IABPs provide temporary circulatory support by reducing the resistance to blood flow out of the heart during systole and by providing added pressure to aid in perfusing the heart during diastole. In this Evaluation, we tested three IABPs from three suppliers. We examined the units' technical performance, safety and monitoring, human factors design, transport operation, and supplier support. Rather than test all the triggering (activation) modes available, we focused our testing on the modes most commonly used on each unit. We also provide information on an IABP currently available only in Japan; although we did not test this unit, we do provide a preliminary judgment based on the information provided to us by the supplier. In the Technology Overview also included in the Evaluation, we describe the basic operation and use of an IABP, as well as review the state of the art of this technology. And in the Selection, Purchasing, and Use Guide at the conclusion of the Evaluation, we discuss such topics as balloon costs and sizing, interfacing IABPs with patient monitors, and the use of IABPs in community hospitals.

  10. Flow in an Aortic Coarctation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loma, Luis; Miller, Paul; Hertzberg, Jean

    2009-11-01

    Coarctation of the aorta is a congenital cardiovascular defect that causes a constriction in the descending thoracic aorta. To gain a better understanding of the cause of post-surgical problems, a rigid glass and a compliant in vitro model of the aortic arch and descending aorta with a coarctation were constructed. Near-physiologic compliance was obtained using a silicone elastomer. Stereoscopic PIV was used to obtain 3D velocity maps. Results show a high speed turbulent jet formed at the exit of the coarctation. Flow in the rigid model was significantly different from in the compliant model. In the rigid model, the jet was symmetric, creating a toroidal recirculation area. In the compliant model, the jet was directed towards the medial wall, inducing flow reversal only at the lateral wall. Peak velocities and turbulence intensities were higher in the rigid model, however shear rate values in the compliant model were significantly above both the rigid model and normal in vivo values at the medial wall. In both models the reattachment region fluctuated, creating oscillatory shear.

  11. Rapid prototyping in aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Bangeas, Petros; Voulalas, Grigorios; Ktenidis, Kiriakos

    2016-04-01

    3D printing provides the sequential addition of material layers and, thus, the opportunity to print parts and components made of different materials with variable mechanical and physical properties. It helps us create 3D anatomical models for the better planning of surgical procedures when needed, since it can reveal any complex anatomical feature. Images of abdominal aortic aneurysms received by computed tomographic angiography were converted into 3D images using a Google SketchUp free software and saved in stereolithography format. Using a 3D printer (Makerbot), a model made of polylactic acid material (thermoplastic filament) was printed. A 3D model of an abdominal aorta aneurysm was created in 138 min, while the model was a precise copy of the aorta visualized in the computed tomographic images. The total cost (including the initial cost of the printer) reached 1303.00 euros. 3D imaging and modelling using different materials can be very useful in cases when anatomical difficulties are recognized through the computed tomographic images and a tactile approach is demanded preoperatively. In this way, major complications during abdominal aorta aneurysm management can be predicted and prevented. Furthermore, the model can be used as a mould; the development of new, more biocompatible, less antigenic and individualized can become a challenge in the future.

  12. Primary Stenting in Infrarenal Aortic Occlusive Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Nyman, Ulf; Uher, Petr; Lindh, Mats; Lindblad, Bengt; Ivancev, Krasnodar

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the results of primary stenting in aortic occlusive disease.Methods: Thirty patients underwent primary stenting of focal concentric (n = 2) and complex aortic stenoses (n = 19), and aortic or aorto-iliac occlusions (n = 9). Sixteen patients underwent endovascular outflow procedures, three of whom also had distal open surgical reconstructions. Median follow-up was 16 months (range 1-60 months).Results: Guidewire crossing of two aorto-biiliac occlusions failed, resulting in a 93% (28/30) technical success. Major complications included one access hematoma, one myocardial infarction, one death (recurrent thromboembolism) in a patient with widespread malignancy, and one fatal hemorrhage during thrombolysis of distal emboli from a recanalized occluded iliac artery. One patient did not improve his symptoms, resulting in a 1-month clinical success of 83% (25/30). Following restenting the 26 stented survivors changed their clinical limb status to +3 (n = 17) and +2 (n = 9). During follow-up one symptomatic aortic restenosis occurred and was successfully restented.Conclusions: Primary stenting of complex aortic stenoses and short occlusions is an attractive alternative to conventional surgery. Larger studies with longer follow-up and stratification of lesion morphology are warranted to define its role relative to balloon angioplasty. Stenting of aorto-biiliac occlusions is feasible but its role relative to bypass grafting remains to be defined.

  13. Research of Customized Aortic Stent Graft Manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Chen, Xin; Liu, Muhan

    2017-03-01

    Thoracic descending aorta diseases include aortic dissection and aortic aneurysm, of which the natural mortality rate is extremely high. At present, endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has been widely used as an effective means for the treatment of descending aortic disease. Most of the existing coating stents are standard design, which are unable to meet the size or structure of different patients. As a result, failure of treatment would be caused by dimensional discrepancy between stent and vessels, which could lead to internal leakage or rupture of blood vessels. Therefore, based on rapid prototyping sacrificial core - coating forming (RPSC-CF), a customized aortic stent graft manufactured technique has been proposed in this study. The aortic stent graft consists of film and metallic stent, so polyether polyurethane (PU) and nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy with good biocompatibility were chosen. To minimum film thickness without degrading performance, effect of different dip coating conditions on the thickness of film were studied. To make the NiTi alloy exhibit super-elasticity at body temperature (37°C), influence of different heat treatment conditions on austenite transformation temperature (Af) and mechanical properties were studied. The results show that the customized stent grafts could meet the demand of personalized therapy, and have good performance in blasting pressure and radial support force, laying the foundation for further animal experiment and clinical experiment.

  14. Phonocardiographic diagnosis of aortic ball variance.

    PubMed

    Hylen, J C; Kloster, F E; Herr, R H; Hull, P Q; Ames, A W; Starr, A; Griswold, H E

    1968-07-01

    Fatty infiltration causing changes in the silastic poppet of the Model 1000 series Starr-Edwards aortic valve prostheses (ball variance) has been detected with increasing frequency and can result in sudden death. Phonocardiograms were recorded on 12 patients with ball variance confirmed by operation and of 31 controls. Ten of the 12 patients with ball variance were distinguished from the controls by an aortic opening sound (AO) less than half as intense as the aortic closure sound (AC) at the second right intercostal space (AO/AC ratio less than 0.5). Both AO and AC were decreased in two patients with ball variance, with the loss of the characteristic high frequency and amplitude of these sounds. The only patient having a diminished AO/AC ratio (0.42) without ball variance at reoperation had a clot extending over the aortic valve struts. The phonocardiographic findings have been the most reliable objective evidence of ball variance in patients with Starr-Edwards aortic prosthesis of the Model 1000 series.

  15. Advances in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Kleiman, Neal S.; Reardon, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is becoming widely used for the treatment of symptomatic severe aortic stenosis in patients with high surgical risk. Data from The PARTNER Trial (Placement of AoRtic TraNscathetER Valves) and the Medtronic CoreValve® U.S. Pivotal Investigational Device Exemption trial indicate that survival for extreme-risk patients is superior to best medical therapy and equivalent or superior to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), although long-term durability remains unknown. Paravalvular leak remains higher in TAVR than SAVR, as does permanent pacemaker implantation in self-expanding valves. New-generation valves are addressing these issues, especially for paravalvular leak. There is strong evidence that TAVR is appropriate for both extreme-risk and high-risk patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis, and the continued development of new valves are making implantation more reliable. This review discusses the studies supporting the use of TAVR and explores current advances in the field. PMID:27127560

  16. Caffeine increases aortic stiffness in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Hirata, Kozo; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Toutouzas, Pavlos; O'Rourke, Michael F

    2003-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used pharmacologic substance. Aortic stiffness is an important factor for cardiovascular system performance and a prognosticator of cardiovascular risk. We investigated the effect of caffeine on aortic stiffness in treated hypertensive patients. We studied the effect of caffeine (250 mg) in 12 treated hypertensive patients according to a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over design during a 3-h period. Aortic stiffness was evaluated by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity. Systolic blood pressure (BP) and pulse pressure increased significantly throughout the study (by 12.3 and 7.4 mm Hg, P =.005 and P <.01, respectively), whereas diastolic BP did not change. Pulse wave velocity increased (by 0.57 m/sec, P <.05) denoting an increase in aortic stiffness. This effect of caffeine lasted throughout the study (3 h), peaking at 60 min and decreasing progressively thereafter. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that caffeine exerts an acute unfavorable effect on aortic stiffness in treated hypertensive patients. This finding has important implications for the impact of caffeine consumption on cardiovascular risk in hypertension.

  17. Airway obstruction by an aortic false aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Taillandier, S; Guillon, A; Favelle, O; Garot, D; Perrotin, D

    2011-12-01

    Aortic false aneurysms are rare complications of aortic valve replacement and cardiac surgical procedures in general. Aortic false aneurysms can also presents as a mediastinal mass. A false aneurysm etiology should always be considered in mediastinal mass exploration of patients with a cardiac surgery history. Although, a computed tomography (CT) scan can detect a mediastinal mass, it can equally misdiagnose an aneurysm in the absence of tumour contrast enhancement. We present the case of a 60-year-old woman who was hospitalized for a laryngeal dyspnea. She had undergone aortic valve replacement 3 years earlier and had no other relevant medical history. In the last 3 months, she presented a progressively worsening dyspnea and cough. A chest radiograph showed a large mass in the superior mediastinum. A contrast-enhanced CT-scan showed an anterior mediastinal mass (9 cm × 8 cm × 9 cm) not enhanced by contrast product, suggestive of a tissue density tumour. The mass was in fact an aortic false aneurysm where the communication with the aorta was too narrow to be filled by the contrast product in arterial phase imaging. The aneurysm was excised and successfully replaced with a prosthetic graft during deep hypothermic and circulatory arrest. In this case report, we discuss the unusual clinical presentation of this pseudoaneurysm and the absence of contrast enhancement during CT-scan, which could have lead to a catastrophic error. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Acute aortic syndromes: pathophysiology and management.

    PubMed

    Alli, Oluseun; Jacobs, Larry; Amanullah, Aman M

    2008-01-01

    The acute aortic syndromes carry significant morbidity and mortality, especially when detected late. Symptoms may mimic myocardial ischemia, and physical findings may be absent or, if present, can be suggestive of a diverse range of other conditions. Maintaining a high clinical index of suspicion is crucial in establishing the diagnosis. All patients with suspected aortic disease and evidence of acute ischemia on electrocardiogram should undergo diagnostic imaging studies before thrombolytics are administered. The demonstration of an intimal flap separating 2 lumina is the basis for diagnosis. Tear detection and localization are very important because any therapeutic intervention aims to occlude the entry tear. The goals of medical therapy are to reduce the force of left ventricular contractions, decrease the steepness of the rise of the aortic pulse wave, and reduce the systemic arterial pressure to as low a level as possible without compromising perfusion of vital organs. Surgical therapy still remains the gold standard of care for type A aortic dissection, whereas in type B dissection, percutaneous aortic stenting and fenestration techniques have been developed and are sometimes used in conjunction with medical therapy in certain situations.

  19. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation: status and challenges.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Gregory A; Schoen, Frederick J; Fishbein, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease of the elderly is the most prevalent hemodynamically-significant valvular disease, and the most common lesion requiring valve replacement in industrialized countries. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a less invasive alternative to classical aortic valve replacement that can provide a therapeutic option for high-risk or inoperable patients with aortic stenosis. These devices must be biocompatible, have excellent hemodynamic performance, be easy to insert, be securely anchored without sutures, and be durable, without increased risk of thrombosis or infection. To date, complications are related to the site of entry for insertion, the site of implantation (aorta, coronary ostia, base of left ventricle), and to the structure and design of the inserted device. However, as with any novel technology unanticipated complications will develop. Goals for future development will be to make the devices more effective, more durable, safer, and easier to implant, so as to further improve outcome for patients with severe aortic stenosis. The pathologist participating in research and development, and examination of excised devices will have a critical role in improving outcome for these patients.

  20. Tracheal replacement with an aortic autograft.

    PubMed

    Azorin, Jacques F; Bertin, Francois; Martinod, Emmanuel; Laskar, Marc

    2006-02-01

    Tracheal replacement after extensive resection remains a challenge for the thoracic surgeon. We propose an innovative solution: the use of an aortic autograft. After an experimental work on animals with aortic autografts and allografts [Martinod E, Seguin A, Pfeuty K, Fornes P, Kambouchner M, Azorin JF, Carpentier AF. Long-term evaluation of the replacement of the trachea with an autologous aortic graft. Ann Thorac Surg 2003;75(5):1572-8; Martinod E, Seguin A, Holder-Espinasse M, Kambouchner M, Duterque-Coquillaud M, Azorin JF, Carpentier AF. Tracheal regeneration following tracheal replacement with an allogenic aorta. Ann Thorac Surg 2005;79(3):942-8], we present the first human case of long tracheal replacement with an aortic autograft. In this case we replaced 7 cm of a tumoral trachea using an aortic infra-renal autograft supported by a silicone stent. The early postoperative course was uneventful. The stent was removed at three months. The patient died at six months from an acute pulmonary infection without any sign of anastomosis leakage or graft rupture. A new field of clinical study has to be investigated.

  1. Real-time transesophageal echocardiography facilitates antegrade balloon aortic valvuloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Kazato; Yano, Kentaro; Tanaka, Chiharu; Nakashoji, Tomohiro; Tonomura, Daisuke; Takehara, Kosuke; Kino, Naoto; Yoshida, Masataka; Kurotobi, Toshiya; Tsuchida, Takao; Fukumoto, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    We report two cases of severe aortic stenosis (AS) where antegrade balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) was performed under real-time transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) guidance. Real-time TEE can provide useful information for evaluating the aortic valve response to valvuloplasty during the procedure. It was led with the intentional wire-bias technique in order to compress the severely calcified leaflet, and consequently allowed the balloon to reach the largest possible size and achieve full expansion of the aortic annulus. PMID:27054107

  2. Aortic root replacement for bicuspid aortopathy following heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Elizabeth H; Fukuhara, Shinichi; Neely, Robert C; Takayama, Hiroo

    2017-09-27

    Although donors with well-functioning bicuspid aortic valves (BAV) are not a contraindication for transplantation, BAV patients are at risk for long-term aortopathy and valve dysfunction. We report a case of a patient status-post heart transplant 13 years ago who presented to our institution with a BAV and severe aortic regurgitation associated with an aortic root aneurysm and underwent aortic root replacement. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Aortic valve perforation secondary to blunt force trauma.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Sachin; Wilson, Gibbs; Suarez, Keith; Chiles, Christopher D

    2017-07-01

    Blunt chest trauma has seldom been reported as a cause of rupture of an aortic valve cusp. We report the case of a 63-year-old man who had a motor vehicle collision resulting in transection of the descending thoracic aorta, splenic pseudoaneurysm, and rupture of an aortic valve cusp causing severe aortic regurgitation. Despite replacement of the aortic valve, he died of multiorgan failure.

  4. Aortic valve perforation secondary to blunt force trauma

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Gibbs; Suarez, Keith; Chiles, Christopher D.

    2017-01-01

    Blunt chest trauma has seldom been reported as a cause of rupture of an aortic valve cusp. We report the case of a 63-year-old man who had a motor vehicle collision resulting in transection of the descending thoracic aorta, splenic pseudoaneurysm, and rupture of an aortic valve cusp causing severe aortic regurgitation. Despite replacement of the aortic valve, he died of multiorgan failure. PMID:28670065

  5. Bicuspid aortic valve and severe aortic stenosis in a newborn exposed to carbamazapine during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Karataş, Zehra; Karataş, Ahmet; Özlü, Tülay; Goksugur, Sevil B.; Varan, Birgül

    2014-01-01

    The use of antiepileptic drugs increases the risk of major congenital malformations during pregnancy. Here, we report an infant who had a history of in-utero carbamazepine exposure and who was born with a cardiac malformation. The infant was born at 39 weeks of gestation vaginally to an epileptic mother who had been treated with carbamazepine throughout her pregnancy. He was referred due to cardiac murmur in the second week of his life. The mother had not received folic acid supplementation. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed bicuspid aortic valve, mild aortic stenosis, patent ductus arteriosus, patent foramen ovale and the renal ultrasound revealed mild left hydronephrosis. Follow-up echocardiography performed 14 weeks later showed increased severity of aortic stenosis and percutaneous balloon aortic valvuloplasty was performed. To our knowledge, there is only one case report in the literature mentioning the association of a bicuspid aortic valve and aortic stenosis with oxcarbazepine exposure, which is a structural derivative of carbamazepine. However, there are no reports for association with carbamazepine itself. Bicuspid aorta and aortic stenosis may be among the cardiac malformations that result from the teratogenic effect of carbamazepine. PMID:25584038

  6. Myocardial remodeling with aortic stenosis and after aortic valve replacement: mechanisms and future prognostic implications.

    PubMed

    Yarbrough, William M; Mukherjee, Rupak; Ikonomidis, John S; Zile, Michael R; Spinale, Francis G

    2012-03-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is a common cause of left ventricular pressure overload, a pathologic process that elicits myocyte hypertrophy and alterations in extracellular matrix composition, both of which contribute to increases in left ventricular stiffness. However, clinical and animal studies suggest that increased myocardial extracellular matrix fibrillar collagen content occurs later in the time course of left ventricular pressure overload at a time coincident with severe abnormalities in diastolic function followed by the development of symptomatic heart failure. Aortic valve replacement remains the most effective treatment for elimination of chronic pressure overload secondary to aortic stenosis but has traditionally been recommended only after the onset of clinical symptoms. Long-term follow-up of patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis after aortic valve replacement suggests that valve replacement may not result in complete reversal of the maladaptive changes that occur within the myocardial extracellular matrix secondary to the pressure overload state. To the contrary, residual left ventricular extracellular matrix abnormalities such as these are likely responsible for persistent abnormalities in diastolic function and increased morbidity and mortality after aortic valve replacement. Defining the mechanisms and pathways responsible for regulating the myocardial extracellular matrix during the natural history of aortic stenosis may provide a means by which to detect crucial structural milestones and thereby permit more precise identification of the development of maladaptive left ventricular remodeling. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  7. Local repair of distal thoracal aortic dissections (Locus minoris resistencia).

    PubMed

    Belov, Iu V; Komarov, R N; Stepanenko, A B; Gens, A P; Charchian, E R

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents the method of local repair of distal aortic dissections. Local aortic grafting for surgical correction of type B dissecting aortic aneurysms helped to decrease hospital mortality up to 15.4%, the rate of paraparesis and multiorgan failure - up to 11.5%.

  8. Aortic Calcification: An Early Sign of Heart Valve Problems?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rekha Mankad, M.D. References AskMayoExpert. Valvular disease – aortic stenosis. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and ... Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/aortic-stenosis/expert-answers/aortic-valve-calcification/FAQ-20058525 . Mayo ...

  9. Total Endovascular Aortic Repair in a Patient with Marfan Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Amako, Mau; Spear, Rafaëlle; Clough, Rachel E; Hertault, Adrien; Azzaoui, Richard; Martin-Gonzalez, Teresa; Sobocinski, Jonathan; Haulon, Stéphan

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study is to describe a total endovascular aortic repair with branched and fenestrated endografts in a young patient with Marfan syndrome and a chronic aortic dissection. Open surgery is the gold standard to treat aortic dissections in patients with aortic disease and Marfan syndrome. In 2000, a 38-year-old man with Marfan syndrome underwent open ascending aorta repair for an acute type A aortic dissection. One year later, a redo sternotomy was performed for aortic valve replacement. In 2013, the patient presented with endocarditis and pulmonary infection, which necessitated tracheostomy and temporary dialysis. In 2014, the first stage of the endovascular repair was performed using an inner branched endograft to exclude a 77-mm distal arch and descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. In 2015, a 63-mm thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm was excluded by implantation of a 4-fenestrated endograft. Follow-up after both endovascular repairs was uneventful. Total aortic endovascular repair was successfully performed to treat a patient with arch and thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with chronic aortic dissection and Marfan syndrome. The postoperative images confirmed patency of the endograft and its branches, and complete exclusion of the aortic false lumen. Endovascular repair is a treatment option in patients with connective tissue disease who are not candidates for open surgery. Long-term follow-up is required to confirm these favorable early outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Painless, acute aortic dissection presenting as an acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Baydin, Ahmet; Nargis, Cemil; Nural, M Selim; Aygun, Dursun; Karatas, Aydin Deniz; Bahcivan, Muzaffer

    2006-12-01

    Acute aortic dissection is an uncommon disease; however, it has a high mortality rate. Classically, aortic dissection presents with sudden and severe pain in the chest, back, or abdomen. Patients often describe tearing or ripping pain. There are a few reports of atypical findings or no pain in the literature. We report a case of painless, acute aortic dissection presenting as acute stroke.

  11. Blunt traumatic aortic injuries of the ascending aorta and aortic arch: a clinical multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, Victor X; Marini, Milagros; Muñiz, Javier; Gulias, Daniel; Asorey-Veiga, Vanesa; Adrio-Nazar, Belen; Herrera, José M; Pradas-Montilla, Gonzalo; Cuenca, José J

    2013-09-01

    To report the clinical and radiological characteristics, management and outcomes of traumatic ascending aorta and aortic arch injuries. Historic cohort multicentre study including 17 major trauma patients with traumatic aortic injury from January 2000 to January 2011. The most common mechanism of blunt trauma was motor-vehicle crash (47%) followed by motorcycle crash (41%). Patients sustaining traumatic ascending aorta or aortic arch injuries presented a high proportion of myocardial contusion (41%); moderate or greater aortic valve regurgitation (12%); haemopericardium (35%); severe head injuries (65%) and spinal cord injury (23%). The 58.8% of the patients presented a high degree aortic injury (types III and IV). Expected in-hospital mortality was over 50% as defined by mean TRISS 59.7 (SD 38.6) and mean ISS 48.2 (SD 21.6) on admission. Observed in-hospital mortality was 53%. The cause of death was directly related to the ATAI in 45% of cases, head and abdominal injuries being the cause of death in the remaining 55% cases. Long-term survival was 46% at 1 year, 39% at 5 years, and 19% at 10 years. Traumatic aortic injuries of the ascending aorta/arch should be considered in any major thoracic trauma patient presenting cardiac tamponade, aortic valve regurgitation and/or myocardial contusion. These aortic injuries are also associated with a high incidence of neurological injuries, which can be just as lethal as the aortic injury, so treatment priorities should be modulated on an individual basis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Heritable retinoblastoma and accelerated aortic valve disease

    PubMed Central

    Abeyratne, L R; Kingston, J E; Onadim, Z; Dubrey, S W

    2013-01-01

    Heritable retinoblastoma is associated with a germline mutation in the tumour suppressor gene RBI. The Rb protein (pRb) arises from the RB1 gene, which was the first demonstrated cancer susceptibility gene in humans. 1 Second primary malignancies are recognised complications of retinoblastoma. Furthermore, pRb is implicated in valve remodelling in calcific aortic valve disease. 2 3 We report a family with hereditary retinoblastoma and associated secondary primary malignancies. There are two interesting aspects to this family. The first is the concept of ‘cancer susceptibility genes’; the RBI gene being the first reported in humans. A further feature of note is that two family members also have bicuspid aortic valves. We discuss a potential association between the gene defect responsible for retinoblastoma (with its associated propensity for further malignancies) and accelerated deterioration of the bicuspid aortic valve in the proband carrying this gene defect. PMID:23595191

  13. Vascular approaches for transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Isaac; Carro, Amelia; Hernández-Vaquero, Daniel; Díaz, Rocío; Rozado, Jose; Lorca, Rebeca; Martín, María; Silva, Jacobo; Morís, César

    2017-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a rapidly evolving therapeutic modality currently available for patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) that are unsuitable for surgery because of technical/anatomical issues or high-estimated surgical risk. Transfemoral approach is the preferred TAVI delivery route when possible. Alternative non-transfemoral access options include transaortic, trans-subclavian and transapical access. Other approaches are also feasible (transcarotid, transcaval, and antegrade aortic) but are restricted to operators and hospitals with experience. The peculiarities of each of the vascular approaches designed for TAVI delivery make it necessary to carefully assess patient’s atherosclerotic load and location, arterial size and tortuosity, and presence of mural thrombus. Several clinical trials are currently ongoing and in the near future the indications for these approaches will likely be better defined and extended to a broader spectrum of TAVI candidates. PMID:28616344

  14. [Abdominal aortic aneurysm and renovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Riambau, Vicente; Guerrero, Francisco; Montañá, Xavier; Gilabert, Rosa

    2007-06-01

    Recent technological advances in the diagnosis and therapy of abdominal aortic aneurysm and renovascular disease are continuing to bring about changes in the way patients suffering from these conditions are treated. The prevalence of both these conditions is increasing. This is due to greater life-expectancy in patients with arteriosclerosis, a pathogenetic factor underlying both conditions. The application of diagnostic imaging techniques to non-vascular conditions has led to the early diagnosis of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Clinical suspicion of reno-vascular disease can be confirmed easily using high-resolution diagnostic imaging modalities such as CT angiography and magnetic resonance angiography. Endovascular intervention is successfully replacing conventional surgical repair techniques, with the result that it may be possible to improve outcome in both conditions using effective and minimally invasive approaches. Future technological developments will enable these endovascular techniques to be applied in the large majority of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm or renovascular disease.

  15. Abdominal aortic aneurysms: an autoimmune disease?

    PubMed

    Jagadesham, Vamshi P; Scott, D Julian A; Carding, Simon R

    2008-12-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are a multifactorial degenerative vascular disorder. One of the defining features of the pathophysiology of aneurysmal disease is inflammation. Recent developments in vascular and molecular cell biology have increased our knowledge on the role of the adaptive and innate immune systems in the initiation and propagation of the inflammatory response in aortic tissue. AAAs share many features of autoimmune disease, including genetic predisposition, organ specificity and chronic inflammation. Here, this evidence is used to propose that the chronic inflammation observed in AAAs is a consequence of a dysregulated autoimmune response against autologous components of the aortic wall that persists inappropriately. Identification of the molecular and cellular targets involved in AAA formation will allow the development of therapeutic agents for the treatment of AAA.

  16. Preservation and function of heterologous aortic valves

    PubMed Central

    Gunning, A. J.; Meade, J. B.

    1971-01-01

    Heterologous aortic valves are used in many clinics as replacements for diseased human aortic and mitral valves. These valves possess all the advantages of homologous aortic valves and are more easily available to the surgeon. The heterologous valve also provides a greater choice of valve size than does the homograft; this can be of importance when replacing the mitral valve. Heterograft valves, like homografts, are usually preserved for periods ranging from a few days to a few months before insertion into a patient. Four methods of preservation, described, are currently in use. This study compares the effects of these four methods of preservation when pig valves are transplanted into the dog's aorta. Images PMID:5576535

  17. The Genetic Basis of Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Mark E.; Dietz, Harry C.

    2014-01-01

    Gene identification in human aortic aneurysm conditions is proceeding at a rapid pace and the integration of pathogenesis-based management strategies in clinical practice is an emerging reality. Human genetic alterations causing aneurysm involve diverse gene products including constituents of the extracellular matrix, cell surface receptors, intracellular signaling molecules, and elements of the contractile cytoskeleton. Animal modeling experiments and human genetic discoveries have extensively implicated the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) cytokine-signaling cascade in aneurysm progression, but mechanistic links between many gene products remain obscure. This chapter will integrate human genetic alterations associated with aortic aneurysm with current basic research findings in an attempt to form a reconciling if not unifying model for hereditary aortic aneurysm. PMID:25183854

  18. The aortic valve microenvironment and its role in calcific aortic valve disease.

    PubMed

    Yip, Cindy Ying Yin; Simmons, Craig A

    2011-01-01

    In calcific aortic valve disease, fibrotic and calcific lesions form focally in the fibrosa layer of the valve leaflets. Layer-specific pathosusceptibility suggests that the fibrosa microenvironment is permissive to pathological development. The cellular microenvironment in the aortic valve is defined by a variety of biomechanical-, biochemical-, and extracellular-mediated factors, some of which are unique to the fibrosa. Growing evidence supports the role of these microenvironmental cues in the local regulation of side-specific valve cell phenotypes and focal pathological alterations, revealing new insights into the cellular and molecular processes that contribute to calcific aortic valve disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Aortic Arch and Thoracic Aorta Curvature Remodeling after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair.

    PubMed

    Mestres, Gaspar; Garcia, Marvin E; Yugueros, Xavier; Urrea, Rodrigo; Tripodi, Paolo; Gomez, Fernando; Maeso, Jordi; Riambau, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the original curvature of the aortic arch and thoracic aorta, and how it is modified after the placement of a thoracic endograft. We retrospectively analyzed all patients primarily treated for thoracic aortic aneurysms and blunt traumatic aortic injuries by means of an endograft sealed into the aortic arch (zones, Z1-Z3) in 2 different centers (Vascular Surgery Division, Hospital Clinic, UB; and Vascular and Endovascular Surgery Department, Hospital Vall d'Hebron, UAB; Barcelona, Spain), between 2010 and 2015. The last preoperative and early (1-month) postoperative computed tomography angiography (CTA) was obtained for all cases, and an accurate 3-dimensional (3D) center lumen line was created, from the aortic valve to the renal arteries. Angles in 2-dimensional (2D; XY-plane) and 3D (referred to cranial-caudal Z-axis) were analyzed in: the distal ascending aorta, aortic arch, and thoracic aorta (at 5, 10, 15, and 20 cm from the brachiocephalic trunk [BCT]) and celiac trunk (CT). Changes in preoperative-postoperative CTA were compared independently for both diseases. Thirty-six cases were included (20 aneurysms, 16 blunt traumatic injuries; mean age, 69.5 and 42.5 years). After placement of an aortic endograft (sealed in Z1-Z2 in 30% of aneurysms and 75% of traumatic injuries; mean endograft length: 22.6 cm and 11.3 cm, respectively), a global left anterior displacement of the ascending aorta was observed (2D examination: -13.1° and -7.5°, P = 0.049 and 0.041, respectively). The 3D examination showed an average increase of the aortic angle at 5 and 10 cm from the BCT in the whole sample (+4.0°, +4.9° in reference to the vertical; P = 0.017, 0.001), softening the curvature of the proximal descending thoracic aorta. In addition, in traumatic injuries, a decrease in the aortic arch angle was observed (-3.5°, P = 0.030). Placement of an endograft into the aortic arch and proximal thoracic aorta engenders a

  20. Multiple multilayer stents for thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm: a possible new tool for aortic endovascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Tolva, Valerio Stefano; Bianchi, Paolo Guy; Cireni, Lea Valeria; Lombardo, Alma; Keller, Guido Carlo; Parati, Gianfranco; Casana, Renato Maria

    2012-01-01

    Endovascular surgery data are confirming the paramount role of modern endovascular tools for a safe and sure exclusion of thoracoabdominal lesions. A 57-year-old female presented with severe comorbidity affected by a 58 mm thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA). After patient-informed consent and local Ethical Committee and Italian Public Health Ministry authorization, three multilayer stents were implanted in the thoracoabdominal aortic tract, obtaining at a 20-month computed tomography scan follow up, a complete exclusion of the TAAA, with normal patency of visceral vessels. Multilayer stents can be used in thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm, with positive results.

  1. Multiple multilayer stents for thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm: a possible new tool for aortic endovascular surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tolva, Valerio Stefano; Bianchi, Paolo Guy; Cireni, Lea Valeria; Lombardo, Alma; Keller, Guido Carlo; Parati, Gianfranco; Casana, Renato Maria

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Endovascular surgery data are confirming the paramount role of modern endovascular tools for a safe and sure exclusion of thoracoabdominal lesions. Case report A 57-year-old female presented with severe comorbidity affected by a 58 mm thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA). After patient-informed consent and local Ethical Committee and Italian Public Health Ministry authorization, three multilayer stents were implanted in the thoracoabdominal aortic tract, obtaining at a 20-month computed tomography scan follow up, a complete exclusion of the TAAA, with normal patency of visceral vessels. Conclusion Multilayer stents can be used in thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm, with positive results. PMID:22866014

  2. Use of Endurant Stent-Graft Aortic Extensions for the Treatment of Focal Aortic Pathology.

    PubMed

    Giagtzidis, Ioakeim T; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos; Kalogirou, Thomas E; Karkos, Christos D; Papazoglou, Konstantinos O

    2016-10-01

    To describe our experience with the endovascular treatment of focal abdominal aortic pathology with an adequate distal neck length using Endurant (Medtronic) aortic extension cuffs. From July 2010 to May 2015, 16 patients (14 male), with a mean age of 73.6 years (range, 59-88), were treated for focal abdominal aortic pathology using only Endurant (Medtronic) aortic cuff extensions. The indication for intervention was a saccular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in 5 patients, a fusiform aortic aneurysm in 6 patients, abdominal aortic dissection in 2 patients, an aortic juxtarenal rupture in 1 patient, a large anastomotic pseudoaneurysm of previous bifurcated open repair in 1 patient, and a juxtarenal aneurysm above a previous open AAA repair. Aortic lesions had a mean diameter of 52.9 (range, 32-90) mm. All patients were operated under local anesthesia with unilateral femoral exposure. A single 70-mm long Endurant aortic extension was deployed in 5 cases, while in the remaining 11 cases, 2 cuffs were used with the "telescopic" (double tube) technique. A chimney technique was performed in 5 cases (with a bare metal stent in the renal artery in 3 and a stent graft in the celiac artery in 2). The intraoperative technical success was 100% with no endoleaks on completion angiogram. There was no 30-day mortality. One patient developed acute limb ischemia immediately postoperatively and was treated successfully with thrombectomy. During a mean follow-up of 21.9 months, 1 patient died 2 months after the procedure due to cardiac arrest unrelated to his aortic operation. There was 1 early type IIb endoleak (present at the 30-day follow-up computerized tomography scan), which disappeared 10 months after the procedure. Finally, 1 patient was diagnosed with a type II endoleak and stable diameter 53 months postoperatively, while to date there are no cases of stent-graft migration. The use of Endurant aortic extensions in aneurysms with adequate distal neck is a safe, simple

  3. Fever of unknown origin in aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Yuan, S-M

    2017-05-01

    Aortic dissection is the most devastating sequela of thoracic aortic disorder. Patients with acute aortic dissection typically manifest as an acute onset of severe chest pain, but occasionally present with atypical symptoms including fever of unknown origin. A total of 50 patients from 41 articles based on a complete literature retrieval were included in this study. More patients had a fever prior to pain. The time to presentation was 40.7 ± 105.6 days, the time to diagnosis was 52.9 ± 110.1 days, and the time to surgery/intervention was 1.8 ± 5.6 days. The patients' temperature on admission was 38.2 ± 0.6 °C and the maximal temperature recorded was 38.8 ± 0.4 °C. Laboratory findings showed increased white blood cell counts, cardiac enzymes, and inflammatory biomarkers. More pronounced laboratory findings of the infectious type than the inflammatory type aortic dissection could be helpful in the differential diagnosis. Half of patients warrant aortic repair with or without valve replacement, less than half of patients were conservatively managed, and a few were interventionally treated or were being followed up. The mortality rate was 9.5 %. Physicians should always bear in mind aortic dissection when patients present with fever of unknown origin particularly in those without chest pain. Laboratory findings may offer inflammatory evidence for the diagnosis. An early diagnosis as well as subsequent treatment is indispensable for patients' outcomes.

  4. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in Marfan Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hagerty, Tracy; Geraghty, Patrick; Braverman, Alan C

    2017-04-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) leads to aortic root aneurysm, while descending thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) occurs less commonly. Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is rarely reported in MFS. Risk factors for AAA are poorly understood and there are no guidelines for AAA screening in MFS. We sought to characterize AAA among Marfan patients in our center. The records of 12 adults with MFS and AAA disease were reviewed. Clinical features, imaging, operative reports, and outcomes were analyzed. Twelve adults with MFS and AAA were studied; age at AAA diagnosis was 44 ± 15 years (range 18-63). Nine patients smoked cigarettes. Eleven patients underwent prior aortic root replacement at age 31 ± 15 years. The size of AAA was 5.0 ± 1.3 cm (range 3.5-7.5) at the time of diagnosis. The AAA was suprarenal in 5, juxtarenal in 2, and infrarenal in 5 patients. Two patients had a descending TAA. Branch vessel aneurysms were present in 7 patients. Five patients underwent open surgical repair, 5 underwent endovascular repair, and 5 are being treated medically. One patient died suddenly with AAA size 5.7 cm, 2 months before death. Three patients subsequently developed type B aortic dissection, from 3 months to 9 years after AAA diagnosis. Adults with MFS are at risk for developing AAA. Evaluation for AAA is recommended in adults with MFS and prior root replacement, especially if descending aortic or branch vessel aneurysm is present or the patient smokes cigarettes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Aortic Input Impedance during Nitroprusside Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Pepine, Carl J.; Nichols, W. W.; Curry, R. C.; Conti, C. Richard

    1979-01-01

    Beneficial effects of nitroprusside infusion in heart failure are purportedly a result of decreased afterload through “impedance” reduction. To study the effect of nitroprusside on vascular factors that determine the total load opposing left ventricular ejection, the total aortic input impedance spectrum was examined in 12 patients with heart failure (cardiac index <2.0 liters/min per m2 and left ventricular end diastolic pressure >20 mm Hg). This input impedance spectrum expresses both mean flow (resistance) and pulsatile flow (compliance and wave reflections) components of vascular load. Aortic root blood flow velocity and pressure were recorded continuously with a catheter-tip electromagnetic velocity probe in addition to left ventricular pressure. Small doses of nitroprusside (9-19 μg/min) altered the total aortic input impedance spectrum as significant (P < 0.05) reductions in both mean and pulsatile components were observed within 60-90 s. With these acute changes in vascular load, left ventricular end diastolic pressure declined (44%) and stroke volume increased (20%, both P < 0.05). Larger nitroprusside doses (20-38 μg/min) caused additional alteration in the aortic input impedance spectrum with further reduction in left ventricular end diastolic pressure and increase in stroke volume but no additional changes in the impedance spectrum or stroke volume occurred with 39-77 μg/min. Improved ventricular function persisted when aortic pressure was restored to control values with simultaneous phenylephrine infusion in three patients. These data indicate that nitroprusside acutely alters both the mean and pulsatile components of vascular load to effect improvement in ventricular function in patients with heart failure. The evidence presented suggests that it may be possible to reduce vascular load and improve ventricular function independent of aortic pressure reduction. PMID:457874

  6. Genes and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Hinterseher, Irene; Tromp, Gerard; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2010-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a multifactorial disease with a strong genetic component. Since first candidate gene studies were published 20 years ago, nearly 100 genetic association studies using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in biologically relevant genes have been reported on AAA. The studies investigated SNPs in genes of the extracellular matrix, the cardiovascular system, the immune system, and signaling pathways. Very few studies were large enough to draw firm conclusions and very few results could be replicated in another sample set. The more recent unbiased approaches are family-based DNA linkage studies and genome-wide genetic association studies, which have the potential of identifying the genetic basis for AAA, if appropriately powered and well-characterized large AAA cohorts are used. SNPs associated with AAA have already been identified in these large multicenter studies. One significant association was of a variant in a gene called CNTN3 which is located on chromosome 3p12.3. Two follow-up studies, however, could not replicate the association. Two other SNPs, which are located on chromosome 9p21 and 9q33 were replicated in other samples. The two genes with the strongest supporting evidence of contribution to the genetic risk for AAA are the CDKN2BAS gene, also known as ANRIL, which encodes an antisense RNA that regulates expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors CDKN2A and CDKN2B, and DAB2IP, which encodes an inhibitor of cell growth and survival. Functional studies are now needed to establish the mechanisms by which these genes contribute to AAA pathogenesis. PMID:21146954

  7. ULTIMATE RESULTS OF AORTIC TRANSPLANTATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Carrel, Alexis

    1912-01-01

    In the first experiment, a segment of popliteal artery, extirpated from the leg of a young man and preserved for twenty-four days in cold storage, was transplanted upon the abdominal aorta of a small bitch. The animal lived in excellent health for four years and two months, became pregnant several times, and finally died during labor. The abdominal aorta was normal, but the human arterial segment was slightly dilated, and its wall was composed of connective tissue only. In the second experiment, a segment of dog's jugular vein, preserved for twenty-four hours in cold storage, was transplanted upon the thoracic aorta of a fox terrier. In spite of slight lesions of the cord due to interruption of the aortic circulation during the operation, the animal remained in excellent health. After two years and two months, the dog died of an epidemic disease. The descending aorta was normal. The transplanted segment had about the same caliber as that of the aorta, but its wall was composed of connective tissue, with no evidence of muscular or elastic tissues. In these two experiments, the walls of the transplanted segments contained neither muscle nor elastic tissue fibers and were not thicker than those of the artery. Nevertheless, they were able to withstand the pressure of the blood without undergoing any marked dilatation. If death due to accident had not brought these two experiments to an end, it is probable that the transplanted segment would have successfully resisted the pressure of the blood for a much longer time. As it is, the result shows that, in one experiment after four years and in the other after two years, the segments transplanted upon the abdominal and thoracic aortas were still efficient. PMID:19867531

  8. Aortic injuries in newer vehicles.

    PubMed

    Ryb, Gabriel E; Dischinger, Patricia C; Kleinberger, Michael; McGwin, Gerald; Griffin, Russell L

    2013-10-01

    The occurrence of AI was studied in relation to vehicle model year (MY) among front seat vehicular occupants, age≥16 in vehicles MY≥1994, entered in the National Automotive Sampling System Crashworthiness Data System between 1997 and 2010 to determine whether newer vehicles, due to their crashworthiness improvements, are linked to a lower risk of aortic injuries (AI). MY was categorized as 1994-1997, 1998-2004, or 2005-2010 reflecting the introduction of newer occupant protection technology. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals for the association between AI and MY independent of possible confounders. Analysis was repeated, stratified by frontal and near lateral impacts. AI occurred in 19,187 (0.06%) of the 31,221,007 (weighted) cases, and contributed to 11% of all deaths. AIs were associated with advanced age, male gender, high BMI, near-side impact, rollover, ejection, collision against a fixed object, high ΔV, vehicle mismatch, unrestrained status, and forward track position. Among frontal crashes, MY 98-04 and MY 05-10 showed increased adjusted odds of AI when compared to MY 94-97 [OR 1.84 (1.02-3.32) and 1.99 (0.93-4.26), respectively]. In contrast, among near-side impact crashes, MY 98-04 and MY 05-10 showed decreased adjusted odds of AI [OR 0.50 (0.25-0.99) and 0.27 (0.06-1.31), respectively]. While occupants of newer vehicles experience lower odds of AI in near side impact crashes, a higher AI risk is present in frontal crashes.

  9. Ventricular Septal Defect from Aortic Regurgitation Jet Lesion in Aortic Valve Infective Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Darabant, Sergiu; Oberton, Shelby B; Roldan, Luis P; Roldan, Carlos A

    2016-03-01

    Aortic valve infective endocarditis (IE) can be complicated with severe aortic regurgitation (AR) jet-related lesions such as vegetations, pseudoaneurysms, aneurysms or perforations on the anterior mitral leaflet. Herein is reported the case of a 69-year-old male with culture-negative aortic valve endocarditis complicated with aortic valve perforations resulting in severe and eccentric AR and an AR jet-related ventricular septal defect (VSD). Neither transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) nor two-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (2D-TEE) were unable to clearly discriminate an aorto-right ventricular fistula from a VSD. By contrast, three-dimensional TEE (3D-TEE) demonstrated multiple aortic valve vegetations, aortic valve perforations, severe AR, and an AR jet-related VSD. The 3D-TEE findings were confirmed at surgery, the aortic valve was replaced with a bioprosthetic valve, and the VSD was repaired with a pericardial patch. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of a VSD resulting from an AR jet lesion to be detected and characterized using 3D-TEE. The accurate preoperative diagnosis and characterization of the VSD with 3D-TEE contributed to successful surgery and the patient's short- and long-term survival. Video 1A: This four-chamber transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) view with color Doppler shows a color-Doppler jet traversing the basal interventricular septum (IVS) into the right ventricle, predominantly during systole. However, the origin of the jet resulting from an aortic-right ventricular fistula cannot be determined. A mild to moderate degree of tricuspid regurgitation is also noted. Video 1B: Close-up view of the basal IVS demonstrates a color Doppler jet traversing the IVS, predominantly during systole and apparently originating in the left ventricular outflow tract side, as illustrated by a color Doppler acceleration zone. However, and as in Fig. 1A, the origin of the jet resulting from an aortic-right ventricular fistula cannot

  10. Supravalvular aortic stenosis after arterial switch operation.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Takuya; Koide, Masaaki; Kunii, Yoshifumi; Watanabe, Kazumasa; Kanzaki, Tomohito; Ohashi, Yuko

    2016-07-01

    Supravalvular aortic stenosis as a late complication of transposition of the great arteries is very rare, and only a few cases have been reported. We describe the case of a 14-year-old girl who developed supravalvular aortic stenosis as a late complication of the arterial switch operation for transposition of the great arteries. The narrowed ascending aorta was replaced with a graft. The right pulmonary artery was transected to approach the ascending aorta which adhered severely to the main pulmonary trunk, and we obtained a good operative field.

  11. Transcatheter wiring of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, P.; Simonetti, G.; Passariello, R.; Stipa, S.; Cavallaro, A.

    1983-04-01

    A new technique of transcatheder wiring of unresectable aortic aneurysm is described that provides simultaneous transcatheder occlusion of both common iliac arteries followed by exillofemoral bypass. The spring coil used for aortic aneurysm wiring was of our own making. The outer portion of a movable core stainless steel guidewire was bent in a coil shape and introduced into the aneurysm through a 7 French Teflon catheder via the right femoral artery. The same catheder was also used for coil embolus occlusion of both iliac arteries.

  12. A bovine aortic arch in humans

    PubMed Central

    Arnáiz-García, María Elena; González-Santos, Jose María; López-Rodriguez, Javier; Dalmau-Sorli, María José; Bueno-Codoñer, María; Arévalo-Abascal, Adolfo; Fdez García-Hierro, Jose Ma; Arnáiz-García, Ana María; Arnáiz, Javier

    2014-01-01

    We describe a curious congenital variation of human aortic arch (AA) branching pattern termed the “bovine aortic arch”. Rather than arising directly from the AA as a separate branch as occurs in the most common AA branching pattern, the left common carotid artery moves to the right and merges from the brachiocephalic trunk. It is the normal AA branching pattern presented in a number of animals (canines, felines or Macaque monkeys) but it has nothing to do with anatomy of AA in ruminant animals, including cattle and buffalo. That is why it is one of the most widely misnomers used in medical literature whose origin is nowadays unknown. PMID:24973853

  13. A bovine aortic arch in humans.

    PubMed

    Arnáiz-García, María Elena; González-Santos, Jose María; López-Rodriguez, Javier; Dalmau-Sorli, María José; Bueno-Codoñer, María; Arévalo-Abascal, Adolfo; Fdez García-Hierro, Jose Ma; Arnáiz-García, Ana María; Arnáiz, Javier

    2014-01-01

    We describe a curious congenital variation of human aortic arch (AA) branching pattern termed the "bovine aortic arch". Rather than arising directly from the AA as a separate branch as occurs in the most common AA branching pattern, the left common carotid artery moves to the right and merges from the brachiocephalic trunk. It is the normal AA branching pattern presented in a number of animals (canines, felines or Macaque monkeys) but it has nothing to do with anatomy of AA in ruminant animals, including cattle and buffalo. That is why it is one of the most widely misnomers used in medical literature whose origin is nowadays unknown.

  14. Idiopathic thoracic aortic aneurysm at pediatric age.

    PubMed

    Marín-Manzano, E; González-de-Olano, D; Haurie-Girelli, J; Herráiz-Sarachaga, J I; Bermúdez-Cañete, R; Tamariz-Martel, A; Cuesta-Gimeno, C; Pérez-de-León, J

    2009-03-01

    A 6-year-old-boy presented with epigastric pain and vomiting over 1 year. Chest X-ray and esophagogastric transit showed a mediastinal mass. A chest computerized tomography angiogram demonstrated a descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. Analytical determinations carried out were all negative. The aneurysm was surgically repaired using a Dacron patch. The anatomopathological study described atherosclerotic lesions with calcifications, compatible with an atherosclerotic aneurysm wall. Aneurysms are uncommon in the pediatric population. Usually, no pathogenesis can be determined, and thus, such cases are grouped as idiopathic. Direct repair with or without patch is a therapeutic alternative in pediatric aneurysms and can allow the growth of the aortic circumference.

  15. Carotid endarterectomy using a "home-constructed" shunt for patients intolerant to cross-clamping.

    PubMed

    Ugurlucan, Murat; Filik, Muslum Ercument; Caglar, Ilker Murat; Zencirci, Ertugrul; Sayin, Omer Ali; Aydiner, Omer; Yildiz, Yahya; Basaran, Murat; Cicek, Sertac

    2015-03-01

    There is a small minority of patients with occlusive carotid artery disease, who are at high-risk for general anesthesia because of their intolerance to carotid flow blockage, even if only for seconds, without neurologic deficit. Even <30 s of temporary clamping of the carotid arteries to deploy a shunt may prove eventful in this patient group. We define safe carotid endarterectomy after the insertion of a novel shunt that we made from simple medical equipment in this patient population. Among 65 patients who underwent carotid endarterectomy between March 2010 and December 2012, 5 (7.7 %; 3 men and 2 women; age range 56-77 years) could not tolerate carotid clamping. We used an alternative carotid shunt, made by us from simple equipment in our clinic, during surgery for these patients. Two patients had bilateral lesions and the remainder had unilateral disease. The degree of stenosis ranged from 70 to 95 %. Temporary carotid clamping resulted in neurologic events, such as loss of consciousness in all and tremor in one, in <10 s (range, from immediately to 8 s after clamping). Full neurologic function was regained 15-30 s after releasing the clamps. All of the patients tolerated the procedures well with the support of our novel shunt. Shunt flow was adequate in all patients and no neurologic deterioration occurred after carotid clamping. The mean carotid clamp time was 28.11 ± 14.19 min. There was no mortality and all patients were followed up for a mean period of 9.3 ± 3.6 months, uneventfully. An alternative, simple shunt, which is easily constructed in the operating room or clinic, using an angiocatheter, a three-way stopcock, and a serum line can provide adequate cerebral flow and permit safe carotid endarterectomy for those rare patients with carotid artery stenosis, who cannot tolerate even seconds of carotid occlusion.

  16. Excessive Surgical Adhesive Mimicking Aortic Root Abscess: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Silverton, Natalie A; Bull, David A; Morrissey, Candice K

    2017-07-15

    Aortic root abscess is a complication of aortic valve endocarditis that is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. The diagnosis usually is made with transesophageal echocardiography, which is highly sensitive and specific for the disease. We present a case of suspected aortic root abscess 1 week after mechanical aortic valve replacement for native valve endocarditis. The diagnosis was made by the use of transesophageal echocardiography but surgical inspection revealed that the paravalvular fluid collection was excessive surgical adhesive. We discuss the clinical significance and differential diagnosis of aortic root abscess in the setting of infective endocarditis.

  17. Endovascular treatment for traumatic thoracic aortic pseudoaneurysm: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cases of an endovascular treatment for traumatic aortic injury are extremely rare. A prompt diagnosis of traumatic thoracic aortic pseudoaneurysm through a 3-dimensional computed tomographic angiography of aorta and emergency repair are mandatory to rescue the life-threatening condition. An endovascular treatment is a trend for traumatic aortic injury because of lower invasivity, morbidity and mortality. We reported a rare case of traumatic aortic injury with thoracic aortic pseudoaneurysm definitively diagnosed by the reconstructional computed tomographic angiography of aorta and successfully treated with endovascular stent-graft. PMID:23452982

  18. First reported case of fetal aortic valvuloplasty in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sun-Young; Lee, Mi-Young; Cho, Min Kyong; Jung, Euiseok; Kim, Ki-Soo; Kim, Young-Hwue

    2017-01-01

    Prenatal intervention of severe fetal aortic valve stenosis by ultrasound-guided percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty has been performed to prevent the progression to hypoplastic left heart syndrome, and achieve biventricular circulation in neonates. Here we report a case of fetal aortic valvuloplasty prenatally diagnosed with aortic stenosis at 24 weeks of gestation and showed worsening features on a follow-up echocardiography. Prenatal aortic valvuloplasty was performed at 29 weeks of gestation, and was a technical success. However, fetal bradycardia sustained, and an emergency cesarean delivery was performed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of fetal aortic valvuloplasty which was performed in Asia. PMID:28217680

  19. Portico Sheathless Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation via Distal Axillary Artery.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Giuseppe; Colombo, Paola; Botta, Luca; Nava, Stefano; Merlanti, Bruno; Belli, Oriana; Musca, Francesco; Soriano, Francesco; Russo, Claudio F; Oliva, Fabrizio

    2017-02-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation has been designed to treat older patients affected by severe aortic stenosis who are considered high-risk surgical candidates because of multiple comorbidities. The least invasive approach for transcatheter aortic valves implantation should be considered the transfemoral retrograde route, because it is minimally invasive and is feasible with local anesthesia and mild sedation. Despite significant technical improvements in recent years, the transfemoral approach is contraindicated in cases of severe peripheral artery disease. We describe the first case of a Portico transcatheter aortic valve implantation system (St. Jude Medical, Minneapolis, MN) made through the distal axillary artery in a 90-year-old patient affected by severe aortic stenosis.

  20. Proposed modification for valve-sparing aortic root replacement.

    PubMed

    Mahesh, Balakrishnan; Deville, Claude; Nashef, Samer

    2014-05-01

    Valve-sparing aortic root replacement (ARR) is the procedure of choice in young patients with aortic root aneurysm and preserved aortic valve leaflets; however, coronary ostial anastomoses remain an issue. Troublesome bleeding sometimes occurs during surgery, and in the long term, there is a risk of aneurysmal formation in the residual aortic wall of the ostial "button." We describe a technique of valve-sparing ARR wherein each coronary button along with its flange of aortic tissue is implanted within the prosthetic graft used for ARR, thereby eliminating the risk of both immediate surgical bleeding and late coronary button aneurysms.

  1. Endovascular Management of Chronic Type B Dissecting Aortic Aneurysm Utilizing Aortic and Renal Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J. D. Dunckley, M.; Thompson, M.; Morgan, R. A.

    2008-07-15

    Over the last 10 years endovascular stent-graft placement has been increasingly used to treat complicated acute Type B thoracic aortic dissections. While studies have demonstrated the use of additional aortic stent-grafts to treat continued false lumen perfusion and case reports have detailed the use of renal artery stents to treat renal ischemia related to aortic dissection, to our knowledge the adjuvant use of renal artery stents to reduce false lumen perfusion has not been reported. We present the case of a 72-year-old male who had previously undergone endovascular repair of a complicated Type B thoracic aortic dissection and presented with an expanding false lumen in the peridiaphragmatic aorta despite coverage of the entire thoracic aorta. This was treated by closure of a right renal fenestration using a renal stent.

  2. Risk of Aortic Dissection and Aortic Aneurysm in Patients Taking Oral Fluoroquinolone.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chien-Chang; Lee, Meng-Tse Gabriel; Chen, Yueh-Sheng; Lee, Shih-Hao; Chen, Yih-Sharng; Chen, Shyr-Chyr; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2015-11-01

    Fluoroquinolones have been associated with collagen degradation, raising safety concerns related to more serious collagen disorders with use of these antibiotics, including aortic aneurysm and dissection. To examine the relationship between fluoroquinolone therapy and the risk of developing aortic aneurysm and dissection. We conducted a nested case-control analysis of 1477 case patients and 147 700 matched control cases from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) from among 1 million individuals longitudinally observed from January 2000 through December 2011. Cases patients were defined as those hospitalized for aortic aneurysm or dissection. One hundred control patients were matched for each case based on age and sex. Current, past, or any prior-year use of fluoroquinolone. Current use was defined as a filled fluoroquinolone prescription within 60 days of the aortic aneurysm or dissection; past use refers to a filled fluoroquinolone prescription between 61 and 365 days prior to the aortic aneurysm; and any prior-year use refers to having a fluoroquinolone prescription filled for 3 or more days any time during the 1-year period before the aortic aneurysm or dissection. Risk of developing aortic aneurysm or dissection. A total of 1477 individuals who experienced aortic aneurysm or dissection were matched to 147 700 controls. After propensity score adjustment, current use of fluoroquinolones was found to be associated with increased risk for aortic aneurysm or dissection (rate ratio [RR], 2.43; 95% CI, 1.83-3.22), as was past use, although this risk was attenuated (RR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.18-1.86). Sensitivity analysis focusing on aortic aneurysm and dissection requiring surgery also demonstrated an increased risk associated with current fluoroquinolone use, but the increase was not statistically significant (propensity score-adjusted RR, 2.15; 95% CI, 0.97-4.60). Use of fluoroquinolones was associated with an increased risk of aortic aneurysm and

  3. Morphometric evaluation of the aortic root in stillborns.

    PubMed

    da Fonseca Ferraz, Mara Lúcia; Franco, Calline Alves; Juliano, Gabriela Ribeiro; Juliano, Guilherme Ribeiro; de Almeida, João Antônio; Soares, Maria Helena; Oliveira, Lívia Ferreira; Ramalho, Luciana Santos; Cavellani, Camila Lourencini; Espindula, Ana Paula; Corrêa, Rosana Rosa Miranda; de Oliveira, Flávia Aparecida; Dos Reis, Marlene Antônia; de Paula Antunes Teixeira, Vicente

    2016-08-01

    To describe the dimensions and amount of collagen in the aortic root of autopsied fetuses at different gestational ages. 40 samples of aortic roots were selected from autopsied fetuses with gestational ages ranging between 20 and 40 weeks. The thickness and the area of the aortic wall were analyzed on slides stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin, and the collagen was quantified on slides stained with Picrosirius, by using an image analyzing system. A positive correlation was observed between the thickness of the media layer of the aortic wall and the gestational age. There was a positive and significant correlation between the percentage of collagen in the aortic wall with gestational age and fetal weight. The correlation between gestational age and the area of the aortic root circumference was positive and significant. And the correlation between the aortic diameter and the gestational age as well as fetal length was positive and significant. The thickness of the media layer, the amount of collagen in the aortic wall, the area of the aortic root circumference and the aortic diameter rose with the increase of the gestational age. Thus, the morphological analysis of the aortic root may help as a parameter during the follow-up of inter-uterine growth and fetal development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Aortic Remodeling Following Transverse Aortic Constriction in Mice is Attenuated with AT1 Receptor Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Shao-Qing; Geng, Liang; Prakash, Siddharth K.; Cao, Jiu-Mei; Guo, Steven; Villamizar, Carlos; Kwartler, Callie S.; Ju, Xiaoxi; Brasier, Allan R.; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although hypertension is the most common risk factor for thoracic aortic diseases, it is not understood how increased pressures on the ascending aorta lead to aortic aneurysms. We investigated the role of Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor activation in ascending aortic remodeling in response to increased biomechanical forces using a transverse aortic constriction (TAC) mouse model. Approach and Results Two weeks after TAC, the increased biomechanical pressures led to ascending aortic dilatation, aortic wall thickening and medial hypertrophy. Significant adventitial hyperplasia and inflammatory responses in TAC ascending aortas were accompanied by increased adventitial collagen, elevated inflammatory and proliferative markers, and increased cell density due to accumulation of myofibroblasts and macrophages. Treatment with losartan significantly blocked TAC induced vascular inflammation and macrophage accumulation. However, losartan only partially prevented TAC induced adventitial hyperplasia, collagen accumulation and ascending aortic dilatation. Increased Tgfb2 expression and phosphorylated-Smad2 staining in the medial layer of TAC ascending aortas was effectively blocked with losartan. In contrast, the increased Tgfb1 expression and adventitial phospho-Smad2 staining were only partially attenuated by losartan. In addition, losartan significantly blocked Erk activation and ROS production in the TAC ascending aorta. Conclusions Inhibition of the AT1 receptor using losartan significantly attenuated the vascular remodeling associated with TAC but did not completely block the increased TGF- β1 expression, adventitial Smad2 signaling and collagen accumulation. These results help to delineate the aortic TGF-β signaling that is dependent and independent of the AT1 receptor after TAC. PMID:23868934

  5. Modelling of aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection through 3D printing.

    PubMed

    Ho, Daniel; Squelch, Andrew; Sun, Zhonghua

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess if the complex anatomy of aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection can be accurately reproduced from a contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan into a three-dimensional (3D) printed model. Contrast-enhanced cardiac CT scans from two patients were post-processed and produced as 3D printed thoracic aorta models of aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection. The transverse diameter was measured at five anatomical landmarks for both models, compared across three stages: the original contrast-enhanced CT images, the stereolithography (STL) format computerised model prepared for 3D printing and the contrast-enhanced CT of the 3D printed model. For the model with aortic dissection, measurements of the true and false lumen were taken and compared at two points on the descending aorta. Three-dimensional printed models were generated with strong and flexible plastic material with successful replication of anatomical details of aortic structures and pathologies. The mean difference in transverse vessel diameter between the contrast-enhanced CT images before and after 3D printing was 1.0 and 1.2 mm, for the first and second models respectively (standard deviation: 1.0 mm and 0.9 mm). Additionally, for the second model, the mean luminal diameter difference between the 3D printed model and CT images was 0.5 mm. Encouraging results were achieved with regards to reproducing 3D models depicting aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection. Variances in vessel diameter measurement outside a standard deviation of 1 mm tolerance indicate further work is required into the assessment and accuracy of 3D model reproduction. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian Society of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy and New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology.

  6. [Evaluation of aortic valve replacement involving small severely calcified aortic annulus in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Iwahashi, M; Nishimura, Y; Hiramatsu, K; Komori, S; Shibata, M; Yuzaki, M; Okamura, Y

    2006-04-01

    We performed aortic valve replacement in 24 patients aged over 70 with small calcified valves. The surgical management of such patients remains controversial as the extensive calcification compromises implantation. Hence, we used an ultrasonic debridement instrument to remove calcium and selected a small prosthesis with the largest possible orifice without enlargement of the aortic annulus. Echocardiography showed significant reductions in left ventricular mass index compared with preoperative values. Early and mid-term prognosis has been relatively good.

  7. Sex differences in aortic valve calcification measured by multidetector computed tomography in aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Shivani R; Clavel, Marie-Annick; Messika-Zeitoun, David; Cueff, Caroline; Malouf, Joseph; Araoz, Philip A; Mankad, Rekha; Michelena, Hector; Vahanian, Alec; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2013-01-01

    Aortic valve calcification (AVC) is the intrinsic mechanism of valvular obstruction leading to aortic stenosis (AS) and is measurable by multidetector computed tomography. The link between sex and AS is controversial and that with AVC is unknown. We prospectively performed multidetector computed tomography in 665 patients with AS (aortic valve area, 1.05±0.35 cm(2); mean gradient, 39±19 mm Hg) to measure AVC and to assess the impact of sex on the AVC-AS severity link in men and women. AS severity was comparable between women and men (peak aortic jet velocity: 4.05±0.99 versus 3.93±0.91 m/s, P=0.11; aortic valve area index: 0.55±0.20 versus 0.56±0.18 cm(2)/m(2); P=0.46). Conversely, AVC load was lower in women versus men (1703±1321 versus 2694±1628 arbitrary units; P<0.0001) even after adjustment for their smaller body surface area or aortic annular area (both P<0.0001). Thus, odds of high-AVC load were much greater in men than in women (odds ratio, 5.07; P<0.0001). Although AVC showed good associations with hemodynamic AS severity in men and women (all r>0.67; P<0.0001), for any level of AS severity measured by peak aortic jet velocity or aortic valve area index, AVC load, absolute or indexed, was higher in men versus women (all P≤0.01). In this large AS population, women incurred similar AS severity than men for lower AVC loads, even after indexing for their smaller body size. Hence, the relationship between valvular calcification process and AS severity differs in women and men, warranting further pathophysiological inquiry. For AS severity diagnostic purposes, interpretation of AVC load should be different in men and in women.

  8. Frequency of abdominal aortic expansion after thoracic endovascular repair of type B aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Weber, Tim F; Böckler, Dittmar; Müller-Eschner, Matthias; Bischoff, Moritz; Kronlage, Moritz; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Hyhlik-Dürr, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    To determine abdominal aortic expansion after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in patients with aortic dissection type B and 36 months minimum follow-up. Retrospective study of 18 TEVAR patients with follow-up >36 months. Abdominal aortic diameters at celiac trunk (location B) and infrarenal aorta (location C) were recorded on the first and last imaging after TEVAR. False lumen thrombosis was determined at level of endograft (A) and at B and C. Aortic expansion was defined as diameter increase of 5 mm or 15%. Correlation analyses were performed to investigate potential determinants of expansion. Median follow-up was 75.2 months. Sixteen of 18 patients (88.9%) demonstrated abdominal expansion. Mean expansion was 9.9 ± 6.1 mm at B and 11.7 ± 6.5 mm at C, without a difference between acute and chronic dissections. Critical diameters of 55 mm were reached in two patients treated for chronic dissection (11.1%). Annual diameter increase was significantly greater at locations with baseline diameters >30 mm (2.1 ± 1.1 mm vs. 1.0 ± 0.6 mm, p = 0.009). Baseline diameters were greater in patients with chronic dissections. Abdominal aortic expansion can be frequently recognized after TEVAR for aortic dissection type B and occurs independently from thoracic false lumen thrombosis. Clinical significant abdominal aortic expansion may occur more frequently in patients treated with TEVAR for chronic dissection. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Aortic insufficiency. A result of intermittent migration of aortic valve prosthesis poppet.

    PubMed

    Kunstadt, D; Adeyemo, A; Clauss, R H

    1976-06-28

    A bizarre mechanism of aortic valve incompetence was observed when the occluder of a Braunwald-Cutter aortic valve prosthesis decreased in diameter, volume, and weight, and from time to time fell into the left ventricle. The patient's symptoms were palpitation, coughing, chocking sensations, and fright. An operation disclosed a small, smooth ball with disrupted cloth on all the struts. The residual torn mesh was removed, and the ball was replaced.

  10. Aortic Valvular Replacement: Clinical Experience With 13 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Grondin, Pierre; Lepage, Gilles; Castonguay, Yves

    1964-01-01

    Acquired aortic disease is now currently corrected by total prosthetic replacement of the aortic valve. Aortic valve replacement was performed in 13 cases at the Montreal Heart Institute in 1963. In the first four cases, Bahnson aortic leaflets were used; in the remaining nine, the Starr-Edwards semirigid aortic valve prosthesis. The surgical technique employed is described. There were two operative deaths and two late deaths. The results have been excellent in all of the survivors but one. They have returned to full-time activities and four of them to strenuous physical work. It is the contention of the authors that aortic valve replacement is a surgical procedure with acceptable risks, offering hope for a near-normal life to patients crippled by severe aortic valvular lesions. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7 PMID:14179061

  11. Association of aortic valve calcification severity with the degree of aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Koos, Ralf; Mahnken, Andreas Horst; Dohmen, Guido; Brehmer, Kathrin; Günther, Rolf W; Autschbach, Rüdiger; Marx, Nikolaus; Hoffmann, Rainer

    2011-07-15

    This study sought to examine a possible relationship between the severity of aortic valve calcification (AVC), the distribution of AVC and the degree of aortic valve regurgitation (AR) after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) for severe aortic stenosis (AS). 57 patients (22 men, 81 ± 5 years) with symptomatic AS and with a logistic EuroSCORE of 24 ± 12 were included. 38 patients (67%) received a third (18F)-generation CoreValve® aortic valve prosthesis, in 19 patients (33%) an Edwards SAPIEN™ prosthesis was implanted. Prior to TAVI dual-source computed tomography for assessment of AVC was performed. To determine the distribution of AVC the percentage of the calcium load of the most severely calcified cusp was calculated. After TAVI the degree of AR was determined by angiography and echocardiography. The severity of AR after TAVI was related to the severity and distribution of AVC. There was no association between the distribution of AVC and the degree of paravalvular AR after TAVI as assessed by angiography (r = -0.02, p = 0.88). Agatston AVC scores were significantly higher in patients with AR grade ≥ 3 (5055 ± 1753, n = 3) than in patients with AR grade < 3 (1723 ± 967, p = 0.03, n = 54). Agatston AVC scores > 3000 were associated with a relevant paravalvular AR and showed a trend for increased need for second manoeuvres. There was a significant correlation between the severity of AVC and the degree of AR after AVR (r = 0.50, p < 0.001). Patients with severe AVC have an increased risk for a relevant AR after TAVI as well as a trend for increased need for additional procedures. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Computed tomography evaluation for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI): imaging of the aortic root and iliac arteries.

    PubMed

    Schoenhagen, Paul; Kapadia, Samir R; Halliburton, Sandra S; Svensson, Lars G; Tuzcu, E Murat

    2011-01-01

    For patients with severe aortic stenosis, open-heart surgical valve replacement remains the current clinical standard with documented, excellent long-term outcome. Over the past few years, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has developed into a treatment alternative for high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Because transcatheter valvular procedures are characterized by lack of exposure of the operative field, image guidance is critical. This Pictorial Essay describes the role of 3-dimensional imaging with multidetector row computed tomography for detailed reconstructions of the aortic valve, aortic root, and iliac arteries in the context of TAVI.

  13. Vitamins and abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hisato; Umemoto, Takuya

    2017-02-01

    To summarize the association of vitamins (B6, B12, C, D, and E) and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), we reviewed clinical studies with a comprehensive literature research and meta-analytic estimates. To identify all clinical studies evaluating the association of vitamins B6/B12/C/D/E and AAA, databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched through April 2015, using Web-based search engines (PubMed and OVID). For each case-control study, data regarding vitamin levels in both the AAA and control groups were used to generate standardized mean differences (SMDs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Pooled analyses of the 4 case-control studies demonstrated significantly lower circulating vitamin B6 levels (SMD, -0.33; 95% CI, -0.55 to -0.11; P=0.003) but non-significantly lower vitamin B12 levels (SMD, -0.42; 95% CI, -1.09 to 0.25; P=0.22) in patients with AAA than subjects without AAA. Pooled analyses of the 2 case-control studies demonstrated significantly lower levels of circulating vitamins C (SMD, -0.71; 95% CI, -1.23 to -0.19; P=0.007) and E (SMD, -1.76; 95% CI, -2.93 to 0.60; P=0.003) in patients with AAA than subjects without AAA. Another pooled analysis of the 3 case-control studies demonstrated significantly lower circulating vitamin D (25-hydroxyvitamin D) levels (SMD, -0.25; 95% CI, -0.50 to -0.01; P=0.04) in patients with AAA than subjects without AAA. In a double-blind controlled trial, 4.0-year treatment with a high-dose folic acid and vitamin B6/B12 multivitamin in kidney transplant recipients did not reduce a rate of AAA repair despite significant reduction in homocysteine level. In another randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 5.8-year supplementation with α-tocopherol (vitamin E) had no preventive effect on large AAA among male smokers. In clinical setting, although low circulating vitamins B6/C/D/E (not B12) levels are associated with AAA presence, vitamins B6/B12/E

  14. Ultrasonic delineation of aortic microstructure: The relative contribution of elastin and collagen to aortic elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Jon N.; Takiuchi, Shin; Lin, Shiow Jiuan; Lanza, Gregory M.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2004-05-01

    Aortic elasticity is an important factor in hemodynamic health, and compromised aortic compliance affects not only arterial dynamics but also myocardial function. A variety of pathologic processes (e.g., diabetes, Marfan's syndrome, hypertension) can affect aortic elasticity by altering the microstructure and composition of the elastin and collagen fiber networks within the tunica media. Ultrasound tissue characterization techniques can be used to obtain direct measurements of the stiffness coefficients of aorta by measurement of the speed of sound in specific directions. In this study we sought to define the contributions of elastin and collagen to the mechanical properties of aortic media by measuring the magnitude and directional dependence of the speed of sound before and after selective isolation of either the collagen or elastin fiber matrix. Formalin-fixed porcine aortas were sectioned for insonification in the circumferential, longitudinal, or radial direction and examined using high-frequency (50 MHz) ultrasound microscopy. Isolation of the collagen or elastin fiber matrices was accomplished through treatment with NaOH or formic acid, respectively. The results suggest that elastin is the primary contributor to aortic medial stiffness in the unloaded state, and that there is relatively little anisotropy in the speed of sound or stiffness in the aortic wall.

  15. Aortic root aneurysm in an adult patient with aortic coarctation: a single-stage approach

    PubMed Central

    Ananiadou, Olga G.; Koutsogiannidis, Charilaos; Ampatzidou, Fotini; Drossos, George E.

    2012-01-01

    Coarctation of the aorta is a common congenital defect that may be undiagnosed until adulthood. Moreover, coarctation is associated with congenital and acquired cardiac pathology that may require surgical intervention. The management of an adult patient with aortic coarctation and an associated cardiac defect poses a great technical challenge since there are no standard guidelines for the therapy of such a complex pathology. Several extra-anatomic bypass grafting techniques have been described, including methods in which distal anastomosis is performed on the descending thoracic aorta, allowing simultaneous intracardiac repair. We report here a 37-year old man who was diagnosed with an aortic root aneurysm and aortic coarctation. The patient was treated electively with a single-stage approach through a median sternotomy that consisted of valve-sparing replacement of the aortic root and ascending-to-descending extra-anatomic aortic bypass, using a 18-mm Dacron graft. Firstly, the aortic root was replaced with the Yacoub remodelling procedure, and then the distal anastomosis was performed to the descending aorta, behind the heart, with the posterior pericardial approach. The extra-anatomic bypass graft was brought laterally from the right atrium and implanted in the ascending graft. Postoperative recovery was uneventful and a control computed tomographic angiogram 1 month after complete repair showed good results. PMID:22647969

  16. Aortic valve leaflet replacement with bovine pericardium to preserve native dynamic capabilities of the aortic annulus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hwa; Choi, Jong Bum; Kim, Min Ho; Kim, Won Ho; Lee, Mi Kyung; Lee, Sam Youn

    2014-02-01

    Valve replacement is typically the most appropriate option for treating aortic valve stenotic insufficiency. However, neither mechanical nor bioprosthetic replacement components preserve the circumferential expansion and contraction of a native aortic annulus during the cardiac cycle, because the prosthetic ring is affixed to the annulus. A 64-year-old man presented with a bicuspid and stenotic aortic valve, and the native annulus was too small to accommodate a porcine replacement valve. We fashioned new aortic leaflets from bovine pericardium with use of a template, and we affixed the sinotubular junction with use of inner and outer stabilization rings. Postoperative echocardiograms revealed coaptation of the 3 new leaflets with no regurgitation. At the patient's 5.5-year follow-up examination, echocardiograms showed flexible leaflet movement with a coaptation height of 7 mm, and expansion and contraction of the aortic annulus similar to that of a normal native annulus. The transvalvular pressure gradient was insignificant. If long-term durability of the new leaflets is confirmed, this method of leaflet replacement and fixation of the sinotubular junction might serve as an acceptable alternative to valve replacement in the treatment of aortic valve stenosis. We describe the patient's case and present our methods and observations.

  17. Aortic Valve Leaflet Replacement with Bovine Pericardium to Preserve Native Dynamic Capabilities of the Aortic Annulus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Min Ho; Kim, Won Ho; Lee, Mi Kyung; Lee, Sam Youn

    2014-01-01

    Valve replacement is typically the most appropriate option for treating aortic valve stenotic insufficiency. However, neither mechanical nor bioprosthetic replacement components preserve the circumferential expansion and contraction of a native aortic annulus during the cardiac cycle, because the prosthetic ring is affixed to the annulus. A 64-year-old man presented with a bicuspid and stenotic aortic valve, and the native annulus was too small to accommodate a porcine replacement valve. We fashioned new aortic leaflets from bovine pericardium with use of a template, and we affixed the sinotubular junction with use of inner and outer stabilization rings. Postoperative echocardiograms revealed coaptation of the 3 new leaflets with no regurgitation. At the patient's 5.5-year follow-up examination, echocardiograms showed flexible leaflet movement with a coaptation height of 7 mm, and expansion and contraction of the aortic annulus similar to that of a normal native annulus. The transvalvular pressure gradient was insignificant. If long-term durability of the new leaflets is confirmed, this method of leaflet replacement and fixation of the sinotubular junction might serve as an acceptable alternative to valve replacement in the treatment of aortic valve stenosis. We describe the patient's case and present our methods and observations. PMID:24512414

  18. Aortic valve replacement with sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valve prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Berretta, Paolo; Di Eusanio, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is the most common valve disease in the western world. Over the past few years the number of aortic valve replacement (AVR) interventions has increased with outcomes that have been improved despite increasing age of patients and increasing burden of comorbidities. However, despite such excellent results and its well-established position, conventional AVR has undergone great development over the previous two decades. Such progress, by way of less invasive incisions and use of new technologies, including transcatheter aortic valve implantation and sutureless valve prostheses, is intended to reduce the traumatic impact of the surgical procedure, thus fulfilling lower risk patients' expectations on the one hand, and extending the operability toward increasingly high-risk patients on the other. Sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valves are biological, pericardial prostheses that anchor within the aortic annulus with no more than three sutures. The sutureless prostheses, by avoiding the passage and the tying of the sutures, significantly reduce operative times and may improve outcomes. However, there is still a paucity of robust, evidence-based data on the role and performance of sutureless AVR. Therefore, strongest long-term data, randomized studies and registry data are required to adequately assess the durability and long-term outcomes of sutureless aortic valve replacement. PMID:27582765

  19. Aortic root aneurysm in an adult patient with aortic coarctation: a single-stage approach.

    PubMed

    Ananiadou, Olga G; Koutsogiannidis, Charilaos; Ampatzidou, Fotini; Drossos, George E

    2012-09-01

    Coarctation of the aorta is a common congenital defect that may be undiagnosed until adulthood. Moreover, coarctation is associated with congenital and acquired cardiac pathology that may require surgical intervention. The management of an adult patient with aortic coarctation and an associated cardiac defect poses a great technical challenge since there are no standard guidelines for the therapy of such a complex pathology. Several extra-anatomic bypass grafting techniques have been described, including methods in which distal anastomosis is performed on the descending thoracic aorta, allowing simultaneous intracardiac repair. We report here a 37-year old man who was diagnosed with an aortic root aneurysm and aortic coarctation. The patient was treated electively with a single-stage approach through a median sternotomy that consisted of valve-sparing replacement of the aortic root and ascending-to-descending extra-anatomic aortic bypass, using a 18-mm Dacron graft. Firstly, the aortic root was replaced with the Yacoub remodelling procedure, and then the distal anastomosis was performed to the descending aorta, behind the heart, with the posterior pericardial approach. The extra-anatomic bypass graft was brought laterally from the right atrium and implanted in the ascending graft. Postoperative recovery was uneventful and a control computed tomographic angiogram 1 month after complete repair showed good results.

  20. Current Indications for Surgical Repair in Patients with Bicuspid Aortic Valve and Ascending Aortic Ectasia

    PubMed Central

    Etz, Christian D.; Misfeld, Martin; Borger, Michael A.; Luehr, Maximilian; Strotdrees, Elfriede; Mohr, Friedrich-Wilhelm

    2012-01-01

    Preventive surgical repair of the moderately dilated ascending aorta/aortic root in patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is controversial. Most international reference centers are currently proposing a proactive approach for BAV patients with a maximum ascending aortic/root diameter of 45 mm since the risk of dissection/rupture raises significantly with an aneurysm diameter >50 mm. Current guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the joint guidelines of the American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) recommend elective repair in symptomatic patients with dysfunctional BAV (aortic diameter ≥45 mm). In asymptomatic patients with a well-functioning BAV, elective repair is recommended for diameters ≥50 mm, or if the aneurysm is rapidly progressing (rate of 5 mm/year), or in case of a strong family history of dissection/rupture/sudden death, or with planned pregnancy. As diameter is likely not the most reliable predictor of rupture and dissection and the majority of BAV patients may never experience an aortic catastrophe at small diameters, an overly aggressive approach almost certainly will put some patients with BAV unnecessarily at risk of operative and early mortality. This paper discusses the indications for preventive, elective repair of the aortic root, and ascending aorta in patients with a BAV and a moderately dilated—or ectatic—ascending aorta. PMID:23050195

  1. [Ascending-descending Aortic Bypass and Aortic Valve Replacement for Aortic Coarctation with Bicuspid Aortic Valve and an Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Asano, Ryota; Nakano, Kiyoharu; Kodera, Kojiro; Sato, Atsuhiko; Kataoka, Go; Tatsuishi, Wataru; Kubota, Sayaka; Namiki, Shigetaka; Suzuki, Seiya

    2015-08-01

    A 53-year-old woman was developed congestive heart failure. She was diagnosed as having aortic coarctation, incompetent bicuspid aortic valve and an aberrant right subclavian artery by using echocardiography and enhanced computed tomography. Ankle brachial pressure index(ABI)in the right was 0.71 and 0.69 in the left. Blood pressure of the right arm was 60 mmHg lower than that of the left arm. To avoid perioperative adverse cardiac events due to a 2-staged operation, we performed ascending-descending aortic bypass and aortic valve replacement simultaneously through a median sternotomy. The heart was retracted cranially, and a vascular prosthesis was anastomosed to the descending aorta just above the diaphragm in an end-to-side manner. Then the graft was placed curvilinearly around the right atrium and was anastomosed to the ascending aorta. After the operation, the right and left ABI increased to 0.90 and 0.98 respectively. There was no pressure difference between the arms. The postoperative course was uneventful.

  2. Lipid Interventions in Aortic Valvular Disease.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kwang Jin; Tsomidou, Christiana; Lerakis, Stamatios; Madanieh, Raef; Vittorio, Timothy J; Kosmas, Constantine E

    2015-10-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is the most common valvular disease in the elderly population. Presently, there is increasing evidence that aortic stenosis (AS) is an active process of lipid deposition, inflammation, fibrosis and calcium deposition. The pathogenesis of AS shares many similarities to that of atherosclerosis; therefore, it was hypothesized that certain lipid interventions could prevent or slow the progression of aortic valve stenosis. Despite the early enthusiasm that statins may slow the progression of AS, recent large clinical trials did not consistently demonstrate a decrease in the progression of AS. However, some researchers believe that statins may have a benefit early on in the disease process, where inflammation (and not calcification) is the predominant process, in contrast to severe or advanced AS, where calcification (and not inflammation) predominates. Positron emission tomography using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose and 18F-sodium fluoride can demonstrate the relative contributions of valvular calcification and inflammation in AS, and thus this method might potentially be useful in providing the answer as to whether lipid interventions at the earlier stages of AS would be more effective in slowing the progression of the disease. Currently, there is a strong interest in recombinant apolipoprotein A-1 Milano and in the development of new pharmacological agents, targeting reduction of lipoprotein (a) levels and possibly reduction of the expression of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2, as potential means to slow the progression of aortic valvular stenosis.

  3. Winged scapula after aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Christoph; Sodian, Ralf; Witt, Thomas N; Juchem, Gerd; Lang, Nora; Bruegger, Christian; Kowalski, Christian; Reichart, Bruno

    2009-04-01

    Iatrogenic nerve lesions affecting the long thoracic nerve are very rare after a median sternotomy. Here we report on a patient who developed clinical signs of a so-called "winged scapula" after an uneventful aortic valve replacement for infective endocarditis.

  4. Fatal Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Aortic Graft Infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael (Technical Monitor); Smith, Davey; Metzgar, David; Wills, Christopher; Fierer, Joshua

    2002-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a yeast commonly used in baking and a frequent colonizer of human mucosal surfaces. It is considered relatively nonpathogenic in immunocompetent adults. We present a case of S. cerevisiae fungemia and aortic graft infection in an immunocompetent adult. This is the first reported case of S. cerevisiue fungemia where the identity of the pathogen was confirmed by rRNA sequencing.

  5. Fatal Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Aortic Graft Infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael (Technical Monitor); Smith, Davey; Metzgar, David; Wills, Christopher; Fierer, Joshua

    2002-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a yeast commonly used in baking and a frequent colonizer of human mucosal surfaces. It is considered relatively nonpathogenic in immunocompetent adults. We present a case of S. cerevisiae fungemia and aortic graft infection in an immunocompetent adult. This is the first reported case of S. cerevisiue fungemia where the identity of the pathogen was confirmed by rRNA sequencing.

  6. Complication of Behcet's disease: spontaneous aortic pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Ugurlucan, Murat; Sayin, Omer Ali; Surmen, Benguhan; Kafali, Eylul; Basaran, Murat; Alpagut, Ufuk; Dayioglu, Enver; Onursal, Ertan

    2006-01-01

    Behcet's disease is an autoimmune multisystemic disorder based on vasculitis. In this disease, the most important predictor of morbidity and mortality is the vascular complications. Appropriate surgical interventions are critical and must be planned strategically. Here, we will describe a very rare complication of the disease; spontaneous aortic pseudoaneurysm in a 33-year-old patient.

  7. Middle aortic syndrome in a teenager.

    PubMed

    Eyileten, Zeynep; Taşar, Mehmet; Yazıcıoğlu, Levent; Kaya, Bülent; Fitöz, Suat; Uysalel, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    Middle aortic syndrome (MAS) is a rare pathology that involves diffuse/segmental narrowing of the distal thoracic or abdominal aorta. The most common clinical manifestation is severe hypertension, which requires multiple antihypertensive medications and/or surgical repair. We report the surgical repair of MAS in a 14-year-old male.

  8. Aortic surgery using total miniaturized cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Issitt, Richard W; Mulholland, John W; Oliver, Martin D; Yarham, Gemma J; Borra, Philippa J; Morrison, Paul; Dimarakis, Ioannis; Anderson, Jon R

    2008-08-01

    Few centers have attempted aortic surgery using miniaturized cardiopulmonary bypass (MCPB) systems due to concerns of air handling. The extra corporeal circuit optimized (ECCO) total MCPB system uses a venous air removal device and a parallel soft-shell reservoir that allows for venting of the heart. At our institution, total MCPB is used for all coronary artery bypass graft patients. Our objective was to assess the suitability of the ECCO total MCPB system during aortic surgery. Fifty consecutive and unselected aortic procedures using the ECCO system were undertaken. Surgical feasibility, air removal ability, and blood transfusion requirements were audited to determine the efficacy of this technique. The bypass time was 81.6 +/- 28.0 minutes and the ischemic time was 56.7 +/- 18.9 minutes. Total MCPB handled 1,910 +/- 404 mL of vented blood with 96 venous air removal device activations noted. The blood product transfusion rate was 12%, which was below the surgical transfusion rate for our unit. There were no complications. Aortic surgery can be undertaken safely and effectively using the ECCO total MCPB system.

  9. Painless aortic dissection presenting as paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Colak, Necmettin; Nazli, Yunus; Alpay, Mehmet Fatih; Akkaya, Ismail Olgun; Cakir, Omer

    2012-01-01

    Acute dissection of the aorta can be life-threatening. As a presenting manifestation of aortic dissection, neurologic complications such as paraplegia are rare. Herein, we report the case of a 51-year-old man who presented with sudden-onset paraplegia and ischemia of the legs, with no chest or back pain. His medical history included coronary artery bypass grafting. Physical examination revealed pulseless lower extremities, and computed tomography showed aortic dissection from the ascending aorta to the common iliac arteries bilaterally. A lumbar catheter was inserted for cerebrospinal fluid drainage, and axillary arterial cannulation was established. With the use of cardiopulmonary bypass, the aortic dissection was corrected, and the previous coronary artery grafts were reattached. The surgery restored spinal and lower-extremity perfusion, and the patient walked unaided from the hospital upon his discharge 5 days later. Although acute aortic dissection presenting as paraplegia is rare, it should be considered in patients who have pulseless femoral arteries bilaterally and sudden-onset paraplegia, despite no pain in the chest or back. Prompt diagnosis and intervention can prevent morbidity and death.

  10. Aortic aneurysm mimicking a right atrial mass.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Ahmed; Elsayed, Mahmoud; Kalra, Rajat; Bulur, Serkan; Nanda, Navin C

    2016-10-01

    We present a case of a 54-year-old female who was initially thought to have a cystic mass in the right atrium on two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography. Careful transducer angulation and off-axis imaging showed this mass-like effect was produced by an aortic root aneurysm impinging on the right atrium.

  11. Aortic dilation, genetic testing, and associated diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Zarate, Yuri A; Sellars, Elizabeth; Lepard, Tiffany; Tang, Xinyu; Collins, R Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the genetic diagnoses most frequently associated with aortic dilation in a large population and to describe the results of genetic testing in the same. A retrospective review of records from patients with known aortic dilation identified through an echocardiogram database was performed. During the study period, different chromosomal microarray platforms and molecular diagnostic techniques were used. A total of 715 patients (mean age, 9.7 years; 67% male) met study inclusion criteria. The overall frequency of underlying presumptive or confirmed genetic diagnoses was 17% (125/715). Molecular evaluation for possible underlying aortopathy-related disorders was performed in 9% of patients (66/715). Next-generation sequencing panels were performed in 16 patients, and pathogenic abnormalities were detected in 4 (25%). Microarrays were conducted in 10% of patients (72/715), with a total of 23 pathogenic copy-number variants identified in 19 patients (26%). Marfan syndrome was the most frequently recognized genetic disorder associated with aortic dilation, but other cytogenetic abnormalities and associated diagnoses also were identified. The differential diagnosis in patients with aortic dilation is broad and includes many conditions outside the common connective tissue disorder spectrum. A genetics evaluation should be considered to assist in the diagnostic evaluation.Genet Med 18 4, 356-363.

  12. Aortic mismatch in heart transplantation: readaptation.

    PubMed

    Miralles, A

    1997-10-01

    Great vessel mismatch between donor and recipient is very usual in heart transplantation. Different procedures have been used to manage this situation. A tailoring aortoplasty is described, as a technical alternative, in cases of considerable size incongruence between donor and recipient aortic diameters.

  13. [Albert Einstein and his abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Cervantes Castro, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The interesting case of Albert Einstein's abdominal aortic aneurysm is presented. He was operated on at age 69 and, finding that the large aneurysm could not be removed, the surgeon elected to wrap it with cellophane to prevent its growth. However, seven years later the aneurysm ruptured and caused the death of the famous scientist.

  14. Surgical management of a hypoplastic distal aortic arch and coarctation of aorta in a patient with Klippel-Feil syndrome, ascending aortic aneurysm and bicuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Sabol, Frantisek; Kolesar, Adrián; Toporcer, Tomás; Bajmoczi, Milan

    2014-10-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome has been associated with cardiovascular malformations, but only 3 cases have been reported to be associated with aortic coarctation and surgical management is not defined. A 51-year old woman with Klippel-Feil syndrome associated with an aneurysm of the ascending aorta, hypoplastic aortic arch and aortic coarctation at the level of the left subclavian artery presented with shortness of breath 2 years after diagnosis. Imaging identified interim development of a 7.2-cm aneurysm at the level of the aortic coarctation. She underwent surgical repair with a Dacron interposition graft under hypothermic circulatory arrest. She continues to do well 18 months following repair.

  15. Preserving a Well-Functioning 33-Year-Old Starr-Edwards Aortic Prosthesis in Repeat Aortic Root Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Alimov, Victor K.; Rousou, John A.; Pluchino, Fabrizio I.

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 61-year-old obese male patient in whom we found a well-functioning 33-year-old Starr-Edwards aortic prosthesis during repeat aortic surgery. Rather than explant the prosthesis, we remodeled the aortic root, almost completely removing the aortic sinuses and leaving only a pillar of aortic tissue around the coronary ostia. The proximal end of a Hemashield tube-graft was then scalloped to accommodate the remaining aortic tissue. The patient's heart function was excellent after his weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass. Simplifying the repeat aortic root repair, by preserving a well-functioning Starr-Edwards valve, might lead to a better outcome in similar cases. We also discuss other instances of this valve's durability. PMID:28100977

  16. Coronary Ostial Stenosis after Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ziakas, Antonios G.; Economou, Fotios I.; Charokopos, Nicholas A.; Pitsis, Antonios A.; Parharidou, Despina G.; Papadopoulos, Thomas I.; Parharidis, Georgios E.

    2010-01-01

    Coronary ostial stenosis is a rare but potentially serious sequela after aortic valve replacement. It occurs in the left main or right coronary artery after 1% to 5% of aortic valve replacement procedures. The clinical symptoms are usually severe and may appear from 1 to 6 months postoperatively. Although the typical treatment is coronary artery bypass grafting, patients have been successfully treated by means of percutaneous coronary intervention. Herein, we present the cases of 2 patients in whom coronary ostial stenosis developed after aortic valve replacement. In the 1st case, a 72-year-old man underwent aortic valve replacement and bypass grafting of the saphenous vein to the left anterior descending coronary artery. Six months later, he experienced a non-ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. Coronary angiography revealed a critical stenosis of the right coronary artery ostium. In the 2nd case, a 78-year-old woman underwent aortic valve replacement and grafting of the saphenous vein to an occluded right coronary artery. Four months later, she experienced unstable angina. Coronary angiography showed a critical left main coronary artery ostial stenosis and occlusion of the right coronary artery venous graft. In each patient, we performed percutaneous coronary intervention and deployed a drug-eluting stent. Both patients were asymptomatic on 6-to 12-month follow-up. We attribute the coronary ostial stenosis to the selective ostial administration of cardioplegic solution during surgery. We conclude that retrograde administration of cardioplegic solution through the coronary sinus may reduce the incidence of postoperative coronary ostial stenosis, and that stenting may be an efficient treatment option. PMID:20844624

  17. Anatomical and clinical predictors of valve dysfunction and aortic dilation in bicuspid aortic valve disease.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Arturo; Gallego, Pastora; Calvo-Iglesias, Francisco; Bermejo, Javier; Robledo-Carmona, Juan; Sánchez, Violeta; Saura, Daniel; Arnold, Roman; Carro, Amelia; Maldonado, Giuliana; Sao-Avilés, Augusto; Teixidó, Gisela; Galian, Laura; Rodríguez-Palomares, José; García-Dorado, David

    2017-09-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is associated with early valvular dysfunction and proximal aorta dilation with high heterogeneity. This study aimed to assess the determinants of these complications. Eight hundred and fifty-two consecutive adults diagnosed of BAV referred from cardiac outpatient clinics to eight echocardiographic laboratories of tertiary hospitals were prospectively recruited. Exclusion criteria were aortic coarctation, other congenital disorders or intervention. BAV morphotype, significant valve dysfunction and aorta dilation (≥2 Z-score) at sinuses and ascending aorta were established. Three BAV morphotypes were identified: right-left coronary cusp fusion (RL) in 72.9%, right-non-coronary (RN) in 24.1% and left-non-coronary (LN) in 3.0%. BAV without raphe was observed in 18.3%. Multivariate analysis showed aortic regurgitation (23%) to be related to male sex (OR: 2.80, p<0.0001) and valve prolapse (OR: 5.16, p<0.0001), and aortic stenosis (22%) to BAV-RN (OR: 2.09, p<0.001), the presence of raphe (OR: 2.75, p<0.001), age (OR: 1.03; p<0.001), dyslipidaemia (OR: 1.77, p<0.01) and smoking (OR: 1.63, p<0.05). Ascending aorta was dilated in 76% without differences among morphotypes and associated with significant valvular dysfunction. By contrast, aortic root was dilated in 34% and related to male sex and aortic regurgitation but was less frequent in aortic stenosis and BAV-RN. Normofunctional valves are more prevalent in BAV without raphe. Aortic stenosis is more frequent in BAV-RN and associated with some cardiovascular risk factors, whereas aortic regurgitation (AR) is associated with male sex and sigmoid prolapse. Although ascending aorta is the most commonly dilated segment, aortic root dilation is present in one-third of patients and associated with AR. Remarkably, BAV-RL increases the risk for dilation of the proximal aorta, whereas BAV-RN spares this area. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the

  18. [Dehiscence of the Pericardial Patch, after Surgical Treatment of Active Infective Aortic Valve Endocarditis with Reconstruction of the Aortic Annulus Using a Glutaraldehyde-treated Autologous Pericardium].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kazufumi; Fukunaga, Naoto; Koizumi, Shigeki; Nishiya, Kenta; Matsuda, Yasuhiro; Ishigami, Masanosuke; Nagasawa, Atsushi; Sakata, Ryuzo; Koyama, Tadaaki

    2017-03-01

    A 50-year-old man was admitted with fever and chill sensation 6 months ago. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) showed left and right coronary cusp prolapses and a thickened tissue of the aortic curtain. Congestive heart failure due to active infective aortic valve endocarditis was diagnosed, and he underwent aortic valve replacement. The aortic annulus was reconstructed using a glutaraldehydetreated autologous pericardium. Six months after surgery, TTE showed severe aortic regurgitation and saccular change in the aortic annulus. Transesophageal echocargiography showed some echo free space from left to noncoronary cusp and abnormal movement of the prosthetic valve annulus. Intraoperative examination showed dehiscence of the pericardial patch from the aortic wall, but no finding of infection. Aortic valve rereplacement was performed with reconstruction of the aortic annulus using a bovine pericardium. To prevent the dehiscence of the pericardial patch from the aortic wall, sutures fixing the prosthetic valve were passed from outside of the aortic wall.

  19. Inhibitory role of Notch1 in calcific aortic valve disease.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Asha; Hans, Chetan P; Koenig, Sara N; Nichols, Haley A; Galindo, Cristi L; Garner, Harold R; Merrill, Walter H; Hinton, Robert B; Garg, Vidu

    2011-01-01

    Aortic valve calcification is the most common form of valvular heart disease, but the mechanisms of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) are unknown. NOTCH1 mutations are associated with aortic valve malformations and adult-onset calcification in families with inherited disease. The Notch signaling pathway is critical for multiple cell differentiation processes, but its role in the development of CAVD is not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular changes that occur with inhibition of Notch signaling in the aortic valve. Notch signaling pathway members are expressed in adult aortic valve cusps, and examination of diseased human aortic valves revealed decreased expression of NOTCH1 in areas of calcium deposition. To identify downstream mediators of Notch1, we examined gene expression changes that occur with chemical inhibition of Notch signaling in rat aortic valve interstitial cells (AVICs). We found significant downregulation of Sox9 along with several cartilage-specific genes that were direct targets of the transcription factor, Sox9. Loss of Sox9 expression has been published to be associated with aortic valve calcification. Utilizing an in vitro porcine aortic valve calcification model system, inhibition of Notch activity resulted in accelerated calcification while stimulation of Notch signaling attenuated the calcific process. Finally, the addition of Sox9 was able to prevent the calcification of porcine AVICs that occurs with Notch inhibition. In conclusion, loss of Notch signaling contributes to aortic valve calcification via a Sox9-dependent mechanism.

  20. Aortic hemodynamics and white matter hyperintensities in normotensive postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Jill N; Harvey, Ronée E; Zuk, Samantha M; Lundt, Emily S; Lesnick, Timothy G; Gunter, Jeffrey L; Senjem, Matthew L; Shuster, Lynne T; Miller, Virginia M; Jack, Clifford R; Joyner, Michael J; Kantarci, Kejal

    2017-04-07

    Hypertension is associated with development of white matter hyperintensities (WMH) in the brain, which are risk factors for mild cognitive impairment. Hormonal shifts at menopause alter vascular function putting women at risk for both hypertension and WMH. Elevations in aortic hemodynamics precede the appearance of clinically defined hypertension but the relationship of aortic hemodynamics to development of WMH in women is not known. Therefore, this study aimed to characterize aortic hemodynamics in relationship to WMH in postmenopausal women. Aortic systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), aortic augmentation index (Alx) and aortic round trip travel time (Aortic T R) by tonometry were examined in 53 postmenopausal women (age 60 ± 2 years). WMH was calculated from fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MRI using a semi-automated segmentation algorithm. WMH as a fraction of total white matter volume positively associated with aortic systolic BP (regression coefficient = 0.018; p = 0.04) after adjusting for age. In addition, WMH fraction was positively associated with AIx (0.025; p = 0.04), and inversely associated with Aortic T R (-0.015; p = 0.04) after adjusting for age. Our results suggest that assessing aortic hemodynamics may identify individuals at risk for accelerated development of WMH and guide early treatment to reduce WMH burden and cognitive impairment in the future.

  1. Mathematical modeling of aortic valve dynamics during systole.

    PubMed

    Aboelkassem, Yasser; Savic, Dragana; Campbell, Stuart G

    2015-01-21

    We have derived a mathematical model describing aortic valve dynamics and blood flow during systole. The model presents a realistic coupling between aortic valve dynamics, sinus vortex local pressure, and variations in the systemic vascular resistance. The coupling is introduced by using Hill׳s classical semi-spherical vortex model and an aortic pressure-area compliance constitutive relationship. The effects of introducing aortic sinus eddy vortices and variable systemic vascular resistance on overall valve opening-closing dynamics, left ventricular pressure, aortic pressure, blood flow rate, and aortic orifice area are examined. In addition, the strength of the sinus vortex is coupled explicitly to the valve opening angle, and implicitly to the aortic orifice area in order to predict how vortex strength varies during the four descriptive phases of aortic valve motion (fast-opening, fully-opening, slow-closing, and fast-closing). Our results compare favorably with experimental observations and the model reproduces well-known phenomena corresponding to aortic valve function such as the dicrotic notch and retrograde flow at end systole. By invoking a more complete set of physical phenomena, this new model will enable representation of pathophysiological conditions such as aortic valve stenosis or insufficiency, making it possible to predict their integrated effects on cardiac load and systemic hemodynamics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Computer-aided design of the human aortic root.

    PubMed

    Ovcharenko, E A; Klyshnikov, K U; Vlad, A R; Sizova, I N; Kokov, A N; Nushtaev, D V; Yuzhalin, A E; Zhuravleva, I U

    2014-11-01

    The development of computer-based 3D models of the aortic root is one of the most important problems in constructing the prostheses for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. In the current study, we analyzed data from 117 patients with and without aortic valve disease and computed tomography data from 20 patients without aortic valvular diseases in order to estimate the average values of the diameter of the aortic annulus and other aortic root parameters. Based on these data, we developed a 3D model of human aortic root with unique geometry. Furthermore, in this study we show that by applying different material properties to the aortic annulus zone in our model, we can significantly improve the quality of the results of finite element analysis. To summarize, here we present four 3D models of human aortic root with unique geometry based on computational analysis of ECHO and CT data. We suggest that our models can be utilized for the development of better prostheses for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

  3. Aortic events in a nationwide Marfan syndrome cohort.

    PubMed

    Groth, Kristian A; Stochholm, Kirstine; Hove, Hanne; Kyhl, Kasper; Gregersen, Pernille A; Vejlstrup, Niels; Østergaard, John R; Gravholt, Claus H; Andersen, Niels H

    2017-02-01

    Marfan syndrome is associated with morbidity and mortality due to aortic dilatation and dissection. Preventive aortic root replacement has been the standard treatment in Marfan syndrome patients with aortic dilatation. In this study, we present aortic event data from a nationwide Marfan syndrome cohort. The nationwide cohort of Danish Marfan syndrome patients was established from the Danish National Patient Registry and the Cause of Death Register, where we retrieved information about aortic surgery and dissections. We associated aortic events with age, sex, and Marfan syndrome diagnosis prior or after the first aortic event. From the total cohort of 412 patients, 150 (36.4 %) had an aortic event. Fifty percent were event free at age 49.6. Eighty patients (53.3 %) had prophylactic surgery and seventy patients (46.7 %) a dissection. The yearly event rate was 0.02 events/year/patient in the period 1994-2014. Male patients had a significant higher risk of an aortic event at a younger age with a hazard ratio of 1.75 (CI 1.26-2.42, p = 0.001) compared with women. Fifty-three patients (12.9 %) were diagnosed with MFS after their first aortic event which primarily was aortic dissection [n = 44 (83.0 %)]. More than a third of MFS patients experienced an aortic event and male patients had significantly more aortic events than females. More than half of the total number of dissections was in patients undiagnosed with MFS at the time of their event. This emphasizes that diagnosing MFS is lifesaving and improves mortality risk by reducing the risk of aorta dissection.

  4. The risk for type B aortic dissection in Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    den Hartog, Alexander W; Franken, Romy; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Timmermans, Janneke; Scholte, Arthur J; van den Berg, Maarten P; de Waard, Vivian; Pals, Gerard; Mulder, Barbara J M; Groenink, Maarten

    2015-01-27

    Aortic dissections involving the descending aorta are a major clinical problem in patients with Marfan syndrome. The purpose of this study was to identify clinical parameters associated with type B aortic dissection and to develop a risk model to predict type B aortic dissection in patients with Marfan syndrome. Patients with the diagnosis of Marfan syndrome and magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomographic imaging of the aorta were followed for a median of 6 years for the occurrence of type B dissection or the combined end point of type B aortic dissection, distal aortic surgery, and death. A model using various clinical parameters as well as genotyping was developed to predict the risk for type B dissection in patients with Marfan syndrome. Between 1998 and 2013, 54 type B aortic dissections occurred in 600 patients with Marfan syndrome (mean age 36 ± 14 years, 52% male). Independent variables associated with type B aortic dissection were prior prophylactic aortic surgery (hazard ratio: 2.1; 95% confidence interval: 1.2 to 3.8; p = 0.010) and a proximal descending aorta diameter ≥27 mm (hazard ratio: 2.2; 95% confidence interval: 1.1 to 4.3; p = 0.020). In the risk model, the 10-year occurrence of type B aortic dissection in low-, moderate-, and high-risk patients was 6%, 19%, and 34%, respectively. Angiotensin II receptor blocker therapy was associated with fewer type B aortic dissections (hazard ratio: 0.3; 95% confidence interval: 0.1 to 0.9; p = 0.030). Patients with Marfan syndrome with prior prophylactic aortic surgery are at substantial risk for type B aortic dissection, even when the descending aorta is only slightly dilated. Angiotensin II receptor blocker therapy may be protective in the prevention of type B aortic dissections. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Novel morphological features for prediction of distal thoracic aortic enlargement after thoracic endovascular aortic repair of DeBakey IIIb aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yang Yang; Xue, Yan; Guo, Wei; Zhang, Hong Peng; Liu, Xiao Ping; Xiong, Jiang; Jia, Xin; Ma, Xiao Hui; Wang, Li Jun

    2017-09-05

    To assess the novel morphological features for DeBakey IIIb aortic dissection in predicting distal thoracic aortic enlargement after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). Sixty-seven patients who underwent TEVAR for DeBakey IIIb aortic dissection between January 2011 and December 2013 at our center were divided based on preoperative computer tomography angiography (CTA) features into 3 groups: I (n = 27) and III (n = 9), with true and false lumen, respectively, coursing closely along thoracic vertebral bodies; and II, spiral configuration (n = 31). Distal thoracic aortic enlargement was determined using pre- and postoperative CTA images. At median 12.2 (interquartile range, 4.3-26.6) months, 12 patients developed distal thoracic aortic enlargement, with estimated cumulative incidence tending to increase from categories I to III (P for trend < .01). Categories II and III vs. I had more frequently concave location of primary entry tear (P < .01), larger dissection length and height index (L/Hi) (P = .05), and greater number of abdominal small branches involved preoperatively (P = .03), with otherwise similar baseline characteristics; and significantly greater total aortic diameter increase and lower false lumen regression up to 24 months, and lower true lumen expansion up to 12 months. In multivariable regression analysis, categories II and III were independently associated with distal thoracic aortic enlargement (hazard ratio, 19.95 [95% confidence interval, 2.14-186.09]; 41.23 [3.61-470.22], respectively) after adjustment for Society of Vascular Surgery score, preoperative maximum total aortic diameter, L/Hi, and number of abdominal small branches involved preoperatively. The CTA-based morphological features described in this study might improve preoperative risk stratification of DeBakey IIIb aortic dissection, with categories II and III having higher risk of distal thoracic aortic enlargement after TEVAR. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Aortic Thrombus Formation Following Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair.

    PubMed

    Nauta, Foeke J H; Lau, Kevin D; Arthurs, Christopher J; Eagle, Kim A; Williams, David M; Trimarchi, Santi; Patel, Himanshu J; Figueroa, Carlos A

    2017-06-01

    We present the possible utility of computational fluid dynamics in the assessment of thrombus formation and virtual surgical planning illustrated in a patient with aortic thrombus in a kinked ascending aortic graft following thoracic endovascular aortic repair. A patient-specific three-dimensional model was built from computed tomography. Additionally, we modeled 3 virtual aortic interventions to assess their effect on thrombosis potential: (1) open surgical repair, (2) conformable endografting, and (3) single-branched endografting. Flow waveforms were extracted from echocardiography and used for the simulations. We used the computational index termed platelet activation potential (PLAP) representing accumulated shear rates of fluid particles within a fluid domain to assess thrombosis potential. The baseline model revealed high PLAP in the entire arch (119.8 ± 42.5), with significantly larger PLAP at the thrombus location (125.4 ± 41.2, p < 0.001). Surgical repair showed a 37% PLAP reduction at the thrombus location (78.6 ± 25.3, p < 0.001) and a 24% reduction in the arch (91.6 ± 28.9, p < 0.001). Single-branched endografting reduced PLAP in the thrombus region by 20% (99.7 ± 24.6, p < 0.001) and by 14% in the arch (103.8 ± 26.1, p < 0.001), whereas a more conformable endograft did not have a profound effect, resulting in a modest 4% PLAP increase (130.6 ± 43.7, p < 0.001) in the thrombus region relative to the baseline case. Regions of high PLAP were associated with aortic thrombus. Aortic repair resolved pathologic flow patterns, reducing PLAP. Branched endografting also relieved complex flow patterns reducing PLAP. Computational fluid dynamics may assist in the prediction of aortic thrombus formation in hemodynamically complex cases and help guide repair strategies. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Aortic Valve Pathology as a Predictive Factor for Acute Aortic Dissection.

    PubMed

    Berdajs, Denis; Mosbahi, Selim; Ferrari, Enrico; Charbonnier, Dominique; von Segesser, Ludwig K

    2017-10-01

    In this study, the effect of aortic valve (AV) pathology on local hemodynamic conditions was evaluated as a potential trigger for the onset of acute type A and B aortic dissection. A time- and pressure-related four-dimensional (4-D) computed fluid dynamic model of the aorta was established. In an experimental setup, AV stenosis and AV insufficiency were created. 4-D pressure-related geometry of the aortic root (AR) with valve insufficiency and valve stenosis were determined by high-fidelity (200 Hz) microsonometric crystals. Flow and pressure were obtained at the left ventricle, ascending aorta, and aortic arch. Expansion of the AR in AV insufficiency was higher with expansion in AV stenosis, at peak ejection, and at the end of systole. In AV insufficiency, there was low shear stress (0 to 0.6 Pa), turbulent flow, and high pressure (80 to 95 mm Hg) at the anterior wall of the ascending aorta, at the proximal aortic arch, and at the aortic isthmus. In stenosis, high shear stress (>2 Pa) and high pressure (>95 mm Hg) were found at the ascending aorta and at the bifurcation of the brachiocephalic trunk. In AV insufficiency, low shear stresses and turbulent flow regions were documented at the traditional levels of entry tears for acute type A and B dissection. In AV stenosis, high shear stress with elevated pressure at the ascending aorta may be a trigger element for vessel dilatation, aneurysm formation, and intimal tear, which is typical for type A aortic dissection. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Aortic morphology following endovascular repair of acute and chronic type B aortic dissection: implications for management.

    PubMed

    Sayer, D; Bratby, M; Brooks, M; Loftus, I; Morgan, R; Thompson, M

    2008-11-01

    The study aimed to define early clinical outcomes, and medium term morphological changes, following endovascular treatment of acute (AAD) and chronic (CAD) Type B aortic dissections. The cohort comprised 78 patients who underwent endovascular repair for AAD (38) and CAD (40). Early and late clinical outcomes were prospectively recorded. All patients underwent serial follow up with CT scanning. False lumen thrombosis rates, true, false and total aortic short axis diameter were recorded at the mid point of the endograft and below this level in the thoracic aorta. The total maximum aortic diameter in the thoracic, abdominal aorta was quantified. The 30-d mortality was 2.6% in AAD and 7.5% in CAD. The 30-d stroke and paraplegia rates were 5.3% and 0% in AAD. There were no cases of stroke or paraplegia in patients with CAD. At 30 months follow up, the cumulative survival for the two groups was 93% for AAD and 66.5% for CAD (P=0.015, Kaplan Meier) and the cumulative re-intervention rate was 62% and 55% in AAD and CAD respectively (P=0.961, Kaplan-Meier). False lumen thrombosis rates were equivalent in the two groups and were higher at the level of the endograft than below this level (P<0.05). Aortic remodelling was greater in AAD, whereas the aortic dimensions after treatment of CAD remained relatively static. Up to 20% of patients in both groups demonstrated enlargement of the thoracic aorta. The data support the use of endovascular repair of the thoracic aorta in Type B aortic dissection. 30-d outcomes are acceptable. Patients with AAD demonstrate significant aortic remodelling whereas patients with CAD do not. This has significant implications for practice as patients with CAD must rely on maintenance of false lumen thrombosis to preserve the integrity of the endovascular repair.

  9. Indexing aortic valve area by body surface area increases the prevalence of severe aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Jander, Nikolaus; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa; Bahlmann, Edda; Gerdts, Eva; Boman, Kurt; Chambers, John B; Egstrup, Kenneth; Nienaber, Christoph A; Pedersen, Terje R; Ray, Simon; Rossebø, Anne B; Willenheimer, Ronnie; Kienzle, Rolf-Peter; Wachtell, Kristian; Neumann, Franz-Josef; Minners, Jan

    2014-01-01

    To account for differences in body size in patients with aortic stenosis, aortic valve area (AVA) is divided by body surface area (BSA) to calculate indexed AVA (AVAindex). Cut-off values for severe stenosis are <1.0 cm2 for AVA and <0.6 cm2/m2 for AVAindex. To investigate the influence of indexation on the prevalence of severe aortic stenosis and on the predictive accuracy regarding clinical outcome. Echocardiographic and anthropometric data from a retrospective cohort of 2843 patients with aortic stenosis (jet velocity >2.5 m/s) and from 1525 patients prospectively followed in the simvastatin and ezetimibe in aortic stenosis (SEAS) trial were analysed. The prevalence of severe stenosis increased with the AVAindex criterion compared to AVA from 71% to 80% in the retrospective cohort, and from 29% to 44% in SEAS (both p<0.001). Overall, the predictive accuracy for aortic valve events was virtually identical for AVA and AVAindex in the SEAS population (mean follow-up of 46 months; area under the receiver operating characteristic curve: 0.67 (95% CI 0.64 to 0.70) vs. 0.68 (CI 0.65 to 0.71) (NS). However, 213 patients additionally categorised as severe by AVAindex experienced significantly less valve related events than those fulfilling only the AVA criterion (p<0.001). Indexing AVA by BSA (AVAindex) significantly increases the prevalence of patients with criteria for severe stenosis by including patients with a milder degree of the disease without improving the predictive accuracy for aortic valve related events.

  10. Percutaneous implantation of the first repositionable aortic valve prosthesis in a patient with severe aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Buellesfeld, Lutz; Gerckens, Ulrich; Grube, Eberhard

    2008-04-01

    Percutaneous aortic valve replacement is a new less-invasive alternative for high-risk surgical candidates with aortic stenosis. However, the clinical experience is still limited, and the currently available 'first-generation devices' revealed technical shortcomings, such as lack of repositionability and presence of paravalvular leakages. We report the first-in-man experience with the new self-expanding Lotus Valve prosthesis composed of a nitinol frame with implemented bovine pericardial leaflets which is designed to address these issues, being repositionable and covered by a flexible membrane to seal paravalvular gaps. We implanted this prosthesis in a 93-year old patient presenting with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (valve area: 0.6 cm(2)). Surgical valve replacement had been declined due to comorbidities. We used a retrograde approach for insertion of the 21-French Lotus catheter loaded with the valve prosthesis via surgical cut-down to the external iliac artery. Positioning of the valve was guided by transesophageal echo and supra-aortic angiograms. The prosthesis was successfully inserted and deployed within the calcified native valve. Echocardiography immediately after device deployment showed a significant reduction of the transaortic mean pressure gradient (32 to 9 mmHg; final valve area 1.7 cm(2)) without evidence of residual aortic regurgitation. The postprocedural clinical status improved from NYHA-IV to NYHA-II. These results remained unchanged up to the 3 month follow-up. Successful percutaneous aortic valve replacement can be performed using the new self-expanding and repositionable Lotus valve for treatment of high-risk patients with aortic valve stenosis. Further studies are mandatory to assess device safety and efficacy in larger patient populations. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Suspected aortic dissection and other aortic disorders: multi-detector row CT in 373 cases in the emergency setting.

    PubMed

    Hayter, Robert G; Rhea, James T; Small, Andrew; Tafazoli, Faranak S; Novelline, Robert A

    2006-03-01

    To retrospectively review the authors' experience with multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) for detection of aortic dissection in the emergency setting. The investigation was institutional review board approved, did not require informed patient consent, and was HIPAA compliant. In 373 clinical evaluations in the emergency setting, 365 patients suspected of having aortic dissection and/or other aortic disorders underwent multidetector CT. Criteria for acute aortic disorder were confirmed by using surgical and pathologic diagnoses or findings at clinical follow-up and any subsequent imaging as the reference standard. Positive cases were characterized according to type of disorder interpreted. Resulting sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy were calculated by using two-way contingency tables. All cases found to be negative for acute aortic disorders were grouped according to alternative CT findings. Sixty-seven (18.0%) of the 373 cases were interpreted as positive for acute aortic disorder. One hundred twelve acute aortic disorders were identified in these 67 cases: 23 acute aortic dissections, 14 acute aortic intramural hematomas, 20 acute penetrating aortic ulcers, 44 new or enlarging aortic aneurysms, and 11 acute aortic ruptures. Three hundred five (81.8%) cases were interpreted as negative for acute aortic disorder. In 48 negative cases, multidetector CT depicted alternative findings that accounted for the clinical presentation. Of these, three included both acute aortic disorders and alternative findings, and 45 included only alternative findings. One (0.3%) case was indeterminate for acute aortic disorder. Overall, 112 findings were interpreted as positive for acute aortic disorder, an alternative finding, or both at CT. No interpretations were false-positive, one was false-negative, 67 were true-positive, and 304 were true-negative. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy were

  12. Thoracic aortic aneurysm: reading the enemy's playbook.

    PubMed

    Elefteriades, John A

    2008-05-01

    The vast database of the Yale Center for Thoracic Aortic Disease--which includes information on 3000 patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm or dissection, with 9000 catalogued images and 9000 patient-years of follow-up--has, over the last decade, permitted multiple glimpses into the "playbook" of this virulent disease. Understanding the precise behavioral features of thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection permits us more effectively to combat this disease. In this monograph, we will first review certain fundamentals--in terms of anatomy, nomenclature, imaging, diagnosis, medical, surgical, and stent treatment. After reviewing these fundamentals, we will proceed with a detailed exploration of lessons learned by peering into the operational playbook of thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection. Among the glimpses afforded in the behavioral playbook of this disease are the following: 1 Thoracic aortic aneurysm, while lethal, is indolent. Mortality usually does not occur until after years of growth. 2 The aneurysmal ascending thoracic aorta grows slowly: about 0.1 cm per year (the descending aorta grows somewhat faster). 3 Over a patient's lifetime, "hinge points" at which the likelihood of rupture or dissection skyrockets are seen at 5.5 cm for the ascending and 6.5 cm for the descending aorta. Intervening at 5 cm diameter for the ascending and 6 cm for the descending prevents most adverse events. 4 Symptomatic aneurysms require resection regardless of size. 5 The yearly rate of rupture, dissection, or death is 14.1% for a patient with a thoracic aorta of 6 cm diameter. 6 The mechanical properties of the aorta deteriorate markedly at 6 cm diameter (distensibility falls, and wall stress rises)--a finding that "dovetails" perfectly with observations of the clinical behavior of the thoracic aorta. 7 Thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection are largely inherited diseases, with a predominantly autosomal-dominant pattern. The specific genetics are being elucidated at the

  13. Aortic dissection and rupture in a 16-year-old girl with Turner syndrome following previous progression of aortic dilation.

    PubMed

    Pleskacova, Jana; Rucklova, Kristina; Popelova, Jana; Cerny, Stepan; Syrucek, Martin; Snajderova, Marta; Lebl, Jan

    2010-10-01

    Aortic dissection occurs in Turner syndrome with substantially higher frequency in comparison to the general population, and its prevention is one of the main aims of cardiologic follow-up. Findings of cystic medial necrosis in the aortic wall and a high prevalence of aortic dilation suggest that a form of aortopathy exists in Turner syndrome. However, little is known about natural development of aortic dilation prior to dissection. We present a 16-year-old girl with Turner syndrome with a bicuspid aortic valve, aortic stenosis, and dilation of ascending aorta, who underwent annual echocardiographic examinations from early childhood. Significant progressions of proximal aortic dilation occurred twice at the age of 10 and 15 years. Thereafter, another rapid progression was observed during 8 months and within 3 weeks preceding dissection. Acute aortic dissection was diagnosed while the girl was waiting for elective surgery. She was successfully operated. Frequent estimations of aortic diameter in Turner patients with abnormal findings may help to anticipate this life-threatening event. Additionally, we learned that rapid progression of aortic dilation should lead to immediate surgery to prevent more risky urgent intervention following the dissection.

  14. Aortic Blood Flow Reversal Determines Renal Function: Potential Explanation for Renal Dysfunction Caused by Aortic Stiffening in Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Junichiro; Ito, Sadayoshi

    2015-07-01

    Aortic stiffness determines the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and predicts the progressive decline of the GFR. However, the underlying pathophysiological mechanism remains obscure. Recent evidence has shown a close link between aortic stiffness and the bidirectional (systolic forward and early diastolic reverse) flow characteristics. We hypothesized that the aortic stiffening-induced renal dysfunction is attributable to altered central flow dynamics. In 222 patients with hypertension, Doppler velocity waveforms were recorded at the proximal descending aorta to calculate the reverse/forward flow ratio. Tonometric waveforms were recorded to measure the carotid-femoral (aortic) and carotid-radial (peripheral) pulse wave velocities, to estimate the aortic pressure from the radial waveforms, and to compute the aortic characteristic impedance. In addition, renal hemodynamics was evaluated by duplex ultrasound. The estimated GFR was inversely correlated with the aortic pulse wave velocity, reverse/forward flow ratio, pulse pressure, and characteristic impedance, whereas it was not correlated with the peripheral pulse wave velocity or mean arterial pressure. The association between aortic pulse wave velocity and estimated GFR was independent of age, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, and antihypertensive medication. However, further adjustment for the aortic reverse/forward flow ratio and pulse pressure substantially weakened this association, and instead, the reverse/forward flow ratio emerged as the strongest determinant of estimated GFR (P=0.001). A higher aortic reverse/forward flow ratio was also associated with lower intrarenal forward flow velocities. These results suggest that an increase in aortic flow reversal (ie, retrograde flow from the descending thoracic aorta toward the aortic arch), caused by aortic stiffening and impedance mismatch, reduces antegrade flow into the kidney and thereby deteriorates renal function.

  15. [Status of aortic valve reconstruction and Ross operation in aortic valve diseases].

    PubMed

    Sievers, Hans H

    2002-08-01

    At first glance the aortic valve is a relative simple valve mechanism connecting the left ventricle and the ascending aorta. Detailed analysis of the different components of the aortic valve including the leaflets and sinuses revealed a complex motion of each part leading to a perfect durable valve mechanism at rest and during exercise. Theoretically, the reconstruction or imitation of these structures in patients with aortic valve disease should lead to optimal results. Prerequisite is the exact knowledge of the important functional characteristics of the aortic valve. The dynamic behavior of the aortic root closely harmonizing with the leaflets not only warrants stress minimizing and valve durability, but also optimizes coronary flow, left ventricular function and aortic impedance. The newly discovered contractile capacity of the leaflets and the root components are important for tuning the dynamics. Isolated reconstruction of the aortic valve such as decalcification, commissurotomy, plication of ring or leaflets of a tricuspid aortic valve and cusp extension are seldom indicated in contrast to the reconstruction of the bicuspid insufficient valve. Proper indication and skilled techniques lead to excellent hemodynamic and clinical intermediate-term result up to 7 years after reconstruction. Latest follow-up revealed a mean aortic insufficiency of 0.7, maximal pressure gradient of 11.4 +/- 8.5 mm Hg with zero hospital or late mortality, reoperation or thromboembolic events in 22 patients. The reconstructive techniques for aortic root aneurysm and/or type A dissection according to David or Yacoub have become routine procedures in the last 10 years. The hemodynamic and clinical results are excellent with low reoperation rate and very low risk of thromboembolism. Generally, a maximal diameter of the root of 5 cm is indicative for performing the operation. In patients with Marfan's syndrome the reconstruction should be advanced even with smaller diameters especially

  16. Enlargement of the aortic annulus during aortic valve replacement: a review.

    PubMed

    Bortolotti, Uberto; Celiento, Michele; Milano, Aldo D

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of aortic valve replacement (AVR) is to obtain relief from the fixed left ventricular (LV) obstruction by replacing the aortic valve with a prosthesis, either mechanical or biological, of adequate size. Most currently available prostheses provide satisfactory hemodynamic performance, but small-sized prostheses may be associated with high transvalvular gradients and suboptimal effective orifice area that result in prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM), and thus are far from ideal for use in young, active patients. The avoidance of PPM is advisable as it has been repeatedly associated with increased mortality, decreased exercise tolerance and an impaired regression of LV hypertrophy after AVR for severe aortic stenosis. Enlargement of the aortic annulus (EAA) has proved to be a valuable method to prevent PPM in the presence of a diminutive aortic root. This review outlines the various techniques described for EAA, presenting technical details, long-term results and major procedure-related complications, and discussing the current role of EAA in patients requiring AVR.

  17. Endovascular Treatment of Late Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms after Surgical Repair of Congenital Aortic Coarctation in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Juszkat, Robert; Perek, Bartlomiej; Zabicki, Bartosz; Trojnarska, Olga; Jemielity, Marek; Staniszewski, Ryszard; Smoczyk, Wiesław; Pukacki, Fryderyk

    2013-01-01

    Background In some patients, local surgery-related complications are diagnosed many years after surgery for aortic coarctation. The purposes of this study were: (1) to systematically evaluate asymptomatic adults after Dacron patch repair in childhood, (2) to estimate the formation rate of secondary thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) and (3) to assess outcomes after intravascular treatment for TAAs. Methods This study involved 37 asymptomatic patients (26 female and 11 male) who underwent surgical repair of aortic coarctation in the childhood. After they had reached adolescence, patients with secondary TAAs were referred to endovascular repair. Results Follow-up studies revealed TAA in seven cases (19%) (including six with the gothic type of the aortic arch) and mild recoarctation in other six (16%). Six of the TAA patients were treated with stentgrafts, but one refused to undergo an endovascular procedure. In three cases, stengrafts covered the left subclavian artery (LSA), in another the graft was implanted distally to the LSA. In two individuals, elective hybrid procedures were performed with surgical bypass to the supraaortic arteries followed by stengraft implantation. All subjects survived the secondary procedures. One patient developed type Ia endoleak after stentgraft implantation that was eventually treated with a debranching procedure. Conclusions The long-term course of clinically asymptomatic patients after coarctation patch repair is not uncommonly complicated by formation of TAAs (particularly in individuals with the gothic pattern of the aortic arch) that can be treated effectively with stentgrafts. However, in some patients hybrid procedures may be necessary. PMID:24386233

  18. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement: transapical resection of the aortic valve in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bombien Quaden, René; Leester-Schaedel, Monika; Lozonschi, Lucian; Lutter, Georg

    2012-09-01

    The resection of pulmonary valves has already been demonstrated in an experimental beating-heart model. The aim of this study was to analyse the transapical laser-assisted resection of aortic valves in an in vivo porcine model in a non-beating heart. The resection was performed in a porcine model (n = 10) using a Thullium:YAG laser. After establishing a standard extracorporeal circulatory support, the aortic valve isolation chamber (AVIC) system was inserted transapically. The resection of the aortic leaflets was carried out step-by-step in the arrested heart. The AVIC implantation, the resection process, and the gross anatomy of intracardiac lesions were analysed. The procedure for installing the AVIC took 5.8 ± 1.5 min. A sealed chamber was achieved in 9/10 cases. The resection of the valves was performed in 8/10 and completed in 7/10 cases. The resection took, on average, 7.4 ± 2.7 min/cusp. In 9/10 cases, the sealing was sufficient. Gross anatomy and histological analysis demonstrated only superficial damage to the surrounding tissue. In this study, the in vivo on-pump isolation of the left ventricular outflow tract and the laser resection of the native aortic valve could be demonstrated successfully. Nevertheless, this model is the next step towards a beating-heart resection of the aortic valve using the isolation chamber.

  19. Aortic replacement in the setting of bicuspid aortic valve: how big? How much?

    PubMed

    Sundt, Thoralf M

    2015-02-01

    Despite more than a decade of intense investigation, controversy persists regarding appropriate triggers for aortic replacement in the setting of bicuspid aortic valve. The difficulty is that the data are inescapably imperfect. Although we can count individuals with bicuspid valve who suffer dissection, we have an insufficient understanding of the true denominator of individuals at risk to calculate the probability of dissection for an individual patient. In addition, our own decision-making process is subject to "denominator neglect" or focus on the fact of the occurrence of the event rather than on the risk of the occurrence. Furthermore, the data are inherently incomplete given the asymmetric nature of outcomes information. Specifically, although we can see those who did or did not dissect among the patients not undergoing surgery, the converse is not true; the tragedy of prophylactic surgery is that one cannot distinguish those who have benefited through prevention of dissection from those who paid the price of surgery but in whom dissection would never have occurred. Finally, we have data for only some of the critical determinants of dissection. Structural failure occurs when stresses exceed strengths. Aortic diameter gives us some insight into stress but we have little information on the material strength of the aorta. Early indications that patients undergoing aortic valve replacement for bicuspid valve had a significant risk of aortic dissection were followed by laboratory data showing histologic, biochemical, and mechanical abnormalities supporting an aggressive approach to resection; however, more recent clinical studies call this into question.

  20. Exertional dyspnea as a symptom of infrarenal aortic occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Schott, Stacey L; Carreiro, Fernanda Porto; Harkness, James R; Malas, Mahmoud B; Sozio, Stephen M; Zakaria, Sammy

    2014-06-01

    Advanced atherosclerosis of the aorta can cause severe ischemia in the kidneys, refractory hypertension, and claudication. However, no previous reports have clearly associated infrarenal aortic stenosis with shortness of breath. A 77-year-old woman with hypertension and hyperlipidemia presented with exertional dyspnea. Despite extensive testing and observation, no apparent cause for this patient's dyspnea was found. Images revealed severe infrarenal aortic stenosis. After the patient underwent stenting of the aortic occlusion, she had immediate symptomatic improvement and complete resolution of her dyspnea within one month. Twelve months after vascular intervention, the patient remained asymptomatic. In view of the distinct and lasting elimination of dyspnea after angioplasty and stenting of a nearly occluded infrarenal aortic lesion, we hypothesize that infrarenal aortic stenosis might be a treatable cause of exertional dyspnea. Clinicians should consider infrarenal aortic stenosis as a possible cause of dyspnea. Treatment of the stenosis might relieve symptoms.

  1. Diagnosis of aortic aneurysms by scintigraphy and ultrasonography

    SciTech Connect

    Caille, G. ); Chatal, J.F.; Tellier, J.L.; Talmant, C.; Guihard, R. )

    1981-10-01

    Angioscintigraphy, performed on 50 patients suspected of aortic aneurysm and complemented by abdominal ultrasonography in 31 cases, disclosed: - Three cases of thoracic aortic aneurysm, 2 of which were confirmed by arteriography and surgery. It was impossible to perform surgery in the third case, no arteriography was done. Strict agreement with standard thoracic images had made the angioscintigraphic diagnosis seem correct. Twenty-seven cases of abdominal aortic aneurysms were confirmed by arteriography or surgery. Ultrasonography disclosed an abdominal aortic aneurysm in 26 cases, 20 of which were confirmed. The agreement of the two procedures in 10 unconfirmed cases led us to consider the diagnosis as correct. Angioscintigraphy appears to be a reliable procedure for detecting thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms. Ultrasonography is the simplest and least costly procedure for study of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  2. Refractory ascites - a rare presentation of severe aortic regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Jenkinson, Charles; Rajaratnam, Shanker; Joshi, Pragnesh; Passage, Jurgen

    2014-01-01

    A 47 year-old male with a history of refractory ascites presented to our centre complaining of dyspnoea, abdominal distention, and weight gain. He was admitted under a medical team for investigation and management. Work-up excluded all common aetiologies of ascites. Echocardiography revealed severe aortic regurgitation (AR) with a dilated left ventricle but no right heart pathology or pulmonary hypertension. He underwent mechanical aortic valve replacement. Intra-operatively, a prolapsing left coronary leaflet of the aortic valve with frayed edges raised suspicion of resolved infective endocarditis. Postoperative course was uneventful. Following replacement of the aortic valve, the patient was completely free of ascites. This case demonstrates that ascites can be an unusual clinical presentation of severe aortic regurgitation, which may respond to aortic valve replacement. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Experimental fluid dynamics of transventricular apical aortic cannulation.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Ikuo; Yanaoka, Hideki; Inamura, Takao; Minakawa, Masahito; Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Suzuki, Yasuyuki

    2010-03-01

    To clarify the flow pattern from a transventricular apical aortic cannula, hydrodynamic analysis of transventricular apical aortic cannulation (apical cannulation) was performed using particle-image velocimetry in a glass aortic model. Simulated apical cannulation using a 7-mm Sarns Soft-Flow cannula and the newly developed 7-mm apical aortic cannula was compared with standard aortic cannulation. The flow-velocity, streamline, and distribution of magnitude of the strain rate tensor (function of shear stress) were analyzed. Streamline analysis revealed a steady and organized flow profile in apical cannulation as compared with that in standard aortic cannulation. The magnitude of the strain rate tensor decreased within a few centimeters from the exit of the apical cannula.

  4. Aortic valve replacement in familial hypercholesterolemia: not an ordinary procedure.

    PubMed

    Muretti, Mirko; Massi, Francesco; Coradduzza, Enrico; Portoghese, Michele

    2015-04-28

    Familial hypercholesterolemia is an inherited disorder with incidences of approximately 1:500 and 1:1,000,000 in heterozygous and homozygous form respectively. Affected patients usually show early coronary artery disease and severe aortic root calcification, despite optimization of therapy. We report a case of a 64-year-old woman affected by heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia which presented dyspnea and anginal symptoms due to a severely calcified aortic root causing valve stenosis and narrowed sinotubular junction. Aortic valve replacement and aortic root enlargement were performed using the Manougian procedure. Even for experiences surgeons, this surgery could prove challenging for this group of patients due to aggressive degenerative tissue calcification of the aortic root, which often presents an extremely calcified aortic valve with a small annulus associated to a narrowed sinotubular junction.

  5. Role of chemical elements in formation of an aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Okuneva, G N; Levicheva, E N; Loginova, I Iu; Volkov, A M; Cherniavskiĭ, A M; Al'sov, S A; Trunova, V A; Zvereva, V V

    2008-01-01

    The method of X-ray fluorescence employing synchronous radiation was used to study the content of chemical elements (CE) in the aortic wall in patients suffering from CAD (Group I), patients diagnosed with an ascending aortic aneurysm (Group II), and those presenting with aortic dissection (Group III). The obtained findings revealed a pronounced CE disbalance in the aortic wall in Group II and III patients as compared with Group I patients, suggesting an important role of trace and macroelements in metabolic processes related to formation of artic aneurysms. Based on the degree of the ascending aorta dilatation, we determined the coefficient of the ratio of the ascending aorta maximal diameter to the fibrous ring aortic valve diameter, equalling 1.88 +/- 0.04, above which metabolic processes in the aortic wall change over to a qualitatively another level. This point was arbitrarily termed the metabolic process reversibility point.

  6. Implantation of the CoreValve percutaneous aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Lamarche, Yoan; Cartier, Raymond; Denault, André Y; Basmadjian, Arsène; Berry, Colin; Laborde, Jean-Claude; Bonan, Raoul

    2007-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement is the only recommended treatment for significant aortic valve stenosis. Percutaneous aortic valve replacement appears to be a novel option for high-risk patients. We report the implantation of the ReValving system (CoreValve, Paris, France) in a 64-year-old woman who was refused aortic valve replacement surgery for critical aortic stenosis and left ventricular dysfunction because of severe pulmonary fibrosis. After anesthesia, the patient was put on femorofemoral cardiopulmonary bypass, and underwent a balloon valvuloplasty with subsequent retrograde aortic valve replacement by the ReValving system. Transesophageal echocardiographic monitoring of the patient's hemodynamics showed immediate improvements of the valvular area and left ventricular ejection fraction and only traces of paravalvular leaks. The patient was easily weaned from ventilation and resumed activity soon after the surgery. A multidisciplinary approach is presently necessary to offer a reliable and safe procedure.

  7. Aneurysm of an Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery Successfully Excluded by a Thoracic Aortic Stent Graft with Supra-aortic Bypass of Three Arch Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Munneke, Graham J. Loosemore, Thomas M.; Belli, Anna-Maria; Thompson, Matt M.; Morgan, Robert A.

    2005-06-15

    An aberrant right subclavian artery (ARSA) arising from a left-sided aortic arch is the fourth most common aortic arch anomaly. Aneurysmal dilatation of the ARSA requires treatment because of the associated risk of rupture. We present a case where supra-aortic bypass of the arch vessels was performed to facilitate exclusion of the aneurysm by a thoracic aortic stent graft.

  8. Optimal Design of Aortic Leaflet Prosthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghista, Dhanjoo N.; Reul, Helmut; Ray, Gautam; Chandran, K. B.

    1978-01-01

    The design criteria for an optimum prosthetic-aortic leaflet valve are a smooth washout in the valve cusps, minimal leaflet stress, minimal transmembrane pressure for the valve to open, an adequate lifetime (for a given blood-compatible leaflet material's fatigue data). A rigorous design analysis is presented to obtain the prosthetic tri-leaflet aortic valve leaflet's optimum design parameters. Four alternative optimum leaflet geometries are obtained to satisfy the criteria of a smooth washout and minimal leaflet stress. The leaflet thicknesses of these four optimum designs are determined by satisfying the two remaining design criteria for minimal transmembrane opening pressure and adequate fatigue lifetime, which are formulated in terms of the elastic and fatigue properties of the selected leaflet material - Avcothane-51 (of the Avco-Everett Co. of Massachusetts). Prosthetic valves are fabricated on the basis of the optimum analysis and the resulting detailed engineering drawings of the designs are also presented in the paper.

  9. Geometry of aortic heart valves. [prosthetic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karara, H. M.

    1975-01-01

    Photogrammetric measurements of the surface topography of the aortic valves obtained from silicon rubber molds of freshly excised human aortic valves are presented. The data are part of an investigation into the design of a new prosthetic valve which will be a central-flow device, like the real valve and unlike previous central-occluding prostheses. Since the maximum stress on the heart valve is induced when the valve is closed and subject to diastolic back-pressure, it was decided to determine the valve geometry during diastole. That is, the molds were formed by pouring the rubber down the excised aortas, causing the valves to close. The molds were made under different pressures (20-120 torr); photogrammetry served as a vehicle for the assessment of the mold topography through the following outputs: digital models, surface profiles, and contour maps.

  10. Single Coronary Artery with Aortic Regurgitation

    SciTech Connect

    Katsetos, Manny C. Toce, Dale T.

    2003-11-15

    An isolated single coronary artery can be associated with normal life expectancy; however, patients are at an increased risk of sudden death. A case is reported of a 54-year-old man with several months of chest pressure with activity. On exercise Sestamibi stress testing, the patient developed a hypotensive response with no symptoms and minimal electrocardiographic changes. Nuclear scanning demonstrated reversible septal and lateral perfusion defects consistent with severe ischemia. Coronary angiography revealed a single coronary artery with the right coronary artery arising from the left main. There were high-grade stenotic lesions in the left anterior descending and circumflex arteries with only moderate atherosclerotic disease in the right coronary artery. An aortogram showed 2-3+ aortic regurgitation, with an ejection fraction of 45% on ventriculography. The patient underwent four-vessel revascularization and aortic valve replacement and did well postoperatively.

  11. Geometry of aortic heart valves. [prosthetic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karara, H. M.

    1975-01-01

    Photogrammetric measurements of the surface topography of the aortic valves obtained from silicon rubber molds of freshly excised human aortic valves are presented. The data are part of an investigation into the design of a new prosthetic valve which will be a central-flow device, like the real valve and unlike previous central-occluding prostheses. Since the maximum stress on the heart valve is induced when the valve is closed and subject to diastolic back-pressure, it was decided to determine the valve geometry during diastole. That is, the molds were formed by pouring the rubber down the excised aortas, causing the valves to close. The molds were made under different pressures (20-120 torr); photogrammetry served as a vehicle for the assessment of the mold topography through the following outputs: digital models, surface profiles, and contour maps.

  12. Basic mechanisms of calcific aortic valve disease.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Patrick; Boulanger, Marie-Chloé

    2014-09-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is the most common heart valve disorder. There is no medical treatment to prevent and/or promote the regression of CAVD. Hence, it is of foremost importance to delineate and understand the key basic underlying mechanisms involved in CAVD. In the past decade our comprehension of the underpinning processes leading to CAVD has expanded at a fast pace. Hence, our understanding of the basic pathobiological processes implicated in CAVD might lead eventually to the development of novel pharmaceutical therapies for CAVD. In this review, we discuss molecular processes that are implicated in fibrosis and mineralization of the aortic valve. Specifically, we address the role of lipid retention, inflammation, phosphate signalling and osteogenic transition in the development of CAVD. Interplays between these different processes and the key regulation pathways are discussed along with their clinical relevance.

  13. Glucose Suppresses Biological Ferroelectricity in Aortic Elastin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanming; Wang, Yunjie; Chow, Ming-Jay; Chen, Nataly Q.; Ma, Feiyue; Zhang, Yanhang; Li, Jiangyu

    2013-04-01

    Elastin is an intriguing extracellular matrix protein present in all connective tissues of vertebrates, rendering essential elasticity to connective tissues subjected to repeated physiological stresses. Using piezoresponse force microscopy, we show that the polarity of aortic elastin is switchable by an electrical field, which may be associated with the recently discovered biological ferroelectricity in the aorta. More interestingly, it is discovered that the switching in aortic elastin is largely suppressed by glucose treatment, which appears to freeze the internal asymmetric polar structures of elastin, making it much harder to switch, or suppressing the switching completely. Such loss of ferroelectricity could have important physiological and pathological implications from aging to arteriosclerosis that are closely related to glycation of elastin.

  14. Familial aortic aneurysm in Leonberg dogs.

    PubMed

    Chetboul, Valérie; Tessier, Dominique; Borenstein, Nicolas; Delisle, Françoise; Zilberstein, Luca; Payen, Guillaume; Leglaive, Eric; Franc, Brigitte; Derumeaux, Geneviève; Pouchelon, Jean-Louis

    2003-10-15

    A thoracic aortic aneurysm was diagnosed in a 6-month-old male Leonberg dog by use of radiography, transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography, and magnetic resonance imaging. The aneurysm was associated with a twisted ascending aorta and dilatation of several other thoracic arteries (pulmonary trunk, brachiocephalic trunk, and left subclavian artery). Histologic examination of the aorta revealed cystic medial necrosis, with disruption of the elastic network, collagen fibers, and the muscle glycoprotein fibrillin-1. The dam and sire of the dog and 8 littermates were examined by use of transthoracic echocardiography. The sire and 1 male littermate also had an aneurysm of the ascending aorta. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of familial aortic aneurysm in dogs.

  15. Optimal Design of Aortic Leaflet Prosthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghista, Dhanjoo N.; Reul, Helmut; Ray, Gautam; Chandran, K. B.

    1978-01-01

    The design criteria for an optimum prosthetic-aortic leaflet valve are a smooth washout in the valve cusps, minimal leaflet stress, minimal transmembrane pressure for the valve to open, an adequate lifetime (for a given blood-compatible leaflet material's fatigue data). A rigorous design analysis is presented to obtain the prosthetic tri-leaflet aortic valve leaflet's optimum design parameters. Four alternative optimum leaflet geometries are obtained to satisfy the criteria of a smooth washout and minimal leaflet stress. The leaflet thicknesses of these four optimum designs are determined by satisfying the two remaining design criteria for minimal transmembrane opening pressure and adequate fatigue lifetime, which are formulated in terms of the elastic and fatigue properties of the selected leaflet material - Avcothane-51 (of the Avco-Everett Co. of Massachusetts). Prosthetic valves are fabricated on the basis of the optimum analysis and the resulting detailed engineering drawings of the designs are also presented in the paper.

  16. Apicoaortic conduit for severe hemolytic anemia after aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Hatori, Kyohei; Ohki, Satoshi; Obayashi, Tamiyuki; Koyano, Tetsuya; Yasuhara, Kiyomitsu; Hirai, Hanako

    2015-06-01

    We describe the case of an 82-year-old woman who had undergone aortic mechanical valve replacement for aortic stenosis with a small annulus, and coronary artery bypass grafting. Four years after the operation, she began to experience hemolysis. Prosthetic valve obstruction was observed but there was no paravalvular leakage or aortic regurgitation through the mechanical valve. We elected to perform apicoaortic bypass in this patient with severe hemolytic anemia secondary to a mechanical valve malfunction.

  17. Absent Aortic Valve in DiGeorge Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bertsch, Elizabeth C; Minturn, Lucy; Gotteiner, Nina L; Ernst, Linda M

    2016-01-01

    A 20-week-old fetus with the 22q11.2 deletion characteristic of DiGeorge syndrome is described with vertebral segmentation abnormalities and complex cardiovascular anomalies including an absent aortic valve. This is only the second known case of absent aortic valve in association with DiGeorge syndrome. We discuss the association of absent aortic valve with other conotruncal defects and the utility of fetal echocardiography in the diagnosis of DiGeorge syndrome.

  18. CT and MRI in the Evaluation of Thoracic Aortic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the most commonly used imaging examinations to evaluate thoracic aortic diseases because of their high spatial and temporal resolutions, large fields of view, and multiplanar imaging reconstruction capabilities. CT and MRI play an important role not only in the diagnosis of thoracic aortic disease but also in the preoperative assessment and followup after treatment. In this review, the CT and MRI appearances of various acquired thoracic aortic conditions are described and illustrated. PMID:24396601

  19. Simple Renal Cysts as Markers of Thoracic Aortic Disease.

    PubMed

    Ziganshin, Bulat A; Theodoropoulos, Panagiotis; Salloum, Mohammad N; Zaza, Khaled J; Tranquilli, Maryann; Mojibian, Hamid R; Dahl, Neera K; Fang, Hai; Rizzo, John A; Elefteriades, John A

    2016-01-08

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm is usually a clinically silent disease; timely detection is largely dependent upon identification of clinical markers of thoracic aortic disease (TAD); (bicuspid aortic valve, intracranial aortic aneurysm, bovine aortic arch, or positive family history). Recently, an association of simple renal cysts (SRC) with abdominal aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection was established. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of SRC in patients with TAD in order to assess whether the presence of SRC can be used as a predictor of TAD. We evaluated the prevalence of SRC in 842 patients with TAD (64.0% males) treated at our institution from 2004 to 2013 and compared to a control group of patients (n=543; 56.2% males). Patients were divided into 4 groups: ascending aortic aneurysm (456; 54.2%); descending aortic aneurysm (86; 10.2%); type A aortic dissection (118; 14.0%); and type B aortic dissection (182; 21.6%). SRC were identified by abdominal computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging of these patients. Prevalence of SRC is 37.5%, 57.0%, 44.1%, and 47.3% for patients with ascending aneurysm, descending aneurysm, type A dissection, and type B dissection, respectively. Prevalence of SRC in the control group was 15.3%. Prevalence of SRC was not significantly different between male and female aortic disease patients, despite reported general male predominance (2:1), which was also observed in our control group (1.7:1). This study establishes an increased prevalence of SRC in patients with TAD. SRC can potentially be used as a marker for timely detection of patients at risk of TAD. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  20. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement: techniques, complications, and bailout strategies.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vikas; Macon, Conrad J; Scot Shaw, Eric; Londoño, Juan C; Martinez, Claudia A

    2013-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement has emerged as an alternative option for inoperable or very high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis-however, there are serious complications associated with the procedure, such as patient mortality, stroke, conduction disturbances, paravalvular regurgitation, and vascular concerns. Our review focuses on the most common complications related to transcatheter aortic valve replacement procedures and potential bailout strategies and techniques.

  1. Acute aortic and mitral valve regurgitation following blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Bernabeu, Eduardo; Mestres, Carlos A; Loma-Osorio, Pablo; Josa, Miguel

    2004-03-01

    Traumatic rupture of intracardiac structures is an uncommon phenomenon although there are a number of reports with regards to rupture of the tricuspid, mitral and aortic valves. We report the case of a 25-year-old patient who presented with acute aortic and mitral valve regurgitation of traumatic origin. Both lesions were seen separated by 2 weeks. Pathophysiology is reviewed. The combination of both aortic and mitral lesions following blunt chest trauma is almost exceptional.

  2. Proximal aortic repair versus extensive aortic repair in the treatment of acute type A aortic dissection: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yan; Xu, Li; Zhang, Hao; Xu, Zhi-Yun; Ding, Xue-Yan; Wang, Shu-Wei; Xue, Xiang; Tan, Meng-Wei

    2016-05-01

    The optimal surgical strategy for acute type A aortic dissection (ATAAD) is still controversial because of the inconsistent or even conflicting results of proximal aortic repair (PR) versus extensive aortic repair (ER) on early and late prognostic outcomes. This meta-analysis pooled data from all available studies of PR versus ER to get a summarized conclusion. Studies were identified by searching the Medline, EMBASE and Cochrane databases. Early and late prognostic outcomes of interest were evaluated with meta-analysis. Fixed- or random-effect models were used according to the significance of heterogeneity. Robustness of pooled estimates and the source of heterogeneity were assessed via sensitivity analyses and meta-regression, respectively. Publication bias was evaluated by the funnel plot and Egger's test. Nine studies with a total of 1872 patients were included for the meta-analysis. Pooled results indicated that, when compared with the ER procedure, PR was associated with lower early mortality [risk ratio (RR) = 0.69, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.54-0.90, P = 0.005] but higher incidence of postoperative aortic events including reoperation of the distal aorta (RR = 3.14, 95% CI 1.74-5.67, P < 0.001). PR and ER demonstrated analogous prognosis on long-term mortality (HR = 1.02, 95% CI 0.51-2.06, P = 0.96) and the incidences of early postoperative renal failure (RR = 0.75, 95% CI 0.49-1.14, P = 0.17) and stroke (RR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.30-1.78, P = 0.50). All the pooled results were robust to sensitivity analysis. Heterogeneity was insignificant except for the meta-analysis of late mortality. Performing a less aggressive initial surgical procedure of PR in ATAAD patients would have lower early mortality but elevated incidence rates of late aortic reintervention, when compared with ER. Other prognostic results of the two surgical strategies including long-term mortality were similar for both. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  3. Total Percutaneous Aortic Repair: Midterm Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Bent, Clare L. Fotiadis, Nikolas; Renfrew, Ian; Walsh, Michael; Brohi, Karim; Kyriakides, Constantinos; Matson, Matthew

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate and midterm outcomes of percutaneous endovascular repair of thoracic and abdominal aortic pathology. Between December 2003 and June 2005, 21 patients (mean age: 60.4 {+-} 17.1 years; 15 males, 6 females) underwent endovascular stent-graft insertion for thoracic (n = 13) or abdominal aortic (n = 8) pathology. Preprocedural computed tomographic angiography (CTA) was performed to assess the suitability of aorto-iliac and common femoral artery (CFA) anatomy, including the degree of CFA calcification, for total percutaneous aortic stent-graft repair. Percutaneous access was used for the introduction of 18- to 26-Fr delivery devices. A 'preclose' closure technique using two Perclose suture devices (Perclose A-T; Abbott Vascular) was used in all cases. Data were prospectively collected. Each CFA puncture site was assessed via clinical examination and CTA at 1, 6, and 12 months, followed by annual review thereafter. Minimum follow-up was 36 months. Outcome measures evaluated were rates of technical success, conversion to open surgical repair, complications, and late incidence of arterial stenosis at the site of Perclose suture deployment. A total of 58 Perclose devices were used to close 29 femoral arteriotomies. Outer diameters of stent-graft delivery devices used were 18 Fr (n = 5), 20 Fr (n = 3), 22 Fr (n = 4), 24 Fr (n = 15), and 26 Fr (n = 2). Percutaneous closure was successful in 96.6% (28/29) of arteriotomies. Conversion to surgical repair was required at one access site (3.4%). Mean follow-up was 50 {+-} 8 months. No late complications were observed. By CT criteria, no patient developed a >50% reduction in CFA caliber at the site of Perclose deployment during the study period. In conclusion, percutaneous aortic stent-graft insertion can be safely performed, with a low risk of both immediate and midterm access-related complications.

  4. Abdominal aortic aneurysm presenting as meralgia paraesthetica.

    PubMed Central

    Brett, A; Hodgetts, T

    1997-01-01

    A case of abdominal aortic aneurysm is reported in a patient with long standing low back pain, presenting as meralgia paraesthetica and an increase in the severity of back pain. The case highlights the need for objective assessment of new symptoms arising in a chronic condition, and for a systematic approach to the assessment of radiographs performed in the accident and emergency department. Images p50-a PMID:9147718

  5. Helical (spiral) CT in the evaluation of emergent thoracic aortic syndromes. Traumatic aortic rupture, aortic aneurysm, aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Ledbetter, S; Stuk, J L; Kaufman, J A

    1999-05-01

    For the near future, CT will play the critical and dominant role in the evaluation of patients presenting with emergent aortic syndromes. Its convenience, accuracy, and utility in the rapid evaluation of not just the aorta, but the entire thorax, make it ideally suited for use in emergency settings. Further benefits are likely to be realized in speed and resolution with multislice CT, although it is as yet not widely available.

  6. FOXE3 mutations predispose to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Shao-Qing; Medina-Martinez, Olga; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Gong, Limin; Regalado, Ellen S; Reynolds, Corey L; Boileau, Catherine; Jondeau, Guillaume; Prakash, Siddharth K; Kwartler, Callie S; Zhu, Lawrence Yang; Peters, Andrew M; Duan, Xue-Yan; Bamshad, Michael J; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Debbie A; Santos-Cortez, Regie L; Dong, Xiurong; Leal, Suzanne M; Majesky, Mark W; Swindell, Eric C; Jamrich, Milan; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2016-03-01

    The ascending thoracic aorta is designed to withstand biomechanical forces from pulsatile blood. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections (TAADs) occur as a result of genetically triggered defects in aortic structure and a dysfunctional response to these forces. Here, we describe mutations in the forkhead transcription factor FOXE3 that predispose mutation-bearing individuals to TAAD. We performed exome sequencing of a large family with multiple members with TAADs and identified a rare variant in FOXE3 with an altered amino acid in the DNA-binding domain (p.Asp153His) that segregated with disease in this family. Additional pathogenic FOXE3 variants were identified in unrelated TAAD families. In mice, Foxe3 deficiency reduced smooth muscle cell (SMC) density and impaired SMC differentiation in the ascending aorta. Foxe3 expression was induced in aortic SMCs after transverse aortic constriction, and Foxe3 deficiency increased SMC apoptosis and ascending aortic rupture with increased aortic pressure. These phenotypes were rescued by inhibiting p53 activity, either by administration of a p53 inhibitor (pifithrin-α), or by crossing Foxe3-/- mice with p53-/- mice. Our data demonstrate that FOXE3 mutations lead to a reduced number of aortic SMCs during development and increased SMC apoptosis in the ascending aorta in response to increased biomechanical forces, thus defining an additional molecular pathway that leads to familial thoracic aortic disease.

  7. FOXE3 mutations predispose to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Shao-Qing; Medina-Martinez, Olga; Guo, Dong-chuan; Gong, Limin; Regalado, Ellen S.; Reynolds, Corey L.; Boileau, Catherine; Jondeau, Guillaume; Prakash, Siddharth K.; Kwartler, Callie S.; Zhu, Lawrence Yang; Peters, Andrew M.; Duan, Xue-Yan; Bamshad, Michael J.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Debbie A.; Santos-Cortez, Regie L.; Dong, Xiurong; Leal, Suzanne M.; Majesky, Mark W.; Swindell, Eric C.; Jamrich, Milan; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2016-01-01

    The ascending thoracic aorta is designed to withstand biomechanical forces from pulsatile blood. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections (TAADs) occur as a result of genetically triggered defects in aortic structure and a dysfunctional response to these forces. Here, we describe mutations in the forkhead transcription factor FOXE3 that predispose mutation-bearing individuals to TAAD. We performed exome sequencing of a large family with multiple members with TAADs and identified a rare variant in FOXE3 with an altered amino acid in the DNA-binding domain (p.Asp153His) that segregated with disease in this family. Additional pathogenic FOXE3 variants were identified in unrelated TAAD families. In mice, Foxe3 deficiency reduced smooth muscle cell (SMC) density and impaired SMC differentiation in the ascending aorta. Foxe3 expression was induced in aortic SMCs after transverse aortic constriction, and Foxe3 deficiency increased SMC apoptosis and ascending aortic rupture with increased aortic pressure. These phenotypes were rescued by inhibiting p53 activity, either by administration of a p53 inhibitor (pifithrin-α), or by crossing Foxe3–/– mice with p53–/– mice. Our data demonstrate that FOXE3 mutations lead to a reduced number of aortic SMCs during development and increased SMC apoptosis in the ascending aorta in response to increased biomechanical forces, thus defining an additional molecular pathway that leads to familial thoracic aortic disease. PMID:26854927

  8. Aortic root abscess resulting from endocarditis: spectrum of angiographic findings

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.W.; Dinsmore, R.E.

    1984-11-01

    Abscesses in the aortic root are a serious complication of infective endocarditis and require accurate diagnosis for antibiotic and surgical management. Nineteen cases of endocarditis of a native valve or prosthetic valve and adjacent abscess cavities were identified with angiography. Of 6 patients with endocarditis of a native valve, 5 had bicuspid aortic valves and all had severe aortic regurgitation. Of 13 patients with endocarditis of a prosthetic aortic valve, all had paravalvular regurgitation. Fistulas were detected into the mitral anulus in 8 patients, and into the right ventricle in 3 patients. No complications from the catheterization were recorded during the 48-hour follow-up.

  9. Interrupted aortic arch: A misdiagnosed cause of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ponte, Marta; Dias, Adelaide; Dias Ferreira, Nuno; Fonseca, Conceição; Mota, João Carlos; Gama, Vasco

    2014-06-01

    We present the case of a 47-year-old man with hypertension for over 20 years, referred to our hospital due to mild aortic dilatation detected on a transthoracic echocardiogram. On physical examination weak lower limb pulses and a blood pressure differential of >50 mmHg between arms and legs were detected. Complete interruption of the aortic arch below the left subclavian artery was diagnosed by computed tomography angiography. With this case we aim to draw attention to aortic coarctation and interrupted aortic arch as potential causes of hypertension and to highlight the importance of the physical examination in the diagnosis of secondary causes of hypertension.

  10. C-reactive protein in aortic valve disease

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Pedro L; Mazzone, Anna Maria

    2006-01-01

    Aortic Valve Disease, includes a range of disorder severity from mild leaflet thickening without valve obstruction, "aortic sclerosis", to severe calcified aortic stenosis. It is a slowly progressive active process of valve modification similar atherosclerosis for cardiovascular risk factors, lipoprotein deposition, chronic inflammation, and calcification. Systemic signs of inflammation, as wall and serum CRP, similar to those found in atherosclerosis, are present in patients with degenerative aortic valve stenosis and may be expression of a common disease, useful in monitoring of stenosis progression. PMID:17042945

  11. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Comprehensive Review and Present Status

    PubMed Central

    Misenheimer, Jacob A.; Ramaraj, Radhakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease in the developed world. About 7% of the population over age 65 years suffers from degenerative aortic stenosis. The prognosis of patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis is dismal without valve replacement. Even though the American College of Cardiology recommends aortic valve replacement to treat this condition as a class I recommendation, approximately one third of these patients over the age of 75 years are not referred for surgery. Typically, this is from concern about prohibitive surgical risk associated with patient frailty, comorbidities, age, and severe left ventricular dysfunction. The advent in France of transcatheter aortic valve replacement has raised the hope in the United States for an alternative, less invasive treatment for aortic stenosis. Two recent trials—the Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER Valve Trial Edwards SAPIEN Transcatheter Heart Valve (Partner) and the CoreValve US Pivotal—have established transcatheter aortic valve replacement as the preferred approach in patients who are at high or prohibitive surgical risk. The more recently published Partner 2 trial has shown the feasibility of transcatheter aortic valve replacement in intermediate-surgical-risk patients as well. With a profile that promises easier use and better valve performance and delivery, newer-generation valves have shown their potential for further improvement in safety profile and overall outcomes. We review the history and status of this topic. PMID:28265210

  12. Concomitant reconstruction of arch vessels during repair of aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Micovic, Slobodan; Nezic, Dusko; Vukovic, Petar; Jovanovic, Marko; Lozuk, Branko; Jagodic, Sinisa; Djukanovic, Bosko

    2014-08-01

    Surgery for acute aortic dissection is challenging, especially in cases of cerebral malperfusion. Should we perform only the aortic repair, or should we also reconstruct the arch vessels when they are severely affected by the disease process? Here we present a case of acute aortic dissection with multiple tears that involved the brachiocephalic artery and caused cerebral and right upper-extremity malperfusion. The patient successfully underwent complete replacement of the brachiocephalic artery and the aortic arch during deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, with antegrade cerebral protection. We have found this technique to be safe and reproducible for use in this group of patients.

  13. Major dehiscence of a prosthetic aortic valve: detection by echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Salem, B I; Pechacek, L W; Leachman, R D

    1979-04-01

    A 21-year-old man had acute aortic insufficiency three months after insertion of an aortic valve prosthesis. Chest roentgenography demonstrated abnormal orientation of the prosthesis. M-mode echocardiography showed dense, linear echoes from the prosthetic valve between the interventricular septum and the mitral valve, along with loss of normal poppet motion within the aortic root. At surgery, the prosthesis was found to be extensively disrupted, resulting in prolapse into the left ventricular outflow tract. Another valve replacement was performed with patient survival. Echocardiography appears to be a useful adjunct to established roentgenographic procedures in the diagnosis of major dehiscence of prosthetic aortic valves.

  14. Surgery for supravalvular aortic stenosis - the three-patch technique.

    PubMed

    Arnáiz, Elena; Koolbergen, Dave; Adsuar, Alejandro; Hazekamp, Mark G

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe the three-patch technique for repair of supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS). Supravalvular aortic stenosis is a rare malformation as a result of an abnormal thickening of the aortic wall. SVAS may present in two forms: a localized form (affecting only the aortic sinotubular junction) and a diffuse form, where the aortic arch and its side branches are also affected. Since 1960, multiple surgical techniques have been described with the aim of relieving the aortic narrowing and restoring the aortic root. We present the three-patch technique as originally developed by Brom. After transection of the aorta at the sinotubular junction, three longitudinal incisions are made into the three sinuses. The aortic root geometry is then restored by placement of three separate patches of autologous pericardium in the opened sinuses. Brom's technique provides a complete and symmetric restoration of the aortic anatomy. The technique is illustrated by angiographies, surgical drawings, videos and a review of the literature. The results of the three-patch technique are good and our long-term experience will be described.

  15. Advances in aortic disease management: a year in review.

    PubMed

    Garg, Vinay; Ouzounian, Maral; Peterson, Mark D

    2016-03-01

    The medical and surgical management of aortic disease is continually changing in search for improved outcomes. Our objective is to highlight recent advances in a few select areas pertaining to aortic disease and aortic surgery: the genetics of aortopathy, medical therapy of aortic aneurysms, advances in cardiac imaging, and operative strategies for the aortic arch. As our understanding of the genetic basis for aortopathy continues to improve, routine genetic testing may be of value in assessing patients with genetically triggered forms of aortic disease. With regard to medical advances, treating patients with Marfan syndrome with either losartan or atenolol at an earlier stage in their disease course improves outcomes. In addition, novel imaging indices such as wall shear stress and aortic stiffness assessed by MRI may become useful markers of aortopathy and warrant further study. With regard to the optimal technique for cerebral perfusion in aortic arch surgery, high-quality data are still lacking. Finally, in patients with complex, multilevel aortic disease, the frozen elephant trunk is a viable single-stage option compared with the conventional elephant trunk, although with an increased risk for spinal cord injury. Based on recent advances, continued studies in genetics, cardiac imaging, and surgical trials will further elucidate the etiology of aortopathy and ultimately guide management, both medically and surgically.

  16. Chronic Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Presenting 29 Years following Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Sarah; Kumar, Prashant; Van den Bosch, Rene; Khanafer, Adib

    2015-01-01

    Blunt, nonpenetrating injuries of the thoracic aorta are uncommon and associated with a high mortality rate within the first hour. Aortic injury is missed in 1-2% of patients that survive to hospital, and a chronic thoracic aortic aneurysm may subsequently form. We present a case in which a chronic thoracic aortic aneurysm was diagnosed 29 years following a significant motor vehicle accident. We discuss the epidemiology, presentation, and management of this uncommon consequence of blunt, nonpenetrating aortic injury. Our case illustrates an important clinical lesson; a past medical history of trauma should not be overlooked at any patient assessment. PMID:26351610

  17. Early-onset Streptomyces endocarditis in a prosthetic aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Shehatha, Jaffar S; Taha, Abdulsalam Y

    2017-02-01

    A 66-year-old Australian man underwent elective replacement of a severely stenotic aortic valve with a 22-mm Medtronic-Hall valve. Six weeks later, he was readmitted with worsening dyspnea, fever, and mild anemia. Investigations confirmed pulmonary edema and moderate periprosthetic aortic regurgitation. The pulmonary edema was managed conservatively, and a second 22-mm Medtronic-Hall valve was implanted. Infective endocarditis was suspected in the aortic annulus below the orifice of the right coronary artery. A bacteriological study revealed a rare bacteria of Streptomyces species. The patient received intensive antibiotic therapy over a 6-week period of hospitalization, and the aortic regurgitation disappeared one week postoperatively.

  18. [Surgical treatment for prosthetic valve endocarditis after aortic root replacement].

    PubMed

    Kanamori, Taro; Ichihara, Tetsuya; Sakaguchi, Hidehito; Inoue, Takehiko

    2014-05-01

    Aorto-left ventricular continuity destruction due to prosthetic valve endocarditis is rare, but it is one of the fatal complications after aortic root operation. We report a case of surgical treatment for prosthetic valve endocarditis after aortic root replacement. A 47-year-old man, who had undergone aortic root replacement with a composite graft was transferred to our hospital with sudden chest pain and high fever. Enhanced computed tomography showed a large space with contrast enhancement suggesting perivalvular leakage around the artificial composite graft. Emergency operation including aortic root re-replacement and reconstruction of the left ventricular outflow tract was performed successfully. We focused on its technical aspect.

  19. Aortic curvature as a predictor of intraoperative type Ia endoleak.

    PubMed

    Schuurmann, Richte C L; Ouriel, Kenneth; Muhs, Bart E; Jordan, William D; Ouriel, Richard L; Boersen, Johannes T; de Vries, Jean-Paul P M

    2016-03-01

    Hostile infrarenal neck characteristics are associated with complications such as type Ia endoleak after endovascular aneurysm repair. Aortic neck angulation has been identified as one such characteristic, but its association with complications has not been uniform between studies. Neck angulation assumes triangular oversimplification of the aortic trajectory, which may explain conflicting findings. By contrast, aortic curvature is a measurement that includes the bending rate and tortuosity and may provide better predictive value for neck complications. Data were retrieved from the Heli-FX (Aptus Endosystems, Inc, Sunnyvale, Calif) Aortic Securement System Global Registry (ANCHOR). One cohort included patients who presented with intraoperative endoleak type Ia at the completion angiogram as the indication for EndoAnchors (Aptus Endosystems), and a second cohort comprised those without intraoperative or late type Ia endoleak (controls). The aortic trajectory was divided into six segments with potentially different influence on the stent graft performance: suprarenal, juxtarenal, and infrarenal aortic neck (-30 to -10 mm, -10 to 10 mm, and 10-30 mm from the lowest renal artery, respectively), the entire aortic neck, aneurysm sac, and terminal aorta (20 mm above the bifurcation to the bifurcation). Maximum and average curvature were automatically calculated over the six segments by proprietary custom software. Aortic curvature was compared with other standard neck characteristics, including neck length, neck diameter, maximum aneurysm sac diameter, neck thrombus and calcium thickness and circumference, suprarenal angulation, infrarenal angulation, and the neck tortuosity index. Independent risk factors for intraoperative type Ia endoleak were identified using backwards stepwise logistic regression. For the variables in the final regression model, suitable cutoff values in relation to the prediction of acute type Ia endoleak were defined with the area under the

  20. Management strategies and future challenges for aortic valve disease.

    PubMed

    Bonow, Robert O; Leon, Martin B; Doshi, Darshan; Moat, Neil

    2016-03-26

    The management of aortic valve disease has been improved by accurate diagnosis and assessment of severity by echocardiography and advanced imaging techniques, efforts to elicit symptoms or objective markers of disease severity and progression, and consideration of optimum timing of aortic valve replacement, even in elderly patients. Prevalence of calcific aortic stenosis is growing in ageing populations. Conventional surgery remains the most appropriate option for most patients who require aortic valve replacement, but the transcatheter approach is established for high-risk patients or poor candidates for surgery. The rapid growth of transcatheter aortic valve replacement has been fuelled by improved technology, evidence-based clinical research, and setting up of multidisciplinary heart teams. Aortic regurgitation can be difficult to diagnose and quantify. Left ventricular dysfunction often precedes symptoms, needing active surveillance by echocardiography to determine the optimum time for aortic valve replacement. Development of transcatheter approaches for aortic regurgitation is challenging, owing to the absence of valvular calcification and distortion of aortic root anatomy in many patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Penn classification in acute aortic dissection patients.

    PubMed

    Pisano, Calogera; Balistreri, Carmela Rita; Torretta, Federico; Capuccio, Veronica; Allegra, Alberto; Argano, Vincenzo; Ruvolo, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Penn classification in predicting in-hospital mortality after surgery in acute type A aortic dissection patients. We evaluated 58 patients (42 men and 16 women; mean age 62.17 ± 10.6 years) who underwent emergency surgery for acute type A aortic dissection between September 2003 and June 2010 in our department. We investigated the correlation between the pre-operative malperfusion and in-hospital outcome after surgery. Twenty-eight patients (48%) were Penn class Aa (absence of branch vessel malperfusion or circulatory collapse), 11 (19%) were Penn class Ab (branch vessel malperfusion with ischaemia), 5 (9%) were Penn class Ac (circulatory collapse with or without cardiac involvement) and 14 (24%) were Penn class Abc (both branch vessel malperfusion and circulatory collapse). The number of patients with localized or generalized ischaemia or both, Penn class non-Aa, was 30 (52%). In-hospital mortality was 24%. In-hospital mortality was significantly higher in Penn class Abc and Penn class non-Aa. Intensive unit care stay, hospital ward stay and overall hospital stay was longer in Penn class non-Aa vs Penn class Aa. De Bakey type I dissection and type II diabetes mellitus were associated with in-hospital mortality. Preoperative malperfusion is important for the evaluation of patients with acute aortic type A dissection. The Penn classification is a simple and quick method to apply and predict in-hospital mortality and outcomes.

  2. Aortic arch dissection: a controversy of classification.

    PubMed

    Lempel, Jason K; Frazier, Aletta Ann; Jeudy, Jean; Kligerman, Seth J; Schultz, Randall; Ninalowo, Hammed A; Gozansky, Elliott K; Griffith, Bartley; White, Charles S

    2014-06-01

    Aortic dissections originating in the ascending aorta and descending aorta have been classified as type A and type B dissections, respectively. However, dissections with intimal flap extension into the aortic arch between the innominate and left subclavian arteries are not accounted for adequately in the widely used Stanford classification. This gap has been the subject of controversy in the medical and surgical literature, and there is a tendency among many radiologists to categorize such arch dissections as type A lesions, thus making them an indication for surgery. However, the radiologic perspective is not supported by either standard dissection classification or current clinical management. In this special report, the origin of dissection classification and its evolution into current radiologic interpretation and surgical practice are reviewed. The cause for the widespread misconception about classification and treatment algorithms is identified. Institutional review board approval and waiver of informed consent were obtained as part of this HIPAA-compliant retrospective study to assess all aortic dissection studies performed at the University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore between 2010 and 2012 to determine the prevalence of arch dissections. Finally, a unified classification system that reconciles imaging interpretation and management implementation is proposed.

  3. Gender differences in experimental aortic aneurysm formation.

    PubMed

    Ailawadi, Gorav; Eliason, Jonathan L; Roelofs, Karen J; Sinha, Indranil; Hannawa, Kevin K; Kaldjian, Eric P; Lu, Guanyi; Henke, Peter K; Stanley, James C; Weiss, Stephen J; Thompson, Robert W; Upchurch, Gilbert R

    2004-11-01

    It is hypothesized that a male predominance, similar to that in humans, persists in a rodent model of experimental abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) via alterations in matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Group I experiments were as follows: elastase perfusion of the infrarenal aorta was performed in male (M) and female (F) rats. At 14 days, aortas were harvested for immunohistochemistry, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and zymography. Group II experiments were the following: abdominal aorta was transplanted from F or M donors into F or M recipients. At 14 days, rodents that had undergone transplantation underwent elastase perfusion. In group III, male rats were given estradiol or sham 5 days before elastase perfusion. In group I, M rats had larger AAAs with higher frequency than did F rats. M rat aortas had more significant macrophage infiltrates and increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 production and activity. In group II, M-to-M aortic transplants uniformly developed aneurysms after elastase perfusion, whereas F-to-F aortic transplants remained resistant to aneurysm formation. F aortas transplanted into M recipients, however, lost aneurysm resistance. In group III, estradiol-treated rats demonstrated smaller aneurysms and less macrophage infiltrate and MMP-9 compared with M controls after elastase. These data provide evidence of gender-related differences in AAA development, which may reflect an estrogen-mediated reduction in macrophage MMP-9 production.

  4. Fluid dynamics of aortic valve stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarz-Motamed, Zahra; Maftoon, Nima

    2009-11-01

    Aortic valve stenosis, which causes considerable constriction of the flow passage, is one of the most frequent cardiovascular diseases and is the most common cause of the valvular replacements which take place for around 100,000 per year in North America. Furthermore, it is considered as the most frequent cardiac disease after arterial hypertension and coronary artery disease. The objective of this study is to develop an analytical model considering the coupling effect between fluid flow and elastic deformation with reasonable boundary conditions to describe the effect of AS on the left ventricle and the aorta. The pulsatile and Newtonian blood flow through aortic stenosis with vascular wall deformability is analyzed and its effects are discussed in terms of flow parameters such as velocity, resistance to flow, shear stress distribution and pressure loss. Meanwhile we developed analytical expressions to improve the comprehension of the transvalvular hemodynamics and the aortic stenosis hemodynamics which is of great interest because of one main reason. To medical scientists, an accurate knowledge of the mechanical properties of whole blood flow in the aorta can suggest a new diagnostic tool.

  5. Trans-Aortic Counterpulsation: A Viable Alternative?

    PubMed Central

    Datt, Bharat; Hutchison, Lisa; Peniston, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: Transthoracic intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) insertion has been a relatively rare and uncommon procedure. However, it is an established beneficial option in patients with severe peripheral vascular disease (PVD) accompanied with bi-lateral femoral arterial occlusion. There are several viable alternatives to trans-aortic IABP insertion, including trans-axillary or in abdominal aorta (requiring a laparotomy). Cardiac surgery has the advantage of an open sternum, facilitating effortless direct intraaortic balloon (IAB) insertion into the aorta. The IAB can be inserted either through a 9-mm graft or directly into the ascending aorta. During cardiac surgery, direct insertion into the ascending aorta with the balloon tip lying distally in the abdominal aorta is facilitated with an open sternum. The base of the balloon lies ∼2 cm below the left subclavian and can be confirmed through a trans-esophageal echocardiogram (TEE). Elimination of a graft insertion saves the team from time-consuming maneuvers and additional hemorrhagic complications. In our experience, postoperative vasoplegic syndrome coupled with myocardial edema contributed to patent instability and was treated with vasopressin and transthoracic IAB insertion. The CS 100 (Datascope Corp., Mahwah, NJ) console allowed the ability to time the balloon accurately. This case report details our experience with one such patient and establishes trans-aortic counter-pulsation as a safe and viable option in patients with severe PVD, where percutaneous insertion is precluded or has failed. PMID:17672190

  6. Techniques for aortic arch endovascular repair.

    PubMed

    Hongku, Kiattisak; Dias, Nuno; Sonesson, Bjorn; Resch, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    This article reviews endovascular strategies for aortic arch repair. Open repair remains the gold standard particularly for good risk patients. Endovascular treatment potentially offers a less invasive repair. Principles, technical considerations, devices and outcomes of each technique are discussed and summarized. Hybrid repair combines less invasive revascularization options, instead of arch replacement while extending stent-graft into the arch. Outcomes vary with regard to extent of repair and aortic arch pathologies treated. Results of arch chimney and other parallel graft techniques perhaps make it a less preferable choice for elective cases. However, they are very appealing options for urgent or bailout situations. Fenestrated stent-grafting is subjected to many technical challenges in aortic arch due to difficulties in stent-graft orientation and fenestration positioning. In situ fenestration techniques emerge to avoid these problems, but durability of stent-grafts after fenestration and ischemic consequences of temporary carotid arteries coverage raises some concern total arch repair using this technique. Arch branched graft is a new technology. Early outcomes did not meet the expectation; however the results have been improving after its learning curve period. Refining stent-graft technologies and implantation techniques positively impact outcomes of endovascular approaches.

  7. [Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI): Current perspectives].

    PubMed

    Gaede, Luise; Möllmann, Helge

    2015-08-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has evolved as the treatment modality of choice for elderly patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis who are at high risk for surgery. More than 10,000 TAVI procedures were undertaken in Germany during 2014.A mortality benefit has been shown for TAVI compared with conservative treatment in patients deemed inoperable, and the procedure was proven to be at least non-inferior to surgical aortic valve replacement in high-risk patients. Through improvements in preprocedural imaging and in valve technology as well as increasing operator and surgical team experience, TAVI has developed rapidly in the past few years. Complication rates declinded considerably and the latest study results even suggest a superiority of TAVI to surgical valve replacement in patients at intermediate operative risk. Nevertheless, the challenge to avoid procedure-specific complications influencing the outcome still remains. Therefore, making an individual decision about the approach and the valve prosthesis in an interdisciplinary heart team consisting of a cardiologist and a cardiac surgeon is indispensable for guaranteeing the best therapy for the patient.Considering the rapid developments and procedural improvements in this field, randomized trials are required to assess whether the indication for TAVI may be extended to patients at lower perioperative risk in the future.

  8. Functional evaluation after aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Niemelä, K; Ikäheimo, M; Takkunen, J

    1983-01-01

    Preoperative and sequential postoperative bicycle exercise tests were compared with clinical and catheterization data in assessment of the functional outcome of uncomplicated aortic valve replacement (AVR) in 33 patients. The operation was done because of aortic stenosis (AS) in 14 patients and aortic regurgitation (AR) in 19. Both groups of patients showed improved NYHA functional class and peak achieved workload after AVR, but the results in these respects did not correlate. Nor did the regression in left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and dilatation after AVR that was seen in both patient groups correlate with the changes measured in exercise tolerance. Preoperative exercise capacity was not predictive of the postoperative performance. In the AR patients, however, preoperative ability to raise the systolic blood pressure during exercise appeared to predict which patients were likely to show enhanced resting LV systolic pump function after AVR. It is concluded that objective tests of exercise tolerance alone permit reliable evaluation of the functional outcome of uncomplicated AVR. Indices of resting LV performance, though helpful in observation of the changes resulting from removal of the untoward LV burden after AVR, are likely to be less useful for evaluating changes in the LV exercise reserve. The response of the systolic blood pressure to exercise may be an additional predictive factor for postoperative resting LV performance in patients with AR.

  9. Monocytes and macrophages in abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Raffort, Juliette; Lareyre, Fabien; Clément, Marc; Hassen-Khodja, Réda; Chinetti, Giulia; Mallat, Ziad

    2017-04-13

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a life-threatening disease associated with high morbidity, and high mortality in the event of aortic rupture. Major advances in open surgical and endovascular repair of AAA have been achieved during the past 2 decades. However, drug-based therapies are still lacking, highlighting a real need for better understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in AAA formation and progression. The main pathological features of AAA include extracellular matrix remodelling associated with degeneration and loss of vascular smooth muscle cells and accumulation and activation of inflammatory cells. The inflammatory process has a crucial role in AAA and substantially influences many determinants of aortic wall remodelling. In this Review, we focus specifically on the involvement of monocytes and macrophages, summarizing current knowledge on the roles, origin, and functions of these cells in AAA development and its complications. Furthermore, we show and propose that distinct monocyte and macrophage subsets have critical and differential roles in initiation, progression, and healing of the aneurysmal process. On the basis of experimental and clinical studies, we review potential translational applications to detect, assess, and image macrophage subsets in AAA, and discuss the relevance of these applications for clinical practice.

  10. [Surgery repair of aortic coarctation in infancy].

    PubMed

    Acevedo-Bañuelos, Iliana; González-Peña, Javier; Chagolla-Santillán, Miguel Ángel; Hernández-Morales, Gunter; Farías-Serratos, Claudia Vianey

    2013-01-01

    The study's purpose is to present our experience with surgical correction of aortic coarctation in infants, at short and medium term, particularly morbidity and mortality. This is a retrospective observational and descriptive trial. We included all infant patients undergoing surgical correction of AC. All data were obtained from the clinical database of the hospital. We included 20 patients with AC. The surgical technique was extended coarctectomy in 19 patients and, in one patient, a subclavian artery flap was performed. In all patients, the average time of aortic clamping was 18min. The residual gradient measured by echocardiography was in average of 12.2mmHg. One patient died of sepsis secondary to pneumonia. The main cause of immediate postoperative morbidity was systemic hypertension in seven patients, nosocomial infection in four patients with development of sepsis, one patient had to be reoperated due to high gradient. One patient had cholestatic syndrome. Eighteen patients required a transfusion at some time during their hospital stay. Average in-hospital stay was of 12 days. The aortic coarctation surgery has had favorable results so far and we can conclude that the program has been successful. The surgical technique has shown low mortality and complications and midterm follow-up shows low rate of recoarctation. Copyright © 2012 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  11. Therapeutics Targeting Drivers of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Acute Aortic Dissections: Insights from Predisposing Genes and Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Milewicz, Dianna M; Prakash, Siddharth K; Ramirez, Francesco

    2017-01-14

    Thoracic aortic diseases, including aneurysms and dissections of the thoracic aorta, are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Risk factors for thoracic aortic disease include increased hemodynamic forces on the ascending aorta, typically due to poorly controlled hypertension, and heritable genetic variants. The altered genes predisposing to thoracic aortic disease either disrupt smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction or adherence to an impaired extracellular matrix, or decrease canonical transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling. Paradoxically, TGF-β hyperactivity has been postulated to be the primary driver for the disease. More recently, it has been proposed that the response of aortic SMCs to the hemodynamic load on a structurally defective aorta is the primary driver of thoracic aortic disease, and that TGF-β overactivity in diseased aortas is a secondary, unproductive response to restore tissue function. The engineering of mouse models of inherited aortopathies has identified potential therapeutic agents to prevent thoracic aortic disease.

  12. Cocaine induces apoptosis in primary cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells: possible relationship to aortic dissection, atherosclerosis, and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Su, Jialin; Li, Jianfeng; Li, Wenyan; Altura, Bella; Altura, Burton

    2004-01-01

    Cocaine abuse is known to induce many adverse cardiovascular effects, including hypertension, atherosclerosis, and aortic dissection. A major physiological event leading to these pathophysiological actions of cocaine could be apoptosis. This study was designed to investigate if primary cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) can undergo apoptosis when treated with cocaine. After treatment with cocaine (10(-6) to 10(-4) M), morphological analysis of aortic VSMCs using confocal fluoresence microscopy showed that the percentage of apoptotic aortic VSMCs increased after cocaine (10(-6) to 10(-4) M) treatment for 12, 24, and 48 h. These results demonstrate that aortic VSMCs can undergo rapid apoptosis in response to cocaine in a concentration-dependent manner. Cocaine-induced apoptosis may thus play a major role in cocaine abuse-induced aortic dissection, atherosclerosis, and hypertension.

  13. Endovascular Stent Grafting for Aortic Arch Aneurysm in Aortoiliac Occlusive Disease following Aortic Arch Debranching and Aortobifemoral Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Canbay, Cagla; Onal, Yilmaz; Beyaz, Metin Onur; Sayin, Omer Ali; Barburoglu, Mehmet; Yornuk, Mesut; Acunas, Bulent; Alpagut, Ufuk; Dayioglu, Enver

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms constitutes high mortality and morbidity rates despite improvements in surgery, anesthesia, and technology. Endovascular stent grafting may be an alternative therapy with lower risks when compared with conventional techniques. However, sometimes the branches of the aortic arch may require transport to the proximal segments prior to successful thoracic aortic endovascular stent grafting. Atherosclerosis is accounted among the etiology of both aneurysms and occlusive diseases that can coexist in the same patient. In these situations stent grafting may even be more complicated. In this report, we present the treatment of a 92-year-old patient with aortic arch aneurysm and proximal descending aortic aneurysm. For successful thoracic endovascular stent grafting, the patient needed an alternative route other than the native femoral and iliac arteries for the deployment of the stent graft. In addition, debranching of left carotid and subclavian arteries from the aortic arch was also required for successful exclusion of the thoracic aneurysm. PMID:28408933

  14. Aortic Disease in the Young: Genetic Aneurysm Syndromes, Connective Tissue Disorders, and Familial Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Marcelo; Zeidan, Fernanda; Lobato, Armando C.

    2013-01-01

    There are many genetic syndromes associated with the aortic aneurysmal disease which include Marfan syndrome (MFS), Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS), familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD), bicuspid aortic valve disease (BAV), and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). In the absence of familial history and other clinical findings, the proportion of thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms and dissections resulting from a genetic predisposition is still unknown. In this study, we propose the review of the current genetic knowledge in the aortic disease, observing, in the results that the causative genes and molecular pathways involved in the pathophysiology of aortic aneurysm disease remain undiscovered and continue to be an area of intensive research. PMID:23401778

  15. Aortic valve replacement with concomitant annular enlargement for small aortic annulus of less than 19 mm.

    PubMed

    Takakura, H; Sasaki, T; Hashimoto, K; Hachiya, T; Onoguchi, K; Oshiumi, M; Takeuchi, S

    2000-06-01

    Three female patients with aortic stenosis associated with a severely small annulus underwent aortic valve replacement. In intraoperative measurements, a 19-mm obtulator could not pass through the aortic annulus in each case. We therefore concluded that it would be difficult to implant an appropriate-sized prosthesis in a routine fashion, so we performed an annular enlargement in a modified Nicks procedure. By using a wide teardrop-shaped patch for enlargement and slightly tilting insertion of a prosthesis, a 21 mm bileaflet mechanical prosthesis could be inserted into the enlarged annulus. Despite being a simpler method than other enlarging procedures, a two- or three-sizes larger prosthesis than the native annulus can be inserted with relative ease. Thus, the use of a 19 mm mechanical prosthesis may be avoidable in most adult cases.

  16. Transcaval Aortic Access for Percutaneous Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Initial Human Experience

    PubMed Central

    Uflacker, Andre; Lim, Scott; Ragosta, Michael; Haskal, Ziv J; Lederman, Robert J.; Kern, John; Upchurch, Gilbert; Huber, Timothy; Angle, John F.; Ailawadi, Gorav

    2015-01-01

    Transcaval aortic access has been used for deployment of transcatheter aortic valves in patients in whom conventional arterial approaches are not feasible. The present report describes its use for thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in a 61-year-old man with a descending thoracic aneurysm. Transcaval access was performed in lieu of a surgical iliac conduit in view of small atherosclerotic pelvic arteries. TEVAR was successfully performed, followed by intervascular tract occlusion with the use of a ventricular septal occluder. Computed tomography 2 d later demonstrated no extravasation. At 1 mo, the aneurysm was free of endoleaks, the aortocaval tract had healed, and the patient had returned to baseline functional status. PMID:26408210

  17. Do all Critical Aortic Stenosis with Chest Pain Need Aortic Valve Replacement? A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Munish; Mascarenhas, Daniel A.N.

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement (AVR) remains the cornerstone of treatment for symptomatic critical aortic stenosis (AS). It is a Class I indication that symptomatic patients with critical AS undergo either surgical or transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). We present a patient with critical AS and new angina that was managed successfully with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of the Right coronary artery. Physicians should consider that not all patients with critical AS and angina necessarily require AVR. Concomitant pathology leading to the symptoms should be carefully ruled out. This leads to a less invasive, cost effective care plan especially in patients with advanced age and comorbidities for which any type of surgical valvular intervention may pose high risk. PMID:27994841

  18. Momentary and wide aortic regurgitation as an indicator of aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, Takafumi; Sasaki, Osamu; Nishioka, Toshihiko; Ito, Hiroyuki; Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Yamabi, Hideaki; Imanaka, Kazuhito; Sasaki, Hideki

    2017-03-01

    A 55-year-old female with a history of hypertension was admitted for dyspnea, epigastralgia and nausea. A chest X-ray showed pulmonary congestion. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) revealed severe left ventricular dysfunction with akinesis of the infero-posterior wall and Doppler color-flow mode showed mild aortic regurgitation (AR). Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, intravenous heparin and diuretics were administered. Follow-up TTE revealed a dissection flap as well as momentary and wide AR only during isovolumetric relaxation. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the chest revealed Stanford type A aortic dissection. A momentary and wide AR in echocardiograms might serve as an important and useful indicator of aortic dissection in patients with acute myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure.

  19. Long-term outcome and quality of life following emergency surgery for acute aortic dissection type A: a comparison between young and elderly adults.

    PubMed

    Jussli-Melchers, Jill; Panholzer, Bernd; Friedrich, Christine; Broch, Ole; Renner, Jochen; Schöttler, Jan; Rahimi, Aziz; Cremer, Jochen; Schoeneich, Felix; Haneya, Assad

    2017-03-01

    Innovations in surgical techniques and perioperative management have continuously improved survival rates for acute aortic dissection type A (AADA). The aim of our study was to evaluate long-term outcome and quality of life (QoL) after surgery for AADA in elderly patients compared with younger patients. We retrospectively evaluated 242 consecutive patients, who underwent surgery for AADA between January 2004 and April 2014. Patients were divided into two groups: those aged 70 years and older (elderly group; n  = 78, mean age, 76 ± 4 years) and those younger than 70 years (younger group; n  = 164, mean age, 56 ± 10 years). QoL was assessed with the Short Form Health Survey Questionnaire (SF-36) 1 year after surgery. The questionnaire return rate was 91.0%. There were already significant differences noted between the two groups with regard to preoperative risk factors on admission. The clinical presentation with a cardiac tamponade was higher in the elderly group (62.8% vs 47.6%; P  = 0.03). Intraoperatively, complex procedures were more common in the younger group (21.3% vs 5.2%; P  = 0.001). Accordingly, cardiopulmonary bypass and cross-clamping times were significantly longer in the younger group. The operative mortality was similar in both groups (3.8% vs 1.2%; P  = 0.33). In the elderly population, 30-day mortality was higher (21.8% vs 7.9%; P  = 0.003). One-year (72% vs 85%), 3-year (68% vs 84%) and 5-year (63% vs 79%) survival rates were satisfactory for the elderly group, but significantly lower compared with the younger group ( P  = 0.008). The physical component summary score also was similar between the groups (39.14 ± 11.12 vs 39.12 ± 12.02; P  = 0.99). However, the mental component summary score might be slightly higher in the elderly group but not statistically significant (51.61 ± 10.73 vs 48.63 ± 11.25; P  = 0.12). Satisfactory long-term outcome and the general perception of well

  20. Histopathology of aortic complications in bicuspid aortic valve versus Marfan syndrome: relevance for therapy?

    PubMed

    Grewal, Nimrat; Franken, Romy; Mulder, Barbara J M; Goumans, Marie-José; Lindeman, Johannes H N; Jongbloed, Monique R M; DeRuiter, Marco C; Klautz, Robert J M; Bogers, Ad J J C; Poelmann, Robert E; Groot, Adriana C Gittenberger-de

    2016-05-01

    Patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) and patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) are more prone to develop aortic dilation and dissection compared to persons with a tricuspid aortic valve (TAV). To elucidate potential common and distinct pathways of clinical relevance, we compared the histopathological substrates of aortopathy. Ascending aortic wall biopsies were divided in five groups: BAV (n = 36) and TAV (n = 23) without and with dilation and non-dilated MFS (n = 8). General histologic features, apoptosis, the expression of markers for vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) maturation, markers predictive for ascending aortic dilation in BAV, and expression of fibrillin-1 were investigated. Both MFS and BAV showed an altered distribution and decreased fibrillin-1 expression in the aorta and a significantly lower level of differentiated VSMC markers. Interestingly, markers predictive for aortic dilation in BAV were not expressed in the MFS aorta. The aorta in MFS was similar to the aorta in dilated TAV with regard to the presence of medial degeneration and apoptosis, while other markers for degeneration and aging like inflammation and progerin expression were low in MFS, comparable to BAV. Both MFS and BAV aortas have immature VSMCs, while MFS and TAV patients have a similar increased rate of medial degeneration. However, the mechanism leading to apoptosis is expected to be different, being fibrillin-1 mutation induced increased angiotensin-receptor-pathway signaling in MFS and cardiovascular aging and increased progerin in TAV. Our findings could explain why angiotensin inhibition is successful in MFS and less effective in TAV and BAV patients.