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Sample records for supraceliac aortic cross-clamping

  1. Organ protection during aortic cross-clamping.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Kak Khee; Groeneveld, Menno; Lu, Joyce Ja-Ning; van Diemen, Pepijn; Jongkind, Vincent; Wisselink, Willem

    2016-09-01

    Open surgical repair of an aortic aneurysm requires aortic cross-clamping, resulting in temporary ischemia of all organs and tissues supplied by the aorta distal to the clamp. Major complications of open aneurysm repair due to aortic cross-clamping include renal ischemia-reperfusion injury and postoperative colonic ischemia in case of supra- and infrarenal aortic aneurysm repair. Ischemia-reperfusion injury results in excessive production of reactive oxygen species and in oxidative stress, which can lead to multiple organ failure. Several perioperative protective strategies have been suggested to preserve renal function during aortic cross-clamping, such as pharmacotherapy and therapeutic hypothermia of the kidneys. In this chapter, we will briefly discuss the pathophysiology of ischemia-reperfusion injury and the preventative measures that can be taken to avoid abdominal organ injury. Finally, techniques to minimize the risk of complications during and after open aneurysm repair will be presented. PMID:27650341

  2. Impact of Aortic Cross-Clamping Time on Peripheral Nerves: Experimental Model

    PubMed Central

    Akdemir, Ovunc; Cavusoglu, Turker; Lineaweaver, William C; Ates, Utku; Zhang, Feng; Erbas, Oytun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The present study investigated the correlation between extend aortic cross-clamping time and peripheral nerve injury on rats. Methods: 24 male, Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups; (a) control group: abdomen was directly closed after reached aorta, and followed by 72 hours, (b) short-term ischaemia-reperfusion group: peripheral nerve ischemia was induced in rats by supraceliac aortic occlusion for 20 min followed by 72 h of reperfusion, (c) long-term ischaemia-reperfusion group: peripheral nerve ischemia was induced for 30 min followed by 72 h of reperfusion. Preoperative and postoperative, electromyography (EMG) recordings were done. End of 72 h, the sciatic nerves were harvested from each animal for histopathological and biochemical analysis. Results: The mean compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude of long-term ischaemia-reperfusion group was statically significant reduced when compared to the control group (p <0.01). However, the mean distal latency value of long-term ischaemia-reperfusion group was statically significant increased (p <0.01). On the other hand, there were statically significant differences between the results of malondialdehyde, edema and ischemia fiber degeneration grades on control and long-term ischaemia-reperfusion group (p <0.001). Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the extending cross clamping time directly harms the peripheral nerve of rats. PMID:24583701

  3. Physiologic Responses to Infrarenal Aortic Cross-Clamping during Laparoscopic or Conventional Vascular Surgery in Experimental Animal Model: Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Cancho, María F.; Crisóstomo, Verónica; Soria, Federico; Calles, Carmen; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco M.; Díaz-Güemes, Idoia; Usón-Gargallo, Jesús

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the hemodynamic and ventilatory effects of prolonged infrarenal aortic cross-clamping in pigs undergoing either laparotomy or laparoscopy. 18 pigs were used for this study. Infrarenal aortic crossclamping was performed for 60 minutes in groups I (laparotomy, n = 6) and II (laparoscopy, n = 6). Group III (laparoscopy, n = 6) underwent a 120-minute long pneumoperitoneum in absence of aortic clamping (sham group). Ventilatory and hemodynamic parameters and renal function were serially determined in all groups. A significant decrease in pH and significant increase in PaCO2 were observed in group II, whereas no changes in these parameters were seen in group I and III. All variables returned to values similar to baseline in groups I and II 60 minutes after declamping. A significant increase in renal resistive index was evidenced during laparoscopy, with significantly higher values seen in Group II. Thus a synergic effect of pneumoperitoneum and aortic cross-clamping was seen in this study. These two factors together cause decreased renal perfusion and acidosis, thus negatively affecting the patient's general state during this type of surgery. PMID:21197458

  4. Rewarming Rate of the Myocardium During the Aortic Cross-Clamp Time: Variations with Different Levels of Body Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Juffé, Alberto; Burgos, Raul; Montero, Carlos Garcia; Tellez, Gaberiel; Prades, Gonzalo; Lloves, Eduardo; Figuera, Diego

    1985-01-01

    Twenty patients underwent elective cardiac valve replacement at 20° C of body hypothermia. Temperatures of the ventricles of both walls were monitored on 12 different sites. Distribution of myocardial temperature ranged between 24.3 and 29.3° C for patients of Group I before cardioplegia delivery and 13.2° C in the septum after cardioplegic infusion. Average temperatures for the anterior and posterior wall were 13.6 C and 15° C in the left ventricle and 14.7 and 15° C in the right ventricle. Myocardial temperatures ranged from 26 to 28.7° C for patients of Group II. After cardioplegic arrest, septal temperatures averaged 14.9° C. The recorded sites of the anterior and posterior left ventricle were 14.1 and 13.1° C. The effects of rewarming on the different myocardial areas occurred according to a logarithmic equation, which is faster in the first 10 minutes. The data suggest that the myocardium can be adequately protected with 25° C hypothermia when the cross-clamp period is shorter than 60 minutes. When longer ischemic periods are expected, myocardial protection is best accomplished with 20° C hypothermia. PMID:15227003

  5. Free-floating left atrial ball thrombus after mitral valve replacement with patent coronary artery bypass grafts: successful removal by a right minithoracotomy approach without aortic cross-clamp.

    PubMed

    Hisatomi, Kazuki; Hashizume, Koji; Tanigawa, Kazuyoshi; Miura, Takashi; Matsukuma, Seiji; Yokose, Shogo; Kitamura, Tessho; Shimada, Takashi; Eishi, Kiyoyuki

    2016-06-01

    A free-floating thrombus in the left atrium without attachment to either the atrial wall or the mitral valve is extremely rare. We describe a case in a 79-year-old woman with chronic atrial fibrillation and a recent stroke who had undergone mitral valve replacement 25 years previously and coronary artery bypass grafting 5 years previously. Redo cardiac surgery represents a clinical challenge due to a higher rate of peri-operative morbidity and mortality. Median re-sternotomy can be particularly difficult in patients with functioning coronary artery grafts, where the risk of graft injury is a significant concern. Prompt surgical intervention was carried out, and to avoid the challenge of re-sternotomy in this patient with two prior thoracotomies, we successfully removed the thrombus by a right minithoracotomy approach without aortic cross-clamping. There was no postoperative occurrence of a new stroke or aggravation of the pre-existing stroke.

  6. Anticoagulation management during cross-clamping and bypass.

    PubMed

    Lander, H; Zammert, M; FitzGerald, D

    2016-09-01

    Anticoagulation is required for successful implementation of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), as well as for surgeries requiring temporary aortic occlusion. It is well established that both coagulation and fibrinolysis are activated during CPB (Teufelsbauer et al., 1992) [1]. Appropriate dosing, monitoring, and maintenance of anticoagulation are essential to prevent devastating thrombosis of the CPB circuit or the occluded aorta and to minimize the activation of the hemostatic system. Although numerous novel anticoagulants have been developed over the past decade, unfractionated heparin remains the primary anticoagulant utilized during these types of procedures, with monitoring systems primarily based upon the activated clotting time and/or heparin concentration. This article will review the current state of anticoagulation management during cross-clamp and CPB. PMID:27650345

  7. A proof-of-principle robot with potential for the development of a hand-held tactile instrument for minimally-invasive artery cross-clamping.

    PubMed

    Pahlavan, Pedram; Najarian, Siamak; Dargahi, Javad; Moini, Majid

    2014-08-01

    One of the most common diseases of the vascular system is abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), for which the most definitive treatment is surgery. Minimally invasive aorta surgery is a novel method of surgery performed through small incisions and offers significant advantages including less pain, shorter hospital stay, faster patient recovery, less possibility of infection, etc. However, lack of sense of touch is the main drawback of this type of aorta surgery that would incapacitate the surgeon to exactly distinguish the aorta from its surrounding tissues which could cause various problems during the aorta cross-clamping process. One of the most important drawbacks is that it makes the aorta cross-clamping process the most time-consuming process of aortic repair surgery. The artificial tactile sensing approach is a novel method that can be used in various fields of medicine and, more specifically, in minimally invasive surgeries, where using the 'tactile sense' is not possible. In this paper, considering the present problems during aortic-repair-laparoscopy and imitating the movement of surgeons' fingers during aorta cross-clamping, a novel tactile-based artery cross-clamping robot is introduced and its function is evaluated experimentally. It is illustrated that this new tactile-based artery cross-clamping robot is well capable of dissecting an artery from its adjacent tissues in a short time with an acceptable accuracy.

  8. del Nido versus St. Thomas Cardioplegia Solutions: A Single-Center Retrospective Analysis of Post Cross-Clamp Defibrillation Rates.

    PubMed

    Buel, Shane T; Striker, Carrie Whittaker; O'Brien, James E

    2016-06-01

    There are many cardioplegia solutions currently in use for pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). The most common being del Nido solution. Another common cardioplegia solution used for pediatric CPB is St. Thomas. In October 2014, Children's Mercy Kansas City changed from the use of modified St. Thomas to del Nido. This study compared rates of post cross-clamp fibrillation requiring defibrillation between del Nido solution and modified St. Thomas solution stratified by weight at Children's Mercy Kansas City. This retrospective study consisted of 394 patients who underwent cardiac surgery requiring cardioplegia between January 1, 2014 and July 31, 2015. The outcome measured was defibrillation upon cross-clamp removal. Statistical significance was determined using Fishers exact test with a two-sided significance level of .05. Incidence of defibrillation post cross-clamp removal was 4.4% in the del Nido group and 26.8% in the St. Thomas group (p < .0001). Analysis by weight stratifications displays a reduction in post cross-clamp defibrillation rates in groups using the del Nido solution. The 0- to 6-kg category had an incidence of fibrillation of 1.23% in the del Nido group and 17.5% in the St. Thomas group (p < .0003). The 6- to 15-kg category had an incidence of defibrillation of 1.82% in the del Nido group and 14% in the St. Thomas group (p < .0198). The 15- to 60-kg category had an incidence of defibrillation of 8.9% in the del Nido group and 61% in the St. Thomas group (p < .0001). The >60-kg category had an incidence of defibrillation of 16.7% in the del Nido group and 63% in the St. Thomas group (p < .0623). This study demonstrates a 6-fold decrease in the overall rate of defibrillation post cross-clamp removal between St. Thomas and del Nido cardioplegia solutions. Analyses of weight stratifications demonstrate a decrease in the rate of defibrillation post cross-clamp removal in all categories within the del Nido group. PMID:27578896

  9. Sutureless aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The increasing incidence of aortic stenosis and greater co-morbidities and risk profiles of the contemporary patient population has driven the development of minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) techniques to reduce surgical trauma. Recent technological developments have led to an alternative minimally invasive option which avoids the placement and tying of sutures, known as “sutureless” or rapid deployment aortic valves. Potential advantages for sutureless aortic prostheses include reducing cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) duration, facilitating minimally invasive surgery and complex cardiac interventions, whilst maintaining satisfactory hemodynamic outcomes and low paravalvular leak rates. However, given its recent developments, the majority of evidence regarding sutureless aortic valve replacement (SU-AVR) is limited to observational studies and there is a paucity of adequately-powered randomized studies. Recently, the International Valvular Surgery Study Group (IVSSG) has formulated to conduct the Sutureless Projects, set to be the largest international collaborative group to investigate this technology. This keynote lecture will overview the use, the potential advantages, the caveats, and current evidence of sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valve replacement (AVR). PMID:25870807

  10. [MINIMALLY INVASIVE AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT].

    PubMed

    Tabata, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) is defined as aortic valve replacement avoiding full sternotomy. Common approaches include a partial sternotomy right thoracotomy, and a parasternal approach. MIAVR has been shown to have advantages over conventional AVR such as shorter length of stay and smaller amount of blood transfusion and better cosmesis. However, it is also known to have disadvantages such as longer cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times and potential complications related to peripheral cannulation. Appropriate patient selection is very important. Since the procedure is more complex than conventional AVR, more intensive teamwork in the operating room is essential. Additionally, a team approach during postoperative management is critical to maximize the benefits of MIAVR.

  11. Centrifugal pump support for distal aortic perfusion during repair of traumatic thoracic aortic injury.

    PubMed

    Walls, Joseph T; Curtis, Jack J; McKenney-Knox, Charlotte A; Schmaltz, Richard A

    2002-11-01

    Paraplegia from ischemic injury of the spinal cord and renal failure from inadequate perfusion of the kidneys may occur from aortic cross-clamping during repair of traumatic thoracic aortic injuries. After Institutional Review Board approval, we retrospectively reviewed the charts of 26 patients surgically treated for traumatic transection of the descending thoracic aorta during a 14 year period (1987-2001), using centrifugal pump (Sarns) support for distal aortic perfusion. The study group comprised 19 males and 7 females, whose ages ranged from 15 to 69 years. For all but 1 patient, who fell from a flagpole, the injuries were incurred in motor vehicle accidents. Aortic cross-clamp time lasted between 5 to 78 min (median = 40 min). Mean arterial pressure ranged from 50 to 80 mm Hg (median = 70 mm Hg). All patients survived operation without developing paraplegia or renal failure. Distal centrifugal pump perfusion during repair of traumatic injury of the descending thoracic aorta is a valuable adjunct during surgical treatment and aids in preservation of spinal cord and renal function.

  12. Chylous Ascites after Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Ohki, Shinichi; Kurumisawa, Soki; Misawa, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was transferred for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm. He had no history of abdominal surgeries. Grafting between the infra-renal abdominal aorta and the bilateral common iliac arteries was performed. Proximal and distal cross clamps were applied for grafting. He developed chylous ascites on the 5th post-operative day, 2 days after initiation of oral intake. Fortunately, he responded to treatment with total parenteral hyper-alimentation for 10 days, followed by a low-fat diet. There was no recurrence of ascites. PMID:27087873

  13. Sutureless aortic valve replacement: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin; Tsai, Yi-Chin; Niranjan, Nithya; Bouchard, Denis; Carrel, Thierry P.; Dapunt, Otto E.; Eichstaedt, Harald C.; Fischlein, Theodor; Gersak, Borut; Glauber, Mattia; Haverich, Axel; Misfeld, Martin; Oberwalder, Peter J.; Santarpino, Giuseppe; Shrestha, Malakh Lal; Solinas, Marco; Vola, Marco; Yan, Tristan D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sutureless aortic valve replacement (SU-AVR) has emerged as an innovative alternative for treatment of aortic stenosis. By avoiding the placement of sutures, this approach aims to reduce cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) duration and thereby improve surgical outcomes and facilitate a minimally invasive approach suitable for higher risk patients. The present systematic review and meta-analysis aims to assess the safety and efficacy of SU-AVR approach in the current literature. Methods Electronic searches were performed using six databases from their inception to January 2014. Relevant studies utilizing sutureless valves for aortic valve implantation were identified. Data were extracted and analyzed according to predefined clinical endpoints. Results Twelve studies were identified for inclusion of qualitative and quantitative analyses, all of which were observational reports. The minimally invasive approach was used in 40.4% of included patients, while 22.8% underwent concomitant coronary bypass surgery. Pooled cross-clamp and CPB duration for isolated AVR was 56.7 and 46.5 minutes, respectively. Pooled 30-day and 1-year mortality rates were 2.1% and 4.9%, respectively, while the incidences of strokes (1.5%), valve degenerations (0.4%) and paravalvular leaks (PVL) (3.0%) were acceptable. Conclusions The evaluation of current observational evidence suggests that sutureless aortic valve implantation is a safe procedure associated with shorter cross-clamp and CPB duration, and comparable complication rates to the conventional approach in the short-term. PMID:25870805

  14. Aortic Valve Replacement With the Stentless Freedom SOLO Bioprosthesis: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Wollersheim, Laurens W; Li, Wilson W; Bouma, Berto J; Repossini, Alberto; van der Meulen, Jan; de Mol, Bas A

    2015-10-01

    This systematic review examined the clinical and hemodynamic performance of the stentless Freedom SOLO (Sorin Group, Milan, Italy) aortic bioprosthesis. The occurrence of postoperative thrombocytopenia was also analyzed. The Freedom SOLO is safe to use in everyday practice, with short cross-clamp times, and postoperative pacemaker implantation is notably lower. Valvular gradients are low and remain stable during short-term follow-up. Thrombocytopenia is more severe than in other aortic prostheses; however, this is without clinical consequences. Within a few years, the 15-year follow-up of this bioprosthesis will be known, which will be key to evaluating its long-term durability.

  15. Aortic Valve Replacement With the Stentless Freedom SOLO Bioprosthesis: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Wollersheim, Laurens W; Li, Wilson W; Bouma, Berto J; Repossini, Alberto; van der Meulen, Jan; de Mol, Bas A

    2015-10-01

    This systematic review examined the clinical and hemodynamic performance of the stentless Freedom SOLO (Sorin Group, Milan, Italy) aortic bioprosthesis. The occurrence of postoperative thrombocytopenia was also analyzed. The Freedom SOLO is safe to use in everyday practice, with short cross-clamp times, and postoperative pacemaker implantation is notably lower. Valvular gradients are low and remain stable during short-term follow-up. Thrombocytopenia is more severe than in other aortic prostheses; however, this is without clinical consequences. Within a few years, the 15-year follow-up of this bioprosthesis will be known, which will be key to evaluating its long-term durability. PMID:26324106

  16. Minimally Invasive Versus Conventional Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Attia, Rizwan Q.; Hickey, Graeme L.; Grant, Stuart W.; Bridgewater, Ben; Roxburgh, James C.; Kumar, Pankaj; Ridley, Paul; Bhabra, Moninder; Millner, Russell W. J.; Athanasiou, Thanos; Casula, Roberto; Chukwuemka, Andrew; Pillay, Thasee; Young, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) has been demonstrated as a safe and effective option but remains underused. We aimed to evaluate outcomes of isolated MIAVR compared with conventional aortic valve replacement (CAVR). Methods Data from The National Institute for Cardiovascular Outcomes Research (NICOR) were analyzed at seven volunteer centers (2006–2012). Primary outcomes were in-hospital mortality and midterm survival. Secondary outcomes were postoperative length of stay as well as cumulative bypass and cross-clamp times. Propensity modeling with matched cohort analysis was used. Results Of 307 consecutive MIAVR patients, 151 (49%) were performed during the last 2 years of study with a continued increase in numbers. The 307 MIAVR patients were matched on a 1:1 ratio. In the matched CAVR group, there was no statistically significant difference in in-hospital mortality [MIAVR, 4/307,(1.3%); 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.4%–3.4% vs CAVR, 6/307 (2.0%); 95% CI, 0.8%–4.3%; P = 0.752]. One-year survival rates in the MIAVR and CAVR groups were 94.4% and 94.6%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in midterm survival (P = 0.677; hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.56–1.46). Median postoperative length of stay was lower in the MIAVR patients by 1 day (P = 0.009). The mean cumulative bypass time (94.8 vs 91.3 minutes; P = 0.333) and cross-clamp time (74.6 vs 68.4 minutes; P = 0.006) were longer in the MIAVR group; however, this was significant only in the cross-clamp time comparison. Conclusions Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement is a safe alternative to CAVR with respect to operative and 1-year mortality and is associated with a shorter postoperative stay. Further studies are required in high-risk (logistic EuroSCORE > 10) patients to define the role of MIAVR. PMID:26926521

  17. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation: anesthetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Billings, Frederic T; Kodali, Susheel K; Shanewise, Jack S

    2009-05-01

    Aortic valvular stenosis remains the most common debilitating valvular heart lesion. Despite the benefit of aortic valve (AV) replacement, many high-risk patients cannot tolerate surgery. AV implantation treats aortic stenosis without subjecting patients to sternotomy, cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), and aorta cross-clamping. This transcatheter procedure is performed via puncture of the left ventricular (LV) apex or percutaneously, via the femoral artery or vein. Patients undergo general anesthesia, intense hemodynamic manipulation, and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). To elucidate the role of the anesthesiologist in the management of transcatheter AV implantation, we review the literature and provide our experience, focusing on anesthetic care, intraoperative events, TEE, and perioperative complications. Two approaches to the aortic annulus are performed today: transfemoral retrograde and transapical antegrade. Iliac artery size and tortuosity, aortic arch atheroma, and pathology in the area of the (LV) apex help determine the preferred approach in each patient. A general anesthetic is tailored to achieve extubation after procedure completion, whereas IV access and pharmacological support allow for emergent sternotomy and initiation of CPB. Rapid ventricular pacing and cessation of mechanical ventilation interrupts cardiac ejection and minimizes heart translocation during valvuloplasty and prosthesis implantation. Although these maneuvers facilitate exact prosthesis positioning within the native annulus, they promote hypotension and arrhythmia. Vasopressor administration before pacing and cardioversion may restore adequate hemodynamics. TEE determines annulus size, aortic pathology, ventricular function, and mitral regurgitation. TEE and fluoroscopy are used for positioning the introducer catheter within the aortic annulus. The prosthesis, crimped on a valvuloplasty balloon catheter, is implanted by inflation. TEE immediately measures aortic regurgitation and

  18. Decellularized aortic homografts for aortic valve and aorta ascendens replacement†

    PubMed Central

    Tudorache, Igor; Horke, Alexander; Cebotari, Serghei; Sarikouch, Samir; Boethig, Dietmar; Breymann, Thomas; Beerbaum, Philipp; Bertram, Harald; Westhoff-Bleck, Mechthild; Theodoridis, Karolina; Bobylev, Dmitry; Cheptanaru, Eduard; Ciubotaru, Anatol; Haverich, Axel

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The choice of valve prosthesis for aortic valve replacement (AVR) in young patients is challenging. Decellularized pulmonary homografts (DPHs) have shown excellent results in pulmonary position. Here, we report our early clinical results using decellularized aortic valve homografts (DAHs) for AVR in children and mainly young adults. METHODS This prospective observational study included all 69 patients (44 males) operated from February 2008 to September 2015, with a mean age of 19.7 ± 14.6 years (range 0.2–65.3 years). In 18 patients, a long DAH was used for simultaneous replacement of a dilated ascending aorta as an extended aortic root replacement (EARR). Four patients received simultaneous pulmonary valve replacement with DPH. RESULTS Thirty-nine patients (57%) had a total of 62 previous operations. The mean aortic cross-clamp time in isolated cases was 129 ± 41 min. There was 1 conduit-unrelated death. The mean DAH diameter was 22.4 ± 3.7 mm (range, 10–29 mm), the average peak gradient was 14 ± 15 mmHg and the mean aortic regurgitation grade (0.5 = trace, 1 = mild) was 0.6 ± 0.5. The mean effective orifice area (EOA) of 25 mm diameter DAH was 3.07 ± 0.7 cm2. DAH annulus z-values were 1.1 ± 1.1 at implantation and 0.7 ± 1.3 at the last follow-up. The last mean left ventricle ejection fraction and left ventricle end diastolic volume index was 63 ± 7% and 78 ± 16 ml/m2 body surface area, respectively. To date, no dilatation has been observed at any level of the graft during follow-up; however, the observational time is short (140.4 years in total, mean 2.0 ± 1.8 years, maximum 7.6 years). One small DAH (10 mm at implantation) had to be explanted due to subvalvular stenosis and developing regurgitation after 4.5 years and was replaced with a 17 mm DAH without complication. No calcification of the explanted graft was noticed intraoperatively and after histological analysis, which revealed extensive recellularization without inflammation

  19. Assessment of Perfusion toward the Aortic Valve Using the New Dispersion Aortic Cannula during Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Grooters, Ronald K.; Thieman, Kent C.; Schneider, Robert F.; Nelson, Mark G.

    2000-01-01

    When there is an echocardiographic diagnosis of severe mobile atherosclerotic plaque in the aortic arch or descending aorta, perfusion toward the aortic arch during cardiopulmonary bypass may create a high risk of embolic neurologic injury. Other perfusion methods, such as cannulation of the femoral or axillary arteries, are not always possible, due to atherosclerosis. The ascending aorta may be an alternative site for perfusion, since it is less frequently diseased. We assessed a new technique of perfusion toward the aortic valve using a new cannula designed for this purpose (Dispersion aortic cannula). Our study included 100 consecutive patients, 72 men and 28 women, with an average age of 68 ± 1.0 years (range, 39–89 years). There were no complications related to insertion of the cannula or perfusion. The ascending aorta could be cross-clamped and side-clamped without perfusion problems. Three deaths occurred; none was related to the cannulation technique. No intra-operative stroke occurred. Two patients suffered neurologic events, one on day 1 and the other on day 6; both had been fully alert after surgery. Perfusion toward the aortic valve appears to be safe and hemodynamically effective. This cannulation technique appears to be an acceptable alternative to present methods. Comparative studies will be needed to determine whether this alternative technique is effective in patients with severe aortic arch disease. PMID:11198309

  20. Reproducibility of aortic pulsatility measurements from ECG-gated abdominal CTA in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manduca, Armando; Fletcher, Joel G.; Wentz, Robert J.; Shields, Raymond C.; Vrtiska, Terri J.; Siddiki, Hassan; Nielson, Theresa

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: ECG-gated abdominal CT angiography with reconstruction of multiple, temporally overlapping CT angiography datasets has been proposed for measuring aortic pulsatility. The purpose of this work is to develop algorithms to segment the aorta from surrounding structures from CTA datasets across cardiac phases, calculate registered centerlines and measurements of regional aortic pulsatility in patients with AAA, and to assess the reproducibility of these measurements. Methods: ECG-gated CTA was performed with a temporal resolution of 165 ms, reconstructed to 1 mm slices ranging at 14 cardiac phase points. Data sets were obtained from 17 patients on which two such scans were performed 6 to 12 months apart. Automated segmentation, centerline generation, and registration of centerlines between phases was performed, followed by calculation of cross-sectional areas and regional and local pulsatility. Results: Pulsatility calculations for the supraceliac region were very reproducible between earlier and later scans of the same patient, with average differences less than 1% for pulsatility values ranging from 2% to 13%. Local radial pulsatilities were also reproducible to within ~1%. Aneurysm volume changes between scans can also be quantified. Conclusion: Automated segmentation, centerline generation, and registration of temporally resolved CTA datasets permit measurements of regional changes in cross-sectional area over the course of the cardiac cycle (i.e., regional aortic pulsatility). These measurements are reproducible between scans 6-12 months apart, with differences in aortic areas reflecting both aneurysm remodeling and changes in blood pressure. Regional pulsatilities ranged from 2 to 13% but were reproducible at the 1% level.

  1. Aortic cusp extension valvuloplasty: repair with an extracellular patch

    PubMed Central

    Pawlak, Szymon; Śliwka, Joanna; Urlik, Maciej; Maruszewski, Marcin; Kukulski, Tomasz; Nożyński, Jerzy; Zembala, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The proportion of valve repair procedures is increasing in experienced centers. The aim of the study was to assess the clinical and echocardiographic outcomes after aortic valve reconstruction with a novel surgical technique. Material and methods The study group consisted of 30 patients (23 male and 7 female) at a mean age of 35 ± 14 years. In patients with aortic root aneurysm the reimplantation or Florida sleeve technique was used. A sub-commissural annuloplasty, plication of the free edge of the cusp, shaving, and commissurotomy were performed. At this stage of surgery aortic repair was then attempted by cusp extension. Since 2013 the strips have been tailored from extracellular matrix. Results The mean aortic cross-clamp time was 90 ± 32 min. The mean cardiopulmonary bypass time was 126 ± 38 min. There was no in-hospital death. Re-exploration for bleeding was required in 1 patient. During follow-up, 1 patient needed reoperation at 1 year due to endocarditis. All patients remained alive in New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class I. The echocardiographic findings remained unchanged in all cases during follow-up. Conclusions Our modification of aortic valve repair results in a good outcome. PMID:26855646

  2. Aortic root surgery in combination with hypothermic circulatory arrest: preserve or replace the aortic valve in the context of postoperative neurological outcome? A case match comparison.

    PubMed

    Khaladj, Nawid; Ismail, Issam; Shrestha, Malakh; Peterss, Sven; Pichlmaier, Maximilian; Kallenbach, Klaus; Haverich, Axel; Hagl, Christian

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the results of elective composite (C) vs. David (D) operations in patients requiring additional aortic arch surgery using hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) and selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (SACP), with the focus on postoperative neurological outcome and quality of life (SF-36). Between November 1999 and March 2006, 333 patients underwent aortic root surgery and ascending aortic replacement with HCA and SACP at our institution. Out of these patients, 46 were matched with respect to age, gender, HCA-time and year of surgery. Two patients, one in each group, died during hospital stay (4%), with no late deaths. Follow-up was completed in 95% [64 (6-90) months]. Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) time (141 min vs. 168 min, P=0.007) and aortic cross-clamp time (99 min vs. 123 min, P=0.004) were significantly longer in the David-group. The incidence of temporary neurological dysfunction (TND 7%: D n=1, C n=2) was not different between groups, no permanent dysfunction could be detected. Follow-up SF-36 scores were comparable. The combination of aortic arch surgery with more time consuming valve sparing aortic root surgery does not increase the risk for adverse outcome applying comparable periods of HCA and SACP.

  3. Aortic sutureless bioprosthesis implantation following degeneration of a SOLO stentless valve.

    PubMed

    Vola, Marco; Gerbay, Antoine; Campisi, Salvatore; Thulane, Claire; Fuzellier, François

    2015-03-01

    A case is presented of the early degeneration of a 21 mm SOLO stentless valve concomitant with severe mitral regurgitation (MR). Transcatheter valve-in-valve implantation was considered in this high-risk case (logistic EuroSCORE 29.3%), but was dismissed because of the risk of coronary occlusion, an absence of visual landmarks, and the impossibility to treat the MR. Following the implantation of a 27 mm Medtronic Hancock II mitral bioprosthesis, the leaflets of the SOLO valve were removed, and a 19 mm 3f Enable sutureless bioprosthesis delivered into the remaining sewing belt of the stentless valve. The total cross-clamp time was 64 min. No aortic paravalvular leakage was detected at discharge and early follow up (four months); the mean and peak transvalvular aortic gradients were 13 and 23 mmHg, respectively, and the left ventricular ejection fraction 60%. A sutureless strategy simplified the management of this high-risk case.

  4. Aortic Aneurysm Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Aortic Aneurysm Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... cause of most deaths from aortic aneurysms. Aortic Aneurysm in the United States Aortic aneurysms were the ...

  5. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis ... aortic aneurysm treated? What is an abdominal aortic aneurysm? The aorta, the largest artery in the body, ...

  6. Double aortic arch

    MedlinePlus

    Aortic arch anomaly; Double arch; Congenital heart defect - double aortic arch; Birth defect heart - double aortic arch ... aorta is a single arch that leaves the heart and moves leftward. In double aortic arch, some ...

  7. Branched and fenestrated options to treat aortic arch aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Maurel, Blandine; Mastracci, Tara M; Spear, Rafaelle; Hertault, Adrien; Azzaoui, Richard; Sobocinski, Jonathan; Haulon, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    Conventional surgical repair of aortic arch aneurysms using cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest remains the gold standard, however it is associated with a substantial mortality and morbidity rate, especially in the elderly. Hybrid techniques avoid aortic cross-clamping and circulatory arrest, but are of limited use and are only applicable to selected patients. The development of new devices to treat aortic arch aneurysms endovascularly has the potential to offer a treatment modality to patients unfit for an open repair. We present the challenges specific to endovascular arch repair based on our experience and the literature available from the first experience in 1999 to the third generation graft currently commonly used. Following an initial learning curve associated with the use of the third generation arch branch device, along with careful patient selection and operator experience, early results are promising. Technical success was achieved in all cases, there was no early mortality and strokes were noted in 11%. As with branched and fenestrated technology for thoracoabdominal aneurysm repair, the use of total endovascular repair for arch pathology will require an evolution in endovascular practice and device design. However, at present, the early use of the latest generation device offers a novel approach to patients who previously had no surgical options. PMID:27332680

  8. Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the abdomen Most aneurysms are found during ...

  9. Aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Nienaber, Christoph A; Clough, Rachel E; Sakalihasan, Natzi; Suzuki, Toru; Gibbs, Richard; Mussa, Firas; Jenkins, Michael T; Thompson, Matt M; Evangelista, Arturo; Yeh, James S M; Cheshire, Nicholas; Rosendahl, Ulrich; Pepper, John

    2016-01-01

    Aortic dissection is a life-threatening condition caused by a tear in the intimal layer of the aorta or bleeding within the aortic wall, resulting in the separation (dissection) of the layers of the aortic wall. Aortic dissection is most common in those 65-75 years of age, with an incidence of 35 cases per 100,000 people per year in this population. Other risk factors include hypertension, dyslipidaemia and genetic disorders that involve the connective tissue, such as Marfan syndrome. Swift diagnostic confirmation and adequate treatment are crucial in managing affected patients. Contemporary management is multidisciplinary and includes serial non-invasive imaging, biomarker testing and genetic risk profiling for aortopathy. The choice of approach for repairing or replacing the damaged region of the aorta depends on the severity and the location of the dissection and the risks of complication from surgery. Open surgical repair is most commonly used for dissections involving the ascending aorta and the aortic arch, whereas minimally invasive endovascular intervention is appropriate for descending aorta dissections that are complicated by rupture, malperfusion, ongoing pain, hypotension or imaging features of high risk. Recent advances in the understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of aortic dissection have led to more patients being considered at substantial risk of complications and, therefore, in need of endovascular intervention rather than only medical or surgical intervention. PMID:27440162

  10. Aortic stenting.

    PubMed

    Droc, Ionel; Calinescu, Francisca Blanca; Droc, Gabriela; Blaj, Catalin; Dammrau, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    The approach to aortic pathology is nowadays more and more endovascular at both thoracic and abdominal levels. Thoracic stenting has gained worldwide acceptance as first intention to treat pathologies of the descending thoracic aorta. Indications have been extended to aortic arch aneurysms and also to diseases of the ascending aorta. The current devices in use for thoracic endovascular repair (TEVAR) are Medtronic Valiant, Gore TAG, Cook Tx2 and Jotec. The choice of the endograft depends on the thoracic aortic pathology and the anatomical suitability. The technological evolution of the abdominal aortic endografts was very rapid, arriving now at the fourth generation. We report the results of 55 elective cases of endovascular abdominal aortic repair (EVAR) performed in two vascular surgical centers in Romania and Germany. The prostheses used were 16 E-vita Abdominal XT, 12 Excluder, eight Talent, seven PowerLink, three Endurant and nine custom-made, fenestrated or branched from Jotec. The mean follow-up was 18 months with CT-scan, duplex ultrasound and contrast-enhanced ultrasound. The mortality was 2%. EVAR tends to become the gold standard for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Technological development of the devices with lowest profile introduction systems will permit to extend the anatomical indications to new frontiers. PMID:26200430

  11. [Aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Villar, Fernando; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Vila, Ramón; Lahoz, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Aortic aneurysm is one important cause of death in our country. The prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurism (AAA) is around 5% for men older than 50 years of age. Some factors are associated with increased risk for AAA: age, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, cardiovascular disease and, in particular, smoking. The medical management of patients with an AAA includes cardiovascular risk treatment, particularly smoking cessation. Most of major societies guidelines recommend ultrasonography screening for AAA in men aged 65 to 75 years who have ever smoked because it leads to decreased AAA-specific mortality. PMID:24238836

  12. Proximal clamping levels in abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Büket, S; Atay, Y; Islamoğlu, F; Yağdi, T; Posacioğlu, H; Alat, I; Cikirikçioğlu, M; Yüksel, M; Durmaz, I

    1999-01-01

    In the surgical treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm, the single proximal cross-clamp can be placed at 3 alternative aortic levels: infrarenal, hiatal, and thoracic. We performed this retrospective study to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of the 3 main aortic clamping locations. Eighty patients presented at our institution with abdominal aortic aneurysms from March 1993 through May 1998. Fifty of these patients had intact aneurysms and underwent elective surgery, and 30 had ruptured aneurysms that necessitated emergency surgery. Proximal aortic clamping was applied at the infrarenal level in 24 patients (22 from the intact aneurysm group, 2 from the ruptured group), at the hiatal level in 34 patients (22 intact, 12 ruptured), and at the thoracic level (descending aorta) via a limited left lateral thoracotomy in 22 patients (6 intact, 16 ruptured). Early mortality rates (within 30 days) were 4% (2 of 50 patients) among patients with intact aneurysms and 40% (12 of 30 patients) among those with ruptured aneurysms. In the 2 patients from the intact aneurysm group, proximal aortic clamps were applied at the hiatal level. In the ruptured aneurysm group, proximal aortic clamps were placed at the thoracic level in 10 patients, the infrarenal level in 1, and the hiatal level in 1. According to our study, the clinical status of the patient and the degree of operative urgency--as determined by the extent of the aneurysm--generally dictate the proximal clamp location. Patients who present with aneurysmal rupture or hypovolemic shock benefit from thoracic clamping, because it restores the blood pressure and allows time to replace the volume deficit. Infrarenal placement is advantageous in patients with intact aneurysms if there is sufficient space for the clamp between the renal arteries and the aortic aneurysm. In patients with juxtarenal aneurysms, hiatal clamping enables safe and easy anastomosis to the healthy aorta. Clamping at this level also helps prevent

  13. Stentless aortic valve replacement: an update

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Junjiro

    2011-01-01

    Although porcine aortic valves or pericardial tissue mounted on a stent have made implantation techniques easier, these valves sacrifice orifice area and increase stress at the attachment of the stent, which causes primary tissue failure. Optimizing hemodynamics to prevent patient–prosthetic mismatch and improve durability, stentless bioprostheses use was revived in the early 1990s. The purpose of this review is to provide a current overview of stentless valves in the aortic position. Retrospective and prospective randomized controlled studies showed similar operative mortality and morbidity in stented and stentless aortic valve replacement (AVR), though stentless AVR required longer cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass time. Several cohort studies showed improved survival after stentless AVR, probably due to better hemodynamic performance and earlier left ventricular (LV) mass regression compared with stented AVR. However, there was a bias of operation age and nonrandomization. A randomized trial supported an improved 8-year survival of patients with the Freestyle or Toronto valves compared with Carpentier–Edwards porcine valves. On the contrary, another randomized study did not show improved clinical outcomes up to 12 years. Freedom from reoperation at 12 years in Toronto stentless porcine valves ranged from 69% to 75%, which is much lower than for Carpentier–Edwards Perimount valves. Cusp tear with consequent aortic regurgitation was the most common cause of structural valve deterioration. Cryolife O’Brien valves also have shorter durability compared with stent valves. Actuarial freedom from reoperation was 44% at 10 years. Early prosthetic valve failure was also reported in patients who underwent root replacement with Shelhigh stentless composite grafts. There was no level I or IIa evidence of more effective orifice area, mean pressure gradient, LV mass regression, surgical risk, durability, and late outcomes in stentless bioprostheses. There is no

  14. Acute Aortic Syndromes and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Ramanath, Vijay S.; Oh, Jae K.; Sundt, Thoralf M.; Eagle, Kim A.

    2009-01-01

    Acute and chronic aortic diseases have been diagnosed and studied by physicians for centuries. Both the diagnosis and treatment of aortic diseases have been steadily improving over time, largely because of increased physician awareness and improvements in diagnostic modalities. This comprehensive review discusses the pathophysiology and risk factors, classification schemes, epidemiology, clinical presentations, diagnostic modalities, management options, and outcomes of various aortic conditions, including acute aortic dissection (and its variants intramural hematoma and penetrating aortic ulcers) and thoracic aortic aneurysms. Literature searches of the PubMed database were conducted using the following keywords: aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, aortic ulcer, and thoracic aortic aneurysm. Retrospective and prospective studies performed within the past 20 years were included in the review; however, most data are from the past 15 years. PMID:19411444

  15. Aortic Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Tricuspid Valve Disease Cardiac Rhythm Disturbances Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Heart abnormalities that ... Disease Tricuspid Valve Disease Cardiac Rhythm Disturbances Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Valve Disease Overview The human heart has ...

  16. The Sorin Freedom SOLO stentless tissue valve: early outcomes after aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Altintas, Garip; Diken, Adem Ilkay; Hanedan, Onur; Yurdakok, Okan; Ozyalcin, Sertan; Kucuker, Seref Alp; Ozatik, Mehmet Ali

    2013-01-01

    We prospectively evaluated the hemodynamic performance of the SORIN Freedom SOLO aortic bioprosthesis, a stentless bovine pericardial valve designed for supra-annular implantation. Forty patients (mean age, 71.68 ± 5.25 yr; 29 men) with severe aortic stenosis underwent aortic valve replacement from January 2008 through August 2009. Patients were evaluated by transthoracic echocardiography and clinical examination, both preoperatively and again at 6 and 24 postoperative months. Peak and mean transvalvular gradients, end-diastolic and end-systolic diameters, interventricular septal and posterior wall thicknesses, indexed volumes of ventricular mass, degrees of aortic regurgitation, and left ventricular ejection fractions were calculated echocardiographically. The valves were implanted with single polypropylene sutures. In the early postoperative period, 1 patient (2.5%) died of multiorgan failure. The mean aortic cross-clamp time was 86.05 ± 34.2 min. Echocardiographic peak gradients were 84.54 ± 16.85 mmHg (preoperative), 29.59 ± 6.27 mmHg (6 mo postoperative), and 24.33 ± 4.67 mmHg (24 mo postoperative) (P < 0.001); left ventricular mass indices were 176.26 ± 39.98 g/m(2) (preoperative), 139.21 ± 30.1 (6 mo postoperative), and 120.51 ± 23.88 g/m(2) (24 mo postoperative) (P < 0.001). During follow-up, the maximum aortic insufficiency recorded was trace, and no valve dysfunctions were observed. Temporary thrombocytopenia was documented in all patients during early postoperative follow-up (lowest level at day 3); recovery to preoperative levels occurred by day 10. The Freedom SOLO aortic bioprosthesis is an easy-to-implant valve with excellent hemodynamic performance. The thrombocytopenia appears to be a transient laboratory finding.

  17. Do we need sutureless or self-anchoring aortic valve prostheses?

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Malakh

    2015-03-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) is the 'gold standard' for the treatment of aortic valve stenosis. Due to the increasing age of the patient population (reflecting the demographic changes), the use of biological valves has increased over the past years. At the same time, a large proportion of these patients require concomitant surgical procedures in addition to AVR. Although trans-apical or trans-femoral aortic valve implantations (TAVI) have been introduced for high risk patients, they are limited to patients with isolated aortic valve pathology. Therefore, strategies for avoiding long ischemia times, as well as long periods of extra-corporeal circulation (ECC) resulting in reduced peri-operative risks should be welcomed among the surgical community. Modern 'sutureless valves' with reduced cross-clamp and cardio-pulmonary bypass times as a result of the absence of sutures, combined with excellent hemodynamics in the short and mid-term, may be an ideal solution for geriatric patients. Additionally, 'self-anchoring' valves will increase the armament of surgeons in treating 'technically difficult' group of patients needing AVR who have small calcified aortic roots and those coming back after aortic root replacement with homografts. These valves should also expand the application of minimally access AVR. Therefore, the question of whether we need 'self-anchoring valves' is not only redundant, but the time may have come for these type of valves to be considered as the 'valve of choice' for higher risk geriatric patients who may be 'high risk' for conventional valves but not ineligible for TAVIs.

  18. Reduction of gaseous microembolism during aortic valve replacement using a dynamic bubble trap.

    PubMed

    Schönburg, M; Ziegelhoeffer, T; Kraus, B; Mühling, A; Heidt, M; Taborski, U; Gerriets, T; Roth, M; Hein, S; Urbanek, S; Klövekorn, W P

    2006-06-01

    Serious postoperative psycho-neurological dysfunction is at least partially attributed to the occurrence of gaseous microbubbles in the arterial line of extracorporeal circulation (ECC). Therefore, we investigated in a prospective randomized double blind study whether the usage of dynamic bubble trap (DBT) will reduce microbubble load of patients undergoing aortic valve replacement. Patients (n = 41) were divided into group I (GI, n = 22) with DBT introduced into the arterial line of ECC and group II (GII, n = 19) with placebo-DBT instead. Doppler ultrasonography was used for detection of microbubbles before and after DBT, and for detection of high intensity transient signals (HITS) within the middle cerebral artery. The recording time during ECC was divided into period 1 (P1, until aortic clamp removal) and period 2 (P2, clamp removal until the end of ECC). A significant reduction of microbubble load was found in GI only (p < 0.0001 for ECC; p < 0.0001 for P1; p < 0.0025 for P2). A significant difference in number of HITS between the groups was observed in P1 only (p < 0.002 left middle cerebral artery, p < 0.005 right middle cerebral artery), since in P2 the trapped air in left chamber can go to the supraaortal vessels without passing ECC. In conclusion the use of DBT cannot substitute careful venting after aortic declamping. Nevertheless, reduction of HITS in the cross-clamped period of ECC justifies the use of DBT in patients undergoing open chamber surgery.

  19. Myocardial protection during aortic valve replacement. Cardiac metabolism and enzyme release following hypothermic cardioplegia.

    PubMed

    Bomfim, V; Kaijser, L; Bendz, R; Sylvén, C; Olin, C

    1980-01-01

    Cardiac metabolism following hypothermic potassium cardioplegia was studied in 23 patients undergoing isolated aortic valve replacement. All had normal coronary arteries. Cardioplegia was induced by infusing 700-1 000 ml of cold Ringer's acetate containing 20 mekv K+ selectively into the left coronary artery. Simultaneous blood samples were taken from the radial artery, a central vein and from the coronary sinus before and after cardioplegia. The PO2, O2-saturation and content, PCO2, pH, lactate, glucose, potassium, myoglobin, total creatine kinase (CK), its isoenzyme CK-MB, aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT) and alanine aminotransferase (ALAT) were assessed. Before bypass lactate was extracted by the heart. During the initial 10 to 20 min after cardioplegia there was a marked release of lactate in the coronary sinus. Myoglobin concentration and CK-MB serum activity peaked during the first 4 hours after the release of the aortic cross-clamping. In order to determine the best indicator of myocardial damage after cardioplegia, duration of extracorporeal circulation (ECC-time), aortic occlusion time (AOT), mean myocardial temperature (MMT) and the product of AOT and MMT, referred to as time-temperature area (TTA), were related to possible indicators of myocardial injury, such as enzyme and myoglobin release. The TTA was the best way of expressing the degree of exposure of the heart to ischaemia. The CK-MB to peak area (CK-MB max area) was the best indicator of the degree of ischaemic injury sustained by the heart during operation. PMID:7375890

  20. International Expert Consensus on Sutureless and Rapid Deployment Valves in Aortic Valve Replacement Using Minimally Invasive Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Glauber, Mattia; Moten, Simon C.; Quaini, Eugenio; Solinas, Marco; Folliguet, Thierry A.; Meuris, Bart; Miceli, Antonio; Oberwalder, Peter J.; Rambaldini, Manfredo; Teoh, Kevin H. T.; Bhatnagar, Gopal; Borger, Michael A.; Bouchard, Denis; Bouchot, Olivier; Clark, Stephen C.; Dapunt, Otto E.; Ferrarini, Matteo; Fischlein, Theodor J. M.; Laufer, Guenther; Mignosa, Carmelo; Millner, Russell; Noirhomme, Philippe; Pfeiffer, Steffen; Ruyra-Baliarda, Xavier; Shrestha, Malakh Lal; Suri, Rakesh M.; Troise, Giovanni; Gersak, Borut

    2016-01-01

    Objective To define the benefit of sutureless and rapid deployment valves in current minimally invasive approaches in isolated aortic valve replacement. Methods A panel of 28 international experts with expertise in both minimally invasive aortic valve replacement and rapid deployment valves was constituted. After thorough literature review, the experts rated evidence-based recommendations in a modified Delphi approach. Results No guideline could be retrieved. Thirty-three clinical trials and 9 systematic reviews could be identified for detailed text analysis to obtain a total of 24 recommendations. After rating by the experts 12, final recommendations were identified: preoperative computed tomographic scan as well as intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography are highly recommended. Suitable annular sizes are 19 to 27 mm. There is a contraindication for bicuspid valves only for type 0 and for annular abscess or destruction due to infective endocarditis. The use of sutureless and rapid deployment valves reduces extracorporeal circulation and aortic cross-clamp time and leads to less early complications as prolonged ventilation, blood transfusion, atrial fibrillation, pleural effusions, paravalvular leakages and aortic regurgitation, and renal replacement therapy, respectively. These clinical outcomes result in reduced intensive care unit and hospital stay and reduced costs. The use of sutureless and rapid deployment valves will lead to a higher adoption rate of minimally invasive approaches in aortic valve replacement. Respect should be taken to a necessary short learning curve for both sutureless and minimally invasive programs. Conclusions Sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valve replacement together with minimally invasive approaches offers an attractive option in aortic valve placement for patients requiring biological valve replacement. PMID:27540996

  1. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty.

    PubMed

    Wang, A; Harrison, J K; Bashore, T M

    1997-01-01

    Balloon aortic valvuloplasty is a percutaneous, therapeutic option for patients with severe aortic stenosis, yet the effectiveness of this procedure is dependent on the morphology of the stenotic aortic valve and the respective mechanism of dilation. In younger patients with congenital aortic stenosis, acute and intermediate-term results are good. However, in adult patients, in whom degenerative aortic stenosis is the most common cause, the acute clinical and hemodynamic benefits of balloon aortic valvuloplasty are not lasting, as restenosis occurs in most patients within 6 months. Sympatomatic relief for adults undergoing balloon aortic valvuloplasty is only apparent in patients with normal left ventricular function, who generally are also candidates for aortic valve replacement. Furthermore, the long-term survival for adults after balloon aortic valvuloplasty is similar to the natural history of untreated severe aortic stenosis. In this article, the mechanism of balloon aortic valvuloplasty, as well as its clinical and hemodynamic effects, are reviewed in the context of the different morphological types of aortic stenosis. In addition, two large registries of adult patients treated with balloon aortic valvuloplasty provide important information regarding the acute and long-term results of this procedure and are reviewed.

  2. Aortic Annular Enlargement during Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Dumani, Selman; Likaj, Ermal; Dibra, Laureta; Llazo, Stavri; Refatllari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    In the surgery of aortic valve replacement is always attempted, as much as possible, to implant the larger prosthesis with the mains goals to enhance the potential benefits, to minimise transvalvular gradient, decrease left ventricular size and avoid the phenomenon of patient-prosthesis mismatch. Implantation of an ideal prosthesis often it is not possible, due to a small aortic annulus. A variety of aortic annulus enlargement techniques is reported to avoid patient-prosthesis mismatch. We present the case that has submitted four three times open heart surgery. We used Manouguian technique to enlarge aortic anulus with excellent results during the fourth time of surgery. PMID:27703574

  3. Clinical Results of Different Myocardial Protection Techniques in Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Hee; Jeong, Dong Seop; Sung, Kiick; Kim, Wook Sung; Lee, Young Tak; Park, Pyo Won

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypertrophied myocardium is especially vulnerable to ischemic injury. This study aimed to compare the early and late clinical outcomes of three different methods of myocardial protection in patients with aortic stenosis. Methods This retrospective study included 225 consecutive patients (mean age, 65±10 years; 123 males) with severe aortic stenosis who underwent aortic valve replacement. Patients were excluded if they had coronary artery disease, an ejection fraction <50%, more than mild aortic regurgitation, or endocarditis. The patients were divided into three groups: group A, which was treated with antegrade and retrograde cold blood cardioplegia; group B, which was treated with antegrade crystalloid cardioplegia using histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate (HTK) solution; and group C, treated with retrograde cold blood cardioplegia. Results Group A contained 70 patients (31.1%), group B contained 74 patients (32.9%), and group C contained 81 patients (36%). The three groups showed significant differences with regard to the proportion of patients with a New York Heart Association functional classification ≥III (p=0.035), N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels (p=0.042), ejection fraction (p=0.035), left ventricular dimensions (p<0.001), left ventricular mass index (p<0.001), and right ventricular systolic pressure (p<0.001). Differences in cardiopulmonary bypass time (p=0.532) and aortic cross-clamp time (p=0.48) among the three groups were not statistically significant. During postoperative recovery, no significant differences were found regarding the use of inotropes (p=0.328), mechanical support (n=0), arrhythmias (atrial fibrillation, p=0.347; non-sustained ventricular tachycardia, p=0.1), and ventilator support time (p=0.162). No operative mortality occurred. Similarly, no significant differences were found in long-term outcomes. Conclusion Although the three groups showed some significant differences with regard to patient

  4. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... information Membership Directory (SIR login) Interventional Radiology Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Interventional Radiologists Treat Abdominal Aneurysms Nonsurgically Interventional radiologists ...

  5. Transperitoneal repair of a juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm and co-existent horseshoe kidney with division of the renal isthmus.

    PubMed

    Hajibandeh, Shahin; Hajibandeh, Shahab; Johnpulle, Michelle; Perricone, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    The co-existence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and horseshoe kidney (HSK) is rare. We report a 67-year-old man with an expanding juxtarenal AAA associated with a HSK. The aneurysm had a severely angulated neck and contained a significant amount of mural thrombus. The isthmus of HSK closely lied over the aneurysm, making its exposure extremely difficult. The aneurysm was successfully repaired using transperitoneal approach with division of the renal isthmus and without any need for the renal artery reconstruction. Despite the potential complications, particularly renal insufficiency, associated with division of the renal isthmus and suprarenal cross-clamping of the abdominal aorta, in our case, post-operative period was uneventful and the patient's recovery was satisfactory. PMID:26511935

  6. Myocardial protection by simple systemic hypothermia without aortic occlusion.

    PubMed

    Susilo, A W; Rocher, A; Mohan, R; van der Laarse, A

    1990-01-01

    Systemic hypothermia at 25 degrees-28 degrees C without chemical cardioplegia was used in 908 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Local coronary artery flow was interrupted only during grafting of a distal anastomosis. Systemic perfusion pressure was maintained at 80-100 mmHg, hematocrit at 20%-25%, and pCO2 and pH were monitored during hypothermia according to the alpha-stat principle, while the left ventricle was vented routinely. Proximal anastomoses were performed just before extracorporeal circulation was started by only partially occluding the ascending aorta. Preoperatively 61.9% of the patients had had a myocardial infarction, and 44% had unstable angina. In 14% a severe lesion of the main stem of the left coronary artery was present. Left ventricular function was moderately depressed in 25% and severely depressed in 8% of the patients. Forty-eight patients (5.3%) were aged 70 years or older. The mean number of grafts placed per patient was 3.3. Perioperative myocardial infarction occurred in 3%. Death due to left ventricular failure occurred in 0.4%. No left ventricular assist devices were needed; an intra-aortic balloon pump was used in 1%; positive inotropic support was required in 3.8% of the patients. These results indicate that systemic hypothermia alone provides safe myocardial protection and in certain cases may be the method of choice, particularly if aortic cross clamping or administration of cardioplegic solution is contraindicated. In addition, this method provides rapid revascularization of a severely ischemic zone, as present after unsuccessful PTCA procedures.

  7. Moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest in total arch repair for acute type A aortic dissection: clinical safety and efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ming; Ma, Wei-Guo; Guan, Xin-Liang; Wang, Long-Fei; Li, Jia-Chen; Lan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background Continued debates exist regarding the optimal temperature during hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) in aortic arch repair for patients with type A aortic dissection (TAAD). This study seeks to examine whether the use of moderate HCA in emergency aortic arch surgery provides comparable operative outcomes to deep HCA for patients with acute TAAD. Methods We prospectively enrolled 74 consecutive patients (mean age 47.7±9.8 years, 54 males) with acute TAAD, who underwent emergency total arch replacement and frozen elephant trunk implantation under HCA (18–28 °C) with unilateral selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (uSACP). Patients were divided into two groups based on the nasopharyngeal temperature at the initiation of HCA: deep HCA (DHCA, <20 °C) in 35 (47.3%) and moderate HCA (MHCA, 20–28 °C) in 39 (52.7%). Operative outcomes including mortality, morbidity and visceral organ functions were compared between the two groups. Results The mean times of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and aortic cross-clamp were 211±54 and 238±62 minutes (P=0.053) and 118±27 and 142±45 minutes (P=0.005) in the MHCA and DHCA groups, respectively. Operative mortality did not differ between two groups (10.2% in MHCA vs. 14.3% in DHCA groups, P=0.862). Nor did the incidence of morbidities differ between the two groups (P>0.05). The temporal trend in the changes of postoperative levels of creatinine, aspartate aminotransferase, total bilirubin and lactate did not differ between two groups (P>0.05). Multivariate analysis found that the temperature during HCA (MHCA vs. DHCA) did not affect operative mortality, morbidities and neurologic complications. Instead, CPB time (in minutes) was the risk factor for operative mortality (odds ratio, 1.032; 95% confidence interval, 1.004–1.061; P=0.023). Conclusions: Moderate HCA is associated with equivalent operative mortality and morbidity and visceral organ functions compared to deep HCA in patients with acute TAAD undergoing

  8. Aortic outflow cannula tip design and orientation impacts cerebral perfusion during pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass procedures.

    PubMed

    Menon, Prahlad G; Antaki, James F; Undar, Akif; Pekkan, Kerem

    2013-12-01

    Poor perfusion of the aortic arch is a suspected cause for peri- and post-operative neurological complications associated with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). High-speed jets from 8 to 10FR pediatric/neonatal cannulae delivering ~1 L/min of blood can accrue sub-lethal hemolytic damage while also subjecting the aorta to non-physiologic flow conditions that compromise cerebral perfusion. Therefore, we emphasize the importance of cannulation strategy and hypothesize engineering better CPB perfusion through a redesigned aortic cannula tip. This study employs computational fluid dynamics to investigate novel diffuser-tipped aortic cannulae for shape sensitivity to cerebral perfusion, in an in silico cross-clamped aortic arch model modeled with fixed outflow resistances. 17 parametrically altered configurations of an 8FR end-hole and several diffuser cone angled tips in combination with jet incidence angles toward or away from the head-neck vessels were studied. Experimental pressure-flow characterizations were also conducted on these cannula tip designs. An 8FR end-hole aortic cannula delivering 1 L/min along the transverse aortic arch was found to give rise to backflow from the brachicephalic artery (BCA), irrespective of angular orientation, for the chosen ascending aortic insertion location. Parametric alteration of the cannula tip to include a diffuser cone angle (tested up to 7°) eliminated BCA backflow for any tested angle of jet incidence. Experiments revealed that a 1 cm long 10° diffuser cone tip demonstrated the best pressure-flow performance improvement in contrast with either an end-hole tip or diffuser cone angles greater than 10°. Performance further improved when the diffuser was preceded by an expanded four-lobe swirl inducer attachment-a novel component. In conclusion, aortic cannula orientation is crucial in determining net head-neck perfusion but precise angulations and insertion-depths are difficult to achieve practically. Altering the cannula tip

  9. Early and Long-Term Outcomes in Japanese Patients Aged 80 Years or Older Undergoing Conventional Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Osaka, Shunji; Yaoita, Hiroko; Ishii, Yusuke; Arimoto, Munehito; Hata, Hiroaki; Shiono, Motomi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the early and long-term results of conventional aortic valve replacement (AVR) in very old patients. Methods: Seventy-five patients with aortic stenosis underwent conventional AVR for patients aged 80 years.We examined early death and major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular event (MACCE). Results: The operative mortality was 0% for isolated AVR and 19.2% for concomitant surgery. The postoperative survival rate and MACCE free-rate were no significant differences between the isolated AVR and the concomitant surgery. Univariate analysis confirmed that cardiac dysfunction, severe chronic kidney disease (CKD), hemodialysis, + coronary artery bypass grafting, and norepinephrine use were risk factor of early death. Univariate analysis confirmed that severe CKD, BNP >1000 pg/ml, aortic cross clamping time (ACCT) >180 min, and non-use carperitide and multivariate analysis confirmed that ACCT >180 min, and non-use carperitide were risk factor of MACCE. Conclusions: This study showed that the results of conventional AVR in very old patients were not satisfactory. However, the results obtained with isolated AVR were favorable with no operative deaths. The present study demonstrated that preoperative cardiac function, preoperative renal function, and operative factors have an important impact on early mortality and MACCE. PMID:26004118

  10. The use of methylene blue in abdominal aortic surgery: a case report.

    PubMed

    Piraccini, E; Agnoletti, V; Corso, R; Maitan, S; Gambale, G

    2010-01-01

    The open abdominal aortic surgery includes a well-known phase in which arterial blood flow is stopped by occluding clamps, resulting in peculiar physiologic changes usually superimposed on advanced pathologic conditions. An anesthetic plan should aim at providing hemodynamic stability and preserving organ function. Clamp removal leads to an acute fall in blood pressure following a decrease in systemic vascular resistance, caused by reactive hyperemia due to opening of the previously minimally perfused vascular beds. Several different mediators, including the nitrous oxide (NO) pathway, have been thought to be responsible for this hemodynamic effect. The massive production of NO by the inducible isoform of NO synthase could be partially responsible for the profound vasodilatation and myocardial dysfunction. The dye methylene blue (MB) has been used as to prevent vasodilatation in other clinical situations like sepsis, cardiopulmonary bypass and liver transplantation. We describe its use in a patient with poor hemodynamic status, who was submitted to aortic aneurism repair with infrarenal cross clamp. The intervention was also associated with a severe bleeding. In this case MB allowed us to control hypotension with relatively low doses of vasopressors. PMID:23440623

  11. Acute aortic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a term used to describe a constellation of life-threatening aortic diseases that have similar presentation, but appear to have distinct demographic, clinical, pathological and survival characteristics. Many believe that the three major entities that comprise AAS: aortic dissection (AD), intramural hematoma (IMH) and penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU), make up a spectrum of aortic disease in which one entity may evolve into or coexist with another. Much of the confusion in accurately classifying an AAS is that they present with similar symptoms: typically acute onset of severe chest or back pain, and may have similar radiographic features, since the disease entities all involve injury or disruption of the medial layer of the aortic wall. The accurate diagnosis of an AAS is often made at operation. This manuscript will attempt to clarify the similarities and differences between AD, IMH and PAU of the ascending aorta and describe the challenges in distinguishing them from one another. PMID:27386405

  12. Para-aortic lymphocyst.

    PubMed

    Helmkamp, B F; Krebs, H B; Isikoff, M B; Poliakoff, S R; Averette, H E

    1980-10-15

    Although numerous articles regarding the etiology, incidence, complications, and management of pelvic lymphocysts have been published in the American literature since 1958, there has been no mention of para-aortic lymphocyst as a complication of para-aortic node dissection. Two recent cases of symptomatic para-aortic lymphocyst have prompted a review of our para-aortic node dissection technique when this procedure is not combined with a more extensive pelvic lymphadenectomy. Our modification in technique is to use retroperitoneal para-aortic drainage by constant pressure-controlled suction following closure of the posterior parietal peritoneum, and the results in our first 15 patients are presented. There were no complications related to the drainage technique. Abdominal ultrasound and intravenous urography have proved to be excellent diagnostic tools in the initial evaluation and subsequent follow-up of para-aortic lymphocytes.

  13. Acute aortic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corvera, Joel S

    2016-05-01

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) is a term used to describe a constellation of life-threatening aortic diseases that have similar presentation, but appear to have distinct demographic, clinical, pathological and survival characteristics. Many believe that the three major entities that comprise AAS: aortic dissection (AD), intramural hematoma (IMH) and penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU), make up a spectrum of aortic disease in which one entity may evolve into or coexist with another. Much of the confusion in accurately classifying an AAS is that they present with similar symptoms: typically acute onset of severe chest or back pain, and may have similar radiographic features, since the disease entities all involve injury or disruption of the medial layer of the aortic wall. The accurate diagnosis of an AAS is often made at operation. This manuscript will attempt to clarify the similarities and differences between AD, IMH and PAU of the ascending aorta and describe the challenges in distinguishing them from one another. PMID:27386405

  14. Hemiarch versus total aortic arch replacement in acute type A dissection: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Shi Sum; Theologou, Thomas; Harrington, Deborah; Kuduvalli, Manoj; Oo, Aung

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite recent advances in aortic surgery, acute type A aortic dissection remains a surgical emergency associated with high mortality and morbidity. Appropriate management is crucial to achieve satisfactory outcomes but the optimal surgical approach is controversial. The present systematic review and meta-analysis sought to access cumulative data from comparative studies between hemiarch and total aortic arch replacement in patients with acute type A aortic dissection. Methods A systematic review of the literature using six databases. Eligible studies include comparative studies on hemiarch versus total arch replacement reporting short, medium and long term outcomes. A meta-analysis was performed on eligible studies reporting outcome of interest to quantify the effects of hemiarch replacement on mortality and morbidity risk compared to total arch replacement. Result Fourteen retrospective studies met the inclusion criteria and 2,221 patients were included in the final analysis. Pooled analysis showed that hemiarch replacement was associated with a lower risk of post-operative renal dialysis [risk ratio (RR) =0.72; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.56–0.94; P=0.02; I2=0%]. There was no significant difference in terms of in-hospital mortality between the two groups (RR =0.84; 95% CI: 0.65–1.09; P=0.20; I2=0%). Cardiopulmonary bypass, aortic cross clamp and circulatory arrest times were significantly longer in total arch replacement. During follow up, no significant difference was reported from current studies between the two operative approaches in terms of aortic re-intervention and freedom from aortic reoperation. Conclusions Within the context of publication bias by high volume aortic centres and non-randomized data sets, there was no difference in mortality outcomes between the two groups. This analysis serves to demonstrate that for those centers doing sufficient total aortic arch activity to allow for publication, excellent and equivalent outcomes

  15. Conservative Management of Chronic Aortic Dissection with Underlying Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Yusuf Beebeejaun, Mohammad; Malec, Aleksandra; Gupta, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Aortic dissection is one of the most common aortic emergencies affecting around 2000 Americans each year. It usually presents in the acute state but in a small percentage of patients aortic dissections go unnoticed and these patients survive without any adequate therapy. With recent advances in medical care and diagnostic technologies, aortic dissection can be successfully managed through surgical or medical options, consequently increasing the related survival rate. However, little is known about the optimal long-term management of patients suffering from chronic aortic dissection. The purpose of the present report is to review aortic dissection, namely its pathology and the current diagnostic tools available, and to discuss the management options for chronic aortic dissection. We report a patient in which chronic aortic dissection presented with recurring episodes of vomiting and also discuss the management plan of our patient who had a chronic aortic dissection as well as an underlying aortic aneurysm. PMID:24179638

  16. Surgical Repair of Abdominal Aortic and Renal Artery Aneurysms in Takayasu's Arteritis.

    PubMed

    Wetstein, Paul J; Clark, Margaret E; Cafasso, Danielle E; Golarz, Scott R; Ayubi, Farhan S; Kellicut, Dwight C

    2016-01-01

    Takayasu's arteritis is a large vessel vasculitis that can be a challenging diagnosis to make and has a varied clinical presentation. Management largely depends on affected vessel disease severity and individual patient considerations. The diagnosis must be considered in a young patient with large vessel aneurysms. We present a case of a 30 year-old woman of Pacific Islander descent who presented to the Tripler Army medical Center Vascular Surgery Department in Honolulu, Hawai'i seeking repair of her abdominal aortic and renal artery aneurysms prior to conception. A 30 year-old Pacific Islander woman with a history of a saccular abdominal aortic aneurysm and renal artery aneurysms presented to our clinic seeking vascular surgery consultation prior to a planned pregnancy. She had a renal artery stent placed at an outside institution for hypertension. She met the diagnosis of Takayasu's arteritis by Sharma's criteria. Physical exam was significant for a palpable, pulsatile, abdominal mass and CT angiography revealed a saccular irregular-appearing infra-renal abdominal aortic aneurysm, extending to the aortic bifurcation, with a maximum diameter of 3.3 cm. A right renal artery aneurysm was also identified proximally, contiguous with the aorta, with a maximal transverse diameter of 1.7 cm. The patient underwent a supraceliac bypass to the right renal artery with a 7 mm Dacron graft, as well as excision of the right renal artery aneurysm. The abdominal aortic aneurysm was replaced using a Hemashield Dacron bifurcated 14 mm x 7 mm bypass graft. Intraoperative measurements of the renal artery aneurysm were 1.5 x 1.5 cm and the saccular appearing distal abdominal aortic aneurysm measured 3.6 x 3.3 cm. The patient was discharged from the hospital 7 days post-operatively. At 1-year follow up, CT scan of the abdominal aorta revealed the repair was without any evidence of aneurysm formation, anastomotic pseudoaneurysm formation, or areas of stenosis. She has remained

  17. Selective cerebro-myocardial perfusion in complex congenital aortic arch pathology: a novel technique.

    PubMed

    De Rita, Fabrizio; Lucchese, Gianluca; Barozzi, Luca; Menon, Tiziano; Faggian, Giuseppe; Mazzucco, Alessandro; Luciani, Giovanni Battista

    2011-11-01

    Simultaneous cerebro-myocardial perfusion has been described in neonatal and infant arch surgery, suggesting a reduction in cardiac morbidity. Here reported is a novel technique for selective cerebral perfusion combined with controlled and independent myocardial perfusion during surgery for complex or recurrent aortic arch lesions. From April 2008 to April 2011, 10 patients with arch pathology underwent surgery (two hypoplastic left heart syndrome [HLHS], four recurrent arch obstruction, two aortic arch hypoplasia + ventricular septal defect [VSD], one single ventricle + transposition of the great arteries + arch hypoplasia, one interrupted aortic arch type B + VSD). Median age was 63 days (6 days-36 years) and median weight 4.0 kg (1.6-52). Via midline sternotomy, an arterial cannula (6 or 8 Fr for infants) was directly inserted into the innominate artery or through a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft (for neonates <2.0 kg). A cardioplegia delivery system was inserted into the aortic root. Under moderate hypothermia, ascending and descending aorta were cross-clamped, and "beating heart and brain" aortic arch repair was performed. Arch repair was composed of patch augmentation in five, end-to-side anastomosis in three, and replacement in two patients. Average cardiopulmonary bypass time was 163 ± 68 min (71-310). In two patients only (one HLHS, one complex single ventricle), a period of cardiac arrest was required to complete intracardiac repair. In such cases, antegrade blood cardioplegia was delivered directly via the same catheter used for selective myocardial perfusion. Average time of splanchnic ischemia during cerebro-myocardial perfusion was 39 ± 18 min (17-69). Weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass was achieved without inotropic support in three and with low dose in seven patients. One patient required veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Four patients, body weight <3.0 kg, needed delayed sternal closure. No neurologic dysfunction was noted

  18. Selective cerebro-myocardial perfusion in complex congenital aortic arch pathology: a novel technique.

    PubMed

    De Rita, Fabrizio; Lucchese, Gianluca; Barozzi, Luca; Menon, Tiziano; Faggian, Giuseppe; Mazzucco, Alessandro; Luciani, Giovanni Battista

    2011-11-01

    Simultaneous cerebro-myocardial perfusion has been described in neonatal and infant arch surgery, suggesting a reduction in cardiac morbidity. Here reported is a novel technique for selective cerebral perfusion combined with controlled and independent myocardial perfusion during surgery for complex or recurrent aortic arch lesions. From April 2008 to April 2011, 10 patients with arch pathology underwent surgery (two hypoplastic left heart syndrome [HLHS], four recurrent arch obstruction, two aortic arch hypoplasia + ventricular septal defect [VSD], one single ventricle + transposition of the great arteries + arch hypoplasia, one interrupted aortic arch type B + VSD). Median age was 63 days (6 days-36 years) and median weight 4.0 kg (1.6-52). Via midline sternotomy, an arterial cannula (6 or 8 Fr for infants) was directly inserted into the innominate artery or through a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft (for neonates <2.0 kg). A cardioplegia delivery system was inserted into the aortic root. Under moderate hypothermia, ascending and descending aorta were cross-clamped, and "beating heart and brain" aortic arch repair was performed. Arch repair was composed of patch augmentation in five, end-to-side anastomosis in three, and replacement in two patients. Average cardiopulmonary bypass time was 163 ± 68 min (71-310). In two patients only (one HLHS, one complex single ventricle), a period of cardiac arrest was required to complete intracardiac repair. In such cases, antegrade blood cardioplegia was delivered directly via the same catheter used for selective myocardial perfusion. Average time of splanchnic ischemia during cerebro-myocardial perfusion was 39 ± 18 min (17-69). Weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass was achieved without inotropic support in three and with low dose in seven patients. One patient required veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Four patients, body weight <3.0 kg, needed delayed sternal closure. No neurologic dysfunction was noted

  19. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement: the Leipzig experience

    PubMed Central

    Merk, Denis R.; Etz, Christian D.; Seeburger, Joerg; Schroeter, Thomas; Oberbach, Andreas; Uhlemann, Madlen; Hoellriegel, Robert; Haensig, Martin; Leontyev, Sergey; Garbade, Jens; Misfeld, Martin; Mohr, Friedrich W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive techniques are progressively challenging traditional approaches in cardiothoracic surgery. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (AVR) has become a routine procedure at our institution. Methods We retrospectively analyzed all patients undergoing minimally invasive isolated AVR between January 2003 and March 2014, at our institution. Mean follow-up was 4.7±4.3 years (range: 0-18 years) and was 99.8% complete. Results There were 1,714 patients who received an isolated minimally invasive AVR. The mean (± SD) patient age was 65±12.8 years, ejection fraction 60%±12% and log EuroSCORE 5.3%±5.1%. Mean cross-clamp time was 58±18 minutes and mean cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) time was 82.9±26.7 minutes. Thirty-day survival was 97.8%±0.4%, and 69.4%±1.7% at 10-years. The multivariate analysis revealed age at surgery [P=0.016; odds ratio (OR), 1.1], length of surgery time (P=0.002; OR, 1.01), female gender (P=0.023; OR, 3.54), preoperative myocardial infarction (MI) (P=0.006; OR, 7.87), preoperative stroke (P=0.001; OR, 13.76) and preoperative liver failure (P=0.015; OR, 10.28) as independent risk factors for mortality. Cox-regression analysis revealed the following predictors for long term mortality: age over 75 years (P<0.001; OR, 3.5), preoperative dialysis (P<0.01; OR, 2.14), ejection fraction less than 30% (P=0.003; OR, 3.28) and urgent or emergency operation (P<0.001; OR, 2.3). Conclusions Minimally invasive AVR can be performed safely and effectively with very few perioperative complications. The early and long-term outcomes in these patients are acceptable. PMID:25694976

  20. Abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Keisler, Brian; Carter, Chuck

    2015-04-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm refers to abdominal aortic dilation of 3.0 cm or greater. The main risk factors are age older than 65 years, male sex, and smoking history. Other risk factors include a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, coronary artery disease, hypertension, peripheral artery disease, and previous myocardial infarction. Diagnosis may be made by physical examination, an incidental finding on imaging, or ultrasonography. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force released updated recommendations for abdominal aortic aneurysm screening in 2014. Men 65 to 75 years of age with a history of smoking should undergo one-time screening with ultrasonography based on evidence that screening will improve abdominal aortic aneurysm-related mortality in this population. Men in this age group without a history of smoking may benefit if they have other risk factors (e.g., family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm, other vascular aneurysms, coronary artery disease). There is inconclusive evidence to recommend screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm in women 65 to 75 years of age with a smoking history. Women without a smoking history should not undergo screening because the harms likely outweigh the benefits. Persons who have a stable abdominal aortic aneurysm should undergo regular surveillance or operative intervention depending on aneurysm size. Surgical intervention by open or endovascular repair is the primary option and is typically reserved for aneurysms 5.5 cm in diameter or greater. There are limited options for medical treatment beyond risk factor modification. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm is a medical emergency presenting with hypotension, shooting abdominal or back pain, and a pulsatile abdominal mass. It is associated with high prehospitalization mortality. Emergent surgical intervention is indicated for a rupture but has a high operative mortality rate. PMID:25884861

  1. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Samir R; Tuzcu, E Murat

    2009-12-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most important valvular heart disease affecting the elderly population. Surgical aortic valve replacement is the mainstay of treatment, although a substantial number of patients are considered high risk for surgery. Many of these patients do not undergo surgery and have poor outcomes from medically treated symptomatic, severe aortic stenosis. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) provides a promising treatment option for some of these patients. Several devices are under investigation. The Edwards Sapien valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA) and the CoreValve (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) have the largest human experience to date. Initial data suggest that these devices have an acceptable safety profile and provide excellent hemodynamic relief of aortic stenosis. The Edwards Sapien valve is currently under investigation in the United States in the PARTNER (Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valve) trial in high-risk surgical or inoperable patients; TAVI is available for clinical use in both Canada and Europe. TAVI is not used in low- or intermediate-risk surgical patients; however, future studies may prove its applicability in these subsets. The major complications of TAVI include access site-related problems and device malpositioning/migration. There are several new-generation prosthetic valves and delivery systems designed to be low profile and repositionable. Technical advances and refinement of the implantation methods may make TAVI even safer and ultimately a better treatment option, not only for patients with high surgical risk but also for those with moderate or low risk.

  2. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Ziaja, K; Sedlak, L; Urbanek, T; Kostyra, J; Ludyga, T

    2000-01-01

    The reported incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is from 2% to 14% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and the etiology of this disease is still discussed--according to the literature several pathogenic theories have been proposed. From 1992 to 1997 32 patients with IAAA were operated on. The patients were mostly symptomatic--abdominal pain was present in 68.75% cases, back pain in 31.25%, fever in 12.5% and weight loss in 6.25% of the operated patients. In all the patients ultrasound examination was performed, in 4 patients CT and in 3 cases urography. All the patients were operated on and characteristic signs of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm like: thickened aortic wall, perianeurysmal infiltration or retroperitoneal fibrosis with involvement of retroperitoneal structures were found. In all cases surgery was performed using transperitoneal approach; in three cases intraoperatively contiguous abdominal organs were injured, which was connected with their involvement into periaortic inflammation. In 4 cases clamping of the aorta was done at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus. 3 patients (9.37%) died (one patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm). Authors present diagnostic procedures and the differences in the surgical tactic, emphasizing the necessity of the surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  3. Are Aortic Stent Grafts Safe in Pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Khandanpour, Nader; Mehta, Tapan A.; Adiseshiah, M.; Meyer, Felicity J.

    2015-01-01

    Aortic stent grafts are increasingly used to treat aortic aneurysms and also other aortic pathologies. The safety of aortic stent grafts in pregnancy has never been studied or reported. We report on two cases of aortic stent grafts in pregnant women and discuss the effect of pregnancy on these aortic stent grafts. PMID:26229702

  4. Reoperative transapical transcatheter aortic valve replacement for central aortic regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuanjia; Kapadia, Samir; Krishnaswamy, Amar; Svensson, Lars G; Mick, Stephanie

    2016-09-01

    Paravalvular leak-related aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a common complication and is associated with increased short- and long-term mortality. However, the impact of isolated central aortic regurgitation is unknown. We report a case of transapical (TA) TAVR with postprocedural central aortic regurgitation, who returned after two years with progression of regurgitation. A reoperative valve-in-valve TA-TAVR was performed. PMID:27405799

  5. Surgical Aortic Valvuloplasty Versus Balloon Aortic Valve Dilatation in Children.

    PubMed

    Donald, Julia S; Konstantinov, Igor E

    2016-09-01

    Balloon aortic valve dilatation (BAD : is assumed to provide the same outcomes as surgical aortic valvuloplasty (SAV). However, the development of precise modern surgical valvuloplasty techniques may result in better long-term durability of the aortic valve repair. This review of the recent literature suggests that current SAV provides a safe and durable repair. Furthermore, primary SAV appears to have greater freedom from reintervention and aortic valve replacement when compared to BAD. PMID:27587493

  6. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... final recommendation statement on Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm. This final recommendation statement applies to adults ages ...

  7. Monoparesis after graft replacement of non-ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hitoshi; Ogino, Hitoshi; Saito, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Hiroaki; Minatoya, Kenji; Kobayashi, Junjiro; Yagihara, Toshikatsu; Kitamura, Soichiro

    2006-10-01

    A 67-year-old man was admitted with a saccular aneurysm of the abdominal aorta. Preoperative CT revealed cylindrical calcification of the abdominal aorta and the patent internal iliac arteries (IIAs). At the elective surgery, a cylinder-shaped and severely calcified intimal layer was found, and the lumbar arteries were totally occluded. Hypotension caused by the loose iliac clamp due to severe calcification continued for 15 minutes and long-time cross clamp was necessary. Monoparesis of the left lower extremity and dysuria occurred postoperatively. Spinal MRI revealed small infarction at the Th10 level. Symptoms improved and he could walk with a cane and within a few months no uninary catheter support was needed. Thoracic spinal cord infarction after abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery and a severely calcified abdominal aorta indicated the importance of the blood flow in the IIA as the significant source of spinal blood supply. To prevent spinal cord injury (SCI) which is rare but significant complication of AAA surgery, understanding of the spinal blood supply, quick surgery, and complete revascularization of pelvic arteries are important. PMID:17095985

  8. Aneurysms: thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Chun, Kevin C; Lee, Eugene S

    2015-04-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) have many possible etiologies, including congenital heart defects (eg, bicuspid aortic valves, coarctation of the aorta), inherited connective tissue disorders (eg, Marfan, Ehlers-Danlos, Loeys-Dietz syndromes), and degenerative conditions (eg, medial necrosis, atherosclerosis of the aortic wall). Symptoms of rupture include a severe tearing pain in the chest, back, or neck, sometimes associated with cardiovascular collapse. Before rupture, TAAs may exert pressure on other thoracic structures, leading to a variety of symptoms. However, most TAAs are asymptomatic and are found incidentally during imaging for other conditions. Diagnosis is confirmed with computed tomography scan or echocardiography. Asymptomatic TAAs should be monitored with imaging at specified intervals and patients referred for repair if the TAAs are enlarging rapidly (greater than 0.5 cm in diameter over 6 months for heritable etiologies; greater than 0.5 cm over 1 year for degenerative etiologies) or reach a critical aortic diameter threshold for elective surgery (5.5 cm for TAAs due to degenerative etiologies, 5.0 cm when associated with inherited syndromes). Open surgery is used most often to treat asymptomatic TAAs in the ascending aorta and aortic arch. Asymptomatic TAAs in the descending aorta often are treated medically with aggressive blood pressure control, though recent data suggest that endovascular procedures may result in better long-term survival rates. PMID:25860136

  9. [Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Kalder, J; Kotelis, D; Jacobs, M J

    2016-09-01

    Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA) are rare events with an incidence of 5.9 cases per 100,000 persons per year. In Germany approximately 940 TAAA procedures are performed annually. The cause of TAAA is mostly degenerative but they can also occur on the basis of an aortic dissection or connective tissue disease (e. g. Marfan's syndrome). Patients often have severe comorbidities and suffer from hypertension, coronary heart disease or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, mostly as a result of smoking. Operative treatment is indicated when the maximum aortic diameter has reached 6 cm (> 5 cm in patients with connective tissue disease) or the aortic diameter rapidly increases (> 5 mm/year). Treatment options are open surgical aortic repair with extracorporeal circulation, endovascular repair with branched/fenestrated endografts and parallel grafts (chimneys) or a combination of open and endovascular procedures (hybrid procedures). Mortality rates after both open and endovascular procedures are approximately 8 % depending on the extent of the repair. Furthermore, there are relevant risks of complications, such as paraplegia (up to 20 %) and the necessity for dialysis. In recent years several approaches to minimize these risks have been proposed. Besides cardiopulmonary risk evaluation, clinical assessment of patients by the physician with respect to the patient-specific anatomy influences the allocation of patients to one treatment option or another. Surgery of TAAA should ideally be performed in high-volume centers in order to achieve better results. PMID:27558261

  10. Quadricuspid aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Timperley, Jonathan; Milner, Robert; Marshall, Andrew J; Gilbert, Timothy J

    2002-12-01

    Quadricuspid aortic valves (QAV) are a rare but well recognized cause of significant aortic regurgitation. The first case was found reported in 1862. Since then there have been 110 reported cases of QAV and we report 4 more. Previously, these were diagnosed at the time of surgery or postmortem examination. With advances in echocardiography, including harmonic imaging, and also the advent of transesophageal echocardiography, more cases are being diagnosed prior to surgery. We describe four more cases, three diagnosed preoperatively and one at the time of surgery, and then review the previously reported cases. Of the 114 cases reported, 46 had the aortic valve replaced, most commonly in the 5th and 6th decade of life. Hurwitz and Roberts classified quadricuspid valves according to the size of the leaflets. It has previously been believed that QAVs with four equal sized leaflets were less likely to develop significant aortic regurgitation; however, on review of the available cases, this would not appear to be the case. The preoperative diagnosis of QAVs is important as they can be associated with abnormally placed coronary ostium. Of the 114 cases reported, there are 10 reports of abnormally placed ostia. There has been at least one reported case of death occurring because of obstruction of an abnormally placed right coronary ostium by a prosthetic aortic valve.

  11. Awake transapical aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Petridis, Francesco Dimitri; Savini, Carlo; Castelli, Andrea; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto

    2012-05-01

    Transapical aortic valve implantation is being employed as a less invasive alternative to open heart surgery in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Here we report the case of an awake transapical aortic valve implantation in a patient with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  12. Proximal aortic dissection (dissecting aortic aneurysm) in a mature ostrich.

    PubMed

    Ferreras, M C; González, J; Pérez, V; Reyes, L E; Gómez, N; Pérez, C; Corpa, J M; García-Marín, J F

    2001-01-01

    The gross and histopathologic lesions observed in a case of spontaneous proximal aortic dissection (dissecting aortic aneurysm) in a mature ostrich are reported. At necropsy, a dissecting intramural hematoma was seen in the proximal aorta, extended about 12 cm distally from the aortic valves. Histopathologic changes in aortic dissection included fragmentation and disruption of elastic laminae, presence of cystic extracellular spaces, and pooling of ground substance in the tunica media. Hepatic copper levels were measured, and the low concentration found suggested that a copper deficiency together with other risk factors such as the elevation of blood pressure may have been implicated in the development of the aortic dissection seen in this ostrich.

  13. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Malaisrie, S Chris; Iddriss, Adam; Flaherty, James D; Churyla, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Severe aortic stenosis (AS) is a life-threatening condition when left untreated. Aortic valve replacement (AVR) is the gold standard treatment for the majority of patients; however, transcatheter aortic valve implantation/replacement (TAVI/TAVR) has emerged as the preferred treatment for high-risk or inoperable patients. The concept of transcatheter heart valves originated in the 1960s and has evolved into the current Edwards Sapien and Medtronic CoreValve platforms available for clinical use. Complications following TAVI, including cerebrovascular events, perivalvular regurgitation, vascular injury, and heart block have decreased with experience and evolving technology, such that ongoing trials studying TAVI in lower risk patients have become tenable. The multidisciplinary team involving the cardiac surgeon and cardiologist plays an essential role in patient selection, procedural conduct, and perioperative care.

  14. Endovascular aortic aneurysm operations.

    PubMed

    Najibi, Sasan; Terramani, Thomas T; Weiss, Victor J; Smith, Robert B; Salam, Atef A; Dodson, Thomas F; Chaikof, Elliot L; Lumsden, Alan B

    2002-02-01

    Options for the treatment of abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms are in a state of evolutionary change. The development and continued refinement of the endoluminal approaches has decreased the need for open aortic aneurysm surgery. Endovascular stent graft technology is an area of active research in which both the delivery systems and the endografts are undergoing continued improvement so that patients with what was previously thought to be unfavorable anatomy may be treated by these means. The design and deployment techniques of the currently available endografts, as well as those in clinical trials, are presented. PMID:11822962

  15. Aortic wraps a modification to aortic grafting.

    PubMed

    Gordon, J A

    1989-09-01

    Aortic wrapping has been attempted on occasion when the standard replacement of a diseased lower third of the aorta by a trouser graft is not feasible. Cellophane has been the most common agent employed, but these wraps have met with minimal success and on occasion has even been passed rectally. Kartchner and Lovett have reviewed the techniques and results of the later procedures replacing the cellophane wraps. In most instances a Dacron sheet was utilized. Six cases are reviewed from a solo private practice in which a standard trouser graft replacement was varied by using an alternative form of wrapping.

  16. Ascending-to-descending aortic bypass and aortic valve replacement for concomitant severe aortic coarctation and aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Chu, Michael W A; Adams, Corey; Torres, Pedro

    2011-04-01

    We present a 33-year-old male with severe, symptomatic aortic coarctation and aortic stenosis assessed on a humanitarian medical mission to a developing country. Contemplating limited time and available resources, we performed a simultaneous single-stage approach with ascending-to-descending aortic bypass with a reinforced gortex graft and concomitant aortic valve replacement through a median sternotomy. The patient had an uneventful postoperative convalescence and was discharged on postoperative day 5. At 1-year follow-up, he was asymptomatic and doing well with good blood pressure control and complete equalization of upper and lower limb blood pressure measurements. Computed tomography and transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated a widely patent ascending-to-descending aortic bypass graft and a normally functioning prosthetic aortic valve, respectively. In developing countries where health care resources are limited, a combined approach with an extra-anatomic, thoracic aortic bypass, and aortic valve replacement resulted in good early and 1-year outcomes. This procedure may represent the most effective surgical option for patients with concomitant aortic coarctation and aortic stenosis.

  17. Genetics, Pregnancy, and Aortic Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Jeffrey D; Hsieh, Cindy M; Schenning, Ryan C; Slater, Matthew S; Landry, Gregory J; Moneta, Gregory L; Mitchell, Erica L

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection (FTAAD) in a pregnant female. FTAAD is an inherited, nonsyndromic aortopathy resulting from several genetic mutations critical to aortic wall integrity have been identified. One such mutation is the myosin heavy chain gene (MYH11) which is responsible for 1-2% of all FTAAD cases. This mutation results in aortic medial degeneration, loss of elastin, and reticulin fiber fragmentation predisposing to TAAD. Aortic disease is more aggressive during pregnancy as a result of increased wall stress from hyperdynamic cardiovascular changes and estrogen-induced aortic media degeneration. Our patient was a 29-year-old G2P1 woman at 26 weeks gestation presenting with abdominal and back pain. Work-up revealed a 6.4-cm ascending aortic aneurysm with a type A dissection extending into all arch vessels, aortic coarctation at the isthmus, and a separate focal type B aortic dissection with visceral involvement. Surgical management included concomitant cesarean section with delivery of a live premature infant, tubal ligation, ascending aortic replacement with reconstruction of the arch vessels, and aortic valve resuspension. The type B dissection was managed medically without complication. This is the first reported case of aortic dissection in a patient with FTAAD/MYH11 mutation and pregnancy. This case highlights that FTAAD and pregnancy cause aortic degeneration via distinct mechanisms and that hyperdynamics of pregnancy increase aortic wall stress. Management of pregnancy associated with aortopathy requires early transfer to a tertiary center, careful investigation to identify familial aortopathy, fetal monitoring, and a multidisciplinary team approach. PMID:26381327

  18. Sutureless Aortic Valve Replacement International Registry (SU-AVR-IR): design and rationale from the International Valvular Surgery Study Group (IVSSG)

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin; Bouchard, Denis; Carrel, Thierry P.; Dapunt, Otto E.; Di Bartolomeo, Roberto; Eichstaedt, Harald C.; Fischlein, Theodor; Folliguet, Thierry; Gersak, Borut; Glauber, Mattia; Haverich, Axel; Misfeld, Martin; Oberwalder, Peter J.; Santarpino, Giuseppe; Shrestha, Malakh Lal; Solinas, Marco; Vola, Marco; Alamanni, Francesco; Albertini, Alberto; Bhatnagar, Gopal; Carrier, Michel; Clark, Stephen; Collart, Federic; Kappert, Utz; Kocher, Alfred; Meuris, Bart; Mignosa, Carmelo; Ouda, Ahmed; Pelletier, Marc; Rahmanian, Parwis Baradaran; Reineke, David; Teoh, Kevin; Troise, Giovanni; Villa, Emmanuel; Wahlers, Thorsten; Yan, Tristan D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sutureless aortic valve replacement (SU-AVR) is an innovative approach which shortens cardiopulmonary bypass and cross-clamp durations and may facilitate minimally invasive approach. Evidence outlining its safety, efficacy, hemodynamic profile and potential complications is replete with small-volume observational studies and few comparative publications. Methods Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and high-volume SU-AVR replacement centers were contacted for recruitment into a global collaborative coalition dedicated to sutureless valve research. A Research Steering Committee was formulated to direct research and support the mission of providing registry evidence warranted for SU-AVR. Results The International Valvular Surgery Study Group (IVSSG) was formed under the auspices of the Research Steering Committee, comprised of 36 expert valvular surgeons from 27 major centers across the globe. IVSSG Sutureless Projects currently proceeding include the Retrospective and Prospective Phases of the SU-AVR International Registry (SU-AVR-IR). Conclusions The global pooling of data by the IVSSG Sutureless Projects will provide required robust clinical evidence on the safety, efficacy and hemodynamic outcomes of SU-AVR. PMID:25870808

  19. First direct aortic retrievable transcatheter aortic valve implantation in humans.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Jaya; Glover, Chris; Labinaz, Marino; Ruel, Marc

    2014-11-01

    We describe 2 cases in which transcatheter aortic valve implantation was performed with a Portico prosthesis (St Jude Medical, St Paul, MN) through a direct aortic approach. In 1 of the cases, prosthesis retrieval was needed during the procedure and was essential to the successful outcome. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of direct aortic Portico prosthesis implantation, and it highlights the significance of the retrievable nature of this device. PMID:25442452

  20. [Stent Grafting for Aortic Dissection].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naomichi

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of stent graft for aortic dissection is to terminate antegrade blood flow into the false lumen through primary entry. Early intervention for primary entry makes excellent aortic remodeling and emergent stent grafting for complicated acute type B aortic dissection is supported as a class I. On the other hand stent grafting for chronic aortic dissection is controversial. Early stent grafting is considered with in 6 months after on-set if the diameter of the descending aorta is more than 40 mm. Additional interventions for residual false lumen on the downstream aorta are still required. Stent graft for re-entry, candy-plug technique, and double stenting, other effective re-interventions were reported. Best treatment on the basis of each anatomical and physical characteristics should be selected in each institution. Frozen elephant trunk is alternative procedure for aortic dissection without the need to take account of proximal anatomical limitation and effective for acute type A aortic dissection. PMID:27440026

  1. Aortic dimensions in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Quezada, Emilio; Lapidus, Jodi; Shaughnessy, Robin; Chen, Zunqiu; Silberbach, Michael

    2015-11-01

    In Turner syndrome, linear growth is less than the general population. Consequently, to assess stature in Turner syndrome, condition-specific comparators have been employed. Similar reference curves for cardiac structures in Turner syndrome are currently unavailable. Accurate assessment of the aorta is particularly critical in Turner syndrome because aortic dissection and rupture occur more frequently than in the general population. Furthermore, comparisons to references calculated from the taller general population with the shorter Turner syndrome population can lead to over-estimation of aortic size causing stigmatization, medicalization, and potentially over-treatment. We used echocardiography to measure aortic diameters at eight levels of the thoracic aorta in 481 healthy girls and women with Turner syndrome who ranged in age from two to seventy years. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to assess the influence of karyotype, age, body mass index, bicuspid aortic valve, blood pressure, history of renal disease, thyroid disease, or growth hormone therapy. Because only bicuspid aortic valve was found to independently affect aortic size, subjects with bicuspid aortic valve were excluded from the analysis. Regression equations for aortic diameters were calculated and Z-scores corresponding to 1, 2, and 3 standard deviations from the mean were plotted against body surface area. The information presented here will allow clinicians and other caregivers to calculate aortic Z-scores using a Turner-based reference population. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Aortic dimensions in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Quezada, Emilio; Lapidus, Jodi; Shaughnessy, Robin; Chen, Zunqiu; Silberbach, Michael

    2015-11-01

    In Turner syndrome, linear growth is less than the general population. Consequently, to assess stature in Turner syndrome, condition-specific comparators have been employed. Similar reference curves for cardiac structures in Turner syndrome are currently unavailable. Accurate assessment of the aorta is particularly critical in Turner syndrome because aortic dissection and rupture occur more frequently than in the general population. Furthermore, comparisons to references calculated from the taller general population with the shorter Turner syndrome population can lead to over-estimation of aortic size causing stigmatization, medicalization, and potentially over-treatment. We used echocardiography to measure aortic diameters at eight levels of the thoracic aorta in 481 healthy girls and women with Turner syndrome who ranged in age from two to seventy years. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to assess the influence of karyotype, age, body mass index, bicuspid aortic valve, blood pressure, history of renal disease, thyroid disease, or growth hormone therapy. Because only bicuspid aortic valve was found to independently affect aortic size, subjects with bicuspid aortic valve were excluded from the analysis. Regression equations for aortic diameters were calculated and Z-scores corresponding to 1, 2, and 3 standard deviations from the mean were plotted against body surface area. The information presented here will allow clinicians and other caregivers to calculate aortic Z-scores using a Turner-based reference population. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26118429

  3. Almanac 2014: aortic valve disease.

    PubMed

    Otto, Catherine M

    2015-06-01

    The past few years have seen major advances in the diagnosis of aortic valve disease and in our understanding of the pathophysiology of disease. In addition, transcatheter aortic valve implantation has transformed our clinical management options. This article summarises new aortic valve disease research published in Heart in 2013 and 2014, within the context of other major studies published in general medical journals, including a discussion of the potential impact of these new research findings on the clinical approach to management of adults with aortic valve disease.

  4. Infrarenal Aortic Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Traverso, L. W.; Baker, J. D.; Dainko, E. A.; Machleder, H. I.

    1978-01-01

    Twenty-eight patients with total occlusion of the infrarenal aorta have been seen at the UCLA Hospitals in the past 11 years. Claudication was the presenting complaint in all but one patient, with one-third having ischemic rest pain. The average age of these patients was 54 years, and their histories revealed a surprising absence of myocardial infarction, stroke, or diabetes, although 40% had essential hypertension. Heavy tobacco use, however, was characteristic of the entire group. Arteriography proved valuable in identifying and characterizing the vascular abnormalities, but posed problems in technique and interpretation. Significant distal arterial disease was detected radiographically in only 21% of these patients. Operative correction of the aortic occlusion was performed on 26 patients, 18 by aortic bypass grafts and eight by aorto-iliac endarterectomy, with one early postoperative death. Although the thrombus extended to the renal artery origins in 77% of the cases, a well-designed technical approach did not require renal artery occlusion. Using serial creatinine determinations, one case of renal insufficiency was detected which was associated with prolonged postoperative hypotension. Although the extent of distal disease was more severe in those who underwent bypass, symptoms of claudication returned earlier and were more prominent in the endarterectomy group. This recurrence of systems was not favorably altered by sympathectomy performed concomitantly with the initial procedure. Even though this condition seems to pose difficult technical obstacles and has a poor prognosis, infrarenal aortic occlusion can be successfully treated by aortic bypass, with favorable long-term results, if particular attention is paid to elements of the preoperative evaluation and the intraoperative technical requirements peculiar to this relatively uncommon disease entity. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3. PMID:646479

  5. Neuroprotection during aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Helen; Srinivas, Coimbatore; Djaiani, George

    2016-09-01

    Neurological injury is a major limitation of aortic surgery, whether it involves spinal cord injury following intervention to the thoracoabdominal aorta, or stroke following surgery on the arch and ascending aorta. Despite an extensive body of literature and various proposals, a completely effective strategy to prevent or treat neurological injury remains elusive. In this article, we summarise the evidence for established and emerging strategies, and review current concepts in pathophysiology and risk assessment as they relate to neurological injury. PMID:27650340

  6. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Hans Henrik Møller

    2012-12-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) was introduced experimentally in 1989, based on a newly developed heart valve prosthesis - the stentvalve. The valve was invented by a Danish cardiologist named Henning Rud Andersen. The new valve was revolutionary. It was foldable and could be inserted via a catheter through an artery in the groin, without the need for heart lung machine. This allowed for a new valve implantation technique, much less invasive than conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Surgical aortic valve replacement is safe and improves symptoms along with survival. However, up to 1/3 of patients with aortic valve stenosis cannot complete the procedure due to frailty. The catheter technique was hoped to provide a new treatment option for these patients. The first human case was in 2002, but more widespread clinical use did not begin until 2006-2010. Today, in 2011, more than 40,000 valves have been implanted worldwide. Initially, because of the experimental character of the procedure, TAVI was reserved for patients who could not undergo SAVR due to high risk. The results in this group of patients were promising. The procedural safety was acceptable, and the patients experienced significant improvements in their symptoms. Three of the papers in this PhD-thesis are based on the outcome of TAVI at Skejby Hospital, in this high-risk population [I, II and IV]. Along with other international publications, they support TAVI as being superior to standard medical treatment, despite a high risk of prosthetic regurgitation. These results only apply to high-risk patients, who cannot undergo SAVR. The main purpose of this PhD study has been to investigate the quality of TAVI compared to SAVR, in order to define the indications for this new procedure. The article attached [V] describes a prospective clinical randomised controlled trial, between TAVI to SAVR in surgically amenable patients over 75 years of age with isolated aortic valve stenosis

  7. Quadricuspid Aortic Valve: A Rare Congenital Cause of Aortic Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Vasudev, Rahul; Shah, Priyank; Bikkina, Mahesh; Shamoon, Fayez

    2016-01-01

    Quadricuspid aortic valve (QAV) is a rare congenital cardiac anomaly causing aortic regurgitation usually in the fifth to sixth decade of life. Earlier, the diagnosis was mostly during postmortem or intraoperative, but now with the advent of better imaging techniques such as transthoracic echocardiography, transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, more cases are being diagnosed in asymptomatic patients. We present a case of a 39-year-old male who was found to have QAV, with the help of TEE, while undergoing evaluation for a diastolic murmur. The patient was found to have Type B QAV with moderate aortic regurgitation. We also present a brief review of classification, pathophysiology, and embryological basis of this rare congenital anomaly. The importance of diagnosing QAV lies in the fact that majority of these patients will require surgery for aortic regurgitation and close follow-up so that aortic valve replacement/repair is done before the left ventricular decompensation occurs. PMID:27195176

  8. Management of Acute Aortic Syndrome and Chronic Aortic Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Nordon, Ian M. Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Loftus, Ian M.; Morgan, Robert A.; Thompson, Matt M.

    2011-10-15

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) describes several life-threatening aortic pathologies. These include intramural hematoma, penetrating aortic ulcer, and acute aortic dissection (AAD). Advances in both imaging and endovascular treatment have led to an increase in diagnosis and improved management of these often catastrophic pathologies. Patients, who were previously consigned to medical management or high-risk open surgical repair, can now be offered minimally invasive solutions with reduced morbidity and mortality. Information from the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection (IRAD) database demonstrates how in selected patients with complicated AAD the 30-day mortality from open surgery is 17% and endovascular stenting is 6%. Despite these improvements in perioperative deaths, the risks of stroke and paraplegia remain with endovascular treatment (combined outcome risk 4%). The pathophysiology of each aspect of AAS is described. The best imaging techniques and the evolving role of endovascular techniques in the definitive management of AAS are discussed incorporating strategies to reduce perioperative morbidity.

  9. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty as a bridge to aortic valve surgery for severe aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Nwaejike, Nnamdi; Mills, Keith; Stables, Rod; Field, Mark

    2015-03-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was, in patients with severe aortic stenosis, can balloon valvuloplasty be used as a bridge to aortic valve replacement? Altogether 463 papers were found using the reported search, of which 11 papers represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. We conclude that balloon aortic valvuloplasty is recommended as a bridge to aortic valve replacement (AVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. Institutional practices, local and logistic factors can affect patient selection and management approaches to severe aortic stenosis, but having the facility to offer balloon aortic valvuloplasty (especially in the TAVI era) provides another management option for patients who would otherwise have been considered unacceptably high risk for aortic valve surgery. The increased incidence of balloon aortic valvuloplasty mirrors the increase in the use of TAVI with a sharp increase in activity from 2006. Success rates for bridging from balloon aortic valvuloplasty to definite surgical intervention are in the range 26.3-74%, with AVR or TAVI occurring within 8 weeks to 7 months. Complications from balloon aortic valvuloplasty such as aortic regurgitation (AR) can be managed successfully. Up to 40% of patients selected by balloon aortic valvuloplasty to have TAVI or AVR do not have these procedures within 2 years. While most of these patients are excluded for objective clinical reasons such as terminal disease/malignancy or other persistent contraindication, some patients refuse definitive treatment and others die while on the waiting list. Outcomes in patients bridged to AVR/TAVI are better than in patients treated with balloon aortic valvuloplasty

  10. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Coulon, Capucine

    2015-11-01

    Half of acute aortic dissection in women under the age of 40 occurs during pregnancy or peripartum period. Marfan syndrome is the most common syndromic presentation of ascending aortic aneurysm, but other syndromes such as vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome and Turner syndrome also have ascending aortic aneurysms and the associated cardiovascular risk of aortic dissection and rupture. Management of aortic root aneurysm has been established in recent recommendations, even if levels of evidence are weak. Pregnancy and postpartum period should be followed very closely and determined to be at high risk. Guidelines suggest that women with aortopathy should be counseled against the risk of pregnancy and about the heritable nature of the disease prior to pregnancy.

  11. New Insights Into Aortic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kuivaniemi, Helena; Sakalihasan, Natzi; Lederle, Frank A.; Jones, Gregory T.; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier; Labropoulos, Nicos; Legrand, Victor; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Nienaber, Christoph; Radermecker, Marc A.; Elefteriades, John A.

    2013-01-01

    The current state of research and treatment on aortic diseases was discussed in the “3rd International Meeting on Aortic Diseases” (IMAD3) held on October 4–6, 2012, in Liège, Belgium. The 3-day meeting covered a wide range of topics related to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections, abdominal aortic aneurysms, and valvular diseases. It brought together clinicians and basic scientists and provided an excellent opportunity to discuss future collaborative research projects for genetic, genomics, and biomarker studies, as well as clinical trials. Although great progress has been made in the past few years, there are still a large number of unsolved questions about aortic diseases. Obtaining answers to the key questions will require innovative, interdisciplinary approaches that integrate information from epidemiological, genetic, molecular biology, and bioengineering studies on humans and animal models. It is more evident than ever that multicenter collaborations are needed to accomplish these goals. PMID:26798669

  12. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Coulon, Capucine

    2015-11-01

    Half of acute aortic dissection in women under the age of 40 occurs during pregnancy or peripartum period. Marfan syndrome is the most common syndromic presentation of ascending aortic aneurysm, but other syndromes such as vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome and Turner syndrome also have ascending aortic aneurysms and the associated cardiovascular risk of aortic dissection and rupture. Management of aortic root aneurysm has been established in recent recommendations, even if levels of evidence are weak. Pregnancy and postpartum period should be followed very closely and determined to be at high risk. Guidelines suggest that women with aortopathy should be counseled against the risk of pregnancy and about the heritable nature of the disease prior to pregnancy. PMID:26454306

  13. Fenestrated Endovascular Grafts for the Repair of Juxtarenal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    determine if it can provide better outcomes than open surgical repair (OSR). In an OSR approach, aortic clamping above one or both renal arteries, or above the visceral arteries, is required. The higher the level of aortic clamping, the greater the risk of cardiac stress and renal or visceral ischemia. During suprarenal or supraceliac aortic clamping, strain-induced myocardial ischemia may also occur due to concomitant rise in cardiac afterload and a decrease in cardiac output. Reports indicate that 6% of patients undergoing surgical repair develop myocardial infarction. The ideal level of clamp location remains controversial with conflicting views having been reported. Method A search of electronic databases (OVID MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, and the International Agency for Health Technology Assessment [INAHTA] database was undertaken to identify evidence published from January 1, 2004 to December 19, 2008. The search was limited to English-language articles and human studies. The automatic search alerts were received and reviewed up to March 23, 2009. The literature search and automatic search update identified 320 citations, of which 13 met inclusion/exclusion criteria. One comparative study presented at an international seminar, five single-arm studies on f—EVAR, and 7 studies on OSR (one prospective and six retrospective) were considered for this analysis. To grade the strength of the body of evidence, the grading system formulated by the GRADE working group and adopted by MAS, was applied. The GRADE system classifies evidence quality as high (Grade A), moderate (Grade B), or low (Grade C) according to four key elements: study design, study quality, consistency across studies, and directness. A summary of the characteristics of the f—EVAR and OSR studies found through the literature search is shown in Table ES-1. ES-1. Patient Characteristics: f–EVAR Studies versus OSR Studies Technique Number of

  14. Intraoperative aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajmer; Mehta, Yatin

    2015-01-01

    Intraoperative aortic dissection is a rare but fatal complication of open heart surgery. By recognizing the population at risk and by using a gentle operative technique in such patients, the surgeon can usually avoid iatrogenic injury to the aorta. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography and epiaortic scanning are invaluable for prompt diagnosis and determination of the extent of the injury. Prevention lies in the strict control of blood pressure during cannulation/decannulation, construction of proximal anastomosis, or in avoiding manipulation of the aorta in high-risk patients. Immediate repair using interposition graft or Dacron patch graft is warranted to reduce the high mortality associated with this complication. PMID:26440240

  15. Peripheral cardiopulmonary bypass with modified assisted venous drainage and transthoracic aortic crossclamp: optimal management for robotic mitral valve repair.

    PubMed

    Sobieski, Michael A; Slaughter, Mark S; Hart, David E; Pappas, Patroklos S; Tatooles, Antone J

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate peripheral cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) with modified assisted venous drainage (MAVD) and transthoracic aortic cross-clamping to maintain a bloodless surgical field, adequate myocardial protection, systemic flow and pressure during robotic surgical repair of the mitral valve. Peripheral CPB was established with a standard Duraflo-coated closed circuit with femoral arterial and venous cannulation. An additional 17 Fr wire-bound cannula was inserted into the right internal jugular vein and drainage rates of 200-400 mL/min were regulated using a separate roller-head pump. A transthoracic aortic crossclamp with antegrade cardioplegia was used for myocardial protection. Mitral valve (MV) repair was then performed through two 1-cm ports for the robotic arms and a 4-cm intercostal incision for the camera and passing suture. From October 2001 to October 2002, 25 patients underwent robotic MV repair. Average surgical times include leaflet resection and repair, 20 min, and insertion of annuloplasty ring, 28 min; average perfusion times, crossclamp 88 min and total bypass time of 126 min. There were no incisional conversions, no reoperations for bleeding and no deaths, strokes or perioperative myocardial infarctions. Twenty-one (84%) patients were extubated in the operating room. Average LOS was 2.7 days with eight (32%) patients discharged home in less than 24 hours. In conclusion, peripheral CPB with gravity drainage of the lower body and MAVD of the upper body allow safe and effective support during robotically assisted minimally invasive MV repair. This approach may be applied to other forms of minimally invasive cardiac surgery that requires CPB. PMID:14604249

  16. Aortic, celiac axis, and superior mesenteric artery thrombosis associated with sigmoid colon adenocarcinoma and hypercoagulable state.

    PubMed

    Serck, Luke C; Cogbill, Thomas H

    2009-01-01

    A patient with sigmoid colon adenocarcinoma and hypercoagulable state developed acute visceral ischemia secondary to thrombus involving the suprarenal aorta, celiac axis and superior mesenteric artery. A large, laminated fibrin thrombus was removed via supraceliac aortotomy. Attempts to clear thrombus from branches of the celiac axis and superior mesenteric artery by open and catheter-based techniques were of limited success. Extensive visceral infarction ensued and the patient died.

  17. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair for blunt thoracic aortic injuries in complex aortic arch vessels anatomies.

    PubMed

    Piffaretti, Gabriele; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Ierardi, Anna Maria; Mariscalco, Giovanni; Macchi, Edoardo; Castelli, Patrizio; Tozzi, Matteo; Franchin, Marco

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to report the use of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in blunt thoracic aortic injuries (BTAIs) presenting with complex anatomies of the aortic arch vessels. Two patients were admitted to our hospital for the management of BTAI. Anomalies were as follow: aberrant right subclavian artery (n = 1) and right-sided aortic arch with 5 vessels anatomy variant (n = 1). TEVAR was accomplished using parallel graft with periscope configuration in the patient with the aberrant right subclavian artery. At 12-month follow-up, computed tomography angiographies confirmed the exclusion of the BTAI, the stability of the endograft, the resolution of the pseudoaneurysm, and the patency of the parallel endograft. Aortic arch vessels variants and anomalies are not rare, and should be recognized and studied precisely to plan the most appropriate operative treatment. TEVAR proved to be effective even in complex anatomies.

  18. Aortic biomechanics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Badran, Hala Mahfouz; Soltan, Ghada; Faheem, Nagla; Elnoamany, Mohamed Fahmy; Tawfik, Mohamed; Yacoub, Magdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ventricular-vascular coupling is an important phenomenon in many cardiovascular diseases. The association between aortic mechanical dysfunction and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction is well characterized in many disease entities, but no data are available on how these changes are related in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Aim of the work: This study examined whether HCM alone is associated with an impaired aortic mechanical function in patients without cardiovascular risk factors and the relation of these changes, if any, to LV deformation and cardiac phenotype. Methods: 141 patients with HCM were recruited and compared to 66 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects as control group. Pulse pressure, aortic strain, stiffness and distensibility were calculated from the aortic diameters measured by M-mode echocardiography and blood pressure obtained by sphygmomanometer. Aortic wall systolic and diastolic velocities were measured using pulsed wave Doppler tissue imaging (DTI). Cardiac assessment included geometric parameters and myocardial deformation (strain and strain rate) and mechanical dyssynchrony. Results: The pulsatile change in the aortic diameter, distensibility and aortic wall systolic velocity (AWS') were significantly decreased and aortic stiffness index was increased in HCM compared to control (P < .001) In HCM AWS' was inversely correlated to age(r = − .32, P < .0001), MWT (r = − .22, P < .008), LVMI (r = − .20, P < .02), E/Ea (r = − .16, P < .03) LVOT gradient (r = − 19, P < .02) and severity of mitral regurg (r = − .18, P < .03) but not to the concealed LV deformation abnormalities or mechanical dyssynchrony. On multivariate analysis, the key determinant of aortic stiffness was LV mass index and LVOT obstruction while the role LV dysfunction in aortic stiffness is not evident in this population. Conclusion: HCM is associated with abnormal aortic mechanical properties. The severity of cardiac

  19. Abdominal aortic grafting for spontaneous infrarenal abdominal aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Hiroto; Shibuya, Takashi; Shintani, Takashi; Uenaka, Hisazumi; Suehiro, Shigefumi; Satoh, Hisashi

    2010-02-01

    This case report concerns a 62-year-old woman with spontaneous infrarenal abdominal aortic dissection, which developed into claudication and rest pain in the lower extremity. Multi-row detector computed tomography showed the entry site of the abdominal aortic dissection at the second lumbar artery, while the reentry site was found intraoperatively at the median sacral artery, indicating that the false lumen had progressed and compressed the true lumen. A direct approach involving grafting appears to be an effective procedure for resolving mesenteric and lower extremity hypoperfusion due to aortic dissection with a dilated false channel, even during the acute period. PMID:19879731

  20. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in bicuspid aortic valve stenosis.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Gidon Y; Blanke, Philipp; Webb, John G

    2016-09-18

    Bicuspid aortic stenosis (AS) is not rare in patients treated with transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Bicuspid valves have unique anatomy which could affect the results of TAVI; however, multiple recent reports have shown that TAVI is safe and effective in this population. Paravalvular aortic regurgitation was initially found to be more frequent in bicuspid patients, but newer-generation devices have shown superior results in this respect. Higher rates of pacemaker implantation after TAVI in bicuspid AS do require further investigation. Current data suggest that bicuspid valves should not be a contraindication for TAVI, but future specific trials are needed to support this assertion. PMID:27640030

  1. Clinical and biochemical outcomes for additive mesenteric and lower body perfusion during hypothermic circulatory arrest for complex total aortic arch replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, P; Cleland, A; Adams, C; Chu, M W A

    2012-11-01

    Surgical repair of transverse aortic arch aneurysms frequently employ hypothermia and antegrade cerebral perfusion as protective strategies during circulatory arrest. However, prolonged mesenteric and lower limb ischemia can lead to significant lactic acidosis and end organ dysfunction, which remains a significant cause of post-operative morbidity and mortality. We report our experience with additive warm mesenteric and lower body perfusion (1-3 L/min, 30°C) in addition to continuous cerebral and myocardial perfusion in 5 patients who underwent total aortic arch replacement with trifurcated head vessel re-implantation and distal elephant trunk reconstruction. Concomitant surgical procedures included re-operations (2), aortic root operations (2), coronary artery bypass (2) and descending thoracic aortic replacement (1). Serum lactate levels demonstrated a rapid decline from a peak 9.9 ± 2.6 post circulatory arrest to 3.4 ± 2.0 in the intensive care unit (ICU). The lowest serum bicarbonate levels were 19.3 ± 3.5 mmol/L, intra-operatively, which normalized to 28.4 ± 2.4 mmol/L on return to the ICU. The lowest pH levels were 7.25 ± 0.10, corrected to 7.43 ± 0.04 on return to the ICU. Mean cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times were 361 ± 104 and 253 ± 85 minutes, respectively. Mean cerebral and lower body circulatory arrest times were 0 (0) and 50 ± 35 minutes, respectively. The mean time required for systemic rewarming was 95 ± 66 minutes. There were no in-hospital mortalities and no patient experienced any neurological, mesenteric, renal or lower limb ischemic complications. Two patients required mechanical ventilation >24 hours, and one patient returned for reoperation for bleeding. Median intensive care unit and total hospital lengths of stay were 5 and 16 days, respectively. Our results suggest early serum lactate clearance, normalization of acidosis, and metabolic recovery when utilizing a simultaneous cerebral perfusion and warm body

  2. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Castrovinci, Sebastiano; Emmanuel, Sam; Moscarelli, Marco; Murana, Giacomo; Caccamo, Giuseppa; Bertolino, Emanuela Clara; Nasso, Giuseppe; Speziale, Giuseppe; Fattouch, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve disease is a prevalent disorder that affects approximately 2% of the general adult population. Surgical aortic valve replacement is the gold standard treatment for symptomatic patients. This treatment has demonstrably proven to be both safe and effective. Over the last few decades, in an attempt to reduce surgical trauma, different minimally invasive approaches for aortic valve replacement have been developed and are now being increasingly utilized. A narrative review of the literature was carried out to describe the surgical techniques for minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and report the results from different experienced centers. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement is associated with low perioperative morbidity, mortality and a low conversion rate to full sternotomy. Long-term survival appears to be at least comparable to that reported for conventional full sternotomy. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery, either with a partial upper sternotomy or a right anterior minithoracotomy provides early- and long-term benefits. Given these benefits, it may be considered the standard of care for isolated aortic valve disease. PMID:27582764

  3. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Castrovinci, Sebastiano; Emmanuel, Sam; Moscarelli, Marco; Murana, Giacomo; Caccamo, Giuseppa; Bertolino, Emanuela Clara; Nasso, Giuseppe; Speziale, Giuseppe; Fattouch, Khalil

    2016-09-01

    Aortic valve disease is a prevalent disorder that affects approximately 2% of the general adult population. Surgical aortic valve replacement is the gold standard treatment for symptomatic patients. This treatment has demonstrably proven to be both safe and effective. Over the last few decades, in an attempt to reduce surgical trauma, different minimally invasive approaches for aortic valve replacement have been developed and are now being increasingly utilized. A narrative review of the literature was carried out to describe the surgical techniques for minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and report the results from different experienced centers. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement is associated with low perioperative morbidity, mortality and a low conversion rate to full sternotomy. Long-term survival appears to be at least comparable to that reported for conventional full sternotomy. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery, either with a partial upper sternotomy or a right anterior minithoracotomy provides early- and long-term benefits. Given these benefits, it may be considered the standard of care for isolated aortic valve disease. PMID:27582764

  4. Reoperative Aortic Root Replacement in Patients with Previous Aortic Root or Aortic Valve Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Byung Kwon; Jung, Sung-Ho; Choo, Suk Jung; Chung, Cheol Hyun; Lee, Jae Won; Kim, Joon Bum

    2016-01-01

    Background Generalization of standardized surgical techniques to treat aortic valve (AV) and aortic root diseases has benefited large numbers of patients. As a consequence of the proliferation of patients receiving aortic root surgeries, surgeons are more frequently challenged by reoperative aortic root procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of redo-aortic root replacement (ARR). Methods We retrospectively reviewed 66 patients (36 male; mean age, 44.5±9.5 years) who underwent redo-ARR following AV or aortic root procedures between April 1995 and June 2015. Results Emergency surgeries comprised 43.9% (n=29). Indications for the redo-ARR were aneurysm (n=12), pseudoaneurysm (n=1), or dissection (n=6) of the residual native aortic sinus in 19 patients (28.8%), native AV dysfunction in 8 patients (12.1%), structural dysfunction of an implanted bioprosthetic AV in 19 patients (28.8%), and infection of previously replaced AV or proximal aortic grafts in 30 patients (45.5%). There were 3 early deaths (4.5%). During follow-up (median, 54.65 months; quartile 1–3, 17.93 to 95.71 months), there were 14 late deaths (21.2%), and 9 valve-related complications including reoperation of the aortic root in 1 patient, infective endocarditis in 3 patients, and hemorrhagic events in 5 patients. Overall survival and event-free survival rates at 5 years were 81.5%±5.1% and 76.4%±5.4%, respectively. Conclusion Despite technical challenges and a high rate of emergency conditions in patients requiring redo-ARR, early and late outcomes were acceptable in these patients. PMID:27525233

  5. [ENDOVASCULAR ABDOMINAL AORTIC ANEURISM REPAIR].

    PubMed

    Maĭstrenko, D N; Generalov, M I; Tarazov, P G; Zherebtsov, F K; Osovskikh, V V; Ivanov, A S; Oleshchuk, A N; Granov, D A

    2015-01-01

    The authors analyzed the single-center experience of treatment of 72 patients with abdominal aortic aneurisms and severe accompanied pathology. The aneurisms were repaired by stent-grafts. All the patients had abdominal aortic aneurisms with the diameters from 41 to 84 mm against the background of severe somatic pathology. It was a contraindication to planned open surgery. An installation of stent-graft was successful in all 72 follow-ups. It wasn't necessary to use a conversion to open surgery. The follow-up period consisted of 44,6?2,1 months. Control ultrasound and computer tomography studies hadn't revealed an increase of aneurism sack sizes or "eakages". A reduction of abdominal aortic aneurism sizes was noted in 37 patients on 4-5% during first year after operation. The stent-graft implantation extends the possibilities of abdominal aortic aneurism treatment for patients from a high surgical risk group. PMID:26234059

  6. Aortic dissection--an update.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Debabrata; Eagle, Kim A

    2005-06-01

    Acute aortic dissection is a medical emergency with high morbidity and mortality requiring emergent diagnosis and therapy. Rapid advances in noninvasive imaging technology have facilitated the early diagnosis of this condition and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any patient with chest, back, or abdominal pain. Emergent surgery is the treatment for patients with type A dissection while optimal medical therapy is appropriate in patients with uncomplicated type B dissection. Adequate beta-blockade is the cornerstone of medical therapy. Patients who survive acute aortic dissection need long-term medical therapy with beta-blockers and statins and appropriate serial imaging follow-up. Future advances in this field include biomarkers in the early diagnosis of acute aortic dissection and presymptomatic diagnosis with genetic screening. Overall patients with aortic dissection are at high risk for an adverse outcome and need to be managed aggressively in hospital and long term with frequent follow-up. PMID:15973249

  7. [New aspects in aortic valve disease].

    PubMed

    Tornos, P

    2001-01-01

    Renewed interest for aortic valve disease has evolved in recent years. Aortic valve replacement has become the second most frequent cause of cardiac surgery, following coronary bypass surgery. In addition, the etiologic and physiopathologic knowledge of this disorder has improved. In the present paper we analyze three aspects of the disease which are, at present, the subject of study and controversy: first, we discuss the possible relationship between degenerative aortic stenosis and atherosclerosis; second, the involvement of the aortic root in cases of bicuspid aortic valve; and third, the surgical indications in asymptomatic patients with either aortic stenosis or regurgitation.

  8. Aortic or Mitral Valve Replacement With the Biocor and Biocor Supra

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-09

    Aortic Valve Insufficiency; Aortic Valve Regurgitation; Aortic Valve Stenosis; Aortic Valve Incompetence; Mitral Valve Insufficiency; Mitral Valve Regurgitation; Mitral Valve Stenosis; Mitral Valve Incompetence

  9. Ascending Aortic Slide for Interrupted Aortic Arch Repair.

    PubMed

    Urencio, Miguel; Dodge-Khatami, Ali; Greenleaf, Chris E; Aru, Giorgio; Salazar, Jorge D

    2016-09-01

    For repair of interrupted aortic arch, unfavorable anatomy challenges a tension-free anastomosis. We describe a useful alternative surgical technique used in five neonates/infants, involving splitting the ascending aorta from the sinotubular junction to the arch origin, leftward and posterior "sliding" of the flap with anastomosis to the distal arch creating a native tissue bridge, and reconstruction with a patch. With wide interruption gaps between proximal and distal aortic portions, the ascending aortic slide is a safe and reproducible technique, providing a tension-free native tissue bridge with potential for growth, and a scaffold for patch augmentation in biventricular hearts, or for Norwood stage I in univentricular palliation. PMID:27587504

  10. Surgical Repair of Retrograde Type A Aortic Dissection after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Young; Kim, Yeon Soo; Ryoo, Ji Yoon

    2014-01-01

    It is expected that the stent graft will become an alternative method for treating aortic diseases or reducing the extent of surgery; therefore, thoracic endovascular aortic repair has widened its indications. However, it can have rare but serious complications such as paraplegia and retrograde type A aortic dissection. Here, we report a surgical repair of retrograde type A aortic dissection that was performed after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. PMID:24570865

  11. Abdominal aortic feminism.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-11-14

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer.

  12. Open aortic surgery after thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    PubMed

    Coselli, Joseph S; Spiliotopoulos, Konstantinos; Preventza, Ourania; de la Cruz, Kim I; Amarasekara, Hiruni; Green, Susan Y

    2016-08-01

    In the last decade, thoracic endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (TEVAR) has emerged as an appealing alternative to the traditional open aortic aneurysm repair. This is largely due to generally improved early outcomes associated with TEVAR, including lower perioperative mortality and morbidity. However, it is relatively common for patients who undergo TEVAR to need a secondary intervention. In select circumstances, these secondary interventions are performed as an open procedure. Although it is difficult to assess the rate of open repairs after TEVAR, the rates in large series of TEVAR cases (>300) have ranged from 0.4 to 7.9 %. Major complications of TEVAR that typically necessitates open distal aortic repair (i.e., repair of the descending thoracic or thoracoabdominal aorta) include endoleak (especially type I), aortic fistula, endograft infection, device collapse or migration, and continued expansion of the aneurysm sac. Conversion to open repair of the distal aorta may be either elective (as for many endoleaks) or emergent (as for rupture, retrograde complicated dissection, malperfusion, and endograft infection). In addition, in select patients (e.g., those with a chronic aortic dissection), unrepaired sections of the aorta may progressively dilate, resulting in the need for multiple distal aortic repairs. Open repairs after TEVAR can be broadly classified as full extraction, partial extraction, or full salvage of the stent-graft. Although full and partial stent-graft extraction imply failure of TEVAR, such failure is generally absent in cases where the stent-graft can be fully salvaged. We review the literature regarding open repair after TEVAR and highlight operative strategies.

  13. Aortic regurgitation caused by rupture of the abnormal fibrous band between the aortic valve and aortic wall.

    PubMed

    Minami, Hiroya; Asada, Tatsuro; Gan, Kunio; Yamada, Akitoshi; Sato, Masanobu

    2011-07-01

    This report documents the sudden onset of aortic regurgitation (AR) by an exceptional cause. A 68-year-old woman suddenly experienced general fatigue, and AR was diagnosed. One year later, we performed aortic valve replacement. At surgery, three aortic cusps with a larger noncoronary cusp had prolapsed along with a free-floating fibrous band that had previously anchored the cusp to the aortic wall. Its rupture had induced the sudden onset of AR. There was no sign of infectious endocarditis. We performed successful aortic valve replacement. PMID:21751110

  14. Pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuan-Qiang; Yao, Feng; Shang, An-Dong; Pan, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch is uncommonly associated with cancer, and is extremely rare in pulmonary cancer. Here, we report an unusual and successfully treated case of aortic arch pseudoaneurysm in a male patient with lung squamous cell carcinoma. Methods: A 64-year-old male patient was admitted to the Emergency Department, presenting with massive hemoptysis (>500 mL blood during the 12 hours prior to treatment). The diagnosis of aortic arch pseudoaneurysm was confirmed after inspection of computed tomographic angiography and three-dimensional reconstruction. We processed the immediate endovascular stent-grafting for this patient. Results: This patient recovered with no filling or enlargement of the pseudoaneurysm, no episodes of hemoptysis, and no neurological complications during the 4-week follow-up period. Conclusion: Herein, we compare our case with other cancer-related pseudoaneurysms in the medical literature and summarize the clinical features and treatment of this unusual case. PMID:27495079

  15. Abdominal aortic aneurysms: case report

    PubMed Central

    Hadida, Camille; Rajwani, Moez

    1998-01-01

    A 71-year-old male presented to a chiropractic clinic with subacute low back pain. While the pain appeared to be mechanical in nature, radiographic evaluation revealed an abdominal aortic aneurysm, which required the patient to have vascular surgery. This case report illustrates the importance of the history and physical examination in addition to a thorough knowledge of the features of abdominal aortic aneurysms. The application of spinal manipulative therapy in patients with (AAA) is also discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3

  16. Aortic and other arterial injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, J D; Raju, S; Neely, W A; Berry, D W

    1975-01-01

    Three hundred sixty arterial injuries in 353 patients are reviewed. They covered a wide spectrum of injuries and included 36 aortic injuries and 19 cases of carotid truama. The mortality rate of 12% was in large part due to aortic injuries. Shock was the predominant cause of death. Infection was the most frequent non-fatal complication. Pulmonary complications were surprisingly uncommon. With methods and techniques discussed in the paper, 90% satisfactory end results were achieved. The amputation rate was 6% where extremity injuries were involved. Images Fig. 11. Fig. 13. PMID:1130881

  17. [Quadricuspid Aortic Valve: Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Ryugo, Masahiro; Takasaki, Taiichi

    2016-02-01

    A 69-year-old woman with general fatigue was admitted to our hospital for further examination of mediastinal lymph node swelling. Mediastinal lymph node sampling was planned. Preoperative transthoracic echocardiography revealed severe aortic regurgitation, and aortic valve replacement combined with mediastinal lymph node sampling was performed. Following lymph node sampling, the ascending aorta was opened, and the aortic valve was found to be quadricuspid. An accessory cusp was existed between the left coronary cusp and the non coronary cusp. Aortic valve replacement was successfully performed. A quadricuspid aortic valve is a very rare anomaly. PMID:27075156

  18. [Remote results of reimplantation of the aortic valve in patients with ascending aortic aneurysm accompanied by aortic insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Cherniavskiĭ, A M; Al'sov, S A; Sirota, D A; Khvan, D S; Liashenko, M M; Ponomarev, D N; Kadyrbaev, D Zh

    2015-01-01

    Valve-sparing operations on the aorta has recently been gaining ever increasing popularity due to more detailed study of physiology of the aortic root, as well as promising mid- and long-term results. The world practice uses various techniques making it possible to remove both ascending aortic aneurysm and aortic valve insufficiency. The authors herein describe and analyse their experience in performing reimplantation of the aortic valve in patients with ascending aortic aneurysm and concomitant aortic insufficiency. Specialists of the clinic of the Novosibirsk Scientific Research Institute for Circulatory Pathology during the period from 2003 to 2013 performed a total of 77 operations of reimplantation of the aortic valve in patients with ascending aortic aneurysm and pronounced aortic valve insufficiency. The majority of patients were men (57 males and 20 females), mean age 53.1±12.2 years (range 21-72). 80% of cases had NYHA functional class II-III circulatory insufficiency (degree 2.3±0.7). Preoperative examination revealed in the majority of patients (97.4%) moderate-to-severe aortic valve insufficiency and ascending aortic aneurysm. All patients underwent reimplantation of the aortic valve. The duration of artificial circulation amounted to 202.4±33 minutes, with the average time of aortic occlusion being 164±28 min. Accompanying procedures (annuloplasty of the mitral valve and/or coronary aortic bypass grafting) were performed in 12 (15.6%) cases. Additional plasty of valvular cusps was carried out in 9 (11.7%) patients, with rethoracotomy required in 5 (6.4%) cases due to haemorrhage. The average period of follow up amounted to 53.3±8.5 (3-115) months. During this time total survival amounted to 91%, with freedom from aortic valve prosthetic repair equalling 93%. The obtained findings suggest that aortic valve reimplantation into the prosthesis is a safe intervention and associated with a comparatively low level of operative lethality. Moderate aortic

  19. Aortic Wall Injury Related to Endovascular Therapy for Aortic Coarctation.

    PubMed

    Tretter, Justin T; Jones, Thomas K; McElhinney, Doff B

    2015-09-01

    Aortic wall complications can occur in unrepaired aortic coarctation (CoA) and after surgical repair or endovascular treatment. This review summarizes the available literature and current understanding of aortic wall injury (AWI) surrounding the management of CoA, focusing specifically on acute and follow-up AWI after endovascular treatment. There have been 23 reported cases of aortic rupture after endovascular treatment for CoA, including angioplasty alone, bare metal stenting, and primary covered stent therapy. Even if these published cases represent only a minority of ruptures that have actually occurred, the incidence is substantially <1%. The incidence of acute aneurysm formation was 0% to 13% after angioplasty, 0% to 5% after bare metal stent placement, and <1% after covered stent placement. The reported incidence and natural history of both acute and new AWI during follow-up after endovascular therapy for CoA varies considerably, likely secondary to ascertainment and reporting biases and inconsistent definitions. Although important AWI after endovascular treatment of CoA seems to be declining in frequency with increasing experience and improving technology, it remains one of the most important potential adverse outcomes. Long-term surveillance for new AWI and monitoring of existing AWI is mandatory, with institution of appropriate treatment when necessary. A central research focus in this population should be determination of the appropriate treatment for both native and recurrent CoA across various ages with regard to limiting recurrent CoA and preventing associated aortic wall complications, in addition to determining the appropriate treatment of various AWI. Consistent definitions and reporting are necessary to truly understand the incidence of, risk factors for, and measures protective against AWI after angioplasty or stent implantation for CoA.

  20. Spectrum of Aortic Valve Abnormalities Associated with Aortic Dilation Across Age Groups in Turner Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Olivieri, Laura J.; Baba, Ridhwan Y.; Arai, Andrew E.; Bandettini, W. Patricia; Rosing, Douglas R.; Bakalov, Vladimir; Sachdev, Vandana; Bondy, Carolyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Congenital aortic valve fusion is associated with aortic dilation, aneurysm and rupture in girls and women with Turner syndrome (TS). Our objective was to characterize aortic valve structure in subjects with TS, and determine the prevalence of aortic dilation and valve dysfunction associated with different types of aortic valves. Methods and Results The aortic valve and thoracic aorta were characterized by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging in 208 subjects with TS in an IRB-approved natural history study. Echocardiography was used to measure peak velocities across the aortic valve, and the degree of aortic regurgitation. Four distinct valve morphologies were identified: tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) 64%(n=133), partially fused aortic valve (PF) 12%(n=25), bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) 23%(n=47), and unicuspid aortic valve (UAV) 1%(n=3). Age and body surface area (BSA) were similar in the 4 valve morphology groups. There was a significant trend, independent of age, towards larger BSA-indexed ascending aortic diameters (AADi) with increasing valve fusion. AADi were (mean +/− SD) 16.9 +/− 3.3 mm/m2, 18.3 +/− 3.3 mm/m2, and 19.8 +/− 3.9 mm/m2 (p<0.0001) for TAV, PF and BAV+UAV respectively. PF, BAV, and UAV were significantly associated with mild aortic regurgitation and elevated peak velocities across the aortic valve. Conclusions Aortic valve abnormalities in TS occur with a spectrum of severity, and are associated with aortic root dilation across age groups. Partial fusion of the aortic valve, traditionally regarded as an acquired valve problem, had an equal age distribution and was associated with an increased AADi. PMID:24084490

  1. Vascular airway compression management in a case of aortic arch and descending thoracic aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Alok; Dutta, Vikas; Negi, Sunder; Puri, G. D.

    2016-01-01

    Airway compression due to distal aortic arch and descending aortic aneurysm repair has been documented. This case of tracheal and left main stem bronchus compression due to aortic aneurysm occurred in a 42-year-old man. The airway compression poses a challenge for the anesthesiologist in airway management during aortic aneurysm repair surgery. The fiber-optic bronchoscope is very helpful in decision-making both preoperatively and postoperatively in such cases. We report a case of airway compression in a 42-year-old patient who underwent elective distal aortic arch and descending aortic aneurysm repair. PMID:27397474

  2. Surgical repair for aortic dissection accompanying a right-sided aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Obitsu, Yukio; Koizumi, Nobusato; Iwahashi, Toru; Saiki, Naozumi; Shigematsu, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Aortic anomaly in which a right-sided aortic arch associated with Kommerell's diverticulum and aberrant left subclavian artery is rare. The present report describes a patient with type-B aortic dissection accompanying aortic anomalies consisting of right-sided aortic arch and the left common carotid and left subclavian artery arising from Kommerell's diverticulum. As dissecting aortic aneurysm diameter increased rapidly, Single-stage surgical repair of extensive thoracic aorta was performed through median sternotomy and right posterolateral fifth intercostal thoracotomy, yielding favorable results. Our surgical procedures are discussed.

  3. Surgical repair for aortic dissection accompanying a right-sided aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Aortic anomaly in which a right-sided aortic arch associated with Kommerell's diverticulum and aberrant left subclavian artery is rare. The present report describes a patient with type-B aortic dissection accompanying aortic anomalies consisting of right-sided aortic arch and the left common carotid and left subclavian artery arising from Kommerell's diverticulum. As dissecting aortic aneurysm diameter increased rapidly, Single-stage surgical repair of extensive thoracic aorta was performed through median sternotomy and right posterolateral fifth intercostal thoracotomy, yielding favorable results. Our surgical procedures are discussed. PMID:20459743

  4. Traumatic aortic regurgitation combined with descending aortic pseudoaneurysm secondary to blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Siho; Park, Joon Suk; Yoo, Seung Min; Kim, Kyung Ho; Yang, Woo-In; Sung, Jung-Hoon; Kim, In Jai; Lim, Sang-Wook; Cha, Dong-Hun; Moon, Jae-Youn

    2014-09-23

    Rupture of the aorta is a relatively rare complication of blunt chest trauma, and traumatic rupture of the aortic valve is even rarer. Even though both result from blunt chest trauma, the causative mechanisms of aortic valve injury differ from those of descending aortic rupture. There are no previous reports in the literature of simultaneous injuries to both the descending aorta and the aortic valve. We report a case of a 70-year-old man who presented with traumatic aortic regurgitation combined with traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the aortic isthmus following blunt chest trauma, and its successful repair with a hybrid surgical strategy.

  5. Chronic Type A Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Hynes, Conor F.; Greenberg, Michael D.; Sarin, Shawn; Trachiotis, Gregory D.

    2016-01-01

    Stanford Type A aortic dissection is a rapidly progressing disease process that is often fatal without emergent surgical repair. A small proportion of Type A dissections go undiagnosed in the acute phase and are found upon delayed presentation of symptoms or incidentally. These chronic lesions may have a distinct natural history that may have a better prognosis and could potentially be managed differently then those presenting acutely. The method of repair depends on location and extent of the false lumen, as well as involvement of critical structures and branch arteries. Surgical repair techniques similar to those employed for acute dissection management are currently first-line therapy for chronic cases that involve the aortic valve, sinuses of Valsalva, coronary arteries, and supra-aortic branch arteries. In patients with high-risk for surgery, endovascular repairs have been successful, and active development of delivery systems and grafts will continue to enhance outcomes. We present two cases of chronic Type A aortic dissection and review the current literature.

  6. Decreased expression of fibulin-4 in aortic wall of aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Huawei, P; Qian, C; Chuan, T; Lei, L; Laing, W; Wenlong, X; Wenzhi, L

    2014-02-01

    In this research, we will examine the expression of Fibulin-4 in aortic wall to find out its role in aortic dissection development. The samples of aortic wall were obtained from 10 patients operated for acute ascending aortic dissection and five patients for chronic ascending aortic dissection. Another 15 pieces of samples from patients who had coronary artery bypass were as controls. The aortic samples were stained with aldehyde magenta dyeing to evaluate the arrangement of elastic fibers. The Fibulin-4 protein and mRNA expression were both determined by Western blot and realtime quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Compared with the control group, both in acute and chronic ascending aortic dissection, elastic fiber fragments increased and the expression of fibulin-4 protein significantly decreased (P= 0.045 < 0.05). The level of fibulin-4 mRNA decreased in acute ascending aortic dissection (P= 0.034 < 0.05), while it increased in chronic ascending aortic dissection (P=0.004 < 0.05). The increased amounts of elastic fiber fragments were negatively correlated with the expression of fibulin-4 mRNA in acute ascending aortic dissection. In conclusion, in aortic wall of ascending aortic dissection, the expression of fibulin-4 protein decreased and the expression of fibulin-4 mRNA was abnormal. Fibulin-4 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of aortic dissection.

  7. MDCT evaluation of acute aortic syndrome (AAS).

    PubMed

    Valente, Tullio; Rossi, Giovanni; Lassandro, Francesco; Rea, Gaetano; Marino, Maurizio; Muto, Maurizio; Molino, Antonio; Scaglione, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Non-traumatic acute thoracic aortic syndromes (AAS) describe a spectrum of life-threatening aortic pathologies with significant implications on diagnosis, therapy and management. There is a common pathway for the various manifestations of AAS that eventually leads to a breakdown of the aortic intima and media. Improvements in biology and health policy and diffusion of technology into the community resulted in an associated decrease in mortality and morbidity related to aortic therapeutic interventions. Hybrid procedures, branched and fenestrated endografts, and percutaneous aortic valves have emerged as potent and viable alternatives to traditional surgeries. In this context, current state-of-the art multidetector CT (MDCT) is actually the gold standard in the emergency setting because of its intrinsic diagnostic value. Management of acute aortic disease has changed with the increasing realization that endovascular therapies may offer distinct advantages in these situations. This article provides a summary of AAS, focusing especially on the MDCT technique, typical and atypical findings and common pitfalls of AAS, as well as recent concepts regarding the subtypes of AAS, consisting of aortic dissection, intramural haematoma, penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer and unstable aortic aneurysm or contained aortic rupture. MDCT findings will be related to pathophysiology, timing and management options to achieve a definite and timely diagnostic and therapeutic definition. In the present article, we review the aetiology, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, outcomes and therapeutic approaches to acute aortic syndromes. PMID:27033344

  8. Subtle-discrete aortic dissection without bulging of the aortic wall. A rare but lethal lesion.

    PubMed

    Kalogerakos, Paris Dimitrios; Kampitakis, Emmanouil; Pavlopoulos, Dionisios; Chalkiadakis, George; Lazopoulos, George

    2016-08-01

    We report a subtle-discrete aortic dissection, without bulging of the aortic wall or aneurysm or valve pathology or periaortic effusion, which resulted in a lethal cardiac tamponade to a 35-year-old male. PMID:27357491

  9. Spring retractor: a new adjunct for aortic valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Izzat, Mohammad Bashar

    2011-07-01

    We describe a new aortic retractor that is effective in maintaining aortic root geometry and providing for adequate intraoperative visual valve assessment, and therefore enables the surgeon to perform precise aortic valve repair or replacement procedures.

  10. Type B Aortic Dissection Repair Using a Thoraflex Hybrid Prosthesis in a Complex Aortic Arch Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Moussa Abi; Gomez-Sanchez, Mario; Chaufour, Xavier; Marcheix, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) is recognized as an attractive option to treat complicated Type B aortic dissection. Nevertheless, TEVAR is not always technically possible. We report the case of a 53-year-old male with complicated Type B aortic dissection, in the setting of a complex anomalous aortic arch anatomy with an aneurysmal aberrant right subclavian artery. He was successfully treated by the frozen elephant trunk technique using the Thoraflex hybrid graft.

  11. Severe Aortic Stenosis Associated with Unicommissural Unicuspid Aortic Valve in a Middle Aged Male

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hee-Jin; Kim, Song Soo; Sun, Byung Joo; Jin, Sun Ah; Kim, Jun-Hyung; Lee, Jae-Hwan; Choi, Siwan; Jeong, Jin-Ok; Seong, In-Whan

    2016-01-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve (UAV) is an extremely rare form of congenital aortic valvular abnormality. Although UAV shows similar clinical characteristics to bicuspid aortic valve, the clinical symptoms develop at earlier age and progress at a faster pace in UAV. In this report, we are presenting a 42-year-old male with severe aortic stenosis associated with unicommissural UAV. The patients underwent a successful Bentall operation. PMID:27721957

  12. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in Jehovah's Witness patients with symptomatic severe aortic valve stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Buz, Semih; Pasic, Miralem; Unbehaun, Axel; Hetzer, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is currently reserved for high or prohibitive surgical-risk patients with aortic valve stenosis. We report on successful TAVI in two Jehovah's witness patients. It offers a simple and effective treatment of severe aortic valve stenosis in high-risk patients who refuse the use of allogeneic blood and blood products. PMID:22753437

  13. Contemporary management of aortic stenosis: surgical aortic valve replacement remains the gold standard.

    PubMed

    Walther, Thomas; Blumenstein, Johannes; van Linden, Arnaud; Kempfert, Jörg

    2012-11-01

    Aortic valve disease is the most frequent acquired heart valve lesion in humans. In western communities, approximately 90% of patients present with aortic stenosis (AS), predominantly of a calcific degenerative aetiology. The remaining approximately 10% of patients predominantly present with aortic valve incompetence.

  14. Cervical aortic arch and a new type of double aortic arch. Report of a case.

    PubMed Central

    Cornali, M; Reginato, E; Azzolina, G

    1976-01-01

    A case of cervical aortic arch is reported. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first to be associated with a serious intracardiac anomaly. In addition, it is part of a new type of double aortic arch, caused by failure of reabsorption of both dorsal aortic roots and persistence of the fourth right and second (or third) left branchial arches. PMID:971387

  15. Aortic Valve Surgery: Minimally Invasive Options

    PubMed Central

    Ramlawi, Basel; Bedeir, Kareem; Lamelas, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery has not been adopted by a significant proportion of cardiac surgeons despite proven benefits. This may be related to a high learning curve and technical issues requiring retraining. In this review, we discuss the data for minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and describe our operative technique for both ministernotomy and anterior thoracotomy approaches. We also discuss the advent of novel sutureless valves and how these techniques compare to available transcatheter aortic valve procedures. PMID:27127559

  16. Aortic root dilatation in young men with normally functioning bicuspid aortic valves

    PubMed Central

    Nistri, S; Sorbo, M; Marin, M; Palisi, M; Scognamiglio, R; Thiene, G

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate the dimensions of the aortic root in a selected population of young males with isolated normally functioning bicuspid aortic valve.
DESIGN AND SETTING—Echocardiographic and Doppler evaluation of conscripts with bicuspid aortic valve at the time of military pre-enrolment screening in two military hospitals.
SUBJECTS AND METHODS—66 consecutive young men with a normally functioning bicuspid aortic valve were studied to assess aortic size at four aortic levels: annulus, sinuses of Valsalva, supra-aortic ridge, and proximal ascending aorta; 70 consecutive normal young subjects, matched for age and body surface area, were used as controls.
RESULTS—In men with a bicuspid aortic valve, the diameter of the aortic root was significantly larger than in controls at the sinuses (3.16 (0.37) v 2.87 (0.31) cm, p < 0.001), at the supra-aortic ridge (2.64 (0.46) v 2.47 (0.28) cm, p = 0.01), and at the level of the proximal ascending aorta (3.12 (0.48) v 2.69 (0.28) cm, p < 0.001). The prevalence of aortic root dilatation was 7.5% at the annulus (5/66), 19.6% at the sinuses (13/66), 15% at the supra-aortic ridge (10/66), and 43.9% at the ascending aorta (29/66); 32 subjects (48%) had aortic root dimensions comparable with controls, while 34 (52%) had definitely abnormal aortic root dimensions.
CONCLUSIONS—Aortic root enlargement in people with a bicuspid aortic valve occurs independently of haemodynamic abnormalities, age, and body size. However, there appear to be different subgroups of young adults with bicuspid aortic valves, one of which is characterised by aortic dilatation, possibly caused by a congenital abnormality of the aortic wall.


Keywords: bicuspid aortic valve; aortic root dilatation PMID:10377302

  17. Hybrid treatment of penetrating aortic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Lara, Juan Antonio Herrero; Martins-Romêo, Daniela de Araújo; Escudero, Carlos Caparrós; Vázquez, Rosa María Lepe; Falcón, María Del Carmen Prieto; Batista, Vinicius Bianchi

    2015-01-01

    Penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer is a rare entity with poor prognosis in the setting of acute aortic syndrome. In the literature, cases like the present one, located in the aortic arch, starting with chest pain and evolving with dysphonia, are even rarer. The present report emphasizes the role played by computed tomography in the diagnosis of penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer as well as in the differentiation of this condition from other acute aortic syndromes. Additionally, the authors describe a new therapeutic approach represented by a hybrid endovascular surgical procedure for treatment of the disease.

  18. Low-gradient aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Marie-Annick; Magne, Julien; Pibarot, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    An important proportion of patients with aortic stenosis (AS) have a 'low-gradient' AS, i.e. a small aortic valve area (AVA <1.0 cm(2)) consistent with severe AS but a low mean transvalvular gradient (<40 mmHg) consistent with non-severe AS. The management of this subset of patients is particularly challenging because the AVA-gradient discrepancy raises uncertainty about the actual stenosis severity and thus about the indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR) if the patient has symptoms and/or left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction. The most frequent cause of low-gradient (LG) AS is the presence of a low LV outflow state, which may occur with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), i.e. classical low-flow, low-gradient (LF-LG), or preserved LVEF, i.e. paradoxical LF-LG. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of patients with AS may have a normal-flow, low-gradient (NF-LG) AS: i.e. a small AVA-low-gradient combination but with a normal flow. One of the most important clinical challenges in these three categories of patients with LG AS (classical LF-LG, paradoxical LF-LG, and NF-LG) is to differentiate a true-severe AS that generally benefits from AVR vs. a pseudo-severe AS that should be managed conservatively. A low-dose dobutamine stress echocardiography may be used for this purpose in patients with classical LF-LG AS, whereas aortic valve calcium scoring by multi-detector computed tomography is the preferred modality in those with paradoxical LF-LG or NF-LG AS. Although patients with LF-LG severe AS have worse outcomes than those with high-gradient AS following AVR, they nonetheless display an important survival benefit with this intervention. Some studies suggest that transcatheter AVR may be superior to surgical AVR in patients with LF-LG AS.

  19. Aortic root disease in athletes: aortic root dilation, anomalous coronary artery, bicuspid aortic valve, and Marfan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yim, Eugene Sun

    2013-08-01

    Two professional athletes in the U.S. National Basketball Association required surgery for aortic root dilation in 2012. These cases have attracted attention in sports medicine to the importance of aortic root disease in athletes. In addition to aortic root dilation, other forms of aortic disease include anomalous coronary artery, bicuspid aortic valve, and Marfan's syndrome. In this review, electronic database literature searches were performed using the terms "aortic root" and "athletes." The literature search produced 122 manuscripts. Of these, 22 were on aortic root dilation, 21 on anomalous coronary arteries, 12 on bicuspid aortic valves, and 8 on Marfan's syndrome. Aortic root dilation is a condition involving pathologic dilation of the aortic root, which can lead to life-threatening sequelae. Prevalence of the condition among athletes and higher risk athletes in particular sports needs to be better delineated. Normative parameters for aortic root diameter in the general population are proportionate to anthropomorphic variables, but this has not been validated for athletes at the extremes of anthropomorphic indices. Although echocardiography is the favored screening modality, computed tomography (CT) and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are also used for diagnosis and surgical planning. Medical management has utilized beta-blockers, with more recent use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), and statins. Indications for surgery are based on comorbidities, degree of dilation, and rate of progression. Management decisions for aortic root dilation in athletes are nuanced and will benefit from the development of evidence-based guidelines. Anomalous coronary artery is another form of aortic disease with relevance in athletes. Diagnosis has traditionally been through cardiac catheterization, but more recently has included evaluation with echocardiography, multislice CT, and MRI. Athletes with this

  20. WUnicuspid Aortic Valve- An Uncommon Anomaly With a Common Presentation.

    PubMed

    Sitwala, Puja; Abusara, Ashraf; Ladia, Vatsal; Ladia, Vatsal; Panchal, Hemang B; Raudat, Charles; Paul, Timir K

    2016-01-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve (UAV), which is a rare congenital anomaly, usually presents as aortic stenosis and/or aortic regurgitation. Here we present a case of UAV co-existent with an ascending aortic aneurysm. A 26-year-old male with no significant past medical history presented to the hospital after two episodes of syncope. Transthoracic echocardiogram showed an ejection fraction of 62%, severely stenotic aortic valve, and moderate aortic regurgitation. Computed tomography revealed calcification of the aortic valve, compatible with aortic stenosis and aneurysm of the ascending aorta measuring 4.3 cm in diameter. He underwent successful aortic valve replacement and repair of ascending aortic aneurysm. He recovered well without any complications. This case suggests that any young patient who presents with syncope, aortic stenosis would be a differential and further workup by any available non-invasive modality needs to be performed.

  1. The role of transesophageal echocardiography in aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Nowak-Machen, Martina

    2016-09-01

    Aortic disease, when left untreated, is still associated with major morbidity and mortality. Aortic dissection and aortic aneurysm are the main reasons for performing aortic surgery procedures in the adult. Imaging techniques such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging play a key role in the preoperative evaluation. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has become a safe and invaluable perioperative imaging tool for aortic disease over the past decade with high sensitivity and specificity. TEE can increase patient safety and improve overall patient outcome in aortic surgery. Especially during endovascular aortic repair, TEE is more sensitive than other imaging modalities in diagnosing complications such as graft endoleaks. Newer echocardiographic techniques such as three-dimensional (3D) TEE and contrast-enhanced TEE are emerging and seem to have a valuable role especially in aortic dissection repair and endovascular aortic stent procedures. In the absence of contraindications, TEE should generally be performed during aortic surgery and endovascular aortic procedures. PMID:27650342

  2. [Surgical aspects of acute aortic dissection].

    PubMed

    Laas, J; Heinemann, M; Jurmann, M; Borst, H G

    1992-12-01

    This paper highlights some of the surgical aspects of acute aortic dissections such as: emergency diagnosis, indications for surgery, reconstructive operative techniques, malperfusion phenomena and necessity for follow-up. Aortic dissection is caused by an intimal tear, called the "entry", and subsequent splitting of the media by the stream of blood. Two lumina are thus created, which may communicate through "re-entries". As this creates severe weakness of the aortic wall, rupture and/or dilatation are the imminent dangers of acute aortic dissection. Acute aortic dissection type A, by definition involving the ascending aorta (Figures 1 and 2), is an absolute indication for emergency surgical treatment, because its natural history shows an extremely poor outcome (Figure 3). Due to impending (intrapericardial) aortic rupture, it may be necessary to limit diagnostic procedures to a minimum. Transesophageal echocardiography is the method of choice for establishing a quick, precise and reliable diagnosis (Figure 4). In stable patients, computed tomography gives additional information about aortic diameters or sites of extrapericardial perforation. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) shows perfusion of the lumina and dependent organs. The surgical strategy in acute aortic dissection type A aims at replacement of the ascending aorta. Reconstructive techniques have to be considered, especially in aortic valve regurgitation without annuloectasia (Figures 5 and 6). In recent times, the use of GRF tissue glue has reduced the need for teflon felt. Involvement of the aortic arch should be treated aggressively up to the point of total arch replacement in deep hypothermic circulatory arrest as part of the primary procedure (Figure 7). Malperfusion phenomena of aortic branches remain risk-factors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Aortic Stiffness, Cerebrovascular Dysfunction, and Memory

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Leroy L.; Mitchell, Gary F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Aortic stiffness is associated with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events and cognitive decline. This mini-review focuses on relations of aortic stiffness with microvascular dysfunction and discusses the contribution of abnormal pulsatile hemodynamics to cerebrovascular damage and cognitive decline. We also provide a rationale for considering aortic stiffness as a putative and important contributor to memory impairment in older individuals. Summary Aging is associated with stiffening of the aorta but not the muscular arteries, which reduces wave reflection and increases the transmission of pulsatility into the periphery. Aortic stiffening thereby impairs a protective mechanism that shields the peripheral microcirculation from excessive pulsatility within downstream target organs. Beyond midlife, aortic stiffness increases rapidly and exposes the cerebral microcirculation to abnormal pulsatile mechanical forces that are associated with microvascular damage and remodeling in the brain. Aortic stiffening and high-flow pulsatility are associated with alterations in the microvasculature of the brain; however, a mechanistic link between aortic stiffness and memory has not been established. We showed that in a community-based sample of older individuals, cerebrovascular resistance and white matter hyperintensities - markers of cerebrovascular remodeling and damage - mediated the relation between higher aortic stiffness and lower performance on memory function tests. These data suggest that microvascular and white matter damage associated with excessive aortic stiffness contribute to impaired memory function with advancing age. Key Messages Increasing evidence suggests that vascular etiologies - including aortic stiffness and microvascular damage - contribute to memory impairment and the pathogenesis of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease. Interventions that reduce aortic stiffness may delay memory decline among older individuals. PMID:27752478

  4. Congenital quadricuspid aortic valve associated with aortic insufficiency and mitral regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Congenital quadricuspid aortic valve is a rare cardiac anomaly. More than half of the patients with this abnormality will develop aortic insufficiency in adulthood. It is vital that patients with quadricuspid aortic valve who present with progressive aortic regurgitation undergo valve replacement or repair at appropriate time. Here, we present two cases of quadricuspid aortic valve. We first describe a 58-year-old man who had mitral regurgitation and ascending aorta dilatation with quadricuspid aortic valve. He underwent aortic valve replacement and mitral valve plasty and recovered well. The second patient is a 20-year-old asymptomatic boy who has been closely followed up and has not received any surgical treatment. PMID:23587156

  5. Congenital quadricuspid aortic valve associated with aortic insufficiency and mitral regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiaquan; Zhang, Junwen; Wu, Shubin; Zhang, Yunjiao; Ding, Fangbao; Mei, Ju

    2013-01-01

    Congenital quadricuspid aortic valve is a rare cardiac anomaly. More than half of the patients with this abnormality will develop aortic insufficiency in adulthood. It is vital that patients with quadricuspid aortic valve who present with progressive aortic regurgitation undergo valve replacement or repair at appropriate time. Here, we present two cases of quadricuspid aortic valve. We first describe a 58-year-old man who had mitral regurgitation and ascending aorta dilatation with quadricuspid aortic valve. He underwent aortic valve replacement and mitral valve plasty and recovered well. The second patient is a 20-year-old asymptomatic boy who has been closely followed up and has not received any surgical treatment. PMID:23587156

  6. Recent advances in aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Adhami, Ahmed; Al-Attar, Nawwar

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement is no longer an operation that is approached solely through a median sternotomy. Recent advances in the fields of transcatheter valves have expanded the proportion of patients eligible for intervention. Comparisons between transcatheter valves and conventional surgery have shown non-inferiority of transcatheter valve implants in patients with a high or intermediate pre-operative predictive risk. With advances in our understanding of sutureless valves and their applicability to minimally invasive surgery, the invasiveness and trauma of surgery can be reduced with potential improvements in outcome. The strategy of care has radically changed over the last decade. PMID:27803800

  7. Temporary Incomplete Ischemia of the Legs Induced by Aortic Clamping in Man: Effects on Central Hemodynamics and Skeletal Muscle Metabolism by Adrenergic Block

    PubMed Central

    Eklöf, B.; Neglén, P.; Thomson, D.

    1981-01-01

    The hemodynamic changes which occur when clamping and unclamping the aorta during reconstructive surgery might be a threat to the elderly patient with concomitant cardiac disease. In addition, the cross-clamping induces a temporary ischemia of the legs, with severe metabolic derangement after the release of the aortic clamp. We have studied the effect of a intraoperative adrenergic block (phenoxybenzamine plus metoprolol) on the central circulation and the skeletal metabolism in 14 patients undergoing aortic reconstruction to treat occlusive arteriosclerotic disease. Cardiac output, heart rate, arterial and pulmonary artery pressures, and cardiac filling pressures, as well as femoral venous blood flow were studied. Biopsy specimens of the lateral vastus muscle and blood samples from the radial artery and iliac vein were taken before aortic clamping, and before, 30 minutes, four and 16 hours after the aorta was unclamped, as well as five days postoperatively. In addition, intramuscular temperature and pH were measured. Glycogen, glucose, lactate, pyruvate, ATP, ADP, AMP, phosphocreatine (PCr) and creatine (Cr) contents of the muscle and lactate and pyruvate concentrations in iliac venous and radial arterial blood were determined using enzymatic fluorometric techniques. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) averaged 80 mmHg before clamping, chiefly because of the low systemic vascular resistance (SVR), and left ventricular stroke work (LVSW) was normal. At clamping MAP, SVR, LVSW, remained unchanged. MAP and LVSW were unaffected even though SVR decreased slightly after the aorta was unclamped and resulted in an increased cardiac output, mainly due to a higher stroke volume. No major change in the pulmonary circulation was observed. During clamping the muscle lactate/pyruvate ratio increased, intramuscular pH and femoral venous blood flow decreased indicating insufficient tissue perfusion. Energy charge (EC), the adenylate (ATP + ADP + AMP) and creatine (PCr + Cr) pools

  8. Intraoperative tracking of aortic valve plane

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Duc Long Hung; Garreau, Mireille; Auffret, Vincent; Le Breton, Hervé; Verhoye, Jean-Philippe; Haigron, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to track the aortic valve plane in intra-operative fluoroscopic images in order to optimize and secure Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) procedure. This paper is focused on the issue of aortic valve calcifications tracking in fluoroscopic images. We propose a new method based on the Tracking-Learning-Detection approach, applied to the aortic valve calcifications in order to determine the position of the aortic valve plane in intra-operative TAVI images. This main contribution concerns the improvement of object detection by updating the recursive tracker in which all features are tracked jointly. The approach has been evaluated on four patient databases, providing an absolute mean displacement error less than 10 pixels ≈ 2mm). Its suitability for the TAVI procedure has been analyzed. PMID:24110703

  9. Successful management of para-aortic lymphocyst with laparoscopic fenestration.

    PubMed

    Sarli, L; Cortellini, P; Pavlidis, C; Simonazzi, M; Sebastio, N

    2000-04-01

    Para-aortic lymphocyst occasionally follows retroperitoneal para-aortic node dissection for neoplastic diseases. We present a case in which the leakage of chylous fluid and then a para-aortic lymphocyst followed right nephrectomy and para-aortic node dissection for kidney cancer. Our method of treatment utilized conservative management of chylous ascites and laparoscopic internal drainage of the retroperitoneal lymphocyst.

  10. Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Norwood, M G A; Lloyd, G M; Bown, M J; Fishwick, G; London, N J; Sayers, R D

    2007-01-01

    The operative mortality following conventional abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair has not fallen significantly over the past two decades. Since its inception in 1991, endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has provided an alternative to open AAA repair and perhaps an opportunity to improve operative mortality. Two recent large randomised trials have demonstrated the short and medium term benefit of EVAR over open AAA repair, although data on the long term efficacy of the technique are still lacking. This review aimed at providing an overview of EVAR and a discussion of the potential benefits and current limitations of the technique. PMID:17267674

  11. Leaking mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Sing, T M; Young, N; O'Rourke, I C; Tomlinson, P

    1994-11-01

    A case of leaking mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm is reported, with a brief review of the literature. A 58 year old female presented with shoulder and abdominal pain associated with diarrhoea, vomiting and fever with leucocytosis. Computed tomography of the abdomen showed pooling of contrast in the retroperitoneum anterior to a non-dilated abdominal aorta. There was considerable retroperitoneal blood accumulating in a mass-like lesion in the right lower abdomen and pelvis obstructing the right renal collecting system. Laparotomy revealed a 4 cm diameter saccular aneurysm of the abdominal aorta, with a 1 cm diameter neck. Culture of the thrombus grew Streptococcus pyogenes. PMID:7993259

  12. Aortic valve and ascending aortic root modeling from 3D and 3D+t CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grbic, Saša; Ionasec, Razvan I.; Zäuner, Dominik; Zheng, Yefeng; Georgescu, Bogdan; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2010-02-01

    Aortic valve disorders are the most frequent form of valvular heart disorders (VHD) affecting nearly 3% of the global population. A large fraction among them are aortic root diseases, such as aortic root aneurysm, often requiring surgical procedures (valve-sparing) as a treatment. Visual non-invasive assessment techniques could assist during pre-selection of adequate patients, planning procedures and afterward evaluation of the same. However state of the art approaches try to model a rather short part of the aortic root, insufficient to assist the physician during intervention planning. In this paper we propose a novel approach for morphological and functional quantification of both the aortic valve and the ascending aortic root. A novel physiological shape model is introduced, consisting of the aortic valve root, leaflets and the ascending aortic root. The model parameters are hierarchically estimated using robust and fast learning-based methods. Experiments performed on 63 CT sequences (630 Volumes) and 20 single phase CT volumes demonstrated an accuracy of 1.45mm and an performance of 30 seconds (3D+t) for this approach. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time a complete model of the aortic valve (including leaflets) and the ascending aortic root, estimated from CT, has been proposed.

  13. From Unicuspid to Quadricuspid: Influence of Aortic Valve Morphology on Aortic 3D Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Entezari, Pegah; Schnell, Susanne; Mahadevia, Riti; Malaisrie, Chris; McCarthy, Patrick; Mendelson, Marla; Collins, Jeremy; Carr, James C.; Markl, Michael; Barker, Alex J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the impact of aortic valve morphology on aortic hemodynamicsbetweennormal tricuspid and congenitally anomalous aortic valvesranging from unicuspid to quadricuspid morphology. Materials and Methods Aortic 3D blood flow was evaluated by 4D flow MRI in 14 healthy volunteers with normal trileaflet valves and 14 patients withunicuspid(n=3), bicuspid (n=9, 3 ‘true’ bicuspid, 3 right-left (RL), 3 right-non (RN) coronary leaflet fusion, and quadricuspid aortic valves (n=2). Data analysis included the co-registered visualization of aortic valve morphology with systolic 3D blood flow. The influence of valve morphology on aortic hemodynamics was quantified by valve flow angle. Results All RL-BAV were associated with flow jets directed towards the right anterior aortic wallwhile RN-fusion and unicuspid valves resulted in flow jet patterns towards the right-posterior or posterior wall. Flow angles were clearly influenced by valve morphology(47°±10, 28°±2, 29°±18, 18°±12, 15°±2 for unicuspid, trueBAV, RN-BAV, RL-BAV, quadricuspid valves) and increased compared to controls (7.2°±1.1, p=0.001). Conclusions Altered 3D aortic hemodynamics are impacted by the morphology of congenitally malformed aortic valves. PMID:24265266

  14. Aortic root size and prevalence of aortic regurgitation in elite strength trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Babaee Bigi, Mohammad Ali; Aslani, Amir

    2007-08-01

    Athletes involved in mainly static or isometric exercise (e.g., weight lifting, power lifting, and bodybuilding) develop pressure overloads due to the high systemic arterial pressure found in this type of exercise. It is hypothesized that chronically elevated aortic wall tension in strength-trained athletes is associated with aortic dilatation and regurgitation. The aim of this study was to evaluate aortic root size and the prevalence of aortic regurgitation in elite strength-trained athletes. The cohort included 100 male athletes (mean age 22.1 +/- 3.6 years; all were finalists or medalists in the country) and 128 healthy age- and height-matched subjects (the control group). Aortic root diameters at end-diastole were measured at 4 locations: (1) the aortic annulus, (2) the sinuses of Valsalva, (3) the sinotubular junction, and (4) the maximal diameter of the proximal ascending aorta. Aortic root diameters at all levels were significantly greater in the strength-trained athletes (p <0.05 for all comparisons). When the strength-trained athletes were divided into quartiles of duration of high-intensity strength training (first quartile: <18 months; second quartile: >18 and <36 months; third quartile: >36 and <54 months; fourth quartile: >54 months), progressive enlargement was found at all aortic diameters. In conclusion, aortic root diameters in all segments of the aortic root were significantly greater in elite strength-trained athletes compared with an age- and height-matched population.

  15. Nontraumatic avulsion of aortic valve commissure as a cause of acute aortic valve regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Rei-Yeuh; Chen, Chien-Chang; Hsu, Wei-Pang; Hsiao, Pei-Ching; Tsai, Han-Lin; Hsiao, Ping-Gune; Wu, Jiann-Der; Guo, How-Ran

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Avulsion of the aortic valve commissure as a cause of acute aortic valve regurgitation is mostly due to trauma, infective endocarditis, or ascending aortic dissection. Nontraumatic avulsion of the aortic valve commissure is very rare. We reviewed the literature and analyzed potential risk factors of nontraumatic avulsion. Case presentation: An 80-year-old male with hypertension was seen in the emergency department with acute onset dyspnea. Echocardiogram revealed left ventricular hypertrophy with adequate systolic function, prolapse of the noncoronary cusp, and incomplete coaptation of the right coronary and noncoronary cusps with severe aortic valve regurgitation. Surgery revealed an avulsion between the left coronary and noncoronary cusps. Histopathology examination of the aortic valve showed myxoid degeneration, fibrosis, and calcification. Examination of the ascending aorta revealed myxoid degeneration and fragmentation of elastic fibers. Aortic valve replacement was performed, and the patient was alive and well 4 years after surgery. A review of the literature showed that more than three-fourths of the similar cases occurred in males, and about half in patients with hypertension and those 60 years of age or older. Conclusions: In the case of acute aortic regurgitation without a history of trauma, infection, or valvotomy, when 2 prolapsed aortic cusps are observed by echocardiography in the absence of an intimal tear of the ascending aorta, an avulsion of the aortic commissure should be suspected, especially in males with hypertension who are 60 years of age or older. PMID:27749570

  16. Giant Thoracic Aneurysm Following Valve Replacement for Bicuspid Aortic Valve.

    PubMed

    Tran, Cao; Ul Haq, Ehtesham; Nguyen, Ngoc; Omar, Bassam

    2015-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve is a common congenital anomaly associated with aortopathy, which can cause aortic root dilatation, necessitating regular screening if the aortic root is > 4.0 cm. Despite the low absolute incidence of aortic complications associated with bicuspid aortic valve in the general population, the consequences of such complications for an individual patient can be devastating. Herein we propose a balanced algorithm that incorporates recommendations from the three major guidelines for follow-up imaging of the aortic root and ascending thoracic aorta in patients with a bicuspid aortic valve, maintaining the current recommendations with regard to surgical thresholds. PMID:26827748

  17. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging of aortic valve stenosis and aortic root to multimodality imaging for selection of transcatheter aortic valve implantation candidates.

    PubMed

    Paelinck, Bernard P; Van Herck, Paul L; Rodrigus, Inez; Claeys, Marc J; Laborde, Jean-Claude; Parizel, Paul M; Vrints, Christiaan J; Bosmans, Johan M

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the aortic valve area, aortic valve annulus, and aortic root dimensions measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with catheterization, transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). An optimal prosthesis--aortic root match is an essential goal when evaluating patients for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Comparisons between MRI and the other imaging techniques are rare and need validation. In 24 consecutive, high-risk, symptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis, aortic valve area was prospectively determined using MRI and direct planimetry using three-dimensional TTE and calculated by catheterization using the Gorlin equation and by Doppler echocardiography using the continuity equation. Aortic valve annulus and the aortic root dimensions were prospectively measured using MRI, 2-dimensional TTE, and invasive aortography. In addition, aortic valve annulus was measured using TEE. No differences in aortic valve area were found among MRI, Doppler echocardiography, and 3-dimensional TTE compared with catheterization (p = NS). Invasive angiography underestimated aortic valve annulus compared with MRI (p <0.001), TEE (p <0.001), and 2-dimensional TTE (p <0.001). Two-dimensional TTE tended to underestimate the aortic valve annulus diameters compared to TEE and MRI. In contrast to 2-dimensional TTE, 3 patients had aortic valve annulus beyond the transcatheter aortic valve implantation range using TEE and MRI. In conclusion, MRI planimetry, Doppler, and 3-dimensional TTE provided an accurate estimate of the aortic valve area compared to catheterization. MRI and TEE provided similar and essential assessment of the aortic valve annulus dimensions, especially at the limits of the transcatheter aortic valve implantation range.

  18. The Effects of Positioning of Transcatheter Aortic Valve on Fluid Dynamics of the Aortic Root

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jimmy L; Kheradvar, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a novel treatment for severe aortic valve stenosis. Due to the recent use of this technology and the procedural variability, there is very little data that quantifies the hemodynamic consequences of variations in valve placement. Changes in aortic wall stresses and fluid retention in the sinuses of Valsalva can have a significant effect on the clinical response a patient has to the procedure. By comprehensively characterizing complex flow in the sinuses of Valsalva using Digital Particle Image Velocimetry and an advanced heart flow simulator, various positions of a deployed transcatheter valve with respect to a bioprosthetic aortic valve (valve-in-valve) were tested in vitro. Displacements of the transcatheter valve were axial and directed below the simulated native valve annulus. It was determined that for both blood residence time and aortic Reynolds stresses, it is optimal to have the annulus of the transcatheter valve deployed as close to the aortic valve annulus as possible. PMID:25010918

  19. Pathology specific secondary aortic interventions after thoracic endovascular aortic repair

    PubMed Central

    Scali, Salvatore T.; Beck, Adam W.; Butler, Khayree; Feezor, Robert J.; Martin, Tomas D.; Hess, Philip J.; Huber, Thomas S.; Chang, Catherine K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Despite improved short-term outcomes, concerns remain regarding durability of thoracic endovascular aortic repair(TEVAR). The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate the pathology-specific incidence of secondary aortic interventions(SAI) after TEVAR and their impact on survival. Methods: Retrospective review was performed of all TEVAR procedures and SAI at one institution from 2004-2011. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate survival. Results: Of 585 patients, 72(12%) required SAI at a median of 5.6 months(interquartile range(IQR):1.4-14.2) with 22(3.7%) requiring multiple SAI. SAI incidence differed significantly by pathology(P=.002): acute dissection(21.3%), post-surgical(20.0%), chronic dissection(16.7%), degenerative aneurysm(10.8%), traumatic transection(8.1%), penetrating ulcer(1.5%), and other etiologies(14.8%). Most common indications after dissection were persistent false lumen flow and proximal/distal extension of disease. For degenerative aneurysms, SAI was performed primarily to treat type I/III endoleaks. SAI patients had a greater mean number of comorbidities(P<.0005), stents placed(P=.0002), and postoperative complications after the index TEVAR(P<.0005) compared to those without SAI. Freedom from SAI at 1 and 5 years(95% CI) was estimated to be 86%(82-90%) and 68%(57-76%), respectively. There were no differences in survival(95% CI) between patients requiring SAI and those who did not: SAI 1-year: 88%(77-93%), 5-year: 51%(37-63%) and no SAI 1-year: 82%(79-85%), 5-year: 67%(62-71%)(Log-rank P=0.2). Conclusion: SAI after TEVAR is not uncommon, particularly in patients with dissection, but does not affect long-term survival. Aortic pathology is the most important variable impacting survival and dictated need, timing and mode of SAI. The varying incidence of SAI by indication underscores the need for diligent surveillance protocols that should be pathology-specific. PMID:24571937

  20. Endovascular Repair of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Findeiss, Laura K.; Cody, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    Degenerative aneurysms of the thoracic aorta are increasing in prevalence; open repair of descending thoracic aortic aneurysms is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Repair of isolated descending thoracic aortic aneurysms using stent grafts was introduced in 1995, and in an anatomically suitable subgroup of patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm, repair with endovascular stent graft provides favorable outcomes, with decreased perioperative morbidity and mortality relative to open repair. The cornerstones of successful thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair are appropriate patient selection, thorough preprocedural planning, and cautious procedural execution, the elements of which are discussed here. PMID:22379281

  1. Giant aortic arch aneurysm complicating Kawasaki's disease

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Kaouthar; Boussada, Rafik; Chaker, Lilia; Ouarda, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a common acute vasculitis in pediatric population that usually involves small- and middle-sized arteries, commonly coronary arteries. Although the incidence and natural course of coronary aneurysms after KD are well documented in studies, related reports on peripheral arterial and aortic aneurysms are scarce. We report the occurrence of a giant aortic aneurysm involving the horizontal part of aortic arch in a 28-month-old boy diagnosed with KD. This complication was managed by steroids therapy in the beginning. Because of mechanical complication and potential risk of rupture, surgery was undertaken. PMID:25298695

  2. Bacillus cereus endocarditis in native aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Ngow, H A; Wan Khairina, W M N

    2013-02-01

    Bacillus cereus endocarditis is rare. It has been implicated in immunocompromised individuals, especially in intravenous drug users as well as in those with a cardiac prosthesis. The patient was a 31-year-old ex-intravenous drug addict with a past history of staphylococcal pulmonary valve endocarditis, who presented with symptoms of decompensated cardiac failure. Echocardiography showed severe aortic regurgitation with an oscillating vegetation seen on the right coronary cusp of the aortic valve. The blood cultures grew Bacillus cereus. We report this as a rare case of Bacillus cereus endocarditis affecting a native aortic valve.

  3. Management of Traumatic Aortic and Splenic Rupture in a Patient With Ascending Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Topcu, Ahmet Can; Ciloglu, Ufuk; Bolukcu, Ahmet; Dagsali, Sabri

    2016-08-01

    Traumatic aortic rupture is rupture of all or part of the aortic wall, mostly resulting from blunt trauma to the chest. The most common site of rupture is the aortic isthmus. Traumatic rupture of the ascending aorta is rare. A 62-year-old man with a family history of ascending aortic aneurysm was referred to our hospital after a motor vehicle accident. He had symptoms of cardiogenic shock. A contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan revealed rupture of the proximal ascending aorta and an ascending aortic aneurysm with a diameter of 55 mm at the level of the sinuses of Valsalva. Transthoracic echocardiography at the bedside revealed severe aortic valvular insufficiency. We performed a successful Bentall procedure. During postoperative recovery, the patient experienced a cerebrovascular accident. Transesophageal echocardiography did not reveal thrombosis of the mechanical prosthesis. The patient's symptoms resolved in time, and he was discharged from the hospital on postoperative day 47 without any sequelae. He has been symptom free during a 6-month follow-up period. We suggest that individuals who have experienced blunt trauma to the chest and have symptoms of traumatic aortic rupture and a known medical history of ascending aortic aneurysm should be evaluated for a rupture at the ascending aorta and the aortic isthmus. PMID:27449463

  4. Descending aortic dissection injured by tip of the sheath during transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Atsushi; Shirai, Shinichi; Hanyu, Michiya; Arai, Yoshio; Kamioka, Norihiko; Hayashi, Masaomi

    2016-04-01

    An 86-year-old woman was referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) because of recurrent severe aortic stenosis after balloon aortic valvuloplasty in May 2014. We planned to implant a 23-mm Sapien XT valve by transfemoral approach. During procedure, aortic dissection was detected by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). The dissection limited to the descending aorta and did not include the ascending aorta. Therefore, our team decided to implant the 23-mm Sapien valve as planned. After the procedure, the dissection was treated conservatively without surgical repair. Three weeks later, she was discharged without any complications.

  5. Valve selection in aortic valve endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Zubrytska, Yana

    2016-01-01

    Aortic prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) is a potentially life-threatening disease. Mortality and incidence of infective endocarditis have been reduced in the past 30 years. Medical treatment of aortic PVE may be successful in patients who have a prompt response after antibiotic treatment and who do not have prosthetic dysfunction. In advanced stages, antibiotic therapy alone is insufficient to control the disease, and surgical intervention is necessary. Surgical treatment may be lifesaving, but it is still associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. The aim of surgery is to perform a radical excision of all infected and necrotic tissue, reconstruction of the left ventricle outflow tract, and replacement of the aortic valve. There is no unanimous consensus on which is the optimal prosthesis to implant in this context, and several surgical techniques have been suggested. We aim to analyze the efficacy of the surgical treatment and discuss the issue of valve selection in patients with aortic valve endocarditis. PMID:27785132

  6. A rare cause of recurrent aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Yashwant; Gupta, Vishal

    2016-07-01

    We report the case of a 19-year-old man with a history of Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS), which was diagnosed when he had a Stanford type A aortic dissection. He also had multiple aneurysms including ones in the innominate, right common carotid, and right internal mammary arteries. He had had multiple procedures including Bentall's procedure, repeat sternotomy with complete arch and valve replacement, and coil embolization of internal mammary artery aneurysm in the past. His LDS was characterized by gene mutation for transforming growth factor-β receptor 1. He presented to our facility with sudden onset of back pain, radiating to the right shoulder and chest. He was diagnosed with Stanford type B aortic dissection and underwent thoracic aorta endovascular repair for his aortic dissection. This case represents the broad spectrum of pathology associated with LDS where even with regular surveillance and aggressive medical management the patient developed Stanford B aortic dissection. PMID:27358537

  7. The diagnosis and management of aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Karthikesalingam, A; Holt, P J E; Hinchliffe, R J; Thompson, M M; Loftus, I M

    2010-04-01

    Aortic dissection represents the most common aortic emergency, affecting 3 to 4 per 100,000 people per year and is still associated with a high mortality. Twenty percent of the patients with aortic dissection die before reaching hospital and 30% die during hospital admission. Aortic dissections may be classified in 3 ways: according to their anatomical extent (the Stanford or DeBakey systems), according to the time from onset (acute or chronic), and according to the underlying pathology (the European Society of Cardiologists' system). Advances in endovascular technology have provided new treatment options. Hybrid endovascular and conventional open surgical repair represent the mainstay of treatment for acute type A dissection. Medical management remains the gold standard for acute and uncomplicated chronic type B dissection, though endovascular surgery offers exciting potential in the management of complicated type B dissection through sealing of the intimal entry tear.

  8. Nanobacteria-associated calcific aortic valve stenosis.

    PubMed

    Jelic, Tomislav M; Chang, Ho-Huang; Roque, Rod; Malas, Amer M; Warren, Stafford G; Sommer, Andrei P

    2007-01-01

    Calcific aortic valve stenosis is the most common valvular disease in developed countries, and the major reason for operative valve replacement. In the US, the current annual cost of this surgery is approximately 1 billion dollars. Despite increasing morbidity and mortality, little is known of the cellular basis of the calcifications, which occur in high-perfusion zones of the heart. The case is presented of a patient with calcific aortic valve stenosis and colonies of progressively mineralized nanobacteria in the fibrocalcific nodules of the aortic cusps, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. Consistent with their outstanding bioadhesivity, nanobacteria might serve as causative agents in the development of calcific aortic valve stenosis. PMID:17315391

  9. Transfemoral aortic valve implantation in severe aortic stenosis patients with prior mitral valve prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Sarı, Cenk; Baştuğ, Serdal; Kasapkara, Hacı Ahmet; Durmaz, Tahir; Keleş, Telat; Akçay, Murat; Aslan, Abdullah Nabi; Bayram, Nihal Akar; Bozkurt, Engin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Transcatheter aortic valve implantation for severe symptomatic aortic stenosis in patients with a previous mitral valve prosthesis is technically challenging, and pre-procedural comprehensive assessment of these patients before transcatheter aortic valve implantation is vital for an uncomplicated and successful procedure. Aim We want to share our experience with transcatheter aortic valve implantation in patients with a preexisting functional mitral valve prosthesis and describe a series of important technical and pre-procedural details. Material and methods At our center, 135 patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis were treated with transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Six of them with a preexisting mitral valve prosthesis received an Edwards SAPIEN XT valve through the transfemoral route. Results Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was performed successfully in all 6 patients without any deformation of the cobalt-chromium/steel stents of the aortic valve bioprosthesis. Also no distortion or malfunction in the mitral valve prosthesis was observed after the procedure. There were no complications during the hospitalization period. Post-procedural echocardiography revealed no or mild aortic paravalvular regurgitation and normal valve function in all the patients. In addition, serial echocardiographic examination demonstrated that both the stability and function of the aortic and mitral prosthetic valves were normal without any deterioration in the gradients and the degree of the regurgitation at long-term follow-ups. Conclusions Our experience confirms that transcatheter aortic valve implantation is technically feasible in patients with previous mitral valve replacement but comprehensive evaluation of patients by multimodal imaging techniques such as transesophageal echocardiography and multislice computed tomography is mandatory for a successful and safe procedure. PMID:26677380

  10. Peripartum presentation of an acute aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Lewis, S; Ryder, I; Lovell, A T

    2005-04-01

    We report the case of an acute type A aortic dissection occurring in a 35-year-old parturient. The initial diagnosis was missed; a subsequent emergency Caesarean section 3 weeks after presentation was followed by the development of left ventricular failure and pulmonary oedema in the early postoperative period. Echocardiography confirmed the diagnosis of aortic dissection and the patient underwent a successful surgical repair.

  11. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysmectomy in Renal Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jebara, Victor A.; Fabiani, Jean-Noël; Moulonguet-Deloris, L.; Acar, Christophe; Debauchez, Mathieu; Chachques, J.C.; Glotz, Denis; Duboust, Alain; Langanay, Thierry; Carpentier, Alain

    1990-01-01

    Because renal transplantation is allowing an increased number of patients to survive for prolonged periods, abdominal aortic aneurysms can be expected to occur with growing frequency in these patients. Surgical management of such cases involves the provision of allograft protection. To date, the literature contains 15 reports of abdominal aortic aneurysms in renal allograft recipients. We describe a 16th case and discuss the management of these patients. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1990;17:240-4) Images PMID:15227179

  12. Peripartum presentation of an acute aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Lewis, S; Ryder, I; Lovell, A T

    2005-04-01

    We report the case of an acute type A aortic dissection occurring in a 35-year-old parturient. The initial diagnosis was missed; a subsequent emergency Caesarean section 3 weeks after presentation was followed by the development of left ventricular failure and pulmonary oedema in the early postoperative period. Echocardiography confirmed the diagnosis of aortic dissection and the patient underwent a successful surgical repair. PMID:15640303

  13. Juxtarenal aortic aneurysm: endoluminal transfemoral repair?

    PubMed

    Ferko, A; Krajina, A; Jon, B; Lesko, M; Voboril, Z; Zizka, J; Eliás, P

    1997-01-01

    Endoluminal transfemoral repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm by a stent graft placement requires a segment of the nondilated infrarenal aorta of at least 15 mm long for safe stent graft attachment. The possibility of endoluminal treatment of a juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm with partially covered spiral Z stent was assessed in experiment and in three clinical cases. In the experiment, the noncovered spiral Z stent was placed into the abdominal aorta, across the origins of renal arteries and mesenteric arteries, in six dogs. In the clinical cases, a partially covered stent graft was attached in 3 patients with the juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (of the group of 12 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm). The stent grafts were attached with proximal uncovered parts across the origins of the renal arteries. In experiment, the renal artery occlusions or stenoses were not observed 36 months after stent placement, and in clinic, 3 patients with the juxtarenal aortic aneurysm were successfully treated by stent graft placement. There were no signs of flow impairment into the renal arteries 14 months after stent graft implantation. This approach can possibly expand the indications for endoluminal grafting in the treatment of juxtarenal aortic aneurysms in patients who are at high risk for surgery.

  14. Quantification of abdominal aortic deformation after EVAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirci, Stefanie; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode; Navab, Nassir

    2009-02-01

    Quantification of abdominal aortic deformation is an important requirement for the evaluation of endovascular stenting procedures and the further refinement of stent graft design. During endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) treatment, the aortic shape is subject to severe deformation that is imposed by medical instruments such as guide wires, catheters, and, the stent graft. This deformation can affect the flow characteristics and morphology of the aorta which have been shown to be elicitors for stent graft failures and be reason for reappearance of aneurysms. We present a method for quantifying the deformation of an aneurysmatic aorta imposed by an inserted stent graft device. The outline of the procedure includes initial rigid alignment of the two abdominal scans, segmentation of abdominal vessel trees, and automatic reduction of their centerline structures to one specified region of interest around the aorta. This is accomplished by preprocessing and remodeling of the pre- and postoperative aortic shapes before performing a non-rigid registration. We further narrow the resulting displacement fields to only include local non-rigid deformation and therefore, eliminate all remaining global rigid transformations. Finally, deformations for specified locations can be calculated from the resulting displacement fields. In order to evaluate our method, experiments for the extraction of aortic deformation fields are conducted on 15 patient datasets from endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) treatment. A visual assessment of the registration results and evaluation of the usage of deformation quantification were performed by two vascular surgeons and one interventional radiologist who are all experts in EVAR procedures.

  15. Direct aortic transcatheter valve implantation in a porcelain aorta.

    PubMed

    Bruschi, Giuseppe; Botta, Luca; De Marco, Federico; Colombo, Paola; Klugmann, Silvio; Martinelli, Luigi

    2014-10-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation has been designed to treat elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis at high risk for surgery, and is generally performed retrogradely with vascular access. However, in certain patients, this access is either not possible or deemed to carry a high risk of vascular injury. We report our experience of a direct aortic approach in a 78-year old man with severe aortic stenosis, excluded from standard aortic valve replacement due to a porcelain aorta, and affected by severe aortic, iliac-femoral, and subclavian arteriopathy, rendering the transfemoral or subclavian approach unemployable.

  16. Chest radiography in acute aortic syndrome: pearls and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Ashish; Rajendran, Surendran; Yung, Wai Heng; Babu, Suresh Balasubramanian; Peh, Wilfred C

    2016-08-01

    Acute aortic syndrome is a group of life-threatening diseases of the thoracic aorta that usually present to the emergency department. It includes aortic dissection, aortic intramural hematoma, and penetrating aortic ulcer. Rare aortic pathologies of aorto-esophageal fistula and mycotic aneurysm may also be included in this list. All these conditions require urgent treatment with complex clinical care and management. Most patients who present with chest pain are evaluated with a chest radiograph in the emergency department. It is important that maximum diagnostic information is extracted from the chest radiograph as certain signs on the chest radiograph are extremely useful in pointing towards the diagnosis of acute aortic syndrome.

  17. Valve sparing: aortic root replacement with the reimplantation technique.

    PubMed

    Mastrobuoni, Stefano; Tamer, Sadallah; de Kerchove, Laurent; El Khoury, Gebrine

    2015-01-01

    Aortic valve-sparing procedures are alternative options to aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic root aneurysm and/or severe aortic regurgitation reducing the risk of prosthesis-related complications, such as thromboembolism, and have no need for long-term oral anticoagulation. However, these techniques are technically demanding and long-term results are highly dependent on perfect intraoperative restoration of valve function. We describe a systematic approach to aortic valve-sparing aortic root replacement with the reimplantation technique the way it is currently performed in our institution. PMID:26137865

  18. Aortic root dissection. Another cause of early systolic closure of the aortic valve.

    PubMed Central

    Candell-Riera, J; del Castillo, H G; Rius, J

    1980-01-01

    An early systolic closure of the aortic valve was recorded in the echocardiogram in two patients with aortic root dissection. This sign, initially described in discrete subaortic stenosis and occasionally observed in mitral regurgitation and interventricular septal defect, has not so far been described in dissecting aneurysm of the aorta. Images PMID:7378219

  19. [Surgical Outcomes of Aortic Root Repair in Type A Acute Aortic Dissection].

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yuki; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Asami, Fuyuki; Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Mizumoto, Masahiro; Okubo, Yuka; Takesue, Yuki; Yoshii, Sinpei

    2016-04-01

    We carried out a retrospective evaluation of the early and long-term outcomes of aortic root reconstruction for type A acute aortic dissection. Between January 2001 and March 2015, a total of 21 patients underwent aortic root reconstruction. Bentall operation was performed in 9 patients( B group) and Patch plasty of sinus of Valsalva patients was performed in 12 patients (V group). There were 3 in-hospital deaths due in the B group and 1 death due in the V group. Overall survival in the V group was 72.9% and was not significantly different from survival in the B group(66.7%). In conclusion, our study demonstrated good early and long-term outcomes for patch plasty of sinus of Valsalva for type A acute aortic dissection. There was no postoperative patch-related complication in the V group. Thus, a patch plasty of sinus of Valsalva for type A acute aortic issection may be acceptable. PMID:27210253

  20. Combined surgical and catheter-based treatment of extensive thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic valve stenosis.

    PubMed

    De Backer, Ole; Lönn, Lars; Søndergaard, Lars

    2015-02-15

    An extensive thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is a potentially life-threatening condition and remains a technical challenge to surgeons. Over the past decade, repair of aortic arch aneurysms has been accomplished using both hybrid (open and endovascular) and totally endovascular techniques. Thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) has changed and extended management options in thoracic aorta disease, including in those patients deemed unfit or unsuitable for open surgery. Accordingly, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is increasingly used to treat patients with symptomatic severe aortic valve stenosis (AS) who are considered at high risk for surgical aortic valve replacement. In this report, we describe the combined surgical and catheter-based treatment of an extensive TAA and AS. To our knowledge, this is the first report of hybrid TAA repair combined with TAVR.

  1. Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... español Talk to Your Doctor about Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Browse Sections The Basics Overview What is AAA? ... doctor about getting screened (tested) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). If AAA isn't found and treated ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions familial TAAD familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description Familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection ( familial TAAD ) involves problems with the ...

  3. Ventricular tachycardia following trans-apical aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Beinart, Roy; Danik, Stephan; Palacios, Igor; Barrett, Conor; Inglessis, Ignacio; Agnihotri, Arvind; Passeri, Jonathan

    2012-03-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a relatively new procedure for high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. We report a case of a new left ventricular outflow tract ventricular tachycardia following TAVR. PMID:22016303

  4. Thoracic Endovascular Stent Graft Repair of Middle Aortic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joung Taek; Lee, Mina; Kim, Young Sam; Yoon, Yong Han; Baek, Wan Ki

    2016-09-01

    Middle aortic syndrome is a rare disease defined as a segmental narrowing of the distal descending thoracic or abdominal aorta. A thoracoabdominal bypass or endovascular treatment is the choice of treatment. Endovascular therapy consists of a balloon dilatation and stent implantation. Recently, thoracic endovascular aortic repair has been widely used in a variety of aortic diseases. We report a case of middle aortic syndrome treated with a thoracic endovascular stent graft. PMID:27549552

  5. Real-time transesophageal echocardiography facilitates antegrade balloon aortic valvuloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Kazato; Yano, Kentaro; Tanaka, Chiharu; Nakashoji, Tomohiro; Tonomura, Daisuke; Takehara, Kosuke; Kino, Naoto; Yoshida, Masataka; Kurotobi, Toshiya; Tsuchida, Takao; Fukumoto, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    We report two cases of severe aortic stenosis (AS) where antegrade balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) was performed under real-time transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) guidance. Real-time TEE can provide useful information for evaluating the aortic valve response to valvuloplasty during the procedure. It was led with the intentional wire-bias technique in order to compress the severely calcified leaflet, and consequently allowed the balloon to reach the largest possible size and achieve full expansion of the aortic annulus. PMID:27054107

  6. Rapid prototyping in aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Bangeas, Petros; Voulalas, Grigorios; Ktenidis, Kiriakos

    2016-04-01

    3D printing provides the sequential addition of material layers and, thus, the opportunity to print parts and components made of different materials with variable mechanical and physical properties. It helps us create 3D anatomical models for the better planning of surgical procedures when needed, since it can reveal any complex anatomical feature. Images of abdominal aortic aneurysms received by computed tomographic angiography were converted into 3D images using a Google SketchUp free software and saved in stereolithography format. Using a 3D printer (Makerbot), a model made of polylactic acid material (thermoplastic filament) was printed. A 3D model of an abdominal aorta aneurysm was created in 138 min, while the model was a precise copy of the aorta visualized in the computed tomographic images. The total cost (including the initial cost of the printer) reached 1303.00 euros. 3D imaging and modelling using different materials can be very useful in cases when anatomical difficulties are recognized through the computed tomographic images and a tactile approach is demanded preoperatively. In this way, major complications during abdominal aorta aneurysm management can be predicted and prevented. Furthermore, the model can be used as a mould; the development of new, more biocompatible, less antigenic and individualized can become a challenge in the future. PMID:26803324

  7. Flow in an Aortic Coarctation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loma, Luis; Miller, Paul; Hertzberg, Jean

    2009-11-01

    Coarctation of the aorta is a congenital cardiovascular defect that causes a constriction in the descending thoracic aorta. To gain a better understanding of the cause of post-surgical problems, a rigid glass and a compliant in vitro model of the aortic arch and descending aorta with a coarctation were constructed. Near-physiologic compliance was obtained using a silicone elastomer. Stereoscopic PIV was used to obtain 3D velocity maps. Results show a high speed turbulent jet formed at the exit of the coarctation. Flow in the rigid model was significantly different from in the compliant model. In the rigid model, the jet was symmetric, creating a toroidal recirculation area. In the compliant model, the jet was directed towards the medial wall, inducing flow reversal only at the lateral wall. Peak velocities and turbulence intensities were higher in the rigid model, however shear rate values in the compliant model were significantly above both the rigid model and normal in vivo values at the medial wall. In both models the reattachment region fluctuated, creating oscillatory shear.

  8. Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Arnaoutakis, Dean J; Zammert, Martin; Karthikesalingam, Alan; Belkin, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms is an important technique in the vascular surgeon's armamentarium, which has created a seismic shift in the management of aortic pathology over the past two decades. In comparison to traditional open repair, the endovascular approach is associated with significantly improved perioperative morbidity and mortality. The early survival benefit of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair is sustained up to 3 years postoperatively, but longer-term life expectancy remains poor regardless of operative modality. Nonetheless, most abdominal aortic aneurysms are now repaired using endovascular stent grafts. The technology is not perfect as several postoperative complications, namely endoleak, stent-graft migration, and graft limb thrombosis, can develop and therefore lifelong imaging surveillance is required. In addition, a postoperative inflammatory response has been documented after endovascular repair of aortic aneurysms; the clinical significance of this finding has yet to be determined. Subsequently, the safety and applicability of endovascular stent grafts are likely to improve and expand with the introduction of newer-generation devices and with the simplification of fenestrated systems. PMID:27650343

  9. Primary Stenting in Infrarenal Aortic Occlusive Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Nyman, Ulf; Uher, Petr; Lindh, Mats; Lindblad, Bengt; Ivancev, Krasnodar

    2000-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the results of primary stenting in aortic occlusive disease.Methods: Thirty patients underwent primary stenting of focal concentric (n = 2) and complex aortic stenoses (n = 19), and aortic or aorto-iliac occlusions (n = 9). Sixteen patients underwent endovascular outflow procedures, three of whom also had distal open surgical reconstructions. Median follow-up was 16 months (range 1-60 months).Results: Guidewire crossing of two aorto-biiliac occlusions failed, resulting in a 93% (28/30) technical success. Major complications included one access hematoma, one myocardial infarction, one death (recurrent thromboembolism) in a patient with widespread malignancy, and one fatal hemorrhage during thrombolysis of distal emboli from a recanalized occluded iliac artery. One patient did not improve his symptoms, resulting in a 1-month clinical success of 83% (25/30). Following restenting the 26 stented survivors changed their clinical limb status to +3 (n = 17) and +2 (n = 9). During follow-up one symptomatic aortic restenosis occurred and was successfully restented.Conclusions: Primary stenting of complex aortic stenoses and short occlusions is an attractive alternative to conventional surgery. Larger studies with longer follow-up and stratification of lesion morphology are warranted to define its role relative to balloon angioplasty. Stenting of aorto-biiliac occlusions is feasible but its role relative to bypass grafting remains to be defined.

  10. Echocardiographic assessment of severity of aortic regurgitation.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, K E; Barritt, D W

    1975-01-01

    An echocardiographic study of left ventricular diameter was made in 27 patients with aortic regurgitation. Comparison was made with a group of 21 normal subjects and a group of 6 patients with large left ventricles without valvar regurgitation. Total stroke volume, total left ventricular output, and ejection fraction were derived by the method of cubing the left ventricular diameter to give approximate left ventricular volumes at and-diastole and end-systole. The patients were assessed independently and placed into three grades of severity. The eechocardiographic dimensions of patients with mild aortic regurgitation were not significantly different from those of the normal subjects. With increasing severity of aortic regurgitation, there were increases in group values for left ventricular diameter, total stroke volume, and total left ventricular output. The ejection fraction was depressed below the normal range in only one patient with aortic regurgitation. It is concluded that echocardiographic measurement of left ventribular dimensions is of value in assessing the severity of aortic regurgitation. Images PMID:1156476

  11. Advances in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Kleiman, Neal S.; Reardon, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is becoming widely used for the treatment of symptomatic severe aortic stenosis in patients with high surgical risk. Data from The PARTNER Trial (Placement of AoRtic TraNscathetER Valves) and the Medtronic CoreValve® U.S. Pivotal Investigational Device Exemption trial indicate that survival for extreme-risk patients is superior to best medical therapy and equivalent or superior to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR), although long-term durability remains unknown. Paravalvular leak remains higher in TAVR than SAVR, as does permanent pacemaker implantation in self-expanding valves. New-generation valves are addressing these issues, especially for paravalvular leak. There is strong evidence that TAVR is appropriate for both extreme-risk and high-risk patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis, and the continued development of new valves are making implantation more reliable. This review discusses the studies supporting the use of TAVR and explores current advances in the field. PMID:27127560

  12. Endovascular repair of a type B aortic dissection with a right-sided aortic arch: case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Right-sided aortic arch is a rare anomaly, and aortic dissection involving a right-sided aortic arch is extremely rare. We report the case of a 65-year-old man with a right-sided aortic arch and a right descending aortic dissection and a stent-graft was accurately deployed without perioperative complications. There were no any complaints and complications after 18 months follow-up. The CTA demonstrated that the false lumen was largely thrombosed only with a mild type II endoleak and a mild descending aortic expansion. We feel that endovascular repair is feasible to patient of type B aortic dissection with a right-sided aortic arch. However, long-term clinical efficacy and safety have yet to be confirmed. PMID:23343010

  13. Late degeneration of transcatheter aortic valves: pathogenesis and management.

    PubMed

    Barbanti, Marco; Tamburino, Corrado

    2016-09-18

    There is a growing body of evidence demonstrating the durability of current transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) devices up to 5 years. However, it is well known that transcatheter aortic valves can degenerate in a manner similar to surgical bioprostheses. In this review we briefly discuss the modes of failure of trans-catheter aortic valves and their potential management. PMID:27640028

  14. Physical exercise, aortic blood pressure, and aortic wall elasticity and composition in rats.

    PubMed

    Niederhoffer, N; Kieffer, P; Desplanches, D; Lartaud-Idjouadiene, I; Sornay, M H; Atkinson, J

    2000-04-01

    With a training schedule (8 weeks' treadmill running at 30 m/min up a 10% incline 5 d/wk for 90 min/day), we investigated whether exercise modifies aortic wall dimensions, composition (calcium and elastin content), or stiffness in normotensive 6-month-old male Wistar WAG/Rij rats. Maximal oxygen uptake was measured in half of the rats (n=10 per group). Wall stiffness was evaluated in the other half (9 trained and 10 untrained) on the basis of changes in thoracoabdominal pressure pulse wave velocity and differences in amplitude between the peripheral and central aortic pressure signals. Experiments were performed in nonanesthetized, unrestrained rats and then after pithing. The impact of exercise on the oxidative capacity of the plantaris muscles was evaluated with the measurement of citrate synthase activity. Training increased maximal oxygen uptake by 34% and citrate synthase activity by 40%. Mean peripheral aortic pressure increased by 6% and 19% in trained rats, under awake and pithed conditions, whereas mean central aortic pressure increased by 16%, after pithing only. All indexes of aortic stiffness were similar in trained and control rats, as were aortic wall dimensions, composition, cardiac mass, and heart rate. In conclusion, physical exercise in young rats appears to have no effect on aortic stiffness. PMID:10775562

  15. Diagnosis and management of acute aortic syndromes: dissection, intramural hematoma, and penetrating aortic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Bonaca, Marc P; O'Gara, Patrick T

    2014-01-01

    Acute aortic syndromes constitute a spectrum of conditions characterized by disruptions in the integrity of the aortic wall that may lead to potentially catastrophic outcomes. They include classic aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, and penetrating aortic ulcer. Although imaging studies are sensitive and specific, timely diagnosis can be delayed because of variability in presenting symptoms and the relatively low frequency with which acute aortic syndromes are seen in the emergency setting. Traditional classification systems, such as the Stanford system, facilitate early treatment decision-making through recognition of the high risk of death and major complications associated with involvement of the ascending aorta (type A). These patients are treated surgically unless intractable and severe co-morbidities are present. Outcomes with dissections that do not involve the ascending aorta (type B) depend on the presence of acute complications (e.g., malperfusion, early aneurysm formation, leakage), the patency and size of the false lumen, and patient co-morbidities. Patients with uncomplicated type B dissections are initially treated medically. Endovascular techniques have emerged as an alternative to surgery for the management of complicated type B dissections when intervention is necessary. Patients with acute aortic syndromes require aggressive medical care, risk stratification for additional complications and targeted genetic assessment as well as careful long-term monitoring to assess for evolving complications. The optimal care of patients with acute aortic syndrome requires the cooperation of members of an experienced multidisciplinary team both in the acute and chronic setting.

  16. Abdominal aortic aneurysmectomy in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed Central

    Lacombe, M

    1986-01-01

    Five patients who had undergone renal transplantation 3 months to 23 years ago were operated on successfully for an abdominal aortic aneurysm. In the first case, dating from 1973, the kidney was protected by general hypothermia. In the remaining patients, no measure was used to protect the kidney. Only one patient showed a moderate increase of blood creatinine in the postoperative period; renal function returned to normal in 15 days. All five patients have normal renal function 6 months to 11 years after aortic repair. Results obtained in this series show that protection of the transplant during aortic surgery is not necessary, provided adequate surgical technique is used. Such a technique is described in detail. Its use simplifies surgical treatment of such lesions and avoids the complex procedures employed in the seven previously published cases. Images FIGS. 1A and B. FIGS. 2A and B. FIGS. 3A and B. FIGS. 4A and B. FIGS. 5A and B. PMID:3510592

  17. Diagnosis and Management of Valvular Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Czarny, Matthew J; Resar, Jon R

    2014-01-01

    Valvular aortic stenosis (AS) is a progressive disease that affects 2% of the population aged 65 years or older. The major cause of valvular AS in adults is calcification and fibrosis of a previously normal tricuspid valve or a congenital bicuspid valve, with rheumatic AS being rare in the United States. Once established, the rate of progression of valvular AS is quite variable and impossible to predict for any particular patient. Symptoms of AS are generally insidious at onset, though development of any of the three cardinal symptoms of angina, syncope, or heart failure portends a poor prognosis. Management of symptomatic AS remains primarily surgical, though transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is becoming an accepted alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) for patients at high or prohibitive operative risk. PMID:25368539

  18. Aortic stiffness and distensibility among hypertensives.

    PubMed

    Meenakshisundaram, R; Kamaraj, K; Murugan, S; Thirumalaikolundusubramanian, P

    2009-09-01

    Hypertension is one among many factors that contribute to aortic stiffness, which has repercussions mainly on the heart. To assess aortic stiffness among essential hypertensives of South India and its relationship with gender. An analytical study was designed to assess aortic stiffness among 60 nonobese, nonalcoholic, nonsmoking, and non-caffeine consuming essential hypertensives without any overt illness or infection, and compared with 30 healthy age- and sex-matched nonhypertensives. They were assessed clinically and also by laboratory means. Their left ventricular mass (LV) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were measured using Transthoracic echocardiogram. Aortic systolic and diastolic diameters were measured by using M-mode echocardiography during consecutive beats and averaged for each case. Finally, aortic stiffness was calculated. The data were analyzed statistically. Hypertensives were divided into Group I, consisting of patients with hypertension at least for 5 years, who were not adherent to medication, and Group II, consisting of patients with hypertension of duration between 6 months and 1 year. There were 20 males and 10 females in each group. There was no significant difference between the hypertensive groups and a control, normotensive, group with regard to BMI or total cholesterol. The means of LV mass (in grams), systolic BP (in mmHg), diastolic BP (in mmHg), aortic systolic diameter (in mm), aortic diastolic diameter (in mm), aortic distensibility (in mm), and aortic stiffness found in Group I, Group II, and controls were 105.8 +/- 23.8, 101.5 +/- 21, and 84 +/- 9.8; 138 +/- 14.2, 153 +/- 17.1, and 120 +/- 8.3; 90.5 +/- 11.6, 101.7 +/- 17.1, and 76.5 +/- 5; 30.85 +/- 2.6, 28.7 +/- 2.6, and 27.7 +/- 2.4; 28.7 +/- 2.2, 25.8 +/- 2.5, and 24.2 +/- 2.5; 2.14 +/- 0.3, 2.84 +/- 0.5, and 3.5 +/- 0.6; and 1.31 +/- 0.09, 1.14 +/- 0.1, and 1.04 +/- 0.08, respectively. The differences between the hypertensive groups and the control group were

  19. ED 02-1 ACUTE AORTIC SYNDROME.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae-Kwan

    2016-09-01

    The successful clinical introduction of various non-invasive imaging modalities has contributed to the establishment of 'acute aortic syndrome', a relatively new clinical syndrome incorporating several disease entities with similar clinical features (at the time of clinical presentation). Aortic dissection (AD) with intimal flap and two aortic channels (true and false lumens) is the most important disease entity in acute aortic syndrome. Clinical characteristics of AD have been established, with standardized treatment strategies depending on the affected site of the aorta. For the past several decades, variant forms of classic AD, including aortic intramural hematoma (IMH) and incomplete dissection, have been increasingly diagnosed in routine clinical practice worldwide, and imaging findings characteristic of these variant forms have been established for their differential diagnosis. As imaging findings, rather than clinical features, are critical for the differential diagnosis of acute aortic syndrome, careful interpretation of imaging results is necessary for accurate diagnosis and better clinical decision-making, thus improving patient outcomes. IMH is probably the most important variant form of classic AD and has been the source of intense controversy regarding its pathogenesis and optimal treatment options. Clinical reports regarding outcomes of patients with IMH from different centers have shown conflicting results and risk stratification based on imaging findings remains a challenging clinical issue.Intimal tears can have a very wide spectrum. For example, a stellate or linear intimal tear can involve the exposure of the underlying aortic media or adventitial layers but without the progression and separation of the medial layers, resulting in extensive undermining of the intimal layers. This incomplete dissection, characterized by an intimal tear without an intimal flap or hematoma, was reported to be present in 9 of 181 (5%) consecutive patients with

  20. Mechanical versus biological aortic valve replacement strategies.

    PubMed

    Reineke, D; Gisler, F; Englberger, L; Carrel, T

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement (AVR) is the most frequently performed procedure in valve surgery. The controversy about the optimal choice of the prosthetic valve is as old as the technique itself. Currently there is no perfect valve substitute available. The main challenge is to choose between mechanical and biological prosthetic valves. Biological valves include pericardial (bovine, porcine or equine) and native porcine bioprostheses designed in stented, stentless and sutureless versions. Homografts and pulmonary autografts are reserved for special indications and will not be discussed in detail in this review. We will focus on the decision making between artificial biological and mechanical prostheses, respectively. The first part of this article reviews guideline recommendations concerning the choice of aortic prostheses in different clinical situations while the second part is focused on novel strategies in the treatment of patients with aortic valve pathology. PMID:26678683

  1. Temporary extracorporeal bypass modalities during aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Bassin, Levi; Bell, David

    2016-09-01

    The key to aortic surgery is protection of the brain, heart, spinal cord, and viscera. For operations involving the aortic arch, the focus is on cerebral protection, while for pathology involving the descending thoracic aorta, the focus is on spinal protection. Optimal cerebral and spinal protection requires an extensive knowledge of the operative steps and an understanding of the cardiopulmonary bypass modalities that are possible. A bloodless field is required when operating on the aorta. As a result, periods of ischemia to the central nervous system and end-organ viscera are often unavoidable. The main techniques to mitigate ischemia include hypothermia and selective perfusion of the ischemic organ in question. This chapter will first briefly review bypass modalities and then describe how they can be used for various aortic scenarios. PMID:27650344

  2. Endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Ibrahim; Kische, Stephan; Rehders, Tim C.; Nienaber, Christoph A.; Rauchhaus, Mathias

    2010-01-01

    A thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is a potentially life-threatening condition with structural weakness of the aortic wall, which can progress to arterial dilatation and rupture. Today, both an increasing awareness of vascular disease and the access to tomographic imaging facilitate the diagnosis of TAA even in an asymptomatic stage. The risk of rupture for untreated aneurysms beyond a diameter of 5.6 cm ranges from 46% to 74% and the two-year mortality rate is greater than 70%, with most deaths resulting from rupture. Treatment options include surgical and non-surgical repair to prevent aneurysm enlargement and rupture. While most cases of ascending aortic involvement are subject to surgical repair (partially with valve-preserving techniques), aneurysm of the distal arch and descending thoracic aorta are amenable to emerging endovascular techniques as an alternative to classic open repair or to a hybrid approach (combining debranching surgery with stent grafting) in an attempt to improve outcomes. PMID:22419919

  3. Aortic Input Impedance during Nitroprusside Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Pepine, Carl J.; Nichols, W. W.; Curry, R. C.; Conti, C. Richard

    1979-01-01

    Beneficial effects of nitroprusside infusion in heart failure are purportedly a result of decreased afterload through “impedance” reduction. To study the effect of nitroprusside on vascular factors that determine the total load opposing left ventricular ejection, the total aortic input impedance spectrum was examined in 12 patients with heart failure (cardiac index <2.0 liters/min per m2 and left ventricular end diastolic pressure >20 mm Hg). This input impedance spectrum expresses both mean flow (resistance) and pulsatile flow (compliance and wave reflections) components of vascular load. Aortic root blood flow velocity and pressure were recorded continuously with a catheter-tip electromagnetic velocity probe in addition to left ventricular pressure. Small doses of nitroprusside (9-19 μg/min) altered the total aortic input impedance spectrum as significant (P < 0.05) reductions in both mean and pulsatile components were observed within 60-90 s. With these acute changes in vascular load, left ventricular end diastolic pressure declined (44%) and stroke volume increased (20%, both P < 0.05). Larger nitroprusside doses (20-38 μg/min) caused additional alteration in the aortic input impedance spectrum with further reduction in left ventricular end diastolic pressure and increase in stroke volume but no additional changes in the impedance spectrum or stroke volume occurred with 39-77 μg/min. Improved ventricular function persisted when aortic pressure was restored to control values with simultaneous phenylephrine infusion in three patients. These data indicate that nitroprusside acutely alters both the mean and pulsatile components of vascular load to effect improvement in ventricular function in patients with heart failure. The evidence presented suggests that it may be possible to reduce vascular load and improve ventricular function independent of aortic pressure reduction. PMID:457874

  4. Spinal ischemia following abdominal aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, L R; Bergan, J J; Conn, J; Yao, J S

    1975-03-01

    Serious spinal cord ischemia may follow infrarenal abdominal aortic surgery. Five cases are summarized and added to the 23 previously published cases in order to identify this syndrome, emphasize its importance, and draw attention to the possibility of spontaneous recovery which may occur. The multifactorial complex which comprises each patient's clinical picture clouds a precise and specific cause for paraplegia in these cases. However, neither hypotension, steal phenomena nor emboli are necessary for completion of the syndrome. The relevant spinal cord arterial anatomy indicates that the common anomalies which occur favor development of spinal cord ischemia in the arteriosclerotic population which requires aortic surgery. No means of prevention is possible at this time.

  5. Idiopathic thoracic aortic aneurysm at pediatric age.

    PubMed

    Marín-Manzano, E; González-de-Olano, D; Haurie-Girelli, J; Herráiz-Sarachaga, J I; Bermúdez-Cañete, R; Tamariz-Martel, A; Cuesta-Gimeno, C; Pérez-de-León, J

    2009-03-01

    A 6-year-old-boy presented with epigastric pain and vomiting over 1 year. Chest X-ray and esophagogastric transit showed a mediastinal mass. A chest computerized tomography angiogram demonstrated a descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. Analytical determinations carried out were all negative. The aneurysm was surgically repaired using a Dacron patch. The anatomopathological study described atherosclerotic lesions with calcifications, compatible with an atherosclerotic aneurysm wall. Aneurysms are uncommon in the pediatric population. Usually, no pathogenesis can be determined, and thus, such cases are grouped as idiopathic. Direct repair with or without patch is a therapeutic alternative in pediatric aneurysms and can allow the growth of the aortic circumference.

  6. Contemporary management of blunt aortic trauma.

    PubMed

    Dubose, J J; Azizzadeh, A; Estrera, A L; Safi, H J

    2015-10-01

    Blunt thoracic aortic injury (BTAI) remains a common cause of death following blunt mechanisms of trauma. Among patients who survive to reach hospital care, significant advances in diagnosis and treatment afford previously unattainable survival. The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) guidelines provide current best-evidence suggestions for treatment of BTAI. However, several key areas of controversy regarding optimal BTAI care remain. These include the refinement of selection criteria, timing for treatment and the need for long-term follow-up data. In addition, the advent of the Aortic Trauma Foundation (ATF) represents an important development in collaborative research in this field.

  7. Genes and Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Hinterseher, Irene; Tromp, Gerard; Kuivaniemi, Helena

    2010-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a multifactorial disease with a strong genetic component. Since first candidate gene studies were published 20 years ago, nearly 100 genetic association studies using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in biologically relevant genes have been reported on AAA. The studies investigated SNPs in genes of the extracellular matrix, the cardiovascular system, the immune system, and signaling pathways. Very few studies were large enough to draw firm conclusions and very few results could be replicated in another sample set. The more recent unbiased approaches are family-based DNA linkage studies and genome-wide genetic association studies, which have the potential of identifying the genetic basis for AAA, if appropriately powered and well-characterized large AAA cohorts are used. SNPs associated with AAA have already been identified in these large multicenter studies. One significant association was of a variant in a gene called CNTN3 which is located on chromosome 3p12.3. Two follow-up studies, however, could not replicate the association. Two other SNPs, which are located on chromosome 9p21 and 9q33 were replicated in other samples. The two genes with the strongest supporting evidence of contribution to the genetic risk for AAA are the CDKN2BAS gene, also known as ANRIL, which encodes an antisense RNA that regulates expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors CDKN2A and CDKN2B, and DAB2IP, which encodes an inhibitor of cell growth and survival. Functional studies are now needed to establish the mechanisms by which these genes contribute to AAA pathogenesis. PMID:21146954

  8. Aortic injuries in newer vehicles.

    PubMed

    Ryb, Gabriel E; Dischinger, Patricia C; Kleinberger, Michael; McGwin, Gerald; Griffin, Russell L

    2013-10-01

    The occurrence of AI was studied in relation to vehicle model year (MY) among front seat vehicular occupants, age≥16 in vehicles MY≥1994, entered in the National Automotive Sampling System Crashworthiness Data System between 1997 and 2010 to determine whether newer vehicles, due to their crashworthiness improvements, are linked to a lower risk of aortic injuries (AI). MY was categorized as 1994-1997, 1998-2004, or 2005-2010 reflecting the introduction of newer occupant protection technology. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals for the association between AI and MY independent of possible confounders. Analysis was repeated, stratified by frontal and near lateral impacts. AI occurred in 19,187 (0.06%) of the 31,221,007 (weighted) cases, and contributed to 11% of all deaths. AIs were associated with advanced age, male gender, high BMI, near-side impact, rollover, ejection, collision against a fixed object, high ΔV, vehicle mismatch, unrestrained status, and forward track position. Among frontal crashes, MY 98-04 and MY 05-10 showed increased adjusted odds of AI when compared to MY 94-97 [OR 1.84 (1.02-3.32) and 1.99 (0.93-4.26), respectively]. In contrast, among near-side impact crashes, MY 98-04 and MY 05-10 showed decreased adjusted odds of AI [OR 0.50 (0.25-0.99) and 0.27 (0.06-1.31), respectively]. While occupants of newer vehicles experience lower odds of AI in near side impact crashes, a higher AI risk is present in frontal crashes. PMID:23831451

  9. EXPERIMENTAL MODELLING OF AORTIC ANEURYSMS

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Barry J; Corbett, Timothy J; Cloonan, Aidan J; O’Donnell, Michael R; Walsh, Michael T; Vorp, David A; McGloughlin, Timothy M

    2009-01-01

    A range of silicone rubbers were created based on existing commercially available materials. These silicones were designed to be visually different from one another and have distinct material properties, in particular, ultimate tensile strengths and tear strengths. In total, eleven silicone rubbers were manufactured, with the materials designed to have a range of increasing tensile strengths from approximately 2-4MPa, and increasing tear strengths from approximately 0.45-0.7N/mm. The variations in silicones were detected using a standard colour analysis technique. Calibration curves were then created relating colour intensity to individual material properties. All eleven materials were characterised and a 1st order Ogden strain energy function applied. Material coefficients were determined and examined for effectiveness. Six idealised abdominal aortic aneurysm models were also created using the two base materials of the study, with a further model created using a new mixing technique to create a rubber model with randomly assigned material properties. These models were then examined using videoextensometry and compared to numerical results. Colour analysis revealed a statistically significant linear relationship (p<0.0009) with both tensile strength and tear strength, allowing material strength to be determined using a non-destructive experimental technique. The effectiveness of this technique was assessed by comparing predicted material properties to experimentally measured methods, with good agreement in the results. Videoextensometry and numerical modelling revealed minor percentage differences, with all results achieving significance (p<0.0009). This study has successfully designed and developed a range of silicone rubbers that have unique colour intensities and material strengths. Strengths can be readily determined using a non-destructive analysis technique with proven effectiveness. These silicones may further aid towards an improved understanding of the

  10. Pleural Empyema and Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ching-Yang; Su, Ta-Wei; Huang, Kuo-Yang; Ko, Po-Jen; Yu, Sheng-Yueh; Kao, Tsung-Chi; Shen, Te-Chun; Chou, Tzu-Yi; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pleural empyema (PE) may evolve into necrosis, fistula in the thorax, and sepsis; thus, it is also associated with high mortality. We investigated and analyzed the risk of aortic aneurysm (AA) in a cohort study of patients with PE. A total of 34,250 patients diagnosed with PE were identified as the PE cohort, and 137,000 patients without PE were selected randomly as the control group and matched by sex, age, and index year of PE diagnosis. Patients ages 20 years and younger with a history of AA were excluded. The risk of AA was analyzed using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. Excess risk of AA development was 1.69-fold higher in PE patients (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 1.69; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.39–2.05) compared with non-PE patients. The patients with PE exhibited a greater adjusted risk of AA (aHR = 2.01; CI = 1.44–2.81) even if they did not have any of the 9 comorbidities included in our analysis (diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure, cardiac artery disease, stroke, bacterial endocarditis, and rheumatic endocarditis). Compared with the patients without any of the 9 comorbidities or PE, the patients with only PE had a greater risk of developing AA (aHR = 2.00; CI = 1.43–2.79). The PE cohort had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of AA than the non-PE cohort did during 12 years of follow-up. In a large-scale cohort, patients with PE are linked with an increased risk of AA. PMID:26632741

  11. Infected abdominal aortic aneurysm due to Morganella morganii: CT findings.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh Young; Lee, Jong Seok; Choi, Han Sung; Hong, Hoon Pyo; Ko, Young Gwan

    2011-02-01

    An infected aortic aneurysm, or mycotic aneurysm, is a rare arterial dilatation due to destruction of the infected vessel wall. Common pathogens resulting in an infected aortic aneurysm are Salmonella and Clostridium species, as well as Staphylococcus aureus; Morganella morganii, on the other hand, is very rare. An infected abdominal aortic aneurysm has tendencies to grow rapidly and to rupture. The mortality rate is high in patients undergoing emergent surgical intervention. We report the case of a 65-year-old man who presented with an infected abdominal aortic aneurysm caused by M. morganii. A high index of suspicion and imaging tests are necessary in order to diagnose an infected aortic aneurysm.

  12. The role of balloon aortic valvuloplasty in the era of transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Wacławski, Jacek; Wilczek, Krzysztof; Pres, Damian; Krajewski, Adam; Poloński, Lech; Zembala, Marian; Gąsior, Mariusz

    2015-03-01

    Balloon aortic valvuloplasty is recommended in patients not suitable for transcatheter aortic valve implantation/aortic valve replacement (TAVI/AVR) or when such interventions are temporarily contraindicated. The number of performed balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) procedures has been increasing in recent years. Valvuloplasty enables the selection of individuals with severe left ventricular dysfunction or with symptoms of uncertain origin resulting from concomitant disorders (including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD]) who can benefit from destination therapy (AVR/TAVI). Thanks to improved equipment, the number of adverse effects is now lower than it was in the first years after the advent of BAV. Valvuloplasty can be safely performed even in unstable patients, but long-term results remain poor. In view of the limited availability of TAVI in Poland, it is reasonable to qualify patients for BAV more often, as it is a relatively safe procedure improving the clinical condition of patients awaiting AVR/TAVI. PMID:26336471

  13. Endovascular Management of Chronic Type B Dissecting Aortic Aneurysm Utilizing Aortic and Renal Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J. D. Dunckley, M.; Thompson, M.; Morgan, R. A.

    2008-07-15

    Over the last 10 years endovascular stent-graft placement has been increasingly used to treat complicated acute Type B thoracic aortic dissections. While studies have demonstrated the use of additional aortic stent-grafts to treat continued false lumen perfusion and case reports have detailed the use of renal artery stents to treat renal ischemia related to aortic dissection, to our knowledge the adjuvant use of renal artery stents to reduce false lumen perfusion has not been reported. We present the case of a 72-year-old male who had previously undergone endovascular repair of a complicated Type B thoracic aortic dissection and presented with an expanding false lumen in the peridiaphragmatic aorta despite coverage of the entire thoracic aorta. This was treated by closure of a right renal fenestration using a renal stent.

  14. The Triplex BioValsalva Prostheses To Reconstruct the Aortic Valve and the Aortic Root.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yijun; Li, Bin; Bourget, Jean-Michel; Bondarenko, Olexandr; Lin, Jing; Guzman, Randolph; Paynter, Royston; Desaulniers, Denis; Qin, Boyin; Wang, Lu; Germain, Lucie; Zhang, Ze; Guidoin, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The Bentall procedure introduced in 1968 represents an undisputed cure to treat multiple pathologies involving the aortic valve and the ascending thoracic aorta. Over the years, multiple modifications have been introduced as well as a standardized approach to the operation with the goal to prevent long-term adverse events. The BioValsalva prosthesis provides a novel manner to more efficiently reconstruct the aortic valve together with the anatomy of the aortic root with the implantation of a valved conduit. This prosthesis comprises three sections: the collar supporting the valve; the skirt mimicking the Valsalva, which is suitable for the anastomoses with the coronary arteries; and the main body of the graft, which is designed to replace the ascending aorta. The BioValsalva prosthesis allows the Bentall operation to be used in patients whose aortic valve cannot be spared. PMID:27649763

  15. Aortic dilatation and aortopathy in congenital heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Zanjani, Keyhan Sayadpour; Niwa, Koichiro

    2013-01-01

    Longer survival after corrective surgery for congenital heart diseases has rendered late complications more important. One of these complications is aortic dilatation which may occur in patients with repaired or unrepaired disease and can progress to aneurysm, dissection, and rupture. This aortic dilatation in various congenital heart diseases does not simply mean anatomical dilatation of the aortic root, but it closely relates to the aortic pathophysiological abnormality, aortic regurgitation, and aortic and ventricular dysfunction; therefore, we can recognize this complex lesion as a new concept: "aortopathy". The pathophysiology of this disease is complex and only partially understood. In this review, we first discuss history, pathophysiology, and clinical features of aortic dilatation and aortopathy of congenital heart disease. Then we provide a review of the evaluation and management of this disease.

  16. Aortic valve-sparing in aortic dissection with transposition of great arteries.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rajiv; Cohen, Brent; Peters, Paul; Shah, Pallav

    2013-04-01

    Patients with transposition of the great arteries have good survival after surgery, but some have complications ranging from heart failure to valve dysfunction. A 42-year-old woman who underwent surgical correction in childhood, presented with aortic dissection and had a valve-sparing root operation, but died immediately postoperatively. Both aortic dissection and valve-sparing root operations in this setting have not been described before. This case highlights facts to consider in the treatment of this presentation. PMID:24532622

  17. Aortic valve replacement with sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valve prostheses.

    PubMed

    Berretta, Paolo; Di Eusanio, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is the most common valve disease in the western world. Over the past few years the number of aortic valve replacement (AVR) interventions has increased with outcomes that have been improved despite increasing age of patients and increasing burden of comorbidities. However, despite such excellent results and its well-established position, conventional AVR has undergone great development over the previous two decades. Such progress, by way of less invasive incisions and use of new technologies, including transcatheter aortic valve implantation and sutureless valve prostheses, is intended to reduce the traumatic impact of the surgical procedure, thus fulfilling lower risk patients' expectations on the one hand, and extending the operability toward increasingly high-risk patients on the other. Sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valves are biological, pericardial prostheses that anchor within the aortic annulus with no more than three sutures. The sutureless prostheses, by avoiding the passage and the tying of the sutures, significantly reduce operative times and may improve outcomes. However, there is still a paucity of robust, evidence-based data on the role and performance of sutureless AVR. Therefore, strongest long-term data, randomized studies and registry data are required to adequately assess the durability and long-term outcomes of sutureless aortic valve replacement. PMID:27582765

  18. Inflammatory Characteristics of Stenotic Aortic Valves: A Comparison between Rheumatic and Nonrheumatic Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Wallby, Lars; Steffensen, Thora; Jonasson, Lena; Broqvist, Mats

    2013-01-01

    Background. Although our comprehension of nonrheumatic aortic stenosis (NRAS) has increased substantially during the last decade, less is known about the histopathology of rheumatic aortic stenosis (RAS). The aim of this study was to investigate rheumatic aortic stenosis by means of analyses previously used in nonrheumatic stenosis. Material and Methods. Valve specimens were obtained from 39 patients referred to hospital due to significant aortic stenosis. According to established macroscopic criteria the valves were divided into two groups consisting of 29 NRAS and 10 RAS valves. Mononuclear inflammatory cells and apolipoproteins were investigated using immunohistochemical analyses. Results. The localisation of calcification differed in tricuspid nonrheumatic valves when compared to bicuspid nonrheumatic and rheumatic valves. The RAS valves revealed a lower degree of T lymphocyte infiltration compared with the NRAS valves. Infiltration of macrophages was seen in all valves and there were no differences regarding deposition of apolipoprotein. Conclusion. Rheumatic and nonrheumatic aortic stenotic valves show a similar and significant chronic inflammation. The similarities regarding the localisation of calcification indicate that the valve anomaly/morphology can influence the pathogenesis of aortic stenosis. Finally, our findings highlight the question of a postinflammatory valvular disease of other causes than rheumatic fever.

  19. Aortic valve replacement with sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valve prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Berretta, Paolo; Di Eusanio, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is the most common valve disease in the western world. Over the past few years the number of aortic valve replacement (AVR) interventions has increased with outcomes that have been improved despite increasing age of patients and increasing burden of comorbidities. However, despite such excellent results and its well-established position, conventional AVR has undergone great development over the previous two decades. Such progress, by way of less invasive incisions and use of new technologies, including transcatheter aortic valve implantation and sutureless valve prostheses, is intended to reduce the traumatic impact of the surgical procedure, thus fulfilling lower risk patients' expectations on the one hand, and extending the operability toward increasingly high-risk patients on the other. Sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valves are biological, pericardial prostheses that anchor within the aortic annulus with no more than three sutures. The sutureless prostheses, by avoiding the passage and the tying of the sutures, significantly reduce operative times and may improve outcomes. However, there is still a paucity of robust, evidence-based data on the role and performance of sutureless AVR. Therefore, strongest long-term data, randomized studies and registry data are required to adequately assess the durability and long-term outcomes of sutureless aortic valve replacement. PMID:27582765

  20. Ultrasonic delineation of aortic microstructure: The relative contribution of elastin and collagen to aortic elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Jon N.; Takiuchi, Shin; Lin, Shiow Jiuan; Lanza, Gregory M.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2004-05-01

    Aortic elasticity is an important factor in hemodynamic health, and compromised aortic compliance affects not only arterial dynamics but also myocardial function. A variety of pathologic processes (e.g., diabetes, Marfan's syndrome, hypertension) can affect aortic elasticity by altering the microstructure and composition of the elastin and collagen fiber networks within the tunica media. Ultrasound tissue characterization techniques can be used to obtain direct measurements of the stiffness coefficients of aorta by measurement of the speed of sound in specific directions. In this study we sought to define the contributions of elastin and collagen to the mechanical properties of aortic media by measuring the magnitude and directional dependence of the speed of sound before and after selective isolation of either the collagen or elastin fiber matrix. Formalin-fixed porcine aortas were sectioned for insonification in the circumferential, longitudinal, or radial direction and examined using high-frequency (50 MHz) ultrasound microscopy. Isolation of the collagen or elastin fiber matrices was accomplished through treatment with NaOH or formic acid, respectively. The results suggest that elastin is the primary contributor to aortic medial stiffness in the unloaded state, and that there is relatively little anisotropy in the speed of sound or stiffness in the aortic wall.

  1. Long-Term Changes in the Distal Aorta after Aortic Arch Replacement in Acute DeBakey Type I Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kwangjo; Jeong, Jeahwa; Park, Jongyoon; Yun, Sungsil; Woo, Jongsu

    2016-01-01

    Background We analyzed the long-term results of ascending aortic replacement and arch aortic replacement in acute DeBakey type I aortic dissections to measure the differences in the distal aortic changes with extension of the aortic replacement. Methods We reviewed 142 cases of acute DeBakey type I aortic dissections (1996–2015). Seventy percent of the cases were ascending aortic replacements, and 30% of the cases underwent total arch aortic replacement, which includes the aorta from the root to the beginning of the descending aorta with the 3 arch branches. Fourteen percent (20 cases) resulted in surgical mortality and 86% of cases that survived had a mean follow-up period of 6.6±4.6 years. Among these cases, 64% of the patients were followed up with computed tomography (CT) angiograms with the duration of the final CT check period of 4.9±2.9 years. Results There were 15 cases of reoperation in 13 patients. Of these 15 cases, 13 cases were in the ascending aortic replacement group and 2 cases were in the total arch aortic replacement group. Late mortality occurred in 13 cases; 10 cases were in the ascending aortic replacement group and 3 cases were in the total arch aortic replacement group. Eight patients died of a distal aortic problem in the ascending aortic replacement group, and 1 patient died of distal aortic rupture in the total arch aortic replacement group. The follow-up CT angiogram showed that 69.8% of the ascending aortic replacement group and 35.7% of the total arch aortic replacement group developed distal aortic dilatation (p=0.0022). Conclusion The total arch aortic replacement procedure developed fewer distal remnant aortic problems from dilatation than the ascending aortic replacement procedure in acute type I aortic dissections. PMID:27525235

  2. Endovascular resection of the native aortic valve before transcatheter aortic valve implantation: state of the art and review.

    PubMed

    Navarra, Emiliano; Mosala Nezhad, Zahra; Bollen, Xavier; Gielen, Charles-Edouard; Mastrobuoni, Stefano; De Kerchove, Laurent; Raucent, Benoit; Astarci, Parla

    2016-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was introduced into clinical practice in 2002 as a rescue approach in patients presenting with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis but not eligible for conventional aortic valve replacement. This technique allows implantation of a balloon expandable bioprosthesis without resection of the native aortic valve. Several complications are described as a consequence of the residual highly calcified valve being squeezed against the aortic wall by the stent of the implant. This can result in deformation of the metal stent and paravalvular leakage, risk of occlusion of the coronary ostia, or central and peripheral embolization of valvular debris. To avoid these complications, many authors suggest the possibility to resect and remove the native aortic valve before transcatheter aortic valve implantation. In this field, different authors have described possible techniques and different sources of energy to resect the calcified valve. In this article, we review the development of these experimental techniques and discuss future prospects in this field.

  3. Endovascular resection of the native aortic valve before transcatheter aortic valve implantation: state of the art and review.

    PubMed

    Navarra, Emiliano; Mosala Nezhad, Zahra; Bollen, Xavier; Gielen, Charles-Edouard; Mastrobuoni, Stefano; De Kerchove, Laurent; Raucent, Benoit; Astarci, Parla

    2016-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was introduced into clinical practice in 2002 as a rescue approach in patients presenting with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis but not eligible for conventional aortic valve replacement. This technique allows implantation of a balloon expandable bioprosthesis without resection of the native aortic valve. Several complications are described as a consequence of the residual highly calcified valve being squeezed against the aortic wall by the stent of the implant. This can result in deformation of the metal stent and paravalvular leakage, risk of occlusion of the coronary ostia, or central and peripheral embolization of valvular debris. To avoid these complications, many authors suggest the possibility to resect and remove the native aortic valve before transcatheter aortic valve implantation. In this field, different authors have described possible techniques and different sources of energy to resect the calcified valve. In this article, we review the development of these experimental techniques and discuss future prospects in this field. PMID:27032472

  4. [Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair in a Young Patient with Descending Aortic Injury;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    No, Hironari; Nishida, Satoru; Takagi, Takeshi; Mohri, Ryosuke

    2016-08-01

    A 15-year-old boy was referred to our emergency room due to a penetrating injury of the back. Computed tomography( CT) demonstrated a descending aortic injury at the Th9/10 level, bilateral hemothorax, and spinal cord injury. Although surgical treatment was indicated, multiple organ injury complicated open surgical repair, which required cardiopulmonary bypass with full heparinization. Therefore, the patient was scheduled to undergo thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). A 23×33-mm Excluder aortic extension cuff was chosen for the small, 15-mm diameter aorta. The aortic extension was delivered and deployed in the descending aorta. Postoperative CT demonstrated neither endoleak nor collapse of the stent-graft. TEVAR for traumatic aortic aneurysm appears to be safe and effective, and an aortic extension for an abdominal aortic aneurysm may be utilized as an alternative device if the patient is young and the aorta is small. PMID:27476569

  5. [Albert Einstein and his abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Cervantes Castro, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The interesting case of Albert Einstein's abdominal aortic aneurysm is presented. He was operated on at age 69 and, finding that the large aneurysm could not be removed, the surgeon elected to wrap it with cellophane to prevent its growth. However, seven years later the aneurysm ruptured and caused the death of the famous scientist.

  6. Epigenetic regulation of aortic remodeling in hyperhomocysteinemia

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Nithya; Pushpakumar, Sathnur Basappa; Givvimani, Srikanth; Kundu, Sourav; Metreveli, Naira; James, Dexter; Bratcher, Adrienne P.; Tyagi, Suresh C.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is prevalent in patients with hypertension and is an independent risk factor for aortic pathologies. HHcy is known to cause an imbalance between matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), leading to the accumulation of collagen in the aorta and resulting in stiffness and development of hypertension. Although the exact mechanism of extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling is unclear, emerging evidence implicates epigenetic regulation involving DNA methylation. Our purpose was to investigate whether 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (Aza), a DNA methyltransferase (DNMT1) inhibitor, reduces high blood pressure (BP) by regulating aortic ECM remodeling in HHcy. Wild-type and cystathionine β-synthase (CBS)+/− HHcy mice were treated with Aza (0.5 mg/kg body weight). In HHcy mice, Aza treatment normalized the plasma homocysteine (Hcy) level and BP. Thoracic and abdominal aorta ultrasound revealed a reduction in the resistive index and wall-to-lumen ratio. Vascular response to phenylephrine, acetylcholine, and sodium nitroprusside improved after Aza in HHcy mice. Histology showed a marked reduction in collagen deposition in the aorta. Aza treatment decreased the expression of DNMT1, MMP9, TIMP1, and S-adenosyl homocysteine hydrolase (SAHH) and upregulated methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR). We conclude that reduction of DNA methylation by Aza in HHcy reduces adverse aortic remodeling to mitigate hypertension.—Narayanan, N., Pushpakumar, S. B., Givvimani, S., Kundu, S., Metreveli, N., James, D., Bratcher, A. P., Tyagi, S. C. Epigenetic regulation of aortic remodeling in hyperhomocysteinemia. PMID:24739303

  7. [Spinal cord ischemia following subrenal aortic clamping].

    PubMed

    Battisti, G; Marigliani, M; Stio, F; Iavarone, C

    1990-01-01

    The paraplegia caused by an aortic clamping just below the Renal artery is a rare but very complication in aortic surgery. Such a complication is even rarer if we consider the few cases reported in literature following a reconstructive surgery for occlusive chronic diseases of aortiliac axes. The authors have studied the case of a patient bearing the syndrome of Leriche; this one had an aortic clamping below the kidney and soon after developed an acute ischaemic syndrome below the spinal medulla with flaccid paraparesis, anal and vesical sphincteric diseases and persistence of deep tactile sensibility. After a reconstruction of vascular anatomy of the medulla they emphasize the importance, in such a disease, of the "arteria radicularis magna" of Adamkievicz and its place of origin. After they discuss the severe physioopathologic moments that are connected: with the direct ischaemia following aortic clamping in the cases where the arteria radicularis magna rises at a level lower than the clamping itself; with the embolism or thrombosis caused by surgical manipulation peroperatively (it might be the cause of paraplegia more frequent in aneurysmectomia surgery); with the severe hypotension per- and post operatively for the existence of arteriosclerotic disease of the lumbar arteries. Finally they analyses preoperatively diagnostic possibilities and per operatively methods used in preventing this sort of complication.

  8. The future of transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Christian W; Arsalan, Mani; Mack, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    Since the introduction of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) into clinical practice, the treatment of aortic stenosis has changed dramatically. In the past, medical therapy with or without balloon aortic valvuloplasty was the only option for inoperable patients. More recently, TAVI has become the treatment of choice for these patients and the preferred alternative for high-risk operable patients. Surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) currently remains the gold standard for patients at low or intermediate operative risk. As randomized trials have demonstrated comparable results between TAVI and SAVR in the high-risk population, there is now a clear trend towards performing TAVI even in intermediate-risk patients while awaiting the results of randomized trials in that population. Nevertheless, there are still questions regarding TAVI involving paravalvular leak (PVL), stroke, pacemaker requirements, and durability that remain to be more definitively answered before TAVI can routinely be performed in a broader, lower risk population. Improvements in patient selection, imaging, and second and third generation devices have decreased the incidence of PVLs and vascular complications that followed the earliest TAVI procedures, but the rates of perioperative stroke and permanent pacemaker implantation must still be addressed. Furthermore, the long-term durability of TAVI devices and a role for post-procedure antithrombotic management remain unanswered. Until these questions are more clearly answered, it is the Heart Team's task to determine the optimal treatment for each patient based on risk scores, frailty metrics, comorbidities, patient preference, and potential for improvement in quality of life.

  9. Fatal Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Aortic Graft Infection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael (Technical Monitor); Smith, Davey; Metzgar, David; Wills, Christopher; Fierer, Joshua

    2002-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a yeast commonly used in baking and a frequent colonizer of human mucosal surfaces. It is considered relatively nonpathogenic in immunocompetent adults. We present a case of S. cerevisiae fungemia and aortic graft infection in an immunocompetent adult. This is the first reported case of S. cerevisiue fungemia where the identity of the pathogen was confirmed by rRNA sequencing.

  10. Lipid Interventions in Aortic Valvular Disease.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kwang Jin; Tsomidou, Christiana; Lerakis, Stamatios; Madanieh, Raef; Vittorio, Timothy J; Kosmas, Constantine E

    2015-10-01

    Aortic valve stenosis is the most common valvular disease in the elderly population. Presently, there is increasing evidence that aortic stenosis (AS) is an active process of lipid deposition, inflammation, fibrosis and calcium deposition. The pathogenesis of AS shares many similarities to that of atherosclerosis; therefore, it was hypothesized that certain lipid interventions could prevent or slow the progression of aortic valve stenosis. Despite the early enthusiasm that statins may slow the progression of AS, recent large clinical trials did not consistently demonstrate a decrease in the progression of AS. However, some researchers believe that statins may have a benefit early on in the disease process, where inflammation (and not calcification) is the predominant process, in contrast to severe or advanced AS, where calcification (and not inflammation) predominates. Positron emission tomography using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose and 18F-sodium fluoride can demonstrate the relative contributions of valvular calcification and inflammation in AS, and thus this method might potentially be useful in providing the answer as to whether lipid interventions at the earlier stages of AS would be more effective in slowing the progression of the disease. Currently, there is a strong interest in recombinant apolipoprotein A-1 Milano and in the development of new pharmacological agents, targeting reduction of lipoprotein (a) levels and possibly reduction of the expression of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2, as potential means to slow the progression of aortic valvular stenosis. PMID:26263237

  11. Intraoperative aortic dissection in pediatric heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Hibino, Narutoshi; Harada, Yorikazu; Hiramatsu, Takeshi; Yasukochi, Satoshi; Satomi, Gengi

    2006-06-01

    Intraoperative aortic dissection occurred in a 3-year-old-boy undergoing repair of an atrial septal defect. Transesophageal echocardiography was useful for the diagnosis, and conservative medical treatment under close observation was feasible in this case which involved a limited intimal tear. PMID:16714685

  12. Aortic valve replacement with combined myocardial revascularisation.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, M; Schofield, P M; Brooks, N H; Dark, J F; Moussalli, H; Deiraniya, A K; Lawson, R A; Rahman, A N

    1989-01-01

    Early and late outcome was studied in 630 patients who underwent aortic valve replacement between 1974 and 1982. Group 1 (506 patients) did not have important coronary artery disease, group 2 (69 patients) had coronary artery disease and underwent coronary artery bypass grafting, and group 3 (55 patients) had coronary artery disease but did not undergo myocardial revascularisation. Early mortality (within 30 days of operation) was significantly lower for group 1 (6%) than for group 2 (13%) and for group 3 (16%). Operative mortality in all three groups was lower in patients operated on more recently. The three year survival of patients in group 1 (83%) was significantly higher than that of patients in group 3 (62%) but not than that of patients in group 2 (76%). The findings of this study suggest that the presence of coronary artery disease increases the risk of aortic valve replacement whether or not coronary artery grafting is performed. Myocardial revascularisation, however, seems to return patients with aortic valve and coronary artery disease to a survival curve similar to that of patients with isolated aortic valve disease. PMID:2788003

  13. Spatiotemporal complexity of the aortic sinus vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Brandon; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2014-07-01

    The aortic sinus vortex is a classical flow structure of significant importance to aortic valve dynamics and the initiation and progression of calcific aortic valve disease. We characterize the spatiotemporal characteristics of aortic sinus vortex dynamics in relation to the viscosity of blood analog solution as well as heart rate. High-resolution time-resolved (2 kHz) particle image velocimetry was conducted to capture 2D particle streak videos and 2D instantaneous velocity and streamlines along the sinus midplane using a physiological but rigid aorta model fitted with a porcine bioprosthetic heart valve. Blood analog fluids used include a water-glycerin mixture and saline to elucidate the sensitivity of vortex dynamics to viscosity. Experiments were conducted to record 10 heart beats for each combination of blood analog and heart rate condition. Results show that the topological characteristics of the velocity field vary in timescales as revealed using time bin-averaged vectors and corresponding instantaneous streamlines. There exist small timescale vortices and a large timescale main vortex. A key flow structure observed is the counter vortex at the upstream end of the sinus adjacent to the base (lower half) of the leaflet. The spatiotemporal complexity of vortex dynamics is shown to be profoundly influenced by strong leaflet flutter during systole with a peak frequency of 200 Hz and peak amplitude of 4 mm observed in the saline case. While fluid viscosity influences the length and timescales as well as the introduction of leaflet flutter, heart rate influences the formation of counter vortex at the upstream end of the sinus. Higher heart rates are shown to reduce the strength of the counter vortex that can greatly influence the directionality and strength of shear stresses along the base of the leaflet. This study demonstrates the impact of heart rate and blood analog viscosity on aortic sinus hemodynamics.

  14. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation today and tomorrow.

    PubMed

    Wenaweser, Peter; Praz, Fabien; Stortecky, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease in Western industrial countries (including Switzerland) with a prevalence of about 5% in the population aged 75 and over. If left untreated, symptomatic patients have a rate of death of more than 50% within 2 years. As a result of age and elevated surgical risk, an important proportion of elderly patients are not referred to surgery. Thus, the introduction of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in 2002 has initiated a paradigm shift in the treatment of patients with symptomatic, severe aortic stenosis. The early technical and procedural success of this minimal invasive treatment in high-risk patients has promoted further innovation and development of transcatheter heart valve (THV) systems during the last 13 years. Downsizing of the delivery catheters along with technical improvements aiming to reduce postprocedural paravalvular regurgitation have resulted in a significant reduction in mortality. As a consequence, TAVI is nowadays established as safe and effective treatment for selected inoperable and high-risk patients. Ongoing studies are investigating the outcome of intermediate risk patients allocated to either surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) or TAVI. Despite these advancements, some specific areas of concern still require attention and need further investigations including conduction disturbances, valve degeneration and antithrombotic management. Although the off-label use of TAVI devices in the mitral, tricuspid or pulmonary position has recently developed, important limitations still apply and careful patient selection remains crucial. This review aims to summarise the available clinical evidence of transcatheter aortic valve treatment during the last 13 years and to provide a glimpse of future technologies.

  15. Coronary Ostial Stenosis after Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ziakas, Antonios G.; Economou, Fotios I.; Charokopos, Nicholas A.; Pitsis, Antonios A.; Parharidou, Despina G.; Papadopoulos, Thomas I.; Parharidis, Georgios E.

    2010-01-01

    Coronary ostial stenosis is a rare but potentially serious sequela after aortic valve replacement. It occurs in the left main or right coronary artery after 1% to 5% of aortic valve replacement procedures. The clinical symptoms are usually severe and may appear from 1 to 6 months postoperatively. Although the typical treatment is coronary artery bypass grafting, patients have been successfully treated by means of percutaneous coronary intervention. Herein, we present the cases of 2 patients in whom coronary ostial stenosis developed after aortic valve replacement. In the 1st case, a 72-year-old man underwent aortic valve replacement and bypass grafting of the saphenous vein to the left anterior descending coronary artery. Six months later, he experienced a non-ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction. Coronary angiography revealed a critical stenosis of the right coronary artery ostium. In the 2nd case, a 78-year-old woman underwent aortic valve replacement and grafting of the saphenous vein to an occluded right coronary artery. Four months later, she experienced unstable angina. Coronary angiography showed a critical left main coronary artery ostial stenosis and occlusion of the right coronary artery venous graft. In each patient, we performed percutaneous coronary intervention and deployed a drug-eluting stent. Both patients were asymptomatic on 6-to 12-month follow-up. We attribute the coronary ostial stenosis to the selective ostial administration of cardioplegic solution during surgery. We conclude that retrograde administration of cardioplegic solution through the coronary sinus may reduce the incidence of postoperative coronary ostial stenosis, and that stenting may be an efficient treatment option. PMID:20844624

  16. Inhibitory Role of Notch1 in Calcific Aortic Valve Disease

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Sara N.; Nichols, Haley A.; Galindo, Cristi L.; Garner, Harold R.; Merrill, Walter H.; Hinton, Robert B.; Garg, Vidu

    2011-01-01

    Aortic valve calcification is the most common form of valvular heart disease, but the mechanisms of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) are unknown. NOTCH1 mutations are associated with aortic valve malformations and adult-onset calcification in families with inherited disease. The Notch signaling pathway is critical for multiple cell differentiation processes, but its role in the development of CAVD is not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular changes that occur with inhibition of Notch signaling in the aortic valve. Notch signaling pathway members are expressed in adult aortic valve cusps, and examination of diseased human aortic valves revealed decreased expression of NOTCH1 in areas of calcium deposition. To identify downstream mediators of Notch1, we examined gene expression changes that occur with chemical inhibition of Notch signaling in rat aortic valve interstitial cells (AVICs). We found significant downregulation of Sox9 along with several cartilage-specific genes that were direct targets of the transcription factor, Sox9. Loss of Sox9 expression has been published to be associated with aortic valve calcification. Utilizing an in vitro porcine aortic valve calcification model system, inhibition of Notch activity resulted in accelerated calcification while stimulation of Notch signaling attenuated the calcific process. Finally, the addition of Sox9 was able to prevent the calcification of porcine AVICs that occurs with Notch inhibition. In conclusion, loss of Notch signaling contributes to aortic valve calcification via a Sox9-dependent mechanism. PMID:22110751

  17. Computer-aided design of the human aortic root.

    PubMed

    Ovcharenko, E A; Klyshnikov, K U; Vlad, A R; Sizova, I N; Kokov, A N; Nushtaev, D V; Yuzhalin, A E; Zhuravleva, I U

    2014-11-01

    The development of computer-based 3D models of the aortic root is one of the most important problems in constructing the prostheses for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. In the current study, we analyzed data from 117 patients with and without aortic valve disease and computed tomography data from 20 patients without aortic valvular diseases in order to estimate the average values of the diameter of the aortic annulus and other aortic root parameters. Based on these data, we developed a 3D model of human aortic root with unique geometry. Furthermore, in this study we show that by applying different material properties to the aortic annulus zone in our model, we can significantly improve the quality of the results of finite element analysis. To summarize, here we present four 3D models of human aortic root with unique geometry based on computational analysis of ECHO and CT data. We suggest that our models can be utilized for the development of better prostheses for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

  18. Aortic Blood Flow Reversal Determines Renal Function: Potential Explanation for Renal Dysfunction Caused by Aortic Stiffening in Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Junichiro; Ito, Sadayoshi

    2015-07-01

    Aortic stiffness determines the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and predicts the progressive decline of the GFR. However, the underlying pathophysiological mechanism remains obscure. Recent evidence has shown a close link between aortic stiffness and the bidirectional (systolic forward and early diastolic reverse) flow characteristics. We hypothesized that the aortic stiffening-induced renal dysfunction is attributable to altered central flow dynamics. In 222 patients with hypertension, Doppler velocity waveforms were recorded at the proximal descending aorta to calculate the reverse/forward flow ratio. Tonometric waveforms were recorded to measure the carotid-femoral (aortic) and carotid-radial (peripheral) pulse wave velocities, to estimate the aortic pressure from the radial waveforms, and to compute the aortic characteristic impedance. In addition, renal hemodynamics was evaluated by duplex ultrasound. The estimated GFR was inversely correlated with the aortic pulse wave velocity, reverse/forward flow ratio, pulse pressure, and characteristic impedance, whereas it was not correlated with the peripheral pulse wave velocity or mean arterial pressure. The association between aortic pulse wave velocity and estimated GFR was independent of age, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, and antihypertensive medication. However, further adjustment for the aortic reverse/forward flow ratio and pulse pressure substantially weakened this association, and instead, the reverse/forward flow ratio emerged as the strongest determinant of estimated GFR (P=0.001). A higher aortic reverse/forward flow ratio was also associated with lower intrarenal forward flow velocities. These results suggest that an increase in aortic flow reversal (ie, retrograde flow from the descending thoracic aorta toward the aortic arch), caused by aortic stiffening and impedance mismatch, reduces antegrade flow into the kidney and thereby deteriorates renal function.

  19. Aortic tear and dissection related to connective tissues abnormalities resembling Marfan syndrome in a Great Dane.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Jennifer A; Bach, Jonathan F; Bell, Cynthia M; Stepien, Rebecca L

    2015-06-01

    Aortic tears and acute aortic dissection are rarely reported in dogs. This report describes a case of aortic dissection and probable sinus of Valsalva rupture in a young Great Dane with associated histopathologic findings suggestive of a connective tissue abnormality.

  20. The many faces of aortic dissections: Beware of unusual presentations.

    PubMed

    Scaglione, Mariano; Salvolini, Luca; Casciani, Emanuele; Giovagnoni, Andrea; Mazzei, Maria Antonietta; Volterrani, Luca

    2008-03-01

    Aortic dissection is gaining recognition in Western societies, and it is being diagnosed with increasing frequency. New diagnostic imaging modalities, longer life expectancy, as well as the increase in the number patients suffering from hypertension have all contributed to the growing awareness of aortic dissection. Nevertheless, as many as 30% of patients ultimately diagnosed with acute dissection are first thought to be suffering from something else. The increased availability and use of multidetector computed tomography has led to the incidental discovery of aortic dissection in very different settings. This article focuses on unusual presentations of painless aortic dissection. It is important for radiologists to remember that aortic dissections may present in different ways, not only as an acute, critical fatality but also with subtle, unusual signs and symptoms, which apparently do not seem to be strictly related to aortic diseases. PMID:17950552

  1. Small aortic valve annulus in children with fixed subaortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Thilenius, O G; Campbell, D; Bharati, S; Lev, M; Arcilla, R A

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-one hearts with fixed subaortic stenosis (FSAS) were examined pathologically. Thirty children with no hemodynamically significant heart disease, 31 children with valvar aortic stenosis, and 25 children with FSAS were studied by echo- and angiocardiography. The following conclusions were drawn: (1) Patients with FSAS often have abnormal aortic valve leaflets as well as small aortic valve annulus. (2) A small aortic annulus/descending aorta ratio is probably present at birth, and may decrease with increasing age. (3) In some patients with FSAS the aortic valve annulus is too small for simple resection of the fibroelastic tissue. A Konno operation is needed for these patients. (4) M-mode echocardiography has not been useful in identifying abnormally small aortic valve annulus in FSAS patients.

  2. Chest radiography in acute aortic syndrome: pearls and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Ashish; Rajendran, Surendran; Yung, Wai Heng; Babu, Suresh Balasubramanian; Peh, Wilfred C

    2016-08-01

    Acute aortic syndrome is a group of life-threatening diseases of the thoracic aorta that usually present to the emergency department. It includes aortic dissection, aortic intramural hematoma, and penetrating aortic ulcer. Rare aortic pathologies of aorto-esophageal fistula and mycotic aneurysm may also be included in this list. All these conditions require urgent treatment with complex clinical care and management. Most patients who present with chest pain are evaluated with a chest radiograph in the emergency department. It is important that maximum diagnostic information is extracted from the chest radiograph as certain signs on the chest radiograph are extremely useful in pointing towards the diagnosis of acute aortic syndrome. PMID:27282377

  3. Alternative surgical approach to treat aortic arch aneurysm after ascending aortic replacement with hybrid prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Zeitani, Jacob; Nardi, Paolo; Bellos, Kyriakos; De Propris, Silvia; Chiariello, Luigi

    2013-10-01

    We present a surgical technique to treat the distal aortic arch in patients who previously underwent ascending aortic replacement using the frozen elephant trunk. After debranching of the epiaortic vessels using a custom-made four-branch graft and systemic cooling, the extracorporeal circulation is interrupted, maintaining antegrade cerebral perfusion through the four-branch prosthesis. Then the "old" Dacron prosthesis, previously implanted for the ascending aortic replacement, is partially incised at its distal end, leaving a margin of prosthesis anastomosed to the native distal aorta, and the E-vita stent-graft is deployed under direct vision. Then the two margins of the "old" Dacron and the new Dacron E-vita prosthesis (Jotec Inc., Hechingen, Germany) are sutured together with one suture line to guarantee sealing and reconstruction of the aorta. This technique presents several advantages: the discrepancy between the graft size and the native aortic diameter is avoided, performing the anastomosis between two prosthetic materials with similar diameters is easier; there is no risk of tears in the diseased native aortic wall and related bleeding; and finally, it is easier to perform the anastomosis at the level of the ascending aorta rather than at the distal arch, especially when the disease of the aorta is extended to the descending segment.

  4. Haemodynamics in the mouse aortic arch computed from MRI-derived velocities at the aortic root.

    PubMed

    Van Doormaal, Mark A; Kazakidi, Asimina; Wylezinska, Marzena; Hunt, Anthony; Tremoleda, Jordi L; Protti, Andrea; Bohraus, Yvette; Gsell, Willy; Weinberg, Peter D; Ethier, C Ross

    2012-11-01

    Mice are widely used to investigate atherogenesis, which is known to be influenced by stresses related to blood flow. However, numerical characterization of the haemodynamic environment in the commonly studied aortic arch has hitherto been based on idealizations of inflow into the aorta. Our purpose in this work was to numerically characterize the haemodynamic environment in the mouse aortic arch using measured inflow velocities, and to relate the resulting shear stress patterns to known locations of high- and low-lesion prevalence. Blood flow velocities were measured in the aortic root of C57/BL6 mice using phase-contrast MRI. Arterial geometries were obtained by micro-CT of corrosion casts. These data were used to compute blood flow and wall shear stress (WSS) patterns in the arch. WSS profiles computed using realistic and idealized aortic root velocities differed significantly. An unexpected finding was that average WSS in the high-lesion-probability region on the inner wall was actually higher than the WSS in the low-probability region on the outer wall. Future studies of mouse aortic arch haemodynamics should avoid the use of idealized inflow velocity profiles. Lesion formation does not seem to uniquely associate with low or oscillating WSS in this segment, suggesting that other factors may also play a role in lesion localization. PMID:22764131

  5. Left main compression by an aortic root abscess.

    PubMed

    Misuraca, Leonardo; De Caro, Francesco; De Carlo, Marco; Barzaghi, Carlo; Scioti, Gianni; Minzioni, Gaetano; Petronio, Anna S

    2012-03-01

    A 79-year-old man with severe aortic stenosis, history of coronary artery disease and a recent hospitalization for sepsis presented at our institution following a syncope and angina at rest. Coronary angiography and aortography showed an aortic root abscess, causing left main coronary artery compression. This life-threatening complication of aortic valve endocarditis is rare and requires immediate surgical correction. PMID:22306781

  6. Acute aortic and mitral valve regurgitation following blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Bernabeu, Eduardo; Mestres, Carlos A; Loma-Osorio, Pablo; Josa, Miguel

    2004-03-01

    Traumatic rupture of intracardiac structures is an uncommon phenomenon although there are a number of reports with regards to rupture of the tricuspid, mitral and aortic valves. We report the case of a 25-year-old patient who presented with acute aortic and mitral valve regurgitation of traumatic origin. Both lesions were seen separated by 2 weeks. Pathophysiology is reviewed. The combination of both aortic and mitral lesions following blunt chest trauma is almost exceptional.

  7. Conservative management of aortic arch injury following penetrating trauma.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, R K; Cheung, S; Parikh, S P; Asgaria, K

    2015-04-01

    Aortic arch injuries following penetrating trauma are typically lethal events with high mortality rates. Traditionally, the standard of care for patients presenting with penetrating injury and aortic involvement has included surgical intervention. We report the case of a 31-year-old man who was managed non-operatively after sustaining multiple stab wounds to the left chest and presenting with mid aortic arch injury.

  8. Comparison of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation versus Surgical Aortic Valve Replacement to Improve Quality of Life in Patients >70 Years of Age with Severe Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kocaaslan, Cemal; Ketenci, Bülend; Yılmaz, Mehmet; Kehlibar, Tamer; Memetoğlu, Mehmet Erdem; Ertaş, Gökhan; Eren, Mehmet; Demirtaş, Mahmut Murat

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Transcatheter aortic valve implantation has recently been used in the treatment of severe aortic valve stenosis, particularly in patients with high mortality and morbidity rates for open surgery. The purpose of this study was to compare quality of life in patients over 70 years of age undergoing surgical or transcatheter aortic valve implantation, before the procedure and in the early post-procedural period. Methods: Seventy-nine patients were included in the study, 38 (48.1%) male and 41 (51.9%) female. Mean age of patients was 74.3±5.2 (70-91) years. The surgical aortic valve replacement group consisted of 51 (64.6%) patients and the transcatheter aortic valve replacement group of 28 (35.4%). Quality of life data before the procedure and at the 3rd month postoperatively in patients aged 70 years and older undergoing surgical or transcatheter aortic valve implantation were assessed using the 36-item Short Form Health Survey form. Results: Positive increases in physical task difficulty (13.2±9.8 vs. 5.1±7.3) (P=0.001), emotional task difficulty (14.4±11.9 vs. 8.5±6.4) (P=0.035), and mental health (0.4±10.4 vs. 9.6±15.1) (P=0.001; P<0.01) scores in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement were significantly higher compared to the surgical aortic valve replacement group. No statistically significant difference was determined between the groups in terms of pain, vitality, social function, physical function or general health scores in the preoperative and postoperative periods. Conclusion: The positive increase in quality of life parameters in the transcatheter aortic valve implantation group at the 3rd month postoperatively was significantly higher compared to the surgical aortic valve replacement group. PMID:27074268

  9. Single Coronary Artery with Aortic Regurgitation

    SciTech Connect

    Katsetos, Manny C. Toce, Dale T.

    2003-11-15

    An isolated single coronary artery can be associated with normal life expectancy; however, patients are at an increased risk of sudden death. A case is reported of a 54-year-old man with several months of chest pressure with activity. On exercise Sestamibi stress testing, the patient developed a hypotensive response with no symptoms and minimal electrocardiographic changes. Nuclear scanning demonstrated reversible septal and lateral perfusion defects consistent with severe ischemia. Coronary angiography revealed a single coronary artery with the right coronary artery arising from the left main. There were high-grade stenotic lesions in the left anterior descending and circumflex arteries with only moderate atherosclerotic disease in the right coronary artery. An aortogram showed 2-3+ aortic regurgitation, with an ejection fraction of 45% on ventriculography. The patient underwent four-vessel revascularization and aortic valve replacement and did well postoperatively.

  10. Spinal cord protection in aortic endovascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Scott, D A; Denton, M J

    2016-09-01

    A persistent neurological deficit, such as paraplegia or paraparesis, secondary to spinal cord injury remains one of the most feared complications of surgery on the descending thoracic or abdominal aorta. This is despite sophisticated advances in imaging and the use of less invasive endovascular procedures. Extensive fenestrated endovascular aortic graft prostheses still carry a risk of spinal cord injury of up to 10%; thus, this risk should be identified and strategies implemented to protect the spinal cord and maintain perfusion. The patients at highest risk are those undergoing extensive thoracic aortic stenting including thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic vessels. Although many techniques are available, lumbar cerebrospinal fluid drainage remains the most frequent intervention, along with maintenance of perfusion pressure and possibly staged procedures to allow collateral vessel stabilization. Many questions remain regarding other technical aspects, spinal cord monitoring and cooling, pharmacological protection, and the optimal duration of interventions into the postoperative period. PMID:27566805

  11. Optimal Design of Aortic Leaflet Prosthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghista, Dhanjoo N.; Reul, Helmut; Ray, Gautam; Chandran, K. B.

    1978-01-01

    The design criteria for an optimum prosthetic-aortic leaflet valve are a smooth washout in the valve cusps, minimal leaflet stress, minimal transmembrane pressure for the valve to open, an adequate lifetime (for a given blood-compatible leaflet material's fatigue data). A rigorous design analysis is presented to obtain the prosthetic tri-leaflet aortic valve leaflet's optimum design parameters. Four alternative optimum leaflet geometries are obtained to satisfy the criteria of a smooth washout and minimal leaflet stress. The leaflet thicknesses of these four optimum designs are determined by satisfying the two remaining design criteria for minimal transmembrane opening pressure and adequate fatigue lifetime, which are formulated in terms of the elastic and fatigue properties of the selected leaflet material - Avcothane-51 (of the Avco-Everett Co. of Massachusetts). Prosthetic valves are fabricated on the basis of the optimum analysis and the resulting detailed engineering drawings of the designs are also presented in the paper.

  12. Glucose Suppresses Biological Ferroelectricity in Aortic Elastin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanming; Wang, Yunjie; Chow, Ming-Jay; Chen, Nataly Q.; Ma, Feiyue; Zhang, Yanhang; Li, Jiangyu

    2013-04-01

    Elastin is an intriguing extracellular matrix protein present in all connective tissues of vertebrates, rendering essential elasticity to connective tissues subjected to repeated physiological stresses. Using piezoresponse force microscopy, we show that the polarity of aortic elastin is switchable by an electrical field, which may be associated with the recently discovered biological ferroelectricity in the aorta. More interestingly, it is discovered that the switching in aortic elastin is largely suppressed by glucose treatment, which appears to freeze the internal asymmetric polar structures of elastin, making it much harder to switch, or suppressing the switching completely. Such loss of ferroelectricity could have important physiological and pathological implications from aging to arteriosclerosis that are closely related to glycation of elastin.

  13. Cardiovocal Syndrome Secondary to an Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsing-Won; Chen, Mei-Chien; Chao, Pin-Zhir; Lee, Fei-Peng

    2016-01-01

    We reported that a 68-year-old man presented to the ENT outpatient department complaining of hoarseness for more than 10 months. Clinical exam identified left vocal palsy in the paramedian position and atrophic vocal folds were noted. Chest radiography revealed a large bulging contour overlying aorta and left hilar shadow. Aortic aneurysm was proved by CT scanning. Contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography for further evaluation showed a broad-based aortic aneurysm at proximal descending aorta, projecting anterolaterally. Cardiovocal syndrome was proved. The syndrome is a rare clinical presentation. While a patient with unilateral vocal palsy is encountered, one might keep in mind the possibility of cardiovocal syndrome especially in an adult who had a cardiovascular disease. PMID:27088024

  14. Geometry of aortic heart valves. [prosthetic design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karara, H. M.

    1975-01-01

    Photogrammetric measurements of the surface topography of the aortic valves obtained from silicon rubber molds of freshly excised human aortic valves are presented. The data are part of an investigation into the design of a new prosthetic valve which will be a central-flow device, like the real valve and unlike previous central-occluding prostheses. Since the maximum stress on the heart valve is induced when the valve is closed and subject to diastolic back-pressure, it was decided to determine the valve geometry during diastole. That is, the molds were formed by pouring the rubber down the excised aortas, causing the valves to close. The molds were made under different pressures (20-120 torr); photogrammetry served as a vehicle for the assessment of the mold topography through the following outputs: digital models, surface profiles, and contour maps.

  15. Retroperitoneal lymphocele after abdominal aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Garrett, H E; Richardson, J W; Howard, H S; Garrett, H E

    1989-09-01

    Lymphoceles may occur as a result of lymphatic injury during abdominal aortic surgery. These lymphatic collections may occur as a retroperitoneal mass or as groin lymphoceles. Four cases are presented in which persistent retroperitoneal lymphoceles were discovered 2 to 8 years after surgery. Reexploration of the groin and repeated aspirations of lymphatic fluid failed to control the drainage. Reexploration of the retroperitoneum documented lymphatic injury, which was controlled by ligation of the lymphatics with suture. A review of the literature discloses five similar reported cases of retroperitoneal lymphocele and 12 cases of chylous ascites after abdominal aortic surgery. Clearly, avoiding lymphatic injury or immediate repair of any lymphatic injuries will prevent this problem. Once a persistent lymphocele has developed, aspiration will establish the diagnosis. Our experience would suggest that reexploration of the retroperitoneum is required to control the drainage and to prevent possible graft infection.

  16. Cardiovocal Syndrome Secondary to an Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsing-Won; Chen, Mei-Chien; Chao, Pin-Zhir; Lee, Fei-Peng

    2016-01-01

    We reported that a 68-year-old man presented to the ENT outpatient department complaining of hoarseness for more than 10 months. Clinical exam identified left vocal palsy in the paramedian position and atrophic vocal folds were noted. Chest radiography revealed a large bulging contour overlying aorta and left hilar shadow. Aortic aneurysm was proved by CT scanning. Contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography for further evaluation showed a broad-based aortic aneurysm at proximal descending aorta, projecting anterolaterally. Cardiovocal syndrome was proved. The syndrome is a rare clinical presentation. While a patient with unilateral vocal palsy is encountered, one might keep in mind the possibility of cardiovocal syndrome especially in an adult who had a cardiovascular disease. PMID:27088024

  17. Advances in the diagnosis of acute aortic syndromes: Role of imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Ciccone, Marco Matteo; Dentamaro, Ilaria; Masi, Filippo; Carbonara, Santa; Ricci, Gabriella

    2016-06-01

    Aortic diseases include a wide range of pathological conditions: aortic aneurysms, pseudoaneurysms, acute aortic syndromes, atherosclerotic and inflammatory conditions, genetic diseases and congenital anomalies. Acute aortic syndromes have acute onset and may be life-threatening. They include aortic dissection, intramural haematoma, penetrating aortic ulcer and traumatic aortic injury. Pain is the common denominator to all acute aortic syndromes. Pain occurs regardless of age, gender and other associated clinical conditions. In this review, we deal with the main findings in the clinical setting and the most recent indications for diagnostic imaging, which are aimed to start an appropriate treatment and improve the short- and long-term prognosis of these patients. PMID:26957573

  18. Aortic function: from the research laboratory to the clinic.

    PubMed

    Boudoulas, Konstantinos Dean; Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Raman, Subha V; Sparks, Elizabeth A; Triposciadis, Filippos; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Boudoulas, Harisios

    2012-01-01

    For many years, much of the pioneering research on aortic function was carried out by a small group of investigators frequently working away from the clinical environment in the research laboratory. The evaluation of aortic function using aortic pulse wave velocity, aortic distensibility, or other practical indices had yet to reach clinical threshold. It was necessary for the clinicians to take over and to apply these indices to the clinic. In this Odyssey, the work by the basic scientist was important to define the fundamental mechanisms of aortic function; however, it was the vision of the clinical investigator who recognized the importance of aortic function and introduced it into clinical practice. In the near future, the clinical investigator will introduce aortic function in daily clinical practice as the measurement of left ventricular function is used today. A close collaboration between the clinical and the basic investigator will be necessary in order to define the molecular mechanisms related to aortic wall synthesis and degradation of collagen and elastin. Application of these findings by the clinical investigator may help to delay or prevent aortic dysfunction related to aging or other conditions and diseases.

  19. Aortic Stenosis and Noncardiac Surgery: Managing the Risk.

    PubMed

    Pislaru, Sorin V; Abel, Martin D; Schaff, Hartzell V; Pellikka, Patricia A

    2015-11-01

    Managing the risk of noncardiac surgery in patients with aortic stenosis is a problem that is frequently confronted in clinical practice. Traditionally, patients with severe aortic stenosis were considered to be at substantial risk during noncardiac surgery, and as such, elective procedures were avoided before intervention on the aortic valve in most patients other than those who were ineligible or refused aortic valve replacement. Recent data suggest that with contemporary anesthesia and surgical techniques, the risk of noncardiac surgery is substantially lower than previously believed. We review the existent literature in the field, and propose a practical approach to complex patients.

  20. Aortic Disease in the Young: Genetic Aneurysm Syndromes, Connective Tissue Disorders, and Familial Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Marcelo; Zeidan, Fernanda; Lobato, Armando C.

    2013-01-01

    There are many genetic syndromes associated with the aortic aneurysmal disease which include Marfan syndrome (MFS), Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS), familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD), bicuspid aortic valve disease (BAV), and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). In the absence of familial history and other clinical findings, the proportion of thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms and dissections resulting from a genetic predisposition is still unknown. In this study, we propose the review of the current genetic knowledge in the aortic disease, observing, in the results that the causative genes and molecular pathways involved in the pathophysiology of aortic aneurysm disease remain undiscovered and continue to be an area of intensive research. PMID:23401778

  1. Intra-aortic balloon pump associated with dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction after valve replacement for aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Morewood, G H; Weiss, S J

    2000-03-01

    An unstable patient with critical aortic stenosis had an intra-aortic balloon pump placed preoperatively for hemodynamic support and alleviation of symptoms. After separation from cardiopulmonary bypass following aortic valve replacement, the patient was hypotensive with increased pulmonary artery pressures. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed left ventricular outflow tract obstruction associated with systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve and severe mitral regurgitation. This pathophysiology was present when ventricular systole was preceded by balloon counterpulsation, but was absent during unassisted systole. This case report demonstrates a potentially significant untoward effect of intra-aortic balloon pump augmentation after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis. The timely diagnosis of this iatrogenic condition in the operating room permitted the prompt implementation of appropriate management strategies and avoided unnecessary surgical intervention.

  2. Crater-Like Ulceration of Aortic Arch.

    PubMed

    Simon, Caterina; Calabrese, Alice; Canu, Gianluca; Merlo, Maurizio; Galletti, Lorenzo

    2014-12-01

    We report the case of a 78-year-old female who presented to our hospital with signs of hemorrhagic shock and breathlessness. A transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated pericardial effusion. Computed tomography of the chest showed a penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer of the aortic arch with an intramural hematoma of the ascending and descending aorta. Endovascular repair with stent-grafting was urgently performed and a pericardial window placement was done to reduce mediastinal bleeding. PMID:26798748

  3. Crater-Like Ulceration of Aortic Arch.

    PubMed

    Simon, Caterina; Calabrese, Alice; Canu, Gianluca; Merlo, Maurizio; Galletti, Lorenzo

    2014-12-01

    We report the case of a 78-year-old female who presented to our hospital with signs of hemorrhagic shock and breathlessness. A transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated pericardial effusion. Computed tomography of the chest showed a penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer of the aortic arch with an intramural hematoma of the ascending and descending aorta. Endovascular repair with stent-grafting was urgently performed and a pericardial window placement was done to reduce mediastinal bleeding.

  4. [Single coronary artery and right aortic arch].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Coronary anomalies are mostly asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally during coronary angiography or echocardiography. However, they must be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of angina, dyspnea, syncope, acute myocardial infarction or sudden death in young patients. The case is presented of two rare anomalies, single coronary artery originating from right sinus of Valsalva and right aortic arch, in a 65 year-old patient with atherosclerotic coronary artery disease treated percutaneously.

  5. [Single coronary artery and right aortic arch].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Coronary anomalies are mostly asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally during coronary angiography or echocardiography. However, they must be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of angina, dyspnea, syncope, acute myocardial infarction or sudden death in young patients. The case is presented of two rare anomalies, single coronary artery originating from right sinus of Valsalva and right aortic arch, in a 65 year-old patient with atherosclerotic coronary artery disease treated percutaneously. PMID:25304052

  6. Total Percutaneous Aortic Repair: Midterm Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Bent, Clare L. Fotiadis, Nikolas; Renfrew, Ian; Walsh, Michael; Brohi, Karim; Kyriakides, Constantinos; Matson, Matthew

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate and midterm outcomes of percutaneous endovascular repair of thoracic and abdominal aortic pathology. Between December 2003 and June 2005, 21 patients (mean age: 60.4 {+-} 17.1 years; 15 males, 6 females) underwent endovascular stent-graft insertion for thoracic (n = 13) or abdominal aortic (n = 8) pathology. Preprocedural computed tomographic angiography (CTA) was performed to assess the suitability of aorto-iliac and common femoral artery (CFA) anatomy, including the degree of CFA calcification, for total percutaneous aortic stent-graft repair. Percutaneous access was used for the introduction of 18- to 26-Fr delivery devices. A 'preclose' closure technique using two Perclose suture devices (Perclose A-T; Abbott Vascular) was used in all cases. Data were prospectively collected. Each CFA puncture site was assessed via clinical examination and CTA at 1, 6, and 12 months, followed by annual review thereafter. Minimum follow-up was 36 months. Outcome measures evaluated were rates of technical success, conversion to open surgical repair, complications, and late incidence of arterial stenosis at the site of Perclose suture deployment. A total of 58 Perclose devices were used to close 29 femoral arteriotomies. Outer diameters of stent-graft delivery devices used were 18 Fr (n = 5), 20 Fr (n = 3), 22 Fr (n = 4), 24 Fr (n = 15), and 26 Fr (n = 2). Percutaneous closure was successful in 96.6% (28/29) of arteriotomies. Conversion to surgical repair was required at one access site (3.4%). Mean follow-up was 50 {+-} 8 months. No late complications were observed. By CT criteria, no patient developed a >50% reduction in CFA caliber at the site of Perclose deployment during the study period. In conclusion, percutaneous aortic stent-graft insertion can be safely performed, with a low risk of both immediate and midterm access-related complications.

  7. Myocardial Infarction and Aortic Root Mycotic Aneurysm Complicating Aortic Valve Endocarditis: Utility of Cardiac CT

    PubMed Central

    Moores, Aimee E.; Cahill, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Aortic mycotic aneurysms are a rare but life-threatening potential complication of infective endocarditis. Rapid deterioration of the vascular wall in highly focal areas makes these pseudoaneurysms particularly prone to rupture, resulting in uncontrolled aortic hemorrhage. While computed tomography angiography (CTA) is the imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of mycotic aneurysms, it is not routinely performed in patients with known or suspected infective endocarditis (IE). However, current valvular heart disease guidelines support the use of cardiac CTA in cases of IE and suspected perivalvular extension when there is inadequate or ambiguous visualization on echocardiography. Here, we describe a case of IE in which cardiac CTA was used for two purposes: to assess perivalvular complications and to define coronary anatomy in a patient with a suspected embolic myocardial infarction. Subsequent detection of an aortic root mycotic aneurysm not previously demonstrated on transthoracic or transesophageal echocardiography allowed for timely and uncomplicated surgical intervention, while avoiding invasive coronary angiography. PMID:27642299

  8. Myocardial Infarction and Aortic Root Mycotic Aneurysm Complicating Aortic Valve Endocarditis: Utility of Cardiac CT

    PubMed Central

    Moores, Aimee E.; Cahill, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Aortic mycotic aneurysms are a rare but life-threatening potential complication of infective endocarditis. Rapid deterioration of the vascular wall in highly focal areas makes these pseudoaneurysms particularly prone to rupture, resulting in uncontrolled aortic hemorrhage. While computed tomography angiography (CTA) is the imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of mycotic aneurysms, it is not routinely performed in patients with known or suspected infective endocarditis (IE). However, current valvular heart disease guidelines support the use of cardiac CTA in cases of IE and suspected perivalvular extension when there is inadequate or ambiguous visualization on echocardiography. Here, we describe a case of IE in which cardiac CTA was used for two purposes: to assess perivalvular complications and to define coronary anatomy in a patient with a suspected embolic myocardial infarction. Subsequent detection of an aortic root mycotic aneurysm not previously demonstrated on transthoracic or transesophageal echocardiography allowed for timely and uncomplicated surgical intervention, while avoiding invasive coronary angiography.

  9. Transcaval Aortic Access for Percutaneous Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Initial Human Experience

    PubMed Central

    Uflacker, Andre; Lim, Scott; Ragosta, Michael; Haskal, Ziv J; Lederman, Robert J.; Kern, John; Upchurch, Gilbert; Huber, Timothy; Angle, John F.; Ailawadi, Gorav

    2015-01-01

    Transcaval aortic access has been used for deployment of transcatheter aortic valves in patients in whom conventional arterial approaches are not feasible. The present report describes its use for thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in a 61-year-old man with a descending thoracic aneurysm. Transcaval access was performed in lieu of a surgical iliac conduit in view of small atherosclerotic pelvic arteries. TEVAR was successfully performed, followed by intervascular tract occlusion with the use of a ventricular septal occluder. Computed tomography 2 d later demonstrated no extravasation. At 1 mo, the aneurysm was free of endoleaks, the aortocaval tract had healed, and the patient had returned to baseline functional status. PMID:26408210

  10. Myocardial Infarction and Aortic Root Mycotic Aneurysm Complicating Aortic Valve Endocarditis: Utility of Cardiac CT.

    PubMed

    Moores, Aimee E; Cahill, Michael S; Villines, Todd C

    2016-01-01

    Aortic mycotic aneurysms are a rare but life-threatening potential complication of infective endocarditis. Rapid deterioration of the vascular wall in highly focal areas makes these pseudoaneurysms particularly prone to rupture, resulting in uncontrolled aortic hemorrhage. While computed tomography angiography (CTA) is the imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of mycotic aneurysms, it is not routinely performed in patients with known or suspected infective endocarditis (IE). However, current valvular heart disease guidelines support the use of cardiac CTA in cases of IE and suspected perivalvular extension when there is inadequate or ambiguous visualization on echocardiography. Here, we describe a case of IE in which cardiac CTA was used for two purposes: to assess perivalvular complications and to define coronary anatomy in a patient with a suspected embolic myocardial infarction. Subsequent detection of an aortic root mycotic aneurysm not previously demonstrated on transthoracic or transesophageal echocardiography allowed for timely and uncomplicated surgical intervention, while avoiding invasive coronary angiography. PMID:27642299

  11. Non coding RNAs in aortic aneurysmal disease

    PubMed Central

    Duggirala, Aparna; Delogu, Francesca; Angelini, Timothy G.; Smith, Tanya; Caputo, Massimo; Rajakaruna, Cha; Emanueli, Costanza

    2015-01-01

    An aneurysm is a local dilatation of a vessel wall which is >50% its original diameter. Within the spectrum of cardiovascular diseases, aortic aneurysms are among the most challenging to treat. Most patients present acutely after aneurysm rupture or dissection from a previous asymptomatic condition and are managed by open surgical or endovascular repair. In addition, patients may harbor concurrent disease contraindicating surgical intervention. Collectively, these factors have driven the search for alternative methods of identifying, monitoring and treating aortic aneurisms using less invasive approaches. Non-coding RNA (ncRNAs) are emerging as new fundamental regulators of gene expression. The small microRNAs have opened the field of ncRNAs capturing the attention of basic and clinical scientists for their potential to become new therapeutic targets and clinical biomarkers for aortic aneurysm. More recently, long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) have started to be actively investigated, leading to first exciting reports, which further suggest their important and yet largely unexplored contribution to vascular physiology and disease. This review introduces the different ncRNA types and focus at ncRNA roles in aorta aneurysms. We discuss the potential of therapeutic interventions targeting ncRNAs and we describe the research models allowing for mechanistic studies and clinical translation attempts for controlling aneurysm progression. Furthermore, we discuss the potential role of microRNAs and lncRNAs as clinical biomarkers. PMID:25883602

  12. Fluid dynamics of aortic valve stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarz-Motamed, Zahra; Maftoon, Nima

    2009-11-01

    Aortic valve stenosis, which causes considerable constriction of the flow passage, is one of the most frequent cardiovascular diseases and is the most common cause of the valvular replacements which take place for around 100,000 per year in North America. Furthermore, it is considered as the most frequent cardiac disease after arterial hypertension and coronary artery disease. The objective of this study is to develop an analytical model considering the coupling effect between fluid flow and elastic deformation with reasonable boundary conditions to describe the effect of AS on the left ventricle and the aorta. The pulsatile and Newtonian blood flow through aortic stenosis with vascular wall deformability is analyzed and its effects are discussed in terms of flow parameters such as velocity, resistance to flow, shear stress distribution and pressure loss. Meanwhile we developed analytical expressions to improve the comprehension of the transvalvular hemodynamics and the aortic stenosis hemodynamics which is of great interest because of one main reason. To medical scientists, an accurate knowledge of the mechanical properties of whole blood flow in the aorta can suggest a new diagnostic tool.

  13. Cadaveric aorta implantation for aortic graft infection.

    PubMed

    Ali, Asad; Bahia, Sandeep S S; Ali, Tahir

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes a 73-year-old gentleman who underwent explantation of an infected prosthetic aorto-iliac graft and replacement with a cryopreserved thoracic and aorto-iliac allograft. The patient has been followed up a for more than a year after surgery and remains well. After elective tube graft repair of his abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in 2003, he presented to our unit in 2012 in cardiac arrest as a result of a rupture of the distal graft suture line due to infection. After resuscitation he underwent aorto-bifemoral grafting using a cuff of the original aortic graft proximally. Distally the new graft was anastomosed to his common femoral arteries, with gentamicin beads left in situ. Post discharge the patient was kept under close surveillance with serial investigations including nuclear scanning, however it became apparent that his new graft was infected and that he would require aortic graft replacement, an operation with a mortality of at least 50%. The patient underwent the operation and findings confirmed a synthetic graft infection. This tube graft was explanted and a cryopreserved aorta was used to the refashion the abdominal aorta and its bifurcation. The operation required a return to theatre day one post operatively for a bleeding side branch, which was repaired. The patient went on to make a full recovery stepping down from the intensive therapy unit day 6 post operatively and went on to be discharged 32 days after his cryopreserved aorta implantation. PMID:27351624

  14. Molecular Mechanisms of Thoracic Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Darrell; Shen, Ying H.; Russell, Ludivine; Coselli, Joseph S.; LeMaire, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Thoracic aortic dissection (TAD) is a highly lethal vascular disease. In many patients with TAD, the aorta progressively dilates and ultimately ruptures. Dissection formation, progression, and rupture cannot be reliably prevented pharmacologically because the molecular mechanisms of aortic wall degeneration are poorly understood. The key histopathologic feature of TAD is medial degeneration, a process characterized by smooth muscle cell depletion and extracellular matrix degradation. These structural changes have a profound impact on the functional properties of the aortic wall and can result from excessive protease-mediated destruction of the extracellular matrix, altered signaling pathways, and altered gene expression. Review of the literature reveals differences in the processes that lead to ascending versus descending and sporadic versus hereditary TAD. These differences add to the complexity of this disease. Although tremendous progress has been made in diagnosing and treating TAD, a better understanding of the molecular, cellular, and genetic mechanisms that cause this disease is necessary to developing more effective preventative and therapeutic treatment strategies. PMID:23856125

  15. DOCK8 deficiency in a boy who presented with a giant aortic aneurysm between aortic root and iliac bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Patıroğlu, Türkan; Akar, Himmet Haluk; Doğan, Mehmet Sait; Üzüm, Kazım

    2016-06-01

    Dedicator of cytokinesis 8 protein (DOCK8) deficiency is an autosomal recessive, inherited form of hyper-immunoglobulin E (hyper-IgE) syndrome, characterized by persistent cutaneous viral infections, elevated IgE, eosinophilia, and allergic manifestations. The case of a 10-year-old boy who presented with giant aortic aneurysm between the aortic root and iliac bifurcation is described in the present report. Aortic aneurysm of this size has not yet been reported. PMID:27372622

  16. Coronary artery dissection with rupture of aortic valve commissure following type A aortic dissection: the role of 64-slice MDCT.

    PubMed

    Das, K M; Abdou, Sayed M; El-Menyar, Ayman; Ayman, El Menyar; Khulaifi, A A; Nabti, A L

    2008-01-01

    A rare case of bilateral coronary artery dissection with rupture of aortic valve commissure following type A aortic dissection is described. 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) was able to demonstrate both this findings along with involvement of other neck vessels. TEE demonstrated the severity and mechanisms of aortic valve damage and assisted the surgeon in valve repair. MDCT has played an invaluable role in the diagnosis of the abnormal details of such life-threatening vascular complications. PMID:18384568

  17. Comparison of gene expression profiles in aortic dissection and normal human aortic tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Yu, Cuntao; Chang, Qian; Luo, Xinjin; Qiu, Juntao; Liu, Shen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the gene expression profiles in aortic dissection (AD) and healthy human aortic tissue samples by DNA microarray analysis in order to screen the differential genes. In total, five AD and four healthy aortic specimens were selected; the total RNA was extracted and reverse transcribed into cDNA and in vitro transcribed into aRNA, followed by microarray hybridization for analysis. Thereafter, the transcription levels of six differential genes, myosin light chain kinase (MYLK), polycystin 1, transient receptor potential channel interacting (PKD-1), myosin heavy chain 11 (MYH11), superoxide dismutase 3, extracellular (SOD3), filamin A (FLNA), and transgelin (TAGLN), screened from the expression profiles were quantitatively verified. Compared with the healthy aortic specimens, a total of 1,661 genes in the AD group demonstrated more than 2-fold differential expression, of which 997 genes were upregulated and 664 genes were downregulated. Thereafter, six AD-associated genes that showed downregulation in the microarray assay were selected for quantitatively verifying the gene transcription level using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), which confirmed their downregulation compared with the healthy aortic tissue genes; of the six genes, the expression levels of MYLK, PKD-1, MYH11, SOD3 and TAGLN were significantly downregulated (P<0.05), while the expression of FLNA was not significantly downregulated (P>0.05). Thus, whole genome microarray may be used to screen differentially expressed genes between AD and healthy aortic tissues. When used in combination with RT-qPCR validation, this method may provide novel strategies for investigating AD. PMID:27699008

  18. Cytokine amplification and macrophage effector functions in aortic inflammation and abdominal aortic aneurysm formation.

    PubMed

    Ijaz, Talha; Tilton, Ronald G; Brasier, Allan R

    2016-08-01

    On April 29, 2015, Son and colleagues published an article entitled "Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is required for aortic dissection/intramural haematoma" in Nature Communications. The authors observed that the heterozygous Kruppel-like transcription factor 6 (KLF6) deficiency or absence of myeloid-specific KLF6 led to upregulation of macrophage GM-CSF expression, promoted the development of aortic hematoma/dissection, and stimulated abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) formation when the vessel wall was subjected to an inflammatory stimulus. The additional findings of increased adventitial fibrotic deposition, marked infiltration of macrophages, and increased expression of matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9) and IL-6 were blocked with neutralizing GM-CSF antibodies, or recapitulated in normal mice with excess GM-CSF administration. The authors concluded that GM-CSF is a key regulatory molecule in the development of AAA and further suggested that activation of GM-CSF is independent of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)-Smad pathway associated with the Marfan aortic pathology. In this perspective, we expand on this mechanism, drawing from previous studies implicating a similar essential role for IL-6 signaling in macrophage activation, Th17 expansion and aortic dissections. We propose a sequential "two-hit" model of vascular inflammation involving initial vascular injury followed by recruitment of Ly6C(hi) macrophages. Aided by fibroblast interactions inflammatory macrophages produce amplification of IL-6 and GM-CSF expression that converge on a common, pathogenic Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducers and activations of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway. This pathway stimulates effector functions of macrophages, promotes differentiation of Th17 lymphocytes and enhances matrix metalloproteinase expression, ultimately resulting in deterioration of vascular wall structural integrity. Further research evaluating the impact of

  19. Cytokine amplification and macrophage effector functions in aortic inflammation and abdominal aortic aneurysm formation

    PubMed Central

    Ijaz, Talha; Tilton, Ronald G.

    2016-01-01

    On April 29, 2015, Son and colleagues published an article entitled “Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is required for aortic dissection/intramural haematoma” in Nature Communications. The authors observed that the heterozygous Kruppel-like transcription factor 6 (KLF6) deficiency or absence of myeloid-specific KLF6 led to upregulation of macrophage GM-CSF expression, promoted the development of aortic hematoma/dissection, and stimulated abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) formation when the vessel wall was subjected to an inflammatory stimulus. The additional findings of increased adventitial fibrotic deposition, marked infiltration of macrophages, and increased expression of matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9) and IL-6 were blocked with neutralizing GM-CSF antibodies, or recapitulated in normal mice with excess GM-CSF administration. The authors concluded that GM-CSF is a key regulatory molecule in the development of AAA and further suggested that activation of GM-CSF is independent of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)-Smad pathway associated with the Marfan aortic pathology. In this perspective, we expand on this mechanism, drawing from previous studies implicating a similar essential role for IL-6 signaling in macrophage activation, Th17 expansion and aortic dissections. We propose a sequential “two-hit” model of vascular inflammation involving initial vascular injury followed by recruitment of Ly6Chi macrophages. Aided by fibroblast interactions inflammatory macrophages produce amplification of IL-6 and GM-CSF expression that converge on a common, pathogenic Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducers and activations of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway. This pathway stimulates effector functions of macrophages, promotes differentiation of Th17 lymphocytes and enhances matrix metalloproteinase expression, ultimately resulting in deterioration of vascular wall structural integrity. Further research evaluating the impact of

  20. Comparison of gene expression profiles in aortic dissection and normal human aortic tissues

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Yu, Cuntao; Chang, Qian; Luo, Xinjin; Qiu, Juntao; Liu, Shen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the gene expression profiles in aortic dissection (AD) and healthy human aortic tissue samples by DNA microarray analysis in order to screen the differential genes. In total, five AD and four healthy aortic specimens were selected; the total RNA was extracted and reverse transcribed into cDNA and in vitro transcribed into aRNA, followed by microarray hybridization for analysis. Thereafter, the transcription levels of six differential genes, myosin light chain kinase (MYLK), polycystin 1, transient receptor potential channel interacting (PKD-1), myosin heavy chain 11 (MYH11), superoxide dismutase 3, extracellular (SOD3), filamin A (FLNA), and transgelin (TAGLN), screened from the expression profiles were quantitatively verified. Compared with the healthy aortic specimens, a total of 1,661 genes in the AD group demonstrated more than 2-fold differential expression, of which 997 genes were upregulated and 664 genes were downregulated. Thereafter, six AD-associated genes that showed downregulation in the microarray assay were selected for quantitatively verifying the gene transcription level using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), which confirmed their downregulation compared with the healthy aortic tissue genes; of the six genes, the expression levels of MYLK, PKD-1, MYH11, SOD3 and TAGLN were significantly downregulated (P<0.05), while the expression of FLNA was not significantly downregulated (P>0.05). Thus, whole genome microarray may be used to screen differentially expressed genes between AD and healthy aortic tissues. When used in combination with RT-qPCR validation, this method may provide novel strategies for investigating AD.

  1. Contemporary Use of Balloon Aortic Valvuloplasty in the Era of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Dawn S.; Shavelle, David M.; Cunningham, Mark J.; Matthews, Ray V.; Starnes, Vaughn A.

    2014-01-01

    The development of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has increased the use of balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) in treating aortic stenosis. We evaluated our use of BAV in an academic tertiary referral center with a developing TAVI program. We reviewed 69 consecutive stand-alone BAV procedures that were performed in 62 patients (mean age, 77 ± 10 yr; 62% men; baseline mean New York Heart Association functional class, 3 ± 1) from January 2009 through December 2012. Enrollment for the CoreValve® clinical trial began in January 2011. We divided the study cohort into 2 distinct periods, defined as pre-TAVI (2009–2010) and TAVI (2011–2012). We reviewed clinical, hemodynamic, and follow-up data, calculating each BAV procedure as a separate case. Stand-alone BAV use increased 145% from the pre-TAVI period to the TAVI period. The mean aortic gradient reduction was 13 ± 10 mmHg. Patients were successfully bridged as intended to cardiac or noncardiac surgery in 100% of instances and to TAVI in 60%. Five patients stabilized with BAV subsequently underwent surgical aortic valve replacement with no operative deaths. The overall in-hospital mortality rate (17.4%) was highest in emergent patients (61%). The implementation of a TAVI program was associated with a significant change in BAV volumes and indications. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty can successfully bridge patients to surgery or TAVI, although least successfully in patients nearer death. As TAVI expands to more centers and higher-risk patient groups, BAV might become integral to collaborative treatment decisions by surgeons and interventional cardiologists. PMID:25425977

  2. Study of ascending aortic elasticity in the Chinese population with a high risk of aortic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Guo, Wei; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Jia, Xin; Zhang, Hong-Peng; Zhang, Min-Hong; Du, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze aortic elastic properties (AEP) characteristics, dissection and elastic data of ascending aorta (AA) in the population with a high risk of aortic diseases. Methods: Forty five patients with artery diseases undergoing aortic digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were enrolled in this study. The maximal, minimal diameter and changes in diameter of ascending and descending aorta were measured, and the aortic stiffness index (ASI) and aortic distensibility (AD) were calculated. Results: The mean changes in diameter were (2.34 ± 0.95), (1.6 ± 0.71), (1.65 ± 0.68) and (0.99 ± 0.28) mm. The ASI of D1-D4 aorta was (9.67 ± 5.02), (15.54 ± 7.85), (13.78 ± 6.45) and (15.53 ± 4.74). AD (mmHg-1) × 10-3 of D1-D4 aorta was (2.76 ± 1.65), (1.76 ± 1.15), (1.94 ± 1.23) and (1.33 ± 0.40). The ratio of diameter difference/minimal diameter was (7.18 ± 3.21), (4.6 ± 2.3), (4.96 ± 2.22) and (3.86 ± 1.16). The tapered angle of D2-D3 aorta was (2.47 ± 1.80)°. The maximal and minimal diameters of D1 aorta significantly differed between male and female subjects. Conclusion: DSA and artery pressure accurately measure the changes in diameter and artery pressure of aorta along with single beat. Aortic ASI and AD could be accurately calculated to precisely analyze AEP. Over aging and arteriosclerosis development, D2 aorta is the most vulnerable to elasticity attenuation, whereas D1 aorta is the least vulnerable part with certain elasticity. PMID:26064228

  3. Cytokine amplification and macrophage effector functions in aortic inflammation and abdominal aortic aneurysm formation

    PubMed Central

    Ijaz, Talha; Tilton, Ronald G.

    2016-01-01

    On April 29, 2015, Son and colleagues published an article entitled “Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is required for aortic dissection/intramural haematoma” in Nature Communications. The authors observed that the heterozygous Kruppel-like transcription factor 6 (KLF6) deficiency or absence of myeloid-specific KLF6 led to upregulation of macrophage GM-CSF expression, promoted the development of aortic hematoma/dissection, and stimulated abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) formation when the vessel wall was subjected to an inflammatory stimulus. The additional findings of increased adventitial fibrotic deposition, marked infiltration of macrophages, and increased expression of matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9) and IL-6 were blocked with neutralizing GM-CSF antibodies, or recapitulated in normal mice with excess GM-CSF administration. The authors concluded that GM-CSF is a key regulatory molecule in the development of AAA and further suggested that activation of GM-CSF is independent of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)-Smad pathway associated with the Marfan aortic pathology. In this perspective, we expand on this mechanism, drawing from previous studies implicating a similar essential role for IL-6 signaling in macrophage activation, Th17 expansion and aortic dissections. We propose a sequential “two-hit” model of vascular inflammation involving initial vascular injury followed by recruitment of Ly6Chi macrophages. Aided by fibroblast interactions inflammatory macrophages produce amplification of IL-6 and GM-CSF expression that converge on a common, pathogenic Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducers and activations of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway. This pathway stimulates effector functions of macrophages, promotes differentiation of Th17 lymphocytes and enhances matrix metalloproteinase expression, ultimately resulting in deterioration of vascular wall structural integrity. Further research evaluating the impact of

  4. Determination of aortic pulse wave velocity from waveform decomposition of the central aortic pressure pulse.

    PubMed

    Qasem, Ahmed; Avolio, Alberto

    2008-02-01

    Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV), calculated from pulse transit time (PTT) using 2 separate pulse recordings over a known distance, is a significant biomarker of cardiovascular risk. This study evaluates a novel method of determining PTT from waveform decomposition of central aortic pressure using a single pulse measurement. Aortic pressure was estimated from a transformed radial pulse and decomposed into forward and backward waves using a triangular flow wave. Pulse transit time was determined from cross-correlation of forward and backward waves. Pulse transit time, representing twice the PTT between 2 specific sites, was compared with independent measurements of carotid-femoral PTT in a cohort of 46 subjects (23 females; age 57+/-14 years). Linear regression between measured PTT (y; milliseconds) and calculated PTT (x; milliseconds) was y=1.05x-2.1 (r=0.67; P<0.001). This model was tested in a separate group of 44 subjects (21 females; age 55+/-14 years) by comparing measured carotid-femoral PWV (y; meters per second) and PWV calculated using the estimated value of PTT (eTR/2) and carotid femoral distance (x; meters per second; y=1.21x-2.5; r=0.82; P<0.001). Findings indicate that the time lag between the forward and backward waves obtained from the decomposition of aortic pressure wave can be used to determine PWV along the aortic trunk and shows good agreement with carotid-femoral PWV. This technique can be used as a noninvasive and nonintrusive method for measurement of aortic PWV using a single pressure recording.

  5. Fenestrated endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms: a less invasive option for the treatment of juxtarenal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Bryan A; Abularrage, Christopher J

    2016-05-01

    Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair has become the predominant surgical therapy for abdominal aortic aneurysms. Whereas anatomical limitations had become the major contraindication to endovascular treatment, fenestrated stent grafts were developed to overcome such obstacles. Fenestrated endovascular aortic aneurysm repair now provides an additional treatment option for patients felt to be unsuitable for an invasive open repair whose anatomy is not compatible with more traditional stent grafts. We review the evolution of fenestrated endovascular aortic aneurysm repair and compare its safety and efficacy to other endovascular options.

  6. Emergency percutaneous balloon aortic valvuloplasty using a triple balloon technique to a patient with severe aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Kenji; Hara, Hidehiko; Yamashita, Yuji; Takenaka, Hiroki; Nakamura, Masato; Sugi, Kaoru

    2013-10-01

    A 76-year-old male who had already been diagnosed with ischemic heart disease and severe aortic stenosis was transferred to our hospital in a state of cardiogenic shock. We finally diagnosed him with severe aortic stenosis. We decided to perform emergency balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) as a bridge treatment to surgical repair. We first performed BAV with a double balloon technique, and next with a triple balloon technique. As a result, the blood pressure recovered, and surgical aortic valve repair could thus be successfully performed.

  7. Asymptomatic Interrupted Aortic Arch, Severe Tricuspid Regurgitation, and Bicuspid Aortic Valve in a 76-Year-Old Woman

    PubMed Central

    Tajdini, Masih; Sardari, Akram; Forouzannia, Seyed Khalil; Baradaran, Abdolvahab; Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Interrupted aortic arch is a rare congenital abnormality with a high infancy mortality rate. The principal finding is loss of luminal continuity between the ascending and descending portions of the aorta. Because of the high mortality rate in infancy, interrupted aortic arch is very rare among adults. In this report, we describe the case of a 76-year-old woman with asymptomatic interrupted aortic arch, severe tricuspid regurgitation, and bicuspid aortic valve. To our knowledge, she is the oldest patient ever reported with this possibly unique combination of pathologic conditions. In addition to reporting her case, we review the relevant medical literature. PMID:27777532

  8. Unreliability of aortic size index to predict risk of aortic dissection in a patient with Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nijs, Jan; Gelsomino, Sandro; Lucà, Fabiana; Parise, Orlando; Maessen, Jos G; Meir, Mark La

    2014-01-01

    Aortic size index (ASI) has been proposed as a reliable criterion to predict risk for aortic dissection in Turner syndrome with significant thresholds of 20-25 mm/m2. We report a case of aortic arch dissection in a patient with Turner syndrome who, from the ASI thresholds proposed, was deemed to be at low risk of aortic dissection or rupture and was not eligible for prophylactic surgery. This case report strongly supports careful monitoring and surgical evaluation even when the ASI is < 20 mm/m2 if other significant risk factors are present. PMID:24944765

  9. Painless Type B Aortic Dissection: Insights From the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Tolenaar, Jip L.; Hutchison, Stuart J.; Montgomery, Dan; O'Gara, Patrick; Fattori, Rosella; Pyeritz, Reed E.; Pape, Linda; Suzuki, Toru; Evangelista, Arturo; Moll, Frans L.; Rampoldi, Vincenzo; Isselbacher, Eric M.; Nienaber, Cristoph A.; Eagle, Kim A.; Trimarchi, Santi

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The classical presentation of a patient with Type B acute aortic dissection (TBAAD) is characterized by severe chest, back, or abdominal pain, ripping or tearing in nature. However, some patients present with painless acute aortic dissection, which can lead to a delay in diagnosis and treatment. We utilized the International Registry on Acute Aortic Dissections (IRAD) database to study these patients. Methods: We analyzed 43 painless TBAAD patients enrolled in the database between January 1996 and July 2012. The differences in presentation, diagnostics, management, and outcome were compared with patients presenting with painful TBAAD. Results: Among the 1162 TBAAD patients enrolled in IRAD, 43 patients presented with painless TBAAD (3.7%). The mean age of patients with painless TBAAD was significantly higher than normal TBAAD patients (69.2 versus 63.3 years, P = 0.020). The presence of atherosclerosis (46.4% versus 30.1%, P = 0.022), diabetes (17.9% versus 7.5%; P = 0.018), and other aortic diseases (8.6% versus 2.3%, P= 0.051), such as prior aortic aneurysm (31% versus 18.8% P = 0.049) was more common in these patients. Median delay time between presentation and diagnosis was longer in painless patients (median 34.0 versus 19.0 hours; P = 0.006). Dissection of iatrogenic origin (19.5% versus 1.3%; P < 0.001) was significantly more frequent in the painless group. The in-hospital mortality was 18.6% in the painless group, compared with an in-hospital mortality of 9.9% in the control group (P = 0.063). Conclusion: Painless TBAAD is a relatively rare presentation (3.7%) of aortic dissection, and is often associated with a history of atherosclerosis, diabetes, prior aortic disease including aortic aneurysm, and an iatrogenic origin. We observed a trend for increased in-hospital mortality in painless TBAAD patients, which may be the result of a delay in diagnosis and management. Therefore, physicians should be aware of this relative rare presentation of

  10. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement – pros and cons of keyhole aortic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Szałański, Przemysław; Zembala, Michał; Filipiak, Krzysztof; Karolak, Wojciech; Wojarski, Jacek; Garbacz, Marcin; Kaczmarczyk, Aleksandra; Kwiecień, Anna; Zembala, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Over the last twenty years, minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) has evolved into a safe, well-tolerated and efficient surgical treatment option for aortic valve disease. It has been shown to reduce postoperative morbidity, providing faster recovery and rehabilitation, shorter hospital stay and better cosmetic results compared with conventional surgery. A variety of minimally invasive accesses have been developed and utilized to date. This concise review demonstrates and discusses surgical techniques used in contemporary approaches to MIAVR and presents the most important results of MIAVR procedures. PMID:26336491

  11. Complicated chronic pancreatitis causing mycotic aortic aneurysm: in situ replacement with a cryopreserved aortic allograft.

    PubMed

    Knosalla, C; Bauer, M; Weng, Y g; Weidemann, H; Hetzer, R

    2000-11-01

    Mycotic aortic aneurysm, which resulted from infected pancreatic pseudocysts with retroperitoneal abscess, developed in a patient with chronic pancreatitis. The aorta was approached through median laparotomy. Necrotic material was debrided from the pancreatic pseudocysts, and the mycotic aneurysm was resected. The aorta was replaced in situ with a cryopreserved aortic allograft. This report discusses the rare complication of pancreatic pseudocysts, which affect the infrarenal abdominal aorta and cause a large mycotic aneurysm. This case suggests that the use of cryopreserved allografts is promising for in situ reconstruction, even in a grossly infected field.

  12. Development of the Aortic Baroreflex in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, Tsuyoshi; Yamasaki, Masao; Waki, Hidefumi; Katsuda, Shin-ichiro; Oishi, Hirotaka; Katahira, Kiyoaki; Nagayama, Tadanori; Miyake, Masao; Miyamoto, Yukako

    2003-01-01

    Baroreceptors sense pressure in blood vessels and send this information to the brain. The primary baroreceptors are located in the main blood vessel leaving the heart (the aorta) and in the arteries in the neck (the carotid arteries). The brain uses information from the baroreceptors to determine whether blood pressure should be raised or lowered. These reflex responses are called baroreflexes. Changing position within a gravity field (i.e., moving from lying to sitting or standing) powerfully stimulates the baroreflexes. In weightlessness, the amount of stimuli that the baroreflexes receive is dramatically reduced. If this reduction occurs when the pathways that control the baroreflexes are being formed, it is possible that either the structure or function of the baroreceptors may be permanently changed. To study the effect of microgravity on structural and functional development of the aortic baroreflex system, we studied young rats (eight days old at launch) that flew on the Space Shuttle Columbia for 16 days. Six rats were studied on landing day; another six were studied after re-adapting to Earth's gravity for 30 days. On both landing day and 30 days after landing, we tested the sensitivity of the rats' baroreflex response. While the rats were anaesthetized, we recorded their arterial pressure, heart rate, and aortic nerve activity. After the tissues were preserved with perfusion fixation, we also examined the baroreflex structures. On landing day, we found that, compared to the controls, the flight rats had: fewer unmyelinated nerve fibers in their aortic nerves lower baroreflex sensitivity significantly lower contraction ability and wall tension of the aorta a reduced number of smooth muscle cells in the aorta. In the 30-day recovery group, the sensitivity of the baroreflex showed no difference between the flight rats and the control groups, although the unmyelinated fibers of the aortic nerve remained reduced in the flight rats. The results show that

  13. The pathology and pathobiology of bicuspid aortic valve: State of the art and novel research perspectives†

    PubMed Central

    Bossé, Yohan; Huggins, Gordon S; Corte, Alessandro Della; Pibarot, Philippe; Michelena, Hector I.; Limongelli, Giuseppe; Boulanger, Marie‐Chloé; Evangelista, Arturo; Bédard, Elisabeth; Citro, Rodolfo; Body, Simon C; Nemer, Mona; Schoen, Frederick J

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bicuspid aortic valve is the most prevalent cardiac valvular malformation. It is associated with a high rate of long‐term morbidity including development of calcific aortic valve disease, aortic regurgitation and concomitant thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection. Recently, basic and translational studies have identified some key processes involved in the development of bicuspid aortic valve and its morbidity. The development of aortic valve disease and thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection is the result of complex interactions between genotypes, environmental risk factors and specific haemodynamic conditions created by bicuspid aortic valve anatomy. Herein, we review the pathobiology of bicuspid aortic valve with a special emphasis on translational aspects of these basic findings. Important but unresolved problems in the pathology of bicuspid aortic valve and thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection are discussed, along with the molecular processes involved. PMID:27499904

  14. The pathology and pathobiology of bicuspid aortic valve: State of the art and novel research perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Patrick; Bossé, Yohan; Huggins, Gordon S; Corte, Alessandro Della; Pibarot, Philippe; Michelena, Hector I; Limongelli, Giuseppe; Boulanger, Marie-Chloé; Evangelista, Arturo; Bédard, Elisabeth; Citro, Rodolfo; Body, Simon C; Nemer, Mona; Schoen, Frederick J

    2015-10-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve is the most prevalent cardiac valvular malformation. It is associated with a high rate of long-term morbidity including development of calcific aortic valve disease, aortic regurgitation and concomitant thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection. Recently, basic and translational studies have identified some key processes involved in the development of bicuspid aortic valve and its morbidity. The development of aortic valve disease and thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection is the result of complex interactions between genotypes, environmental risk factors and specific haemodynamic conditions created by bicuspid aortic valve anatomy. Herein, we review the pathobiology of bicuspid aortic valve with a special emphasis on translational aspects of these basic findings. Important but unresolved problems in the pathology of bicuspid aortic valve and thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection are discussed, along with the molecular processes involved. PMID:27499904

  15. Hybrid Endovascular Repair in Aortic Arch Pathologies: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaohui; Guo, Wei; Liu, Xiaoping; Yin, Tai; Jia, Xin; Xiong, Jiang; Zhang, Hongpeng; Wang, Lijun

    2010-01-01

    The aortic arch presents specific challenges to endovascular repair. Hybrid repair is increasingly evolving as an alternative option for selected patients, and promising initial results have been reported. The aim of this study was to introduce our experiences and evaluate mid-term results of supra aortic transpositions for extended endovascular repair of aortic arch pathologies. From December 2002 to January 2008, 25 patients with thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections involving the aortic arch were treated with hybrid endovascular treatment in our center. Of the 25 cases, 14 were atherosclerotic thoracic aortic aneurysms and 11 were thoracic aortic dissection. The hybrid repair method included total-arch transpositions (15 cases) or hemi-arch transpositions (10 cases), and endovascular procedures. All hybrid endovascular procedures were completed successfully. Three early residual type-I endoleaks and one type-II endoleak were observed. Stroke occurred in three patients (8%) during the in-hospital stage. The perioperative mortality rate was 4%; one patients died post-operatively from catheter related complications. The average follow-up period was 15 ± 5.8 months (range, 1–41 months). The overall crude survival rate at 15 months was 92% (23/25). During follow-up, new late endoleaks and stent-raft related complications were not observed. One case (4%) developed a unilateral lower limb deficit at 17 days and was readmitted to hospital. In conclusion, the results are encouraging for endovascular aortic arch repair in combination with supra-aortic transposition in high risk cases. Aortic endografting offers good mid-term results. Mid-term results of the hybrid approach in elderly patients with aortic arch pathologies are satisfying. PMID:21151464

  16. A huge saccular aortic aneurysm compressing right coronary artery 7 years after aortic valve replacement due to bicuspid aortic valve insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Min; Jeong, Haemin; Hong, Kyung-Soon; Kim, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: In a patient underwent aortic valve replacement (AVR) due to bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) insufficiency without marked dilation of ascending aorta, the development of delayed-typed aneurysmal complication of ascending aorta has been often reported because the dilated aorta tends to grow insidiously with age. Case summary: A 58-year-old man who underwent AVR with mechanical valve due to severe aortic regurgitation secondary to BAV 7 years previously presented with exertional chest discomfort for 1 year. An echocardiography showed a well-functioning mechanical aortic valve without any significant abnormal findings. Cardiac multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) revealed a huge saccular aortic root aneurysm (79.7 mm × 72.8 mm in size) compressing the proximal right coronary artery resulting in ∼90% eccentric diffuse luminal narrowing. The patient subsequently underwent open-heart surgery with resection of the ascending aortic aneurysmal sac and consecutive ascending aorta and hemi-arch replacement using a graft. Conclusion: After successful AVR in the patient with BAV insufficiency and mildly dilated ascending aorta, a regular aortic imaging such as cardiac MDCT with aortography would be helpful to monitor the morphology and size of ascending aorta and related complications to guide future management. PMID:27749539

  17. Pathological Investigation of Congenital Bicuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis, Compared with Atherosclerotic Tricuspid Aortic Valve Stenosis and Congenital Bicuspid Aortic Valve Regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Hamatani, Yasuhiro; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Nagai, Toshiyuki; Sugano, Yasuo; Kanzaki, Hideaki; Yasuda, Satoshi; Fujita, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Junjiro; Anzai, Toshihisa

    2016-01-01

    Background Congenital bicuspid aortic valve (CBAV) is the main cause of aortic stenosis (AS) in young adults. However, the histopathological features of AS in patients with CBAV have not been fully investigated. Methods and Results We examined specimens of aortic valve leaflets obtained from patients who had undergone aortic valve re/placement at our institution for severe AS with CBAV (n = 24, CBAV-AS group), severe AS with tricuspid aortic valve (n = 24, TAV-AS group), and severe aortic regurgitation (AR) with CBAV (n = 24, CBAV-AR group). We compared the histopathological features among the three groups. Pathological features were classified using semi-quantitative methods (graded on a scale 0 to 3) by experienced pathologists without knowledge of the patients’ backgrounds. The severity of inflammation, neovascularization, and calcium and cholesterol deposition did not differ between the CBAV-AS and TAV-AS groups, and these four parameters were less marked in the CBAV-AR group than in the CBAV-AS (all p<0.01). Meanwhile, the grade of valvular fibrosis was greater in the CBAV-AS group, compared with the TAV-AS and CBAV-AR groups (both p<0.01). In AS patients, thickness of fibrotic lesions was greater on the aortic side than on the ventricular side (both p<0.01). Meanwhile, thickness of fibrotic lesions was comparable between the aortic and ventricular sides in CBAV-AR patients (p = 0.35). Conclusions Valvular fibrosis, especially on the aortic side, was greater in patients with CBAV-AS than in those without, suggesting a difference in the pathogenesis of AS between CBAV and TAV. PMID:27479126

  18. Can release of urinary retention trigger abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture?

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Andreas; Powell-Bowns, Matilda; Elseedawy, Emad

    2013-04-04

    Only 50% of abdominal aortic aneurysms present with the classic triad of hypotension, back pain and a pulsatile abdominal mass. This variability in symptoms can delay diagnosis and treatment. We present the case of a patient presenting with a unique combination of symptoms suggesting that decompression of urinary retention can lead to abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture.

  19. Premature aortic stiffness in systemic lupus erythematosus by transesophageal echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Roldan, C A; Joson, J; Qualls, C R; Sharrar, J; Sibbitt, W L

    2010-12-01

    To assess aortic stiffness by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and to determine its clinical predictors and relation to age, blood pressure, renal function, and atherosclerosis, 50 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 94% women, with a mean age of 38 ± 12 years, and 22 age and gender-matched healthy controls underwent clinical and laboratory evaluations and multiplane TEE to assess stiffness, intima-media thickness (IMT), and plaques of the proximal, mid, and distal descending thoracic aorta. Stiffness at each level and overall aortic stiffness by the pressure-strain elastic modulus was higher in patients than in controls after adjusting for age (overall, 8.25 ± 4.13 versus 6.1 ± 2.5 Pascal units, p = 0.01). Patients had higher aortic stiffness than controls after adjusting both groups to the same mean age, blood pressure, creatinine, and aortic IMT (p = 0.005). Neither IMT nor plaques were predictors of aortic stiffness. Moreover, normotensive patients, those without aortic plaques, and non-smokers had higher stiffness than controls (all p < 0.05). Age at SLE diagnosis and non-neurologic damage score were the only SLE-specific independent predictors of aortic stiffness (both p ≤ 0.01). Thus, increased aortic stiffness is an early manifestation of lupus vasculopathy that seems to precede the development of hypertension and atherosclerosis.

  20. Aortic valve replacement in a case of Ehlers Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, P; Nellen, M; Ross, D N

    1979-01-01

    A case of Ehlers Danlos syndrome is described in a 54-year-old Caucasian male. He had calcific aortic valve disease and dilatation of the ascending aorta. An aortic valve replacement was performed using a Starr prosthesis. Images PMID:383121

  1. Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Chronic Type A Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Farag, Ahmed; Chauhan, Aneesha; Avinash, Sunita; Liew, Chee K; Eichhöfer, Jonas; Chauhan, Anoop

    2016-01-01

    This case illustrates the complexities of performing a primary percutaneous intervention in a patient with chronic Type A aortic aneurysm and dissection with contraindications for surgical management. We also discuss the significant risk that the patient had to overcome to survive an undiagnosed aortic dissection and an acute ST elevation myocardial infarction. PMID:27757405

  2. Adult presentation with vascular ring due to double aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Henryk; Uebing, Anselm; Mohiaddin, Raad

    2006-11-01

    This is a case report on the use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to diagnose vascular ring due to double aortic arch in an adult presenting with an abnormal chest X-ray. The experience in this case and the literature review identify the benefits of using cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to clarify complex aortic arch anatomy.

  3. Aortic valve homograft for revision surgery - transesophageal echocardiography considerations

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Arindam; Magoon, Rohan; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra; Rajashekar, P.

    2016-01-01

    Aortic root surgical anatomy and knowledge of the various homograft implantation techniques is of paramount importance to the attending anesthesiologist for echocardiographic correlation, estimation and accurately predicting aortic annular dimensions for the valve replacement in a case of diseased homograft. PMID:27716714

  4. Familial abdominal aortic aneurysm: prevalence and implications for screening.

    PubMed

    Adams, D C; Tulloh, B R; Galloway, S W; Shaw, E; Tulloh, A J; Poskitt, K R

    1993-11-01

    The high prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in men over the age of 65 has led to the establishment of ultrasound screening programmes for this group. The apparent familial tendency towards AAA formation suggests that relatives of aneurysm patients may form another subpopulation in whom screening is appropriate. The first degree relatives of 100 consecutive aneurysm patients were identified. Of 110 relatives over 50 years of age, two were known to have had AAA and ultrasound scans were performed on 74, providing information on aortic size for 76 relatives (69%). No further aortic aneurysms (antero-posterior diameter > or = 4.0 cm) were found on scanning. However, nine relatives were demonstrated to have aortic dilatation (2.5-3.9 cm). Aortic dilatation was observed in 21% of male first degree relatives over 50 years of age, affecting 27% of sons and 17% of brothers. Only 4% of the sisters and none of the daughters were found to have aortic dilatation. The prevalence of aortic enlargement seems to be sufficiently high amongst male first degree relatives of AAA patients over 50 years of age to justify aortic screening.

  5. Aortic Endograft Infection by Pasteurella multocida: A Rare Case.

    PubMed

    Jayakrishnan, Thejus T; Keyashian, Brian; Amene, Juliet; Malinowski, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Infection of an aortic endograft is a rare complication following endovascular aneurysm repair. These patients have been treated with explantation of the graft to obtain source control followed by an extra-anatomic bypass to restore circulation. The present case study describes an interesting case of Pasteurella infection involving an aortic endograft managed nonoperatively by percutaneous drainage and graft preservation. PMID:27581225

  6. Usefulness of repeat balloon aortic valvuloplasty in children.

    PubMed

    Shim, D; Lloyd, T R; Beekman, R H

    1997-04-15

    This retrospective study examines all 15 patients who underwent a second balloon dilation procedure for congenital aortic stenosis to determine its safety and efficacy. The recurrent gradient was significantly reduced, but 4 patients had unsatisfactory gradient relief, 3 of whom had previous surgical valvotomies; therefore, we conclude that repeat balloon aortic valvuloplasty is worthwhile, although third balloon dilations may not be beneficial.

  7. Preoperative evaluation of a patient for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed Central

    Chonchubhair, A. N.; Cunningham, A. J.

    1998-01-01

    Coexistent cardiovascular disease is common in patients presenting for repair of aortic aneurysms. However, preoperative cardiac evaluation prior to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) surgery remains contentious with significant variations in practice between countries, institutions and individual anesthetists. The following case report raises some everyday issues confronting clinical anesthetists. PMID:10604782

  8. Transesophageal echocardiography: first-line imaging for aortic diseases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yalcin, F.; Thomas, J. D.; Homa, D.; Flachskampf, F. A.

    2000-01-01

    Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is now commonly used to evaluate the thoracic aorta, because it is widely available and provides high-resolution images and flow information by Doppler. This article reviews the essential features on TEE of acute and chronic aortic diseases, such as aortic dissection, aneurysm, and atherosclerosis, and discusses its strengths, weaknesses, and indications.

  9. Bronchial Aneurysms Mimicking Aortic Aneurysms: Endovascular Treatment in Two Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Vernhet, Helene; Bousquet, Claudine; Jean, Betty; Lesnik, Alvian; Durand, Gerard; Giron, Jacques; Senac, Jean Paul

    1999-05-15

    Bronchial artery dilatation and aneurysm formation is a potential complication of local inflammation, especially in bronchiectasis. When the bronchial artery has an ectopic origin from the inferior segment of the aortic arch, aneurysms may mimick aortic aneurysms. Despite this particular location, endovascular treatment is possible. We report two such aneurysms that were successfully embolized with steel coils.

  10. Pre- and Postoperative Imaging of the Aortic Root.

    PubMed

    Hanneman, Kate; Chan, Frandics P; Mitchell, R Scott; Miller, D Craig; Fleischmann, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional datasets acquired using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are ideally suited for characterization of the aortic root. These modalities offer different advantages and limitations, which must be weighed according to the clinical context. This article provides an overview of current aortic root imaging, highlighting normal anatomy, pathologic conditions, imaging techniques, measurement thresholds, relevant surgical procedures, postoperative complications and potential imaging pitfalls. Patients with a range of clinical conditions are predisposed to aortic root disease, including Marfan syndrome, bicuspid aortic valve, vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Various surgical techniques may be used to repair the aortic root, including placement of a composite valve graft, such as the Bentall and Cabrol procedures; placement of an aortic root graft with preservation of the native valve, such as the Yacoub and David techniques; and implantation of a biologic graft, such as a homograft, autograft, or xenograft. Potential imaging pitfalls in the postoperative period include mimickers of pathologic processes such as felt pledgets, graft folds, and nonabsorbable hemostatic agents. Postoperative complications that may be encountered include pseudoaneurysms, infection, and dehiscence. Radiologists should be familiar with normal aortic root anatomy, surgical procedures, and postoperative complications, to accurately interpret pre- and postoperative imaging performed for evaluation of the aortic root. Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26761529

  11. Differential gene expression in human abdominal aortic aneurysm and aortic occlusive disease

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Corey S.; Schreurs, Charlotte; Lindeman, Jan H. N.; Walker, Philip J.; Nataatmadja, Maria; West, Malcolm; Holdt, Lesca M.; Hinterseher, Irene; Pilarsky, Christian; Golledge, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and aortic occlusive disease (AOD) represent common causes of morbidity and mortality in elderly populations which were previously believed to have common aetiologies. The aim of this study was to assess the gene expression in human AAA and AOD. We performed microarrays using aortic specimen obtained from 20 patients with small AAAs (≤ 55mm), 29 patients with large AAAs (> 55mm), 9 AOD patients, and 10 control aortic specimens obtained from organ donors. Some differentially expressed genes were validated by quantitative-PCR (qRT-PCR)/immunohistochemistry. We identified 840 and 1,014 differentially expressed genes in small and large AAAs, respectively. Immune-related pathways including cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and T-cell-receptor signalling were upregulated in both small and large AAAs. Examples of validated genes included CTLA4 (2.01-fold upregulated in small AAA, P = 0.002), NKTR (2.37-and 2.66-fold upregulated in small and large AAA with P = 0.041 and P = 0.015, respectively), and CD8A (2.57-fold upregulated in large AAA, P = 0.004). 1,765 differentially expressed genes were identified in AOD. Pathways upregulated in AOD included metabolic and oxidative phosphorylation categories. The UCP2 gene was downregulated in AOD (3.73-fold downregulated, validated P = 0.017). In conclusion, the AAA and AOD transcriptomes were very different suggesting that AAA and AOD have distinct pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:25944698

  12. Impact of Transapical Aortic Cannulation for Acute Type A Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Manabu; Fumoto, Hideyuki; Hiromitsu Kawasaki; Koga MD, Syugo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Early and mid-term result of transapical aortic (TAA) cannulation technique was evaluated compared with femoral artery (FA) cannulation in Acute Type A Aortic Dissection(AAAD). Methods: From January 2000 to October 2013, 80 consecutive patients with AAAD were underwent the ascending aortic replacement at Nagasaki Kouseikai Hospital. These patients were divided into two groups according to the cannulation site, FA cannulation (n = 34) and TAA cannulation (n = 46). Early and mid-term outcomes were compared between two groups. Result: Preoperative patient characteristics were almost comparable between groups. The time from skin incision to starting cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) was significantly shorter in the TAA group (45 ± 16 vs 23 ± 5.1 min; P <0.001). There were no significant differences in post-operative cerebral infarction in two groups (17% versus 11%; P = NS). The operative mortality rate was 8.8% in FA group and 4.3% in TAA group (P = NS). During follow up (mean, 6.8 years), survival at 3 years and 5 years was 77.4% and 71.9% in TAA group and 76.3% and 73.8% in FA group, respectively. Conclusion: The postoperative morbidity and mortality between the two groups were almost the same. TAA cannulation for acute Type A aortic dissection is faster, easy and safe with acceptable early and mid-term outcome. PMID:25740452

  13. Homograft Aortic Root Replacement with Saphenous Vein Graft Hemi-Cabrol for Prosthetic Aortic Valve Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Dimarakis, Ioannis; Wooldridge, Wilfred J.; Kadir, Isaac

    2015-01-01

    A 44-year-old female presented with prosthetic valve endocarditis with periannular abscess involving the left coronary ostium. We describe cryopreserved aortic homograft root replacement with hemi-Cabrol reimplantation of the left coronary ostium using the long saphenous vein. PMID:26798762

  14. Total aortic repair: the new paradigm in the treatment of acute type A aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Nisal K.; Galvin, Sean D.

    2016-01-01

    The surgical management of acute type A aortic dissection (ATAAD) is in a period of rapid evolution. Understanding the complex physiology and anatomy of both acute and chronic dissection has been enhanced by the ready availability of state of the art imaging techniques. Technical advances in the intraoperative monitoring of organ perfusion, together with adjuncts to limit organ injury and increasing sophistication in open and endovascular surgery have led to a major reduction in both perioperative morbidity and mortality. In many centers, there has been a transition in mindset and surgical approach away from a purely central aortic operation focusing on the ascending aorta and a ‘live to fight another day’ philosophy. The current more global perspective recognizes the importance of aortic valve function, malperfusion, false lumen (FL) patency and the potential for future complex aneurysm development. The time is now right to transition into the next phase of sophistication in the management of ATAAD with the aim of achieving not only a safe acute operation, but to either entirely prevent chronic complications or to greatly simplify their management by the creation of an anatomical situation that facilitates future endovascular intervention in place of complex re-do surgery. We present our view on the evolution of surgery for ATAAD leading to our current technique of Branch First Arch replacement and Total Aortic Repair, which not only provides a safe immediate operation, but also offers the hope of a simplified future management if not a total cure for the pathology. PMID:27386409

  15. Including aortic valve morphology in computational fluid dynamics simulations: initial findings and application to aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Wendell, David C; Samyn, Margaret M; Cava, Joseph R; Ellwein, Laura M; Krolikowski, Mary M; Gandy, Kimberly L; Pelech, Andrew N; Shadden, Shawn C; LaDisa, John F

    2013-06-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations quantifying thoracic aortic flow patterns have not included disturbances from the aortic valve (AoV). 80% of patients with aortic coarctation (CoA) have a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) which may cause adverse flow patterns contributing to morbidity. Our objectives were to develop a method to account for the AoV in CFD simulations, and quantify its impact on local hemodynamics. The method developed facilitates segmentation of the AoV, spatiotemporal interpolation of segments, and anatomic positioning of segments at the CFD model inlet. The AoV was included in CFD model examples of a normal (tricuspid AoV) and a post-surgical CoA patient (BAV). Velocity, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), time-averaged wall shear stress (TAWSS), and oscillatory shear index (OSI) results were compared to equivalent simulations using a plug inlet profile. The plug inlet greatly underestimated TKE for both examples. TAWSS differences extended throughout the thoracic aorta for the CoA BAV, but were limited to the arch for the normal example. OSI differences existed mainly in the ascending aorta for both cases. The impact of AoV can now be included with CFD simulations to identify regions of deleterious hemodynamics thereby advancing simulations of the thoracic aorta one step closer to reality. PMID:22917990

  16. [Acute and chronic aortic diseases of the thoracic and abdominal aorta of the adult - 2014 AS SMC Guidelines on the classification and diagnosis of aortic diseases].

    PubMed

    Gavorník, Peter; Dukát, Andrej; Gašpar, Ľudovít

    2015-01-01

    In addition to organovascular arterial ischemic diseases (cardiovascular, vasculovascular, neurovascular, extre-mitovascular, renovascular, genitovascular, bronchopulmovascular, mesenteriovascular, osteoarthromusculovascular, dermovascular, oculovascular, otovascular, stomatovascular etc.), aortic diseases contribute to the wide spectrum of arterial diseases: aortic aneurysms (AA), acute aortic syndromes (AAS) including aortic dissection (AD), intramural haematoma (IMH), penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer (PAU) and traumatic aortic injury (TAI), pseudoaneurysm, aortic rupture, atherosclerosis, vasculitis as well as genetic diseases (e.g. Turner syndrome, Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome) and congenital abnormalities including the coarctation of the aorta (CoA). Similarly to other arterial diseases, aortic diseases may be diagnosed after a long period of subclinical development or they may have an acute presentation. Acute aortic syndrome is often the first sign of the disease, which needs rapid diagnosis and decisionmaking to reduce the extremely poor prognosis. Key clinical-etiology-anatomy-patophysiology (CEAP) diagnostic aspects of aortic diseases are discussed in this document (project Vessels).

  17. 3D image analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subasic, Marko; Loncaric, Sven; Sorantin, Erich

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents a method for 3-D segmentation of abdominal aortic aneurysm from computed tomography angiography images. The proposed method is automatic and requires minimal user assistance. Segmentation is performed in two steps. First inner and then outer aortic border is segmented. Those two steps are different due to different image conditions on two aortic borders. Outputs of these two segmentations give a complete 3-D model of abdominal aorta. Such a 3-D model is used in measurements of aneurysm area. The deformable model is implemented using the level-set algorithm due to its ability to describe complex shapes in natural manner which frequently occur in pathology. In segmentation of outer aortic boundary we introduced some knowledge based preprocessing to enhance and reconstruct low contrast aortic boundary. The method has been implemented in IDL and C languages. Experiments have been performed using real patient CTA images and have shown good results.

  18. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation: current trends and future directions.

    PubMed

    Allahwala, Usaid K; Hansen, Peter S; Danson, Edward J; Straiton, Nicola; Sinhal, Ajay; Walters, Darren L; Bhindi, Ravinay

    2016-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has been increasingly utilized for the treatment of severe symptomatic aortic stenosis in inoperable and high surgical risk patients. Recent advances in valve technology include repositionable scaffolds and smaller delivery systems, as well as improvement in periprocedural imaging. These advances have resulted in reduction of vascular complications, rates of paravalvular aortic regurgitation and periprocedural stroke and improved overall outcomes. Increasingly, TAVI is the preferred treatment for high-risk surgical patients with severe aortic stenosis. Consequently, there is growing interest for the use of TAVI in lower surgical risk patients. Furthermore, the role of TAVI has expanded to include valve-in-valve procedures for the treatment of degenerative bioprosthetic valves and bicuspid aortic valves. Questions remain in regard to the optimal management of concurrent coronary artery disease, strategies to minimize valve leaflet restriction and treatment of conduction abnormalities as well as identifying newer indications for its use.

  19. Acute aortic syndromes: new insights from electrocardiographically gated computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fleischmann, Dominik; Mitchell, R Scott; Miller, D Craig

    2008-01-01

    The development of retrospective electrocardiographic (ECG)-gating has proved to be a diagnostic and therapeutic boon for computed tomography (CT) imaging of patients with acute thoracic aortic diseases, such as aortic dissection/intramural hematoma (AD/IMH), penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer (APU), and ruptured/leaking aneurysm. The notorious pulsation motion artifacts in the ascending aorta confounding regular CT scanning can be eliminated, and involvement of the sinuses of Valsalva, the valve cusps, the aortic annulus, and the coronary arteries in aortic dissection can be clearly depicted or excluded. Motion-free images also allow reliable identification of the site of the primary intimal tear, the location, and extent of the intimomedial flap, and branch artery involvement. ECG-gated CTA also allows the detection of more subtle lesions and variants of aortic dissection, which may ultimately expand our understanding of these complex, life-threatening disorders.

  20. Delayed aortic rupture resulting from postoperative superficial sternal wound infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Wan; Chang, Jee Won

    2016-01-01

    While deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) after cardiac surgery is a significant contributor to patient morbidity and mortality, superficial sternal wound infection (SSWI) mostly has a benign course. We report a mortality case of aortic rupture resulting from SSWI after cardiac surgery. A 50-year-old male underwent an aortic valve replacement (AVR). Three months after the valve operation, he presented with severe dyspnea, which had never before been observed, and chest computed tomography revealed an ascending aortic rupture with large hematoma compressing the main pulmonary artery. We performed an emergent operation for aortic rupture that possibly originated from the SSWI. Postoperatively, the patient died of hypovolemic shock due to recurrent aortic rupture despite efforts to resuscitate him. PMID:27499988

  1. A case of neonatal arterial thrombosis mimicking interrupted aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Gürsu, Hazım Alper; Varan, Birgül; Oktay, Ayla; Özkan, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal arterial thrombosis is a very rare entity with clinical findings resembling coarctation of aorta or interrupted aortic arch. A two day-old male newborn was admitted to a different hospital with difficulty in sucking and sleepiness. On echocardiographic examination, a diagnosis of interrupted aortic arch was made and he was treated with prostoglandin E2. When the patient presented to our center, physical examination revealed that his feet were bilaterally cold. The pulses were not palpable and there were ecchymotic regions in the lower extremities. Echocardiography ruled out interrupted aortic arch. Computerized tomographic angiography revealed a large thrombosis and total occlusion of the abdominal aorta. Since there was no response to treatment with tissue plasminogen activator, we performed thrombectomy. Homozygous Factor V Leiden and Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase mutations were found in this patient. Neonatal aortic thrombosis which is observed very rarely and fatal should be considered in the differential diagnosis of coarctation of aorta and interrupted aortic arch. PMID:26265897

  2. Acute aortic syndromes: new insights from electrocardiographically gated computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fleischmann, Dominik; Mitchell, R Scott; Miller, D Craig

    2008-01-01

    The development of retrospective electrocardiographic (ECG)-gating has proved to be a diagnostic and therapeutic boon for computed tomography (CT) imaging of patients with acute thoracic aortic diseases, such as aortic dissection/intramural hematoma (AD/IMH), penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer (APU), and ruptured/leaking aneurysm. The notorious pulsation motion artifacts in the ascending aorta confounding regular CT scanning can be eliminated, and involvement of the sinuses of Valsalva, the valve cusps, the aortic annulus, and the coronary arteries in aortic dissection can be clearly depicted or excluded. Motion-free images also allow reliable identification of the site of the primary intimal tear, the location, and extent of the intimomedial flap, and branch artery involvement. ECG-gated CTA also allows the detection of more subtle lesions and variants of aortic dissection, which may ultimately expand our understanding of these complex, life-threatening disorders. PMID:19251175

  3. Effect of abdominal aortic grafts on aortic stiffness and central hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Lantelme, Pierre; Dzudie, Anastase; Milon, Hugues; Bricca, Giampiero; Legedz, Liliana; Chevalier, Jean-Michel; Feugier, Patrick

    2009-06-01

    Graft-prosthesis and stentgraft placements are effective modalities for treating abdominal aortic aneurysm, but related changes in arterial stiffness are not well established. The present study sought to assess aortic stiffness after aneurism repair by measuring pulse wave velocity (PWV). The graft-related variation of carotid-femoral PWV was compared with that of carotid-radial PWV, the latter being unaffected by vascular treatment. The secondary objective was to evaluate potential differences between graft-prosthesis and stentgraft in terms of aortic stiffness and augmentation index, a composite indicator integrating wave reflexion. Fifty patients were included (39 had a graft-prosthesis and 11 had a stentgraft). In the whole group and after a median postoperative follow-up of 47 days, carotid-femoral PWV increased by +1.0 m/s [-12.3, +10.3], while carotid-radial PWV slightly decreased by -0.3 m/s [-4.4; +3.5] (P = 0.001). The effect of the type of prosthesis on the PWV was not significant. Nevertheless, the augmentation index increased after stentgraft implantation (+4% [-10; +17]) and decreased after graft-prosthesis placement (-8.5% [-47; +17]) (P < 0.01). This difference was not explained by a heart rate or a treatment effect and was likely attributable to the prosthesis per se. This study demonstrates the impact of aortic grafts on aortic stiffness. Besides, it suggests that stentgraft increases reflected waves more than graft-prostheses. These changes of vascular properties may influence the outcomes after surgery. PMID:19342960

  4. Extended aortic valvuloplasty: a new approach for the management of congenital valvar aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Ilbawi, M N; DeLeon, S Y; Wilson, W R; Roberson, D A; Husayni, T S; Quinones, J A; Arcilla, R A

    1991-09-01

    A new technique for the treatment of congenital valvar aortic stenosis is described. It consists of augmenting the aortic cusp by extending the commissurotomy incision into the aortic wall around the leaflet insertion, mobilizing the valve cusp attachment at the commissures, and freeing the aortic insertion of the rudimentary commissure. The results of standard valvotomy performed on 48 patients (group 1) were compared with those of the new extended valvuloplasty carried out on 16 patients (group 2). The two groups were comparable in age at operation (2.7 +/- 2.1 years for group 1 versus 2.1 +/- 1.7 years for group 2; p = not significant) and in preoperative pressure gradient (58 +/- 25 mm Hg for group 1 versus 61 +/- 36 mm Hg for group 2; p = not significant). There was no operative mortality in either group. Follow-up is available on all patients, with a mean of 4.3 +/- 2.6 years for group 1 versus 1.7 +/- 0.5 years for group 2 (p = 0.05). There was one late death in group 1. Postoperative gradient was 47 +/- 13 mm Hg in group 1 versus 19 +/- 13 mm Hg in group 2 (p = 0.05). Moderate or severe regurgitation was present in 18 patients (38%) in group 1 and 2 patients (13%) in group 2 (p = not significant). Reoperation was needed in 8 patients (17%) in group 1 versus 2 patients (13%) in group 2 (p = not significant). The described valvuloplasty procedure addresses the unique pathological features of valvar aortic stenosis and provides better relief of the obstruction than the presently available techniques. Longer follow-up is needed to determine the late results of this approach.

  5. Experimental measurement of dynamic fluid shear stress on the aortic surface of the aortic valve leaflet

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Choon Hwai; Saikrishnan, Neelakantan; Tamilselvan, Gowthami

    2011-01-01

    Aortic valve (AV) calcification is a highly prevalent disease with serious impact on mortality and morbidity. Although exact causes and mechanisms of AV calcification are unclear, previous studies suggest that mechanical forces play a role. Since calcium deposits occur almost exclusively on the aortic surfaces of AV leaflets, it has been hypothesized that adverse patterns of fluid shear stress on the aortic surface of AV leaflets promote calcification. The current study characterizes AV leaflet aortic surface fluid shear stresses using Laser Doppler velocimetry and an in vitro pulsatile flow loop. The valve model used was a native porcine valve mounted on a suturing ring and preserved using 0.15% glutaraldehyde solution. This valve model was inserted in a mounting chamber with sinus geometries, which is made of clear acrylic to provide optical access for measurements. To understand the effects of hemodynamics on fluid shear stress, shear stress was measured across a range of conditions: varying stroke volumes at the same heart rate and varying heart rates at the same stroke volume. Systolic shear stress magnitude was found to be much higher than diastolic shear stress magnitude due to the stronger flow in the sinuses during systole, reaching up to 20 dyn/cm2 at mid-systole. Upon increasing stroke volume, fluid shear stresses increased due to stronger sinus fluid motion. Upon increasing heart rate, fluid shear stresses decreased due to reduced systolic duration that restricted the formation of strong sinus flow. Significant changes in the shear stress waveform were observed at 90 beats/ min, most likely due to altered leaflet dynamics at this higher heart rate. Overall, this study represents the most well-resolved shear stress measurements to date across a range of conditions on the aortic side of the AV. The data presented can be used for further investigation to understand AV biological response to shear stresses. PMID:21416247

  6. Molecular mechanisms underlying the onset of degenerative aortic valve disease.

    PubMed

    Hakuno, Daihiko; Kimura, Naritaka; Yoshioka, Masatoyo; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2009-01-01

    Morbidity from degenerative aortic valve disease is increasing worldwide, concomitant with the ageing of the general population and the habitual consumption of diets high in calories and cholesterol. Immunohistologic studies have suggested that the molecular mechanism occurring in the degenerate aortic valve resembles that of atherosclerosis, prompting the testing of HMG CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) for the prevention of progression of native and bioprosthetic aortic valve degeneration. However, the effects of these therapies remain controversial. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying the onset of aortic valve degeneration are largely unknown, research in this area is advancing rapidly. The signaling components involved in embryonic valvulogenesis, such as Wnt, TGF-beta(1), BMP, and Notch, are also involved in the onset of aortic valve degeneration. Furthermore, investigations into extracellular matrix remodeling, angiogenesis, and osteogenesis in the aortic valve have been reported. Having noted avascularity of normal cardiac valves, we recently identified chondromodulin-I (chm-I) as a crucial anti-angiogenic factor. The expression of chm-I is restricted to cardiac valves from late embryogenesis to adulthood in the mouse, rat, and human. In human degenerate atherosclerotic valves, the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases and angiogenesis is observed in the area of chm-I downregulation. Gene targeting of chm-I resulted in VEGF expression, angiogenesis, and calcification in the aortic valves of aged mice, and aortic stenosis is detected by echocardiography, indicating that chm-I is a crucial factor for maintaining normal cardiac valvular function by preventing angiogenesis. The present review focuses on the animal models of aortic valve degeneration and recent studies on the molecular mechanisms underlying the onset of degenerative aortic valve disease. PMID:18766323

  7. Critical Transitions in Early Embryonic Aortic Arch Patterning and Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, William J.; Dur, Onur; Wang, Yajuan; Patrick, Michael J.; Tinney, Joseph P.; Keller, Bradley B.; Pekkan, Kerem

    2013-01-01

    Transformation from the bilaterally symmetric embryonic aortic arches to the mature great vessels is a complex morphogenetic process, requiring both vasculogenic and angiogenic mechanisms. Early aortic arch development occurs simultaneously with rapid changes in pulsatile blood flow, ventricular function, and downstream impedance in both invertebrate and vertebrate species. These dynamic biomechanical environmental landscapes provide critical epigenetic cues for vascular growth and remodeling. In our previous work, we examined hemodynamic loading and aortic arch growth in the chick embryo at Hamburger-Hamilton stages 18 and 24. We provided the first quantitative correlation between wall shear stress (WSS) and aortic arch diameter in the developing embryo, and observed that these two stages contained different aortic arch patterns with no inter-embryo variation. In the present study, we investigate these biomechanical events in the intermediate stage 21 to determine insights into this critical transition. We performed fluorescent dye microinjections to identify aortic arch patterns and measured diameters using both injection recordings and high-resolution optical coherence tomography. Flow and WSS were quantified with 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Dye injections revealed that the transition in aortic arch pattern is not a uniform process and multiple configurations were documented at stage 21. CFD analysis showed that WSS is substantially elevated compared to both the previous (stage 18) and subsequent (stage 24) developmental time-points. These results demonstrate that acute increases in WSS are followed by a period of vascular remodeling to restore normative hemodynamic loading. Fluctuations in blood flow are one possible mechanism that impacts the timing of events such as aortic arch regression and generation, leading to the variable configurations at stage 21. Aortic arch variations noted during normal rapid vascular remodeling at stage 21 identify a

  8. Normal rate of ventricular emptying in valvular aortic stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Lederman, S M; Gash, A K; Bove, A A; Spann, J F

    1981-01-01

    The delayed upstroke of the arterial pulse in valvular aortic stenosis has been attributed, in part, to prolonged left ventricular emptying. Left ventricular emptying rate, however, has not been measured in aortic stenosis. We assessed the rate of left ventricular emptying by computer analysis of biplane cineangiograms in seven normal subjects, six patients with mild to moderate aortic stenosis, and 12 patients with severe aortic stenosis. As an indicator of delayed arterial pulse rise, T time index (time to half maximum aortic pressure corrected for heart rate) was measured in each group. T time index averaged 0.07 +/- 0.01 units in normal subjects, 0.14 +/- 0.04 units in the patients with mild to moderate aortic stenosis, and 0.13 +/- 0.05 units in those with severe aortic stenosis. Patients with mild to moderate and severe aortic stenosis differed significantly from normal subjects. Relative emptying rates were defined as the percentage of initial systolic volume ejected divided by the percentage of systole elapsed. These relative emptying rates were determined during the first, second, and third thirds of systole in all three groups. No significant decrease in the relative rate of left ventricular emptying was noted when each group of patients with aortic stenosis was compared with the normal subjects. Neither was there slowing in the actual rate of ejection of blood in ml per second throughout systole. We conclude that the rate of ventricular emptying is normal in aortic stenosis and does not explain the arterial pulse delay in this disease. PMID:7295438

  9. Unusual findings in secondary hypertension: double orifice mitral associated to aortic coarctation, bicuspid aortic valve, and ventricular septal defect.

    PubMed

    Mouine, Najat; Amri, Rachida; Cherti, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Double orifice mitral valve is a rare congenital anomaly presenting as the division of the mitral orifice into two anatomically distinct orifices, it is most often associated with other congenital heart defects such as left-sided obstructive lesions, ventricular septal defects or aortic coarctation. We report the case of a 15 year's old boy, admitted for arterial hypertension, auscultation revealed a rude aortic systolic murmur. Femoral pulses were weak. Owing to the suspicion of aortic coarctation, transthoracic echocardiography was performed, the aortic coarctation with dilation of the aorta proximal to the stenosis was confirmed and bicuspid aortic valve was found with good function. The mitral valve was dysmorphic, having two orifices; it was divided into 2 separate valve orifices by a fibrous bridge. No mitral or aortic regurgitation was documented by color Doppler flow imaging. The left ventricular ejection fraction was normal. There was a small peri membranous ventricular septal defect with left to right shunt. Owing to the severity of the aortic coarctation and taking into account the anatomy and characteristics of the patient, he was made a surgical correction of aortic coarctation with good outcome. PMID:24693935

  10. Redo After Failure of Aortic Homografts With a Rapid Deployment Valve.

    PubMed

    Danesi, Tommaso Hinna; Minniti, Giuseppe; Cresce, Giovanni Domenico; Favaro, Alessandro; Magagna, Paolo; Auriemma, Stefano; Micciolo, Matteo; Mirone, Salvo; Polesel, Elvio; Salvador, Loris

    2016-10-01

    Homograft implantation in the aortic position was a common approach for full root aortic surgical procedures in the early 2000s. Reintervention after degeneration of such homografts remains a challenge. We report two cases of successful implantation of the Edwards Intuity Elite rapid deployment valve into patients with degeneration of existing aortic homograft implants leading to severe aortic regurgitation.

  11. Redo After Failure of Aortic Homografts With a Rapid Deployment Valve.

    PubMed

    Danesi, Tommaso Hinna; Minniti, Giuseppe; Cresce, Giovanni Domenico; Favaro, Alessandro; Magagna, Paolo; Auriemma, Stefano; Micciolo, Matteo; Mirone, Salvo; Polesel, Elvio; Salvador, Loris

    2016-10-01

    Homograft implantation in the aortic position was a common approach for full root aortic surgical procedures in the early 2000s. Reintervention after degeneration of such homografts remains a challenge. We report two cases of successful implantation of the Edwards Intuity Elite rapid deployment valve into patients with degeneration of existing aortic homograft implants leading to severe aortic regurgitation. PMID:27645962

  12. Volumetric analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskin, Kevin M.; Kusnick, Catherine A.; Shamsolkottabi, Susanne; Lang, Elvira V.; Corson, J. D.; Stanford, William; Thompson, Brad H.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a valid, reliable and accurate system of measurement of abdominal aortic aneurysms, using volumetric analysis of x-ray computed tomographic data. This study evaluates illustrative cases, and compares measurements of AAA phantoms, using standard 2D versus volumetric methods. To validate the volumetric analysis, four phantom aneurysms were constructed in a range of diameters (4.5 - 7.0 cm) which presents the greatest management challenge to the clinician. These phantoms were imaged using a Toshiba Xpress SX helical CT. Separate scans were obtained at conventional (10 mm X 10 mm) and thin slice (5 mm X 5 mm) collimations. The thin slices were reconstructed at 2 mm intervals. Data from each of the 96 scans were interpreted using a standard 2D approach, then analyzed using task-oriented volumetric software. We evaluate patient assessments, and compare greatest outer diameters of phantoms, by standard versus volumetric methods. Qualitative differences between solutions based on standard versus volumetric analysis of illustrative patient cases are substantial. Expert radiologists' standard measurements of phantom aneurysms are highly reliable (r2 equals 0.901 - 0.958; p < 0.001), but biased toward significant overestimation of aneurysm diameters in the range of clinical interest. For the same phantoms, volumetric analysis was both more reliable (r2 equals 0.986 - 0.996; p < 0.001), and more accurate, with no significant bias in the range of interest. Volumetric analysis promotes selection of more valid management strategies, by providing vital information not otherwise available, and allowing more reliable and accurate assessment of abdominal aortic aneurysms. It is particularly valuable in the presence of aortic tortuosity, vessel eccentricity, and uncertain involvement of critical vessels.

  13. Medical management of small abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Baxter, B Timothy; Terrin, Michael C; Dalman, Ronald L

    2008-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a common condition that may be lethal when it is unrecognized. Current guidelines suggest repair as the aneurysm diameter reaches 5.0 to 5.5 cm. Most aortic aneurysms are detected incidentally when imaging is done for other purposes or through screening programs. Ninety percent of these aneurysms are below the threshold for intervention at the time of detection. A number of studies have sought to determine factors that lead to progression of aneurysmal disease that might be amenable to intervention during this period of observation. We review these studies and make recommendations for the medical management of small abdominal aortic aneurysms. On the basis of our current knowledge of the causes of aneurysm, a number of approaches have been proposed to prevent progression of aneurysmal disease. These include hemodynamic management, inhibition of inflammation, and protease inhibition. The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association clinical practice guidelines rules of evidence have helped to define strength of evidence to support these approaches. Level A evidence (from large randomized trials) is available to indicate that observation of small aneurysms in men is safe up to a size of 5.5 cm and that propranolol does not inhibit aneurysm expansion. Level B evidence (from small randomized trials) suggests that roxithromycin or doxycycline will decrease the rate of aneurysm expansion. A number of studies agree that tobacco use is associated with an increased rate of aneurysm expansion. Level B and C evidence is available to suggest that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) may inhibit aneurysm expansion. There are animal data but no human data demonstrating that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or losartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker, will decrease the rate of AAA expansion. A pharmacological agent without important side effects that inhibited aneurysm expansion could change

  14. Simulation for transthoracic echocardiography of aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Navin C; Kapur, K K; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra

    2016-01-01

    Simulation allows interactive transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) learning using a virtual three-dimensional model of the heart and may aid in the acquisition of the cognitive and technical skills needed to perform TTE. The ability to link probe manipulation, cardiac anatomy, and echocardiographic images using a simulator has been shown to be an effective model for training anesthesiology residents in transesophageal echocardiography. A proposed alternative to real-time reality patient-based learning is simulation-based training that allows anesthesiologists to learn complex concepts and procedures, especially for specific structures such as aortic valve. PMID:27397455

  15. Occupational Radiation Exposure During Endovascular Aortic Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Sailer, Anna M.; Schurink, Geert Willem H.; Bol, Martine E. Haan, Michiel W. de Zwam, Willem H. van Wildberger, Joachim E. Jeukens, Cécile R. L. P. N.

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThe aim of the study was to evaluate the radiation exposure to operating room personnel and to assess determinants for high personal doses during endovascular aortic repair.Materials and MethodsOccupational radiation exposure was prospectively evaluated during 22 infra-renal aortic repair procedures (EVAR), 11 thoracic aortic repair procedures (TEVAR), and 11 fenestrated or branched aortic repair procedures (FEVAR). Real-time over-lead dosimeters attached to the left breast pocket measured personal doses for the first operators (FO) and second operators (SO), radiology technicians (RT), scrub nurses (SN), anesthesiologists (AN), and non-sterile nurses (NSN). Besides protective apron and thyroid collar, no additional radiation shielding was used. Procedural dose area product (DAP), iodinated contrast volume, fluoroscopy time, patient’s body weight, and C-arm angulation were documented.ResultsAverage procedural FO dose was significantly higher during FEVAR (0.34 ± 0.28 mSv) compared to EVAR (0.11 ± 0.21 mSv) and TEVAR (0.06 ± 0.05 mSv; p = 0.003). Average personnel doses were 0.17 ± 0.21 mSv (FO), 0.042 ± 0.045 mSv (SO), 0.019 ± 0.042 mSv (RT), 0.017 ± 0.031 mSv (SN), 0.006 ± 0.007 mSv (AN), and 0.004 ± 0.009 mSv (NSN). SO and AN doses were strongly correlated with FO dose (p = 0.003 and p < 0.001). There was a significant correlation between FO dose and procedural DAP (R = 0.69, p < 0.001), iodinated contrast volume (R = 0.67, p < 0.001) and left-anterior C-arm projections >60° (p = 0.02), and a weak correlation with fluoroscopy time (R = 0.40, p = 0.049).ConclusionAverage FO dose was a factor four higher than SO dose. Predictors for high personal doses are procedural DAP, iodinated contrast volume, and left-anterior C-arm projections greater than 60°.

  16. Chaotic musical murmur in aortic regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, K; Amitani, S; Sohara, H; Kurose, M; Iwamura, H; Toyohira, H; Taira, A

    1996-12-01

    We report an interesting case of aortic regurgitation. Phonocardiographically, the shape of the diastolic musical murmur in this case changed in each cardiac cycle despite being in sinus rhythm, in the same posture and in the same breathing phase. Experimentally, we were able to obtain a similar noise pattern using an artificial respirator and a hemispherical silicone membrane. We concluded that the irregular and chaotic change in the shape of the diastolic musical murmur in the present case occurred due to irregular swaying of the non-coronary cusp under the influence of the Venturi effect owing to a regurgitant jet stream.

  17. Surrogate Markers of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression.

    PubMed

    Wanhainen, Anders; Mani, Kevin; Golledge, Jonathan

    2016-02-01

    The natural course of many abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is to gradually expand and eventually rupture and monitoring the disease progression is essential to their management. In this publication, we review surrogate markers of AAA progression. AAA diameter remains the most widely used and important marker of AAA growth. Standardized reporting of reproducible methods of measuring AAA diameter is essential. Newer imaging assessments, such as volume measurements, biomechanical analyses, and functional and molecular imaging, as well as circulating biomarkers, have potential to add important information about AAA progression. Currently, however, there is insufficient evidence to recommend their routine use in clinical practice. PMID:26715680

  18. Simulation for transthoracic echocardiography of aortic valve

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Navin C.; Kapur, K. K.; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra

    2016-01-01

    Simulation allows interactive transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) learning using a virtual three-dimensional model of the heart and may aid in the acquisition of the cognitive and technical skills needed to perform TTE. The ability to link probe manipulation, cardiac anatomy, and echocardiographic images using a simulator has been shown to be an effective model for training anesthesiology residents in transesophageal echocardiography. A proposed alternative to real-time reality patient-based learning is simulation-based training that allows anesthesiologists to learn complex concepts and procedures, especially for specific structures such as aortic valve. PMID:27397455

  19. Aortic Atherosclerosis in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Roldan, Paola C; Ratliff, Michelle; Snider, Richard; Macias, Leonardo; Rodriguez, Rodrigo; Sibbitt, Wilmer; Roldan, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    Aortic atherosclerosis (AoA) defined as intima-media thickening or plaques and aortic stiffness (AoS) also considered an atherosclerotic process and defined as decreased vessel distensibility (higher pulse pressure to achieve similar degree of vessel distension) are common in patients with SLE. Immune-mediated inflammation, thrombogenesis, traditional atherogenic factors, and therapy-related metabolic abnormalities are the main pathogenic factors of AoA and AoS. Pathology of AoA and AoS suggests an initial subclinical endothelialitis or vasculitis, which is exacerbated by thrombogenesis and atherogenic factors and ultimately resulting in AoA and AoS. Computed tomography (CT) for detection of arterial wall calcifications and arterial tonometry for detection of increased arterial pulse wave velocity are the most common diagnostic methods for detecting AoA and AoS, respectively. MRI may become a more applicable and accurate technique than CT. Although transesophageal echocardiography accurately detects earlier and advanced stages of AoA and AoS, it is semi-invasive and cannot be used as a screening method. Although imaging techniques demonstrate highly variable prevalence rates, on average about one third of adult SLE patients may have AoA or AoS. Age at SLE diagnosis; SLE duration; activity and damage; corticosteroid therapy; metabolic syndrome; chronic kidney disease; and mitral annular calcification are common independent predictors of AoA and AoS. Also, AoA and AoS are highly associated with carotid and coronary atherosclerosis. Earlier stages of AoA and AoS are usually subclinical. However, earlier stages of disease may be causally related or contribute to peripheral or cerebral embolism, pre-hypertension and hypertension, and increased left ventricular afterload resulting in left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction. Later stages of disease predisposes to visceral ischemia, aortic aneurysms and aortic dissection. Even earlier stages of AoA and Ao

  20. Temporary extra-anatomic brain perfusion followed by total rerouting of the supra-aortic vessels for hybrid repair of a ruptured aortic arch aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Joyeux, Frederic; Canaud, Ludovic; Hireche, Kheira; Berthet, Jean-Philippe; Marty-Ane, Charles; Alric, Pierre

    2011-10-01

    Hybrid repair of ruptured aortic arch repair has been proposed as a valuable approach. However, the presence of an anterior mediastinal hematoma must be carefully detected because of the inherent risk of rupture at sternotomy. We report the case of a patient presenting a ruptured aortic arch aneurysm with anterior rupture who underwent hybrid repair using a temporary extra-anatomic brain perfusion followed by total rerouting of the supra-aortic trunks. We propose this adjunctive technique as a means of allowing a safe endovascular exclusion of aortic arch lesions and avoiding the risk of acute and total aortic rupture in case of anterior rupture of aortic arch aneurysms.

  1. An Adult Case of Unicommissural Unicuspid Aortic Valve Diagnosed Based on the Intraoperative Findings.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Tetsuo; Fukatsu, Toru; Ichinohe, Yoshimaro; Komatsu, Hirotaka; Seki, Masahiro; Sasaki, Kenichi; Takai, Hideaki; Kunihara, Takashi; Hirata, Yasunobu

    2016-01-01

    We herein report an adult case of unicommissural unicuspid aortic valve (UAV). A 59-year-old man, who was noted to have a cardiac murmur at 31 years of age, was admitted to our hospital due to acute heart failure. Severe calcification in the aortic valve with severe low-flow/low-gradient aortic stenosis and moderate aortic regurgitation was observed and thought to be the cause of heart failure, however, the etiology of aortic valve dysfunction was not clear. Aortic valve replacement was subsequently performed, and unicommissural UAV was diagnosed according to the intraoperative findings. UAV is very rare congenital aortic valve disease which is rarely diagnosed preoperatively.

  2. An Adult Case of Unicommissural Unicuspid Aortic Valve Diagnosed Based on the Intraoperative Findings.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Tetsuo; Fukatsu, Toru; Ichinohe, Yoshimaro; Komatsu, Hirotaka; Seki, Masahiro; Sasaki, Kenichi; Takai, Hideaki; Kunihara, Takashi; Hirata, Yasunobu

    2016-01-01

    We herein report an adult case of unicommissural unicuspid aortic valve (UAV). A 59-year-old man, who was noted to have a cardiac murmur at 31 years of age, was admitted to our hospital due to acute heart failure. Severe calcification in the aortic valve with severe low-flow/low-gradient aortic stenosis and moderate aortic regurgitation was observed and thought to be the cause of heart failure, however, the etiology of aortic valve dysfunction was not clear. Aortic valve replacement was subsequently performed, and unicommissural UAV was diagnosed according to the intraoperative findings. UAV is very rare congenital aortic valve disease which is rarely diagnosed preoperatively. PMID:27629961

  3. Endovascular Stent-Graft Repair as a Late Secondary Procedure After Previous Aortic Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Matsagas, Miltiadis I. Anagnostopoulos, Constantine E.; Papakostas, John C.; DeRose, Joseph J.; Siminelakis, Stavros; Katsouras, Christos S.; Toumpoulis, Ioannis K.; Drossos, George E.; Michalis, Lampros K.

    2006-08-15

    Thoracic and abdominal aortic endovascular procedures as alternatives to aortic reoperations were studied in three different cases. An anastomotic aneurysm after previous thoracic aortic graft for coarctation, a second-stage elephant trunk repair (descending thoracic aortic aneurysm), and a secondary aneurysm proximal to a previous abdominal aortic graft were successfully treated with endovascular stent-grafts. During the follow-up period no lethal events or major aortic or graft-related complications were observed, except a type II endoleak in the anastomotic aortic aneurysm case. An endovascular stent-graft can be safely deployed into a previously implanted vascular graft, avoiding repeat surgery.

  4. Quantitation of aortic valve area in aortic stenosis with multiplane transesophageal echocardiography: comparison with monoplane transesophageal approach.

    PubMed

    Tribouilloy, C; Shen, W F; Peltier, M; Mirode, A; Rey, J L; Lesbre, J P

    1994-09-01

    The accuracy and reliability of two-dimensional monoplane and multiplane transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) in the quantitation of aortic valve area were compared in 54 patients with aortic stenosis. Fifty patients had aortic valve area calculated by the continuity equation and transthoracic Doppler echocardiography (TTE); 25 underwent cardiac catheterization. Two-dimensional echocardiograms adequate for quantitation of aortic valve area were obtained in 21 (39%) patients with monoplane TEE and in 51 (94%) with multiplane TEE. The mean aortic valve area determined by both TEE methods did not differ significantly from that derived from TTE and catheterization. The mean difference of aortic valve area measurements between monoplane TEE and TTE was -0.045 +/- 0.11 cm2; that between multiplane TEE and TTE was 0.001 +/- 0.11 cm2. Multiplane TEE provided a better correlation of aortic valve area measurements with either TTE (y = 0.97 x + 0.03; r = 0.96; SEE = 0.11 cm2) or catheterization (y = 0.84 x + 0.11; r = 0.90; SEE = 0.12 cm2) than the monoplane TEE (y = 0.88 x + 0.13; r = 0.83; SEE = 0.15 cm2 and y = 0.41 x + 0.42; r = 0.81; SEE = 0.15 cm2). Severe aortic stenosis with valve orifice area of < or = 0.75 cm2 during TTE examination was found by multiplane TEE with a sensitivity of 96% and a specificity of 96%. Thus aortic valve area can be directly and reliably measured by two-dimensional multiplane TEE in majority of patients with aortic stenosis.

  5. Clampless and Sutureless Hybrid Technique for Aortic Arch Debranching on a Porcelain Aorta.

    PubMed

    Poletto, Giorgio L; Musto, Liam; Civilini, Efrem; Giorgetti, PierLuigi

    2016-06-01

    An innovative hybrid approach to the supraaortic vessels in a porcelain aorta and severe fibrotic tissue reaction at the neck is described. The technique is demonstrated in an 80-year-old woman with previous several carotid operations but still experiencing recurrent transient ischemic attacks. Clinical success was achieved at midterm follow-up, demonstrating the efficacy of hybrid treatment for this high-risk patient. Novel prosthetic vascular grafts that can be applied without cross-clamping may also provide a solution to approaching a porcelain aorta and difficult anatomies. PMID:27211961

  6. [Abdominal aortic aneurysm: an uncommon presentation].

    PubMed

    Taborda, Lúcia; Pereira, Laurinda; Amona, Eurides; Pinto, Erique Guedes; Rodrigues, Joaquim

    2011-01-01

    Most abdominal aortic aneurysms are asymptomatic, being accidentally found on physical examination or in routinely performed imaging studies. They only require surveillance (which is variable according to the aneurism size) and medical therapy in order to achieve risk factor reduction. However, in certain situations, according to the risk of aneurism rupture, elective surgery or endovascular procedure may be necessary. About 80% of the cases of aneurism rupture occur into the retroperitoneal space, with a high mortality rate. There are uncommon presentations of aneurism rupture as the aorto-caval fistula, which also require fast diagnosis and intervention. The authors present the case of a 71-year-old man, with the previous diagnosis of hypertension, acute myocardial infarction 2 months earlier (undergone primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention) and tabagism, who was admitted at the emergency department with intense 24-hour-evolution epigastric pain. On physical examination, the Blood Pressure values measured at the lower limbs were about half the ones measured at the upper limbs and there was an abdominal pulsatile mass, with a high-intensity murmur. As the authors suspected aortic dissection, aneurysm, coarctation or thrombosis, it was done a Computed Tomography scanning with intravenous contrast, which revealed a ruptured abdominal aorta aneurysm with a mural thrombus. The doppler ultrasound confirmed the presence of a high debit aorto-caval fistula. The patient was immediately transferred to the Vascular Surgery. However he died 2 hours later, during surgery. PMID:22525642

  7. Endovascular Management of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Fattori, Rossella Russo, Vincenzo; Lovato, Luigi; Buttazzi, Katia; Rinaldi, Giovanni

    2011-12-15

    The overall survival of patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) has improved significantly in the past few years. Endovascular treatment, proposed as an alternative to surgery, has been considered a therapeutic innovation because of its low degree of invasiveness, which allows the treatment of even high-surgical risk patients with limited complications and mortality. A major limitation is the lack of adequate evidence regarding long-term benefit and durability because follow-up has been limited to just a few years even in the largest series. The combination of endovascular exclusion with visceral branch revascularization for the treatment of thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysms involving the visceral aorta has also been attempted. As an alternative, endografts with branches represent a technological evolution that allows treatment of complex anatomy. Even if only small numbers of patients and short follow-up are available, this technical approach, which has with limited mortality (<10%) and paraplegia rates, to expand endovascular treatment to TAA seems feasible. With improved capability to recognize proper anatomy and select clinical candidates, the choice of endovascular stent-graft placement may offer a strategy to optimize management and improve prognosis.

  8. Blood flow characteristics in the aortic arch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; van Wyk, Stevin; Mihaiescu, Mihai; Fuchs, Laszlo; Gutmark, Ephraim; Backeljauw, Philippe; Gutmark-Little, Iris

    2012-11-01

    The purpose with this study is to investigate the flow characteristics of blood in the aortic arch. Cardiovascular diseases are associated with specific locations in the arterial tree. Considering atherogenesis, it is claimed that the Wall Shear Stress (WSS) along with its temporal and spatial gradients play an important role in the development of the disease. The WSS is determined by the local flow characteristics, that in turn depends on the geometry as well as the rheological properties of blood. In this numerical work, the time dependent fluid flow during the entire cardiac cycle is fully resolved. The Quemada model is applied to account for the non-Newtonian properties of blood, an empirical model valid for different Red Blood Cell loading. Data obtained through Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging have been used in order to reconstruct geometries of the the aortic arch. Here, three different geometries are studied out of which two display malformations that can be found in patients having the genetic disorder Turner's syndrome. The simulations show a highly complex flow with regions of secondary flow that is enhanced for the diseased aortas. The financial support from the Swedish Research Council (VR) and the Sweden-America Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Coronary Obstruction Following Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Henrique Barbosa; Sarmento-Leite, Rogério; Siqueira, Dimytri A. A.; Carvalho, Luiz Antônio; Mangione, José Armando; Rodés-Cabau, Josep; Perin, Marco A.; de Brito, Fábio Sandoli

    2014-01-01

    Background Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) was established as an important alternative for high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. However, there are few data in the literature regarding coronary obstruction, that although rare, is a potentially fatal complication. Objective Evaluate this complication in Brazil. Methods We evaluated all patients presenting coronary obstruction from the Brazilian Registry of TAVI. Main baseline and procedural characteristics, management of the complication, and clinical outcomes were collected from all patients. Results From 418 consecutive TAVI procedures, coronary obstruction occurred in 3 cases (incidence of 0.72%). All patients were women, without prior coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), and with mean age of 85 ± 3 years, logistic EuroSCORE of 15 ± 6% and STS-PROM score of 9 ± 4%. All of the cases were performed with balloon-expandable Sapien XT prosthesis. In one patient, with pre-procedural computed tomography data, coronary arteries presented a low height and a narrow sinus of Valsalva. All patients presented with clinically significant severe maintained hypotension, immediately after valve implantation, and even though coronary angioplasty with stent implantation was successfully performed in all cases, patients died during hospitalization, being two periprocedurally. Conclusion Coronary obstruction following TAVI is a rare but potentially fatal complication, being more frequent in women and with the balloon-expandable prosthesis. Anatomical factors might be related with its increased occurrence, highlighting the importance of a good pre-procedural evaluation of the patients in order to avoid this severe complication. PMID:24652089

  10. Pulsatile blood flow in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Lasheras, Juan C.; Singel, Soeren; Varga, Chris

    2001-11-01

    We discuss the results of combined in-vitro laboratory measurements and clinical observations aimed at determining the effect that the unsteady wall shear stresses and the pressure may have on the growth and eventual rupturing of an Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA), a permanent bulging-like dilatation occurring near the aortic bifurcation. In recent years, new non-invasive techniques, such as stenting, have been used to treat these AAAs. However, the development of these implants, aimed at stopping the growth of the aneurysm, has been hampered by the lack of understanding of the effect that the hemodynamic forces have on the growth mechanism. Since current in-vivo measuring techniques lack the precision and the necessary resolution, we have performed measurements of the pressure and shear stresses in laboratory models. The models of the AAA were obtained from high resolution three-dimensional CAT/SCANS performed in patients at early stages of the disease. Preliminary DPIV measurements show that the pulsatile blood flow discharging into the cavity of the aneurysm leads to large spikes of pressure and wall shear stresses near and around its distal end, indicating a possible correlation between the regions of high wall shear stresses and the observed location of the growth of the aneurysm.

  11. Fundamental mechanics of aortic heart valve closure.

    PubMed

    Hose, David Rodney; Narracott, Andrew James; Penrose, Justin M T; Baguley, David; Jones, Ian P; Lawford, Patricia V

    2006-01-01

    Stresses in a prosthetic heart valve at closure are determined by its geometrical and structural characteristics, by the mechanical support environment, and by the momentum of the valve leaflets or occluder and of the blood at the instant of closure. The mass of blood to be arrested is significantly greater than that of the leaflets or occluder, and is therefore likely to dominate the closure impulse. The kinetic energy of the blood must be transduced into potential energy in the structural components (valve leaflets, aortic root and aorta). This paper presents a methodology for computation and parameterisation of the blood momentum associated with a valve in the aortic position. It is suggested that the influence of physiological parameters, such as systolic waveform and systemic impedance, on the closure characteristics can be investigated based on the fluid dynamic implications. Detailed results are presented for a single leaflet mechanical valve (Bjork-Shiley 60 degrees Convexo-Concave). It is demonstrated that a simple analytical method can yield results that might be adequate for the purposes of valve design.

  12. Effects of aortic irregularities on blood flow.

    PubMed

    Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; van Wyk, Stevin; Fuchs, Laszlo; Gutmark, Ephraim; Backeljauw, Philippe; Gutmark-Little, Iris

    2016-04-01

    Anatomic aortic anomalies are seen in many medical conditions and are known to cause disturbances in blood flow. Turner syndrome (TS) is a genetic disorder occurring only in females where cardiovascular anomalies, particularly of the aorta, are frequently encountered. In this study, numerical simulations are applied to investigate the flow characteristics in four TS patient- related aortic arches (a normal geometry, dilatation, coarctation and elongation of the transverse aorta). The Quemada viscosity model was applied to account for the non-Newtonian behavior of blood. The blood is treated as a mixture consisting of water and red blood cells (RBC) where the RBCs are modeled as a convected scalar. The results show clear geometry effects where the flow structures and RBC distribution are significantly different between the aortas. Transitional flow is observed as a jet is formed due to a constriction in the descending aorta for the coarctation case. RBC dilution is found to vary between the aortas, influencing the WSS. Moreover, the local variations in RBC volume fraction may induce large viscosity variations, stressing the importance of accounting for the non-Newtonian effects. PMID:26104133

  13. [Syphilitic aortic aneurysm. A case report].

    PubMed

    Ben Halima, A; Ibn Elhadj, Z; Essmat, W; Léfi, A; Kammoun, I; Zouaoui, W; Marrakchi, S; Chine, S; Gargouri, S; Keskes, H; Kachboura, S

    2006-05-01

    The incidence of tertiary syphilis has declined in recent years owing to the early recognition of the disease and use of antibiotics. As a result, syphilitic aortic aneurysms are rarely encountered nowadays. We report the case of a 65 years old man, who was admitted to our hospital in June 2004 for dyspnea, cough and chest discomfort. On physical examination, blood pressure was 130/80 mmHg with no significant laterality, pulse rate was 70 per minute and there was a decrease of breath sounds over the right lung. Laboratory findings revealed a slight elevation of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Serological studies for syphilis showed a positive venereal disease laboratory test (VDRL) at 1/32 and a positive Treponema pallidum hemagglutination test (TPHA) at 1/2560. The chest radiography showed a right para cardiac opacity measuring 16 x 12 cm. Fiber optic bronchoscopy showed an extrinsic compression of the right upper lobar bronchus. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography and 16 multidetector-row spiral computed aortography showed a huge partially thrombosed saccular aneurysm of the ascending aorta measuring 132 mm in diameter. The circulating lumen measured 53 mm in its largest diameter. This aneurysm involved the innominate artery. There was no other arterial involvement. The patient was given a three week course of intravenous penicillin followed by a successful surgical procedure in September 2004 with ascending aortic replacement and innominate artery reimplantation. This case illustrates well a formerly common, but now extremely rare disease.

  14. Right Axillary Artery Cannulation in Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Toshihiko; Murakami, Takashi; Sakaguchi, Masanori; Suehiro, Yasuo; Suehiro, Shigefumi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This retrospective study aimed to evaluate the results of our experience with axillary artery cannulation via a side graft in aortic valve replacement in patients with ascending aortic atherosclerotic disease. Methods: From January 2002 to 2012, we operated on 76 patients for aortic valve disease with the use of the axillary artery for arterial inflow in our institute. The indications for cannulation of the axillary artery were aortic aneurysm in 37 patients, severe aortic atherosclerosis in 28 patients, and re do surgery in 11 patients. Results: Right axillary artery cannulation via a side graft provides sufficient antegrade aortic flow of 2.6 ± 0.1 L/m2 during cardiopulmonary bypass. No additional arterial cannulation was necessary to obtain sufficient perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass. Although permanent perioperative stroke was observed in two patients, this did not occur during the operation. There were no problems with cannulation or wound and graft infections. During the follow-up period, there were no thrombotic events due to an axillary graft stump in the right upper extremities. Conclusions: Axillary artery cannulation via a side graft is a useful and safe option for cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with atherosclerotic disease of the ascending aorta undergoing aortic valve replacement. PMID:26780952

  15. Mechanics of the pulmonary valve in the aortic position.

    PubMed

    Soares, A L F; van Geemen, D; van den Bogaerdt, A J; Oomens, C W J; Bouten, C V C; Baaijens, F P T

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical models can provide valuable information to assess and evaluate the mechanical behavior and remodeling of native tissue. A relevant example when studying collagen remodeling is the Ross procedure because it involves placing the pulmonary autograft in the more demanding aortic valve mechanical environment. The objective of this study was therefore to assess and evaluate the mechanical differences between the aortic valve and pulmonary valve and the remodeling that may occur in the pulmonary valve when placed in the aortic position. The results from biaxial tensile tests of pairs of human aortic and pulmonary valves were compared and used to determine the parameters of a structurally based constitutive model. Finite element analyzes were then performed to simulate the mechanical response of both valves to the aortic diastolic load. Additionally, remodeling laws were applied to assess the remodeling of the pulmonary valve leaflet to the new environment. The pulmonary valve showed to be more extensible and less anisotropic than the aortic valve. When exposed to aortic pressure, the pulmonary leaflet appeared to remodel by increasing its thickness and reorganizing its collagen fibers, rotating them toward the circumferential direction. PMID:24035437

  16. Mechanism of development of aortic transection: a possible new angle.

    PubMed

    Warwick, R; Mediratta, N; Pullan, M; Chalmers, J; Poullis, M

    2013-03-01

    Aortic transection injury is a frequently fatal injury secondary to sudden deceleration. To date magnitude of deceleration is the only factor known to influence the development of an aortic transection injury. We hypothesise that different 3D geometries of the aortic arch in healthy young adult patients as a possible predisposing factor for transection injuries when undergoing sudden deceleration. We extend this to hypothesise that the direction of deceleration may be important as well. In addition we hypothesise that the stage in the cardiac cycle, which determines central aortic blood pressure, when the deceleration occurs as an important factor. We utilise known engineering principles such as Newton's second Law of motion, moment of inertia, law of Laplace, and the theory of superposition to explain our hypothesis. We present limited data to demonstrate the wide variation in aortic arch 3D geometry to explain the possible an individual's variable susceptibility to transection injuries via the principle of moment of inertia. Engineering principles suggest that 3D aortic arch geometry, direction of deceleration and stage in the cardiac cycle, in addition to the magnitude of deceleration are potentially important factors in predisposing certain individuals in a given situation to aortic transaction injuries.

  17. Ultrasound Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The aim of this review was to assess the effectiveness of ultrasound screening for asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Clinical Need Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a localized abnormal dilatation of the aorta greater than 3 cm. In community surveys, the prevalence of AAA is reported to be between 2% and 5.4%. Abdominal aortic aneurysms are found in 4% to 8% of older men and in 0.5% to 1.5% of women aged 65 years and older. Abdominal aortic aneurysms are largely asymptomatic. If left untreated, the continuing extension and thinning of the vessel wall may eventually result in rupture of the AAA. Often rupture may occur without warning, causing acute pain. Rupture is always life threatening and requires emergency surgical repair of the ruptured aorta. The risk of death from ruptured AAA is 80% to 90%. Over one-half of all deaths attributed to a ruptured aneurysm take place before the patient reaches hospital. In comparison, the rate of death in people undergoing elective surgery is 5% to 7%; however, symptoms of AAA rarely occur before rupture. Given that ultrasound can reliably visualize the aorta in 99% of the population, and its sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing AAA approaches 100%, screening for aneurysms is worth considering as it may reduce the incidence of ruptured aneurysms and hence reduce unnecessary deaths caused by AAA-attributable mortality. Review Strategy The Medical Advisory Secretariat used its standard search strategy to retrieve international health technology assessments and English-language journal articles from selected databases to determine the effectiveness of ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms. Case reports, letters, editorials, nonsystematic reviews, non-human studies, and comments were excluded. Questions asked: Is population-based AAA screening effective in improving health outcomes in asymptomatic populations? Is AAA screening acceptable to the population? Does this affect the

  18. Unicuspid Aortic Stenosis in a Patient with Turner Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Essandoh, Michael; Castellon-Larios, Karina; Zuleta-Alarcon, Alix; Portillo, Juan Guillermo; Crestanello, Juan A.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital aortic valve anomalies are the cause of premature aortic stenosis in pediatric and younger adult populations. Despite being very rare, unicuspid aortic valves account for approximately 5% of isolated aortic valve replacements. Patients with aortic stenosis, present with the same symptomatology independent of leaflet morphology. However, the presence of bicuspid and unicuspid aortic stenosis is associated with a higher incidence of aortopathy, especially in Turner syndrome patients. Turner syndrome, an X monosomy, is associated with aortic valve anomalies, aortopathy, and hypertension. These risk factors lead to a higher incidence of aortic dissection in this population. Patients with Turner syndrome and aortic stenosis that present for aortic valve replacement should therefore undergo extensive aortic imaging prior to surgery. Transthoracic echocardiography is the diagnostic tool of choice for valvular pathology, yet it can misdiagnose unicuspid aortic valves as bicuspid valves due to certain similarities on imaging. Transesophageal echocardiography is a better tool for distinguishing between the two valvular abnormalities, although diagnostic errors can still occur. We present a case of a 50-year-old female with history of Turner syndrome and bicuspid aortic stenosis presenting for aortic valve replacement and ascending aorta replacement. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography revealed a stenotic unicommissural unicuspid aortic valve with an eccentric orifice, which was missed on preoperative imaging. This case highlights the importance of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography in confirming preoperative findings, diagnosing further cardiac pathology, and ensuring adequate surgical repair. PMID:26664864

  19. Right Aortic Arch and Coarctation: A Rare Association

    PubMed Central

    Ismat, Fraz A.; Weinberg, Paul M.; Rychik, Jack; Karl, Tom R.; Fogel, Mark A.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives Understand anatomical and clinical correlatives to coarctation in right aortic arch. Background Coarctation of the aorta is rare in patients with a functional right aortic arch. We reviewed a single institutional experience, examining associated diagnoses, diagnostic methodology, and surgical approaches. Methods A retrospective study was performed of our echocardiographic, magnetic resonance imaging, catheterization, and surgical databases from 1988 to 2001. Results Of 240 patients with right aortic arch, 10 (4.1%) had coarctation, constituting 1.9% of all native coarctations (n = 524). Nine (90%) had long-segment hypoplasia. Six (60%) had an aberrant left subclavian artery or retroesophageal diverticulum, 3 (30%) had mirror image branching, and 1 (10%) had a double arch with an atretic left arch. Other congenital heart defects were seen in 6 (60%) comprising 3 with ventricular septal defects, and one each with double-outlet right ventricle, cor triatriatum, and pulmonary valve abnormality. No patients with long-segment hypoplasia had bicuspid aortic valve. Six (60%) had vascular rings, and 5 (50%) had other associated syndromes. Magnetic resonance imaging and/or echocardiography successfully diagnosed all of these patients. Although long-segment right aortic arch coarctation courses behind the trachea posteriorly, only 2 needed an extra-anatomic (jump) graft; the remainders were repaired with patch angioplasty. Conclusion Coarctation with right aortic arch is rare, constituting 4.1% of all patients with right aortic arch, compared with 5–8% of patients with left aortic arch and congenital heart disease. Nearly all had long-segment hypoplasia without bicuspid aortic valve, and half were part of other syndrome complexes. This association can be diagnosed noninvasively and can often be repaired by patch angioplasty. PMID:17330153

  20. Cauda equina syndrome: an uncommon symptom of aortic diseases

    PubMed Central

    He, Fuliang; Xing, Tong; Yu, Fang; Li, Hongchuan; Fang, Xiutong; Song, Hongxing

    2015-01-01

    Background: In order to help diagnose and deal with the fetal aortic diseases in time, we retrospectively reviewed 8 patients who presented with cauda equina syndrome (CES) but actually suffered from low spinal nerve ischemia due to aortic diseases. Material and Methods: 8 patients were initially diagnosed as CES. 7 patients were confirmed with aortic diseases. 1 patient was confirmed with aortic saddle embolism post emergent laminectomy. Relief of CES symptoms was evaluated during preoperation and follow-up period. Results: 1 patient was diagnosed as aortic dissection and 5 patients as AAA. These 6 patients underwent endovascular aortic repair (EVAR). The CES was relieved in 5-10 d post procedure. The 7th patient was diagnosed with acute abdominal aortic occlusion and then underwent catheter directed thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) for 20 h and CES disappeared. The JOA scores of the 7 patients were recovered from preoperative 15.14±1.21 to 21.00±2.16 within 5-10 d (P<0.01), and evaluated to be 24.12±1.34, 25.88±1.21 and 26.29±1.11 at 3 m-, 6 m- and 12 m-follow-up point, respectively. The 8th patient was initially diagnosed as lumbar spinal stenosis and lumbar disc herniation. The patient underwent emergent vertebral canal decompression and presented with serious CES symptoms. CTA confirmed that the patient had been suffered from aortic saddle embolism (ASE). Conclusion: CES caused by abdominal aortic diseases is a special event with fetal consequences if it is not recognized and treated promptly. Orthopedists and neurosurgeons should pay attentions particularly to this issue to preserve the cauda equina functions to their maximums. PMID:26379869

  1. Nearly Asymptomatic Eight-Month Thoracic Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arjun; Kumar, Krishan; Zeltser, Roman; Makaryus, Amgad N.

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic aortic dissection is a rare, but lethal, medical condition that is either misdiagnosed as a myocardial infarction or overlooked completely. Though thoracic aortic dissections are commonly diagnosed in patients exhibiting sharp chest pain, there are some notable cases where patients do not report the expected severity of pain. We report a unique case of a patient with a thoracic aortic dissection who was initially nearly asymptomatic for eight months, in order to heighten awareness, highlight diagnosis protocol, and improve prognosis for this commonly misdiagnosed, but fatal, condition. PMID:27257400

  2. Para-aortic lymph node radiation in advanced cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Emami, B.; Watring, W.G.; Tak, W.; Anderson, B.; Piro, A.J.

    1980-09-01

    Thirty-six patients with advanced carcinoma of the uterine cervix and with iliac or para-aortic nodes interpreted as un-equivocally positive on lymphangiography have received radiation therapy to the para-aortic area at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology at Tufts-New England Medical Center Hospital. Of 29 patients who received para-aortic area irradiation as part of their initial treatment, local control was achieved in 18 patients (62%). Overall, four patients developed major complications requiring surgical intervention. Detailed results and our current pre-treatment evaluation policy including lymphangiography, percutaneous needle biopsy and selective extra-peritoneal lymph node biopsy will be discussed.

  3. Aortic dissection presenting as gait disturbance: a case report.

    PubMed

    Estreicher, Michael; Portale, Joseph; Lopez, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Emergency medicine dogma traditionally teaches that aortic dissection presents as tearing chest pain, radiating to the back. This case report describes a 55-year-old woman presenting with a left homonymous hemianopsia and resultant gait disturbance. Initial head computed tomography demonstrated a right parietal infarct, and chest radiograph demonstrated a markedly widened mediastinum. Acute Stanford type A aortic dissection was subsequently confirmed. This report provides further evidence for atypical, painless presentations of aortic dissection. Given recent literature on the increasing prevalence of painless dissection, the disease entity should be included in the differential diagnosis for stroke, and a simple portable chest x-ray should always be obtained before administering thrombolytics.

  4. Autologous adventitial overlay method reinforces anastomoses in aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Minato, Naoki; Okada, Takayuki; Sumida, Tomohiko; Watanabe, Kenichi; Maruyama, Takahiro; Kusunose, Takashi

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we present an inexpensive and effective method for providing a secure and hemostatic anastomosis using autologous adventitia obtained from a dissected or aneurysmal wall. The resected aortic wall is separated between the adventitia and media, and a soft, 2 × 10-cm adventitial strip is overlaid to cover the anastomotic margin. A graft is sutured to the aortic stump. This autologous adventitial overlay method can inexpensively and strongly reinforce the anastomosis during aortic surgery for dissection or aneurysm and will contribute to anastomotic hemostasis and long-term stability.

  5. Dissecting thoracic aortic aneurysm associated with tuberculous pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    Im, Kyong Shil; Choi, Min Kyung; Jeon, Yong Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of thoracic aortic aneurysm associated with the tuberculous pleural effusion. An 82-year-old woman underwent emergency stent graft under a diagnosis of dissecting thoracic aortic aneurysm. Preoperative computed tomography revealed right pleural effusion supposed to the hemothorax caused by the dissecting aneurysm. But, the effusion was sanguineous color fluid and it was determined to result from pulmonary tuberculosis. The medical team was exposed to the pulmonary tuberculosis; fortunately no one became infected. Physicians should be aware of the possibility of an infected aortic aneurysm and prepare for pathogen transmission. PMID:27499987

  6. Aortic dissection accompanied by preeclampsia in a postpartum young woman

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Wan; Kim, Su-Mi; Yu, Gyu-Bong

    2016-01-01

    Aortic dissection is very rare in obstetrics, but it is a fatal disease. A 37-weeks primigravida woman with dyspnea and pitting edema presented to our emergency room. The patient was diagnosed with preeclampsia and underwent an emergency cesarean section under spinal anesthesia. The patient complained of severe dyspnea after the cesarean section, and the chest computed tomography scan was done. With the finding of aortic dissection, cardiopulmonary arrest occurred 5 hours after the cesarean section, and the patient died without reaction to cardio-pulmonary resuscitation. If a patient with preeclampsia complains of severe dyspnea or chest pain, aortic dissection needs to be suspected and a diagnosis should not be delayed.

  7. Post-mortem shrinkage of homograft aortic valves

    PubMed Central

    Dexter, F.; Donnelly, R. J.; Deverall, P. B.; Watson, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    Experience has shown that some frame-mounted homograft aortic valves, although competent immediately after mounting, are incompetent when subsequently presented for surgical use. Retraction and shrinkage of the cusps appears to be the cause of this change. Clinical and experimental studies have shown that shrinkage of homograft aortic valves occurs over an approximately five-day period after death of the donor and it is recommended that this period should elapse before mounting homograft aortic valves on to support frames. Images PMID:5039445

  8. Abdominal aortic rupture from an impaling osteophyte following blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Vernon, Seth A; Murphy, William R C; Murphy, Todd W; Haan, James M

    2014-04-01

    Blunt injury of the abdominal aorta is highly fatal. We present an unusual case of an osteophyte impaling the abdominal aorta treated by endovascular repair. A 77-year-old man sustained a thoracolumbar fracture-dislocation with posterior aortic rupture between his celiac and superior mesenteric artery origins. His aortic injury was treated with a stent graft, excluding the celiac origin. He was dismissed on postoperative day 6. At 6 months, he had returned to most preinjury activities, and at 2-year follow-up, he continues to have good functional outcome. Endovascular repair may be successfully employed in select aortic injuries in hemodynamically stable patients.

  9. Computed Tomography Imaging Artifact Simulating Type A Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Alan S.; Ziganshin, Bulat A.; Elefteriades, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) is an effective tool for assessment of thoracic aortic disease in the modern era. Here, we describe a case of Type A aortic dissection incidentally detected by CT in a 63-year old man. Upon more precise imaging with electrocardiography (ECG)-gated CT, the dissection vanished, revealing it to be an aortic motion artifact. This report highlights the importance of motion artifacts mimicking a dissection flap. CT imaging gated with ECG can distinguish a dissection flap from an artifact.

  10. Dilated aortic root and severe aortic regurgitation causing dilated cardiomyopathy in classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zainal, Abir; Hamad, Mahmoud Nidal; Naqvi, Syed Yaseen

    2016-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of heritable disorders characterised by vast clinical heterogeneity ranging from the classic constellation of symptoms including skin hyperextensibility, joint hypermobility and skin fragility to the exceedingly critical consequences of arterial rupture and visceral perforation. We describe the case of a 65-year-old male with a history of classic EDS who reported of dyspnoea on exertion, orthopnoea, fatigue and palpitations. He was found to have dilated cardiomyopathy with an ejection fraction of 35%, aortic root dilation and severe aortic valve regurgitation. The authors intend to draw attention to the rare cardiac manifestations of this condition and the therapeutic challenges involved in managing such patients. PMID:27413024

  11. Quantification of the aortic arch morphology in 3D CTA images for endovascular aortic repair (EVAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wörz, S.; von Tengg-Kobligk, H.; Henninger, V.; Böckler, D.; Kauczor, H.-U.; Rohr, K.

    2008-03-01

    We introduce a new model-based approach for the segmentation and quantification of the aortic arch morphology in 3D CTA images for endovascular aortic repair (EVAR). The approach is based on a 3D analytic intensity model for thick vessels, which is directly fitted to the image. Based on the fitting results we compute the (local) 3D vessel curvature and torsion as well as the relevant lengths not only along the 3D centerline but particularly along the inner and outer contour. These measurements are important for pre-operative planning in EVAR applications. We have successfully applied our approach using ten 3D CTA images and have compared the results with ground truth obtained by a radiologist. It turned out that our approach yields accurate estimation results. We have also performed a comparison with a commercial vascular analysis software.

  12. Blunt Traumatic Aortic Injury of Right Aortic Arch in a Patient with an Aberrant Left Subclavian Artery

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Daryl Li-Tian; Haider, Sajjad; Zhen, Claire Alexandra Chew

    2015-01-01

    Right-sided aortic arch (RAA) is a rare congenital developmental variant present in about 0.1 percent of the population. This anatomical anomaly is commonly associated with congenital heart disease and complications from compression of mediastinal structures. However, it is unknown if patients are at a higher risk of blunt thoracic aortic injury (BTAI). We report a case of a 20-year-old man admitted to the hospital after being hit by an automobile. Computed tomographic scan revealed an RAA with an aberrant left subclavian artery originating from a Kommerell’s diverticulum. A pseudo-aneurysm was also seen along the aortic arch. A diagnosis of blunt traumatic aortic injury was made. The patient was successfully treated with a 26mm Vascutek hybrid stentgraft using the frozen elephant trunk technique. A literature review of the pathophysiology of BTAI was performed to investigate if patients with right-sided aortic arch are at a higher risk of suffering from BTAI. Results from the review suggest that although theoretically there may be a higher risk of BTAI in RAA patients, the rarity of this condition has prevented large studies to be conducted. Previously reported cases of BTAI in RAA have highlighted the possibility that the aortic isthmus may be anatomically weak and therefore prone to injury. We have explored this possibility by reviewing current literature of the embryological origins of the aortic arch and descending aorta. PMID:25745378

  13. Blunt traumatic aortic injury of right aortic arch in a patient with an aberrant left subclavian artery.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Daryl Li-Tian; Haider, Sajjad; Zhen, Claire Alexandra Chew

    2015-03-01

    Right-sided aortic arch (RAA) is a rare congenital developmental variant present in about 0.1 percent of the population. This anatomical anomaly is commonly associated with congenital heart disease and complications from compression of mediastinal structures. However, it is unknown if patients are at a higher risk of blunt thoracic aortic injury (BTAI). We report a case of a 20-year-old man admitted to the hospital after being hit by an automobile. Computed tomographic scan revealed an RAA with an aberrant left subclavian artery originating from a Kommerell's diverticulum. A pseudo-aneurysm was also seen along the aortic arch. A diagnosis of blunt traumatic aortic injury was made. The patient was successfully treated with a 26mm Vascutek hybrid stentgraft using the frozen elephant trunk technique. A literature review of the pathophysiology of BTAI was performed to investigate if patients with right-sided aortic arch are at a higher risk of suffering from BTAI. Results from the review suggest that although theoretically there may be a higher risk of BTAI in RAA patients, the rarity of this condition has prevented large studies to be conducted. Previously reported cases of BTAI in RAA have highlighted the possibility that the aortic isthmus may be anatomically weak and therefore prone to injury. We have explored this possibility by reviewing current literature of the embryological origins of the aortic arch and descending aorta.

  14. MMP-2 gene polymorphisms are associated with type A aortic dissection and aortic diameters in patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ou; Xie, Wuxiang; Qin, Yanwen; Jia, Lixin; Zhang, Jing; Xin, Yi; Guan, Xinliang; Li, Haiyang; Gong, Ming; Liu, Yuyong; Wang, Xiaolong; Li, Jianrong; Lan, Feng; Zhang, Hongjia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Matrix metalloproteinases-2 (MMP-2) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of type A aortic dissection (AD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the MMP-2 gene with type A AD risk and aortic diameters in patients. We performed a case–control study with 172 unrelated type A AD patients and 439 controls. Three SNPs rs11644561, rs11643630, and rs243865 were genotyped through the MassARRAY platform. Allelic associations of SNPs and SNP haplotypes with type A AD and aortic diameters in patients were evaluated. The frequency of the G allele of the rs11643630 polymorphism was significantly lower in type A AD patients than in control subjects (odds ratio 0.705, 95% confidence interval 0.545–0.912, P = 0.008). The association remained significant after adjusting for clinical covariates (P = 0.008). Carriers of the GG genotype of the rs11643630 polymorphism had significantly smaller aortic diameters than those with GT genotype or TT genotype (P = 0.02). Further haplotype analysis identified 1 protective haplotype (GC; P = 0.008) for development of type A AD. Again, a significant correlation was observed between haplotype GC and AD size (P = 0.020). Our results suggest that MMP-2 gene polymorphisms contribute to type A AD susceptibility. In addition, MMP-2 gene SNPs are associated with AD size, which could be used as a target for the development of new drug therapy. PMID:27759651

  15. Right aortic arch and Kommerell's diverticulum associated with acute aortic dissection and pericardial tamponade

    PubMed Central

    Ebner, Lukas; Huber, Andreas; Christe, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The right-sided aorta associated with an aberrant left subclavian artery is a rare anomaly of the aortic branches in the upper mediastinum. We present a 62-year-old patient suffering from an acute dissection of the ascending aorta associated with hemopericardium. In this case, there was also aneurysmal dilatation of the origin of the left subclavian artery, known as diverticulum of Kommerell. PMID:23986854

  16. A rare complication: an attempt of retrieval of an aortic valve wrapped with pig tail catheter during transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Bekir Serhat; Alihanoglu, Yusuf Izzettin; Alur, Ihsan; Evrengul, Harun; Kaya, Dayimi

    2015-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation is preferred to treat high surgical risk patients with severe aort stenosis. Wrapping of a pig tail catheter with device struts during transcatheter aortic valve implantation is a very rare complication. In this report, we present the images and videos of an attempt of retrieval of an aortic valve wrapped with pig tail catheter during transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a 71-year-old man.

  17. Aortic valve/root procedures in patients with an anomalous left circumflex coronary artery and a bicuspid aortic valve: anatomical and technical implications.

    PubMed

    Liebrich, Markus; Tzanavaros, Ioannis; Scheid, Michael; Voth, Wladimir; Doll, Kai-Nicolas; Hemmer, Wolfgang B

    2015-07-01

    An anomalous origin of the left circumflex coronary artery that arises as a side branch of the right coronary artery from the right coronary sinus of Valsalva encircling the aortic annulus is usually an incidental finding. However, in patients undergoing aortic valve procedures, its existence can significantly complicate the surgical treatment. We report our operative strategy in patients with an anomalous left circumflex coronary artery, a bicuspid aortic valve morphology and different aortic valve pathologies.

  18. Two Cases of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm with Right Aortic Arch: Comparison of Two Operative Strategies for Hybrid Thoracic Endovascular Repair

    PubMed Central

    Onohara, Takeshi; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Kishimoto, Yuichiro; Harada, Shingo; Fujiwara, Yoshikazu; Saiki, Munehiro

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid TEVAR was performed in 2 patients with right aortic arch accompanied by Kommerell’s diverticulum and aortic aneurysm. In patient 1, total debranch + TEVAR was performed with 1-stage median sternotomy. In patient 2, total arch replacement and insertion of a peripheral elephant trunk were performed first, followed by TEVAR. No endoleaks or aortic events were observed in either case during the observation period, and both patients had good postoperative clinical courses. We report our experience with two such cases that were treated with two different methods of hybrid TEVAR, and discuss the merits and demerits of each treatment method. PMID:25298843

  19. Causes and histopathology of ascending aortic disease in children and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepali; Dietz, Harry C.; Oswald, Gretchen L.; Maleszewski, Joseph J.; Halushka, Marc K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Ascending aortic diseases (aneurysms, dissections, and stenosis) and associated aortic valve disease are rare but important causes of morbidity and mortality in children and young adults. Certain genetic causes, such as Marfan syndrome and congenital bicuspid aortic valve disease, are well known. However, other rarer genetic and nongenetic causes of aortic disease exist. Methods We performed an extensive literature search to identify known causes of ascending aortic pathology in children and young adults. We catalogued both aortic pathologies and other defining systemic features of these diseases. Results We describe 17 predominantly genetic entities that have been associated with thoracic aortic disease in this age group. Conclusions While extensive literature on the common causes of ascending aortic disease exists, there is a need for better histologic documentation of aortic pathology in rarer diseases. PMID:19926309

  20. Guilt by association: paradigm for detecting a silent killer (thoracic aortic aneurysm)

    PubMed Central

    Elefteriades, John A; Sang, Adam; Kuzmik, Gregory; Hornick, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have confirmed a close association between various medical conditions (intracranial aneurysm, abdominal aortic aneurysm, temporal arteritis, autoimmune disorder, renal cysts), certain aortic anatomic variants (bovine aortic arch, direct origin of left vertebral artery from aortic arch, bicuspid aortic valve), and family history of aneurysm disease with thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection. This paper reviews these associations. We propose to capitalise on these associations as powerful and expanding opportunities to diagnose the virulent but silent disease of thoracic aortic aneurysm. This can be accomplished by recognition of this ‘guilt by association’ with the other conditions. Thus, patients with associated diseases and anatomic variants should be investigated for silent aortic aneurysms. Such a paradigm holds substantial potential for reducing death from the silent killer represented by thoracic aortic aneurysm disease. PMID:25932333

  1. The expanding indications of transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Chiam, Paul T L; Ewe, See Hooi

    2016-03-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), also known as transcatheter aortic valve replacement, is increasingly performed worldwide and is a technology that is here to stay. It has become the treatment of choice for inoperable patients and an alternative option for patients at high surgical risk with severe aortic stenosis. Early results of TAVI in intermediate-risk patients appear promising although larger randomized trial results are awaited before the widespread adoption of this technology in this big pool of patients. In patients with bicuspid aortic stenosis and degenerated surgical bioprostheses, TAVI has been shown to be feasible and relatively safe, though certain important considerations remain. Indications for TAVI are likely to grow as newer generation and improved devices and delivery systems become available.

  2. Central aortic blood pressure assessment and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Ram, C Venkata S

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral brachial blood pressure measurements may not provide an accurate representation of degenerative changes that characterize cardiovascular disease. Evidence is mounting that antihypertensive treatment strategies with apparently similar effects on brachial blood pressure may have different effects on central aortic pressure, which in turn may lead to overestimation or underestimation of therapeutic efficacy. The relative importance of central and brachial blood pressure for predicting cardiovascular risk and clinical outcomes has been examined in several clinical studies. These studies have reported that a large proportion of individuals considered to have normal blood pressure values based on brachial systolic pressures had high-normal blood pressure based on central aortic pressure measurements. As additional evidence suggesting the superiority of central aortic pressure over peripheral assessments becomes more abundant, measurement of central aortic pressure may be the next important advancement in the management of hypertension.

  3. Rare Case of Vaginal Delivery in Giant Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Luneva, Ekaterina; Samokhvalova, Maria; Pakhomov, Artem; Mitrofanova, Lubov; Malev, Eduard; Uspenskiy, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old woman underwent successful vaginal delivery despite previously unsuspected 8-cm ascending and 6-cm descending aortic aneurysms. These were repaired immediately after delivery. PMID:27069941

  4. Fatal aortic pseudoaneurysm from disseminated Mycobacterium kansasii infection: case report.

    PubMed

    Ehsani, Laleh; Reddy, Sujan C; Mosunjac, Mario; Kraft, Colleen S; Guarner, Jeannette

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium kansasii is a photochromogenic, slow-growing mycobacterium species that can cause pulmonary infection in patients with predisposing lung diseases, as well as extrapulmonary or disseminated disease in immunosuppressed patients. We describe a patient with a myelodysplastic syndrome, disseminated M kansasii infection, and ruptured aortic aneurysm. He had a recent diagnosis of mycobacterium cavitary lung lesions and was transferred to our facility for possible surgical intervention of an aortic aneurysm. Few hours after admission, the patient suddenly collapsed and died despite resuscitation efforts. A complete autopsy was performed and showed ruptured ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm with hemopericardium, disseminated necrotizing and nonnecrotizing granulomas with acid-fast bacilli in the aortic wall, lungs, heart, liver, spleen, and kidneys. Further genetic studies were consistent with monocytopenia and mycobacterial infection syndrome. PMID:25537975

  5. Minimally Invasive Techniques for Total Aortic Arch Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Faulds, Jason; Sandhu, Harleen K; Estrera, Anthony L; Safi, Hazim J

    2016-01-01

    The cumulative experience with endovascular aortic repair in the descending thoracic and infrarenal aorta has led to increased interest in endovascular aortic arch reconstruction. Open total arch replacement is a robust operation that can be performed with excellent results. However, it requires cardiopulmonary bypass and circulatory arrest and, therefore, may not be tolerated by all patients. Minimally invasive techniques have been considered as an alternative and include hybrid arch debranching, parallel stent graft deployment in the chimney and snorkel configurations, and complete endovascular branched reconstruction with multi-branched devices. This review discusses the evolving use of endovascular techniques in the management of aortic arch pathology and considers their relevance in an era of safe and durable open aortic arch reconstruction.

  6. Minimally Invasive Techniques for Total Aortic Arch Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Faulds, Jason; Sandhu, Harleen K.; Estrera, Anthony L.; Safi, Hazim J.

    2016-01-01

    The cumulative experience with endovascular aortic repair in the descending thoracic and infrarenal aorta has led to increased interest in endovascular aortic arch reconstruction. Open total arch replacement is a robust operation that can be performed with excellent results. However, it requires cardiopulmonary bypass and circulatory arrest and, therefore, may not be tolerated by all patients. Minimally invasive techniques have been considered as an alternative and include hybrid arch debranching, parallel stent graft deployment in the chimney and snorkel configurations, and complete endovascular branched reconstruction with multi-branched devices. This review discusses the evolving use of endovascular techniques in the management of aortic arch pathology and considers their relevance in an era of safe and durable open aortic arch reconstruction. PMID:27127562

  7. Wrapping of abdominal aortic aneurysms: a viable alternative.

    PubMed

    Kartchner, M M; Lovett, V F

    1986-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm wrapping is an excellent procedure to use for poor-risk patients, calcified aneurysms, aneurysms extending above the renal arteries, and prophylaxis for small aneurysms. The procedure has a low operative mortality rate and a low long-term graft-related complication rate. It appears that aortic wrapping can be performed with a similar mortality and long-term survival rate as standard resection and grafting procedures, in spite of its application in generally poorer-risk patients. However, we do not believe that this procedure will replace aortic resection and grafting for most lumbar aortic aneurysms, but it should be considered for use in selected instances and should be in the armamentarium of all vascular surgeons.

  8. Acute and chronic acalculous cholecystitis associated with aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Fuyuki F; Hara, Yoshiaki; Kamei, Masako; Tanaka, Michio; Yasuno, Masamichi

    2015-01-01

    Acalculous cholecystitis is a rare but life-threatening disease, but its pathogenesis is not fully revealed yet. We experienced two acalculous cholecystitis cases associated with aortic dissection. In Case 1, acalculous cholecystitis occurred just after the exacerbation of the aortic dissection. Laparotomy showed necrotized cholecystitis with fresh thrombi formation. Case 2 developed acalculous cholecystitis on the 65th hospital day of aortic dissection. Laparotomy revealed the perforation of the gallbladder. Histological study revealed fibrosis and hemosiderosis in the subserosal layer. The histological findings of these two patients are quite different: Case 1 is acute ischemic and Case 2 is chronic ischemic. While a few cases of acute ischemic cholecystitis have been reported previously, chronic acalculous cholecystitis (CAC) has not been documented. History of aortic dissection could be a risk factor of acute and CAC due to relatively decreased splanchnic blood flow. PMID:26232599

  9. Postmortem Aortic Dissection: An Artifact of the Embalming Process.

    PubMed

    Rae, Guenevere; Husain, Mujtaba; McGoey, Robin; Swartz, William

    2016-01-01

    Aortic dissection (AD) is a serious condition that affects 3/100,000 individuals a year. Recently, a case report was published describing an embalmed patient with an aortic dissection. The purpose of this study was to examine the frequency of AD among 80 embalmed cadavers and confirm the AD with histopathologic evaluation. In seven cases of grossly identified AD, six were determined to be due to the embalming procedure and only one case of true antemortem AD was confirmed. These results suggest that aortic morphology can be altered by administration of the embalming fluid and that alterations can mimic AD, not only on gross inspection but also on postmortem imaging. Awareness of this embalming artifact may prevent misdiagnosis of an aortic dissection in an embalmed patient, a point particularly useful for autopsy pathology that may include postmortem examination of an embalmed patient.

  10. Imaging of the aortic valve with MRI and CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Harvey, J J; Hoey, E T D; Ganeshan, A

    2013-12-01

    The aortic valve may be affected by a wide range of congenital and acquired diseases. Echocardiography is the main non-invasive imaging technique for assessing patho-anatomical alterations of the aortic valve and adjacent structures and in many cases is sufficient to establish a diagnosis and/or guide treatment decisions. Recent technological advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) have enabled these techniques to play a complimentary role in certain clinical scenarios and as such can be useful problem-solving tools. Radiologists should be familiar with the indications, advantages, and limitations of MRI and MDCT in order to advise and direct an appropriate imaging strategy depending upon the clinical scenario. This article reviews the role of MRI and MDCT angiography for assessment of the aortic valve including relevant anatomy, scan acquisition protocols, and post-processing methods. An approach to interpretation and the key imaging features of commonly encountered aortic valvular diseases are discussed.

  11. Mean aortic pressure is the geometric mean of systolic and diastolic aortic pressure in resting humans.

    PubMed

    Chemla, Denis; Antony, Isabelle; Zamani, Karen; Nitenberg, Alain

    2005-12-01

    The aim of our study was twofold: 1) to establish a mathematical link between mean aortic pressure (MAP) and systolic (SAP) and diastolic aortic pressures (DAP) by testing the hypothesis that either the geometric mean or the harmonic mean of SAP and DAP were reliable MAP estimates; and 2) to critically evaluate three empirical formulas recently proposed to estimate MAP. High-fidelity pressures were recorded at rest at the aortic root level in controls (n = 31) and in subjects with various forms of cardiovascular diseases (n = 108). The time-averaged MAP and the pulse pressure (PP = SAP - DAP) were calculated. The MAP ranged from 66 to 160 mmHg [mean = 107.9 mmHg (SD 18.2)]. The geometric mean, i.e., the square root of the product of SAP and DAP, furnished a reliable estimate of MAP [mean bias = 0.3 mmHg (SD 2.7)]. The harmonic mean was inaccurate. The following MAP formulas were also tested: DAP + 0.412 PP (Meaney E, Alva F, Meaney A, Alva J, and Webel R. Heart 84: 64, 2000), DAP + 0.33 PP + 5 mmHg [Chemla D, Hébert JL, Aptecar E, Mazoit JX, Zamani K, Frank R, Fontaine G, Nitenberg A, and Lecarpentier Y. Clin Sci (Lond) 103: 7-13, 2002], and DAP + [0.33 + (heart rate x 0.0012)] PP (Razminia M, Trivedi A, Molnar J, Elbzour M, Guerrero M, Salem Y, Ahmed A, Khosla S, Lubell DL. Catheter Cardiovasc Interv 63: 419-425, 2004). They all provided accurate and precise estimates of MAP [mean bias = -0.2 (SD 2.9), -0.3 (SD 2.7), and 0.1 mmHg (SD 2.9), respectively]. The implications of the geometric mean pressure strictly pertained to the central (not peripheral) level. It was demonstrated that the fractional systolic (SAP/MAP) and diastolic (DAP/MAP) pressures were reciprocal estimates of aortic pulsatility and that the SAP times DAP product matched the total peripheral resistance times cardiac power product. In conclusion, although the previously described thumb-rules applied, the "geometric MAP" appears more valuable as it established a simple mathematical link between

  12. Aortic intimal sarcoma with embolic metastases.

    PubMed

    Wright, E P; Glick, A D; Virmani, R; Page, D L

    1985-12-01

    A 46-year-old woman died from massive bowel infarction. At autopsy, a primary sarcoma was found growing along the intimal surface of the aorta at the level of the celiac axis. Tumor emboli were found in distal aortic branches and most abdominal organs. Immunoperoxidase for Factor VIII and electron microscopy (EM) did not support an endothelial origin. EM showed myofibroblastic differentiation. Review of the literature yields an array of diagnostic histologic terms for these tumors, hampering case comparison. The literature does suggest, however, that the clinical presentation of these rare neoplasms correlates nicely with the location and gross morphology of the lesion. We therefore propose a clinicopathologic classification, categorizing the lesions as intimal (obstructive and nonobstructive) and mural. The former are typically pleomorphic sarcomas and are probably of myofibroblastic origin, whereas the latter are usually leiomyosarcomas or fibrosarcomas that probably originate in the media or adventitia. PMID:3000205

  13. Vertebral destruction due to abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez Viseu Pinheiro, J.F.; Blanco Blanco, J.F.; Pescador Hernández, D.; García García, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Low back pain is a common cause of medical consultation, and usually supposes a non-malignant prognostic. Presentation of case We report an atypical appearance of low back pain associated to shock and pulsatile abdominal mass that made us diagnose an abdominal aortic aneurysm as reason of vertebral lysis and pain. Discusion Surgical repair of contained AAA should be directed to secondary re-rupture prevention, with an approximate survival near to 100% at selected patients for elective surgery. Consequently, orthopedic surgery for back spine stabilization has to be elective in those cases when vertebral destruction is above 30% and clinic is directly related to spine instability. Conclusion We should consider AAA as other cause of low back pain and routinely examine the abdomen and seek complementary imaging proves when risk factors for AAA are present. PMID:25569196

  14. A Sizable Aortic Root Paravalvular Mycotic Pseudoaneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Ouf, Noran M.

    2016-01-01

    Mycotic aneurysm is an established condition first identified in 1885 by Sir William Osler. It is linked to malignant endocarditis. With prevalence of 0.7–2.6% of all cases of aortic aneurysms, it is associated with a significant rate of mortality and morbidity. Physicians should be highly cautious, as diagnosis and effective treatment for this condition are difficult. The following is a case report of a 13-year-old pediatric patient diagnosed with mycotic aneurysm. Before an adequate treatment plan could be developed and implemented, patient's status worsened swiftly and was ultimately terminal. This case is the sole instance of this condition evidenced in the last ten years in Saudi Arabia. PMID:27807483

  15. Acute Aortic Occlusion Presenting as Flaccid Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Kilany, Ayman; Al-Hashel, Jasem Y.; Rady, Azza

    2015-01-01

    A 67-year-old male known to be hypertensive and diabetic had a sudden onset of severe low back pain and flaccid paraplegia with no sensory level or bladder affection and the distal pulsations were felt. Acute compressive myelopathy was excluded by MRI of the dorsal and lumbar spines. The nerve conduction study and CSF analysis was suggestive of acute demyelinating polyneuropathy. The patient developed ischemic changes of the lower limb and CT angiography revealed severe stenosis of the abdominal aorta and both common iliac arteries. We emphasize the importance of including acute aortic occlusion in the differential diagnosis of acute flaccid paraplegia especially in the presence of severe back pain even if the distal pulsations were felt. PMID:25866688

  16. Acute aortic occlusion presenting as flaccid paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Kilany, Ayman; Al-Hashel, Jasem Y; Rady, Azza

    2015-01-01

    A 67-year-old male known to be hypertensive and diabetic had a sudden onset of severe low back pain and flaccid paraplegia with no sensory level or bladder affection and the distal pulsations were felt. Acute compressive myelopathy was excluded by MRI of the dorsal and lumbar spines. The nerve conduction study and CSF analysis was suggestive of acute demyelinating polyneuropathy. The patient developed ischemic changes of the lower limb and CT angiography revealed severe stenosis of the abdominal aorta and both common iliac arteries. We emphasize the importance of including acute aortic occlusion in the differential diagnosis of acute flaccid paraplegia especially in the presence of severe back pain even if the distal pulsations were felt. PMID:25866688

  17. Iatrogenic aortic pseudoaneurysm: a forgotten complication.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Samuel; Bico, Pedro; Almeida, António R; Laranjeira Santos, Álvaro; Banazol, Nuno; Fragata, José; Rabaçal, Carlos

    2014-02-01

    Pseudoaneurysms of the ascending aorta are a rare complication of cardiac surgery. However, the poor prognosis associated with this condition if untreated makes early diagnosis and treatment important. We present the case of a 66-year-old woman who had undergone mitral valvuloplasty 12 days previously, who was admitted with a diagnosis of new-onset atrial fibrillation. The transthoracic echocardiogram showed a clot in the right atrium and anticoagulation was initiated, followed by antibiotic therapy. After further investigation, the patient was diagnosed with a pseudoaneurysm of the ascending aorta and underwent surgical repair, followed by six weeks of antibiotic therapy. She was readmitted six months later for an abscess of the lower sternum and mediastinum. After a conservative approach with antibiotics and local drainage failed, recurrence of a large pseudoaneurysm compressing the superior vena cava was documented. A third operation was performed to debride the infected tissue and to place an aortic allograft. There were no postoperative complications. PMID:24508151

  18. Combined aortic and renal artery surgery. A contemporary experience.

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, M E; Hansen, K J; Craven, T E; Keith, D R; Plonk, G W; Geary, R L; Dean, R H

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: This retrospective study examines results with simultaneous aortic and renal artery repair in 133 consecutive hypertensive patients. These results are compared with consecutive patient groups undergoing aortic reconstruction alone (269 patients) or renal artery reconstruction alone (182 patients). METHODS: From January 1987 through July 1995, 61 women and 72 men (mean age, 62.5 years) underwent combined repair of renal artery and aortic disease (abdominal aortic aneurysm [AAA]: 47 patients; occlusive disease: 86 patients; both: 12 patients). All patients were hypertensive (mean blood pressure: 194/103 mmHg; mean medications: 2.4). Evidenced by serum creatinine levels > or = 2.0 mg/dL, 46 patients (35%) had significant renal dysfunction (mean serum creatinine level: 3.78 mg/dL; range 2.0-10.6 mg/dL, including 7 dialysis-dependent patients). Aortic replacements (29% tube grafts; 71% bifurcated grafts) were combined with unilateral renal artery repair in 47% of patients; 53% had bilateral repair. Preoperative clinical features and perioperative mortality were compared with those groups having isolated aortic and renal repairs. RESULTS: There were seven perioperative deaths (5.3%) after combined repair, which differed significantly from isolated aortic repair (mortality: 0.74%; p = 0.005), but did not reach statistical significance when compared with the isolated renal artery group (mortality: 1.65%; p = 0.145). Risk analysis did not reveal a significant association between preoperative clinical features and mortality in either the combined repair group or the groups undergoing renal repair alone or aortic repair alone. Among survivors in the combined group, a favorable hypertension response was observed in 63%. This differed significantly from the group receiving renal repair alone (90% cured/improved; p < 0.001). Based on a 20% decrease in serum creatinine levels, excretory renal function was improved in 33% of patients with combined repair, including four

  19. Aortic wall shear stress in Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Julia; Arnold, Raoul; Herzer, Lena; Hirtler, Daniel; Stankovic, Zoran; Russe, Max; Langer, Mathias; Markl, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify changes in thoracic aortic wall shear stress (WSS) in asymptomatic patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) compared with healthy controls. WSS in the thoracic aorta was quantified based on time-resolved 3D phase contrast MRI with three-directional velocity encoding (4D flow MRI, temporal resolution ∼44 ms, spatial resolution ∼2.5 mm) in 24 patients with confirmed MFS (age = 18 ± 12 years) and in 12 older healthy volunteers (age = 25 ± 3 years). Diameters of the thoracic aorta normalized to body surface area were similar for both groups. Peak systolic velocity, absolute WSS, time-averaged WSS, circumferential WSS, peak systolic WSS, and WSS eccentricity were calculated in eight analysis planes distributed along the thoracic aorta. Plane-wise comparison revealed significant differences between MFS patients and volunteers in the proximal ascending aorta for peak systolic velocities (1.11 ± 0.23 m/s vs. 1.34 ± 0.18 m/s, P = 0.004) and circumferential WSS (0.14 ± 0.03 N/m(2) vs. 0.11 ± 0.02 N/m(2), P = 0.007). WSS eccentricity was altered in most of the ascending aorta and proximal arch (P = 0.009-0.020). MFS patients demonstrated segmental differences in peak systolic WSS with a significantly higher WSS at the inner curvature in the proximal ascending aorta and at the anterior part in the more distal ascending aorta (P < 0.01). These findings indicate differences in WSS associated with MFS despite similar aortic dimensions compared to controls.

  20. Left ventricular function in chronic aortic regurgitation

    SciTech Connect

    Iskandrian, A.S.; Hakki, A.H.; Manno, B.; Amenta, A.; Kane, S.A.

    1983-06-01

    Left ventricular performance was determined in 42 patients with moderate or severe aortic regurgitation during upright exercise by measuring left ventricular ejection fraction and volume with radionuclide ventriculography. Classification of the patients according to exercise tolerance showed that patients with normal exercise tolerance (greater than or equal to 7.0 minutes) had a significantly higher ejection fraction at rest (probability (p) . 0.02) and during exercise (p . 0.0002), higher cardiac index at exercise (p . 0.0008) and lower exercise end-systolic volume (p . 0.01) than did patients with limited exercise tolerance. Similar significant differences were noted in younger patients compared with older patients in ejection fraction at rest and exercise (both p . 0.001) and cardiac index at rest (p . 0.03) and exercise (p . 0.0005). The end-diastolic volume decreased during exercise in 60% of the patients. The patients with a decrease in volume were significantly younger and had better exercise tolerance and a larger end-diastolic volume at rest than did patients who showed an increase in volume. The mean corrected left ventricular end-diastolic radius/wall thickness ratio was significantly greater in patients with abnormal than in those with normal exercise reserve (mean +/- standard deviation 476 +/- 146 versus 377 +/- 92 mm Hg, p less than 0.05). Thus, in patients with chronic aortic regurgitation: 1) left ventricular systolic function during exercise was related to age, exercise tolerance and corrected left ventricular end-diastolic radius/wall thickness ratio, and 2) the end-diastolic volume decreased during exercise, especially in younger patients and patients with normal exercise tolerance or a large volume at rest.

  1. Enlightenment from a small but rapidly evolving penetrating aortic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Guangyi; Tang, Wenyi; Chen, Jian

    2016-07-01

    Penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU) is a pathologic type of acute aortic syndrome and usually locates in the descending aorta. The presentation, behavior and natural history of this disease process have not been clear. Here we report a case in which a rapidly evolving PAU in descending aorta needed aggressive percutaneous interventional treatment. The present case with its unique scenario might draw clinicians' attention on a "beyond the guidelines" issue.

  2. Essential steps in the performance of safe retroperitoneal aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Conway, K; Williams, I M

    2016-10-01

    Endovascular stent grafting has become the primary modality when assessing patients for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). The traditional open approach is transperitoneal (TP) but many suggest the retroperitoneal method (RP) has significant benefits. Retroperitoneal aortic surgery may be unfamiliar to many surgeons as they have been trained in the TP approach. This paper provides specific tips for the critical steps of this approach enabling it to be performed with ease and minimal morbidity. PMID:26211699

  3. [Simultaneous operations in patients with infrarenal aortic aneurism].

    PubMed

    Dudkin, B P; Butkevich, A Ts; Rybakov, V V; Pan'ko, V Ia

    2011-01-01

    During the period between 1982 and 2007 years, 125 patients had been simultaneously operated on the infrarenal atherosclerotic aortic aneurism (aorto-femoral by-pass) and other organs. 86 of them overcame simultaneous surgery considering vascular interventions, the rest 39 had been operated on general surgical and oncologic diseases of abdomen. The acquired results were satisfactory and proved the reasonability of simultaneous operations by aortic aneurism. PMID:21378700

  4. Intimal Flap Vegetation Following Aortic Root Re-dissection

    PubMed Central

    Osada, Hiroaki; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Meshii, Katsuaki; Ohnaka, Motoaki

    2016-01-01

    A 75-year-old man who had undergone ascending aorta replacement for acute Type A aortic dissection presented with a recurring high fever. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed that a vegetation had formed on the re-dissected intimal flap of the noncoronary sinus of Valsalva. This didactic case suggests that antibiotic prophylactic measures be considered for aortic dissection flaps as for irregular valves susceptible to infective endocarditis.

  5. A Migrated Aortic Stent Graft Causing Erosive Spondylopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Gestrich, Christopher Probst, Chris; Wilhelm, Kai; Schiller, Wolfgang

    2013-12-15

    We report about a patient presenting with back pain 4 months after an uneventful endovascular implantation of an aortic stent graft. Computed tomography scan revealed a migration of the stent with consecutive endoleakage, kink formation, and movement of the stent toward the spine, which caused destruction of the aortic wall as well as vertebral necrosis. Explantation of the stent and replacement of the native aorta relieved the patient of his symptoms.

  6. Essential steps in the performance of safe retroperitoneal aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Conway, K; Williams, I M

    2016-10-01

    Endovascular stent grafting has become the primary modality when assessing patients for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). The traditional open approach is transperitoneal (TP) but many suggest the retroperitoneal method (RP) has significant benefits. Retroperitoneal aortic surgery may be unfamiliar to many surgeons as they have been trained in the TP approach. This paper provides specific tips for the critical steps of this approach enabling it to be performed with ease and minimal morbidity.

  7. Rare Seagull Cooing Murmur from Acute Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, J; Cheng, Z; Quan, X; Zhao, Z

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acute aortic dissection is a rare but potentially fatal disease. The early recognition of this disease is important for timely treatment. Some signs and symptoms, such as past history of hypertension, tearing pain and pulselessness, can provide valuable clues to the diagnosis of this disease. In this case study, the mechanism of a seagull murmur from aortic dissection is first described. This information is potentially useful for the differential diagnosis of dissection. PMID:26426186

  8. Percutaneous transluminal alcohol septal myocardial ablation after aortic valve replacement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitges, M.; Kapadia, S.; Rubin, D. N.; Thomas, J. D.; Tuzcu, M. E.; Lever, H. M.

    2001-01-01

    When left ventricular outflow tract obstruction develops after aortic valve replacement, few treatment choices have been available until now. We present a patient with prior aortic valve replacement who developed left ventricle outflow tract obstruction that was successfully treated with a percutaneous transcoronary myocardial septal alcohol ablation. This technique is a useful tool for the treatment of obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, especially in those patients with prior heart surgery. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Enlightenment from a small but rapidly evolving penetrating aortic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Guangyi; Tang, Wenyi; Chen, Jian

    2016-07-01

    Penetrating aortic ulcer (PAU) is a pathologic type of acute aortic syndrome and usually locates in the descending aorta. The presentation, behavior and natural history of this disease process have not been clear. Here we report a case in which a rapidly evolving PAU in descending aorta needed aggressive percutaneous interventional treatment. The present case with its unique scenario might draw clinicians' attention on a "beyond the guidelines" issue. PMID:26961076

  10. Exclusion of Complex Paraannular Aortic Abscess With the Freestyle Xenograft.

    PubMed

    Guihaire, Julien; Kloeckner, Martin; Deleuze, Philippe

    2016-10-01

    Destructive aortic valve endocarditis is a serious condition that can result in aortoventricular disjunction. The appropriate surgical approach for severe excavating lesions remains a matter of debate. Homografts, prosthetic valves associated with a pericardial patch for annulus repair, and prosthetic valve conduits can be used. We report the technical issue of subcoronary inclusion of the full root Freestyle xenograft for complicated aortic endocarditis extending to the left ventricular outflow tract. PMID:27645988

  11. Aortic lesion simulating pulmonary disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    do Amaral, Ricardo Holderbaum; de Souza, Vinícius Valério Silveira; Nin, Carlos Schuler; Pedraza, Cesar Adrian Alvarez; Biegelmeyer, Júlia; Maciel, Antonio Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The authors report the case of an elderly woman assessed for dyspnea and right costal margin pain, whose chest radiography demonstrated opacity simulating pulmonary lesion, and computed tomography revealed the vascular origin of the condition. Acute aortic syndrome due to ruptured atheromatous plaque penetrating through the elastic lamina in association with aortic hematoma and aneurysm is a relevant differential diagnosis to be considered in these cases.

  12. Intra-aortic filtration is effective in collecting hazardous materials.

    PubMed

    Mestres, Carlos-A; Bernabeu, Eduardo; Fernández, Claudio; Colli, Andrea; Josa, Miguel

    2007-04-01

    Neurological complications after cardiac operations are mostly due to particle embolization. This case illustrates the embolic potential of any material. A 77-year-old lady underwent re-operation for homograft aortic regurgitation and mitral valve replacement. Intra-aortic filtration was used. After cardiopulmonary bypass the filter was found to have captured a pledget from a suture used to secure the mitral replacement device.

  13. Hemodynamic and cellular response feedback in calcific aortic valve disease.

    PubMed

    Gould, Sarah T; Srigunapalan, Suthan; Simmons, Craig A; Anseth, Kristi S

    2013-07-01

    This review highlights aspects of calcific aortic valve disease that encompass the entire range of aortic valve disease progression from initial cellular changes to aortic valve sclerosis and stenosis, which can be initiated by changes in blood flow (hemodynamics) and pressure across the aortic valve. Appropriate hemodynamics is important for normal valve function and maintenance, but pathological blood velocities and pressure can have profound consequences at the macroscopic to microscopic scales. At the macroscopic scale, hemodynamic forces impart shear stresses on the surface of the valve leaflets and cause deformation of the leaflet tissue. As discussed in this review, these macroscale forces are transduced to the microscale, where they influence the functions of the valvular endothelial cells that line the leaflet surface and the valvular interstitial cells that populate the valve extracellular matrix. For example, pathological changes in blood flow-induced shear stress can cause dysfunction, impairing their homeostatic functions, and pathological stretching of valve tissue caused by elevated transvalvular pressure can activate valvular interstitial cells and latent paracrine signaling cytokines (eg, transforming growth factor-β1) to promote maladaptive tissue remodeling. Collectively, these coordinated and complex interactions adversely impact bulk valve tissue properties, feeding back to further deteriorate valve function and propagate valve cell pathological responses. Here, we review the role of hemodynamic forces in calcific aortic valve disease initiation and progression, with focus on cellular responses and how they feed back to exacerbate aortic valve dysfunction.

  14. Aortic calcification produced by vitamin D3 plus nicotine.

    PubMed

    Niederhoffer, N; Bobryshev, Y V; Lartaud-Idjouadiene, I; Giummelly, P; Atkinson, J

    1997-01-01

    Calcification of the elastic arteries of the young rat by treatment with vitamin D and nicotine (VDN) has been proposed as an animal model of arterial calcification associated with age and age-related vascular pathology in man. The calcium-binding protein, S-100, which is found in human atherosclerotic lesions was associated with medial calcification of the aorta in VDN rats, especially in cases of severe calcification. Calcification (total calcium content: 366 +/- 87, n = 12 in VDN vs. 24 +/- 2 micromol g(-1) aortic dry weight in controls, n = 13) involved elastocalcinosis leading to elastolysis as revealed by a fall in the amount of desmosine and isodesmosine in the aortic wall (266 +/- 17 and 254 +/- 15 in VDN vs. 655 +/- 56 and 588 +/- 30 microg g(-1) aortic dry weight in controls). The decrease in elastin was associated with an increase in the stiffness of the aortic wall (elastic modulus: 15.1 +/- 1.8 in VDN vs. 6.7 +/- 0.5 10(6) dyn cm(-2) in controls), an increase in end-systolic stress (central systolic aortic pressure: 152 +/- 6 in VDN vs. 136 +/- 2 mm Hg in controls) (at a normotensive mean pressure level) and left ventricular hypertrophy (heart weight/body weight 2.51 +/- 0.10 in VDN vs. 2.24 +/- 0.07 g kg(-1) in controls). In conclusion, the mechanisms and consequences of aortic calcification in VDN show several similarities with calcification occurring in human athero- and arteriosclerosis.

  15. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation despite challenging vascular access.

    PubMed

    Nascimbene, Angelo; Azpurua, Federico; Livesay, James J; Fish, R David; Krajcer, Zvonimir

    2015-04-01

    We describe transcatheter aortic valve implantation in a patient who had severe peripheral artery disease. The patient's vascular condition required additional preliminary peripheral intervention to enable adequate vascular access. A 78-year-old man with severe aortic stenosis, substantial comorbidities, and severe heart failure symptoms was referred for aortic valve replacement. The patient's 20-mm aortic annulus necessitated the use of a 23-mm Edwards Sapien valve inserted through a 22F sheath, which itself needed a vessel diameter of at least 7 mm for percutaneous delivery. The left common femoral artery was selected for valve delivery. The left iliac artery and infrarenal aorta underwent extensive intervention to achieve an intraluminal diameter larger than 7 mm. After aortic valvuloplasty, valve deployment was successful, and the transaortic gradient decreased from 40 mmHg to less than 5 mmHg. The patient was discharged from the hospital 4 days postoperatively. We conclude that transcatheter aortic valve implantation can be successfully performed in patients with obstructed vascular access, including stenosis of the infrarenal aorta and the subclavian and coronary arteries.

  16. Aortic Baroreceptors Display Higher Mechanosensitivity than Carotid Baroreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Eva On-Chai; Lo, Chun-Yin; Yao, Yifei; Mak, Arthur Fuk-Tat; Jiang, Liwen; Huang, Yu; Yao, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Arterial baroreceptors are mechanical sensors that detect blood pressure changes. It has long been suggested that the two arterial baroreceptors, aortic and carotid baroreceptors, have different pressure sensitivities. However, there is no consensus as to which of the arterial baroreceptors are more sensitive to changes in blood pressure. In the present study, we employed independent methods to compare the pressure sensitivity of the two arterial baroreceptors. Firstly, pressure-activated action potential firing was measured by whole-cell current clamp with a high-speed pressure clamp system in primary cultured baroreceptor neurons. The results show that aortic depressor neurons possessed a higher percentage of mechano-sensitive neurons. Furthermore, aortic baroreceptor neurons show a lower pressure threshold than that of carotid baroreceptor neurons. Secondly, uniaxial stretching of baroreceptor neurons, that mimics the forces exerted on blood vessels, elicited a larger increase in intracellular Ca2+ rise in aortic baroreceptor neurons than in carotid baroreceptor neurons. Thirdly, the pressure-induced action potential firing in the aortic depressor nerve recorded in vivo was also higher. The present study therefore provides for a basic physiological understanding on the pressure sensitivity of the two baroreceptor neurons and suggests that aortic baroreceptors have a higher pressure sensitivity than carotid baroreceptors. PMID:27630578

  17. [Severe aortic stenosis and cardiogenic shock: a therapeutic challenge].

    PubMed

    Caetano, Francisca; Almeida, Inês; Seca, Luís; Botelho, Ana; Mota, Paula; Leitão Marques, António

    2013-09-01

    Acute heart failure in patients with severe aortic stenosis and left ventricular systolic dysfunction is well known for its dire prognosis and limited therapeutic options. The authors describe the case of a man admitted for non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction. Diagnostic exams revealed severe aortic stenosis, with good left ventricular systolic function, and two-vessel coronary artery disease. The development of cardiogenic shock with left ventricular systolic dysfunction on day four led to changes in the therapeutic strategy. Percutaneous aortic balloon valvuloplasty coupled with complete myocardial revascularization was performed with a view to future surgical intervention. After discharge, the patient was readmitted with acute pulmonary edema, cardiogenic shock and cardiopulmonary arrest. Ventilator weaning was not possible due to acute heart failure and so it was decided to administer levosimendan, which resulted in substantial clinical and echocardiographic improvement. The patient subsequently underwent successful aortic valve replacement. This case highlights the challenge that characterizes the management of patients with concomitant coronary artery disease, left ventricular systolic dysfunction and severe aortic stenosis. Percutaneous aortic balloon valvuloplasty and levosimendan were safe and effective in the treatment of acute heart failure, acting as a bridge to surgery.

  18. Aortic Baroreceptors Display Higher Mechanosensitivity than Carotid Baroreceptors.

    PubMed

    Lau, Eva On-Chai; Lo, Chun-Yin; Yao, Yifei; Mak, Arthur Fuk-Tat; Jiang, Liwen; Huang, Yu; Yao, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Arterial baroreceptors are mechanical sensors that detect blood pressure changes. It has long been suggested that the two arterial baroreceptors, aortic and carotid baroreceptors, have different pressure sensitivities. However, there is no consensus as to which of the arterial baroreceptors are more sensitive to changes in blood pressure. In the present study, we employed independent methods to compare the pressure sensitivity of the two arterial baroreceptors. Firstly, pressure-activated action potential firing was measured by whole-cell current clamp with a high-speed pressure clamp system in primary cultured baroreceptor neurons. The results show that aortic depressor neurons possessed a higher percentage of mechano-sensitive neurons. Furthermore, aortic baroreceptor neurons show a lower pressure threshold than that of carotid baroreceptor neurons. Secondly, uniaxial stretching of baroreceptor neurons, that mimics the forces exerted on blood vessels, elicited a larger increase in intracellular Ca(2+) rise in aortic baroreceptor neurons than in carotid baroreceptor neurons. Thirdly, the pressure-induced action potential firing in the aortic depressor nerve recorded in vivo was also higher. The present study therefore provides for a basic physiological understanding on the pressure sensitivity of the two baroreceptor neurons and suggests that aortic baroreceptors have a higher pressure sensitivity than carotid baroreceptors. PMID:27630578

  19. Paraplegia caused by aortic coarctation complicated with spinal epidural hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Da; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Hsu, Chia-Ching; Liao, Wen-I; Chen, Sy-Jou

    2016-03-01

    Aortic coarctation complicated with spinal artery aneurysm rupture is exceptionally rare and can be source of intraspinal hemorrhage with markedly poor prognosis. A 21-year-old man visited the emergency department because of chest and back pain along with immobility of bilateral lower limbs immediately after he woke up in the morning. Complete flaccid paraplegia and hypoesthesia in dermatome below bilateral T3 level and pain over axial region from neck to lumbar region were noted. A computed tomography excluded aortic dissection. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a fusiform lesion involving the anterior epidural space from C7 to T2 level suspected of epidural hemorrhage, causing compression of spinal cord. He started intravenous corticosteroid but refused operation concerning the surgical benefits. Severe chest pain occurred with newly onset right bundle branch block that developed the other day. Coronary artery angiography revealed myocardial bridge of left anterior descending coronary artery at middle third and coarctation of aorta. He underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair uneventfully. The patient was hemodynamically stable but with slow improvement in neurologic recovery of lower limbs. Aortic coarcation can cause paralysis by ruptured vascular aneurysms with spinal hemorrhage and chest pain that mimics acute aortic dissection. A history of hypertension at young age and aortic regurgitated murmurs may serve as clues for further diagnostic studies. Cautious and prudent evaluation and cross disciplines cares are essential for diagnosis and successful management of the disease.

  20. Paraplegia caused by aortic coarctation complicated with spinal epidural hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Da; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Hsu, Chia-Ching; Liao, Wen-I; Chen, Sy-Jou

    2016-03-01

    Aortic coarctation complicated with spinal artery aneurysm rupture is exceptionally rare and can be source of intraspinal hemorrhage with markedly poor prognosis. A 21-year-old man visited the emergency department because of chest and back pain along with immobility of bilateral lower limbs immediately after he woke up in the morning. Complete flaccid paraplegia and hypoesthesia in dermatome below bilateral T3 level and pain over axial region from neck to lumbar region were noted. A computed tomography excluded aortic dissection. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a fusiform lesion involving the anterior epidural space from C7 to T2 level suspected of epidural hemorrhage, causing compression of spinal cord. He started intravenous corticosteroid but refused operation concerning the surgical benefits. Severe chest pain occurred with newly onset right bundle branch block that developed the other day. Coronary artery angiography revealed myocardial bridge of left anterior descending coronary artery at middle third and coarctation of aorta. He underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair uneventfully. The patient was hemodynamically stable but with slow improvement in neurologic recovery of lower limbs. Aortic coarcation can cause paralysis by ruptured vascular aneurysms with spinal hemorrhage and chest pain that mimics acute aortic dissection. A history of hypertension at young age and aortic regurgitated murmurs may serve as clues for further diagnostic studies. Cautious and prudent evaluation and cross disciplines cares are essential for diagnosis and successful management of the disease. PMID:26275629

  1. Bare Metal Stenting for Endovascular Exclusion of Aortic Arch Thrombi

    SciTech Connect

    Mahnken, Andreas H.; Hoffman, Andras; Autschbach, Ruediger; Damberg, Anneke L. M.

    2013-08-01

    BackgroundAortic thrombi in the ascending aorta or aortic arch are rare but are associated with a relevant risk of major stroke or distal embolization. Although stent grafting is commonly used as a treatment option in the descending aorta, only a few case reports discuss stenting of the aortic arch for the treatment of a thrombus. The use of bare metal stents in this setting has not yet been described.MethodsWe report two cases of ascending and aortic arch thrombus that were treated by covering the thrombus with an uncovered stent. Both procedures were performed under local anesthesia via a femoral approach. A femoral cutdown was used in one case, and a total percutaneous insertion was possible in the second case.ResultsBoth procedures were successfully performed without any periprocedural complications. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. In both cases, no late complications or recurrent embolization occurred at midterm follow-up, and control CT angiography at 1 respectively 10 months revealed no stent migration, freely perfused supra-aortic branches, and no thrombus recurrence.ConclusionTreating symptomatic thrombi in the ascending aorta or aortic arch with a bare metal stent is feasible. This technique could constitute a minimally invasive alternative to a surgical intervention or complex endovascular therapy with fenestrated or branched stent grafts.

  2. A computerized system for video analysis of the aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Vesely, I; Menkis, A; Campbell, G

    1990-10-01

    A novel technique was developed to study the dynamic behavior of the porcine aortic valve in an isolated heart preparation. Under the control of a personal computer, a video frame grabber board continuously acquired and digitized images of the aortic valve, and an analog-to-digital (A/D) converter read four channels of physiological data (flow rate, aortic and ventricular pressure, and aortic root diameter). The valve was illuminated with a strobe light synchronized to fire at the field acquisition rate of the CCD video camera. Using the overlay bits in the video board, the measured parameters were super-imposed over the live video as graphical tracing, and the resultant composite images were recorded on-line to video tape. The overlaying of the valve images with the graphical tracings of acquired data enabled the data tracings to be precisely synchronized with the video images of the aortic valve. This technique enabled us to observe the relationship between aortic root expansion and valve function.

  3. Genetic and Environmental Effects on the Abdominal Aortic Diameter Development

    PubMed Central

    Tarnoki, Adam Domonkos; Tarnoki, David Laszlo; Littvay, Levente; Garami, Zsolt; Karlinger, Kinga; Berczi, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Background Configuration of the abdominal aorta is related to healthy aging and a variety of disorders. Objectives We aimed to assess heritable and environmental effects on the abdominal aortic diameter. Methods 114 adult (69 monozygotic, 45 same-sex dizygotic) twin pairs (mean age 43.6 ± 16.3 years) underwent abdominal ultrasound with Esaote MyLab 70X ultrasound machine to visualize the abdominal aorta below the level of the origin of the renal arteries and 1-3 cm above the bifurcation. Results Age- and sex-adjusted heritability of the abdominal aortic diameter below the level of the origin of the renal arteries was 40% [95% confidence interval (CI), 14 to 67%] and 55% above the aortic bifurcation (95% CI, 45 to 70%). None of the aortic diameters showed common environmental effects, but unshared environmental effects were responsible for 60% and 45% of the traits, respectively. Conclusions Our analysis documents the moderate heritability and its segment-specific difference of the abdominal aortic diameter. The moderate part of variance was explained by unshared environmental components, emphasizing the importance of lifestyle factors in primary prevention. Further studies in this field may guide future gene-mapping efforts and investigate specific lifestyle factors to prevent abdominal aortic dilatation and its complications. PMID:26559855

  4. Aortic Baroreceptors Display Higher Mechanosensitivity than Carotid Baroreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Eva On-Chai; Lo, Chun-Yin; Yao, Yifei; Mak, Arthur Fuk-Tat; Jiang, Liwen; Huang, Yu; Yao, Xiaoqiang

    2016-01-01

    Arterial baroreceptors are mechanical sensors that detect blood pressure changes. It has long been suggested that the two arterial baroreceptors, aortic and carotid baroreceptors, have different pressure sensitivities. However, there is no consensus as to which of the arterial baroreceptors are more sensitive to changes in blood pressure. In the present study, we employed independent methods to compare the pressure sensitivity of the two arterial baroreceptors. Firstly, pressure-activated action potential firing was measured by whole-cell current clamp with a high-speed pressure clamp system in primary cultured baroreceptor neurons. The results show that aortic depressor neurons possessed a higher percentage of mechano-sensitive neurons. Furthermore, aortic baroreceptor neurons show a lower pressure threshold than that of carotid baroreceptor neurons. Secondly, uniaxial stretching of baroreceptor neurons, that mimics the forces exerted on blood vessels, elicited a larger increase in intracellular Ca2+ rise in aortic baroreceptor neurons than in carotid baroreceptor neurons. Thirdly, the pressure-induced action potential firing in the aortic depressor nerve recorded in vivo was also higher. The present study therefore provides for a basic physiological understanding on the pressure sensitivity of the two baroreceptor neurons and suggests that aortic baroreceptors have a higher pressure sensitivity than carotid baroreceptors.

  5. Acute Type A Aortic Dissection Missed as Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ansari-Ramandi, Mohammad Mostafa; Firoozi, Ata

    2016-01-01

    Although the aortic dissection is not common, its outcome is frequently fatal, and many patients with aortic dissection die before referral to the hospital or any diagnostic testing. The symptoms of aortic dissection can be similar to myocardial ischemia. A 66-year-old male was referred to our hospital with suspicion of aortic dissection after echocardiography done for evaluating his high blood pressure. He had symptoms of acute coronary syndrome two years before and had done coronary angiography. On presentation to our hospital he had a high blood pressure. On reviewing his past medical history and examining, in the film of coronary angiography, the dissection flap in ascending aorta was identified. Although type A aortic dissection is a catastrophic condition with high mortality and requires prompt surgical treatment but in some cases it may be misdiagnosed as acute coronary syndrome. Sometimes against its high mortality when left untreated, patients survive and are diagnosed later in life incidentally. So it is of great importance to have great clinical suspicion for aortic dissection in patients referring to the hospital with chest pain and the predisposing factors. PMID:27437290

  6. Acute aortic dissection diagnosed after embalming: macroscopic and microscopic findings.

    PubMed

    Savall, Frédéric; Dedouit, Fabrice; Piercecchi-Marti, Marie-Dominique; Leonetti, Georges; Rougé, Daniel; Telmon, Norbert

    2014-09-01

    A 58-year-old man died suddenly in Madagascar and poisoning was suspected. The body was embalmed after death and the general state of preservation was good. We found a major aortic dissection with a large false lumen from the aortic root to the common iliac arteries and a hemopericardium with formalinized blood clot. The intimal tear was on the ascending aorta, and an intramural hemorrhage was noted at the right coronary artery, attesting to a retrograde dissection. Microscopic studies confirmed aortic dissection with extensive intramural hemorrhage and also confirmed the retrograde dissection to the right coronary artery with a reduction of 90% of the true lumen. Classically, aortic dissection occurs in individuals with hypertension and individuals with genetic disorders of collagen formation. The diagnosis is often first established at the postmortem examination. Aortic dissection is therefore dealt with largely in necropsy studies. The usual cause of death is rupture into the pericardial sac. One case of bloodless dissection has been reported but the sudden death was explained by acute myocardial ischemia secondary to dissection of the left coronary artery. In our case, we found major hemopericardium and also intramural hemorrhage at the right coronary artery. We were able to make the diagnosis of aortic dissection and exclude the suspicion of homicide 15 days after death and after embalming.

  7. Acute aortic dissection diagnosed after embalming: macroscopic and microscopic findings.

    PubMed

    Savall, Frédéric; Dedouit, Fabrice; Piercecchi-Marti, Marie-Dominique; Leonetti, Georges; Rougé, Daniel; Telmon, Norbert

    2014-09-01

    A 58-year-old man died suddenly in Madagascar and poisoning was suspected. The body was embalmed after death and the general state of preservation was good. We found a major aortic dissection with a large false lumen from the aortic root to the common iliac arteries and a hemopericardium with formalinized blood clot. The intimal tear was on the ascending aorta, and an intramural hemorrhage was noted at the right coronary artery, attesting to a retrograde dissection. Microscopic studies confirmed aortic dissection with extensive intramural hemorrhage and also confirmed the retrograde dissection to the right coronary artery with a reduction of 90% of the true lumen. Classically, aortic dissection occurs in individuals with hypertension and individuals with genetic disorders of collagen formation. The diagnosis is often first established at the postmortem examination. Aortic dissection is therefore dealt with largely in necropsy studies. The usual cause of death is rupture into the pericardial sac. One case of bloodless dissection has been reported but the sudden death was explained by acute myocardial ischemia secondary to dissection of the left coronary artery. In our case, we found major hemopericardium and also intramural hemorrhage at the right coronary artery. We were able to make the diagnosis of aortic dissection and exclude the suspicion of homicide 15 days after death and after embalming. PMID:24684562

  8. Aortic Wave Dynamics and Its Influence on Left Ventricular Workload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlevan, Niema; Gharib, Morteza

    2010-11-01

    Clinical and epidemiologic studies have shown that hypertension plays a key role in development of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and ultimately heart failure mostly due to increased LV workload. Therefore, it is crucial to diagnose and treat abnormal high LV workload at early stages. The pumping mechanism of the heart is pulsatile, thus it sends pressure and flow wave into the compliant aorta. The wave dynamics in the aorta is dominated by interplay of heart rate (HR), aortic rigidity, and location of reflection sites. We hypothesized that for a fixed cardiac output (CO) and peripheral resistance (PR), interplay of HR and aortic compliance can create conditions that minimize LV power requirement. We used a computational approach to test our hypothesis. Finite element method with direct coupling method of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) was used. Blood was assumed to be incompressible Newtonian fluid and aortic wall was considered elastic isotropic. Simulations were performed for various heart rates and aortic rigidities while inflow wave, CO, and PR were kept constant. For any aortic compliance, LV power requirement becomes minimal at a specific heart rate. The minimum shifts to higher heart rates as aortic rigidity increases.

  9. Implantation of mitral, aortic, and tricuspid bioprostheses due to infective endocarditis with necessary reimplantation of the bioprosthetic aortic valve

    PubMed Central

    Bugajski, Paweł; Olszewski, Roman; Greberski, Krzysztof; Kalawski, Ryszard

    2016-01-01

    The patient was admitted to the Department of Cardiac Surgery of the J. Struś City Hospital in Poznan due to infective endocarditis involving the aortic, mitral, and tricuspid valves. Implantation of three biological valve prostheses proceeded without complications. Starting on day 23, the patient's general condition deteriorated, with high fever. Despite postoperative antibiotic therapy, transesophageal echocardiography revealed the presence of vegetation on the bioprosthetic aortic valve. On the 46th day after the initial surgery, the patient required replacement of the aortic bioprosthesis, which exhibited the presence of numerous vegetations. The bioprosthetic mitral and tricuspid valves were not affected by the degenerative process. On the 12th day after the reimplantation of the bioprosthetic aortic valve, the patient was discharged from the hospital in good general condition. PMID:27785140

  10. Pathologic Features of Lone Aortic Mobile Thrombus in the Ascending Aorta.

    PubMed

    Endo, Hidehito; Ishii, Hikaru; Tsuchiya, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yu; Shimoyamada, Hiroaki; Isomura, Aya; Nakajima, Masanori; Hirano, Teruyuki; Ohkura, Yasuo; Kubota, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    This report describes the case of a 79-year-old man with aortic mobile thrombus in the ascending aorta, followed by a discussion of the pathologic basis of aortic mobile thrombus formation. The patient underwent replacement of the ascending aorta. Macroscopic examination revealed an aortic wall ulcer with cholesterol-rich atherosclerotic plaque under the aortic mobile thrombus. Microscopic examination showed plaque rupture. These findings are very similar to those of plaque rupture in the coronary artery. We speculate that plaque rupture of localized aortic atherosclerosis is one of the causes of aortic mobile thrombus. PMID:27645970

  11. Delayed aortic regurgitation caused by a right coronary stent protruding into the aorta.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Eduard; Mestres, Carlos A; Congiu, Stefano; Josa, Miguel; Cartañá, Ramon

    2009-11-01

    Aortic valve perforation is an extremely rare complication after percutaneous coronary intervention. The case is presented of a 49-year-old male with aortic valve regurgitation secondary to the intra-aortic protrusion of a right coronary stent. The patient had undergone an apparently successful rescue percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty with a drug-eluting stent following failed fibrinolysis, but one month later was readmitted for acute pulmonary edema. Further investigations demonstrated new-onset aortic regurgitation. Medical stabilization was achieved and an elective aortic valve replacement and coronary revascularization performed. Intraoperatively, the stent was found to be partially deployed within the aortic lumen, causing perforation to the non-coronary cusp.

  12. Counterpulsation with symphony prevents retrograde carotid, aortic, and coronary flows observed with intra-aortic balloon pump support.

    PubMed

    Giridharan, Guruprasad A; Bartoli, Carlo R; Spence, Paul A; Dowling, Robert D; Koenig, Steven C

    2012-07-01

    A counterpulsation device (Symphony) is being developed to provide long-term circulatory support for advanced heart failure (HF) patients. In acute animal experiments, flow waveform patterns in the aortic, carotid, and coronary arteries were compared during Symphony and intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) support. Human data were examined for similarities. The 30-mL Symphony was compared to a 40-mL IABP in calves with cardiac dysfunction (80-100 kg, n = 8). Aortic pressures and aortic, carotid, and coronary artery flows were simultaneously recorded at baseline (devices off) and during 1:1 and 1:2 support. Forward, retrograde, and mean flows were calculated and compared for each test condition. Findings were also compared to aortic flow measurements recorded in HF patients (n = 21) supported by 40-mL IABP. IABP caused significant retrograde flows in the aorta, coronary (IABP: -24 ± 8 mL/min, Symphony: -6 ± 2 mL/min, baseline: -2 ± 1 mL/min, P < 0.05), and carotid arteries (IABP: -30 ± 5 mL/min, Symphony: -0 ± 0 mL/min, baseline: -0 ± 0 L/min, P < 0.05) during ventricular systole compared to the Symphony. IABP support produced higher diastolic pressure and flow augmentation compared to Symphony. Due to retrograde flows during IABP support, Symphony provided higher overall coronary, carotid, and aortic flows. Similar reduction in total aortic flows due to retrograde flow was observed in HF patients during IABP support. Counterpulsation with an IABP via aortic volume displacement produces retrograde flows during rapid balloon deflation that reduces total flow. Counterpulsation with Symphony via volume removal eliminates retrograde flow and improves total flow more than that achieved with IABP. The Symphony may provide long-term hemodynamic benefits in HF patients.

  13. Thrombotic Occlusion of Stent Graft Limbs due to Severe Angulation of Aortic Neck in Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minsu; Kim, Myeong Gun; Oh, Pyung Chun; Lee, Ji Yeon; Kang, Jin Mo; Chung, Wook-Jin; Shin, Eak Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a safe alternative to open surgical repair for an abdominal aortic aneurysm. However, unfavorable aortic anatomy of the aneurysm has restricted the widespread use of EVAR. Anatomic limitation is most often related to characteristics of the proximal neck anatomy. In this report, we described a patient with a severely angulated proximal neck who underwent EVAR, but required repeat intervention because of thrombotic occlusion of stent graft limbs. PMID:27721866

  14. In-Graft Endovascular Stenting Repair for Supravalvular Stenosis From Aortic Rupture After Balloon-Expanding Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Nobuyuki; Scholtz, Werner; Haas, Nikolaus; Ensminger, Stephan; Gummert, Jan; Börgermann, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    An 81-year-old man with high-grade aortic valve stenosis and status post-coronary artery bypass grafting and supracoronary replacement of the ascending aorta was referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. He was in New York Heart Association class III and had dyspnea. After appropriate screening, we implanted a 29-mm SAPIEN XT valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA USA) through a transapical approach because of severe peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Postinterventional aortography revealed correct positioning and function of the valve and free coronary ostia but contrast extravasation in the vicinity of the interposed vascular prosthesis, resulting in severe luminal narrowing. We chose to manage the stenosis with an endovascular stent. After stenting, extravascular compression was markedly reduced, and the pressure gradient disappeared. The patient was discharged home on the 20th postoperative day. Three months later, computed tomography depicted correct positioning of both grafts. The patient's general health is good, and he is now in New York Heart Association class II. This case illustrates a complication of transcatheter aortic valve implantation specific for patients with an ascending aortic graft. Although stenting may be a good solution, as depicted by this case, self-expanding transcatheter aortic valves should be preferred in patients with ascending aortic grafts to avoid the described complication.

  15. Recurrent Gain-of-Function Mutation in PRKG1 Causes Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Acute Aortic Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong-chuan; Regalado, Ellen; Casteel, Darren E.; Santos-Cortez, Regie L.; Gong, Limin; Kim, Jeong Joo; Dyack, Sarah; Horne, S. Gabrielle; Chang, Guijuan; Jondeau, Guillaume; Boileau, Catherine; Coselli, Joseph S.; Li, Zhenyu; Leal, Suzanne M.; Shendure, Jay; Rieder, Mark J.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Kim, Choel; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2013-01-01

    Gene mutations that lead to decreased contraction of vascular smooth-muscle cells (SMCs) can cause inherited thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections. Exome sequencing of distant relatives affected by thoracic aortic disease and subsequent Sanger sequencing of additional probands with familial thoracic aortic disease identified the same rare variant, PRKG1 c.530G>A (p.Arg177Gln), in four families. This mutation segregated with aortic disease in these families with a combined two-point LOD score of 7.88. The majority of affected individuals presented with acute aortic dissections (63%) at relatively young ages (mean 31 years, range 17–51 years). PRKG1 encodes type I cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG-1), which is activated upon binding of cGMP and controls SMC relaxation. Although the p.Arg177Gln alteration disrupts binding to the high-affinity cGMP binding site within the regulatory domain, the altered PKG-1 is constitutively active even in the absence of cGMP. The increased PKG-1 activity leads to decreased phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain in fibroblasts and is predicted to cause decreased contraction of vascular SMCs. Thus, identification of a gain-of-function mutation in PRKG1 as a cause of thoracic aortic disease provides further evidence that proper SMC contractile function is critical for maintaining the integrity of the thoracic aorta throughout a lifetime. PMID:23910461

  16. Initial experience in the treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysmal disease with a thoracic aortic endograft at Baylor University Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Apple, Jeffrey; McQuade, Karen L.; Hamman, Baron L.; Hebeler, Robert F.; Shutze, William P.

    2008-01-01

    A retrospective review of 27 patients who underwent endovascular repair of thoracic aneurysms and of other thoracic aortic pathology with the thoracic aortic endograft (Gore Medical, Flagstaff, AZ) from June 2005 to July 2007 was performed. The mean follow-up period was 13.5 months (range, 2–25 months). Indications for thoracic endografting included descending thoracic aneurysms (n = 18), thoracoabdominal aneurysms (n = 3), traumatic aortic injuries (n = 3), penetrating aortic ulcers (n = 2), and contained rupture of a type B dissection (n = 1). One patient died during the procedure, for an overall mortality rate of 3.7%. The average length of stay was 8.1 days, with an average stay in the intensive care unit of 4.2 days. If patients with traumatic aortic injuries were excluded, the average overall and intensive care unit length of stay were 5.6 and 1.8 days, respectively. There was one incident of spinal cord ischemia (3.7%). There were five type I or type III endoleaks, three of which required revision (11.1%). In conclusion, thoracic endografting is a safe and viable option for the repair of descending thoracic aneurysms and other aortic pathologies. We have found it to be less invasive, even in conjunction with preoperative debranching procedures, with a shorter recovery time, decreased perioperative morbidity and blood loss, and decreased peri-operative mortality compared with standard open repair. PMID:18382748

  17. Endovascular Repair of Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To conduct an assessment on endovascular repair of descending thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA). Clinical Need Aneurysm is the most common condition of the thoracic aorta requiring surgery. Aortic aneurysm is defined as a localized dilatation of the aorta. Most aneurysms of the thoracic aorta are asymptomatic and incidentally discovered. However, TAA tends to enlarge progressively and compress surrounding structures causing symptoms such as chest or back pain, dysphagia (difficulty swallowing), dyspnea (shortness of breath), cough, stridor (a harsh, high-pitched breath sound), and hoarseness. Significant aortic regurgitation causes symptoms of congestive heart failure. Embolization of the thrombus to the distal arterial circulation may occur and cause related symptoms. The aneurysm may eventually rupture and create a life-threatening condition. The overall incidence rate of TAA is about 10 per 100,000 person-years. The descending aorta is involved in about 30% to 40% of these cases. The prognosis of large untreated TAAs is poor, with a 3-year survival rate as low as 25%. Intervention is strongly recommended for any symptomatic TAA or any TAA that exceeds twice the diameter of a normal aorta or is 6 cm or larger. Open surgical treatment of TAA involves left thoracotomy and aortic graft replacement. Surgical treatment has been found to improve survival when compared with medical therapy. However, despite dramatic advances in surgical techniques for performing such complex operations, operative mortality from centres of excellence are between 8% and 20% for elective cases, and up to 50% in patients requiring emergency operations. In addition, survivors of open surgical repair of TAAs may suffer from severe complications. Postoperative or postprocedural complications of descending TAA repair include paraplegia, myocardial infarction, stroke, respiratory failure, renal failure, and intestinal ischemia. The Technology Endovascular aortic aneurysm

  18. The effect of aortic morphology on peri-operative mortality of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aims To investigate whether aneurysm shape and extent, which indicate whether a patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) is eligible for endovascular repair (EVAR), influence the outcome of both EVAR and open surgical repair. Methods and results The influence of six morphological parameters (maximum aortic diameter, aneurysm neck diameter, length and conicality, proximal neck angle, and maximum common iliac diameter) on mortality and reinterventions within 30 days was investigated in rAAA patients randomized before morphological assessment in the Immediate Management of the Patient with Rupture: Open Versus Endovascular strategies (IMPROVE) trial. Patients with a proven diagnosis of rAAA, who underwent repair and had their admission computerized tomography scan submitted to the core laboratory, were included. Among 458 patients (364 men, mean age 76 years), who had either EVAR (n = 177) or open repair (n = 281) started, there were 155 deaths and 88 re-interventions within 30 days of randomization analysed according to a pre-specified plan. The mean maximum aortic diameter was 8.6 cm. There were no substantial correlations between the six morphological variables. Aneurysm neck length was shorter in those undergoing open repair (vs. EVAR). Aneurysm neck length (mean 23.3, SD 16.1 mm) was inversely associated with mortality for open repair and overall: adjusted OR 0.72 (95% CI 0.57, 0.92) for each 16 mm (SD) increase in length. There were no convincing associations of morphological parameters with reinterventions. Conclusion Short aneurysm necks adversely influence mortality after open repair of rAAA and preclude conventional EVAR. This may help explain why observational studies, but not randomized trials, have shown an early survival benefit for EVAR. Clinical trial registration: ISRCTN 48334791. PMID:25627357

  19. Anesthetic management for resection of para-aortic paraganglioma and unexpected aortic resection: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WANG, CHERYL; RICHMOND, ROBERT; ELDESOUKI, ENAS

    2015-01-01

    Paragangliomas account for 15–20% of pheochromocytomas derived from chromaffin cells and secretes catecholamines. It has a high mortality rate due to hypertension and challenging anesthetic management. The present report is of a case of the successful management of paraganglioma resection with unexpected aortic resection. The patient presented for paraganglioma resection. The blood pressure (BP) was well controlled with α blockade followed by β blockade prior to surgery. The patient was under general anesthesia, with multiple intravenous lines, catheters and an arterial line. Induction was achieved by the administration of narcotic and volatile agents. During the procedure, the aorta was found to require resection in order to complete the tumor resection. The BP changed markedly with clamping and unclamping, tumor vein ligation and tumor resection. The increased BP due to catecholamine release and unclamping was controlled with phentolamine, nitroprusside, esmolol and labetolol. Drops in BP due to tumor vein ligation and clamping were managed with norepinephrine and vasopressin. With close communication and monitoring, the surgery on the patient was successfully completed and the patient was discharged days later in a hemodynamically stable condition. The diagnosis was further confirmed by pathology. This was a challenging case of paraganglioma resection with unexpected aortic resection. The success achieved suggests that the resection of paraganglioma and an aortic segment requires delicate anesthetic management. The key are α blockade and β blockade as necessary to control BP pre-operatively, frequent communication between the anesthesiologist and surgeons, intra-operative intervention in excess catecholamine release with phentolamine, nitroprusside and labetalol prior to tumor removal, and vasopressin for catecholamine deficiency when clamping or subsequent to tumor removal. It is a delicately orchestrated process requiring team work. PMID:25780466

  20. Transfemoral aortic valve implantation for severe aortic stenosis in a patient with dextrocardia situs inversus.

    PubMed

    Good, Richard I S; Morgan, Kenneth P; Brydie, Alan; Beydoun, Hussein K; Nadeem, S Najaf

    2014-09-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVR) has grown rapidly over the past 10 years. Device and delivery catheter systems have evolved to facilitate the procedure and reduce the risk of associated complications, including those related to vascular access. It is important to understand the utility of the TAVR equipment in patients with more challenging anatomy to select the most appropriate technique for this complex procedure. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of a patient with dextrocardia situs inversus and previous coronary artery bypass grafting who underwent TAVR from the femoral route using the Edwards SAPIEN XT Novaflex+ Transfemoral System (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA).

  1. Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair in a Patient with Mobile Aortic Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Lohrmann, Graham M.; Peters, Ferande

    2014-01-01

    A 58-year-old female presented with acute arterial insufficiency to her left leg. Following cardiovascular evaluation using multimodality imaging, it was discovered that she had mobile thoracic thrombi overlying a normal descending thoracic aorta which had also caused a splenic infarction. This patient was treated with unfractionated heparin for three days and underwent subsequent thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) uneventfully with no subsequent complications at one-year followup. This case highlights the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges in treating patients with this uncommon challenging clinical scenario. PMID:24716094

  2. Giant Aortic Root Aneurysm Presenting as Acute Type A Aortic Dissection.

    PubMed

    Raz, Guy M; Stamou, Sotiris C

    2014-06-01

    A 49-year-old woman with four months of increasing episodic palpitations, chest pain, and shortness of breath presented to an outside clinic where a new 4/6 systolic ejection murmur was identified. A transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a large aortic root aneurysm. The patient underwent emergent repair of the dissected root aneurysm with a modified Bentall procedure utilizing a #19 St Jude Valsalva mechanical valve conduit. Postoperatively, she required a permanent pacemaker placement. Her echo showed ejection fraction improvement from a preoperative 25% to a postoperative 35%. She was discharged home on postoperative day 7. PMID:26798728

  3. Thoracic aortic aneurysm with aortic pseudocoarctation involving the left subclavian artery.

    PubMed

    Kitabayashi, Katsukiyo; Sakaki, Masayuki; Araki, Kanta; Shibamoto, Ai; Mizoguchi, Hiroki; Ohtake, Shigeaki

    2013-08-01

    A 39-year-old man with a thoracic aortic aneurysm and pseudocoarctation underwent graft replacement of the distal arch. The left subclavian artery, which rose just after the aneurysm, was also reconstructed at surgery. The aneurysmal wall was extremely thin, and the adventitia and a small amount of medial tissue were found on histologic examination. Thus, surgical treatment was recommended due to risk of rupture. Furthermore, because aneurysms involved the cervical branch, separate reconstruction was also performed. Endovascular intervention is not appropriate for this group of patients because of the complex kinking of the aorta and the extremely thin aneurysmal wall.

  4. Influence of beta-blocker therapy on aortic blood flow in patients with bicuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Allen, Bradley D; Markl, Michael; Barker, Alex J; van Ooij, Pim; Carr, James C; Malaisrie, S Chris; McCarthy, Patrick; Bonow, Robert O; Kansal, Preeti

    2016-04-01

    In patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV), beta-blockers (BB) are assumed to slow ascending aorta (AAo) dilation by reducing wall shear stress (WSS) on the aneurysmal segment. The aim of this study was to assess differences in AAo peak velocity and WSS in BAV patients with and without BB therapy. BAV patients receiving BB (BB+, n = 30, age: 47 ± 11 years) or not on BB (BB-, n = 30, age: 46 ± 13 years) and healthy controls (n = 15, age: 43 ± 11 years) underwent 4D flow MRI for the assessment of in vivo aortic 3D blood flow. Peak systolic velocities and 3D WSS were calculated at the anterior and posterior walls of the AAo. Both patient groups had higher maximum and mean WSS relative to the control group (p = 0.001 to p = 0.04). WSS was not reduced in the BB+ group compared to BB- patients in the anterior AAo (maximum: 1.49 ± 0.47 vs. 1.38 ± 0.49 N/m(2), p = 0.99, mean: 0.76 ± 0.2 vs. 0.74 ± 0.18 N/m(2), p = 1.00) or posterior AAo (maximum: 1.45 ± 0.42 vs. 1.39 ± 0.58 N/m(2), p = 1.00; mean: 0.65 ± 0.16 vs. 0.63 ± 0.16 N/m(2), p = 1.00). AAo peak velocity was elevated in patients compared to controls (p < 0.01) but similar for BB+ and BB- groups (p = 0.42). Linear models identified significant relationships between aortic stenosis severity and increased maximum WSS (β = 0.186, p = 0.007) and between diameter at the sinus of Valsalva and reduced mean WSS (β = -0.151, p = 0.045). Peak velocity and systolic WSS were similar for BAV patients irrespective of BB therapy. Further prospective studies are needed to investigate the impact of dosage and duration of BB therapy on aortic hemodynamics and development of aortopathy. PMID:26817758

  5. Endovascular Repair of a Traumatic Thoracic Aortic Injury Resulting in Late Aortic Dilatation

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, Kumi; Matsui, Osamu; Ohtake, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Go; anada, Junichiro

    2013-01-01

    We present an unusual complication following endovascular repair of traumatic thoracic aortic injury using a homemade stent-graft. Although an initial technical success was apparently obtained, the aorta showed remarkable dilatation without shortening or migration of the stent skeleton in late follow-up period. The possible cause of the dilatation was considered to be the expansion and gathering of the crimped, loosely attached, graft fabric in addition to the incomplete exclusion due to the insufficient landing zone and the limited radial force. Thus, the specific feature of stent-graft, considered to provide an advantage to treatment, has adversely affected the native aorta. PMID:24436598

  6. Diagnosis of Aortic Dissection in Emergency Department Patients is Rare

    PubMed Central

    Alter, Scott M.; Eskin, Barnet; Allegra, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Aortic dissection is a rare event. While the most frequent symptom is chest pain, that is a common emergency department (ED) chief complaint and other diseases causing chest pain occur much more often. Furthermore, 20% of dissections are without chest pain and 6% are painless. For these reasons, diagnosing dissections may be challenging. Our goal was to determine the number of total ED and atraumatic chest pain patients for every aortic dissection diagnosed by emergency physicians. Methods Design: Retrospective cohort. Setting: 33 suburban and urban New York and New Jersey EDs with annual visits between 8,000 and 80,000. Participants: Consecutive patients seen by emergency physicians from 1-1-1996 through 12-31-2010. Observations: We identified aortic dissection and atraumatic chest pain patients using the International Classification of Diseases 9th Revision and Clinical Modification codes. We then calculated the number of total ED and atraumatic chest pain patients for every aortic dissection, along with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results From a database of 9.5 million ED visits, we identified 782 aortic dissections or one for every 12,200 (95% CI [11,400–13,100]) visits. The mean age of dissection patients was 66±16 years and 38% were female. There were 763,000 (8%) with atraumatic chest pain diagnoses. Thus, there is one dissection for every 980 (95% CI [910–1,050]) atraumatic chest pain patients. Conclusion The diagnosis of aortic dissections by emergency physicians is rare and challenging. An emergency physician seeing 3,000 to 4,000 patients a year would diagnose an aortic dissection approximately every three to four years. PMID:26587083

  7. Aortic PWV in Chronic Kidney Disease: A CRIC Ancillary Study

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Raymond R.; Wimmer, Neil J.; Chirinos, Julio A.; Parsa, Afshin; Weir, Matthew; Perumal, Kalyani; Lash, James P.; Chen, Jing; Steigerwalt, Susan P.; Flack, John; Go, Alan S.; Rafey, Mohammed; Rahman, Mahboob; Sheridan, Angela; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Robinson, Nancy A.; Joffe, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    Background Aortic PWV is a measure of arterial stiffness and has proved useful in predicting cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in several populations of patients, including the healthy elderly, hypertensives and those with end stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis. Little data exist characterizing aortic stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease who are not receiving dialysis, and in particular the effect of reduced kidney function on aortic PWV. Methods We performed measurements of aortic PWV in a cross-sectional cohort of participants enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study to determine factors which predict increased aortic PWV in chronic kidney disease. Results PWV measurements were obtained in 2564 participants. The tertiles of aortic PWV (adjusted for waist circumference) were < 7.7 m/sec, 7.7–10.2 m/sec and > 10.2 m/sec with an overall mean (± S.D.) value of 9.48 ± 3.03 m/sec [95% CI = 9.35–9.61 m/sec]. Multivariable regression identified significant independent positive associations of age, blood glucose concentrations, race, waist circumference, mean arterial blood pressure, gender, and presence of diabetes with aortic PWV and a significant negative association with the level of kidney function. Conclusions The large size of this unique cohort, and the targeted enrollment of chronic kidney disease participants provides an ideal situation to study the role of reduced kidney function as a determinant of arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness may be a significant component of the enhanced cardiovascular risk associated with kidney failure. PMID:20019670

  8. Abdominal Aortic Disease Caused by Penetrating Atherosclerotic Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Masataka; Imai, Akito; Sakamoto, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Akinobu; Watanabe, Yasunori; Jikuya,, Tomoaki

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer (PAU) of the aorta is defined as an atherosclerotic lesion with ulceration of the aortic intima and media and rupture of the internal elastic lamina. PAU induced aortic dissection, aortic rupture, and secular aortic aneurysm and typically occurs in elderly hypertensive patients with severe atherosclerosis. Although it has been reported that atherosclerosis similarly occurs in the abdominal aorta, its natural history and treatment are still unclear. This study investigated the clinical features, natural history, and treatment of PAU of the abdominal aorta. Method:Between April 2006 and March 2009, 4 diagnoses of PAU in the abdominal aorta were made by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These 4 cases were analyzed along with 61 previously reported cases from the literature with diagnoses of PAU in the abdominal aorta, aortic rupture, and isolated abdominal aortic dissection over the past 15 years, giving a total of 65 cases. Results:The patients were men with an average age of 63.5 years. All 4 had hypertension, and 2 had concomitant coronary artery disease. Two patients were asymptomatic, and the other 2 were symptomatic and transmural rupture had occurred. All diagnoses were made by CT and MRI. All 4 patients underwent open surgery with a knitted Dacron graft, with no postoperative deaths. In the literature, 53% of cases were symptomatic, including pain (40%, n = 26), shock (4.6%, n = 3), and lower limb embolism (9.2%, n = 6). The remaining 40% of cases were asymptomatic (n = 26). Six patients were treated medically, while 58 patients underwent surgery, with 2 postoperative deaths. Conclusion:We suggest that surgical treatment (open surgery or endovascular stent grafting) should be performed to prevent an aortic catastrophe such as intramural hematoma, dissection, or rupture. (English translation of Jpn J Vasc Surg 2010; 19: 723-730.) PMID:23555480

  9. The hemostatic disturbance in patients with acute aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Xinliang; Li, Jiachen; Gong, Ming; Lan, Feng; Zhang, Hongjia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Coagulopathy is still a frequent complication in the surgical treatment of acute aortic dissection. However, the physiopathology of surgically induced coagulopathy has never been systematically and comprehensively studied in patients with acute aortic dissection. The aim of the present study was to describe the perioperative hemostatic system in patients with acute aortic dissection. The 87 patients who underwent aortic arch surgery for acute Stanford type A aortic dissection from January 2013 to September 2015 were enrolled in this study. The perioperative biomarkers of hemostatic system were evaluated using standard laboratory tests and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) at 5 time points: anesthesia induction (T1), lowest nasopharyngeal temperature (T2), protamine reversal (T3), 4 hours after surgery (T4), and 24 hours after surgery (T5). The ELISAs biomarkers revealed activation of coagulation (thrombin-antithrombin III complex [TAT] and prothrombin fragment 1 + 2 [F1 + 2] were elevated), suppression of anticoagulation (antithrombin III [AT III] levels were depressed), and activation of fibrinolysis (plasminogen was decreased and plasmin-antiplasmin complex [PAP] was elevated). The standard laboratory tests also demonstrated that surgery resulted in a significant reduction in platelet counts and fibrinogen concentration. Systemic activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis, and inhibition of anticoagulation were observed during the perioperative period in patients with acute aortic dissection. Indeed, these patients exhibited consumption coagulopathy and procoagulant state perioperatively. Therefore, we believe that this remarkable disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC)-like coagulopathy has a high risk of bleeding and may influence postoperative outcome of patients with acute aortic dissection. PMID:27603366

  10. Associations and clinical relevance of aortic-brachial artery stiffness mismatch, aortic reservoir function, and central pressure augmentation.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Martin G; Hughes, Alun D; Davies, Justin E; Sharman, James E

    2015-10-01

    Central augmentation pressure (AP) and index (AIx) predict cardiovascular events and mortality, but underlying physiological mechanisms remain disputed. While traditionally believed to relate to wave reflections arising from proximal arterial impedance (and stiffness) mismatching, recent evidence suggests aortic reservoir function may be a more dominant contributor to AP and AIx. Our aim was therefore to determine relationships among aortic-brachial stiffness mismatching, AP, AIx, aortic reservoir function, and end-organ disease. Aortic (aPWV) and brachial (bPWV) pulse wave velocity were measured in 359 individuals (aged 61 ± 9, 49% male). Central AP, AIx, and aortic reservoir indexes were derived from radial tonometry. Participants were stratified by positive (bPWV > aPWV), negligible (bPWV ≈ aPWV), or negative stiffness mismatch (bPWV < aPWV). Left-ventricular mass index (LVMI) was measured by two-dimensional-echocardiography. Central AP and AIx were higher with negative stiffness mismatch vs. negligible or positive stiffness mismatch (11 ± 6 vs. 10 ± 6 vs. 8 ± 6 mmHg, P < 0.001 and 24 ± 10 vs. 24 ± 11 vs. 21 ± 13%, P = 0.042). Stiffness mismatch (bPWV-aPWV) was negatively associated with AP (r = -0.18, P = 0.001) but not AIx (r = -0.06, P = 0.27). Aortic reservoir pressure strongly correlated to AP (r = 0.81, P < 0.001) and AIx (r = 0.62, P < 0.001) independent of age, sex, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and height (standardized β = 0.61 and 0.12, P ≤ 0.001). Aortic reservoir pressure independently predicted abnormal LVMI (β = 0.13, P = 0.024). Positive aortic-brachial stiffness mismatch does not result in higher AP or AIx. Aortic reservoir function, rather than discrete wave reflection from proximal arterial stiffness mismatching, provides a better model description of AP and AIx and also has clinical relevance as evidenced by an independent association of aortic reservoir pressure with LVMI.

  11. Serum and tissue biomarkers in aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kapelouzou, Alkistis; Tsourelis, Loukas; Kaklamanis, Loukas; Degiannis, Dimitrios; Kogerakis, Nektarios; Cokkinos, Dennis V.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Calcific aortic valve stenosis (CAVS) is seen in a large proportion of individuals over 60 years. It is an active process, influenced by lipid accumulation, mechanical stress, inflammation, and abnormal extracellular matrix turnover. Various biomarkers (BMs) are studied, as regards mechanisms, diagnosis and prognosis. Methods: In the calcified valves calcium deposition, elastin fragmentation and disorganization of cellular matrix were assessed, together with expression of OPN, OPG, osteocalcin (OCN) and RL2. We prospectively studied the following serum BMs in 60 patients with CAVS and compared them to 20 healthy controls, free from any cardiac disease: Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) 2 and 9 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1), which regulate collagen turnover, inflammatory factors, i.e. tumor necrosis factor a (TNFa), interleukin 2 (IL2), transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) which regulates fibrosis, fetuin-A (fet-A), osteopontin (OPN), osteoprotegerin (OPG), sclerostin (SOST), and relaxin-2 (RL2) which positively or negatively regulate calcification. Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) which regulates migration and infiltration of monocytes/macrophages was also studied as well as malondialdehyde (MDA) an oxidative marker. Results: Extent of tissue valve calcification (Alizarin Red stain) was negatively correlated with tissue elastin, and RL2, and positively correlated with tissue OCN and serum TIMP1 and MCP-1 and negatively with MMP9. Tissue OCN was positively correlated with OPN and negatively with the elastin. Tissue OPN was negatively correlated with elastin and OPG. Tissue OPN OPG and RL2 were not correlated with serum levels In the serum we found in patients statistically lower TIMP1, fet-A and RL2 levels, while all other BMs were higher compared to the healthy group. Positive correlations between SOST and IL2, OPG and MDA but negative with TNFa and OPN were found; also MMP9 was negatively correlated with TNFa and MCP-1

  12. Deep Crater in Heavily Calcified Aortic Valve Leaflet: A "Smoking Gun" for Embolic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sarah Chaoying; Canter, Lisa; Zeeshan, Ahmad; Elefteriades, John A

    2015-10-01

    The association of severe calcific aortic stenosis with clinically significant stroke has not been well established. This case vividly describes the relationship with clinical and pathological (gross and microscopic) findings in a 62-year-old man with a severely calcified bicuspid aortic valve. Eleven months prior to aortic valve surgery, the patient had stigmata of cerebral embolic events in the absence of any other embolic source. During the aortic valve replacement surgery for aortic stenosis, he was found to have a large atheroma on the aortic valve cusp with a crater containing friable debris in its center. These findings support the potential for embolic stroke in patients with severe calcific aortic stenosis. We recommend that the aortic valve be considered as an embolic source in patients with an otherwise cryptogenic cerebrovascular accident. PMID:27175368

  13. Predicting long-term outcomes of acute aortic dissection: a focus on gender.

    PubMed

    Divchev, Dimitar; Najjar, Tarek; Tillwich, Falko; Rehders, Tim; Palisch, Holger; Nienaber, Christoph A

    2015-03-01

    Acute aortic disease ranks as the 19th leading cause of death with steadily increasing incidence. The prevalence of aneurysms varies depending on the localization along the aorta with a mortality of aortic rupture of around 80%. Traditionally, aortic disease affects men more frequently than women, however, with a varying gender ratio. Nevertheless, in the setting of acute aortic dissection, the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissections identified significant gender-related differences in the management of both sexes with acute aortic conditions. Current data suggest that women are at an increased risk of both dying from aortic dissection and having aorta-related complications than men. This review aims to report on current evidence of gender impact on natural history, treatment and outcomes in patients with acute aortic dissection. PMID:25608580

  14. Deep Crater in Heavily Calcified Aortic Valve Leaflet: A "Smoking Gun" for Embolic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sarah Chaoying; Canter, Lisa; Zeeshan, Ahmad; Elefteriades, John A

    2015-10-01

    The association of severe calcific aortic stenosis with clinically significant stroke has not been well established. This case vividly describes the relationship with clinical and pathological (gross and microscopic) findings in a 62-year-old man with a severely calcified bicuspid aortic valve. Eleven months prior to aortic valve surgery, the patient had stigmata of cerebral embolic events in the absence of any other embolic source. During the aortic valve replacement surgery for aortic stenosis, he was found to have a large atheroma on the aortic valve cusp with a crater containing friable debris in its center. These findings support the potential for embolic stroke in patients with severe calcific aortic stenosis. We recommend that the aortic valve be considered as an embolic source in patients with an otherwise cryptogenic cerebrovascular accident.

  15. Mitochondrial oxidative stress in aortic stiffening with age: the role of smooth muscle cell function.

    EPA Science Inventory

    OBJECTIVE: Age-related aortic stiffness is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Although oxidative stress is implicated in aortic stiffness, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unelucidated. Here, we examined the source of oxidative stress in aging and i...

  16. New Method for Performing Aortic Valve Replacement Proves Successful in High-Risk Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Releases News Release Monday, October 31, 2016 New method for performing aortic valve replacement proves successful ... the National Institutes of Health have developed a new, less invasive way to perform transcatheter aortic valve ...

  17. Composite graft tear and aortico-left ventricular tunnel after aortic root replacement using Cabrol's technique.

    PubMed

    Chu, J J; Chang, J P; Lin, P J; Chang, C H

    2000-02-01

    Woven graft tera is a very rare complication after aortic root replacement using Cabrol's technique. In this report, we present a 40-year-old man with aortic annular ectasia and severe aortic regurgitation who underwent four revisional aortic valve operations because of recurrent paravalvular leakage after valve repair and/or replacement. The Bentall operation with translocated aortic valve and Cabrol's coronary artery anastomosis were performed in the fifth operation, because of progressive dilatation of the aortic root and ascending aorta. Unfortunately, aortico-ventricular tunnel developed 2 years after aortic root replacement using Cabrol's technique. Graft tear and proximal anastomotic leakage were found to be the cause of the tunnel during the sixth operation. The patient died of myocardial failure 8 days after the seventh aortic root replacement operation. The devastating result of this complication should alert cardiovascular surgeons to the possibility of graft failure after the Bentall operation.

  18. National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-08

    Marfan Syndrome; Turner Syndrome; Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome; Loeys-Dietz Syndrome; FBN1, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, ACTA2 or MYH11 Genetic Mutation; Bicuspid Aortic Valve Without Known Family History; Bicuspid Aortic Valve With Family History; Bicuspid Aortic Valve With Coarctation; Familial Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissections; Shprintzen-Goldberg Syndrome; Other Aneur/Diss of Thoracic Aorta Not Due to Trauma, <50yo; Other Congenital Heart Disease

  19. Banding for type IA endoleak after endovascular abdominal aortic repair: An underexposed treatment option.

    PubMed

    van Lammeren, G W; Ünlü, Ç; De Vries, J P P M

    2016-04-01

    More challenging abdominal aortic aneurysms with unfavorable proximal aortic neck anatomy are treated with endovascular means. As a consequence, proximal inadequate sealing may result in type IA endoleak, which in turn can lead to abdominal aortic aneurysm progression or rupture. The presence of type IA endoleak is an indication for secondary interventions. External aortic banding can be a good option to solve a type IA endoleak, but is underreported in literature; we present two cases and review literature.

  20. Patient values and preferences on transcatheter or surgical aortic valve replacement therapy for aortic stenosis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lytvyn, Lyubov; Guyatt, Gordon H; Manja, Veena; Siemieniuk, Reed A; Zhang, Yuan; Agoritsas, Thomas; Vandvik, Per O

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate patients' values and preferences regarding aortic valve replacement therapy for aortic stenosis. Setting Studies published after transcatheter aortic valve insertion (TAVI) became available (2002). Participants Adults with aortic stenosis who are considering or have had valve replacement, either TAVI or via surgery (surgical aortic valve replacement, SAVR). Outcome measures We sought quantitative measurements, or qualitative descriptions, of values and preferences. When reported, we examined correlations between preferences and objective (eg, ejection fraction) or subjective (eg, health-related quality of life) measures of health. Results We reviewed 1348 unique citations, of which 2 studies proved eligible. One study of patients with severe aortic stenosis used a standard gamble study to ascertain that the median hypothetical mortality risk patients were willing to tolerate to achieve full health was 25% (IQR 25–50%). However, there was considerable variability; for mortality risk levels defined by current guidelines, 130 participants (30%) were willing to accept low-to-intermediate risk (≤8%), 224 (51%) high risk (>8–50%) and 85 (19%) a risk that guidelines would consider prohibitive (>50%). Study authors did not, however, assess participants' understanding of the exercise, resulting in a potential risk of bias. A second qualitative study of 15 patients identified the following factors that influence patients to undergo assessment for TAVI: symptom burden; expectations; information support; logistical barriers; facilitators; obligations and responsibilities. The study was limited by serious risk of bias due to authors' conflict of interest (5/9 authors industry-funded). Conclusions Current evidence on patient values and preferences of adults with aortic stenosis is very limited, and no studies have enrolled patients deciding between TAVI and SAVR. On the basis of the data available, there is evidence of variability in individual

  1. Minimal traumatic aortic injuries: meaning and natural history.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, Victor X; Marini, Milagros; Gulías, Daniel; Cao, Ignacio; Muñiz, Javier; Herrera-Noreña, José Manuel; López-Pérez, José Manuel; Cuenca, José Joaquin

    2012-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Minimal aortic injuries (MAIs) are being recognized more frequently due to the increasing use of high-resolution diagnostic techniques. The objective of this case series review was to report the clinical and radiological characteristics and outcomes of a series of patients with MAI. METHODS From January 2000 to December 2011, 54 major blunt trauma patients were admitted to our institution with traumatic aortic injuries. Nine of them presented with MAI, whereas the remaining 45 patients suffered a significant aortic injury (SAI). RESULTS MAIs accounted for 17% of the overall traumatic aortic injuries in our series. Major trauma patients with MAI and SAI were similar regarding the presence of severe associated non-aortic injuries and the expected mortality calculated by injury severity score, revised trauma score and trauma injury severity score. There were no statistically significant differences in in-hospital mortality between MAI (22.2%) and SAI (30.2%). No death in the MAI group was aortic related, whereas five deaths in the SAI group were caused by an aortic complication. The survival of MAI patients was 77.8% at 1 and 5 years. There was no late mortality among MAI patients. The survival of SAI patients was 69.7% at 1 year and 63.6% at 5 and 10 years. None of the seven surviving patients with MAI presented a progression of the aortic injury. In six patients, the intimal tear completely healed in imaging controls, whereas one patient developed a small saccular pseudoaneurysm. CONCLUSIONS Blunt traumas presenting MAI are as severe as traumas that associate SAI and present similar in-hospital mortality. In contrast to SAI traumas, in-hospital mortality due to MAI is not usually related to the aortic injury, so these injuries are more amenable to a conservative management. It is mandatory to perform a close imaging surveillance to detect early any potential adverse evolution of an MAI. Nevertheless, a balance must be struck between a close serial imaging

  2. Association between abdominal aortic plaque and coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Luo, Songyuan; Luo, Jianfang; Liu, Yuan; Huang, Wenhui; Chen, Jiyan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Currently, the association between abdominal aortic plaques and coronary artery disease (CAD) has not yet been clarified clearly. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of abdominal aortic plaques by ultrasound imaging and to explore its association with CAD in patients undergoing coronary angiography. Methods Between October 2014 and June 2015, a prospective study was conducted in the Department of Cardiology at Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China. Ultrasound scanning of the abdominal aortas was performed in 1,667 consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography. Clinical characteristics and coronary profile were collected from the patients. Results Of the 1,667 study patients (male, 68.9%; mean age, 63±11 years) undergoing coronary angiography, 1,268 had CAD. Compared with 399 patients without CAD, 1,268 patients with CAD had higher prevalence of abdominal aortic plaques (37.3% vs 17%, P<0.001). In multivariate analysis, abdominal aortic plaques served as independent factors associated with the presence of CAD (odds ratio =2.08; 95% confidence interval =1.50–2.90; P<0.001). Of the 1,268 patients with CAD, the prevalence of abdominal aortic plaques was 27.0% (98/363) in patients with one-vessel disease, 35.0% (107/306) in patients with two-vessel disease, and 44.7% (268/599) in patients with three-vessel disease. Stepwise increases in the prevalence of abdominal aortic plaque was found depending on the number of stenotic coronary vessels (P<0.001; P-value for trend <0.001). In an ordinal logistic regression model, abdominal aortic plaques served as independent factors associated with the severity of CAD according to the number of stenotic coronary vessels (P<0.001). Conclusion The prevalence of abdominal aortic plaques was higher in patients with CAD than in those without CAD. Abdominal aortic plaque was an independent factor associated with the presence and severity of CAD. PMID:27279740

  3. Aortic valve orifice equation independent of valvular flow intervals: application to aortic valve area computation in aortic stenosis and comparison with the Gorlin formula.

    PubMed

    Seitz, W; Oppenheimer, L; McIlroy, M; Nelson, D; Operschall, J

    1986-12-01

    An orifice equation is derived relating the effective aortic valve area, A, the average aortic valve pressure gradient, dP, the stroke volume, SV, and the heart frequency, FH, through considerations of momentum conservation across the aortic valve. This leads to a formula consistent with Newton's second law of motion. The form of the new equation is A = (7.5 X 10(-5)) SV FH2/Pd, where A, VS, FH and Pd are expressed in cm2, ml, s-1 and mmHg, respectively. Aortic valve areas computed with the new orifice equation are found to correlate with those computed by the Gorlin formula in conditions of resting haemodynamic states at a level of r = 0.86, SE = 0.25 cm2, N = 120. The results suggest that the new formula may be considered as an independent orifice equation having a similar domain of validity as the Gorlin formula. The new equation offers the possibility of deriving additional useful haemodynamic relationships through combination with established cardiological formulas and applying it in a noninvasive Doppler ultrasonic or echocardiographic context.

  4. [Endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Hatlinghus, S; Dale, L G; Nordby, A; Aadahl, P; Lundbom, J; Saether, O D; Myhre, H O

    1996-02-28

    Eight patients, six men and two women (mean age 67.3 years) were treated for infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm by endovascular technique. A bifurcated graft (Mialhe Stentor, Min Tec, France) was used in all cases. The introducing system, with an 18 French diameter, is inserted through an arteriotomy in the common femoral artery. The proximal end of the main part of the graft is placed just distal to the renal arteries, and includes one graft limb, which is placed in the iliac artery on the ipsilateral side. The contralateral graft limb is introduced into a short limb of the main graft through a 10 French introducer, using Seldinger-technique, from the contralateral common femoral artery. All the implantations were successful from both a technical and a clinical point of view. All patients except one were mobilized on the first day after operation and received a normal diet. A thorough preoperative evaluation of the patient with regard to selection of the right size of the implant is necessary, and the implantation must be performed with great attention to technical details. PMID:8644071

  5. Percutaneous Zenith endografting for abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Heyer, Kamaldeep S; Resnick, Scott A; Matsumura, Jon S; Amaranto, Daniel; Eskandari, Mark K

    2009-03-01

    A completely percutaneous approach to infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) endografting has the theoretic benefits of being minimally invasive and more expedient. Our goal was to demonstrate the utility of this approach using a suprarenal fixation device and a suture-mediated closure system. We conducted a single-institution, retrospective review of 14 patients who underwent percutaneous AAA repair with the Zenith device between August 2003 and March 2007. Immediate and delayed access-related outcomes were examined over a mean follow-up of 12.1+/-2.0 months. Mean AAA size was 5.6 cm. Immediate arterial closure and technical success rate was 96% (27/28 vessels). One immediate hemostatic failure required open surgical repair. Over follow-up, one vessel required operative repair for new-onset claudication. No other immediate or delayed complications (thrombosis, pseudoaneurysm, infection, or deep venous thrombosis) were detected. A percutaneous approach for the treatment of AAA has several advantages over femoral artery cutdown but also has its own unique set of risks in the immediate and late postoperative period. Ultimately, the "preclose technique" can be safely applied for the Zenith device despite its large-bore delivery system.

  6. Osteoprotegerin Prevents Development of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Masayuki; Yoshimura, Koichi; Aoki, Hiroki; Orita, Yuichi; Ishida, Takafumi; Ohtaki, Megu; Nagao, Masataka; Ishida, Mari; Yoshizumi, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs), which commonly occur among elderly individuals, are accompanied by a risk of rupture and subsequent high mortality. Establishment of medical therapies for the prevention of AAAs requires further understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this condition. This report details the possible involvement of Osteoprotegerin (OPG) in the prevention of AAAs through inhibition of Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). In CaCl2-induced AAA models, both internal and external diameters were significantly increased with destruction of elastic fibers in the media in Opg knockout (KO) mice, as compared to wild-type mice. Moreover, up-regulation of TRAIL expression was observed in the media by immunohistochemical analyses. Using a culture system, both the TRAIL-induced expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and the chemoattractive effect of TRAIL on SMCs were inhibited by OPG. These data suggest that Opg may play a preventive role in the development of AAA through its antagonistic effect on Trail. PMID:26783750

  7. Percutaneous Zenith endografting for abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Heyer, Kamaldeep S; Resnick, Scott A; Matsumura, Jon S; Amaranto, Daniel; Eskandari, Mark K

    2009-03-01

    A completely percutaneous approach to infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) endografting has the theoretic benefits of being minimally invasive and more expedient. Our goal was to demonstrate the utility of this approach using a suprarenal fixation device and a suture-mediated closure system. We conducted a single-institution, retrospective review of 14 patients who underwent percutaneous AAA repair with the Zenith device between August 2003 and March 2007. Immediate and delayed access-related outcomes were examined over a mean follow-up of 12.1+/-2.0 months. Mean AAA size was 5.6 cm. Immediate arterial closure and technical success rate was 96% (27/28 vessels). One immediate hemostatic failure required open surgical repair. Over follow-up, one vessel required operative repair for new-onset claudication. No other immediate or delayed complications (thrombosis, pseudoaneurysm, infection, or deep venous thrombosis) were detected. A percutaneous approach for the treatment of AAA has several advantages over femoral artery cutdown but also has its own unique set of risks in the immediate and late postoperative period. Ultimately, the "preclose technique" can be safely applied for the Zenith device despite its large-bore delivery system. PMID:18774684

  8. Endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Dominique B.; van Herwaarden, Joost A.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.; Moll, Frans L.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are usually treated with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR), which has become the standard of care in many hospitals for patients with suitable anatomy. Clinical evidence indicates that EVAR is associated with superior perioperative outcomes and similar long-term survival compared with open repair. Since the randomized, controlled trials that provided this evidence were conducted, however, the stent graft technology for infrarenal AAA has been further developed. Improvements include profile downsizing, optimization of sealing and fixation, and the use of low porosity fabrics. In addition, imaging techniques have improved, enabling better preoperative planning, stent graft placement, and postoperative surveillance. Also in the past few years, fenestrated and branched stent grafts have increasingly been used to manage anatomically challenging aneurysms, and experiments with off-label use of stent grafts have been performed to treat patients deemed unfit or unsuitable for other treatment strategies. Overall, the indications for endovascular management of AAA are expanding to include increasingly complex and anatomically challenging aneurysms. Ongoing studies and optimization of imaging, in addition to technological refinement of stent grafts, will hopefully continue to broaden the utilization of EVAR. PMID:24343568

  9. A planning system for transapical aortic valve implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessat, Michael; Merk, Denis R.; Falk, Volkmar; Walther, Thomas; Jacobs, Stefan; Nöttling, Alois; Burgert, Oliver

    2009-02-01

    Stenosis of the aortic valve is a common cardiac disease. It is usually corrected surgically by replacing the valve with a mechanical or biological prosthesis. Transapical aortic valve implantation is an experimental minimally invasive surgical technique that is applied to patients with high operative risk to avoid pulmonary arrest. A stented biological prosthesis is mounted on a catheter. Through small incisions in the fifth intercostal space and the apex of the heart, the catheter is positioned under flouroscopy in the aortic root. The stent is expanded and unfolds the valve which is thereby implanted into the aortic root. Exact targeting is crucial, since major complications can arise from a misplaced valve. Planning software for the perioperative use is presented that allows for selection of the best fitting implant and calculation of the safe target area for that implant. The software uses contrast enhanced perioperative DynaCT images acquired under rapid pacing. In a semiautomatic process, a surface segmentation of the aortic root is created. User selected anatomical landmarks are used to calculate the geometric constraints for the size and position of the implant. The software is integrated into a PACS network based on DICOM communication to query and receive the images and implants templates from a PACS server. The planning results can be exported to the same server and from there can be rertieved by an intraoperative catheter guidance device.

  10. Novel pharmacological strategies to prevent aortic complications in Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Matt, Peter; Eckstein, Friedrich

    2011-12-01

    The Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a systemic connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the FBN1 gene. Recent molecular studies, most performed in mouse models, revealed that the MFS is more a developmental abnormality with broad and complex effects on the morphogenesis and function of multiple organ systems. FBN1 haploinsufficiency and dysregulated transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling seem to be critical for clinical manifestations in MFS including aortic root dilatation. Aortic root aneurysm and aortic dissection represent the main causes of morbidity and mortality in MFS. Most importantly, TGF-β antagonism through angiotensin II type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs), for example losartan, has been shown to prevent and possibly reverse aortic root dilatation in a mouse model of MFS. A first human study on a small pediatric cohort confirmed those promising results in reducing the aortic root growth over a follow-up period of 12 to 47 months. So, a large multicenter trial has been set up and results should be available soon. Other therapeutic strategies which might be combined with losartan include traditional β-blockade, doxycyclin and statins. Such management could offer the first potential for primary prevention of clinical manifestations in MFS. PMID:22783312

  11. Hereditary Influence in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection.

    PubMed

    Isselbacher, Eric M; Lino Cardenas, Christian Lacks; Lindsay, Mark E

    2016-06-14

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm is a potentially life-threatening condition in that it places patients at risk for aortic dissection or rupture. However, our modern understanding of the pathogenesis of thoracic aortic aneurysm is quite limited. A genetic predisposition to thoracic aortic aneurysm has been established, and gene discovery in affected families has identified several major categories of gene alterations. The first involves mutations in genes encoding various components of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling cascade (FBN1, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, TGFB2, TGFB3, SMAD2, SMAD3 and SKI), and these conditions are known collectively as the TGF-β vasculopathies. The second set of genes encode components of the smooth muscle contractile apparatus (ACTA2, MYH11, MYLK, and PRKG1), a group called the smooth muscle contraction vasculopathies. Mechanistic hypotheses based on these discoveries have shaped rational therapies, some of which are under clinical evaluation. This review discusses published data on genes involved in thoracic aortic aneurysm and attempts to explain divergent hypotheses of aneurysm origin. PMID:27297344

  12. Computed tomography for planning transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Apfaltrer, Paul; Henzler, Thomas; Blanke, Phillip; Krazinski, Aleksander W; Silverman, Justin R; Schoepf, U Joseph

    2013-07-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is rapidly becoming a widely used alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in patients with severe aortic stenosis at high surgical risk. In these patients, TAVR has been associated with markedly improved survival and relief from symptoms. Despite a very-high risk patient profile, recent multicenter registries have confirmed the safety and efficacy of this procedure. Moreover, the randomized, controlled PARTNER (Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER Valves) trial has confirmed both the superiority of TAVR over medical treatment in patients not considered to be candidates for standard SAVR and the noninferiority of TAVR compared with SAVR in high-risk patients. The TAVR procedure requires a comprehensive preinterventional diagnostic workup. Above all, detailed information on the anatomy of the aortic annulus (AA) and the relation of the AA to the coronary arteries is essential to avoid complications. So far, no imaging reference standard for AA sizing has been established. Echocardiography, catheter angiography, and computed tomography angiography are widely and often complementarily used imaging techniques for this purpose. Compared with 2-dimensional imaging techniques, computed tomography (CT) has been proven to provide comprehensive information on AA anatomy and geometry, supporting appropriate patient selection and prosthesis sizing. In addition, CT is gaining an increasing role in evaluating the vascular access route before the procedure. This article describes the rapidly emerging role of CT in the context of pre-TAVR assessment.

  13. 3D image analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subasic, Marko; Loncaric, Sven; Sorantin, Erich

    2001-07-01

    In this paper we propose a technique for 3-D segmentation of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) from computed tomography angiography (CTA) images. Output data (3-D model) form the proposed method can be used for measurement of aortic shape and dimensions. Knowledge of aortic shape and size is very important in planning of minimally invasive procedure that is for selection of appropriate stent graft device for treatment of AAA. The technique is based on a 3-D deformable model and utilizes the level-set algorithm for implementation of the method. The method performs 3-D segmentation of CTA images and extracts a 3-D model of aortic wall. Once the 3-D model of aortic wall is available it is easy to perform all required measurements for appropriate stent graft selection. The method proposed in this paper uses the level-set algorithm for deformable models, instead of the classical snake algorithm. The main advantage of the level set algorithm is that it enables easy segmentation of complex structures, surpassing most of the drawbacks of the classical approach. We have extended the deformable model to incorporate the a priori knowledge about the shape of the AAA. This helps direct the evolution of the deformable model to correctly segment the aorta. The algorithm has been implemented in IDL and C languages. Experiments have been performed using real patient CTA images and have shown good results.

  14. Does atorvastatin induce aortic smooth muscle cell apoptosis in vivo?

    PubMed

    Doyon, Marielle; Hale, Taben Mary; Huot-Marchand, Julie-Emilie; Wu, Rong; de Champlain, Jacques; DeBlois, Denis

    2011-01-01

    It has been reported that HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors such as atorvastatin induce vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) apoptosis in vitro. However, this effect remains to be demonstrated in vivo. The present studies were designed to test the ability of atorvastatin to induce SMC apoptosis in vivo, using the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) as a well-known reference model of SMC apoptosis induction in vivo by cardiovascular drugs including the calcium channel blocker amlodipine. Atorvastatin was administered to SHR for 3 or 6 weeks either alone or together with amlodipine, a drug combination clinically available to patients. Primary endpoints included aortic medial hypertrophy and aortic SMC hyperplasia, internucleosomal DNA fragmentation and expression of the apoptosis regulatory proteins Bax and Bcl-2. The SHR aorta showed no evidence of SMC apoptosis induction by atorvastatin, even at the high dose of 50 mg kg(-1) day(-1), although the statin significantly reduced oxidative stress after 3 weeks and blood pressure after 6 weeks of administration. Amlodipine-induced regression of aortic hypertophy and aortic SMC hyperplasia were dose- and time-dependent, but there was no interaction between atorvastatin and amlodipine in modulating the primary endpoints. These results do not support the notion that atorvastatin induces SMC apoptosis in the aortic media in vivo.

  15. Hereditary Influence in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection.

    PubMed

    Isselbacher, Eric M; Lino Cardenas, Christian Lacks; Lindsay, Mark E

    2016-06-14

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm is a potentially life-threatening condition in that it places patients at risk for aortic dissection or rupture. However, our modern understanding of the pathogenesis of thoracic aortic aneurysm is quite limited. A genetic predisposition to thoracic aortic aneurysm has been established, and gene discovery in affected families has identified several major categories of gene alterations. The first involves mutations in genes encoding various components of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling cascade (FBN1, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, TGFB2, TGFB3, SMAD2, SMAD3 and SKI), and these conditions are known collectively as the TGF-β vasculopathies. The second set of genes encode components of the smooth muscle contractile apparatus (ACTA2, MYH11, MYLK, and PRKG1), a group called the smooth muscle contraction vasculopathies. Mechanistic hypotheses based on these discoveries have shaped rational therapies, some of which are under clinical evaluation. This review discusses published data on genes involved in thoracic aortic aneurysm and attempts to explain divergent hypotheses of aneurysm origin.

  16. An evidence-based approach to acute aortic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Lo, Bruce M

    2013-12-01

    Aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer are parts of a spectrum of acute aortic syndromes that represent uncommon--but potentially deadly--diagnoses seen in the emergency department. The differential for acute aortic syndromes is large, as many conditions (including the much more common conditions of acute coronary syndromes and pulmonary embolism) present with many of the same chief complaints. This review looks at the features and classifications of acute aortic syndromes and presents evidence regarding the risk factors and chief complaints that can assist emergency clinicians in identifying the patients who require further investigation. Although no set of clinical factors has been shown to rule out aortic dissection, elements of a complete history and physical examination are critical in identifying patients who may be at risk for these diseases. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of the various available advanced imaging strategies, the evidence regarding efficacy of laboratory testing (including D-dimer), as well as surgical and nonsurgical treatment options are reviewed.

  17. Evaluation of regional aortic distensibility using color kinesis.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yoshimasa; Kotoh, Keiju; Yamashita, Akio; Furuta, Hidetoshi; Shimazu, Chikasi; Misaki, Takurou

    2003-01-01

    Regional aortic stiffness cannot be evaluated by conventional methods. Regional aortic wall velocity during systole in the descending aorta was evaluated by using transesophageal echocardiography with color kinesis. The authors defined regional aortic distensibility (RAD) by considering pulse pressure, with RAD (microm/s/mm Hg) = (regional aortic wall velocity)/(pulse pressure). RAD was evaluated in 38 patients who had coronary artery disease (CAD) and 10 who did not. RAD decreased depending on aging (partial regression coefficient was -5.39 x 10(-1), p<0.001), and RAD was lower in the CAD group than that in the no-CAD group (p<0.05). In the CAD group, 19 patients had a single fixed plaque (4 calcified and 15 noncalcified plaques). RAD in the calcified plaque was lower than that in the noncalcified plaque (p<0.01), and RAD was lower in the noncalcified plaque than that in the no-plaque region (p<0.05). In noncalcified plaques, the relation between RAD and maximum intimal thickness had a significant correlation, r=0.7, p<0.001. The residual of RAD from the regression line was significantly larger in the calcified plaque than that in the noncalcified plaque (p<0.001). In conclusion, RAD can express increasing regional aortic wall stiffness brought about by arteriosclerosis quantitatively. Color kinesis provides information on characteristic difference between calcified and noncalcified plaque.

  18. [Aortic vascular anomalies and Kommerell's diverticulum, an imagiologic diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Vasco; Marques, Hugo; Valentim, Hugo; Guerra, Adalgisa; Afonso, P Diana; Ventura, Carlos; Gaspar, Augusto

    2012-01-01

    Aortic vascular anomalies are complex anatomic entities requiring often complex and problematic surgical approaches. The authors report the clinical case of a Kommerell's diverticulum and right-sided aortic arch. Right-sided aortic arch is an uncommon congenital defect of the aorta and it is rare in the setting of an otherwise normal heart. A right-sided aortic arch was described more than two centuries ago. Several classifications of these anomalies have been proposed on the basis of the arrangement of the arch vessels, relationships with the esophagus, or the presence of congenital heart anomalies. In the adult population, a right-sided aortic arch is often asymptomatic, unless aneurismal disease develops. This usually occurs at the level of the take-off of an aberrant left subclavian artery and is known as a Kommerell's diverticulum. In spite of its rarity, this condition is clinically relevant due to the mortality associated with rupture, morbidity caused by compression of mediastinal structures, and complexity of surgery.

  19. Antibiotic therapy of aortic graft infection: treatment and prevention recommendations.

    PubMed

    Hodgkiss-Harlow, Kelley D; Bandyk, Dennis F

    2011-12-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) after aortic intervention, an uncommon but serious vascular condition, requires patient-specific antibiotic therapy. Effective treatment and prevention requires the vascular surgeon to be cognizant of changing SSI microbiology, advances in antibiotic delivery, and patient characteristics. The majority of aortic graft infections are caused by Gram-positive bacteria, with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus now the prevalent pathogen. Nasal carriage of methicillin-sensitive or methicillin-resistant S aureus strains, diabetes mellitus, recent hospitalization, a failed arterial reconstruction, and the presence of a groin incision are important SSI risk factors. Overall, the aortic SSI rate is higher than predicted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance risk category system; ranging from 5% after open or endovascular aortic interventions to as high as 10% to 15% after aortofemoral bypass or uni-aortoiliac grafting with femorofemoral bypass. Perioperative measures to reduce S aureus nares and skin colonization, administration of antibiotic prophylaxis, meticulous wound closure/care, and therapy directed to optimize patient host defense regulation mechanisms (eg, temperature, oxygenation, blood sugar) can minimize SSI occurrence. Antibiotic therapy for aortic graft infection should utilize bactericidal drugs that penetrate bacteria biofilms and can be delivered to the surgical site both parenterally and locally in the form of antibiotic-impregnated beads or prosthetic grafts.

  20. Treatment of acute thoracic aortic syndromes using endovascular techniques

    PubMed Central

    Uğuz, Emrah; Canyiğit, Murat; Hıdıroğlu, Mete; Şener, Erol

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Acute thoracic aortic syndrome (ATAS) is a novel term to define emergency aortic conditions with common clinical features and challenges. Traditional management of ATAS includes surgical replacement of the aorta and is correlated with high perioperative mortality and morbidity. We aimed to evaluate our experience and outcomes in patients presenting with ATAS, managed by endovascular techniques. METHODS This cohort consisted of 31 consecutive patients (24 males; mean age, 57.5±13.81 years; range, 19–84 years) with acute thoracic aortic pathologies who underwent endovascular repair between January 2011 and January 2015. The study was designed as a retrospective analysis of prospectively maintained data. RESULTS Complicated acute type-B aortic dissection was the most common pathology (35.5%). All aortic stent-grafts (n=37) and dissection stents (n=9) were implanted with 100% procedural success. The overall in-hospital mortality was 9.7%. The mean follow-up duration of patients who were alive at 30 days was 25.9±11.49 months (3–53 months). So far, there have been no late deaths after 30 days. CONCLUSION In the high-risk setting of ATAS, endovascular procedures come forward as novel therapeutic strategies with promising results. Endovascular repair of ATAS can be considered as a first-line treatment alternative under emergency conditions with encouraging results, particularly when conventional surgical repair cannot be implemented due to prohibitive comorbidities. PMID:27113420

  1. Bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics does not promote remodeling in porcine aortic wall concavity

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Samantha K; Moore, Alison N; Sucosky, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of type-I left-right bicuspid aortic valve (LR-BAV) hemodynamic stresses in the remodeling of the thoracic ascending aorta (AA) concavity, in the absence of underlying genetic or structural defects. METHODS: Transient wall shear stress (WSS) profiles in the concavity of tricuspid aortic valve (TAV) and LR-BAV AAs were obtained computationally. Tissue specimens excised from the concavity of normal (non-dilated) porcine AAs were subjected for 48 h to those stress environments using a shear stress bioreactor. Tissue remodeling was characterized in terms of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and activity via immunostaining and gelatin zymography. RESULTS: Immunostaining semi-quantification results indicated no significant difference in MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression between the tissue groups exposed to TAV and LR-BAV AA WSS (P = 0.80 and P = 0.19, respectively). Zymography densitometry revealed no difference in MMP-2 activity (total activity, active form and latent form) between the groups subjected to TAV AA and LR-BAV AA WSS (P = 0.08, P = 0.15 and P = 0.59, respectively). CONCLUSION: The hemodynamic stress environment present in the concavity of type-I LR-BAV AA does not cause any significant change in proteolytic enzyme expression and activity as compared to that present in the TAV AA. PMID:26839660

  2. Modified cuffed anastomosis technique to treat pseudoaneurysms following thoracic endovascular aortic repair

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Satoshi; Oda, Katsuhiko; Motoyoshi, Naotaka; Saiki, Yoshikatsu

    2012-01-01

    Pseudoaneurysm after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) is very rare. We report a case of thoracic aortic pseudoaneurysms due to flares at the proximal end of a stent graft after TEVAR for ductal aneurysm. We describe a total aortic arch replacement in this case using a modified cuffed anastomosis technique with an elephant trunk procedure leaving the partial stent graft in situ. PMID:22314008

  3. 21 CFR 870.3535 - Intra-aortic balloon and control system

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Intra-aortic balloon and control system 870.3535... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3535 Intra-aortic balloon and control system (a) Identification. A intra-aortic balloon and control system is a device...

  4. 21 CFR 870.3535 - Intra-aortic balloon and control system

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Intra-aortic balloon and control system 870.3535... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3535 Intra-aortic balloon and control system (a) Identification. A intra-aortic balloon and control system is a device...

  5. 21 CFR 870.3535 - Intra-aortic balloon and control system

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Intra-aortic balloon and control system 870.3535... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3535 Intra-aortic balloon and control system (a) Identification. A intra-aortic balloon and control system is a device...

  6. 21 CFR 870.3535 - Intra-aortic balloon and control system

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intra-aortic balloon and control system 870.3535... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3535 Intra-aortic balloon and control system (a) Identification. A intra-aortic balloon and control system is a device...

  7. Aortic complications following pediatric heart transplantation: A case series and review

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Sean M; Frazier, Elizabeth A; Collins, R Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Aortic complications occur rarely after pediatric orthotopic heart transplantation, but are typically accompanied by catastrophic events. We describe the three cases of major aortic complications in our experience of 329 pediatric heart transplants. This case series and review highlight the important risk factors for aortic complications after heart transplantation. PMID:27011691

  8. Survival of an aortic trauma patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV: a case report.

    PubMed

    Levine, M P

    2000-12-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV is the most lethal variant of that illness and is associated with fatal large vessel arterial hemorrhages. The literature reports only two survivors of elective aortic surgery and two survivors of spontaneous aortic hemorrhage. This article presents a 14-year-old boy who had aortic and vena cava blunt trauma and survived.

  9. Continuous flow left ventricular assist device implantation concomitant with aortic arch replacement and aortic valve closure in a patient with end-stage heart failure associated with bicuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Masatoshi; Hosoyama, Katsuhiro; Kumagai, Kiichiro; Kawamoto, Shunsuke; Saiki, Yoshikatsu

    2015-12-01

    Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation has become an established treatment for patients with end-stage heart failure as a bridge to cardiac transplantation. During LVAD implantation, some patients require concomitant surgeries, including tricuspid valve repair, aortic valve repair or replacement, and patent foramen ovale closure. However, concomitant aortic surgeries are rare in patients requiring LVAD implantation. We successfully performed total arch replacement with an open distal technique, aortic valve closure, and continuous flow LVAD implantation simultaneously. PMID:25957796

  10. Late iliac artery aneurysms and occlusive disease after aortic tube grafts for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. A 35-year experience.

    PubMed Central

    Calcagno, D; Hallett, J W; Ballard, D J; Naessens, J M; Cherry, K J; Gloviczki, P; Pairolero, P C

    1991-01-01

    Controversy continues over whether patients treated with straight Dacron aortic tube grafts for an abdominal aortic aneurysm remain at significant risk for subsequent development of iliac aneurysm or occlusive disease. To address this issue, the authors performed a population-based analysis of 432 patients who had an abdominal aortic aneurysm diagnosed between 1951 and 1984. Aneurysm repair was performed eventually in 206 patients (48%). To ascertain differences in late development of graft-related complications, iliac aneurysms, and arterial occlusions, the authors compared all tube-graft patients with similar numbers of bifurcated-graft patients matched for age and year of operation. In the tube-graft group, no subsequent clinically evident or autopsy-proven iliac aneurysms or iliac occlusive disease were noted. Over a mean follow-up of 6 years (range, 4 to 18 years), new aortic aneurysms occurred in the proximal aorta in both tube and bifurcated-graft patients (5.0% and 2.5%, respectively). In contrast the cumulative incidence of graft-related complications was higher with a bifurcated prosthesis (12.8%) compared with a straight graft (5.0%) (p = 0.15). These problems generally occurred 5 to 15 years postoperatively and emphasize the need for long-term graft surveillance. The authors conclude that straight tube-grafts for repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms provide excellent late patency with minimal risk of subsequent iliac aneurysm development. PMID:1835832

  11. Impact of Endografting on the Thoracic Aortic Anatomy: Comparative Analysis of the Aortic Geometry before and after the Endograft Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Midulla, Marco; Moreno, Ramiro; Negre-Salvayre, Anne; Nicoud, Franc; Pruvo, Jean Pierre; Haulon, Stephan; Rousseau, Hervé

    2013-03-13

    PurposeAlthough the widespread acceptance of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) as a first-line treatment option for a multitude of thoracic aortic diseases, little is known about the consequences of the device implantation on the native aortic anatomy. We propose a comparative analysis of the pre- and postoperative geometry on a clinical series of patients and discuss the potential clinical implicationsMethodsCT pre- and postoperative acquisitions of 30 consecutive patients treated by TEVAR for different pathologies (20 thoracic aortic aneurysms, 6 false aneurysms, 3 penetrating ulcers, 1 traumatic rupture) were used to model the vascular geometry. Pre- and postoperative geometries were compared for each patient by pairing and matching the 3D models. An implantation site was identified, and focal differences were detected and described.ResultsSegmentation of the data sets was successfully performed for all 30 subjects. Geometry differences between the pre- and postoperative meshes were depicted in 23 patients (76 %). Modifications at the upper implantation site were detected in 14 patients (47 %), and among them, the implantation site involved the arch (Z0–3) in 11 (78 %).ConclusionModeling the vascular geometry on the basis of imaging data offers an effective tool to perform patient-specific analysis of the vascular geometry before and after the treatment. Future studies will evaluate the consequences of these changes on the aortic function.

  12. Preoperative evaluation value of aortic arch lesions by multidetector computed tomography angiography in type A aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fang; Chen, Qiang; Lai, Qing-Quan; Huang, Wen-Han; Wu, Hong; Li, Wei-Cheng

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to preoperatively evaluate the value of aortic arch lesions by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography in type A aortic dissection (AD).From January 2013 to December 2015, we enrolled 42 patients with type A AD who underwent MDCT angiography in our hospital. The institutional database of patients was retrospectively reviewed to identify MDCT angiography examinations for type A AD. Surgical corrections were conducted in all patients to confirm diagnostic accuracy.In this study, the diagnostic accuracy of MDCT angiography was 100% in all 42 patients. The intimal tear site locations that were identified in patients included the ascending aorta (n = 25), aortic arch (n = 12), and all other sites (n = 5). Compared with the control group, there were significant differences in the aortic arch anatomy among the cases. Regarding the distance between the left common carotid and left subclavian arteries, compared with the control group, most cases with type A AD had a significant variation.MDCT angiography plays an important role in detecting aortic arch lesions of type A AD, especially in determining the location of the intimal entry site and change of branch blood vessels. Surgeons can formulate an appropriate operating plan, according to the preoperative MDCT diagnosis information. PMID:27684852

  13. Successful implantation of a second-generation aortic valve in severe aortic regurgitation secondary to a traumatic cusp lesion.

    PubMed

    Mangieri, Antonio; Latib, Azeem; Aurelio, Andrea; Figini, Filippo; Agricola, Eustachio; Rosa, Isabella; Stella, Stefano; Spagnolo, Pietro; Castiglioni, Alessandro; Colombo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    A 67-year-old man with a dilated cardiomyopathy and severe aortic regurgitation (AR) secondary to a traumatic cusp lesion was referred to our institution because of progressive worsening of dyspnea. After formal discussion in the heart team, the patient was scheduled for TAVI (transcatheter aortic valve implantation). The pre procedural computed tomography scan revealed a minimum amount of calcium on the aortic valve and low position of coronary ostia. The TAVI procedure was performed with the implantation of a fully retrievable and repositionable aortic valve prosthesis (Direct Flow 29 mm, Direct Flow Medical, Santa Rosa, California) with an excellent result and no paravalvular leak. The TAVI devices designed for the treatment of calcific aortic stenosis have numerous limitations for the treatment of pure AR such as the risk of residual AR, the lack of repositionability and retrievability, and the need for valve- in-valve implantation. We believe that treatment of selected cases of pure AR with the Direct Flow valve is feasible and takes advantage of the retrievability of the prosthesis.

  14. Externalization of a stiff guide wire via the radial artery: a new technique to facilitate advancement of an Inoue balloon across the aortic valve in patients with aortic stenosis undergoing antegrade balloon aortic valvuloplasty.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroshi; Kubota, Shoichi; Goto, Takuya; Haba, Toshihiro; Yamamoto, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    An 84-year-old woman with aortic stenosis underwent antegrade balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV). After transseptal puncture, we introduced a 7-Fr wedge catheter into the left ventricle and across the aortic valve. We then inserted a 0.032-inch soft guide wire, and the tip of the guide wire was advanced into the brachial artery and exchanged for a stiff guide wire. We externalized the tip of the stiff guide wire from the radial artery. Finally, we advanced an Inoue balloon (Toray, Tokyo, Japan) across the aortic valve and inflated the balloon. Transradial externalization makes antegrade BAV an even less invasive procedure. PMID:25862651

  15. Principles for Management of Intraoperative Acute Type A Aortic Dissection.

    PubMed

    Gukop, Philemon; Chandrasekaran, Vankatachalam

    2015-12-01

    Intraoperative Type A aortic dissection is a rare pathology with incidence of 0.06-0.32%. It is associated with a high mortality between 30-50%. Some associated risk factors, including hypertension, enlarged aorta, peripheral vascular disease, advanced age, atheroma, and high arterial pressure on cardiopulmonary bypass, have been identified. Modification of these risk factors could reduce the incidence of this event. Prompt diagnosis and management, with the aid of intraoperative trans-esophageal echocardiography and/or epi-aortic ultrasound has been shown to reduce the mortality to 17%. We illustrate the principles of management of this pathology with the case of a 62-year-old female who developed acute Type A aortic dissection while undergoing minimally invasive mitral valve repair.

  16. Delayed coronary ischemia after transfemoral aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Jategaonkar, Smita R; Dimitriadis, Zisis; Hakim-Meibodi, Kavous; Gummert, Jan; Horstkotte, Dieter; Scholtz, Werner

    2013-11-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) offers a less invasive treatment alternative to surgical aortic valve replacement for high-risk patients. Although the procedure can be performed at low risk, life-threatening complications may arise in single cases during or even months after the procedure. Here, the details are presented of two patients who underwent TAVI by a transfemoral approach with Medtronic CoreValve prostheses and suffered myocardial ischemia months later. The patients' anatomy with small aortic root, narrow sinus of Valsalva and small distance between the annulus base and coronary arteries and/or the relative oversizing of the CoreValve prosthesis with a high positioning may have contributed to this late complication. Hence, caution is mandatory in this type of patient, with exact pre-procedural planning and close follow up required. PMID:24597395

  17. Endovascular repair of traumatic thoracic aortic injuries: a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Lin, Peter H; Huynh, Tam T; Kougias, Panagiotis; Wall, Mathew J; Coselli, Joseph S; Mattox, Kenneth L

    2008-08-01

    Blunt trauma to the thoracic aorta is life-threatening, with instant fatality in at least 75% of victims. If left untreated, nearly half of those who survive the initial injury will die within the first 24 hours. Surgical repair has been the standard treatment of blunt aortic injury, but immediate operative intervention is frequently difficult due to concomitant injuries. Although endovascular treatment of traumatic aortic disruption is less invasive than conventional repair via thoracotomy, this strategy remains controversial in young patients due to anatomical considerations and device limitations. This article reviews the likely advantages of endovascular interventions for blunt thoracic aortic injuries. Potential limitations and clinical outcomes of this minimally invasive technique are also discussed.

  18. Annular management during aortic valve repair: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kunihara, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Annuloplasty is considered to play a key role to control aortic valve regurgitation (AR) and prevent recurrence of AR after aortic valve repair, because aortic root dilatation has emerged as a risk factor for recurrence of AR. Various modifications of annuloplasty have been advocated, however, none of them has become standardized. Thus in this review they are outlined and classified (internal/external, with/without ring, rigid/flexible ring), and their advantages and disadvantages are clarified. Their clinical outcomes seem currently acceptable in general, and external flexible annuloplasty has been performed more frequently with favorable outcomes. However, they are still performed for a minority of patients by special experienced teams with limited follow-up periods. Therefore, it seems too early to determine the superiority or inferiority of each approach. We must carefully conduct evaluation to clarify which approach will become reproducible, effective, and standardized.

  19. Repair techniques for anomalous aortic origins of the coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Mavroudis, Constantine; Mavroudis, Constantine D; Jacobs, Jeffrey P

    2015-12-01

    Anomalous aortic origins of the coronary arteries comprise approximately one-third of all coronary artery anomalies and are characterised by coronary arteries with anomalies of aortic origin involving abnormal courses, stenoses, and compression that can lead to myocardial ischaemia and sudden death. Operative techniques to treat these anomalies have not been standardised yet. Moreover, the management of potential complications has not been addressed. Common and rare forms of anomalous aortic origins of the coronary arteries are reviewed and understood standard techniques for an uncomplicated unroofing procedure are illustrated. Also noted are techniques that can be applied to unexpected anatomical findings and unwanted complications that could prove to be life-threatening. Several technical recommendations are offered.

  20. Aortic dissection accompanied by preeclampsia in a postpartum young woman

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Wan; Kim, Su-Mi; Yu, Gyu-Bong

    2016-01-01

    Aortic dissection is very rare in obstetrics, but it is a fatal disease. A 37-weeks primigravida woman with dyspnea and pitting edema presented to our emergency room. The patient was diagnosed with preeclampsia and underwent an emergency cesarean section under spinal anesthesia. The patient complained of severe dyspnea after the cesarean section, and the chest computed tomography scan was done. With the finding of aortic dissection, cardiopulmonary arrest occurred 5 hours after the cesarean section, and the patient died without reaction to cardio-pulmonary resuscitation. If a patient with preeclampsia complains of severe dyspnea or chest pain, aortic dissection needs to be suspected and a diagnosis should not be delayed. PMID:27668205