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Sample records for surface antigen levels

  1. A Molecular-Level Account of the Antigenic Hantaviral Surface

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sai; Rissanen, Ilona; Zeltina, Antra; Hepojoki, Jussi; Raghwani, Jayna; Harlos, Karl; Pybus, Oliver G.; Huiskonen, Juha T.; Bowden, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Hantaviruses, a geographically diverse group of zoonotic pathogens, initiate cell infection through the concerted action of Gn and Gc viral surface glycoproteins. Here, we describe the high-resolution crystal structure of the antigenic ectodomain of Gn from Puumala hantavirus (PUUV), a causative agent of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Fitting of PUUV Gn into an electron cryomicroscopy reconstruction of intact Gn-Gc spike complexes from the closely related but non-pathogenic Tula hantavirus localized Gn tetramers to the membrane-distal surface of the virion. The accuracy of the fitting was corroborated by epitope mapping and genetic analysis of available PUUV sequences. Interestingly, Gn exhibits greater non-synonymous sequence diversity than the less accessible Gc, supporting a role of the host humoral immune response in exerting selective pressure on the virus surface. The fold of PUUV Gn is likely to be widely conserved across hantaviruses. PMID:27117403

  2. A Molecular-Level Account of the Antigenic Hantaviral Surface.

    PubMed

    Li, Sai; Rissanen, Ilona; Zeltina, Antra; Hepojoki, Jussi; Raghwani, Jayna; Harlos, Karl; Pybus, Oliver G; Huiskonen, Juha T; Bowden, Thomas A

    2016-05-01

    Hantaviruses, a geographically diverse group of zoonotic pathogens, initiate cell infection through the concerted action of Gn and Gc viral surface glycoproteins. Here, we describe the high-resolution crystal structure of the antigenic ectodomain of Gn from Puumala hantavirus (PUUV), a causative agent of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Fitting of PUUV Gn into an electron cryomicroscopy reconstruction of intact Gn-Gc spike complexes from the closely related but non-pathogenic Tula hantavirus localized Gn tetramers to the membrane-distal surface of the virion. The accuracy of the fitting was corroborated by epitope mapping and genetic analysis of available PUUV sequences. Interestingly, Gn exhibits greater non-synonymous sequence diversity than the less accessible Gc, supporting a role of the host humoral immune response in exerting selective pressure on the virus surface. The fold of PUUV Gn is likely to be widely conserved across hantaviruses. PMID:27117403

  3. Human Leukocyte Antigen Class II Alleles Influence Levels of Antibodies to the Plasmodium falciparum Asexual-Stage Apical Membrane Antigen 1 but Not to Merozoite Surface Antigen 2 and Merozoite Surface Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Armead H.; Leke, Rose G. F.; Mendell, Nancy R.; Shon, Dewon; Suh, Young Ju; Bomba-Nkolo, Dennis; Tchinda, Viviane; Kouontchou, Samuel; Thuita, Lucy W.; van der Wel, Anne Marie; Thomas, Alan; Stowers, Anthony; Saul, Allan; Zhou, Ainong; Taylor, Diane W.; Quakyi, Isabella A.

    2004-01-01

    The apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1), merozoite surface antigen 2 (MSA2), and merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1) are asexual-stage proteins currently being evaluated for inclusion in a vaccine for Plasmodium falciparum. Accordingly, it is important to understand factors that control antibody responses to these antigens. Antibody levels in plasma from residents of Etoa, Cameroon, between the ages of 5 and 70 years, were determined using recombinant AMA1, MSA2, and the N-terminal region of MSP1 (MSP1-190L). In addition, antibody responses to four variants of the C-terminal region of MSP1 (MSP119) were assessed. Results showed that all individuals produced antibodies to AMA1, MSA2, and MSP1-190L; however, a proportion of individuals never produced antibodies to the MSP119 variants, although the percentage of nonresponders decreased with age. The influence of age and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1/DQB1 alleles on antibody levels was evaluated using two-way analysis of variance. Age was correlated with levels of antibodies to AMA1 and MSP119 but not with levels of antibodies to MSA2 and MSP1-190L. No association was found between a single HLA allele and levels of antibodies to MSA2, MSP1-190L, or any of the MSP119 variants. However, individuals positive for DRB1*1201 had higher levels of antibodies to the variant of recombinant AMA1 tested than did individuals of all other HLA types. Since the effect was seen across all age groups, HLA influenced the level but not the rate of antibody acquisition. This association for AMA1, combined with the previously reported association between HLA class II alleles and levels of antibodies to rhoptry-associated protein 1 (RAP1) and RAP2, indicates that HLA influences the levels of antibodies to three of the five vaccine candidate antigens that we have evaluated. PMID:15102786

  4. First evaluation of the serum level of anti-hepatitis B surface antigen after vaccination in Libya.

    PubMed

    Madour, A; Alkout, A; Vanin, S

    2013-12-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination schedule in Libya follows international recommendations (1st dose at birth, 2nd after 1 month and 3rd after 6 months). This research aimed to evaluate the long-term protection of the HBV immunization programme in Tripoli and to determine the best age to administer booster doses. Serum levels of hepatitis B surface antigen were determined in 277 randomly selected children aged 1-12 years. The response to HBV vaccine in 1-3-year-olds was 93.2%, but this declined with age and at 7-9 years after initial vaccination only 53.1% of children had protective titres (> or = 10 mIU/mL). No significant differences between males and females in antibody persistence or response to vaccine were observed. We recommend continuing the HBV vaccination programme and that a booster dose be given to 6-year-old children to ensure maximum protection during the period of school entry and beyond.

  5. Surface antigens of smooth brucellae.

    PubMed

    Diaz, R; Jones, L M; Leong, D; Wilson, J B

    1968-10-01

    Surface antigens of smooth brucellae were extracted by ether-water, phenol-water, trichloroacetic acid, and saline and examined by immunoelectrophoresis and gel diffusion with antisera from infected and immunized rabbits. Ether-water extracts of Brucella melitensis contained a lipopolysaccharide protein component, which was specific for the surface of smooth brucellae and was correlated with the M agglutinogen of Wilson and Miles, a polysaccharide protein component devoid of lipid which was not restricted to the surface of smooth brucellae and was not correlated with the smooth agglutinogen (component 1), and several protein components which were associated with internal antigens of rough and smooth brucellae. Immunoelectrophoretic analysis of ether-water extracts of B. abortus revealed only two components, a lipopolysaccharide protein component, which was correlated with the A agglutinogen, and component 1. Component 1 from B. melitensis and B. abortus showed identity in gel diffusion tests, whereas component M from B. melitensis and component A from B. abortus showed partial identity with unabsorbed antisera and no cross-reactions with monospecific sera. Attempts to prepare monospecific sera directly by immunization of rabbits with cell walls or ether-water extracts were unsuccessful. Absorption of antisera with heavy fraction of ether-water extracts did not always result in monospecific sera. It was concluded (as has been described before) that the A and M antigens are present on a single antigenic complex, in different proportions depending upon the species and biotype, and that this component is a lipopolysaccharide protein complex of high molecular weight that diffuses poorly through agar gel. Components 1, A, and M were also demonstrated in trichloroacetic acid and phenol-water extracts. With all extracts, B. melitensis antigen showed greater diffusibility in agar than B. abortus antigens. After mild acid hydrolysis, B. abortus ether-water extract was able

  6. A surface antigen influenza vaccine. 2. Pyrogenicity and antigenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Brady, M. I.; Furminger, I. G.

    1976-01-01

    Conventional influenza vaccine containing whole virus particles purified on a zonal centrifuge is pyrogenic and can cause systemic and local adverse side effects. An improved vaccine was therefore prepared which contained only the surface antigens of the virus adsorbed to aluminium hydroxide. The antigenicity of this vaccine was compared with conventional vaccine in chickens. Both vaccines induced similar titres of serum haemagglutination-inhibition and neuraminidase inhibition antibody. The dose response curves, however, were different. The surface antigens at vaccine strength without aluminium hydroxide were of negligible pyrogenicity in rabbits. PMID:1068196

  7. Correlation between hepatitis B virus surface antigen level and alpha-fetoprotein in patients free of hepatocellular carcinoma or severe hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Akuta, Norio; Suzuki, Fumitaka; Kobayashi, Mariko; Hara, Tasuku; Sezaki, Hitomi; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Hosaka, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Saitoh, Satoshi; Ikeda, Kenji; Kumada, Hiromitsu

    2014-01-01

    Alfa-fetoprotein (AFP) is used as a marker of early hepatocarcinogenesis. However, the impact of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) on this relationship in patients with HBV infection is not clear. The present study evaluated the relation between HBsAg and AFP levels at the initial visit in 1,610 untreated HBV patients, free of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or severe hepatitis. The cumulative rate of HCC was significantly lower in patients with a low AFP level (≤10 µg/L; below the upper limit of normal) than in those with a high AFP level (≥11 µg/L) at the initial visit. In patients with HBsAg levels more than 500 IU/ml, HBsAg levels correlated significantly and negatively with AFP levels, and significantly with platelet count. Multivariate analysis of data of patients with HBsAg more than 500 IU/ml identified HBsAg (<7,000 IU/ml), albumin (<3.9 g/dl), platelet count (<20.0 × 10(4) /mm(3)), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (≥50 IU/L), aspartate aminotransferase (≥34 IU/L), HBeAg (positive), and HBV core-related antigen (≥3.0 log U/ml) as determinants of a high AFP. Especially, in patients with HBsAg more than 500 IU/ml and low transaminase levels (below the upper limit of normal), HBsAg was identified as significant determinant of a high AFP. On the other hand, in patients with HBsAg less than 500 IU/ml, multivariate analysis identified albumin, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, and HBV core-related antigen as determinants of a high AFP. The results indicated that HBsAg level seems to affect, at least in part, the AFP levels, and that it can be used as a surrogate marker of early hepatocarcinogenesis.

  8. Dose-response association between hepatitis B surface antigen levels and liver cancer risk in Chinese men and women

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Gao, Jing; Li, Hong-Lan; Zheng, Wei; Yang, Gong; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Xiao; Tan, Yu-Ting; Rothman, Nat; Gao, Yu-Tang; Chow, Wong-Ho; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Xiang, Yong-Bing

    2016-01-01

    We aimed at evaluating the risk of liver cancer in different levels of HBsAg among Chinese men and women. We carried out a nested case-control study including 363 cases and 3,511 controls in two population-based cohorts in Shanghai. Plasma samples collected at enrollment were quantified for HBsAg levels using the Architect QT assay. Conditional logistic regression was performed to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) for liver cancer, with adjustment for potential confounders. HBsAg was detected in 6.29% of control subjects overall (7.02% in men and 4.98% in women). HBsAg levels were positively associated with liver cancer risk in a dose-response manner (Ptrend<0.001). Such association showed a significant gender disparity. With increasing levels of HBsAg, liver cancer risks rose more steeply in men than in women. In men, the adjusted ORs increased from 7.27 (95%CI: 3.49–15.15) at the lowest detectable level of HBsAg (5–9 IU/ml) to 7.16 (95%CI: 3.21–15.96), 34.30 (95%CI: 16.94–69.44), and 47.33 (95%CI: 23.50–95.34) at the highest level of HBsAg (≥1,000 IU/ml) compared to those negative for HBsAg. The corresponding ORs were much lower for women, from 1.37 (95%CI: 0.25–7.47) to 3.81 (95%CI: 1.09–13.28), 7.36 (95%CI: 2.41–22.46), and 16.86 (95%CI: 7.24–39.27), respectively. HBsAg quantification has potential to distinguish individuals at different risks of liver cancer. Men with the lowest detectable level of HBsAg should still pay attention to their liver cancer risks, but those with a higher level may be given a higher priority in future liver cancer surveillance program. PMID:26990915

  9. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  10. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  11. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  12. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  13. 21 CFR 660.40 - Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.40 Section 660.40...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.40 Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this...

  14. Cell surface expression level variation between two common Human Leukocyte Antigen alleles, HLA-A2 and HLA-B8, is dependent on the structure of the C terminal part of the alpha 2 and the alpha 3 domains.

    PubMed

    Dellgren, Christoffer; Nehlin, Jan O; Barington, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Constitutive cell surface expression of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class I antigens vary extremely from tissue to tissue and individual antigens may differ widely in expression levels. Down-regulation of class I expression is a known immune evasive mechanism used by cancer cells and viruses. Moreover, recent observations suggest that even minor differences in expression levels may influence the course of viral infections and the frequency of complications to stem cell transplantation. We have shown that some human multipotent stem cells have high expression of HLA-A while HLA-B is only weakly expressed, and demonstrate here that this is also the case for the human embryonic kidney cell line HEK293T. Using quantitative flow cytometry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction we found expression levels of endogenous HLA-A3 (median 71,204 molecules per cell) 9.2-fold higher than the expression of-B7 (P = 0.002). Transfection experiments with full-length HLA-A2 and -B8 encoding plasmids confirmed this (54,031 molecules per cell vs. 2,466, respectively, P = 0.001) independently of transcript levels suggesting a post-transcriptional regulation. Using chimeric constructs we found that the cytoplasmic tail and the transmembrane region had no impact on the differential cell surface expression. In contrast, ~65% of the difference could be mapped to the six C-terminal amino acids of the alpha 2 domain and the alpha 3 domain (amino acids 176-284), i.e. amino acids not previously shown to be of importance for differential expression levels of HLA class I molecules. We suggest that the differential cell surface expression of two common HLA-A and-B alleles is regulated by a post-translational mechanism that may involve hitherto unrecognized molecules. PMID:26258424

  15. Quantitative Levels of Hepatitis B Virus DNA and Surface Antigen and the Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Patients with Hepatitis B Receiving Long-Term Nucleos(t)ide Analogue Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kawanaka, Miwa; Nishino, Ken; Nakamura, Jun; Oka, Takahito; Urata, Noriyo; Goto, Daisuke; Suehiro, Mitsuhiko; Kawamoto, Hirofumi; Kudo, Masatoshi; Yamada, Gotaro

    2014-01-01

    Background Serum levels of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA are an important predictor of the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with chronic HBV infection. However, little is known about whether high levels of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) increase the risk for HCC. Methods We investigated 167 patients who were treated with nucleos(t)ide analogues (NA) for at least 2 years (median: 5.8 years, range: 2-13.1 years). Relationships between reduced levels of HBsAg and various factors were evaluated. In addition, we evaluated the usefulness of quantitative serum levels of HBV DNA and HBsAg as predictors of HCC development in patients receiving long-term NA therapy. Results HCC developed in 9 of the 167 NA-treated patients. In the 9 patients with HCC, HBV DNA was undetectable (<2.1 log copies/mL), but HBsAg levels were ≥2000 C.O.I. in 7 patients. No maternal transmission, long NA treatment period, HBV DNA levels <3.0 log copies/mL, and reduced hepatitis B e antigen levels during the first 24 weeks of treatment were a significant factor of HBsAg levels <2000 C.O.I.. Conclusions Hepatocarcinogenesis was observed in patients with high HBsAg levels, despite the negative conversion of HBV DNA as a result of long-term NA therapy. Therefore, to suppress hepatocarcinogenesis, it is important to control not only HBV DNA levels but also HBsAg levels. PMID:24804176

  16. CELL SURFACE ANTIGENS OF A MOUSE TESTICULAR TERATOMA

    PubMed Central

    Gooding, Linda R.; Edidin, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Rabbit antisera to a mouse testicular teratoma, absorbed with normal mouse tissues, react by immunofluorescence with plasma membrane antigens of a variety of transplantable mouse tumor cells and transformed fibroblast cell lines including Clone 1D, SV-40-3T3, and 3T12. Trypsin treatment of cells of "normal" lines, 3T3 and FR-SV-3T3, uncovers reactivity on these as well. Early passage mouse embryo fibroblast cell cultures do not react even after trypsinization. By cross-absorbtion studies, the anti-teratoma serum appears to react with an antigen common to most tumor cells investigated thus far. When this antigen on Clone 1D cells is "capped," H-2 antigens collect with the teratoma antigens in the cap indicating a physical association between the molecules. Molecules specified by both the H-2D and H-2K regions are bound to the teratoma antigens in the Clone 1D plasma membrane. This antigen is also found in soluble tumor cell fractions where it is believed to be free of H-2. A second cell surface antigen defined by anti-teratoma serum is expressed only by hepatoma and teratoma itself. This second antigen is apparently a secretory product of teratoma cells. A third surface antigen defined by anti-teratoma serum appears to be specific for the teratoma. PMID:4365513

  17. Hepatitis B Virus DNA in Blood Samples Positive for Antibodies to Core Antigen and Negative for Surface Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, C.; León, G.; Loureiro, C. L.; Uzcátegui, N.; Liprandi, F.; Pujol, F. H.

    1999-01-01

    Anti-hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg)-positive hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative plasma samples from blood donors were tested by nested PCR. DNA positivity was more significantly associated with high levels of anti-HBcAg than with low levels of anti-HBsAg antibodies. Analysis of a dilution of anti-HBcAg antibodies might result in a more rational exclusion of anti-HBcAg-positive HBsAg-negative samples, reducing the number of donations discarded and enabling more countries to incorporate anti-HBcAg testing. PMID:10473534

  18. Analysis of cell surface antigens by Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Stojanović, Ivan; Schasfoort, Richard B M; Terstappen, Leon W M M

    2014-02-15

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is most commonly used to measure bio-molecular interactions. SPR is used significantly less frequent for measuring whole cell interactions. Here we introduce a method to measure whole cells label free using the specific binding of cell surface antigens expressed on the surface of cancer cells and specific ligands deposited on sensor chips using an IBIS MX96 SPR imager (SPRi). As a model system, cells from the breast cancer cell line HS578T, SKBR3 and MCF7 were used. SPRi responses to Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM) antibody and other ligands coated on the sensor chips were measured. SPR curves show a response attributable to the sedimentation of the cells and a specific binding response on top of the initial response, the magnitude of which is dependent on the ligand density and the cell type used. Comparison of SPRi with flow cytometry showed similar EpCAM expression on MCF7, SKBR3 and HS578T cells.

  19. Five novel cell surface antigens of CNS neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Jennings, M T; Jennings, V D; Asadourian, L L; Rosenblum, M; Albino, A P; Cairncross, J G; Old, L J

    1989-01-01

    Optimal monoclonal antibody-mediated immunotherapy requires the identification of tumor-restricted cell surface antigens. We have identified and partially characterized 5 new monoclonal antibodies generated against malignant astrocytoma, medulloblastoma, neuroblastoma and melanoma which were used to define 5 neuroectodermal tumor antigenic systems. CNT/1 identifies a 57-kDa, heat-stable, trypsin-sensitive neuroblastoma surface antigen, which is expressed intracellularly in many malignant gliomas, medulloblastomas, ependymomas, breast and ovarian carcinomas. CNT/2 reacts with a 130-kDa, heat-labile, trypsin- and neuraminidase-resistant antigen restricted to low-grade astrocytomas and malignant gliomas. CNT/11 reacts with a 70-kDa, heat-labile, trypsin-sensitive antigen coded for by a gene on chromosome 12, and is restricted to astrocytomas, neuroblastomas and sarcomas. CNT/8 identifies a heat-labile, trypsin-sensitive antigen whose gene has been localized to chromosome 15 and is expressed by neuroectodermal and mesodermally derived tumors and few epithelial cancers. The B2.6 antigen is identified only in terms of serologic reactivity with a subset of cultured astrocytomas and melanomas. Neuroectodermal tumor-associated antigens may be categorized as lineage-consistent, lineage-independent and putatively tumor-restricted in their expression. These restricted antibodies may be potentially useful reagents to consider for monoclonal antibody-mediated immunotherapy of CNS neoplasms.

  20. Mapping Antigenic Motifs in the Trypomastigote Small Surface Antigen from Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Balouz, Virginia; Cámara, María de los Milagros; Cánepa, Gaspar E.; Carmona, Santiago J.; Volcovich, Romina; Gonzalez, Nicolás; Altcheh, Jaime; Agüero, Fernán

    2015-01-01

    The trypomastigote small surface antigen (TSSA) is a mucin-like molecule from Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, which displays amino acid polymorphisms in parasite isolates. TSSA expression is restricted to the surface of infective cell-derived trypomastigotes, where it functions as an adhesin and engages surface receptors on the host cell as a prerequisite for parasite internalization. Previous results have established TSSA-CL, the isoform encoded by the CL Brener clone, as an appealing candidate for use in serology-based diagnostics for Chagas disease. Here, we used a combination of peptide- and recombinant protein-based tools to map the antigenic structure of TSSA-CL at maximal resolution. Our results indicate the presence of different partially overlapping B-cell epitopes clustering in the central portion of TSSA-CL, which contains most of the polymorphisms found in parasite isolates. Based on these results, we assessed the serodiagnostic performance of a 21-amino-acid-long peptide that spans TSSA-CL major antigenic determinants, which was similar to the performance of the previously validated glutathione S-transferase (GST)-TSSA-CL fusion molecule. Furthermore, the tools developed for the antigenic characterization of the TSSA antigen were also used to explore other potential diagnostic applications of the anti-TSSA humoral response in Chagasic patients. Overall, our present results provide additional insights into the antigenic structure of TSSA-CL and support this molecule as an excellent target for molecular intervention in Chagas disease. PMID:25589551

  1. Surface Antigens Produced by Herpesviruses: Varicella-Zoster Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Michio; Barron, Almen L.

    1973-01-01

    Surface antigen(s) was demonstrated by the mixed agglutination technique on cell cultures infected with varicella-zoster virus (V-Z). The reactions appeared to be specific for V-Z, and no cross-reaction was obtained with herpes simplex virus (HSV). V-Z surface antigen had similar physicochemical properties to that of HSV. It was stable to heating at 56 C and treatment with 1% Formalin, 2,4-dinitrophenol, and periodate, whereas it was undetectable after exposure to acetone or ethanol. Antibodies detecting surface antigen were present in high titer in sera from varicella or herpes zoster patients and paralleled titers obtained by the complement fixation test. Images PMID:4352455

  2. Expression of Plasmodium falciparum surface antigens in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Ardeshir, F; Flint, J E; Reese, R T

    1985-01-01

    The asexual blood stages of the human malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum produce many antigens, only some of which are important for protective immunity. Most of the putative protective antigens are believed to be expressed in schizonts and merozoites, the late stages of the asexual cycle. With the aim of cloning and characterizing genes for important parasite antigens, we used late-stage P. falciparum mRNA to construct a library of cDNA sequences inserted in the Escherichia coli expression vector pUC8. Nine thousand clones from the expression library were immunologically screened in situ with serum from Aotus monkeys immune to P. falciparum, and 95 clones expressing parasite antigens were identified. Mice were immunized with lysates from 49 of the bacterial clones that reacted with Aotus sera, and the mouse sera were tested for their reactivity with parasite antigens by indirect immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation, and immunoblotting assays. Several different P. falciparum antigens were identified by these assays. Indirect immunofluorescence studies of extracellular merozoites showed that three of these antigens appear to be located on the merozoite surface. Thus, we have identified cDNA clones to three different P. falciparum antigens that may be important in protective immunity. Images PMID:3887406

  3. Hepatitis B surface antigen-specific cell-mediated immune responses in human chronic hepatitis B surface antigen carriers.

    PubMed Central

    Beutner, K R; Tiku, M L; Ogra, P L

    1978-01-01

    The presence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and antibody (anti-HBs), hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and antibody (anti-HBe), the nature of T-cell function, and specific cell-mediated immunity to HBsAg were determined and evaluated serially in groups of subjects with chronic HBsAg carrier states and in seronegative controls. The techniques of in vitro lymphocyte transformation, spontaneous rosette formation, radioimmunoassay, reverse passive hemagglutination, passive hemagglutination, rheophoresis, and liver function tests were employed for these studies. For the lymphocyte transformation assay, multiple concentrations of phytohemagglutinin and purified HBsAg were used as stimulants. Cell-mediated immunity to HBsAg was detectable in 50% of the chronic HBsAg carriers (responders) at one or more concentrations of HBsAg. The remaining carriers (nonresponders) and controls failed to manifest HBsAg-specific lymphocyte transformation activity. The profile of the responders was characterized by elevated serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase levels, the presence of anti-HBe, high HBsAg titers, and the conspicuous absence of HBeAg in the serum. The nonresponders were characterized by normal serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase levels, the presence of HBeAg and anti-HBe, and lower HBsAg titers. These observations demonstrate the presence of specific cell-mediated immunity to HBsAg in chronic HBsAg carriers who manifest biochemical evidence of liver disease. PMID:80380

  4. Dominance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with lower quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen and higher serum interferon-γ-induced protein 10 levels in HBV/HCV-coinfected patients.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, S B; Jaroszewicz, J; Potthoff, A; Höner Zu Siederdissen, C; Maasoumy, B; Deterding, K; Manns, M P; Wedemeyer, H; Cornberg, M

    2015-07-01

    Different viral dominance patterns have been documented in coinfection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) based on HBV DNA and HCV RNA quantification. In most cases, HCV is dominant and suppresses HBV replication. In vitro studies revealed that there is most probably no direct interference between HBV and HCV replication. We hypothesized that indirect mechanisms mediated by host immune responses might be responsible for the different dominance patterns. In this study we analysed quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) as a marker for immune control of HBV and interferon γ-induced protein 10 (IP-10) as host marker for the endogenous interferon in 85 patients with HBV/HCV coinfection. Levels of HBsAg were closely associated with viral dominance patterns in 85 HBV/HCV-coinfected patients. HBsAg levels were lowest in patients with HCV dominance, even lower compared with HBV-monoinfected patients undergoing treatment with nucleos(t)ide analogues (NA) but comparable to low replicative HBsAg carriers. An increase in HCV RNA during follow up was associated with HBsAg decline. Patients with HCV dominance had significantly higher serum IP-10 levels compared with HBV-dominant patients or HBV-monoinfected patients treated with NA. Lower HBsAg and higher IP-10 levels in HCV-dominant HBV/HCV-coinfected patients suggest that HCV suppresses HBV DNA replication and also HBsAg production by immune mechanisms.

  5. 21 CFR 660.1 - Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.1... Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.1 Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. The product...

  6. 21 CFR 660.1 - Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.1... Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.1 Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. The product...

  7. 21 CFR 660.1 - Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.1... Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.1 Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. The product...

  8. 21 CFR 660.1 - Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.1... Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.1 Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. The product...

  9. 21 CFR 660.1 - Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. 660.1... Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.1 Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of this product shall be Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. The product...

  10. Are Serum Quantitative Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Levels, Liver Histopathology and Viral Loads Related in Chronic Hepatitis B-infected Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Balkan, Ayhan; Namıduru, Mustafa; Balkan, Yasemin; Mete, Ayşe Özlem; Karaoğlan, İlkay; Boşnak, Vuslat Keçik

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Fluctuations in hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA and alanine transaminase (ALT) levels complicate assessment of the phases of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection and correct identification of the inactive HBV carrier state. In this study, we aimed to examine the role of HBsAg quantification (qHBsAg) in the identification of the phases of HBV and to evaluate its association with liver histopathology. Patients and Methods: Inactive HBV carriers (IC) (n = 104) and CHB patients (n = 100) were enrolled in the study. Demographic characteristics of patients were evaluated; biochemical parameters and serum qHBsAg levels were studied, and liver biopsy and histopathology were assessed. Results: Serum qHBsAg levels were found to be significantly low in IC (5150.78 ± 8473.16 IU/mL) compared with the HBeAg-negative CHB (7503.21 ± 8101.41 IU/mL) (P = 0.001) patients. The diagnostic accuracy of qHBsAg to differentiate HBeAg-negative CHB from IC was found to be moderate (c-statistic: 0.695) and the cutoff level for qHBsAg in diagnosis was found as 1625 IU/mL (specificity: 80%; sensitivity: 49%). No correlation was noted between serum qHBsAg level and ALT, histologic activity index (HAI), and fibrosis in IC and CHB. A moderate and positive correlation was observed between the serum qHBsAg level and HBV-DNA in HBeAg-positive CHB patients. Conclusions: Serum qHBsAg levels may prove to be useful in the differentiation between IC and HBeAg-negative CHB when used in conjunction with HBV DNA. Furthermore, patients diagnosed solely on the basis of HBV DNA and ALT may present with higher grade and stage of liver histopathology than expected. PMID:27184639

  11. Conformational Dynamics and Antigenicity in the Disordered Malaria Antigen Merozoite Surface Protein 2

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Dean; Krishnarjuna, Bankala; Nováček, Jiří; Žídek, Lukáš; Sklenář, Vladimír; Richards, Jack S.; Beeson, James G.; Anders, Robin F.; Norton, Raymond S.

    2015-01-01

    Merozoite surface protein 2 (MSP2) of Plasmodium falciparum is an abundant, intrinsically disordered protein that is GPI-anchored to the surface of the invasive blood stage of the malaria parasite. Recombinant MSP2 has been trialled as a component of a malaria vaccine, and is one of several disordered proteins that are candidates for inclusion in vaccines for malaria and other diseases. Nonetheless, little is known about the implications of protein disorder for the development of an effective antibody response. We have therefore undertaken a detailed analysis of the conformational dynamics of the two allelic forms of MSP2 (3D7 and FC27) using NMR spectroscopy. Chemical shifts and NMR relaxation data indicate that conformational and dynamic properties of the N- and C-terminal conserved regions in the two forms of MSP2 are essentially identical, but significant variation exists between and within the central variable regions. We observe a strong relationship between the conformational dynamics and the antigenicity of MSP2, as assessed with antisera to recombinant MSP2. Regions of increased conformational order in MSP2, including those in the conserved regions, are more strongly antigenic, while the most flexible regions are minimally antigenic. This suggests that modifications that increase conformational order may offer a means to tune the antigenicity of MSP2 and other disordered antigens, with implications for vaccine design. PMID:25742002

  12. Posttranscriptional control is a strong factor enabling exclusive expression of surface antigens in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Simon, Martin C; Marker, Simone; Schmidt, Helmut J

    2006-01-01

    Variable antigens are large proteins located on the outer membrane of parasitic but also of free-living protists. Multigene families encoding surface antigens demonstrate an exclusive expression of proteins. The resulting presence of just one protein species on the cell surface is required for surface antigen function; therefore, the molecular mechanism of exclusive expression is of main interest. Regulation of gene expression and mechanisms establishing switching of antigens are hardly understood in any organism. Here we report on the reaction of Paramecium to the artificial knock down of surface antigen 51A expression by bacteria-mediated RNAi. This technique involves the feeding of dsRNA-producing bacteria. We analyzed different fragments of the target gene for dsRNA template regarding their specific knock down efficiency and found great differences. Treatment of Paramecia with RNAi against the 51A antigen demonstrated that although a massive amount of mRNA was present, the protein was not detected on the cell surface. Moreover, a minor abundance of 51D transcripts resulted in an exclusive presence of 51D proteins on the cell surface. This posttranscriptional regulation was confirmed by the transcript ratio (51A/51D) determined by real-time (RT) PCR of single cells. Because we were able to document unexclusive transcription also in wild-type cells our results indicate that this posttranscriptional regulation is a main factor of enabling exclusive gene expression. The comparison of serotype shifts, caused by efficient and inefficient knock down, indicates an involvement of full-length transcripts in regulation of gene expression. Thus, our study gives new insights into the mechanism of exclusive expression on the molecular level: (i) exclusive transcription does not occur, (ii) posttranscriptional regulation is a powerful factor enabling exclusive antigen expression, and (iii) surface antigen mRNA is shown to be involved in this mechanism in a regulating way.

  13. Prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis B e antigen and antibody, and antigen subtypes in atomic bomb survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Neriishi, K.; Kodama, K.; Akiba, S. |

    1995-11-01

    On the basis of previous studies showing an association between hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positivity and radiation exposure in atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors, we investigated further the active state of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection by incorporating tests of hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) and hepatitis B e antibody (anti-HBe) and HBsAg subtypes into our biennial health examinations. Among 6548 A-bomb survivors for whom HBsAg was assayed between July 1979 and July 1981, 129 persons were HBsAg positive. HBeAg and anti-HBe were measured in 104 of these persons and subtypes of HBsAg in 98 persons. Among those exposed to radiation (average liver dose 0.58 Sv), the odds ratio of HBsAg positivity tended to increase with radiation dose (P for trend = 0.024). The P values for association between the prevalence of HB e antigen and radiation dose were 0.094 and 0.17, respectively. The HB antigen subtype adr was predominant over other subtypes in both Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but the distribution of subtypes did not seem to differ in relation to radiation dose. These results suggested that A-bomb survivors remain in active state of HBV infection and that the mechanism(s) of seroconversion may be impaired. 29 refs., 6 tabs.

  14. Aggregation and antigenicity of virus like particle in salt solution--A case study with hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Zhang, Yan; Quan, Can; Luo, Jian; Yang, Yanli; Yu, Mengran; Kong, Yingjun; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2015-08-20

    The phenomenon of aggregation of virus-like particles (VLPs) in salt solution and the corresponding effect upon antigenicity was reported. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) combined with multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) was used to characterize the size and the aggregation behavior of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). The average diameter of HBsAg VLP was 22.8±0.4 nm and it tended to aggregate in salt solution to form large particles and the antigenicity changed accordingly. In 0-4 M NaCl solution, part of HBsAg molecules aggregated rapidly into oligomeric particles (OP), whose diameter distributed from 25 to 40 nm, and the antigenicity slightly decreased about 10%. The aggregation reaction is reversible. After removing NaCl, both size and antigenicity could recover to normal level (92-96%). By contrast, the aggregation process is more complicated in (NH4)2SO4 solution. Most of HBsAg particles aggregated into OP and further aggregated into polymeric particles (PP). The diameter of the PP could reach 40 to 140 nm. The concentration of (NH4)2SO4 had remarkable influence upon the rate of aggregation. When concentration of (NH4)2SO4 was below 1 M, most of HBsAg aggregated only into OP in 1 h. While with concentration of (NH4)2SO4 above 1 M, most of particles formed PP within 1 h. The aggregation process to PP was irreversible. After removing (NH4)2SO4, the large aggregates could not recover to normal particles and the remaining antigenicity was below 30%. PMID:25862298

  15. Nanoscopic Localization of Surface-Exposed Antigens of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Lemgruber, Leandro; Sant'Anna, Celso; Griffths, Caron; Abud, Yuri; Mhlanga, Musa; Wallich, Reinhard; Frischknecht, Friedrich

    2015-06-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, the causative agent of Lyme disease, is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected Ixodes spp. ticks. Successful infection of vertebrate hosts necessitates sophisticated means of the pathogen to escape the vertebrates' immune system. One strategy employed by Lyme disease spirochetes to evade adaptive immunity involves a highly coordinated regulation of the expression of outer surface proteins that is vital for infection, dissemination, and persistence. Here we characterized the expression pattern of bacterial surface antigens using different microscopy techniques, from fluorescent wide field to super-resolution and immunogold-scanning electron microscopy. A fluorescent strain of B. burgdorferi spirochetes was labeled with monoclonal antibodies directed against various bacterial surface antigens. Our results indicate that OspA is more evenly distributed over the surface than OspB and OspC that were present as punctate areas. PMID:25739645

  16. A 32 kDa surface antigen of Theileria parva: characterization and immunization studies.

    PubMed

    Skilton, R A; Musoke, A J; Wells, C W; Yagi, Y; Nene, V; Spooner, P R; Gachanja, J; Osaso, J; Bishop, R P; Morzaria, S P

    2000-06-01

    Previous studies using monoclonal antibody (mAb) 4C9 specific for a 32 kDa antigen (p32) of Theileria parva demonstrated expression of the antigen on the surface of the sporozoite, making it a potential antigen for sporozoite neutralization. A full-length cDNA encoding the major merozoite/piroplasm surface antigen (mMPSA) of T. parva was cloned and expressed in bacteria. The expressed product reacted strongly with mAb 4C9, demonstrating identity between the p32 and mMPSA of T. parva. Using immunoblot analysis and immunoelectron microscopy with mAb 4C9 it was shown that the mMPSA is a major antigen of the merozoite and piroplasm at the cell surface, while lower levels of antigen are expressed in the sporozoite and schizont stages. Upregulation of the mMPSA occurs at merogony and can be induced by culturing schizont-infected lymphocytes at 42 degrees C. Recombinant mMPSA of T. parva induced high titres of specific antibodies in cattle but failed to confer protection against a T. parva sporozoite stabilate challenge. The pre-challenge sera also failed to neutralize infectivity of sporozoites in an in vitro assay. Possible reasons for the lack of parasite neutralization in vivo and in vitro are discussed. PMID:10874718

  17. Hepatitis B surface antigen clearance in inactive hepatitis B surface antigen carriers treated with peginterferon alfa-2a

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming-Hui; Xie, Yao; Zhang, Lu; Lu, Yao; Shen, Ge; Wu, Shu-Ling; Chang, Min; Mu, Cai-Qin; Hu, Lei-Ping; Hua, Wen-Hao; Song, Shu-Jing; Zhang, Shu-Feng; Cheng, Jun; Xu, Dao-Zhen

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine the association between interferon (IFN) therapy and loss of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in inactive HBsAg carriers. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study in inactive HBsAg carriers, who were treatment-naive, with a serum HBsAg level < 100 IU/mL and an undetectable hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA level (< 100 IU/mL). All the 20 treated patients received subcutaneous PEG-IFN alfa-2a 180 μg/wk for 72 wk and were then followed for 24 wk. There were 40 untreated controls matched with 96 wk of observation. Serum HBsAg, HBV DNA, and alanine aminotransferases were monitored every 3 mo in the treatment group and every 3-6 mo in the control group. RESULTS: Thirteen (65.0%) of 20 treated patients achieved HBsAg loss, 12 of whom achieved HBsAg seroconversion. Mean HBsAg level in treated patients decreased to 6.69 ± 13.04 IU/mL after 24 wk of treatment from a baseline level of 26.22 ± 33.00 IU/mL. Serum HBV DNA level remained undetectable (< 100 IU/mL) in all treated patients during the study. HBsAg level of the control group decreased from 25.72 ± 25.58 IU/mL at baseline to 17.11 ± 21.62 IU/mL at week 96 (P = 0.108). In the control group, no patient experienced HBsAg loss/seroconversion, and two (5.0%) developed HBV reactivation. CONCLUSION: IFN treatment results in HBsAg loss and seroconversion in a considerable proportion of inactive HBsAg carriers with low HBsAg concentrations. PMID:27239256

  18. Prevalence of Serologic Hepatitis B Markers in Blood Donors From Puebla, Mexico: The Association of Relatively High Levels of Anti-Core Antibodies With the Detection of Surface Antigen and Genomic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Sosa-Jurado, Francisca; Hilda Rosas-Murrieta, Nora; Guzman-Flores, Belinda; Perez Zempoaltecalt, Cintia; Patricia Sanchez Torres, Ana; Ramirez Rosete, Leticia; Bernal-Soto, Maribel; Marquez-Dominguez, Luis; Melendez-Mena, Daniel; Angel Mendoza Torres, Miguel; Teresa Lopez Delgado, Maria; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Vallejo-Ruiz, Veronica; Santos-Lopez, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Background The hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes chronic hepatitis, hepatic cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Surface antigen (HBsAg) detection is a definitive test that can confirm HBV infection, while the presence of antibodies against the core protein (anti-HBc) suggests either a previous or ongoing infection or occult hepatitis B infection (OBI). Objectives The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of anti-HBc and HBsAg in blood donors. Further, the study aimed to estimate the anti-HBc level at which HBV DNA is detected in putative OBI cases, as well as to search for mutations in the “a” determinant associated with the non-detection of HBsAg in serum. Patients and Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study from 2003–2009. The study included 120,552 blood donors from the state of Puebla, Mexico. Different commercial systems based on microparticles (enzymatic (MEIA) or chemiluminescent (CMIA)) were used to determine the HBsAg and anti-HBc levels. For the detection of HBV DNA, a nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) was used and the genotypes were determined using Sanger sequencing. Results Of the 120,552 blood donors, 1437 (1.19%, 95% CI: 1.12 - 1.26) were reactive to anti-HBc, while 82 (0.066%, 95% CI: 0.053 - 0.079) were reactive to HBsAg. Some 156 plasma samples collected in 2009 from anti-HBc-positive/HBsAg-negative blood donors were submitted for HBV DNA detection in a search for probable OBI. Viral DNA was detected in 27/156 (17.3%, 95% CI: 11.5 - 23.1). Our results show an association between HBV DNA or HBsAg and anti-HBc S/CO levels ≥ 4.0. All DNA samples were identified as genotype H and some “a” determinant mutations were identified, although none corresponded to mutations previously reported to hinder the detection of HBsAg by commercial immunoassays. Conclusions We observed that as the anti-HBc levels increase, there is a higher prevalence of the viral protein HBsAg in blood donors. Samples testing positive

  19. Prevalence of Serologic Hepatitis B Markers in Blood Donors From Puebla, Mexico: The Association of Relatively High Levels of Anti-Core Antibodies With the Detection of Surface Antigen and Genomic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Sosa-Jurado, Francisca; Hilda Rosas-Murrieta, Nora; Guzman-Flores, Belinda; Perez Zempoaltecalt, Cintia; Patricia Sanchez Torres, Ana; Ramirez Rosete, Leticia; Bernal-Soto, Maribel; Marquez-Dominguez, Luis; Melendez-Mena, Daniel; Angel Mendoza Torres, Miguel; Teresa Lopez Delgado, Maria; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Vallejo-Ruiz, Veronica; Santos-Lopez, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Background The hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes chronic hepatitis, hepatic cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Surface antigen (HBsAg) detection is a definitive test that can confirm HBV infection, while the presence of antibodies against the core protein (anti-HBc) suggests either a previous or ongoing infection or occult hepatitis B infection (OBI). Objectives The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of anti-HBc and HBsAg in blood donors. Further, the study aimed to estimate the anti-HBc level at which HBV DNA is detected in putative OBI cases, as well as to search for mutations in the “a” determinant associated with the non-detection of HBsAg in serum. Patients and Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study from 2003–2009. The study included 120,552 blood donors from the state of Puebla, Mexico. Different commercial systems based on microparticles (enzymatic (MEIA) or chemiluminescent (CMIA)) were used to determine the HBsAg and anti-HBc levels. For the detection of HBV DNA, a nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) was used and the genotypes were determined using Sanger sequencing. Results Of the 120,552 blood donors, 1437 (1.19%, 95% CI: 1.12 - 1.26) were reactive to anti-HBc, while 82 (0.066%, 95% CI: 0.053 - 0.079) were reactive to HBsAg. Some 156 plasma samples collected in 2009 from anti-HBc-positive/HBsAg-negative blood donors were submitted for HBV DNA detection in a search for probable OBI. Viral DNA was detected in 27/156 (17.3%, 95% CI: 11.5 - 23.1). Our results show an association between HBV DNA or HBsAg and anti-HBc S/CO levels ≥ 4.0. All DNA samples were identified as genotype H and some “a” determinant mutations were identified, although none corresponded to mutations previously reported to hinder the detection of HBsAg by commercial immunoassays. Conclusions We observed that as the anti-HBc levels increase, there is a higher prevalence of the viral protein HBsAg in blood donors. Samples testing positive

  20. Antigenicity and immunogenicity of Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein-3.

    PubMed

    Bitencourt, Amanda R; Vicentin, Elaine C; Jimenez, Maria C; Ricci, Ricardo; Leite, Juliana A; Costa, Fabio T; Ferreira, Luis C; Russell, Bruce; Nosten, François; Rénia, Laurent; Galinski, Mary R; Barnwell, John W; Rodrigues, Mauricio M; Soares, Irene S

    2013-01-01

    A recent clinical trial in African children demonstrated the potential utility of merozoite surface protein (MSP)-3 as a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria. The present study evaluated the use of Plasmodium vivax MSP-3 (PvMSP-3) as a target antigen in vaccine formulations against malaria caused by P. vivax. Recombinant proteins representing MSP-3α and MSP-3β of P. vivax were expressed as soluble histidine-tagged bacterial fusions. Antigenicity during natural infection was evaluated by detecting specific antibodies using sera from individuals living in endemic areas of Brazil. A large proportion of infected individuals presented IgG antibodies to PvMSP-3α (68.2%) and at least 1 recombinant protein representing PvMSP-3β (79.1%). In spite of the large responder frequency, reactivity to both antigens was significantly lower than was observed for the immunodominant epitope present on the 19-kDa C-terminal region of PvMSP-1. Immunogenicity of the recombinant proteins was studied in mice in the absence or presence of different adjuvant formulations. PvMSP-3β, but not PvMSP-3α, induced a TLR4-independent humoral immune response in the absence of any adjuvant formulation. The immunogenicity of the recombinant antigens were also tested in formulations containing different adjuvants (Alum, Salmonella enterica flagellin, CpG, Quil A,TiterMax® and incomplete Freunds adjuvant) and combinations of two adjuvants (Alum plus flagellin, and CpG plus flagellin). Recombinant PvMSP-3α and PvMSP-3β elicited higher antibody titers capable of recognizing P. vivax-infected erythrocytes harvested from malaria patients. Our results confirm that P. vivax MSP-3 antigens are immunogenic during natural infection, and the corresponding recombinant proteins may be useful in elucidating their vaccine potential. PMID:23457498

  1. Antigenicity and Immunogenicity of Plasmodium vivax Merozoite Surface Protein-3

    PubMed Central

    Bitencourt, Amanda R.; Vicentin, Elaine C.; Jimenez, Maria C.; Ricci, Ricardo; Leite, Juliana A.; Costa, Fabio T.; Ferreira, Luis C.; Russell, Bruce; Nosten, François; Rénia, Laurent; Galinski, Mary R.; Barnwell, John W.; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.; Soares, Irene S.

    2013-01-01

    A recent clinical trial in African children demonstrated the potential utility of merozoite surface protein (MSP)-3 as a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria. The present study evaluated the use of Plasmodium vivax MSP-3 (PvMSP-3) as a target antigen in vaccine formulations against malaria caused by P. vivax. Recombinant proteins representing MSP-3α and MSP-3β of P. vivax were expressed as soluble histidine-tagged bacterial fusions. Antigenicity during natural infection was evaluated by detecting specific antibodies using sera from individuals living in endemic areas of Brazil. A large proportion of infected individuals presented IgG antibodies to PvMSP-3α (68.2%) and at least 1 recombinant protein representing PvMSP-3β (79.1%). In spite of the large responder frequency, reactivity to both antigens was significantly lower than was observed for the immunodominant epitope present on the 19-kDa C-terminal region of PvMSP-1. Immunogenicity of the recombinant proteins was studied in mice in the absence or presence of different adjuvant formulations. PvMSP-3β, but not PvMSP-3α, induced a TLR4-independent humoral immune response in the absence of any adjuvant formulation. The immunogenicity of the recombinant antigens were also tested in formulations containing different adjuvants (Alum, Salmonella enterica flagellin, CpG, Quil A,TiterMax® and incomplete Freunds adjuvant) and combinations of two adjuvants (Alum plus flagellin, and CpG plus flagellin). Recombinant PvMSP-3α and PvMSP-3β elicited higher antibody titers capable of recognizing P. vivax-infected erythrocytes harvested from malaria patients. Our results confirm that P. vivax MSP-3 antigens are immunogenic during natural infection, and the corresponding recombinant proteins may be useful in elucidating their vaccine potential. PMID:23457498

  2. CARbodies: Human Antibodies Against Cell Surface Tumor Antigens Selected From Repertoires Displayed on T Cell Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Sánchez-Martín, David; Compte, Marta; Nuñez-Prado, Natalia; Diaz, Rosa M; Vile, Richard; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2013-01-01

    A human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody library was expressed on the surface of human T cells after transduction with lentiviral vectors (LVs). The repertoire was fused to a first-generation T cell receptor ζ (TCRζ)-based chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). We used this library to isolate antibodies termed CARbodies that recognize antigens expressed on the tumor cell surface in a proof-of-principle system. After three rounds of activation-selection there was a clear repertoire restriction, with the emergence dominant clones. The CARbodies were purified from bacterial cultures as soluble and active proteins. Furthermore, to validate its potential application for adoptive cell therapy, human T cells were transduced with a LV encoding a second-generation costimulatory CAR (CARv2) bearing the selected CARbodies. Transduced human primary T cells expressed significant levels of the CARbodies-based CARv2 fusion protein on the cell surface, and importantly could be specifically activated, after stimulation with tumor cells. This approach is a promising tool for the generation of antibodies fully adapted to the display format (CAR) and the selection context (cell synapse), which could extend the scope of current adoptive cell therapy strategies with CAR-redirected T cells. PMID:23695536

  3. Bacterial surface antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies used to detect beer spoilage pediococci.

    PubMed

    Whiting, M S; Ingledew, W M; Lee, S Y; Ziola, B

    1999-08-01

    Fourteen monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) were isolated that react with surface antigens of Pediococcus beer spoilage organisms, including P. damnosus, P. pentosaceous, P. acidilactici, and unspeciated isolates. Immunoblotting, enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) of protease- and neuraminidase-treated surface antigen extracts, carbohydrate competition EIAs, and cardiolipin EIAs were used to characterize the bacterial antigens involved in Mab binding. Antigen stability in situ was tested by protease treatment or surface antigen extraction of washed bacteria. In most cases, the Mabs bind to Pediococcus surface antigens that appear to be covalently bound cell wall polymers resistant to alteration or removal from the bacterial surface. These bacterial surface antigen reactive Mabs show good potential for rapid, sensitive, and specific immunoassay detection of Pediococcus beer spoilage organisms.

  4. Surface Polysaccharide Mutants Reveal that Absence of O Antigen Reduces Biofilm Formation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Hathroubi, S.; Hancock, M. A.; Langford, P. R.; Tremblay, Y. D. N.; Labrie, J.

    2015-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium belonging to the Pasteurellaceae family and the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, a highly contagious lung disease causing important economic losses. Surface polysaccharides, including lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and capsular polysaccharides (CPS), are implicated in the adhesion and virulence of A. pleuropneumoniae, but their role in biofilm formation is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the requirement for these surface polysaccharides in biofilm formation by A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1. Well-characterized mutants were used: an O-antigen LPS mutant, a truncated core LPS mutant with an intact O antigen, a capsule mutant, and a poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PGA) mutant. We compared the amount of biofilm produced by the parental strain and the isogenic mutants using static and dynamic systems. Compared to the findings for the biofilm of the parental or other strains, the biofilm of the O antigen and the PGA mutants was dramatically reduced, and it had less cell-associated PGA. Real-time PCR analyses revealed a significant reduction in the level of pgaA, cpxR, and cpxA mRNA in the biofilm cells of the O-antigen mutant compared to that in the biofilm cells of the parental strain. Specific binding between PGA and LPS was consistently detected by surface plasmon resonance, but the lack of O antigen did not abolish these interactions. In conclusion, the absence of the O antigen reduces the ability of A. pleuropneumoniae to form a biofilm, and this is associated with the reduced expression and production of PGA. PMID:26483403

  5. Surface Polysaccharide Mutants Reveal that Absence of O Antigen Reduces Biofilm Formation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Hathroubi, S; Hancock, M A; Bossé, J T; Langford, P R; Tremblay, Y D N; Labrie, J; Jacques, M

    2016-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium belonging to the Pasteurellaceae family and the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, a highly contagious lung disease causing important economic losses. Surface polysaccharides, including lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and capsular polysaccharides (CPS), are implicated in the adhesion and virulence of A. pleuropneumoniae, but their role in biofilm formation is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the requirement for these surface polysaccharides in biofilm formation by A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1. Well-characterized mutants were used: an O-antigen LPS mutant, a truncated core LPS mutant with an intact O antigen, a capsule mutant, and a poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PGA) mutant. We compared the amount of biofilm produced by the parental strain and the isogenic mutants using static and dynamic systems. Compared to the findings for the biofilm of the parental or other strains, the biofilm of the O antigen and the PGA mutants was dramatically reduced, and it had less cell-associated PGA. Real-time PCR analyses revealed a significant reduction in the level of pgaA, cpxR, and cpxA mRNA in the biofilm cells of the O-antigen mutant compared to that in the biofilm cells of the parental strain. Specific binding between PGA and LPS was consistently detected by surface plasmon resonance, but the lack of O antigen did not abolish these interactions. In conclusion, the absence of the O antigen reduces the ability of A. pleuropneumoniae to form a biofilm, and this is associated with the reduced expression and production of PGA. PMID:26483403

  6. Linearized hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis B core-related antigen in the natural history of chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Seto, W-K; Wong, D K-H; Fung, J; Huang, F-Y; Liu, K S-H; Lai, C-L; Yuen, M-F

    2014-11-01

    Changes in two novel HBV serological markers, linearized hepatitis B surface antigen (HQ-HBsAg) and hepatitis B core-related antigen (HBcrAg), in the natural history of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) have not been well characterized. Serum HQ-HBsAg and HBcrAg levels of 404 Asian treatment-naïve CHB patients were analysed in a cross-sectional manner. Patients were categorized into five groups: immune tolerant (IT group, n=52), immune clearance (IC group, n=105), hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-negative hepatitis (ENH group, n=97), HBeAg-negative quiescent group (ENQ group, n=95) and CHB with hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) seroclearance (SC group, n=55). HQ-HBsAg and HBcrAg were measured and correlated with HBV DNA, HBsAg, HBV genotype and clinical parameters. HQ-HBsAg showed good correlation with HBsAg, especially in the ENQ group (r=0.874, p<0.001). Correlation of HQ-HBsAg with HBV DNA was less prominent and weakest in the ENH group (r=0.268, p 0.008). HBcrAg correlated best with HBV DNA in the ENQ group (r=0.537, p<0.001). In the ENQ group, 42.1% of patients had undetectable HBcrAg; this subgroup of patients, when compared with those with detectable HBcrAg, had significantly lower median HBV DNA (3.17/4.48 log IU/mL, p<0.001) and HBsAg (5.05/5.96 log mIU/mL, p<0.001) levels. Forty per cent of the SC group patients had detectable HQ-HBsAg and/or HBcrAg up to 42 months after HBsAg seroclearance. When comparing anti-HBs positivity and median time after HBsAg seroclearance in the SC group with and without detectable HQ-HBsAg/HBcrAg, there was no significant difference (22.7% and 36.4%, respectively, p 0.284, and 76.5 and 93.2 months, respectively, p 0.245). HQ-HBsAg and HBcrAg showed unique patterns of distribution throughout the five disease phases of CHB, including high detectability rates after HBsAg seroclearance, opening up different possibilities for their applicability.

  7. Modulation of cell-surface antigens of a murine neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Akeson, R; Herschman, H R

    1974-01-01

    Antisera were produced in rabbits to morphologically differentiated cells from the C1300 murine neuroblastoma (i.e., cells in which process formation was induced by maintenance on serum-free medium for 5 days). These antisera reacted more strongly in the complement fixation reaction with such "differentiated" cells than with "undifferentiated" (nonprocess-bearing) neuroblastoma cells. Adsorption of the antisera with undifferentiated cells removed the reactivity to cells without processes, while the reactivity with serum-free cells which possess processes was retained. Indirect immunofluorescence studies confirmed the results obtained by complement fixation and demonstrated that antibodies to the surface antigens of process-bearing cells could be adsorbed by particulate preparations from brain but not liver, spleen, or kidney. This is the first description of neural-associated cell-surface changes that correlate with the morphological differentiation in culture of neuroblastoma cells.

  8. Characterization of antigen association with accessory cells: specific removal of processed antigens from the cell surface by phospholipases.

    PubMed Central

    Falo, L D; Haber, S I; Herrmann, S; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1987-01-01

    To characterize the basis for the cell surface association of processed antigen with the antigen-presenting cell (APC) we analyzed its sensitivity to enzymatic digestion. Antigen-exposed APC that are treated with phospholipase and then immediately fixed lose their ability to stimulate antigen-plus-Ia-specific T-T hybridomas. This effect is seen with highly purified phospholipase A2 and phospholipase C. In addition it is observed with three distinct antigens--ovalbumin, bovine insulin, and poly(LGlu56LLys35LPhe9) [(GluLysPhe)n]. The effect of phospholipases is highly specific. Identically treated APC are equivalent to controls in their ability to stimulate alloreactive hybridomas specific for precisely the same Ia molecule that is corecognized by antigen-plus-Ia-specific hybrids. Furthermore, the antigen-presenting function of enzyme-treated, fixed APC can be reconstituted by the addition of exogenous in vitro processed or "processing independent" antigens. In parallel studies 125I-labeled avidin was shown to specifically bind to APC that were previously exposed and allowed to process biotin-insulin. Biotin-insulin-exposed APC that are pretreated with phospholipase bind significantly less 125I-labeled avidin than do untreated, exposed APC. Identical enzyme treatment does not reduce the binding of avidin to a biotinylated antibody already bound to class II major histocompatibility complex molecules of APC. At least some of the biotin-insulin surface sites are immunologically relevant, because the presentation of processed biotin-insulin by fixed APC is blocked by avidin. This effect is specific. Avidin binding to biotin-insulin-exposed APC does not inhibit allospecific stimulation nor the presentation of unconjugated insulin. These studies demonstrate that phospholipase effectively removes processed cell surface antigen. PMID:3467371

  9. Antibodies to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Potentiate the Response of Human T Lymphocyte Clones to the Same Antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celis, Esteban; Chang, Tse Wen

    1984-04-01

    Human T-helper lymphocyte clones specific for hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) proliferate on stimulation with HBsAg in vitro. Antibodies specific for HBsAg, but no other antibodies, augment this proliferative response. In the presence of antibodies to HBsAg, the maximum response could be achieved at HBsAg concentrations that were 1 percent of those required in the absence of the antibodies. These findings suggest that antigen-specific antibodies exert regulatory controls on T cells that recognize the same antigens.

  10. Demonstration of a tumor-associated surface antigen in Marek's disease.

    PubMed

    Witter, R L; Stephens, E A; Sharma, J M; Nazerian, K

    1975-07-01

    Surface antigenic markers were detected on three classes of Marek's disease (MD) tumor cells, i.e., MD lymphoma cells, cultured cells of the MSB-1 lymphoblastoid cell line, and JMV lymphoblastic leukemia cells, by indirect membrane immunofluorescent staining with serum from chickens immunized with JMV cells or from rabbits immunized with MSB-1 cells. This surface antigen was not detected on normal chicken lymphocytes, RPL-16 tumor cells (tranedormed by an avian RNA virus, or MD virus-infected fibroblasts that were positive for viral membrane antigen (MA). Furthermore, the surface antigen appeared unrelated to embryonic or histocompatibility antigens. This antigen is provisionally designated as a Marek's disease tumor-associated surface antigen (MATSA). The MATSA's on JMV, MSB-1 and MD lymphoma cells were related but not identical as demonstrated by antiserum titration, absorption and blocking tests with homologous and heterologous systems.

  11. Cell surface origin of antigens shed by Leishmania donovani during growth in axenic culture.

    PubMed Central

    Kaneshiro, E S; Gottlieb, M; Dwyer, D M

    1982-01-01

    Antisera against isolated cell surface preparations (PCSP-As) of Leishmania donovani promastigotes were used to detect extracellular antigens produced during the growth of these organisms in four different growth media. The PCSP-As precipitated two major antigenically identical but electrophoretically distinct components, in addition to several minor antigens. Immunoelectrophoretic studies employing PCSP-As, PCSP-As absorbed with intact, live promastigotes, and PCSP-As absorbed with a major extracellular antigen demonstrated the antigenic identity between the major extracellular antigens and two major components externally disposed at the surface of promastigotes. Growth curve kinetic investigations suggested that the major extracellular antigens did not appear in the growth media primarily as a result of cell lysis or damage. The carbohydrate nature of the major extracellular antigens was indicated by physicochemical characterization. Images PMID:7118250

  12. Stable isotope labeling of oligosaccharide cell surface antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, C.J.; Silks, L.A. III; Martinez, R.A.

    1998-12-31

    The overall goal of this Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project was to develop new methods for synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled oligosaccharides that are required for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of their solution conformation. Oligosaccharides are components of the cell`s outer surface and are involved in important processes such as cell-cell recognition and adhesion. Recently, Danishefsky and coworkers at Slone-Kettering Cancer Center developed a method for the solid-phase chemical synthesis of oligosaccharides. The specific goal of this LDRD project was to prepare uniform {sup 13}C-labeled aldohexose precursors required for the solid-phase synthesis of the Lewis blood-group antigenic determinants. We report the synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled D-glucal, D-galactal and Fucosyl precursors. We have been collaborating with the Danishefsky group on the synthesis of the Lewis oligosaccharides and the NMR analysis of their solution conformation.

  13. Ontogeny of pig discrete Peyer's patches: expression of surface antigens.

    PubMed

    Makala, L H; Kamada, T; Nagasawa, H; Igarashi, I; Fujisaki, K; Suzuki, N; Mikami, T; Haverson, K; Bailey, M; Stokes, C R; Bland, P W

    2001-06-01

    Leukocyte populations present in the discrete Peyer's patches (PP) of the pig were characterized from birth (Day 0) to day 35 after birth by immunohistochemistry and image analysis. Immediately after birth, cell membrane expression of CD2 and CD3, major histocompatibilty complex (MHC) class 11 (both SLA (swine leukocyte antigen) -DQ+ and SLA-DR+), CD21, 74-22-15 and surface immunoglobulin (sIg) were all demonstrable. Computer assisted morphometric techniques were used to confirm the significant expansion of these cell populations from birth onwards. The distribution of the cell types was not random but suggested a preferential retention of cells at specific sites. This implies a degree of organization of immunological cells within the discrete PP, enhancing the potential to mount immune responses in the most efficient manner.

  14. Clonal evolution of myeloma cells leads to quantitative changes in immunoglobulin secretion and surface antigen expression.

    PubMed Central

    Leibson, P J; Loken, M R; Panem, S; Schreiber, H

    1979-01-01

    We report that a cloned population of tumor cells can rapidly produce variants that differ in their quantitative expression of surface proteins and in their rate of immunoglobulin secretion. A fresh clonal isolate of S107 myeloma cells possessing large amounts of surface IgA was continuously passaged in vitro for 2 years. During this period, fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis indicated the development of subpopulations possessing decreased amounts of surface IgA. Cells from these variant subpopulations were isolated by first using the cell sorter to enrich for cells with decreased amounts of surface IgA and then cloning the selected population in soft agar. The 50 sublines that were isolated showed heritable differences in their levels of surface IgA and H-2 antigens and in their rates of myeloma protein secretion. Sublines having either large amounts, intermediate amounts, or absence of surface IgA also had corresponding large amounts, intermediate amounts, or absence of myeloma protein secretion. In contrast, a decrease or loss of surface Ig did not correlate with a decrease or loss of viral envelope glycoprotein gp71 and H-2 antigens. The variants did not resemble the phenotypes of less-differentiated normal lymphocyte populations of the B-cell lineage. The isolation and characterization of these variants allows us to explore the mechanisms and pathways of tumor cell differentiation as well as to study the regulation and function of cell surface proteins. PMID:288078

  15. Clinical significance of serum carcinoembryonic antigen, carbohydrate antigen 19-9, and squamous cell carcinoma antigen levels in esophageal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kosugi, Shin-ichi; Nishimaki, Tadashi; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakagawa, Satoru; Ohashi, Manabu; Hatakeyama, Katsuyoshi

    2004-07-01

    Serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9, and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) antigen levels were assessed to determine if their levels are useful for staging esophageal cancer preoperatively and for predicting patient survival after esophagectomy. Hence their seropositivity was investigated for a correlation with resectability, clinicopathologic parameters of tumor progression, and treatment outcomes in patients with unresectable esophageal cancer ( n = 63) and those undergoing esophagectomy for resectable disease ( n = 267). Abnormal elevation of serum SCC antigen levels showed a significant correlation with resectability ( p< 0.0001), depth of tumor invasion ( p < 0.0001), lymph node status ( p = 0.0015), TNM stage ( p < 0.0001), lymphatic invasion ( p = 0.0019), blood vessel invasion ( p = 0.0079), and poor survival after esophagectomy ( p = 0.0061). A significant relation ( p = 0.0145) was found between elevated serum CEA levels and distant metastasis, whereas the seropositivity of CA 19-9 showed no association with resectability, tumor progression, or patient survival. These results indicate that abnormal elevation of serum SCC antigen is a useful predictor of advanced esophageal cancer associated with poor survival after esophagectomy.

  16. Bacterial surface antigens defined by monoclonal antibodies: the methanogens

    SciTech Connect

    Conway de Macario, E.; Macario, A.J.L.; Magarinos, M.C.; Jovell, R.J.; Kandler, O.

    1982-01-01

    The methanogens (MB) are unique microbes of great evolutionary interest with applications in biotechnology-bioengineerings and are important in digestive processes. Their cell-wall composition is distinctively different from that of Eubacteria, e.g. the Methanobacteriaceae possess the peptidoglycan pseudomurein rather than murein. The range of cell-wall compositions among MB and their evolutionary and functional significance is not well known. The authors undertook a systematic study of the MB's surface structure using monoclonal antibodies through the following steps: (1) generation of hybridomas that produce antibody to several MB from 3 of their 4 families; (2) development of immunoenzymatic assays for MB's antigens and antibodies; (3) determination of the fine specificity of monoclonal antibodies by inhibition-blocking tests using cell-wall extracts and compounds of known structure; thus a set of monoclonal probes of predetermined specificity was assembled; and (4) resolution of surface determinants of MB representative of the Methanobacteriaceae using the monoclonal probes. Specific markers of MB strains were characterized. Two epitopes were identified within the pseudomurein molecule.

  17. Relationship between prostate-specific antigen levels and ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohwaki, Kazuhiro; Endo, Fumiyasu; Hattori, Kazunori; Muraishi, Osamu

    2014-07-01

    We examined the association between prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and daily mean ambient temperature on the day of the test in healthy men who had three annual checkups. We investigated 9,694 men who visited a hospital for routine health checkups in 2007, 2008, and 2009. Although the means and medians of ambient temperature for the three years were similar, the mode in 2008 (15.8 °C) was very different from those in 2007 and 2009 (22.4 °C and 23.2 °C). After controlling for age, body mass index, and hematocrit, a multiple regression analysis revealed a U-shaped relationship between ambient temperature and PSA in 2007 and 2009 ( P < 0.001 and P = 0.004, respectively), but not in 2008 ( P = 0.779). In 2007, PSA was 13.5 % higher at 5 °C and 10.0 % higher at 30 °C than that at 18.4 °C (nadir). In 2009, PSA was 7.3 % higher at 5 °C and 6.8 % at 30 °C compared with the level at 17.7 °C (nadir). In logistic regression analysis, a U-shaped relationship was found for the prevalence of a higher PSA (> 2.5 ng/mL) by ambient temperature, with the lowest likelihood of having a high PSA at 17.8 °C in 2007 ( P = 0.038) and 15.5 °C in 2009 ( P = 0.033). When tested at 30 °C, there was a 57 % excess risk of having a high PSA in 2007 and a 61 % higher risk in 2009 compared with those at each nadir temperature. We found a U-shaped relationship between PSA and ambient temperature with the lowest level of PSA at 15-20 °C.

  18. Clinical significance of hepatitis B surface antigen mutants

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Nicola; Onorato, Lorenzo; Minichini, Carmine; Di Caprio, Giovanni; Starace, Mario; Sagnelli, Caterina; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major public health problem in many countries, with nearly 300 million people worldwide carrying HBV chronic infection and over 1 million deaths per year due to cirrhosis and liver cancer. Several hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) mutations have been described, most frequently due to a single amino acid substitution and seldom to a nucleotide deletion. The majority of mutations are located in the S region, but they have also been found in the pre-S1 and pre-S2 regions. Single amino acid substitutions in the major hydrophilic region of HBsAg, called the “a” determinant, have been associated with immune escape and the consequent failure of HBV vaccination and HBsAg detection, whereas deletions in the pre-S1 or pre-S2 regions have been associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. This review article will focus on the HBsAg mutants and their biological and clinical implications. PMID:26644816

  19. Antigenic characterization of dimorphic surface protein in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Matsuba, Takashi; Siddiqi, Umme Ruman; Hattori, Toshio; Nakajima, Chie; Fujii, Jun; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2016-05-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv0679c protein is a surface protein that contributes to host cell invasion. We previously showed that a single nucleotide transition of the Rv0679c gene leads to a single amino acid substitution from asparagine to lysine at codon 142 in the Beijing genotype family. In this study, we examined the immunological effect of this substitution. Several recombinant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium smegmatis and characterized with antisera and two monoclonal antibodies named 5D4-C2 and 8G10-H2. A significant reduction of antibody binding was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western blot analysis in the Lys142-type protein. This reduction of 8G10-H2 binding was more significant, with the disappearance of a signal in the proteins expressed by recombinant mycobacteria in western blot analysis. In addition, epitope mapping analysis of the recombinant proteins showed a linear epitope by 5D4-C2 and a discontinuous epitope by 8G10-H2. The antibody recognizing the conformational epitope detected only mycobacterial Asn142-type recombinant protein. Our results suggest that a single amino acid substitution of Rv0679c has potency for antigenic change in Beijing genotype strains. PMID:27190237

  20. The MDCK epithelial cell line expresses a cell surface antigen of the kidney distal tubule

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were prepared against the Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line to identify epithelial cell surface macromolecules involved in renal function. Lymphocyte hybrids were generated by fusing P3U-1 myeloma cells with spleen cells from a C3H mouse immunized with MDCK cells. Hybridomas secreting anti-MDCK antibodies were obtained and clonal lines isolated in soft agarose. We are reporting on one hybridoma line that secretes a monoclonal antibody that binds to MDCK cells at levels 20-fold greater than background binding. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy was utilized to study the distribution of antibody binding on MDCK cells and on frozen sections of dog kidney and several nonrenal tissues. In the kidney the fluorescence staining pattern demonstrates that the antibody recognizes an antigenic determinant that is expressed only on the epithelial cells of the thick ascending limb of Henle's loops and the distal convoluted tubule and appears to be localized on the basolateral plasma membrane. This antigen also has a unique distribution in non-renal tissues and can only be detected on cells known to be active in transepithelial ion movements. These results indicate the probable distal tubule origin of MDCK and suggest that the monoclonal antibody recognizes a cell surface antigen involved in physiological functions unique to the kidney distal tubule and transporting epithelia of nonrenal tissues. PMID:6178742

  1. Construction and Screening of Antigen Targeted Immune Yeast Surface Display Antibody Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Keith D.; Pefaur, Noah B.; Baird, Cheryl L.

    2008-07-01

    These protocols describe a yeast surface display-based process for the rapid selection of antibodies from immunized mice, eliminating the need for creating and screening hybridoma fusions. A yeast surface display library of single-chain antibody fragments (scFvs) is created from antigen-binding B cells from the splenocytes of immunized mice. The antigen targeted library is then screened for antigen specific scFv by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Library construction and screening can be accomplished in as little as 2 weeks resulting in a panel of scFvs specific for the target antigen.

  2. Construction and Screening of Antigen Targeted Immune Yeast Surface Display Antibody Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Keith D.; Pefaur, Noah B.; Baird, Cheryl L.

    2009-08-02

    These protocols describe a yeast surface display-based process for the rapid selection of antibodies from immunized mice, eliminating the need for creating and screening hybridoma fusions. A yeast surface display library of single-chain antibody fragments (scFvs) is created from antigen-binding B cells from the splenocytes of immunized mice. The antigen targeted library is then screened for antigen specific scFv by magneticactivated cell sorting (MACS) and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Library construction and screening can be accomplished in as little as 2 weeks, resulting in a panel of scFvs specific for the target antigen.

  3. Surface antigens of melanoma and melanocytes. Specificity of induction of Ia antigens by human gamma-interferon

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    IFN-gamma is known to induce expression of Ia antigens on a variety of cell types. In the present study, this activity of IFN-gamma has been analyzed with a panel of 36 melanoma cell lines, normal melanocytes, and 97 cell lines representing a range of other differentiation lineages. 55% of the melanoma cell lines express Ia antigens in a constitutive manner without IFN-gamma induction. Of the 16 Ia-melanoma lines, 13 could be induced to express Ia antigens by IFN-gamma, whereas three were noninducible. Melanocytes, which do not normally express Ia antigens, are converted to Ia expression by IFN-gamma. Ia antigens expressed constitutively or after IFN-gamma induction were identified with antibodies detecting monomorphic and allomorphic products of DR and DC loci. IFN-gamma appeared to be unique in its ability to induce Ia expression on melanoma and melanocytes; 14 other agents (including IFN-alpha and IFN-beta) known to influence growth or differentiation did not have Ia-inducing activity. Equally striking is the restriction of antigenic changes following IFN-gamma induction to HLA-associated products; of the 38 systems of cell surface antigens examined, only HLA- A,B,C, beta 2m, and Ia antigens were affected. A variety of other Ia- cell types were shown to be Ia-inducible by IFN-gamma; these included established lines of breast, colon, pancreas, bladder, kidney, ovary, and brain cancers, and cultures of normal fibroblasts, kidney epithelia, and epidermal keratinocytes. In contrast, three tumor types, teratocarcinoma, choriocarcinoma, and neuroblastoma, were not inducible for Ia expression, even though IFN-gamma could induce expression of HLA- A,B,C products. The broad representation of Ia antigens on most somatic cell types expressed either constitutively or after IFN-gamma can be viewed in an immunological context (antigen presentation/immune regulatory signals) or could indicate that Ia products have functions other than those related to immune reactions. PMID

  4. COMMON CELL SURFACE ANTIGEN ASSOCIATED WITH MAMMALIAN C-TYPE RNA VIRUSES

    PubMed Central

    Yoshiki, Takashi; Mellors, Robert C.; Hardy, William D.; Fleissner, Erwin

    1974-01-01

    The indirect membrane immunofluorescence test and the absorption analysis of rabbit anti-FeLV, rabbit anti-FeLVp 30, and rabbit anti-MuLVp 30 antisera yielded the following conclusions. An antigen shared by mammalian (murine and feline) C-type RNA leukemia and sarcoma viruses was detected on the surface of cells infected or transformed by C-type viruses. The antigen was characterized as membrane-bound gs antigen bearing two determinants, membrane-bound gs-1, intraspecies-specific antigenic determinant, and membrane-bound gs-3, interspecies-specific antigenic determinant. Membrane-bound gs antigen was located on the cell surface, frequently near the site of virus budding but not on the envelope of murine C-type RNA virus. PMID:4131513

  5. Surface antigen expression and complement susceptibility of differentiated neuroblastoma clones.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; Caragine, T; Cheung, N K; Tomlinson, S

    2000-03-01

    Human neuroblastoma cell lines typically consist of heterogenous subpopulations of cells that are morphologically and biochemically distinct. The cell types are characterized as neuroblastic (N-type), substrate-adherent Schwann-like (S-type), or intermediate (I). These cell types can undergo spontaneous or induced transdifferentiation in vitro. We investigated the complement sensitivity of different neuroblastoma cell lines and of matched sets of cloned N- and S-type neuroblastoma cell lines. Human neuroblastoma cell lines that consisted predominantly of a neuroblastic phenotype were shown to be significantly more susceptible to human complement-mediated lysis than cell lines of other cancer types. Complement sensitivity of neuroblastoma cell lines was correlated with low levels of CD59, decay-accelerating factor, and membrane cofactor protein expression. We found that cloned S-type neuroblastoma cells were much more resistant to complement-mediated lysis than cloned N-type cells. The increased complement resistance of S-type cells was shown to be due to increased expression of membrane-bound complement inhibitors. CD59 was the single most important protein in providing S-type cells with protection from complement lysis. S-type cells were also found to express lower levels of GD2, a target antigen for a complement activating monoclonal antibody currently in clinical trials for neuroblastoma immunotherapy. The ability of S-type cells to evade complement, and the ability of S-type cells to differentiate into the more tumorigenic N-type cells, may represent a mechanism of tumor survival and regrowth, a phenomenon often observed with this cancer.

  6. Antigen heterogeneity among isolates of Mycoplasma bovis is generated by high-frequency variation of diverse membrane surface proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Rosengarten, R; Behrens, A; Stetefeld, A; Heller, M; Ahrens, M; Sachse, K; Yogev, D; Kirchhoff, H

    1994-01-01

    The protein and antigen profiles of 11 isolates of Mycoplasma bovis were compared by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblot analysis of whole organisms. The isolates examined included the type strain PG45 and 10 other filter-cloned strains or purified isolates both from animals without clinical signs and from clinical cases of bovine mastitis, arthritis, or pneumonia. While the overall protein patterns visualized by silver staining were very similar, marked differences in the antigen banding profiles were detected by rabbit antiserum prepared against whole organisms from one of the strains analyzed. This antigenic heterogeneity was shown to be independent of the geographical origin, the type of clinical disease, and the site of isolation and was also observed among serial isolates from a single animal. Antigen profiles were further monitored throughout sequentially subcloned populations of the PG45 strain. This clonal analysis revealed a high-frequency variation in the expression levels of several prominent antigens. All of these variable antigens were defined by detergent-phase fractionation with Triton X-114 as amphiphilic integral membrane proteins. A subset of different-sized membrane proteins was identified by a monoclonal antibody raised against a PG45 subclone expressing a 63- and a 46-kDa variant antigen within that set. The selective susceptibility of these proteins to trypsin treatment of intact organisms and their ability to bind the monoclonal antibody in colony immunoblots demonstrated that they were exposed on the cell surface. In addition, their preferential recognition by serum antibodies from individual cattle with naturally induced M. bovis mastitis or arthritis confirmed that they were major immunogens of this organism. These studies establish that the apparent antigenic heterogeneity among M. bovis isolates reported here does not represent stable phenotypic strain differences generated from accumulated

  7. Characterization of human sperm surface antigens with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Wolf, D P; Sokoloski, J E; Dandekar, P; Bechtol, K B

    1983-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (McAb) against human ejaculated sperm were developed from mice immunized with sperm membrane preparations. A solid-phase radioimmunoassay, with dried sperm as antigen, was employed in McAb screening. The tissue and species specificity of monoclonal antibodies HS 2, 4 and 6 were evaluated after absorption of antibody preparations with heterologous sperm, human serum or seminal plasma or cells from other human organs. The sensitivity of HS 2, 4 and 6 antigens to trypsin exposure was determined: HS 4 antigen was highly sensitive while HS 2 and 6 were not. The regional distribution of McAb 4 on intact sperm cells was determined by immunofluorescence staining. HS 4 may be a sperm-coating antigen based on its presence on sperm and in seminal plasma. This possibility led to an investigation of its role in sperm capacitation. HS 4 antibody binding was reduced when capacitated sperm were compared with noncapacitated cells. HS 4 antibody, when present during capacitation and insemination, was without effect on sperm motility or fusion with zona-free hamster eggs. Trypsin removal of as much as 60% of HS 4 antigen from the cell population also did not impact on sperm function. To identify the molecular correlate of HS 4 antigen, membrane components were extracted from washed sperm with Nonidet P-40, concentrated by acetone precipitation and analyzed electrophoretically in SDS-urea on 10% polyacrylamide slab gels. Immunoassays on protein blots with peroxidase-coupled second antibody identified a single reactive species in the molecular weight range of 130,000. Multiple reactive components were detected in blot transfers of seminal plasma.

  8. The preS1 antigen of hepatitis B virus is highly immunogenic at the T cell level in man.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, C; Penna, A; Bertoletti, A; Cavalli, A; Valli, A; Schianchi, C; Fiaccadori, F

    1989-01-01

    14 hepatitis B vaccine recipients who showed high titers of anti-hepatitis B surface antibodies in serum after booster immunization with a polyvalent hepatitis B surface antigen vaccine that contained trace amounts of hepatitis B virus (HBV) preS1 and preS2 envelope antigens were studied for their in vitro T cell response to these antigens. All 14 subjects displayed a significant proliferative T cell response to the S/p25 envelope region encoded polypeptide; 8 also responded to preS1, while only 1 showed a significant level of T cell proliferation to preS2. Limiting dilution analysis demonstrated that the frequency of preS-specific T cells in two of these vaccine recipients was higher than that of S/p25-specific T cells. T cell cloning was then performed and a total of 29 HBV envelope antigen-reactive CD4+ cloned lines were generated from two preS-responsive vaccines. 21 of these lines were S/p25 specific, 7 preS1 specific, and 1 preS2 specific. Taken together, all these results suggest that the preS1 antigen may function as a strong T cell immunogen in man. PMID:2529268

  9. Expression of hepatitis B surface antigen in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris using the GAP promoter.

    PubMed

    Vassileva, A; Chugh, D A; Swaminathan, S; Khanna, N

    2001-06-01

    High-level expression and efficient assembly of Hepatitis B surface Antigen (HBsAg) particles have been reported in Pichia pastoris by integrating a single copy of the HBsAg gene under the control of the alcohol oxidase (AOX1) promoter. However, the time taken to reach peak product concentration is usually very long ( approximately 240 h). In this paper, we describe the expression of HBsAg in P. pastoris using the recently described glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAP) promoter. Unlike the previously described AOX1 promoter based system (in which biomass is generated first followed by methanol-induced antigen production), biomass generation and antigen production occur simultaneously in medium containing glycerol or glucose. Maximal levels of HBsAg expression in case of the single copy AOX1 integrant (attained after 6 days of induction) exceeded the levels of antigen produced by the single copy GAP integrant. However, this was offset by continuous antigen production by the GAP clone. In an attempt to further enhance antigen production levels of the GAP clones, we isolated multicopy Pichia integrants containing up to four copies of the GAP promoter-driven constitutive expression cassette using the Zeocin screening procedure. The data demonstrated a direct correlation between the gene dosage and the levels of HBsAg expressed by the GAP clones. The effect of copy number was additive and the four copy clone resulted in about four-fold higher yield of HBsAg. The majority of HBsAg produced in the constitutive expression system was found to be of particulate form, based on sedimentation behaviour and particle-specific ELISA, suggesting that it has the potential to serve as an effective immunogen. These particles were sensitive to thiol reagents. We also explored the possibility of secreting the GAP expressed HBsAg in P. pastoris. In-frame fusion of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha-factor secretion signal under the constitutive GAP promoter resulted in

  10. Antibodies to dendritic neuronal surface antigens in opsoclonus myoclonus ataxia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Panzer, Jessica A; Anand, Ronan; Dalmau, Josep; Lynch, David R

    2015-09-15

    Opsoclonus myoclonus ataxia syndrome (OMAS) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by rapid, random, conjugate eye movements (opsoclonus), myoclonus, and ataxia. Given these symptoms, autoantibodies targeting the cerebellum or brainstem could mediate the disease or be markers of autoimmunity. In a subset of patients with OMAS, we identified such autoantibodies, which bind to non-synaptic puncta on the surface of live cultured cerebellar and brainstem neuronal dendrites. These findings implicate autoimmunity to a neuronal surface antigen in the pathophysiology of OMAS. Identification of the targeted antigen(s) could elucidate the mechanisms underlying OMAS and provide a biomarker for diagnosis and response to therapy.

  11. Antigenic specificity of the 72-kilodalton major surface glycoprotein of Leishmania braziliensis braziliensis.

    PubMed Central

    Kutner, S; Pellerin, P; Breniere, S F; Desjeux, P; Dedet, J P

    1991-01-01

    We examined the expression and the antigenicity of the major surface polypeptides of Leishmania braziliensis braziliensis and Leishmania donovani chagasi, parasites which commonly coexist in the same endemic areas of Bolivia. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis protein profiles from surface-iodinated promastigotes showed the presence of a unique iodinatable polypeptide of 72 kDa on the L. b. braziliensis surface and of two major components of 65 and 50 kDa exposed at the surface of L. d. chagasi. Comparison of the peptide digestion profiles of the major iodinated polypeptides of both strains showed no similarity between the maps of the 72- and the 65-kDa polypeptides of L. b. braziliensis and L. d. chagasi, respectively. Immunoprecipitation of surface-labeled L. b. braziliensis Nonidet P-40 extracts with 35 serum specimens obtained from Bolivian patients with cutaneous and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis showed that all serum specimens recognized predominantly the 72-kDa antigen and high-molecular-mass proteins in some cases. The recognition patterns were independent of the geographical origin of the patient, the type of lesion, and the serum antibody titer. Serum specimens from children with visceral leishmaniasis did not precipitate the L. b. braziliensis 72-kDa antigen. Hamster hyperimmune serum against L. b. braziliensis also recognized the 72-kDa surface antigen. However, this recognition was inhibited in the presence of the homologous nonlabeled antigen but not in the presence of heterologous (L. d. chagasi and Trypanosoma cruzi) antigens. The specific recognition of 72-kDa surface antigen in both natural and experimental L. b. braziliensis infections suggests that this antigen could be a good candidate for use in the differential immunodiagnosis and prognosis of the disease. Images PMID:2037677

  12. Improved Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Surface Antigen by a New Rapid Automated Assay

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Bernard; Bayer, Anja; Kirch, Peter; Schlüter, Volker; Schlieper, Dietmar; Melchior, Walter

    1999-01-01

    The performance of hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen (HBsAg) screening assays is continuously improved in order to reduce the residual risk of transfusion-associated hepatitis B. In a multicenter study, a new automated rapid screening assay, Elecsys HBsAg (Roche Diagnostics), was compared to well-established tests (Auszyme Monoclonal [overnight incubation] version B and IMx HBsAg [Abbott]). Included in the evaluation were 23 seroconversion panels; sera from the acute and chronic phases of infection; dilution series of various HBsAg standards, HBV subtypes, and S gene mutants; and isolated anti-HBV core antigen-positive samples. To challenge the specificity of the new assay, sera from HBsAg-negative blood donors, pregnant women, and dialysis and hospitalized patients and potentially cross-reactive samples were investigated. Elecsys HBsAg showed a higher sensitivity for HBsAg subtypes ad, ay, adw2, adw4, ayw1, ayw2, ayw4, and adr detection in dilution series of different standards or sera than Auszyme Monoclonal version B and/or IMx HBsAg. Acute hepatitis B was detected in 11 to 16 of 23 seroconversion panels between 2 and 16 days earlier with Elecsys HBsAg than with the alternative assays. Elecsys HBsAg and Auszyme Monoclonal version B detected HBsAg surface mutants with equal sensitivity. The sensitivity and specificity of Elecsys HBsAg were 100%. Auszyme Monoclonal version B had a 99.9% specificity, and its sensitivity was 96.6%. IMx HBsAg showed a poorer sensitivity and specificity than the other assays. In conclusion, Elecsys HBsAg permits earlier detection of acute hepatitis B and different HBV subtypes than the alternative assays. By using highly sensitive HBsAg screening assays, low-level HBsAg carriers among isolated anti-HBV core antigen-positive individuals can be detected. PMID:10405414

  13. Gold Nanoparticle Based Activatable Probe for Sensing Ultra-Low Levels of Prostate Specific Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dingbin; Huang, Xinglu; Wang, Zhantong; Jin, Albert; Sun, Xiaolian; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Fu; Ma, Ying; Niu, Gang; HightWalker, Angela R.; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-01-01

    It is still in high demand to develop extremely sensitive and accurate clinical tools for biomarkers of interest for early diagnosis and monitoring of diseases. In this report, we present a highly sensitive and compatible gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-based fluorescence activatable probe for sensing ultra-low levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in patient serum samples. The limit of detection of the newly-developed probe for PSA was pushed down to 0.032 pg/mL, which is more than two orders of magnitude lower than that of the conventional fluorescence probe. The ultrahigh sensitivity of this probe was attributed to the high loading efficiency of the dyes on AuNP surfaces and high fluorescence quenching unquenching abilities of the dye-AuNP pairs. The efficiency and robustness of this probe was investigated in patient serum samples, demonstrating the great potential of this probe in real-world applications. PMID:23683064

  14. Inhibition of immune opsonin-independent phagocytosis by antibody to a pulmonary macrophage cell surface antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Parod, R.J.; Godleski, J.J.; Brain J.D.

    1986-03-15

    Unlike other hamster phagoycytes, hamster pulmonary macrophages (PM) avidly ingest albumin-coated latex particles in the absence of serum. They also possess a highly specific cell surface antigen. To evaluate the relationship between these two characteristics, PM were incubated with mouse monoclonal antibody directed against the PM antigen. After unbound antibody was removed, the amount of bound antibody and the phagocytic capability of PM were measured by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Maximum antibody binding produced a 25% inhibition of ingestion. Particle attachment was not affected. This effect was antigen specific, since neither a nonspecific mouse myeloma protein of the same subclass nor a mouse antibody that bound to another hamster surface antigen had any effect on binding or ingestion. If antigen-specific F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments were introduced both before and during the period of phagocytosis, the inhibition of particle ingestion approached 100%. Particle binding increased at low F(ab')/sub 2/ concentrations but declined at higher concentrations. Because calcium may play a role in the ingestion process, the effect of antibody on /sup 45/Ca uptake was evaluated. It was observed that antigen-specific F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments stimulated /sup 45/Ca uptake, whereas control antibodies did not. These results suggest that the antigen reacting with the anti-hamster PM monoclonal antibody is involved in immune opsonin-independent phagocytosis and that calcium participates in this phagocytic process.

  15. Production of immunologically active surface antigens of hepatitis B virus by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    MacKay, P; Pasek, M; Magazin, M; Kovacic, R T; Allet, B; Stahl, S; Gilbert, W; Schaller, H; Bruce, S A; Murray, K

    1981-01-01

    Several plasmids have been constructed which direct the synthesis of hepatitis B virus surface antigens in Escherichia coli either as the native polypeptide or fused to other plasmid encoded polypeptides. When injected into rabbits, extracts from bacteria carrying some of these plasmids induced the synthesis of antibodies to the antigens even though the extracts did not give satisfactory positive results in radioimmunoassay for them. Either the NH2-terminal segment or the COOH-terminal segment of the surface antigens alone was sufficient to elicit the immune response, but antibodies against the two segments showed different specificities. The results emphasize the value of an in vivo assay for the presence of antigens in crude cell extracts and illustrate the feasibility of this type of screening with laboratory animals. PMID:6170067

  16. Bacterial cell surface display for epitope mapping of hepatitis C virus core antigen.

    PubMed

    Kang, Su-Min; Rhee, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Eui-Joong; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Oh, Jong-Won

    2003-09-26

    Cell surface expression of protein has been widely used to display enzymes and antigens. Here we show that Pseudomonas syringae ice nucleation protein with a deletion of internal repeating domain (INC) can be used in Escherichia coli to display peptide in a conformationally active form on the outside of the folded protein by fusing to the C-terminus of INC. Diagnostic potential of this technology was demonstrated by effective mapping of antigenic epitopes derived from hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein. Amino acids 1-38 and 26-53 of HCV core protein were found to react more sensitively in a native conformation with the HCV patient sera than commercial diagnostic antigen, c22p (amino acids 10-53) by display-ELISA. These results demonstrate that the bacterial cell surface display using INC is useful for peptide presentation and thus epitope mapping of antigen. PMID:14553932

  17. The use of marsupial x eutherian somatic cell hybrids to study marsupial cell surface antigens.

    PubMed

    Sykes, P J; Hope, R M

    1978-12-01

    Buck and Bodmer (1976) have developed a technique for identifying an antigen on the surface of human x mouse somatic cell hybrids, specified by a gene on a particular human chromosome. We have successfully adapted this technique to a study of marsupial cell surface antigens. Somatic cell hybrids between Macropus rufus (Marsupialia) lymphocytes and the mouse cell lines PG19 and 1R were injected intraperitoneally into mice of the same inbred strain from which the above cell lines were derived (C57B16J and C3H, respectively). The only identified M. rufus chromosome present in the hybrid cells was the X chromosome. The antisera, after adsorption with PG19 or 1R, were tested using indirect immunofluorescence, against the hybrid cells, and also against sub-clones (derived from hybrids) which had apparently lost the M. rufus X chromosome, or at least its long arm. The results of these tests showed that the absorbed antisera contained reactivity against an M. rufus cell surface antigen (or antigens). The reactions of one of the antisera were most simply interpreted by supposing that it was detecting an M. rufus X-lined antigen(s).

  18. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Holers, V.M.; Kotzin, B.L.

    1985-09-01

    The authors used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases.

  19. Mendelian and non-mendelian mutations affecting surface antigen expression in Paramecium tetraurelia

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, L.M.; Forney, J.D.

    1984-08-01

    A screening procedure was devised for the isolation of X-ray-induced mutations affecting the expression of the A immobilization antigen (i-antigen) in Paramecium tetraurelia. Two of the mutations isolated by this procedure proved to be in modifier genes. The two genes are unlinked to each other and unlinked to the structural A i-antigen gene. These are the first modifier genes identified in a Paramecium sp. that affect surface antigen expression. Another mutation was found to be a deletion of sequences just downstream from the A i-antigen gene. In cells carrying this mutation, the A i-antigen gene lies in close proximity to the end of a macronuclear chromosome. The expression of the A i-antigen is not affected in these cells, demonstrating that downstream sequences are not important for the regulation and expression of the A i-antigen gene. A stable cell line was also recovered which shows non-Mendelian inheritance of a macronuclear deletion of the A i-antigen gene. This mutant does not contain the gene in its macronucleus, but contains a complete copy of the gene in its micronucleus. In the cytoplasm of wild-type animals, the micronuclear gene is included in the developing macronucleus; in the cytoplasm of the mutant, the incorporation of the A i-antigen gene into the macronucleus is inhibited. This is the first evidence that a mechanism is available in ciliates to control the expression of a gene by regulating its incorporation into developing macronuclei.

  20. Studies on the surface coat of Paramecium aurelia. II. Relationship to the immobilization antigen.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, E

    1977-07-11

    Correlations between the presence of surface coat and immobilization antigen of Paramecium tetraurelia were studied. Supravital, partial removal of the surface coat resulted in accelerated response of monobacterially and axenically grown cells to the homologous antiserum. Ciliates pretreated with trypsin or pronase (0.5 mg/ml for 45 min at 0-4 degrees C) were immobilized approximately twice as fast as untreated control cells. The probable localization of at least part, of the immobilization antigen within the surface coat of P. tetraurelia is discussed.

  1. Production of highly concentrated, heat stable hepatitis B surface antigen in maize

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Celine A.; Egelkrout, Erin M.; Moscoso, Alessa M.; Enrique, Cristina; Keener, Todd K.; Jimenez-Flores, Rafael; Wong, Jeffrey C.; Howard, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Plant-based oral vaccines are a promising emergent technology that could help alleviate disease burden worldwide by providing a low-cost, heat stable, oral alternative to parenterally administered commercial vaccines. Here we describe high-level accumulation of the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) at a mean concentration of 0.51%TSP in maize T1 seeds using an improved version of the globulin1 promoter. This concentration is more than four-fold higher than any previously reported lines. HBsAg expressed in maize seeds was extremely heat stable, tolerating temperatures up to 55°C for one month without degradation. Optimal heat stability was achieved after oil extraction of ground maize material, either by supercritical fluid extraction or hexane treatment. The contributions of this material towards the development of a practical oral vaccine delivery system are discussed. PMID:22816734

  2. Epidemiological analysis of the significance of low-positive test results for antibody to hepatitis B surface and core antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Hadler, S C; Murphy, B L; Schable, C A; Heyward, W L; Francis, D P; Kane, M A

    1984-01-01

    To determine the significance of certain serological test results commonly encountered in hepatitis B virus testing, we reviewed serological test data from nine studies of hepatitis B conducted between 1980 and 1982. Three tests, for hepatitis B surface antigen and for antibodies to hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBs and anti-HBc), were used to measure hepatitis B virus infection risk in various populations. Two results, low levels of anti-HBs alone and low levels of anti-HBc alone, occurred at constant frequencies (2.72 and 0.4%, respectively), regardless of the prevalence of HBV infection in the population. Positivity for low levels of anti-HBs alone persisted for 1 year in less than one-half of those studied; in addition, response to hepatitis B virus vaccine was augmented in only one-third of this group. Positivity for low levels of anti-HBc alone did not persist in any of 11 persons studied. These findings indicate that presently available tests for anti-HBs and anti-HBc at low levels are often nonspecific and should be interpreted with caution. PMID:6715519

  3. Research progress on surface antigen 1 (SAG1) of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasitic protozoan that has a wide host range and causes a zoonotic parasitosis called toxoplasmosis. This infection causes significant morbidity, costs for care and loss of productivity and suffering. The most effective measures to minimize this parasite’s harm to patients are prompt diagnosis and treatment and preventing infection. A parasite surface antigen, SAG1, is considered an important antigen for the development of effective diagnostic tests or subunit vaccines. This review covers several aspects of this antigen, including its gene structure, contribution to host invasion, mechanisms of the immune responses and its applications for diagnosis and vaccine development. This significant progress on this antigen provides foundations for further development of more effective and precise approaches to diagnose toxoplasmosis in the clinic, and also have important implications for exploring novel measures to control toxoplasmosis in the near future. PMID:24726014

  4. Performance evaluation of new automated hepatitis B viral markers in the clinical laboratory: two quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen assays and an HBV core-related antigen assay.

    PubMed

    Park, Yongjung; Hong, Duck Jin; Shin, Saeam; Cho, Yonggeun; Kim, Hyon-Suk

    2012-05-01

    We evaluated quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen (qHBsAg) assays and a hepatitis B virus (HBV) core-related antigen (HBcrAg) assay. A total of 529 serum samples from patients with hepatitis B were tested. HBsAg levels were determined by using the Elecsys (Roche Diagnostics, Indianapolis, IN) and Architect (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL) qHBsAg assays. HBcrAg was measured by using Lumipulse HBcrAg assay (Fujirebio, Tokyo, Japan). Serum aminotransferases and HBV DNA were respectively quantified by using the Hitachi 7600 analyzer (Hitachi High-Technologies, Tokyo, Japan) and the Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan test (Roche). Precision of the qHBsAg and HBcrAg assays was assessed, and linearity of the qHBsAg assays was verified. All assays showed good precision performance with coefficients of variation between 4.5% and 5.3% except for some levels. Both qHBsAg assays showed linearity from 0.1 to 12,000.0 IU/mL and correlated well (r = 0.9934). HBsAg levels correlated with HBV DNA (r = 0.3373) and with HBcrAg (r = 0.5164), and HBcrAg also correlated with HBV DNA (r = 0.5198; P < .0001). This observation could provide impetus for further research to elucidate the clinical usefulness of the qHBsAg and HBcrAg assays.

  5. Unique lipid anchor attaches Vi antigen capsule to the surface of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    PubMed

    Liston, Sean D; Ovchinnikova, Olga G; Whitfield, Chris

    2016-06-14

    Polysaccharide capsules are surface structures that are critical for the virulence of many Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi is the etiological agent of typhoid fever. It produces a capsular polysaccharide known as "Vi antigen," which is composed of nonstoichiometrically O-acetylated α-1,4-linked N-acetylgalactosaminuronic acid residues. This glycan is a component of currently available vaccines. The genetic locus for Vi antigen production is also present in soil bacteria belonging to the genus Achromobacter Vi antigen assembly follows a widespread general strategy with a characteristic glycan export step involving an ATP-binding cassette transporter. However, Vi antigen producers lack the enzymes that build the conserved terminal glycolipid characterizing other capsules using this method. Achromobacter species possess a Vi antigen-specific depolymerase enzyme missing in S enterica Typhi, and we exploited this enzyme to isolate acylated Vi antigen termini. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed a reducing terminal N-acetylhexosamine residue modified with two β-hydroxyl acyl chains. This terminal structure resembles one half of lipid A, the hydrophobic portion of bacterial lipopolysaccharides. The VexE protein encoded in the Vi antigen biosynthesis locus shares similarity with LpxL, an acyltransferase from lipid A biosynthesis. In the absence of VexE, Vi antigen is produced, but its physical properties are altered, its export is impaired, and a Vi capsule structure is not assembled on the cell surface. The structure of the lipidated terminus dictates a unique assembly mechanism and has potential implications in pathogenesis and vaccine production. PMID:27226298

  6. Ultra-sensitive immunosensor for detection of hepatitis B surface antigen using multi-functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shourian, M; Ghourchian, H; Boutorabi, M

    2015-10-01

    The signal amplification for analytical purposes has considerable potential in detecting trace levels of analytes for clinical, security or environmental applications. In the present report a strategy based on a sandwich type immunoassay system was designed for the detection of hepatitis B surface antigen which exploits the specific affinity interaction between streptavidin and biotin recognition systems. The method involves the specific coupling of multi-functionalized gold nanoparticles (bearing biotin and luminol molecules) to the streptavidin modified by secondary antibody. The chemiluminescent signal is produced by the gold nanoparticles in the presence of HAuCl4 as catalyst and hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. The immunosensor was able to detect hepatitis B surface antigen in the linear concentration range from 1.7 to 1920 pg mL(-1) and the detection limit of 0.358 pg mL(-1), at signal/noise = 3.

  7. Computational antigenic epitope prediction by calculating electrostatic desolvation penalties of protein surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fiorucci, Sébastien; Zacharias, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The prediction of antigenic epitopes on the surface of proteins is of great importance for vaccine development and to specifically design recombinant antibodies. Computational methods based on the three-dimensional structure of the protein allow for the detection of noncontinuous epitopes in contrast to methods based on the primary amino-acid sequence only. A method recently developed to predict protein-protein binding sites is presented, and the application to predict putative antigenic epitopes is described in detail. The prediction approach is based on the local perturbation of the electrostatic field at the surface of a protein due to a neutral probe of low dielectric constant that represents an approaching binding partner. The calculated change in electrostatic energy corresponds to an energy penalty of desolvating a protein surface region, and antigenic epitope surface regions tend to be associated with a lower penalty compared to the average protein surface. The protocol to perform the calculations is described and illustrated on an example antigen, the outer surface protein A of Borrelia burgdorferi, a pathogenic organism causing lyme disease.

  8. The immune responses to bacterial antigens encountered in vivo at mucosal surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Dougan, G; Ghaem-Maghami, M; Pickard, D; Frankel, G; Douce, G; Clare, S; Dunstan, S; Simmons, C

    2000-01-01

    Mammals have evolved a sophisticated immune system for handling antigens encountered at their mucosal surfaces. The way in which mucosally delivered antigens are handled influences our ability to design effective mucosal vaccines. Live attenuated derivatives of pathogens are one route towards the development of mucosal vaccines. However, some molecules, described as mucosal immunogens, are inherently immunogenic at mucosal surfaces. Studies on mucosal immunogens may facilitate the identification of common characteristics that contribute to mucosal immunogenicity and aid the development of novel, non-living mucosal vaccines and immunostimulators. PMID:10874742

  9. Antibody responses to surface antigens of Plasmodium falciparum gametocyte-infected erythrocytes and their relation to gametocytaemia.

    PubMed

    Dinko, B; King, E; Targett, G A T; Sutherland, C J

    2016-06-01

    An essential element for continuing transmission of Plasmodium falciparum is the availability of mature gametocytes in human peripheral circulation for uptake by mosquitoes. Natural immune responses to circulating gametocytes may play a role in reducing transmission from humans to mosquitoes. Here, antibody recognition of the surface of mature intra-erythrocytic gametocytes produced either by a laboratory-adapted parasite, 3D7, or by a recent clinical isolate of Kenyan origin (HL1204), was evaluated longitudinally in a cohort of Ghanaian school children by flow cytometry. This showed that a proportion of children exhibited antibody responses that recognized gametocyte surface antigens on one or both parasite lines. A subset of the children maintained detectable anti-gametocyte surface antigen (GSA) antibody levels during the 5 week study period. There was indicative evidence that children with anti-GSA antibodies present at enrolment were less likely to have patent gametocytaemia at subsequent visits (odds ratio = 0·29, 95% CI 0·06-1·05; P = 0·034). Our data support the existence of antigens on the surface of gametocyte-infected erythrocytes, but further studies are needed to confirm whether antibodies against them reduce gametocyte carriage. The identification of GSA would allow their evaluation as potential anti-gametocyte vaccine candidates and/or biomarkers for gametocyte carriage. PMID:27084060

  10. Trypanosoma cruzi. Surface antigens of blood and culture forms

    SciTech Connect

    Nogueira, N.; Chaplan, S.; Tydings, J.D.; Unkeless, J.; Cohn, Z.

    1981-03-01

    The surface polypeptides of both cultured and blood forms of Trypanosoma cruzi were iodinated by the glucose oxidase-lactoperoxidase technique. Blood-form trypomastigotes (BFT) isolated form infected mice displayed a major 90,000-Mr component. In contrast, both epimastigotes and trypomastigotes obtained form acellular cultures expressed a smaller 75,000-Mr peptide. Both major surface components were presumably glycoproteins in terms of their binding to concanavalin A-Sepharose 4B. Within a 3-h period, both blood and culture forms synthesized their respective surface glycoproteins (90,000 Mr and 75,000 Mr, respectively in vitro. (/sub 35/S)methionine-labeled surface peptides were immunoprecipitated with immune sera of both human and murine origin. A panel of sera form patients with chronic Chagas' disease and hyperimmunized mice recognized similar surface peptides. These immunogens were the same components as the major iodinated species. The major BFT surface peptide was readily removed by trypsin treatment of the parasites, although the procedure did not affect the 75,000-Mr peptide from the culture forms. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the 90,000-Mr peptide found on BFT was an acidic protein of isoelectric point (pI) 5.0, whereas, the 75,000-Mr peptide form culture-form trypomastigotes has a pI of 7.2. The 90,000-Mr component is thought to be responsible for the anti-phagocytic properties of the BFT (1).

  11. The location of surface antigens of Bordetella pertussis by immuno-electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, L A; Dowsett, A B; Irons, L I; Robinson, A

    1985-01-01

    Immuno-electron microscopy using colloidal gold-tagged monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) has been used to detect antigens on the surface of Bordetella pertussis cells. McAbs to serotype-specific agglutinogens 2 and 3 labelled fimbriae in a serotype-specific manner. An attempt was made to determine whether individual fimbriae of serotype 1.2.3 cells bear both antigens 2 and 3. In double labelling experiments, individual cells were found to label with McAbs to antigen 2 (3 nm gold) and to antigen 3 (15 nm gold). Many fimbriae labelled with only one of these reagents, but there were instances where both labels could have been attached to the same fimbria. No fimbrial labelling was obtained with McAb to agglutinogen 1. Gold-tagged McAbs to filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA) labelled neither the fimbriae nor the surface of B. pertussis cells. Unfixed cells on electron microscope grids appeared to shed FHA readily. After fixation, a small proportion of cells bore aggregates of FHA which labelled specifically with anti-FHA McAb-gold. Results with one McAb to lymphocytosis promoting factor indicated that this antigen may be more intimately associated with the surface of B. pertussis than is FHA. PMID:2872100

  12. [Application of surface-linked liposomal antigens for the development of vaccines].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Tetsuya; Taneichi, Maiko

    2008-10-01

    The potential ability of surface-linked liposomal antigens for application to vaccine development was investigated. During the course of this investigation, a significant difference, which correlated closely with the adjuvant activity of liposomes, was observed in the recognition of liposomal antigens by APCs between liposomes with different lipid components. In addition to this "quantitative" difference between liposomes with differential lipid components, a "qualitative" difference (i.e., the differential ability to induce cross-presentation) was observed among liposomes with different lipid components. Although the precise mechanism underlying this difference is currently unclear, the significant difference in membrane mobility observed between these liposomes might affect their ability to induce cross-presentation. Thus, surface-linked liposomal antigens are potentially applicable for the development of vaccines with the least allergic side effects and for a novel protocol of allergen immunotherapy. In addition, by the utilization of their ability to induce cross-presentation, surface-linked liposomal antigen might potentially serve as a candidate protocol for virus vaccines which induce CTL response, and for tumor vaccine preparation to present tumor antigens to APCs and induce effective antitumor responses.

  13. The immune response to disialoganglioside GD3 vaccination in normal dogs: a melanoma surface antigen vaccine.

    PubMed

    Milner, R J; Salute, M; Crawford, C; Abbot, J R; Farese, J

    2006-12-15

    As a result of its metastatic potential, canine malignant melanoma like its human counterpart like its human counter part, has a poor response to conventional treatment protocols. This prompted us to investigate the possibility of enhancing the immune response against the melanoma cell surface antigen, disialoganglioside GD3. Initially a flow cytometric study was designed in which the incidence of GD3 on the cell surface, recognized by the monoclonal antibody Mel-1 (R24), was established in canine melanoma cell lines. Results from the flow cytometry found GD3 to be highly expressed (94.2%) in six out of seven canine melanoma cell lines. Since it was thus potentially a good target, a study in which normal dogs were vaccinated intradermally with a vaccine containing GD3 plus adjuvants was designed. The adjuvant included CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG-ODN) sequences and RIBI-adjuvant, which are known to target toll-like receptors (TLR) of the innate immune system. From a cohort of 10 dogs, 4 were vaccinated 3 times, at 4 weekly intervals with GD3 plus adjuvant, and 4 received only RIBI-adjuvant, and 2 phosphate buffered saline. Caliper measurements were collected to assess skin reaction at the vaccination site and sera assayed for IgM and IgG antibodies against GD3 and cell-mediated cytotoxicity against a melanoma cell line. Results from the study found significant differences (P<0.05) in the vaccine site reactions, IgM/IgG levels and cell-mediated cytotoxicity in the vaccinated versus unvaccinated dogs. The addition of CpG-ODN sequences and increasing GD3 concentration in the vaccine increased the inflammation response at the injection site. GD3 IgG and IgM antibodies in vaccinated dogs showed increasing titers over time and achieved significance at weeks 9 and 12, respectively. Cell-mediated cytotoxicity was only detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from vaccinated dogs. In conclusion, by combining the tumor antigen GD3 (a known weak self-antigen) and an

  14. Identification of Babesia bigemina infected erythrocyte surface antigens containing epitopes conserved among strains.

    PubMed

    Shompole, S; McElwain, T F; Jasmer, D P; Hines, S A; Katende, J; Musoke, A J; Rurangirwa, F R; McGuire, T C

    1994-03-01

    The presence of previously uncharacterized antigens (new antigens) on the surface of intact erythrocytes infected with three strains of Babesia bigemina from Kenya and one each from Puerto Rico, Mexico, St. Croix, and Texcoco-Mexico was demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescent antibody (IFA) reactions. These antigens were not strain specific because antibodies in bovine immune serum to either the Mexico or Kenya isolates reacted with all seven strains tested. Homologous and heterologous immune serum antibodies bound a maximum of 83% and 55%, respectively, of intact erythrocytes infected with the Kenya-Ngong strain but not uninfected erythrocytes. Both sera caused agglutination of only infected erythrocytes. Antibodies eluted from the surface of glutaraldehyde (0.25%) fixed infected erythrocytes had IFA reaction patterns among strains similar to those of immune sera before elution. Eluted antibodies were used to determine if these antigens were protein and encoded by B. bigemina. Eluted antibodies bound seven parasite-encoded proteins of 240, 220, 66, 62, 58, 52 and 38 kDa in an erythrocyte surface-specific immunoprecipitation reaction of 35S-methionine labelled proteins. It was concluded that the surface of B. bigemina infected erythrocytes had parasite-encoded proteins and that these proteins had surface exposed epitopes that were conserved among the seven strains examined which were from two continents.

  15. Serological survey of normal humans for natural antibody to cell surface antigens of melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, A N; Taormina, M C; Ikeda, H; Watanabe, T; Oettgen, H F; Old, L J

    1980-01-01

    Sera of 106 normal adult men were tested for antibodies reacting with cell surface antigens of three established lines of cultured malignant melanoma. Positive reactions with a protein A assay for IgG antibodies were extremely rare (1-2%). The frequency of positive reactions with assays for IgM antibodies was higher: 5-15% in immune adherence assays and 55-82% in anti-C3 mixed hemadsorption assays. After low-titered sera and sera reacting with fetal calf serum components, conventional alloantigens, and widely distributed class 3 antigens were excluded, sera from seven individuals (one with IgG antibody and six with IgM antibodies) were selected for detailed analysis. The serum containing the IgG antibody came from a healthy 65-year-old Caucasian man; titers of antibody in his serum ranged from < 1/10 to 1/40,000 in tests with different melanoma cell lines. This IgG antibody identifies a differentiation antigen of melanocytes, provisionally designated Mel 1, that distinguishes two classes of melanomas: 22 melanoma cell lines typed Mel 1+ and 17 types Mel 1-. Mel 1 is expressed by fetal fibroblasts but not adult fibroblasts and can be found on a proportion of cultured epithelial cancer cell lines (5 out of 23) but not on glioma or B-cell lines. The melanoma antigens detected by the naturally occurring IgM antibodies are serologically unrelated to Mel 1 but, like Mel 1, appear to be differentiation antigens that distinguish subsets of melanoma. These IgM antibodies detect antigens that are identical or closely related to the AH antigen, a melanoma surface antigen that was initially defined by autologous antibody in a patient with melanoma. In view of the immunogenicity of both Mel 1 and the AH antigens in humans and their occurrence on more than 50% of melanomas, it remains to be seen whether antibody to these antigens can be elicited by specific vaccination of seronegative melanoma patients and whether this will have an influence on the clinical course of the disease

  16. Prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in blood donors from Bombay.

    PubMed

    Satoskar, A; Ray, V

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of serum samples from 3104 blood donors from Bombay screened for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) by ELISA. HBsAg was detected in 4.7% of the subjects. Relatives showed a significantly higher prevalence of HBsAg than volunteer donors. There was no significant association between HBsAg positivity and a particular blood group.

  17. Infectious vaccinia virus recombinants that express hepatitis B virus surface antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Geoffrey L.; Mackett, Michael; Moss, Bernard

    1983-04-01

    Potential live vaccines against hepatitis B virus have been produced. The coding sequence for hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) has been inserted into the vaccinia virus genome under control of vaccinia virus early promoters. Cells infected with these vaccinia virus recombinants synthesize and excrete HBsAg and vaccinated rabbits rapidly produce antibodies to HBsAg.

  18. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Holers, V M; Kotzin, B L

    1985-01-01

    We used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. None of the monoclonal autoantibodies appeared to bind to a significant percentage of cells of relatively small cell size, either before or after culture. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Further experiments, including those using aggregated Ig to block antibody binding, strongly indicated that anti-histone antibody binding was not Fc receptor mediated. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations (0.25 micrograms/ml) of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases. Images PMID:3876357

  19. Biodegradable polylactide microspheres enhance specific immune response induced by Hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Shaohui; Wei, Qiang; Liang, Zhenglun; Ma, Guanghui; Wang, Lianyan; An, Wenqi; Ma, Xiaowei; Fang, Xin; He, Peng; Li, Hemin; Hu, Zhongyu

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B (HB) infection caused by Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the most common liver disease in the world. HB vaccine, when administered in conjunction with alum adjuvants, induces Th2 immunity that confers protection against HBV. However, currently available vaccine formulations and adjuvants do not elicit adequate Th1 and CTL responses that are important for prevention of maternal transmission of the virus. Microspheres synthesized from poly (D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or poly (D, L-lactide) (PLA) polymers have been considered as promising tools for in vivo delivery of antigens and drugs. Here we describe PLA microspheres synthesized by premix membrane emulsification method and their application in formulating a new microsphere based HB vaccine. To evaluate the immunogenicity of this microsphere vaccine, BALB/c mice were immunized with microsphere vaccine and a series of immunological assays were conducted. Results of Enzyme-linked ImmunoSpot (ELISPOT) assays revealed that the number of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ)-producing splenocytes and CD8(+) T cells increased significantly in the microsphere vaccine group. Microsphere vaccine group showed enhanced specific cell lysis when compared with HB surface antigen (HBsAg) only group in (51)Cr cytotoxicity assays. Moreover, microsphere vaccine elicited a comparable level of antibody production as that of HB vaccine administered with alum adjuvant. We show that phagocytosis of HBsAg by dendritic cells is more pronounced in microsphere vaccine group when compared with other control groups. These results clearly demonstrate the potential of using PLA microspheres as effective HB vaccine adjuvants for an enhanced Th1 immune response.

  20. Biodegradable polylactide microspheres enhance specific immune response induced by Hepatitis B surface antigen

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Shaohui; Wei, Qiang; Liang, Zhenglun; Ma, Guanghui; Wang, Lianyan; An, Wenqi; Ma, Xiaowei; Fang, Xin; He, Peng; Li, Hemin; Hu, Zhongyu

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B (HB) infection caused by Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the most common liver disease in the world. HB vaccine, when administered in conjunction with alum adjuvants, induces Th2 immunity that confers protection against HBV. However, currently available vaccine formulations and adjuvants do not elicit adequate Th1 and CTL responses that are important for prevention of maternal transmission of the virus. Microspheres synthesized from poly (D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or poly (D, L-lactide) (PLA) polymers have been considered as promising tools for in vivo delivery of antigens and drugs. Here we describe PLA microspheres synthesized by premix membrane emulsification method and their application in formulating a new microsphere based HB vaccine. To evaluate the immunogenicity of this microsphere vaccine, BALB/c mice were immunized with microsphere vaccine and a series of immunological assays were conducted. Results of Enzyme-linked ImmunoSpot (ELISPOT) assays revealed that the number of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ)-producing splenocytes and CD8+ T cells increased significantly in the microsphere vaccine group. Microsphere vaccine group showed enhanced specific cell lysis when compared with HB surface antigen (HBsAg) only group in 51Cr cytotoxicity assays. Moreover, microsphere vaccine elicited a comparable level of antibody production as that of HB vaccine administered with alum adjuvant. We show that phagocytosis of HBsAg by dendritic cells is more pronounced in microsphere vaccine group when compared with other control groups. These results clearly demonstrate the potential of using PLA microspheres as effective HB vaccine adjuvants for an enhanced Th1 immune response. PMID:25424942

  1. A putative, novel coli surface antigen 8B (CS8B) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Njoroge, Samuel M.; Boinett, Christine J.; Madé, Laure F.; Ouko, Tom T.; Fèvre, Eric M.; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Kariuki, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains harbor multiple fimbriae and pili to mediate host colonization, including the type IVb pilus, colonization factor antigen III (CFA/III). Not all colonization factors are well characterized or known in toxin positive ETEC isolates, which may have an impact identifying ETEC isolates based on molecular screening of these biomarkers. We describe a novel coli surface antigen (CS) 8 subtype B (CS8B), a family of CFA/III pilus, in a toxin producing ETEC isolate from a Kenyan collection. In highlighting the existence of this putative CS, we provide the sequence and specific primers, which can be used alongside other ETEC primers previously described. PMID:26187892

  2. A putative, novel coli surface antigen 8B (CS8B) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Njoroge, Samuel M; Boinett, Christine J; Madé, Laure F; Ouko, Tom T; Fèvre, Eric M; Thomson, Nicholas R; Kariuki, Samuel

    2015-10-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains harbor multiple fimbriae and pili to mediate host colonization, including the type IVb pilus, colonization factor antigen III (CFA/III). Not all colonization factors are well characterized or known in toxin positive ETEC isolates, which may have an impact identifying ETEC isolates based on molecular screening of these biomarkers. We describe a novel coli surface antigen (CS) 8 subtype B (CS8B), a family of CFA/III pilus, in a toxin producing ETEC isolate from a Kenyan collection. In highlighting the existence of this putative CS, we provide the sequence and specific primers, which can be used alongside other ETEC primers previously described. PMID:26187892

  3. A putative, novel coli surface antigen 8B (CS8B) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Njoroge, Samuel M; Boinett, Christine J; Madé, Laure F; Ouko, Tom T; Fèvre, Eric M; Thomson, Nicholas R; Kariuki, Samuel

    2015-10-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains harbor multiple fimbriae and pili to mediate host colonization, including the type IVb pilus, colonization factor antigen III (CFA/III). Not all colonization factors are well characterized or known in toxin positive ETEC isolates, which may have an impact identifying ETEC isolates based on molecular screening of these biomarkers. We describe a novel coli surface antigen (CS) 8 subtype B (CS8B), a family of CFA/III pilus, in a toxin producing ETEC isolate from a Kenyan collection. In highlighting the existence of this putative CS, we provide the sequence and specific primers, which can be used alongside other ETEC primers previously described.

  4. Transdermal immunization of P. falciparum surface antigen (MSP-119) via elastic liposomes confers robust immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Rajeev K; Garg, Neeraj K; Dalai, Sarat K; Awasthi, Amit

    2016-04-01

    As transdermal immunization results in poor immunogenicity, which is attributed to poor permeability of antigens through the skin, we believed ultradeformable lipid vesicles (elastic liposome) might address the challenges encountered during transdermal immunization. The elastic liposome, versatile carrier, proves better vehicle for transcutaneous delivery of protein, peptide and nucleic acid antigens. Our recently published article (1) is suggestive of improved immunogenicity of carboxyl-terminal 19 kDa fragment of merozoite surface protein-1 (PfMSP-119) of Plasmodium falciparum when administered subcutaneously via elastic liposomes ( Fig. 1 ). PMID:26810033

  5. Plasmodium falciparum Antigens on the Surface of the Gametocyte-Infected Erythrocyte

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Maha; Roeffen, Will; Alexander, Neal; Drakeley, Christopher J.; Targett, Geoffrey A. T.; Sutherland, Colin J.

    2008-01-01

    Background The asexual blood stages of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum produce highly immunogenic polymorphic antigens that are expressed on the surface of the host cell. In contrast, few studies have examined the surface of the gametocyte-infected erythrocyte. Methodology/Principal Findings We used flow cytometry to detect antibodies recognising the surface of live cultured erythrocytes infected with gametocytes of P. falciparum strain 3D7 in the plasma of 200 Gambian children. The majority of children had been identified as carrying gametocytes after treatment for malaria, and each donated blood for mosquito-feeding experiments. None of the plasma recognised the surface of erythrocytes infected with developmental stages of gametocytes (I–IV), but 66 of 194 (34.0%) plasma contained IgG that recognised the surface of erythrocytes infected with mature (stage V) gametocytes. Thirty-four (17.0%) of 200 plasma tested recognised erythrocytes infected with trophozoites and schizonts, but there was no association with recognition of the surface of gametocyte-infected erythrocytes (odds ratio 1.08, 95% C.I. 0.434–2.57; P = 0.851). Plasma antibodies with the ability to recognise gametocyte surface antigens (GSA) were associated with the presence of antibodies that recognise the gamete antigen Pfs 230, but not Pfs48/45. Antibodies recognising GSA were associated with donors having lower gametocyte densities 4 weeks after antimalarial treatment. Conclusions/Significance We provide evidence that GSA are distinct from antigens detected on the surface of asexual 3D7 parasites. Our findings suggest a novel strategy for the development of transmission-blocking vaccines. PMID:18509532

  6. Soluble recombinant merozoite surface antigen-142kDa of Plasmodium vivax: An improved diagnostic antigen for vivax malaria.

    PubMed

    Mirahmadi, Hadi; Fallahi, Shirzad; Seyyed Tabaei, Seyyed Javad

    2016-04-01

    Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA), as a serological test, can be a beneficial tool for epidemiological studies by screening blood donors and diagnosis of specific antibodies from Plasmodium vivax (P. vivax) infected cases. Since P. vivax cannot easily be acquired in vitro, ELISA assays using total or semi-purified antigens are seldom used. On the basis of this restriction, we examined whether recombinant protein 42 kDa related to C-terminal region of the merozoite surface antigen-1 of P. vivax (MSA-1(42)) could be suitable for serological detection of vivax malaria infection. Purified recombinant protein produced in Escherichia coli (E. coli) (GST-MSA-1(42)) was examined for its ability to bind to IgG antibodies of individuals with patent P. vivax infection. The method was tested with 262 serum samples collected from individuals living in the south and southeastern regions of Iran where malaria is endemic. Samples exposed to Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) infection and patients with other infectious disease (toxoplasmosis, Leishmania infantum infection, echinococcosis and FUO (fever with unknown origin)) except for P. falciparum were residing in non- malaria endemic areas in Iran. Generally, the sensitivity of ELISA evaluated with sera from naturally infected individuals was 86.9%. The specificity value of the ELISA determined with sera from healthy individuals and from individuals with other infectious diseases was 94.05%. The positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) provided, and the diagnostic efficiency of anti-rPvMSA-1(42) antibody using indirect ELISA were determined 93.58, 87.77 and 91.06% respectively. Our study demonstrated that, because MSA-1(42) kDa contains both the 33 and 19 kDa fragments in its structure, it can serve as the basis for the development of a sensitive serological test which can be used for epidemiological studies, screening blood donors and diagnosis of P. vivax malaria. PMID:26851675

  7. A flow cytometric screening test for detergent-resistant surface antigens in monocytes.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Zsuzsanna; Orsó, Evelyn; Werner, Tobias; Boettcher, Alfred; Schmitz, Gerd

    2006-03-01

    Rafts resemble cholesterol- and glycosphingolipid-enriched, liquid-ordered plasma membrane microdomains, showing resistance to nonionic detergents, and are involved in various cellular processes. In the present study, we have tested surface antigens on resting and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human peripheral blood monocytes for their detergent resistance (i.e. raft-association), by flow cytometry. Constitutive (CD14, CD32, CD55), or LPS-induced (CD81) raft-association, and detergent solubility (i.e. exclusion of rafts) (CD71) of monocyte antigens in the presence of 0.01% Triton X-100 are clearly demonstrated. Flow cytometric detergent insolubility is a powerful tool for rapid screening the raft-association of monocyte antigens in a whole-blood assay.

  8. Recovery of a cell surface fetal antigen from circulating immune complexes of melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Wong, J H; Aguero, B; Gupta, R K; Morton, D L

    1988-01-01

    A well-characterized 69.5 x 10(3) dalton glycoprotein fetal antigen (FA), isolated from the spent culture medium of a melanoma cell line, UCLA-SO-14 (M14), was utilized to characterize the antigen component of circulating immune complexes (CIC) from melanoma patients. Ten serum samples from five patients with stage II melanoma at 1 and 4 months prior to the clinical detection of recurrent disease were selected for study. The CIC were dissociated with low pH and ultrafiltered through a 100 x 10(3) dalton exclusion limit membrane. The low pH treatment resulted in an increase in antibody titer in eight of ten serum samples. The antibody activity in membrane immunofluorescence was quantitatively inhibited by the filtered antigen fraction and purified FA, suggesting the presence of anti-FA antibodies in the treated serum, which possibly were complexed with FA in the untreated sample. As determined by competitive inhibition in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, the filtrate (antigen fraction) contained an antigen that was immunologically similar to FA. These results clearly demonstrate that FA, expressed on the cell surface of melanoma cells, is present in CIC of selected melanoma patients.

  9. Enteric trimethyl chitosan nanoparticles containing hepatitis B surface antigen for oral delivery

    PubMed Central

    Farhadian, Asma; Dounighi, Naser Mohammadpour; Avadi, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    Oral vaccination is the preferred route of immunization. However, the degradative condition of the gastrointestinal tract and the higher molecular size of peptides pose major challenges in developing an effective oral vaccination system. One of the most excellent methods used in the development of oral vaccine delivery system relies on the entrapment of the antigen in polymeric nanoparticles. In this work, trimethyl chitosan (TMC) nanoparticles were fabricated using ionic gelation teqnique by interaction hydroxypropyl methylcellulose phthalate (HPMCP), a pH-sensitive polymer, with TMC and the utility of the particles in the oral delivery of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was evaluated employing solutions that simulated gastric and intestinal conditions. The particle size, morphology, zeta potential, loading capacity, loading efficiency, in vitro release behavior, structure, and morphology of nanoparticles were evaluated, and the activity of the loaded antigen was assessed. Size of the optimized TMC/HPMCP nanoparticles and that of the antigen-loaded nanoparticles were 85 nm and 158 nm, respectively. Optimum loading capacity (76.75%) and loading efficiency (86.29%) were achieved at 300 µg/mL concentration of the antigen. SEM images revealed a spherical shape as well as a smooth and near-homogenous surface of nanoparticles. Results of the in vitro release studies showed that formulation with HPMCP improved the acid stability of the TMC nanoparticles as well as their capability to preserve the loaded HBsAg from gastric destruction. The antigen showed good activity both before and after loading. The results suggest that TMC/HPMCP nanoparticles could be used in the oral delivery of HBsAg vaccine. PMID:26158754

  10. Prostate-Specific Antigen Velocity Before and After Elimination of Factors That Can Confound the Prostate-Specific Antigen Level

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jessica J.; Chen, Ming-Hui; Loffredo, Marian; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) velocity, like PSA level, can be confounded. In this study, we estimated the impact that confounding factors could have on correctly identifying a patient with a PSA velocity >2 ng/ml/y. Methods and Materials: Between 2006 and 2010, a total of 50 men with newly diagnosed PC comprised the study cohort. We calculated and compared the false-positive and false-negative PSA velocity >2 ng/ml/y rates for all men and those with low-risk disease using two approaches to calculate PSA velocity. First, we used PSA values obtained within 18 months of diagnosis; second, we used values within 18 months of diagnosis, substituting the prebiopsy PSA for a repeat, nonconfounded PSA that was obtained using the same assay and without confounders. Results: Using PSA levels pre-biopsy, 46% of all men had a PSA velocity >2 ng/ml/y; whereas this value declined to 32% when substituting the last prebiopsy PSA for a repeat, nonconfounded PSA using the same assay and without confounders. The false-positive rate for PSA velocity >2 ng/ml/y was 43% as compared with a false-negative rate of PSA velocity >2 ng/ml/y of 11% (p = 0.0008) in the overall cohort. These respective values in the low-risk subgroup were 60% and 16.7% (p = 0.09). Conclusion: This study provides evidence to explain the discordance in cancer-specific outcomes among groups investigating the prognostic significance of PSA velocity >2 ng/ml/y, and highlights the importance of patient education on potential confounders of the PSA test before obtaining PSA levels.

  11. Generalized immunological recognition of the major merozoite surface antigen (gp195) of Plasmodium falciparum

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.P.; Hui, G.S.N.; Kato, A.; Siddiqui, W.A. )

    1989-08-01

    The antibody response to the Plasmodium falciparum major merozoite surface antigen (gp195) of congenic mouse strains differing in H-2 haplotype has been examined. All seven strains of mice were capable of producing gp195-specific antibodies. Generalized immune recognition of gp195 by mice of diverse H-2 haplotypes distinguished gp195 from the P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein and the 230-kDa and 48/45-kDa gamete surface antigens. However, the H-2 genetic locus appeared to influence the specificity of gp105-specific antibodies. Immunoblot patterns of mouse sera with parasite antigens revealed a complex pattern of reactivity with terminal and intermediate processing fragments of gp195. The majority of immunoblot bands observed were similar for all of the mouse strains; however, there were several strains that additionally recognized a few unique fragments or displayed more intense reactivities with specific processing fragments. These results suggest that while individuals of diverse major histocompatibility complex makeup are capable of recognizing the gp195 antigen, the recognition of specific gp195 B-cell and T-cell epitopes may be under control of the major histocompatibility complex.

  12. Identification and Characterization of Ixodes scapularis Antigens That Elicit Tick Immunity Using Yeast Surface Display

    PubMed Central

    Daffre, Sirlei; DePonte, Kathleen; Hovius, Joppe W. R.; Veer, Cornelis van't; van der Poll, Tom; Bakhtiari, Kamran; Meijers, Joost C. M.; Boder, Eric T.; van Dam, Alje P.; Fikrig, Erol

    2011-01-01

    Repeated exposure of rabbits and other animals to ticks results in acquired resistance or immunity to subsequent tick bites and is partially elicited by antibodies directed against tick antigens. In this study we demonstrate the utility of a yeast surface display approach to identify tick salivary antigens that react with tick-immune serum. We constructed an Ixodes scapularis nymphal salivary gland yeast surface display library and screened the library with nymph-immune rabbit sera and identified five salivary antigens. Four of these proteins, designated P8, P19, P23 and P32, had a predicted signal sequence. We generated recombinant (r) P8, P19 and P23 in a Drosophila expression system for functional and immunization studies. rP8 showed anti-complement activity and rP23 demonstrated anti-coagulant activity. Ixodes scapularis feeding was significantly impaired when nymphs were fed on rabbits immunized with a cocktail of rP8, rP19 and rP23, a hall mark of tick-immunity. These studies also suggest that these antigens may serve as potential vaccine candidates to thwart tick feeding. PMID:21246036

  13. Identification and characterization of Ixodes scapularis antigens that elicit tick immunity using yeast surface display.

    PubMed

    Schuijt, Tim J; Narasimhan, Sukanya; Daffre, Sirlei; DePonte, Kathleen; Hovius, Joppe W R; Van't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom; Bakhtiari, Kamran; Meijers, Joost C M; Boder, Eric T; van Dam, Alje P; Fikrig, Erol

    2011-01-05

    Repeated exposure of rabbits and other animals to ticks results in acquired resistance or immunity to subsequent tick bites and is partially elicited by antibodies directed against tick antigens. In this study we demonstrate the utility of a yeast surface display approach to identify tick salivary antigens that react with tick-immune serum. We constructed an Ixodes scapularis nymphal salivary gland yeast surface display library and screened the library with nymph-immune rabbit sera and identified five salivary antigens. Four of these proteins, designated P8, P19, P23 and P32, had a predicted signal sequence. We generated recombinant (r) P8, P19 and P23 in a Drosophila expression system for functional and immunization studies. rP8 showed anti-complement activity and rP23 demonstrated anti-coagulant activity. Ixodes scapularis feeding was significantly impaired when nymphs were fed on rabbits immunized with a cocktail of rP8, rP19 and rP23, a hall mark of tick-immunity. These studies also suggest that these antigens may serve as potential vaccine candidates to thwart tick feeding.

  14. Multicenter Evaluation of the Elecsys Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Quantitative Assay ▿

    PubMed Central

    Zacher, B. J.; Moriconi, F.; Bowden, S.; Hammond, R.; Louisirirotchanakul, S.; Phisalprapa, P.; Tanwandee, T.; Wursthorn, K.; Brunetto, M. R.; Wedemeyer, H.; Bonino, F.

    2011-01-01

    The Elecsys hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) II quantitative assay is a new quantitative electrochemiluminescence immunoassay which uses onboard dilution and a simple algorithm to determine HBsAg levels expressed in international units (IU)/ml (standardized against the World Health Organization [WHO] Second International Standard). This study evaluated its performance using routine serum samples from a wide range of HBsAg carriers and patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). HBsAg levels were measured in serum samples collected independently by five centers in Europe, Australia, and Asia. Serial dilution analyses were performed to assess the recommended dilution algorithm and determine the assay range free of hook effect. Assay precision was also established. Following assessment of serial dilutions (1:100 to 1:1,000,000) of the 611 samples analyzed, 70.0% and 85.6% of samples tested with analyzers incorporating 1:100 (Elecsys 2010 and cobas e 411) and 1:400 (Modular Analytics E170) onboard dilution, respectively, fell within the linear range of the assay, providing a final result on the first test. No high-dose hook effect was seen up to the maximum HBsAg serum level tested (870,000 IU/ml) using the dilution algorithm. HBsAg levels were reliably determined across all hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes, phases of HBV infection, and stages of disease tested. Precision was high across all analyzers (% coefficient of variation [CV], 1.4 to 9.6; HBsAg concentrations, 0.1 to 37,300 IU/ml). The Elecsys HBsAg II quantitative assay accurately and reliably quantifies HBsAg in routine clinical samples. Onboard dilution minimizes retesting and reduces the potential for error. PMID:21880853

  15. Multicenter evaluation of the Elecsys hepatitis B surface antigen quantitative assay.

    PubMed

    Zacher, B J; Moriconi, F; Bowden, S; Hammond, R; Louisirirotchanakul, S; Phisalprapa, P; Tanwandee, T; Wursthorn, K; Brunetto, M R; Wedemeyer, H; Bonino, F

    2011-11-01

    The Elecsys hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) II quantitative assay is a new quantitative electrochemiluminescence immunoassay which uses onboard dilution and a simple algorithm to determine HBsAg levels expressed in international units (IU)/ml (standardized against the World Health Organization [WHO] Second International Standard). This study evaluated its performance using routine serum samples from a wide range of HBsAg carriers and patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). HBsAg levels were measured in serum samples collected independently by five centers in Europe, Australia, and Asia. Serial dilution analyses were performed to assess the recommended dilution algorithm and determine the assay range free of hook effect. Assay precision was also established. Following assessment of serial dilutions (1:100 to 1:1,000,000) of the 611 samples analyzed, 70.0% and 85.6% of samples tested with analyzers incorporating 1:100 (Elecsys 2010 and cobas e 411) and 1:400 (Modular Analytics E170) onboard dilution, respectively, fell within the linear range of the assay, providing a final result on the first test. No high-dose hook effect was seen up to the maximum HBsAg serum level tested (870,000 IU/ml) using the dilution algorithm. HBsAg levels were reliably determined across all hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes, phases of HBV infection, and stages of disease tested. Precision was high across all analyzers (% coefficient of variation [CV], 1.4 to 9.6; HBsAg concentrations, 0.1 to 37,300 IU/ml). The Elecsys HBsAg II quantitative assay accurately and reliably quantifies HBsAg in routine clinical samples. Onboard dilution minimizes retesting and reduces the potential for error.

  16. Targeted Surface Expression of an Exogenous Antigen in Stably Transfected Babesia bovis

    PubMed Central

    Laughery, Jacob M.; Knowles, Donald P.; Schneider, David A.; Bastos, Reginaldo G.; McElwain, Terry F.; Suarez, Carlos E.

    2014-01-01

    Babesia bovis is a tick-borne intraerythocytic protozoan responsible for acute disease in cattle which can be controlled by vaccination with attenuated B. bovis strains. Emerging B. bovis transfection technologies may increase the usefulness of these live vaccines. One use of transfected B. bovis parasites may be as a vaccine delivery platform. Previous transfection methods for B. bovis were limited by single expression sites and intracellular expression of transfected antigens. This study describes a novel transfection system in which two exogenous genes are expressed: one for selection and the other for a selected antigen designed to be delivered to the surface of the parasites. The strategy for duplicating the number of transfected genes was based on the use of the putative bidirectional promoter of the B. bovis 1.4 Kb ef-1α intergenic region. The ability of this region to regulate two independent expression sites was demonstrated using a luciferase assay on transiently transfected B. bovis parasites and then incorporated into a stable transfection plasmid to control independent expression of the selectable marker GFP-BSD and another gene of interest. A chimeric gene was synthetized using sequences from the protective B-cell epitopes of Rhipicephalus microplus tick antigen Bm86 along with sequences from the surface exposed B. bovis major surface antigen-1. This chimeric gene was then cloned into the additional expression site of the transfection plasmid. Transfection of the B. bovis Mo7 strain with this plasmid resulted in stable insertion into the ef-1α locus and simultaneous expression of both exogenous genes. Expression of the Bm86 epitopes on the surface of transfected merozoites was demonstrated using immunofluorescence analyses. The ability to independently express multiple genes by the inclusion of a bidirectional promoter and the achievement of surface expression of foreign epitopes advances the potential of transfected B. bovis as a future vaccine

  17. Detection and Characterization of Autoantibodies to Neuronal Cell-Surface Antigens in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    van Coevorden-Hameete, Marleen H.; Titulaer, Maarten J.; Schreurs, Marco W. J.; de Graaff, Esther; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A. E.; Hoogenraad, Casper C.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis (AIE) is a group of disorders in which autoantibodies directed at antigens located on the plasma membrane of neurons induce severe neurological symptoms. In contrast to classical paraneoplastic disorders, AIE patients respond well to immunotherapy. The detection of neuronal surface autoantibodies in patients’ serum or CSF therefore has serious consequences for the patients’ treatment and follow-up and requires the availability of sensitive and specific diagnostic tests. This mini-review provides a guideline for both diagnostic and research laboratories that work on the detection of known surface autoantibodies and/or the identification of novel surface antigens. We discuss the strengths and pitfalls of different techniques for anti-neuronal antibody detection: (1) Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and immunofluorescence on rat/primate brain sections; (2) Immunocytochemistry (ICC) of living cultured hippocampal neurons; and (3) Cell Based Assay (CBA). In addition, we discuss the use of immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analysis for the detection of novel neuronal surface antigens, which is a crucial step in further disease classification and the development of novel CBAs. PMID:27303263

  18. Biotin avidin amplified magnetic immunoassay for hepatitis B surface antigen detection using GoldMag nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, An; Geng, Tingting; Fu, Qiang; Chen, Chao; Cui, Yali

    2007-04-01

    Using GoldMag (Fe3O4/Au) nanoparticles as a carrier, a biotin-avidin amplified ELISA was developed to detect hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). A specific antibody was labeled with biotin and then used to detect the antigen with an antibody coated on GoldMag nanoparticles by a sandwich ELISA assay. The results showed that 5 mol of biotin were surface bound per mole of antibody. The biotin-avidin amplified ELISA assay has a higher sensitivity than that of the direct ELISA assay. There is 5-fold difference between HBsAg positive and negative serum even at dilution of 1:10000, and the relative standard deviation of the parallel positive serum at dilution of 1:4000 is 5.98% (n=11).

  19. Liver Abscess With a Markedly High Level of Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Yusuke; Seo, Kazunori; Koga, Ichiro; Matsunaga, Naohisa; Kitazawa, Takatoshi; Takamori, Yoriyuki; Ota, Yasuo

    2012-01-01

    Serological tumor markers are useful for detection of malignancies and evaluation of disease progression. However, some markers are rarely elevated in patients with benign diseases and without malignancies. We herein present a case of a liver abscess with a highly elevated carbohydrate antigen (CA 19-9) level in both the serum and abscess fluid. The serological level of CA 19-9 decreased with treatment. Although CA 19-9 is known to be a specific tumor marker, high serum levels of CA 19-9 can be observed in patients with pyogenic liver abscesses. CA 19-9 may also be a marker for treatment response in patients with liver abscesses.

  20. Role of TLR-2 and fungal surface antigens on innate immune response against Sporothrix schenckii.

    PubMed

    Negrini, Thais de C; Ferreira, Lucas S; Alegranci, Pâmela; Arthur, Rodrigo A; Sundfeld, Pedro P; Maia, Danielle C G; Spolidorio, Luis C; Carlos, Iracilda Z

    2013-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is an infection caused by the dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenckii. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in immunity, since they bind to pathogen surface antigens and initiate the immune response. However, little is known about the role of TLR-2 and fungal surface antigens in the recognition of S. schenckii and in the subsequent immune response. This study aimed to evaluate the involvement of TLR-2 and fungal surface soluble (SolAg) and lipidic (LipAg) antigens in phagocytosis of S. schenckii and production of immune mediators by macrophages obtained from WT and TLR-2(-/-) animals. The results showed that TLR-2(-/-) animals had had statistical lower percentage of macrophages with internalized yeasts compared to WT. SolAg and LipAg impaired phagocytosis and immunological mediator production for both WT and TLR-2(-/-). The absence of TLR-2 led to lower production of the cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-12 and IL-10 compared to WT animals. These results suggest a new insight in relation to how the immune system, through TLR-2, recognizes and induces the production of mediators in response to the fungus S. schenckii.

  1. Age-dependent B cell Autoimmunity to a Myelin Surface Antigen in Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Katherine A.; Chitnis, Tanuja; Newcombe, Jia; Franz, Bettina; Kennedy, Julia; McArdel, Shannon; Kuhle, Jens; Kappos, Ludwig; Rostasy, Kevin; Pohl, Daniela; Gagne, Donald; Ness, Jayne M.; Tenembaum, Silvia; O'Connor, Kevin C.; Viglietta, Vissia; Wong, Susan J.; Tavakoli, Norma P.; de Seze, Jerome; Khoury, Samia J.; Bar-Or, Amit; Hafler, David A.; Banwell, Brenda; Wucherpfennig, Kai W.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) typically manifests in early to mid adulthood, but there is increasing recognition of pediatric-onset MS, aided by improvements in imaging techniques. The immunological mechanisms of disease are largely unexplored in pediatric-onset MS, in part because studies have historically focused on adult-onset disease. We investigated autoantibodies to myelin surface antigens in a large cohort of pediatric MS cases by flow cytometric labeling of transfectants that expressed different myelin proteins. While antibodies to native myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) were uncommon among adult-onset patients, a subset of pediatric patients had serum antibodies that brightly labeled the MOG transfectant. Antibodies to two other myelin surface antigens were largely absent. Affinity purification of MOG antibodies as well as competition of binding with soluble MOG documented their binding specificity. The prevalence of such autoantibodies was highest among patients with a very early onset of MS: 38.7% of patients less than 10 years of age at disease onset had MOG antibodies, compared to 14.7% of patients in the 10–18 year age group. B cell autoimmunity to this myelin surface antigen is therefore most common in patients with a very early onset of MS. PMID:19687098

  2. Variant colony surface antigenic phenotypes within mycoplasma strain populations: implications for species identification and strain standardization.

    PubMed Central

    Rosengarten, R; Yogev, D

    1996-01-01

    Immunobinding assays with mycoplasma colonies on agar plates (immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase techniques) or with imprints of colonies transferred to solid supports (colony immunoblotting) are widely used as standard diagnostic tests for serological species identification of mycoplasma isolates. However, in light of the high rate of variability of surface antigens in many mycoplasmas, diagnostic data obtained with these techniques require a more critical evaluation. In this report, we demonstrate with some examples that mycoplasma surface variability based on alterations in expression, in size, and in surface presentation of integral and peripheral membrane proteins may lead to misinterpretation of colony immunostaining reactions obtained by using specific monoclonal antibodies as well as conventional diagnostic hyperimmune sera. To more easily identify phenotypically mixed isolates or samples which contain more than one species, we have introduced some minor modifications of the colony immunoblot technique which provide sharp signals of positive as well as negative reactions and enable identification of cryptic epitopes. It is further demonstrated that because of the variability in colony surface antigenic phenotype, mycoplasma strains, including well-established reference and other prototype strains which are used under the same designation in many laboratories, can differ markedly in their antigen profiles and their potentially virulence-related surface properties, since they are usually purified by filter cloning and often propagated by subcultivation of randomly selected agar-grown subpopulations. We conclude from this study that because of this surface variability, the establishment of criteria for standardization of mycoplasma strains and diagnostic antisera is urgently required in order to obtain reproducible results in different laboratories. PMID:8748292

  3. Simulation and Theory of Antibody Binding to Crowded Antigen-Covered Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    De Michele, Cristiano; De Los Rios, Paolo; Foffi, Giuseppe; Piazza, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a fully flexible coarse-grained model of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies parametrized directly on cryo-EM data and simulate the binding dynamics of many IgGs to antigens adsorbed on a surface at increasing densities. Moreover, we work out a theoretical model that allows to explain all the features observed in the simulations. Our combined computational and theoretical framework is in excellent agreement with surface-plasmon resonance data and allows us to establish a number of important results. (i) Internal flexibility is key to maximize bivalent binding, flexible IgGs being able to explore the surface with their second arm in search for an available hapten. This is made clear by the strongly reduced ability to bind with both arms displayed by artificial IgGs designed to rigidly keep a prescribed shape. (ii) The large size of IgGs is instrumental to keep neighboring molecules at a certain distance (surface repulsion), which essentially makes antigens within reach of the second Fab always unoccupied on average. (iii) One needs to account independently for the thermodynamic and geometric factors that regulate the binding equilibrium. The key geometrical parameters, besides excluded-volume repulsion, describe the screening of free haptens by neighboring bound antibodies. We prove that the thermodynamic parameters govern the low-antigen-concentration regime, while the surface screening and repulsion only affect the binding at high hapten densities. Importantly, we prove that screening effects are concealed in relative measures, such as the fraction of bivalently bound antibodies. Overall, our model provides a valuable, accurate theoretical paradigm beyond existing frameworks to interpret experimental profiles of antibodies binding to multi-valent surfaces of different sorts in many contexts. PMID:26967624

  4. The underlying mechanisms for the "isolated positivity for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)" serological profile.

    PubMed

    Pondé, Robério Amorim de Almeida

    2011-02-01

    During HBV infection, four structural antigen/antibody systems are observed: hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and its antibody (anti-HBs); the pre-S antigens associated with HBsAg particles and their antibodies; the particulate nucleocapsid antigen (HBcAg) and anti-HBc; and an antigen structurally related to HBcAg, namely HBeAg and its antibody (anti-HBe). Through the examination of this antigen-antibodies system, hepatitis B infection is diagnosed and the course of the disorder may be observed. Isolated HBsAg seropositivity is a peculiar serological pattern in HBV infection observed some times in routine laboratory. In most cases is not clear how this profile should be interpreted neither its significance. This pattern, however, may be associated with some clinical and laboratorial situations of great relevance, some of which will be addressed in this article.

  5. Occult infection related hepatitis B surface antigen variants showing lowered secretion capacity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong; Lee, Seoung-Ae; Won, You-Sub; Lee, HyunJoo; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying hepatitis B virus (HBV) occult infection of genotype C. METHODS: A total of 10 types of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) variants from a Korean occult cohort were used. After a complete HBV genome plasmid mutated such that it does not express HBsAg and plasmid encoding, each HBsAg variant was transiently co-transfected into HuH-7 cells. The secretion capacity and intracellular expression of the HBV virions and HBsAgs in their respective variants were analyzed using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays and commercial HBsAg enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, respectively. RESULTS: All variants exhibited lower levels of HBsAg secretion into the medium compared with the wild type. In particular, in eight of the ten variants, very low levels of HBsAg secretion that were similar to the negative control were detected. In contrast, most variants (9/10) exhibited normal virion secretion capacities comparable with, or even higher than, the wild type. This provided new insight into the intrinsic nature of occult HBV infection, which leads to HBsAg sero-negativeness but has horizontal infectivity. Furthermore, most variants generated higher reactive oxidative species production than the wild type. This finding provides potential links between occult HBV infection and liver disease progression. CONCLUSION: The presently obtained data indicate that deficiency in the secretion capacity of HBsAg variants may have a pivotal function in the occult infections of HBV genotype C. PMID:25684944

  6. Indium 111 ZCE-025 immunoscintigraphy in occult recurrent colorectal cancer with elevated carcinoembryonic antigen level

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, R.J.; Abdel-Nabi, H.; Merchant, B. )

    1990-02-01

    We investigated the utility of scanning with indium 111 labeled to monoclonal antibody in 13 patients after curative resection of colorectal cancer who had elevated carcinoembryonic antigen levels and negative results of clinical workup. Each patient received 1 mg of anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody type ZCE 025 labeled with 5.5 mCi of {sup 111}In, plus 9 to 39 mg of the same antibody unlabeled. Patients underwent scanning 3 to 7 days after infusion by planar and emission computed tomography. ZCE-025 monoclonal antibody imaging detected tumor recurrence or metastasis in 11 of 13 patients. In one patient the monoclonal antibody scan gave a true-negative result, and in one patient the monoclonal antibody scan failed to disclose a metachronous cecal primary. Tumor sites identified were the pelvis (2 patients), abdominal wall (2), retroperitoneum (1), lymph nodes (3); liver (2), bone (2), and lung (1). The accurate localization of colorectal carcinoma recurrences by means of {sup 111}In ZCE-025 monoclonal antibody demonstrates the usefulness of this diagnostic agent in the setting of elevated carcinoembryonic antigen level and negative results of clinical and radiologic workup.

  7. MHC Class II Association with Lipid Rafts on the Antigen Presenting Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Howard A.; Roche, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    MHC class II (MHC-II) molecules function by binding peptides derived from either self-or foreign proteins and expressing these peptides on the surface of antigen presenting cells (APCs) for recognition by CD4 T cells. MHC-II is known to exist on clusters on the surface of APCs, and a variety of biochemical and functional studies have suggested that these clusters represent lipid raft microdomain-associated MHC-II. This review will summarize data exploring the biosynthesis of raft-associated MHC-II and the role that lipid raft association plays in regulating T cell activation by APCs. PMID:25261705

  8. Investigating the impact of hepatitis B virus surface gene polymorphism on antigenicity using ex vivo phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Ijaz, Samreen; Szypulska, Renata; Andrews, Nick; Tedder, Richard S

    2012-11-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen (HBsAg) is a complex protein, and understanding accurately the impact of amino acid changes on the antigenicity of the immunodominant a determinant must take this complexity into consideration. Epitope mapping with four mAbs was used to phenotype HBsAg directly from patients' sera to investigate the effect of mutations in their native genetic backbone. The expected mAb reactivity was established initially for samples harbouring 'wild-type' HBsAg sequences across genotypes A-E. The alteration of HBsAg antigenicity, defined by mAb epitope loss, was demonstrated in a number of samples with sequence-inferred amino acid changes. Individual mutations within the mapped epitopes to which the mAbs were directed usually affected their binding. However, the loss of more than one epitope was observed as the number of mutations within a sequence increased. Conversely, not all mutations occurring in the a determinant altered the HBsAg conformation. The genotype backbone, the specific amino acid substitution and amino acid changes occurring outside the major antigenic region appeared to be important in determining expression of the predicted epitope loss. These data clearly demonstrate that sequence-based methods alone may not accurately define HBsAg phenotype. This phenotyping methodology allows for the rapid and accurate identification of antigenically altered viruses and will greatly enhance current HBV surveillance, research and diagnostic activities. The data generated can be used to inform on public health issues relating to prevalence, transmission and impact of HBsAg mutants in HBV-infected populations. PMID:22855781

  9. Seroprevalence of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen and Occupational Risk Factors Among Health Care Workers in Ekiti State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Alese, Oluwole Ojo; Ohunakin, Afolabi; Oluyide, Peter Olumuyiwa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is contracted from blood and other body fluid making healthcare workers (HCW) prone to the infection especially in the developing world. Though it is a vaccine preventable disease, the level of awareness and universal precaution among HCW is low in sub-Saharan African and Asia. Aim The study was aimed at determining the seroprevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen and occupational risk factors among health care workers at Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado Ekiti. Materials and Methods One hundred and eighty-seven (187) blood samples were collected from volunteer subjects who comprised of medical doctors, nurses, health attendants, and porters who are in regular contact with blood, body fluids and patients after informed consent. Well detailed and structured questionnaires were used to obtain demographic and other relevant data from the subjects. Blood samples were tested by Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for hepatitis B surface antigen. Results Out of the 187 HCWs there were 91 males (48.7%) and 96 (51.3%) females. Only 2 participants tested positive to hepatitis B surface antigen with a prevalence of 1.1%. Also, only 30 (16.0%) of the participants had been fully vaccinated against the infection while the remaining 157(84.0%) had no adult vaccination. Conclusion It is obvious that the awareness of the infection is low among the HCWs studied thus the need to incorporate screening for HbsAg and vaccination against HBV into the periodic/pre-employment health intervention programmes by employers to help in the protection of HCWs and control the spread of the virus. PMID:27042489

  10. Loss of the WaaL O-Antigen Ligase Prevents Surface Activation of the Flagellar Gene Cascade in Proteus mirabilis▿

    PubMed Central

    Morgenstein, Randy M.; Clemmer, Katy M.; Rather, Philip N.

    2010-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a Gram-negative bacterium that undergoes a physical and biochemical change from a vegetative swimmer cell (a typical Gram-negative rod) to an elongated swarmer cell when grown on a solid surface. In this study, we report that a transposon insertion in the waaL gene, encoding O-antigen ligase, blocked swarming motility on solid surfaces but had little effect on swimming motility in soft agar. The waaL mutant was unable to differentiate into a swarmer cell. Differentiation was also prevented by a mutation in wzz, encoding a chain length determinant for O antigen, but not by a mutation in wzyE, encoding an enzyme that polymerizes enterobacterial common antigen, a surface polysaccharide different from the lipid A::core. In wild-type P. mirabilis, increased expression of the flhDC operon occurs after growth on solid surfaces and is required for the high-level expression of flagellin that is characteristic of swarmer cells. However, in both the waaL and the wzz mutants, the flhDC operon was not activated during growth on agar. A loss-of-function mutation in the rcsB response regulator or overexpression of flhDC restored swarming to the waaL mutant, despite the absence of O antigen. Therefore, although O antigen may serve a role in swarming by promoting wettability, the loss of O antigen blocks a regulatory pathway that links surface contact with the upregulation of flhDC expression. PMID:20382766

  11. Human erythrocyte antigens. Regulation of expression of a novel erythrocyte surface antigen by the inhibitor Lutheran In(Lu) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Telen, M J; Eisenbarth, G S; Haynes, B F

    1983-01-01

    Our study describes a novel human erythrocyte protein antigen, the expression of which is regulated by the rare Lutheran inhibitor In(Lu) gene. We have produced a monoclonal antibody (A3D8) that bound strongly to erythrocytes from subjects with Lutheran phenotypes Lu(a+b+), Lu(a+b-), and Lu(a-b+) but bound negligibly to erythrocytes from subjects with the dominant form of Lu(a-b-) phenotype, reflecting inheritance of the In(Lu) gene. Importantly, erythrocytes from an individual with the recessive form of Lu(a-b-) phenotype (i.e., absence of the In(Lu) gene and absence of genes encoding for Lutheran antigens) showed reactivity with A3D8 antibody comparable to that seen with Lu(a+) or Lu(b+) erythrocytes. A3D8 antigen activity was also found on all leukocytes and in serum and plasma; this activity also appeared to be regulated by the In(Lu) gene in serum, plasma, and on a subset of leukocytes. Thus, we have identified a human erythrocyte protein whose expression is modified by the In(Lu) gene. This knowledge that such an antigen exists on erythrocytes and in normal plasma should allow further studies into the molecular genetics of the In(Lu) gene and into the functional and structural significance of the A3D8 antigen. PMID:6863545

  12. The Level of Viral Antigen Presented by Hepatocytes Influences CD8 T-Cell Function▿

    PubMed Central

    Gehring, Adam J.; Sun, Dianxing; Kennedy, Patrick T. F.; Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther; Lim, Seng Gee; Wasser, Shanthi; Selden, Clare; Maini, Mala K.; Davis, Dan M.; Nassal, Michael; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    CD8 T cells exert their antiviral function through cytokines and lysis of infected cells. Because hepatocytes are susceptible to noncytolytic mechanisms of viral clearance, CD8 T-cell antiviral efficiency against hepatotropic viruses has been linked to their capacity to produce gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). On the other hand, intrahepatic cytokine production triggers the recruitment of mononuclear cells, which sustain acute and chronic liver damage. Using virus-specific CD8 T cells and human hepatocytes, we analyzed the modulation of virus-specific CD8 T-cell function after recognition peptide-pulsed or virally infected hepatocytes. We observed that hepatocyte antigen presentation was generally inefficient, and the quantity of viral antigen strongly influenced CD8 T-cell antiviral function. High levels of hepatitis B virus production induced robust IFN-γ and TNF-α production in virus-specific CD8 T cells, while limiting amounts of viral antigen, both in hepatocyte-like cells and naturally infected human hepatocytes, preferentially stimulated CD8 T-cell degranulation. Our data document a mechanism where virus-specific CD8 T-cell function is influenced by the quantity of virus produced within hepatocytes. PMID:17202217

  13. How selection forces dictate the variant surface antigens used by malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Severins, Maite; Klinkenberg, Don; Heesterbeek, Hans

    2012-02-01

    Red blood cells infected by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum express variant surface antigens (VSAs) that evade host immunity and allow the parasites to persist in the human population. There exist many different VSAs and the differential expression of these VSAs is associated with the virulence (damage to the host) of the parasites. The aim of this study is to unravel the differences in the effect key selection forces have on parasites expressing different VSAs such that we can better understand how VSAs enable the parasites to adapt to changes in their environment (like control measures) and how this may impact the virulence of the circulating parasites. To this end, we have built an individual-based model that captures the main selective forces on malaria parasites, namely parasite competition, host immunity, host death and mosquito abundance at both the within- and between-host levels. VSAs are defined by the net growth rates they infer to the parasites and the model keeps track of the expression of, and antibody build-up against, each VSA in all hosts. Our results show an ordered acquisition of VSA-specific antibodies with host age, which causes a dichotomy between the more virulent VSAs that reach high parasitaemias but are restricted to young relatively non-immune hosts, and less virulent VSAs that do not reach such high parasitaemias but can infect a wider range of hosts. The outcome of a change in the parasite's environment in terms of parasite virulence depends on the exact balance between the selection forces, which sets the limiting factor for parasite survival. Parasites will evolve towards expressing more virulent VSAs when the limiting factor for parasite survival is the within-host parasite growth and the parasites are able to minimize this limitation by expressing more virulent VSAs.

  14. Prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen among refugees entering the United States between 2006 and 2008.

    PubMed

    Rein, David B; Lesesne, Sarah B; O'Fallon, Ann; Weinbaum, Cindy M

    2010-02-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) testing to identify chronic hepatitis B virus infection for foreign-born persons from countries or regions with HBsAg prevalence of >or=2%. However, limited data exist to indicate which countries meet this definition. To address this data gap, we estimated the HBsAg prevalence among refugees entering the United States between 2006 and 2008. We contacted state refugee health coordinators and asked them to report the number of refugees, country of origin, and HBsAg prevalence among refugees screened in their jurisdiction during the most recently available 12-month period prior to August 2008. We pooled data across jurisdictions and calculated the prevalence for any country with more than 30 refugees entering the United States, and where this level of data was not available by country, continents were considered. Of the 47 jurisdictions contacted, we received basic information from 31, with nine jurisdictions reporting HBsAg prevalence by country of origin applicable to 31,980 refugees (approximately 42% of refugees entering the United States during the observation period). We estimated an HBsAg prevalence of 2.8% (95% confidence interval 2.6%-3.0%) for refugees overall. Of the 37 countries with 30 or more refugees entering the United States, 25 had a prevalence of >or=2%. Prevalence was highest among refugees from Africa and Southeast Asia, and lowest among refugees from the Middle East and South/Central America. In the eight countries for which we had comparison data, six had lower HBsAg prevalence than in 1991.

  15. A Rough Energy Landscape to Describe Surface-Linked Antibody and Antigen Bond Formation

    PubMed Central

    Limozin, Laurent; Bongrand, Pierre; Robert, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies and B cell receptors often bind their antigen at cell-cell interface while both molecular species are surface-bound, which impacts bond kinetics and function. Despite the description of complex energy landscapes for dissociation kinetics which may also result in significantly different association kinetics, surface-bound molecule (2D) association kinetics usually remain described by an on-rate due to crossing of a single free energy barrier, and few experimental works have measured association kinetics under conditions implying force and two-dimensional relative ligand-receptor motion. We use a new laminar flow chamber to measure 2D bond formation with systematic variation of the distribution of encounter durations between antigen and antibody, in a range from 0.1 to 10 ms. Under physiologically relevant forces, 2D association is 100-fold slower than 3D association as studied by surface plasmon resonance assays. Supported by brownian dynamics simulations, our results show that a minimal encounter duration is required for 2D association; an energy landscape featuring a rough initial part might be a reasonable way of accounting for this. By systematically varying the temperature of our experiments, we evaluate roughness at 2kBT, in the range of previously proposed rough parts of landscapes models during dissociation. PMID:27731375

  16. Practical guidelines for assessing patients positive for hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Feinman, S. V.; Berris, B.; Sinclair, J. C.; Wrobel, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    In assessing the patient the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) the physician must decide on the basis of physical findings, results of laboratory tests and biopsy, when indicated, whether the patient is an asymptomatic carrier or has acute or chronic hepatitis. Asymptomatic carriers of HBsAg must be educated in personal hygiene and the possibility of transmission, should not be allowed to donate blood or breast-feed and should not work with blood products for human use or pharmaceutical products designated for intravenous use. However, it is otherwise not necessary to advise these individuals to change their profession. PMID:1032589

  17. Native surface association of a recombinant 38-kilodalton Treponema pallidum antigen isolated from the Escherichia coli outer membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Fehniger, T E; Radolf, J D; Walfield, A M; Cunningham, T M; Miller, J N; Lovett, M A

    1986-01-01

    A recombinant plasmid designated pAW305, containing a 6-kilobase insert of Treponema pallidum DNA, directed the expression of a 38-kilodalton (kDa) treponemal antigen in Escherichia coli. The 38-kDa antigen copurified with the outer membrane fraction of the E. coli cell envelope after treatment with nonionic detergents or sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Rabbits immunized with the recombinant 38-kDa antigen developed antibodies which reacted specifically with a 38-kDa T. pallidum antigen on immunoblots, and 38-kDa antisera specifically immobilized T. pallidum in a complement-dependent manner in the T. pallidum immobilization test. Antisera to the 38-kDa recombinant antigen were also used to demonstrate its native surface association on T. pallidum by immunoelectron microscopy. Images PMID:3516880

  18. Quantitating Antibody Uptake In Vivo: Conditional Dependence on Antigen Expression Levels

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Antibodies form an important class of cancer therapeutics, and there is intense interest in using them for imaging applications in diagnosis and monitoring of cancer treatment. Despite the expanding body of knowledge describing pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions of antibodies in vivo, discrepancies remain over the effect of antigen expression level on tumoral uptake with some reports indicating a relationship between uptake and expression and others showing no correlation. Procedures Using a cell line with high EpCAM expression and moderate EGFR expression, fluorescent antibodies with similar plasma clearance were imaged in vivo. A mathematical model and mouse xenograft experiments were used to describe the effect of antigen expression on uptake of these high affinity antibodies. Results As predicted by the theoretical model, under subsaturating conditions, uptake of the antibodies in such tumors is similar because localization of both probes is limited by delivery from the vasculature. In a separate experiment, when the tumor is saturated, the uptake becomes dependent on the number of available binding sites. In addition, targeting of small micrometastases is shown to be higher than larger vascularized tumors. Conclusions These results are consistent with the prediction that high affinity antibody uptake is dependent on antigen expression levels for saturating doses and delivery for subsaturating doses. It is imperative for any probe to understand whether quantitative uptake is a measure of biomarker expression or transport to the region of interest. The data provide support for a predictive theoretical model of antibody uptake, enabling it to be used as a starting point for the design of more efficacious therapies and timely quantitative imaging probes. PMID:20809210

  19. Fluorescence Evaluation of Antigen-Antibody Reactivity on Surface of Proteinaceous Occlusion Body: Toward Application in Reusable Protein Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.; Hosokawa, Yoichiroh; Suzuki, Kenji; Ikeda, Keiko; Mori, Hajime; Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    A proteinaceous occlusion body, which is produced by insect viruses and consists of polyhedrin protein, has attracted much attention as a capsule for occluding an antigen protein. The occlusion body is called polyhedron. Its shape is cubic and its size is a few μm. Because several antigen proteins will be on the surface of polyhedra and several chemically active sites will be exposed, the polyhedra can be used as elements of protein chips to monitor antigen-antibody reactions. This idea is demonstrated by fixing a single polyhedron on a glass substrate and inducing an antigen-antibody reaction individually, and confirmed using relevant fluorescence microscopic images. Furthermore, a technique of cleaning the reacted surface is developed on the basis of the solubility of the polyhedrin matrix in an alkaline solution. The antigen-antibody complex on the surface can be removed by washing with the alkaline solution, and the antigen inside the polyhedron is exposed to the surface. On the basis of these results, the possibility of developing a “reusable protein chip” using the polyhedron is proposed.

  20. Elastic liposome-mediated transdermal immunization enhanced the immunogenicity of P. falciparum surface antigen, MSP-119.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Rajeev K; Garg, Neeraj K; Jadon, Rajesh; Sahu, Tejram; Katare, Om Prakash; Dalai, Sarat K; Awasthi, Amit; Marepally, Srujan K

    2015-08-26

    Transdermal immunization results in poor immunogenicity, which can be attributed to poor permeability of antigens through the skin. Therefore, elastic liposome, ultradeformable lipid vesicles, may overcome the challenges faced during transdermal immunization. This versatile carrier proves better vehicle for transcutaneous delivery of protein, peptide and nucleic acid antigens. The present results are suggestive of improved immunogenicity of carboxyl-terminal 19 kDa fragment of merozoite surface protein-1 (PfMSP-119) of Plasmodium falciparum when administered subcutaneously through elastic liposomes. The prepared elastic liposomes were characterized with respect to vesicles shape and surface morphology, size and size distribution, entrapment efficiency, elasticity, stability and in vitro release. Humoral and cell-mediated immune (CMI) response elicited by topically applied PfMSP-119-loaded elastic liposomes, intramuscularly administered alum-adsorbed PfMSP-119 solution, and topically applied PfMSP-119-loaded conventional liposomes were compared and normalized with vehicle control. Results suggest greater transcutaneous immunization via elastic liposomes, and induced robust and perdurable IgG-specific antibody and cytophilic isotype responses. We report to have achieved sizeable CMI activating factor (IFNγ), a crucial player in conferring resistance to asexual blood stage malaria, responses with elastic liposomes when compared with other formulations. The fluorescence microscopy and histopathology results are suggestive of prominent skin permeation and biodistribution, and demonstrate efficient delivery of malaria antigen via elastic liposomes to immunocompetent Langerhans cells (LC) and lymphatics. In conclusion, elastic liposomal formulation provided greater entrapment efficiency, enhanced penetration and heightened and long-lasting immune response. Moreover, effective immunoadjuvant property of this carrier justifies its potential for improved vaccine delivery

  1. Evaluation of a novel chemiluminescent microplate enzyme immunoassay for hepatitis B surface antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin; Song, Liu-Wei; Fang, Lin-Lin; Wu, Yong; Ge, Sheng-Xiang; Li, Hui; Yuan, Quan; Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) is an important biomarker used in the diagnosis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, but false-negative results are still reported in the detection of HBsAg using commercial assays. In this study, we evaluated the qualitative properties of a novel HBsAg chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA) assay--WTultra. WHO standard sample dilution series and samples from low-level HBsAg carriers (<1 ng/mL) were used to evaluate the sensitivity of the WTultra assay. Boston Biomedica, Inc. (BBI) hepatitis B seroconversion panels were used to assess the ability of the WTultra assay to detect the window period. In addition, dilution series of 22 serum samples with different genotypes, serotypes and HBsAg mutations were used to assess the WTultra assay, and these were compared with other commercial assays. The lower detection limit of the WTultra assay was 0.012 IU/mL, and it showed a high sensitivity (97.52%, 95% CI, 94.95-99.00) in the detection of 282 low-level HBsAg carriers (<1 ng/mL). In samples with various HBV genotypes, serotypes and HBsAg mutations, the WTultra assay yielded 117 positive results in 132 samples, which was significantly higher than the results with the other four commercial assays (89, 83, 65 and 45, respectively, p<0.01). In the assays of mutant strains, the WTultra assay detected 82 positive results in 90 samples, which was significantly better than the results for the Hepanostika HBsAg Ultra (58 positive) and Architect (55 positive) (p<0.01) assays, which in turn were significantly better than the Murex V.3 (41 positive, p=0.026) and AxSYM V2 (29 positive, p<0.01) assays. However, in the detection of 42 samples of wild-type strains with various genotypes and serotypes, no significant differences were observed among the WTultra (35 positive), Architect (28 positive) and Hepanostika HBsAg Ultra (31 positive) assays. However, the WTultra assay detected significantly more samples than the Murex V.3 (24

  2. Immunotherapy for Osteosarcoma: Genetic Modification of T cells Overcomes Low Levels of Tumor Antigen Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Nabil; Salsman, Vita S; Yvon, Eric; Louis, Chrystal U; Perlaky, Laszlo; Wels, Winfried S; Dishop, Meghan K; Kleinerman, Eugenie E; Pule, Martin; Rooney, Cliona M; Heslop, Helen E; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is expressed by the majority of human osteosarcomas and is a risk factor for poor outcome. Unlike breast cancer, osteosarcoma cells express HER2 at too low, a level for patients to benefit from HER2 monoclonal antibodies. We reasoned that this limitation might be overcome by genetically modifying T cells with HER2-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), because even a low frequency of receptor engagement could be sufficient to induce effector cell killing of the tumor. HER2-specific T cells were generated by retroviral transduction with a HER2-specific CAR containing a CD28.ζ signaling domain. HER2-specific T cells recognized HER2-positive osteosarcoma cells as judged by their ability to proliferate, produce immunostimulatory T helper 1 cytokines, and kill HER2-positive osteosarcoma cell lines in vitro. The adoptive transfer of HER2-specific T cells caused regression of established osteosarcoma xenografts in locoregional as well as metastatic mouse models. In contrast, delivery of nontransduced (NT) T cells did not change the tumor growth pattern. Genetic modification of T cells with CARs specific for target antigens, expressed at too low a level to be effectively recognized by monoclonal antibodies, may allow immunotherapy to be more broadly applicable for human cancer therapy. PMID:19532139

  3. Surface antigen cross-linking triggers forced exit of a protozoan parasite from its host.

    PubMed

    Clark, T G; Lin, T L; Dickerson, H W

    1996-06-25

    We used the common fish pathogen Ichthyophthirius multifiliis as a model for studying interactions between parasitic ciliates and their vertebrate hosts. Although highly pathogenic, Ichthyophthirius can elicit a strong protective immune response in fish after exposure to controlled infections. To investigate the mechanisms underlying host resistance, a series of passive immunization experiments were carried out using mouse monoclonal antibodies against a class of surface membrane proteins, known as immobilization antigens (or i-antigens), thought to play a role in the protective response. Such antibodies bind to cilia and immobilize I. multifiliis in vitro. Surprisingly, we found that passive antibody transfer in vivo caused rapid exit of parasites from the host. The effect was highly specific for a given I. multifiliis serotype. F(ab)2 subfragments had the same effect as intact antibody, whereas monovalent Fab fragments failed to protect. The activity of Fab could, nevertheless, be restored after subsequent i.p. injection of bivalent goat anti-mouse IgG. Parasites that exit the host had detectable antibody on their surface and appeared viable in all respects. These findings represent a novel instance among protists in which protective immunity (and evasion of the host response) result from an effect of antibody on parasite behavior.

  4. Blastocystis surface antigen is stable in chemically preserved stool samples for at least 1 year.

    PubMed

    Gould, Rick; Boorom, Kenneth

    2013-07-01

    Blastocystis spp. refer to a group of prevalent enteric protists found in humans and animals. Detection of Blastocystis spp. in fecal samples is often performed by clinicians with direct microscopy, which provides low sensitivity, or with culture and polymerase chain reaction testing, a method which is problematic when used with formalin-preserved stool samples. Prior study of Blastocystis and other enteric protists suggests that immunofluorescence antibody (IFA) stain could provide sensitivity and compatibility with formalin, but no information is available on the longevity of Blastocystis sp.'s surface antigens in formalin. We collected fecal samples from animals at a country fair held in the summer of 2009 in Oregon, USA. Samples were tested for the presence of Blastocystis infection using an IFA stain shortly after collection, and again after 1 year, with samples stored refrigerated at 4-8 °C. Most samples collected from steer, pigs, and goats were found to be Blastocystis positive. All fecal samples that were Blastocystis positive initially remained positive after 1 year. Blastocystis-negative samples remained negative. Minimal degradation was observed in stained slides. Blastocystis surface antigens detected by a polyclonal stain remained stable in formalin for a period of at least 1 year.

  5. Analysis of Structures and Epitopes of Surface Antigen Glycoproteins Expressed in Bradyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Hua; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Qingli; Gong, Jing; Cong, Haizi; Xin, Qing; He, Shenyi

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan parasite capable of infecting humans and animals. Surface antigen glycoproteins, SAG2C, -2D, -2X, and -2Y, are expressed on the surface of bradyzoites. These antigens have been shown to protect bradyzoites against immune responses during chronic infections. We studied structures of SAG2C, -2D, -2X, and -2Y proteins using bioinformatics methods. The protein sequence alignment was performed by T-Coffee method. Secondary structural and functional domains were predicted using software PSIPRED v3.0 and SMART software, and 3D models of proteins were constructed and compared using the I-TASSER server, VMD, and SWISS-spdbv. Our results showed that SAG2C, -2D, -2X, and -2Y are highly homologous proteins. They share the same conserved peptides and HLA-I restricted epitopes. The similarity in structure and domains indicated putative common functions that might stimulate similar immune response in hosts. The conserved peptides and HLA-restricted epitopes could provide important insights on vaccine study and the diagnosis of this disease. PMID:23586017

  6. Yeast surface display of a noncovalent MHC class II heterodimer complexed with antigenic peptide.

    PubMed

    Boder, Eric T; Bill, Jerome R; Nields, Andrew W; Marrack, Philippa C; Kappler, John W

    2005-11-20

    Microbial protein display technologies have enabled directed molecular evolution of binding and stability properties in numerous protein systems. In particular, dramatic improvements to antibody binding affinity and kinetics have been accomplished using these tools in recent years. Examples of successful application of display technologies to other immunological proteins have been limited to date. Herein, we describe the expression of human class II major histocompatibility complex allele (MHCII) HLA-DR4 on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a noncovalently associated heterodimer. The yeast-displayed MHCII is fully native as assessed by binding of conformationally specific monoclonal antibodies; failure of antibodies specific for empty HLA-DR4 to bind yeast-displayed protein indicates antigenic peptide is bound. This report represents the first example of a noncovalent protein dimer displayed on yeast and of successful display of wild-type MHCII. Results further point to the potential for using yeast surface display for engineering and analyzing the antigen binding properties of MHCII.

  7. Studies on thyroid cell surface antigens using cultured human thyroid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fenzi, G F; Bartalena, L; Chiovato, L; Marcocci, C; Rotella, C M; Zonefrati, R; Toccafondi, R; Pinchera, A

    1982-01-01

    Human thyroid cells in primary culture were used for studies of thyroid cell surface antibodies in patients with thyroid autoimmune disorders. Radioiodinated IgG preparations containing thyroid microsomal antibody (TMAb), thyroid stimulating antibody (TSAb) and/or thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb) were tested for binding to thyroid cells. Binding was observed with radioiodinated IgG from patients with Graves' disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and idiopathic myxoedema containing TMAb, irrespective of the presence of TSAb and TgAb, while negative results were obtained with normal IgG. A dose-dependent inhibition of binding to thyroid cells was produced by the addition of the corresponding unlabelled IgG preparations. Evidence for tissue specificity was provided by the absence of binding to human skin fibroblasts used as controls. Preabsorption with human thyroid microsomes completely abolished the binding to thyroid cells of a radioiodinated TMAb positive IgG preparation, while only incomplete removal of the reactivity to thyroid microsomes was produced by preabsorption with thyroid cells. These data suggest that some but not all microsomal antigenic determinants are expressed on the thyroid cell surface. Binding to thyroid cells was also observed with purified TgAb, indicating that thyroglobulin antigenic determinants are present on the surface of thyroid cells. No evidence of binding was obtained with a TSAb positive Graves' IgG preparation with undetectable TMAb and TgAb. Unlabelled IgG preparations containing TMAb from patients with either Hashimoto's thyroiditis or idiopathic myxoedema were shown to inhibit the binding to thyroid cells of radioiodinated TMAb positive Graves' IgG and vice versa. These data indicate that antibodies present in these thyroid autoimmune disorders share common thyroid cell surface antigens. However, the binding of radioiodinated IgG from a patient with idiopathic myxoedema was only partially inhibited by Graves' or Hashimoto's Ig

  8. Detection of cells captured with antigens on shear horizontal surface-acoustic-wave sensors.

    PubMed

    Hao, Hsu-Chao; Chang, Hwan-You; Wang, Tsung-Pao; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2013-02-01

    Techniques to separate cells are widely applied in immunology. The technique to separate a specific antigen on a microfluidic platform involves the use of a shear horizontal surface-acoustic-wave (SH-SAW) sensor. With specific antibodies conjugated onto the surface of the SH-SAW sensors, this technique can serve to identify specific cells in bodily fluids. Jurkat cells, used as a target in this work, provide a model of cells in small abundance (1:1000) for isolation and purification with the ultimate goal of targeting even more dilute cells. T cells were separated from a mixed-cell medium on a chip (Jurkat cells/K562 cells, 1/1000). A novel microchamber was developed to capture cells during the purification, which required a large biosample. Cell detection was demonstrated through the performance of genetic identification on the chip.

  9. Recombinant Forms of Leishmania amazonensis Excreted/Secreted Promastigote Surface Antigen (PSA) Induce Protective Immune Responses in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Petitdidier, Elodie; Pagniez, Julie; Papierok, Gérard; Vincendeau, Philippe; Lemesre, Jean-Loup; Bras-Gonçalves, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Preventive vaccination is a highly promising strategy for interrupting leishmaniasis transmission that can, additionally, contribute to elimination. A vaccine formulation based on naturally excreted secreted (ES) antigens was prepared from L. infantum promastigote culture supernatant. This vaccine achieved successful results in Phase III trials and was licensed and marketed as CaniLeish. We recently showed that newly identified ES promastigote surface antigen (PSA), from both viable promastigotes and axenically-grown amastigotes, represented the major constituent and the highly immunogenic antigen of L. infantum and L. amazonensis ES products. We report here that three immunizations with either the recombinant ES LaPSA-38S (rPSA) or its carboxy terminal part LaPSA-12S (Cter-rPSA), combined with QA-21 as adjuvant, confer high levels of protection in naive L. infantum-infected Beagle dogs, as checked by bone marrow parasite absence in respectively 78.8% and 80% of vaccinated dogs at 6 months post-challenge. The parasite burden in infected vaccinated dogs was significantly reduced compared to placebo group, as measured by q-PCR. Moreover, our results reveal humoral and cellular immune response clear-cut differences between vaccinated and control dogs. An early increase in specific IgG2 antibodies was observed in rPSA/QA-21- and Cter-rPSA/QA-21-immunized dogs only. They were found functionally active in vitro and were highly correlated with vaccine protection. In vaccinated protected dogs, IFN-γ and NO productions, as well as anti-leishmanial macrophage activity, were increased. These data strongly suggest that ES PSA or its carboxy-terminal part, in recombinant forms, induce protection in a canine model of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis by inducing a Th1-dominant immune response and an appropriate specific antibody response. These data suggest that they could be considered as important active components in vaccine candidates. PMID:27223609

  10. Antigen processing of glycoconjugate vaccines; the polysaccharide portion of the pneumococcal CRM(197) conjugate vaccine co-localizes with MHC II on the antigen processing cell surface.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zengzu; Schreiber, John R

    2009-05-21

    Pneumococcal (Pn) polysaccharides (PS) are T-independent (TI) antigens and do not induce immunological memory or antibodies in infants. Conjugation of PnPS to the carrier protein CRM(197) induces PS-specific antibody in infants, and memory similar to T-dependent (Td) antigens. Conjugates have improved immunogenicity via antigen processing and presentation of carrier protein with MHC II and recruitment of T cell help, but the fate of the PS attached to the carrier is unknown. To determine the location of the PS component of PnPS-CRM(197) in the APC, we separately labeled PS and protein and tracked their location. The PS of types 14-CRM(197) and 19F-CRM(197) was specifically labeled by Alexa Fluor 594 hydrazide (red). The CRM(197) was separately labeled red in a reaction that did not label PS. Labeled antigens were incubated with APC which were fixed, permeabilized and incubated with anti-MHC II antibody labeled green by Alexa Fluor 488, followed by confocal microscopy. Labeled CRM(197) was presented on APC surface and co-localized with MHC II (yellow). Labeled unconjugated 14 or 19F PS did not go to the APC surface, but PS labeled 14-CRM(197) and 19F-CRM(197) was internalized and co-localized with MHC II. Monoclonal antibody to type 14 PS bound to intracellular type 14 PS and PS-CRM(197). Brefeldin A and chloroquine blocked both CRM(197) and PS labeled 14-CRM(197) and 19F-CRM(197) from co-localizing with MHC II. These data suggest that the PS component of the CRM(197) glycoconjugate enters the endosome, travels with CRM(197) peptides to the APC surface and co-localizes with MHC II.

  11. Surface plasmon resonance label-free monitoring of antibody antigen interactions in real time

    SciTech Connect

    Kausaite, A.; van Dijk, M.; Castrop, J.; Ramanaviciene, A.; Baltrus, J.P.; Acaite, J.; Ramanavicius, A.

    2007-01-01

    Detection of biologically active compounds is one of the most important topics in molecular biology and biochemistry. One of the most promising detection methods is based on the application of surface plasmon resonance for label-free detection of biologically active compounds. This method allows one to monitor binding events in real time without labeling. The system can therefore be used to determine both affinity and rate constants for interactions between various types of molecules. Here, we describe the application of a surface plasmon resonance biosensor for label-free investigation of the interaction between an immobilized antigen bovine serum albumin (BSA) and antibody rabbit anti-cow albumin IgG1 (anti-BSA). The formation of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) over a gold surface is introduced into this laboratory training protocol as an effective immobilization method, which is very promising in biosensing systems based on detection of affinity interactions. In the next step, covalent attachment via artificially formed amide bonds is applied for the immobilization of proteins on the formed SAM surface. These experiments provide suitable experience for postgraduate students to help them understand immobilization of biologically active materials via SAMs, fundamentals of surface plasmon resonance biosensor applications, and determination of non-covalent biomolecular interactions. The experiment is designed for master and/or Ph.D. students. In some particular cases, this protocol might be adoptable for bachelor students that already have completed an extended biochemistry program that included a background in immunology.

  12. King cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) bites in Myanmar: venom antigen levels and development of venom antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tun-Pe; Aye-Aye-Myint; Warrell, D A; Tin-Myint

    1995-03-01

    Venom, venom IgG and IgM antibody and total serum IgG levels following king cobra bites in two reptile handlers were measured by enzyme immunoassay. The patient in case 1 received antivenom while the patient in case 2 did not. Case 1 made a complete recovery following the bite and produced a high titre short-lived antibody. Venom antigen was not detected in the sample taken 11 hr after antivenom. Case 2 had experienced two recent minor king cobra bites and had received traditional immunization 4 weeks before the accident reported here. He had developed only local swelling and suffered no neurological symptoms. Venom antigen measured at 1.45 hr after the bite was 132 ng/ml; this rapidly fell to 45 ng/ml over the next 30 min, and was no longer detectable 14 hr after the bite. The pattern of venom IgG and IgM antibody responses in both cases was comparable, except that in case 2 the venom IgG peak was maintained for 13 days, compared with 1 day in case 1; in case 2 it subsequently fell to low levels 8 weeks after the bite. Venom IgM appeared 1 day after the bite, peaked at day 7-9, rapidly tailed off on day 12-16 and was then undetectable from day 20 onwards in both. Total IgG level remained within normal limits in both. It is possible that previous bites and recent immunization contributed to the boosting of the venom IgG response in case 2.

  13. Antibody to Hepatitis B Core Antigen Levels in the Natural History of Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Wei; Song, Liu-Wei; Fang, Yu-Qing; Wu, Xiao-Feng; Liu, Dan-Yang; Xu, Chun; Wang, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Wen; Lv, Dong-Xia; Li, Jun; Deng, Yong-Qiong; Wang, Yan; Huo, Na; Yu, Min; Xi, Hong-Li; Liu, Dan; Zhou, Yi-Xing; Wang, Gui-Qiang; Xia, Ning-Shao; Zhang, Ming-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies have revealed antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc) levels as a predictor of treatment response in hepatitis B early antigen (HBeAg)-positive chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients in both interferon and nucleos(t)ide analog therapy cohorts. However, there is no information about anti-HBc levels in the natural history of CHB. This study aimed to define anti-HBc levels of different phases in the natural history of CHB. Two hundred eleven treatment-naive CHB patients were included in the study. They were classified into 4 phases: immune tolerance (IT) phase (n = 39), immune clearance (IC) phase (n = 48), low or no-replicative (LR) phase (n = 55), and HBeAg-negative hepatitis (ENH, n = 69). Fifty patients who were HBsAg negative and anti-HBc positive were also recruited as past HBV infection (PBI) control group. Anti-HBc levels were measured by a newly developed double-sandwich immunoassay. Correlation of anti-HBc levels with alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and other HBV-related markers within each phase was performed. Serum anti-HBc levels were statistically significant between patients in different phases of CHB (P < 0.001). The median anti-HBc levels were: IT (3.17 log10 IU/mL), IC (4.39 log10 IU/mL), LR (3.29 log10 IU/mL), ENH (4.12 log10 IU/mL), and PBI (0.61 log10 IU/mL). There existed a strong correlation in IC (r = 0.489, P < 0.001), a poor correlation in ENH (r = 0.275, P = 0.042), and no correlation in patients with ALT reached 5 times upper limit of normal (r = 0.120, P = 0.616). Anti-HBc levels show significant differences during the natural course of CHB. These results may provide some potentially useful insights into hepatitis B pathogenesis and immune activation against hepatitis B virus. PMID:25546679

  14. Crossreacting determinants in variant-specific surface antigens of African trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Barbet, A F; McGuire, T C

    1978-04-01

    A number of variant-specific surface antigens (VSSAs) were purified from clones of Trypanosoma brucei and T. congolense and tested for immunological crossreactivity. Anti-VSSA sera were clone-specific when tested by indirect immunofluorescence of living trypanosomes, but they were not clone-specific when tested by radioimmunoassay with purified 125I-labeled VSSAs. In this double-antibody radioimmunoassay every VSSA tested was precipitated by the homologous and all heterologous anti-VSSA sera. Any unlabeled VSSA could inhibit the heterologous precipitation reactions by 100%. The homologous precipitation reactions were effectively inhibited only by unlabeled homologous VSSA. Crossreactions between different VSSA molecules were also revealed by microcomplement fixation tests. The results confirm the presence, in VSSAs, of variable determinants specific to individual VSSAs and also show crossreacting determinants in all VSSAs tested, including those isolated from different species of trypanosomes. These results contrast with previous studies which failed to find evidence for immunological crossreactivity between different VSSA molecules. We suggest that the crossreacting determinants in VSSAs may represent common structural regions. The existence of such regions would have considerable implication for the development of theories and experiments concerning the mechanism of antigenic variation in African trypanosomes.

  15. Are the PE-PGRS proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis variable surface antigens?

    PubMed

    Banu, Sayera; Honoré, Nadine; Saint-Joanis, Brigitte; Philpott, Dana; Prévost, Marie-Christine; Cole, Stewart T

    2002-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv contains 67 PE-PGRS genes, with multiple tandem repetitive sequences, encoding closely related proteins that are exceptionally rich in glycine and alanine. As no functional information was available, 10 of these genes were selected and shown to be expressed in vitro by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Antibodies against five PE-PGRS proteins, raised in mice by DNA vaccination, detected single proteins when the same plasmid constructs used for immunization were expressed in epithelial cells or in reticulocyte extracts, confirming that the PE-PGRS proteins are antigenic. As expected from the conserved repetitive structure, the antibodies cross-reacted with more than one PE-PGRS protein, suggesting that different proteins share common epitopes. PE-PGRS proteins were detected by West-ern blotting in five different mycobacterial species (M. tuberculosis, M. bovis BCG, M. smegmatis, M. marinum and M. gordonae) and 11 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis. Whole-genome comparisons of M. tuberculosis predicted allelic diversity in the PE-PGRS family, and this was confirmed by immunoblot studies as size variants were detected in clinical strains. Subcellular fractionation studies and immunoelectron microscopy localized many PE-PGRS proteins in the cell wall and cell membrane of M. tuberculosis. The data suggest that some PE-PGRS proteins are variable surface antigens.

  16. Crossreacting determinants in variant-specific surface antigens of African trypanosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Barbet, A F; McGuire, T C

    1978-01-01

    A number of variant-specific surface antigens (VSSAs) were purified from clones of Trypanosoma brucei and T. congolense and tested for immunological crossreactivity. Anti-VSSA sera were clone-specific when tested by indirect immunofluorescence of living trypanosomes, but they were not clone-specific when tested by radioimmunoassay with purified 125I-labeled VSSAs. In this double-antibody radioimmunoassay every VSSA tested was precipitated by the homologous and all heterologous anti-VSSA sera. Any unlabeled VSSA could inhibit the heterologous precipitation reactions by 100%. The homologous precipitation reactions were effectively inhibited only by unlabeled homologous VSSA. Crossreactions between different VSSA molecules were also revealed by microcomplement fixation tests. The results confirm the presence, in VSSAs, of variable determinants specific to individual VSSAs and also show crossreacting determinants in all VSSAs tested, including those isolated from different species of trypanosomes. These results contrast with previous studies which failed to find evidence for immunological crossreactivity between different VSSA molecules. We suggest that the crossreacting determinants in VSSAs may represent common structural regions. The existence of such regions would have considerable implication for the development of theories and experiments concerning the mechanism of antigenic variation in African trypanosomes. PMID:77021

  17. Suppression of hamster lymphocyte reactivity to simian virus 40 tumor surface antigens by spleen cells from pregnant hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Weppner, W.A.; Adkinson, L.R.; Coggin, J.H.Jr

    1980-09-01

    SV40-transformed tumor cells in hamsters have been found to have cell surface antigens cross-reactive with antigens temporally expressed on fetal tissues. Using a lymphocyte transformation assay, spleen cells from pregnant hamsters were found to be incapable of responding to preparations of either hamster fetal tissue or SV40-transformed cells. However, a suppressor component can be demonstrated in spleen cell populations of both primi-and multiparous hamsters during pregnancy that is capable of reducing the response of lymphocytes sensitized against SV40 tumor-associated antigens. The degree of suppression is proportional to the ratio of responder cells to spleen cells from pregnant animals. These results suggest there is a subpopulation of spleen cells involved in immunoregulation during pregnancy that has the ability to suppress the reactivity of lymphocytes sensitized against SV40-associated oncofetal antigens.

  18. Impact of surface chemistry and topography on the function of antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Rostam, H M; Singh, S; Vrana, N E; Alexander, M R; Ghaemmaghami, A M

    2015-03-01

    Antigen presenting cells (APCs) such as macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) play a crucial role in orchestrating immune responses against foreign materials. The activation status of APCs can determine the outcome of an immune response following implantation of synthetic materials, towards either healing or inflammation. A large range of biomaterials are used in the fabrication of implantable devices and drug delivery systems. These materials will be in close contact with APCs and characteristics such as surface chemistry and topography may have a critical role in initiating pro- or anti-inflammatory immune responses. Controlling biomaterial surface attributes provides a powerful tool for modulating the phenotype and function of immune cells with the aim of reducing detrimental pro-inflammatory responses and promoting beneficial healing responses. In this article, we review recent literature on how biomaterial surface topography and chemistry can modulate APC populations towards distinct pro- or anti-inflammatory phenotypes with specific examples of how these properties can be used to control host response in vivo. Topographical and/or chemical design of biomaterial surfaces with respect to the APC responses can pave the way for a new generation of 'cell instructive' materials with immunomodulatory properties with a wide range of clinical applications.

  19. Acute Cholecystitis with Significantly Elevated Levels of Serum Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9

    PubMed Central

    Akimoto, Shuji; Banshodani, Masataka; Nishihara, Masahiro; Nambu, Junko; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Shimamoto, Fumio; Dohi, Kiyohiko; Sugino, Keizo; Ohdan, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9), a marker of malignant tumors, is generally slightly elevated in benign conditions. We report a case of acute cholecystitis with a significantly elevated level of serum CA 19-9 based on positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) findings. A 65-year-old woman presented with abdominal pain and fever. A CT image revealed an enlarged gallbladder without tumor shadows. The C-reactive protein (CRP) level was elevated to 7.66 mg/dl. Moreover, the serum CA 19-9 level was significantly elevated to 19,392 U/ml. We started antibiotic treatment, because we suspected acute cholecystitis, but still, we could not ignore the possible presence of malignant tumors. After 11 days of antibiotic treatment, serum CRP and CA 19-9 levels decreased to 0.11 mg/dl and 1,049 U/ml, respectively. There was an accumulation of fluorine 18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (maximum standardized uptake value, 9.3) without tumor shadows in the liver, near the gallbladder, on the PET-CT examination. We considered the possibility that the inflammation had spread from the gallbladder to the liver, made a diagnosis of acute cholecystitis, and performed a cholecystectomy 33 days after treatment initiation. The serum CA 19-9 level decreased to 45 U/ml after the surgery. One year after the surgery, the patient was alive, and the serum CA 19-9 level was 34 U/ml. Acute cholecystitis with a significantly high elevation of the serum CA 19-9 level is rare. In such cases, it is important to confirm the change in the serum CA 19-9 level over time after antibiotic treatment and perform imaging studies to distinguish between inflammation and malignancy. PMID:27721726

  20. Preparation of miniantibodies to Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 surface antigens and their use for bacterial detection.

    PubMed

    Dykman, Lev A; Staroverov, Sergei A; Guliy, Olga I; Ignatov, Oleg V; Fomin, Alexander S; Vidyasheva, Irina V; Karavaeva, Olga A; Bunin, Viktor D; Burygin, Gennady L

    2012-01-01

    This article reports the first preparation of miniantibodies to Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 surface antigens by using a combinatorial phage library of sheep antibodies. The prepared phage antibodies were used for the first time for lipopolysaccharide and flagellin detection by dot assay, electro-optical analysis of cell suspensions, and transmission electron microscopy. Interaction of A. brasilense Sp245 with antilipopolysaccharide and antiflagellin phage-displayed miniantibodies caused the magnitude of the electro-optical signal to change considerably. The electro-optical results were in good agreement with the electron microscopic data. This is the first reported possibility of employing phage-displayed miniantibodies in bacterial detection aided by electro-optical analysis of cell suspensions.

  1. Expression of the Major Surface Antigen of Plasmodium knowlesi Sporozoites in Yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Shobhona; Godson, G. Nigel

    1985-05-01

    The circumsporozoite protein, a surface antigen of the sporozoite stage of the monkey malarial parasite Plasmodium knowlesi, was expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using an expression vector containing the 5' regulatory region of the yeast alcohol dehydrogenase I gene. It was necessary to eliminate the entire 5' upstream region of the parasite DNA to obtain the expression of this protein. Only the circumsporozoite precursor protein was produced by the yeast transformants, as detected by immunoblotting. About 55 and 20 percent of the circumsporozoite protein produced in yeast was associated with the 25,000g and 150,000g particulate fractions, respectively. The protein could be solubilized in Triton X-100 and was stable in solubilized extracts.

  2. Detection of dengue NS1 antigen using long-range surface plasmon waveguides.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wei Ru; Sekaran, Shamala Devi; Adikan, Faisal Rafiq Mahamd; Berini, Pierre

    2016-04-15

    The non-structural 1 (NS1) protein of the dengue virus circulates in infected patients' blood samples and can be used for early diagnosis of dengue infection. In this paper, we present the detection of naturally-occurring dengue NS1 antigen in infected patient blood plasma using straight long-range surface plasmon waveguides. Three commercially-available anti-NS1 monoclonal antibodies were used for recognition and their performance was compared and discussed. A similar figure of merit to the one used in conventional dengue NS1 capture using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was applied to our results. In general, the positive patient samples can be clearly differentiated from the negative ones and the results agree with those obtained using ELISA. The largest signal-to-noise ratio observed during the experiments was 356 and the best detection limit observed is estimated as 5.73 pg/mm(2).

  3. Chemically Induced Surface Evolutions with Level Sets

    2006-11-17

    ChISELS is used for the theoretical modeling of detailed surface chemistry and consomitant surface evolutions occurring during microsystem fabrication processes conducted at low pressures. Examples include physical vapor deposition (PVD), low pressure chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), and plasma etching. Evolving interfaces are represented using the level-set method and the evolution equations time integrated using a Semi-Lagrangian approach. A Ballistic transport model is employed to solve for the fluxes incident on each of the surface elements.more » Surface chemistry leading to etching or deposition is computed by either coupling to Surface Chemkin (a commercially available code) or by providing user defined subroutines. The computational meshes used are quad-trees (2-D) and oct-trees (3-D), constructed such that grid refinement is localized to regions near the surface interfaces. As the interface evolves, the mesh is dynamically reconstructed as needed for the grid to remain fine only around the interface. For parallel computation, a domain decomposition scheme with dynamic load balancing is used to distribute the computational work across processors.« less

  4. Serum levels of IGF-I and IGFBP-III and their relation with carcinoembryonic antigen and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 in cases of esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, O; Eroglu, A; Dag, E; Karaoglanoglu, N; Yilmaz, A

    2006-12-01

    Tumour markers are used for diagnosis, staging, evaluation of response to treatment, prognosis and detection of recurrences in clinical oncology. In this study, we aim to investigate the levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-III in cases with oesophageal carcinoma. We investigated their possible use as tumour markers and their relation to other tumour markers. Forty patients who were diagnosed as having oesophageal carcinoma by histopathological evaluation of endoscopic biopsies between January 2003 and July 2004 and 40 healthy people as the control group were included in the study. The serum levels of tumour markers including IGF-I, IGFBP-III, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 were measured in both groups. Data were compared statistically, and the importance of IGF-I and IGFBP-III levels were investigated in cases with oesophageal carcinoma. IGF-I levels were significantly higher in patients with oesophageal carcinoma when compared with the control group (p < 0.05), whereas IGFBP-III levels were significantly lower (p < 0.05). The increase in CEA levels was not statistically significant when compared with the control group. The increase in CA 19-9 levels was statistically significant when compared with the control group (p < 0.05). No correlation was detected between levels of IGF-I and IGFBP-III and levels of CEA and CA 19-9. We suggest that the serum IGF-I level may be used as a tumour marker in oesophageal carcinoma. A low level of serum IGFBP-III is also significant in cases with oesophageal carcinoma. We believe that drugs which inhibit IGF-I function or which stimulate the function of IGFBP-III may open new horizons in extra-surgical modalities for the treatment of oesophageal cancer.

  5. Preparation and characterization of human monoclonal antibodies directed against the hepatitis B virus surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Colucci, G; Kohtz, D S; Waksal, S D

    1986-06-01

    The hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) is highly immunogenic and induces an antibody response which is protective in vivo against hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Human monoclonal antibodies specific for HBsAg were produced, which could have potential therapeutic applications. Lymphocytes obtained from a vaccinated donor were stimulated in vitro and fused with the human myeloma cell line GM 4672, and eight hybridomas were obtained. Three of these clones, which reacted in an ELISA against the HBsAg vaccine, were expanded, subcloned and further analyzed. The subclones E7C2, C4C10, and D5B2 were able to bind to different HBsAg preparations, which express various subtypes, and recognized the major HBsAg peptides in Western blot analysis. Cross-inhibition experiments showed that E7C2, C4C10 and D5B2 are directed against the same epitope and have an affinity constant ranging from 5 X 10(7) to 3.3 X 10(9) M. Furthermore, these antibodies stained the surface and cytoplasm of the HBsAg-secreting cell lines PLC/PRF/5 and 4.10. The production of immunoglobulins varies from 0.3 to 1.3 micrograms/ml/10(6) and has remained stable over a period of 8 months. These human monoclonal antibodies, which appear to be directed against an antigenic determinant common to all HBsAg subtypes, could be useful in the study of HBV-related liver diseases as well as in their diagnosis and experimental therapy.

  6. Small-angle neutron scattering study of recombinant yeast-derived human hepatitis B virus surface antigen vaccine particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, M.; Ito, Y.; Kameyama, K.; Imai, M.; Ishikawa, N.; Takagi, T.

    1995-02-01

    The overall and internal structure of recombinant yeast-derived human hepatitis B virus surface antigen vaccine particles was investigated by small-angle neutron scattering using the contrast variation method. The vaccine is a nearly spherical particle, and its contrast-matching point was determined to be at about 24% D 2O content, indicating that a large part of the vaccine particle is occupied by lipids and carbohydrates from the yeast. The Stuhrmann plot suggests that the surface antigens exist predominantly in the peripheral region of the particle, which is favorable to the induction of anti-virus antibodies.

  7. Experimental studies on the inhibition effects of 1000 Chinese medicinal herbs on the surface antigen of hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Zheng, M; Zheng, Y

    1992-09-01

    The reverse passive hemagglutination inhibition test was used in the screening of 1000 Chinese materia medica for inhibitors of hepatitis B virus surface antigen. The herbal drugs were commercially available and the surface antigen was from sera of hepatitis B patients. 127 effective drugs were obtained from the survey of which 28 were highly inhibitory (8:1), 35 were moderately effective (4:1), and 64 mildly effective (2:1). Further experiments with varying dosages of the drug, dosages of HBsAg and duration of contact showed 10 drugs to be of optimal effect. PMID:1453758

  8. Evaluation of three recombinant multi-antigenic vaccines composed of surface and secretory antigens of Toxoplasma gondii in murine models of experimental toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Dziadek, Bozena; Gatkowska, Justyna; Brzostek, Anna; Dziadek, Jaroslaw; Dzitko, Katarzyna; Grzybowski, Marcin; Dlugonska, Henryka

    2011-01-17

    The great clinical and economical impact of Toxoplasma gondii infections makes the development of an effective vaccine for controlling toxoplasmosis an extremely important aim. In the presented study, we evaluate the protective and immunogenic properties of three recombinant subunit vaccines composed of rROP2+rGRA4+rSAG1, rROP2+rROP4+rGRA4 and rROP2+rROP4+rSAG1 proteins of T. gondii in an experimental toxoplasmosis model in the C3H/HeJ and C57BL/6 mouse strains. All three recombinant vaccines induced partial protection as measured by the reduction of brain cyst burden following challenge with five tissue cysts of the low virulence DX T. gondii strain. The level of protection was dependent on the antigen composition of the vaccine and the genetic background of the laboratory animals. The strongest protection against chronic toxoplasmosis was induced in both C3H/HeJ and C57BL/6 mice by the mixture of rhoptry proteins rROP2 and rROP4 combined with tachyzoite major protein rSAG1. The average parasite burden in these groups of mice was reduced by 71% and 90%, respectively, compared to non-vaccinated mice. The observed protective effect was related to the vaccine-induced cellular and humoral immune responses, as measured by the antigen-induced release of the Th1 cytokines IFN-γ and IL-2, the antigen-stimulated proliferation of spleen cells of vaccinated animals in comparison to control animals and the development of systemic antigen-specific IgG1 and IgG2a (C3H/HeJ) or IgG2c (C57BL/6) antibodies. Our studies show that recombinant rROP2, rROP4, rGRA4 and rSAG1 antigens may be promising candidates for a subunit vaccine against toxoplasmosis. Additionally, we demonstrate that the ideal composition of vaccine antigens can be equally effective in mice with different genetic backgrounds and variable levels of innate resistance to toxoplasmosis, resulting in strong protection against T. gondii invasion.

  9. Immunocytological and biochemical characterization of a new neuronal cell surface component (L1 antigen) which is involved in cell adhesion.

    PubMed Central

    Rathjen, F G; Schachner, M

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal and polyclonal L1 antibodies react by indirect immunofluorescence with the cell surface of cultured tetanus toxin-positive neurons from post-natal cerebella of mice, but not with glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes, O4 antigen-positive oligodendrocytes or fibronectin-positive fibroblasts or fibroblast-like cells. During cerebellar development L1 antigen is detectable on tetanus toxin-positive cells as early as embryonic day 13 after 3 days in culture. In sections of the early post-natal cerebellum, L1 antigen is found on pre-migratory neurons in the internal, but not in the external part of the external granular layer. In the adult cerebellum, L1 antigen is predominantly localized in the molecular layer and around Purkinje cells. Fibers in white matter and the granular layer are also L1 antigen-positive. Granule cell bodies and synaptic glomeruli are weakly antigen-positive. Several cell lines derived from neuroblastoma C1300 also express L1 antigen. The antigen is not detectable by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in tissue homogenates of liver, kidney, lung, heart, sperm or thymus. With polyclonal L1 antibodies, cross-reactive determinants are found in brains of rat, guinea pig, hamster, chicken, rabbit and man, but not in frog, while monoclonal antibody reacts detectably only with mouse brain. The molecular species recognized by both monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies display two prominent bands by SDS-PAGE under reducing and non-reducing conditions with apparent mol. wts. of 140 and 200 kd. L1 antigen isolated from cultured cerebellar cells consists mainly of a band in the 200-kd range and a faint one at 140 kd. L1 antigen from neuroblastoma N2A shows two bands with slightly higher apparent mol. wts. All molecular forms of L1 antigen can be labeled by [3H]fucose and [3H]glucosamine. Ca2+-independent re-aggregation of cerebellar cells from early post-natal C57BL/6J mice and of the continuous cell line N2A derived from the murine

  10. Identification of cross-reactive promastigote cell surface antigens of some leishmanial stocks by 125I labeling and immunoprecipitation.

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, P R; Jaffe, C L; Dwyer, D M

    1984-01-01

    Externally oriented surface membrane constituents of promastigotes from several Leishmania species were radiolabeled with 125I. Autoradiographs of cell surface-labeled and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-separated proteins of the stocks revealed distinctive patterns of bands in the molecular weight range of 6,000 to 240,000. Immunoprecipitation of detergent extracts of the labeled promastigote stocks with anti-Leishmania donovani membrane serum demonstrated that each of the stocks contained some antigenically cross-reactive determinants. The electrophoretic patterns of these determinants serve both to distinguish the parasite stocks (by unique, species-specific patterns) and to indicate antigenic similarities in stocks thought to be different by other biochemical criteria. At least 12 cross-reactive cell surface antigens in two New World leishmanias are recognized by polyvalent anti-L. donovani serum, suggesting that these common leishmanial antigens may account for the documented serological cross-reactivities among various Leishmania species. In all stocks tested, an iodinated protein was identified which had a relative molecular weight of 65,000 under reducing conditions but which demonstrated an increase in relative mobility in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels under nonreducing conditions. Distinctive patterns of the antigens common to the several stocks were also demonstrated with the use of monoclonal antibodies. Images PMID:6363295

  11. Clinical significance of venom antigen levels in patients envenomed by the Malayan pit viper (Calloselasma rhodostoma).

    PubMed

    Ho, M; Warrell, D A; Looareesuwan, S; Phillips, R E; Chanthavanich, P; Karbwang, J; Supanaranond, W; Viravan, C; Hutton, R A; Vejcho, S

    1986-05-01

    Serial venom antigen levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 46 patients with systemic envenoming by the Malayan pit viper (Calloselasma rhodostoma), a major cause of snake bite in Southeast Asia. The principal effects of the venom are defibrination, hemorrhage and local tissue necrosis. Admission venom levels, which varied between 0 and 595 ng/ml, correlated with the incidence of spontaneous systemic bleeding, blood incoagulability and concentrations of plasma fibrinogen and serum fibrin degradation products. The presence or absence of nonclotting blood also correlated with the time elapsed between the bite and hospital admission. The development of nonclotting blood may be delayed by up to 72 hr after the bite even though circulating venom and raised FDP may be detected at presentation. This is probably explained by a temporary equilibrium between synthesis and consumption of fibrinogen. Venom antigenemia recurred in 12 patients (26%) suggesting continuous absorption of venom from the wound or saturation of extravascular binding sites. Admission venom levels also correlated with the extent of local swelling and the occurrence of tissue necrosis at the site of the bite. Venom was detected in 87% of wound aspirates and 88% of urine specimens taken on admission. Tourniquets, of the type used in rural Thailand, did not delay the absorption of venom into the circulation. PMID:3706625

  12. Fibronectin and asialoglyprotein receptor mediate hepatitis B surface antigen binding to the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Wang, Feng; Tian, Linlin; Su, Jing; Zhu, Xiangqian; Lin, Li; Ding, Xiaoran; Wang, Xuejun; Wang, Shengqi

    2010-06-01

    Both fibronectin and the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) have been identified by some investigators as partners for hepatitis B virus (HBV) envelope proteins. Because fibronectin is a natural ligand for ASGPR, we speculated that HBV might attach to ASGPR expressed on the hepatocyte surface via fibronectin. To test this hypothesis, we first confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation that ASGPR, fibronectin and HBsAg bind to each other in HepG2.2.15 cells, and possible binding domains were identified by GST pull-down. In addition, by measuring binding of HBsAg to cells, we found that ASGPR and fibronectin enhanced the binding capability of HBsAg to HepG2 cells, and even to 293T and CHO cells, which normally do not bind HBV. In conclusion, our findings suggest that both fibronectin and ASGPR mediate HBsAg binding to the cell surface, which provides further evidence for the potential roles of these two proteins in mediating HBV binding to liver cells. PMID:20364278

  13. Serological responses to Cryptosporidium antigens among women using riverbank-filtered water, conventionally filtered surface water and groundwater in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Frost, Floyd; Craun, Gunther; Mihály, Kádár; György, Berencsi; Calderon, Rebecca; Muller, Tm

    2005-03-01

    We compared serological responses to Cryptosporidium parvum antigens using surplus sera from females undergoing routine screening for pregnancy from three counties in Hungary where bank-filtered surface water, conventionally filtered and disinfected surface water, and groundwater from either a karst or confined aquifer are commonly used for drinking water. The primary purpose was to determine whether the prevalence and intensity of serological responses, indicators of prior Cryptosporidium infection were similar for these populations. Women using groundwater from a confined aquifer had significantly lower mean serological responses for both the 15/17-kDa and 27-kDa (p < 0.0001) antigen groups than women using conventionally filtered and disinfected surface water or karst well water. This is suggestive of less frequent infections. Women using bank-filtered water also had lower mean responses for both antigen groups. Among women using bank-filtered water, the mean intensity of response for both antigen groups was almost one-third of the mean response observed for women using conventionally filtered and disinfected surface water. These findings suggest that riverbank filtration may be an effective alternative to conventional treatment for reducing Cryptosporidium exposures and infection from surface drinking water sources.

  14. Systemic and mucosal immune response induced by transcutaneous immunization using Hepatitis B surface antigen-loaded modified liposomes.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Dinesh; Mishra, Pradyumna Kumar; Dubey, Vaibhav; Nahar, Manoj; Dabadghao, Sunil; Jain, N K

    2008-04-23

    We have evaluated the efficiency of novel modified liposomes (ethosomes) for transcutaneous immunization (TCI) against Hepatitis B. Antigen-loaded ethosomes were prepared and characterized for shape, lamellarity, fluidity, size distribution, and entrapment efficiency. Spectral bio-imaging and flow cytometric studies showed efficient uptake of Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-loaded ethosomes by murine dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro, reaching a peak by 180 min. Transcutaneous delivery potential of the antigen-loaded system using human cadaver skin demonstrated a much higher skin permeation of the antigen in comparison to conventional liposomes and soluble antigen preparation. Topically applied HBsAg-loaded ethosomes in experimental mice showed a robust systemic and mucosal humoral immune response compared to intramuscularly administered alum-adsorbed HBsAg suspension, topically applied plain HBsAg solution and hydroethanolic (25%) HBsAg solution. The ability of the antigen-pulsed DCs to stimulate autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes was demonstrated by BrdU assay and a predominantly TH1 type of immune response was observed by multiplex cytometric bead array analysis. HBsAg-loaded ethosomes are able to generate a protective immune response and their ability to traverse and target the immunological milieu of the skin may find a potential application in the development of a transcutaneous vaccine against Hepatitis B virus (HBV).

  15. Systemic and mucosal immune response induced by transcutaneous immunization using Hepatitis B surface antigen-loaded modified liposomes.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Dinesh; Mishra, Pradyumna Kumar; Dubey, Vaibhav; Nahar, Manoj; Dabadghao, Sunil; Jain, N K

    2008-04-23

    We have evaluated the efficiency of novel modified liposomes (ethosomes) for transcutaneous immunization (TCI) against Hepatitis B. Antigen-loaded ethosomes were prepared and characterized for shape, lamellarity, fluidity, size distribution, and entrapment efficiency. Spectral bio-imaging and flow cytometric studies showed efficient uptake of Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-loaded ethosomes by murine dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro, reaching a peak by 180 min. Transcutaneous delivery potential of the antigen-loaded system using human cadaver skin demonstrated a much higher skin permeation of the antigen in comparison to conventional liposomes and soluble antigen preparation. Topically applied HBsAg-loaded ethosomes in experimental mice showed a robust systemic and mucosal humoral immune response compared to intramuscularly administered alum-adsorbed HBsAg suspension, topically applied plain HBsAg solution and hydroethanolic (25%) HBsAg solution. The ability of the antigen-pulsed DCs to stimulate autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes was demonstrated by BrdU assay and a predominantly TH1 type of immune response was observed by multiplex cytometric bead array analysis. HBsAg-loaded ethosomes are able to generate a protective immune response and their ability to traverse and target the immunological milieu of the skin may find a potential application in the development of a transcutaneous vaccine against Hepatitis B virus (HBV). PMID:18359615

  16. cDNA sequence analysis of a 29-kDa cysteine-rich surface antigen of pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica

    SciTech Connect

    Torian, B.E.; Stroeher, V.L.; Stamm, W.E. ); Flores, B.M. ); Hagen, F.S. )

    1990-08-01

    A {lambda}gt11 cDNA library was constructed from poly(U)-Spharose-selected Entamoeba histolytica trophozoite RNA in order to clone and identify surface antigens. The library was screened with rabbit polyclonal anti-E. histolytica serum. A 700-base-pair cDNA insert was isolated and the nucleotide sequence was determined. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cDNA revealed a cysteine-rich protein. DNA hybridizations showed that the gene was specific to E. histolytica since the cDNA probe reacted with DNA from four axenic strains of E. histolytica but did not react with DNA from Entamoeba invadens, Acanthamoeba castellanii, or Trichomonas vaginalis. The insert was subcloned into the expression vector pGEX-1 and the protein was expressed as a fusion with the C terminus of glutathione S-transferase. Purified fusion protein was used to generate 22 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and a mouse polyclonal antiserum specific for the E. histolytica portion of the fusion protein. A 29-kDa protein was identified as a surface antigen when mAbs were used to immunoprecipitate the antigen from metabolically {sup 35}S-labeled live trophozoites. The surface location of the antigen was corroborated by mAb immunoprecipitation of a 29-kDa protein from surface-{sup 125}I-labeled whole trophozoites as well as by the reaction of mAbs with live trophozoites in an indirect immunofluorescence assay performed at 4{degree}C. Immunoblotting with mAbs demonstrated that the antigen was present on four axenic isolates tested. mAbs recognized epitopes on the 29-kDa native antigen on some but not all clinical isolates tested.

  17. Circulating Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Particles Carry Hepatocellular microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Novellino, Luisa; Rossi, Riccardo L.; Bonino, Ferruccio; Cavallone, Daniela; Abrignani, Sergio; Pagani, Massimiliano; Brunetto, Maurizia R.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) produces high quantities of subviral surface antigen particles (HBsAg) which circulate in the blood outnumbering virions of about 1\\103–6 times. In individuals coinfected with the defective hepatitis Delta virus (HDV) the small HDV-RNA-genome and Delta antigen circulate as ribonucleoprotein complexes within HBsAg subviral particles. We addressed the question whether subviral HBsAg particles may carry in the same way cellular microRNAs (miRNAs) which are released into the bloodstream within different subcellular forms such as exosomes and microvescicles. Circulating HBsAg particles were isolated from sera of 11 HBsAg carriers by selective immunoprecipitation with monoclonal anti-HBs-IgG, total RNA was extracted and human miRNAs were screened by TaqMan real-time quantitative PCR Arrays. Thirty-nine human miRNAs were found to be significantly associated with the immunoprecipitated HBsAg, as determined by both comparative DDCT analysis and non-parametric tests (Mann-Whitney, p<0.05) with respect to controls. Moreover immunoprecipitated HBsAg particles contained Ago2 protein that could be revealed in ELISA only after 0.5% NP40. HBsAg associated miRNAs were liver-specific (most frequent = miR-27a, miR-30b, miR-122, miR-126 and miR-145) as well as immune regulatory (most frequent = miR-106b and miR-223). Computationally predicted target genes of HBsAg-associated miRNAs highlighted molecular pathways dealing with host-pathogen The finding that HBsAg particles carry selective pools of hepatocellular miRNAs opens new avenues of research to disentangle the complex interactions between host and HBV and provides a non invasive tool to study the physiopathology of liver epigenetics. PMID:22470417

  18. Circulating hepatitis B surface antigen particles carry hepatocellular microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Novellino, Luisa; Rossi, Riccardo L; Bonino, Ferruccio; Cavallone, Daniela; Abrignani, Sergio; Pagani, Massimiliano; Brunetto, Maurizia R

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) produces high quantities of subviral surface antigen particles (HBsAg) which circulate in the blood outnumbering virions of about 1\\10(3-6) times. In individuals coinfected with the defective hepatitis Delta virus (HDV) the small HDV-RNA-genome and Delta antigen circulate as ribonucleoprotein complexes within HBsAg subviral particles. We addressed the question whether subviral HBsAg particles may carry in the same way cellular microRNAs (miRNAs) which are released into the bloodstream within different subcellular forms such as exosomes and microvescicles. Circulating HBsAg particles were isolated from sera of 11 HBsAg carriers by selective immunoprecipitation with monoclonal anti-HBs-IgG, total RNA was extracted and human miRNAs were screened by TaqMan real-time quantitative PCR Arrays. Thirty-nine human miRNAs were found to be significantly associated with the immunoprecipitated HBsAg, as determined by both comparative DDCT analysis and non-parametric tests (Mann-Whitney, p<0.05) with respect to controls. Moreover immunoprecipitated HBsAg particles contained Ago2 protein that could be revealed in ELISA only after 0.5% NP40. HBsAg associated miRNAs were liver-specific (most frequent = miR-27a, miR-30b, miR-122, miR-126 and miR-145) as well as immune regulatory (most frequent = miR-106b and miR-223). Computationally predicted target genes of HBsAg-associated miRNAs highlighted molecular pathways dealing with host-pathogen. The finding that HBsAg particles carry selective pools of hepatocellular miRNAs opens new avenues of research to disentangle the complex interactions between host and HBV and provides a non invasive tool to study the physiopathology of liver epigenetics.

  19. Identification of new meningococcal serogroup B surface antigens through a systematic analysis of neisserial genomes.

    PubMed

    Pajon, Rolando; Yero, Daniel; Niebla, Olivia; Climent, Yanet; Sardiñas, Gretel; García, Darién; Perera, Yasser; Llanes, Alejandro; Delgado, Maité; Cobas, Karem; Caballero, Evelin; Taylor, Stephen; Brookes, Charlotte; Gorringe, Andrew

    2009-12-11

    The difficulty of inducing an effective immune response against the Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B capsular polysaccharide has lead to the search for vaccines for this serogroup based on outer membrane proteins. The availability of the first meningococcal genome (MC58 strain) allowed the expansion of high-throughput methods to explore the protein profile displayed by N. meningitidis. By combining a pan-genome analysis with an extensive experimental validation to identify new potential vaccine candidates, genes coding for antigens likely to be exposed on the surface of the meningococcus were selected after a multistep comparative analysis of entire Neisseria genomes. Eleven novel putative ORF annotations were reported for serogroup B strain MC58. Furthermore, a total of 20 new predicted potential pan-neisserial vaccine candidates were produced as recombinant proteins and evaluated using immunological assays. Potential vaccine candidate coding genes were PCR-amplified from a panel of representative strains and their variability analyzed using maximum likelihood approaches for detecting positive selection. Finally, five proteins all capable of inducing a functional antibody response vs N. meningitidis strain CU385 were identified as new attractive vaccine candidates: NMB0606 a potential YajC orthologue, NMB0928 the neisserial NlpB (BamC), NMB0873 a LolB orthologue, NMB1163 a protein belonging to a curli-like assembly machinery, and NMB0938 (a neisserial specific antigen) with evidence of positive selection appreciated for NMB0928. The new set of vaccine candidates and the novel proposed functions will open a new wave of research in the search for the elusive neisserial vaccine.

  20. Preparation and testing of a Haemophilus influenzae Type b/Hepatitis B surface antigen conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    An, So Jung; Woo, Joo Sung; Chae, Myung Hwa; Kothari, Sudeep; Carbis, Rodney

    2015-03-24

    The majority of conjugate vaccines focus on inducing an antibody response to the polysaccharide antigen and the carrier protein is present primarily to induce a T-cell dependent response. In this study conjugates consisting of poly(ribosylribitolphosphate) (PRP) purified from Haemophilus influenzae Type b bound to Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) virus like particles were prepared with the aim of inducing an antibody response to not only the PRP but also the HBsAg. A conjugate consisting of PRP bound to HBsAg via an adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) spacer induced strong IgG antibodies to both the PRP and HBsAg. When conjugation was performed without the ADH spacer the induction of an anti-PRP response was equivalent to that seen by conjugate with the ADH spacer, however, a negligible anti-HBsAg response was induced. For comparison, PRP was conjugated to diphtheria toxoid (DT) and Vi polysaccharide purified from Salmonella Typhi conjugated to HBsAg both using an ADH spacer. The PRPAH-DT conjugate induced strong anti-PRP and anti-DT responses, the Vi-AHHBsAg conjugate induced a good anti-HBsAg response but not as strong as that induced by the PRPAH-HBsAg conjugate. This study demonstrated that in mice it was possible to induce robust antibody responses to both polysaccharide and carrier protein provided the conjugate has certain physico-chemical properties. A PRPAH-HBsAg conjugate with the capacity to induce anti-PRP and anti-HBsAg responses could be incorporated into a multivalent pediatric vaccine and simplify formulation of such a vaccine. PMID:25659268

  1. Preparation and testing of a Haemophilus influenzae Type b/Hepatitis B surface antigen conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    An, So Jung; Woo, Joo Sung; Chae, Myung Hwa; Kothari, Sudeep; Carbis, Rodney

    2015-03-24

    The majority of conjugate vaccines focus on inducing an antibody response to the polysaccharide antigen and the carrier protein is present primarily to induce a T-cell dependent response. In this study conjugates consisting of poly(ribosylribitolphosphate) (PRP) purified from Haemophilus influenzae Type b bound to Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) virus like particles were prepared with the aim of inducing an antibody response to not only the PRP but also the HBsAg. A conjugate consisting of PRP bound to HBsAg via an adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) spacer induced strong IgG antibodies to both the PRP and HBsAg. When conjugation was performed without the ADH spacer the induction of an anti-PRP response was equivalent to that seen by conjugate with the ADH spacer, however, a negligible anti-HBsAg response was induced. For comparison, PRP was conjugated to diphtheria toxoid (DT) and Vi polysaccharide purified from Salmonella Typhi conjugated to HBsAg both using an ADH spacer. The PRPAH-DT conjugate induced strong anti-PRP and anti-DT responses, the Vi-AHHBsAg conjugate induced a good anti-HBsAg response but not as strong as that induced by the PRPAH-HBsAg conjugate. This study demonstrated that in mice it was possible to induce robust antibody responses to both polysaccharide and carrier protein provided the conjugate has certain physico-chemical properties. A PRPAH-HBsAg conjugate with the capacity to induce anti-PRP and anti-HBsAg responses could be incorporated into a multivalent pediatric vaccine and simplify formulation of such a vaccine.

  2. The efficacy of serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cancer antigen 125 (CA125), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), carbohydrate antigen 15-3 (CA15-3), alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) levels in determining the malignancy of solitary pulmonary nodules.

    PubMed

    Bekci, T T; Senol, T; Maden, E

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the utility of the tumour markers carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cancer antigen 125 (CA125), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), carbohydrate antigen 15-3 (CA15-3), alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) for the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant solitary pulmonary nodules in 42 hospitalized patients. Routine medical history and physical examination of each patient was performed and each patient also had a chest X-ray and a thoracic computed tomography scan. The following diagnostic procedures were also undertaken: bronchoscopy, transthoracic needle aspiration biopsy, sputum cytology and culture, analysis of sputum acid-fast bacilli and thoracotomy. Measurement of serum levels of tumour antigens by Immulite 2000 radioimmunoassay found that three tumour markers, CEA, CA125 and CA15-3, could be used in the diagnosis of malignant solitary pulmonary nodules. More research is now required involving a larger group of patients.

  3. Surface plasmon resonance measurements of plasma antibody avidity during primary and secondary responses to anthrax protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Heather E; Stewart, Shelley M; Kepler, Thomas B; Sempowski, Gregory D; Alam, S Munir

    2014-02-01

    Establishment of humoral immunity against pathogens is dependent on events that occur in the germinal center and the subsequent induction of high-affinity neutralizing antibodies. Quantitative assays that allow monitoring of affinity maturation and duration of antibody responses can provide useful information regarding the efficacy of vaccines and adjuvants. Using an anthrax protective antigen (rPA) and alum model antigen/adjuvant system, we describe a methodology for monitoring antigen-specific serum antibody concentration and avidity by surface plasmon resonance during primary and secondary immune responses. Our analyses showed that following a priming dose in mice, rPA-specific antibody concentration and avidity increases over time and reaches a maximal response in about six weeks, but gradually declines in the absence of antigenic boost. Germinal center reactions were observed early with maximal development achieved during the primary response, which coincided with peak antibody avidity responses to primary immunization. Boosting with antigen resulted in a rapid increase in rPA-specific antibody concentration and five-fold increase in avidity, which was not dependent on sustained GC development. The described methodology couples surface plasmon resonance-based plasma avidity measurements with germinal center analysis and provides a novel way to monitor humoral responses that can play a role in facilitating vaccine and adjuvant development.

  4. Study of the immunogenicity of hepatitis B surface antigen synthesized in transgenic potato plants with increased biosafety.

    PubMed

    Rukavtsova, Elena B; Rudenko, Natalya V; Puchko, Elena N; Zakharchenko, Natalya S; Buryanov, Yaroslav I

    2015-06-10

    Oral immunogenicity of the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) synthesized in the tubers of marker-free potato plants has been demonstrated. Experiments were performed in the two groups of outbred NMRI mice. At the beginning of investigations, the mice of experimental group were fed the tubers of transgenic potato synthesizing the HBsAg three times. The mice of control group were fed nontransgenic potato. Intraperitoneal injection of the commercial vaccine against hepatitis B (0.5μg/mouse) was made on day 71 of the experiment. Enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) of the serum of immunized animals showed an increase in the level of HBsAg antibodies significantly above the protective value, which was maintained for 1 year after the immunization. In 1 year, the experimental group of mice underwent additional oral immunization with HBsAg-containing potato tubers. As a result, the level of antibodies against the HBsAg increased and remained at a high protective level for several months. The findings show the possibility of using transgenic plants as a substance for obtaining a safe edible vaccine against hepatitis B. PMID:25840367

  5. Surface antigens of brain synapses: identification of minor proteins using polyclonal antisera

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Antigenic proteins of brain synaptic plasma membranes (SPM) and postsynaptic densities (PSD) were characterized using antisera raised against SPM. Immunostaining of brain sections showed that the antigens were restricted to synapses, and electron microscopy revealed staining at both presynaptic terminals and PSDs. In primary brain cell cultures the antisera were also neuron-specific but the antigens were distributed throughout the entire neuronal plasma membrane, suggesting that some restrictive influence present in whole tissue is absent when neurons are grown dispersed. The antigenic proteins with which these antisera react were identified using SDS gel immunoblots. SPM and PSD differed from one another in their characteristic antigenic proteins. Comparison with amido-black stained gel blots showed that in both cases most of these did not correspond to known abundant proteins of SPM or PSDs revealed by conventional biochemical techniques. None of the antigens revealed by the polyclonal antisera were detected by any of a large series of monoclonal antibodies against SPM. PMID:6368568

  6. The Prevalence of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen and Antibody in Home-Reared Individuals with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Siegfried M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This study found no significant difference in the prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigens or antibodies between 180 noninstitutionalized subjects (ages 1-29) with Down's syndrome and 155 subjects without Down's syndrome. This finding contrasts with previous findings with institutionalized Down's syndrome subjects. (Author/DB)

  7. Major surface antigen, P30, of Toxoplasma gondii is anchored by a glycolipid

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, S.D.; Boothroyd, J.C.

    1989-04-05

    P30, the major surface antigen of the parasitic protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, can be specifically labeled with (/sup 3/H)palmitic acid and with myo-(2-/sup 3/H)inositol. The fatty acid label can be released by treatment of P30 with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). Such treatment exposes an immunological cross-reacting determinant first described on Trypanosoma brucei variant surface glycoprotein. PI-PLC cleavage of intact parasites metabolically labeled with (/sup 35/S)methionine results in the release of intact P30 polypeptide in a form which migrates faster in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These results argue that P30 is anchored by a glycolipid. Results from thin layer chromatography analysis of purified (/sup 3/H) palmitate-labeled P30 treated with PI-PLC, together with susceptibility to mild alkali hydrolysis and to cleavage with phospholipase A2, suggest that the glycolipid anchor of T. gondii P30 includes a 1,2-diacylglycerol moiety.

  8. Review of hepatitis B surface antigen-1018 ISS adjuvant-containing vaccine safety and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Barry, Mazin; Cooper, Curtis

    2007-11-01

    Existing hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccines produce seroprotective titers in > 90% of healthy adult recipients following 3 doses administered over 6 months. The durability of this response is variable. Vaccine efficacy is greatly diminished in immune compromised patients. Given the high worldwide prevalence and burden of disease produced by chronic HBV infection, vaccines capable of producing high rates of durable seroprotective HBV surface antibody titers are required. Immunostimulatory sequences (ISS) containing repeating sequences of cytosine phosphoguanosine (CpG) dinucleotide motifs have emerged as useful tools for modulating immune responses. Dynavax Technologies produced a synthetic oligodexynucleotide (ODN) containing these motifs, resulting in an unmethylated cytosine and phosphoguanosine ODN called 1018 ISS. Dynavax's hepatitis B virus vaccine HEPLISAV is comprised of 1018 ISS mixed with recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen. Clinical trials, to date, have shown that HEPLISAV produces rapid, high titer, sustained seroprotection in healthy adults and vaccine hyporesponsive populations. Although additional supporting data are required, this represents a promising strategy to facilitate worldwide HBV prevention efforts. PMID:17961095

  9. Elevated Level of Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) and Search for a Malignancy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Asad-Ur-Rahman, Fnu; Saif, Muhammad W

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) has been shown to be associated with tumor burden in patients with colorectal cancer. However, it is also elevated to a significant degree in a number of other malignant and non-malignant conditions. We report a case of reversible CEA elevation in a patient using lithium for bipolar disorder. A 58-year-old female with a longstanding smoking history and a past medical history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), bipolar illness, hypothyroidism, and obesity was found to have an elevated CEA level of 11.2 ng/ml (normal level <5 ng/ml) in the workup for postmenopausal bleeding. Her history was not positive for malignancy of colorectum, ovaries, thyroid, or breast.  She underwent a large number of imaging and endoscopic studies to evaluate for colorectal, breast, ovarian, and lung cancer; however, it did not reveal any evidence of malignancy. Upon review of her medications, she reported that she had recently started lithium for her bipolar illness. We followed up her CEA level while her dose of lithium was reduced from 450 to 300 mg per day. Her CEA level decreased from 25 mg/dl to 6.1 mg/dl and remained stable over the course of the next eight months. Our case is the first case report that identifies lithium as a potential cause of reversible CEA elevation. The underlying mechanism is yet to be elucidated, but it underscores the importance of investigating the medications as part of the workup. PMID:27446768

  10. Elevated Level of Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) and Search for a Malignancy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Saif, Muhammad W

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) has been shown to be associated with tumor burden in patients with colorectal cancer. However, it is also elevated to a significant degree in a number of other malignant and non-malignant conditions. We report a case of reversible CEA elevation in a patient using lithium for bipolar disorder. A 58-year-old female with a longstanding smoking history and a past medical history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), bipolar illness, hypothyroidism, and obesity was found to have an elevated CEA level of 11.2 ng/ml (normal level <5 ng/ml) in the workup for postmenopausal bleeding. Her history was not positive for malignancy of colorectum, ovaries, thyroid, or breast.  She underwent a large number of imaging and endoscopic studies to evaluate for colorectal, breast, ovarian, and lung cancer; however, it did not reveal any evidence of malignancy. Upon review of her medications, she reported that she had recently started lithium for her bipolar illness. We followed up her CEA level while her dose of lithium was reduced from 450 to 300 mg per day. Her CEA level decreased from 25 mg/dl to 6.1 mg/dl and remained stable over the course of the next eight months. Our case is the first case report that identifies lithium as a potential cause of reversible CEA elevation. The underlying mechanism is yet to be elucidated, but it underscores the importance of investigating the medications as part of the workup. PMID:27446768

  11. Immunological evaluation of colonic delivered Hepatitis B surface antigen loaded TLR-4 agonist modified solid fat nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Kantrol Kumar; Pandey, Ravi Shankar

    2016-10-01

    Hepatitis B is one of the leading liver diseases and remains a major global health problem. Currently available vaccines provide protection but often results in weaker/minimal mucosal immunity. Thus the present study is devoted to the development and in-vivo exploration of the colonically delivered biomimetic nanoparticles which capably enhance humoral as well as cellular immune response. In present work, Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) entrapped nanoparticles containing Monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) (HB+L-NP) were prepared by solvent evaporation method and characterized for particle size (~210nm), shape, zeta potential (-24mV±0.68), entrapment efficiency (58.45±1.68%), in-vitro release and antigen integrity. Dose escalation study was done to confirm prophylactic immune response following defined doses of prepared nanoparticulate formulations with or without MPLA. Intramuscular administered alum based marketed HBsAg (Genevac B) was used as standard (10μg) and were able to induce significant systemic (IgG) but remarkably low mucosal immune (IgA) response. Notably, HB+L-NP (0.5ml-10μg) induced strong systemic and robust mucosal immunity (510 and 470 mIU/ml respectively, p<0.001) from which mucosal was more significant due to the involvement of Common Mucosal Immune System (CMIS). Likewise, significant cellular immune response was elicited by HB+L-NP through T-cell activation (mixed Th1 and Th2) as confirmed by significantly increased cytokines level (IL-2 and Interferon-γ) in spleen homogenates. This study supports that delivery of HBsAg to the colon may open new vista in designing oral vaccines later being one of most accepted route for potential vaccines in future. PMID:27526270

  12. Immunological evaluation of colonic delivered Hepatitis B surface antigen loaded TLR-4 agonist modified solid fat nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Kantrol Kumar; Pandey, Ravi Shankar

    2016-10-01

    Hepatitis B is one of the leading liver diseases and remains a major global health problem. Currently available vaccines provide protection but often results in weaker/minimal mucosal immunity. Thus the present study is devoted to the development and in-vivo exploration of the colonically delivered biomimetic nanoparticles which capably enhance humoral as well as cellular immune response. In present work, Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) entrapped nanoparticles containing Monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) (HB+L-NP) were prepared by solvent evaporation method and characterized for particle size (~210nm), shape, zeta potential (-24mV±0.68), entrapment efficiency (58.45±1.68%), in-vitro release and antigen integrity. Dose escalation study was done to confirm prophylactic immune response following defined doses of prepared nanoparticulate formulations with or without MPLA. Intramuscular administered alum based marketed HBsAg (Genevac B) was used as standard (10μg) and were able to induce significant systemic (IgG) but remarkably low mucosal immune (IgA) response. Notably, HB+L-NP (0.5ml-10μg) induced strong systemic and robust mucosal immunity (510 and 470 mIU/ml respectively, p<0.001) from which mucosal was more significant due to the involvement of Common Mucosal Immune System (CMIS). Likewise, significant cellular immune response was elicited by HB+L-NP through T-cell activation (mixed Th1 and Th2) as confirmed by significantly increased cytokines level (IL-2 and Interferon-γ) in spleen homogenates. This study supports that delivery of HBsAg to the colon may open new vista in designing oral vaccines later being one of most accepted route for potential vaccines in future.

  13. Cloning and Expression of Major Surface Antigen 1 Gene of Toxoplasma gondii RH Strain Using the Expression Vector pVAX1 in Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abdizadeh, Rahman; Maraghi, Sharif; Ghadiri, Ata A.; Tavalla, Mehdi; Shojaee, Saeedeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Toxoplasmosis is an opportunistic protozoan infection with a high prevalence in a broad range of hosts infecting up to one-third of the world human population. Toxoplasmosis leads to serious medical problems in immunocompromised individuals and fetuses and also induces abortion and mortality in domestic animals. Therefore, there is a huge demand for the development of an effective vaccine. Surface Antigen 1 (SAG1) is one of the important immunodominant surface antigens of Toxoplasma gondii, which interacts with host cells and primarily involved in adhesion, invasion and stimulation of host immune response. Surface antigen 1 is considered as the leading candidate for development of an effective vaccine against toxoplasmosis. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to clone the major surface antigen1 gene (SAG1) from the genotype 1 of T. gondii, RH strain into the eukaryotic expression vector pVAX1 in order to use for a DNA vaccine. Materials and Methods: Genomic DNA was extracted from tachyzoite of the parasite using the QIAamp DNA mini kit. After designing the specific primers, SAG1 gene was amplified by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). The purified PCR products were then cloned into a pPrime plasmid vector. The aforementioned product was subcloned into the pVAX1 eukaryotic expression vector. The recombinant pVAX1-SAG1 was then transfected into Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells and expression of SAG1 antigen was evaluated using Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR), Immunofluorescence Assay (IFA) and Western Blotting (WB). Results: The cloning and subcloning products (pPrime-SAG1 and pVAX1-SAG1 plasmid vectors) of SAG1 gene were verified and confirmed by enzyme digestion and sequencing. A 30 kDa recombinant protein was expressed in CHO cells as shown by IFA and WB methods. Conclusions: The pVAX1 expression vector and CHO cells are a suitable system for high-level recombinant protein production for SAG1 gene from T. gondii parasites

  14. Body mass index in relation to serum prostate-specific antigen levels and prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Bonn, Stephanie E; Sjölander, Arvid; Tillander, Annika; Wiklund, Fredrik; Grönberg, Henrik; Bälter, Katarina

    2016-07-01

    High Body mass index (BMI) has been directly associated with risk of aggressive or fatal prostate cancer. One possible explanation may be an effect of BMI on serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). To study the association between BMI and serum PSA as well as prostate cancer risk, a large cohort of men without prostate cancer at baseline was followed prospectively for prostate cancer diagnoses until 2015. Serum PSA and BMI were assessed among 15,827 men at baseline in 2010-2012. During follow-up, 735 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer with 282 (38.4%) classified as high-grade cancers. Multivariable linear regression models and natural cubic linear regression splines were fitted for analyses of BMI and log-PSA. For risk analysis, Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) and natural cubic Cox regression splines producing standardized cancer-free probabilities were fitted. Results showed that baseline Serum PSA decreased by 1.6% (95% CI: -2.1 to -1.1) with every one unit increase in BMI. Statistically significant decreases of 3.7, 11.7 and 32.3% were seen for increasing BMI-categories of 25 < 30, 30 < 35 and ≥35 kg/m(2), respectively, compared to the reference (18.5 < 25 kg/m(2)). No statistically significant associations were seen between BMI and prostate cancer risk although results were indicative of a positive association to incidence rates of high-grade disease and an inverse association to incidence of low-grade disease. However, findings regarding risk are limited by the short follow-up time. In conclusion, BMI was inversely associated to PSA-levels. BMI should be taken into consideration when referring men to a prostate biopsy based on serum PSA-levels.

  15. Plasmodium falciparum complicated malaria: Modulation and connectivity between exportome and variant surface antigen gene families.

    PubMed

    Subudhi, Amit Kumar; Boopathi, P A; Pandey, Isha; Kohli, Ramandeep; Karwa, Rohan; Middha, Sheetal; Acharya, Jyoti; Kochar, Sanjay K; Kochar, Dhanpat K; Das, Ashis

    2015-05-01

    In temperate and sub-tropical regions of Asia and Latin America, complicated malaria manifested as hepatic dysfunction or renal dysfunction is seen in all age groups. There has been a concerted focus on understanding the patho-physiological and molecular basis of complicated malaria in children, much less is known about it in adults. We report here, the analysis of data from a custom, cross strain microarray (Agilent Platform) using material from adult patient samples, showing hepatic dysfunction or renal failure. These are the most common manifestations seen in adults along with cerebral malaria. The data has been analyzed with reference to variant surface antigens, encoded by the var, rifin and stevor gene families. The differential regulation profiles of key genes (comparison between Plasmodium falciparum complicated and uncomplicated isolates) have been observed. The exportome has been analyzed using similar parameters. Gene ontology term based functional enrichment of differentially regulated genes identified, up-regulated genes statistically enriched (P<0.05) to critical biological processes like generation of precursor metabolite and energy, chromosome organization and electron transport chain. Systems network based functional enrichment of overall differentially regulated genes yielded a similar result. We are reporting here, up-regulation of var group B and C genes whose proteins are predicted to interact with CD36 receptor in the host, the up-regulation of domain cassette 13 (DC13) containing var group A, as also the up-regulation of group A rifins and many of the stevors. This is contrary to most other reports from pediatric patients, with cerebral malaria where the up-regulation of mostly var A group genes have been seen. A protein-protein interaction based network has been created and analysis performed. This co-expression and text mining based network has shown overall connectivity between the variant surface antigens (VSA) and the exportome. The up

  16. Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Loss and Hepatocellular Carcinoma Development in Patients With Dual Hepatitis B and C Infection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wan-Ting; Wu, Li-Wei; Tseng, Tai-Chung; Chen, Chi-Ling; Yang, Hung-Chih; Su, Tung-Hung; Wang, Chia-Chi; Kuo, Stephanie Fang-Tzu; Liu, Chen-Hua; Chen, Pei-Jer; Chen, Ding-Shinn; Liu, Chun-Jen; Kao, Jia-Horng

    2016-03-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections are 2 major causes of chronic viral hepatitis. It is still unclear how HCV coinfection affects HBV replication and clinical outcomes in HBV/HCV coinfected patients.We conducted a longitudinal study, which enrolled 111 patients with HBV/HCV coinfection and 111 propensity score-matched controls with HBV monoinfection. Both groups had comparable baseline age, sex, fibrosis stage, levels of HBV DNA, and HBV surface antigen (HBsAg). The HCV coinfection and other host/viral factors were correlated with various outcomes, including HBsAg loss and cirrhosis/hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development.After a 10-year follow-up, we found that HCV coinfection itself was not associated with HBsAg loss. However, coinfected patients with alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level >80 U/L had a higher chance of HBsAg loss than those with ALT level ≤80 U/L [hazard ratio (95% confidence interval): 4.41 (1.75-11.15)] or matched controls with HBV monoinfection [hazard ratio (95% confidence interval): 3.40 (1.54-7.50)]. Besides, both HCV coinfection and higher ALT levels were associated with higher HCC risks and the HCC risks remained even after HBsAg loss in HBV/HCV con-infected patient.HCV coinfection is not associated with HBsAg loss. A higher ALT level is a major determinant of HBsAg loss in patients with HBV/HCV coinfection. Both HCV coinfection and a higher ALT level were independent risk factors of HCC.

  17. Brucella abortus vaccine strain RB51 produces low levels of M-like O-antigen.

    PubMed

    Cloeckaert, Axel; Zygmunt, Michel S; Guilloteau, Laurence A

    2002-03-15

    Brucella abortus RB51 is a rough (R) stable vaccine strain used in cattle and is believed to be devoid of O-side chain. We analyzed by use of a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against seven previously defined O-polysaccharide (O-PS) epitopes the O-chain expression in strain RB51. Two MAbs specific for the C/Y (A=M) and C (M>A) epitopes showed low bindings in ELISA to strain RB51. O-chain expression was further confirmed by Western blot after SDS-PAGE of strain RB51. In particular, the MAb of C (M>A) specificity, showing preferential binding to M-dominant smooth (S) Brucella strains, revealed in strain RB51 a typical smooth-lipopolysaccharide (S-LPS) pattern which resembled that of M-dominant S-LPS. Thus, the results clearly show that strain RB51 produces low levels of M-like O-antigen.

  18. Surface-Enhanced Electrochemiluminescence of Ru@SiO2 for Ultrasensitive Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Daifang; Li, Yanyan; Lin, Zhenyu; Qiu, Bin; Guo, Longhua

    2015-06-16

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is recognized as a disease biomarker to reflect the existence of various cancers and tumors in the human body. Sensitive detection of CEA in body fluid is valuable for clinical diagnosis and treatment assessment of cancers. Herein, we present a new approach for ultrasensitive determination of CEA in human serum based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) enhanced electrochemiluminescence (ECL) of Ru(bpy)3(2+). In this surface-enhanced ECL (SEECL) sensing scheme, Ru(bpy)3(2+)-doped SiO2 nanoparticles (Ru@SiO2) act as ECL luminophores, and AuNPs are used as LSPR source to enhance the ECL signal. Two different kinds of aptamers specific to CEA are modified on the surface of Ru@SiO2 and AuNPs, respectively. In the presence of CEA, a multilayer of Ru@SiO2-AuNPs nanoarchitectures would be formed. Our investigation reveals that the ECL signal of Ru@SiO2 can be effectively enhanced by AuNPs. One layer of Ru@SiO2-AuNPs nanoarchitectures would generate about 3-fold ECL enhancement compared with the ECL of the nanoarchitectures without the presence of AuNPs. As much as 30-fold ECL enhancement could be obtained by a multilayer of Ru@SiO2-AuNPs nanoarchitectures. Under the optimal conditions, a detection limit of 1.52 × 10(-6) ng/mL of CEA in human serum was achieved. To the best of our knowledge, CEA assays with such a low LOD have never been reported for an ECL sensor.

  19. Antigen-specific T cell phenotyping microarrays using Grating Coupled Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging and Surface Plasmon Coupled Emission

    PubMed Central

    Rice, James M.; Stern, Lawrence J.; Guignon, Ernest F.; Lawrence, David A.; Lynes, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    The circulating population of peripheral T lymphocytes obtained from a blood sample can provide a large amount of information about an individual's medical status and history. Recent evidence indicates that the detection and functional characterization of antigen-specific T cell subsets within the circulating population may provide a diagnostic indicator of disease and has the potential to predict an individual's response to therapy. In this report, a microarray detection platform that combines grating-coupled surface plasmon resonance imaging (GCSPRI) and grating-coupled surface plasmon coupled emission (SPCE) fluorescence detection modalities was used to detect and characterize CD4+ T cells. The microspot regions of interest (ROIs) printed on the array consisted of immobilized antibodies or peptide loaded MHC monomers (p/MHC) as T cell capture ligands mixed with additional antibodies as cytokine capture ligands covalently bound to the surface of a corrugated gold sensor chip. Using optimized parameters, an unlabelled influenza peptide reactive T cell clone could be detected at a frequency of 0.1% in a mixed T cell sample using GCSPRI. Additionally, after cell binding was quantified, differential TH1 cytokine secretion patterns from a T cell clone cultured under TH1 or TH2 inducing conditions was detected using an SPCE fluorescence based assay. Differences in the secretion patterns of 3 cytokines, characteristic of the inducing conditions, indicated that differences were a consequence of the functional status of the captured cells. A dual mode GCSPRI/SPCE assay can provide a rapid, high content T cell screening/characterization tool that is useful for diagnosing disease, evaluating vaccination efficacy, or assessing responses to immunotherapeutics. PMID:22104646

  20. Serum levels of cytoplasmic melanoma-associated antigen at diagnosis may predict clinical relapse in neuroblastoma patients.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Fabio; Corrias, Maria Valeria; Levreri, Isabella; Scaruffi, Paola; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Carlini, Barbara; Bocca, Paola; Prigione, Ignazia; Stigliani, Sara; Amoroso, Loredana; Ferrone, Soldano; Pistoia, Vito

    2011-10-01

    The high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen (HMW-MAA) and the cytoplasmic melanoma-associated antigen (cyt-MAA/LGALS3BP) are expressed in melanoma. Their serum levels are increased in melanoma patients and correlate with clinical outcome. We investigated whether these molecules can serve as prognostic markers for neuroblastoma (NB) patients. Expression of cyt-MAA and HMW-MAA was evaluated by flow cytometry in NB cell lines, patients' neuroblasts ((FI)-NB), and short-term cultures of these latter cells (cNB). LGALS3BP gene expression was evaluated by RT-qPCR on (FI)-NB, cNB, and primary tumor specimens. Soluble HMW-MAA and cyt-MAA were tested by ELISA. Cyt-MAA and HMW-MAA were expressed in NB cell lines, cNB, and (FI)-NB samples. LGALS3BP gene expression was higher in primary tumors and cNB than in (FI)-NB samples. Soluble cyt-MAA, but not HMW-MAA, was detected in NB cell lines and cNBs supernatants. NB patients' serum levels of both antigens were higher than those of the healthy children. High cyt-MAA serum levels at diagnosis associated with higher incidence of relapse, independently from other known risk factors. In conclusion, both HMW-MAA and cyt-MAA antigens, and LGALS3BP gene, were expressed by NB cell lines and patients' neuroblasts, and both antigens' serum levels were increased in NB patients. Elevated serum levels of cyt-MAA at diagnosis correlated with relapse, supporting that cyt-MAA may serve as early serological biomarker to individuate patients at higher risk of relapse that may require a more careful follow-up, after being validated in a larger cohort of patients at different time-points during follow-up. Given its immunogenicity, cyt-MAA may also be a potential target for NB immunotherapy.

  1. Linear antigenic mapping of flagellin (FliC) from Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis with yeast surface expression system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gaoling; Shi, Bingtian; Li, Tao; Zuo, Teng; Wang, Bin; Si, Wei; Xin, Jiuqing; Yang, Kongbin; Shi, Xuanlin; Liu, Siguo; Liu, Henggui

    2016-02-29

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a major cause of food-borne illness around the world and can have significant health implications in humans, poultry and other animals. Flagellin (FliC) is the primary component of bacterial flagella. It has been shown that the FliC of S. Enteritidis is a significant antigenic structure and can elicit strong humoral responses against S. Enteritidis infection in chickens. Here, we constructed a FliC antigen library using a yeast surface expression system. Yeast cells expressing FliC peptide antigens were labeled with chicken sera against S. Enteritidis and sorted using FACS. The analyses of FliC peptides revealed that the FliC linear antigenicity in chickens resided on three domains which were able to elicit strong humoral responses in vivo. Animal experiments further revealed that the antibodies elicited by these antigenic domains were able to significantly inhibit the invasion of S. Enteritidis into the liver and spleen of chickens. These findings will facilitate our better understanding of the humoral responses elicited by FliC in chickens upon infection by S. Enteritidis. PMID:26854340

  2. Linear antigenic mapping of flagellin (FliC) from Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis with yeast surface expression system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gaoling; Shi, Bingtian; Li, Tao; Zuo, Teng; Wang, Bin; Si, Wei; Xin, Jiuqing; Yang, Kongbin; Shi, Xuanlin; Liu, Siguo; Liu, Henggui

    2016-02-29

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is a major cause of food-borne illness around the world and can have significant health implications in humans, poultry and other animals. Flagellin (FliC) is the primary component of bacterial flagella. It has been shown that the FliC of S. Enteritidis is a significant antigenic structure and can elicit strong humoral responses against S. Enteritidis infection in chickens. Here, we constructed a FliC antigen library using a yeast surface expression system. Yeast cells expressing FliC peptide antigens were labeled with chicken sera against S. Enteritidis and sorted using FACS. The analyses of FliC peptides revealed that the FliC linear antigenicity in chickens resided on three domains which were able to elicit strong humoral responses in vivo. Animal experiments further revealed that the antibodies elicited by these antigenic domains were able to significantly inhibit the invasion of S. Enteritidis into the liver and spleen of chickens. These findings will facilitate our better understanding of the humoral responses elicited by FliC in chickens upon infection by S. Enteritidis.

  3. Analyses of gonococcal H8 antigen. Surface location, inter- and intrastrain electrophoretic heterogeneity, and unusual two-dimensional electrophoretic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Hitchcock, P J; Hayes, S F; Mayer, L W; Shafer, W M; Tessier, S L

    1985-12-01

    The H8 protein is a surface-exposed antigen that is found, among members of the Neisseria genus, primarily on pathogenic species. In this study, the surface exposure of H8 was reassessed by four techniques. Results of slide agglutination, indirect fluorescent antibody binding, absorption of sera with whole gonococci, and immune electron microscopy all confirmed the presence of H8 in the outer membrane. The degree to which protein A-gold-labeled monoclonal antibodies bound to H8 was marked, and suggested that this antigen was present in abundant amounts in the outer membrane. Also in this study, the electrophoretic heterogeneity of this common surface antigen was examined. Because H8 stains poorly, electrophoretic mobility was assessed using polyclonal antibodies and a monoclonal antibody that recognizes a common H8 epitope. H8 was analyzed with respect to protein I, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and pilus and opacity phenotypic variation; results confirmed that heterogeneity of Mr was the rule among strains (21 were examined), however, the variability in Mr was independent of protein I or LPS Mr. In one strain (FA1090), the heterogeneity of H8 was examined among 10 piliation/opacity variants; the H8 (and LPS) Mr was identical in all variants; similar data were generated in strains JS3 and JS1. The electrophoretic mobility of H8 was altered in serum-resistant and neutrophil enzyme-resistant gonococci compared to the sensitive gonococci. Some of the unusual electrophoretic migration characteristics of the antigen were also examined. H8 formed a unique mushroom-shaped band in one-dimensional gels; in a two-dimensional electrophoresis system, the antigen migrated aberrantly, very similarly to LPS. Also seen in the two-dimensional electrophoresis profile were multimers of the H8 antigen; in strain JS3 (Mr 23,500), these migrated at 43,600, 86,000, and greater than 150,000. In other strains, the Mr of the multimers differed depending upon the Mr of the monomer. The two

  4. Identification of Coli Surface Antigen 23, a Novel Adhesin of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Del Canto, Felipe; Botkin, Douglas J.; Valenzuela, Patricio; Popov, Vsevolod; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Nataro, James P.; Levine, Myron M.; Stine, O. Colin; Pop, Mihai

    2012-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of diarrhea, mainly in developing countries. Although there are 25 different ETEC adhesins described in strains affecting humans, between 15% and 50% of the clinical isolates from different geographical regions are negative for these adhesins, suggesting that additional unidentified adhesion determinants might be present. Here, we report the discovery of Coli Surface Antigen 23 (CS23), a novel adhesin expressed by an ETEC serogroup O4 strain (ETEC 1766a), which was negative for the previously known ETEC adhesins, albeit it has the ability to adhere to Caco-2 cells. CS23 is encoded by an 8.8-kb locus which contains 9 open reading frames (ORFs), 7 of them sharing significant identity with genes required for assembly of K88-related fimbriae. This gene locus, named aal (adhesion-associated locus), is required for the adhesion ability of ETEC 1766a and was able to confer this adhesive phenotype to a nonadherent E. coli HB101 strain. The CS23 major structural subunit, AalE, shares limited identity with known pilin proteins, and it is more closely related to the CS13 pilin protein CshE, carried by human ETEC strains. Our data indicate that CS23 is a new member of the diverse adhesin repertoire used by ETEC strains. PMID:22645287

  5. Liver grafts from hepatitis B surface antigen-positive donors: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Loggi, Elisabetta; Conti, Fabio; Cucchetti, Alessandro; Ercolani, Giorgio; Pinna, Antonio Daniele; Andreone, Pietro

    2016-09-21

    The scarcity of available organs and the gap between supply and demand continue to be the main limitations of liver transplantation. To relieve the organ shortage, current transplant strategies have implemented extended criteria, which include the use of liver from patients with signs of past or present hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. While the use of liver grafts from donors with evidence of past HBV infection is quite limited, some data have been collected regarding the feasibility of transplanting a liver graft from a hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positive donor. The aim of the present work was to review the literature regarding liver transplants from HBsAg-positive donors. A total of 17 studies were identified by a search in Medline. To date, HBsAg positive grafts have preferentially been allocated to HBsAg positive recipients. The large majority of these patients continue to be HBsAg positive despite the use of immunoglobulin, and infection prevention can only be guaranteed by using antiviral prophylaxis. Although serological persistence is evident, no significant HBV-related disease has been observed, except in patients coinfected with delta virus. Consistently less data are available for HBsAg negative recipients, although they are mostly promising. HBsAg-positive grafts could be an additional organ source for liver transplantation, provided that the risk of reinfection/reactivation is properly prevented. PMID:27672295

  6. Epidermal surface antigen (MS17S1) is highly conserved between mouse and human

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.J.; Chema, D.; Cho, M.

    1995-05-20

    A mouse monoclonal antibody ECS-1 raised to human keratinocytes detects a 35-kDa epidermal surface antigen (ESA) and causes keratinocyte dissociation in vitro. ECS-1 stains skin of 16-day mouse embryo and 8- to 9-week human fetus. Mouse Esa cDNA encodes a 379-amino-acid protein that is 99.2% identical to the human, differing at only 3 amino acids. The gene (M17S1) was mapped to mouse chromosome 11, highlighting the conserved linkage synteny existing between human chromosome 17 and mouse chromosome 11. Although the nude locus has been mapped to the same region of chromosome 11, no abnormalities in protein, mRNA, or cDNA or genomic sequences were detected in nude mice. However, both nude and control mice were found to have a second Esa mRNA transcript that conserves amino acid sequence and molecular weight. The mouse and human 5{prime} and 3{prime} untranslated sequences are conserved. Similar RNA folding patterns of the 5{prime} untranslated region are predicted despite a 91-bp insertion in the mouse. These data suggest that both the function and the regulation of ESA protein are of importance and that Esa (M17S1) is not the nude locus gene. 42 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Transient Elastography with Serum Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Enhances Liver Fibrosis Detection

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Tianyi; Si, Jia; Hao, Meina; Li, Cheng; Liu, Xia; Li, Jie; Ma, Anlin

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to explore transient elastography (TE) with quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen (qHBsAg) for detecting advanced hepatic fibrosis. Material/Methods This was a single-center prospective real-life analysis of 111 treatment-naïve chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients enrolled into the Establishment of Non-invasive Diagnosis Criteria and Model of Hepatitis B Virus-related Cirrhosis Study. Results There were significant correlations between TE, qHBsAg, and fibrosis. Both qHBsAg and TE were identified as independent predictors for advanced fibrosis. In receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis, TEqHBsAg (combination of TE and qHBsAg) resulted in the highest area under the receiver-operator curve (AUC) (0.912), mainly due to increased specificity. Using the optimal cut-off, TEqHBsAg provided a sensitivity of 86.7%, and increased specificity from 78.7% to 85.1%. Conclusions Combining TE with qHBsAg enhances specificity in identifying advanced fibrosis in treatment-naïve CHB patients. PMID:27526179

  8. Identification of Coli Surface Antigen 23, a novel adhesin of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Del Canto, Felipe; Botkin, Douglas J; Valenzuela, Patricio; Popov, Vsevolod; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Nataro, James P; Levine, Myron M; Stine, O Colin; Pop, Mihai; Torres, Alfredo G; Vidal, Roberto

    2012-08-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of diarrhea, mainly in developing countries. Although there are 25 different ETEC adhesins described in strains affecting humans, between 15% and 50% of the clinical isolates from different geographical regions are negative for these adhesins, suggesting that additional unidentified adhesion determinants might be present. Here, we report the discovery of Coli Surface Antigen 23 (CS23), a novel adhesin expressed by an ETEC serogroup O4 strain (ETEC 1766a), which was negative for the previously known ETEC adhesins, albeit it has the ability to adhere to Caco-2 cells. CS23 is encoded by an 8.8-kb locus which contains 9 open reading frames (ORFs), 7 of them sharing significant identity with genes required for assembly of K88-related fimbriae. This gene locus, named aal (adhesion-associated locus), is required for the adhesion ability of ETEC 1766a and was able to confer this adhesive phenotype to a nonadherent E. coli HB101 strain. The CS23 major structural subunit, AalE, shares limited identity with known pilin proteins, and it is more closely related to the CS13 pilin protein CshE, carried by human ETEC strains. Our data indicate that CS23 is a new member of the diverse adhesin repertoire used by ETEC strains. PMID:22645287

  9. Flow cytometric analysis of cell-surface and intracellular antigens in the diagnosis of acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Paredes-Aguilera, R; Romero-Guzman, L; Lopez-Santiago, N; Burbano-Ceron, L; Camacho-Del Monte, O; Nieto-Martinez, S

    2001-10-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of flow cytometric detection of intracellular antigens (Ags) in establishing proper lineage affiliation and its contribution to the diagnosis of acute leukemia, we studied 100 consecutive patients in whom acute leukemia was diagnosed between January 1997 and July 1998. Immunological classification was assessed using a three-line panel of monoclonal antibodies for phenotypic characterization of leukemic blast cells as proposed at the First Latin American Consensus Conference for Flow Cytometric Immunophenotyping of Leukemia. We found 74 cases of B-cell lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), seven cases of T-cell ALL, and 19 cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this study cytoplasmic (cy) CD79a, cyCD22, cyCD3, and cyMPO were highly sensitive, specific B, T, and myeloid markers that were expressed in virtually all cases of B and T cell ALL and in all subtypes of AML. Applied in combination with immunophenotyping this knowledge led to improvement in diagnostic precision and refinement of immunological classification, ensuring the selection of the most appropriate therapy for the patients studied. In conclusion, intracellular Ags detection was of utmost importance in establishing correct lineage affiliation in cases lacking expression of B, T, or myeloid surface Ags or disclosing equivocal or ambiguous immunophenotypic features and in identifying biphenotypic acute leukemia. In combination with FAB morphology and immunophenotyping, we were able to reliably classify all patients with acute leukemia in this study.

  10. Liver grafts from hepatitis B surface antigen-positive donors: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Loggi, Elisabetta; Conti, Fabio; Cucchetti, Alessandro; Ercolani, Giorgio; Pinna, Antonio Daniele; Andreone, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    The scarcity of available organs and the gap between supply and demand continue to be the main limitations of liver transplantation. To relieve the organ shortage, current transplant strategies have implemented extended criteria, which include the use of liver from patients with signs of past or present hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. While the use of liver grafts from donors with evidence of past HBV infection is quite limited, some data have been collected regarding the feasibility of transplanting a liver graft from a hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positive donor. The aim of the present work was to review the literature regarding liver transplants from HBsAg-positive donors. A total of 17 studies were identified by a search in Medline. To date, HBsAg positive grafts have preferentially been allocated to HBsAg positive recipients. The large majority of these patients continue to be HBsAg positive despite the use of immunoglobulin, and infection prevention can only be guaranteed by using antiviral prophylaxis. Although serological persistence is evident, no significant HBV-related disease has been observed, except in patients coinfected with delta virus. Consistently less data are available for HBsAg negative recipients, although they are mostly promising. HBsAg-positive grafts could be an additional organ source for liver transplantation, provided that the risk of reinfection/reactivation is properly prevented.

  11. Liver grafts from hepatitis B surface antigen-positive donors: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Loggi, Elisabetta; Conti, Fabio; Cucchetti, Alessandro; Ercolani, Giorgio; Pinna, Antonio Daniele; Andreone, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    The scarcity of available organs and the gap between supply and demand continue to be the main limitations of liver transplantation. To relieve the organ shortage, current transplant strategies have implemented extended criteria, which include the use of liver from patients with signs of past or present hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. While the use of liver grafts from donors with evidence of past HBV infection is quite limited, some data have been collected regarding the feasibility of transplanting a liver graft from a hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positive donor. The aim of the present work was to review the literature regarding liver transplants from HBsAg-positive donors. A total of 17 studies were identified by a search in Medline. To date, HBsAg positive grafts have preferentially been allocated to HBsAg positive recipients. The large majority of these patients continue to be HBsAg positive despite the use of immunoglobulin, and infection prevention can only be guaranteed by using antiviral prophylaxis. Although serological persistence is evident, no significant HBV-related disease has been observed, except in patients coinfected with delta virus. Consistently less data are available for HBsAg negative recipients, although they are mostly promising. HBsAg-positive grafts could be an additional organ source for liver transplantation, provided that the risk of reinfection/reactivation is properly prevented. PMID:27672295

  12. Proteomic analysis of hepatitis B surface antigen positive transgenic mouse liver and decrease of cyclophilin A.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chao; Fang, Cai-Yun; Tian, Xiao-Chen; Wang, Long; Yang, Peng-Yuan; Wen, Yu-Mei

    2007-10-01

    The small, 22-nm spherical particles associated with hepatitis B infection are composed of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and usually outnumber the virions by a ratio of 10(2) or 10(3). To study the interactions and pathogenesis between liver cells and the expression of HBsAg, global protein profiles were compared by two dimensional gel-based differential proteomics between the livers of a lineage of HBsAg positive transgenic mice and their HBsAg negative control siblings. A total of 93 proteins were identified in the HBV transgenic mice. Around 45% of these differentially expressed proteins were enzymes associated with metabolism, suggesting that the processing of lipids, carbohydrates and certain amino acids were up- or down-regulated. Among these proteins, cyclophilin A (CypA), the major target for the potent immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A, was found decreased in HBsAg positive transgenic mouse liver and in a stable cell line expressing HBsAg when compared to their controls. The decrease of intracellular CypA was accompanied by an increased secretion of this protein into the supernatant of HBsAg positive cells. Possible implications of HBsAg expression and the intracellular decrease of CypA are discussed.

  13. Identification of Coli Surface Antigen 23, a novel adhesin of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Del Canto, Felipe; Botkin, Douglas J; Valenzuela, Patricio; Popov, Vsevolod; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Nataro, James P; Levine, Myron M; Stine, O Colin; Pop, Mihai; Torres, Alfredo G; Vidal, Roberto

    2012-08-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is an important cause of diarrhea, mainly in developing countries. Although there are 25 different ETEC adhesins described in strains affecting humans, between 15% and 50% of the clinical isolates from different geographical regions are negative for these adhesins, suggesting that additional unidentified adhesion determinants might be present. Here, we report the discovery of Coli Surface Antigen 23 (CS23), a novel adhesin expressed by an ETEC serogroup O4 strain (ETEC 1766a), which was negative for the previously known ETEC adhesins, albeit it has the ability to adhere to Caco-2 cells. CS23 is encoded by an 8.8-kb locus which contains 9 open reading frames (ORFs), 7 of them sharing significant identity with genes required for assembly of K88-related fimbriae. This gene locus, named aal (adhesion-associated locus), is required for the adhesion ability of ETEC 1766a and was able to confer this adhesive phenotype to a nonadherent E. coli HB101 strain. The CS23 major structural subunit, AalE, shares limited identity with known pilin proteins, and it is more closely related to the CS13 pilin protein CshE, carried by human ETEC strains. Our data indicate that CS23 is a new member of the diverse adhesin repertoire used by ETEC strains.

  14. Flow-induced detachment of red blood cells adhering to surfaces by specific antigen-antibody bonds.

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Z; Goldsmith, H L; van de Ven, T G

    1994-01-01

    Fixed spherical swollen human red blood cells of blood type B adhering on a glass surface through antigen-antibody bonds to monoclonal mouse antihuman IgM, adsorbed or covalently linked on the surface, were detached by known hydrodynamic forces created in an impinging jet. The dynamic process of detachment of the specifically bound cells was recorded and analyzed. The fraction of adherent cells remaining on the surface decreased with increasing hydrodynamic force. For an IgM coverage of 0.26%, a tangential force on the order of 100 pN was able to detach almost all of the cells from the surface within 20 min. After a given time of exposure to hydrodynamic force, the fraction of adherent cells remaining increased with time, reflecting an increase in adhesion strength. The characteristic time for effective aging was approximately 4 h. Results from experiments in which the adsorbed antibody molecules were immobilized through covalent coupling and from evanescent wave light scattering of adherent cells, imply that deformation of red cells at the contact area was the principal cause for aging, rather than local clustering of the antibody through surface diffusion. Experiments with latex beads specifically bound to red blood cells suggest that, instead of breaking the antigen-antibody bonds, antigen molecules were extracted from the cell membrane during detachment. Images FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 PMID:8038393

  15. A GENOME-WIDE EXPLORATION SUGGESTS AN OLIGOGENIC MODEL OF INHERITANCE FOR THE TAFI ACTIVITY AND ITS ANTIGEN LEVELS

    PubMed Central

    Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Buil, Alfonso; Souto, Juan Carlos; Almasy, Laura; Borrell, Montserrat; Lathrop, Mark; Blangero, John; Fontcuberta, Jordi; Soria, José Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Thrombin-Activatable Fibrinolysis Inhibitor (TAFI) is a protein that attenuates fibrinolysis potently. A considerable proportion of its variability levels is genetically determined. It has been associated with arterial and venous thrombosis. We conducted a genomewide linkage scan for genes affecting variation in plasma TAFI levels in 398 subjects from 21 extended Spanish families. The data were analyzed by a variance-component linkage method. A strong linkage was found on the long arm of Chromosome 13, near the DNA marker D13S156, where the structural gene encoding for TAFI is located. In addition, other new linkage signals were detected on chromosome regions 5p and 7q. More importantly, we performed another multipoint linkage analysis of functional TAFI conditioned on TAFI antigen levels. We detected a strong linkage signal on Chromosome 19 (LOD = 3.0, p = 0.0001) suggesting a novel QTL in this region involved in the specific functional activity of TAFI, regardless of the TAFI antigen levels. One notable aspect of this study is the identification of new QTLs that reveal a clearer picture of the genetic determinants responsible for variation in TAFI levels. Another is the replication of the linkage signal of the CPB2 gene, which confirms an important genetic determinant for TAFI antigen levels. These results strongly suggest an oligogenic mode of inheritance for TAFI, in which CPB2 gene accounts for a proportion of the variation of the phenotype together with other unknown genes that may represent potential risk factors for thrombotic disease. PMID:18563448

  16. NXS2 murine neuroblastomas express increased levels of MHC class I antigens upon recurrence following NK-dependent immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Neal, Zane C; Imboden, Michael; Rakhmilevich, Alexander L; Kim, Kyung-Mann; Hank, Jacquelyn A; Surfus, Jean; Dixon, John R; Lode, Holger N; Reisfeld, Ralph A; Gillies, Stephen D; Sondel, Paul M

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated recurrent NXS2 neuroblastoma tumors that developed following NK- or T-cell-mediated immunotherapy in tumor-bearing mice. Recurrent tumors developed following an NK-dependent antitumor response using a suboptimal dose of hu14.18-IL2, a humanized IL-2 immunocytokine targeted to the GD(2)-ganglioside. This treatment initially induced complete resolution of measurable tumor in the majority of mice, followed, however, by delayed tumor recurrence in some mice. These recurrent NXS2 tumors revealed markedly enhanced (> fivefold) MHC class I antigen expression when compared with NXS2 tumors growing in PBS-treated control mice. A similar level of enhanced MHC class I antigen-expression could be induced on NXS2 cells in vitro by culturing with interferon gamma, and was associated with reduced susceptibility to both NK-cell-mediated tumor cell lysis and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity in vitro. In contrast, Flt3-ligand treatment of NXS2-bearing mice induced a protective T-cell-dependent antitumor memory response. Recurrent NXS2 tumors that developed following Flt3-L therapy revealed a decreased expression of MHC class I antigens. While NXS2 tumors are susceptible to in vivo destruction following either hu14.18-IL2 or Flt3-ligand immunotherapies, these results suggest that some tumor cells may be selected to survive and progress by expressing either higher or lower levels of MHC class I antigen in order to resist either NK- or T-cell-mediated antitumor responses, respectively.

  17. In vitro evaluation of a soluble Leishmania promastigote surface antigen as a potential vaccine candidate against human leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Chamakh-Ayari, Rym; Bras-Gonçalves, Rachel; Bahi-Jaber, Narges; Petitdidier, Elodie; Markikou-Ouni, Wafa; Aoun, Karim; Moreno, Javier; Carrillo, Eugenia; Salotra, Poonam; Kaushal, Himanshu; Negi, Narender Singh; Arevalo, Jorge; Falconi-Agapito, Francesca; Privat, Angela; Cruz, Maria; Pagniez, Julie; Papierok, Gérard-Marie; Rhouma, Faten Bel Haj; Torres, Pilar; Lemesre, Jean-Loup; Chenik, Mehdi; Meddeb-Garnaoui, Amel

    2014-01-01

    PSA (Promastigote Surface Antigen) belongs to a family of membrane-bound and secreted proteins present in several Leishmania (L.) species. PSA is recognized by human Th1 cells and provides a high degree of protection in vaccinated mice. We evaluated humoral and cellular immune responses induced by a L. amazonensis PSA protein (LaPSA-38S) produced in a L. tarentolae expression system. This was done in individuals cured of cutaneous leishmaniasis due to L. major (CCLm) or L. braziliensis (CCLb) or visceral leishmaniasis due to L. donovani (CVLd) and in healthy individuals. Healthy individuals were subdivided into immune (HHR-Lm and HHR-Li: Healthy High Responders living in an endemic area for L. major or L. infantum infection) or non immune/naive individuals (HLR: Healthy Low Responders), depending on whether they produce high or low levels of IFN-γ in response to Leishmania soluble antigen. Low levels of total IgG antibodies to LaPSA-38S were detected in sera from the studied groups. Interestingly, LaPSA-38S induced specific and significant levels of IFN-γ, granzyme B and IL-10 in CCLm, HHR-Lm and HHR-Li groups, with HHR-Li group producing TNF-α in more. No significant cytokine response was observed in individuals immune to L. braziliensis or L. donovani infection. Phenotypic analysis showed a significant increase in CD4+ T cells producing IFN-γ after LaPSA-38S stimulation, in CCLm. A high positive correlation was observed between the percentage of IFN-γ-producing CD4+ T cells and the released IFN-γ. We showed that the LaPSA-38S protein was able to induce a mixed Th1 and Th2/Treg cytokine response in individuals with immunity to L. major or L. infantum infection indicating that it may be exploited as a vaccine candidate. We also showed, to our knowledge for the first time, the capacity of Leishmania PSA protein to induce granzyme B production in humans with immunity to L. major and L. infantum infection. PMID:24786587

  18. New broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies against hepatitis B virus surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Kucinskaite-Kodze, Indre; Pleckaityte, Milda; Bremer, Corinna M; Seiz, Pia L; Zilnyte, Milda; Bulavaite, Aiste; Mickiene, Gitana; Zvirblis, Gintautas; Sasnauskas, Kestutis; Glebe, Dieter; Zvirbliene, Aurelija

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen (HBsAg) is considered to be the most important target for the diagnosis and immune prophylaxis of HBV infection. HBsAg-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are extensively used for studying the complex structure of the HBsAg, mapping the neutralizing epitopes and development of HBV diagnostic tests. However, the efficiency of anti-HBV binding strongly depends on the epitope structure and MAb capability to recognize different HBV variants. In the current study, 9 MAbs against yeast-expressed HBsAg of ayw2 serotype were generated and 7 of them were shown to recognize a linear epitope comprising amino acid (aa) residues 119-GPCRTCT-125 within the main antigenic "a" determinant of HBsAg. One MAb of the highest affinity (clone HB1) was selected for detailed cross-reactivity studies, generation of recombinant single-chain antibody (scFv) and molecular modelling of antibody-epitope interaction. The importance of each aa residue within the identified MAb epitope was determined by alanine substitution study that revealed aa residues C(121), T(123), C(124) and T(125) as essential for binding. These aa residues are highly conserved among HBV variants. In contrast, alanine substitution of G119, P120 and R122 had no or minor influence on the reactivity with the MAb. Certain aa residues at position 122 (either R or K) define different HBV serotypes (either d or y), therefore, the affinity of the MAb HB1 for the epitope with R122K substitution was determined to evaluate its diagnostic potential. The MAb recognized both epitope variants with high affinity. Sequence alignment of the MAb epitope within different HBV strains demonstrated that the shortest peptide recognized by the MAb 121-CR(K)TCT-125 is identical among different human HBV genotypes (HBV A-F, H) and monkey HBV species (HBVCP, HBVGO, HBVGB, WMHBV). In line with these data, the MAb HB1 was cross-reactive in Western blot with a large panel of antigens derived from different HBV

  19. The ganglioside antigen GD2 is surface-expressed in Ewing sarcoma and allows for MHC-independent immune targeting

    PubMed Central

    Kailayangiri, S; Altvater, B; Meltzer, J; Pscherer, S; Luecke, A; Dierkes, C; Titze, U; Leuchte, K; Landmeier, S; Hotfilder, M; Dirksen, U; Hardes, J; Gosheger, G; Juergens, H; Rossig, C

    2012-01-01

    Background: Novel treatment strategies are needed to cure disseminated Ewing sarcoma. Primitive neuroectodermal features and a mesenchymal stem cell origin are both compatible with aberrant expression of the ganglioside antigen GD2 and led us to explore GD2 immune targeting in this cancer. Methods: We investigated GD2 expression in Ewing sarcoma by immunofluorescence staining. We then assessed the antitumour activity of T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor specific for GD2 against Ewing sarcoma in vitro and in vivo. Results: Surface GD2 was detected in 10 out of 10 Ewing sarcoma cell lines and 3 out of 3 primary cell cultures. Moreover, diagnostic biopsies from 12 of 14 patients had uniform GD2 expression. T cells specifically modified to express the GD2-specific chimeric receptor 14. G2a-28ζ efficiently interacted with Ewing sarcoma cells, resulting in antigen-specific secretion of cytokines. Moreover, chimeric receptor gene-modified T cells from healthy donors and from a patient exerted potent, GD2-specific cytolytic responses to allogeneic and autologous Ewing sarcoma, including tumour cells grown as multicellular, anchorage-independent spheres. GD2-specific T cells further had activity against Ewing sarcoma xenografts. Conclusion: GD2 surface expression is a characteristic of Ewing sarcomas and provides a suitable target antigen for immunotherapeutic strategies to eradicate micrometastatic cells and prevent relapse in high-risk disease. PMID:22374462

  20. Proper exercise decreases plasma carcinoembryonic antigen levels with the improvement of body condition in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Ko, Il-Gyu; Park, Eung-Mi; Choi, Hye-Jung; Yoo, Jaehyun; Lee, Jong-Kyun; Jee, Yong-Seok

    2014-01-01

    Aging increases the risk of chronic diseases including cancers. Physical exercise has the beneficial effects for the elderly susceptible to the development of cancers, through maintaining a healthy body condition and improving the immune system. However, excessive or insufficient exercise might increase the risk for cancer. In the present study, we investigated what exercise frequency improves cancer-related biomarkers, such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), alpha fetoprotein (AFP), red blood cell (RBC), and white blood cell (WBC), and the body composition of elderly women. Fifty-four females, aged 70 to 77 years, were divided into 4 groups: control, 1-day exercise (1E), 2-3-day exercise (2-3E), and 5-day exercise (5E) groups. The control group did not participate in any physical activity, while the subjects in the exercise groups underwent the exercise program for 12 weeks. As results, CEA was significantly decreased in the exercise groups, with the lowest values in 2-3E group. In contrast, AFP, RBC and WBC were not significantly changed. CEA is an oncofetal glycoprotein that is overexpressed in adenocarcinomas. Although the function of CEA has not been fully understood, CEA has been suggested to be involved in the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines via stimulating monocytes and macrophages. Moreover, body weight and body mass index were improved in the exercise groups, with the lowest levels in 5E group. Thus, we suggest that exercise for 2-3 days per week decreases the expression of CEA and improves body condition, without loading fatigue or stress, which may contribute to preventing cancer in the elderly women.

  1. Somatic cell genetic analysis of human cell surface antigens 5.1H11 and F35/9 (gp45).

    PubMed

    Rettig, W J; Triche, T J; Bander, N H

    1990-01-01

    Serologic analysis of rodent-human somatic cell hybrids has permitted the assignment of loci coding for cell surface differentiation antigens 5.1H11 (gene symbol MSK39) and F35/9 (MSK40) to human chromosomes 11q13-qter and 22, respectively. Both antigens are expressed in hybrids constructed with antigen-positive human cells and certain hybrids constructed with antigen-negative human cells, indicating that the coding genes are not irreversibly silenced in human nonexpressor cells. Antigens 5.1H11 and F35/9, and at least six additional cell surface antigens encoded by chromosomes 11 and 22, are expressed on human Ewing sarcoma and peripheral neuroepithelioma cells, providing selectable markers for isolating and characterizing the specific t(11;22)(q24;q12) marker chromosomes of these tumors in interspecies hybrids.

  2. The world's highest levels of surface UV.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Raul R; Seckmeyer, Gunther; Damiani, Alessandro; Riechelmann, Stefan; Rayas, Juan; Labbe, Fernando; Laroze, David

    2014-01-01

    Chile's northern Atacama Desert has been pointed out as one of the places on earth where the world's highest surface ultraviolet (UV) may occur. This area is characterized by its high altitude, prevalent cloudless conditions and relatively low total ozone column. Aimed at detecting those peak UV levels, we carried out in January 2013 ground-based spectral measurements on the Chajnantor Plateau (5100 m altitude, 23°00'S, 67°45'W) and at the Paranal Observatory (2635 m altitude, 24°37'S, 70°24'W). The UV index computed from our spectral measurements peaked at 20 on the Chajnantor Plateau (under broken cloud conditions) and at 16 at the Paranal Observatory (under cloudless conditions). Spectral measurements carried out in June 2005 at the Izaña Observatory (2367 m altitude, 28°18'N, 16°30'W) were used for further comparisons. Due to the differences in sun-earth separation, total ozone column, altitude, albedo, aerosols and clouds, peak UV levels are expected to be significantly higher at southern hemisphere sites than at their northern hemisphere counterparts.

  3. Detection of Rubisco and mycotoxins as potential contaminants of a plantibody against the hepatitis B surface antigen purified from tobacco.

    PubMed

    Geada, Déborah; Valdés, Rodolfo; Escobar, Arturo; Ares, Dulce M; Torres, Edel; Blanco, Reinaldo; Ferro, Williams; Dorta, Dayamí; González, Marcos; Alemán, María R; Padilla, Sigifredo; Gómez, Leonardo; Del Castillo, Norma; Mendoza, Otto; Urquiza, Dioslaida; Soria, Yordanka; Brito, José; Leyva, Alberto; Borroto, Carlos; Gavilondo, Jorge V

    2007-10-01

    Antibodies have been one of the proteins widely expressed in tobacco plants for pharmaceutical purposes, which demand contaminant free preparations. Rubisco constitutes 40-60% of tobacco leaf soluble proteins; therefore it is the major potential protein contaminant of plantibodies, while mycotoxins are toxic compounds that could be introduced during the biomass production and post-harvest stages with important consequences to human health. The objective of this paper was to investigate whether Rubisco and mycotoxins are present in Plantibody HB-01 preparations used in the immunopurification of the hepatitis B surface antigen. Rubisco was purified from Nicotiana tabacum yielding 154 microg of protein per gram of leaves and purity over 95%. Among mouse monoclonal antibodies generated against this enzyme, the CBSS.Rub-2 was selected for its immunodetection. It recognizes a conserved sequential epitope of Rubisco large subunit with an affinity constant of 0.13 x 10(8)M(-1). Rubisco quantification limit was 1 microg spreading to the measurement of this contaminant less than 4% of plantibodies samples. Additionally, according to a Reverse Phase-HPLC used to measure the level of adventitiously introduced contaminants, it can be concluded that aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 and G2 were undetected in the purified Plantibody HB-01 samples.

  4. B-cell surface antigen B7 provides a costimulatory signal that induces T cells to proliferate and secrete interleukin 2.

    PubMed Central

    Gimmi, C D; Freeman, G J; Gribben, J G; Sugita, K; Freedman, A S; Morimoto, C; Nadler, L M

    1991-01-01

    Occupancy of the T-cell receptor complex does not appear to be a sufficient stimulus to induce a T-cell-mediated immune response. Increasing evidence suggests that cognate cell-cell interaction between an activated T cell and an antigen-presenting cell may provide such a stimulus. A candidate T-cell surface molecule for this costimulatory signal is the T-cell-restricted CD28 antigen. Following crosslinking with anti-CD28 mAb, suboptimally stimulated CD28+ T cells show increased proliferation and markedly increased secretion of a subset of lymphokines. Recently, the B-cell surface activation antigen B7 was shown to be a natural ligand for the CD28 molecule, and both B7 and CD28 are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily. Here we report that B7-transfected CHO cells can induce suboptimally activated CD28+ T cells to proliferate and secrete high levels of interleukin 2. The response is identical whether T cells are submitogenically stimulated with either phorbol myristate acetate or anti-CD3 to activate the T cells. This response is specific and can be totally abrogated with anti-B7 monoclonal antibody. As has previously been observed for anti-CD28 monoclonal antibody, B7 ligation induced secretion of interleukin 2 but not interleukin 4. We have previously demonstrated that B7 expression is restricted to activated B lymphocytes and interferon gamma-activated monocytes. Since these two cellular populations are involved in antigen presentation as well as cognate interaction with T lymphocytes, B7 is likely to represent a central constimulatory signal that is capable of amplifying an immune response. PMID:1650475

  5. Serological responses to Cryptosporidium antigens in inhabitants of Hungary using conventionally filtered surface water and riverbank filtered drinking water.

    PubMed

    Farkas, K; Plutzer, J; Moltchanova, E; Török, A; Varró, M J; Domokos, K; Frost, F; Hunter, P R

    2015-10-01

    In this study the putative protective seroprevalence (PPS) of IgG antibodies to the 27-kDa and 15/17-kDa Cryptosporidium antigens in sera of healthy participants who were and were not exposed to Cryptosporidium oocysts via surface water-derived drinking water was compared. The participants completed a questionnaire regarding risk factors that have been shown to be associated with infection. The PPS was significantly greater (49-61%) in settlements where the drinking water originated from surface water, than in the control city where riverbank filtration was used (21% and 23%). Logistic regression analysis on the risk factors showed an association between bathing/swimming in outdoor pools and antibody responses to the 15/17-kDa antigen complex. Hence the elevated responses were most likely due to the use of contaminated water. Results indicate that waterborne Cryptosporidium infections occur more frequently than reported but may derive from multiple sources.

  6. Diversity of Babesia bovis merozoite surface antigen genes in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Tattiyapong, Muncharee; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Ybanez, Adrian Patalinghug; Ybanez, Rochelle Haidee Daclan; Perez, Zandro Obligado; Guswanto, Azirwan; Igarashi, Ikuo; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2014-02-01

    Babesia bovis is the causative agent of fatal babesiosis in cattle. In the present study, we investigated the genetic diversity of B. bovis among Philippine cattle, based on the genes that encode merozoite surface antigens (MSAs). Forty-one B. bovis-positive blood DNA samples from cattle were used to amplify the msa-1, msa-2b, and msa-2c genes. In phylogenetic analyses, the msa-1, msa-2b, and msa-2c gene sequences generated from Philippine B. bovis-positive DNA samples were found in six, three, and four different clades, respectively. All of the msa-1 and most of the msa-2b sequences were found in clades that were formed only by Philippine msa sequences in the respective phylograms. While all the msa-1 sequences from the Philippines showed similarity to those formed by Australian msa-1 sequences, the msa-2b sequences showed similarity to either Australian or Mexican msa-2b sequences. In contrast, msa-2c sequences from the Philippines were distributed across all the clades of the phylogram, although one clade was formed exclusively by Philippine msa-2c sequences. Similarities among the deduced amino acid sequences of MSA-1, MSA-2b, and MSA-2c from the Philippines were 62.2-100, 73.1-100, and 67.3-100%, respectively. The present findings demonstrate that B. bovis populations are genetically diverse in the Philippines. This information will provide a good foundation for the future design and implementation of improved immunological preventive methodologies against bovine babesiosis in the Philippines. The study has also generated a set of data that will be useful for futher understanding of the global genetic diversity of this important parasite.

  7. Prevalence of antibody to hepatitits B surface antigen among staff in an Edinburgh hospital.

    PubMed

    Burrell, C J; Tonkin, R W; Proudfoot, E; Leadbetter, G; Cowan, P; Lockerbie, L; Gore, S; Lutz, W; Marmion, B P

    1977-02-01

    Antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen was detected by radioimmunoprecipitation in 74 (5-5%) of 1336 staff members in a large general hospital in Edinburgh, in 14 (2-9%) of 480 volunteer blood donors in the area, and in 12 (6-1%) of 197 pregnant women attending for the first time at the ante-natal clinic in the hospital. Rates of antibody prevalence rose with age in the sample of hospital staff and in that of the blood donors, particularly among males. On the other hand, in the ante-natal patients antibody prevalence declined with age. The rates in hospital staff were higher than those in blood donors of comparable age and sex, and high titres of antibody were more common in the staff group. However, no association was found between antibody prevalence and a history of clinical hepatitis, blood transfusion, or recognized contact with cases of hepatitis. Staff who had previously worked in an infectious disease hospital did not show increased antibody prevalence, indicating that simple isolation measures have been adequate to minimize exposure to hepatitis B. No particular prevalence of infection was seen in physicians and surgeons, in the nursing staff, or in workers in clinical diagnostic laboratories, hospital administration or other areas. One group clearly showing increased antibody prevalence was staff currently working, or who had worked, in the Haemodialysis Unit; this correlated with the outbreak of dialysis-associated hepatitis in 1969--70. However, no evidence suggested that significant dissemination of infection had occurred to other defined groups of hospital staff. Elevated rates were also observed in a small sample of kitchen and portering staff, and in obstetric medical and nursing staff; the latter observation indicate a need for further investigation to identify unsuspected exposure to hepatitis B virus.

  8. Maternal ABO and rhesus blood group phenotypes and hepatitis B surface antigen carriage.

    PubMed

    Lao, T T; Sahota, D S; Chung, M-K; Cheung, T K W; Cheng, Y K Y; Leung, T Y

    2014-11-01

    In view of a persistently high prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) carriage in our obstetric population, we examined the association between HBsAg carriage with maternal ABO and rhesus (Rh) blood group phenotypes determined at routine antenatal screening. In a retrospective study, the antenatal screening results of women booked for confinement between 1998 and 2011 in our hospital were examined for the relationship between HBsAg carriage with the ABO and rhesus blood groups, taking into account also the effects of advanced maternal age (≥ 35 years) and parity status (nulliparous or multiparous), and year of birth before or following the availability of the hepatitis B vaccine (1984). HBsAg carriage was found in 9.9%, 9.6%, 9.1% and 10.2% (P = 0.037) for group-A (n = 20 581 or 26.1%), -B (n = 20 744 or 26.4%), -AB (n = 5138 or 6.5%) and -O (n = 32 242 or 41.0%) among the 78705 women in the study cohort. Rhesus negativity was found in 0.6%, and HBsAg carriage was 12.3% and 9.8%, respectively, for the Rh-negative and Rh-positive women (P = 0.071). Carriage rate between group-O and non-O was influenced by nulliparity, age ≥ 35 years and Rh-positive status. Regression analysis indicated that group-B (P = 0.044, aOR = 1.062, 95% CI 1.002-1.127) and group-AB (P = 0.016, aOR = 1.134, 95% CI 1.024-1.256) were associated with HBsAg carriage. Blood groups-B and -AB are associated with increased hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in our population, and further studies are warranted to elucidate the implications of this on the sequelae of HBV infection.

  9. Expression of the hepatitis B virus surface antigen in Drosophila S2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Alexandra S.; Spina, Ângela; Pereira, Carlos A.

    2008-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells were transfected with a plasmid vector (pAcHBsAgHy) containing the S gene, coding for the hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg), under control of the constitutive drosophila actin promoter (pAc), and the hygromycin B (Hy) selection gene. The vector was introduced into Schneider 2 (S2) Drosophila cells by DNA transfection and a cell population (S2AcHBsAgHy) was selected by its resistance to hygromycin B. The pAcHBsAgHy vector integrated in transfected S2 cell genome and approximately 1,000 copies per cell were found in a higher HBsAg producer cell subpopulation. The HBsAg production varied in different subpopulations, but did not when a given subpopulation was cultivated in different culture flasks. Higher HBsAg expression was found in S2AcHBsAgHy cells cultivated in Insect Xpress medium (13.5 μg/1E7 cells) and SFX medium (7 μg/1E7 cells) in comparison to SF900II medium (0.6 μg/1E7 cells). An increase of HBsAg was observed in culture maintained under hygromycin selection pressure. Data presented in the paper show that S2AcHBsAgHy cells produce efficiently the HBsAg which is mainly found in the cell supernatant, suggesting that HBsAg is secreted from the cells. The data also show that our approach using the Drosophila expression system is suitable for the preparation of other viral protein preparation. PMID:19003172

  10. Localization of immunodominant epitopes within the "a" determinant of hepatitis B surface antigen using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Golsaz-Shirazi, Forough; Mohammadi, Hamed; Amiri, Mohammad Mehdi; Khoshnoodi, Jalal; Kardar, Gholam Ali; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Shokri, Fazel

    2016-10-01

    The common "a" determinant is the major immunodominant region of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) shared by all serotypes and genotypes of hepatitis B virus (HBV). Antibodies against this region are thought to confer protection against HBV and are essential for viral clearance. Mutations within the "a" determinant may lead to conformational changes in this region, which can affect the binding of neutralizing antibodies. There is an increasing concern about identification and control of mutant viruses which is possible by comprehensive structural investigation of the epitopes located within this region. Anti-HBs monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against different epitopes of HBsAg are a promising tool to meet this goal. In the present study, 19 anti-HBs mAbs were employed to map epitopes localized within the "a" determinant, using a panel of recombinant mutant HBsAgs. The topology of the epitopes was analyzed by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Our results indicate that all of the mAbs seem to recognize epitopes within or in the vicinity of the "a" determinant of HBsAg. Different patterns of binding with mutant forms were observed with different mAbs. Amino acid substitutions at positions 123, 126, 129, 144, and 145 dramatically reduced the reactivity of antibodies with HBsAg. The T123N mutation had the largest impact on antibody binding to HBsAg. The reactivity pattern of our panel of mAbs with mutant forms of HBsAg could have important clinical implications for immunoscreening, diagnosis of HBV infection, design of a new generation of recombinant HB vaccines, and immunoprophylaxis of HBV infection as an alternative to therapy with hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG). PMID:27439498

  11. Variation of expression defects in cell surface 190-kDa protein antigen of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Lapirattanakul, Jinthana; Nomura, Ryota; Matsumoto-Nakano, Michiyo; Srisatjaluk, Ratchapin; Ooshima, Takashi; Nakano, Kazuhiko

    2015-05-01

    Streptococcus mutans, which consists of four serotypes, c, e, f, and k, possesses a 190-kDa cell surface protein antigen (PA) for initial tooth adhesion. We used Western blot analysis to determine PA expression in 750 S. mutans isolates from 150 subjects and found a significantly higher prevalence of the isolates with PA expression defects in serotypes f and k compared to serotypes c and e. Moreover, the defect patterns could be classified into three types; no PA expression on whole bacterial cells and in their supernatant samples (Type N1), PA expression mainly seen in supernatant samples (Type N2), and only low expression of PA in the samples of whole bacterial cells (Type W). The underlying reasons for the defects were mutations in the gene encoding PA as well as in the transcriptional processing of this gene for Type N1, defects in the sortase gene for Type N2, and low mRNA expression of PA for Type W. Since cellular hydrophobicity and phagocytosis susceptibility of the PA-defective isolates were significantly lower than those of the normal expression isolates, the potential implication of such defective isolates in systemic diseases involving bacteremia other than dental caries was suggested. Additionally, multilocus sequence typing was utilized to characterize S. mutans clones that represented a proportion of isolates with PA defects of 65-100%. Therefore, we described the molecular basis for variation defects in PA expression of S. mutans. Furthermore, we also emphasized the strong association between PA expression defects and serotypes f and k as well as the clonal relationships among these isolates. PMID:25792295

  12. Evaluation of saliva specimens as an alternative sampling method to detect hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Helena Medina; da Silva, Elisangela Ferreira; Villela-Nogueira, Cristiane A; Nabuco, Letícia C; do Ó, Kycia Maria Rodrigues; Lewis-Ximenez, Lia Laura; Yoshida, Clara Fumiko Tachibana; Lampe, Elisabeth; Villar, Livia Melo

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a modified enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was evaluated for the Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) among whole saliva and oral fluid samples. Specimens were collected from 115 individuals who gave serum and oral fluid using Salivette (Sarstedt, Nümbrecht, Germany) and whole saliva. Saliva specimens were tested following a modified ELISA, and the results were compared with paired serum specimens that were tested according to the supplier's instructions. Transport buffer for the oral fluids, sample volume for assay, incubation period of sample with conjugate as well as cut-off values were evaluated to optimize the assay. The highest sensitivity and specificity were obtained by increasing the incubation of sample and conjugate to 16  hr and using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve to calculate cut-off values. HBsAg was detected in 40 oral fluids and 44 whole saliva samples out of 47 paired positive serum specimens and not detected in 64 oral fluids and 63 whole saliva samples out of 68 matched negative sera samples by the ELISA assay. There was excellent agreement between the results for the serum and saliva specimens kappa value (κ): 0.80 for oral fluid and κ: 0.87 for whole saliva and there was excellent reproducibility. Using an optimized protocol, the sensitivities of whole saliva and oral fluid were 93.6 and 85.1%, respectively, whereas specificities of whole saliva and oral fluid were 92.6 and 94.1%, respectively. Our data showed a significant promise for the use of whole saliva and oral fluid together with the modified commercial EIA for Hepatitis B virus infection surveillance.

  13. Prevalence of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen in US-Born and Foreign-Born Asian/Pacific Islander College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quang, Yen N.; Vu, Joanne; Yuk, Jihey; Li, Chin-Shang; Chen, Moon; Bowlus, Christopher L.

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic hepatitis B (HBV) among college-age US-born Asian and Pacific Islanders (A/PI) is not well known. Objectives: To compare the prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) seropositivity in US-born to A/PI-born students at a public university. Participants: Undergraduate who self-identified themselves as A/PI. Results:…

  14. Intracellular transport of membrane glycoproteins: two closely related histocompatibility antigens differ in their rates of transit to the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The intracellular transport of two closely related membrane glycoproteins was studied in the murine B cell lymphoma line, AKTB-1b. Using pulse-chase radiolabeling, the kinetics of appearance of the class I histocompatibility antigens, H-2Kk and H-2Dk, at the cell surface were compared and found to be remarkably different. Newly synthesized H-2Kk is transported rapidly such that all radiolabeled molecules reach the surface within 1 h. In contrast, the H-2Dk antigen is transported slowly with a half-time of 4-5 h. The rates of surface appearance for the two antigens closely resemble the rates at which their Asn-linked oligosaccharides mature from endoglucosaminidase H (endo H)-sensitive to endo H-resistant forms, a process that occurs in the Golgi apparatus. This suggests that the rate-limiting step in the transport of H-2Dk to the cell surface occurs before the formation of endo H-resistant oligosaccharides in the Golgi apparatus. Subcellular fractionation experiments confirmed this conclusion by identifying the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as the site where the H-2Dk antigen accumulates. The retention of this glycoprotein in the ER does not appear to be due to a lack of solubility or an inability of the H-2Dk heavy chain to associate with beta 2-microglobulin. Our data is inconsistent with a passive membrane flow mechanism for the intracellular transport of membrane glycoproteins. Rather, it suggests that one or more receptors localized to the ER membrane may mediate the selective transport of membrane glycoproteins out of the ER to the Golgi apparatus. The fact that H-2Kk and H-2Dk are highly homologous (greater than or equal to 80%) indicates that this process can be strongly influenced by limited alterations in protein structure. PMID:3928633

  15. Intracellular transport of membrane glycoproteins: two closely related histocompatibility antigens differ in their rates of transit to the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Williams, D B; Swiedler, S J; Hart, G W

    1985-09-01

    The intracellular transport of two closely related membrane glycoproteins was studied in the murine B cell lymphoma line, AKTB-1b. Using pulse-chase radiolabeling, the kinetics of appearance of the class I histocompatibility antigens, H-2Kk and H-2Dk, at the cell surface were compared and found to be remarkably different. Newly synthesized H-2Kk is transported rapidly such that all radiolabeled molecules reach the surface within 1 h. In contrast, the H-2Dk antigen is transported slowly with a half-time of 4-5 h. The rates of surface appearance for the two antigens closely resemble the rates at which their Asn-linked oligosaccharides mature from endoglucosaminidase H (endo H)-sensitive to endo H-resistant forms, a process that occurs in the Golgi apparatus. This suggests that the rate-limiting step in the transport of H-2Dk to the cell surface occurs before the formation of endo H-resistant oligosaccharides in the Golgi apparatus. Subcellular fractionation experiments confirmed this conclusion by identifying the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as the site where the H-2Dk antigen accumulates. The retention of this glycoprotein in the ER does not appear to be due to a lack of solubility or an inability of the H-2Dk heavy chain to associate with beta 2-microglobulin. Our data is inconsistent with a passive membrane flow mechanism for the intracellular transport of membrane glycoproteins. Rather, it suggests that one or more receptors localized to the ER membrane may mediate the selective transport of membrane glycoproteins out of the ER to the Golgi apparatus. The fact that H-2Kk and H-2Dk are highly homologous (greater than or equal to 80%) indicates that this process can be strongly influenced by limited alterations in protein structure. PMID:3928633

  16. Effects of solution conditions and surface chemistry on the adsorption of three recombinant botulinum neurotoxin antigens to aluminum salt adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Vessely, Christina; Estey, Tia; Randolph, Theodore W; Henderson, Ian; Nayar, Rajiv; Carpenter, John F

    2007-09-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is a biological warfare threat. Protein antigens have been developed against the seven major BoNT serotypes for the development of a recombinant protein vaccine. This study is an evaluation of adsorption profiles for three of the recombinant protein antigens to aluminum salt adjuvants in the development of a trivalent vaccine against BoNT. Adsorption profiles were obtained over a range of protein concentrations. The results document that charge-charge interactions dominate the adsorption of antigen to adjuvant. Optimal conditions for adsorption were determined. However, potency studies and solution stability studies indicated the necessity of using aluminum hydroxide adjuvant at low pH. To improve the adsorption profiles to AlOH adjuvant, phosphate ions were introduced into the adsorption buffers. The resulting change in the adjuvant chemistry led to an improvement of adsorption of the BoNT antigens to aluminum hydroxide adjuvant while maintaining potency. Competitive adsorption profiles were also determined, and showed changes in maximum adsorption from mixed solutions compared to adsorption from individual protein solutions. The adsorption profiles for each protein varied due to differences in adsorption mechanism and affinity for the adjuvant surface. These results emphasize the importance of evaluating competitive adsorption in the development of multivalent vaccine products. PMID:17518359

  17. Elevation of serum carcinoembryonic antigen level in a patient with hypothyroidism after radiation therapy for cervical esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Gen; Abe, Eisuke; Sasamoto, Ryuta; Sasai, Keisuke

    2010-02-01

    We report the case of a 51-year-old woman who showed elevation of serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level 14 months after chemoradiation therapy for her cervical esophageal cancer. Close examination demonstrated that the patient was suffering from hypothyroidism probably due to the chemoradiation therapy. The serum CEA level decreased after starting supplementary treatment with oral levothyroxine. The exact mechanism underlying the elevated level of CEA observed in a patient with hypothyroidism is unclear. However, we should be aware of the possibility of transient elevation of CEA affected by thyroid function in patients after radiation therapy for head and neck cancer.

  18. What pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level warrants long-term androgen deprivation?

    SciTech Connect

    Feigenberg, Steven J. . E-mail: S_Feigenberg@fccc.edu; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Uzzo, Robert G.; Eisenberg, Debra F.; Pollack, Alan

    2005-03-15

    Purpose: Several large randomized prospective studies have demonstrated a survival benefit with the addition of long-term androgen deprivation to definitive radiotherapy for patients with Gleason score 8-10 or T3-T4 prostate cancer. However, these studies were performed before the routine use of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) measurement. The purpose of this study was to determine what pretreatment (initial) PSA (iPSA) level, if any, warrants the addition of long-term androgen deprivation in the PSA era. Methods and materials: The data set evaluated consisted of 1003 prostate cancer patients treated definitively with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy between May 1, 1989 and November 30, 1999 (median follow-up, 61 months). Specifically excluded were patients with T3-T4 disease or Gleason score greater than 7 or those who had undergone androgen deprivation as a part of their initial therapy. The median radiation dose was 76 Gy. Patients were randomly split into two data sets, with the first (n = 487) used to evaluate the optimal iPSA cutpoint for which a statistically significant difference in outcome was noted. The second data set (n = 516) served as a validation data set for the initial modeling. The analysis of the optimal iPSA cutpoint was based on a recursive partitioning approach for censored data using the log-rank test for nodal separation of freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF) as defined by the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition. Cox multivariate regression analysis was used to confirm independent predictors of outcome among the clinical and treatment-related factors: iPSA (grouped as defined by the recursive partitioning analysis), Gleason score (2-6 vs. 7), T stage (T1c-T2a vs. T2b-T2c), and total radiation dose (continuous). Results: The recursive partitioning analysis data set resulted in an optimal iPSA cutpoint of 35 ng/mL, such that the 5-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of FFBF was 80%, 69%, and 19% for i

  19. Physiological Level Production of Antigen-Specific Human Immunoglobulin in Cloned Transchromosomic Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hua; Jiao, Jin-An; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sullivan, Eddie J.; Wang, Zhongde; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs) derived from pooled plasma from human donors are Food and Drug Administration approved biologics used in the treatment of a variety of human diseases. Powered by the natural diversity of immune response, hpAbs are effective in treating diseases caused by complex or quickly-evolving antigens such as viruses. We previously showed that transchromosomic (Tc) cattle carrying a human artificial chromosome (HAC) comprising the entire unrearranged human immunoglobulin heavy-chain (hIGH) and kappa-chain (hIGK) germline loci (named as κHAC) are capable of producing functional hpAbs when both of the bovine immunoglobulin mu heavy-chains, bIGHM and bIGHML1, are homozygously inactivated (double knockouts or DKO). However, B lymphocyte development in these Tc cattle is compromised, and the overall production of hpAbs is low. Here, we report the construction of an improved HAC, designated as cKSL-HACΔ, by incorporating all of the human immunoglobulin germline loci into the HAC. Furthermore, for avoiding the possible human-bovine interspecies incompatibility between the human immunoglobulin mu chain protein (hIgM) and bovine transmembrane α and β immunoglobulins (bIgα and bIgβ) in the pre-B cell receptor (pre-BCR) complex, we partially replaced (bovinized) the hIgM constant domain with the counterpart of bovine IgM (bIgM) that is involved in the interaction between bIgM and bIgα/Igβ; human IgM bovinization would also improve the functionality of hIgM in supporting B cell activation and proliferation. We also report the successful production of DKO Tc cattle carrying the cKSL-HACΔ (cKSL-HACΔ/DKO), the dramatic improvement of B cell development in these cattle and the high level production of hpAbs (as measured for the human IgG isotype) in the plasma. We further demonstrate that, upon immunization by tumor immunogens, high titer tumor immunogen-specific human IgG (hIgG) can be produced from such Tc cattle. PMID:24205120

  20. Physiological level production of antigen-specific human immunoglobulin in cloned transchromosomic cattle.

    PubMed

    Sano, Akiko; Matsushita, Hiroaki; Wu, Hua; Jiao, Jin-An; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sullivan, Eddie J; Wang, Zhongde; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs) derived from pooled plasma from human donors are Food and Drug Administration approved biologics used in the treatment of a variety of human diseases. Powered by the natural diversity of immune response, hpAbs are effective in treating diseases caused by complex or quickly-evolving antigens such as viruses. We previously showed that transchromosomic (Tc) cattle carrying a human artificial chromosome (HAC) comprising the entire unrearranged human immunoglobulin heavy-chain (hIGH) and kappa-chain (hIGK) germline loci (named as κHAC) are capable of producing functional hpAbs when both of the bovine immunoglobulin mu heavy-chains, bIGHM and bIGHML1, are homozygously inactivated (double knockouts or DKO). However, B lymphocyte development in these Tc cattle is compromised, and the overall production of hpAbs is low. Here, we report the construction of an improved HAC, designated as cKSL-HACΔ, by incorporating all of the human immunoglobulin germline loci into the HAC. Furthermore, for avoiding the possible human-bovine interspecies incompatibility between the human immunoglobulin mu chain protein (hIgM) and bovine transmembrane α and β immunoglobulins (bIgα and bIgβ) in the pre-B cell receptor (pre-BCR) complex, we partially replaced (bovinized) the hIgM constant domain with the counterpart of bovine IgM (bIgM) that is involved in the interaction between bIgM and bIgα/Igβ; human IgM bovinization would also improve the functionality of hIgM in supporting B cell activation and proliferation. We also report the successful production of DKO Tc cattle carrying the cKSL-HACΔ (cKSL-HACΔ/DKO), the dramatic improvement of B cell development in these cattle and the high level production of hpAbs (as measured for the human IgG isotype) in the plasma. We further demonstrate that, upon immunization by tumor immunogens, high titer tumor immunogen-specific human IgG (hIgG) can be produced from such Tc cattle.

  1. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 bacterial ghosts retain crucial surface properties and express chlamydial antigen: an imaging study of a delivery system for the ocular surface.

    PubMed

    Montanaro, Jacqueline; Inic-Kanada, Aleksandra; Ladurner, Angela; Stein, Elisabeth; Belij, Sandra; Bintner, Nora; Schlacher, Simone; Schuerer, Nadine; Mayr, Ulrike Beate; Lubitz, Werner; Leisch, Nikolaus; Barisani-Asenbauer, Talin

    2015-01-01

    To target chronic inflammatory ocular surface diseases, a drug delivery platform is needed that is safe, possesses immunomodulatory properties, and can be used either for drug delivery, or as a foreign antigen carrier. A new therapeutic approach that we have previously proposed uses nonliving bacterial ghosts (BGs) as a carrier-delivery system which can be engineered to carry foreign antigens and/or be loaded with therapeutic drugs. The parent strain chosen for development of our BG delivery system is the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN), whose intrinsic properties trigger the innate immune system with the flagella and fimbriae used to attach and stimulate epithelial cells. In previous studies, we have shown that EcN BGs are safe for the ocular surface route, but evidence that EcN BGs retain flagella and fimbriae after transformation, has never been visually confirmed. In this study, we used different visualization techniques to determine whether flagella and fimbriae are retained on EcN BGs engineered either for drug delivery or as a foreign antigen carrier. We have also shown by immunoelectron microscopy that EcN retains two foreign antigens after processing to become EcN BGs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that BGs derived from EcN and expressing a foreign antigen attachment to conjunctival epithelial cells in vitro without causing reduced cell viability. These results are an important step in constructing a delivery system based on a nonliving probiotic that is suitable for use in ocular surface diseases pairing immunomodulation and targeted delivery. PMID:26229437

  2. Induction of endoplasmic reticulum-derived oxidative stress by an occult infection related S surface antigen variant

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In-Kyung; Lee, Seoung-Ae; Kim, Hong; Won, You-Sub; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the mechanism of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induction by an occult infection related hepatitis B virus S surface antigen (HBsAg) variant. METHODS: We used an HBsAg variant with lower secretion capacity, which was a KD variant from a Korean subject who was occultly infected with the genotype C. We compared the expression profiles of ER stress-related proteins between HuH-7 cells transfected with HBsAg plasmids of a wild-type and a KD variant using Western blot. RESULTS: Confocal microscopy indicated that the KD variant had higher levels of co-localization with ER than the wild-type HBsAg. The KD variant up-regulated ER stress-related proteins and induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) compared to the wild-type via an increase in calcium. The KD variant also down-regulated anti-oxidant proteins (HO-1, catalase and SOD) compared to the wild-type, which indicates positive amplification loops of the ER-ROS axis. The KD variant also induced apoptotic cell death via the up-regulation of caspase proteins (caspase 6, 9 and 12). Furthermore, the KD variant induced a higher level of nitric oxide than wild-type HBsAg via the up-regulation of the iNOS protein. CONCLUSION: Our data indicate that occult infection related HBsAg variants can lead to ER-derived oxidative stress and liver cell death in HuH-7 cells. PMID:26078563

  3. Synthetic surfaces as artificial antigen presenting cells in the study of T cell receptor triggering and immunological synapse formation.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Darrell J; Doh, Junsang

    2007-08-01

    T cell activation occurs when T cell receptors engage peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) molecules displayed on the surface of antigen presenting cells (APCs). Clustering of TCRs and other receptors in physical patterns at the T-APC interface forms a structure known as an immunological synapse (IS). Studies of the IS are challenging due to the cell-cell contact context of the governing interactions. Model surfaces as synthetic APCs have thus been developed, where the type, quantity, and physical arrangement of ligands displayed to T cells are precisely controlled. These model systems have provided important insights into the structure and function of the IS. PMID:17398113

  4. A selective defect in IgM antigen receptor synthesis and transport causes loss of cell surface IgM expression on tolerant B lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, S E; Goodnow, C C

    1994-01-01

    To explore the biochemical basis for maintaining immunological tolerance by functional inactivation of self-reactive B lymphocytes, transgenic mice carrying rearranged anti-lysozyme immunoglobulin transgenes and a lysozyme transgene were used as a source of large numbers of tolerant self-reactive B cells. Antigen receptors of the IgD isotype were expressed at normal levels on tolerant B cells, contained the heterodimeric MB1/B29 signalling component of the receptor complex and were structurally indistinguishable from IgD on nontolerant B cells. In contrast, cell surface expression of IgM receptor complexes on tolerant B cells was greatly reduced, despite normal expression of mRNA encoding the receptor components. Three-fold fewer immunoreactive mu heavy chains were detectable after a short period of biosynthetic labelling and the immunoreactive mu chains produced were paired with kappa light chains and assembled normally into intact receptor complexes containing the MB1/B29 heterodimer. Nascent IgM receptor complexes nevertheless failed to be processed into an endoglycosidase H-resistant form in the tolerant B cells and thus appeared to be selectively blocked in their transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to the medial Golgi. These findings demonstrate that intracellular trafficking of antigen receptor complexes is regulated by exposure to receptor stimuli at the cell surface causing a long-lasting decrease in surface receptor expression on tolerant B cells. Images PMID:8112296

  5. Vibriocidal activity, immune globulin producing cells and immune globulin levels in Theropithecus gelada after administration of a Vibrio cholerae antigen

    PubMed Central

    Felsenfeld, Oscar; Greer, William E.

    1968-01-01

    Geladas were fed or injected with an antigen that contained Burrows' type 2 cholera toxin. Rising agglutinin and vibriocidal titres were observed in the serum, peripheral and mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen and lymphatic tissue of the upper intestine. Oral administration stimulated a more intensive vibriocidal activity in the mesenteric lymphatic nodes and intestinal lymphatic tissue, and within a shorter time than parenteral injection of the same antigen. Immune globulin synthesis paralleled largely the number of immunologically active cells. The agglutinin titres reflected the level of immune globulins and the numbers of globulin producing cells, whereas vibriocidal titres appeared independent of both. In terms of antibody site serum IgG was weight for weight more vibriocidal than serum IgM. PMID:4170509

  6. Expression and morphology of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli surface antigen CS31A in E. coli K12 and Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Kuehni-Boghenbor, Kathrin; Jordi, Helene A; Frey, Joachim; Vilei, Edy M; Favre, Didier; Stoffel, Michael H

    2012-06-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is known as a worldwide cause of diarrheal disease. The pathogenesis involves the attachment of the microorganisms to the mucosa and the production of enterotoxins. Surface expression of CS31A fimbriae was assessed by Western blots, dot blots, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy using negative staining and immunogold labeling. These investigations revealed significant differences in both the morphology of the wild-type and recombinant strains and the antigen exposure of CS31A in the wild-type and recombinant strains. In the wild-type ETEC strain, expression of CS31A was subject to phase variation. The recombinant E. coli strain produced CS31A but was prone to epitope shedding. In Vibrio cholerae vaccine strain CVD 103-HgR, the recombinant CS31A antigen was expressed but was only found intracellularly. Thus, E. coli strains seem to lend themselves better to the development of recombinant vaccines expressing ETEC-specific antigens at the cell's surface than strains from other orders or genera such as V. cholerae. PMID:22607531

  7. The Murine Humoral Immune Response to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen: Idiotype Network Pathways.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schick, Michael Roy

    Recognition of a wide spectrum in disease outcomes following Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) infection has led to the suggestion that individual differences may be due to characteristics of the immune response. HBV, a hepatotropic virus, is not directly cytopathic to the host hepatocytes but the cellular damage which does not occur may be due to the host's own immune response. It is this variety in immune response capabilities following natural infection or vaccination which led to the present study in which the murine humoral immune response to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was examined. Following immunization with purified HBsAg an anti-HBs response could be detected in 19 inbred strains of mice. The response, which varied among the strains, was linked to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Among high responders to HBsAg were two strains in which a poor response to a single epitope could be detected. Although quantitatively serum from these strains resembled serum from other high responders, there was a major difference in the qualitative aspects. Included within this study was the role of idotype networks within the murine anti-HBs response. By directly targeting HBsAg-specific B cells within the framework of an idiotype network by an Ab-2, it was possible to circumvent T cell-dependent regulation of an immune response. In each of five inbred strains of mice immunized with a polyclonal rabbit Ab-2 an Ab-3 population with HBsAg-specificity (Ab -1^') was induced. These mice were also immunized with HBsAg resulting in a higher anti-HBs response as compared to HBsAg immunization alone in all of the strains tested except for one. The response in this strain, normally a low responder to HBsAg, indicated that the mechanisms for genetic restriction of the anti -HBs response was still active, although it was not apparent during anti-Id immunization. The effects of an anti-Id on the murine antibody response to HBsAg may lead to insights on the presence of idiotype

  8. Cell-surface antigens of melanoma recognized by human monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, H; Furukawa, K; Fortunato, S R; Livingston, P O; Lloyd, K O; Oettgen, H F; Old, L J

    1987-01-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were derived from lymph node lymphocytes and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from patients with melanoma. Four methods for generating human mAbs were compared: fusion with human [LICR-LON-HMy-2 (LICR-2)] or mouse (NS-1) cells; transformation by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV); and EBV transformation followed by NS-1 fusion. NS-1 fusion with lymph node lymphocytes resulted in a higher number of growing hybrids than LICR-2 fusion. Virtually no hybrids were obtained from NS-1 or LICR-2 fusions with PBL. EBV transformed lymphocytes from lymph node and peripheral blood with equal efficiency, and the yield of proliferating cultures for antibody screening was more than 10- to 30-fold greater than that obtained by fusion techniques. However, once antibody-producing cultures had been identified, stability and clonability of EBV-transformed cells were poorer than that of NS-1 hybrid cells. To combine the strengths of both methods, cultures of EBV-transformed cells were fused with NS-1; and hybrid clones were isolated that showed vigorous growth, clonability, and stable antibody secretion. Detailed specificity analysis of the mAbs produced by six of these clones indicated detection of a class 1 (unique) melanoma antigen, a class 3 melanoma antigen, and four ganglioside antigens (GD3, GM3, and two other, as yet uncharacterized, heterophile antigens). Images PMID:3031684

  9. Rapid screening and identification of dominant B cell epitopes of HBV surface antigen by quantum dot-based fluorescence polarization assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhongji; Song, Ruihua; Chen, Yue; Zhu, Yang; Tian, Yanhui; Li, Ding; Cui, Daxiang

    2013-03-01

    A method for quickly screening and identifying dominant B cell epitopes was developed using hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen as a target. Eleven amino acid fragments from HBV surface antigen were synthesized by 9-fluorenylmethoxy carbonyl solid-phase peptide synthesis strategy, and then CdTe quantum dots were used to label the N-terminals of all peptides. After optimizing the factors for fluorescence polarization (FP) immunoassay, the antigenicities of synthetic peptides were determined by analyzing the recognition and combination of peptides and standard antibody samples. The results of FP assays confirmed that 10 of 11 synthetic peptides have distinct antigenicities. In order to screen dominant antigenic peptides, the FP assays were carried out to investigate the antibodies against the 10 synthetic peptides of HBV surface antigen respectively in 159 samples of anti-HBV surface antigen-positive antiserum. The results showed that 3 of the 10 antigenic peptides may be immunodominant because the antibodies against them existed more widely among the samples and their antibody titers were higher than those of other peptides. Using three dominant antigenic peptides, 293 serum samples were detected for HBV infection by FP assays; the results showed that the antibody-positive ratio was 51.9% and the sensitivity and specificity were 84.3% and 98.2%, respectively. In conclusion, a quantum dot-based FP assay is a very simple, rapid, and convenient method for determining immunodominant antigenic peptides and has great potential in applications such as epitope mapping, vaccine designing, or clinical disease diagnosis in the future.

  10. Cell surface antigen profiling using a novel type of antibody array immobilised to plasma ion-implanted polycarbonate.

    PubMed

    Main, Heather; Radenkovic, Jelena; Kosobrodova, Elena; McKenzie, David; Bilek, Marcela; Lendahl, Urban

    2014-10-01

    To identify and sort out subpopulations of cells from more complex and heterogeneous assemblies of cells is important for many biomedical applications, and the development of cost- and labour-efficient techniques to accomplish this is warranted. In this report, we have developed a novel array-based platform to discriminate cellular populations based on differences in cell surface antigen expressions. These cell capture microarrays were produced through covalent immobilisation of CD antibodies to plasma ion immersion implantation-treated polycarbonate (PIII-PC), which offers the advantage of a transparent matrix, allowing direct light microscopy visualisation of captured cells. The functionality of the PIII-PC array was validated using several cell types, resulting in unique surface antigen expression profiles. PIII-PC results were compatible with flow cytometry, nitrocellulose cell capture arrays and immunofluorescent staining, indicating that the technique is robust. We report on the use of this PIII-PC cluster of differentiation (CD) antibody array to gain new insights into neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and into the consequences of genetic targeting of the Notch signalling pathway, a key signalling mechanism for most cellular differentiation processes. Specifically, we identify CD98 as a novel marker for neural precursors and polarised expression of CD9 in the apical domain of ES cell-derived neural rosettes. We further identify expression of CD9 in hitherto uncharacterised non-neural cells and enrichment of CD49e- and CD117-positive cells in Notch signalling-deficient ES cell differentiations. In conclusion, this work demonstrates that covalent immobilisation of antibody arrays to the PIII-PC surface provides faithful cell surface antigen data in a cost- and labour-efficient manner. This may be used to facilitate high throughput identification and standardisation of more precise marker profiles during stem cell differentiation and in

  11. Glycoproteins, antigens, and regulation of complement activation on the surface of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma lewisi: implications for immune evasion

    SciTech Connect

    Sturtevant, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    The surface antigens and glycoproteins of the rat parasitic protozoan, Trypanosoma lewisi were characterized. Radioiodination with /sup 125/I identified 10 out of more 40 polypeptides separated on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. All of these components were identified as glycoproteins by peroxidase-conjugated Conconavalin A (HR-Con A) lectin affinoblotting. This analysis detected that quantitative but not qualitative changes occurred during infection. Localization of most of the reactive determinants was indicated by immunoblotting extracts of radioiodinated T. lewisi. Changes in the antigenicity as related to survival in the host are discussed. The presence of IgG and IgM on the surface of T. lewisi isolated from intact and ..gamma..-irradiated rats (irr.) and that determinants bind Ig from uninfected rat sera (NRS) was indicated by flow cytometric analysis. Immunoblotting identified the major NRS IgG binding component as the 74 kd surface glycoprotein. Complement component C3 deposition during infection was indicated by flow cytometric analysis and immunoblotting. Incubation of intact T. lewisi with normal human sera indicated that C3, C5, and factor B deposition was Mg/sup 2 +/ dependent, Ca/sup 2 +/ independent and deposited C3 was rapidly processed to hemolytically inactive fragments. Radioiodination of intact and protease T. lewisi after cultivation identified three components which correlate with resistance to lysis. This suggests that surface moieties on intact T. lewisi modulate host complement activity by restricting C3/C5 convertase activity.

  12. A newly identified immunodominant membrane protein (pMB67) involved in Mycoplasma bovis surface antigenic variation.

    PubMed

    Behrens, A; Poumarat, F; Le Grand, D; Heller, M; Rosengarten, R

    1996-09-01

    Mycoplasma bovis is a bovine pathogen able to cause systemic disease. It possesses a series of prominent, structurally related yet clearly distinguishable membrane lipoproteins on the cell surface. These variable surface proteins (Vsps) undergo highly dynamic and spontaneous changes in size and expression and are key immunogenic components. They may play a critical role as mediators of adherence to host cells and in escaping immune destruction. In this report, we define a novel, Vsp-unrelated membrane protein also associated with M. bovis surface antigenic variation. This protein has an apparent molecular mass of 67,000 Da in the type strain PG45 and was designated pMB67. Immunological and biochemical characterization of pMB67 demonstrated that it: (i) contains a specific epitope, (ii) is not modified by lipid but does contain cysteine, (iii) does not contain a Vsp-like repetitive periodic protein structure, (iv) is a predominant antigen recognized during M. bovis infections, (v) undergoes a high rate of phase variation in vitro and (vi) is size-variable. These results showed that M. bovis employs two types of specialized membrane proteins for surface diversification. The pMB67 protein may be useful in diagnostic assays and as a vaccine component.

  13. Dual oncogenic and tumor suppressor roles of the promyelocytic leukemia gene in hepatocarcinogenesis associated with hepatitis B virus surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yih-Lin; Wu, Mei-Ling

    2016-05-10

    Proteasome-mediated degradation of promyelocytic leukemia tumor suppressor (PML) is upregulated in many viral infections and cancers. We previously showed that PML knockdown promotes early-onset hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg)-transgenic mice. Here we report the effects of PML restoration on late-onset HBsAg-induced HCC. We compared protein expression patterns, genetic mutations and the effects of pharmacologically targeting PML in wild-type, PML-/-, PML+/+HBsAgtg/o and PML-/-HBsAgtg/o mice. PML-/- mice exhibited somatic mutations in DNA repair genes and developed severe steatosis and proliferative disorders, but not HCC. PML-/-HBsAgtg/o mice exhibited early mutations in cancer driver genes and developed hyperplasia, fatty livers and indolent adipose-like HCC. In PML+/+HBsAg-transgenic mice, HBsAg expression declined over time, and HBsAg-associated PML suppression was concomitantly relieved. Nevertheless, these mice accumulated mutations in genes contributing to oxidative stress pathways and developed aggressive late-onset angiogenic trabecular HCC. PML inhibition using non-toxic doses of arsenic trioxide selectively killed long-term HBsAg-affected liver cells in PML+/+HBsAgtg/o mice with falling HBsAg and rising PML levels, but not normal liver cells or early-onset HCC cells in PML-/-HBsAgtg/0 mice. These findings suggest dual roles for PML as a tumor-suppressor lost in early-onset HBsAg-induced hepatocarcinogenesis and as an oncogenic promoter in late-onset HBsAg-related HCC progression. PMID:27058621

  14. Dual oncogenic and tumor suppressor roles of the promyelocytic leukemia gene in hepatocarcinogenesis associated with hepatitis B virus surface antigen

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yih-Lin; Wu, Mei-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Proteasome-mediated degradation of promyelocytic leukemia tumor suppressor (PML) is upregulated in many viral infections and cancers. We previously showed that PML knockdown promotes early-onset hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg)-transgenic mice. Here we report the effects of PML restoration on late-onset HBsAg-induced HCC. We compared protein expression patterns, genetic mutations and the effects of pharmacologically targeting PML in wild-type, PML−/−, PML+/+HBsAgtg/o and PML−/−HBsAgtg/o mice. PML−/− mice exhibited somatic mutations in DNA repair genes and developed severe steatosis and proliferative disorders, but not HCC. PML−/−HBsAgtg/o mice exhibited early mutations in cancer driver genes and developed hyperplasia, fatty livers and indolent adipose-like HCC. In PML+/+HBsAg-transgenic mice, HBsAg expression declined over time, and HBsAg-associated PML suppression was concomitantly relieved. Nevertheless, these mice accumulated mutations in genes contributing to oxidative stress pathways and developed aggressive late-onset angiogenic trabecular HCC. PML inhibition using non-toxic doses of arsenic trioxide selectively killed long-term HBsAg-affected liver cells in PML+/+HBsAgtg/o mice with falling HBsAg and rising PML levels, but not normal liver cells or early-onset HCC cells in PML−/−HBsAgtg/0 mice. These findings suggest dual roles for PML as a tumor-suppressor lost in early-onset HBsAg-induced hepatocarcinogenesis and as an oncogenic promoter in late-onset HBsAg-related HCC progression. PMID:27058621

  15. Supercritical Fluid Extraction Provides an Enhancement to the Immune Response for Orally-Delivered Hepatitis B Surface Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Celine A.; Smith, Emily M.; Turner, Debra D.; Keener, Todd K.; Wong, Jeffrey C.; Walker, John H.; Tizard, Ian R.; Jimenez-Flores, Rafael; Howard, John A.

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus continues to be a major pathogen worldwide despite the availability of an effective parenteral vaccine for over 20 years. Orally-delivered subunit vaccines produced in maize may help to alleviate the disease burden by providing a low-cost, heat stable alternative to the parenteral vaccine. Oral subunit vaccination has been an elusive goal due to the large amounts of antigen required to induce an immunologic response when administered through the digestive tract. Here we show that high levels of HBsAg were obtained in maize grain, the grain was formed into edible wafers, and wafers were fed to mice at a concentration of approximately 300µg/g. When these wafers were made with supercritical fluid extraction (SFE)-treated maize material, robust IgG and IgA responses in sera were observed that were comparable to the injected commercial vaccine Recombivax®). In addition, all mice administered SFE wafers showed high secretory IgA titers in fecal material whereas Recombivax® treated mice showed no detectable titer. Increased salivary IgA titers were also detected in SFE-fed mice but not in Recombivax® treated mice. Wafers made from hexane-treated, or full fat, maize material induced immunologic responses, but fecal titers were attenuated relative to those produced by SFE-treated wafers. These responses demonstrate the feasibility of using a two-dose oral vaccine booster in the absence of an adjuvant to induce immunologic responses in both sera and at mucosal surfaces, and highlight the potential limitations of using an exclusively parenteral dosing regime. PMID:24486361

  16. Exposure of the Rh0(D) antigen on the surface and cytoplasmic domains of the red cell membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Kleeman, J E; Masouredis, S P; Victoria, E J

    1982-01-01

    Inside-out (IO) and right-side-out (RO) vesicles derived form human red blood cells were tested for their ability to bind 125I-labelled IgG anti-RHO(D). The binding of anti-RHO(D) to RO vesicles from RHO(D)-positive cells was quantitatively similar to that exhibited by intact cells when compared on a membrane surface area basis. There was no significant binding of labelled antibody to IO vesicles from RhO(D)-positive cells or to either RO or IO vesicles derived from RhO(D)-negative cells. The RhO(D) antigen was immunologically accessible on only the plasma side of the membrane in RhO(D)-positive red cells, as has been shown for blood group antigens defined by carbohydrate determinants. No immunologically reactive RhO(D) antigen was present on either RO or IO vesicles derived from RHO(D)-negative red cells. PMID:6799392

  17. Detection of cell surface rubella virus antigens in Vero cells with Staphylococcus aureus rich in protein A.

    PubMed

    Montero, M T; Ortega, E; Gómez, B

    1988-12-01

    The presence of cell surface rubella antigen was used to verify and monitor viral replication in Vero cell monolayers. Viral antigen was observed in infected cells by the adherence of Staphylococcus aureus sensitized with immune anti-rubella sera. The staphylococci specifically bound to infected cells were Gram-stained and observed using light microscopy. The minimum titer of IgG antiviral hemagglutinin required for sensitizing the bacteria was 3.9 IU/ml. The specificity of the assay was demonstrated by treating the infected cells with bacteria sensitized with normal sera, by treating the mock-infected cells with staphylococci sensitized with either immune or normal sera, and by sensitizing the bacteria with immune sera from which anti-rubella antibodies had been removed. Viral antigens were detected from day 2-9 post-infection. The sensitivity of the assay in verifying and monitoring viral propagation was comparable to the titration of viral particles of hemagglutination. The assay is specific, rapid, simple and can be performed in laboratories with minimal equipment.

  18. Contained indirect viable-cell membrane immunofluorescence microassay for surface antigen analysis of cells infected with hazardous viruses.

    PubMed

    Cloyd, M W; Bigner, D D

    1977-01-01

    A microtechnique for an indirect viable-cell membrane immunofluorescence titration assay was developed using Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MuLV)-producing cells and monospecific rabbit antisera to F-MuLV structural antigens. The assay was sensitive and displayed little variation within or between assays. Since moderate-risk tumor viruses, such as recently discovered primate oncornaviruses or feline leukemia virus (FeLV), may be hazardous to laboratory personnel, the assay was adapted for containment of cells infected with such viruses. Cells producing gibbon ape lymphoma virus or FeLV were grown in class III containment cabinets and transferred in sealed flasks to a class II laminar-flow cabinet, where the assay was performed. This micromethod not only conserved reagents but also minimized the numbers of moderate-risk tumor virus-infected cells handled at one time. Centrifugation was contained using custom-made devices shown to form a gas-tight seal over microtiter plates. Interspecies reactivity of monospecific rabbit antisera against F-MuLV structural antigen gp71, but not against p12, was demonstrated for surface antigens on FeLV-producing cells.

  19. HD-03/ES: A Herbal Medicine Inhibits Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Secretion in Transfected Human Hepatocarcinoma PLC/PRF/5 Cells.

    PubMed

    Varma, Sandeep R; Sundaram, R; Gopumadhavan, S; Vidyashankar, Satyakumar; Patki, Pralhad S

    2013-01-01

    HD-03/ES is a herbal formulation used for the treatment of hepatitis B. However, the molecular mechanism involved in the antihepatitis B (HBV) activity of this drug has not been studied using in vitro models. The effect of HD-03/ES on hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) secretion and its gene expression was studied in transfected human hepatocarcinoma PLC/PRF/5 cells. The anti-HBV activity was tested based on the inhibition of HBsAg secretion into the culture media, as detected by HBsAg-specific antibody-mediated enzyme assay (ELISA) at concentrations ranging from 125 to 1000  μ g/mL. The effect of HD-03/ES on HBsAg gene expression was analyzed using semiquantitative multiplex RT-PCR by employing specific primers. The results showed that HD-03/ES suppressed HBsAg production with an IC50 of 380  μ g/mL in PLC/PRF/5 cells for a period of 24 h. HD-03/ES downregulated HBsAg gene expression in PLC/PRF/5 cells. In conclusion, HD-03/ES exhibits strong anti-HBV properties by inhibiting the secretion of hepatitis B surface antigen in PLC/PRF/5 cells, and this action is targeted at the transcription level. Thus, HD-03/ES could be beneficial in the treatment of acute and chronic hepatitis B infections.

  20. HD-03/ES: A Herbal Medicine Inhibits Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Secretion in Transfected Human Hepatocarcinoma PLC/PRF/5 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Sandeep R.; Sundaram, R.; Gopumadhavan, S.; Vidyashankar, Satyakumar; Patki, Pralhad S.

    2013-01-01

    HD-03/ES is a herbal formulation used for the treatment of hepatitis B. However, the molecular mechanism involved in the antihepatitis B (HBV) activity of this drug has not been studied using in vitro models. The effect of HD-03/ES on hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) secretion and its gene expression was studied in transfected human hepatocarcinoma PLC/PRF/5 cells. The anti-HBV activity was tested based on the inhibition of HBsAg secretion into the culture media, as detected by HBsAg-specific antibody-mediated enzyme assay (ELISA) at concentrations ranging from 125 to 1000 μg/mL. The effect of HD-03/ES on HBsAg gene expression was analyzed using semiquantitative multiplex RT-PCR by employing specific primers. The results showed that HD-03/ES suppressed HBsAg production with an IC50 of 380 μg/mL in PLC/PRF/5 cells for a period of 24 h. HD-03/ES downregulated HBsAg gene expression in PLC/PRF/5 cells. In conclusion, HD-03/ES exhibits strong anti-HBV properties by inhibiting the secretion of hepatitis B surface antigen in PLC/PRF/5 cells, and this action is targeted at the transcription level. Thus, HD-03/ES could be beneficial in the treatment of acute and chronic hepatitis B infections. PMID:23691296

  1. Cell surface antigens detected on mature and leukemic granulocytic populations by cytotoxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Drew, S I; Carter, B M; Terasaki, P I; Naiem, F; Nathanson, D S; Abromowitz, B; Gale, R P

    1978-08-01

    Using a microcytotoxicity assay, the serological reactivity of human granulocytes, namely neutrophils and eosinophils, and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells and cultured CML cell lines (K562, NALM-1) were examined. Mature granulocyte forms and cord granulocytes are readily lysed by specific granulocyte cytotoxins that do not react with random T and B lymphocytes, monocytes, red blood cells, or platelets. Furthermore, certain antisera were preferentially cytotoxic for eosinophil-enriched populations. Granulocytotoxin detected antigens on one of three CML blast cell populations tested and K562, but failed to react with NALM-1. By cytotoxicity, mature granulocytes were poor targets for B2-microglobulin and the appropriate HLA antisera although both sera types are absorbed with granulocytes. Furthermore, granulocytes did not possess B-lymphocytes (Ia-like) or blood group A, B, and Rh (D) antigens. Except for K562, both HLA and heterologous B-lymphocyte antisera were cytotoxic for the CML blast cell populations tested.

  2. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering study of carcinoembryonic antigen in serum from patients with colorectal cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang; Chen, Yanping; Zheng, Xiongwei; He, Cheng; Lu, Jianping; Feng, Shangyuan; Chen, Rong; Zeng, Haisan

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we developed a SERS platform for quantitative detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in serum of patients with colorectal cancers. Anti-CEA-functionalized 4-mercaptobenzoic acid-labeled Au/Ag core-shell bimetallic nanoparticles were prepared first and then used to analyze CEA antigen solutions of different concentrations. A calibration curve was established in the range from 5 × 10-3 to 5 × 105 ng/mL. Finally, this new SERS probe was applied for quantitative detection of CEA in serum obtained from 26 colorectal cancer patients according to the calibration curve. The results were in good agreement with that obtained by electrochemical luminescence method, suggesting that SERS immunoassay has high sensitivity and specificity for CEA detection in serum. A detection limit of 5 pg/ml was achieved. This study demonstrated the feasibility and great potential for developing this new technology into a clinical tool for analysis of tumor markers in the blood.

  3. Vaccine adjuvant systems containing monophosphoryl lipid A and QS21 induce strong and persistent humoral and T cell responses against hepatitis B surface antigen in healthy adult volunteers.

    PubMed

    Vandepapelière, Pierre; Horsmans, Yves; Moris, Philippe; Van Mechelen, Marcelle; Janssens, Michel; Koutsoukos, Marguerite; Van Belle, Pascale; Clement, Frédéric; Hanon, Emmanuel; Wettendorff, Martine; Garçon, Nathalie; Leroux-Roels, Geert

    2008-03-01

    A randomised, double-blind study assessing the potential of four adjuvants in combination with recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen has been conducted to evaluate humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in healthy adults after three vaccine doses at months 0, 1 and 10. Three Adjuvant Systems (AS) contained 3-O-desacyl-4'-monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) and QS21, formulated either with an oil-in-water emulsion (AS02B and AS02V) or with liposomes (AS01B). The fourth adjuvant was CpG oligonucleotide. High levels of antibodies were induced by all adjuvants, whereas cell-mediated immune responses, including cytolytic T cells and strong and persistent CD4(+) T cell response were mainly observed with the three MPL/QS21-containing Adjuvant Systems. The CD4(+) T cell response was characterised in vitro by vigorous lymphoproliferation, high IFN-gamma and moderate IL-5 production. Antigen-specific T cell immune response was further confirmed ex vivo by detection of IL-2- and IFN-gamma-producing CD4(+) T cells, and in vivo by measuring increased levels of IFN-gamma in the serum and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses. The CpG adjuvanted vaccine induced consistently lower immune responses for all parameters. All vaccine adjuvants were shown to be safe with acceptable reactogenicity profiles. The majority of subjects reported local reactions at the injection site after vaccination while general reactions were recorded less frequently. No vaccine-related serious adverse event was reported. Importantly, no increase in markers of auto-immunity and allergy was detected over the whole study course. In conclusion, the Adjuvant Systems containing MPL/QS21, in combination with hepatitis B surface antigen, induced very strong humoral and cellular immune responses in healthy adults. The AS01B-adjuvanted vaccine induced the strongest and most durable specific cellular immune responses after two doses. These Adjuvant Systems, when added to recombinant protein antigens, can be

  4. Well-known surface and extracellular antigens of pathogenic microorganisms among the immunodominant proteins of the infectious microalgae Prototheca zopfii.

    PubMed

    Irrgang, Alexandra; Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan; Weise, Christoph; Azab, Walid; Roesler, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae of the genus Prototheca (P.) are associated with rare but severe infections (protothecosis) and represent a potential zoonotic risk. Genotype (GT) 2 of P. zopfii has been established as pathogenic agent for humans, dogs, and cattle, whereas GT1 is considered to be non-pathogenic. Since pathogenesis is poorly understood, the aim of this study was to determine immunogenic proteins and potential virulence factors of P. zopfii GT2. Therefore, 2D western blot analyses with sera and isolates of two dogs naturally infected with P. zopfii GT2 have been performed. Cross-reactivity was determined by including the type strains of P. zopfii GT2, P. zopfii GT1, and P. blaschkeae, a close relative of P. zopfii, which is known to cause subclinical forms of bovine mastitis. The sera showed a high strain-, genotype-, and species-cross-reactivity. A total of 198 immunogenic proteins have been analyzed via MALDI-TOF MS. The majority of the 86 identified proteins are intracellularly located (e.g., malate dehydrogenase, oxidoreductase, 3-dehydroquinate synthase) but some antigens and potential virulence factors, known from other pathogens, have been found (e.g., phosphomannomutase, triosephosphate isomerase). One genotype-specific antigen could be identified as heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), a well-known antigen of eukaryotic pathogens with immunological importance when located extracellularly. Both sera were reactive to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase of all investigated strains. This house-keeping enzyme is found to be located on the surface of several pathogens as virulence factor. Flow-cytometric analysis revealed its presence on the surface of P. blaschkeae. PMID:26484314

  5. Well-known surface and extracellular antigens of pathogenic microorganisms among the immunodominant proteins of the infectious microalgae Prototheca zopfii

    PubMed Central

    Irrgang, Alexandra; Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan; Weise, Christoph; Azab, Walid; Roesler, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae of the genus Prototheca (P.) are associated with rare but severe infections (protothecosis) and represent a potential zoonotic risk. Genotype (GT) 2 of P. zopfii has been established as pathogenic agent for humans, dogs, and cattle, whereas GT1 is considered to be non-pathogenic. Since pathogenesis is poorly understood, the aim of this study was to determine immunogenic proteins and potential virulence factors of P. zopfii GT2. Therefore, 2D western blot analyses with sera and isolates of two dogs naturally infected with P. zopfii GT2 have been performed. Cross-reactivity was determined by including the type strains of P. zopfii GT2, P. zopfii GT1, and P. blaschkeae, a close relative of P. zopfii, which is known to cause subclinical forms of bovine mastitis. The sera showed a high strain-, genotype-, and species-cross-reactivity. A total of 198 immunogenic proteins have been analyzed via MALDI—TOF MS. The majority of the 86 identified proteins are intracellularly located (e.g., malate dehydrogenase, oxidoreductase, 3-dehydroquinate synthase) but some antigens and potential virulence factors, known from other pathogens, have been found (e.g., phosphomannomutase, triosephosphate isomerase). One genotype-specific antigen could be identified as heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), a well-known antigen of eukaryotic pathogens with immunological importance when located extracellularly. Both sera were reactive to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase of all investigated strains. This house-keeping enzyme is found to be located on the surface of several pathogens as virulence factor. Flow-cytometric analysis revealed its presence on the surface of P. blaschkeae. PMID:26484314

  6. Modulation of human leukocyte antigen and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 surface expression in malignant and nonmalignant human thyroid cells by cytokines in the context of extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Miller, A; Kraiem, Z; Sobel, E; Lider, O; Lahat, N

    2000-11-01

    Interactions between malignant cells and their environment are achieved via cell-surface receptors and adhesion molecules. The extracellular matrix (ECM) and ECM-bound cytokines modulate the expression of cell-surface molecules on target malignant cells, which may lead to changes in their susceptibility to cytolysis, in their ability to present antigens, and in the induction of local immune-cell activation and patrol. Eventually, these alterations may culminate in either the destruction, or escape and proliferation, of the tumor. We studied the effects of the ECM and its components in a "naive" form or following binding of the inflammatory cytokines interferon gamma (IFNgamma) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) on the surface expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class-I, HLA class-II (HLA-DR), and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), on nonmalignant and malignant thyroid cells. The basal expression of HLA class-I molecules was not significantly changed either by naive ECM and its components or by ECM-bound cytokines. ECM synergized with IFNgamma and TNFalpha in inducing HLA-DR molecules on nonmalignant and malignant thyrocytes, with higher HLA-DR levels on the malignant cells. The laminin component, in particular, synergized with IFNgamma. Basal ICAM-1 expression on nonneoplastic cells was not significantly affected by the cytokines when grown in the absence of ECM, but was significantly upregulated when cells were cultured on ECM. In contrast, in malignant thyrocyte cultures, ECM significantly attenuated IFNgamma- and TNFalpha-mediated enhancement of ICAM-1 expression. We concluded that signals derived from ECM-embedded cytokines participate in the regulation of key thyroid cell surface molecules and, thus, may affect the final outcome of human thyroid malignancies. PMID:11128721

  7. Hepatitis B core-related antigen (HBcrAg) levels in the natural history of hepatitis B virus infection in a large European cohort predominantly infected with genotypes A and D.

    PubMed

    Maasoumy, B; Wiegand, S B; Jaroszewicz, J; Bremer, B; Lehmann, P; Deterding, K; Taranta, A; Manns, M P; Wedemeyer, H; Glebe, D; Cornberg, M

    2015-06-01

    Hepatitis B core-related antigen (HBcrAg) has been suggested as an additional marker of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. HBcrAg combines the antigenic reactivity resulting from denatured hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), HBV core antigen and an artificial core-related protein (p22cr). In Asian patients, high levels of HBcrAg have been suggested to be an independent risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma, while low levels could guide safe cessation of treatment with nucleos(t)ide analogues. We here studied HBcrAg levels in different phases of HBV infection in a large European cohort predominantly infected with genotypes A and D: HBeAg-positive immune tolerance (n = 30), HBeAg-positive immune clearance (IC) (n = 60), HBeAg-negative hepatitis (ENH) (n = 50), HBeAg-negative inactive/quiescent carrier phase (c) (n = 109) and acute hepatitis B (n = 8). Median HBcrAg levels were high in the immune tolerance and immune clearance phases (8.41 and 8.11 log U/mL, respectively), lower in ENH subjects (4.82 log U/mL) but only 2.00 log U/mL in ENQ subjects. Correlation between HBcrAg and HBV DNA varied among the different phases of HBV infection, while HBcrAg moderately correlated with hepatitis B surface antigen in all phases. ENQ patients had HBcrAg levels <3 log U/mL in 79%, in contrast to only 12% in the ENH group. HBcrAg levels vary significantly during the different phases of HBV infection. HBcrAg may serve as valuable marker for virus replication and reflect the transcriptional activity of intrahepatic cccDNA. In HBeAg-negative patients, HBcrAg may help to distinguish between inactive carriers (ENQ) and those with active disease (ENH).

  8. Surface expression patterns of defined glycan antigens change during Schistosoma mansoni cercarial transformation and development of schistosomula.

    PubMed

    Smit, Cornelis H; Homann, Arne; van Hensbergen, Vincent P; Schramm, Gabriele; Haas, Helmut; van Diepen, Angela; Hokke, Cornelis H

    2015-12-01

    During the complex lifecycle of Schistosoma mansoni, a large variety of glycans is expressed. To many of these glycans, antibodies are induced by the infected host and some might be targets for vaccines or diagnostic tests. Spatial changes in glycan expression during schistosome development are largely unexplored. To study the surface-exposed glycans during the important initial stages of infection, we analyzed the binding of a panel of anti-glycan monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to cercariae and schistosomula up to 72 h after transformation by immunofluorescence microscopy. The mAb specificity toward their natural targets was studied using a microarray containing a wide range of schistosomal N-glycans, O-glycans and glycosphingolipid glycans. With the exception of GalNAcβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc (LDN-F), mono- and multifucosylated GalNAcβ1-4GlcNAc (LDN)-motifs were exposed at the surface of all developmental stages studied. Multifucosylated LDN-motifs were present on cercarial glycocalyx-derived O-glycans as well as cercarial glycolipids. In contrast, the Galβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc (Lewis X) and LDN-F-motifs, also expressed on cercarial glycolipids, and in addition on a range of cercarial N- and O-glycans, became surface expressed only after transformation of cercariae to schistosomula. In line with the documented shedding of the O-glycan-rich cercarial glycocalyx after transformation these observations suggest that surface accessible multifucosylated LDN-motifs are mostly expressed by O-glycans in cercariae, but principally by glycosphingolipids in schistosomula. We hypothesize that these temporal changes in surface exposure of glycan antigens are relevant to the interaction with the host during the initial stages of infection with schistosomes and discuss the potential of these glycan antigens as intervention targets. PMID:26347524

  9. A single point in protein trafficking by Plasmodium falciparum determines the expression of major antigens on the surface of infected erythrocytes targeted by human antibodies.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jo-Anne; Howell, Katherine B; Langer, Christine; Maier, Alexander G; Hasang, Wina; Rogerson, Stephen J; Petter, Michaela; Chesson, Joanne; Stanisic, Danielle I; Duffy, Michael F; Cooke, Brian M; Siba, Peter M; Mueller, Ivo; Bull, Peter C; Marsh, Kevin; Fowkes, Freya J I; Beeson, James G

    2016-11-01

    Antibodies to blood-stage antigens of Plasmodium falciparum play a pivotal role in human immunity to malaria. During parasite development, multiple proteins are trafficked from the intracellular parasite to the surface of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes (IEs). However, the relative importance of different proteins as targets of acquired antibodies, and key pathways involved in trafficking major antigens remain to be clearly defined. We quantified antibodies to surface antigens among children, adults, and pregnant women from different malaria-exposed regions. We quantified the importance of antigens as antibody targets using genetically engineered P. falciparum with modified surface antigen expression. Genetic deletion of the trafficking protein skeleton-binding protein-1 (SBP1), which is involved in trafficking the surface antigen PfEMP1, led to a dramatic reduction in antibody recognition of IEs and the ability of human antibodies to promote opsonic phagocytosis of IEs, a key mechanism of parasite clearance. The great majority of antibody epitopes on the IE surface were SBP1-dependent. This was demonstrated using parasite isolates with different genetic or phenotypic backgrounds, and among antibodies from children, adults, and pregnant women in different populations. Comparisons of antibody reactivity to parasite isolates with SBP1 deletion or inhibited PfEMP1 expression suggest that PfEMP1 is the dominant target of acquired human antibodies, and that other P. falciparum IE surface proteins are minor targets. These results establish SBP1 as part of a critical pathway for the trafficking of major surface antigens targeted by human immunity, and have key implications for vaccine development, and quantifying immunity in populations.

  10. Functional Specialty of CD40 and Dendritic Cell Surface Lectins for Exogenous Antigen Presentation to CD8(+) and CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wenjie; Gorvel, Laurent; Zurawski, Sandra; Li, Dapeng; Ni, Ling; Duluc, Dorothée; Upchurch, Katherine; Kim, JongRok; Gu, Chao; Ouedraogo, Richard; Wang, Zhiqing; Xue, Yaming; Joo, HyeMee; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are major antigen-presenting cells that can efficiently prime and cross-prime antigen-specific T cells. Delivering antigen to DCs via surface receptors is thus an appealing strategy to evoke cellular immunity. Nonetheless, which DC surface receptor to target to yield the optimal CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cell responses remains elusive. Herein, we report the superiority of CD40 over 9 different lectins and scavenger receptors at evoking antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses. However, lectins (e.g., LOX-1 and Dectin-1) were more efficient than CD40 at eliciting CD4(+) T cell responses. Common and distinct patterns of subcellular and intracellular localization of receptor-bound αCD40, αLOX-1 and αDectin-1 further support their functional specialization at enhancing antigen presentation to either CD8(+) or CD4(+) T cells. Lastly, we demonstrate that antigen targeting to CD40 can evoke potent antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses in human CD40 transgenic mice. This study provides fundamental information for the rational design of vaccines against cancers and viral infections. PMID:27077111

  11. Functional Specialty of CD40 and Dendritic Cell Surface Lectins for Exogenous Antigen Presentation to CD8+ and CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wenjie; Gorvel, Laurent; Zurawski, Sandra; Li, Dapeng; Ni, Ling; Duluc, Dorothée; Upchurch, Katherine; Kim, JongRok; Gu, Chao; Ouedraogo, Richard; Wang, Zhiqing; Xue, Yaming; Joo, HyeMee; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are major antigen-presenting cells that can efficiently prime and cross-prime antigen-specific T cells. Delivering antigen to DCs via surface receptors is thus an appealing strategy to evoke cellular immunity. Nonetheless, which DC surface receptor to target to yield the optimal CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses remains elusive. Herein, we report the superiority of CD40 over 9 different lectins and scavenger receptors at evoking antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses. However, lectins (e.g., LOX-1 and Dectin-1) were more efficient than CD40 at eliciting CD4+ T cell responses. Common and distinct patterns of subcellular and intracellular localization of receptor-bound αCD40, αLOX-1 and αDectin-1 further support their functional specialization at enhancing antigen presentation to either CD8+ or CD4+ T cells. Lastly, we demonstrate that antigen targeting to CD40 can evoke potent antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses in human CD40 transgenic mice. This study provides fundamental information for the rational design of vaccines against cancers and viral infections. PMID:27077111

  12. Merkel cell polyomavirus small T antigen mRNA level is increased following in vivo UV-radiation.

    PubMed

    Mogha, Ariane; Fautrel, Alain; Mouchet, Nicolas; Guo, Na; Corre, Sébastien; Adamski, Henri; Watier, Eric; Misery, Laurent; Galibert, Marie-Dominique

    2010-07-02

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare but aggressive skin cancer involving Merkel cells. Recently, a new human polyomavirus was implicated in MCC, being present in 80% of the samples analyzed. In virus-positive MCC, the Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is clonally integrated into the patients DNA, and carries mutations in its large T antigen, leading to a truncated protein. In non-symptomatic tissue MCPyV can reside at very low levels. MCC is also associated with older age, immunosuppression and sun exposure. However, the link with solar exposure remains unknown, as the precise mechanism and steps involved between time of infection by MCPyV and the development of MCC. We thus investigated the potential impact of solar simulated radiation (SSR) on MCPyV transcriptional activity. We screened skin samples of 20 healthy patients enrolled in a photodermatological protocol based on in vivo-administered 2 and 4 J/cm(2) SSR. Two patients were infected with two new variants of MCPyV, present in their episomal form and RT-QPCR analyses on SSR-irradiated skin samples showed a specific and unique dose-dependent increase of MCPyV small t antigen transcript. A luciferase based in vitro assay confirmed that small t promoter is indeed UV-inducible. These findings demonstrate that solar radiation has an impact on MCPyV mRNA levels that may explain the association between MCC and solar exposure.

  13. Probing Surface Chemistry at the Nanoscale Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rene-Boisneuf, Laetitia

    Studies various nanostructured materials have gained considerable interest within the past several decades. This novel class of materials has opened up a new realm of possibilities, both for the fundamental comprehension of matter, but also for innovative applications. The size-dependent effect observed for these systems often lies in their interaction with the surrounding environment and understanding such interactions is the pivotal point for the investigations undertaken in this thesis. Three families of nanoparticles are analyzed: semiconductor quantum dots, metallic silver nanoparticles and rare-earth oxide nanomaterials. The radical scavenging ability of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO 2) is quite controversial since they have been labeled as both oxidizing and antioxidant species for biological systems. Here, both aqueous and organic stabilized nanoparticles are examined in straightforward systems containing only one reactive oxygen species to ensure a controlled release. The apparent absence of their direct radical scavenging ability is demonstrated despite the ease at which CeO2 nanoparticles generate stable surface Ce 3+ clusters, which is used to explain the redox activity of these nanomaterials. On the contrary, CeO2 nanoparticles are shown to have an indirect scavenging effect in Fenton reactions by annihilating the reactivity of Fe 2+ salts. Cadmium selenide quantum dots (CdSe QD) constitute another highly appealing family of nanocolloids in part due to their tunable, size-dependent luminescence across the visible spectrum. The effect of elemental sulfur treatment is investigated to overcome one of the main drawbacks of CdSe QD: low fluorescence quantum yield. Herein, we report a constant and reproducible quantum yield of 15%. The effect of sulfur surface treatment is also assessed following the growth of a silica shell, as well as the response towards a solution quencher (4-amino-TEMPO). The sulfur treated QD is also tested for interaction with

  14. Cloning and Characterization of Surface-Localized α-Enolase of Streptococcus iniae, an Effective Protective Antigen in Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Kaiyu; Chen, Defang; Geng, Yi; Huang, Xiaoli; He, Yang; Ji, Lili; Liu, Tao; Wang, Erlong; Yang, Qian; Lai, Weimin

    2015-06-25

    Streptococcus iniae is a major fish pathogen that can also cause human bacteremia, cellulitis and meningitis. Screening for and identification of protective antigens plays an important role in developing therapies against S. iniae infections. In this study, we indicated that the α-enolase of S. iniae was not only distributed in the cytoplasm and associated to cell walls, but was also secreted to the bacterial cell surface. The functional identity of the purified recombinant α-enolase protein was verified by its ability to catalyze the conversion of 2-phosphoglycerate (2-PGE) to phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP), and both the recombinant and native proteins interacted with human plasminogen. The rabbit anti-rENO serum blockade assay shows that α-enolase participates in S. iniae adhesion to and invasion of BHK-21 cells. In addition, the recombinant α-enolase can confer effective protection against S. iniae infection in mice, which suggests that α-enolase has potential as a vaccine candidate in mammals. We conclude that S. iniae α-enolase is a moonlighting protein that also associates with the bacterial outer surface and functions as a protective antigen in mice.

  15. Surface antigens and potential virulence factors from parasites detected by comparative genomics of perfect amino acid repeats

    PubMed Central

    Fankhauser, Niklaus; Nguyen-Ha, Tien-Minh; Adler, Joël; Mäser, Pascal

    2007-01-01

    Background Many parasitic organisms, eukaryotes as well as bacteria, possess surface antigens with amino acid repeats. Making up the interface between host and pathogen such repetitive proteins may be virulence factors involved in immune evasion or cytoadherence. They find immunological applications in serodiagnostics and vaccine development. Here we use proteins which contain perfect repeats as a basis for comparative genomics between parasitic and free-living organisms. Results We have developed Reptile , a program for proteome-wide probabilistic description of perfect repeats in proteins. Parasite proteomes exhibited a large variance regarding the proportion of repeat-containing proteins. Interestingly, there was a good correlation between the percentage of highly repetitive proteins and mean protein length in parasite proteomes, but not at all in the proteomes of free-living eukaryotes. Reptile combined with programs for the prediction of transmembrane domains and GPI-anchoring resulted in an effective tool for in silico identification of potential surface antigens and virulence factors from parasites. Conclusion Systemic surveys for perfect amino acid repeats allowed basic comparisons between free-living and parasitic organisms that were directly applicable to predict proteins of serological and parasitological importance. An on-line tool is available at . PMID:18096064

  16. Infection with an H2 recombinant herpes simplex virus vector results in expression of MHC class I antigens on the surfaces of human neuroblastoma cells in vitro and mouse sensory neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Abendroth, A; Simmons, A; Efstathiou, S; Pereira, R A

    2000-10-01

    The majority of neurons in herpes simplex virus (HSV)-infected murine sensory ganglia are transiently induced to express MHC-I antigens at the cell surface, whereas only a minority are themselves productively infected. The aim of the current work was to determine whether MHC-I antigens can be expressed on the surfaces of infected neurons in addition to their uninfected neighbours. To address this aim a recombinant HSV type 1 strain, S-130, was used to deliver a mouse H2K(d) gene, under control of the HCMV IE-1 promoter/enhancer, into human neuroblastoma cells in vitro and mouse primary sensory neurons in vivo. S-130 expressed H2K(d) antigens on the surfaces of IMR-32 cells, a human neuroblastoma cell line that expresses very low levels of MHC-I constitutively. In K562 cells, which do not express MHC-I constitutively, H2K(d) and beta(2)-microglobulin (beta(2)m) were shown to be co-expressed at the cell surface following S-130 infection. This observation was taken as evidence that class I heavy chain (alphaC) molecules encoded by the expression cassette in the HSV genome were transported to the cell surface as stable complexes with beta(2)m. Significantly, after introduction of S-130 into flank skin, H2K(d) antigens were detected on the surfaces of primary sensory neurons in ganglia innervating the inoculation site. Our data show that HSV-infected murine primary sensory neurons and human neuroblastoma cells are capable of expressing cell-surface MHC-I molecules encoded by a transgene. From this, we infer that up-regulation of alphaC expression is, in principle, sufficient to overcome potential impediments to neuronal cell surface expression of MHC-I complexes.

  17. The glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of Candida albicans is a surface antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Navarro, I; Gil, M L; Casanova, M; O'Connor, J E; Martínez, J P; Gozalbo, D

    1997-01-01

    A lambda gt11 cDNA library from Candida albicans ATCC 26555 was screened by using pooled sera from two patients with systemic candidiasis and five neutropenic patients with high levels of anti-C. albicans immunoglobulin M antibodies. Seven clones were isolated from 60,000 recombinant phages. The most reactive one contained a 0.9-kb cDNA encoding a polypeptide immunoreactive only with sera from patients with systemic candidiasis. The whole gene was isolated from a genomic library by using the cDNA as a probe. The nucleotide sequence of the coding region showed homology (78 to 79%) to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae TDH1 to TDH3 genes coding for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and their amino acid sequences showed 76% identity; thus, this gene has been named C. albicans TDH1. A rabbit polyclonal antiserum against the purified cytosolic C. albicans GAPDH (polyclonal antibody [PAb] anti-CA-GAPDH) was used to identify the GAPDH in the beta-mercaptoethanol extracts containing cell wall moieties. Indirect immunofluorescence demonstrated the presence of GAPDH at the C. albicans cell surface, particularly on the blastoconidia. Semiquantitative flow cytometry analysis showed the sensitivity of this GAPDH form to trypsin and its resistance to be removed with 2 M NaCl or 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate. The decrease in fluorescence in the presence of soluble GAPDH indicates the specificity of the labelling. In addition, a dose-dependent GAPDH enzymatic activity was detected in intact blastoconidia and germ tube cells. This activity was reduced by pretreatment of the cells with trypsin, formaldehyde, and PAb anti-CA-GAPDH. These observations indicate that an immunogenic, enzymatically active cell wall-associated form of the glycolytic enzyme GAPDH is found at the cell surface of C. albicans cells. PMID:9260938

  18. Beta 2-microglobulin is not required for cell surface expression of the murine class I histocompatibility antigen H-2Db or of a truncated H-2Db.

    PubMed

    Allen, H; Fraser, J; Flyer, D; Calvin, S; Flavell, R

    1986-10-01

    beta 2-Microglobulin (beta 2m) has been thought essential for transport of all major histocompatibility complex class I antigens to the cell surface. Here, we show that the mouse class I antigen H-2Db is expressed at the cell surface even when there is no beta 2m present within the cell. This was established by transfecting the H-2Db gene into the R1E cell line, which lacks beta 2m. The conformation of the Db antigen expressed by the R1E transfectant is very different from that of the native molecule. This Db antigen is not recognized by Db-allospecific and Db-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes or by most monoclonal antibodies to the native Db. We show further that a deletion construct of the Db gene, which consists of exon 1 linked to exons 4-8, expresses a truncated Db antigen lacking domains 1 and 2 [Db-(1 + 2)] at the cell surface after transfection into the R1E line. Previous biochemical and crystallographic data have indicated that domain 3 is associated with beta 2m; unexpectedly, Db-(1 + 2) does not associate with beta 2m when the mouse beta 2mb gene is transfected into the R1E transfectant expressing the truncated Db. This suggests that interactions with domains 1 and 2 are important for the paired association of domain 3 and beta 2m in the native Db antigen.

  19. Antigen processing by epidermal Langerhans cells correlates with the level of biosynthesis of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules and expression of invariant chain

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Two prior studies with a small number of T cell lines have shown that the presentation of native protein antigens by epidermal Langerhans cells (LC) is regulated. When freshly isolated, LC are efficient antigen-presenting cells (APC), but after a period of culture LC are inefficient or even inactive. The deficit in culture seems to be a selective loss in antigen processing, since cultured LC are otherwise rich in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II products and are active APC for alloantigens and mitogens, which do not require processing. We have extended the analysis by studying presentation to bulk populations of primed lymph node and a T-T hybrid. Only freshly isolated LC can be pulsed with the protein antigens myoglobin and conalbumin, but once pulsed, antigen is retained in an immunogenic form for at least 2 d. The acquisition of antigen, presumably as MHC-peptide complexes, is inhibited if the fresh LC are exposed to foreign protein in the presence of chloroquine or cycloheximide. The latter, in contrast, improves the efficacy of antigen pulsing in anti-Ig- stimulated B blasts. In additional studies of mechanism, we noted that both fresh and cultured LC endocytose similar amounts of an antigen, rhodamineovalbumin, into perinuclear granules. However, freshly isolated LC synthesize high levels class II MHC molecules and express higher amounts of the class II-associated invariant chain. Fresh LC are at least 5-10 times more active than many other cells types in the level of biosynthesis of MHC class II products. These findings provide a physiologic model in which newly synthesized MHC class II molecules appear to be the principal vehicle for effective antigen processing by APC of the dendritic cell lineage. Another APC, the B lymphoblast, does not appear to require newly synthesized MHC class II molecules for presentation. PMID:2121888

  20. Influence of dioxin exposure upon levels of prostate-specific antigen and steroid hormones in Vietnamese men.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xian Liang; Kido, Teruhiko; Honma, Seijiro; Okamoto, Rie; Manh, Ho Dung; Maruzeni, Shoko; Nishijo, Muneko; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Nakano, Takeshi; Koh, Eitetsu; Takasuga, Takumi; Nhu, Dang Duc; Hung, Nguyen Ngoc; Son, Le Ke

    2016-04-01

    Most studies on the relationship between Agent Orange and prostate cancer have focused on US veterans of the Vietnam War. There have been few studies focusing on the relationship between levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and dioxins or steroid hormones in Vietnamese men. In 2009-2011, we collected blood samples from 97 men who had resided in a "dioxin hotspot" and 85 men from a non-sprayed region in Vietnam. Then levels of PSA, dioxins, and steroid hormones were analyzed. Levels of most dioxins, furans, and non-ortho polychlorinated biphenyls were higher in the hotspot than those in the non-sprayed region. Levels of testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, and estradiol differed significantly between the hotspot and the non-sprayed region, but there were no correlations between levels of PSA and steroid hormones and dioxins in either of the two regions. Our findings suggest that PSA levels in Vietnamese men are not associated with levels of dioxin or steroid hormones in these two regions. PMID:26758301

  1. D-Dimer and Carcinoembryonic Antigen Levels: Useful Indicators for Predicting the Tumor Stage and Postoperative Survival.

    PubMed

    Tekeşin, Kemal; Bayrak, Savaş; Esatoğlu, Varol; Özdemir, Ebru; Özel, Leyla; Melih Kara, Veli

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study is to determine the preoperative plasma D-dimer and serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) levels of patients scheduled for curative surgical resection for colorectal cancer and to evaluate the significance of these levels on the prognosis and postoperative survival rate. One hundred sixty-five patients with colorectal cancer, who were scheduled to have elective resection between January 2008 and January 2011, were included in the study. A significant increase was observed in the D-dimer levels, particularly in poorly differentiated tumors. The distance covered by the tumor inside the walls of the colon and rectum (T-stage) was significant for both D-dimer and CEA levels. As the T-stage increased, there was also a significant increase in the D-dimer and CEA levels. A high significance and correlation level was detected between the TNM staging and both D-dimer and CEA. A significant relationship was found between the advanced tumor stage and short postoperative survival rate of patients with colorectal cancer. Therefore, the analysis of preoperative D-dimer and CEA levels can be useful in predicting the stage and differentiation of the tumor and the postoperative survival rate. PMID:27651789

  2. D-Dimer and Carcinoembryonic Antigen Levels: Useful Indicators for Predicting the Tumor Stage and Postoperative Survival

    PubMed Central

    Tekeşin, Kemal; Esatoğlu, Varol; Özdemir, Ebru; Özel, Leyla; Melih Kara, Veli

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study is to determine the preoperative plasma D-dimer and serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) levels of patients scheduled for curative surgical resection for colorectal cancer and to evaluate the significance of these levels on the prognosis and postoperative survival rate. One hundred sixty-five patients with colorectal cancer, who were scheduled to have elective resection between January 2008 and January 2011, were included in the study. A significant increase was observed in the D-dimer levels, particularly in poorly differentiated tumors. The distance covered by the tumor inside the walls of the colon and rectum (T-stage) was significant for both D-dimer and CEA levels. As the T-stage increased, there was also a significant increase in the D-dimer and CEA levels. A high significance and correlation level was detected between the TNM staging and both D-dimer and CEA. A significant relationship was found between the advanced tumor stage and short postoperative survival rate of patients with colorectal cancer. Therefore, the analysis of preoperative D-dimer and CEA levels can be useful in predicting the stage and differentiation of the tumor and the postoperative survival rate. PMID:27651789

  3. Label-free Screening of Multiple Cell-surface Antigens Using a Single Pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, Karthik; Chapman, Matthew; Kesavaraju, Anand; Sohn, Lydia

    2012-02-01

    Microfluidic pores have emerged as versatile tools for performing highly sensitive measurements. Pore functionalization can result in slower particle transit rates, thereby providing insight into the properties of particles that travel through a pore. While enhancing utility, functionalizing with only one species limits the broader applicability of pores for biosensing by restricting the insight gained in a single run. We have developed a method of using variable cross-section pores to create unique electronic signatures for reliable detection and automated data analysis. By defining a single pore into sections using common lithography techniques, we can detect when a cell passes through a given pore segment using resistive-pulse sensing. This offers such advantages as 1) the ability to functionalize each portion of a pore with a different antibody that corresponds to different cell surface receptors, enabling label-free multianalyte detection in a single run; and 2) a unique electronic signature that allows for both an accelerated real-time analysis and an additional level of precision to testing. This is particularly critical for clinical diagnostics where accuracy and reliability of results are crucial for healthcare professionals upon which to act.

  4. A vaccine prepared from the 22 nm particles of surface hepatitis B antigen (HBsAg)

    SciTech Connect

    Karelin, V.P.; Babaeva, E.E.; Gubenko, E.F.; Kaulen, D.K.; Zhdanov, V.M.

    1980-01-01

    A method for obtaining a subunit inactivated vaccine preparation from the 22-nm particles of HBsAg is proposed. For inactivation of the residual infectious hepatitis B virus (HBV) the preparations were successively treated with 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and nucleases. In addition, thermal denaturation and ultraviolet irradiation of HBV DNA were used. As a control the biologic activity of a reference virus (SV40) was tested after the same treatment. The effectiveness of DNA inactivation was monitored by adding 3H-thymidine labeled reference virus to the vaccine preparations. The purified and inactivated HBsAg was adsorbed on Al2O3. Antigenicity was calculated on the basis of the determination of antibody in guinea pigs immunized with various doses of the vaccine, and the release of /sup 125/I- HBsAg from blood and kidneys in immunized and control mice was analyzed. Possible methods of inactivation and control of HBV vaccine is discussed.

  5. Monitoring human leukocyte antigen class I molecules by micro-Raman spectroscopy at single-cell level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Gobind; La Rocca, Rosanna; Lakshmikanth, Tadepally; Gentile, Francesco; Tallerico, Rossana; Zambetti, Lia P.; Devitt, J.; Candeloro, Patrizio; de Angelis, Francesco; Carbone, Ennio; di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2010-03-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules are formed by three immunoglobulin-like domains (α1, α2, and α3) once folded by peptide and β2-microglobulin show the presence of two α-helix streams and one β-sheet limiting the pocket for the antigenic peptide. The loss of HLA class I expression in tumors and virus-infected cells, on one hand, prevents T cell recognition, while on the other hand, it leads to natural killer (NK) cell mediated cytotoxicity. We propose the possibility of using Raman spectroscopy to measure the relative expression of HLA class I molecules at the single-cell level. Raman spectra are recorded for three cell lines (K562, T2, and T3) and monomers (HLA class I folded, unfolded and peptide+β2-microlobulin refolded) using 830 nm laser line. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that in the Raman spectra, ranging from 1600 to 1800 cm-1, the intensity variation of cells associated with HLA class I molecules could be measured.

  6. High antigen levels induce an exhausted phenotype in a chronic infection without impairing T cell expansion and survival.

    PubMed

    Utzschneider, Daniel T; Alfei, Francesca; Roelli, Patrick; Barras, David; Chennupati, Vijaykumar; Darbre, Stephanie; Delorenzi, Mauro; Pinschewer, Daniel D; Zehn, Dietmar

    2016-08-22

    Chronic infections induce T cells showing impaired cytokine secretion and up-regulated expression of inhibitory receptors such as PD-1. What determines the acquisition of this chronic phenotype and how it impacts T cell function remain vaguely understood. Using newly generated recombinant antigen variant-expressing chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) strains, we uncovered that T cell differentiation and acquisition of a chronic or exhausted phenotype depend critically on the frequency of T cell receptor (TCR) engagement and less significantly on the strength of TCR stimulation. In fact, we noted that low-level antigen exposure promotes the formation of T cells with an acute phenotype in chronic infections. Unexpectedly, we found that T cell populations with an acute or chronic phenotype are maintained equally well in chronic infections and undergo comparable primary and secondary expansion. Thus, our observations contrast with the view that T cells with a typical chronic infection phenotype are severely functionally impaired and rapidly transition into a terminal stage of differentiation. Instead, our data unravel that T cells primarily undergo a form of phenotypic and functional differentiation in the early phase of a chronic LCMV infection without inheriting a net survival or expansion deficit, and we demonstrate that the acquired chronic phenotype transitions into the memory T cell compartment. PMID:27455951

  7. Monitoring human leukocyte antigen class I molecules by micro-Raman spectroscopy at single-cell level.

    PubMed

    Das, Gobind; La Rocca, Rosanna; Lakshmikanth, Tadepally; Gentile, Francesco; Tallerico, Rossana; Zambetti, Lia P; Devitt, J; Candeloro, Patrizio; De Angelis, Francesco; Carbone, Ennio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2010-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules are formed by three immunoglobulin-like domains (alpha1, alpha2, and alpha3) once folded by peptide and beta(2)-microglobulin show the presence of two alpha-helix streams and one beta-sheet limiting the pocket for the antigenic peptide. The loss of HLA class I expression in tumors and virus-infected cells, on one hand, prevents T cell recognition, while on the other hand, it leads to natural killer (NK) cell mediated cytotoxicity. We propose the possibility of using Raman spectroscopy to measure the relative expression of HLA class I molecules at the single-cell level. Raman spectra are recorded for three cell lines (K562, T2, and T3) and monomers (HLA class I folded, unfolded and peptide+beta(2)-microlobulin refolded) using 830 nm laser line. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that in the Raman spectra, ranging from 1600 to 1800 cm(-1), the intensity variation of cells associated with HLA class I molecules could be measured.

  8. In silico predicted conserved B-cell epitopes in the Merozoite Surface Antigen -2 family of B. bovis are neutralization-sensitive

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Merozoite Surface Antigens-2 of Babesia bovis conform a family of GPI-anchored glycoproteins located at the parasite cell surface, that contain neutralization-sensitive B-cell epitopes, thus constituting putative vaccine candidates for bovine babesiosis. It was previously shown that (i) the MSA-...

  9. Major role for carbohydrate epitopes preferentially recognized by chronically infected mice in the determination of Schistosoma mansoni schistosomulum surface antigenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Omer-ali, P.; Magee, A.I.; Kelly, C.; Simpson, A.J.G.

    1986-12-01

    A radioimmunoassay that makes use of whole Schistosomula and /sup 125/I-labeled protein A has been used to characterize and to quantify the binding of antisera to the surface of 3 hr mechanically transformed schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni. This technique facilitates the determination of epitopes on the schistosomula in addition to those detected by surface labeling and immunoprecipitation. By using this technique, it has been demonstrated that there is a much greater binding to the parasite surface of antibodies from chronically infected mice (CMS) than of antibodies from mice infected with highly irradiated cercariae (VMS), and CMS recognizes epitopes that VMS does not. Treatment of the surface of the schistosomula with trifluoromethanesulphonic acid and sodium metaperiodate has suggested that the discrepancy of the binding between the two sera is due to the recognition of a large number of additional epitopes by CMS, which are carbohydrate in nature. Some of the carbohydrate epitopes are expressed on the previously described surface glycoprotein antigens of M/sub r/ 200,000, 38,000, and 17,000.

  10. Imaging with indium111-labeled anticarcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody ZCE-025 of recurrent colorectal or carcinoembryonic antigen-producing cancer in patients with rising serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels and occult metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Patt, Y.Z.; Lamki, L.M.; Shanken, J.; Jessup, J.M.; Charnsangavej, C.; Ajani, J.A.; Levin, B.; Merchant, B.; Halverson, C.; Murray, J.L. )

    1990-07-01

    We tested whether nuclear imaging with indium111 (111In)-labeled murine monoclonal (MoAb) anticarcinoembryonic antigen (anti-CEA) ZCE-025 antibody could detect recurrent disease in patients with a rising serum CEA level but negative findings for computed tomographic (CT) scans of the abdomen and pelvis, chest radiograph, and colonoscopy or barium enema. Twenty patients with a history of completely resected CEA-producing adenocarcinoma and a rising serum CEA level were given an intravenous infusion of 2 mg of 111In-labeled ZCE-025 mixed with 38 mg of unlabeled ZCE-025. Planar and single-photon emission CT (SPECT) scans were acquired at 72 and 144 hours, and in 19 of the 20 patients these were positive. Of those 19, 13 underwent exploratory surgery, and cancer was found in 10, and two had a diagnostic biopsy, which confirmed cancer. Three patients who had negative laparotomies and all four patients who did not undergo surgery or biopsy were followed radiologically. In all seven, cancer was subsequently detected at the sites suggested by the ZCE-025 scan. Thus, tumor was confirmed in all 19 patients with positive scans. Five of 13 patients who were explored benefited from the study and the exploratory laparotomy, as disease was entirely resected in four or was subjected to definitive radiation therapy to the pelvis in the fifth. In two additional patients who were not explored, MoAb imaging resulted in definitive therapy to regionally confined recurrent disease. 111In-labeled anti-CEA MoAb ZCE-025 scanning in patients with rising CEA successfully imaged metastatic colorectal cancer that eluded detection by other methods and affected the care given to some. These results suggest an important role for 111In-labeled ZCE-025 scanning among patients with rising CEA and otherwise occult metastatic cancer.

  11. Serum Early Prostate Cancer Antigen (EPCA) Level and Its Association with Disease Progression in Prostate Cancer in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhigang; Ma, Wenjing; Zeng, Guohua; Qi, Defeng; Ou, Lili; Liang, Yeping

    2011-01-01

    Background Early prostate cancer antigen (EPCA) has been shown a prostate cancer (PCa)-associated nuclear matrix protein, however, its serum status and prognostic power in PCa are unknown. The goals of this study are to measure serum EPCA levels in a cohort of patients with PCa prior to the treatment, and to evaluate the clinical value of serum EPCA. Methods Pretreatment serum EPCA levels were determined with an ELISA in 77 patients with clinically localized PCa who underwent radical prostatectomy and 51 patients with locally advanced or metastatic disease who received primary androgen deprivation therapy, and were correlated with clinicopathological variables and disease progression. Serum EPCA levels were also examined in 40 healthy controls. Results Pretreatment mean serum EPCA levels were significantly higher in PCa patients than in controls (16.84±7.60 ng/ml vs. 4.12±2.05 ng/ml, P<0.001). Patients with locally advanced and metastatic PCa had significantly higher serum EPCA level than those with clinically localized PCa (22.93±5.28 ng/ml and 29.41±8.47 ng/ml vs. 15.17±6.03 ng/ml, P = 0.014 and P<0.001, respectively). Significantly elevated EPCA level was also found in metastatic PCa compared with locally advanced disease (P<0.001). Increased serum EPCA levels were significantly and positively correlated with Gleason score and clinical stage, but not with PSA levels and age. On multivariate analysis, pretreatment serum EPCA level held the most significantly predictive value for the biochemical recurrence and androgen-independent progression among pretreatment variables (HR = 4.860, P<0.001 and HR = 5.418, P<0.001, respectively). Conclusions Serum EPCA level is markedly elevated in PCa. Pretreatment serum EPCA level correlates significantly with the poor prognosis, showing prediction potential for PCa progression. PMID:21559289

  12. Hepatitis B surface antigen titer is a good indicator of durable viral response after entecavir off-treatment for chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han Ah; Seo, Yeon Seok; Park, Seung Woon; Park, Sang Jung; Kim, Tae Hyung; Suh, Sang Jun; Jung, Young Kul; Kim, Ji Hoon; An, Hyunggin; Yim, Hyung Joon; Yeon, Jong Eun; Byun, Kwan Soo; Um, Soon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Clear indicators for stopping antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients are not yet available. Since the level of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) is correlated with covalently closed circular DNA, the HBsAg titer might be a good indicator of the off-treatment response. This study aimed to determine the relationship between the HBsAg titer and the entecavir (ETV) off-treatment response. Methods This study analyzed 44 consecutive CHB patients (age, 44.6±11.4 years, mean±SD; men, 63.6%; positive hepatitis B envelope antigen (HBeAg) at baseline, 56.8%; HBV DNA level, 6.8±1.3 log10 IU/mL) treated with ETV for a sufficient duration and in whom treatment was discontinued after HBsAg levels were measured. A virological relapse was defined as an increase in serum HBV DNA level of >2000 IU/mL, and a clinical relapse was defined as a virological relapse with a biochemical flare, defined as an increase in the serum alanine aminotransferase level of >2 × upper limit of normal. Results After stopping ETV, virological relapse and clinical relapse were observed in 32 and 24 patients, respectively, during 20.8±19.9 months of follow-up. The cumulative incidence rates of virological relapse were 36.2% and 66.2%, respectively, at 6 and 12 months, and those of clinical relapse were 14.3% and 42.3%. The off-treatment HBsAg level was an independent factor associated with clinical relapse (hazard ratio, 2.251; 95% confidence interval, 1.076–4.706; P=0.031). When patients were grouped according to off-treatment HBsAg levels, clinical relapse did not occur in patients with an off-treatment HBsAg level of ≤2 log10 IU/mL (n=5), while the incidence rates of clinical relapse at 12 months after off-treatment were 28.4% and 55.7% in patients with off-treatment HBsAg levels of >2 and ≤3 log10 IU/mL (n=11) and >3 log10 IU/mL (n=28), respectively. Conclusion The off-treatment HBsAg level is closely related to clinical relapse after treatment cessation. A

  13. A Novel Surface Antigen of Relapsing Fever Spirochetes Can Discriminate between Relapsing Fever and Lyme Borreliosis▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Job E.; Schrumpf, Merry E.; Nagarajan, Vijayaraj; Raffel, Sandra J.; McCoy, Brandi N.; Schwan, Tom G.

    2010-01-01

    In a previous immunoproteome analysis of Borrelia hermsii, candidate antigens that bound IgM antibodies from mice and patients infected with relapsing fever spirochetes were identified. One candidate that was identified is a hypothetical protein with a molecular mass of 57 kDa that we have designated Borrelia immunogenic protein A (BipA). This protein was further investigated as a potential diagnostic antigen for B. hermsii given that it is absent from the Borrelia burgdorferi genome. The bipA locus was amplified and sequenced from 39 isolates of B. hermsii that had been acquired from western North America. bipA was also expressed as a recombinant fusion protein. Serum samples from mice and patients infected with B. hermsii or B. burgdorferi were used to confirm the immunogenicity of the recombinant protein in patients infected with relapsing fever spirochetes. Lastly, in silico and experimental analysis indicated that BipA is a surface-exposed lipoprotein in B. hermsii. These findings enhance the capabilities of diagnosing infection with relapsing fever spirochetes. PMID:20147497

  14. Comparative analysis of the humoral immune response to Moraxella catarrhalis and Streptococcus pneumoniae surface antigens in children suffering from recurrent acute otitis media and chronic otitis media with effusion.

    PubMed

    Verhaegh, Suzanne J C; Stol, Kim; de Vogel, Corné P; Riesbeck, Kristian; Lafontaine, Eric R; Murphy, Timothy F; van Belkum, Alex; Hermans, Peter W M; Hays, John P

    2012-06-01

    A prospective clinical cohort study was established to investigate the humoral immune response in middle ear fluids (MEF) and serum against bacterial surface proteins in children suffering from recurrent acute otitis media (rAOM) and chronic otitis media with effusion (COME), using Luminex xMAP technology. The association between the humoral immune response and the presence of Moraxella catarrhalis and Streptococcus pneumoniae in the nasopharynx and middle ear was also studied. The levels of antigen-specific IgG, IgA, and IgM showed extensive interindividual variation. No significant differences in anti-M. catarrhalis and anti-S. pneumoniae serum and MEF median fluorescence intensity (MFI) values (anti-M. catarrhalis and antipneumococcal IgG levels) were observed between the rAOM or COME groups for all antigens tested. No significant differences were observed for M. catarrhalis and S. pneumoniae colonization and serum IgG levels against the Moraxella and pneumococcal antigens. Similar to the antibody response in serum, no significant differences in IgG, IgA, and IgM levels in MEF were observed for all M. catarrhalis and S. pneumoniae antigens between OM M. catarrhalis- or S. pneumoniae-positive and OM M. catarrhalis- or S. pneumonia-negative children suffering from either rAOM or COME. Finally, results indicated a strong correlation between antigen-specific serum and MEF IgG levels. We observed no significant in vivo expressed anti-M. catarrhalis or anti-S. pneumoniae humoral immune responses using a range of putative vaccine candidate proteins. Other factors, such as Eustachian tube dysfunction, viral load, and genetic and environmental factors, may play a more important role in the pathogenesis of OM and in particular in the development of rAOM or COME.

  15. Synthetic antigens reveal dynamics of BCR endocytosis during inhibitory signaling.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Adam H; Bennett, Nitasha R; Zwick, Daniel B; Hudon, Jonathan; Kiessling, Laura L

    2014-01-17

    B cells detect foreign antigens through their B cell antigen receptor (BCR). The BCR, when engaged by antigen, initiates a signaling cascade. Concurrent with signaling is endocytosis of the BCR complex, which acts to downregulate signaling and facilitate uptake of antigen for processing and display on the cell surface. The relationship between signaling and BCR endocytosis is poorly defined. Here, we explore the interplay between BCR endocytosis and antigens that either promote or inhibit B cell activation. Specifically, synthetic antigens were generated that engage the BCR alone or both the BCR and the inhibitory co-receptor CD22. The lectin CD22, a member of the Siglec family, binds sialic acid-containing glycoconjugates found on host tissues, inhibiting BCR signaling to prevent erroneous B cell activation. At low concentrations, antigens that can cocluster the BCR and CD22 promote rapid BCR endocytosis; whereas, slower endocytosis occurs with antigens that bind only the BCR. At higher antigen concentrations, rapid BCR endocytosis occurs upon treatment with either stimulatory or inhibitory antigens. Endocytosis of the BCR, in response to synthetic antigens, results in its entry into early endocytic compartments. Although the CD22-binding antigens fail to activate key regulators of antigen presentation (e.g., Syk), they also promote BCR endocytosis, indicating that inhibitory antigens can be internalized. Together, our observations support a functional role for BCR endocytosis in downregulating BCR signaling. The reduction of cell surface BCR levels in the absence of B cell activation should raise the threshold for BCR subsequent activation. The ability of the activating synthetic antigens to trigger both signaling and entry of the BCR into early endosomes suggests strategies for targeted antigen delivery.

  16. A self-amplified transistor immunosensor under dual gate operation: highly sensitive detection of hepatitis B surface antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, I.-K.; Jeun, M.; Jang, H.-J.; Cho, W.-J.; Lee, K. H.

    2015-10-01

    Ion-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs), although they have attracted considerable attention as effective immunosensors, have still not been adopted for practical applications owing to several problems: (1) the poor sensitivity caused by the short Debye screening length in media with high ion concentration, (2) time-consuming preconditioning processes for achieving the highly-diluted media, and (3) the low durability caused by undesirable ions such as sodium chloride in the media. Here, we propose a highly sensitive immunosensor based on a self-amplified transistor under dual gate operation (immuno-DG ISFET) for the detection of hepatitis B surface antigen. To address the challenges in current ISFET-based immunosensors, we have enhanced the sensitivity of an immunosensor by precisely tailoring the nanostructure of the transistor. In the pH sensing test, the immuno-DG ISFET showed superior sensitivity (2085.53 mV per pH) to both standard ISFET under single gate operation (58.88 mV per pH) and DG ISFET with a non-tailored transistor (381.14 mV per pH). Moreover, concerning the detection of hepatitis B surface antigens (HBsAg) using the immuno-DG ISFET, we have successfully detected trace amounts of HBsAg (22.5 fg mL-1) in a non-diluted 1× PBS medium with a high sensitivity of 690 mV. Our results demonstrate that the proposed immuno-DG ISFET can be a biosensor platform for practical use in the diagnosis of various diseases.Ion-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs), although they have attracted considerable attention as effective immunosensors, have still not been adopted for practical applications owing to several problems: (1) the poor sensitivity caused by the short Debye screening length in media with high ion concentration, (2) time-consuming preconditioning processes for achieving the highly-diluted media, and (3) the low durability caused by undesirable ions such as sodium chloride in the media. Here, we propose a highly sensitive immunosensor

  17. The Relationship Between Metformin and Serum Prostate‐Specific Antigen Levels

    PubMed Central

    Jayalath, Viranda H.; Ireland, Christopher; Fleshner, Neil E.; Hamilton, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Metformin is the first‐line oral antihyperglycemic of choice for individuals with type 2 diabetes. Recent evidence supports a role for metformin in prostate cancer chemoprotection. However, whether metformin indeed influences prostate biology is unknown. We aimed to study the association between metformin and serum prostate‐specific antigen (PSA) levels—the primary prostate cancer biomarker. METHODS We conducted a cross‐sectional study of 326 prostate cancer‐free men with type 2 diabetes were recruited between 2004 and 2013 at St. Michael's Hospital. Men were excluded if they had a PSA ≥10‐ng/ml, or used >2,550‐mg/d metformin or supplemental androgens. Multivariate linear regressions quantified the association between metformin dose and log‐PSA. Secondary analyses quantified the association between other antihyperglycemics (sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones) and PSA; sensitivity analyses tested covariate interactions. RESULTS Median PSA was 0.9‐ng/ml (IQR: 0.5–1.6‐ng/ml). Metformin dose associated positively with BMI, HbA1c, diabetes duration, and number of statin, acetylsalicylic acid, diuretic users, and number of antihyperglycemics used, and negatively with LDL‐C. In multivariate models, PSA changed by −8% (95%CI: −13 to −2%, P = 0.011) per 500‐mg/d increase in metformin. Men with diabetes for ≥6 years (n = 163) saw a greater difference in PSA per 500‐mg/d metformin (−12% [95% CI: −19 to −4%, P = 0.002], P‐interaction = 0.018). Serum PSA did not relate with sulfonylureas, thiazolidinediones, or total number of antihyperglycemic agents used. Our findings are limited by the cross‐sectional design of this study. CONCLUSIONS Metformin dose‐dependently inversely associated with serum PSA, independent of other antihyperglycemic medications. Whether metformin confers a dose‐dependent benefit on prostate tumorigenesis and progression warrants investigation. Prostate 76:1445–1453, 2016.

  18. Genomic Characterization of Variable Surface Antigens Reveals a Telomere Position Effect as a Prerequisite for RNA Interference-Mediated Silencing in Paramecium tetraurelia

    PubMed Central

    Baranasic, Damir; Oppermann, Timo; Cheaib, Miriam; Cullum, John; Schmidt, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antigenic or phenotypic variation is a widespread phenomenon of expression of variable surface protein coats on eukaryotic microbes. To clarify the mechanism behind mutually exclusive gene expression, we characterized the genetic properties of the surface antigen multigene family in the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia and the epigenetic factors controlling expression and silencing. Genome analysis indicated that the multigene family consists of intrachromosomal and subtelomeric genes; both classes apparently derive from different gene duplication events: whole-genome and intrachromosomal duplication. Expression analysis provides evidence for telomere position effects, because only subtelomeric genes follow mutually exclusive transcription. Microarray analysis of cultures deficient in Rdr3, an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, in comparison to serotype-pure wild-type cultures, shows cotranscription of a subset of subtelomeric genes, indicating that the telomere position effect is due to a selective occurrence of Rdr3-mediated silencing in subtelomeric regions. We present a model of surface antigen evolution by intrachromosomal gene duplication involving the maintenance of positive selection of structurally relevant regions. Further analysis of chromosome heterogeneity shows that alternative telomere addition regions clearly affect transcription of closely related genes. Consequently, chromosome fragmentation appears to be of crucial importance for surface antigen expression and evolution. Our data suggest that RNAi-mediated control of this genetic network by trans-acting RNAs allows rapid epigenetic adaptation by phenotypic variation in combination with long-term genetic adaptation by Darwinian evolution of antigen genes. PMID:25389173

  19. Functional and structural changes in human erythrocyte surface after irradiation by uv waves of various wavelengths. Report 1: expression of ABO and Rhesus system antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Samoylova, K.A.; Klimova, K.N.; Priyezzheva, L.S.; Artsishevskaya, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of shortwave ultraviolet (SUV) radiation ad causes change in the external surface of human erythrocytes, modifying the expression of the ABO and Rh system antigens which are related to the surface of the cells was investigated. Erythrocytes in a structurally prepared erythrocyte mass from 23 donors stabilized by glugicir or heparin were examined. Three series of experiments were performed: (1) isolated erythrocytes, before irradiation thrice washed to remove plasma with isotonic NaC1 0.9%, erythrocytes diluted to 5 x s10 to the 7th power cells per milliliter and erythrocytes on the undiluted erythrocyte mass about 7 x 5 x 109 to the 9th power cells power milliliter. The agglutinating activity of the ABO and Rh antigens was studied. Two to three hours after exposure to 248, 620, 1240 and 2480 J/m2, the degree of hemolysis of isolated erythrocytes increased by 5,10,18 and 28%. Changes were also observed in agglutinating activity of ABO antigens. The agglutinating activity of A and B antigens increased by an average factor of 2 minus H antigens by a factor of 4. The SUV radiation did not cause any activation of the Rh antigen.

  20. Serodiagnosis of bovine trypanosomosis caused by non-tsetse transmitted Trypanosoma (Duttonella) vivax parasites using the soluble form of a Trypanozoon variant surface glycoprotein antigen.

    PubMed

    Uzcanga, Graciela L; Pérez-Rojas, Yenis; Camargo, Rocío; Izquier, Adriana; Noda, José A; Chacín, Ronny; Parra, Nereida; Ron, Lenin; Rodríguez-Hidalgo, Richar; Bubis, José

    2016-03-15

    Previous studies have shown that a 64-kDa antigen (p64) that was purified from the Venezuelan TeAp-N/D1 isolate of Trypanosoma (Trypanozoon) equiperdum corresponds to the soluble form of its predominant variant surface glycoprotein (VSG), and exhibited cross-reactivity with Trypanosoma (Duttonella) vivax. The course of experimental acute infections of bovines with T. vivax were followed by measuring whole anti-p64 antibodies and specific anti-p64 IgG and IgM antibodies in animal sera by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The value of p64 to diagnose bovine trypanosomosis was also examined using 350 sera from healthy and T. vivax-infected cows living in a trypanosomosis-endemic and enzootic stable area, and 48 sera obtained during a trypanosomosis outbreak. Serological assays showed that ∼ 70-80% of the infected sera contained anti-p64 antibodies, based on the comparative immunodetection of the T. equiperdum clarified antigenic fraction used as a reference test. In the absence of a gold standard, Bayesian analysis for multiple testing estimated a sensitivity and specificity of 71.6% and 98.8%, respectively, for the indirect ELISA using p64 as antigen. An apparent prevalence of 37.7% for bovine trypanosomosis infection was also estimated with a Bayesian approach when the p64 ELISA test was used. Employing blood from acute infected cows, the indirect ELISA response against p64 was contrasted with the microhematocrit centrifuge method and analyses by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using specific primers targeting the inter-specific length variation of the internal transcribed spacer 1 region of the 18S ribosomal gene. The efficiency of p64 for the detection of anti-trypanosome antibodies in acute infected bovines was also corroborated serologically by comparing its response to that of the Indonesian Trypanosoma evansi Rode Trypanozoon antigen type (RoTat) 1.2 VSG, which possesses high specificity and sensitivity. As expected, PCR was the best

  1. Gastric dilatation syndrome associated with chronic nephropathy, hypergastrinemia, and gastritis in mice exposed to high levels of environmental antigens.

    PubMed

    García, A; Erdman, S; Sheppard, B J; Murphy, J C; Fox, J G

    2001-06-01

    Gastric dilatation (GD) has been observed in Tac:(SW)fBR surveillance mice, with mean age of 10 months, that are exposed to high levels of environmental antigens during routine exposure to dirty bedding. The aim of the study reported here was to determine whether GD was associated with other systemic conditions affecting mice. Three groups of nine animals including-surveillance mice not exposed to dirty bedding (control), surveillance mice with out GD (NGD), and surveillance mice with GD (group GD)-had mean stomach weight with ingesta of 0.5 +/- 0.02 g, 1.09 +/- 0.07 g (P < 0.0001), and 2.54 +/- 0.4 g (P < 0.0001), respectively. Mean serum creatinine concentration was significantly higher in GD (1.6 +/- 0.25 mg/dl), compared with NGD (0.17 +/- 0.22 mg/dl, P < 0.0001) and control (0.2 +/- 0.16 mg/ dl, P < 0.0001) mice. In addition, lesions consistent with severe chronic nephropathy and mild gastritis were common in GD, compared with NGD and control mice. Finally, serum amidated gastrin concentration was significantly high in GD (179.37 +/- 53.86 pM, P < 0.03) and NGD (264.89 +/- 115.89 pM, P < 0.009), compared with control (60.77 +/- 8.39 pM) mice. Gastric dilatation syndrome is associated with chronic nephropathy, hypergastrinemia, and gastritis in surveillance mice exposed to high levels of environmental antigens. PMID:11924783

  2. Malaria vaccine candidate antigen targeting the pre-erythrocytic stage of Plasmodium falciparum produced at high level in plants.

    PubMed

    Voepel, Nadja; Boes, Alexander; Edgue, Güven; Beiss, Veronique; Kapelski, Stephanie; Reimann, Andreas; Schillberg, Stefan; Pradel, Gabriele; Fendel, Rolf; Scheuermayer, Matthias; Spiegel, Holger; Fischer, Rainer

    2014-11-01

    Plants have emerged as low-cost production platforms suitable for vaccines targeting poverty-related diseases. Besides functional efficacy, the stability, yield, and purification process determine the production costs of a vaccine and thereby the feasibility of plant-based production. We describe high-level plant production and functional characterization of a malaria vaccine candidate targeting the pre-erythrocytic stage of Plasmodium falciparum. CCT, a fusion protein composed of three sporozoite antigens (P. falciparum cell traversal protein for ookinetes and sporozoites [PfCelTOS], P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein [PfCSP], and P. falciparum thrombospondin-related adhesive protein [PfTRAP]), was transiently expressed by agroinfiltration in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, accumulated to levels up to 2 mg/g fresh leaf weight (FLW), was thermostable up to 80°C and could be purified to >95% using a simple two-step procedure. Reactivity of sera from malaria semi-immune donors indicated the immunogenic conformation of the purified fusion protein consisting of PfCelTOS, PfCSP_TSR, PfTRAP_TSR domains (CCT) protein. Total IgG from the CCT-specific mouse immune sera specifically recognized P. falciparum sporozoites in immunofluorescence assays and induced up to 35% inhibition in hepatocyte invasion assays. Featuring domains from three promising sporozoite antigens with different roles (attachment and cell traversal) in the hepatocyte invasion process, CCT has the potential to elicit broader immune responses against the pre-erythrocytic stage of P. falciparum and represents an interesting new candidate, also as a component of multi-stage, multi-subunit malaria vaccine cocktails. PMID:25200253

  3. Abnormal cell surface antigen expression in individuals with variant CD45 splicing and histiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Boxall, Sally; McCormick, James; Beverley, Peter; Strobel, Stephan; De Filippi, Paola; Dawes, Ritu; Klersy, Catherine; Clementi, Rita; De Juli, Emanuella; Ferster, Aline; Wallace, Diana; Aricò, Maurizio; Danesino, Cezare; Tchilian, Elma

    2004-03-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) and Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) are members of a group of rare heterogenous disorders, the histiocytoses, characterized by uncontrolled accumulation of pleomorphic infiltrates of leukocytes. The etiology of these diseases is mainly unknown. CD45 is a hemopoietic cell specific tyrosine phosphatase essential for antigen receptor mediated signaling in lymphocytes and different patterns of CD45 splicing are associated with distinct functions. Recently a polymorphism (C77G) in exon 4 of CD45 causing abnormal CD45 splicing and a point mutation affecting CD45 dimerization were implicated in multiple sclerosis in humans and lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity in mice respectively. Here we show that two patients with HLH exhibited abnormal CD45 splicing caused by the C77G variant allele, while a further 21 HLH patients have normal CD45. We have also examined 62 LCH patients and found three to have the C77G mutation. Peripheral blood thymus-derived (T) CD8(+) cells from normal individuals carrying the C77G mutation show a significant decrease in the proportion of cells expressing L-selectin and increased frequency of cells with LFA-1(hi) expression. It remains to be established whether C77G is a contributing factor in these histiocytic disorders. PMID:14630980

  4. Maternal inhibition of hepatitis B surface antigen gene expression in transgenic mice correlates with de novo methylation.

    PubMed

    Hadchouel, M; Farza, H; Simon, D; Tiollais, P; Pourcel, C

    Differential modifications of the genome during gametogenesis result in a functional difference between the paternal and maternal genomes at the moment of fertilization. A possible cause of this imprinting is the methylation of DNA. The insertion of foreign DNA into transgenic mice allows the tagging of regions that are differentially methylated during gametogenesis. We describe here a transgenic mouse strain in which the expression of the hepatitis B surface antigen gene is irreversibly repressed following its passage through the female germ line. This inhibition is accompanied by the methylation of all the HpaII and HhaI sites within the foreign gene, which we have shown to be integrated into a site on chromosome 13. The irreversibility reported here contrasts with what is found with other transgenic mice sequences which are reversibly methylated after passage through the male or female germ line, though in both cases methylation appears to be important in the imprinting process.

  5. A molecular assembly system for presentation of antigens on the surface of HBc virus-like particles

    SciTech Connect

    Blokhina, Elena A.; Kuprianov, Victor V.; Stepanova, Ludmila A.; Tsybalova, Ludmila M.; Kiselev, Oleg I.; Ravin, Nikolai V.; Skryabin, Konstantin G.

    2013-01-20

    Hepatitis B virus-like particles, icosahedral structures formed by multiple core protein dimers, are promising immune-enhancing vaccine carriers for foreign antigens. Insertions into the surface-exposed immunodominant loop are especially immunogenic. However, the need to conserve the particulate structure to ensure high immunogenicity imposes restraints on the nature of the heterologous sequence that can be inserted. We propose a new approach to constructing HBc particles linked to the target epitopes that relies on non-covalent interactions between the epitope and pre-assembled unmodified HBc particles. Interaction was enabled by fusion of the epitope to the GSLLGRMKGA peptide, binding to the spike tips. This peptide may be used as a 'binding tag' allowing in vitro construction of HBc particles carrying the target peptide. Such virus-like particles carrying multiple copies of the extracellular domain of the M2 protein of different influenza strains appeared to be highly immunogenic and protected immunised mice against a lethal influenza challenge.

  6. An alternative to reduction of surface pressure to sea level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deardorff, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    The pitfalls of the present method of reducing surface pressure to sea level are reviewed, and an alternative, adjusted pressure, P, is proposed. P is obtained from solution of a Poisson equation over a continental region, using the simplest boundary condition along the perimeter or coastline where P equals the sea level pressure. The use of P would avoid the empiricisms and disadvantages of pressure reduction to sea level, and would produce surface pressure charts which depict the true geostrophic wind at the surface.

  7. A self-amplified transistor immunosensor under dual gate operation: highly sensitive detection of hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Lee, I-K; Jeun, M; Jang, H-J; Cho, W-J; Lee, K H

    2015-10-28

    Ion-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs), although they have attracted considerable attention as effective immunosensors, have still not been adopted for practical applications owing to several problems: (1) the poor sensitivity caused by the short Debye screening length in media with high ion concentration, (2) time-consuming preconditioning processes for achieving the highly-diluted media, and (3) the low durability caused by undesirable ions such as sodium chloride in the media. Here, we propose a highly sensitive immunosensor based on a self-amplified transistor under dual gate operation (immuno-DG ISFET) for the detection of hepatitis B surface antigen. To address the challenges in current ISFET-based immunosensors, we have enhanced the sensitivity of an immunosensor by precisely tailoring the nanostructure of the transistor. In the pH sensing test, the immuno-DG ISFET showed superior sensitivity (2085.53 mV per pH) to both standard ISFET under single gate operation (58.88 mV per pH) and DG ISFET with a non-tailored transistor (381.14 mV per pH). Moreover, concerning the detection of hepatitis B surface antigens (HBsAg) using the immuno-DG ISFET, we have successfully detected trace amounts of HBsAg (22.5 fg mL(-1)) in a non-diluted 1× PBS medium with a high sensitivity of 690 mV. Our results demonstrate that the proposed immuno-DG ISFET can be a biosensor platform for practical use in the diagnosis of various diseases.

  8. The Inverse Association Between the Presence of Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen and Atopy in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Inseon S.; Park, Chang-Hwan; Ahn, Jae-Sook; Ji, Seung-Gyu

    2005-01-01

    Background Some bacterial and viral infections may reduce the risk of atopy, and this is based on the concept of their ability to divert the immune system towards the Th1 responses. Most of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections occur in the developing countries and this is where atopic disorders are least prevalent. Th1 responses are important for the viral clearance of HBV and also for antibody production. The aim of the study is to investigate whether the presence of antibodies to the hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) is inversely associated with atopy in adults. Methods A random sample of 358 subjects, who were without hepatitis B surface antigen, was recruited; they were aged from 18 to 79 years (105 young adults aged ≤40 years and 253 older adults aged > 40 years). Determinations of the anti-HBs and skin prick tests using aeroallergens were performed. Those subjects with one or more positive skin reactions (a mean wheal diameter ≥3 mm) were considered atopic. Results The prevalence rate of atopy (p=0.035) or the sensitization to Dermatophagoides farinae (p=0.01) was significantly lower in the subjects with anti-HBs than in those subjects without anti-HBs for the young adults, but not for the older adults. The logistic regression analysis that was done on the young adults showed that the presence of anti-HBs was associated with a significantly lower risk of atopy (the odds ratio adjusted for confounding variables = 0.40 [95% CI 0.16-0.98], p=0.046) or with the sensitization to D. farinae (0.20 [0.06-0.65], p = 0.008). Conclusion The presence of anti-HBs produced by a natural HBV infection or vaccination might be inversely associated with atopy in young adults. PMID:16295779

  9. Definition of the surface antigens of Mycobacterium malmoense and use in studying the etiology of a form of mycobacteriosis.

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, M; Tsang, A Y; McClatchy, J K; Stewart, C; Jardine, I; Brennan, P J

    1987-01-01

    Mycobacterium malmoense is the latest of a roster of atypical mycobacteria implicated in pulmonary infections. Yet it lacks recognizable phenotypic features to allow its ready identification. Some 23 clinical isolates of M. malmoense were examined for homologous seroagglutination reactions and characteristic surface antigens. One group showed concordant agglutination interreactions and an identical spectrum of glycolipids and are regarded as M. malmoense sensu stricto. The glycolipids are of the newly found, trehalose-containing lipooligosaccharide class. De-O-acylation followed by high-pressure liquid chromatography revealed one major and several minor oligosaccharides. Partial acidic cleavage to release glycosidically linked trehalose, alpha-mannosidase digestion to demonstrate the presence of a non-reducing-end mannobiose, perdeuteriomethylation, partial acid hydrolysis, reduction, and O ethylation, combined with 1H nuclear magnetic resonance and electron impact and fast-atom bombardment mass spectrometry revealed the structure of the major oligosaccharide as alpha-D-Manp-(1----3) -alpha-D-Manp-(1----[2-alpha-L-Rhap-(1--]4--3)-alpha-L-Rh ap- (1----3)-alpha-D-Glcp-(1----1)-alpha-D-Glcp, in which two of the 2-alpha-L-Rhap residues are O methylated at C-3. (Man, mannose; Rha, rhamnose; Glc, glucose; p, pyranosyl). The structures of the minor oligosaccharides were also determined; they differ at the distal nonreducing end. The dominant oligosaccharide was acylated by octanoate, 2-methyleicosanoate, and 2,4-dimethylpentacosanoate to yield the major species-specific surface antigen of M. malmoense, which we regard as the most characteristic feature of the pathogen. Images PMID:3597323

  10. Hookah smoking and cancer: carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels in exclusive/ever hookah smokers

    PubMed Central

    Sajid, Khan Mohammad; Chaouachi, Kamal; Mahmood, Rubaida

    2008-01-01

    Background We have recently published some work on CEA levels in hookah (also called narghile, shisha elsewhere) and cigarette smokers. Hookah smokers had higher levels of CEA than non-smokers although mean levels were low compared to cigarette smokers. However some of them were also users of other tobacco products (cigarettes, bidis, etc.). Objectives To find serum CEA levels in ever/exclusive hookah smokers, i.e. those who smoked only hookah (no cigarettes, bidis, etc.), prepared between 1 and 4 times a day with a quantity of up to 120 g of a tobacco-molasses mixture each (i.e. the tobacco weight equivalent of up to 60 cigarettes of 1 g each) and consumed in 1 to 8 sessions. Methods Enhanced chemiluminescent immunometric technique was applied to measure CEA levels in serum samples from 59 exclusive male smokers with age ranging from 20–80 years (mean = 58.8 ± 14.7 years) and 8–65 years of smoking (mean = 37.7 ± 16.8). 36 non-smokers served as controls. Subjects were divided into 3 groups according to the number of preparations; the number of sessions and the total daily smoking time: Light (1; 1; ≤ 20 minutes); Medium (1–3; 1–3; >20 min to ≤ 2 hrs) and Heavy smokers (2–4; 3–8; >2 hrs to ≤ 6 hrs). Because of the nature of distribution of CEA levels among our individuals, Wilcoxon's rank sum two-sample test was applied to compare the variables. Results The overall CEA levels in exclusive hookah smokers (mean: 3.58 ± 2.61 ng/ml; n = 59) were not significantly different (p ≤ 0.0937) from the levels in non-smokers (2.35 ± 0.71 ng/ml). Mean levels in light, medium and heavy smokers were: 1.06 ± 0.492 ng/ml (n = 5); 2.52 ± 1.15 ng/ml (n = 28) and 5.11 ± 3.08 ng/ml (n = 26) respectively. The levels in medium smokers and non-smokers were also not significantly different (p ≤ 0.9138). In heavy smokers, the CEA levels were significantly higher than in non-smokers (p ≤ 0.0001567). Conclusion Overall CEA levels in exclusive hookah smokers were

  11. Production and Characterization of a Monoclonal Antibody Raised Against Surface Antigens from Mycelium of Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici: Evidence for an Extracellular Polyphenol Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Thornton, C R; Dewey, F M; Gilligan, C A

    1997-01-01

    ABSTRACT A murine monoclonal antibody (MAb) of immunoglobulin class M (IgM) was raised against surface antigens from Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici and, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, recognized isolates of G. graminis var. tritici, G. graminis var. avenae and G. graminis var. graminis. Characterization of the antigen by heat and protease treatments showed that the epitope recognized by the MAb was a protein. Antigen production was detected only in live mycelia. Immunofluorescence studies showed that the antigen was associated with both the broad melanized macrohyphae and hyaline mycelia of G. graminis var. tritici. Secretion of antigen into an aqueous minimal medium was promoted only by exposure of live mycelia to certain phenolic substrates, including monophenols ortho-, para-, and meta-cresol; 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid (gallic acid); and phenolic amino acid L-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl) alanine (L-DOPA). Antigen secretion was not promoted by 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl) alanine (L-tyrosine). The MAb reacted strongly with purified enzyme laccase (polyphenol oxidase, EC 1.10.3.2) but did not recognize purified tyrosinase (monophenol oxidase, EC 1.14.18.1). Moreover, chemicals that bind to copper and inhibit copper-containing enzymes such as laccase completely inhibited antigen secretion in response to L-DOPA. The MAb was tested for specificity against a wide range of fungi, common yeast species, and gram positive and negative bacteria. It did not recognize antigens from a broad range of unrelated fungi, including Gliocladium roseum, Fusarium sp., Phoma exigua, Phialophora fastigiata, Penicillium crustosum, Pythium ultimum, Rhizopus stolonifer, Rhizoctonia carotae, R. oryzae, R. tuliparum, and Trichoderma viride, nor did it recognize surface antigens from yeasts or bacteria. The MAb cross-reacted with antigens from Botrytis spp., Chaetomium globosum, R. cerealis, and R. solani. However, secretion of antigen by R. solani and R. cerealis was not promoted by L

  12. Targeting cryptic epitope with modified antigen coupled to the surface of liposomes induces strong antitumor CD8 T-cell immune responses in vivo

    PubMed Central

    HORIUCHI, YUTAKA; TAKAGI, AKIRA; UCHIDA, TETSUYA; AKATSUKA, TOSHITAKA

    2015-01-01

    Active cancer immunotherapy, such as cancer vaccine, is based on the fundamental knowledge that tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) are presented on MHC molecules for recognition by specific T cells. However, most TAAs are self-antigens and are also expressed on normal tissues, including the thymus. This fact raises the issue of the tolerance of the TAA-specific T-cell repertoire and consequently the inability to trigger a strong and efficient antitumor immune response. In the present study, we used antigens chemically coupled to the surface of liposomes to target telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), a widely expressed self/tumor antigen. Taking advantage of the high homology between mouse and human TERT, we investigated immunogenicity and antitumor efficiency of the liposomal TERT peptides in HLA-A*0201 transgenic HHD mice. Using the heteroclitical peptide-modifying approach with antigen-coupled liposomes, we identified a novel cryptic epitope with low affinity for HLA*0201 molecules derived from TERT. The heteroclitical variant derived from this novel low affinity peptide exhibited strong affinity for HLA*0201 molecules. However, it induced only weak CD8 T-cell immune responses in HHD mice when emulsified in IFA. By contrast, when coupled to the surface of the liposomes, it induced powerful CD8 T-cell immune responses which cross-reacted against the original cryptic epitope. The induced CD8 T cells also recognized endogenously TERT-expressing tumor cells and inhibited their growth in HHD mice. These data suggest that heteroclitical antigen derived from low affinity epitope of tumor antigens coupled to the surface of liposome may have a role as an effective cancer vaccine candidate. PMID:26398429

  13. Tissue-specific expression of cell-surface Qa-2 antigen from a transfected Q7b gene of C57BL/10 mice

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    We screened a cDNA library prepared from a BALB.B10 CTL clone that expresses Qa-2 antigen, and isolated four clones derived from Q7b, a Qa region gene of C57BL/10. One of these Q7b cDNAs and the Q7b chromosomal gene were subcloned into expression vectors and transfected into L cells and R1.1 thymoma cells. We found that the chromosomal Q7b gene expresses Qa-2 on the surface of R1.1 cells, but not on L cells while the Q7b cDNA expresses protein on the surface of both cell types. The levels of Qa-2 expression do not correlate with the total levels of Q7b mRNA in these transfectants. Our results suggest that the tissue- specific expression of Qa-2 may be controlled, in part, by mechanisms of alternate RNA splicing. By using hybrid gene constructs, we have mapped the tissue-specific element to the 3' part of the gene, downstream of a site near the middle of exon 4. The hybrid polypeptides differ significantly in their transmembrane and cytoplasmic regions. These portions of the protein also may play a role in the tissue- specific expression of Qa-2. PMID:3502706

  14. Phenotypic modulation of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells by phorbol ester: induction of IgM secretion and changes in the expression of B cell-associated surface antigens.

    PubMed

    Gordon, J; Mellstedt, H; Aman, P; Biberfeld, P; Klein, G

    1984-01-01

    Freshly explanted neoplastic populations from 22 cases of phenotypically well-characterized chronic type B lymphocytic leukemia were studied for their capacity to respond to the phorbol ester TPA in vitro. In all but four cases the secretion of IgM was either induced or increased, often to a high level. In contrast, the export of free immunoglobulin (Ig) light chains, an almost consistent feature of the B lymphocytic leukemias, remained relatively constant after TPA treatment. Parallel changes in leukemic cell surface phenotype were probed with both "conventional" and monoclonal antibodies, revealing some modulation of markers in every case investigated. A diminution in the level of surface Ig (preferentially IgD) and the accumulation of cytoplasmic Ig observed after phorbol ester treatment were accompanied by a corresponding reduction or loss of the B1 antigen and usually of B2 when present. The most consistent change induced by TPA was the appearance of BB-1, a marker of activated B lymphocytes, which was rarely expressed on fresh leukemic cells. Another marker of activated lymphocytes, LB-1, was also often induced or increased in its expression after exposure of the cells to TPA. The magnitude of the TPA response appeared to relate to the stage of maturation arrest of the individual leukemic clones rather than to any clinical parameter explored. The significance of the findings to normal B cell differentiation and their potential clinical utility are discussed.

  15. Assessing stability and assembly of the hepatitis B surface antigen into virus-like particles during down-stream processing.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Maria; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Rinas, Ursula

    2015-07-17

    The hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) is a recombinant protein-based vaccine being able to form virus-like particles (VLPs). HBsAg is mainly produced using yeast-based expression systems, however, recent results strongly suggest that VLPs are not formed within the yeast cells during the cultivation but are formed in a gradual manner during the following down-stream procedures. VLPs are also not detectable during the first down-stream steps including mechanical and EDTA/detergent-assisted cell destruction. Moreover, VLPs are not detectable in the cell lysate treated with polyethylene glycol and colloidal silica. The first VLP resembling structures appear after elution of HBsAg from colloidal silica to which it binds through hydrophobic interaction. These first VLP resembling structures are non-symmetrical as well as heterodisperse and exhibit a high tendency toward cluster formation presumably because of surface exposed hydrophobic patches. More symmetrical and monodisperse VLPs appear after the following ion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography most likely as the result of buffer changes during these purification steps (toward more neutral pH and less salt). Final treatment of the VLPs with the denaturant KSCN at moderate concentrations with following KSCN removal by dialysis does not cause unfolding and VLP disassembly but results in a re- and fine-structuring of the VLP surface topology.

  16. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and other gram-negative bacteria of infantile diarrhea: surface antigens, hemagglutinins, colonization factor antigen, and loss of enterotoxigenicity.

    PubMed

    Bäck, E; Möllby, R; Kaijser, B; Stintzing, G; Wadström, T; Habte, D

    1980-09-01

    Heat-labile enterotoxin (LT)-producing Escherichia coli and other enteric bacteria isolated from diarrheal Ethiopian children were studied for O and K antigen, production of heat-stable enterotoxin (ST), stability of LT production, properties of mannose-resistant hemagglutination (MRHA) (indicative of adhesive properties), and colonization factor antigen (CFA). Of the E. coli strains, 33% possessed O6, O8, or O78; 93% of these were stable producers of LT, and 86% produced both Lt and ST. O78 strains possessed CFA/I, whereas O6 and O8 strains possessed CFA/II. The E. coli with O antigens other than O6, O8, or O78, as well as the non-E. coli bacteria tended to lose their ability to produce LT; only 16% produced ST, and they only occasionally showed MRHA properties. The former group of E. coli strains might be considered as true enteropathogenic bacteria (enterovirulent E. coli), which may be identified serologically, while the pathogenic significance of the diversified latter group remains less certain. PMID:7003030

  17. A phase I study of the safety and immunogenicity of recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen co-administered with an immunostimulatory phosphorothioate oligonucleotide adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Halperin, Scott A; Van Nest, Gary; Smith, Bruce; Abtahi, Simin; Whiley, Heather; Eiden, Joseph J

    2003-06-01

    Certain oligodeoxynuclotides with CpG motifs provide enhanced immune response to co-delivered antigens. We performed a phase I, observer-blinded, randomized study in healthy anti-hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBsAg) antibody negative adults to explore safety and immunogenicity of co-injection of recombinant HBsAg combined with an immunostimulatory DNA sequence (ISS) 1018 ISS. Four ISS dosage groups (N=12 per group) were used: 300, 650, 1000 or 3000 microg. For each group, two controls received 20 microg HBsAg alone, two controls received ISS alone, and eight subjects received ISS+20 microg HBsAg. Subjects received two doses 8 weeks apart. Injection site reactions (tenderness and pain on limb movement) were more frequent at higher ISS+HBsAg doses but were mainly mild and of short duration. Higher anti-HBsAg antibody levels were associated with higher ISS doses. Four weeks after the first dose, a seroprotective titer (>or=10 mIU/ml) was noted for 0, 25, 75, and 87.5% of subjects by increasing ISS dose group (P<0.05) for those who received ISS+HBsAg; 1 month after the second dose this increased to 62.5, 100, 100, and 100%, respectively. Geometric mean anti-HBsAg antibody levels by increasing ISS+HBsAg dose were 1.22, 5.78, 24.75, and 206.5 mIU/ml after the first dose and 65.37, 877.6, 1545, and 3045 mIU/ml after the second dose. We conclude that 1018 ISS+HBsAg was well tolerated and immunogenic in this phase I study in healthy adults and may offer the potential for enhancement of hepatitis B virus (HBV) immunization and protection after one or two doses or in individuals who fail to respond to the standard vaccine regimen. PMID:12744879

  18. Antigen nonspecific effect of major histocompatibility complex haplotype on autoantibody levels in systemic lupus erythematosus-prone lpr mice.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, P L; Creech, E; Nakul-Aquaronne, D; McDaniel, R; Ackler, S; Rapoport, R G; Sobel, E S; Eisenberg, R A

    1993-01-01

    MHC-linked genes strongly influence susceptibility to autoimmune diseases and also regulate responses to exogenous antigens. To begin to understand the mechanism of this MHC effect on disease, we have investigated MHC-congenic mouse strains that develop spontaneous autoimmunity because of the lpr gene. C57BL6/lpr (B6/lpr) mice (H-2b) are known to have substantial levels of autoantibodies to chromatin, single stranded DNA (ssDNA3), and IgG of different murine subclasses (rheumatoid factor). We have crossed the H-2d and the H-2bm12 (la mutant) haplotypes onto the B6/lpr background. Surprisingly, levels of all the autoantibodies were markedly lower in B6/lpr.H-2d, but levels in B6/lpr.H-2bm12 were no different from those in B6/lpr mice. The downregulating influence of the H-2d allele was dominant, and there was no effect on autoantibody fine specificities. The genetics of the H-2d effect and its diffuse influence on multiple autoantibody specificities, in addition to the lack of effect of the bm12 mutation, which modifies the peptide-binding groove of I-A, together raise the question of whether MHC-linked genes other than classical (IR) genes may be responsible for MHC disease associations in this model. Images PMID:7685774

  19. Driving forces for the adsorption of a His-tag Chagas antigen. A rational approach to design bio-functional surfaces.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Laura E; Smania, Andrea M; De Pauli, Carlos P; Giacomelli, Carla E

    2013-12-01

    In order to rationally design a bio-functional surface based on the adsorption of a His-tag antigen, three requirements have to be considered: the bio-recognition element, the driving forces for the adsorption process and the detection mode of the bio-recognition event. This work is focused on the study of the adsorption mechanism of the His-tag H49 Chagas antigen on Ni(II) modified substrates. In order to construct the bio-functional surface, the gen of the H49 Chagas antigen was modified to incorporate His6 moiety at the N-terminal (His6-H49). Then, its physical adsorption and bio-affinity interaction with the solid substrate was studied by reflectometry. Besides His-Ni(II) bio-affinity interactions, His6-H49 was also physically adsorbed on Ni(II) modified substrates, leading to randomly oriented antigens. These loosely attached bio-molecules were partially removed using conditions of electrostatic repulsion. On the other hand, bio-affinity interactions, resulting in site-oriented molecules on the substrate, were only removable by specific competitors for Ni(II) surface sites. Finally, the surface bio-activity was determined from the peak separations of voltammetry waves due to the change of the electron transfer kinetics of a redox probe through the bio-functional surface (working electrode). PMID:24001449

  20. Driving forces for the adsorption of a His-tag Chagas antigen. A rational approach to design bio-functional surfaces.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Laura E; Smania, Andrea M; De Pauli, Carlos P; Giacomelli, Carla E

    2013-12-01

    In order to rationally design a bio-functional surface based on the adsorption of a His-tag antigen, three requirements have to be considered: the bio-recognition element, the driving forces for the adsorption process and the detection mode of the bio-recognition event. This work is focused on the study of the adsorption mechanism of the His-tag H49 Chagas antigen on Ni(II) modified substrates. In order to construct the bio-functional surface, the gen of the H49 Chagas antigen was modified to incorporate His6 moiety at the N-terminal (His6-H49). Then, its physical adsorption and bio-affinity interaction with the solid substrate was studied by reflectometry. Besides His-Ni(II) bio-affinity interactions, His6-H49 was also physically adsorbed on Ni(II) modified substrates, leading to randomly oriented antigens. These loosely attached bio-molecules were partially removed using conditions of electrostatic repulsion. On the other hand, bio-affinity interactions, resulting in site-oriented molecules on the substrate, were only removable by specific competitors for Ni(II) surface sites. Finally, the surface bio-activity was determined from the peak separations of voltammetry waves due to the change of the electron transfer kinetics of a redox probe through the bio-functional surface (working electrode).

  1. Prognosis Can Be Predicted More Accurately Using Pre- and Postchemoradiotherapy Carcinoembryonic Antigen Levels Compared to Only Prechemoradiotherapy Carcinoembryonic Antigen Level in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients Who Received Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sung, SooYoon; Son, Seok Hyun; Kay, Chul Seung; Lee, Yoon Suk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of a change in the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level during neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. A total of 110 patients with clinical T3/T4 or node-positive disease underwent nCRT and curative total mesorectal resection from February 2006 to December 2013. Serum CEA level was measured before nCRT, after nCRT, and then again after surgery. A cut-off value for CEA level to predict prognosis was determined using the maximally selected log-rank test. According to the test, patients were classified into 3 groups, based on their CEA levels (Group A: pre-CRT CEA ≤3.2; Group B: pre-CRT CEA level >3.2 and post-CRT CEA ≤2.8; and Group C: pre-CRT CEA >3.2 and post-CRT CEA >2.8). The median follow-up time was 31.1 months. The 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates of Group A and Group B were similar, while Group C showed a significantly lower 3-year DFS rate (82.5% vs. 89.5% vs. 55.1%, respectively, P = 0.001). Other clinicopathological factors that showed statistical significance on univariate analysis were pre-CRT CEA, post-CRT CEA, tumor distance from the anal verge, surgery type, downstage, pathologic N stage, margin status and perineural invasion. The CEA group (P = 0.001) and tumor distance from the anal verge (P = 0.044) were significant prognostic factors for DFS on multivariate analysis. Post-CRT CEA level may be a useful prognostic factor in patients whose prognosis cannot be predicted exactly by pre-CRT CEA levels alone in the neoadjuvant treatment era. Combined pre-CRT CEA and post-CRT CEA levels enable us to predict prognosis more accurately and determine treatment and follow-up policies. Further large-scale studies are necessary to validate the prognostic value of CEA levels. PMID:26962798

  2. Generation of a phage-display library of single-domain camelid VH H antibodies directed against Chlamydomonas reinhardtii antigens, and characterization of VH Hs binding cell-surface antigens.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenzhi; Rosenberg, Julian N; Wauchope, Akelia D; Tremblay, Jacqueline M; Shoemaker, Charles B; Weeks, Donald P; Oyler, George A

    2013-11-01

    Single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) are powerful tools for the detection, quantification, purification and subcellular localization of proteins of interest in biological research. We have generated camelid (Lama pacos) heavy chain-only variable VH domain (VH H) libraries against antigens in total cell lysates from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The sdAbs in the sera from immunized animals and VH H antibody domains isolated from the library show specificity to C. reinhardtii and lack of reactivity to antigens from four other algae: Chlorella variabilis, Coccomyxa subellipsoidea, Nannochloropsis oceanica and Thalassiosira pseudonana. Antibodies were produced against a diverse representation of antigens as evidenced by sera ELISA and protein-blot analyses. A phage-display library consisting of the VH H region contained at least 10(6) individual transformants, and thus should represent a wide range of C. reinhardtii antigens. The utility of the phage library was demonstrated by using live C. reinhardtii cells to pan for VH H clones with specific recognition of cell-surface epitopes. The lead candidate VH H clones (designated B11 and H10) bound to C. reinhardtii with EC50 values ≤ 0.5 nm. Treatment of cells with VH H B11 fused to the mCherry or green fluorescent proteins allowed brilliant and specific staining of the C. reinhardtii cell wall and analysis of cell-wall genesis during cell division. Such high-complexity VH H antibody libraries for algae will be valuable tools for algal researchers and biotechnologists.

  3. Surface Plasmon Resonance Label-Free Monitoring of Antibody Antigen Interactions in Real Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kausaite, Asta; van Dijk, Martijn; Castrop, Jan; Ramanaviciene, Almira; Baltrus, John P.; Acaite, Juzefa; Ramanavicius, Arunas

    2007-01-01

    Detection of biologically active compounds is one of the most important topics in molecular biology and biochemistry. One of the most promising detection methods is based on the application of surface plasmon resonance for label-free detection of biologically active compounds. This method allows one to monitor binding events in real time without…

  4. Hepatitis B surface antigen nanoparticles coated with chitosan and trimethyl chitosan: Impact of formulation on physicochemical and immunological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Tafaghodi, Mohsen; Saluja, Vinay; Kersten, Gideon F A; Kraan, Heleen; Slütter, Bram; Amorij, Jean-Pierre; Jiskoot, Wim

    2012-08-01

    Mucosal immunization offers various advantages over parenteral vaccination, but typically requires potent delivery systems and/or adjuvants to result in protective immunity. Here we report on the preparation of trimethylated chitosan (TMC) and chitosan (CHT) nanoparticles (NPs) loaded with hepatitis B surface antigen (HB), by a simple and scalable method. TMC:HB and CHT:HB NPs were prepared by direct coating of antigen by polymer. The impact of buffer, pH and tonicity of the dispersion medium on NPs' polydispersity, zeta potential and association percentage of polymer with antigen was evaluated. Moreover, biological properties of both NPs were addressed in vitro by studying their effect on cell viability, transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and dendritic cell (DC) maturation. Finally, immunogenicity was assessed by evaluating IgG, IgG1, IgG2a, IgA titers and sIgA after both mucosal (nasal) as well intramuscular (i.m.) vaccination in a murine model. TMC:HB and CHT:HB NPs, prepared in acetate buffer pH 6.7 of three different tonicities, had comparable size, polydispersity, zeta potential and association percentage. TMC:HB NPs, but not CHT:HB NPs, had a mild negative effect on cell viability and TEER, and a considerable positive effect on DC maturation. After nasal and i.m. immunization, TMC:HB NPs in hypotonic medium and CHT:HB NPs in all media induced higher serum and nasal antibody titers compared with HB solution (P<0.001). After i.m. injection, both TMC:HB and CHT:HB NPs induced higher IgG and IgG2a titers compared with alum adsorbed HB (P<0.001). For CHT:HB NPs, the tonicity of the dispersion medium did not affect the mucosal and systemic immune responses. In conclusion, TMC NPs and CHT NPs are similarly potent mucosal immunoadjuvants for HB. Moreover, both polymers are potent immunoadjuvants for i.m. administered isotonic HB, resulting in higher IgG2a/IgG1 ratios compared with alum adjuvanted HB. PMID:22749834

  5. Hepatitis B surface antigen nanoparticles coated with chitosan and trimethyl chitosan: Impact of formulation on physicochemical and immunological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Tafaghodi, Mohsen; Saluja, Vinay; Kersten, Gideon F A; Kraan, Heleen; Slütter, Bram; Amorij, Jean-Pierre; Jiskoot, Wim

    2012-08-01

    Mucosal immunization offers various advantages over parenteral vaccination, but typically requires potent delivery systems and/or adjuvants to result in protective immunity. Here we report on the preparation of trimethylated chitosan (TMC) and chitosan (CHT) nanoparticles (NPs) loaded with hepatitis B surface antigen (HB), by a simple and scalable method. TMC:HB and CHT:HB NPs were prepared by direct coating of antigen by polymer. The impact of buffer, pH and tonicity of the dispersion medium on NPs' polydispersity, zeta potential and association percentage of polymer with antigen was evaluated. Moreover, biological properties of both NPs were addressed in vitro by studying their effect on cell viability, transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and dendritic cell (DC) maturation. Finally, immunogenicity was assessed by evaluating IgG, IgG1, IgG2a, IgA titers and sIgA after both mucosal (nasal) as well intramuscular (i.m.) vaccination in a murine model. TMC:HB and CHT:HB NPs, prepared in acetate buffer pH 6.7 of three different tonicities, had comparable size, polydispersity, zeta potential and association percentage. TMC:HB NPs, but not CHT:HB NPs, had a mild negative effect on cell viability and TEER, and a considerable positive effect on DC maturation. After nasal and i.m. immunization, TMC:HB NPs in hypotonic medium and CHT:HB NPs in all media induced higher serum and nasal antibody titers compared with HB solution (P<0.001). After i.m. injection, both TMC:HB and CHT:HB NPs induced higher IgG and IgG2a titers compared with alum adsorbed HB (P<0.001). For CHT:HB NPs, the tonicity of the dispersion medium did not affect the mucosal and systemic immune responses. In conclusion, TMC NPs and CHT NPs are similarly potent mucosal immunoadjuvants for HB. Moreover, both polymers are potent immunoadjuvants for i.m. administered isotonic HB, resulting in higher IgG2a/IgG1 ratios compared with alum adjuvanted HB.

  6. Expression profile of novel cell surface molecules on different subsets of human peripheral blood antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Damasceno, Daniela; Andrés, Martín Pérez; van den Bossche, Wouter BL; Flores-Montero, Juan; de Bruin, Sandra; Teodosio, Cristina; van Dongen, Jacques JM; Orfao, Alberto; Almeida, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Although major steps have been recently made in understanding the role of the distinct subsets of dendritic cells (DC)/antigen-presenting cells (APC), further studies are required to unravel their precise role, including in-depth immunophenotypic characterisation of these cells. Here, we used eight-colour flow cytometry to investigate the reactivity of a panel of 72 monoclonal antibodies (including those clustered in seven new Cluster of Differentiation, CD) on different subsets of APC in peripheral blood (PB) samples from five healthy adults. These experiments were performed in the context of the Tenth International Workshop on Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigens (HLDA10). Plasmacytoid DC was the only cell population that expressed CD85g and CD195, whereas they lacked all of the other molecules investigated. In contrast, myeloid DC mostly expressed inhibitory C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) and other inhibitory-associated molecules, whereas monocytes expressed both inhibitory and activating CLRs, together with other phagocytosis-associated receptors. Within monocytes, progressively lower levels of expression were generally observed from classical monocytes (cMo) to SLAN− and SLAN+ non-classical monocytes (ncMo) for most of the molecules expressed, except for the CD368 endocytic receptor. This molecule was found to be positive only in cMo, and the CD369 and CD371 modulating/signalling receptors. In addition, the CD101 inhibitory molecule was found to be expressed at higher levels in SLAN+ vs SLAN− ncMo. In summary, the pattern of expression of the different signalling molecules and receptors analysed in this work varies among the distinct subsets of PB APCs, with similar profiles for molecules within each functional group. These findings suggest unique pattern-recognition and signalling capabilities for distinct subpopulations of APCs, and therefore, diverse functional roles. PMID:27766148

  7. Synthesis of antibodies to hepatitis B virus by cultured lymphocytes from chronic hepatitis B surface antigen carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Dusheiko, G.M.; Hoofnagle, J.H.; Cooksley, W.G.; James, S.P.; Jones, E.A.

    1983-05-01

    It has been postulated that host immune defects are responsible for the development and persistence of the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) carrier state. The synthesis of both anti-HBs and antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc) in cultures containing peripheral blood mononuclear cells from chronic HBsAg carriers and from control (antibody-positive) patients was measured in the presence of pokeweed mitogen. Similar amounts of polyclonal IgG and IgM were synthesized by cultures containing lymphocytes from chronic carriers and controls. Anti-HBc was detectable in lymphocyte supernatants from 2 of 20 controls and from 21 of 29 carriers. The presence of anti-HBc synthesis in vitro correlated with high serum titers of anti-HBc. In contrast, anti-HBs was detected in lymphocyte supernatants from 6 of 20 controls (predominantly in those who had high serum titers of anti-HBs) but in none of the supernatants from 29 HBsAg carriers. Co-culture experiments were performed using T and B lymphocyte fractions that had been purified by affinity chromatography. B lymphocytes from carriers co-cultured with allogeneic irradiated (''helper'') T lymphocytes from controls synthesized normal amounts of IgG, IgM, and anti-HBc but still did not synthesize detectable amounts of anti-HBs. In the converse experiments, B lymphocytes from controls were co-cultured with irradiated T lymphocytes from carriers. The T lymphocytes from 16 of 24 carriers augmented anti-HBs production by control B cells normally, the remaining eight did not. Finally, mixtures of control B cells and control irradiated T lymphocytes were co-cultured with T lymphocytes from chronic HBsAg carriers. 5 of 12 carriers demonstrated active suppression of anti-HBs production, and in three this suppression was specific, as IgG and IgM production remained normal.

  8. Molecular basis for variable expression of merozoite surface antigen gp45 among American isolates of Babesia bigemina.

    PubMed

    Fisher, T G; McElwain, T F; Palmer, G H

    2001-06-01

    Immunization with the merozoite surface glycoprotein gp45 induces protection against challenge using the homologous Babesia bigemina strain. However, gp45 B-cell epitopes are highly polymorphic among B. bigemina strains isolated from different geographical locations within North and South America. The molecular basis for this polymorphism was investigated using the JG-29 biological clone of a Mexico strain of B. bigemina and comparison with the Puerto Rico, St. Croix, and Texcoco strains. The molecular size and antibody reactivity of gp45 expressed by the JG-29 clone were identical to those of the parental Mexico strain. gp45 cDNA and the genomic locus encompassing gp45 were cloned and sequenced from JG-29. The locus sequence and Southern blot data were consistent with a single gp45 copy in the JG-29 genome. The JG-29 cDNA expressed the full-length protein recognized by the gp45-specific monoclonal antibody 14/1.3.2. The genomes of the Puerto Rico and St. Croix strains of B. bigemina were shown to lack a closely related gp45-like gene by PCR using multiple primer sets and by Southern blots using both full-length and region-specific gp45 probes. This genomic difference was confirmed using unpassaged isolates from a 1999 disease outbreak in Puerto Rico. In contrast, the Texcoco strain retains a gp45 gene, encoding an open reading frame identical to that of JG-29. However, the Texcoco gp45 gene is not transcribed. These two mechanisms, lack of a closely related gp45-like gene and failure to transcribe gp45, result in generation of antigenic polymorphism among B. bigemina strains, and the latter mechanism is unique compared to prior mechanisms of antigenic polymorphism identified in babesial parasites.

  9. Protective vaccination with promastigote surface antigen 2 from Leishmania major is mediated by a TH1 type of immune response.

    PubMed

    Handman, E; Symons, F M; Baldwin, T M; Curtis, J M; Scheerlinck, J P

    1995-11-01

    Leishmania major promastigote surface antigen-2 complex (PSA-2) comprises a family of three similar but distinct polypeptides. The three PSA-2 polypeptides were purified from cultured promastigotes by a combination of detergent phase separation and monoclonal antibody affinity chromatography. Intraperitoneal vaccination of C3H/He mice with PSA-2 with Corynebacterium parvum as an adjuvant resulted in complete protection from lesion development after challenge infection with virulent L. major. Significant protection was also obtained in the genetically susceptible BALB/cH-2k and BALB/c mice. One of the PSA-2 genes was cloned and expressed in both Escherichia coli and Leishmania mexicana promastigotes. Vaccination with the recombinant PSA-2 purified from E. coli did not confer protection, in contrast to the L. mexicana-derived recombinant PSA-2, which provided excellent protection. CD4+ T cells isolated from the spleens of vaccinated mice produced large amounts of gamma interferon but no detectable interleukin 4 upon stimulation with PSA-2 in vitro. Limiting dilution analysis showed a marked increase in the precursor frequency of PSA-2-specific gamma interferon-secreting CD4+ T cells. No substantial change in precursor frequency was observed for interleukin 4-secreting T cells in the vaccinated mice. A CD4+ PSA-2 specific T-cell line generated from splenocytes of a vaccinated mouse produces a cytokine pattern consistent with a TH1 phenotype. Intravenous injection of this line into naive mice reduced significantly the parasite burden upon challenge infection. Taken together, the data suggest that vaccination with PSA-2 induces a TH1 type of immune response which protects mice from L. major infection. Moreover, a single recombinant PSA-2 polypeptide derived from a genomic clone can also vaccinate, provided that the structural form of the antigen is near native. PMID:7591056

  10. Time to lowest postoperative carcinoembryonic antigen level is predictive on survival outcome in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Huichuan; Luo, Yanxin; Wang, Xiaolin; Bai, Liangliang; Huang, Pinzhu; Wang, Lei; Huang, Meijin; Deng, Yanhong; Wang, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    This study was to investigate whether the time to the lowest postoperative CEA can predict cancer survival. We enrolled 155 rectal cancer patients in this retrospective and longitudinal cohort study. Deepness of response (DpR) of CEA refers to the relative change of the lowest postoperative CEA level from baseline, and time to DpR (TTDpR) refers to the time from surgery to the lowest postoperative CEA level. The median of TTDpR and DpR was 4.5 (range, 3.0–18.0) weeks and −67% (range, −99% to 114%) respectively. Patients with TTDpR 4.5 weeks. Using TTDpR as a continuous variable, the HR of DFS and OS was 1.13 (95% CI 1.06–1.22, P = 0.001) and 1.17 (95% CI 1.07–1.29, P = 0.001) respectively. On multivariate analysis, the predictive value of prolonged TTDpR remained [adjusted HRs: 1.12 (95% CI 1.03–1.21, P = 0.006) and 1.17 (95% CI 1.06–1.28, P = 0.001)]. These findings remained significant in patients with normal preoperative CEA. Our results showed prolonged TTDpR of CEA independently predicted unfavorable survival outcomes, regardless of whether preoperative CEA was elevated or not. PMID:27658525

  11. Results of a study to correlate serum prostate specific antigen and reproductive hormone levels in patients with localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, S.; Quadri, S. F.; Dong, L.; Ignacio, L.; Kathuria, I. N.; Sutton, H.; Halpern, H.

    1995-01-01

    This cross-sectional study was undertaken to determine whether serum hormones (free testosterone, androstenedione, luteinizing hormone, or prolactin) have any influence on serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels in patients with stage A-C prostate cancer. Blood samples were collected prior to any treatment in 36 patients; in 19 (group 1), three blood samples were collected 10 minutes apart between 9:00 AM and 9:30 AM for each patient and pooled together to avoid diurnal and episodic variation in serum testosterone values. In the remaining patients, only one sample could be collected (group 2). Free testosterone, androstenedione, luteinizing hormone, prolactin, and PSA levels were determined with appropriate radioimmunoassay techniques. Statistical analyses were performed separately for groups 1 and 2, and then with pooled data. None of the hormones in any of the analyses showed any association to serum PSA values except for prolactin for the pooled data and for group 2. This statistical significance for prolactin disappeared on multivariate analysis. There were 21 African-American men and 15 whites in the study; no racial differences in hormonal levels were found except for lower luteinizing hormone levels in African Americans in group 2 and pooled data. No differences were found between group 1 and group 2 in the mean serum prolactin and luteinizing hormone values. Serum free testosterone, androstenedione, and luteinizing hormone appeared to have no influence on serum PSA values in nonmetastatic cancer patients. Serum prolactin values were inversely associated with PSA values in univariate analysis for the pooled data; this disappeared in multivariate analysis. Unlike other studies that found higher serum testosterone levels in African-American college students than whites, no such differences were seen in this age group. Luteinizing hormone was lower in African-American men than in whites in the pooled study population. Further studies are needed to clarify

  12. Air sampling for hepatitis B surface antigen in a dental operatory.

    PubMed

    Petersen, N J; Bond, W W; Favero, M S

    1979-09-01

    Forty samples of air with a mean sample volume of 104 liters were collected during the treatment of patients whose blood was positive for HBsAG: no samples contained HBsAG and occult blood. These findings suggest that, if environmentally mediated transmission of hepatitis B occurs in the dental operatory, it is more likely to occur through contact with contaminated surfaces than through the airborne route.

  13. Complexes of hepatitis B surface antigen and immunoglobulin M in the sera of patients with hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Palla, M; Rizzi, R; Toti, M; Almi, P; Rizzetto, M; Bonino, F; Purcell, R

    1983-01-01

    Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) bound to immunoglobulin M (IgM) was detected in sera of HBsAg carriers by a radioimmunoassay based on selective absorption of the immunoglobulin on a solid phase coated with antiserum to human IgM. Isopycnic banding and rate-zonal sedimentation have shown that the reaction is related to particulate forms of the HBsAg complexed with IgM. The binding of IgM possibly occurred because of a selective affinity of these molecules to the surface of HBsAg particles. HBsAg/IgM was found transiently in 24 of 25 (96%) patients with acute self-limited hepatitis B and persistently in 6 of 25 patients whose acute hepatitis B progressed to chronicity. It was also found in 20 of 39 (51%) chronic HBsAg carriers with inactive and asymptomatic infection. The HBsAg/IgM phenomenon is not dependent on replication of hepatitis B virions; its persistence in patients with acute hepatitis B may provide complementary evidence of transition of the infection to chronicity. PMID:6309673

  14. Facile preparation of carbon nanotube-conducting polymer network for sensitive electrochemical immunoassay of Hepatitis B surface antigen in serum.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yaogai; Zhao, Zhengyu; Wan, Qianqian

    2011-06-01

    A novel electrochemical immunosensor built on three dimensional carbon nanotube-conducting polymer (CNT-CP) network is reported for detection of Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in human serum. The CNT-CP network is prepared by drop-drying of CNT solution on glassy carbon electrode, followed by electrochemical polymerization of poly (pyrrole propionic acid) (pPPA) film to crosslink and stabilize the CNTs, wherein the CNTs form the backbone of the network, and offer great specific surface areas for antibody attachment, and confer good conductivity for electrochemical detection, while the conducting film integrates the carbon nanotubes into a stable network due to its self-limiting growth behavior and provides abundant carboxyl groups for covalent immobilization of probe proteins. As a unique matrix, the CNT-CP network enables sensitive electrochemical detection of HBsAg biomarker by using alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-conjugated secondary antibodies under sandwich format coupling with the ALP substrate solution, p-aminophenyl phosphate (PAPP), reaching a detection limit of 0.01ng/mL with a dynamic range of 5 orders of magnitude.

  15. Protection of rats against Mycoplasma arthritidis-induced arthritis by active and passive immunizations with two surface antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Washburn, L R; Weaver, E J

    1997-01-01

    We previously identified two surface-exposed Mycoplasma arthritidis protein antigens, designated MAA1 and MAA2, that may be involved in cytadherence. Since adherence to host tissues is an important first step in most bacterial infections, we suggest that MAA1 and MAA2 may be virulence factors for M. arthritidis. In order to provide evidence for such a role, we conducted a series of experiments in which rats were actively immunized with each of these proteins purified from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels or passively immunized with poly- or monoclonal antibodies against MAA1 and MAA2. In each case, immunity against MAA1 and MAA2 conferred at least partial protection against M. arthritidis-induced disease. The greatest protection was achieved by passive immunization with monoclonal antibody A9a, directed against a surface-exposed epitope of putative adhesin MAA1. Because protective immunity in most bacterial infections is directed against major virulence factors, these results suggest that MAA1 and MAA2 may play a role in the pathogenesis of M. arthritidis-induced arthritis of rats, possibly by mediating initial colonization of joint tissues. PMID:9144371

  16. Azurin-like protein blocks invasion of Toxoplasma gondii through potential interactions with parasite surface antigen SAG1.

    PubMed

    Naguleswaran, Arunasalam; Fialho, Arsenio M; Chaudhari, Anita; Hong, Chang Soo; Chakrabarty, Ananda M; Sullivan, William J

    2008-02-01

    Some pathogenic bacteria produce factors that have evolved a capacity to neutralize competing microbes. The cupredoxin family protein azurin, produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, exhibits a remarkable ability to impede invasion of a number of diverse intracellular pathogens, including the human AIDS virus human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and the protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum (which causes malaria). Here we report that azurin and an azurin-like protein (Laz) from gonococci/meningococci have activity against Toxoplasma, an apicomplexan parasite that causes opportunistic infection in immunocompromised individuals. We demonstrate that the mechanism of action for Laz involves interfering with the ability of Toxoplasma to adhere to host cells. Computer structural analysis reveals that azurin shares structural features with the predominant surface antigen SAG1, which is known to play an important role in parasite attachment. Interestingly, azurin also has structural similarities to a monoclonal antibody to SAG1. Surface plasmon resonance binding studies validate that SAG1 interacts strongly with Laz and, to lesser extent, azurin. Moreover, Toxoplasma mutants lacking SAG1 are not as susceptible to the growth-inhibitory effects of Laz. Collectively, our data show that Toxoplasma adhesion can be significantly impaired by Laz, and to some extent by azurin, via interactions with SAG1. These observations indicate that Laz can serve as an important tool in the study of host-pathogen interactions and is worthy of further study for development into potential therapeutic agents. PMID:18070964

  17. The prevalence of mutations in the major hydrophilic region of the surface antigen of hepatitis B virus varies with subgenotype.

    PubMed

    Wang, X Y; Harrison, T J; He, X; Chen, Q Y; Li, G J; Liu, M H; Li, H; Yang, J Y; Fang, Z L

    2015-12-01

    Mutations in the major hydrophilic region (MHR) of the surface antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBV) may result in vaccine escape, failure of immunotherapy and antiviral resistance. These mutants may be transmitted and constitute a public health threat. We aimed to determine the prevalence of MHR mutations of HBV in areas of high endemicity in Guangxi, China. HBV surface gene was analysed from 278 HBsAg-positive asymptomatic individuals recruited from Guangxi using cluster sampling. Three genotypes, B, C and I, were identified. The overall prevalence of MHR mutations is 17·6%. The prevalence of MHR mutations in genotype B (15·1%) is not significantly different from that in genotype C (16·4%). However, the prevalence in subgenotype C5 (31·1%) is significantly higher than in subgenotype C2 (13·0%) (χ 2 = 6·997, P < 0·05). The prevalence of escape mutations and overlapping polymerase substitutions in subgenotype C5 is significantly higher than in subgenotypes B2 and C2. In total, 7·9% of MHR mutants are escape mutations and 72·1% of MHR mutations produced amino-acid changes in the overlapping polymerase, including resistance mutations to entecavir. Our results suggest that the prevalence of MHR mutations varies with subgenotype. The prevalence of escape mutations and polymerase mutations may be associated with subgenotype.

  18. Protection of rats against Mycoplasma arthritidis-induced arthritis by active and passive immunizations with two surface antigens.

    PubMed

    Washburn, L R; Weaver, E J

    1997-05-01

    We previously identified two surface-exposed Mycoplasma arthritidis protein antigens, designated MAA1 and MAA2, that may be involved in cytadherence. Since adherence to host tissues is an important first step in most bacterial infections, we suggest that MAA1 and MAA2 may be virulence factors for M. arthritidis. In order to provide evidence for such a role, we conducted a series of experiments in which rats were actively immunized with each of these proteins purified from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels or passively immunized with poly- or monoclonal antibodies against MAA1 and MAA2. In each case, immunity against MAA1 and MAA2 conferred at least partial protection against M. arthritidis-induced disease. The greatest protection was achieved by passive immunization with monoclonal antibody A9a, directed against a surface-exposed epitope of putative adhesin MAA1. Because protective immunity in most bacterial infections is directed against major virulence factors, these results suggest that MAA1 and MAA2 may play a role in the pathogenesis of M. arthritidis-induced arthritis of rats, possibly by mediating initial colonization of joint tissues.

  19. Targeting cryptic epitope with modified antigen coupled to the surface of liposomes induces strong antitumor CD8 T-cell immune responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Yutaka; Takagi, Akira; Uchida, Tetsuya; Akatsuka, Toshitaka

    2015-12-01

    Active cancer immunotherapy, such as cancer vaccine, is based on the fundamental knowledge that tumor‑associated antigens (TAAs) are presented on MHC molecules for recognition by specific T cells. However, most TAAs are self-antigens and are also expressed on normal tissues, including the thymus. This fact raises the issue of the tolerance of the TAA‑specific T‑cell repertoire and consequently the inability to trigger a strong and efficient antitumor immune response. In the present study, we used antigens chemically coupled to the surface of liposomes to target telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), a widely expressed self/tumor antigen. Taking advantage of the high homology between mouse and human TERT, we investigated immunogenicity and antitumor efficiency of the liposomal TERT peptides in HLA-A*0201 transgenic HHD mice. Using the heteroclitical peptide-modifying approach with antigen‑coupled liposomes, we identified a novel cryptic epitope with low affinity for HLA*0201 molecules derived from TERT. The heteroclitical variant derived from this novel low affinity peptide exhibited strong affinity for HLA*0201 molecules. However, it induced only weak CD8 T‑cell immune responses in HHD mice when emulsified in IFA. By contrast, when coupled to the surface of the liposomes, it induced powerful CD8 T‑cell immune responses which cross-reacted against the original cryptic epitope. The induced CD8 T cells also recognized endogenously TERT‑expressing tumor cells and inhibited their growth in HHD mice. These data suggest that heteroclitical antigen derived from low affinity epitope of tumor antigens coupled to the surface of liposome may have a role as an effective cancer vaccine candidate.

  20. Effect of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 on surface expression of class I major histocompatibility complex antigens on infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, S R; Rice, P L; Kloszewski, E D; Anderson, R W; Thompson, D L; Tevethia, S S

    1985-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) generated in C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice in response to infection with the serologically distinct herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) or type 2 (HSV-2) were cross-reactive against target cells infected with either serotype. However, HSV-2-infected cells were shown to be much less susceptible to CTL-mediated lysis, and analysis through the use of HSV-1 X HSV-2 intertypic recombinants mapped the reduced susceptibility to a region contained within 0.82 to 1.00 map units of the HSV-2 genome. The study reported here was undertaken to determine the possible reasons for the reduced susceptibility of HSV-2-infected cells to lysis by CTL. Competition for the specific lysis of labeled HSV-1-infected cells by either HSV-1- or HSV-2-infected, unlabeled inhibitor cells and frequency analysis of the CTL precursor able to recognize HSV-1- and HSV-2-infected cells suggested that the reduced susceptibility of HSV-2-infected cells to lysis could be explained, at least in part, by reduced levels of target cell recognition. A determination of the surface expression of the critical elements involved in target cell recognition by CTL following infection with HSV-1 or HSV-2 revealed that all the major HSV-specific glycoprotein species were expressed. Infection with both HSV-1 and HSV-2 caused a reduction in the expression of the class I H-2 antigens. However, this reduction was much greater following infection with HSV-2. This suggested that one important factor contributing to reduced lysis of HSV-2-infected cells may be the altered or reduced expression of the class I H-2 self-antigens. PMID:2999432

  1. A 2013/2014 northern hemisphere season surface antigen inactivated trivalent influenza vaccine--Assessing the immunogenicity and safety in an open label, uncontrolled study.

    PubMed

    Roggelin, Louise; Vinnemeier, Christof D; Meyer, Seetha; Witte, Kai; Marx, Lydia; Theeß, Wiebke; Burchard, Gerd D; Rolling, Thierry; Cramer, Jakob P

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of the 2013/2014 trivalent surface antigen inactivated subunit seasonal influenza virus vaccine Fluvirin® in healthy adults (18 - ≤ 60 years) and elderly (>60 years). The vaccine contained 15 µg haemagglutinin protein from each of influenza A/California/7/2009 (H1N1)pdm09-like strain, A/Victoria/361/2011 (H3N2)-like strain and B/Massachusetts/2/2012-like strain (B/Yamagata) as recommended by the WHO in the 2013/2014 Northern Hemisphere season. Antibody response to each influenza antigen after vaccination was measured prior to vaccination and 21 d after by single radial hemolysis (SRH) assay or hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay in accordance with Guidance CPMP/BWP/214/96. 125 subjects (61 adults and 64 elderly) were enrolled in the study. Pre-vaccination protective antibody levels (SRH area ≥ 25 mm(2)) against A(H1N1), A(H3N2) and the B strain were detected in 17%, 20% and 57% of adults and in 36%, 20% and 55% of elderly, respectively, Post-vaccination, SRH area ≥ 25 mm(2) was detectable in 95%, 82% and 92% in adult and in 80%, 84% and 92% of the elderly subjects for A(H1N1), A(H3N2) and the B strain, respectively. Geometric mean ratio (GMR) was higher in adult subjects (2.62-7.62) than in elderly subjects (2.33-3.42). All three CHMP licensure criteria were met for all strains contained in the vaccine for both age groups. The most frequently reported solicited local and systemic reactions were pain at the injection side, headache and fatigue. In conclusion, the vaccine demonstrated a good immunogenicity and an acceptable safety profile in both adults and elderly.

  2. Identification of surface antigens of schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni recognized by antibodies from mice immunized by chronic infection and by exposure to highly irradiated cercariae

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, A.J.; James, S.L.; Sher, A.

    1983-08-01

    Surface components of mechanically transformed schistosomula of Schistosoma mansoni were labeled by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination. After solubilization with Triton X-100, antigens were identified by immunoprecipitation. Serum from chronically infected Swiss mice reproducibly precipitated seven major polypeptides with approximate molecular weights (X 10/sup 3/) of 94, 68, 45, 40 to 32, 22, and 16. The antigens of molecular weights (X 10/sup 3/) of 94, 40 to 32, 22, and 16 were shown to be exposed on the parasite surface by interaction of the antibodies with intact labeled schistosomula. Sera from several strains of infected inbred mice precipitated the same polypeptides. The antibodies produced during chronic infection were found to be stimulated by adult worms since sera from 6-week-infected animals precipitated none of the surface antigens, and the pattern produced by precipitation with antibodies from a mouse infected with male worms only was indistinguishable from the pattern obtained with sera from mice with bisexual infections. Antibodies from mice immunized with highly irradiated cercariae reproducibly precipitated major polypeptides of approximately (X 10/sup 3/) 94, 68, 45, 32, 22, 19, and 15 daltons. The antigens of (X 10/sup 3/) 94, 43, 32, 22, and 15 daltons were shown to be exposed on the parasite surface by interaction of the antibodies with intact labeled schistosomula. The 15 X 10(3)-dalton surface protein was recognized by sera from vaccinated, but not chronically infected, mice, suggesting that it represents a stage-specific immunogen present on schistosomula but not on adult worms. Sera from two inbred strains of mice which develop different degrees of immunity recognized the same antigens.

  3. Human MHC class I antigens are associated with a 90-kDa cell surface protein.

    PubMed

    Ferm, M T; Grönberg, A

    1991-08-01

    Human MHC class I proteins are expressed on almost all nucleated cells as a heavy chain (about 45 kDa) non-covalently associated with beta 2-microglobulin (12 kDa). In this report we show that MHC class I (MHC-I) proteins can also be associated with a 90-kDa protein in the cell membrane. Surface-radiolabelled cells were treated with dithiobis succinimidyl propionate (DSP) in order to preserve multimer protein complexes during cell lysis. The lysates were immunoprecipitated and analysed by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. Immunoprecipitation of human MHC-I proteins co-precipitated another protein of about 90 kDa in molecular weight-p90. p90 was coprecipitated from all the MHC-I expressing cells tested: U937, Raji, Molt-4 and IFN-gamma treated K562, but not from untreated, MHC-I negative K562. A 90-kDa protein was also co-precipitated with MHC-I from fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Furthermore, p90 was coprecipitated by different MoAbs to the MHC-I heavy chain or beta 2-microglobulin, but not by control antibodies. Two additional co-precipitating proteins at 34 kDa and 28 kDa were seen in MHC-I precipitates from Raji cells. Our results suggest that MHC-I proteins and the 90-kDa protein are associated in the cell membrane, probably by a close but weak, non-covalent interaction. Two additional cell surface proteins at 34 kDa and 28 kDa seem to be MHC-I associated on Raji Burkitt's lymphoma cells.

  4. The Effect of Testosterone Replacement Therapy on Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Levels in Men Being Treated for Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Kang, De-Ying; Li, Hong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Testosterone replacement therapy is used for the treatment of age-related male hypogonadism, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a primary screening tool for prostate cancer. The systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to determine the effect of testosterone replacement therapy on PSA levels. Medline, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases were searched until February 28, 2014, and inclusion criteria were as follows: randomized controlled trial; intervention group received testosterone/androgen replacement therapy; control group did not receive treatment; and no history of prostate cancer. The primary outcome was change of PSA level between before and after treatment. Secondary outcomes were elevated PSA level after treatment, and the number of patients who developed prostate cancer. After initially identifying 511 articles, 15 studies with a total of 739 patients that received testosterone replacement and 385 controls were included. The duration of treatment ranged from 3 to 12 months. Patients treated with testosterone tended to have higher PSA levels, and thus a greater change than those that received control treatments (difference in means of PSA levels = 0.154, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.069 to 0.238, P < 0.001). The difference in means of PSA levels were significant higher for patients that received testosterone intramuscularly (IM) than controls (difference in means of PSA levels = 0.271, 95% CI 0.117–0.425, P = 0.001). Elevated PSA levels after treatment were similar between patients that received treatment and controls (odds ratio [OR] = 1.02, 95% CI 0.48–2.20, P = 0.953). Only 3 studies provided data with respect to the development of prostate cancer, and rates were similar between those that received treatment and controls. Testosterone replacement therapy does not increase PSA levels in men being treated for hypogonadism, except when it is given IM and even the increase with IM administration

  5. Age and Prostate-Specific Antigen Level Prior to Diagnosis Predict Risk of Death from Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    MacKintosh, F. Roy; Sprenkle, Preston C.; Walter, Louise C.; Rawson, Lori; Karnes, R. Jeffrey; Morrell, Christopher H.; Kattan, Michael W.; Nawaf, Cayce B.; Neville, Thomas B.

    2016-01-01

    A single early prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level has been correlated with a higher likelihood of prostate cancer diagnosis and death in younger men. PSA testing in older men has been considered of limited utility. We evaluated prostate cancer death in relation to age and PSA level immediately prior to prostate cancer diagnosis. Using the Veterans Affairs database, we identified 230,081 men aged 50–89 years diagnosed with prostate cancer and at least one prior PSA test between 1999 and 2009. Prostate cancer-specific death over time was calculated for patients stratified by age group (e.g., 50–59 years, through 80–89 years) and PSA range at diagnosis (10 ranges) using Kaplan–Meier methods. Risk of 10-year prostate cancer mortality across age and PSA was compared using log-rank tests with a Bonferroni adjustment for multiple testing. 10.5% of men diagnosed with prostate cancer died of cancer during the 10-year study period (mean follow-up = 3.7 years). Higher PSA values prior to diagnosis predict a higher risk of death in all age groups (p < 0.0001). Within the same PSA range, older age groups are at increased risk for death from prostate cancer (p < 0.0001). For PSA of 7–10 ng/mL, cancer-specific death, 10 years after diagnosis, increased from 7% for age 50–59 years to 51% for age 80–89 years. Men older than 70 years are more likely to die of prostate cancer at any PSA level than younger men, suggesting prostate cancer remains a significant problem among older men (even those aged 80+) and deserves additional study. PMID:27446803

  6. Salvage Radiotherapy for Rising Prostate-Specific Antigen Levels After Radical Prostatectomy for Prostate Cancer: Dose-Response Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Johnny Ray; Buskirk, Steven J.; Heckman, Michael G.; Diehl, Nancy N.; Ko, Stephen J.; Macdonald, Orlan K.; Schild, Steven E.; Pisansky, Thomas M.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association between external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) dose and biochemical failure (BcF) of prostate cancer in patients who received salvage prostate bed EBRT for a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level after radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: We evaluated patients with a rising PSA level after prostatectomy who received salvage EBRT between July 1987 and October 2007. Patients receiving pre-EBRT androgen suppression were excluded. Cox proportional hazards models were used to investigate the association between EBRT dose and BcF. Dose was considered as a numeric variable and as a categoric variable (low, <64.8 Gy; moderate, 64.8-66.6 Gy; high, >66.6 Gy). Results: A total of 364 men met study selection criteria and were followed up for a median of 6.0 years (range, 0.1-19.3 years). Median pre-EBRT PSA level was 0.6 ng/mL. The estimated cumulative rate of BcF at 5 years after EBRT was 50% overall and 57%, 46%, and 39% for the low-, moderate-, and high-dose groups, respectively. In multivariable analysis adjusting for potentially confounding variables, there was evidence of a linear trend between dose and BcF, with risk of BcF decreasing as dose increased (relative risk [RR], 0.77 [5.0-Gy increase]; p = 0.05). Compared with the low-dose group, there was evidence of a decreased risk of BcF for the high-dose group (RR, 0.60; p = 0.04), but no difference for the moderate-dose group (RR, 0.85; p = 0.41). Conclusions: Our results suggest a dose response for salvage EBRT. Doses higher than 66.6 Gy result in decreased risk of BcF.

  7. Increasing level of prostate-specific antigen and prostate cancer risk factors among 193 men examined in screening procedure.

    PubMed

    Opalińska, Edyta; Michalak, Anna; Stoma, Filip; Latalski, Maciej; Goniewicz, Mariusz

    2003-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men, therefore has become recently an essential problem of public health. The factors influencing cancer include: androgens metabolism disorders, diabetes mellitus, overweight and obesity, smoking, alcohol and black coffee intake, diet rich in saturated fats and poor in unsaturated, lack of physical activity, geographical zone, race, such carcinogenic substances as: cadmium, materials used in rubber, painting, printing, ship industry etc., contagious factors and also older age and a positive family history of the disease. To diagnose prostate cancer in its early stage such screening procedures as physical examination--digital rectal exam (DRE) and determination of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level in blood serum are used. The aim of the study was to assess prostate cancer risk factors occurrence in the examined 193 men, aged 50-70 years, who reported to urology outpatient department at Clinical Hospital in Lublin, measure the PSA level in blood serum and examine the correlation between them. Respondents filled in a questionnaire about the presence of prostate cancer risk factors and urogenital symptoms. The questionnaire was completed with DRE and PSA measurement. The results led us to the following conclusions: 1/ in the studied population elevated PSA level is determined in 3.1% of 193 examined men, 2/ increased PSA occurs mainly in men from rural areas, with elementary education, divorced, older (>60 years), using fat-rich diet, smokers, black coffee drinkers, with overweight or obesity and non diabetic, 3/ a combination of PSA test with DRE seems to be useful and rather cheap for the detection of prostate cancer in the early stage of its development.

  8. Hepatitis B core-related antigen levels are associated with response to entecavir and peginterferon add-on therapy in hepatitis B e antigen-positive chronic hepatitis B patients.

    PubMed

    van Campenhout, M J H; Brouwer, W P; van Oord, G W; Xie, Q; Zhang, Q; Zhang, N; Guo, S; Tabak, F; Streinu-Cercel, A; Wang, J; Pas, S D; Sonneveld, M J; de Knegt, R J; Boonstra, A; Hansen, B E; Janssen, H L A

    2016-06-01

    Hepatitis B core-related antigen (HBcrAg), a new serum marker, may be useful in monitoring chronic hepatitis B infection. HBcrAg was measured in 175 hepatitis B e antigen-positive patients treated with entecavir (ETV) with or without peginterferon (PEG-IFN) add-on therapy. Decline in HBcrAg was stronger in patients with vs. without combined response (ETV: -3.22 vs. -1.71 log U/mL, p <0.001; PEG-IFN add-on: -3.16 vs. -1.83 IU/mL, p <0.001) and in patients with vs. without hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) response (ETV: -2.60 vs. -1.74 log U/mL, p <0.001; PEG-IFN add-on: -2.38 vs. -2.15 log U/mL, p = 0.31). HBcrAg was associated with combined response (adjusted odds ratio 0.3, 95% confidence interval 0.2-0.5, p <0.001), but was not superior to quantitative HBsAg (qHBsAg).

  9. Expression of the carcinoma markers: the sialylated Lewis A and X carbohydrate antigens in normal laryngeal surface epithelium and submucosal glands from old humans.

    PubMed

    Kirkeby, Svend; Moe, Dennis

    2013-03-01

    Aberrant surface expression of the carbohydrate ABH and Lewis antigens are often used as markers for the diagnosis of cancer, but while the distribution of these histo-blood group antigens is relatively well-described in tissues and organs from young and middle-aged humans little is known of their expression in old age. The objective for this study was to estimate if the Lewis A and X antigens together with their sialylated modifications, are expressed in sections of normal laryngeal tissue from old humans. Antibodies directed against the tumor markers Sialyl Lewis A and Sialyl Lewis X showed positive reaction in the surface epithelia from normal larynx autopsies obtained from people aged 77-90 years. The sialylated and non-sialylated Lewis A antigens were more frequently expressed in the pseudostratified epithelium than in squamous surface epithelium. Both the sialylated and the non-sialylated carbohydrates were stained in the submucosal glands in all the autopsies. In conclusion, visualization of Lewis tumor markers in the larynx should be interpreted with great care, as they may be present in normal laryngeal epithelial cells from old humans.

  10. HIV-1 adaptation to antigen processing results in population-level immune evasion and affects subtype diversification.

    PubMed

    Tenzer, Stefan; Crawford, Hayley; Pymm, Phillip; Gifford, Robert; Sreenu, Vattipally B; Weimershaus, Mirjana; de Oliveira, Tulio; Burgevin, Anne; Gerstoft, Jan; Akkad, Nadja; Lunn, Daniel; Fugger, Lars; Bell, John; Schild, Hansjörg; van Endert, Peter; Iversen, Astrid K N

    2014-04-24

    The recent HIV-1 vaccine failures highlight the need to better understand virus-host interactions. One key question is why CD8(+) T cell responses to two HIV-Gag regions are uniquely associated with delayed disease progression only in patients expressing a few rare HLA class I variants when these regions encode epitopes presented by ~30 more common HLA variants. By combining epitope processing and computational analyses of the two HIV subtypes responsible for ~60% of worldwide infections, we identified a hitherto unrecognized adaptation to the antigen-processing machinery through substitutions at subtype-specific motifs. Multiple HLA variants presenting epitopes situated next to a given subtype-specific motif drive selection at this subtype-specific position, and epitope abundances correlate inversely with the HLA frequency distribution in affected populations. This adaptation reflects the sum of intrapatient adaptations, is predictable, facilitates viral subtype diversification, and increases global HIV diversity. Because low epitope abundance is associated with infrequent and weak T cell responses, this most likely results in both population-level immune evasion and inadequate responses in most people vaccinated with natural HIV-1 sequence constructs. Our results suggest that artificial sequence modifications at subtype-specific positions in vitro could refocus and reverse the poor immunogenicity of HIV proteins.

  11. Improved cell mediated immune responses after successful re-vaccination of non-responders to the hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) vaccine using the combined hepatitis A and B vaccine.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Jessica; Cardell, Kristina; Björnsdottir, Thora Björg; Fryden, Aril; Hultgren, Catharina; Sällberg, Matti

    2008-11-01

    We successfully re-vaccinated hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine non-responders using a double dose of the combined hepatitis A virus (HAV) and HBV vaccine. The hope was to improve priming of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-specific cell mediated immune response (CMI) by an increased antigen dose and a theoretical adjuvant-effect from the local presence of a HAV-specific CMI. A few non-responders had a detectable HBsAg-specific CMI before re-vaccination. An in vitro detectable HBsAg-specific CMI was primed equally effective in non-responders (58%) as in first time vaccine recipients (68%). After the third dose a weak, albeit significant, association was observed between the magnitude of HBsAg-specific proliferation and anti-HBs levels. This regimen improves the priming of HBsAg-specific CMIs and antibodies.

  12. Modulation by glycyrrhizin of the cell-surface expression of H-2 class I antigens on murine tumour cell lines and normal cell populations.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y H; Yoshida, T; Isobe, K; Rahman, S M; Nagase, F; Ding, L; Nakashima, I

    1990-01-01

    Glycyrrhizin (GL), a saponin fraction of licorice with defined chemical structure, was shown to display a definite action in vitro augmenting the cell-surface expression of H-2 class I antigens as well as class I gene transcription on various tumour cell lines. The magnitude of augmentation was varied among eight different cell lines tested, but reached more than three times. It was also found that GL enhanced the expression of H-2Dd antigens in some normal cell populations in vivo. The augmentation of H-2 class I antigens on tumour cell lines in vitro was probably not mediated by the interferon, which might have been produced by the cultured cells. These findings may suggest a new immunopharmacological action of GL. Images Figure 4 PMID:1696243

  13. Vaccination with recombinant Parasite Surface Antigen 2 from Leishmania major induces a Th1 type of immune response but does not protect against infection.

    PubMed

    Sjölander, A; Baldwin, T M; Curtis, J M; Bengtsson, K L; Handman, E

    1998-12-01

    Vaccination with the native Parasite Surface Antigen 2 of Leishmania major with Corynebacterium parvum as adjuvant protects mice from leishmaniasis through a Th1 mediated response. Here we show that vaccination with a recombinant form of this protein, purified from Escherichia coli and administered in iscoms or with C. parvum as adjuvant, does not induce protective immunity despite the induction of Th1 responses. The results suggest that protective immunity depends on the ability of the vaccinating antigen to induce Th1-like T cells with ability to be recalled by infection. Therefore, the conformation of antigens may play a more major role for the induction of T cell mediated immunity than originally considered. PMID:9796067

  14. Opium consumption is negatively associated with serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), free PSA, and percentage of free PSA levels.

    PubMed

    Safarinejad, Mohammad Reza; Asgari, Seyyed Alaeddin; Farshi, Alireza; Iravani, Shahrokh; Khoshdel, Alireza; Shekarchi, Babak

    2013-01-01

    Addiction to opium continues to be a major worldwide medical and social problem. The study addressing the association between opium consumption and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level is lacking. We determined the effects of opium consumption on serum PSA levels in opium-addict men. Our study subjects comprised 438 opium-addict men with a mean age of 52.2 ± 6.4 years (group 1). We compared these men with 446 men who did not indicate current or past opium use (group 2). Serum total PSA (tPSA), free PSA (fPSA), % fPSA, and sex hormones were compared between the 2 groups. The mean serum tPSA level was significantly lower in group 1 (1.05 ng/mL) than in controls (1.45 ng/mL) (P = 0.001). Opium consumption was also associated with lower fPSA (P = 0.001) and % fPSA (P = 0.001). Serum free testosterone level in opium-addict patients (132.5 ± 42 pg/mL) was significantly lower than that in controls (156.2 ± 43 pg/mL) (P = 0.03). However, no significant correlation existed between tPSA and free testosterone levels (r = 0.28, 95% CI, -0.036 to 0.51, P = 0.34). Among the patients with cancer in group 1, 35% were found to have high-grade tumor (Gleason score ≥ 7) compared with 26.7% in group 2 (P = 0.02). Total PSA and fPSA were strongly correlated with duration of opium use (r = -0.06, 95% CI, -0.04 to -0.08, P = 0.0001; and r = -0.05, 95% CI, -0.03 to -0.07, P = 0.0001, respectively). Opium consumption is independently and negatively associated with serum tPSA, fPSA, and % fPSA levels.

  15. Plasma membrane-associated antigens on tumor cells derived from transitional-cell carcinoma of the human urinary bladder. II. Identification at the molecular level of plasma membrane-associated antigens.

    PubMed

    Schneider, M U; Paulie, S; Troye, M; Perlmann, P

    1980-08-01

    The surface proteins of seven human cell lines (three bladder carcinomas (TCC), two normal urothelial lines, one colon carcinoma, and one malignant melanoma) were labelled with 125I by the glucose oxidase-lactoperoxidase technique. Plasma membranes of the cells were isolated and analysed by sodium dodecyl sulphate electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). When analysed under reducing conditions by staining with protein stain, approximately 45 distinct membrane polypeptides were detected in all membrane preparations. Although the banding patterns for all cell lines were very similar, a 23 K and a 110 K band were only seen in the five unrothelial lines. When the same gels were analysed by autoradiography, between 13 and 17 bands were detected for each of the cell lines. However, in this case, analysis revealed individual and stable banding profiles for each. One 180 K band and one 100 K band were only seen in the autoradiographs of the two normal lines but not in those of the tumor membranes. Analysis under non-reducing conditions gave similar results. The antigenicity of these surface components was analysed by incubating detergent extracts of surface-iodinated cells with IgG from a rabbit anti-TCC serum, absorbed with fetal bovine serum and bound to protein A (from Staphylococcus aureus) on a matrix of Sepharose 4B. Analysis of the eluates by autoradiography after SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions showed that many of the labelled polypeptides were antigenic and shared by all seven cell lines. Analysis of eluates from IgG preparations, exhaustively absorbed with human spleen, revealed the presence of at least one antigenic 110 K polypeptide confined to the membrane of the urothelial cells. Preparation of a rabbit antiserum to this 110 K component, isolated from one of the TCC-lines and tested by ADCC, indicated that this polypeptide constitutes an important surface antigen, present on urothelial cells of both TCC- and normal origin but absent from the colon carcinoma and

  16. Unexpected interference in cell surface staining by monoclonal antibodies to unrelated antigens.

    PubMed

    De Vita, Martina; Catzola, Valentina; Buzzonetti, Alexia; Fossati, Marco; Battaglia, Alessandra; Zamai, Loris; Fattorossi, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    Background: The possible occurrence of an erroneous immunophenotyping due to interference between monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) is often overlooked when the epitopes are assumed to be not close to each other. This is particularly important when exploring immune cell populations whose identification is still investigational. The commonly held view is that myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) can be identified as either HLA-DR(neg) (/dim) cells or interleukin-4 receptor-α (CD124)(+) cells among peripheral blood monocytes. We made the serendipitous observation that the fluorescence signal provided by the PE-CD124 MoAb was attenuated when the PE-CF594-HLA-DR MoAb was added to the staining tube. Methods: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy donors were stained with the PE-CD124 MoAb and, as control, PE -CD40, -CD4 and -CD14, and either the PE-CF594-HLA-DR MoAb or its unlabeled form. B cells, which also express CD124, were analyzed for comparison. Results: The PE-CF594-HLA-DR MoAb but not its unlabeled form reduced PE-CD124 MoAb staining on monocytes and B cells. No other monocyte and B cell surface marker staining was affected by the PE-CF594-HLA-DR MoAb. The PE-CF594-HLA-DR MoAb interfered with the PE-CD124 MoAb likely because of steric hindrance by bulky fluorochromes, although a quenching due to fluorescence resonance energy transfer might also cooperate to the PE-CD124 MoAb staining attenuation. Conclusions: Present observations highlight the importance of interference between MoAbs as a source of error when analyzing multicolor flow cytometry data. © 2014 Clinical Cytometry Society. PMID:25270399

  17. Structural characterization of the N-glycans of a recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen derived from yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Ip, C.C.Y.; Miller, W.J.; Kubek, D.J. ); Strang, A.M.; van Halbeek, H. ); Piesecki, S.J.; Alhadeff, J.A. )

    1992-01-14

    The N-glycans of purified recombinant middle surface protein (preS2+S) from hepatitis B virus, a candidate vaccine antigen expressed in a mnn9 mutant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have been characterized structurally. The glycans were released by N-glycanase treatment, isolated by size-exclusion chromatography on Sephadex G-50 and Bio-Gel P-4 columns, and analyzed by 500-MHz {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. The mixture of oligosaccharides was fractionated by HPLC, the major subfractions were isolated, and their carbohydrate compositions were determined by high-pH anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection. The combined results suggest that high-mannose oligosaccharides account for all the N-glycans released from preS2+S: structures include Man{sub 7}GlcNAc{sub 2}, Man{sub 8}GlcNAc{sub 2} isomers in the ratios of 3:6:1. Approximately 80% of the oligosaccharides contain the C2, C6-branched trimannosyl structural element typical of yeast high-mannose oligosaccharides but not usually found in high-mannose oligosaccharides in animal glycoproteins.

  18. [Comparison of adsorbent with varying arm length and ligand density for the purification of recombinant hepatitis B virus surface antigen].

    PubMed

    Li, Rui-Hong; Li, Yan; Bi, Jing-Xiu; Zhao, Lan; Zhou, Wei-Bin; Huang, Yong-Dong; Zhang, Yan; Sun, Li-Jing; Wang, Hua-Jun; Su, Zhi-Guo

    2007-07-01

    Novel hydrophobic absorbents were synthesized by immobilizing butyl derivative onto the highly cross-linked agarose beads manufatured in China, which are used as matrix. The effect of the spacer arm length (3C, 8C and 10C) and ligand density (from 13 to 45 micromol/mL) on the hydrophobicity were investigated using purified Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) expressed by CHO cell lines. Also considering the effects of salt concentration and pH on HBsAg recovery and purification factor, orthogonal experiment design method was used to evaluated the absorbents. The results showed the butyl-S absorbent with the spacer arm length of C8, the ligand density of 22 micromol/mL gel showed the best performance for the separation of HBsAg. Approximately 100% HBsAg recovery and 60 as purification fold were achieved by this media under the operating condition of pH 7.0 and 9% of salt concentrateion.

  19. Brucella outer membrane lipoprotein shares antigenic determinants with Escherichia coli Braun lipoprotein and is exposed on the cell surface.

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Miguel, M J; Moriyón, I; López, J

    1987-01-01

    In an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), purified Brucella abortus and Escherichia coli peptidoglycan-linked lipoproteins gave a strong cross-reaction with sera from rabbits hyperimmunized with the heterologous lipoprotein. When smooth E. coli cells were used as ELISA antigens, the immunological cross-reaction was not observed unless the cells were treated to remove lipopolysaccharide and other outer membrane components. In contrast, intact cells from smooth strains of B. abortus and Brucella melitensis bound anti-lipoprotein immunoglobulin G, and the controls performed by ELISA showed that this reaction was not due to antibodies to the lipopolysaccharide, group 3 outer membrane proteins, or porins. Electron microscopy of cells labeled with antilipoprotein serum and protein A-colloidal gold showed specific labeling of smooth cells from both B. abortus and B. melitensis, even though unspecific labeling by nonimmune serum was observed with rough B. abortus. These results confirm the close similarity between E. coli and Brucella peptidoglycan-linked lipoproteins and show that, in contrast to E. coli, the lipoprotein of B. abortus and B. melitensis is partially exposed on the surface of smooth cells. Images PMID:2432014

  20. Surface antigens on cat leukemic cells induced by feline leukemia virus: area density and antibody-binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Boone, C W; Gordin, F; Kawakami, T G

    1973-04-01

    The binding of autologous bovine antibody to feline leukemia virus-induced cell surface antigens (FeCSA) on cat leukemia cells was studied by performing certain titration procedures with a mixture of immune and normal sera labeled with different iodine radioisotopes (paired-label technique). By using plots of titration data which conformed to linear equations derived from the mass action law, we determined the following constants. (i) The density of FeCSA was 2.03 x 10(6) sites per cell, or 5,230 sites per mum(2). (ii) The equilibrium constant of the FeCSA-antibody reaction was 2.67 x 10(7), from which the antibody binding affinity or standard free energy of the FeCSA-antibody bond was determined to be - 10.48 kcal (-43,869.28 J) per mol. The use of the techniques described to measure the concentration of antibody in antiserum, in micrograms per milliliter, is discussed.

  1. Pectinesterase Inhibitor from Jelly Fig (Ficus awkeotsang Makino) Achene Inhibits Surface Antigen Expression by Human Hepatitis B Virus

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Chuen; Jiang, Chii-Ming; Chen, Yu-Jen; Chen, Yu-Yawn

    2013-01-01

    Pectinesterase inhibitor (PEI) isolated from jelly fig (Ficus awkeotsang Makino) is an edible component of a popular drink consumed in Asia. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is prevalent in Asia, and current treatments for HBV infection need improvement. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of PEI on the surface antigen expression by HBV (HBsAg). Human hepatoma cell lines Hep3B and Huh7 served as in vitro models for assessing the cytotoxicity and HBsAg expression. A culture of primary hepatocytes cultured from mice served as the normal counterpart. Cell viability was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay. HBsAg expression was evaluated by measuring HBsAg secretion into the culture medium using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed that PEI did not affect the viability of the human hepatoma cell lines or primary mouse hepatocytes. PEI inhibited the expression of HBsAg in hepatoma cell lines harboring endogenous (Hep3B) and integrated (Huh7) HBV genomes in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, thus implicating a universal activity against HBV gene expression. In conclusion, it suggests that PEI from jelly fig inhibits the expression of human HBsAg in host cells without toxic effects on normal primary hepatocytes. PMID:24302965

  2. Pectinesterase Inhibitor from Jelly Fig (Ficus awkeotsang Makino) Achene Inhibits Surface Antigen Expression by Human Hepatitis B Virus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Chuen; Jiang, Chii-Ming; Chen, Yu-Jen; Chen, Yu-Yawn

    2013-01-01

    Pectinesterase inhibitor (PEI) isolated from jelly fig (Ficus awkeotsang Makino) is an edible component of a popular drink consumed in Asia. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is prevalent in Asia, and current treatments for HBV infection need improvement. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of PEI on the surface antigen expression by HBV (HBsAg). Human hepatoma cell lines Hep3B and Huh7 served as in vitro models for assessing the cytotoxicity and HBsAg expression. A culture of primary hepatocytes cultured from mice served as the normal counterpart. Cell viability was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay. HBsAg expression was evaluated by measuring HBsAg secretion into the culture medium using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed that PEI did not affect the viability of the human hepatoma cell lines or primary mouse hepatocytes. PEI inhibited the expression of HBsAg in hepatoma cell lines harboring endogenous (Hep3B) and integrated (Huh7) HBV genomes in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, thus implicating a universal activity against HBV gene expression. In conclusion, it suggests that PEI from jelly fig inhibits the expression of human HBsAg in host cells without toxic effects on normal primary hepatocytes. PMID:24302965

  3. Europium nanoparticle-based simple to perform dry-reagent immunoassay for the detection of hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Talha, Sheikh M; Salminen, Teppo; Juntunen, Etvi; Spangar, Anni; Gurramkonda, Chandrasekhar; Vuorinen, Tytti; Khanna, Navin; Pettersson, Kim

    2016-03-01

    Hepatitis B infection, caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV), presents a huge global health burden. Serological diagnosis of HBV mainly relies on the detection of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Although there are high sensitivity commercial HBsAg enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) available, many low-resource laboratories lacking trained technicians continue to use rapid point-of-care assays with low sensitivities for HBsAg detection, due to their simplicity to operate. We developed a time-resolved fluorometric dry-reagent HBsAg immunoassay which meets the detection limit of high sensitivity EIAs but is simple to operate. To develop the assay, anti-HBsAg monoclonal antibody coated on europium nanoparticles was dried atop of biotinylated anti-HBsAg polyclonal antibody immobilized on streptavidin-coated microtiter wells. To test a sample in dry-reagent assay, serum sample and assay buffer were added to the wells, incubated, washed and europium signals were measured. The assay showed a detection limit of 0.25 ng/ml using HBsAg spiked in serum sample. When evaluated with 24 HBV positive and 37 negative serum samples, assay showed 100% sensitivity and specificity. Assay wells are stable for at least 26 weeks when stored at 4°C, and can tolerate elevated temperatures of up to 35°C for two weeks. The developed assay has high potential to be used in low-resource laboratories.

  4. Correlation of the Serum Level of Carcinoembryonic Antigen and Prolactin with Different Stages of Colorectal Carcinoma According to Dukes' Staging.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M R; Sheikh, S H; Lima, I J; Islam, M R; Faisal, M; Islam, M S; Faruk, M O; Jalal, M T

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is well established tumor marker for colorectal cancers worldwide. Recent studies show that serum prolactin level is also raised in colorectal cancers. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the correlation of serum CEA and Prolactin with Dukes' staging of colorectal carcinomas. Between January 2013 and June 2013, Serum CEA and Serum Prolactin were measured by radioimmunoassay from 103 patients who were histopathologically diagnosed as colorectal carcinomas. Evaluation of the stages of the colorectal cancers was done on the basis of preoperative investigations and postoperative histopathology and correlated with Preoperative Serum CEA and Serum Prolactin. Results were presented as median value, range and percentage. Male to female ratio was 1.4:1 with median age of 42.26 years (range 17-78 years). Most of the patients in this series presented with carcinoma rectum (42%). Most of the patients (52%) were found in Dukes' stage C and 27% and 15% cases were found as Dukes' stage B and Dukes' stage D respectively. Stage of the disease is directly proportionate to percentage of the patient with high serum prolactin except early stage (Dukes' A-50%, Dukes' B-28.6%, Dukes' C-33.3% & Dukes' D-46.7%). Similarly serum CEA level is directly proportionate to tumor stage (Dukes' A-0%, Dukes' B-32%, Dukes' C-40.7% & Dukes' D-74.7%). A preoperative high serum CEA value suggests advanced disease either locally or with distant metastasis. In contrast preoperative high serum prolactin (hyperprolactinaemia) did not suggest advanced disease as it can be elevated even in early stage of disease. Serum CEA and Serum Prolactin both are valuable tumor markers but serum CEA could not be replaced by serum Prolactin. Serum Prolactin may be a helpful marker in earlier stages of the colorectal cancer.

  5. The membrane IgM-associated proteins MB-1 and Ig-beta are sufficient to promote surface expression of a partially functional B-cell antigen receptor in a nonlymphoid cell line.

    PubMed

    Matsuuchi, L; Gold, M R; Travis, A; Grosschedl, R; DeFranco, A L; Kelly, R B

    1992-04-15

    The B-cell antigen receptors consist of membrane immunoglobulins (mIgs) noncovalently associated with two accessory proteins, MB-1 and Ig-beta. We used transfection into a nonlymphoid cell line to test whether MB-1 and Ig-beta were sufficient to promote cell surface expression of mIgM capable of signal transduction. Expression of MB-1 and Ig-beta, but not MB-1 alone, allowed high-level surface expression of mIgM in the AtT20 endocrine cell line, which presumably lacks other B-cell-specific components. The reconstituted antigen receptor was capable of mediating some of the signaling reactions characteristic of mIgM in B lymphocytes. Crosslinking mIgM on transfected AtT20 cells stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of MB-1 and Ig-beta and also increased the amount of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity that could be precipitated with anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies. When total cell lysates were analyzed by anti-phosphotyrosine immunoblotting, however, no induced phosphorylation of more abundant proteins was detected. Moreover, crosslinking of the receptor in AtT20 cells did not stimulate inositol phospholipid breakdown. Thus, the transfected B-cell antigen receptor could initiate some signal transduction events but AtT20 cells may lack components required for other signaling events associated with mIgM.

  6. A siphon gage for monitoring surface-water levels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCobb, T.D.; LeBlanc, D.R.; Socolow, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    A device that uses a siphon tube to establish a hydraulic connection between the bottom of an onshore standpipe and a point at the bottom of a water body was designed and tested for monitoring surface-water levels. Water is added to the standpipe to a level sufficient to drive a complete slug of water through the siphoning tube and to flush all air out of the system. The water levels in the standpipe and the water body equilibrate and provide a measurable static water surface in the standpipe. The siphon gage was designed to allow quick and accurate year-round measurements with minimal maintenance. Currently available devices for monitoring surface-water levels commonly involve time-consuming and costly installation and surveying, and the movement of reference points and the presence of ice cover in cold regions cause discontinuity and inaccuracy in the data collected. Installation and field testing of a siphon gage using 0.75-in-diameter polyethylene tubing at Ashumet Pond in Falmouth, Massachusetts, demonstrated that the siphon gage can provide long-term data with a field effort and accuracy equivalent to measurement of ground-water levels at an observation well.A device that uses a siphon tube to establish a hydraulic connection between the bottom of an onshore standpipe and a point at the bottom of a water body was designed and tested for monitoring surface-water levels. Water is added to the standpipe to a level sufficient to drive a complete slug of water through the siphoning tube and to flush all air out of the system. The water levels in the standpipe and the water body equilibrate and provide a measurable static water surface in the standpipe. The siphon gage was designed to allow quick and accurate year-round measurements with minimal maintenance. Currently available devices for monitoring surface-water levels commonly involve time-consuming and costly installation and surveying, and the movement of reference points and the presence of ice cover in cold

  7. Electroforming for replicating nanometer-level smooth surface.

    PubMed

    Mimura, Hidekazu; Ishikura, Hiroyuki; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Sano, Yasuhisa; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2011-04-01

    We proposed and developed a new electroforming process for the replication of surfaces having nanometer-level smoothness. In the electroforming process, the separation method plays an important role in preventing the degradation of the surface morphology. The key point in this process is the fabrication of a metal film as an electrode on the master surface. Cr atoms are deposited by an arc plasma deposition method and act as a binding material. Subsequently, a nickel film is fabricated by electron beam deposition to form an electrode. Electrodeposition is then carried out in a nickel sulfamate bath. By controlling the density of Cr atoms on the master surface, the binding strength between the nickel film and master surface can be adjusted, which makes it possible to separate the metal film from the master surface smoothly. As a result, a surface roughness of 0.22 nm (root mean square) has been achieved in a 64 microm x 48 microm area of a replicated surface. PMID:21776648

  8. Surface-exposed antigenic cleavage fragments of Neisseria gonorrhoeae proteins 1A and IB.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, S; Layh, G; Buchanan, T B

    1986-01-01

    Whole bacteria, isolated outer membranes, and purified protein I (PI) from one transparent (O-) and two different opaque (O+) phenotype gonococcal strains (serogroups I, II, and III; PI serotypes 1, 5, and 9b) were each treated with tolylsulfonyl phenylalanyl chloromethyl ketone-trypsin, alpha-chymotrypsin, and proteinase K. Protein IA (PIA) of strain 7122 (O-, serotype 1, serogroup I) was resistant to proteolysis by tolysulfonyl phenylalanyl chloromethyl ketone-trypsin and alpha-chymotrypsin and only slightly affected by proteinase K, as long as it was associated with intact bacteria or isolated outer membranes. Purified PIA however was cleaved by these enzymes, resulting in two to five fragments. In contrast, all preparations of strains 5766 opaque phenotype (O+, serotype 7, serogroup II) and 1955 (O+, serotype 9b, serogroup III) were accessible to proteolysis, resulting in cleavage fragments of PIB compatible to those described previously by O. Barrera and J. Swanson (Infect. Immun. 44:565-568, 1984), M. S. Blake et al. (Infect. Immun. 33:212-222, 1981), and Blake (in G. K. Schoolnik, ed., The Pathogenic Neisseriae, 1985). Our data indicated that the purified PIB fraction was more accessible to proteases than the PIBs of whole bacteria or outer membranes. The fragmentation pattern of PIA cleavage products were quite different from PIB fragments, consistent with the different structure of these two groups of PI molecules. Time-dependent cleavage experiments with proteases, i.e., alpha-chymotrypsin, indicated that PIA was subsequently cleaved into smaller fragments. Highly reactive monoclonal antibodies, each specific for a surface-exposed epitope of PIA of strain 7122 or PIB of strains 5766 and 1955, as assessed by coagglutination, Western blot, and immunofluorescence, were reacted with PIA and PIB cleavage fragments in Western blot experiments. All cleavage fragments of the purified PIA and PIB preparations with molecular weights of greater than or equal to 14

  9. Surface characterization of commercial oral implants on the nanometer level.

    PubMed

    Svanborg, Lory Melin; Andersson, Martin; Wennerberg, Ann

    2010-02-01

    Lately, there has been a growing interest in how the presence of nanometer structures on a bone integrated implant surface influences the healing process. Recent in vitro studies have revealed an increased osteoblast response to different nanophase surfaces. Some commercial implant brands claim their implants have nanometer structures. However, at present, there are no studies where the nano topography of today's commercially available oral implants has been investigated. The aim of this study was to characterize commercial oral implants on the nanometer level and to investigate whether or not the nanometer surface roughness was correlated to the more well-known micrometer roughness on the implants. Twelve different commercial screw-shaped oral implants with various surface modifications were examined using scanning electron microscopy and a white light interferometer. The interferometer is suitable for detection of nanoscale roughness in the vertical dimension; however, limitation exists on the horizontal due to the wavelength of the light. A 1 x 1 microm Gaussian filter was found to be useful for identifying nm roughness with respect to height deviation. The results demonstrated that an implant that was smooth on the micrometer level was not necessarily smooth on the nanometer level. Different structures in the nanometer scale was found on some of the implants, indicating that to fully understand the relationship between the properties of an implant surface and its osseointegration behavior, a characterization at the nanometer scale might be relevant.

  10. Efficient molecular surface generation using level-set methods.

    PubMed

    Can, Tolga; Chen, Chao-I; Wang, Yuan-Fang

    2006-12-01

    Molecules interact through their surface residues. Calculation of the molecular surface of a protein structure is thus an important step for a detailed functional analysis. One of the main considerations in comparing existing methods for molecular surface computations is their speed. Most of the methods that produce satisfying results for small molecules fail to do so for large complexes. In this article, we present a level-set-based approach to compute and visualize a molecular surface at a desired resolution. The emerging level-set methods have been used for computing evolving boundaries in several application areas from fluid mechanics to computer vision. Our method provides a uniform framework for computing solvent-accessible, solvent-excluded surfaces and interior cavities. The computation is carried out very efficiently even for very large molecular complexes with tens of thousands of atoms. We compared our method to some of the most widely used molecular visualization tools (Swiss-PDBViewer, PyMol, and Chimera) and our results show that we can calculate and display a molecular surface 1.5-3.14 times faster on average than all three of the compared programs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our method is able to detect all of the interior inaccessible cavities that can accommodate one or more water molecules. PMID:16621636

  11. Calculation of isotope-specific exemption levels for surface contamination.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Haruyuki; Hattori, Takatoshi

    2009-01-01

    Isotope-specific exemption levels for surface contamination are calculated for representative radionuclides in general nuclear power plants by developing a deterministic dose assessment model for surface contamination that can be applied to radiation, transport and waste safety, and a practical idea of judging exemption for gross surface contamination by measuring gross gamma-ray emission has been proposed. In the dose assessment model, the objects with surface contamination are classified into three types: manually handled, closely handled and remotely handled objects, and the exemption criteria are chosen to be 0.01mSv/yr in the case of using realistic exposure parameters and 1mSv/yr in the case of using low-probability exposure parameters in accordance with the IAEA Safety Standards Series No. RS-G-1.7. Taking into account the distribution area of surface contamination assumed in the dose assessment model, instead of using the evaluation area of 100cm(2) without variation, the exemption levels for gross surface contamination are found to be higher than those obtained by the conventional method for some radionuclides such as Mn-54, Co-60, Zn-65, Nb-94, Cs-134, Cs-137, Eu-152 and Eu-154.

  12. Automatic Measurement of Low Level Contamination on Concrete Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tachibana, M.; Itoh, H.; Shimada, T.; Yanagihara, S.

    2002-02-28

    Automatic measurement of radioactivity is necessary for considering cost effectiveness in final radiological survey of building structures in decommissioning nuclear facilities. The RAPID (radiation measuring pilot device for surface contamination) was developed to be applied to automatic measurement of low level contamination on concrete surfaces. The RAPID has a capability to measure contamination with detection limit of 0.14 Bq/cm2 for 60Co in 30 seconds of measurement time and its efficiency is evaluated to be 5 m2/h in a normal measurement option. It was confirmed that low level contamination on concrete surfaces could be surveyed by the RAPID efficiently compared with direct measurement by workers through its actual application.

  13. Physics of the Be(0001) surface core-level spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Feibelman, P.J.; Stumpf, R. )

    1994-12-15

    First-principles calculations for slabs as many as 13 layers thick show that the three surface core-level features observed on Be(0001) correspond to core-electron ionizations in its three outermost atomic layers. The calculations also imply that the experimental peak identified with core ionization in the bulk is a composite; theoretical core-ionization potentials for the fourth and deeper layers differ by as much as 90 meV. The sign and surprisingly large magnitudes of the Be(0001) surface core-level shifts (SCLS's) are attributed to unusually large surface-state contributions to the three outer layers' local densities of states. Both initial- and final-state effects are substantial in the SCLS's, and their contributions are additive.

  14. Probabilistic surface reconstruction of relative sea-level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choblet, Gael; Husson, Laurent; Bodin, Thomas; Capdeville, Yann

    2013-04-01

    Relative sea level is shaped by multiple processes (mantle dynamic topography, plate tectonics, glacio-isostatic adjustment, present day melting of continental ice, anthropogenic causes…), most of which induce spatial gradients in relative sea level fluctuations. The evaluation of the global mean sea level rise is a also a key variable to decipher sea level evolution. Tide gauges represent the only mean to monitor sea-level rise on the scale of the 20th century, while the high quality satellite altimetry era is too short to be immune from short-term fluctuations. Tide gauge data compiled by the Permanent Service for the Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) converts into local estimates of sea level rise. Classically, these in situ observations are averaged spatially in order to infer the global mean sea level trend. However, the strongly heterogeneous distribution of tide gauges (e.g. very sparse in the Southern hemisphere) makes this approach relatively prone to uncertainties, given that sea level rise strongly varies geographically. Last, the societal consequences for coastal communities raise the prominent need for local (rather than global) sea level estimates. An alternative is therefore to provide a global surface reconstruction of relative sea level leading to both local variations and a better constrained global average. Here, we propose such a model from tide gauge records using a probabilistic scheme based on the reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm (as described by Bodin et al., JGR, 2012 for the example of the Australian Moho). This method allows to infer both model and parameter space so that not only the functions within the model but also the number of functions itself are free to vary. This is particulalry relevant to the case of tide gauges that are unevenly distributed on the surface of the Earth and whose record lengths are strongly variable. In addition, Bayesian statistics leads to a probabilistic representation (rather than a best fitting

  15. Temporal differences in the activation of three classes of non-transmembrane protein tyrosine kinases following B-cell antigen receptor surface engagement.

    PubMed

    Saouaf, S J; Mahajan, S; Rowley, R B; Kut, S A; Fargnoli, J; Burkhardt, A L; Tsukada, S; Witte, O N; Bolen, J B

    1994-09-27

    We evaluated in WEHI 231 B cells the time-dependent responses of Lyn, Blk, Btk, Syk, and three members of the Jak family of protein tyrosine kinases following antibody-mediated surface engagement of the B-cell antigen receptor. Our results show that the enzyme activities of Lyn and Blk were stimulated within seconds of antigen receptor engagement and correlated with the initial tyrosine phosphorylation of the Ig alpha and Ig beta subunits of the B-cell antigen receptor. Btk enzyme activity was also transiently stimulated and was maximal at approximately 5 min after B-cell receptor surface binding. Syk activity gradually increased to a maximum at 10-30 min following receptor ligation and was found to parallel the association of Syk with the tyrosine phosphorylated Ig alpha and Ig beta subunits of the receptor. While the specific activities of the Jak1, Jak2, and Tyk2 protein tyrosine kinases were unaltered following B-cell receptor ligation, the abundance of Jak1 and Jak2 were increased 3- to 4-fold within 10 min of receptor engagement. These results demonstrate that multiple families of non-transmembrane protein tyrosine kinases are temporally regulated during the process of B-cell antigen receptor-initiated intracellular signal transduction. PMID:7524079

  16. Temporal differences in the activation of three classes of non-transmembrane protein tyrosine kinases following B-cell antigen receptor surface engagement.

    PubMed Central

    Saouaf, S J; Mahajan, S; Rowley, R B; Kut, S A; Fargnoli, J; Burkhardt, A L; Tsukada, S; Witte, O N; Bolen, J B

    1994-01-01

    We evaluated in WEHI 231 B cells the time-dependent responses of Lyn, Blk, Btk, Syk, and three members of the Jak family of protein tyrosine kinases following antibody-mediated surface engagement of the B-cell antigen receptor. Our results show that the enzyme activities of Lyn and Blk were stimulated within seconds of antigen receptor engagement and correlated with the initial tyrosine phosphorylation of the Ig alpha and Ig beta subunits of the B-cell antigen receptor. Btk enzyme activity was also transiently stimulated and was maximal at approximately 5 min after B-cell receptor surface binding. Syk activity gradually increased to a maximum at 10-30 min following receptor ligation and was found to parallel the association of Syk with the tyrosine phosphorylated Ig alpha and Ig beta subunits of the receptor. While the specific activities of the Jak1, Jak2, and Tyk2 protein tyrosine kinases were unaltered following B-cell receptor ligation, the abundance of Jak1 and Jak2 were increased 3- to 4-fold within 10 min of receptor engagement. These results demonstrate that multiple families of non-transmembrane protein tyrosine kinases are temporally regulated during the process of B-cell antigen receptor-initiated intracellular signal transduction. Images PMID:7524079

  17. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level, CEA ratio, and treatment outcome of rectal cancer patients receiving pre-operative chemoradiation and surgery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a prognostic factor for rectal cancer patients receiving pre-operative chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods Between 2000 and 2009, 138 patients with advanced rectal cancer receiving CRT before surgery at our hospital were retrospectively classified into 3 groups: pre-CRT CEA <6 ng/ml (group L; n = 87); pre-CRT CEA ≥ 6 ng/ml and post-CRT CEA <6 ng/ml (group H-L; n = 32); and both pre- and post-CRT CEA ≥ 6 ng/ml (group H-H; n = 19). CEA ratio (defined as post-CRT CEA divided by pre-CRT CEA), post-CRT CEA level and other factors were reviewed for prediction of pathologic complete response (pCR). Results Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) was better in groups L (69.0%) and H-L (74.5%) than in group H-H (44.9%) (p = 0.024). Pathologic complete response was observed in 19.5%, 21.9% and 5.3% of groups L, H-L and H-H respectively (p = 0.281). Multivariate analysis showed that ypN stage and pCR were independent prognostic factors for DFS and that post-CRT CEA level was independently predictive of pCR. As a whole, post-CRT CEA <2.61 ng/ml predicted pCR (sensitivity 76.0%; specificity 58.4%). For those with pre-CRT CEA ≥6 ng/ml, post-CRT CEA and CEA ratio both predicted pCR (sensitivity 87.5%, specificity 76.7%). Conclusions In patients with pre-CRT serum CEA ≥6 ng/ml, those with “normalized” CEA levels after CRT may have similar DFS to those with “normal” (<6 ng/ml) pre-CRT values. Post-CRT CEA level is a predictor for pCR, especially in those with pre-CRT CEA ≥6 ng/ml. PMID:23452434

  18. Successful Antiparasitic Treatment for Cysticercosis is Associated with a Fast and Marked Reduction of Circulating Antigen Levels in a Naturally Infected Pig Model.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Armando E; Bustos, Javier A; Garcia, Hector H; Rodriguez, Silvia; Zimic, Mirko; Castillo, Yesenia; Praet, Nicolas; Gabriël, Sarah; Gilman, Robert H; Dorny, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    Taenia solium cysticercosis is a common parasitic infection of humans and pigs. We evaluated the posttreatment evolution of circulating parasite-specific antigen titers in 693 consecutive blood samples from 50 naturally infected cysticercotic pigs, which received different regimes of antiparasitic drugs (N = 39, 7 groups), prednisone (N = 5), or controls (N = 6). Samples were collected from baseline to week 10 after treatment, when pigs were euthanized and carefully dissected at necropsy. Antigen levels decreased proportionally to the efficacy of treatment and correlated with the remaining viable cysts at necropsy (Pearson's p = 0.67, P = 0.000). A decrease of 5 times in antigen levels (logarithmic scale) compared with baseline was found in 20/26 pigs free of cysts at necropsy, compared with 1/24 of those who had persisting viable cysts (odds ratio [OR] = 76.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 8.1-3308.6, P < 0.001). Antigen monitoring reflects the course of infection in the pig. If a similar correlation exists in infected humans, this assay may provide a minimally invasive and easy monitoring assay to assess disease evolution and efficacy of antiparasitic treatment in human neurocysticercosis. PMID:26392159

  19. Stem Cell Physics. Laser Manipulation of Blood Types: Laser-Stripping-Away of Red Blood Cell Surface Antigens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2014-03-01

    A novel mechanism of importance for the transfusion medicine[2] is proposed. The interaction of ultrashort wavelength multilaser beams with the flowing blood thin films can lead to a conversion of blood types A, B, and AB into O type.[3] The stripping away of antigens is done by the scanning-multiple-lasers of a high repetition rate in the blue-purple frequency domain. The guiding-lasers are in the red-green frequency domain. The laser force, (parametric interaction with the antigen eigen-oscillation),[4] upon the antigen protein molecule must exceed its weight. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs, La Jolla, CA.

  20. Evaluation of the performance of four methods for detection of hepatitis B surface antigen and their application for testing 116,455 specimens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Can; Chen, Tianbin; Lin, Jinpiao; Chen, Huijuan; Chen, Jing; Lin, Sheng; Yang, Bin; Shang, Hongyan; Ou, Qishui

    2014-02-01

    Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) is a crucial serum marker for the diagnosis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. It is imperative to compare test results from different detection methods based on different principles. Four methods, chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay (CMIA), electrochemiluminescent immunoassay (ECLIA), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and golden immunochromato-graphic assay (GICA) were applied to test the HBsAg level in 250 specimens. According to the EP12-A2 and EP15-A2 documents from Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI), the concentration at which repeated results are 50% positive (C50) of HBsAg detected by CMIA, ECLIA, ELISA and GICA was 0.05, 0.08, 0.15 and 15.0IU/ml, respectively. When the detection concentration of HBsAg was 0.5IU/ml, the imprecision degree of CMIA, ECLIA and ELISA was 8.1%, 5.9% and 14.9% respectively. When detecting high HBsAg level (≥20.0IU/ml) and HBsAg negative specimens, the consistency of the four methods was high, while for the low level (0.05-20.0IU/ml), the consistency was poor (except for the CMIA and ECLIA, P<0.05). When evaluation of the four methods in qualitative diagnosis of HBsAg level in the 116,455 specimens, there was no significant discrepancy among CMIA, CMIA and ECLIA, however, GICA was significantly different from the other 3 methods. Compared with CMIA, the false negative rate of ECLIA, ELISA and GICA was 0.2%, 1.3% and 12.3% respectively. In conclusion, GICA was only suitable for the preliminary screening of HBsAg positive individuals and ELISA can be applied to the qualitative diagnosis of HBsAg. Both CMIA and ECLIA were suitable for the quantitative determination of HBsAg.

  1. Antibody responses of domestic animals to salivary antigens of Triatoma infestans as biomarkers for low-level infestation of triatomines

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Alexandra; Sternberg, Jeremy M.; Johnston, Valerie; Medrano-Mercado, Nora; Anderson, Jennifer M.; Hume, Jen C.C.; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Schaub, Günter A.; Billingsley, Peter F.

    2009-01-01

    Hematophagous arthropods such as Triatoma infestans, the vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, elicit host-immune responses during feeding. Characterization of antibody responses to salivary antigens offers the potential to develop immunologically based monitoring techniques for exposure to re-emergent triatomine bug populations in peridomestic animals. IgG-antibody responses to the salivary antigens of T. infestans have been detected in chickens as soon as 2 days after the first exposure to five adult bugs. Chickens and guinea pigs regularly exposed to this number of triatomines showed a significantly lower anti-saliva antibody titre than animals exposed to 25 adults and fifth instars of four different T. infestans strains originating from Bolivia and from Northern Chile. Highly immunogenic salivary antigens of 14 and 21 kDa were recognised by all chicken sera and of 79 kDa by all guinea pig sera. Cross-reactivity studies using saliva or salivary gland extracts from different hematophagous species, e.g. different triatomines, bed bugs, mosquitoes, sand flies and ticks, as well as chicken sera exposed to triatomines and mosquitoes, demonstrated that the 14 and 21 kDa salivary antigens were only found in triatomines. Sera from peridomestic chickens and guinea pigs in sites of known T. infestans challenge in Bolivia also recognised the 14 and 21 kDa antigens. These represent promising epidemiological markers for the detection of small numbers of feeding bugs and hence may be a new tool for vector surveillance in Chagas disease control programs. PMID:19248784

  2. Outcome After Conformal Salvage Radiotherapy in Patients With Rising Prostate-Specific Antigen Levels After Radical Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Geinitz, Hans; Riegel, Martina G.; Thamm, Reinhard; Astner, Sabrina T.; Lewerenz, Carolin; Zimmermann, Frank; Molls, Michael; Nieder, Carsten

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: This study attempts to improve our understanding of the role of salvage radiotherapy (SRT) in patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse after radical prostatectomy with regard to biochemical control, rate of distant metastasis, and survival. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective analysis of 96 men treated with conformal prostate bed SRT (median, 64.8 Gy) at a single institution (median follow-up, 70 months). The majority had intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer. Fifty-four percent underwent a resection with positive margins (R1 resection). The median time interval between surgery and SRT was 22 months. Results: After SRT, 66% of patients reached a PSA nadir of less than 0.2 ng/mL. However, the 5-year biochemical no evidence of disease rate was 35%. Seminal vesicle involvement was predictive for a significantly lower biochemical no evidence of disease rate. All patients with a preoperative PSA level greater than 50 ng/mL relapsed biochemically within 2 years. The 5-year distant metastasis rate was 18%, the 5-year prostate cancer-specific survival rate was 90%, and the 5-year overall survival rate was 88%. Significantly more distant metastases developed in patients with a PSA nadir greater than 0.05 ng/mL after SRT, and they had significantly inferior prostate cancer-specific and overall survival rates. Resection status (R1 vs. R0) was not predictive for any of the endpoints. Conclusions: Men with postoperative PSA relapse can undergo salvage treatment by prostate bed radiotherapy, but durable PSA control is maintained only in about one-third of the patients. Despite a high biochemical failure rate after SRT, prostate cancer-specific survival does not decrease rapidly.

  3. Benign Hydronephrosis and Elevated of Serum Levels of Carbohydrate Antigen CA 19-9: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Filipovic, Branka; Milinić, Nikola; Gacic, Jasna; Markovic, Olivera; Djokovic, Aleksandra; Filipovic, Branislav

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 58 Final Diagnosis: Hydronephrosis Symptoms: Blunt abdominal pain • constipation • constipation Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and percutaneous nephrostolithotomy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Carbohydrate tumor-associated antigen (CA 19-9) has been shown to be upregulated in other malignant tumors including gastric, ovarian, hepatocellular, and colorectal carcinoma as well as benign diseases of the biliary track such as pancreatitis, cholangitis, and choledocholithiasis. According to the available literature, in several cases of benign hydronephrosis and in a few cases of benign renal diseases, elevated CA 19-9 has been noted. Case Report: A 58-year-old Caucasian male patient was admitted in our clinic with complaints about blunt abdominal pain in the past two-month period localized in the right lumbar region and irradiating into the right inguinal area, constipation, abdominal bloating, and intermittent hematuria. The concentration of serum CA 19-9 was 3500 U/mL. Urine cytology provided no signs of abnormality. Intravenous urography visualized right-sided pyelon and ureter duplex with the defect in contrast shade of the pyelon, caused by a stag horn calculus. Contrast added computerized axial tomography of the abdomen and pelvis visualized the pyelon casted concretion spreading throughout the right pyelon, with ureterohydronephrosis with the distal block for passage of the contrast to the distal part of the ureter. Conclusions: There is no doubt that CA 19-9 level is occasionally elevated in patients with obstructive urolithiasis as it was in our case. In the routine medical praxis, urolithiasis should not be neglected in the differential diagnosis of elevated concentrations of CA 19-9 marker. PMID:27287959

  4. Surface Fermi level and surface state density in GaAsSb surface intrinsic-n^+ structures by photoreflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kuang-I.; Tsai, Jung-Tse; Lee, Ming-Hsun; Chiu, Pei-Chin; Chen, Shu-Han; Chyi, Jen-Inn; Hwang, Jenn-Shyong

    2010-03-01

    The III-V ternary semiconductor GaAsSb has recently attracted considerable attention as the base layer of the high speed heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBT). Performance optimization of the HBT requires a precise determination of the surface state density and the surface Fermi level position of the GaAsSb alloy, but few such determinations have been reported. In this work, photoreflectance is employed to investigate the Fermi level pinning and the surface state density of a GaAs0.65Sb0.35 surface intrinsic-n^+ (SIN^+) structure based on the thermionic emission theory and the current-transport theory by the dependence of surface barrier height on the pump beam intensity. The surface state density is estimated as approximately 1.91 x 10^13 cm-2, and the Fermi level is located 0.63 eV below the conduction band edge at the surface. The high surface state density leads the surface Fermi level to be strongly pinned within the bandgap demonstrated by sequential etching of the intrinsic layer.

  5. Is the surface layer from hazelnut pollen, which is precipitated by Cuprolinic blue, an effective antigen in hay-fever patients?

    PubMed

    Völker, W; Sinclair, N J; Kalveram, K J; Robenek, H

    1986-01-01

    In electron micrographs it could be shown that hazelnut (Corylus avellana) pollen grains are covered on their surface by a diffusible 10 nm thick lamellar layer. On pollen surface as well as in pollen extract this layer could be precipitated and stained by the polycationic dye Cuprolinic blue. By subsequent application of both immunogold labeling with serum from a hay-fever patient allergic to tree pollen grains and histochemical detection with Cuprolinic blue this pollen surface layer proved to be an effective antigen.

  6. Interface Surface Area Tracking for the Conservative Level Set Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firehammer, Stephanie; Desjardins, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    One key question in liquid-gas flows is how to model the interface between phases in a way that is mass, momentum, and energy conserving. The accurate conservative level set (ACLS) method of Desjardins et al. provides a tool for tracking a liquid-gas interface with minimal mass conservation issues; however, it does not explicitly compute the interface surface area and thus nothing can be said a priori about the balance between kinetic energy and surface energy. This work examines an equation for the transport of interface surface area density, which can be written in terms of the gradient of the volume fraction. Furthermore this presentation will outline a numerical method for jointly transporting a conservative level set and surface area density. Finally, we will explore oppportunities for energy conservation via the accurate exchange of energy between the flow field and the interface through surface tension, with test cases to show the results of our extended ACLS method. Funding from the National Science Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. Interaction of Plasmodium vivax Tryptophan-rich Antigen PvTRAg38 with Band 3 on Human Erythrocyte Surface Facilitates Parasite Growth*

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Mohd. Shoeb; Choudhary, Vandana; Zeeshan, Mohammad; Tyagi, Rupesh K.; Rathore, Sumit; Sharma, Yagya D.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium tryptophan-rich proteins are involved in host-parasite interaction and thus potential drug/vaccine targets. Recently, we have described several P. vivax tryptophan-rich antigens (PvTRAgs), including merozoite expressed PvTRAg38, from this noncultivable human malaria parasite. PvTRAg38 is highly immunogenic in humans and binds to host erythrocytes, and this binding is inhibited by the patient sera. This binding is also affected if host erythrocytes were pretreated with chymotrypsin. Here, Band 3 has been identified as the chymotrypsin-sensitive erythrocyte receptor for this parasite protein. Interaction of PvTRAg38 with Band 3 has been mapped to its three different ectodomains (loops 1, 3, and 6) exposed at the surface of the erythrocyte. The binding region of PvTRAg38 to Band3 has been mapped to its sequence, KWVQWKNDKIRSWLSSEW, present at amino acid positions 197–214. The recombinant PvTRAg38 was able to inhibit the parasite growth in in vitro Plasmodium falciparum culture probably by competing with the ligand(s) of this heterologous parasite for the erythrocyte Band 3 receptor. In conclusion, the host-parasite interaction at the molecular level is much more complicated than known so far and should be considered during the development of anti-malarial therapeutics. PMID:26149684

  8. Surface ozone levels at Table Mountain during STOIC 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermid, I. Stuart; Walsh, T. Daniel

    1995-05-01

    As a part of the routine operations of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory atmospheric measurements program at the Table Mountain Facility, the surface ozone concentration is continuously monitored using a Dasibi photometer. The influence of the Los Angeles basin to the southwest of the facility and the height of the inversion layer cause large fluctuations in the ozone concentration. Peaks as high as 200 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) were observed during the Stratospheric Ozone Intercomparison Campaign (STOIC) compared to a normal background level near 50 ppbv. These measurements, made during STOIC, were important in assessing the impact of the surface ozone concentration on the various instruments participating in the campaign.

  9. Presentation of a functional pituitary adenoma as a significant decrease in prostate-specific antigen level in a patient followed for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Grotas, Aaron B; Nagler, Harris M

    2006-12-01

    The stimulatory role of testosterone in the production and release of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has been well characterized. Testosterone production by the testes is dependent on a functional hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. High prolactin levels have been shown to disrupt this axis, resulting in decreases in gonadotropins and testosterone levels. We report a patient with prostate cancer and elevated PSA levels followed with "watchful waiting" for several years who experienced a precipitous decrease in PSA level over a 3 month period. The patient was found to have an asymptomatic prolactin-secreting pituitary macroadenoma.

  10. Cyclosporine inhibits macrophage-mediated antigen presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, H.K.; Palay, D.; Wentworth, P.; Cluff, C.

    1986-03-01

    The influence of cyclosporine on antigen-specific, macrophage-dependent T cell activation was analyzed in vitro. Murine T cell activation by antigens derived from Listeria monocytogenes was monitored by the production of interleukin-2. Pretreatment (2 hrs., 37/sup 0/C) of macrophages with cyclosporine resulted in a population of macrophages with a markedly diminished capacity to support the activation of T lymphocytes. When cyclosporine-pretreated macrophages were added to cultures of antigen and untreated T cells, the dose of cyclosporine which produced 50% inhibition was 1.5 ..mu..g/ml. Appropriate control experiments indicated that cyclosporine was indeed inhibiting at the macrophage level. The addition of interleukin-1 or indomethacin to the cultures did not alter the inhibitory effect of cyclosporine. Under conditions which produced >90% inhibition of antigen presentation, macrophage surface Ia expression was not altered, and the uptake and catabolism of radiolabelled antigen was normal. Thus, cyclosporine inhibits antigen presentation by a mechanism which appears unrelated to changes in Il-1 elaboration, prostaglandin production, Ia expression, or antigen uptake and catabolism.

  11. Murine cell surface glycoproteins. Characterization of a major component of 80,000 daltons as a polymorphic differentiation antigen of mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Hughes, E N; Mengod, G; August, J T

    1981-07-10

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with NIH/3T3 cell surface antigens were obtained from hybridomas of murine myeloma cells fused to spleen cells of rats immunized with NIH/3T3 cell plasma membranes. Four of the antibodies, of forty that have been studied, appeared to react with allospecific antigenic determinants: they bound to NIH/3T3 cells but not to BALB/ 3T3 cells. Each of these four antibodies immunoprecipitated a glycoprotein of about 80,000 daltons that migrated to an isoelectric point of about pH 5.0. Polypeptides of identical molecular weight and isoelectric points, and yielding the same proteolytic cleavage fragments, were present in BALB/3T3 cells, but were not antigenically reactive. The 80,000-dalton glycoprotein was a major constituent of the plasma membrane. It was a predominant lactoperoxidase iodinated component of intact NIH/3T3 cells, and saturation binding of 125I-labeled antibody indicated that there were about 10(6) antigenic sites/cell. Studies of the distribution of the immunoreactive glycoprotein among different strains of mice confirmed the polymorphic expression of the determinant: Spleen cells of BALB/c, DBA/1, DBA/2, and CBA mice did not bind anti-80,000-dalton glycoprotein monoclonal antibodies, whereas spleen cells of a large number of other strains of mice were positive for antibody-binding. The antigenic reactivity varied markedly among different cell lines and was greatest with the NIH/3T3 mouse embryo fibroblast, G8-1 Swiss Webster myoblast, and IC-21 SV40-transformed C57BL/6 mouse peritoneal macrophage. The properties of the 80,000-dalton glycoprotein characterized this molecule as a new cell surface differentiation alloantigen of murine mesenchymal cells. PMID:6787057

  12. Genetic variations in merozoite surface antigen genes of Babesia bovis detected in Vietnamese cattle and water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Naoaki; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Tuvshintulga, Bumduuren; Hayashida, Kyoko; Igarashi, Ikuo; Inoue, Noboru; Long, Phung Thang; Lan, Dinh Thi Bich

    2015-03-01

    The genes that encode merozoite surface antigens (MSAs) in Babesia bovis are genetically diverse. In this study, we analyzed the genetic diversity of B. bovis MSA-1, MSA-2b, and MSA-2c genes in Vietnamese cattle and water buffaloes. Blood DNA samples from 258 cattle and 49 water buffaloes reared in the Thua Thien Hue province of Vietnam were screened with a B. bovis-specific diagnostic PCR assay. The B. bovis-positive DNA samples (23 cattle and 16 water buffaloes) were then subjected to PCR assays to amplify the MSA-1, MSA-2b, and MSA-2c genes. Sequencing analyses showed that the Vietnamese MSA-1 and MSA-2b sequences are genetically diverse, whereas MSA-2c is relatively conserved. The nucleotide identity values for these MSA gene sequences were similar in the cattle and water buffaloes. Consistent with the sequencing data, the Vietnamese MSA-1 and MSA-2b sequences were dispersed across several clades in the corresponding phylogenetic trees, whereas the MSA-2c sequences occurred in a single clade. Cattle- and water-buffalo-derived sequences also often clustered together on the phylogenetic trees. The Vietnamese MSA-1, MSA-2b, and MSA-2c sequences were then screened for recombination with automated methods. Of the seven recombination events detected, five and two were associated with the MSA-2b and MSA-2c recombinant sequences, respectively, whereas no MSA-1 recombinants were detected among the sequences analyzed. Recombination between the sequences derived from cattle and water buffaloes was very common, and the resultant recombinant sequences were found in both host animals. These data indicate that the genetic diversity of the MSA sequences does not differ between cattle and water buffaloes in Vietnam. They also suggest that recombination between the B. bovis MSA sequences in both cattle and water buffaloes might contribute to the genetic variation in these genes in Vietnam.

  13. Physical Characterization of the Manganese-sensing Pneumococcal Surface Antigen Repressor (PsaR) from Streptococcus pneumoniae*

    PubMed Central

    Lisher, John P.; Higgins, Khadine A.; Maroney, Michael J.; Giedroc, David P.

    2013-01-01

    Transition metals, including manganese, are required for proper virulence and persistence of many pathogenic bacteria. In Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn), manganese homeostasis is controlled by a high affinity Mn(II) uptake complex, PsaBCA, and a constitutively expressed efflux transporter, MntE. PsaBCA expression is transcriptionally regulated by the DtxR/MntR family metalloregulatory protein pneumococcal surface antigen repressor (PsaR) in Spn. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of the metal and DNA-binding properties of PsaR. PsaR is a homodimer in the absence and presence of metals and binds two manganese or zinc per protomer (four per dimer) in two pairs of structurally distinct sites, termed site 1 and site 2. Site 1 is likely filled with Zn(II) in vivo (KZn1≥1013 M−1; KMn1≈108 M−1). The Zn(II)-site 1 complex adopts a pentacoordinate geometry by x-ray absorption spectroscopy containing a single cysteine, and appears analogous to the Cd(II) site observed in S. gordonii ScaR. Site 1 is necessary but not sufficient for full positive allosteric activation of DNA operator binding by metals as measured by ΔGc, the allosteric coupling free energy, since mutants in site 1 show intermediate ΔGc. Site 2 is the primary regulatory site and governs specificity for Mn(II) over Zn(II) in PsaR, with ΔGcZn,Mn>>ΔGcZn,Zn despite the fact that Zn(II) binds site 2 with 40-fold higher affinity relative to Mn(II), i.e., KZn2>KMn2. Mutational studies reveal that Asp7 in site 2 is a critical ligand for Mn(II)-dependent allosteric activation of DNA binding. These findings are discussed in the context of other well-studied DtxR/MntR Mn(II)/Fe(II) metallorepressors. PMID:24067066

  14. Characterization of a monoclonal antibody that recognizes a lymphocyte surface antigen for the cetacean homologue to CD45R.

    PubMed Central

    De Guise, S; Erickson, K; Blanchard, M; Dimolfetto, L; Lepper, H; Wang, J; Stott, J L; Ferrick, D A

    1998-01-01

    As part of our current efforts to develop assays and reagents to study the immune system of marine mammals, and in view of the effort currently made to develop monoclonal antibodies to cell surface proteins of lymphocyte subsets in different species, the present paper reports on the characterization of a monoclonal antibody against the homologue of CD45R on cetacean lymphocytes. The specificity of this antibody has been characterized on the basis of immunoprecipitation of the antigen it recognized, immunoperoxidase staining on cetacean lymph node and thymus sections, as well as one and two-colour flow cytometric analysis of cetacean peripheral blood mononuclear cells and single-cell suspensions of thymus, lymph node and spleen. Anticetacean CD45R (F21.H) immunoprecipitated proteins of 180, 200 and 220 x 10(3) MW, with the 180 x 10(3) MW from being predominantly expressed on T cells and the 220 x 10(3) MW form expressed predominantly on B cells and thymocytes F21.H labelled all B cells and a proportion of T cells on single-cell suspensions of spleen cells. CD45R- killer whale peripheral blood lymphocytes expressed a higher density of CD2 than CD45R+, a characteristic of memory T cells. Killer whale T lymphocytes also lost the expression of CD45R upon activation with concanavalin A (Con A) and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). This is the first report of a monoclonal antibody to CD45R in cetaceans, and this antibody is foreseen as a possible valuable diagnostic and research tool to assess immune functions of captive and wild cetaceans as part of the evaluation of their health status. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9741342

  15. Pasteurella haemolytica antigens associated with resistance to pneumonic pasteurellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Mosier, D A; Simons, K R; Confer, A W; Panciera, R J; Clinkenbeard, K D

    1989-01-01

    Antigens associated with whole Pasteurella haemolytica biotype A serotype 1, a capsular carbohydrate-protein extract of the organism, and P. haemolytica leukotoxin were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Antigens of the electrophoresed preparations were detected by Western blotting (immunoblotting) with sera from cattle which were either nonvaccinated or vaccinated with live or killed P. haemolytica vaccines and had variable degrees of resistance to experimental pneumonic pasteurellosis. Distinct, easily recognizable antigens of these preparations were identified, and the antibody responses to these antigens were quantified by densitometry. To determine their importance to disease resistance, we then compared antibody responses with experimental lesion scores. Antibody reactivity to surface antigens which were significantly correlated with resistance and present in two or more of the preparations were detected at 86, 66, 51, 49, 34, 31, and 16 kilodaltons (kDa). Of these, antibody responses to antigens at 86, 49, and 31 kDa appeared most important based on their concentration and significance levels. Antibody reactivity to leukotoxin antigens which were significantly correlated with resistance and common with important surface antigens were detected at 86, 66, and 49 kDa. Antibody responses to unique leukotoxin antigens which were significantly correlated with resistance were present at 92 and 58 kDa. Images PMID:2917783

  16. Sea level: measuring the bounding surfaces of the ocean.

    PubMed

    Tamisiea, Mark E; Hughes, Chris W; Williams, Simon D P; Bingley, Richard M

    2014-09-28

    The practical need to understand sea level along the coasts, such as for safe navigation given the spatially variable tides, has resulted in tide gauge observations having the distinction of being some of the longest instrumental ocean records. Archives of these records, along with geological constraints, have allowed us to identify the century-scale rise in global sea level. Additional data sources, particularly satellite altimetry missions, have helped us to better identify the rates and causes of sea-level rise and the mechanisms leading to spatial variability in the observed rates. Analysis of all of the data reveals the need for long-term and stable observation systems to assess accurately the regional changes as well as to improve our ability to estimate future changes in sea level. While information from many scientific disciplines is needed to understand sea-level change, this review focuses on contributions from geodesy and the role of the ocean's bounding surfaces: the sea surface and the Earth's crust.

  17. Sea level: measuring the bounding surfaces of the ocean

    PubMed Central

    Tamisiea, Mark E.; Hughes, Chris W.; Williams, Simon D. P.; Bingley, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    The practical need to understand sea level along the coasts, such as for safe navigation given the spatially variable tides, has resulted in tide gauge observations having the distinction of being some of the longest instrumental ocean records. Archives of these records, along with geological constraints, have allowed us to identify the century-scale rise in global sea level. Additional data sources, particularly satellite altimetry missions, have helped us to better identify the rates and causes of sea-level rise and the mechanisms leading to spatial variability in the observed rates. Analysis of all of the data reveals the need for long-term and stable observation systems to assess accurately the regional changes as well as to improve our ability to estimate future changes in sea level. While information from many scientific disciplines is needed to understand sea-level change, this review focuses on contributions from geodesy and the role of the ocean's bounding surfaces: the sea surface and the Earth's crust. PMID:25157196

  18. Sea level: measuring the bounding surfaces of the ocean.

    PubMed

    Tamisiea, Mark E; Hughes, Chris W; Williams, Simon D P; Bingley, Richard M

    2014-09-28

    The practical need to understand sea level along the coasts, such as for safe navigation given the spatially variable tides, has resulted in tide gauge observations having the distinction of being some of the longest instrumental ocean records. Archives of these records, along with geological constraints, have allowed us to identify the century-scale rise in global sea level. Additional data sources, particularly satellite altimetry missions, have helped us to better identify the rates and causes of sea-level rise and the mechanisms leading to spatial variability in the observed rates. Analysis of all of the data reveals the need for long-term and stable observation systems to assess accurately the regional changes as well as to improve our ability to estimate future changes in sea level. While information from many scientific disciplines is needed to understand sea-level change, this review focuses on contributions from geodesy and the role of the ocean's bounding surfaces: the sea surface and the Earth's crust. PMID:25157196

  19. Direct Observations of Surface Thermal Fluctuations Below Shot Noise Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Kenichiro; Mitsui, Takahisa

    Surface thermal fluctuation spectra are measured to previously unachieved precision, down to three orders of magnitude below the shot noise level. Such precision is achieved through statistical reduction of extraneous noise, including shot noise, using the averaged correlation of measurements. Both height and inclination fluctuations of surface fluctuations are measured for various materials and in the case of liquids, their hydrodynamical understanding is compared to the experimental results at unprecedented levels. They agree well for water, but for oil, deviations are seen at high frequencies, perhaps indicating its more complex underlying physics. Surface thermal fluctuation spectra of complex fluids (such as epoxy), rubber and biological materials have also been measured and have qualitatively diverse behavior. We discuss the physics underlying the various spectra and explain the experimental methods used to obtain them. The measurement is simple, requiring relatively a weak power light source, a short time and a small surface area, so that it should be useful for fluctuation measurements in various fields requiring precision, both within and outside physics.

  20. Comprehensive Analysis and Characterization of Linear Antigenic Domains on HN Protein from Genotype VII Newcastle Disease Virus Using Yeast Surface Display System.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Wang, Gaoling; Shi, Bingtian; Liu, Peixin; Si, Wei; Wang, Bin; Jiang, Li; Zhou, Lunjiang; Xiu, Jinsheng; Liu, Henggui

    2015-01-01

    Circulation of genotype VII Newcastle disease virus (NDV) has posed a great threat for the poultry industry worldwide. Antibodies against Hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), a membrane protein of NDV with critical roles in NDV infection, have been reported to provide chickens protection from NDV infection. In this study, we comprehensively analyzed the in vivo antibody responses against the linear antigenic domains of the HN protein from genotype VII NDV using a yeast surface display system. The results revealed four distinct regions of HN, P1 (1-52aa), P2 (53-192aa), P3 (193-302aa) and P4 (303-571aa), respectively, according to their antigenic potency. Analysis by FACS and ELISA assay indicated P2 to be the dominant linear antigenic domain, with the immunogenic potency to protect the majority of chickens from NDV challenge. In contrast, the P1, P3 and P4 domains showed weak antigenicity in vivo and could not protect chickens from NDV challenge. These results provide important insight into the characteristic of humoral immune responses elicited by HN of NDV in vivo.

  1. Comprehensive Analysis and Characterization of Linear Antigenic Domains on HN Protein from Genotype VII Newcastle Disease Virus Using Yeast Surface Display System.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Wang, Gaoling; Shi, Bingtian; Liu, Peixin; Si, Wei; Wang, Bin; Jiang, Li; Zhou, Lunjiang; Xiu, Jinsheng; Liu, Henggui

    2015-01-01

    Circulation of genotype VII Newcastle disease virus (NDV) has posed a great threat for the poultry industry worldwide. Antibodies against Hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), a membrane protein of NDV with critical roles in NDV infection, have been reported to provide chickens protection from NDV infection. In this study, we comprehensively analyzed the in vivo antibody responses against the linear antigenic domains of the HN protein from genotype VII NDV using a yeast surface display system. The results revealed four distinct regions of HN, P1 (1-52aa), P2 (53-192aa), P3 (193-302aa) and P4 (303-571aa), respectively, according to their antigenic potency. Analysis by FACS and ELISA assay indicated P2 to be the dominant linear antigenic domain, with the immunogenic potency to protect the majority of chickens from NDV challenge. In contrast, the P1, P3 and P4 domains showed weak antigenicity in vivo and could not protect chickens from NDV challenge. These results provide important insight into the characteristic of humoral immune responses elicited by HN of NDV in vivo. PMID:26121247

  2. Comprehensive Analysis and Characterization of Linear Antigenic Domains on HN Protein from Genotype VII Newcastle Disease Virus Using Yeast Surface Display System

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Wang, Gaoling; Shi, Bingtian; Liu, Peixin; Si, Wei; Wang, Bin; Jiang, Li; Zhou, Lunjiang; Xiu, Jinsheng; Liu, Henggui

    2015-01-01

    Circulation of genotype VII Newcastle disease virus (NDV) has posed a great threat for the poultry industry worldwide. Antibodies against Hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), a membrane protein of NDV with critical roles in NDV infection, have been reported to provide chickens protection from NDV infection. In this study, we comprehensively analyzed the in vivo antibody responses against the linear antigenic domains of the HN protein from genotype VII NDV using a yeast surface display system. The results revealed four distinct regions of HN, P1 (1-52aa), P2 (53-192aa), P3 (193-302aa) and P4 (303-571aa), respectively, according to their antigenic potency. Analysis by FACS and ELISA assay indicated P2 to be the dominant linear antigenic domain, with the immunogenic potency to protect the majority of chickens from NDV challenge. In contrast, the P1, P3 and P4 domains showed weak antigenicity in vivo and could not protect chickens from NDV challenge. These results provide important insight into the characteristic of humoral immune responses elicited by HN of NDV in vivo. PMID:26121247

  3. The effect of polarity and surface states on the Fermi level at III-nitride surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, P; Bryan, I; Bryan, Z; Guo, W; Hussey, L; Collazo, R; Sitar, Z

    2014-09-28

    Surface states and their influence on the Fermi level at the surface of GaN and AlN are studied using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The effect of polarity on surface electronic properties was studied. Accurate modeling of the valence band edge and comparison with XPS data revealed the presence of donor surface states at 1.4 eV and acceptor states at energies > 2.7 eV from the valence band in GaN. Al polar AlN showed acceptor states at energies > 3.3 eV. Density of acceptor surface states was estimated to be between 10(13) and 10(14) eV(-1) cm(-2) in both GaN and AlN. The shift in charge neutrality levels and barrier heights due to polarity and the density of surface states on AlN and GaN were estimated from XPS measurements. Theoretical modeling and comparison with XPS data implied full compensation of spontaneous polarization charge by charged surface states. Barrier height measurements also reveal a dependence on polarity with phi(metal-polar)>phi(non-polar)>phi(nitrogen-polar) suggesting that the N-polar surface is the most suitable for Ohmic contacts. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  4. Antibody responses of domestic animals to salivary antigens of Triatomainfestans as biomarkers for low-level infestation of triatomines.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Alexandra; Sternberg, Jeremy M; Johnston, Valerie; Medrano-Mercado, Nora; Anderson, Jennifer M; Hume, Jen C C; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Schaub, Günter A; Billingsley, Peter F

    2009-07-15

    Hematophagous arthropods such as Triatoma infestans, the vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, elicit host-immune responses during feeding. Characterization of antibody responses to salivary antigens offers the potential to develop immunologically based monitoring techniques for exposure to re-emergent triatomine bug populations in peridomestic animals. IgG-antibody responses to the salivary antigens of T.infestans have been detected in chickens as soon as 2 days after the first exposure to five adult bugs. Chickens and guinea pigs regularly exposed to this number of triatomines showed a significantly lower anti-saliva antibody titre than animals exposed to 25 adults and fifth instars of four different T.infestans strains originating from Bolivia and from Northern Chile. Highly immunogenic salivary antigens of 14 and 21kDa were recognised by all chicken sera and of 79kDa by all guinea pig sera. Cross-reactivity studies using saliva or salivary gland extracts from different hematophagous species, e.g. different triatomines, bed bugs, mosquitoes, sand flies and ticks, as well as chicken sera exposed to triatomines and mosquitoes, demonstrated that the 14 and 21kDa salivary antigens were only found in triatomines. Sera from peridomestic chickens and guinea pigs in sites of known T.infestans challenge in Bolivia also recognised the 14 and 21kDa antigens. These represent promising epidemiological markers for the detection of small numbers of feeding bugs and hence may be a new tool for vector surveillance in Chagas disease control programs. PMID:19248784

  5. Heterozygous Mutation in IκBNS Leads to Reduced Levels of Natural IgM Antibodies and Impaired Responses to T-Independent Type 2 Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Gabriel K.; Ádori, Monika; Stark, Julian M.; Khoenkhoen, Sharesta; Arnold, Carrie; Beutler, Bruce; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B.

    2016-01-01

    Mice deficient in central components of classical NF-κB signaling have low levels of circulating natural IgM antibodies and fail to respond to immunization with T-independent type 2 (TI-2) antigens. A plausible explanation for these defects is the severely reduced numbers of B-1 and marginal zone B (MZB) cells in such mice. By using an ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis screen, we identified a role for the atypical IκB protein IκBNS in humoral immunity. IκBNS-deficient mice lack B-1 cells and have severely reduced numbers of MZB cells, and thus resemble several other strains with defects in classical NF-κB signaling. We analyzed mice heterozygous for the identified IκBNS mutation and demonstrate that these mice have an intermediary phenotype in terms of levels of circulating IgM antibodies and responses to TI-2 antigens. However, in contrast to mice that are homozygous for the IκBNS mutation, the heterozygous mice had normal frequencies of B-1 and MZB cells. These results suggest that there is a requirement for IκBNS expression from two functional alleles for maintaining normal levels of circulating natural IgM antibodies and responses to TI-2 antigens. PMID:26973645

  6. Heterozygous Mutation in IκBNS Leads to Reduced Levels of Natural IgM Antibodies and Impaired Responses to T-Independent Type 2 Antigens.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Gabriel K; Ádori, Monika; Stark, Julian M; Khoenkhoen, Sharesta; Arnold, Carrie; Beutler, Bruce; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B

    2016-01-01

    Mice deficient in central components of classical NF-κB signaling have low levels of circulating natural IgM antibodies and fail to respond to immunization with T-independent type 2 (TI-2) antigens. A plausible explanation for these defects is the severely reduced numbers of B-1 and marginal zone B (MZB) cells in such mice. By using an ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis screen, we identified a role for the atypical IκB protein IκBNS in humoral immunity. IκBNS-deficient mice lack B-1 cells and have severely reduced numbers of MZB cells, and thus resemble several other strains with defects in classical NF-κB signaling. We analyzed mice heterozygous for the identified IκBNS mutation and demonstrate that these mice have an intermediary phenotype in terms of levels of circulating IgM antibodies and responses to TI-2 antigens. However, in contrast to mice that are homozygous for the IκBNS mutation, the heterozygous mice had normal frequencies of B-1 and MZB cells. These results suggest that there is a requirement for IκBNS expression from two functional alleles for maintaining normal levels of circulating natural IgM antibodies and responses to TI-2 antigens.

  7. Negative staining and immunoelectron microscopy of adhesion-deficient mutants of Streptococcus salivarius reveal that the adhesive protein antigens are separate classes of cell surface fibril.

    PubMed Central

    Weerkamp, A H; Handley, P S; Baars, A; Slot, J W

    1986-01-01

    The subcellular distribution of the cell wall-associated protein antigens of Streptococcus salivarius HB, which are involved in specific adhesive properties of the cells, was studied. Mutants which had lost the adhesive properties and lacked the antigens at the cell surface were compared with the parent strain. Immunoelectron microscopy of cryosections of cells labeled with affinity-purified, specific antisera and colloidal gold-protein A complexes was used to locate the antigens. Antigen C (AgC), a glycoprotein involved in attachment to host surfaces, was mainly located in the fibrillar layer outside the cell wall. A smaller amount of label was also found throughout the cytoplasmic area in the form of small clusters of gold particles, which suggests a macromolecular association. Mutant HB-7, which lacks the wall-associated AgC, accumulated AgC reactivity intracellularly. Intracellular AgC was often found associated with isolated areas of increased electron density, but sometimes seemed to fill the entire interior of the cell. Antigen B (AgB), a protein responsible for interbacterial coaggregation, was also located in the fibrillar layer, although its distribution differed from that of the wall-associated AgC since AgB was found predominantly in the peripheral areas. A very small amount of label was also found in the cytoplasmic area as discrete gold particles. Mutant HB-V5, which lacks wall-associated AgB, was not labeled in the fibrillar coat, but showed the same weak intracellular label as the parent strain. Immunolabeling with serum against AgD, another wall-associated protein but of unknown function, demonstrated its presence in the fibrillar layer of strain HB. Negatively stained preparations of whole cells of wild-type S. salivarius and mutants that had lost wall-associated AgB or AgC revealed that two classes of short fibrils are carried on the cell surface at the same time. AgB and AgC are probably located on separate classes of short, protease

  8. Prostate-specific Antigen (PSA) Density and Free to Total PSA Ratio in Diagnosing Prostate Cancer with Prostate-Specific Antigen Levels of 4.0 ng/ml or Less

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Xin; TANG, Jie; FEI, Xiang; LI, Qiu-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Background: We aimed to value the usefulness of free to total prostate-specific antigen and Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) density for prostate cancer in the patients with PSA levels of 4.0 ng/ml or less. Methods: A total of 343 subjects with PSA levels of 4.0 ng/ml or less were biopsied. All patients were divided into four groups according to the PSA levels: 0 to 1.0 ng/ml, 1.1 to 2.0 ng/ml, 2.1 to 3.0 ng/ml, and 3.1 to 4.0 ng/ml. The reliability of cancer detection in relation to the f/t PSA ratio and PSAD were estimated. Results: Overall, 65 people were diagnosed with prostate cancer. The detection rate was 16.28%、17.17%, 21.82%, 25.00% in subjects with PSA levels of 0 to 1.0 ng/ml, 1.1 to 2.0 ng/ml, 2.1 to 3.0 ng/ml, and 3.1 to 4.0 ng/ml, respectively. The f/t PSA ratio was significantly lower in patients with prostate cancer and PSA levels of 2.1 to 4.0 ng/ml (P<0.05). The PSAD had no statistical significance between the two groups. Conclusions: Routine prostate biopsy should be undertaken if the f/t PSA ratio less than 15% with /without abnormal DRE/TRUS findings. PMID:26744703

  9. Plasmid-encoded production of coli surface-associated antigen 1 (CS1) in a strain of Escherichia coli serotype O139.H28.

    PubMed

    Willshaw, G A; Smith, H R; McConnell, M M; Gaastra, W; Thomas, A; Hibberd, M; Rowe, B

    1990-07-01

    Production of coli surface-associated antigen 1 (CS1) by Escherichia coli strain E24377 of serotype O139.H28 was controlled by a plasmid that also encoded heat stable and heat labile enterotoxins and CS3. The presence of a regulatory sequence was detected on this plasmid by hybridization with the cfaD gene that regulates expression of colonization factor antigen I fimbriae and is at least 96% homologous with the rns sequence controlling production of CS1 or CS2 fimbriae by strains of serotype O6.H16 of appropriate biotype. A separate plasmid, pDEP20, carrying the structural genes for CS1 synthesis was identified and transformed into E. coli strain HB101 or a derivative of strain E24377 without large plasmids. Transformants carrying pDEP20 did not produce CS1 fimbrial antigen, but antigen expression was obtained when a cloned cfaD gene or a wild-type plasmid carrying the rns sequence was introduced. Transposon mutagenesis with Tn1000 identified a 3.7 kbp region of pDEP20 essential for production of CS1 fimbriae. Genes encoding production of CS1 fimbriae were cloned on a 9.9 kbp BamHI fragment and were expressed in the presence of the cfaD sequence. A strain producing both CS1 and CS2 antigens was constructed by introduction of the cloned cfaD gene into a strain of serotype O6.H16 biotype C carrying plasmid pDEP20.

  10. Pacific sea level rise patterns and global surface temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyser, Cheryl E.; Yin, Jianjun; Landerer, Felix W.; Cole, Julia E.

    2016-08-01

    During 1998-2012, climate change and sea level rise (SLR) exhibit two notable features: a slowdown of global surface warming (hiatus) and a rapid SLR in the tropical western Pacific. To quantify their relationship, we analyze the long-term control simulations of 38 climate models. We find a significant and robust correlation between the east-west contrast of dynamic sea level (DSL) in the Pacific and global mean surface temperature (GST) variability on both interannual and decadal time scales. Based on linear regression of the multimodel ensemble mean, the anomalously fast SLR in the western tropical Pacific observed during 1998-2012 indicates suppression of a potential global surface warming of 0.16° ± 0.06°C. In contrast, the Pacific contributed 0.29° ± 0.10°C to the significant interannual GST increase in 1997/1998. The Pacific DSL anomalies observed in 2015 suggest that the strong El Niño in 2015/2016 could lead to a 0.21° ± 0.07°C GST jump.

  11. Upregulation of capsule enables Streptococcus pyogenes to evade immune recognition by antigen-specific antibodies directed to the G-related alpha2-macroglobulin-binding protein GRAB located on the bacterial surface.

    PubMed

    Dinkla, Katrin; Sastalla, Inka; Godehardt, Antonia W; Janze, Nina; Chhatwal, Gursharan S; Rohde, Manfred; Medina, Eva

    2007-07-01

    One of the major problems associated with the development of a vaccine against Streptococcus pyogenes is the ability of this pathogen to escape recognition by antibodies directed against conserved surface-associated determinants and to establish infection in the setting of an acquired immune response. Identification of the mechanism(s) used by S. pyogenes to avoid recognition by antigen-specific antibodies and escape killing in blood was the focus of this study. We showed here that S. pyogenes was capable of surviving in human blood containing high levels of antibodies directed against the G-related alpha2-macroglobulin-binding protein GRAB, a highly conserved bacterial surface protein. S. pyogenes upregulated the hyaluronic acid capsule production during incubation with human blood, suggesting that the capsule may structurally minimize antibody access to protein GRAB. This hypothesis was confirmed by the ability of anti-GRAB antibodies to promote opsonophagocytosis of a capsule-deficient mutant of S. pyogenes but not of the encapsulated wild-type strain. Capsule upregulation and protection of S. pyogenes from opsonophagocytosis in the presence of anti-GRAB antibodies was also observed in a murine model of streptococcal infection. Thus, masking of surface immunogenic determinants by the hyaluronic acid capsule may constitute a novel mechanism of S. pyogenes for evasion of antigen-specific antibodies.

  12. Bacterial membranes enhance the immunogenicity and protective capacity of the surface exposed tick Subolesin-Anaplasma marginale MSP1a chimeric antigen.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Marinela; Moreno-Cid, Juan A; Domingos, Ana; Canales, Mario; Díez-Delgado, Iratxe; Pérez de la Lastra, José M; Sánchez, Emilio; Merino, Octávio; Zavala, Rigoberto López; Ayllón, Nieves; Boadella, Mariana; Villar, Margarita; Gortázar, Christian; de la Fuente, José

    2015-09-01

    Ticks are vectors of diseases that affect humans and animals worldwide. Tick vaccines have been proposed as a cost-effective and environmentally sound alternative for tick control. Recently, the Rhipicephalus microplus Subolesin (SUB)-Anaplasma marginale MSP1a chimeric antigen was produced in Escherichia coli as membrane-bound and exposed protein and used to protect vaccinated cattle against tick infestations. In this research, lipidomics and proteomics characterization of the E. coli membrane-bound SUB-MSP1a antigen showed the presence of components with potential adjuvant effect. Furthermore, vaccination with membrane-free SUB-MSP1a and bacterial membranes containing SUB-MSP1a showed that bacterial membranes enhance the immunogenicity of the SUB-MSP1a antigen in animal models. R. microplus female ticks were capillary-fed with sera from pigs orally immunized with membrane-free SUB, membrane bound SUB-MSP1a and saline control. Ticks ingested antibodies added to the blood meal and the effect of these antibodies on reduction of tick weight was shown for membrane bound SUB-MSP1a but not SUB when compared to control. Using the simple and cost-effective process developed for the purification of membrane-bound SUB-MSP1a, endotoxin levels were within limits accepted for recombinant vaccines. These results provide further support for the development of tick vaccines using E. coli membranes exposing chimeric antigens such as SUB-MSP1a. PMID:26219233

  13. [Site-directed mutagensis of the major antigen E2 gene of CSFV, its high level expression in Escherichia coli and the immunonicity of recombinant E2 protein].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xing-Long; Tu, Chang-Chun; Xu, Xing-Ran; Zhang, Mao-Lin; Chen, Yi-Xiang; Liu, Bo-Hua

    2003-07-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV), an enveloped positive-stranded RNA virus in the genus Pestivirus of the Flaviviridae family, is the causative agent of a highly contagious swine disease characterized by symptoms of hemorrhagic fever and immune depression, usually leading to substantial economic losses. The serological methods for detection of CSFV antibody such as ELISA are important means for the diagnosis of CSFV and immune surveillance. It is difficult to obtain CSFV antigen with high quality using traditional method because its titration titer is low in cell culture. CSFV has four structural protein named C, E0, El and E2. The E2 protein contains major antigenic determinants that are conserved between different CSFV strains and involved in neutralization by antibodies. So recombinant E2 protein can be developed as an alternative to the intact viral antigen. So far, CSFV E2 have not been expressed in E. coli with high level. Many factors, such as the secondary structure, the stability of 5' and 3' terminus of gene, the location of SD sequence and the bias of codes, are involved in the expressing level of foreign gene in E. coli . In this study, two sites of the E2 gene sequence were confirmed to be detrimental to its expression efficiency in E. coli through the computer-aided analysis. So they were mutated using recombinant PCR without changing the amino acids sequence of CSFV E2 gene. A plasmid was constructed by inserting the mutated E2 gene into the prokaryotic expression vector pET-28a(+) and named pETE2. The E. coli competent host BL21 (DE3)lysS transformed with pETE2 could express the E2 gene at high level, amounting to 28% of the total protein of the induced recombinant bacteria at the presence of IPTG. Except the hydrophobic transmembrane domain at C terminus, the recombinant E2 protein includes the total aa sequence. So it contains all the potential linear antigen epitopes of E2 protein because hydrophobic aa region can not form epitope. The

  14. Epitope analysis of immunoglobulins against gp20, a GPI-anchored protein of the human sperm surface homologous to leukocyte antigen CD52.

    PubMed

    Flori, F; Giovampaola, C Della; Focarelli, R; Secciani, F; La Sala, G B; Nicoli, A; Hale, G; Rosati, F

    2005-09-01

    Gp20 is a sialylglycoprotein of the human sperm surface related to maturation and capacitation and is homologous to CD52, a glycosyl- phosphatidyl-inositol (GPI)-anchored protein highly expressed in lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, and epididymal cells, described by the monoclonal antibody family CAMPATH. The CAMPATH antigen is characterized by a very short peptide (12 amino acids) and an N-linked oligosaccharide chain bound to the asparagine located in the third position and a GPI anchor bound to the C-terminal serine. The CAMPATH epitope includes three amino acids at the C-terminus and part of the GPI anchor. It has been suggested that anti-gp20 interacts with the same peptide recognized by CAMPATH antibodies but with a different epitope, since it describes the corresponding antigen in a different way. For example, it localizes the corresponding antigen in the equatorial region of the sperm head when sperm are capacitated, whereas CAMPATH antibodies bind all over the sperm surface. Our results indicate that the anti-gp20 epitope does not include the peptide backbone, the GPI anchor, or the N-glycans but consists of O-linked oligosaccharide chains bound to a unique CD52 glycoform present both in sperm and leukocytes. This is suggested by results obtained using many different approaches, such as immunoblot analysis of gp20 after removal of N- and O-glycans and after jacalin (Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin)-affinity chromatography.

  15. Immune pressure selects for Plasmodium falciparum parasites presenting distinct red blood cell surface antigens and inducing strain-specific protection in Saimiri sciureus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The passive transfer of specific antibodies to a naive splenectomized Saimiri sciureus monkey infected with the Palo Alto FUP/SP strain of Plasmodium falciparum resulted in the emergence of parasites resistant to the transferred antibodies. Molecular typing indicated that the original and resistant parasites were isogenic. Saimiri monkeys primed with original parasites were fully susceptible to a challenge by the resistant ones, and vice versa. This absence of crossprotection indicates that strain-specific determinants would be the major targets of protective immunity developed in these monkeys. Phenotypic analysis showed that the surface of the infected red blood cells differed in both lines. Original parasites formed rosettes, autoagglutinated, presented characteristic knobs at the surface of the infected red blood cell, and did not agglutinate in the presence of a pool of human immune sera. In contrast, the resistant parasites did not form rosettes, did not spontaneously autoagglutinate, presented abnormal flattened knobs, and formed large aggregates in the presence of a pool of human immune sera. The presence of strain-specific determinants at the surface of the resistant parasites was confirmed by surface immunofluorescence and agglutination using homologous Saimiri serum. Neither the original nor the resistant parasites cytoadhered to an amelanotic melanoma cell line, suggesting that cytoadherence and agglutination can be dissociated. These results indicate that parasites that differ by the antigens exposed at the surface of the red blood cell induce strain- specific immunity. Furthermore they show that rosetting and nonrosetting parasites differ in their antigenic properties and do not crossprotect. PMID:7807008

  16. Immunochromatographic assay for quantitative and sensitive detection of hepatitis B virus surface antigen using highly luminescent quantum dot-beads.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jun; Zhou, Yaofeng; Fu, Fen; Xu, Hengyi; Lv, Jiaofeng; Xiong, Yonghua; Wang, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Hepatitis B virus infection is one of the major causes of hepatitis, liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. In this study, we used highly luminescent quantum dot-beads (QBs) as signal amplification probes in the sandwich immunochromatographic assay (ICA) for ultrasensitive and quantitative detection of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) in human serum. Various parameters that influenced the sensitivity and stability of the QB-based ICA (QB-ICA) sensor were investigated. Two linear independent regression equations for detection of serum HBsAg were expressed with Y=0.3361X-0.0059 (R(2)=0.9983) for low HBsAg concentrations between 75 pg mL(-1) and 4.8 ng mL(-1), and Y=0.8404 X-2.9364 (R(2)=0.9939) for high HBsAg concentrations in the range from 4.8 ng mL(-1) to 75 ng mL(-1). The detection limit of the proposed ICA sensor achieved was 75 pg mL(-1), which is much higher than that of the routinely-used gold nanoparticle based ICA. The intra- and inter-assays recovery rates for spiked serum samples at HBsAg concentrations of 75 pg mL(-1), 3.75 ng mL(-1) and 18.75 ng mL(-1) ranged from 90.14% to 97.6%, and coefficients of variation were all below 7%, indicating that the QB-ICA sensor has an acceptable accuracy for HBsAg detection. Additionally, the quantitative method developed showed no false positive results in an analysis of 49 real HBsAg-negative serum samples, and exhibited excellent agreement (R(2)=0.9209) with a commercial chemiluminescence immunoassay kit in identifying 47 HBsAg-positive serum samples. In summary, due to its high fluorescence intensity, the sandwich QB-ICA sensor is a very promising point-of-care test for rapid, simple and ultrasensitive detection of HBsAg, as well as other disease-related protein biomarkers.

  17. Surface core-level shifts and atomic coordination at a stepped W(110) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Riffe, D.M.; Kim, B.; Erskine, J.L. ); Shinn, N.D. )

    1994-11-15

    Core-level 4[ital f][sub 7/2] photoemission spectra have been measured from a single, bifacial W crystal, which has both a flat W(110) and a vicinal, stepped W(110) [W(320)] surface. This procedure reduces uncertainties in the quantitative description of peaks in the spectra from W(320). Various analyses, including nonlinear least-squares curve fitting, show that the average surface core-level shift (SCS) for W(320) is only [similar to][minus]140 meV, compared to [minus]310 meV for W(110) and that, at a maximum, only two of five terrace rows are isoelectronic to W(110) surface atoms. The absence of a large SCS for the step-edge atoms contradicts earlier interpretations of W(320) core-level spectra and departs significantly from expectations based on atomic-coordination models or tight-binding calculations of a bulk truncated surface. We suggest that systematic errors are responsible for the differences in reported core-level shifts for W(320). Implications of possible step-edge-driven atomic rearrangements are discussed.

  18. Immunophenotyping of Waldenströms macroglobulinemia cell lines reveals distinct patterns of surface antigen expression: potential biological and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Aneel; Chitta, Kasyapa S; Wallace, Paul K; Advani, Pooja P; Akhtar, Sharoon; Kuranz-Blake, Maja; Ailawadhi, Sikander; Chanan-Khan, Asher A

    2015-01-01

    Waldenströms macroglobulinemia (WM) is a subtype of Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in which the tumor cell population is markedly heterogeneous, consisting of immunoglobulin-M secreting B-lymphocytes, plasmacytoid lymphocytes and plasma cells. Due to rarity of disease and scarcity of reliable preclinical models, many facets of WM molecular and phenotypic architecture remain incompletely understood. Currently, there are 3 human WM cell lines that are routinely used in experimental studies, namely, BCWM.1, MWCL-1 and RPCI-WM1. During establishment of RPCI-WM1, we observed loss of the CD19 and CD20 antigens, which are typically present on WM cells. Intrigued by this observation and in an effort to better define the immunophenotypic makeup of this cell line, we conducted a more comprehensive analysis for the presence or absence of other cell surface antigens that are present on the RPCI-WM1 model, as well as those on the two other WM cell lines, BCWM.1 and MWCL-1. We examined expression of 65 extracellular and 4 intracellular antigens, comprising B-cell, plasma cell, T-cell, NK-cell, myeloid and hematopoietic stem cell surface markers by flow cytometry analysis. RPCI-WM1 cells demonstrated decreased expression of CD19, CD20, and CD23 with enhanced expression of CD28, CD38 and CD184, antigens that were differentially expressed on BCWM.1 and MWCL-1 cells. Due to increased expression of CD184/CXCR4 and CD38, RPCI-WM1 represents a valuable model in which to study the effects anti-CXCR4 or anti-CD38 targeted therapies that are actively being developed for treatment of hematologic cancers. Overall, differences in surface antigen expression across the 3 cell lines may reflect the tumor clone population predominant in the index patients, from whom the cell lines were developed. Our analysis defines the utility of the most commonly employed WM cell lines as based on their immunophenotype profiles, highlighting unique differences that can be further studied for therapeutic exploit

  19. Hepatitis B surface antigen prevalence among 12 393 rural women of childbearing age in Hainan Province, China: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is highly endemic in China and it threats human health seriously. The hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) prevalence among women of childbearing age plays an important role in mother to child transmission of HBV, as 30% ~50% of chronic carriers can be attributed to maternal-infantile transmission. However, there are few studies which have reported on the prevalence of HBsAg among women of childbearing age in China. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of HBsAg and its associated risk factors among rural women of childbearing age in Hainan, which is the highest hepatitis B virus endemic province in China. Methods A cross-sectional, population-based study, which included 12393 rural women aged 15 ~ 49 years, enrolled by a multistage stratified cluster sampling, was carried out in Hainan province, China, from November 2007 to December 2008. Blood samples were obtained from each study participant, and screened for HBsAg. Results The overall HBsAg prevalence of childbearing age women was 9.51%. Risk factors for HBsAg positivity among rural women were: lower education level (OR=1.206), lower family monthly income (OR=1.233), having an HBsAg-positive family member (OR=1.300), without an immunization history (OR=1.243), tattooing (OR=1.190), body piercing (OR=1.293), vaginoscopy history (OR=1.103) and history of induced abortion (OR=1.142). Conclusions There is a high HBsAg seroprevalence rate among rural women of childbearing age in Hainan province. Hence, it is necessary to take preventive measures to reduce the seroprevalence of HBsAg and to control its associated risk factors. PMID:23332007

  20. Validation of Rapid Point-of-Care (POC) Tests for Detection of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen in Field and Laboratory Settings in the Gambia, Western Africa

    PubMed Central

    Njai, Harr Freeya; Shimakawa, Yusuke; Sanneh, Bakary; Ferguson, Lynne; Ndow, Gibril; Mendy, Maimuna; Sow, Amina; Lo, Gora; Toure-Kane, Coumba; Tanaka, Junko; Taal, Makie; D'alessandro, Umberto; Njie, Ramou; Thursz, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a leading cause of death in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Point-of-care tests for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) could be an ideal tool for a large-scale HBV screening/treatment program in SSA. Using data from the PROLIFICA (Prevention of Liver Fibrosis and Cancer in Africa) program, we conducted a cross-sectional study to assess the diagnostic accuracy of three point-of-care tests (Determine, Vikia, and Espline) for the detection of HBsAg in the field or a laboratory setting in the Gambia. In the field, we used finger-prick whole blood for the Determine and Vikia tests and dried blood spots for the reference standard test (AxSYM HBsAg enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA]). In the laboratory we used serum for the Determine, Espline, and reference test (Architect chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay). Of 773 participants recruited at the community and 227 known chronic HBV carriers (1,000 subjects in total), 293 were positive for HBsAg. The sensitivity and specificity of the Determine test were 88.5% and 100% in the field and 95.3% and 93.3% in the laboratory setting, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity were 90.0% and 99.8% for the Vikia test (in the field) and 93.9% and 94.7% for the Espline test (in the laboratory). There was no evidence that one kit was better than another. Most of the patients with false-negative results (18/19) were classified as inactive chronic carriers. In summary, the three point-of-care tests had acceptable ranges of diagnostic accuracy. These tests may represent accurate, rapid, and inexpensive alternatives to serology testing for the screening of HBV infection at field level in SSA. PMID:25631805

  1. Purification of hepatitis B surface antigen virus-like particles from recombinant Pichia pastoris and in vivo analysis of their immunogenic properties.

    PubMed

    Gurramkonda, Chandrasekhar; Zahid, Maria; Nemani, Satish Kumar; Adnan, Ahmad; Gudi, Satheesh Kumar; Khanna, Navin; Ebensen, Thomas; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Guzmán, Carlos A; Rinas, Ursula

    2013-12-01

    Following earlier studies on high-level intracellular production of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) using recombinant Pichia pastoris, we present here in detail an enhanced method for the purification of recombinant HBsAg virus-like particles (VLPs). We have screened various detergents for their ability to promote the solubilization of recombinant intracellular HBsAg. In addition, we have analyzed the effect of cell disruption and extraction regarding their impact on the release of HBsAg. Our results show that introduction of the mild nonionic detergent Tween 20 in the initial process of cell lysis at ∼600bars by high pressure homogenization leads to the best results. The subsequent purification steps involved polyethylene glycol precipitation of host cell contaminants, hydrophobic adsorption of HBsAg to colloidal silica followed by ion-exchange chromatography and either isopycnic density ultracentrifugation or size exclusion chromatography for the recovery of the VLPs. After final KSCN treatment and dialysis, a total yield of ∼3% with a purity of >99% was reached. The pure protein was characterized by electron microscopy, showing the presence of uniform VLPs which are the pre-requisite for immunogenicity. The intramuscular co-administration of HBsAg VLPs, with either alum or a PEGylated-derivative of the toll-like receptor 2/6 agonist MALP-2, to mice resulted in the elicitation of significantly higher HBsAg-specific IgG titers as well as a stronger cellular immune response compared to mice vaccinated with a gold standard vaccine (Engerix™). These results show that P. pastoris derived HBsAg VLPs exhibit a high potential as a superior biosimilar vaccine against hepatitis B.

  2. Antibody levels to multiple malaria vaccine candidate antigens in relation to clinical malaria episodes in children in the Kasena-Nankana district of Northern Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Considering the natural history of malaria of continued susceptibility to infection and episodes of illness that decline in frequency and severity over time, studies which attempt to relate immune response to protection must be longitudinal and have clearly specified definitions of immune status. Putative vaccines are expected to protect against infection, mild or severe disease or reduce transmission, but so far it has not been easy to clearly establish what constitutes protective immunity or how this develops naturally, especially among the affected target groups. The present study was done in under six year old children to identify malaria antigens which induce antibodies that correlate with protection from Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Methods In this longitudinal study, the multiplex assay was used to measure IgG antibody levels to 10 malaria antigens (GLURP R0, GLURP R2, MSP3 FVO, AMA1 FVO, AMA1 LR32, AMA1 3D7, MSP1 3D7, MSP1 FVO, LSA-1and EBA175RII) in 325 children aged 1 to 6 years in the Kassena Nankana district of northern Ghana. The antigen specific antibody levels were then related to the risk of clinical malaria over the ensuing year using a negative binomial regression model. Results IgG levels generally increased with age. The risk of clinical malaria decreased with increasing antibody levels. Except for FMPOII-LSA, (p = 0.05), higher IgG levels were associated with reduced risk of clinical malaria (defined as axillary temperature ≥37.5°C and parasitaemia of ≥5000 parasites/ul blood) in a univariate analysis, upon correcting for the confounding effect of age. However, in a combined multiple regression analysis, only IgG levels to MSP1-3D7 (Incidence rate ratio = 0.84, [95% C.I.= 0.73, 0.97, P = 0.02]) and AMA1 3D7 (IRR = 0.84 [95% C.I.= 0.74, 0.96, P = 0.01]) were associated with a reduced risk of clinical malaria over one year of morbidity surveillance. Conclusion The data from this study support the view that a multivalent vaccine

  3. Upregulation and induction of surface antigens with special reference to MHC class II expression in microglia in postnatal rat brain following intravenous or intraperitoneal injections of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, J; Ling, E A

    1994-01-01

    The effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the expression of surface antigens including major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and complement type 3 (CR3) receptors on microglial cells in the corpus callosum in postnatal rat brain were investigated. When LPS was injected intravenously (i.v.) in 1-d-old rats, the immunostaining of callosal amoeboid microglial cells with OX-18 directed against MHC class I antigen was enhanced 24 h after the injection in comparison with the controls. The expression of MHC class II (Ia) antigen on the same cell type as shown by its immunoreactivity with OX-6 was also elicited especially after 2 intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of LPS. Thus 7 d after a single i.p. injection of LPS into 1-d-old rats, only a few OX-6 positive cells showing a moderate staining reaction were observed in the corpus callosum. The immunoreactivity diminished 14 d after the injection. However, in rats receiving 2 successive i.p. injections of LPS at 1 and 4 d of age and killed 7 d after the 1st injection, a significant number of intensely stained OX-6 positive amoeboid microglial cells were observed in the corpus callosum. The expression of MHC class II antigens induced by 2 injections of LPS was sustained at least until d 14 when the callosal ramified microglial cells, known to be derived from gradual metamorphic transformation of amoeboid microglia, still exhibited intense immunoreactivity with OX-6. The effect of LPS on the expression of CR3 on amoeboid microglial cells was not obvious after a single injection, but the immunoreactivity with OX-42 was also augmented in rats given 2 i.p. administration of LPS into rats at 1 an 4 d of age. It is concluded from this study that the expression of MHC class I and class II antigens on amoeboid microglial cells in corpus callosum was upregulated and induced respectively after i.v. or i.p. injection of LPS into early postnatal rats. Although relatively fewer in number when compared with OX-18 and OX-42

  4. Measurement of Circulating Filarial Antigen Levels in Human Blood with a Point-of-Care Test Strip and a Portable Spectrodensitometer.

    PubMed

    Chesnais, Cédric B; Vlaminck, Johnny; Kunyu-Shako, Billy; Pion, Sébastien D; Awaca-Uvon, Naomi-Pitchouna; Weil, Gary J; Mumba, Dieudonné; Boussinesq, Michel

    2016-06-01

    The Alere Filariasis Test Strip (FTS) is a qualitative, point-of-care diagnostic tool that detects Wuchereria bancrofti circulating filarial antigen (CFA) in human blood, serum, or plasma. The Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis employs the FTS for mapping filariasis-endemic areas and assessing the success of elimination efforts. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between the intensity of positive test lines obtained by FTS with CFA levels as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with blood and plasma samples from 188 individuals who live in a filariasis-endemic area. The intensity of the FTS test line was assessed visually to provide a semiquantitative score (visual Filariasis Test Strip [vFTS]), and line intensity was measured with a portable spectrodensitometer (quantitative Filariasis Test Strip [qFTS]). These results were compared with antigen levels measured by ELISA in plasma from the same subjects. qFTS measurements were highly correlated with vFTS scores (ρ = 0.94; P < 0.001) and with plasma CFA levels (ρ = 0.91; P < 0.001). Thus, qFTS assessment is a convenient method for quantifying W. bancrofti CFA levels in human blood, which are correlated with adult worm burdens. This tool may be useful for assessing the impact of treatment on adult filarial worms in individuals and communities. PMID:27114288

  5. Measurement of Circulating Filarial Antigen Levels in Human Blood with a Point-of-Care Test Strip and a Portable Spectrodensitometer

    PubMed Central

    Chesnais, Cédric B.; Vlaminck, Johnny; Kunyu-Shako, Billy; Pion, Sébastien D.; Awaca-Uvon, Naomi-Pitchouna; Weil, Gary J.; Mumba, Dieudonné; Boussinesq, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The Alere Filariasis Test Strip (FTS) is a qualitative, point-of-care diagnostic tool that detects Wuchereria bancrofti circulating filarial antigen (CFA) in human blood, serum, or plasma. The Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis employs the FTS for mapping filariasis-endemic areas and assessing the success of elimination efforts. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between the intensity of positive test lines obtained by FTS with CFA levels as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with blood and plasma samples from 188 individuals who live in a filariasis-endemic area. The intensity of the FTS test line was assessed visually to provide a semiquantitative score (visual Filariasis Test Strip [vFTS]), and line intensity was measured with a portable spectrodensitometer (quantitative Filariasis Test Strip [qFTS]). These results were compared with antigen levels measured by ELISA in plasma from the same subjects. qFTS measurements were highly correlated with vFTS scores (ρ = 0.94; P < 0.001) and with plasma CFA levels (ρ = 0.91; P < 0.001). Thus, qFTS assessment is a convenient method for quantifying W. bancrofti CFA levels in human blood, which are correlated with adult worm burdens. This tool may be useful for assessing the impact of treatment on adult filarial worms in individuals and communities. PMID:27114288

  6. Selection of scFv Antibody Fragments Binding to Human Blood versus Lymphatic Endothelial Surface Antigens by Direct Cell Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Thomas; Kalt, Romana; Raab, Ingrid; Schachner, Helga; Mayrhofer, Corina; Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Hantusch, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    The identification of marker molecules specific for blood and lymphatic endothelium may provide new diagnostic tools and identify new targets for therapy of immune, microvascular and cancerous diseases. Here, we used a phage display library expressing human randomized single-chain Fv (scFv) antibodies for direct panning against live cultures of blood (BECs) and lymphatic (LECs) endothelial cells in solution. After six panning rounds, out of 944 sequenced antibody clones, we retrieved 166 unique/diverse scFv fragments, as indicated by the V-region sequences. Specificities of these phage clone antibodies for respective compartments were individually tested by direct cell ELISA, indicating that mainly pan-endothelial cell (EC) binders had been selected, but also revealing a subset of BEC-specific scFv antibodies. The specific staining pattern was recapitulated by twelve phage-independently expressed scFv antibodies. Binding capacity to BECs and LECs and differential staining of BEC versus LEC by a subset of eight scFv antibodies was confirmed by immunofluorescence staining. As one antigen, CD146 was identified by immunoprecipitation with phage-independent scFv fragment. This antibody, B6-11, specifically bound to recombinant CD146, and to native CD146 expressed by BECs, melanoma cells and blood vessels. Further, binding capacity of B6-11 to CD146 was fully retained after fusion to a mouse Fc portion, which enabled eukaryotic cell expression. Beyond visualization and diagnosis, this antibody might be used as a functional tool. Overall, our approach provided a method to select antibodies specific for endothelial surface determinants in their native configuration. We successfully selected antibodies that bind to antigens expressed on the human endothelial cell surfaces in situ, showing that BECs and LECs share a majority of surface antigens, which is complemented by cell-type specific, unique markers. PMID:25993332

  7. Energy filtering transmission electron microscopy immunocytochemistry and antigen retrieval of surface layer proteins from Tannerella forsythensis using microwave or autoclave heating with citraconic anhydride.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, K; Mitamura, Y; Iwami, J; Hasegawa, Y; Higuchi, N; Murakami, Y; Maeda, H; Yoshimura, F; Nakamura, H; Ohno, N

    2012-11-01

    Tannerella forsythensis (Bacteroides forsythus), an anaerobic Gram-negative species of bacteria that plays a role in the progression of periodontal disease, has a unique bacterial protein profile. It is characterized by two unique protein bands with molecular weights of more than 200 kDa. It also is known to have a typical surface layer (S-layer) consisting of regularly arrayed subunits outside the outer membrane. We examined the relationship between high molecular weight proteins and the S-layer using electron microscopic immunolabeling with chemical fixation and an antigen retrieval procedure consisting of heating in a microwave oven or autoclave with citraconic anhydride. Immunogold particles were localized clearly at the outermost cell surface. We also used energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) to visualize 3, 3'-diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride (DAB) reaction products after microwave antigen retrieval with 1% citraconic anhydride. The three-window method for electron spectroscopic images (ESI) of nitrogen by the EFTEM reflected the presence of moieties demonstrated by the DAB reaction with horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated secondary antibodies instead of immunogold particles. The mapping patterns of net nitrogen were restricted to the outermost cell surface.

  8. Characterization of a novel chromosomal virulence locus involved in expression of a major surface flagellar sheath antigen of the fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum.

    PubMed Central

    Norqvist, A; Wolf-Watz, H

    1993-01-01

    The fish pathogenic bacterium Vibrio anguillarum 775.17B was mutated by the use of transposon Tn5-132. Two hundred independent exconjugants were isolated and screened for a reduction of virulence in experimental infections of rainbow trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss). Two of these exconjugants, VAN20 and VAN70, showed a significant reduction in virulence after both intraperitoneal and immersion infections. The avirulent mutants showed no loss of any previously suggested virulence determinants of V. anguillarum. One of the mutants (VAN70) was further characterized. DNA sequence analysis revealed two open reading frames, the gene into which Tn5-132 had been inserted (virA) and a closely linked upstream gene (virB). A virB mutant of 775.17B, NQ706, was isolated and also shown to be avirulent. The deduced amino acid sequences of virA and virB correspond to proteins with molecular weights of 36,000 and 42,000, respectively. Insertional mutagenesis of the corresponding virA and virB genes of a clinical isolate of V. anguillarum, serotype O1, also resulted in avirulence. In immunoblot experiments, the total cell lysates of VAN70 (virA) and NQ706 (virB) did not respond to a rabbit polyclonal antiserum directed against whole cells of 775.17B (wild type). This suggests that virA and virB are involved in the biosynthesis of a major surface antigen important for the virulence of V. anguillarum. Immunogold electron microscopy showed that a constituent of the flagellar sheath was expressed by 775.17B (wild type) but not by VAN70 (virA) and NQ706 (virB), suggesting that the major surface antigen lacking in VAN70 and NQ706 is located on the outer sheath of the flagellum. Analysis of this major surface antigen revealed it likely to be lipopolysaccharide. Further analysis showed that the flagellum and the major surface antigen were expressed in vivo during fish infections. Images PMID:8388864

  9. Molecular cloning of a 46-kilodalton surface antigen (P46) gene from Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae: direct evidence of CGG codon usage for arginine.

    PubMed

    Futo, S; Seto, Y; Mitsuse, S; Mori, Y; Suzuki, T; Kawai, K

    1995-04-01

    The DNA sequence of the gene encoding the early and specific 46-kDa surface antigen (P46) of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae has been determined. The P46 gene, encoding a putative lipoprotein, contained three TGA codons and a single CGG codon in a 1,257-bp open reading frame. Edman degradation of peptide fragments showed that at least one TGA codon encodes tryptophan and that the CGG codon, which has been reported to be nonsense or unassigned in other mycoplasmas, is used for arginine in M. hyopneumoniae. PMID:7896725

  10. Molecular cloning of a 46-kilodalton surface antigen (P46) gene from Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae: direct evidence of CGG codon usage for arginine.

    PubMed Central

    Futo, S; Seto, Y; Mitsuse, S; Mori, Y; Suzuki, T; Kawai, K

    1995-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the gene encoding the early and specific 46-kDa surface antigen (P46) of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae has been determined. The P46 gene, encoding a putative lipoprotein, contained three TGA codons and a single CGG codon in a 1,257-bp open reading frame. Edman degradation of peptide fragments showed that at least one TGA codon encodes tryptophan and that the CGG codon, which has been reported to be nonsense or unassigned in other mycoplasmas, is used for arginine in M. hyopneumoniae. PMID:7896725

  11. Murine retroviruses control class I major histocompatibility antigen gene expression via a trans effect at the transcriptional level.

    PubMed

    Wilson, L D; Flyer, D C; Faller, D V

    1987-07-01

    Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) and Moloney murine sarcoma virus (M-MSV) exert a regulatory effect on the class I genes of the murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC). We have previously shown that M-MuLV infection of mouse fibroblasts results in a substantial increase in cell surface expression of H-2K, H-2D, and H-2L proteins, whereas M-MSV, upon coinfection of the same cells, is apparently able to override the MuLV-induced increase in H-2 expression. As a result of this modulation, immune recognition of the infected cells is profoundly altered. Our efforts have been directed toward elucidating the molecular basis for this phenomenon. We report here that stimulation of interferon production as a result of infection with MuLV does not occur and, therefore, is not the cause of MuLV-induced enhancement of MHC expression. Control of H-2 class I and beta 2-microglobulin gene expression by M-MuLV, and probably by M-MSV, takes place at the transcriptional level as indicated by nuclear runoff studies and analysis of steady-state mRNA levels. Our demonstration that M-MuLV controls expression of widely separated endogenous cellular genes (those coding for H-2D, H-2K, H-2L, and beta 2-microglobulin), transfected class I MHC genes, and unintegrated chimeric genes consisting of fragments of class I MHC genes linked to sequences encoding a procaryotic enzyme, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, suggests that M-MuLV exerts its effect in trans and not by proviral integration in the vicinity of the H-2 gene complex. Finally, we show that the sequences of at least one MHC gene, which are responsive to trans regulation by M-MuLV, lie within 1.2 kilobases upstream of the initiation codon for that gene.

  12. Assessing Clinical Significance of Serum CA15-3 and Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) Levels in Breast Cancer Patients: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yijie; Li, Hui

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Breast cancer is the most common malignant cancer in women worldwide. The tumor markers Cancer Antigen 15-3 (CA15-3) and Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) are frequently used for screening and monitoring breast cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS We conducted a meta-analysis of 13 published case-control studies to assess the associations between serum levels of CA15-3 and CEA with breast cancer susceptibility, including 1179 cases and 493 controls. The analyses were performed on malignant tumor and benign tumor, as well as in different subgroups with respect to the patient ethnicities and clinical tumor stages. RESULTS This systematic review and meta-analysis of association studies shows that serum levels of CA15-3 and CEA are potential biomarkers for breast cancer monitoring. When stratified by clinical stage, we noticed that although malignant tumors in all stages show elevated levels of CA15-3, it is greatly associated with the tumor stage, as it increases as breast tumor stage worsens. CONCLUSIONS This study clarifies the inconsistent conclusions from multiple studies, and provides a precise estimation for clinical utility of 2 important biomarkers, CA15-3 and CEA, in breast cancer monitoring. Thus, our study will shed lights on the prognosis of breast cancer patients. PMID:27596019

  13. Assessing Clinical Significance of Serum CA15-3 and Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) Levels in Breast Cancer Patients: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yijie; Li, Hui

    2016-09-06

    BACKGROUND Breast cancer is the most common malignant cancer in women worldwide. The tumor markers Cancer Antigen 15-3 (CA15-3) and Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) are frequently used for screening and monitoring breast cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS We conducted a meta-analysis of 13 published case-control studies to assess the associations between serum levels of CA15-3 and CEA with breast cancer susceptibility, including 1179 cases and 493 controls. The analyses were performed on malignant tumor and benign tumor, as well as in different subgroups with respect to the patient ethnicities and clinical tumor stages. RESULTS This systematic review and meta-analysis of association studies shows that serum levels of CA15-3 and CEA are potential biomarkers for breast cancer monitoring. When stratified by clinical stage, we noticed that although malignant tumors in all stages show elevated levels of CA15-3, it is greatly associated with the tumor stage, as it increases as breast tumor stage worsens. CONCLUSIONS This study clarifies the inconsistent conclusions from multiple studies, and provides a precise estimation for clinical utility of 2 important biomarkers, CA15-3 and CEA, in breast cancer monitoring. Thus, our study will shed lights on the prognosis of breast cancer patients.

  14. Assessing Clinical Significance of Serum CA15-3 and Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) Levels in Breast Cancer Patients: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yijie; Li, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the most common malignant cancer in women worldwide. The tumor markers Cancer Antigen 15-3 (CA15-3) and Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) are frequently used for screening and monitoring breast cancer. Material/Methods We conducted a meta-analysis of 13 published case-control studies to assess the associations between serum levels of CA15-3 and CEA with breast cancer susceptibility, including 1179 cases and 493 controls. The analyses were performed on malignant tumor and benign tumor, as well as in different subgroups with respect to the patient ethnicities and clinical tumor stages. Results This systematic review and meta-analysis of association studies shows that serum levels of CA15-3 and CEA are potential biomarkers for breast cancer monitoring. When stratified by clinical stage, we noticed that although malignant tumors in all stages show elevated levels of CA15-3, it is greatly associated with the tumor stage, as it increases as breast tumor stage worsens. Conclusions This study clarifies the inconsistent conclusions from multiple studies, and provides a precise estimation for clinical utility of 2 important biomarkers, CA15-3 and CEA, in breast cancer monitoring. Thus, our study will shed lights on the prognosis of breast cancer patients. PMID:27596019

  15. Surface antigen expression on Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes is modified in alpha- and beta-thalassemia

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to determine the mechanism whereby thalassemia in its milder forms may protect against malaria, we have examined the expression of neoantigen at the surface of Plasmodium falciparum- parasitized thalassemic red cells. Neoantigen expression was estimated by measurement of antibody bound after incubation in serum from adults living in a malaria-endemic area, using a quantitative radiometric antiglobulin assay. We found that P. falciparum-parasitized alpha- and beta-thalassemic red cells bind greater levels of antibody from endemic serum than controls: mean binding ratios (+/- SE), respectively, for alpha- and beta-thalassemia compared with controls were 1.69 +/- 0.12 and 1.23 +/- 0.06 on a cell for cell basis, and 1.97 +/- 0.11 and 1.47 +/- 0.08 after a correction for surface area differences. Binding of antibody increased exponentially during parasite maturation. In addition, we found a small but significant degree of binding of naturally occurring antibody to parasitized red cells, the extent of which was also greater in thalassemia. The apparent protective effect of thalassemia against malaria may be related to enhanced immune recognition and hence clearance of parasitized erythrocytes. PMID:2007853

  16. Antigen-Antibody Interaction Database (AgAbDb): a compendium of antigen-antibody interactions.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila; Raskar-Renuse, Snehal; Natekar-Kalantre, Girija; Saxena, Smita A

    2014-01-01

    Antigen-Antibody Interaction Database (AgAbDb) is an immunoinformatics resource developed at the Bioinformatics Centre, University of Pune, and is available online at http://bioinfo.net.in/AgAbDb.htm. Antigen-antibody interactions are a special class of protein-protein interactions that are characterized by high affinity and strict specificity of antibodies towards their antigens. Several co-crystal structures of antigen-antibody complexes have been solved and are available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). AgAbDb is a derived knowledgebase developed with an objective to compile, curate, and analyze determinants of interactions between the respective antigen-antibody molecules. AgAbDb lists not only the residues of binding sites of antigens and antibodies, but also interacting residue pairs. It also helps in the identification of interacting residues and buried residues that constitute antibody-binding sites of protein and peptide antigens. The Antigen-Antibody Interaction Finder (AAIF), a program developed in-house, is used to compile the molecular interactions, viz. van der Waals interactions, salt bridges, and hydrogen bonds. A module for curating water-mediated interactions has also been developed. In addition, various residue-level features, viz. accessible surface area, data on epitope segment, and secondary structural state of binding site residues, are also compiled. Apart from the PDB numbering, Wu-Kabat numbering and explicit definitions of complementarity-determining regions are provided for residues of antibodies. The molecular interactions can be visualized using the program Jmol. AgAbDb can be used as a benchmark dataset to validate algorithms for prediction of B-cell epitopes. It can as well be used to improve accuracy of existing algorithms and to design new algorithms. AgAbDb can also be used to design mimotopes representing antigens as well as aid in designing processes leading to humanization of antibodies. PMID:25048123

  17. Contact Potentials, Fermi Level Equilibration, and Surface Charging.

    PubMed

    Peljo, Pekka; Manzanares, José A; Girault, Hubert H

    2016-06-14

    This article focuses on contact electrification from thermodynamic equilibration of the electrochemical potential of the electrons of two conductors upon contact. The contact potential difference generated in bimetallic macro- and nanosystems, the Fermi level after the contact, and the amount and location of the charge transferred from one metal to the other are discussed. The three geometries considered are spheres in contact, Janus particles, and core-shell particles. In addition, the force between the two spheres in contact with each other is calculated and is found to be attractive. A simple electrostatic model for calculating charge distribution and potential profiles in both vacuum and an aqueous electrolyte solution is described. Immersion of these bimetallic systems into an electrolyte solution leads to the formation of an electric double layer at the metal-electrolyte interface. This Fermi level equilibration and the associated charge transfer can at least partly explain experimentally observed different electrocatalytic, catalytic, and optical properties of multimetallic nanosystems in comparison to systems composed of pure metals. For example, the shifts in the surface plasmon resonance peaks in bimetallic core-shell particles seem to result at least partly from contact charging. PMID:27176729

  18. Molecular-level assemblies on metal oxide surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Schoonover, J.R.; Bignozzi, C.; Meyer, T.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to explore molecular-level assemblies based on polypyridyl transition metal complexes attached to metal oxide surfaces to provide the basis for applications such as energy conversion and electricity generation, photoremediation of hazardous waste, chemical sensors, and optical storage and photorefractive devices for communications and optical computing. We have elucidated the fundamental factors that determine the photochemistry and photophysics of a series of these photoactive inorganic complexes in solution and on metal oxide substrates by exploiting our unique transient laser capabilities. This data is being utilized to design and fabricate molecular-level photonic devices. The rich chemistry of transition metal polypyridyl complexes can be utilized to prepare molecular assemblies having well-defined redox or excited-state properties that can be finely tuned to produce desired materials properties. We plan to explore other novel applications such as photorefractive switches and optical sensors using this molecular engineering approach.

  19. Antigenic topology of the P29 surface lipoprotein of Mycoplasma fermentans: differential display of epitopes results in high-frequency phase variation.

    PubMed

    Theiss, P; Karpas, A; Wise, K S

    1996-05-01

    Antibodies to P29, a major lipid-modified surface protein of Mycoplasma fermentans, reveal phase variation of surface epitopes occurring with high frequency in clonal lineages of the organism. This occurs despite continuous expression of the entire epitope-bearing P29 product (detected by Western immunoblotting) and contrasts with phase variation of other surface antigens mediated by differential expression of proteins. To understand the structure and antigenic topology of P29, the single-copy p29 gene from strain PG18 was cloned and sequenced. The gene encodes a prolipoprotein containing a signal sequence predicted to be modified with lipid and cleaved at the N-terminal Cys-1 residue of the mature P29 lipoprotein. The remaining 218-residue hydrophilic sequence of P29 is predicted to be located external to the single plasma membrane. Additional Cys residues at positions 91 and 128 in the mature protein were shown to form a 36-residue disulfide loop by selectively labeling sulfhydryl groups that were liberated only after chemical reduction of monomeric P29. Two nearly identical charged amino acid sequences occurred in P29, within the disulfide loop and upstream of this structure. Two distinct epitopes binding different monoclonal antibodies were associated with opposite ends of the P29 protein, by mapping products expressed in Escherichia coli from PCR-generated 3' deletion mutations of the p29 gene. Each monoclonal antibody detected high-frequency and noncoordinate changes in accessibility of the corresponding epitopes in colony immunoblots of clonal variants, yet sequencing of the p29 gene from these variants and analysis of disulfide bonds revealed no associated changes in the primary sequence or disulfide loop structure of P29. These results suggest that P29 surface epitope variation may involve masking of selected regions of P29, possibly by other surface components undergoing phase variation by differential expression. Differential masking may be an important

  20. Process for leveling film surfaces and products thereof

    DOEpatents

    Birkmire, R.W.; McCandless, B.E.

    1990-03-20

    Semiconductor films and photovoltaic devices prepared therefrom are provided wherein the semiconductor films have a specular surface with a texture less than about 0.25 micron greater than the average planar film surface and wherein the semiconductor films are surface modified by exposing the surface to an aqueous solution of bromine containing an acid or salt and continuing such exposure for a time sufficient to etch the surface. 8 figs.

  1. Process for levelling film surfaces and products thereof

    DOEpatents

    Birkmire, Robert W.; McCandless, Brian E.

    1990-03-20

    Semiconductor films and photovoltaic devices prepared therefrom are provided wherein the semiconductor films have a specular surface with a texture less than about 0.25 micron greater than the average planar film surface and wherein the semiconductor films are surface modified by exposing the surface to an aqueous solution of bromine containing an acid or salt and continuing such exposure for a time sufficient to etch the surface.

  2. Underwater and surface strategies of 200 m world level swimmers.

    PubMed

    Veiga, Santiago; Roig, Andreu

    2016-01-01

    Pacing strategies of elite swimmers have been consistently characterised from the average lap velocities. In the present study, we examined the racing strategies of 200 m world class-level swimmers with regard to their underwater and surface lap components. The finals and semi-finals of the 200 m races at the 2013 World Swimming Championships (Barcelona, Spain) were analysed by an innovative image-processing system (InThePool® 2.0). Free swimming velocities of elite swimmers typically decreased throughout the 200 m race laps (-0.12 m · s(-1), 95% CI -0.11 to -0.14 m · s(-1), P = 0.001, η(2) = 0.81), whereas underwater velocities, which were faster than free swimming, were not meaningfully affected by the race progress (0.02 m · s(-1), -0.01 to 0.04 m · s(-1), P = 0.01, η(2) = 0.04). When swimming underwater, elite swimmers typically travelled less distance (-0.66 m, -0.83 to -0.49 m, P = 0.001, η(2) = 0.34) from the first to the third turn of the race, although underwater distances were maintained on the backstroke and butterfly races. These strategies allowed swimmers to maintain their average velocity in the last lap despite a decrease in the free swimming velocity. Elite coaches and swimmers are advised to model their racing strategies by considering both underwater and surface race components. PMID:26186108

  3. Underwater and surface strategies of 200 m world level swimmers.

    PubMed

    Veiga, Santiago; Roig, Andreu

    2016-01-01

    Pacing strategies of elite swimmers have been consistently characterised from the average lap velocities. In the present study, we examined the racing strategies of 200 m world class-level swimmers with regard to their underwater and surface lap components. The finals and semi-finals of the 200 m races at the 2013 World Swimming Championships (Barcelona, Spain) were analysed by an innovative image-processing system (InThePool® 2.0). Free swimming velocities of elite swimmers typically decreased throughout the 200 m race laps (-0.12 m · s(-1), 95% CI -0.11 to -0.14 m · s(-1), P = 0.001, η(2) = 0.81), whereas underwater velocities, which were faster than free swimming, were not meaningfully affected by the race progress (0.02 m · s(-1), -0.01 to 0.04 m · s(-1), P = 0.01, η(2) = 0.04). When swimming underwater, elite swimmers typically travelled less distance (-0.66 m, -0.83 to -0.49 m, P = 0.001, η(2) = 0.34) from the first to the third turn of the race, although underwater distances were maintained on the backstroke and butterfly races. These strategies allowed swimmers to maintain their average velocity in the last lap despite a decrease in the free swimming velocity. Elite coaches and swimmers are advised to model their racing strategies by considering both underwater and surface race components.

  4. Rapid detection of S. mutans surface antigen I/II using a sensitive monoclonal anti-Ag I/II antibody by ELISA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Ah; Jeon, Hyun-Soon; Shin, Se-Young; Baik, Byeong-Ju; Yang, Yeon-Mi; Lee, Kyung-Yeol; Kim, Jae-Gon

    2013-10-01

    The cell-surface protein antigen I/II (Ag I/II) is expressed in oral streptococci, which are known as the causative agent of a number of diseases including dental caries, endocarditis, gingivitis, and periodontal disease. Consequently, monoclonal antibodies (MAb) capable of recognizing the streptococcal Ag I/II protein could be a useful tool for the diagnosis and cure of these diseases. In this study, a previously generated monoclonal anti-Ag I/II antibody, ckAg I/II, was used to detect a small amount of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) surface antigen Ag I/II. The ckAg I/II was proved to be very sensitive and able to detect as little as 1 ng of recombinant Ag I/II protein within 5 min and Ag I/II in saliva within 10 min, as well as native Ag I/II in 20 μL of culture supernatant by ELISA. These results suggest that ckAg I/II can be used as a fast and efficient diagnostic tool to detect Ag I/II. PMID:24111865

  5. Airborne Interferometry using GNSS Reflections for Surface Level Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semmling, Maximilian; Beyerle, Georg; Schön, Steffen; Stosius, Ralf; Gerber, Thomas; Beckheinrich, Jamila; Markgraf, Markus; Ge, Maorong; Wickert, Jens

    2013-04-01

    The interferometric use of GNSS reflections for ocean altimetry can fill the gap in coverage of ocean observations. Today radar altimeters are used for large scale ocean observations to monitor e.g. global sea level change or circulation processes like El Niño. Spacial and temporal resolution of a single radar altimeter, however, is insufficient to observe mesoscale ocean phenomena like large oceanic eddies that are important indicators of climate change. The high coverage expected for a spaceborne altimeter based on GNSS reflections stimulated investigations on according interferometric methods. Several airborne experiments have been conducted using code observations. Carrier observations have a better precision but are severely affected by noise and have mostly been used in ground-based experiments. A new interferometric approach is presented using carrier observations for airborne application. Implementing a spectral retrieval noise reduction is achieved. A flight experiment was conducted with a Zeppelin airship on 2010/10/12 over Lake Constance at the border between Austria, Germany and Switzerland. The lake surface with an area of 536km2 is suitable for altimetric study as its decimeter range Geoid undulations are well-known. Three GNSS receiver were installed on the airship. A Javad Delta receiver recording direct signals for navigation. The DLR G-REX receiver recording reflected signals for scatterometry and the GORS (GNSS Occultation Reflectometry Scatterometry) receiver recording direct and reflected signals for interferometry. The airship's trajectory is determined from navigation data with a precision better than 10cm using regional augmentation. This presentation focuses on the interferometric analysis of GORS observations. Ray tracing calculations are used to model the difference of direct and reflected signals' path. Spectral retrieval is applied to determine Doppler residuals of modelled path difference and interferometric observations. Lake level

  6. Clinical indicators of envenoming and serum levels of venom antigens in patients bitten by Bothrops lanceolatus in Martinique. Research Group on Snake Bites in Martinique.

    PubMed

    Bucher, B; Canonge, D; Thomas, L; Tyburn, B; Robbe-Vincent, A; Choumet, V; Bon, C; Ketterlé, J; Lang, J

    1997-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed to measure venom antigen levels in the serum of 40 patients bitten by Bothrops lanceolatus. The grading system used for the severity of envenomation (grades 1 to 4, minor to major) was predominantly based on the presence of local signs. Serum venom levels increased with the grade of severity (P < 0.001, by Spearman's rank correlation test); they were 6 +/- 6 ng/mL (mean +/- SD) in clinically non-envenomed patients (grade 1, n = 3), 7.6 +/- 11.7 (n = 17), 44.3 +/- 41.8 (n = 17), and 80.3 +/- 34.1 ng/mL (n = 3) in patients diagnosed as grade 2, 3 and 4 respectively. However, venom antigens could not be detected in the serum of 54% of patients who showed clinical signs of envenomation. Most patients diagnosed as grade 2, 3 or 4 were given 20, 40 and 60 mL of a monospecific F(ab')2 antivenom, respectively. Venom concentrations > or = 15 ng/mL were observed in all patients with progressive aggravation of swelling despite the use of early antivenom therapy. No venom was detectable in blood samples taken after completion of serotherapy. All patients recovered. These results confirm the efficacy of both the clinical severity scoring system used and the therapeutic regimen. PMID:9196765

  7. An African swine fever virus gene with similarity to the T-lymphocyte surface antigen CD2 mediates hemadsorption.

    PubMed

    Borca, M V; Kutish, G F; Afonso, C L; Irusta, P; Carrillo, C; Brun, A; Sussman, M; Rock, D L

    1994-03-01

    An open reading frame, LMW8-DR, in the African swine fever virus (ASFV) genome possesses striking similarity to the lymphocyte membrane antigen CD2. All characterized CD2 domains, including the amino-terminal signal sequence, IgV, hinge, IgC2, stalk, transmembrane, and proline-rich carboxy cytoplasmic domains, are highly conserved in the ASFV gene. Critical residues for the binding of the lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA-3) and CD59 and for T-cell activation are also partially conserved. LMW8-DR is actively transcribed in ASFV-infected swine macrophages and Vero cells at late times in the infection cycle and Vero and COS cells transiently expressing the LMW8-DR open reading frame hemadsorbed swine red blood cells. The structural and functional similarities of LMW8-DR to CD2, a protein that is involved in cell-cell adhesion and immune response modulation, suggest a possible role in the pathogenesis of ASFV infection.

  8. Increased serum level of early prostate cancer antigen is associated with subsequent cancer risk in men with high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhigang; Zeng, Guohua

    2010-06-01

    Early prostate cancer antigen (EPCA) has been recently suggested as a novel biomarker in malignant and premalignant lesions of the prostate. This study was to examine serum expression of EPCA and to further clarify the relationship between initial serum EPCA levels and the presence of subsequent cancer in the individuals with isolated high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN). An indirect ELISA was used for initial serum EPCA measurement in 112 men with isolated HGPIN, who were enrolled and completed a follow-up of >or=5 years. All patients had a detectable concentration of EPCA in the initial serum, with a mean of 0.64+/-0.13 absorbance at 450 nm. Thirty-three patients had an initial serum EPCA level of >or=1.10, in which 31 cases were subsequently identified as having prostate cancer on follow-up. However, in the remaining 79 cases, serum EPCA levels were all <1.10, and none was diagnosed with cancer later. Statistical analysis showed a significantly higher serum ECPA level in isolated HGPIN patients with subsequent cancer than those without cancer (P<0.001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curves showed that serum EPCA level had better predictive accuracy of cancer onset on follow-up than prostate specific antigen velocity and abnormal digital rectal examination findings. Furthermore, univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses demonstrated the predictive performance independently by initial serum EPCA>or=1.10 absorbance (relative risk, 3.32; 95% confidence intervals, 2.62-5.03, P<0.001). These preliminary findings first show the potential of serum EPCA to serve as a significant predictor for subsequent cancer in isolated HGPIN.

  9. Plasma Carotenoids and Tocopherols in Relation to Prostate-specific Antigen (PSA) Levels Among Men with Biochemical Recurrence of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Antwi, Samuel; Steck, Susan E.; Zhang, Hongmei; Stumm, Lareissa; Zhang, Jiajia; Hurley, Thomas G.; Hebert, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although men presenting with clinically localized prostate cancer (PrCA) often are treated with radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy with curative intent, about 25–40% develop biochemically recurrent PrCA within 5 years of treatment, which has no known cure. Studies suggest that carotenoid and tocopherol intake may be associated with PrCA risk and progression. We examined plasma carotenoid and tocopherol levels in relation to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels among men with PSA-defined biochemical recurrence of PrCA. Methods Data analyzed were from a 6-month diet, physical activity and stress-reduction intervention trial conducted in South Carolina among biochemically recurrent PrCA patients (n=39). Plasma carotenoids and tocopherol levels were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Linear regression was used to estimate least-square means comparing PSA levels of men with high versus low carotenoid/tocopherol levels, adjusting for covariates. Results After adjusting for baseline PSA level, plasma cis-lutein/zeaxanthin level at 3 months was related inversely to PSA level at 3 months (P=0.0008), while α-tocopherol (P=0.01), β-cryptoxanthin (P=0.01), and all-trans-lycopene (P=0.004) levels at 3 months were related inversely to PSA levels at 6-months. Percent increase in α-tocopherol and trans-β-carotene levels from baseline to month 3 were associated with lower PSA levels at 3 and 6 months. Percent increase in β−cryptoxanthin, cislutein/zeaxanthin and all-trans-lycopene were associated with lower PSA levels at 6 months only. Conclusions Certain plasma carotenoids and tocopherols were related inversely to PSA levels at various timepoints, suggesting that greater intake of foods containing these micronutrients might be beneficial to men with PSA-defined PrCA recurrence. PMID:26165176

  10. Differentiation antigens in lymphohemopoietic tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Miyasaka, M.; Trnka, Z.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 15 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: In Situ Characterization of Human Lymphoid Cells Using Monoclonal Antibodies; Structural and Functional Aspects of HLA Clas II Genes; Cell-Surface Differentiation Antigens Expressed on Thymocytes and T Cells of the Mouse; and Differentiation Antigens on Lymphoid Cells of the Guinea Pig.

  11. Rational design of a meningococcal antigen inducing broad protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Scarselli, Maria; Aricò, Beatrice; Brunelli, Brunella; Savino, Silvana; Di Marcello, Federica; Palumbo, Emmanuelle; Veggi, Daniele; Ciucchi, Laura; Cartocci, Elena; Bottomley, Matthew James; Malito, Enrico; Lo Surdo, Paola; Comanducci, Maurizio; Giuliani, Marzia Monica; Cantini, Francesca; Dragonetti, Sara; Colaprico, Annalisa; Doro, Francesco; Giannetti, Patrizia; Pallaoro, Michele; Brogioni, Barbara; Tontini, Marta; Hilleringmann, Markus; Nardi-Dei, Vincenzo; Banci, Lucia; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino

    2011-07-13

    The sequence variability of protective antigens is a major challenge to the development of vaccines. For Neisseria meningitidis, the bacterial pathogen that causes meningitis, the amino acid sequence of the protective antigen factor H binding protein (fHBP) has more than 300 variations. These sequence differences can be classified into three distinct groups of antigenic variants that do not induce cross-protective immunity. Our goal was to generate a single antigen that would induce immunity against all known sequence variants of N. meningitidis. To achieve this, we rationally designed, expressed, and purified 54 different mutants of fHBP and tested them in mice for the induction of protective immunity. We identified and determined the crystal structure of a lead chimeric antigen that was able to induce high levels of cross-protective antibodies in mice against all variant strains tested. The new fHBP antigen had a conserved backbone that carried an engineered surface containing specificities for all three variant groups. We demonstrate that the structure-based design of multiple immunodominant antigenic surfaces on a single protein scaffold is possible and represents an effective way to create broadly protective vaccines.

  12. Comparison of Three Luminescent Immunoassays for Hepatitis B Virus Surface Antigen Quantification during the Natural History of Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiao-Dong; Song, Liu-Wei; Fang, Lin-Lin; Yang, Lin; Wu, Yong; Ge, Sheng-Xiang; Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) quantification has garnered attention because of its high predictive value in determining treatment responses. The HBsAg quantification assays, such as Architect and Elecsys, are commercially available, and more assays are in development. We aimed to compare the results of the Architect and Elecsys assays with those of a new assay, WTultra. The WTultra HBsAg assay is a sandwich chemiluminescent microplate enzyme immunoassay and provides an alternative choice which is more cost-effective and potentially applicable in developing or resource-constrained countries and areas. A total of 411 serum samples were collected from patients during various phases of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection. The samples were assessed using the three assays, and the results were compared and analyzed. The results for the Architect, Elecsys, and WTultra assays were well correlated according to the overall results for the samples (correlation coefficients, rArchitect versus WTultra = 0.936, rArchitect versus Elecsys = 0.952, and rWTultra versus Elecsys = 0.981) and the various infection phases (rArchitect versus WTultra ranging from 0.67 to 0.975, rArchitect versus Elecsys ranging from 0.695 to 0.982, and rWTultra versus Elecsys ranging from 0.877 to 0.99). Additionally, consistent results were observed according to genotype (genotype B: rArchitect versus WTultra = 0.976, rArchitect versus Elecsys = 0.978, and rWTultra versus Elecsys = 0.979; genotype C: rArchitect versus WTultra = 0.950, rArchitect versus Elecsys = 0.963, and rWTultra versus Elecsys = 0.981) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA levels (rArchitect = 0.540, rWTultra = 0.553, and rElecsys = 0.580). In conclusion, the Elecsys and WTultra assays were well correlated with the Architect assay, irrespective of the CHB infection phase or genotype. All of these assays are reliable for HBsAg quantification. PMID:25209557

  13. Cholera Toxin B Subunit as a Carrier Molecule Promotes Antigen Presentation and Increases CD40 and CD86 Expression on Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    George-Chandy, Annie; Eriksson, Kristina; Lebens, Michael; Nordström, Inger; Schön, Emma; Holmgren, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) is an efficient mucosal carrier molecule for the generation of mucosal antibody responses and/or induction of systemic T-cell tolerance to linked antigens. CTB binds with high affinity to GM1 ganglioside cell surface receptors. In this study, we evaluated how conjugation of a peptide or protein antigen to CTB by chemical coupling or genetic fusion influences the T-cell-activating capacity of different antigen-presenting cell (APC) subsets. Using an in vitro system in which antigen-pulsed APCs were incubated with antigen-specific, T-cell receptor-transgenic T cells, we found that the dose of antigen required for T-cell activation could be decreased >10,000-fold using CTB-conjugated compared to free antigen. In contrast, no beneficial effects were observed when CTB was simply admixed with antigen. CTB conjugation enhanced the antigen-presenting capacity not only of dendritic cells and B cells but also of macrophages, which expressed low levels of cell surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and were normally poor activators of naive T cells. Enhanced antigen-presenting activity by CTB-linked antigen resulted in both increased T-cell proliferation and increased interleukin-12 and gamma interferon secretion and was associated with up-regulation of CD40 and CD86 on the APC surface. These results imply that conjugation to CTB dramatically lowers the threshold concentration of antigen required for immune cell activation and also permits low-MHC II-expressing APCs to prime for a specific immune response. PMID:11500448

  14. Three-Dimensional Structure and Biophysical Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Cell Surface Antigen-Manganese Transporter MntC

    SciTech Connect

    Gribenko, Alexey; Mosyak, Lidia; Ghosh, Sharmistha; Parris, Kevin; Svenson, Kristine; Moran, Justin; Chu, Ling; Li, Sheng; Liu, Tong; Woods, Jr., Virgil L.; Jansen, Kathrin U.; Green, Bruce A.; Anderson, Annaliesa S.; Matsuka, Yury V.

    2013-08-23

    MntC is a metal-binding protein component of the Mn2 +-specific mntABC transporter from the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. The protein is expressed during the early stages of infection and was proven to be effective at reducing both S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis infections in a murine animal model when used as a vaccine antigen. MntC is currently being tested in human clinical trials as a component of a multiantigen vaccine for the prevention of S. aureus infections. To better understand the biological function of MntC, we are providing structural and biophysical characterization of the protein in this work. The three-dimensional structure of the protein was solved by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 Å resolution and suggests two potential metal binding modes, which may lead to reversible as well as irreversible metal binding. Precise Mn2 +-binding affinity of the protein was determined from the isothermal titration calorimetry experiments using a competition approach. Differential scanning calorimetry experiments confirmed that divalent metals can indeed bind to MntC reversibly as well as irreversibly. Finally, Mn2 +-induced structural and dynamics changes have been characterized using spectroscopic methods and deuterium–hydrogen exchange mass spectroscopy. Results of the experiments show that these changes are minimal and are largely restricted to the structural elements involved in metal coordination. Therefore, it is unlikely that antibody binding to this antigen will be affected by the occupancy of the metal-binding site by Mn2 +.

  15. Prognostic significance of postoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen levels in patients with completely resected pathological-stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Until date, there are no clear recommendations for regular perioperative measurements of serum CEA levels for lung cancer in any guidelines. The purpose in the present study is to evaluate the prognostic significance of perioperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels in patients with pathological-stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods We retrospectively reviewed 263 completely resected pathological-stage I NSCLC patients whose preoperative and postoperative serum CEA levels were measured. Patients were subdivided according to the perioperative change of CEA levels: continuously normal CEA levels (NN group), continuously high CEA levels (HH group), and high preoperative CEA levels that returned to normal levels post-operation (HN group). The clinicopathological factors and overall survival (OS) among these 3 groups were compared. Univariate and multivariate analyses of the correlation between clinicopathological factors and OS were performed. Results High preoperative CEA levels significantly correlated with men aged >70 years with smoking history, high serum CYFRA 21–1 levels, greater tumor diameter, presence of visceral pleural invasion (VPI), and moderate-to-poor differentiation. Five-year OS rates in the NN and HH groups were 95.5% and 59.3%, respectively. Four-year OS rate in the HN group was 85.5%. Multivariate analyses indicated tumor diameter of more than 30 mm, presence of VPI, and the HH group were independent unfavorable prognostic factors. Conclusions A high postoperative CEA level was an independent unfavorable prognostic factor in pathological-stage I NSCLC patients. Patients with high postoperative CEA levels may benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:23607757

  16. Identification of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell epitopes of woodchuck hepatitis virus core and surface antigens in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Callejero, L; Otano, I; Vales, A; Olagüe, C; Sarobe, P; Lasarte, J J; Prieto, J; Menne, S; González-Aseguinolaza, G

    2010-07-19

    A therapeutic vaccine against chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection requires the development of a strong and multispecific Th1 cell immune response. Woodchucks chronically infected with the woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) closely resemble HBV infection and represent the best animal model for this hepadnavirus-induced disease. Using the BIMAS "HLA Peptide Binding Predictions" program, we have identified and further characterized novel H-2 d-restricted CD8+ epitopes within the WHV core (peptides C#12-21, C#18-32, C#19-27, C#61-69) and surface antigens (peptides preS2#10-18, preS2#27-35, S#76-84, S#133-140 and S#257-265), respectively. These peptides bind to H-2 d with high efficiency and upon immunization of mice with peptide and Freund's adjuvant they induce the development of IFN-gamma producing T cells. More importantly, WHV core peptides C#19-27 and C#61-69 and WHV surface peptides S#133-140 and S#257-265 were also recognized by CD8+ T cells after immunization of mice with DNA/PEI nanoparticles. Direct stimulation of splenocytes obtained from such DNA-immunized mice with peptides C#18-32, S#76-84, and S#257-265 resulted in significant production of IFN-gamma. Thus, we have identified T cell determinants in mice from WHV core and surface antigens that have important value for designing and evaluating an effective vaccine against hepadnavirus infection. PMID:20665977

  17. A Novel Platform for the Potentiation of Therapeutic Antibodies Based on Antigen-Dependent Formation of IgG Hexamers at the Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Verploegen, Sandra; Strumane, Kristin; van Kampen, Muriel D.; Voorhorst, Marleen; Horstman, Wendy; Engelberts, Patrick J.; Oostindie, Simone C.; Wang, Guanbo; Heck, Albert J. R.; Schuurman, Janine; Parren, Paul W. H. I.

    2016-01-01

    IgG antibodies can organize into ordered hexamers on cell surfaces after binding their antigen. These hexamers bind the first component of complement C1 inducing complement-dependent target cell killing. Here, we translated this natural concept into a novel technology platform (HexaBody technology) for therapeutic antibody potentiation. We identified mutations that enhanced hexamer formation and complement activation by IgG1 antibodies against a range of targets on cells from hematological and solid tumor indications. IgG1 backbones with preferred mutations E345K or E430G conveyed a strong ability to induce conditional complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) of cell lines and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patient tumor cells, while retaining regular pharmacokinetics and biopharmaceutical developability. Both mutations potently enhanced CDC- and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of a type II CD20 antibody that was ineffective in complement activation, while retaining its ability to induce apoptosis. The identified IgG1 Fc backbones provide a novel platform for the generation of therapeutics with enhanced effector functions that only become activated upon binding to target cell–expressed antigen. PMID:26736041

  18. A Novel Platform for the Potentiation of Therapeutic Antibodies Based on Antigen-Dependent Formation of IgG Hexamers at the Cel