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Sample records for surface chemistry investigation

  1. Investigating the surface chemistry of Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Grunthaner, F.J.; Ricco, A.J.; Butler, A.M.; Lane, A.L.; McKay, C.P.; Zent, A.P.; Quinn, R.C.; Murray, B.; Klein, H.P.; Levin, G.V.; Terhune, R.W.; Homer, M.L.; Ksendzov, A.; Niedermann, P.

    1995-10-01

    One of the primary objectives of the Viking missions to Mars in the 1970s was to search for life. Numerous theories were put forth to explain the Viking data, most of which involved an oxidizing species in the Martian surface material. In December 1992, the Mars Oxidant Experiment (MOx) was selected as the U.S. contribution to the Russian Mars 96 mission. Two landers are scheduled for launch in November 1996 and should arrive at Mars in September 1997. The MOx instrument on the Russian lander is designed to investigate the chemical nature of the Martian surface material, with particular emphasis on its oxidative character. The instrument uses fiber-optic technology to monitor real-time physicochemical changes in a suite of chemically sensitive thin-film materials. This report describes the scientific rationale and basis for the MOx instrument, along with the details of its design and construction. 15 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Surface science investigations of oxidative chemistry on gold.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jinlong; Mullins, C Buddie

    2009-08-18

    Because of gold's resistance to oxidation and corrosion, historically chemists have considered this metal inert. However, decades ago, researchers discovered that highly dispersed gold particles on metal oxides are highly chemically active, particularly in low-temperature CO oxidations. These seminal findings spurred considerable interest in investigations and applications of gold-based materials. Since the discovery of gold's chemical activity at the nanoscale, researchers found that bulk gold also has interesting catalytic properties. Thus, it is important to understand and contrast the intrinsic chemical properties of bulk gold with those of nanoparticle Au. Despite numerous studies, the structure and active site of supported Au nanoclusters and the active oxygen species remain elusive, and model studies under well-controlled conditions could help identify these species. The {111} facet has the lowest surface energy and is the most stable and prevalent configuration of most supported gold nanoparticles. Therefore, a molecular-level understanding of the physical properties and surface chemistry of Au(111) could provide mechanistic details regarding the nature of Au-based catalysts and lead to improved catalytic processes. This Account focuses on our current understanding of oxidative chemistry on well-defined gold single crystals, predominantly from recent investigations on Au(111) that we have performed using modern surface science techniques. Our model system strategy allows us to control reaction conditions, which assists in the identification of reaction intermediates, the determination of the elementary reaction steps, and the evaluation of reaction energetics for rate-limiting steps. We have employed temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), molecular beam reactive scattering (MBRS), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) to evaluate surface oxidative chemistry. In some cases, we have combined these results with density functional theory (DFT) calculations

  3. Laboratory investigations: Low Earth orbit environment chemistry with spacecraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Jon B.

    1990-01-01

    Long-term space operations that require exposure of material to the low earth orbit (LEO) environment must take into account the effects of this highly oxidative atmosphere on material properties and the possible contamination of the spacecraft surroundings. Ground-based laboratory experiments at Los Alamos using a newly developed hyperthermal atomic oxygen (AO) source have shown that not only are hydrocarbon based materials effected but that inorganic materials such as MoS2 are also oxidized and that thin protective coatings such as Al2O3 can be breached, producing oxidation of the underlying substrate material. Gas-phase reaction products, such as SO2 from oxidation of MoS2 and CO and CO2 from hydrocarbon materials, have been detected and have consequences in terms of spacecraft contamination. Energy loss through gas-surface collisions causing spacecraft drag has been measured for a few select surfaces and has been found to be highly dependent on the surface reactivity.

  4. Investigations of nitrogen oxide plasmas: Fundamental chemistry and surface reactivity and monitoring student perceptions in a general chemistry recitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blechle, Joshua M.

    Part I of this dissertation focuses on investigations of nitrogen oxide plasma systems. With increasing concerns over the environmental presence of NxOy species, there is growing interest in utilizing plasma-assisted conversion techniques. Advances, however, have been limited because of the lack of knowledge regarding the fundamental chemistry of these plasma systems. Understanding the kinetics and thermodynamics of processes in these systems is vital to realizing their potential in a range of applications. Unraveling the complex chemical nature of these systems, however, presents numerous challenges. As such, this work serves as a foundational step in the diagnostics and assessment of these NxOy plasmas. The partitioning of energy within the plasma system is essential to unraveling these complications as it provides insight into both gas and surface reactivity. To obtain this information, techniques such as optical emission spectroscopy (OES), broadband absorption spectroscopy (BAS), and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) were utilized to determine species energetics (vibrational, rotational, translational temperatures). These temperature data provide mechanistic insight and establish the relationships between system parameters and energetic outcomes. Additionally, these data are also correlated to surface reactivity data collected with the Imaging of Radicals Interacting with Surfaces (IRIS) technique. IRIS data demonstrate the relationship between internal temperatures of radicals and their observed surface scatter coefficients (S), the latter of which is directly related to surface reactivity (R) [R = 1-S]. Furthermore, time-resolved (TR) spectroscopic techniques, specifically TR-OES, revealed kinetic trends in NO and N2 formation from a range of precursors (NO, N2O, N2/O2). By examining the rate constants associated with the generation and destruction of various plasma species we can investigate possible mechanistic implications. All told, such data provides

  5. Field and laboratory emission cell automation and control system for investigating surface chemistry reactions.

    PubMed

    Flemmer, Michael M; Ham, Jason E; Wells, J R

    2007-01-01

    A novel system [field and laboratory emission cell (FLEC) automation and control system] has been developed to deliver ozone to a surface utilizing the FLEC to simulate indoor surface chemistry. Ozone, humidity, and air flow rate to the surface were continuously monitored using an ultraviolet ozone monitor, humidity, and flow sensors. Data from these sensors were used as feedback for system control to maintain predetermined experimental parameters. The system was used to investigate the chemistry of ozone with alpha-terpineol on a vinyl surface over 72 h. Keeping all other experimental parameters the same, volatile organic compound emissions from the vinyl tile with alpha-terpineol were collected from both zero and 100 ppb (parts per 10(9)) ozone exposures. System stability profiles collected from sensor data indicated experimental parameters were maintained to within a few percent of initial settings. Ozone data from eight experiments at 100 ppb (over 339 h) provided a pooled standard deviation of 1.65 ppb and a 95% tolerance of 3.3 ppb. Humidity data from 17 experiments at 50% relative humidity (over 664 h) provided a pooled standard deviation of 1.38% and a 95% tolerance of 2.77%. Data of the flow rate of air flowing through the FLEC from 14 experiments at 300 ml/min (over 548 h) provided a pooled standard deviation of 3.02 ml/min and a 95% tolerance range of 6.03 ml/min. Initial experimental results yielded long term emissions of ozone/alpha-terpineol reaction products, suggesting that surface chemistry could play an important role in indoor environments.

  6. Field and laboratory emission cell automation and control system for investigating surface chemistry reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flemmer, Michael M.; Ham, Jason E.; Wells, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    A novel system [field and laboratory emission cell (FLEC) automation and control system] has been developed to deliver ozone to a surface utilizing the FLEC to simulate indoor surface chemistry. Ozone, humidity, and air flow rate to the surface were continuously monitored using an ultraviolet ozone monitor, humidity, and flow sensors. Data from these sensors were used as feedback for system control to maintain predetermined experimental parameters. The system was used to investigate the chemistry of ozone with α-terpineol on a vinyl surface over 72h. Keeping all other experimental parameters the same, volatile organic compound emissions from the vinyl tile with α-terpineol were collected from both zero and 100ppb(partsper109) ozone exposures. System stability profiles collected from sensor data indicated experimental parameters were maintained to within a few percent of initial settings. Ozone data from eight experiments at 100ppb (over 339h) provided a pooled standard deviation of 1.65ppb and a 95% tolerance of 3.3ppb. Humidity data from 17 experiments at 50% relative humidity (over 664h) provided a pooled standard deviation of 1.38% and a 95% tolerance of 2.77%. Data of the flow rate of air flowing through the FLEC from 14 experiments at 300ml/min (over 548h) provided a pooled standard deviation of 3.02ml/min and a 95% tolerance range of 6.03ml/min. Initial experimental results yielded long term emissions of ozone/α-terpineol reaction products, suggesting that surface chemistry could play an important role in indoor environments.

  7. Investigating playa surface textures: The impact of chemistry and environment on surface morphology and dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tollerud, H. J.; Fantle, M. S.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral dust is an important component of geochemical cycles, but its impact on those cycles is not thoroughly understood. For instance, dust inputs to the ocean have been suggested to affect the iron cycle by stimulating natural iron fertilization, which then could modify climate. The influence of dust on geochemical cycles is determined by the chemical and mineralogical composition of dust inputs, which is governed in turn by the composition of dust source regions. A loose, unconsolidated surface texture is more easily ablated by wind, and so a location where composition and environmental characteristics encourage this type of surface is more likely to produce dust and influence geochemical cycles. Also, if evaporation concentrates evaporites such as calcite at the surface of a dust producing region, dust Ca concentrations are likely to be higher. Playas can be regionally significant dust source regions, and they are amenable to study as their surface textures often vary significantly across small areas. This study investigates surface processes experimentally, and compares the results to observations of surface texture in a natural playa system (the Black Rock Desert, Nevada). We dry surfaces with 25% to 75% clay and quartz at 40°C for approximately a day, wet the surface to simulate rain, and then repeat the cycle multiple times. We estimate surface roughness, measure surface strength with a penetrometer, and investigate thermal characteristics with an IR camera (wavelength range 8-12μm). We find that textures similar to those in playas can be reproduced with cycles of wetting and drying, such as might occur in an arid environment with intermittent rain. We investigate the addition of calcite and halite, since their precipitation potentially can disrupt the clay surfaces through the formation and expansion of crystals, thereby linking the chemical composition with the disruption of a strong surface texture and an increased chance of dust production. In the

  8. Investigations of Nitrogen Oxide Plasmas: Fundamental Chemistry and Surface Reactivity and Monitoring Student Perceptions in a General Chemistry Recitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blechle, Joshua M.

    2016-01-01

    Part I of this dissertation focuses on investigations of nitrogen oxide plasma systems. With increasing concerns over the environmental presence of NxOy species, there is growing interest in utilizing plasma-assisted conversion techniques. Advances, however, have been limited because of the lack of knowledge regarding the fundamental chemistry of…

  9. Impact of surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Somorjai, Gabor A; Li, Yimin

    2011-01-18

    The applications of molecular surface chemistry in heterogeneous catalyst technology, semiconductor-based technology, medical technology, anticorrosion and lubricant technology, and nanotechnology are highlighted in this perspective. The evolution of surface chemistry at the molecular level is reviewed, and the key roles of surface instrumentation developments for in situ studies of the gas-solid, liquid-solid, and solid-solid interfaces under reaction conditions are emphasized.

  10. Impact of surface chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Li, Yimin

    2011-01-01

    The applications of molecular surface chemistry in heterogeneous catalyst technology, semiconductor-based technology, medical technology, anticorrosion and lubricant technology, and nanotechnology are highlighted in this perspective. The evolution of surface chemistry at the molecular level is reviewed, and the key roles of surface instrumentation developments for in situ studies of the gas–solid, liquid–solid, and solid–solid interfaces under reaction conditions are emphasized. PMID:20880833

  11. Getting Physical with Your Chemistry: Mechanically Investigating Local Structure and Properties of Surfaces with the Atomic Force Microscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinz, William F.; Hoh, Jan H.

    2005-01-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) investigates mechanically the chemical properties of individual molecules, surfaces, and materials using suitably designed probes. The current state of the art of AFM in terms of imaging, force measurement, and sample manipulation and its application to physical chemistry is discussed.

  12. Getting Physical with Your Chemistry: Mechanically Investigating Local Structure and Properties of Surfaces with the Atomic Force Microscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinz, William F.; Hoh, Jan H.

    2005-01-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) investigates mechanically the chemical properties of individual molecules, surfaces, and materials using suitably designed probes. The current state of the art of AFM in terms of imaging, force measurement, and sample manipulation and its application to physical chemistry is discussed.

  13. Chemistry of SOFC Cathode Surfaces: Fundamental Investigation and Tailoring of Electronic Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Yildiz, Bilge; Heski, Clemens

    2013-08-31

    1) Electron tunneling characteristics on La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSM) thin-film surfaces were studied up to 580oC in 10-3mbar oxygen pressure, using scanning tunneling microscopy/ spectroscopy (STM/STS). A threshold-like drop in the tunneling current was observed at positive bias in STS, which is interpreted as a unique indicator for the activation polarization in cation oxygen bonding on LSM cathodes. Sr-enrichment was found on the surface at high temperature using Auger electron spectroscopy, and was accompanied by a decrease in tunneling conductance in STS. This suggests that Sr-terminated surfaces are less active for electron transfer in oxygen reduction compared to Mn-terminated surfaces on LSM. 2) Effects of strain on the surface cation chemistry and the electronic structure are important to understand and control for attaining fast oxygen reduction kinetics on transition metal oxides. Here, we demonstrate and mechanistically interpret the strain coupling to Sr segregation, oxygen vacancy formation, and electronic structure on the surface of La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSM) thin films as a model system. Our experimental results from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy are discussed in light of our first principles-based calculations. A stronger Sr enrichment tendency and a more facile oxygen vacancy formation prevail for the tensile strained LSM surface. The electronic structure of the tensile strained LSM surface exhibits a larger band gap at room temperature, however, a higher tunneling conductance near the Fermi level than the compressively strained LSM at elevated temperatures in oxygen. Our findings suggest lattice strain as a key parameter to tune the reactivity of perovskite transition metal oxides with oxygen in solid oxide fuel cell cathodes. 3) Cation segregation on perovskite oxide surfaces affects vastly the oxygen reduction activity and stability of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathodes. A unified theory that explains the physical

  14. Soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigation of the surface chemistry and treatments of copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS)

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Craig; Nordlund, Dennis; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Contreras, Miguel; Weng, Tsu -Chien; Mansfield, Lorelle; Hurst, Katherine E.; Dameron, Arrelaine; Ramanathan, Kannan; Prendergast, David; Christensen, Steven T.

    2016-11-10

    The surface and near surface structure of the copper-indium-gallium-selenide (CIGS) absorber layer is integral to producing of a high-quality photovoltaic junction. By using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and monitoring multiple elemental absorption edges with both theory and experiment, we are able to identify several features of the surface of CIGS as a function of composition and surface treatments. The XAS data shows trends in the near surface region of oxygen, copper, indium and gallium species as the copper content is varied in the films. The oxygen surface species are also monitored through a series of experiments that systematically investigate the effects of water and various solutions of: ammonium hydroxide, cadmium sulfate, and thiourea. These being components of cadmium sulfide chemical bath deposition (CBD). Characteristics of the CBD are correlated with a restorative effect that produces a normalized, uniform surface chemistry as measured by XAS. This surface chemistry is found in CIGS solar cells with excellent power conversion efficiency (~19%). Finally, the results provide new insight for CIGS processing strategies that seek to replace CBD and/or cadmium sulfide.

  15. Soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigation of the surface chemistry and treatments of copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS)

    DOE PAGES

    Schwartz, Craig; Nordlund, Dennis; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; ...

    2016-11-10

    The surface and near surface structure of the copper-indium-gallium-selenide (CIGS) absorber layer is integral to producing of a high-quality photovoltaic junction. By using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and monitoring multiple elemental absorption edges with both theory and experiment, we are able to identify several features of the surface of CIGS as a function of composition and surface treatments. The XAS data shows trends in the near surface region of oxygen, copper, indium and gallium species as the copper content is varied in the films. The oxygen surface species are also monitored through a series of experiments that systematically investigate themore » effects of water and various solutions of: ammonium hydroxide, cadmium sulfate, and thiourea. These being components of cadmium sulfide chemical bath deposition (CBD). Characteristics of the CBD are correlated with a restorative effect that produces a normalized, uniform surface chemistry as measured by XAS. This surface chemistry is found in CIGS solar cells with excellent power conversion efficiency (~19%). Finally, the results provide new insight for CIGS processing strategies that seek to replace CBD and/or cadmium sulfide.« less

  16. A solid phase extraction based non-disruptive sampling technique to investigate the surface chemistry of macroalgae.

    PubMed

    Cirri, Emilio; Grosser, Katharina; Pohnert, Georg

    2016-01-01

    The surface chemistry of aquatic organisms determines their biotic interactions. Metabolites in the spatially limited laminar boundary layer mediate processes, such as antifouling, allelopathy and chemical defense against herbivores. However, very few methods are available for the investigation of such surface metabolites. An approach is described in which surfaces are extracted by means of C18 solid phase material. By powdering wet algal surfaces with this material, organic compounds are adsorbed and can be easily recovered for subsequent liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) investigations. The method is robust, picks up metabolites of a broad polarity range and is easy to handle. It is more universal compared to established solvent dipping protocols and it does not cause damage to the test organisms. A protocol is introduced for the macroalgae Fucus vesiculosus, Caulerpa taxifolia and Gracilaria vermiculophylla, but it can be easily transferred to other aquatic organisms.

  17. Investigating Unusual Organic Functional Groups to Engineer the Surface Chemistry of Mesoporous Silica to Tune CO2-Surface Interactions.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Emily; Besson, Eric; Queyroy, Séverine; Llewellyn, Richard; Gastaldi, Stéphane; Llewellyn, Philip L

    2017-04-26

    As the search for functionalized materials for CO2 capture continues, the role of theoretical chemistry is becoming more and more central. In this work, a strategy is proposed where ab initio calculations are compared and validated by adsorption microcalorimetry experiments for a series of, so far unexplored, functionalized SBA-15 silicas with different spacers (aryl, alkyl) and terminal functions (N3, NO2). This validation then permitted to propose the use of a nitro-indole surface functionality. After synthesis of such a material the predictions were confirmed by experiment. This confirms that it is possible to fine-tune CO2-functional interactions at energies much lower than those observed with amine species.

  18. Interstellar Grain Surface Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Chemistry on grain surfaces plays an Important role in the formation of interstellar Ices, It can also influence the composition of the gas phase through outgassing near luminous, newly formed stars. This paper reviews the chemical processes taking place on Interstellar grain surfaces with the emphasis on those transforming CO into other hydrocarbons. At low, molecular cloud temperatures (approximately equal to 10K), physisorption processes dominate interstellar grain surface chemistry and GO is largely hydrogenated through reactions with atomic H and oxidized through reactions with atomic O. The former will lead to the formation of H2CO and CH3OH ices, while the latter results in CO2 ice. The observational evidence for these ices in molecular clouds will be discussed. Very close to protostars, the gas and grain temperatures are much higher (approximately equal to 500K) and chemisorption processes, including catalytic surface reactions, becomes important. This will be illustrated based upon our studies of the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis of CH4 from CO on metallic surfaces. Likely, this process has played an important role in the early solar nebula. Observational consequences will be pointed out.

  19. Investigation of pyrite oxidation by hexavalent chromium: solution species and surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Demoisson, Frédéric; Mullet, Martine; Humbert, Bernard

    2007-12-15

    Pyrite oxidation processes by aqueous Cr(VI) were investigated at 25 degrees C under an argon atmosphere. Synthetic pyrite suspensions (6 g L(-1)) were reacted for 20 h with a range of Cr(VI) solutions from 0 to 700 microM and at pH 2-12. The main objective of this work was to investigate the reaction mechanisms by emphasizing the role of sulfur species. Aqueous chemical processes were well illustrated in acidic media where significant amounts of sulfate and iron species were determined. Sulfate anions are the final stable sulfur species involved in the reaction pathway. Experiments showing complete Cr(VI) removal from solution displayed ratios [S(VI)]/[Fe](tot)<2, probably due to a deficit in aqueous sulfur species. Experiments showing incomplete Cr(VI) removal displayed ratios [Cr(VI)](removed)/[S(VI)] close to 1.5. This ratio was found to be consistent with the formation of thiosulfate (S(2)O(2-)(3)). Thiosulfate ions disproportionated into elemental sulfur S(0) and tetrathionate ions (S(4)O(2-)(6)) that were finally oxidized to sulfate anions under acidic conditions. The distribution of the oxidation state of sulfur atoms at the pyrite surface determined by XPS was additional evidence for the multistep sulfur oxidation process. The presence of elemental sulfur in the S(2p) spectra correlated well with the disproportion of thiosulfate under acidic conditions.

  20. Investigation of IAQ-Relevant Surface Chemistry and Emissions on HVAC Filter Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Destaillats, Hugo; Fisk, William J.

    2010-02-01

    Chemical reactions involving ozone of outdoor origin and indoor materials are known to be significant sources of formaldehyde and other irritant gas-phase oxidation products in the indoor environment. HVAC filters are exposed to particularly high ozone concentrations--close to outdoor levels. In this study, we investigated chemical processes taking place on the surface of filters that included fiberglass, polyester, cotton/polyester blend and synthetic (e.g., polyolefin) filter media. Ozone reactions were studied on unused filter media, and on filters that were deployed for 3 months in two different locations: at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and at the Port of Oakland. Specimens from each filter were exposed to ozone under controlled conditions in a laboratory flow tube at a constant flow of dry or humidified air (50percent relative humidity). Ozone was generated with a UV source upstream of the flow tube, and monitored using a photometric detector. Ozone breakthrough curves were recorded for each sample exposed to ~;;150 ppbv O3 for periods of ~;;1000 min, from which we estimated their uptake rate. Most experiments were performed at 1.3 L/min (corresponding to a face velocity of 0.013 m/s), except for a few tests performed at a higher airflow rate, to obtain a face velocity of 0.093 m/s, slightly closer to HVAC operation conditions. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, two oxidation byproducts, were collected downstream of the filter and quantified. Emissions of these volatile aldehydes were consistently higher under humidified air than under dry conditions, at which levels were near the limit of detection. Our results confirm that there are significant reactions of ozone as air containing ozone flows through HVAC filters, particularly when the filters are loaded with particles and the air is humidified. The amount of ozone reacted was not clearly related to the types of filter media, e.g., fiberglass versus synthetic. Specific fiberglass filters that were

  1. Surface chemistry investigation of colloid transport in packed beds. Final report, August 1, 1989--July 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, T.M.

    1996-12-31

    The importance of colloids as co-transport agents for pollutants in subsurface systems hinges on the extent to which electrostatic or other sources of repulsive colloid-collector interactions inhibit their filtration. When electrostatic interactions are favorable, for example when the colloid and groundwater media have opposite charge, colloids may be expected to travel only a few centimeters in saturated porous media. Repulsive electrostatic interactions between colloids and aquifer media with the same charge sign are postulated to significantly mobilize particles. As it happens, however, theories describing particle filtration from first principles, i.e., DLVO (Derjagin and Landau, Verwey and Overbeek) theory, dramatically underestimate filtration rates when colloid-collector interactions are electrostatically repulsive. One of the primary objectives of the project was to experimentally investigate potential reasons for the historical lack of agreement between particle filtration models based on DLVO theory and observed particle deposition rates. An important hypothesis of the study was to test the validity of the assumption of surface homogeneity, as required by these models. The approach was to focus on collector surfaces that were commonly used as model systems, e.g., glass beads and quartz sand. Laboratory-scale column filtration experiments were conducted with colloidal polystyrene latex spheres. Collector surface preparation and cleaning approaches were examined, as well as the effects of solution chemistry.

  2. Nanografting for surface physical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Maozi; Amro, Nabil A; Liu, Gang-yu

    2008-01-01

    This article reveals the enabling aspects of nanografting (an atomic force microscopy-based lithography technique) in surface physical chemistry. First, we characterize self-assembled monolayers and multilayers using nanografting to place unknown molecules into a matrix with known structure or vice versa. The availability of an internal standard in situ allows the unknown structures to be imaged and quantified. The same approaches are applied to reveal the orientation and packing of biomolecules (ligands, DNA, and proteins) upon immobilization on surfaces. Second, nanografting enables systematic investigations of size-dependent mechanics at the nanometer scale by producing a series of designed nanostructures and measuring their Young's modulus in situ. Third, one can investigate systematically the influence of ligand local structure on biorecognition and protein immobilization by precisely engineering ligand nanostructures. Finally, we also demonstrate the regulation of the surface reaction mechanism, kinetics, and products via nanografting.

  3. An investigation of molybdenum and molybdenum oxide catalyzed hydrocarbon formation reactions. [Surface chemistry of ethylene oxide on Pd(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    Progress was made in the following four areas: activity of model catalyst (Mo oxides) for olefin metathesis (2 C[sub 3]H[sub 6] [r arrow] C[sub 4]H[sub 8] + C[sub 2]H[sub 4]); kinetics of Mo(100)-catalyzed olefin metathesis; surface chemistry of ethylene oxide on Pd(111); and uv source construction.

  4. Investigations of the structure and "interfacial" surface chemistry of Bioglass (RTM) materials by solid-state multinuclear NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Gautam

    formation of surface silica species and follow the formation of phosphate species, respectively, while cross-polarization magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) 29Si and 31P NMR have provided information about low intensity NMR peaks due to various silicon- and phosphorus-species present in the vicinity of associated protons on the surface of in vitro reacted BioglassRTM materials. The solid-state NMR investigations of the "interfacial" surface reactions of BioglassRTM materials are discussed in the context of the structure of these materials and the influence of this structure on the kinetics and the mechanism of their "interfacial" surface chemistry. (Abstract shortened by UMI.) BioglassRTM, trademark, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 32611.

  5. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy with an automated control feedback system for investigating nitrate radical surface chemistry reactions.

    PubMed

    Flemmer, Michael M; Ham, Jason E

    2012-08-01

    Nitrate radical (NO(3)(●)) surface chemistry of indoor environments has not been well studied due to the difficulty in generating and maintaining NO(3)(●) at low concentrations for long term exposures. This article presents the Surface Chemistry Reactant Air Delivery and Experiment System (SCRADES), a novel feedback controlled system developed to deliver nitrate radicals at specified concentrations (50-500 ppt, ±30 ppt) and flow rates (500-2000 ml min(-1)) to a variety of indoor surfaces to initiate reaction chemistry for periods of up to 72 h. The system uses a cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS), with a detection limit of 1.7 ppt, to measure the concentration of NO(3)(●) supplied to a 24 l experiment chamber. Nitrate radicals are introduced via thermal decomposition of N(2)O(5) and diluted with clean dry air until the desired concentration is achieved. Additionally, this article addresses details concerning NO(3)(●) loss through the system, consistency of the NO(3)(●) concentration delivered, and stability of the CRDS cavity over long exposure durations (72 h).

  6. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy with an automated control feedback system for investigating nitrate radical surface chemistry reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flemmer, Michael M.; Ham, Jason E.

    2012-08-01

    Nitrate radical (NO3•) surface chemistry of indoor environments has not been well studied due to the difficulty in generating and maintaining NO3• at low concentrations for long term exposures. This article presents the Surface Chemistry Reactant Air Delivery and Experiment System (SCRADES), a novel feedback controlled system developed to deliver nitrate radicals at specified concentrations (50-500 ppt, ±30 ppt) and flow rates (500-2000 ml min-1) to a variety of indoor surfaces to initiate reaction chemistry for periods of up to 72 h. The system uses a cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS), with a detection limit of 1.7 ppt, to measure the concentration of NO3• supplied to a 24 l experiment chamber. Nitrate radicals are introduced via thermal decomposition of N2O5 and diluted with clean dry air until the desired concentration is achieved. Additionally, this article addresses details concerning NO3• loss through the system, consistency of the NO3• concentration delivered, and stability of the CRDS cavity over long exposure durations (72 h).

  7. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy with an automated control feedback system for investigating nitrate radical surface chemistry reactions

    PubMed Central

    Flemmer, Michael M.; Ham, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate radical (NO3•) surface chemistry of indoor environments has not been well studied due to the difficulty in generating and maintaining NO3• at low concentrations for long term exposures. This article presents the Surface Chemistry Reactant Air Delivery and Experiment System (SCRADES), a novel feedback controlled system developed to deliver nitrate radicals at specified concentrations (50–500 ppt, ±30 ppt) and flow rates (500–2000 ml min−1) to a variety of indoor surfaces to initiate reaction chemistry for periods of up to 72 h. The system uses a cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS), with a detection limit of 1.7 ppt, to measure the concentration of NO3• supplied to a 24 l experiment chamber. Nitrate radicals are introduced via thermal decomposition of N2O5 and diluted with clean dry air until the desired concentration is achieved. Additionally, this article addresses details concerning NO3• loss through the system, consistency of the NO3• concentration delivered, and stability of the CRDS cavity over long exposure durations (72 h). PMID:22938328

  8. Experimental and computational investigation of acetic acid deoxygenation over oxophilic molybdenum carbide: Surface chemistry and active site identity

    SciTech Connect

    Schaidle, Joshua A.; Blackburn, Jeffrey; Farberow, Carrie A.; Nash, Connor; Steirer, K. Xerxes; Clark, Jared; Robichaud, David J.; Ruddy, Daniel A.

    2016-01-21

    Ex situ catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) is a promising route for producing fungible biofuels; however, this process requires bifunctional catalysts that favor C–O bond cleavage, activate hydrogen at near atmospheric pressure and high temperature (350–500 °C), and are stable under high-steam, low hydrogen-to-carbon environments. Recently, early transition-metal carbides have been reported to selectively cleave C–O bonds of alcohols, aldehydes, and oxygenated aromatics, yet there is limited understanding of the metal carbide surface chemistry under reaction conditions and the identity of the active sites for deoxygenation. In this study, we evaluated molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) for the deoxygenation of acetic acid, an abundant component of biomass pyrolysis vapors, under ex situ CFP conditions, and we probed the Mo2C surface chemistry, identity of the active sites, and deoxygenation pathways using in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations.

  9. Experimental and computational investigation of acetic acid deoxygenation over oxophilic molybdenum carbide: Surface chemistry and active site identity

    DOE PAGES

    Schaidle, Joshua A.; Blackburn, Jeffrey; Farberow, Carrie A.; ...

    2016-01-21

    Ex situ catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP) is a promising route for producing fungible biofuels; however, this process requires bifunctional catalysts that favor C–O bond cleavage, activate hydrogen at near atmospheric pressure and high temperature (350–500 °C), and are stable under high-steam, low hydrogen-to-carbon environments. Recently, early transition-metal carbides have been reported to selectively cleave C–O bonds of alcohols, aldehydes, and oxygenated aromatics, yet there is limited understanding of the metal carbide surface chemistry under reaction conditions and the identity of the active sites for deoxygenation. In this study, we evaluated molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) for the deoxygenation of acetic acid, anmore » abundant component of biomass pyrolysis vapors, under ex situ CFP conditions, and we probed the Mo2C surface chemistry, identity of the active sites, and deoxygenation pathways using in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations.« less

  10. Visualizing Chemistry: Investigations for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ealy, Julie B.; Ealy, James L., Jr.

    This book contains 101 investigations for chemistry classrooms. Topics include: (1) Physical Properties; (2) Reactions of Some Elements; (3) Reactions Involving Gases; (4) Energy Changes; (5) Solutions and Solubility; (6) Transition Metals and Complex Ions; (7) Kinetics and Equilibrium; (8) Acids and Bases; (9) Oxidation-Reduction; (10)…

  11. Visualizing Chemistry: Investigations for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ealy, Julie B.; Ealy, James L., Jr.

    This book contains 101 investigations for chemistry classrooms. Topics include: (1) Physical Properties; (2) Reactions of Some Elements; (3) Reactions Involving Gases; (4) Energy Changes; (5) Solutions and Solubility; (6) Transition Metals and Complex Ions; (7) Kinetics and Equilibrium; (8) Acids and Bases; (9) Oxidation-Reduction; (10)…

  12. Surface chemistry: Mussel power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waite, J. Herbert

    2008-01-01

    The adhesive proteins secreted by mussels are the inspiration behind a versatile approach to the surface modification of a wide range of inorganic and organic materials, resulting in the fabrication of multifunctional coatings for a variety of applications.

  13. Surface chemistries for antibody microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Seurynck-Servoss, Shannon L.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Rodland, Karin D.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2007-05-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarrays promise to be a powerful tool for the detection of disease biomarkers. The original technology for printing ELISA microarray chips and capturing antibodies on slides was derived from the DNA microarray field. However, due to the need to maintain antibody structure and function when immobilized, surface chemistries used for DNA microarrays are not always appropriate for ELISA microarrays. In order to identify better surface chemistries for antibody capture, a number of commercial companies and academic research groups have developed new slide types that could improve antibody function in microarray applications. In this review we compare and contrast the commercially available slide chemistries, as well as highlight some promising recent advances in the field.

  14. Surface Chemistry Maps

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-13

    Maps of magnesium/silicon (left) and thermal neutron absorption (right) across Mercury's surface (red indicates high values, blue low) are shown. These maps, together with maps of other elemental abundances, reveal the presence of distinct geochemical terranes. Volcanic smooth plains deposits are outlined in white. Read the mission news story to learn more! http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19242

  15. Surface chemistry in photodissociation regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esplugues, G. B.; Cazaux, S.; Meijerink, R.; Spaans, M.; Caselli, P.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The presence of dust can strongly affect the chemical composition of the interstellar medium. We model the chemistry in photodissociation regions (PDRs) using both gas-phase and dust-phase chemical reactions. Aims: Our aim is to determine the chemical compositions of the interstellar medium (gas/dust/ice) in regions with distinct (molecular) gas densities that are exposed to radiation fields with different intensities. Methods: We have significantly improved the Meijerink PDR code by including 3050 new gas-phase chemical reactions and also by implementing surface chemistry. In particular, we have included 117 chemical reactions occurring on grain surfaces covering different processes, such as adsorption, thermal desorption, chemical desorption, two-body reactions, photo processes, and cosmic-ray processes on dust grains. Results: We obtain abundances for different gas and solid species as a function of visual extinction, depending on the density and radiation field. We also analyse the rates of the formation of CO2 and H2O ices in different environments. In addition, we study how chemistry is affected by the presence/absence of ice mantles (bare dust or icy dust) and the impact of considering different desorption probabilities. Conclusions: The type of substrate (bare dust or icy dust) and the probability of desorption can significantly alter the chemistry occurring on grain surfaces, leading to differences of several orders of magnitude in the abundances of gas-phase species, such as CO, H2CO, and CH3OH. The type of substrate, together with the density and intensity of the radiation field, also determine the threshold extinction to form ices of CO2 and H2O. We also conclude that H2CO and CH3OH are mainly released into the gas phase of low, far-ultraviolet illuminated PDRs through chemical desorption upon two-body surface reactions, rather than through photodesorption.

  16. Surface Chemistry of Perovskite-Type Electrodes During High Temperature CO2 Electrolysis Investigated by Operando Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Alexander K; Nenning, Andreas; Rameshan, Christoph; Kubicek, Markus; Götsch, Thomas; Blume, Raoul; Hävecker, Michael; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Rupprechter, Günther; Klötzer, Bernhard; Fleig, Jürgen

    2017-10-05

    Any substantial move of energy sources from fossil fuels to renewable resources requires large scale storage of excess energy, for example, via power to fuel processes. In this respect electrochemical reduction of CO2 may become very important, since it offers a method of sustainable CO production, which is a crucial prerequisite for synthesis of sustainable fuels. Carbon dioxide reduction in solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) is particularly promising owing to the high operating temperature, which leads to both improved thermodynamics and fast kinetics. Additionally, compared to purely chemical CO formation on oxide catalysts, SOECs have the outstanding advantage that the catalytically active oxygen vacancies are continuously formed at the counter electrode, and move to the working electrode where they reactivate the oxide surface without the need of a preceding chemical (e.g., by H2) or thermal reduction step. In the present work, the surface chemistry of (La,Sr)FeO3-δ and (La,Sr)CrO3-δ based perovskite-type electrodes was studied during electrochemical CO2 reduction by means of near-ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (NAP-XPS) at SOEC operating temperatures. These measurements revealed the formation of a carbonate intermediate, which develops on the oxide surface only upon cathodic polarization (i.e., under sufficiently reducing conditions). The amount of this adsorbate increases with increasing oxygen vacancy concentration of the electrode material, thus suggesting vacant oxygen lattice sites as the predominant adsorption sites for carbon dioxide. The correlation of carbonate coverage and cathodic polarization indicates that an electron transfer is required to form the carbonate and thus to activate CO2 on the oxide surface. The results also suggest that acceptor doped oxides with high electron concentration and high oxygen vacancy concentration may be particularly suited for CO2 reduction. In contrast to water splitting, the CO2

  17. Investigation of the Effects of Surface Chemistry and Solution Concentration on the Conformation of Adsorbed Proteins Using an Improved Circular Dichroism Method

    PubMed Central

    Sivaraman, Balakrishnan; Fears, Kenan P.; Latour, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present the development of methods using circular dichroism spectropolarimetry with a custom-designed cuvette to increase the signal-to-noise ratio for the measurement of the secondary structure of adsorbed proteins, thus providing enhanced sensitivity and reproducibility. These methods were then applied to investigate how surface chemistry and solution concentration influence both the amount of adsorbed proteins and their secondary structure. Human fibrinogen and albumin were adsorbed onto alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold with CH3, OCH2-CF3, NH2, COOH, and OH terminal groups from both dilute (0.1 mg/mL) and moderately concentrated (1.0 mg/mL) solutions. An increase in surface hydrophobicity was found to cause an increase in both the amount of the protein adsorbed and the degree of structural change that was caused by the adsorption process, while an increase in solution concentration caused an increase in the amount of protein adsorbed but a decrease in the degree of conformational change, with these effects being more pronounced on the more hydrophobic surfaces. The combined use of these two parameters (i.e., surface chemistry and solution concentration) thus provides a means of independently varying the degree of structural change following adsorption from the amount of adsorbed protein. Further studies are underway to examine which of these factors most strongly influences platelet response, with the overall goal of developing a better understanding of the fundamental factors governing the hemocompatibility of biomaterial surfaces. PMID:19437712

  18. Surface chemistry of liquid metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, J. Adin, Jr.; Peebles, Henry; Peebles, Diamond; Rye, Robert; Yost, Fred

    1993-01-01

    The fundamental surface chemistry of the behavior of liquid metals spreading on a solid substrate is not at all well understood. Each of these questions involves knowing the details of the structure of interfaces and their dynamics. For example the structure of a monolayer of tin oxide on pure liquid tin is unknown. This is in contrast to the relatively large amount of data available on the structure of copper oxide monolayers on solid, pure copper. However, since liquid tin has a vapor pressure below 10(exp -10)torr for a reasonable temperature range above its melting point, it is possible to use the techniques of surface science to study the geometric, electronic and vibrational structures of these monolayers. In addition, certain techniques developed by surface chemists for the study of liquid systems can be applied to the ultra-high vacuum environment. In particular we have shown that light scattering spectroscopy can be used to study the surface tension tensor of these interfaces. The tin oxide layer in particular is very interesting in that the monolayer is rigid but admits of bending. Ellipsometric microscopy allows the visualization of monolayer thick films and show whether island formation occurs at various levels of dosing.

  19. Influence of pH and Surface Chemistry on Poly(L-lysine) Adsorption onto Solid Supports Investigated by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Seong-Oh; Linardy, Eric; Dreaden, Erik C; Zhdanov, Vladimir P; Hammond, Paula T; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2015-08-20

    Poly(L-lysine) (PLL) adsorption onto various materials has been widely applied as a surface modification strategy and layer-by-layer fabrication method. Considering the role of electrostatic charges, a detailed understanding of the influence of solution pH on PLL adsorption process is important for optimization of PLL coating protocols. Herein, PLL adsorption onto different polar and hydrophilic substrates—silica, an amine-terminated self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on gold, and a carboxyl-terminated SAM on gold—across a range of pH conditions was investigated using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation. The adsorption kinetics consisted of an initial rapid phase, followed by a second phase where adsorption rate gradually decelerated. These features were interpreted by applying a mean-field kinetic model implying diffusion-limited adsorption in the first phase and reconfiguration of adsorbed PLL molecules in the second phase. The adsorption kinetics and uptake were found to be sensitive to the pH condition, surface chemistry, and flow rate. The strongest PLL adsorption occurred at pH 11 on all three surfaces while weak PLL adsorption generally occurred under acidic conditions. The surface morphology and roughness of adsorbed PLL layers were investigated using atomic force microscopy, and strong PLL adsorption is found to produce a uniform and smooth adlayer while weak adsorption formed a nonuniform and rough adlayer.

  20. Chemistry of the Burning Surface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-12

    1993lOct. 1, 1989 to Sept..30, 1993 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS l| PE -61102F Chemistry of the Burning Surface PR - 2308 PR- 2308 6. AUTHOR(S...to characterize the rapid 4 thermal decomposition of hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (HNIW or Cl-20). The remaining three years of work were devoted to...2CH3 OH n NO2 1 6 NH4 NO 3 NH4CIO 4 (NJ 8 6 0 12,-i 1 2NNO2 AN APOýNN \\ N 50 .•N 11 "aa: NO2 02 N ~ADN ~NN* [NNO]DINFP HNIW PJH4 \\N04S HTPB HO+04t=CH

  1. Chemistry. Teacher's Guide. Investigations in Natural Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renner, John W.; And Others

    Investigations in Natural Science is a program in secondary school biology, chemistry, and physics based upon the description of science as a quest for knowledge, not the knowledge itself. This teaching guide is designed for use with the 19 chemistry investigations found in the student manual. These investigations focus on concepts related to:…

  2. Chemistry. Teacher's Guide. Investigations in Natural Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renner, John W.; And Others

    Investigations in Natural Science is a program in secondary school biology, chemistry, and physics based upon the description of science as a quest for knowledge, not the knowledge itself. This teaching guide is designed for use with the 19 chemistry investigations found in the student manual. These investigations focus on concepts related to:…

  3. Surface Chemistry Enhanced Microbial Bioelectrocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Carlo; Babanova, Sofia; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Cornejo, Jose’ A.; Ista, Linnea; Bretschger, Orianna; Marsili, Enrico; Atanassov, Plamen; Schuler, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) modified gold anodes are used in single chamber microbial fuel cells (SCMFC) for organics removal and electricity generation. Hydrophilic (−N(CH3)3+, −OH, −COOH) and hydrophobic (−CH3) SAMs are examined for their effect on bacterial attachment, current and power output. The different substratum chemistry affects both the current and power output and the community composition of the electrochemically active biofilm formed. Of the four SAM-modified anode tested, −N(CH3)3+ results in shortest start up time, highest single electrode polarization and power density, followed by −OH and –COOH SAMs. Hydrophobic SAM decreases bacteria attachment and anodes performance in comparison to hydrophilic SAMs. Electron transfer rate is faster on the N(CH3)3+-surface than on other surfaces, and correlates with a high abundance of δ-Proteobacteria, including electrochemically active species. A consortium of Clostridia and δ-Proteobacteria is found on all the anode surfaces, suggesting a synergistic cooperation under anodic conditions. PMID:26025340

  4. Mars surface chemistry investigated with the MOx probe: A 1-kg optical microsensor-based chemical analysis instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Ricco, A.J.; Butler, M.A.; Grunthaner, F.J.

    1996-12-31

    The authors have designed and built the prototype of an instrument that will use fiber optic micromirror-based chemical sensors to investigate the surprising reactivity of martian soil reported by several Viking Lander Experiments in the mid 1970s. The MOx (Mars Oxidant Experiment) Instrument, which will probe the reactivity of the near-surface martian atmosphere as well as soil, utilizes an array of chemically sensitive thin films including metals, organometallics, and organic dyes to produce a pattern of reflectivity changes characteristic of the species interacting with these sensing layers. The 850-g system includes LED light sources, optical fiber light guides, silicon micromachined fixtures, a line-array CCD detector, control-and-measurement electronics, microprocessor, memory, interface, batteries, and housing. This instrument monitors real-time reflectivities from an array of {approximately}200 separate micromirrors. The unmanned Russian Mars 96 mission is slated to carry the MOx Instrument along with experiments from several other nations. The principles of the chemically sensitive micromirror upon which this instrument is based will be described and preliminary data for reactions of micromirrors with oxidant materials believed to be similar to those on Mars will be presented. The general design of the instrument, including Si micromachined components, as well as the range of coatings and the rationale for their selection, will be discussed as well.

  5. A detailed DSMC surface chemistry model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanova Shumakova, A. N.; Kashkovsky, A. V.; Bondar, Ye. A.

    2014-12-01

    This work is aimed at development of detailed molecular surface chemistry models for DSMC method, their implementation into the SMILE++ software system, verification and validation. An approach to construction of DSMC suface chemistry models based on macroscopic reaction rate data was proposed. The approach was applied to macroscopic data for the air mixture of Deutschmann et al. The resulting DSMC surface chemistry model was implemented into SMILE++ software system and verified for thermal equilibrium conditions.

  6. Mass Spectral Investigation of Laboratory Made Tholins and Their Reaction Products: Implications to Tholin Surface Chemistry on Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyi, Arpad; Smith, M. A.

    2006-09-01

    The success of the Huygens mission does not overshadow the importance of laboratory simulations of gas-phase and surface reactions that might occur in Titan's atmosphere and surface, respectively. We present here our latest results on chemical reactions (hydrolysis, peroxidation and hydrogenation) of laboratory made tholins obtained by FT-ICR mass spectrometry. The laboratory synthesis of tholins has been described in our earlier papers [1,2]. Overall, we conclude that our laboratory tholins are reactive materials that undergo fast hydrolysis, oxidation and reduction. Thus, if the tholin on Titan's surface resemble our laboratory made tholins, it can be considered as a potential starting material for several synthetic processes that can provide organic compounds of pre-biotic interest. Hydrolysis reactions occur with rate constants of 2-10 hour-1 at room temperature. Formal water addition to several species of CxHyNz has been observed by detecting the formation of CxHy+2NzO species. MS/MS fragmentation of the oxygen containing ions leads to the loss of water, ammonia, HCN, acetonitrile, etc. This suggests that tholin hydrolysis may occur in temporary melted ponds of water/ammonia ice on Titan. Peroxidation, which can be considered as a very harsh oxidation, leads to mono-, and multiple oxygenated compounds within a few minutes. The MS/MS fragmentation of these compounds suggests the presence of organic amides and, presumably, amino acid like compounds. Hydrogenation leads to compounds in which the originally present carbon-carbon or carbon-nitrogen double and triple bonds are saturated. H/D exchange experiments show different kinetics depending on the degree of unsaturation/saturation and the number of N atoms. [1] Sarker, N.; Somogyi, A.; Lunine, J. I.; Smith, M. A. Astrobiology, 2003, 3, 719-726. [2] Somogyi, A.; Oh, C-H.; Lunine, J. I.; Smith, M. A. J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 2005, 16, 850-859.

  7. Chemistry. Student Investigations and Readings. Investigations in Natural Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renner, John W.; And Others

    Investigations in Natural Science is a program in secondary school biology, chemistry, and physics based upon the description of science as a quest for knowledge, not the knowledge itself. This student manual contains the 19 chemistry investigations. These investigations focus on concepts related to: interactions with water; salt and calcium;…

  8. Chemistry. Student Investigations and Readings. Investigations in Natural Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renner, John W.; And Others

    Investigations in Natural Science is a program in secondary school biology, chemistry, and physics based upon the description of science as a quest for knowledge, not the knowledge itself. This student manual contains the 19 chemistry investigations. These investigations focus on concepts related to: interactions with water; salt and calcium;…

  9. Surface Raman spectroscopy as a probe of surface chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Child, Craig M.; Foster, Michelle; Ivanecky, J. E., III; Perry, Scott S.; Campion, Alan

    1995-09-01

    Unenhanced surface Raman spectroscopy has been used to study the chemistry of polymers adsorbed on solid surfaces and the chemical enhancement mechanism of surface-enhanced Raman scattering. The adsorption and reactions of the polyimide monomers pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA) and oxydianiline on silver, copper and silicon surfaces under ultrahigh vacuum have been investigated. These include both nondissociative physisorption and dissociative chemisorption of the monomers, and the condensation polymerization to form adsorbed polyimide. The intermediate polyamic acid is detected for the first time in a surface experiment. PMDA adsorbed on Cu(111) shows chemical enhancement in the absence of electromagnetic enhancement. High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy has revealed a strong charge transfer absorption near the Raman excitation frequency. This observation provides strong support for a proposed resonance Raman chemical enhancement mechanism.

  10. The Surface Chemistry of Metal Chalcogenide Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Nicholas Charles

    The surface chemistry of metal chalcogenide nanocrystals is explored through several interrelated analytical investigations. After a brief discussion of the nanocrystal history and applications, molecular orbital theory is used to describe the electronic properties of semiconductors, and how these materials behave on the nanoscale. Quantum confinement plays a major role in dictating the optical properties of metal chalcogenide nanocrystals, however surface states also have an equally significant contribution to the electronic properties of nanocrystals due to the high surface area to volume ratio of nanoscale semiconductors. Controlling surface chemistry is essential to functionalizing these materials for biological imaging and photovoltaic device applications. To better understand the surface chemistry of semiconducting nanocrystals, three competing surface chemistry models are presented: 1.) The TOPO model, 2.) the Non-stoichiometric model, and 3.) the Neutral Fragment model. Both the non-stoichiometric and neutral fragment models accurately describe the behavior of metal chalcogenide nanocrystals. These models rely on the covalent bond classification system, which divides ligands into three classes: 1.) X-type, 1-electron donating ligands that balance charge with excess metal at the nanocrystal surface, 2.) L-type, 2-electron donors that bind metal sites, and 3.) Z-type, 2-electron acceptors that bind chalcogenide sites. Each of these ligand classes is explored in detail to better understand the surface chemistry of metal chalcogenide nanocrystals. First, chloride-terminated, tri-n-butylphosphine (Bu 3P) bound CdSe nanocrystals were prepared by cleaving carboxylate ligands from CdSe nanocrystals with chlorotrimethylsilane in Bu3P solution. 1H and 31P{1H} nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the isolated nanocrystals allowed assignment of distinct signals from several free and bound species, including surface-bound Bu3P and [Bu3P-H]+[Cl]- ligands as well as a Bu

  11. Magmatic and fragmentation controls on ash surface chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimarelli, C.; Ayris, P. M.; Diplas, S.; Damby, D. E.; Hornby, A. J.; Delmelle, P.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    The chemical effects of silicate ash particles ejected by explosive volcanic eruptions on biotic and abiotic systems are fundamentally mediated by ash particle surfaces. Ash surface properties can be presumed to be functions of magmatic state and fragmentation processes, as well as in-plume and atmospheric alteration by volcanic and/or environmental gases and liquid aerosols. Recently, attention has been focussed on the capacity of alteration processes to shape ash surfaces, with the chemistry and mineralogy of the pre-existing ash surface presumed to be equivalent to those of the bulk particle, or even of the ash deposit. Here we present findings which highlight the influence of magma composition and fragmentation mechanisms on ash surfaces. We conducted rapid decompression experiments at varying temperature and pressure conditions on porous andesitic rocks to produce fragmented ash materials, untouched by secondary alteration. These materials were compared to samples produced by crushing of clasts from the same experiments. The bulk chemistry and surface mineralogy of ash particles from a selected size fraction (63-90 μm) was determined via XRF, SEM-BSE, and EPMA, while the surface chemistry (<10 nm) was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We identify similar disparities between whole-rock and surface chemistry as identified in previous ash studies, demonstrating ash surface chemistry to be a product of surface generation mechanisms, in addition to alteration. We observe dependences on both fragmentation pressure and temperature of ash surface chemistry. The mechanisms, pressure and temperature of magma fragmentation may thus influence ash surface chemistry and mineralogy, and subsequently, the post-eruptive alteration of ash particles and their reactivity within biotic and abiotic systems.

  12. Engineering Two-dimensional Materials Surface Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chih-Jen

    2016-11-30

    This account reviews our recent research activities and achievements in the field of two-dimensional (2D) materials surface chemistry. 2D materials are atomically thin, so that carriers are less-restricted to move in the in-plane direction, whereas the out-of-plain motion is quantum-confined. Semiconductor quantum wells and graphene are two well-known examples. Applications of 2D materials in optoelectronics, surface modification, and complex materials must overcome engineering challenges associated with understanding and engineering surface chemistry of 2D materials, which essentially bridge multiscale physical phenomena. In my research group, we understand and engineer broad aspects of chemistry and physics at nanomaterials surfaces for advancing nanomaterials-based technologies. The three main topics covered in this account are as follows: i) colloidal synthesis of stacking-controlled 2D materials, ii) wetting properties of 2D materials, and iii) engineering electronic transport at 2D materials-semiconductor interfaces.

  13. Switching surface chemistry with supramolecular machines.

    PubMed

    Bunker, Bruce C; Huber, Dale L; Kushmerick, James G; Dunbar, Timothy; Kelly, Michael; Matzke, Carolyn; Cao, Jianguo; Jeppesen, Jan O; Perkins, Julie; Flood, Amar H; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2007-01-02

    Tethered supramolecular machines represent a new class of active self-assembled monolayers in which molecular configurations can be reversibly programmed using electrochemical stimuli. We are using these machines to address the chemistry of substrate surfaces for integrated microfluidic systems. Interactions between the tethered tetracationic cyclophane host cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) and dissolved pi-electron-rich guest molecules, such as tetrathiafulvalene, have been reversibly switched by oxidative electrochemistry. The results demonstrate that surface-bound supramolecular machines can be programmed to adsorb or release appropriately designed solution species for manipulating surface chemistry.

  14. Desulfurization chemistry on tungsten surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Benziger, J.B.; Preston, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Desulfurization on tungsten surfaces was studied by Auger spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption, and infrared spectroscopy. Aliphatic compounds reacted by electrophilic interaction of sulfur with the surface. On sulfided surfaces adsorption occurred by disulfide linkages, but C-S bond scission required vacant metal sites. Thiophene underwent electrophilic attack on the ring at the ..cap alpha..-carbon by metal sites.

  15. The EDM surface: Topography, chemistry, and metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    The surface created by the electric discharge machining (EDM) process is of special interest because it has been shown to have a negative effect on the fatigue properties of many alloys. An understanding of the surface metallurgy and chemistry is important in predicting those alloys which are most susceptible to failure. Remedial actions, including thickness minimization, alteration, or removal of the surface layer are addressed.

  16. Laboratory Investigations of Stratospheric Halogen Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wine, Paul H.; Nicovich, J. Michael; Stickel, Robert E.; Hynes, Anthony J.

    1997-01-01

    A final report for the NASA-supported project on laboratory investigations of stratospheric halogen chemistry is presented. In recent years, this project has focused on three areas of research: (1) kinetic, mechanistic, and thermochemical studies of reactions which produce weakly bound chemical species of atmospheric interest; (2) development of flash photolysis schemes for studying radical-radical reactions of stratospheric interest; and (3) photochemistry studies of interest for understanding stratospheric chemistry. The first section of this paper contains a discussion of work which has not yet been published. All subsequent chapters contain reprints of published papers that acknowledge support from this grant.

  17. Surface chemistry driven actuation in nanoporous gold

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Wittstock, A; Zepeda-Ruiz, L; Biener, M M; Zielasek, V; Kramer, D; Viswanath, R N; Weissmuller, J; Baumer, M; Hamza, A V

    2008-04-14

    Although actuation in biological systems is exclusively powered by chemical energy, this concept has not been realized in man-made actuator technologies, as these rely on generating heat or electricity first. Here, we demonstrate that surface-chemistry driven actuation can be realized in high surface area materials such as nanoporous gold. For example, we achieve reversible strain amplitudes in the order of a few tenths of a percent by alternating exposure of nanoporous Au to ozone and carbon monoxide. The effect can be explained by adsorbate-induced changes of the surface stress, and can be used to convert chemical energy directly into a mechanical response thus opening the door to surface-chemistry driven actuator and sensor technologies.

  18. SURFACE CHEMISTRY INFLUENCE IMPLANT BIOCOMPATIBILITY

    PubMed Central

    Thevenot, Paul; Hu, Wenjing; Tang, Liping

    2011-01-01

    Implantable medical devices are increasingly important in the practice of modern medicine. Unfortunately, almost all medical devices suffer to a different extent from adverse reactions, including inflammation, fibrosis, thrombosis and infection. To improve the safety and function of many types of medical implants, a major need exists for development of materials that evoked desired tissue responses. Because implant-associated protein adsorption and conformational changes thereafter have been shown to promote immune reactions, rigorous research efforts have been emphasized on the engineering of surface property (physical and chemical characteristics) to reduce protein adsorption and cell interactions and subsequently improve implant biocompatibility. This brief review is aimed to summarize the past efforts and our recent knowledge about the influence of surface functionality on protein:cell:biomaterial interactions. It is our belief that detailed understandings of bioactivity of surface functionality provide an easy, economic, and specific approach for the future rational design of implantable medical devices with desired tissue reactivity and, hopefully, wound healing capability. PMID:18393890

  19. Anisotropic surface chemistry of crystalline pharmaceutical solids.

    PubMed

    Heng, Jerry Y Y; Bismarck, Alexander; Williams, Daryl R

    2006-10-06

    The purpose of this study was to establish the link between the wetting behavior of crystalline pharmaceutical solids and the localized surface chemistry. A range of conventional wetting techniques were evaluated and compared with a novel experimental approach: sessile drop contact angle measurements on the individual facets of macroscopic (>1 cm) single crystals. Conventional measurement techniques for determining surface energetics such as capillary rise and sessile drops on powder compacts were found not to provide reliable results. When the macroscopic crystal approach was used, major differences for advancing contact angles, theta(a), of water were observed-as low as 16 degrees on facet (001) and as high as 68 degrees on facet (010) of form I paracetamol. theta(a) trends were in excellent agreement with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy surface composition and known crystallographic structures, suggesting a direct relationship to the local surface chemistry. Inverse gas chromatography (IGC) was further used to probe the surface properties of milled and unmilled samples, as a function of particle size. IGC experiments confirmed that milling exposes the weakest attachment energy facet, with increasing dominance as particle size is reduced. The weakest attachment energy facet was also found to exhibit the highest theta(a) for water and to be the most hydrophobic facet. This anisotropic wetting behavior was established for a range of crystalline systems: paracetamol polymorphs, aspirin, and ibuprofen racemates. theta(a) was found to be very sensitive to the local surface chemistry. It is proposed that the hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of facets reflects the presence of functional groups at surfaces to form hydrogen bonds with external molecules.

  20. Surface chemistry of carbon dioxide revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taifan, William; Boily, Jean-François; Baltrusaitis, Jonas

    2016-12-01

    This review discusses modern developments in CO2 surface chemistry by focusing on the work published since the original review by H.J. Freund and M.W. Roberts two decades ago (Surface Science Reports 25 (1996) 225-273). It includes relevant fundamentals pertaining to the topics covered in that earlier review, such as conventional metal and metal oxide surfaces and CO2 interactions thereon. While UHV spectroscopy has routinely been applied for CO2 gas-solid interface analysis, the present work goes further by describing surface-CO2 interactions under elevated CO2 pressure on non-oxide surfaces, such as zeolites, sulfides, carbides and nitrides. Furthermore, it describes additional salient in situ techniques relevant to the resolution of the interfacial chemistry of CO2, notably infrared spectroscopy and state-of-the-art theoretical methods, currently used in the resolution of solid and soluble carbonate species in liquid-water vapor, liquid-solid and liquid-liquid interfaces. These techniques are directly relevant to fundamental, natural and technological settings, such as heterogeneous and environmental catalysis and CO2 sequestration.

  1. Chemistry in the near-surface atmosphere at Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shematovich, V. I.

    2013-09-01

    Theoretical predictions of the composition and chemical evolution of near-surface atmospheres of the icy satellites in the Jovian and Kronian systems are of great importance for assessing the biological potential of these satellites. Depending on the satellite mass the formation of the rarefied exosphere with the relatively dense near-surface layer is possible as, for example, in the case of the relatively heavy Galilean satellites Europa and Ganymede in the Jovian system [1-3]. Ganymede is of special interest, because observations indicate that Ganymede has a significant O2 near - surface atmosphere, probably subsurface ocean, and is the only satellite with its own magnetosphere. Processes of formation of the rarefied gaseous envelope of Ganymede and chemical exchange between atmosphere and icy surface will be considered. The water vapour is usually the domin ant parent species in such gaseous envelope because of the ejection from the satellite icy surface due to the thermal outgassing, non-thermal photolysis and radiolysis and other active processes at work on the surface. The photochemis try of water vapour in the near - surface atmospheric layer [4] and the radiolysis of icy regolith [5] result in the supplement of the atmosphere by an admixture of H2, O2, OH and O. Returning molecules have species-dependent behaviour on contact with icy surface of the satellite and non-thermal energy distributions for the chemical radicals. The H2 and O2 molecules stick with very low efficiency and are immediately desorbed thermally, but returning H2O, OH, H and O stick to the grains in the icy regolith with unit efficiency. The suprathermal radicals OH, H, and O entering the regolith can drive the surface chemistry. The numerical kinetic model to investigate on the molecular level the chemistry of the atmosphere - surface interface of the rarefied Н2О-dominant gaseous envelope at Ganymede was developed. Such numerical model simulates the gas-phase and diffusive surface

  2. Operando chemistry of catalyst surfaces during catalysis.

    PubMed

    Dou, Jian; Sun, Zaicheng; Opalade, Adedamola A; Wang, Nan; Fu, Wensheng; Tao, Franklin Feng

    2017-04-03

    Chemistry of a catalyst surface during catalysis is crucial for a fundamental understanding of mechanism of a catalytic reaction performed on the catalyst in the gas or liquid phase. Due to the pressure- or molecular density-dependent entropy contribution of gas or liquid phase of the reactants and the potential formation of a catalyst surface during catalysis different from that observed in an ex situ condition, the characterization of the surface of a catalyst under reaction conditions and during catalysis can be significant and even necessary for understanding the catalytic mechanism at a molecular level. Electron-based analytical techniques are challenging for studying catalyst nanoparticles in the gas or liquid phase although they are necessary techniques to employ. Instrumentation and further development of these electron-based techniques have now made in situ/operando studies of catalysts possible. New insights into the chemistry and structure of catalyst nanoparticles have been uncovered over the last decades. Herein, the origin of the differences between ex situ and in situ/operando studies of catalysts, and the technical challenges faced as well as the corresponding instrumentation and innovations utilized for characterizing catalysts under reaction conditions and during catalysis, are discussed. The restructuring of catalyst surfaces driven by the pressure of reactant(s) around a catalyst, restructuring in reactant(s) driven by reaction temperature and restructuring during catalysis are also reviewed herein. The remaining challenges and possible solutions are briefly discussed.

  3. Carbon Dioxide Chemistry on Titan's Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodyss, R. P.; Cable, M. L.; Malaska, M. J.; Vu, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    The surfaces of the moons of the outer Solar System are usually considered too cold (30-100 K) for significant chemistry to occur without the input of energy from exogenic sources (such as charged particles or VUV irradiation). In particular, Titan's thick atmosphere prevents significant amounts of high energy radiation from reaching the surface, limiting opportunities for surface chemical reactivity. Recently, we have identified carbamation, the reaction of carbon dioxide with primary amines to form carbamic acids, as a reaction that could occur thermally on Titan's surface. Amines should be present on Titan's surface, formed by photochemical reactions of N2 and CH4 in the upper atmosphere, and amine-containing molecules have been detected as a component of laboratory tholins made in terrestrial laboratories. There is some spectral evidence that CO2 is present on the surface, and CO2 has been definitively identified in the atmosphere. We use a combination of micro-Raman spectroscopy and UHV FTIR spectroscopy to examine the reaction products and kinetics of the carbamation reaction for a variety of primary amines. The reaction occurs readily at Titan surface temperatures (94 K), and leads to both carbamic acids and ammonium carbamate salts. Our kinetic data can be used to estimate the lifetime of CO2 on Titan's surface, and thus constrain the age of possible CO2-bearing cryovolcanic deposits.

  4. Contraband drug surface chemistry at nanogram levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homstead, Juliana; Poziomek, Edward J.

    1997-02-01

    The surface chemistry of contraband drugs is very important in many detection techniques. It is also important in choosing materials for sampling and sample handling. The chemical nature of surfaces may facilitate drug decomposition or serve to stabilize the drugs. We have developed a simple technique to study the chemistry of contraband drugs such as cocaine HCl at nanogram levels. The normal operating modes of an IONSCAN 400 ion mobility spectrometer were adjusted to allow the chemistry of the drugs to be examined in the sample chamber of the spectrometer. For example, a membrane with deposited drug is held in the sample chamber at a specified temperature up to 20 seconds with no air flow. An ON-OFF valve was placed in- line just before the carrier gas enters the desorption chamber where samples are heated. This modification allows the gas flow to be manually turned off while the sample is being heated. We have used this technique to examine the pyrolysis of cocaine hydrochloride under a variety of conditions. At the end of the designated reaction time, the air flow is turned on allowing the reaction products and any starting materials to flow into the spectrometer for analysis. This technique has allowed studies of the stability of the drugs at various temperatures on different surfaces. For example, evidence was obtained of cocaine HCl decomposition at 75 degrees for 5 seconds using Teflon as the support material. The use of this technique has also assisted us in choosing materials for pyrolysis studies in which the goal is the decompose target drugs quickly and efficiently for detection applications.

  5. Surface modification of Fe2O3 nanoparticles with 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS): An attempt to investigate surface treatment on surface chemistry and mechanical properties of polyurethane/Fe2O3 nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palimi, M. J.; Rostami, M.; Mahdavian, M.; Ramezanzadeh, B.

    2014-11-01

    Fe2O3 nanoparticles were modified with various amounts of 3-amino propyl trimethoxy silane (APTMS). Modified and unmodified nanoparticles were introduced into the polyurethane matrix at different concentrations. Fourier transform infrared radiation (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS) were employed in order to investigate the APTMS grafting on the nanoparticles field emission-scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) was utilized in order to investigate nanoparticles dispersion in the polyurethane coating matrix as well as the fracture behavior of the nanocomposites. The mechanical properties of the nanocomposites were investigated by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) and tensile test. The FTIR spectra and XPS analysis clearly showed that APTMS was grafted on the surface of nanoparticles successfully and formed chemical bonds with the surface. Also, surface treatment of the nanoparticles by silane resulted in the significant improvement of the mechanical properties of the polyurethane coating. The improvement was most pronounced when the nanoparticles were modified with 3 gr silane/5 g nanoparticles.

  6. Acidic deposition and surface water chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, M. R.

    A pair of back-to-back (morning and afternoon) hydrology sessions, held December 10, 1987, at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif., covered “Predicting the Effects of Acidic Deposition on Surface Water Chemistry.” The combined sessions included four invited papers, 12 contributed papers, and a panel discussion at its conclusion. The gathering dealt with questions on a variety of aspects of modeling the effects of acidic deposition on surface water chemistry.Contributed papers included discussions on the representation of processes in models as well as limiting assumptions in model application (V. S. Tripathi et al., Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tenn., and E. C. Krug, Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign), along with problems in estimating depositional inputs to catchments and thus inputs to be used in the simulation of catchment response (M. M. Reddy et al., U.S. Geological Survey, Lakewood, Colo.; and E. A. McBean, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada). L. A. Baker et al. (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis) dealt with the problem of modeling seepage lake systems, an exceedingly important portion of the aquatic resources in Florida and parts of the upper U.S. Midwest. J. A. Hau and Y. Eckstein (Kent State University, Kent, Ohio) considered equilibrium modeling of two northern Ohio watersheds that receive very different loads of acidic deposition but are highly similar in other respects.

  7. Surface chemistry and mineralogy. [of planet Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banin, A.; Clark, B. C.; Waenke, H.

    1992-01-01

    The accumulated knowledge on the chemistry and mineralogy of Martian surface materials is reviewed. Pertinent information obtained by direct analyses of the soil on Mars by the Viking Landers, by remote sensing of Mars from flyby and orbiting spacecraft, by telescopic observations from earth, and through detailed analyses of the SNC meteorites presumed to be Martian rocks are summarized and analyzed. A compositional model for Mars soil, giving selected average elemental concentrations of major and trace elements, is suggested. It is proposed that the fine surface materials on Mars are a multicomponent mixture of weathered and nonweathered minerals. Smectite clays, silicate mineraloids similar to palagonite, and scapolite are suggested as possible major candidate components among the weathered minerals.

  8. An investigation of the surface chemistry of crown ethers: the adsorption and reaction of 12-crown-4 on palladium ( 1 1 1 )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azad, S.; Laack, B.; Tysoe, W. T.

    2002-01-01

    The adsorption of 12-crown-4 on Pd(1 1 1) is investigated using reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy and temperature-programmed desorption. Analysis of the infrared spectrum of 12-crown-4 suggests that it adsorbs in a flat-lying geometry with C 4v symmetry with a saturation coverage of 0.073±0.008 monolayers. This implies that the crown ether bonds to the surface via the lone pair orbitals on the ether oxygen atoms. Estimating the saturation coverage for this geometry using Van der Waals' radii yields a value of 0.088 monolayers in good agreement with the measured value. 12-crown-4 thermally decomposes to leave predominantly CO and ethylidyne species on the surface where the desorbing CO removes three of the four crown ether oxygen atoms, the fourth remaining on the surface. Small amounts of ethylene are also found to desorb along with a high molecular weight product which is tentatively assigned to the formation of C 2H 5OCH 2CHO.

  9. Surface Chemistry in Electrochemical Atomic Layer Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    example, where a thin film of a material is formed an atomic layer at a time. That is, surface limited reactions are used to deposit individual atomic...The present studies were designed to investigate these surface limited reactions. To determine what the structures of the deposits were, and how that structure influenced subsequent deposition .

  10. Ferroelectric based catalysis: Switchable surface chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakekhani, Arvin; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2015-03-01

    We describe a new class of catalysts that uses an epitaxial monolayer of a transition metal oxide on a ferroelectric substrate. The ferroelectric polarization switches the surface chemistry between strongly adsorptive and strongly desorptive regimes, circumventing difficulties encountered on non-switchable catalytic surfaces where the Sabatier principle dictates a moderate surface-molecule interaction strength. This method is general and can, in principle, be applied to many reactions, and for each case the choice of the transition oxide monolayer can be optimized. Here, as a specific example, we show how simultaneous NOx direct decomposition (into N2 and O2) and CO oxidation can be achieved efficiently on CrO2 terminated PbTiO3, while circumventing oxygen (and sulfur) poisoning issues. One should note that NOx direct decomposition has been an open challenge in automotive emission control industry. Our method can expand the range of catalytically active elements to those which are not conventionally considered for catalysis and which are more economical, e.g., Cr (for NOx direct decomposition and CO oxidation) instead of canonical precious metal catalysts. Primary support from Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing, North America, Inc.

  11. Evaluation of Surface Chemistries for Antibody Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Seurynck-Servoss, Shannon L.; White, Amanda M.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Rodland, Karin D.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2007-12-01

    Antibody microarrays are an emerging technology that promises to be a powerful tool for the detection of disease biomarkers. The current technology for protein microarrays has been primarily derived from DNA microarrays and is not fully characterized for use with proteins. For example, there are a myriad of surface chemistries that are commercially available for antibody microarrays, but no rigorous studies that compare these different surfaces. Therefore, we have used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarray platform to analyze 16 different commercially available slide types. Full standard curves were generated for 24 different assays. We found that this approach provides a rigorous and quantitative system for comparing the different slide types based on spot size and morphology, slide noise, spot background, lower limit of detection, and reproducibility. These studies demonstrate that the properties of the slide surface affect the activity of immobilized antibodies and the quality of data produced. Although many slide types can produce useful data, glass slides coated with poly-L-lysine or aminosilane, with or without activation with a crosslinker, consistently produce superior results in the ELISA microarray analyses we performed.

  12. Nanomaterial surface chemistry design for advancements in capillary electrophoresis modes.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Michael R; Haes, Amanda J

    2011-01-07

    Tailored surface chemistry impacts nanomaterial function and stability in applications including in various capillary electrophoresis (CE) modes. Although colloidal nanoparticles were first integrated as colouring agents in artwork and pottery over 2000 years ago, recent developments in nanoparticle synthesis and surface modification increased their usefulness and incorporation in separation science. For instance, precise control of surface chemistry is critically important in modulating nanoparticle functionality and stability in dynamic environments. Herein, recent developments in nanomaterial pseudostationary and stationary phases will be summarized. First, nanomaterial core and surface chemistry compositions will be classified. Next, characterization methods will be described and related to nanomaterial function in various CE modes. Third, methods and implications of nanomaterial incorporation into CE will be discussed. Finally, nanoparticle-specific mechanisms likely involved in CE will be related to nanomaterial surface chemistry. Better understanding of surface chemistry will improve nanoparticle design for the integration into separation techniques.

  13. Engineered microtopographies and surface chemistries direct cell attachment and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magin, Chelsea Marie

    Harrison, in 1914, first recognized that cells respond to physicochemical cues such as substratum topography when he observed that fibroblasts elongated while cultured on spider silk. Recently, techniques developed in the micro-electronics industry have been used to create molds for producing microscaled topographies with various shapes and spatial arrangements. Although these patterning techniques are well-established, very little is known about the mechanisms underlying cell sensing and response to microtopographies. In this work cellular micro-environments with varying surface topographies and chemistries were evaluated with marine organisms and mammalian cells to investigate cellular sensing and response. Biofouling---the accumulation of micro-organisms, plants, and animals on submerged surfaces---is an environmental and economic concern. Engineered topographies, replicated in polydimethylsiloxane elastomer (PDMSe) and functionalized poly(ethylene glycol)-dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) hydrogels, were evaluated for inhibition of marine fouling organism attachment. Microtopographies replicated in PDMSe inhibited attachment of the marine bacterium, Cobetia marina up to 99% versus smooth. The average normalized attachment densities of cells of C. marina and zoospores of the green algae Ulva on PDMSe topographies scaled inversely with the Engineered Roughness Index (ERIII), a representation of surface energy. Attachment densities of Ulva from four assays and C. marina from two growth phases to PDMSe surfaces scaled inversely with one equation: ERI II multiplied by the Reynolds number of the organism (Re) (R 2 = 0.77). The same microtopographies created in PDMSe reduced the initial attachment density and attachment strength of cells of the diatoms Navicula incerta and Seminavis robusta compared to smooth PDMSe. The average normalized attachment density of Navicula after exposure to shear stress (48 Pa) was correlated with the contact area between the diatom and a

  14. Influence of chemistry on wetting dynamics of nanotextured hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Di Mundo, Rosa; Palumbo, Fabio; d'Agostino, Riccardo

    2010-04-06

    In this work, the role of a chemical parameter, such as the degree of fluorination, on the wetting behavior of nanotextured hydrophobic surfaces is investigated. Texture and chemistry tuning of the surfaces has been accomplished with single batch radiofrequency low-pressure plasma processes. Polystyrene substrates have been textured by CF(4) plasma etching and subsequently covered by thin films with a tunable F-to-C ratio, obtained in discharges fed with C(4)F(8)-C(2)H(4). Measurements of wetting dynamics reveal a regime transition from adhesive-hydrophobic to slippery-superhydrophobic, i.e., from wet to non wet states, as the F-to-C rises at constant topography. Such achievements are strengthened by calculation of the solid fraction of surface water contact area applying Cassie-Baxter advancing and receding equations to water contact angle data of textured and flat reference surfaces.

  15. The surface chemistry of cerium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullins, David R.

    2015-03-01

    This review covers the structure of, and chemical reactions on, well-defined cerium oxide surfaces. Ceria, or mixed oxides containing ceria, are critical components in automotive three-way catalysts due to their well-known oxygen storage capacity. Ceria is also emerging as an important material in a number of other catalytic processes, particularly those involving organic oxygenates and the water-gas shift reaction. Ceria's acid-base properties, and thus its catalytic behavior, are closely related to its surface structure where different oxygen anion and cerium cation environments are present on the low-index structural faces. The actual structure of these various faces has been the focus of a number of theoretical and experimental investigations. Ceria is also easily reducible from CeO2 to CeO2-X. The presence of oxygen vacancies on the surface often dramatically alters the adsorption and subsequent reactions of various adsorbates, either on a clean surface or on metal particles supported on the surface. Most surface science studies have been conducted on the surfaces of thin-films rather than on the surfaces of bulk single crystal oxides. The growth, characterization and properties of these thin-films are also examined.

  16. The surface chemistry of cerium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, David R.

    2015-01-29

    Our review covers the structure of, and chemical reactions on, well-defined cerium oxide surfaces. Ceria, or mixed oxides containing ceria, are critical components in automotive three-way catalysts due to their well-known oxygen storage capacity. Ceria is also emerging as an important material in a number of other catalytic processes, particularly those involving organic oxygenates and the water–gas shift reaction. Ceria's acid–base properties, and thus its catalytic behavior, are closely related to its surface structure where different oxygen anion and cerium cation environments are present on the low-index structural faces. The actual structure of these various faces has been the focus of a number of theoretical and experimental investigations. Ceria is also easily reducible from CeO2 to CeO2-X. The presence of oxygen vacancies on the surface often dramatically alters the adsorption and subsequent reactions of various adsorbates, either on a clean surface or on metal particles supported on the surface. We conducted surface science studies on the surfaces of thin-films rather than on the surfaces of bulk single crystal oxides. The growth, characterization and properties of these thin-films are also examined.

  17. The surface chemistry of cerium oxide

    DOE PAGES

    Mullins, David R.

    2015-01-29

    Our review covers the structure of, and chemical reactions on, well-defined cerium oxide surfaces. Ceria, or mixed oxides containing ceria, are critical components in automotive three-way catalysts due to their well-known oxygen storage capacity. Ceria is also emerging as an important material in a number of other catalytic processes, particularly those involving organic oxygenates and the water–gas shift reaction. Ceria's acid–base properties, and thus its catalytic behavior, are closely related to its surface structure where different oxygen anion and cerium cation environments are present on the low-index structural faces. The actual structure of these various faces has been the focusmore » of a number of theoretical and experimental investigations. Ceria is also easily reducible from CeO2 to CeO2-X. The presence of oxygen vacancies on the surface often dramatically alters the adsorption and subsequent reactions of various adsorbates, either on a clean surface or on metal particles supported on the surface. We conducted surface science studies on the surfaces of thin-films rather than on the surfaces of bulk single crystal oxides. The growth, characterization and properties of these thin-films are also examined.« less

  18. Wet oxidation of ordered mesoporous carbon FDU-15 by using (NH4)2S2O8 for fast adsorption of Sr(II): An investigation on surface chemistry and adsorption mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yang; Ye, Gang; Chen, Jing; Lv, Dachao; Wang, Jianchen

    2015-12-01

    Surface modification of ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) by wet oxidation provides an oxygen-enriched platform for complexation of metal ions. Here, we present a comprehensive study on the surface chemistry and textual property of OMC FDU-15 modified by wet oxidation using (NH4)2S2O8 as a benign oxidant. And, for the first time, the adsorption behavior and mechanism of wet-oxidized OMC FDU-15 toward Sr(II) in aqueous solutions were investigated. The mesostructural regularity of the OMC FDU-15 was well-reserved under wet oxidation. Compared to OMC CMK-type counterparts prepared via nanocasting, the OMC FDU-15 by soft template method showed much-enhanced structural stability. Due to the introduction of abundant oxygen-containing species, the oxidized OMC FDU-15 exhibited excellent hydrophilicity and dispersibility in aqueous solutions. The adsorption behavior toward Sr(II) was fully investigated, showing a super-fast adsorption kinetics (< 5 min to reach equilibrium) and a Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Moreover, an in-depth X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis through deconvolution of high resolution C1s and O1s spectra was implemented to identify the chemical species of the surface functional groups, while probing the adsorption mechanism. The results suggested that oxygen donor atoms in Csbnd O single bonds mainly contribute to the adsorption of Sr(II) via formation of metal-ligand complexation.

  19. The 2007 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for surface chemistry: understanding nanoscale phenomena at surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bowker, Michael

    2007-11-01

    The 2007 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Gerhard Ertl for his seminal work in the area of surface science, particularly at the gas-solid interface. Although Ertl began his career at a time when the term "nanotechnology" was not yet known, his contributions to the field have paved the way for many future scientists in this area and led to a deeper understanding of catalysis and other surface-specific processes at the nanoscale. Here, we summarize the scientific developments that guided early progress in surface science, and we explore the major advancements in Ertl's career, including his work on adsorption and oxidation of small molecules on metal surfaces. Significant contributions of other key scientists to this rich area are also presented.

  20. Impact Driven Chemistry on Europa's Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khare, B. N.; NNa Mvondo, D.; Borucki, J. G.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Belisle, W. A.; Wilhite, P.; McKay, C. P.

    2005-08-01

    A new energy source for organic synthesis on simulated Europan surfaces, electrical discharge, light emission, and magnetic phenomena from impacts into the ice, has been studied [Borucki et al. J. Geophys. Res. 107 (E11) 5114 (2002)]. Part of the impactor's kinetic energy is converted into electrical potential. The mechanical disruption causes the release of energy as light, heat, and electrical and magnetic fields as secondary emissions that synthesizes complex organic material named tholin [Sagan and Khare, Nature 277, 102 (1979)] in the area of impact craters. The morphology of the impact craters indicates that tholin is the result of outflow from the fracture zone. Large pool of liquid water may exist for thousands of years as suggested for Titan [Thompson and Sagan, Eur. Space Agency Spec. Publ., ESA-SP, 338, 167 (1992)] and may also apply to Europa potentially driving prebiotic chemistry due to energy pumped in from the secondary emissions. We have detected 8.8 ppm of H2O2 from impact of a 1/4" iron bullet at 5.3 km/s over water ice at ca. -100 C. H2O2 has been detected on the surface of Europa [Carlson et al., Science 283, 2062 (1999)]. Further confirmation by Raman Scattering at 874.5 cm-1 and IR absorbance at 2854 cm-1 is continuing. Since the impactor is limited in the number of experiments we can run, other experiments used a laser induced plasma (LIP) to shock ice mixed with ammonium sulphate and methanol. We detected CH4, CO, N2O, C2H6, CH3CN, CH3COCH3, HCOOCH3 (methyl formate), and traces of HCN. LIP on a mixture of water and methanol ice produced CH4, CO, HCHO, ethanol, formic acid methylester, propanol, acetone, dimethoxyme, and possibly ethanone-1phenyl or other phenyl group. NH3 and methanol could be delivered on impact of comets while sulfur expelled from Io.

  1. Investigating expanded chemistry in CMAQ clouds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Clouds and fogs significantly impact the amount, composition, and spatial distribution of gas and particulate atmospheric species, not least of which through the chemistry that occurs in cloud droplets.ᅠ Atmospheric sulfate is an important component of fine aerosol mass an...

  2. Investigating expanded chemistry in CMAQ clouds

    EPA Science Inventory

    Clouds and fogs significantly impact the amount, composition, and spatial distribution of gas and particulate atmospheric species, not least of which through the chemistry that occurs in cloud droplets.ᅠ Atmospheric sulfate is an important component of fine aerosol mass an...

  3. The surface chemistry of multi-oxide silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelkers, Eric H.; Golubev, Sergey V.; Chairat, Claire; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Schott, Jacques

    2009-08-01

    The surface chemistry of natural wollastonite, diopside, enstatite, forsterite, and albite in aqueous solutions was characterized using both electrokinetic techniques and surface titrations performed for 20 min in batch reactors. Titrations performed in such reactors allow determination of both proton consumption and metal release from the mineral surface as a function of pH. The compositions, based on aqueous solution analysis, of all investigated surfaces vary dramatically with solution pH. Ca and Mg are preferentially released from the surfaces of all investigated divalent metal silicates at pH less than ˜8.5-10 but preferentially retained relative to silica at higher pH. As such, the surfaces of these minerals are Si-rich and divalent metal poor except in strongly alkaline solutions. The preferential removal of divalent cations from these surfaces is coupled to proton consumption. The number of protons consumed by the preferential removal of each divalent cation is pH independent but depends on the identity of the mineral; ˜1.5 protons are consumed by the preferential removal of each Ca atom from wollastonite, ˜3 protons are consumed by the preferential removal of each Mg or Ca atom from diopside or enstatite, and ˜4 protons are consumed by the preferential removal of each Mg from forsterite. These observations are interpreted to stem from the creation of additional 'internal' adsorption sites by the preferential removal of divalent metal cations which can be coupled to the condensation of partially detached Si. Similarly, Na and Al are preferentially removed from the albite surface at 2 > pH > 11; mass balance calculations suggest that three protons are consumed by the preferential removal of each Al atom from this surface over this entire pH range. Electrokinetic measurements on fresh mineral powders yield an isoelectric point (pH IEP) 2.6, 4.4, 3.0, 4.5, and <1, for wollastonite, diopside, enstatite, forsterite, and albite, respectively, consistent with

  4. Surface roughness rather than surface chemistry essentially affects insect adhesion

    PubMed Central

    England, Matt W; Sato, Tomoya; Yagihashi, Makoto; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2016-01-01

    Summary The attachment ability of ladybird beetles Coccinella septempunctata was systematically investigated on eight types of surface, each with different chemical and topographical properties. The results of traction force tests clearly demonstrated that chemical surface properties, such as static/dynamic de-wettability of water and oil caused by specific chemical compositions, had no significant effect on the attachment of the beetles. Surface roughness was found to be the dominant factor, strongly affecting the attachment ability of the beetles. PMID:27826522

  5. Surface roughness rather than surface chemistry essentially affects insect adhesion.

    PubMed

    England, Matt W; Sato, Tomoya; Yagihashi, Makoto; Hozumi, Atsushi; Gorb, Stanislav N; Gorb, Elena V

    2016-01-01

    The attachment ability of ladybird beetles Coccinella septempunctata was systematically investigated on eight types of surface, each with different chemical and topographical properties. The results of traction force tests clearly demonstrated that chemical surface properties, such as static/dynamic de-wettability of water and oil caused by specific chemical compositions, had no significant effect on the attachment of the beetles. Surface roughness was found to be the dominant factor, strongly affecting the attachment ability of the beetles.

  6. Ozone reactive chemistry on residential surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Reiss, R.; Ryan, P.B.; Koutrakis, P.; Tibbetts, S.J.

    1994-12-31

    The heterogeneous chemistry of ozone on interior latex paint was investigated in a tube flow reactor. The emissions of several polar volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including organic acids, aldehydes and ketones were measured while a glass tube coated with latex paint was exposed to clean air and two different concentrations of ozone. Formic and acetic acid were not found to be generated via ozone reactions; however, both were found to offgas from the latex paints. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acetone were found to be produced by ozone reactions. It was found that formaldehyde is produced in sufficient quantities to impact indoor concentrations. Additionally, ozone, organic acids, aldehydes and ketones were measured over an approximately 24 hour period in 4 residences during the winter of 1993 and in 9 residences during the summer of 1993. Environmental variables such as indoor and outdoor temperature and indoor and outdoor relative humidity were recorded. It was found that the VOC emission rate was correlated with both the environmental variables and the ozone removal rate. A combined ozone removal rate and environmental variable model indicated that both these factors are important, suggesting that polar VOCs may be formed by ozone reactions.

  7. Surface chemistry: key to control and advance myriad technologies.

    PubMed

    Yates, John T; Campbell, Charles T

    2011-01-18

    This special issue on surface chemistry is introduced with a brief history of the field, a summary of the importance of surface chemistry in technological applications, a brief overview of some of the most important recent developments in this field, and a look forward to some of its most exciting future directions. This collection of invited articles is intended to provide a snapshot of current developments in the field, exemplify the state of the art in fundamental research in surface chemistry, and highlight some possibilities in the future. Here, we show how those articles fit together in the bigger picture of this field.

  8. Surface chemistry: Key to control and advance myriad technologies

    PubMed Central

    Yates, John T.; Campbell, Charles T.

    2011-01-01

    This special issue on surface chemistry is introduced with a brief history of the field, a summary of the importance of surface chemistry in technological applications, a brief overview of some of the most important recent developments in this field, and a look forward to some of its most exciting future directions. This collection of invited articles is intended to provide a snapshot of current developments in the field, exemplify the state of the art in fundamental research in surface chemistry, and highlight some possibilities in the future. Here, we show how those articles fit together in the bigger picture of this field. PMID:21245359

  9. Effect of non-equilibrium flow chemistry and surface catalysis on surface heating to AFE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David A.; Henline, William D.; Chen, Yih-Kanq

    1991-01-01

    The effect of nonequilibrium flow chemistry on the surface temperature distribution over the forebody heat shield on the Aeroassisted Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle was investigated using a reacting boundary-layer code. Computations were performed by using boundary-layer-edge properties determined from global iterations between the boundary-layer code and flow field solutions from a viscous shock layer (VSL) and a full Navier-Stokes solution. Surface temperature distribution over the AFE heat shield was calculated for two flight conditions during a nominal AFE trajectory. This study indicates that the surface temperature distribution is sensitive to the nonequilibrium chemistry in the shock layer. Heating distributions over the AFE forebody calculated using nonequilibrium edge properties were similar to values calculated using the VSL program.

  10. Effect of non-equilibrium flow chemistry and surface catalysis on surface heating to AFE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David A.; Henline, William D.; Chen, Yih-Kanq

    1991-01-01

    The effect of nonequilibrium flow chemistry on the surface temperature distribution over the forebody heat shield on the Aeroassisted Flight Experiment (AFE) vehicle was investigated using a reacting boundary-layer code. Computations were performed by using boundary-layer-edge properties determined from global iterations between the boundary-layer code and flow field solutions from a viscous shock layer (VSL) and a full Navier-Stokes solution. Surface temperature distribution over the AFE heat shield was calculated for two flight conditions during a nominal AFE trajectory. This study indicates that the surface temperature distribution is sensitive to the nonequilibrium chemistry in the shock layer. Heating distributions over the AFE forebody calculated using nonequilibrium edge properties were similar to values calculated using the VSL program.

  11. Laboratory investigations on the role of sediment surface and ground water chemistry in transport of bacteria through a contaminated Sandy Aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholl, M.A.; Harvey, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of pH and sediment surface characteristics on sorption of indigenous groundwater bacteria were determined using contaminated and uncontaminated aquifer material from Cape Cod, MA. Over the pH range of the aquifer (5-7), the extent of bacterial sorption onto sediment in uncontaminated groundwater was strongly pH-dependent, but relatively pH-insensitive in contaminated groundwater from the site. Bacterial sorption was also affected by the presence of oxyhydroxide coatings (iron, aluminum, and manganese). Surface coating effects were most pronounced in uncontaminated groundwater (pH 6.4 at 10??C). Desorption of attached bacteria (up to 14% of the total number of labeled cells added) occurred in both field and laboratory experiments upon adjustment of groundwater to pH 8. The dependence of bacterial sorption upon environmental conditions suggests that bacterial immobilization could change substantially over relatively short distances in contaminated, sandy aquifers and that effects caused by changes in groundwater geochemistry can be significant.

  12. Adsorption of perfluoroalkyl acids by carbonaceous adsorbents: Effect of carbon surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Yue; Liu, Jinxia

    2015-07-01

    Adsorption by carbonaceous sorbents is among the most feasible processes to remove perfluorooctane sulfonic (PFOS) and carboxylic acids (PFOA) from drinking and ground waters. However, carbon surface chemistry, which has long been recognized essential for dictating performance of such sorbents, has never been considered for PFOS and PFOA adsorption. Thus, the role of surface chemistry was systematically investigated using sorbents with a wide range in precursor material, pore structure, and surface chemistry. Sorbent surface chemistry overwhelmed physical properties in controlling the extent of uptake. The adsorption affinity was positively correlated carbon surface basicity, suggesting that high acid neutralizing or anion exchange capacity was critical for substantial uptake of PFOS and PFOA. Carbon polarity or hydrophobicity had insignificant impact on the extent of adsorption. Synthetic polymer-based Ambersorb and activated carbon fibers were more effective than activated carbon made of natural materials in removing PFOS and PFOA from aqueous solutions.

  13. INVESTIGATING ENVIRONMENTAL SINKS OF MACROLIDE ANTIBIOTICS WITH ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Possible environmental sinks (wastewater effluents, biosolids, sediments) of macrolide antibiotics (i.e., azithromycin, roxithromycin and clarithromycin)are investigated using state-of-the-art analytical chemistry techniques.

  14. INVESTIGATING ENVIRONMENTAL SINKS OF MACROLIDE ANTIBIOTICS WITH ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Possible environmental sinks (wastewater effluents, biosolids, sediments) of macrolide antibiotics (i.e., azithromycin, roxithromycin and clarithromycin)are investigated using state-of-the-art analytical chemistry techniques.

  15. Surface Chemistry in Heterogeneous Catalysis: An Emerging Discipline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, J. M.; Campbell, Charles T.

    1980-01-01

    Provides background data on surface chemistry as an emerging discipline. Highlights the important role which surfaces play in catalysis by focusing on the catalyzed oxidation of carbon monoxide. Provides a demonstration of how surfaces exert their influences in heterogeneous phenomena and illustrates how experimental problems in this field are…

  16. Surface Chemistry in Heterogeneous Catalysis: An Emerging Discipline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, J. M.; Campbell, Charles T.

    1980-01-01

    Provides background data on surface chemistry as an emerging discipline. Highlights the important role which surfaces play in catalysis by focusing on the catalyzed oxidation of carbon monoxide. Provides a demonstration of how surfaces exert their influences in heterogeneous phenomena and illustrates how experimental problems in this field are…

  17. Water at surfaces with tunable surface chemistries and the chiral imprint of water around DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Poul

    Aqueous interfaces are ubiquitous in atmospheric chemistry and biological systems but are notoriously hard to probe experimentally. Surface-specific vibrational spectroscopy offers an avenue to directly probe the vibrational modes of the water OH stretching band but this method is challenging to implement to buried surfaces. Here we present results from sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy probing the buried interface between a functionalized surface and aqueous solutions. Studying such buried surfaces offers the advantage of being able to systematically tune the surface chemistry using self-assembled monolayers, i.e. the hydrophobic and hydrophilic character, and examine the effect on the interfacial water. In addition to water at these controlled surfaces, we have initiated studying water at biological surfaces. This includes the solvation structure around DNA. X-ray experiments at cryogenic temperatures have found crystallographic water in the minor grove of DNA giving rise to the notion of a spine of hydration surrounding DNA. Such structured water should exhibit a chiral structure adapted from DNA. We investigate if such a chiral water structure exist around DNA at room temperature using chiral SFG. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under a NSF CAREER Grant (CHE-1151079).

  18. Surface Chemistry of PdO(101)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Jason

    2014-03-01

    The formation of palladium oxide (PdO) is thought to be responsible for the exceptional activity of supported Pd catalysts toward the complete oxidation of alkanes under oxygen-rich conditions. In this talk, I will discuss our investigations of the surface chemical properties of a PdO(101) thin film, focusing particularly on the adsorption and selective activation of alkanes. We find that n-alkanes adsorb relatively strongly on the PdO(101) surface by forming σ-complexes along rows of coordinatively-unsaturated Pd atoms, and that this adsorbed state acts as the precursor for initial C-H bond cleavage. I will discuss characteristics of the binding and activation of alkane σ-complexes on PdO(101) as determined from both experiment and density functional theory calculations. I will also discuss elementary processes involved in adsorbate oxidation on PdO(101) and make comparisons with the chemical reactivity of other late transition metal oxides.

  19. Field investigation of FGD system chemistry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Litherland, S.T.; Colley, J.D.; Glover, R.L.; Maller, G.; Behrens, G.P.

    1984-12-01

    Three full-scale wet limestone FGD systems were investigated to gain a better understanding of FGD system operation and chemistry. The three plants which participated in the program were South Mississippi Electric Power Association's R. D. Morrow Station, Colorado-Ute Electric Association's Craig Station, and Central Illinois Light Company's Duck Creek Station. Each FGD system was characterized with respect to SO/sub 2/ removal, liquid and solid phase chemistry, and calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate relative saturation. Mist eliminator chemistry and performance were documented at Morrow and Duck Creek. Solutions to severe mist eliminator scaling and pluggage were demonstrated at Duck Creek. A technical and econ

  20. Molecular dynamics study on mechanism of preformed particle gel transporting through nanopores: Surface chemistry and heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Peng; Zhang, Heng; Ma, Ying; Hao, Qingquan; Liu, Gang; Sun, Jichao; Yuan, Shiling

    2017-10-01

    The translocation behavior of preformed particle gel (PPG) in porous media is crucial for its application in enhanced oil recovery. By means of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation, the translocation mechanism of PPG confined in different silica nanopores were investigated. The influence of surface chemistry and chemical heterogeneity of silica nanopore on the translocation process was revealed. As the degree of surface hydroxylation increases and the heterogeneity decreases, the pulling force needed to drive PPG decreases. We infer that the nanopore's surface (i.e. surface chemistry and heterogeneity) affects the translocation of PPG indirectly by forming different hydration layers.

  1. Graphene veils: A versatile surface chemistry for sensors.

    PubMed

    Mulvaney, Shawn P; Stine, Rory; Long, Nina C; Tamanaha, Cy R; Sheehan, Paul E

    2014-07-01

    Thin spun-coat films (~4 nm thick) of graphene oxide (GO) constitute a versatile surface chemistry compatible with a broad range of technologically important sensor materials. Countless publications are dedicated to the nuances of surface chemistries that have been developed for sensors, with almost every material having unique characteristics. There would be enormous value in a surface chemistry that could be applied generally with functionalization and passivation already optimized regardless of the sensor material it covered. Such a film would need to be thin, conformal, and allow for multiple routes toward covalent linkages. It is also vital that the film permit the underlying sensor to transduce. Here we show that GO films can be applied over a diverse set of sensor surfaces, can link biomolecules through multiple reaction pathways, and can support cell growth. Application of a graphene veil atop a magnetic sensor array is demonstrated with an immunoassay. We also present biosensing and material characterization data for these graphene veils.

  2. Probing Surface Chemistry at the Nanoscale Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rene-Boisneuf, Laetitia

    Studies various nanostructured materials have gained considerable interest within the past several decades. This novel class of materials has opened up a new realm of possibilities, both for the fundamental comprehension of matter, but also for innovative applications. The size-dependent effect observed for these systems often lies in their interaction with the surrounding environment and understanding such interactions is the pivotal point for the investigations undertaken in this thesis. Three families of nanoparticles are analyzed: semiconductor quantum dots, metallic silver nanoparticles and rare-earth oxide nanomaterials. The radical scavenging ability of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO 2) is quite controversial since they have been labeled as both oxidizing and antioxidant species for biological systems. Here, both aqueous and organic stabilized nanoparticles are examined in straightforward systems containing only one reactive oxygen species to ensure a controlled release. The apparent absence of their direct radical scavenging ability is demonstrated despite the ease at which CeO2 nanoparticles generate stable surface Ce 3+ clusters, which is used to explain the redox activity of these nanomaterials. On the contrary, CeO2 nanoparticles are shown to have an indirect scavenging effect in Fenton reactions by annihilating the reactivity of Fe 2+ salts. Cadmium selenide quantum dots (CdSe QD) constitute another highly appealing family of nanocolloids in part due to their tunable, size-dependent luminescence across the visible spectrum. The effect of elemental sulfur treatment is investigated to overcome one of the main drawbacks of CdSe QD: low fluorescence quantum yield. Herein, we report a constant and reproducible quantum yield of 15%. The effect of sulfur surface treatment is also assessed following the growth of a silica shell, as well as the response towards a solution quencher (4-amino-TEMPO). The sulfur treated QD is also tested for interaction with

  3. Quantitative evaluation of bioorthogonal chemistries for surface functionalization of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Feldborg, Lise N; Jølck, Rasmus I; Andresen, Thomas L

    2012-12-19

    We present here a highly efficient and chemoselective liposome functionalization method based on oxime bond formation between a hydroxylamine and an aldehyde-modified lipid component. We have conducted a systematic and quantitative comparison of this new approach with other state-of-the-art conjugation reactions in the field. Targeted liposomes that recognize overexpressed receptors or antigens on diseased cells have great potential in therapeutic and diagnostic applications. However, chemical modifications of nanoparticle surfaces by postfunctionalization approaches are less effective than in solution and often not high-yielding. In addition, the conjugation efficiency is often challenging to characterize and therefore not addressed in many reports. We present here an investigation of PEGylated liposomes functionalized with a neuroendocrine tumor targeting peptide (TATE), synthesized with a variety of functionalities that have been used for surface conjugation of nanoparticles. The reaction kinetics and overall yield were quantified by HPLC. Reactions were conducted in solution as well as by postfunctionalization of liposomes in order to study the effects of steric hindrance and possible affinity between the peptide and the liposome surface. These studies demonstrate the importance of choosing the correct chemistry in order to obtain a quantitative surface functionalization of liposomes.

  4. Surface chemistry governs cellular tropism of nanoparticles in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Eric; Gaudin, Alice; King, Amanda R.; Seo, Young-Eun; Suh, Hee-Won; Deng, Yang; Cui, Jiajia; Tietjen, Gregory T.; Huttner, Anita; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2017-05-01

    Nanoparticles are of long-standing interest for the treatment of neurological diseases such as glioblastoma. Most past work focused on methods to introduce nanoparticles into the brain, suggesting that reaching the brain interstitium will be sufficient to ensure therapeutic efficacy. However, optimized nanoparticle design for drug delivery to the central nervous system is limited by our understanding of their cellular deposition in the brain. Here, we investigated the cellular fate of poly(lactic acid) nanoparticles presenting different surface chemistries, after administration by convection-enhanced delivery. We demonstrate that nanoparticles with `stealth' properties mostly avoid internalization by all cell types, but internalization can be enhanced by functionalization with bio-adhesive end-groups. We also show that association rates measured in cultured cells predict the extent of internalization of nanoparticles in cell populations. Finally, evaluating therapeutic efficacy in an orthotopic model of glioblastoma highlights the need to balance significant uptake without inducing adverse toxicity.

  5. Effect of surface chemistry on bacterial adhesion, viability, and morphology.

    PubMed

    Parreira, Paula; Magalhães, Ana; Gonçalves, Inês C; Gomes, Joana; Vidal, Ricardo; Reis, Celso A; Leckband, Deborah E; Martins, M Cristina L

    2011-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most common infectious agents in the world and it is thought to colonize the gastric mucosa of about half of the world's population causing several gastric diseases. In this work, the effect of surface chemistry on H. pylori nonspecific adhesion, viability, and morphology was evaluated using three H. pylori strains with different adhesins expression profile. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiols on gold were used to obtain surfaces exposing different functional groups: OH, CH3, and ethylene glycol (EG4). Bacterial adhesion onto the surfaces reached a plateau at 2 h. There was a correlation between adhesion and the exposed surface group, with bacterial cells adhering preferentially to CH3-SAMs while EG4-SAMs prevented H. pylori adhesion during the entire adhesion test (24 h). Surfaces that presented the EG4 group were also the only ones that significantly reduced the viability of adhered bacteria. Surface chemistry also influenced the morphology of adhered bacteria. The H. pylori rod shape observed in the control (Tissue Culture Polyethylene-TCPE) was only retrieved on CH3-SAMs. This work demonstrates that surface chemistry, namely specific functional groups on the material, influence the nonspecific adsorption of H. pylori. Moreover, the features of the bacterial strain and the surface chemistry can alter the adhesion kinetics, as well as the morphology and viability of attached bacteria. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Gas Plasma Surface Chemistry for Biological Assays.

    PubMed

    Sahagian, Khoren; Larner, Mikki

    2015-01-01

    Biological systems respond to and interact with surfaces. Gas plasma provides a scalable surface treatment method for designing interactive surfaces. There are many commercial examples of plasma-modified products. These include well plates, filtration membranes, dispensing tools, and medical devices. This chapter presents an overview of gas plasma technology and provides a guide to using gas plasma for modifying surfaces for research or product development.

  7. Investigations in Marine Chemistry: Tide Pool Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    Students investigated the salinity of tide pools at different levels in the intertidal zone. Data are analyzed collectively. Students graphed and discussed data. Included are suggestions for evaluation and further study. (Author)

  8. Investigations in Marine Chemistry: Tide Pool Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    Students investigated the salinity of tide pools at different levels in the intertidal zone. Data are analyzed collectively. Students graphed and discussed data. Included are suggestions for evaluation and further study. (Author)

  9. Investigations in Marine Chemistry: Salinity II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    Presented is a science activity in which the student investigates methods of calibration of a simple conductivity meter via a hands-on inquiry technique. Conductivity is mathematically compared to salinity using a point slope formula and graphical techniques. Sample solutions of unknown salinity are provided so that the students can sharpen their…

  10. Role of the surface chemistry of ceria surfaces on silicate adsorption.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jihoon; Lee, Jung Woo; Moon, Jinok; Sigmund, Wolfgang; Paik, Ungyu

    2014-05-28

    Ceria nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely explored as a promising material in various fields. As synthesized under various physicochemical conditions, it exhibits the different surface chemistry. Here, the role of hydroxyl and nitrate group on ceria surface, formed under various physicochemical conditions, for the silicate adsorption was experimentally and theoretically investigated based on the adsorption isotherms and theoretical analyses using density functional theory (DFT) calculation. Experimental results acquired from adsorption isotherms with Freundlich model indicated that the nitrate group shows a much higher affinity with silicate than the hydroxyl groups. These phenomena were demonstrated through the theoretical approaches that exhibit the binding energy of the NO3-ceria (-4.383 eV) on the SiO2 surface being much higher than that of the OH-ceria (-3.813 eV). In good agreement with the experimental and the theoretical results based on adsorption properties, the results of chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) also show that the nitrate groups significantly enhance the removal of SiO2 than the hydroxyl groups. The results investigated in this study will provide researchers, studying the ceria NPs, with guidelines on the importance of exploring the surface chemistry of ceria.

  11. Surface chemistry associated with plasma etching processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, David B.; Humbird, David

    2002-05-01

    We present our progress towards an accurate simulation model of plasma etching of silicon. A study of the interactions of energetic argon ions with silicon surfaces using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is reported. A dynamic balance between ion-induced damage and recrystallization of the surface is detected. By manipulating ion energy, argon ions are able to both create disordered regions near the surface, and recrystallize these disordered regions. Silicon atoms in this amorphous region are readily mixed by argon ions. Limited mixing in the crystalline layer is observed. Fluorine adsorbed on the silicon surface does not mix into the layer with argon ion impact. When an energetic F + impacts a silicon surface, the uptake and apparent sub-surface mixing of F is much greater than Ar +-induced mixing. However, a closer examination shows that the F impacts have primarily increased the Si surface area by creating crevices and cracks, and that the F remains mainly on the surface of this layer. A similar situation results when SiF 3+ impacts the surface.

  12. Surface chemistry and tribology of MEMS.

    PubMed

    Maboudian, Roya; Carraro, Carlo

    2004-01-01

    The microscopic length scale and high surface-to-volume ratio, characteristic of microelectro-mechanical systems (MEMS), dictate that surface properties are of paramount importance. This review deals with the effects of surface chemical treatments on tribological properties (adhesion, friction, and wear) of MEMS devices. After a brief review of materials and processes that are utilized in MEMS technology, the relevant tribological and chemical issues are discussed. Various MEMS microinstruments are discussed, which are commonly employed to perform adhesion, friction, and wear measurements. The effects of different surface treatments on the reported tribological properties are discussed.

  13. Impact of surface chemistry and blocking strategies on DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Scott; Smith, Stephanie; Windle, Brad; Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony

    2003-08-15

    The surfaces and immobilization chemistries of DNA microarrays are the foundation for high quality gene expression data. Four surface modification chemistries, poly-L-lysine (PLL), 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPS), DAB-AM-poly(propyleminime hexadecaamine) dendrimer (DAB) and 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APS), were evaluated using cDNA and oligonucleotide sub-arrays. Two un-silanized glass surfaces, RCA-cleaned and immersed in Tris-EDTA buffer were also studied. DNA on amine-modified surfaces was fixed by UV (90 mJ/cm(2)), while DNA on GPS-modified surfaces was immobilized by covalent coupling. Arrays were blocked with either succinic anhydride (SA), bovine serum albumin (BSA) or left unblocked prior to hybridization with labeled PCR product. Quality factors evaluated were surface affinity for cDNA versus oligonucleotides, spot and background intensity, spotting concentration and blocking chemistry. Contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy were preformed to characterize surface wettability and morphology. The GPS surface exhibited the lowest background intensity regardless of blocking method. Blocking the arrays did not affect raw spot intensity, but affected background intensity on amine surfaces, BSA blocking being the lowest. Oligonucleotides and cDNA on unblocked GPS-modified slides gave the best signal (spot-to-background intensity ratio). Under the conditions evaluated, the unblocked GPS surface along with amine covalent coupling was the most appropriate for both cDNA and oligonucleotide microarrays.

  14. Surface chemistry: Single handedness in flatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Karl-Heinz

    2017-03-01

    Planar molecules may break mirror symmetry when aligned on a surface, but both right- and left-handed forms will be created. Starting with a single-handed precursor, chiral adsorbates of planar hydrocarbons with a single handedness are formed in on-surface reactions.

  15. Covalent-Bond Formation via On-Surface Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Held, Philipp Alexander; Fuchs, Harald; Studer, Armido

    2017-05-02

    In this Review article pioneering work and recent achievements in the emerging research area of on-surface chemistry is discussed. On-surface chemistry, sometimes also called two-dimensional chemistry, shows great potential for bottom-up preparation of defined nanostructures. In contrast to traditional organic synthesis, where reactions are generally conducted in well-defined reaction flasks in solution, on-surface chemistry is performed in the cavity of a scanning probe microscope on a metal crystal under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. The metal first acts as a platform for self-assembly of the organic building blocks and in many cases it also acts as a catalyst for the given chemical transformation. Products and hence success of the reaction are directly analyzed by scanning probe microscopy. This Review provides a general overview of this chemistry highlighting advantages and disadvantages as compared to traditional reaction setups. The second part of the Review then focuses on reactions that have been successfully conducted as on-surface processes. On-surface Ullmann and Glaser couplings are addressed. In addition, cyclodehydrogenation reactions and cycloadditions are discussed and reactions involving the carbonyl functionality are highlighted. Finally, the first examples of sequential on-surface chemistry are considered in which two different functionalities are chemoselectively addressed. The Review gives an overview for experts working in the area but also offers a starting point to non-experts to enter into this exciting new interdisciplinary research field. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Post-Cassini Investigations of Titan Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörst, Sarah M.

    The arrival of the Cassini-Huygens mission to the Saturn system ushered in a new era in the study of Titan. Armed with a variety of instruments capable of remote sensing and in situ investigations of Titan's atmosphere and surface, Cassini and Huygens have provided a wealth of new information about Titan and have finally allowed humankind to see its surface. This work focuses on two discoveries made by the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS): the detection of oxygen ions (O+) precipitating into Titan's atmosphere (Hartle et al., 2006) and the discovery of very large positive (Waite et al., 2007; Crary et al., 2009) and negative ions (Coates et al., 2007, 2009) present in Titan's thermosphere.Through the use of a photochemical model, I demonstrate that the observed densities of CO, CO2 and H2O can be explained by a combination of O and OH or H2O input to the upper atmosphere. Given the detection of O+ precipitation into Titan's upper atmosphere, it is no longer necessary to invoke outgassing from Titan's interior as a source for atmospheric CO or to assume that the observed CO is the remnant of a larger primordial abundance in Titan's atmosphere. Instead, it is most likely that the oxygen bearing species in Titan's atmosphere are the result of external input, most likely from Enceladus.I have also used very high resolution mass spectrometry to investigate the com- position of Titan aerosol analogues, or "tholins". Although there are an enormous number of molecules present in tholin samples, they exhibit numerous patterns, in- cluding very regular spectral spacing. These patterns may help constrain the com- position of the very large ions observed in the CAPS spectra, since the resolution of the instrument makes identification of the molecules impossible. Additionally, tholins produced with CO possess molecules of prebiotic interest, including all 5 nucleotide bases and the 2 smallest amino acids (glycine and alanine). This indicates that

  17. Surface chemistry and catalysis confined under two-dimensional materials.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Bao, Xinhe

    2016-10-07

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials are characterised by their strong intraplanar bonding but weak interplanar interaction. Interfaces between neighboring 2D layers or between 2D overlayers and substrate surfaces provide intriguing confined spaces for chemical processes, which have stimulated a new area of "chemistry under 2D cover". In particular, well-defined 2D material overlayers such as graphene, hexagonal boron nitride, and transition metal dichalcogenides have been deposited on solid surfaces, which can be used as model systems to understand the new chemistry. In the present review, we first show that many atoms and molecules can intercalate ultrathin 2D materials supported on solid surfaces and the space under the 2D overlayers has been regarded as a 2D nanocontainer. Moreover, chemical reactions such as catalytic reactions, surface adlayer growth, chemical vapor deposition, and electrochemical reactions occur in the 2D confined spaces, which further act as 2D nanoreactors. It has been demonstrated that surface chemistry and catalysis are strongly modulated by the 2D covers, resulting in weakened molecule adsorption and enhanced surface reactions. Finally, we conclude that the confinement effect of the 2D cover leads to new chemistry in a small space, such as "catalysis under cover" and "electrochemistry under cover". These new concepts enable us to design advanced nanocatalysts encapsulated with 2D material shells which may present improved performance in many important processes of heterogeneous catalysis, electrochemistry, and energy conversion.

  18. Supported organometallic complexes, surface chemistry, spectroscopy, and catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, T.J.

    1993-04-01

    Goal is to elucidate and understand the surface chemistry and catalytic properties of well-defined, highly-reactive organometallic molecules (principally based upon abundant actinide, lanthanide, and early transition elements) adsorbed on metal oxides and halides. Nature of adsorbed species is probed by a battery of chemical and physicochemical techniques, to understand the nature of the molecule-surface coordination chemistry and how this can give rise to extremely high catalytic activity. A complementary objective is to delineate the scope and mechanisms of the heterogeneous catalytic reactions, as well as to relate them both conceptually and functionally to model systems generated in solution.

  19. Molecular Surface Chemistry by Metal Single Crystals and Nanoparticles from Vacuum to High Pressure.

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Park, Jeong Y.

    2008-04-05

    Model systems for studying molecular surface chemistry have evolved from single crystal surfaces at low pressure to colloidal nanoparticles at high pressure. Low pressure surface structure studies of platinum single crystals using molecular beam surface scattering and low energy electron diffraction techniques probe the unique activity of defects, steps and kinks at the surface for dissociation reactions (H-H, C-H, C-C, O{double_bond}O bonds). High-pressure investigations of platinum single crystals using sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy have revealed the presence and the nature of reaction intermediates. High pressure scanning tunneling microscopy of platinum single crystal surfaces showed adsorbate mobility during a catalytic reaction. Nanoparticle systems are used to determine the role of metal-oxide interfaces, site blocking and the role of surface structures in reactive surface chemistry. The size, shape and composition of nanoparticles play important roles in determining reaction activity and selectivity.

  20. Clean Air Markets - Monitoring Surface Water Chemistry

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn about how EPA uses Long Term Monitoring (LTM) and Temporily Integrated Monitoring of Ecosystems (TIME) to track the effect of the Clean Air Act Amendments on acidity of surface waters in the eastern U.S.

  1. Surface chemistry studies of phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Amy Suzanne

    This research examined the surface of an undoped and rare-earth doped sodium alumino metaphosphate glass after fracture or surface finishing and subsequent exposure to humid and aqueous environments. In addition, the adsorption of aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APS), and the dominant parameters controlling the structure of the deposited film, were studied. Typically, commercial glasses must be cut and polished into optical components for engineering applications. This process involves a series of aqueous treatments in both acidic and basic media. The experiments performed here on aluminophosphate glass showed that this results in dissolution, surface composition changes (depletion of Na) and surface pitting. In both alkaline detergent and acid etching solution, dissolution at a rate of approximately 4 x 10 -3 mol/m2/hr (0.2 mum/hr) occurs along with a drastic alteration of the surface morphology. When exposed to an environment of elevated humidity and temperature for an extended period of time, this aluminophosphate glass was observed to break down, forming a soluble phosphate gel that dissolves away from the surface. Simultaneously, the surface became enriched in silica, a trace contaminant in the glass, which eventually precipitated and coalesced into a dendritic pattern that covered the surface. The freshly powdered phosphate glass was found to contain surface hydroxyls weakly associated with one another, and some bound by a stronger hydrogen bond, likely to adjacent non-bridging oxygens. Most of these hydroxyls could be desorbed upon heating above the glass transition temperature to leave only a small concentration of weakly associated hydroxyls and free hydroxyls on the surface. The characterization of hydroxyls and water on the phosphate glass surface was used to understand the adsorption of aminopropyl tri-ethoxysilane (APS) also through the use of in-situ DRIFTS. The concentration of adsorbed APS was found to be independent of solution pH, but the measured

  2. Surface chemistry of rare-earth oxide surfaces at ambient conditions: reactions with water and hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Külah, Elçin; Marot, Laurent; Steiner, Roland; Romanyuk, Andriy; Jung, Thomas A; Wäckerlin, Aneliia; Meyer, Ernst

    2017-03-22

    Rare-earth (RE) oxide surfaces are of significant importance for catalysis and were recently reported to possess intrinsic hydrophobicity. The surface chemistry of these oxides in the low temperature regime, however, remains to a large extent unexplored. The reactions occurring at RE surfaces at room temperature (RT) in real air environment, in particular, in presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were not addressed until now. Discovering these reactions would shed light onto intermediate steps occurring in automotive exhaust catalysts before reaching the final high operational temperature and full conversion of organics. Here we first address physical properties of the RE oxide, nitride and fluoride surfaces modified by exposure to ambient air and then we report a room temperature reaction between PAH and RE oxide surfaces, exemplified by tetracene (C18H12) on a Gd2O3. Our study evidences a novel effect - oxidation of higher hydrocarbons at significantly lower temperatures (~300 K) than previously reported (>500 K). The evolution of the surface chemical composition of RE compounds in ambient air is investigated and correlated with the surface wetting. Our surprising results reveal the complex behavior of RE surfaces and motivate follow-up studies of reactions between PAH and catalytic surfaces at the single molecule level.

  3. Surface chemistry of rare-earth oxide surfaces at ambient conditions: reactions with water and hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Külah, Elçin; Marot, Laurent; Steiner, Roland; Romanyuk, Andriy; Jung, Thomas A.; Wäckerlin, Aneliia; Meyer, Ernst

    2017-03-01

    Rare-earth (RE) oxide surfaces are of significant importance for catalysis and were recently reported to possess intrinsic hydrophobicity. The surface chemistry of these oxides in the low temperature regime, however, remains to a large extent unexplored. The reactions occurring at RE surfaces at room temperature (RT) in real air environment, in particular, in presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were not addressed until now. Discovering these reactions would shed light onto intermediate steps occurring in automotive exhaust catalysts before reaching the final high operational temperature and full conversion of organics. Here we first address physical properties of the RE oxide, nitride and fluoride surfaces modified by exposure to ambient air and then we report a room temperature reaction between PAH and RE oxide surfaces, exemplified by tetracene (C18H12) on a Gd2O3. Our study evidences a novel effect – oxidation of higher hydrocarbons at significantly lower temperatures (~300 K) than previously reported (>500 K). The evolution of the surface chemical composition of RE compounds in ambient air is investigated and correlated with the surface wetting. Our surprising results reveal the complex behavior of RE surfaces and motivate follow-up studies of reactions between PAH and catalytic surfaces at the single molecule level.

  4. Surface chemistry of rare-earth oxide surfaces at ambient conditions: reactions with water and hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Külah, Elçin; Marot, Laurent; Steiner, Roland; Romanyuk, Andriy; Jung, Thomas A.; Wäckerlin, Aneliia; Meyer, Ernst

    2017-01-01

    Rare-earth (RE) oxide surfaces are of significant importance for catalysis and were recently reported to possess intrinsic hydrophobicity. The surface chemistry of these oxides in the low temperature regime, however, remains to a large extent unexplored. The reactions occurring at RE surfaces at room temperature (RT) in real air environment, in particular, in presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were not addressed until now. Discovering these reactions would shed light onto intermediate steps occurring in automotive exhaust catalysts before reaching the final high operational temperature and full conversion of organics. Here we first address physical properties of the RE oxide, nitride and fluoride surfaces modified by exposure to ambient air and then we report a room temperature reaction between PAH and RE oxide surfaces, exemplified by tetracene (C18H12) on a Gd2O3. Our study evidences a novel effect – oxidation of higher hydrocarbons at significantly lower temperatures (~300 K) than previously reported (>500 K). The evolution of the surface chemical composition of RE compounds in ambient air is investigated and correlated with the surface wetting. Our surprising results reveal the complex behavior of RE surfaces and motivate follow-up studies of reactions between PAH and catalytic surfaces at the single molecule level. PMID:28327642

  5. Quantification of air plasma chemistry for surface disinfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovich, Matthew J.; Clark, Douglas S.; Graves, David B.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric-pressure air plasmas, created by a variety of discharges, are promising sources of reactive species for the emerging field of plasma biotechnology because of their convenience and ability to operate at ambient conditions. One biological application of ambient-air plasma is microbial disinfection, and the ability of air plasmas to decontaminate both solid surfaces and liquid volumes has been thoroughly established in the literature. However, the mechanism of disinfection and which reactive species most strongly correlate with antimicrobial effects are still not well understood. We describe quantitative gas-phase measurements of plasma chemistry via infrared spectroscopy in confined volumes, focusing on air plasma generated via surface micro-discharge (SMD). Previously, it has been shown that gaseous chemistry is highly sensitive to operating conditions, and the measurements we describe here extend those findings. We quantify the gaseous concentrations of ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2, or NOx) throughout the established ‘regimes’ for SMD air plasma chemistry: the low-power, ozone-dominated mode; the high-power, nitrogen oxides-dominated mode; and the intermediate, unstable transition region. The results presented here are in good agreement with previously published experimental studies of aqueous chemistry and parameterized models of gaseous chemistry. The principal finding of the present study is the correlation of bacterial inactivation on dry surfaces with gaseous chemistry across these time and power regimes. Bacterial decontamination is most effective in ‘NOx mode’ and less effective in ‘ozone mode’, with the weakest antibacterial effects in the transition region. Our results underscore the dynamic nature of air plasma chemistry and the importance of careful chemical characterization of plasma devices intended for biological applications.

  6. Desorption of 1,3,5-Trichlorobenzene from Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Impact of Solution Chemistry and Surface Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xingmao; Uddin, Sheikh

    2013-01-01

    The strong affinity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to environmental contaminants has raised serious concern that CNTs may function as a carrier of environmental pollutants and lead to contamination in places where the environmental pollutants are not expected. However, this concern will not be realized until the contaminants are desorbed from CNTs. It is well recognized that the desorption of environmental pollutants from pre-laden CNTs varies with the environmental conditions, such as the solution pH and ionic strength. However, comprehensive investigation on the influence of solution chemistry on the desorption process has not been carried out, even though numerous investigations have been conducted to investigate the impact of solution chemistry on the adsorption of environmental pollutants on CNTs. The main objective of this study was to determine the influence of solution chemistry (e.g., pH, ionic strength) and surface functionalization on the desorption of preloaded 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene (1,3,5-TCB) from multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). The results suggested that higher pH, ionic strength and natural organic matter in solution generally led to higher desorption of 1,3,5-TCB from MWNTs. However, the extent of change varied at different values of the tested parameters (e.g., pH < 7 vs. pH > 7). In addition, the impact of these parameters varied with MWNTs possessing different surface functional groups, suggesting that surface functionalization could considerably alter the environmental behaviors and impact of MWNTs. PMID:28348336

  7. A model of Martian surface chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oyama, V. I.; Berdahl, B. J.

    1979-01-01

    Alkaline earth and alkali metal superoxides and peroxides, gamma-Fe2O3 and carbon suboxide polymer, are proposed to be constituents of the Martian surface material. These reactive substances explain the water modified reactions and thermal behaviors of the Martian samples demonstrated by all of the Viking Biology Experiments. It is also proposed that the syntheses of these substances result mainly from electrical discharges between wind-mobilized particles at Martian pressures; plasmas are initiated and maintained by these discharges. Active species in the plasma either combine to form or react with inorganic surfaces to create the reactive constituents.

  8. Investigating the Effectiveness of Computer Simulations for Chemistry Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plass, Jan L.; Milne, Catherine; Homer, Bruce D.; Schwartz, Ruth N.; Hayward, Elizabeth O.; Jordan, Trace; Verkuilen, Jay; Ng, Florrie; Wang, Yan; Barrientos, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Are well-designed computer simulations an effective tool to support student understanding of complex concepts in chemistry when integrated into high school science classrooms? We investigated scaling up the use of a sequence of simulations of kinetic molecular theory and associated topics of diffusion, gas laws, and phase change, which we designed…

  9. Investigating the Effectiveness of Computer Simulations for Chemistry Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plass, Jan L.; Milne, Catherine; Homer, Bruce D.; Schwartz, Ruth N.; Hayward, Elizabeth O.; Jordan, Trace; Verkuilen, Jay; Ng, Florrie; Wang, Yan; Barrientos, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Are well-designed computer simulations an effective tool to support student understanding of complex concepts in chemistry when integrated into high school science classrooms? We investigated scaling up the use of a sequence of simulations of kinetic molecular theory and associated topics of diffusion, gas laws, and phase change, which we designed…

  10. An Investigative, Cooperative Learning Approach for General Chemistry Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Díaz-Vázquez, Liz M.; Montes, Barbara Casañas; Echevarría Vargas, Ileabett M.; Hernandez-Cancel, Griselle; Gonzalez, Fernando; Molina, Anna M.; Morales-Cruz, Moraima; Torres-Díaz, Carlos M.; Griebenow, Kai

    2012-01-01

    The integration of research and education is an essential component of our university's teaching philosophy. Recently, we made a curricular revision to facilitate such an approach in the General Chemistry Laboratory, to teach students that investigative approaches are at the core of sciences. The curriculum revision included new interdisciplinary…

  11. Architecture and Surface Chemistry of Compound Nanoclusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-31

    Apparently, a strong ligand effect leads to the selective capture of this cluster size. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy on silver nanorods substrates...infrared optical parametric oscillator laser systems that now provide IR light across the 700-4500 cm-1 range. We have measured infrared spectroscopy for

  12. Architecture and Surface Chemistry of Compound Nanoclusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    size. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy on silver nanorods substrates were undertaken to determine the structure of the Co4O4(CH3CN)6 species...parametric oscillator laser systems that now provide IR light across the 700-4500 cm-1 range. We have measured infrared spectroscopy for these systems

  13. Organic chemistry on Titan: Surface interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. Reid; Sagan, Carl

    1992-01-01

    The interaction of Titan's organic sediments with the surface (solubility in nonpolar fluids) is discussed. How Titan's sediments can be exposed to an aqueous medium for short, but perhaps significant, periods of time is also discussed. Interactions with hydrocarbons and with volcanic magmas are considered. The alteration of Titan's organic sediments over geologic time by the impacts of meteorites and comets is discussed.

  14. Chemistry and Physics of Solid Surfaces 5

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    53, 76? (1981); f) B.K. Teo , D.C. Joy (eds.): EXAFS Spectroscopy, Techniques and Appli- cations (Plenum, New York 1981) 10.6 A. Bianconi: Appl. Surf...Meeussen, B.P. Veltman, P. Bennema, C. van Leeuwen , G.H. Gilmer: J. Crystal Growth 24/25, 491 (1974) 13.3 A review of surface roughening and crystal

  15. Organic chemistry on Titan: Surface interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. Reid; Sagan, Carl

    1992-01-01

    The interaction of Titan's organic sediments with the surface (solubility in nonpolar fluids) is discussed. How Titan's sediments can be exposed to an aqueous medium for short, but perhaps significant, periods of time is also discussed. Interactions with hydrocarbons and with volcanic magmas are considered. The alteration of Titan's organic sediments over geologic time by the impacts of meteorites and comets is discussed.

  16. Density functional theory in surface chemistry and catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Nørskov, Jens K.; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Studt, Felix; Bligaard, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of reactivity trends for chemistry at transition-metal surfaces have enabled in silico design of heterogeneous catalysts in a few cases. The current status of the field is discussed with an emphasis on the role of coupling theory and experiment and future challenges. PMID:21220337

  17. Density functional theory in surface chemistry and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Nørskov, Jens K; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Studt, Felix; Bligaard, Thomas

    2011-01-18

    Recent advances in the understanding of reactivity trends for chemistry at transition-metal surfaces have enabled in silico design of heterogeneous catalysts in a few cases. The current status of the field is discussed with an emphasis on the role of coupling theory and experiment and future challenges.

  18. Effects of urine application on chemistry of feedlot pen surfaces

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Beef cattle feedlots can emit significant quantities of ammonia that may adversely affect air quality and decrease the fertilizer value of manure. The major source of ammonia loss may be urinary urea. We conducted three studies to evaluate the effects of urine on the chemistry of feedlot pen surface...

  19. Density Functional Theory in Surface Chemistry and Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Norskov, Jens

    2011-05-19

    Recent advances in the understanding of reactivity trends for chemistry at transition metal surfaces have enabled in silico design of heterogeneous catalysts in a few cases. Current status of the field is discussed with an emphasis on the role of coupling between theory and experiment and future challenges.

  20. Effect of accelerated weathering on surface chemistry of modified wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temiz, Ali; Terziev, Nasko; Eikenes, Morten; Hafren, Jonas

    2007-04-01

    In this study, the effects of UV-light irradiation and water spray on colour and surface chemistry of scots pine sapwood samples were investigated. The specimens were treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA), a metal-free propiconazol-based formulation, chitosan, furfuryl alcohol and linseed and tall oils. The weathering experiment was performed by cycles of 2 h UV-light irradiation followed by water spray for 18 min. The changes at the surface of the weathered samples were characterised by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR); colour characterizations were performed by measuring CIELab parameters. The results show that all treatment methods except chitosan treatment provided lower colour changes than the control groups after 800 h exposure in weathering test cycle, but differences between chitosan and control were also small. The lowest colour changes were found on linseed oil (full cell process) and CCA treated wood. FT-IR results show that oil treatment (linseed and tall oil) decreased the intensities of a lignin specific peak (1500-1515 cm -1). Absorption band changes at 1630-1660 cm -1 were reduced by all treatments.

  1. Investigating the Relationship between Faculty Cognitive Expectations about Learning Chemistry and the Construction of Exam Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanabria-Rios, David; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated chemistry faculty's cognitive expectations about learning chemistry and their influence upon the construction of exam questions in a general chemistry curriculum. Faculty cognitive expectations for learning chemistry were measured using QUIMX. Learning objectives and exam questions for a year-long general chemistry sequence…

  2. Investigating the Relationship between Faculty Cognitive Expectations about Learning Chemistry and the Construction of Exam Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanabria-Rios, David; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated chemistry faculty's cognitive expectations about learning chemistry and their influence upon the construction of exam questions in a general chemistry curriculum. Faculty cognitive expectations for learning chemistry were measured using QUIMX. Learning objectives and exam questions for a year-long general chemistry sequence…

  3. Lunar surface chemistry: A new imaging technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andre, C.G.; Bielefeld, M.J.; Eliason, E.; Soderblom, L.A.; Adler, I.; Philpotts, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    Detailed chemical maps of the lunar surface have been constructed by applying a new weighted-filter imaging technique to Apollo 15 and Apollo 16 x-ray fluorescence data. The data quality improvement is amply demonstrated by (i) modes in the frequency distribution, representing highland and mare soil suites, which are not evident before data filtering and (ii) numerous examples of chemical variations which are correlated with small-scale (about 15 kilometer) lunar topographic features.

  4. Nanochannel array plastics with tailored surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Rzayev, Javid; Hillmyer, Marc A

    2005-09-28

    The utilization of nanoporous substrates in applications such as selective ion transport, biomolecule separation, seeded templating, and catalysis necessitates the ability to efficiently control pore surface properties. We approached this task by preparing nanoporous polymer monoliths from ABC triblock copolymer precursors that assemble into a cylindrical morphology, where the A block constitutes matrix, C is the removable minor component, and B provides the functionality on the surface of the pores. Polystyrene-polydimethylacrylamide-polylactide (PS-PDMA-PLA) triblock copolymers were prepared by a combination of controlled ring-opening and free-radical polymerization techniques. After selective etching of the PLA cylinders from shear-aligned monoliths, a nanoporous polystyrene matrix containing a hexagonally packed array of hydrophilic, PDMA-coated channels was obtained. Extremely high degrees of alignment and order could be attained, and nanoporous substrates with second-order orientation factors of as high as 0.96 were prepared. PDMA brushes inside the pores were then hydrolyzed in a controlled fashion to introduce a desired number of carboxylic acid groups to the internal pore surface. Carbodiimide mediated couplings with amines were then used to confirm the accessibility of the interior acidic groups and to render materials with different functional content. This modular approach allows for the convenient preparation of functionalized nanoporous materials from a single block copolymer precursor.

  5. Theoretical Insights into C1 Surface Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neurock, Matthew

    2008-03-01

    Reforming and partial oxidation of methane as well as other C1 fuels are important processes in the production of hydrogen and synthesis gas and will likely play important roles future energy strategies. Herein we use theory and simulation to examine the reactivity of methane, methanol and dimethyl ether with CO2, H2O, or O2 over supported transition metals. We systematically probe the elementary C-H bond activation as well as the oxidation pathways involved in both reforming as the oxidation of methane and other C1 intermediates over well defined transition metal surfaces, metal alloys and metal nanoparticles. The calculations demonstrate well-established trends in C-H bond activation as the result of changes in the metal, the activating molecule (methane, methanol, and DME) as well as the reaction conditions. The reaction conditions ultimately dictate the surface coverage of carbon and oxygen which have important consequences on the surface reactivity. The theoretical and simulation results are compared with well defined experiments carried out at Berkeley over supported particles.

  6. Selected Bibliography II-Diamond Surface Chemistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-30

    RESPONSIBLE INDIVIDUAL 22bfTELEPHONEf/r•ude Area Code) 122c. OFFICE SYMBOL John T. Yates, Jr. (4 l)624-•a2U DD FORM 1473,84 MAR 93 APR edition may be used...AUTHOR: Waclawski B.J., Pierce D.T., Swanson N. and Celotta R.J. TITLE: "Direct Verification cf Hydrogen Termiration of the Se.iconduction Diamond...Evans S. TITLE: "Surface Properties of Diamond" JNL: Prop. Nat. Synth. Diamond, Edited by: Field, John Edwin. Academic: London, UK. REF: (1992) 181-214 93

  7. Surface design for controlled crystallization: the role of surface chemistry and nanoscale pores in heterogeneous nucleation.

    PubMed

    Diao, Ying; Myerson, Allan S; Hatton, T Alan; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2011-05-03

    Current industrial practice for control of primary nucleation (nucleation from a system without pre-existing crystalline matter) during crystallization from solution involves control of supersaturation generation, impurity levels, and solvent composition. Nucleation behavior remains largely unpredictable, however, due to the presence of container surfaces, dust, dirt, and other impurities that can provide heterogeneous nucleation sites, thus making the control and scale-up of processes that depend on primary nucleation difficult. To develop a basis for the rational design of surfaces to control nucleation during crystallization from solution, we studied the role of surface chemistry and morphology of various polymeric substrates on heterogeneous nucleation using aspirin as a model compound. Nucleation induction time statistics were utilized to investigate and quantify systematically the effectiveness of polymer substrates in inducing nucleation. The nucleation induction time study revealed that poly(4-acryloylmorpholine) and poly(2-carboxyethyl acrylate), each cross-linked by divinylbenzene, significantly lowered the nucleation induction time of aspirin while the other polymers were essentially inactive. In addition, we found the presence of nanoscopic pores on certain polymer surfaces led to order-of-magnitude faster aspirin nucleation rates when compared with surfaces without pores. We studied the preferred orientation of aspirin crystals on polymer films and found the nucleation-active polymer surfaces preferentially nucleated the polar facets of aspirin, guided by hydrogen bonds. A model based on interfacial free energies was also developed which predicted the same trend of polymer surface nucleation activities as indicated by the nucleation induction times.

  8. Surface fabrication of oxides via solution chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chenglin; Sun, Congting; Shi, Yong; Xue, Dongfeng

    2008-04-01

    A template- and catalyst-free strategy has been successfully designed to prepare MgO and hydrated magnesium carbonate hydroxide (Mg 5(CO 3) 4(OH) 2·4H 2O) nanosheets with different patterns (such as chrysalides- and rose-like morphology) on the substrate surface. Experimental results reveal that the temperature and substrate allow us to tune the morphology of patterns. Mg 5(CO 3) 4(OH) 2·4H 2O thermodynamically prefers to grow into the sheet-like crystal at the current solution growth environment, which has been successfully explained by using the chemical bonding theory. The predicted morphology can accord well with the current experimental results. The obtained MgO and its precursor Mg 5(CO 3) 4(OH) 2·4H 2O with novel patterns might find enhanced applications in catalysis, refractory materials, plastics, fire retardants, and functional nanodevices.

  9. Testing Grain Surface Chemistry in Star Forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, Jacqueline; Boogert, Adwin

    2008-03-01

    The key chemical reactions that produce the first generation ice mantles in dense molecular clouds are still poorly known. Within cold, dense clouds, species formed in the gas and on the grain surfaces will stick to the grains and form icy mantles. However, during star-formation, materials in the general cloud medium are subjected to numerous chemical and physical processes that are driven mostly by thermal and energetic radiation. The comparison between background stars and protostars is a proven excellent tool for this purpose. By comparing observed interstellar solid state abundances with models of grain surface chemistry it is possible to elucidate the efficiency and hence relevancy of a number of chemical reactions, in particular the CO_2 formation pathways. In part because of Spitzer, significant progress has been made towards understanding the various effects of these radiation processes on the ices around a large sample of high- and low-mass protostars. First results suggest that two different CO2 formation pathways play a role in these harsh environments. Though which reaction initially dominated the chemistry is unknown due to the numerous physical processes. Unfortunately, only a small sample of background field stars have been observed, most notably Taurus. In Taurus, only one reaction pathway appears to be efficient in quiescent regions, but this result is sample limited. We propose to take low resolution spectra from 5 to 22 microns along the line of sight toward 31 field stars behind the LDN 673 molecular cloud. Differences in near-IR ice chemistry have already been observed and we will use these mid-infrared data to provide more stringent constraints on chemical models of grain surface chemistry. With this sample it is possible to address fundamental questions in astrochemistry: what are the dominant grain surface chemistry pathways? What is the composition of the first generation ice mantles in molecular clouds?

  10. Quantum Chemistry for Surface Segregation in Metal Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sholl, David

    2006-08-31

    Metal alloys are vital materials for the fabrication of high-flux, high-selectivity hydrogen separation membranes. A phenomenon that occurs in alloys that does not arise in pure metals is surface segregation, where the composition of the surface differs from the bulk composition. Little is known about the strength of surface segregation in the alloys usually considered for hydrogen membranes. Despite this lack of knowledge, surface segregation may play a decisive role in the ability of appropriately chosen alloys to be resistant to chemical poisoning, since membrane poisoning is controlled by surface chemistry. The aim of this Phase I project is to develop quantum chemistry approaches to assess surface segregation in a prototypical hydrogen membrane alloy, fcc Pd{sub 75}Cu{sub 25}. This alloy is known experimentally to have favorable surface properties as a poison resistant H{sub 2} purification membrane (Kamakoti et al., Science 307 (2005) 569-573), but previous efforts at modeling surfaces of this alloy have ignored the possible role of surface segregation (Alfonso et al., Surf. Sci. 546 (2003) 12-26).

  11. Microstructure and surface chemistry of amorphous alloys important to their friction and wear behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the microstructure and surface chemistry of amorphous alloys, and their effects on tribological behavior. The results indicate that the surface oxide layers present on amorphous alloys are effective in providing low friction and a protective film against wear in air. Clustering and crystallization in amorphous alloys can be enhanced as a result of plastic flow during the sliding process at a low sliding velocity, at room temperature. Clusters or crystallines with sizes to 150 nm and a diffused honeycomb-shaped structure are produced on the wear surface. Temperature effects lead to drastic changes in surface chemistry and friction behavior of the alloys at temperatures to 750 C. Contaminants can come from the bulk of the alloys to the surface upon heating and impart to the surface oxides at 350 C and boron nitride above 500 C. The oxides increase friction while the boron nitride reduces friction drastically in vacuum.

  12. Immobilization chemistries suitable for use in the BIAcore surface plasmon resonance detector.

    PubMed

    O'Shannessy, D J; Brigham-Burke, M; Peck, K

    1992-08-15

    Surface plasmon resonance detectors, such as the BIAcore instrument produced by Pharmacia, show promise for the detection and quantitation of macromolecular interactions in a label-free mode. Such detectors rely on the covalent immobilization of one of the interacting species onto the sensing surface. To date, the only published chemistry for this purpose is reaction of primary amino-containing ligands with an N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester-activated surface. In an effort to increase the versatility of the BIAcore with respect to immobilizing ligands, we undertook an investigation of activation chemistries compatible with this system. Using readily available reagents, we demonstrated that the carboxylated dextran-coated sensing surface could be easily converted to functions other than NHS-esters, including amine-activated, hydrazine-activated, and sulfhydryl-activated surfaces. In addition, use was made of the streptavidin/biotin interaction to probe chemical modifications of the sensing surface, by employing specifically modified biotin derivatives.

  13. Surface Chemistry and Properties of Oxides as Catalyst Supports

    SciTech Connect

    DeBusk, Melanie Moses; Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Contescu, Cristian I

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis relies on metal-oxides as supports for the catalysts. Catalyst supports are an indispensable component of most heterogeneous catalysts, but the role of the support is often minimized in light of the one played by the catalytically active species it supports. The active species of supported catalysts are located on the surface of the support where their contact with liquid or gas phase reactants will be greatest. Considering that support plays a major role in distribution and stability of active species, the absorption and retention of reactive species, and in some cases in catalytic reaction, the properties and chemistry that can occur at the surface of an oxide support are important for understanding their impact on the activity of a supported catalyst. This chapter examines this rich surface chemistry and properties of oxides used as catalyst supports, and explores the influence of their interaction with the active species.

  14. The effect of processing variables on steel surface chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, G.S.

    1993-12-31

    Differences in processing at all stages in the steel making process can effect the surface chemistry of steel. The surface chemistry can dictate the performance of many different products and processes including electrogalvanized steel. If the steel chemistry is not controlled sufficiently, the zinc electrodeposit will be subject to hydrogen blistering. This dissertation examined the effect of many processing variables on both the organic and inorganic contaminants on steel surfaces. Processes both before the electrogalvanizing line and those after the electrogalvanizing line were examined. Mechanisms were determined for reactions of organic oils with the steel surface. Reaction between the carbonyl functionality, present as an acid or an ester, and iron hydroxide to form a tenaciously adherent iron soap was demonstrated using infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Thermodynamics and kinetics of segregation of metallic elements to the surface of the steel were determined. It was shown that the primary mechanism for segregation of elements such as aluminum, silicon, chromium, and titanium is oxidation during the anneal. Analysis of the kinetics indicated the feasibility of this mechanism. The mechanism of electrocleaning were elucidated, based on both electrochemical and physical effects. Improved methods of electrocleaning were described based upon optimization of the cleaning frequency. It was found that increasing the frequency of anodic and cathodic cycling increasing the cleaning efficiency up to about 5 Hz. Above this frequency bubbles, which provide physical scrubbing and convection near the interface, can not form rapidly enough to be effective. Increased current density was shown to be effective in improving electrocleaning.

  15. Color and surface chemistry changes of extracted wood flour after heating at 120 °C

    Treesearch

    Yao Chen; Mandla A. Tshabalala; Jianmin Gao; Nicole M. Stark

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effect of heat on color and surface chemistry of wood flour (WF), unextracted, extracted and delignified samples of commercial WF were heated at 120 °C for 24 h and analyzed by colorimetry, diffuse reflectance visible (DRV), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and Fourier transform Raman (FT-Raman) spectroscopies....

  16. Chemistry of the surface and lower atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, B., Jr.; Treiman, A.

    1992-01-01

    A comprehensive overview of the chemical interactions between the atmosphere and surface of Venus is presented. Earth-based, earth-orbital, and spacecraft data on the composition of the atmosphere and surface of Venus are presented and applied to quantitative evaluations of the chemical interactions between carbon, hydrogen, sulfur, chlorine, fluorine, and nitrogen-containing gases and possible minerals on the Venus surface. The calculation results are used to predict stable minerals and mineral assemblages on the Venus surface to determine which, if any, atmospheric gases are buffered by mineral assemblages on the surface, and to critically review and assess prior work on atmosphere-surface chemistry on Venus. It is concluded that the CO2 pressure on Venus is comparable to the CO2 equilibrium partial pressure developed by the calcite + wollastonite + quartz assemblage at the mean Venus surface temperature of 740 K.

  17. Chemistry of the surface and lower atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, B., Jr.; Treiman, A.

    1992-01-01

    A comprehensive overview of the chemical interactions between the atmosphere and surface of Venus is presented. Earth-based, earth-orbital, and spacecraft data on the composition of the atmosphere and surface of Venus are presented and applied to quantitative evaluations of the chemical interactions between carbon, hydrogen, sulfur, chlorine, fluorine, and nitrogen-containing gases and possible minerals on the Venus surface. The calculation results are used to predict stable minerals and mineral assemblages on the Venus surface to determine which, if any, atmospheric gases are buffered by mineral assemblages on the surface, and to critically review and assess prior work on atmosphere-surface chemistry on Venus. It is concluded that the CO2 pressure on Venus is comparable to the CO2 equilibrium partial pressure developed by the calcite + wollastonite + quartz assemblage at the mean Venus surface temperature of 740 K.

  18. Influence of surface structure and chemistry on water droplet splashing.

    PubMed

    Koch, Kerstin; Grichnik, Roland

    2016-08-06

    Water droplet splashing and aerosolization play a role in human hygiene and health systems as well as in crop culturing. Prevention or reduction of splashing can prevent transmission of diseases between animals and plants and keep technical systems such as pipe or bottling systems free of contamination. This study demonstrates to what extent the surface chemistry and structures influence the water droplet splashing behaviour. Smooth surfaces and structured replicas of Calathea zebrina (Sims) Lindl. leaves were produced. Modification of their wettability was done by coating with hydrophobizing and hydrophilizing agents. Their wetting was characterized by contact angle measurement and splashing behaviour was observed with a high-speed video camera. Hydrophobic and superhydrophilic surfaces generally showed fewer tendencies to splash than hydrophobic ones. Structuring amplified the underlying behaviour of the surface chemistries, increasing hydrophobic surfaces' tendency to splash and decreasing splash on hydrophilic surfaces by quickly transporting water off the impact point by capillary forces. The non-porous surface structures found in C. zebrina could easily be applied to technical products such as plastic foils or mats and coated with hydrophilizing agents to suppress splash in areas of increased hygiene requirements or wherever pooling of liquids is not desirable.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bioinspired hierarchically structured surfaces for green science'.

  19. A surface-chemistry study of barium ferrite nanoplates with DBSa-modified surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisjak, Darja; Ovtar, Simona; Kovač, Janez; Gregoratti, Luca; Aleman, Belen; Amati, Matteo; Fanetti, Mattia; Makovec, Darko

    2014-06-01

    Barium ferrite (BaFe12O19) is a ferrimagnetic oxide with a high magnetocrystalline anisotropy that can be exploited in magnetically aligned ceramics or films for self-biased magnetic applications. Magnetic alignment of the films can be achieved by the directed assembly of barium ferrite nanoplates. In this investigation the nanoplates were synthesized hydrothermally and suspended in 1-butanol using dodecylbenzene sulphonic acid (DBSa) as a surfactant. They were then deposited in an electric or magnetic field on flat substrates and exhibited a significant preferential alignment in the plane of the substrate, allowing a differentiation between the analysis of their basal and side planes using scanning photoelectron microscopy with a lateral resolution down to 100 nm. The surface chemistry of the nanoplates was additionally studied with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. For a comparison, bare barium ferrite nanoplates were also analyzed after decomposing the DBSa at 460 °C. The deviation of the surface chemistry from the stoichiometric composition was observed and the adsorption of the DBSa molecules on the nanoplates was confirmed with all three methods. Different types of bonding (physi- or chemisorption) were possible and considered with respect to the assembly of the barium ferrite nanoplates into anisotropic magnetic films.

  20. Surface Chemistry and Growth of Large Molecules in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Catherine; Aikawa, Yuri; Herbst, Eric; Millar, Tom; Widicus Weaver, Susanna; Nomura, Hideko

    Protoplanetary disks are vital objects in star and planet formation, possessing all the material - dust, gas, and ice - which may form a planetary system orbiting the new star. To date, a handful of small and relatively simple molecules have been observed in nearby disks reflecting the limitations of existing telescopes. However, in the era of ALMA, the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array, we expect the molecular inventory of protoplanetary disks to significantly increase. Of particular interest are so-called complex organic molecules (COMs) which are thought to be necessary precursors to molecules important for prebiotic chemistry, such as, amino acids. The formation of COMs remains one of the puzzles of astrochemistry. Under the physical conditions in interstellar and circumstellar environments, COMs do not have efficient gas-phase routes to formation. Instead, they are postulated to form via association reactions on and within ice mantles on the the surfaces of dust grains and released to the gas phase via either thermal desorption (sublimation) or desorpton triggered by the absorption of UV radiation (photodesorption). In this presentation, I will discuss the synthesis of COMs in protoplanetary disks to investigate the potential origin of complex molecules in planetary systems. I will present results from exploratory models of a protoplanetary disk around a low-mass star including a large grain-surface chemical network to model the formation of large complex organic molecules. I will compare the resulting abundances of COMs in the gas phase and in the solid phase with existing observations towards nearby low-mass star-disk systems and comets, respectively. I will also discuss how the formation of COMs is influenced by the birth environment of the young stellar system.

  1. The surface coordination chemistry of cuprate high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feng

    The goals of the research described in this dissertation were: (1) to explore the surface coordination chemistry of cuprate high-temperature superconductors (HTSCs); (2) to develop chemical methodology for directly tailoring the surface and interfacial properties of cuprate HTSCs. This thesis documents the first survey of the surface coordination chemistry of a cuprate HTSC, YBa2Cu3O7-delta. Functional groups that can chemically bind to YBa2Cu3O 7-delta have been determined using cyclic voltammetry in conjunction with a series of redox-active ferrocenyl containing adsorbate molecules. Primary alkylamines have emerged as the optimum adsorbates for HTSCs, forming stable and robust monolayer films with no apparent damage to the bulk properties of the underlying superconductors. The interactions between alkylamine adsorbates and YBa2Cu3O7-delta have been shown to involve Cu(II)-NR3 coordination chemistry. The influence of organic monolayers on the properties of YBa2Cu3O 7-delta has been examined using cyclic voltammetry, X-ray powder diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and resistivity vs. temperature measurements. The presence of H2O in the soaking solution adversely affects the adsorption process due to a competing corrosion reaction. However, stable monolayers form on HTSC substrates under rigorously dry conditions. Significantly, monolayer modified HTSCs are substantially more stable to corrosion environmental reagents. The formation kinetics of redox-active alkylamine monolayers on ceramic YBa2Cu3O7-delta are proposed to involve two major processes: a fast adsorption process and a relatively slow pore diffusion process. Surface-solution adsorbate exchange is very dynamic and reversible, which appears to occur via an associative pathway. Monolayers on c-axis-oriented thin films have been shown to be more densely-packed and stable than those on ceramic substrates. Notably, the surface alkylamine "ligands" display traits of Cu(II)-based coordination chemistry

  2. Ferroelectrics: A pathway to switchable surface chemistry and catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakekhani, Arvin; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Altman, Eric I.

    2016-08-01

    It has been known for more than six decades that ferroelectricity can affect a material's surface physics and chemistry thereby potentially enhancing its catalytic properties. Ferroelectrics are a class of materials with a switchable electrical polarization that can affect surface stoichiometry and electronic structure and thus adsorption energies and modes; e.g., molecular versus dissociative. Therefore, ferroelectrics may be utilized to achieve switchable surface chemistry whereby surface properties are not fixed but can be dynamically controlled by, for example, applying an external electric field or modulating the temperature. Several important examples of applications of ferroelectric and polar materials in photocatalysis and heterogeneous catalysis are discussed. In photocatalysis, the polarization direction can control band bending at water/ferroelectric and ferroelectric/semiconductor interfaces, thereby facilitating charge separation and transfer to the electrolyte and enhancing photocatalytic activity. For gas-surface interactions, available results suggest that using ferroelectrics to support catalytically active transition metals and oxides is another way to enhance catalytic activity. Finally, the possibility of incorporating ferroelectric switching into the catalytic cycle itself is described. In this scenario, a dynamic collaboration of two polarization states can be used to drive reactions that have been historically challenging to achieve on surfaces with fixed chemical properties (e.g., direct NOx decomposition and the selective partial oxidation of methane). These predictions show that dynamic modulation of the polarization can help overcome some of the fundamental limitations on catalytic activity imposed by the Sabatier principle.

  3. Aryl Diazonium Chemistry for the Surface Functionalization of Glassy Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wei; van den Hurk, Remko; Cao, Yong; Du, Rongbing; Sun, Xuejun; Wang, Yiyu; McDermott, Mark T.; Evoy, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    Nanostring resonator and fiber-optics-based biosensors are of interest as they offer high sensitivity, real-time measurements and the ability to integrate with electronics. However, these devices are somewhat impaired by issues related to surface modification. Both nanostring resonators and photonic sensors employ glassy materials, which are incompatible with electrochemistry. A surface chemistry approach providing strong and stable adhesion to glassy surfaces is thus required. In this work, a diazonium salt induced aryl film grafting process is employed to modify a novel SiCN glassy material. Sandwich rabbit IgG binding assays are performed on the diazonium treated SiCN surfaces. Fluorescently labelled anti-rabbit IgG and anti-rabbit IgG conjugated gold nanoparticles were used as markers to demonstrate the absorption of anti-rabbit IgG and therefore verify the successful grafting of the aryl film. The results of the experiments support the effectiveness of diazonium chemistry for the surface functionalization of SiCN surfaces. This method is applicable to other types of glassy materials and potentially can be expanded to various nanomechanical and optical biosensors. PMID:26985910

  4. Aryl Diazonium Chemistry for the Surface Functionalization of Glassy Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; van den Hurk, Remko; Cao, Yong; Du, Rongbing; Sun, Xuejun; Wang, Yiyu; McDermott, Mark T; Evoy, Stephane

    2016-03-14

    Nanostring resonator and fiber-optics-based biosensors are of interest as they offer high sensitivity, real-time measurements and the ability to integrate with electronics. However, these devices are somewhat impaired by issues related to surface modification. Both nanostring resonators and photonic sensors employ glassy materials, which are incompatible with electrochemistry. A surface chemistry approach providing strong and stable adhesion to glassy surfaces is thus required. In this work, a diazonium salt induced aryl film grafting process is employed to modify a novel SiCN glassy material. Sandwich rabbit IgG binding assays are performed on the diazonium treated SiCN surfaces. Fluorescently labelled anti-rabbit IgG and anti-rabbit IgG conjugated gold nanoparticles were used as markers to demonstrate the absorption of anti-rabbit IgG and therefore verify the successful grafting of the aryl film. The results of the experiments support the effectiveness of diazonium chemistry for the surface functionalization of SiCN surfaces. This method is applicable to other types of glassy materials and potentially can be expanded to various nanomechanical and optical biosensors.

  5. Investigation of Partially Ionized Plasma Chemistry of Hydroxylammonium Nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, Forrest; Lemmer, Kristina

    2016-10-01

    Future space missions require an efficient and versatile method of propulsion. One possibility is the use of dual-mode-propulsion. Dual-mode-propulsion combines the high specific impulse of electric propulsion with the high thrust of chemical propulsion. However, to effectively implement dual-mode-propulsion a propellant that can be used in both electric and chemical propulsion is required. Ionic liquids are one class of propellants currently being investigated for their use in dual-mode-propulsion systems. Hydroxylammonium Nitrate (HAN) is the ionic liquid of interest in this study. HAN's chemistry and decomposition have been thoroughly investigated at pressures above atmospheric pressure; however, the chemistry of partially ionized HAN is not well understood. Ab-initio modelling is used to determine the chemistry of key ion-neutral reactions and to develop a reaction network for HAN plasma. Calculations using Density Functional Theory and Coupled Cluster Singles Doubles with approximate Triples corrections are performed. This will allow for accurate modelling of HAN's interaction with thruster components and prevent premature failure.

  6. Covalent surface chemistry gradients for presenting bioactive peptides.

    PubMed

    Kipper, Matt J; Kleinman, Hynda K; Wang, Francis W

    2007-04-15

    The activation of surfaces by covalent attachment of bioactive moieties is an important strategy for improving the performance of biomedical materials. Such techniques have also been used as tools to study cellular responses to particular chemistries of interest. The creation of gradients of covalently bound chemistries is a logical extension of this technique. Gradient surfaces may permit the rapid screening of a large range of concentrations in a single experiment. In addition, the biological response to the gradient itself may provide new information on receptor requirements and cell signaling. The current work describes a rapid and flexible technique for the covalent addition of bioactive peptide gradients to a surface or gel and a simple fluorescence technique for assaying the gradient. In this technique, bioactive peptides with a terminal cysteine are bound via a heterobifunctional coupling agent to primary amine-containing surfaces and gels. A gradient in the coupling agent is created on the surfaces or gels by varying the residence time of the coupling agent across the surface or gel, thereby controlling the extent of reaction. We demonstrate this technique using poly(l-lysine)-coated glass surfaces and fibrin gels. Once the surface or gel has been activated by the addition of the coupling agent gradient, the bioactive peptide is added. Quantitation of the gradient is achieved by measuring the reaction kinetics of the coupling agent with the surface or gel of interest. This can be done either by fluorescently labeling the coupling agent (in the case of surfaces) or by spectrophotometrically detecting the release of pyridine-2-thione, which is produced when the thiol-reactive portion of the coupling agent reacts. By these methods, we can obtain reasonably precise estimates for the peptide gradients without using expensive spectroscopic or radiolabeling techniques. Validation with changes in fibroblast cell migration behavior across a bioactive peptide

  7. The Role of Surface Chemistry in Filter Feeding by Zooplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerritsen, Jeroen; Porter, Karen G.

    1982-06-01

    Surface chemistry of both particles and animals is important in filter feeding at low Reynolds number. Daphnia magna, fed mixtures of three sizes of polystyrene particles, retained particles that were smaller than the mesh size of the animals (1.0 micrometer) at greater efficiencies than predicted by a sieving model. Retention efficiency of the smallest particles (0.5 micrometer) was increased when negative surface charge on the particles was neutralized, and retention was decreased when a nonionic surfactant was added to reduce wettability.

  8. Endothelial cell behavior on vascular prosthetic grafts: effect of polymer chemistry, surface structure, and surface treatment.

    PubMed

    Marois, Y; Sigot-Luizard, M F; Guidoin, R

    1999-01-01

    When implanting any vascular prosthetic grafts, one important goal to ensure long-term patency is achieving complete endothelialization of the luminal surface, a process that has rarely been observed clinically in humans. Seeding vascular grafts with endothelial cells has been seen as an attractive approach but has not been clinically convincing. A determining factor may be the type of polymer and surface structure. Using organotypic culture assays, the present investigation studied the effect of different polymers, surface structures, and surface treatments on endothelial cell behavior. The materials tested were polyester (PET), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), polyesterurethane (PESU), and polyetherurethane (PETU) grafts with different surface structures. The surface treatments on the PET grafts included impregnation with cross-linked albumin, collagen, and gelatin, and treatments with fluoropolymer and electrically conducting polypyrrole polymer. Low density polyethylene (LDPE) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) sheets (smooth surface, plain wall) were used as controls. After incubation for 7 days at 37 degrees C, cell adhesion and migration on the different polymers and structures were as follows: woven and knitted PET (high porosity) > PTFE, PESU, PETU hydrophobic (low porosity) > PETU hydrophilic, LDPE, PDMS (no porosity). Cell density results showed no difference between polymers and porous structures and a higher cell density on smooth nonporous surfaces. Compared with the nonimpregnated PET structures, knitted PET treated with albumin, collagen, or gelatin showed slight decreases of cell adhesion. No differences in cell migration and density were reported between any of the PET grafts, except for one polyester graft with a different chemistry than Dacron, which exhibited greater cell migration and lower cell density. Polyester grafts with a fluoropolymer treatment showed lower cell adhesion and migration and higher cell density than the nontreated PET. Finally

  9. The surface chemistry of rutile in technologically relevant environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Anqi

    The surface science of titanium dioxide, TiO2, has attracted great amount of attention due to its high profile applications. This dissertation shows the development of well-controlled rutile (110) surfaces that provide a platform for studying the chemical and photochemical reactivity of rutile in technologically relevant environments, including air and solutions. Near-perfect rutile (110) surfaces characterized by atomically flat terraces and straight steps were produced using basic peroxide solutions. The reaction produced straight steps with a different orientation, different structure, and different reactivity from those prepared in ultrahigh vacuum. The morphology was explained by a site-specific model of rutile (110) etching based on metal oxo coordination chemistry. This work shows that one of the important roles of peroxo ligands in etching and growth reactions is to destabilize neighboring bonds and increase their lability. The peroxo ligands add a degree of reversibility to the growth reaction, leading to the formation of well-ordered crystals. In addition, this near-perfect rutile (110) surface is an ideal starting point for studying surface chemistry of rutile in technologically relevant environments. Under ambient conditions atmospheric CO2 reacted with adsorbed H2O and produced a self-assembled monolayer of HCO 3 on rutile (110) surfaces. The monolayer was formed on the near-perfect rutile surfaces prepared by basic peroxide etching, indicating that surface defects, such as Ti interstitials and O vacancies, were not required. DFT calculations suggested that the nanoscale water film adsorbed on the surface solvated the adsorbates and changed the reaction energetics. The HCO 3 monolayer was very stable, even in vacuum, which was a result of the strong bidentate bonding of HCO3. The formation of the strongly bound bicarbonate monolayer suggests that HCO3, instead of CO 2, plays a key role in the photoreduction of CO2. A high-quality, self

  10. The impact of surface chemistry modification on macrophage polarisation.

    PubMed

    Rostam, Hassan M; Singh, Sonali; Salazar, Fabian; Magennis, Peter; Hook, Andrew; Singh, Taranjit; Vrana, Nihal E; Alexander, Morgan R; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M

    2016-11-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells that have a central role in combating infection and maintaining tissue homeostasis. They exhibit remarkable plasticity in response to environmental cues. At either end of a broad activation spectrum are pro-inflammatory (M1) and anti-inflammatory (M2) macrophages with distinct functional and phenotypical characteristics. Macrophages also play a crucial role in orchestrating immune responses to biomaterials used in the fabrication of implantable devices and drug delivery systems. To assess the impact of different surface chemistries on macrophage polarisation, human monocytes were cultured for 6 days on untreated hydrophobic polystyrene (PS) and hydrophilic O2 plasma-etched polystyrene (O2-PS40) surfaces. Our data clearly show that monocytes cultured on the hydrophilic O2-PS40 surface are polarised towards an M1-like phenotype, as evidenced by significantly higher expression of the pro-inflammatory transcription factors STAT1 and IRF5. By comparison, monocytes cultured on the hydrophobic PS surface exhibited an M2-like phenotype with high expression of mannose receptor (MR) and production of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and CCL18. While the molecular basis of such different patterns of cell differentiation is yet to be fully elucidated, we hypothesise that it is due to the adsorption of different biomolecules on these surface chemistries. Indeed our surface characterisation data show quantitative and qualitative differences between the protein layers on the O2-PS40 surface compared to PS surface which could be responsible for the observed differential macrophage polarisation on each surface.

  11. Continuous wear contact lens surface chemistry and wearability.

    PubMed

    Nicolson, Paul C

    2003-01-01

    Continuous wear (CW) contact lenses are defined as lenses composed of hydrogel polymers containing elements other than carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen that enhance oxygen permeability to an extent greater than water alone. Those elements are silicon and fluorine. Silicon is incorporated as siloxanes, and fluorine is used as fluoroalkyl. Despite the water present in CW lenses, they are not wearable without surface modification because of the tendency of siloxanes and fluoroakyls to move in the soft polymers, orient, and become enriched at the surface. Various methods of surface modification are discussed, with emphasis on the plasma technologies used by the two commercial CW lens products, Focus Night & Day and PureVision. Speculation about future directions in surface chemistry are also presented.

  12. Exploring and exploiting chemistry at the cell surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mager, Morgan D.; Lapointe, Vanessa; Stevens, Molly M.

    2011-08-01

    Engineering the surface chemistry of a material so that it can interface with cells is an extraordinarily demanding task. The surface of a cell is composed of thousands of different lipids, proteins and carbohydrates, all intricately (and dynamically) arranged in three dimensions on multiple length scales. This complexity presents both a challenge and an opportunity to chemists working on bioactive interfaces. Here we discuss how some of these challenges can be met with interdisciplinary material synthesis. We also review the most popular classes of functional molecules grafted on engineered surfaces and explore some alternatives that may offer greater flexibility and specificity. Finally, we discuss the emerging field of dynamic surfaces capable of stimulating and responding to cellular activity in real time.

  13. The role of "inert" surface chemistry in marine biofouling prevention.

    PubMed

    Rosenhahn, Axel; Schilp, Sören; Kreuzer, Hans Jürgen; Grunze, Michael

    2010-05-07

    The settlement and colonization of marine organisms on submerged man-made surfaces is a major economic problem for many marine industries. The most apparent detrimental effects of biofouling are increased fuel consumption of ships, clogging of membranes and heat exchangers, disabled underwater sensors, and growth of biofoulers in aquaculture systems. The presently common-but environmentally very problematic-way to deal with marine biofouling is to incorporate biocides, which use biocidal products in the surface coatings to kill the colonizing organisms, into the surface coatings. Since the implementation of the International Maritime Organization Treaty on biocides in 2008, the use of tributyltin (TBT) is restricted and thus environmentally benign but effective surface coatings are required. In this short review, we summarize the different strategies which are pursued in academia and industry to better understand the mechanisms of biofouling and to develop strategies which can be used for industrial products. Our focus will be on chemically "inert" model surface coatings, in particular oligo- and poly(ethylene glycol) (OEG and PEG) functionalized surface films. The reasons for choosing this class of chemistry as an example are three-fold: Firstly, experiments on spore settlement on OEG and PEG coatings help to understand the mechanism of non-fouling of highly hydrated interfaces; secondly, these studies defy the common assumption that surface hydrophilicity-as measured by water contact angles-is an unambiguous and predictive tool to determine the fouling behavior on the surface; and thirdly, choosing this system is a good example for "interfacial systems chemistry": it connects the behavior of unicellular marine organisms with the antifouling properties of a hydrated surface coating with structural and electronic properties as derived from ab initio quantum mechanical calculations using the electronic wave functions of oxygen, hydrogen, and carbon. This short

  14. SURFACE CHEMISTRY INFLUENCE IMPLANT MEDIATED HOST TISSUE RESPONSES

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Shwetha; Bhattacharyya, Dhiman; Padukudru, Chandana; Timmons, Richard B.; Tang, Liping

    2011-01-01

    Implant-mediated fibrotic reactions are detrimental to the performance of encapsulated cells, implanted drug release devices and sensors. To improve the implant function and longevity, research has emphasized altering cellular responses. Although material surface functional groups have been shown to be potent in affecting cellular activity in vitro and short term in vivo responses, these groups appear to have little influence on long-term in vivo fibrotic reactions, possibly as a result of insufficient interactions between recruited host cells and functional groups on the implants. To maximize the influence of functionality on cells, and to mimic drug release microspheres, functionalized micron-sized particles were created and tested for their ability in modulating tissue responses to biomaterial implants. In this work, the surfaces of polypropylene particles were controllably coated with four different functional groups, specifically –OH, -NH2, -CFx and –COOH, using a radio frequency glow discharge plasma polymerization technique. The effect of these surface functionalities on host tissue responses were then evaluated using a mice subcutaneous implantation model. Major differences were observed in contrasting tissue response to the different chemistries. Surfaces with –OH and –NH2 surface groups induced the thickest fibrous capsule accompanied with the greatest cellular infiltration into the implants. In contrast, surfaces with –CFx and –COOH exhibited the least inflammatory/fibrotic responses and cellular infiltrations. The present results clearly demonstrate that, by increasing the available functionalized surface area and spatial distribution, the effect of surface chemistry on tissue reactivity can be substantially enhanced. PMID:18022841

  15. Controlling Multivalent Binding through Surface Chemistry: Model Study on Streptavidin.

    PubMed

    Dubacheva, Galina V; Araya-Callis, Carolina; Geert Volbeda, Anne; Fairhead, Michael; Codée, Jeroen; Howarth, Mark; Richter, Ralf P

    2017-03-09

    Although multivalent binding to surfaces is an important tool in nanotechnology, quantitative information about the residual valency and orientation of surface-bound molecules is missing. To address these questions, we study streptavidin (SAv) binding to commonly used biotinylated surfaces such as supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) and self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Stability and kinetics of SAv binding are characterized by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, while the residual valency of immobilized SAv is quantified using spectroscopic ellipsometry by monitoring binding of biotinylated probes. Purpose-designed SAv constructs having controlled valencies (mono-, di-, trivalent in terms of biotin-binding sites) are studied to rationalize the results obtained on regular (tetravalent) SAv. We find that divalent interaction of SAv with biotinylated surfaces is a strict requirement for stable immobilization, while monovalent attachment is reversible and, in the case of SLBs, leads to the extraction of biotinylated lipids from the bilayer. The surface density and lateral mobility of biotin, and the SAv surface coverage are all found to influence the average orientation and residual valency of SAv on a biotinylated surface. We demonstrate how the residual valency can be adjusted to one or two biotin binding sites per immobilized SAv by choosing appropriate surface chemistry. The obtained results provide means for the rational design of surface-confined supramolecular architectures involving specific biointeractions at tunable valency. This knowledge can be used for the development of well-defined bioactive coatings, biosensors and biomimetic model systems.

  16. Controlling Multivalent Binding through Surface Chemistry: Model Study on Streptavidin

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Although multivalent binding to surfaces is an important tool in nanotechnology, quantitative information about the residual valency and orientation of surface-bound molecules is missing. To address these questions, we study streptavidin (SAv) binding to commonly used biotinylated surfaces such as supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) and self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Stability and kinetics of SAv binding are characterized by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, while the residual valency of immobilized SAv is quantified using spectroscopic ellipsometry by monitoring binding of biotinylated probes. Purpose-designed SAv constructs having controlled valencies (mono-, di-, trivalent in terms of biotin-binding sites) are studied to rationalize the results obtained on regular (tetravalent) SAv. We find that divalent interaction of SAv with biotinylated surfaces is a strict requirement for stable immobilization, while monovalent attachment is reversible and, in the case of SLBs, leads to the extraction of biotinylated lipids from the bilayer. The surface density and lateral mobility of biotin, and the SAv surface coverage are all found to influence the average orientation and residual valency of SAv on a biotinylated surface. We demonstrate how the residual valency can be adjusted to one or two biotin binding sites per immobilized SAv by choosing appropriate surface chemistry. The obtained results provide means for the rational design of surface-confined supramolecular architectures involving specific biointeractions at tunable valency. This knowledge can be used for the development of well-defined bioactive coatings, biosensors and biomimetic model systems. PMID:28234007

  17. Surface chemistry, morphological analysis and properties of cellulose nanocrystals with gradiented sulfation degrees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ning; Dufresne, Alain

    2014-04-01

    The process of sulfuric acid-hydrolysis of cellulose fibers for the preparation of cellulose nanocrystals (CNs) includes an esterification reaction between acid and cellulose molecules, which induces the covalent coupling of sulfate groups on the surface of prepared CNs. Negatively charged sulfate groups play an important role in both surface chemistry and physical properties of CNs. This study explored the strategy of introducing a gradient of sulfate groups on the surface of CNs, and further investigated the effect of the sulfation degree on surface chemistry, morphology, dimensions, and physical properties of different CN samples. Based on the discussion of their surface chemistry, the selection of different cross-section models was reported to significantly affect the calculation of the degree of substitution of sulfate groups on CNs. A new ellipsoid cross-section model was proposed on the basis of AFM observations. The effect of sulfate groups on crystal properties and thermal stability was discussed and validated, and the birefringence behavior of nanocrystal suspensions was observed.The process of sulfuric acid-hydrolysis of cellulose fibers for the preparation of cellulose nanocrystals (CNs) includes an esterification reaction between acid and cellulose molecules, which induces the covalent coupling of sulfate groups on the surface of prepared CNs. Negatively charged sulfate groups play an important role in both surface chemistry and physical properties of CNs. This study explored the strategy of introducing a gradient of sulfate groups on the surface of CNs, and further investigated the effect of the sulfation degree on surface chemistry, morphology, dimensions, and physical properties of different CN samples. Based on the discussion of their surface chemistry, the selection of different cross-section models was reported to significantly affect the calculation of the degree of substitution of sulfate groups on CNs. A new ellipsoid cross-section model was

  18. Grain Surface Chemistry and the Composition of Interstellar Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2006-01-01

    Submicron sized dust grains are an important component of the interstellar medium. In particular they provide surface where active chemistry can take place. At the low temperatures (-10 K) of the interstellar medium, colliding gas phase species will stick, diffuse, react, and form an icy mantle on these dust grains. This talk will review the principles of grain surface chemistry and delineate important grain surface routes, focusing on reactions involving H, D, and O among each other and with molecules such as CO. Interstellar ice mantles can be studied through the fundamental vibrations of molecular species in the mid-infrared spectra of sources embedded in or located behind dense molecular clouds. Analysis of this type of data has provided a complex view of the composition of these ices and the processes involved. Specifically, besides grain surface chemistry, the composition of interstellar ices is also affected by thermal processing due to nearby newly formed stars. This leads to segregation between different ice components as well as outgassing. The latter results in the formation of a so-called Hot Core region with a gas phase composition dominated by evaporated mantle species. Studies of such regions provide thus a different view on the ice composition and the chemical processes involved. Interstellar ices can also be processed by FUV photons and high energy cosmic ray ions. Cosmic ray processing likely dominates the return of accreted species to the gas phase where further gas phase reactions can take place. These different chemical routes towards molecular complexity in molecular clouds and particularly regions of star formation will be discussed.

  19. Grain Surface Chemistry and the Composition of Interstellar Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2006-01-01

    Submicron sized dust grains are an important component of the interstellar medium. In particular they provide surface where active chemistry can take place. At the low temperatures (-10 K) of the interstellar medium, colliding gas phase species will stick, diffuse, react, and form an icy mantle on these dust grains. This talk will review the principles of grain surface chemistry and delineate important grain surface routes, focusing on reactions involving H, D, and O among each other and with molecules such as CO. Interstellar ice mantles can be studied through the fundamental vibrations of molecular species in the mid-infrared spectra of sources embedded in or located behind dense molecular clouds. Analysis of this type of data has provided a complex view of the composition of these ices and the processes involved. Specifically, besides grain surface chemistry, the composition of interstellar ices is also affected by thermal processing due to nearby newly formed stars. This leads to segregation between different ice components as well as outgassing. The latter results in the formation of a so-called Hot Core region with a gas phase composition dominated by evaporated mantle species. Studies of such regions provide thus a different view on the ice composition and the chemical processes involved. Interstellar ices can also be processed by FUV photons and high energy cosmic ray ions. Cosmic ray processing likely dominates the return of accreted species to the gas phase where further gas phase reactions can take place. These different chemical routes towards molecular complexity in molecular clouds and particularly regions of star formation will be discussed.

  20. Surface Chemistry Regulates Valvular Interstitial Cell Differentiation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rush, Matthew N.; Coombs, Kent E.; Hedberg-Dirk, Elizabeth L.

    2015-01-01

    The primary driver for valvular calcification is the differentiation of valvular interstitial cells (VICs) into a diseased phenotype. However, the factors leading to the onset of osteoblastic-like VICs (obVICs) and resulting calcification are not fully understood. This study isolates the effect of substrate surface chemistry on in vitro VIC differentiation and calcified tissue formation. Using ω-functionalized alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold [CH3 (hydrophobic), OH (hydrophilic), COOH (COO−, negative at physiological pH), and NH2 (NH3+, positive at physiological pH)], we have demonstrated that surface chemistry modulates VIC phenotype and calcified tissue deposition independent of osteoblastic-inducing media additives. Over seven days VICs exhibited surface-dependent differences in cell proliferation (COO− = NH3+> OH > CH3), morphology, and osteoblastic potential. Both NH3+and CH3-terminated SAMs promoted calcified tissue formation while COO−-terminated SAMs showed no calcification. VICs on NH3+-SAMs exhibited the most osteoblastic phenotypic markers through robust nodule formation, up-regulated osteocalcin and α-smooth muscle actin expression, and adoption of a round/rhomboid morphology indicative of osteoblastic differentiation. With the slowest proliferation, VICs on CH3-SAMs promoted calcified aggregate formation through cell detachment and increased cell death indicative of dystrophic calcification. Furthermore, induction of calcified tissue deposition on NH3+ and CH3-SAMs was distinctly different than that of media induced osteoblastic VICs. These results demonstrate that substrate surface chemistry alters VIC behavior and plays an important role in calcified tissue formation. In addition, we have identified two novel methods of calcified VIC induction in vitro. Further study of these environments may yield new models for in vitro testing of therapeutics for calcified valve stenosis, although additional studies need to be conducted

  1. Influence of surface chemistry on the hygienic status of industrial stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Boulange-Petermann, L; Jullien, C; Dubois, P E; Benezech, T; Faille, C

    2004-02-01

    Coupons of fourteen different stainless steels were investigated in terms of surface chemistry and ease of cleaning. Steel surfaces were exposed to Bacillus cereus spores in static saline solution for 2 h. Surfaces were rinsed and then covered with whole milk and allowed to dry. Surfaces were then cleaned in an experimental flow system that mimics an industrial application. After cleaning, remaining spores were released by sonication, spores cultured and colony forming units determined. Surfaces with higher levels of Fe in the outer surface of the passive film cleaned more easily. There was a relation between the polar component and ease of cleaning. The higher the polar component the more easily the surface cleaned. The cleaning mechanism involves dissolution of Fe enriched hydroxide films on the surface.

  2. Overview of the Antarctic Tropospheric Chemistry Investigation (ANTCI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisele, F. L.; Davis, D. D.

    2004-12-01

    The first ANTCI campaign took place during the austral spring/early summer from the second half of November through December of 2003. It consisted of ground based measurements at the South Pole and Twin Otter aircraft studies over portions of the polar plateau, glacial valleys, and the coast of the Ross Sea. The study makes use of previous findings of the Investigation of Sulfur Chemistry in the Antarctic Troposphere (ISCAT) and Sulfur Chemistry of the Antarctic Troposphere Experiment (SCATE) to define and address critical questions about what controls oxidation rates in the Antarctic troposphere and how these rates influence the evolution of reactive sulfur and nitrogen gases in the atmosphere prior to their incorporation into the ice core record. Ground based studies focused on vertical mixing and local photochemistry and sulfur chemistry. Boundary layer mixing heights were determined by several different methods including: acoustic sounder measurements up to 80 m, tethered balloon measurements of meteorological parameters and ozone to 500 m, and tethered balloon measurements of NO to 100m. These vertical measurements were designed to supplement a much larger suite of chemical measurements made from the South Pole ARO building in order to explore how chemical emissions from the snow mix into the lower troposphere and influence the photochemical oxidation process and its products. Aircraft measurements began the process of defining the horizontal extent of elevated NO concentrations over the plateau, which is presumed to result in enhanced photochemical oxidation rates. Flights also briefly investigated flow along large glacial valleys and the outflow of reactive nitrogen from the continent and the inflow of reactive sulfur gases like dimethyl sulfide.

  3. Delaying Frost Formation by Controlling Surface Chemistry of Carbon Nanotube-Coated Steel Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Klittich, Mena R; Gao, Min; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2017-02-22

    Superhydrophobic surfaces are appealing as anti-icing surfaces, given their excellent water repellent performance. However, when water condenses on the surface due to high humidity, the water becomes pinned, and superhydrophobic surfaces fail to perform. Here we studied how the stability of the superhydrophobicity affected water condensation and frost formation. We created rough surfaces with the same surface structure, but with a variety of surface chemistries, and compared their antifrost properties as a function of intrinsic contact angle. Frost initiation was significantly delayed on surfaces with higher intrinsic contact angles. We coupled these macromeasurements with environmental scanning electron microscopy of water droplet initiation under high humidity conditions. These provide experimental evidence toward previous hypotheses that for a lower intrinsic-angle rough surface, Wenzel state is thermodynamically favorable, whereas the higher intrinsic-angle surface maintains a Cassie-Baxter state. Surfaces with a thermodynamically stable Cassie-Baxter state can then act both as antisteam and antifrost surfaces. This research could answer the persistent question of why superhydrophobic surfaces sometimes are not icephobic; anti-icing performance depends on the surface chemistry, which plays a critical role in the stability of the superhydrophobic surfaces.

  4. Applications of mineral surface chemistry to environmental problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Art F.

    1995-07-01

    Environmental surface chemistry involves processes that occur at the interface between the regolith, hydrosphere and atmosphere. The more limited scope of the present review addresses natural and anthropogenically-induced inorganic geochemical reactions between solutes in surface and ground waters and soil and aquifer substrates. Important surficial reactions include sorption, ion exchange, dissolution, precipitation and heterogeneous oxidation/reduction processes occurring at the solid/aqueous interface. Recent research advances in this field have addressed, both directly and indirectly, societal issues related to water quality, pollution, biogeochemical cycling, nutrient budgets and chemical weathering related to long term global climate change. This review will include recent advances in the fundamental and theoretical understanding of these surficial processes, breakthroughs in experimental and instrumental surface characterization, and development of methodologies for field applications.

  5. Surface chemistry modulates osteoblasts sensitivity to low fluid shear stress.

    PubMed

    Xing, Juan; Li, Yan; Lin, Manping; Wang, Jinfeng; Wu, Jinchuan; Ma, Yufei; Wang, Yuanliang; Yang, Li; Luo, Yanfeng

    2014-11-01

    Low fluid shear stress (FSS) is the mechanical environment encountered by osteoblasts in implanted bones or native bones of bed rest patients. High sensitivity of osteoblasts to low FSS is beneficial to osteogenesis. We hypothesize that this sensitivity might be regulated by chemical microenvironment provided by scaffolds. To confirm this hypothesis, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were used to provide various surface chemistries including OH, CH3 , and NH2 while parallel-plate fluid flow system produced low FSS (5 dynes/cm(2) ). Alterations in S-phase cell fraction, alkaline phosphatase activity, fibronectin (Fn), and collagen type I (COL I) secretion compared to those without FSS exposure were detected to characterize the sensitivity. Osteoblasts on OH and CH3 SAMs demonstrated obvious sensitivity while on NH2 SAMs negligible sensitivity was observed. Examination of the cell aspect ratio, orientation, and focal adhesions before and after FSS exposure indicates that the full spreading and robust focal adhesions on NH2 SAMs should be responsible for the negligible sensitivity through increasing the cell tolerance to low FSS. Despite the higher sensitivity, the Fn and COL I depositions on both OH and CH3 SAMs after FSS exposure were still less than on NH2 SAMs without FSS exposure. These results suggest that elaborate design of surface chemical compositions is essential for orchestration of surface chemistry with low FSS to realize both high sensitivity and high matrix secretion, facilitating the formation of functional bone tissues in implanted bone.

  6. The physics and chemistry of graphene-on-surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guoke; Li, Xinming; Huang, Meirong; Zhen, Zhen; Zhong, Yujia; Chen, Qiao; Zhao, Xuanliang; He, Yijia; Hu, Ruirui; Yang, Tingting; Zhang, Rujing; Li, Changli; Kong, Jing; Xu, Jian-Bin; Ruoff, Rodney S; Zhu, Hongwei

    2017-07-31

    Graphene has demonstrated great potential in next-generation electronics due to its unique two-dimensional structure and properties including a zero-gap band structure, high electron mobility, and high electrical and thermal conductivity. The integration of atom-thick graphene into a device always involves its interaction with a supporting substrate by van der Waals forces and other intermolecular forces or even covalent bonding, and this is critical to its real applications. Graphene films on different surfaces are expected to exhibit significant differences in their properties, which lead to changes in their morphology, electronic structure, surface chemistry/physics, and surface/interface states. Therefore, a thorough understanding of the surface/interface properties is of great importance. In this review, we describe the major "graphene-on-surface" structures and examine the roles of their properties and related phenomena in governing the overall performance for specific applications including optoelectronics, surface catalysis, anti-friction and superlubricity, and coatings and composites. Finally, perspectives on the opportunities and challenges of graphene-on-surface systems are discussed.

  7. Saltwater icephobicity: Influence of surface chemistry on saltwater icing

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Katherine; Bahadur, Vaibhav

    2015-01-01

    Most studies on icephobicity focus on ice formation with pure water. This manuscript presents studies to understand the influence of surfaces on saltwater ice nucleation and propagation. Experiments are conducted to quantify the influence of surface chemistry on saltwater ice nucleation and to understand the utility of superhydrophobic surfaces for saltwater icephobicity. These experiments are conducted with pure water and two sodium chloride solutions, which represent the salinity of seawater and briny produced water. It is seen that the presence of salt slows down the ice front propagation velocity significantly. Saltwater droplet impact dynamics on superhydrophobic surfaces are also different from pure water. Saltwater droplets retract more and a greater fraction of impacting liquid is repelled from the superhydrophobic surface. It is seen that the greater bounciness of saltwater droplets is a result of slower ice nucleation propagation kinetics. These experiments indicate that superhydrophobic surfaces will have better resistance to impact icing with saltwater than pure water and can remain useful at temperatures as low as −40 °C. Overall, this work is a starting point for further studies on heterogeneous nucleation in saltwater and serves as a bridge between the widely studied freshwater icephobic surfaces and saltwater-related applications. PMID:26626958

  8. Saltwater icephobicity: Influence of surface chemistry on saltwater icing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Katherine; Bahadur, Vaibhav

    2015-12-01

    Most studies on icephobicity focus on ice formation with pure water. This manuscript presents studies to understand the influence of surfaces on saltwater ice nucleation and propagation. Experiments are conducted to quantify the influence of surface chemistry on saltwater ice nucleation and to understand the utility of superhydrophobic surfaces for saltwater icephobicity. These experiments are conducted with pure water and two sodium chloride solutions, which represent the salinity of seawater and briny produced water. It is seen that the presence of salt slows down the ice front propagation velocity significantly. Saltwater droplet impact dynamics on superhydrophobic surfaces are also different from pure water. Saltwater droplets retract more and a greater fraction of impacting liquid is repelled from the superhydrophobic surface. It is seen that the greater bounciness of saltwater droplets is a result of slower ice nucleation propagation kinetics. These experiments indicate that superhydrophobic surfaces will have better resistance to impact icing with saltwater than pure water and can remain useful at temperatures as low as -40 °C. Overall, this work is a starting point for further studies on heterogeneous nucleation in saltwater and serves as a bridge between the widely studied freshwater icephobic surfaces and saltwater-related applications.

  9. Surface chemistry effects of topographic modification of titanium dental implant surfaces: 2. In vitro experiments.

    PubMed

    Cassinelli, Clara; Morra, Marco; Bruzzone, Giuseppe; Carpi, Angelo; Di Santi, Giuseppe; Giardino, Roberto; Fini, Milena

    2003-01-01

    To determine, in vitro, cytotoxicity and cell adhesion on 3 different implant surfaces. All samples had machined surfaces, but they were subjected to different cleaning procedures, which produced 3 different surface chemistries. One of the samples was "as-produced" from the machining tools. The other samples were subjected to partial and total cleaning routines. Cytotoxicity was evaluated using mouse fibroblast cultures, and cell adhesion was evaluated with osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cells. The "as-produced" sample showed a pronounced surface contamination by lubricating oils. For partially and totally cleaned samples, an increasing amount of titanium and a decreasing carbon/titanium ratio was observed as cleaning became more complete. Differences in surface chemistry such as those normally found on titanium implant surfaces (see part 1 of this series) can lead to those same effects which, in in vitro experiments, are normally accounted for in terms of surface topography alone. Effects related to surface chemistry can operate over and above surface topography, making it impossible, without proper characterization, to make definite statements about the role of topography alone.

  10. Developing an Interactive Non-Formal Chemistry Setting and Investigating Its Effectiveness on High School Students' Attitudes towards Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demircioglu, Gökhan

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to design an interactive non-formal chemistry environment and investigate its effectiveness on high school students' attitudes towards chemistry. Besides that, it is tried to determine to what extent students correlate these concepts with daily life. 14 voluntary students (5 female, 9 male) from different levels…

  11. Fluorination of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes: from CF4 plasma chemistry to surface functionalization

    PubMed Central

    Scardamaglia, Mattia; Colomer, Jean-François; Verdini, Alberto; Floreano, Luca; Snyders, Rony; Bittencourt, Carla

    2017-01-01

    The surface chemistry of plasma fluorinated vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (vCNT) is correlated to the CF4 plasma chemical composition. The results obtained via FTIR and mass spectrometry are combined with the XPS and Raman analysis of the sample surface showing the dependence on different plasma parameters (power, time and distance from the plasma region) on the resulting fluorination. Photoemission and absorption spectroscopies are used to investigate the evolution of the electronic properties as a function of the fluorine content at the vCNT surface. The samples suffer a limited ageing effect, with a small loss of fluorine functionalities after two weeks in ambient conditions. PMID:28904833

  12. Fluorination of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes: from CF4 plasma chemistry to surface functionalization.

    PubMed

    Struzzi, Claudia; Scardamaglia, Mattia; Colomer, Jean-François; Verdini, Alberto; Floreano, Luca; Snyders, Rony; Bittencourt, Carla

    2017-01-01

    The surface chemistry of plasma fluorinated vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (vCNT) is correlated to the CF4 plasma chemical composition. The results obtained via FTIR and mass spectrometry are combined with the XPS and Raman analysis of the sample surface showing the dependence on different plasma parameters (power, time and distance from the plasma region) on the resulting fluorination. Photoemission and absorption spectroscopies are used to investigate the evolution of the electronic properties as a function of the fluorine content at the vCNT surface. The samples suffer a limited ageing effect, with a small loss of fluorine functionalities after two weeks in ambient conditions.

  13. The hydrochemistry of glacial Ebba River (Petunia Bay, Central Spitsbergen): Groundwater influence on surface water chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragon, Krzysztof; Marciniak, Marek; Szpikowski, Józef; Szpikowska, Grażyna; Wawrzyniak, Tomasz

    2015-10-01

    The article presents the investigation of surface water chemistry changes of the glacial Ebba River (Central Spitsbergen) during three melting seasons of 2008, 2009 and 2010. The twice daily water chemistry analyses allow recognition of the surface water chemistry differentiation. The surface water chemistry changes are related to the river discharge and changes in the influence of different water balance components during each melting season. One of the most important process that influence river water component concentration increase is groundwater inflow from active layer occurring on the valley area. The significance of this process is the most important at the end of the melting season when temperatures below 0 °C occur on glaciers (resulting in a slowdown of melting of ice and snow and a smaller recharge of the river by the water from the glaciers) while the flow of groundwater is still active, causing a relatively higher contribution of groundwater to the total river discharge. The findings presented in this paper show that groundwater contribution to the total polar river water balance is more important than previously thought and its recognition allow a better understanding of the hydrological processes occurring in a polar environment.

  14. Isothermal microcalorimetry to investigate non specific interactions in biophysical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ball, Vincent; Maechling, Clarisse

    2009-07-28

    Isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC) is mostly used to investigate the thermodynamics of "specific" host-guest interactions in biology as well as in supramolecular chemistry. The aim of this review is to demonstrate that ITC can also provide useful information about non-specific interactions, like electrostatic or hydrophobic interactions. More attention will be given in the use of ITC to investigate polyelectrolyte-polyelectrolyte (in particular DNA-polycation), polyelectrolyte-protein as well as protein-lipid interactions. We will emphasize that in most cases these "non specific" interactions, as their definition will indicate, are favoured or even driven by an increase in the entropy of the system. The origin of this entropy increase will be discussed for some particular systems. We will also show that in many cases entropy-enthalpy compensation phenomena occur.

  15. Chemistry in crime investigation: sodium percarbonate effects on bloodstains detection.

    PubMed

    Castelló, Ana; Francés, Francesc; Verdú, Fernando

    2012-03-01

    Chemistry plays a leading role in crime investigation. In the study of bloodstains, chemical reactions provide the means for the detection. All these procedures have been thoroughly studied. However, recently, a new source of error has been found: washing stains with "active oxygen" detergents abrogates presumptive and human hemoglobin tests for bloodstains (although visible). The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the ability of pure sodium percarbonate-main component of detergents-to abrogate presumptive and human hemoglobin tests. Then, a solution to this problem could be found. The results demonstrate that pure sodium percarbonate-itself-is able to abrogate all tests, as well as the different degrees to which each of them is affected by the product. Consequently, faced with a stain of bloody appearance, even the preliminary tests are negative; it is advisable to analyze the DNA. Otherwise, the opportunity of obtaining valuable information is lost.

  16. Isothermal Microcalorimetry to Investigate Non Specific Interactions in Biophysical Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Vincent; Maechling, Clarisse

    2009-01-01

    Isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC) is mostly used to investigate the thermodynamics of “specific” host-guest interactions in biology as well as in supramolecular chemistry. The aim of this review is to demonstrate that ITC can also provide useful information about non-specific interactions, like electrostatic or hydrophobic interactions. More attention will be given in the use of ITC to investigate polyelectrolyte-polyelectrolyte (in particular DNA-polycation), polyelectrolyte-protein as well as protein-lipid interactions. We will emphasize that in most cases these “non specific” interactions, as their definition will indicate, are favoured or even driven by an increase in the entropy of the system. The origin of this entropy increase will be discussed for some particular systems. We will also show that in many cases entropy-enthalpy compensation phenomena occur. PMID:20111693

  17. Understanding surface structure and chemistry of single crystal lanthanum aluminate.

    PubMed

    Pramana, Stevin S; Cavallaro, Andrea; Qi, Jiahui; Nicklin, Chris L; Ryan, Mary P; Skinner, Stephen J

    2017-03-02

    The surface crystallography and chemistry of a LaAlO3 single crystal, a material mainly used as a substrate to deposit technologically important thin films (e.g. for superconducting and magnetic devices), was analysed using surface X-ray diffraction and low energy ion scattering spectroscopy. The surface was determined to be terminated by Al-O species, and was significantly different from the idealised bulk structure. Termination reversal was not observed at higher temperature (600 °C) and chamber pressure of 10(-10) Torr, but rather an increased Al-O occupancy occurred, which was accompanied by a larger outwards relaxation of Al from the bulk positions. Changing the oxygen pressure to 10(-6) Torr enriched the Al site occupancy fraction at the outermost surface from 0.245(10) to 0.325(9). In contrast the LaO, which is located at the next sub-surface atomic layer, showed no chemical enrichment and the structural relaxation was lower than for the top AlO2 layer. Knowledge of the surface structure will aid the understanding of how and which type of interface will be formed when LaAlO3 is used as a substrate as a function of temperature and pressure, and so lead to improved design of device structures.

  18. Understanding surface structure and chemistry of single crystal lanthanum aluminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramana, Stevin S.; Cavallaro, Andrea; Qi, Jiahui; Nicklin, Chris L.; Ryan, Mary P.; Skinner, Stephen J.

    2017-03-01

    The surface crystallography and chemistry of a LaAlO3 single crystal, a material mainly used as a substrate to deposit technologically important thin films (e.g. for superconducting and magnetic devices), was analysed using surface X-ray diffraction and low energy ion scattering spectroscopy. The surface was determined to be terminated by Al-O species, and was significantly different from the idealised bulk structure. Termination reversal was not observed at higher temperature (600 °C) and chamber pressure of 10-10 Torr, but rather an increased Al-O occupancy occurred, which was accompanied by a larger outwards relaxation of Al from the bulk positions. Changing the oxygen pressure to 10-6 Torr enriched the Al site occupancy fraction at the outermost surface from 0.245(10) to 0.325(9). In contrast the LaO, which is located at the next sub-surface atomic layer, showed no chemical enrichment and the structural relaxation was lower than for the top AlO2 layer. Knowledge of the surface structure will aid the understanding of how and which type of interface will be formed when LaAlO3 is used as a substrate as a function of temperature and pressure, and so lead to improved design of device structures.

  19. Understanding surface structure and chemistry of single crystal lanthanum aluminate

    PubMed Central

    Pramana, Stevin S.; Cavallaro, Andrea; Qi, Jiahui; Nicklin, Chris L.; Ryan, Mary P.; Skinner, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    The surface crystallography and chemistry of a LaAlO3 single crystal, a material mainly used as a substrate to deposit technologically important thin films (e.g. for superconducting and magnetic devices), was analysed using surface X-ray diffraction and low energy ion scattering spectroscopy. The surface was determined to be terminated by Al-O species, and was significantly different from the idealised bulk structure. Termination reversal was not observed at higher temperature (600 °C) and chamber pressure of 10−10 Torr, but rather an increased Al-O occupancy occurred, which was accompanied by a larger outwards relaxation of Al from the bulk positions. Changing the oxygen pressure to 10−6 Torr enriched the Al site occupancy fraction at the outermost surface from 0.245(10) to 0.325(9). In contrast the LaO, which is located at the next sub-surface atomic layer, showed no chemical enrichment and the structural relaxation was lower than for the top AlO2 layer. Knowledge of the surface structure will aid the understanding of how and which type of interface will be formed when LaAlO3 is used as a substrate as a function of temperature and pressure, and so lead to improved design of device structures. PMID:28252044

  20. Gridded global surface ozone metrics for atmospheric chemistry model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofen, E. D.; Bowdalo, D.; Evans, M. J.; Apadula, F.; Bonasoni, P.; Cupeiro, M.; Ellul, R.; Galbally, I. E.; Girgzdiene, R.; Luppo, S.; Mimouni, M.; Nahas, A. C.; Saliba, M.; Tørseth, K.; Wmo Gaw, Epa Aqs, Epa Castnet, Capmon, Naps, Airbase, Emep, Eanet Ozone Datasets, All Other Contributors To

    2015-07-01

    The concentration of ozone at the Earth's surface is measured at many locations across the globe for the purposes of air quality monitoring and atmospheric chemistry research. We have brought together all publicly available surface ozone observations from online databases from the modern era to build a consistent dataset for the evaluation of chemical transport and chemistry-climate (Earth System) models for projects such as the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative and Aer-Chem-MIP. From a total dataset of approximately 6600 sites and 500 million hourly observations from 1971-2015, approximately 2200 sites and 200 million hourly observations pass screening as high-quality sites in regional background locations that are appropriate for use in global model evaluation. There is generally good data volume since the start of air quality monitoring networks in 1990 through 2013. Ozone observations are biased heavily toward North America and Europe with sparse coverage over the rest of the globe. This dataset is made available for the purposes of model evaluation as a set of gridded metrics intended to describe the distribution of ozone concentrations on monthly and annual timescales. Metrics include the moments of the distribution, percentiles, maximum daily eight-hour average (MDA8), SOMO35, AOT40, and metrics related to air quality regulatory thresholds. Gridded datasets are stored as netCDF-4 files and are available to download from the British Atmospheric Data Centre (doi:10.5285/08fbe63d-fa6d-4a7a-b952-5932e3ab0452). We provide recommendations to the ozone measurement community regarding improving metadata reporting to simplify ongoing and future efforts in working with ozone data from disparate networks in a consistent manner.

  1. Gridded global surface ozone metrics for atmospheric chemistry model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofen, E. D.; Bowdalo, D.; Evans, M. J.; Apadula, F.; Bonasoni, P.; Cupeiro, M.; Ellul, R.; Galbally, I. E.; Girgzdiene, R.; Luppo, S.; Mimouni, M.; Nahas, A. C.; Saliba, M.; Tørseth, K.

    2016-02-01

    The concentration of ozone at the Earth's surface is measured at many locations across the globe for the purposes of air quality monitoring and atmospheric chemistry research. We have brought together all publicly available surface ozone observations from online databases from the modern era to build a consistent data set for the evaluation of chemical transport and chemistry-climate (Earth System) models for projects such as the Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative and Aer-Chem-MIP. From a total data set of approximately 6600 sites and 500 million hourly observations from 1971-2015, approximately 2200 sites and 200 million hourly observations pass screening as high-quality sites in regionally representative locations that are appropriate for use in global model evaluation. There is generally good data volume since the start of air quality monitoring networks in 1990 through 2013. Ozone observations are biased heavily toward North America and Europe with sparse coverage over the rest of the globe. This data set is made available for the purposes of model evaluation as a set of gridded metrics intended to describe the distribution of ozone concentrations on monthly and annual timescales. Metrics include the moments of the distribution, percentiles, maximum daily 8-hour average (MDA8), sum of means over 35 ppb (daily maximum 8-h; SOMO35), accumulated ozone exposure above a threshold of 40 ppbv (AOT40), and metrics related to air quality regulatory thresholds. Gridded data sets are stored as netCDF-4 files and are available to download from the British Atmospheric Data Centre (doi: 10.5285/08fbe63d-fa6d-4a7a-b952-5932e3ab0452). We provide recommendations to the ozone measurement community regarding improving metadata reporting to simplify ongoing and future efforts in working with ozone data from disparate networks in a consistent manner.

  2. Role of nanoparticle size, shape and surface chemistry in oral drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Amrita; Qi, Jianping; Gogoi, Rohan; Wong, Jessica; Mitragotri, Samir

    2016-09-28

    Nanoparticles find intriguing applications in oral drug delivery since they present a large surface area for interactions with the gastrointestinal tract and can be modified in various ways to address the barriers associated with oral delivery. The size, shape and surface chemistry of nanoparticles can greatly impact cellular uptake and efficacy of the treatment. However, the interplay between particle size, shape and surface chemistry has not been well investigated especially for oral drug delivery. To this end, we prepared sphere-, rod- and disc-shaped nanoparticles and conjugated them with targeting ligands to study the influence of size, shape and surface chemistry on their uptake and transport across intestinal cells. A triple co-culture model of intestinal cells was utilized to more closely mimic the intestinal epithelium. Results demonstrated higher cellular uptake of rod-shaped nanoparticles in the co-culture compared to spheres regardless of the presence of active targeting moieties. Transport of nanorods across the intestinal co-culture was also significantly higher than spheres. The findings indicate that nanoparticle-mediated oral drug delivery can be potentially improved with departure from spherical shape which has been traditionally utilized for the design of nanoparticles. We believe that understanding the role of nanoparticle geometry in intestinal uptake and transport will bring forth a paradigm shift in nanoparticle engineering for oral delivery and non-spherical nanoparticles should be further investigated and considered for oral delivery of therapeutic drugs and diagnostic materials.

  3. Modifying Thermal Transport in Colloidal Nanocrystal Solids with Surface Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minglu; Ma, Yuanyu; Wang, Robert Y

    2015-12-22

    We present a systematic study on the effect of surface chemistry on thermal transport in colloidal nanocrystal (NC) solids. Using PbS NCs as a model system, we vary ligand binding group (thiol, amine, and atomic halides), ligand length (ethanedithiol, butanedithiol, hexanedithiol, and octanedithiol), and NC diameter (3.3-8.2 nm). Our experiments reveal several findings: (i) The ligand choice can vary the NC solid thermal conductivity by up to a factor of 2.5. (ii) The ligand binding strength to the NC core does not significantly impact thermal conductivity. (iii) Reducing the ligand length can decrease the interparticle distance, which increases thermal conductivity. (iv) Increasing the NC diameter increases thermal conductivity. (v) The effect of surface chemistry can exceed the effect of NC diameter and becomes more pronounced as NC diameter decreases. By combining these trends, we demonstrate that the thermal conductivity of NC solids can be varied by an overall factor of 4, from ∼0.1-0.4 W/m-K. We complement these findings with effective medium approximation modeling and identify thermal transport in the ligand matrix as the rate-limiter for thermal transport. By combining these modeling results with our experimental observations, we conclude that future efforts to increase thermal conductivity in NC solids should focus on the ligand-ligand interface between neighboring NCs.

  4. Why surface chemistry matters for QD–QD resonance energy transfer

    DOE PAGES

    Hoffman, Jacob B.; Alam, Rabeka; Kamat, Prashant V.

    2017-01-12

    Resonance energy transfer (RET) has been shown to occur in films of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) with variation in QD composition and size. When coupled with charge carrier transfer, RET could provide a complementary strategy for light harvesting in QD based solid state photovoltaic devices. Due to a direct dependence on the optical properties of the donor and acceptor, QD surface chemistry plays a drastic role in determining the efficiency of RET. Here, the impact of QD surface chemistry on RET in QD films was investigated using a pair of different sized CdSe QDs spin-cast onto a glass substrate. Themore » effects of QD surface passivation on RET were studied by removing surface ligands through QD washing and adding an insulating ZnS shell. In addition, QD films were subjected to solid state ligand exchanges with thiolated ligands in order to mimic a layer-by-layer deposition method commonly used in the construction of QD photovoltaics. These solid state ligand exchanges exhibit drastic quenching of RET in the films. As a result, these experiments highlight the importance of understanding surface chemistry when designing photovoltaics that utilize RET.« less

  5. Influence of organic surface chemistry on the nucleation of plasma deposited SiO x films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, C.; Mitschker, F.; Giner, I.; de los Arcos, T.; Awakowicz, P.; Grundmeier, G.

    2017-05-01

    The nucleation and film growth of SiO x plasma polymer films as a function of the substrate surface chemistry are analysed by a combination of microscopic, spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques. Self-assembled organothiol monolayers (SAMs) surfaces with different terminating groups (methyl, carboxyl- and trimethoxysilane groups) on Au(111) serve as a model system. Ultra-thin SiO x films with thickness ranging from 0.4 to 1.4 nm were deposited by microwave plasma in a mixture of HMDSO and O2. The changes in surface, interface and thin film chemistry are characterized by PM-IRRAS. Cyclic voltammetry with ferricyanide as a redox system is used to probe the defect density of the bare SAMs and the SiO x -covered SAMs. Furthermore, the evolution of the SiO x surface morphology for increasing film thickness as function of the substrate chemical termination is investigated by AFM. A strong influence of the surface chemistry on the SiO x nucleation and film growth is observed. While the methyl and carboxyl terminated SAMs are degraded during the nucleation leading to defect rich ultrathin films, the trimethoxysilane group protects the aliphatic chain of the SAM and leads to much better barrier properties of the ultra-thin SiO x -films. A mechanistic explanation of the results is provided.

  6. Surface chemistry and moisture sorption properties of wood coated with multifunctional alkoxysilanes by sol-gel process

    Treesearch

    Mandla A. Tshabalala; Peter Kingshott; Mark R. VanLandingham; David Plackett

    2003-01-01

    Sol-gel surface deposition of a hydrophobic polysiloxane coating on wood was accomplished by using a mixture of a low molecular weight multifunctional alkoxysilane, methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMOS), and a high molecular weight multifunctional alkoxysilane, hexadecyltrimethoxysilane (HDTMOS). Investigation of the surface chemistry and morphology of the wood specimens by...

  7. Surface chemistry regulates the sensitivity and tolerability of osteoblasts to various magnitudes of fluid shear stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wang, Jinfeng; Xing, Juan; Wang, Yuanliang; Luo, Yanfeng

    2016-12-01

    Scaffolds provide a physical support for osteoblasts and act as the medium to transfer mechanical stimuli to cells. To verify our hypothesis that the surface chemistry of scaffolds regulates the perception of cells to mechanical stimuli, the sensitivity and tolerability of osteoblasts to fluid shear stress (FSS) of various magnitudes (5, 12, 20 dynes/cm(2) ) were investigated on various surface chemistries (-OH, -CH3 , -NH2 ), and their follow-up effects on cell proliferation and differentiation were examined as well. The sensitivity was characterized by the release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) while the tolerability was by cellular membrane integrity. The cell proliferation was characterized by S-phase cell fraction and the differentiation by ALP activity and ECM expression (fibronectin and type I collagen). As revealed, osteoblasts demonstrated higher sensitivity and lower tolerability on OH and CH3 surfaces, yet lower sensitivity and higher tolerability on NH2 surfaces. Observations on the focal adhesion formation, F-actin organization and cellular orientation before and after FSS exposure suggest that the potential mechanism lies in the differential control of F-actin organization and focal adhesion formation by surface chemistry, which further divergently mediates the sensitivity and tolerability of ROBs to FSS and the follow-up cell proliferation and differentiation. These findings are essentially valuable for design/selection of desirable surface chemistry to orchestrate with FSS stimuli, inducing appropriate cell responses and promoting bone formation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2978-2991, 2016.

  8. Effects of wood fiber surface chemistry on strength of wood-plastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migneault, Sébastien; Koubaa, Ahmed; Perré, Patrick; Riedl, Bernard

    2015-07-01

    Because wood-plastic composites (WPC) strength relies on fiber-matrix interaction at fiber surface, it is likely that fiber surface chemistry plays an important role in WPC strength development. The objective of the present study is to investigate the relationships between fiber surface chemical characteristics and WPC mechanical properties. Different fibers were selected and characterized for surface chemical characteristics using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). WPC samples were manufactured at 40% fiber content and with six different fibers. High density polyethylene was used as matrix and maleated polyethylene (MAPE) was used as compatibility agent. WPC samples were tested for mechanical properties and fiber-matrix interface was observed with scanning electron microscope. It was found WPC strength decreases as the amount of unoxidized carbon (assigned to lignin and extractives) measured with XPS on fiber surface increases. In the opposite case, WPC strength increases with increasing level of oxidized carbon (assigned to carbohydrates) on fiber surface. The same conclusions were found with FTIR where WPC strength decreases as lignin peaks intensity increases. Esterification reaction of fibers with MAPE occurs on polar sites of carbohydrates, such as hydroxyls (Osbnd H). Thus, fibers with carbohydrates-rich surface, such as cellulose pulp, produced stronger WPC samples. Other factors such as mechanical interlocking and fiber morphology interfered with the effects of fiber surface chemistry.

  9. Inflammatory cytokine release is affected by surface morphology and chemistry of titanium implants.

    PubMed

    Östberg, Anna-Karin; Dahlgren, Ulf; Sul, Young-Taeg; Johansson, Carina B

    2015-04-01

    To investigate in vitro cellular cytokine expression in relation to commercially pure titanium discs, comparing a native surface to a fluorinated oxide nanotube surface. Control samples pure titanium discs with a homogenous wave of the margins and grooves and an often smeared-out surface structure. Test samples pure titanium discs with a fluorinated titanium oxide chemistry and surface morphology with nanopore/tube geometry characterized by ordered structures of nanotubes with a diameter of ≈ 120 nm, a spacing of ≈ 30 nm, and a wall thickness of ≈ 10 nm. Cross-section view showed vertically aligned nanotubes with similar lengths of ≈ 700 nm. Peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes were cultured for 1, 3, and 6 days according to standard procedures. BioPlex Pro™ assays were used for analysis and detection of cytokines. Selected inflammatory cytokines are reported. A pronounced difference in production of the inflammatogenic cytokines was observed. Leucocytes exposed to control coins produced significantly more TNF-α, IL-1ß, and IL-6 than the test nanotube coins. The effect on the TH2 cytokine IL-4 was less pronounced at day 6 compared to days 1 and 3, and slightly higher expressed on the control coins. The morphology and surface chemistry of the titanium surface have a profound impact on basic cytokine production in vitro. Within the limitations of the present study, it seems that the fluorinated oxide nanotube surface results in a lower inflammatory response compared to a rather flat surface that seems to favour inflammation.

  10. Influence of the microporosity and surface chemistry of polymeric resins on adsorptive properties toward phenol.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yongwen; Li, Zhong; Xi, Hongxia

    2004-09-10

    In this work, the effects of the microporosity and chemical surface of polymeric adsorbents on adsorptive properties of phenol were investigated. Textural parameters of four kinds of polymeric resins, namely AB-8, D4006, NKA-II and D16 resin, were separately measured by ASAP 2010. The surface chemistry of these polymeric resins was determined by means of inverse gas chromatography (IGC) and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Static equilibrium adsorption experiments were carried out to obtain the isotherms of phenol on the polymeric resins. It was shown that NKA-II and AB-8 resin possessed relatively high BET surface areas and micropore volumes, while D4006 and D16 resin possessed comparatively low BET surface areas and micropore volumes. The results of IGC experiments revealed that NKA-II resin had extraordinary high specific component of the free energy of adsorption both for polar acetone and benzene probe, and thus extraordinary strong surface polarity compared to the other polymeric resins. It was also found that the isotherm of phenol on NKA-II was much higher than that on the other polymeric resins due to its strongest surface polarity and largest micropore volume among four kinds of resins. These experimental observations indicated that adsorption of phenol on the polymeric resins depended greatly on their microporosity and surface chemistry. The well-developed microporosity and the strong surface polarity would improve the adsorption of phenol on the polymeric resins.

  11. What's on the Surface? Physics and Chemistry of Delta-Doped Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Outline of presentation: 1. Detector surfaces and the problem of stability 2. Delta-doped detectors 3. Physics of Delta-doped Silicon 4. Chemistry of the Si-SiO2 Interface 5. Physics and Chemistry of Delta-doped Surfaces a. Compensation b. Inversion c. Quantum exclusion. Conclusions: 1. Quantum confinement of electrons and holes dominates the behavior of delta-doped surfaces. 2. Stability of delta-doped detectors: Delta-layer creates an approx 1 eV tunnel barrier between bulk and surface. 3. At high surface charge densities, Tamm-Shockley states form at the surface. 4. Surface passivation by quantum exclusion: Near-surface delta-layer suppresses T-S trapping of minority carriers. 5. The Si-SiO2 interface compensates the surface 6. For delta-layers at intermediate depth, surface inversion layer forms 7. Density of Si-SiO2 interface charge can be extremely high (>10(exp 14)/sq cm)

  12. What's on the Surface? Physics and Chemistry of Delta-Doped Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Outline of presentation: 1. Detector surfaces and the problem of stability 2. Delta-doped detectors 3. Physics of Delta-doped Silicon 4. Chemistry of the Si-SiO2 Interface 5. Physics and Chemistry of Delta-doped Surfaces a. Compensation b. Inversion c. Quantum exclusion. Conclusions: 1. Quantum confinement of electrons and holes dominates the behavior of delta-doped surfaces. 2. Stability of delta-doped detectors: Delta-layer creates an approx 1 eV tunnel barrier between bulk and surface. 3. At high surface charge densities, Tamm-Shockley states form at the surface. 4. Surface passivation by quantum exclusion: Near-surface delta-layer suppresses T-S trapping of minority carriers. 5. The Si-SiO2 interface compensates the surface 6. For delta-layers at intermediate depth, surface inversion layer forms 7. Density of Si-SiO2 interface charge can be extremely high (>10(exp 14)/sq cm)

  13. Surface chemistry of polyimide precursors on Cu(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanecky, J. E.; Child, C. M.; Campion, Alan

    1995-03-01

    We have investigated the bonding of the monomers pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA) and oxydianiline (ODA) as well as model compounds, succinic anhydride, phthalic anhydride, and benzoic acid, on Cu(111) in ultrahigh vacuum. Unenhanced surface Raman spectroscopy was used to identify the adsorbed species. ODA was unreactive at 110 K; the surface vibrational features were identical to those in the condensed multilayer. In contrast, PMDA chemisorbed dissociatively to form a bidentate surface carboxylate. Succinic anhydride physisorbed at 110 K, whereas benzoic acid and phthalic anhydride both adsorbed dissociatively forming bridging surface carboxylates as was observed for PMDA. The surface Raman spectrum of PMDA showed resonance enhancement.

  14. Correlation between surface chemistry and ion energy dependence of the etch yield in multicomponent oxides etching

    SciTech Connect

    Berube, P.-M.; Poirier, J.-S.; Margot, J.; Stafford, L.; Ndione, P. F.; Chaker, M.; Morandotti, R.

    2009-09-15

    The influence of surface chemistry in plasma etching of multicomponent oxides was investigated through measurements of the ion energy dependence of the etch yield. Using pulsed-laser-deposited Ca{sub x}Ba{sub (1-x)}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 6} (CBN) and SrTiO{sub 3} thin films as examples, it was found that the etching energy threshold shifts toward values larger or smaller than the sputtering threshold depending on whether or not ion-assisted chemical etching is the dominant etching pathway and whether surface chemistry is enhancing or inhibiting desorption of the film atoms. In the case of CBN films etched in an inductively coupled Cl{sub 2} plasma, it is found that the chlorine uptake is inhibiting the etching reaction, with the desorption of nonvolatile NbCl{sub 2} and BaCl{sub 2} compounds being the rate-limiting step.

  15. Carbon dioxide chemistry on the surface of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodyss, Robert; Piao, Sophie; Malaska, Michael; Cable, Morgan

    2016-10-01

    Titan possesses many of the basic elements of habitability, including a rich organic chemistry. However, the thick atmosphere of Titan shields the surface from radiation, which makes the incorporation of oxygen into organic compounds difficult, due to a reducing environment and low temperatures that slow chemical reactions. These obstacles may be overcome by impacts or cryovolcanic heating of ice, which would mix organics with liquid water and allow chemical reactions that can incorporate oxygen. However, reactions involving oxygen can occur on Titan without invoking such unusual conditions. We show that the reaction of carbon dioxide with amines can lead to oxygenated organics at Titan's surface without the need for external energy input, via the carbamation reaction: R-NH2 + CO2 → R-NH-COOH. Using a combination of micro-Raman spectroscopy and UHV FTIR spectroscopy, we examine the reaction products and kinetics of the carbamation reaction for a variety of primary and secondary amines. We have observed carbamic acid formation in mixtures of methylamine, ethylamine and dibutylamine with CO2 at cryogenic temperatures. This indicates that both primary and secondary amines can undergo carbamation at low temperatures. Reaction was observed with methylamine as low as 40 K, and with ethylamine at 100 K, demonstrating that carbamation is fast at Titan surface temperatures. We will present data on the kinetics of the carbamation reaction for a variety of amines, as well as estimates of the quantity of carbamic acids that may be produced on Titan's surface and in the atmosphere.

  16. The impact of surface chemistry on the performance of localized solar-driven evaporation system

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shengtao; Zhang, Yao; Duan, Haoze; Liu, Yanming; Quan, Xiaojun; Tao, Peng; Shang, Wen; Wu, Jianbo; Song, Chengyi; Deng, Tao

    2015-01-01

    This report investigates the influence of surface chemistry (or wettability) on the evaporation performance of free-standing double-layered thin film on the surface of water. Such newly developed evaporation system is composed of top plasmonic light-to-heat conversion layer and bottom porous supporting layer. Under solar light illumination, the induced plasmonic heat will be localized within the film. By modulating the wettability of such evaporation system through the control of surface chemistry, the evaporation rates are differentiated between hydrophilized and hydrophobized anodic aluminum oxide membrane-based double layered thin films. Additionally, this work demonstrated that the evaporation rate mainly depends on the wettability of bottom supporting layer rather than that of top light-to-heat conversion layer. The findings in this study not only elucidate the role of surface chemistry of each layer of such double-layered evaporation system, but also provide additional design guidelines for such localized evaporation system in applications including desalination, distillation and power generation. PMID:26337561

  17. The impact of surface chemistry on the performance of localized solar-driven evaporation system.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shengtao; Zhang, Yao; Duan, Haoze; Liu, Yanming; Quan, Xiaojun; Tao, Peng; Shang, Wen; Wu, Jianbo; Song, Chengyi; Deng, Tao

    2015-09-04

    This report investigates the influence of surface chemistry (or wettability) on the evaporation performance of free-standing double-layered thin film on the surface of water. Such newly developed evaporation system is composed of top plasmonic light-to-heat conversion layer and bottom porous supporting layer. Under solar light illumination, the induced plasmonic heat will be localized within the film. By modulating the wettability of such evaporation system through the control of surface chemistry, the evaporation rates are differentiated between hydrophilized and hydrophobized anodic aluminum oxide membrane-based double layered thin films. Additionally, this work demonstrated that the evaporation rate mainly depends on the wettability of bottom supporting layer rather than that of top light-to-heat conversion layer. The findings in this study not only elucidate the role of surface chemistry of each layer of such double-layered evaporation system, but also provide additional design guidelines for such localized evaporation system in applications including desalination, distillation and power generation.

  18. Early osteoblast responses to orthopedic implants: Synergy of surface roughness and chemistry of bioactive ceramic coating.

    PubMed

    Aniket; Reid, Robert; Hall, Benika; Marriott, Ian; El-Ghannam, Ahmed

    2015-06-01

    Pro-osteogenic stimulation of bone cells by bioactive ceramic-coated orthopedic implants is influenced by both surface roughness and material chemistry; however, their concomitant impact on osteoblast behavior is not well understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of nano-scale roughness and chemistry of bioactive silica-calcium phosphate nanocomposite (SCPC50) coated Ti-6Al-4V on modulating early bone cell responses. Cell attachment was higher on SCPC50-coated substrates compared to the uncoated controls; however, cells on the uncoated substrate exhibited greater spreading and superior quality of F-actin filaments than cells on the SCPC50-coated substrates. The poor F-actin filament organization on SCPC50-coated substrates is thought to be due to the enhanced calcium uptake by the ceramic surface. Dissolution analyses showed that an increase in surface roughness was accompanied by increased calcium uptake, and increased phosphorous and silicon release, all of which appear to interfere with F-actin assembly and osteoblast morphology. Moreover, cell attachment onto the SCPC50-coated substrates correlated with the known adsorption of fibronectin, and was independent of surface roughness. High-throughput genome sequencing showed enhanced expression of extracellular matrix and cell differentiation related genes. These results demonstrate a synergistic relationship between bioactive ceramic coating roughness and material chemistry resulting in a phenotype that leads to early osteoblast differentiation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The impact of surface chemistry on the performance of localized solar-driven evaporation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shengtao; Zhang, Yao; Duan, Haoze; Liu, Yanming; Quan, Xiaojun; Tao, Peng; Shang, Wen; Wu, Jianbo; Song, Chengyi; Deng, Tao

    2015-09-01

    This report investigates the influence of surface chemistry (or wettability) on the evaporation performance of free-standing double-layered thin film on the surface of water. Such newly developed evaporation system is composed of top plasmonic light-to-heat conversion layer and bottom porous supporting layer. Under solar light illumination, the induced plasmonic heat will be localized within the film. By modulating the wettability of such evaporation system through the control of surface chemistry, the evaporation rates are differentiated between hydrophilized and hydrophobized anodic aluminum oxide membrane-based double layered thin films. Additionally, this work demonstrated that the evaporation rate mainly depends on the wettability of bottom supporting layer rather than that of top light-to-heat conversion layer. The findings in this study not only elucidate the role of surface chemistry of each layer of such double-layered evaporation system, but also provide additional design guidelines for such localized evaporation system in applications including desalination, distillation and power generation.

  20. Investigation of Venus Surface Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Peter G.

    2002-01-01

    Strong localized radar echoes have been observed at decimeter wavelengths from the highlands of Venus since the earliest radar maps were obtained over 30 years ago. These echoes are some five to ten times stronger than those from the presumably basaltic rocks seen at lower altitudes elsewhere on Venus. Observations of thermal emission from the visible disk of Venus at wavelengths corresponding to those used in the radar mapping confirm that the regions of high reflectivity also exhibit low emissivity, as expected from considerations of detailed thermodynamic balance. Two possibilities have been put forward to explain this unexpected aspect of the Venus highlands: 1) surface materials of high effective dielectric constant, probably associated with finite electrical conductivity, and 2) volume scattering associated with multiple scattering from a layer of very-low-loss material containing voids and extending down a few hundred wavelengths beneath the surface. Analogs to these two mechanisms are found elsewhere in the solar system, and each is capable of explaining the basic observations. as of the early 1990's. In 1993, however, it became possible to carry out a bistatic observation of the anomalous highland regions using the Magellan spacecraft, then in orbit about Venus. In this experiment the on-board telemetry transmitter was aimed at the planet's surface with its linear S-band polarization vector oriented at 45 deg to the spacecraft-Venus-Earth scattering plane. The pointing of the transmitting antenna was adjusted so that the spacecraft-to-illuminated-surface incidence angle equalled the Earth-to-Venus-surface incidence angle. In this way, the experiment emphasized the specular scattering component. A full Stokes-Vector analysis of the reflected signal as received on Earth was carried out as the illuminated region scanned across the highland regions of Venus. From the observed position angle of the echo, it was possible to calculate the Fresnel reflectivity of

  1. Surface chemistry studies of copper and nickel nanoparticles deposited on a titanium dioxide(110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing

    Metal nanoparticles on oxides are important in heterogeneous catalysis due to their unique properties related to size and structure. In this study, supported Cu and Ni nanoparticles on a rutile TiO2(110) surface have been studied as model systems for 'real world' heterogeneous catalysts to understand the relationship between the size and the catalytic properties of the metal particles. All the experiments were carried out under ultrahigh vacuum conditions using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), low energy electron spectroscopy (LEED) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) techniques. Cu and Ni grow three-dimensional particles on the TiO2(110) surface at temperatures between 295 K and 850 K. The growth of Cu and Ni is similar except that the sintering of Ni particles occurs at higher temperatures. In order to investigate the particle size effect on the catalytic reactivity of the metal particles, different sizes of Cu and Ni particles with uniform size distributions were prepared on titania by varying the metal diffusion rate (D) to deposition flux (F) ratios. The surface chemistry of these supported Cu and Ni nanoparticles was investigated with dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), a simulant for chemical warfare agents and pesticides. TPD studies indicate that DMMP decomposition may be via the methoxy intermediate. The adsorbed DMMP decomposes to CH4, H2CO and H2 on the Cu nanoparticles and films, and to CH4, CO and H2 on the Ni nanoparticles and films between 295 K and 850 K. The decomposition of DMMP on Cu and Ni surfaces is not sensitive to the particle size. However, heating the Ni particles or film before DMMP adsorption causes a decrease in Ni reactivity due to the loss of active sites. The titania support plays an important role in DMMP reaction on Cu surfaces. Finally, in order to relate ultrahigh vacuum studies with real catalytic conditions usually associated with much higher pressures, the role of oxygen on

  2. Examining metal nanoparticle surface chemistry using hollow-core, photonic-crystal, fiber-assisted SERS.

    PubMed

    Eftekhari, Fatemeh; Lee, Anna; Kumacheva, Eugenia; Helmy, Amr S

    2012-02-15

    In this Letter, we demonstrate the efficacy of hollow core photonic crystal fibers (HCPCFs) as a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) platform for investigating the ligand exchange process on the surface of gold nanoparticles. Raman measurements carried out using this platform show the capability to monitor minute amounts of surface ligands on gold nanoparticles used as an SERS substrate. The SERS signal from an HCPCF exhibits a tenfold enhancement compared to that in a direct sampling scheme using a cuvette. Using exchange of cytotoxic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide with α-methoxy-ω-mercaptopoly(ethylene glycol) on the surface of gold nanorods as an exemplary system, we show the feasibility of using HCPCF SERS to monitor the change in surface chemistry of nanoparticles.

  3. Investigation of Surface Plasmon Dispersion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-30

    of Cs-Ag and the Cs-O-Ag surface layers are likely to have energy bands rather than dis- crete energies . We have analyzed the data presented in...into the Au-Si interface. When the photon energy is larger than the band gap of the semiconductor, as in our case, the EM field can create elec- tron...in which electrons are injected from Ad into Si. To study only the internal photo- emission, SPW with photon energies between the band gap of Si and

  4. Students' Written Arguments in General Chemistry Laboratory Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Aeran; Hand, Brian; Greenbowe, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the written arguments developed by college freshman students using the Science Writing Heuristic approach in inquiry-based general chemistry laboratory classrooms and its relationships with students' achievement in chemistry courses. Fourteen freshman students participated in the first year of the study while 19…

  5. Control of pyrite surface chemistry in physical coal cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Luttrell, G.H.; Yoon, R.H.; Zachwieja, J.; Lagno, M.

    1992-06-24

    To better understand the surface chemical properties of coal and mineral pyrite, studies on the effect of flotation surfactants (frother and kerosene) on the degree of hydrophobicity have been conducted. The presence of either frother or kerosene enhanced the flotability of coal and mineral pyrite with a corresponding decrease in induction time over the pH range examined. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results indicate a correlation exists between the sample surface morphology and crystal structure and the observed hydrophobicity. As a result of the data obtained from the surface characterization studies, controlled surface oxidation was investigated as a possible pyrite rejection scheme in microbubble column flotation.

  6. Surface and Interface Chemistry for Gate Stacks on Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, M. M.; Chabal, Y. J.

    This chapter addresses the fundamental silicon surface science associated with the continued progress of nanoelectronics along the path prescribed by Moore's law. Focus is on hydrogen passivation layers and on ultrathin oxide films encountered during silicon cleaning and gate stack formation in the fabrication of metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). Three main topics are addressed. (i) First, the current practices and understanding of silicon cleaning in aqueous solutions are reviewed, including oxidizing chemistries and cleans leading to a hydrogen passivation layer. The dependence of the final surface termination and morphology/roughness on reactant choice and pH and the influence of impurities such as dissolved oxygen or metal ions are discussed. (ii) Next, the stability of hydrogen-terminated silicon in oxidizing liquid and gas phase environments is considered. In particular, the remarkable stability of hydrogen-terminated silicon surface in pure water vapor is discussed in the context of atomic layer deposition (ALD) of high-permittivity (high-k) gate dielectrics where water is often used as an oxygen precursor. Evidence is also provided for co-operative action between oxygen and water vapor that accelerates surface oxidation in humid air. (iii) Finally, the fabrication of hafnium-, zirconium- and aluminum-based high-k gate stacks is described, focusing on the continued importance of the silicon/silicon oxide interface. This includes a review of silicon surface preparation by wet or gas phase processing and its impact on high-k nucleation during ALD growth, and the consideration of gate stack capacitance and carrier mobility. In conclusion, two issues are highlighted: the impact of oxygen vacancies on the electrical characteristics of high-k MOS devices, and the way alloyed metal ions (such as Al in Hf-based gate stacks) in contact with the interfacial silicon oxide layer can be used to control flatband and threshold voltages.

  7. Plant surface reactions: an ozone defence mechanism impacting atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jud, W.; Fischer, L.; Canaval, E.; Wohlfahrt, G.; Tissier, A.; Hansel, A.

    2015-07-01

    Elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations are considered a toxic threat to plants, responsible for global crop losses with associated economic costs of several billion dollars per year. Plant injuries have been linked to the uptake of ozone through stomatal pores and oxidative damage of the internal leaf tissue. But a striking question remains: how much ozone effectively enters the plant through open stomata and how much is lost by chemical reactions at the plant surface? In this laboratory study we could show that semi-volatile organic compounds exuded by the glandular trichomes of different Nicotiana tabacum varieties are an efficient ozone sink at the plant surface. In our experiments, different diterpenoid compounds were responsible for a strongly variety dependent ozone uptake of plants under dark conditions, when stomatal pores are almost closed. Surface reactions of ozone were accompanied by prompt release of oxygenated volatile organic compounds, which could be linked to the corresponding precursor compounds: ozonolysis of cis-abienol (C20H34O) - a diterpenoid with two exocyclic double bonds - caused emissions of formaldehyde (HCHO) and methyl vinyl ketone (C4H6O). The ring-structured cembratrien-diols (C20H34O2) with three endocyclic double bonds need at least two ozonolysis steps to form volatile carbonyls such as 4-oxopentanal (C5H8O2), which we could observe in the gas phase, too. Fluid dynamic calculations were used to model ozone distribution in the diffusion limited leaf boundary layer under daylight conditions. In the case of an ozone-reactive leaf surface, ozone gradients in the vicinity of stomatal pores are changed in such a way, that ozone flux through the open stomata is strongly reduced. Our results show that unsaturated semi-volatile compounds at the plant surface should be considered as a source of oxygenated volatile organic compounds, impacting gas phase chemistry, as well as efficient ozone sink improving the ozone tolerance of plants.

  8. Exploring silicon surface chemistry with spectroscopy and microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fan

    Recent technology advances have pushed the development of silicon devices to their physical performance limits. An alternative way to keep Moore's law valid and avoid the physical limits of today's magnetic memory is to combine molecules with the silicon. Molecules possess degrees of freedom that traditional silicon devices lack, such as rotation, conformation, oxidation states, spontaneous dipole moment, and discrete energy levels. Cleverly taking advantage of these properties may lead to next generation devices that are more powerful and efficient than today's silicon devices. To realize such an ambitious goal, it is necessary to understand the surface chemistry of silicon, i.e., the adsorption, reaction, and disorder phenomena of molecules at the surface. Spectroscopy and microscopy are two complementary methods to study surface chemistry and provide insight into mechanisms for next generation silicon devices. In this thesis, the major spectroscopy method used is Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. To make full use of this technique, a new model is introduced in order to disentangle the concepts of disorder and orientation, both of which are provided by a NEXAFS measurement. The disorder information is obtained by introducing a disorder parameter sigma, whose magnitude directly measures the spread of the orientation angle around its average. This model clarifies some long existing controversial interpretations of NEXAFS measurements and provides insights into disorder-related physical properties. The second emphasis of this thesis is the development of molecular nanostructures where one-dimensional molecular arrays with strong dipole moments are formed on the Si(111) 5x2-Au surface. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) is used to characterize these nanostructures. The study shows that upward versus downward orientations of the dipole moment of the molecules can be distinguished by STM barrier height imaging. Such structures could be a

  9. Adsorption of pentacene on (100) vicinal surfaces: role of coordination, surface chemistry and vdWs effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, Jeronimo; Kara, Abdelkader

    2015-03-01

    In contrast to low miller index surfaces, vicinal surfaces are characterized by steps and step edges that not only present an interesting atomic landscape for the adsorption organic molecules, but also a unique electronic structure resulting in part from the low coordinated atoms at the step edges. The adsorption of pentacene on the stepped (511), (711), (911) surfaces (respectively 3, 4 and 5-atom wide terraces) of Cu and Ag (coinage transition metals); Pt (reactive transition metal); and Ni (reactive, magnetic transition metal) are studied using density functional theory, in order to investigate the support effects arising from differing surface chemistry. We compare the adsorption energy, adsorption geometry and electronic structure predicted by the PBE functional with those obtained from one of the optimized vdW-DF methods: optB88-vdW. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Basic Energy Science under Contract No. DE-FG02-11ER16243.

  10. Surface chemistry of polyimide formation on Cu(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Child, C. M.; Fieberg, Jeffrey E.; Campion, Alan

    1997-02-01

    We have investigated the adsorption and reaction of the monomers pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA) and oxydianiline (ODA) to form the intermediate amic acid and then polyimide adsorbed on Cu(111) using solventless vapor deposition in ultrahigh vacuum. Unenhanced surface Raman spectroscopy was used to identify the adsorbed species. The initial reaction of PMDA and ODA at 383 K created an amic acid ion that was bound to the surface via carboxylate and surface amide linkages. Upon heating the intermediate acid to 473 K, polyimide was formed; it was bound to the surface only via a surface carboxylate. The interfacial polymerization produced only relatively short polyimide chains. The surface Raman spectrum of the amic acid was resonantly enhanced.

  11. Effects of surface curvature and surface chemistry on the structure and activity of proteins adsorbed in nanopores.

    PubMed

    Sang, Lung-Ching; Coppens, Marc-Olivier

    2011-04-14

    The interactions of proteins with the surface of cylindrical nanopores are systematically investigated to elucidate how surface curvature and surface chemistry affect the conformation and activity of confined proteins in an aqueous, buffered environment. Two globular proteins, lysozyme and myoglobin, with different catalytic functions, were used as model proteins to analyze structural changes in proteins after adsorption on ordered mesoporous silica SBA-15 and propyl-functionalized SBA-15 (C(3)SBA-15) with carefully controlled pore size. Liquid phase ATR-FTIR spectroscopy was used to study the amide I and II bands of the adsorbed proteins. The amide I bands showed that the secondary structures of free and adsorbed protein molecules differ, and that the secondary structure of the adsorbed protein is influenced by the local geometry as well as by the surface chemistry of the nanopores. The conformation of the adsorbed proteins inside the nanopores of SBA-15 and C(3)SBA-15 is strongly correlated with the local geometry and the surface properties of the nanoporous materials, which results in different catalytic activities. Adsorption by electrostatic interaction of proteins in nanopores of an optimal size provides a favorably confining and protecting environment, which may lead to considerably enhanced structural stability and catalytic activity.

  12. Surface chemistry of gold nanorods: origin of cell membrane damage and cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liming; Jiang, Xiumei; Ji, Yinglu; Bai, Ru; Zhao, Yuliang; Wu, Xiaochun; Chen, Chunying

    2013-08-01

    We investigated how surface chemistry influences the interaction between gold nanorods (AuNRs) and cell membranes and the subsequent cytotoxicity arising from them in a serum-free cell culture system. Our results showed that the AuNRs coated with cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) molecules can generate defects in the cell membrane and induce cell death, mainly due to the unique bilayer structure of CTAB molecules on the surface of the rods rather than their charge. Compared to CTAB-capped nanorods, positively charged polyelectrolyte-coated, i.e. poly(diallyldimethyl ammonium chloride) (PDDAC), AuNRs show improved biocompatibility towards cells. Thus, the present results indicate that the nature of surface molecules, especially their packing structures on the surface of AuNRs rather than surface charge, play a more crucial role in determining cytotoxicity. These findings about interfacial interactions could also explain the effects of internalized AuNRs on the structures or functions of organelles. This study will help understanding of the toxic nature of AuNRs and guide rational design of the surface chemistry of AuNRs for good biocompatibility in pharmaceutical therapy.

  13. Microstructure and surface chemistry of amorphous alloys important to their friction and wear behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the microstructure and surface chemistry of amorphous alloys, and their effects on tribological behavior. The results indicate that the surface oxide layers present on amorphous alloys are effective in providing low friction and a protective film against wear in air. Clustering and crystallization in amorphous alloys can be enhanced as a result of plastic flow during the sliding process at a low sliding velocity, at room temperature. Clusters or crystallines with sizes to 150 nm and a diffused honeycomb-shaped structure are produced on sizes to 150 nm and a diffused honeycomb-shaped structure are produced on the wear surface. Temperature effects lead to drastic changes in surface chemistry and friction behavior of the alloys at temperatures to 750 C. Contaminants can come from the bulk of the alloys to the surface upon heating and impart to the surface oxides at 350 C and boron nitride above 500 C. The oxides increase friction while the boron nitride reduces friction drastically in vacuum.

  14. Rational design of surface/interface chemistry for quantitative in vivo monitoring of brain chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meining; Yu, Ping; Mao, Lanqun

    2012-04-17

    To understand the molecular basis of brain functions, researchers would like to be able to quantitatively monitor the levels of neurochemicals in the extracellular fluid in vivo. However, the chemical and physiological complexity of the central nervous system (CNS) presents challenges for the development of these analytical methods. This Account describes the rational design and careful construction of electrodes and nanoparticles with specific surface/interface chemistry for quantitative in vivo monitoring of brain chemistry. We used the redox nature of neurochemicals at the electrode/electrolyte interface to establish a basis for monitoring specific neurochemicals. Carbon nanotubes provide an electrode/electrolyte interface for the selective oxidation of ascorbate, and we have developed both in vivo voltammetry and an online electrochemical detecting system for continuously monitoring this molecule in the CNS. Although Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) are involved in a number of neurochemical signaling processes, they are still difficult to detect in the CNS. These divalent cations can enhance electrocatalytic oxidation of NADH at an electrode modified with toluidine blue O. We used this property to develop online electrochemical detection systems for simultaneous measurements of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) and for continuous selective monitoring of Mg(2+) in the CNS. We have also harnessed biological schemes for neurosensing in the brain to design other monitoring systems. By taking advantage of the distinct reaction properties of dopamine (DA), we have developed a nonoxidative mechanism for DA sensing and a system that can potentially be used for continuously sensing of DA release. Using "artificial peroxidase" (Prussian blue) to replace a natural peroxidase (horseradish peroxidase, HRP), our online system can simultaneously detect basal levels of glucose and lactate. By substituting oxidases with dehydrogenases, we have used enzyme-based biosensing schemes to develop a physiologically

  15. Surface chemistry of poly(p-xylylene) and nylon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera-Alonso, Margarita

    The interaction of a material with its surroundings occurs at the material-environment interface, therefore, the chemical and physical characteristics of the material's surface plays a fundamental role in determining its properties, such as its biocompatibility, adhesion, and wettability, and ultimately, its technological applicability. This dissertation discusses aspects of the chemical surface modification of two polymers, poly(p-xylylene) and nylon. Chapter 2 focuses on the synthesis and wet-chemistry surface modification of poly(p-xylylene) (PPX) thin films. A series of electrophilic aromatic substitutions were studied including chlorosulfonation, chloroamidomethylation, and Friedel-Crafts catalyzed reactions. It was found that the yields and surface selectivity of the reactions studied were highly dependent on the interaction of the polymer with the reaction medium. Chapter 3 describes the use of vapor deposition polymerization in template-assisted synthesis. Poly(p-xylylene) nanotubes were synthesized by template assisted methods using porous aluminum oxide membranes as the templating material. The pore diameter showed a linear dependence with respect to the deposition time. FESEM analysis showed that PPX was deposited along the pores of the membranes. Exposure of the membranes to a reactive solution resulted in chemical functionalization of the inner walls of the nanotubes, confirmed by XPS. Chapter 4 discusses the chemical reduction of nylon film surfaces by reaction with a borane-tetrahydrofuran complex. It was observed that, while the reaction occurs in high yields, its surface-confinement is highly dependent on the segmental mobility of the polymer. The amine-rich surfaces were further used as templates for the synthesis of composite films by electrostatic adsorption of polyanions. Chapter 5 deals with the synthesis of linear polyalkyleneimines of different hydrocarbon lengths by the surface-mediated reduction of nylons. These polyalkyleneimines were

  16. The interfacial chemistry of organic materials on commercial glass surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Joy

    The hydrolytic stability of glass is dependent on its composition. Glasses are exposed to water during their processing and in many applications; therefore, their surface or interface with other materials must withstand hydrolytic attack. Multi-component silicate glasses are widely used but have been the least studied. In coatings-based applications, these glasses come in contact with organosilanes and organic molecules where the adsorption may be affected by surface water. For example, the influence of glass composition on the wet strength of a glass/polymer composite material is unclear, but it is presumed to be driven by the hydrolytic stability of the interfacial chemistry. Organosilanes are critical for increasing the performance of composite materials in humid environments but the precise manner by which the improvement occurs has not been verified. The current school of thought is that the application of silane coatings on a multi-component glass surface transforms the chemically heterogeneous surface into a homogenous and hydrolytically stable surface. In this study, multi-component silicate glass surfaces were silanized by both aqueous and non-aqueous methods. The effect of glass composition and surface hydration on silane coverage was quantified by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The monolayer-level adsorption results showed that the low-sodium content glasses had greater coverage than a high-sodium content glass in dry conditions in contrast to an equivalent coverage in wet conditions. The hydrolytically-stable coverage on multi-component silicate glass surfaces by both silanization methods was found to be sub-monolayer. A thin film model in conjunction with XPS and Infrared Spectroscopy was used to probe the interfacial region of a fiberglass insulation material containing a sodium-rich multi-component silicate glass and an acrylate resin binder. Upon the application of the aqueous binder, the leaching of sodium from the glass promoted

  17. Cassini atmospheric chemistry mapper. Volume 1. Investigation and technical plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, William Hayden; Baines, Kevin Hays; Drossart, Pierre; Fegley, Bruce; Orton, Glenn; Noll, Keith; Reitsema, Harold; Bjoraker, Gordon L.

    1990-01-01

    The Cassini Atmospheric Chemistry Mapper (ACM) enables a broad range of atmospheric science investigations for Saturn and Titan by providing high spectral and spatial resolution mapping and occultation capabilities at 3 and 5 microns. ACM can directly address the major atmospheric science objectives for Saturn and for Titan, as defined by the Announcement of Opportunity, with pivotal diagnostic measurements not accessible to any other proposed Cassini instrument. ACM determines mixing ratios for atmospheric molecules from spectral line profiles for an important and extensive volume of the atmosphere of Saturn (and Jupiter). Spatial and vertical profiles of disequilibrium species abundances define Saturn's deep atmosphere, its chemistry, and its vertical transport phenomena. ACM spectral maps provide a unique means to interpret atmospheric conditions in the deep (approximately 1000 bar) atmosphere of Saturn. Deep chemistry and vertical transport is inferred from the vertical and horizontal distribution of a series of disequilibrium species. Solar occultations provide a method to bridge the altitude range in Saturn's (and Titan's) atmosphere that is not accessible to radio science, thermal infrared, and UV spectroscopy with temperature measurements to plus or minus 2K from the analysis of molecular line ratios and to attain an high sensitivity for low-abundance chemical species in the very large column densities that may be achieved during occultations for Saturn. For Titan, ACM solar occultations yield very well resolved (1/6 scale height) vertical mixing ratios column abundances for atmospheric molecular constituents. Occultations also provide for detecting abundant species very high in the upper atmosphere, while at greater depths, detecting the isotopes of C and O, constraining the production mechanisms, and/or sources for the above species. ACM measures the vertical and horizontal distribution of aerosols via their opacity at 3 microns and, particularly, at 5

  18. Surface modification and chemistry of hematite-based catalysts for water oxidation: Model surfaces, nanomaterials, and thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Peng

    Hematite-based electrocatalysts are widely used for water oxidation, but these catalysts suffer from its low reaction kinetics. To help elucidate detailed reaction mechanisms associated with water oxidation, water chemisorption and reaction as well as structural changes induced by Ni incorporation into the alpha-Fe2O3(0001) surface was studied. Incorporation of Ni into the near-surface region of hematite changes the structure of the (0001) surface by the formation of FeO-like domains on the topmost layer. Electrochemical measurements demonstrated that Ni incorporation leads to higher current density and lower onset potential than the unmodified alpha-Fe 2O3 surface. To extend the surface science study to real catalysts, hematite nanocrystals were synthesized with continuous tuning of the aspect-ratio and fine control of the surface area ratio (from 98% to 30%) of the (0001) facet with respect to other surfaces. Ni doping forms a uniformly doped NixFe 2-xO3 surface overlayer that improves the electrocatalytic activity of water oxidation. The enhancement of water oxidation activity by Ni-doping increased as the surface area ratio of the (0001) facet of hematite nanocrystals increased, consistent with the theoretical predictions and surface science studies. Then, a composite oxide film photoelectrode comprised of alpha-Fe 2O3 and WO3 were prepared, and exhibited a water oxidation photocurrent onset potential as low as 0.43 V vs. RHE. This result represents one of the lowest onset potentials measured for hematite-based PEC water oxidation systems. The composition of the films differs between the surfaces and bulk, with tungsten found to be concentrated in the surface region. Post-reaction Raman spectroscopy characterization demonstrates that water interacts with surface WO3 crystals, an event that is associated with the formation of a hydrated form of the oxide. Lastly, the surface chemistry of H2O on hematite nanoplates is investigated by studying water adsorption and

  19. Functional surface chemistry of carbon-based nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdula, Daner

    The recently discovered abilities to synthesize single-walled carbon nanotubes and prepare single layer graphene have spurred interest in these sp2-bonded carbon nanostructures. In particular, studies of their potential use in electronic devices are many as silicon integrated circuits are encountering processing limitations, quantum effects, and thermal management issues due to rapid device scaling. Nanotube and graphene implementation in devices does come with significant hurdles itself. Among these issues are the ability to dope these materials and understanding what influences defects have on expected properties. Because these nanostructures are entirely all-surface, with every atom exposed to ambient, introduction of defects and doping by chemical means is expected to be an effective route for addressing these issues. Raman spectroscopy has been a proven characterization method for understanding vibrational and even electronic structure of graphene, nanotubes, and graphite, especially when combined with electrical measurements, due to a wealth of information contained in each spectrum. In Chapter 1, a discussion of the electronic structure of graphene is presented. This outlines the foundation for all sp2-bonded carbon electronic properties and is easily extended to carbon nanotubes. Motivation for why these materials are of interest is readily gained. Chapter 2 presents various synthesis/preparation methods for both nanotubes and graphene, discusses fabrication techniques for making devices, and describes characterization methods such as electrical measurements as well as static and time-resolved Raman spectroscopy. Chapter 3 outlines changes in the Raman spectra of individual metallic single-walled carbon nantoubes (SWNTs) upon sidewall covalent bond formation. It is observed that the initial degree of disorder has a strong influence on covalent sidewall functionalization which has implications on developing electronically selective covalent chemistries and

  20. Ion irradiation of TNO surface analogue ice mixtures: the chemistry .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baratta, G. A.; Brunetto, R.; Caniglia, G.; Fulvio, D.; Ioppolo, S.; Leto, G.; Palumbo, M. E.; Spinella, F.; Strazzulla, G.

    Vis-NIR spectra of some Centaurs and Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs) indicate surfaces rich in H_2O, N_2, CO_2, CH_4 e CH_3OH. Cosmic ion irradiation is one of the processes driving the evolution of TNO surfaces. A main role is played by the chemistry induced by colliding ions; many molecular bonds are broken along the ion track, and this may lead to the formation of byproduct molecules. Starting from laboratory experiments, it is possible to infer the presence of molecules still undetected on TNOs. For instance, carbonic acid (H_2CO_3) is produced after irradiation of H_2O:CO_2 icy mixtures, while irradiation of H_2O:N_2 icy mixtures causes the production of N_2O, NO, and NO_2. From H_2O:CH_4:N_2 mixtures, many species are formed, such as CO, CO_2, HCN, HNCO, N_2O, and molecules including CN bonds. Moreover, ion irradiation may modify the relative intensity of NIR features, as in the case of solid methanol, whose 2.34 mu m band decreases in intensity with respect to the 2.27 mu m band, after increasing irradiation doses. We suggest that this effect may be observed on Centaur Pholus.

  1. Coupling of Ligands to the Liposome Surface by Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Spanedda, Maria Vittoria; De Giorgi, Marcella; Hassane, Fatouma Saïd; Schuber, Francis; Bourel-Bonnet, Line; Frisch, Benoît

    2017-01-01

    Click chemistry represents a new bioconjugation strategy that can be used to conveniently attach various ligands to the surface of preformed liposomes. This efficient and chemoselective reaction involves a Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition which can be performed under mild experimental conditions in aqueous media. Here we describe the application of a model click reaction to the conjugation, in a single step, of unprotected α-1-thiomannosyl ligands, functionalized with an azide group, to liposomes containing a terminal alkyne-functionalized lipid anchor. Excellent coupling yields have been obtained in the presence of bathophenanthroline disulfonate, a water soluble copper-ion chelator, acting as a catalyst. No vesicle leakage is triggered by this conjugation reaction and the coupled mannose ligands are exposed at the surface of the liposomes. The major limitation of Cu(I)-catalyzed click reactions is that this conjugation is restricted to liposomes made of saturated (phospho)lipids. To circumvent that constraint, an example of alternative copper-free azide-alkyne click reaction has been developed. Molecular tools and results are presented here.

  2. Molecular potential energy surfaces for interstellar chemistry and fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braams, Bastiaan J.; Huang, Xinchuan; Jin, Zhong; Xie, Zhen; Zhang, Xiubin; Bowman, Joel M.; Sharma, Amit Raj; Scheider, Ralf

    2006-04-01

    In the Born-Oppenheimer approximation the electronic Schr"odinger equation is solved given the nuclear positions as parameters, and this defines the potential energy surface. We have used computational invariant theory and the MAGMA computer algebra system as an aid to develop representations for the potential energy and dipole moment surfaces that are fully invariant under permutations of like nuclei, extending an approach that for 3-body and 4-body systems has a long history, e.g. [J. N. Murrell et al. Molecular Potential Energy Functions, Wiley, 1984]. A many-body (cluster) expansion is used to describe reaction complexes. The methods have been applied in an almost routine way for systems of up to 7 nuclei, including several molecules that are of interest for interstellar chemistry and for the issue of hydrocarbon breakdown in fusion edge plasma: H5^+, CH5, CH5^+, C2H3^+, and their fragments, with C2H5^+ on the way. The mathematical and computional methods and the hydrocarbon applications will be presented.

  3. Surface Chemistry at Size-Selected Nano-Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Jeffrey

    2005-03-01

    A method has been developed to conduct surface chemistry and extract surface kinetic rates from size-selected aerosol nanoparticles. The measurements encompass broad ranges of particle size, phase, and composition. Results will be presented on the uptake of water by aerosolized soot nanoparticles of radius between 10 and 40 nm. Water uptake was monitored by tandem differential mobility analysis (T-DMA), which is capable of measuring changes in particle diameter as little as 0.2 nm. Soot particles were produced in an ethene diffusion flame and extracted into an atmospheric pressure aerosol flow tube reactor. The particles were subjected to various thermal and oxidative treatments, and the effects of these treatments on the ability of soot to adsorb monolayer quantities of water was determined. The results are important because soot nucleates atmospheric cloud particles. More generally, the results represent one of the first kinetic and mechanistic studies of gas-phase nanoparticle reactivity. Co-author: Henry Ajo, University of Minnesota

  4. Analysis of temporal evolution of quantum dot surface chemistry by surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doğan, Ilker; Gresback, Ryan; Nozaki, Tomohiro; van de Sanden, Mauritius C. M.

    2016-07-01

    Temporal evolution of surface chemistry during oxidation of silicon quantum dot (Si-QD) surfaces were probed using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). A monolayer of hydrogen and chlorine terminated plasma-synthesized Si-QDs were spin-coated on silver oxide thin films. A clearly enhanced signal of surface modes, including Si-Clx and Si-Hx modes were observed from as-synthesized Si-QDs as a result of the plasmonic enhancement of the Raman signal at Si-QD/silver oxide interface. Upon oxidation, a gradual decrease of Si-Clx and Si-Hx modes, and an emergence of Si-Ox and Si-O-Hx modes have been observed. In addition, first, second and third transverse optical modes of Si-QDs were also observed in the SERS spectra, revealing information on the crystalline morphology of Si-QDs. An absence of any of the abovementioned spectral features, but only the first transverse optical mode of Si-QDs from thick Si-QD films validated that the spectral features observed from Si-QDs on silver oxide thin films are originated from the SERS effect. These results indicate that real-time SERS is a powerful diagnostic tool and a novel approach to probe the dynamic surface/interface chemistry of quantum dots, especially when they involve in oxidative, catalytic, and electrochemical surface/interface reactions.

  5. Analysis of temporal evolution of quantum dot surface chemistry by surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    PubMed Central

    Doğan, İlker; Gresback, Ryan; Nozaki, Tomohiro; van de Sanden, Mauritius C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Temporal evolution of surface chemistry during oxidation of silicon quantum dot (Si-QD) surfaces were probed using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). A monolayer of hydrogen and chlorine terminated plasma-synthesized Si-QDs were spin-coated on silver oxide thin films. A clearly enhanced signal of surface modes, including Si-Clx and Si-Hx modes were observed from as-synthesized Si-QDs as a result of the plasmonic enhancement of the Raman signal at Si-QD/silver oxide interface. Upon oxidation, a gradual decrease of Si-Clx and Si-Hx modes, and an emergence of Si-Ox and Si-O-Hx modes have been observed. In addition, first, second and third transverse optical modes of Si-QDs were also observed in the SERS spectra, revealing information on the crystalline morphology of Si-QDs. An absence of any of the abovementioned spectral features, but only the first transverse optical mode of Si-QDs from thick Si-QD films validated that the spectral features observed from Si-QDs on silver oxide thin films are originated from the SERS effect. These results indicate that real-time SERS is a powerful diagnostic tool and a novel approach to probe the dynamic surface/interface chemistry of quantum dots, especially when they involve in oxidative, catalytic, and electrochemical surface/interface reactions. PMID:27389331

  6. Importance of the surface chemistry of nanoparticles on peroxidase-like activity.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Ramy; Ye, Fei; Asem, Heba; Ashour, Radwa; Zheng, Wenyi; Muhammed, Mamoun; Hassan, Moustapha

    2017-09-09

    We report the studies on origin of peroxidase-like activity for gold nanoparticles, as well as the impact from morphology and surface charge of nanoparticles. For this purpose, we have synthesized hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNS) and gold nanorods (AuNR) with different morphology and surface chemistry to investigate their influence on the catalytic activity. We found that citrate-capped HAuNS show catalyzing efficiency in oxidation reaction of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and it is superior to that of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)-capped AuNR. The kinetics of catalytic activities from HAuNS and AuNR were respectively studied under varied temperatures. The results indicated that surface chemistry rather than morphology of nanoparticles plays an important role in the catalytic reaction of substrate. Furthermore, influencing factors such as pH, amount of nanoparticle and H2O2 concentration were also investigated on HAuNS-catalyzed system. The great impact of nanoparticle surface properties on catalytic reactions makes a paradigm in constructing nanozymes as peroxidase mimic for sensing application. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Arabidopsis thaliana Root Surface Chemistry Regulates in Planta Biofilm Formation of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Rudrappa, Thimmaraju

    2007-01-01

    Among the various rhizospheric interactions, plant root-microbe interactions are very important both economically and ecologically. The interaction of plant roots with plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) have been studied in case of symbiotic organisms. However, the knowledge on interaction with other PGPRs such as biocontrol Bacillus sps. is vastly unexplored. Especially the complex root surface chemistry and its effect on modulating the bacterial growth and association with the root system has not been investigated. Recently, by adopting a systematic stepwise experimental approach we unraveled the importance of root plane chemistry on the colonization and biofilm formation by B. subtilis, an important biocontrol-PGPR. This study may further increase our understanding in the field of rhizosphere biology and area of root secretions and their possible role in plant microbe interactions. PMID:19704655

  8. Surface chemistry dependent immunostimulative potential of porous silicon nanoplatforms.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Fernández, Tahia D; Mäkilä, Ermei M; Le Guével, Xavier; Mayorga, Cristobalina; Kaasalainen, Martti H; Salonen, Jarno J; Hirvonen, Jouni T; Santos, Hélder A

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been suggested for immunotherapy applications in order to optimize the delivery of immuno-stimulative or -suppressive molecules. However, low attention towards the impact of the NPs' physicochemical properties has presented a major hurdle for developing efficient immunotherapeutic agents. Here, the effects of porous silicon (PSi) NPs with different surface chemistries were evaluated on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) and lymphocytes in order to highlight the importance of the NPs selection in immuno-stimulative or -suppressive treatment. Although all the PSi NPs showed high biocompatibility, only thermally oxidized PSi (TOPSi) and thermally hydrocarbonized PSi (THCPSi) NPs were able to induce very high rate of immunoactivation by enhancing the expression of surface co-stimulatory markers of the MDDCs (CD80, CD83, CD86, and HLA-DR), inducing T-cell proliferation, and also the secretion of interleukins (IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, IFN-γ, and TNF-α). These results indicated a balanced increase in the secretion of Th1, Th2, and Treg cytokines. Moreover, undecylenic acid functionalized THCPSi, as well as poly(methyl vinyl ether-alt-maleic acid) conjugated to (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane functionalized thermally carbonized PSi and polyethyleneimine conjugated undecylenic acid functionalized THCPSi NPs showed moderate immunoactivation due to the mild increase in the above-mentioned markers. By contrast, thermally carbonized PSi (TCPSi) and (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane functionalized TCPSi NPs did not induce any immunological responses, suggesting that their application could be in the delivery of immunosuppressive molecules. Overall, our findings suggest all the NPs containing more nitrogen or oxygen on the outermost backbone layer have lower immunostimulatory effect than NPs with higher C-H structures on the surface. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Don Quixote Pond Sediments: Surface and Subsurface Chemistry and Mineralogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englert, P. A. J.; Bishop, J. L.; Patel, S.; Gibson, E. K.; Koeberl, C.

    2014-12-01

    Don Quixote Pond, like Don Juan Pond in the South Fork of Wright Valley, Antarctica, is a model for calcium and chlorine weathering and distribution on Mars. It is located in the western part of the North Fork about 100 m above Mean Seawater Level; its brine is seasonally frozen [1]. Field observations show zones of discoloration which grow lighter with distance from the pond edges. Four sediment cores, a set of radial surface samples, special surface samples, and samples of local rocks were obtained [2]. We report on chemical and mineral analyses of traverse samples and on two cores. Core DQ20 is a northeastern shoreline core. Its soluble salt concentration exceeds 200 micromoles/g in the top 5 cm, and then falls to less than 70 micromoles/g at the permafrost depth of 15 cm. These concentrations are low when compared to similarly positioned locations at Don Juan Pond and to cores from Prospect Mesa close to Lake Vanda, Wright Valley. Halite, soda niter, tachyhydrite and/bischovite are suggested from the ionic molar relationships Measured halite concentrations of surface samples, collected along a traverse of 35 m from the pond outwards, range from over 5% to trace amounts, decreasing with distance. Gypsum is also present in almost all of these samples ranging from 0.2% to 2.6%, but does not exhibit a trend. However, in core DQ35, located at a distance of 15 m along the traverse, gypsum decreases from 2.5% to 0.6% from the surface to the permafrost depth of 12 cm. While DQ35 and radial samples show high quartz and albite abundance, samples that contained visible encrustations and evaporites are low in these minerals and rich in highly diverse alteration products. Don Juan Basin ponds may have formed by a complex surface water mobilization of weathering products [3] and local groundwater action [4,5]. In contrast, Don Quixote pond mineralogy and chemistry may be consistent with a less complex shallow and deep groundwater system origin [1]. [1] Harris H

  10. Investigation of Varied Strontium-Transuranic Precipitation Chemistries for Crossflow

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.A.

    2000-07-27

    Precipitation chemistries for strontium and transuranic (TRU) removal have been tested for crossflow filterability and lanthanide removal with simulants of Hanford tank 241-AN-107 supernate. This is the initial work indicating the usefulness of a strontium and permanganate precipitation process as applied to the Hanford River Protection Project. Precipitations with both ferric and ferrous iron were shown to be at least two orders of magnitude less filterable than a 0.1 gpm/ft target average flux that was desired at the time. A precipitate from a strontium nitrate strike alone was found to filter easily and to make the desired average flux. Other chemistries tested included precipitant of lanthanum(III), nickel (II), calcium (II), and a redox chemistry using sodium permanganate. Of these chemistries a strontium and permanganate strike including calcium provided the highest filter flux compared to the other chemistries. It showed the most promise in lanthanide removal as well. This work provides a promising direction for further work to achieve both acceptable filterability and decontamination for Envelope C wastes to be treated by the Hanford River Protection Project. The work reported here was originally intended to satisfy needs for crossflow filter testing of a strontium and ferric precipitation method for treating Envelope C using a 241-AN-107 simulant.

  11. An Investigation into the Effectiveness of Problem-Based Learning in a Physical Chemistry Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurses, Ahmet; Acikyildiz, Metin; Dogar, Cetin; Sozbilir, Mustafa

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a problem-based learning (PBL) approach in a physical chemistry laboratory course. The parameters investigated were students' attitudes towards a chemistry laboratory course, scientific process skills of students and their academic achievement. The design of the study was one group…

  12. An Investigation into the Effectiveness of Problem-Based Learning in a Physical Chemistry Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurses, Ahmet; Acikyildiz, Metin; Dogar, Cetin; Sozbilir, Mustafa

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a problem-based learning (PBL) approach in a physical chemistry laboratory course. The parameters investigated were students' attitudes towards a chemistry laboratory course, scientific process skills of students and their academic achievement. The design of the study was one group…

  13. Effects of Tailored Surface Chemistry on Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: a Surface-Analytical Study by XPS and AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penna, Andrea; Careri, Maria; Spencer, Nicholas D.; Rossi, Antonella

    2015-08-01

    Since it was proposed for the first time, desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) has been evaluated for applicability in numerous areas. Elucidations of the ionization mechanisms and the subsequent formation of isolated gas-phase ions have been proposed so far. In this context, the role of both surface and pneumatic effects on ion-formation yield has recently been investigated. Nevertheless, the effect of the surface chemistry has not yet been completely understood. Functionalized glass surfaces have been prepared, in order to tailor surface performance for ion formation. Three substrates were functionalized by depositing three different silanes [3-mercaptopropyltriethoxysilane (MTES), octyltriethoxysilane (OTES), and 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltriethoxy-silane (FOTES)] from toluene solution onto standard glass slides. Surface characterization was carried out by contact-angle measurements, tapping-mode atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Morphologically homogeneous and thickness-controlled films in the nm range were obtained, with surface free energies lying between 15 and 70 mJ/m2. These results are discussed, together with those of DESI-MS on low-molecular-weight compounds such as melamine, tetracycline, and lincomycin, also taking into account the effects of the sprayer potential and its correlation with surface wettability. The results demonstrate that ion-formation efficiency is affected by surface wettability, and this was demonstrated operating above and below the onset of the electrospray.

  14. Influence of anode surface chemistry on microbial fuel cell operation.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Carlo; Babanova, Sofia; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Cornejo, Jose A; Ista, Linnea; Bretschger, Orianna; Marsili, Enrico; Atanassov, Plamen; Schuler, Andrew J

    2015-12-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) modified gold anodes are used in single chamber microbial fuel cells for organic removal and electricity generation. Hydrophilic (N(CH3)3(+), OH, COOH) and hydrophobic (CH3) SAMs are examined for their effect on bacterial attachment, current and power output. The different substratum chemistry affects the community composition of the electrochemically active biofilm formed and thus the current and power output. Of the four SAM-modified anodes tested, N(CH3)3(+) results in the shortest start up time (15 days), highest current achieved (225 μA cm(-2)) and highest MFC power density (40 μW cm(-2)), followed by COOH (150 μA cm(-2) and 37 μW cm(-2)) and OH (83 μA cm(-2) and 27 μW cm(-2)) SAMs. Hydrophobic SAM decreases electrochemically active bacteria attachment and anode performance in comparison to hydrophilic SAMs (CH3 modified anodes 7 μA cm(-2) anodic current and 1.2 μW cm(-2) MFC's power density). A consortium of Clostridia and δ-Proteobacteria is found on all the anode surfaces, suggesting a synergistic cooperation under anodic conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Surface chemistry and physics of deuterium retention in lithiated graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C. N.; Krstic, Predrag S; Allain, J. P.; Heim, B.; Skinner, C. H.; Kugel, H.

    2011-01-01

    Lithium wall conditioning in TFTR, CDX-U, T-11M, TJ-II and NSTX is found to yield enhanced plasma performance manifest, in part, through improved deuterium particle control. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) experiments examine the affect of D irradiation on lithiated graphite and show that the surface chemistry of lithiated graphite after D ion bombardment (500 eV/amu) is fundamentally different from that of non-Li conditioned graphite. Instead of simple LiD bonding seen in pure liquid Li, graphite introduces additional complexities. XPS spectra show that Li-O-D (533.0 {+-} 0.6 eV) and Li-C-D (291.4 {+-} 0.6 eV) bonds, for a nominal Li dose of 2 {micro}m, become 'saturated' with D at fluences between 3.8 and 5.2 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}. Atomistic modeling indicate that Li-O-D-C interactions may be a result of multibody effects as opposed to molecular bonding.

  16. Surface chemistry and bonding configuration of ultrananocrystalline diamond surfaces and their effects on nanotribological properties.

    SciTech Connect

    Sumant, A. V.; Grierson, D. S.; Gerbi, J. E.; Carlisle, J. A.; Auciello, O.; Carpick, R. W.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison

    2007-12-01

    We present a comprehensive study of surface composition and nanotribology for ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) surfaces, including the influence of film nucleation on these properties. We describe a methodology to characterize the underside of the films as revealed by sacrificial etching of the underlying substrate. This enables the study of the morphology and composition resulting from the nucleation and initial growth of the films, as well as the characterization of nanotribological properties which are relevant for applications including micro-/nanoelectromechanical systems. We study the surface chemistry, bonding configuration, and nanotribological properties of both the topside and the underside of the film with synchrotron-based x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy to identify the bonding state of the carbon atoms, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to determine the surface chemical composition, Auger electron spectroscopy to further verify the composition and bonding configuration, and quantitative atomic force microscopy to study the nanoscale topography and nanotribological properties. The films were grown on SiO{sub 2} after mechanically polishing the surface with detonation synthesized nanodiamond powder, followed by ultrasonication in a methanol solution containing additional nanodiamond powder. The sp{sup 2} fraction, morphology, and chemistry of the as-etched underside are distinct from the topside, exhibiting a higher sp{sup 2} fraction, some oxidized carbon, and a smoother morphology. The nanoscale single-asperity work of adhesion between a diamond nanotip and the as-etched UNCD underside is far lower than for a silicon-silicon interface (59.2 {+-} 2 vs 826 {+-} 186 mJ/m{sup 2}, respectively). Exposure to atomic hydrogen dramatically reduces nanoscale adhesion to 10.2 {+-} 0.4 mJ/m{sup 2}, at the level of van der Waals interactions and consistent with recent ab initio calculations. Friction is substantially reduced as well

  17. Surface chemistry and bonding configuration of ultrananocrystalline diamond surfaces and their effects on nanotribological properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sumant, A. V.; Grierson, D. S.; Carpick, R. W.; Gerbi, J. E.; Carlisle, J. A.; Auciello, O.

    2007-12-15

    We present a comprehensive study of surface composition and nanotribology for ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) surfaces, including the influence of film nucleation on these properties. We describe a methodology to characterize the underside of the films as revealed by sacrificial etching of the underlying substrate. This enables the study of the morphology and composition resulting from the nucleation and initial growth of the films, as well as the characterization of nanotribological properties which are relevant for applications including micro-/nanoelectromechanical systems. We study the surface chemistry, bonding configuration, and nanotribological properties of both the topside and the underside of the film with synchrotron-based x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy to identify the bonding state of the carbon atoms, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to determine the surface chemical composition, Auger electron spectroscopy to further verify the composition and bonding configuration, and quantitative atomic force microscopy to study the nanoscale topography and nanotribological properties. The films were grown on SiO{sub 2} after mechanically polishing the surface with detonation synthesized nanodiamond powder, followed by ultrasonication in a methanol solution containing additional nanodiamond powder. The sp{sup 2} fraction, morphology, and chemistry of the as-etched underside are distinct from the topside, exhibiting a higher sp{sup 2} fraction, some oxidized carbon, and a smoother morphology. The nanoscale single-asperity work of adhesion between a diamond nanotip and the as-etched UNCD underside is far lower than for a silicon-silicon interface (59.2{+-}2 vs 826{+-}186 mJ/m{sup 2}, respectively). Exposure to atomic hydrogen dramatically reduces nanoscale adhesion to 10.2{+-}0.4 mJ/m{sup 2}, at the level of van der Waals' interactions and consistent with recent ab initio calculations. Friction is substantially reduced as well, demonstrating a

  18. Preliminary findings of the Viking gas exchange experiment and a model for Martian surface chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oyama, V. I.; Berdahl, B. J.; Carle, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    Earlier results reported from the Viking Lander-1 experiment are reexamined and interpreted in terms of a model of the Martian soil surface morphology and chemistry. Major events in the gas exchange experiment (GEX) first cycle are tabulated and data are presented on the sample processing and transport environments experienced by the soil samples. Oxygen and CO2 evolved from humidified Martian soil in GEX and slight changes in N2 present are investigated. A soil model involving iron oxide coating on silicate material is entertained to yield a mechanistic explanation of the experimental findings, and invocation of biotic processes is eschewed.

  19. Surface chemistry of Cu(100) in acidic sulfate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Charles B.; Stickney, John L.

    1990-12-01

    The surface chemistry of Cu(100), in H 2SO 4 and acidic K 2SO 4 solutions, has been studied by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). Experiments were conducted in an electrochemical cell coupled directly to a UHV surface analysis chamber. Structures formed on the Cu(100) surface emersed (removed) from sulfate solutions were the principal focus of this study. Structures and coverages were primarily dependent on sulfate concentration and the presence of coadsorbates such as Cl and K +. Emersion of Cu(100) from 1 mM H 2SO 4 resulted in a Cu(100)(2 × 2)-SO 2-4 adlattice with a {1}/{4} coverage of sulfate. A {1}/{5} coverage Cu(100)( 5 × 5) R26.6°- SO2-4 structure formed upon emersion mM H 2SO 4 containing trace Cl - contaminants, and a {1}/{3} coverage Cu(100)(2 × 100)- SO2-4 structure formed following e from 10 mM H 2SO 4. Emersion of Cu(100) from 1 mM K 2SO 4 (pH = 3.6) resulted in a Cu(100)(4 × 2 5)- SO2-4, K + surface structure, with K + and SO 2-4 coadsorbed in a 1:1 stoichiometry, each at {1}/{4} coverage. No significant potential-dependent variatio in surface structure or coverage was observed when the electrode was emersed from H 2SO 4 at potentials in the double-layer charging region. For emersion from 1 mM K 2SO 4 (pH = 3.6), a reduction in K + coverage along with a change in the surface structure to a (2 × 2) occurred at positive potentials. Comparisons were made of sulfate adsorption on the low-index planes of Cu using a Cu single crystal polished on three different faces to the (111), (110) and (100) planes. This electrode was emersed from 1 mM K 2SO 4 (pH = 3.6) at several potentials. A c(8 × 2) and a diffuse (1 × 1) LEED pattern were observed on Cu(110) and Cu(111), respectively. The K + and SO 2-4 coverages differed appreciably between the three surfaces. Significant differences were observed in the thermal desorption spectra of Cu(100) emersed from H 2SO 4 and K 2SO

  20. The influence of carbon surface chemistry on supported palladium nanoparticles in heterogeneous reactions.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuxiao; Zhang, Liyun; Wu, Kuang-Hsu; Feng, Zhenbao; Shi, Wen; Gao, Qiang; Zhang, Bingsen; Su, Dang Sheng

    2016-10-15

    The surface chemistry of nanocarbon support can tailor chemical properties of precious metal nanoparticle/nanocarbon hybrid catalyst in heterogeneous reactions. We report on modified reduced graphene oxide (rGO) support with ionic liquid-derived carbonaceous surface for palladium nanoparticle (Pd NPs) decoration and their actions in different heterogeneous reactions. The surface chemistry of support materials was characterized in detail, and the influence of which on the formation and distribution of metal particles was further investigated. Three different types of reactions including Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction, CO oxidation and phenol reduction were examined in terms of reactivity and selectivity. The roles of substituted nitrogen in graphitic lattice and grafted groups on the carbon surface were exploited. Nitrogen-doping can give rise to changes in electronic properties of supported metals, and the Lewis basicity of the doped nitrogen atoms can favor the adsorption of acidic reactants in phenol reduction. The grafted groups derived a negative impact to the Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction, due to the involvement of larger reactant molecules, despite that they could prevent significant sintering of Pd NPs in the CO oxidation.

  1. ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy in the Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory: Part II--A Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment on Surface Adsorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuttlefield, Jennifer D.; Larsen, Sarah C.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2008-01-01

    Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy is a useful technique for measuring the infrared spectra of solids and liquids as well as probing adsorption on particle surfaces. The use of FTIR-ATR spectroscopy in organic and inorganic chemistry laboratory courses as well as in undergraduate research was presented…

  2. ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy in the Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory: Part II--A Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment on Surface Adsorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuttlefield, Jennifer D.; Larsen, Sarah C.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2008-01-01

    Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy is a useful technique for measuring the infrared spectra of solids and liquids as well as probing adsorption on particle surfaces. The use of FTIR-ATR spectroscopy in organic and inorganic chemistry laboratory courses as well as in undergraduate research was presented…

  3. Biophysical evaluation of cells on nanotubular surfaces: the effects of atomic ordering and chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Shokuhfar, Tolou; Hamlekhan, Azhang; Chang, Jen-Yung; Choi, Chang Kyoung; Sukotjo, Cortino; Friedrich, Craig

    2014-01-01

    After the implantation of a biomaterial in the body, the first interaction occurs between the cells in contact with the biomaterial surface. Therefore, evaluating the cell–substrate interface is crucial for designing a successful implant. In this study, the interaction of MC3T3 osteoblasts was studied on commercially pure and alloy (Ti6Al4V) Ti surfaces treated with amorphous and crystalline titanium dioxide nanotubes. The results indicated that the presence of nanotubes increased the density of osteoblast cells in comparison to bare surfaces (no nanotubes). More importantly, our finding shows that the chemistry of the substrate affects the cell density rather than the morphology of the cells. A novel approach based on the focused ion beam technique was used to investigate the biophysical cell–substrate interaction. The analysis revealed that portions of the cells migrated inside the crystalline nanotubes. This observation was correlated with the super hydrophilic properties of the crystalline nanotubes. PMID:25143725

  4. Investigating and Theorizing Discourse during Analogy Writing in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellocchi, Alberto; Ritchie, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Explanations of the role of analogies in learning science at a cognitive level are made in terms of creating bridges between new information and students' prior knowledge. In this empirical study of learning with analogies in an 11th grade chemistry class, we explore an alternative explanation at the "social" level where analogy shapes…

  5. Investigating and Theorizing Discourse during Analogy Writing in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellocchi, Alberto; Ritchie, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Explanations of the role of analogies in learning science at a cognitive level are made in terms of creating bridges between new information and students' prior knowledge. In this empirical study of learning with analogies in an 11th grade chemistry class, we explore an alternative explanation at the "social" level where analogy shapes…

  6. Spatial And Temporal Variation In The Dissolved Trace Element Chemistry Of Chesapeake Bay Surface Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorval, E.; Hannigan, R.; Jones, C.

    2001-12-01

    Surface waters were collected from sea grass beds around the Chesapeake Bay of Virginia as well as from the mouths of the York, James, Potomac and Rappahannock rivers and Tangier and Smith islands. These sea grass beds represent the nursery habitats for a variety of sport fish including Spotted Sea Trout and Weakfish. Trace element ratios of fish otoliths record the unique chemistries of bodies of water in which the fish live. The data presented here represent the initial results of a "ground-truthing" investigation of the relationships between the water and otolith chemistry. Waters were collected bi-monthly (July through September) from 30 sites around the western and eastern shore of Chesapeake Bay including major tributaries and Tangier and Smith islands. Water was collected using trace metal clean procedures including filtration through a 0.45 uM filter and acidification in the field to pH < 2 with ultra-pure nitric acid. Dissolved trace element composition was measured by sector field ICP-MS. The trace element chemistry of samples show both spatial and temporal variation. Using discriminant analysis it is not possible to statistically classify samples to the respective zones (western shore, eastern shore or islands) but it is possible to separate samples from the Tangier and Smith island sites from the eastern and western shore sites. Elements that allow this classification include Ce and Th, which are found in higher concentration in the samples from the island sites than in the eastern and western shore samples. These relationships follow the trends observed in pH and dissolved oxygen likely related to a restricted flow regime between the islands and the eastern shore. Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios are unique for the sea grass beds along the western shore and allow the distinction of beds located between the York and Rappahannock rivers from those between the Rappahannock and Potomac rivers. Sr and Ba concentrations are variable between sites along the eastern

  7. Properties Data for Adhesion and Surface Chemistry of Aluminum: Sapphire-Aluminum, Single-Crystal Couple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Pohlchuck, Bobby; Whitle, Neville C.; Hector, Louis G., Jr.; Adams, Jim

    1998-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the adhesion and surface chemistry of single-crystal aluminum in contact with single-crystal sapphire (alumina). Pull-off force (adhesion) measurements were conducted under loads of 0. I to I mN in a vacuum of 10(exp -1) to 10(exp -9) Pa (approx. 10(exp -10) to 10(exp -11) torr) at room temperature. An Auger electron spectroscopy analyzer incorporated directly into an adhesion-measuring vacuum system was primarily used to define the chemical nature of the surfaces before and after adhesion measurements. The surfaces were cleaned by argon ion sputtering. With a clean aluminum-clean -sapphire couple the mean value and standard deviation of pull-off forces required to separate the surfaces were 3015 and 298 micro-N, respectively. With a contaminated aluminum-clean sapphire couple these values were 231 and 241 micro-N. The presence of a contaminant film on the aluminum surface reduced adhesion by a factor of 13. Therefore, surfaces cleanliness, particularly aluminum cleanliness, played an important role in the adhesion of the aluminum-sapphire couples. Pressures on the order of 10(exp -8) to 10(exp -9) Pa (approx. 10(exp -10) to 10(exp -11) torr) maintained a clean aluminum surface for only a short time (less then 1 hr) but maintained a clean sapphire surface, once it was achieved, for a much longer time.

  8. Investigating Titan's Atmospheric Chemistry at Low Temperature with the Titan Haze Simulation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, E. M.; Salama, F.

    2012-12-01

    Titan, Saturn's largest satellite, possesses a dense atmosphere (1.5 bar at the surface) composed mainly of N2 and CH4. The solar radiation and electron bombardment from Saturn's magnetosphere induces a complex organic chemistry between these two constituents leading to the production of more complex molecules and subsequently to solid aerosols. These aerosols in suspension in the atmosphere form the haze layers giving Titan its characteristic orange color. Since 2004, the instruments onboard the Cassini orbiter have produced large amounts of observational data, unraveling a chemistry much more complex than what was first expected, particularly in Titan's upper atmosphere. Neutral, positively and negatively charged heavy molecules have been detected in the ionosphere of Titan, including benzene (C6H6) and toluene (C6H5CH3). The presence of these critical precursors of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds suggests that PAHs might play a role in the production of Titan's aerosols. The aim of the Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment, developed at the NASA Ames COSmIC facility, is to study the chemical pathways that link the simple molecules resulting from the first steps of the N2-CH4 chemistry to benzene, and to PAHs and nitrogen-containing PAHs (PANHs) as precursors to the production of solid aerosols. In the THS experiment, Titan's atmospheric chemistry is simulated by plasma in the stream of a supersonic expansion. With this unique design, the gas mixture is cooled to Titan-like temperature (~150K) before inducing the chemistry by plasma discharge. Due to the short residence time of the gas in the plasma discharge, the THS experiment can be used to probe the first and intermediate steps of Titan's chemistry by injecting different gas mixtures in the plasma. The products of the chemistry are detected and studied using two complementary techniques: Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy and Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry. Thin tholin deposits are also produced

  9. Roles of surface chemistry on safety and electrochemistry in lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu Tae; Jeong, Sookyung; Cho, Jaephil

    2013-05-21

    Motivated by new applications including electric vehicles and the smart grid, interest in advanced lithium ion batteries has increased significantly over the past decade. Therefore, research in this field has intensified to produce safer devices with better electrochemical performance. Most research has focused on the development of new electrode materials through the optimization of bulk properties such as crystal structure, ionic diffusivity, and electric conductivity. More recently, researchers have also considered the surface properties of electrodes as critical factors for optimizing performance. In particular, the electrolyte decomposition at the electrode surface relates to both a lithium ion battery's electrochemical performance and safety. In this Account, we give an overview of the major developments in the area of surface chemistry for lithium ion batteries. These ideas will provide the basis for the design of advanced electrode materials. Initially, we present a brief background to lithium ion batteries such as major chemical components and reactions that occur in lithium ion batteries. Then, we highlight the role of surface chemistry in the safety of lithium ion batteries. We examine the thermal stability of cathode materials: For example, we discuss the oxygen generation from cathode materials and describe how cells can swell and heat up in response to specific conditions. We also demonstrate how coating the surfaces of electrodes can improve safety. The surface chemistry can also affect the electrochemistry of lithium ion batteries. The surface coating strategy improved the energy density and cycle performance for layered LiCoO2, xLi2MnO3·(1 - x)LiMO2 (M = Mn, Ni, Co, and their combinations), and LiMn2O4 spinel materials, and we describe a working mechanism for these enhancements. Although coating the surfaces of cathodes with inorganic materials such as metal oxides and phosphates improves the electrochemical performance and safety properties of

  10. Tuning of nanoparticle biological functionality through controlled surface chemistry and characterisation at the bioconjugated nanoparticle surface

    PubMed Central

    Hristov, Delyan R.; Rocks, Louise; Kelly, Philip M.; Thomas, Steffi S.; Pitek, Andrzej S.; Verderio, Paolo; Mahon, Eugene; Dawson, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    We have used a silica – PEG based bionanoconjugate synthetic scheme to study the subtle connection between cell receptor specific recognition and architecture of surface functionalization chemistry. Extensive physicochemical characterization of the grafted architecture is capable of capturing significant levels of detail of both the linker and grafted organization, allowing for improved reproducibility and ultimately insight into biological functionality. Our data suggest that scaffold details, propagating PEG layer architecture effects, determine not only the rate of uptake of conjugated nanoparticles into cells but also, more significantly, the specificity of pathways via which uptake occurs. PMID:26621190

  11. Investigation of student use of Web-based tutorial materials and understanding of chemistry concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, William Joseph

    The purpose of this study was to investigate students' use of Web-based tutorial materials in general chemistry and these students' understanding of chemistry concepts. The Visualization and Problem Solving Web Site includes tutorial materials for several visual chemistry topics such as VSEPR and coordination chemistry. Students generally valued the web site because of the representations and visualizations it provided, the materials and information available on the web site, and because they felt that they needed help with chemistry. Many students who did not use the web site felt that they did not need help with chemistry and thus did not need this additional source of help. Both web site users and nonusers were generally positive about using the web to learn chemistry. Motivation was also a factor in student decisions to use or not use the materials on the web. To gauge students' understanding of chemistry concepts, students were asked questions about coordination chemistry and drew concept maps during the interviews. Web site users made more incorrect statements during the discussion of coordination chemistry questions, but the student concept maps did not show a great difference in terms of percentages of correct and incorrect links.

  12. Molecular metal catalysts on supports: organometallic chemistry meets surface science.

    PubMed

    Serna, Pedro; Gates, Bruce C

    2014-08-19

    -support bonding and structure, which identify the supports as ligands with electron-donor properties that influence reactivity and catalysis. Each of the catalyst design variables has been varied independently, illustrated by mononuclear and tetranuclear iridium on zeolite HY and on MgO and by isostructural rhodium and iridium (diethylene or dicarbonyl) complexes on these supports. The data provide examples resolving the roles of the catalyst design variables and place the catalysis science on a firm foundation of organometallic chemistry linked with surface science. Supported molecular catalysts offer the advantages of characterization in the absence of solvents and with surface-science methods that do not require ultrahigh vacuum. Families of supported metal complexes have been made by replacement of ligands with others from the gas phase. Spectroscopically identified catalytic reaction intermediates help to elucidate catalyst performance and guide design. The methods are illustrated for supported complexes and clusters of rhodium, iridium, osmium, and gold used to catalyze reactions of small molecules that facilitate identification of the ligands present during catalysis: alkene dimerization and hydrogenation, H-D exchange in the reaction of H2 with D2, and CO oxidation. The approach is illustrated with the discovery of a highly active and selective MgO-supported rhodium carbonyl dimer catalyst for hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene to give butenes.

  13. Research program to investigate the fundamental chemistry of technetium

    SciTech Connect

    Shuh, David K.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Burns, Carol J.

    2003-12-19

    The objective of this research is to increase the knowledge of the fundamental technetium chemistry that is necessary to address challenges to the safe, long-term remediation of high-level waste posed by this element. These challenges may be divided into two categories: unexpected behavior of technetium in high-level waste tanks at the Hanford and Savannah River Sites and the behavior of technetium in waste forms.

  14. Using Think-Aloud Protocols to Investigate Secondary School Chemistry Teachers' Misconceptions about Chemical Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Derek

    2009-01-01

    Secondary school chemistry teachers' understanding of chemical equilibrium was investigated through interviews using the think-aloud technique. The interviews were conducted with twelve volunteer chemistry teachers in Hong Kong. Their teaching experience ranged from 3 to 18 years. They were asked to predict what would happen to the equilibrium…

  15. Degradation of Environmental Contaminants with Water-Soluble Cobalt Catalysts: An Integrative Inorganic Chemistry Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Alexandra L.; Messersmith, Reid E.; Green, David B.; Fritsch, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    We present an integrative laboratory investigation incorporating skills from inorganic chemistry, analytical instrumentation, and physical chemistry applied to a laboratory-scale model of the environmental problem of chlorinated ethylenes in groundwater. Perchloroethylene (C[subscript 2]Cl[subscript 4], PCE) a common dry cleaning solvent,…

  16. Degradation of Environmental Contaminants with Water-Soluble Cobalt Catalysts: An Integrative Inorganic Chemistry Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Alexandra L.; Messersmith, Reid E.; Green, David B.; Fritsch, Joseph M.

    2011-01-01

    We present an integrative laboratory investigation incorporating skills from inorganic chemistry, analytical instrumentation, and physical chemistry applied to a laboratory-scale model of the environmental problem of chlorinated ethylenes in groundwater. Perchloroethylene (C[subscript 2]Cl[subscript 4], PCE) a common dry cleaning solvent,…

  17. Using Think-Aloud Protocols to Investigate Secondary School Chemistry Teachers' Misconceptions about Chemical Equilibrium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Derek

    2009-01-01

    Secondary school chemistry teachers' understanding of chemical equilibrium was investigated through interviews using the think-aloud technique. The interviews were conducted with twelve volunteer chemistry teachers in Hong Kong. Their teaching experience ranged from 3 to 18 years. They were asked to predict what would happen to the equilibrium…

  18. An Investigation of College Chemistry Students' Understanding of Structure-Property Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Melanie M.; Corley, Leah M.; Underwood, Sonia M.

    2013-01-01

    The connection between the molecular-level structure of a substance and its macroscopic properties is a fundamental concept in chemistry. Students in college-level general and organic chemistry courses were interviewed to investigate how they used structure-property relationships to predict properties such as melting and boiling points. Although…

  19. Investigating Pre-Service Chemistry Teachers' Problem Solving Strategies: Towards Developing a Framework in Teaching Stoichiometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espinosa, Allen A.; Nueva España, Rebecca C.; Marasigan, Arlyne C.

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated pre-service chemistry teachers' problem solving strategies and alternative conceptions in solving stoichiometric problems and later on formulate a teaching framework based from the result of the study. The pre-service chemistry teachers were given four stoichiometric problems with increasing complexity and they need…

  20. An Investigation of College Chemistry Students' Understanding of Structure-Property Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Melanie M.; Corley, Leah M.; Underwood, Sonia M.

    2013-01-01

    The connection between the molecular-level structure of a substance and its macroscopic properties is a fundamental concept in chemistry. Students in college-level general and organic chemistry courses were interviewed to investigate how they used structure-property relationships to predict properties such as melting and boiling points. Although…

  1. Monsoon Season Surface Water Chemistry Response Following Wildfire: 2003 Aspen Fire in Sabino Canyon, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einloth, S. L.; Chief, K. D.; Ekwurzel, B.; Nijssen, B.; Ferré, P. A.

    2003-12-01

    The Aspen Fire in the Coronado National Forest north of Tucson burned in excess of 80,000 acres and destroyed more than 300 structures. Exposed, burned soils are highly vulnerable to intense monsoon rains, leading to increases in surface runoff, peak flows, and erosion rates. As part of an integrated investigation of the hydrologic impacts of this fire, we rapidly mobilized a field sampling campaign during the 2003 monsoon season that began immediately following the resolution of the fire. Stream water chemistry serves as an integrated signal of many watershed processes: precipitation, runoff, infiltration, soil hydrophobic layers, ash deposition in the stream, debris flows, and subsequent water/ash chemical equilibrium reactions. The portion of the watershed that has been burned by the Aspen fire covers a wide range of elevation and vegetation zones of the Santa Catalina Mountains. Many biogeochemical and hydrological processes within this area were altered by a sudden lack of vegetation and changes in soil properties following a fire: evapotranspiration, litter volume, organic decomposition, leaching, cation exchange, anion sorption, nutrient uptake, and soil hydrophobic layers. Surface water and precipitation samples were collected following an event-based sampling strategy, while soil samples were collected in each vegetation and burn severity regime. Precipitation samples were collected to characterize temperature and elevation effects on precipitation chemistry, in particular stable isotopes. The surface water chemistry changes measured throughout each hydrograph event can be linked to air permeameter results, a rapid measurement for soil hydraulic conductivity, for the different burn severity and vegetation zone regimes. Both nutrient and suspended sediment loads greatly increased following the fire. A debris flow mobilized large diameter boulders. Stream gauge flow event peaks were larger than expected given concurrent extensive precipitation gauge network

  2. Pyridine coordination chemistry for molecular assemblies on surfaces.

    PubMed

    de Ruiter, Graham; Lahav, Michal; van der Boom, Milko E

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Since the first description of coordination complexes, many types of metal-ligand interactions have creatively been used in the chemical sciences. The rich coordination chemistry of pyridine-type ligands has contributed significantly to the incorporation of diverse metal ions into functional materials. Here we discuss molecular assemblies (MAs) formed with a variety of pyridine-type compounds and a metal containing cross-linker (e.g., PdCl2(PhCN2)). These MAs are formed using Layer-by-Layer (LbL) deposition from solution that allows for precise fitting of the assembly properties through molecular programming. The position of each component can be controlled by altering the assembly sequence, while the degree of intermolecular interactions can be varied by the level of π-conjugation and the availability of metal coordination sites. By setting the structural parameters (e.g., bond angles, number of coordination sites, geometry) of the ligand, control over MA structure was achieved, resulting in surface-confined metal-organic networks and oligomers. Unlike MAs that are constructed with organic ligands, MAs with polypyridyl complexes of ruthenium, osmium, and cobalt are active participants in their own formation and amplify the growth of the incoming molecular layer. Such a self-propagating behavior for molecular systems is rare, and the mechanism of their formation will be discussed. These exponentially growing MAs are capable of storing metal salts that can be used during the buildup of additional molecular layers. Various parameters influencing the film growth mechanism will be presented, including (i) the number of binding sites and geometry of the organic ligands, (ii) the metal and the structure of the polypyridyl complexes, (iii) the influence of the metal cross-linker (e.g., second or third row transition metals), and (iv) the deposition conditions. By systematic variation of these parameters, switching between linear and exponential growth could

  3. Aluminum in acidic surface waters: chemistry, transport, and effects.

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, C T

    1985-01-01

    Ecologically significant concentrations of Al have been reported in surface waters draining "acid-sensitive" watersheds that are receiving elevated inputs of acidic deposition. It has been hypothesized that mineral acids from atmospheric deposition have remobilized Al previously precipitated within the soil during soil development. This Al is then thought to be transported to adjacent surface waters. Dissolved mononuclear Al occurs as aquo Al, as well as OH-, F-, SO4(2-), and organic complexes. Although past investigations have often ignored non-hydroxide complexes of Al, it appears that organic and F complexes are the predominant forms of Al in dilute (low ionic strength) acidic surface waters. The concentration of inorganic forms of Al increases exponentially with decreases in solution pH. This response is similar to the theoretical pH dependent solubility of Al mineral phases. The concentration of organic forms of Al, however, is strongly correlated with variations in organic carbon concentration of surface waters rather than pH. Elevated concentrations of Al in dilute acidic waters are of interest because: Al is an important pH buffer; Al may influence the cycling of important elements like P, organic carbon, and trace metals; and Al is potentially toxic to aquatic organisms. An understanding of the aqueous speciation of Al is essential for an evaluation of these processes. PMID:3935428

  4. Surface chemistry and photoluminescence property of functionalized silicon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anoop; Wiggers, Hartmut

    2009-05-01

    We report an efficient method of producing macroscopic quantity of functionalized silicon nanoparticles (Si NPs) with bright photoluminescence (PL). Single crystalline Si NPs were synthesized in a microwave plasma reactor via pyrolysis of silane (SiH 4). Organic molecules were grafted onto the Si surface by reacting freshly etched NPs with 1-hexadecene at high temperature. Both freshly prepared and coated Si NPs were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to evaluate the effectiveness of the surface modification. An increase in the PL intensity and a blue shift in the emission spectrum of functionalized Si NPs were observed compared to as-prepared NPs. The change in particle shape and morphology before and after the surface grafting was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The electron diffraction patterns confirmed that Si NPs maintain their crystallinity after the functionalization process. In addition, functionalized Si NPs showed a red shift in the PL emission spectrum after air oxidation, which originated from the oxidation of remaining Si-H bonds on the surface.

  5. The Consequences of Surface Confinement on Free Radical Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Birtt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C., III

    1999-08-22

    Mass transport limitations impact the thermochemical processing of fossil and renewable energy resources, which involves the breakdown of cross-linked, macromolecular networks. To Investigate the molecular level details of the consequences of molecular confinement on high temperature (275-500°C) free-radical reaction pathways, we have been examining the pyrolysis of model compounds attached to the surface of non-porous silica nanoparticles through a thermally robust Si-O-Caryl, tetha. Pyrolysis of silica-immobilized diphenylalkanes and related ethers have been studied in detail and compared with the corresponding behavior in fluid phases. The diffusional constraints can lead to reduced rates of radical termination on the surface, and enhancement of neophyl-like rearrangements, cyclization-dehydrogenation pathways, and ipso- aromatic substitutions. Furthermore, studies of two-component surfaces have revealed the importance of a radical relay mechanism involving rapid serial hydrogen transfer steps resulting from the molecular pre-organization on the low fractal dimension silica surface. Key findings are reviewed in this paper, and the implications of these results for fuel processing are described.

  6. Controlled surface chemistry of diamond/β-SiC composite films for preferential protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Handschuh-Wang, Stephan; Yang, Yang; Zhuang, Hao; Schlemper, Christoph; Wesner, Daniel; Schönherr, Holger; Zhang, Wenjun; Jiang, Xin

    2014-02-04

    Diamond and SiC both process extraordinary biocompatible, electronic, and chemical properties. A combination of diamond and SiC may lead to highly stable materials, e.g., for implants or biosensors with excellent sensing properties. Here we report on the controllable surface chemistry of diamond/β-SiC composite films and its effect on protein adsorption. For systematic and high-throughput investigations, novel diamond/β-SiC composite films with gradient composition have been synthesized using the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) technique. As revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the diamond/β-SiC ratio of the composite films shows a continuous change from pure diamond to β-SiC over a length of ∼ 10 mm on the surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was employed to unveil the surface termination of chemically oxidized and hydrogen treated surfaces. The surface chemistry of the composite films was found to depend on diamond/β-SiC ratio and the surface treatment. As observed by confocal fluorescence microscopy, albumin and fibrinogen were preferentially adsorbed from buffer: after surface oxidation, the proteins preferred to adsorb on diamond rather than on β-SiC, resulting in an increasing amount of proteins adsorbed to the gradient surfaces with increasing diamond/β-SiC ratio. By contrast, for hydrogen-treated surfaces, the proteins preferentially adsorbed on β-SiC, leading to a decreasing amount of albumin adsorbed on the gradient surfaces with increasing diamond/β-SiC ratio. The mechanism of preferential protein adsorption is discussed by considering the hydrogen bonding of the water self-association network to OH-terminated surfaces and the change of the polar surface energy component, which was determined according to the van Oss method. These results suggest that the diamond/β-SiC gradient film can be a promising material for biomedical applications which

  7. Electronic Structure, Surface Properties, and Interface Chemistry of High Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, H. M.; Weaver, J. H.

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * EXPERIMENTAL * ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF THE HTSCs AND RELATED COMPOUNDS * SURFACE AND INTERFACE CHEMISTRY OF HTSCs AND RELATED COMPOUNDS * SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS * ACKNOWLEDGMENTS * REFERENCES

  8. Bactericidal effects of plasma-modified surface chemistry of silicon nanograss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrikov, Kola; Macgregor-Ramiasa, Melanie; Cavallaro, Alex; (Ken Ostrikov, Kostya; Vasilev, Krasimir

    2016-08-01

    The surface chemistry and topography of biomaterials regulate the adhesion and growth of microorganisms in ways that are still poorly understood. Silicon nanograss structures prepared via inductively coupled plasma etching were coated with plasma deposited nanometer-thin polymeric films to produce substrates with controlled topography and defined surface chemistry. The influence of surface properties on Staphylococcus aureus proliferation is demonstrated and explained in terms of nanograss substrate wetting behaviour. With the combination of the nanograss topography; hydrophilic plasma polymer coatings enhanced antimicrobial activity while hydrophobic coatings reduced it. This study advances the understanding of the effects of surface wettability on the bactericidal properties of reactive nano-engineered surfaces.

  9. Defects in surface chemistry--reductive coupling of benzaldehyde on rutile TiO₂(110).

    PubMed

    Clawin, Peter M; Friend, Cynthia M; Al-Shamery, Katharina

    2014-06-16

    The surface chemistry of oxygen and oxygenates on Rutile TiO2(110) is of great interest for various applications such as heterogeneous catalysis and photo catalysis. Though it is generally accepted that surface defects are active sites, the role of subsurface defects is under debate. We have therefore investigated the influence of the bulk defect density on the reductive coupling of benzaldehyde to stilbene as a model system. Using IRRAS we identify stilbene diolate as a reduction intermediate. The concentration of this intermediate is proportional to the bulk defect density, whereas adsorption of benzaldehyde at lower temperatures is not affected, which indicates a dominant role of Ti interstitials at temperatures above 400 K.

  10. Investigating the impact of adding an environmental focus to a developmental chemistry class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robelia, Beth A.

    Making chemistry more relevant to students has been a goal of many curriculum projects. None of these projects have investigated how specific applications of chemistry impact student learning or environmental mindset. The goal of this study was to examine how focusing attention on environmental issues as applications of chemistry concepts would affect students' understanding of general chemistry or environmental chemistry as well environmental attitudes, behaviors and knowledge. Special attention was paid to how women responded to the addition of an environmental focus because prior research indicated women hold more pro-environmental attitudes but are less knowledgeable about environmental topics. The quasi-experimental design used two treatment groups and a comparison group. Both treatment groups received instruction with a Science-Technology-Society orientation, one group focused on environmental applications of chemistry while the other drew applications of chemistry from a number of different fields students might be familiar with such as health care, food science and forensics. The comparison groups used mainly traditional examples from chemistry laboratories. In order to avoid testing the effect of the instructor, two people co-taught both treatment sections. Students in all three groups took a general chemistry assessment at the beginning and end of the course. The treatment groups took a pre and post environmental chemistry assessment and a survey of their environmental attitudes, behaviors and knowledge. Results indicate that students in the environmentally focused section may have made slight gains in general chemistry knowledge. Gains in environmental chemistry knowledge were not significantly different. Students also made modest gains in environmental attitude. Results for women mirrored results for the classes as a whole.

  11. Surface Chemistry of Semiconducting Quantum Dots: Theoretical Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kilina, Svetlana V; Tamukong, Patrick K; Kilin, Dmitri S

    2016-10-18

    intact, while thiol derivatives add ligand-localized trap states to the band gap. Depending on its position, any loss of ligand from the QD's surface also introduces electron or hole traps, decreasing the QD's luminescence. TDDFT investigations of QD-ligand and QD-QD interactions provide an explanation of experimentally detected enhancement of blinking on-times in closely packed Si QDs and establish favorable conditions for hole transfer from the photoexcited CdSe QD to metal-organic dyes. While TDDFT well describes qualitative trends in optical response to stoichiometry and ligand modifications of QDs, it is unable to calculate highly correlated electronic states like biexcitons and magnetic-dopant-derived states. In these cases, multiconfiguration methods are applied to small nanoclusters and the results are extrapolated to larger-sized QDs, providing reasonable explanations of experimental observables. For light-driven dynamics, the electron-phonon couplings are important, and nonadiabatic dynamics (NAD) is applied. NAD based on first-principles calculations is a current grand challenge for the theory. However, it can be accomplished through sets of semiclassical approximations such as surface hopping (SH). We discuss validations of approximations used in photodynamics of ligated and doped QDs. Time-domain DFT-based SH-NAD reveals the ligand's role in ultrafast energy relaxation and the connection between the phonon bottleneck and the Zeno effect in CdSe QDs. The calculated results are helpful in controlling both dissipation and radiative processes in QDs via surface engineering and in explanations of experimental data.

  12. Surface passivation of aluminum alloy 6061 with gaseous trichlorosilane: A surface investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngongang, Rickielle; Marceau, Eric; Carrier, Xavier; Pradier, Claire-Marie; Methivier, Christophe; Blanc, Jean-Luc; Carre, Martine

    2014-02-01

    A molecular-scale investigation of the interaction at room temperature between gaseous trichlorosilane (HSiCl3), used as a passivating agent, and surfaces of aluminum alloy AA6061 in a polished or hydroxylated state is conducted. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) provide information on the topography and morphology of AA6061 before and after hydroxylation and surface passivation, while surface chemistry has been investigated by Polarization Modulation Infrared Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Oxidation and hydroxylation of the polished alloy surface in boiling water strongly modifies the roughness of the surface, with formation of platelets and needles of oxyhydroxide AlOOH. PM-IRRAS and XPS reveal that, upon adsorption, HSiCl3 dissociates and mainly forms HSiOHn(OAl)3-n, HSi(OSi)n(OAl)3-n and condensed HSiOx species, by reaction with sbnd OH groups from the AlOOH surface phase. The amount of deposited Si-containing species is larger on the rough surface of the hydroxylated alloy and this deposit is accompanied by a decrease of the amount of free sbnd OH groups evidenced by PM-IRRAS. These results can find applications in the field of functionalization of aluminum alloys. It is suggested that a homogeneous oxidation of the alloy surface prior to exposure to gaseous HSiCl3 may enhance the adsorption of the passivating agent.

  13. Surface Chemistry of Nanocellulose Fibers Directs Monocyte/Macrophage Response.

    PubMed

    Hua, Kai; Ålander, Eva; Lindström, Tom; Mihranyan, Albert; Strømme, Maria; Ferraz, Natalia

    2015-09-14

    The effect of surface functionalization of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) on monocyte/macrophage (MM) behavior is investigated to understand how the physicochemical properties of nanocelluloses influence the interactions of such materials with biological systems. Films of anionic (a-), cationic (c-), and unmodified (u-) NFC were synthesized and characterized in terms of surface charge. THP-1 monocytes were cultured on the surface of the films for 24 h in the presence and absence of lipopolysaccharide, and the cell response was evaluated in terms of cell adhesion, morphology, and secretion of TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-1ra. The results show that MMs cultured on carboxymethylated-NFC films (a-NFC) are activated toward a proinflammatory phenotype, whereas u-NFC promotes a mild activation of the studied cells. The presence of hydroxypropyltrimethylammonium groups on c-NFC, however, does not promote the activation of MMs, indicating that c-NFC closely behaves as an inert material in terms of MM activation. None of the materials is able to directly activate the MMs toward an anti-inflammatory response. These results may provide a foundation for the design of future NFC-based materials with the ability to control MM activation and may expand the use of NFC in biomedical applications.

  14. Fundamental surface processes in heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry: Applications to sea-salt (NaCl) and oxide particulate chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Heather Cecile

    1997-10-01

    Although heterogeneous phenomena are important in many atmospheric processes, these complex systems have been difficult to study at the fundamental level. Surface- sensitive techniques are currently being utilized to probe the chemistry of heterogeneous atmospheric systems. In addition to presenting fundamental surface chemistry of several systems, this dissertation shows that surface- sensitive and electron microscopy technology can provide substantial insight into heterogeneous atmospheric processes. Transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy (TEM-EDS) were used to better understand fundamental mechanisms of the reaction of sodium chloride with nitric acid vapor (and reaction with nitrogen dioxide) followed by water vapor. Results show for the first time that exposures to water vapor can lead to major reconstruction and concurrent recrystallization of the surface after reaction of NaCl(s) with HNO3(g). This has significant implications for tropospheric chemistry in polluted urban regions. The entire volume of airborne sea-salt (i.e. NaCl) particles is available for reaction due to the water-induced reorganization of the surface. Additional studies presented here include: (1) Laser induced desorption-Fourier transform mass spectrometry (LID-FTMS) studies of the reactivity of thin films of aluminum oxide (γ- Al2O3/NiAl(100)) after exposure to molecules relevant to tropospheric and stratospheric particulate chemistry, (2) TEM-EDS studies of stratospheric particles, and (3) Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) of CO/NiAl(100). TDS and LID-FTMS studies reveal that non-hydroxylated γ- Al2O3/NiAl(100) is inert toward the adsorption of CF2Cl2 and HCF2Cl. LID-FTMS results show that 1,3-butadiene desorbs intact from non- hydroxylated γ- Al2O3/NiAl(100) at ~200 K. The TEM-EDS studies of stratospheric particles reveal that submicron alumina spheres are amorphous. Previous studies of submicron alumina spheres showed that γ-alumina was the

  15. Investigating the Intercalation Chemistry of Alkali Ions in Fluoride Perovskites

    DOE PAGES

    Yi, Tanghong; Chen, Wei; Cheng, Lei; ...

    2017-01-20

    Reversible intercalation reactions provide the basis for modern battery electrodes. In spite of the decades of exploration of electrode materials, the potential for materials in the nonoxide chemical space with regards to intercalation chemistry is vast and rather untested. Transition metal fluorides stand out as an obvious target. To this end, we report herein a new family of iron fluoride-based perovskite cathode materials AxK1–xFeF3 (A = Li, Na). By starting with KFeF3, approximately 75% of K+ ions were subsequently replaced by Li+ and Na+ through electrochemical means. X-ray diffraction and Fe X-ray absorption spectroscopy confirmed the existence of intercalation ofmore » alkali metal ions in the perovskite structure, which is associated with the Fe2+/3+ redox couple. A computational study by density functional theory showed agreement with the structural and electrochemical data obtained experimentally, which suggested the possibility of fluoride-based materials as potential intercalation electrodes. Our study increases our understanding of the intercalation chemistry of ternary fluorides, which could inform efforts toward the exploration of new electrode materials.« less

  16. Seventh BES (Basic Energy Sciences) catalysis and surface chemistry research conference

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Research programs on catalysis and surface chemistry are presented. A total of fifty-seven topics are included. Areas of research include heterogeneous catalysis; catalysis in hydrogenation, desulfurization, gasification, and redox reactions; studies of surface properties and surface active sites; catalyst supports; chemical activation, deactivation; selectivity, chemical preparation; molecular structure studies; sorption and dissociation. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  17. Influence of the carbon fiber surface microstructure on the surface chemistry generated by a thermo-chemical surface treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Vautard, Frederic; Ozcan, Soydan; Paulauskas, Felix L; Spruiell, J. E.; Meyer III, Harry M; Lance, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Carbon fibers made of textile and aerospace grade polyacrylonitrile precursor fibers were surface treated by a continuous gas phase thermo-chemical treatment. The surface chemistry generated by the surface treatment was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The surface and the average entire micro-structure of the fibers were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. Depending on the grade of the precursor, the final surface concentration of oxygen was comprised between 14% and 24%, whereas the typical commercial electro-chemical surface treatments led to concentrations of around 8% with the same fibers. The final concentration of oxygen was directly correlated to the size of the crystallites which was a function of the grade of the polyacrylonitrile precursor and to the corresponding surface micro-structure. The thermo-chemical surface treatment enabled a better control of the nature of the oxygen-containing functionalities as well. Whatever the grade of the precursor, desired hydroxyl groups and carboxylic acid functionalities were preferably generated, which was not observed with electro-chemical surface treatments.

  18. Phase transition of a symmetric diblock copolymer induced by nanorods with different surface chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yu-qi; Pan, Jun-xing; Sun, Min-na; Zhang, Jin-jun

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the phase transition of a symmetric diblock copolymer induced by nanorods with different surface chemistry. The results demonstrate that the system occurs the phase transition from a disordered structure to ordered parallel lamellae and then to the tilted layered structure as the number of rods increases. The dynamic evolution of the domain size and the order parameter of the microstructure are also examined. Furthermore, the influence of rod property, rod-phase interaction, rod-rod interaction, rod length, and polymerization degree on the behavior of the polymer system is also investigated systematically. Moreover, longer amphiphilic nanorods tend to make the polymer system form the hexagonal structure. It transforms into a perpendicular lamellar structure as the polymerization degree increases. Our simulations provide an efficient method for determining how to obtain the ordered structure on the nanometer scales and design the functional materials with optical, electronic, and magnetic properties.

  19. Rosetta/VIRTIS investigation of the chemistry and activity of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique; Drossart, Pierre; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Migliorini, Alessandra; Erard, Stéphane; Capaccioni, Fabrizio; Filacchione, Gianrico; Fougere, Nicolas; Leyrat, Cedric; Crovisier, Jacques; Capaccioni, Fabrizio

    2016-07-01

    The composition of cometary ices inside cometary nuclei provides clues to the chemistry of the protoplanetary disk where they formed, 4.6 Gyr ago. These ices sublimate when the body approches the Sun, so that the coma molecular species give insights on the nucleus surface and sub-surface composition. So far, most investigations of the coma chemical composition were performed from telescopic observations from the ground or space plateforms. Since August 2014, the ESA/Rosetta spacecraft has been investigating the nucleus and inner coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. This talk will present an overview of the results obtained by the Visual and Infrared Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (VIRTIS) instrument onboard Rosetta, focussing on observations of molecular species. VIRTIS is composed of two channels. The VIRTIS-M channel is a spectro-imager covering the 0.27-5.1 microns range, which allowed us to map the spatial distribution of H2O and CO2 (Migliorini et al. 2016, A&A in press). VIRTIS-H is a high-spectral resolution spectrometer covering the 2-5 microns range. Spectra obtained with VIRTIS-H show signatures of H2O, CO2 (both fundamental and hot bands), 13CO2, CH4 and other C-H bearing species (Bockelee-Morvan et al. A&A, 583, A6,2015). VIRTIS is a key instrument to investigate regional, diurnal and seasonal variations of the comet outgassing.

  20. Use of a two-tiered dynamic chamber to investigate indoor air chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainman, Thomas

    A two tiered dynamic chamber was assembled for the purpose of investigating indoor air chemistry. This design consists of a smaller chamber nested inside of a larger one and allows for conditions of temperature, relative humidity, and surfaces types to be carefully controlled. Three series of experiments were conducted investigating different aspects of indoor air chemistry. The first series of experiments investigated the effects of relative humidity and surface type on nitrous acid (HONO) formation from the reaction of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) with water vapor (H2O). The experimental results show that both surface type and relative humidity play a large role in the production and lifetime of HONO in indoor environments. Synthetic carpet increased the NO2 deposition velocity by nearly an order of magnitude and doubled the peak HONO/NO2 ratio. Vinyl wallpaper was found to act as a sink/source for HONO and the HONO emission rate from the wallpaper was found to be directly proportional to the HONO/NO 2 ratio. A second series of experiments investigated the production of nitric acid (HNO3) through the reaction of NO2 and ozone (O 3). HNO3 formation was determined by measuring particles formed by its reaction with ammonia (NH3) and was found to be dependent relative humidity. Indoor HNO3 is often considered to be the result of infiltration of ambient air. The results of this work show clearly that indoor sources of HNO3 exist. A third series of experiments investigated secondary particle formation through the reaction of O3 and limonene. Significant mass concentrations as a result of the limonene-O3 reaction were produced in all of the experiments. The occurrence of this and other indoor sources of fine particles make it seem unlikely that the new NAAQS for PM2.5 will be attained in indoor environments where people obtain a significant fraction of their total particle exposure. In view of the significance of indoor particle sources to overall exposure, long term studies

  1. Influence of Surface Chemistry on the Release of an Antibacterial Drug from Nanostructured Porous Silicon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mengjia; Hartman, Philip S; Loni, Armando; Canham, Leigh T; Bodiford, Nelli; Coffer, Jeffery L

    2015-06-09

    Nanostructured mesoporous silicon possesses important properties advantageous to drug loading and delivery. For controlled release of the antibacterial drug triclosan, and its associated activity versus Staphylococcus aureus, previous studies investigated the influence of porosity of the silicon matrix. In this work, we focus on the complementary issue of the influence of surface chemistry on such properties, with particular regard to drug loading and release kinetics that can be ideally adjusted by surface modification. Comparison between drug release from as-anodized, hydride-terminated hydrophobic porous silicon and the oxidized hydrophilic counterpart is complicated due to the rapid bioresorption of the former; hence, a hydrophobic interface with long-term biostability is desired, such as can be provided by a relatively long chain octyl moiety. To minimize possible thermal degradation of the surfaces or drug activity during loading of molten drug species, a solution loading method has been investigated. Such studies demonstrate that the ability of porous silicon to act as an effective carrier for sustained delivery of antibacterial agents can be sensitively altered by surface functionalization.

  2. Surface chemistry of the linear chromium chain complex on GaN(0001)

    SciTech Connect

    Lung, C.-H.; Peng, S.-M.; Chang, C.-C.

    2004-09-01

    Better understanding about the chemistry of the organometallic chain complexes reacting on the solid surface can foster concepts of nanowire fabrication which are central to the continued advance of the electronic and optoelectronic industries. In this study, the adsorption and thermal reactivity of a trinuclear chromium chain complex, tetrakis (2,2{sup '}-dipyridylamino)chromium(VI) chloride, on the GaN(0001) surface were investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, temperature-programmed desorption, and static secondary ion mass spectrometry in order to obtain some insight into the bonding changes involved in the reaction of the linear metal chain complex on the compound semiconductor surface. One of the two terminal Cr-Cl bonds of the complex may be cleaved upon adsorption at 110 K, leading to the formation of the Ga-Cl bonds on the surface, although some complexes remained intact upon adsorption and bonded strongly to the surface. No ligand was dissociated from the chromium chain complex during the adsorption. The Cl-cleaved complex residue preserved its original chemical configuration. Both the Cl-cleaved and the intact complexes in the first layer were stable on the surface in the substrate temperature range between 110 and 260 K. A partial decomposition in which some ligands were dissociated from the adsorbed complex took place before the substrate temperature reaching 400 K. Additional Cr-Cl bonds were disrupted, resulting in a larger population of Ga-Cl bonds on the surface. Further thermal reaction at higher temperatures led to the dominance of the Ga-Cl bonding for the Cl presence on the surface. Surface etching of Ga by the dissociated Cl atoms started at a substrate temperature of {approx}525 K and the etching rate reached its maximum at {approx}590 K.

  3. THE INTEGRATED USE OF COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY, SCANNING PROBE MICROSCOPY, AND VIRTUAL REALITY TO PREDICT THE CHEMICAL REACTIVITY OF ENVIRONMENTAL SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the last decade three new techniques scanning probe microscopy (SPM), virtual reality (YR) and computational chemistry ave emerged with the combined capability of a priori predicting the chemically reactivity of environmental surfaces. Computational chemistry provides the cap...

  4. THE INTEGRATED USE OF COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY, SCANNING PROBE MICROSCOPY, AND VIRTUAL REALITY TO PREDICT THE CHEMICAL REACTIVITY OF ENVIRONMENTAL SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the last decade three new techniques scanning probe microscopy (SPM), virtual reality (YR) and computational chemistry ave emerged with the combined capability of a priori predicting the chemically reactivity of environmental surfaces. Computational chemistry provides the cap...

  5. River dykes investigation using seismic surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitri, Adnand; Jousset, Philippe; Samyn, Kévin; Naylor, Adam

    2010-05-01

    Natural underground caves such as karsts are quite common in the region "Centre", France. These subsurface perturbations can be found underneath the protection dykes around "the Loire" River and the damage caused can create routes for floods. Geophysical methods such as Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) can be used for locating voids or karsts systems, but its efficiency on surface with strong topography such as dykes is not certain. Three dimensional Rayleigh wave modelling was used to understand the role of topography in the propagation of surface waves and with the aim of determining the best way for MASW investigations of surfaces with strong topography such as river dykes. Numerical modelling shows that surface waves propagation is not strongly affected by topography for an array parallel to the dyke. For homogeneous models with topography, a diminution of surface waves amplitude is observed while higher propagation modes are amplified in the dispersion curves in the case of heterogeneous models with topography. For an array perpendicular to the dyke, numerical modeling shows that Rayleigh waves' velocity is lower. MASW investigations can then be applied if lateral variations of the topography are not too strong along the seismic line. Diffraction hyperbolas created by a full of water cavity were identified in numerical modelling with topography. According to these elements, a MASW survey has been performed on the dykes of "the Loire" river close to a collapsed cavity and potential karstic systems were discovered.

  6. PES Surface Modification Using Green Chemistry: New Generation of Antifouling Membranes.

    PubMed

    Nady, Norhan

    2016-04-18

    A major limitation in using membrane-based separation processes is the loss of performance due to membrane fouling. This drawback can be addressed thanks to surface modification treatments. A new and promising surface modification using green chemistry has been recently investigated. This modification is carried out at room temperature and in aqueous medium using green catalyst (enzyme) and nontoxic modifier, which can be safely labelled "green surface modification". This modification can be considered as a nucleus of new generation of antifouling membranes and surfaces. In the current research, ferulic acid modifier and laccase bio-catalyst were used to make poly(ethersulfone) (PES) membrane less vulnerable to protein adsorption. The blank and modified PES membranes are evaluated based on e.g., their flux and protein repellence. Both the blank and the modified PES membranes (or laminated PES on silicon dioxide surface) are characterized using many techniques e.g., SEM, EDX, XPS and SPM, etc. The pure water flux of the most modified membranes was reduced by 10% on average relative to the blank membrane, and around a 94% reduction in protein adsorption was determined. In the conclusions section, a comparison between three modifiers-ferulic acid, and two other previously used modifiers (4-hydroxybenzoic acid and gallic acid)-is presented.

  7. Tuning Surface Chemistry of Polyetheretherketone by Gold Coating and Plasma Treatment.

    PubMed

    Novotná, Zdeňka; Rimpelová, Silvie; Juřík, Petr; Veselý, Martin; Kolská, Zdeňka; Hubáček, Tomáš; Borovec, Jakub; Švorčík, Václav

    2017-12-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has good chemical and biomechanical properties that are excellent for biomedical applications. However, PEEK exhibits hydrophobic and other surface characteristics which cause limited cell adhesion. We have investigated the potential of Ar plasma treatment for the formation of a nanostructured PEEK surface in order to enhance cell adhesion. The specific aim of this study was to reveal the effect of the interface of plasma-treated and gold-coated PEEK matrices on adhesion and spreading of mouse embryonic fibroblasts. The surface characteristics (polarity, surface chemistry, and structure) before and after treatment were evaluated by various experimental techniques (gravimetry, goniometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electrokinetic analysis). Further, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to examine PEEK surface morphology and roughness. The biological response of cells towards nanostructured PEEK was evaluated in terms of cell adhesion, spreading, and proliferation. Detailed cell morphology was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Compared to plasma treatment, gold coating improved PEEK wettability. The XPS method showed a decrease in the carbon concentration with increasing time of plasma treatment. Cell adhesion determined on the interface between plasma-treated and gold-coated PEEK matrices was directly proportional to the thickness of a gold layer on a sample. Our results suggest that plasma treatment in a combination with gold coating could be used in biomedical applications requiring enhanced cell adhesion.

  8. Tuning Surface Chemistry of Polyetheretherketone by Gold Coating and Plasma Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotná, Zdeňka; Rimpelová, Silvie; Juřík, Petr; Veselý, Martin; Kolská, Zdeňka; Hubáček, Tomáš; Borovec, Jakub; Švorčík, Václav

    2017-06-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has good chemical and biomechanical properties that are excellent for biomedical applications. However, PEEK exhibits hydrophobic and other surface characteristics which cause limited cell adhesion. We have investigated the potential of Ar plasma treatment for the formation of a nanostructured PEEK surface in order to enhance cell adhesion. The specific aim of this study was to reveal the effect of the interface of plasma-treated and gold-coated PEEK matrices on adhesion and spreading of mouse embryonic fibroblasts. The surface characteristics (polarity, surface chemistry, and structure) before and after treatment were evaluated by various experimental techniques (gravimetry, goniometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electrokinetic analysis). Further, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to examine PEEK surface morphology and roughness. The biological response of cells towards nanostructured PEEK was evaluated in terms of cell adhesion, spreading, and proliferation. Detailed cell morphology was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Compared to plasma treatment, gold coating improved PEEK wettability. The XPS method showed a decrease in the carbon concentration with increasing time of plasma treatment. Cell adhesion determined on the interface between plasma-treated and gold-coated PEEK matrices was directly proportional to the thickness of a gold layer on a sample. Our results suggest that plasma treatment in a combination with gold coating could be used in biomedical applications requiring enhanced cell adhesion.

  9. PES Surface Modification Using Green Chemistry: New Generation of Antifouling Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Nady, Norhan

    2016-01-01

    A major limitation in using membrane-based separation processes is the loss of performance due to membrane fouling. This drawback can be addressed thanks to surface modification treatments. A new and promising surface modification using green chemistry has been recently investigated. This modification is carried out at room temperature and in aqueous medium using green catalyst (enzyme) and nontoxic modifier, which can be safely labelled “green surface modification”. This modification can be considered as a nucleus of new generation of antifouling membranes and surfaces. In the current research, ferulic acid modifier and laccase bio-catalyst were used to make poly(ethersulfone) (PES) membrane less vulnerable to protein adsorption. The blank and modified PES membranes are evaluated based on e.g., their flux and protein repellence. Both the blank and the modified PES membranes (or laminated PES on silicon dioxide surface) are characterized using many techniques e.g., SEM, EDX, XPS and SPM, etc. The pure water flux of the most modified membranes was reduced by 10% on average relative to the blank membrane, and around a 94% reduction in protein adsorption was determined. In the conclusions section, a comparison between three modifiers—ferulic acid, and two other previously used modifiers (4-hydroxybenzoic acid and gallic acid)—is presented. PMID:27096873

  10. Role(s) of adsorbed water in the surface chemistry of environmental interfaces.

    PubMed

    Rubasinghege, Gayan; Grassian, Vicki H

    2013-04-18

    The chemistry of environmental interfaces such as oxide and carbonate surfaces under ambient conditions of temperature and relative humidity is of great interest from many perspectives including heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry, heterogeneous catalysis, photocatalysis, sensor technology, corrosion science, and cultural heritage science. As discussed here, adsorbed water plays important roles in the reaction chemistry of oxide and carbonate surfaces with indoor and outdoor pollutant molecules including nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, ozone and organic acids. Mechanisms of these reactions are just beginning to be unraveled and found to depend on the details of the reaction mechanism as well as the coverage of water on the surface. As discussed here, adsorbed water can: (i) alter reaction pathways and surface speciation relative to the dry surface; (ii) hydrolyze reactants, intermediates and products; (iii) enhance surface reactivity by providing a medium for ionic dissociation; (iv) inhibit surface reactivity by blocking sites; (v) solvate ions; (vi) enhance ion mobility on surfaces and (vii) alter the stability of surface adsorbed species. In this feature article, drawing on research that has been going on for over a decade on the reaction chemistry of oxide and carbonate surfaces under ambient conditions of temperature and relative humidity, a number of specific examples showing the multi-faceted roles of adsorbed water are presented.

  11. The Role of Surface Chemistry in Adhesion and Wetting of Gecko Toe Pads

    PubMed Central

    Badge, Ila; Stark, Alyssa Y.; Paoloni, Eva L.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2014-01-01

    An array of micron-sized setal hairs offers geckos a unique ability to walk on vertical surfaces using van der Waals interactions. Although many studies have focused on the role of surface morphology of the hairs, very little is known about the role of surface chemistry on wetting and adhesion. We expect that both surface chemistry and morphology are important, not only to achieve optimum dry adhesion but also for increased efficiency in self-cleaning of water and adhesion under wet conditions. Here, we used a plasma-based vapor deposition process to coat the hairy patterns on gecko toe pad sheds with polar and non-polar coatings without significantly perturbing the setal morphology. By a comparison of wetting across treatments, we show that the intrinsic surface of gecko setae has a water contact angle between 70–90°. As expected, under wet conditions, adhesion on a hydrophilic surface (glass) was lower than that on a hydrophobic surface (alkyl-silane monolayer on glass). Surprisingly under wet and dry conditions the adhesion was comparable on the hydrophobic surface, independent of the surface chemistry of the setal hairs. This work highlights the need to utilize morphology and surface chemistry in developing successful synthetic adhesives with desirable adhesion and self-cleaning properties. PMID:25323067

  12. The role of surface chemistry in adhesion and wetting of gecko toe pads.

    PubMed

    Badge, Ila; Stark, Alyssa Y; Paoloni, Eva L; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2014-10-17

    An array of micron-sized setal hairs offers geckos a unique ability to walk on vertical surfaces using van der Waals interactions. Although many studies have focused on the role of surface morphology of the hairs, very little is known about the role of surface chemistry on wetting and adhesion. We expect that both surface chemistry and morphology are important, not only to achieve optimum dry adhesion but also for increased efficiency in self-cleaning of water and adhesion under wet conditions. Here, we used a plasma-based vapor deposition process to coat the hairy patterns on gecko toe pad sheds with polar and non-polar coatings without significantly perturbing the setal morphology. By a comparison of wetting across treatments, we show that the intrinsic surface of gecko setae has a water contact angle between 70-90°. As expected, under wet conditions, adhesion on a hydrophilic surface (glass) was lower than that on a hydrophobic surface (alkyl-silane monolayer on glass). Surprisingly under wet and dry conditions the adhesion was comparable on the hydrophobic surface, independent of the surface chemistry of the setal hairs. This work highlights the need to utilize morphology and surface chemistry in developing successful synthetic adhesives with desirable adhesion and self-cleaning properties.

  13. The Role of Surface Chemistry in Adhesion and Wetting of Gecko Toe Pads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badge, Ila; Stark, Alyssa Y.; Paoloni, Eva L.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2014-10-01

    An array of micron-sized setal hairs offers geckos a unique ability to walk on vertical surfaces using van der Waals interactions. Although many studies have focused on the role of surface morphology of the hairs, very little is known about the role of surface chemistry on wetting and adhesion. We expect that both surface chemistry and morphology are important, not only to achieve optimum dry adhesion but also for increased efficiency in self-cleaning of water and adhesion under wet conditions. Here, we used a plasma-based vapor deposition process to coat the hairy patterns on gecko toe pad sheds with polar and non-polar coatings without significantly perturbing the setal morphology. By a comparison of wetting across treatments, we show that the intrinsic surface of gecko setae has a water contact angle between 70-90°. As expected, under wet conditions, adhesion on a hydrophilic surface (glass) was lower than that on a hydrophobic surface (alkyl-silane monolayer on glass). Surprisingly under wet and dry conditions the adhesion was comparable on the hydrophobic surface, independent of the surface chemistry of the setal hairs. This work highlights the need to utilize morphology and surface chemistry in developing successful synthetic adhesives with desirable adhesion and self-cleaning properties.

  14. The correlation between the surface chemistry and the performance of Li-carbon intercalation anodes for rechargeable rocking-chair type batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Aurbach, D.; Ein-Eli, Y.; Chusid, O. . Dept. of Chemistry); Carmeli, Y.; Babai, M.; Yamin, H. . Battery Div.)

    1994-03-01

    The correlation between the electrochemical properties of Li carbon intercalation electrodes and their surface chemistry in solutions was investigated. The carbons investigated were primarily graphite and petroleum coke, and the solvent systems included methyl formate (MF), propylene and ethylene carbonates, ethers and their mixtures. The surface chemistry of the electrodes was studied using mainly diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The following aspects were studied: (1) the effect of temperature on the buildup of the surface films; (2) the effect of additives (e.g., CO[sub 2], crown ethers), (3) the behavior when the passive layer is built in one solution followed by cycling in another; and (4) the effect of cosolvent in MF solutions. The results obtained further prove that the electrochemical behavior of these systems is surface film controlled. An understanding of the surface chemistry of these electrodes enables judicious optimization of carbon-solution systems for use in rechargeable Li batteries.

  15. Surface and coordination chemistry related to GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keys, Andrea

    The vapor phase structures of Al(tBU)3 and Ga(tBU)3 have been investigated by gas phase electron diffraction and consist of planar three-coordinate monomers. Salient structural parameters (ra) include: Al-C = 2.005(3) A, Ga-C = 2.034(2) A. The geometries are controlled by inter-ligand interactions. The electron diffraction structures are compared to those determined by ab initio calculations for M(tBU)3 (M = Al, Ga, In). To understand the most suitable linkages for the surface of GaAs, model compounds were synthesized by reacting Ga(tBU)3 and [tBu2Ga(mu-Cl]2 with one molar equivalent of varying ligands. The synthesized compounds include chlorides, benzenethiolate, dithiocarbamates, carboxylates, amides, benzohydroxamate, and phenylphosphonate. The Ga ⋯ Ga and Ga-ligand interatomic distances for these compounds, as well as Group 15 and 16 donor bridging ligands, are compared to the values for the surface of GaAs and cubic-GaS in order to determine their suitability as linkage groups for self-assembled monolayers. The most suitable linkages were determined to be benzenethiol and phenylphophonic acid, and these were used to grow self-assembled monolayers on {100} GaAs. Carboxylic acid was also used, to determine the success of the organometallic model compounds in predicting the suitability of ligands for surface reaction. Self-assembled monolayers were also grown on Al2O3, using carboxylic acids and phenylphosphonic acids as the surface linkages. Metallo-organic chemical vapor deposition was performed using single-source precursors ( tBU)2Ga(S2CNR2). The tert -butyl gallium bis-dialkyl-dithiocarbamate compounds, (tBu)Ga(S2CNR2)2, are formed as minor products via ligand disproportionation reactions. Gallium sulfide (GaS) thin films have been grown at 375-425°C by atmospheric pressure metal-organic chemical vapor deposition using compounds (tBu) 2Ga(S2CNMe2) and (tBu)2Ga(S 2CNEt2) as single source precursors. Polycrystalline samples of the chalcogenides InSe, In2Se3

  16. High-temperature vesuvianite: crystal chemistry and surface considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmi, Chiara; Brigatti, Maria Franca; Pasquali, Luca; Montecchi, Monica; Laurora, Angela; Malferrari, Daniele; Nannarone, Stefano

    2011-06-01

    A multi-methodical approach has been applied for characterizing the bulk and surface crystal chemical features of a high-temperature vesuvianite crystal from skarns of Mount Somma-Vesuvius Volcano (Naples, Italy). Vesuvianite belongs to the space group P4/ nnc with unit cell parameters a = 15.633(1) Å, c = 11.834(1) Å and chemical formula (Ca18.858 Na0.028 Ba0.004 K0.006 Sr0.005 □0.098)19.000 (Al8.813 Ti0.037 Mg2.954 Mn0.008 Fe{0.114/2+} Fe{1.375/3+} Cr0.008 B0.202)13.511 Si18.000(O0.261 F0.940 OH7.799)9.000. Structure refinement, which converges at R = 0.0328, demonstrates a strong positional disorder down the fourfold axes, indicating that the Y1 site is split into two positions (Y1A and Y1B) alternatively occupied. However, because of X4 proximity to Y1B and Y1A, X4 cannot be occupied if Y1B or Y1A are. Overall Y1 occupancy (Y1A + Y1B) reaches approximately 0.5, as common in vesuvianite and occupancy of Y1B site is extremely limited. Moreover, T1 position, limitedly occupied, accommodates the excess of cations generally related to Y position. A small quantity (0.202 apfu) of boron is sited at the T2 site that, like T1, is poorly occupied. The determination of the amount of each element on the (100) vesuvianite surface, obtained through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy high-resolution spectra in the region of the Si2p, Al2p, Mg1s, and Ca2p core levels, evidences that a greater amount of aluminum and a smaller amount of calcium characterize the surface with respect to the bulk. Although both of these features require further investigation, we may consider the Al increase can be related to preferential orientation of Al-rich sites on the (100) plane. Furthermore, the surface structure of vesuvianite suggests that Al, Ca, and Mg cations maintain coordination features at the surface similar to the bulk. Silica, however, while presenting fourfold coordination, shows also a [1]-fold small coordinated component at binding energy 99.85 eV, due to broken Si-O bonds at

  17. Effect of surface chemistry on the integrin induced pathway in regulating vascular endothelial cells migration.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Gao, Min; Ma, Yunlong; Yu, Hongchi; Cui, Fu-zhai; Gregersen, Hans; Yu, Qingsong; Wang, Guixue; Liu, Xiaoheng

    2015-02-01

    The migration of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) is essential for reendothelialization after implantation of cardiovascular biomaterials. Reendothelialization is largely determined by surface properties of implants. In this study, surfaces modified with various chemical functional groups (CH3, NH2, COOH, OH) prepared by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were used as model system. Expressions and distributions of critical proteins in the integrin-induced signaling pathway were examined to explore the mechanisms of surface chemistry regulating EC migration. The results showed that SAMs modulated cell migration were in the order CH3>NH2>OH>COOH, determined by differences in the expressions of focal adhesion components and Rho GTPases. Multiple integrin subunits showed difference in a surface chemistry-dependent manner, which induced a stepwise activation of signaling cascades associated with EC migration. This work provides a broad overview of surface chemistry regulated endothelial cell migration and establishes association among the surface chemistry, cell migration behavior and associated integrin signaling events. Understanding the relationship between these factors will help us to understand the surface/interface behavior between biomaterials and cells, reveal molecular mechanism of cells sensing surface characterization, and guide surface modification of cardiovascular implanted materials.

  18. Polymer surface chemistry: Surface mixtures, supported polyelectrolyte multilayers and heterogeneous chemical modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuvanartnuruks, Vipavee

    This dissertation is divided into three parts that summarize three discrete projects that are related only in their overall objective of using chemistry to rationally control polymer surface structure and properties. Each part involves polymer surface modification, but the three employ very different techniques to effect surface-chemical changes. The first part (Chapter 1) involves the preparation of surfaces containing controllable mixtures of two functionalities (alcohol/ester or hydrocarbon ester/fluorocarbon ester) from alcohol-functionalized poly(chlorotrifluoroethylene) (PCTFE-OH) and the studies of their wetting behavior as a function of composition and structure. Contact angle analyses indicate that sequential and competitive esterifications yield mixed surfaces consisting of the two functional groups distributed randomly, while compositionally similar, patchy mixed surfaces can be prepared by partial hydrolysis/re-esterification under some specific conditions. Greater contact angle hysteresis was observed on the patchy surfaces. The second part (Chapter 2) describes the layer-by-layer deposition of cationic (polyallylamine hydrochloride (PAH)) and anionic (polysodium styrenesulfonate (PSS)) polyelectrolytes onto the PCTFE-OH substrate. XPS and contact angle data indicate that the assembled layers are stratified even though the individual layers are extremely thin (0.3-4.1 A). This thickness depends both on the charge density of the first layer of PAH (controlled using pH) and the ionic strength of the PSS adsorption solution. The stoichiometry of the assembly process also varies with the ionic strength of the PSS adsorption solution. The third part (Chapter 3) involves the heterogeneous (gas-solid) chemical modification of poly(trifluoroethylene) (PFsb3E). Chlorination of PFsb3E is a surface-selective reaction and the extent of chlorination can be controlled by time and light intensity. The fluorination of PFsb3E carried out using 5% Fsb2/Nsb2 yields

  19. Research program to investigate the fundamental chemistry of technetium

    SciTech Connect

    McKeown, David A.; Buechele, Andrew C.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Muller, Isabelle S.; Shuh, David K.; Pegg, Ian L.

    2007-10-12

    The objective of this research is to increase the knowledge of the fundamental technetium chemistry necessary to address challenges to the safe, long-term disposal of high-level nuclear waste posed by this element. The primary issues examined during the course of this project were the behavior of technetium and its surrogate rhenium during waste vitrification and glass corrosion. Since the redox behavior of technetium can play a large role in determining its volatility, one goal of this research was to better understand the behavior of technetium in glass as a function of the redox potential of the glass melt. In addition, the behavior of rhenium was examined, since rhenium is commonly used as a surrogate for technetium in waste vitrification studies. A number of glasses similar to Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) glasses were prepared under controlled atmospheres. The redox state of the glass was determined from the Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio in the cooled glass, and the speciation of technetium and rhenium was determined by x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. The behavior of rhenium and technetium during glass alteration was also examined using the vapor hydration test (VHT).

  20. Spectroscopic and computational investigation of actinium coordination chemistry

    DOE PAGES

    Ferrier, Maryline Ghislaine; Batista, Enrique Ricardo; Berg, John M.; ...

    2016-08-17

    Actinium-225 is a promising isotope for targeted-α therapy. Unfortunately, progress in developing chelators for medicinal applications has been hindered by a limited understanding of actinium chemistry. This knowledge gap is primarily associated with handling actinium, as it is highly radioactive and in short supply. Hence, AcIII reactivity is often inferred from the lanthanides and minor actinides (that is, Am, Cm), with limited success. Here we overcome these challenges and characterize actinium in HCl solutions using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and molecular dynamics density functional theory. The Ac–Cl and Ac–OH2O distances are measured to be 2.95(3) and 2.59(3) Å, respectively. The X-raymore » absorption spectroscopy comparisons between AcIII and AmIII in HCl solutions indicate AcIII coordinates more inner-sphere Cl1– ligands (3.2±1.1) than AmIII (0.8±0.3). Finally, these results imply diverse reactivity for the +3 actinides and highlight the unexpected and unique AcIII chemical behaviour.« less

  1. Spectroscopic and computational investigation of actinium coordination chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrier, Maryline Ghislaine; Batista, Enrique Ricardo; Berg, John M.; Birnbaum, Eva R.; Cross, Justin Neil; Engle, Jonathan Ward; La Pierre, Henry S.; Kozimor, Stosh Anthony; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S.; Stein, Benjamin W.; Stieber, S. Chantal E.; Wilson, Justin J.

    2016-08-17

    Actinium-225 is a promising isotope for targeted-α therapy. Unfortunately, progress in developing chelators for medicinal applications has been hindered by a limited understanding of actinium chemistry. This knowledge gap is primarily associated with handling actinium, as it is highly radioactive and in short supply. Hence, AcIII reactivity is often inferred from the lanthanides and minor actinides (that is, Am, Cm), with limited success. Here we overcome these challenges and characterize actinium in HCl solutions using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and molecular dynamics density functional theory. The Ac–Cl and Ac–OH2O distances are measured to be 2.95(3) and 2.59(3) Å, respectively. The X-ray absorption spectroscopy comparisons between AcIII and AmIII in HCl solutions indicate AcIII coordinates more inner-sphere Cl1– ligands (3.2±1.1) than AmIII (0.8±0.3). Finally, these results imply diverse reactivity for the +3 actinides and highlight the unexpected and unique AcIII chemical behaviour.

  2. Spectroscopic and computational investigation of actinium coordination chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Ferrier, Maryline G.; Batista, Enrique R.; Berg, John M.; Birnbaum, Eva R.; Cross, Justin N.; Engle, Jonathan W.; La Pierre, Henry S.; Kozimor, Stosh A.; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S.; Stein, Benjamin W.; Stieber, S. Chantal E.; Wilson, Justin J.

    2016-01-01

    Actinium-225 is a promising isotope for targeted-α therapy. Unfortunately, progress in developing chelators for medicinal applications has been hindered by a limited understanding of actinium chemistry. This knowledge gap is primarily associated with handling actinium, as it is highly radioactive and in short supply. Hence, AcIII reactivity is often inferred from the lanthanides and minor actinides (that is, Am, Cm), with limited success. Here we overcome these challenges and characterize actinium in HCl solutions using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and molecular dynamics density functional theory. The Ac–Cl and Ac–OH2O distances are measured to be 2.95(3) and 2.59(3) Å, respectively. The X-ray absorption spectroscopy comparisons between AcIII and AmIII in HCl solutions indicate AcIII coordinates more inner-sphere Cl1– ligands (3.2±1.1) than AmIII (0.8±0.3). These results imply diverse reactivity for the +3 actinides and highlight the unexpected and unique AcIII chemical behaviour. PMID:27531582

  3. Spectroscopic and computational investigation of actinium coordination chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ferrier, Maryline G; Batista, Enrique R; Berg, John M; Birnbaum, Eva R; Cross, Justin N; Engle, Jonathan W; La Pierre, Henry S; Kozimor, Stosh A; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S; Stein, Benjamin W; Stieber, S Chantal E; Wilson, Justin J

    2016-08-17

    Actinium-225 is a promising isotope for targeted-α therapy. Unfortunately, progress in developing chelators for medicinal applications has been hindered by a limited understanding of actinium chemistry. This knowledge gap is primarily associated with handling actinium, as it is highly radioactive and in short supply. Hence, Ac(III) reactivity is often inferred from the lanthanides and minor actinides (that is, Am, Cm), with limited success. Here we overcome these challenges and characterize actinium in HCl solutions using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and molecular dynamics density functional theory. The Ac-Cl and Ac-OH2O distances are measured to be 2.95(3) and 2.59(3) Å, respectively. The X-ray absorption spectroscopy comparisons between Ac(III) and Am(III) in HCl solutions indicate Ac(III) coordinates more inner-sphere Cl(1-) ligands (3.2±1.1) than Am(III) (0.8±0.3). These results imply diverse reactivity for the +3 actinides and highlight the unexpected and unique Ac(III) chemical behaviour.

  4. Spectroscopic and computational investigation of actinium coordination chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrier, Maryline G.; Batista, Enrique R.; Berg, John M.; Birnbaum, Eva R.; Cross, Justin N.; Engle, Jonathan W.; La Pierre, Henry S.; Kozimor, Stosh A.; Lezama Pacheco, Juan S.; Stein, Benjamin W.; Stieber, S. Chantal E.; Wilson, Justin J.

    2016-08-01

    Actinium-225 is a promising isotope for targeted-α therapy. Unfortunately, progress in developing chelators for medicinal applications has been hindered by a limited understanding of actinium chemistry. This knowledge gap is primarily associated with handling actinium, as it is highly radioactive and in short supply. Hence, AcIII reactivity is often inferred from the lanthanides and minor actinides (that is, Am, Cm), with limited success. Here we overcome these challenges and characterize actinium in HCl solutions using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and molecular dynamics density functional theory. The Ac-Cl and Ac-OH2O distances are measured to be 2.95(3) and 2.59(3) Å, respectively. The X-ray absorption spectroscopy comparisons between AcIII and AmIII in HCl solutions indicate AcIII coordinates more inner-sphere Cl1- ligands (3.2+/-1.1) than AmIII (0.8+/-0.3). These results imply diverse reactivity for the +3 actinides and highlight the unexpected and unique AcIII chemical behaviour.

  5. NOx Binding and Dissociation: Enhanced Ferroelectric Surface Chemistry by Catalytic Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakekhani, Arvin; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2013-03-01

    NOx molecules are regulated air pollutants produced during automotive combustion. As part of an effort to design viable catalysts for NOx decomposition operating at higher temperatures that would allow for improved fuel efficiency, we examine NOx chemistry on ferroelectric perovskite surfaces. Changing the direction of ferroelectric polarization can modify surface electronic properties and may lead to switchable surface chemistry. Here, we describe our recent work on potentially enhanced surface chemistry using catalytic RuO2 monolayers on perovskite ferroelectric substrates. In addition to thermodynamic stabilization of the RuO2 layer, we present results on the polarization-dependent binding of NO, O2, N2, and atomic O and N. We present results showing that one key problem with current catalysts, involving the difficulty of releasing dissociation products (especially oxygen), can be ameliorated by this method. Primary support from Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing, North America, Inc.

  6. Hierarchical hydrodynamic flow confinement: efficient use and retrieval of chemicals for microscale chemistry on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Autebert, Julien; Kashyap, Aditya; Lovchik, Robert D; Delamarche, Emmanuel; Kaigala, Govind V

    2014-04-01

    We devised, implemented, and tested a new concept for efficient local surface chemistry that we call hierarchical hydrodynamic flow confinement (hierarchical HFC). This concept leverages the hydrodynamic shaping of multiple layers of liquid to address challenges inherent to microscale surface chemistry, such as minimal dilution, economical consumption of reagent, and fast liquid switching. We illustrate two modes of hierarchical HFC, nested and pinched, by locally denaturing and recovering a 26 bp DNA with as little as 2% dilution and by efficiently patterning an antibody on a surface, with a 5 μm resolution and a 100-fold decrease of reagent consumption compared to microcontact printing. In addition, valveless switching between nanoliter volumes of liquids was achieved within 20 ms. We believe hierarchical HFC will have broad utility for chemistry on surfaces at the microscale.

  7. Tethering Growth Factors to Collagen Surfaces Using Copper-Free Click Chemistry: Surface Characterization and in Vitro Biological Response.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Jong; Fernandes-Cunha, Gabriella M; Putra, Ilham; Koh, Won-Gun; Myung, David

    2017-07-19

    Surface modifications with tethered growth factors have mainly been applied to synthetic polymeric biomaterials in well-controlled, acellular settings, followed by seeding with cells. The known bio-orthogonality of copper-free click chemistry provides an opportunity to not only use it in vitro to create scaffolds or pro-migratory tracks in the presence of living cells, but also potentially apply it to living tissues directly as a coupling modality in situ. In this study, we studied the chemical coupling of growth factors to collagen using biocompatible copper-free click chemistry and its effect on the enhancement of growth factor activity in vitro. We verified the characteristics of modified epidermal growth factor (EGF) using mass spectrometry and an EGF/EGF receptor binding assay, and evaluated the chemical immobilization of EGF on collagen by copper-free click chemistry using surface X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We found that the anchoring was noncytotoxic, biocompatible, and rapid. Moreover, the surface-immobilized EGF had significant effects on epithelial cell attachment and proliferation. Our results demonstrate the possibility of copper-free click chemistry as a tool for covalent bonding of growth factors to collagen in the presence of living cells. This approach is a novel and potentially clinically useful application of copper-free click chemistry as a way of anchoring growth factors to collagen and foster epithelial wound healing.

  8. Analytical Chemistry of Surfaces: Part III. Ion Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hercules, David M.; Hercules, Shirley H.

    1984-01-01

    The fundamentals of two surface techniques--secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and ion-scattering spectrometry (ISS)--are discussed. Examples of how these techniques have been applied to surface problems are provided. (JN)

  9. Work function changes and surface chemistry of oxygen, hydrogen, and carbon on indium tin oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaney, John A.; Pehrsson, Pehr E.

    2001-08-01

    The surface chemistry of indium tin oxide (ITO) has been investigated with Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). A vibrating Kelvin probe (KP) with a graphite reference was used to monitor the absolute work function ( Φ) of ITO as a function of chemical modification. The ITO was exposed in situ to molecular hydrogen (H 2), hot-filament-activated oxygen ( O2∗), and hot-filament-activated deuterium ( D2∗). The initial Φ of ITO was determined to be 5.2 eV, and surface chemical changes had strong effects on this value, as seen by KP. Exposure of clean ITO to O2∗ increased Φ to ˜5.6 eV, but the increase was short-lived. The changes in Φ over time were correlated with the uptake of carbon impurities in ultra high vacuum (UHV), as monitored by AES. The HREELS of ITO revealed significant hydrocarbon impurities. Chemical reduction of ITO produced a metallic surface and dehydrogenated the adsorbed hydrocarbons. Both re-oxidation of metallic ITO and oxidation of clean ITO temporarily removed adventitious carbon from the surface, but oxidized ITO adsorbed an even larger quantity of carbon over time.

  10. 3D Printed Potential and Free Energy Surfaces for Teaching Fundamental Concepts in Physical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaliakin, Danil S.; Zaari, Ryan R.; Varganov, Sergey A.

    2015-01-01

    Teaching fundamental physical chemistry concepts such as the potential energy surface, transition state, and reaction path is a challenging task. The traditionally used oversimplified 2D representation of potential and free energy surfaces makes this task even more difficult and often confuses students. We show how this 2D representation can be…

  11. 3D Printed Potential and Free Energy Surfaces for Teaching Fundamental Concepts in Physical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaliakin, Danil S.; Zaari, Ryan R.; Varganov, Sergey A.

    2015-01-01

    Teaching fundamental physical chemistry concepts such as the potential energy surface, transition state, and reaction path is a challenging task. The traditionally used oversimplified 2D representation of potential and free energy surfaces makes this task even more difficult and often confuses students. We show how this 2D representation can be…

  12. ESCA studies of lunar surface chemistry. [Electron Spectroscopic Chemical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housley, R. M.; Grant, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    We have used ESCA to compare the composition of the natural exterior surface in lunar fines samples with that of the interior surface exposed by crushing. Even though the exterior surfaces have been exposed to air a significant amount of Fe in them is reduced. In addition, Ca, Al, and Mg are strongly depleted in exterior surfaces relative to Si, Ti, and Fe. Preferential sputtering by the solar wind is a possible explanation for these changes.

  13. ESCA studies of lunar surface chemistry. [Electron Spectroscopic Chemical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housley, R. M.; Grant, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    We have used ESCA to compare the composition of the natural exterior surface in lunar fines samples with that of the interior surface exposed by crushing. Even though the exterior surfaces have been exposed to air a significant amount of Fe in them is reduced. In addition, Ca, Al, and Mg are strongly depleted in exterior surfaces relative to Si, Ti, and Fe. Preferential sputtering by the solar wind is a possible explanation for these changes.

  14. Tuning filler shape, surface chemistry and ion content in nanofilled polymer electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapatibhotla, Lalitha V. N. R.

    We investigate how nanofiller surface chemistry and aspect ratio affect the performance of nanofilled solid polymer electrolytes. Polymer-based electrolytes are an attractive alternative to the organic electrolytes currently used in lithium ion batteries. We characterize acidic nanoparticle filled electrolytes and compare them to neutral particle-filled electrolytes previously measured in our lab. Dielectric spectroscopy measurements indicate that the highest increase in conductivity occurs at the eutectic composition (EO/Li=10) and is independent of filler surface chemistry. We measure PEO dynamics using quasi-elastic neutron scattering and do not observe any change in polymer dynamics with particle surface chemistry. When we examine the elastic incoherent structure factor associated with the rotational process, fillers are found to restrict the rotation of the highly conducting PEO6:LiClO4 tunnels. At the eutectic composition, these tunnels are stabilized at the filler surface even above PEO melting temperature. Marginal stability theory predicts formation of alternating layers of coexisting phases at the eutectic composition. We propose a new mechanism, via stabilization of alternating layers of PEO and highly conducting PEO 6:LiClO4 tunnels at the filler surface. When compared to spherical particles, more such structures would be stabilized at a filler surface with high aspect ratio. Consistent with this hypothesis, neutral gamma-Al2O3 nanowhiskers (2-4 nm in diameter and 200-400 nm in length) intensify the effect of neutral gamma-Al 2O3 nanoparticles. The diameters of the two fillers are similar, but the change in aspect ratio (1 to 100) improves conductivity by a factor of 5. This enhancement occurs at battery operation temperatures! Although the change in aspect ratio does not affect thermal transitions and segmental dynamics at optimal whisker loading, the rotation of PEO6 remnants is distinct at the eutectic composition. Because the mechanism by which

  15. Chemistry of Stream Sediments and Surface Waters in New England

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson,, Gilpin R.; Kapo, Katherine E.; Grossman, Jeffrey N.

    2004-01-01

    Summary -- This online publication portrays regional data for pH, alkalinity, and specific conductance for stream waters and a multi-element geochemical dataset for stream sediments collected in the New England states of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. A series of interpolation grid maps portray the chemistry of the stream waters and sediments in relation to bedrock geology, lithology, drainage basins, and urban areas. A series of box plots portray the statistical variation of the chemical data grouped by lithology and other features.

  16. Aircraft-based investigation of Dynamics-Aerosol-Chemistry-Cloud Interactions in Southern West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flamant, Cyrille

    2017-04-01

    The EU-funded project DACCIWA (Dynamics-Aerosol-Chemistry-Cloud Interactions in West Africa, http://www.dacciwa.eu) is investigating the relationship between weather, climate and air pollution in southern West Africa. The air over the coastal region of West Africa is a unique mixture of natural and anthropogenic gases, liquids and particles, emitted in an environment, in which multi-layer cloud decks frequently form. These exert a large influence on the local weather and climate, mainly due to their impact on radiation, the surface energy balance and thus the diurnal cycle of the atmospheric boundary layer. The main objective for the aircraft detachment was to build robust statistics of cloud properties in southern West Africa in different chemical landscapes to investigate the physical processes involved in their life cycle in such a complex chemical environment. As part of the DACCIWA field campaigns, three European aircraft (the German DLR Falcon 20, the French SAFIRE ATR 42 and the British BAS Twin Otter) conducted a total of 50 research flights across Ivory Coast, Ghana, Togo, and Benin from 27 June to 16 July 2016 for a total of 155 flight hours, including hours sponsored through 3 EUFAR projects. The aircraft were used in different ways based on their strengths, but all three had comparable instrumentation with the the capability to do gas-phase chemistry, aerosol and clouds, thereby generating a rich dataset of atmospheric conditions across the region. Eight types of flight objectives were conducted to achieve the goals of the DACCIWA: (i) Stratus clouds, (ii) Land-sea breeze clouds, (iii) Mid-level clouds, (iv) Biogenic emission, (v) City emissions, (vi) Flaring and ship emissions, (vii) Dust and biomass burning aerosols, and (viii) air-sea interactions. An overview of the DACCIWA aircraft campaign as well as first highlights from the airborne observations will be presented.

  17. THE EFFECTS OF SURFACE CHEMISTRY ON THE PROPERTIES OF PROTEINS CONFINED IN NANO-POROUS MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, L. M.; O'Neill, H.

    2007-01-01

    The entrapment of proteins using the sol-gel route provides a means to retain its native properties and artifi cially reproduce the molecular crowding and confi nement experienced by proteins in the cell allowing investigation of the physico-chemical and structural properties of biomolecules at the biotic/abiotic interface. The biomolecules are spatially separated and ‘caged’ in the gel structure but solutes can freely permeate the matrix. Thus, properties such as the folding of ensembles of individual molecules can be examined in the absence of aggregation effects that can occur in solution studies. Green fl uorescent protein from Aequorea coerulescens was used as a model protein to examine the unfolding/re-folding properties of protein in silica gels. The recombinant protein was isolated and purifi ed from Escherichia coli extracts by cell lysis, three-phase partitioning, dialysis, and anion exchange chromatography. The purity of the protein was greater than 90% as judged by SDS PAGE gel analysis. Sol-gels were synthesized using tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS) in combination with, methyltrimethoxyorthosilane (MTMOS), ethyltrimethoxyorthosilane (ETMOS), 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), and 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS). The acid induced denaturation and renaturation of GFP was analyzed by UV-visible, fl uorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies. No renaturation was observed in gels that were made with TMOS only, and in the presence of APTES, MTMOS, and ETMOS. However, in gels that were made with GPTMS, the CD and UV-visible spectra indicated that the protein had refolded. The fl uorescence emission spectrum indicated that approximately 20% of fl uorescence had returned. This study highlights the importance of the surface chemistry of the silica gels for the refolding properties of the entrapped GFP. Future studies will investigate the effect of surface chemistry on the thermal and solvent stability of the entrapped protein.

  18. The Effects of Surface Chemistry on the Properties of Proteins Confined in Nano-porous Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, Latasha M; O'Neill, Hugh Michael

    2007-01-01

    The entrapment of proteins using the sol-gel route provides a means to retain its native properties and artificially reproduce the molecular crowding and confinement experienced by proteins in the cell allowing investigation of the physico-chemical and structural properties of biomolecules at the biotic/abiotic interface. The biomolecules are spatially separated and 'caged' in the gel structure but solutes can freely permeate the matrix. Thus, properties such as the folding of ensembles of individual molecules can be examined in the absence of aggregation effects that can occur in solution studies. Green fluorescent protein from Aequorea coerulescens was used as a model protein to examine the unfolding/re-folding properties of protein in silica gels. The recombinant protein was isolated and purified from Escherichia coli extracts by cell lysis, three-phase partitioning, dialysis, and anion exchange chromatography. The purity of the protein was greater than 90% as judged by SDS PAGE gel analysis. Sol-gels were synthesized using tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS) in combination with, methyltrimethoxyorthosilane (MTMOS), ethyltrimethoxyorthosilane (ETMOS), 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), and 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS). The acid induced denaturation and renaturation of GFP was analyzed by UV-visible, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies. No renaturation was observed in gels that were made with TMOS only, and in the presence of APTES, MTMOS, and ETMOS. However, in gels that were made with GPTMS, the CD and UV-visible spectra indicated that the protein had refolded. The fluorescence emission spectrum indicated that approximately 20% of fluorescence had returned. This study highlights the importance of the surface chemistry of the silica gels for the refolding properties of the entrapped GFP. Future studies will investigate the effect of surface chemistry on the thermal and solvent stability of the entrapped protein.

  19. Switchable Surface Wettability by Using Boronic Ester Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Taleb, Sabri; Noyer, Elisabeth; Godeau, Guilhem; Darmanin, Thierry; Guittard, Frédéric

    2016-01-18

    Here, we report for the first time the use of a boronic ester as an efficient tool for reversible surface post-functionalization. The boronic ester bond allows surfaces to be reversibly switched from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. Based on the well-known boronic acid/glycol affinity, this strategy offers the opportunity to play with surface hydrophobic properties by adding various boronic acids onto substrates bearing glycol groups. The post-functionalization can then be reversed to regenerate the starting glycol surface. This pathway allows for the preparation of various switchable surfaces for a large range of applications in biosensors, liquid transportation, and separation membranes.

  20. (90377) Sedna: Investigation of Surface Compositional Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barucci, M. A.; Morea Dalle Ore, C.; Alvarez-Candal, A.; de Bergh, C.; Merlin, F.; Dumas, C.; Cruikshank, D.

    2010-12-01

    The dwarf planet (90377) Sedna is one of the most remote solar system objects accessible to investigations. To better constrain its surface composition and to investigate the possible heterogeneity of the surface of Sedna, several observations have been carried out at ESO-VLT with the powerful spectrometer SINFONI observing simultaneously the H and K bands. The analyzed spectra (obtained in 2005, 2007, and 2008) show a non-uniform spectral signature, particularly in the K band. Spectral modeling using the Shkuratov radiative transfer code for surface scattering has been performed using the various sets of data, including previous observations at visible wavelengths and photometry at 3.6 and 4.5 μm by the Spitzer Space Telescope. The visible and near-infrared spectra can be modeled with organic materials (triton and titan tholin), serpentine, and H2O ice in fairly significant amounts, and CH4, N2, and C2H6 in varying trace amounts. One of the spectra obtained in 2005 October shows a different signature in the K band and is best modeled with CH3OH in place of CH4, with reduced amounts of serpentine and with the addition of olivine. The compositional surface heterogeneity can give input on the past history as well clues to the origin of this peculiar, distant object. Based on observations obtained at the VLT Observatory Cerro Paranal of European Southern Observatory, ESO, Chile, in the framework of proposal 275.C-5055 and Large Program 178-C-0036/0867.

  1. (90377) SEDNA: INVESTIGATION OF SURFACE COMPOSITIONAL VARIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Barucci, M. A.; De Bergh, C.; Merlin, F.; Morea Dalle Ore, C.; Cruikshank, D.; Alvarez-Candal, A.; Dumas, C.

    2010-12-15

    The dwarf planet (90377) Sedna is one of the most remote solar system objects accessible to investigations. To better constrain its surface composition and to investigate the possible heterogeneity of the surface of Sedna, several observations have been carried out at ESO-VLT with the powerful spectrometer SINFONI observing simultaneously the H and K bands. The analyzed spectra (obtained in 2005, 2007, and 2008) show a non-uniform spectral signature, particularly in the K band. Spectral modeling using the Shkuratov radiative transfer code for surface scattering has been performed using the various sets of data, including previous observations at visible wavelengths and photometry at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m by the Spitzer Space Telescope. The visible and near-infrared spectra can be modeled with organic materials (triton and titan tholin), serpentine, and H{sub 2}O ice in fairly significant amounts, and CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 6} in varying trace amounts. One of the spectra obtained in 2005 October shows a different signature in the K band and is best modeled with CH{sub 3}OH in place of CH{sub 4}, with reduced amounts of serpentine and with the addition of olivine. The compositional surface heterogeneity can give input on the past history as well clues to the origin of this peculiar, distant object.

  2. Control of pyrite surface chemistry in physical coal cleaning. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Luttrell, G.H.; Yoon, R.H.; Richardson, P.E.

    1993-05-19

    In Part I, Surface Chemistry of Coal Pyrite the mechanisms responsible for the inefficient rejection of coal pyrite were investigated using a number of experimental techniques. The test results demonstrate that the hydrophobicity of coal pyrite is related to the surface products formed during oxidation in aqueous solutions. During oxidation, a sulfur-rich surface layer is produced in near neutral pH solutions. This surface layer is composed mainly of sulfur species in the form of an iron-polysulfide along with a smaller amount of iron oxide/hydroxides. The floatability coal pyrite increases dramatically in the presence of frothers and hydrocarbon collectors. These reagents are believed to absorb on the weakly hydrophobic pyrite surfaces as a result of hydrophobic interaction forces. In Part III, Developing the Best Possible Rejection Schemes, a number of pyrite depressants were evaluated in column and conventional flotation tests. These included manganese (Mn) metal, chelating agents quinone and diethylenetriamine (DETA), and several commercially-available organic depressants. Of these, the additives which serve as reducing agents were found to be most effective. Reducing agents were used to prevent pyrite oxidation and/or remove oxidation products present on previously oxidized surfaces. These data show that Mn is a significantly stronger depressant for pyrite than quinone or DETA. Important factors in determining the pyrite depression effect of Mn include the slurry solid content during conditioning, the addition of acid (HCl), and the amount of Mn. The acid helps remove the oxide layer from the surface of Mn and promotes the depression of pyrite by Mn.

  3. Surface chemistry and catalysis on well-defined epitaxial iron-oxide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Werner; Ranke, Wolfgang

    2002-03-01

    Metal-oxide-based catalysts are used for many important synthesis reactions in the chemical industry. A better understanding of the catalyst operation can be achieved by studying elementary reaction steps on well-defined model catalyst systems. For the dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene in the presence of steam both unpromoted and potassium promoted iron-oxide catalysts are active. Here we review the work done over unpromoted single-crystalline FeO(1 1 1), Fe3O4(1 1 1) and α- Fe2O3(0 0 0 1) films grown epitaxially on Pt(1 1 1) substrates. Their geometric and electronic surface structures were characterized by STM, LEED, electron microscopy and electron spectroscopic techniques. In an integrative approach, the interaction of water, ethylbenzene and styrene with these films was investigated mainly by thermal desorption and photoelectron emission spectroscopy. The adsorption-desorption energetics and kinetics depend on the oxide surface terminations and are correlated to the electronic structures and acid-base properties of the corresponding oxide phases, which reveal insight into the nature of the active sites and into the catalytic function of semiconducting oxides in general. Catalytic studies, using a batch-reactor arrangement at high gas pressures and post-reaction surface analysis, showed that only α- Fe2O3(0 0 0 1) containing surface defects is catalytically active, whereas Fe3O4(1 1 1) is always inactive. This can be related to the elementary adsorption and desorption properties observed in ultrahigh vacuum, which indicates that the surface chemical properties of the iron-oxide films do not change significantly across the “pressure-gap”. A model is proposed according to which the active site involves a regular acidic surface site and a defect site next to it. The results on metal-oxide surface chemistry also have implications for other fields such as environmental science, biophysics and chemical sensors.

  4. Surface chemistry of black phosphorus under a controlled oxidative environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wei; Zemlyanov, Dmitry Y.; Milligan, Cory A.; Du, Yuchen; Yang, Lingming; Wu, Yanqing; Ye, Peide D.

    2016-10-01

    Black phosphorus (BP), the bulk counterpart of monolayer phosphorene, is a relatively stable phosphorus allotrope at room temperature. However, monolayer phosphorene and ultra-thin BP layers degrade in ambient atmosphere. In this paper, we report the investigation of BP oxidation and discuss the reaction mechanism based on the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data. The kinetics of BP oxidation was examined under various well-controlled conditions, namely in 5% O2/Ar, 2.3% H2O/Ar, and 5% O2 and 2.3% H2O/Ar. At room temperature, the BP surface is demonstrated not to be oxidized at a high oxidation rate in 5% O2/Ar nor in 2.3% H2O/Ar, according to XPS, with the thickness of the oxidized phosphorus layer <5 Å for 5 h. On the other hand, in the O2/H2O mixture, a 30 Å thickness oxide layer was detected already after 2 h of the treatment. This result points to a synergetic effect of water and oxygen in the BP oxidation. The oxidation effect was also studied in applications to the electrical measurements of BP field-effect transistors (FETs) with or without passivation. The electrical performance of BP FETs with atomic layer deposition (ALD) dielectric passivation or h-BN passivation formed in a glove-box environment are also presented.

  5. Transient Catalytic Combustor Model With Detailed Gas and Surface Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Mellish, Benjamin P.; Miller, Fletcher J.; Tien, James S.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, we numerically investigate the transient combustion of a premixed gas mixture in a narrow, perfectly-insulated, catalytic channel which can represent an interior channel of a catalytic monolith. The model assumes a quasi-steady gas-phase and a transient, thermally thin solid phase. The gas phase is one-dimensional, but it does account for heat and mass transfer in a direction perpendicular to the flow via appropriate heat and mass transfer coefficients. The model neglects axial conduction in both the gas and in the solid. The model includes both detailed gas-phase reactions and catalytic surface reactions. The reactants modeled so far include lean mixtures of dry CO and CO/H2 mixtures, with pure oxygen as the oxidizer. The results include transient computations of light-off and system response to inlet condition variations. In some cases, the model predicts two different steady-state solutions depending on whether the channel is initially hot or cold. Additionally, the model suggests that the catalytic ignition of CO/O2 mixtures is extremely sensitive to small variations of inlet equivalence ratios and parts per million levels of H2.

  6. Principles of silicon surface chemistry from first principles

    SciTech Connect

    Doren, D.J.

    1996-10-01

    First principles theoretical studies of dissociative adsorption of H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, SiH{sub 4} and other species on Si(100)-2x1 demonstrate some common principles that permit qualitative understanding of the mechanisms of reactive adsorption on Si. The structures of transition states and the interactions among surface sites can also be understood in terms of correlations between surface structure and local electron density. For example, the transition states for dissociative adsorption involve buckled surface dimers, which present both electrophilic and nucleophilic reaction sites and allow efficient addition across the dimer. A surface Diels-Alder reaction will also be described, in which symmetric addition to an unbuckled surface dimer is allowed by orbital symmetry. The Diets-Alder product establishes novel reactive surface sites that may be useful for subsequent surface modification. This work has been done in collaboration with Sharmila Pai, Robert Konecny and Anita Robinson Brown.

  7. Effects of surface chemistry and microstructure of electrolyte on oxygen reduction kinetics of solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Joong Sun; An, Jihwan; Lee, Min Hwan; Prinz, Friedrich B.; Lee, Wonyoung

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we report systematic investigation of the surface properties of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes with the control of the grain boundary (GB) density at the surface, and its effects on electrochemical activities. The GB density of thin surface layers deposited on single crystal YSZ substrates is controlled by changing the annealing temperature (750-1450 °C). Higher oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) kinetics is observed in samples annealed at lower temperatures. The higher ORR activity is ascribed to the higher GB density at the YSZ surface where 'mobile' oxide ion vacancies are more populated. Meanwhile, oxide ion vacancies concurrently created with yttrium segregation at the surface at the higher annealing temperature are considered inactive to oxygen incorporation reactions. Our results provide additional insight into the interplay between the surface chemistry, microstructures, and electrochemical activity. They potentially provide important guidelines for engineering the electrolyte electrode interfaces of solid oxide fuel cells for higher electrochemical performance.

  8. Effects of surface chemistry and microstructure of electrolyte on oxygen reduction kinetics of solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joong Sun; An, Jihwan; Lee, Min Hwan; Prinz, Fritz B.; Lee, Wonyoung

    2015-11-01

    We report systematic investigation of the surface properties of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes with the control of the grain boundary (GB) density at the surface, and its effects on electrochemical activities. The GB density of thin surface layers deposited on single crystal YSZ substrates is controlled by changing the annealing temperature (750-1450 °C). Higher oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) kinetics is observed in samples annealed at lower temperatures. The higher ORR activity is ascribed to the higher GB density at the YSZ surface where 'mobile' oxide ion vacancies are more populated. Meanwhile, oxide ion vacancies concurrently created with yttrium segregation at the surface at the higher annealing temperature are considered inactive to oxygen incorporation reactions. Our results provide additional insight into the interplay between the surface chemistry, microstructures, and electrochemical activity. They potentially provide important guidelines for engineering the electrolyte-electrode interfaces of solid oxide fuel cells for higher electrochemical performance.

  9. Hexametaphosphate effects on tooth surface conditioning film chemistry--in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Busscher, Henk J; White, Donald J; van der Mei, Henny C; Baig, Arif A; Kozak, Kathy M

    2002-01-01

    These studies compared the effects of Crest Dual Action Whitening dentifrice with sodium hexametaphosphate and control commercial dentifrices on the surface chemistry of conditioning film-coated dental enamel in vitro and in vivo. Conditioning film chemistry was studied by measurements of film thickness, ability to wet the surface/surface energy, conditioning film chemical composition and zeta potential. Laboratory and in vivo studies demonstrated that brushing and chemical-only treatment of pellicle-coated enamel surfaces produced marked changes in surface chemistry. Brushing of surfaces with all commercial dentifrices significantly reduced pellicle film quantity. Effects on non-brushed areas, of significance in the clinical situation, were different for different dentifrices. For dentifrice chemical treatments, calcium phosphate surface active builders, such as pyrophosphate and hexametaphosphate, produced stronger effects than standard (non-tartar control) dentifrices, peroxide baking soda dentifrices and dentifrices formulated with carboxylate polymers, viz. Colgate Total with copolymer. Crest Dual Action Whitening hexametaphosphate dentifrice removed more pellicle conditioning film, produced a lower zeta potential, produced the largest changes in film composition and had the greatest impact on surface free energies of the tested dentifrices. Crest Dual Action Whitening dentifrice also produced lasting changes in the reacquisition of pellicle conditioning film, as established by in vitro cycling immersion studies. Crest Dual Action Whitening dentifrice produced stronger and more lasting effects on surface film chemistry than low molecular weight pyrophosphate (Crest Tartar Control) or other polymeric-based dentifrice systems (Colgate Total). These surface chemistries may contribute to the unique clinical actions of hexametaphosphate established in recently reported, randomized clinical studies of tartar control, stain prevention and stain removal effects.

  10. Hydrophobicity of protein surfaces: Separating geometry from chemistry.

    PubMed

    Giovambattista, Nicolas; Lopez, Carlos F; Rossky, Peter J; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2008-02-19

    To better understand the role of surface chemical heterogeneity in natural nanoscale hydration, we study via molecular dynamics simulation the structure and thermodynamics of water confined between two protein-like surfaces. Each surface is constructed to have interactions with water corresponding to those of the putative hydrophobic surface of a melittin dimer, but is flattened rather than having its native "cupped" configuration. Furthermore, peripheral charged groups are removed. Thus, the role of a rough surface topography is removed, and results can be productively compared with those previously observed for idealized, atomically smooth hydrophilic and hydrophobic flat surfaces. The results indicate that the protein surface is less hydrophobic than the idealized counterpart. The density and compressibility of water adjacent to a melittin dimer is intermediate between that observed adjacent to idealized hydrophobic or hydrophilic surfaces. We find that solvent evacuation of the hydrophobic gap (cavitation) between dimers is observed when the gap has closed to sterically permit a single water layer. This cavitation occurs at smaller pressures and separations than in the case of idealized hydrophobic flat surfaces. The vapor phase between the melittin dimers occupies a much smaller lateral region than in the case of the idealized surfaces; cavitation is localized in a narrow central region between the dimers, where an apolar amino acid is located. When that amino acid is replaced by a polar residue, cavitation is no longer observed.

  11. Tailoring the surface chemistry of activated carbon cloth by electrochemical methods.

    PubMed

    Tabti, Zakaria; Ruiz-Rosas, Ramiro; Quijada, César; Cazorla-Amorós, Diego; Morallón, Emilia

    2014-07-23

    This paper presents a systematic study of the effect of the electrochemical treatment (galvanostatic electrolysis in a filter-press electrochemical cell) on the surface chemistry and porous texture of commercial activated carbon cloth. The same treatments have been conducted over a granular activated carbon in order to clarify the effect of morphology. The influence of different electrochemical variables, such as the electrode polarity (anodic or cathodic), the applied current (between 0.2 and 1.0 A) and the type of electrolyte (HNO3 and NaCl) have also been analyzed. The anodic treatment of both activated carbons causes an increase in the amount of surface oxygen groups, whereas the cathodic treatment does not produce any relevant modification of the surface chemistry. The HNO3 electrolyte produced a lower generation of oxygen groups than the NaCl one, but differences in the achieved distribution of surface groups can be benefitial to selectively tune the surface chemistry. The porous texture seems to be unaltered after the electro-oxidation treatment. The validity of this method to introduce surface oxygen groups with a pseudocapacitive behavior has been corroborated by cyclic voltammetry. As a conclusion, the electrochemical treatment can be easily implemented to selectively and quantitatively modify the surface chemistry of activated carbons with different shapes and morphologies.

  12. Chemistry of atmosphere-surface interactions on Venus and Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.; Treiman, Allan H.

    1992-01-01

    Earth-based, earth-orbital, and spacecraft observational data are used in the present evaluation of Venus atmosphere-surface interactions to quantitatively characterize the reactions between C, H, S, Cl, F, and N gases and plausible surface minerals. Calculation results are used to predict stable minerals and mineral assemblages on the Venus surface, in order to ascertain which (if any) of the atmospheric gases are buffeted by mineral assemblages. Chemical equilibrium calculations using extant thermodynamic data on scapolite minerals predict that carbonate-bearing scapolite and sulfate meionite are unstable on the surface of Venus, while chloride-bearing scapolite is stable.

  13. Electron induced surface chemistry at the Cs/sapphire interface

    SciTech Connect

    Zavadil, K.R.; Ing, J.L.

    1996-03-01

    Electron induced etching of sapphire in the presence of Cs has been studied using a variety of surface analytical techniques. We find that this process occurs on both the (0001) and (1{bar 1}02) orientations of sapphire. Monolayer amounts of Al and sub-oxides of Al are thermally desorbed from the surface at temperatures as low as 1000 K when the surface is irradiated with electrons in the presence of Cs. Etching is highly dependent on Cs coverage with the (0001) and (1{bar 1}02) surfaces requiring 2.0{times}10{sup 14} and 3.4{times}10{sup 14} atoms/cm{sup 2} to support etching, respectively. Adsorption profiles demonstrate that these coverages correspond to initial saturation of the surface with Cs. Electron damage of the surface in the absence of Cs also produces desorption of Al and sub-oxides of Al, indicating a possible mechanism for etching. The impact of etching on the surface is to increase the adsorption capacity on the (0001) surface while decreasing both initial adsorption probability and capacity on the (1{bar 1}02) surface. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Coupling non-linear optical spectroscopy and surface chemistry: Towards new insights in atmospheric chemistry and aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmonem, Ahmed; Lützenkirchen, Johannes

    2017-04-01

    For decades, the observation of atmospheric processes in general and ice nucleation in particular bridged the scales from macroscopic to microscopic levels. They delivered a wide variety of results in cloud microphysics, particularly concerning the ice nucleation ability of atmospheric aerosol particles [1]. The surface properties of an ice-nucleating particle (INP) play a major role in its ice nucleation ability. This role is not well explored in terms of water/INP-surface molecular-level interactions. For example, we found recently that surface-charge induced templating hampers ice nucleation [2]. Aging of an INP in a cloud may change its surface properties and hence its ice nucleation efficiency. To improve our understanding of heterogeneous ice nucleation, we combine chemical and optical surface techniques to probe the change in surface properties of an INP and the corresponding water structuring on it, respectively. The presentation will show the different scenarios after aging of an INP in a cloud and the impact on its ice nucleation ability. References 1. Hoose, C. and O. Mohler, Heterogeneous ice nucleation on atmospheric aerosols: a review of results from laboratory experiments. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 2012. 12(20): p. 9817-9854. 2. Abdelmonem, A., et al., Surface charge-induced orientation of interfacial water suppresses heterogeneous ice nucleation on α-alumina (0001). Angewandte Chemie (Submitted), 2017.

  15. Investigation into the effect of water chemistry on corrosion product formation in areas of accelerated flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrady, John; Scenini, Fabio; Duff, Jonathan; Stevens, Nicholas; Cassineri, Stefano; Curioni, Michele; Banks, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    The deposition of CRUD (Chalk River Unidentified Deposit) in the primary circuit of a Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) is known to preferentially occur in regions of the circuit where flow acceleration of coolant occurs. A micro-fluidic flow cell was used to recreate accelerated flow under simulated PWR conditions, by flowing water through a disc with a central micro-orifice. CRUD deposition was reproduced on the disc, and CRUD Build-Up Rates (BUR) in various regions of the disc were analysed. The effect of the local environment on BUR was investigated. In particular, the effect of flow velocity, specimen material and Fe concentration were considered. The morphology and composition of the deposits were analysed with respect to experimental conditions. The BUR of CRUD was found to be sensitive to flow velocity and Fe concentration, suggesting that mass transfer is an important factor. The morphology of the deposit was affected by the specimen material indicating a dependence on surface/particle electrostatics meaning surface chemistry plays an important role in deposition. The preferential deposition of CRUD in accelerated flow regions due to electrokinetic effects was observed and it was shown that higher Fe concentrations in solution increased BURs within the orifice whereas increased flow velocity reduced BURs.

  16. Surface chemistry of metal-organic frameworks at the liquid-solid interface.

    PubMed

    Zacher, Denise; Schmid, Rochus; Wöll, Christof; Fischer, Roland A

    2011-01-03

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a fascinating class of novel inorganic-organic hybrid materials. They are essentially based on classic coordination chemistry and hold much promise for unique applications ranging from gas storage and separation to chemical sensing, catalysis, and drug release. The evolution of the full innovative potential of MOFs, in particular for nanotechnology and device integration, however requires a fundamental understanding of the formation process of MOFs. Also necessary is the ability to control the growth of thin MOF films and the positioning of size- and shape-selected crystals as well as MOF heterostructures on a given surface in a well-defined and oriented fashion. MOFs are solid-state materials typically formed by solvothermal reactions and their crystallization from the liquid phase involves the surface chemistry of their building blocks. This Review brings together various key aspects of the surface chemistry of MOFs.

  17. Youthful Geologic Terrains with Anomalous Surface Chemistry on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirley, James H.; Dalton, J. B., III; Prockter, L. M.; Kamp, L. W.

    2010-10-01

    Geologic mapping of Europa's Argadnel Regio has identified more than a dozen distinctive geologic terrains. We have assembled and registered spacecraft imaging, geologic mapping, and spectroscopic mapping datasets for part of this region. We have obtained linear mixture modeling compositional solutions for more than 40 non-overlapping exposures of ridged plains, low albedo plains, chaos, dark spots, and crater ejecta (Dalton et al., LPSC XL #2511, 2009; Shirley et al., 2010, Icarus, in press). This work has uncovered a well-defined spatial gradient of sulfuric acid hydrate abundance, with concentrations of this material increasing in the direction of Europa's trailing-side apex. Surprisingly, the gradient appears to be independent of the nature of the underlying terrain (Shirley et al., LPSC XLI, 2010). This suggests that the H2SO4 hydrate abundance may be closely linked with magnetospheric bombardment processes, which supply both sulfur ions and energy for driving the chemical reactions of the sulfur cycle (Carlson et al., Science 286, 97, 1999; Dalton et al., this meeting). Stratigraphic relationships indicate that the low albedo plains are among the youngest geologic terrains within our study area. Compositional solutions for four contiguous non-overlapping exposures of low albedo plains materials exhibit abundances of the H2SO4 hydrate that are lower than those of their immediate neighbors by up to 33%. We suggest that these particular exposures may not have been exposed to the surface radiation environment long enough to reach radiolytic chemical equilibrium; if so, this would suggest that these deposits may have been emplaced quite recently. We will touch on implications for chemical models of Europa's subsurface fluids, for observing strategies for future missions to Europa, and for astrobiological investigations. This work was supported by NASA's Outer Planets Research Program, and was performed at the California Institute of Technology-Jet Propulsion

  18. Polyoxoanion chemistry moves toward the future: From solids and solutions to surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Klemperer, W.G.; Wall, C.G.

    1998-01-01

    In the context of modern surface science, current understanding of polyoxoanion surface chemistry is truly modest from a structural/mechanistic point of view. Only three techniques have received any attention to date, and none of them has been developed to anywhere near its full potential. The quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) has proven to be a useful qualitative tool for in situ monitoring of polyoxoanion adsorption and adsorption kinetics. A second technique that has shown great potential for in situ study of polyoxoanion surface chemistry at solid-liquid interfaces is modulated infrared spectroscopy. The third and final in situ surface analytical technique that has shown great promise but is yet to be exploited to its full potential is scanning probe microscopy. Sections of the paper discuss scanning probe microscopy; single crystal surfaces; evaporative solution deposition on graphite; electrochemical deposition onto graphite; and self-assembly on metal surfaces.

  19. Analytical Chemistry of Surfaces: Part II. Electron Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hercules, David M.; Hercules, Shirley H.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses two surface techniques: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ESCA) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Focuses on fundamental aspects of each technique, important features of instrumentation, and some examples of how ESCA and AES have been applied to analytical surface problems. (JN)

  20. Geochemistry and Organic Chemistry on the Surface of Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, J. I.; Beauchamp, P.; Beauchamp, J.; Dougherty, D.; Welch, C.; Raulin, F.; Shapiro, R.; Smith, M.

    2001-01-01

    Titan's atmosphere produces a wealth of organic products from methane and nitrogen. These products, deposited on the surface in liquid and solid form, may interact with surface ices and energy sources to produce compounds of exobiological interest. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. Sampling procedure for lake or stream surface water chemistry

    Treesearch

    Robert Musselman

    2012-01-01

    Surface waters collected in the field for chemical analyses are easily contaminated. This research note presents a step-by-step detailed description of how to avoid sample contamination when field collecting, processing, and transporting surface water samples for laboratory analysis.

  2. Geochemistry and Organic Chemistry on the Surface of Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, J. I.; Beauchamp, P.; Beauchamp, J.; Dougherty, D.; Welch, C.; Raulin, F.; Shapiro, R.; Smith, M.

    2001-01-01

    Titan's atmosphere produces a wealth of organic products from methane and nitrogen. These products, deposited on the surface in liquid and solid form, may interact with surface ices and energy sources to produce compounds of exobiological interest. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. Stability investigation of laser darkened metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, Béla; Smausz, Tomi; Lentner, Márton; Kopniczky, Judit; Tápai, Csaba; Gera, Tamás; Csizmadia, Tamás; Ehrhardt, Martin; Lorenz, Pierre; Zimmer, Klaus

    2017-09-01

    Pulsed laser irradiation-induced reflectivity decrease of metal surfaces is a well-established phenomenon, which is extensively utilized in numerous applications. Since the stability of these black surfaces is often a demand, we investigated the resistance of darkened copper and titanium surfaces against optical and mechanical damages. For optical stability studies, samples were irradiated by a probe laser beam ( λ = 775 nm, FWHM = 150 fs, f = 1 kHz) at different fluences (0-300 mJ/cm2), while the mechanical stability was studied with scratch test using 2.5 µm radius tip and applying normal force in 29.4-147 µN range. The observed reflectivity and morphological changes indicated that the optical damage threshold fluence is 130 and 160 mJ/cm2 for copper and titanium surfaces, respectively. Mechanical damage only in case of copper could be detected in the applied parameter range indicating a scratch hardness of 21.5 MPa.

  4. Control of pyrite surface chemistry in physical coal cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Luttrell, G.H.; Yoon, R.H.; Zachwieja, J.B.; Lagno, M.L.

    1992-06-24

    Correlation of the hydrophobicity measurements of coal and mineral pyrite with changes in the surface composition of the samples as determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals that similar surface oxidation products are found on both mineral and coal pyrite samples. The surface oxidation layer of these samples is comprised of different amounts of hydrophilic species (iron hydroxy-oxides and/or iron oxides) and hydrophobic species (polysulfide or elemental sulfur). The resulting hydrophobicity of these samples may be attributed to the ratio of hydrophilic (surface oxides) to hydrophobic (sulfur-containing) species in the surface oxidation layer. Also, coal pyrite samples were found to exhibit a greater degree of superficial oxidation and a less hydrophobic character as compared to the mineral pyrite samples.

  5. The role of mineral surface chemistry in modified dextrin adsorption.

    PubMed

    Beaussart, Audrey; Mierczynska-Vasilev, Agnieszka M; Harmer, Sarah L; Beattie, David A

    2011-05-15

    The adsorption of two modified dextrins (phenyl succinate dextrin--PS Dextrin; styrene oxide dextrin--SO Dextrin) on four different mineral surfaces has been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, and captive bubble contact angle measurements. The four surfaces include highly orientated pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), freshly cleaved synthetic sphalerite (ZnS), and two surfaces produced through surface reactions of sphalerite: one oxidized in alkaline solution (pH 9, 1 h immersion); and one subjected to metal ion exchange between copper and zinc (i.e. copper activation: exposed to 1×10(-3) M CuSO(4) solution for 1 h). XPS measurements indicate that the different sphalerite surfaces contain varying amounts of sulfur, zinc, oxygen, and copper, producing substrates for polymer adsorption with a range of possible binding sites. AFM imaging has shown that the two polymers adsorb to a similar extent on HOPG, and that the two polymers display very different propensities for adsorption on the three sphalerite surface types, with freshly cleaved sphalerite encouraging the least adsorption, and copper activated and oxidized sphalerite encouraging significantly more adsorption. Contact angle measurements of the four surfaces indicate that synthetic sphalerite has a low contact angle upon fracture, and that oxidation on the timescale of one hour substantially alters the hydrophobicity. HOPG and copper-activated sphalerite were the most hydrophobic, as expected due to the carbon and di/poly-sulfide rich surfaces of the two samples, respectively. SO Dextrin is seen to have a significant impact on the wettability of HOPG and the surface reacted sphalerite samples, highlighting the difficulty in selectively separating sphalerite from carbonaceous unwanted minerals in flotation. PS Dextrin has the least effect on the hydrophobicity of the reacted sphalerite surfaces, whilst still significantly increasing the wettability of

  6. Macroform and microform-induced change in redox-sensitive chemistries of river channel surface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, P.; Zhang, H.; Heathwaite, A. L.; Binley, A.; Ullah, S.; Kaeser, D.; Heppell, C. M.; Lansdown, K.; Trimmer, M.

    2012-04-01

    In-stream geomorphological features such as riffle-pool sequences (macroforms) can produce steep hydraulic gradients which induce flow in and out of the riverbed - hyporheic exchange flow (HEF). The acceleration of flow over channel obstacles such as large cobbles and boulders (microforms) can create variation in surface-subsurface pressure gradients and generation of HEF. HEF in shallow surface sediments affect the transformation of redox-sensitive chemical forms and, therefore, the attenuation or release of nutrients in river systems. Here, we examine the relationship between stream geomorphological environment (microform and macroform) and concentration profiles of redox-sensitive species (nitrate, sulphate, iron, manganese) in shallow (15cm) subsurface sediments. In-situ passive samplers (diffusive equilibrium in thin films - DET) are used to obtain biogeochemical data from armoured environments at fine scale (cm) depth resolution where there is strong upwelling. The probes were deployed in a 50m reach of the River Eden, Cumbria, UK, during baseflow conditions. The experimental setup allowed for the assessment of differences in redox-sensitive chemistries between a riffle and pool environment and between smooth and rough bed surfaces in the pool. The passive sensing basis of the DET methodology provided a means for investigating how HEF systems generated at two different geomorphological scales influence the concentration and spatial patterns of redox-sensitive species. DET's capability of measuring at high spatial resolution allowed the extent of hyporheic mixing to be targeted, even though it is often limited to the top few centimetres of sediment.

  7. Supported organometallic complexes, surface chemistry, spectroscopy, and catalysis. Progress report, September 15, 1992--November 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, T.J.

    1993-04-01

    Goal is to elucidate and understand the surface chemistry and catalytic properties of well-defined, highly-reactive organometallic molecules (principally based upon abundant actinide, lanthanide, and early transition elements) adsorbed on metal oxides and halides. Nature of adsorbed species is probed by a battery of chemical and physicochemical techniques, to understand the nature of the molecule-surface coordination chemistry and how this can give rise to extremely high catalytic activity. A complementary objective is to delineate the scope and mechanisms of the heterogeneous catalytic reactions, as well as to relate them both conceptually and functionally to model systems generated in solution.

  8. Investigating Students' Engagement in Epistemic and Narrative Practices of Chemistry in the Context of a Story on Gas Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pabuccu, A.; Erduran, S.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated secondary school students' engagement in epistemic and narrative practices of chemistry in the context of a chemistry story on gas behavior. Argumentation is an example of an epistemic practice in science and stories are one kind of narrative (Ricoeur, 1981). By using a chemistry story, the authors hoped to engage students…

  9. Investigating Students' Engagement in Epistemic and Narrative Practices of Chemistry in the Context of a Story on Gas Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pabuccu, A.; Erduran, S.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated secondary school students' engagement in epistemic and narrative practices of chemistry in the context of a chemistry story on gas behavior. Argumentation is an example of an epistemic practice in science and stories are one kind of narrative (Ricoeur, 1981). By using a chemistry story, the authors hoped to engage students…

  10. Surface Redox Chemistry of Immobilized Nanodiamond: Effects of Particle Size and Electrochemical Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; McDonald, B.; Carrizosa, S. B.

    2017-07-01

    The size of the diamond particle is tailored to nanoscale (nanodiamond, ND), and the ND surface is engineered targeting specific (electrochemical and biological) applications. In this work, we investigated the complex surface redox chemistry of immobilized ND layer on conductive boron-doped diamond electrode with a broad experimental parameter space such as particle size (nano versus micron), scan rate, pH (cationic/acidic versus anionic/basic), electrolyte KCl concentration (four orders of magnitude), and redox agents (neutral and ionic). We reported on the significant enhancement of ionic currents while recording reversible oxidation of neutral ferrocene methanol (FcMeOH) by almost one order of magnitude than traditional potassium ferricyanide (K3Fe(CN)6) redox agent. The current enhancement is inversely related to ND particle diameter in the following order: 1 μm << 1000 nm < 100 nm < 10 nm ≤ 5 nm < 2 nm. We attribute the current enhancement to concurrent electrocatalytic processes, i.e. the electron transfer between redox probes and electroactive surface functional (e.g. hydroxyl, carboxyl, epoxy) moieties and the electron transfer mediated by adsorbed FcMeOH+ (or Fe(CN) 6 3+ ) ions onto ND surface. The first process is pH dependent since it depends upon ND surface functionalities for which the electron transfer is coupled to proton transfer. The adsorption mediated process is observed most apparently at slower scan rates owing to self-exchange between adsorbed FcMeOH+ ions and FcMeOH redox agent molecules in diffusion-limited bulk electrolyte solution. Alternatively, it is hypothesized that the surface functionality and defect sites ( sp 2-bonded C shell and unsaturated bonds) give rise to surface electronic states with energies within the band gap (midgap states) in undoped ND. These surface states serve as electron donors (and acceptors) depending upon their bonding (and antibonding) character and, therefore, they can support electrocatalytic redox

  11. Chemistry and material science at the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Weian; Teo, Grace Sock Leng; Kumar, Namit; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    Cell surfaces are fertile ground for chemists and material scientists to manipulate or augment cell functions and phenotypes. This not only helps to answer basic biology questions but also has diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In this review, we summarize the most recent advances in the engineering of the cell surface. In particular, we focus on the potential applications of surface engineered cells for 1) targeting cells to desirable sites in cell therapy, 2) programming assembly of cells for tissue engineering, 3) bioimaging and sensing, and ultimately 4) manipulating cell biology. PMID:21857791

  12. The surface chemistry of metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Christina V; Forgan, Ross S

    2015-03-28

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have received particular attention over the last 20 years as a result of their attractive properties offering potential applications in a number of areas. Typically, these characteristics are tuned by functionalisation of the bulk of the MOF material itself. This Feature Article focuses instead on modification of MOF particles at their surfaces only, which can also offer control over the bulk properties of the material. The differing surface modification techniques available to the synthetic chemist will be discussed, with a focus on the effect of surface modification of MOFs on their fundamental properties and application in adsorption, catalysis, drug delivery and other areas.

  13. Surface chemistry controls crystallinity of ZnSnanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Benjamin; Huang, Feng; Lin, Zhang; Goodell, Carmen; Zhang, Hengzhong; Banfield Jillian F.

    2005-12-20

    Combined small-angle and high energy wide-angle x-ray scattering measurements of nanoparticle size and structure permit interior strain and disorder to be directly observed in the real-space pair distribution function (PDF). PDF analysis showed that samples of ZnS nanoparticle with similar mean diameters (3.2-3.6 nm) but synthesized and treated differently possess a dramatic range of interior disorder. We used Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy to detect the surface species and the nature of surface chemical interactions. Our results suggest that there is a direct correlation between the strength of surface-ligand interactions and interior crystallinity.

  14. Effect of Space Radiation Processing on Lunar Soil Surface Chemistry: X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dukes, C.; Loeffler, M.J.; Baragiola, R.; Christoffersen, R.; Keller, J.

    2009-01-01

    Current understanding of the chemistry and microstructure of the surfaces of lunar soil grains is dominated by a reference frame derived mainly from electron microscopy observations [e.g. 1,2]. These studies have shown that the outermost 10-100 nm of grain surfaces in mature lunar soil finest fractions have been modified by the combined effects of solar wind exposure, surface deposition of vapors and accretion of impact melt products [1,2]. These processes produce surface-correlated nanophase Feo, host grain amorphization, formation of surface patinas and other complex changes [1,2]. What is less well understood is how these changes are reflected directly at the surface, defined as the outermost 1-5 atomic monolayers, a region not easily chemically characterized by TEM. We are currently employing X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) to study the surface chemistry of lunar soil samples that have been previously studied by TEM. This work includes modification of the grain surfaces by in situ irradiation with ions at solar wind energies to better understand how irradiated surfaces in lunar grains change their chemistry once exposed to ambient conditions on earth.

  15. Surface chemistry mediated assembly of polymer-grafted nanorods in solution and polymer matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrier, Robert Charles, Jr.

    In the dissertation, I investigate ways to assemble nanorods, typically made of gold, in solution and polymer matrices by controlling surface chemistry. Gold nanorods were anisotropically functionalized with polymer on the side and alkane dithiol on the end causing the gold nanorods to spontaneously assemble in solution. The assembly could be tuned by controlling the incubation time which affected the solution absorbance due to plasmon coupling. Linked gold nanorods were cast in polymer thin films and their optical properties were imparted to the film. This anisotropic functionalization method was utilized to placed DNA or peptides on the ends of the gold nanorods allowing for reversibly assembly. In the case of DNA, assembly was reversed upon heating and could be tuned by controlling the concentration of the complimentary DNA strand. In the case of the peptide, assembly was triggered by the presence of Zn 2+ ions and could be reversed by adding in a chelater. Anisotropic modification of the nanorods could also be used to assemble organic semiconductors around the nanorods at specific facets. Here, organic semiconductors rhodamine-B, 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein, and cyanine-3 were assembled onto the surface of gold nanorods. By tuning the surface chemistry the organic semiconductors would assemble around the nanorods in different ways which resulted in unique optical properties. The dispersion of PMMA-grafted mesoscopic iron-oxide rods in polymer matrices was studied by varying the PMMA brush molecular weight (N) polymer matrix molecular weight (P), and polymer matrix type. Here, we found that the ratio of P/N and matrix type had little effect on dispersion of iron-oxide mesorods. N was found to be the main factor that determined dispersion, which is attributed to the large size of the mesorods. Long PS and short PMMA brushes were grafted to gold nanorod surfaces and the dispersion of this system in PS and PMMA was investigated by controlling matrix molecular weight

  16. The effects of surface chemistry and adsorbed proteins on monocyte/macrophage adhesion to chemically modified polystyrene surfaces.

    PubMed

    Shen, M; Horbett, T A

    2001-12-05

    Monocytes and macrophages play critical roles in inflammatory responses to implanted biomaterials. Monocyte adhesion may lead to macrophage activation and the foreign body response. We report that surface chemistry, preadsorbed proteins, and adhesion time all play important roles during monocyte adhesion in vitro. The surface chemistry of tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), polystyrene, Primaria, and ultra low attachment (ULA) used for adhesion studies was characterized by electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. Fibrinogen adsorption measured by (125)I-labeled fibrinogen was the lowest on ULA, higher on TCPS, and the highest on polystyrene or Primaria. Monocyte adhesion on protein preadsorbed surfaces for 2 h or 1 day was measured with a lactate-dehydrogenase method. Monocyte adhesion decreased over time. The ability of preadsorbed proteins to modulate monocyte adhesion was surface dependent. Adhesion was the lowest on ULA, higher and similar on TCPS or polystyrene, and the highest on Primaria. Monocyte adhesion on plasma or fibrinogen adsorbed surfaces correlated positively and linearly to the amount of adsorbed fibrinogen. Preadsorbed fibronectin, immunoglobulin G, plasma, or serum also promoted adhesion compared with albumin preadsorbed or uncoated surfaces. Overall, biomaterial surface chemistry, the type and amount of adsorbed proteins, and adhesion time all affected monocyte adhesion in vitro. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res 57: 336-345, 2001

  17. Fundamental investigations of silane adhesion promoters on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Sourabh

    1997-08-01

    samples were pre-oxidized in an attempt to increase the amount of oxides on the surface and thereby retain chlorosilane. Pre-oxidation converted Cusb2O to CuO. This did not change the behavior of chlorosilane and reduced the uptake of methoxysilane. Solution and surface reactions were suggested for both silanes. For methoxysilane, silanes or silanols directly hydrogen bonded to surface oxide or hydroxyl groups are proposed to be the primary species that lead to metal siloxanes. In the second part of the study, silylation of commercially pure Ti (cpTi) was investigated to determine the orientation of silanes on Ti and the utility of silanes as adhesion promoters on biomaterials. Amino-propyl-silanes with varying number of ethoxy groups were deposited using wet chemistry techniques. Polished cpTi surfaces had mainly TiOsb2, O-H groups, and hydrocarbonaceous impurities. Silylation led to the presence of Si-O groups. Trifunctional silanes produced thicker silane layers than monofunctional silanes. This was attributed to crosslinking between Si-O groups. The silanes were found to be bonded primarily in "amine up" configurations. Some silane groups were in "amine down" configuration in the case of monofunctional silane. The silane layers were found to be stable when exposed to toluene and were less stable when exposed to water. This was attributed to covalent linkage between the Si-O groups and the surface oxides. The compatibility of the silane layers for bio-adhesion was tested by immobilizing poly(ethylene glycol) PEG. The PEG layer was stable on silylated cpTi even after exposure to water, whereas PEG deposited on polished cpTi was washed away in water.

  18. Effects of Surface Chemistry on the Porous Structure of Coal

    SciTech Connect

    Radovic, Ljubisa R; Hatcher, Patrick G

    1997-05-01

    In this report, 129 Xe nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of xenon gas adsorbed in coal is used to describe some poorly understood features of coal microporous structure, particularly in establishing that a connected network exists, the type of connectivity, and its changes with the rank of coal. Micropore size scale and distribution are also considered. Two methods are developed which are new and versatile tools for the investigation of porous structure. Both utilize xenon gas that is in motion, while undergoing diffusion or exchange in coal, to describe the connectivity of the micropore structure of coal. Time tracking of the adsorption process by NMR, selective saturation, and saturation transfer techniques were used to obtain new information on the coal rank dependence of porous structure. In addition, an existing 129 Xe chemical shift-pore diameter model was used to calculate micropore diameters for coals, as well as for a microporous carbon, before and after pore-size alteration. In the initial study performed, straightforward 129 Xe NMR spectra at equilibrium xenon adsorption at a series of pressures were acquired for a rank-varied set of six coals. Acquisition of the NMR signal as an echo was tested and found to improve spectral quality. The spectra were used to calculate micropore diameters for the six coals. These range from 5.6 to 7.5 and exhibit a minimum value for the intermediate coal rank. The smallest pores occur in coals of about 82-85% carbon; at both lower and higher coal ranks, the average micropore size tends to be larger. The changes in the spectra with coal rank and surface area were explored. Signal linewidths were found to decrease with increasing coal rank and were interpreted in terms of increasing chemical or physical homogeneity of the coal as rank increases. The packing density of powdered coal was found to alter the spectral appearance in a high volatile bituminous coal, which is preliminary evidence that exchange affects the

  19. From helical to planar chirality by on-surface chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetsovych, Oleksandr; Švec, Martin; Vacek, Jaroslav; Chocholoušová, Jana Vacek; Jančařík, Andrej; Rybáček, Jiří; Kosmider, Krzysztof; Stará, Irena G.; Jelínek, Pavel; Starý, Ivo

    2016-11-01

    The chirality of molecular structures is paramount in many phenomena, including enantioselective reactions, molecular self-assembly, biological processes and light or electron-spin polarization. Flat prochiral molecules, which are achiral in the gas phase or solution, can exhibit adsorption-induced chirality when deposited on surfaces. The whole array of such molecular adsorbates is naturally racemic as spontaneous global mirror-symmetry breaking is disfavoured. Here we demonstrate a chemical method of obtaining flat prochiral molecules adsorbed on the solid achiral surface in such a way that a specific adsorbate handedness globally dominates. An optically pure helical precursor is flattened in a cascade of on-surface reactions, which enables chirality transfer. The individual reaction products are identified by high-resolution scanning-probe microscopy. The ultimate formation of globally non-racemic assemblies of flat molecules through stereocontrolled on-surface synthesis allows for chirality to be expressed in as yet unexplored types of organic-inorganic chiral interfaces.

  20. From helical to planar chirality by on-surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Stetsovych, Oleksandr; Švec, Martin; Vacek, Jaroslav; Chocholoušová, Jana Vacek; Jančařík, Andrej; Rybáček, Jiří; Kosmider, Krzysztof; Stará, Irena G; Jelínek, Pavel; Starý, Ivo

    2017-03-01

    The chirality of molecular structures is paramount in many phenomena, including enantioselective reactions, molecular self-assembly, biological processes and light or electron-spin polarization. Flat prochiral molecules, which are achiral in the gas phase or solution, can exhibit adsorption-induced chirality when deposited on surfaces. The whole array of such molecular adsorbates is naturally racemic as spontaneous global mirror-symmetry breaking is disfavoured. Here we demonstrate a chemical method of obtaining flat prochiral molecules adsorbed on the solid achiral surface in such a way that a specific adsorbate handedness globally dominates. An optically pure helical precursor is flattened in a cascade of on-surface reactions, which enables chirality transfer. The individual reaction products are identified by high-resolution scanning-probe microscopy. The ultimate formation of globally non-racemic assemblies of flat molecules through stereocontrolled on-surface synthesis allows for chirality to be expressed in as yet unexplored types of organic-inorganic chiral interfaces.

  1. Control of pyrite surface chemistry in physical coal cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Luttrell, G.H.; Yoon, R.H.; Lagno, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    The removal of pyrite from coal by flotation or any other surface- based separation process is often hampered by the apparent hydrophobicity of the mineral. Microflotation tests and induction time measurements conducted under different conditions showed that the hydrophobicity of coal pyrite is due to superficial oxidation of the mineral surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of the oxidized pyrite samples suggests that the sulfur-rich surfaces formed during oxidation may be responsible for the hydrophobicity of both coal pyrite and mineral pyrite. Based on these findings, an oxidation mechanism is proposed in which metal polysulfides and iron oxides-hydroxides are produced. The floatability of both coal pyrite and mineral pyrite can be correlated with the atomic ration between these hydrophobic and hydrophilic species that are formed on the surface. 14 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Reaction chemistry and ligand exchange at cadmium selenide nanocrystal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Jonathan; Park, Jungwon; Trudeau, Paul-Emile; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-12-02

    Chemical modification of nanocrystal surfaces is fundamentally important to their assembly, their implementation in biology and medicine, and greatly impacts their electrical and optical properties. However, it remains a major challenge owing to a lack of analytical tools to directly determine nanoparticle surface structure. Early nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies of CdSe nanocrystals prepared in tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (1) and tri-n-octylphosphine (2), suggested these coordinating solvents are datively bound to the particle surface. However, assigning the broad NMR resonances of surface-bound ligands is complicated by significant concentrations of phosphorus-containing impurities in commercial sources of 1, and XPS provides only limited information about the nature of the phosphorus containing molecules in the sample. More recent reports have shown the surface ligands of CdSe nanocrystals prepared in technical grade 1, and in the presence of alkylphosphonic acids, include phosphonic and phosphinic acids. These studies do not, however, distinguish whether these ligands are bound datively, as neutral, L-type ligands, or by X-type interaction of an anionic phosphonate/phosphinate moiety with a surface Cd{sup 2+} ion. Answering this question would help clarify why ligand exchange with such particles does not proceed generally as expected based on a L-type ligand model. By using reagents with reactive silicon-chalcogen and silicon-chlorine bonds to cleave the ligands from the nanocrystal surface, we show that our CdSe and CdSe/ZnS core-shell nanocrystal surfaces are likely terminated by X-type binding of alkylphosphonate ligands to a layer of Cd{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} ions, rather than by dative interactions. Further, we provide spectroscopic evidence that 1 and 2 are not coordinated to our purified nanocrystals.

  3. Surface Physics and Chemistry of Electrical Contact Phenomena.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    terms of a simple outgassing model that involves bulk diffusion of sulfur to the surface and its precipitation there. Clearly locally high...on diffusion controlled " outgassing " in which the sulfur segregated to the surface instead of vaporizing. The activation energies for this process for...increased slightly with temperature. tially identical to that involved in the outgassing of materials However, only for the Ag/Cu alloy, above 500’C the

  4. Surface engineering of poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic devices using transition metal sol-gel chemistry.

    PubMed

    Roman, Gregory T; Culbertson, Christopher T

    2006-04-25

    We report the coating of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microchannels using transition metal sol-gel chemistry and the subsequent characterization of the coatings. The channels were created using soft polymer lithography, and three metal alkoxide sol-gel precursors were investigated, titanium isopropoxide, zirconium isopropoxide, and vanadium triisobutoxide oxide. The metal alkoxides were diffused into the sidewalls of a PDMS channel and subsequently hydrolyzed using water vapor. This procedure resulted in the formation of durable metal oxide surfaces of titania, zirconia, or vanadia. The resulting surfaces were characterized using contact angle, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and electroosmotic mobility (EOM) measurements. All of the metal oxide-modified PDMS surfaces were significantly more hydrophilic than native PDMS. Contact angles for the coatings were 90 degrees for PDMS-ZrO2, 61 degrees for PDMS-TiO2, and 19 degrees for PDMS-vanadia. XPS showed the presence of titania, zirconia, and vanadia on the PDMS surface. XPS spectra also showed no chemical modification of the PDMS after the in situ deposition of the particles either in the Si-O, Si-C, or C-H bonds of the PDMS. The particles deposited in situ were imaged with TEM and were found to be homogeneously distributed throughout the bulk of the PDMS. EOM measurements of the inorganic coatings were stable over a period of at least 95 days. Both cathodic and anodic EOMs could be generated depending upon buffer pH used. The points of net zero charge for PDMS-TiO2, PDMS-ZrO2, and PDMS-vanadia channels were calculated using EOM versus pH measurements and were found to be 4.1 +/- 0.25, 6.1 +/- 0.2, and 7.0 +/- 0.43, respectively. In addition to modifying PDMS channels with inorganic coatings, these inorganic coatings were derivatized with various organic functionalities including oligoethylene

  5. Urban PM2.5 surface chemistry and interactions with bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Michaela; Guntern, Jodok; Lockyer, Nicholas P; Jones, Frances H; Hutton, Bernie M; Lippmann, Morton; Tetley, Teresa D

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the surface chemistry of urban fine particles (PM(2.5)), and quantified the adsorbed and desorbed species after exposure to bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Urban background and roadside PM(2.5) samples of different mass concentration and total weight were collected in triplicate in the South Bronx region of New York City. Simultaneously, the concentrations of other atmospheric pollutants (CO, NO(x), SO(2), O(3), elemental carbon) were measured, and weather conditions were recorded. The collected PM(2.5) samples underwent one of three treatments: no treatment, treatment in vitro with BALF, or treatment in a saline solution (control). The surfaces of untreated, saline-treated, and BALF-treated PM(2.5) samples were analyzed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). These results were then compared with ambient air pollutant concentrations, weather variables, selected BALF characteristics, and results from a previous London study conducted using identical preparation methods by XPS analysis only. Both XPS and ToF-SIMS detected PM(2.5) surface species and observed changes in surface concentrations after treatment. XPS analysis showed the surface of untreated urban PM(2.5) consisted of 79 to 87% carbon and 10 to 16% oxygen with smaller contributions of N, S, Si, and P in the samples from both background and roadside locations. A wider variety of other inorganic and organic species (including metals, aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, and nitrogen-containing molecules) was detected with ToF-SIMS. Surface characteristics of particles from the roadside and background sites were very similar, except for higher (p <.05) nitrate concentrations at the roadside, which were attributable to higher roadside NO(x) concentrations. Comparable species and quantities were identified in a previous study of London PM(2.5), where PM(2.5) surface chemistry differed considerably depending on the

  6. Effect of surface chemistry on in vitro actomyosin motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Kristi L.; Solana, Gerardin; Nicolau, Dan V.

    2005-02-01

    A variety of surface coatings were evaluated for their ability to promote in vitro actomyosin motility. Rabbit skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin (HMM) was adsorbed to uncoated glass and to surfaces coated with nitrocellulose, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), poly(butyl methacrylate) (PBMA), poly(tert-butyl methacrylate (PtBMA), polystyrene (PS) and hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS), and the myosin driven movement of fluorescently labeled actin filaments was recorded using epifluorescence microscopy. HMDS and uncoated glass did not support actomyosin motility, while mean velocities on other surfaces ranged from 1.7 μm sec-1 (PtBMA) to 3.5 μm sec-1 (NC). Nitrocellulose supported the highest proportion of motile filaments (75%), while 47 - 61% of filaments were motile on other surfaces. Within the methacrylate polymers, average filament velocities increased with decreasing hydrophobicity of the surface. Distributions of instantaneous acceleration values and angle deviations suggested more erratic and stuttered movement on the methacrylates and polystyrene than on NC, in line with qualitative visual observations. Despite the higher velocities and high proportion of motile filaments on NC, this surface resulted in a high proportion of small filaments and high rates of filament breakage during motility. Similar effects were observed on PS and PtBMA, while PBMA and PMMA supported longer filaments with less observed breakage.

  7. Quantum chemistry investigation of fluorinated polymer systems of industrial interest.

    PubMed

    Mavroudakis, Evangelos; Cuccato, Danilo; Dossi, Marco; Comino, Giovanni; Moscatelli, Davide

    2014-01-09

    In this work, the free-radical polymerization (FRP) of widely used fluorinated monomers was investigated. Computational studies were conducted to assess the FRP kinetics of each binary copolymerization between vinylidene fluoride (VDF), hexafluoropropylene (HFP), and tetrafluoroethylene (TFE). More specifically, all calculations were performed using density functional theory (DFT), and the B3LYP level of theory was used to optimize structures and determine absolute minimum energy geometries, whereas the electronic energies were estimated using B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) as well as a higher level of theory, MPWB1K/6-31G(d,p). Transition state theory was employed to determine kinetic parameters according to the terminal model of copolymerization. The homopolymerization of VDF and all of its corresponding copolymerizations were investigated by taking into account every possible propagation reaction (head to head, head to tail, tail to tail, head to monomer, tail to monomer, etc.) to estimate the Arrhenius parameters for each system. This study provides the estimation of a large set of rate coefficients, which gives detailed pictures of the specific copolymerization systems examined and is highly valuable to generate a comprehensive overview of the polymerization kinetics of relevant fluorinated monomers.

  8. Dental implant surface chemistry and energy alter macrophage activation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hotchkiss, Kelly M; Ayad, Nancy B; Hyzy, Sharon L; Boyan, Barbara D; Olivares-Navarrete, Rene

    2017-04-01

    To determine the effects of dental implant surface chemistry and energy on macrophage activation in vitro. Disks made from two clinically used implant materials (titanium [Ti], titanium zirconium alloy [TiZr]) were produced with two different surface treatments (sandblast/acid-etch [SLA], hydrophilic-SLA [modSLA]). Surface roughness, energy, and chemistry were characterized. Primary murine macrophages were isolated from 6- to 8-week-old male C57Bl/6 mice and cultured on test surfaces (Ti SLA, TiZr SLA, Ti modSLA, TiZr modSLA) or control tissue culture polystyrene. mRNA was quantified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction after 24 h of culture. Pro- (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α) and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10) protein levels were measured by ELISA after 1 or 3 days of culture. Quantitatively, microroughness was similar on all surfaces. Qualitatively, nanostructures were present on modSLA surfaces that were denser on Ti than on TiZr. modSLA surfaces were determined hydrophilic (high-energy surface) while SLA surfaces were hydrophobic (low-energy surface). Cells on high-energy surfaces had higher levels of mRNA from anti-inflammatory markers characteristic of M2 activation compared to cells on low-energy surfaces. This effect was enhanced on the TiZr surfaces when compared to cells on Ti SLA and Ti modSLA. Macrophages cultured on TiZr SLA and modSLA surfaces released more anti-inflammatory cytokines. The combination of high-energy and altered surface chemistry present on TiZr modSLA was able to influence macrophages to produce the greatest anti-inflammatory microenvironment and reduce extended pro-inflammatory factor release. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Aspects of goethite surface microtopography, structure, chemistry, and reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Rakovan, J.; Becker, U.; Hochella, M.F. Jr.

    1999-05-01

    Goethite (010), (110), and (111) growth faces and (010) cleavage surfaces of large, natural single crystals, as well as a high surface area synthetic sample were characterized using various surface sensitive microscopies and spectroscopies. Differential interference contrast and atomic force microscopy characterization of the natural single crystal faces showed microtopography indicative of growth, dissolution, and cleavage. Low energy electron diffraction patterns of the goethite (010) surface exhibit sharp, intense diffraction spots, indicating long-range order on this important surface. Ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy was performed on (010) cleavage faces, although the tunneling properties of the surface were very heterogeneous. Atomic resolution was not obtained; however, microtopographic images are identical to those collected with AFM. XPS spectra from the (010) faces of two natural samples as well as the synthetic powder all have peak maxima for Fe(2p{sub 3/2}) at 711.5 {+-} 0.1 eV. The O(1s) line originating from the goethite can be fit with two peaks with a chemical shift of 1.3 eV. The peak at higher binding energy represents the protonated oxygen in the structure, and the peak at lower binding energy represents the proton-free oxygen in the structure. Ab initio and semi-empirical models of the (010) surface suggest that cleavage occurs through the hydroxide plane at 1/4 b in the structure. This is contrary to cleavage through the oxide plane at 1/2 b, which has been assumed in several previous studies.

  10. The Australian methane budget: Interpreting surface and train-borne measurements using a chemistry transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Annemarie; Chan Miller, Christopher; Palmer, Paul I.; Deutscher, Nicholas M.; Jones, Nicholas B.; Griffith, David W. T.

    2011-10-01

    We investigate the Australian methane budget from 2005-2008 using the GEOS-Chem 3D chemistry transport model, focusing on the relative contribution of emissions from different sectors and the influence of long-range transport. To evaluate the model, we use in situ surface measurements of methane, methane dry air column average (XCH4) from ground-based Fourier transform spectrometers (FTSs), and train-borne surface concentration measurements from an in situ FTS along the north-south continental transect. We use gravity anomaly data from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment to describe the spatial and temporal distribution of wetland emissions and scale it to a prior emission estimate, which better describes observed atmospheric methane variability at tropical latitudes. The clean air sites of Cape Ferguson and Cape Grim are the least affected by local emissions, while Wollongong, located in the populated southeast with regional coal mining, samples the most locally polluted air masses (2.5% of the total air mass versus <1% at other sites). Averaged annually, the largest single source above background of methane at Darwin is long-range transport, mainly from Southeast Asia, accounting for ˜25% of the change in surface concentration above background. At Cape Ferguson and Cape Grim, emissions from ruminant animals are the largest source of methane above background, at approximately 20% and 30%, respectively, of the surface concentration. At Wollongong, emissions from coal mining are the largest source above background representing 60% of the surface concentration. The train data provide an effective way of observing transitions between urban, desert, and tropical landscapes.

  11. Hydrogeologic controls of surface-water chemistry in the Adirondack region of New York State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, N.E.; Driscoll, C.T.

    1987-01-01

    Relationships between surface-water discharge, water chemistry, and watershed geology were investigated to evaluate factors affecting the sensitivity of drainage waters in the Adirondack region of New York to acidification by atmospheric deposition. Instantaneous discharge per unit area was derived from relationships between flow and staff-gage readings at 10 drainage basins throughout the region. The average chemical composition of the waters was assessed from monthly samples collected from July 1982 through July 1984. The ratio of flow at the 50-percent exceedence level to the flow at the 95-percent exceedence level of flow duration was negatively correlated with mean values of alkalinity or acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC), sum of basic cations (SBC), and dissolved silica, for basins containing predominantly aluminosilicate minerals and little or no carbonate-bearing minerals. Low ratios are indicative of systems in which flow is predominately derived from surface- and ground-water storage, whereas high ratios are characteristic of watersheds with variable flow that is largely derived from surface runoff. In an evaluation of two representative surface-water sites, concentrations of ANC, SBC, and dissolved silica, derived primarily from soil mineral weathering reactions. decreased with increasing flow. Furthermore, the ANC was highest at low flow when the percentage of streamflow derived from ground water was maximum. As flow increased, the ANC decreased because the contribution of dilute surface runoff and lateral flow through the shallow acidic soil horizons to total flow increased. Basins having relatively high ground-water contributions to total flow, in general, have large deposits of thick till or stratified drift. A major factor controlling the sensitivity of these streams and lakes to acidification is the relative contribution of ground water to total discharge. ?? 1987 Martinus Nijhoff/Dr W. Junk Publishers.

  12. [Ocular surface investigations in dry eye].

    PubMed

    Labbé, A; Brignole-Baudouin, F; Baudouin, C

    2007-01-01

    Dry eye is a complex clinicopathological entity involving tear film, lacrimal glands, eyelids, and a wide spectrum of ocular surface cells, including epithelial, inflammatory, immune, and goblet cells. From the tightly regulated lacrimal film functions and structure, a large variety of investigations have been developed, including tear meniscus measurements, fluorophotometry, meibometry, interference pattern analysis, evaporation rate, tear osmolarity, and thermography. Dry eye conditions also interfere with the ocular surface, causing corneal irregularities that may be explored using the techniques of videokeratography and in vivo confocal microscopy, or optical impairment, as confirmed by aberrometry. At the level of ocular surface cells, impression cytology remains a standard for assessing cell alterations. It has greatly benefited from new confocal microscopy, molecular biology, and flow cytometry techniques. Biological assessment of tear proteins or other mediators is also useful. Major limits should be acknowledged, however, such as technical issues in tear film collection, especially in dry eyes, and the lack of standardization of most measurements. Tear osmolarity, electrophoresis, and dosage of normal tear proteins, such as lysozyme or lactoferrin, remain the most useful tests. Finally, some extraocular explorations such as accessory gland biopsy or serum antinuclear antibody dosage may be useful for assessing the diagnosis of Sjögren's syndrome.

  13. Vesper - Venus Chemistry and Dynamics Orbiter - A NASA Discovery Mission Proposal: Submillimeter Investigation of Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Gordon

    2011-01-01

    Vesper conducts a focused investigation of the chemistry and dynamics of the middle atmosphere of our sister planet- from the base of the global cloud cover to the lower thermosphere. The middle atmosphere controls the stability of the Venus climate system. Vesper determines what processes maintain the atmospheric chemical stability, cause observed variability of chemical composition, control the escape of water, and drive the extreme super-rotation. The Vesper science investigation provides a unique perspective on the Earth environment due to the similarities in the middle atmosphere processes of both Venus and the Earth. Understanding key distinctions and similarities between Venus and Earth will increase our knowledge of how terrestrial planets evolve along different paths from nearly identical initial conditions.

  14. Trends in the chemistry of precipitation and surface water in a national network of small watersheds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aulenbach, Brent T.; Hooper, R.P.; Bricker, O.P.

    1996-01-01

    Trends in precipitation and surface water chemistry at a network of 15 small watersheds ( < 10 km2) in the USA were evaluated using a statistical test for monotonic trends (the seasonal Kendall test) and a graphical smoothing technique for the visual identification of trends. Composite precipitation samples were collected weekly and surface water samples were collected at least monthly. Concentrations were adjusted before trend analysis, by volume for precipitation samples and by flow for surface water samples. A relation between precipitation and surface water trends was not evident either for individual inorganic solutes or for solute combinations, such as ionic strength, at most sites. The only exception was chloride, for which there was a similar trend at 60% of the sites. The smoothing technique indicated that short-term patterns in precipitation chemistry were not reflected in surface waters. The magnitude of the short-term variations in surface water concentration was generally larger than the overall long-term trend, possibly because flow adjustment did not adequately correct for climatic variability. Detecting the relation between precipitation and surface water chemistry trends may be improved by using a more powerful sampling strategy and by developing better methods of concentration adjustment to remove the effects of natural variation in surface waters.

  15. Surface chemistry and morphology in single particle optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekiz-Kanik, Fulya; Sevenler, Derin Deniz; Ünlü, Neşe Lortlar; Chiari, Marcella; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2017-05-01

    Biological nanoparticles such as viruses and exosomes are important biomarkers for a range of medical conditions, from infectious diseases to cancer. Biological sensors that detect whole viruses and exosomes with high specificity, yet without additional labeling, are promising because they reduce the complexity of sample preparation and may improve measurement quality by retaining information about nanoscale physical structure of the bio-nanoparticle (BNP). Towards this end, a variety of BNP biosensor technologies have been developed, several of which are capable of enumerating the precise number of detected viruses or exosomes and analyzing physical properties of each individual particle. Optical imaging techniques are promising candidates among broad range of label-free nanoparticle detectors. These imaging BNP sensors detect the binding of single nanoparticles on a flat surface functionalized with a specific capture molecule or an array of multiplexed capture probes. The functionalization step confers all molecular specificity for the sensor's target but can introduce an unforeseen problem; a rough and inhomogeneous surface coating can be a source of noise, as these sensors detect small local changes in optical refractive index. In this paper, we review several optical technologies for label-free BNP detectors with a focus on imaging systems. We compare the surface-imaging methods including dark-field, surface plasmon resonance imaging and interference reflectance imaging. We discuss the importance of ensuring consistently uniform and smooth surface coatings of capture molecules for these types of biosensors and finally summarize several methods that have been developed towards addressing this challenge.

  16. Investigation into the hydrodynamic performance of fouling-release surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Ronan Declan

    Silicone fouling release coatings provide the only proven biocide free antifouling method, available to ship and boat operators. These surfaces rely on hydrodynamic forces for the removal of fouling and there is interest in understanding the relationship between biofouling and the hydrodynamic forces required for removal. This research investigated the feasibility of predicting the release of cylinders adhered to silicone with epoxy under hydrodynamic loading using a simple point load adhesion measurement. Adhesion and material science, fracture mechanics and hydrodynamics are complex subjects and a detailed review is presented. Experiments were designed and divided into two main categories. Laboratory measurements, which were undertaken to investigate the factors that affect the adhesion of epoxy to fouling release surfaces, and hydrodynamic experiments that were designed to understand the forces and moments imparted on known shapes. The laboratory experiments determined that the stress at failure of epoxy to a silicone fouling release type surface is determined by coating thickness, rate of loading, how the load is applied, chemistry of the interface, and the mechanical properties of the coating. The hydrodynamic experiments were conducted from a test section built into the hull of a 9 meter power vessel. Glass panels were mounted into an instrument such that the coating surface became an integral part of the boat hull. The instrument included, a pitot static tube, to measure the boundary layer velocity, a six component force balance, to measure the forces and moments imparted on these shapes, and the test glass panel. The panels were coated with a clear silicone and cylinders were adhered using epoxy to the coating. This setup enabled the interface between the silicone and epoxy to be viewed using a high speed digital video camera. From these experiments it was determined that it is possible to relatively predict the failure of a cylinder of any length and

  17. Mussel-Inspired Surface Chemistry for Multifunctional Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Haeshin; Dellatore, Shara M.; Miller, William M.; Messersmith, Phillip B.

    2007-10-01

    We report a method to form multifunctional polymer coatings through simple dip-coating of objects in an aqueous solution of dopamine. Inspired by the composition of adhesive proteins in mussels, we used dopamine self-polymerization to form thin, surface-adherent polydopamine films onto a wide range of inorganic and organic materials, including noble metals, oxides, polymers, semiconductors, and ceramics. Secondary reactions can be used to create a variety of ad-layers, including self-assembled monolayers through deposition of long-chain molecular building blocks, metal films by electroless metallization, and bioinert and bioactive surfaces via grafting of macromolecules.

  18. Mussel-Inspired Surface Chemistry for Multifunctional Coatings

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Haeshin; Dellatore, Shara M.; Miller, William M.; Messersmith, Phillip B.

    2008-01-01

    We report a method to form multifunctional polymer coatings through simple dip-coating of objects in an aqueous solution of dopamine. Inspired by the composition of adhesive proteins in mussels, we used dopamine self-polymerization to form thin, surface-adherent polydopamine films onto a wide range of inorganic and organic materials, including noble metals, oxides, polymers, semiconductors, and ceramics. Secondary reactions can be used to create a variety of ad-layers, including self-assembled monolayers through deposition of long-chain molecular building blocks, metal films by electroless metallization, and bioinert and bioactive surfaces via grafting of macromolecules. PMID:17947576

  19. Varying molecular interactions by coverage in supramolecular surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yeliang; Fabris, Stefano; White, Thomas W; Pagliuca, Federico; Moras, Paolo; Papagno, Marco; Topwal, Dinesh; Sheverdyaeva, Polina; Carbone, Carlo; Lingenfelder, Magalí; Classen, Thomas; Kern, Klaus; Costantini, Giovanni

    2012-01-14

    The possibility of modifying the intermolecular interactions of absorbed benzene-carboxylic acids from coordination to hydrogen bonding by changing their surface coverage is demonstrated through a combination of scanning tunnelling microscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations.

  20. Delivery of minimally dispersed liquid interfaces for sequential surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ostromohov, N; Bercovici, M; Kaigala, G V

    2016-08-02

    We present a method for sequential delivery of reagents to a reaction site with minimal dispersion of their interfaces. Using segmented flow to encapsulate the reagents as droplets, the dispersion between reagent plugs remains confined in a limited volume, while being transmitted to the reaction surface. In close proximity to the target surface, we use a passive array of microstructures for removal of the oil phase such that the original reagent sequence is reconstructed, and only the aqueous phase reaches the reaction surface. We provide a detailed analysis of the conditions under which the method can be applied and demonstrate maintaining a transition time of 560 ms between reagents transported to a reaction site over a distance of 60 cm. We implemented the method using a vertical microfluidic probe on an open surface, allowing contact-free interaction with biological samples, and demonstrated two examples of assays implemented using the method: measurements of receptor-ligand reaction kinetics and of the fluorescence response of immobilized GFP to local variations in pH. We believe that the method can be useful for studying the dynamic response of cells and proteins to various stimuli, as well as for highly automated multi-step assays.

  1. Surface chemistry and rheology of polysulfobetaine-coated silica.

    PubMed

    Starck, Pierre; Mosse, Wade K J; Nicholas, Nathan J; Spiniello, Marisa; Tyrrell, Johanna; Nelson, Andrew; Qiao, Greg G; Ducker, William A

    2007-07-03

    We have measured the viscosity of suspensions of colloidal silica particles (d = 300 nm) and the properties of silica surfaces in solutions of a polymer consisting of zwitterionic monomer groups, poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate), polySBMA. This polymer has potential use in modifying surface properties because the polymer is net uncharged and therefore does not generate double-layer forces. The solubility of the polymer can be controlled and varies from poor to good by the addition of sodium chloride salt. Ellipsometry was used to demonstrate that polySBMA adsorbs to silica and exhibits an increase in surface excess at lower salt concentration, which is consistent with a smaller area per molecule at low salt concentration. Neutron reflectivity measurements show that the adsorbed polymer has a thickness of about 3.7 nm and is highly hydrated. The polymer can be used to exercise considerable control over suspension rheology. When silica particles are not completely covered in polymer, the suspension produces a highly viscous gel. Atomic force microscopy was used to show this is caused by bridging of polymer between the particles. At higher surface coverage, the polymer can produce either a high or very low viscosity slurry depending on the sodium chloride concentration. At high salt concentration, the suspension is stable, and the viscosity is lower. This is probably because the entrainment of many small ions renders the polymer film highly hydrophilic, producing repulsive surface forces and lubricating the flow of particles. At low salt concentrations, the polymer is barely soluble and more densely adsorbed. This produces less stable and more viscous solutions, which we attribute to attractive interactions between the adsorbed polymer layers.

  2. Defining an optimal surface chemistry for pluripotent stem cell culture in 2D and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zonca, Michael R., Jr.

    Surface chemistry is critical for growing pluripotent stem cells in an undifferentiated state. There is great potential to engineer the surface chemistry at the nanoscale level to regulate stem cell adhesion. However, the challenge is to identify the optimal surface chemistry of the substrata for ES cell attachment and maintenance. Using a high-throughput polymerization and screening platform, a chemically defined, synthetic polymer grafted coating that supports strong attachment and high expansion capacity of pluripotent stem cells has been discovered using mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells as a model system. This optimal substrate, N-[3-(Dimethylamino)propyl] methacrylamide (DMAPMA) that is grafted on 2D synthetic poly(ether sulfone) (PES) membrane, sustains the self-renewal of ES cells (up to 7 passages). DMAPMA supports cell attachment of ES cells through integrin beta1 in a RGD-independent manner and is similar to another recently reported polymer surface. Next, DMAPMA has been able to be transferred to 3D by grafting to synthetic, polymeric, PES fibrous matrices through both photo-induced and plasma-induced polymerization. These 3D modified fibers exhibited higher cell proliferation and greater expression of pluripotency markers of mouse ES cells than 2D PES membranes. Our results indicated that desirable surfaces in 2D can be scaled to 3D and that both surface chemistry and structural dimension strongly influence the growth and differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. Lastly, the feasibility of incorporating DMAPMA into a widely used natural polymer, alginate, has been tested. Novel adhesive alginate hydrogels have been successfully synthesized by either direct polymerization of DMAPMA and methacrylic acid blended with alginate, or photo-induced DMAPMA polymerization on alginate nanofibrous hydrogels. In particular, DMAPMA-coated alginate hydrogels support strong ES cell attachment, exhibiting a concentration dependency of DMAPMA. This research provides a

  3. Challenges in Teaching "Colloid and Surface Chemistry"--A Danish Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kontogeorgis, Georgios M.; Vigild, Martin E.

    2009-01-01

    Seven years ago we were asked, as one of our first teaching duties at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), to teach a 5 ECTS point course on "Colloid and Surface Chemistry". The topic is itself at the same time exciting and demanding, largely due to its multidisciplinary nature. Several "local" requirements posed…

  4. Challenges in Teaching "Colloid and Surface Chemistry"--A Danish Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kontogeorgis, Georgios M.; Vigild, Martin E.

    2009-01-01

    Seven years ago we were asked, as one of our first teaching duties at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), to teach a 5 ECTS point course on "Colloid and Surface Chemistry". The topic is itself at the same time exciting and demanding, largely due to its multidisciplinary nature. Several "local" requirements posed…

  5. Facile modification of silica substrates provides a platform for direct-writing surface click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Oberhansl, Sabine; Hirtz, Michael; Lagunas, Anna; Eritja, Ramon; Martinez, Elena; Fuchs, Harald; Samitier, Josep

    2012-02-20

    Please click here: a facile two-step functionalization strategy for silicon oxide-based substrates generates a stable platform for surface click chemistry via direct writing. The suitability of the obtained substrates is proven by patterning with two different direct-writing techniques and three different molecules.

  6. Investigating Massive Dust Events Using a Coupled Weather-Chemistry Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raman, A.; Arellano, A. F.

    2012-12-01

    Prediction of local to regional scale dust events is challenging due to the complex nature of key processes driving emission, transport, and deposition of mineral dust. In particular, it is difficult to map precisely the sources of mineral dust across heterogeneous land surface properties and land-use changes. This is especially true for Arizona haboobs. These dust storm events are typically driven by thunderstorms and down-bursts over arid regions generating high atmospheric loading of dust in the order of hundreds to thousands of microgram per cubic meter. Modeling and prediction of these events are further complicated by the limitations in satellite-derived and in-situ measurements of dust and related geophysical variables. Here, we investigate the capability of a coupled weather-chemistry model in predicting Arizona haboobs. In particular, this research focuses on the simulation of July 5, 2011 Phoenix haboob using Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) and Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport Model (GOCART) dust scheme. We evaluate the ability of WRF-Chem in simulating the haboob using satellite retrievals of aerosol extinction properties and mass concentrations from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite (CALIPSO) and high resolution SEVIRI false color dust product, in conjunction with in-situ PM10 and PM2.5 measurements. The study uses a nested modeling domain covering Utah, California and Arizona at a horizontal resolution of 5.4 km (outer) and 1.8 km (inner). Boundary conditions for the model are obtained from NOAA Global Forecasting System six-hourly forecast. We present results illustrating the key features of the haboobs, such as the cold pools and surface wind speeds driving the horizontal and vertical structure of the dust, as well as the patterns of dust transport and deposition. Although the spatio-temporal patterns of the haboob

  7. Surface modification of model hydrogel contact lenses with hyaluronic acid via thiol-ene "click" chemistry for enhancing surface characteristics.

    PubMed

    Korogiannaki, Myrto; Zhang, Jianfeng; Sheardown, Heather

    2017-10-01

    Discontinuation of contact lens wear as a result of ocular dryness and discomfort is extremely common; as many as 26% of contact lens wearers discontinue use within the first year. While patients are generally satisfied with conventional hydrogel lenses, improving on-eye comfort continues to remain a goal. Surface modification with a biomimetic, ocular friendly hydrophilic layer of a wetting agent is hypothesized to improve the interfacial interactions of the contact lens with the ocular surface. In this work, the synthesis and characterization of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) surfaces grafted with a hydrophilic layer of hyaluronic acid are described. The immobilization reaction involved the covalent attachment of thiolated hyaluronic acid (20 kDa) on acrylated poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) via nucleophile-initiated Michael addition thiol-ene "click" chemistry. The surface chemistry of the modified surfaces was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The appearance of N (1s) and S (2p) peaks on the low resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra confirmed successful immobilization of hyaluronic acid. Grafting hyaluronic acid to the poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) surfaces decreased the contact angle, the dehydration rate, and the amount of nonspecific sorption of lysozyme and albumin in comparison to pristine hydrogel materials, suggesting the development of more wettable surfaces with improved water-retentive and antifouling properties, while maintaining optical transparency (>92%). In vitro testing also showed excellent viability of human corneal epithelial cells with the hyaluronic acid-grafted poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) surfaces. Hence, surface modification with hyaluronic acid via thiol-ene "click" chemistry could be useful in improving contact lens surface properties, potentially alleviating symptoms of contact lens related dryness and discomfort during

  8. Mechanical work makes important contributions to surface chemistry at steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, M. F.; Curtin, W. A.

    2015-02-01

    The effect of mechanical strain on the binding energy of adsorbates to late transition metals is believed to be entirely controlled by electronic factors, with tensile stress inducing stronger binding. Here we show, via computation, that mechanical strain of late transition metals can modify binding at stepped surfaces opposite to well-established trends on flat surfaces. The mechanism driving the trend is mechanical, arising from the relaxation of stored mechanical energy. The mechanical energy change can be larger than, and of opposite sign than, the energy changes due to electronic effects and leads to a violation of trends predicted by the widely accepted electronic ‘d-band’ model. This trend has a direct impact on catalytic activity, which is demonstrated here for methanation, where biaxial tension is predicted to shift the activity of nickel significantly, reaching the peak of the volcano plot and comparable to cobalt and ruthenium.

  9. Mechanical work makes important contributions to surface chemistry at steps

    PubMed Central

    Francis, M. F.; Curtin, W. A.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of mechanical strain on the binding energy of adsorbates to late transition metals is believed to be entirely controlled by electronic factors, with tensile stress inducing stronger binding. Here we show, via computation, that mechanical strain of late transition metals can modify binding at stepped surfaces opposite to well-established trends on flat surfaces. The mechanism driving the trend is mechanical, arising from the relaxation of stored mechanical energy. The mechanical energy change can be larger than, and of opposite sign than, the energy changes due to electronic effects and leads to a violation of trends predicted by the widely accepted electronic ‘d-band’ model. This trend has a direct impact on catalytic activity, which is demonstrated here for methanation, where biaxial tension is predicted to shift the activity of nickel significantly, reaching the peak of the volcano plot and comparable to cobalt and ruthenium. PMID:25677075

  10. Control of pyrite surface chemistry in physical coal cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Luttrell, G.H.; Yoon, R.H.; Ou, Z.S.

    1992-06-24

    The successful separation of pyrite from coal by flotation is dependent to a large extent upon the selectivity of the process, and the use of a pyrite depressant is one of the most important and cost-effective techniques for achieving this. This report evaluates the effects of three factors on the floatability of pyrite. These are (1) the superficial oxidation of pyrite, (2) the contamination of pyrite surfaces by carbonaceous matter, and (3) pulp redox potentials. XPS (x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) and IR spectrometry have been used to identify surface reaction products. Microflotation, laboratory-scale conventional flotation and microbubble column flotation were used to quantify the effects of these factors. It was found that low (reducing) pulp potentials are effective depressants of pyrite (more so for fresh, unoxidized samples than for oxidized samples), whilst at the same time do not materially affect coal flotation.

  11. Atomic scale characterization and surface chemistry of metal modified titanate nanotubes and nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukovecz, Ákos; Kordás, Krisztián; Kiss, János; Kónya, Zoltán

    2016-10-01

    Titanates are salts of polytitanic acid that can be synthesized as nanostructures in a great variety concerning crystallinity, morphology, size, metal content and surface chemistry. Titanate nanotubes (open-ended hollow cylinders measuring up to 200 nm in length and 15 nm in outer diameter) and nanowires (solid, elongated rectangular blocks with length up to 1500 nm and 30-60 nm diameter) are the most widespread representatives of the titanate nanomaterial family. This review covers the properties and applications of these two materials from the surface science point of view. Dielectric, vibrational, electron and X-ray spectroscopic results are comprehensively discussed first, then surface modification methods including covalent functionalization, ion exchange and metal loading are covered. The versatile surface chemistry of one-dimensional titanates renders them excellent candidates for heterogeneous catalytic, photocatalytic, photovoltaic and energy storage applications, therefore, these fields are also reviewed.

  12. Control of Microcellular Structure in Polymeric Foams via Nanofiller Size and Surface Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goren, Kerem; Schadler, Linda; Ozisik, Rahmi

    2008-03-01

    Polymeric foams are used in many applications, where thermal insulation, selective sound inhibition or low density materials are needed. They are generally produced by blending polymer with a chemical blowing agent, which releases inert gas at processing temperatures. There are two major drawbacks to this process: chemical residues that form during the decomposition of blowing agent and formation of large (macroscopic) pores that weaken the material. To overcome these drawbacks, supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) is used. Use of scCO2 along with nanofillers provide heterogeneous nucleation, and present the opportunity to control pore size and pore distribution. In the current study, the effect of silica size and silica-scCO2 interaction on microcellular structure was investigated. Two different silica fillers were synthesized: 15 and 150 nm. These silica nanofillers were surface modified with tridecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrooctyl triethoxysilanes. Dynamic Light Scattering, FT-IR, TGA, and SEM were used to characterize the samples. Results indicate that there is a strong correlation between surface chemistry, and hence scCO2 and filler interaction on pore size and size distribution.

  13. Transition metal oxides deposited on rhodium and platinum: Surface chemistry and catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Boffa, Alexander Bowman

    1994-07-01

    The surface chemistry and catalytic reactivity of transition metal oxides deposited on Rh and Pt substrates has been examined in order to establish the role of oxide-metal interactions in influencing catalytic activity. The oxides investigated included titanium oxide (TiOx), vanadium oxide (VOx), iron oxide (FeOx), zirconium oxide (ZrOx), niobium oxide (NbOx), tantalum oxide (TaOx), and tungsten oxide (WOx). The techniques used to characterize the sample included AES, XPS, LEED, TPD, ISS, and STM. After characterization of the surface in UHV, the sample was enclosed in an atmospheric reaction cell to measure the influence of the oxide deposits on the catalytic activity of the pure metal for CO and CO2 hydrogenation. The oxide deposits were found to strongly enhance the reactivity of the Rh foil. The rates of methane formation were promoted by up to 15 fold with the maximum in rate enhancement occurring at oxide coverages of approximately 0.5 ML. TiOx TaOx, and NbOx were the most effective promoters and were stable in the highest oxidation states during both reactions (compared to VOx, WOx, and FeOx). The trend in promoter effectiveness was attributed to the direct relationship between oxidation state and Lewis acidity. Bonding at the metal oxide/metal interface between the oxygen end of adsorbed CO and the Lewis acidic oxide was postulated to facilitate C-O bond dissociation and subsequent hydrogenation. 192 refs.

  14. Improving surface and defect center chemistry of fluorescent nanodiamonds for imaging purposes--a review.

    PubMed

    Nagl, Andreas; Hemelaar, Simon Robert; Schirhagl, Romana

    2015-10-01

    Diamonds are widely used for jewelry owing to their superior optical properties accounting for their fascinating beauty. Beyond the sparkle, diamond is highly investigated in materials science for its remarkable properties. Recently, fluorescent defects in diamond, particularly the negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV(-)) center, have gained much attention: The NV(-) center emits stable, nonbleaching fluorescence, and thus could be utilized in biolabeling, as a light source, or as a Förster resonance energy transfer donor. Even more remarkable are its spin properties: with the fluorescence intensity of the NV(-) center reacting to the presence of small magnetic fields, it can be utilized as a sensor for magnetic fields as small as the field of a single electron spin. However, a reproducible defect and surface and defect chemistry are crucial to all applications. In this article we review methods for using nanodiamonds for different imaging purposes. The article covers (1) dispersion of particles, (2) surface cleaning, (3) particle size selection and reduction, (4) defect properties, and (5) functionalization and attachment to nanostructures, e.g., scanning probe microscopy tips.

  15. Surface Chemistry of CWAs for Decon Enabling Sciences

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-04

    Developed high- level computational methods for modeling the adsorption of agents (GB, GD, VX, and HD) on hydrogen bonding materials • Elucidated the... application of surface analytical instrumentation. Here, we describe the design, construction, and testing of a novel multi-functional ultra-high...instrumentation, collect and log data from gauges and other sensors , and to prevent accidental operation of sensitive equipment under high pressure

  16. Structure, Bonding and Surface Chemistry of Metal Oxide Nanoclusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-23

    Rh, as well as those of vanadium oxides. In synthetic experiments, metal oxide clusters are captured from the gas phase into solution, stabilized with... clusters . Additional work has examined vanadium carbide clusters as well as metal-silicon clusters of several transition metals. These ultra-small... clusters are studied with laser desorption and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, optical spectroscopy methods (IR, surface-enhanced Raman, UV

  17. Surface chemistry at Swiss Universities of Applied Sciences.

    PubMed

    Brodard, Pierre; Pfeifer, Marc E; Adlhart, Christian D; Pieles, Uwe; Shahgaldian, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    In the Swiss Universities of Applied Sciences, a number of research groups are involved in surface science, with different methodological approaches and a broad range of sophisticated characterization techniques. A snapshot of the current research going on in different groups from the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland (HES-SO), the Zurich University of Applied Sciences (ZHAW) and the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland (FHNW) is given.

  18. Biofunctionalization on alkylated silicon substrate surfaces via "click" chemistry.

    PubMed

    Qin, Guoting; Santos, Catherine; Zhang, Wen; Li, Yan; Kumar, Amit; Erasquin, Uriel J; Liu, Kai; Muradov, Pavel; Trautner, Barbara Wells; Cai, Chengzhi

    2010-11-24

    Biofunctionalization of silicon substrates is important to the development of silicon-based biosensors and devices. Compared to conventional organosiloxane films on silicon oxide intermediate layers, organic monolayers directly bound to the nonoxidized silicon substrates via Si-C bonds enhance the sensitivity of detection and the stability against hydrolytic cleavage. Such monolayers presenting a high density of terminal alkynyl groups for bioconjugation via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (CuAAC, a "click" reaction) were reported. However, yields of the CuAAC reactions on these monolayer platforms were low. Also, the nonspecific adsorption of proteins on the resultant surfaces remained a major obstacle for many potential biological applications. Herein, we report a new type of "clickable" monolayers grown by selective, photoactivated surface hydrosilylation of α,ω-alkenynes, where the alkynyl terminal is protected with a trimethylgermanyl (TMG) group, on hydrogen-terminated silicon substrates. The TMG groups on the film are readily removed in aqueous solutions in the presence of Cu(I). Significantly, the degermanylation and the subsequent CuAAC reaction with various azides could be combined into a single step in good yields. Thus, oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) with an azido tag was attached to the TMG-alkyne surfaces, leading to OEG-terminated surfaces that reduced the nonspecific adsorption of protein (fibrinogen) by >98%. The CuAAC reaction could be performed in microarray format to generate arrays of mannose and biotin with varied densities on the protein-resistant OEG background. We also demonstrated that the monolayer platform could be functionalized with mannose for highly specific capturing of living targets (Escherichia coli expressing fimbriae) onto the silicon substrates.

  19. Global Transcriptomic Analysis of Model Human Cell Lines Exposed to Surface-Modified Gold Nanoparticles: The Effect of Surface Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Grzincic, E. M.; Yang, J. A.; Drnevich, J.; Falagan-Lotsch, P.; Murphy, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) are attractive for biomedical applications not only for their remarkable physical properties, but also for the ease of which their surface chemistry can be manipulated. Many applications involve functionalization of the Au NP surface in order to improve biocompatibility, attach targeting ligands or carry drugs. However, changes in cells exposed to Au NPs of different surface chemistries have been observed, and little is known about how Au NPs and their surface coatings may impact cellular gene expression. The gene expression of two model human cell lines, human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and prostate cancer cells (PC3) was interrogated by microarray analysis of over 14,000 human genes. The cell lines were exposed to four differently functionalized Au NPs: citrate, poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH), and lipid coatings combined with alkanethiols or PAH. Gene functional annotation categories and weighted gene correlation network analysis were used in order to connect gene expression changes to common cellular functions and to elucidate expression patterns between Au NP samples. Coated Au NPs affect genes implicated in proliferation, angiogenesis, and metabolism in HDF cells, and inflammation, angiogenesis, proliferation apoptosis regulation, survival and invasion in PC3 cells. Subtle changes in surface chemistry, such as the initial net charge, lability of the ligand, and underlying layers greatly influence the degree of expression change and the type of cellular pathway affected. PMID:25491924

  20. Engineering novel cell surface chemistry for selective tumor cell targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Bertozzi, C.R. |

    1997-12-31

    A common feature of many different cancers is the high expression level of the two monosaccharides sialic acid and fucose within the context of cell-surface associated glycoconjugates. A correlation has been made between hypersialylation and/or hyperfucosylation and the highly metastatic phenotype. Thus, a targeting strategy based on sialic acid or fucose expression would be a powerful tool for the development of new cancer cell-selective therapies and diagnostic agents. We have discovered that ketone groups can be incorporated metabolically into cell-surface associated sialic acids. The ketone is can be covalently ligated with hydrazide functionalized proteins or small molecules under physiological conditions. Thus, we have discovered a mechanism to selectively target hydrazide conjugates to highly sialylated cells such as cancer cells. Applications of this technology to the generation of novel cancer cell-selective toxins and MRI contrast reagents will be discussed, in addition to progress towards the use of cell surface fucose residues as vehicles for ketone expression.

  1. Laboratory invesitgations: Low earth orbit environment chemistry with spacecraft surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    Long-term space operations that require exposure of material to the low earth orbit (LEO) environment must take into account the effects of this highly oxidative atmosphere on material properties and the possible contamination of the spacecraft surroundings. Ground-based laboratory experiments at Los Alamos using a newly developed hyperthermal atomic oxygen (AO) source have shown that not only are hydrocarbon based materials effected but that inorganic materials such as MoS/sub 2/ are also oxidized and that thin (750A) protective coatings such as Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ can be breached, producing oxidation of the underlying substrate material. Gas-phase reaction products, such as SO/sub 2/ from oxidation of MoS/sub 2/ and CO and CO/sub 2/ from hydrocarbon materials, have been detected and have consequences in terms of spacecraft contamination. Energy loss through gas-surface collisions causing spacecraft drag has been measured for a few select surfaces and has been found to be highly dependent on the surface reactivity. 10 refs., 11 figs.

  2. Inquiry-Based Arson Investigation for General Chemistry Using GC-MS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer, Marta K.; Bukowski, Michael R.; Menachery, Mary D.; Zatorsky, Adam R.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a two-week guided-inquiry laboratory in which first-semester general chemistry students investigate a suspected arson using gas chromatography--mass spectrometry and paper chromatography. In the process of evaluating evidence from the crime scene, students develop and test hypotheses and learn the fundamentals of chromatography,…

  3. Analysis of Verbal Interactions during an Extended, Open-Inquiry General Chemistry Laboratory Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krystyniak, Rebecca A.; Heikkinen, Henry W.

    2007-01-01

    This study explores effects of participation by second-semester college general chemistry students in an extended, open-inquiry laboratory investigation. Verbal interactions among a student lab team and with their instructor over three open-inquiry laboratory sessions and two non-inquiry sessions were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed. Coding…

  4. Investigating the Effectiveness of an Analogy Activity in Improving Students' Conceptual Change for Solution Chemistry Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calik, Muammer; Ayas, Alipasa; Coll, Richard K.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation on the use of an analogy activity and seeks to provide evidence of whether the activity enables students to change alternative conceptions towards views more in accord with scientific views for aspects of solution chemistry. We were also interested in how robust any change was and whether these changes in…

  5. Investigation of High School Chemistry Students' Concepts of Chemical Symbol, Formula, and Equation: Students' Prescientific Conceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Kunifed, Ali; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of eighteen 11th grade high school chemistry students' prior mathematical knowledge on their understanding of certain chemical concepts (symbol, formula, and equation). It also investigated students' ideas about the meaning of plus sign, reaction sign, and the relationships between subscript, and…

  6. An Investigation of the Value of Using Concept Maps in General Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicoll, Gayle; Francisco, Joseph; Nakhleh, Mary B.

    2001-01-01

    Reports on a qualitative investigation of the effects of integrating concept maps into freshman-level general chemistry curriculum. Indicates that students in the experimental section had significantly more links and nodes in their concept maps than students in the traditional section. There were no significant differences between the two sections…

  7. Inquiry-Based Arson Investigation for General Chemistry Using GC-MS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer, Marta K.; Bukowski, Michael R.; Menachery, Mary D.; Zatorsky, Adam R.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a two-week guided-inquiry laboratory in which first-semester general chemistry students investigate a suspected arson using gas chromatography--mass spectrometry and paper chromatography. In the process of evaluating evidence from the crime scene, students develop and test hypotheses and learn the fundamentals of chromatography,…

  8. Investigating the Effectiveness of an Analogy Activity in Improving Students' Conceptual Change for Solution Chemistry Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calik, Muammer; Ayas, Alipasa; Coll, Richard K.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation on the use of an analogy activity and seeks to provide evidence of whether the activity enables students to change alternative conceptions towards views more in accord with scientific views for aspects of solution chemistry. We were also interested in how robust any change was and whether these changes in…

  9. Controlling the Photophysical Properties of Semiconductor Quantum Dot Arrays by Strategically Altering Their Surface Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Ashley R.

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are interesting materials that, after less than 40 years of research, are used in commercial products. QDs are now found in displays, such as Samsung televisions and the Kindle Fire, and have applications in lighting, bio-imaging, quantum computing, and photovoltaics. They offer a large range of desirable properties: a controllable band gap, solution processability, controlled energy levels, and are currently the best materials for multiple exciton generation. The tunable optoelectronic properties of QDs can be controlled using size, shape, composition, and surface treatments--as shown here. Due to the quasi-spherical shape of QDs the surface to volume ratio is high, i.e. many of the constituent atoms are found on the QD surface. This makes QDs highly sensitive to surface chemistry modifications. This thesis encompasses the effects of surface treatments for QDs of two semiconducting materials: lead chalcogenides and CsPbI3. Our group developed a new synthetic technique for lead chalcogenide QDs via the cation exchange of cadmium chalcogenides. An in-depth chemical analysis is paired with optical and electrical studies and we find that metal halide residue contributes to the oxidative stability and decreased trap state density in cation-exchanged PbS QDs. We exploit these properties to make air-stable QD photovoltaic devices from both PbS and PbSe QD materials. Beyond the effects of residual atoms left from the synthetic technique, I investigated how to controllably add atoms onto the surface of QDs. I found that by introducing metal halides as a post-treatment in an electronically coupled array I am able to control the performance parameters in QD photovoltaic devices. These treatments fully infiltrate the assembled film, even under short exposure times and allow me to add controlled quantities of surface atoms to study their effects on film properties and photovoltaic device performance. Finally, I sought to apply the knowledge of

  10. Theoretical investigation of gas-surface interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyall, Kenneth G.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this project was to develop computational tools for the calculation of the electronic structure of molecules containing heavy atoms, and to use these tools in the study of catalytic processes, with the overall objective of gaining an understanding of the catalytic process which could be used to design more efficient catalysts. The main catalytic system of interest was the combustion of hydrogen on platinum surfaces. Under this project, a flexible Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) program has been developed, a code to calculate DHF correlation energies at the second-order Moeller-Plesset perturbation (PP2) level is almost complete, and code to include correlation at the MCSCF and MCSCF/MP2 level is planned. The tools so far developed have been validated and used to calibrate some more approximate methods, and applied to investigate the importance of relativistic effects in the bonding of hydrogen to platinum.

  11. Investigation of the ion beryllium surface interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Guseva, M.I.; Birukov, A.Yu.; Gureev, V.M.

    1995-09-01

    The self -sputtering yield of the Be was measured. The energy dependence of the Be self-sputtering yield agrees well with that calculated by W. Eckstein et. al. Below 770 K the self-sputtering yield is temperature independent; at T{sub irr}.> 870 K it increases sharply. Hot-pressed samples at 370 K were implanted with monoenergetic 5 keV hydrogen ions and with a stationary plasma (flux power {approximately} 5 MW/m{sup 2}). The investigation of hydrogen behavior in beryllium shows that at low doses hydrogen is solved, but at doses {ge} 5x10{sup 22} m{sup -2} the bubbles and channels are formed. It results in hydrogen profile shift to the surface and decrease of its concentration. The sputtering results in further concentration decrease at doses > 10{sup 25}m{sup -2}.

  12. Informatics guided discovery of surface structure-chemistry relationships in catalytic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Andriotis, Antonis N; Mpourmpakis, Giannis; Broderick, Scott; Rajan, Krishna; Datta, Somnath; Sunkara, Mahendra; Menon, Madhu

    2014-03-07

    A data driven discovery strategy based on statistical learning principles is used to discover new correlations between electronic structure and catalytic activity of metal surfaces. From the quantitative formulations derived from this informatics based model, a high throughput computational framework for predicting binding energy as a function of surface chemistry and adsorption configuration that bypasses the need for repeated electronic structure calculations has been developed.

  13. Informatics guided discovery of surface structure-chemistry relationships in catalytic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Andriotis, Antonis N.; Mpourmpakis, Giannis; Broderick, Scott Rajan, Krishna; Datta, Somnath; Sunkara, Mahendra; Menon, Madhu

    2014-03-07

    A data driven discovery strategy based on statistical learning principles is used to discover new correlations between electronic structure and catalytic activity of metal surfaces. From the quantitative formulations derived from this informatics based model, a high throughput computational framework for predicting binding energy as a function of surface chemistry and adsorption configuration that bypasses the need for repeated electronic structure calculations has been developed.

  14. An organometallic guide to the chemistry of hydrocarbon moieties on transition metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zaera, F.

    1995-12-01

    In this review what is known about the chemistry of hydrocarbon molecules on transition metal surfaces will be surveyed. Here the authors discuss the results reported to date on the structure and reactivity of the different types of hydrocarbon moieties that form on transition metal surfaces. One of the goals of this review is to provide an organometallic guide for the possible interactions of hydrocarbons with transition metals with the idea of examining their relation to the corresponding surface chemistry. The authors however limit the review of the organometallic literature to the information relevant to the surface systems, and also narrow the field to cover only molecules with carbon and hydrogen atoms; compounds containing other atoms (O, S, N) will be excluded. The present review is organized in the following manner. First, a brief discussion of the experimental techniques used to characterize both organometallic and surface systems is presented. A discussion of the coordination and structure of the different types of organic moieties, first in organometallic compounds and then on metal surfaces, follows. Here the systems are classified according to the type of bonding between the molecules and the metals. Next, the different elementary steps that such systems can undergo are summarized: C-H and C-C bond-breaking and bond-forming reactions, isomerizations, and others. Again, the chemistry of organometallic compounds is discussed first, and the surface chemistry is presented subsequently. A brief description of a few key nonelementary reactions is also given, including some catalytic processes. Lastly, a brief discussion on the main similarities and differences found so far between surface and organometallic systems, and on possible future directions for this field, is offered.

  15. Recent Advances in chemistry and pharmacology of 2-methoxyestradiol: An anticancer investigational drug.

    PubMed

    Kumar, B Sathish; Raghuvanshi, Dushyant Singh; Hasanain, Mohammad; Alam, Sarfaraz; Sarkar, Jayanta; Mitra, Kalyan; Khan, Feroz; Negi, Arvind S

    2016-06-01

    2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME2), an estrogen hormone metabolite is a potential cancer chemotherapeutic agent. Presently, it is an investigational drug under various phases of clinical trials alone or in combination therapy. Its anticancer activity has been attributed to its antitubulin, antiangiogenic, pro-apoptotic and ROS induction properties. This anticancer drug candidate has been explored extensively in last twenty years for its detailed chemistry and pharmacology. Present review is an update of its chemistry and biological activity. It also extends an assessment of potential of 2ME2 and its analogues as possible anticancer drug in future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling aerosol surface chemistry and gas-particle interaction kinetics with K2-SURF: PAH oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, M.; Garland, R.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere. They have the ability to impact cloud properties, radiative balance and provide surfaces for heterogeneous reactions. The uptake of gaseous species on aerosol surfaces impacts both the aerosol particles and the atmospheric budget of trace gases. These subsequent changes to the aerosol can in turn impact the aerosol chemical and physical properties. However, this uptake, as well as the impact on the aerosol, is not fully understood. This uncertainty is due not only to limited measurement data, but also a dearth of comprehensive and applicable modeling formalizations used for the analysis, interpretation and description of these heterogeneous processes. Without a common model framework, comparing and extrapolating experimental data is difficult. In this study, a novel kinetic surface model (K2-SURF) [Ammann & Pöschl, 2007; Pöschl et al., 2007] was used to describe the oxidation of a variety of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Integrated into this consistent and universally applicable kinetic and thermodynamic process model are the concepts, terminologies and mathematical formalizations essential to the description of atmospherically relevant physicochemical processes involving organic and mixed organic-inorganic aerosols. Within this process model framework, a detailed master mechanism, simplified mechanism and parameterizations of atmospheric aerosol chemistry are being developed and integrated in analogy to existing mechanisms and parameterizations of atmospheric gas-phase chemistry. One of the key aspects to this model is the defining of a clear distinction between various layers of the particle and surrounding gas phase. The processes occurring at each layer can be fully described using known fluxes and kinetic parameters. Using this system there is a clear separation of gas phase, gas-surface and surface bulk transport and reactions. The partitioning of compounds can be calculated using the flux

  17. Investigation of ammonia air-surface exchange processes in a ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Recent assessments of atmospheric deposition in North America note the increasing importance of reduced (NHx = NH3 + NH4+) forms of nitrogen (N) relative to oxidized forms. This shift in in the composition of inorganic nitrogen deposition has both ecological and policy implications. Deposition budgets developed from inferential models applied at the landscape scale, as well as regional and global chemical transport models, indicate that NH3 dry deposition contributes a significant portion of inorganic N deposition in many areas. However, the bidirectional NH3 flux algorithms employed in these models have not been extensively evaluated for North American conditions (e.g, atmospheric chemistry, meteorology, biogeochemistry). Further understanding of the processes controlling NH3 air-surface exchange in natural systems is critically needed. Based on preliminary results from the Southern Appalachian Nitrogen Deposition Study (SANDS), this presentation examines processes of NH3 air-surface exchange in a deciduous montane forest at the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory in western North Carolina. A combination of measurements and modeling are used to investigate net fluxes of NH3 above the forest and sources and sinks of NH3 within the canopy and forest floor. Measurements of biogeochemical NH4+ pools are used to characterize emission potential and NH3 compensation points of canopy foliage (i.e., green vegetation), leaf litter, and soil and their relation to NH3 fluxes

  18. Venting temperature determines surface chemistry of magnetron sputtered TiN films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greczynski, G.; Mráz, S.; Hultman, L.; Schneider, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Surface properties of refractory ceramic transition metal nitride thin films grown by magnetron sputtering are essential for resistance towards oxidation necessary in all modern applications. Here, typically neglected factors, including exposure to residual process gases following the growth and the venting temperature Tv, each affecting the surface chemistry, are addressed. It is demonstrated for the TiN model materials system that Tv has a substantial effect on the composition and thickness-evolution of the reacted surface layer and should therefore be reported. The phenomena are also shown to have impact on the reliable surface characterization by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  19. Venting temperature determines surface chemistry of magnetron sputtered TiN films

    SciTech Connect

    Greczynski, G.; Mráz, S.; Schneider, J. M.; Hultman, L.

    2016-01-25

    Surface properties of refractory ceramic transition metal nitride thin films grown by magnetron sputtering are essential for resistance towards oxidation necessary in all modern applications. Here, typically neglected factors, including exposure to residual process gases following the growth and the venting temperature T{sub v}, each affecting the surface chemistry, are addressed. It is demonstrated for the TiN model materials system that T{sub v} has a substantial effect on the composition and thickness-evolution of the reacted surface layer and should therefore be reported. The phenomena are also shown to have impact on the reliable surface characterization by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  20. Surface Chemistry of Trimethyl Phosphate on α-Fe2O3

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Michael A.

    2011-12-01

    The chemistry of trimethyl phosphate (TMP) was examined on the (012) crystallographic face of hematite (α-Fe2O3) using temperature programmed desorption (TPD), high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), static secondary ion mass spectrometry (SSIMS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). TMP binds to Fe3+ sites on the clean α-Fe2O3(012) surface through lone pairs on the P=O oxygen atom. A small portion of adsorbed TMP desorbs without decomposition, however, the majority of adsorbed TMP decomposes in a two step process on the clean surface. The first step, occurring at or below room temperature (RT), likely involves displacement or substitution of one –OCH3 group to form surface methoxy groups and adsorbed dimethyl phosphate (DMP). In the second step, DMP decomposes above 500 K to a 1:1 ratio of gaseous methanol and formaldehyde with phosphate left on the surface. Identification of these steps was confirmed using the chemistry of methanol on the clean surface. Coadsorption of TMP and water led to a small degree of hydrolysis between these two molecules in the multilayer, but no significant change in the chemistry on the surface. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  1. Engineering of Surface Chemistry for Enhanced Sensitivity in Nanoporous Interferometric Sensing Platforms.

    PubMed

    Law, Cheryl Suwen; Sylvia, Georgina M; Nemati, Madieh; Yu, Jingxian; Losic, Dusan; Abell, Andrew D; Santos, Abel

    2017-03-15

    We explore new approaches to engineering the surface chemistry of interferometric sensing platforms based on nanoporous anodic alumina (NAA) and reflectometric interference spectroscopy (RIfS). Two surface engineering strategies are presented, namely (i) selective chemical functionalization of the inner surface of NAA pores with amine-terminated thiol molecules and (ii) selective chemical functionalization of the top surface of NAA with dithiol molecules. The strong molecular interaction of Au(3+) ions with thiol-containing functional molecules of alkane chain or peptide character provides a model sensing system with which to assess the sensitivity of these NAA platforms by both molecular feature and surface engineering. Changes in the effective optical thickness of the functionalized NAA photonic films (i.e., sensing principle), in response to gold ions, are monitored in real-time by RIfS. 6-Amino-1-hexanethiol (inner surface) and 1,6-hexanedithiol (top surface), the most sensitive functional molecules from approaches i and ii, respectively, were combined into a third sensing strategy whereby the NAA platforms are functionalized on both the top and inner surfaces concurrently. Engineering of the surface according to this approach resulted in an additive enhancement in sensitivity of up to 5-fold compared to previously reported systems. This study advances the rational engineering of surface chemistry for interferometric sensing on nanoporous platforms with potential applications for real-time monitoring of multiple analytes in dynamic environments.

  2. Control of pyrite surface chemistry in physical coal cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Luttrell, G.H.; Yoon, R.H.; Zachwieja, J.; Lagno, M.

    1990-01-17

    To better understand the flotation behavior of coal pyrite, studies have been initiated to characterize the floatability of coal pyrite and mineral pyrite. The hydrophobicity of coal material pyrite was examined over a range of pH and oxidation times. The results indicate that surface oxidation plays an important role in coal and mineral pyrite hydrophobicity. The hydrophobicity of mineral pyrite decreases with increasing oxidation time (20 min. to 5 hr.) and increasing pH (pH 4.6 to 9.2), with maximum depression occurring at pH 9.2. However, coal pyrite exhibited low floatability, even at the lowest oxidation time, over the entire pH range. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results suggest the growth of an oxidized iron layer as being responsible for the deterioration in floatability, while a sulfur-containing species present on the sample surfaces may promote floatability. Preliminary studies of the effect of frother indicate an enhancement in the floatability of both coal and mineral pyrite over the entire pH range.

  3. Control of pyrite surface chemistry in physical coal cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Richardson, P.R.

    1992-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, much research has provided convincing evidence that one major difficulty in using froth flotation to separate pyrite from coal is the self-induced'' flotation of pyrite. Numerous studies have attempted to identify reactions that occur under moderate oxidizing conditions, which lead to self-induced flotation, and to identify the oxidization products. During the past two report periods, it was established that: (1) freshly fractured pyrite surfaces immediately assume, at fracture, an electrode potential several hundred millivolts more negative than the usual steady state mixed potentials. Within minutes after fracture, the electrodes oxidize and reach higher steady state potentials. It was also shown, by photocurrent measurements, that a negative surface charge (upward band bending) already exists on freshly fractured pyrite, and (2) particle bed electrodes can be used to control the oxidation of pyrite and to precisely determine the electrochemical conditions where flotation occurs, or is depressed. By circulating the solution phase to an ultraviolet spectrometer, soluble products produced on pyrite by oxidation and reduction can be determined, e.g., HS[sup [minus

  4. Understanding Surface and Interfacial Chemistry in Functional Nanomaterials via Solid-State NMR.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Alessandro; Chen, Juner; Pang, Zhenfeng; Li, Shenhui; Ling, Daishun; Deng, Feng; Kong, Xueqian

    2017-04-01

    Surface and interfacial chemistry is of fundamental importance in functional nanomaterials applied in catalysis, energy storage and conversion, medicine, and other nanotechnologies. It has been a perpetual challenge for the scientific community to get an accurate and comprehensive picture of the structures, dynamics, and interactions at interfaces. Here, some recent examples in the major disciplines of nanomaterials are selected (e.g., nanoporous materials, battery materials, nanocrystals and quantum dots, supramolecular assemblies, drug-delivery systems, ionomers, and graphite oxides) and it is shown how interfacial chemistry can be addressed through the perspective of solid-state NMR characterization techniques.

  5. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-11-01

    Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH2) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such zwitterion modified PP surface.

  6. A Kinetic Study of the Heterogeneous Chemistry and Photochemistry of Ozone Dissociation on Oxide Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Stanier, C. O.; Young, M. A.; Grassian, V. H.

    2011-12-01

    Transport of mineral dust over long distance raised the possibility that mineral dust aerosol can alter the chemical partitioning of atmospheric trace gases on global scale. One such important heterogeneous reaction is the decomposition of ozone, which is of particular interest due to the critical role ozone plays in atmospheric oxidation, its potential as a greenhouse gas, and its presence as a toxic tropospheric pollutant. In this study, the heterogeneous chemistry and photochemistry of ozone, O3, on components of mineral dust aerosol, including α-Fe2O3 (hematite), TiO2, and α-Al2O3, at different relative humidity were investigated using an environmental aerosol chamber. The rate and extent of O3 decomposition on the surfaces of these oxides is a function of the nature of the surface, presence of light and relative humidity. In the dark and dry conditions, only α-Fe2O3 exhibits catalytic decomposition toward O3. However, upon irradiation TiO2 is active toward O3 decomposition but α-Al2O3 remains inactive. In the presence of relative humidity, ozone decay on illuminated α-Fe2O3 as well as in the dark, is found to decrease, due to the competitive adsorption of water molecules and ozone for active surface sites. In contrast, the relative humidity dependence of ozone uptake on TiO2 in the presence of light is more complex with an increase in ozone uptake observed at low relative humidity and a decrease at higher relative humidity. A kinetic model to simulate reactions in the environmental aerosol chamber was built with the Kinetic Preprocessor, in order to obtain kinetic data regarding ozone uptake on these metal oxides under a variety of conditions. The application of this model to the environmental aerosol chamber results allows us to differentiate heterogeneous photochemistry from heterogeneous and homogeneous chemistry and extract valuable kinetic information, improving our understanding of ozone uptake on mineral dust aerosol.

  7. Studies of the surface reactivity of metal oxyhydroxides and sulfides with relevance to environmental chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre-Louis, Andro-Marc

    With the benefits of an ever increasing advance of industrialization around the globe come formidable environmental problems. Three environmental problems that have relevance to the research described in this thesis are the 1) buildup of atmospheric CO2 gas through the burning of fossil fuels, 2) eutrophication of aquatic systems, and 3) the acidification of environments from acid mine drainage (AMD) resulting from coal-mining activities. In particular research is presented in this thesis that investigated the surface chemistry of CO2 and phosphate (PO43-) on a suite of environmentally relevant iron oxyhydroxide materials and the chemistry of phospholipid molecules on environmentally relevant iron sulfide surfaces to suppress AMD. To develop a microscopic understanding of the surface chemistry of the different systems, an array of experimental and computational techniques were used in the research. Techniques included X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic adsorption, X-ray diffraction, scanning transmission microscopy with electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (STEM/EDS), ion chromatography (IC), and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR). Results from the latter technique were interpreted with the aid of density function theory (DFT) calculations. Iron oxyhydroxides, which consisted of ferrihydrite (FeOOH), goethite (α-FeOOH), ferrimagnetic ferrihydrite (FerriFh), and aluminum-doped iron oxyhydroxide (content from 0-100 mol%) were synthesized and studied before and after exposure to gaseous CO2, CO32-, and PO43- species. FeOOH and mixed Al/Fe oxyhydroxide surfaces showed high affinities for the formation of carbonate and bicarbonate species upon exposure to gaseous CO2. Within the Al/Fe oxyhydroxide circumstance, a low Al level of incorporation in the iron oxyhydroxide structure caused a slight increase in surface area and increase in the amount of oxyanion (e.g., CO32- or PO43-) adsorption up to an Al level of 30 mol%. Significant

  8. Substituent effects in the surface coordination chemistry of nitriles

    SciTech Connect

    Wexler, R.M.; Muetterties, E.L.

    1984-08-30

    A detailed kinetic analysis is presented for the thermal desorption of alkyl and perfluoroalkyl cyanides (nitriles) from Ni(111). The activation energies for the desorption of the perfluoroalkyl derivatives were about 8 kcal/mol greater than for the alkyl analogues. These data suggest that the perfluoronitriles, the better acceptor molecules, are more strongly bound to the d-electron-rich nickel surface. Only CH/sub 3/CN and CF/sub 3/CN exhibited coverage dependence in the magnitude of the desorption activation energies. Nitriles with functional groups such as chloro, acetyl, vinyl, and aryl showed only a minor degree of molecular desorption from Ni(111); thermal decomposition was the dominant process in these cases. 17 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  9. Triethynylmethanol Derivatives: Stable Acetylenic Building Blocks for Surface Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Prenzel, Dominik; Sander, Tim; Gebhardt, Julian; Soni, Himadri; Hampel, Frank; Görling, Andreas; Maier, Sabine; Tykwinski, Rik R

    2017-02-03

    The synthesis of non-conjugated, carbon-rich building blocks is described, based on a basic scaffold of triethynylmethanol (TEtM). The substitution of the ethynyl groups can be easily varied (including R3 Si, H, Br), and this allows structural tuning for stabilization, synthetic derivatization, and adsorption on Ag(111) or Au(111). X-ray crystallography helps to explain the surprising stability of the selected derivatives in the solid state, and an unusual form of hydrogen bonding is identified from these analyses. Preliminary efforts to achieve surface-based reactions on Ag(111) and Au(111) are outlined experimentally and computationally. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Heterogeneous chemistry of HOBR on surfaces characteristic of atmospheric aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Abbatt, J.P.D.

    1995-12-31

    The heterogeneous interactions of HOBr, HBr and HCl with ice and supercooled sulfuric acid solutions have been studied in a low temperatures low pressure flow tube coupled to a mass spectrometer. The heterogeneous reactions HOBr + HCl {yields} BrCl + H{sub 2}O and HOBr + HBr {yields} Br{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O have been demonstrated to proceed readily on these surfaces, and it has been shown that both HOBr and HBr are more easily partitioned to the condensed phase than their chlorine analogues. These heterogeneous reactions represent routes for the activation of halogen species in the atmosphere. In particular, the implications of this research to the depletion of stratospheric ozone after the Mt. Pinatubo volcanic eruption and to the depletion of ozone in the springtime Arctic boundary layer will be discussed.

  11. Surface-water chemistry in the wintertime southwest Indian Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.T.A.

    1986-01-01

    In the 1984 austral winter (July), the first cruise of the joint French-US INDIVAT (Indien Valorisation de Transite) program was successfully accomplished. Surface data were collected during transit from La Reunion to Crozet, Kerguelen, Amsterdam Island and back to La Reunion Aboard the French antarctic research/supply vessel Marion Dufresne. The subtropical front was found to be near 40/sup 0/S and the antarctic front was near 47/sup 0/S during INDIVAT 1. Many chemical properties, especially when normalized to a constant salinity to remove the effects of evaporation and precipitation, are known to correlate linearly with temperature. This paper reports normalized values for nitrate, alkalinity, pH, and carbon dioxide. Production of organic carbon as soft tissue is also discussed.

  12. The effect of injection molding conditions on the near-surface rubber morphology, surface chemistry, and adhesion performance of semi-crystalline and amorphous polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weakley-Bollin, Shannon Christine

    This thesis investigated the effect of injection molding processing variables, resin formulation and mold material on the resulting morphology and properties of semi-crystalline and amorphous polymers in parts molded on large presses with fully developed flow. Five different polymer resins and two different coating types were investigated, and the near-surface morphology was found to be dependent on material formulation, processing parameters, and geometry. For painted TPO, changes in the near-surface rubber morphology and surface chemistry based on material and processing conditions had no significant effect on the adhesion performance. For metal plated ABS, the adhesion performance was found to be heavily dependent on the rubber surface morphology, which varied with material formulation and processing conditions. One of the most significant findings was that forged aluminum injection molding tooling had little effect on the surface morphology or adhesion performance of either polypropylene or the two TPO formulations examined, despite the five-fold increase in thermal conductivity over traditional tool steel. Surface chemistry, however, was found to be affected by cooling rate, depending on material formulation. A UV stabilizer additive was found concentrated at 2.5 atomic percent on the surface of the aluminum molded part, but not the steel molded part, demonstrating a possible opportunity for using additives and aluminum tooling to create "designer surfaces". Processing conditions were found to have a competing role in metal plated ABS, where conditions that lowered surface stress and improved adhesion by a factor of 15 also increased the amount of bulk molded-in stress by nearly 7%. Both factors were found to play an important role in adhesion performance due to the effect of surface stress on the quality of the resulting etch structure. The bulk stress must be minimized to due to the large mechanical and thermal mismatch between the polymer and metal layers

  13. Surface Chemistry of Nano-Structured Mixed Metal Oxide Films

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-11

    demonstrated that carbon -modified Mo(1 1 0), C–Mo(1 1 0), is up to 15 times more selective for the dehydrogenation of formic acid than Mo(1 1 0...Reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) indicates that carbidic carbon blocks active sites for C–O bond cleavage, decreasing the rate of... hydrothermally synthesized single-crystalline hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanorods and investigated them as an anode material for Li-ion batteries. Electrodes prepared with

  14. The effect of surface chemistry and nanotopography of titanium nitride (TiN) films on primary hippocampal neurones.

    PubMed

    Cyster, L A; Parker, K G; Parker, T L; Grant, D M

    2004-01-01

    The cell-substrate interaction of primary hippocampal neurones with thin films of TiN was studied in vitro. TiN films of different surface chemistries and topographies were deposited by pulsed DC reactive magnetron sputtering and closed field unbalanced magnetron sputter ion plating by Teer Coatings Ltd., Hartlebury, UK to result in TiN films with similar surface chemistries but different topographical features. TiN films were characterised using X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The neuron-substrate interaction was examined using environmental scanning electron microscopy (FEG-ESEM) for morphological information. Bromodeoxyuridine and TUNEL assays were used to identify proliferating neurones as well as apoptotic neurones. Fluorescent staining for MAP-2 was used to label neuronal network formation. Primary hippocampal neurones were found to attach and spread to all of the TiN film chemistries and topographies investigated. Neuronal network morphology appeared to be more preferential on the nitrogen rich TiN films and also with reduced nanotopographical features.

  15. Facile functionalization of PDMS elastomer surfaces using thiol-ene click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Chen, Yang; Brook, Michael A

    2013-10-08

    A variety of methods have been developed for polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer surface functionalization, particularly for the improvement of hydrophilicity. However, in addition to difficulties in avoiding undesired physical changes to the modified surface, including surface cracking, "hydrophobic recovery" frequently leads hydrophilically modified surfaces to completely return over time to their hydrophobic nature, with accompanying loss of accessible functional groups. Thiol-ene chemistry provides a mild and robust technology for synthetic elaboration. We demonstrate the introduction of thiol groups onto the PDMS surface via base-catalyzed equilibration of MTS ((MeO)3Si(CH2)3SH). Thiols in the product elastomer were shown to be located primarily at the air interface using EDX, XPS, and fluorescence labeling initially, and after extended periods of time: total thiol concentrations at the surface and in the bulk were established by complementary chemical titrations with DTDP (4,4'-dithiodipyridine) and iodine titrations in different solvents. The surface density of thiols was readily controlled by reaction conditions: the rate of hydrophobic recovery, which led to incomplete loss of accessible functional groups, was determined. Thiol-ene click chemistry was then used to introduce a variety of hydrophilic moieties onto the surface including a silicone surfactant and maleic anhydride, respectively. In the latter case, molecular functionalization with both small (fluorescent labels) and polymeric nucleophiles (poly(ethylene glycol), chitosan) could be subsequently induced by simple ring-opening nucleophilic attack leading to permanently functional surfaces.

  16. Using advanced surface complexation models for modelling soil chemistry under forests: Solling forest, Germany.

    PubMed

    Bonten, Luc T C; Groenenberg, Jan E; Meesenburg, Henning; de Vries, Wim

    2011-10-01

    Various dynamic soil chemistry models have been developed to gain insight into impacts of atmospheric deposition of sulphur, nitrogen and other elements on soil and soil solution chemistry. Sorption parameters for anions and cations are generally calibrated for each site, which hampers extrapolation in space and time. On the other hand, recently developed surface complexation models (SCMs) have been successful in predicting ion sorption for static systems using generic parameter sets. This study reports the inclusion of an assemblage of these SCMs in the dynamic soil chemistry model SMARTml and applies this model to a spruce forest site in Solling Germany. Parameters for SCMs were taken from generic datasets and not calibrated. Nevertheless, modelling results for major elements matched observations well. Further, trace metals were included in the model, also using the existing framework of SCMs. The model predicted sorption for most trace elements well.

  17. Giant magnetoresistive biosensors for molecular diagnosis: surface chemistry and assay development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Heng; Osterfeld, Sebastian J.; Xu, Liang; White, Robert L.; Pourmand, Nader; Wang, Shan X.

    2008-08-01

    Giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biochips using magnetic nanoparticle as labels were developed for molecular diagnosis. The sensor arrays consist of GMR sensing strips of 1.5 μm or 0.75 μm in width. GMR sensors are exquisitely sensitive yet very delicate, requiring ultrathin corrosion-resistive passivation and efficient surface chemistry for oligonucleotide probe immobilization. A mild and stable surface chemistry was first developed that is especially suitable for modifying delicate electronic device surfaces, and a practical application of our GMR biosensors was then demonstrated for detecting four most common human papillomavirus (HPV) subtypes in plasmids. We also showed that the DNA hybridization time could potentially be reduced from overnight to about ten minutes using microfluidics.

  18. Cytocompatibility of Wood-derived Cellulose Nanofibril Hydrogels with Different Surface Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Rashad, Ahmad; Mustafa, Kamal; Heggset, Ellinor Bœvre; Syverud, Kristin

    2017-03-06

    The current study aims to demonstrate the influence of the surface chemistry of wood-derived cellulose nanofibril (CNF) hydrogels on fibroblasts for tissue engineering applications. TEMPO-mediated oxidation or carboxymethylation pretreatments were employed to produce hydrogels with different surface chemistry. This study demonstrates, firstly, the gelation of CNF with cell culture medium and formation of stable hydrogels with improved rheological properties. Secondly, the response of mouse fibroblasts cultured on the surface of the hydrogels or sandwiched within the materials with respect to cytotoxicity, cell attachment, proliferation, morphology and migration. Indirect cytotoxicity tests showed no toxic effect of either hydrogel. The direct contact with the caroxymethylated hydrogel adversely influenced the morphology of the cells and limited their spreading, while typical morphology and spreading of cells was observed with the TEMPO-oxidized hydrogel. The porous fibrous structure may be a key to cell proliferation and migration in the hydrogels.

  19. Pretreatment-dependent surface chemistry of wood nanocellulose for pH-sensitive hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Chinga-Carrasco, Gary; Syverud, Kristin

    2014-09-01

    Nanocellulose from wood is a promising material with potential in various technological areas. Within biomedical applications, nanocellulose has been proposed as a suitable nano-material for wound dressings. This is based on the capability of the material to self-assemble into 3D micro-porous structures, which among others have an excellent capacity of maintaining a moist environment. In addition, the surface chemistry of nanocellulose is suitable for various applications. First, OH-groups are abundant in nanocellulose materials, making the material strongly hydrophilic. Second, the surface chemistry can be modified, introducing aldehyde and carboxyl groups, which have major potential for surface functionalization. In this study, we demonstrate the production of nanocellulose with tailor-made surface chemistry, by pre-treating the raw cellulose fibres with carboxymethylation and periodate oxidation. The pre-treatments yielded a highly nanofibrillated material, with significant amounts of aldehyde and carboxyl groups. Importantly, the poly-anionic surface of the oxidized nanocellulose opens up for novel applications, i.e. micro-porous materials with pH-responsive characteristics. This is due to the swelling capacity of the 3D micro-porous structures, which have ionisable functional groups. In this study, we demonstrated that nanocellulose gels have a significantly higher swelling degree in neutral and alkaline conditions, compared to an acid environment (pH 3). Such a capability can potentially be applied in chronic wounds for controlled and intelligent release of antibacterial components into biofilms.

  20. Pretreatment-dependent surface chemistry of wood nanocellulose for pH-sensitive hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Syverud, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Nanocellulose from wood is a promising material with potential in various technological areas. Within biomedical applications, nanocellulose has been proposed as a suitable nano-material for wound dressings. This is based on the capability of the material to self-assemble into 3D micro-porous structures, which among others have an excellent capacity of maintaining a moist environment. In addition, the surface chemistry of nanocellulose is suitable for various applications. First, OH-groups are abundant in nanocellulose materials, making the material strongly hydrophilic. Second, the surface chemistry can be modified, introducing aldehyde and carboxyl groups, which have major potential for surface functionalization. In this study, we demonstrate the production of nanocellulose with tailor-made surface chemistry, by pre-treating the raw cellulose fibres with carboxymethylation and periodate oxidation. The pre-treatments yielded a highly nanofibrillated material, with significant amounts of aldehyde and carboxyl groups. Importantly, the poly-anionic surface of the oxidized nanocellulose opens up for novel applications, i.e. micro-porous materials with pH-responsive characteristics. This is due to the swelling capacity of the 3D micro-porous structures, which have ionisable functional groups. In this study, we demonstrated that nanocellulose gels have a significantly higher swelling degree in neutral and alkaline conditions, compared to an acid environment (pH 3). Such a capability can potentially be applied in chronic wounds for controlled and intelligent release of antibacterial components into biofilms. PMID:24713295

  1. Control of pyrite surface chemistry in physical coal cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Luttrell, G.H.; Yoon, R.H.; Zachwieja, J.B.; Lagno, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    Several pyrite depressants have been evaluated for their effectiveness in depressing coal pyrite. A novel reagent, NVT, has been synthesized and shown to be selective for the separation of coal from coal pyrite by froth flotation. This organic reagent contains no sulfur group in its structure and exhibits a stronger affinity toward pyrite than toward coal. The effects of a number of parameters such as pH, reagent concentration and flotation time on flotation response were investigated in a microflotation cell and a bench-scale Denver flotation cell. The reagent has demonstrated good performance at relatively low concentrations when compared to the commercially available sulfur-based pyrite depressants. 8 figs.

  2. Catalyst design for enhanced sustainability through fundamental surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Personick, Michelle L; Montemore, Matthew M; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Madix, Robert J; Biener, Juergen; Friend, Cynthia M

    2016-02-28

    Decreasing energy consumption in the production of platform chemicals is necessary to improve the sustainability of the chemical industry, which is the largest consumer of delivered energy. The majority of industrial chemical transformations rely on catalysts, and therefore designing new materials that catalyse the production of important chemicals via more selective and energy-efficient processes is a promising pathway to reducing energy use by the chemical industry. Efficiently designing new catalysts benefits from an integrated approach involving fundamental experimental studies and theoretical modelling in addition to evaluation of materials under working catalytic conditions. In this review, we outline this approach in the context of a particular catalyst-nanoporous gold (npAu)-which is an unsupported, dilute AgAu alloy catalyst that is highly active for the selective oxidative transformation of alcohols. Fundamental surface science studies on Au single crystals and AgAu thin-film alloys in combination with theoretical modelling were used to identify the principles which define the reactivity of npAu and subsequently enabled prediction of new reactive pathways on this material. Specifically, weak van der Waals interactions are key to the selectivity of Au materials, including npAu. We also briefly describe other systems in which this integrated approach was applied.

  3. Control of pyrite surface chemistry in physical coal cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Richardson, P.R.

    1992-06-24

    One of the most difficult separations in minerals processing involves the differential flotation of pyrite and coal. Under practical flotation conditions, they are both hydrophobic and no cost-effective method has been developed to efficiently reject the pyrite. The problem arises from inherent floatability of coal and pyrite. Coal is naturally hydrophobic and remains so under practical flotation. Although pyrite is believed to be naturally hydrophilic under practical flotation conditions it undergoes a relatively rapid incipient oxidation reaction that causes self-induced'' flotation. The oxidation product responsible for self-induced'' flotation is believed to be a metal polysulfide, excess sulfur in the lattice, or in some cases elemental sulfur. It is believed that if incipient oxidation of pyrite could be prevented, good pyrite rejection could be obtained. In order to gain a better understanding of how pyrite oxidizes, a new method of preparing fresh, unoxidized pyrite surfaces and a new method of studying pyrite oxidation have been developed this reporting period.

  4. Surface chemistry of TiCl 4 on W(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Roberts, Jeffrey T.

    1996-07-01

    The interactions of titanium tetrachloride (TiCl 4) with the W(100) surface are described. Reactions were studied using temperature programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). From TPD measurements, it is concluded that TiCl 4 is the sole desorption product below 700 K. Desorption occurs in three temperature regions, near 170 K, in a process assigned to multilayer sublimation, near 225 K, from two states designated α1- and α2-TiCl 4, and near 455 K, from two states designated γ1- and γ2-TiCl 4. The Ti(2p) and Cl(2p) photoelectron spectra imply that TiCl 4 is molecularly adsorbed below 190 K. Between 190 and 275 K, α-TiCl 4 desorption competes with dissociation to TiCl 3(a) and Cl (a). Adsorbed TiCl 3, which has been spectroscopically identified by XPS, self-disproportionates between 300 and 500 K, yielding γ-TiCl 4, as well as adsorbed Ti and Cl. Adsorbed Cl eventually desorbs as a volatile tungsten chloride, and Ti probably evolves into the gas phase as Ti (g).

  5. Organometallic Chemistry and catalysis on gold metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Angelici, Robert J.

    2007-11-21

    As in transition metal complexes, C{triple_bond}N-R ligands adsorbed on powdered gold undergo attack by amines to give putative diaminocarbene groups on the gold surface. This reaction forms the basis for the discovery of a gold metal-catalyzed reaction of C{triple_bond}N-R, primary amines (R{prime}NH{sub 2}) and O{sub 2} to give carbodiimides (R{prime}-N{double_bond}C{double_bond}N-R). An analogous reaction of C{triple_bond}O, RNH{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} gives isocyanates (R-N{double_bond}C{double_bond}O), which react with additional amine to give urea (RNH){sub 2}C{double_bond}O products. The gold-catalyzed reaction of C{triple_bond}N-R with secondary amines (HNR{prime}{sub 2}) and O{sub 2} gives mixed ureas RNH(CO)NR{prime}{sub 2}. In another type of gold-catalyzed reaction, secondary amines HN(CH{sub 2}R){sub 2} react with O{sub 2} to undergo dehydrogenation to the imine product, RCH{double_bond}N(CH{sub 2}R). Of special interest is the high catalytic activity of gold powder, which is otherwise well-known for its poor catalytic properties.

  6. Effects of surface chemistry on hot corrosion life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryxell, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Burner rig tests were conducted under the following conditions: 900 C, hourly thermal cycling, 0.5 ppm sodium as MaCl in the gas stream, velocity 0.3 Mach. The alloys are Udiment 700, Rene 80, uncoated and with RT21, Codep, or NiCoCrAlY coatings. These tests were completed for specimens in the as-processed condition and after aging at 1100 C in oxidizing or inert evnivronments for time up to 600 hours. Coil inductance changes used for periodic nondestructive inspection of specimens were useful in following the course of corrosion. Typical sulfidation was observed in all cases, structurally similar to that observed for service-run turbine components. Aging at cuased a severe decrease in hot corrosion life of RT21 and Codep coatings and a significant but less decrease in the life of the NiCoCrAlY coating. The extent of these decreases was much greater for all three coatings on U700 substrates than on Rene 80 substrates. Coating/substrate interdiffusion rather than by surface oxidation.

  7. Surface chemistry of electrospun cellulose nitrate nanofiber membranes.

    PubMed

    Nartker, Steven; Askeland, Per; Wiederoder, Sara; Drzal, Lawrence T

    2011-02-01

    Electrospinning is a rapidly developing technology that provides a unique way to produce novel polymer nanofibers with controllable diameters. Cellulose nitrate non-woven mats of submicron-sized fibers with diameters of 100-1200 nm were prepared. The effects of processing equipment collector design void gap, and steel drum coated with polyvinylidene dichloride (PVDC) were investigated. The PVDC layer applied to the rotating drum aided in fiber harvesting. Electron microscopy (FESEM and ESEM) studies of as-spun fibers revealed that the morphology of cellulose nitrate fibers depended on the collector type and solution viscosity. When a rotating steel drum was employed a random morphology was observed, while the void gap collector produced aligned fiber mats. Increases in viscosity lead to larger diameter fibers. The fibers collected were free from all residual solvents and could undergo oxygen plasma treatment to increase the hydropholicity.

  8. Nanoporous Gold as a Neural Interface Coating: Effects of Topography, Surface Chemistry, and Feature Size

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Christopher A. R.; Chen, Hao; Stamou, Marianna; Biener, Juergen; Biener, Monika M.; Lein, Pamela J.; Seker, Erkin

    2015-02-23

    We report that designing neural interfaces that maintain close physical coupling of neurons to an electrode surface remains a major challenge for both implantable and in vitro neural recording electrode arrays. Typically, low-impedance nanostructured electrode coatings rely on chemical cues from pharmaceuticals or surface-immobilized peptides to suppress glial scar tissue formation over the electrode surface (astrogliosis), which is an obstacle to reliable neuron–electrode coupling. Nanoporous gold (np-Au), produced by an alloy corrosion process, is a promising candidate to reduce astrogliosis solely through topography by taking advantage of its tunable length scale. In the present in vitro study on np-Au’s interaction with cortical neuron–glia co-cultures, we demonstrate that the nanostructure of np-Au achieves close physical coupling of neurons by maintaining a high neuron-to-astrocyte surface coverage ratio. Atomic layer deposition-based surface modification was employed to decouple the effect of morphology from surface chemistry. Additionally, length scale effects were systematically studied by controlling the characteristic feature size of np-Au through variations in the dealloying conditions. In conclusion, our results show that np-Au nanotopography, not surface chemistry, reduces astrocyte surface coverage while maintaining high neuronal coverage and may enhance neuron–electrode coupling through nanostructure-mediated suppression of scar tissue formation.

  9. Nanoporous Gold as a Neural Interface Coating: Effects of Topography, Surface Chemistry, and Feature Size

    DOE PAGES

    Chapman, Christopher A. R.; Chen, Hao; Stamou, Marianna; ...

    2015-02-23

    We report that designing neural interfaces that maintain close physical coupling of neurons to an electrode surface remains a major challenge for both implantable and in vitro neural recording electrode arrays. Typically, low-impedance nanostructured electrode coatings rely on chemical cues from pharmaceuticals or surface-immobilized peptides to suppress glial scar tissue formation over the electrode surface (astrogliosis), which is an obstacle to reliable neuron–electrode coupling. Nanoporous gold (np-Au), produced by an alloy corrosion process, is a promising candidate to reduce astrogliosis solely through topography by taking advantage of its tunable length scale. In the present in vitro study on np-Au’s interactionmore » with cortical neuron–glia co-cultures, we demonstrate that the nanostructure of np-Au achieves close physical coupling of neurons by maintaining a high neuron-to-astrocyte surface coverage ratio. Atomic layer deposition-based surface modification was employed to decouple the effect of morphology from surface chemistry. Additionally, length scale effects were systematically studied by controlling the characteristic feature size of np-Au through variations in the dealloying conditions. In conclusion, our results show that np-Au nanotopography, not surface chemistry, reduces astrocyte surface coverage while maintaining high neuronal coverage and may enhance neuron–electrode coupling through nanostructure-mediated suppression of scar tissue formation.« less

  10. Nanoporous Gold as a Neural Interface Coating: Effects of Topography, Surface Chemistry, and Feature Size

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Christopher A. R.; Chen, Hao; Stamou, Marianna; Biener, Juergen; Biener, Monika M.; Lein, Pamela J.; Seker, Erkin

    2015-01-01

    Designing neural-electrode interfaces that maintain close physical coupling of neurons to the electrode surface remains a major challenge for both implantable and in vitro neural recording electrode arrays. Typically, low-impedance nanostructured electrode coatings rely on chemical cues from pharmaceuticals or surface-immobilized peptides to suppress glial scar tissue formation over the electrode surface (astrogliosis), which is an obstacle to reliable neuron-electrode coupling. Nanoporous gold (np-Au), produced by an alloy corrosion process, is a promising candidate to reduce astrogliosis solely through topography by taking advantage of its tunable length scale. In the present in vitro study on np-Au’s interaction with cortical neuron-glia co-cultures, we demonstrate that the nanostructure of np-Au is achieving close physical coupling of neurons through maintaining a high neuron-to-astrocyte surface coverage ratio. Atomic layer deposition-based surface modification was employed to decouple the effect of morphology from surface chemistry. Additionally, length scale effects were systematically studied by controlling the characteristic feature size of np-Au through variations of the dealloying conditions. Our results show that np-Au nanotopography, not surface chemistry, reduces astrocyte surface coverage while maintaining high neuronal coverage, and may enhance the neuron-electrode coupling through nanostructure-mediated suppression of scar tissue formation. PMID:25706691

  11. Enabling organosilicon chemistries on inert polymer surfaces with a vapor-deposited silica layer.

    PubMed

    Anderson, A; Ashurst, W R

    2009-10-06

    Given the large surface area-to-volume ratios commonly encountered in microfluidics applications, the ability to engineer the chemical properties of surfaces encountered in these applications is critically important. However, as various polymers are rapidly replacing glass and silicon as the chosen materials for microfluidics devices, the ability to easily modify the surface chemistry has been diminished by the relatively inert nature of some commonly employed polymer surfaces, such as poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polystyrene, and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This paper describes the low-temperature, vapor-phase deposition of robust silica layers to PMMA, polystyrene, and PDMS surfaces, which enables the functionalization of these surfaces by standard organosilane chemistries. Attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy, contact angle goniometry, ellipsometry, and atomic force microscopy are used to characterize the silica layers that form on these surfaces. Aqueous immersion experiments indicate that the silica layer has excellent stability in aqueous environments, which is a prerequisite for microfluidics applications, but for PMMA surfaces, low adhesion of the silica layer to the underlying substrate is problematic. For PDMS substrates, the presence of the silica layer helps to slow the process of hydrophobic recovery, which is an additional advantage.

  12. Investigation of Enhanced Surface Spray Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Eric A.; Kim, Jungho; Kiger, Ken

    2004-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the effects of enhanced surfaces on heat transfer during spray cooling. The surface enhancements consisted of cubic pin fins, pyramids, and straight fins (uniform cross sectional straight fins) machined on the top surface of copper heater blocks. Each had a cross-sectional area of 2.0 square cm. Measurements were also obtained on a heater block with a flat surface for baseline comparison purposes. A 2x2 nozzle array was used with PF-5060 as the working fluid. Thermal performance data was obtained under nominally degassed (chamber pressure of 41.4 kPa ) and gassy conditions (chamber with N2 gas at 101 kPa). The results show that the straight fins had the largest enhancement in heat flow. Critical heat flux (CHF) for this surface showed an increase of 55% in comparison to the flat surface for the nominally degassed condition. The cubic pin finned and pyramid surfaces provided slightly more than half the heat flux enhancement (30% - 40% greater than the flat surface) of the straight fins. The gassy case showed that the straight fins again provided the largest enhancement (48%) in CHF relative to the flat surface. This was followed by the cubic pin fins, and pyramids which had increases of 31% and 18% respectively. No significant effect was observed in the surface temperature at which CHF occurs for either portion of the study.

  13. An investigation of student understanding in the undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grutsch, John Leo, Jr.

    Laboratory activities in organic chemistry involve a mixture of sophisticated logic and empirical observation that requires the integration of mechanistic thought, laboratory technique, and problem-solving skills. In an effort to understand how students develop the thought processes and problem-solving skills necessary for laboratory work in organic chemistry, student understanding of how the interaction between a reaction system (reactants or starting material(s), reagent(s), and/or solvent), experimental variables (pH, temperature, concentrations, etc), provides a result of interest (yield, selectivity, purity, etc.) for an experiment performed in the organic chemistry laboratory was investigated through the collection of responses to questions posed on pre-laboratory quizzes followed by in-depth interviews during which student volunteers discussed their responses along with their experiences in the laboratory. The conceptual change theory of learning which assumes new conceptions are understood, judged, acquired, or rejected in a conceptual context was used as a theoretical paradigm to examine students responses to questions posed on pre-laboratory quizzes and transcripts of the interviews with student volunteers. Students were found to not have developed a mechanistic understanding of how the interaction between a reaction system (reactants or starting material(s), reagent(s), and/or solvent), experimental variables (pH, temperature, concentrations, etc), provides a result of interest (yield, selectivity, purity, etc.) for an experiment performed in the organic chemistry laboratory. However, students' prior exposure to and understanding of chemical concepts was found to simultaneously assist and hinder in their development of a partial mechanistic understanding of how a reaction system (reactants or starting material(s), reagent(s), and/or solvent), experimental variables (pH, temperature, concentrations, etc), interact to provide a result of interest (yield

  14. Role of the surface chemistry of activated carbons in dye removal from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hua-lei; Zhen, Wen-juan; Zhu, Qian; Wu, Xiao-bin; Chang, Zhi-dong; Li, Wen-jun

    2015-07-01

    Commercial activated carbons were modified by a series of chemical or physical treatments using H2O2, NH3, and heating under N2 flow without notably changing their pore structures. The resultant carbons were characterized by N2 adsorption and Bohem titration and then used to remove Ponceau 4R, methyl orange and brilliant blue from aqueous solutions. Surface chemistry was found to play a significantly different role in removing these three compounds. The removal of anionic Ponceau 4R increases with increasing carbon surface basicity due to the predominant dispersive interaction mechanism. In contrast, surface chemistry has little effect on the removal of anionic methyl orange, which can be explained by two parallel mechanisms involving electrostatic and dispersive interactions due to the basic amine group in a dye molecule. The influence of surface chemistry on the removal of amphoteric brilliant blue dye can also be ignored due to a weak interaction between the carbons and dye molecules, which is resulted from strong cohesive energy from electrostatic forces inside amphoteric dye molecules.

  15. An Investigation of the Effects of Reader Characteristics on Reading Comprehension Of a General Chemistry Text

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiles, Kelly Y.

    There is great concern in the scientific community that students in the United States, when compared with other countries, are falling behind in their scientific achievement. Increasing students' reading comprehension of scientific text may be one of the components involved in students' science achievement. To investigate students' reading comprehension this quantitative study examined the effects of different reader characteristics, namely, students' logical reasoning ability, factual chemistry knowledge, working memory capacity, and schema of the chemistry concepts, on reading comprehension of a chemistry text. Students' reading comprehension was measured through their ability to encode the text, access the meanings of words (lexical access), make bridging and elaborative inferences, and integrate the text with their existing schemas to make a lasting mental representation of the text (situational model). Students completed a series of tasks that measured the reader characteristic and reading comprehension variables. Some of the variables were measured using new technologies and software to investigate different cognitive processes. These technologies and software included eye tracking to investigate students' lexical accessing and a Pathfinder program to investigate students' schema of the chemistry concepts. The results from this study were analyzed using canonical correlation and regression analysis. The canonical correlation analysis allows for the ten variables described previously to be included in one multivariate analysis. Results indicate that the relationship between the reader characteristic variables and the reading comprehension variables is significant. The resulting canonical function accounts for a greater amount of variance in students' responses then any individual variable. Regression analysis was used to further investigate which reader characteristic variables accounted for the differences in students' responses for each reading comprehension

  16. Investigation on Surface Roughness in Cylindrical Grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudrapati, Ramesh; Bandyopadhyay, Asish; Pal, Pradip Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Cylindrical grinding is a complex machining process. And surface roughness is often a key factor in any machining process while considering the machine tool or machining performance. Further, surface roughness is one of the measures of the technological quality of the product and is a factor that greatly influences cost and quality. The present work is related to some aspects of surface finish in the context of traverse-cut cylindrical grinding. The parameters considered have been: infeed, longitudinal feed and work speed. Taguchi quality design is used to design the experiments and to identify the significantly import parameter(s) affecting the surface roughness. By utilization of Response Surface Methodology (RSM), second order differential equation has been developed and attempts have also been made for optimization of the process in the context of surface roughness by using C- programming.

  17. Exploitation of desilylation chemistry in tailor-made functionalization on diverse surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yongchun; Chen, Songjie; Kuzume, Akiyoshi; Rudnev, Alexander; Huang, Cancan; Kaliginedi, Veerabhadrarao; Baghernejad, Masoud; Hong, Wenjing; Wandlowski, Thomas; Decurtins, Silvio; Liu, Shi-Xia

    2015-03-01

    Interface engineering to attain a uniform and compact self-assembled monolayer at atomically flat surfaces plays a crucial role in the bottom-up fabrication of organic molecular devices. Here we report a promising and operationally simple approach for modification/functionalization not only at ultraflat single-crystal metal surfaces, M(111) (M=Au, Pt, Pd, Rh and Ir) but also at the highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface, upon efficient in situ cleavage of trimethylsilyl end groups of the molecules. The obtained self-assembled monolayers are ultrastable within a wide potential window. The carbon-surface bonding on various substrates is confirmed by shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Application of this strategy in tuning surface wettability is also demonstrated. The most valuable finding is that a combination of the desilylation with the click chemistry represents an efficient method for covalent and tailor-made functionalization of diverse surfaces.

  18. Major Successes of Theory-and-Experiment-Combined Studies in Surface Chemistry and Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Li, Yimin

    2009-11-21

    Experimental discoveries followed by theoretical interpretations that pave the way of further advances by experimentalists is a developing pattern in modern surface chemistry and catalysis. The revolution of modern surface science started with the development of surface-sensitive techniques such as LEED, XPS, AES, ISS and SIMS, in which the close collaboration between experimentalists and theorists led to the quantitative determination of surface structure and composition. The experimental discovery of the chemical activity of surface defects and the trends in the reactivity of transitional metals followed by the explanations from the theoretical studies led to the molecular level understanding of active sites in catalysis. The molecular level knowledge, in turn, provided a guide for experiments to search for new generation of catalysts. These and many other examples of successes in experiment-and-theory-combined studies demonstrate the importance of the collaboration between experimentalists and theorists in the development of modern surface science.

  19. Exploitation of desilylation chemistry in tailor-made functionalization on diverse surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yongchun; Chen, Songjie; Kuzume, Akiyoshi; Rudnev, Alexander; Huang, Cancan; Kaliginedi, Veerabhadrarao; Baghernejad, Masoud; Hong, Wenjing; Wandlowski, Thomas; Decurtins, Silvio; Liu, Shi-Xia

    2015-03-11

    Interface engineering to attain a uniform and compact self-assembled monolayer at atomically flat surfaces plays a crucial role in the bottom-up fabrication of organic molecular devices. Here we report a promising and operationally simple approach for modification/functionalization not only at ultraflat single-crystal metal surfaces, M(111) (M=Au, Pt, Pd, Rh and Ir) but also at the highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface, upon efficient in situ cleavage of trimethylsilyl end groups of the molecules. The obtained self-assembled monolayers are ultrastable within a wide potential window. The carbon-surface bonding on various substrates is confirmed by shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Application of this strategy in tuning surface wettability is also demonstrated. The most valuable finding is that a combination of the desilylation with the click chemistry represents an efficient method for covalent and tailor-made functionalization of diverse surfaces.

  20. Surface grafting of vinyl-functionalized poly(fluorene)s via thiol-ene click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Davis, Andrew R; Carter, Kenneth R

    2014-04-22

    Thiol-ene chemistry is used for the surface grafting of vinyl-functionalized poly(fluorene) derivatives onto substrates containing free surface thiol groups. The grafting reaction proceeds in a matter of minutes under UV irradiation without photoinitiator, and the resulting surface-bound, solvent-impervious conjugated polymers retain their characteristic optoelectronic properties. End-chain grafted poly(fluorene)s reach greater surface densities than their side-chain grafted counterparts and show less blue-shifting of photoluminescence upon grafting, suggesting that chain end-grafted conjugated polymers experience less disruption of their extended conjugation and adopt a more brush-like surface conformation. Surface grafted poly(fluorene)s showed facile photopatterning, and thin film transistors with semiconducting polymers directly grafted to the dielectric layer showed performances directly comparable to conventional self-assembled layers of performance-improving alkylsilanes.

  1. Electron traps and their effect on the surface chemistry of TiO2(110)

    PubMed Central

    Papageorgiou, Anthoula C.; Beglitis, Nikolaos S.; Pang, Chi L.; Teobaldi, Gilberto; Cabailh, Gregory; Chen, Qiao; Fisher, Andrew J.; Hofer, Werner A.; Thornton, Geoff

    2010-01-01

    Oxygen vacancies on metal oxide surfaces have long been thought to play a key role in the surface chemistry. Such processes have been directly visualized in the case of the model photocatalyst surface TiO2(110) in reactions with water and molecular oxygen. These vacancies have been assumed to be neutral in calculations of the surface properties. However, by comparing experimental and simulated scanning tunneling microscopy images and spectra, we show that oxygen vacancies act as trapping centers and are negatively charged. We demonstrate that charging the defect significantly affects the reactivity by following the reaction of molecular oxygen with surface hydroxyl formed by water dissociation at the vacancies. Calculations with electronically charged hydroxyl favor a condensation reaction forming water and surface oxygen adatoms, in line with experimental observations. This contrasts with simulations using neutral hydroxyl where hydrogen peroxide is found to be the most stable product. PMID:20133773

  2. Oxygen concentration control of dopamine-induced high uniformity surface coating chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Won; McCloskey, Bryan D; Choi, Tae Hwan; Lee, Changho; Kim, Min-Joung; Freeman, Benny D; Park, Ho Bum

    2013-01-23

    Material surface engineering has attracted great interest in important applications, including electronics, biomedicine, and membranes. More recently, dopamine has been widely exploited in solution-based chemistry to direct facile surface modification. However, unsolved questions remain about the chemical identity of the final products, their deposition kinetics and their binding mechanism. In particular, the dopamine oxidation reaction kinetics is a key to improving surface modification efficiency. Here, we demonstrate that high O(2) concentrations in the dopamine solution lead to highly homogeneous, thin layer deposition on any material surfaces via accelerated reaction kinetics, elucidated by Le Chatelier's principle toward dopamine oxidation steps in a Michael-addition reaction. As a result, highly uniform, ultra-smooth modified surfaces are achieved in much shorter deposition times. This finding provides new insights into the effect of reaction kinetics and molecular geometry on the uniformity of modifications for surface engineering techniques.

  3. Exploitation of desilylation chemistry in tailor-made functionalization on diverse surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yongchun; Chen, Songjie; Kuzume, Akiyoshi; Rudnev, Alexander; Huang, Cancan; Kaliginedi, Veerabhadrarao; Baghernejad, Masoud; Hong, Wenjing; Wandlowski, Thomas; Decurtins, Silvio; Liu, Shi-Xia

    2015-01-01

    Interface engineering to attain a uniform and compact self-assembled monolayer at atomically flat surfaces plays a crucial role in the bottom-up fabrication of organic molecular devices. Here we report a promising and operationally simple approach for modification/functionalization not only at ultraflat single-crystal metal surfaces, M(111) (M=Au, Pt, Pd, Rh and Ir) but also at the highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface, upon efficient in situ cleavage of trimethylsilyl end groups of the molecules. The obtained self-assembled monolayers are ultrastable within a wide potential window. The carbon–surface bonding on various substrates is confirmed by shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Application of this strategy in tuning surface wettability is also demonstrated. The most valuable finding is that a combination of the desilylation with the click chemistry represents an efficient method for covalent and tailor-made functionalization of diverse surfaces. PMID:25758661

  4. Bacterial resistance of self-assembled surfaces using PPOm-b-PSBMAn zwitterionic copolymer - concomitant effects of surface topography and surface chemistry on attachment of live bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Sheng-Wen; Venault, Antoine; Yang, Hui-Shan; Chang, Yung

    2014-06-01

    Three well-defined diblock copolymers made of poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (poly(SBMA)) and poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) groups were synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) method. They were physically adsorbed onto three types of surfaces having different topography, including smooth flat surface, convex surface, and indented surface. Chemical state of surfaces was characterized by XPS while the various topographies were examined by SEM and AFM. Hydrophilicity of surfaces was dependent on both the surface chemistry and the surface topography, suggesting that orientation of copolymer brushes can be tuned in the design of surfaces aimed at resisting bacterial attachment. Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus mutans and Escherichia coli with green fluorescent protein (E. coli GFP) were used in bacterial tests to assess the resistance to bacterial attachment of poly(SBMA)-covered surfaces. Results highlighted a drastic improvement of resistance to bacterial adhesion with the increasing of poly(SBMA) to PPO ratio, as well as an important effect of surface topography. The chemical effect was directly related to the length of the hydrophilic moieties. When longer, more water could be entrapped, leading to improved anti-bacterial properties. The physical effect impacted on the orientation of the copolymer brushes, as well as on the surface contact area available. Convex surfaces as well as indented surfaces wafer presented the best resistance to bacterial adhesion. Indeed, bacterial attachment was more importantly reduced on these surfaces compared with smooth surfaces. It was explained by the non-orthogonal orientation of copolymer brushes, resulting in a more efficient surface coverage of zwitterionic molecules. This work suggests that not only the control of surface chemistry is essential in the preparation of surfaces resisting bacterial attachment, but also the control of surface topography and orientation of antifouling

  5. Variation in Adirondack, New York, lakewater chemistry as function of surface area

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.J. ); Kugler, D.L.; Johnson, C.B.; Rosenbaum, B.J. ); Small, M.J. ); Landers, D.H. ); Overton, W.S. ); Kretser, W.A.; Gallagher, J. )

    1990-02-01

    Data from a recent survey conducted by the Adirondack Lake Survey Corporation were used to evaluate the influence of lake surface area on the acid-base status of lakes in Adirondack State Park, New York. Acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) in the small lakes (<4 ha) occurred more frequently at extreme values (>200, <0 {mu}eq L{sup {minus}1}), whereas larger lakes tended to be intermediate in ANC. Consequently, acidic (ANC {le} 0) and low-pH lakes were typically small. The small lakes also exhibited lower Ca{sup 2+} concentration and higher dissolved organic carbon than did larger lakes. Lakes {ge} 4 ha were only half as likely to be acidic as were lakes {ge} 1 ha in area. These data illustrate the dependence of lake chemistry on lake surface area and the importance of the lower lake area limit for a statistical survey of lakewater chemistry.

  6. Variation in Adirondack, New York, lake-water chemistry as function of surface area

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.J.; Kugler, D.L.; Small, M.J.; Johnson, C.B.; Landers, D.H.

    1990-01-01

    Data from a recent survey conducted by the Adirondack Lake Survey Corporation were used to evaluate the influence of lake surface area on the acid-base status of lakes in Adirondack State Park, New York. Acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) in the small lakes (<4 ha) occurred more frequently at extreme values (>200, <0 microeq/L), whereas larger lakes tended to be intermediate in ANC. Consequently, acidic (ANC = or < 0) and low pH lakes were typically small. The small lakes also exhibited lower Ca(2+) concentration and higher dissolved organic carbon than did larger lakes. Lakes = or > 4 ha were only half as likely to be acidic as were lakes = or > 1 ha in area. These data illustrate the dependence of lake chemistry on lake surface area and the importance of the lower lake area limit for a statistical survey of lakewater chemistry.

  7. Modelling interstellar physics and chemistry: implications for surface and solid-state processes.

    PubMed

    Williams, David; Viti, Serena

    2013-07-13

    We discuss several types of regions in the interstellar medium of the Milky Way and other galaxies in which the chemistry appears to be influenced or dominated by surface and solid-state processes occurring on or in interstellar dust grains. For some of these processes, for example, the formation of H₂ molecules, detailed experimental and theoretical approaches have provided excellent fundamental data for incorporation into astrochemical models. In other cases, there is an astrochemical requirement for much more laboratory and computational study, and we highlight these needs in our description. Nevertheless, in spite of the limitations of the data, it is possible to infer from astrochemical modelling that surface and solid-state processes play a crucial role in astronomical chemistry from early epochs of the Universe up to the present day.

  8. Global transcriptomic analysis of model human cell lines exposed to surface-modified gold nanoparticles: the effect of surface chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzincic, E. M.; Yang, J. A.; Drnevich, J.; Falagan-Lotsch, P.; Murphy, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) are attractive for biomedical applications not only for their remarkable physical properties, but also for the ease of which their surface chemistry can be manipulated. Many applications involve functionalization of the Au NP surface in order to improve biocompatibility, attach targeting ligands or carry drugs. However, changes in cells exposed to Au NPs of different surface chemistries have been observed, and little is known about how Au NPs and their surface coatings may impact cellular gene expression. The gene expression of two model human cell lines, human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and prostate cancer cells (PC3) was interrogated by microarray analysis of over 14 000 human genes. The cell lines were exposed to four differently functionalized Au NPs: citrate, poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH), and lipid coatings combined with alkanethiols or PAH. Gene functional annotation categories and weighted gene correlation network analysis were used in order to connect gene expression changes to common cellular functions and to elucidate expression patterns between Au NP samples. Coated Au NPs affect genes implicated in proliferation, angiogenesis, and metabolism in HDF cells, and inflammation, angiogenesis, proliferation apoptosis regulation, survival and invasion in PC3 cells. Subtle changes in surface chemistry, such as the initial net charge, lability of the ligand, and underlying layers greatly influence the degree of expression change and the type of cellular pathway affected.Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) are attractive for biomedical applications not only for their remarkable physical properties, but also for the ease of which their surface chemistry can be manipulated. Many applications involve functionalization of the Au NP surface in order to improve biocompatibility, attach targeting ligands or carry drugs. However, changes in cells exposed to Au NPs of different surface chemistries have been observed, and little is known about how

  9. Research and Development in support of the Surface Chemistry Branch. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    AND DEVELOPMENT IN SUPPORT OF THE SURFACE CHEMISTRY BRANCHI FINAL REPORT PREPARED FOR NAVAL RESEARCH LABORATORY 4555 OVERLOOK DRIVE, S.W. WASHINGTON...JUNE 1988 ~ ~ Jw ~GEO-CENTERiS, INC. (Ao *aak11* 4:t. *UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLMSIFICArION OF rI41 PAG3E r - REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE )a. REPORT ...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 1b. RESTRICTIVE MARKINGS UNCLASSIFIED.___________________ :EUIYCAS1FCTO AUTHORITY J . :DISTRIBUTION/ AVAILABILITYOF. REPORT 91CAT

  10. Effect of Gold Nanorod Surface Chemistry on Cellular Interactions In Vitro

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    properties of GNRs on cells. Previous studies on the cytotoxicity of various nanoparticles indicated that surface chemistry has a strong influence on cell...supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS, ATCC) and 1% penicillin/streptomycin (pen/strep, Sigma). For nanoparticle exposure, media was supplemented...reagent ( phenazine ethosulfate; PES). Metabolically active cells reduce the MTS compound into a colored formazan product that is soluble in tissue

  11. Odd electrons in molecular chemistry, surface science, and solid state magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheka, E. F.

    A unified theoretical or computational odd-electrons approach is suggested to nanomaterials, making possible their consideration on the same conceptual basis as well as on the same computational footing. The current paper presents the approach application to the chemistry of fullerenes, carbon single-walled nanotubes, surface science of silicon crystal, as well as to the molecular magnetism of both molecular crystals composed of transitional metal complexes and solid polymerized fullerenes.0

  12. The Physical-Organic Chemistry of Surfaces, and Its Relevance to Molecular Recognition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    THE PHYSICAL-ORGANiC CHEMISTRY OF SURFACES , 0AND ITS RELEVANCE TO MOLECULAR RECOGNITION L N George M. Whitesides and Hans Biebuyck Department of...DEFENSE ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS AGENCY 1400 Wilson Boulevard Arlington VA 22209 DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY Offic- of Naval Research , Code 1130P 800...Advanced Research Projects Agency or the U.S. Government. LDIST-R-UTI ,j STAApprovcd for pu8bU Y9 1e; 9 Dibu fonl Unlimited SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS

  13. Precipitation chemistry - Atmospheric loadings to the surface waters of the Indian River lagoon basin by rainfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreschel, Thomas W.; Madsen, Brooks C.; Maull, Lee A.; Hinkle, C. R.; Knott, William M., III

    1990-01-01

    Rain volume and chemistry monitoring as part of the Kennedy Space Center Long Term Environmental Monitoring Program included the years 1984-1987 as part of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program. Atmospheric deposition in rainfall consisted primarily of sea salt and hydrogen ion, sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium ions. The deposition of nitrogen (a principal plant nutrient) was on the order of 200-300 metric tons per year to the surface waters.

  14. Surface Modification of Polydivinylbenzene Microspheres with a Fluorinated Glycopolymer Using Thiol-Halogen Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Song, Wentao; Granville, Anthony M

    2016-01-01

    Distillation-precipitation polymerization of divinylbenzene was applied to obtain uniform-sized polymeric microspheres. The microspheres were then modified with polypentafluorostyrene chains utilizing surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization techniques. The hydrophobic fluoropolymer-coated microsphere was then converted to a hydrophilic biopolymer by performing thiol-halogen click chemistry between polypentafluorostyrene and 1-thio-β-D-glucose sodium salt. The semi-fluorinated glycopolymer showed good binding ability with Concanavalin A as determined by confocal microscopy and turbidity experiments.

  15. Bioconjugation of trypsin onto gold nanoparticles: effect of surface chemistry on bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Hinterwirth, Helmut; Lindner, Wolfgang; Lämmerhofer, Michael

    2012-07-06

    The systematic study of activity, long-time stability and auto-digestion of trypsin immobilized onto gold nanoparticles (GNPs) is described in this paper and compared to trypsin in-solution. Thereby, the influence of GNP's size and immobilization chemistry by various linkers differing in lipophilicity/hydrophilicity and spacer lengths was investigated with regard to the bioactivity of the conjugated enzyme. GNPs with different sizes were prepared by reduction and simultaneous stabilization with trisodium citrate and characterized by UV/vis spectra, dynamic light scattering (DLS), ζ-potential measurements and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). GNPs were derivatized by self-assembling of bifunctional thiol reagents on the nanoparticle (NP) surface via dative thiol-gold bond yielding a carboxylic acid functionalized surface. Trypsin was either attached directly via hydrophobic and ionic interactions onto the citrate stabilized GNPs or immobilized via EDC/NHS bioconjugation onto the carboxylic functionalized GNPs, respectively. The amount of bound trypsin was quantified by measuring the absorbance at 280 nm. The activity of bound enzyme and its Michaelis Menten kinetic parameter K(m) and v(max) were measured by the standard chromogenic substrate N(α)-Benzoyl-DL-arginine 4-nitroanilide hydrochloride (BApNA). Finally, digestion of a standard protein mixture with the trypsin-conjugated NPs followed by analysis with LC-ESI-MS and successful MASCOT search demonstrated the applicability of the new heterogenous nano-structured biocatalyst. It could be shown that the amount of immobilized trypsin and its activity can be increased by a factor of 6 using a long hydrophilic spacer with simultaneous reduced auto-digestion and reduced digestion time. The applicability of the new trypsin bioreactor was proven by digestion of casein and identification of α- as well as κ-casein by subsequent MASCOT search. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Investigating the Surface Roughness of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susorney, H. C. M.; Barnouin, O. S.; Ernst, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) on the MErcury, Surface, Space ENviorment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft has acquired high-resolution topographic measurements of Mercury's northern hemisphere. These measurements permit the quantification of surface roughness on Mercury over baselines between 500 m and 200 km. In contrast to previous studies of Mercury's surface roughness, which have employed median differential surface slope, we calculate surface roughness as the root mean square (RMS) deviation of the difference in height. If the topography is self-affine or fractal, a power law can be fit to the RMS deviation as a function of baseline length. The exponent of this fit is called the Hurst exponent. This Hurst exponent describes whether or not a surface is self-affine, which occurs when processes produce a surface roughness that is inherently random. The surface roughness of Mercury's northern hemisphere reflects the observed bimodal nature of Mercury: the northern smooth plains have lower roughness values than the rougher heavily cratered terrain and intercrater plains. The relationship between RMS height and baseline length on Mercury shows two fractal sections, one between lengths of 500 m and 1 km, and another between lengths of 1 km and 20 km. We also find that the northern rise is indistinguishable from the surrounding smooth plains across all measured baselines, implying that the rise did not alter its surface topography at the baselines used in this study. Craters that host radar-bright deposits have similar roughness values to craters that do not host such deposits. Finally, fresh crater ejecta within the smooth plains have similar roughness values (particularly at the 1 km baseline) to the intercrater plains, supporting the interpretation that the intercrater plains may result from the modification of volcanic plains via cratering.

  17. Investigation of Surfaces after Non Conventional Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micietova, Anna; Neslusan, Miroslav; Cillikova, Maria

    2016-12-01

    This paper deals with analysis of surface integrity of steel after electro discharge machining (EDM), water jet machining, (WJM) laser beam machining (LBM) and plasma beam machining (PBM). The paper discusses surface integrity expressed in surface roughness, sample precision expressed in perpendicularity deviation as well as stress state. This study also demonstrates influence of the various non-conventional methods on structure transformations and reports about sensitivity of the different non-conventional methods of machining with regard to variable thickness of machined samples.

  18. Effects of surface chemistry on the optical properties and cellular interaction of lanthanide-based nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedraza, Francisco J.; Avalos, Julio C.; Mimun, Lawrence C.; Yust, Brian G.; Tsin, Andrew; Sardar, Dhiraj K.

    2015-03-01

    Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) such as KYb2F7:Tm3+ potential in biomedical applications due to their ability to absorb and emit within the biological window, where near infrared light is less attenuated by soft tissue. This results in less tissue damage and deeper tissue penetration making it a viable candidate in biological imaging. Another big factor in determining their ability to perform in a biological setting is the surface chemistry. Biocompatible coatings, including polyethylene glycol (PEG), polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), pluronic and folic acid are commonly used because they pose several advantages such as ease of functionalization, better dispersion, and higher cellular uptake. To study the effects of the NP surface chemistry, KYb2F7:Tm3+ a solvothermal method using PEG, PVP, pluronic acid, and folic acid as a capping agent, followed by thorough optical characterizations. Optical changes were thoroughly studied and compared using absorption, emission, and quantum yield data. Cell viability was obtained by treating Rhesus Monkey Retinal Endothelial cells (RhREC) with KYb2F7:Tm3+ and counting viable cells following a 24 hour uptake period. The work presented will compare the optical properties and toxicity dependency on the surface chemistry on KYb2F7:Tm3+. The results will also indicate that KYb2F7:Tm3+ nanoparticles are viable candidates for various biomedical applications.

  19. The contribution of inflammasome components on macrophage response to surface nanotopography and chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christo, Susan; Bachhuka, Akash; Diener, Kerrilyn R.; Vasilev, Krasimir; Hayball, John D.

    2016-05-01

    Implantable devices have become an established part of medical practice. However, often a negative inflammatory host response can impede the integration and functionality of the device. In this paper, we interrogate the role of surface nanotopography and chemistry on the potential molecular role of the inflammasome in controlling macrophage responses. To achieve this goal we engineered model substrata having precisely controlled nanotopography of predetermined height and tailored outermost surface chemistry. Bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) were harvested from genetically engineered mice deficient in the inflammasome components ASC, NLRP3 and AIM2. These cells were then cultured on these nanoengineered substrata and assessed for their capacity to attach and express pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our data provide evidence that the inflammasome components ASC, NLRP3 and AIM2 play a role in regulating macrophage adhesion and activation in response to surface nanotopography and chemistry. The findings of this paper are important for understanding the inflammatory consequences caused by biomaterials and pave the way to the rational design of future implantable devices having controlled and predictable inflammatory outcomes.

  20. Regulating Biocompatibility of Carbon Spheres via Defined Nanoscale Chemistry and a Careful Selection of Surface Functionalities

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Santosh K.; Chang, Huei-Huei; Mukherjee, Prabuddha; Tiwari, Saumya; Ohoka, Ayako; Pan, Dipanjan

    2015-01-01

    A plethora of nanoarchitectures have been evaluated preclincially for applications in early detection and treatment of diseases at molecular and cellular levels resulted in limited success of their clinical translation. It is important to identify the factors that directly or indirectly affect their use in human. We bring a fundamental understanding of how to adjust the biocompatibility of carbon based spherical nanoparticles (CNPs) through defined chemistry and a vigilant choice of surface functionalities. CNPs of various size are designed by tweaking size (2–250 nm), surface chemistries (positive, or negatively charged), molecular chemistries (linear, dendritic, hyperbranched) and the molecular weight of the coating agents (MW 400–20 kDa). A combination of in vitro assays as tools were performed to determine the critical parameters that may trigger toxicity. Results indicated that hydrodynamic sizes are potentially not a risk factor for triggering cellular and systemic toxicity, whereas the presence of a highly positive surface charge and increasing molecular weight enhance the chance of inducing complement activation. Bare and carboxyl-terminated CNPs did present some toxicity at the cellular level which, however, is not comparable to those caused by positively charged CNPs. Similarly, negatively charged CNPs with hydroxyl and c