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Sample records for surface force measurements

  1. Measurement of Surface Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-16

    combination of these opposing forces, described by the DLVO theory [30,311 (named after Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek ), is the basis of a variety of...1988): 199. 18. van Blokland. P. H. G. M mnd Overbeek . 1. T. J. Chem Soc., Faraday Trans. 1 74 (1978)- Ifk ’. 19. Lee, C.-W., and Bard. A. J. J...and Overbeek . 1. T. G. Theory of the Stability of Lyophobic Colloids. Elsevier: Amsterdam, 1948. 32. Voropajeva. T.; Derjaguin. B.; and Kabanov. B

  2. Interfacial forces between silica surfaces measured by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jinming

    2009-01-01

    Colloidal particle stability and some other interfacial phenomena are governed by interfacial force interactions. The two well known forces are van der Waals force and electrostatic force, as documented by the classical Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek (DLVO) theory. Moreover, advances in modern instrumentation and colloid science suggested that some short-ranged forces or structure forces are important for relevant colloidal systems. The interfacial and/or molecular forces can be measured as a resultant force as function of separation distance by atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloid probe. This article presents a discussion on AFM colloid probe measurement of silica particle and silica wafer surfaces in solutions with some technical notifications in measurement and data convolution mechanisms. The measured forces are then analyzed and discussed based on the 'constant charge' and 'constant potential' models of DLVO theory. The difference between the prediction of DLVO theory and the measured results indicates that there is a strong short-range structure force between the two hydrophilic surfaces, even at extremely low ionic concentration, such as Milli-Q water purity solution.

  3. Roughness in Surface Force Measurements: Extension of DLVO Theory To Describe the Forces between Hafnia Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Eom, Namsoon; Parsons, Drew F; Craig, Vincent S J

    2017-07-06

    The interaction between colloidal particles is commonly viewed through the lens of DLVO theory, whereby the interaction is described as the sum of the electrostatic and dispersion forces. For similar materials acting across a medium at pH values remote from the isoelectric point the theory typically involves an electrostatic repulsion that is overcome by dispersion forces at very small separations. However, the dominance of the dispersion forces at short separations is generally not seen in force measurements, with the exception of the interaction between mica surfaces. The discrepancy for silica surfaces has been attributed to hydration forces, but this does not explain the situation for titania surfaces where the dispersion forces are very much larger. Here, the interaction forces between very smooth hafnia surfaces have been measured using the colloid probe technique and the forces evaluated within the DLVO framework, including both hydration forces and the influence of roughness. The measured forces across a wide range of pH at different salt concentrations are well described with a single parameter for the surface roughness. These findings show that even small degrees of surface roughness significantly alter the form of the interaction force and therefore indicate that surface roughness needs to be included in the evaluation of surface forces between all surfaces that are not ideally smooth.

  4. Preparation of stable silica surfaces for surface forces measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Huai-Yin; Mizukami, Masashi; Kurihara, Kazue

    2017-09-01

    A surface forces apparatus (SFA) measures the forces between two surfaces as a function of the surface separation distance. It is regarded as an essential tool for studying the interactions between two surfaces. However, sample surfaces used for the conventional SFA measurements have been mostly limited to thin (ca. 2-3 μm) micas, which are coated with silver layers (ca. 50 nm) on their back, due to the requirement of the distance determination by transmission mode optical interferometry called FECO (fringes of equal chromatic order). The FECO method has the advantage of determining the absolute distance, so it should be important to increase the availability of samples other than mica, which is chemically nonreactive and also requires significant efforts for cleaving. Recently, silica sheets have been occasionally used in place of mica, which increases the possibility of surface modification. However, in this case, the silver layer side of the sheet is glued on a cylindrical quartz disc using epoxy resin, which is not stable in organic solvents and can be easily swollen or dissolved. The preparation of substrates more stable under severe conditions, such as in organic solvents, is necessary for extending application of the measurement. In this study, we report an easy method for preparing stable silica layers of ca. 2 μm in thickness deposited on gold layers (41 nm)/silica discs by sputtering, then annealed to enhance the stability. The obtained silica layers were stable and showed no swelling in organic solvents such as ethanol and toluene.

  5. Preparation of stable silica surfaces for surface forces measurement.

    PubMed

    Ren, Huai-Yin; Mizukami, Masashi; Kurihara, Kazue

    2017-09-01

    A surface forces apparatus (SFA) measures the forces between two surfaces as a function of the surface separation distance. It is regarded as an essential tool for studying the interactions between two surfaces. However, sample surfaces used for the conventional SFA measurements have been mostly limited to thin (ca. 2-3 μm) micas, which are coated with silver layers (ca. 50 nm) on their back, due to the requirement of the distance determination by transmission mode optical interferometry called FECO (fringes of equal chromatic order). The FECO method has the advantage of determining the absolute distance, so it should be important to increase the availability of samples other than mica, which is chemically nonreactive and also requires significant efforts for cleaving. Recently, silica sheets have been occasionally used in place of mica, which increases the possibility of surface modification. However, in this case, the silver layer side of the sheet is glued on a cylindrical quartz disc using epoxy resin, which is not stable in organic solvents and can be easily swollen or dissolved. The preparation of substrates more stable under severe conditions, such as in organic solvents, is necessary for extending application of the measurement. In this study, we report an easy method for preparing stable silica layers of ca. 2 μm in thickness deposited on gold layers (41 nm)/silica discs by sputtering, then annealed to enhance the stability. The obtained silica layers were stable and showed no swelling in organic solvents such as ethanol and toluene.

  6. Influence of Nanoscale Surface Roughness on Colloidal Force Measurements.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yi; Jayasuriya, Sunil; Manke, Charles W; Mao, Guangzhao

    2015-09-29

    Forces between colloidal particles determine the performances of many industrial processes and products. Colloidal force measurements conducted between a colloidal particle AFM probe and particles immobilized on a flat substrate are valuable in selecting appropriate surfactants for colloidal stabilization. One of the features of inorganic fillers and extenders is the prevalence of rough surfaces-even the polymer latex particles, often used as model colloidal systems including the current study, have rough surfaces albeit at a much smaller scale. Surface roughness is frequently cited as the reason for disparity between experimental observations and theoretical treatment but seldom verified by direct evidence. This work reports the effect of nanoscale surface roughness on colloidal force measurements carried out in the presence of surfactants. We applied a heating method to reduce the mean surface roughness of commercial latex particles from 30 to 1 nm. We conducted force measurements using the two types of particles at various salt and surfactant concentrations. The surfactants used were pentaethylene glycol monododecyl ether, Pluronic F108, and a styrene/acrylic copolymer, Joncryl 60. In the absence of the surfactant, nanometer surface roughness affects colloidal forces only in high salt conditions when the Debye length becomes smaller than the surface roughness. The adhesion is stronger between colloids with higher surface roughness and requires a higher surfactant concentration to be eliminated. The effect of surface roughness on colloidal forces was also investigated as a function of the adsorbed surfactant layer structure characterized by AFM indentation and dynamic light scattering. We found that when the layer thickness exceeds the surface roughness, the colloidal adhesion is less influenced by surfactant concentration variation. This study demonstrates that surface roughness at the nanoscale can influence colloidal forces significantly and should be taken

  7. Casimir force and in situ surface potential measurements on nanomembranes.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Sanchez, Daniel; Fong, King Yan; Bhaskaran, Harish; Lamoreaux, Steve; Tang, Hong X

    2012-07-13

    We present Casimir force measurements in a sphere-plate configuration that consists of a high quality nanomembrane resonator and a millimeter sized gold coated sphere. The nanomembrane is fabricated from stoichiometric silicon nitride metallized with gold. A Kelvin probe method is used in situ to image the surface potentials to minimize the distance-dependent residual force. Resonance-enhanced frequency-domain measurements of the nanomembrane motion allow for very high resolution measurements of the Casimir force gradient (down to a force gradient sensitivity of 3  μN/m). Using this technique, the Casimir force in the range of 100 nm to 2  μm is accurately measured. Experimental data thus obtained indicate that the device system in the measured range is best described with the Drude model.

  8. Bite force measurements with hard and soft bite surfaces.

    PubMed

    Serra, C M; Manns, A E

    2013-08-01

    Bite force has been measured by different methods and over a wide variety of designs. In several instruments, the fact that bite surface has been manufactured with stiff materials might interfere in obtaining reliable data, by a more prompt activation of inhibitory reflex mechanisms. The purpose of this study was to compare the maximum voluntary bite force measured by a digital occlusal force gauge (GM10 Nagano Keiki, Japan) between different opponent teeth, employing semi-hard or soft bite surfaces. A sample of 34 young adults with complete natural dentition was studied. The original semi-hard bite surface was exchanged by a soft one, made of leather and rubber. Maximum voluntary bite force recordings were made for each tooth group and for both bite surfaces. Statistical analyses (Student's t-test) revealed significant differences, with higher scores while using the soft surface across sexes and tooth groups (P < 0·05). Differential activation of periodontal mechanoreceptors of a specific tooth group is mainly conditioned by the hardness of the bite surface; a soft surface induces greater activation of elevator musculature, while a hard one induces inhibition more promptly. Thus, soft bite surfaces are recommended for higher reliability in maximum voluntary bite force recordings.

  9. Capillary-force measurement on SiC surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, M.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Palasantzas, G.

    2016-06-01

    Capillary forces have been measured by atomic force microscopy in the sphere-plate geometry, in a controlled humidity environment, between smooth silicon carbide and borosilicate glass spheres. The force measurements were performed as a function of the rms surface roughness ˜4-14 nm mainly due to sphere morphology, the relative humidity (RH) ˜0%-40%, the applied load on the cantilever, and the contact time. The pull-off force was found to decrease by nearly two orders of magnitude with increasing rms roughness from 8 to 14 nm due to formation of a few capillary menisci for the roughest surfaces, while it remained unchanged for rms roughness <8 nm implying fully wetted surface features leading to a single meniscus. The latter reached a steady state in less than 5 s for the smoothest surfaces, as force measurements versus contact time indicated for increased RH˜40%. Finally, the pull-off force increases and reaches a maximum with applied load, which is associated with plastic deformation of surface asperities, and decreases at higher loads.

  10. Molecular Architecture Studied by the Surface Forces Measurement.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Kazue

    2016-11-29

    This feature article reviews the surface forces measurement as a tool for studying molecular architecture chemistry. The history of the measurement is briefly described in the Introduction. The general overview covers specific features of the surface forces measurement as a tool for studying and using molecular architecture. This measurement is powerful for understanding interaction forces and for characterizing and discovering the phenomena at solid-liquid interfaces and soft complex matter. An apparatus for opaque samples was developed, which can be used to study not only opaque samples in various media but also electrochemical processes under various electrochemical potentials. Our studies of molecular architecture are reviewed; they include biological molecular recognition especially involved in the enzyme-substrate interaction; polyelectrolyte brushes exhibiting steric repulsion, which can be reproduced by the osmotic pressure of the counterions, and a density-dependent transition; the hydrogen-bonded molecular macrocluster formation of alcohol and carboxylic acids adsorbed on silica in nonpolar solvents such as cyclohexane; and surface forces between ferrocene-modified electrodes under various applied potentials. These studies demonstrate how the forces measurement is used to identify interacting species such as in biological systems to reveal unknown phenomena and to characterize soft complex matter and the effective potential of the electrodes. Readers will be introduced to the broad applications of the force measurement.

  11. A Simple Instrument for Measuring Surface Forces in Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannon, James; Tromp, Rudolf; Haight, Richard; Ellis, Arthur

    2015-03-01

    We have constructed a simple instrument to measure the interaction force between two surfaces in solution, or in vacuum. Specifically, we measure the interaction between a lens and a thin silicon cantilever. Either the lens, or the cantilever (or both) can be coated with the species of interest. When the lens is brought close to the cantilever surface, the force of interaction causes the cantilever to bend. By measuring the deflection as a function of the distance between the lens and cantilever, the long-range interactions between the two surfaces can be determined. Our approach includes three important innovations. First, a commercial lens with a radius of ~ 1 cm is used for one surface. The relatively large radius of curvature enhances force sensitivity of the method. Second, we use optical interference (Newton's Rings) to determine the distance between lens and cantilever with ~ 1 nm accuracy. Third, we make use of thin crystalline cantilevers (100 μm thick) whose elastic properties can be easily measured. We have achieved a force sensitivity F / R better than 0.001 mN/m. I will discuss the theory of operation of the new instrument and describe measurements made on SiO2 and metal oxide surfaces in water.

  12. Theoretical Models for Surface Forces and Adhesion and Their Measurement Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Fabio L.; Bueno, Carolina C.; Da Róz, Alessandra L.; Ziemath, Ervino C.; Oliveira, Osvaldo N.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing importance of studies on soft matter and their impact on new technologies, including those associated with nanotechnology, has brought intermolecular and surface forces to the forefront of physics and materials science, for these are the prevailing forces in micro and nanosystems. With experimental methods such as the atomic force spectroscopy (AFS), it is now possible to measure these forces accurately, in addition to providing information on local material properties such as elasticity, hardness and adhesion. This review provides the theoretical and experimental background of AFS, adhesion forces, intermolecular interactions and surface forces in air, vacuum and in solution. PMID:23202925

  13. Theoretical models for surface forces and adhesion and their measurement using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Leite, Fabio L; Bueno, Carolina C; Da Róz, Alessandra L; Ziemath, Ervino C; Oliveira, Osvaldo N

    2012-10-08

    The increasing importance of studies on soft matter and their impact on new technologies, including those associated with nanotechnology, has brought intermolecular and surface forces to the forefront of physics and materials science, for these are the prevailing forces in micro and nanosystems. With experimental methods such as the atomic force spectroscopy (AFS), it is now possible to measure these forces accurately, in addition to providing information on local material properties such as elasticity, hardness and adhesion. This review provides the theoretical and experimental background of afs, adhesion forces, intermolecular interactions and surface forces in air, vacuum and in solution.

  14. Drag force and surface roughness measurements on freshwater biofouled surfaces.

    PubMed

    Andrewartha, J; Perkins, K; Sargison, J; Osborn, J; Walker, G; Henderson, A; Hallegraeff, G

    2010-05-01

    The detrimental effect of biofilms on skin friction for near wall flows is well known. The diatom genera Gomphonema and Tabellaria dominated the biofilm mat in the freshwater open channels of the Tarraleah Hydropower Scheme in Tasmania, Australia. A multi-faceted approach was adopted to investigate the drag penalty for biofouled 1.0 m x 0.6 m test plates which incorporated species identification, drag measurement in a recirculating water tunnel and surface characterisation using close-range photogrammetry. Increases in total drag coefficient of up to 99% were measured over clean surface values for biofouled test plates incubated under flow conditions in a hydropower canal. The effective roughness of the biofouled surfaces was found to be larger than the physical roughness; the additional energy dissipation was caused in part by the vibration of the biofilms in three-dimensions under flow conditions. The data indicate that there was a roughly linear relationship between the maximum peak-to-valley height of a biofilm and the total drag coefficient.

  15. Interpreting atomic force microscopy measurements of hydrodynamic and surface forces with nonlinear parametric estimation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Song; Manica, Rogerio; Tabor, Rico F; Chan, Derek Y C

    2012-10-01

    A nonlinear parameter estimation method has been developed to extract the separation-dependent surface force and cantilever spring constant from atomic force microscope data taken at different speeds for the interaction between a silica colloidal probe and plate in aqueous solution. The distinguishing feature of this approach is that it exploits information from the velocity dependence of the force-displacement data due to hydrodynamic interaction to provide an unbiased estimate of the functional form of the separation-dependent surface force. An assumed function for the surface force with unknown parameters is not required. In addition, the analysis also yields a consistent estimate of the in situ cantilever spring constant. In combination with data from static force measurements, this approach can further be used to quantify the extent of hydrodynamic slip.

  16. Wettability and surface forces measured by atomic force microscopy: the role of roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavoille, J.; Takadoum, J.; Martin, N.; Durand, D.

    2009-10-01

    Thin films of titanium, copper and silver with various roughnesses were prepared by physical vapour deposition technique: dc magnetron sputtering. By varying the deposition time from few minutes to one hour it was possible to obtain metallic films with surface roughness average ranging from 1 to 20 nm. The wettability of these films was studied by measuring the contact angle using the sessile drop method and surface forces were investigated using the atomic force microscopy (AFM) by measuring the pull-off force between the AFM tip and the surfaces. Experimental results have been mainly discussed in terms of metal surface reactivity, Young modulus of the materials and real surface of contact between the AFM tip and the film surfaces.

  17. Surface force measurements at kaolinite edge surfaces using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Sandaklie-Nikolova, Linda; Wang, Xuming; Miller, Jan D

    2014-04-15

    Fundamental results obtained from research on the properties of the edge surfaces of kaolinite particles (~500 nm) are reported. Of particular significance was the development of the experimental protocol. Well-ordered kaolinite edge surfaces were prepared as an epoxy resin sandwich structure having layered kaolinite particles in the center of the epoxy resin sandwich. Images of the sectioned kaolinite edge surfaces were examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the average thickness of kaolinite particles in this study was determined to be 38.3 nm±11.7 nm. Furthermore, the surface charge of the kaolinite edge surfaces was evaluated with a super sharp Si tip. The point of zero charge (PZC) of the kaolinite edge surface was determined to be below pH 4, in contrast to the traditional view that the edge surfaces of kaolinite particles may carry a positive charge at pH 4. This lower PZC of the kaolinite edge surface was attributed to the lack of isomorphous substitution in the silica tetrahedral layer when compared to the PZC for the muscovite edge surface. Our results are consistent with the particle aggregation and flotation behavior of kaolinite, and should provide the basis for improved flotation strategies leading to the efficient recovery and utilization of mineral and energy resources. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Application of evanescent wave optics to the determination of absolute distance in surface force measurements using the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Huntington, S T; Hartley, P G; Katsifolis, J

    2003-04-01

    A combined scanning near field optical/atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to obtain surface force measurements between a near field sensing tip and a tapered optical fibre surface, whilst simultaneously detecting the intensity of the evanescent field emanating from the fibre. The tapered optical fibre acts as a compliant sample to demonstrate the possible use of the near field intensity measurement system in determining 'real' surface separations from normal AFM surface force measurements at sub-nanometer resolution between deformable surfaces.

  19. Precision measurement of the Casimir force between metallic surfaces and the demonstration of the lateral Casimir force and temperature correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng

    The Casimir effect has recently become important because of its central role in modern physics. Despite its exclusively quantum nature, associated with the zero-point energy of a quantized field, the Casimir force between neutral metallic surfaces is a macroscopic phenomenon. Because the Casimir force increases rapidly with the distance between surfaces and strongly depends on the shape of the boundary, it plays a very important role in micro-electromechanical systems. The precision measurement of the Casimir force has also been advanced as a new powerful test for hypothetical long-range interactions, including corrections to the Newtonian gravitational law at small distances predicted by the unified gauge theories, supersymmetry, supergravity and string theory. This work develops new techniques to measure the Casimir force between a Au coated sphere and plate under different boundary conditions. At the heart of these techniques is the precision force measurement adapted to the Atomic Force Microscope. Calibrations of the necessary parameters have been developed. Here we report an improved precision measurement of the normal Casimir force. The experimental data are compared with a theory that has no adjustable parameters. Combined random and systematic error of order 2.5% of the Casimir force at the closest separation is achieved. We made the first demonstration of the lateral Casimir force between two sinusoidally corrugated surfaces. The obtained results are shown to be in good agreement with a complete theory taking into account the imperfectness of the boundary metal. This demonstration opens new opportunities for the use of the Casimir effect for lateral translation in microelectromechanical systems. We also developed a sensitive differential force measurement technique for measuring the temperature correction. A preliminary experiment investigating the temperature correction to the Casimir force is reported. With further improvement, this may be able to

  20. Measurements of Propeller-Induced Unsteady Surface Force and Pressures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    lessons learned froka the experimental and analytical investiga- tions carried out for the AO-177 project was the observation of how such subtle changes of...ing Model N400 Filter 1000 Hz 5 kHz 1000 Hz 70 v2 is made at point 2 in the same direction as the calibration drive force, with the cavitating

  1. Surface force measurements and simulations of mussel-derived peptide adhesives on wet organic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Zachary A.; Rapp, Michael V.; Wei, Wei; Mullen, Ryan Gotchy; Wu, Chun; Zerze, Gül H.; Mittal, Jeetain; Waite, J. Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2016-01-01

    Translating sticky biological molecules—such as mussel foot proteins (MFPs)—into synthetic, cost-effective underwater adhesives with adjustable nano- and macroscale characteristics requires an intimate understanding of the glue’s molecular interactions. To help facilitate the next generation of aqueous adhesives, we performed a combination of surface forces apparatus (SFA) measurements and replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations on a synthetic, easy to prepare, Dopa-containing peptide (MFP-3s peptide), which adheres to organic surfaces just as effectively as its wild-type protein analog. Experiments and simulations both show significant differences in peptide adsorption on CH3-terminated (hydrophobic) and OH-terminated (hydrophilic) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), where adsorption is strongest on hydrophobic SAMs because of orientationally specific interactions with Dopa. Additional umbrella-sampling simulations yield free-energy profiles that quantitatively agree with SFA measurements and are used to extract the adhesive properties of individual amino acids within the context of MFP-3s peptide adhesion, revealing a delicate balance between van der Waals, hydrophobic, and electrostatic forces. PMID:27036002

  2. Surface force measurements and simulations of mussel-derived peptide adhesives on wet organic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Levine, Zachary A; Rapp, Michael V; Wei, Wei; Mullen, Ryan Gotchy; Wu, Chun; Zerze, Gül H; Mittal, Jeetain; Waite, J Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2016-04-19

    Translating sticky biological molecules-such as mussel foot proteins (MFPs)-into synthetic, cost-effective underwater adhesives with adjustable nano- and macroscale characteristics requires an intimate understanding of the glue's molecular interactions. To help facilitate the next generation of aqueous adhesives, we performed a combination of surface forces apparatus (SFA) measurements and replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations on a synthetic, easy to prepare, Dopa-containing peptide (MFP-3s peptide), which adheres to organic surfaces just as effectively as its wild-type protein analog. Experiments and simulations both show significant differences in peptide adsorption on CH3-terminated (hydrophobic) and OH-terminated (hydrophilic) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), where adsorption is strongest on hydrophobic SAMs because of orientationally specific interactions with Dopa. Additional umbrella-sampling simulations yield free-energy profiles that quantitatively agree with SFA measurements and are used to extract the adhesive properties of individual amino acids within the context of MFP-3s peptide adhesion, revealing a delicate balance between van der Waals, hydrophobic, and electrostatic forces.

  3. Measuring adhesion on rough surfaces using atomic force microscopy with a liquid probe.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Juan V; Garza, Cristina; Castillo, Rolando

    2017-01-01

    We present a procedure to perform and interpret pull-off force measurements during the jump-off-contact process between a liquid drop and rough surfaces using a conventional atomic force microscope. In this method, a micrometric liquid mercury drop is attached to an AFM tipless cantilever to measure the force required to pull this drop off a rough surface. We test the method with two surfaces: a square array of nanometer-sized peaks commonly used for the determination of AFM tip sharpness and a multi-scaled rough diamond surface containing sub-micrometer protrusions. Measurements are carried out in a nitrogen atmosphere to avoid water capillary interactions. We obtain information about the average force of adhesion between a single peak or protrusion and the liquid drop. This procedure could provide useful microscopic information to improve our understanding of wetting phenomena on rough surfaces.

  4. Dynamic measurement of the force required to move a liquid drop on a solid surface.

    PubMed

    Pilat, D W; Papadopoulos, P; Schäffel, D; Vollmer, D; Berger, R; Butt, H-J

    2012-12-11

    We measured the forces required to slide sessile drops over surfaces. The forces were measured by means of a vertical deflectable capillary stuck in the drop. The drop adhesion force instrument (DAFI) allowed the investigation of the dynamic lateral adhesion force of water drops of 0.1 to 2 μL volume at defined velocities. On flat PDMS surfaces, the dynamic lateral adhesion force increases linearly with the diameter of the contact area of the solid-liquid interface and linearly with the sliding velocity. The movement of the drop relative to the surfaces enabled us to resolve the pinning of the three-phase contact line to individual defects. We further investigated a 3D superhydrophobic pillar array. The depinning of the receding part of the rim of the drop occurred almost simultaneously from four to five pillars, giving rise to peaks in the lateral adhesion force.

  5. Atomic force microscope measurements of long-range forces near lipid-coated surfaces in electrolytes.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, W; Blackford, B L; Cordes, J G; Jericho, M H; Pink, D A; Levadny, V G; Beveridge, T

    1997-01-01

    The interaction of DMPC (L-alpha-dimyristoyl-1,2-diterradecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoch oli ne, C36H72NO8P) lipid-coated Si3N4 surfaces immersed in an electrolyte was investigated with an atomic force microscope. A long-range interaction was observed, even when the Si3N4 surfaces were covered with nominally neutral lipid layers. The interaction was attributed to Coulomb interactions of charges located at the lipid surface. The experimental force curves were compared with solutions for the linearized as well as with exact solutions of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The comparison suggested that in 0.5 mM KCl electrolyte the DMPC lipids carried about one unit of charge per 100 lipid molecules. The presence of this surface charge made it impossible to observe an effective charge density recently predicted for dipole layers near a dielectric when immersed in an electrolyte. A discrepancy between the theoretical results and the data at short separations was interpreted in terms of a decrease in the surface charge with separation distance. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:9138586

  6. Correlation between Desorption Force Measured by Atomic Force Microscopy and Adsorption Free Energy Measured by Surface Plasmon Resonance Spectroscopy for Peptide–Surface Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yang; Latour, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Surface Plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy is a useful technique for thermodynamically characterizing peptide–surface interactions; however, its usefulness is limited to the types of surfaces that can readily be formed as thin layers in nanometer scale on metallic biosensor substrates. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), on the other hand, can be used with any microscopically flat surface, thus making it more versatile for studying peptide–surface interactions. AFM, however, has the drawback of data interpretation due to questions regarding peptide-to-probe–tip density. This problem could be overcome if results from a standardized AFM method could be correlated with SPR results for a similar set of peptide–surface interactions so that AFM studies using the standardized method could be extended to characterize peptide–surface interactions for surfaces that are not amenable for characterization by SPR. In this paper, we present the development and application of an AFM method to measure adsorption forces for host–guest peptides sequence on surfaces consisting of alkanethiol self–assembled monolayers (SAMs) with different functionality. The results from these studies show that a linear correlation exists between these data and the adsorption free energy (ΔG°ads) values associated with a similar set of peptide–surface systems available from SPR measurements. These methods will be extremely useful to thermodynamically characterize the adsorption behavior for peptides on a much broader range of surfaces than can be used with SPR to provide information related to understanding protein adsorption behavior to these surfaces and to provide an experimental database that can be used for the evaluation, modification, and validation of force field parameters that are needed to accurately represent protein adsorption behavior for molecular simulations. PMID:21073182

  7. Interferon alpha-2a interactions on glass vial surfaces measured by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenbach, Monica S; Reimann, Peter; Thommen, Verena; Hegner, Martin; Mumenthaler, Marco; Schwob, Jacky; Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim

    2002-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy was used to study adsorption and adhesion peculiarities of interferon alpha-2a on glass and mica surfaces. The specific protein adsorption behavior as a function of the pH value was illustrated on mica by single molecule imaging, while adhesion forces between interferon molecules and inner surfaces of borosilicate glass vials were measured directly under aqueous buffer conditions by force microscopy. We found that the adhesion force on Schott FIOLAX Type I plus was reduced by 40% of the total adhesion force measured on Schott FIOLAX, a standard type I borosilicate glass quality. These results reflect the anticipated superiority of the special "Type I plus" coating over undesired protein adsorption to glass. In addition, this study gives insight into a new method to predict unintended protein adsorption to glass container walls and to characterize the adsorption process by force measurement.

  8. A relationship between three-dimensional surface hydration structures and force distribution measured by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazawa, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Naritaka; Watkins, Matthew; Shluger, Alexander L.; Amano, Ken-Ichi; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2016-03-01

    Hydration plays important roles in various solid-liquid interfacial phenomena. Very recently, three-dimensional scanning force microscopy (3D-SFM) has been proposed as a tool to visualise solvated surfaces and their hydration structures with lateral and vertical (sub) molecular resolution. However, the relationship between the 3D force map obtained and the equilibrium water density, ρ(r), distribution above the surface remains an open question. Here, we investigate this relationship at an interface of an inorganic mineral, fluorite, and water. The force maps measured in pure water are directly compared to force maps generated using the solvent tip approximation (STA) model and from explicit molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that the simulated STA force map describes the major features of the experimentally obtained force image. The agreement between the STA data and the experiment establishes the correspondence between the water density used as an input to the STA model and the experimental hydration structure and thus provides a tool to bridge the experimental force data and atomistic solvation structures. Further applications of this method should improve the accuracy and reliability of both interpretation of 3D-SFM force maps and atomistic simulations in a wide range of solid-liquid interfacial phenomena.Hydration plays important roles in various solid-liquid interfacial phenomena. Very recently, three-dimensional scanning force microscopy (3D-SFM) has been proposed as a tool to visualise solvated surfaces and their hydration structures with lateral and vertical (sub) molecular resolution. However, the relationship between the 3D force map obtained and the equilibrium water density, ρ(r), distribution above the surface remains an open question. Here, we investigate this relationship at an interface of an inorganic mineral, fluorite, and water. The force maps measured in pure water are directly compared to force maps generated using the solvent

  9. Understanding gas-surface interactions from direct force measurements using a specialized torsion balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, S. R.; Hoffbauer, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    The first comprehensive measurements of the magnitude and direction of the forces exerted on surfaces by molecular beams are discussed and used to obtain information about the microscopic properties of the gas-surface interactions. This unique approach is not based on microscopic measurements of the scattered molecules. The reduced force coefficients are introduced as a new set of parameters that completely describe the macroscopic average momentum transfer to a surface by an incident molecular beam. By using a specialized torsion balance and molecular beams of N2, CO, CO2, and H2, the reduced force coefficients are determined from direct measurements of the force components exerted on surface of a solar panel array material, Kapton, SiO2-coated Kapton, and Z-93 as a function of the angle of incidence ranging from 0 degrees to 85 degrees. The absolute flux densities of the molecular beams were measured using a different torsion balance with a beam-stop that nullified the force of the scattered molecules. Standard time-of-flight techniques were used to determine the flux-weighted average velocities of the various molecular beams ranging from 1600 m/s to 4600 m/s. The reduced force coefficients can be used to directly obtain macroscopic average properties of the scattered molecules, such as the flux-weighted average velocity and translational energy, that can then be used to determine microscopic details concerning gas-surface interactions without the complications associated with averaging microscopic measurements.

  10. Understanding gas-surface interactions from direct force measurements using a specialized torsion balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, S. R.; Hoffbauer, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    The first comprehensive measurements of the magnitude and direction of the forces exerted on surfaces by molecular beams are discussed and used to obtain information about the microscopic properties of the gas-surface interactions. This unique approach is not based on microscopic measurements of the scattered molecules. The reduced force coefficients are introduced as a new set of parameters that completely describe the macroscopic average momentum transfer to a surface by an incident molecular beam. By using a specialized torsion balance and molecular beams of N2, CO, CO2, and H2, the reduced force coefficients are determined from direct measurements of the force components exerted on surface of a solar panel array material, Kapton, SiO2-coated Kapton, and Z-93 as a function of the angle of incidence ranging from 0 degrees to 85 degrees. The absolute flux densities of the molecular beams were measured using a different torsion balance with a beam-stop that nullified the force of the scattered molecules. Standard time-of-flight techniques were used to determine the flux-weighted average velocities of the various molecular beams ranging from 1600 m/s to 4600 m/s. The reduced force coefficients can be used to directly obtain macroscopic average properties of the scattered molecules, such as the flux-weighted average velocity and translational energy, that can then be used to determine microscopic details concerning gas-surface interactions without the complications associated with averaging microscopic measurements.

  11. Direct measurements of forces induced by Bloch surface waves in a one-dimensional photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Shilkin, Daniil A; Lyubin, Evgeny V; Soboleva, Irina V; Fedyanin, Andrey A

    2015-11-01

    An experimental study of the interaction between a single dielectric microparticle and the evanescent field of the Bloch surface wave in a one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal is reported. The Bloch surface wave-induced forces on a 1 μm polystyrene sphere were measured by photonic force microscopy. The results demonstrate the potential of 1D photonic crystals for the optical manipulation of microparticles and suggest a novel approach for utilizing light in lab-on-a-chip devices.

  12. An aspect of denture base retention: direct measurement of force due to surface tension.

    PubMed

    Murray, M D; Darvell, B W

    1991-01-01

    A fixed-volume drop of liquid between a pair of parallel surfaces has been a common model for the denture-mucosa system. The reported one-term equation for the model, the derivation of which is suspect, implies that the acting force is inversely proportional to the square of the separation. Direct measurement of the force, however, showed that a better approximation is given by a two-term equation, with force varying as the inverse of the separation. The need for rigorous theoretical derivation is thereby emphasized. The experimental data suggest that a maximum retention force might occur for denture bases at separations of about 15 microns.

  13. Simultaneous scanning tunneling microscopy and stress measurements to elucidate the origins of surface forces.

    PubMed

    Narushima, Tetsuya; Kinahan, Niall T; Boland, John J

    2007-05-01

    We have developed a new combined measurement system to investigate the underlying origins of forces on solid state surfaces from the viewpoint of atomic surface morphology. This system consists of two main parts: the measurements of force based on displacements and detailed atomic resolution observations of the surface morphology. The former involves a large sample cantilever and a capacitive detection method that provide sufficient resolution to detect changes of a few meV/atom or pN/atom at surfaces. For the latter, a scanning tunneling microscope was incorporated to observe structural changes occurring on the surface of the cantilever sample. Although this combined observation is not trivial, it was accomplished by carefully designing sample dimensions while suppressing the self-oscillation of the cantilever. To demonstrate the performance of this system a preliminary study of the room temperature adsorption of Br(2) on the clean Si(111)-7x7 surface is presented.

  14. Measurement of elastic force on a scanned probe near a solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond Roby, M. A.; Wetsel, G. C., Jr.

    1996-12-01

    The physical nature of the forces acting between a laterally vibrating probe in air near a solid surface has been investigated using a calibrated method for the experimental determination of dynamic force. The frequency response of the probe vibrating near its fundamental bending resonance was measured as a function of distance as the probe approached the surface. The experimental results were compared with a continuum-mechanical model of bending waves in a rod; the nature of the forces was inferred by determining the effect of various boundary conditions on the standing-wave motion of the probe. The results conclusively show that while in the initial stage of approach the force is dominated by fluid-dynamic effects, in the final stage of approach an elastic force appears. The appearance of the elastic deformation is characterized by a shift in the resonant frequency of the vibrating probe.

  15. Understanding gas-surface interactions from direct force measurements using a specialized torsion balance

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, S.R.; Hoffbauer, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    The first comprehensive measurements of the magnitude and direction of the forces exerted on surfaces by molecular beams are discussed and used to obtain information about the microscopic properties of the gas-surface interactions. This unique approach is not based on microscopic measurements of the scattered molecules. The reduced force coefficients are introduced as a new set of parameters that completely describe the macroscopic average momentum transfer to a surface by an incident molecular beam. By using a specialized torsion balance and molecular beams of N{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}, the reduced force coefficients are determined from direct measurements of the force components exerted on surface of a solar panel array material, Kapton, SiO{sub 2}-coated Kapton, and Z-93 as a function of the angle of incidence ranging from 0{degrees} to 85{degrees}. The absolute flux densities of the molecular beams were measured using a different torsion balance with a beam-stop that nullified the force of the scattered molecules. Standard time-of-flight techniques were used to determine the flux-weighted average velocities of the various molecular beams ranging from 1600 m/s to 4600 m/s. The reduced force coefficients can be used to directly obtain macroscopic average properties of the scattered molecules, such as the flux-weighted average velocity and translational energy, that can then be used to determine microscopic details concerning gas-surface interactions without the complications associated with averaging microscopic measurements.

  16. Adhesion measurement of micropatterned surfaces using three-dimensional-printed atomic force microscopy tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chih-Yi; Yeh, Yun-Peng; Sung, Cheng-Kuo; Liao, Wei-Chien; Chuang, Tzu-Han; Fu, Chien-Chung

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the present work is to fabricate three-dimensional-printed (3D-printed) atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips for the measurement of the adhesion force on micropatterned surfaces. The shape of the microstructure strongly affects the peeling-off process in the fabrication of flexible electronic devices, and we demonstrate the fabrication of a micropatterned structure for the peeling-off process from soft materials. Furthermore, the 3D-printed AFM tips not only have an optimized design but also increase the sensitivity of adhesion force measurement. We have demonstrated the conical 3D-printed AFM tips with the radii of the spherical end from 2 to 10 µm with various sensitivities of adhesive force measurement.

  17. Interactions of biopolymers with silica surfaces: Force measurements and electronic structure calculation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Kideok D.; Vadillo-Rodriguez, Virginia; Logan, Bruce E.; Kubicki, James D.

    2006-08-01

    Pull-off forces were measured between a silica colloid attached to an atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever and three homopolymer surfaces representing constituents of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The pull-off forces were -0.84 (±0.16), -0.68 (±0.15), and -2.37 (±0.31) nN as measured in water for dextran, phosphorylated dextran, and poly- L-lysine, respectively. Molecular orbital and density functional theory methods (DFT) were applied to analyze the measured pull-off forces using dimer clusters representing interactions between the three polymers and silica surfaces. Binding energies for each dimer were calculated with basis set superposition error (BSSE) and interpolated using corrections for silica surface hydroxyl density and silica charge density. The binding energies were compared with the normalized pull-off forces with the effective silica surface area contacting the polymer surfaces. The predicted binding energies at a -0.064 C/m 2 silica surface charge density corresponding to circum-neutral pH were -0.055, -0.029, and -0.338 × 10 -18 J/nm 2 for the dimers corresponding to the silica surface with dextran, phosphorylated dextran, and poly- L-lysine, respectively. Polarizable continuum model (PCM) calculations with different solvents, silanol vibrational frequency calculations, and orbital interaction analysis based on natural bonding orbital (NBO) showed that phosphate groups formed stronger H-bonds with neutral silanols than hydroxyl and amino functional groups of polymers, implying that phosphate containing polymers would play important roles in EPS binding to silica surfaces.

  18. Surface force measurements at the basal planes of ordered kaolinite particles.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vishal; Miller, Jan D

    2010-04-15

    An experimental procedure is presented to order kaolinite particles on substrates for interrogation of the two basal plane surfaces by atomic force microscopy. Surface force measurements were performed between a silicon nitride tip and each of the two faces (silica tetrahedral face and alumina octahedral face) of kaolinite in 1 mM KCl solution at pH 4, 5, 6, 8 and 10, using atomic force microscopy. The colloidal force measurements reveal that the silica tetrahedral face of kaolinite is negatively charged at pH>4, whereas the alumina octahedral face of kaolinite is positively charged at pH<6, and negatively charged at pH>8. Such measurements have not been reported previously and the results suggest that the iso-electric point of the silica tetrahedral face is at pH<4, and that the iso-electric point of the alumina octahedral face lies between pH 6 and 8. These results contradict the generally accepted view that basal plane surfaces of kaolinite carry a permanent negative charge due to minor substitution of Al(3+) for Si(4+) in the silica tetrahedral layer, and suggest some surface charge dependency of the two faces with respect to solution pH. With this new information it may be possible to further explain the electrokinetic behavior of kaolinite particles, and their interactions in aqueous suspensions.

  19. Surface summertime radiative forcing by shallow cumuli at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains site

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Larry K.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Long, Charles N.; Mills Jr., David L.

    2011-01-08

    Although shallow cumuli are common over large areas of the globe, their impact on the surface radiative forcing has not been carefully evaluated. This study addresses this shortcoming by analyzing data from days with shallow cumuli collected over eight summers (2000-2007) at the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (collectively ACRF) Southern Great Plains site. During periods with clouds, the average shortwave and longwave radiative forcings are 45.5 W m-2 and +11.6 W m-2, respectively. The forcing has been defined so that a negative (positive) forcing indicates a surface cooling (warming). On average, the shortwave forcing is negative, however, instances with positive shortwave forcing are observed approximately 20% of the time. These positive values of shortwave forcing are associated with three-dimensional radiative effects of the clouds. The three-dimensional effects are shown to be largest for intermediate cloud amounts. The magnitude of the three-dimensional effects decreased with averaging time, but it is not negligibly small even for large averaging times as long as four hours.

  20. Interaction force measurement between E. coli cells and nanoparticles immobilized surfaces by using AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wen; Chen, Yongsheng

    2011-01-01

    To better understand environmental behaviors of nanoparticles (NPs), we used the atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure interaction forces between E. coli cells and NPs immobilized on surfaces in an aqueous environment. The results showed that adhesion force strength was significantly influenced by particle size for both hematite ( -Fe2 O3 ) and corundum ( -Al2 O3 ) NPs whereas the effect on the repulsive force was not observed. The adhesion force decreased from 6.3 0.7 nN to 0.8 0.4 nN as hematite NPs increased from 26 nm to 98 nm in diameter. Corundum NPs exhibited a similar dependence of adhesion force on particle size. The Johnson Kendall Roberts (JKR) model was employed to estimate the contact area between E. coli cells and NPs, and based on the JKR model a new model that considers local effective contact area was developed. The prediction of the new model matched the size dependence of adhesion force in experimental results. Size effects on adhesion forces may originate from the difference in local effective contact areas as supported by our model. These findings provide fundamental information for interpreting the environmental behaviors and biological interactions of NPs, which barely have been addressed.

  1. Measurement and simulation of forces generated when a surface is sputtered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spethmann, Alexander; Trottenberg, Thomas; Kersten, Holger

    2017-09-01

    Forces on small plane sputter targets that are exposed to an ion beam at different angles of incidence are investigated. The force exerted on the sputter target is determined in two dimensions by means of an interferometric technique that measures the displacement of the target which is mounted at the end of an elastic cantilever. Different target materials made of silver, copper, aluminum, titanium, graphite, and carbon fiber velvet are studied. The experimental results are compared with a simulation based on the popular SRIM code. The forces are found to be caused predominantly by implanted beam particles and sputtered target atoms and insignificantly by re-emitted beam particles. The material dependent forces are discussed in connection with the simulations and in terms of the sputtering yield and surface topography. In case of the carbon fiber velvet, and in good approximation for graphite, the transferred momentum corresponds almost entirely to the momentum of the impinging beam particles.

  2. Probing three-dimensional surface force fields with atomic resolution: Measurement strategies, limitations, and artifact reduction.

    PubMed

    Baykara, Mehmet Z; Dagdeviren, Omur E; Schwendemann, Todd C; Mönig, Harry; Altman, Eric I; Schwarz, Udo D

    2012-01-01

    Noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) is being increasingly used to measure the interaction force between an atomically sharp probe tip and surfaces of interest, as a function of the three spatial dimensions, with picometer and piconewton accuracy. Since the results of such measurements may be affected by piezo nonlinearities, thermal and electronic drift, tip asymmetries, and elastic deformation of the tip apex, these effects need to be considered during image interpretation.In this paper, we analyze their impact on the acquired data, compare different methods to record atomic-resolution surface force fields, and determine the approaches that suffer the least from the associated artifacts. The related discussion underscores the idea that since force fields recorded by using NC-AFM always reflect the properties of both the sample and the probe tip, efforts to reduce unwanted effects of the tip on recorded data are indispensable for the extraction of detailed information about the atomic-scale properties of the surface.

  3. Reconstruction of Energy Surfaces from Friction Force Microscopy Measurements with the Jarzynski Equality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkovich, Ronen; Klafter, Joseph; Urbakh, Michael

    Free energy is one of the most fundamental thermodynamic functions, determining relative phase stability and serving as a generating function for other thermodynamic quantities. The calculation of free energies is a challenging enterprise. In equilibrium statistical mechanics, the free energy is related to the canonical partition function. The partition function itself involves integrations over all degrees of freedom in the system and, in most cases, cannot be easily calculated directly. In 1997, Jarzynski proved a remarkable equality that allows computing the equilibrium free-energy difference between two states from the probability distribution of the nonequilibrium work done on the system to switch between the two states. The Jarzynski equality provides a powerful free-energy difference estimator from a set of irreversible experiments. This method is closely related to free-energy perturbation approach, which is also a computational technique for estimating free-energy differences. The ability to map potential profiles and topologies is of major significance to areas as diverse as biological recognition and nanoscale friction. This capability has been demonstrated for frictional studies where a force between the tip of the scanning force microscope and the surface is probed. The surface free-energy corrugation produces a detectable friction forces. Thus, friction force microscopy (FFM) should be able to discriminate between energetically different areas on the probed surface. Here, we apply the Jarzynski equality for the analysis of FFM measurements and thus obtain a variation of the free energy along a surface.

  4. Single molecule force measurements delineate salt, pH and surface effects on biopolymer adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirzer, T.; Geisler, M.; Scheibel, T.; Hugel, T.

    2009-06-01

    In this paper we probe the influence of surface properties, pH and salt on the adhesion of recombinant spider silk proteins onto solid substrates with single molecule force spectroscopy. A single engineered spider silk protein (monomeric C16 or dimeric (QAQ)8NR3) is covalently bound with one end to an AFM tip, which assures long-time measurements for hours with one and the same protein. The tip with the protein is brought into contact with various substrates at various buffer conditions and then retracted to desorb the protein. We observe a linear dependence of the adhesion force on the concentration of three selected salts (NaCl, NaH2PO4 and NaI) and a Hofmeister series both for anions and cations. As expected, the more hydrophobic C16 shows a higher adhesion force than (QAQ)8NR3, and the adhesion force rises with the hydrophobicity of the substrate. Unexpected is the magnitude of the dependences—we never observe a change of more than 30%, suggesting a surprisingly well-regulated balance between dispersive forces, water-structure-induced forces as well as co-solute-induced forces in biopolymer adhesion.

  5. Near-field Light Scattering Techniques for Measuring Nanoparticle-Surface Interaction Energies and Forces

    PubMed Central

    O'Dell, Dakota; Adam, Ian S.; DiPaolo, Brian; Sabharwal, Manit; Shi, Ce; Hart, Robert; Earhart, Christopher; Erickson, David

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles are quickly becoming commonplace in many commercial and industrial products, ranging from cosmetics to pharmaceuticals to medical diagnostics. Predicting the stability of the engineered nanoparticles within these products a priori remains an important and difficult challenge. Here we describe our techniques for measuring the mechanical interactions between nanoparticles and surfaces using near-field light scattering. Particle-surface interfacial forces are measured by optically “pushing” a particle against a reference surface and observing its motion using scattered near-field light. Unlike atomic force microscopy, this technique is not limited by thermal noise, but instead takes advantage of it. The integrated waveguide and microfluidic architecture allow for high-throughput measurements of about 1000 particles per hour. We characterize the reproducibility of and experimental uncertainty in the measurements made using the NanoTweezer surface instrument. We report surface interaction studies on gold nanoparticles with 50 nm diameters, smaller than previously reported in the literature using similar techniques. PMID:26855473

  6. Lubrication and wear properties of grafted polyelectrolytes, hyaluronan and hylan, measured in the surface forces apparatus.

    PubMed

    Benz, Marcel; Chen, Nianhuan; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2004-10-01

    Hyaluronan is believed to have an important function in the boundary biolubrication of articular cartilage. Using a Surface Forces Apparatus, we tested the tribological properties of surface bound, rather than "free" hyaluronan. The grafting process of the polyelectrolyte included either a biological route via an HA-binding protein or a chemical reaction to covalently bind the polymer to a lipid bilayer coated surface. In another reaction, we constructed a surface with covalently grafted hylan (crosslinked hyaluronan). We studied the normal and shear forces between these surfaces. None of the systems demonstrated comparable lubrication to that found between cartilage surfaces except at very low loads. Both grafted hyaluronan and hylan generated coefficients of friction between 0.15 and 0.3. Thus, the polysaccharide, which is a constituent of the lamina splendens (outermost cartilage layer), is not expected to be the responsible molecule for the great lubricity of cartilage; however, it may contribute to the load bearing and wear protection of these surfaces. This was concluded from the results with hylan, where a thin gel layer was sufficient to shield the underlying surfaces from damage even at applied pressures of over 200 atmospheres during shear. Our study shows that a low coefficient of friction is not a requirement for, or necessarily a measure of, wear protection.

  7. Measurement of adhesive forces between bacteria and protein-coated surfaces using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Kathryn H.; Bowden, Gabriela; Hook, Magnus; Anvari, Bahman

    2002-05-01

    Bacterial adhesion is a primary cause of failure in implanted medical devices. Bacteria commonly found in device-related infections, such as S. aureus, have multiple cell surface adhesins which mediate specific adhesion to molecules found in extracellular matrix and blood plasma. Adhesins recognizing fibrinogen, fibronectin, collagen, and elastin molecules have been isolated in S. aureus. We have used optical tweezers to measure the adhesive force between a single bacterium and a protein-coated surface. Various concentrations of fibronectin, fibrinogen, or whole plasma were immobilized onto 10-micrometers diameter polystyrene microspheres. We optically trapped a bacterium with a titanium-sapphire laser tuned to 830 nm and contacted the cell with a coated bead. We determined the minimum force necessary to separate the cell and bead. For beads coated with fibronectin and fibrinogen, detachment force values occurred as approximate integer multiples of an estimated single bond detachment force. With plasma-coated beads, only cells lacking the fibrinogen adhesin could be detached; therefore, we believe that either this adhesin is prevalent on wilde-type cells, or it is preferentially adsorbed onto the beads. Additionally, the whole plasma detachment forces appeared random; therefore, we believe that many adhesins participate in boding to plasma.

  8. Non-additivity of molecule-surface van der Waals potentials from force measurements.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Christian; Fournier, Norman; Ruiz, Victor G; Li, Chen; Müllen, Klaus; Rohlfing, Michael; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Temirov, Ruslan; Tautz, F Stefan

    2014-11-26

    Van der Waals (vdW) forces act ubiquitously in condensed matter. Despite being weak on an atomic level, they substantially influence molecular and biological systems due to their long range and system-size scaling. The difficulty to isolate and measure vdW forces on a single-molecule level causes our present understanding to be strongly theory based. Here we show measurements of the attractive potential between differently sized organic molecules and a metal surface using an atomic force microscope. Our choice of molecules and the large molecule-surface separation cause this attraction to be purely of vdW type. The experiment allows testing the asymptotic vdW force law and its validity range. We find a superlinear growth of the vdW attraction with molecular size, originating from the increased deconfinement of electrons in the molecules. Because such non-additive vdW contributions are not accounted for in most first-principles or empirical calculations, we suggest further development in that direction.

  9. Non-additivity of molecule-surface van der Waals potentials from force measurements

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Christian; Fournier, Norman; Ruiz, Victor G.; Li, Chen; Müllen, Klaus; Rohlfing, Michael; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Temirov, Ruslan; Tautz, F. Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Van der Waals (vdW) forces act ubiquitously in condensed matter. Despite being weak on an atomic level, they substantially influence molecular and biological systems due to their long range and system-size scaling. The difficulty to isolate and measure vdW forces on a single-molecule level causes our present understanding to be strongly theory based. Here we show measurements of the attractive potential between differently sized organic molecules and a metal surface using an atomic force microscope. Our choice of molecules and the large molecule-surface separation cause this attraction to be purely of vdW type. The experiment allows testing the asymptotic vdW force law and its validity range. We find a superlinear growth of the vdW attraction with molecular size, originating from the increased deconfinement of electrons in the molecules. Because such non-additive vdW contributions are not accounted for in most first-principles or empirical calculations, we suggest further development in that direction. PMID:25424490

  10. Direct Measurement of Transfer Functions in Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy Using Artificially Patterned Surface Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozasa, Kazunari; Nemoto, Shigeyuki; Isoshima, Takashi; Ito, Eisuke; Maeda, Mizuo; Hara, Masahiko

    2008-07-01

    We report a direct measurement of two-dimensional (2D) transfer functions of conductive probes used in Kelvin probe force microscopy (KFM). The 2D transfer functions are obtained by measuring a well-defined step pattern of surface potentials, prepared on thin films of tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminum(III) (Alq3) by contact-mask exposure. The experimentally obtained 2D transfer functions are highly asymmetric and are spread over 50 µm. A new finding is the observation of negative values in the KFM transfer function, which cannot be explained by conventional KFM formula. The reconstruction of true surface-potential profiles by model-fitting calculation is demonstrated. The technique presented in this study, i.e., the preparation of surface-potential patterns on Alq3 thin films, is ideal for determining the KFM transfer functions experimentally.

  11. Drift reduction in a scanning electrostatic force microscope for surface profile measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Zhigang; Ito, So; Goto, Shigeaki; Hosobuchi, Keiichiro; Shimizu, Yuki; Gao, Wei

    2014-09-01

    The influence of drifts on the measurement results of an electrostatic force microscope (EFM) based on a dual-height method for surface profile measurement is analyzed. Two types of drifts and their influence on the EFM measurement are discussed by computer simulation. It is figured out that the mechanical drift has a larger impact compared to the resonance frequency drift for the specific EFM with the conventional round-trip scan mode. It is also verified that the profile reconstruction algorithm of the dual-height method for separating the electric property distribution and the surface profile of the surface has an effect of magnifying the drift error in the result of surface profile measurement, which is a much more significant measurement of uncertainty sources for the developed EFM compared with an ordinary scanning probe microscope (SPM). A new vertical reciprocating scan (VRS) mode is then employed to reduce the influences of the drifts. The feasibility of the VRS mode is demonstrated by computer simulation and measurement experiments with a diffraction grating.

  12. Measurement of Surface Photovoltage by Atomic Force Microscopy under Pulsed Illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Zeno; Miyahara, Yoichi; Spielhofer, Andreas; Grutter, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Measuring the structure-function relation in photovoltaic materials has been a major drive for atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Kelvin-probe force microscopy (KPFM). The local surface photovoltage (SPV) is measured as the change in contact potential difference (CPD) between the tip and sample upon illumination. The quantities of interest that one will like to correlate with the structure are the decay times of SPV and/or its wavelength dependence. KPFM depends on the tip and sample potential; therefore, SPV is prone to tip changes, rendering an accurate measurement of SPV challenging. We present a measurement technique which allows us to directly measure the difference in the CPD between illuminated and dark states and, thus, SPV as well as the capacitance derivative by using pulsed illumination. The variation of the measured SPV can be minimized due to the time-domain measurement, allowing accurate measurements of the SPV. The increased accuracy enables the systematic comparison of SPV across different measurement setups and excitation conditions (e.g., wavelength dependence and decay time of SPV).

  13. Measurement and characterization of soft tissue behavior with surface deformation and force response under large deformations.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Bummo; Kim, Jung

    2010-04-01

    Soft tissue characterization with the inverse finite element method (FEM) optimization algorithm plays an important role in developing a physical model for medical simulations. However, tissue characterization that takes into account comprehensive boundary conditions for large deformations remains a challenge due to computational complexities and a lack of experimental data. In this study, soft tissue experiments on porcine livers were performed to measure the surface deformation and force response of soft tissues resulting from indentation loading depending on various indentation depths and two different tip shapes. Measurements were carried out with a three-dimensional (3D) optical system and a force transducer. Using the surface deformation and force response results, we estimated the maximum radius of influence, which can be utilized to determine the minimal required soft tissue model size for the FEM simulation. Considering the influence of the boundary conditions, the model was designed and integrated into an inverse FEM optimization algorithm to estimate the model parameters. The mechanical behavior of large deformations was characterized with FE modeling via hyperelastic and linear viscoelastic models. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Fast, high-resolution surface potential measurements in air with heterodyne Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Joseph L.; Munday, Jeremy N.

    2016-06-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) adapts an atomic force microscope to measure electric potential on surfaces at nanometer length scales. Here we demonstrate that Heterodyne-KPFM enables scan rates of several frames per minute in air, and concurrently maintains spatial resolution and voltage sensitivity comparable to frequency-modulation KPFM, the current spatial resolution standard. Two common classes of topography-coupled artifacts are shown to be avoidable with H-KPFM. A second implementation of H-KPFM is also introduced, in which the voltage signal is amplified by the first cantilever resonance for enhanced sensitivity. The enhanced temporal resolution of H-KPFM can enable the imaging of many dynamic processes, such as such as electrochromic switching, phase transitions, and device degredation (battery, solar, etc), which take place over seconds to minutes and involve changes in electric potential at nanometer lengths.

  15. Statistical analysis of long- and short-range forces involved in bacterial adhesion to substratum surfaces as measured using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C; Norde, Willem

    2011-08-01

    Surface thermodynamic analyses of microbial adhesion using measured contact angles on solid substrata and microbial cell surfaces are widely employed to determine the nature of the adhesion forces, i.e., the interplay between Lifshitz-van der Waals and acid-base forces. While surface thermodynamic analyses are often viewed critically, atomic force microscopy (AFM) can also provide information on the nature of the adhesion forces by means of Poisson analysis of the measured forces. This review first presents a description of Poisson analysis and its underlying assumptions. The data available from the literature for different combinations of bacterial strains and substrata are then summarized, leading to the conclusion that bacterial adhesion to surfaces is generally dominated by short-range, attractive acid-base interactions, in combination with long-range, weaker Lifshitz-van der Waals forces. This is in line with the findings of surface thermodynamic analyses of bacterial adhesion. Comparison with single-molecule ligand-receptor forces from the literature suggests that the short-range-force contribution from Poisson analysis involves a discrete adhesive bacterial cell surface site rather than a single molecular force. The adhesion force arising from these cell surface sites and the number of sites available may differ from strain to strain. Force spectroscopy, however, involves the tedious task of identifying the minor peaks in the AFM retraction force-distance curve. This step can be avoided by carrying out Poisson analysis on the work of adhesion, which can also be derived from retraction force-distance curves. This newly proposed way of performing Poisson analysis confirms that multiple molecular bonds, rather than a single molecular bond, contribute to a discrete adhesive bacterial cell surface site.

  16. Defect localization in fibre-reinforced composites by computing external volume forces from surface sensor measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, F.; Schöpfer, F.; Schuster, T.

    2015-02-01

    We suggest a prospective method for detecting and visualizing defects in fibre-reinforced composites by computing external volume forces from measurements acquired by sensors that are integrated on the surface of the structure. Anisotropic materials like carbon fibre-reinforced composites are widely used in light weight construction which can exhibit damages that are not optically detectable. The key idea of our method is the interpretation of defects in such structures as if they were induced by an external volume force. This idea is based on the observation that a propagating elastic wave interferes with a damaged area by reflecting the wave. In that sense a damage can be seen as an additional source. Thus identifying the external volume force which has caused this wave is supposed to reveal the location of the defect. This approach leads to the inverse problem of determining the inhomogeneity of a hyperbolic initial-boundary value problem. We tackle this ill-posed problem by minimizing a Tikhonov functional which takes the oberservation points of our surface measurements into account. In the article we address the solvability of the direct problem, state and analyze the PDE-based optimization problem that aims for computing the external force and develop a numerical realization of its solution using the conjugate gradient method. First numerical results for a simple model case with different sensor adjustments show that the defects in fact are detectable. In that sense this article might be seen as starting point of future research which should comprehend deeper numerical studies and analysis of the problem.

  17. Nanofluids mediating surface forces.

    PubMed

    Pilkington, Georgia A; Briscoe, Wuge H

    2012-11-01

    Fluids containing nanostructures, known as nanofluids, are increasingly found in a wide array of applications due to their unique physical properties as compared with their base fluids and larger colloidal suspensions. With several tuneable parameters such as the size, shape and surface chemistry of nanostructures, as well as numerous base fluids available, nanofluids also offer a new paradigm for mediating surface forces. Other properties such as local surface plasmon resonance and size dependent magnetism of nanostructures also present novel mechanisms for imparting tuneable surface interactions. However, our fundamental understanding, experimentally and theoretically, of how these parameters might affect surface forces remains incomplete. Here we review recent results on equilibrium and dynamic surface forces between macroscopic surfaces in nanofluids, highlighting the overriding trends in the correlation between the physical parameters that characterise nanofluids and the surface forces they mediate. We also discuss the challenges that confront existing surface force knowledge as a result of this new paradigm.

  18. Polymer Droplet Dynamic Wetting Measurement at the Nanometer Scale on Smooth Surfaces Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleymaniha, Mohammadreza; Felts, Jonathan Robert; Anml Team

    2016-11-01

    Fluid spreading is a complex phenomenon driven strongly by intermolecular forces that requires nanometer scale microscopy to observe and understand. We present a technique for measuring molten polymer spreading dynamics with nanometer scale spatial resolution at elevated temperatures on sapphire, silicon oxide and mica using tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The experimental setup is used to measure the spreading dynamics of polystyrene droplets with 2 μ m diameters at 115-175 C. Custom image processing algorithms realize the droplet height, radius, volume and contact angle of the droplet over time. The contact angle evolution followed a power law with time with experimental exponent values of -0.26, -0.08, and -0.2 for sapphire, silicon oxide, and mica, respectively at 115 C. The non-zero steady state contact angles result in a slower evolution of contact angle with time compared to Tanner's Law, as expected. We observe local crystallinity on the molten droplet surface, where crystalline structures appear to nucleate at the contact line and migrate toward the top of the droplet. Increasing the temperature from 115 C to 175 C reduced surface crystallinity from 35% to 12%, consistent with increasingly energetically favorable amorphous phase as the temperature approaches the melting temperature. This platform provides a way to measure spreading dynamics of extremely small volumes of heterogeneously complex fluids not possible through other means. Dr.Jonathan Felts is the principal investigator of the ANML research group in Mechanical Engineering Department of Texas A&M University.

  19. Application of protein-coated scanning force microscopy probes in measurements of surface affinity to protein adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Patel, N.; Davies, M. C.; Roberts, C. J.; Tendler, S. J. B.; Williams, P. M.; Davies, J.; Dawkes, A. C.; Edwards, J. C.

    Scanning force microscopy (SFM, also called atomic force microscopy, or AFM) has been applied to rapid in situ quantification of surface affinity to protein. The surface affinity was measured by adhesion force measurement with protein-coated SFM probes. Experiments on three model surfaces, -CH3, -COOH and -NH2 terminated self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces, have been performed at pH 4.5 and pH 6.8 environments, using probes covalently coated with bovine serum albumin (BSA). Results show that the hydrophobic -CH3 surface possesses the highest affinity and is independent of pH values. The -COOH and -NH2 surfaces possess pH-dependent affinities. A higher affinity was observed on charged surfaces to proteins with dissimilar net surface charges than with similar net surface charges. Results are corroborated to previous elutability studies on similar systems.

  20. Orthoclase surface structure dissolution measured in situ by x-ray reflectivity and atomic force microscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Sturchio, N. C.; Fenter, P.; Cheng, L.; Teng, H.

    2000-11-28

    Orthoclase (001) surface topography and interface structure were measured during dissolution by using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and synchrotrons X-ray reflectivity at pH 1.1-12.9 and T = 25-84 C. Terrace roughening at low pH and step motion at high pH were the main phenomena observed, and dissolution rates were measured precisely. Contrasting dissolution mechanisms are inferred for low- and high-pH conditions. These observations clarify differences in alkali feldspar dissolution mechanisms as a function of pH, demonstrate a new in situ method for measuring face-specific dissolution rates on single crystals, and improve the fundamental basis for understanding alkali feldspar weathering processes.

  1. Optical measurements of dynamic adhesive forces between bacteria and protein-coated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Kathryn H.; Bowden, Gabriela; Hook, Magnus; Anvari, Bahman

    2003-06-01

    Bacterial adhesion to host tissue is an initial step in the infectious process. Staphylococcus aureus, a major human pathogen, has covalently anchored cell surface adhesins called microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs) which mediate specific adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules. Understanding MSCRAMM binding is potentially useful in developing effective antibacterial drugs. In this study, optical tweezers were used in conjunction with a quadrant photodetector to measure adhesive forces between MSCRAMMs and surfaces coated with the ECM molecule fibronectin. Using a piezoelectrically driven stage, a fibronectin-coated microsphere adherent to a coverslip was brought into contact with a cell optically trapped at 830 nm. The microsphere was subsequently moved away from the cell, and a quadrant photodiode monitored the cell displacement from the trap center during the detachment process. The photodetector voltage signals were subsequently converted into the adhesive forces between MSCRAMMs and fibronectin based on a calibration using Stoke"s law for viscous drag. Optical detection of the trapped bead displacement allowed us to study both the dynamics of the detachment process and observe the effects of various loading rates. This technique can be extended to identify the contributions of various MSCRAMM domains to adhesion in order to develop new methods of treating infections.

  2. Estimations of Forest fire Smoke Forcing From Surface Measurements, Satellite Data, and Trajectory Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, S. J.; Stackhouse, P. W.; Baum, B. A.; Pierce, R. B.; Harvey, V. L.; Mikovitz, J. C.; Chiacchio, M.

    2002-05-01

    Methods of using satellite and surface measurements along with trajectory modeling to determine the radiative effect of large boreal forest fires are developed. We present results of surface and top of atmosphere shortwave radiative forcings due to smoke from a very large forest fire outbreak in Manitoba, Canada in July and August 1989. These fires resulted in a large smoke plume over a wide area over the two months. The LaRC trajectory model (LTM) (Pierce et al., 1997) was run in time forward mode for the July-August 1989 time period. The model was seeded with fire pixels as recognized by the Baum and Trepte (1999) smoke/fire/cloud mask. Meteorological data was taken from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts 15-year reanalysis (ERA-15). Air parcels were traced from fire regions over a period of five days globally on a 2.5o equal angle grid. Areas with large numbers of trajectories originating from boundary layer air in fire regions were considered to be likely to be influenced by smoke. An analysis of the effects of the smoke from the Manitoba fires at Canadian surface radiometric sites was performed. Hourly shortwave surface fluxes were compared to a variety of radiative transfer model calculations, satellite data products, and trajectory model results. Numbers and ages of fire-originating trajectories passing within a two degree adius of each of the sites were collected. A theoretical "clean sky" (i.e., with no aerosols or clouds) surface shortwave flux was calculated at each surface site for each hour in July and August using the Fu-Liou radiative transfer code with TOMS ozone values and GEOS-1 meteorology. July 23, 1989 was taken as a first test case. Smoke was heavy over the fire region of Manitoba and Ontario, and both the trajectory model and TOMS showed a tongue of smoke advected far east of the fire region, over the Canadian maritime provinces. At solar noon over each of five stations (Winnipeg, Moosonee, Big Trout Lake, Fredericton, and

  3. Simultaneous measurement of dynamic force and spatial thin film thickness between deformable and solid surfaces by integrated thin liquid film force apparatus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xurui; Tchoukov, Plamen; Manica, Rogerio; Wang, Louxiang; Liu, Qingxia; Xu, Zhenghe

    2016-11-09

    Interactions involving deformable surfaces reveal a number of distinguishing physicochemical characteristics that do not exist in interactions between rigid solid surfaces. A unique fully custom-designed instrument, referred to as integrated thin liquid film force apparatus (ITLFFA), was developed to study the interactions between one deformable and one solid surface in liquid. Incorporating a bimorph force sensor with interferometry, this device allows for the simultaneous measurement of the time-dependent interaction force and the corresponding spatiotemporal film thickness of the intervening liquid film. The ITLFFA possesses the specific feature of conducting measurement under a wide range of hydrodynamic conditions, with a displacement velocity of deformable surfaces ranging from 2 μm s(-1) to 50 mm s(-1). Equipped with a high speed camera, the results of a bubble interacting with hydrophilic and partially hydrophobic surfaces in aqueous solutions indicated that ITLFFA can provide information on interaction forces and thin liquid film drainage dynamics not only in a stable film but also in films of the quick rupture process. The weak interaction force was extracted from a measured film profile. Because of its well-characterized experimental conditions, ITLFFA permits the accurate and quantitative comparison/validation between measured and calculated interaction forces and temporal film profiles.

  4. Force measurements on myelin basic protein adsorbed to mica and lipid bilayer surfaces done with the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, H; Butt, H J; Bamberg, E

    1999-01-01

    The mechanical and adhesion properties of myelin basic protein (MBP) are important for its function, namely the compaction of the myelin sheath. To get more information about these properties we used atomic force microscopy to study tip-sample interaction of mica and mixed dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS) (20%)/egg phosphatidylcholine (EPC) (80%) lipid bilayer surfaces in the absence and presence of bovine MBP. On mica or DOPS/EPC bilayers a short-range repulsive force (decay length 1.0-1.3 nm) was observed during the approach. The presence of MBP always led to an attractive force between tip and sample. When retracting the tip again, force curves on mica and on lipid layers were different. While attached to the mica surface, the MBP molecules exhibited elastic stretching behavior that agreed with the worm-like chain model, yielding a persistence length of 0.5 +/- 0.25 nm and an average contour length of 53 +/- 19 nm. MBP attached to a lipid bilayer did not show elastic stretching behavior. This shows that the protein adopts a different conformation when in contact with lipids. The lipid bilayer is strongly modified by MBP attachment, indicating formation of MBP-lipid complexes and possibly disruption of the original bilayer structure. PMID:9916039

  5. Surface EMG and intra-socket force measurement to control a prosthetic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanford, Joe; Patterson, Rita; Popa, Dan

    2015-06-01

    Surface electromyography (SEMG) has been shown to be a robust and reliable interaction method allowing for basic control of powered prosthetic devices. Research has shown a marked decrease in EMG-classification efficiency throughout activities of daily life due to socket shift and movement and fatigue as well as changes in degree of fit of the socket throughout the subject's lifetime. Users with the most severe levels of amputation require the most complex devices with the greatest number of degrees of freedom. Controlling complex dexterous devices with limited available inputs requires the addition of sensing and interaction modalities. However, the larger the amputation severity, the fewer viable SEMG sites are available as control inputs. Previous work reported the use of intra-socket pressure, as measured during wrist flexion and extension, and has shown that it is possible to control a powered prosthetic device with pressure sensors. In this paper, we present data correlations of SEMG data with intra-socket pressure data. Surface EMG sensors and force sensors were housed within a simulated prosthetic cuff fit to a healthy-limbed subject. EMG and intra-socket force data was collected from inside the cuff as a subject performed pre-defined grip motions with their dominant hand. Data fusion algorithms were explored and allowed a subject to use both intra-socket pressure and SEMG data as control inputs for a powered prosthetic device. This additional input modality allows for an improvement in input classification as well as information regarding socket fit through out activities of daily life.

  6. Fabrication and measurement of nanostructures on the micro ball surface using a modified atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X. S.; Geng, Y. Q.; Li, W. B.; Yan, Y. D.; Hu, Z. J.; Sun, T.; Liang, Y. C.; Dong, S.

    2012-11-01

    In order to machine and measure nanostructures on the micro ball surface, a modified atomic force microscope (AFM) combining a commercial AFM system with a home built precision air bearing spindle is established. Based on this system, motions of both the AFM scanner and the air bearing spindle are controlled to machine nanostructures on the micro ball based on the AFM tip-based nano mechanical machining approach. The eccentric error between the axis of the micro ball and the axis of the spindle is reduced to 3-4 μm by the provided fine adjusting method. A 1000 nano lines array, 36 square pits structure, 10 square pits structure, and a zig-zag structure on the circumference of the micro ball with the diameter of 1.5 mm are machined successfully. The measurement results achieved by the same system reveal that the profiles and mode-power spectra curves of the micro ball are influenced by the artificially machined nanostructures significantly according to their distributions. This work is an useful attempt for modifying the micro ball profile and manufacture of the spherical modulation targets to study the experimental performance of the micro ball in implosion.

  7. Fabrication and measurement of nanostructures on the micro ball surface using a modified atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X S; Geng, Y Q; Li, W B; Yan, Y D; Hu, Z J; Sun, T; Liang, Y C; Dong, S

    2012-11-01

    In order to machine and measure nanostructures on the micro ball surface, a modified atomic force microscope (AFM) combining a commercial AFM system with a home built precision air bearing spindle is established. Based on this system, motions of both the AFM scanner and the air bearing spindle are controlled to machine nanostructures on the micro ball based on the AFM tip-based nano mechanical machining approach. The eccentric error between the axis of the micro ball and the axis of the spindle is reduced to 3-4 μm by the provided fine adjusting method. A 1000 nano lines array, 36 square pits structure, 10 square pits structure, and a zig-zag structure on the circumference of the micro ball with the diameter of 1.5 mm are machined successfully. The measurement results achieved by the same system reveal that the profiles and mode-power spectra curves of the micro ball are influenced by the artificially machined nanostructures significantly according to their distributions. This work is an useful attempt for modifying the micro ball profile and manufacture of the spherical modulation targets to study the experimental performance of the micro ball in implosion.

  8. Using optical tweezers for measuring the interaction forces between human bone cells and implant surfaces: System design and force calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Martin; Madgavkar, Ashwin; Stjerndahl, Maria; Wu, Yanrong; Tan, Weihong; Duran, Randy; Niehren, Stefan; Mustafa, Kamal; Arvidson, Kristina; Wennerberg, Ann

    2007-07-15

    Optical tweezers were used to study the interaction and attachment of human bone cells to various types of medical implant materials. Ideally, the implant should facilitate cell attachment and promote migration of the progenitor cells in order to decrease the healing time. It is therefore of interest, in a controlled manner, to be able to monitor the cell adhesion process. Results from such studies would help foresee the clinical outcome of integrating medical implants. The interactions between two primary cell culture models, human gingival fibroblasts and bone forming human osteoblast cells, and three different implant materials, glass, titanium, and hydroxyapatite, were studied. A novel type of optical tweezers, which has a newly designed quadrant detector and a powerful 3 W laser was constructed and force calibrated using two different methods: one method in which the stiffness of the optical trap was obtained by monitoring the phase lag between the trap and the moved object when imposing a forced oscillation on the trapped object and another method in which the maximum trapping force was derived from the critical velocity at which the object escapes the trap. Polystyrene beads as well as cells were utilized for the calibrations. This is the first time that cells have been used directly for these types of force calibrations and, hence, direct measurements of forces exerted on cells can be performed, thus avoiding the difficulties often encountered when translating the results obtained from cell measurements to the calibrations obtained with reference materials. This more straightforward approach represents an advantage in comparison to established methods.

  9. Measurement of the friction between single polystyrene nanospheres and silicon surface using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dan; Li, Jingnan; Chang, Li; Luo, Jianbin

    2013-06-11

    In the present work, the individual nanoparticles have been manipulated on a silicon surface, using atomic force microscope (AFM) techniques. As a model system, near-spherical polystyrene nanoparticles with radii from 28.85 nm to 228.2 nm were deposited on a nanosmooth silicon wafer. Experiments demonstrated that when the normal force is above a threshold load, nanoparticles could steadily be pushed by the tip of the AFM along the defined pathway. The tests allow us to quantitatively study the interfacial friction between the nanoparticle and the surface. It was found that the friction could be affected by various factors such as the load, the particle size, and the surface treatment. The results showed that the friction between particles and substrate is proportional to the two-third power of the radius, which is in agreement with the Hertzian theory. It can also be seen that the ratio between the kinetic and the static friction was slightly changed from 0.3 to 0.6, depending on the size of the particles. However, the value of the ratio was little affected by other factors such as the particles' location, the tip normal force and the surface modification. The results provided new insights into the intriguing friction phenomenon on the nanoscale.

  10. Measuring forces and spatiotemporal evolution of thin water films between an air bubble and solid surfaces of different hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Cui, Xin; Xie, Lei; Liu, Qingxia; Chan, Derek Y C; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-01-27

    A combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM) was used to measure simultaneously the interaction force and the spatiotemporal evolution of the thin water film between a bubble in water and mica surfaces with varying degrees of hydrophobicity. Stable films, supported by the repulsive van der Waals-Casimir-Lifshitz force were always observed between air bubble and hydrophilic mica surfaces (water contact angle, θ(w) < 5°) whereas bubble attachment occurred on hydrophobized mica surfaces. A theoretical model, based on the Reynolds lubrication theory and the augmented Young-Laplace equation including the effects of disjoining pressure, provided excellent agreement with experiment results, indicating the essential physics involved in the interaction between air bubble and solid surfaces can be elucidated. A hydrophobic interaction free energy per unit area of the form: WH(h) = -γ(1 - cos θ(w))exp(-h/D(H)) can be used to quantify the attraction between bubble and hydrophobized solid substrate at separation, h, with γ being the surface tension of water. For surfaces with water contact angle in the range 45° < θ(w) < 90°, the decay length DH varied between 0.8 and 1.0 nm. This study quantified the hydrophobic interaction in asymmetric system between air bubble and hydrophobic surfaces, and provided a feasible method for synchronous measurements of the interaction forces with sub-nN resolution and the drainage dynamics of thin films down to nm thickness.

  11. Non-intrusive measurements of frictional forces between micro-spheres and flat surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Hsun; Daraio, Chiara; Daraio's Group Team

    2014-03-01

    We report a novel, optical pump-probe experimental setup to study micro-friction phenomena between micro-particles and a flat surface. We present a case study of stainless steel microspheres, of diameter near 250 μm, in contact with different surfaces of variable roughness. In these experiments, the contact area between the particles and the substrates is only a few nanometers wide. To excite the particles, we deliver an impulse using a pulsed, high-power laser. The reaction force resulting from the surface ablation induced by the laser imparts a controlled initial velocity to the target particle. This initial velocity can be varied between 10-5 to 1 m/s. We investigate the vibrating and rolling motions of the micro-particles by detecting their velocity and displacement with a laser vibrometer and a high-speed microscope camera. We calculate the effective Hamaker constant from the vibrating motion of a particle, and study its relation to the substrate's surface roughness. We analyze the relation between rolling friction and the minimum momentum required to break surface bonding forces. This non-contact and non-intrusive technique could be employed to study a variety of contact and tribology problems at the microscale.

  12. Force, Surface Pressure and Flowfield Measurements on Slender Missile Configurations at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birch, T. J.; Allen, J. M.; Wilcox, F. J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a series of wind tunnel experiments carried out with the aim of providing data suitable for evaluating the performance of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. The configurations and flow conditions studied are most relevant to slender supersonic missiles. However, the data obtained, which includes forces and moments, surface pressures, flowfield surveys and a selection of flow visualization images, should he of interest to other CFD practitioners. Results for three test cases are presented and discussed in this paper. These cases have been the subject of a collaborative study concerned with the evaluation of Navier-Stokes solvers for missiles, carried out under the auspices of The Technical Cooperation Programme (TTCP).

  13. Force-Measuring Clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Force-measuring clamps have been invented to facilitate and simplify the task of measuring the forces or pressures applied to clamped parts. There is a critical need to measure clamping forces or pressures in some applications for example, while bonding sensors to substrates or while clamping any sensitive or delicate parts. Many manufacturers of adhesives and sensors recommend clamping at specific pressures while bonding sensors or during adhesive bonding between parts in general. In the absence of a force-measuring clamp, measurement of clamping force can be cumbersome at best because of the need for additional load sensors and load-indicating equipment. One prior method of measuring clamping force involved the use of load washers or miniature load cells in combination with external power sources and load-indicating equipment. Calibrated spring clamps have also been used. Load washers and miniature load cells constitute additional clamped parts in load paths and can add to the destabilizing effects of loading mechanisms. Spring clamps can lose calibration quickly through weakening of the springs and are limited to the maximum forces that the springs can apply. The basic principle of a force-measuring clamp can be implemented on a clamp of almost any size and can enable measurement of a force of almost any magnitude. No external equipment is needed because the component(s) for transducing the clamping force and the circuitry for supplying power, conditioning the output of the transducers, and displaying the measurement value are all housed on the clamp. In other words, a force-measuring clamp is a complete force-application and force-measurement system all in one package. The advantage of unitary packaging of such a system is that it becomes possible to apply the desired clamping force or pressure with precision and ease.

  14. The effect of surface properties on the strength of attachment of fungal spores using AFM perpendicular force measurements.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Kathryn A; Deisenroth, Ted; Preuss, Andrea; Liauw, Christopher M; Verran, Joanna

    2011-02-01

    Polymeric substrata may be biodegraded by fungal species resulting in damaged, weakened and unsightly materials. This process typically begins with fungal spore attachment to the surface. In order to better understand the processes that precedes a biofouling event, fungal spore attachment to a range of surfaces, was determined using perpendicular force measurements. This was carried out using atomic force microscope cantilevers modified with fungal spores from Aspergillus niger 1957 (5μm diameter, non-wettable, spherical), Aspergillus niger 1988 (5μm diameter non-wettable, spikey) or Aureobasidium pullulans (5μm-10μm sized, wettable, ellipsoidal). The strength of attachment of the spores was determined in combination with seven surfaces (nitric acid cleaned glass, cast poly(methylmethacrylate) sheet [c-PMMA], polytetrafluoroethylene [PTFE], silicon wafers spin coated with poly(3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxy silane (γ-MPS)-co-methylmethacrylate (MMA)) [p(γ-MPS-co-MMA)], poly (γ-MPS-co-lauryl methacrylate) [p(γ-MPS-co-LMA)] [both in a ratio of 10-90], PMMA dissolved in a solvent [PMMAsc] and silicon wafers). Perpendicular force measurements could not be related to the R(a) values of the surfaces, but surface wettability was shown to have an effect. All three spore types interacted comparably with the surfaces. All spores attached strongly to c-PMMA and glass (wettable surfaces), and weakly to PTFE, (p(γ- MPS-co-LMA)) (non-wettable) and (p(γ-MPS-co-MMA)). Spore shape also affected the strength of attachment. Aureobasidium pullulans spores attached with the widest range of forces whilst A. niger 1957 attached with the smallest. Findings will inform the selection of surfaces for use in environments where biofouling is an important consideration.

  15. A method for the direct measurement of surface tension of collected atmospherically relevant aerosol particles using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hritz, Andrew D.; Raymond, Timothy M.; Dutcher, Dabrina D.

    2016-08-01

    Accurate estimates of particle surface tension are required for models concerning atmospheric aerosol nucleation and activation. However, it is difficult to collect the volumes of atmospheric aerosol required by typical instruments that measure surface tension, such as goniometers or Wilhelmy plates. In this work, a method that measures, ex situ, the surface tension of collected liquid nanoparticles using atomic force microscopy is presented. A film of particles is collected via impaction and is probed using nanoneedle tips with the atomic force microscope. This micro-Wilhelmy method allows for direct measurements of the surface tension of small amounts of sample. This method was verified using liquids, whose surface tensions were known. Particles of ozone oxidized α-pinene, a well-characterized system, were then produced, collected, and analyzed using this method to demonstrate its applicability for liquid aerosol samples. It was determined that oxidized α-pinene particles formed in dry conditions have a surface tension similar to that of pure α-pinene, and oxidized α-pinene particles formed in more humid conditions have a surface tension that is significantly higher.

  16. Atomic force microscopy of orb-spider-web-silks to measure surface nanostructuring and evaluate silk fibers per strand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, D. M.; Naidoo, N.; Staib, G. R.

    2010-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) study is used to measure the surface topology and roughness of radial and capture spider silks on the micro- and nanoscale. This is done for silks of the orb weaver spider Argiope keyserlingi. Capture silk has a surface roughness that is five times less than that for radial silk. The capture silk has an equivalent flatness of λ /100 (5-6 nm deep surface features) as an optical surface. This is equivalent to a very highly polished optical surface. AFM does show the number of silk fibers that make up a silk thread but geometric distortion occurs during sample preparation. This prevented AFM from accurately measuring the silk topology on the microscale in this study.

  17. Effect of the charge and roughness of surfaces on normal and friction forces measured in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    McNamee, Cathy E; Higashitani, Ko

    2013-04-23

    We used the atomic force microscope (AFM) to determine how the roughness and charge on a surface affect the adhesion and friction when measured against a smooth surface (colloid probe) in an aqueous solution. The effect of roughness was investigated by coating TiO2 crystal substrates with TiO2 nano- or micro-sized particles, where an increase in the particle size increased the RMS roughness of the substrate. The charge of the substrate was varied by changing the pH of the aqueous solution. Force-separation curves and friction-load data were measured for the smooth colloid probe-rough substrate systems. The adhesion and friction between two surfaces in solution were seen to depend on the surface charge and roughness. A noncharged surface gave the greatest adhesion, while a charged surface gave weaker adhesions. Increasing the roughness of the surface resulted in a stronger adhesion. The magnitude and range of the adhesions were not affected by the measuring velocity in the case of a noncharged substrate but decreased with an increasing velocity for charged surfaces. The friction was seen not to depend on roughness in the case of a noncharged surface. However, in the case of a charged surface, the friction decreased with an increased roughness for low loads and then showed no dependence on the surface roughness for high loads. The results of this experiment show that the adhesion and friction of a system can be decreased via the roughness and charge of the substrate and the ion types in the solution.

  18. Oriented covalent immobilization of antibodies for measurement of intermolecular binding forces between zipper-like contact surfaces of split inteins

    PubMed Central

    Sorci, Mirco; Dassa, Bareket; Liu, Hongwei; Anand, Gaurav; Dutta, Amit K.; Pietrokovski, Shmuel; Belfort, Marlene; Belfort, Georges

    2013-01-01

    In order to measure the intermolecular binding forces between two halves (or partners) of naturally split protein splicing elements called inteins, a novel thiol-hydrazide linker was designed and used to orient immobilized antibodies specific for each partner. Activation of the surfaces was achieved in one step allowing direct force measurements of the formation of a peptide bond catalyzed by the binding of the two partners of the split intein (called protein trans-splicing). Through this binding process, a whole functional intein is formed resulting in subsequent splicing. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to directly measure the split intein partner binding at 1µm/s between native (wild-type) and mixed pairs of C- and N-terminal partners of naturally occurring split inteins from three cyanobacteria. Native and mixed pairs exhibit similar binding forces within the error of the measurement technique (~52 pN). Bioinformatic sequence analysis and computational structural analysis discovered a zipper-like contact between the two partners with electrostatic and non-polar attraction between multiple aligned ion pairs and hydrophobic residues. Also, we tested the Jarzynski’s equality and demonstrated, as expected, that non-equilibrium dissipative measurements obtained here gave larger energies of interaction as compared with those for equilibrium. Hence, AFM coupled with our immobilization strategy and computational studies provides a useful analytical tool for the direct measurement of intermolecular association of split inteins and could be extended to any interacting protein pair. PMID:23679912

  19. Determination of the surface free energy of crystalline and amorphous lactose by atomic force microscopy adhesion measurement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianxin; Ebbens, Stephen; Chen, Xinyong; Jin, Zheng; Luk, Shen; Madden, Claire; Patel, Nikin; Roberts, Clive J

    2006-02-01

    This study was conducted to accurately measure the dispersive surface free energy of lactose solids in ordered and disordered states. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to determine the contact adhesion force between an AFM tip and lactose under low humidity (ca. 1% RH). The geometry of the tip contacting apex was characterized by scanning a porous aluminum film with ultrasharp spikes (radius 2-3 nm). A sphere vs. flat surface model was employed to relate the adhesion force determined to the surface energy based upon the Johnson-Kendal-Roberts theory. Spray-dried amorphous lactose in a compressed-disk form and single crystals of alpha-lactose monohydrate were prepared as model samples. The condition of the smooth sample surface and sphere-shaped tip used was shown to be appropriate to the application of the JKR model. The surface energy of crystalline [(0,-1,-1) face] and amorphous lactose was determined to be 23.3 +/- 2.3 and 57.4 +/- 7.9 mJ m(-2), respectively. We have demonstrated the capability of AFM to measure the dispersive surface free energy of pharmaceutical materials directly through a blank probe at the nanometer scale. These data, although consistent with results from more traditional methods, illustrate some unique attributes of this approach, namely, surface energies are directly derived from solid-solid interactions, measurements may be made on specific crystalline faces, and the potential exists to identify the submicron heterogeneity of organic solids in terms of their molecular energy states (such as ordered and disordered lactose).

  20. Extracting local surface charges and charge regulation behavior from atomic force microscopy measurements at heterogeneous solid-electrolyte interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Cunlu; Ebeling, Daniel; Siretanu, Igor; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2015-10-01

    We present a method to determine the local surface charge of solid-liquid interfaces from Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) measurements that takes into account shifts of the adsorption/desorption equilibria of protons and ions as the cantilever tip approaches the sample. We recorded AFM force distance curves in dynamic mode with sharp tips on heterogeneous silica surfaces partially covered by gibbsite nano-particles immersed in an aqueous electrolyte with variable concentrations of dissolved NaCl and KCl at pH 5.8. Forces are analyzed in the framework of Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory in combination with a charge regulation boundary that describes adsorption and desorption reactions of protons and ions. A systematic method to extract the equilibrium constants of these reactions by simultaneous least-squared fitting to experimental data for various salt concentrations is developed and is shown to yield highly consistent results for silica-electrolyte interfaces. For gibbsite-electrolyte interfaces, the surface charge can be determined, yet, an unambiguous identification of the relevant surface speciation reactions is not possible, presumably due to a combination of intrinsic chemical complexity and heterogeneity of the nano-particle surfaces.

  1. Surface shortwave aerosol radiative forcing during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Mobile Facility deployment in Niamey, Niger

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Sally A.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

    2009-03-18

    This study presents ground-based remote sensing measurements of aerosol optical properties and corresponding shortwave surface radiative effect calculations for the deployment of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program’s Mobile Facility (AMF) to Niamey, Niger during 2006. Aerosol optical properties including aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA), and asymmetry parameter (AP) were derived from multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) measurements during the two dry seasons (Jan-Apr and Oct-Dec) at Niamey. The vertical distribution of aerosol extinction was derived from the collocated micropulse lidar (MPL). The aerosol optical properties and vertical distribution of extinction varied significantly throughout the year, with higher AOD, lower SSA, and deeper aerosol layers during the Jan-Apr time period, when biomass burning aerosol layers were more frequent. Using the retrieved aerosol properties and vertical extinction profiles, broadband shortwave surface fluxes and atmospheric heating rate profiles were calculated. Corresponding calculations with no aerosol were used to estimate the aerosol direct radiative effect at the surface. Comparison of the calculated surface fluxes to observed fluxes for non-cloudy periods indicated that the remote sensing retrievals provided a reasonable estimation of the optical properties, with mean differences between calculated and observed fluxes of less than 5 W/m2 and RMS differences less than 25 W/m2. Sensitivity tests for a particular case study showed that the observed fluxes could be matched with variations of < 10% in the inputs to the radiative transfer model. We estimated the daily-averaged aerosol radiative effect at the surface by subtracting the clear calculations from the aerosol calculations. The average daily SW aerosol radiative effect over the study period was -27 W/m2, which is comparable to values estimated from satellite data and from climate models with sophisticated

  2. Evidence for water structuring forces between surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, Christopher B; Rau, Dr. Donald

    2011-01-01

    Structured water on apposing surfaces can generate significant energies due to reorganization and displacement as the surfaces encounter each other. Force measurements on a multitude of biological structures using the osmotic stress technique have elucidated commonalities that point toward an underlying hydration force. In this review, the forces of two contrasting systems are considered in detail: highly charged DNA and nonpolar, uncharged hydroxypropyl cellulose. Conditions for both net repulsion and attraction, along with the measured exclusion of chemically different solutes from these macromolecular surfaces, are explored and demonstrate features consistent with a hydration force origin. Specifically, the observed interaction forces can be reduced to the effects of perturbing structured surface water.

  3. Attachment forces of ants measured with a centrifuge: better 'wax-runners' have a poorer attachment to a smooth surface.

    PubMed

    Federle, W; Rohrseitz, K; Hölldobler, B

    2000-02-01

    The symbiotic ant partners of glaucous Macaranga ant-plants show an exceptional capacity to run on the slippery epicuticular wax crystals covering the plant stem without any difficulty. We test the hypothesis that these specialised 'wax-runners' have a general, superior attachment capacity. We compared attachment on a smooth surface for 11 ant species with different wax-running capacities. The maximum force that could be withstood before an ant became detached was quantified using a centrifuge recorded by a high-speed video camera. This technique has the advantage of causing minimum disruption and allows measurements in very small animals. When strong centrifugal forces were applied, the ants showed a conspicuous 'freezing reflex' advantageous to attachment. Attachment forces differed strongly among the ant species investigated. This variation could not be explained by different surface area/weight ratios of smaller and larger ants. Within species, however, detachment force per body weight (F/W) scaled with the predicted value of W(-)(0.33), where W is body weight in newtons. Surprisingly, our results not only disprove the hypothesis that 'wax-runners' generally attach better but also provide evidence for the reverse effect. Superior 'wax-runners' (genera Technomyrmex and Crematogaster) did not cling better to smooth Perspex, but performed significantly worse than closely related congeners that are unable to climb up waxy stems. This suggests an inverse relationship between adaptations to run on wax and to attach to a smooth surface.

  4. Force-Measuring Clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A precision clamp that accurately measures force over a wide range of conditions is described. Using a full bridge or other strain gage configuration. the elastic deformation of the clamp is measured or detected by the strain gages. Thc strain gages transmit a signal that corresponds to the degree of stress upon the clamp. Thc strain gage signal is converted to a numeric display. Calibration is achieved by ero and span potentiometers which enable accurate measurements by the force-measuring clamp.

  5. Force-Measuring Clamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunnelee, Mark (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A precision clamp that accurately measures force over a wide range of conditions is described. Using a full bridge or other strain gage configuration. the elastic deformation of the clamp is measured or detected by the strain gages. Thc strain gages transmit a signal that corresponds to the degree of stress upon the clamp. Thc strain gage signal is converted to a numeric display. Calibration is achieved by ero and span potentiometers which enable accurate measurements by the force-measuring clamp.

  6. Hoof accelerations and ground reaction forces of Thoroughbred racehorses measured on dirt, synthetic, and turf track surfaces.

    PubMed

    Setterbo, Jacob J; Garcia, Tanya C; Campbell, Ian P; Reese, Jennifer L; Morgan, Jessica M; Kim, Sun Y; Hubbard, Mont; Stover, Susan M

    2009-10-01

    To compare hoof acceleration and ground reaction force (GRF) data among dirt, synthetic, and turf surfaces in Thoroughbred racehorses. 3 healthy Thoroughbred racehorses. Forelimb hoof accelerations and GRFs were measured with an accelerometer and a dynamometric horseshoe during trot and canter on dirt, synthetic, and turf track surfaces at a racecourse. Maxima, minima, temporal components, and a measure of vibration were extracted from the data. Acceleration and GRF variables were compared statistically among surfaces. The synthetic surface often had the lowest peak accelerations, mean vibration, and peak GRFs. Peak acceleration during hoof landing was significantly smaller for the synthetic surface (mean + or - SE, 28.5g + or - 2.9g) than for the turf surface (42.9g + or - 3.8g). Hoof vibrations during hoof landing for the synthetic surface were < 70% of those for the dirt and turf surfaces. Peak GRF for the synthetic surface (11.5 + or - 0.4 N/kg) was 83% and 71% of those for the dirt (13.8 + or - 0.3 N/kg) and turf surfaces (16.1 + or - 0.7 N/kg), respectively. The relatively low hoof accelerations, vibrations, and peak GRFs associated with the synthetic surface evaluated in the present study indicated that synthetic surfaces have potential for injury reduction in Thoroughbred racehorses. However, because of the unique material properties and different nature of individual dirt, synthetic, and turf racetrack surfaces, extending the results of this study to encompass all track surfaces should be done with caution.

  7. Correlating steric hydration forces with water dynamics through surface force and diffusion NMR measurements in a lipid–DMSO–H2O system

    PubMed Central

    Schrader, Alex M.; Donaldson, Stephen H.; Song, Jinsuk; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Dong Woog; Han, Songi; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2015-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a common solvent and biological additive possessing well-known utility in cellular cryoprotection and lipid membrane permeabilization, but the governing mechanisms at membrane interfaces remain poorly understood. Many studies have focused on DMSO–lipid interactions and the subsequent effects on membrane-phase behavior, but explanations often rely on qualitative notions of DMSO-induced dehydration of lipid head groups. In this work, surface forces measurements between gel-phase dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine membranes in DMSO–water mixtures quantify the hydration- and solvation-length scales with angstrom resolution as a function of DMSO concentration from 0 mol% to 20 mol%. DMSO causes a drastic decrease in the range of the steric hydration repulsion, leading to an increase in adhesion at a much-reduced intermembrane distance. Pulsed field gradient NMR of the phosphatidylcholine (PC) head group analogs, dimethyl phosphate and tetramethylammonium ions, shows that the ion hydrodynamic radius decreases with increasing DMSO concentration up to 10 mol% DMSO. The complementary measurements indicate that, at concentrations below 10 mol%, the primary effect of DMSO is to decrease the solvated volume of the PC head group and that, from 10 mol% to 20 mol%, DMSO acts to gradually collapse head groups down onto the surface and suppress their thermal motion. This work shows a connection between surface forces, head group conformation and dynamics, and surface water diffusion, with important implications for soft matter and colloidal systems. PMID:26261313

  8. Correlating steric hydration forces with water dynamics through surface force and diffusion NMR measurements in a lipid-DMSO-H2O system.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Alex M; Donaldson, Stephen H; Song, Jinsuk; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Dong Woog; Han, Songi; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2015-08-25

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a common solvent and biological additive possessing well-known utility in cellular cryoprotection and lipid membrane permeabilization, but the governing mechanisms at membrane interfaces remain poorly understood. Many studies have focused on DMSO-lipid interactions and the subsequent effects on membrane-phase behavior, but explanations often rely on qualitative notions of DMSO-induced dehydration of lipid head groups. In this work, surface forces measurements between gel-phase dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine membranes in DMSO-water mixtures quantify the hydration- and solvation-length scales with angstrom resolution as a function of DMSO concentration from 0 mol% to 20 mol%. DMSO causes a drastic decrease in the range of the steric hydration repulsion, leading to an increase in adhesion at a much-reduced intermembrane distance. Pulsed field gradient NMR of the phosphatidylcholine (PC) head group analogs, dimethyl phosphate and tetramethylammonium ions, shows that the ion hydrodynamic radius decreases with increasing DMSO concentration up to 10 mol% DMSO. The complementary measurements indicate that, at concentrations below 10 mol%, the primary effect of DMSO is to decrease the solvated volume of the PC head group and that, from 10 mol% to 20 mol%, DMSO acts to gradually collapse head groups down onto the surface and suppress their thermal motion. This work shows a connection between surface forces, head group conformation and dynamics, and surface water diffusion, with important implications for soft matter and colloidal systems.

  9. Tip-force induced surface deformation in the layered commensurate tellurides NbA xTe 2 (A = Si, Ge) during atomic force microscopy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengel, H.; Cantow, H.-J.; Magonov, S. N.; Monconduit, L.; Evain, M.; Whangbo, M.-H.

    1994-12-01

    The Te-atom surfaces of commensurate layered tellurides NbA xTe 2 ( A = Si, x = {1}/{2}; A = Ge, x = {1}/{3}, {2}/{5}, {3}/{7}) were examined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) at different applied forces. Although the bulk crystal structures show a negligible height corrugation in the surface Te-atom sheets, the AFM images exhibit dark linear patterns that become strongly pronounced at high applied forces (several hundreds nN). This feature comes about because the tip-sample force interactions induce a surface corrugation according to the local hardness variation of the surface.

  10. Shear rheology of mixed protein adsorption layers vs their structure studied by surface force measurements.

    PubMed

    Danov, Krassimir D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Radulova, Gergana M; Basheva, Elka S; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Pelan, Eddie G

    2015-08-01

    The hydrophobins are proteins that form the most rigid adsorption layers at liquid interfaces in comparison with all other investigated proteins. The mixing of hydrophobin HFBII with other conventional proteins is expected to reduce the surface shear elasticity and viscosity, E(sh) and η(sh), proportional to the fraction of the conventional protein. However, the experiments show that the effect of mixing can be rather different depending on the nature of the additive. If the additive is a globular protein, like β-lactoglobulin and ovalbumin, the surface rigidity is preserved, and even enhanced. The experiments with separate foam films indicate that this is due to the formation of a bilayer structure at the air/water interface. The more hydrophobic HFBII forms the upper layer adjacent to the air phase, whereas the conventional globular protein forms the lower layer that faces the water phase. Thus, the elastic network formed by the adsorbed hydrophobin remains intact, and even reinforced by the adjacent layer of globular protein. In contrast, the addition of the disordered protein β-casein leads to softening of the HFBII adsorption layer. Similar (an even stronger) effect is produced by the nonionic surfactant Tween 20. This can be explained with the penetration of the hydrophobic tails of β-casein and Tween 20 between the HFBII molecules at the interface, which breaks the integrity of the hydrophobin interfacial elastic network. The analyzed experimental data for the surface shear rheology of various protein adsorption layers comply with a viscoelastic thixotropic model, which allows one to determine E(sh) and η(sh) from the measured storage and loss moduli, G' and G″. The results could contribute for quantitative characterization and deeper understanding of the factors that control the surface rigidity of protein adsorption layers with potential application for the creation of stable foams and emulsions with fine bubbles or droplets. Copyright © 2014

  11. Electrostatic patch potentials in Casimir force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Joseph; Somers, David; Munday, Jeremy

    2015-03-01

    Measurements of the Casimir force require the elimination of the electrostatic force between interacting surfaces. The force can be minimized by applying a potential to one of the two surfaces. However, electrostatic patch potentials remain and contribute an additional force which can obscure the Casimir force signal. We will discuss recent measurements of patch potentials made with Heterodyne Amplitude-Modulated Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy that suggest patches could be responsible for >1% of the signal in some Casimir force measurements, and thus make the distinction between different theoretical models of the Casimir force (e.g. a Drude-model or a plasma-model for the dielectric response) difficult to discern.

  12. Contact sensing from force measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bicchi, Antonio; Salisbury, J. K.; Brock, David L.

    1993-01-01

    This article addresses contact sensing (i.e., the problem of resolving the location of a contact, the force at the interface, and the moment about the contact normals). Called 'intrinsic' contact sensing for the use of internal force and torque measurements, this method allows for practical devices that provide simple, relevant contact information in practical robotic applications. Such sensors have been used in conjunction with robot hands to identify objects, determine surface friction, detect slip, augment grasp stability, measure object mass, probe surfaces, and control collision and for a variety of other useful tasks. This article describes the theoretical basis for their operation and provides a framework for future device design.

  13. Hydrodynamic Drag Force Measurement Of A Functionalized Surface Exhibiting Superhydrophobic Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    change in properties is proportional to the fluence. After performing Elemental Surface Analysis (XPS) to monitor the change in surface chemistry ...model MX-9204, 21 samples were suspended to a height of 50% of the total enclosure height and exposed to an atmosphere consisting of an atomized 3.5...superhydrophobic sample. The first hypothesis is that the atomized water vapor is small enough in scale to penetrate the micro scale surface features and bind to

  14. Surface forces: Surface roughness in theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Drew F. Walsh, Rick B.; Craig, Vincent S. J.

    2014-04-28

    A method of incorporating surface roughness into theoretical calculations of surface forces is presented. The model contains two chief elements. First, surface roughness is represented as a probability distribution of surface heights around an average surface height. A roughness-averaged force is determined by taking an average of the classic flat-surface force, weighing all possible separation distances against the probability distributions of surface heights. Second the model adds a repulsive contact force due to the elastic contact of asperities. We derive a simple analytic expression for the contact force. The general impact of roughness is to amplify the long range behaviour of noncontact (DLVO) forces. The impact of the elastic contact force is to provide a repulsive wall which is felt at a separation between surfaces that scales with the root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of the surfaces. The model therefore provides a means of distinguishing between “true zero,” where the separation between the average centres of each surface is zero, and “apparent zero,” defined by the onset of the repulsive contact wall. A normal distribution may be assumed for the surface probability distribution, characterised by the RMS roughness measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Alternatively the probability distribution may be defined by the histogram of heights measured by AFM. Both methods of treating surface roughness are compared against the classic smooth surface calculation and experimental AFM measurement.

  15. Unbinding forces of single pertussis toxin-antibody complexes measured by atomic force spectroscopy correlate with their dissociation rates determined by surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Nadège; Chevalier, Michel; Ronzon, Frédéric; Manin, Catherine; Dupuy, Monique; Krell, Tino; Rieu, Jean-Paul

    2011-01-01

    An inactivated form of pertussis toxin (PTX) is the primary component of currently available acellular vaccines against Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough. The PTX analyzed here is purified at industrial scale and is subsequently inactivated using glutaraldehyde. The influence of this treatment on antibody recognition is of crucial importance and is analyzed in this study. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) experiments using PTX and its inactivated form (toxoid) with 10 different monoclonal antibodies were conducted. PTX was found to recognize the antibodies with an average affinity of 1.34 ± 0.50 nM, and chemical inactivation caused only a modest decrease in affinity by a factor of approximately 4.5. However, glutaraldehyde treatment had contrary effects on the kinetic association constant k(a) and the dissociation constant k(d) . A significant reduction in k(a) was observed, whereas the dissociation of the toxoid from the bound antibody occurred slower than PTX. These data indicate that the chemical inactivation of PTX not only reduces the velocity of antibody recognition but also stabilizes the interaction with antibodies as shown by a reduction in k(d) . The same interactions were also studied by dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS). Data reveal a correlation between the k(d) values determined by SPR and the mean unbinding force as measured by DFS. The unbinding forces of one complex were determined as a function of the loading rate to directly estimate the k(d) value. Several interactions were impossible to be analyzed using SPR because of ultratight binding. Using DFS, the unbinding forces of these interactions were determined, which in turn could be used to estimate k(d) values. The use of DFS as a technique to study ultratight binding is discussed. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Savinase proteolysis of insulin Langmuir monolayers studied by surface pressure and surface potential measurements accompanied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging.

    PubMed

    Balashev, K; Ivanova, Tz; Mircheva, K; Panaiotov, I

    2011-08-15

    The mechanism of the enzymatic action of Savinase on an insulin substrate organized in a monolayer at the air-water interface was studied. We followed two steps experimental approach classical surface pressure and surface potential measurements in combination with atomic force microscopy imaging. Utilizing the barostat surface balance, the hydrolysis kinetic was followed by measuring simultaneously the decrease in the surface area and the change of the surface potential versus time. The decrease in the surface area is a result of the random scission of the peptide bonds of polypeptide chain, progressively appearance of amino acid residues, and their solubilization in the aqueous subphase. The interpretation of the surface potential data was based on the contribution of the dipole moments of the intact and broken peptide groups which remain at the interface during the proteolysis. An appropriate kinetic model for the Savinase action was applied, and the global kinetic constant was obtained. The application of the AFM revealed the state of the insulin monolayers before and after the Savinase action. The comparison of the topography of the films and the roughness analysis showed that insulin Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films transferred before the enzyme action were flat, while at the end of hydrolysis, roughness of films has increased and the appearance of 3D structures was observed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Attractive forces between hydrophobic solid surfaces measured by AFM on the first approach in salt solutions and in the presence of dissolved gases.

    PubMed

    Azadi, Mehdi; Nguyen, Anh V; Yakubov, Gleb E

    2015-02-17

    Interfacial gas enrichment of dissolved gases (IGE) has been shown to cover hydrophobic solid surfaces in water. The atomic force microscopy (AFM) data has recently been supported by molecular dynamics simulation. It was demonstrated that IGE is responsible for the unexpected stability and large contact angle of gaseous nanobubbles at the hydrophobic solid-water interface. Here we provide further evidence of the significant effect of IGE on an attractive force between hydrophobic solid surfaces in water. The force in the presence of dissolved gas, i.e., in aerated and nonaerated NaCl solutions (up to 4 M), was measured by the AFM colloidal probe technique. The effect of nanobubble bridging on the attractive force was minimized or eliminated by measuring forces on the first approach of the AFM probe toward the flat hydrophobic surface and by using high salt concentrations to reduce gas solubility. Our results confirm the presence of three types of forces, two of which are long-range attractive forces of capillary bridging origin as caused by either surface nanobubbles or gap-induced cavitation. The third type is a short-range attractive force observed in the absence of interfacial nanobubbles that is attributed to the IGE in the form of a dense gas layer (DGL) at hydrophobic surfaces. Such a force was found to increase with increasing gas saturation and to decrease with decreasing gas solubility.

  18. Direct Measurement of the Effect of Surface Roughness on the Colloidal Forces between a Particle and Flat Plate.

    PubMed

    Suresh; Walz

    1997-12-15

    The van der Waals and electrostatic interaction energies between a single particle and a flat plate were measured using the optical technique of total internal reflection microscopy (TIRM). The particles used were 15-µm-diameter polystyrene latex spheres and the flat plate was a polished BK-7 glass slide. The measurements were performed in aqueous solutions of ionic strength ranging from 3 to 7 mM, and the particle-plate separation distances ranged from approximately 25 to 300 nm. During measurement, the particle was trapped in a secondary energy well formed by the repulsive electrostatic and attractive van der Waals forces; however, the particle was free to undergo Brownian motion at all times. These measurements, which capitalize on the extreme sensitivity of the TIRM technique, are believed to be the first direct measurement of the van der Waals interaction energy in aqueous solutions at separation distances where retardation effects are substantial. Comparison of the measured energy wells with predictions made with traditional energy equations produced only fair agreement; specifically, the measured well depths were consistently lower than predicted. However, when the measured results were compared with predictions made using the recent model of L. Suresh and J. Y. Walz ([J. Colloid Interface Sci. 183, 199 (1996)] for rough surfaces, very good agreement was obtained. The asperity heights yielding the best agreement ranged between 14 and 33 nm, with an average height of 26 nm. This value is consistent with previous estimates of the roughness height obtained by measuring the particle sedimentation velocity [J. Y. Walz and L. Suresh, J. Chem. Phys. 103, 10714 (1995)]. Copyright 1997 Academic Press.

  19. Gravity Forcing Of Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenyon, K. E.

    2005-12-01

    Surface waves in deep water are forced entirely by gravity at the air-sea interface when no other forces act tangent to the surface. Then according to Newton's second law, the fluid acceleration parallel to the surface must equal the component of gravity parallel to the surface. Between crest and trough the fluid accelerates; between trough and crest the fluid decelerates. By replacing Bernoulli's law, gravity forcing becomes the dynamic boundary condition needed to solve the mathematical problem of these waves. Irrotational waves with a sinusoidal profile satisfy the gravity forcing condition, with the usual dispersion relation, provided the slope is small compared to one, as is true also of the Stokes development. However, the exact wave shape can be calculated using the gravity forcing method in a way that is less complex and less time consuming than that of the Stokes perturbation expansion. To the second order the surface elevation is the same as the Stokes result; the third order calculation has not been made yet. Extensions of the gravity forcing method can easily be carried out for multiple wave trains, solitary waves and bores, waves in finite constant mean depths, and internal waves in a two-layer system. For shoaling surface waves gravity forcing provides a physical understanding of the progressive steepening often observed near shore.

  20. Measuring Roughnesses Of Optical Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulter, Daniel R.; Al-Jumaily, Gahnim A.; Raouf, Nasrat A.; Anderson, Mark S.

    1994-01-01

    Report discusses use of scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy to measure roughnesses of optical surfaces. These techniques offer greater spatial resolution than other techniques. Report notes scanning tunneling microscopes and atomic force microscopes resolve down to 1 nm.

  1. Junction formation of Cu3BiS3 investigated by Kelvin probe force microscopy and surface photovoltage measurements

    PubMed Central

    Mesa, Fredy; Chamorro, William; Vallejo, William; Baier, Robert; Dittrich, Thomas; Grimm, Alexander; Lux-Steiner, Martha C

    2012-01-01

    Summary Recently, the compound semiconductor Cu3BiS3 has been demonstrated to have a band gap of ~1.4 eV, well suited for photovoltaic energy harvesting. The preparation of polycrystalline thin films was successfully realized and now the junction formation to the n-type window needs to be developed. We present an investigation of the Cu3BiS3 absorber layer and the junction formation with CdS, ZnS and In2S3 buffer layers. Kelvin probe force microscopy shows the granular structure of the buffer layers with small grains of 20–100 nm, and a considerably smaller work-function distribution for In2S3 compared to that of CdS and ZnS. For In2S3 and CdS buffer layers the KPFM experiments indicate negatively charged Cu3BiS3 grain boundaries resulting from the deposition of the buffer layer. Macroscopic measurements of the surface photovoltage at variable excitation wavelength indicate the influence of defect states below the band gap on charge separation and a surface-defect passivation by the In2S3 buffer layer. Our findings indicate that Cu3BiS3 may become an interesting absorber material for thin-film solar cells; however, for photovoltaic application the band bending at the charge-selective contact has to be increased. PMID:22497001

  2. Force, Surface Pressure, and Flowfield Measurements on a Slender Missile Configuration with Square Cross-Section at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Birch, Trevor J.; Allen, Jerry M.

    2004-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation of a square cross-section missile configuration has been conducted to obtain force and moment measurements, surface pressure measurements, and vapor screen flow visualization photographs for comparison with computational fluid dynamics studies conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperation Program (TTCP). Tests were conducted on three configurations which included: (1) body alone, (2) body plus tail fins mounted on the missile corners, and (3) body plus tail fins mounted on the missile side. This test was conducted in test section #2 of the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at Mach numbers of 2.50 and 4.50 and at a Reynolds number of 4 million per ft. The data were obtained over an angle of attack range from -4 deg. to 24 deg. and roll angles from 0 deg. to 45 deg., i.e., from a diamond shape (as viewed from the rear) at a roll angle of 0 deg. to a square shape at 45 deg.

  3. Nanometer-Sized Water Bridge and Pull-Off Force in AFM at Different Relative Humidities: Reproducibility Measurement and Model Based on Surface Tension Change.

    PubMed

    Bartošík, Miroslav; Kormoš, Lukáš; Flajšman, Lukáš; Kalousek, Radek; Mach, Jindřich; Lišková, Zuzana; Nezval, David; Švarc, Vojtěch; Šamořil, Tomáš; Šikola, Tomáš

    2017-01-26

    This article deals with the analysis of the relationship between the pull-off force measured by atomic force microscopy and the dimensions of water bridge condensed between a hydrophilic silicon oxide tip and a silicon oxide surface under ambient conditions. Our experiments have shown that the pull-off force increases linearly with the radius of the tip and nonmonotonically with the relative humidity (RH). The latter dependence generally consists of an initial constant part changing to a convex-concave-like increase of the pull-off force and finally followed by a concave-like decrease of this force. The reproducibility tests have demonstrated that the precision limits have to be taken into account for comparing these measurements carried out under atmospheric conditions. The results were fitted by a classical thermodynamic model based on water-bridge envelope calculations using the numerical solution of the Kelvin equation in the form of axisymmetric differential equations and consequent calculation of adhesive forces. To describe the measured data more precisely, a decrease of the water surface tension for low RH was incorporated into the calculation. Such a decrease can be expected as a consequence of the high surface curvature in the nanometer-sized water bridge between the tip and the surface.

  4. Local viscoelasticity of the surfaces of individual Gram-negative bacterial cells measured using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadillo-Rodriguez, Virginia; Beveridge, Terry; Dutcher, John

    2008-03-01

    The cell wall of Gram-negative bacteria performs many important biological functions: it plays a structural role, it allows the selective movement of molecules across itself, and it allows for growth and division. These functions not only suggest that the cell wall is dynamic, but that its mechanical properties are very important. We have used a novel, AFM-based approach to probe the mechanical properties of single bacterial cells by applying a constant compressive force to the cell under physiological conditions while measuring the time-dependent displacement (creep) of the AFM tip due to the viscoelastic properties of the cell. For these experiments, we chose a representative Gram-negative bacterium, P. aeruginosa PAO1, and we used AFM tips of different size and geometry. We find that the cell response is well described by a three element mechanical model with an effective cell spring constant k and an effective time constant τ for the creep motion. Adding glutaraldehyde, which increases the covalent bonding of the cell surface, produced a significant increase in k and a significant decrease in τ.

  5. Nanonet Force Microscopy for Measuring Cell Forces.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Kevin; Wang, Ji; Zhao, Wei; Kapania, Rakesh; Nain, Amrinder S

    2016-07-12

    The influence of physical forces exerted by or felt by cells on cell shape, migration, and cytoskeleton arrangement is now widely acknowledged and hypothesized to occur due to modulation of cellular inside-out forces in response to changes in the external fibrous environment (outside-in). Our previous work using the non-electrospinning Spinneret-based Tunable Engineered Parameters' suspended fibers has revealed that cells are able to sense and respond to changes in fiber curvature and structural stiffness as evidenced by alterations to focal adhesion cluster lengths. Here, we present the development and application of a suspended nanonet platform for measuring C2C12 mouse myoblast forces attached to fibers of three diameters (250, 400, and 800 nm) representing a wide range of structural stiffness (3-50 nN/μm). The nanonet force microscopy platform measures cell adhesion forces in response to symmetric and asymmetric external perturbation in single and cyclic modes. We find that contractility-based, inside-out forces are evenly distributed at the edges of the cell, and that forces are dependent on fiber structural stiffness. Additionally, external perturbation in symmetric and asymmetric modes biases cell-fiber failure location without affecting the outside-in forces of cell-fiber adhesion. We then extend the platform to measure forces of (1) cell-cell junctions, (2) single cells undergoing cyclic perturbation in the presence of drugs, and (3) cancerous single-cells transitioning from a blebbing to a pseudopodial morphology. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of radioactivity on surface interaction forces.

    PubMed

    Walker, M E; McFarlane, J; Glasgow, D C; Chung, E; Taboada-Serrano, P; Yiacoumi, S; Tsouris, C

    2010-10-15

    Although some differences have been observed, the transport behavior of radioactive aerosol particles has often been assumed to be analogous to the behavior of nonradioactive aerosols in dispersion models. However, radioactive particles can become electrostatically charged as a result of the decay process. Theories have been proposed to describe this self-charging phenomenon, which may have a significant effect on how these particles interact with one another and with charged surfaces in the environment. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to quantify surface forces between a particle and a planar surface and to compare measurements with and without the involvement of radioactivity. The main objective of this work is to assess directly the effects of radioactivity on the surface interactions of radioactive aerosols via the measurement of the adhesion force. The adhesion force between a silicon nitride AFM tip and an activated gold substrate was measured so that any possible effects due to radioactivity could be observed. The adhesion force between the tip and the gold surface increased significantly when the gold substrate (25 mm(2) surface area) was activated to a level of approximately 0.6 mCi. The results of this investigation will prompt further work into the effects of radioactivity in particle-surface interactions. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Influence of Radioactivity on Surface Interaction Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Mark E; McFarlane, Joanna; Glasgow, David C; Chung, Eunhyea; Taboada Serrano, Patricia L; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2010-01-01

    Although some differences have been observed, the transport behavior of radioactive aerosol particles has often been assumed to be analogous to the behavior of nonradioactive aerosols in dispersion models. However, radioactive particles can become electrostatically charged as a result of the decay process. Theories have been proposed to describe this self-charging phenomenon, which may have a significant effect on how these particles interact with one another and with charged surfaces in the environment. In this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to quantify surface forces between a particle and a planar surface and to compare measurements with and without the involvement of radioactivity. The main objective of this work is to assess directly the effects of radioactivity on the surface interactions of radioactive aerosols via the measurement of the adhesion force. The adhesion force between a silicon nitride AFM tip and an activated gold substrate was measured so that any possible effects due to radioactivity could be observed. The adhesion force between the tip and the gold surface increased significantly when the gold substrate (25 mm{sup 2} surface area) was activated to a level of approximately 0.6 mCi. The results of this investigation will prompt further work into the effects of radioactivity in particle-surface interactions.

  8. Measurement of the interaction forces at various pH levels by using AFM for the interpretation of DNA adsorption on silanized surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seung Pil; Suga, Kosaku; Fujihara, Masamichi; Park, Byung-Eun

    2014-09-01

    Various surfaces have been used for deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) immobilization, one example being a silanized surface. This is useful for determining DNA lengths and, thus, locating specific gene sequences in DNA by using fluorescence microscopy and scanning probe microscopy. In this study, we deposited DNA by using the molecular combing method and, we used fluorescence microscopy to study how the chain lengths of n-alkylsilanes affected the surface density of DNA deposited on the silanized surfaces in a tris-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (TE) buffer. The forces between a cleaned silicon-nitride (Si3N4) tip and each substrate surface in aqueous buffers at various pH levels (1.0 ~ 9.0) were also studied by using atomic force microscopy to measure the force-distance curves. We explain why the density of lambda bacteriophage DNA (λ-DNA) deposited by using the molecular combing method at pH 8 was lower on the silanized surface with the shorter alkyl chain than it was on the silanized surface with the longer alkyl chain in terms of the electrical double layer (EDL) and the adhesive force.

  9. Uncertainty in NIST Force Measurements.

    PubMed

    Bartel, Tom

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses upon the uncertainty of force calibration measurements at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The uncertainty of the realization of force for the national deadweight force standards at NIST is discussed, as well as the uncertainties associated with NIST's voltage-ratio measuring instruments and with the characteristics of transducers being calibrated. The combined uncertainty is related to the uncertainty of dissemination for force transfer standards sent to NIST for calibration.

  10. Measuring Your Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, David E.

    2005-01-01

    This article talks about the force behind education leaders. With all the challenges facing public education today, it is difficult to remain focused and to remember why one chartered this particular leadership course. Perhaps someone respected encouraged one to take this path long ago. Perhaps this kind of service to the nation and its future…

  11. Measuring Your Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, David E.

    2005-01-01

    This article talks about the force behind education leaders. With all the challenges facing public education today, it is difficult to remain focused and to remember why one chartered this particular leadership course. Perhaps someone respected encouraged one to take this path long ago. Perhaps this kind of service to the nation and its future…

  12. Ductile cutting of silicon microstructures with surface inclination measurement and compensation by using a force sensor integrated single point diamond tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuan-Liu; Cai, Yindi; Shimizu, Yuki; Ito, So; Gao, Wei; Ju, Bing-Feng

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a measurement and compensation method of surface inclination for ductile cutting of silicon microstructures by using a diamond tool with a force sensor based on a four-axis ultra-precision lathe. The X- and Y-directional inclinations of a single crystal silicon workpiece with respect to the X- and Y-motion axes of the lathe slides were measured respectively by employing the diamond tool as a touch-trigger probe, in which the tool-workpiece contact is sensitively detected by monitoring the force sensor output. Based on the measurement results, fabrication of silicon microstructures can be thus carried out directly along the tilted silicon workpiece by compensating the cutting motion axis to be parallel to the silicon surface without time-consuming pre-adjustment of the surface inclination or turning of a flat surface. A diamond tool with a negative rake angle was used in the experiment for superior ductile cutting performance. The measurement precision by using the diamond tool as a touch-trigger probe was investigated. Experiments of surface inclination measurement and ultra-precision ductile cutting of a micro-pillar array and a micro-pyramid array with inclination compensation were carried out respectively to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method.

  13. The hydrophobic force: measurements and methods.

    PubMed

    Tabor, Rico F; Grieser, Franz; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C

    2014-09-14

    The hydrophobic force describes the attraction between water-hating molecules (and surfaces) that draws them together, causing aggregation, phase separation, protein folding and many other inherent physical phenomena. Attempts have been made to isolate the range and magnitude of this interaction between extended surfaces for more than four decades, with wildly varying results. In this perspective, we critically analyse the application of common force-measuring techniques to the hydrophobic force conundrum. In doing so, we highlight possible interferences to these measurements and provide physical rationalisation where possible. By analysing the most recent measurements, new approaches to establishing the form of this force become apparent, and we suggest potential future directions to further refine our understanding of this vital, physical force.

  14. Direct measurement of critical Casimir forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertlein, C.; Helden, L.; Gambassi, A.; Dietrich, S.; Bechinger, C.

    2008-01-01

    When fluctuating fields are confined between two surfaces, long-range forces arise. A famous example is the quantum-electrodynamical Casimir force that results from zero-point vacuum fluctuations confined between two conducting metal plates. A thermodynamic analogue is the critical Casimir force: it acts between surfaces immersed in a binary liquid mixture close to its critical point and arises from the confinement of concentration fluctuations within the thin film of fluid separating the surfaces. So far, all experimental evidence for the existence of this effect has been indirect. Here we report the direct measurement of critical Casimir force between a single colloidal sphere and a flat silica surface immersed in a mixture of water and 2,6-lutidine near its critical point. We use total internal reflection microscopy to determine in situ the forces between the sphere and the surface, with femtonewton resolution. Depending on whether the adsorption preferences of the sphere and the surface for water and 2,6-lutidine are identical or opposite, we measure attractive and repulsive forces, respectively, that agree quantitatively with theoretical predictions and exhibit exquisite dependence on the temperature of the system. We expect that these features of critical Casimir forces may result in novel uses of colloids as model systems.

  15. Direct measurement of critical Casimir forces.

    PubMed

    Hertlein, C; Helden, L; Gambassi, A; Dietrich, S; Bechinger, C

    2008-01-10

    When fluctuating fields are confined between two surfaces, long-range forces arise. A famous example is the quantum-electrodynamical Casimir force that results from zero-point vacuum fluctuations confined between two conducting metal plates. A thermodynamic analogue is the critical Casimir force: it acts between surfaces immersed in a binary liquid mixture close to its critical point and arises from the confinement of concentration fluctuations within the thin film of fluid separating the surfaces. So far, all experimental evidence for the existence of this effect has been indirect. Here we report the direct measurement of critical Casimir force between a single colloidal sphere and a flat silica surface immersed in a mixture of water and 2,6-lutidine near its critical point. We use total internal reflection microscopy to determine in situ the forces between the sphere and the surface, with femtonewton resolution. Depending on whether the adsorption preferences of the sphere and the surface for water and 2,6-lutidine are identical or opposite, we measure attractive and repulsive forces, respectively, that agree quantitatively with theoretical predictions and exhibit exquisite dependence on the temperature of the system. We expect that these features of critical Casimir forces may result in novel uses of colloids as model systems.

  16. Force measurements on airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seewald, F

    1929-01-01

    The most essential phenomena of aircraft should be classified according to their origin and then measured. Information can thus be obtained in a quicker, cheaper, and more reliable way than otherwise would be possible.

  17. Force based displacement measurement in micromechanical devices

    SciTech Connect

    O {close_quote}Shea, S. J.; Ng, C. K.; Tan, Y. Y.; Xu, Y.; Tay, E. H.; Chua, B. L.; Tien, N. C.; Tang, X. S.; Chen, W. T.

    2001-06-18

    We demonstrate how force detection methods based on atomic force microscopy can be used to measure displacement in micromechanical devices. We show the operation of a simple microfabricated accelerometer, the proof mass of which incorporates a tip which can be moved towards an opposing surface. Both noncontact operation using long range electrostatic forces and tapping mode operation are demonstrated. The displacement sensitivity of the present device using feedback to control the tip-surface separation is approximately 1 nm. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  18. Jaw bite force measurement device.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Dennis; Ilies, Horea; O'Brien, Brendan; McManus, Anne; Larrow, Beau

    2012-08-01

    We describe a cost-effective device that uses an off-the-shelf force transducer to measure patient bite force as a diagnostic aid in determining dental implant size, number of implants, and prosthetic design for restoring partial edentulism. The main advantages of the device are its accuracy, simplicity, modularity, ease of manufacturing, and low cost.

  19. Cooling Force Measurements at CELSIUS

    SciTech Connect

    Ga ring lnander, B.; Lofnes, T.; Ziemann, V.; Fedotov, A. V.; Litvinenko, V. N.; Sidorin, A. O.; Smirnov, A. V.

    2006-03-20

    The design of future high energy coolers relies heavily on extending the results of cooling force measurements into new regimes by using simulation codes. In order to carefully benchmark these codes we have accurately measured the longitudinal friction force in CELSIUS by recording the phase shift between the beam and the RF voltage while varying the RF frequency. Moreover, parameter dependencies on the electron current, solenoid magnetic field and magnetic field alignment were carried out.

  20. COOLING FORCE MEASUREMENTS IN CELSIUS.

    SciTech Connect

    GALNANDER, B.; FEDOTOV, A.V.; LITVINENKO, V.N.; ET AL.

    2005-09-18

    The design of future high energy coolers relies heavily on extending the results of cooling force measurements into new regimes by using simulation codes. In order to carefully benchmark these codes we have accurately measured the longitudinal friction force in CELSIUS by recording the phase shift between the beam and the RF voltage while varying the RF frequency. Moreover, parameter dependencies on the electron current, solenoid magnetic field and magnetic field alignment were carried out.

  1. Reduced hydrophobic interaction of polystyrene surfaces by spontaneous segregation of block copolymers with oligo (ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate blocks: force measurements in water using atomic force microscope with hydrophobic probes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Seki, Akiko; Ishizone, Takashi; Yokoyama, Hideaki

    2008-05-20

    Reduction of hydrophobic interaction in water is important in biological interfaces. In our previous work, we have found that poly(styrene- b-triethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate) (PS-PME3MA) segregates the PME3MA block to the surface in hydrophobic environment, such as in air or in a vacuum, and shows remarkable resistance against adsorption or adhesion of proteins, platelets, and cells in water. In this paper, we report that atomic force microscopy (AFM) with hydrophobic probes can directly monitor the reduced hydrophobic interaction of the PS surfaces modified by poly(styrene- b-origoethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate) (PS-PME NMA), where N is the number of ethylene glycol units. The pull-off forces between the hydrophobic probes that are coated with octyltrichlorosilane (OLTS) and the PS-PME NMA modified polystyrene (PS) surfaces in water were measured. The absolute spring constants and tip-curvatures of the AFM cantilevers were measured to compute the work of adhesion by the Johnson, Kendall, and Roberts (JKR) theory, which relates the pull-off force at which the separation occurs between a hemisphere and a plane to the work of adhesion. The hydrophobic interactions between the hydrophobic tip and polymer surfaces in water were greatly reduced with the segregated PME NMA blocks. The hydrophobic interactions decrease with increasing N of the series of PS-PME NMA and show a correlation with the amount of protein adsorbed.

  2. The electrochemical surface forces apparatus: the effect of surface roughness, electrostatic surface potentials, and anodic oxide growth on interaction forces, and friction between dissimilar surfaces in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Valtiner, Markus; Banquy, Xavier; Kristiansen, Kai; Greene, George W; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2012-09-11

    We present a newly designed electrochemical surface forces apparatus (EC-SFA) that allows control and measurement of surface potentials and interfacial electrochemical reactions with simultaneous measurement of normal interaction forces (with nN resolution), friction forces (with μN resolution), and distances (with Å resolution) between apposing surfaces. We describe three applications of the developed EC-SFA and discuss the wide-range of potential other applications. In particular, we describe measurements of (1) force-distance profiles between smooth and rough gold surfaces and apposing self-assembled monolayer-covered smooth mica surfaces; (2) the effective changing thickness of anodically growing oxide layers with Å-accuracy on rough and smooth surfaces; and (3) friction forces evolving at a metal-ceramic contact, all as a function of the applied electrochemical potential. Interaction forces between atomically smooth surfaces are well-described using DLVO theory and the Hogg-Healy-Fuerstenau approximation for electric double layer interactions between dissimilar surfaces, which unintuitively predicts the possibility of attractive double layer forces between dissimilar surfaces whose surface potentials have similar sign, and repulsive forces between surfaces whose surface potentials have opposite sign. Surface roughness of the gold electrodes leads to an additional exponentially repulsive force in the force-distance profiles that is qualitatively well described by an extended DLVO model that includes repulsive hydration and steric forces. Comparing the measured thickness of the anodic gold oxide layer and the charge consumed for generating this layer allowed the identification of its chemical structure as a hydrated Au(OH)(3) phase formed at the gold surface at high positive potentials. The EC-SFA allows, for the first time, one to look at complex long-term transient effects of dynamic processes (e.g., relaxation times), which are also reflected in friction

  3. An Analytical Model of Nanometer Scale Viscoelastic Properties of Polymer Surfaces Measured Using an Atomic Force Microscope

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    19 DMT Derjaguin, Muller, and Toporov... DMT ) [18] also solved the problem of the adhesive forces between two elastic spheres. The force of adhesion for DMT can be written as Fadh = κc3a R... DMT model applies to tips with small radius of curvature and cantilevers of high stiffness. The model works well for low adhesion systems [34]. The

  4. Characterization of electrowetting processes through force measurements.

    PubMed

    Crane, Nathan B; Mishra, Pradeep; Volinsky, Alex A

    2010-04-01

    A new method of characterizing electrowetting is presented. In this method, the electrowetting actuation forces are measured rather than the contact angle. The forces on the liquid are measured by trapping a droplet between a flat nanoindenter tip and the test substrate. When voltage is applied to electrodes in the substrate, lateral and normal forces are exerted on the tip and measured by the nanoindenter transducer. Proper selection of the tip geometry permits direct prediction of the resulting in-plane lateral forces using analytical formulas derived from the Young-Lippmann equation. Experimental results show good agreement with both analytical and numerical predictions. Numerical modeling using SURFACE EVOLVER shows that the lateral forces are relatively insensitive to most alignment errors and that the analytical model is most accurate when the flat tip is close to the substrate. Evaporation of the test liquid can introduce modest errors in long measurements, but compensation methods are presented. As the droplet undergoes almost no movement, the fluid dynamics have minimal impact on the measured forces and transient electrowetting events are readily detected. Experimental results show significant response at frequencies up to 40 Hz. This setup is useful in measuring electrowetting responses at high speeds and in measuring system degradation processes.

  5. Adhesion forces between AFM tips and superficial dentin surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pelin, I M; Piednoir, A; Machon, D; Farge, P; Pirat, C; Ramos, S M M

    2012-06-15

    In this work, we study the adhesion forces between atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips and superficial dentin etched with phosphoric acid. Initially, we quantitatively analyze the effect of acid etching on the surface heterogeneity and the surface roughness, two parameters that play a key role in the adhesion phenomenon. From a statistical study of the force-distance curves, we determine the average adhesion forces on the processed substrates. Our results show that the average adhesion forces, measured in water, increase linearly with the acid exposure time. The highest values of such forces are ascribed to the high density of collagen fibers on the etched surfaces. The individual contribution of exposed collagen fibrils to the adhesion force is highlighted. We also discuss in this paper the influence of the environmental medium (water/air) in the adhesion measurements. We show that the weak forces involved require working in the aqueous medium. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Automatic HTS force measurement instrument

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, Scott T.; Niemann, Ralph C.

    1999-01-01

    A device for measuring the levitation force of a high temperature superconductor sample with respect to a reference magnet includes a receptacle for holding several high temperature superconductor samples each cooled to superconducting temperature. A rotatable carousel successively locates a selected one of the high temperature superconductor samples in registry with the reference magnet. Mechanism varies the distance between one of the high temperature superconductor samples and the reference magnet, and a sensor measures levitation force of the sample as a function of the distance between the reference magnet and the sample. A method is also disclosed.

  7. Automatic HTS force measurement instrument

    DOEpatents

    Sanders, S.T.; Niemann, R.C.

    1999-03-30

    A device is disclosed for measuring the levitation force of a high temperature superconductor sample with respect to a reference magnet includes a receptacle for holding several high temperature superconductor samples each cooled to superconducting temperature. A rotatable carousel successively locates a selected one of the high temperature superconductor samples in registry with the reference magnet. Mechanism varies the distance between one of the high temperature superconductor samples and the reference magnet, and a sensor measures levitation force of the sample as a function of the distance between the reference magnet and the sample. A method is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  8. Intrinsic adhesion force of lubricants to steel surface.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghwi

    2004-09-01

    The intrinsic adhesion forces of lubricants and other pharmaceutical materials to a steel surface were quantitatively compared using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). A steel sphere was attached to the tip of an AFM cantilever, and its adhesion forces to the substrate surfaces of magnesium stearate, sodium stearyl fumarate, lactose, 4-acetamidophenol, and naproxen were measured. Surface roughness varied by an order of magnitude among the materials. However, the results clearly showed that the two lubricants had about half the intrinsic adhesion force as lactose, 4-acetamidophenol, and naproxen. Differences in the intrinsic adhesion forces of the two lubricants were insignificant. The lubricant molecules were unable to cover the steel surface during AFM measurements. Intrinsic adhesion force can slightly be modified by surface treatment and compaction, and its tip-to-tip variation was not greater than its difference between lubricants and other pharmaceutical particles. This study provides a quantitative fundamental basis for understanding adhesion related issues.

  9. Surface Force Strategy: Return to Sea Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    trategy orce urfaceS F S Return to Sea Control Surface Force Strategy Return to Sea Control 14 Return to Sea Control Return to Sea Control A quarter...Responding to the call to “strengthen naval power at and from the sea,” the U.S. Naval Surface Force submits this “Surface Force Strategy .” The... strategy describes the return to sea control and implementation of Distributed Lethality as an operational and organizational principle for achieving

  10. Electromagnetic force on structured metallic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velzen, Andrew H.; Webb, Kevin J.

    2015-09-01

    We present a method by which the relatively weak electromagnetic force exerted on a surface can be dramatically enhanced. By structuring a metal surface at the nanoscale, we show that the force can be substantially increased over that on the planar metallic surface. The basis for this effect is found to be cavity-enhanced fields and the excitation of surface waves, and results are related to theory. In practice, this force enhancement could be expanded to other materials in various frequency regimes. This increased electromagnetic force should facilitate an expansion of applications related to optomechanics.

  11. Covalent Immobilization of Microtubules on Glass Surfaces for Molecular Motor Force Measurements and Other Single-Molecule Assays

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Matthew P.; Rao, Lu; Gennerich, Arne

    2014-01-01

    Rigid attachment of microtubules (MTs) to glass cover slip surfaces is a prerequisite for a variety of microscopy experiments in which MTs are used as substrates for MT-associated proteins, such as the molecular motors kinesin and cytoplasmic dynein. We present an MT-surface coupling protocol in which aminosilanized glass is formylated using the cross-linker glutaraldehyde, fluorescence-labeled MTs are covalently attached, and the surface is passivated with highly pure beta-casein. The technique presented here yields rigid MT immobilization while simultaneously blocking the remaining glass surface against nonspecific binding by polystyrene optical trapping microspheres. This surface chemistry is straightforward and relatively cheap and uses a minimum of specialized equipment or hazardous reagents. These methods provide a foundation for a variety of optical tweezers experiments with MT-associated molecular motors and may also be useful in other assays requiring surface-immobilized proteins. PMID:24633798

  12. Measuring Adhesion And Friction Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1991-01-01

    Cavendish balance adapted to new purpose. Apparatus developed which measures forces of adhesion and friction between specimens of solid materials in vacuum at temperatures from ambient to 900 degrees C. Intended primarily for use in studying adhesion properties of ceramics and metals, including silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, and iron-base amorphous alloys.

  13. Detecting chameleons through Casimir force measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe; Davis, Anne-Christine; Shaw, Douglas; Mota, David F.

    2007-12-15

    The best laboratory constraints on strongly coupled chameleon fields come not from tests of gravity per se but from precision measurements of the Casimir force. The chameleonic force between two nearby bodies is more akin to a Casimir-like force than a gravitational one: The chameleon force behaves as an inverse power of the distance of separation between the surfaces of two bodies, just as the Casimir force does. Additionally, experimental tests of gravity often employ a thin metallic sheet to shield electrostatic forces; however, this sheet masks any detectable signal due to the presence of a strongly coupled chameleon field. As a result of this shielding, experiments that are designed to specifically test the behavior of gravity are often unable to place any constraint on chameleon fields with a strong coupling to matter. Casimir force measurements do not employ a physical electrostatic shield and as such are able to put tighter constraints on the properties of chameleons fields with a strong matter coupling than tests of gravity. Motivated by this, we perform a full investigation on the possibility of testing chameleon models with both present and future Casimir experiments. We find that present-day measurements are not able to detect the chameleon. However, future experiments have a strong possibility of detecting or rule out a whole class of chameleon models.

  14. Forces and Holes in Liquid Surfaces and Soap Films: A Simple Measurement of a Not-So-Simple Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gratton, Luigi M.; Oss, Stefano

    2004-01-01

    In this article we show how to verify that in a fluid surface or film the value of the surface tension (i.e. the free energy per unit area) does not depend on the area of the film itself. The experimental evidence discussed can be obtained extremely simply yet with great accuracy. This experiment is important in that it leads to a deeper…

  15. Forces and Holes in Liquid Surfaces and Soap Films: A Simple Measurement of a Not-So-Simple Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gratton, Luigi M.; Oss, Stefano

    2004-01-01

    In this article we show how to verify that in a fluid surface or film the value of the surface tension (i.e. the free energy per unit area) does not depend on the area of the film itself. The experimental evidence discussed can be obtained extremely simply yet with great accuracy. This experiment is important in that it leads to a deeper…

  16. The effect of patch potentials in Casimir force measurements determined by heterodyne Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Joseph L; Somers, David; Munday, Jeremy N

    2015-06-03

    Measurements of the Casimir force require the elimination of the electrostatic force between the surfaces. However, due to electrostatic patch potentials, the voltage required to minimize the total force may not be sufficient to completely nullify the electrostatic interaction. Thus, these surface potential variations cause an additional force, which can obscure the Casimir force signal. In this paper, we inspect the spatially varying surface potential of e-beamed, sputtered, sputtered and annealed, and template stripped gold surfaces with Heterodyne amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy (HAM-KPFM). It is demonstrated that HAM-KPFM improves the spatial resolution of surface potential measurements compared to amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy. We find that patch potentials vary depending on sample preparation, and that the calculated pressure can be similar to the pressure difference between Casimir force calculations employing the plasma and Drude models.

  17. The effect of patch potentials in Casimir force measurements determined by heterodyne Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Joseph L.; Somers, David; Munday, Jeremy N.

    2015-06-01

    Measurements of the Casimir force require the elimination of the electrostatic force between the surfaces. However, due to electrostatic patch potentials, the voltage required to minimize the total force may not be sufficient to completely nullify the electrostatic interaction. Thus, these surface potential variations cause an additional force, which can obscure the Casimir force signal. In this paper, we inspect the spatially varying surface potential of e-beamed, sputtered, sputtered and annealed, and template stripped gold surfaces with Heterodyne amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy (HAM-KPFM). It is demonstrated that HAM-KPFM improves the spatial resolution of surface potential measurements compared to amplitude modulated Kelvin probe force microscopy. We find that patch potentials vary depending on sample preparation, and that the calculated pressure can be similar to the pressure difference between Casimir force calculations employing the plasma and Drude models.

  18. Surface potential and resistance measurements for detecting wear of chemically-bonded and unbonded molecularly-thick perfluoropolyether lubricant films using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Palacio, Manuel; Bhushan, Bharat

    2007-11-01

    The wear of perfluoropolyether (PFPE) lubricants applied on Si(100) and an Au film on Si(100) substrate at ultralow loads was investigated by using atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based surface potential and resistance measurements. Surface potential data is used in detecting lubricant removal and the initiation of wear on the silicon substrate. The surface potential change is attributed to the change in the work function of the silicon after wear, and electrostatic charge build-up of debris in the lubricant. It was found that coatings that are partially bonded, i.e., containing a mobile lubricant fraction, were better able to protect the silicon substrate from wear compared to the fully bonded coating. This enhanced protection is attributed to a lubricant replenishment mechanism. However, an untreated lubricant coating exhibited considerable wear as it contains a smaller amount of lubricant bonded to the substrate relative to the partially bonded and fully bonded coatings. A sample subjected to shear is shown to have improved wear resistance, and this enhancement is attributed to chain reorientation and alignment of the lubricant molecules. The detection of wear of PFPE lubricants on Au by an AFM-based resistance measurement method is demonstrated for the first time. This technique provides complementary information to surface potential data in detecting substrate exposure after wear and is a promising method for studying the wear of conducting films.

  19. Investigation of relationship between interfacial electroadhesive force and surface texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J.; Tailor, M.; Bamber, T.; Chamberlain, M.; Justham, L.; Jackson, M.

    2016-01-01

    A novel investigation into the relationship between the obtainable interfacial electroadhesive forces and different surface textures is presented in this paper. Different surface textures were generated then characterized based on a recognized areal-based non-contact surface texture measurement platform and procedure. An advanced electroadhesive force measurement platform and procedure were then implemented to measure the obtainable electroadhesive forces on those different surface textures. The results show that the obtained interfacial electroadhesive forces increase with decreasing Sq (root mean square height) value of the substrate surface provided that the difference in Sq between the different substrates is over 5 μm. Also, the higher the applied voltage, the larger the relative increase in electroadhesive forces observed. However, when the difference of Sq value between different substrate surfaces is below 2 μm, the obtained interfacial electroadhesive forces do not necessarily increase with decreasing Sq. Furthermore, the obtainable electroadhesive forces are not necessarily the same when the Sq value of two substrate surfaces are the same due to the fact that the direction of the surface texture plays an important role in achieving electroadhesive forces.

  20. Surface charge mapping of solid surfaces in water by pulsed-force-mode atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyatani, T.; Okamoto, S.; Rosa, A.; Marti, O.; Fujihira, M.

    We have studied the lateral distribution of charges on various surfaces in water by measuring the electrical double layer forces between a Si3N4 atomic force microscope (AFM) tip and the surfaces. By increasing the pH of the solution around the isoelectric point (IEP) of Si3N4 of approximately 6, the charge on the Si3N4 AFM tip was changed from positive to negative. The surface charges of the samples were also controlled by the pH of the solution in which the sample oxides were dipped. When the samples were electronically conductive, the surface charge was controlled by the electrode potentials. When the sample surface was heterogeneous in terms of the isoelectric point or point of zero charge (pzc), the surface charge was changed from one place to the other. As a heterogeneous oxide sample, a quartz plate patterned with alumina was used. The lateral charge distributions on such surfaces were mapped by pulsed-force-mode AFM. The lateral resolution of the present method was found to be approximately 20 nm.

  1. Electrical potentials measured on the surface of the knee reflect the changes of the contact force in the knee joint produced by postural sway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Garon, Martin; Quenneville, Éric; Buschmann, Michael D; Savard, Pierre

    2017-02-01

    Electroarthrography (EAG) is a novel technique for recording potentials on the knee surface that are generated by the compression of articular cartilage and that reflect both compression force and cartilage quality. The mechanical loading of the knee is achieved by transferring the subject's body weight from a bipedal stance to a unipedal stance. We hypothesized that EAG potentials change with postural sway. The study was performed on 20 normal subjects (10 male, 10 female; age 29±10.5 yrs.; mass 68.8±14.2kg; height 172.6±11.4cm). Data was recorded during 10 successive loading cycles repeated on two different days. During loading, EAG potentials were recorded with 4 electrodes placed on both sides of the knee and the ground reaction force (GRF) and the antero-posterior and medial-lateral displacements of the center of pressure (COP) were measured with a force plate. Two electromechanical models predicting the EAG signal from the GRF alone or from the GRF plus the COP displacements were computed by linear regression. The mean relative error between the four EAG signals and the predicted signals ranged from 24% to 49% for the GRF model, and from 15% to 35% for the GRF+COP model, this reduction was statistically significant at 3 electrode sites (p<0.05). The GRF+COP model also improved the repeatability of the parameters estimated on the first and second days when compared to the GRF model. In conclusion, EAG signals can be predicted by GRF and COP displacements and may reflect changes in the knee contact force due to postural sway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Electromotive force measurements in the combustion wave front during layer-by-layer surface laser sintering of exothermic powder compositions.

    PubMed

    Shishkovskiy, Igor V; Morozov, Yury G; Kuznetsov, Maxim V; Parkin, Ivan P

    2009-05-14

    Electric potentials arise between the combustion wave front and final products during layer-by-layer surface laser sintering of exothermic powder compositions (Ni-Ti, Ni-Al, Ti-Al). By using an analog-digital-analog converter to control the laser movement and hence the exothermic reaction itself, we show that near optimal conditions can be obtained for the formation of layered 3D articles. Comparative results of the structural-phase transformations that occur during laser-controlled SHS in related reaction-capable compositions are also presented.

  3. Short wave Aerosol Radiative Forcing estimates over a semi urban coastal environment in south-east India and validation with surface flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aruna, K.; Lakshmi Kumar, T. V.; Krishna Murthy, B. V.; Babu, S. Suresh; Ratnam, M. Venkat; Rao, D. Narayana

    2016-01-01

    The short wave direct Aerosol Radiative Forcing (ARF) at a semi urban coastal location near Chennai (12.81 °N, 80.03 °E, ˜45 m amsl), a mega city on the east coast of India has been estimated for all the four seasons in the year 2013 using the SBDART (Santa Barbara Discrete ordinate Atmospheric Radiative Transfer) model. As inputs to this model, measured aerosol parameters together with modeled aerosol and atmospheric parameters are used. The ARF in the atmosphere is found to be higher in the pre-monsoon and winter seasons compared to the other seasons whereas at the surface, it is found to be higher in the south-west (SW) monsoon and winter seasons. The estimated ARF values are compared with those reported over other locations in India. The effect of Relative Humidity on ARF has been investigated for the first time in the present study. It is found that the ARF increases with increasing RH in the SW monsoon and winter seasons. An unique feature of the present study is the comparison of the net surface short wave fluxes estimated from the model (SBDART) and measured fluxes using CNR 4 net radiometer. This comparison between the estimated and measured fluxes showed good agreement, providing a 'closure' for the estimates.

  4. Direct measurements of drag forces in C. elegans crawling locomotion.

    PubMed

    Rabets, Yegor; Backholm, Matilda; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari; Ryu, William S

    2014-10-21

    With a simple and versatile microcantilever-based force measurement technique, we have probed the drag forces involved in Caenorhabditis elegans locomotion. As a worm crawls on an agar surface, we found that substrate viscoelasticity introduces nonlinearities in the force-velocity relationships, yielding nonconstant drag coefficients that are not captured by original resistive force theory. A major contributing factor to these nonlinearities is the formation of a shallow groove on the agar surface. We measured both the adhesion forces that cause the worm's body to settle into the agar and the resulting dynamics of groove formation. Furthermore, we quantified the locomotive forces produced by C. elegans undulatory motions on a wet viscoelastic agar surface. We show that an extension of resistive force theory is able to use the dynamics of a nematode's body shape along with the measured drag coefficients to predict the forces generated by a crawling nematode.

  5. Structural and functional changes of the articular surface in a post-traumatic model of early osteoarthritis measured by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Desrochers, Jane; Amrein, Matthias A; Matyas, John R

    2010-12-01

    The functional integrity of the articulating cartilage surface is a critical determinant of joint health. Although a variety of techniques exist to characterize the structural changes in the tissue with osteoarthritis (OA), some with extremely high resolution, most lack the ability to detect and monitor the functional changes that accompany the structural deterioration of this essential bearing surface. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) enables the acquisition of both structural and mechanical properties of the articular cartilage surface, with up to nanoscale resolution, making it particularly useful for evaluating the functional behavior of the macromolecular network forming the cartilage surface, which disintegrates in OA. In the present study, AFM was applied to the articular cartilage surfaces from six pairs of canine knee joints with post-traumatic OA. Microstructure (RMS roughness) and micromechanics (dynamic indentation modulus, E* of medial femoral condyle cartilages were compared between contralateral controls and cruciate-transected knee joints, which develop early signs of OA by three months after surgery. Results reveal a significant increase in RMS roughness and a significant four-fold decrease in E* in cartilages from cruciate-transected joints versus contralateral controls. Compared to previous reports of changes in bulk mechanics, AFM was considerably more sensitive at detecting early cartilage changes due to cruciate-deficiency. The use of AFM in this study provides important new information on early changes in the natural history of OA because of its ability to sensitively detect and measure local structural and functional changes of the articular cartilage surface, the presumptive site of osteoarthritic initiation.

  6. Microscale friction investigation of polysilicon surface using scanning force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flueraru, C.; Cobianu, C.; Dascalu, D.; Flueraru, M.

    1998-07-01

    Microscale phenomena between the surface of chemically vapour deposited silicon films and a silicon nitride tip was investigated using Scanning Force Microscopy. An analysis of friction forces for different scan directions is presented. For different applied forces, the friction forces were measured and consequently the friction coefficient was calculated. We found that the average friction force linearly increases with the applied force and is reversible when unloading. Connection between the surface roughness and the friction coefficient was experimentally demonstrated. On a étudié par Microscopie à Force Atomique des phénomènes à échelle microscopique au niveau de la jonction pointe de nitrure de silicium et surface de films de silicium, obtenus par déposition chimique en phase vapeur. Dans cet article, nous présentons une analyse des forces de friction pour différentes directions de balayage. On a déterminé les forces de friction et, en conséquence, nous avons calculé le coefficient de friction pour différentes forces appliquées. Les résultats montrent que la force moyenne de friction augmente en fonction de la force appliquée, et qu'elle est reversible lorsque la charge diminue. Une dépendance entre la rugosité de la surface et le coefficient de friction est déduite.

  7. Influence of roughness on capillary forces between hydrophilic surfaces.

    PubMed

    van Zwol, P J; Palasantzas, G; De Hosson, J Th M

    2008-09-01

    Capillary forces have been measured by atomic force microscopy in the plate-sphere setup between gold, borosilicate glass, GeSbTe, titanium, and UV-irradiated amorphous titanium-dioxide surfaces. The force measurements were performed as a function contact time and surface roughness in the range 0.2-15 nm rms and relative humidity ranging between 2% and 40%. It is found that even for the lowest attainable relative humidity ( approximately 2%+/-1%) very large capillary forces are still present. The latter suggests the persistence of a nanometers-thick adsorbed water layer that acts as a capillary bridge between contacting surfaces. Moreover, we found a significantly different scaling behavior of the force with rms roughness for materials with different hydrophilicity as compared to gold-gold surfaces.

  8. Adhesion force between cyclopentane hydrate and mineral surfaces.

    PubMed

    Aman, Zachary M; Leith, William J; Grasso, Giovanny A; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Koh, Carolyn A

    2013-12-17

    Clathrate hydrate adhesion forces play a critical role in describing aggregation and deposition behavior in conventional energy production and transportation. This manuscript uses a unique micromechanical force apparatus to measure the adhesion force between cyclopentane hydrate and heterogeneous quartz and calcite substrates. The latter substrates represent models for coproduced sand and scale often present during conventional energy production and transportation. Micromechanical adhesion force data indicate that clathrate hydrate adhesive forces are 5-10× larger for calcite and quartz minerals than stainless steel. Adhesive forces further increased by 3-15× when increasing surface contact time from 10 to 30 s. In some cases, liquid water from within the hydrate shell contacted the mineral surface and rapidly converted to clathrate hydrate. Further measurements on mineral surfaces with physical control of surface roughness showed a nonlinear dependence of water wetting angle on surface roughness. Existing adhesive force theory correctly predicted the dependence of clathrate hydrate adhesive force on calcite wettability, but did not accurately capture the dependence on quartz wettability. This comparison suggests that the substrate surface may not be inert, and may contribute positively to the strength of the capillary bridge formed between hydrate particles and solid surfaces.

  9. Fiber Bragg Grating based bite force measurement.

    PubMed

    Umesh, Sharath; Padma, Srivani; Asokan, Sundarrajan; Srinivas, Talabattula

    2016-09-06

    The present study reports an in vivo, novel methodology for the dynamic measurement of the bite force generated by individual tooth using a Fiber Bragg Grating Bite Force Recorder (FBGBFR). Bite force is considered as one of the major indicators of the functional state of the masticatory system, which is dependent on the craniomandibular structure comprising functional components such as muscles of mastication, joints and teeth. The proposed FBGBFR is an intra-oral device, developed for the transduction of the bite force exerted at the occlusal surface, into strain variations on a base plate, which in turn is sensed by the FBG sensor bonded over it. The FBGBFR is calibrated against a Micro Universal Testing Machine (UTM) for 0-900N range and the resolution of the developed FBGBFR is found to be 0.54N. 36 volunteers (20 males and 16 females) performed the bite force measurement test at molar, premolar and incisor tooth on either side of the dental arch and the obtained results show clinically relevant bite forces varying from 176N to 635N. The bite forces obtained from the current study for a substantial sample size, show that the bite forces increases along the dental arch from the incisors towards the molars and are found to be higher in male than in female. The FBG sensor element utilized in FBGBFR is electrically passive, which makes it a safe in vivo intra-oral device. Hence the FBGBFR is viable to be employed in clinical studies on biomechanics of oral function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Adhesion Force Measurements Using an Atomic Force Microscope Upgraded with a Linear Position Sensitive Detector

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, M.; Stuart, J.; Pungor, A.; Dryden, P.

    2012-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM), in addition to providing images on an atomic scale, can be used to measure the forces between surfaces and the AFM probe. The potential uses of mapping the adhesive forces on the surface include a spatial determination of surface energy and a direct identification of surface proteins through specific protein–ligand binding interactions. The capabilities of the AFM to measure adhesive forces can be extended by replacing the four-quadrant photodiode detection sensor with an external linear position sensitive detector and by utilizing a dedicated user-programmable signal generator and acquisiton system. Such an upgrade enables the microscope to measure in the larger dynamic range of adhesion forces, improves the sensitivity and linearity of the measurement, and eliminates the problems inherent to the multiple repetitious contacts between the AFM probe and the specimen surface. PMID:25125792

  11. Anisotropic particles near surfaces: Propulsion force and friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Boris; Krüger, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    We theoretically study the phenomenon of propulsion through Casimir forces in thermal nonequilibrium. Using fluctuational electrodynamics, we derive a formula for the propulsion force for an arbitrary small object in two scenarios: (i) for the object being isolated, and (ii) for the object being close to a planar surface. In the latter case, the propulsion force (i.e., the force parallel to the surface) increases with decreasing distance, i.e., it couples to the near field. We numerically calculate the lateral force acting on a hot spheroid near a surface and show that it can be as large as the gravitational force, thus being potentially measurable in fly-by experiments. We close by linking our results to well-known relations of linear-response theory in fluctuational electrodynamics: Looking at the friction of the anisotropic object for constant velocity, we identify a correction term that is additional to the typically used approach.

  12. Nanoscale adhesive forces between silica surfaces in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Troncoso, Paula; Saavedra, Jorge H; Acuña, Sergio M; Jeldres, Ricardo; Concha, Fernando; Toledo, Pedro G

    2014-06-15

    Nanoscale adhesive forces between a colloidal silica probe and a flat silica substrate were measured with an atomic force microscope (AFM) in a range of aqueous NaCl, CaCl2, and AlCl3 solutions, with concentrations ranging from 10(-)(6) to 10(-)(2) M at pH ∼5.1. Notably, the measured force curves reveal large pull-off forces in water which increase in electrolyte solutions, with jump-off-contact occurring as a gradual detachment of the probe from the flat substrate rather than as a sharp discontinuous jump. The measured force curves also show that the number and size of the steps increase with concentration and notably with electrolyte valence. For the higher concentration and valence the steps become jumps. We propose that these nanoscale adhesive forces between mineral surfaces in aqueous solutions may arise from newly born cavities or persistent subnanometer bubbles. Formation of cavities or nanobubbles cannot be observed directly in our experiments; however, we cannot disregard them as responsible for the discontinuities in the measured force data. A simple model based on several cavities bridging the two surfaces we show that is able to capture all the features in the measured force curves. The silica surfaces used are clean but not intentionally hydroxylated, as contact angle measurements show, and as such may be responsible for the cavities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Assimilation of high-frequency radar surface currents measurements to optimize tidal boundary conditions and wind forcing (Outstanding Young Scientist Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Alexander; Alvera-Azcárate, Aida; Gurgel, Klaus-Werner; Staneva, Joanna; Beckers, Jean-Marie; Port, Alexander; Stanev, Emil

    2010-05-01

    An ensemble smoother scheme is presented to assimilate high-frequency (HF) radar surface currents to improve tidal boundary conditions and wind forcings of a circulation model of the German Bight. To create an ensemble of dynamically realistic tidal boundary conditions, a cost function is formulated which is directly related to the probability of each perturbation. This cost function ensures that the perturbations are spatially smooth and that the structure of the perturbations satisfies approximately the harmonic linearized shallow water equations. Based on those perturbations an ensemble simulation is carried out using the full three-dimensional General Estuarine Ocean Model (GETM). Optimized boundary values are obtained using all observations within the assimilation period using the covariances of the ensemble simulation. The approach acts like a smoother scheme since past and future observations are taken into account. The final analysis is obtained by rerunning the model using the optimal perturbation of the boundary conditions. The analyzed model solution satisfies thus the model equations exactly and does not suffer from spurious adjustments often observed with sequential assimilation schemes. Model results are also compared to independent tide gage data. The assimilation also reduces the model error compared to those sea level observations. The same scheme is also used to correct surface winds. Surface winds are crucial for accurately modeling the marine circulation in coastal waters. The method is validated directly by comparing the analyzed wind speed to in situ measurements and indirectly by assessing the impact of the corrected winds on sea surface temperature (SST) relative to satellite SST.

  14. Force measurements with the atomic force microscope: Technique, interpretation and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Cappella, Brunero; Kappl, Michael

    2005-10-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is not only a tool to image the topography of solid surfaces at high resolution. It can also be used to measure force-versus-distance curves. Such curves, briefly called force curves, provide valuable information on local material properties such as elasticity, hardness, Hamaker constant, adhesion and surface charge densities. For this reason the measurement of force curves has become essential in different fields of research such as surface science, materials engineering, and biology. Another application is the analysis of surface forces per se. Some of the most fundamental questions in colloid and surface science can be addressed directly with the AFM: What are the interactions between particles in a liquid? How can a dispersion be stabilized? How do surfaces in general and particles in particular adhere to each other? Particles and surfaces interactions have major implications for friction and lubrication. Force measurements on single molecules involving the rupture of single chemical bonds and the stretching of polymer chains have almost become routine. The structure and properties of confined liquids can be addressed since force measurements provide information on the energy of a confined liquid film. After the review of Cappella [B. Cappella, G. Dietler, Surf. Sci. Rep. 34 (1999) 1-104] 6 years of intense development have occurred. In 1999, the AFM was used only by experts to do force measurements. Now, force curves are used by many AFM researchers to characterize materials and single molecules. The technique and our understanding of surface forces has reached a new level of maturity. In this review we describe the technique of AFM force measurements. Important experimental issues such as the determination of the spring constant and of the tip radius are discussed. Current state of the art in analyzing force curves obtained under different conditions is presented. Possibilities, perspectives but also open questions and

  15. Surface Biology of DNA by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansma, Helen G.

    2001-10-01

    The atomic force microscope operates on surfaces. Since surfaces occupy much of the space in living organisms, surface biology is a valid and valuable form of biology that has been difficult to investigate in the past owing to a lack of good technology. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) of DNA has been used to investigate DNA condensation for gene therapy, DNA mapping and sizing, and a few applications to cancer research and to nanotechnology. Some of the most exciting new applications for atomic force microscopy of DNA involve pulling on single DNA molecules to obtain measurements of single-molecule mechanics and thermodynamics.

  16. Surface forces of colloidal particles from micrometer to nanometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jeong-Min

    2003-10-01

    Surface forces of colloidal particles play critical roles in the macroscopic behavior of particulate systems such as dispersion and coagulation, adhesion and coating, and the rheological behavior of ceramic slurries. As particle size is decreased from micrometer to nanometer range, surface forces are increasingly important. Polyelectrolytes are the chemical additives commonly used to efficiently control the stabilization of the colloidal system. Their conformations on the solid surfaces as well as the interactions between the adsorbed polyelectrolytes are important issues in colloidal processing. Most experimental and theoretical approaches to the surface forces are based on particle sizes in the micrometer range. However, nanoparticles at close proximity or high solids loading are expected to show different behavior than what can be estimated from conventional theories such as continuum or mean field theories. My study examined the effect of pH, ionic strength, and molecular weight of the polyelectrolytes on the surface forces of colloidal particles by the interplay with the adsorption, turbidity, and direct surface force measurement in terms of the conformation on the solid surfaces. The colloid probe technique based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) is well established for micron size particles; and could be extended for nanosize particles by using carbon nanotubes as proximal probes. Nanotubes with their high aspect ratio avoid the contribution from cone shapes that happens with AFM tips. The difference in particle size significantly influences surface forces for sterically dispersed colloidal systems.

  17. Unsteady Aerodynamic Force Sensing from Measured Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi

    2016-01-01

    A simple approach for computing unsteady aerodynamic forces from simulated measured strain data is proposed in this study. First, the deflection and slope of the structure are computed from the unsteady strain using the two-step approach. Velocities and accelerations of the structure are computed using the autoregressive moving average model, on-line parameter estimator, low-pass filter, and a least-squares curve fitting method together with analytical derivatives with respect to time. Finally, aerodynamic forces over the wing are computed using modal aerodynamic influence coefficient matrices, a rational function approximation, and a time-marching algorithm. A cantilevered rectangular wing built and tested at the NASA Langley Research Center (Hampton, Virginia, USA) in 1959 is used to validate the simple approach. Unsteady aerodynamic forces as well as wing deflections, velocities, accelerations, and strains are computed using the CFL3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code and an MSC/NASTRAN code (MSC Software Corporation, Newport Beach, California, USA), and these CFL3D-based results are assumed as measured quantities. Based on the measured strains, wing deflections, velocities, accelerations, and aerodynamic forces are computed using the proposed approach. These computed deflections, velocities, accelerations, and unsteady aerodynamic forces are compared with the CFL3D/NASTRAN-based results. In general, computed aerodynamic forces based on the lifting surface theory in subsonic speeds are in good agreement with the target aerodynamic forces generated using CFL3D code with the Euler equation. Excellent aeroelastic responses are obtained even with unsteady strain data under the signal to noise ratio of -9.8dB. The deflections, velocities, and accelerations at each sensor location are independent of structural and aerodynamic models. Therefore, the distributed strain data together with the current proposed approaches can be used as distributed deflection

  18. Force-Control Algorithm for Surface Sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acikmese, Behcet; Quadrelli, Marco B.; Phan, Linh

    2008-01-01

    A G-FCON algorithm is designed for small-body surface sampling. It has a linearization component and a feedback component to enhance performance. The algorithm regulates the contact force between the tip of a robotic arm attached to a spacecraft and a surface during sampling.

  19. Measuring the structure of thin soft matter films under confinement: A surface-force type apparatus for neutron reflection, based on a flexible membrane approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vos, Wiebe M.; Mears, Laura L. E.; Richardson, Robert M.; Cosgrove, Terence; Dalgliesh, Robert M.; Prescott, Stuart W.

    2012-11-01

    A unique surface force type apparatus that allows the investigation of a confined thin film using neutron reflection is described. The central feature of the setup consists of a solid substrate (silicon) and a flexible polymer membrane (Melinex®). We show that inflation of the membrane against the solid surface provides close and even contact between the interfaces over a large surface area. Both heavy water and air can be completely squeezed out from between the flexible film and the solid substrate, leaving them in molecular contact. The strength of confinement is controlled by the pressure used to inflate the membrane. Dust provides a small problem for this approach as it can get trapped between membrane and substrate to prevent a small part of the membrane from making good contact with the substrate. This results in the measured neutron reflectivity containing a small component of an unwanted reflection, between 10% and 20% at low confining pressures (1 bar) and between 1% and 5% at high confining pressures (5 bar). However, we show that this extra signal does not prevent good and clear information on the structure of thin films being extracted from the neutron reflectivity. The effects of confinement are illustrated with data from a poly(vinyl pyrollidone) gel layer in water, a polyelectrolyte multilayer in water, and with data from a stack of supported lipid-bilayers swollen with D2O vapor. The data demonstrates the potential of this apparatus to provide information on the structure of thin films under confinement for a known confining pressure.

  20. Measuring the structure of thin soft matter films under confinement: A surface-force type apparatus for neutron reflection, based on a flexible membrane approach

    SciTech Connect

    Vos, Wiebe M. de; Mears, Laura L. E.; Richardson, Robert M.; Cosgrove, Terence; Prescott, Stuart W.; Dalgliesh, Robert M.

    2012-11-15

    A unique surface force type apparatus that allows the investigation of a confined thin film using neutron reflection is described. The central feature of the setup consists of a solid substrate (silicon) and a flexible polymer membrane (Melinex{sup Registered-Sign }). We show that inflation of the membrane against the solid surface provides close and even contact between the interfaces over a large surface area. Both heavy water and air can be completely squeezed out from between the flexible film and the solid substrate, leaving them in molecular contact. The strength of confinement is controlled by the pressure used to inflate the membrane. Dust provides a small problem for this approach as it can get trapped between membrane and substrate to prevent a small part of the membrane from making good contact with the substrate. This results in the measured neutron reflectivity containing a small component of an unwanted reflection, between 10% and 20% at low confining pressures (1 bar) and between 1% and 5% at high confining pressures (5 bar). However, we show that this extra signal does not prevent good and clear information on the structure of thin films being extracted from the neutron reflectivity. The effects of confinement are illustrated with data from a poly(vinyl pyrollidone) gel layer in water, a polyelectrolyte multilayer in water, and with data from a stack of supported lipid-bilayers swollen with D{sub 2}O vapor. The data demonstrates the potential of this apparatus to provide information on the structure of thin films under confinement for a known confining pressure.

  1. Chemical identification of individual surface atoms by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Pou, Pablo; Abe, Masayuki; Jelinek, Pavel; Pérez, Rubén; Morita, Seizo; Custance, Oscar

    2007-03-01

    Scanning probe microscopy is a versatile and powerful method that uses sharp tips to image, measure and manipulate matter at surfaces with atomic resolution. At cryogenic temperatures, scanning probe microscopy can even provide electron tunnelling spectra that serve as fingerprints of the vibrational properties of adsorbed molecules and of the electronic properties of magnetic impurity atoms, thereby allowing chemical identification. But in many instances, and particularly for insulating systems, determining the exact chemical composition of surfaces or nanostructures remains a considerable challenge. In principle, dynamic force microscopy should make it possible to overcome this problem: it can image insulator, semiconductor and metal surfaces with true atomic resolution, by detecting and precisely measuring the short-range forces that arise with the onset of chemical bonding between the tip and surface atoms and that depend sensitively on the chemical identity of the atoms involved. Here we report precise measurements of such short-range chemical forces, and show that their dependence on the force microscope tip used can be overcome through a normalization procedure. This allows us to use the chemical force measurements as the basis for atomic recognition, even at room temperature. We illustrate the performance of this approach by imaging the surface of a particularly challenging alloy system and successfully identifying the three constituent atomic species silicon, tin and lead, even though these exhibit very similar chemical properties and identical surface position preferences that render any discrimination attempt based on topographic measurements impossible.

  2. Surface cleanliness measurement procedure

    DOEpatents

    Schroder, Mark Stewart; Woodmansee, Donald Ernest; Beadie, Douglas Frank

    2002-01-01

    A procedure and tools for quantifying surface cleanliness are described. Cleanliness of a target surface is quantified by wiping a prescribed area of the surface with a flexible, bright white cloth swatch, preferably mounted on a special tool. The cloth picks up a substantial amount of any particulate surface contamination. The amount of contamination is determined by measuring the reflectivity loss of the cloth before and after wiping on the contaminated system and comparing that loss to a previous calibration with similar contamination. In the alternative, a visual comparison of the contaminated cloth to a contamination key provides an indication of the surface cleanliness.

  3. Graphene thickness dependent adhesion force and its correlation to surface roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Pourzand, Hoorad; Tabib-Azar, Massood

    2014-04-28

    In this paper, adhesion force of graphene layers on 300 nm silicon oxide is studied. A simple model for measuring adhesion force for a flat surface with sub-nanometer roughness was developed and is shown that small surface roughness decreases adhesion force while large roughness results in an effectively larger adhesion forces. We also show that surface roughness over scales comparable to the tip radius increase by nearly a factor of two, the effective adhesion force measured by the atomic force microscopy. Thus, we demonstrate that surface roughness is an important parameter that should be taken into account in analyzing the adhesion force measurement results.

  4. Plasma forces on microparticles on a surface: an experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heijmans, L. C. J.; Neelis, T. W. C.; van Leuken, D. P. J.; Bouchut, A.; Nijdam, S.

    2017-07-01

    A plasma causes a force on particles on a surface. We quantitatively measure this force by means of two different setups, which use different methods to balance the forces on these particles: one using vibrations, the other a centrifuge. From this, we deduce both the adhesion that sticks the particles to the surface, and how the application of a plasma affects the adhesion of the particles. We show that the plasma alters the force balance on 100 μ {{m}} diameter particles with a force in the order of micronewtons. We can conclude, from both additional experiments and comparison to theory, that the main plasma effect is not an electrostatic force on a charged particle; its magnitude is orders of magnitude larger than what would be expected from electrostatic theory. The plasma likely has an effect on the particle adhesion, possibly caused by evaporation of water.

  5. Adhesion force of staphylococcus aureus on various biomaterial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Alam, Fahad; Balani, Kantesh

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus comprises of more than half of all pathogens in orthopedic implant infections and they can cause major bone infection which can result in destruction of joint and bone. In the current study, adhesion force of bacteria on the surface of various biomaterial surfaces is measured using atomic force microscope (AFM). Staphylococcus aureus was immobilized on an AFM tipless cantilever as a force probe to measure the adhesion force between bacteria and biomaterials (viz. ultra-high molecular weight poly ethylene (UHMWPE), stainless steel (SS), Ti-6Al-4V alloy, hydroxyapatite (HA)). At the contact time of 10s, UHMWPE shows weak adhesion force (~4nN) whereas SS showed strong adhesion force (~15nN) due to their surface energy and surface roughness. Bacterial retention and viability experiment (3M™ petrifilm test, agar plate) dictates that hydroxyapatite shows the lowest vaibility of bacteria, whereas lowest bacterial retention is observed on UHMWPE surface. Similar results were obtained from live/dead staining test, where HA shows 65% viability, whereas on UHMWPE, SS and Ti-6Al-4V, the bacterial viability is 78%, 94% and 97%, respectively. Lower adhesion forces, constrained pull-off distance (of bacterial) and high antibacterial resistance of bioactive-HA makes it a potential biomaterial for bone-replacement arthroplasty.

  6. Traction Force Measurement Using Deformable Microposts.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tianfa; Hawkins, Jamar; Sun, Yubing

    2017-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that mechanical forces strongly influence wound repair and fibrosis across multiple organ systems. Traction force is vital to the characterization of cellular responses to mechanical stimuli. Using hydrogel-based traction force microscopy, a FRET-based tension sensor, or microengineered cantilevers, the magnitude of traction forces can be measured. Here, we describe a traction force measurement methodology using a dense array of elastomeric microposts. This platform can be used to measure the traction force of a single cell or a colony of cells with or without geometric confinement.

  7. Controlling adhesion force by means of nanoscale surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, Shivaprakash N; Clasohm, Lucy Y; Rao, Akshata; Spencer, Nicholas D

    2011-08-16

    Control of adhesion is a crucial aspect in the design of microelectromechanical and nanoelectromechanical devices. To understand the dependence of adhesion on nanometer-scale surface roughness, a roughness gradient has been employed. Monomodal roughness gradients were fabricated by means of silica nanoparticles (diameter ∼12 nm) to produce substrates with varying nanoparticle density. Pull-off force measurements on the gradients were performed using (polyethylene) colloidal-probe microscopy under perfluorodecalin, in order to restrict interactions to van der Waals forces. The influence of normal load on pull-off forces was studied and the measured forces compared with existing Hamaker-approximation-based models. We observe that adhesion force reaches a minimum value at an optimum particle density on the gradient sample, where the mean particle spacing becomes comparable with the diameter of the contact area with the polyethylene sphere. We also observe that the effect on adhesion of increasing the normal load depends on the roughness of the surface.

  8. Friction and Adhesion Forces of Bacillus thuringiensis Spores on Planar Surfaces in Atmospheric Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kweon, Hyojin; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2011-01-01

    The kinetic friction force and the adhesion force of Bacillus thuringiensis spores on planar surfaces in atmospheric systems were studied using atomic force microscopy. The influence of relative humidity (RH) on these forces varied for different surface properties including hydrophobicity, roughness, and surface charge. The friction force of the spore was greater on a rougher surface than on mica, which is atomically flat. As RH increases, the friction force of the spores decreases on mica whereas it increases on rough surfaces. The influence of RH on the interaction forces between hydrophobic surfaces is not as strong as for hydrophilic surfaces. The friction force of the spore is linear to the sum of the adhesion force and normal load on the hydrophobic surface. The poorly defined surface structure of the spore and the adsorption of contaminants from the surrounding atmosphere are believed to cause a discrepancy between the calculated and measured adhesion forces.

  9. The impact of rubbing fabric type on surface roughness and tribological properties of some semi-alicyclic polyimides evaluated from atomic force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoica, Iuliana; Barzic, Andreea Irina; Hulubei, Camelia

    2013-03-01

    The morphology of some polyimides (PI) prepared from a flexible and alicyclic dianhydride, in combination with aromatic diamines was investigated in detail before and after rubbing with two types of fabric: cotton velvet (CV) and cellulose diacetate velvet (CDV). Atomic force microscopy was employed to evaluate the correlation between rubbing-induced grooves in PI film and size/flexibility of textile fibers. For both samples surface isotropy decreased appreciatively with 91% after patterning since the appearance of ordered nanostructures in the direction of rubbing. The angular spectra reveal the generation of a surface anisotropy after rubbing process and a higher surface regularity and uniformity when using CV. This result is confirmed by decrease of texture direction index with 75% and of surface texture aspect ratio with 89%. These parameters together with the rubbing fiber characteristics are key factors in controlling liquid crystal alignment on patterned PI surfaces.

  10. Rigid two-axis MEMS force plate for measuring cellular traction force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Jung, Uijin G.; Kan, Tetsuo; Tsukagoshi, Takuya; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2016-10-01

    Cellular traction force is one of the important factors for understanding cell behaviors, such as spreading, migration and differentiation. Cells are known to change their behavior according to the mechanical stiffness of the environment. However, the measurement of cell traction forces on a rigid environment has remained difficult. This paper reports a micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) force plate that provides a cellular traction force measurement on a rigid substrate. Both the high force sensitivity and high stiffness of the substrate were obtained using piezoresistive sensing elements. The proposed force plate consists of a 70 µm  ×  15 µm  ×  5 µm base as the substrate for cultivating a bovine aortic smooth muscle cell, and the supporting beams with piezoresistors on the sidewall and the surface were used to measure the forces in both the horizontal and vertical directions. The spring constant and force resolution of the fabricated force plate in the horizontal direction were 0.2 N m-1 and less than 0.05 µN, respectively. The cell traction force was measured, and the traction force increased by approximately 1 µN over 30 min. These results demonstrate that the proposed force plate is applicable as an effective traction force measurement.

  11. Adhesion force mapping on wood by atomic force microscopy: influence of surface roughness and tip geometry

    PubMed Central

    Kasal, B.

    2016-01-01

    This study attempts to address the interpretation of atomic force microscopy (AFM) adhesion force measurements conducted on the heterogeneous rough surface of wood and natural fibre materials. The influences of wood surface roughness, tip geometry and wear on the adhesion force distribution are examined by cyclic measurements conducted on wood surface under dry inert conditions. It was found that both the variation of tip and surface roughness of wood can widen the distribution of adhesion forces, which are essential for data interpretation. When a common Si AFM tip with nanometre size is used, the influence of tip wear can be significant. Therefore, control experiments should take the sequence of measurements into consideration, e.g. repeated experiments with used tip. In comparison, colloidal tips provide highly reproducible results. Similar average values but different distributions are shown for the adhesion measured on two major components of wood surface (cell wall and lumen). Evidence supports the hypothesis that the difference of the adhesion force distribution on these two locations was mainly induced by their surface roughness. PMID:27853541

  12. Adhesion force mapping on wood by atomic force microscopy: influence of surface roughness and tip geometry.

    PubMed

    Jin, X; Kasal, B

    2016-10-01

    This study attempts to address the interpretation of atomic force microscopy (AFM) adhesion force measurements conducted on the heterogeneous rough surface of wood and natural fibre materials. The influences of wood surface roughness, tip geometry and wear on the adhesion force distribution are examined by cyclic measurements conducted on wood surface under dry inert conditions. It was found that both the variation of tip and surface roughness of wood can widen the distribution of adhesion forces, which are essential for data interpretation. When a common Si AFM tip with nanometre size is used, the influence of tip wear can be significant. Therefore, control experiments should take the sequence of measurements into consideration, e.g. repeated experiments with used tip. In comparison, colloidal tips provide highly reproducible results. Similar average values but different distributions are shown for the adhesion measured on two major components of wood surface (cell wall and lumen). Evidence supports the hypothesis that the difference of the adhesion force distribution on these two locations was mainly induced by their surface roughness.

  13. Adhesion force mapping on wood by atomic force microscopy: influence of surface roughness and tip geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, X.; Kasal, B.

    2016-10-01

    This study attempts to address the interpretation of atomic force microscopy (AFM) adhesion force measurements conducted on the heterogeneous rough surface of wood and natural fibre materials. The influences of wood surface roughness, tip geometry and wear on the adhesion force distribution are examined by cyclic measurements conducted on wood surface under dry inert conditions. It was found that both the variation of tip and surface roughness of wood can widen the distribution of adhesion forces, which are essential for data interpretation. When a common Si AFM tip with nanometre size is used, the influence of tip wear can be significant. Therefore, control experiments should take the sequence of measurements into consideration, e.g. repeated experiments with used tip. In comparison, colloidal tips provide highly reproducible results. Similar average values but different distributions are shown for the adhesion measured on two major components of wood surface (cell wall and lumen). Evidence supports the hypothesis that the difference of the adhesion force distribution on these two locations was mainly induced by their surface roughness.

  14. Dynamic Force Measurement with Strain Gauges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Bruce E.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the use of four strain gauges, a Wheatstone bridge, and an oscilloscope to measure forces dynamically. Included is an example of determining the centripetal force of a pendulum in a general physics laboratory. (CC)

  15. Dynamic Force Measurement with Strain Gauges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Bruce E.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the use of four strain gauges, a Wheatstone bridge, and an oscilloscope to measure forces dynamically. Included is an example of determining the centripetal force of a pendulum in a general physics laboratory. (CC)

  16. Adhesive force mapping of friction-transferred PTFE film surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, H.; Mashiko, S.

    The adhesive force of a friction-transferred polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) film was mapped by using an atomic force microscope (AFM) system driven by custom software. The friction-transferred PTFE film, which was made by sliding a PTFE polymer rod on a heated glass, consisted of many PTFE ridges running parallel to the sliding direction on the glass surface. The adhesive force on the sample was derived from force curve measurement. A triangular wave amplified with a custom high-voltage amplifier was fed into the Z piezo of the AFM head through an AFM controller unit to obtain force curves while the AFM cantilever scanned a single line of the sample. The force curves both of the PTFE ridges and of the bare glass surface could be obtained by scanning the region perpendicular to the sliding direction. The deflection signal of the cantilever was sampled and stored in a computer through an AD converter. The adhesive force on the PTFE region was about half that on the glass surface. This difference was explained by the difference in capillary force of the surface water.

  17. Precision surface measurement.

    PubMed

    Jiang, X

    2012-08-28

    Surface size, geometry and texture are some of the most influential subjects in the fields of precision and ultra-precision engineering, defining the functional interface through which emerging products operate. Next-generation products demand super-smooth surfaces, freeform geometries or even deterministically introduced microstructures to provide functional performance. Technological progress using these surfaces types is possible only if the associated manufacturing processes are rigorously controlled and the surfaces are measurable. Metrology for advanced surfaces is not established. The current state of the art is challenged in respect to (i) surface characteristics, extremity of size, ultra precision, quality, geometric complexity, or combinations of these aspects, and (ii) measurement technology for the manufacturing environment, in particular, online, non-contact, high speed, ease of use, small footprint and robustness. This study addresses the challenges in this subject area and discusses some fundaments and principles derived from interdisciplinary research. The combination of these aspects is enabling the creation of manufacturing-environment-based measurement technology. This is expected to facilitate advanced surface manufacture over a wide range of sectors, including large science programmes and high-technology engineering.

  18. Measurement of Subcellular Force Generation in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    O’Toole, Matthew; Lamoureux, Phillip; Miller, Kyle E.

    2015-01-01

    Forces are important for neuronal outgrowth during the initial wiring of the nervous system and after trauma, yet subcellular force generation over the microtubule-rich region at the rear of the growth cone and along the axon has never, to our knowledge, been directly measured. Because previous studies have indicated microtubule polymerization and the microtubule-associated proteins Kinesin-1 and dynein all generate forces that push microtubules forward, a major question is whether the net forces in these regions are contractile or expansive. A challenge in addressing this is that measuring local subcellular force generation is difficult. Here we develop an analytical mathematical model that describes the relationship between unequal subcellular forces arranged in series within the neuron and the net overall tension measured externally. Using force-calibrated towing needles to measure and apply forces, in combination with docked mitochondria to monitor subcellular strain, we then directly measure force generation over the rear of the growth cone and along the axon of chick sensory neurons. We find the rear of the growth cone generates 2.0 nN of contractile force, the axon generates 0.6 nN of contractile force, and that the net overall tension generated by the neuron is 1.3 nN. This work suggests that the forward bulk flow of the cytoskeletal framework that occurs during axonal elongation and growth-cone pauses arises because strong contractile forces in the rear of the growth cone pull material forward. PMID:25762315

  19. A constant compliance force modulation technique for scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging of polymer surface elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Stroup, E.W.; Pungor, A/

    2012-01-01

    A new method of force modulation scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging based on a constant compliance feedback loop is presented. The feedback adjusts the loading force applied by the SFM tip to the surface in order to maintain a constant compliance beneath the tip. The new method, constant compliance force modulation (CCFM), has the advantage of being able to quantify the loading force exerted by the tip onto the sample surface and thus to estimate the elastic modulus of the material probed by the SFM tip. Once the elastic modulus of one region is known, the elastic moduli of other surface regions can be estimated from the spatial map of loading forces using the Hertz model of deformation. Force vs. displacement measurements made on one surface locality could also be used to estimate the local modulus. Several model surfaces, including a rubber-toughened epoxy polymer blend which showed clearly resolved compliant rubber phases within the harder epoxy matrix, were analyzed with the CCFM technique to illustrate the method’s application. PMID:9195751

  20. A constant compliance force modulation technique for scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging of polymer surface elasticity.

    PubMed

    Stroup, E W; Pungor, A; Hlady, V

    1996-12-01

    A new method of force modulation scanning force microscopy (SFM) imaging based on a constant compliance feedback loop is presented. The feedback adjusts the loading force applied by the SFM tip to the surface in order to maintain a constant compliance beneath the tip. The new method, constant compliance force modulation (CCFM), has the advantage of being able to quantify the loading force exerted by the tip onto the sample surface and thus to estimate the elastic modulus of the material probed by the SFM tip. Once the elastic modulus of one region is known, the elastic moduli of other surface regions can be estimated from the spatial map of loading forces using the Hertz model of deformation. Force vs. displacement measurements made on one surface locality could also be used to estimate the local modulus. Several model surfaces, including a rubber-toughened epoxy polymer blend which showed clearly resolved compliant rubber phases within the harder epoxy matrix, were analyzed with the CCFM technique to illustrate the method's application.

  1. Correlation between frictional force and surface roughness of orthodontic archwires.

    PubMed

    Choi, Samjin; Hwang, Eun-Young; Park, Hun-Kuk; Park, Young-Guk

    2015-01-01

    Lateral force microscopy measures the lateral bending of the cantilever depending on the frictional force acting between the tip and surface. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the relationship between the surface roughness and frictional resistance of four archwire and bracket combinations consisting of the 0.016-inch NiTi and 0.019 × 0.025-inch stainless steel archwires interacting clinically with two representative self-ligating brackets, active-type Clippy-C(®) ceramic self-ligating brackets, and passive-type Damon(®) stainless steel self-ligating brackets, using the lateral force microscopy technique. A 0.016-inch NiTi archwire interacting with passive-type Damon(®) stainless steel self-ligating brackets showed the smoothest surface roughness and the lowest frictional resistance compared to other combinations. The archwires interacting with passive-type Damon(®) stainless steel self-ligating brackets showed significantly lower surface roughness and frictional resistance than those interacting with active-type Clippy-C(®) ceramic self-ligating brackets. The frictional force in the in vivo archwire and bracket system increased with increasing surface roughness of the archwire. This positive correlation suggests that surface roughness can be used as an evaluating marker for estimating the efficiency of orthodontic treatment, rather than the direct measurement of frictional force. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Surface force spectroscopic point load measurements and viscoelastic modelling of the micromechanical properties of air flow sensitive hairs of a spider (Cupiennius salei).

    PubMed

    McConney, Michael E; Schaber, Clemens F; Julian, Michael D; Eberhardt, William C; Humphrey, Joseph A C; Barth, Friedrich G; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2009-08-06

    The micromechanical properties of spider air flow hair sensilla (trichobothria) were characterized with nanometre resolution using surface force spectroscopy (SFS) under conditions of different constant deflection angular velocities theta (rad s(-1)) for hairs 900-950 microm long prior to shortening for measurement purposes. In the range of angular velocities examined (4 x 10(-4) - 2.6 x 10(-1) rad s(-1)), the torque T (Nm) resisting hair motion and its time rate of change (Nm s(-1)) were found to vary with deflection velocity according to power functions. In this range of angular velocities, the motion of the hair is most accurately captured by a three-parameter solid model, which numerically describes the properties of the hair suspension. A fit of the three-parameter model (3p) to the experimental data yielded the two torsional restoring parameters, S(3p)=2.91 x 10(-11) Nm rad(-1) and =2.77 x 10(-11) Nm rad(-1) and the damping parameter R(3p)=1.46 x 10(-12) Nm s rad(-1). For angular velocities larger than 0.05 rad s(-1), which are common under natural conditions, a more accurate angular momentum equation was found to be given by a two-parameter Kelvin solid model. For this case, the multiple regression fit yielded S(2p)=4.89 x 10(-11) Nm rad(-1) and R(2p)=2.83 x 10(-14) Nm s rad(-1) for the model parameters. While the two-parameter model has been used extensively in earlier work primarily at high hair angular velocities, to correctly capture the motion of the hair at both low and high angular velocities it is necessary to employ the three-parameter model. It is suggested that the viscoelastic mechanical properties of the hair suspension work to promote the phasic response behaviour of the sensilla.

  3. Frictional forces and surface topography of a new ceramic bracket.

    PubMed

    Tanne, K; Matsubara, S; Hotei, Y; Sakuda, M; Yoshida, M

    1994-09-01

    The present study was designed to measure the frictional forces between orthodontic wires and a new ceramic bracket and to investigate the differences in the frictional forces with the new and two previously available ceramic brackets. Frictional forces were measured during the sliding of 0.016 x 0.022-inch and 0.017 x 0.022-inch cobalt-chromium alloy wire through three brackets bonded to a simulated tooth. The wires were not ligated into the brackets, so as to eliminate the influences of ligation on the bracket-wire friction. Further, slot surfaces of the three brackets were examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The magnitude of frictional forces produced by the new ceramic bracket was significantly less for both the wires than that produced by the two ceramic brackets at 1% level of confidence. The frictional forces with all the brackets exhibited a slight increase as the wire size became larger. The magnitude of frictional forces decreased substantially as the retraction point shifted more cervically. Slot surfaces of the new ceramic bracket were substantially smoother than those surfaces of the two other ceramic brackets. It is shown that refinements of slot surfaces of the ceramic bracket may be effective to reduce friction, although the bracket-wire frictions in this in vitro study were somewhat underestimated because of the lack of ligation of the wire into the bracket.

  4. Influence of surface roughness on dispersion forces.

    PubMed

    Svetovoy, V B; Palasantzas, G

    2015-02-01

    Surface roughness occurs in a wide variety of processes where it is both difficult to avoid and control. When two bodies are separated by a small distance the roughness starts to play an important role in the interaction between the bodies, their adhesion, and friction. Control of this short-distance interaction is crucial for micro and nanoelectromechanical devices, microfluidics, and for micro and nanotechnology. An important short-distance interaction is the dispersion forces, which are omnipresent due to their quantum origin. These forces between flat bodies can be described by the Lifshitz theory that takes into account the actual optical properties of interacting materials. However, this theory cannot describe rough bodies. The problem is complicated by the nonadditivity of the dispersion forces. Evaluation of the roughness effect becomes extremely difficult when roughness is comparable with the distance between bodies. In this paper we review the current state of the problem. Introduction for non-experts to physical origin of the dispersion forces is given in the paper. Critical experiments demonstrating the nonadditivity of the forces and strong influence of roughness on the interaction between bodies are reviewed. We also describe existing theoretical approaches to the problem. Recent advances in understanding the role of high asperities on the forces at distances close to contact are emphasized. Finally, some opinions about currently unsolved problems are also presented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Indium adhesion provides quantitative measure of surface cleanliness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krieger, G. L.; Wilson, G. J.

    1968-01-01

    Indium tipped probe measures hydrophobic and hydrophilic contaminants on rough and smooth surfaces. The force needed to pull the indium tip, which adheres to a clean surface, away from the surface provides a quantitative measure of cleanliness.

  6. Micromechanical cohesion force measurements to determine cyclopentane hydrate interfacial properties.

    PubMed

    Aman, Zachary M; Joshi, Sanjeev E; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Koh, Carolyn A

    2012-06-15

    Hydrate aggregation and deposition are critical factors in determining where and when hydrates may plug a deepwater flowline. We present the first direct measurement of structure II (cyclopentane) hydrate cohesive forces in the water, liquid hydrocarbon and gas bulk phases. For fully annealed hydrate particles, gas phase cohesive forces were approximately twice that obtained in a liquid hydrocarbon phase, and approximately six times that obtained in the water phase. Direct measurements show that hydrate cohesion force in a water-continuous bulk may be only the product of solid-solid cohesion. When excess water was present on the hydrate surface, gas phase cohesive forces increased by a factor of three, suggesting the importance of the liquid or quasi-liquid layer (QLL) in determining cohesive force. Hydrate-steel adhesion force measurements show that, when the steel surface is coated with hydrophobic wax, forces decrease up to 96%. As the micromechanical force technique is uniquely capable of measuring hydrate-surface forces with variable contact time, the present work contains significant implications for hydrate applications in flow assurance.

  7. Measuring the force of drag on air sheared sessile drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, Andrew J. B.; Fleck, Brian; Amirfazli, Alidad

    2012-11-01

    To blow a drop along or off of a surface (i.e. to shed the drop), the drag force on the drop (based on flow conditions, drop shape, and fluid properties) must overcome the adhesion force between the drop and the surface (based on surface tension, drop shape, and contact angle). While the shedding of sessile drops by shear flow has been studied [Milne, A. J. B. & Amirfazli, A. Langmuir 25, 14155 (2009).], no independent measurements of the drag or adhesion forces have been made. Likewise, analytic predictions are limited to hemispherical drops and low air velocities. We present, therefore, measurements of the drag force on sessile drops at air velocities up to the point of incipient motion. Measurements were made using a modified floating element shear sensor in a laminar low speed wind tunnel to record drag force over the surface with the drop absent, and over the combined system of the surface and drop partially immersed in the boundary layer. Surfaces of different wettabilities were used to study the effects of drop shape and contact angles, with drop volume ranged between approximately 10 and 100 microlitres. The drag force for incipient motion (which by definition equals the maximum of the adhesion force) is compared to simplified models for drop adhesion such as that of Furmidge

  8. Surface potential modeling and reconstruction in Kelvin probe force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie; Wu, Yangqing; Li, Wei; Xu, Jun

    2017-09-08

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) measurement has been extensively applied in metallic, semiconductor and organic electronic or photovoltaic devices, to characterize the local contact potential difference or surface potential of the samples at the nanoscale. Here, a comprehensive modeling of surface potential in KPFM is established, from the well-known single capacitance model to a precise electrodynamic model, considering the long range property of the electrostatic force in KPFM. The limitations and relations of different models are also discussed. Besides, the feedback condition of the KPFM system is reconsidered and modified, showing that the influence of the cantilever has been overestimated by about 20% in previous reports. Afterwards, the surface potential of charged Si-nanocrystals is reconstructed based on the electrodynamic model, and the calculated surface charge density is very consistent with the macroscopic capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurement. A deep understanding and correct reconstruction of surface potential is crucial to the quantitative analysis of KPFM results.

  9. Surface potential modeling and reconstruction in Kelvin probe force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jie; Wu, Yangqing; Li, Wei; Xu, Jun

    2017-09-01

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) measurement has been extensively applied in metallic, semiconductor and organic electronic or photovoltaic devices, to characterize the local contact potential difference or surface potential of the samples at the nanoscale. Here, a comprehensive modeling of surface potential in KPFM is established, from the well-known single capacitance model to a precise electrodynamic model, considering the long range property of the electrostatic force in KPFM. The limitations and relations of different models are also discussed. Besides, the feedback condition of the KPFM system is reconsidered and modified, showing that the influence of the cantilever has been overestimated by about 20% in previous reports. Afterwards, the surface potential of charged Si-nanocrystals is reconstructed based on the electrodynamic model, and the calculated surface charge density is very consistent with the macroscopic capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurement. A deep understanding and correct reconstruction of surface potential is crucial to the quantitative analysis of KPFM results.

  10. Measurement of non-monotonic Casimir forces between silicon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, L.; Wang, M.; Ng, C. Y.; Nikolic, M.; Chan, C. T.; Rodriguez, A. W.; Chan, H. B.

    2017-01-01

    Casimir forces are of fundamental interest because they originate from quantum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. Apart from controlling this force via the optical properties of materials, a number of novel geometries have been proposed to generate repulsive and/or non-monotonic Casimir forces between bodies separated by vacuum gaps. Experimental realization of these geometries, however, is hindered by the difficulties in alignment when the bodies are brought into close proximity. Here, using an on-chip platform with integrated force sensors and actuators, we circumvent the alignment problem and measure the Casimir force between two surfaces with nanoscale protrusions. We demonstrate that the force depends non-monotonically on the displacement. At some displacements, the Casimir force leads to an effective stiffening of the nanomechanical spring. Our findings pave the way for exploiting the Casimir force in nanomechanical systems using structures of complex and non-conventional shapes.

  11. Isoelectric point of fluorite by direct force measurements using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Assemi, Shoeleh; Nalaskowski, Jakub; Miller, Jan D; Johnson, William P

    2006-02-14

    Interaction forces between a fluorite (CaF2) surface and colloidal silica were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in 1 x 10(-3) M NaNO3 at different pH values. Forces between the silica colloid and fluorite flat were measured at a range of pH values above the isoelectric point (IEP) of silica so that the forces were mainly controlled by the fluorite surface charge. In this way, the IEP of the fluorite surface was deduced from AFM force curves at pH approximately 9.2. Experimental force versus separation distance curves were in good agreement with theoretical predictions based on long-range electrostatic interactions, allowing the potential of the fluorite surface to be estimated from the experimental force curves. AFM-deduced surface potentials were generally lower than the published zeta potentials obtained from electrokinetic methods for powdered samples. Differences in methodology, orientation of the fluorite, surface carbonation, and equilibration time all could have contributed to this difference.

  12. Knee joint forces: prediction, measurement, and significance

    PubMed Central

    D’Lima, Darryl D.; Fregly, Benjamin J.; Patil, Shantanu; Steklov, Nikolai; Colwell, Clifford W.

    2011-01-01

    Knee forces are highly significant in osteoarthritis and in the survival and function of knee arthroplasty. A large number of studies have attempted to estimate forces around the knee during various activities. Several approaches have been used to relate knee kinematics and external forces to internal joint contact forces, the most popular being inverse dynamics, forward dynamics, and static body analyses. Knee forces have also been measured in vivo after knee arthroplasty, which serves as valuable validation of computational predictions. This review summarizes the results of published studies that measured knee forces for various activities. The efficacy of various methods to alter knee force distribution, such as gait modification, orthotics, walking aids, and custom treadmills are analyzed. Current gaps in our knowledge are identified and directions for future research in this area are outlined. PMID:22468461

  13. Intermolecular forces and scaling relations between heterogeneous macromolecular surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Kenneth J.

    Most theories regarding the behavior of intermolecular forces assume perfectly smooth surfaces with well-defined chemical and material properties. In this thesis, three separate systems are studied to explore the accuracy of this assumption in very different situations. In the first system, the effects of milli-molar amounts of dissolved gas (the amount typically present in normal atmospheric conditions) have been studied at a pristine oil/water interface. It was found that the removal of the dissolved gas significantly increased the lifetime of the oil droplets, effectively reducing the long-range hydrophobic attractive force present under standard conditions. In the second system, the effect of varying normal and lateral roughness of solid surfaces in understanding the long-range steric forces and shorter-range adhesive (van der Waals) forces are studied. Various techniques to reproducibly control and vary the roughness were developed for a number of different types of polymeric surfaces. A strong correlation between the roughness and the repulsive steric force was observed for randomly rough surfaces. Similar scaling relations between the roughness and the magnitude of the adhesive force were measured. Friction measurements between these surfaces show that even a few nanometers of roughness significantly reduces the critical shear stress required to initiate sliding. However, the coefficient of friction was relatively unaffected by the range of roughness considered, in agreement with the macroscopic Amontons' law. The third and final system dealt with the properties of adsorbed layers of polyampholytes (containing both positively and negatively charged groups), as opposed to the more common classes of neutral polymers or polyelectrolytes. These measurements took advantage of a naturally occurring family of proteins (a class of polyampholytes), known as tau, which exist in six different well-defined lengths and charge densities. Force measurements were made with

  14. Determination of dynamic surface forces using piezoelectric arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitsche, W.; Mirow, P.

    The experimental determination of static and dynamic surface forces on flow bodies using piezoelectric arrays is outlined. The fundamentals of the piezo-array sensor technique (sensor construction, signal separation, and signal transmission) are presented. Practical applications of piezo-arrays in the fields of airfoil aerodynamics and general flow investigations are explained. The obtained measuring results are purely qualitative.

  15. Measurement of surface microtopography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, S. D.; Farr, T. G.; Muller, J.-P.; Lewis, P.; Leberl, F. W.

    1991-01-01

    Acquisition of ground truth data for use in microwave interaction modeling requires measurement of surface roughness sampled at intervals comparable to a fraction of the microwave wavelength and extensive enough to adequately represent the statistics of a surface unit. Sub-centimetric measurement accuracy is thus required over large areas, and existing techniques are usually inadequate. A technique is discussed for acquiring the necessary photogrammetric data using twin film cameras mounted on a helicopter. In an attempt to eliminate tedious data reduction, an automated technique was applied to the helicopter photographs, and results were compared to those produced by conventional stereogrammetry. Derived root-mean-square (RMS) roughness for the same stereo-pair was 7.5 cm for the automated technique versus 6.5 cm for the manual method. The principal source of error is probably due to vegetation in the scene, which affects the automated technique but is ignored by a human operator.

  16. Surface force spectroscopic point load measurements and viscoelastic modelling of the micromechanical properties of air flow sensitive hairs of a spider (Cupiennius salei)

    PubMed Central

    McConney, Michael E.; Schaber, Clemens F.; Julian, Michael D.; Eberhardt, William C.; Humphrey, Joseph A.C.; Barth, Friedrich G.; Tsukruk, Vladimir V.

    2009-01-01

    The micromechanical properties of spider air flow hair sensilla (trichobothria) were characterized with nanometre resolution using surface force spectroscopy (SFS) under conditions of different constant deflection angular velocities (rad s−1) for hairs 900–950 μm long prior to shortening for measurement purposes. In the range of angular velocities examined (4×10−4−2.6×10−1 rad s−1), the torque T (Nm) resisting hair motion and its time rate of change (Nm s−1) were found to vary with deflection velocity according to power functions. In this range of angular velocities, the motion of the hair is most accurately captured by a three-parameter solid model, which numerically describes the properties of the hair suspension. A fit of the three-parameter model (3p) to the experimental data yielded the two torsional restoring parameters, S 3p=2.91×10−11 Nm rad−1 and =2.77×10−11 Nm rad−1 and the damping parameter R 3p=1.46×10−12 Nm s rad−1. For angular velocities larger than 0.05 rad s−1, which are common under natural conditions, a more accurate angular momentum equation was found to be given by a two-parameter Kelvin solid model. For this case, the multiple regression fit yielded S 2p=4.89×10−11 Nm rad−1 and R 2p=2.83×10−14 Nm s rad−1 for the model parameters. While the two-parameter model has been used extensively in earlier work primarily at high hair angular velocities, to correctly capture the motion of the hair at both low and high angular velocities it is necessary to employ the three-parameter model. It is suggested that the viscoelastic mechanical properties of the hair suspension work to promote the phasic response behaviour of the sensilla. PMID:19091682

  17. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing

    PubMed Central

    Gravesen, Flemming H; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2009-01-01

    The esophagus serves to transport food and fluid from the pharynx to the stomach. Manometry has been the “golden standard” for the diagnosis of esophageal motility diseases for many decades. Hence, esophageal function is normally evaluated by means of manometry even though it reflects the squeeze force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure of esophageal transport function. The technique used to record axial force has developed from external force transducers over in-vivo strain gauges of various sizes to electrical impedance based measurements. The amplitude and duration of the axial force has been shown to be as reliable as manometry. Normal, as well as abnormal, manometric recordings occur with normal bolus transit, which have been documented using imaging modalities such as radiography and scintigraphy. This inconsistency using manometry has also been documented by axial force recordings. This underlines the lack of information when diagnostics are based on manometry alone. Increasing the volume of a bag mounted on a probe with combined axial force and manometry recordings showed that axial force amplitude increased by 130% in contrast to an increase of 30% using manometry. Using axial force in combination with manometry provides a more complete picture of esophageal motility, and the current paper outlines the advantages of using this method. PMID:19132762

  18. Influence of aerosols on surface reaching spectral irradiance and introduction to a new technique for estimating aerosol radiative forcing from spectral flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol radiative forcing estimates with high certainty are required in climate change studies. The approach in estimating the aerosol radiative forcing by using the chemical composition of aerosols is not effective as the chemical composition data with radiative properties are not widely available. In this study we look into the approach where ground based spectral radiation flux measurements along with an RT model is used to estimate radiative forcing. Measurements of spectral flux were made using an ASD spectroradiometer with 350 - 1050 nm wavelength range and 3nm resolution for around 54 clear-sky days during which AOD range was around 0.1 to 0.7. Simultaneous measurements of black carbon were also made using Aethalometer (Magee Scientific) which ranged from around 1.5 ug/m3 to 8 ug/m3. All the measurements were made in the campus of Indian Institute of Science which is in the heart of Bangalore city. The primary study involved in understanding the sensitivity of spectral flux to change in the mass concentration of individual aerosol species (Optical properties of Aerosols and Clouds -OPAC classified aerosol species) using the SBDART RT model. This made us clearly distinguish the region of influence of different aerosol species on the spectral flux. Following this, a new technique has been introduced to estimate an optically equivalent mixture of aerosol species for the given location. The new method involves an iterative process where the mixture of aerosol species are changed in OPAC model and RT model is run as long as the mixture which mimics the measured spectral flux within 2-3% deviation from measured spectral flux is obtained. Using the optically equivalent aerosol mixture and RT model aerosol radiative forcing is estimated. The new method is limited to clear sky scenes and its accuracy to derive an optically equivalent aerosol mixture reduces when diffuse component of flux increases. Our analysis also showed that direct component of spectral flux is

  19. Measurement of edgewise torque force in vitro.

    PubMed

    Steyn, C L

    1977-05-01

    The construction of a model for the measurement of palatal root torque is described. It was demonstrated that: 1. Halfway between the apex of a tooth and the arch wire the force was double that which was delivered at the apex. 2. The lateral incisors were subjected to appreciably more force than the central incisors. 3. The smaller the number of teeth acted upon, the greater the force they received.

  20. Laser Photon Force Measurements using a CW Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Perry; Edwards, David L.; Carruth, M. Ralph, Jr.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The photon force resulting from the non-damaging impact of laser derived photons on a metallic target was measured using a vacuum compatible microbalance. This experiment quantitatively verified that the force resulting from laser photons impacting a reflective surface is measurable and predictable. The photon wavelength is 1064 mn and the laser is a multi-mode 30OW Nd YAG continuous wave (CW) laser.

  1. Force measurement enabling precise analysis by dynamic force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Taninaka, Atsushi; Hirano, Yuuichi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Shigekawa, Hidemi

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS) makes it possible to investigate specific interactions between two molecules such as ligand-receptor pairs at the single-molecule level. In the DFS method based on the Bell-Evans model, the unbinding force applied to a molecular bond is increased at a constant rate, and the force required to rupture the molecular bond is measured. By analyzing the relationship between the modal rupture force and the logarithm of the loading rate, microscopic potential barrier landscapes and the lifetimes of bonds can be obtained. However, the results obtained, for example, in the case of streptavidin/biotin complexes, have differed among previous studies and some results have been inconsistent with theoretical predictions. In this study, using an atomic force microscopy technique that enables the precise analysis of molecular interactions on the basis of DFS, we investigated the effect of the sampling rate on DFS analysis. The shape of rupture force histograms, for example, was significantly deformed at a sampling rate of 1 kHz in comparison with that of histograms obtained at 100 kHz, indicating the fundamental importance of ensuring suitable experimental conditions for further advances in the DFS method.

  2. Influence of aerosols on surface reaching spectral irradiance and introduction to a new technique of estimating aerosol radiative forcing from high resolution spectral flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Roshan

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol radiative forcing estimates with high certainty are required in climate change studies. The approach in estimating the aerosol radiative forcing by using the chemical composition of aerosols is not effective as the chemical composition data with radiative properties are not widely available. We look into the approach where ground based spectral radiation flux measurement is made and along with an Radtiative transfer (RT) model, radiative forcing is estimated. Measurements of spectral flux were made using an ASD spectroradiometer with 350 - 1050 nm wavelength range and a 3nm resolution during around 54 clear-sky days during which AOD range was around 0.01 to 0.7. Simultaneous measurements of black carbon were also made using Aethalometer (Magee Scientific) which ranged from around 1.5 ug/m3 to 8 ug/m3. The primary study involved in understanding the sensitivity of spectral flux due to change in individual aerosol species (Optical properties of Aerosols and Clouds (OPAC) classified aerosol species) using the SBDART RT model. This made us clearly distinguish the influence of different aerosol species on the spectral flux. Following this, a new technique has been introduced to estimate an optically equivalent mixture of aerosol species for the given location. The new method involves matching different combinations of aerosol species in OPAC model and RT model as long as the combination which gives the minimum root mean squared deviation from measured spectral flux is obtained. Using the optically equivalent aerosol mixture and RT model, aerosol radiative forcing is estimated. Also an alternate method to estimate the spectral SSA is discussed. Here, the RT model, the observed spectral flux and spectral AOD is used. Spectral AOD is input to RT model and SSA is varied till the minimum root mean squared difference between observed and simulated spectral flux from RT model is obtained. The methods discussed are limited to clear sky scenes and its accuracy to derive

  3. Force Measurement Device for ARIANE 5 Payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, O.; Braeken, R.

    2004-08-01

    ESTEC uses since 1991 a Force Measurement Device (FMD) for the measurement of dynamic mechanical forces and moments. This tool allows the determination of forces and moments applied to the test hardware at its interface to the test facilities during dynamic testing. Three forces and three moments are calculated from the measurements of eight tri-axial force links and used to either characterize the dynamic mechanical behaviour of the test item and/or to control forces and moments during vibration testing (force limited vibration control). The current FMD is limited to test items with an interface diameter of up to about 1.2 m (adapter already available) and a mass compatible with ARIANE 4 payloads. The limitations of the current system come from the maximum of eight tri-axial force links and from the analogue technique of the Signal Processing Unit (SPU) that allows only a limited number of geometric configurations for the mechanical interface. Following the success of the FMD during former test campaigns, e.g. ROSETTA STM + FM, the need for a FMD, compatible with ARIANE 5 payloads has been established. Therefore ESA decided to develop a new FMD system. The system will include a digital real time SPU with 72 force input channels, corresponding to 24 tri-axes force sensors or 72 mono axial force sensors. The SPU design will allow extending the number of force input channels to 144. The set-up of the FMD will be done via a standard PC interface. The user will enter for each force sensor the location and the measurement direction in the reference coordinate system. Based on the geometrical information and the maximum forces and moments expected the PC will calculate the optimum range settings for the charge-amplifiers and the corresponding matrix with weighting factors which will allow to perform a fast calculation of the six output forces and moments from the 72 (or 144) input forces. The six output channels with forces and moments can then be connected either to the

  4. Augmented Computer Mouse Would Measure Applied Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Larry C. H.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed computer mouse measures force of contact applied by user. Adds another dimension to two-dimensional-position-measuring capability of conventional computer mouse; force measurement designated to represent any desired continuously variable function of time and position, such as control force, acceleration, velocity, or position along axis perpendicular to computer video display. Proposed mouse enhances sense of realism and intuition in interaction between operator and computer. Useful in such applications as three-dimensional computer graphics, computer games, and mathematical modeling of dynamics.

  5. Augmented Computer Mouse Would Measure Applied Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Larry C. H.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed computer mouse measures force of contact applied by user. Adds another dimension to two-dimensional-position-measuring capability of conventional computer mouse; force measurement designated to represent any desired continuously variable function of time and position, such as control force, acceleration, velocity, or position along axis perpendicular to computer video display. Proposed mouse enhances sense of realism and intuition in interaction between operator and computer. Useful in such applications as three-dimensional computer graphics, computer games, and mathematical modeling of dynamics.

  6. Forced wetting of a reactive surface.

    PubMed

    Blake, T D

    2012-11-01

    The dynamic wetting of water on gelatin-coated poly(ethylene terephthalate) (GC-PET) has been investigated by forced wetting over a wide speed range and compared with earlier data obtained with unmodified PET. The results were analysed according to the molecular-kinetic theory of dynamic wetting (MKT). Both substrates show complex behaviour, with separate low- and high-speed modes. For the GC-PET, this is attributed to a rapid change in the wettability of the substrate on contact with water, specifically a surface molecular transformation from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. This results in a smooth wetting transition from one mode to the other. For the PET, the bimodal behaviour is attributed to surface heterogeneity, with the low-speed dynamics dominated by interactions with polar sites on the substrate that become masked at higher speeds. In this case, the transition is discontinuous. The study has general ramifications for the investigation of any wetting processes in which a physicochemical transformation takes place at the solid surface on contact with the liquid. In particular, it shows how forced wetting, combined with the MKT, can reveal subtle details of the processes involved. It is unlikely that similar insight could be gained from spontaneous wetting studies, such as spreading drops.

  7. Development of computerized masticatory force measurement system.

    PubMed

    Rane, Vivek; Hamde, Satish; Agrawal, Ankush

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the Maximum Voluntary Bite Force (MVBF) in Indian population with normal occlusion and after treatment of mandibular angle fracture. This paper discusses the development of a sensor fork with modified load cell and computer-based bite force measuring system that generates force profile on the computer. This is a powerful diagnostic tool in response to the needs of dentists seeking an accurate way to dynamically measure occlusion. This study was carried out to evaluate the maximum voluntary bite force generated by the patients after the treatment of mandibular angle fracture. The in vivo measurements were repeated on the following day, week and two months later. The measurements of the device were highly repeatable. This development provides the cost effective and handy equipment for bite force measurement further, if again sensor thickness reduced, we will be able to get more close results of forces that are exactly generated during the mastication process. Our study shows a significant difference in mean bite force efficiency between the all the treatment weeks and increased with time at α = 0.05 level. The gender difference was statistically significant in the male and female.

  8. Measuring Force-Induced Dissociation Kinetics of Protein Complexes Using Single-Molecule Atomic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Manibog, K; Yen, C F; Sivasankar, S

    2017-01-01

    Proteins respond to mechanical force by undergoing conformational changes and altering the kinetics of their interactions. However, the biophysical relationship between mechanical force and the lifetime of protein complexes is not completely understood. In this chapter, we provide a step-by-step tutorial on characterizing the force-dependent regulation of protein interactions using in vitro and in vivo single-molecule force clamp measurements with an atomic force microscope (AFM). While we focus on the force-induced dissociation of E-cadherins, a critical cell-cell adhesion protein, the approaches described here can be readily adapted to study other protein complexes. We begin this chapter by providing a brief overview of theoretical models that describe force-dependent kinetics of biomolecular interactions. Next, we present step-by-step methods for measuring the response of single receptor-ligand bonds to tensile force in vitro. Finally, we describe methods for quantifying the mechanical response of single protein complexes on the surface of living cells. We describe general protocols for conducting such measurements, including sample preparation, AFM force clamp measurements, and data analysis. We also highlight critical limitations in current technologies and discuss solutions to these challenges. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Phoretic Force Measurement for Microparticles Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, E. J.; Zheng, R.

    1999-01-01

    This theoretical and experimental investigation of the collisional interactions between gas molecules and solid and liquid surfaces of microparticles involves fundamental studies of the transfer of energy, mass and momentum between gas molecules and surfaces. The numerous applications include particle deposition on semiconductor surfaces and on surfaces in combustion processes, containerless processing, the production of nanophase materials, pigments and ceramic precursors, and pollution abatement technologies such as desulfurization of gaseous effluents from combustion processes. Of particular emphasis are the forces exerted on microparticles present in a nonuniform gas, that is, in gaseous surroundings involving temperature and concentration gradients. These so-called phoretic forces become the dominant forces when the gravitational force is diminished, and they are strongly dependent on the momentum transfer between gas molecules and the surface. The momentum transfer, in turn, depends on the gas and particle properties and the mean free path and kinetic energy of the gas molecules. The experimental program involves the particle levitation system shown. A micrometer size particle is held between two heat exchangers enclosed in a vacuum chamber by means of ac and dc electric fields. The ac field keeps the particle centered on the vertical axis of the chamber, and the dc field balances the gravitational force and the thermophoretic force. Some measurements of the thermophoretic force are presented in this paper.

  10. Atomic force microscopy study of tooth surfaces.

    PubMed

    Farina, M; Schemmel, A; Weissmüller, G; Cruz, R; Kachar, B; Bisch, P M

    1999-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study tooth surfaces in order to compare the pattern of particle distribution in the outermost layer of the tooth surfaces. Human teeth and teeth from a rodent (Golden hamster), from a fish (piranha), and from a grazing mollusk (chiton) with distinct feeding habits were analyzed in terms of particle arrangement, packing, and size distribution. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used for comparison. It was found that AFM gives high-contrast, high-resolution images and is an important tool as a source of complementary and/or new structural information. All teeth were cleaned and some were etched with acidic solutions before analysis. It was observed that human enamel (permanent teeth) presents particles tightly packed in the outer surface, whereas enamel from the hamster (continuously growing teeth) shows particles of less dense packing. The piranha teeth have a thin cuticle covering the long apatite crystals of the underlying enameloid. This cuticle has a rough surface of particles that have a globular appearance after the brief acidic treatment. The similar appearance of the in vivo naturally etched tooth surface suggests that the pattern of globule distribution may be due to the presence of an organic material. Elemental analysis of this cuticle indicated that calcium, phosphorus, and iron are the main components of the structure while electron microdiffraction of pulverized cuticle particles showed a pattern consistent with hydroxyapatite. The chiton mineralized tooth cusp had a smooth surface in an unabraded region and a very rough structure with the magnetite crystals (already known to make part of the structure) protruding from the surface. It was concluded that the structures analyzed are optimized for efficiency in feeding mechanism and life span of the teeth.

  11. Micromechanical apparatus for measurement of forces

    DOEpatents

    Tanner, Danelle Mary; Allen, James Joe

    2004-05-25

    A new class of micromechanical dynamometers has been disclosed which are particularly suited to fabrication in parallel with other microelectromechanical apparatus. Forces in the microNewton regime and below can be measured with such dynamometers which are based on a high-compliance deflection element (e.g. a ring or annulus) suspended above a substrate for deflection by an applied force, and one or more distance scales for optically measuring the deflection.

  12. Instrument for measuring human biting force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopola, Harri K.; Mantyla, Olavi; Makiniemi, Matti; Mahonen, Kalevi; Virtanen, Kauko

    1995-02-01

    Alongside EMG activity, biting force is the primary parameter used for assessing the biting problems of dentulous patients and patients with dentures. In a highly conductive oral cavity, dielectric measurement methods are preferred, for safety reasons. The maximum biting force for patients with removable dentures is not more than 100 ... 300 N. We report here on an instrument developed for measuring human biting force which consists of three units: a mouthpiece, a signal processing and interface unit (SPI), and a PC. The mouthpiece comprises a sensor head of thickness 3.4 mm, width 20 mm and length 30 mm constructed of two stainless steel plates and with a fiber optic microbending sensor between them. This is connected to the SPI unit by a three-meter fiber optic cable, and the SPI unit to the PC by an RS connection. A computer program has been developed that includes measurement, display, zeroing, and calibration operations. The instrument measures biting force as a function of time and displays the time-dependent force profile and maximum force on a screen or plots it in hard copy. The dynamic measurement range of the mouthpiece is from 0 to 1000 N, and the resolution of the instrument is 10 N. The results of preliminary clinical measurements and repeatability tests are reported.

  13. High-resolution capacitance measurement and potentiometry by force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Yves; Abraham, David W.; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar

    1988-03-01

    We demonstrate the usefulness and high sensitivity of the atomic force microscope (AFM) for imaging surface dielectric properties and for potentiometry through the detection of electrostatic forces. Electric forces as small as 10-10 N have been measured, corresponding to a capacitance of 10-19 farad. The sensitivity of our AFM should ultimately allow us to detect capacitances as low as 8×10-22 F. The method enables us to detect the presence of dielectric material over Si, and to measure the voltage in a p-n junction with submicron spatial resolution.

  14. Force measurements in skinned muscle fibres

    PubMed Central

    Hellam, D. C.; Podolsky, R. J.

    1969-01-01

    1. Isometric force was measured in skinned segments of frog semitendinosus muscle fibres exposed to solutions in which the calcium ion concentration was controlled with EGTA. 2. The threshold for force development, calculated from an apparent stability constant for the CaEGTA complex of 106.69 M-1 at pH 7·0, was generally close to pCa 7·5. Maximum force was reached at about pCa 6·0. 3. Maximum force is proportional to the cross-sectional area of the fibres. 4. The rate of force development was slower than that expected from simple diffusion of a substance from the bathing solution into the fibre. The delay appears to be due to slow equilibration of the EGTA buffer system during calcium uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum. 5. Addition of deoxycholate (DOC) to the bathing solution produced a reversible increase in the rate of force development. The steady force was also increased for values of pCa that gave less than maximum force, which shifted the force—pCa relation toward lower calcium concentrations by about 0·5 pCa unit. 6. The length—force relation in partially activated preparations is similar to that reported for electrically activated intact fibres. This result suggests that in the region of myofilament overlap the affinity of the binding sites for calcium is uniform along the length of the calciumbinding myofilament. PMID:5765859

  15. Arctic Aerosol Surface-Column Partitioning and Radiative Forcing Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComiskey, A. C.; Creamean, J.; de Boer, G.; Stone, R. S.

    2016-12-01

    Due to rapid warming, the Arctic is moving toward a new state characterized by less sea ice and increasingly earlier snowmelt. Coupled with these changes in surface conditions, radiative forcing of aerosols, clouds, and variability in precipitation control vertical and horizontal heat exchange and atmospheric circulation patterns that further drive changes in air temperature. The role of aerosol in this complex and intricately coupled system is not well-known. Aerosols can impact radiative forcing and precipitation year-round in the Arctic through their modification of cloud properties, surface reflectivity, and attenuation of radiation in the otherwise clear atmosphere. The sources, properties, and distributions of aerosols that govern these impacts are in turn strongly dependent on surface cover and atmospheric circulation patterns. Most of our knowledge of Arctic aerosols comes from in situ measurements at the surface because they can be made continuously throughout the polar summer and winter. However, an examination of the differences in seasonal and inter-annual patterns of surface in situ and column aerosol extinction reveal significant differences that may alter our understanding of aerosol forcing, especially in their interactions with low clouds. Here we examine the persistent, seasonal differences in surface and column aerosol properties, inter-annual variability in these differences, likely drivers such as biomass burning events and changes in other dominant sources, and the radiative forcing implications as the surface and atmospheric state continues to change in the Arctic. Finally, we make an argument for the necessity of alternative aerosol observations such as lunar photometry and in situ measurements on unmanned aerial systems that fill the gaps in observations of column aerosol properties throughout the polar annual cycle.

  16. Fusion of intraoperative force sensoring, surface reconstruction and biomechanical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röhl, S.; Bodenstedt, S.; Küderle, C.; Suwelack, S.; Kenngott, H.; Müller-Stich, B. P.; Dillmann, R.; Speidel, S.

    2012-02-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is medically complex and can heavily benefit from computer assistance. One way to help the surgeon is to integrate preoperative planning data into the surgical workflow. This information can be represented as a customized preoperative model of the surgical site. To use it intraoperatively, it has to be updated during the intervention due to the constantly changing environment. Hence, intraoperative sensor data has to be acquired and registered with the preoperative model. Haptic information which could complement the visual sensor data is still not established. In addition, biomechanical modeling of the surgical site can help in reflecting the changes which cannot be captured by intraoperative sensors. We present a setting where a force sensor is integrated into a laparoscopic instrument. In a test scenario using a silicone liver phantom, we register the measured forces with a reconstructed surface model from stereo endoscopic images and a finite element model. The endoscope, the instrument and the liver phantom are tracked with a Polaris optical tracking system. By fusing this information, we can transfer the deformation onto the finite element model. The purpose of this setting is to demonstrate the principles needed and the methods developed for intraoperative sensor data fusion. One emphasis lies on the calibration of the force sensor with the instrument and first experiments with soft tissue. We also present our solution and first results concerning the integration of the force sensor as well as accuracy to the fusion of force measurements, surface reconstruction and biomechanical modeling.

  17. Probing surface adhesion forces of Enterococcus faecalis to medical-grade polymers using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sénéchal, Annie; Carrigan, Shawn D; Tabrizian, Maryam

    2004-05-11

    The aim of this study was to compare the initial adhesion forces of the uropathogen Enterococcus faecalis with the medical-grade polymers polyurethane (PU), polyamide (PA), and poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE). To quantify the cell-substrate adhesion forces, a method was developed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid that allows for the detachment of individual live cells from a polymeric surface through the application of increasing force using unmodified cantilever tips. Results show that the lateral force required to detach E. faecalis cells from a substrate differed depending on the nature of the polymeric surface: a force of 19 +/- 4 nN was required to detach cells from PU, 6 +/- 4 nN from PA, and 0.7 +/- 0.3 nN from PTFE. Among the unfluorinated polymers (PU and PA), surface wettability was inversely proportional to the strength of adhesion. AFM images also demonstrated qualitative differences in bacterial adhesion; PU was covered by clusters of cells with few cell singlets present, whereas PA was predominantly covered by individual cells. Moreover, extracellular material could be observed on some clusters of PU-adhered cells as well as in the adjacent region surrounding cells adhered on PA. E. faecalis adhesion to the fluorinated polymer (PTFE) showed different characteristics; only a few individual cells were found, and bacteria were easily damaged, and thus detached, by the tip. This work demonstrates the utility of AFM for measurement of cell-substrate lateral adhesion forces and the contribution these forces make toward understanding the initial stages of bacterial adhesion. Further, it suggests that initial adhesion can be controlled, through appropriate biomaterial design, to prevent subsequent formation of aggregates and biofilms.

  18. Measurement of tool forces in diamond turning

    SciTech Connect

    Drescher, J.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    A dynamometer has been designed and built to measure forces in diamond turning. The design includes a 3-component, piezoelectric transducer. Initial experiments with this dynamometer system included verification of its predicted dynamic characteristics as well as a detailed study of cutting parameters. Many cutting experiments have been conducted on OFHC Copper and 6061-T6 Aluminum. Tests have involved investigation of velocity effects, and the effects of depth and feedrate on tool forces. Velocity has been determined to have negligible effects between 4 and 21 m/s. Forces generally increase with increasing depth of cut. Increasing feedrate does not necessarily lead to higher forces. Results suggest that a simple model may not be sufficient to describe the forces produced in the diamond turning process.

  19. Surface energy budget responses to radiative forcing at Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Nathaniel B.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Cox, Christopher J.; Noone, David; Persson, P. Ola G.; Steffen, Konrad

    2017-02-01

    Greenland Ice Sheet surface temperatures are controlled by an exchange of energy at the surface, which includes radiative, turbulent, and ground heat fluxes. Data collected by multiple projects are leveraged to calculate all surface energy budget (SEB) terms at Summit, Greenland, for the full annual cycle from July 2013 to June 2014 and extend to longer periods for the radiative and turbulent SEB terms. Radiative fluxes are measured directly by a suite of broadband radiometers. Turbulent sensible heat flux is estimated via the bulk aerodynamic and eddy correlation methods, and the turbulent latent heat flux is calculated via a two-level approach using measurements at 10 and 2 m. The subsurface heat flux is calculated using a string of thermistors buried in the snow pack. Extensive quality-control data processing produced a data set in which all terms of the SEB are present 75 % of the full annual cycle, despite the harsh conditions. By including a storage term for a near-surface layer, the SEB is balanced in this data set to within the aggregated uncertainties for the individual terms. November and August case studies illustrate that surface radiative forcing is driven by synoptically forced cloud characteristics, especially by low-level, liquid-bearing clouds. The annual cycle and seasonal diurnal cycles of all SEB components indicate that the non-radiative terms are anticorrelated to changes in the total radiative flux and are hence responding to cloud radiative forcing. Generally, the non-radiative SEB terms and the upwelling longwave radiation component compensate for changes in downwelling radiation, although exact partitioning of energy in the response terms varies with season and near-surface characteristics such as stability and moisture availability. Substantial surface warming from low-level clouds typically leads to a change from a very stable to a weakly stable near-surface regime with no solar radiation or from a weakly stable to neutral

  20. Measurements of human force control during a constrained arm motion using a force-actuated joystick.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, J; Gurfinkel, E V; Lipshits, M I; Droulez, J; Gurfinkel, V S

    1995-03-01

    1. When interacting with the environment, human arm movements may be prevented in certain directions (i.e., when sliding the hand along a surface) resulting in what is called a "constrained motion." In the directions that the movement is restricted, the subject is instead free to control the forces against the constraint. 2. Control strategies for constrained motion may be characterized by two extreme models. Under the active compliance model, an essentially feedback-based approach, measurements of contact force may be used in real time to modify the motor command and precisely control the forces generated against the constraint. Under the passive compliance model the motion would be executed in a feedforward manner, using an internal model of the constraint geometry. The feedforward model relies on the compliant behavior of the passive mechanical system to maintain contact while avoiding excessive contact forces. 3. Subjects performed a task in which they were required to slide the hand along a rigid surface. This task was performed in a virtual force environment in which contact forces were simulated by a two-dimensional force-actuated joystick. Unknown to the subject, the orientation of the surface constraint was varied from trial to trial, and contact force changes induced by these perturbations were measured. 4. Subjects showed variations in contact force correlated with the direction of the orientation perturbation. "Upward" tilts resulted in higher contact forces, whereas "downward" tilts resulted in lower contact forces. This result is consistent with a feedforward-based control of a passively compliant system. 5. Subject responses did not, however, correspond exactly to the predictions of a static analysis of a passive, feedforward-controlled system. A dynamic analysis reveals a much closer resemblance between a passive, feedforward model and the observed data. Numerical simulations demonstrate that a passive, dynamic system model of the movement captures

  1. Flapping wing PIV and force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Benjamin H.

    Flapping wing aerodynamics has been of interest to engineers recently due in part to the DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) MAV (Micro-Aerial Vehicle) initiative. MAVs are small unmanned aerial vehicles with length scales similar to birds and insects. Flapping wing MAVs would serve as mobile and stealthy sensing platforms capable of gathering intelligence in hazardous and physically inaccessible locations. Traditional means of lift and thrust generation become inefficient when scaled to these sizes, therefore a flapping wing propulsion system will be necessary. The design of a flapping wing MAV requires the ability to measure forces and velocities around the wing. Three components of velocity were measured in the wake of a two dimensional (2D) flapping airfoil model using a novel application of stereoscopic DPIV (Digital Particle Image Velocimetry). One component of force was measured using a newly proposed method outlined in the dissertation. The force measurement technique relies on a specific sequence of data acquisition, which has the benefit of reducing measurement uncertainty and noise. No experiments of this type have been conducted, and no direct aerodynamic force data exists for the low Reynolds numbers applicable to flapping wing MAVs. The well-established stereoscopic DPIV technique produces relatively low uncertainties while the new force measurement technique has not been previously tested. Theoretical analysis and experimental results show that aerodynamic forces are attainable for chord Reynolds numbers as low as 1,000, which is significantly lower than previous studies. PIV measurements reveal symmetric and asymmetric wake topologies for a NACA 0012 and flat plate airfoil. A sinusoidally heaving flat plate airfoil produces highly deflected wakes for a wider range of flapping conditions than a NACA 0012 airfoil. Deflected wakes are of potentially interest since both lift and thrust components of force are developed. The flat plate also

  2. Electronegativity determination of individual surface atoms by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoda, Jo; Ondráček, Martin; Jelínek, Pavel; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki

    2017-04-01

    Electronegativity is a fundamental concept in chemistry. Despite its importance, the experimental determination has been limited only to ensemble-averaged techniques. Here, we report a methodology to evaluate the electronegativity of individual surface atoms by atomic force microscopy. By measuring bond energies on the surface atoms using different tips, we find characteristic linear relations between the bond energies of different chemical species. We show that the linear relation can be rationalized by Pauling's equation for polar covalent bonds. This opens the possibility to characterize the electronegativity of individual surface atoms. Moreover, we demonstrate that the method is sensitive to variation of the electronegativity of given atomic species on a surface due to different chemical environments. Our findings open up ways of analysing surface chemical reactivity at the atomic scale.

  3. Electronegativity determination of individual surface atoms by atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Onoda, Jo; Ondráček, Martin; Jelínek, Pavel; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-01

    Electronegativity is a fundamental concept in chemistry. Despite its importance, the experimental determination has been limited only to ensemble-averaged techniques. Here, we report a methodology to evaluate the electronegativity of individual surface atoms by atomic force microscopy. By measuring bond energies on the surface atoms using different tips, we find characteristic linear relations between the bond energies of different chemical species. We show that the linear relation can be rationalized by Pauling's equation for polar covalent bonds. This opens the possibility to characterize the electronegativity of individual surface atoms. Moreover, we demonstrate that the method is sensitive to variation of the electronegativity of given atomic species on a surface due to different chemical environments. Our findings open up ways of analysing surface chemical reactivity at the atomic scale. PMID:28443645

  4. Electronegativity determination of individual surface atoms by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Jo; Ondráček, Martin; Jelínek, Pavel; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki

    2017-04-26

    Electronegativity is a fundamental concept in chemistry. Despite its importance, the experimental determination has been limited only to ensemble-averaged techniques. Here, we report a methodology to evaluate the electronegativity of individual surface atoms by atomic force microscopy. By measuring bond energies on the surface atoms using different tips, we find characteristic linear relations between the bond energies of different chemical species. We show that the linear relation can be rationalized by Pauling's equation for polar covalent bonds. This opens the possibility to characterize the electronegativity of individual surface atoms. Moreover, we demonstrate that the method is sensitive to variation of the electronegativity of given atomic species on a surface due to different chemical environments. Our findings open up ways of analysing surface chemical reactivity at the atomic scale.

  5. The Kilogram and Measurements of Mass and Force

    PubMed Central

    Jabbour, Z. J.; Yaniv, S. L.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the facilities, measurement capabilities, and ongoing research activities in the areas of mass and force at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The first section of the paper is devoted to mass metrology and starts with a brief historical perspective on the developments that led to the current definition of the kilogram. An overview of mass measurement procedures is given with a brief discussion of current research on alternative materials for mass standards and surface profiles of the U.S. national prototype kilograms. A brief outlook into the future possible redefinition of the unit of mass based on fundamental principles is included. The second part of this paper focuses on the unit of force and describes the realization of the unit, measurement procedures, uncertainty in the realized force, facilities, and current efforts aimed at the realization of small forces. PMID:27500016

  6. Armor Plate Surface Roughness Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    Armor Plate Surface Roughness Measurements by Brian Stanton, William Coburn, and Thomas J. Pizzillo ARL-TR-3498 April 2005... Armor Plate Surface Roughness Measurements Brian Stanton, William Coburn and Thomas J. Pizzillo Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate...October 2004 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Armor Plate Surface Roughness Measurements 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  7. A force plate system for measuring low-magnitude reaction forces in small laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Handley, D E; Ross, J F; Carr, G J

    1998-07-01

    We present a force plate system which measures low-magnitude vertical reaction forces generated by small laboratory animals. The force plate mechanical design minimizes radiated transverse waves, acoustic reverberation, and standing waves caused by impacts on the force plate surface. A secondary force plate and PC-based software algorithm minimize floor vibrational artifact. The force plate was used to measure function of rats during two tests: forelimb/hindlimb hopping reaction and surface righting reaction. In control rats, forelimb hopping rate exceeded hindlimb hopping rate during 16 weeks of repeated testing. Subchronic intraperitoneal (i.p.) dosing of 10 mg/kg/day acrylamide produced a selective impairment of hindlimb hopping. In contrast, single doses of haloperidol (1-5 mg/kg, i.p.) slowed the righting reaction and produced a relatively selective impairment of forelimb hopping. The force plate system presents new opportunities for performing quantitative neurological assessments of small laboratory animals when previously such tests had been performed subjectively and qualitatively.

  8. Hydrodynamic boundary conditions and dynamic forces between bubbles and surfaces.

    PubMed

    Manor, Ofer; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Tang, Xiaosong; O'Shea, Sean J; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Grieser, Franz; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C

    2008-07-11

    Dynamic forces between a 50 microm radius bubble driven towards and from a mica plate using an atomic force microscope in electrolyte and in surfactant exhibit different hydrodynamic boundary conditions at the bubble surface. In added surfactant, the forces are consistent with the no-slip boundary condition at the mica and bubble surfaces. With no surfactant, a new boundary condition that accounts for the transport of trace surface impurities explains variations of dynamic forces at different speeds and provides a direct connection between dynamic forces and surface transport effects at the air-water interface.

  9. Hydrodynamic Boundary Conditions and Dynamic Forces between Bubbles and Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manor, Ofer; Vakarelski, Ivan U.; Tang, Xiaosong; O'Shea, Sean J.; Stevens, Geoffrey W.; Grieser, Franz; Dagastine, Raymond R.; Chan, Derek Y. C.

    2008-07-01

    Dynamic forces between a 50μm radius bubble driven towards and from a mica plate using an atomic force microscope in electrolyte and in surfactant exhibit different hydrodynamic boundary conditions at the bubble surface. In added surfactant, the forces are consistent with the no-slip boundary condition at the mica and bubble surfaces. With no surfactant, a new boundary condition that accounts for the transport of trace surface impurities explains variations of dynamic forces at different speeds and provides a direct connection between dynamic forces and surface transport effects at the air-water interface.

  10. Surface texture generation during cylindrical milling in the aspect of cutting force variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojciechowski, S.; Twardowski, P.; Pelic, M.

    2014-03-01

    The work presented here concentrates on surface texture analysis, after cylindrical milling of hardened steel. Cutting force variations occurring in the machining process have direct influence on the cutter displacements and thus on the generated surface texture. Therefore, in these experiments, the influence of active number of teeth (zc) on the cutting force variations was investigated. Cutting forces and cutter displacements were measured during machining process (online) using, namely piezoelectric force dynamometer and 3D laser vibrometer. Surface roughness parameters were measured using stylus surface profiler. The surface roughness model including cutting parameters (fz, D) and cutting force variations was also developed. The research revealed that in cylindrical milling process, cutting force variations have immediate influence on surface texture generation.

  11. Does an instrumented treadmill correctly measure the ground reaction forces?

    PubMed Central

    Willems, Patrick A.; Gosseye, Thierry P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Since the 1990s, treadmills have been equipped with multi-axis force transducers to measure the three components of the ground reaction forces during walking and running. These measurements are correctly performed if the whole treadmill (including the motor) is mounted on the transducers. In this case, the acceleration of the treadmill centre of mass relative to the reference frame of the laboratory is nil. The external forces exerted on one side of the treadmill are thus equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the external forces exerted on the other side. However, uncertainty exists about the accuracy of these measures: due to friction between the belt and the tread-surface, due to the motor pulling the belt, some believe that it is not possible to correctly measure the horizontal components of the forces exerted by the feet on the belt. Here, we propose a simple model of an instrumented treadmill and we demonstrate (1) that the forces exerted by the subject moving on the upper part of the treadmill are accurately transmitted to the transducers placed under it and (2) that all internal forces – including friction – between the parts of the treadmill are cancelling each other. PMID:24285705

  12. Measuring the Drag Force on a Falling Ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod; Lindsey, Crawford

    2014-03-01

    The effect of the aerodynamic drag force on an object in flight is well known and has been described in this and other journals many times. At speeds less than about 1 m/s, the drag force on a sphere is proportional to the speed and is given by Stokes' law. At higher speeds, the drag force is proportional to the velocity squared and is usually small compared with the gravitational force if the object mass is large and its speed is low. In order to observe a significant effect, or to measure the terminal velocity, experiments are often conducted with very light objects such as a balloon or coffee filter3 or muffin cup,4 or are conducted in a liquid rather than in air. The effect of the drag force can also be increased by increasing the surface area of the object.

  13. Friction of ice measured using lateral force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bluhm, Hendrik; Inoue, Takahito; Salmeron, Miquel

    2000-03-15

    The friction of nanometer thin ice films grown on mica substrates is investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Friction was found to be of similar magnitude as the static friction of ice reported in macroscopic experiments. The possible existence of a lubricating film of water due to pressure melting, frictional heating, and surface premelting is discussed based on the experimental results using noncontact, contact, and lateral force microscopy. We conclude that AFM measures the dry friction of ice due to the low scan speed and the squeezing out of the water layer between the sharp AFM tip and the ice surface. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  14. Effect of gold oxide in measurements of colloidal force.

    PubMed

    Tabor, Rico F; Morfa, Anthony J; Grieser, Franz; Chan, Derek Y C; Dagastine, Raymond R

    2011-05-17

    Atomic force microscopy, contact-angle, and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements were employed to investigate the presence and properties of gold oxide on the surface of gold metal. It was found that, in agreement with available literature, unoxidized gold surfaces were hydrophobic, whereas oxidation rendered the surface highly hydrophilic. The oxide could be removed with ethanol or base but appeared to be stable over long periods in water or salt solutions between pH 3 and 7. After oxidation, the oxide layer thickness, determined using ellipsometry, was consistent with an approximate monolayer of Au-O bonds at the gold surface. The presence of gold oxide was found to alter significantly the electrical double-layer characteristics of the gold surface below pH 6 and may explain the apparent inconsistencies in observed force behavior where gold is employed as well as aiding in design of future microfluidic systems which incorporate gold as a coating.

  15. Temporomandibular joint forces measured at the condyle of Macaca arctoides.

    PubMed

    Boyd, R L; Gibbs, C H; Mahan, P E; Richmond, A F; Laskin, J L

    1990-06-01

    Forces were measured at the articular surface of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condyle in two stump-tail monkeys (Macaca arctoides) during chewing, incisal biting, and drinking and also during aggressive behaviors. Force was measured with a thin piezoelectric foil transducer, which was cemented over the anterior and superior surfaces of the condyle. Wires from the upper and lower surfaces of the foil were insulated between two layers of Teflon tape and run subcutaneously to a telemetry unit, which was implanted in the upper back. Force applied across the foil by the condyle was detected by the telemetry unit and transmitted to an FM radio receiver outside the animal. The FM signals were received and demodulated, and a signal proportional to the force applied between the condyle and the TMJ fossa was displayed on a chart recorder. Data were collected over an 8-day period. The animals were not constrained. The TMJ was found to be load bearing. The greatest force of 39.0 lb (17.7 kg) was measured during feisty vocal aggression. Forces ranged as high as 34.5 lb (15.7 kg) during chewing and 28.5 lb (13.0 kg) during incisal biting. Forces were greater on the working (food) side than on the nonworking (balancing) side by average ratios of 1.4 to 2.6. A large unilateral interference at the most distal molar greatly disturbed chewing. It reduced TMJ forces by 50% or more, and the monkey refused to chew on the side opposite the interference.

  16. Forced and Moment Measurements with Pressure-Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, James H.

    1999-01-01

    The potential of pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) to provide aerodynamic loads measurements has been a driving force behind the development of this measurement technique. To demonstrate the suitability of PSP for this purpose, it is necessary to show that PSP-derived pressures can be accurately integrated over the model surface. This cannot be done simply by demonstrating the accuracy of PSP as compared to pressure taps. PSP errors due to misregistration or temperature sensitivity may be high near model edges, where they will have a strong effect on moment measurements, but where pressure taps are rarely installed. A more suitable technique is to compare integrated PSP data over the entire model surface with balance and/or CFD results. This paper presents results from three experiments in which integrated PSP data is compared with balance and/or CFD data. This allows the usefulness of PSP for force and moment measurements, and by implication for loads measurements, to be assessed.

  17. Critical Casimir forces between homogeneous and chemically striped surfaces.

    PubMed

    Parisen Toldin, Francesco; Tröndle, Matthias; Dietrich, S

    2013-11-01

    Recent experiments have measured the critical Casimir force acting on a colloid immersed in a binary liquid mixture near its continuous demixing phase transition and exposed to a chemically structured substrate. Motivated by these experiments, we study the critical behavior of a system, which belongs to the Ising universality class, for the film geometry with one planar wall chemically striped, such that there is a laterally alternating adsorption preference for the two species of the binary liquid mixture, which is implemented by surface fields. For the opposite wall we employ alternatively a homogeneous adsorption preference or homogeneous Dirichlet boundary conditions, which within a lattice model are realized by open boundary conditions. By means of mean-field theory, Monte Carlo simulations, and finite-size scaling analysis we determine the critical Casimir force acting on the two parallel walls and its corresponding universal scaling function. We show that in the limit of stripe widths small compared with the film thickness, on the striped surface the system effectively realizes Dirichlet boundary conditions, which generically do not hold for actual fluids. Moreover, the critical Casimir force is found to be attractive or repulsive, depending on the width of the stripes of the chemically patterned surface and on the boundary condition applied to the opposing surface.

  18. Measurement systems for cell adhesive forces.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dennis W; García, Andrés J

    2015-02-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) involves integrin receptor-ligand binding and clustering to form focal adhesion (FA) complexes, which mechanically link the cell's cytoskeleton to the ECM and regulate fundamental cell signaling pathways. Although elucidation of the biochemical events in cell-matrix adhesive interactions is rapidly advancing, recent studies show that the forces underlying cell-matrix adhesive interactions are also critical to cell responses. Therefore, multiple measurement systems have been developed to quantify the spatial and temporal dynamics of cell adhesive forces, and these systems have identified how mechanical events influence cell phenotype and FA structure-function relationships under physiological and pathological settings. This review focuses on the development, methodology, and applications of measurement systems for probing (a) cell adhesion strength and (b) 2D and 3D cell traction forces.

  19. Intermodulation electrostatic force microscopy for imaging surface photo-voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Borgani, Riccardo Forchheimer, Daniel; Thorén, Per-Anders; Haviland, David B.; Bergqvist, Jonas; Inganäs, Olle

    2014-10-06

    We demonstrate an alternative to Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy for imaging surface potential. The open-loop, single-pass technique applies a low-frequency AC voltage to the atomic force microscopy tip while driving the cantilever near its resonance frequency. Frequency mixing due to the nonlinear capacitance gives intermodulation products of the two drive frequencies near the cantilever resonance, where they are measured with high signal to noise ratio. Analysis of this intermodulation response allows for quantitative reconstruction of the contact potential difference. We derive the theory of the method, validate it with numerical simulation and a control experiment, and we demonstrate its utility for fast imaging of the surface photo-voltage on an organic photo-voltaic material.

  20. Atomic force microscopic observation of surface-supported human erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Mon-Shu; Kuo, Feng-Jia; Lee, Yu-Siang; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2007-07-01

    The nanomechanical characteristics of the membrane cytoskeleton of human erythrocytes were studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The self-assembly, fine structure, cell diameter, thickness, and reticulate cytoskeleton of erythrocytes on the mica surface were investigated. The adhesive forces that correspond to the membrane elasticity of various parts of the erythrocyte membrane surface were measured directly by AFM to be 0.64±0.14nN for cell indentation, 4.2±0.7nN for cell hump, and 11.5nN for side waist, respectively. The deformation of erythrocytes was discussed. Standing waves on the membrane that were set up by increased AFM amplitude were observed. The propagating velocity on the erythrocyte membrane was estimated to be ˜2.02×10-2m/s. Liquid physiological conditions were considered throughout.

  1. Direct Aerosol Radiative Forcing: Calculations and Measurements from the Tropospheric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, P. B.; Hignett, P.; Stowe, L. L.; Livingston, J. M.; Kinne, S.; Wong, J.; Chan, K. Roland (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Radiative forcing is defined as the change in the net (downwelling minus upwelling) radiative flux at a given level in the atmosphere. This net flux is the radiative power density available to drive climatic processes in the earth-atmosphere system below that level. Recent research shows that radiative forcing by aerosol particles is a major source of uncertainty in climate predictions. To reduce those uncertainties, TARFOX was designed to determine direct (cloud-free) radiative forcing by the aerosols in one of the world's major industrial pollution plumes--that flowing from the east coast of the US over the Atlantic Ocean. TARFOX measured a variety of aerosol radiative effects (including direct forcing) while simultaneously measuring the chemical, physical, and optical properties of the aerosol particles causing those effects. The resulting data sets permit a wide variety of tests of the consistency, or closure, among the measurements and the models that link them. Because climate predictions use the same or similar model components, closure tests help to assess and reduce prediction uncertainties. In this work we use the TARFOX-determined aerosol, gas, and surface properties to compute radiative forcing for a variety of aerosol episodes, with inadvisable optical depths ranging from 0.07 to 0.6. We calculate forcing by several techniques with varying degrees of sophistication, in part to test the range of applicability of simplified techniques--which are often the only ones feasible in climate predictions by general circulation models (GCMs). We then compare computed forcing to that determined from: (1) Upwelling and downwelling fluxes (0.3-0.7 mm and 0.7-3.0 mm) measured by radiometers on the UK MRF C-130. and (2) Daily average cloud-free absorbed solar and emitted thermal radiative flux at the top of the atmosphere derived from the AVHRR radiometer on the NOAA- 14 satellite. The calculations and measurements all yield aerosol direct radiative forcing in the

  2. Quantitative surface parameter maps using Intermodulation Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forchheimer, Daniel; Platz, Daniel; Tholén, Erik; Hutter, Carsten; Haviland, David

    2011-03-01

    It is well known that the phase image in amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) is sensitive to material properties of the surface. However that information is not enough to fully quantify the tip-surface interaction. We have developed Intermodulation AFM, based on a spectral analysis of the cantilever's nonlinear dynamics, which increases the amount of information obtained without increasing scan time. We show how it is possible to extract quantitative material properties of the surface from this additional information. The method works under the assumption of a tip-surface force model, such as the DMT model, fitting the model parameters to the measured spectral data. The parameters are obtained at each pixel of the AFM image and form surface property maps which can be displayed together with topography. We demonstrate this on different surfaces such as polymer blends, extracting stiffness and adhesive properties. D. Platz, E. A. Tholen, D. Pesen, and D. B. Haviland, Appl. Phys. Lett., 92, 153106 (2008)

  3. [Influence of surface roughness on oral streptococcal adhesion forces to dental filling materials].

    PubMed

    Sainan, Zheng; Li, Jiang; Lei, Zhang; Liying, Hao; Lu, Ye; Wei, Li

    2016-10-01

    This study is to determine the common oral streptococcal adhesion forces by using composite resin and glass ionomer cement (GIC) with different degrees of surface roughness via atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis. The influence of surface roughness on bacterial adhesion force is also discussed. Polishing and grinding were applied to obtain 300, 200, 100, and 10 nm surfaces of light-cured composite resin and GIC samples. Surface topography was assessed by AFM analysis. Initial colonizers (Streptococcus sanguinis and Streptococcus mitis) and cariogenic bacterial strains (Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus) were used to obtain bacteria-modified AFM probes. The force-distance curves were also measured by AFM analysis to determine the adhesion forces of bacteria on the surfaces of the composite resin and GIC. Material surface roughness was analyzed using ANOVA, and adhesion forces were subjected to nonparametric analysis (Kruskal-Wallis test). Comparison among groups was performed by Dunn's test. Material surface roughness and bacterial adhesion forces were subjected to correlation analysis. Bacterial adhesion forces increased with increasing material roughness. The adhesion forces of the four bacterial species reached the maximum on the material surface of 300 nm. The adhesion force of Streptococcus mutans increased from 0.578 nN to 2.876 nN on GIC surfaces with 10 and 300 nm roughness. The adhesion forces of the four species on the surface of the composite resin were stronger than that of GIC. The initial colonizers exhibited stronger adhesion forces to different materials than the cariogenic strains. Intergroup differences were evident on the 200 and 300 nm material surfaces. The surface roughness of the material significantly affected the bacterial adhesion forces, and a significant linear correlation existed between both factors. The bacterial adhesion forces of the GIC were lower than that of the composite resin. Furthermore, surface roughness

  4. Sublattice identification in noncontact atomic force microscopy of the NaCl(001) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, R.; Weiner, D.; Schirmeisen, A.; Foster, A. S.

    2009-09-15

    We compare the three-dimensional force field obtained from frequency-distance measurements above the NaCl(001) surface to atomistic calculations using various tip models. In the experiments, long-range forces cause a total attractive force even on the similarly charged site. Taking force differences between two sites minimizes the influence of such long-range forces. The magnitude of the measured force differences are by a factor of 6.5-10 smaller than the calculated forces. This is an indication that for the particular tip used in this experiment several atoms of the tip interact with the surface atoms at close tip-sample distances. The interaction of these additional atoms with the surface is small at the imaging distance, because symmetric images are obtained. The force distance characteristics resemble those of a negative tip apex ion which could be explained, e.g., by a neutral Si tip.

  5. Quantitative evaluation of interaction force of fibrinogen at well-defined surfaces with various structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weixin; Inoue, Yuuki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The effects of functional groups and structures at the surface of biomaterials on protein adsorption were examined using direct interaction force measurements. Three kinds of surface structures were evaluated: polymer brushes, self-assembled monolayers with low molecular weight compounds, and surfaces with conventional polymer coatings. These surfaces had various functional groups including phosphorylcholine (PC) group. The surface characterization demonstrated that surface wettability and flexibility depended on both the structure of the surface and the functional groups at the surface. The interactions of protein with these surfaces were evaluated by a force vs. distance curve using an atomic force microscope (AFM). We used fibrinogen as the protein, and the fibrinogen was immobilized on the surface of the AFM cantilever by a conventional technique. It was observed that the interaction force of fibrinogen was strongly related to surface hydrophobic nature and flexibility. That is, the interaction force increased with the increasing hydrophobic nature of the surface. The relationship between the amount of fibrinogen adsorbed on the surface and the interaction force showed good correlation in the range of fibrinogen adsorption from 0 to 250 ng/cm(2), that is, in a monolayered adsorption region. The interaction force decreased with increasing surface viscoelasticity. The most effective surface for preventing fibrinogen adsorption was the polymer brush surface with phosphorylcholine (PC) groups, that is, poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) brush. The interaction force of this sample was less than 0.1 nN and the amount of fibrinogen adsorbed on the surface was minimal. It was found that the evaluation of protein adsorption based on the interaction force measurement is useful for low-protein adsorption surfaces. It was demonstrated that an extremely hydrophilic and flexible surface could weaken the protein interactions at the surface, resulting in

  6. A MEMS sensor for microscale force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majcherek, S.; Aman, A.; Fochtmann, J.

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of a new MEMS-based sensor device for microscale contact force measurements. A special MEMS cell was developed to reach higher lateral resolution than common steel-based load cells with foil-type strain gauges as mechanical-electrical converters. The design provided more than one normal force measurement point with spatial resolution in submillimeter range. Specific geometric adaption of the MEMS-device allowed adjustability of its measurement range between 0.5 and 5 N. The thin film nickel-chromium piezo resistors were used to achieve a mechanical-electrical conversion. The production process was realized by established silicon processing technologies such as deep reactive ion etching and vapor deposition (sputtering). The sensor was tested in two steps. Firstly, the sensor characteristics were carried out by application of defined loads at the measurement points by a push-pull tester. As a result, the sensor showed linear behavior. A measurement system analysis (MSA1) was performed to define the reliability of the measurement system. The measured force values had the maximal relative deviation of 1% to average value of 1.97 N. Secondly, the sensor was tested under near-industrial conditions. In this context, the thermal induced relaxation behavior of the electrical connector contact springs was investigated. The handling of emerging problems during the characterization process of the sensor is also described.

  7. Simplified fundamental force and mass measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, I. A.

    2016-08-01

    The watt balance relates force or mass to the Planck constant h, the metre and the second. It enables the forthcoming redefinition of the unit of mass within the SI by measuring the Planck constant in terms of mass, length and time with an uncertainty of better than 2 parts in 108. To achieve this, existing watt balances require complex and time-consuming alignment adjustments limiting their use to a few national metrology laboratories. This paper describes a simplified construction and operating principle for a watt balance which eliminates the need for the majority of these adjustments and is readily scalable using either electromagnetic or electrostatic actuators. It is hoped that this will encourage the more widespread use of the technique for a wide range of measurements of force or mass. For example: thrust measurements for space applications which would require only measurements of electrical quantities and velocity/displacement.

  8. Interface corrective force measurements in Boston brace treatment.

    PubMed

    van den Hout, J A A M; van Rhijn, L W; van den Munckhof, R J H; van Ooy, A

    2002-08-01

    Brace application has been reported to be effective in treating idiopathic adolescent scoliosis. The exact working mechanism of a thoracolumbo spinal orthosis is a result of different mechanisms and is not completely understood. One of the supposed working mechanisms is a direct compressive force working through the brace upon the body and thereby correcting the scoliotic deformity, achieving optimal fit of the individual orthosis. In this study we measured these direct forces exerted by the pads in a Boston brace in 16 patients with idiopathic adolescent scoliosis, using the electronic PEDAR measuring device (Novel, Munich, Germany). This is designed as an in-shoe measuring system consisting of two shoe insoles (size 8 1/2), wired to a computer, recording static and dynamic pressure distribution under the plantar surface of the foot. After positioning the inserts between the lumbar and thoracic pads and the body, we measured the forces acting upon the body in eight different postures. In all positions the mean corrective force through the lumbar brace pad was larger than the mean corrective force over the thoracic brace pad. Some changes in body posture resulted in statistically significant alterations in the exerted forces. There was no significant correlation between the magnitude of the compressive force over the lumbar and thoracic brace-pad and the degree of correction of the major curve. Comparing the corrective forces in a relatively new (<6 months) and old (>6 months) brace, there was no statistically relevant difference, although the corrective force was slightly larger in the new braces. We think that the use of this pressure measurement device is practicable and of value for studies of the working mechanism of brace treatment, and in the future it might be of help in achieving optimal fit of the individual orthosis.

  9. Surface roughness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Thomas G.

    1994-10-01

    The Optics Division is currently in the research phase of producing grazing-incidence mirrors to be used in x-ray detector applications. The traditional method of construction involves labor-intensive glass grinding. This also culminates in a relatively heavy mirror. For lower resolution applications, the mirrors may be of a replicated design which involves milling a mandrel as a negative of the final shape and electroplating the cylindrical mirror onto it. The mirror is then separated from the mandrel by cooling. The mandrel will shrink more than the 'shell' (mirror) allowing it to be pulled from the mandrel. Ulmer (2) describes this technique and its variations in more detail. To date, several mirrors have been tested at MSFC by the Optical Fabrication Branch by focusing x-ray energy onto a detector with limited success. Little is known about the surface roughness of the actual mirror. Hence, the attempt to gather data on these surfaces. The test involves profiling the surface of a sample, replicating the surface as described above, and then profiling the replicated surface.

  10. Interaction forces between asphaltene surfaces in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengqun; Liu, Jianjun; Zhang, Liyan; Masliyah, Jacob; Xu, Zhenghe

    2010-01-05

    The colloidal interactions between asphaltene surfaces in heptol, a mixture of n-heptane and toluene, were studied for the first time by colloidal force measurements using an atomic force microscope (AFM). Asphaltenes were deposited on silica wafers and silica spheres using the Langmuir-Blodgett upstroke technique. The results showed that the ratio of toluene to heptane can significantly change solvent quality in terms of the ability to solubilize asphaltenes and hence the nature and the magnitude of the interaction forces between asphaltene surfaces. In pure toluene, there is a steric long-range repulsion which can be well fitted by the scaling theory of polymer brushes. As toluene volume fraction in heptol (Phi(T)) is gradually decreased from Phi(T) = 1 (pure toluene) to Phi(T) = 0 (pure n-heptane), the steric repulsion reduced and changed to weak attraction when Phi(T) < 0.2. The attraction in heptane can be fitted by van der Waals forces alone which are thus believed to promote asphaltene aggregation, leading to asphaltene precipitation. The results obtained in this study provide an insight into interactions that determine asphaltene behavior in an organic medium and hence in crude oils.

  11. Measurement methods in atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Torre, Bruno; Canale, Claudio; Ricci, Davide; Braga, Pier Carlo

    2011-01-01

    This chapter is introductory to the measurements: it explains different measurement techniques both for imaging and for force spectroscopy, on which most of the AFM experiments rely. It gives a general overview of the different techniques and of the output expected from the instrument; therefore it is, at a basic level, a good tool to properly start a new experiment. Concepts introduced in this chapter give the base for understanding the applications shown in the following chapters. Subheading 1 introduces the distinction between spectroscopy and imaging experiments and, within the last ones, between DC and AC mode. Subheading 2 is focused on DC mode (contact), explaining the topography and the lateral force channel. Subheading 3 introduces AC mode, both in noncontact and intermittent contact case. Phase imaging and force modulation are also discussed. Subheading 4 explains how the AFM can be used to measure local mechanical and adhesive properties of specimens by means of force spectroscopy technique. An overview on the state of the art and future trends in this field is also given.

  12. Casimir Force on a Surface with Shallow Nanoscale Corrugations: Geometry and Finite Conductivity Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Y.; Guerout, R.; Lussange, J.; Lambrecht, A.; Cirelli, R. A.; Klemens, F.; Mansfield, W. M.; Pai, C. S.; Chan, H. B.

    2010-12-17

    We measure the Casimir force between a gold sphere and a silicon plate with nanoscale, rectangular corrugations with a depth comparable to the separation between the surfaces. In the proximity force approximation (PFA), both the top and bottom surfaces of the corrugations contribute to the force, leading to a distance dependence that is distinct from a flat surface. The measured Casimir force is found to deviate from the PFA by up to 10%, in good agreement with calculations based on scattering theory that includes both geometry effects and the optical properties of the material.

  13. Trends of Measured Climate Forcing Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, James E.; Sato, Makiko; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The growth rate of climate forcing by measured greenhouse gases peaked near 1980 at almost 5 W/sq m per century. This growth rate has since declined to approximately equal to 3 W/sq m per century, largely because of cooperative international actions. We argue that trends can be reduced to the level needed for the moderate "alternative" climate scenario (approximately equal to 2 W/M2 per century for the next 50 years) by means of concerted actions that have other benefits, but the forcing reductions are not automatic "co-benefits" of actions that slow CO2 emissions. Current trends of climate forcings by aerosols remain very uncertain. Nevertheless, practical constraints on changes in emission levels suggest that global warming at a rate + 0.15 +/- 0.05 C per decade will occur over the next several decades.

  14. Motion recognition from contact force measurement.

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Takumi; Venture, Gentiane

    2013-01-01

    Optical motion capture systems, which are used in broad fields of research, are costly; they need large installation space and calibrations. We find difficulty in applying it in typical homes and care centers. Therefore we propose to use low cost contact force measurement systems to develop rehabilitation and healthcare monitoring tools. Here, we propose a novel algorithm for motion recognition using the feature vector from force data solely obtained during a daily exercise program. We recognized 7 types of movement (Radio Exercises) of two candidates (mean age 22, male). The results show that the recognition rate of each motion has high score (mean: 86.9%). The results also confirm that there is a clustering of each movement in personal exercises data, and a similarity of the clustering even for different candidates thus that motion recognition is possible using contact force data.

  15. Surface roughness model based on force sensors for the prediction of the tool wear.

    PubMed

    de Agustina, Beatriz; Rubio, Eva María; Sebastián, Miguel Ángel

    2014-04-04

    In this study, a methodology has been developed with the objective of evaluating the surface roughness obtained during turning processes by measuring the signals detected by a force sensor under the same cutting conditions. In this way, the surface quality achieved along the process is correlated to several parameters of the cutting forces (thrust forces, feed forces and cutting forces), so the effect that the tool wear causes on the surface roughness is evaluated. In a first step, the best cutting conditions (cutting parameters and radius of tool) for a certain quality surface requirement were found for pieces of UNS A97075. Next, with this selection a model of surface roughness based on the cutting forces was developed for different states of wear that simulate the behaviour of the tool throughout its life. The validation of this model reveals that it was effective for approximately 70% of the surface roughness values obtained.

  16. The extended surface forces apparatus. IV. Precision static pressure control.

    PubMed

    Schurtenberger, E; Heuberger, M

    2011-10-01

    We report on design and performance of an extended surface forces apparatus (eSFA) built into a pressurized system. The aim of this instrument is to provide control over static pressure and temperature to facilitate direct surface force experiments in equilibrium with fluids at different loci of their phase diagram. We built an autoclave that can bear a miniature eSFA. To avoid mechanical or electrical feedtroughs the miniature apparatus uses an external surface coarse approach stage under ambient conditions. The surface separation is thus pre-adjusted to approximately ~3 μm before sliding the apparatus into the autoclave. Inside the autoclave, the surface separation can be further controlled with a magnetic drive at sub-Ångstrom precision over a 14 μm range. The autoclave pressure can then be set and maintained between 20 mbar and 170 bars with few mbar precision. The autoclave is connected to a specially designed pressurization system to precondition the fluids. The temperature can be controlled between -20 and 60 °C with few mK precision. We demonstrate the operation of the instrument in the case of gaseous or liquid carbon dioxide. Thanks to a consequent decoupling of the eSFA mechanical loop from the autoclave structure, the obtained measurement stability and reproducibility, at elevated pressures, is comparable to the one established for the conventional eSFA, operated under ambient conditions.

  17. Surface temperature measurement errors

    SciTech Connect

    Keltner, N.R.; Beck, J.V.

    1983-05-01

    Mathematical models are developed for the response of surface mounted thermocouples on a thick wall. These models account for the significant causes of errors in both the transient and steady-state response to changes in the wall temperature. In many cases, closed form analytical expressions are given for the response. The cases for which analytical expressions are not obtained can be easily evaluated on a programmable calculator or a small computer.

  18. Analysis of intraocular lens surface adhesiveness by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lombardo, Marco; Carbone, Giovanni; Lombardo, Giuseppe; De Santo, Maria P; Barberi, Riccardo

    2009-07-01

    To analyze intraocular lens (IOL) optic surface adhesiveness using atomic force microscopy (AFM). LiCryL Laboratory, University of Calabria, Rende, Italy. The surface adhesive properties of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), silicone, hydrophilic acrylic, and hydrophobic acrylic IOLs were evaluated by AFM. Analysis was performed at room temperature (21 degrees C) in a liquid environment using the force-versus-distance mode of a commercial instrument (NanoScope III). Measurements were acquired with rectangular silicon cantilevers of a nominal elastic constant of 10 Newton/m. The nominal value of the tip's radius of curvature was 1 mum, and the scanning speed during the acquisitions ranged from 10 to 400 nm/s. The adhesion force measurements showed different characteristics for the various types of IOLs (P<.001, analysis of variance). The hydrophobic acrylic IOL had the largest mean adhesive force (283.75 nanoNewton [nN] +/- 0.14 [SD]) followed by the hydrophilic acrylic (84.76 +/- 0.94 nN), PMMA (45.77 +/- 0.47 nN), and silicone (2.10 +/- 0.01 nN) IOLs. The surface properties of the biomaterials used to manufacture IOLs are important because they can influence the incidence and severity of posterior capsule opacification (PCO). Although further studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanism of PCO development and the interface interactions between the IOL and capsule, the results in this study may bolster the theory of manufacturing more-adhesive materials to prevent PCO.

  19. Combined atomic force microscopy and voltage pulse technique to accurately measure electrostatic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inami, Eiichi; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki

    2016-08-01

    We propose a new method of extracting electrostatic force. The technique is based on frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) combined with a voltage pulse. In this method, the work that the electrostatic field does on the oscillating tip is measured through the cantilever energy dissipation. This allows us to directly extract capacitive forces including the longer range part, to which the conventional FM-AFM is insensitive. The distance-dependent contact potential difference, which is modulated by local charges distributed on the surfaces of the tip and/or sample, could also be correctly obtained. In the absence of local charges, our method can perfectly reproduce the electrostatic force as a function of the distance and the bias voltage. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the system serves as a sensitive sensor enabling us to check the existence of the local charges such as trapped charges and patch charges.

  20. Modeling and experiments of the adhesion force distribution between particles and a surface.

    PubMed

    You, Siming; Wan, Man Pun

    2014-06-17

    Due to the existence of surface roughness in real surfaces, the adhesion force between particles and the surface where the particles are deposited exhibits certain statistical distributions. Despite the importance of adhesion force distribution in a variety of applications, the current understanding of modeling adhesion force distribution is still limited. In this work, an adhesion force distribution model based on integrating the root-mean-square (RMS) roughness distribution (i.e., the variation of RMS roughness on the surface in terms of location) into recently proposed mean adhesion force models was proposed. The integration was accomplished by statistical analysis and Monte Carlo simulation. A series of centrifuge experiments were conducted to measure the adhesion force distributions between polystyrene particles (146.1 ± 1.99 μm) and various substrates (stainless steel, aluminum and plastic, respectively). The proposed model was validated against the measured adhesion force distributions from this work and another previous study. Based on the proposed model, the effect of RMS roughness distribution on the adhesion force distribution of particles on a rough surface was explored, showing that both the median and standard deviation of adhesion force distribution could be affected by the RMS roughness distribution. The proposed model could predict both van der Waals force and capillary force distributions and consider the multiscale roughness feature, greatly extending the current capability of adhesion force distribution prediction.

  1. Forced free-shear layer measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leboeuf, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    Detailed three-dimensional three-component phase averaged measurements of the spanwise and streamwise vorticity formation and evolution in acoustically forced plane free-shear flows have been obtained. For the first time, phase-averaged measurements of all three velocity components have been obtained in both a mixing layer and a wake on three-dimensional grids, yielding the spanwise and streamwise vorticity distributions without invoking Taylor's hypothesis. Initially, two-frequency forcing was used to phase-lock the roll-up and first pairing of the spanwise vortical structures in a plane mixing layer. The objective of this study was to measure the near-field vortical structure morphology in a mixing layer with 'natural' laminar initial boundary layers. For the second experiment the second and third subharmonics of the fundamental roll-up frequency were added to the previous two-frequency forcing in order to phase-lock the roll-up and first three pairings of the spanwise rollers in the mixing layer. The objective of this study was to determine the details of spanwise scale changes observed in previous time-averaged measurements and flow visualization of unforced mixing layers. For the final experiment, single-frequency forcing was used to phase-lock the Karman vortex street in a plane wake developing from nominally two-dimensional laminar initial boundary layers. The objective of this study was to compare measurements of the three-dimensional structure in a wake developing from 'natural' initial boundary layers to existing models of wake vortical structure.

  2. Measurement-only topological quantum computation without forced measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Huaixiu; Dua, Arpit; Jiang, Liang

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the measurement-only topological quantum computation (MOTQC) approach proposed by Bonderson et al (2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 101 010501) where the braiding operation is shown to be equivalent to a series of topological charge ‘forced measurements’ of anyons. In a forced measurement, the charge measurement is forced to yield the desired outcome (e.g. charge 0) via repeatedly measuring charges in different bases. This is a probabilistic process with a certain success probability for each trial. In practice, the number of measurements needed will vary from run to run. We show that such an uncertainty associated with forced measurements can be removed by simulating the braiding operation using a fixed number of three measurements supplemented by a correction operator. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in practice we can avoid applying the correction operator in hardware by implementing it in software. Our findings greatly simplify the MOTQC proposal and only require the capability of performing charge measurements to implement topologically protected transformations generated by braiding exchanges without physically moving anyons.

  3. Probing anisotropic surface properties and interaction forces of chrysotile rods by atomic force microscopy and rheology.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dingzheng; Xie, Lei; Bobicki, Erin; Xu, Zhenghe; Liu, Qingxia; Zeng, Hongbo

    2014-09-16

    Understanding the surface properties and interactions of nonspherical particles is of both fundamental and practical importance in the rheology of complex fluids in various engineering applications. In this work, natural chrysotile, a phyllosilicate composed of 1:1 stacked silica and brucite layers which coil into cylindrical structure, was chosen as a model rod-shaped particle. The interactions of chrysotile brucite-like basal or bilayered edge planes and a silicon nitride tip were measured using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The force-distance profiles were fitted using the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, which demonstrates anisotropic and pH-dependent surface charge properties of brucite-like basal plane and bilayered edge surface. The points of zero charge (PZC) of the basal and edge planes were estimated to be around pH 10-11 and 6-7, respectively. Rheology measurements of 7 vol % chrysotile (with an aspect ratio of 14.5) in 10 mM NaCl solution showed pH-dependent yield stress with a local maximum around pH 7-9, which falls between the two PZC values of the edge and basal planes of the rod particles. On the basis of the surface potentials of the edge and basal planes obtained from AFM measurements, theoretical analysis of the surface interactions of edge-edge, basal-edge, and basal-basal planes of the chrysotile rods suggests the yield stress maximum observed could be mainly attributed to the basal-edge attractions. Our results indicate that the anisotropic surface properties (e.g., charges) of chrysotile rods play an important role in the particle-particle interaction and rheological behavior, which also provides insight into the basic understanding of the colloidal interactions and rheology of nonspherical particles.

  4. Combining the effect of crops surface albedo variability on the radiative forcing together with crop GHG budgets calculated from in situ flux measurements in a life cycle assessment approach: methodology and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceschia, E.; Ferlicoq, M.; Brut, A.; Tallec, T.

    2013-12-01

    The carbon and GHG budgets (GHGB) of the 2 crop sites with contrasted management located in South West France was estimated over a complete rotation by combining a classical LCA approach with on site CO2 flux measurements. At both sites, carbon inputs (organic fertilization, seeds), carbon exports (harvest) and net ecosystem production (NEP), measured with the eddy covariance technique, were estimated. The variability of the different terms and their relative contributions to the net ecosystem carbon budget (NECB) were analyzed for all site-years, and the effect of management on NECB was assessed. To account for GHG fluxes that were not directly measured on site, we estimated the emissions caused by field operations (EFO) for each site using emission factors from the literature. The EFO were added to the NECB to calculate the total GHGB for a range of cropping systems and management regimes. N2O emissions were calculated following the IPCC (2007) guidelines or and CH4 emissions were assumed to be negligible. Albedo was calculated continuously using the short wave incident and reflected radiation measurements in the field from CNR1 sensors. Rapid changes in surface albedo typical from those ecosystems and resulting from management and crop phenology were analysed. The annual radiative forcing for each plot was estimated by calculating the difference between a mean annual albedo for each crop and a reference bare soil albedo value calculated over 5 years for each plot. To finalize the radiative forcing calculation, the method developed by Muñoz et al (2010) using up and down atmospheric transmittance had to be corrected so it would only account for up-going atmospheric transmittance. Annual differences in radiative forcing between crops were then converted in g C equivalent m-2 in order to add this effect to the GHG budget of each crop within a rotation. This methodology could be applied to all ICOS/NEON cropland sites. We found that the differences in radiative

  5. A measurement of the hysteresis loop in force-spectroscopy curves using a tuning-fork atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Lange, Manfred; van Vörden, Dennis; Möller, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of the frequency shift versus distance in noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) allow measurements of the force gradient between the oscillating tip and a surface (force-spectroscopy measurements). When nonconservative forces act between the tip apex and the surface the oscillation amplitude is damped. The dissipation is caused by bistabilities in the potential energy surface of the tip-sample system, and the process can be understood as a hysteresis of forces between approach and retraction of the tip. In this paper, we present the direct measurement of the whole hysteresis loop in force-spectroscopy curves at 77 K on the PTCDA/Ag/Si(111) √3 × √3 surface by means of a tuning-fork-based NC-AFM with an oscillation amplitude smaller than the distance range of the hysteresis loop. The hysteresis effect is caused by the making and breaking of a bond between PTCDA molecules on the surface and a PTCDA molecule at the tip. The corresponding energy loss was determined to be 0.57 eV by evaluation of the force-distance curves upon approach and retraction. Furthermore, a second dissipation process was identified through the damping of the oscillation while the molecule on the tip is in contact with the surface. This dissipation process occurs mainly during the retraction of the tip. It reaches a maximum value of about 0.22 eV/cycle.

  6. Dependence of capillary forces on relative humidity and the surface properties of femtosecond laser micromachined titanium.

    PubMed

    Lehr, Jorge; Kietzig, Anne-Marie

    2015-06-15

    Capillary forces were measured with colloidal atomic force microscopy at different levels of relative humidity on femtosecond laser micromachined titanium surfaces. After laser machining at different intensity levels, the titanium surfaces show a nanoscale ripple topology or microscopic bumpy structures. Different machining environments were chosen to influence the surface chemistry in addition to topology: while machining in pure oxygen and water resulted in surfaces consisting of TiO2, a composite surface of TiO2 and TiN was obtained after machining in pure nitrogen. All samples were subsequently exposed to pure oxygen, carbon dioxide or water, and showed different levels of wettability and capillary force. We have introduced the concept of humidity sensitivity as the relative increase of the capillary force with respect to the measured force at 0% humidity. We report that samples with a nanoscale ripple topology machined in pure oxygen exhibit the lowest level of capillary force and the lowest sensitivity towards humidity in the environment. Surfaces with low sensitivity towards changes of the relative humidity are good candidates for technical applications, where capillary forces have to be controlled. This study contributes to the development of such surfaces, to a better understanding of how capillary bridges are formed on rough surfaces and ultimately to the exploration of the relationship between surface wettability and capillary forces. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Global estimate of aerosol direct radiative forcing from satellite measurements.

    PubMed

    Bellouin, Nicolas; Boucher, Olivier; Haywood, Jim; Reddy, M Shekar

    2005-12-22

    Atmospheric aerosols cause scattering and absorption of incoming solar radiation. Additional anthropogenic aerosols released into the atmosphere thus exert a direct radiative forcing on the climate system. The degree of present-day aerosol forcing is estimated from global models that incorporate a representation of the aerosol cycles. Although the models are compared and validated against observations, these estimates remain uncertain. Previous satellite measurements of the direct effect of aerosols contained limited information about aerosol type, and were confined to oceans only. Here we use state-of-the-art satellite-based measurements of aerosols and surface wind speed to estimate the clear-sky direct radiative forcing for 2002, incorporating measurements over land and ocean. We use a Monte Carlo approach to account for uncertainties in aerosol measurements and in the algorithm used. Probability density functions obtained for the direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere give a clear-sky, global, annual average of -1.9 W m(-2) with standard deviation, +/- 0.3 W m(-2). These results suggest that present-day direct radiative forcing is stronger than present model estimates, implying future atmospheric warming greater than is presently predicted, as aerosol emissions continue to decline.

  8. Direct Measurements of Drag Forces in C. elegans Crawling Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Rabets, Yegor; Backholm, Matilda; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari; Ryu, William S.

    2014-01-01

    With a simple and versatile microcantilever-based force measurement technique, we have probed the drag forces involved in Caenorhabditis elegans locomotion. As a worm crawls on an agar surface, we found that substrate viscoelasticity introduces nonlinearities in the force-velocity relationships, yielding nonconstant drag coefficients that are not captured by original resistive force theory. A major contributing factor to these nonlinearities is the formation of a shallow groove on the agar surface. We measured both the adhesion forces that cause the worm’s body to settle into the agar and the resulting dynamics of groove formation. Furthermore, we quantified the locomotive forces produced by C. elegans undulatory motions on a wet viscoelastic agar surface. We show that an extension of resistive force theory is able to use the dynamics of a nematode’s body shape along with the measured drag coefficients to predict the forces generated by a crawling nematode. PMID:25418179

  9. Computerized interferometric surface measurements [Invited].

    PubMed

    Wyant, James C

    2013-01-01

    The addition of electronics, computers, and software to interferometry has enabled enormous improvements in optical metrology. This paper discusses four areas in which computerized interferometric measurement improvements have been made in the measurement of surface shape and surface roughness: (a) The use of computer-generated holograms for the testing of aspheric optics, (b) phase-shifting interferometry for getting interferometric data into a computer so the data can be analyzed, (c) computerized interference microscopes, including multiple-wavelength and coherence scanning, for the precision measurement of surface microstructure, and (d) vibration-insensitive dynamic interferometers for enabling precise measurements in noncontrolled environments.

  10. Measured long-range repulsive Casimir–Lifshitz forces

    PubMed Central

    Munday, J. N.; Capasso, Federico; Parsegian, V. Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations create intermolecular forces that pervade macroscopic bodies1–3. At molecular separations of a few nanometres or less, these interactions are the familiar van der Waals forces4. However, as recognized in the theories of Casimir, Polder and Lifshitz5–7, at larger distances and between macroscopic condensed media they reveal retardation effects associated with the finite speed of light. Although these long-range forces exist within all matter, only attractive interactions have so far been measured between material bodies8–11. Here we show experimentally that, in accord with theoretical prediction12, the sign of the force can be changed from attractive to repulsive by suitable choice of interacting materials immersed in a fluid. The measured repulsive interaction is found to be weaker than the attractive. However, in both cases the magnitude of the force increases with decreasing surface separation. Repulsive Casimir–Lifshitz forces could allow quantum levitation of objects in a fluid and lead to a new class of switchable nanoscale devices with ultra-low static friction13–15. PMID:19129843

  11. Comparison of Shortwave Cloud Radiative Forcing Derived from ARM SGP Surface and GOES-8 Satellite Measurements During ARESE I and ARESE II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, A. D.; Doelling, D. R.; Khaiyer, M. M.; Minnis, P.; Smith, W. L., Jr.; Nguyen, L.; Haeffelin, M. P.; Valero, F. P. J.; Asano, S.

    2001-01-01

    One of the objectives of the ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) is to investigate the absorption of solar radiation by clouds over the ARM Southern Great Plains central facility. A variety of techniques employing various combinations Of Surface, aircraft, and satellite data have been used to estimate the absorption empirically. During ARESE-I conducted during fall 1995, conflicting results were produced from different analyses of the combined datasets leading to the need for a more controlled experiment. ARESE-II was conducted during spring 2000. Improved calibrations, different sampling strategies, and broadband satellite data were all available to minimize some of the sources of uncertainty in the data. In this paper, cloud absorption or its parametric surrogates (e.g., Cess et al. 1995) are derived from collocated and coincident surface and satellite radiometer data from both ARESE-I and ARESE-II using the latest satellite and surface instrument calibrations.

  12. Capillary force on a tilted cylinder: Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) measurements.

    PubMed

    Kosgodagan Acharige, Sébastien; Laurent, Justine; Steinberger, Audrey

    2017-11-01

    The capillary force in situations where the liquid meniscus is asymmetric, such as the one around a tilted object, has been hitherto barely investigated even though these situations are very common in practice. In particular, the capillary force exerted on a tilted object may depend on the dipping angle i. We investigate experimentally the capillary force that applies on a tilted cylinder as a function of its dipping angle i, using a home-built tilting Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) with custom made probes. A micrometric-size rod is glued at the end of an AFM cantilever of known stiffness, whose deflection is measured when the cylindrical probe is dipped in and retracted from reference liquids. We show that a torque correction is necessary to understand the measured deflection. We give the explicit expression of this correction as a function of the probes' geometrical parameters, so that its magnitude can be readily evaluated. The results are compatible with a vertical capillary force varying as 1/cosi, in agreement with a recent theoretical prediction. Finally, we discuss the accuracy of the method for measuring the surface tension times the cosine of the contact angle of the liquid on the probe. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Uncertainty quantification in nanomechanical measurements using the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Ryan; Moon, Robert; Pratt, Jon; Shaw, Gordon; Raman, Arvind

    2011-11-11

    Quantifying uncertainty in measured properties of nanomaterials is a prerequisite for the manufacture of reliable nanoengineered materials and products. Yet, rigorous uncertainty quantification (UQ) is rarely applied for material property measurements with the atomic force microscope (AFM), a widely used instrument that can measure properties at nanometer scale resolution of both inorganic and biological surfaces and nanomaterials. We present a framework to ascribe uncertainty to local nanomechanical properties of any nanoparticle or surface measured with the AFM by taking into account the main uncertainty sources inherent in such measurements. We demonstrate the framework by quantifying uncertainty in AFM-based measurements of the transverse elastic modulus of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), an abundant, plant-derived nanomaterial whose mechanical properties are comparable to Kevlar fibers. For a single, isolated CNC the transverse elastic modulus was found to have a mean of 8.1 GPa and a 95% confidence interval of 2.7-20 GPa. A key result is that multiple replicates of force-distance curves do not sample the important sources of uncertainty, which are systematic in nature. The dominant source of uncertainty is the nondimensional photodiode sensitivity calibration rather than the cantilever stiffness or Z-piezo calibrations. The results underscore the great need for, and open a path towards, quantifying and minimizing uncertainty in AFM-based material property measurements of nanoparticles, nanostructured surfaces, thin films, polymers and biomaterials.

  14. Hydration forces between surfaces of surfactant coated single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Changwoo; Jang, Hyung-Sik; Choi, Sung-Min

    2013-03-01

    The interaction force between functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) plays an important role in the fabrication of self-assembled and highly ordered SWNT arrays for a wide range of potential applications. Here, we measured interaction force between SWNTs encapsulated with polymerized surfactant monolayer (p-SWNTs). The balance between the repulsion between p-SWNTs and the osmotic pressure exerted by poly(ethylene glycol) in aqueous solution results in two-dimensional hexagonal arrays of p-SWNTs with very small surface to surface distances (<1 nm). The interaction force measured by the osmotic pressure technique shows characteristic decay length of hydration force in its origin.

  15. Novel Method of Measuring Cantilever Deflection during an AFM Force Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Hlady, V.; Pierce, M.; Pungor, A.

    2012-01-01

    A combination of a reflection interference contrast microscope (RICM) and the atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to monitor the cantilever–surface separation distance during force measurements using the streptavidin–biotin recognition pairs. The RICM showed that the cantilever loses contact with the surface before the final rupture of the adhesive bonds is measured by the AFM detection system. This finding suggests that the immobilization of biotin by physisorbed albumin and subsequent binding of streptavidin might have created a cross-linked protein network whose cohesion is tested by the AFM cantilever with the immobilized biotin ligands. PMID:25132721

  16. Critical Casimir forces between planar and crenellated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tröndle, M; Harnau, L; Dietrich, S

    2015-06-03

    We study critical Casimir forces between planar walls and geometrically structured substrates within mean-field theory. As substrate structures, crenellated surfaces consisting of periodic arrays of rectangular crenels and merlons are considered. Within the widely used proximity force approximation, both the top surfaces of the merlons and the bottom surfaces of the crenels contribute to the critical Casimir force. However, for such systems the full, numerically determined critical Casimir forces deviate significantly from the pairwise addition formalism underlying the proximity force approximation. A first-order correction to the proximity force approximation is presented in terms of a step contribution arising from the critical Casimir interaction between a planar substrate and the right-angled steps of the merlons consisting of their upper and lower edges as well as their sidewalls.

  17. Tools for measuring surface cleanliness

    DOEpatents

    Schroder, Mark Stewart; Woodmansee, Donald Ernest; Beadie, Douglas Frank

    2002-01-01

    A procedure and tools for quantifying surface cleanliness are described. Cleanliness of a target surface is quantified by wiping a prescribed area of the surface with a flexible, bright white cloth swatch, preferably mounted on a special tool. The cloth picks up a substantial amount of any particulate surface contamination. The amount of contamination is determined by measuring the reflectivity loss of the cloth before and after wiping on the contaminated system and comparing that loss to a previous calibration with similar contamination. In the alternative, a visual comparison of the contaminated cloth to a contamination key provides an indication of the surface cleanliness.

  18. The relation between the surface electromyogram and muscular force.

    PubMed Central

    Milner-Brown, H S; Stein, R B

    1975-01-01

    1. Motor units in the first dorsal interosseus muscle of normal human subjects were recorded by needle electrodes, together with the surface electromyogram (e.m.g.). The wave form contributed by each motor unit to the surface e.m.g. was determined by signal averaging. 2. The peak-to-peak amplitude of the wave form contributed to the surface e.m.g. by a motor unit increased approximately as the square root of the threshold force at which the unit was recruited. The peak-to-peak duration of the wave form was independent of the threshold force. 3. Large and small motor units are uniformly distributed throughout this muscle, and the muscle fibres making up a motor unit may be widely dispersed. 4. The rectified surface e.m.g. was computed as a function of force, based on the sample of motor units recorded. The largest contribution of motor unit recruitment occurs at low force levels, while the contribution of increased firing rate becomes more important at higher force levels. 5. Possible bases for the common experimental observation that the mean rectified surface e.m.g. varies linearly with the force generated by a muscle are discussed. E.m.g. potentials and contractile responses may both sum non-linearly at moderate to high force levels, but in such a way that the rectified surface e.m.g. is still approximately linearly related to the force produced by the muscle. PMID:1133787

  19. A measurement of the hysteresis loop in force-spectroscopy curves using a tuning-fork atomic force microscope

    PubMed Central

    van Vörden, Dennis; Möller, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Summary Measurements of the frequency shift versus distance in noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) allow measurements of the force gradient between the oscillating tip and a surface (force-spectroscopy measurements). When nonconservative forces act between the tip apex and the surface the oscillation amplitude is damped. The dissipation is caused by bistabilities in the potential energy surface of the tip–sample system, and the process can be understood as a hysteresis of forces between approach and retraction of the tip. In this paper, we present the direct measurement of the whole hysteresis loop in force-spectroscopy curves at 77 K on the PTCDA/Ag/Si(111) √3 × √3 surface by means of a tuning-fork-based NC-AFM with an oscillation amplitude smaller than the distance range of the hysteresis loop. The hysteresis effect is caused by the making and breaking of a bond between PTCDA molecules on the surface and a PTCDA molecule at the tip. The corresponding energy loss was determined to be 0.57 eV by evaluation of the force–distance curves upon approach and retraction. Furthermore, a second dissipation process was identified through the damping of the oscillation while the molecule on the tip is in contact with the surface. This dissipation process occurs mainly during the retraction of the tip. It reaches a maximum value of about 0.22 eV/cycle. PMID:22496993

  20. Surface Polarity Of Beta-hmx Crystal And The Related Adhesive Forces With Estane Binder

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lu; Hanson, David E

    2008-01-01

    Here we present the results on the study of surface properties of {beta}-HMX crystal utilizing molecular simulations. The surface polarity of three principal crystal surfaces are investigated by measuring the water contact angles. The calculated contact angles agree excellently with the values measured by experiment and show that the surface polarity of three crystal surfaces are different. The free energies and forces of detaching an Estane chain with and without nitroplasticizer from the three principal crystal surfaces were calculated using umbrella sampling technique. We find that the detaching free energy/force increases with the increasing HMX surface polarity. In addition, our results also show that nitroplasticizer plays an important role in the adhesion forces between Estane and HMX surfaces.

  1. Shear force microscopy using piezoresistive cantilevers in surface metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotszalk, Teodor; Kopiec, Daniel; Sierakowski, Andrzej; Janus, Paweł; Grabiec, Piotr; Rangelow, Ivo W.

    2014-09-01

    In this article we describe application of piezoresistive cantilevers in surface investigations carried out with the use of shear force microscopy (ShFM). The novel piezoresistive cantilevers integrate a Wheatstone piezoresistive bridge was used to detect the cantilever deflection, thermal deflection detector and planar tip protruding out of the spring beam. Because the planar tip deflection can be detected and controlled electronically the described technology is very flexible and can be applied in many surface investigations. In this article we will present operation theory of the described solution, experimental setup, methods for calibration of the tip deflection detection and actuation The analysis will be illustrated with example results of topography measurements performed using the described technology.

  2. Atmosphere-surface exchange measurements.

    PubMed

    Dabberdt, W F; Lenschow, D H; Horst, T W; Zimmerman, P R; Oncley, S P; Delany, A C

    1993-06-04

    The exchange of various trace species and energy at the earth's surface plays an important role in climate, ecology, and human health and welfare. Surface exchange measurements can be difficult to obtain yet are important to understand physical processes, assess environmental and global change impacts, and develop robust parameterizations of atmospheric processes. The physics and turbulent structure of the atmospheric boundary layer are reviewed as they contribute to dry surface exchange rates (fluxes). Micrometeorological, budget, and enclosure techniques used to measure or estimate surface fluxes are described, along with their respective advantages and limitations. Various measurement issues (such as site characteristics, sampling considerations, sensor attributes, and flow distortion) impact on the ability to obtain representative surface-based and airborne flux data.

  3. Quantitative evaluation of interaction force between functional groups in protein and polymer brush surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Sho; Inoue, Yuuki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2014-03-18

    To understand interactions between polymer surfaces and different functional groups in proteins, interaction forces were quantitatively evaluated by force-versus-distance curve measurements using atomic force microscopy with a functional-group-functionalized cantilever. Various polymer brush surfaces were systematically prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization as well-defined model surfaces to understand protein adsorption behavior. The polymer brush layers consisted of phosphorylcholine groups (zwitterionic/hydrophilic), trimethylammonium groups (cationic/hydrophilic), sulfonate groups (anionic/hydrophilic), hydroxyl groups (nonionic/hydrophilic), and n-butyl groups (nonionic/hydrophobic) in their side chains. The interaction forces between these polymer brush surfaces and different functional groups (carboxyl groups, amino groups, and methyl groups, which are typical functional groups existing in proteins) were quantitatively evaluated by force-versus-distance curve measurements using atomic force microscopy with a functional-group-functionalized cantilever. Furthermore, the amount of adsorbed protein on the polymer brush surfaces was quantified by surface plasmon resonance using albumin with a negative net charge and lysozyme with a positive net charge under physiological conditions. The amount of proteins adsorbed on the polymer brush surfaces corresponded to the interaction forces generated between the functional groups on the cantilever and the polymer brush surfaces. The weakest interaction force and least amount of protein adsorbed were observed in the case of the polymer brush surface with phosphorylcholine groups in the side chain. On the other hand, positive and negative surfaces generated strong forces against the oppositely charged functional groups. In addition, they showed significant adsorption with albumin and lysozyme, respectively. These results indicated that the interaction force at the functional group level might be

  4. Robust high-resolution imaging and quantitative force measurement with tuned-oscillator atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dagdeviren, Omur E; Götzen, Jan; Hölscher, Hendrik; Altman, Eric I; Schwarz, Udo D

    2016-02-12

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and spectroscopy are based on locally detecting the interactions between a surface and a sharp probe tip. For highest resolution imaging, noncontact modes that avoid tip-sample contact are used; control of the tip's vertical position is accomplished by oscillating the tip and detecting perturbations induced by its interaction with the surface potential. Due to this potential's nonlinear nature, however, achieving reliable control of the tip-sample distance is challenging, so much so that despite its power vacuum-based noncontact AFM has remained a niche technique. Here we introduce a new pathway to distance control that prevents instabilities by externally tuning the oscillator's response characteristics. A major advantage of this operational scheme is that it delivers robust position control in both the attractive and repulsive regimes with only one feedback loop, thereby providing an easy-to-implement route to atomic resolution imaging and quantitative tip-sample interaction force measurement.

  5. Some results from 50 years' research on surface forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derjaguin, B. V.

    1992-05-01

    A review is presented about research on surface forces and surface interactions conducted over the past half-century, with some emphasis on the pioneering contributions of the Department of Surface Phenomena at the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the USSR Academy of Sciences.

  6. Crossover of critical Casimir forces between different surface universality classes.

    PubMed

    Mohry, T F; Maciołek, A; Dietrich, S

    2010-06-01

    In confined systems near a continuous phase transition the long-ranged fluctuations of the corresponding order parameter are subject to boundary conditions. These constraints result in so-called critical Casimir forces acting as effective forces on the confining surfaces. For systems belonging to the Ising bulk universality class corresponding to a scalar order parameter the critical Casimir force is studied for the film geometry in the crossover regime characterized by different surface fields at the two surfaces. The scaling function of the critical Casimir force is calculated within mean-field theory. Within our approach, the scaling functions of the critical Casimir force and of the order parameter profile for finite surface fields can be mapped by rescaling, except for a narrow crossover regime, onto the corresponding scaling function of the so-called normal fixed point of strong surface fields. In the crossover regime, the critical Casimir force as function of temperature exhibits more than one extremum and for certain ranges of surface field strengths it changes sign twice upon varying temperature. Monte Carlo simulation data obtained for a three-dimensional Ising film show similar trends. The sign of the critical Casimir force can be inferred from the comparison of the order parameter profiles in the film and in the semi-infinite geometry.

  7. Muscle force estimation with surface EMG during dynamic muscle contractions: a wavelet and ANN based approach.

    PubMed

    Bai, Fengjun; Chew, Chee-Meng

    2013-01-01

    Human muscle force estimation is important in biomechanics studies, sports and assistive devices fields. Therefore, it is essential to develop an efficient algorithm to estimate force exerted by muscles. The purpose of this study is to predict force/torque exerted by muscles under dynamic muscle contractions based on continuous wavelet transform (CWT) and artificial neural networks (ANN) approaches. Mean frequency (MF) of the surface electromyography (EMG) signals power spectrum was calculated from CWT. ANN models were trained to derive the MF-force relationships from the subset of EMG signals and the measured forces. Then we use the networks to predict the individual muscle forces for different muscle groups. Fourteen healthy subjects (10 males and 4 females) were voluntarily recruited in this study. EMG signals were collected from the biceps brachii, triceps, hamstring and quadriceps femoris muscles to evaluate the proposed method. Root mean square errors (RMSE) and correlation coefficients between the predicted forces and measured actual forces were calculated.

  8. Strong Casimir force reduction through metallic surface nanostructuring

    PubMed Central

    Intravaia, Francesco; Koev, Stephan; Jung, Il Woong; Talin, A. Alec; Davids, Paul S.; Decca, Ricardo S.; Aksyuk, Vladimir A.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; López, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The Casimir force between bodies in vacuum can be understood as arising from their interaction with an infinite number of fluctuating electromagnetic quantum vacuum modes, resulting in a complex dependence on the shape and material of the interacting objects. Becoming dominant at small separations, the force has a significant role in nanomechanics and object manipulation at the nanoscale, leading to a considerable interest in identifying structures where the Casimir interaction behaves significantly different from the well-known attractive force between parallel plates. Here we experimentally demonstrate that by nanostructuring one of the interacting metal surfaces at scales below the plasma wavelength, an unexpected regime in the Casimir force can be observed. Replacing a flat surface with a deep metallic lamellar grating with sub-100 nm features strongly suppresses the Casimir force and for large inter-surfaces separations reduces it beyond what would be expected by any existing theoretical prediction. PMID:24071657

  9. Strong Casimir force reduction through metallic surface nanostructuring.

    PubMed

    Intravaia, Francesco; Koev, Stephan; Jung, Il Woong; Talin, A Alec; Davids, Paul S; Decca, Ricardo S; Aksyuk, Vladimir A; Dalvit, Diego A R; López, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The Casimir force between bodies in vacuum can be understood as arising from their interaction with an infinite number of fluctuating electromagnetic quantum vacuum modes, resulting in a complex dependence on the shape and material of the interacting objects. Becoming dominant at small separations, the force has a significant role in nanomechanics and object manipulation at the nanoscale, leading to a considerable interest in identifying structures where the Casimir interaction behaves significantly different from the well-known attractive force between parallel plates. Here we experimentally demonstrate that by nanostructuring one of the interacting metal surfaces at scales below the plasma wavelength, an unexpected regime in the Casimir force can be observed. Replacing a flat surface with a deep metallic lamellar grating with sub-100 nm features strongly suppresses the Casimir force and for large inter-surfaces separations reduces it beyond what would be expected by any existing theoretical prediction.

  10. Investigating biomolecular recognition at the cell surface using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congzhou; Yadavalli, Vamsi K

    2014-05-01

    Probing the interaction forces that drive biomolecular recognition on cell surfaces is essential for understanding diverse biological processes. Force spectroscopy has been a widely used dynamic analytical technique, allowing measurement of such interactions at the molecular and cellular level. The capabilities of working under near physiological environments, combined with excellent force and lateral resolution make atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based force spectroscopy a powerful approach to measure biomolecular interaction forces not only on non-biological substrates, but also on soft, dynamic cell surfaces. Over the last few years, AFM-based force spectroscopy has provided biophysical insight into how biomolecules on cell surfaces interact with each other and induce relevant biological processes. In this review, we focus on describing the technique of force spectroscopy using the AFM, specifically in the context of probing cell surfaces. We summarize recent progress in understanding the recognition and interactions between macromolecules that may be found at cell surfaces from a force spectroscopy perspective. We further discuss the challenges and future prospects of the application of this versatile technique.

  11. AFM force measurement on nano scale Polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guoyu; Zahra Fakhraai Team

    2014-03-01

    Large surface/volume ratio can significantly change the mechanical properties of polymer film with nanometer thickness. Intuitively, the average response contains a larger component of the liquid like layer on the surface compared with the bulk, which should lead to reduced elastic constant. But the ultra small length scale makes it challenging to directly measure the viscoelastic response of nanostructured polymers. When the film thickness is decreased, some measurement supports that the elastic moduli of amorphous polymer films also decreases , while others show the rubbery modulus stiffens. Though the indentation on millimeter and micrometer scale has become common, not much research has investigated the yield stress and strain on nano scale indentation, which contains much larger percentage and effect from the free surface layer. In this study, we use regular AFM tip to indent onto the surface of polystyrene nanodroplets, under various loading speeds to study relaxation times and mechanical response in these systems. . Thanks to the support from NBIC and NCF in U Penn.

  12. Tip-surface forces, amplitude, and energy dissipation in amplitude-modulation (tapping mode) force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Álvaro San; García, Ricardo

    2001-11-01

    Amplitude-modulation (tapping mode) atomic force microscopy is a technique for high resolution imaging of a wide variety of surfaces in air and liquid environments. Here by using the virial theorem and energy conservation principles we have derived analytical relationships between the oscillation amplitude, phase shift, and average tip-surface forces. We find that the average value of the interaction force and oscillation and the average power dissipated by the tip-surface interaction are the quantities that control the amplitude reduction. The agreement obtained between analytical and numerical results supports the analytical method.

  13. Molecular interaction forces generated during protein adsorption to well-defined polymer brush surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Sho; Inoue, Yuuki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2015-03-17

    The molecular interaction forces generated during the adsorption of proteins to surfaces were examined by the force-versus-distance (f-d) curve measurements of atomic force microscopy using probes modified with appropriate molecules. Various substrates with polymer brush layers bearing zwitterionic, cationic, anionic, and hydrophobic groups were systematically prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. Surface interaction forces on these substrates were analyzed by the f-d curve measurements using probes with the same polymer brush layer as the substrate. Repulsive forces, which decreased depending on the ionic strength, were generated between cationic or anionic polyelectrolyte brush layers; these were considered to be electrostatic interaction forces. A strong adhesive force was detected between hydrophobic polymer brush layers during retraction; this corresponded to the hydrophobic interaction between two hydrophobic polymer layers. In contrast, no significant interaction forces were detected between zwitterionic polymer brush layers. Direct interaction forces between proteins and polymer brush layers were then quantitatively evaluated by the f-d curve measurements using protein-immobilized probes consisting of negatively charged albumin and positively charged lysozyme under physiological conditions. In addition, the amount of protein adsorbed on the polymer brush layer was quantified by surface plasmon resonance measurements. Relatively large amounts of protein adsorbed to the polyelectrolyte brush layers with opposite charges. It was considered that the detachment of the protein after contact with the polymer brush layer hardly occurred due to salt formation at the interface. Both proteins adsorbed significantly on the hydrophobic polymer brush layer, which was due to hydrophobic interactions at the interface. In contrast, the zwitterionic polymer brush layer exhibited no significant interaction force with proteins and suppressed

  14. A force vector and surface orientation sensor for intelligent grasping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcglasson, W. D.; Lorenz, R. D.; Duffie, N. A.; Gale, K. L.

    1991-01-01

    The paper discusses a force vector and surface orientation sensor suitable for intelligent grasping. The use of a novel four degree-of-freedom force vector robotic fingertip sensor allows efficient, real time intelligent grasping operations. The basis of sensing for intelligent grasping operations is presented and experimental results demonstrate the accuracy and ease of implementation of this approach.

  15. Surface Gravity and Hawking Temperature from Entropic Force Viewpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; D'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; di Canto, A.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kietzman, B.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramanov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.; Prokoshin, F.; Pronko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Rutherford, B.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Santi, L.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    We consider a freely falling holographic screen for the Schwarzschild and Reissner-Nordström black holes and evaluate the entropic force à la Verlinde. When the screen crosses the event horizon, the temperature of the screen agrees to the Hawking temperature and the entropic force gives rise to the surface gravity for both of the black holes.

  16. Artefacts for optical surface measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, Stuart; Beraldin, J.-Angelo; Brownhill, Andrew; MacDonald, Lindsay

    2011-07-01

    Flexible manufacturing technologies are supporting the routine production of components with freeform surfaces in a wide variety of materials and surface finishes. Such surfaces may be exploited for both aesthetic and performance criteria for a wide range of industries, for example automotive, aircraft, small consumer goods and medial components. In order to ensure conformance between manufactured part and digital design it is necessary to understand, validate and promote best practice of the available measurement technologies. Similar, but currently less quantifiable, measurement requirements also exist in heritage, museum and fine art recording where objects can be individually hand crafted to extremely fine levels of detail. Optical 3D measurement systems designed for close range applications are typified by one or more illumination sources projecting a spot, line or structured light pattern onto a surface or surfaces of interest. Reflections from the projected light are detected in one or more imaging devices and measurements made concerning the location, intensity and optionally colour of the image. Coordinates of locations on the surface may be computed either directly from an understanding of the illumination and imaging geometry or indirectly through analysis of the spatial frequencies of the projected pattern. Regardless of sensing configuration some independent means is necessary to ensure that measurement capability will meet the requirements of a given level of object recording and is consistent for variations in surface properties and structure. As technologies mature, guidelines for best practice are emerging, most prominent at the current time being the German VDI/VDE 2634 and ISO/DIS 10360-8 guidelines. This considers state of the art capabilities for independent validation of optical non-contact measurement systems suited to the close range measurement of table top sized manufactured or crafted objects.

  17. Surface-Plasmon-Enhanced Optical Forces in Silver Nanoaggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hongxing; Käll, Mikael

    2002-11-01

    We use extended Mie theory to investigate optical forces induced by and acting on small silver nanoparticle aggregates excited at surface plasmon resonance. It is shown that single molecules can be trapped at junctions between closely spaced nanoparticles, which are simultaneously pulled together by optical forces. These effects could significantly influence surface-enhanced Raman scattering and related spectroscopies under normal experimental conditions and contribute to single-molecule sensitivity.

  18. Surface modifications with Lissajous trajectories using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Wei; Yao, Nan

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we report a method for atomic force microscopy surface modifications with single-tone and multiple-resolution Lissajous trajectories. The tip mechanical scratching experiments with two series of Lissajous trajectories were carried out on monolayer films. The scratching processes with two scan methods have been illustrated. As an application, the tip-based triboelectrification phenomenon on the silicon dioxide surface with Lissajous trajectories was investigated. The triboelectric charges generated within the tip rubbed area on the surface were characterized in-situ by scanning Kelvin force microscopy. This method would provide a promising and cost-effective approach for surface modifications and nanofabrication.

  19. Measuring molecular weight by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sheiko, Sergei S; da Silva, Marcelo; Shirvaniants, David; LaRue, Isaac; Prokhorova, Svetlana; Moeller, Martin; Beers, Kathryn; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2003-06-04

    Absolute-molecular-weight distribution of cylindrical brush molecules were determined using a combination of the Langmuir Blodget (LB) technique and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The LB technique gives mass density of a monolayer, i.e., mass per unit area, whereas visualization of individual molecules by AFM enables accurate measurements of the molecular density, i.e., number of molecules per unit area. From the ratio of the mass density to the molecular density, one can determine the absolute value for the number average molecular weight. Assuming that the structure of brush molecules is uniform along the backbone, the length distribution should be virtually identical to the molecular weight distribution. Although we used only brush molecules for demonstration purpose, this approach can be applied for a large variety of molecular and colloidal species that can be visualized by a microscopic technique.

  20. Impact of surface imperfections on the Casimir force for lenses of centimeter-size curvature radii

    SciTech Connect

    Bezerra, V. B.; Romero, C.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mohideen, U.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2011-02-15

    The impact of imperfections, which are always present on surfaces of lenses with centimeter-size curvature radii, on the Casimir force in the lens-plate geometry is investigated. It is shown that the commonly used formulation of the proximity force approximation is inapplicable for spherical lenses with surface imperfections, such as bubbles and pits. More general expressions for the Casimir force are derived that take surface imperfections into account. Using these expressions, we show that surface imperfections can both increase and decrease the magnitude of the Casimir force up to a few tens percent when compared with the case of a perfectly spherical lens. We demonstrate that the Casimir force between a perfectly spherical lens and a plate described by the Drude model can be made approximately equal to the force between a sphere with some surface imperfection and a plate described by the plasma model, and vice versa. In the case of a metallic sphere and a semiconductor plate, approximately the same Casimir forces are obtained for four different descriptions of charge carriers in the semiconductor if appropriate surface imperfections on the lens surface are present. The conclusion is made that there is a fundamental problem in the interpretation of measurement data for the Casimir force using spherical lenses of centimeter-size radii.

  1. A Simple Apparatus for Electrostatic Force Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the construction of an apparatus that demonstrates that electrostatic forces can be large and also gives some idea of dependence of electrostatic forces between charged parallel discs on potential differences and separation. (CS)

  2. Initial bioadhesion on surfaces in the oral cavity investigated by scanning force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwender, N.; Huber, K.; Marrawi, F. Al; Hannig, M.; Ziegler, Ch.

    2005-09-01

    Scanning force microscopy (SFM) was used to measure the adhesion forces between BSA, a saliva protein, and two dental surfaces, natural enamel and a filling material (Dyract AP™). Measurements were taken in phosphate buffered aqueous solutions (PBS). Forces were resolved down to the piconewton regime. The dependency of the adhesion force on the interaction time, pH-value and substrate surface was monitored. In a further step, surface samples were fixed on an enamel brace and carried for a defined time in the oral cavity. The formed biofilm, called pellicle, shows a different morphology on the different substrates. This can be explained by the above-mentioned substrate dependence of the adhesion force.

  3. Apparatus for measuring the thermal Casimir force at large distances.

    PubMed

    Bimonte, Giuseppe

    2014-12-12

    We describe a Casimir apparatus based on a differential force measurement between a Au-coated sphere and a planar slab divided in two regions, one of which is made of high-resistivity (dielectric) Si, and the other of Au. The crucial feature of the setup is a semitransparent plane parallel conducting overlayer, covering both regions. The setup offers two important advantages over existing Casimir setups. On one hand, it leads to a large amplification of the difference between the Drude and the plasma prescriptions that are currently used to compute the thermal Casimir force. On the other hand, thanks to the screening power of the overlayer, it is in principle immune from electrostatic forces caused by potential patches on the plates surfaces, that plague present large distance Casimir experiments. If a semitransparent conductive overlayer with identical patch structure over the Au-Si regions of the plate can be manufactured, similar to the opaque overlayers used in recent searches of non-Newtonian gravitational forces based on the isoelectronic technique, the way will be paved for a clear observation of the thermal Casimir force up to separations of several microns, and an unambiguous discrimination between the Drude and the plasma prescriptions.

  4. Apparatus for Measuring the Thermal Casimir Force at Large Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bimonte, Giuseppe

    2014-12-01

    We describe a Casimir apparatus based on a differential force measurement between a Au-coated sphere and a planar slab divided in two regions, one of which is made of high-resistivity (dielectric) Si, and the other of Au. The crucial feature of the setup is a semitransparent plane parallel conducting overlayer, covering both regions. The setup offers two important advantages over existing Casimir setups. On one hand, it leads to a large amplification of the difference between the Drude and the plasma prescriptions that are currently used to compute the thermal Casimir force. On the other hand, thanks to the screening power of the overlayer, it is in principle immune from electrostatic forces caused by potential patches on the plates surfaces, that plague present large distance Casimir experiments. If a semitransparent conductive overlayer with identical patch structure over the Au-Si regions of the plate can be manufactured, similar to the opaque overlayers used in recent searches of non-Newtonian gravitational forces based on the isoelectronic technique, the way will be paved for a clear observation of the thermal Casimir force up to separations of several microns, and an unambiguous discrimination between the Drude and the plasma prescriptions.

  5. Measuring shear force transmission across a biomimetic glycocalyx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Isabel; Young, Dylan; Scrimgeour, Jan

    Human blood vessels are lined with a low-density polymer brush known as the glycocalyx. This brush plays an active role in defining the mechanical and biochemical environment of the endothelial cell in the blood vessel wall. In addition, it is involved in the detection of mechanical stimuli, such as the shear stress from blood flowing in the vessel. In this work, we construct a biomimetic version of the glycocalyx on top of a soft deformable substrate in order to measure its ability to modulate the effects of shear stress at the endothelial cell surface. The soft substrate is stamped on to a glass substrate and then enclosed inside a microfluidic device that generates a controlled flow over the substrate. The hydrogel chemistry has been optimized so that it reliably stamps into a defined shape and has consistent mechanical properties. Fluorescent microbeads embedded in the gel allow measurement of the surface deformation, and subsequently, calculation of the shear force at the surface of the soft substrate. We investigate the effect of the major structural elements of the glycocalyx, hyaluronic acid and charged proteoglycans, on the magnitude of the shear force transmitted to the surface of the hydrogel.

  6. Fundamental aspects of electric double layer force-distance measurements at liquid-solid interfaces using atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Jennifer M.; Zhu, Mengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Unocic, Raymond R.; Guo, Daqiang; Okatan, M. Baris; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Feng, Guang; Balke, Nina

    2016-09-02

    In this paper, atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance measurements are used to investigate the layered ion structure of Ionic Liquids (ILs) at the mica surface. The effects of various tip properties on the measured force profiles are examined and reveal that the measured ion position is independent of tip properties, while the tip radius affects the forces required to break through the ion layers as well as the adhesion force. Force data is collected for different ILs and directly compared with interfacial ion density profiles predicted by molecular dynamics. Through this comparison it is concluded that AFM force measurements are sensitive to the position of the ion with the larger volume and mass, suggesting that ion selectivity in force-distance measurements are related to excluded volume effects and not to electrostatic or chemical interactions between ions and AFM tip. Finally, the comparison also revealed that at distances greater than 1 nm the system maintains overall electroneutrality between the AFM tip and sample, while at smaller distances other forces (e.g., van der waals interactions) dominate and electroneutrality is no longer maintained.

  7. Fundamental aspects of electric double layer force-distance measurements at liquid-solid interfaces using atomic force microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Black, Jennifer M.; Zhu, Mengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; ...

    2016-09-02

    In this paper, atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance measurements are used to investigate the layered ion structure of Ionic Liquids (ILs) at the mica surface. The effects of various tip properties on the measured force profiles are examined and reveal that the measured ion position is independent of tip properties, while the tip radius affects the forces required to break through the ion layers as well as the adhesion force. Force data is collected for different ILs and directly compared with interfacial ion density profiles predicted by molecular dynamics. Through this comparison it is concluded that AFM force measurements aremore » sensitive to the position of the ion with the larger volume and mass, suggesting that ion selectivity in force-distance measurements are related to excluded volume effects and not to electrostatic or chemical interactions between ions and AFM tip. Finally, the comparison also revealed that at distances greater than 1 nm the system maintains overall electroneutrality between the AFM tip and sample, while at smaller distances other forces (e.g., van der waals interactions) dominate and electroneutrality is no longer maintained.« less

  8. Fundamental aspects of electric double layer force-distance measurements at liquid-solid interfaces using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Black, Jennifer M; Zhu, Mengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Unocic, Raymond R; Guo, Daqiang; Okatan, M Baris; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T; Kalinin, Sergei V; Feng, Guang; Balke, Nina

    2016-09-02

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance measurements are used to investigate the layered ion structure of Ionic Liquids (ILs) at the mica surface. The effects of various tip properties on the measured force profiles are examined and reveal that the measured ion position is independent of tip properties, while the tip radius affects the forces required to break through the ion layers as well as the adhesion force. Force data is collected for different ILs and directly compared with interfacial ion density profiles predicted by molecular dynamics. Through this comparison it is concluded that AFM force measurements are sensitive to the position of the ion with the larger volume and mass, suggesting that ion selectivity in force-distance measurements are related to excluded volume effects and not to electrostatic or chemical interactions between ions and AFM tip. The comparison also revealed that at distances greater than 1 nm the system maintains overall electroneutrality between the AFM tip and sample, while at smaller distances other forces (e.g., van der waals interactions) dominate and electroneutrality is no longer maintained.

  9. Fundamental aspects of electric double layer force-distance measurements at liquid-solid interfaces using atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Black, Jennifer M.; Zhu, Mengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Unocic, Raymond R.; Guo, Daqiang; Okatan, M. Baris; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Feng, Guang; Balke, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance measurements are used to investigate the layered ion structure of Ionic Liquids (ILs) at the mica surface. The effects of various tip properties on the measured force profiles are examined and reveal that the measured ion position is independent of tip properties, while the tip radius affects the forces required to break through the ion layers as well as the adhesion force. Force data is collected for different ILs and directly compared with interfacial ion density profiles predicted by molecular dynamics. Through this comparison it is concluded that AFM force measurements are sensitive to the position of the ion with the larger volume and mass, suggesting that ion selectivity in force-distance measurements are related to excluded volume effects and not to electrostatic or chemical interactions between ions and AFM tip. The comparison also revealed that at distances greater than 1 nm the system maintains overall electroneutrality between the AFM tip and sample, while at smaller distances other forces (e.g., van der waals interactions) dominate and electroneutrality is no longer maintained. PMID:27587276

  10. Fundamental aspects of electric double layer force-distance measurements at liquid-solid interfaces using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Jennifer M.; Zhu, Mengyang; Zhang, Pengfei; Unocic, Raymond R.; Guo, Daqiang; Okatan, M. Baris; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Feng, Guang; Balke, Nina

    2016-09-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force-distance measurements are used to investigate the layered ion structure of Ionic Liquids (ILs) at the mica surface. The effects of various tip properties on the measured force profiles are examined and reveal that the measured ion position is independent of tip properties, while the tip radius affects the forces required to break through the ion layers as well as the adhesion force. Force data is collected for different ILs and directly compared with interfacial ion density profiles predicted by molecular dynamics. Through this comparison it is concluded that AFM force measurements are sensitive to the position of the ion with the larger volume and mass, suggesting that ion selectivity in force-distance measurements are related to excluded volume effects and not to electrostatic or chemical interactions between ions and AFM tip. The comparison also revealed that at distances greater than 1 nm the system maintains overall electroneutrality between the AFM tip and sample, while at smaller distances other forces (e.g., van der waals interactions) dominate and electroneutrality is no longer maintained.

  11. Diamagnetic Levitation Cantilever System for the Calibration of Normal Force Atomic Force Microscopy Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Jahn; Yi, Jin-Woo; Murphy, Colin; Kim, Kyung-Suk

    2011-03-01

    In this presentation we report a novel technique for normal force calibration for Atomic Force Microcopy (AFM) adhesion measurements known as the diamagnetic normal force calibration (D-NFC) system. The levitation produced by the repulsion between a diamagnetic graphite sheet and a set of rare-earth magnets is used in order to produce an oscillation due to an unstable mechanical moment produced by a silicon cantilever supported on the graphite. The measurement of the natural frequency of this oscillation allows for the calculation of the stiffness of the system to three-digit accuracy. The D-NFC response was proven to have a high sensitivity for the structure of water molecules collected on its surface. This in turns allows for the study of the effects of coatings on the structure of surface water. This work was supported by the Coatings/Biofouling Program and the Maritime Sensing Program of the Office of Naval Research as well as the ILIR Program of the Naval Undersea Warfare Center DIVNPT.

  12. Measurements of the rotordynamic shroud forces for centrifugal pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinzburg, A.; Brennen, C. E.; Acosta, A. J.; Caughey, T. K.

    1990-01-01

    An experiment was designed to measure the rotordynamic shroud forces on a centrifugal pump impeller. The measurements were done for various whirl/impeller speed ratios and for different flow rates. A destabilizing tangential force was measured for small positive whirl ratios and this force decreased with increasing flow rate.

  13. Measurements of the rotordynamic shroud forces for centrifugal pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinzburg, A.; Brennen, C. E.; Acosta, A. J.; Caughey, T. K.

    1990-01-01

    An experiment was designed to measure the rotordynamic shroud forces on a centrifugal pump impeller. The measurements were done for various whirl/impeller speed ratios and for different flow rates. A destabilizing tangential force was measured for small positive whirl ratios and this force decreased with increasing flow rate.

  14. Vertical and lateral force mapping on the Si(111)-(7×7) surface by dynamic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Namikawa, Takashi; Miki, Koutaro; Abe, Masayuki; Morita, Seizo

    2008-05-01

    The topographic image of dynamic force microscopy (DFM) keeping the frequency shift (Δfz) constant at tiny cantilever oscillation amplitudes corresponds to the constant-vertical force (Fz) gradient surface, while the interpretation becomes complicated at larger oscillation amplitudes. We discuss how Fz and the potential energy (U) act on the tip during DFM topographic scan at various cantilever oscillation amplitudes by measuring the Δfz map on the Si(111)-(7×7) surface at room temperature. The Δfz map is numerically converted into Fz and U maps. DFM topographic curves at various cantilever oscillation amplitudes are numerically derived by using the experimentally obtained Fz map. In addition, we discuss how the lateral force (Fx) acts on the tip at various tip-surface distances on various surface sites by an Fx map converted from a U map. The positions at which Fx becomes zero are identified as U minimum sites, such as the top of adatom sites, and U maximum sites (equilibrium positions of Fx ), such as the center positions among three center adatoms. The tip deviated from these sites is then laterally attracted toward the U minimum sites. It is also demonstrated that lateral force microscopy performed at 1Å cantilever oscillation enables direct measurement of the lateral force gradient by numerically deriving the frequency shift (Δfx) caused by Fx .

  15. Shortwave Spectral Radiative Forcing of Cumulus Clouds from Surface Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Berg, Larry K.; Long, Charles N.; Flynn, Connor J.

    2011-04-02

    The spectral changes of the total cloud radiative forcing (CRF) and its diffuse and direct components are examined by using spectrally resolved (visible spectral range) all-sky surface irradiances measured by Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer. We demonstrate: (i) the substantial contribution of the diffuse component to the total CRF, (ii) the well-defined spectral variations of total CRF in the visible spectral region, and (iii) the strong statistical relationship between spectral (500 nm) and shortwave broadband values of total CRF. Our results suggest that the framework based on the visible narrowband fluxes can provide important radiative quantities for rigorous evaluation of radiative transfer parameterizations and can be applied for estimation of the shortwave total CRF.

  16. Atomic force microscopy of lead iodide crystal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, M. A.; Azoulay, M.; Jayatirtha, H. N.; Biao, Y.; Burger, A.; Collins, W. E.; Silberman, E.

    1994-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the surface of lead iodide crystals. The high vapor pressure of lead iodide prohibits the use of traditional high resolution surface study techniques that require high vacuum conditions. AFM was used to image numerous insulating surface in various ambients, with very little sample preparation techniques needed. Freshly cleaved and modified surfaces, including, chemical and vacuum etched, and air aged surfaces, were examined. Both intrinsic and induced defects were imaged with high resolution. The results were compared to a similar AFM study of mercuric iodide surfaces and it was found that, at ambient conditions, lead iodide is significantly more stable than mercuric iodide.

  17. Surface roughtness and its influence on particle adhesion using atomic force microscope techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Gady, B.; Schaefer, D.; Reifenberger, R.; Rimai, D.; DeMejo, L.P.

    1996-12-31

    The surface force interactions between individual 8 {mu}m diameter spheres and atomically flat substrates have been systematically investigated using atomic force techniques. The lift-off force of glass, polystyrene and tin particles from atomically smooth mica and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite substrates was determined as a function of the applied loading force in an inert nitrogen environment. While the relative magnitudes of the measured lift-off force was found to scale as expected between the various systems studied, the absolute values were a factor of {approximately}50 smaller than expected from the Johnson, Kendall, and Roberts theory. The surface topography of representative spheres was characterized with atomic force microscopy, allowing a quantitative assessment of the role that surface roughness plays in the adhesion of micrometer-size particles to substrates. Taking into account the radius of curvature of the asperities measured from the atomic force scans, agreement between the measured and theoretical estimates for the lift-off forces was improved, with the corrected experimental forces about a factor of 3 smaller than theoretical expectations.

  18. Atomic force microscopy characterization of the surface wettability of natural fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietak, Alexis; Korte, Sandra; Tan, Emelyn; Downard, Alison; Staiger, Mark P.

    2007-01-01

    Natural fibres represent a readily available source of ecologically friendly and inexpensive reinforcement in composites with degradable thermoplastics, however chemical treatments of fibres are required to prepare feasible composites. It is desirable to characterize the surface wettability of fibres after chemical treatment as the polarity of cellulose-based fibres influences compatibility with a polymer matrix. Assessment of the surface wettability of natural fibres using conventional methods presents a challenge as the surfaces are morphologically and chemically heterogeneous, rough, and can be strongly wicking. In this work it is shown that under atmospheric conditions the adhesion force between an atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip and the fibre surface can estimate the water contact angle and surface wettability of the fibre. AFM adhesion force measurements are suitable for the more difficult surfaces of natural fibres and in addition allow for correlations between microstructural features and surface wettability characteristics.

  19. Uncertainty quantification in nanomechanical measurements using the atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Ryan; Moon, Robert; Pratt, Jon; Shaw, Gordon; Raman, Arvind

    2011-11-01

    Quantifying uncertainty in measured properties of nanomaterials is a prerequisite for the manufacture of reliable nanoengineered materials and products. Yet, rigorous uncertainty quantification (UQ) is rarely applied for material property measurements with the atomic force microscope (AFM), a widely used instrument that can measure properties at nanometer scale resolution of both inorganic and biological surfaces and nanomaterials. We present a framework to ascribe uncertainty to local nanomechanical properties of any nanoparticle or surface measured with the AFM by taking into account the main uncertainty sources inherent in such measurements. We demonstrate the framework by quantifying uncertainty in AFM-based measurements of the transverse elastic modulus of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), an abundant, plant-derived nanomaterial whose mechanical properties are comparable to Kevlar fibers. For a single, isolated CNC the transverse elastic modulus was found to have a mean of 8.1 GPa and a 95% confidence interval of 2.7-20 GPa. A key result is that multiple replicates of force-distance curves do not sample the important sources of uncertainty, which are systematic in nature. The dominant source of uncertainty is the nondimensional photodiode sensitivity calibration rather than the cantilever stiffness or Z-piezo calibrations. The results underscore the great need for, and open a path towards, quantifying and minimizing uncertainty in AFM-based material property measurements of nanoparticles, nanostructured surfaces, thin films, polymers and biomaterials. This work is a partial contribution of the USDA Forest Service and NIST, agencies of the US government, and is not subject to copyright.

  20. Development of a commercially viable piezoelectric force sensor system for static force measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Luo, Xinwei; Liu, Jingcheng; Li, Min; Qin, Lan

    2017-09-01

    A compensation method for measuring static force with a commercial piezoelectric force sensor is proposed to disprove the theory that piezoelectric sensors and generators can only operate under dynamic force. After studying the model of the piezoelectric force sensor measurement system, the principle of static force measurement using a piezoelectric material or piezoelectric force sensor is analyzed. Then, the distribution law of the decay time constant of the measurement system and the variation law of the measurement system’s output are studied, and a compensation method based on the time interval threshold Δ t and attenuation threshold Δ {{u}th} is proposed. By calibrating the system and considering the influences of the environment and the hardware, a suitable Δ {{u}th} value is determined, and the system’s output attenuation is compensated based on the Δ {{u}th} value to realize the measurement. Finally, a static force measurement system with a piezoelectric force sensor is developed based on the compensation method. The experimental results confirm the successful development of a simple compensation method for static force measurement with a commercial piezoelectric force sensor. In addition, it is established that, contrary to the current perception, a piezoelectric force sensor system can be used to measure static force through further calibration.

  1. ForceFit: a code to fit classical force fields to quantum mechanical potential energy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Waldher, Benjamin; Kuta, Jadwiga; Chen, Samuel; Henson, Neil; Clark, Aurora E

    2010-09-01

    The ForceFit program package has been developed for fitting classical force field parameters based upon a force matching algorithm to quantum mechanical gradients of configurations that span the potential energy surface of the system. The program, which runs under UNIX and is written in C++, is an easy-to-use, nonproprietary platform that enables gradient fitting of a wide variety of functional force field forms to quantum mechanical information obtained from an array of common electronic structure codes. All aspects of the fitting process are run from a graphical user interface, from the parsing of quantum mechanical data, assembling of a potential energy surface database, setting the force field, and variables to be optimized, choosing a molecular mechanics code for comparison to the reference data, and finally, the initiation of a least squares minimization algorithm. Furthermore, the code is based on a modular templated code design that enables the facile addition of new functionality to the program.

  2. Surface polarity of beta-HMX crystal and the related adhesive forces with Estane binder.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lu

    2008-12-02

    Here I present the results on the study of surface properties of beta-HMX crystal utilizing molecular dynamics simulations. The surface polarity of three principal crystal surfaces, (011), (010), and (110), is investigated by measuring the water contact angles. The calculated contact angles are in excellent agreement with the values measured by experiment and show that the surface polarity of three crystal surfaces are different. The free energies and forces of detaching an Estane chain (with and without surrounding nitroplasticizer molecules) from the three principal crystal surfaces are also calculated using the umbrella sampling method. I find that the force for Estane detachment increases with the increasing HMX surface polarity. In addition, my results show that the nitroplasticizer also plays an important role in the adhesion between Estane and HMX surfaces.

  3. Measuring Wind Ventilation of Dense Surface Snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, S. A.; Huwald, H.; Selker, J. S.; Higgins, C. W.; Lehning, M.; Thomas, C. K.

    2014-12-01

    Wind ventilation enhances exposure of suspended, canopy-captured and corniced snow to subsaturated air and can significantly increase sublimation rate. Although sublimation rate may be high for highly ventilated snow this snow regime represents a small fraction snow that resides in a basin potentially minimizing its influence on snow mass balance. In contrast, the vast majority of a seasonal snowpack typically resides as poorly ventilated surface snow. The sublimation rate of surface snow is often locally so small as to defy direct measurement but regionally pervasive enough that the integrated mass loss of frozen water across a basin may be significant on a seasonal basis. In a warming climate, sublimation rate increases even in subfreezing conditions because the equilibrium water vapor pressure over ice increases exponentially with temperature. To better understand the process of wintertime surface snow sublimation we need to quantify the depth to which turbulent and topographically driven pressure perturbations effect air exchange within the snowpack. Hypothetically, this active layer depth increases the effective ventilated snow surface area, enhancing sublimation above that given by a plane, impermeable snow surface. We designed and performed a novel set of field experiments at two sites in the Oregon Cascades during the 2014 winter season to examine the spectral attenuation of pressure perturbations with depth for dense snow as a function of turbulence intensity and snow permeability. We mounted a Campbell Scientific Irgason Integrated CO2 and H2O Open Path Gas Analyzer and 3-D Sonic Anemometer one meter above the snow to capture mean and turbulent wind forcing and placed outlets of four high precision ParoScientific 216B-102 pressure transducers at different depths to measure the depth-dependent pressure response to wind forcing. A GPS antenna captured data acquisition time with sufficient precision to synchronize a Campbell Scientific CR-3000 acquiring

  4. Modeling noncontact atomic force microscopy resolution on corrugated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Burson, Kristen M; Yamamoto, Mahito; Cullen, William G

    2012-01-01

    Key developments in NC-AFM have generally involved atomically flat crystalline surfaces. However, many surfaces of technological interest are not atomically flat. We discuss the experimental difficulties in obtaining high-resolution images of rough surfaces, with amorphous SiO(2) as a specific case. We develop a quasi-1-D minimal model for noncontact atomic force microscopy, based on van der Waals interactions between a spherical tip and the surface, explicitly accounting for the corrugated substrate (modeled as a sinusoid). The model results show an attenuation of the topographic contours by ~30% for tip distances within 5 Å of the surface. Results also indicate a deviation from the Hamaker force law for a sphere interacting with a flat surface.

  5. Study of DNA adsorption on mica surfaces using a surface force apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Yajing; Tan, Qiyan; Wu, Gensheng; Si, Wei; Chen, Yunfei

    2015-02-01

    We report our studies on the adsorption properties of double-stranded DNA molecules on mica surfaces in a confined environment using a surface force apparatus. Specifically, we studied the influence of cation species and concentrations on DNA adsorption properties. Our results indicated that divalent cations (Mg2+ and Co2+) preferred to form uniform and moderately dense DNA layers on a mica substrate. By measuring the interactions between DNA-coated mica and bare mica in an aqueous solution, obvious adhesion was observed in a cobalt chloride solution, possibly due to the ion-correlation attraction between negatively charged DNA and the mica surface. Furthermore, the interaction differences that were observed with MgCl2 and CoCl2 solutions reveal that the specific adsorption behaviors of DNA molecules on a mica substrate were mediated by these two salts. Our results are helpful to elucidate the dynamics of DNA binding on a solid substrate.

  6. Force measurement reveals structure of a confined liquid: Observation of the impenetrable space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Ken-ichi; Tanaka, Eisuke; Kobayashi, Kazuya; Onishi, Hiroshi; Nishi, Naoya; Sakka, Tetsuo

    2015-11-01

    Understanding of the structure of a confined liquid is an important subject for developments in surface science, tribology, biophysics, etc. In this study, we propose its measurement theory and conduct a test of the theory. The measurement theory uses a force curve obtained by surface force apparatus and transforms the force curve into the confined liquid structure. To check the validity of the measurement theory, we perform a verification test in a computer. It is found that the theory can semi-quantitatively reproduce the confined liquid structure. The theory will lead to the first step toward measuring a liquid structure confined between optically impenetrable substrates.

  7. Cantilevers orthodontics forces measured by fiber sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Neblyssa; Milczewski, Maura S.; de Oliveira, Valmir; Guariza Filho, Odilon; Lopes, Stephani C. P. S.; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.

    2015-09-01

    Fibers Bragg Gratings were used to evaluate the transmission of the forces generates by orthodontic mechanic based one and two cantilevers used to move molars to the upright position. The results showed levels forces of approximately 0,14N near to the root of the molar with one and two cantilevers.

  8. Measurement of dynamic bite force during mastication.

    PubMed

    Shimada, A; Yamabe, Y; Torisu, T; Baad-Hansen, L; Murata, H; Svensson, P

    2012-05-01

    Efficient mastication of different types and size of food depends on fast integration of sensory information from mechanoreceptors and central control mechanisms of jaw movements and applied bite force. The neural basis underlying mastication has been studied for decades but little progress in understanding the dynamics of bite force has been made mainly due to technical limitations of bite force recorders. The aims of this study were to develop a new intraoral bite force recorder which would allow the study of natural mastication without an increase in the occlusal vertical dimension and subsequently to analyze the relation between electromyographic (EMG) activity of jaw-closing muscles, jaw movements and bite force during mastication of five different types of food. Customized force recorders based on strain gauge sensors were fitted to the upper and lower molar teeth on the preferred chewing side in fourteen healthy and dentate subjects (21-39 years), and recordings were carried out during voluntary mastication of five different kinds of food. Intraoral force recordings were successively obtained from all subjects. anova showed that impulse of bite force as well as integrated EMG was significantly influenced by food (P<0·05), while time-related parameters were significantly affected by chewing cycles (P<0·001). This study demonstrates that intraoral force recordings are feasible and can provide new information on the dynamics of human mastication with direct implications for oral rehabilitation. We also propose that the control of bite force during mastication is achieved by anticipatory adjustment and encoding of bolus characteristics.

  9. Lateral hydrodynamic interactions between an emulsion droplet and a flat surface evaluated by frictional force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Higashitani, Ko; Grieser, Franz

    2010-06-01

    We introduce a lateral atomic force microscopy (AFM) method to measure the hydrodynamic drag force acting on a microscopic emulsion droplet moving parallel to a flat surface. A tetradecane oil droplet formed in an aqueous solution of sodium dodecylsulfate was attached to a V-shaped atomic force microscopy cantilever, and lateral hydrodynamic interactions between the droplet and a flat glass surface were measured using a range of scanning velocities. The droplet was positioned either far from the oscillating surface or was pressed to the surface under a constant applied load. These measurements demonstrate the feasibility of using AFM to study lateral hydrodynamic interactions and lubricity between soft matter materials relevant to a large number of applications in areas as diverse as flavor delivery in foods to the applications of emulsions or emollients in personal care products.

  10. Measuring the Magnetic Force on a Current-Carrying Conductor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herreman, W.; Huysentruyt, R.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a fast and simple method for measuring the magnetic force acting on a current-carrying conductor using a digital balance. Discusses the influence of current intensity and wire length on the magnetic force on the conductor. (JRH)

  11. Dynamometer for measuring machining forces in two perpendicular directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, I. A.

    1974-01-01

    Published report discusses development of two-component force dynamometer which is used for dynamic measurement of machining forces in cutting and thrust directions. Resulting data suggest that faster metal-cutting machines may be developed that have reduced vibrations.

  12. Measurement of Nonlinear Receptivity to Surface Irregularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila-Acaron, Jose B.; Hajj, Muhammad R.

    1998-01-01

    Acoustic receptivity is the process by which acoustic disturbances are internalized into the shear layer to generate instability waves. Experiments have shown that, when tuned to the eigenvalue modes, the amplitude of the resulting T-S waves scales with the acoustic field intensity. When a surface irregularity is present, the characteristic wall wavenumber forces a spatial mode onto the near-wall mean velocity field, thus providing modal length scales comparable to those of T-S waves. In this experiment an attempt was made to increase the acoustic receptivity by exciting a difference mode via a quadratic interaction between two larger-wavenumber, forced modes. The difference mode is tuned to the dominant T-S eigenmode wavenumber. As expected, an increased receptivity corresponding to the difference mode was measured downstream of branch I, suggesting the presence of the nonlinearity.

  13. Direct Measurement of Lateral Force Using Dual Cantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Makoto; Ichikawa, Masaya; Miura, Kouji

    2012-01-01

    We have constructed an experimental system to measure a piconewton lateral force using dual cantilevers which cross with each other. The resolution of the lateral force is estimated to be 3.3 p ± 0.2 pN, which is comparable to forces due to thermal fluctuation. This experimental apparatus works so easily that it will enable us to determine forces during nano-manipulation and nano-tribological measurements. PMID:22737001

  14. Infrared Aerosol Radiative Forcing at the Surface and the Top of the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowicz, Krzysztof M.; Flatau, Piotr J.; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2003-01-01

    We study the clear-sky aerosol radiative forcing at infrared wavelengths using data from the Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia) cruise of the NOAA R/V Ronald H. Brown. Limited number of data points is analyzed mostly from ship and collocated satellite values. An optical model is derived from chemical measurements, lidar profiles, and visible extinction measurements which is used to and estimate the infrared aerosol optical thickness and the single scattering albedo. The IR model results are compared to detailed Fourier Transform Interferometer based infrared aerosol forcing estimates, pyrgeometer based infrared downward fluxes, and against the direct solar forcing observations. This combined approach attests for the self-consistency of the optical model and allows to derive quantities such as the infrared forcing at the top of the atmosphere or the infrared optical thickness. The mean infrared aerosol optical thickness at 10 microns is 0.08 and the single scattering albedo is 0.55. The modeled infrared aerosol forcing reaches 10 W/sq m during the cruise, which is a significant contribution to the total direct aerosol forcing. The surface infrared aerosol radiative forcing is between 10 to 25% of the shortwave aerosol forcing. The infrared aerosol forcing at the top of the atmosphere can go up to 19% of the solar aerosol forcing. We show good agreement between satellite (CERES instrument) retrievals and model results at the top of the atmosphere. Over the Sea of Japan, the average infrared radiative forcing is 4.6 W/sq m in the window region at the surface and it is 1.5 W/sq m at top of the atmosphere. The top of the atmosphere IR forcing efficiency is a strong function of aerosol temperature while the surface IR forcing efficiency varies between 37 and 55 W/sq m (per infrared optical depth unit). and changes between 10 to 18 W/sq m (per infrared optical depth unit).

  15. Surface flow measurements from drones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauro, Flavia; Porfiri, Maurizio; Grimaldi, Salvatore

    2016-09-01

    Drones are transforming the way we sense and interact with the environment. However, despite their increased capabilities, the use of drones in geophysical sciences usually focuses on image acquisition for generating high-resolution maps. Motivated by the increasing demand for innovative and high performance geophysical observational methodologies, we posit the integration of drone technology and optical sensing toward a quantitative characterization of surface flow phenomena. We demonstrate that a recreational drone can be used to yield accurate surface flow maps of sub-meter water bodies. Specifically, drone's vibrations do not hinder surface flow observations, and velocity measurements are in agreement with traditional techniques. This first instance of quantitative water flow sensing from a flying drone paves the way to novel observations of the environment.

  16. Effects of Surface Roughness and Surface Force on the Thin Film Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication of Circular Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Li-Ming; Lin, Jaw-Ren; Chen, Jiann-Lin

    2012-07-01

    The effects of surface roughness and surface force on thin film elastohydrodynamic lubrication (TFEHL) circular contact problems are analyzed and discussed under constant load condition. The multi-level multi-integration (MLMI) algorithm and the Gauss-Seidel iterative method are used to simultaneously solve the average Reynolds type equation, surface force equations, the load balance equation, the rheology equations, and the elastic deformation equation. The simulation results reveal that the difference between the TFEHL model and the traditional EHL model increase with decreasing film thickness. The effects of surface forces become significant as the film thickness becomes thinner. The surface forces have obvious effects in the Hertzian contact region. The oscillation phenomena in pressure and film thickness come mainly from the action of solvation forces

  17. Dynamic forces between bubbles and surfaces and hydrodynamic boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Manor, Ofer; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Grieser, Franz; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C

    2008-10-21

    A bubble attached to the end of an atomic force microscope cantilever and driven toward or away from a flat mica surface across an aqueous film is used to characterize the dynamic force that arises from hydrodynamic drainage and electrical double layer interactions across the nanometer thick intervening aqueous film. The hydrodynamic response of the air/water interface can range from a classical fully immobile, no-slip surface in the presence of added surfactants to a partially mobile interface in an electrolyte solution without added surfactants. A model that includes the convection and diffusion of trace surface contaminants can account for the observed behavior presented. This model predicts quantitatively different interfacial dynamics to the Navier slip model that can also be used to fit dynamic force data with a post hoc choice of a slip length.

  18. Electrostatic force spectroscopy of near-surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dana, Aykutlu

    Measurement of electrostatic interaction between a conductive atomic force microscopy tip and a semiconductor sample can provide data which can be processed and interpreted to give information about location and energies of localized electronic states on and below the sample surface. Potentially large amount information that describes the distribution of localized states in the sample can not be inferred from a single measurement of the electrostatic interaction. However, multiple measurements of the interaction with varying tip-sample separation and bias can yield enough data, which can be processed to estimate information about the state. Theoretical description of such a technique is given along with experimental methods for its realization. Application of the method using a sample with Indium Arsenide self-assembled quantum dots as trap centers is demonstrated. A quantum dot (QD) refers to a nanometer scale semiconductor structure embedded in a host crystal, in which electrons and holes can occupy certain discrete energy levels. These levels serve as localized states in the presented experiments. The method can be applied directly to characterization of novel thin dielectric films. With further development, it can potentially be applied to high spatial resolution characterization of dopant distributions.

  19. Forces on nuclei moving on autoionizing molecular potential energy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2017-01-14

    Autoionization of molecular systems occurs in diatomic molecules and in small biochemical systems. Quantum chemistry packages enable calculation of complex potential energy surfaces (CPESs). The imaginary part of the CPES is associated with the autoionization decay rate, which is a function of the molecular structure. Molecular dynamics simulations, within the framework of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, require the definition of a force field. The ability to calculate the forces on the nuclei in bio-systems when autoionization takes place seems to rely on an understanding of radiative damages in RNA and DNA arising from the release of slow moving electrons which have long de Broglie wavelengths. This work addresses calculation of the real forces on the nuclei moving on the CPES. By using the transformation of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, previously used by Madelung, we proved that the classical forces on nuclei moving on the CPES correlated with the gradient of the real part of the CPES. It was proved that the force on the nuclei of the metastable molecules is time independent although the probability to detect metastable molecules exponentially decays. The classical force is obtained from the transformed Schrödinger equation when ℏ=0 and the Schrödinger equation is reduced to the classical (Newtonian) equations of motion. The forces on the nuclei regardless on what potential energy surface they move (parent CPES or product real PESs) vary in time due to the autoionization process.

  20. Forces on nuclei moving on autoionizing molecular potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2017-01-01

    Autoionization of molecular systems occurs in diatomic molecules and in small biochemical systems. Quantum chemistry packages enable calculation of complex potential energy surfaces (CPESs). The imaginary part of the CPES is associated with the autoionization decay rate, which is a function of the molecular structure. Molecular dynamics simulations, within the framework of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, require the definition of a force field. The ability to calculate the forces on the nuclei in bio-systems when autoionization takes place seems to rely on an understanding of radiative damages in RNA and DNA arising from the release of slow moving electrons which have long de Broglie wavelengths. This work addresses calculation of the real forces on the nuclei moving on the CPES. By using the transformation of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, previously used by Madelung, we proved that the classical forces on nuclei moving on the CPES correlated with the gradient of the real part of the CPES. It was proved that the force on the nuclei of the metastable molecules is time independent although the probability to detect metastable molecules exponentially decays. The classical force is obtained from the transformed Schrödinger equation when ℏ =0 and the Schrödinger equation is reduced to the classical (Newtonian) equations of motion. The forces on the nuclei regardless on what potential energy surface they move (parent CPES or product real PESs) vary in time due to the autoionization process.

  1. Measurement of Cantilever's Spring Constant with Cms Electrostatic Force Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sheng-Jui; Pan, Sheau-Shi; Yeh, Yu-Shan; Lin, Yi-Ching

    The mechanical property is one of the important parameters for evaluating micro/nano-scale materials. The measurement of micro/nano-mechanical property usually involves measurements of small displacement and force. To provide a traceable force standard in micro/nano-newton level, we have developed a force measurement system based on electrostatic sensing and actuation techniques. The system mainly consists of a monolithic flexure stage, a three-electrode capacitor and a digital controller. The three-electrode capacitor is utilized as a position sensor, and at the same time an electrostatic force actuator. The force under measurement is balanced by a compensation electrostatic force which is traceable to electrical and length standards. A commercial cantilever-type micro-force probe was used in this calibration experiment. The force probe was brought to contact with and press into the load button (a ruby sphere) of the force measurement system by a closed-loop controlled z-scanner. The spring constant was obtained from the average slope determined from measured force-displacement curves and was found to be (2.26 ± 0.01) N/m where the given uncertainty is one standard deviation. We have successfully demonstrated the calibration of the microforce probe using our self-developed electrostatic sensing and actuating force measurement system. The measured spring constant is consistent with the manufacturer's specification, and the relative standard deviation is less than 0.5%. Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.

  2. Surface roughness mediated adhesion forces between borosilicate glass and gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Preedy, Emily; Perni, Stefano; Nipiĉ, Damijan; Bohinc, Klemen; Prokopovich, Polina

    2014-08-12

    It is well-known that a number of surface characteristics affect the extent of adhesion between two adjacent materials. One of such parameters is the surface roughness as surface asperities at the nanoscale level govern the overall adhesive forces. For example, the extent of bacterial adhesion is determined by the surface topography; also, once a bacteria colonizes a surface, proliferation of that species will take place and a biofilm may form, increasing the resistance of bacterial cells to removal. In this study, borosilicate glass was employed with varying surface roughness and coated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) in order to replicate the protein layer that covers orthopedic devices on implantation. As roughness is a scale-dependent process, relevant scan areas were analyzed using atomic force microscope (AFM) to determine Ra; furthermore, appropriate bacterial species were attached to the tip to measure the adhesion forces between cells and substrates. The bacterial species chosen (Staphylococci and Streptococci) are common pathogens associated with a number of implant related infections that are detrimental to the biomedical devices and patients. Correlation between adhesion forces and surface roughness (Ra) was generally better when the surface roughness was measured through scanned areas with size (2 × 2 μm) comparable to bacteria cells. Furthermore, the BSA coating altered the surface roughness without correlation with the initial values of such parameter; therefore, better correlations were found between adhesion forces and BSA-coated surfaces when actual surface roughness was used instead of the initial (nominal) values. It was also found that BSA induced a more hydrophilic and electron donor characteristic to the surfaces; in agreement with increasing adhesion forces of hydrophilic bacteria (as determined through microbial adhesion to solvents test) on BSA-coated substrates.

  3. Optical measurements on contaminated surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonham, T. E.; Schmitt, R. J.; Linford, R. M. F.

    1975-01-01

    A bidirectional reflectometer system was developed for in situ measurements of the changes in spectral reflectance of surfaces contaminated with films of organic materials. The system permits experiments with films of controlled thickness in an environment that simulates the thermal, radiation, and vacuum conditions of space. The mechanical and optical construction of the reflectometer are discussed in detail, and actual data curves are used to illustrate its operation and performance.

  4. Spikes removal in surface measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podulka, P.; Pawlus, P.; Dobrzański, P.; Lenart, A.

    2014-03-01

    Several cylinder surface topographies made from grey cast iron were measured by Talysurf CCI white light interferometer with and without use of spikes filter. They were plateau honed by abrasive stones. Measured area was 3.3 mm × 3.3 mm, height resolution was 0.01 nm. The forms were eliminated using polynomial of the 3rd degree. After it, spikes were removed using four methods. These approaches were compared. Parameters of the smaller and highest sensitivity on spikes presence were selected.

  5. The Frictional Force with Respect to the Actual Contact Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holm, Ragnar

    1944-01-01

    Hardy's statement that the frictional force is largely adhesion, and to a lesser extent, deformation energy is proved by a simple experiment. The actual contact surface of sliding contacts and hence the friction per unit of contact surface was determined in several cases. It was found for contacts in normal atmosphere to be about one-third t-one-half as high as the macroscopic tearing strength of the softest contact link, while contacts annealed in vacuum and then tested, disclosed frictional forces which are greater than the macroscopic strength.

  6. Critical Casimir forces in colloidal suspensions on chemically patterned surfaces.

    PubMed

    Soyka, Florian; Zvyagolskaya, Olga; Hertlein, Christopher; Helden, Laurent; Bechinger, Clemens

    2008-11-14

    We investigate the behavior of colloidal particles immersed in a binary liquid mixture of water and 2,6-lutidine in the presence of a chemically patterned substrate. Close to the critical point of the mixture, the particles are subjected to critical Casimir interactions with force components normal and parallel to the surface. Because the strength and sign of these interactions can be tuned by variations in the surface properties and the mixtures temperature, critical Casimir forces allow the formation of highly ordered monolayers but also extend the use of colloids as model systems.

  7. Critical Casimir Forces in Colloidal Suspensions on Chemically Patterned Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soyka, Florian; Zvyagolskaya, Olga; Hertlein, Christopher; Helden, Laurent; Bechinger, Clemens

    2008-11-01

    We investigate the behavior of colloidal particles immersed in a binary liquid mixture of water and 2,6-lutidine in the presence of a chemically patterned substrate. Close to the critical point of the mixture, the particles are subjected to critical Casimir interactions with force components normal and parallel to the surface. Because the strength and sign of these interactions can be tuned by variations in the surface properties and the mixtures temperature, critical Casimir forces allow the formation of highly ordered monolayers but also extend the use of colloids as model systems.

  8. Surface forces and properties of foam films from rhamnolipid biosurfactants.

    PubMed

    Cohen, R; Exerowa, D

    2007-10-31

    Foam films are considered as a convenient model to study the interaction behaviour and surface properties of microbial rhamnolipid type biosurfactants. The Scheludko-Exerowa microinterferometric methodology of film thickness measurements is employed for experimental studies of microscopic foam films formed from aqueous solutions of a single rhamnolipid Rh1 (with one rhamnosyl head group) and of mixtures of rhamnolipid surfactants Rh1 and Rh2 (with two rhamnosyl head groups) at ratios Rh2/Rh1=1.2 and Rh2/Rh1=0.69. The measurements of the equilibrium thickness (h) of the obtained films as a function of surfactant concentration (Cs) and electrolyte (NaCl) concentration (C el) determine the conditions for obtaining common, common black and Newton black films. The saturation values of the diffuse electric layer potential phi 0 approximately 60 mV for the Rh1.2 and phi 0 approximately 94 mV for the Rh0.69 common films conform the ionic character of the rhamnolipids. The h(C el) curves of the rhamnolipid foam films and the directly measured disjoining pressure (Pi(h)) isotherms indicate the ranges of action of the DLVO and non-DLVO surface forces. The obtained foam film parameters allow their practical use in ecology and in various technological processes where rhamnolipid surfactants are used. Experiments with model lung surfactant (Infasurf) foam films with rhamnolipid added outline a perspective for the potential application of the foam film for investigating the effect of rhamnolipids on human alveoli.

  9. Interferometric measurement of functional surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Peter; Xie, Weichang; Kühnhold, Peter; Niehues, Jan

    2013-06-01

    Increasing capabilities in precision manufacturing and micro technology are accompanied by increasing demands of high precision industrial metrology systems. Especially for measuring functional surfaces, areal optical principles are widely used. If, in addition, nanometer height resolution is needed interferometers seem to be the most promising instruments. First, this contribution focuses on the transfer characteristics of white-light interferometers with microscopic field of view. In general, microscopic instruments suffer from their limited lateral resolution capabilities. Hence, the transfer function of these instruments is typically assumed to show a linear low-pass characteristic. We studied the transfer characteristics of white-light interferometers by theoretical simulations and experimental investigations. Our results show that in most practical cases these instruments behave nonlinear, i.e. the output surface profile cannot be obtained from the input profile by a simple linear filter operation. Although they are well-established, there are some further limitations of white-light interferometers if they are used to measure micro or even sub-microstructures. If edges, steeper slopes or abrupt slope changes are present on a measuring object characteristic errors such as batwings occur. Furthermore, a high effort concerning the correction of chromatic aberration is necessary in order to avoid dispersion effects. Otherwise, there will be systematic discrepancies between profiles obtained from evaluation of the coherence peak and those resulting from the phase of the interference signals. These may lead to 2π phase jumps if the fringe order is obtained from the position of the coherence peak. Finally, measurement artifacts may also result if the measured micro-structure shows discontinuities of the surface slope. This contribution analyses the different phenomena and discusses approaches to overcome existing limitations.

  10. Unbinding forces and energies between a siRNA molecule and a dendrimer measured by force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dumitru, Andra C; Herruzo, Elena T; Rausell, Estrella; Ceña, Valentin; Garcia, Ricardo

    2015-12-21

    We have measured the intermolecular forces between small interference RNA (siRNA) and polyamidoamine dendrimers at the single molecular level. A single molecule force spectroscopy approach has been developed to measure the unbinding forces and energies between a siRNA molecule and polyamidoamine dendrimers deposited on a mica surface in a buffer solution. We report three types of unbinding events which are characterized by forces and free unbinding energies, respectively, of 28 pN, 0.709 eV; 38 pN, 0.722 eV; and 50 pN, 0.724 eV. These events reflect different possible electrostatic interactions between the positive charges of one or two dendrimers and the negatively charged phosphate groups of a single siRNA. We have evidence of a high binding affinity of siRNA towards polyamidoamine dendrimers that leads to a 45% probability of measuring specific unbinding events.

  11. Unbinding forces and energies between a siRNA molecule and a dendrimer measured by force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitru, Andra C.; Herruzo, Elena T.; Rausell, Estrella; Ceña, Valentin; Garcia, Ricardo

    2015-11-01

    We have measured the intermolecular forces between small interference RNA (siRNA) and polyamidoamine dendrimers at the single molecular level. A single molecule force spectroscopy approach has been developed to measure the unbinding forces and energies between a siRNA molecule and polyamidoamine dendrimers deposited on a mica surface in a buffer solution. We report three types of unbinding events which are characterized by forces and free unbinding energies, respectively, of 28 pN, 0.709 eV; 38 pN, 0.722 eV; and 50 pN, 0.724 eV. These events reflect different possible electrostatic interactions between the positive charges of one or two dendrimers and the negatively charged phosphate groups of a single siRNA. We have evidence of a high binding affinity of siRNA towards polyamidoamine dendrimers that leads to a 45% probability of measuring specific unbinding events.

  12. Measurement of polyamide and polystyrene adhesion with coated-tip atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Thio, Beng Joo Reginald; Meredith, J Carson

    2007-10-01

    This work presents atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements of adhesion forces between polyamides, polystyrene and AFM tips coated with the same materials. The polymers employed were polyamide 6 (PA6), PA66, PA12 and polystyrene (PS). All adhesion forces between the various unmodified or modified AFM tips and the polymer surfaces were in the range -1.5 to -8 nN. The weakest force was observed for an unmodified AFM tip with a PS surface and the strongest was between a PS-coated tip and PS surface. The results point to both the benefits and drawbacks of coated-tip AFM force-distance measurements. Adhesion forces between the two most dissimilar (PA6-PS and PA66-PS) materials were significantly asymmetric, e.g., the forces were different depending on the relative placement of each polymer on the AFM tip or substrate. Materials with similar chemistry and intermolecular interactions yielded forces in close agreement regardless of placement on tip or substrate. Using experimental forces, we calculated the contact radii via four models: Derjaguin, Muller, and Toporov; Johnson, Kendall, and Roberts; parametric tip-force-distance relation; and a square pyramid-flat surface (SPFS) model developed herein. The SPFS model gave the most reasonable contact tip radius estimate. Hamaker constants calculated from the SPFS model using this radius agreed in both magnitude and trends with experiment and Lifshitz theory.

  13. Two techniques for measuring locomotion impact forces during zero G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenisen, Michael C.; Smith, Richard A.; Klute, Glenn K.; Mccaulley, James B.

    1993-01-01

    A load-cell-instrumented treadmill mated to a Kistler force plate was used to investigate two methods of force measurement instrumentation during treadmill ambulation in zero g, created by parabolic flight on NASA's KC-135 aircraft. Current spaceflight treadmills do not have adequate instrumentation to determine the resultant foot impact force applied during restrained ambulation. Accurate measurement of foot-ground reaction forces is critical in attaining proper one-g loading, therefore ensuring proper musculoskeletal conditioning. Treadmill instrumentation and force plate measurements were compared for frequency response and linearity. Locomotion impact data were also collected under one-g laboratory settings and in Keplerian flight. The first resonant frequency for both techniques was found to be well above the primary frequency content of the locomotive forces. Peak impact forces measured by the two systems compared to within 10 percent.

  14. Probing the interaction between air bubble and sphalerite mineral surface using atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lei; Shi, Chen; Wang, Jingyi; Huang, Jun; Lu, Qiuyi; Liu, Qingxia; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-03-03

    The interaction between air bubbles and solid surfaces plays important roles in many engineering processes, such as mineral froth flotation. In this work, an atomic force microscope (AFM) bubble probe technique was employed, for the first time, to directly measure the interaction forces between an air bubble and sphalerite mineral surfaces of different hydrophobicity (i.e., sphalerite before/after conditioning treatment) under various hydrodynamic conditions. The direct force measurements demonstrate the critical role of the hydrodynamic force and surface forces in bubble-mineral interaction and attachment, which agree well with the theoretical calculations based on Reynolds lubrication theory and augmented Young-Laplace equation by including the effect of disjoining pressure. The hydrophobic disjoining pressure was found to be stronger for the bubble-water-conditioned sphalerite interaction with a larger hydrophobic decay length, which enables the bubble attachment on conditioned sphalerite at relatively higher bubble approaching velocities than that of unconditioned sphalerite. Increasing the salt concentration (i.e., NaCl, CaCl2) leads to weakened electrical double layer force and thereby facilitates the bubble-mineral attachment, which follows the classical Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory by including the effects of hydrophobic interaction. The results provide insights into the basic understanding of the interaction mechanism between bubbles and minerals at nanoscale in froth flotation processes, and the methodology on probing the interaction forces of air bubble and sphalerite surfaces in this work can be extended to many other mineral and particle systems.

  15. Characterization of the surface charge distribution on kaolinite particles using high resolution atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Naveen; Zhao, Cunlu; Klaassen, Aram; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder; Siretanu, Igor

    2016-02-01

    Most solid surfaces, in particular clay minerals and rock surfaces, acquire a surface charge upon exposure to an aqueous environment due to adsorption and/or desorption of ionic species. Macroscopic techniques such as titration and electrokinetic measurements are commonly used to determine the surface charge and ζ -potential of these surfaces. However, because of the macroscopic averaging character these techniques cannot do justice to the role of local heterogeneities on the surfaces. In this work, we use dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) to determine the distribution of surface charge on the two (gibbsite-like and silica-like) basal planes of kaolinite nanoparticles immersed in aqueous electrolyte with a lateral resolution of approximately 30 nm. The surface charge density is extracted from force-distance curves using DLVO theory in combination with surface complexation modeling. While the gibbsite-like and the silica-like facet display on average positive and negative surface charge values as expected, our measurements reveal lateral variations of more than a factor of two on seemingly atomically smooth terraces, even if high resolution AFM images clearly reveal the atomic lattice on the surface. These results suggest that simple surface complexation models of clays that attribute a unique surface chemistry and hence homogeneous surface charge densities to basal planes may miss important aspects of real clay surfaces.

  16. Adhesion forces in liquid media: effect of surface topography and wettability.

    PubMed

    Serro, A P; Colaço, R; Saramago, B

    2008-09-15

    This work was motivated by the unexpected values of adhesion forces measured between an atomic force microscopy tip and the hydrophobic surface of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene. Two types of samples with different roughness but similar wettability were tested. Adhesion forces of similar magnitude were obtained in air and in polar liquids (water and Hank's Balanced Salt Solution, a saline solution) with the rougher sample. In contrast, the adhesion forces measured on the smoother sample in air were much higher than those measured in water or in the aqueous solution. Those experimental results suggested the presence of nanobubbles at the interface between the rough sample and the polar liquids. The existence of the nanobubbles was further confirmed by the images of the interface obtained in noncontact tapping mode. The adhesion forces measured in a nonpolar liquid (hexadecane) were small and of the same order of magnitude for both samples and their values were in good agreement with the predictions of the London-Hamaker approach for the van der Waals interactions. Finally, we correlate the appearance of nanobubbles with surface topography. The conclusion of this work is that adhesion forces measured in aqueous media may be strongly affected by the presence of nanobubbles if the surface presents topographical accidents.

  17. Long Term Surface Salinity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Raymond W.; Brown, Neil L.

    2005-01-01

    Our long-term goal is to establish a reliable system for monitoring surface salinity around the global ocean. Salinity is a strong indicator of the freshwater cycle and has a great influence on upper ocean stratification. Global salinity measurements have potential to improve climate forecasts if an observation system can be developed. This project is developing a new internal field conductivity cell that can be protected from biological fouling for two years. Combined with a temperature sensor, this foul-proof cell can be deployed widely on surface drifters. A reliable in-situ network of surface salinity sensors will be an important adjunct to the salinity sensing satellite AQUARIUS to be deployed by NASA in 2009. A new internal-field conductivity cell has been developed by N Brown, along with new electronics. This sensor system has been combined with a temperature sensor to make a conductivity - temperature (UT) sensor suitable for deployment on drifters. The basic sensor concepts have been proven on a high resolution CTD. A simpler (lower cost) circuit has been built for this application. A protection mechanism for the conductivity cell that includes antifouling protection has also been designed and built. Mr. A.Walsh of our commercial partner E-Paint has designed and delivered time-release formulations of antifoulants for our application. Mr. G. Williams of partner Clearwater Instrumentation advised on power and communication issues and supplied surface drifters for testing.

  18. Intermolecular Casimir-Polder forces in water and near surfaces.

    PubMed

    Thiyam, Priyadarshini; Persson, Clas; Sernelius, Bo E; Parsons, Drew F; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders; Boström, Mathias

    2014-09-01

    The Casimir-Polder force is an important long-range interaction involved in adsorption and desorption of molecules in fluids. We explore Casimir-Polder interactions between methane molecules in water, and between a molecule in water near SiO(2) and hexane surfaces. Inclusion of the finite molecular size in the expression for the Casimir-Polder energy leads to estimates of the dispersion contribution to the binding energies between molecules and between one molecule and a planar surface.

  19. Mapping of endoglucanases displayed on yeast cell surface using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Musashi; Kobayashi, Takuya; Inokuma, Kentaro; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Maruyama, Tatsuo; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2017-03-01

    The surface of yeast cells has been an attractive interface for the effective use of cellulose. Surface enzymes, however, are difficult to visualize and evaluate. In this study, two kinds of unique anchoring regions were used to display the cellulase, endoglucanase (EG), on a yeast cell surface. Differences in the display level and the localization of EG were observed by atomic force microscopy. By surveying the yeast cell surface with a chemically modified cantilever, the interactive force between the cellulose and EG was measured. Force curve mapping revealed differences in the display levels and the localization of EG according to anchoring regions. The proposed methodology enables visualization of displayed enzymes such as EG on the yeast cell surface. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Reflectance measurements from particulate surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltoniemi, J.; Gritsevich, M.; Hakala, T.; Penttilä, A.; Eskelinen, J.; Dagsson-Waldhauserova, P.; Arnalds, O.; Guirado, D.; Muinonen, K.

    2014-07-01

    Asteroids consists of, e.g., metals and rocky materials, and comets consist of, e.g., icy and rocky materials and dust. Their surfaces can be covered by small particles. To certain extent, these surfaces can resemble some natural or artificial surfaces on the Earth, such as snow layers, sand, gravels, or silt. By measuring the reflectance from such surfaces, one can gain better understanding on how to interpret astronomical observations of asteroids and comets. Even if not completely analogous, these samples and measurements provide a strict test bed for the scattering models applied to interpret observations of small Solar System bodies. FIGIFIGO (Finnish Geodetic Institute's Field Gonio-spectro-polari- radiometer) can measure the bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) of surface targets of a diameter of around 10 cm, in a selected angular range and resolution, in the spectral range of 400-2400 nm, at about 10-nm resolution, including linear polarisation (Stokes I, Q, and U, or reflection coefficient matrix elements R_{11}, R_{12}, and R_{13}). Using FIGIFIGO, over 500 samples have been measured over the past years, including over 100 snow samples and almost 100 samples resembling sand, silt, soil, dust, or gravel. For planetary studies, especially interesting are dark volcanic ash and silt samples from Eyjafjallajökull and Grímsvönt eruptions. These have been measured loose and compressed, smooth and rough, purely and deposited on snow. Further single-scattering measurements using the Granada setup and measurements using the Univ. Helsinki integrating sphere complement the picture. Generally, we have observed that the reflectance from volcanic materials behaves mostly as expected and modelled. BRF shows typical bowl shape with strong phase-angle dependence. Spectral features are smooth, with slight angular dependence. Polarisation depends strongly on the phase angle, weaker on other angles defining the scattering geometry, and smoothly on the wavelength. There

  1. Forcing and Responses of the Surface Energy Budget at Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Nathaniel B.

    Energy exchange at the Greenland Ice Sheet surface governs surface temperature variability, a factor critical for representing increasing surface melt extent, which portends a rise in global sea level. A comprehensive set of cloud, tropospheric, near-surface and sub-surface measurements at Summit Station is utilized to determine the driving forces and subsequent responses of the surface energy budget (SEB). This budget includes radiative, turbulent, and ground heat fluxes, and ultimately controls the evolution of surface temperature. At Summit Station, clouds radiatively warm the surface in all months with an annual average cloud radiative forcing value of 33 W m -2, largely driven by the occurrence of liquid-bearing clouds. The magnitude of the surface temperature response is dependent on how turbulent and ground heat fluxes modulate changes to radiative forcing. Relationships between forcing terms and responding surface fluxes show that changes in the upwelling longwave radiation compensate for 65-85% (50- 60%) of the total change in radiative forcing in the winter (summer). The ground heat flux is the second largest response term (16% annually), especially during winter. Throughout the annual cycle, the sensible heat flux response is comparatively constant (9%) and latent heat flux response is only 1.5%, becoming more of a factor in modulating surface temperature responses during the summer. Combining annual cycles of these responses with cloud radiative forcing results, clouds warm the surface by an estimated 7.8°C annually. A reanalysis product (ERA-I), operational model (CFSv2), and climate model (CESM) are evaluated utilizing the comprehensive set of SEB observations and process-based relationships. Annually, surface temperatures in each model are warmer than observed with overall poor representation of the coldest surface temperatures. Process-based relationships between different SEB flux terms offer insight into how well a modeling framework represents

  2. Energy cost and pole forces during Nordic walking under different surface conditions.

    PubMed

    Schiffer, Thorsten; Knicker, Axel; Dannöhl, Regine; Strüder, Heiko K

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify the effect of three different surfaces on energy consumption and the forces acting on the walking poles during ground contact in Nordic walking (NW). Thirteen female NW instructors (age = 26 +/- 4 yr, weight = 58.5 +/- 4.2 kg, height = 168.1 +/- 4.6 cm) volunteered in the study. The subjects walked a distance of 1200 m at a controlled, constant speed of 2.2 m x s(-1) on each of a concrete surface (C), an artificial athletics track (A), and a naturally grown soccer lawn (G). They used NW poles with inbuilt strain gauge force transducers to measure ground reaction forces acting along the long axes of the poles. Oxygen uptake, capillary blood lactate (La), HR, and RPE were measured before and after the tests. Impact forces, maximum forces, force rates during ground contact identified from the registered force time histories, displayed significant differences related to the surface conditions. However, force time integrals did not show surface-related differences. Relative oxygen consumption showed significant differences between NW on C and on G whereas no surface-related differences could be identified between the surface conditions for the parameters La, HR, and RPE. Our data indicate that the impulse that is generated by the poles on the subjects is identical between the varying surfaces. Because there are differences for the oxygen uptake between C and G, the main regulator for the propulsion must be the musculature of the lower extremities. The work of the upper extremities seems to be a luxury effort for Nordic walkers with a proper technique.

  3. Subminiature transducers for measuring forces and deformation of heart muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, C.; Osher, J. V.; Lewis, G. W.; Silver, R. H.; Duran, E. N.

    1975-01-01

    Two subminiature transducers, one measuring muscle forces and one measuring muscle displacement, can be inserted into heart muscle without interfering with it. Probe, approximately 1 mm (0.04 in), causes no damage to heart muscle. Probe can be rotated to different positions to measure muscle forces from various directions.

  4. Application of the FlexiForce contact surface force sensor to continuous extraocular compression monitoring during craniotomy for cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Mutoh, Tatsushi; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Nishimura, Hiromi; Yasui, Nobuyuki

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to introduce our newly developed device equipped with a contact surface force sensor (FlexiForce) for monitoring extraocular compression continuously, and to illustrate its potential clinical application using this device in patients undergoing uncomplicated frontotemporal or bifrontal craniotomy for surgical clipping of unruptured anterior circulation aneurysms. In a pilot study with volunteers, we determined the critical force of 100 gf to cause painful ocular sensation. Then we performed the bilateral extraocular force measurements in 15 patients undergoing uncomplicated frontotemporal or bifrontal craniotomy for surgical clipping of unruptured anterior circulation aneurysms. Extraocular force increased immediately after retraction of the flap, increased to 144+/-26 gf (mean+/-SD) during lower craniotomy close to the orbit, was maintained at 91+/-18 gf during microsurgery, and returned close to baseline at 24+/-14 gf after restoration of skin flap retraction. Such changes were observed only on the surgical side in frontotemporal craniotomy. Abnormal increase in extraocular force was effectively reduced by placing a real-time digital panel meter to warn surgeons to avoid excessive skin flap retraction during the surgical procedure. In conclusion, this new tool may allow us to monitor the external forces that can be applied intraoperatively to the ocular globe in the supine position.

  5. Fermi surface measurements of lutetium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johanson, W. R.; Crabtree, G. W.; Schmidt, F. A.

    1982-03-01

    We report de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) measurements of the Fermi surface of lutetium at temperatures down to 0.3 K and in fields up to 150 kG in the (101¯0) and (112¯0) planes. Lutetium, having a filled 4f shell, serves as a nonmagnetic prototype of the structurally similar (hcp), trivalent, heavy rare earths from Gd to Tm. No complete frequency branches were observed, indicating that there are no closed pieces of surface. We observed all but one orbit predicted by relativistic-augmented-plane wave (RAPW) calculations of Keeton and Loucks, and the data support a geometry that is in good qualitative agreement with the existence of nested open electron and hole sheets.

  6. Fermi surface measurements of lutetium

    SciTech Connect

    Johanson, W.R.; Crabtree, G.W.; Schmidt, F.A.

    1982-03-01

    We report de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) measurements of the Fermi surface of lutetium at temperatures down to 0.3 K and in fields up to 150 kG in the (1010) and (1120) planes. Lutetium, having a filled 4f shell, serves as a nonmagnetic prototype of the structurally similar (hcp), trivalent, heavy rare earths from Gd to Tm. No complete frequency branches were observed, indicating that there are no closed pieces of surface. We observed all but one orbit predicted by relativistic-augmented-plane wave (RAPW) calculations of Keeton and Loucks, and the data support a geometry that is in good qualitative agreement with the existence of nested open electron and hole sheets.

  7. Fermi surface measurements of lutetium

    SciTech Connect

    Johanson, W.R.; Crabtree, G.W.; Schmidt, F.A.

    1982-01-01

    We report de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) measurements of the Fermi surface of Lutetium at temperatures down to .3K and in fields up to 150 kG in the (1010) and (1120) planes. Lutetium, having a filled 4f shell, serves as a non-magnetic prototype of the structurally similar (hcp), trivalent, heavy rare-earths from Gd to Tm. No complete frequency branches were observed, indicating that there are no closed pieces of surface. We observed all but one orbit predicted by relativistic-augmented-plane wave (RAPW) calculations of Keeton and Loucks, and the data support a geometry that is in good qualitative agreement with the existence of nested open electron and hole sheets.

  8. Sensor Prototype to Evaluate the Contact Force in Measuring with Coordinate Measuring Arms

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta, Eduardo; Telenti, Alejandro; Patiño, Hector; González-Madruga, Daniel; Martínez-Pellitero, Susana

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the design, development and evaluation tests of an integrated force sensor prototype for portable Coordinate Measuring Arms (CMAs or AACMMs). The development is based on the use of strain gauges located on the surface of the CMAs’ hard probe. The strain gauges as well as their cables and connectors have been protected with a custom case, made by Additive Manufacturing techniques (Polyjet 3D). The same method has been selected to manufacture an ergonomic handle that includes trigger mechanics and the electronic components required for synchronizing the trigger signal when probing occurs. The paper also describes the monitoring software that reads the signals in real time, the calibration procedure of the prototype and the validation tests oriented towards increasing knowledge of the forces employed in manual probing. Several experiments read and record the force in real time comparing different ways of probing (discontinuous and continuous contact) and measuring different types of geometric features, from single planes to exterior cylinders, cones, or spheres, through interior features. The probing force is separated into two components allowing the influence of these strategies in probe deformation to be known. The final goal of this research is to improve the probing technique, for example by using an operator training programme, allowing extra-force peaks and bad contacts to be minimized or just to avoid bad measurements. PMID:26057038

  9. "Magic" surface clustering of borazines driven by repulsive intermolecular forces.

    PubMed

    Kervyn, Simon; Kalashnyk, Nataliya; Riello, Massimo; Moreton, Ben; Tasseroul, Jonathan; Wouters, Johan; Jones, Tim S; De Vita, Alessandro; Costantini, Giovanni; Bonifazi, Davide

    2013-07-15

    It's a kind of magic: Hydroxy pentaaryl borazine molecules self-assemble into small clusters (see structure) on Cu(111) surfaces, whereas with symmetric hexaaryl borazine molecules large islands are obtained. Simulations indicate that the observed "magic" cluster sizes result from long-range repulsive Coulomb forces arising from the deprotonation of the B-OH groups of the hydroxy pentaaryl borazine.

  10. Spatial spectrograms of vibrating atomic force microscopy cantilevers coupled to sample surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Ryan; Raman, Arvind; Proksch, Roger

    2013-12-23

    Many advanced dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) techniques such as contact resonance, force modulation, piezoresponse force microscopy, electrochemical strain microscopy, and AFM infrared spectroscopy exploit the dynamic response of a cantilever in contact with a sample to extract local material properties. Achieving quantitative results in these techniques usually requires the assumption of a certain shape of cantilever vibration. We present a technique that allows in-situ measurements of the vibrational shape of AFM cantilevers coupled to surfaces. This technique opens up unique approaches to nanoscale material property mapping, which are not possible with single point measurements alone.

  11. Adhesive Force of a Spider Mite, Tetranychus urticae, to a Flat Smooth Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Katsumi; Egashira, Kai; Toukai, Tadashi; Ogushi, Jun

    The adhesion of a spider mite to a surface of a flat smooth plate is investigated as a model for micromachine parts to adhere to and move on such surfaces. The measurement of adhesive force is carried out under various conditions in which plate material, surface roughness of a plate and environmental humidity are differed. The adhesion mechanism is also discussed. Of the forces acting between a spider mite and a surface, one from dispersion interaction is the most dominant because (1) there is a high correlation between the adhesive force and the dispersion force component of surface energy with adhesive forces of 8.2µN for glass, 9.7µN for mica, 9.9µN for silicon and 12.1µN for gold, and because (2) high humidity and high surface roughness reduce the adhesive force. For strong adhesion based on work of adhesion, spider mites have tenent hairs with a bell-shaped end.

  12. Measuring the Forces between Magnetic Dipoles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gayetsky, Lisa E.; Caylor, Craig L.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a simple undergraduate lab in which students determine how the force between two magnetic dipoles depends on their separation. We consider the case where both dipoles are permanent and the case where one of the dipoles is induced by the field of the other (permanent) dipole. Agreement with theoretically expected results is quite good.

  13. Method for measuring surface temperature

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Gary A.; Baker, Sheila N.; McCleskey, T. Mark

    2009-07-28

    The present invention relates to a method for measuring a surface temperature using is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methyl pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  14. Probing characteristics of collagen molecules on various surfaces via atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Hao-Wei; Ho, Mon-Shu; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2012-06-01

    We examine, herein, specific dynamic responses of collagen molecules (i.e., observations of self-assembly and nanometric adhesion force measurements of type-I collagen molecules) as they interact with either a hydrophobic or a hydrophilic surface at two distinct temperatures, using a liquid-type atomic force microscope. We conclude that, regardless of surface hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity, assembled microfibrils eventually distribute homogeneously in accordance with changes in surface-related mechanical properties of collagen molecules at different self-assembly stages.

  15. Radiative forcing by light absorbing impurities in snow from MODIS surface reflectance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, Thomas H.; Bryant, Ann C.; Skiles, S. McKenzie

    2012-09-01

    The episodic deposition of dust and carbonaceous particles to snow decreases snow surface albedo and enhances absorption of solar radiation, leading to accelerated snowmelt, negative glacier mass balance, and the snow-albedo feedback. Until now, no remote sensing retrieval has captured the spatial and temporal variability of this forcing. Here we present the MODIS Dust Radiative Forcing in Snow (MODDRFS) model that retrieves surface radiative forcing by light absorbing impurities in snow cover from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) surface reflectance data. Validation of MODDRFS with a 7-year record of in situ measurements indicates the radiative forcing retrieval has positive bias at lower values and slight negative bias above 200 W m-2, subject to mixed pixel uncertainties. With bias-correction, MODDRFS has a root mean squared error of 32 W m-2 and mean absolute error of 25 W m-2. We demonstrate MODDRFS in the Upper Colorado River Basin and Hindu Kush-Himalaya.

  16. Force plate for measuring small animal forces by digital speckle pattern interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroyo, M. Pilar; Bea, José Antonio; Andrés, Nieves; Osta, Rosario; Doblaré, Manuel

    2007-06-01

    This paper presents a force plate specially designed for measuring ground reaction forces in small animals. Digital Speckle Pattern Interferometry (DSPI) is used to measure the plate deformation produced by the animal. Elasticity theory is used to obtain force magnitude and application position from the vertical displacement field measured with DSPI. The force plate has been tested with static weights of 5g and 10g at various locations on the plate. Some experiments with 20g body weight transgenic mice are also reported.

  17. Microstructural Characterization of Hierarchical Structured Surfaces by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomareva, A. A.; Moshnikov, V. A.; Suchaneck, G.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we evaluate the hierarchical surface topography of reactively sputtered nanocrystalline Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 and TiO2 thin films as well as plasma-treated antireflective PET films by means of determining the fractal dimension and power spectral density (PSD) of surface topography recorded by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Local fractal dimension was obtained using the triangulation method. The PSDs of all samples were fitted to the k-correlation model (also called ABC model) valid for a self-affine surface topography. Fractal analysis of AFM images was shown to be an appropriate and easy to use tool for the characterization of hierarchical nanostructures.

  18. Surface energy and interparticle forces correlations in model pMDI formulations.

    PubMed

    Traini, Daniela; Rogueda, Philippe; Young, Paul; Price, Robert

    2005-05-01

    To compare experimental measurements of particle cohesion and adhesion forces in a model propellant with theoretical measurements of the interfacial free energy of particulate interactions; with the aim of characterizing suspension stability of pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs). Interparticulate forces of salbutamol sulfate, budesonide, and formoterol fumarate dihydrate were investigated by in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) in a model propellant 2H,3H perfluoropentane. The surface thermodynamic properties were determined by contact angle (CA) and inverse gas chromatography (IGC). Experimental data were compared with theoretical work of adhesion/cohesion using a surface component approach (SCA), taking into account both dispersive and polar contributions of the surface free energy. Results indicated that the measured forces of interaction between particles in model propellant could not be accounted for by theoretical treatment of the dispersive surface free energies via CA and IGC. A correlation between theoretical work of adhesion/cohesion and AFM measurements was observed upon the introduction of the polar interfacial interactions within the SCA model. It is suggested that the polar contributions of the surface free energy measurements of particles may play a crucial role in particle interaction within propellant-based systems. Together with the application of a SCA model, this approach may be capable of predicting suspension stability of pMDI formulations.

  19. Force dependency of biochemical reactions measured by single molecule force-clamp spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Popa, Ionel; Kosuri, Pallav; Alegre-Cebollada, Jorge; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Fernandez, Julio M.

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a protocol for using force-clamp spectroscopy to precisely quantify the effect of force on biochemical reactions. A calibrated force is used to control the exposure of reactive sites in a single polyprotein substrate composed of repeated domains. The use of polyproteins allows the identification of successful single-molecule recordings from unambiguous mechanical unfolding fingerprints. Biochemical reactions are then measured directly by detecting the length changes of the substrate held at a constant force. We present the layout of a force-clamp spectrometer along with protocols to design and conduct experiments. These experiments measure reaction kinetics as a function of applied force. We show sample data of the force dependency of two different reactions, protein unfolding and disulfide reduction. These data, which can be acquired in just a few days, reveal mechanistic details of the reactions that currently cannot be resolved by any other technique. PMID:23744288

  20. Driving Force for the WO3(001) Surface Relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovkin, Ivan N.; Gutowski, Maciej S.

    2007-03-15

    The optimized structure of the WO3(001) surface with various types of termination ((1x1)O, (1x1) WO2, and c(2x2)O) has been simulated using density functional theory with the Perdew-Wang 91 gradient-corrected exchange correlation functional. While energy of bulk WO3 depends weakly on the distortions and tilting of the WO6 octahedra, relaxation the (001) surface results in a significant decrease of surface energy (from 10.2x10-2 eV/Å2 for bulk-extracted, ReO3-like, c(2x2)O-terminated surface to 2.2x10-2 eV/Å2 for the relaxed surface). This feature illustrates important role of surface in formation of crystalline nano-size clusters of WO3. The surface relaxation is accompanied by a dramatic redistribution of density of states near the Fermi level, in particular the transformations of surface electronic states. This redistribution is responsible for the decrease of electronic energy and therefore is suggested to be the driving force for surface relaxation of the WO3(001) surface and, presumably, similar surfaces of other transition metal oxides. Battelle operates PNNL for the USDOE.

  1. Microsystems for cellular force measurement: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayne Zheng, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Xin

    2011-05-01

    Microsystems are providing key advances in studying single cell mechanical behavior. The mechanical interaction of cells with their extracellular matrix is fundamentally important for cell migration, division, phagocytosis and aptoptosis. This review reports the development of microsystems on studying cell forces. Microsystems provide advantages of studying single cells since the scale of cells is on the micron level. The components of microsystems provide culture, loading, guiding, trapping and on chip analysis of cellular mechanical forces. This paper gives overviews on how MEMS are advancing in the field of cell biomechno sensory systems. It presents different materials, and mode of studying cell mechanics. Finally, we comment on the future directions and challenges on the state of art techniques.

  2. Coalescence and noncoalescence of sessile drops: impact of surface forces.

    PubMed

    Karpitschka, Stefan; Hanske, Christoph; Fery, Andreas; Riegler, Hans

    2014-06-17

    Due to capillarity, sessile droplets of identical liquids will instantaneously fuse when they come in contact at their three-phase lines. However, with drops of different, completely miscible liquids, instantaneous coalescence can be suppressed. Instead, the drops remain in a state of noncoalescence for some time, with the two drop bodies connected only by a thin neck. The reason for this noncoalescence is the surface tension difference, Δγ, between the liquids. If Δγ is sufficiently large, then it induces a sufficiently strong Marangoni flow, which keeps the main drop bodies temporarily separated. Studies with spreading drops have revealed that the boundary between instantaneous coalescence and noncoalescence is sharp (Karpitschka, S.; Riegler, H. J. Fluid. Mech. 2014, 743, R1). The boundary is a function of two parameters only: Δγ and Θ(a), the arithmetic mean of the contact angles in the moment of drop-drop contact. It appears plausible that surface forces (the disjoining pressure) could also influence the coalescence behavior. However, in experiments with spreading drops, surface forces always promote coalescence and their influence might be obscured. Therefore, we present here coalescence experiments with partially wetting liquids and compare the results to the spreading case. We adjust different equilibrium contact angles (i.e., different surface forces) with different substrate surface coatings. As for spreading drops, we observe a sharp boundary between regimes of coalescence and noncoalescence. The boundary follows the same power law relation for both partially and completely wetting cases. Therefore, we conclude that surface forces have no significant, explicit influence on the coalescence behavior of sessile drops from different miscible liquids.

  3. The role of deformable structured surfaces on viscous forces during peeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhong, Charles; Frechette, Joelle

    It is known that tree frogs are able to adhere well in flooded environments, presumably due to their interconnected network of drainage channels formed by hexagonal epithelial cells in their toe pads. To investigate this effect, a patterned surface of hexagonally arranged cylindrical posts was brought close to a stationary substrate in a submerged, viscous fluid via a normal load, and then peeled off to measure a retraction force. Because these structured surfaces were made from PDMS, they are able to deform throughout the process. We find that these deformable surfaces further reduce the work required to peel apart the two surfaces, even when compared to previous studies in the same system with rigid structures, and we isolated these contributions independent of conservative forces. We then conducted experiments to compare the effect of deformation on the viscous forces and conservative forces. We find that there are several regimes where deformation either increases or decreases the retraction force since we have found that elasticity decreases retraction forces when considering viscous contributions but is also known to increase adhesion in the context of conservative forces. Office of Naval Research, National Science Foundation, Hopkins Extreme Materials Institute.

  4. Precision Measurement of the Casimir Force for Au Using a Dynamic Afm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.-C.; Banishev, A. A.; Castillo-Garza, R.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.; Mohideen, U.

    2012-07-01

    The gradient of the Casimir force between carefully cleaned Au surfaces of a sphere and a plate is measured using a dynamic atomic force microscope in the frequency modulation regime in high vacuum. The electrostatic calibration of the setup did not reveal any effect of patches or surface contaminants. The experimental data for the force gradient are found to be consistent with theory using the plasma model approach over the entire measurement range. The Drude model approach is excluded by the data at separations from 235 to 400 nm at a 67% confidence level.

  5. Understanding nanorheology and surface forces of confined thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jun; Yan, Bin; Faghihnejad, Ali; Xu, Haolan; Zeng, Hongbo

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the nanorheology and associated intermolecular/surface forces of fluids in confined geometries or porous media is of both fundamental and practical importance, providing significant insights into various applications such as lubrication and micro/nanoelectromechanical systems. In this work, we briefly reviewed the fundamentals of nanoreheolgy, advances in experimental techniques and theoretical simulation methods, as well as important progress in the nanorheology of confined thin films. The advent of advanced experimental techniques such as surface forces apparatus (SFA), X-ray surface forces apparatus (XSFA) and atomic force microscope (AFM) and computational methods such as molecular dynamics simulations provides powerful tools to study a wide range of rheological phenomena at molecular level and nano scale. One of the most challenging issues unresolved is to elucidate the relationship between the rheological properties and structural evolution of the confined fluid films and particles suspensions. Some of the emerging research areas in the nanorheology field include, but are not limited to, the development of more advanced characterization techniques, design of multifunctional rheological fluids, bio-related nanorheology, and polymer brushes.

  6. Atomically resolved graphitic surfaces in air by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wastl, Daniel S; Weymouth, Alfred J; Giessibl, Franz J

    2014-05-27

    Imaging at the atomic scale using atomic force microscopy in biocompatible environments is an ongoing challenge. We demonstrate atomic resolution of graphite and hydrogen-intercalated graphene on SiC in air. The main challenges arise from the overall surface cleanliness and the water layers which form on almost all surfaces. To further investigate the influence of the water layers, we compare data taken with a hydrophilic bulk-silicon tip to a hydrophobic bulk-sapphire tip. While atomic resolution can be achieved with both tip materials at moderate interaction forces, there are strong differences in force versus distance spectra which relate to the water layers on the tips and samples. Imaging at very low tip-sample interaction forces results in the observation of large terraces of a naturally occurring stripe structure on the hydrogen-intercalated graphene. This structure has been previously reported on graphitic surfaces that are not covered with disordered adsorbates in ambient conditions (i.e., on graphite and bilayer graphene on SiC, but not on monolayer graphene on SiC). Both these observations indicate that hydrogen-intercalated graphene is close to an ideal graphene sample in ambient environments.

  7. Modifications of the structure of the pericellular matrix measured via optical force probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLane, Louis; Kramer, Anthony; Chang, Patrick; Curtis, Jennifer

    2013-03-01

    The pericellular matrix is a large protein and polysaccharide rich polymer layer attached to the surface of many cells, and which often extends several microns out from the cell surface into the surrounding extracellular space. Here we study the intrinsic nature and modifications of the structure of the pericellular coat on rat chondrocytes with the use of optical force probe microscopy. Optical force probe studies allow us to make both dynamic force measurements as well as equilibrium force measurements throughout the coat. These force measurements are used to observe the structural change in the coat with the addition of exogenous aggrecan. Not only does addition of exogenous aggrecan dramatically swell our coat to well over twice in size, our analysis indicates that the addition of exogenous aggrecan decreases the mesh size throughout the coat. We speculate that the added aggrecan binds to available binding sites along the hyaluronan chain, both enlarging the coat's size as well as tightening up the opening within the coat. We further suggest that the available binding sites for the exogenous aggrecan are abundant in the outer edges of the coat, as both the dynamic and equilibrium forces in this region are changed. Here, both force measurements show that forces closest to the cell membrane remain relatively unchanged, while the forces in the outer region of the coat are increased. These results are consistent with those obtained with complementary measurements using quantitative particle exclusion assays.

  8. Parallel force measurement with a polymeric microbeam array using an optical microscope and micromanipulator.

    PubMed

    Sasoglu, F Mert; Bohl, Andrew J; Allen, Kathleen B; Layton, Bradley E

    2009-01-01

    An image analysis method and its validation are presented for tracking the displacements of parallel mechanical force sensors. Force is measured using a combination of beam theory, optical microscopy, and image analysis. The primary instrument is a calibrated polymeric microbeam array mounted on a micromanipulator with the intended purpose of measuring traction forces on cell cultures or cell arrays. One application is the testing of hypotheses involving cellular mechanotransduction mechanisms. An Otsu-based image analysis code calculates displacement and force on cellular or other soft structures by using edge detection and image subtraction on digitally captured optical microscopy images. Forces as small as 250+/-50 nN and as great as 25+/-2.5 microN may be applied and measured upon as few as one or as many as hundreds of structures in parallel. A validation of the method is provided by comparing results from a rigid glass surface and a compliant polymeric surface.

  9. Measurement of dynamic and static radiation force on a sphere.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shigao; Silva, Glauber T; Kinnick, Randall R; Greenleaf, James F; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2005-05-01

    Dynamic radiation force from ultrasound has found increasing applications in elasticity imaging methods such as vibro-acoustography. Radiation force that has both static and dynamic components can be produced by interfering two ultrasound beams of slightly different frequencies. This paper presents a method to measure both static and dynamic components of the radiation force on a sphere suspended by thin threads in water. Due to ultrasound radiation force, the sphere deflects to an equilibrant position and vibrates around it. The static radiation force is estimated from the deflection of the sphere. The dynamic radiation force is estimated from the calculated radiation impedance of the sphere and its vibration speed measured by a laser vibrometer. Experimental results on spheres of different size, vibrated at various frequencies, confirm the theoretical prediction that the dynamic and static radiation force on a sphere have approximately equal magnitudes [G. T. Silva, Phys. Rev. E 71, 056617 (2005)].

  10. Direct calibration of colloidal probe cantilevers via Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek surface forces in electrolyte solution.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xiaoting; Willing, Gerold A

    2008-12-01

    The development of colloidal probe microscopy has made it possible to directly measure the interaction forces between two different surfaces in solution. Cantilever calibration is presently a subject of intense experimental and theoretical interest due to the need for accurate force measurement. We developed a novel and direct calibration method for colloidal probe cantilevers to which a silica microsphere has been previously attached based on fitting experimental force curves for the interaction between the silica sphere and a silica flat in dilute KBr solutions to the theoretical Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek force curves using the measured zeta potential of the silica surfaces.

  11. Calculation of Excavation Force for ISRU on Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeng, Xiangwu (David); Burnoski, Louis; Agui, Juan H.; Wilkinson, Allen

    2007-01-01

    Accurately predicting the excavation force that will be encountered by digging tools on the lunar surface is a crucial element of in-situ resource utilization (ISRU). Based on principles of soil mechanics, this paper develops an analytical model that is relatively simple to apply and uses soil parameters that can be determined by traditional soil strength tests. The influence of important parameters on the excavation force is investigated. The results are compared with that predicted by other available theories. Results of preliminary soil tests on lunar stimulant are also reported.

  12. Non-Markovianity in atom-surface dispersion forces

    DOE PAGES

    Intravaia, F.; Behunin, R. O.; Henkel, C.; ...

    2016-10-18

    Here, we discuss the failure of the Markov approximation in the description of atom-surface fluctuation-induced interactions, both in equilibrium (Casimir-Polder forces) and out of equilibrium (quantum friction). Using general theoretical arguments, we show that the Markov approximation can lead to erroneous predictions of such phenomena with regard to both strength and functional dependencies on system parameters. Particularly, we show that the long-time power-law tails of two-time dipole correlations and their corresponding low-frequency behavior, neglected in the Markovian limit, affect the prediction of the force. These findings highlight the importance of non-Markovian effects in dispersion interactions.

  13. Measurements of particle-wall interaction forces using simultaneous position and force detection (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashchuk, Anatolii V.; Bui, Ann A. M.; Stilgoe, Alexander B.; Carberry, David M.; Nieminen, Timo A.; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2016-09-01

    Particle-wall interactions are important in biology, micromachining, coagulation studies, and many other areas of science. As a contactless tool, optical tweezers are ideal for measuring these kind of interactions. Here we will present a new method for calculating the non-optical forces acting on a trapped particle using simultaneous position and force detection. Analysis of the particle's Brownian motion when trapped gives a measure of all the forces experienced by the particle. In contrast, measuring only the light's momentum change directly gives the solely optical force. This is achieved measuring the changes in the scattered light. The difference between the forces recorded by the two techniques reveals the external forces acting on the trapped particle. Therefore, by trapping the particle close to a wall, one can study the particle-wall interaction force in details. The simulation were done using the optical tweezer toolbox [1] to find the optical force acting on a particle. The net force was calculated from a Brownian motion's statistics of a trapped particle in the presence of the exponential external force. By using the proposed method, we were able to successfully reconstruct the external force. The experiment was done on a trapped spherical PMMA particle (d=2.2um) close to the 3D-printed wall. For the particle-wall distance 0.7um the non-optical force is 100fN . The experiment and simulation results confirm the efficiency of the proposed method for an external force measurements. [1] Nieminen et al., J. Opt. A 9, S196-S203 (2007).

  14. Direct Measurement of the Surface Energy of Graphene.

    PubMed

    van Engers, Christian D; Cousens, Nico E A; Babenko, Vitaliy; Britton, Jude; Zappone, Bruno; Grobert, Nicole; Perkin, Susan

    2017-06-14

    Graphene produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a promising candidate for implementing graphene in a range of technologies. In most device configurations, one side of the graphene is supported by a solid substrate, wheras the other side is in contact with a medium of interest, such as a liquid or other two-dimensional material within a van der Waals stack. In such devices, graphene interacts on both faces via noncovalent interactions and therefore surface energies are key parameters for device fabrication and operation. In this work, we directly measured adhesive forces and surface energies of CVD-grown graphene in dry nitrogen, water, and sodium cholate using a modified surface force balance. For this, we fabricated large (∼1 cm(2)) and clean graphene-coated surfaces with smooth topography at both macro- and nanoscales. By bringing two such surfaces into contact and measuring the force required to separate them, we measured the surface energy of single-layer graphene in dry nitrogen to be 115 ± 4 mJ/m(2), which was similar to that of few-layer graphene (119 ± 3 mJ/m(2)). In water and sodium cholate, we measured interfacial energies of 83 ± 7 and 29 ± 6 mJ/m(2), respectively. Our work provides the first direct measurement of graphene surface energy and is expected to have an impact both on the development of graphene-based devices and contribute to the fundamental understanding of surface interactions.

  15. A Revised Force Restore Model for Land Surface Modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Diandong; Xue, Ming

    2004-11-01

    To clarify the definition of the equation for the temperature toward which the soil skin temperature is restored, the prediction equations in the commonly used force restore model for soil temperature are rederived from the heat conduction equation. The derivation led to a deep-layer temperature, commonly denoted T2, that is defined as the soil temperature at depth πd plus a transient term, where d is the e-folding damping depth of soil temperature diurnal oscillations. The corresponding prediction equation for T2 has the same form as the commonly used one except for an additional term involving the lapse rate of the “seasonal mean” soil temperature and the damping depth d. A term involving the same also appears in the skin temperature prediction equation, which also includes a transient term. In the literature, T2 was initially defined as the short-term (over several days) mean of the skin temperature, but in practice it is often used as the deep-layer temperature. Such inconsistent use can lead to drift in T2 prediction over a several-day period, as is documented in this paper. When T2 is properly defined and initialized, large drift in T2 prediction is avoided and the surface temperature prediction is usually improved. This is confirmed by four sets of experiments, each for a period during each season of 2000, that are initialized using and verified against measurements of the Oklahoma Atmospheric Surface-Layer Instrumentation System (OASIS) project.


  16. Force Measurement on the GLAST Delta II Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Scott; Kaufman, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the interface force measurement at spacecraft separation of GLAST Delta II. The contents include: 1) Flight Force Measurement (FFM) Background; 2) Team Members; 3) GLAST Mission Overview; 4) Methodology Development; 5) Ground Test Validation; 6) Flight Data; 7) Coupled Loads Simulation (VCLA & Reconstruction); 8) Basedrive Simulation; 9) Findings; and 10) Summary and Conclusions.

  17. Physical forces exerted by microbubbles on a surface in a traveling wave field.

    PubMed

    Brems, S; Hauptmann, M; Camerotto, E; Mertens, P W; Heyns, M; Struyf, H; De Gendt, S

    2014-02-01

    The effect of a wave with a varying traveling component on the bubble activity as well as the physical force generated by microbubbles on a surface has been studied. The acoustic emission from a collection of bubbles is measured in a 928 kHz sound field. Particle removal tests on a surface, which actually measures the applied physical force by the bubbles on that surface, indicate a very strong dependence on the angle of incidence. In other words, when the traveling wave component is maximized, the average physical force applied by microbubbles reaches a maximum. Almost complete particle removal for 78 nm silica particles was obtained for a traveling wave, while particle removal efficiency was reduced to only a few percent when a standing wave was applied. This increase in particle removal for a traveling wave is probably caused by a decrease in bubble trapping at nodes and antinodes in a standing wave field.

  18. Hydrophobic pore array surfaces: wetting and interaction forces in water/ethanol mixtures.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Petra M; Hormozan, Yashar; Brandner, Birgit D; Linnros, Jan; Claesson, Per M; Swerin, Agne; Schoelkopf, Joachim; Gane, Patrick A C; Thormann, Esben

    2013-04-15

    Interactions between and wetting behavior of structured hydrophobic surfaces using different concentrations of water/ethanol mixtures have been investigated. Silica surfaces consisting of pore arrays with different pore spacings and pore depths were made hydrophobic by silanization. Their static and dynamic contact angles were found to be independent of the pore depth while fewer pores on the surface, i.e. a closer resemblance to a flat surface, gave a lower contact angle. As expected, a higher amount of ethanol facilitated wetting on all the surfaces tested. Confocal Raman microscopy measurements proved both water and ethanol to penetrate into the pores. AFM colloidal probe force measurements clearly showed that formation of air cavitation was hindered between the hydrophobic surfaces in presence of ethanol, and an increase in ethanol concentration was followed by a smaller jump-in distance and a weaker adhesion force. On separation, an immediate jump-out of contact occurred. The measured forces were interpreted as being due to capillary condensation of ethanol between the surfaces giving rise to very unstable cavities immediately rupturing on surface separation.

  19. Magnetic tweezers: micromanipulation and force measurement at the molecular level.

    PubMed Central

    Gosse, Charlie; Croquette, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    Cantilevers and optical tweezers are widely used for micromanipulating cells or biomolecules for measuring their mechanical properties. However, they do not allow easy rotary motion and can sometimes damage the handled material. We present here a system of magnetic tweezers that overcomes those drawbacks while retaining most of the previous dynamometers properties. Electromagnets are coupled to a microscope-based particle tracking system through a digital feedback loop. Magnetic beads are first trapped in a potential well of stiffness approximately 10(-7) N/m. Thus, they can be manipulated in three dimensions at a speed of approximately 10 microm/s and rotated along the optical axis at a frequency of 10 Hz. In addition, our apparatus can work as a dynamometer relying on either usual calibration against the viscous drag or complete calibration using Brownian fluctuations. By stretching a DNA molecule between a magnetic particle and a glass surface, we applied and measured vertical forces ranging from 50 fN to 20 pN. Similarly, nearly horizontal forces up to 5 pN were obtained. From those experiments, we conclude that magnetic tweezers represent a low-cost and biocompatible setup that could become a suitable alternative to the other available micromanipulators. PMID:12023254

  20. Direct measurement of the intermolecular forces between counterion-condensed DNA double helices. Evidence for long range attractive hydration forces.

    PubMed Central

    Rau, D C; Parsegian, V A

    1992-01-01

    Rather than acting by modifying van der Waals or electrostatic double layer interactions or by directly bridging neighboring molecules, polyvalent ligands bound to DNA double helices appear to act by reconfiguring the water between macromolecular surfaces to create attractive long range hydration forces. We have reached this conclusion by directly measuring the repulsive forces between parallel B-form DNA double helices pushed together from the separations at which they have self organized into hexagonal arrays of parallel rods. For all of the wide variety of "condensing agents" from divalent Mn to polymeric protamines, the resulting intermolecular force varies exponentially with a decay rate of 1.4-1.5 A, exactly one-half that seen previously for hydration repulsion. Such behavior qualitatively contradicts the predictions of all electrostatic double layer and van der Waals force potentials previously suggested. It fits remarkably well with the idea, developed and tested here, that multivalent counterion adsorption reorganizes the water at discrete sites complementary to unadsorbed sites on the apposing surface. The measured strength and range of these attractive forces together with their apparent specificity suggest the presence of a previously unexpected force in molecular organization. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:1540693

  1. Direct measurement of the intermolecular forces between counterion-condensed DNA double helices. Evidence for long range attractive hydration forces.

    PubMed

    Rau, D C; Parsegian, V A

    1992-01-01

    Rather than acting by modifying van der Waals or electrostatic double layer interactions or by directly bridging neighboring molecules, polyvalent ligands bound to DNA double helices appear to act by reconfiguring the water between macromolecular surfaces to create attractive long range hydration forces. We have reached this conclusion by directly measuring the repulsive forces between parallel B-form DNA double helices pushed together from the separations at which they have self organized into hexagonal arrays of parallel rods. For all of the wide variety of "condensing agents" from divalent Mn to polymeric protamines, the resulting intermolecular force varies exponentially with a decay rate of 1.4-1.5 A, exactly one-half that seen previously for hydration repulsion. Such behavior qualitatively contradicts the predictions of all electrostatic double layer and van der Waals force potentials previously suggested. It fits remarkably well with the idea, developed and tested here, that multivalent counterion adsorption reorganizes the water at discrete sites complementary to unadsorbed sites on the apposing surface. The measured strength and range of these attractive forces together with their apparent specificity suggest the presence of a previously unexpected force in molecular organization.

  2. Recent Investments by NASA's National Force Measurement Technology Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Commo, Sean A.; Ponder, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    The National Force Measurement Technology Capability (NFMTC) is a nationwide partnership established in 2008 and sponsored by NASA's Aeronautics Evaluation and Test Capabilities (AETC) project to maintain and further develop force measurement capabilities. The NFMTC focuses on force measurement in wind tunnels and provides operational support in addition to conducting balance research. Based on force measurement capability challenges, strategic investments into research tasks are designed to meet the experimental requirements of current and future aerospace research programs and projects. This paper highlights recent and force measurement investments into several areas including recapitalizing the strain-gage balance inventory, developing balance best practices, improving calibration and facility capabilities, and researching potential technologies to advance balance capabilities.

  3. Impact of Thermal Gradients on Wind Tunnel Force Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hereford, James; Parker, Peter A.; Rhew, Ray D.

    1999-01-01

    In a wind tunnel facility, the direct measurement of forces and moments induced on the model are performed by a force measurement balance. The measurement balance is a precision-machined device that has strain gages at strategic locations to measure the strain (i.e., deformations) due to applied forces and moments. The strain gages convert the strain (and hence the applied force) to an electrical voltage that is measured by external meters. Thermal gradients can complicate the process, however. Thermal gradients on the balance cause differential expansion (or contraction) of various parts of the balance that induce a strain that is detected by the strain gages and is indistinguishable from an external applied force. The thermal gradients can result when testing is done at elevated temperatures or at cryogenic temperatures such as at the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC).

  4. Are External Knee Load and EMG Measures Accurate Indicators of Internal Knee Contact Forces during Gait?

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Andrew J.; D'Lima, Darryl D.; Besier, Thor F.; Lloyd, David G.; Colwell, Clifford W.; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical loading is believed to be a critical factor in the development and treatment of knee osteoarthritis. However, the contact forces to which the knee articular surfaces are subjected during daily activities cannot be measured clinically. Thus, the ability to predict internal knee contact forces accurately using external measures (i.e., external knee loads and muscle EMG signals) would be clinically valuable. This study quantifies how well external knee load and EMG measures predict internal knee contact forces during gait. A single subject with a force-measuring tibial prosthesis and post-operative valgus alignment performed four gait patterns (normal, medial thrust, walking pole, and trunk sway) to induce a wide range of external and internal knee joint loads. Linear regression analyses were performed to assess how much of the variability in internal contact forces was accounted for by variability in the external measures. Though the different gait patterns successfully induced significant changes in the external and internal quantities, changes in external measures were generally weak indicators of changes in total, medial, and lateral contact force. Our results suggest that when total contact force may be changing, caution should be exercised when inferring changes in knee contact forces based on observed changes in external knee load and EMG measures. Advances in musculoskeletal modeling methods may be needed for accurate estimation of in vivo knee contact forces. PMID:23280647

  5. Development of cylindrical-type finger force measuring system using force sensors and its characteristics evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyeon-Min; Yoon, Joungwon; Shin, Hee-Suk; Kim, Gab-Soon

    2012-02-01

    Some patients cannot use their hands because of the paralysis of their fingers. Their fingers can recover with rehabilitative training, and the extent of rehabilitation can be judged by grasping a cylindrical-object with their fingers. At present, the cylindrical-object used in hospitals is only a plastic cylinder, which cannot measure grasping force of the fingers. Therefore, doctors must judge the extent of rehabilitation by watching patients' fingers as they grasp the plastic cylinder. In this paper, the development of two cylindrical-type finger force measuring systems with four force sensors for left hand and right hand were developed. The developed finger force measuring system can measure the grasping force of patients' each finger (forefinger, middle finger, ring finger and little finger), and the measured results could be used to judge the rehabilitation extent of a finger patient. The grasping force tests of men and women were performed using the developed cylindrical-type finger force measuring systems. The tests confirm that the average finger forces of right hand and left hand for men were about 194 N and 179 N, and for women, 108 N and 95 N.

  6. Adhesion force interactions between cyclopentane hydrate and physically and chemically modified surfaces.

    PubMed

    Aman, Zachary M; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Koh, Carolyn A

    2014-12-07

    Interfacial interactions between liquid-solid and solid-solid phases/surfaces are of fundamental importance to the formation of hydrate deposits in oil and gas pipelines. This work establishes the effect of five categories of physical and chemical modification to steel on clathrate hydrate adhesive force: oleamide, graphite, citric acid ester, nonanedithiol, and Rain-X anti-wetting agent. Hydrate adhesive forces were measured using a micromechanical force apparatus, under both dry and water-wet surface conditions. The results show that the graphite coating reduced hydrate-steel adhesion force by 79%, due to an increase in the water wetting angle from 42 ± 8° to 154 ± 7°. Two chemical surface coatings (nonanedithiol and the citric acid ester) induced rapid hydrate growth in the hydrate particles; nonanedithiol increased hydrate adhesive force by 49% from the baseline, while the citric acid ester coating reduced hydrate adhesion force by 98%. This result suggests that crystal growth may enable a strong adhesive pathway between hydrate and other crystalline structures, however this effect may be negated in cases where water-hydrocarbon interfacial tension is minimised. When a liquid water droplet was placed on the modified steel surfaces, the graphite and citric acid ester became less effective at reducing adhesive force. In pipelines containing a free water phase wetting the steel surface, chemical or physical surface modifications alone may be insufficient to eliminate hydrate deposition risk. In further tests, the citric acid ester reduced hydrate cohesive forces by 50%, suggesting mild activity as a hybrid anti-agglomerant suppressing both hydrate deposition and particle agglomeration. These results demonstrate a new capability to develop polyfunctional surfactants, which simultaneously limit the capability for hydrate particles to aggregate and deposit on the pipeline wall.

  7. Correct height measurement in noncontact atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sadewasser, Sascha; Lux-Steiner, Martha Ch

    2003-12-31

    We demonstrate that topography measurements by noncontact atomic force microscopy are subject to residual electrostatic forces. On highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) with a submonolayer coverage of C60, we monitor the step height from C60 to HOPG as a function of dc bias between tip and sample. Because of the different contact potential of C60 and HOPG ( approximately 50 mV), the step height is strongly dependent on the dc bias. The presented results and additional simulations demonstrate clearly that for correct height measurements it is mandatory to use a Kelvin probe force microscopy method with active compensation of electrostatic forces.

  8. A measurable force driven by an excitonic condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Hakioğlu, T.; Özgün, Ege; Günay, Mehmet

    2014-04-21

    Free energy signatures related to the measurement of an emergent force (≈10{sup −9}N) due to the exciton condensate (EC) in Double Quantum Wells are predicted and experiments are proposed to measure the effects. The EC-force is attractive and reminiscent of the Casimir force between two perfect metallic plates, but also distinctively different from it by its driving mechanism and dependence on the parameters of the condensate. The proposed experiments are based on a recent experimental work on a driven micromechanical oscillator. Conclusive observations of EC in recent experiments also provide a strong promise for the observation of the EC-force.

  9. Measurement of Force-Dependent Release Rates of Cytoskeletal Motors.

    PubMed

    Can, Sinan; Yildiz, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    Optical tweezers permit measuring motor-filament rupture forces with piconewton sensitivity. For deeper structural and mechanistic understanding of motors, different structural constraints can be induced by pulling motor proteins at various positions and manipulating the direction of the exerted force. Here, we present an optical-trapping approach to investigate the effect of the magnitude and direction of tension applied to the linker element of cytoskeletal motors on motor-filament interactions. Using this approach, force-dependent microtubule release rates of monomeric kinesins can be directly measured by pulling on kinesin's "neck linker" with a constant force.

  10. Surface Instability of Liquid Propellant under Vertical Oscillatory Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, H. Q.; Peugeot, John

    2011-01-01

    Fluid motion in a fuel tank produced during thrust oscillations can circulate sub-cooled hydrogen near the liquid-vapor interface resulting in increased condensation and ullage pressure collapse. The first objective of this study is to validate the capabilities of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tool, CFD-ACE+, in modeling the fundamental interface transition physics occurring at the propellant surface. The second objective is to use the tool to assess the effects of thrust oscillations on surface dynamics. Our technical approach is to first verify the CFD code against known theoretical solutions, and then validate against existing experiments for small scale tanks and a range of transition regimes. A 2D axisymmetric, multi-phase model of gases, liquids, and solids is used to verify that CFD-ACE+ is capable of modeling fluid-structure interaction and system resonance in a typical thrust oscillation environment. Then, the 3D mode is studied with an assumed oscillatory body force to simulate the thrust oscillating effect. The study showed that CFD modeling can capture all of the transition physics from solid body motion to standing surface wave and to droplet ejection from liquid-gas interface. Unlike the analytical solutions established during the 1960 s, CFD modeling is not limited to the small amplitude regime. It can extend solutions to the nonlinear regime to determine the amplitude of surface waves after the onset of instability. The present simulation also demonstrated consistent trends from numerical experiments through variation of physical properties from low viscous fluid to high viscous fluids, and through variation of geometry and input forcing functions. A comparison of surface wave patterns under various forcing frequencies and amplitudes showed good agreement with experimental observations. It is concluded that thrust oscillations can cause droplet formation at the interface, which results in increased surface area and enhanced heat transfer

  11. Measurement of axial forces via natural frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petro, Samer H.; Reynolds, Don; EnChen, Shen; GangaRao, Hota V. S.

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents results from testing several suspender ropes of the Delaware Memorial Bridge using vibration measurements and a non-destructive evaluation (NDE) instrument called the Axial Load Monitor (ALM). The testing consisted of measuring the frequencies of suspender ropes and determining their tension levels. Results were compared to theoretical predictions. This paper presents the results of the testing and discusses the problems associated with vibration measurements on actual bridges.

  12. Surface-charge differentiation of streptavidin and avidin by atomic force microscopy-force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Almonte, Lisa; Lopez-Elvira, Elena; Baró, Arturo M

    2014-09-15

    Chemical information can be obtained by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and force spectroscopy (FS) with atomic or molecular resolution, even in liquid media. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that single molecules of avidin and streptavidin anchored to a biotinylated bilayer can be differentiated by using AFM, even though AFM topographical images of the two proteins are remarkably alike. At physiological pH, the basic glycoprotein avidin is positively charged, whereas streptavidin is a neutral protein. This charge difference can be determined with AFM, which can probe electrostatic double-layer forces by using FS. The force curves, owing to the electrostatic interaction, show major differences when measured on top of each protein as well as on the lipid substrate. FS data show that the two proteins are negatively charged. Nevertheless, avidin and streptavidin can be clearly distinguished, thus demonstrating the sensitivity of AFM to detect small changes in the charge state of macromolecules.

  13. Tibial forces measured in vivo after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    D'Lima, Darryl D; Patil, Shantanu; Steklov, Nikolai; Slamin, John E; Colwell, Clifford W

    2006-02-01

    An instrumented tibial prosthesis was developed to measure forces in vivo after total tibial arthroplasty. This prosthesis was implanted in a 67-kg, 80-year-old man. The prosthesis measured forces at the 4 quadrants of the tibial tray. Tibial forces were measured postoperatively during rehabilitation, rising from a chair, standing, walking, and climbing stairs. By the sixth postoperative week, the peak tibial forces during walking averaged 2.2 times body weight (BW). Stair climbing increased from 1.9 times BW on day 6 to 2.5 times BW at 6 weeks. This represents the first direct in vivo measurement of tibial forces, which should lead to refined surgical techniques and enhanced prosthetic designs. Technical design improvements will enhance function, quality of life, and longevity of total knee arthroplasty.

  14. Temporal Modulations of Contact Force during Haptic Surface Exploration

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Sven; Schwarz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Individuals constantly modulate their exploratory movements and adapt their internal hypotheses to incoming sensory information to achieve a thorough and realistic percept. Perception depends on the exploratory movements as well as influencing them. While this seems to be common sense, scientifically we know very little about the temporal dynamics during haptic exploration. To address this, we investigated the exploratory force modulations of two groups of healthy young adults during the exploration of grated surfaces with differing detection difficulty during successive (n = 20) and random stimulus presentation (n = 20). Results showed that exploratory force depended on stimulus properties and increased with increasing detection difficulty. Both experiments yielded the same direction of results with slightly smaller effects in the random stimulus presentation group. Across exploration time average fingertip force also increased. The biggest increase occurred systematically at the beginning (within the first 40 percent) of exploration time per stimulus indicating that most critical information is received during the initial contact phase and is directly transformed into the exploration procedure and force application. Furthermore, video-analyses and comparisons to our high temporal resolution data revealed strong dynamic changes in pressure application during test stimulus exploration with differences in the force dynamics and exploration strategies of simple and difficult stimuli. PMID:27073843

  15. Forces involved in bacterial adhesion to hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Boks, Niels P; Norde, Willem; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2008-10-01

    Using a parallel-plate flow chamber, the hydrodynamic shear forces to prevent bacterial adhesion (F(prev)) and to detach adhering bacteria (F(det)) were evaluated for hydrophilic glass, hydrophobic, dimethyldichlorosilane (DDS)-coated glass and six different bacterial strains, in order to test the following three hypotheses. 1. A strong hydrodynamic shear force to prevent adhesion relates to a strong hydrodynamic shear force to detach an adhering organism. 2. A weak hydrodynamic shear force to detach adhering bacteria implies that more bacteria will be stimulated to detach by passing an air-liquid interface (an air bubble) through the flow chamber. 3. DLVO (Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, Overbeek) interactions determine the characteristic hydrodynamic shear forces to prevent adhesion and to detach adhering micro-organisms as well as the detachment induced by a passing air-liquid interface. F(prev) varied from 0.03 to 0.70 pN, while F(det) varied from 0.31 to over 19.64 pN, suggesting that after initial contact, strengthening of the bond occurs. Generally, it was more difficult to detach bacteria from DDS-coated glass than from hydrophilic glass, which was confirmed by air bubble detachment studies. Calculated attractive forces based on the DLVO theory (F(DLVO)) towards the secondary interaction minimum were higher on glass than on DDS-coated glass. In general, all three hypotheses had to be rejected, showing that it is important to distinguish between forces acting parallel (hydrodynamic shear) and perpendicular (DLVO, air-liquid interface passages) to the substratum surface.

  16. Direct measurement of cell detachment force on single cells using a new electromechanical method.

    PubMed

    Francis, G W; Fisher, L R; Gamble, R A; Gingell, D

    1987-05-01

    We describe a new device in which an accurately measured force is applied to individual adherent cells while the topography of the adhesion zone is simultaneously monitored. The force is applied via a flexible glass micropipette, attached by suction to the cell under study, and is calculated directly from the measured pipette deflection. Regions of close contact in the adhesion zone are observed using interference reflection microscopy. We have used the device to measure the force required to detach human red blood cells from hydrophobic and hydrophilic glass surfaces, and to detach Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae from a hydrophobic glass surface. The measured forces per unit length of contact perimeter are within an order of magnitude of the tensions required for membrane rupture.

  17. High-speed force load in force measurement in liquid using scanning probe microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Zou, Qingze

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an inversion-based iterative feedforward-feedback (II-FF/FB) approach to achieve high-speed force load in force measurement of soft materials in liquid using scanning probe microscope (SPM). SPM force measurement under liquid environment is needed to interrogate a wide range of soft materials, particularly live biological samples. Moreover, when dynamic evolution of the sample occurs during the measurement, and/or measuring the rate-dependent viscoelasticity of the sample, the force measurement also needs to be acquired at high-speed. Precision force load in liquid, however, is challenged by adverse effects including the thermal drift effect, the reduction of the signal to noise ratio, the distributive hydrodynamic force effect, and the hysteresis and vibrational dynamics effects of the piezoelectric actuators (for positioning the probe relative to the sample), particularly during high-speed measurement. Thus, the main contribution of the article is the development of the II-FF/FB approach to tackle these challenges. The proposed method is illustrated through an experimental implementation to the force-curve measurement of a poly (dimethylsiloxane) sample in liquid at high-speed.

  18. Annual Cycle of Cloud Forcing of Surface Radiation Budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilber, Anne C.; Smith, G. Louis; Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.; Gupta, Shashi K.

    2006-01-01

    The climate of the Earth is determined by its balance of radiation. The incoming and outgoing radiation fluxes are strongly modulated by clouds, which are not well understood. The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (Barkstrom and Smith, 1986) provided data from which the effects of clouds on radiation at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) could be computed (Ramanathan, 1987). At TOA, clouds increase the reflected solar radiation, tending to cool the planet, and decrease the OLR, causing the planet to retain its heat (Ramanathan et al., 1989; Harrison et al., 1990). The effects of clouds on radiation fluxes are denoted cloud forcing. These shortwave and longwave forcings counter each other to various degrees, so that in the tropics the result is a near balance. Over mid and polar latitude oceans, cloud forcing at TOA results in large net loss of radiation. Here, there are large areas of stratus clouds and cloud systems associated with storms. These systems are sensitive to surface temperatures and vary strongly with the annual cycle. During winter, anticyclones form over the continents and move to the oceans during summer. This movement of major cloud systems causes large changes of surface radiation, which in turn drives the surface temperature and sensible and latent heat released to the atmosphere.

  19. Measuring thermal rupture force distributions from an ensemble of trajectories.

    PubMed

    Swan, J W; Shindel, M M; Furst, E M

    2012-11-09

    Rupture, bond breaking, or extraction from a deep and narrow potential well requires considerable force while producing minimal displacement. In thermally fluctuating systems, there is not a single force required to achieve rupture, but a spectrum, as thermal forces can both augment and inhibit the bond breaking. We demonstrate measurement and interpretation of the distribution of rupture forces between pairs of colloidal particles bonded via the van der Waals attraction. The otherwise irreversible bond is broken by pulling the particles apart with optical tweezers. We show that an ensemble of the particle trajectories before, during and after the rupture event may be used to produce a high fidelity description of the distribution of rupture forces. This analysis is equally suitable for describing rupture forces in molecular and biomolecular contexts with a number of measurement techniques.

  20. Simulation of Forces between Humid Amorphous Silica Surfaces: A Comparison of Empirical Atomistic Force Fields

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric humidity strongly influences the interactions between dry granular particles in process containers. To reduce the energy loss in industrial production processes caused by particle agglomeration, a basic understanding of the dependence of particle interactions on humidity is necessary. Hence, in this study, molecular dynamic simulations were carried out to calculate the adhesion between silica surfaces in the presence of adsorbed water. For a realistic description, the choice of force field is crucial. Because of their frequent use and transferability to biochemical systems, the Clay and CWCA force fields were investigated with respect to their ability to describe the water–silica interface in comparison to the more advanced Reax force field, ab initio calculations, and experiments. PMID:23378869

  1. [Measurement of the isometric dorsiflexion and plantar flexion force in the ankle joint].

    PubMed

    Göpfert, Beat; Valderrabano, Victor; Hintermann, Beat; Wirz, Dieter

    2005-09-01

    This article describes an easy to use test equipment for measuring the isometric force in the ankle joints in dorsiflexion and plantar flexion. The combination of the test equipment for measuring the voluntary maximal isometric muscle force in the ankle joint, the surface electromyograms and the motion analysis of the measured leg allow an objective comparison of the strength of the muscular force between the left and right leg. It might be also used as a control setup during rehabilitation after surgical treatment or injuries.

  2. Boundary slip study on hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and superhydrophobic surfaces with dynamic atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Bharat; Wang, Yuliang; Maali, Abdelhamid

    2009-07-21

    Slip length has been measured using the dynamic atomic force microscopy (AFM) method. Unlike the contact AFM method, the sample surface approaches an oscillating sphere with a very low velocity in the dynamic AFM method. During this process, the amplitude and phase shift data are recorded to calculate the hydrodynamic damping coefficient, which is then used to obtain slip length. In this study, a glass sphere with a large radius was glued to the end of an AFM cantilever to measure the slip length on rough surfaces. Experimental results for hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and superhydrophobic surfaces show that the hydrodynamic damping coefficient decreases from the hydrophilic surface to the hydrophobic surface and from the hydrophobic one to the superhydrophobic one. The slip lengths obtained on the hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces are 43 and 236 nm, respectively, which indicates increasing boundary slip from the hydrophobic surface to the superhydrophobic one.

  3. Measured force/current relations in solid magnetic thrust bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Allaire, P.E.; Fittro, R.L.; Maslen, E.H.; Wakefield, W.C.

    1997-01-01

    When magnetic bearings are employed in a pump, compressor, turbine, or other rotating machine, measurement of the current in the bearing coils provides knowledge of the forces imposed on the bearings. This can be a significant indicator of machine problems. Additionally, magnetic bearings can be utilized as a load cell for measuring impeller forces in test rigs. The forces supported by magnetic bearings are directly related to the currents, air gaps, and other parameters in the bearings. This paper discusses the current/force relation for magnetic thrust bearings. Force versus current measurements were made on a particular magnetic bearing in a test rig as the bearing coil currents were cycled at various time rates of change.d the quasi-static force versus current relations were measured for a variety of air gaps and currents. The thrust bearing exhibits a hysteresis effect, which creates a significant difference between the measured force when the current is increasing as compared to that when the current is decreasing. For design current loops, 0.95 A to 2.55 A, at the time rate of change of 0.1 A/s, the difference between increasing and decreasing current curves due to hysteresis ranged from 4 to 8%. If the bearing is operated in small trajectories about a fixed (nonzero) operation point on the F/I (force/current) curve, the scatter in the measurement error could be expected to be on the order of 4%. A quasi-static nonlinear current/force equation was developed to model the data and curve-fit parameters established for the measured data. The effects of coercive force and iron reluctance, obtained from conventional magnetic materials tests, were included to improve the model, but theoretically calculated values from simple magnetic circuit theory do not produce accurate results. Magnetic fringing, leakage, and other effects must be included.

  4. Quantification of surface displacements and electromechanical phenomena via dynamic atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Balke, Nina; Jesse, Stephen; Yu, Pu; Carmichael, Ben; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Tselev, Alexander

    2016-09-15

    Detection of dynamic surface displacements associated with local changes in material strain provides access to a number of phenomena and material properties. Contact resonance-enhanced methods of atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been shown capable of detecting ~1–3 pm-level surface displacements, an approach used in techniques such as piezoresponse force microscopy, atomic force acoustic microscopy, and ultrasonic force microscopy. Here, based on an analytical model of AFM cantilever vibrations, we demonstrate a guideline to quantify surface displacements with high accuracy by taking into account the cantilever shape at the first resonant contact mode, depending on the tip–sample contact stiffness. The approach has been experimentally verified and further developed for piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) using well-defined ferroelectric materials. These results open up a way to accurate and precise measurements of surface displacement as well as piezoelectric constants at the pm-scale with nanometer spatial resolution and will allow avoiding erroneous data interpretations and measurement artifacts. Furthermore, this analysis is directly applicable to all cantilever-resonance-based scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques.

  5. Quantification of surface displacements and electromechanical phenomena via dynamic atomic force microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Balke, Nina; Jesse, Stephen; Yu, Pu; ...

    2016-09-15

    Detection of dynamic surface displacements associated with local changes in material strain provides access to a number of phenomena and material properties. Contact resonance-enhanced methods of atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been shown capable of detecting ~1–3 pm-level surface displacements, an approach used in techniques such as piezoresponse force microscopy, atomic force acoustic microscopy, and ultrasonic force microscopy. Here, based on an analytical model of AFM cantilever vibrations, we demonstrate a guideline to quantify surface displacements with high accuracy by taking into account the cantilever shape at the first resonant contact mode, depending on the tip–sample contact stiffness. The approachmore » has been experimentally verified and further developed for piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) using well-defined ferroelectric materials. These results open up a way to accurate and precise measurements of surface displacement as well as piezoelectric constants at the pm-scale with nanometer spatial resolution and will allow avoiding erroneous data interpretations and measurement artifacts. Furthermore, this analysis is directly applicable to all cantilever-resonance-based scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques.« less

  6. Quantification of surface displacements and electromechanical phenomena via dynamic atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balke, Nina; Jesse, Stephen; Yu, Pu; Carmichael, Ben; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Tselev, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Detection of dynamic surface displacements associated with local changes in material strain provides access to a number of phenomena and material properties. Contact resonance-enhanced methods of atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been shown capable of detecting ˜1-3 pm-level surface displacements, an approach used in techniques such as piezoresponse force microscopy, atomic force acoustic microscopy, and ultrasonic force microscopy. Here, based on an analytical model of AFM cantilever vibrations, we demonstrate a guideline to quantify surface displacements with high accuracy by taking into account the cantilever shape at the first resonant contact mode, depending on the tip-sample contact stiffness. The approach has been experimentally verified and further developed for piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) using well-defined ferroelectric materials. These results open up a way to accurate and precise measurements of surface displacement as well as piezoelectric constants at the pm-scale with nanometer spatial resolution and will allow avoiding erroneous data interpretations and measurement artifacts. This analysis is directly applicable to all cantilever-resonance-based scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques.

  7. Quantification of surface displacements and electromechanical phenomena via dynamic atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Balke, Nina; Jesse, Stephen; Yu, Pu; Carmichael, Ben; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Tselev, Alexander

    2016-09-15

    Detection of dynamic surface displacements associated with local changes in material strain provides access to a number of phenomena and material properties. Contact resonance-enhanced methods of atomic force microscopy (AFM) have been shown capable of detecting ~1–3 pm-level surface displacements, an approach used in techniques such as piezoresponse force microscopy, atomic force acoustic microscopy, and ultrasonic force microscopy. Here, based on an analytical model of AFM cantilever vibrations, we demonstrate a guideline to quantify surface displacements with high accuracy by taking into account the cantilever shape at the first resonant contact mode, depending on the tip–sample contact stiffness. The approach has been experimentally verified and further developed for piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) using well-defined ferroelectric materials. These results open up a way to accurate and precise measurements of surface displacement as well as piezoelectric constants at the pm-scale with nanometer spatial resolution and will allow avoiding erroneous data interpretations and measurement artifacts. Furthermore, this analysis is directly applicable to all cantilever-resonance-based scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques.

  8. A density-scaled continuum surface force model within a balanced force formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, Kensuke

    2014-12-01

    We propose a numerical framework which can simulate free surface flows with complex moving interfaces like droplet splashing as minimizing spurious currents. The numerical framework is based on the CLSVOF (coupled level set and volume-of-fluid) method, the THINC/WLIC (tangent of hyperbola for interface capturing/weighted line interface calculation) scheme, multi-moment methods (CIP-CSL and VSIAM3) and density-scaled CSF (continuum surface force) model within a balanced force formulation. In this paper, we propose a level set based algorithm of the density-scaled balanced CSF model and show that the density-scaled balanced CSF model can reduce spurious currents more than the standard balanced CSF model without using the density-scaling when the exact curvature is not given. We also show that the numerical framework can well capture the physics of droplet splashing.

  9. Differential MS2 Interaction with Food Contact Surfaces Determined by Atomic Force Microscopy and Virus Recovery.

    PubMed

    Shim, J; Stewart, D S; Nikolov, A D; Wasan, D T; Wang, R; Yan, R; Shieh, Y C

    2017-10-06

    Enteric viruses are recognized as a major etiology for U.S. foodborne infections. These viruses are easily transmitted via food contact surfaces. Understanding virus interactions with surfaces may facilitate developing improved means for their removal thus reducing transmission. Using MS2 coliphage as a virus surrogate, the strength of virus adhesion onto common food processing and preparation surfaces of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and glass were assessed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and virus recovery assays. The interaction forces of MS2 to various surfaces were measured from adhesion peaks in force-distance curves registered using a spherical bead probe pre-conjugated with MS2 particles. MS2 in PBS demonstrated approximately 5 times less adhesion force to glass [0.54 nano Newton (nN)] than to PVC (2.87 nN), P < 0.0001. This is consistent with the virus recovery assay, which shows 1.4-fold fewer virus plaque-forming units (PFU) recovered from PVC than from glass after identical inoculation and 24 hr-cold storage. The difference in adhesion was ascribed to both the intrinsic chemical characteristics and the substrate surface porosity, smooth glass vs. porous PVC. Incorporating a surfactant micellar solution of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) into the PBS medium reduced the adhesion force of PVC (∼ 0 nN), and consistently increased virus recovery by 19%. With direct and indirect evidence of virus adhesion, this study illustrated a two-way assessment of virus adhesion for the initial evaluation of a potential means in mitigating virus adhesion to food contact surfaces.IMPORTANCE Spread of foodborne viruses is likely associated with their adhesive nature. Virus attachment on food contact surfaces has been evaluated by quantitating their recoveries from inoculated surfaces. This study aims to evaluate the microenvironment where nano-sized viruses interact with food contact surfaces, and to compare the virus adhesion differences using atomic force microscopy (AFM

  10. Atomic force microscopy analysis of different surface treatments of Ti dental implant surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bathomarco, Ti R. V.; Solorzano, G.; Elias, C. N.; Prioli, R.

    2004-06-01

    The surface of commercial unalloyed titanium, used in dental implants, was analyzed by atomic force microscopy. The morphology, roughness, and surface area of the samples, submitted to mechanically-induced erosion, chemical etching and a combination of both, were compared. The results show that surface treatments strongly influence the dental implant physical and chemical properties. An analysis of the length dependence of the implant surface roughness shows that, for scan sizes larger than 50 μm, the average surface roughness is independent of the scanning length and that the surface treatments lead to average surface roughness in the range of 0.37 up to 0.48 μm. It is shown that the implant surface energy is sensitive to the titanium surface area. As the area increases there is a decrease in the surface contact angle.

  11. Oceanic Precipitation Measurement - Surface Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klepp, Christian

    2013-04-01

    State-of-the-art satellite derived and reanalysis based precipitation climatologies still show remarkably large differences in frequency, amount, intensity, variability and temporal behavior of precipitation over the oceans. Additionally so far appropriate in-situ validation instruments were not available for shipboard use. The uncertainties are largest for light precipitation within the ITCZ and subtropics and for cold season high-latitude precipitation including mix-phase and snowfall. Hence, a long-term issue on which IPWG and GPM-GV is urging more attention is the provision of high quality surface validation data in oceanic areas using innovative ship-based instruments. Precipitation studies would greatly benefit from systematic dataset collection and analysis as such data could also be used to constrain precipitation retrievals. To achieve this goal, the KlimaCampus and Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg, Germany funded this project that uses automated shipboard optical disdrometers, called Eigenbrodt ODM470, that are capable of measuring liquid and solid precipitation using drop size distributions in minute intervals on moving ships with high accuracy even under high wind speeds and rough sea states. Since the project start in 2009 the statistical basis for a conclusive validation has significantly improved with comprehensive data collection of more than 3 million minutes of precipitation measurements onboard six ships. Currently, six ODM470 instrument systems are available of which three are long-term mounted onboard the German research icebreaker R/V Polarstern (Alfred Wegner Institut) since June 2010, on R/V Akademik Ioffe (P.P.Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia) since September 2010 and on R/V Maria S. Merian (Brise Research, University of Hamburg) since December 2011. Three instruments are used for additional short-term shipboard campaigns and intercomparison projects. The core regions for these

  12. Molecular force sensors to measure stress in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhune, Meenakshi; Rehfeldt, Florian; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2017-06-01

    Molecularly generated forces are essential for most activities of biological cells, but also for the maintenance of steady state or homeostasis. To quantitatively understand cellular dynamics in migration, division, or mechanically guided differentiation, it will be important to exactly measure stress fields within the cell and the extracellular matrix. Traction force microscopy and related techniques have been established to determine the stress transmitted from adherent cells to their substrates. However, different approaches are needed to directly assess the stress generated inside the cell. This has recently led to the development of novel molecular force sensors. In this topical review, we briefly mention methods used to measure cell-external forces, and then summarize and explain different designs for the measurement of cell-internal forces with their respective advantages and disadvantages.

  13. Piconewton force measurement using a nanometric photonic crystal diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Jo, Wonuk; Digonnet, Michel J F

    2014-08-01

    A compact force fiber sensor capable of measuring forces at the piconewton level is reported. It consists of a miniature Fabry-Perot cavity fabricated at the tip a single-mode fiber, in which the external reflector is a compliant photonic-crystal diaphragm that deflects when subjected to a force. In the laboratory environment, this sensor was able to detect a force of only ∼4  pN generated by the radiation pressure of a laser beam. Its measured minimum detectable force (MDF) at 3 kHz was as weak as 1.3  pN/√Hz. In a quiet environment, the measured noise was ∼16 times lower, and the MDF predicted to be ∼76  fN/√Hz.

  14. Direct measurement of the forces generated by an undulatory microswimmer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulman, Rafael; Backholm, Matilda; Ryu, William; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2014-11-01

    C. elegans is a millimeter-sized nematode which has served as a model organism in biology for several decades, primarily due to its simple anatomy. Employing an undulatory form of locomotion, this worm is capable of propelling itself through various media. Using a micropipette deflection technique, in conjunction with high speed imaging, we directly measure the time-varying forces generated by C. elegans. We observe excellent agreement between our measured forces and the predictions of resistive force theory, through which we determine the drag coefficients of the worm. We also perform the direct force measurements at controlled distances from a single solid boundary as well as between two solid boundaries. We extract the drag coefficients of the worm to quantify the influence of the boundary on the swimming and the hydrodynamic forces involved.

  15. Nanonewton force measurement using a modified Michelson interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahviliyan, Masoud; Charsooghi, Mohammad A.; Akhlaghi, Ehsan A.; Taghi Tavassoly, Mohammad

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new method to measure forces in the nanonewton range. The method is based on modification of a Michelson interferometer in which the rigid mirrors are replaced with two thin rod-like mirrors. One of the rod-like mirrors is fixed at both ends and the other has one free end. As the mirror with free end deflects in response to an applied force the spatial interference pattern is changed. Analysis of the interference fringes provides a readout of the rod deflection and thereby the applied force. The device is calibrated by applying known forces to the mirror with a free end and measuring the resulting displacement. Two different methods, mechanical and electrostatic, are used for calibration. The precision of the measurements and the propagation of the calibration uncertainty are investigated. The results show that this optical method is a good candidate for detecting small forces in the nanonewton range.

  16. Specific antigen/antibody interactions measured by force microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Dammer, U; Hegner, M; Anselmetti, D; Wagner, P; Dreier, M; Huber, W; Güntherodt, H J

    1996-01-01

    Molecular recognition between biotinylated bovine serum albumin and polyclonal, biotin-directed IG antibodies has been measured directly under various buffer conditions using an atomic force microscope (AFM). It was found that even highly structured molecules such as IgG antibodies preserve their specific affinity to their antigens when probed with an AFM in the force mode. We could measure the rupture force between individual antibody-antigen complexes. The potential and limitations of this new approach for the measurement of individual antigen/antibody interactions and some possible applications are discussed. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 PMID:9172770

  17. Force Measurements in Magnetic Suspension and Balance System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzin, Alexander; Shapovalov, George; Prohorov, Nikolay

    1996-01-01

    The description of an infrared telemetry system for measurement of drag forces in Magnetic Suspension and Balance Systems (MSBS) is presented. This system includes a drag force sensor, electronic pack and transmitter placed in the model which is of special construction, and receiver with a microprocessor-based measuring device, placed outside of the test section. Piezosensitive resonators as sensitive elements and non-magnetic steel as the material for the force sensor are used. The main features of the proposed system for load measurements are discussed and the main characteristics are presented.

  18. Attractive surface force in the presence of dissolved gas: a molecular approach.

    PubMed

    Bratko, Dusan; Luzar, Alenka

    2008-02-19

    Despite widespread evidence of the influence of dissolved air on hydrophobic interaction, the mechanisms of observed effects are still unknown. Although some experiments indicate that adsorbed gases can modify the structure of water next to hydrophobic surfaces, gas effects on measured forces have been observed only at large surface separations. Gas-specific depletion of water at a hydrophobic surface has been detected but was not reproduced in subsequent measurements. We use computer simulations to study short-ranged hydrophobic attraction in the absence and presence of dissolved gas and monitor gas adsorption at molecular resolution inaccessible in experiments. Although we observe a significant accumulation of dissolved gases at hydrophobic surfaces, even in supersaturated gas solutions surface concentrations remain too low to induce any significant change in the local structure of water and short-range surface forces. We present direct calculations of the hydrophobic force between model hydrocarbon plates at separations between 1.5 and 4 nm. Although stronger, the calculated solvation force has a similar decay rate as deduced from recent surface force apparatus measurements at a somewhat lower contact angle. Within the statistical uncertainty, short-range attraction is not affected by the presence of dissolved nitrogen, even in supersaturated solution with a gas fugacity as high as 30 atm. Comparisons of the adsorption behavior of N2, O2, CO2, and Ar reveal similar features in contrast to the peculiar suppression of water depletion reported for an Ar solution in a neutron reflectivity experiment. Our calculations reveal a notable difference between pathways to the capillary evaporation of pure water and gas-phase nucleation in confined supersaturated gas solutions.

  19. Effect of nanobubbles on friction forces between hydrophobic surfaces in water.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Marc A; Donose, Bogdan C; Taran, Elena; Nguyen, Anh V

    2009-01-01

    The interaction between hydrophobic surfaces in aqueous solutions is particularly important because it is encountered in many industrial processes. Even though advances in surface science have been tremendous, the nature of the hydrophobic interaction remains one of the greatest challenges to the field. In this work an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to measure the normal and lateral interactions between a silica bead and a smooth silica substrate hydrophobized by esterification with 1-octanol. The experiments were performed in water and in water after alcohol-water exchange, a method that has been shown to increase the occurrence and size of nanobubbles at the hydrophobic surface and in turn result in a longer range hydrophobic force due to capillary bridge formation. It was found that the alcohol-water exchange had a significant impact on the friction force due to the increased size of the capillary, which increased adhesion.

  20. Characterization of local hydrophobicity on sapphire (0001) surfaces in aqueous environment by colloidal probe atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Tomoya; Yamazaki, Kenji; Isono, Toshinari; Ogino, Toshio

    2017-02-01

    Sapphire (0001) surfaces exhibit a phase-separation into hydrophobic and hydrophilic domains upon high-temperature annealing, which were previously distinguished by the thickness of adsorbed water layers in air using atomic force microscopy (AFM). To characterize their local surface hydrophobicity in aqueous environment, we used AFM equipped with a colloidal probe and measured the local adhesive force between each sapphire domain and a hydrophilic SiO2 probe surface, or a hydrophobic polystyrene one. Two data acquisition modes for statistical analyses were used: one is force measurements at different positions of the surface and the other repeated measurement at a fixed position. We found that adhesive force measurements using the polystyrene probe allow us to distinctly separate the hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains. The dispersion in the force measurement data at different positions of the surface is larger than that in the repeated measurements at a fixed position. It indicates that the adhesive force measurement is repeatable although their data dispersion for the measurement positions is relatively large. From these results, we can conclude that the hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains on the sapphire (0001) surfaces are distinguished by a difference in their hydration degrees.

  1. Vehicle Lateral State Estimation Based on Measured Tyre Forces

    PubMed Central

    Tuononen, Ari J.

    2009-01-01

    Future active safety systems need more accurate information about the state of vehicles. This article proposes a method to evaluate the lateral state of a vehicle based on measured tyre forces. The tyre forces of two tyres are estimated from optically measured tyre carcass deflections and transmitted wirelessly to the vehicle body. The two remaining tyres are so-called virtual tyre sensors, the forces of which are calculated from the real tyre sensor estimates. The Kalman filter estimator for lateral vehicle state based on measured tyre forces is presented, together with a simple method to define adaptive measurement error covariance depending on the driving condition of the vehicle. The estimated yaw rate and lateral velocity are compared with the validation sensor measurements. PMID:22291535

  2. From static to animated: Measuring mechanical forces in tissues.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Celeste M

    2017-01-02

    Cells are physical objects that exert mechanical forces on their surroundings as they migrate and take their places within tissues. New techniques are now poised to enable the measurement of cell-generated mechanical forces in intact tissues in vivo, which will illuminate the secret dynamic lives of cells and change our current perception of cell biology.

  3. Report of the Task Force on Institutional Effectiveness Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Board of Directors for Community Colleges, Phoenix.

    The Task Force on Institutional Effectiveness Measures was formed by the State Board of Directors for Community Colleges of Arizona to develop a statewide plan for systematically demonstrating the degree to which community colleges accomplish their diverse missions. Two subgroups were formed in the Task Force on transfer and college programs and…

  4. Uncertainties in forces extracted from non-contact atomic force microscopy measurements by fitting of long-range background forces.

    PubMed

    Sweetman, Adam; Stannard, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    In principle, non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) now readily allows for the measurement of forces with sub-nanonewton precision on the atomic scale. In practice, however, the extraction of the often desired 'short-range' force from the experimental observable (frequency shift) is often far from trivial. In most cases there is a significant contribution to the total tip-sample force due to non-site-specific van der Waals and electrostatic forces. Typically, the contribution from these forces must be removed before the results of the experiment can be successfully interpreted, often by comparison to density functional theory calculations. In this paper we compare the 'on-minus-off' method for extracting site-specific forces to a commonly used extrapolation method modelling the long-range forces using a simple power law. By examining the behaviour of the fitting method in the case of two radically different interaction potentials we show that significant uncertainties in the final extracted forces may result from use of the extrapolation method.

  5. Uncertainties in forces extracted from non-contact atomic force microscopy measurements by fitting of long-range background forces

    PubMed Central

    Stannard, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Summary In principle, non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) now readily allows for the measurement of forces with sub-nanonewton precision on the atomic scale. In practice, however, the extraction of the often desired ‘short-range’ force from the experimental observable (frequency shift) is often far from trivial. In most cases there is a significant contribution to the total tip–sample force due to non-site-specific van der Waals and electrostatic forces. Typically, the contribution from these forces must be removed before the results of the experiment can be successfully interpreted, often by comparison to density functional theory calculations. In this paper we compare the ‘on-minus-off’ method for extracting site-specific forces to a commonly used extrapolation method modelling the long-range forces using a simple power law. By examining the behaviour of the fitting method in the case of two radically different interaction potentials we show that significant uncertainties in the final extracted forces may result from use of the extrapolation method. PMID:24778964

  6. Imaging the condensation and evaporation of molecularly thin ethanol films with surface forces apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Gutian; Tan, Qiyan; Xiang, Li; Zhang, Di; Ni, Zhonghua E-mail: yunfeichen@seu.edu.cn; Yi, Hong; Chen, Yunfei E-mail: yunfeichen@seu.edu.cn

    2014-01-15

    A new method for imaging condensation and evaporation of molecularly thin ethanol films is reported. It is found that the first adsorbed layer of ethanol film on mica surface behaves as solid like structure that cannot flow freely. With the increase of exposure time, more ethanol molecules condense over the mica surface in the saturated ethanol vapor condition. The first layer of adsorbed ethanol film is about 3.8 Å thick measured from the surface forces apparatus, which is believed to be the average diameter of ethanol molecules while they are confined in between two atomically smooth mica surfaces.

  7. Measuring Air Force Contracting Customer Satisfaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    customers to determine the kind and quality of services they want and their level of satisfaction with existing services ; (c) post service ...Contracting’s customer service chain. A. WHAT IS A CUSTOMER ? Prior to developing a customer satisfaction measurement tool, it is necessary to define what...by servicing organizations to evaluate a customer’s experience. Correspondingly, organizations often use customer satisfaction

  8. Measuring Drag Force in Newtonian Liquids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawhinney, Matthew T.; O'Donnell, Mary Kate; Fingerut, Jonathan; Habdas, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    The experiments described in this paper have two goals. The first goal is to show how students can perform simple but fundamental measurements of objects moving through simple liquids (such as water, oil, or honey). In doing so, students can verify Stokes' law, which governs the motion of spheres through simple liquids, and see how it fails at…

  9. Force Developments. The Measurement of Effectiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-01-01

    14309 Prevention and Control of Cormmunicable Diseases oi Animals . 14689 Analysis to Identify Non-Divisional TOE Combat FSarvi~e Support Units Requiring...powerful tool for performing comparative analyses if experimentaion is properly de- signed and conducted. 4. Specifics in the Measurement .f

  10. Measuring Drag Force in Newtonian Liquids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawhinney, Matthew T.; O'Donnell, Mary Kate; Fingerut, Jonathan; Habdas, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    The experiments described in this paper have two goals. The first goal is to show how students can perform simple but fundamental measurements of objects moving through simple liquids (such as water, oil, or honey). In doing so, students can verify Stokes' law, which governs the motion of spheres through simple liquids, and see how it fails at…

  11. Direct measurement of Vorticella contraction force by micropipette deflection.

    PubMed

    France, Danielle; Tejada, Jonathan; Matsudaira, Paul

    2017-02-01

    The ciliated protozoan Vorticella convallaria is noted for its exceptionally fast adenosine triphosphate-independent cellular contraction, but direct measurements of contractile force have proven difficult given the length scale, speed, and forces involved. We used high-speed video microscopy to image live Vorticella stalled in midcontraction by deflection of an attached micropipette. Stall forces correlate with both distance contracted and the resting stalk length. Estimated isometric forces range from 95 to 177 nanonewtons (nN), or 1.12 nN·μm(-1) of the stalk. Maximum velocity and work are also proportional to distance contracted. These parameters constrain proposed biochemical/physical models of the contractile mechanism.

  12. Sensitivity of Force Specifications to the Errors in Measuring the Interface Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worth, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    Force-Limited Random Vibration Testing has been applied in the last several years at NASA/GSFC for various programs at the instrument and system level. Different techniques have been developed over the last few decades to estimate the dynamic forces that the test article under consideration will encounter in the operational environment. Some of these techniques are described in the handbook, NASA-HDBK-7004, and the monograph, NASA-RP-1403. A key element in the ability to perform force-limited testing is multi-component force gauges. This paper will show how some measurement and calibration errors in force gauges are compensated for w en tie force specification is calculated. The resulting notches in the acceleration spectrum, when a random vibration test is performed, are the same as the notches produced during an uncompensated test that has no measurement errors. The paper will also present the results of tests that were used to validate this compensation. Knowing that the force specification can compensate for some measurement errors allows tests to continue after force gauge failures or allows dummy gauges to be used in places that are inaccessible.

  13. Measurement of agitation force in dissolution test and mechanical destructive force in disintegration test.

    PubMed

    Kamba, Masaharu; Seta, Yasuo; Takeda, Nao; Hamaura, Takeshi; Kusai, Akira; Nakane, Hisanori; Nishimura, Kenji

    2003-01-02

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the agitation force and mechanical destructive force on the drug dissolution of a tablet in the paddle rotation dissolution test and in the disintegration test. The agitation in the paddle method and the mechanical destructive force in the disintegration test were considered to be conclusive factors for drug dissolution. The dissolution rate of planar-constant-release tablets increased with increasing paddle rotation speed and increased with increasing distance from the center of the vessel bottom. Separately, the fluid resistance (agitation force) in the vessel was measured using a modified paddle method apparatus equipped with a fluid resistance sensor. The fluid resistance was 0.03 x 10(-3) N/(64 mm(2)) when the paddle rotation speed was 50 rpm at a position 4 mm away from the center. A considerable position-dependent change in agitation force intensity was seen with the fluid resistance sensor. The impulsive force (mechanical destructive force) in the disintegration test apparatus was measured using a modified basket-rack assembly with a strain gauge transducer. The fluid resistance was measured using the basket-rack assembly with a different sensor probe and amplifier. The impulsive force applied by the auxiliary disk was 0.31 N and the fluid resistance at the bottom of the basket-rack assembly was 1.66 x 10(-3) N/(64 mm(2)).

  14. Sensitivity of Force Specifications to the Errors in Measuring the Interface Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worth, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    Force-Limited Random Vibration Testing has been applied in the last several years at NASA/GSFC for various programs at the instrument and system level. Different techniques have been developed over the last few decades to estimate the dynamic forces that the test article under consideration will encounter in the operational environment. Some of these techniques are described in the handbook, NASA-HDBK-7004, and the monograph, NASA-RP-1403. A key element in the ability to perform force-limited testing is multi-component force gauges. This paper will show how some measurement and calibration errors in force gauges are compensated for w en tie force specification is calculated. The resulting notches in the acceleration spectrum, when a random vibration test is performed, are the same as the notches produced during an uncompensated test that has no measurement errors. The paper will also present the results of tests that were used to validate this compensation. Knowing that the force specification can compensate for some measurement errors allows tests to continue after force gauge failures or allows dummy gauges to be used in places that are inaccessible.

  15. A force balance system for the measurement of skin friction drag force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. W.; Mcvey, E. S.

    1971-01-01

    Research on force balance instrumentation to measure the skin friction of hypersonic vehicles at extreme temperatures, high altitudes and in a vibration field is discussed. A rough overall summary and operating instructions for the equipment are presented.

  16. An instrumented cylinder measuring pinch force and orientation

    PubMed Central

    Bourbonnais, Daniel; Frak, Victor; Pilon, Jean-François; Goyette, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Background The function of a cylinder allowing simultaneous measurements of the opposition axis of the index finger and thumb of the hand and the magnitude of pinch force is described. Methods The apparatus is made of two half-cylinders that are bonded together through a 6-axis force/torque sensor and allows the measurement of 3D orthogonal forces and moments of force. The amplitude of the pinch force exerted on the cylinder by the fingers is defined as the resultant of the forces in the different axes. A software program was developed to measure the barycentre of the forces on the instrumented cylinder, allowing calculation of the angle of the opposition axis between the fingers and the location of the resulting pinch force on the cylinder, assuming that the pinch or grip forces are co-linear through the center of the cylinder. In order to assess the validity and reliability of the measurements, the cylinder was mounted on a milling table and seven calibrated weights (from 100 to 500 g) were successively applied perpendicularly to a 9*9 matrix of sites separated by 1 cm. With the exception of the extreme lateral parts of the cylinder, the dispersion of the calculated vertical position of the resulting force was always within 1 mm of the application point, suggesting a high reliability of these measurements. In addition, the errors in the angles of the applied force were calculated and found to be less than 2 degree with no clear patterns of variation across the different locations of the cylinder. Results The usefulness of the cylinder is demonstrated by evaluating the pinch force and the opposition axis in six healthy subjects lifting the cylinder from the table using three different orientations of their right hand. The magnitude of the grip force was not significantly different across orientations (45, 22 and -22 degrees relative to the midline of the subject) suggesting that force grip is controlled. Conclusion From these results, it has been concluded that

  17. The measurement of surface gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossley, David; Hinderer, Jacques; Riccardi, Umberto

    2013-04-01

    This review covers basic theory and techniques behind the use of ground-based gravimetry at the Earth's surface. The orientation is toward modern instrumentation, data processing and interpretation for observing surface, land-based, time-variable changes to the geopotential. The instrumentation side is covered in some detail, with specifications and performance of the most widely used models of the three main types: the absolute gravimeters (FG5, A10 from Micro-g LaCoste), superconducting gravimeters (OSG, iGrav from GWR instruments), and the new generation of spring instruments (Micro-g LaCoste gPhone, Scintrex CG5 and Burris ZLS). A wide range of applications is covered, with selected examples from tides and ocean loading, atmospheric effects on gravity, local and global hydrology, seismology and normal modes, long period and tectonics, volcanology, exploration gravimetry, and some examples of gravimetry connected to fundamental physics. We show that there are only a modest number of very large signals, i.e. hundreds of µGal (10-8 m s-2), that are easy to see with all gravimeters (e.g. tides, volcanic eruptions, large earthquakes, seasonal hydrology). The majority of signals of interest are in the range 0.1-5.0 µGal and occur at a wide range of time scales (minutes to years) and spatial extent (a few meters to global). Here the competing effects require a careful combination of different gravimeter types and measurement strategies to efficiently characterize and distinguish the signals. Gravimeters are sophisticated instruments, with substantial up-front costs, and they place demands on the operators to maximize the results. Nevertheless their performance characteristics such as drift and precision have improved dramatically in recent years, and their data recording ability and ruggedness have seen similar advances. Many subtle signals are now routinely connected with known geophysical effects such as coseismic earthquake displacements, post-glacial rebound

  18. The measurement of surface gravity.

    PubMed

    Crossley, David; Hinderer, Jacques; Riccardi, Umberto

    2013-04-01

    This review covers basic theory and techniques behind the use of ground-based gravimetry at the Earth's surface. The orientation is toward modern instrumentation, data processing and interpretation for observing surface, land-based, time-variable changes to the geopotential. The instrumentation side is covered in some detail, with specifications and performance of the most widely used models of the three main types: the absolute gravimeters (FG5, A10 from Micro-g LaCoste), superconducting gravimeters (OSG, iGrav from GWR instruments), and the new generation of spring instruments (Micro-g LaCoste gPhone, Scintrex CG5 and Burris ZLS). A wide range of applications is covered, with selected examples from tides and ocean loading, atmospheric effects on gravity, local and global hydrology, seismology and normal modes, long period and tectonics, volcanology, exploration gravimetry, and some examples of gravimetry connected to fundamental physics. We show that there are only a modest number of very large signals, i.e. hundreds of µGal (10(-8) m s(-2)), that are easy to see with all gravimeters (e.g. tides, volcanic eruptions, large earthquakes, seasonal hydrology). The majority of signals of interest are in the range 0.1-5.0 µGal and occur at a wide range of time scales (minutes to years) and spatial extent (a few meters to global). Here the competing effects require a careful combination of different gravimeter types and measurement strategies to efficiently characterize and distinguish the signals. Gravimeters are sophisticated instruments, with substantial up-front costs, and they place demands on the operators to maximize the results. Nevertheless their performance characteristics such as drift and precision have improved dramatically in recent years, and their data recording ability and ruggedness have seen similar advances. Many subtle signals are now routinely connected with known geophysical effects such as coseismic earthquake displacements, post

  19. La force de Casimir et les plasmons de surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intravaia, F.; Lambrecht, A.; Reynaud, S.

    2004-11-01

    La présence de fluctuations irréductibles de champ dans le vide est une prédiction importante de la théorie quantique. Ces fluctuations ont de nombreux effets bien connus, dont l'archétype est la force de Casimir apparaîssant entre deux miroirs placés dans le vide par suite de la pression de radiation du vide. Elle a été récemment mesurée avec une précision de l'ordre du %. De nombreux travaux sont consacrés à l'évaluation théorique de cette force en visant une précision du même ordre. Ici nous étudions la force de Casimir dans la configuration de deux miroirs métalliques plans parallèles à température nulle. En supposant les miroirs décrits par un modèle plasma nous interprétons la force de Casimir comme le résultat de l'interaction entre les plasmons de surface des deux miroirs.

  20. Response of the surface tropical Atlantic Ocean to wind forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, Paola; Pelegrí, Josep L.; Campos, Edmo J. D.; Rosell-Fieschi, Miquel; Gasser, Marc

    2015-05-01

    We use 10 years of satellite data (sea level pressure, surface winds and absolute dynamic topography [ADT]) together with Argo-inferred monthly-mean values of near-surface velocity and water transport, to examine how the tropical system of near-surface zonal currents responds to wind forcing. The data is analyzed using complex Hilbert empirical orthogonal functions, confirming that most of the variance has annual periodicity, with maximum amplitudes in the region spanned by the seasonal displacement of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). The ADT mirrors the shape of the upper isopycnals, hence becoming a good indicator of the amount of water stored in the upper ocean. Within about 3° from the Equator, where the Coriolis force is small, there is year-long meridional Ekman-transport divergence that would lead to the eastward transport of the Equatorial Undercurrent and its northern and southern branches. Beyond 3° of latitude, and at least as far as 20°, the convergence of the Ekman transport generally causes a poleward positive ADT gradient, which sustains the westward South Equatorial Current (SEC). The sole exception occurs in summer, between 8°N and 12°N, when an Ekman-transport divergence develops and depletes de amount of surface water, resulting in an ADT ridge-valley system which reverses the ADT gradient and drives the eastward North Equatorial Countercurrent (NECC) at latitudes 4-9°N; in late fall, divergence ceases and the NECC drains the ADT ridge, so the ADT gradient again becomes positive and the SEC reappears. The seasonal evolution of a tilted ITCZ controls the surface water fluxes: the wind-induced transports set the surface divergence-convergence, which then drive the ADT and, through the ADT gradients, create the geostrophic jets that close the water balance.

  1. High-Resolution Capacitance Measurement By Force Microscopy: Application To Sample Characterization And Potentiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, David W.; Martin, Yves; Wiekramasinghe, Kumar

    1988-07-01

    We demonstrate the usefulness and high sensitivity of the atomic force microscope (AFM) for imaging surface dielectric properties and for potentiometry through the detection of electrostatic forces. The attractive force with an applied voltage between tip and sample is generally much larger than the van der Waals force. On the other hand, electric forces as small as 10-10 N have been measured, corresponding to a capacitance of 10-19 farad. The sensitivity of our AFM should ultimately allow us to detect capacitances as low as 8 x 10-22 farad. We have used this technique to detect the presence of dielectric material over Si, and have made measure-ments of the voltage over a p-n junction with sub-micron spatial resolution.

  2. Measuring the complete force field of an optical trap.

    PubMed

    Jahnel, Marcus; Behrndt, Martin; Jannasch, Anita; Schäffer, Erik; Grill, Stephan W

    2011-04-01

    The use of optical traps to measure or apply forces on the molecular level requires a precise knowledge of the trapping force field. Close to the trap center, this field is typically approximated as linear in the displacement of the trapped microsphere. However, applications demanding high forces at low laser intensities can probe the light-microsphere interaction beyond the linear regime. Here, we measured the full nonlinear force and displacement response of an optical trap in two dimensions using a dual-beam optical trap setup with back-focal-plane photodetection. We observed a substantial stiffening of the trap beyond the linear regime that depends on microsphere size, in agreement with Mie theory calculations. Surprisingly, we found that the linear detection range for forces exceeds the one for displacement by far. Our approach allows for a complete calibration of an optical trap.

  3. Cutting force measurement of electrical jigsaw by strain gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazup, L.; Varadine Szarka, A.

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes a measuring method based on strain gauges for accurate specification of electric jigsaw's cutting force. The goal of the measurement is to provide an overall perspective about generated forces in a jigsaw's gearbox during a cutting period. The lifetime of the tool is affected by these forces primarily. This analysis is part of the research and development project aiming to develop a special linear magnetic brake for realizing automatic lifetime tests of electric jigsaws or similar handheld tools. The accurate specification of cutting force facilitates to define realistic test cycles during the automatic lifetime test. The accuracy and precision resulted by the well described cutting force characteristic and the possibility of automation provide new dimension for lifetime testing of the handheld tools with alternating movement.

  4. Line contribution to the critical Casimir force between a homogeneous and a chemically stepped surface.

    PubMed

    Toldin, Francesco Parisen; Tröndle, Matthias; Dietrich, S

    2015-06-03

    Recent experimental realizations of the critical Casimir effect have been implemented by monitoring colloidal particles immersed in a binary liquid mixture near demixing and exposed to a chemically structured substrate. In particular, critical Casimir forces have been measured for surfaces consisting of stripes with periodically alternating adsorption preferences, forming chemical steps between them. Motivated by these experiments, we analyze the contribution of such chemical steps to the critical Casimir force for the film geometry and within the Ising universality class. By means of Monte Carlo simulations, mean-field theory and finite-size scaling analysis we determine the universal scaling function associated with the contribution to the critical Casimir force due to individual, isolated chemical steps facing a surface with homogeneous adsorption preference or with Dirichlet boundary condition. In line with previous findings, these results allow one to compute the critical Casimir force for the film geometry and in the presence of arbitrarily shaped, but wide stripes. In this latter limit the force decomposes into a sum of the contributions due to the two homogeneous parts of the surface and due to the chemical steps between the stripes. We assess this decomposition by comparing the resulting sum with actual simulation data for the critical Casimir force in the presence of a chemically striped substrate.

  5. Time measurement techniques. [U.S. Air Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnaba, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    The common time measurements as used by the U.S. Air Force Measurements and Standards Laboratory, Aerospace Guidance and Metrology Center (AGMC), Newark Air Force Station, Ohio, are described. Electronic counter time interval measurements are emphasized since this is the most common time comparison measurement in use. The proper use and setting of controls will be covered along with helpful hints and common mistakes to be avoided. Applications of time measurements are described and some of these are timekeeping via Loran-C, TV Line-10, and WWV. Frequency determination using periodic time readings will also be discussed.

  6. Flight of a Rufous Hummingbird Robotic Model-Force Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez Alarcon, Ramiro; Bocanegra Evans, Humberto; Ferreira de Sousa, Paulo; Tobalske, Bret; Allen, James

    2008-11-01

    Aerodynamic force data was measured on a 2-DOF scaled robotic hummingbird model for both hovering and translational flight. Experiments were conducted in a large water channel facility at New Mexico State University. Reynolds and Strouhal numbers for the experiment are in the range of 3600 and 0.97, respectively. Forces are directly measured using strain gages and compared with phase-locked PIV results.

  7. Fat-Line Towed-Array Force Measurement Apparatus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-06-12

    No. 78872 n 3 FAT -LINE TOWED-ARRAY FORCE MEASUREMENT APPARATUS 4 5 STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST 6 The invention described herein may be...application. 16 17 BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 18 (1) Field of the Invention 19 The present invention relates generally to fat -line towed- 2 0 arrays, and...more particularly to an apparatus for measuring the 21 force applied to fat -line towed-arrays during flushing cycles. 22 (2) Description of the

  8. Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) Force Measurement System (FMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Paul W.

    2012-01-01

    An Electronics Engineer at the Glenn Research Center (GRC), requested the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) provide technical support for an evaluation of the existing force measurement system (FMS) at the GRC's Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) with the intent of developing conceptual designs to improve the tunnel's force measurement capability in order to better meet test customer needs. This report contains the outcome of the NESC technical review.

  9. Communication: Contrasting effects of glycerol and DMSO on lipid membrane surface hydration dynamics and forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Alex M.; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Han, Songi

    2016-07-01

    Glycerol and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) are commonly used cryoprotectants in cellular systems, but due to the challenges of measuring the properties of surface-bound solvent, fundamental questions remain regarding the concentration, interactions, and conformation of these solutes at lipid membrane surfaces. We measured the surface water diffusivity at gel-phase dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer surfaces in aqueous solutions containing ≤7.5 mol. % of DMSO or glycerol using Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization. We found that glycerol similarly affects the diffusivity of water near the bilayer surface and that in the bulk solution (within 20%), while DMSO substantially increases the diffusivity of surface water relative to bulk water. We compare these measurements of water dynamics with those of equilibrium forces between DPPC bilayers in the same solvent mixtures. DMSO greatly decreases the range and magnitude of the repulsive forces between the bilayers, whereas glycerol increases it. We propose that the differences in hydrogen bonding capability of the two solutes leads DMSO to dehydrate the lipid head groups, while glycerol affects surface hydration only as much as it affects the bulk water properties. The results suggest that the mechanism of the two most common cryoprotectants must be fundamentally different: in the case of DMSO by decoupling the solvent from the lipid surface, and in the case of glycerol by altering the hydrogen bond structure and intermolecular cohesion of the global solvent, as manifested by increased solvent viscosity.

  10. Communication: Contrasting effects of glycerol and DMSO on lipid membrane surface hydration dynamics and forces.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Alex M; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Han, Songi

    2016-07-28

    Glycerol and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) are commonly used cryoprotectants in cellular systems, but due to the challenges of measuring the properties of surface-bound solvent, fundamental questions remain regarding the concentration, interactions, and conformation of these solutes at lipid membrane surfaces. We measured the surface water diffusivity at gel-phase dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer surfaces in aqueous solutions containing ≤7.5 mol. % of DMSO or glycerol using Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization. We found that glycerol similarly affects the diffusivity of water near the bilayer surface and that in the bulk solution (within 20%), while DMSO substantially increases the diffusivity of surface water relative to bulk water. We compare these measurements of water dynamics with those of equilibrium forces between DPPC bilayers in the same solvent mixtures. DMSO greatly decreases the range and magnitude of the repulsive forces between the bilayers, whereas glycerol increases it. We propose that the differences in hydrogen bonding capability of the two solutes leads DMSO to dehydrate the lipid head groups, while glycerol affects surface hydration only as much as it affects the bulk water properties. The results suggest that the mechanism of the two most common cryoprotectants must be fundamentally different: in the case of DMSO by decoupling the solvent from the lipid surface, and in the case of glycerol by altering the hydrogen bond structure and intermolecular cohesion of the global solvent, as manifested by increased solvent viscosity.

  11. Acoustic force measurement in a dual-temperature resonant chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robey, Judith L.; Trinh, Eugene H.; Wang, Taylor G.

    1987-01-01

    The acoustic radiation force was measured for a dual-temperature resonant chamber. This rectangular chamber has its long dimension approximately 8.5 times the square cross-sectional dimension, and the opposite ends are at widely different temperatures. Force profiles were obtained for two hot end temperatures of 520 C and 760 C, while the cool end remained at approximately room temperature. Force magnitudes as high as 17 dyn for a sample 1.2 cm in diameter at 760 C and at 162-dB input level were measured.

  12. Quantitative measurements of shear displacement using atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wenbo; Wu, Weida; Sun, Ying; Zhao, Yonggang

    2016-03-21

    We report a method to quantitatively measure local shear deformation with high sensitivity using atomic force microscopy. The key point is to simultaneously detect both torsional and buckling motions of atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers induced by the lateral piezoelectric response of the sample. This requires the quantitative calibration of torsional and buckling response of AFM. This method is validated by measuring the angular dependence of the in-plane piezoelectric response of a piece of piezoelectric α-quartz. The accurate determination of the amplitude and orientation of the in-plane piezoelectric response, without rotation, would greatly enhance the efficiency of lateral piezoelectric force microscopy.

  13. Measuring Molecular Forces Using Calibrated Optical Tweezers in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hendricks, Adam G.; Goldman, Yale E.

    2017-01-01

    Optical tweezers have been instrumental in uncovering the mechanisms motor proteins use to generate and react to force. While optical traps have primarily been applied to purified, in vitro systems, emerging methods enable measurements in living cells where the actively fluctuating, viscoelastic environment and varying refractive index complicate calibration of the instrument. Here, we describe techniques to calibrate optical traps in living cells using the forced response to sinusoidal oscillations and spontaneous fluctuations, and to measure the forces exerted by endogenous ensembles of kinesin and dynein motor proteins as they transport cargoes in the cell. PMID:27844443

  14. Measuring Molecular Forces Using Calibrated Optical Tweezers in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Adam G; Goldman, Yale E

    2017-01-01

    Optical tweezers have been instrumental in uncovering the mechanisms motor proteins use to generate and react to force. While optical traps have primarily been applied to purified, in vitro systems, emerging methods enable measurements in living cells where the actively fluctuating, viscoelastic environment and varying refractive index complicate calibration of the instrument. Here, we describe techniques to calibrate optical traps in living cells using the forced response to sinusoidal oscillations and spontaneous fluctuations, and to measure the forces exerted by endogenous ensembles of kinesin and dynein motor proteins as they transport cargoes in the cell.

  15. Flight Force Measurements on a Spacecraft to Launch Vehicle Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Daniel S.; Gordon, Scott A.

    2012-07-01

    For several years we had wanted to measure interface forces between a launch vehicle and the Payload. Finally in July 2006 a proposal was made and funded to evaluate the use of flight force measurements (FFM) to improve the loads process of a Spacecraft in its design and test cycle. A NASA/Industry team was formed, the core Team consisted of 20 people. The proposal identified two questions that this assessment would attempt to address by obtaining the flight forces. These questions were: 1) Is flight correlation and reconstruction with acceleration methods sufficient? 2) How much can the loads and therefore the design and qualification be reduced by having force measurements? The objective was to predict the six interface driving forces between the Spacecraft and the Launch Vehicle throughout the boost phase. Then these forces would be compared with reconstructed loads analyses for evaluation in an attempt to answer them. The paper will present the development of a strain based force measurement system and also an acceleration method, actual flight results, post flight evaluations and lessons learned.

  16. MEMS-Based Flexible Force Sensor for Tri-Axial Catheter Contact Force Measurement.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Hardik J; Sheng, Jun; Desai, Jaydev P

    2017-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is a significant healthcare problem caused by the uneven and rapid discharge of electrical signals from pulmonary veins (PVs). The technique of radiofrequency (RF) ablation can block these abnormal electrical signals by ablating myocardial sleeves inside PVs. Catheter contact force measurement during RF ablation can reduce the rate of AFib recurrence, since it helps to determine effective contact of the catheter with the tissue, thereby resulting in effective power delivery for ablation. This paper presents the development of a three-dimensional (3D) force sensor to provide the real-time measurement of tri-axial catheter contact force. The 3D force sensor consists of a plastic cubic bead and five flexible force sensors. Each flexible force sensor was made of a PEDOT:PSS strain gauge and a PDMS bump on a flexible PDMS substrate. Calibration results show that the fabricated sensor has a linear response in the force range required for RF ablation. To evaluate its working performance, the fabricated sensor was pressed against gelatin tissue by a micromanipulator and also integrated on a catheter tip to test it within deionized water flow. Both experiments simulated the ventricular environment and proved the validity of applying the 3D force sensor in RF ablation.

  17. Friction force measurement during cochlear implant insertion: application to a force-controlled insertion tool design.

    PubMed

    Miroir, Mathieu; Nguyen, Yann; Kazmitcheff, Guillaume; Ferrary, Evelyne; Sterkers, Olivier; Grayeli, Alexis Bozorg

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate force profiles during array insertion in human cochlea specimens and to evaluate a mechatronic inserter using a 1-axis force sensor. Today, the surgical challenge in cochlear implantation is the preservation of the anatomic structures and the residual hearing. In routine practice, the electrode array is inserted manually with a limited sensitive feedback. Hifocus 1J electrode arrays were studied. The bench test comprised a mechatronic inserter combined to a 1-axis force sensor between the inserter and the base of the array and a 6-axis force sensor beneath the cochlea model. Influence of insertion tube material, speed (0.15, 0.5, and 1.5 mm/s) and lubricant on frictions forces were studied (no-load). Different models were subsequently evaluated: epoxy scala tympani model and temporal bones. Frictions forces were lower in the plastic tube compared with those in the metal tube (0.09 ± 0.028 versus 0.14 ± 0.034 at 0.5 mm/s, p < 0.001) and with the use of hyaluronic acid gel. Speed did not influence frictions forces in our study. Insertion force profiles provided by the 1- and 6-axis force sensors were similar when friction forces inside the insertion tool (no-load measurements) were subtracted from the 1-axis sensor data in the epoxy and temporal bone models (mean error, 0.01 ± 0.001 N). Using a sensor included in the inserter, we were able to measure array insertion forces. This tool can be potentially used to provide real-time information to the surgeon during the procedure.

  18. Measuring Drag Force in Newtonian Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawhinney, Matthew T.; O'Donnell, Mary Kate; Fingerut, Jonathan; Habdas, Piotr

    2012-03-01

    The experiments described in this paper have two goals. The first goal is to show how students can perform simple but fundamental measurements of objects moving through simple liquids (such as water, oil, or honey). In doing so, students can verify Stokes' law, which governs the motion of spheres through simple liquids, and see how it fails at higher object speeds. Moreover, they can qualitatively study fluid patterns at various object speeds (Reynolds numbers). The second goal is to help students make connections between physics and other sciences. Specifically, the results of these experiments can be used to help students understand the role of fluid motion in determining the shape of an organism, or where it lives. At Saint Josephs University we have developed these experiments as part of a newly developed course in biomechanics where both physics and biology undergraduate students bring their ideas and expertise to enrich a shared learning environment.

  19. Nanonet force microscopy for measuring forces in single smooth muscle cells of the human aorta.

    PubMed

    Hall, Alexander; Chan, Patrick; Sheets, Kevin; Apperson, Matthew; Delaughter, Christopher; Gleason, Thomas G; Phillippi, Julie A; Nain, Amrinder

    2017-07-07

    A number of innovative methods exist to measure cell-matrix adhesive forces, but they have yet to accurately describe and quantify the intricate interplay of a cell and its fibrous extracellular matrix (ECM). In cardiovascular pathologies, such as aortic aneurysm, new knowledge on the involvement of cell-matrix forces could lead to elucidation of disease mechanisms. To better understand this dynamics, we measured primary human aortic single smooth muscle cell (SMC) forces using nanonet force microscopy in both inside-out (I-O intrinsic contractility) and outside-in (O-I external perturbation) modes. For SMC populations, we measured the I-O and O-I forces to be 12.9 ± 1.0 and 57.9 ± 2.5 nN, respectively. Exposure of cells to oxidative stress conditions caused a force decrease of 57 and 48% in I-O and O-I modes, respectively, and an increase in migration rate by 2.5-fold. Finally, in O-I mode, we cyclically perturbed cells at constant strain of varying duration to simulate in vivo conditions of the cardiac cycle and found that I-O forces decrease with increasing duration and O-I forces decreased by half at shorter cycle times. Thus our findings highlight the need to study forces exerted and felt by cells simultaneously to comprehensively understand force modulation in cardiovascular disease. © 2017 Hall et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  20. Uncertainty quantification in nanomechanical measurements using the atomic force microscope

    Treesearch

    Ryan Wagner; Robert Moon; Jon Pratt; Gordon Shaw; Arvind Raman

    2011-01-01

    Quantifying uncertainty in measured properties of nanomaterials is a prerequisite for the manufacture of reliable nanoengineered materials and products. Yet, rigorous uncertainty quantification (UQ) is rarely applied for material property measurements with the atomic force microscope (AFM), a widely used instrument that can measure properties at nanometer scale...

  1. Predictability in France : atmospheric forcing or land surface initial conditions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singla, S.; Martin, E.; Céron, J.-P.; Regimbeau, F.

    2010-09-01

    A first study of a hydrological forecasting suite has already been done at seasonal time scales over France (Céron and al., 2010) in a context of adaptation for water resources management. The results showed the feasibility of hydrological seasonal forecasts by forcing the hydrometeorological model Safran-Isba-Modcou (SIM) with seasonal atmospheric forecasts from the DEMETER project. Scores were better for hydrological variables than for atmospheric variables for four river catchments for the spring season. The purpose of the present study is to quantify the sources of predictability of the hydrometeorological system. Two experiences were conducted in order to address this issue. The first experience consisted in testing the impact of the land surface initial conditions. We used realistic land surface initial state produced by the operational SIM model for the specific year and 9 random years of Safran atmospheric analyses (temperature and precipitation) from 1971 to 2001, in a consistent way with the previous study (Céron et al, 2010). The other atmospheric parameters (wind, specific humidity, long wave and short wave radiation and cloudiness) come from the SAFRAN climatology over the same period. The second experience was designed to evaluate the impact of the atmospheric forcing with 9 random years, chosen for the land surface initial state. The atmospheric forcing (temperature and precipitation) comes from the Safran analysis system for the corresponding year. Some results of this study will be presented on soil wetness index (SWI) forecasts and river flows forecasts for all stations in France. We will compare deterministic and probabilistic scores of the two experiences with those of the hydrological forecasting suite built with the seasonal forecasts from the DEMETER project. Perspectives for the downscaling of seasonal forecasts will be discussed in a last part. Céron J-P, Tanguy G, Franchistéguy L, Martin E, Regimbeau F and Vidal J-P, 2010. Hydrological

  2. Measuring electric fields from surface contaminants with neutral atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Obrecht, J. M.; Wild, R. J.; Cornell, E. A.

    2007-06-15

    In this paper we demonstrate a technique of utilizing magnetically trapped neutral {sup 87}Rb atoms to measure the magnitude and direction of stray electric fields emanating from surface contaminants. We apply an alternating external electric field that adds to (or subtracts from) the stray field in such a way as to resonantly drive the trapped atoms into a mechanical dipole oscillation. The growth rate of the oscillation's amplitude provides information about the magnitude and sign of the stray field gradient. Using this measurement technique, we are able to reconstruct the vector electric field produced by surface contaminants. In addition, we can accurately measure the electric fields generated from adsorbed atoms purposely placed onto the surface and account for their systematic effects, which can plague a precision surface-force measurement. We show that baking the substrate can reduce the electric fields emanating from adsorbate and that the mechanism for reduction is likely surface diffusion, not desorption.

  3. Interaction of cationic hydrophobic surfactants at negatively charged surfaces investigated by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    McNamee, Cathy E; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Higashitani, Ko; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Kappl, Michael

    2009-10-06

    Atomic force microscopy was used to study the adsorption of the surfactant octadecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (C18TAC) at a low concentration (0.03 mM) to negatively charged surfaces in water. Atomic force microscopy tips were functionalized with dimethyloctadecyl(3-tripropyl)ammonium chloride (C18TAC-si) or N-trimethoxysilylpropyl-N,N,N-trimethylammomium chloride (hydrophilpos-si) to facilitate imaging of the adsorbed surfactant without artifacts. Tapping mode images and force measurements revealed C18TAC patches, identified as partial surfactant bilayers or hemimicelles. The forces controlling the adsorption process of the C18TAC to a negatively charged surface were investigated by measuring the forces between a C18TAC-si or a hydrophilpos-si tip and a silica surface in the presence of varying concentrations of either NaCl or NaNO3. Screening of forces with an increasing NaCl concentration was observed for the C18TAC-si and hydrophilpos-si tips, proving an electrostatic contribution. Screening was also observed for the hydrophilpos-si tip in NaNO3, whereas a long-range attraction was observed for the C18TAC-si tip for all NaNO3 concentrations. These results indicate that screening of the forces for the C18TAC-si tip depended on the type and/or size of the anion, possibly due to a different probability of the anions to enter the silane layers. The interaction of C18TAC patches with C18TAC-si tips in the presence of NaCl and the interaction of the patches with hydrophilpos-si tips in either NaCl or NaNO3 were repulsive and independent of the number of force curves measured, indicating a stable, positively charged C18TAC patch. However, the forces measured between the patches and a C18TAC-si tip in NaNO3 depended on the number of force curves measured, indicating a change in patch structure induced by the first interaction.

  4. Quantitative measurements of force and displacement using an optical trap.

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, R M; Finer, J T; Chu, S; Spudich, J A

    1996-01-01

    We combined a single-beam gradient optical trap with a high-resolution photodiode position detector to show that an optical trap can be used to make quantitative measurements of nanometer displacements and piconewton forces with millisecond resolution. When an external force is applied to a micron-sized bead held by an optical trap, the bead is displaced from the center of the trap by an amount proportional to the applied force. When the applied force is changed rapidly, the rise time of the displacement is on the millisecond time scale, and thus a trapped bead can be used as a force transducer. The performance can be enhanced by a feedback circuit so that the position of the trap moves by means of acousto-optic modulators to exert a force equal and opposite to the external force applied to the bead. In this case the position of the trap can be used to measure the applied force. We consider parameters of the trapped bead such as stiffness and response time as a function of bead diameter and laser beam power and compare the results with recent ray-optic calculations. PMID:8785341

  5. Capacitive detection of buried interfaces by a dynamic surface