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Sample records for surface receptor aggregates

  1. Modeling multivalent ligand-receptor interactions with steric constraints on configurations of cell surface receptor aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Monine, Michael; Posner, Richard; Savage, Paul; Faeder, James; Hlavacek, William S

    2008-01-01

    Signal transduction generally involves multivalent protein-protein interactions, which can produce various protein complexes and post-translational modifications. The reaction networks that characterize these interactions tend to be so large as to challenge conventional simulation procedures. To address this challenge, a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) method has been developed that can take advantage of a model specification in terms of reaction rules for molecular interactions. A set of rules implicitly defines the reactions that can occur as a result of the interactions represented by the rules. With the rule-based KMC method, explicit generation of the underlying chemical reaction network implied by rules is avoided. Here, we apply and extend this method to characterize the interactions of a trivalent ligand with a bivalent cell-surface receptor. This system is also studied experimentally. We consider the following kinetic models: an equivalent-site model, an extension of this model, which takes into account steric constraints on the configurations of receptor aggregates, and finally, a model that accounts for cyclic receptor aggregates. Simulation results for the equivalent-site model are consistent with an equilibrium continuum model. Using these models, we investigate the effects of steric constraints and the formation of cyclic aggregates on the kinetics and equilibria of small and large aggregate formation and the percolation phase transition that occurs in this system.

  2. Aggregation Limits Surface Expression of Homomeric GluA3 Receptors.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Sarah K; Hou, Ying; Willibald, Marina; Semenov, Artur; Möykkynen, Tommi; Keinänen, Kari

    2016-04-15

    AMPA receptors are glutamate-gated cation channels assembled from GluA1-4 subunits and have properties that are strongly dependent on the subunit composition. The subunits have different propensities to form homomeric or various heteromeric receptors expressed on cell surface, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we examined the biochemical basis for the poor ability of GluA3 subunits to form homomeric receptors, linked previously to two amino acid residues, Tyr-454 and Arg-461, in its ligand binding domain (LBD). Surface expression of GluA3 was improved by co-assembly with GluA2 but not with stargazin, a trafficking chaperone and modulator of AMPA receptors. The secretion efficiency of GluA2 and GluA3 LBDs paralleled the transport difference between the respective full-length receptors and was similarly dependent on Tyr-454/Arg-461 but not on LBD stability. In comparison to GluA2, GluA3 homomeric receptors showed a strong and Tyr-454/Arg-461-dependent tendency to aggregate both in the macroscopic scale measured as lower solubility in nonionic detergent and in the microscopic scale evident as the preponderance of hydrodynamically large structures in density gradient centrifugation and native gel electrophoresis. We conclude that the impaired surface expression of homomeric GluA3 receptors is caused by nonproductive assembly and aggregation to which LBD residues Tyr-454 and Arg-461 strongly contribute. This aggregation inhibits the entry of newly synthesized GluA3 receptors to the secretory pathway. PMID:26912664

  3. Dynamics of signal transduction after aggregation of cell-surface receptors: studies on the type I receptor for IgE.

    PubMed Central

    Kent, U M; Mao, S Y; Wofsy, C; Goldstein, B; Ross, S; Metzger, H

    1994-01-01

    Many ligands stimulate cellular responses by aggregating the cell-surface receptors to which they are bound. We investigated several mechanistic questions related to aggregation of receptors by using the high-affinity receptor for IgE (Fc epsilon RI) on mast cells as a model system. We briefly exposed cells to covalently cross-linked oligomers of IgE and then added excess monomeric IgE to prevent further aggregation. Early events were examined by monitoring the phosphorylation of protein tyrosines; later events were examined by monitoring secretion. We found that aggregated receptors continue to signal both late and early events in the absence of formation of new aggregates. Additional experiments suggested that the clustered receptors undergo a dynamic process of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Our findings suggest that for these and related receptors that function by aggregation, the persistence of signal transduction is directly related to the intrinsic affinity of the ligand for the individual receptor. Images PMID:7512721

  4. Dynamics of signal transduction after aggregation of cell-surface receptors: Studies on the type I receptor for IgE

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, U.M.; Mao, S.Y.; Ross, S.; Metzger, H.; Wofsy, C.; Goldstein, B.

    1994-04-12

    Many ligands stimulate cellular responses by aggregating the cell-surface receptors to which they are bound. The authors investigated several mechanistic questions related to aggregation of receptors by using the high-affinity receptor for IgE (Fc{sub e}RI) on mast cells as a model system. They briefly exposed cells to covalently cross-linked oligomers of IgE and then added excess monomeric IgE to prevent further aggregation. Early events were examined by monitoring the phosphorylation of protein tyrosines; later events were examined by monitoring secretion. They found that aggregated receptors continue to signal both late and early events in the absence of formation of new aggregates. Additional experiments suggested that the clustered receptors undergo a dynamic process of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. The findings suggest that for these and related receptors that function by aggregation, the persistence of signal transduction is directly related to the intrinsic affinity of the ligand for the individual receptor.

  5. Surface aggregation patterns of LDL receptors near coated pits III: potential effects of combined retrograde membrane flow-diffusion and a polarized-insertion mechanism.

    PubMed

    Echavarria-Heras, Héctor; Leal-Ramirez, Cecilia; Castillo, Oscar

    2014-05-22

    Although the process of endocytosis of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) macromolecule and its receptor have been the subject of intense experimental research and modeling, there are still conflicting hypotheses and even conflicting data regarding the way receptors are transported to coated pits, the manner by which receptors are inserted before they aggregate in coated pits, and the display of receptors on the cell surface. At first it was considered that LDL receptors in human fibroblasts are inserted at random locations and then transported by diffusion toward coated pits. But experiments have not ruled out the possibility that the true rate of accumulation of LDL receptors in coated pits might be faster than predicted on the basis of pure diffusion and uniform reinsertion over the entire cell surface. It has been claimed that recycled LDL receptors are inserted preferentially in regions where coated pits form, with display occurring predominantly as groups of loosely associated units. Another mechanism that has been proposed by experimental cell biologists which might affect the accumulation of receptors in coated pits is a retrograde membrane flow. This is essentially linked to a polarized receptor insertion mode and also to the capping phenomenon, characterized by the formation of large patches of proteins that passively flow away from the regions of membrane exocytosis. In this contribution we calculate the mean travel time of LDL receptors to coated pits as determined by the ratio of flow strength to diffusion-coefficient, as well as by polarized-receptor insertion. We also project the resulting display of unbound receptors on the cell membrane. We found forms of polarized insertion that could potentially reduce the mean capture time of LDL receptors by coated pits which is controlled by diffusion and uniform insertion. Our results show that, in spite of its efficiency as a possible device for enhancement of the rate of receptor trapping, polarized

  6. Surface aggregation patterns of LDL receptors near coated pits III: potential effects of combined retrograde membrane flow-diffusion and a polarized-insertion mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although the process of endocytosis of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) macromolecule and its receptor have been the subject of intense experimental research and modeling, there are still conflicting hypotheses and even conflicting data regarding the way receptors are transported to coated pits, the manner by which receptors are inserted before they aggregate in coated pits, and the display of receptors on the cell surface. At first it was considered that LDL receptors in human fibroblasts are inserted at random locations and then transported by diffusion toward coated pits. But experiments have not ruled out the possibility that the true rate of accumulation of LDL receptors in coated pits might be faster than predicted on the basis of pure diffusion and uniform reinsertion over the entire cell surface. It has been claimed that recycled LDL receptors are inserted preferentially in regions where coated pits form, with display occurring predominantly as groups of loosely associated units. Another mechanism that has been proposed by experimental cell biologists which might affect the accumulation of receptors in coated pits is a retrograde membrane flow. This is essentially linked to a polarized receptor insertion mode and also to the capping phenomenon, characterized by the formation of large patches of proteins that passively flow away from the regions of membrane exocytosis. In this contribution we calculate the mean travel time of LDL receptors to coated pits as determined by the ratio of flow strength to diffusion-coefficient, as well as by polarized-receptor insertion. We also project the resulting display of unbound receptors on the cell membrane. We found forms of polarized insertion that could potentially reduce the mean capture time of LDL receptors by coated pits which is controlled by diffusion and uniform insertion. Our results show that, in spite of its efficiency as a possible device for enhancement of the rate of receptor trapping, polarized

  7. Surface fractals in liposome aggregation.

    PubMed

    Roldán-Vargas, Sándalo; Barnadas-Rodríguez, Ramon; Quesada-Pérez, Manuel; Estelrich, Joan; Callejas-Fernández, José

    2009-01-01

    In this work, the aggregation of charged liposomes induced by magnesium is investigated. Static and dynamic light scattering, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and cryotransmission electron microscopy are used as experimental techniques. In particular, multiple intracluster scattering is reduced to a negligible amount using a cross-correlation light scattering scheme. The analysis of the cluster structure, probed by means of static light scattering, reveals an evolution from surface fractals to mass fractals with increasing magnesium concentration. Cryotransmission electron microscopy micrographs of the aggregates are consistent with this interpretation. In addition, a comparative analysis of these results with those previously reported in the presence of calcium suggests that the different hydration energy between lipid vesicles when these divalent cations are present plays a fundamental role in the cluster morphology. This suggestion is also supported by infrared spectroscopy data. The kinetics of the aggregation processes is also analyzed through the time evolution of the mean diffusion coefficient of the aggregates. PMID:19257067

  8. Surface fractals in liposome aggregation.

    PubMed

    Roldán-Vargas, Sándalo; Barnadas-Rodríguez, Ramon; Quesada-Pérez, Manuel; Estelrich, Joan; Callejas-Fernández, José

    2009-01-01

    In this work, the aggregation of charged liposomes induced by magnesium is investigated. Static and dynamic light scattering, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and cryotransmission electron microscopy are used as experimental techniques. In particular, multiple intracluster scattering is reduced to a negligible amount using a cross-correlation light scattering scheme. The analysis of the cluster structure, probed by means of static light scattering, reveals an evolution from surface fractals to mass fractals with increasing magnesium concentration. Cryotransmission electron microscopy micrographs of the aggregates are consistent with this interpretation. In addition, a comparative analysis of these results with those previously reported in the presence of calcium suggests that the different hydration energy between lipid vesicles when these divalent cations are present plays a fundamental role in the cluster morphology. This suggestion is also supported by infrared spectroscopy data. The kinetics of the aggregation processes is also analyzed through the time evolution of the mean diffusion coefficient of the aggregates.

  9. Aggregation effects of surface heterogeneity in land surface processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Z.; Pelgrum, H.; Menenti, M.

    In order to investigate the aggregation effects of surface heterogeneity in land surface processes we have adapted a theory of aggregation. Two strategies have been adopted: 1) Aggregation of radiative fluxes. The aggregated radiative fluxes are used to derive input parameters that are then used to calculate the aerodynamic fluxes at different aggregation levels. This is equivalent to observing the same area at different resolutions using a certain remote sensor, and then calculating the aerodynamic fluxes correspondingly. 2) Aggregation of aerodynamic fluxes calculated at the original observation scale to different aggregation levels. A case study has been conducted to identify the effects of aggregation on areal estimates of sensible and latent heat fluxes. The length scales of surface variables in heterogeneous landscapes are estimated by means of wavelet analysis.

  10. Diffusion-limited aggregation on curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Crowdy, D.; Bazant, M. Z.

    2010-08-01

    We develop a general theory of transport-limited aggregation phenomena occurring on curved surfaces, based on stochastic iterated conformal maps and conformal projections to the complex plane. To illustrate the theory, we use stereographic projections to simulate diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) on surfaces of constant Gaussian curvature, including the sphere (K>0) and the pseudo-sphere (K<0), which approximate "bumps" and "saddles" in smooth surfaces, respectively. Although the curvature affects the global morphology of the aggregates, the fractal dimension (in the curved metric) is remarkably insensitive to curvature, as long as the particle size is much smaller than the radius of curvature. We conjecture that all aggregates grown by conformally invariant transport on curved surfaces have the same fractal dimension as DLA in the plane. Our simulations suggest, however, that the multifractal dimensions increase from hyperbolic (K<0) to elliptic (K>0) geometry, which we attribute to curvature-dependent screening of tip branching.

  11. Large-scale co-aggregation of fluorescent lipid probes with cell surface proteins

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Large scale aggregation of fluorescein-labeled immunoglobulin E (IgE) receptor complexes on the surface of RBL cells results in the co- aggregation of a large fraction of the lipophilic fluorescent probe 3,3'-dihexadecylindocarbocyanine (diI) that labels the plasma membranes much more uniformly in the absence of receptor aggregation. Most of the diI molecules that are localized in patches of aggregated receptors have lost their lateral mobility as determined by fluorescence photobleaching recovery. The diI outside of patches is mobile, and its mobility is similar to that in control cells without receptor aggregates. It is unlikely that the co-aggregation of diI with IgE receptors is due to specific interactions between these components, as two other lipophilic probes of different structures are also observed to redistribute with aggregated IgE receptors, and aggregation of two other cell surface antigens also results in the coredistribution of diI at the RBL cell surface. Quantitative analysis of CCD images of labeled cells reveals some differences in the spatial distributions of co- aggregated diI and IgE receptors. The results indicate that cross- linking of specific cell surface antigens causes a substantial change in the organization of the plasma membrane by redistributing pre- existing membrane domains or causing their formation. PMID:8188747

  12. Particle aggregation with simultaneous surface growth

    SciTech Connect

    pablo.mitchell@cal.Berkeley.EDU

    2003-04-29

    Particle aggregation with simultaneous surface growth was modeled using a dynamic Monte Carlo method. The Monte Carlo algorithm begins in the particle inception zone and constructs aggregates via ensemble-averaged collisions between spheres and deposition of gaseous species on the sphere surfaces. Simulations were conducted using four scenarios. The first, referred to as scenario 0, is used as a benchmark and simulates aggregation in the absence of surface growth. Scenario 1 forces all balls to grow at a uniform rate while scenario 2 only permits them to grow once they have collided and stuck to each other. The last one is a test scenario constructed to confirm conclusions drawn from scenarios 0-2. The transition between the coalescent and the fully-developed fractal aggregation regimes is investigated using shape descriptors to quantify particle geometry. They are used to define the transition between the coalescent and fractal growth regimes. The simulations demonstrate that the morphology of aggregating particles is intimately related to both the surface deposition and particle nucleation rates.

  13. STAND: Surface Tension for Aggregation Number Determination.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Pablo F; Brocos, Pilar; Amigo, Alfredo; García-Río, Luis; Gracia-Fadrique, Jesús; Piñeiro, Ángel

    2016-04-26

    Taking advantage of the extremely high dependence of surface tension on the concentration of amphiphilic molecules in aqueous solution, a new model based on the double equilibrium between free and aggregated molecules in the liquid phase and between free molecules in the liquid phase and those adsorbed at the air/liquid interface is presented and validated using literature data and fluorescence measurements. A key point of the model is the use of both the Langmuir isotherm and the Gibbs adsorption equation in terms of free molecules instead of the nominal concentration of the solute. The application of the model should be limited to non ionic compounds since it does not consider the presence of counterions. It requires several coupled nonlinear fittings for which we developed a software that is publicly available in our server as a web application. Using this tool, it is straightforward to get the average aggregation number of an amphiphile, the micellization free energy, the adsorption constant, the maximum surface excess (and so the minimum area per molecule), the distribution of solute in the liquid phase between free and aggregate species, and the surface coverage in only a couple of seconds, just by uploading a text file with surface tension vs concentration data and the corresponding uncertainties. PMID:27048988

  14. Alpha-galactosidase stimulates acetylcholine receptor aggregation in skeletal muscle cells via PNA-binding carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Parkhomovskiy, N; Martin, P T

    2000-04-21

    Aggregation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in skeletal muscle is an essential step in the formation of the mammalian neuromuscular junction. While proteins that bind to myotube receptors such as agrin and laminin can stimulate AChR aggregation in cultured myotubes, removal of cell surface sialic acids stimulates aggregation in a ligand-independent manner. Here, we show that removal of cell surface alpha-galactosides also stimulates AChR aggregation in the absence of added laminin or agrin. AChR aggregation stimulated by alpha-galactosidase was blocked by peanut agglutinin (PNA), which binds to lactosamine-containing disaccharides, but not by the GalNAc-binding lectin Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA-B4). AChR aggregation stimulated by alpha-galactosidase potentiated AChR clustering induced by either neural agrin or laminin-1 and could be inhibited by muscle agrin. These data suggest that capping of cell surface lactosamines or N-acetyllactosamines with alpha-galactose affects AChR aggregation much as capping with sialic acids does.

  15. Structural Basis for Receptor-Mediated Selective Autophagy of Aminopeptidase I Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Akinori; Watanabe, Yasunori; Adachi, Wakana; Suzuki, Kuninori; Matoba, Kazuaki; Kirisako, Hiromi; Kumeta, Hiroyuki; Nakatogawa, Hitoshi; Ohsumi, Yoshinori; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Noda, Nobuo N

    2016-06-28

    Selective autophagy mediates the degradation of various cargoes, including protein aggregates and organelles, thereby contributing to cellular homeostasis. Cargo receptors ensure selectivity by tethering specific cargo to lipidated Atg8 at the isolation membrane. However, little is known about the structural requirements underlying receptor-mediated cargo recognition. Here, we report structural, biochemical, and cell biological analysis of the major selective cargo protein in budding yeast, aminopeptidase I (Ape1), and its complex with the receptor Atg19. The Ape1 propeptide has a trimeric coiled-coil structure, which tethers dodecameric Ape1 bodies together to form large aggregates. Atg19 disassembles the propeptide trimer and forms a 2:1 heterotrimer, which not only blankets the Ape1 aggregates but also regulates their size. These receptor activities may promote elongation of the isolation membrane along the aggregate surface, enabling sequestration of the cargo with high specificity. PMID:27320913

  16. Development of ultrastructural specializations during the formation of acetylcholine receptor aggregates on cultured myotubes.

    PubMed

    Olek, A J; Ling, A; Daniels, M P

    1986-02-01

    The ultrastructure of cultured rat myotubes was examined at stages in the initial assembly of acetylcholine receptor (AChR) aggregates in order to elucidate the role of cell-surface specializations in aggregate formation. Within 4-6 hr, embryonic brain extract (EBX) induces the formation of sites of AChR density elevated 5-9 X above that of surrounding regions, and the appearance of these aggregates is preceded by the formation of clouds of punctate microaggregates (Olek et al., 1983). A video image-intensification system was used to monitor this redistribution of fluorescently labeled AChR, and sites of aggregation were mapped on identified myotubes. After processing the cultures for electron microscopy, thin sections were taken through identified aggregate sites at various stages in assembly. Specializations, including a basal lamina, mound-shaped plasma membrane contours with occasional deep infoldings, and a subjacent dense cytoskeletal specialization, which tended to exclude other cytoplasmic organelles, were associated with newly formed aggregates found 4-6 hr after adding EBX to the cultures. Analysis of random thin sections through EBX-treated and untreated myotubes showed that the extent of specializations of the basal lamina and cytoplasm was approximately threefold greater in cells exposed to EBX for 4 hr, suggesting a concurrent, and possibly interdependent, organization of such specializations with AChR aggregate assembly. Examination of sections through clouds of microaggregates, which formed within 90 min, revealed mound-shaped plasma membrane contours and underlying cytoplasm depleted of organelles but relatively little basal lamina and submembrane cytoskeletal density. These results suggest that the initial stage of AChR aggregate assembly involves relatively subtle changes in the structure of the cell cortex and that the evolution of microaggregates to aggregates may require the formation of additional cytoskeletal and extracellular matrix

  17. Neurocognitive derivation of protein surface property from protein aggregate parameters

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Hrishikesh; Lahiri, Tapobrata

    2011-01-01

    Current work targeted to predicate parametric relationship between aggregate and individual property of a protein. In this approach, we considered individual property of a protein as its Surface Roughness Index (SRI) which was shown to have potential to classify SCOP protein families. The bulk property was however considered as Intensity Level based Multi-fractal Dimension (ILMFD) of ordinary microscopic images of heat denatured protein aggregates which was known to have potential to serve as protein marker. The protocol used multiple ILMFD inputs obtained for a protein to produce a set of mapped outputs as possible SRI candidates. The outputs were further clustered and largest cluster centre after normalization was found to be a close approximation of expected SRI that was calculated from known PDB structure. The outcome showed that faster derivation of individual protein’s surface property might be possible using its bulk form, heat denatured aggregates. PMID:21572883

  18. F-actin binding regions on the androgen receptor and huntingtin increase aggregation and alter aggregate characteristics.

    PubMed

    Angeli, Suzanne; Shao, Jieya; Diamond, Marc I

    2010-01-01

    Protein aggregation is associated with neurodegeneration. Polyglutamine expansion diseases such as spinobulbar muscular atrophy and Huntington disease feature proteins that are destabilized by an expanded polyglutamine tract in their N-termini. It has previously been reported that intracellular aggregation of these target proteins, the androgen receptor (AR) and huntingtin (Htt), is modulated by actin-regulatory pathways. Sequences that flank the polyglutamine tract of AR and Htt might influence protein aggregation and toxicity through protein-protein interactions, but this has not been studied in detail. Here we have evaluated an N-terminal 127 amino acid fragment of AR and Htt exon 1. The first 50 amino acids of ARN127 and the first 14 amino acids of Htt exon 1 mediate binding to filamentous actin in vitro. Deletion of these actin-binding regions renders the polyglutamine-expanded forms of ARN127 and Htt exon 1 less aggregation-prone, and increases the SDS-solubility of aggregates that do form. These regions thus appear to alter the aggregation frequency and type of polyglutamine-induced aggregation. These findings highlight the importance of flanking sequences in determining the propensity of unstable proteins to misfold. PMID:20140226

  19. Up-regulation of the iC3b receptor (CR3) is neither necessary nor sufficient to promote neutrophil aggregation.

    PubMed Central

    Philips, M R; Buyon, J P; Winchester, R; Weissmann, G; Abramson, S B

    1988-01-01

    The iC3b receptor (CR3) is required for neutrophil adhesive functions, including homotypic aggregation. Because stimuli that enhance neutrophil adhesion also induce up-regulation of surface CR3, it is widely held that these two responses are causally related. We have dissociated CR3 display (immunofluorescence) from CR3 function (aggregation). Neutrophils isolated at 4 degrees C and rewarmed to 37 degrees C up-regulated surface CR3 twofold, but did not aggregate. The kinetics of FMLP-induced CR3 up-regulation were discordant with those of aggregation. In the absence of extracellular divalent cations, CR3 expression increased twofold after exposure to FMLP, but neutrophils did not aggregate. FMLP elicited 3.5-fold more aggregation than the ionophore A23187, yet less than one-half as much CR3 up-regulation. 3 mM sodium salicylate inhibited aggregation 55 +/- 4%, but had no effect on CR3 up-regulation. Conversely, 1 mM tetracaine completely inhibited CR3 up-regulation, while significantly enhancing aggregation. Neutroplasts expressed CR3, but did not up-regulate the receptor; in contrast, FMLP induced CR3-dependent aggregation of neutroplasts. We conclude that, although constitutive surface CR3 is required for neutrophil aggregation, the up-regulation of CR3 is neither necessary nor sufficient to promote cell-cell adhesion. Images PMID:2841354

  20. Reversible surface aggregation in pore formation by pardaxin.

    PubMed Central

    Rapaport, D; Peled, R; Nir, S; Shai, Y

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism of leakage induced by surface active peptides is not yet fully understood. To gain insight into the molecular events underlying this process, the leakage induced by the peptide pardaxin from phosphatidylcholine/ phosphatidylserine/cholesterol large unilamellar vesicles was studied by monitoring the rate and extent of dye release and by theoretical modeling. The leakage occurred by an all-or-none mechanism: vesicles either leaked or retained all of their contents. We further developed a mathematical model that includes the assumption that certain peptides become incorporated into the vesicle bilayer and aggregate to form a pore. The current experimental results can be explained by the model only if the surface aggregation of the peptide is reversible. Considering this reversibility, the model can explain the final extents of calcein leakage for lipid/peptide ratios of > 2000:1 to 25:1 by assuming that only a fraction of the bound peptide forms pores consisting of M = 6 +/- 3 peptides. Interestingly, less leakage occurred at 43 degrees C, than at 30 degrees C, although peptide partitioning into the bilayer was enhanced upon elevation of the temperature. We deduced that the increased leakage at 30 degrees C was due to an increase in the extent of reversible surface aggregation at the lower temperature. Experiments employing fluorescein-labeled pardaxin demonstrated reversible aggregation of the peptide in suspension and within the membrane, and exchange of the peptide between liposomes. In summary, our experimental and theoretical results support reversible surface aggregation as the mechanism of pore formation by pardaxin. Images FIGURE 7 PMID:8744290

  1. Identification of aggregates for Tennessee bituminous surface courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauter, Heather Jean

    Tennessee road construction is a major venue for federal and state spending. Tax dollars each year go to the maintenance and construction of roads. One aspect of highway construction that affects the public is the safety of its state roads. There are many factors that affect the safety of a given road. One factor that was focused on in this research was the polish resistance capabilities of aggregates. Several pre-evaluation methods have been used in the laboratory to predict what will happen in a field situation. A new pre-evaluation method was invented that utilized AASHTO T 304 procedure upscaled to accommodate surface bituminous aggregates. This new method, called the Tennessee Terminal Textural Condition Method (T3CM), was approved by Tennessee Department of Transportation to be used as a pre-evaluation method on bituminous surface courses. It was proven to be operator insensitive, repeatable, and an accurate indication of particle shape and texture. Further research was needed to correlate pre-evaluation methods to the current field method, ASTM E 274-85 Locked Wheel Skid Trailer. In this research, twenty-five in-place bituminous projects and eight source evaluations were investigated. The information gathered would further validate the T3CM and find the pre-evaluation method that best predicted the field method. In addition, new sources of aggregates for bituminous surface courses were revealed. The results of this research have shown T3CM to be highly repeatable with an overall coefficient of variation of 0.26% for an eight sample repeatability test. It was the best correlated pre-evaluation method with the locked wheel skid trailer method giving an R2 value of 0.3946 and a Pearson coefficient of 0.710. Being able to predict field performance of aggregates prior to construction is a powerful tool capable of saving time, money, labor, and possibly lives.

  2. Reduced receptor aggregation and altered cytoskeleton in cultured myocytes after space-flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruener, R.; Roberts, R.; Reitstetter, R.

    1994-01-01

    We carried out parallel experiments first on the slow clinostat and then in space-flight to examine the effects of altered gravity on the aggregation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and the structure of the cytoskeleton in cultured Xenopus embryonic muscle cells. By examining the concordance between results from space flight and the clinostat, we tested whether the slow clinostat is a relevant simulation paradigm. Space-flown cells showed marked changes in the distribution and organization of actin filaments and had a reduced incidence of acetylcholine receptor aggregates at the site of contact with polystyrene beads. Similar effects were found after clinostat rotation. The sensitivity of synaptic receptor aggregation and cytoskeletal morphology suggests that in the microgravity of space cell behavior may be importantly altered.

  3. Kinetic Roughening with Surface Diffusion: Crossover from Ramified Aggregates to Continuous Films on Liquid Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Neng; Zhang, Chu-Hang; Yang, Bo; Pan, Qi-Fa; Ye, Gao-Xiang

    2012-09-01

    Ramified iron aggregates are fabricated on silicone oil surface by thermal evaporation method at room temperature and the crossover from ramified aggregates to continuous films is studied by atomic force microscopy. It is shown that the aggregates are composed of numerous granules with the average diameter around 34 nm. The dynamic scaling analysis shows that the growth exponent β = 0.23 ± 0.02 and the roughness exponent α evolves from 0.65 to 0.42 with the nominal film thickness, indicating a roughening behavior transfer may exist during the growth process. The physical interpretation for the scaling behavior is presented.

  4. Fc alpha receptors mediate release of tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 by human monocytes following receptor aggregation.

    PubMed Central

    Patry, C; Herbelin, A; Lehuen, A; Bach, J F; Monteiro, R C

    1995-01-01

    The functional capacity of the human monocyte receptor for the Fc portion of IgA (Fc alpha R) in mediating signal transduction was evaluated by cytokine release. F(ab')2 fragments of anti-Fc alpha R monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were used as specific probes to induce release of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Multivalent cross-linking by a secondary anti-mouse antibody [F(ab')2 fragments] induced a significant release of TNF-alpha and IL-6 by human blood mononuclear cells, indicating requirements for Fc alpha R aggregation on the cell surface to transmit signals. Both cytokines were released exclusively by adherent cells, identifying monocytes as the responding cells within the mononuclear cell population. This cytokine release could not be due to contaminating endotoxins, because it was not abolished by polymyxin B, a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibitor. Moreover, purified recombinant soluble Fc alpha R inhibited the anti-Fc alpha R mAb-mediated cytokine release from blood monocytes, demonstrating that TNF-alpha and IL-6 were released in a receptor-specific manner. Our data suggest that Fc alpha R, through its capacity to mediate secretion of IL-6, may play an important role in B-cell proliferation and immunoglobulin production. On the other hand, release of TNF-alpha following stimulation of Fc alpha R molecules directly implicates these receptors in amplification and regulation of the inflammatory process occurring during IgA-mediated host defence. PMID:7590867

  5. Studies of the cAMP mediated aggregation in Dictyostelium discoideum: receptor mediated activation of the adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Theibert, W.E.A.B.

    1985-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum, a eukaryotic amoeba of the cellular slime mold family, provides an interesting paradigm in developmental biology. During development, hundreds of thousands of cells aggregate to form a multicellular aggregate. Aggregation is mediated by chemotaxis and chemical signaling. Waves of adenosine 3'-5' cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) propagate through the monolayer and provide transient gradients for chemotaxis. The author has used a reversible inhibitor of the cAMP signaling response to demonstrate that adaptation to cAMP is independent of the activation of the adenylate cyclase and therefore is not caused by the rise in intracellular cAMP. Next, it is shown that adenosine inhibits the cAMP signaling response. Inhibition is rapid, reversible, and depends on the cAMP stimulus concentration. Then the specificity of the cAMP receptors which mediates signaling is determined and compared with the receptors which mediate chemotaxis, the cGMP response, and cAMP binding antagonism. The cAMP surface receptor has been identified by photoaffinity labeling intact cells with (/sup 32/P)-8-N/sub 3/-cAMP using an ammonium sulfate binding stabilization technique. The photoactivated ligand specifically labels a polypeptide, localized to the membrane fraction, which migrates as a closely spaced doublet on SDS Page.

  6. Cell surface receptors for CCN proteins.

    PubMed

    Lau, Lester F

    2016-06-01

    The CCN family (CYR61; CTGF; NOV; CCN1-6; WISP1-3) of matricellular proteins in mammals is comprised of six homologous members that play important roles in development, inflammation, tissue repair, and a broad range of pathological processes including fibrosis and cancer. Despite considerable effort to search for a high affinity CCN-specific receptor akin to growth factor receptors, no such receptor has been found. Rather, CCNs bind several groups of multi-ligand receptors as characteristic of other matricellular proteins. The most extensively documented among CCN-binding receptors are integrins, including αvβ3, αvβ5, α5β1, α6β1, αIIbβ3, αMβ2, and αDβ2, which mediate diverse CCN functions in various cell types. CCNs also bind cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), low density liproprotein receptor-related proteins (LRPs), and the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate (M6P) receptor, which are endocytic receptors that may also serve as co-receptors in cooperation with other cell surface receptors. CCNs have also been reported to bind FGFR-2, Notch, RANK, and TrkA, potentially altering the affinities of these receptors for their ligands. The ability of CCNs to bind a multitude of receptors in various cell types may account for the remarkable versatility of their functions, and underscore the diverse signaling pathways that mediate their activities.

  7. The Rhone-Aggregation Land Surface Scheme Intercomparison Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, A. A.; Habets, F.; Noilhan and Working Group, J.

    2002-05-01

    The Rhone-AGGregation (Rhone-AGG) Land Surface Scheme intercomparison project is an initiative within the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Global Land-Atmosphere System Study (GLASS)/Global Soil Wetness Project (GSWP) panel of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP). This project makes use of the Rhone modeling system, which was developed in recent years by the French research community in order to study the continental water cycle on a regional scale. Three distinct components comprise this system: an analysis system to determine the near-surface atmospheric forcing, a Land Surface Scheme (LSS) interface and a distributed hydrological model. The coupling between the three components of the system is 1-way. It was created in an attempt to ensure a consistent dialogue between the atmosphere (precipitation, radiative fluxes, state variables) and the hydrological variables (evaporation, soil moisture, runoff, ground water and river flow). The atmospheric data, which have been mapped to an 8 km grid, consist of standard screen level observations at approximately 60 Météo-France weather network sites within the domain, European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analysis, climatological data and total daily precipitation data from over 1500 gauges. The system utilizes high spatial resolution European soil and vegetation databases, but it has been designed such that it is transferable to other regions. The size of the entire Rhone basin (86,996 km 2) is comparable to the area of a typical coarse-resolution Global atmospheric Climate Model (GCM) grid element, so that it is of interest to examine how the simulations from a wide range of LSSs, which are used in GCMs, numerical weather prediction models, mesoscale atmospheric models or hydrological models, are impacted by changing the spatial resolution over the domain from 8 km to approximately 69 km (1 degree). The main issues addressed by the Rhone-AGG project are how various state of

  8. Macromolecular cell surface engineering for accelerated and reversible cellular aggregation.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Adérito J R; Pasparakis, George

    2015-12-25

    We report the synthesis of two simple copolymers that induce rapid cell aggregation within minutes in a fully reversible manner. The polymers can act as self-supporting "cellular glues" or as "drivers" of 3D cell spheroids/aggregates formation at minute concentrations.

  9. Aggregation of complement receptors on human neutrophils in the absence of ligand

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    C3bi receptors (CR3) on human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) bind ligand-coated particles and promote their ingestion. The binding activity of CR3 is not constitutive but is transiently enabled by phorbol esters (Wright, S. D., and B. D. Meyer, 1986, J. Immunol. 136:1759-1764). Our observations indicate that the capacity of CR3 to bind ligand is tightly correlated with the degree of ligand-independent aggregation of the receptor in the plane of the membrane. Fixed PMN were labeled with anti-CR3 monoclonal antibodies and streptavidin colloidal gold before viewing in the electron microscope either en face or in thin section. On unstimulated PMN, gold particles marking CR3 were dispersed randomly. Stimulation of PMN for 25 min with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) dramatically enhances binding of C3bi-coated particles, and the CR3 on such stimulated cells was observed in clusters containing more than six gold particles. CR3 was not aggregated over coated pits. After 50 min in PMA, the binding activity of CR3 falls, and the distribution of CR3 was again observed to be disperse. If a hydrophilic phorbol ester was washed away after a 20-min stimulation, binding activity remains elevated for at least 50 min, and CR3 remained aggregated. Thus, clustering of CR3 was temporally correlated with its ability to bind ligand and initiate phagocytosis. Unlike CR3, Fc receptors and HLA did not exhibit changes in their aggregation state in response to PMA. Treating PMN with formyl- methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, which enhances expression of CR3 but not its function, did not lead to aggregation of CR3. These observations suggest that a clustered configuration is a precondition necessary for binding ligand and signaling phagocytosis. PMID:2958480

  10. Thrombin action decreases acetylcholine receptor aggregate number and stability in cultured mouse myotubes.

    PubMed

    Davenport, R W; Lanuza, M; Kim, S; Jia, M; Snyder, E; Nelson, P G

    2000-08-30

    Neurons develop and make very stable, long-term synaptic connections with other nerve cells and with muscle. Synaptic stability at the neuromuscular junction changes over development in that a proliferation of synaptic input are made to individual myotubes and synapses from all but one neuron are lost during development. In an established co-culture paradigm in which spinal motoneurons synaptically contact myotubes, thrombin and associated protease inhibitors have been shown to affect the loss of functional synaptic contacts [6]. Evidence has not been provided which clearly demonstrate whether protease/protease inhibitors affect either the pre- or postsynaptic terminal, or both. In an effort to determine whether these reagents directly affect postsynaptic receptors on myotubes, myotubes were cultured in the absence of neurons and the spontaneous presence and stability of aggregates of acetylcholine receptors (AChR) in control and thrombin-containing media were evaluated. In dishes fixed after treatment and in dishes in which individual aggregates were observed live, thrombin action appeared to increase loss of AChR aggregates over time. Hirudin, a specific inhibitor of the thrombin protease, diminished this loss. Neither reagent affected the overall incorporation or degradation of AChR; therefore, it appears these protease/protease inhibitors affect the state of AChR aggregation. PMID:10960680

  11. Equilibrium theory for the clustering of bivalent cell surface receptors by trivalent ligands: application to histamine release from basophils

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, B.; Perelson, A.S.

    1984-06-01

    For certain cell types, the cross-linking of bivalent cell surface receptors by multivalent ligands is an important biochemical step in the transmission of information across the cell's membrane to its interior. The formation of cell surface receptor-ligand aggregates has been shown to turn on and turn off particular cell responses. It has been hypothesized that very large aggregates generate signals that small aggregates cannot. This hypothesis has not been rigorously tested as yet, in part because of a lack of quantitative information about aggregate sizes. Here the authors develop a general equilibrium theory for the clustering of bivalent receptors by trivalent ligands. In addition to predicting the concentrations of receptor-ligand aggregates of all possible sizes, they show that a range of ligand concentrations exists at which extremely large aggregates, i.e., superaggregates, form on the cell surface. The formation of a superaggregate corresponds to a sol-gel phase transition, and this transition is studied in some detail. For the biologically interesting case of histamine release by basophils, it is shown, using realistic parameter values, that such transitions should occur when the cells are from highly allergic individuals. Experimental conditions are described in detail under which such transitions should occur. These conditions can be used as a guide to test whether or not large aggregates provide signals to cells that small aggregates do not.

  12. Submicromolar Aβ42 reduces hippocampal glutamate receptors and presynaptic markers in an aggregation-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewski, Meagan L.; Hwang, Jeannie; Bahr, Ben A.

    2011-01-01

    Synaptic pathology in Alzheimer's disease brains is thought to involve soluble Aβ42 peptide. Here, sterile incubation in PBS caused small Aβ42 oligomer formation as well as heterogeneous, 6E10-immunopositive aggregates of 80-100 kDa. High molecular weight aggregates (H-agg) formed in a time-dependent manner over an extended 30-day period. Interestingly, an inverse relationship between dimeric and H-agg formation was more evident when incubations were performed at 37°C as compared to 23°C, thus providing an experimental strategy with which to address synaptic compromise produced by the different Aβ aggregates. H-agg species formed faster and to higher levels at 37°C compared to 23°C, and the two aggregate preparations were evaluated in hippocampal slice cultures, a sensitive system for monitoring synaptic integrity. Applied daily at 80-600 nM for 7 days, the Aβ42 preparations caused dose-dependent and aggregation-dependent declines in α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits as well as in presynaptic components. Unlike the synaptic effects, Aβ42 induced only trace cellular degeneration that was CA1 specific. The 37°C preparation was less effective at decreasing synaptic markers, corresponding with its reduced levels of Aβ42 monomers and dimers. Aβ42 dimers decayed significantly faster at 37°C than 23°C, and more rapidly than monomers at either temperature. These findings indicate that Aβ42 can self-aggregate into potent synaptotoxic oligomers as well as into larger aggregates that may serve to neutralize the toxic formations. These results will add to the growing debate concerning whether high molecular weight Aβ complexes that form amyloid plaques are protective through the sequestration of oligomeric species. PMID:21978994

  13. Surface characterization of proteins using multi-fractal property of heat-denatured aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Lahiri, Tapobrata; Mishra, Hrishikesh; Sarkar, Subrata; Misra, Krishna

    2008-01-01

    Multi-fractal property of heat-denatured protein aggregates (HDPA) is characteristic of its individual form. The visual similarity between digitally generated microscopic images of HDPA with that of surface-image of its individual X-ray structures in protein databank (PDB) displayed using Visual Molecular Dynamics (VMD) viewer is the basis of the study. We deigned experiments to view the fractal nature of proteins at different aggregate scales. Intensity based multi-fractal dimensions (ILMFD) extracted from various planes of digital microscopic images of protein aggregates were used to characterize HDPA into different classes. Moreover, the ILMFD parameters extracted from aggregates show similar classification pattern to digital images of protein surface displayed by VMD viewer using PDB entry. We discuss the use of irregular patterns of heat-denatured aggregate proteins to understand various surface properties in native proteins. PMID:18795110

  14. Biophysical Insights into How Surfaces, Including Lipid Membranes, Modulate Protein Aggregation Related to Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Kathleen A.; Yates, Elizabeth A.; Legleiter, Justin

    2013-01-01

    There are a vast number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Huntington’s disease (HD), associated with the rearrangement of specific proteins to non-native conformations that promotes aggregation and deposition within tissues and/or cellular compartments. These diseases are commonly classified as protein-misfolding or amyloid diseases. The interaction of these proteins with liquid/surface interfaces is a fundamental phenomenon with potential implications for protein-misfolding diseases. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies indicate that significant conformational changes can be induced in proteins encountering surfaces, which can play a critical role in nucleating aggregate formation or stabilizing specific aggregation states. Surfaces of particular interest in neurodegenerative diseases are cellular and subcellular membranes that are predominately comprised of lipid components. The two-dimensional liquid environments provided by lipid bilayers can profoundly alter protein structure and dynamics by both specific and non-specific interactions. Importantly for misfolding diseases, these bilayer properties can not only modulate protein conformation, but also exert influence on aggregation state. A detailed understanding of the influence of (sub)cellular surfaces in driving protein aggregation and/or stabilizing specific aggregate forms could provide new insights into toxic mechanisms associated with these diseases. Here, we review the influence of surfaces in driving and stabilizing protein aggregation with a specific emphasis on lipid membranes. PMID:23459674

  15. Surface Pressure Study of Lipid Aggregates at the Air Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shew, Woody; Ploplis Andrews, Anna

    1996-11-01

    Qualitative and quantitative descriptions of the growth of fatty acid aggregates on a water/air interface were made by analyzing surface pressure measurements taken with a Langmuir Balance. High concentrations of palmitic acid, lauric acid, myristic acid, and also phosphatidylethanolamine in solution with chloroform were applied with a syringe to the surface of the Langmuir Balance and surface pressure was monitored as aggregates assembled spontaneously. The aggregation process for palmitic acid was determined to consist of three distinct parts. Exponential curves were fit to the individual regions of the data and growth and decay constants were determined. Surface pressure varied in very complex ways for lauric acid, myristic acid, and phosphatidylethanolamine yet kinetic measurements yield qualitative information about assembly of those aggregates. This research was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-93-22301.

  16. Monolayers of charged particles in a Langmuir trough: Could particle aggregation increase the surface pressure?

    PubMed

    Petkov, Plamen V; Danov, Krassimir D; Kralchevsky, Peter A

    2016-01-15

    The effect of aggregation on the surface pressure, Π, of monolayers from charged micrometer-sized colloidal particles on the air/water interface is investigated. Π is completely due to the long-range electrostatic repulsion between the particles mediated by their electrostatic field in the air. The most probable origin of particle aggregation is the attraction between capillary quadrupoles due to undulated contact lines on particle surfaces. Aggregates have higher charge and repel each other stronger than single particles. The data analysis by means of a theoretical model implies that Π linearly increases with n(1/2); n is the mean aggregation number, which can be determined from the experimental Π vs. area curves. The presence of electrolyte promotes aggregation, which tends to increase Π, but simultaneously reduces the surface charge that leads to lower Π. For our system, the first effect prevails and apparently paradoxical behavior is observed: the addition of salt in water enhances the electrostatic surface pressure. The data indicate limited aggregation: the rise of the electrostatic barrier prevents the further coalescence of aggregates if they have become sufficiently large. The results contribute for a better understanding of the factors that control the interactions in monolayers of charged particles at liquid interfaces.

  17. The Effect of Surface Charge Saturation on Heat-induced Aggregation of Firefly Luciferase.

    PubMed

    Gharanlar, Jamileh; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Sajedi, Reza H; Yaghmaei, Parichehr

    2015-01-01

    We present here the effect of firefly luciferase surface charge saturation and the presence of some additives on its thermal-induced aggregation. Three mutants of firefly luciferase prepared by introduction of surface Arg residues named as 2R, 3R and 5R have two, three and five additional arginine residues substituted at their surface compared to native luciferase; respectively. Turbidimetric study of heat-induced aggregation indicates that all three mutants were reproducibly aggregated at higher rates relative to wild type in spite of their higher thermostability. Among them, 2R had most evaluated propensity to heat-induced aggregation. Therefore, the hydrophilization followed by appearing of more substituted arginine residues with positive charge on the firefly luciferase surface was not reduced its thermal aggregation. Nevertheless, at the same condition in the presence of charged amino acids, e.g. Arg, Lys and Glu, as well as a hydrophobic amino acid, e.g. Val, the heat-induced aggregation of wild type and mutants of firefly luciferases was markedly decelerated than those in the absence of additives. On the basis of obtained results it seems, relinquishment of variety in charge of amino acid side chains, they via local interactions with proteins cause to decrease rate and extent of their thermal aggregation.

  18. Soft electrostatic repulsion in particle monolayers at liquid interfaces: surface pressure and effect of aggregation.

    PubMed

    Kralchevsky, Peter A; Danov, Krassimir D; Petkov, Plamen V

    2016-07-28

    Non-densely packed interfacial monolayers from charged micrometre-sized colloid particles find applications for producing micropatterned surfaces. The soft electrostatic repulsion between the particles in a monolayer on an air/water (or oil/water) interface is mediated by the non-polar fluid, where Debye screening is absent and the distances between the particles are considerably greater than their diameters. Surface pressure versus area isotherms were measured at the air/water interface. The experiments show that asymptotically the surface pressure is inversely proportional to the third power of the interparticle distance. A theoretical model is developed that predicts not only the aforementioned asymptotic law but also the whole surface pressure versus area dependence. An increase in the surface pressure upon aggregation of charged particles in the interfacial monolayers is experimentally established. This effect is explained by the developed theoretical model, which predicts that the surface pressure should linearly increase with the square root of the particle mean aggregation number. The effect of added electrolyte on the aggregation is also investigated. The data lead to the conclusion that 'limited aggregation' exists in the monolayers of charged particles. In brief, the stronger electrostatic repulsion between the bigger aggregates leads to a higher barrier to their coalescence that, in turn, prevents any further aggregation, i.e. negative feedback is present.This article is part of the themed issue 'Soft interfacial materials: from fundamentals to formulation'. PMID:27298437

  19. Serotonin-induced platelet aggregation predicts the antihypertensive response to serotonin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Gleerup, G; Persson, B; Hedner, T; Winther, K

    1993-01-01

    The 5-HT2-receptor antagonist ketanserin (20-40 mg b.i.d.) was administered to 62 patients of both sexes with uncomplicated primary hypertension. After 4 weeks of treatment about 50% of the patients had reached the target diastolic blood pressure of 90 mm Hg or below. Interindividual variability was large. In a retrospective analysis the variability could not be explained by sex or the dose of ketanserin. There was a weak association between age and systolic blood pressure response (r = 0.24; P = 0.06), which could be entirely accounted for by the higher base line blood pressure in the elderly patients. In one group of patients (n = 12), the ex vivo aggregation to serotonin (10(-6) M) was studied during treatment with placebo and ketanserin. Ketanserin completely inhibited 5-HT-induced aggregation in all patients. There was a close correlation between the area under the 5-HT-induced platelet aggregation curve during placebo and the subsequent reduction in diastolic blood pressure after 4 weeks of treatment with ketanserin. The present data suggest that the blood pressure response to ketanserin can be predicted from the ex vivo sensitivity of platelets to serotonin. By implication, they also support a role for serotonergic mechanisms in hypertension.

  20. SIZE AND SURFACE AREA OF ICY DUST AGGREGATES AFTER A HEATING EVENT AT A PROTOPLANETARY NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Sirono, Sin-iti

    2013-03-01

    The activity of a young star rises abruptly during an FU Orionis outburst. This event causes a temporary temperature increase in the protoplanetary nebula. H{sub 2}O icy grains are sublimated by this event, and silicate cores embedded inside the ice are ejected. During the high-temperature phase, the silicate grains coagulate to form silicate core aggregates. After the heating event, the temperature drops, and the ice recondenses onto the aggregates. I determined numerically the size distribution of the ice-covered aggregates. The size of the aggregates exceeds 10 {mu}m around the snow line. Because of the migration of the ice to large aggregates, only a small fraction of the silicate core aggregate is covered with H{sub 2}O ice. After the heating event, the surface of an ice-covered aggregate is totally covered by silicate core aggregates. This might reduce the fragmentation velocity of aggregates when they collide. It is possible that the covering silicate cores shield the UV radiation field which induces photodissociation of H{sub 2}O ice. This effect may cause the shortage of cold H{sub 2}O vapor observed by Herschel.

  1. Effects of Ocean Acidification on the Ballast of Surface Aggregates Sinking through the Twilight Zone

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus Mendes, Pedro A.; Thomsen, Laurenz

    2012-01-01

    The dissolution of CaCO3 is one of the ways ocean acidification can, potentially, greatly affect the ballast of aggregates. A diminution of the ballast could reduce the settling speed of aggregates, resulting in a change in the carbon flux to the deep sea. This would mean lower amounts of more refractory organic matter reaching the ocean floor. This work aimed to determine the effect of ocean acidification on the ballast of sinking surface aggregates. Our hypothesis was that the decrease of pH will increase the dissolution of particulate inorganic carbon ballasting the aggregates, consequently reducing their settling velocity and increasing their residence time in the upper twilight zone. Using a new methodology for simulation of aggregate settling, our results suggest that future pCO2 conditions can significantly change the ballast composition of sinking aggregates. The change in aggregate composition had an effect on the size distribution of the aggregates, with a shift to smaller aggregates. A change also occurred in the settling velocity of the particles, which would lead to a higher residence time in the water column, where they could be continuously degraded. In the environment, such an effect would result in a reduction of the carbon flux to the deep-sea. This reduction would impact those benthic communities, which rely on the vertical flow of carbon as primary source of energy. PMID:23272075

  2. Self-assembly of thiolated cyanine aggregates on Au(111) and Au nanoparticle surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menéndez, Guillermo O.; Cortés, Emiliano; Grumelli, Doris; Méndez de Leo, Lucila P.; Williams, Federico J.; Tognalli, Nicolás G.; Fainstein, Alejandro; Vela, María Elena; Jares-Erijman, Elizabeth A.; Salvarezza, Roberto C.

    2012-01-01

    Heptamethinecyanine J-aggregates display sharp, intense fluorescence emission making them attractive candidates for developing a variety of chem-bio-sensing applications. They have been immobilized on planar thiol-covered Au surfaces and thiol-capped Au nanoparticles by weak molecular interactions. In this work the self-assembly of novel thiolated cyanine (CNN) on Au(111) and citrate-capped AuNPs from solutions containing monomers and J-aggregates has been studied by using STM, XPS, PM-IRRAS, electrochemical techniques and Raman spectroscopy. Data show that CNN species adsorb on the Au surfaces by forming thiolate-Au bonds. We found that the J-aggregates are preferentially adsorbed on the Au(111) surface directly from the solution while adsorbed CNN monomers cannot organize into aggregates on the substrate surface. These results indicate that the CNN-Au interaction is not able to disorganize the large J-aggregates stabilized by π-π stacking to optimize the S-Au binding site but it is strong enough to hinder the π-π stacking when CNNs are chemisorbed as monomers. The optical properties of the J-aggregates remain active after adsorption. The possibility of covalently bonding CNN J-aggregates to Au planar surfaces and Au nanoparticles controlling the J-aggregate/Au distance opens a new path regarding their improved stability and the wide range of biological applications of both CNN and AuNP biocompatible systems.Heptamethinecyanine J-aggregates display sharp, intense fluorescence emission making them attractive candidates for developing a variety of chem-bio-sensing applications. They have been immobilized on planar thiol-covered Au surfaces and thiol-capped Au nanoparticles by weak molecular interactions. In this work the self-assembly of novel thiolated cyanine (CNN) on Au(111) and citrate-capped AuNPs from solutions containing monomers and J-aggregates has been studied by using STM, XPS, PM-IRRAS, electrochemical techniques and Raman spectroscopy. Data show

  3. Cloning and molecular analysis of genes affecting expression of binding substance, the recipient-encoded receptor(s) mediating mating aggregate formation in Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Bensing, B A; Dunny, G M

    1993-11-01

    Transfer of the conjugative plasmid pCF10 in Enterococcus faecalis strains involves production of a plasmid-encoded aggregation substance on the surface of donor cells in response to stimulation by a pheromone secreted by recipient cells. Aggregation substance then facilitates attachment to recipient cells via a chromosomally encoded receptor, termed binding substance (BS). A BS mutant, strain INY3000, generated by random Tn916 insertions, was previously found to carry copies of the transposon at four unique sites (K. M. Trotter and G. M. Dunny, Plasmid 24:57-67, 1990). In the present study, DNA flanking the Tn916 insertions was used to complement the BS mutation of INY3000 following Tn916 excision from cloned chromosomal fragments. Complementation results showed that three of the four regions mutated in INY3000 play some role in BS expression. Tn5 mutagenesis and DNA sequence analysis of the complementing fragment from one of these regions indicated the presence of three genes (ebsA, ebsB, and ebsC) that affect BS expression. The ebsA and ebsB genes encode peptides likely to function in cell wall metabolism, whereas ebsC may encode a product that suppresses the function or expression of EbsB.

  4. Cloning and molecular analysis of genes affecting expression of binding substance, the recipient-encoded receptor(s) mediating mating aggregate formation in Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed Central

    Bensing, B A; Dunny, G M

    1993-01-01

    Transfer of the conjugative plasmid pCF10 in Enterococcus faecalis strains involves production of a plasmid-encoded aggregation substance on the surface of donor cells in response to stimulation by a pheromone secreted by recipient cells. Aggregation substance then facilitates attachment to recipient cells via a chromosomally encoded receptor, termed binding substance (BS). A BS mutant, strain INY3000, generated by random Tn916 insertions, was previously found to carry copies of the transposon at four unique sites (K. M. Trotter and G. M. Dunny, Plasmid 24:57-67, 1990). In the present study, DNA flanking the Tn916 insertions was used to complement the BS mutation of INY3000 following Tn916 excision from cloned chromosomal fragments. Complementation results showed that three of the four regions mutated in INY3000 play some role in BS expression. Tn5 mutagenesis and DNA sequence analysis of the complementing fragment from one of these regions indicated the presence of three genes (ebsA, ebsB, and ebsC) that affect BS expression. The ebsA and ebsB genes encode peptides likely to function in cell wall metabolism, whereas ebsC may encode a product that suppresses the function or expression of EbsB. Images PMID:8226689

  5. Phenotypes of Non-Attached Pseudomonas aeruginosa Aggregates Resemble Surface Attached Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Alhede, Morten; Kragh, Kasper Nørskov; Qvortrup, Klaus; Allesen-Holm, Marie; van Gennip, Maria; Christensen, Louise D.; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Nielsen, Anne K.; Parsek, Matt; Wozniak, Dan; Molin, Søren; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Høiby, Niels; Givskov, Michael; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    For a chronic infection to be established, bacteria must be able to cope with hostile conditions such as low iron levels, oxidative stress, and clearance by the host defense, as well as antibiotic treatment. It is generally accepted that biofilm formation facilitates tolerance to these adverse conditions. However, microscopic investigations of samples isolated from sites of chronic infections seem to suggest that some bacteria do not need to be attached to surfaces in order to establish chronic infections. In this study we employed scanning electron microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, RT-PCR as well as traditional culturing techniques to study the properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa aggregates. We found that non-attached aggregates from stationary-phase cultures have comparable growth rates to surface attached biofilms. The growth rate estimations indicated that, independently of age, both aggregates and flow-cell biofilm had the same slow growth rate as a stationary phase shaking cultures. Internal structures of the aggregates matrix components and their capacity to survive otherwise lethal treatments with antibiotics (referred to as tolerance) and resistance to phagocytes were also found to be strikingly similar to flow-cell biofilms. Our data indicate that the tolerance of both biofilms and non-attached aggregates towards antibiotics is reversible by physical disruption. We provide evidence that the antibiotic tolerance is likely to be dependent on both the physiological states of the aggregates and particular matrix components. Bacterial surface-attachment and subsequent biofilm formation are considered hallmarks of the capacity of microbes to cause persistent infections. We have observed non-attached aggregates in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients; otitis media; soft tissue fillers and non-healing wounds, and we propose that aggregated cells exhibit enhanced survival in the hostile host environment, compared with non-aggregated bacterial

  6. A novel thromboxane receptor antagonist, nstpbp5185, inhibits platelet aggregation and thrombus formation in animal models.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shiu-Wen; Kuo, Heng-Lan; Hsu, Ming-Tsung; Tseng, Yufeng Jane; Lin, Shu-Wha; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Peng, Hui-Chin; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Huang, Tur-Fu

    2016-08-01

    A novel benzimidazole derivative, nstpbp5185, was discovered through in vitro and in vivo evaluations for antiplatelet activity. Thromaboxane receptor (TP) is important in vascular physiology, haemostasis and pathophysiological thrombosis. Nstpbp5185 concentration-dependently inhibited human platelet aggregation caused by collagen, arachidonic acid and U46619. Nstpbp5185 caused a right-shift of the concentration-response curve of U46619 and competitively inhibited the binding of 3H-SQ-29548 to TP receptor expressed on HEK-293 cells, with an IC50 of 0.1 µM, indicating that nstpbp5185 is a TP antagonist. In murine thrombosis models, nstpbp5185 significantly prolonged the latent period in triggering platelet plug formation in mesenteric and FeCl3-induced thrombi formation, and increased the survival rate in pulmonary embolism model with less bleeding than aspirin. This study suggests nstpbp5185, an orally selective anti-thrombotic agent, acting through blockade of TXA2 receptor, may be efficacious for prevention or treatment of pathologic thrombosis.

  7. A novel thromboxane receptor antagonist, nstpbp5185, inhibits platelet aggregation and thrombus formation in animal models.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shiu-Wen; Kuo, Heng-Lan; Hsu, Ming-Tsung; Tseng, Yufeng Jane; Lin, Shu-Wha; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Peng, Hui-Chin; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Huang, Tur-Fu

    2016-08-01

    A novel benzimidazole derivative, nstpbp5185, was discovered through in vitro and in vivo evaluations for antiplatelet activity. Thromaboxane receptor (TP) is important in vascular physiology, haemostasis and pathophysiological thrombosis. Nstpbp5185 concentration-dependently inhibited human platelet aggregation caused by collagen, arachidonic acid and U46619. Nstpbp5185 caused a right-shift of the concentration-response curve of U46619 and competitively inhibited the binding of 3H-SQ-29548 to TP receptor expressed on HEK-293 cells, with an IC50 of 0.1 µM, indicating that nstpbp5185 is a TP antagonist. In murine thrombosis models, nstpbp5185 significantly prolonged the latent period in triggering platelet plug formation in mesenteric and FeCl3-induced thrombi formation, and increased the survival rate in pulmonary embolism model with less bleeding than aspirin. This study suggests nstpbp5185, an orally selective anti-thrombotic agent, acting through blockade of TXA2 receptor, may be efficacious for prevention or treatment of pathologic thrombosis. PMID:27173725

  8. Phagocytosis of aggregated lipoprotein by macrophages: Low density lipoprotein receptor-dependent foam-cell formation

    SciTech Connect

    Suits, A.G.; Chait, A.; Aviram, M.; Heinecke, J.W. )

    1989-04-01

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) modified by incubation with phospholipase C (PLC-LDL) aggregates in solution and is rapidly taken up and degraded by human and mouse macrophages, producing foam cells in vitro. Human, mouse, and rabbit macrophages degraded {sup 125}I-labeled PLC-LDL ({sup 125}I-PLC-LDL) more rapidly than native {sup 125}I-labeled LDL ({sup 125}I-LDL), while nonphagocytic cells such as human fibroblasts and bovine aortic endothelial cells degraded {sup 125}I-PLC-LDL more slowly than {sup 125}I-LDL. This suggested the mechanism for internalization of PLC-LDL was phagocytosis. When examined by electron microscopy, mouse peritoneal macrophages appeared to be phagocytosing PLC-LDL. The uptake and degradation of {sup 125}I-PLC-LDL by human macrophages was inhibited >80% by the monoclonal antibody C7 (IgG2b) produced by hybridoma C7, which blocks the ligand binding domain of the LDL receptor. Similarly, methylation of {sup 125}I-LDL ({sup 125}I-MeLDL) prior to treatment with phospholipase C decreased its subsequent uptake and degradation by human macrophages by >90%. The uptake and degradation of phospholipase C-modified {sup 125}I-MeLDL by macrophages could be restored by incubation of the methylated lipoprotein with apoprotein E, a ligand recognized by the LDL receptor. These results indicate that macrophages internalize PLC-LDL by LDL receptor-dependent phagocytosis.

  9. Aggregation of nanoparticles in endosomes and lysosomes produces surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Leanne J.; Chen, Xiaoke K.; Smith, Aaron J.; Korbelik, Mladen; Zeng, Haishan; Lee, Patrick W. K.; Hewitt, Kevin Cecil

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the use of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to image the distribution of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in cells. To accomplish this task, 30-nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) tagged with antibodies to EGFR (1012 per mL) were incubated with cells (106 per mL) of the A431 human epidermoid carcinoma and normal human bronchial epithelial cell lines. Using the 632.8-nm excitation line of a He-Ne laser, Raman spectroscopy measurements were performed using a point mapping scheme. Normal cells show little to no enhancement. SERS signals were observed inside the cytoplasm of A431 cells with an overall enhancement of 4 to 7 orders of magnitude. Raman intensity maps of the 1450 and 1583 cm-1 peaks correlate well with the expected distribution of EGFR and AuNPs, aggregated following uptake by endosomes and lysosomes. Spectral features from tyrosine and tryptophan residues dominate the SERS signals.

  10. Surface Plasmon-Coupled Emission of Rhodamine 110 Aggregates in a Silica Nanolayer.

    PubMed

    Rangełowa-Jankowska, Simeonika; Jankowski, Dawid; Bogdanowicz, Robert; Grobelna, Beata; Bojarski, Piotr

    2012-12-01

    First analysis of strong directional surface plasmon-coupled emission (SPCE) of ground-state formed intermolecular aggregates of Rhodamine 110 (R110) in silica nanofilms deposited on silver nanolayers is reported. Until now, the processes of energy transport and its trapping due to aggregate formation have not been studied in the presence of SPCE. A new approach to multicomponent systems with weakly and strongly fluorescent centers making use of fluorophore-surface plasmon interaction is presented. The analysis is based on comparison of experimental free-space emission spectra (F-SE), experimental SPCE with theoretical surface plasmon resonance spectra (SPR). It is shown that, due to the dispersion of SPCE, the detection of weak aggregate emission is straightforward if only the monomers and aggregates fluorescence spectra are somewhat spectrally shifted. SPCE studies confirmed the formation of weakly fluorescent higher order aggregates of R110 in silica films. The results indicate that the increase of energy transfer from monomers to aggregates is due to fluorophore-plasmon interaction.

  11. Protein structural and surface water rearrangement constitute major events in the earliest aggregation stages of tau

    PubMed Central

    Pavlova, Anna; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Kinnebrew, Maia; Lew, John; Dahlquist, Frederick W.; Han, Songi

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, and the mechanism of its progression is poorly understood. Here, we examine the structural and dynamic characteristics of transiently evolving protein aggregates under ambient conditions by directly probing protein surface water diffusivity, local protein segment dynamics, and interprotein packing as a function of aggregation time, along the third repeat domain and C terminus of Δtau187 spanning residues 255–441 of the longest isoform of human tau. These measurements were achieved with a set of highly sensitive magnetic resonance tools that rely on site-specific electron spin labeling of Δtau187. Within minutes of initiated aggregation, the majority of Δtau187 that is initially homogeneously hydrated undergoes structural transformations to form partially structured aggregation intermediates. This is reflected in the dispersion of surface water dynamics that is distinct around the third repeat domain, found to be embedded in an intertau interface, from that of the solvent-exposed C terminus. Over the course of hours and in a rate-limiting process, a majority of these aggregation intermediates proceed to convert into stable β-sheet structured species and maintain their stacking order without exchanging their subunits. The population of β-sheet structured species is >5% within 5 min of aggregation and gradually grows to 50–70% within the early stages of fibril formation, while they mostly anneal block-wisely to form elongated fibrils. Our findings suggest that the formation of dynamic aggregation intermediates constitutes a major event occurring in the earliest stages of tau aggregation that precedes, and likely facilitates, fibril formation and growth. PMID:26712030

  12. Early stages in the formation and stabilization of acetylcholine receptor aggregates on cultured myotubes: sensitivity to temperature and azide.

    PubMed

    Olek, A J; Krikorian, J G; Daniels, M P

    1986-09-01

    We have studied the effects of temperature and sodium azide on the formation and stability of embryonic brain extract (EBX)2-induced acetylcholine receptor (AChR) aggregates on myotubes. Sequential changes in AChR distribution were studied on living myotubes in culture by video-intensified fluorescence microscopy. Aggregate formation was temperature dependent, increasing sharply from 24-36 degrees, maximal at 36-37 degrees, and virtually blocked at 38-40 degrees. Whereas aggregate size increased rapidly with time (up to 4 hr) at 36 degrees, at 18-24 degrees small (less than or equal to 1 micron) "microaggregates" formed and accumulated for up to 10 hr. Aggregates formed within 1.5 hr at the sites of microaggregates (formed after 4 hr at 23 degrees) if the temperature was raised to 36 degrees. However, if EBX was removed, the microaggregates on 50% of myotubes disassembled within 1.5 hr. The formation of microaggregates at 23 degrees and aggregates at 36 degrees was reversibly inhibited by sodium azide. These results show that clusters of microaggregates are the precursors of aggregates, and suggest that microaggregate clouds represent a discrete, labile, ATP-dependent stage in aggregate formation. Aggregates that had formed after 4 hr in the presence of EBX disassembled slowly (within 12-14 hr) following removal of EBX at 36 degrees, and even more slowly at 23-30 degrees. However, a temperature shift to 38 degrees, or the addition of azide, resulted in a rapid but reversible disassembly of aggregates (within 4 hr). Thus, newly formed aggregates appear to be relatively stable structures, while microaggregate clouds are labile, tending to disassemble or evolve into aggregates.

  13. Microstructured block copolymer surfaces for control of microbe capture and aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Ryan R; Shubert, Katherine R; Morrell, Jennifer L.; Lokitz, Bradley S; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Retterer, Scott T

    2014-01-01

    The capture and arrangement of surface-associated microbes is influenced by biochemical and physical properties of the substrate. In this report, we develop lectin-functionalized substrates containing patterned, three-dimensional polymeric structures of varied shapes and densities and use these to investigate the effects of topology and spatial confinement on lectin-mediated microbe capture. Films of poly(glycidyl methacrylate)-block-4,4-dimethyl-2-vinylazlactone (PGMA-b-PVDMA) were patterned on silicon surfaces into line or square grid patterns with 5 m wide features and varied edge spacing. The patterned films had three-dimensional geometries with 900 nm film thickness. After surface functionalization with wheat germ agglutinin, the size of Pseudomonas fluorescens aggregates captured was dependent on the pattern dimensions. Line patterns with edge spacing of 5 m or less led to the capture of individual microbes with minimal formation of aggregates, while grid patterns with the same spacing also captured individual microbes with further reduction in aggregation. Both geometries allowed for increases in aggregate size distribution with increased in edge spacing. These engineered surfaces combine spatial confinement with affinity-based microbe capture based on exopolysaccharide content to control the degree of microbe aggregation, and can also be used as a platform to investigate intercellular interactions and biofilm formation in microbial populations of controlled sizes.

  14. PGE(2) reverses G(s)-mediated inhibition of platelet aggregation by interaction with EP3 receptors, but adds to non-G(s)-mediated inhibition of platelet aggregation by interaction with EP4 receptors.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Jacqueline R; White, Ann E; Iyu, David; Heptinstall, Stan

    2012-01-01

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) has intriguing effects on platelet function in the presence of agents that raise cyclic adenosine 3'5'-monophosphate (cAMP). PGE(2) reverses inhibition of platelet aggregation by agents that stimulate cAMP production via a G(s)-linked receptor, but adds to the inhibition of platelet function brought about by agents that raise cAMP through other mechanisms. Here, we used the EP receptor antagonists DG-041 (which acts at the EP3 receptor) and ONO-AE3-208 (which acts at the EP4 receptor) to investigate the role of these receptors in mediating these effects of PGE(2). Platelet aggregation was measured in platelet-rich plasma obtained from healthy volunteers in response to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) using single platelet counting. The effects of a range of concentrations of PGE(2) were determined in the presence of (1) the prostacyclin mimetic iloprost, which operates through G(s)-linked IP receptors, (2) the cAMP PDE inhibitor DN9693 and (3) the direct-acting adenylate cyclase stimulator forskolin. Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation was also determined as a measure of cAMP. PGE(2) reversed the inhibition of aggregation brought about by iloprost; this was prevented in the presence of the EP3 antagonist DG-041, indicating that this effect of PGE(2) is mediated via the EP3 receptor. In contrast, PGE(2) added to the inhibition of aggregation brought about by DN9693 or forskolin; this was reversed by the EP4 antagonist ONO-AE3-208, indicating that this effect of PGE(2) is mediated via the EP4 receptor. Effects on aggregation were accompanied by corresponding changes in VASP phosphorylation. The dominant role of EP3 receptors circumstances where cAMP is increased through a Gs-linked mechanism may be relevant to the situation in vivo where platelets are maintained in an inactive state through constant exposure to prostacyclin, and thus the main effect of PGE(2) may be prothrombotic. If so, the results described here

  15. Aggregate breakdown and surface seal development influenced by rain intensity, slope gradient and soil particle size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjmand Sajjadi, S.; Mahmoodabadi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Aggregate breakdown is an important process which controls infiltration rate (IR) and the availability of fine materials necessary for structural sealing under rainfall. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of different slope gradients, rain intensities and particle size distributions on aggregate breakdown and IR to describe the formation of surface sealing. To address this issue, 60 experiments were carried out in a 35 cm x 30 cm x 10 cm detachment tray using a rainfall simulator. By sieving a sandy loam soil, two sub-samples with different maximum aggregate sizes of 2 mm (Dmax 2 mm) and 4.75 mm (Dmax 4.75 mm) were prepared. The soils were exposed to two different rain intensities (57 and 80 mm h-1) on several slopes (0.5, 2.5, 5, 10, and 20%) each at three replications. The result showed that the most fraction percentages in soils Dmax 2 mm and Dmax 4.75 mm were in the finest size classes of 0.02 and 0.043 mm, respectively for all slope gradients and rain intensities. The soil containing finer aggregates exhibited higher transportability of pre-detached material than the soil containing larger aggregates. Also, IR increased with increasing slope gradient, rain intensity and aggregate size under unsteady state conditions because of less development of surface seal. But under steady state conditions, no significant relationship was found between slope and IR. The finding of this study revealed the importance of rain intensity, slope steepness and soil aggregate size on aggregate breakdown and seal formation, which can control infiltration rate and the consequent runoff and erosion rates.

  16. Influence of radioactivity on surface charging and aggregation kinetics of particles in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Lee, Ida; McFarlane, Joanna; Tsouris, Costas

    2014-01-01

    Radioactivity can influence surface interactions, but its effects on particle aggregation kinetics have not been included in transport modeling of radioactive particles. In this research, experimental and theoretical studies have been performed to investigate the influence of radioactivity on surface charging and aggregation kinetics of radioactive particles in the atmosphere. Radioactivity-induced charging mechanisms have been investigated at the microscopic level, and heterogeneous surface potential caused by radioactivity is reported. The radioactivity-induced surface charging is highly influenced by several parameters, such as rate and type of radioactive decay. A population balance model, including interparticle forces, has been employed to study the effects of radioactivity on particle aggregation kinetics in air. It has been found that radioactivity can hinder aggregation of particles because of similar surface charging caused by the decay process. Experimental and theoretical studies provide useful insights into the understanding of transport characteristics of radioactive particles emitted from severe nuclear events, such as the recent accident of Fukushima or deliberate explosions of radiological devices.

  17. Influence of radioactivity on surface charging and aggregation kinetics of particles in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Lee, Ida; McFarlane, Joanna; Tsouris, Costas

    2014-01-01

    Radioactivity can influence surface interactions, but its effects on particle aggregation kinetics have not been included in transport modeling of radioactive particles. In this research, experimental and theoretical studies have been performed to investigate the influence of radioactivity on surface charging and aggregation kinetics of radioactive particles in the atmosphere. Radioactivity-induced charging mechanisms have been investigated at the microscopic level, and heterogeneous surface potential caused by radioactivity is reported. The radioactivity-induced surface charging is highly influenced by several parameters, such as rate and type of radioactive decay. A population balance model, including interparticle forces, has been employed to study the effects of radioactivity on particle aggregation kinetics in air. It has been found that radioactivity can hinder aggregation of particles because of similar surface charging caused by the decay process. Experimental and theoretical studies provide useful insights into the understanding of transport characteristics of radioactive particles emitted from severe nuclear events, such as the recent accident of Fukushima or deliberate explosions of radiological devices. PMID:24308778

  18. Aggregation process of optical properties and temperature over heterogeneous surfaces in infrared domain

    SciTech Connect

    Fontanilles, Guillaume; Briottet, Xavier; Fabre, Sophie; Lefebvre, Sidonie; Vandenhaute, Pierre-Francois

    2010-08-20

    We propose a modeling of the aggregation processes of optical properties and temperature over the heterogeneous landscape in the infrared domain (3-14{mu}m). The main objectives of the modeling are to understand how these parameters aggregate and to study their links at different spatial scales. As the landscape is described at each scale by its radiative parameters, general equations linking the radiative parameters at a given high spatial scale to those at a rough scale are proposed. Then these equations are applied to several synthetic landscapes. An analysis based on a design of experiments is conducted to point out the influence of each of the input factors. The results show the importance of the intrinsic parameters (reflectance, emissivity, and surface temperature) of each surface element and also the directional and spectral behaviors of the aggregated parameters.

  19. Mapping Surface Cover Parameters Using Aggregation Rules and Remotely Sensed Cover Classes. Version 1.9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arain, Altaf M.; Shuttleworth, W. James; Yang, Z-Liang; Michaud, Jene; Dolman, Johannes

    1997-01-01

    A coupled model, which combines the Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS) with an advanced atmospheric boundary-layer model, was used to validate hypothetical aggregation rules for BATS-specific surface cover parameters. The model was initialized and tested with observations from the Anglo-Brazilian Amazonian Climate Observational Study and used to simulate surface fluxes for rain forest and pasture mixes at a site near Manaus in Brazil. The aggregation rules are shown to estimate parameters which give area-average surface fluxes similar to those calculated with explicit representation of forest and pasture patches for a range of meteorological and surface conditions relevant to this site, but the agreement deteriorates somewhat when there are large patch-to-patch differences in soil moisture. The aggregation rules, validated as above, were then applied to remotely sensed 1 km land cover data set to obtain grid-average values of BATS vegetation parameters for 2.8 deg x 2.8 deg and 1 deg x 1 deg grids within the conterminous United States. There are significant differences in key vegetation parameters (aerodynamic roughness length, albedo, leaf area index, and stomatal resistance) when aggregate parameters are compared to parameters for the single, dominant cover within the grid. However, the surface energy fluxes calculated by stand-alone BATS with the 2-year forcing, data from the International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) CDROM were reasonably similar using aggregate-vegetation parameters and dominant-cover parameters, but there were some significant differences, particularly in the western USA.

  20. Design of peptidyl compounds that affect beta-amyloid aggregation: importance of surface tension and context.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Todd J; Murphy, Regina M

    2005-06-21

    Self-association of beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide into cross-beta-sheet fibrils induces cellular toxicity in vitro and is linked with progression of Alzheimer's disease. Previously, we demonstrated that hybrid peptides, containing a recognition domain that binds to Abeta and a disrupting domain consisting of a chain of charged amino acids, inhibited Abeta-associated toxicity in vitro and increased the rate of Abeta aggregation. In this work we examine the design parameter space of the disrupting domain. Using KLVFFKKKKKK as a base case, we tested hybrid compounds with a branched rather than linear lysine oligomer, with l-lysine replaced by d-lysine, and with lysine replaced by diaminopropionic acid. We synthesized a compound with a novel anionic disrupting domain that contained cysteine thiols oxidized to sulfates, as well as other compounds in which alkyl or ether chains were appended to KLVFF. In all cases, the hybrid compound's ability to increase solvent surface tension was the strongest predictor of its effect on Abeta aggregation kinetics. Finally, we investigated the effects of arginine on Abeta aggregation. Arginine is a well-known chaotrope but increases surface tension of water. Arginine modestly decreased Abeta aggregation. In contrast, RRRRRR slightly, and KLVFFRRRRRR greatly, increased Abeta aggregation. Thus, the influence of arginine on Abeta aggregation depends strongly on the context in which it is presented. The effect of arginine, RRRRRR, and KLVFFRRRRRR on Abeta aggregation was examined in detail using laser light scattering, circular dichroism spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thioflavin T fluorescence, and transmission electron microscopy. PMID:15952797

  1. Density functional theory of equilibrium random copolymers: application to surface adsorption of aggregating peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haiqiang; Forsman, Jan; Woodward, Clifford E.

    2016-06-01

    We generalize a recently developed polymer density functional theory (PDFT) for polydisperse polymer fluids to the case of equilibrium random copolymers. We show that the generalization of the PDFT to these systems allows us to obtain a remarkable simplification compared to the monodispersed polymers. The theory is used to treat a model for protein aggregation into linear filaments in the presence of surfaces. Here we show that, for attractive surfaces, there is evidence of significant enhancement of protein aggregation. This behaviour is a consequence of a surface phase transition, which has been shown to occur with ideal equilibrium polymers in the presence of sufficiently attractive surfaces. For excluding monomers, this transition is suppressed, though an echo of the underlying ideal transition is present in the sudden change in the excess adsorption.

  2. Genetic Variation in the Platelet Endothelial Aggregation Receptor 1 Gene Results in Endothelial Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Fisch, Adam S; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Backman, Joshua D; Wang, Hong; Donnelly, Patrick; Ryan, Kathleen A; Parihar, Ankita; Pavlovich, Mary A; Mitchell, Braxton D; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Herzog, William; Harman, Christopher R; Wren, Jonathan D; Lewis, Joshua P

    2015-01-01

    Platelet Endothelial Aggregation Receptor 1 (PEAR1) is a newly identified membrane protein reported to be involved in multiple vascular and thrombotic processes. While most studies to date have focused on the effects of this receptor in platelets, PEAR1 is located in multiple tissues including the endothelium, where it is most highly expressed. Our first objective was to evaluate the role of PEAR1 in endothelial function by examining flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery in 641 participants from the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention Heart Study. Our second objective was to further define the impact of PEAR1 on cardiovascular disease computationally through meta-analysis of 75,000 microarrays, yielding insights regarding PEAR1 function, and predictions of phenotypes and diseases affected by PEAR1 dysregulation. Based on the results of this meta-analysis we examined whether genetic variation in PEAR1 influences endothelial function using an ex vivo assay of endothelial cell migration. We observed a significant association between rs12041331 and flow-mediated dilation in participants of the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention Heart Study (P = 0.02). Meta-analysis results revealed that PEAR1 expression is highly correlated with several genes (e.g. ANG2, ACVRL1, ENG) and phenotypes (e.g. endothelial cell migration, angiogenesis) that are integral to endothelial function. Functional validation of these results revealed that PEAR1 rs12041331 is significantly associated with endothelial migration (P = 0.04). Our results suggest for the first time that genetic variation of PEAR1 is a significant determinant of endothelial function through pathways implicated in cardiovascular disease. PMID:26406321

  3. Surfaces modulate beta-amyloid peptide aggregation associated with Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, Elizabeth Anne

    A hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, a late onset neurodegenerative disease, is the presence of neuritic amyloid plaques deposited within the brain composed of beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide aggregates. Abeta can aggregate into a variety of polymorphic aggregate structures under different chemical environments, specifically affected by the presence of differing surfaces. There are several point mutations clustered around the central hydrophobic core of Abeta (E22G Arctic mutation, E22K Italian mutation, D23N Iowa mutation, and A21G Flemish mutation). These mutations are associated with hereditary diseases ranging from almost pure cerebral amyloid angiopathy to typical Alzheimer's disease pathology with both plaques and tangles. To determine how these different point mutations, which modify both peptide charge and hydrophobic character, altered Abeta aggregation and morphology under free solution conditions, at an anionic surface/liquid interface and in the presence of supported lipid bilayers, atomic force microscopy was used. Additionally, the non-native conformation of Abeta leads to the formation of nanoscale, toxic aggregates which have been shown to strongly interact with supported lipid bilayers, which may represent a key step in potential toxic mechanisms. Understanding how specific regions of Abeta regulate its aggregation in the absence and presence of surfaces can provide insight into the fundamental interaction of Abeta with cellular surfaces. Specific fragments of Abeta (Abeta1-11, Abeta 1-28, Abeta10-26, Abeta12-24, Abeta 16-22, Abeta22-35, and Abeta1-40), represent a variety of chemically unique regions along Abeta, i.e., the extracellular domain, the central hydrophobic core, and transmembrane domain. Using various scanning probe microscopic techniques, the interaction of these Abeta sequences with lipid membranes was shown to alter aggregate morphology and induce mechanical changes of lipid bilayers compared to aggregates formed under free solution

  4. Aggregation and resuspension of graphene oxide in simulated natural surface aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Hua, Zulin; Tang, Zhiqiang; Bai, Xue; Zhang, Jianan; Yu, Lu; Cheng, Haomiao

    2015-10-01

    A series of experiments were performed to simulate the environmental behavior and fate of graphene oxide nanoparticles (GONPs) involved in the surface environment relating to divalent cations, natural organic matter (NOM), and hydraulics. The electrokinetic properties and hydrodynamic diameters of GONPs was systematically determined to characterize GONPs stability and the results indicated Ca(2+) (Mg(2+)) significantly destabilized GONPs with high aggregate strength factors (SF) and fractal dimension (FD), whereas NOM decreased aggregate SF with lower FD and improved GONPs stability primarily because of increasing steric repulsion and electrostatic repulsion. Furthermore, the GONPs resuspension from the sand bed into overlying water with shear flow confirmed that the release would be restricted by Ca(2+) (Mg(2+)), however, enhanced by NOM. The interaction energy based on Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory verifies the aggregation and resuspension well. Overall, these experiments provide an innovative look and more details to study the behavior and fate of GONPs. PMID:26071942

  5. Fabrication and surface properties of hydrophobic barium sulfate aggregates based on sodium cocoate modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Linna; Wang, Guangxiu; Cao, Rong; Yang, Chun; Chen, Xi

    2014-10-01

    Hydrophobic barium sulfate aggregates were fabricated by the direction of cocoate anions. At 30 °C, when the weight ratio of sodium cocoate to BaSO4 particles was 2.0 wt.%, the active ratio of the product reached 99.43% and the contact angle was greater than 120°. This method could not only simplify the complex modification process, but reduce energy consumption. The surface morphology, chemical structure and composition of BaSO4 aggregates were characterized by SEM, XRD, and FTIR. The results indicated that the as-synthesized BaSO4 particles were almond-liked and were composed of many interconnected nanoballs and that their surfaces were affected by cocoate anions. The adsorption of cocoate anions reversed the charge and weakened the surface polarity of BaSO4 particles, driving the formation of aggregates. And cocoate anions induced a change of the BaSO4 particles surface from hydrophilic to hydrophobic by a self-assembly and transformation process. Due to the self-assembled structure and the surface hydrophobicity, when adding the hydrophobic BaSO4 into PVC, the mechanical properties of PVC composite materials were significantly improved.

  6. Challenges in imaging cell surface receptor clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medda, Rebecca; Giske, Arnold; Cavalcanti-Adam, Elisabetta Ada

    2016-01-01

    Super-resolution microscopy offers unique tools for visualizing and resolving cellular structures at the molecular level. STED microscopy is a purely optical method where neither complex sample preparation nor mathematical post-processing is required. Here we present the use of STED microscopy for imaging receptor cluster composition. We use two-color STED to further determine the distribution of two different receptor subunits of the family of receptor serine/threonine kinases in the presence or absence of their ligands. The implications of receptor clustering on the downstream signaling are discussed, and future challenges are also presented.

  7. Analysis of mineral trioxide aggregate surface when set in the presence of fetal bovine serum.

    PubMed

    Tingey, Mark C; Bush, Peter; Levine, Ming Shih

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the chemical and physical characteristics of set mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) surface can provide insight into its bioactivity. The purpose of this study was to describe the surface chemistry and morphology of gray and white MTA set in the presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS). Eight MTA blocks were prepared: four set in the presence of water and four in FBS. The surface morphologic characteristics were studied via scanning electron microscopy. The surface chemical composition of the set cement was investigated by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray fluorescence. No difference was found between gray and white MTA when set in the same solution. However, MTA/FBS and MTA/water present differing surface morphology and chemical distributions. When set in FBS, MTA's surface had a homogenous distribution of chemicals and a relatively smooth globular appearance. MTA/water's surface was biphasic, containing large hexagonal crystalline plates composed of calcium embedded in a pool of globular crystals.

  8. Selective activation of the prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype EP2 or EP4 leads to inhibition of platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Shuhko; Kashiwagi, Hitoshi; Yuhki, Koh-ichi; Kojima, Fumiaki; Yamada, Takehiro; Fujino, Takayuki; Hara, Akiyoshi; Takayama, Koji; Maruyama, Takayuki; Yoshida, Akitoshi; Narumiya, Shuh; Ushikubi, Fumitaka

    2010-10-01

    The effect of selective activation of platelet prostaglandin (PG) E2 receptor subtype EP2 or EP4 on platelet aggregation remains to be determined. In platelets prepared from wild-type mice (WT platelets), high concentrations of PGE2 inhibited platelet aggregation induced by U-46619, a thromboxane receptor agonist. However, there was no significant change in the inhibitory effect of PGE2 on platelets lacking EP2 (EP2-/- platelets) and EP4 (EP4-/- platelets) compared with the inhibitory effect on WT platelets. On the other hand, AE1-259 and AE1-329, agonists for EP2 and EP4, respectively, potently inhibited U-46619 -induced aggregation with respective IC50 values of 590 ± 14 and 100 ± 4.9 nM in WT platelets, while the inhibition was significantly blunted in EP2-/- and EP4-/- platelets. In human platelets, AE1-259 and AE1-329 inhibited U-46619-induced aggregation with respective IC50 values of 640 ± 16 and 2.3 ± 0.3 nM. Notably, the inhibitory potency of AE1-329 in human platelets was much higher than that in murine platelets, while such a difference was not observed in the inhibitory potency of AE1-259. AE1-329 also inhibited adenosine diphosphate-induced platelet aggregation, and the inhibition was almost completely blocked by AE3-208, an EP4 antagonist. In addition, AE1-329 increased intracellular cAMP concentrations in a concentration- and EP4-dependent manner in human platelets. These results indicate that selective activation of EP2 or EP4 can inhibit platelet aggregation and that EP4 agonists are particularly promising as novel anti-platelet agents.

  9. Hyperthermia restores apoptosis induced by death receptors through aggregation-induced c-FLIP cytosolic depletion

    PubMed Central

    Morlé, A; Garrido, C; Micheau, O

    2015-01-01

    TRAIL is involved in immune tumor surveillance and is considered a promising anti-cancer agent owing to its limited side effects on healthy cells. However, some cancer cells display resistance, or become resistant to TRAIL-induced cell death. Hyperthermia can enhance sensitivity to TRAIL-induced cell death in various resistant cancer cell lines, including lung, breast, colon or prostate carcinomas. Mild heat shock treatment has been proposed to restore Fas ligand or TRAIL-induced apoptosis through c-FLIP degradation or the mitochondrial pathway. We demonstrate here that neither the mitochondria nor c-FLIP degradation are required for TRAIL-induced cell death restoration during hyperthermia. Our data provide evidence that insolubilization of c-FLIP, alone, is sufficient to enhance apoptosis induced by death receptors. Hyperthermia induced c-FLIP depletion from the cytosolic fraction, without apparent degradation, thereby preventing c-FLIP recruitment to the TRAIL DISC and allowing efficient caspase-8 cleavage and apoptosis. Hyperthermia-induced c-FLIP depletion was independent of c-FLIP DED2 FL chain assembly motif or ubiquitination-mediated c-FLIP degradation, as assessed using c-FLIP point mutants on lysine 167 and 195 or threonine 166, a phosphorylation site known to regulate ubiquitination of c-FLIP. Rather, c-FLIP depletion was associated with aggregation, because addition of glycerol not only prevented the loss of c-FLIP from the cytosol but also enabled c-FLIP recruitment within the TRAIL DISC, thus inhibiting TRAIL-induced apoptosis during hyperthermia. Altogether our results demonstrate that c-FLIP is a thermosensitive protein whose targeting by hyperthermia allows restoration of apoptosis induced by TNF ligands, including TRAIL. Our findings suggest that combining TRAIL agonists with whole-body or localized hyperthermia may be an interesting approach in cancer therapy. PMID:25675293

  10. Hyperthermia restores apoptosis induced by death receptors through aggregation-induced c-FLIP cytosolic depletion.

    PubMed

    Morlé, A; Garrido, C; Micheau, O

    2015-01-01

    TRAIL is involved in immune tumor surveillance and is considered a promising anti-cancer agent owing to its limited side effects on healthy cells. However, some cancer cells display resistance, or become resistant to TRAIL-induced cell death. Hyperthermia can enhance sensitivity to TRAIL-induced cell death in various resistant cancer cell lines, including lung, breast, colon or prostate carcinomas. Mild heat shock treatment has been proposed to restore Fas ligand or TRAIL-induced apoptosis through c-FLIP degradation or the mitochondrial pathway. We demonstrate here that neither the mitochondria nor c-FLIP degradation are required for TRAIL-induced cell death restoration during hyperthermia. Our data provide evidence that insolubilization of c-FLIP, alone, is sufficient to enhance apoptosis induced by death receptors. Hyperthermia induced c-FLIP depletion from the cytosolic fraction, without apparent degradation, thereby preventing c-FLIP recruitment to the TRAIL DISC and allowing efficient caspase-8 cleavage and apoptosis. Hyperthermia-induced c-FLIP depletion was independent of c-FLIP DED2 FL chain assembly motif or ubiquitination-mediated c-FLIP degradation, as assessed using c-FLIP point mutants on lysine 167 and 195 or threonine 166, a phosphorylation site known to regulate ubiquitination of c-FLIP. Rather, c-FLIP depletion was associated with aggregation, because addition of glycerol not only prevented the loss of c-FLIP from the cytosol but also enabled c-FLIP recruitment within the TRAIL DISC, thus inhibiting TRAIL-induced apoptosis during hyperthermia. Altogether our results demonstrate that c-FLIP is a thermosensitive protein whose targeting by hyperthermia allows restoration of apoptosis induced by TNF ligands, including TRAIL. Our findings suggest that combining TRAIL agonists with whole-body or localized hyperthermia may be an interesting approach in cancer therapy. PMID:25675293

  11. Static and Dynamic Aspects of Surfactant Surface Aggregates studied by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schniepp, Hannes; Saville, Dudley; Aksay, Ilhan

    2006-03-01

    Using AFM, we show that surfactants form micellar aggregates of varying morphology, depending on the surface structure. While all previous studies were limited to atomically flat substrates, we achieve imaging the micelles on rough gold. By gradually annealing these surfaces, we show the influence of roughness on the aggregate structures. For crystalline gold (111), aligned, hemi-cylindrical micelles that recognize the symmetry axes of the gold lattice are found. With increasing roughness, the degree of organization of the aggregates decreases. We also show that the micellar pattern on HOPG and gold(111) surfaces changes with time and responds to perturbations in a self-healing way. Our results suggest that this organization happens at the molecular scale. Theoretical analysis for HOPG, however, show that the micelle orientation cannot be explained on the molecular level, but the anisotropic van der Waals interaction between micelles and HOPG has to be considered as well [1]. [1] Saville, D. A.; Chun, J.; Li, J.-L.; Schniepp, H. C.; Car, R.; Aksay, I. A., accepted by Physical Review Letters.

  12. Solid-State Synthesized Nanostructured Au Dendritic Aggregates Towards Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentile, A.; Ruffino, F.; D'Andrea, C.; Gucciardi, P. G.; Reitano, R.; Grimaldi, M. G.

    2016-06-01

    Micrometric Au structures, presenting a dendritic nano-structure, have been fabricated on a Si-based substrate. The fabrication method involves the deposition of a thin Au film on the substrate and a high-temperature annealing (1100°C) using fast heating and cooling ramps. The thermal process produces the growth, from the substrate, of Si micro-pillars whose top surfaces, covered by a crystalline Au layer, present a nanodendritic morphology. In addition to the micro-pillars, the sample surface presents a complex structural and chemical composition including Si3N4 regions due to the silicon-nitrogen intermixing during the heating stage. By studying the kinetic processes at the Au-Si interface during the thermal treatment, we describe the stages involved in the micro-pillars growth, in the dendritic morphology development, and in the Au atoms entrapment at the top of the dendritic surfaces. Finally, we present the analyses of the optical and surface enhanced Raman scattering properties of the Au dendritic aggregates. We show, in particular, that: (1) the Au dendrites aggregates act as effective scattering elements for the electromagnetic radiation in the infrared spectral region; and (2) the higher surface area due to the branched dendritic structure is responsible for the improvement in the sensitivity of the surface enhanced Raman scattering activity.

  13. Stabilization by urea during thermal unfolding-mediated aggregation of recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor (type II): does solvation entropy play a role?

    PubMed

    Remmele, Richard L; Zhang-van Enk, Jian; Phan, Duke; Yu, Lei

    2012-06-21

    The protein denaturing properties of urea are well-known and still the subject of debate. It has been noted that in some cases where urea concentrations are relatively low stabilization is afforded against aggregation. An explanation for this unusual effect has seemingly remained elusive. Evidence is offered to propose urea stabilization is related to its influence on the solvation property of the protein molecules when in contact with an unfolded hydrophobic surface that tends to increase the entropy of the local aqueous solvent. This property of urea is expected to lower the entropic driving force of unfolded-mediated aggregation despite the increase in enthalpy. The data presented from toluene transfer experiments into 2 M urea + 0.1 M sodium phosphate solutions showed that the solvation free energy change was negative up to ∼75 °C. The associated ΔΔH was positive, leading to the conclusion that entropy drives the solvation process within the temperature domain from ∼20° to 75 °C. Using thermodynamic parameters from the toluene solvation experiments, it was possible to accurately determine the T(m) shift of recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor type II (rhuIL-1R(II)). Heating experiments above the apparent T(m) in the same urea/phosphate solution support the thesis that urea inhibits the entropy-driven aggregation process of rhuIL-1R(II), adding yet another molecule to the list of low urea concentration stabilized molecules. PMID:22571594

  14. Analysis of the cell surface expression of cytokine receptors using the surface protein biotinylation method.

    PubMed

    Pavel, Mahmud Arif; Lam, Clarissa; Kashyap, Parul; Salehi-Najafabadi, Zahra; Singh, Gurpreet; Yu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines are pleiotropic, low-molecular-weight proteins that regulate the immune responses to infection and inflammation. They stimulate the immune responses by binding to cytokine receptors on the cell plasma membrane. Thus, knowledge of the expression level of particular cytokine receptors on cell surface is crucial for understanding the cytokine function and regulation. One of the techniques to explore the membrane embedded cytokine receptors is cell surface biotinylation. Biotinylated surface proteins can be rapidly purified through the strong interaction between biotin and streptavidin. Here, we describe the procedure for surface biotinylation and purification of biotinylated cytokine receptors for further downstream analysis. PMID:24908305

  15. Analysis of the cell surface expression of cytokine receptors using the surface protein biotinylation method.

    PubMed

    Pavel, Mahmud Arif; Lam, Clarissa; Kashyap, Parul; Salehi-Najafabadi, Zahra; Singh, Gurpreet; Yu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines are pleiotropic, low-molecular-weight proteins that regulate the immune responses to infection and inflammation. They stimulate the immune responses by binding to cytokine receptors on the cell plasma membrane. Thus, knowledge of the expression level of particular cytokine receptors on cell surface is crucial for understanding the cytokine function and regulation. One of the techniques to explore the membrane embedded cytokine receptors is cell surface biotinylation. Biotinylated surface proteins can be rapidly purified through the strong interaction between biotin and streptavidin. Here, we describe the procedure for surface biotinylation and purification of biotinylated cytokine receptors for further downstream analysis.

  16. Pyocyanin facilitates extracellular DNA binding to Pseudomonas aeruginosa influencing cell surface properties and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Das, Theerthankar; Kutty, Samuel K; Kumar, Naresh; Manefield, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Pyocyanin is an electrochemically active metabolite produced by the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It is a recognized virulence factor and is involved in a variety of significant biological activities including gene expression, maintaining fitness of bacterial cells and biofilm formation. It is also recognized as an electron shuttle for bacterial respiration and as an antibacterial and antifungal agent. eDNA has also been demonstrated to be a major component in establishing P. aeruginosa biofilms. In this study we discovered that production of pyocyanin influences the binding of eDNA to P. aeruginosa PA14 cells, mediated through intercalation of pyocyanin with eDNA. P. aeruginosa cell surface properties including cell size (hydrodynamic diameter), hydrophobicity and attractive surface energies were influenced by eDNA in the presence of pyocyanin, affecting physico-chemical interactions and promoting aggregation. A ΔphzA-G PA14 mutant, deficient in pyocynain production, could not bind with eDNA resulting in a reduction in hydrodynamic diameter, a decrease in hydrophobicity, repulsive physico-chemical interactions and reduction in aggregation in comparison to the wildtype strain. Removal of eDNA by DNase I treatment on the PA14 wildtype strain resulted in significant reduction in aggregation, cell surface hydrophobicity and size and an increase in repulsive physico-chemical interactions, similar to the level of the ΔphzA-G mutant. The cell surface properties of the ΔphzA-G mutant were not affected by DNase I treatment. Based on these findings we propose that pyocyanin intercalation with eDNA promotes cell-to-cell interactions in P. aeruginosa cells by influencing their cell surface properties and physico-chemical interactions. PMID:23505483

  17. Self-assembled nanoparticle aggregates: Organizing disorder for high performance surface-enhanced spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasolato, C.; Domenici, F.; Brasili, F.; Mura, F.; Sennato, S.; De Angelis, L.; Mazzi, E.; Bordi, F.; Postorino, P.

    2015-06-01

    The coherent oscillations of the surface electron gas, known as surface plasmons, in metal nanostructures can give rise to the localization of intense electromagnetic fields at the metal-dielectric interface. These strong fields are exploited in surface enhanced spectroscopies, such as Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS), for the detection and characterization of molecules at very low concentration. Still, the implementation of SERS-based biosensors requires a high level of reproducibility, combined with cheap and simple fabrication methods. For this purpose, SERS substrates based on self-assembled aggregates of commercial metallic nanoparticles (Nps) can meet all the above requests. Following this line, we report on a combined micro-Raman and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analysis of the SERS efficiency of micrometric silver Np aggregates (enhancement factors up to 109) obtained by self-assembly. Despite the intrinsic disordered nature of these Np clusters, we were able to sort out some general rules relating the specific aggregate morphology to its plasmonic response. We found strong evidences of cooperative effects among the NPs within the cluster and namely a clear dependence of the SERS-efficiency on both the cluster area (basically linear) and the number of stacked NPs layers. A cooperative action among the superimposed layers has been proved also by electromagnetic simulations performed on simplified nanostructures consisting of stacking planes of ordered Nps. Being clear the potentialities of these disordered self-assembled clusters, in terms of both easy fabrication and signal enhancement, we developed a specific nanofabrication protocol, based on electron beam lithography and molecular functionalization, that allowed for a fine control of the Np assemblies into designed shapes fixing their area and height. In particular, we fabricated 2D ordered arrays of disordered clusters choosing gold Nps owing to their high stability. AFM measurements confirmed

  18. Self-assembled nanoparticle aggregates: Organizing disorder for high performance surface-enhanced spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fasolato, C.; Domenici, F.; Brasili, F.; Mazzi, E.; Postorino, P.; Mura, F.; Sennato, S.; De Angelis, L.; Bordi, F.

    2015-06-23

    The coherent oscillations of the surface electron gas, known as surface plasmons, in metal nanostructures can give rise to the localization of intense electromagnetic fields at the metal-dielectric interface. These strong fields are exploited in surface enhanced spectroscopies, such as Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS), for the detection and characterization of molecules at very low concentration. Still, the implementation of SERS-based biosensors requires a high level of reproducibility, combined with cheap and simple fabrication methods. For this purpose, SERS substrates based on self-assembled aggregates of commercial metallic nanoparticles (Nps) can meet all the above requests. Following this line, we report on a combined micro-Raman and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analysis of the SERS efficiency of micrometric silver Np aggregates (enhancement factors up to 10{sup 9}) obtained by self-assembly. Despite the intrinsic disordered nature of these Np clusters, we were able to sort out some general rules relating the specific aggregate morphology to its plasmonic response. We found strong evidences of cooperative effects among the NPs within the cluster and namely a clear dependence of the SERS-efficiency on both the cluster area (basically linear) and the number of stacked NPs layers. A cooperative action among the superimposed layers has been proved also by electromagnetic simulations performed on simplified nanostructures consisting of stacking planes of ordered Nps. Being clear the potentialities of these disordered self-assembled clusters, in terms of both easy fabrication and signal enhancement, we developed a specific nanofabrication protocol, based on electron beam lithography and molecular functionalization, that allowed for a fine control of the Np assemblies into designed shapes fixing their area and height. In particular, we fabricated 2D ordered arrays of disordered clusters choosing gold Nps owing to their high stability. AFM measurements

  19. Beyond the cell surface: new mechanisms of receptor function.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, Carlos F

    2010-05-21

    The text book view of cell surface receptors depicts them at the top of a vertical chain of command that starts with ligand binding and proceeds in a lineal fashion towards the cell nucleus. Although pedagogically useful, this view is incomplete and recent findings suggest that the extracellular domain of cell surface receptors can be a transmitter as much as a receiver in intercellular communication. GFRalpha1 is a GPI-anchored receptor for GDNF (glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor), a neuronal growth factor with widespread functions in the developing and adult nervous system. GFRalpha1 partners with transmembrane proteins, such as the receptor tyrosine kinase RET or the cell adhesion molecule NCAM, for intracellular transmission of the GDNF signal. In addition to this canonical role, GFRalpha1 can also engage in horizontal interactions and thereby modify the function of other cell surface components. GFRalpha1 can also function as a ligand-induced adhesion cell molecule, mediating homophilic cell-cell interactions in response to GDNF. Finally, GFRalpha1 can also be released from the cell surface and act at a distance as a soluble factor together with its ligand. This plethora of unconventional mechanisms is likely to be a feature common to several other receptors and considerably expands our view of cell surface receptor function. PMID:20494105

  20. Ionizing Radiation Induces Macrophage Foam Cell Formation and Aggregation Through JNK-Dependent Activation of CD36 Scavenger Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Ikuo; Hotokezaka, Yuka; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Sumi, Tadateru; Nakamura, Takashi

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: Irradiated arteries of cancer patients can be associated with atherosclerosis-like lesions containing cholesterol-laden macrophages (foam cells). Endothelial cell damage by irradiation does not completely explain the foam cell formation. We investigated the possible underlying mechanisms for ionizing radiation (IR)-induced foam cell formation. Methods and Materials: Human peripheral blood monocytes were activated by macrophage colony-stimulating factor and then treated with varying doses of IR in vitro in the absence of endothelial cells. Scavenger receptor expression and foam cell formation of IR-treated macrophages were investigated in the presence or absence of oxidized low-density lipoprotein. We also assessed the importance of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity in the macrophage colony-stimulating factor-activated human monocytes (macrophages) for the foam cell formation. Results: We found that IR treatment of macrophage colony-stimulating factor-activated human peripheral blood monocytes resulted in the enhanced expression of CD36 scavenger receptors and that cholesterol accumulated in the irradiated macrophages with resultant foam cell formation in the presence of oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Furthermore, when cultured on collagen gels, human macrophages formed large foam cell aggregates in response to IR. Antibodies against CD36 inhibited the IR-induced foam cell formation and aggregation, indicating that the IR-induced foam cell formation and the subsequent aggregation are dependent on functional CD36. In addition, we found that IR of human macrophages resulted in c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation and that c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibition suppressed IR-induced CD36 expression and the subsequent foam cell formation and aggregation. Conclusion: Taken together, these results suggest that IR-induced foam cell formation is mediated by c-Jun N-terminal kinase-dependent CD36 activation.

  1. Predictive response surface model for heat-induced rheological changes and aggregation of whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Pedro A; Emond, Charles; Gomaa, Ahmed; Remondetto, Gabriel E; Subirade, Muriel

    2015-02-01

    Whey proteins are now far more than a by-product of cheese processing. In the last 2 decades, food manufacturers have developed them as ingredients, with the dairy industry remaining as a major user. For many applications, whey proteins are modified (denatured) to alter their structure and functional properties. The objective of this research was to study the influence of 85 to 100 °C, with protein concentration of 8% to 12%, and treatment times of 5 to 30 min, while measuring rheological properties (storage modulus, loss modulus, and complex viscosity) and aggregation (intermolecular beta-sheet formation) in dispersions of whey protein concentrate (WPC). A Box-Behnken Response Surface Methodology modeled the heat denaturation of liquid sweet WPC at 3 variables and 3 levels. The model revealed a very significant fit for viscoelastic properties, and a lesser fit for protein aggregation, at temperatures not previously studied. An exponential increase of rheological parameters was governed by protein concentration and temperature, while a modest linear relationship of aggregation was governed by temperature. Models such as these can serve as valuable guides to the ingredient and dairy industries to develop target products, as whey is a major ingredient in many functional foods.

  2. Estradiol signaling via sequestrable surface receptors.

    PubMed

    Benten, W P; Stephan, C; Lieberherr, M; Wunderlich, F

    2001-04-01

    Estradiol (E(2))-signaling is widely considered to be exclusively mediated through the transcription-regulating intracellular estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and ERbeta. The aim of this study was to investigate transcription-independent E(2)-signaling in mouse IC-21 macrophages. E(2) and E(2)-BSA induce a rapid rise in the intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) of Fura-2 loaded IC-21 cells as examined by spectrofluorometry. These changes in [Ca(2+)](i) can be inhibited by pertussis toxin, but not by the ER-blockers tamoxifen and raloxifene. The E(2)-signaling initiated at the plasma membrane is mediated through neither ERalpha nor ERbeta, but rather through a novel G protein-coupled membrane E(2)-receptor as revealed by RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. A special feature of this E(2)-receptor is its sequestration upon agonist stimulation. Sequestration depends on energy and temperature, and it proceeds through a clathrin- and caveolin-independent pathway. PMID:11250949

  3. Enhanced hydrophobicity of polyurethane via non-solvent induced surface aggregation of silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Seyfi, Javad; Hejazi, Iman; Jafari, Seyed Hassan; Khonakdar, Hossein Ali; Simon, Frank

    2016-09-15

    Fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces from hydrophilic polymers has always been regarded as a challenge. In this study, to achieve superhydrophobic polyurethane (PU) surfaces, silica nanoparticles and ethanol as non-solvent were simultaneously utilized during a solution casting-based process. Such modified version of phase separation process was found to be highly efficient, and also it required much lower concentration of nanoparticles to achieve superhydrophobicity as compared to the previously reported methods in the literature. According to the proposed mechanism, non-solvent induces a more profound aggregation of silica nanoparticles at the surface's top layer causing the surface energy to be highly diminished, and thus, the water repellency is improved. Morphology and topography results showed that a unique "triple-sized" structure was formed on the surface of superhydrophobic samples. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results proved that both PU macromolecules and silica nanoparticles were concurrently present at the surface layer of the superhydrophobic sample. It was concluded that surface composition and roughness could be regarded as competing factors in achieving superhydrophobicity. Based on the obtained results, the proposed method exhibits a promising potential in large-scale fabrication of surface layers with superhydrophobic property. Moreover, a mechanism was also presented to further explicate the physics behind the suggested method. PMID:27288577

  4. A physical scaling model for aggregation and disaggregation of field-scale surface soil moisture dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, Richa; Govindaraju, Rao S.

    2015-07-01

    Scaling relationships are needed as measurements and desired predictions are often not available at concurrent spatial support volumes or temporal discretizations. Surface soil moisture values of interest to hydrologic studies are estimated using ground based measurement techniques or utilizing remote sensing platforms. Remote sensing based techniques estimate field-scale surface soil moisture values, but are unable to provide the local-scale soil moisture information that is obtained from local measurements. Further, obtaining field-scale surface moisture values using ground-based measurements is exhaustive and time consuming. To bridge this scale mismatch, we develop analytical expressions for surface soil moisture based on sharp-front approximation of the Richards equation and assumed log-normal distribution of the spatial surface saturated hydraulic conductivity field. Analytical expressions for field-scale evolution of surface soil moisture to rainfall events are utilized to obtain aggregated and disaggregated response of surface soil moisture evolution with knowledge of the saturated hydraulic conductivity. The utility of the analytical model is demonstrated through numerical experiments involving 3-D simulations of soil moisture and Monte-Carlo simulations for 1-D renderings—with soil moisture dynamics being represented by the Richards equation in each instance. Results show that the analytical expressions developed here show promise for a principled way of scaling surface soil moisture.

  5. A physical scaling model for aggregation and disaggregation of field-scale surface soil moisture dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Richa; Govindaraju, Rao S

    2015-07-01

    Scaling relationships are needed as measurements and desired predictions are often not available at concurrent spatial support volumes or temporal discretizations. Surface soil moisture values of interest to hydrologic studies are estimated using ground based measurement techniques or utilizing remote sensing platforms. Remote sensing based techniques estimate field-scale surface soil moisture values, but are unable to provide the local-scale soil moisture information that is obtained from local measurements. Further, obtaining field-scale surface moisture values using ground-based measurements is exhaustive and time consuming. To bridge this scale mismatch, we develop analytical expressions for surface soil moisture based on sharp-front approximation of the Richards equation and assumed log-normal distribution of the spatial surface saturated hydraulic conductivity field. Analytical expressions for field-scale evolution of surface soil moisture to rainfall events are utilized to obtain aggregated and disaggregated response of surface soil moisture evolution with knowledge of the saturated hydraulic conductivity. The utility of the analytical model is demonstrated through numerical experiments involving 3-D simulations of soil moisture and Monte-Carlo simulations for 1-D renderings-with soil moisture dynamics being represented by the Richards equation in each instance. Results show that the analytical expressions developed here show promise for a principled way of scaling surface soil moisture.

  6. Probing surface characteristics of diffusion-limited-aggregation clusters with particles of variable size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menshutin, A. Yu.; Shchur, L. N.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2007-01-01

    We develop a technique for probing the harmonic measure of a diffusion-limited-aggregation (DLA) cluster surface with variable-size particles and generate 1000 clusters with 50×106 particles using an original off-lattice killing-free algorithm. Taking, in sequence, the limit of the vanishing size of the probing particles and then sending the growing cluster size to infinity, we achieve unprecedented accuracy in determining the fractal dimension D=1.7100(2) crucial to the characterization of the geometric properties of DLA clusters.

  7. Input of 137Cs and 90Sr into plants from the surface of soil aggregates and the intraped space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fokin, A. D.; Torshin, S. P.; Bebneva, Yu. M.; Gadzhiagaeva, R. A.; Zolotareva, Yu. I.; Umer, M. I.

    2014-12-01

    Soil aggregates with different localization of radionuclides—(a) only on the aggregate surface, (b) only in the intraped space, and (c) uniformly distributed throughout the aggregate volume—have been obtained under laboratory conditions, which has allowed separately assessing the roles of different aggregate parts in the uptake of radionuclides by plant roots and the reaggregation rate of the soil material. The uptake rate of the radionuclides localized on the surface of soil aggregates, especially 137Cs, by plants manifold exceeds their uptake observed at the localization of pollutants throughout the aggregate volume or only in their intraped material. The input rate of radionuclides into plants decreases with time. For 137Cs, this decrease is due to the strengthening of the sorption fixation of the radionuclide (about 15%) and the reaggregation of the soil material (85%). Under natural conditions, at a depth of 10 cm in the dark gray forest soil of a forest belt, aggregates 7-10 mm in size are subjected to 40-75% destruction and reaggregation on the average within a year, which corresponds, with consideration for the statistical dispersion of the initial data, to the aggregate lifetime of 1.5 to 3 years.

  8. Aggregation and antigenicity of virus like particle in salt solution--A case study with hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Zhang, Yan; Quan, Can; Luo, Jian; Yang, Yanli; Yu, Mengran; Kong, Yingjun; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2015-08-20

    The phenomenon of aggregation of virus-like particles (VLPs) in salt solution and the corresponding effect upon antigenicity was reported. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) combined with multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) was used to characterize the size and the aggregation behavior of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). The average diameter of HBsAg VLP was 22.8±0.4 nm and it tended to aggregate in salt solution to form large particles and the antigenicity changed accordingly. In 0-4 M NaCl solution, part of HBsAg molecules aggregated rapidly into oligomeric particles (OP), whose diameter distributed from 25 to 40 nm, and the antigenicity slightly decreased about 10%. The aggregation reaction is reversible. After removing NaCl, both size and antigenicity could recover to normal level (92-96%). By contrast, the aggregation process is more complicated in (NH4)2SO4 solution. Most of HBsAg particles aggregated into OP and further aggregated into polymeric particles (PP). The diameter of the PP could reach 40 to 140 nm. The concentration of (NH4)2SO4 had remarkable influence upon the rate of aggregation. When concentration of (NH4)2SO4 was below 1 M, most of HBsAg aggregated only into OP in 1 h. While with concentration of (NH4)2SO4 above 1 M, most of particles formed PP within 1 h. The aggregation process to PP was irreversible. After removing (NH4)2SO4, the large aggregates could not recover to normal particles and the remaining antigenicity was below 30%. PMID:25862298

  9. Correlation of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and nanoparticle aggregation with rhodamine 6G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, Christopher A.

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has fascinated the analytical chemistry field for decades. The SERS phenomenon has progressively leveraged the inherently insensitive Raman phenomenon from a novelty vibrational spectroscopy method into one capable of single molecule detection, with attendant molecular level selectivity and information. Yet, even after 40 years since its discovery, the core mechanism behind this phenomenon is still debated. This thesis presents results from a series of photometric titrations wherein solutions of 30 nm Au@Ag nanoparticles (NPs) were titrated with rhodamine 6G (R6G), spanning five orders of magnitude in R6G concentration, and which elucidate the conditions required for the onset of SERS by R6G in this system. The experiments illustrated the correlation between the Raman response and the plasmonic (via UV-Vis spectroscopy) properties of the nanoparticle solutions. It was found that the onset of R6G SERS was related much more closely to the aggregation of the nanoparticles in solution than to their R6G adsorbed surface coverage. However, triggering aggregation with sodium chloride appeared to enhance SERS by an independent mechanism, which is operative only at low, i.e., [NaCl] > 100 mM concentration.

  10. Nephrocalcin isoforms coat crystal surfaces and differentially affect calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal morphology, growth, and aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurutz, Josh W.; Carvalho, Mauricio; Nakagawa, Yasushi

    2003-08-01

    Calcium oxalate crystals were grown in the presence of each of the four isoforms of nephrocalcin (NC), a urinary protein proposed to inhibit kidney stone growth. Crystal size, morphology, and surface topography were assessed using optical microscopy, Coulter counter measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). All crystals grown in the presence of NC isoforms were calcium oxalate monohydrates (COMs). Crystals formed in the presence of NC-A were smaller than control crystals, which were grown without NC, according to optical and SEM results, suggesting that NC-A restricts crystal growth. In contrast, samples grown with NC-C and NC-D exhibit more large crystals and several crystal aggregates, suggesting that NC-C and -D promote crystal growth and aggregation. Crystals grown with NC-B are not significantly larger or smaller than controls. AFM images of the crystals reveal significantly different surface textures on the control crystals relative to those grown with NC isoforms, indicating that NC acts by coating nascent calcium oxalate crystals. These are the first reported AFM images that show topography of NC-coated crystals. These findings suggest that NC isoforms have distinct interactions with different COM crystal faces, which may be responsible for their different effects on crystal growth and morphology.

  11. Casein kinase 2-dependent serine phosphorylation of MuSK regulates acetylcholine receptor aggregation at the neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Cheusova, Tatiana; Khan, Muhammad Amir; Schubert, Steffen Wolfgang; Gavin, Anne-Claude; Buchou, Thierry; Jacob, Germaine; Sticht, Heinrich; Allende, Jorge; Boldyreff, Brigitte; Brenner, Hans Rudolf; Hashemolhosseini, Said

    2006-01-01

    The release of Agrin by motoneurons activates the muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK) as the main organizer of subsynaptic specializations at the neuromuscular junction. MuSK downstream signaling is largely undefined. Here we show that protein kinase CK2 interacts and colocalizes with MuSK at post-synaptic specializations. We observed CK2-mediated phosphorylation of serine residues within the kinase insert (KI) of MuSK. Inhibition or knockdown of CK2, or exchange of phosphorylatable serines by alanines within the KI of MuSK, impaired acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering, whereas their substitution by residues that imitate constitutive phosphorylation led to aggregation of AChRs even in the presence of CK2 inhibitors. Impairment of AChR cluster formation after replacement of MuSK KI with KIs of other receptor tyrosine kinases correlates with potential CK2-dependent serine phosphorylation within KIs. MuSK activity was unchanged but AChR stability decreased in the presence of CK2 inhibitors. Muscle-specific CK2β knockout mice develop a myasthenic phenotype due to impaired muscle endplate structure and function. This is the first description of a regulatory cross-talk between MuSK and CK2 and of a role for the KI of the receptor tyrosine kinase MuSK for the development of subsynaptic specializations. PMID:16818610

  12. Cell Surface Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors Increase Src and c-Cbl Activity and Receptor Ubiquitylation*

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Eileen E.; Ceresa, Brian P.

    2014-01-01

    There is an established role for the endocytic pathway in regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling to downstream effectors. However, because ligand-mediated EGFR endocytosis utilizes multiple “moving parts,” dissecting the spatial versus temporal contributions has been challenging. Blocking all endocytic trafficking can have unintended effects on other receptors as well as give rise to compensatory mechanisms, both of which impact interpretation of EGFR signaling. To overcome these limitations, we used epidermal growth factor (EGF) conjugated to polystyrene beads (EGF beads). EGF beads simultaneously activate the EGFR while blocking its endocytosis and allow analysis of EGFR signaling from the plasma membrane. Human telomerase immortalized corneal epithelial (hTCEpi) cells were used to model normal epithelial cell biology. In hTCEpi cells, both cell surface and intracellular EGFRs exhibited dose-dependent increases in effector activity after 15 min of ligand stimulation, but only the serine phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) was statistically significant when accounting for receptor phosphorylation. However, over time with physiological levels of receptor phosphorylation, cell surface receptors produced either enhanced or sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK), Casitas B-lineage lymphoma (c-Cbl), and the pro-oncogene Src activity. These increases in effector communication by cell surface receptors resulted in an increase in EGFR ubiquitylation with sustained ligand incubation. Together, these data indicate that spatial regulation of EGFR signaling may be an important regulatory mechanism in receptor down-regulation. PMID:25074934

  13. Adsorption of neon and tetrafluoromethane on carbon nanohorn aggregates: differences in specific surface area values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krungleviciute, Vaiva; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio; Migone, Aldo

    2008-03-01

    We have measured adsorption isotherms for two different adsorbates, neon and tetrafluoromethane, on dahlia-like carbon nanohorn aggregates. The experiments were performed at similar relative temperatures for both gases. The measurements were conducted to explore the effect of adsorbate diameter on the behavior of the resulting adsorbed systems. We measured the effective specific surface area value of the nanohorn sample using both gases, and we found that this quantity was about 22% smaller when we determined this quantity using tetrafluoromethane, the larger molecule. Isosteric heat and binding energy values were also determined from our measurements. We will compare our experimental results with those from a computer simulation study performed by Prof. M. Calbi. The simulations help us understand the source of the observed differences in the measured specific surface values, as well as the coverage dependence of the isosteric heat of adsorption for both gases.

  14. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1995-01-01

    Part of the 1994 Industrial Minerals Review. The production, consumption, and applications of construction aggregates are reviewed. In 1994, the production of construction aggregates, which includes crushed stone and construction sand and gravel combined, increased 7.7 percent to 2.14 Gt compared with the previous year. These record production levels are mostly a result of funding for highway construction work provided by the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991. Demand is expected to increase for construction aggregates in 1995.

  15. The Effect of Surface Induced Flows on Bubble and Particle Aggregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guelcher, Scott A.; Solomentsev, Yuri E.; Anderson, John L.; Boehmer, Marcel; Sides, Paul J.

    1999-01-01

    Almost 20 years have elapsed since a phenomenon called "radial specific coalescence" was identified. During studies of electrolytic oxygen evolution from the back side of a vertically oriented, transparent tin oxide electrode in alkaline electrolyte, one of the authors (Sides) observed that large "collector" bubbles appeared to attract smaller bubbles. The bubbles moved parallel to the surface of the electrode, while the electric field was normal to the electrode surface. The phenomenon was reported but not explained. More recently self ordering of latex particles was observed during electrophoretic deposition at low DC voltages likewise on a transparent tin oxide electrode. As in the bubble work, the field was normal to the electrode while the particles moved parallel to it. Fluid convection caused by surface induced flows (SIF) can explain these two apparently different experimental observations: the aggregation of particles on an electrode during electrophoretic deposition, and a radial bubble coalescence pattern on an electrode during electrolytic gas evolution. An externally imposed driving force (the gradient of electrical potential or temperature), interacting with the surface of particles or bubbles very near a planar conducting surface, drives the convection of fluid that causes particles and bubbles to approach each other on the electrode.

  16. TGP, an extremely stable, non-aggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering

    PubMed Central

    Close, Devin W.; Don Paul, Craig; Langan, Patricia S.; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Traore, Daouda A.K.; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C.; Waldo, Geoffery S.; Payne, Riley J.; Rucker, Joseph B.; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction of high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization. PMID:25287913

  17. Surface plasmon resonance for the label-free detection of Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide aggregation.

    PubMed

    Palladino, Pasquale; Aura, Angela M; Spoto, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid peptide oligomers and fibrils are studied as targets for therapy and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. They are usually detected by amyloid incubation, but such method is necessarily associated with Aβ1-42 depletion and dye binding or conjugation, which have a complex influence on fibril growth, provide information about fibril elongation over long time periods only, and might lead to false-positive results in amyloid inhibition assay. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is used to study with no labelling and in real time the aggregation of Aβ1-42 amyloid on specific antibodies. SPR data show, for the first time by using SPR, a multi-phase association behavior for Aβ1-42 oligomers accounting for a sigmoidal growth of amyloid as a function of time, with two antibody-dependent aggregation patterns. The new method represents an advantageous alternative to traditional procedures for investigating amyloid self-assembly and inhibition from early-stage oligomer association, on the time scale of seconds to minutes, to long-term polymerization, on the time scale of hours to days. PMID:26558762

  18. A Generalizable Platform for the Photoactivation of Cell Surface Receptors.

    PubMed

    Duc, Thinh Nguyen; Huse, Morgan

    2015-11-20

    Polarized signal transduction from cell surface receptors plays a central role in the development and homeostasis of multicellular organisms, and it also contributes to cellular dysfunction in many disease states. Understanding the molecular and cellular bases of polarized signaling requires experimental methods that provide precise spatiotemporal control of receptor activation. However, we currently lack strategies for inducing both sustained and spatially constrained signal transduction. In the present study, we combined synthetic and cell biological tools to develop a generalizable photoactivation approach for the stimulation of cell surface receptors. Our system, which is based upon the local decaging of a "universal" peptide ligand, is particularly well suited for the live imaging of single cells. We anticipate that it will greatly facilitate future mechanistic analyses of polarized signal transduction in a variety of cell types. PMID:26295186

  19. Determination of anionic surface active agents using silica coated magnetite nanoparticles modified with cationic surfactant aggregates.

    PubMed

    Pena-Pereira, Francisco; Duarte, Regina M B O; Trindade, Tito; Duarte, Armando C

    2013-07-19

    The development of a novel methodology for extraction and preconcentration of the most commonly used anionic surface active agents (SAAs), linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS), is presented herein. The present method, based on the use of silica-magnetite nanoparticles modified with cationic surfactant aggregates, was developed for determination of C10-C13 LAS homologues. The proposed methodology allowed quantitative recoveries of C10-C13 LAS homologues by using a reduced amount of magnetic nanoparticles. Limits of detection were in the range 0.8-1.9μgL(-1) for C10-C13 LAS homologues, while the repeatability, expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD), ranged from 2.0 to 3.9% (N=6). Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of a variety of natural water samples.

  20. Role of the Cell Surface of Methanosarcina mazei in Cell Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Ralph W.; Aldrich, H. C.; Hurst, Steven F.; Bleiweis, A. S.

    1985-01-01

    Colonial aggregates of Methanosarcina (= Methanococcus) mazei were examined with scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Cells are irregular and grouped into multicellular sarcinal colonies, which may disaggregate in older cultures. The protoplast is bounded by a typical trilaminar plasma membrane, outside of which is a matrix of loose fibrils. The presence and compactness of matrix material are responsible for the close packing of cells, and colony disaggregation seems to be the result of matrix shedding and degradation. The cell envelope contains complex hetero polysaccharides of N-acetylgalactosamine and galacturonic and glucuronic acids. Polymers extruded by M. mazei are likely quite adhesive in nature, accounting for its strong adherence to surfaces and hardiness compared with many other methanogens. Images PMID:16346718

  1. Progress in detecting cell-surface protein receptors: the erythropoietin receptor example.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Steve; Sinclair, Angus; Collins, Helen; Rice, Linda; Jelkmann, Wolfgang

    2014-02-01

    Testing for the presence of specific cell-surface receptors (such as EGFR or HER2) on tumor cells is an integral part of cancer care in terms of treatment decisions and prognosis. Understanding the strengths and limitations of these tests is important because inaccurate results may occur if procedures designed to prevent false-negative or false-positive outcomes are not employed. This review discusses tests commonly used to identify and characterize cell-surface receptors, such as the erythropoietin receptor (EpoR). First, a summary is provided on the biology of the Epo/EpoR system, describing how EpoR is expressed on erythrocytic progenitors and precursors in the bone marrow where it mediates red blood cell production in response to Epo. Second, studies are described that investigated whether erythropoiesis-stimulating agents could stimulate tumor progression in cancer patients and whether EpoR is expressed and functional on tumor cells or on endothelial cells. The methods used in these studies included immunohistochemistry, Northern blotting, Western blotting, and binding assays. This review summarizes the strengths and limitations of these methods. Critically analyzing data from tests for cell-surface receptors such as EpoR requires understanding the techniques utilized and demonstrating that results are consistent with current knowledge about receptor biology. PMID:24337485

  2. A Rapid Method for Refolding Cell Surface Receptors and Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Lu; Wu, Ling; Li, Feng; Burnham, Robert S.; Pizarro, Juan C.; Xu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Production of membrane-associated cell surface receptors and their ligands is often a cumbersome, expensive, and time-consuming process that limits detailed structural and functional characterization of this important class of proteins. Here we report a rapid method for refolding inclusion-body-based, recombinant cell surface receptors and ligands in one day, a speed equivalent to that of soluble protein production. This method efficiently couples modular on-column immobilized metal ion affinity purification and solid-phase protein refolding. We demonstrated the general utility of this method for producing multiple functionally active immunoreceptors, ligands, and viral decoys, including challenging cell surface proteins that cannot be produced using typical dialysis- or dilution-based refolding approaches. PMID:27215173

  3. Erythrocyte Aggregation due to Surface Nanobubble Interactions During the Onset of Thermal Burn Injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidner, Harrison S.

    Red Blood Cell (RBC) aggregation is an important hemorheological phenomenon especially in microcirculation. In healthy individuals, RBCs are known to aggregate and gravitate toward the faster flow in the center of vessels to increase their throughput for more efficient oxygen delivery. Their aggregation is known to occur during a variety of environmental, pathological, and physiological conditions and is reversible when aggregates are subject to the relatively high shear forces in the circulation. The likelihood that aggregates will monodisperse in flow is dependent on the conditions during which they form. In situations where such aggregates are not sheared to monodispersion their presence can impact the perfusion of microvascular networks. More specifically, aggregates subject to the low shear rates in the zone of stasis near regions of thermal burn injury are capable of occluding vessels in the microcirculation and inhibiting the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to tissue downstream. The basic mechanism leading to erythrocyte aggregation at the onset of thermal injury is unknown. This dissertation investigates parameters involved in erythrocyte aggregation, methods of measuring and testing erythrocyte aggregation, and incorporates modeling based on first principles ultimately to propose a mechanism of this phenomenon.

  4. Surface plasmon delocalization in silver nanoparticle aggregates revealed by subdiffraction supercontinuum hot spots

    PubMed Central

    Borys, Nicholas J.; Shafran, Eyal; Lupton, John M.

    2013-01-01

    The plasmonic resonances of nanostructured silver films produce exceptional surface enhancement, enabling reproducible single-molecule Raman scattering measurements. Supporting a broad range of plasmonic resonances, these disordered systems are difficult to investigate with conventional far-field spectroscopy. Here, we use nonlinear excitation spectroscopy and polarization anisotropy of single optical hot spots of supercontinuum generation to track the transformation of these plasmon modes as the mesoscopic structure is tuned from a film of discrete nanoparticles to a semicontinuous layer of aggregated particles. We demonstrate how hot spot formation from diffractively-coupled nanoparticles with broad spectral resonances transitions to that from spatially delocalized surface plasmon excitations, exhibiting multiple excitation resonances as narrow as 13 meV. Photon-localization microscopy reveals that the delocalized plasmons are capable of focusing multiple narrow radiation bands over a broadband range to the same spatial region within 6 nm, underscoring the existence of novel plasmonic nanoresonators embedded in highly disordered systems. PMID:23807624

  5. Deletion of vitamin D receptor leads to premature emphysema/COPD by increased matrix metalloproteinases and lymphoid aggregates formation

    SciTech Connect

    Sundar, Isaac K.; Hwang, Jae-Woong; Wu, Shaoping; Sun, Jun; Rahman, Irfan

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Vitamin D deficiency is linked to accelerated decline in lung function. {yields} Levels of vitamin D receptor (VDR) are decreased in lungs of patients with COPD. {yields} VDR knock-out mouse showed increased lung inflammation and emphysema. {yields} This was associated with decline in lung function and increased MMPs. {yields} VDR knock-out mouse model is useful for studying the mechanisms of lung diseases. -- Abstract: Deficiency of vitamin D is associated with accelerated decline in lung function. Vitamin D is a ligand for nuclear hormone vitamin D receptor (VDR), and upon binding it modulates various cellular functions. The level of VDR is reduced in lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) which led us to hypothesize that deficiency of VDR leads to significant alterations in lung phenotype that are characteristics of COPD/emphysema associated with increased inflammatory response. We found that VDR knock-out (VDR{sup -/-}) mice had increased influx of inflammatory cells, phospho-acetylation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-{kappa}B) associated with increased proinflammatory mediators, and up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) MMP-2, MMP-9, and MMP-12 in the lung. This was associated with emphysema and decline in lung function associated with lymphoid aggregates formation compared to WT mice. These findings suggest that deficiency of VDR in mouse lung can lead to an early onset of emphysema/COPD because of chronic inflammation, immune dysregulation, and lung destruction.

  6. Detection of CXCR2 cytokine receptor surface expression using immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Lam, Clarissa; Pavel, Mahmud Arif; Kashyap, Parul; Salehi-Najafabadi, Zahra; Valentino, Victoria; Yu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    The interleukin-8 (IL-8, CXCL8) chemokine, also known as the neutrophil chemotactic factor, is a cytokine that plays a key role in inflammatory response, cell proliferation, migration, and survival. IL-8 expression is increased not only in inflammatory disorders, but also in many types of cancer, including prostate cancer. IL-8 acts as a ligand for the C-X-C chemokine receptor 2 (CXCR2) protein present on the cell plasma membrane. Binding of the IL-8 ligand to the CXCR2 receptor results in an intracellular signaling pathway mediated by GTP binding proteins coupled to the receptor itself. Knowledge of the CXCR2 expression levels facilitates the understanding of the role and function of IL-8. In this chapter, we describe a protocol that uses the immunofluorescence method and confocal microscopy to analyze the CXCR2 surface expression in human prostate cancer cells. However, this protocol is easily adaptable to analyze the surface expression of other cytokine receptors in different cell types. PMID:24908306

  7. Theory and Simulations of Adhesion Receptor Dimerization on Membrane Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yinghao; Honig, Barry; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam

    2013-01-01

    The equilibrium constants of trans and cis dimerization of membrane bound (2D) and freely moving (3D) adhesion receptors are expressed and compared using elementary statistical-thermodynamics. Both processes are mediated by the binding of extracellular subdomains whose range of motion in the 2D environment is reduced upon dimerization, defining a thin reaction shell where dimer formation and dissociation take place. We show that the ratio between the 2D and 3D equilibrium constants can be expressed as a product of individual factors describing, respectively, the spatial ranges of motions of the adhesive domains, and their rotational freedom within the reaction shell. The results predicted by the theory are compared to those obtained from a novel, to our knowledge, dynamical simulations methodology, whereby pairs of receptors perform realistic translational, internal, and rotational motions in 2D and 3D. We use cadherins as our model system. The theory and simulations explain how the strength of cis and trans interactions of adhesive receptors are affected both by their presence in the constrained intermembrane space and by the 2D environment of membrane surfaces. Our work provides fundamental insights as to the mechanism of lateral clustering of adhesion receptors after cell-cell contact and, more generally, to the formation of lateral microclusters of proteins on cell surfaces. PMID:23528081

  8. Detection of CXCR2 cytokine receptor surface expression using immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Lam, Clarissa; Pavel, Mahmud Arif; Kashyap, Parul; Salehi-Najafabadi, Zahra; Valentino, Victoria; Yu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    The interleukin-8 (IL-8, CXCL8) chemokine, also known as the neutrophil chemotactic factor, is a cytokine that plays a key role in inflammatory response, cell proliferation, migration, and survival. IL-8 expression is increased not only in inflammatory disorders, but also in many types of cancer, including prostate cancer. IL-8 acts as a ligand for the C-X-C chemokine receptor 2 (CXCR2) protein present on the cell plasma membrane. Binding of the IL-8 ligand to the CXCR2 receptor results in an intracellular signaling pathway mediated by GTP binding proteins coupled to the receptor itself. Knowledge of the CXCR2 expression levels facilitates the understanding of the role and function of IL-8. In this chapter, we describe a protocol that uses the immunofluorescence method and confocal microscopy to analyze the CXCR2 surface expression in human prostate cancer cells. However, this protocol is easily adaptable to analyze the surface expression of other cytokine receptors in different cell types.

  9. P2Y2 nucleotide receptor activation enhances the aggregation and self-organization of dispersed salivary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Farid G; Camden, Jean M; Woods, Lucas T; Khalafalla, Mahmoud G; Petris, Michael J; Erb, Laurie; Weisman, Gary A

    2014-07-01

    Hyposalivation resulting from salivary gland dysfunction leads to poor oral health and greatly reduces the quality of life of patients. Current treatments for hyposalivation are limited. However, regenerative medicine to replace dysfunctional salivary glands represents a revolutionary approach. The ability of dispersed salivary epithelial cells or salivary gland-derived progenitor cells to self-organize into acinar-like spheres or branching structures that mimic the native tissue holds promise for cell-based reconstitution of a functional salivary gland. However, the mechanisms involved in salivary epithelial cell aggregation and tissue reconstitution are not fully understood. This study investigated the role of the P2Y2 nucleotide receptor (P2Y2R), a G protein-coupled receptor that is upregulated following salivary gland damage and disease, in salivary gland reconstitution. In vitro results with the rat parotid acinar Par-C10 cell line indicate that P2Y2R activation with the selective agonist UTP enhances the self-organization of dispersed salivary epithelial cells into acinar-like spheres. Other results indicate that the P2Y2R-mediated response is dependent on epidermal growth factor receptor activation via the metalloproteases ADAM10/ADAM17 or the α5β1 integrin/Cdc42 signaling pathway, which leads to activation of the MAPKs JNK and ERK1/2. Ex vivo data using primary submandibular gland cells from wild-type and P2Y2R(-/-) mice confirmed that UTP-induced migratory responses required for acinar cell self-organization are mediated by the P2Y2R. Overall, this study suggests that the P2Y2R is a promising target for salivary gland reconstitution and identifies the involvement of two novel components of the P2Y2R signaling cascade in salivary epithelial cells, the α5β1 integrin and the Rho GTPase Cdc42.

  10. Surface Modification of ZnO Nanorods with Hamilton Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zeininger, Lukas; Klaumünzer, Martin; Peukert, Wolfgang; Hirsch, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    A new prototype of a Hamilton receptor suitable for the functionalization of inorganic nanoparticles was synthesized and characterized. The hydrogen bonding receptor was coupled to a catechol moiety, which served as anchor group for the functionalization of metal oxides, in particular zinc oxide. Synthesized zinc oxide nanorods [ZnO] were used for surface functionalization. The wet-chemical functionalization procedure towards monolayer-grafted particles [ZnO-HR] is described and a detailed characterization study is presented. In addition, the detection of specific cyanurate molecules is demonstrated. The hybrid structures [ZnO-HR-CA] were stable towards agglomeration and exhibited enhanced dispersability in apolar solvents. This observation, in combination with several spectroscopic experiments gave evidence of the highly directional supramolecular recognition at the surface of nanoparticles. PMID:25872141

  11. Regional Study of No-Till Impacts on Near-Surface Aggregate Properties that Influence Soil Erodibility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The extent to which tillage systems modify the near-surface soil aggregate properties affecting soil’s susceptibility to erosion by water and wind is not well understood. We hypothesized that an increase in soil organic carbon (SOC) content with conservation tillage systems, particularly NT, may imp...

  12. Wetting and evaporative aggregation of nanofluid droplets on CVD-synthesized hydrophobic graphene surfaces.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae S; Kihm, Kenneth D; Kim, Honggoo; Lim, Gyumin; Cheon, Sosan; Lee, Joon S

    2014-07-22

    The wetting and evaporative aggregation of alumina nanofluids (Al2O3) are examined for CVD-synthesized graphene-coated (GC) surfaces that are known as strongly hydrophobic (θcontact ≈ 90°). Our findings are compared to those associated with a hydrophilic cover glass (CG) substrate (θcontact ≈ 45°). The nanofluidic self-assemblies on the GC substrate are elaborately characterized in terms of the droplet wetting/crack formation, the particle migration time over the evaporative time (CR), the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek forces (FDLVO), and the relative thermal conductivity (KR). The GC substrate forms relatively thicker and larger cracks and requires a longer evaporation time. Both the GC and CG substrates share approximately the same time constant CR, which suggests the formation of coffee-ring patterns for both substrates. The GC shows negative FDLVO, which implies a repulsive force between the nanoparticles and the substrate, and the CG shows a positive FDLVO of attraction. Furthermore, a more than 3 order of magnitude larger thermal conductivity of GC compared to that of CG drives significantly different particle/fluid motions near the drop edge areas between the two substrates.

  13. Enhanced aggregation of androgen receptor in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons from spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Nihei, Yoshihiro; Ito, Daisuke; Okada, Yohei; Akamatsu, Wado; Yagi, Takuya; Yoshizaki, Takahito; Okano, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Norihiro

    2013-03-22

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked motor neuron disease caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Ligand-dependent nuclear accumulation of mutant AR protein is a critical characteristic of the pathogenesis of SBMA. SBMA has been modeled in AR-overexpressing animals, but precisely how the polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion leads to neurodegeneration is unclear. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a new technology that can be used to model human diseases, study pathogenic mechanisms, and develop novel drugs. We established SBMA patient-derived iPSCs, investigated their cellular biochemical characteristics, and found that SBMA-iPSCs can differentiate into motor neurons. The CAG repeat numbers in the AR gene of SBMA-iPSCs and also in the atrophin-1 gene of iPSCs derived from another polyQ disease, dentato-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy (DRPLA), remain unchanged during reprogramming, long term passage, and differentiation, indicating that polyQ disease-associated CAG repeats are stable during maintenance of iPSCs. The level of AR expression is up-regulated by neuronal differentiation and treatment with the AR ligand dihydrotestosterone. Filter retardation assays indicated that aggregation of ARs following dihydrotestosterone treatment in neurons derived from SBMA-iPSCs increases significantly compared with neurological control iPSCs, easily recapitulating the pathological feature of mutant ARs in SBMA-iPSCs. This phenomenon was not observed in iPSCs and fibroblasts, thereby showing the neuron-dominant phenotype of this disease. Furthermore, the HSP90 inhibitor 17-allylaminogeldanamycin sharply decreased the level of aggregated AR in neurons derived from SBMA-iPSCs, indicating a potential for discovery and validation of candidate drugs. We found that SBMA-iPSCs possess disease-specific biochemical features and could thus open new avenues of research into not only SBMA, but also other polyglutamine diseases.

  14. The effect of humic acid adsorption on pH-dependent surface charging and aggregation of magnetite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Illes, E.; Tombacz, E.

    2006-03-01

    The pH-dependent adsorption of humic acid (HA) on magnetite and its effect on the surface charging and the aggregation of oxide particles were investigated. HA was extracted from brown coal. Synthetic magnetite was prepared by alkaline hydrolysis of iron(II) and iron(III) salts. The pH-dependent particle charge and aggregation, and coagulation kinetics at pH around to 4 were measured by laser Doppler electrophoresis and dynamic light scattering. The charge of pure magnetite reverses from positive to negative at pH around 8, which may consider as isoelectric point (IEP). Near this pH, large aggregates form, while stable sols exist further from it. In the presence of increasing HA loading, the IEP shifts to lower pH, then at higher loading, magnetite becomes negatively charged even at low pHs, which indicate the neutralization and gradual recharging positive charges on surface. In acidic region, the trace HA amounts are adsorbed on magnetite surface as oppositely charged patches, systems become highly unstable due to heterocoagulation. Above the adsorption saturation, however, the nanoparticles are stabilized in a way of combined steric and electrostatic effects. The HA coated magnetite particles form stable colloidal dispersion, particle aggregation does not occur in a wide range of pH and salt tolerance is enhanced.

  15. Graphene Oxides in Water: Correlating Morphology and Surface Chemistry with Aggregation Behavior.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yi; Raliya, Ramesh; Fortner, John D; Biswas, Pratim

    2016-07-01

    Aqueous aggregation processes can significantly impact function, effective toxicity, environmental transport, and ultimate fate of advanced nanoscale materials, including graphene and graphene oxide (GO). In this work, we have synthesized flat graphene oxide (GO) and five physically crumpled GOs (CGO, with different degrees of thermal reduction, and thus oxygen functionality) using an aerosol method, and characterized the evolution of surface chemistry and morphology using a suite of spectroscopic (UV-vis, FTIR, XPS) and microscopic (AFM, SEM, and TEM) techniques. For each of these materials, critical coagulation concentrations (CCC) were determined for NaCl, CaCl2, and MgCl2 electrolytes. The CCCs were correlated with material ζ-potentials (R(2) = 0.94-0.99), which were observed to be mathematically consistent with classic DLVO theory. We further correlated CCC values with CGO chemical properties including C/O ratios, carboxyl group concentrations, and C-C fractions. For all cases, edge-based carboxyl functional groups are highly correlated to observed CCC values (R(2) = 0.89-0.95). Observations support the deprotonation of carboxyl groups with low acid dissociation constants (pKa) as the main contributors to ζ-potentials and thus material aqueous stability. We also observe CCC values to significantly increase (by 18-80%) when GO is physically crumpled as CGO. Taken together, the findings from both physical and chemical analyses clearly indicate that both GO shape and surface functionality are critical to consider with regard to understanding fundamental material behavior in water. PMID:27248211

  16. Research Resource: Androgen Receptor Activity Is Regulated Through the Mobilization of Cell Surface Receptor Networks.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Jordy J; Ng, Brandon H; Smits, Melinda M; Martinez, Harryl D; Jasavala, Rohini J; Hinkson, Izumi V; Fermin, Damian; Eng, Jimmy K; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I; Wright, Michael E

    2015-08-01

    The aberrant expression of androgen receptor (AR)-dependent transcriptional programs is a defining pathology of the development and progression of prostate cancers. Transcriptional cofactors that bind AR are critical determinants of prostate tumorigenesis. To gain a deeper understanding of the proteins linked to AR-dependent gene transcription, we performed a DNA-affinity chromatography-based proteomic screen designed to identify proteins involved in AR-mediated gene transcription in prostate tumor cells. Functional experiments validated the coregulator roles of known AR-binding proteins in AR-mediated transcription in prostate tumor cells. More importantly, novel coregulatory functions were detected in components of well-established cell surface receptor-dependent signal transduction pathways. Further experimentation demonstrated that components of the TNF, TGF-β, IL receptor, and epidermal growth factor signaling pathways modulated AR-dependent gene transcription and androgen-dependent proliferation in prostate tumor cells. Collectively, our proteomic dataset demonstrates that the cell surface receptor- and AR-dependent pathways are highly integrated, and provides a molecular framework for understanding how disparate signal-transduction pathways can influence AR-dependent transcriptional programs linked to the development and progression of human prostate cancers.

  17. Research Resource: Androgen Receptor Activity Is Regulated Through the Mobilization of Cell Surface Receptor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Jordy J.; Ng, Brandon H.; Smits, Melinda M.; Martinez, Harryl D.; Jasavala, Rohini J.; Hinkson, Izumi V.; Fermin, Damian; Eng, Jimmy K.; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.

    2015-01-01

    The aberrant expression of androgen receptor (AR)-dependent transcriptional programs is a defining pathology of the development and progression of prostate cancers. Transcriptional cofactors that bind AR are critical determinants of prostate tumorigenesis. To gain a deeper understanding of the proteins linked to AR-dependent gene transcription, we performed a DNA-affinity chromatography-based proteomic screen designed to identify proteins involved in AR-mediated gene transcription in prostate tumor cells. Functional experiments validated the coregulator roles of known AR-binding proteins in AR-mediated transcription in prostate tumor cells. More importantly, novel coregulatory functions were detected in components of well-established cell surface receptor-dependent signal transduction pathways. Further experimentation demonstrated that components of the TNF, TGF-β, IL receptor, and epidermal growth factor signaling pathways modulated AR-dependent gene transcription and androgen-dependent proliferation in prostate tumor cells. Collectively, our proteomic dataset demonstrates that the cell surface receptor- and AR-dependent pathways are highly integrated, and provides a molecular framework for understanding how disparate signal-transduction pathways can influence AR-dependent transcriptional programs linked to the development and progression of human prostate cancers. PMID:26181434

  18. G-Protein Coupled Receptors: Surface Display and Biosensor Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurchie, Edward; Leifert, Wayne

    Signal transduction by G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) underpins a multitude of physiological processes. Ligand recognition by the receptor leads to the activation of a generic molecular switch involving heterotrimeric G-proteins and guanine nucleotides. With growing interest and commercial investment in GPCRs in areas such as drug targets, orphan receptors, high-throughput screening of drugs and biosensors, greater attention will focus on assay development to allow for miniaturization, ultrahigh-throughput and, eventually, microarray/biochip assay formats that will require nanotechnology-based approaches. Stable, robust, cell-free signaling assemblies comprising receptor and appropriate molecular switching components will form the basis of future GPCR/G-protein platforms, which should be able to be adapted to such applications as microarrays and biosensors. This chapter focuses on cell-free GPCR assay nanotechnologies and describes some molecular biological approaches for the construction of more sophisticated, surface-immobilized, homogeneous, functional GPCR sensors. The latter points should greatly extend the range of applications to which technologies based on GPCRs could be applied.

  19. Kinetics of insulin aggregation in aqueous solutions upon agitation in the presence of hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Sluzky, V; Tamada, J A; Klibanov, A M; Langer, R

    1991-01-01

    The stability of protein-based pharmaceuticals (e.g., insulin) is important for their production, storage, and delivery. To gain an understanding of insulin's aggregation mechanism in aqueous solutions, the effects of agitation rate, interfacial interactions, and insulin concentration on the overall aggregation rate were examined. Ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography, and quasielastic light scattering analyses were used to monitor the aggregation reaction and identify intermediate species. The reaction proceeded in two stages; insulin stability was enhanced at higher concentration. Mathematical modeling of proposed kinetic schemes was employed to identify possible reaction pathways and to explain greater stability at higher insulin concentration. Images PMID:1946348

  20. 5D-QSAR for spirocyclic sigma1 receptor ligands by Quasar receptor surface modeling.

    PubMed

    Oberdorf, Christoph; Schmidt, Thomas J; Wünsch, Bernhard

    2010-07-01

    Based on a contiguous and structurally as well as biologically diverse set of 87 sigma(1) ligands, a 5D-QSAR study was conducted in which a quasi-atomistic receptor surface modeling approach (program package Quasar) was applied. The superposition of the ligands was performed with the tool Pharmacophore Elucidation (MOE-package), which takes all conformations of the ligands into account. This procedure led to four pharmacophoric structural elements with aromatic, hydrophobic, cationic and H-bond acceptor properties. Using the aligned structures a 3D-model of the ligand binding site of the sigma(1) receptor was obtained, whose general features are in good agreement with previous assumptions on the receptor structure, but revealed some novel insights since it represents the receptor surface in more detail. Thus, e.g., our model indicates the presence of an H-bond acceptor moiety in the binding site as counterpart to the ligands' cationic ammonium center, rather than a negatively charged carboxylate group. The presented QSAR model is statistically valid and represents the biological data of all tested compounds, including a test set of 21 ligands not used in the modeling process, with very good to excellent accuracy [q(2) (training set, n=66; leave 1/3 out) = 0.84, p(2) (test set, n=21)=0.64]. Moreover, the binding affinities of 13 further spirocyclic sigma(1) ligands were predicted with reasonable accuracy (mean deviation in pK(i) approximately 0.8). Thus, in addition to novel insights into the requirements for binding of spirocyclic piperidines to the sigma(1) receptor, the presented model can be used successfully in the rational design of new sigma(1) ligands.

  1. Superradiance of J-Aggregated 2,2'-Cyanine Absorbed onto a Vesicle Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, Daniel L.; Ozcelik, Serdar

    1995-01-01

    Phospholipid vesicles are used as substrates to form adsorbed aggregates of 2,2'-cyanine, also referred to as pseudoisocyanine (PIC). In this paper, we report photophysical parameters of two putative adsorbed aggregates species (cis- and trans-aggregates, relating to their makeup from mono-cis and all-transstereoisomers, respectively). Phase modulation picosecond fluorescence decay measurements reveal that superradiance and energy transfer are dominant features controlling photophysical processes. Superradiance, coherence size, energy transfer and exciton-phonon coupling are discussed for the two types of aggregates; as regards photophysical parameters, the fluorescence lifetimes, fluorescence quantum yields, and nonradiative rate constants are determined. It is suggested that structure plays the crucial role in excited state dynamics.

  2. Integrin receptors and platelet adhesion to synthetic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Goodman, S L; Cooper, S L; Albrecht, R M

    1993-05-01

    The activation-independent and -dependent integrin receptors--glycoproteins GPIc-IIa (alpha 5-beta 1) and GPIIb-IIIa (alpha IIb-beta 3)--are involved in platelet adhesion and thrombus growth on damaged subendothelium through interactions with fibrinogen, fibronectin, von Willebrand factor, and other adhesive proteins. Because these receptors are used in normal in vivo hemostatic adhesion, they may also have a role for adhesion onto synthetic surfaces in the vasculature. Platelet adhesion in vitro was examined onto Formvar, glass, and four polyurethaneureas with various soft segment chemistries and surface properties. Platelets were pretreated with RGD peptides before and after adhesion. RGD peptide pretreatment inhibited spreading and close contact formation compared to treatment with saline or control RGE peptides, with no observable effect on the number of adherent platelets per area. High-voltage electron microscopy showed abnormally sparse and short microfilament structures with RGD peptide treatment, suggesting an indirect inhibition of actin filament formation. Video-enhanced light microscopy showed a cessation of spreading and a partial reversal of close contacts following RGD peptide application to adherent platelets. Because minimal amounts of plasma proteins are present in column-washed platelet suspensions, and as platelet secretion appeared to be minimal in these experiments, these observations suggest that RGD binding integrin receptors may function in platelet spreading even in the absence of exogenous ligand. As RGD peptides did not affect the numbers of adherent platelets, while producing substantial decreases in the extent of spreading, we suggest that platelet integrins, possibly GPIIb-IIIa, are involved in spreading on synthetic surfaces but not for initial adhesion.

  3. Surface plasmon resonance applied to G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Locatelli-Hoops, Silvia; Yeliseev, Alexei A.; Gawrisch, Klaus; Gorshkova, Inna

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) are integral membrane proteins that transmit signals from external stimuli to the cell interior via activation of GTP-binding proteins (G proteins) thereby mediating key sensorial, hormonal, metabolic, immunological, and neurotransmission processes. Elucidating their structure and mechanism of interaction with extracellular and intracellular binding partners is of fundamental importance and highly relevant to rational design of new effective drugs. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has become a method of choice for studying biomolecular interactions at interfaces because measurements take place in real-time and do not require labeling of any of the interactants. However, due to the particular challenges imposed by the high hydrophobicity of membrane proteins and the great diversity of receptor-stimulating ligands, the application of this technique to characterize interactions of GPCR is still in the developmental phase. Here we give an overview of the principle of SPR and analyze current approaches for the preparation of the sensor chip surface, capture and stabilization of GPCR, and experimental design to characterize their interaction with ligands, G proteins and specific antibodies. PMID:24466506

  4. Molecular-level insights of early-stage prion protein aggregation on mica and gold surface determined by AFM imaging and molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Lou, Zhichao; Wang, Bin; Guo, Cunlan; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Haiqian; Xu, Bingqian

    2015-11-01

    By in situ time-lapse AFM, we investigated early-stage aggregates of PrP formed at low concentration (100 ng/mL) on mica and Au(111) surfaces in acetate buffer (pH 4.5). Remarkably different PrP assemblies were observed. Oligomeric structures of PrP aggregates were observed on mica surface, which was in sharp contrast to the multi-layer PrP aggregates yielding parallel linear patterns observed Au(111) surface. Combining molecular dynamics and docking simulations, PrP monomers, dimers and trimers were revealed as the basic units of the observed aggregates. Besides, the mechanisms of the observed PrP aggregations and the corresponding molecular-substrate and intermolecular interactions were suggested. These interactions involved gold-sulfur interaction, electrostatic interaction, hydrophobic interaction, and hydrogen binding interaction. In contrast, the PrP aggregates observed in pH 7.2 PBS buffer demonstrated similar large ball-like structures on both mica and Au(111) surfaces. The results indicate that the pH of a solution and the surface of the system can have strong effects on supramolecular assemblies of prion proteins. This study provides in-depth understanding on the structural and mechanistic nature of PrP aggregation, and can be used to study the aggregation mechanisms of other proteins with similar misfolding properties.

  5. Superhydrophobic Surfaces with Very Low Hysteresis Prepared by Aggregation of Silica Nanoparticles During In Situ Urea-Formaldehyde Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Diwan, Anubhav; Jensen, David S; Gupta, Vipul; Johnson, Brian I; Evans, Delwyn; Telford, Clive; Linford, Matthew R

    2015-12-01

    We present a new method for the preparation of superhydrophobic materials by in situ aggregation of silica nanoparticles on a surface during a urea-formaldehyde (UF) polymerization. This is a one-step process in which a two-tier topography is obtained. The polymerization is carried out for 30, 60, 120, 180, and 240 min on silicon shards. Silicon surfaces are sintered to remove the polymer. SEM and AFM show both an increase in the area covered by the nanoparticles and their aggregation with increasing polymerization time. Chemical vapor deposition of a fluorinated silane in the presence of a basic catalyst gives these surfaces hydrophobicity. Deposition of this low surface energy silane is confirmed by the F 1s signal in XPS. The surfaces show advancing water contact angles in excess of 160 degrees with very low hysteresis (< 7) after 120 min and 60 min polymerization times for 7 nm and 14 nm silica, respectively. Depositions are successfully demonstrated on glass substrates after they are primed with a UF polymer layer. Superhydrophobic surfaces can also be prepared on unsintered substrates.

  6. Roles for glycosylation of cell surface receptors involved in cellular immune recognition.

    PubMed

    Rudd, P M; Wormald, M R; Stanfield, R L; Huang, M; Mattsson, N; Speir, J A; DiGennaro, J A; Fetrow, J S; Dwek, R A; Wilson, I A

    1999-10-22

    The majority of cell surface receptors involved in antigen recognition by T cells and in the orchestration of the subsequent cell signalling events are glycoproteins. The length of a typical N-linked sugar is comparable with that of an immunoglobulin domain (30 A). Thus, by virtue of their size alone, oligosaccharides may be expected to play a significant role in the functions and properties of the cell surface proteins to which they are attached. A databank of oligosaccharide structures has been constructed from NMR and crystallographic data to aid in the interpretation of crystal structures of glycoproteins. As unambiguous electron density can usually only be assigned to the glycan cores, the remainder of the sugar is then modelled into the crystal lattice by superimposing the appropriate oligosaccharide from the database. This approach provides insights into the roles that glycosylation might play in cell surface receptors, by providing models that delineate potential close packing interactions on the cell surface. It has been proposed that the specific recognition of antigen by T cells results in the formation of an immunological synapse between the T cell and the antigen-presenting cell. The cell adhesion glycoproteins, such as CD2 and CD48, help to form a cell junction, providing a molecular spacer between opposing cells. The oligosaccharides located on the membrane proximal domains of CD2 and CD48 provide a scaffold to orient the binding faces, which leads to increased affinity. In the next step, recruitment of the peptide major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) by the T-cell receptors (TCRs) requires mobility on the membrane surface. The TCR sugars are located such that they could prevent non-specific aggregation. Importantly, the sugars limit the possible geometry and spacing of TCR/MHC clusters which precede cell signalling. We postulate that, in the final stage, the sugars could play a general role in controlling the assembly and stabilisation of the

  7. High-pressure studies of aggregation of recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist: Thermodynamics, kinetics, and application to accelerated formulation studies

    PubMed Central

    Seefeldt, Matthew B.; Kim, Yong-Sung; Tolley, Kevin P.; Seely, Jim; Carpenter, John F.; Randolph, Theodore W.

    2005-01-01

    Recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) in aqueous solutions unfolds and aggregates when subjected to hydrostatic pressures greater than about 180 MPa. This study examined the mechanism and thermodynamics of pressure-induced unfolding and aggregation of IL-1ra. The activation free energy for growth of aggregates (ΔG∓aggregation) was found to be 37 ± 3 kJ/mol, whereas the activation volume (ΔV∓aggregation) was −120 ± 20 mL/mol. These values compare closely with equilibrium values for denaturation: The free energy for denaturation, ΔGdenaturation, was 20 ± 5 kJ/mol, whereas the partial specific volume change for denaturation, ΔVdenaturation, was −110 ± 30 mL/mol. When IL-1ra begins to denature at pressures near 140 MPa, cysteines that are normally buried in the native state become exposed. Under oxidizing conditions, this results in the formation of covalently cross-linked aggregates containing nonnative, intermolecular disulfide bonds. The apparent activation free energy for nucleation of aggregates, ΔG∓nuc, was 42 ± 4 kJ/mol, and the activation volume for nucleation, ΔV∓nuc,was −175 ± 37 mL/mol, suggesting that a highly solvent-exposed conformation is needed for nucleation. We hypothesize that the large specific volume of IL-1ra, 0.752 ± 0.004 mL/g, coupled with its relatively low conformational stability, leads to its susceptibility to denaturation at relatively low pressures. The positive partial specific adiabatic compressibility of IL-1ra, 4.5 ± 0.7 ± 10−12 cm2/dyn, suggests that a significant component of the ΔVdenaturation is attributable to the elimination of solvent-free cavities. Lastly, we propose that hydrostatic pressure is a useful variable to conduct accelerated formulation studies of therapeutic proteins. PMID:16081653

  8. Synaptic abnormalities and cytoplasmic glutamate receptor aggregates in contactin associated protein-like 2/Caspr2 knockout neurons

    PubMed Central

    Varea, Olga; Martin-de-Saavedra, Maria Dolores; Kopeikina, Katherine J.; Schürmann, Britta; Fleming, Hunter J.; Fawcett-Patel, Jessica M.; Bach, Anthony; Jang, Seil; Peles, Elior; Kim, Eunjoon; Penzes, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Central glutamatergic synapses and the molecular pathways that control them are emerging as common substrates in the pathogenesis of mental disorders. Genetic variation in the contactin associated protein-like 2 (CNTNAP2) gene, including copy number variations, exon deletions, truncations, single nucleotide variants, and polymorphisms have been associated with intellectual disability, epilepsy, schizophrenia, language disorders, and autism. CNTNAP2, encoded by Cntnap2, is required for dendritic spine development and its absence causes disease-related phenotypes in mice. However, the mechanisms whereby CNTNAP2 regulates glutamatergic synapses are not known, and cellular phenotypes have not been investigated in Cntnap2 knockout neurons. Here we show that CNTNAP2 is present in dendritic spines, as well as axons and soma. Structured illumination superresolution microscopy reveals closer proximity to excitatory, rather than inhibitory synaptic markers. CNTNAP2 does not promote the formation of synapses and cultured neurons from Cntnap2 knockout mice do not show early defects in axon and dendrite outgrowth, suggesting that CNTNAP2 is not required at this stage. However, mature neurons from knockout mice show reduced spine density and levels of GluA1 subunits of AMPA receptors in spines. Unexpectedly, knockout neurons show large cytoplasmic aggregates of GluA1. Here we characterize, for the first time to our knowledge, synaptic phenotypes in Cntnap2 knockout neurons and reveal a novel role for CNTNAP2 in GluA1 trafficking. Taken together, our findings provide insight into the biological roles of CNTNAP2 and into the pathogenesis of CNTNAP2-associated neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25918374

  9. Exposure of fibrinogen receptors in human platelets by surface proteolysis with elastase.

    PubMed Central

    Kornecki, E; Ehrlich, Y H; De Mars, D D; Lenox, R H

    1986-01-01

    Human platelets that were preincubated with porcine elastase aggregated spontaneously upon the addition of fibrinogen. Maximal aggregation to fibrinogen was observed with platelets pretreated with an elastase concentration of 111 micrograms/ml, and half-maximal aggregation occurred after treatment with 11 micrograms/ml elastase. Binding of radiolabeled fibrinogen to elastase-treated platelets was specific, saturable, and showed a single class of 48,400 +/- 9,697 fibrinogen-binding sites per platelet with a dissociation constant of 6.30 +/- 1.48 X 10(-7) M. ATP, apyrase, and the stimulators of platelet adenylate cyclase forskolin, prostaglandin E1, prostacyclin, and N6, 2'-O-dibutyryl cyclic AMP did not inhibit the fibrinogen-induced aggregation of elastase-treated platelets. EDTA completely blocked the initiation of aggregation and reversed the fibrinogen-induced aggregation of elastase-treated platelets. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies directed against glycoproteins (GP) IIb and IIIa completely blocked the fibrinogen-induced aggregation of elastase-treated platelets. Immunoprecipitates with these antibodies obtained from detergent extracts of surface-radiolabeled, intact, and elastase-treated platelets contained the glycoproteins IIb and IIIa. We conclude that surface proteolysis by low concentrations of elastase can expose fibrinogen-binding sites associated with GPIIb and GPIIIa on the platelet surface, resulting in spontaneous aggregation upon the addition of fibrinogen. These findings may be relevant to hemostatic changes observed in patients with increased levels of circulating elastase. Images PMID:3005363

  10. Comparative receptor surface analysis of agonists for tyramine receptor which inhibit sex-pheromone production in Plodia interpunctella.

    PubMed

    Hirashima, A; Eiraku, T; Kuwano, E; Eto, M

    2004-03-01

    The quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) of a set of 29 agonists for tyramine (TA) receptor responsible for the inhibition of sex-pheromone production in Plodia interpunctella, was analyzed using comparative receptor surface analysis (CoRSA). Using the common steric and electrostatic features of the most active members of a series of compounds, CoRSA generated a virtual receptor model, represented as points on a surface complementary to the van der Waals or Wyvill steric surface of the aligned compounds. Three-dimensional energetics descriptors were calculated from receptor surface model (RSM)/ligand interaction and these three-dimensional descriptors were used in genetic partial least squares data analysis to generate a QSAR model, giving a 3D QSAR with r(2)=0.969 for calibration and CV- r(2)=0.635 for the leave-one-out cross validation.

  11. Aggregation and Particle Formation of Therapeutic Proteins in Contact With a Novel Fluoropolymer Surface Versus Siliconized Surfaces: Effects of Agitation in Vials and in Prefilled Syringes.

    PubMed

    Teska, Brandon M; Brake, Jeffrey M; Tronto, Gregory S; Carpenter, John F

    2016-07-01

    We examined the effects of an accelerated agitation protocol on 2 protein therapeutics, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and Avastin (bevacizumab), in contact with a novel fluoropolymer surface and more typical siliconized surfaces. The fluoropolymer surface provides "solid-phase" lubrication for the syringe plunger-obviating the need for silicone oil lubrication in prefilled syringes. We tested the 2 surfaces in a vial system and in prefilled glass syringes. We also examined the effects of 2 buffers, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and 0.2-M glycine, with and without the addition of polysorbate 20, on agitation-induced aggregation of IVIG. Aggregation was monitored by measuring subvisible particle formation and soluble protein loss. In both vials and syringes, protein particle formation was much lower during agitation with the fluoropolymer surface than with the siliconized surface. Also, particle formation was greater in PBS than in glycine buffer, an effect attributed to lower colloidal stability of IVIG in PBS. Polysorbate 20 in the formulation greatly inhibited protein particle formation. Overall, the fluoropolymer plunger surface in an unsiliconized glass barrel was demonstrated to be a viable solution for eliminating silicone oil droplets from prefilled syringe formulations and providing a consistent system for rationale formulation development and simplified particle analysis. PMID:27233685

  12. Impact load-induced micro-structural damage and micro-structure associated mechanical response of concrete made with different surface roughness and porosity aggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Erdem, Savas Dawson, Andrew Robert; Thom, Nicholas Howard

    2012-02-15

    The relationship between the nature of micro damage under impact loading and changes in mechanical behavior associated with different microstructures is studied for concretes made with two different coarse aggregates having significant differences mainly in roughness and porosity - sintered fly ash and uncrushed gravel. A range of techniques including X-ray diffraction, digital image analysis, mercury porosimetry, X-ray computed tomography, laser surface profilometry and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the aggregates and micro-structures. The concrete prepared with lightweight aggregates was stronger in compression than the gravel aggregate concrete due to enhanced hydration as a result of internal curing. In the lightweight concrete, it was deduced that an inhomogeneous micro-structure led to strain incompatibilities and consequent localized stress concentrations in the mix, leading to accelerated failure. The pore structure, compressibility, and surface texture of the aggregates are of paramount importance for the micro-cracking growth.

  13. Casein aggregates built step-by-step on charged polyelectrolyte film surfaces are calcium phosphate-cemented.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Krisztina; Pilbat, Ana-Maria; Groma, Géza; Szalontai, Balázs; Cuisinier, Frédéric J G

    2010-12-10

    The possible mechanism of casein aggregation and micelle buildup was studied in a new approach by letting α-casein adsorb from low concentration (0.1 mg·ml(-1)) solutions onto the charged surfaces of polyelectrolyte films. It was found that α-casein could adsorb onto both positively and negatively charged surfaces. However, only when its negative phosphoseryl clusters remained free, i.e. when it adsorbed onto a negative surface, could calcium phosphate (CaP) nanoclusters bind to the casein molecules. Once the CaP clusters were in place, step-by-step building of multilayered casein architectures became possible. The presence of CaP was essential; neither Ca(2+) nor phosphate could alone facilitate casein aggregation. Thus, it seems that CaP is the organizing motive in the casein micelle formation. Atomic force microscopy revealed that even a single adsorbed casein layer was composed of very small (in the range of tens of nanometers) spherical forms. The stiffness of the adsorbed casein layer largely increased in the presence of CaP. On this basis, we can imagine that casein micelles emerge according to the following scheme. The amphipathic casein monomers aggregate into oligomers via hydrophobic interactions even in the absence of CaP. Full scale, CaP-carrying micelles could materialize by interlocking these casein oligomers with CaP nanoclusters. Such a mechanism would not contradict former experimental results and could offer a synthesis between the submicelle and the block copolymer models of casein micelles.

  14. Casein Aggregates Built Step-by-Step on Charged Polyelectrolyte Film Surfaces Are Calcium Phosphate-cemented*

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Krisztina; Pilbat, Ana-Maria; Groma, Géza; Szalontai, Balázs; Cuisinier, Frédéric J. G.

    2010-01-01

    The possible mechanism of casein aggregation and micelle buildup was studied in a new approach by letting α-casein adsorb from low concentration (0.1 mg·ml−1) solutions onto the charged surfaces of polyelectrolyte films. It was found that α-casein could adsorb onto both positively and negatively charged surfaces. However, only when its negative phosphoseryl clusters remained free, i.e. when it adsorbed onto a negative surface, could calcium phosphate (CaP) nanoclusters bind to the casein molecules. Once the CaP clusters were in place, step-by-step building of multilayered casein architectures became possible. The presence of CaP was essential; neither Ca2+ nor phosphate could alone facilitate casein aggregation. Thus, it seems that CaP is the organizing motive in the casein micelle formation. Atomic force microscopy revealed that even a single adsorbed casein layer was composed of very small (in the range of tens of nanometers) spherical forms. The stiffness of the adsorbed casein layer largely increased in the presence of CaP. On this basis, we can imagine that casein micelles emerge according to the following scheme. The amphipathic casein monomers aggregate into oligomers via hydrophobic interactions even in the absence of CaP. Full scale, CaP-carrying micelles could materialize by interlocking these casein oligomers with CaP nanoclusters. Such a mechanism would not contradict former experimental results and could offer a synthesis between the submicelle and the block copolymer models of casein micelles. PMID:20921229

  15. In vitro platelet activation, aggregation and platelet-granulocyte complex formation induced by surface modified single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Fent, János; Bihari, Péter; Vippola, Minnamari; Sarlin, Essi; Lakatos, Susan

    2015-08-01

    Surface modification of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) such as carboxylation, amidation, hydroxylation and pegylation is used to reduce the nanotube toxicity and render them more suitable for biomedical applications than their pristine counterparts. Toxicity can be manifested in platelet activation as it has been shown for SWCNTs. However, the effect of various surface modifications on the platelet activating potential of SWCNTs has not been tested yet. In vitro platelet activation (CD62P) as well as the platelet-granulocyte complex formation (CD15/CD41 double positivity) in human whole blood were measured by flow cytometry in the presence of 0.1mg/ml of pristine or various surface modified SWCNTs. The effect of various SWCNTs was tested by whole blood impedance aggregometry, too. All tested SWCNTs but the hydroxylated ones activate platelets and promote platelet-granulocyte complex formation in vitro. Carboxylated, pegylated and pristine SWCNTs induce whole blood aggregation as well. Although pegylation is preferred from biomedical point of view, among the samples tested by us pegylated SWCNTs induced far the most prominent activation and a well detectable aggregation of platelets in whole blood.

  16. Design of heat shock-resistant surfaces to prevent protein aggregation: Enhanced chaperone activity of immobilized α-Crystallin.

    PubMed

    Ray, Namrata; Roy, Sarita; Singha, Santiswarup; Chandra, Bappaditya; Dasgupta, Anjan Kr; Sarkar, Amitabha

    2014-05-21

    α-Crystallin is a multimeric protein belonging to the family of small heat shock proteins, which function as molecular chaperones by resisting heat and oxidative stress induced aggregation of other proteins. We immobilized α-Crystallin on a self-assembled monolayer on glass surface and studied its activity in terms of the prevention of aggregation of aldolase. We discovered that playing with grafted protein density led to interesting variations in the chaperone activity of immobilized α-Crystallin. This result is in accordance with the hypothesis that dynamicity of subunits plays a vital role in the functioning of α-Crystallin and might be able to throw light on the structure-activity relationship. We showed that the chaperone activity of a certain number of immobilized α-Crystallins was superior compared to a solution containing an equivalent number of the protein and 10 times the number of the protein at temperatures >60 °C. The α-Crystallin grafted surfaces retained activity on reuse. This could also lead to the design of potent heat-shock resistant surfaces that can find wide applications in storage and shipping of protein based biopharmaceuticals.

  17. High spatial resolution mapping of surface plasmon resonance modes in single and aggregated gold nanoparticles assembled on DNA strands

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We present the mapping of the full plasmonic mode spectrum for single and aggregated gold nanoparticles linked through DNA strands to a silicon nitride substrate. A comprehensive analysis of the electron energy loss spectroscopy images maps was performed on nanoparticles standing alone, dimers, and clusters of nanoparticles. The experimental results were confirmed by numerical calculations using the Mie theory and Gans-Mie theory for solving Maxwell's equations. Both bright and dark surface plasmon modes have been unveiled. PACS 78.67.Bf; 61.46.Df; 87.64.Ee PMID:23890222

  18. Downregulation of transferrin receptor surface expression by intracellular antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Jilin; Wu Sha; Zhao Xiaoping; Wang Min; Li Wenhan; Shen Xin; Liu Jing; Lei Ping; Zhu Huifen; Shen Guanxin . E-mail: guanxin_shen@yahoo.com.cn

    2007-03-23

    To deplete cellular iron uptake, and consequently inhibit the proliferation of tumor cells, we attempt to block surface expression of transferrin receptor (TfR) by intracellular antibody technology. We constructed two expression plasmids (scFv-HAK and scFv-HA) coding for intracellular single-chain antibody against TfR with or without endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal, respectively. Then they were transfected tumor cells MCF-7 by liposome. Applying RT-PCR, Western blotting, immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoelectron microscope experiments, we insure that scFv-HAK intrabody was successfully expressed and retained in ER contrasted to the secreted expression of scFv-HA. Flow cytometric analysis confirmed that the TfR surface expression was markedly decreased approximately 83.4 {+-} 2.5% in scFv-HAK transfected cells, while there was not significantly decrease in scFv-HA transfected cells. Further cell growth and apoptosis characteristics were evaluated by cell cycle analysis, nuclei staining and MTT assay. Results indicated that expression of scFv-HAK can dramatically induce cell cycle G1 phase arrest and apoptosis of tumor cells, and consequently significantly suppress proliferation of tumor cells compared with other control groups. For First time this study demonstrates the potential usage of anti-TfR scFv-intrabody as a growth inhibitor of TfR overexpressing tumors.

  19. Activation of transmembrane cell‐surface receptors via a common mechanism? The “rotation model”

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    It has long been thought that transmembrane cell‐surface receptors, such as receptor tyrosine kinases and cytokine receptors, among others, are activated by ligand binding through ligand‐induced dimerization of the receptors. However, there is growing evidence that prior to ligand binding, various transmembrane receptors have a preformed, yet inactive, dimeric structure on the cell surface. Various studies also demonstrate that during transmembrane signaling, ligand binding to the extracellular domain of receptor dimers induces a rotation of transmembrane domains, followed by rearrangement and/or activation of intracellular domains. The paper here describes transmembrane cell‐surface receptors that are known or proposed to exist in dimeric form prior to ligand binding, and discusses how these preformed dimers are activated by ligand binding. PMID:26241732

  20. Testosterone signaling through internalizable surface receptors in androgen receptor-free macrophages.

    PubMed

    Benten, W P; Lieberherr, M; Stamm, O; Wrehlke, C; Guo, Z; Wunderlich, F

    1999-10-01

    Testosterone acts on cells through intracellular transcription-regulating androgen receptors (ARs). Here, we show that mouse IC-21 macrophages lack the classical AR yet exhibit specific nongenomic responses to testosterone. These manifest themselves as testosterone-induced rapid increase in intracellular free [Ca(2+)], which is due to release of Ca(2+) from intracellular Ca(2+) stores. This Ca(2+) mobilization is also inducible by plasma membrane-impermeable testosterone-BSA. It is not affected by the AR blockers cyproterone and flutamide, whereas it is completely inhibited by the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 and pertussis toxin. Binding sites for testosterone are detectable on the surface of intact IC-21 cells, which become selectively internalized independent on caveolae and clathrin-coated vesicles upon agonist stimulation. Internalization is dependent on temperature, ATP, cytoskeletal elements, phospholipase C, and G-proteins. Collectively, our data provide evidence for the existence of G-protein-coupled, agonist-sequestrable receptors for testosterone in plasma membranes, which initiate a transcription-independent signaling pathway of testosterone. PMID:10512854

  1. Testosterone Signaling through Internalizable Surface Receptors in Androgen Receptor-free Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Benten, W. Peter M.; Lieberherr, Michèle; Stamm, Olaf; Wrehlke, Christian; Guo, Zhiyong; Wunderlich, Frank

    1999-01-01

    Testosterone acts on cells through intracellular transcription-regulating androgen receptors (ARs). Here, we show that mouse IC-21 macrophages lack the classical AR yet exhibit specific nongenomic responses to testosterone. These manifest themselves as testosterone-induced rapid increase in intracellular free [Ca2+], which is due to release of Ca2+ from intracellular Ca2+ stores. This Ca2+ mobilization is also inducible by plasma membrane-impermeable testosterone-BSA. It is not affected by the AR blockers cyproterone and flutamide, whereas it is completely inhibited by the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 and pertussis toxin. Binding sites for testosterone are detectable on the surface of intact IC-21 cells, which become selectively internalized independent on caveolae and clathrin-coated vesicles upon agonist stimulation. Internalization is dependent on temperature, ATP, cytoskeletal elements, phospholipase C, and G-proteins. Collectively, our data provide evidence for the existence of G-protein-coupled, agonist-sequestrable receptors for testosterone in plasma membranes, which initiate a transcription-independent signaling pathway of testosterone. PMID:10512854

  2. Interaction of lectins with membrane receptors on erythrocyte surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sung, L A; Kabat, E A; Chien, S

    1985-08-01

    The interactions of human genotype AO erythrocytes (red blood cells) (RBCs) with N-acetylgalactosamine-reactive lectins isolated from Helix pomatia (HPA) and from Dolichos biflorus (DBA) were studied. Binding curves obtained with the use of tritium-labeled lectins showed that the maximal numbers of lectin molecules capable of binding to human genotype AO RBCs were 3.8 X 10(5) and 2.7 X 10(5) molecules/RBC for HPA and DBA, respectively. The binding of one type of lectin may influence the binding of another type. HPA was found to inhibit the binding of DBA, but not vice versa. The binding of HPA was weakly inhibited by a beta-D-galactose-reactive lectin isolated from Ricinus communis (designated RCA1). Limulus polyphemus lectin (LPA), with specificity for N-acetylneuraminic acid, did not influence the binding of HPA but enhanced the binding of DBA. About 80% of LPA receptors (N-acetylneuraminic acid) were removed from RBC surfaces by neuraminidase treatment. Neuraminidase treatment of RBCs resulted in increases of binding of both HPA and DBA, but through different mechanisms. An equal number (7.6 X 10(5) of new HPA sites were generated on genotypes AO and OO RBCs by neuraminidase treatment, and these new sites accounted for the enhancement (AO cells) and appearance (OO cells) of hemagglutinability by HPA. Neuraminidase treatment did not generate new DBA sites, but increased the DBA affinity for the existing receptors; as a result, genotype AO cells increased their hemagglutinability by DBA, while OO cells remained unagglutinable. The use of RBCs of different genotypes in binding assays with 3H-labeled lectins of known specificities provides an experimental system for studying cell-cell recognition and association.

  3. Expression of surface platelet receptors (CD62P and CD41/61) in horses with recurrent airway obstruction (RAO).

    PubMed

    Iwaszko-Simonik, Alicja; Niedzwiedz, Artur; Graczyk, Stanislaw; Slowikowska, Malwina; Pliszczak-Krol, Aleksandra

    2015-03-15

    Recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) is an allergic disease of horses similar to human asthma, which is characterized by airway inflammation and activation of neutrophils, lymphocytes and platelets. Platelet activation and an increase in circulating platelet-leukocyte aggregates may lead to airway remodeling. The aim of this study was to investigate platelet status in RAO-affected horses based on the platelet morphology and platelet surface expression of CD41/61 and CD62P. Ten RAO-affected horses and ten healthy horses were included in this study. Blood samples were obtained to determine the platelet count (PLT), mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet large cell ratio (P-LCR). Expression of CD62P and CD41/61 was detected by flow cytometry on activated platelets. The median PLT was significantly reduced in horses with RAO compared to the controls. The MPV and the P-LCR values were significantly higher in RAO horses than controls. Expression of CD41/61 on platelets was increased in RAO horses, while CD62P expression was reduced. This study demonstrated the morphological changes in platelets and expression of platelet surface receptors. Despite the decrease of CD62P expression, the observed increased surface expression of CD41/61 on platelets in horses with RAO may contribute to the formation of platelet aggregates in their respiratory system.

  4. The impact of cellulose nanocrystals on the aggregation and initial adhesion to a solid surface of Escherichia coli K12: Role of solution chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaohui; Shao, Yanxi; Boluk, Yaman; Liu, Yang

    2015-12-01

    Aggregation of bacteria and their initial adhesion to silica surfaces are affected greatly by solution chemistry, particularly pH and ionic strength (IS). The effects of pH and IS on the aggregation and deposition of Escherichia coli K12 on silica surfaces were investigated in NaCl solutions at variable pH and IS, and in the absence and presence of cellulose nanocrystals (CNC). In the presence of CNC, bacterial aggregation was generally enhanced as the pH was increased from 3.5 to neutral at a given IS (10mM). At a given pH (7.2), bacterial aggregation was highest at 10mM as the IS was increased from 1mM to 50mM. The contribution of DLVO interaction and depletion interaction to bacterial aggregation in the bacteria and CNC system was compared. The results indicate that at pH ranging from 5.2 to 7.2 and IS ranging from 10mM to 50mM conditions, depletion attraction is the dominant mechanism for CNC induced bacterial aggregation. The lower bacterial deposition rates observed at 10mM IS and pH 7.2 compared with other conditions were mainly attributed to the aggregation of bacteria which could result in decreased convective-diffusive transport to the silica surface.

  5. The impact of cellulose nanocrystals on the aggregation and initial adhesion to a solid surface of Escherichia coli K12: Role of solution chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaohui; Shao, Yanxi; Boluk, Yaman; Liu, Yang

    2015-12-01

    Aggregation of bacteria and their initial adhesion to silica surfaces are affected greatly by solution chemistry, particularly pH and ionic strength (IS). The effects of pH and IS on the aggregation and deposition of Escherichia coli K12 on silica surfaces were investigated in NaCl solutions at variable pH and IS, and in the absence and presence of cellulose nanocrystals (CNC). In the presence of CNC, bacterial aggregation was generally enhanced as the pH was increased from 3.5 to neutral at a given IS (10mM). At a given pH (7.2), bacterial aggregation was highest at 10mM as the IS was increased from 1mM to 50mM. The contribution of DLVO interaction and depletion interaction to bacterial aggregation in the bacteria and CNC system was compared. The results indicate that at pH ranging from 5.2 to 7.2 and IS ranging from 10mM to 50mM conditions, depletion attraction is the dominant mechanism for CNC induced bacterial aggregation. The lower bacterial deposition rates observed at 10mM IS and pH 7.2 compared with other conditions were mainly attributed to the aggregation of bacteria which could result in decreased convective-diffusive transport to the silica surface. PMID:26454547

  6. CSF-1 receptor signalling is governed by pre-requisite EHD1 mediated receptor display on the macrophage cell surface.

    PubMed

    Cypher, Luke R; Bielecki, Timothy Alan; Huang, Lu; An, Wei; Iseka, Fany; Tom, Eric; Storck, Matthew D; Hoppe, Adam D; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2016-09-01

    Colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R), a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), is the master regulator of macrophage biology. CSF-1 can bind CSF-1R resulting in receptor activation and signalling essential for macrophage functions such as proliferation, differentiation, survival, polarization, phagocytosis, cytokine secretion, and motility. CSF-1R activation can only occur after the receptor is presented on the macrophage cell surface. This process is reliant upon the underlying macrophage receptor trafficking machinery. However, the mechanistic details governing this process are incompletely understood. C-terminal Eps15 Homology Domain-containing (EHD) proteins have recently emerged as key regulators of receptor trafficking but have not yet been studied in the context of macrophage CSF-1R signalling. In this manuscript, we utilize primary bone-marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs) to reveal a novel function of EHD1 as a regulator of CSF-1R abundance on the cell surface. We report that EHD1-knockout (EHD1-KO) macrophages cell surface and total CSF-1R levels are significantly decreased. The decline in CSF-1R levels corresponds with reduced downstream macrophage functions such as cell proliferation, migration, and spreading. In EHD1-KO macrophages, transport of newly synthesized CSF-1R to the macrophage cell surface was reduced and was associated with the shunting of the receptor to the lysosome, which resulted in receptor degradation. These findings reveal a novel and functionally important role for EHD1 in governing CSF-1R signalling via regulation of anterograde transport of CSF-1R to the macrophage cell surface. PMID:27224507

  7. Formation, Transport, Aggregation and Coarsening of Biogenic Metal-Sulfide Nanoparticles in Contaminated Near-Surface Aqueous Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, J. W.; Webb, R. I.; Banfield, J. F.

    2002-12-01

    wurtzite at ~8°C, more than 1000°C below the temperature of sphalerite-wurtzite transformation in bulk material, points to a phase stability reversal at very small particle size. Coarser regions of sphalerite (10-30 nm) appear to have grown via oriented aggregation of smaller particles; relatively coarse crystals of wurtzite are also present. These results demonstrate that nanoparticulate metal-sulfide biominerals may be highly localized by heterogeneities to form structures that promote aggregation-based coarsening and consequentially limit the mobility of metal contaminants in near-surface aqueous environments.

  8. Effects of pollutant atmospheres on surface receptors of pulmonary macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, S.B.; Rao, V.S.; Mannix, R.C.; Phalen, R.F.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of two multicomponent pollutant atmospheres on the surface receptors (FcR) and phagocytic activity of rat pulmonary alveolar macrophages have been studied. FcR are crucial for the macrophages to become cytotoxic against target cells. The atmospheres were composed of pollutants that are prevalent in the South Coast Air Basin of southern California. Rats were exposed nose-only to a 7-component oxidant-and sulfate-containing atmosphere for 4 h/d for either 7 or 21 consecutive days. In another experiment rats were exposed 5 h/d for 5 consecutive days to another pollutant combination--acid droplets plus carbon-containing dilute diesel engine exhaust. In both experiments matched rats were exposed nose-only to purified air to be used as controls. Each of the atmospheres studied significantly reduced FcR activity for at least 3 d following the exposure, with the group of rats exposed to the 7-component atmosphere for 21 d exhibiting the most pronounced effect. Macrophages from rats exposed to the diesel exhaust plus acid atmosphere and the 7-component atmosphere for 7 d had significantly reduced phagocytic activity for at least 3 d postexposure, while the macrophages from rats exposed to the latter atmosphere for 21 d had phagocytic activity near control values. The decrease in phagocytosis and inhibition of FcR of macrophages suggests an impairment of macrophage function that probably renders the host vulnerable to bacterial and/or viral infections.

  9. Evaporation of tiny water aggregation on solid surfaces with different wetting properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shen; Tu, Yusong; Wan, Rongzheng; Fang, Haiping

    2012-11-29

    The evaporation of a tiny amount of water on the solid surface with different wettabilities has been studied by molecular dynamics simulations. From nonequilibrium MD simulations, we found that, as the surface changed from hydrophobic to hydrophilic, the evaporation speed did not show a monotonic decrease as intuitively expected, but increased first, and then decreased after it reached a maximum value. The analysis of the simulation trajectory and calculation of the surface water interaction illustrate that the competition between the number of water molecules on the water-gas surface from where the water molecules can evaporate and the potential barrier to prevent those water molecules from evaporating results in the unexpected behavior of the evaporation. This finding is helpful in understanding the evaporation on biological surfaces, designing artificial surfaces of ultrafast water evaporating, or preserving water in soil. PMID:23051060

  10. Interaction of Biofunctionalized Nanoparticles with Receptors on Cell Surfaces: MC Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dormidontova, Elena; Wang, Shihu

    2015-03-01

    One of the areas of active development of modern nanomedicine is drug/gene delivery and imaging application of nanoparticles functionalized by ligands, aptamers or antibodies capable of specific interactions with cell surface receptors. Being a complex multifunctional system different structural aspects of nanoparticles affect their interactions with cell surfaces and the surface properties of cells can be different (e.g. density, distribution and mobility of receptors). Computer simulations allow a systematic investigation of the influence of multiple factors and provide a unified platform for the comparison. Using Monte Carlo simulations we investigate the influence of the nanoparticle properties (nanoparticle size, polymer tether length, polydispersity, density, ligand energy, valence and density) on nanoparticle-cell surface interactions and make predictions regarding favorable nanoparticle design for achieving multiple ligand-receptor binding. We will also discuss the implications of nanoparticle design on the selectivity of attachment to cells with high receptor density while ``ignoring'' cells with a low density of receptors.

  11. Flumazenil decreases surface expression of α4β2δ GABAA receptors by increasing the rate of receptor internalization.

    PubMed

    Kuver, Aarti; Smith, Sheryl S

    2016-01-01

    Increases in expression of α4βδ GABAA receptors (GABARs), triggered by fluctuations in the neurosteroid THP (3α-OH-5α[β]-pregnan-20-one), are associated with changes in mood and cognition. We tested whether α4βδ trafficking and surface expression would be altered by in vitro exposure to flumazenil, a benzodiazepine ligand which reduces α4βδ expression in vivo. We first determined that flumazenil (100 nM-100 μM, IC50=∼1 μM) acted as a negative modulator, reducing GABA (10 μM)-gated current in the presence of 100 nM THP (to increase receptor efficacy), assessed with whole cell patch clamp recordings of recombinant α4β2δ expressed in HEK-293 cells. Surface expression of recombinant α4β2δ receptors was detected using a 3XFLAG reporter at the C-terminus of α4 (α4F) using confocal immunocytochemical techniques following 48 h exposure of cells to GABA (10 μM)+THP (100 nM). Flumazenil (10 μM) decreased surface expression of α4F by ∼60%, while increasing its intracellular accumulation, after 48 h. Reduced surface expression of α4β2δ after flumazenil treatment was confirmed by decreases in the current responses to 100 nM of the GABA agonist gaboxadol. Flumazenil-induced decreases in surface expression of α4β2δ were prevented by the dynamin blocker, dynasore, and by leupeptin, which blocks lysosomal enzymes, suggesting that flumazenil is acting to increase endocytosis and lysosomal degradation of the receptor. Flumazenil increased the rate of receptor removal from the cell surface by 2-fold, assessed using botulinum toxin B to block insertion of new receptors. These findings may suggest new therapeutic strategies for regulation of α4β2δ expression using flumazenil.

  12. Assaying binding of nerve growth factor to cell surface receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Vale, R.D.; Shooter, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    The paper describes methods both for the radioiodination of nerve growth factor (NGF) and for assaying NFG receptors by reversible binding techniques. Preparation of (/sup 125/I)NGF along with a rapid method for determining the amount of cell-bound ligand have allowed the detection of NGF receptors on a number of cell types.

  13. Surface functionalization for tailoring the aggregation and magnetic behaviour of silica-coated iron oxide nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca, A. G.; Carmona, D.; Miguel-Sancho, N.; Bomatí-Miguel, O.; Balas, F.; Piquer, C.; Santamaría, J.

    2012-04-01

    We report here a detailed structural and magnetic study of different silica nanocapsules containing uniform and highly crystalline maghemite nanoparticles. The magnetic phase consists of 5 nm triethylene glycol (TREG)- or dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA)-coated maghemite particles. TREG-coated nanoparticles were synthesized by thermal decomposition. In a second step, TREG ligands were exchanged by DMSA. After the ligand exchange, the ζ potential of the particles changed from - 10 to - 40 mV, whereas the hydrodynamic size remained constant at around 15 nm. Particles coated by TREG and DMSA were encapsulated in silica following a sol-gel procedure. The encapsulation of TREG-coated nanoparticles led to large magnetic aggregates, which were embedded in coalesced silica structures. However, DMSA-coated nanoparticles led to small magnetic clusters inserted in silica spheres of around 100 nm. The final nanostructures can be described as the result of several competing factors at play. Magnetic measurements indicate that in the TREG-coated nanoparticles the interparticle magnetic interaction scenario has not dramatically changed after the silica encapsulation, whereas in the DMSA-coated nanoparticles, the magnetic interactions were screened due to the function of the silica template. Moreover, the analysis of the AC susceptibility suggests that our systems essentially behave as cluster spin glass systems.

  14. Gold-Induced Fibril Growth: The Mechanism of Surface-Facilitated Amyloid Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Gladytz, Anika; Abel, Bernd; Risselada, Herre Jelger

    2016-09-01

    The question of how amyloid fibril formation is influenced by surfaces is crucial for a detailed understanding of the process in vivo. We applied a combination of kinetic experiments and molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate how (model) surfaces influence fibril formation of the amyloid-forming sequences of prion protein SUP35 and human islet amyloid polypeptide. The kinetic data suggest that structural reorganization of the initial peptide corona around colloidal gold nanoparticles is the rate-limiting step. The molecular dynamics simulations reveal that partial physisorption to the surface results in the formation of aligned monolayers, which stimulate the formation of parallel, critical oligomers. The general mechanism implies that the competition between the underlying peptide-peptide and peptide-surface interactions must strike a balance to accelerate fibril formation. PMID:27513605

  15. Aggregation of wet and dry land surfaces in interception schemes for general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.

    1995-03-01

    This paper investigates the parameterization of rainfall interception by a vegetation canopy in general circulation models (GCMs). Recent land surface schemes have introduced canopy water balance equations, which include sub-grid scale rainfall variability. However, current models do not distinguish between wet and dry areas when solving the set of energy balance equations. An alternative method is set out here that solves one set of surface flux equations for the wet area and one for the dry area. The approximation of using a single surface temperature to determine the surface fluxes is shown to overestimate the wet canopy evaporation from a forest by typically 30%. When implemented in the single column version of the U.K. Meteorological Office (UKMO) GCM, this excessive evaporation leads to significant overprediction of modeled interception loss from Amazonian rain forest.

  16. Effect of soil surface conditions on runoff velocity and sediment mean aggregate diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    César Ramos, Júlio; Bertol, Ildegardis; Paz González, Antonio; de Souza Werner, Romeu; Marioti, Juliana; Henrique Bandeira, Douglas; Andrighetti Leolatto, Lidiane

    2013-04-01

    Soil cover and soil management are the factors that most influence soil erosion by water, because they directly affect soil surface roughness and surface cover. The main effect of soil cover by crop residues consists in dissipation of kinetic energy of raindrops and also partly kinetic energy of runoff, so that the soil disaggregation is considerably reduced but, in addition, soil cover captures detached soil particles, retains water on its surface and decreases runoff volume and velocity. In turn, soil surface roughness, influences soil surface water storage and infiltration and also runoff volume and velocity, sediment retention and subsequently water and sediment losses. Based on the above rationale, we performed a field experiment to assess the influence of soil cover and soil surface roughness on decay of runoff velocity as well as on mean diameter of transported sediments (D50 index). The following treatments were evaluated: SRR) residues of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) on a smooth soil surfcace, SRV) residues of common vetch (Vicia sativa) on a smooth soil surface, SSR) scarification after cultivation of Italian ryegrass resulting in a rough surface, SSV) scarification after cultivation of common vetch resulting in a rough surface, and SBS) scarified bare soil with high roughness as a control. The field experiments was performed on an Inceptisol in South Brazil under simulated rainfall conditions during 2012. Experimental plots were 11 m long and 3.5 m wide with an area of 38.5 m2. Six successive simulated rainfall tests were applied using a rotating-boom rain simulator. During each test, rain intensity was 60 mmhr-1, whereas rain duration was 90 minutes. Runoff velocity showed no significant differences between cultivated treatments. However, when compared to bare soil treatment, SBS (0.178 m s-1) and irrespective of the presence of surface crop residues or scarification operations, cultivated soil treatments significantly reduced runoff velocity

  17. The effects of a selective 5-HT2 receptor antagonist (ICI 170,809) on platelet aggregation and pupillary responses in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed Central

    Millson, D S; Jessup, C L; Swaisland, A; Haworth, S; Rushton, A; Harry, J D

    1992-01-01

    1. ICI 170,809 (2-(2-dimethylamino-2-methylpropylthio)-3-phenylquinoline hydrochloride) is a potent 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) type 2 postsynaptic receptor antagonist. 2. Effects of ICI 170,809 as single oral doses (3, 7, 15 and 30 mg) or placebo were studied on the duration of antagonism for the ex vivo platelet aggregatory response to 5-HT and to the pupillary light constrictor response in eight healthy male volunteers. 3. Pupillary dark adapted responses to a 0.5 s light stimulus were measured using a portable infrared pupillometer, for up to 24 h after dosing. 4. The in vitro platelet 5-HT aggregation response was reduced by ICI 170,809, with depression of the dose-response curve to 5-HT at all concentrations of 5-HT and with no evidence for a parallel shift. 5. The ex vivo platelet 5-HT response demonstrated a dose related significant (P less than 0.02) decrease in aggregation reaching a maximum at 2 h after dosing with the effect persisting for at least 8 h after dosing with the 7 and 15 mg doses. 6. Resting pupil diameter (RPD), and light induced pupillary responses in the dark adapted pupil, showed a significant (P less than 0.01) dose related reduction with significant (P less than 0.05) effects still present with the 15 and 30 mg doses at 8 h after dosing. 7. We conclude that, changes in both ex vivo platelet aggregation to 5-HT and dark adapted pupil size, are significantly correlated (P less than 0.0001) with log plasma concentrations (ng ml-1) of ICI 170,809, enabling the assessment of 5-HT2-receptor antagonism in man. PMID:1576048

  18. Investigating the structural changes of β-amyloid peptide aggregation using attenuated-total-reflection surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, K.-C.; Yu, L.-Y.; Yih, J.-N.; Chen, S.-J.

    2007-02-01

    This study utilizes a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) based on the attenuated-total-reflection (ATR) method to investigate that the structural information of the biomolecular monolayer on sensing surface can be dynamically observed with a higher signal-to-noise ratio signal. The secondary structures of long oligonucleotides and their influence on the DNA hybridization on the sensing surface are investigated. The SERS spectrum provides the structural information of the oligonucleotides with the help of a silver colloidal nanoparticle monolayer by control of the size and distribution of the nanoparticles adapted as a Raman active substrate. It is found that the ring-breathing modes of adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine in Raman fingerprint associated with three 60mer oligonucleotides with prominent secondary structures are lower than those observed for the two oligonucleotides with no obvious secondary structures. It is also determined that increasing the DNA hybridization temperature from 35°C to 45°C reduces secondary structure effects. The ATR-SERS biosensing technique will be used to provide valuable structural information regarding the short-term reversible interactions and long-term polymerization events in the Aβ aggregates on the sensing surface.

  19. Cell surface receptors for signal transduction and ligand transport - a design principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Shankaran, Harish; Resat, Haluk; Wiley, H. S.

    2007-06-01

    Although many different receptors undergo endocytosis, the system-level design principles that govern the evolution of receptor dynamics are far from fully understood. We have constructed a generalized mathematical model to understand how receptor internalization dynamics encodes receptor function and regulation. Parametric analysis of the response of receptor systems to ligand inputs reveals that receptors can be categorized a being: i) avidity-controlled where the response control depends primarily on the extracelluar ligand capture efficiency, ii) consumption-controlled where the ability to internalize surface-bound ligand is the primary control parameter, and iii) dual-sensitivity where both the avidity and consumption parameters are important. We show that the transferrin and low-density lipoprotein receptors are avidity-controlled, the vitellogenin receptor is consumption-controlled and epidermal growth factor receptor is a dual-sensitivity receptor. Significantly, we show that ligand-induced endocytosis is a mechanism to anhance the accuracy of signaling receptors rather than serving to attenuate signaling. Our analysis reveals that the location of a receptor system in the avidity-consumption parameter space can be used to understand both its function and its regulations.

  20. Cell Surface Receptors for Signal Transduction and Ligand Transport: A Design Principles Study

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Harish; Resat, Haluk; Wiley, H. Steven

    2007-01-01

    Receptors constitute the interface of cells to their external environment. These molecules bind specific ligands involved in multiple processes, such as signal transduction and nutrient transport. Although a variety of cell surface receptors undergo endocytosis, the systems-level design principles that govern the evolution of receptor trafficking dynamics are far from fully understood. We have constructed a generalized mathematical model of receptor–ligand binding and internalization to understand how receptor internalization dynamics encodes receptor function and regulation. A given signaling or transport receptor system represents a particular implementation of this module with a specific set of kinetic parameters. Parametric analysis of the response of receptor systems to ligand inputs reveals that receptor systems can be characterized as being: i) avidity-controlled where the response control depends primarily on the extracellular ligand capture efficiency, ii) consumption-controlled where the ability to internalize surface-bound ligand is the primary control parameter, and iii) dual-sensitivity where both the avidity and consumption parameters are important. We show that the transferrin and low-density lipoprotein receptors are avidity-controlled, the vitellogenin receptor is consumption-controlled, and the epidermal growth factor receptor is a dual-sensitivity receptor. Significantly, we show that ligand-induced endocytosis is a mechanism to enhance the accuracy of signaling receptors rather than merely serving to attenuate signaling. Our analysis reveals that the location of a receptor system in the avidity-consumption parameter space can be used to understand both its function and its regulation. PMID:17542642

  1. Cargo binding promotes KDEL receptor clustering at the mammalian cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Björn; Shaebani, M. Reza; Rammo, Domenik; Bubel, Tobias; Santen, Ludger; Schmitt, Manfred J.

    2016-01-01

    Transmembrane receptor clustering is a ubiquitous phenomenon in pro- and eukaryotic cells to physically sense receptor/ligand interactions and subsequently translate an exogenous signal into a cellular response. Despite that receptor cluster formation has been described for a wide variety of receptors, ranging from chemotactic receptors in bacteria to growth factor and neurotransmitter receptors in mammalian cells, a mechanistic understanding of the underlying molecular processes is still puzzling. In an attempt to fill this gap we followed a combined experimental and theoretical approach by dissecting and modulating cargo binding, internalization and cellular response mediated by KDEL receptors (KDELRs) at the mammalian cell surface after interaction with a model cargo/ligand. Using a fluorescent variant of ricin toxin A chain as KDELR-ligand (eGFP-RTAH/KDEL), we demonstrate that cargo binding induces dose-dependent receptor cluster formation at and subsequent internalization from the membrane which is associated and counteracted by anterograde and microtubule-assisted receptor transport to preferred docking sites at the plasma membrane. By means of analytical arguments and extensive numerical simulations we show that cargo-synchronized receptor transport from and to the membrane is causative for KDELR/cargo cluster formation at the mammalian cell surface. PMID:27353000

  2. Wellcome Prize Lecture. Cell surface, ion-sensing receptors.

    PubMed

    Riccardi, Daniela

    2002-07-01

    Changes in extracellular calcium (Ca(2+)o) concentration ([Ca2+]o) affect kidney function both under basal and hormone-stimulated conditions. The molecular identification of an extracellular Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaR) has confirmed a direct role of Ca(2+)o on parathyroid and kidney function (i.e. independent of calciotropic hormones) as a modulator of Ca2+ homeostasis. In addition, evidence accumulated over the last 10 years has shown that CaR is also expressed in regions outside the calcium homeostatic system where its role is largely undefined but seems to be linked to regulation of local ionic homeostasis. The parathyroid and kidney CaRs are 1081 and 1079 amino acids long, respectively, and belong to the type III family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which includes other CaRs, metabotropic glutamate receptors and putative vomeronasal organ receptors. For the CaR, its low (millimolar) affinity for Ca2+, its positive cooperativity and its large ion-sensing extracellular domain, indicate that the receptor is more sensitive to changes in net cationic charge rather than to a specific ligand. Mg2+, trivalent cations of the lanthanide series and polyvalent cations such as spermine and aminoglycoside antibiotics can all activate the receptor in vitro with EC50 values in the micromolar range for trivalent and polyvalent cations or in the millimolar range for Ca2+ and Mg2+. In addition to true CaR agonists, CaR sensitivity to Ca(2+)o is also susceptible to allosteric modulation by ionic strength, L-amino acids and by pharmacological agents. This review will address endogenous and exogenous CaR agonists, the role of the receptor in the calcium homeostatic system and some speculation on possible role(s) of the CaR in regions not involved in mineral ion homeostasis.

  3. Wellcome Prize Lecture. Cell surface, ion-sensing receptors.

    PubMed

    Riccardi, Daniela

    2002-07-01

    Changes in extracellular calcium (Ca(2+)o) concentration ([Ca2+]o) affect kidney function both under basal and hormone-stimulated conditions. The molecular identification of an extracellular Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaR) has confirmed a direct role of Ca(2+)o on parathyroid and kidney function (i.e. independent of calciotropic hormones) as a modulator of Ca2+ homeostasis. In addition, evidence accumulated over the last 10 years has shown that CaR is also expressed in regions outside the calcium homeostatic system where its role is largely undefined but seems to be linked to regulation of local ionic homeostasis. The parathyroid and kidney CaRs are 1081 and 1079 amino acids long, respectively, and belong to the type III family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which includes other CaRs, metabotropic glutamate receptors and putative vomeronasal organ receptors. For the CaR, its low (millimolar) affinity for Ca2+, its positive cooperativity and its large ion-sensing extracellular domain, indicate that the receptor is more sensitive to changes in net cationic charge rather than to a specific ligand. Mg2+, trivalent cations of the lanthanide series and polyvalent cations such as spermine and aminoglycoside antibiotics can all activate the receptor in vitro with EC50 values in the micromolar range for trivalent and polyvalent cations or in the millimolar range for Ca2+ and Mg2+. In addition to true CaR agonists, CaR sensitivity to Ca(2+)o is also susceptible to allosteric modulation by ionic strength, L-amino acids and by pharmacological agents. This review will address endogenous and exogenous CaR agonists, the role of the receptor in the calcium homeostatic system and some speculation on possible role(s) of the CaR in regions not involved in mineral ion homeostasis. PMID:12392104

  4. Nonlinear Surface Dilatational Rheology and Foaming Behavior of Protein and Protein Fibrillar Aggregates in the Presence of Natural Surfactant.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zhili; Yang, Xiaoquan; Sagis, Leonard M C

    2016-04-19

    The surface and foaming properties of native soy glycinin (11S) and its heat-induced fibrillar aggregates, in the presence of natural surfactant steviol glycoside (STE), were investigated and compared at pH 7.0 to determine the impact of protein structure modification on protein-surfactant interfacial interactions. The adsorption at, and nonlinear dilatational rheological behavior of, the air-water interface were studied by combining drop shape analysis tensiometry, ellipsometry, and large-amplitude oscillatory dilatational rheology. Lissajous plots of surface pressure versus deformation were used to analyze the surface rheological response in terms of interfacial microstructure. The heat treatment generates a mixture of long fibrils and unconverted peptides. The presence of small peptides in 11S fibril samples resulted in a faster adsorption kinetics than that of native 11S. The addition of STE affected the adsorption of 11S significantly, whereas no apparent effect on the adsorption of the 11S fibril-peptide system was observed. The rheological response of interfaces stabilized by 11S-STE mixtures also differed significantly from the response for 11S fibril-peptide-STE mixtures. For 11S, the STE reduces the degree of strain hardening in extension and increases strain hardening in compression, suggesting the interfacial structure may change from a surface gel to a mixed phase of protein patches and STE domains. The foams generated from the mixtures displayed comparable foam stability to that of pure 11S. For 11S fibril-peptide mixtures STE only significantly affects the response in extension, where the degree of strain softening is decreased compared to the pure fibril-peptide system. The foam stability of the fibril-peptide system was significantly reduced by STE. These findings indicate that fibrillization of globular proteins could be a potential strategy to modify the complex surface and foaming behaviors of protein-surfactant mixtures.

  5. Nonlinear Surface Dilatational Rheology and Foaming Behavior of Protein and Protein Fibrillar Aggregates in the Presence of Natural Surfactant.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zhili; Yang, Xiaoquan; Sagis, Leonard M C

    2016-04-19

    The surface and foaming properties of native soy glycinin (11S) and its heat-induced fibrillar aggregates, in the presence of natural surfactant steviol glycoside (STE), were investigated and compared at pH 7.0 to determine the impact of protein structure modification on protein-surfactant interfacial interactions. The adsorption at, and nonlinear dilatational rheological behavior of, the air-water interface were studied by combining drop shape analysis tensiometry, ellipsometry, and large-amplitude oscillatory dilatational rheology. Lissajous plots of surface pressure versus deformation were used to analyze the surface rheological response in terms of interfacial microstructure. The heat treatment generates a mixture of long fibrils and unconverted peptides. The presence of small peptides in 11S fibril samples resulted in a faster adsorption kinetics than that of native 11S. The addition of STE affected the adsorption of 11S significantly, whereas no apparent effect on the adsorption of the 11S fibril-peptide system was observed. The rheological response of interfaces stabilized by 11S-STE mixtures also differed significantly from the response for 11S fibril-peptide-STE mixtures. For 11S, the STE reduces the degree of strain hardening in extension and increases strain hardening in compression, suggesting the interfacial structure may change from a surface gel to a mixed phase of protein patches and STE domains. The foams generated from the mixtures displayed comparable foam stability to that of pure 11S. For 11S fibril-peptide mixtures STE only significantly affects the response in extension, where the degree of strain softening is decreased compared to the pure fibril-peptide system. The foam stability of the fibril-peptide system was significantly reduced by STE. These findings indicate that fibrillization of globular proteins could be a potential strategy to modify the complex surface and foaming behaviors of protein-surfactant mixtures. PMID:27043221

  6. Effects of Added Salts on Surface Tension and Aggregation of Crown Ether Surfactants.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Maki; Fujio, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Two crown ether surfactants, dodecanoyloxymethyl- (C11Φ6) and octanoyloxymethyl-18-crown-6 (C7Φ6), were synthesized and the surface tension dependence on surfactant concentration of their aqueous solutions was measured both in the absence and presence of alkali chlorides to confirm the critical micelle concentration (CMC) is highest for the added cation that have an ionic diameter comparable to the hole size of the crown ether ring and that several break points on the surface tension vs. concentration curves occur for these crown ether surfactants. For C11Φ6 and C7Φ6, in the absence of salt, the surface tension vs. concentration curves had two break points. Using the solubilization of a water-insoluble dye as an indicator, we found that the break point at the higher concentration (m0) for C7Φ6 was due to micelle formation. Two break points were also observed for the aqueous solution of C11Φ6 in the presence of NaCl, KCl, RbCl, and CsCl salts at concentrations of 0.22 mol kg(-1) and for C7Φ6 with 0.22 mol kg(-1) KCl added. The CMC (m0) was found to be the highest for solutions containing K(+) salts because K(+) has an ionic diameter comparable to the hole size of 18-crown-6 ring. Furthermore, the CMC decreased as the ionic diameters of the added cations deviated from the hole size. The molecular areas at two break points, estimated by the Gibbs adsorption isotherm, except for that at the break point at mI of C7Φ6, were very small for an adsorbed monolayer. Further investigation is required to elucidate the reason for the break point at mI. PMID:26666275

  7. Effects of Added Salts on Surface Tension and Aggregation of Crown Ether Surfactants.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Maki; Fujio, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Two crown ether surfactants, dodecanoyloxymethyl- (C11Φ6) and octanoyloxymethyl-18-crown-6 (C7Φ6), were synthesized and the surface tension dependence on surfactant concentration of their aqueous solutions was measured both in the absence and presence of alkali chlorides to confirm the critical micelle concentration (CMC) is highest for the added cation that have an ionic diameter comparable to the hole size of the crown ether ring and that several break points on the surface tension vs. concentration curves occur for these crown ether surfactants. For C11Φ6 and C7Φ6, in the absence of salt, the surface tension vs. concentration curves had two break points. Using the solubilization of a water-insoluble dye as an indicator, we found that the break point at the higher concentration (m0) for C7Φ6 was due to micelle formation. Two break points were also observed for the aqueous solution of C11Φ6 in the presence of NaCl, KCl, RbCl, and CsCl salts at concentrations of 0.22 mol kg(-1) and for C7Φ6 with 0.22 mol kg(-1) KCl added. The CMC (m0) was found to be the highest for solutions containing K(+) salts because K(+) has an ionic diameter comparable to the hole size of 18-crown-6 ring. Furthermore, the CMC decreased as the ionic diameters of the added cations deviated from the hole size. The molecular areas at two break points, estimated by the Gibbs adsorption isotherm, except for that at the break point at mI of C7Φ6, were very small for an adsorbed monolayer. Further investigation is required to elucidate the reason for the break point at mI.

  8. Cyclic AMP regulation of early gene expression in Dictyostelium discoideum: mediation via the cell surface cyclic AMP receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Mann, S K; Firtel, R A

    1987-01-01

    We examined two sets of genes expressed early in the developmental cycle of Dictyostelium discoideum that appear to be regulated by cyclic AMP (cAMP). The transcripts of both sets of genes were not detectable in vegetative cells. During normal development on filter pads, RNA complementary to these genes could be detected at about 2 h, peaked around 6 to 8 h, and decreased gradually thereafter. Expression of these genes upon starvation in shaking culture was stimulated by pulsing the cells with nanomolar levels of cAMP, a condition that mimics the in vivo pulsing during normal aggregation. Expression was inhibited by caffeine or by continuous levels of cAMP, a condition found later in development when in vivo expression of these genes decreased. The inhibition of caffeine could be overcome by pulsing cells with cAMP. These results suggest that the expression is mediated via the cell surface cAMP receptor, but does not require a rise in intracellular cAMP. mRNA from a gene of the second class was induced upon starvation, peaked by 2.5 h of development, and then declined. In contrast to the other genes, its expression was maintained by continuous levels of cAMP and repressed by cAMP pulses. These and other results on a number of classes of developmentally regulated genes indicates that changing levels of cAMP, acting via the cell surface cAMP receptor, are involved in controlling these groups of genes. We also examined the structure and partial sequence of the cAMP pulse-induced genes. The two tandemly duplicated M3 genes were almost continuously homologous over the sequenced portion of the protein-coding region except for a region near the N-terminal end. The two M3 genes had regions of homology in the 5' flanking sequence and showed slight homology to the same regions in gene D2, another cAMP pulse-induced gene. D2 showed extremely significant homology over its entire sequenced length to an acetylcholinesterase. The results presented here and by others suggest that

  9. EDTA enhances high-throughput two-dimensional bioprinting by inhibiting salt scaling and cell aggregation at the nozzle surface.

    PubMed

    Parzel, Cheryl A; Pepper, Matthew E; Burg, Timothy; Groff, Richard E; Burg, Karen J L

    2009-06-01

    Tissue-engineering strategies may be employed in the development of in vitro breast tissue models for use in testing regimens of drug therapies and vaccines. The physical and chemical interactions that occur among cells and extracellular matrix components can also be elucidated with these models to gain an understanding of the progression of transformed epithelial cells into tumours and the ultimate metastases of tumour cells. The modified inkjet printer may be a useful tool for creating three-dimensional (3D) in vitro models, because it offers an inexpensive and high-throughput solution to microfabrication, and because the printer can be easily manipulated to produce varying tissue attributes. We hypothesized, however, that when ink is replaced with a biologically based fluid (i.e. a 'bio-ink'), specifically a serum-free cell culture medium, printer nozzle failure can result from salt scale build-up as fluid evaporates on the printhead surface. In this study, ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) was used as a culture medium additive to prevent salt scaling and cell aggregation during the bioprinting process. The results showed that EDTA, at a concentration typically found in commercially available trypsin solutions (0.53 mM), prevented nozzle failure when a serum-free culture medium was printed from a nozzle at 1000 drops/s. Furthermore, increasing concentrations of EDTA appeared to mildly decrease aggregation of 4T07 cells. Cell viability studies were performed to demonstrate that addition of EDTA did not result in significant cell death. In conclusion, it is recommended that EDTA be incorporated into bio-ink solutions containing salts that could lead to nozzle failure.

  10. An integrated experimental and theoretical approach to the spectroscopy of organic-dye-sensitized TiO₂ heterointerfaces: disentangling the effects of aggregation, solvation, and surface protonation.

    PubMed

    Marotta, Gabriele; Lobello, Maria Grazia; Anselmi, Chiara; Barozzino Consiglio, Gabriella; Calamante, Massimo; Mordini, Alessandro; Pastore, Mariachiara; De Angelis, Filippo

    2014-04-14

    We report a joint experimental and computational study into the spectroscopic properties of a prototypical D5 organic dye, both in solution and adsorbed on a TiO2 surface, with the aim of modeling and quantifying the UV/Vis spectral shifts that occur in the different explored environments. Going from the dye in solution to dye-sensitized TiO2, various factors may shift the position of the UV/Vis absorption maximum, both towards longer and shorter wavelengths. Here we have focused on the effect of dye aggregation on TiO2, surface protonation, and solvent effects. The D5 dye forms stable aggregates on the TiO2 surface that cause spectral blueshifts. We used different sensitization conditions to vary the dye loading and thus the extent of dye aggregation. For each sensitization condition, we explored protonated and native TiO2 films. Computational modeling of different dimeric aggregates with increasing intermolecular interactions and simulation of the associated optical responses also confirm the observed spectral blueshifts. Our results show that both the presence of surface protons and solvent stabilize the excited state of the adsorbed dye molecules, which causes a marked redshift in the absorption maximum and thus moves in the opposite direction to the shift due to the increase in the surface coverage.

  11. Fibronectin and asialoglyprotein receptor mediate hepatitis B surface antigen binding to the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Wang, Feng; Tian, Linlin; Su, Jing; Zhu, Xiangqian; Lin, Li; Ding, Xiaoran; Wang, Xuejun; Wang, Shengqi

    2010-06-01

    Both fibronectin and the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) have been identified by some investigators as partners for hepatitis B virus (HBV) envelope proteins. Because fibronectin is a natural ligand for ASGPR, we speculated that HBV might attach to ASGPR expressed on the hepatocyte surface via fibronectin. To test this hypothesis, we first confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation that ASGPR, fibronectin and HBsAg bind to each other in HepG2.2.15 cells, and possible binding domains were identified by GST pull-down. In addition, by measuring binding of HBsAg to cells, we found that ASGPR and fibronectin enhanced the binding capability of HBsAg to HepG2 cells, and even to 293T and CHO cells, which normally do not bind HBV. In conclusion, our findings suggest that both fibronectin and ASGPR mediate HBsAg binding to the cell surface, which provides further evidence for the potential roles of these two proteins in mediating HBV binding to liver cells. PMID:20364278

  12. Agonist- and antagonist-induced up-regulation of surface 5-HT3A receptors

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Russell A; Baptista-Hon, Daniel T; Hales, Tim G; Lovinger, David M

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The 5-HT3 receptor is a member of the pentameric ligand-gated ion channel family and is pharmacologically targeted to treat irritable bowel syndrome and nausea/emesis. Furthermore, many antidepressants elevate extracellular concentrations of 5-HT. This study investigates the functional consequences of exposure of recombinant 5-HT3A receptors to agonists and antagonists. Experimental Approach We used HEK cells stably expressing recombinant 5-HT3A receptors and the ND7/23 (mouse neuroblastoma/dorsal root ganglion hybrid) cell line, which expresses endogenous 5-HT3 receptors. Surface expression of recombinant 5-HT3A receptors, modified to contain the bungarotoxin (BTX) binding sequence, was quantified using fluorescence microscopy to image BTX-conjugated fluorophores. Whole cell voltage-clamp electrophysiology was used to measure the density of current mediated by 5-HT3A receptors. Key Results 5-HT3A receptors were up-regulated by the prolonged presence of agonists (5-HT and m-chlorophenylbiguanide) and antagonists (MDL-72222 and morphine). The up-regulation of 5-HT3A receptors by 5-HT and MDL-72222 was time- and concentration-dependent but was independent of newly translated receptors. The phenomenon was observed for recombinant rodent and human 5-HT3A receptors and for endogenous 5-HT3 receptors in neuronal ND7/23 cells. Conclusions and Implications Up-regulation of 5-HT3A receptors, following exposure to either agonists or antagonists suggests that this phenomenon may occur in response to different therapeutic agents. Medications that elevate 5-HT levels, such as the antidepressant inhibitors of 5-HT reuptake and antiemetic inhibitors of 5-HT3 receptor function, may both raise receptor expression. However, this will require further investigation in vivo. PMID:25989383

  13. Aggregation of human polymorphonuclear leucocytes during phagocytosis of bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Henricks, P A; van der Tol, M E; Verhoef, J

    1984-01-01

    The process of aggregation of human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) during the uptake of bacteria was studied. Radiolabelled S. aureus were opsonized in different sera, washed, resuspended in buffer and added to the PMN. Uptake of the bacteria and aggregation of the PMN were measured simultaneously. Maximal aggregation occurred within 6 min, when 5 X 10(6) PMN had phagocytosed 2.5 X 10(8) S. aureus. Also the effects of serum concentrations and different sera for opsonization of the bacteria on PMN aggregation were studied. Despite normal uptake, aggregation of PMN was low when bacteria were opsonized in complement-deficient sera. Furthermore when PMN were treated with pronase to inactivate complement receptors on the cell surface of the PMN, and bacteria preopsonized in immune serum were added, no change in uptake occurred, although the degree of aggregation halved compared to control PMN. So, interaction between the bacteria and the complement receptor of the PMN cell membrane is needed for triggering the process of aggregation. By using dansylcadaverin and diphenylamine to modulate lysosomal enzyme release, azide or PMN from a chronic granulomatous disease patient to study the effect of the formation of oxygen species, and theophylline, DB-cAMP or 8 Br-cAMP to increase cAMP levels, it was concluded that aggregation of PMN during phagocytosis was not dependent on oxygen metabolism, degranulation or cAMP levels of PMN. PMID:6086503

  14. Heterodimerization and Surface Localization of G Protein Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Minneman, Kenneth P.

    2007-01-01

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the largest human gene families, and are targets for many important therapeutic drugs. Over the last few years, there has been a major paradigm shift in our understanding of how these receptors function. Formerly, GPCRs were thought to exist as monomers that, upon agonist occupation, activated a heterotrimeric G protein to alter the concentrations of specific second messengers. Until recently, this relatively linear cascade has been the standard paradigm for signaling by these molecules. However, it is now clear that this model is not adequate to explain many aspects of GPCR function. We now know that many, if not most, GPCRs form homo- and/or hetero-oligomeric complexes and interact directly with intracellular proteins in addition to G proteins. It now appears that many GPCRs may not function independently, but might more accurately be described as subunits of large multi-protein signaling complexes. These observations raise many important new questions; some of which include: 1) How many functionally and pharmacologically distinct receptor subtypes exist in vivo? 2) Which GPCRs physically associate, and in what stochiometries? 3) What are the roles of individual subunits in binding ligand and activating responses? 4) Are the pharmacological or signaling properties of GPCR heterodimers different from monomers? Since these receptors are the targets for a large number of clinically useful compounds, such information is likely to be of direct therapeutic importance, both in understanding how existing drugs work, but also in discovering novel compounds to treat disease. PMID:17011524

  15. Alpha-synuclein up-regulation and aggregation during MPP+-induced apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells: intermediacy of transferrin receptor iron and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Kalivendi, Shasi V; Cunningham, Sonya; Kotamraju, Srigiridhar; Joseph, Joy; Hillard, Cecilia J; Kalyanaraman, B

    2004-04-01

    1-Methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) is a neurotoxin that causes Parkinson's disease in experimental animals and humans. Despite the fact that intracellular iron was shown to be crucial for MPP(+)-induced apoptotic cell death, the molecular mechanisms for the iron requirement remain unclear. We investigated the role of transferrin receptor (TfR) and iron in modulating the expression of alpha-synuclein (alpha-syn) in MPP(+)-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. Results show that MPP(+) inhibits mitochondrial complex-1 and aconitase activities leading to enhanced H(2)O(2) generation, TfR expression and alpha-syn expression/aggregation. Pretreatment with cell-permeable iron chelators, TfR antibody (that inhibits TfR-mediated iron uptake), or transfection with glutathione peroxidase (GPx1) enzyme inhibits intracellular oxidant generation, alpha-syn expression/aggregation, and apoptotic signaling as measured by caspase-3 activation. Cells overexpressing alpha-syn exacerbated MPP(+) toxicity, whereas antisense alpha-syn treatment totally abrogated MPP(+)-induced apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells without affecting oxidant generation. The increased cytotoxic effects of alpha-syn in MPP(+)-treated cells were attributed to inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase and proteasomal function. We conclude that MPP(+)-induced iron signaling is responsible for intracellular oxidant generation, alpha-syn expression, proteasomal dysfunction, and apoptosis. Relevance to Parkinson's disease is discussed. PMID:14742448

  16. 2-Alkynyl derivatives of adenosine-5'-N-ethyluronamide: selective A2 adenosine receptor agonists with potent inhibitory activity on platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Cristalli, G; Volpini, R; Vittori, S; Camaioni, E; Monopoli, A; Conti, A; Dionisotti, S; Zocchi, C; Ongini, E

    1994-05-27

    A series of new 2-alkynyl and 2-cycloalkynyl derivatives of adenosine-5'-N-ethyluronamide (NECA) and of N-ethyl-1'-deoxy-1'-(6-amino-2-hexynyl-9H-purin-9-yl)-beta-D- ribofuranuronamide (1, HE-NECA), bearing hydroxy, amino, chloro, and cyano groups in the side chain, were synthesized. The compounds were studied in binding and functional assays to assess their potency for the A2 compared to A1 adenosine receptor. The presence of an alpha-hydroxyl group in the alkynyl chain of NECA derivatives accounts for the A2 agonist potency, leading to compounds endowed with sub-nanomolar affinity in binding studies. However, these analogues also possess good A1 receptor affinity resulting in low A2 selectivity. From functional experiments the 4-hydroxy-1-butynyl (6) and the 4-(2-tetrahydro-2H-pyranyloxy)-1-butynyl (16) derivatives appear to be very potent in inducing vasorelaxation without appreciable effect on heart rate. The new compounds were also tested as inhibitors of platelet aggregation induced by ADP. Introduction of an alpha-hydroxyl group in the alkynyl side chain caused a greater increase in antiaggregatory activity than either NECA or HE-NECA, resulting in the most potent inhibitors of platelet aggregation so far known in the nucleoside series. The presence of an alpha-quaternary carbon such as the 3-hydroxy-3,5-dimethyl-1-hexynyl (12) and the 3-hydroxy-3-phenyl-1-butynyl (15) derivatives markedly reduced the antiaggregatory potency without affecting the A2 affinity. The hydrophobicity index (k') of the new nucleosides barely correlated with the binding data, whereas high k' values were associated with increased A2 vs A1 selectivity but with reduced activity in all functional assays. Some of the compounds synthesized possess interesting pharmacological properties. Compounds having an appropriate balance between vasorelaxation and antiplatelet activity, if confirmed in vivo, deserve further development for the treatments of cardiovascular disorders.

  17. Manipulating the Lateral Diffusion of Surface-Anchored EGF Demonstrates that Receptor Clustering Modulates Phosphorylation Levels

    PubMed Central

    Stabley, D.; Retterer, S.; Marshall, S.; Salaita, K.

    2013-01-01

    Upon activation, the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor becomes phosphorylated and triggers a vast signaling network that has profound effects on cell growth. The EGF receptor is observed to assemble into clusters after ligand binding and tyrosine kinase autophosphorylation, but the role of these assemblies in the receptor signaling pathway remains unclear. To address this question, we measured the phosphorylation of EGFR when the EGF ligand was anchored onto laterally mobile and immobile surfaces. We found that cells generated clusters of ligand-receptor complex on mobile EGF surfaces, and displayed a lower ratio of phosphorylated EGFR to EGF when compared to immobilized EGF that is unable to cluster. This result was verified by tuning the lateral assembly of ligand-receptor complexes on the surface of living cells using patterned supported lipid bilayers. Nanoscale metal lines fabricated into the supported membrane constrained lipid diffusion and EGF receptor assembly into micron and sub-micron scale corrals. Single cell analysis indicated that clustering impacts EGF receptor activation, and larger clusters (> 1 µm2) of ligand-receptor complex generated lower EGF receptor phosphorylation per ligand than smaller assemblies (< 1 µm2) in HCC1143 cells that were engaged to ligand-functionalized surfaces. We investigated the mechanism of EGFR clustering by treating cells with compounds that disrupt the cytoskeleton (Latrunculin-B), clathrin-mediated endocytosis (Pitstop2), and inhibit EGFR activation (Gefitinib). These results help elucidate the nature of large-scale EGFR clustering, thus underscoring the general significance of receptor spatial organization in tuning function. PMID:23416883

  18. Aeolian bedforms, yardangs, and indurated surfaces in the Tharsis Montes as seen by the HiRISE Camera: Evidence for dust aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bridges, N.T.; Banks, M.E.; Beyer, R.A.; Chuang, F.C.; Noe Dobrea, E.Z.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; Fishbaugh, K.E.; McEwen, A.S.; Michaels, T.I.; Thomson, B.J.; Wray, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    HiRISE images of Mars with ground sampling down to 25 cm/pixel show that the dust-rich mantle covering the surfaces of the Tharsis Montes is organized into ridges whose form and distribution are consistent with formation by aeolian saltation. Other dusty areas near the volcanoes and elsewhere on the planet exhibit a similar morphology. The material composing these "reticulate" bedforms is constrained by their remote sensing properties and the threshold curve combined with the saltation/suspension boundary, both of which vary as a function of elevation (atmospheric pressure), particle size, and particle composition. Considering all of these factors, dust aggregates are the most likely material composing these bedforms. We propose that airfall dust on and near the volcanoes aggregates in situ over time, maybe due to electrostatic charging followed by cementation by salts. The aggregates eventually reach a particle size at which saltation is possible. Aggregates on the flanks are transported downslope by katabatic winds and form linear and "accordion" morphologies. Materials within the calderas and other depressions remain trapped and are subjected to multidirectional winds, forming an interlinked "honeycomb" texture. In many places on and near the volcanoes, light-toned, low thermal inertia yardangs and indurated surfaces are present. These may represent "duststone" formed when aggregates reach a particle size below the threshold curve, such that they become stabilized and subsequently undergo cementation. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc.

  19. Impact of Environmental Conditions (pH, Ionic Strength, And Electrolyte Type) On The Surface Charge And Aggregation Of Silver Nanoparticles Suspensions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact of capping agents and environmental conditions (pH, ionic strength, and background electrolytes) on surface charge and aggregation potential of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) suspensions were investigated. Capping agents are chemicals used in the synthesis of nanopartic...

  20. Online Coupling of Flow-Field Flow Fractionation and Single Particle Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry: Characterization of Nanoparticle Surface Coating Thickness and Aggregation State

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface coating thickness and aggregation state have strong influence on the environmental fate, transport, and toxicity of engineered nanomaterials. In this study, flow-field flow fractionation coupled on-line with single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry i...

  1. Bridging cell surface receptor with nuclear receptors in control of bile acid homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuangwei; Ni, Andrew; Feng, Gen-sheng

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are traditionally considered as “physiological detergents” for emulsifying hydrophobic lipids and vitamins due to their amphipathic nature. But accumulating clinical and experimental evidence shows an association between disrupted BA homeostasis and various liver disease conditions including hepatitis infection, diabetes and cancer. Consequently, BA homeostasis regulation has become a field of heavy interest and investigation. After identification of the Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR) as an endogenous receptor for BAs, several nuclear receptors (SHP, HNF4α, and LRH-1) were also found to be important in regulation of BA homeostasis. Some post-translational modifications of these nuclear receptors have been demonstrated, but their physiological significance is still elusive. Gut secrets FGF15/19 that can activate hepatic FGFR4 and its downstream signaling cascade, leading to repressed hepatic BA biosynthesis. However, the link between the activated kinases and these nuclear receptors is not fully elucidated. Here, we review the recent literature on signal crosstalk in BA homeostasis. PMID:25500873

  2. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte histamine receptors: occurrence in cell surface clusters and their redistribution during locomotion.

    PubMed Central

    Petty, H R; Francis, J W

    1986-01-01

    A univalent and bioactive fluorescent derivative of histamine bound to the surface of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes; free histamine was found to compete with this derivative for binding sites. Histamine H2-receptor specificity was indicated by binding inhibition experiments using cimetidine (H2-specific) but not diphenhydramine (H1-specific). Video-intensification fluorescence microscopy was used to determine the distribution of histamine receptors in living polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Receptors appeared as randomly distributed clusters upon stationary cells. During random locomotion, receptors were restricted to the ends of pseudopods, whereas chemotaxis led to receptor localization at lamellipodia and uropods. Ligand-receptor complexes were restricted to the cell surface, as shown by quenching exterior fluorescence with crystal violet. Therefore, pinocytic uptake cannot account for the observed receptor localization or clustering. As a further control, the lipid analog 1,1-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine remained uniformly distributed during all conditions. Histamine-mediated inhibition of adherence may be related to formation of ligand-receptor membrane domains at adherence sites. Images PMID:3459177

  3. Screening Ingredients from Herbs against Pregnane X Receptor in the Study of Inductive Herb-Drug Interactions: Combining Pharmacophore and Docking-Based Rank Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Zhijie; Kang, Hong; Tang, Kailin; Liu, Qi; Cao, Zhiwei; Zhu, Ruixin

    2015-01-01

    The issue of herb-drug interactions has been widely reported. Herbal ingredients can activate nuclear receptors and further induce the gene expression alteration of drug-metabolizing enzyme and/or transporter. Therefore, the herb-drug interaction will happen when the herbs and drugs are coadministered. This kind of interaction is called inductive herb-drug interactions. Pregnane X Receptor (PXR) and drug-metabolizing target genes are involved in most of inductive herb-drug interactions. To predict this kind of herb-drug interaction, the protocol could be simplified to only screen agonists of PXR from herbs because the relations of drugs with their metabolizing enzymes are well studied. Here, a combinational in silico strategy of pharmacophore modelling and docking-based rank aggregation (DRA) was employed to identify PXR's agonists. Firstly, 305 ingredients were screened out from 820 ingredients as candidate agonists of PXR with our pharmacophore model. Secondly, DRA was used to rerank the result of pharmacophore filtering. To validate our prediction, a curated herb-drug interaction database was built, which recorded 380 herb-drug interactions. Finally, among the top 10 herb ingredients from the ranking list, 6 ingredients were reported to involve in herb-drug interactions. The accuracy of our method is higher than other traditional methods. The strategy could be extended to studies on other inductive herb-drug interactions. PMID:26339628

  4. Cell aggregation on agar as an indicator for cell-matrix adhesion: effects of opioids.

    PubMed

    Debruyne, Delphine; Mareel, Marc; Vanhoecke, Barbara; Bracke, Marc

    2009-09-01

    The slow aggregation assay is generally used to study the functionality of cell-cell adhesion complexes. Single cells are seeded on a semisolid agar substrate in a 96-well plate and the cells spontaneously aggregate. We used HEK FLAG-MOP cells that stably overexpress the mu opioid receptor and the mu-opioid-receptor-selective agonists DAMGO and morphine to study whether other factors than functionality of cell-cell adhesions complexes can contribute to changes in the pattern of slow aggregation on agar. HEK FLAG-MOP cells formed small compact aggregates. In the presence of DAMGO and morphine, larger and fewer aggregates were formed in comparison to the vehicle control. These aggregates were localized in the center of the agar surface, whereas in the vehicle control they were dispersed over the substrate. However, in suspension culture on a Gyrotory shaker, no stimulation of aggregation was observed by DAMGO and morphine, showing that opioids do not affect affinity. A dissociation experiment revealed that HEK FLAG-MOP aggregates formed in the absence or presence of opioids are resistant to de-adhesion. We demonstrated that the larger aggregates are neither the result of cell growth stimulation by DAMGO and morphine. Since manipulations of the substrate such as increasing the agar concentration or mixing agar with agarose induced the same changes in the pattern of slow aggregation as treatment with opioids, we suggest that cell-substrate adhesion may be involved in opioid-stimulated aggregation.

  5. β2-Adrenergic Receptors Chaperone Trapped Bitter Taste Receptor 14 to the Cell Surface as a Heterodimer and Exert Unidirectional Desensitization of Taste Receptor Function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghwa; Pauer, Susan H; Yong, Hwan M; An, Steven S; Liggett, Stephen B

    2016-08-19

    Bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) are G-protein-coupled receptors now recognized to be expressed on extraoral cells, including airway smooth muscle (ASM) where they evoke relaxation. TAS2Rs are difficult to express in heterologous systems, with most receptors being trapped intracellularly. We find, however, that co-expression of β2-adrenergic receptors (β2AR) in HEK-293T routes TAS2R14 to the cell surface by forming receptor heterodimers. Cell surface TAS2R14 expression was increased by ∼5-fold when β2AR was co-expressed. Heterodimer formation was shown by co-immunoprecipitation with tagged receptors, biomolecular fluorescence complementation, and merged confocal images. The dynamic nature of this interaction was shown by: a gene-dose relationship between transfected β2AR and TAS2R14 expression, enhanced (up to 3-fold) TAS2R14 agonist stimulation of [Ca(2+)]i with β2AR co-transfection, ∼53% decrease in [Ca(2+)]i signaling with shRNA knockdown of β2AR in H292 cells, and ∼60% loss of [Ca(2+)]i responsiveness in βAR knock-out mouse ASM. Once expressed on the surface, we detected unidirectional, conformation-dependent, interaction within the heterodimer, with β2AR activation rapidly uncoupling TAS2R14 function (∼65% desensitization). Cross-talk was independent of β2AR internalization and cAMP/PKA, and not accompanied by TAS2R14 internalization. With prolonged β-agonist exposure, TAS2R14 internalized, consistent with slow recycling of naked TAS2R14 in the absence of the heterodimeric milieu. In studies of ASM mechanics, rapid cross-talk was confirmed at the physiologic level, where relaxation from TAS2R14 agonist was decreased by ∼50% with β-agonist co-treatment. Thus the β2AR acts as a double-edged sword: increasing TAS2R14 cell surface expression, but when activated by β-agonist, partially offsetting the expression phenotype by direct receptor:receptor desensitization of TAS2R14 function. PMID:27342779

  6. β2-Adrenergic Receptors Chaperone Trapped Bitter Taste Receptor 14 to the Cell Surface as a Heterodimer and Exert Unidirectional Desensitization of Taste Receptor Function*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Donghwa; Pauer, Susan H.; Yong, Hwan M.; An, Steven S.; Liggett, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) are G-protein-coupled receptors now recognized to be expressed on extraoral cells, including airway smooth muscle (ASM) where they evoke relaxation. TAS2Rs are difficult to express in heterologous systems, with most receptors being trapped intracellularly. We find, however, that co-expression of β2-adrenergic receptors (β2AR) in HEK-293T routes TAS2R14 to the cell surface by forming receptor heterodimers. Cell surface TAS2R14 expression was increased by ∼5-fold when β2AR was co-expressed. Heterodimer formation was shown by co-immunoprecipitation with tagged receptors, biomolecular fluorescence complementation, and merged confocal images. The dynamic nature of this interaction was shown by: a gene-dose relationship between transfected β2AR and TAS2R14 expression, enhanced (up to 3-fold) TAS2R14 agonist stimulation of [Ca2+]i with β2AR co-transfection, ∼53% decrease in [Ca2+]i signaling with shRNA knockdown of β2AR in H292 cells, and ∼60% loss of [Ca2+]i responsiveness in βAR knock-out mouse ASM. Once expressed on the surface, we detected unidirectional, conformation-dependent, interaction within the heterodimer, with β2AR activation rapidly uncoupling TAS2R14 function (∼65% desensitization). Cross-talk was independent of β2AR internalization and cAMP/PKA, and not accompanied by TAS2R14 internalization. With prolonged β-agonist exposure, TAS2R14 internalized, consistent with slow recycling of naked TAS2R14 in the absence of the heterodimeric milieu. In studies of ASM mechanics, rapid cross-talk was confirmed at the physiologic level, where relaxation from TAS2R14 agonist was decreased by ∼50% with β-agonist co-treatment. Thus the β2AR acts as a double-edged sword: increasing TAS2R14 cell surface expression, but when activated by β-agonist, partially offsetting the expression phenotype by direct receptor:receptor desensitization of TAS2R14 function. PMID:27342779

  7. Ambient water and visible-light irradiation drive changes in graphene morphology, structure, surface chemistry, aggregation, and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiangang; Zhou, Ming; Zhou, Qixing

    2015-03-17

    The environmental behaviors and risks associated with graphene have attracted considerable attention. However, the fundamental effects of ambient water and visible-light irradiation on the properties and toxicity of graphene remain unknown. This work revealed that hydration and irradiation result in the transformation of large-sheet graphene to long-ribbon graphene. The thickness of the treated graphene decreased, and oxides were formed through the generation of singlet oxygen. In addition, hydration and irradiation resulted in greater disorder in the graphene structure and in the expansion of the d-spacing of the structure due to the introduction of water molecules and modifications of the functional groups. Oxidative modifications with two-stage (fast and low) kinetics enhanced the number of negative surface charges on the graphene and enhanced graphene aggregation. The above property alterations reduced the nanotoxicity of graphene to algal cells by reducing the generation of reactive oxygen species, diminishing protein carbonylation and decreasing tail DNA. A comparative study using graphene oxide suggested that oxidative modifications could play an important role in inhibiting toxicological activity. This study provides a preliminary approach for understanding the environmental behaviors of graphene and avoids overestimating the risks of graphene in the natural environment.

  8. Aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) mediate colonization of fresh produce and abiotic surface by Shiga toxigenic enteroaggregative Escherichia coli O104:H4.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Attila; Xu, Yunfeng; Bauchan, Gary R; Shelton, Daniel R; Nou, Xiangwu

    2016-07-16

    The Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli O104:H4 isolated during the 2011 European outbreak expresses Shiga toxin 2a and possess virulence genes associated with the enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) pathotype. It produces plasmid encoded aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) which mediate cell aggregation and biofilm formation in human intestine and promote Shiga-toxin adsorption, but it is not clear whether the AAF/I fimbriae are involved in the colonization and biofilm formation on food and environmental matrices such as the surface of fresh produce. We deleted the gene encoding for the AAF/I fimbriae main subunit (AggA) from an outbreak associated E. coli O104:H4 strain, and evaluated the role of AAF/I fimbriae in the adherence and colonization of E. coli O104:H4 to spinach and abiotic surfaces. The deletion of aggA did not affect the adherence of E. coli O104:H4 to these surfaces. However, it severely diminished the colonization and biofilm formation of E. coli O104:H4 on these surfaces. Strong aggregation and biofilm formation on spinach and abiotic surfaces were observed with the wild type strain but not the isogenic aggA deletion mutant, suggesting that AAF/I fimbriae play a crucial role in persistence of O104:H4 cells outside of the intestines of host species, such as on the surface of fresh produce.

  9. Cell surface-associated aggregation-promoting factor from Lactobacillus gasseri SBT2055 facilitates host colonization and competitive exclusion of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Keita; Nakazato, Akiko; Ueno, Shintaro; Seto, Yasuyuki; Kakuda, Tsutomu; Takai, Shinji; Yamamoto, Yuji; Mukai, Takao

    2015-11-01

    Campylobacter jejuni, one of the most common causes of gastroenteritis worldwide, is transmitted to humans through poultry. We previously reported that Lactobacillus gasseri SBT2055 (LG2055) reduced C. jejuni infection in human epithelial cells in vitro and inhibited pathogen colonization of chickens in vivo. This suggested that the LG2055 adhesion and/or co-aggregation phenotype mediated by cell-surface aggregation-promoting factors (APFs) may be important for the competitive exclusion of C. jejuni. Here, we show that cell surface-associated APF1 promoted LG2055 self-aggregation and adhesion to human epithelial cells and exhibited high affinity for the extracellular matrix component fibronectin. These effects were absent in the apf1 knockout mutant, indicating the role of APF1 in LG2055-mediated inhibition of C. jejuni in epithelial cells and chicken colonization. Similar to APF1, APF2 promoted the co-aggregation of LG2055 and C. jejuni but did not inhibit C. jejuni infection. Our data suggest a pivotal role for APF1 in mediating the interaction of LG2055 with human intestinal cells and in inhibiting C. jejuni colonization of the gastrointestinal tract. We thus provide new insight into the health-promoting effects of probiotics and mechanisms of competitive exclusion in poultry. Further research is needed to determine whether the probiotic strains reach the epithelial surface.

  10. Endocytic Trafficking and Recycling Maintain a Pool of Mobile Surface AMPA Receptors Required for Synaptic Potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Petrini, Enrica Maria; Lu, Jiuyi; Cognet, Laurent; Lounis, Brahim; Ehlers, Michael D.; Choquet, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY At excitatory glutamatergic synapses, postsynaptic endocytic zones (EZs), which are adjacent to the postsynaptic density (PSD), mediate clathrin-dependent endocytosis of surface AMPA Receptors (AMPAR) as a first step to receptor recycling or degradation. However, it remains unknown if receptor recycling influences AMPARs lateral diffusion, and if EZs are important for the expression of synaptic potentiation. Here we demonstrate that the presence of both EZs and AMPAR recycling maintain a large pool of mobile AMPARs at synapses. In addition, we find that synaptic potentiation is accompanied by an accumulation and immobilization of AMPARs at synapses resulting from both their exocytosis and stabilization at the PSD. Displacement of EZs from the postsynaptic region impairs the expression of synaptic potentiation by blocking AMPAR recycling. Thus receptor recycling is crucial for maintaining a mobile population of surface AMPARs which can be delivered to synapses for increases in synaptic strength. PMID:19607795

  11. Correlation between spontaneous metastatic potential, platelet-aggregating activity of cell surface extracts, and cell surface sialylation in 10 metastatic-variant derivatives of a rat renal sarcoma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Pearlstein, E; Salk, P L; Yogeeswaran, G; Karpatkin, S

    1980-01-01

    Several properties of 10 cell lines derived from the polyoma-induced PW20 Wistar-Furth rat renal sarcoma have been examined, including the ability of the tumor cells to metastasize spontaneously from subcutaneous sites in syngeneic hosts, the platelet-aggregating activity of material extracted by urea from the surface of cultured cells, the sialic acid content of the platelet-aggregating material, and the degree of sialylation of cell surface glycoconjugates in cultured cells. A correlation has been observed among all of these parameters. The results suggest a possible link between the degree of cell surface sialylation of tumor cells, their ability to aggregate platelets, and their ability to metastasize. PMID:6933486

  12. GGA3 Interacts with a G Protein-Coupled Receptor and Modulates Its Cell Surface Export

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Maoxiang; Davis, Jason E.; Li, Chunman; Gao, Jie; Huang, Wei; Lambert, Nevin A.; Terry, Alvin V.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms governing the anterograde trafficking of nascent G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are poorly understood. Here, we have studied the regulation of cell surface transport of α2-adrenergic receptors (α2-ARs) by GGA3 (Golgi-localized, γ-adaptin ear domain homology, ADP ribosylation factor-binding protein 3), a multidomain clathrin adaptor protein that sorts cargo proteins at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the endosome/lysosome pathway. By using an inducible system, we demonstrated that GGA3 knockdown significantly inhibited the cell surface expression of newly synthesized α2B-AR without altering overall receptor synthesis and internalization. The receptors were arrested in the TGN. Furthermore, GGA3 knockdown attenuated α2B-AR-mediated signaling, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activation and cyclic AMP (cAMP) inhibition. More interestingly, GGA3 physically interacted with α2B-AR, and the interaction sites were identified as the triple Arg motif in the third intracellular loop of the receptor and the acidic motif EDWE in the VHS domain of GGA3. In contrast, α2A-AR did not interact with GGA3 and its cell surface export and signaling were not affected by GGA3 knockdown. These data reveal a novel function of GGA3 in export trafficking of a GPCR that is mediated via a specific interaction with the receptor. PMID:26811329

  13. Secondary Structure of Corona Proteins Determines the Cell Surface Receptors Used by Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles used for biological and biomedical applications encounter a host of extracellular proteins. These proteins rapidly adsorb onto the nanoparticle surface, creating a protein corona. Poly(ethylene glycol) can reduce, but not eliminate, the nonspecific adsorption of proteins. As a result, the adsorbed proteins, rather than the nanoparticle itself, determine the cellular receptors used for binding, the internalization mechanism, the intracellular transport pathway, and the subsequent immune response. Using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, we first characterize a set of polystyrene nanoparticles in which the same adsorbed protein, bovine serum albumin, leads to binding to two different cell surface receptors: native albumin receptors and scavenger receptors. Using a combination of circular dichroism spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, and fluorescence spectroscopy, we demonstrate that the secondary structure of the adsorbed bovine serum albumin protein controls the cellular receptors used by the protein–nanoparticle complexes. These results show that protein secondary structure is a key parameter in determining the cell surface receptor used by a protein–nanoparticle complex. We expect this link between protein structure and cellular outcomes will provide a molecular basis for the design of nanoparticles for use in biological and biomedical applications. PMID:24779411

  14. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF AN AGGREGATE SURFACE SAMPLING METHOD FOR USE IN ASSESSING DERMAL EXPOSURES OF YOUNG CHILDREN

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the macroactivity approach, dermal exposure is estimated using empirically-derived transfer coefficients to aggregate the mass transfer associated with a series of contacts with a contaminated medium. The macroactivity approach affords the possibility of developing screenin...

  15. Decoupling competing surface binding kinetics and reconfiguration of receptor footprint for ultrasensitive stress assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Samadhan B.; Vögtli, Manuel; Webb, Benjamin; Mazza, Giuseppe; Pinzani, Massimo; Soh, Yeong-Ah; McKendry, Rachel A.; Ndieyira, Joseph W.

    2015-10-01

    Cantilever arrays have been used to monitor biochemical interactions and their associated stress. However, it is often necessary to passivate the underside of the cantilever to prevent unwanted ligand adsorption, and this process requires tedious optimization. Here, we show a way to immobilize membrane receptors on nanomechanical cantilevers so that they can function without passivating the underlying surface. Using equilibrium theory, we quantitatively describe the mechanical responses of vancomycin, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antigens and coagulation factor VIII captured on the cantilever in the presence of competing stresses from the top and bottom cantilever surfaces. We show that the area per receptor molecule on the cantilever surface influences ligand-receptor binding and plays an important role on stress. Our results offer a new way to sense biomolecules and will aid in the creation of ultrasensitive biosensors.

  16. Clustering of adhesion receptors following exposure of insect blood cells to foreign surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nardi, James B; Zhuang, Shufei; Pilas, Barbara; Bee, Charles Mark; Kanost, Michael R

    2005-05-01

    Cell-mediated immune responses of insects involve interactions of two main classes of blood cells (hemocytes) known as granular cells and plasmatocytes. In response to a foreign surface, these hemocytes suddenly transform from circulating, non-adherent cells to cells that interact and adhere to each other and the foreign surface. This report presents evidence that during this adhesive transformation the extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins lacunin and a ligand for peanut agglutinin (PNA) lectin are released by granular cells and bind to surfaces of both granular cells and plasmatocytes. ECM protein co-localizes on cell surfaces with the adhesive receptors integrin and neuroglian, a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. The ECM protein(s) secreted by granular cells are hypothesized to interact with adhesion receptors such as neuroglian and integrin by cross linking and clustering them on hemocyte surfaces. This clustering of receptors is known to enhance the adhesiveness (avidity) of interacting mammalian immune cells. The formation of ring-shaped clusters of these adhesion receptors on surfaces of insect immune cells represents an evolutionary antecedent of the mammalian immunological synapse. PMID:15894002

  17. Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli inhibits recycling endosome function and trafficking of surface receptors

    PubMed Central

    Clements, Abigail; Stoneham, Charlotte A; Furniss, R Christopher D; Frankel, Gad

    2014-01-01

    Enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC/EHEC) manipulate many cell processes by injecting effector proteins from the bacteria into the host cell via a Type III secretion system. In this paper we report that the effector protein EspG disrupts recycling endosome function. In particular, we found that following transferrin binding and endocytosis EspG reduces recycling of the transferrin receptor (TfR), the prototypical recycling protein, from an intracellular location to the cell surface, resulting in an accumulation of TfR within the cell. The surface levels of three receptors [TfR, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and β1 integrin] were tested and found to be reduced dependent on EspG translocation. Furthermore, disruption of recycling endosome function and the reduced surface presentation of receptors was dependent on the previously reported RabGAP activity and ARF binding ability of EspG. This paper therefore supports the previous hypothesis that EspG acts as an enzyme scaffold perturbing cell signalling events, in this case altering recycling endosome function and cell surface receptor levels during infection. PMID:24898821

  18. A Bispecific Antibody Promotes Aggregation of Ricin Toxin on Cell Surfaces and Alters Dynamics of Toxin Internalization and Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Cristina; Klokk, Tove Irene; Cole, Richard; Sandvig, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    JJX12 is an engineered bispecific antibody against ricin, a member of the medically important A-B family of toxins that exploits retrograde transport as means to gain entry into the cytosol of target cells. JJX12 consists of RTA-D10, a camelid single variable domain (VHH) antibody directed against an epitope on ricin’s enzymatic subunit (RTA), linked via a 15-mer peptide to RTB-B7, a VHH against ricin’s bivalent galactose binding subunit (RTB). We previously reported that JJX12, but not an equimolar mixture of RTA-D10 and RTB-B7 monomers, was able to passively protect mice against a lethal dose ricin challenge, demonstrating that physically linking RTB-B7 and RTA-D10 is critical for toxin-neutralizing activity in vivo. We also reported that JJX12 promotes aggregation of ricin in solution, presumably through the formation of intermolecular crosslinking. In the current study, we now present evidence that JJX12 affects the dynamics of ricin uptake and trafficking in human epithelial cells. Confocal microscopy, as well as live cell imaging coupled with endocytosis pathway-specific inhibitors, revealed that JJX12-toxin complexes are formed on the surfaces of mammalian cells and internalized via a pathway sensitive to amiloride, a known inhibitor of macropinocytosis. Moreover, in the presence of JJX12, retrograde transport of ricin to the trans-Golgi network was significantly reduced, while accumulation of the toxin in late endosomes was significantly enhanced. In summary, we propose that JJX12, by virtue of its ability to crosslink ricin toxin, alters the route of toxin uptake and trafficking within cells. PMID:27300140

  19. A Bispecific Antibody Promotes Aggregation of Ricin Toxin on Cell Surfaces and Alters Dynamics of Toxin Internalization and Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Cristina; Klokk, Tove Irene; Cole, Richard; Sandvig, Kirsten; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2016-01-01

    JJX12 is an engineered bispecific antibody against ricin, a member of the medically important A-B family of toxins that exploits retrograde transport as means to gain entry into the cytosol of target cells. JJX12 consists of RTA-D10, a camelid single variable domain (VHH) antibody directed against an epitope on ricin's enzymatic subunit (RTA), linked via a 15-mer peptide to RTB-B7, a VHH against ricin's bivalent galactose binding subunit (RTB). We previously reported that JJX12, but not an equimolar mixture of RTA-D10 and RTB-B7 monomers, was able to passively protect mice against a lethal dose ricin challenge, demonstrating that physically linking RTB-B7 and RTA-D10 is critical for toxin-neutralizing activity in vivo. We also reported that JJX12 promotes aggregation of ricin in solution, presumably through the formation of intermolecular crosslinking. In the current study, we now present evidence that JJX12 affects the dynamics of ricin uptake and trafficking in human epithelial cells. Confocal microscopy, as well as live cell imaging coupled with endocytosis pathway-specific inhibitors, revealed that JJX12-toxin complexes are formed on the surfaces of mammalian cells and internalized via a pathway sensitive to amiloride, a known inhibitor of macropinocytosis. Moreover, in the presence of JJX12, retrograde transport of ricin to the trans-Golgi network was significantly reduced, while accumulation of the toxin in late endosomes was significantly enhanced. In summary, we propose that JJX12, by virtue of its ability to crosslink ricin toxin, alters the route of toxin uptake and trafficking within cells. PMID:27300140

  20. Formation of assemblies on cell membranes by secreted proteins: molecular studies of free λ light chain aggregates found on the surface of myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Andrew T; Malik, Ansha; Berkahn, Mark B; Agostino, Mark; To, Joyce; Tacchi, Jessica L; Djordjevic, Steven P; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B; Edmundson, Allen B; Jones, Darren R; Raison, Robert L; Ramsland, Paul A

    2013-09-15

    We have described the presence of cell-membrane-associated κFLCs (free immunoglobulin light chains) on the surface of myeloma cells. Notably, the anti-κFLC mAb (monoclonal antibody) MDX-1097 is being assessed in clinical trials as a therapy for κ light chain isotype multiple myeloma. Despite the clinical potential of anti-FLC mAbs, there have been limited studies on characterizing membrane-associated FLCs at a molecular level. Furthermore, it is not known whether λFLCs can associate with cell membranes of myeloma cells. In the present paper, we describe the presence of λFLCs on the surface of myeloma cells. We found that cell-surface-associated λFLCs are bound directly to the membrane and in an aggregated form. Subsequently, membrane interaction studies revealed that λFLCs interact with saturated zwitterionic lipids such as phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, and using automated docking, we characterize a potential recognition site for these lipids. Atomic force microscopy confirmed that membrane-associated λFLCs are aggregated. Given the present findings, we propose a model whereby individual FLCs show modest affinity for zwitterionic lipids, with aggregation stabilizing the interaction due to multivalency. Notably, this is the first study to image FLCs bound to phospholipids and provides important insights into the possible mechanisms of membrane association by this unique myeloma surface antigen.

  1. Surface localization of the nuclear receptor CAR in influenza A virus-infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Tadanobu; Moriyama, Yusuke; Ikari, Akira; Sugatani, Junko; Suzuki, Takashi; Miwa, Masao

    2008-04-11

    Constitutive active/androstane receptor CAR is a member of the nuclear receptors which regulate transcription of xenobiotic metabolism enzymes. CAR is usually localized in the cytosol and nucleus. Here, we found that CAR was localized at the cell surface of influenza A virus (IAV)-infected cells. Additionally, we demonstrated that expression of a viral envelope glycoprotein, either hemagglutinin (HA) or neuraminidase (NA), but not viral nucleoprotein (NP), was responsible for this localization. This report is the first demonstration of CAR at the surface of tissue culture cells, and suggests that CAR may exert the IAV infection mechanism.

  2. Looking below the surface of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Clare; Treinin, Millet; Papke, Roger L

    2015-08-01

    The amino acid sequences of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) from diverse species can be compared across extracellular, transmembrane, and intracellular domains. The intracellular domains are most divergent among subtypes, yet relatively consistent among species. The diversity indicates that each nAChR subtype has a unique language for communication with its host cell. The conservation across species also suggests that the intracellular domains have defining functional roles for each subtype. Secondary structure prediction indicates two relatively conserved alpha helices within the intracellular domains of all nAChRs. Among all subtypes, the intracellular domain of α7 nAChR is one of the most well conserved, and α7 nAChRs have effects in non-neuronal cells independent of generating ion currents, making it likely that the α7 intracellular domain directly mediates signal transduction. There are potential phosphorylation and protein-binding sites in the α7 intracellular domain, which are conserved and may be the basis for α7-mediated signal transduction.

  3. Ubiquitin-like epitopes associated with Candida albicans cell surface receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Sepulveda, P; Lopez-Ribot, J L; Gozalbo, D; Cervera, A; Martinez, J P; Chaffin, W L

    1996-01-01

    We have recently reported the cloning of a Candida albicans polyubiquitin gene and the presence of ubiquitin in the cell wall of this fungus. The polyubiquitin cDNA clone was isolated because of its reactivity with antibodies generated against the candidal 37-kDa laminin-binding protein. In the present study, we have further investigated the relationship between ubiquitin and cell wall components displaying receptor-like activities, including the 37-kDa laminin receptor, the 58-kDa fibrinogen-binding mannoprotein, and the candidal C3d receptor. Two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis and immunoblot experiments with antibodies against ubiquitin and the individually purified receptor-like molecules confirmed that these cell surface components are ubiquitinated. In an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, polyclonal antisera to each receptor reacted with ubiquitin, thus demonstrating that the purified receptor preparations used as immunogens contained ubiquitin-like epitopes. It is proposed that ubiquitin may play a role in modulating the activity of these receptors and in the interaction of C. albicans cells with host structures. PMID:8926122

  4. Cell Surface Vimentin Is an Attachment Receptor for Enterovirus 71

    PubMed Central

    Du, Ning; Cong, Haolong; Tian, Hongchao; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Wenliang; Song, Lei

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a highly transmissible pathogenic agent that causes severe central nervous system diseases in infected infants and young children. Here, we reported that EV71 VP1 protein could bind to vimentin intermediate filaments expressed on the host cell surface. Soluble vimentin or an antibody against vimentin could inhibit the binding of EV71 to host cells. Accompanied with the reduction of vimentin expression on the cell surface, the binding of EV71 to cells was remarkably decreased. Further evidence showed that the N terminus of vimentin is responsible for the interaction between EV71 and vimentin. These results indicated that vimentin on the host cell surface may serve as an attachment site that mediated the initial binding and subsequently increased the infectivity of EV71. IMPORTANCE This study delivers important findings on the roles of vimentin filaments in relation to EV71 infection and provides information that not only improves our understanding of EV71 pathogenesis but also presents us with potentially new strategies for the treatment of diseases caused by EV71 infections. PMID:24623428

  5. Cell receptor and surface ligand density effects on dynamic states of adhering circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiangjun; Cheung, Luthur Siu-Lun; Schroeder, Joyce A; Jiang, Linan; Zohar, Yitshak

    2011-10-21

    Dynamic states of cancer cells moving under shear flow in an antibody-functionalized microchannel are investigated experimentally and theoretically. The cell motion is analyzed with the aid of a simplified physical model featuring a receptor-coated rigid sphere moving above a solid surface with immobilized ligands. The motion of the sphere is described by the Langevin equation accounting for the hydrodynamic loadings, gravitational force, receptor-ligand bindings, and thermal fluctuations; the receptor-ligand bonds are modeled as linear springs. Depending on the applied shear flow rate, three dynamic states of cell motion have been identified: (i) free motion, (ii) rolling adhesion, and (iii) firm adhesion. Of particular interest is the fraction of captured circulating tumor cells, defined as the capture ratio, via specific receptor-ligand bonds. The cell capture ratio decreases with increasing shear flow rate with a characteristic rate. Based on both experimental and theoretical results, the characteristic flow rate increases monotonically with increasing either cell-receptor or surface-ligand density within certain ranges. Utilizing it as a scaling parameter, flow-rate dependent capture ratios for various cell-surface combinations collapse onto a single curve described by an exponential formula.

  6. Albumin receptor effect may be due to a surface-induced conformational change in albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R.G.; Burrington, C.M.

    1989-06-15

    To determine whether equilibrium binding between albumin and hepatocytes involves a cell surface receptor for albumin, we incubated freshly isolated rat hepatocytes with /sup 125/I-albumin and determined the amount of albumin associated with the cells as a function of the total albumin concentration. The resulting two-phase binding curve showed the rat albumin-hepatocyte interaction to consist of a saturable binding interaction with a dissociation constant of 1.1 microM and 2 X 10(6) sites/cell in addition to a weak, nonsaturable binding interaction. However, the saturable binding of albumin to hepatocytes did not appear to result from the presence of an albumin receptor on the cell surface; the interaction was the same for different species of albumin, for chemically modified albumins, and for fragments of albumin representing mutually exclusive domains of the molecule. The saturable binding was, instead, found to involve a subpopulation of albumin with an enhanced affinity for the cell surface. We show that this subpopulation of albumin is generated upon contact with either solid surfaces or cell surfaces and can be transferred from one surface to another. We propose that the two-phase Scatchard binding curve and the ''albumin receptor effect'' reflect two populations of albumin that bind to the cell surface with different affinities rather than one population of albumin that binds to two classes of binding sites.

  7. Characterization of aggregates of surface modified fullerenes by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation with multi-angle light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Astefanei, Alina; Kok, Wim Th; Bäuerlein, Patrick; Núñez, Oscar; Galceran, Maria Teresa; de Voogt, Pim; Schoenmakers, Peter J

    2015-08-21

    Fullerenes are carbon nanoparticles with widespread biomedical, commercial and industrial applications. Attributes such as their tendency to aggregate and aggregate size and shape impact their ability to be transported into and through the environment and living tissues. Knowledge of these properties is therefore valuable for their human and environmental risk assessment as well as to control their synthesis and manufacture. In this work, asymmetrical flow-field flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to multi-angle light scattering (MALS) was used for the first time to study the size distribution of surface modified fullerenes with both polyhydroxyl and carboxyl functional groups in aqueous solutions having different pH (6.5-11) and ionic strength values (0-200mM) of environmental relevance. Fractionation key parameters such as flow rates, flow programming, and membrane material were optimized for the selected fullerenes. The aggregation of the compounds studied appeared to be indifferent to changes in solution pH, but was affected by changes in the ionic strength. Polyhydroxy-fullerenes were found to be present mostly as 4nm aggregates in water without added salt, but showed more aggregation at high ionic strength, with an up to 10-fold increase in their mean hydrodynamic radii (200mM), due to a decrease in the electrostatic repulsion between the nanoparticles. Carboxy-fullerenes showed a much stronger aggregation degree in water (50-100nm). Their average size and recoveries decreased with the increase in the salt concentration. This behavior can be due to enhanced adsorption of the large particles to the membrane at high ionic strength, because of their higher hydrophobicity and much larger particle sizes compared to polyhydroxy-fullerenes. The method performance was evaluated by calculating the run-to-run precision of the retention time (hydrodynamic radii), and the obtained RSD values were lower than 1%. MALS measurements showed aggregate sizes that were in good

  8. Activation of monocytes and platelets by monoclonal antibodies or malaria-infected erythrocytes binding to the CD36 surface receptor in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Ockenhouse, C F; Magowan, C; Chulay, J D

    1989-01-01

    The CD36 leukocyte differentiation antigen, recognized by MAbs OKM5 and OKM8 and found on human monocytes and endothelial cells, has been implicated as a sequestration receptor for erythrocytes infected with the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (IRBC). CD36 is also expressed on platelets and appears to be identical to platelet glycoprotein IV. We investigated receptor activation of monocytes and platelets by anti-CD36 MAbs and by IRBC. Incubation of human monocytes with anti-CD36 MAbs or IRBC resulted in stimulation of the respiratory burst as measured by reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium and generation of chemiluminescence. Incubation of human platelets with anti-CD36 MAbs resulted in platelet activation as measured by aggregation or ATP secretion. Activation of monocytes and platelets required appropriate intracellular transmembrane signaling and was inhibited by calcium antagonists or by specific inhibitors of protein kinase C or guanine nucleotide binding proteins. Soluble CD36 inhibited binding of IRBC to both monocytes and platelets, suggesting that these interactions are mediated by the CD36 receptor. Using a cytochemical electron microscopic technique, the presence of reactive oxygen intermediates was identified at the interface between human monocytes and IRBC. These data provide support for the hypothesis that reactive oxygen intermediates produced by monocytes when IRBC ligands interact with cell surface receptors may play a role in the pathophysiology of falciparum malaria. Images PMID:2474569

  9. The P2Y2 receptor mediates uptake of matrix-retained and aggregated low density lipoprotein in primary vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Dissmore, Tixieanna; Seye, Cheikh I.; Medeiros, Denis M.; Weisman, Gary A.; Bardford, Barry; Mamedova, Laman

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims The internalization of aggregated low-density lipoproteins (agLDL) mediated by low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein (LRP1) may involve the actin cytoskeleton in ways that differ from the endocytosis of soluble LDL by the LDL receptor (LDLR). This study aims to define novel mechanisms of agLDL uptake through modulation of the actin cytoskeleton, to identify molecular targets involved in foam cell formation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The critical observation that formed the basis for these studies is that under pathophysiological conditions, nucleotide release from blood-derived and vascular cells activates SMC P2Y2 receptors (P2Y2Rs) leading to rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton and cell motility. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that P2Y2R activation mediates agLDL uptake by VSMCs. Methods Primary VSMCs were isolated from aortas of wild type (WT) C57BL/6 and.P2Y2R−/− mice to investigate whether P2Y2R activation modulates LRP1 expression. Cells were transiently transfected with cDNA encoding a hemagglutinin-tagged (HA-tagged) WT P2Y2R, or a mutant P2Y2R that unlike the WT P2Y2R does not bind the cytoskeletal actin-binding protein filamin-A (FLN-A). Results P2Y2R activation significantly increased agLDL uptake, and LRP1 mRNA expression decreased in P2Y2R−/− VSMCs versus WT. SMCs, expressing P2Y2R defective in FLN-A binding, exhibit 3-fold lower LDLR expression levels than SMCs expressing WT P2Y2R, while cells transfected with WT P2Y2R show greater agLDL uptake in both WT and P2Y2R−/− VSMCs versus cells transfected with the mutant P2Y2R. Conclusions Together, these results show that both LRP1 and LDLR expression and agLDL uptake are regulated by P2Y2R in VSMCs, and that agLDL uptake due to P2Y2R activation is dependent upon cytoskeletal reorganization mediated by P2Y2R binding to FLN-A. PMID:27522265

  10. Surface expression of NMDA receptor changes during memory consolidation in the crab Neohelice granulata.

    PubMed

    Hepp, Yanil; Salles, Angeles; Carbo-Tano, Martin; Pedreira, Maria Eugenia; Freudenthal, Ramiro

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the surface expression of the NMDA-like receptors during the consolidation of contextual learning in the crab Neohelice granulata Memory storage is based on alterations in the strength of synaptic connections between neurons. The glutamatergic synapses undergo various forms of N-methyl-D aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent changes in strength, a process that affects the abundance of other receptors at the synapse and underlies some forms of learning and memory. Here we propose a direct regulation of the NMDAR. Changes in NMDAR's functionality might be induced by the modification of the subunit's expression or cellular trafficking. This trafficking does not only include NMDAR's movement between synaptic and extra-synaptic localizations but also the cycling between intracellular compartments and the plasma membrane, a process called surface expression. Consolidation of contextual learning affects the surface expression of the receptor without affecting its general expression. The surface expression of the GluN1 subunit of the NMDAR is down-regulated immediately after training, up-regulated 3 h after training and returns to naïve and control levels 24 h after training. The changes in NMDAR surface expression observed in the central brain are not seen in the thoracic ganglion. A similar increment in surface expression of GluN1 in the central brain is observed 3 h after administration of the competitive GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline. These consolidation changes are part of a plasticity event that first, during the down-regulation, stabilizes the trace and later, at 3-h post-training, changes the threshold for synapse activation.

  11. Real-Time Imaging of Discrete Exocytic Events Mediating Surface Delivery of AMPA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Yudowski, Guillermo A.; Puthenveedu, Manojkumar A.; Leonoudakis, Dmitri; Panicker, Sandip; Thorn, Kurt S.; Beattie, Eric C.; von Zastrow, Mark

    2011-01-01

    We directly resolved discrete exocytic fusion events mediating insertion of AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) to the somatodendritic surface of rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons, in slice and dissociated cultures, using protein tagging with a pH-sensitive GFP (green fluorescent protein) variant and rapid (10 frames/s) fluorescence microscopy. AMPAR-containing exocytic events occurred under basal culture conditions in both the cell body and dendrites; potentiating chemical stimuli produced an NMDA receptor-dependent increase in the frequency of individual exocytic events. The number of AMPARs inserted per exocytic event, estimated using single-molecule analysis, was quite uniform but individual events differed significantly in kinetic properties affecting the subsequent surface distribution of receptors. “Transient” events, from which AMPARs dispersed laterally immediately after surface insertion, generated a pronounced but short-lived (dissipating within ~1 s) increase in surface AMPAR fluorescence extending locally (2–5µm) from the site of exocytosis. “Persistent” events, from which inserted AMPARs dispersed slowly (typically over 5–10 s), affected local surface receptor concentration to a much smaller degree. Both modes of exocytic insertion occurred throughout the dendritic shaft, but remarkably, neither mode of insertion was observed directly into synaptic spines. AMPARs entered spines preferentially from transient events occurring in the adjoining dendritic shaft, driven apparently by mass action and short-range lateral diffusion, and locally delivered AMPARs remained mostly in the mobile fraction. These results suggest a highly dynamic mechanism for both constitutive and activity-dependent surface delivery of AMPARs, mediated by kinetically distinct exocytic modes that differ in propensity to drive lateral entry of receptors to nearby synapses. PMID:17928453

  12. Fluorogen Activating Proteins in Flow Cytometry for the Study of Surface Molecules and Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Matthew J.; Szent-Gyorgyi, Christopher; Fisher, Gregory W.; Jarvik, Jonathan W.; Bruchez, Marcel P.; Waggoner, Alan S.

    2012-01-01

    The use of fluorescent proteins, particularly when genetically fused to proteins of biological interest, have greatly advanced many flow cytometry research applications. However, there remains a major limitation to this methodology in that only total cellular fluorescence is measured. Commonly used fluorescent proteins (e.g. EGFP and its variants) are fluorescent whether the fusion protein exists on the surface or in sub-cellular compartments. A flow cytometer cannot distinguish between these separate sources of fluorescence. This can be of great concern when using flow cytometry, plate readers or microscopy to quantify cell surface receptors or other surface proteins genetically fused to fluorescent proteins. Recently developed fluorogen activating proteins (FAPs) solve many of these issues by allowing the selective visualization of only those cell surface proteins that are exposed to the extra cellular milieu. FAPs are GFP-sized single chain antibodies that specifically bind to and generate fluorescence from otherwise non-fluorescent dyes (‘activate the fluorogen’). Like the fluorescent proteins, FAPs can be genetically fused to proteins of interest. When exogenously added fluorogens bind FAPs, fluorescence immediately increases by as much as 20,000 fold, rendering the FAP fusion proteins highly fluorescent. Moreover, since fluorogens can be made membrane impermeant, fluorescence can be limited to only those receptors expressed on the cell surface. Using cells expressing beta-2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR) fused at its N-terminus to a FAP, flow cytometry based receptor internalization assays have been developed and characterized. The fluorogen/FAP system is ideally suited to the study of cell surface proteins by fluorescence and avoids drawbacks of using receptor/fluorescent protein fusions, such as internal accumulation. We also briefly comment on extending FAP-based technologies to the study of events occurring inside of the cell as well. PMID:22366230

  13. Surface expression of NMDA receptor changes during memory consolidation in the crab Neohelice granulata.

    PubMed

    Hepp, Yanil; Salles, Angeles; Carbo-Tano, Martin; Pedreira, Maria Eugenia; Freudenthal, Ramiro

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the surface expression of the NMDA-like receptors during the consolidation of contextual learning in the crab Neohelice granulata Memory storage is based on alterations in the strength of synaptic connections between neurons. The glutamatergic synapses undergo various forms of N-methyl-D aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent changes in strength, a process that affects the abundance of other receptors at the synapse and underlies some forms of learning and memory. Here we propose a direct regulation of the NMDAR. Changes in NMDAR's functionality might be induced by the modification of the subunit's expression or cellular trafficking. This trafficking does not only include NMDAR's movement between synaptic and extra-synaptic localizations but also the cycling between intracellular compartments and the plasma membrane, a process called surface expression. Consolidation of contextual learning affects the surface expression of the receptor without affecting its general expression. The surface expression of the GluN1 subunit of the NMDAR is down-regulated immediately after training, up-regulated 3 h after training and returns to naïve and control levels 24 h after training. The changes in NMDAR surface expression observed in the central brain are not seen in the thoracic ganglion. A similar increment in surface expression of GluN1 in the central brain is observed 3 h after administration of the competitive GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline. These consolidation changes are part of a plasticity event that first, during the down-regulation, stabilizes the trace and later, at 3-h post-training, changes the threshold for synapse activation. PMID:27421895

  14. Effect of room temperature surface active ionic liquids on aggregated nanostructures of γ-Cyclodextrins: A picosecond fluorescence spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchlyan, Jagannath; Banerjee, Chiranjib; Ghosh, Surajit; Kundu, Niloy; Banik, Debasis; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2014-05-01

    In this Letter we report on controllable transition of aggregated γ-Cyclodextrins (γ-CDs) nanostructures by tuning the concentration of a long chain ionic liquid, 1-dodecyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (C12mimCl) added to the aqueous solution of γ-CDs. The gradual increase in concentration of C12mimCl first results in the breaking of γ-CDs aggregates by the formation of inclusion complexes with C12mimCl and then self-organizes into a new supramolecular aggregate. This spontaneous transition from one nanostructure to another has been established by spectroscopic and microscopic studies. It is worth to mention that addition of 1-octyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride (C8mimCl) does not lead to any such transition.

  15. Relating surface-enhanced Raman scattering signals of cells to gold nanoparticle aggregation as determined by LA-ICP-MS micromapping.

    PubMed

    Büchner, Tina; Drescher, Daniela; Traub, Heike; Schrade, Petra; Bachmann, Sebastian; Jakubowski, Norbert; Kneipp, Janina

    2014-11-01

    The cellular response to nanoparticle exposure is essential in various contexts, especially in nanotoxicity and nanomedicine. Here, 14-nm gold nanoparticles in 3T3 fibroblast cells are investigated in a series of pulse-chase experiments with a 30-min incubation pulse and chase times ranging from 15 min to 48 h. The gold nanoparticles and their aggregates are quantified inside the cellular ultrastructure by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry micromapping and evaluated regarding the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals. In this way, both information about their localization at the micrometre scale and their molecular nanoenvironment, respectively, is obtained and can be related. Thus, the nanoparticle pathway from endocytotic uptake, intracellular processing, to cell division can be followed. It is shown that the ability of the intracellular nanoparticles and their accumulations and aggregates to support high SERS signals is neither directly related to nanoparticle amount nor to high local nanoparticle densities. The SERS data indicate that aggregate geometry and interparticle distances in the cell must change in the course of endosomal maturation and play a critical role for a specific gold nanoparticle type in order to act as efficient SERS nanoprobe. This finding is supported by TEM images, showing only a minor portion of aggregates that present small interparticle spacing. The SERS spectra obtained after different chase times show a changing composition and/or structure of the biomolecule corona of the gold nanoparticles as a consequence of endosomal processing. PMID:25120183

  16. The role of Rabi splitting tuning in the dynamics of strongly coupled J-aggregates and surface plasmon polaritons in nanohole arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hai; Toma, Andrea; Wang, Hai-Yu; Bozzola, Angelo; Miele, Ermanno; Haddadpour, Ali; Veronis, Georgios; de Angelis, Francesco; Wang, Lei; Chen, Qi-Dai; Xu, Huai-Liang; Sun, Hong-Bo; Zaccaria, Remo Proietti

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the influence of Rabi splitting tuning on the dynamics of strongly coupled J-aggregate/surface plasmon polariton systems. In particular, the Rabi splitting was tuned by modifying the J-aggregate molecule concentration while a polaritonic system was provided by a nanostructure formed by holes array in a golden layer. From the periodic and concentration changes we have identified, through numerical and experimental steady-state analyses, the best geometrical configuration for maximizing Rabi splitting, which was then used for transient absorption measurements. It was found that in transient absorption spectra, under upper band excitation, two bleaching peaks appear when a nanostructured polaritonic pattern is used. Importantly, their reciprocal distance increases upon increase of J-aggregate concentration, a result confirmed by steady-state analysis. In a similar manner it was also found that the lifetime of the upper band is intimately related to the coupling strength. In particular, we argue that with strong coupling strength, i.e. high J-aggregate concentration, a short lifetime of the upper band has to be expected due to the suppression of the bottleneck effect. This result supports the idea that the dynamics of hybrid systems is profoundly dependent on Rabi splitting.

  17. The role of Rabi splitting tuning in the dynamics of strongly coupled J-aggregates and surface plasmon polaritons in nanohole arrays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai; Toma, Andrea; Wang, Hai-Yu; Bozzola, Angelo; Miele, Ermanno; Haddadpour, Ali; Veronis, Georgios; De Angelis, Francesco; Wang, Lei; Chen, Qi-Dai; Xu, Huai-Liang; Sun, Hong-Bo; Zaccaria, Remo Proietti

    2016-07-21

    We have investigated the influence of Rabi splitting tuning on the dynamics of strongly coupled J-aggregate/surface plasmon polariton systems. In particular, the Rabi splitting was tuned by modifying the J-aggregate molecule concentration while a polaritonic system was provided by a nanostructure formed by holes array in a golden layer. From the periodic and concentration changes we have identified, through numerical and experimental steady-state analyses, the best geometrical configuration for maximizing Rabi splitting, which was then used for transient absorption measurements. It was found that in transient absorption spectra, under upper band excitation, two bleaching peaks appear when a nanostructured polaritonic pattern is used. Importantly, their reciprocal distance increases upon increase of J-aggregate concentration, a result confirmed by steady-state analysis. In a similar manner it was also found that the lifetime of the upper band is intimately related to the coupling strength. In particular, we argue that with strong coupling strength, i.e. high J-aggregate concentration, a short lifetime of the upper band has to be expected due to the suppression of the bottleneck effect. This result supports the idea that the dynamics of hybrid systems is profoundly dependent on Rabi splitting. PMID:27350590

  18. Surface Expression of NMDA Receptor Changes during Memory Consolidation in the Crab "Neohelice granulata"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hepp, Yanil; Salles, Angeles; Carbo-Tano, Martin; Pedreira, Maria Eugenia; Freudenthal, Ramiro

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the surface expression of the NMDA-like receptors during the consolidation of contextual learning in the crab "Neohelice granulata". Memory storage is based on alterations in the strength of synaptic connections between neurons. The glutamatergic synapses undergo various forms of…

  19. Polymorphisms of the cell surface receptor control mouse susceptibilities to xenotropic and polytropic leukemia viruses.

    PubMed

    Marin, M; Tailor, C S; Nouri, A; Kozak, S L; Kabat, D

    1999-11-01

    The differential susceptibilities of mouse strains to xenotropic and polytropic murine leukemia viruses (X-MLVs and P-MLVs, respectively) are poorly understood but may involve multiple mechanisms. Recent evidence has demonstrated that these viruses use a common cell surface receptor (the X-receptor) for infection of human cells. We describe the properties of X-receptor cDNAs with distinct sequences cloned from five laboratory and wild strains of mice and from hamsters and minks. Expression of these cDNAs in resistant cells conferred susceptibilities to the same viruses that naturally infect the animals from which the cDNAs were derived. Thus, a laboratory mouse (NIH Swiss) X-receptor conferred susceptibility to P-MLVs but not to X-MLVs, whereas those from humans, minks, and several wild mice (Mus dunni, SC-1 cells, and Mus spretus) mediated infections by both X-MLVs and P-MLVs. In contrast, X-receptors from the resistant mouse strain Mus castaneus and from hamsters were inactive as viral receptors. These results suggest that X-receptor polymorphisms are a primary cause of resistances of mice to members of the X-MLV/P-MLV family of retroviruses and are responsible for the xenotropism of X-MLVs in laboratory mice. By site-directed mutagenesis, we substituted sequences between the X-receptors of M. dunni and NIH Swiss mice. The NIH Swiss protein contains two key differences (K500E in presumptive extracellular loop 3 [ECL 3] and a T582 deletion in ECL 4) that are both required to block X-MLV infections. Accordingly, a single inverse mutation in the NIH Swiss protein conferred X-MLV susceptibility. Furthermore, expression of an X-MLV envelope glycoprotein in Chinese hamster ovary cells interfered efficiently with X-MLV and P-MLV infections mediated by X-receptors that contained K500 and/or T582 but had no effect on P-MLV infections mediated by X-receptors that lacked these amino acids. In contrast, moderate expression of a P-MLV (MCF247) envelope glycoprotein did not

  20. The surface receptor is a major determinant of the cell tropism of influenza C virus.

    PubMed

    Herrler, G; Klenk, H D

    1987-07-01

    N-Acetyl-9-O-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5,9Ac2) has been shown to be a high-affinity receptor determinant for attachment of influenza C virus to erythrocytes (G. N. Rogers, G. Herrler, J. C. Paulson, and H-D. Klenk, 1986, J. Biol. Chem. 261, 5947-5951). In this report the nature of the cell surface receptor for influenza C virus on tissue culture cells was analyzed. Pretreatment with either neuraminidase or neuraminate 9-O-acetylesterase was found to render LLC-MK2 cells resistant to infection by influenza C virus as evidenced by the failure to detect virus release into the medium by hemagglutination titration. Susceptibility to infection was fully restored after incubation of neuraminidase-treated cells with bovine brain gangliosides known to contain Neu5,9Ac2. These results indicate that (i) Neu5,9Ac2 is the primary receptor determinant required for influenza C virus to attach to tissue culture cells and to initiate infection and (ii) gangliosides containing this type of sialic acid are potential receptors for influenza C virus. Several cell lines which are resistant to infection by this virus were able to release influenza C virus into the medium provided they were incubated with bovine brain gangliosides prior to virus infection. This result indicates that lack of appropriate receptors on the cell surface is a major reason for the restricted cell tropism of influenza C virus.

  1. Matricryptins Network with Matricellular Receptors at the Surface of Endothelial and Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ricard-Blum, Sylvie; Vallet, Sylvain D.

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a source of bioactive fragments called matricryptins or matrikines resulting from the proteolytic cleavage of extracellular proteins (e.g., collagens, elastin, and laminins) and proteoglycans (e.g., perlecan). Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), cathepsins, and bone-morphogenetic protein-1 release fragments, which regulate physiopathological processes including tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis, a pre-requisite for tumor growth. A number of matricryptins, and/or synthetic peptides derived from them, are currently investigated as potential anti-cancer drugs both in vitro and in animal models. Modifications aiming at improving their efficiency and their delivery to their target cells are studied. However, their use as drugs is not straightforward. The biological activities of these fragments are mediated by several receptor families. Several matricryptins may bind to the same matricellular receptor, and a single matricryptin may bind to two different receptors belonging or not to the same family such as integrins and growth factor receptors. Furthermore, some matricryptins interact with each other, integrins and growth factor receptors crosstalk and a signaling pathway may be regulated by several matricryptins. This forms an intricate 3D interaction network at the surface of tumor and endothelial cells, which is tightly associated with other cell-surface associated molecules such as heparan sulfate, caveolin, and nucleolin. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying the behavior of this network is required in order to optimize the development of matricryptins as anti-cancer agents. PMID:26869928

  2. Matricryptins Network with Matricellular Receptors at the Surface of Endothelial and Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Ricard-Blum, Sylvie; Vallet, Sylvain D

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a source of bioactive fragments called matricryptins or matrikines resulting from the proteolytic cleavage of extracellular proteins (e.g., collagens, elastin, and laminins) and proteoglycans (e.g., perlecan). Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), cathepsins, and bone-morphogenetic protein-1 release fragments, which regulate physiopathological processes including tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis, a pre-requisite for tumor growth. A number of matricryptins, and/or synthetic peptides derived from them, are currently investigated as potential anti-cancer drugs both in vitro and in animal models. Modifications aiming at improving their efficiency and their delivery to their target cells are studied. However, their use as drugs is not straightforward. The biological activities of these fragments are mediated by several receptor families. Several matricryptins may bind to the same matricellular receptor, and a single matricryptin may bind to two different receptors belonging or not to the same family such as integrins and growth factor receptors. Furthermore, some matricryptins interact with each other, integrins and growth factor receptors crosstalk and a signaling pathway may be regulated by several matricryptins. This forms an intricate 3D interaction network at the surface of tumor and endothelial cells, which is tightly associated with other cell-surface associated molecules such as heparan sulfate, caveolin, and nucleolin. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms underlying the behavior of this network is required in order to optimize the development of matricryptins as anti-cancer agents.

  3. New Insights into VacA Intoxication Mediated through Its Cell Surface Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Yahiro, Kinnosuke; Hirayama, Toshiya; Moss, Joel; Noda, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), a major cause of gastroduodenal diseases, produces VacA, a vacuolating cytotoxin associated with gastric inflammation and ulceration. The C-terminal domain of VacA plays a crucial role in receptor recognition on target cells. We have previously identified three proteins (i.e., RPTPα, RPTPβ, and LRP1) that serve as VacA receptors. These receptors contribute to the internalization of VacA into epithelial cells, activate signal transduction pathways, and contribute to cell death and gastric ulceration. In addition, other factors (e.g., CD18, sphingomyelin) have also been identified as cell-surface, VacA-binding proteins. Since we believe that, following interactions with its host cell receptors, VacA participates in events leading to disease, a better understanding of the cellular function of VacA receptors may provide valuable information regarding the mechanisms underlying the pleiotropic actions of VacA and the pathogenesis of H. pylori-mediated disease. In this review, we focus on VacA receptors and their role in events leading to cell damage. PMID:27187473

  4. High Cell Surface Death Receptor Expression Determines Type I Versus Type II Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xue Wei; Peterson, Kevin L.; Dai, Haiming; Schneider, Paula; Lee, Sun-Hee; Zhang, Jin-San; Koenig, Alexander; Bronk, Steve; Billadeau, Daniel D.; Gores, Gregory J.; Kaufmann, Scott H.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that there are two signaling pathways leading from ligation of the Fas receptor to induction of apoptosis. Type I signaling involves Fas ligand-induced recruitment of large amounts of FADD (FAS-associated death domain protein) and procaspase 8, leading to direct activation of caspase 3, whereas type II signaling involves Bid-mediated mitochondrial perturbation to amplify a more modest death receptor-initiated signal. The biochemical basis for this dichotomy has previously been unclear. Here we show that type I cells have a longer half-life for Fas message and express higher amounts of cell surface Fas, explaining the increased recruitment of FADD and subsequent signaling. Moreover, we demonstrate that cells with type II Fas signaling (Jurkat or HCT-15) can signal through a type I pathway upon forced receptor overexpression and that shRNA-mediated Fas down-regulation converts cells with type I signaling (A498) to type II signaling. Importantly, the same cells can exhibit type I signaling for Fas and type II signaling for TRAIL (TNF-α-related apoptosis-inducing ligand), indicating that the choice of signaling pathway is related to the specific receptor, not some other cellular feature. Additional experiments revealed that up-regulation of cell surface death receptor 5 levels by treatment with 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin converted TRAIL signaling in HCT116 cells from type II to type I. Collectively, these results suggest that the type I/type II dichotomy reflects differences in cell surface death receptor expression. PMID:21865165

  5. A Dual Receptor and Reporter for Multi-Modal Cell Surface Engineering.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Westcott, Nathan; Dutta, Debjit; Pulsipher, Abigail; Rogozhnikov, Dmitry; Chen, Jean; Yousaf, Muhammad N

    2015-10-16

    The rapid development of new small molecule drugs, nanomaterials, and genetic tools to modulate cellular function through cell surface manipulation has revolutionized the diagnosis, study, and treatment of disorders in human health. Since the cell membrane is a selective gateway barrier that serves as the first line of defense/offense and communication to its environment, new approaches that molecularly engineer or tailor cell membrane surfaces would allow for a new era in therapeutic design, therapeutic delivery, complex coculture tissue construction, and in situ imaging probe tracking technologies. In order to develop the next generation of multimodal therapies, cell behavior studies, and biotechnologies that focus on cell membrane biology, new tools that intersect the fields of chemistry, biology, and engineering are required. Herein, we develop a liposome fusion and delivery strategy to present a novel dual receptor and reporter system at cell surfaces without the use of molecular biology or metabolic biosynthesis. The cell surface receptor is based on bio-orthogonal functional groups that can conjugate a range of ligands while simultaneously reporting the conjugation through the emission of fluorescence. We demonstrate this dual receptor and reporter system by conjugating and tracking various cell surface ligands for temporal control of cell fluorescent signaling, cell-cell interaction, and tissue assembly construction.

  6. Detection of CXCR4 receptors on cell surface using a fluorescent metal nanoshell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Fu, Yi; Li, Ge; Zhao, Richard Y.; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence cell imaging can be used for disease diagnosis and cellular signal transduction. Using a metal nanoshell as molecular imaging agent, we develop a cellular model system to detect CXCR4 chemokine receptor on T-lymphatic cell surface. These metal nanoshells are observed to express enhanced emission intensity and shortened lifetimes due to the near-field interactions. They are covalently bound with anti-CXCR4 monoclonal antibodies for immunoreactions with the target sites of the CXCR4 receptors on the CEM-SS cells. The fluorescence intensity and lifetime cell images are recorded with a time-resolved confocal microscopy. As expected, the emission signals from the metal nanoshells are clearly isolated from the cellular autofluorescence due to strong intensities and distinctive lifetimes. The number of emission spots on the single cell image is estimated by direct count to the emission signals. Analyzing a pool of cell images, a maximal count number is obtained in a range of 200+/-50. Because there is an average of ~6000 binding sites on the cell surface, we estimate that one emission spot from the metal nanoshell may represent ~30 CXCR5 receptors. In addition, the CXCR4 receptors are estimated to distribute on ~70% area of the cell surface.

  7. The concentration of intracellular nickel in Haemophilus influenzae is linked to its surface properties and cell-cell aggregation and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Ng, Jiaqi; Kidd, Stephen P

    2013-04-01

    Of the known proteins which use nickel as a co-factor, Haemophilus influenzae contains only urease and glyoxalase I (gloA). We have recently reported that this pathogen harbours a unique nickel uptake system (nikKLMQO-nimR). Unusually, the disruption of the nickel uptake system (nikQ or nimR mutants) resulted in cells that aggregated and formed an increased biofilm compared to the wild type cells. Using a gloA mutant strain and urease-specific inhibitor we showed that this phenotype is not due to the loss-of-function of these enzymes. By generating H. influenzae "resting cells" which are enzymatically inactive but maintain their structural integrity we have shown that the cell aggregation in the nikQ/nimR mutants is not due to the loss of enzymatic function. The nikQ mutant was unable to accumulate nickel but the addition of excess nickel did restore intracellular nickel levels and this resulted in the nikQ mutant returning to the wild type "free-living" phenotype; cells with no aggregation and no biofilm formation. We used a range of techniques which showed that the nikQ mutant possesses changes to its cell surface properties. The mutant was more negatively charged than wild type cells as well as being more hydrophobic. Analysis of the outer membrane constituents showed that there were molecular differences. Although the nikQ mutant appears to grow the same as its wild type cell we have shown that there is a change in the "lifestyle" of these nickel limited cells and this induces changes to the surface of the cell to promote cell-cell aggregation and biofilm formation. PMID:23499478

  8. Manipulating the Lateral Diffusion of Surface-Anchored EGF Demonstrates that Receptor Clustering Modulates its Phosphorylation Levels

    SciTech Connect

    Stabley, Daniel; Retterer, Scott T; Marshal, Stephen; Salaita, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    Upon activation, the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor becomes phosphorylated and triggers a vast signaling network that has profound effects on cell growth. The EGF receptor is observed to assemble into clusters after ligand binding and tyrosine kinase autophosphorylation, but the role of these assemblies in the receptor signaling pathway remains unclear. To address this question, we measured the phosphorylation of EGFR when the EGF ligand was anchored onto laterally mobile and immobile surfaces. We found that cells generated clusters of ligand-receptor complex on mobile EGF surfaces, and generated a lower ratio of phosphorylated EGFR to EGF than when compared to immobilized EGF that is unable to cluster. This result was verified by tuning the lateral assembly of ligand-receptor complexes on the surface of living cells using patterned supported lipid bilayers. Nanoscale metal lines fabricated into the supported membrane constrained lipid diffusion and EGF receptor assembly into micron and sub-micron scale corrals. Single cell analysis indicated that clustering impacts EGF receptor activation, and larger clusters (> 1 m2) of ligand-receptor complex generated lower EGF receptor phosphorylation per ligand than smaller assemblies (< 1 m2) in HCC1143 cells that were engaged to ligand-functionalized surfaces. We investigated EGFR clustering by treating cells with compounds that disrupt the cytoskeleton (Latrunculin-B), clathrin-mediated endocytosis (Pitstop2), and inhibit EGFR activation (Gefitinib). These results help elucidate the nature of large-scale EGFR clustering, thus underscoring the general significance of receptor spatial organization in tuning function.

  9. Regulation of cell surface transferrin receptor-2 by iron-dependent cleavage and release of a soluble form.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Alessia; Vieillevoye, Maud; Nai, Antonella; Rausa, Marco; Ladli, Meriem; Lacombe, Catherine; Mayeux, Patrick; Verdier, Frédérique; Camaschella, Clara; Silvestri, Laura

    2015-04-01

    Transferrin receptor-2 is a transmembrane protein whose expression is restricted to hepatocytes and erythroid cells. Transferrin receptor-2 has a regulatory function in iron homeostasis, since its inactivation causes systemic iron overload. Hepatic transferrin receptor-2 participates in iron sensing and is involved in hepcidin activation, although the mechanism remains unclear. Erythroid transferrin receptor-2 associates with and stabilizes erythropoietin receptors on the erythroblast surface and is essential to control erythrocyte production in iron deficiency. We identified a soluble form of transferrin receptor-2 in the media of transfected cells and showed that cultured human erythroid cells release an endogenous soluble form. Soluble transferrin receptor-2 originates from a cleavage of the cell surface protein, which is inhibited by diferric transferrin in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, the shedding of the transferrin receptor-2 variant G679A, mutated in the Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid motif and unable to bind diferric transferrin, is not modulated by the ligand. This observation links the process of transferrin receptor-2 removal from the plasma membrane to iron homeostasis. Soluble transferrin receptor-2 does not affect the binding of erythropoietin to erythropoietin receptor or the consequent signaling and partially inhibits hepcidin promoter activation only in vitro. Whether it is a component of the signals released by erythropoiesis in iron deficiency remains to be investigated. Our results indicate that membrane transferrin receptor-2, a sensor of circulating iron, is released from the cell membrane in iron deficiency. PMID:25637053

  10. Structure-activity relationships of seco-prezizaane and picrotoxane/picrodendrane terpenoids by Quasar receptor-surface modeling.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Thomas J; Gurrath, Marion; Ozoe, Yoshihisa

    2004-08-01

    The seco-prezizaane-type sesquiterpenes pseudoanisatin and parviflorolide from Illicium are noncompetitive antagonists at housefly (Musca domestica) gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors. They show selectivity toward the insect receptor and thus represent new leads toward selective insecticides. Based on the binding data for 13 seco-prezizaane terpenoids and 17 picrotoxane and picrodendrane-type terpenoids to housefly and rat GABA receptors, a QSAR study was conducted by quasi-atomistic receptor-surface modeling (Quasar). The resulting models provide insight into the structural basis of selectivity and properties of the binding sites at GABA receptor-coupled chloride channels of insects and mammals.

  11. Ex-vivo tissue classification of cell surface receptor concentrations using kinetic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Lagnojita; Wang, Yu; Yang, Cynthia; Khan, Altaz; Liu, Jonathan T.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.

    2015-03-01

    One of the major challenges in the complete resection of cancer is the difficulty of distinctly classifying tumor and healthy tissue. This paper investigates the capability of competing kinetic modeling approaches for identifying different tissue types based on differential cell-surface receptor expressions. These approaches require fresh resected tissues to be stained with a mixture of two probes: one targeted to a cancer specific cell-surface receptor, and another left "untargeted" to account for nonspecific retention of the targeted agent, with subsequent repeated rinsing and imaging of the probe concentrations. Analysis of the results were carried out in simulations and in animal experiments for the cancer target, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a cell surface receptor overexpressed by many cancers. In the animal experiments, subcutaneous xenografts of human glioma (U251; moderate EGFR) and human epidermoid (A431; high EGFR) tumors, grown in six athymic mice, were excised and stained with an EGFR targeted surface-enhanced Raman scattering nanoparticle (SERS NP) and untargeted SERS NP pair. The salient finding in this study was that significant non-specific retention was observed for the EGFR targeted probe [anti-EGFR antibody labeled with a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticle], but could be corrected for by the equivalent non-specific retention of the untargeted probe (isotype control antibody labeled with a different SERS nanoparticle). Once this non-specific binding was accounted for, the kinetic model was able to predict the expected differences in EGFR concentration among different tissue types: healthy, U251, and A431 in accordance with an ex vivo flow cytometry analysis, successfully classifying different tissue types.

  12. Vitamin A Transport Mechanism of the Multitransmembrane Cell-Surface Receptor STRA6

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Riki; Zhong, Ming; Kassai, Miki; Ter-Stepanian, Mariam; Sun, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin A has biological functions as diverse as sensing light for vision, regulating stem cell differentiation, maintaining epithelial integrity, promoting immune competency, regulating learning and memory, and acting as a key developmental morphogen. Vitamin A derivatives have also been used in treating human diseases. If vitamin A is considered a drug that everyone needs to take to survive, evolution has come up with a natural drug delivery system that combines sustained release with precise and controlled delivery to the cells or tissues that depend on it. This “drug delivery system” is mediated by plasma retinol binding protein (RBP), the principle and specific vitamin A carrier protein in the blood, and STRA6, the cell-surface receptor for RBP that mediates cellular vitamin A uptake. The mechanism by which the RBP receptor absorbs vitamin A from the blood is distinct from other known cellular uptake mechanisms. This review summarizes recent progress in elucidating the fundamental molecular mechanism mediated by the RBP receptor and multiple newly discovered catalytic activities of this receptor, and compares this transport system with retinoid transport independent of RBP/STRA6. How to target this new type of transmembrane receptor using small molecules in treating diseases is also discussed. PMID:26343735

  13. Evolutionarily conserved Galphabetagamma binding surfaces support a model of the G protein-receptor complex.

    PubMed Central

    Lichtarge, O; Bourne, H R; Cohen, F E

    1996-01-01

    The pivotal role of G proteins in sensory, hormonal, inflammatory, and proliferative responses has provoked intense interest in understanding how they interact with their receptors and effectors. Nonetheless, the locations of the receptors and effector binding sites remain poorly characterized, although nearly complete structures of the alphabetagamma heterotrimeric complex are available. Here we apply evolutionary trace (ET) analysis [Lichtarge, O., Bourne, H. R. & Cohen, F. E. (1996) J. Mol. Biol. 257, 342-358] to propose plausible locations for these sites. On each subunit, ET identifies evolutionarily selected surfaces composed of residues that do not vary within functional subgroups and that form spatial clusters. Four clusters correctly identify subunit interfaces, and additional clusters on Galpha point to likely receptor or effector binding sites. Our results implicate the conformationally variable region of Galpha in an effector binding role. Furthermore the range of predicted interactions between the receptor and Galphabetagamma, is sufficiently limited that we can build a low resolution and testable model of the receptor-G protein complex. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8755504

  14. Analysis of Cell-Surface Receptor Dynamics through Covalent Labeling by Catalyst-Tethered Antibody.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahiro; Yasueda, Yuki; Tamura, Tomonori; Takaoka, Yousuke; Hamachi, Itaru

    2015-04-29

    A general technique for introducing biophysical probes into selected receptors in their native environment is valuable for the study of their structure, dynamics, function, and molecular interactions. A number of such techniques rely on genetic engineering, which is not applicable for the study of endogenous proteins, and such approaches often suffer from artifacts due to the overexpression and bulky size of the probes/protein tags used. Here we designed novel catalyst-antibody conjugates capable of introducing small chemical probes into receptor proteins such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) in a selective manner on the surface of living cells. Because of the selectivity and efficiency of this labeling technique, we were able to monitor the cellular dynamics and lifetime of HER2 endogenously expressed on cancer cells. More significantly, the current labeling technique comprises a stable covalent bond, which combined with a peptide mass fingerprinting analysis allowed epitope mapping of antibodies on living cells and identification of potential binding sites of anti-EGFR affibody. Although as yet unreported in the literature, the binding sites predicted by our labeling method were consistently supported by the subsequent mutation and binding assay experiments. In addition, this covalent labeling method provided experimental evidence that HER2 exhibits a more dynamic structure than expected on the basis of crystallographic analysis alone. Our novel catalyst-antibody conjugates are expected to provide a general tool for investigating the protein trafficking, fluctuation, and molecular interactions of an important class of cell-surface receptors on live cell surfaces. PMID:25853648

  15. Analysis of Cell-Surface Receptor Dynamics through Covalent Labeling by Catalyst-Tethered Antibody.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahiro; Yasueda, Yuki; Tamura, Tomonori; Takaoka, Yousuke; Hamachi, Itaru

    2015-04-29

    A general technique for introducing biophysical probes into selected receptors in their native environment is valuable for the study of their structure, dynamics, function, and molecular interactions. A number of such techniques rely on genetic engineering, which is not applicable for the study of endogenous proteins, and such approaches often suffer from artifacts due to the overexpression and bulky size of the probes/protein tags used. Here we designed novel catalyst-antibody conjugates capable of introducing small chemical probes into receptor proteins such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) in a selective manner on the surface of living cells. Because of the selectivity and efficiency of this labeling technique, we were able to monitor the cellular dynamics and lifetime of HER2 endogenously expressed on cancer cells. More significantly, the current labeling technique comprises a stable covalent bond, which combined with a peptide mass fingerprinting analysis allowed epitope mapping of antibodies on living cells and identification of potential binding sites of anti-EGFR affibody. Although as yet unreported in the literature, the binding sites predicted by our labeling method were consistently supported by the subsequent mutation and binding assay experiments. In addition, this covalent labeling method provided experimental evidence that HER2 exhibits a more dynamic structure than expected on the basis of crystallographic analysis alone. Our novel catalyst-antibody conjugates are expected to provide a general tool for investigating the protein trafficking, fluctuation, and molecular interactions of an important class of cell-surface receptors on live cell surfaces.

  16. The signaling phospholipid PIP3 creates a new interaction surface on the nuclear receptor SF-1.

    PubMed

    Blind, Raymond D; Sablin, Elena P; Kuchenbecker, Kristopher M; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Deacon, Ashley M; Das, Debanu; Fletterick, Robert J; Ingraham, Holly A

    2014-10-21

    The signaling phosphatidylinositol lipids PI(4,5)P2 (PIP2) and PI(3,4,5)P3 (PIP3) bind nuclear receptor 5A family (NR5As), but their regulatory mechanisms remain unknown. Here, the crystal structures of human NR5A1 (steroidogenic factor-1, SF-1) ligand binding domain (LBD) bound to PIP2 and PIP3 show the lipid hydrophobic tails sequestered in the hormone pocket, as predicted. However, unlike classic nuclear receptor hormones, the phosphoinositide head groups are fully solvent-exposed and complete the LBD fold by organizing the receptor architecture at the hormone pocket entrance. The highest affinity phosphoinositide ligand PIP3 stabilizes the coactivator binding groove and increases coactivator peptide recruitment. This receptor-ligand topology defines a previously unidentified regulatory protein-lipid surface on SF-1 with the phosphoinositide head group at its nexus and poised to interact with other proteins. This surface on SF-1 coincides with the predicted binding site of the corepressor DAX-1 (dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia critical region on chromosome X), and importantly harbors missense mutations associated with human endocrine disorders. Our data provide the structural basis for this poorly understood cluster of human SF-1 mutations and demonstrates how signaling phosphoinositides function as regulatory ligands for NR5As. PMID:25288771

  17. The signaling phospholipid PIP3 creates a new interaction surface on the nuclear receptor SF-1

    PubMed Central

    Blind, Raymond D.; Sablin, Elena P.; Kuchenbecker, Kristopher M.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Deacon, Ashley M.; Das, Debanu; Fletterick, Robert J.; Ingraham, Holly A.

    2014-01-01

    The signaling phosphatidylinositol lipids PI(4,5)P2 (PIP2) and PI(3,4,5)P3 (PIP3) bind nuclear receptor 5A family (NR5As), but their regulatory mechanisms remain unknown. Here, the crystal structures of human NR5A1 (steroidogenic factor-1, SF-1) ligand binding domain (LBD) bound to PIP2 and PIP3 show the lipid hydrophobic tails sequestered in the hormone pocket, as predicted. However, unlike classic nuclear receptor hormones, the phosphoinositide head groups are fully solvent-exposed and complete the LBD fold by organizing the receptor architecture at the hormone pocket entrance. The highest affinity phosphoinositide ligand PIP3 stabilizes the coactivator binding groove and increases coactivator peptide recruitment. This receptor-ligand topology defines a previously unidentified regulatory protein-lipid surface on SF-1 with the phosphoinositide head group at its nexus and poised to interact with other proteins. This surface on SF-1 coincides with the predicted binding site of the corepressor DAX-1 (dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia critical region on chromosome X), and importantly harbors missense mutations associated with human endocrine disorders. Our data provide the structural basis for this poorly understood cluster of human SF-1 mutations and demonstrates how signaling phosphoinositides function as regulatory ligands for NR5As. PMID:25288771

  18. Direct method for detection and characterization of cell surface receptors for insulin by means of 125I-labeled autoantibodies against the insulin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Jarrett, D B; Roth, J; Kahn, C R; Flier, J S

    1976-01-01

    Autoantibodies directed against the cell surface receptors for insulin are found in some patients with extreme insulin resistance. These antibodies specifically inhibit the binding of insulin to its receptor. A purified IgG fraction from one patient's plasma was labeled with 125I. The 125I-labeled antireceptor antibody, which initially represented about 0.3% of the total 125I-IgG, was enriched by selective adsorption and subsequent elution from cells rich in insulin receptors. The 125I-antireceptor antibody bound to cells and the binding was inhibited by whole plasma and purified IgG from this patient, as well as whole plasma from another patient with autoantibodies to the insulin receptor. Insulins that differed 300-fold in biological potency and affinity inhibited binding of 125I-antireceptor antibody in direct proportion to their ability to bind to the insulin receptor. The binding of 125I-antireceptor antibody was closely correlated with the binding of 125I-insulin over a wide range of receptor concentrations on different cell types. Experimentally induced reduction of the insulin receptor concentration was associated with parallel decreases in the binding of 125I-antireceptor antibody and 125I-insulin. The preparation of 125I-antireceptor antibody with a high specific activity by cytoadsorption and elution has provided a sensitive method for the detection of receptors and autoantibodies to cell surface components. PMID:1069300

  19. NMDA receptor surface mobility depends on NR2A-2B subunits

    PubMed Central

    Groc, Laurent; Heine, Martin; Cousins, Sarah L.; Stephenson, F. Anne; Lounis, Brahim; Cognet, Laurent; Choquet, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    The NR2 subunit composition of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) varies during development, and this change is important in NMDAR-dependent signaling. In particular, synaptic NMDAR switch from containing mostly NR2B subunit to a mixture of NR2B and NR2A subunits. The pathways by which neurons differentially traffic NR2A- and NR2B-containing NMDARs are poorly understood. Using single-particle and -molecule approaches and specific antibodies directed against NR2A and NR2B extracellular epitopes, we investigated the surface mobility of native NR2A and NR2B subunits at the surface of cultured neurons. The surface mobility of NMDARs depends on the NR2 subunit subtype, with NR2A-containing NMDARs being more stable than NR2B-containing ones, and NR2A subunit overexpression stabilizes surface NR2B-containing NMDARs. The developmental change in the synaptic surface content of NR2A and NR2B subunits was correlated with a developmental change in the time spent by the subunits within synapses. This suggests that the switch in synaptic NMDAR subtypes depends on the regulation of the receptor surface trafficking. PMID:17124177

  20. Chemokine receptor expression on the surface of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Talvani, Andre; Rocha, Manoel O C; Ribeiro, Antonio L; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2004-01-15

    We evaluated the expression of chemokine receptors (CCR1, CCR2, CCR5, and CXCR4) on the surface of peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from patients with chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) and noninfected individuals. Only CCR5 and CXCR4 expression was different on the surface of the subsets (CD4, CD8, and CD14) evaluated. Patients with mild CCC had elevated leukocyte expression of CCR5, compared with noninfected individuals or those with severe disease. CXCR4 expression was lower on leukocytes from patients with severe CCC. The differential expression of both receptors on leukocytes of patients with CCC was consistent and clearly correlated with the degree of heart function such that the lower the heart function, the lower the expression of either CCR5 or CXCR4. These results highlight the possible participation of the chemokine system in early forms of chagasic cardiomyopathy and the relevance of heart failure-induced remodeling in modifying immune parameters in infected individuals.

  1. Self-construction of core-shell and hollow zeolite analcime icositetrahedra: a reversed crystal growth process via oriented aggregation of nanocrystallites and recrystallization from surface to core.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueying; Qiao, Minghua; Xie, Songhai; Fan, Kangnian; Zhou, Wuzong; He, Heyong

    2007-10-31

    Zeolite analcime with a core-shell and hollow icositetrahedron architecture was prepared by a one-pot hydrothermal route in the presence of ethylamine and Raney Ni. Detailed investigations on samples at different preparation stages revealed that the growth of the complex single crystalline geometrical structure did not follow the classic crystal growth route, i.e., a crystal with a highly symmetric morphology (such as polyhedra) is normally developed by attachment of atoms or ions to a nucleus. A reversed crystal growth process through oriented aggregation of nanocrystallites and surface recrystallization was observed. The whole process can be described by the following four successive steps. (1) Primary analcime nanoplatelets undergo oriented aggregation to yield discus-shaped particles. (2) These disci further assemble into polycrystalline microspheres. (3) The relatively large platelets grow into nanorods by consuming the smaller ones, and meanwhile, the surface of the microspheres recrystallizes into a thin single crystalline icositetrahedral shell via Ostwald ripening. (4) Recrystallization continues from the surface to the core at the expense of the nanorods, and the thickness of the monocrystalline shell keeps on increasing until all the nanorods are consumed, leading to hollow single crystalline analcime icositetrahedra. The present work adds new useful information for the understanding of the principles of zeolite growth.

  2. Studies of activated GPIIb/IIIa receptors on the luminal surface of adherent platelets. Paradoxical loss of luminal receptors when platelets adhere to high density fibrinogen.

    PubMed Central

    Coller, B S; Kutok, J L; Scudder, L E; Galanakis, D K; West, S M; Rudomen, G S; Springer, K T

    1993-01-01

    The accessibility of activated GPIIb/IIIa receptors on the luminal surface of platelets adherent to damaged blood vessels or atherosclerotic plaques is likely to play a crucial role in subsequent platelet recruitment. To define better the factors involved in this process, we developed a functional assay to assess the presence of activated, luminal GPIIb/IIIa receptors, based on their ability to bind erythrocytes containing a high density of covalently coupled RGD-containing peptides (thromboerythrocytes). Platelets readily adhered to wells coated with purified type I rat skin collagen and the adherent platelets bound a dense lawn of thromboerythrocytes. With fibrinogen-coated wells, platelet adhesion increased as the fibrinogen-coating concentration increased, reaching a plateau at about 11 micrograms/ml. Thromboerythrocyte binding to the platelets adherent to fibrinogen showed a paradoxical response, increasing at fibrinogen coating concentrations up to approximately 4-6 micrograms/ml and then dramatically decreasing at higher fibrinogen-coating concentrations. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that the morphology of platelets adherent to collagen was similar to that of platelets adherent to low density fibrinogen, with extensive filopodia formation and ruffling. In contrast, platelets adherent to high density fibrinogen showed a bland, flattened appearance. Immunogold staining of GPIIb/IIIa receptors demonstrated concentration of the receptors on the filopodia, and depletion of receptors on the flattened portion of the platelets. Thus, there is a paradoxical loss of accessible, activated GPIIb/IIIa receptors on the luminal surface of platelets adherent to high density fibrinogen. Two factors may contribute to this result: engagement of GPIIb/IIIa receptors with fibrinogen on the abluminal surface leading to the loss of luminal receptors, and loss of luminal filopodia that interact with thromboerythrocytes. These data provide insight into the differences

  3. Both host and parasite MIF molecules bind to chicken macrophages via CD74 surface receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungwon; Cox, Chasity M; Jenkins, Mark C; Fetterer, Ray H; Miska, Katarzyna B; Dalloul, Rami A

    2014-12-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is recognized as a soluble protein that inhibits the random migration of macrophages and plays a pivotal immunoregulatory function in innate and adaptive immunity. Our group has identified both chicken and Eimeria MIFs, and characterized their function in enhancing innate immune responses during inflammation. In this study, we report that chicken CD74 (ChCD74), a type II transmembrane protein, functions as a macrophage surface receptor that binds to MIF molecules. First, to examine the binding of MIF to chicken monocytes/macrophages, fresh isolated chicken peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated with rChIFN-γ and then incubated with recombinant chicken MIF (rChMIF). Immunofluorescence staining with anti-ChMIF followed by flow cytometry revealed the binding of MIF to stimulated PBMCs. To verify that ChCD74 acts as a surface receptor for MIF molecules, full-length ChCD74p41 was cloned, expressed and its recombinant protein (rChCD74p41) transiently over-expressed with green fluorescent protein in chicken fibroblast DF-1 cells. Fluorescence analysis revealed a higher population of cells double positive for CD74p41 and rChMIF, indicating the binding of rChMIF to DF-1 cells via rChCD74p41. Using a similar approach, it was found that Eimeria MIF (EMIF), which is secreted by Eimeria sp. during infection, bound to chicken macrophages via ChCD74p41 as a surface receptor. Together, this study provides conclusive evidence that both host and parasite MIF molecules bind to chicken macrophages via the surface receptor ChCD74.

  4. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, W.H.; Tepordei, V.V.; Bolen, W.P.

    2000-01-01

    Construction aggregates consist primarily of crushed stone and construction sand and gravel. Total estimated production of construction aggregates increased in 1999 by about 2% to 2.39 Gt (2.64 billion st) compared with 1998. This record production level continued an expansion that began in 1992. By commodities, crushed stone production increased 3.3%, while sand and gravel production increased by about 0.5%.

  5. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    Part of a special section on industrial minerals in 1993. The 1993 production of construction aggregates increased 6.3 percent over the 1992 figure, to reach 2.01 Gt. This represents the highest estimated annual production of combined crushed stone and construction sand and gravel ever recorded in the U.S. The outlook for construction aggregates and the issues facing the industry are discussed.

  6. A Describing Function Approach to Aggregating High-Resolution Land-Surface Data for Macroscale Hydrologic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, N.; Georgakakos, K. P.

    2002-12-01

    A new methodology is presented for development of macroscale hydrologic model percolation parameters from a spatial database of soil properties. This approach is applied to three distinct catchments within California- the Kings, American, and lower Eel river basins. Each unique vertical soil profile in these catchments is divided into an upper and a lower layer based on permeability gradients. A one-dimensional numerical unsaturated flow model is applied to each profile to yield percolation from upper to lower layers as a function of lower layer moisture deficit. A Holtan-type power law relationship is postulated to adequately represent profile percolation, with parameters estimated by curve-fitting the numerical model results. These parameters are then aggregated from the scale of the observable soil profiles to the level of the macroscale hydrologic model elements in a mass-conserving manner. In this process, the power law relationship is considered a describing function approximation to the numerical model response. To estimate parameter and flux uncertainties, a Monte Carlo approach is employed in which the soil property values are sampled randomly within the uncertainty ranges provided in the soils database or established by previous studies in the literature. The resulting ensembles of soil profiles are used in the describing function method to generate ensembles of hydrologic parameter spatial distributions for the catchments of interest. These ensembles are used as measures of hydrologic parameter uncertainty. The relationship between aggregate moisture flux and soil parameter distributions is explored, as is the dependence of mean parameter and aggregate flux values and their respective uncertainties on spatial scale. The methodology presented provides a useful means of investigating model-process observability given present-day soils databases, and a robust method for determining physically based macro-scale hydrologic parameters for subsequent

  7. Identification of a new hormone-binding site on the surface of thyroid hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Souza, P C T; Puhl, A C; Martínez, L; Aparício, R; Nascimento, A S; Figueira, A C M; Nguyen, P; Webb, P; Skaf, M S; Polikarpov, I

    2014-04-01

    Thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors involved in cell differentiation, growth, and homeostasis. Although X-ray structures of many nuclear receptor ligand-binding domains (LBDs) reveal that the ligand binds within the hydrophobic core of the ligand-binding pocket, a few studies suggest the possibility of ligands binding to other sites. Here, we report a new x-ray crystallographic structure of TR-LBD that shows a second binding site for T3 and T4 located between H9, H10, and H11 of the TRα LBD surface. Statistical multiple sequence analysis, site-directed mutagenesis, and cell transactivation assays indicate that residues of the second binding site could be important for the TR function. We also conducted molecular dynamics simulations to investigate ligand mobility and ligand-protein interaction for T3 and T4 bound to this new TR surface-binding site. Extensive molecular dynamics simulations designed to compute ligand-protein dissociation constant indicate that the binding affinities to this surface site are of the order of the plasma and intracellular concentrations of the thyroid hormones, suggesting that ligands may bind to this new binding site under physiological conditions. Therefore, the second binding site could be useful as a new target site for drug design and could modulate selectively TR functions.

  8. Ligand-specific regulation of the extracellular surface of a G-protein-coupled receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Bokoch, Michael P.; Zou, Yaozhong; Rasmussen, Søren G.F.; Liu, Corey W.; Nygaard, Rie; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Fung, Juan José; Choi, Hee-Jung; Thian, Foon Sun; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Puglisi, Joseph D.; Weis, William I.; Pardo, Leonardo; Prosser, R. Scott; Mueller, Luciano; Kobilka, Brian K.

    2010-01-14

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven-transmembrane proteins that mediate most cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters. They are the largest group of therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. Recent crystal structures of GPCRs have revealed structural conservation extending from the orthosteric ligand-binding site in the transmembrane core to the cytoplasmic G-protein-coupling domains. In contrast, the extracellular surface (ECS) of GPCRs is remarkably diverse and is therefore an ideal target for the discovery of subtype-selective drugs. However, little is known about the functional role of the ECS in receptor activation, or about conformational coupling of this surface to the native ligand-binding pocket. Here we use NMR spectroscopy to investigate ligand-specific conformational changes around a central structural feature in the ECS of the {beta}{sub 2} adrenergic receptor: a salt bridge linking extracellular loops 2 and 3. Small-molecule drugs that bind within the transmembrane core and exhibit different efficacies towards G-protein activation (agonist, neutral antagonist and inverse agonist) also stabilize distinct conformations of the ECS. We thereby demonstrate conformational coupling between the ECS and the orthosteric binding site, showing that drugs targeting this diverse surface could function as allosteric modulators with high subtype selectivity. Moreover, these studies provide a new insight into the dynamic behaviour of GPCRs not addressable by static, inactive-state crystal structures.

  9. Crosslinking of surface antibodies and Fc sub. gamma. receptors: Theory and application

    SciTech Connect

    Wofsy, C.; Goldstein, B. Los Alamos National Lab., NM )

    1991-03-15

    In an immune response, the crosslinking of surface immunoglobulin (sIg) on B cells by multiply-bound ligand activates a range of cell responses, culminating in the production of antibody-secreting cells. However, when the crosslinking agent is itself an antibody, B cell activation is inhibited. Solution antibody (IgG) can bind simultaneously to sIg and to another cell surface receptor, Fc{sub {gamma}}R, co-crosslinking' the distinct receptors. Experiments point to co-crosslinking as the inhibitory signal. It is not clear how co-crosslinking inhibits B cell stimulation. The authors construct and analyze a mathematical model aimed at clarifying the nature and mechanisms of action of the separate cell signals controlling B cell responses to antibodies. Basophils and mast cells respond to the crosslinking of cell surface antibody by releasing histamine. Like B cells, basophils also express FC{sub {gamma}}R. They use their model to analyze new data on the effect of antibody-induced co-crosslinking of the two types of receptor on this family of cells. Predictions of the model indicate that an observed difference between the response patterns induced by antibodies and by antibody fragments that cannot bind to FC{sub {gamma}}R can be explained if co-crosslinking is neither inhibitory nor stimulatory in this system.

  10. Introduced Amino Terminal Epitopes Can Reduce Surface Expression of Neuronal Nicotinic Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bracamontes, John R.; Akk, Gustav; Steinbach, Joe Henry

    2016-01-01

    Epitopes accessible on the surface of intact cells are extremely valuable in studies of membrane proteins, allowing quantification and determination of the distribution of proteins as well as identification of cells expressing large numbers of proteins. However for many membrane proteins there are no suitable antibodies to native sequences, due to lack of availability, low affinity or lack of specificity. In these cases the use of an introduced epitope at specific sites in the protein of interest can often provide a suitable tool for studies. However, the introduction of the epitope sequence has the potential to affect protein expression, the assembly of multisubunit proteins or transport to the surface membrane. We find that surface expression of heteromeric neuronal nicotinic receptors containing the α4 and β4 subunits can be affected by introduced epitopes when inserted near the amino terminus of a subunit. The FLAG epitope greatly reduces surface expression when introduced into either α4 or β4 subunits, the V5 epitope has little effect when placed in either, while the Myc epitope reduces expression more when inserted into β4 than α4. These results indicate that the extreme amino terminal region is important for assembly of these receptors, and demonstrate that some widely used introduced epitopes may severely reduce surface expression. PMID:26963253

  11. Malaria inhibits surface expression of complement receptor-1 in monocyte/macrophages causing decreased immunecomplex internalization

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Arias, Cristina; Lopez, Jean Pierre; Hernandez-Perez, Jean Nikolae; Bautista-Ojeda, Maria Dolores; Branch, OraLee; Rodriguez, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Complement receptor 1 (CR1) expressed on the surface of phagocytic cells binds complement-bound IC playing an important role in the clearance of circulating immunecomplexes (IC). This receptor is critical to prevent accumulation of IC, which can contribute to inflammatory pathology. Accumulation of circulating IC is frequently observed during malaria, although the factors contributing to this accumulation are not clearly understood. We have observed that the surface expression of CR1 on monocyte/macrophages and B cells is strongly reduced in mice infected with Plasmodium yoelii, a rodent malaria model. Monocyte/macrophages from these infected mice present a specific inhibition of complement-mediated internalization of IC caused by the decreased CR1 expression. Accordingly, mice show accumulation of circulating IC and deposition of IC in the kidneys that inversely correlates with the decrease in CR1 surface expression. Our results indicate that malaria induces a significant decrease on surface CR1 expression in the monocyte/macrophage population that results in deficient internalization of IC by monocyte/macrophages. To determine whether this phenomenon is found in human malaria patients, we have analyzed 92 patients infected with either P. falciparum (22) or P. vivax (70), the most prevalent human malaria parasites. The levels of surface CR1 on peripheral monocyte/macrophages and B cells of these patients show a significant decrease compared to uninfected control individuals in the same area. We propose that this decrease in CR1 plays an essential role in impaired IC clearance during malaria. PMID:23440418

  12. Detection of cavitated approximal surfaces using cone beam CT and intraoral receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, A; Hirsch, E; Christensen, J; Matzen, L H; Scaf, G; Frydenberg, M

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to compare cone beam CT (CBCT) in a small field of view (FOV) with a solid-state sensor and a photostimulable phosphor plate system for detection of cavitated approximal surfaces. Methods 257 non-filled approximal surfaces from human permanent premolars and molars were recorded by two intraoral digital receptors, a storage phosphor plate (Digora Optime, Soredex) and a solid-state CMOS sensor (Digora Toto, Soredex), and scanned in a cone beam CT unit (3D Accuitomo FPD80, Morita) with a FOV of 4 cm and a voxel size of 0.08 mm. Image sections were carried out in the axial and mesiodistal tooth planes. Six observers recorded surface cavitation in all images. Validation of the true absence or presence of surface cavitation was performed by inspecting the surfaces under strong light with the naked eye. Differences in sensitivity, specificity and agreement were estimated by analysing the binary data in a generalized linear model using an identity link function. Results : A significantly higher sensitivity was obtained by all observers with CBCT (p < 0.001), which was not compromised by a lower specificity. Therefore, a significantly higher overall agreement was obtained with CBCT (p < 0.001). There were no significant differences between the Digora Optime phosphor plate system and the Digora Toto CMOS sensor for any parameter. Conclusions CBCT was much more accurate in the detection of surface cavitation in approximal surfaces than intraoral receptors. The differences are interpreted as clinically significant. A CBCT examination performed for other reasons should also be assessed for approximal surface cavities in teeth without restorations. PMID:22842638

  13. Single Particle Tracking reveals two distinct environments for CD4 receptors at the surface of living T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Mascalchi, Patrice; Lamort, Anne Sophie; Salome, Laurence; Dumas, Fabrice

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied the diffusion of single CD4 receptors on living lymphocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study reveals that CD4 receptors have either a random or confined diffusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dynamics of unconfined CD4 receptors was accelerated by a temperature raise. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dynamics of confined CD4 receptors was unchanged by a temperature raise. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our results suggest the existence of two different environments for CD4 receptors. -- Abstract: We investigated the lateral diffusion of the HIV receptor CD4 at the surface of T lymphocytes at 20 Degree-Sign C and 37 Degree-Sign C by Single Particle Tracking using Quantum Dots. We found that the receptors presented two major distinct behaviors that were not equally affected by temperature changes. About half of the receptors showed a random diffusion with a diffusion coefficient increasing upon raising the temperature. The other half of the receptors was permanently or transiently confined with unchanged dynamics on raising the temperature. These observations suggest that two distinct subpopulations of CD4 receptors with different environments are present at the surface of living T lymphocytes.

  14. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) aggregation and absence of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR)/PBR association in the mitochondrial membrane as determined by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET).

    PubMed

    Bogan, Randy L; Davis, Tracy L; Niswender, Gordon D

    2007-04-01

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is responsible for acute control of cholesterol transport across the mitochondrial membrane, however the mechanism of StAR-associated cholesterol transport is unknown and may involve the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR)/endozepine system. Several molecules of PBR may associate to form a channel through which cholesterol passes to the inner mitochondrial membrane, and endozepine is the natural ligand for PBR. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) was used to test StAR/PBR/endozepine interactions, PBR aggregation, and the effect of second messengers on interactions. There was no evidence of StAR/PBR, StAR/endozepine, or PBR/endozepine interactions. The StAR and PBR fusion proteins were trafficking to the mitochondria as expected, but the endozepine fusion protein was not localized to the mitochondria indicating that it was not biologically active. Data were obtained indicating that PBR forms aggregates in the mitochondrial membrane. Energy transfer between PBR fusion proteins was dose and time dependent, but there was no effect induced by PK11195 ligand binding or pharmacologic activation of PKA or PKC second messenger pathways. It appears that PBR aggregates in the mitochondrial membrane, however there was no evidence that PBR aggregation is regulated in the acute control of steroidogenesis, or that PBR and StAR interact.

  15. Quantification of epidermal growth factor receptor expression level and binding kinetics on cell surfaces by surface plasmon resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fenni; Wang, Shaopeng; Yin, Linliang; Yang, Yunze; Guan, Yan; Wang, Wei; Xu, Han; Tao, Nongjian

    2015-10-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, also known as ErbB-1 or HER-1) is a membrane bound protein that has been associated with a variety of solid tumors and the control of cell survival, proliferation, and metabolism. Quantification of the EGFR expression level in cell membranes and the interaction kinetics with drugs are thus important for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Here we report mapping of the distribution and interaction kinetics of EGFR in their native environment with the surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) technique. The monoclonal anti-EGFR antibody was used as a model drug in this study. The binding of the antibody to EGFR overexpressed A431 cells was monitored in real time, which was found to follow the first-order kinetics with an association rate constant (ka) and dissociation rate constant (kd) of (2.7 ± 0.6) × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) and (1.4 ± 0.5) × 10(-4) s(-1), respectively. The dissociation constant (KD) was determined to be 0.53 ± 0.26 nM with up to seven-fold variation among different individual A431 cells. In addition, the averaged A431 cell surface EGFR density was found to be 636/μm(2) with an estimation of 5 × 10(5) EGFR per cell. Additional measurement also revealed that different EGFR positive cell lines (A431, HeLa, and A549) show receptor density dependent anti-EGFR binding kinetics. The results demonstrate that SPRi is a valuable tool for direct quantification of membrane protein expression level and ligand binding kinetics at single cell resolution. Our findings show that the local environment affects the drug-receptor interactions, and in situ measurement of membrane protein binding kinetics is important.

  16. Agonist-dependent modulation of cell surface expression of the cold receptor TRPM8.

    PubMed

    Toro, Carlos A; Eger, Stephanie; Veliz, Luis; Sotelo-Hitschfeld, Pamela; Cabezas, Deny; Castro, Maite A; Zimmermann, Katharina; Brauchi, Sebastian

    2015-01-14

    The spatial and temporal distribution of receptors constitutes an important mechanism for controlling the magnitude of cellular responses. Several members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel family can regulate their function by modulating their expression at the plasma membrane (PM) through rapid vesicular translocation and fusion. The mechanisms underlying this regulation are not completely understood, and the contribution of vesicular trafficking to physiological function is unknown. TRPM8 receptors are expressed in mammalian peripheral sensory neurons and are essential for the detection of cold temperatures. Previously, we showed that TRPM8-containing vesicles are segregated into three main pools, immobile at the PM, simple diffusive and corralled-hopping. Here, we show that channel expression at the PM is modulated by TRPM8 agonists in F11 and HEK293T cells. Our results support a model in which the activation of TRPM8 channels, located at the PM, induces a short-lived recruitment of a TRPM8-containing vesicular pool to the cell surface causing a transitory increase in the number of functional channels, affecting intrinsic properties of cold receptor responses. We further demonstrate the requirement of intact vesicular trafficking to support sustained cold responses in the skin of mice. PMID:25589752

  17. Therapeutic opportunities for targeting the ubiquitous cell surface receptor CD47

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Pantoja, David R.; Stein, Erica V.; Rogers, Natasha M.; Sharifi-Sanjani, Maryam; Isenberg, Jeffrey S.; Roberts, David D.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction CD47 is a ubiquitously expressed cell surface receptor that serves as a counter-receptor for SIRPα in recognition of self by the innate immune system. Independently, CD47 also functions as an important signaling receptor for regulating cell responses to stress. Areas covered We review the expression, molecular interactions, and pathophysiological functions of CD47 in the cardiovascular and immune systems. CD47 was first identified as a potential tumor marker, and we examine recent evidence that its dysregulation contributes to cancer progression and evasion of anti-tumor immunity. We further discuss therapeutic strategies for enhancing or inhibiting CD47 signaling and applications of such agents in preclinical models of ischemia and ischemia/reperfusion injuries, organ transplantation, pulmonary hypertension, radioprotection, and cancer. Expert opinion Ongoing studies are revealing a central role of CD47 for conveying signals from the extracellular microenvironment that limit cell and tissue survival upon exposure to various types of stress. Based on this key function, therapeutics targeting CD47 or its ligands thrombospondin-1 and SIRPα could have broad applications spanning reconstructive surgery, engineering of tissues and biocompatible surfaces, vascular diseases, diabetes, organ transplantation, radiation injuries, inflammatory diseases, and cancer. PMID:23101472

  18. A novel endothelial cell surface receptor tyrosine kinase with extracellular epidermal growth factor homology domains.

    PubMed Central

    Partanen, J; Armstrong, E; Mäkelä, T P; Korhonen, J; Sandberg, M; Renkonen, R; Knuutila, S; Huebner, K; Alitalo, K

    1992-01-01

    Endothelial cell surfaces play key roles in several important physiological and pathological processes such as blood clotting, angiogenic responses, and inflammation. Here we describe the cloning and characterization of tie, a novel type of human endothelial cell surface receptor tyrosine kinase. The extracellular domain of the predicted tie protein product has an exceptional multidomain structure consisting of a cluster of three epidermal growth factor homology motifs embedded between two immunoglobulinlike loops, which are followed by three fibronectin type III repeats next to the transmembrane region. Additionally, a cDNA form lacking the first of the three epidermal growth factor homology domains was isolated, suggesting that alternative splicing creates different tie-type receptors. Cells transfected with tie cDNA expression vector produce glycosylated polypeptides of 117 kDa which are reactive to antisera raised against the tie carboxy terminus. The tie gene was located in chromosomal region 1p33 to 1p34. Expression of the tie gene appeared to be restricted in some cell lines; large amounts of tie mRNA were detected in endothelial cell lines and in some myeloid leukemia cell lines with erythroid and megakaryoblastoid characteristics. In addition, mRNA in situ studies further indicated the endothelial expression of the tie gene. The tie receptor tyrosine kinase may have evolved for multiple protein-protein interactions, possibly including cell adhesion to the vascular endothelium. Images PMID:1312667

  19. GABAB receptor cell-surface export is controlled by an endoplasmic reticulum gatekeeper.

    PubMed

    Doly, S; Shirvani, H; Gäta, G; Meye, F J; Emerit, M-B; Enslen, H; Achour, L; Pardo-Lopez, L; Yang, S-K; Armand, V; Gardette, R; Giros, B; Gassmann, M; Bettler, B; Mameli, M; Darmon, M; Marullo, S

    2016-04-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) release and cell-surface export of many G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are tightly regulated. For gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)B receptors of GABA, the major mammalian inhibitory neurotransmitter, the ligand-binding GB1 subunit is maintained in the ER by unknown mechanisms in the absence of hetero-dimerization with the GB2 subunit. We report that GB1 retention is regulated by a specific gatekeeper, PRAF2. This ER resident transmembrane protein binds to GB1, preventing its progression in the biosynthetic pathway. GB1 release occurs upon competitive displacement from PRAF2 by GB2. PRAF2 concentration, relative to that of GB1 and GB2, tightly controls cell-surface receptor density and controls GABAB function in neurons. Experimental perturbation of PRAF2 levels in vivo caused marked hyperactivity disorders in mice. These data reveal an unanticipated major impact of specific ER gatekeepers on GPCR function and identify PRAF2 as a new molecular target with therapeutic potential for psychiatric and neurological diseases involving GABAB function.

  20. Characterizing Spatial Organization of Cell Surface Receptors in Human Breast Cancer with STORM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyall, Evan; Chapman, Matthew R.; Sohn, Lydia L.

    2012-02-01

    Regulation and control of complex biological functions are dependent upon spatial organization of biological structures at many different length scales. For instance Eph receptors and their ephrin ligands bind when opposing cells come into contact during development, resulting in spatial organizational changes on the nanometer scale that lead to changes on the macro scale, in a process known as organ morphogenesis. One technique able to probe this important spatial organization at both the nanometer and micrometer length scales, including at cell-cell junctions, is stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM). STORM is a technique that localizes individual fluorophores based on the centroids of their point spread functions and then reconstructs a composite image to produce super resolved structure. We have applied STORM to study spatial organization of the cell surface of human breast cancer cells, specifically the organization of tyrosine kinase receptors and chemokine receptors. A better characterization of spatial organization of breast cancer cell surface proteins is necessary to fully understand the tumorigenisis pathways in the most common malignancy in United States women.

  1. Molecular regulation of lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 trafficking to the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Wei, Jianxin; Bowser, Rachel K; Dong, Su; Xiao, Shuqi; Zhao, Yutong

    2014-11-01

    The lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 (LPA1), a G-protein coupled receptor, regulates cell proliferation, migration, and cytokine release. Here, we investigate the molecular signature of LPA1 trafficking to the cell surface. The overexpressed LPA1 with a C-terminal V5 tag (LPA1-V5) is majorly expressed on the cell surface, while two deletion mutants (C320 and ∆84-87) failed to be trafficked to the cell surface. Further, site-directed mutagenesis analysis of the LPA1 revealed that Ile325, Tyr85, and Leu87 within these two fragments regulate LPA1 maturation and trafficking to the cell surface. Over-expression of Sar1, a component of coat protein complex II (COPII), enhances glycosylation of LPA1 wild type, but not these mutants. The mutants of LPA1 are majorly localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and exhibit a higher binding affinity to heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), when compared to the LPA1 wild type. Further, we found that all these mutants failed to increase phosphorylation of Erk, and the cytokine release in response to LPA treatment. These results suggest that Ile325, Tyr85, and Leu87 within LPA1 are essential for LPA1 protein properly folding in the ER.

  2. Hydrophobic Surfaces of Spacecraft Components Enhance the Aggregation of Microorganisms and May Lead to Higher Survival Rates on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuerger, A. C.; Kern, R. G.

    2003-01-01

    In order to minimize the forward contamination of Mars, spacecraft are assembled under clean-room conditions that often require several procedures to clean and sterilize components. Surface characteristics of spacecraft materials may contribute to microbial survival by protecting spores from sterilizing agents, including UV irradiation on the surface of Mars. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of surface characteristics of several spacecraft materials on the survival of Bacillus subtilis spores under simulated Martian conditions.

  3. Detection of the plant parasite Cuscuta reflexa by a tomato cell surface receptor.

    PubMed

    Hegenauer, Volker; Fürst, Ursula; Kaiser, Bettina; Smoker, Matthew; Zipfel, Cyril; Felix, Georg; Stahl, Mark; Albert, Markus

    2016-07-29

    Parasitic plants are a constraint on agriculture worldwide. Cuscuta reflexa is a stem holoparasite that infests most dicotyledonous plants. One exception is tomato, which is resistant to C. reflexa We discovered that tomato responds to a small peptide factor occurring in Cuscuta spp. with immune responses typically activated after perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns. We identified the cell surface receptor-like protein CUSCUTA RECEPTOR 1 (CuRe1) as essential for the perception of this parasite-associated molecular pattern. CuRe1 is sufficient to confer responsiveness to the Cuscuta factor and increased resistance to parasitic C. reflexa when heterologously expressed in otherwise susceptible host plants. Our findings reveal that plants recognize parasitic plants in a manner similar to perception of microbial pathogens. PMID:27471302

  4. Detection of the plant parasite Cuscuta reflexa by a tomato cell surface receptor.

    PubMed

    Hegenauer, Volker; Fürst, Ursula; Kaiser, Bettina; Smoker, Matthew; Zipfel, Cyril; Felix, Georg; Stahl, Mark; Albert, Markus

    2016-07-29

    Parasitic plants are a constraint on agriculture worldwide. Cuscuta reflexa is a stem holoparasite that infests most dicotyledonous plants. One exception is tomato, which is resistant to C. reflexa We discovered that tomato responds to a small peptide factor occurring in Cuscuta spp. with immune responses typically activated after perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns. We identified the cell surface receptor-like protein CUSCUTA RECEPTOR 1 (CuRe1) as essential for the perception of this parasite-associated molecular pattern. CuRe1 is sufficient to confer responsiveness to the Cuscuta factor and increased resistance to parasitic C. reflexa when heterologously expressed in otherwise susceptible host plants. Our findings reveal that plants recognize parasitic plants in a manner similar to perception of microbial pathogens.

  5. Recombinant interleukin-16 selectively modulates surface receptor expression and cytokine release in macrophages and dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, E; Darcissac, E; Idziorek, T; Capron, A; Bahr, G M

    1999-01-01

    Interleukin-16 (IL-16), a natural ligand for the CD4 receptor, has been found to modulate T-lymphocyte function and to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. Antigen-presenting cells (APC), including macrophages and dendritic cells, are known to express functional surface CD4 molecules, to be susceptible to HIV-1 infection and to play a critical role in different immune processes. Therefore, we evaluated the ability of recombinant IL-16 (rIL-16) to regulate receptor expression and cytokine release in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC). Recombinant IL-16 was found to up-regulate CD25 and CD80 but to down-regulate CD4 and CD86 surface expression in MDM cultures. However, no change could be observed on the level of CD4, CD80 and CD86 expression in IL-16-stimulated MDDC, although a significant up-regulation of CD25 and CD83 was consistently detected. Furthermore, the level of gene expression of the chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 was significantly reduced in rIL-16-treated MDM and costimulation with IL-2 did not modify the activity of the recombinant cytokine. The effects on chemokine receptor gene expression were less evident in MDDC and only a transient down-regulation of weak intensity could be detected following stimulation with rIL-16. Analysis of supernatants from rIL-16-stimulatedcultures revealed a different profile of released cytokines/chemokines among the two cell populations studied. These findings establish an important role for IL-16 in modulating the activity of APC and may have relevance regarding the protection of reservoir cells against HIV-1 infection. PMID:10447738

  6. The signaling phospholipid PIP3 creates a new interaction surface on the nuclear receptor SF-1

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Blind, Raymond D.; Sablin, Elena P.; Kuchenbecker, Kristopher M.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Deacon, Ashley M.; Das, Debanu; Fletterick, Robert J.; Ingraham, Holly A.

    2014-10-06

    We previously reported that lipids PI(4,5)P2 (PIP2) and PI(3,4,5)P3 (PIP3) bind NR5A nuclear receptors to regulate their activity. Here, the crystal structures of PIP2 and PIP3 bound to NR5A1 (SF-1) define a new interaction surface that is organized by the solvent-exposed PIPn headgroups. We find that stabilization by the PIP3 ligand propagates a signal that increases coactivator recruitment to SF-1, consistent with our earlier work showing that PIP3 increases SF-1 activity. This newly created surface harbors a cluster of human mutations that lead to endocrine disorders, thus explaining how these puzzling mutations cripple SF-1 activity. Finally, we propose that thismore » new surface acts as a PIP3-regulated interface between SF-1 and coregulatory proteins, analogous to the function of membrane-bound phosphoinositides.« less

  7. Molecular aggregation of humic substances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    Humic substances (HS) form molecular aggregates in solution and on mineral surfaces. Elucidation of the mechanism of formation of these aggregates is important for an understanding of the interactions of HS in soils arid natural waters. The HS are formed mainly by enzymatic depolymerization and oxidation of plant biopolymers. These reactions transform the aromatic and lipid plant components into amphiphilic molecules, that is, molecules that consist of separate hydrophobic (nonpolar) and hydrophilic (polar) parts. The nonpolar parts of the molecules are composed of relatively unaltered segments of plant polymers and the polar parts of carboxylic acid groups. These amphiphiles form membrane-like aggregates on mineral surfaces and micelle-like aggregates in solution. The exterior surfaces of these aggregates are hydrophilic, and the interiors constitute separate hydrophobic liquid-like phases.

  8. The Role of Surface Receptor Density in Surface-Initiated Polymerizations for Cancer Cell Isolation.

    PubMed

    Lilly, Jacob L; Berron, Brad J

    2016-06-01

    Fluid biopsies potentially offer a minimally invasive alternative to traditional tissue biopsies for the continual monitoring of metastatic cancer. Current established technologies for isolating circulating tumor cells (CTCs) suffer from poor purity and yield and require fixatives that preclude the collection of viable cells for longitudinal analyses of biological function. Antigen specific lysis (ASL) is a rapid, high-purity method of cell isolation based on targeted protective coatings on antigen-presenting cells and lysis depletion of unprotected antigen-negative cells. In ASL, photoinitiators are specifically labeled on cell surfaces that enable subsequent surface-initiated polymerization. Critically, the significant determinants of process yield have yet to be investigated for this emerging technology. In this work, we show that the labeling density of photoinitiators is strongly correlated with the yield of intact cells during ASL by flow cytometry analysis. Results suggest ASL is capable of delivering ∼25% of targeted cells after isolation using traditional antibody labeling approaches. Monomer formulations of two molecular weights of PEG-diacrylate (Mn ∼ 575 and 3500) are examined. The gelation response during ASL polymerization is also investigated via protein microarray analogues on planar glass. Finally, a density threshold of photoinitiator labeling required for protection during lysis is determined for both monomer formulations. These results indicate ASL is a promising technology for high yield CTC isolation for rare-cell function assays and fluid biopsies. PMID:27206735

  9. Regulation of the surface expression of the platelet-activating factor receptor in IC-21 peritoneal macrophages. Effects of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Chao, W; Olson, M S

    1992-10-15

    The effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the expression of the receptor for platelet-activating factor (1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine; AGEPC) was examined in cultured IC-21 peritoneal macrophages. AGEPC binding to its receptors reached saturation within 20 min at 25 degrees C and was reversible. Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of AGEPC receptors with a Bmax of approximately 170 fmol/mg cellular protein and a Kd of 0.25 nM. Preincubation of IC-21 cells with LPS (0.01-1,000 ng/ml) induced an increase in the surface expression of AGEPC receptors in a time- and concentration-dependent fashion. The maximal effect of LPS on the AGEPC receptor was observed between 5 and 8 h, with a typical increase between 150 and 200%. Scatchard analysis indicated that LPS treatment of IC-21 cells increased the number of AGEPC receptors on the cell surface without any apparent change in the affinity of the receptor for the ligand. The effect of LPS on the surface expression of the AGEPC receptor was nearly abolished by cycloheximide (0.1 mM) and by actinomycin D (3 microM), suggesting the involvement of enhanced receptor protein synthesis and mRNA production in this event. Moreover, LPS treatment increased the capability of the IC-21 cell to respond to AGEPC addition by elevating intracellular free Ca2+ without causing an increase in the basal level of intracellular Ca2+. The present study demonstrates that IC-21 peritoneal macrophages possess high affinity AGEPC receptors and provides the evidence that the number of functional AGEPC receptors on a cell can be increased significantly upon exposure to LPS. PMID:1328211

  10. Molecular-scale investigations of structures and surface charge distribution of surfactant aggregates by three-dimensional force mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Oyabu, Noriaki; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Kei

    2014-02-07

    Surface charges on nanoscale structures in liquids, such as biomolecules and nano-micelles, play an essentially important role in their structural stability as well as their chemical activities. These structures interact with each other through electric double layers (EDLs) formed by the counter ions in electrolyte solution. Although static-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) including colloidal-probe AFM is a powerful technique for surface charge density measurements and EDL analysis on a submicron scale in liquids, precise surface charge density analysis with single-nanometer resolution has not been made because of its limitation of the resolution and the detection sensitivity. Here we demonstrate molecular-scale surface charge measurements of self-assembled micellar structures, molecular hemicylinders of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), by three-dimensional (3D) force mapping based on frequency modulation AFM. The SDS hemicylindrical structures with a diameter of 4.8 nm on a graphite surface were clearly imaged. We have succeeded in visualizing 3D EDL forces on the SDS hemicylinder surfaces and obtaining the molecular-scale charge density for the first time. The results showed that the surface charge on the trench regions between the hemicylinders was much smaller than that on the hemicylinder tops. The method can be applied to a wide variety of local charge distribution studies, such as spatial charge variation on a single protein molecule.

  11. AMPAR interacting protein CPT1C enhances surface expression of GluA1-containing receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gratacòs-Batlle, Esther; Yefimenko, Natalia; Cascos-García, Helena; Soto, David

    2015-01-01

    AMPARs mediate the vast majority of fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain and their biophysical and trafficking properties depend on their subunit composition and on several posttranscriptional and posttranslational modifications. Additionally, in the brain AMPARs associate with auxiliary subunits, which modify the properties of the receptors. Despite the abundance of AMPAR partners, recent proteomic studies have revealed even more interacting proteins that could potentially be involved in AMPAR regulation. Amongst these, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1C (CPT1C) has been demonstrated to form an integral part of native AMPAR complexes in brain tissue extracts. Thus, we aimed to investigate whether CPT1C might be able to modulate AMPAR function. Firstly, we confirmed that CPT1C is an interacting protein of AMPARs in heterologous expression systems. Secondly, CPT1C enhanced whole-cell currents of GluA1 homomeric and GluA1/GluA2 heteromeric receptors. However, CPT1C does not alter the biophysical properties of AMPARs and co-localization experiments revealed that AMPARs and CPT1C are not associated at the plasma membrane despite a strong level of co-localization at the intracellular level. We established that increased surface GluA1 receptor number was responsible for the enhanced AMPAR mediated currents in the presence of CPT1C. Additionally, we revealed that the palmitoylable residue C585 of GluA1 is important in the enhancement of AMPAR trafficking to the cell surface by CPT1C. Nevertheless, despite its potential as a depalmitoylating enzyme, CPT1C does not affect the palmitoylation state of GluA1. To sum up, this work suggests that CPT1C plays a role as a novel regulator of AMPAR surface expression in neurons. Fine modulation of AMPAR membrane trafficking is fundamental in normal synaptic activity and in plasticity processes and CPT1C is therefore a putative candidate to regulate neuronal AMPAR physiology. PMID:25698923

  12. Quantitatively Resolving Ligand–Receptor Bonds on Cell Surfaces Using Force-Induced Remnant Magnetization Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Molecule-specific noncovalent bonding on cell surfaces is the foundation for cellular recognition and functioning. A major challenge in probing these bonds is to resolve the specific bonds quantitatively and efficiently from the nonspecific interactions in a complex environment. Using force-induced remnant magnetization spectroscopy (FIRMS), we were able to resolve quantitatively three different interactions for magnetic beads bearing anti-CD4 antibodies with CD4+ T cell surfaces based upon their binding forces. The binding force of the CD4 antibody–antigen bonds was determined to be 75 ± 3 pN. For comparison, the same bonds were also studied on a functionalized substrate surface, and the binding force was determined to be 90 ± 6 pN. The 15 pN difference revealed by high-resolution FIRMS illustrates the significant impact of the bonding environment. Because the force difference was unaffected by the cell number or the receptor density on the substrate, we attributed it to the possible conformational or local environmental differences of the CD4 antigens between the cell surface and substrate surface. Our results show that the high force resolution and detection efficiency afforded by FIRMS are valuable for studying protein–protein interactions on cell surfaces. PMID:27163031

  13. Aggregation of Individual Sensing Units for Signal Accumulation: Conversion of Liquid-Phase Colorimetric Assay into Enhanced Surface-Tethered Electrochemical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Tianxiang; Dong, Tingting; Wang, Zhaoyin; Bao, Jianchun; Tu, Wenwen; Dai, Zhihui

    2015-07-22

    A novel concept is proposed for converting liquid-phase colorimetric assay into enhanced surface-tethered electrochemical analysis, which is based on the analyte-induced formation of a network architecture of metal nanoparticles (MNs). In a proof-of-concept trial, thymine-functionalized silver nanoparticle (Ag-T) is designed as the sensing unit for Hg(2+) determination. Through a specific T-Hg(2+)-T coordination, the validation system based on functionalized sensing units not only can perform well in a colorimetric Hg(2+) assay, but also can be developed into a more sensitive and stable electrochemical Hg(2+) sensor. In electrochemical analysis, the simple principle of analyte-induced aggregation of MNs can be used as a dual signal amplification strategy for significantly improving the detection sensitivity. More importantly, those numerous and diverse colorimetric assays that rely on the target-induced aggregation of MNs can be augmented to satisfy the ambitious demands of sensitive analysis by converting them into electrochemical assays via this approach. PMID:26149108

  14. Awa1p on the cell surface of sake yeast inhibits biofilm formation and the co-aggregation between sake yeasts and Lactobacillus plantarum ML11-11.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Satoru; Shimizu, Masashi; Tsuchiya, Noriko; Furukawa, Soichi; Watanabe, Daisuke; Shimoi, Hitoshi; Takagi, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2015-05-01

    We examined mixed-species biofilm formation between Lactobacillus plantarum ML11-11 and both foaming and non-foaming mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeasts. Wild-type strains showed significantly lower levels of biofilm formation compared with the non-foaming mutants. Awa1p, a protein involved in foam formation during sake brewing, is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein and is associated with the cell wall of sake yeasts. The AWA1 gene of the non-foaming mutant strain Kyokai no. 701 (K701) has lost the C-terminal sequence that includes the GPI anchor signal. Mixed-species biofilm formation and co-aggregation of wild-type strain Kyokai no. 7 (K7) were significantly lower than K701 UT-1 (K701 ura3/ura3 trp1/trp1), while the levels of strain K701 UT-1 carrying the AWA1 on a plasmid were comparable to those of K7. The levels of biofilm formation and co-aggregation of the strain K701 UT-1 harboring AWA1 with a deleted GPI anchor signal were similar to those of K701 UT-1. These results clearly demonstrate that Awa1p present on the surface of sake yeast strain K7 inhibits adhesion between yeast cells and L. plantarum ML11-11, consequently impeding mixed-species biofilm formation.

  15. Ultrasensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection of trypsin based on anti-aggregation of 4-mercaptopyridine-functionalized silver nanoparticles: an optical sensing platform toward proteases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lingxin; Fu, Xiuli; Li, Jinhua

    2013-07-01

    In this work, a simple and sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) strategy was developed for recognition and detection of trypsin, by using anti-aggregation of 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MPY)-functionalized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) based on the interaction between protamine and trypsin. The polycationic protamine not only served as a substrate for enzyme hydrolysis but also worked as a medium for SERS enhancement, which could bind negatively charged 4-MPY-functionalized AgNPs and induce their aggregation. The hydrolysis catalyzed with trypsin in sample solution decreased the concentration of free protamine, resulting in the dispersion of AgNPs and thus decreasing the Raman intensity of 4-MPY, by which the trypsin could be sensed optically. A detection level down to 0.1 ng mL(-1) for trypsin was obtained. The induced accumulation of AgNPs modified with Raman reporter 4-MPY largely enhanced the SERS responses. A good linearity was found within the wide range over five orders of magnitude and reasonable relative standard deviations (between 2.4 and 11.6%) were attained. By using trypsin as a model, the new concept can provide an excellent platform for ultrasensitive SERS measurements of various proteases/enzymes which can lead to nanoparticles stability change through catalyzed hydrolysis toward substrate. PMID:23703031

  16. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor for dopamine using D3 dopamine receptor as a biorecognition molecule.

    PubMed

    Kumbhat, Sunita; Shankaran, Dhesingh Ravi; Kim, Sook Jin; Gobi, K Vengatajalabathy; Joshi, Vinod; Miura, Norio

    2007-10-31

    In modern biomedical technology, development of high performance sensing methods for dopamine (DA) is a critical issue because of its vital role in human metabolism. We report here, a new kind of bioaffinity sensor for DA based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) using a D(3) dopamine receptor (DA-RC) as a recognition element. A conjugate of DA was synthesized using bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein and was characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The biosensor surface was constructed by the immobilization of the DA-BSA conjugate onto an SPR gold surface by physical adsorption. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigations revealed that the DA-BSA conjugate was homogeneously distributed over the sensor surface. Specific interaction of the DA-RC with the immobilized DA-BSA conjugate was studied by SPR. Based on the principle of indirect competitive inhibition, the biosensor could detect DA in a linear dynamic range from 85 pg/ml (ppt) to 700 ng/ml (ppb). The biosensor was highly specific for DA and showed no significant interference from potent interferences such as ascorbic acid (AA), uric acid (UA) and other DA analogues viz., 3,4 dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid (DOPAC) and 3-(3,4 dihydroxyphenyl)-alanine (DOPA). The sensor surface displayed a high level of stability during repeated regeneration and affinity reaction cycles. Since this biosensor is simple, effective and is based on utilization of natural receptor, our study presents an encouraging scope for development of portable detection systems for in-vitro and in-vivo measurement of DA in clinical and medical diagnostics.

  17. A Hydrophobic Gold Surface Triggers Misfolding and Aggregation of the Amyloidogenic Josephin Domain in Monomeric Form, While Leaving the Oligomers Unaffected

    PubMed Central

    Apicella, Alessandra; Soncini, Monica; Deriu, Marco Agostino; Natalello, Antonino; Bonanomi, Marcella; Dellasega, David; Tortora, Paolo; Regonesi, Maria Elena; Casari, Carlo Spartaco

    2013-01-01

    Protein misfolding and aggregation in intracellular and extracellular spaces is regarded as a main marker of the presence of degenerative disorders such as amyloidoses. To elucidate the mechanisms of protein misfolding, the interaction of proteins with inorganic surfaces is of particular relevance, since surfaces displaying different wettability properties may represent model systems of the cell membrane. Here, we unveil the role of surface hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity in the misfolding of the Josephin domain (JD), a globular-shaped domain of ataxin-3, the protein responsible for the spinocerebellar ataxia type 3. By means of a combined experimental and theoretical approach based on atomic force microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations, we reveal changes in JD morphology and secondary structure elicited by the interaction with the hydrophobic gold substrate, but not by the hydrophilic mica. Our results demonstrate that the interaction with the gold surface triggers misfolding of the JD when it is in native-like configuration, while no structural modification is observed after the protein has undergone oligomerization. This raises the possibility that biological membranes would be unable to affect amyloid oligomeric structures and toxicity. PMID:23527026

  18. The role of cell surface receptors in the activation of human B cells by phosphorothioate oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Liang, H; Reich, C F; Pisetsky, D S; Lipsky, P E

    2000-08-01

    Phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides (sODN) containing the CpG motif or TCG repeats induce T cell-independent polyclonal activation of human B cells. To elucidate the mechanism of this response, the role of cell surface receptors was investigated. Sepharose beads coated with stimulatory but not nonstimulatory sODNs induced B cell proliferation comparably with soluble sODNs. The B cell stimulatory activity of Sepharose-bound sODN did not result from free sODN released from the beads since media incubated with coated beads were inactive. Using FITC-labeled sODNs as probes, binding to human B cells could be detected by flow cytometry. Binding was rapid, saturable, initially temperature independent, but with a rapid off-rate. Competition studies indicated that both stimulatory sODNs and minimally stimulatory sODNs bound to the same receptor. By contrast, phosphodiester oligonucleotides with the same nucleotide sequence as sODNs and bacterial DNA inhibited the binding of sODNs to B cells minimally. Charge appeared to contribute to the binding of sODNs to B cells since binding of sODNs was competitively inhibited by negatively charged molecules, including fucoidan, poly I, and polyvinyl sulfate. These data indicate that human B cells bind sODNs by a receptor-mediated mechanism that is necessary but not sufficient for polyclonal activation.

  19. CIN85 modulates TGFβ signaling by promoting the presentation of TGFβ receptors on the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Yakymovych, Ihor; Yakymovych, Mariya; Zang, Guangxiang; Mu, Yabing; Bergh, Anders; Landström, Maréne

    2015-01-01

    Members of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) family initiate cellular responses by binding to TGFβ receptor type II (TβRII) and type I (TβRI) serine/threonine kinases, whereby Smad2 and Smad3 are phosphorylated and activated, promoting their association with Smad4. We report here that TβRI interacts with the SH3 domains of the adaptor protein CIN85 in response to TGFβ stimulation in a TRAF6-dependent manner. Small interfering RNA–mediated knockdown of CIN85 resulted in accumulation of TβRI in intracellular compartments and diminished TGFβ-stimulated Smad2 phosphorylation. Overexpression of CIN85 instead increased the amount of TβRI at the cell surface. This effect was inhibited by a dominant-negative mutant of Rab11, suggesting that CIN85 promoted recycling of TGFβ receptors. CIN85 enhanced TGFβ-stimulated Smad2 phosphorylation, transcriptional responses, and cell migration. CIN85 expression correlated with the degree of malignancy of prostate cancers. Collectively, our results reveal that CIN85 promotes recycling of TGFβ receptors and thereby positively regulates TGFβ signaling. PMID:26169354

  20. Molecular recognition of human ephrinB2 cell surface receptor by an emergent African henipavirus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Benhur; Pernet, Olivier; Ahmed, Asim A.; Zeltina, Antra; Beaty, Shannon M.; Bowden, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of African henipaviruses (HNVs) related to pathogenic Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) from Southeast Asia and Australia presents an open-ended health risk. Cell receptor use by emerging African HNVs at the stage of host-cell entry is a key parameter when considering the potential for spillover and infection of human populations. The attachment glycoprotein from a Ghanaian bat isolate (GhV-G) exhibits <30% sequence identity with Asiatic NiV-G/HeV-G. Here, through functional and structural analysis of GhV-G, we show how this African HNV targets the same human cell-surface receptor (ephrinB2) as the Asiatic HNVs. We first characterized this virus−receptor interaction crystallographically. Compared with extant HNV-G–ephrinB2 structures, there was significant structural variation in the six-bladed β-propeller scaffold of the GhV-G receptor-binding domain, but not the Greek key fold of the bound ephrinB2. Analysis revealed a surprisingly conserved mode of ephrinB2 interaction that reflects an ongoing evolutionary constraint among geographically distal and phylogenetically divergent HNVs to maintain the functionality of ephrinB2 recognition during virus–host entry. Interestingly, unlike NiV-G/HeV-G, we could not detect binding of GhV-G to ephrinB3. Comparative structure–function analysis further revealed several distinguishing features of HNV-G function: a secondary ephrinB2 interaction site that contributes to more efficient ephrinB2-mediated entry in NiV-G relative to GhV-G and cognate residues at the very C terminus of GhV-G (absent in Asiatic HNV-Gs) that are vital for efficient receptor-induced fusion, but not receptor binding per se. These data provide molecular-level details for evaluating the likelihood of African HNVs to spill over into human populations. PMID:25825759

  1. Salt-free catanionic surface active ionic liquids 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium alkylsulfate: aggregation behavior in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jingjing; Han, Bing; Lin, Meijia; Cheng, Ni; Yu, Li; Liu, Min

    2013-12-15

    A series of salt-free catanionic surface active ionic liquids (SAILs), 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolim alkyl sulfates (denoted as [Cnmim][CmSO4], n=6, 8, 10; m=12 and n=4; m=10, 14) were synthesized by an ion exchange reaction and their surface properties in aqueous solution were examined systematically by surface tension, fluorescence and electrical conductivity measurements. As catanionic surfactants, these SAILs exhibit notably higher surface activity, compared to the cationic or anionic analogues. Increment in both cationic and anionic alkyl chain lengths for [Cnmim][CmSO4] can both improve the amphiphilic character remarkably. This can be ascribed to cooperative interactions as formation of catanionic pairs between alkyl-substituted imidazolium cations and alkyl sulfate anions. The negative micellization Gibbs free energy values prove that the micellization of all the 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolim alkyl sulfates investigated is a spontaneous process. Any additional CH2 group makes the micellization process easier regardless if it is on a cation or an anion. When keeping the total carbon atom number constant, we find that the [Cnmim][CmSO4] molecules with greater asymmetric alkyl chains display superior surface activity. This work indicates that the self-assembly of these imidazolium-based salt-free catanionic SAILs can be tailored by adjusting the mismatch of alkyl chains. These SAILs are expected to have potential applications in the fields of colloidal and interface and nanomaterial synthesis.

  2. Influence of localized surface plasmon resonance and free electrons on the optical properties of ultrathin Au films: a study of the aggregation effect.

    PubMed

    Li, X D; Chen, T P; Liu, Y; Leong, K C

    2014-03-10

    The contributions of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) and Drude (free electrons) absorption to the complex dielectric function of ultrathin Au films were investigated with spectroscopic ellipsometry. When the Au film thickness is thinner than ~10 nm, Au nanoparticles (NPs) are formed as a result of the discontinuity in the films, leading to the emergence of LSPR of Au NPs; and the LSPR exhibits a splitting when the films thinner than ~8 nm, which could be attributed to the near-field coupling of the Au NPs and/or the inhomogeneous polarizations of the Au NPs. On the other hand, the delocalization of electrons in Au NPs due to the aggregation of Au NPs in a thicker film leads to an increase in the free-electron absorption and a suppression of the LSPR. PMID:24663852

  3. Cell surface activation of the erythropoietin receptor by Friend spleen focus-forming virus gp55.

    PubMed Central

    Li, J P; Hu, H O; Niu, Q T; Fang, C

    1995-01-01

    The leukemogenic membrane glycoprotein gp55, encoded by Friend spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV), induces erythroid cell proliferation through its interaction with the erythropoietin receptor (EPO-R). There are two forms of gp55 in SFFV-infected cells: an intracellular form (more than 95% of the total protein), which is localized within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes, and a cell surface form (about 3 to 5%). Because both forms of the viral proteins bind to EPO-R, it is not clear whether the viral protein induces mitogenesis intracellularly or at the cell surface. To address this question, we constructed an EPO-R mutant that contained a 6-amino-acid (DEKKMP) C-terminus ER retention signal. Biochemical and functional analyses with this mutant indicated that it was completely retained in the ER and not expressed at the cell surface. Further analysis showed that the mutant, like the wild-type EPO-R, interacted with SFFV gp55. However, this apparent intracellular interaction between the two proteins failed to induce growth factor-independent proliferation of Ba/F3 cells. Furthermore, spontaneous variants of the ER-retained EPO-R selected on the basis of their ability to induce cell proliferation when coexpressed with gp55 were exclusively expressed at the cell surface. Thus, our results support the hypothesis that the mitogenic activation of the EPO-R by gp55 requires the interaction of the two proteins at the cell surface. PMID:7853508

  4. Cell surface receptors for herpes simplex virus are heparan sulfate proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The role of cell surface heparan sulfate in herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection was investigated using CHO cell mutants defective in various aspects of glycosaminoglycan synthesis. Binding of radiolabeled virus to the cells and infection were assessed in mutant and wild-type cells. Virus bound efficiently to wild-type cells and initiated an abortive infection in which immediate-early or alpha viral genes were expressed, despite limited production of late viral proteins and progeny virus. Binding of virus to heparan sulfate-deficient mutant cells was severely impaired and mutant cells were resistant to HSV infection. Intermediate levels of binding and infection were observed for a CHO cell mutant that produced undersulfated heparan sulfate. These results show that heparan sulfate moieties of cell surface proteoglycans serve as receptors for HSV. PMID:1310996

  5. Macrophage recognition of toxic advanced glycosylation end products through the macrophage surface-receptor nucleolin.

    PubMed

    Miki, Yuichi; Dambara, Hikaru; Tachibana, Yoshihiro; Hirano, Kazuya; Konishi, Mio; Beppu, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    Advanced glycosylation end-products (AGEs) are non-enzymatically glycosylated proteins that play an important role in several diseases and aging processes, including angiopathy, renal failure, diabetic complications, and some neurodegenerative diseases. In particular, glyceraldehyde (GCA)- and glycolaldehyde (GOA)-derived AGEs are deemed toxic AGEs, due to their cytotoxicity. Recently, the shuttling-protein nucleolin has been shown to possess scavenger receptor-activity. Here, we investigated whether or not macrophages recognize toxic AGEs through nucleolin receptors expressed on their surface. Free amino acid groups and arginine residues found in bovine serum albumin (BSA) were time-dependently modified by incubation with GCA and GOA. In addition, average molecular size was increased by incubation with GCA and GOA. While GCA-treated BSA (GCA-BSA) and GOA-treated BSA (GOA-BSA) were recognized by thioglycollate-elicited mouse peritoneal macrophages in proportion to their respective aldehyde-modification ratios, aldehyde-untreated control-BSA was not. Surface plasmon-resonance analysis revealed that nucleolin strongly associated with GCA-BSA and GOA-BSA, but not with control-BSA. Further, pretreating macrophages with anti-nucleolin antibody, but not control-Immunoglobulin G, inhibited recognition of GCA-BSA and GOA-BSA by macrophages. Additionally, AGRO, a nucleolin-specific oligonucleotide aptamer, inhibited recognition of GCA-BSA and GOA-BSA. Moreover, nucleolin-transfected HEK293 cells recognized more GCA-BSA and GOA-BSA than control HEK cells did. Binding of nucleolin and GCA-BSA/GOA-BSA was also blocked by anti-nucleolin antibody at molecular level. These results indicate that nucleolin is a receptor that allows macrophages to recognize toxic AGEs.

  6. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, T.I.; Bolen, W.P.

    2007-01-01

    Construction aggregates, primarily stone, sand and gravel, are recovered from widespread naturally occurring mineral deposits and processed for use primarily in the construction industry. They are mined, crushed, sorted by size and sold loose or combined with portland cement or asphaltic cement to make concrete products to build roads, houses, buildings, and other structures. Much smaller quantities are used in agriculture, cement manufacture, chemical and metallurgical processes, glass production and many other products.

  7. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    Part of the Annual Commodities Review 1995. Production of construction aggregates such as crushed stone and construction sand and gravel showed a marginal increase in 1995. Most of the 1995 increases were due to funding for highway construction work. The major areas of concern to the industry included issues relating to wetlands classification and the classification of crystalline silica as a probable human carcinogen. Despite this, an increase in demand is anticipated for 1996.

  8. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepordei, V.V.

    1993-01-01

    Part of a special section on the market performance of industrial minerals in 1992. Production of construction aggregates increased by 4.6 percent in 1992. This increase was due, in part, to the increased funding for transportation and infrastructure projects. The U.S. produced about 1.05 Gt of crushed stone and an estimated 734 Mt of construction sand and gravel in 1992. Demand is expected to increase by about 5 percent in 1993.

  9. Modeling study of surface ozone source-receptor relationships in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Yang, Wenyi; Wang, Zifa; Chen, Huansheng; Hu, Bo; Li, Jianjun.; Sun, Yele.; Fu, Pingqing; Zhang, Yuqia

    2016-01-01

    Ozone source-receptor relationships over East Asia have been quantitatively investigated using a chemical transport model including an on-line tracer-tagged procedure, with a particular focus on the source regions of different daily ozone mixing ratios. Comparison with observations showed that the model reproduced surface ozone and tropospheric nitrogen dioxide column densities. Long-range transport from outside East Asia contributed the greatest fraction to annual surface ozone over remote regions, the Korean peninsula, and Japan, reaching 50%-80% of total ozone. Self-contributions accounted for 5%-20% ozone in the Korean peninsula and Japan, whereas the contribution of trans-boundary transport from photochemical production in China was less than 5%-10%. At extra-high ozone levels, self-contributions reached 50%-60% in the Korean peninsula. Ozone source-receptor relationships showed high seasonal variability over East Asia. Significant transport was also found between sub-regions in China, which presents a great challenge to policy-makers because most current control strategies are confined to specific regions.

  10. Brownian nanoimaging of interface dynamics and ligand-receptor binding at cell surfaces in 3-D.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Igor R; Evans, Evan A

    2013-04-01

    We describe a method for nanoimaging interfacial dynamics and ligand-receptor binding at surfaces of live cells in 3-D. The imaging probe is a 1-μm diameter glass bead confined by a soft laser trap to create a "cloud" of fluctuating states. Using a facile on-line method of video image analysis, the probe displacements are reported at ~10 ms intervals with bare precisions (±SD) of 4-6 nm along the optical axis (elevation) and 2 nm in the transverse directions. We demonstrate how the Brownian distributions are analyzed to characterize the free energy potential of each small probe in 3-D taking into account the blur effect of its motions during CCD image capture. Then, using the approach to image interactions of a labeled probe with lamellae of leukocytic cells spreading on cover-glass substrates, we show that deformations of the soft distribution in probe elevations provide both a sensitive long-range sensor for defining the steric topography of a cell lamella and a fast telemetry for reporting rare events of probe binding with its surface receptors. Invoking established principles of Brownian physics and statistical thermodynamics, we describe an off-line method of super resolution that improves precision of probe separations from a non-reactive steric boundary to ~1 nm.

  11. Selection of functional T cell receptor mutants from a yeast surface-display library.

    PubMed

    Kieke, M C; Shusta, E V; Boder, E T; Teyton, L; Wittrup, K D; Kranz, D M

    1999-05-11

    The heterodimeric alphabeta T cell receptor (TCR) for antigen is the key determinant of T cell specificity. The structure of the TCR is very similar to that of antibodies, but the engineering of TCRs by directed evolution with combinatorial display libraries has not been accomplished to date. Here, we report that yeast surface display of a TCR was achieved only after the mutation of specific variable region residues. These residues are located in two regions of the TCR, at the interface of the alpha- and beta-chains and in the beta-chain framework region that is thought to be in proximity to the CD3 signal-transduction complex. The mutations are encoded naturally in many antibody variable regions, indicating specific functional differences that have not been appreciated between TCRs and antibodies. The identification of these residues provides an explanation for the inherent difficulties in the display of wild-type TCRs compared with antibodies. Yeast-displayed mutant TCRs bind specifically to the peptide/MHC antigen, enabling engineering of soluble T cell receptors as specific T cell antagonists. This strategy of random mutagenesis followed by selection for surface expression may be of general use in the directed evolution of other eukaryotic proteins that are refractory to display.

  12. Nanoparticle aggregation: principles and modeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    The high surface area to volume ratio of nanoparticles usually results in highly reactive and colloidal instability compared to their bulk counterparts. Aggregation as well as many other transformations (e.g., dissolution) in the environment may alter the physiochemical properties, reactivity, fate, transport, and biological interactions (e.g., bioavailability and uptake) of nanoparticles. The unique properties pertinent to nanoparticles, such as shape, size, surface characteristics, composition, and electronic structures, greatly challenge the ability of colloid science to understand nanoparticle aggregation and its environmental impacts. This review briefly introduces fundamentals about aggregation, fractal dimensions, classic and extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeak (DLVO) theories, aggregation kinetic modeling, experimental measurements, followed by detailed discussions on the major factors on aggregation and subsequent effects on nanomaterial transport and reactivity.

  13. Aggregation Behavior of Imidazolium-Based Surface-Active Ionic Liquids with Photoresponsive Cinnamate Counterions in the Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yanhui; Zhao, Liuchen; Hu, Qiongzheng; Gao, Yan'an; Yu, Li

    2015-11-24

    Two imidazolium-based surface active ionic liquids (SAILs) with photoresponsive cinnamate aromatic counterions, viz. 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium cinnamate ([C12mim][CA]) and 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium para-hydroxy-cinnamate ([C12mim][PCA]), were newly synthesized, and their self-assembly behaviors in aqueous solutions were systematically explored. Results of surface tension and conductivity measurements show that both [C12mim][CA] and [C12mim][PCA] display a superior surface activity in aqueous solutions compared to the common imidazolium-based SAIL, 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide (C12mimBr), which implies the incorporation of cinnamate aromatic counterions can promote the micellar formation. Furthermore, [C12mim][CA] shows higher surface activity due to the higher hydrophobicity of its counterion in comparison to [C12mim][PCA] that has a hydroxyl group. Both hexagonal liquid-crystalline phase (H1) and cubic liquid-crystalline phase (V2) were constructed in the [C12mim][CA] aqueous solutions. In contrast, the [C12mim][PCA]/H2O system only exhibits a single hexagonal liquid-crystalline phase (H1) in a broad concentration region. These lyotropic liquid crystal (LLC) phases were comprehensively characterized by polarized optical microscopy (POM), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and rheometer. Investigation on the temperature-dependent self-assembly nanostructures demonstrates that the higher temperature leads to a looser arrangement. Under UV irradiation, trans-cis photoisomerization of the phenylalkene group results in inferior surface activity of the prepared SAILs in aqueous solution with higher cmc values. Moreover, UV light irradiation induces obvious change of the structural parameters without altering the LLC phases. This work is expected to enrich the investigations of phase behaviors formed in SAILs systems and receive particular attention due to their unique properties and potential applications in drug delivery, biochemistry, materials

  14. Adhesion, activation, and aggregation of blood platelets and biofilm formation on the surfaces of titanium alloys Ti6Al4V and Ti6Al7Nb.

    PubMed

    Walkowiak-Przybyło, M; Klimek, L; Okrój, W; Jakubowski, W; Chwiłka, M; Czajka, A; Walkowiak, B

    2012-03-01

    Titanium alloys are still on the top list of fundamental materials intended for dental, orthopedics, neurological, and cardiovascular implantations. Recently, a special attention has been paid to vanadium-free titanium alloy, Ti6Al7Nb, that seems to represent higher biocompatibility than traditional Ti6Al4V alloy. Surprisingly, these data are not thoroughly elaborated in the literature; particularly there is a lack of comparative experiments conducted simultaneously and at the same conditions. Our study fills these shortcomings in the field of blood contact and microbiological colonization. To observe platelets adhesion and biofilm formation on the surfaces of compared titanium alloys, fluorescence microscope Olympus GX71 and scanning electron microscope HITACHI S-3000N were used. Additionally, flow cytometry analysis of platelets aggregation and activation in the whole blood after contact with sample surface, as an essential tool for biomaterial thrombocompatibility assessment, was proposed. As a result of our study it was demonstrated that polished surfaces of Ti6Al7Nb and Ti6Al4V alloys after contact with whole citrated blood and E. coli bacterial cells exhibit a considerable difference. Overall, it was established that Ti6Al4V has distinct tendency to higher thrombogenicity, more excessive bacterial biofilm formation and notable cytotoxic properties in comparison to Ti6Al7Nb. However, we suggest these studies should be extended for other types of cells and biological objects.

  15. Effect of bleaching agents having a neutral pH on the surface of mineral trioxide aggregate using electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Kazia, Nooh; Suvarna, Nithin; Shetty, Harish Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of bleaching agents having a neutral pH on the surface of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) used as a coronal seal material for nonvital bleaching, beneath the bleaching agent, with the help of energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Six samples of plastic tubes filled with white MTA (Angelus white) were kept in 100% humidity for 21 days. Each sample was divided into 2 and made into 12 samples. These were then divided into three groups. Group A was exposed to Opalescence Boost 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) (Ultradent). Group B to Opalescence 10% carbamide peroxide (Ultradent) and Group C (control group) not exposed to any bleaching agent. After recommended period of exposure to bleaching agents according to manufacturers’ instructions, the samples were observed under SEM with an energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis system (JSM-6380 LA). Results: There were no relevant changes in color and no statistically significant surface structure changes of the MTA in both the experimental groups. Conclusion: The present findings suggest that even high concentration HP containing bleaching agents with neutral pH can be used on the surface of MTA without causing structural changes. The superior sealing ability of MTA and the high alkalinity would prevent cervical resorption postbleaching.

  16. Effect of bleaching agents having a neutral pH on the surface of mineral trioxide aggregate using electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Kazia, Nooh; Suvarna, Nithin; Shetty, Harish Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of bleaching agents having a neutral pH on the surface of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) used as a coronal seal material for nonvital bleaching, beneath the bleaching agent, with the help of energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Six samples of plastic tubes filled with white MTA (Angelus white) were kept in 100% humidity for 21 days. Each sample was divided into 2 and made into 12 samples. These were then divided into three groups. Group A was exposed to Opalescence Boost 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) (Ultradent). Group B to Opalescence 10% carbamide peroxide (Ultradent) and Group C (control group) not exposed to any bleaching agent. After recommended period of exposure to bleaching agents according to manufacturers’ instructions, the samples were observed under SEM with an energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis system (JSM-6380 LA). Results: There were no relevant changes in color and no statistically significant surface structure changes of the MTA in both the experimental groups. Conclusion: The present findings suggest that even high concentration HP containing bleaching agents with neutral pH can be used on the surface of MTA without causing structural changes. The superior sealing ability of MTA and the high alkalinity would prevent cervical resorption postbleaching. PMID:27656061

  17. Synthesis of an endothelial cell mimicking surface containing thrombomodulin and endothelial protein C receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kador, Karl Erich

    Synthetic materials for use in blood contacting applications have been studied for many years with limited success. One of the main areas of need for these materials is the design of synthetic vascular grafts for use in the hundreds of thousands of patients who have coronary artery bypass grafting, many without suitable veins for autologous grafts. The design of these grafts is constrained by two common modes of failure, the formation of intimal hyperplasia (IH) and thrombosis. IH formation has been previously linked to a mismatching of the mechanical properties of the graft and has been overcome by creating grafts using materials whose compliance mimics that of the native artery. Several techniques and surface modification have been designed to limit thrombosis on the surface of synthetic materials. One which has shown the greatest promise is the immobilization of Thrombomodulin (TM), a protein found on the endothelial cell membrane lining native blood vessels involved in the activation of the anticoagulant Protein C (PC). While TM immobilization has been shown to arrest thrombin formation and limit fibrous formations in in-vitro and in-vivo experiments, it has shown to be transport limiting under arterial flow. On the endothelial cell surface, TM is co-localized with Endothelial Protein C Receptor (EPCR), which increases PC transport onto the cell surface and increases PC activation via TM between 20-100 fold. This dissertation will describe the chemical modification of medical grade polyurethane (PU), whose compliance has been shown to match that of native arteries. This modification will enable the immobilization of two proteins on an enzymatically relevant scale estimated at less than 10 nm. This dissertation will further describe the immobilization of the proteins TM and EPCR, and analyze the ability of a surface co-immobilized with these proteins to activate the anticoagulant PC. Finally, it will compare the ability of this co-immobilized surface to delay

  18. A covalently dimerized recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-15 variant identifies bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 1B as a key cell surface receptor on ovarian granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Pulkki, Minna M; Mottershead, David G; Pasternack, Arja H; Muggalla, Pranuthi; Ludlow, Helen; van Dinther, Maarten; Myllymaa, Samu; Koli, Katri; ten Dijke, Peter; Laitinen, Mika; Ritvos, Olli

    2012-03-01

    Genetic studies have identified bone morphogenetic protein-15 (BMP15) as an essential regulator of female fertility in humans and in sheep. Oocyte-derived BMP15 is a noncovalently linked dimeric growth factor mediating its effects to ovarian somatic cells in a paracrine manner. Although receptor ectodomains capable of binding BMP15 have previously been reported, no cell surface receptor complex involved in BMP15 signaling has previously been characterized. Here we have expressed and purified recombinant human BMP15 noncovalent and covalent dimer variants. The biological effects of these BMP15 variants were assessed in cultured human granulosa-luteal cells or COV434 granulosa cell tumor cells using BMP-responsive transcriptional reporter assays and an inhibin B ELISA. Biochemical characterization of ligand-receptor interactions was performed with affinity-labeling experiments using [(125)I]iodinated BMP15 variants. Both ligand variants were shown to form homodimers and to stimulate Smad1/5/8 signaling and inhibin B production in human granulosa cells in a similar manner. [(125)I]Iodination of both ligands was achieved, but only the covalent dimer variant retained receptor binding capacity. The [(125)I]BMP15(S356C) variant bound preferentially to endogenous BMP receptor 1B (BMPR1B) and BMPR2 receptors on COV434 cells. Binding experiments in COS cells with overexpression of these receptors confirmed that the [(125)I]BMP15(S356C) variant binds to BMPR1B and BMPR2 forming the BMP15 signaling complex. The results provide the first direct evidence in any species on the identification of specific cell surface receptors for a member of the GDF9/BMP15 subfamily of oocyte growth factors. The fact that BMP15 uses preferentially BMPR1B as its type I receptor suggests an important role for the BMPR1B receptor in human female fertility. The result is well in line with the demonstration of ovarian failure in a recently reported human subject with a homozygous BMPR1B loss

  19. Surfactant adsorption and aggregate structure of silica nanoparticles: a versatile stratagem for the regulation of particle size and surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Savita; Rohilla, Deepak; Mehta, S. K.

    2014-03-01

    The area of silica nanoparticles is incredibly polygonal. Silica particles have aroused exceptional deliberation in bio-analysis due to great progress in particular arenas, for instance, biocompatibility, unique properties of modifiable pore size and organization, huge facade areas and pore volumes, manageable morphology and amendable surfaces, elevated chemical and thermal stability. Currently, silica nanoparticles participate in crucial utilities in daily trade rationales such as power storage, chemical and genetic sensors, groceries dispensation and catalysis. Herein, the size-dependent interfacial relation of anionic silica nanoparticles with twelve altered categories of cationic surfactants has been carried out in terms of the physical chemical facets of colloid and interface science. The current analysis endeavours to investigate the virtual consequences of different surfactants through the development of the objective composite materials. The nanoparticle size controls, the surface-to-volume ratio and surface bend relating to its interaction with surfactant will also be addressed in this work. More importantly, the simulated stratagem developed in this work can be lengthened to formulate core-shell nanostructures with functional nanoparticles encapsulated in silica particles, making this approach valuable and extensively pertinent for employing sophisticated materials for catalysis and drug delivery.

  20. Selective imaging of quorum sensing receptors in bacteria using fluorescent Au nanocluster probes surface functionalized with signal molecules.

    PubMed

    Mukherji, Ruchira; Samanta, Anupam; Illathvalappil, Rajith; Chowdhury, Somak; Prabhune, Asmita; Devi, R Nandini

    2013-12-26

    Fluorescent ultrasmall gold clusters decorated with bacterial quorum sensing signal molecules, acyl homoserine lactone, are synthesized. These fluorescent probes are found to have emission in the near-infrared spectral region advantageous for bioimaging. Imaging studies using different strains of bacteria with and without acyl homoserine lactone receptors with the aid of confocal microscopy have shown that the probe interacts preferentially with cells possessing these receptors. This indicates that, with appropriate surface functionalization, the Au clusters can be used for receptor specific detection with enhanced selectivity.

  1. Respiratory burst in human B lymphocytes. Triggering of surface Ig receptors induces modulation of chemiluminescence signal.

    PubMed

    Leca, G; Benichou, G; Bensussan, A; Mitenne, F; Galanaud, P; Vazquez, A

    1991-05-15

    B lymphocytes have been shown to proliferate and release oxygen metabolites when surface Ig is cross-linked and when stimulated with phorbol ester. Biochemical evidence has been provided for the presence of a superoxide generating system in B cells, which seems to be identical to the well-characterized NADPH-oxidase of phagocytes. In this report, we show that normal and EBV-transformed B cells produce superoxide anions after stimulation with phorbol ester and when surface Ig was cross-linked, as detected by lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence. Anti-surface IgG antibodies induced a significant respiratory burst whereas those directed against surface IgM had no effect on B cell oxidative metabolism. Prestimulated B lymphocytes responded to further triggering by the same or another ligand. Pretreatment with Staphlococcus aureus Cowan I strain (SAC) or anti-IgM antibodies resulted in complete unresponsiveness to subsequent SAC or anti-IgG stimulation, but it did not affect PMA- and ionomycin-mediated B cell chemiluminescence. In contrast to preincubation with anti-IgM antibodies, the pretreatment of B cells with SAC induced a transient inhibitory effect on B cell signaling. In fact, SAC-pretreated B lymphocytes could be restimulated with the same ligand when blast cells were isolated. Furthermore, a 24-h incubation of the pretreated B cells in the absence of SAC completely restored the SAC-mediated respiratory burst. These results suggest that two distinct mechanisms may account for SAC- and anti-IgM-induced inhibition: a transient and reversible modulation of surface Ig, induced by SAC, and a long-lasting desensitization of the surface Ig receptors, respectively. These findings may have interesting implications for understanding the transduction of negative signals in B lymphocytes.

  2. Ultrasensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection of trypsin based on anti-aggregation of 4-mercaptopyridine-functionalized silver nanoparticles: an optical sensing platform toward proteases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lingxin; Fu, Xiuli; Li, Jinhua

    2013-06-01

    In this work, a simple and sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) strategy was developed for recognition and detection of trypsin, by using anti-aggregation of 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MPY)-functionalized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) based on the interaction between protamine and trypsin. The polycationic protamine not only served as a substrate for enzyme hydrolysis but also worked as a medium for SERS enhancement, which could bind negatively charged 4-MPY-functionalized AgNPs and induce their aggregation. The hydrolysis catalyzed with trypsin in sample solution decreased the concentration of free protamine, resulting in the dispersion of AgNPs and thus decreasing the Raman intensity of 4-MPY, by which the trypsin could be sensed optically. A detection level down to 0.1 ng mL-1 for trypsin was obtained. The induced accumulation of AgNPs modified with Raman reporter 4-MPY largely enhanced the SERS responses. A good linearity was found within the wide range over five orders of magnitude and reasonable relative standard deviations (between 2.4 and 11.6%) were attained. By using trypsin as a model, the new concept can provide an excellent platform for ultrasensitive SERS measurements of various proteases/enzymes which can lead to nanoparticles stability change through catalyzed hydrolysis toward substrate.In this work, a simple and sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) strategy was developed for recognition and detection of trypsin, by using anti-aggregation of 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MPY)-functionalized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) based on the interaction between protamine and trypsin. The polycationic protamine not only served as a substrate for enzyme hydrolysis but also worked as a medium for SERS enhancement, which could bind negatively charged 4-MPY-functionalized AgNPs and induce their aggregation. The hydrolysis catalyzed with trypsin in sample solution decreased the concentration of free protamine, resulting in the dispersion of AgNPs and

  3. Construction aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bolen, W.P.; Tepordei, V.V.

    2001-01-01

    The estimated production during 2000 of construction aggregates, crushed stone, and construction sand and gravel increased by about 2.6% to 2.7 Gt (3 billion st), compared with 1999. The expansion that started in 1992 continued with record production levels for the ninth consecutive year. By commodity, construction sand and gravel production increased by 4.5% to 1.16 Gt (1.28 billion st), while crushed stone production increased by 1.3% to 1.56 Gt (1.72 billion st).

  4. Up-cycling waste glass to minimal water adsorption/absorption lightweight aggregate by rapid low temperature sintering: optimization by dual process-mixture response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Velis, Costas A; Franco-Salinas, Claudia; O'Sullivan, Catherine; Najorka, Jens; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Cheeseman, Christopher R

    2014-07-01

    Mixed color waste glass extracted from municipal solid waste is either not recycled, in which case it is an environmental and financial liability, or it is used in relatively low value applications such as normal weight aggregate. Here, we report on converting it into a novel glass-ceramic lightweight aggregate (LWA), potentially suitable for high added value applications in structural concrete (upcycling). The artificial LWA particles were formed by rapidly sintering (<10 min) waste glass powder with clay mixes using sodium silicate as binder and borate salt as flux. Composition and processing were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) modeling, and specifically (i) a combined process-mixture dual RSM, and (ii) multiobjective optimization functions. The optimization considered raw materials and energy costs. Mineralogical and physical transformations occur during sintering and a cellular vesicular glass-ceramic composite microstructure is formed, with strong correlations existing between bloating/shrinkage during sintering, density and water adsorption/absorption. The diametrical expansion could be effectively modeled via the RSM and controlled to meet a wide range of specifications; here we optimized for LWA structural concrete. The optimally designed LWA is sintered in comparatively low temperatures (825-835 °C), thus potentially saving costs and lowering emissions; it had exceptionally low water adsorption/absorption (6.1-7.2% w/wd; optimization target: 1.5-7.5% w/wd); while remaining substantially lightweight (density: 1.24-1.28 g.cm(-3); target: 0.9-1.3 g.cm(-3)). This is a considerable advancement for designing effective environmentally friendly lightweight concrete constructions, and boosting resource efficiency of waste glass flows.

  5. Up-cycling waste glass to minimal water adsorption/absorption lightweight aggregate by rapid low temperature sintering: optimization by dual process-mixture response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Velis, Costas A; Franco-Salinas, Claudia; O'Sullivan, Catherine; Najorka, Jens; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Cheeseman, Christopher R

    2014-07-01

    Mixed color waste glass extracted from municipal solid waste is either not recycled, in which case it is an environmental and financial liability, or it is used in relatively low value applications such as normal weight aggregate. Here, we report on converting it into a novel glass-ceramic lightweight aggregate (LWA), potentially suitable for high added value applications in structural concrete (upcycling). The artificial LWA particles were formed by rapidly sintering (<10 min) waste glass powder with clay mixes using sodium silicate as binder and borate salt as flux. Composition and processing were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) modeling, and specifically (i) a combined process-mixture dual RSM, and (ii) multiobjective optimization functions. The optimization considered raw materials and energy costs. Mineralogical and physical transformations occur during sintering and a cellular vesicular glass-ceramic composite microstructure is formed, with strong correlations existing between bloating/shrinkage during sintering, density and water adsorption/absorption. The diametrical expansion could be effectively modeled via the RSM and controlled to meet a wide range of specifications; here we optimized for LWA structural concrete. The optimally designed LWA is sintered in comparatively low temperatures (825-835 °C), thus potentially saving costs and lowering emissions; it had exceptionally low water adsorption/absorption (6.1-7.2% w/wd; optimization target: 1.5-7.5% w/wd); while remaining substantially lightweight (density: 1.24-1.28 g.cm(-3); target: 0.9-1.3 g.cm(-3)). This is a considerable advancement for designing effective environmentally friendly lightweight concrete constructions, and boosting resource efficiency of waste glass flows. PMID:24871934

  6. Changes of the cell surface and of the digestive apparatus of dictyostelium discoideum during the starvation period triggering aggregation

    PubMed Central

    De Chastellier, C; Ryter, A

    1977-01-01

    The effects of starvation on the cell morphology of Dictyostelium discoideum were studied with different cytochemical techniques, and with a morphometric method by which the surface areas of the cell membrane and of the digestive system can be determined. During the first 2 h, the cell membrane becomes very wrinkled and many phagocytic cups and filopods are formed. These changes are in accord with the 40 percent increase in the cell surface area to cytoplasmic volume ratio observed, which is mainly due to a strong decrease in the cytoplasmic volume. At this time of starvation, cells are able to ingest twice as many yeast as during growth. Afterwards, while the phagocytic ability decreases, the phagocytic cups disappear, and all the cells become bristled with many thin filopods. In spite of these morphological changes, no quantitative or topological differences have been observed concerning the polysaccharide content of the plasma membrane, whether it was stained with phosphotungstic acid, silver proteinate, or ruthenium red. During this time, the digestive vacuoles imbricate one into the other. Part of the vacuoles are degraded by this process, thus leading to an atrophy of the digestive apparatus. The digestive apparatus is progressively replaced by an autophagic system. Polysaccharide stainings and morphological observations show that the cytosegresomes seem to originate from the food vacuoles which flatten and sequester portions of cytoplasm. After 5 h of starvation, the digestive system is entirely transformed into an autophagic apparatus. The cell population appears to be homogeneous with respect to these changes. Therefore, potential precursors of prestalk and prespore cells were not observed. PMID:144140

  7. Targeting the anionic region of human protease activated receptor 4 (PAR4) inhibits platelet aggregation and thrombosis without interfering with hemostasis

    PubMed Central

    Mumaw, M. M.; de la Fuente, M.; Noble, D. N.; Nieman, M.T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Human platelet activation and aggregation is a complex process. To date, many therapies have been developed targeting proteins that mediate this process to prevent unwanted activation. However, the current standard of care for acute coronary syndromes still has limitations including bleeding risk. Objective The aim of the current study is to evaluate the PAR4 anionic cluster as a viable antiplatelet target using a polyclonal antibody (CAN12). Methods We used western blotting, aggregation, and secretion ex vivo to evaluate the ability of CAN12 to interact with PAR4 and inhibit platelet activation. The effects of CAN12 in vivo were evaluated with the Rose Bengal arterial thrombosis model and two models of hemostasis. Results We show that CAN12 is able to interact with human PAR4 and delay PAR4 cleavage. In addition, CAN12 inhibits thrombin induced human platelet aggregation and secretion in a dose dependent manner. We next determined that the specificity of CAN12 is agonist dependent. In vivo, we determined that CAN12 is able to inhibit arterial thrombosis and using two independent methods, we found that CAN12 does not influence hemostasis. Conclusion Targeting the extracellular anionic cluster on PAR4 is a viable novel strategy as an anti-platelet therapy. PMID:24888424

  8. Surface aggregation of urinary proteins and aspartic acid-rich peptides on the faces of calcium oxalate monohydrate investigated by in situ force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, M L; Qiu, S R; Hoyer, J R; Casey, W H; Nancollas, G H; De Yoreo, J J

    2008-05-28

    The growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate in the presence of Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP), osteopontin (OPN), and the 27-residue synthetic peptides (DDDS){sub 6}DDD and (DDDG){sub 6}DDD [where D = aspartic acid and X = S (serine) or G (glycine)] was investigated via in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that these three growth modulators create extensive deposits on the crystal faces. Depending on the modulator and crystal face, these deposits can occur as discrete aggregates, filamentary structures, or uniform coatings. These proteinaceous films can lead to either the inhibition or increase of the step speeds (with respect to the impurity-free system) depending on a range of factors that include peptide or protein concentration, supersaturation and ionic strength. While THP and the linear peptides act, respectively, to exclusively increase and inhibit growth on the (-101) face, both exhibit dual functionality on the (010) face, inhibiting growth at low supersaturation or high modulator concentration and accelerating growth at high supersaturation or low modulator concentration. Based on analyses of growth morphologies and dependencies of step speeds on supersaturation and protein or peptide concentration, we argue for a picture of growth modulation that accounts for the observations in terms of the strength of binding to the surfaces and steps and the interplay of electrostatic and solvent-induced forces at crystal surface.

  9. Immune complex receptors on cell surfaces. II. Cytochemical evaluation of their abundance on different immune cells: distribution, uptake, and regeneration.

    PubMed Central

    McKeever, P. E.; Garvin, A. J.; Hardin, D. H.; Spicer, S. S.

    1976-01-01

    A recently developed method for ultrastructural demonstration of cell surface receptors for immune complexes is applied to evaluation of these receptors on various cell types. The method entailing incubation with a complex of horesradish peroxidase (HRP) and antibody to HRP (anti-HRP) disclosed dense foci indicative of immune complex receptors distributed at 30- to 120-mmu intervals over macrophage surfaces. Invaginations, loop-like evaginations, and pinocytotic vasicles stained prominently. The number of stained immune complex receptors averaged 200,000 per oil-induced macrophage and 120,000 per noninduced macrophage, as determined from counts of focal deposits in electron micrographs. Receptor periodicity on giant cells present in oil-induced exudates resembled that on macrophages, but the larger giant cells contained an estimated 1.5 million sites. Although receptor periodicity on eosinophils and neutrophils equaled that on macrophages, the staining was lighter and was interrupted by intervals of unstained membrane. Neutrophils averaged 28,000 and eosinophils 35,000 receptors per cell, whereas those lymphocytes with receptors averaged 3,500 per cell. Viable cells incubated with anti-HRP sequentially exhibited about half as many reactive sites as did cells incubated with immune complex. When warmed to 37 C, viable macrophages and eosinophils pinocytosed soluble immune complexes almost completely within 30 minutes and phagocytosed insoluble complexes more slowly. The endocytosed soluble immune complexes were sequestered within tubulovesicular structures in addition to the expected phagocytic vacuoles. Receptors appeared fully active on macrophages that were restained with soluble, cold immune complex after they had endocytosed immune complex in the course of a 30-minute warming interval. Images Figure 16 Figures 2 and 3 Figures 4-6 Figure 7 Figures 8-11 Figure 1 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figures 14 and 15 PMID:60883

  10. MARCH1 regulates insulin sensitivity by controlling cell surface insulin receptor levels.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Arvindhan; Petersen, Max C; Nasiri, Ali R; Butrico, Gina; Fung, Annie; Ruan, Hai-Bin; Kursawe, Romy; Caprio, Sonia; Thibodeau, Jacques; Bourgeois-Daigneault, Marie-Claude; Sun, Lisha; Gao, Guangping; Bhanot, Sanjay; Jurczak, Michael J; Green, Michael R; Shulman, Gerald I; Wajapeyee, Narendra

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a key driver of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and is characterized by defective insulin receptor (INSR) signalling. Although surface INSR downregulation is a well-established contributor to insulin resistance, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain obscure. Here we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase MARCH1 impairs cellular insulin action by degrading cell surface INSR. Using a large-scale RNA interference screen, we identify MARCH1 as a negative regulator of INSR signalling. March1 loss-of-function enhances, and March1 overexpression impairs, hepatic insulin sensitivity in mice. MARCH1 ubiquitinates INSR to decrease cell surface INSR levels, but unlike other INSR ubiquitin ligases, MARCH1 acts in the basal state rather than after insulin stimulation. Thus, MARCH1 may help set the basal gain of insulin signalling. MARCH1 expression is increased in white adipose tissue of obese humans, suggesting that MARCH1 contributes to the pathophysiology of T2D and could be a new therapeutic target. PMID:27577745

  11. Chronic Morphine Reduces Surface Expression of δ-Opioid Receptors in Subregions of Rostral Striatum.

    PubMed

    Leah, Paul M; Heath, Emily M L; Balleine, Bernard W; Christie, Macdonald J

    2016-03-01

    The delta opioid receptor (DOPr), whilst not the primary target of clinically used opioids, is involved in development of opioid tolerance and addiction. There is growing evidence that DOPr trafficking is involved in drug addiction, e.g., a range of studies have shown increased plasma membrane DOPr insertion during chronic treatment with opioids. The present study used a transgenic mouse model in which the C-terminal of the DOPr is tagged with enhanced-green fluorescence protein to examine the effects of chronic morphine treatment on surface membrane expression in striatal cholinergic interneurons that are implicated in motivated learning following both chronic morphine and morphine sensitization treatment schedules in male mice. A sex difference was noted throughout the anterior striatum, which was most prominent in the nucleus accumbens core region. Incontrast with previous studies in other neurons, chronic exposure to a high dose of morphine for 6 days had no effect, or slightly decreased (anterior dorsolateral striatum) surface DOPr expression. A morphine sensitization schedule produced similar results with a significant decrease in surface DOPr expression in nucleus accumbens shell. These results suggest that chronic morphine and morphine sensitisation treatment may have effects on instrumental reward-seeking behaviours and learning processes related to drug addiction, via effects on striatal DOPr function.

  12. Regulation of AMPA receptor surface trafficking and synaptic plasticity by a cognitive enhancer and antidepressant molecule.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Etherington, L-A; Hafner, A-S; Belelli, D; Coussen, F; Delagrange, P; Chaouloff, F; Spedding, M; Lambert, J J; Choquet, D; Groc, L

    2013-04-01

    The plasticity of excitatory synapses is an essential brain process involved in cognitive functions, and dysfunctions of such adaptations have been linked to psychiatric disorders such as depression. Although the intracellular cascades that are altered in models of depression and stress-related disorders have been under considerable scrutiny, the molecular interplay between antidepressants and glutamatergic signaling remains elusive. Using a combination of electrophysiological and single nanoparticle tracking approaches, we here report that the cognitive enhancer and antidepressant tianeptine (S 1574, [3-chloro-6-methyl-5,5-dioxo-6,11-dihydro-(c,f)-dibenzo-(1,2-thiazepine)-11-yl) amino]-7 heptanoic acid, sodium salt) favors synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons both under basal conditions and after acute stress. Strikingly, tianeptine rapidly reduces the surface diffusion of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) through a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)-dependent mechanism that enhances the binding of AMPAR auxiliary subunit stargazin with PSD-95. This prevents corticosterone-induced AMPAR surface dispersal and restores long-term potentiation of acutely stressed mice. Collectively, these data provide the first evidence that a therapeutically used drug targets the surface diffusion of AMPAR through a CaMKII-stargazin-PSD-95 pathway, to promote long-term synaptic plasticity. PMID:22733125

  13. Isolation of anti-T cell receptor scFv mutants by yeast surface display.

    PubMed

    Kieke, M C; Cho, B K; Boder, E T; Kranz, D M; Wittrup, K D

    1997-11-01

    Yeast surface display and sorting by flow cytometry have been used to isolate mutants of an scFv that is specific for the Vbeta8 region of the T cell receptor. Selection was based on equilibrium binding by two fluorescently labeled probes, a soluble Vbeta8 domain and an antibody to the c-myc epitope tag present at the carboxy-terminus of the scFv. The mutants that were selected in this screen included a scFv with threefold increased affinity for the Vbeta8 and scFv clones that were bound with reduced affinities by the anti-c-myc antibody. The latter finding indicates that the yeast display system may be used to map conformational epitopes, which cannot be revealed by standard peptide screens. Equilibrium antigen binding constants were estimated within the surface display format, allowing screening of isolated mutants without necessitating subcloning and soluble expression. Only a relatively small library of yeast cells (3 x 10[5]) displaying randomly mutagenized scFv was screened to identify these mutants, indicating that this system will provide a powerful tool for engineering the binding properties of eucaryotic secreted and cell surface proteins.

  14. MARCH1 regulates insulin sensitivity by controlling cell surface insulin receptor levels

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Arvindhan; Petersen, Max C.; Nasiri, Ali R.; Butrico, Gina; Fung, Annie; Ruan, Hai-Bin; Kursawe, Romy; Caprio, Sonia; Thibodeau, Jacques; Bourgeois-Daigneault, Marie-Claude; Sun, Lisha; Gao, Guangping; Bhanot, Sanjay; Jurczak, Michael J.; Green, Michael R.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Wajapeyee, Narendra

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a key driver of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and is characterized by defective insulin receptor (INSR) signalling. Although surface INSR downregulation is a well-established contributor to insulin resistance, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain obscure. Here we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase MARCH1 impairs cellular insulin action by degrading cell surface INSR. Using a large-scale RNA interference screen, we identify MARCH1 as a negative regulator of INSR signalling. March1 loss-of-function enhances, and March1 overexpression impairs, hepatic insulin sensitivity in mice. MARCH1 ubiquitinates INSR to decrease cell surface INSR levels, but unlike other INSR ubiquitin ligases, MARCH1 acts in the basal state rather than after insulin stimulation. Thus, MARCH1 may help set the basal gain of insulin signalling. MARCH1 expression is increased in white adipose tissue of obese humans, suggesting that MARCH1 contributes to the pathophysiology of T2D and could be a new therapeutic target. PMID:27577745

  15. Targeted amplification of delivery to cell surface receptors by dendrimer self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Isaacman, Steven; Buckley, Michael; Wang, Xiaojian; Wang, Edwin Y; Liebes, Leonard; Canary, James W

    2014-03-01

    Nanometer-scale architectures assembled on cell surface receptors from smaller macromolecular constituents generated a large amplification of fluorescence. A targeted dendrimer was synthesized from a cystamine-core G4 PAMAM dendrimer, and contained an anti-BrE3 monoclonal antibody as the targeting group, several fluorophores and an average of 12 aldehyde moieties as complementary bio-orthogonal reactive sites for the covalent assembly. A cargo dendrimer, derived from a PAMAM G4 dendrimer, contained several fluorophores as the cargo for delivery and five hydrazine moieties as complimentary bio-orthogonal reactive sites. The system is designed to be flexible and allow for facile incorporation of a variety of targeting ligands.

  16. Targeted amplification of delivery to cell surface receptors by dendrimer self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Isaacman, Steven; Buckley, Michael; Wang, Xiaojian; Wang, Edwin Y.; Liebes, Leonard; Canary, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Nanometer-scale architectures assembled on cell surface receptors from smaller macromolecular constituents generated a large amplification of fluorescence. A targeted dendrimer was synthesized from a cystamine-core G4 PAMAM dendrimer, and contained an anti-BrE3 monoclonal antibody as the targeting group, several fluorophores and an average of 12 aldehyde moieties as complementary bio-orthogonal reactive sites for the covalent assembly. A cargo dendrimer, derived from a PAMAM G4 dendrimer, contained several fluorophores as the cargo for delivery and five hydrazine moieties as complimentary bio-orthogonal reactive sites. The system is designed to be flexible and allow for facile incorporation of a variety of targeting ligands. PMID:24513050

  17. Fluorescence Techniques for Measuring Kinetics of Specific Binding of Hormone to Cell Surface Receptors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellen, Edward Herbert

    This thesis presents theoretical calculations and technical advances relevant to total internal reflection/ fluorescence photobleaching recovery (tir/fpr), and results from experiments using tir/fpr to measure the dissociation rate constant of epidermal growth factor (egf) hormone interacting with its receptor molecule on A431 cells. The classical electromagnetic calculations describe fluorescence emission from fluorophores near an interface (possibly metal coated). It is well known that an interface alters the emission properties of nearby fluorophores. Most previous classical calculations model the fluorophore as a fixed-amplitude dipole oscillator. However, for fluorophores under steady illumination, a fixed-power dipole is more appropriate. This modification corresponds to normalizing the fixed-amplitude dipole's intensity by its total dissipated power. The results for the fixed-power model differ nontrivially from the fixed-amplitude model. The observation-angle -dependent intensity as a function of the fluorophore's orientation and distance from the surface is calculated. General expressions are derived for the emission power as observed through a circular-aperture collection system located on either side of the interface. A system for maintaining long-term focus of samples under high-magnification quantitative observation in an epi-illumination optical microscope is described. Focus -dependent changes in the backreflection of an off-axis HeNe laser generate negative feedback signals which drive a dc motor coupled to the fine-focus knob of the microscope. This system has several advantages: (1) it is compatible and nonobstructive with concurrent data acqusition of sample intensities; (2) it requires no alteration of the sample, stage, or objective; (3) it monitors the position of sample areas very near to those under observation; (4) it is inexpensive. The system can hold a glass coverslip sample to within 0.5 μm of its preset focus position. Prismless tir

  18. Synthetic surfaces as artificial antigen presenting cells in the study of T cell receptor triggering and immunological synapse formation.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Darrell J; Doh, Junsang

    2007-08-01

    T cell activation occurs when T cell receptors engage peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) molecules displayed on the surface of antigen presenting cells (APCs). Clustering of TCRs and other receptors in physical patterns at the T-APC interface forms a structure known as an immunological synapse (IS). Studies of the IS are challenging due to the cell-cell contact context of the governing interactions. Model surfaces as synthetic APCs have thus been developed, where the type, quantity, and physical arrangement of ligands displayed to T cells are precisely controlled. These model systems have provided important insights into the structure and function of the IS. PMID:17398113

  19. Similarities and Distinctions in Actions of Surface-Directed and Classic Androgen Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Suh, Ji Ho; Chattopadhyay, Arundhati; Sieglaff, Douglas H; Storer Samaniego, Cheryl; Cox, Marc B; Webb, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) surface-directed antagonist MJC13 inhibits AR function and proliferation of prostate cancer (PC) cells. These effects are related to arrest of an AR/chaperone complex in the cytoplasm. Here, we compared MJC13 and classic AR antagonists such as flutamide and bicalutamide. Microarray analysis and confirmatory qRT-PCR reveals that MJC13 and flutamide inhibit dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-dependent genes in LNCaP PC cells. Both compounds are equally effective on a genome wide basis and as effective as second generation AR antagonists (MDV3100, ARN-509) at selected genes. MJC13 inhibits AR binding to the prostate specific antigen (PSA) promoter more strongly than flutamide, consistent with different mechanisms of action. Examination of efficacy of MJC13 in conditions that reflect aspects castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) reveals that it inhibits flutamide activation of an AR mutant (ART877A) that emerges during flutamide withdrawal syndrome, but displays greatly restricted gene-specific activity in 22Rv1 cells that express a constitutively active truncated AR and is inactive against glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which can co-opt androgen-dependent signaling networks in CRPC. Importantly, MJC13 inhibits AR interactions with SRC2 and β-catenin in the nucleus and, unlike flutamide, strongly inhibits amplification of AR activity obtained with transfected SRC2 and β-catenin. MJC13 also inhibits DHT and β-catenin-enhanced cell division in LNCaP cells. Thus, a surface-directed antagonist can block AR activity in some conditions in which a classic antagonist fails and may display utility in particular forms of CRPC.

  20. Native Serotonin 5-HT2C Receptors Are Expressed as Homodimers on the Apical Surface of Choroid Plexus Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Grinde, Ellinor; Lindsley, Tara; Teitler, Milt; Mancia, Filippo; Cowan, Ann; Mazurkiewicz, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a prominent class of plasma membrane proteins that regulate physiologic responses to a wide variety of stimuli and therapeutic agents. Although GPCR oligomerization has been studied extensively in recombinant cells, it remains uncertain whether native receptors expressed in their natural cellular environment are monomers, dimers, or oligomers. The goal of this study was to determine the monomer/oligomer status of a native GPCR endogenously expressed in its natural cellular environment. Native 5-HT2C receptors in choroid plexus epithelial cells were evaluated using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) with photon counting histogram (PCH). An anti–5-HT2C fragment antigen binding protein was used to label native 5-HT2C receptors. A known monomeric receptor (CD-86) served as a control for decoding the oligomer status of native 5-HT2C receptors by molecular brightness analysis. FCS with PCH revealed molecular brightness values for native 5-HT2C receptors equivalent to the molecular brightness of a homodimer. 5-HT2C receptors displayed a diffusion coefficient of 5 × 10−9 cm2/s and were expressed at 32 receptors/μm2 on the apical surface of choroid plexus epithelial cells. The functional significance and signaling capabilities of the homodimer were investigated in human embryonic kidney 293 cells using agonists that bind in a wash-resistant manner to one or both protomers of the homodimer. Whereas agonist binding to one protomer resulted in G protein activation, maximal stimulation required occupancy of both protomers. This study is the first to demonstrate the homodimeric structure of 5-HT2C receptors endogenously expressed in their native cellular environment, and identifies the homodimer as a functional signaling unit. PMID:25609374

  1. Delivery of folates to the cytoplasm of MA104 cells is mediated by a surface membrane receptor that recycles

    SciTech Connect

    Kamen, B.A.; Wang, M.T.; Streckfuss, A.J.; Peryea, X.; Anderson, R.G.

    1988-09-25

    MA104 cells, as well as several other rapidly dividing tissue culture cells, have a folate-binding protein associated with their cell surface. The protein has the properties of a membrane receptor: (a) 5-methyl(/sup 3/H)tetrahydrofolic acid binds with high affinity (Kd approximately equal to 3 nM); (b) the protein is an integral membrane protein; (c) it appears to deliver physiological concentrations of 5-methyl(/sup 3/H)tetrahydrofolic acid to the inside of the cell; (d) binding activity is regulated by the concentration of folate within the cell. To better understand the mechanism of action of this receptor, we have studied the pathway of folate internalization. We present evidence that during internalization: (a) folate binds to the membrane receptor; (b) the ligand-receptor complex moves into the cell; (c) the ligand is released from the receptor in an acidic intracellular compartment and moves into the cytoplasm; and (d) the unoccupied receptor returns to the cell surface.

  2. Detection and aggregation of the antitumoral drug parietin in ethanol/water mixture and on plasmonic metal nanoparticles studied by surface-enhanced optical spectroscopy: Effect of pH and ethanol concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Tobar, Eduardo; Verebova, Valeria; Blascakova, Ludmila; Jancura, Daniel; Fabriciova, Gabriela; Sanchez-Cortes, Santiago

    2016-04-01

    In the present paper, we have investigated the effect of ethanol in aqueous media, the pH and the presence of Ag nanoparticles (NPs) on the aggregation processes of the antitumoral anthraquinone parietin in aqueous media and on the metal surface. UV-visible absorption, fluorescence and Raman spectra of parietin were used for such purpose. The present study provides information about the deprotonation and molecular aggregation processes occurring in parietin under different environments: ethanol/water mixture and when adsorbed onto Ag nanoparticles. The effect of ethanol on the optical properties of parietin in alcohol-water mixtures was also investigated at different ethanol concentrations with the time. For the case of the adsorption and organization of parietin molecules on the surface of Ag NPs, special attention was paid to the use of surface-enhanced optical techniques, SEF (surface-enhanced fluorescence) and SERS (surface-enhanced Raman scattering), for the characterization of the parietin aggregates and the ionization of the molecule on the surface. In particular, we have studied the variation of the SEF signal with the pH, which depends on the molecular organization of the molecule on the surface. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of the SERS spectra at different pH was accomplished and the main Raman bands of the protonated, mono-deprotonated and di-deprotonated parietin were identified. Finally, the second ionization pK of parietin on metal NPs was deduced from the SERS spectra.

  3. Detection and aggregation of the antitumoral drug parietin in ethanol/water mixture and on plasmonic metal nanoparticles studied by surface-enhanced optical spectroscopy: Effect of pH and ethanol concentration.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Tobar, Eduardo; Verebova, Valeria; Blascakova, Ludmila; Jancura, Daniel; Fabriciova, Gabriela; Sanchez-Cortes, Santiago

    2016-04-15

    In the present paper, we have investigated the effect of ethanol in aqueous media, the pH and the presence of Ag nanoparticles (NPs) on the aggregation processes of the antitumoral anthraquinone parietin in aqueous media and on the metal surface. UV-visible absorption, fluorescence and Raman spectra of parietin were used for such purpose. The present study provides information about the deprotonation and molecular aggregation processes occurring in parietin under different environments: ethanol/water mixture and when adsorbed onto Ag nanoparticles. The effect of ethanol on the optical properties of parietin in alcohol-water mixtures was also investigated at different ethanol concentrations with the time. For the case of the adsorption and organization of parietin molecules on the surface of Ag NPs, special attention was paid to the use of surface-enhanced optical techniques, SEF (surface-enhanced fluorescence) and SERS (surface-enhanced Raman scattering), for the characterization of the parietin aggregates and the ionization of the molecule on the surface. In particular, we have studied the variation of the SEF signal with the pH, which depends on the molecular organization of the molecule on the surface. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of the SERS spectra at different pH was accomplished and the main Raman bands of the protonated, mono-deprotonated and di-deprotonated parietin were identified. Finally, the second ionization pK of parietin on metal NPs was deduced from the SERS spectra.

  4. A mathematical analysis using fractals for binding interactions of nuclear estrogen receptors occurring on biosensor surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Anand; Sadana, Ajit

    2002-04-01

    A mathematical approach using fractal concepts is presented for modeling the binding and dissociation interactions between analytes and nuclear estrogen receptors (ER) occurring on surface plasmon resonance biosensor chip surfaces. A kinetic knowledge of the binding interactions mediated by ER would help in better understanding the carcinogenicity of these steroidogenic compounds and assist in modulating these reactions. The fractal approach is applied to analyte-ER interaction data obtained from literature. Numerical values obtained for the binding and dissociation rate coefficients are linked to the degree of roughness or heterogeneity (fractal dimension, D(f)) present on the biosensor surface. For example, a single-fractal analysis is used to describe the binding and dissociation phases for the binding of estradiol and ERalpha in solution to clone 31 protein immobilized on a biosensor chip (C-S. Suen et al., 1998, J. Biol. Chem. 273(42), 27645-27653). The binding and the dissociation rate coefficients are 27.57 and 8.813, respectively, and the corresponding fractal dimensions are 1.986 and 2.268, respectively. In some examples dual-fractal models were employed to obtain a better fit of either the association or the dissociation phases or for both. Predictive relationships are developed for (a) the binding and the dissociation rate coefficients as a function of their respective fractal dimensions and (b) the ratio K(A) (= k/k(d)) as a function of the ratio of the fractal dimensions (D(f)/D(fd)). The analysis should provide further physical insights into the ER-mediated interactions occurring on biosensor and other surfaces.

  5. Structure of Viral Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Stephen; Luijten, Erik

    2010-03-01

    The aggregation of virus particles is a particular form of colloidal self-assembly, since viruses of a give type are monodisperse and have identical, anisotropic surface charge distributions. In small-angle X-ray scattering experiments, the Qbeta virus was found to organize in different crystal structures in the presence of divalent salt and non-adsorbing polymer. Since a simple isotropic potential cannot explain the occurrence of all observed phases, we employ computer simulations to investigate how the surface charge distribution affects the virus interactions. Using a detailed model of the virus particle, we find an asymmetric ion distribution around the virus which gives rise to the different phases observed.

  6. Generation of Soluble Advanced Glycation End Products Receptor (sRAGE)-Binding Ligands during Extensive Heat Treatment of Whey Protein/Lactose Mixtures Is Dependent on Glycation and Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fahui; Teodorowicz, Małgorzata; Wichers, Harry J; van Boekel, Martinus A J S; Hettinga, Kasper A

    2016-08-24

    Heating of protein- and sugar-containing materials is considered the primary factor affecting the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). This study aimed to investigate the influence of heating conditions, digestion, and aggregation on the binding capacity of AGEs to the soluble AGE receptor (sRAGE). Samples consisting of mixtures of whey protein and lactose were heated at 130 °C. An in vitro infant digestion model was used to study the influence of heat treatment on the digestibility of whey proteins. The amount of sRAGE-binding ligands before and after digestion was measured by an ELISA-based sRAGE-binding assay. Water activity did not significantly affect the extent of digestibility of whey proteins dry heated at pH 5 (ranging from 3.3 ± 0.2 to 3.6 ± 0.1% for gastric digestion and from 53.5 ± 1.5 to 64.7 ± 1.1% for duodenal digestion), but there were differences in cleavage patterns of peptides among the samples heated at different pH values. Formation of sRAGE-binding ligands depended on the formation of aggregates and was limited in the samples heated at pH 5. Moreover, the sRAGE-binding activity of digested sample was changed by protease degradation and correlated with the digestibility of samples. In conclusion, generation of sRAGE-binding ligands during extensive heat treatment of whey protein/lactose mixtures is limited in acidic heating condition and dependent on glycation and aggregation. PMID:27460534

  7. The HIV coat protein gp120 promotes forward trafficking and surface clustering of NMDA receptors in membrane microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hangxiu; Bae, Mihyun; Tovar-y-Romo, Luis B.; Patel, Neha; Bandaru, Veera Venkata Ratnam; Pomerantz, Daniel; Steiner, Joseph; Haughey, Norman J.

    2011-01-01

    Infection by the Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can result in debilitating neurological syndromes collectively known as HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). While the HIV coat protein gp120 has been identified as a potent neurotoxin that enhances NMDA receptor function, the exact mechanisms for effect are not known. Here we provide evidence that gp120 activates two separate signaling pathways that converge to enhance NMDA-evoked calcium flux by clustering NMDA receptors in modified membrane microdomains. HIV gp120 enlarged, and stabilized the structure of lipid rafts on neuronal dendrites by mechanisms that involved a redox-regulated translocation of a sphingomyelin hydrolase (neutral sphingomyelinase-2; nSMase2) to the plasma membrane. A concurrent pathway was activated that enhanced the forward traffic of NMDA receptors by promoting a PKA-dependent phopshorylation of the NR1 C-terminal serine 897 (that masks an ER retention signal), followed by a PKC-dependent phosphorylation of serine 896 (important for surface expression). NMDA receptors were preferentially targeted to synapses, and clustered in modified membrane microdomains. In these conditions, NMDA receptors were unable to laterally disperse, and did not internalize, even in response to strong agonist induction. Focal NMDA-evoked calcium bursts were enhanced three-fold in these regions. Inhibiting membrane modification or NR1 phosphorylation prevented gp120 from enhancing the surface localization and clustering of NMDA receptors, while disrupting the structure of membrane microdomains restored the ability of NMDA receptors to disperse and internalize following gp120. These findings demonstrate that gp120 contributes to synaptic dysfunction in the setting of HIV-infection by interfering with the traffic of NMDA receptors. PMID:22114277

  8. Estrogen and androgen receptor expression in surface epithelium and inclusion cyst in the ovary of premenopausal and postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The importance of surface epithelium and epithelial inclusion cysts in the ovary arises from studies demonstrating that these structures are susceptible to epithelial ovarian cancer development. The expression of estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha), androgen receptor (AR), in epithelial cells of the ovary from premenopausal and postmenopausal women is interesting because sexual steroid hormones are involved in cell growth and differentiation. Methods The presence of ER alpha, AR, and the orphan G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) was demonstrated by immunofluorescence in ovaries obtained from 79 pre and postmenopausal patients, undergoing histero-salpingo-oophorectomy for proliferative gynecological diseases. The proportion of patients that displayed positive reaction for estrogen and androgen receptors in epithelial cells of the ovary was evaluated according to menopausal status and associated pathology. Results The proportion of patients that displayed a positive receptor expression in the epithelial cells of the ovarian surface and cortical inclusion cysts shows that ER alpha is present in 20 of 79 patients (0.25), AR in 33 of 79 (0.42) and GPR30 in 38 of 55 (0.69). There are no differences in ER alpha, AR, and GPR30 expression between pre and postmenopausal patients and considering the associated pathology, proportions for ER alpha and GPR30 are similar. The patients with cervical cancer show a higher proportion of AR expression in epithelial cells of the ovary, which is statistically significant (P < 0.01) compared with patients with other proliferative diseases. Conclusions The presence of ER alpha, AR, and GPR30 in the surface epithelial ovarian cells and its derivatives are observed with a proportion that is specific for each receptor. The proportion of expression for these receptors in the epithelial cells of the ovary does not change after menopause. The proportion of ovaries with AR positive epithelial cells in patients with cervical

  9. Aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) mediate colonization of fresh produce and abiotic surface by Shiga toxigenic enteroaggregative Escherichia coli O104:H4

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli O104:H4 bares the characteristics of both enterohemorrhagic (EHEC) and enteroaggregative (EAEC) E. coli. It produces plasmid encoded aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) which mediate cell aggregation and biofilm formation in human intestine and promote Shiga...

  10. Interaction of human tumor viruses with host cell surface receptors and cell entry.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Georgia; Blumenthal, Melissa J; Katz, Arieh A

    2015-05-22

    Currently, seven viruses, namely Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV), high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), have been described to be consistently associated with different types of human cancer. These oncogenic viruses belong to distinct viral families, display diverse cell tropism and cause different malignancies. A key to their pathogenicity is attachment to the host cell and entry in order to replicate and complete their life cycle. Interaction with the host cell during viral entry is characterized by a sequence of events, involving viral envelope and/or capsid molecules as well as cellular entry factors that are critical in target cell recognition, thereby determining cell tropism. Most oncogenic viruses initially attach to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans, followed by conformational change and transfer of the viral particle to secondary high-affinity cell- and virus-specific receptors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the host cell surface factors and molecular mechanisms underlying oncogenic virus binding and uptake by their cognate host cell(s) with the aim to provide a concise overview of potential target molecules for prevention and/or treatment of oncogenic virus infection.

  11. Interaction of Human Tumor Viruses with Host Cell Surface Receptors and Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Georgia; Blumenthal, Melissa J.; Katz, Arieh A.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, seven viruses, namely Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV), high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), have been described to be consistently associated with different types of human cancer. These oncogenic viruses belong to distinct viral families, display diverse cell tropism and cause different malignancies. A key to their pathogenicity is attachment to the host cell and entry in order to replicate and complete their life cycle. Interaction with the host cell during viral entry is characterized by a sequence of events, involving viral envelope and/or capsid molecules as well as cellular entry factors that are critical in target cell recognition, thereby determining cell tropism. Most oncogenic viruses initially attach to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans, followed by conformational change and transfer of the viral particle to secondary high-affinity cell- and virus-specific receptors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the host cell surface factors and molecular mechanisms underlying oncogenic virus binding and uptake by their cognate host cell(s) with the aim to provide a concise overview of potential target molecules for prevention and/or treatment of oncogenic virus infection. PMID:26008702

  12. Selection of Antibodies Interfering with Cell Surface Receptor Signaling Using Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Melidoni, Anna N; Dyson, Michael R; McCafferty, John

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies able to bind and modify the function of cell surface signaling components in vivo are increasingly being used as therapeutic drugs. The identification of such "functional" antibodies from within large antibody pools is, therefore, the subject of intense research. Here we describe a novel cell-based expression and reporting system for the identification of functional antibodies from antigen-binding populations preselected with phage display. The system involves inducible expression of the antibody gene population from the Rosa-26 locus of embryonic stem (ES) cells, followed by secretion of the antibodies during ES cell differentiation. Target antigens are cell-surface signaling components (receptors or ligands) with a known effect on the direction of cell differentiation (FGFR1 mediating ES cell exit from self renewal in this particular protocol). Therefore, inhibition or activation of these components by functional antibodies in a few elite clones causes a shift in the differentiation outcomes of these clones, leading to their phenotypic selection. Functional antibody genes are then recovered from positive clones and used to produce the purified antibodies, which can be tested for their ability to affect cell fates exogenously. Identified functional antibody genes can be further introduced in different stem cell types. Inducible expression of functional antibodies has a temporally controlled protein-knockdown capability, which can be used to study the unknown role of the signaling pathway in different developmental contexts. Moreover, it provides a means for control of stem cell differentiation with potential in vivo applications.

  13. WASH drives early recycling from macropinosomes and phagosomes to maintain surface phagocytic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Catherine M.; Gopaldass, Navin; Bosmani, Cristina; Johnston, Simon A.; Insall, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Macropinocytosis is an ancient mechanism that allows cells to harvest nutrients from extracellular media, which also allows immune cells to sample antigens from their surroundings. During macropinosome formation, bulk plasma membrane is internalized with all its integral proteins. It is vital for cells to salvage these proteins before degradation, but the mechanisms for sorting them are not known. Here we describe the evolutionarily conserved recruitment of the WASH (WASP and SCAR homolog) complex to both macropinosomes and phagosomes within a minute of internalization. Using Dictyostelium, we demonstrate that WASH drives protein sorting and recycling from macropinosomes and is thus essential to maintain surface receptor levels and sustain phagocytosis. WASH functionally interacts with the retromer complex at both early and late phases of macropinosome maturation, but mediates recycling via retromer-dependent and -independent pathways. WASH mutants consequently have decreased membrane levels of integrins and other surface proteins. This study reveals an important pathway enabling cells to sustain macropinocytosis without bulk degradation of plasma membrane components. PMID:27647881

  14. Aggregated silver nanoparticles based surface-enhanced Raman scattering enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for ultrasensitive detection of protein biomarkers and small molecules.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jiajie; Liu, Hongwu; Huang, Caihong; Yao, Cuize; Fu, Qiangqiang; Li, Xiuqing; Cao, Donglin; Luo, Zhi; Tang, Yong

    2015-06-01

    Lowering the detection limit is critical to the design of bioassays required for medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring, and food safety regulations. The current sensitivity of standard color-based analyte detection limits the further use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) in research and clinical diagnoses. Here, we demonstrate a novel method that uses the Raman signal as the signal-generating system of an ELISA and combines surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) with silver nanoparticles aggregation for ultrasensitive analyte detection. The enzyme label of the ELISA controls the dissolution of Raman reporter-labeled silver nanoparticles through hydrogen peroxide and generates a strong Raman signal when the analyte is present. Using this assay, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and the adrenal stimulant ractopamine (Rac) were detected in whole serum and urine at the ultralow concentrations of 10(-9) and 10(-6) ng/mL, respectively. The methodology proposed here could potentially be applied to other molecules detection as well as PSA and Rac.

  15. Differential expression of the P2X7 receptor in ovarian surface epithelium during the oestrous cycle in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Cuevas, F G; Cruz-Rico, A; Garay, E; García-Carrancá, A; Pérez-Montiel, D; Juárez, B; Arellano, R O

    2013-01-01

    Purinergic signalling has been proposed as an intraovarian regulatory mechanism. Of the receptors responsible for purinergic transmission, the P2X7 receptor is an ATP-gated cationic channel that displays a broad spectrum of cellular functions ranging from apoptosis to cell proliferation and tumourigenesis. In the present study, we investigated the functional expression of P2X7 receptors in ovarian surface epithelium (OSE). P2X7 protein was detected in the OSE layer of the mouse, both in situ and in primary cultures. In cultures, 2'(3')-O-(4-Benzoylbenzoyl)adenosine-5'-triphosphate (BzATP) activation of P2X7 receptors increased [Ca(2+)]i and induced apoptosis. The functionality of the P2X7 receptor was investigated in situ by intrabursal injection of BzATP on each day of the oestrous cycle and evaluation of apoptosis 24h using the terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-fluorescein nick end-labelling (TUNEL) assay. Maximum effects of BzATP were observed during pro-oestrus, with the effects being blocked by A438079, a specific P2X7 receptor antagonist. Immunofluorescence staining for P2X7 protein revealed more robust expression during pro-oestrus and in OSE regions behind the antral follicles, strongly supporting the notion that the differences in apoptosis can be explained by increased receptor expression, which is regulated during the oestrous cycle. Finally, P2X7 receptor expression was detected in the OSE layer of human ovaries, with receptor expression maintained in human ovaries diagnosed with cancer, as well as in the human ovarian carcinoma SKOV3 cell line.

  16. Chronic intermittent ethanol treatment selectively alters N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit surface expression in cultured cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Mei; Denny, Ashley D; Ticku, Maharaj K

    2007-07-01

    A chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure regimen consists of repeated episodes of ethanol intoxication and withdrawal. CIE treatment has been reported to result in a significant enhancement of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated synaptic responses in vivo, and trafficking of NMDA receptors is emerging a key regulatory mechanism that underlies the channel function. Therefore, in the present study, we examined the effects of CIE on NMDA receptor subunit surface expression. Cultured cortical neurons were exposed to 75 mM ethanol for 14 h followed by 10 h of withdrawal, repeated this cycle five times, and followed by 2 or 5 days of withdrawal. Surface-expressed NMDA receptor subunits and their endocytosis were measured by biotinylation and Western blots. CIE significantly increased NMDA receptor (NR) 1 and NR2B but not NR2A subunit surface expression after 5 days of treatment. However, CIE treatment did not reduce the NMDA receptor endocytosis. Quantification of immunocytochemistry confirmed CIE-induced increase in both the total number of NR1 and NR2B subunit clusters and their targeting to synaptic sites. It is noteworthy that this effect persisted even after ethanol withdrawal with a peak expression occurring between 0 and 2 days after withdrawal, and the expression on the plasma membrane was still at high levels after 5 days of withdrawal. In addition, this was accompanied by significant increases in postsynaptic density protein 95 clusters. Protein kinase A inhibitor completely reversed CIE-induced increase in NR1 and partially in NR2B surface level and a long-lasting effect. These changes may contribute to the development of ethanol-induced neurotoxicity and ethanol dependence.

  17. CD40-induced aggregation of MHC class II and CD80 on the cell surface leads to an early enhancement in antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Clatza, Abigail; Bonifaz, Laura C; Vignali, Dario A A; Moreno, José

    2003-12-15

    Ligation of CD40 on B cells increases their ability to present Ag and to activate MHC class II (MHC-II)-restricted T cells. How this occurs is not entirely clear. In this study we demonstrate that CD40 ligation on Ag-presenting B cells (APC) for a short period between 30 min and 3 h has a rapid, augmenting effect on the ability of a B cell line and normal B cells to activate T cells. This is not due to alterations in Ag processing or to an increase in surface expression of CD80, CD86, ICAM-1, or MHC-II. This effect is particularly evident with naive, resting T lymphocytes and appears to be more pronounced under limiting Ag concentrations. Shortly after CD40 ligation on a B cell line, MHC-II and CD80 progressively accumulated in cholesterol-enriched microdomains on the cell surface, which correlated with an initial enhancement in their Ag presentation ability. Moreover, CD40 ligation induced a second, late, more sustained enhancement of Ag presentation, which correlates with a significant increase in CD80 expression by APC. Thus, CD40 signaling enhances the efficiency with which APC activate T cells by at least two related, but distinct, mechanisms: an early stage characterized by aggregation of MHC-II and CD80 clusters, and a late stage in which a significant increase in CD80 expression is observed. These results raise the possibility that one important role of CD40 is to contribute to the formation of the immunological synapse on the APC side.

  18. Experimental and DFT studies on the aggregation behavior of imidazolium-based surface-active ionic liquids with aromatic counterions in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenwen; Wang, Tao; Cheng, Ni; Hu, Qiongzheng; Bi, Yanhui; Gong, Yanjun; Yu, Li

    2015-02-01

    Two imidazolium-based surface-active ionic liquids with aromatic counterions, namely, 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium salicylate (C12mimSal) and 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoate (C12mimHNC), were synthesized, and their aggregate behavior in aqueous solutions was systematically explored. Surface tension and conductivity measurements indicate that both C12mimSal and C12mimHNC show superior surface activity compared to the common imidazolium-based SAIL with the same hydrocarbon chain length, 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide (C12mimBr). This result demonstrates that the incorporation of aromatic counterions favors the formation of micelles. C12mimHNC displays a higher surface activity than C12mimSal, resulting from the different hydrophobicities of the counterions. In comparison with C12mimBr, C12mimSal not only can form hexagonal liquid-crystalline phase (H1) in aqueous solution, but also exhibits a broad region of cubic liquid-crystalline phase (V2) at higher concentration. As for the C12mimHNC/H2O system, a lamellar liquid-crystalline (L(α)) phase was observed. These lyotropic liquid crystals (LLCs) were characterized by polarized optical microscopy (POM) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Structural parameters calculated from SAXS patterns suggest that a higher concentration of the SAIL leads to a denser arrangement whereas a higher temperature results in the opposite effect. The rheological results manifest that the formed H1 phase in the C12mimSal/H2O system exhibits an impressive viscoelastic behavior, indicated by a modulus (G' and G″) that is 1 order of magnitude higher than that of C12mimBr. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal that C12mimSal has a more negative interaction energy with a water molecule and the Sal(-) counterion presents a stronger electronegativity than the HNC(-) counterion. The specific phase behavior of the C12mimSal/H2O and C12mimHNC/H2O systems can be attributed to the strong synergic

  19. Co-migration and internalization of transferrin and its receptor on K562 cells

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    The incorporation of iron into human cells involves the binding of diferric transferrin to a specific cell surface receptor. We studied the process of endocytosis in K562, a human erythroid cell line, by using tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate-labeled transferrin (TRITC- transferrin) and fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled Fab fragments of goat antireceptor IgG preparation (FITC-Fab-antitransferrin receptor antibody). Because the antireceptor antibody and transferrin bind to different sites on the transferrin receptor molecule it was possible to simultaneously and independently follow ligand and receptor. At 4 degrees C, the binding of TRITC-transferrin or FITC-Fab antitransferrin receptor antibody exhibited diffuse membrane fluorescence. At 20 degrees C, the binding of TRITC-transferrin was followed by the rapid formation of aggregates. However, the FITC-Fab antitransferrin receptor did not show similar aggregation at 20 degrees C unless transferrin was present. In the presence of transferrin, the FITC-Fab antitransferrin receptor antibody formed aggregates at the same sites and within the same time period as TRITC transferrin, indicating co-migration. Although the diffuse surface staining of either label was removed by proteolysis, the larger aggregates were not susceptible to enzyme degradation, indicating that they were intracellular. The internal location of the aggregates was also demonstrated using permeabilized cells that had been preincubated with transferrin and fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde. These cells showed aggregated receptor in the interior of the cell when reacted with fluorescein-labeled antibody to the receptor. This indicated that the transferrin and the transferrin receptor co-internalize and migrate to the same structures within the cell. PMID:6309864

  20. Factor VIII Interacts with the Endocytic Receptor Low-density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein 1 via an Extended Surface Comprising "Hot-Spot" Lysine Residues.

    PubMed

    van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Madsen, Jesper J; Faber, Johan H; Zuurveld, Marleen G; van der Zwaan, Carmen; Olsen, Ole H; Stennicke, Henning R; Mertens, Koen; Meijer, Alexander B

    2015-07-01

    Lysine residues are implicated in driving the ligand binding to the LDL receptor family. However, it has remained unclear how specificity is regulated. Using coagulation factor VIII as a model ligand, we now study the contribution of individual lysine residues in the interaction with the largest member of the LDL receptor family, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP1). Using hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) and SPR interaction analysis on a library of lysine replacement variants as two independent approaches, we demonstrate that the interaction between factor VIII (FVIII) and LRP1 occurs over an extended surface containing multiple lysine residues. None of the individual lysine residues account completely for LRP1 binding, suggesting an additive binding model. Together with structural docking studies, our data suggest that FVIII interacts with LRP1 via an extended surface of multiple lysine residues that starts at the bottom of the C1 domain and winds around the FVIII molecule. PMID:25903134

  1. Factor VIII Interacts with the Endocytic Receptor Low-density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein 1 via an Extended Surface Comprising “Hot-Spot” Lysine Residues♦

    PubMed Central

    van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Madsen, Jesper J.; Faber, Johan H.; Zuurveld, Marleen G.; van der Zwaan, Carmen; Olsen, Ole H.; Stennicke, Henning R.; Mertens, Koen; Meijer, Alexander B.

    2015-01-01

    Lysine residues are implicated in driving the ligand binding to the LDL receptor family. However, it has remained unclear how specificity is regulated. Using coagulation factor VIII as a model ligand, we now study the contribution of individual lysine residues in the interaction with the largest member of the LDL receptor family, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP1). Using hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) and SPR interaction analysis on a library of lysine replacement variants as two independent approaches, we demonstrate that the interaction between factor VIII (FVIII) and LRP1 occurs over an extended surface containing multiple lysine residues. None of the individual lysine residues account completely for LRP1 binding, suggesting an additive binding model. Together with structural docking studies, our data suggest that FVIII interacts with LRP1 via an extended surface of multiple lysine residues that starts at the bottom of the C1 domain and winds around the FVIII molecule. PMID:25903134

  2. Dynamics of Cooperativity in Chemical Sensing among Cell-Surface Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoge, Monica; Meir, Yigal; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2011-10-01

    Cooperative interactions among sensory receptors provide a general mechanism to increase the sensitivity of signal transduction. In particular, bacterial chemotaxis receptors interact cooperatively to produce an ultrasensitive response to chemoeffector concentrations. However, cooperativity between receptors in large macromolecular complexes is necessarily based on local interactions and consequently is fundamentally connected to slowing of receptor-conformational dynamics, which increases intrinsic noise. Therefore, it is not clear whether or under what conditions cooperativity actually increases the precision of the concentration measurement. We explicitly calculate the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for sensing a concentration change using a simple, Ising-type model of receptor-receptor interactions, generalized via scaling arguments, and find that the optimal SNR is always achieved by independent receptors.

  3. Insulation of a G protein-coupled receptor on the plasmalemmal surface of the pancreatic acinar cell

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Receptor desensitization is a key process for the protection of the cell from continuous or repeated exposure to high concentrations of an agonist. Well-established mechanisms for desensitization of guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptors include phosphorylation, sequestration/internalization, and down-regulation. In this work, we have examined some mechanisms for desensitization of the cholecystokinin (CCK) receptor which is native to the pancreatic acinar cell, and have found the predominant mechanism to be distinct from these recognized processes. Upon fluorescent agonist occupancy of the native receptor, it becomes "insulated" from the effects of acid washing and becomes immobilized on the surface of the plasma membrane in a time- and temperature-dependent manner. This localization was assessed by ultrastructural studies using a colloidal gold conjugate of CCK, and lateral mobility of the receptor was assessed using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Of note, recent application of the same morphologic techniques to a CCK receptor-bearing Chinese hamster ovary cell line demonstrated prominent internalization via the clathrin-dependent endocytic pathway, as well as entry into caveolae (Roettger, B.F., R.U. Rentsch, D. Pinon, E. Holicky, E. Hadac, J.M. Larkin, and L.J. Miller, 1995, J. Cell Biol. 128: 1029-1041). These organelles are not observed to represent prominent compartments for the same receptor to traverse in the acinar cell, although fluorescent insulin is clearly internalized in these cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis. In this work, the rate of lateral mobility of the CCK receptor is observed to be similar in both cell types (1-3 x 10(-10) cm2/s), while the fate of the agonist-occupied receptor is quite distinct in each cell. This supports the unique nature of desensitization processes which occur in a cell-specific manner. A plasmalemmal site of insulation of this important receptor on the pancreatic acinar cell

  4. Quantification of cell surface receptor expression in live tissue culture media using a dual-tracer stain and rinse approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaochun; Sinha, Lagnojita; Singh, Aparna; Yang, Cynthia; Xiang, Jialing; Tichauer, Kenneth M.

    2015-03-01

    Immunofluorescence staining is a robust way to visualize the distribution of targeted biomolecules invasively in in fixed tissues and tissue culture. Despite the fact that these methods has been a well-established method in fixed tissue imaging for over 70 years, quantification of receptor concentration still simply assumes that the signal from the targeted fluorescent marker after incubation and sufficient rinsing is directly proportional to the concentration of targeted biomolecules, thus neglecting the experimental inconsistencies in incubation and rinsing procedures and assuming no, nonspecific binding of the fluorescent markers. This work presents the first imaging approach capable of quantifying the concentration of cell surface receptor on cancer cells grown in vitro based on compartment modeling in a nondestructive way. The approach utilizes a dual-tracer protocol where any non-specific retention or variability in incubation and rinsing of a receptor-targeted imaging agent is corrected by simultaneously imaging the retention of a chemically similar, "untargeted" imaging agent. Various different compartment models were used to analyze the data in order to find the optimal procedure for extracting estimates of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) concentration (a receptor overexpressed in many cancers and a key target for emerging molecular therapies) in tissue cultures with varying concentrations of human glioma cells (U251). Preliminary results demonstrated a need to model nonspecific binding of both the targeted and untargeted imaging agents used. The approach could be used to carry out the first repeated measures of cell surface receptor dynamics during 3D tumor mass development, in addition to the receptor response to therapies.

  5. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling requires a specific endoplasmic reticulum thioredoxin for the post-translational control of receptor presentation to the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aiwen; Wodziak, Dariusz; Lowe, Anson W

    2015-03-27

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a well characterized receptor-tyrosine kinase that functions in development and serves a vital role in many human cancers. Understanding EGFR regulatory mechanisms, and hence approaches for clinical intervention, has focused on ligand-receptor interactions and tyrosine kinase activity. Here, we show using the NCI-H460 lung and A431 epidermoid human cancer cell lines that EGFR binding to anterior gradient homolog 2 (AGR2) in the endoplasmic reticulum is required for receptor delivery to the plasma membrane and thus EGFR signaling. Reduced AGR2 protein levels or mutation of an essential cysteine in the active site result in decreased cell surface EGFR and a concomitant decrease in signaling as reflected by AREG, EGR1, and FOS expression. Similar to previously described EGFR nulls, an AGR2 null also resulted in embryonic lethality. Consistent with its role in regulating EGFR-mediated signaling, AGR2 expression is also enhanced in many human cancers and promotes the transformed phenotype. Furthermore, EGFR-mediated signaling in NCI-H460 cells, which are resistant to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1478, is also disrupted with reduced AGR2 expression. The results provide insights into why cancer prognosis or response to therapy often does not correlate with EGFR protein or RNA levels because they do not reflect delivery to the cell surface where signaling is initiated. AGR2, therefore, represents a novel post-translational regulator of EGFR-mediated signaling and a promising target for treating human cancers.

  6. Distribution and dynamics of rat basophilic leukemia immunoglobulin E receptors (FcepsilonRI) on planar ligand-presenting surfaces.

    PubMed

    Spendier, Kathrin; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Lidke, Keith A; Wilson, Bridget S; Timlin, Jerilyn A; Thomas, James L

    2010-07-21

    There is considerable interest in the signaling mechanisms of immunoreceptors, especially when triggered with membrane-bound ligands. We have quantified the spatiotemporal dynamics of the redistribution of immunoglobulin E-loaded receptors (IgE-FcepsilonRI) on rat basophilic leukemia-2H3 mast cells in contact with fluid and gel-phase membranes displaying ligands for immunoglobulin E, using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. To clearly separate the kinetics of receptor redistribution from cell spreading, and to precisely define the initial contact time (+/-50 ms), micropipette cell manipulation was used to bring individual cells into contact with surfaces. On ligand-free surfaces, there are micron-scale heterogeneities in fluorescence that likely reflect regions of the cell that are more closely apposed to the substrate. When ligands are present, receptor clusters form with this same size scale. The initial rate of accumulation of receptors into the clusters is consistent with diffusion-limited trapping with D approximately 10(-1) microm2/s. These results support the hypothesis that clusters form by diffusion to cell-surface contact regions. Over longer timescales (>10 s), individual clusters moved with both diffusive and directed motion components. The dynamics of the cluster motion is similar to the dynamics of membrane fluctuations of cells on ligand-free fluid membranes. Thus, the same cellular machinery may be responsible for both processes.

  7. Distribution and Dynamics of Rat Basophilic Leukemia Immunoglobulin E Receptors (FcɛRI) on Planar Ligand-Presenting Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Spendier, Kathrin; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Lidke, Keith A.; Wilson, Bridget S.; Timlin, Jerilyn A.; Thomas, James L.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract There is considerable interest in the signaling mechanisms of immunoreceptors, especially when triggered with membrane-bound ligands. We have quantified the spatiotemporal dynamics of the redistribution of immunoglobulin E-loaded receptors (IgE-FcɛRI) on rat basophilic leukemia-2H3 mast cells in contact with fluid and gel-phase membranes displaying ligands for immunoglobulin E, using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. To clearly separate the kinetics of receptor redistribution from cell spreading, and to precisely define the initial contact time (±50 ms), micropipette cell manipulation was used to bring individual cells into contact with surfaces. On ligand-free surfaces, there are micron-scale heterogeneities in fluorescence that likely reflect regions of the cell that are more closely apposed to the substrate. When ligands are present, receptor clusters form with this same size scale. The initial rate of accumulation of receptors into the clusters is consistent with diffusion-limited trapping with D ∼10−1μm2/s. These results support the hypothesis that clusters form by diffusion to cell-surface contact regions. Over longer timescales (>10 s), individual clusters moved with both diffusive and directed motion components. The dynamics of the cluster motion is similar to the dynamics of membrane fluctuations of cells on ligand-free fluid membranes. Thus, the same cellular machinery may be responsible for both processes. PMID:20643056

  8. Compaction, Fusion, and Functional Activation of Three-Dimensional Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Aggregate

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ang-Chen; Liu, Yijun; Yuan, Xuegang

    2015-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are primary candidates in cell therapy and tissue engineering and are being tested in clinical trials for a wide range of diseases. Originally isolated and expanded as plastic adherent cells, hMSCs have intriguing properties of in vitro self-assembly into three-dimensional (3D) aggregates that improve a range of biological properties, including multilineage potential, secretion of therapeutic factors, and resistance against ischemic condition. While cell–cell contacts and cell–extracellular matrix interactions mediate 3D cell aggregation, the adaptive changes of hMSC cytoskeleton during self-assembly and associated metabolic reconfiguration may also influence aggregate properties and functional activation. In this study, we investigated the role of actin in regulating 3D hMSC aggregate compaction, fusion, spreading and functional activation. Individual hMSC aggregates with controlled initial cell number were formed by seeding a known number of hMSCs (500, 2000, and 5000 cells/well) in multi-well plates of an ultra-low adherent surface to form multicellular aggregates in individual wells. To assess the influence of actin-mediated contractility on hMSC aggregation and properties, actin modulators, including cytochalasin D (cytoD), nocodazole, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and Y-27632, were added at different stages of aggregation and their impacts on hMSC aggregate compaction and apoptosis were monitored. The results suggest that actin-mediated contractility influences hMSC aggregation, compaction, fusion, and spreading on adherent surface. Formation of multi-cellular aggregates significantly upregulated caspase 3/7 expression, expression of C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR-4), cell migration, secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE-2) and interleukin 6 (IL-6), and resistance to in vitro ischemic stress. The functional enhancement, however, is dependent on caspase activation, because treatment with Q-VD-OPh, a pan

  9. HFE and transferrin directly compete for transferrin receptor in solution and at the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Giannetti, Anthony M; Björkman, Pamela J

    2004-06-11

    Transferrin receptor (TfR) is a dimeric cell surface protein that binds both the serum iron transport protein transferrin (Fe-Tf) and HFE, the protein mutated in patients with the iron overload disorder hereditary hemochromatosis. HFE and Fe-Tf can bind simultaneously to TfR to form a ternary complex, but HFE binding to TfR lowers the apparent affinity of the Fe-Tf/TfR interaction. This apparent affinity reduction could result from direct competition between HFE and Fe-Tf for their overlapping binding sites on each TfR polypeptide chain, from negative cooperativity, or from a combination of both. To explore the mechanism of the affinity reduction, we constructed a heterodimeric TfR that contains mutations such that one TfR chain binds only HFE and the other binds only Fe-Tf. Binding studies using a heterodimeric form of soluble TfR demonstrate that TfR does not exhibit cooperativity in heterotropic ligand binding, suggesting that some or all of the effects of HFE on iron homeostasis result from competition with Fe-Tf for TfR binding. Experiments using transfected cell lines demonstrate a physiological role for this competition in altering HFE trafficking patterns. PMID:15056661

  10. Adherence of Candida albicans to a cell surface polysaccharide receptor on Streptococcus gordonii.

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, A R; Gopal, P K; Jenkinson, H F

    1995-01-01

    Candida albicans ATCC 10261 and CA2 bound to cells of the oral bacteria Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus sanguis when these bacteria were immobilized onto microtiter plate wells, but they did not bind to cells of Streptococcus mutans or Streptococcus salivarius. Cell wall polysaccharide was extracted with alkali from S. gordonii NCTC 7869, the streptococcal species to which C. albicans bound with highest affinity, and was effective in blocking the coaggregation of C. albicans and S. gordonii cells in the fluid phase. When fixed to microtiter plate wells, the S. gordonii polysaccharide was bound by all strains of C. albicans tested. The polysaccharide contained Rha, Glc, GalNAc, GlcNAc, and Gal and was related compositionally to previously characterized cell wall polysaccharides from strains of S. oralis and S. sanguis. The adherence of yeast cells to the immobilized polysaccharide was not inhibitable by a number of saccharides. Antiserum raised to the S. gordonii NCTC 7869 polysaccharide blocked adherence of C. albicans ATCC 10261 to the polysaccharide. The results identify a complex cell wall polysaccharide of S. gordonii as the coaggregation receptor for C. albicans. Adherent interactions of yeast cells with streptococci and other bacteria may be important for colonization of both hard and soft oral surfaces by C. albicans. PMID:7729891

  11. Molecular Recognition by a Polymorphic Cell Surface Receptor Governs Cooperative Behaviors in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Arup; Wall, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Cell-cell recognition is a fundamental process that allows cells to coordinate multicellular behaviors. Some microbes, such as myxobacteria, build multicellular fruiting bodies from free-living cells. However, how bacterial cells recognize each other by contact is poorly understood. Here we show that myxobacteria engage in recognition through interactions between TraA cell surface receptors, which leads to the fusion and exchange of outer membrane (OM) components. OM exchange is shown to be selective among 17 environmental isolates, as exchange partners parsed into five major recognition groups. TraA is the determinant of molecular specificity because: (i) exchange partners correlated with sequence conservation within its polymorphic PA14-like domain and (ii) traA allele replacements predictably changed partner specificity. Swapping traA alleles also reprogrammed social interactions among strains, including the regulation of motility and conferred immunity from inter-strain killing. We suggest that TraA helps guide the transition of single cells into a coherent bacterial community, by a proposed mechanism that is analogous to mitochondrial fusion and fission cycling that mixes contents to establish a homogenous population. In evolutionary terms, traA functions as a rare greenbeard gene that recognizes others that bear the same allele to confer beneficial treatment. PMID:24244178

  12. The Dentin Sialoprotein (DSP) Domain Regulates Dental Mesenchymal Cell Differentiation through a Novel Surface Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Chunyan; Yuan, Guohua; Luo, Daoshu; Zhang, Lu; Lin, Heng; Liu, Huan; Chen, Lei; Yang, Guobin; Chen, Shuo; Chen, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) is a dentin extracellular matrix protein that is processed into dentin sialoprotein (DSP), dentin glycoprotein (DGP) and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). DSP is mainly expressed in odontoblasts. We hypothesized that DSP interacts with cell surface receptors and subsequently activates intracellular signaling. Using DSP as bait for screening a protein library, we demonstrate that DSP acts as a ligand and binds to integrin β6. The 36 amino acid residues of DSP are sufficient to bind to integrin β6. This peptide promoted cell attachment, migration, differentiation and mineralization of dental mesenchymal cells. In addition, DSP aa183-219 stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and P38 kinases. This activation was inhibited by an anti-integrin β6 antibody and siRNA. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this DSP fragment induces SMAD1/5/8 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation via ERK1/2 and P38 signaling. SMAD1/5/8 binds to SMAD binding elements (SBEs) in the DSPP gene promoter. SBE mutations result in a decrease in DSPP transcriptional activity. Endogenous DSPP expression was up-regulated by DSP aa183-219 in dental mesenchymal cells. The data in the current study demonstrate for the first time that this DSP domain acts as a ligand in a RGD-independent manner and is involved in intracellular signaling via interacting with integrin β6. The DSP domain regulates DSPP expression and odontoblast homeostasis via a positive feedback loop. PMID:27430624

  13. Usp12 stabilizes the T-cell receptor complex at the cell surface during signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jahan, Akhee S.; Lestra, Maxime; Swee, Lee Kim; Fan, Ying; Lamers, Mart M.; Tafesse, Fikadu G.; Theile, Christopher S.; Spooner, Eric; Bruzzone, Roberto; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Sanyal, Sumana

    2016-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications are central to the spatial and temporal regulation of protein function. Among others, phosphorylation and ubiquitylation are known to regulate proximal T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling. Here we used a systematic and unbiased approach to uncover deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) that participate during TCR signaling in primary mouse T lymphocytes. Using a C-terminally modified vinyl methyl ester variant of ubiquitin (HA-Ub-VME), we captured DUBs that are differentially recruited to the cytosol on TCR activation. We identified ubiquitin-specific peptidase (Usp) 12 and Usp46, which had not been previously described in this pathway. Stimulation with anti-CD3 resulted in phosphorylation and time-dependent translocation of Usp12 from the nucleus to the cytosol. Usp12−/− Jurkat cells displayed defective NFκB, NFAT, and MAPK activities owing to attenuated surface expression of TCR, which were rescued on reconstitution of wild type Usp12. Proximity-based labeling with BirA-Usp12 revealed several TCR adaptor proteins acting as interactors in stimulated cells, of which LAT and Trat1 displayed reduced expression in Usp12−/− cells. We demonstrate that Usp12 deubiquitylates and prevents lysosomal degradation of LAT and Trat1 to maintain the proximal TCR complex for the duration of signaling. Our approach benefits from the use of activity-based probes in primary cells without any previous genome modification, and underscores the importance of ubiquitin-mediated regulation to refine signaling cascades. PMID:26811477

  14. The cell surface receptor Slamf6 modulates innate immune responses during Citrobacter rodentium-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    van Driel, Boaz; Wang, Guoxing; Liao, Gongxian; Halibozek, Peter J; Keszei, Marton; O'Keeffe, Michael S; Bhan, Atul K; Wang, Ninghai; Terhorst, Cox

    2015-09-01

    The homophilic cell surface receptors CD150 (Slamf1) and CD352 (Slamf6) are known to modulate adaptive immune responses. Although the Th17 response was enhanced in Slamf6(-/-) C57BL/6 mice upon oral infection with Citrobacter rodentium, the pathologic consequences are indistinguishable from an infection of wild-type C57BL/6 mice. Using a reporter-based binding assay, we show that Slamf6 can engage structures on the outer cell membrane of several Gram(-) bacteria. Therefore, we examined whether Slamf6, like Slamf1, is also involved in innate responses to bacteria and regulates peripheral inflammation by assessing the outcome of C. rodentium infections in Rag(-/-) mice. Surprisingly, the pathology and immune responses in the lamina propria of C. rodentium-infected Slamf6(-/-) Rag(-/-) mice were markedly reduced as compared with those of Rag(-/-) mice. Infiltration of inflammatory phagocytes into the lamina propria was consistently lower in Slamf6(-/-) Rag(-/-) mice than in Rag(-/-) animals. Concomitant with the reduced systemic translocation of the bacteria was an enhanced production of IL-22, suggesting that Slamf6 suppresses a mucosal protective program. Furthermore, administering a mAb (330) that inhibits bacterial interactions with Slamf6 to Rag(-/-) mice ameliorated the infection compared with a control antibody. We conclude that Slamf6-mediated interactions of colonic innate immune cells with specific Gram(-) bacteria reduce mucosal protection and enhance inflammation, contributing to lethal colitis that is caused by C. rodentium infections in Rag(-/-) mice.

  15. CC chemokine receptor 10 cell surface presentation in melanocytes is regulated by the novel interaction partner S100A10

    PubMed Central

    Hessner, F.; Dlugos, C. P.; Chehab, T.; Schaefer, C.; Homey, B.; Gerke, V.; Weide, T.; Pavenstädt, H.; Rescher, U.

    2016-01-01

    The superfamily of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) conveys signals in response to various endogenous and exogenous stimuli. Consequently, GPCRs are the most important drug targets. CCR10, the receptor for the chemokines CCL27/CTACK and CCL28/MEC, belongs to the chemokine receptor subfamily of GPCRs and is thought to function in immune responses and tumour progression. However, there is only limited information on the intracellular regulation of CCR10. We find that S100A10, a member of the S100 family of Ca2+ binding proteins, binds directly to the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of CCR10 and that this interaction regulates the CCR10 cell surface presentation. This identifies S100A10 as a novel interaction partner and regulator of CCR10 that might serve as a target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26941067

  16. Optimization of cell receptor-specific targeting through multivalent surface decoration of polymeric nanocarriers

    PubMed Central

    D’Addio, Suzanne M.; Baldassano, Steven; Shi, Lei; Cheung, Lila; Adamson, Douglas H.; Bruzek, Matthew; Anthony, John E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Prud’homme, Robert K.

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of tuberculosis is impaired by poor drug bioavailability, systemic side effects, patient non-compliance, and pathogen resistance to existing therapies. The mannose receptor (MR) is known to be involved in the recognition and internalization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We present a new assembly process to produce nanocarriers with variable surface densities of mannose targeting ligands in a single step, using kinetically-controlled, block copolymer-directed assembly. Nanocarrier association with murine macrophage J774 cells expressing the MR is examined as a function of incubation time and temperature, nanocarrier size, dose, and PEG corona properties. Amphiphilic diblock copolymers are prepared with terminal hydroxyl, methoxy, or mannoside functionality and incorporated into nanocarrier formulations at specific ratios by Flash NanoPrecipitation. Association of nanocarriers protected by a hydroxyl-terminated PEG corona with J774 cells is size dependent, while nanocarriers with methoxy-terminated PEG coronas do not associate with cells, regardless of size. Specific targeting of the MR is investigated using nanocarriers having 0-75% mannoside-terminated PEG chains in the PEG corona. This is a wider range of mannose densities than has been previously studied. Maximum nanocarrier association is attained with 9% mannoside-terminated PEG chains, increasing uptake more than 3-fold compared to non-targeted nanocarriers with a 5 kg mol−1 methoxy-terminated PEG corona. While a 5 kg mol−1 methoxy-terminated PEG corona prevents non-specific uptake, a 1.8 kg mol−1 methoxy-terminated PEG corona does not sufficiently protect the nanocarriers from nonspecific association. There is continuous uptake of MR-targeted nanocarriers at 37°C, but a saturation of association at 4°C. The majority of targeted nanocarriers associate with J774E cells are internalized at 37°C and uptake is receptor-dependent, diminishing with competitive inhibition by dextran. This

  17. Regulation of fibrinogen receptor expression on human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Shattil, S.J.; Motulsky, H.J.; Insel, P.A.; Brass, L.F.

    1986-03-01

    Platelet aggregation requires the binding of fibrinogen to specific receptors on the plasma membrane glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex. Although the IIb-IIIa complex is identifiable on the surface of resting platelets, the fibrinogen receptor is expressed only after platelet activation. The authors have developed a monoclonal anti-IIb-IIIa antibody (PAC-1) that binds only to stimulated platelets and only in the presence of Ca. In order to better understand the steps leading to platelet aggregation, the authors used radiolabeled PAC-1 and fibrinogen to examine the effect of the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic agonist, epinephrine, on the expression and function of the fibrinogen receptor. The addition of epinephrine to unstirred platelets caused and immediate increase in PAC-1 and fibrinogen binding that was associated with platelet aggregation once the platelets were stirred. Even after prolonged incubation of the platelets with epinephrine, fibrinogen receptor expression could be reversed by adding EGTA, PGl/sub 2/, or the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic antagonist, phentolamine. When unstirred platelets were exposed to epinephrine for more than 10 min, the extent of aggregation caused by subsequent stirring was decreased by 70%. Surprisingly, these desensitized platelets bound PAC-1 and fibrinogen normally, indicating that the loss of aggregation was not due to a decrease in fibrinogen receptor expression or function. These studies demonstrate that: (1) fibrinogen receptor expression is dependent on extracellular CA; (2) induction of the fibrinogen receptor by epinephrine requires the continued presence of the agonist; and (3) prolonged stimulation of the platelet by epinephrine can lead to a reduced aggregation response by a mechanism that does not involve a loss of either fibrinogen recepor expression or fibrinogen binding.

  18. Morphological Changes Of The Root Surface And Fracture Resistance After Treatment Of Root Fracture By CO2 Laser And Glass Ionomer Or Mineral Trioxide Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badr, Y. A.; Abd El-Gawad, L. M.; Ghaith, M. E.

    2009-09-01

    This in vitro study evaluates the morphological changes of the root surface and fracture resistance after treatment of root cracks by CO2 laser and glass Ionomer or mineral trioxide aggregates (MTA). Fifty freshly extracted human maxillary central incisor teeth with similar dimension were selected. Crowns were sectioned at the cemento-enamel junction, and the lengths of the roots were adjusted to 13 mm. A longitudinal groove with a dimension of 1×5 mm2 and a depth of 1.5 mm was prepared by a high speed fissure bur on the labial surface of the root. The roots were divided into 5 groups: the 10 root grooves in group 1 were remained unfilled and were used as a control group. The 10 root grooves in group 2 were filled with glass Ionomer, 10 root grooves in group 3 were filled with MTA, the 10 root grooves in group 4 were filled with glass Ionomer and irradiated by CO2 laser and the 10 root grooves in group 5 were filled with MTA and irradiated with CO2 laser. Scanning electron microscopy was performed for two samples in each group. Tests for fracture strength were performed using a universal testing machine and a round tip of a diameter of 4 mm. The force was applied vertically with a constant speed of 1 mm min 1. For each root, the force at the time of fracture was recorded in Newtons. Results were evaluated statistically with ANOVA and Turkey's Honestly Significant Difference (HSD) tests. SEM micrographs revealed that the melted masses and the plate-like crystals formed a tight Chemical bond between the cementum and glass Ionomer and melted masses and globular like structure between cementum and MTA. The mean fracture resistance was the maximum fracture resistance in group 5 (810.8 N). Glass Ionomer and MTA with the help of CO2 laser can be an alternative to the treatment of tooth crack or fracture. CO2 laser increase the resistance of the teeth to fracture.

  19. Functional Mimetics of the HIV-1 CCR5 Co-Receptor Displayed on the Surface of Magnetic Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmina, Alona; Vaknin, Karin; Gdalevsky, Garik; Vyazmensky, Maria; Marks, Robert S.; Taube, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine G protein coupled receptors, principally CCR5 or CXCR4, function as co-receptors for HIV-1 entry into CD4+ T cells. Initial binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 subunit to the host CD4 receptor induces a cascade of structural conformational changes that lead to the formation of a high-affinity co-receptor-binding site on gp120. Interaction between gp120 and the co-receptor leads to the exposure of epitopes on the viral gp41 that mediates fusion between viral and cell membranes. Soluble CD4 (sCD4) mimetics can act as an activation-based inhibitor of HIV-1 entry in vitro, as it induces similar structural changes in gp120, leading to increased virus infectivity in the short term but to virus Env inactivation in the long term. Despite promising clinical implications, sCD4 displays low efficiency in vivo, and in multiple HIV strains, it does not inhibit viral infection. This has been attributed to the slow kinetics of the sCD4-induced HIV Env inactivation and to the failure to obtain sufficient sCD4 mimetic levels in the serum. Here we present uniquely structured CCR5 co-receptor mimetics. We hypothesized that such mimetics will enhance sCD4-induced HIV Env inactivation and inhibition of HIV entry. Co-receptor mimetics were derived from CCR5 gp120-binding epitopes and functionalized with a palmitoyl group, which mediated their display on the surface of lipid-coated magnetic beads. CCR5-peptidoliposome mimetics bound to soluble gp120 and inhibited HIV-1 infectivity in a sCD4-dependent manner. We concluded that CCR5-peptidoliposomes increase the efficiency of sCD4 to inhibit HIV infection by acting as bait for sCD4-primed virus, catalyzing the premature discharge of its fusion potential. PMID:26629902

  20. Scavenger Receptor C-Type Lectin Binds to the Leukocyte Cell Surface Glycan Lewis By a Novel Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, H.; Taylor, M.E.; Weis, W.I.; /Stanford U., Med. School /Imperial Coll., London

    2007-07-10

    The scavenger receptor C-type lectin (SRCL) is unique in the family of class A scavenger receptors, because in addition to binding sites for oxidized lipoproteins it also contains a C-type carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) that interacts with specific glycans. Both human and mouse SRCL are highly specific for the Lewis(x) trisaccharide, which is commonly found on the surfaces of leukocytes and some tumor cells. Structural analysis of the CRD of mouse SRCL in complex with Lewis(x) and mutagenesis show the basis for this specificity. The interaction between mouse SRCL and Lewis(x) is analogous to the way that selectins and DC-SIGN bind to related fucosylated glycans, but the mechanism of the interaction is novel, because it is based on a primary galactose-binding site similar to the binding site in the asialoglycoprotein receptor. Crystals of the human receptor lacking bound calcium ions reveal an alternative conformation in which a glycan ligand would be released during receptor-mediated endocytosis.

  1. Propranolol Restricts the Mobility of Single EGF-Receptors on the Cell Surface before Their Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Otero, Carolina; Linke, Max; Sanchez, Paula; González, Alfonso; Schaap, Iwan A. T.

    2013-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor is involved in morphogenesis, proliferation and cell migration. Its up-regulation during tumorigenesis makes this receptor an interesting therapeutic target. In the absence of the ligand, the inhibition of phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase activity by propranolol treatment leads to internalization of empty/inactive receptors. The molecular events involved in this endocytosis remain unknown. Here, we quantified the effects of propranolol on the mobility of single quantum-dot labelled receptors before the actual internalization took place. The single receptors showed a clear stop-and-go motion; their diffusive tracks were continuously interrupted by sub-second stalling events, presumably caused by transient clustering. In the presence of propranolol we found that: i) the diffusion rate reduced by 22 %, which indicates an increase in drag of the receptor. Atomic force microscopy measurements did not show an increase of the effective membrane tension, such that clustering of the receptor remains the likely mechanism for its reduced mobility. ii) The receptor got frequently stalled for longer periods of multiple seconds, which may signal the first step of the internalization process. PMID:24349439

  2. Increased accuracy of ligand sensing by receptor diffusion on cell surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquino, Gerardo; Endres, Robert G.

    2010-10-01

    The physical limit with which a cell senses external ligand concentration corresponds to the perfect absorber, where all ligand particles are absorbed and overcounting of same ligand particles does not occur. Here, we analyze how the lateral diffusion of receptors on the cell membrane affects the accuracy of sensing ligand concentration. Specifically, we connect our modeling to neurotransmission in neural synapses where the diffusion of glutamate receptors is already known to refresh synaptic connections. We find that receptor diffusion indeed increases the accuracy of sensing for both the glutamate α -Amino-3-hydroxy-5-Methyl-4-isoxazolePropionic Acid (AMPA) and N -Methyl-D-aspartic Acid (NMDA) receptor, although the NMDA receptor is overall much noisier. We propose that the difference in accuracy of sensing of the two receptors can be linked to their different roles in neurotransmission. Specifically, the high accuracy in sensing glutamate is essential for the AMPA receptor to start membrane depolarization, while the NMDA receptor is believed to work in a second stage as a coincidence detector, involved in long-term potentiation and memory.

  3. The thrombopoietin receptor, c-Mpl, is a selective surface marker for human hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ninos, John M; Jefferies, Leigh C; Cogle, Christopher R; Kerr, William G

    2006-01-01

    Background Thrombopoietin (TPO), the primary cytokine regulating megakaryocyte proliferation and differentiation, exerts significant influence on other hematopoietic lineages as well, including erythroid, granulocytic and lymphoid lineages. We previously demonstrated that the receptor for TPO, c-mpl, is expressed by a subset of human adult bone marrow hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSC/PC) that are enriched for long-term multilineage repopulating ability in the SCID-hu Bone in vivo model of human hematopoiesis. Methods Here, we employ flow cytometry and an anti-c-mpl monoclonal antibody to comprehensively define the surface expression pattern of c-mpl in four differentiation stages of human CD34+ HSC/PC (I: CD34+38--, II: CD34+38dim, III: CD34+38+, IV: CD34dim38+) for the major sources of human HSC: fetal liver (FL), umbilical cord blood (UCB), adult bone marrow (ABM), and cytokine-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (mPBSC). We use a surrogate in vivo model of human thymopoiesis, SCID-hu Thy/Liv, to compare the capacity of c-mpl+ vs. c-mpl-- CD34+38--/dim HSC/PC for thymocyte reconstitution. Results For all tissue sources, the percentage of c-mpl+ cells was significantly highest in stage I HSC/PC (FL 72 ± 10%, UCB 67 ± 19%, ABM 82 ± 16%, mPBSC 71 ± 15%), and decreased significantly through stages II, III, and IV ((FL 3 ± 3%, UCB 8 ± 13%, ABM 0.6 ± 0.6%, mPBSC 0.2 ± 0.1%) [ANOVA: P < 0.0001]. The relative median fluorescence intensity of c-mpl expression was similarly highest in stage I, decreasing through stage IV [ANOVA: P < 0.0001]. No significant differences between tissue sources were observed for either % c-mpl+ cells [P = 0.89] or intensity of c-mpl expression [P = 0.21]. Primary Thy/Liv grafts injected with CD34+38--/dimc-mpl+ cells showed slightly higher levels of donor HLA+ thymocyte reconstitution vs. CD34+38--/dimc-mpl---injected grafts and non-injected controls (c-mpl+ vs. c-mpl--: CD2+ 6.8 ± 4.5% vs. 2.8 ± 3.3%, CD4+8-- 54 ± 35% vs

  4. Role of Multicellular Aggregates in Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kragh, Kasper N.; Hutchison, Jaime B.; Melaugh, Gavin; Rodesney, Chris; Roberts, Aled E. L.; Irie, Yasuhiko; Jensen, Peter Ø.; Diggle, Stephen P.; Allen, Rosalind J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In traditional models of in vitro biofilm development, individual bacterial cells seed a surface, multiply, and mature into multicellular, three-dimensional structures. Much research has been devoted to elucidating the mechanisms governing the initial attachment of single cells to surfaces. However, in natural environments and during infection, bacterial cells tend to clump as multicellular aggregates, and biofilms can also slough off aggregates as a part of the dispersal process. This makes it likely that biofilms are often seeded by aggregates and single cells, yet how these aggregates impact biofilm initiation and development is not known. Here we use a combination of experimental and computational approaches to determine the relative fitness of single cells and preformed aggregates during early development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We find that the relative fitness of aggregates depends markedly on the density of surrounding single cells, i.e., the level of competition for growth resources. When competition between aggregates and single cells is low, an aggregate has a growth disadvantage because the aggregate interior has poor access to growth resources. However, if competition is high, aggregates exhibit higher fitness, because extending vertically above the surface gives cells at the top of aggregates better access to growth resources. Other advantages of seeding by aggregates, such as earlier switching to a biofilm-like phenotype and enhanced resilience toward antibiotics and immune response, may add to this ecological benefit. Our findings suggest that current models of biofilm formation should be reconsidered to incorporate the role of aggregates in biofilm initiation. PMID:27006463

  5. Histaminergic pharmacology of homo-oligomeric β3 γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors characterized by surface plasmon resonance biosensor technology.

    PubMed

    Seeger, Christian; Christopeit, Tony; Fuchs, Karoline; Grote, Katharina; Sieghart, Werner; Danielson, U Helena

    2012-08-01

    A surface plasmon resonance biosensor assay was established for studying the interactions of 51 histaminergic and 15 GABAergic ligands with homo-oligomeric β3 GABA(A) receptors. Detergent solubilized receptors were successfully immobilized via affinity-capture on biosensor surfaces. The interaction kinetics of both histaminergic and GABAergic ligands were very rapid but affinities could be determined by steady-state analysis. Binding of several GABAergic ligands was observed, in agreement with previous data. Histamine and 16 histaminergic ligands were detected to directly bind to β3 GABA(A) receptors with micromolar affinity (K(D)<300 μM), thus extending previous evidence that β3 GABA(A) receptors can interact with histaminergic ligands. Histamine exhibited an affinity for these receptors comparable to that for human histamine type 1 (H1) or type 2 (H2) receptors. Furthermore, 13 of these histaminergic ligands appeared to compete with histamine. The discovery that H2, H3 and H4 receptor ligands interact with β3 receptors indicates a unique histaminergic pharmacology of these receptors. Due to their low affinity for the homo-pentameric β3 receptors these histaminergic drugs are not expected to modulate these receptors at clinically relevant concentrations. The results support the use of the new biosensor assay for the identification of drugs interacting with full length receptors and for fragment-based drug discovery of high affinity ligands for β3 receptors. Drugs with high affinity and selectivity for these receptors can be used to clarify the question whether β3 receptors do exist in the brain, and provide new avenues for the development of therapeutically active compounds targeting this novel histamine binding site.

  6. Tyrosine phosphorylation regulates the endocytosis and surface expression of GluN3A-containing NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Dhrubajyoti; Marco, Sonia; Brooks, Ian M; Zandueta, Aitor; Rao, Yijian; Haucke, Volker; Wesseling, John F; Tavalin, Steven J; Pérez-Otaño, Isabel

    2013-02-27

    Selective control of receptor trafficking provides a mechanism for remodeling the receptor composition of excitatory synapses, and thus supports synaptic transmission, plasticity, and development. GluN3A (formerly NR3A) is a nonconventional member of the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) subunit family, which endows NMDAR channels with low calcium permeability and reduced magnesium sensitivity compared with NMDARs comprising only GluN1 and GluN2 subunits. Because of these special properties, GluN3A subunits act as a molecular brake to limit the plasticity and maturation of excitatory synapses, pointing toward GluN3A removal as a critical step in the development of neuronal circuitry. However, the molecular signals mediating GluN3A endocytic removal remain unclear. Here we define a novel endocytic motif (YWL), which is located within the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail of GluN3A and mediates its binding to the clathrin adaptor AP2. Alanine mutations within the GluN3A endocytic motif inhibited clathrin-dependent internalization and led to accumulation of GluN3A-containing NMDARs at the cell surface, whereas mimicking phosphorylation of the tyrosine residue promoted internalization and reduced cell-surface expression as shown by immunocytochemical and electrophysiological approaches in recombinant systems and rat neurons in primary culture. We further demonstrate that the tyrosine residue is phosphorylated by Src family kinases, and that Src-activation limits surface GluN3A expression in neurons. Together, our results identify a new molecular signal for GluN3A internalization that couples the functional surface expression of GluN3A-containing receptors to the phosphorylation state of GluN3A subunits, and provides a molecular framework for the regulation of NMDAR subunit composition with implications for synaptic plasticity and neurodevelopment. PMID:23447623

  7. Estrogen and androgen receptor activities of hydraulic fracturing chemicals and surface and ground water in a drilling-dense region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kassotis, Christopher D.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Davis, J. Wade; Hormann, Anette M.; Nagel, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    The rapid rise in natural gas extraction using hydraulic fracturing increases the potential for contamination of surface and ground water from chemicals used throughout the process. Hundreds of products containing more than 750 chemicals and components are potentially used throughout the extraction process, including more than 100 known or suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals. We hypothesized thataselected subset of chemicalsusedin natural gas drilling operationsandalso surface and ground water samples collected in a drilling-dense region of Garfield County, Colorado, would exhibit estrogen and androgen receptor activities. Water samples were collected, solid-phase extracted, and measured for estrogen and androgen receptor activities using reporter gene assays in human cell lines. Of the 39 unique water samples, 89%, 41%, 12%, and 46% exhibited estrogenic, antiestrogenic, androgenic, and antiandrogenic activities, respectively. Testing of a subset of natural gas drilling chemicals revealed novel antiestrogenic, novel antiandrogenic, and limited estrogenic activities. The Colorado River, the drainage basin for this region, exhibited moderate levels of estrogenic, antiestrogenic, and antiandrogenic activities, suggesting that higher localized activity at sites with known natural gas–related spills surrounding the river might be contributing to the multiple receptor activities observed in this water source. The majority of water samples collected from sites in a drilling-dense region of Colorado exhibited more estrogenic, antiestrogenic, or antiandrogenic activities than reference sites with limited nearby drilling operations. Our data suggest that natural gas drilling operationsmayresult in elevated endocrine-disrupting chemical activity in surface and ground water.

  8. A Novel Approach to Identify Two Distinct Receptor Binding Surfaces of Insulin-like Growth Factor II*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Alvino, Clair L.; McNeil, Kerrie A.; Ong, Shee Chee; Delaine, Carlie; Booker, Grant W.; Wallace, John C.; Whittaker, Jonathan; Forbes, Briony E.

    2009-01-01

    Very little is known about the residues important for the interaction of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) with the type 1 IGF receptor (IGF-1R) and the insulin receptor (IR). Insulin, to which IGF-II is homologous, is proposed to cross-link opposite halves of the IR dimer through two receptor binding surfaces, site 1 and site 2. In the present study we have analyzed the contribution of IGF-II residues equivalent to insulin's two binding surfaces toward the interaction of IGF-II with the IGF-1R and IR. Four “site 1” and six “site 2” analogues were produced and analyzed in terms of IGF-1R and IR binding and activation. The results show that Val43, Phe28, and Val14 (equivalent to site 1) are critical to IGF-1R and IR binding, whereas mutation to alanine of Gln18 affects only IGF-1R and not IR binding. Alanine substitutions at Glu12, Asp15, Phe19, Leu53, and Glu57 analogues resulted in significant (>2-fold) decreases in affinity for both the IGF-1R and IR. Furthermore, taking a novel approach using a monomeric, single-chain minimized IGF-1R we have defined a distinct second binding surface formed by Glu12, Phe19, Leu53, and Glu57 that potentially engages the IGF-1R at one or more of the FnIII domains. PMID:19139090

  9. Estrogen and androgen receptor activities of hydraulic fracturing chemicals and surface and ground water in a drilling-dense region.

    PubMed

    Kassotis, Christopher D; Tillitt, Donald E; Davis, J Wade; Hormann, Annette M; Nagel, Susan C

    2014-03-01

    The rapid rise in natural gas extraction using hydraulic fracturing increases the potential for contamination of surface and ground water from chemicals used throughout the process. Hundreds of products containing more than 750 chemicals and components are potentially used throughout the extraction process, including more than 100 known or suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals. We hypothesized that a selected subset of chemicals used in natural gas drilling operations and also surface and ground water samples collected in a drilling-dense region of Garfield County, Colorado, would exhibit estrogen and androgen receptor activities. Water samples were collected, solid-phase extracted, and measured for estrogen and androgen receptor activities using reporter gene assays in human cell lines. Of the 39 unique water samples, 89%, 41%, 12%, and 46% exhibited estrogenic, antiestrogenic, androgenic, and antiandrogenic activities, respectively. Testing of a subset of natural gas drilling chemicals revealed novel antiestrogenic, novel antiandrogenic, and limited estrogenic activities. The Colorado River, the drainage basin for this region, exhibited moderate levels of estrogenic, antiestrogenic, and antiandrogenic activities, suggesting that higher localized activity at sites with known natural gas-related spills surrounding the river might be contributing to the multiple receptor activities observed in this water source. The majority of water samples collected from sites in a drilling-dense region of Colorado exhibited more estrogenic, antiestrogenic, or antiandrogenic activities than reference sites with limited nearby drilling operations. Our data suggest that natural gas drilling operations may result in elevated endocrine-disrupting chemical activity in surface and ground water.

  10. Plasma binding proteins for platelet-derived growth factor that inhibit its binding to cell-surface receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Raines, E W; Bowen-Pope, D F; Ross, R

    1984-01-01

    Evidence is presented that the binding of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) to plasma constituents inhibits the binding of PDGF to its cell-surface mitogen receptor. Approximately equivalent amounts of PDGF-binding activity were found in plasma from a number of different species known by radioreceptor assay to contain PDGF homologues in their clotted blood. Activation of the coagulation cascade did not significantly alter the PDGF-binding activity of the plasma components. Three molecular weight classes of plasma fractions that inhibit PDGF binding to its cell-surface receptor were defined by gel filtration: approximately equal to 40,000, 150,000, and greater than 500,000. Specific binding of 125I-labeled PDGF to the highest molecular weight plasma fraction could also be demonstrated by gel filtration. The binding of PDGF to these plasma components was reversible under conditions of low pH or with guanidine X HCl, and active PDGF could be recovered from the higher molecular weight fractions. Immunologic and functional evidence is presented that the highest molecular weight plasma fraction may be alpha 2-macroglobulin. A model is proposed in which the activity of PDGF released in vivo may be regulated by association with these plasma binding components and by high-affinity binding to cell-surface PDGF receptors. PMID:6203121

  11. Monoclonal antibodies to the cell surface and a soluble form of the human nerve growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Clagett-Dame, M.; Chung, C.; Chao, M.V.; DiStefano, P.S. )

    1990-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (designated IIIG5, VIID1, VIIIC8, and XIF1) have been produced that bind to the human nerve growth factor receptor (NGF-R) as well as to a soluble, truncated form of the receptor (NGF-Rt). The antibodies were generated against partially purified NGF-Rt from the conditioned medium of E9b cells, a transfected mouse fibroblast cell line (Ltk-) that expresses large numbers of the low affinity form of the human NGF-R on its cell surface. Hybridomas were screened by radiometric immunosorbent assay (RISA) and by immunoprecipitation of solubilized cell surface receptor covalently cross-linked to {sup 125}I-NGF. Four positive lines were cloned by limiting dilution and were found to secrete monoclonal antibodies of the IgGl,k subclass. All monoclonal antibodies bound to both NGF-R and NGF-Rt. Two monoclonal antibodies (VIID1, XIF1) immunoblotted the NGF-R from E9b cell preparations resolved on non-reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gels. The antibodies immunoprecipitated NGF-R from both E9b cells and from SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. The monoclonal antibodies bound to monkey (rhesis and cynomolgus) NGF-Rt, but did not cross-react with NGF-R from chick or rat. Results of antibody competition studies demonstrated that three antibodies bound to a similar or overlapping epitope on the NGF-Rt and one monoclonal antibody (IIIG5) recognized a distinct receptor epitope. Antibodies that bound to different sites on the receptor were used to develop a sensitive 2-site RISA. The 2-site RISA can be used to rapidly quantitate NGF-R and NGF-Rt in large numbers of biological samples in the absence of added {sup 125}I-labeled NGF.

  12. Characterization of surface interleukin-2 receptor expression on gated populations of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from manatees, Trichechus manatus latirostris.

    PubMed

    Sweat, J M; Johnson, C M; Marikar, Y; Gibbs, E P

    2005-12-15

    An in vitro system to determine surface interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) expression on mitogen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from free-ranging manatees, Trichechus manatus latirostris was developed. Human recombinant IL-2, conjugated with a fluorescein dye was used in conjunction with flow cytometric analysis to determine changes in surface expression of IL-2R at sequential times over a 48-h period of in vitro stimulation. Surface expression of IL-2R was detected on manatee PBMC, which also cross-reacted with an anti-feline pan T-cell marker. An expression index (EI) was calculated by comparing mitogen-activated and non-activated PBMC. Based on side- and forward-scatter properties, flow cytometric analysis showed an increase in the number of larger, more granular "lymphoblasts" following concanavalin A (Con A) stimulation. The appearance of lymphoblasts was correlated with an increase in their surface expression of IL-2 receptors. Surface IL-2R expression, in Con A-stimulated PBMC, was detected at 16 h, peaked at 24-36 h, and began to decrease by 48 h. Characterization of the IL-2R expression should provide additional information on the health status of manatees, and the effect of their sub lethal exposure to brevetoxin.

  13. The growth-defense pivot: Crisis management in plants mediated by LRR-RK surface receptors

    PubMed Central

    Belkhadir, Youssef; Yang, Li; Hetzel, Jonathan; Dangl, Jeffery L.; Chory, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Plants must adapt to their environment and require mechanisms for sensing their surroundings and responding appropriately. An expanded family of greater than 200 leucine-rich repeat receptor kinases (LRR-RKs) transduces fluctuating and often contradictory signals from the environment into changes in nuclear gene expression. Two LRR-RKs, BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE 1 (BRI1), a steroid receptor, and FLAGELLIN-SENSITIVE 2 (FLS2), an innate immune receptor that recognizes bacterial flagellin, act cooperatively to partition necessary growth-defense tradeoffs. BRI1 and FLS2 share common signaling components and slightly different activation mechanisms. BRI1 and FLS2 are paradigms for understanding signaling mechanisms of LRR-containing receptors in plants. PMID:25089011

  14. A selective defect in IgM antigen receptor synthesis and transport causes loss of cell surface IgM expression on tolerant B lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, S E; Goodnow, C C

    1994-01-01

    To explore the biochemical basis for maintaining immunological tolerance by functional inactivation of self-reactive B lymphocytes, transgenic mice carrying rearranged anti-lysozyme immunoglobulin transgenes and a lysozyme transgene were used as a source of large numbers of tolerant self-reactive B cells. Antigen receptors of the IgD isotype were expressed at normal levels on tolerant B cells, contained the heterodimeric MB1/B29 signalling component of the receptor complex and were structurally indistinguishable from IgD on nontolerant B cells. In contrast, cell surface expression of IgM receptor complexes on tolerant B cells was greatly reduced, despite normal expression of mRNA encoding the receptor components. Three-fold fewer immunoreactive mu heavy chains were detectable after a short period of biosynthetic labelling and the immunoreactive mu chains produced were paired with kappa light chains and assembled normally into intact receptor complexes containing the MB1/B29 heterodimer. Nascent IgM receptor complexes nevertheless failed to be processed into an endoglycosidase H-resistant form in the tolerant B cells and thus appeared to be selectively blocked in their transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to the medial Golgi. These findings demonstrate that intracellular trafficking of antigen receptor complexes is regulated by exposure to receptor stimuli at the cell surface causing a long-lasting decrease in surface receptor expression on tolerant B cells. Images PMID:8112296

  15. Aggregate breakdown of nanoparticulate titania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, Navin

    Six nanosized titanium dioxide powders synthesized from a sulfate process were investigated. The targeted end-use of this powder was for a de-NOx catalyst honeycomb monolith. Alteration of synthesis parameters had resulted principally in differences in soluble ion level and specific surface area of the powders. The goal of this investigation was to understand the role of synthesis parameters in the aggregation behavior of these powders. Investigation via scanning electron microscopy of the powders revealed three different aggregation iterations at specific length scales. Secondary and higher order aggregate strength was investigated via oscillatory stress rheometry as a means of simulating shear conditions encountered during extrusion. G' and G'' were measured as a function of the applied oscillatory stress. Oscillatory rheometry indicated a strong variation as a function of the sulfate level of the particles in the viscoelastic yield strengths. Powder yield stresses ranged from 3.0 Pa to 24.0 Pa of oscillatory stress. Compaction curves to 750 MPa found strong similarities in extrapolated yield point of stage I and II compaction for each of the powders (at approximately 500 MPa) suggesting that the variation in sulfate was greatest above the primary aggregate level. Scanning electron microscopy of samples at different states of shear in oscillatory rheometry confirmed the variation in the linear elastic region and the viscous flow regime. A technique of this investigation was to approach aggregation via a novel perspective: aggregates are distinguished as being loose open structures that are highly disordered and stochastic in nature. The methodology used was to investigate the shear stresses required to rupture the various aggregation stages encountered and investigate the attempt to realign the now free-flowing constituents comprising the aggregate into a denser configuration. Mercury porosimetry was utilized to measure the pore size of the compact resulting from

  16. Elimination of soluble sup 123 I-labeled aggregates of IgG in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Effect of serum IgG and numbers of erythrocyte complement receptor type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Halma, C.; Breedveld, F.C.; Daha, M.R.; Blok, D.; Evers-Schouten, J.H.; Hermans, J.; Pauwels, E.K.; van Es, L.A. )

    1991-04-01

    Using soluble {sup 123}I-labeled aggregates of human IgG ({sup 123}I-AHIgG) as a probe, we examined the function of the mononuclear phagocyte system in 22 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and 12 healthy controls. In SLE patients, a decreased number of erythrocyte complement receptor type 1 was associated with less binding of {sup 123}I-AHIgG to erythrocytes and a faster initial rate of elimination of {sup 123}I-AHIgG (mean +/- SEM half-maximal clearance time 5.23 +/- 0.2 minutes, versus 6.58 +/- 0.2 minutes in the controls), with possible spillover of the material outside the mononuclear phagocyte system of the liver and spleen. However, multiple regression analysis showed that serum concentrations of IgG were the most important factor predicting the rate of {sup 123}I-AHIgG elimination. IgG concentration may thus reflect immune complex clearance, which in turn, would influence the inflammatory reaction, in SLE.

  17. Ontogeny of B lymphocytes. II. Relative rates of appearance of lymphocytes bearing surface immunoglobulin and complement receptors.

    PubMed

    Gelfand, M C; Elfenbein, G J; Frank, M M; Paul, W E

    1974-05-01

    Many bursa-equivalent (B) lymphocytes of adult mice bear surface Ig and receptors for C3. The frequency of Ig-bearing cells increases rapidly immediately after birth, but these cells lack complement (C) receptors. Lymphocytes bearing C receptors are not found in the spleens of BALB/c, DBA/2, and C57BL/6 mice until 2 wk of age and do not attain substantial numbers until 3-4 wk of age. In AKR mice, a lag between appearance of Ig-bearing and complement receptor lymphocytes (CRL) is also observed but it is of much shorter duration. AKR mice have a frequency of CRL at 2 wk of age of 28% in comparison to a frequency of 4.8% for DBA/2 mice. The difference in frequency between young and adult mice and between "low" and "high CRL" strains cannot be explained by a nonspecific inability to form rosettes as similar results are obtained with soluble antigen-antibody-complement complexes. Analysis of CRL frequency in (AKR x DBA/2)F(1) mice and F(1) x parental backcross progeny suggests that two independent genes control the rate of appearance of CRL. Furthermore, the genetic difference in the ontogeny of CRL is recapitulated in the repopulation of the B-lymphocyte line in adult-irradiated mice restored with syngeneic bone marrow. Thus, the "CRL genes" described here appear to control B-cell differentiation throughout life.

  18. Engineering of PDMS Surfaces for use in Microsystems for Capture and Isolation of Complex and Biomedically Important Proteins: Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor as a Model System

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Aaron M.; Ozer, Byram H.; Wiepz, Gregory J.; Bertics, Paul J.; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2009-01-01

    Elastomers based on poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) are promising materials for fabrication of a wide range of microanalytical systems due to their mechanical and optical properties and ease of processing. To date, however, quantitative studies that demonstrate reliable and reproducible methods for attachment of binding groups that capture complex receptor proteins of relevance to biomedical applications of PDMS microsystems have not been reported. Herein we describe methods that lead to the reproducible capture of a transmembrane protein, the human epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, onto PDMS surfaces presenting covalently immobilized antibodies for EGF receptor, and subsequent isolation of the captured receptor by mechanical transfer of the receptor onto a chemically functionalized surface of a gold film for detection. This result is particularly significant because the physical properties of transmembrane proteins make this class of proteins a difficult one to analyze. We benchmark the performance of antibodies to the human EGF receptor covalently immobilized on PDMS against the performance of the same antibodies physisorbed to conventional surfaces utilized in ELISA assays through the use of EGF receptor that was 32P-radiolabeled in its autophosphorylation domain. These results reveal that two pan-reactive antibodies for the EGF receptor (H11 and 111.6) and one phosphospecific EGF receptor antibody (pY1068) capture the receptor on both PDMS and ELISA plates. When using H11 antibody to capture EGF receptor and subsequent treatment with a stripping buffer (NaOH and sodium dodecylsulfate) to isolate the receptor, the signal-to-background obtained using the PDMS surface was 82:1, exceeding the signal-to-background measured on the ELISA plate (<48:1). We also characterized the isolation of captured EGF receptor by mechanical contact of the PDMS surface with a chemically functionalized gold film. The efficiency of mechanical transfer of the transmembrane protein

  19. Effect of Spatial Inhomogeneities on the Membrane Surface on Receptor Dimerization and Signal Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Kerketta, Romica; Halász, Ádám M.; Steinkamp, Mara P.; Wilson, Bridget S.; Edwards, Jeremy S.

    2016-01-01

    Important signal transduction pathways originate on the plasma membrane, where microdomains may transiently entrap diffusing receptors. This results in a non-random distribution of receptors even in the resting state, which can be visualized as “clusters” by high resolution imaging methods. Here, we explore how spatial in-homogeneities in the plasma membrane might influence the dimerization and phosphorylation status of ErbB2 and ErbB3, two receptor tyrosine kinases that preferentially heterodimerize and are often co-expressed in cancer. This theoretical study is based upon spatial stochastic simulations of the two-dimensional membrane landscape, where variables include differential distributions and overlap of transient confinement zones (“domains”) for the two receptor species. The in silico model is parameterized and validated using data from single particle tracking experiments. We report key differences in signaling output based on the degree of overlap between domains and the relative retention of receptors in such domains, expressed as escape probability. Results predict that a high overlap of domains, which favors transient co-confinement of both receptor species, will enhance the rate of hetero-interactions. Where domains do not overlap, simulations confirm expectations that homo-interactions are favored. Since ErbB3 is uniquely dependent on ErbB2 interactions for activation of its catalytic activity, variations in domain overlap or escape probability markedly alter the predicted patterns and time course of ErbB3 and ErbB2 phosphorylation. Taken together, these results implicate membrane domain organization as an important modulator of signal initiation, motivating the design of novel experimental approaches to measure these important parameters across a wider range of receptor systems. PMID:27570763

  20. Effect of Spatial Inhomogeneities on the Membrane Surface on Receptor Dimerization and Signal Initiation.

    PubMed

    Kerketta, Romica; Halász, Ádám M; Steinkamp, Mara P; Wilson, Bridget S; Edwards, Jeremy S

    2016-01-01

    Important signal transduction pathways originate on the plasma membrane, where microdomains may transiently entrap diffusing receptors. This results in a non-random distribution of receptors even in the resting state, which can be visualized as "clusters" by high resolution imaging methods. Here, we explore how spatial in-homogeneities in the plasma membrane might influence the dimerization and phosphorylation status of ErbB2 and ErbB3, two receptor tyrosine kinases that preferentially heterodimerize and are often co-expressed in cancer. This theoretical study is based upon spatial stochastic simulations of the two-dimensional membrane landscape, where variables include differential distributions and overlap of transient confinement zones ("domains") for the two receptor species. The in silico model is parameterized and validated using data from single particle tracking experiments. We report key differences in signaling output based on the degree of overlap between domains and the relative retention of receptors in such domains, expressed as escape probability. Results predict that a high overlap of domains, which favors transient co-confinement of both receptor species, will enhance the rate of hetero-interactions. Where domains do not overlap, simulations confirm expectations that homo-interactions are favored. Since ErbB3 is uniquely dependent on ErbB2 interactions for activation of its catalytic activity, variations in domain overlap or escape probability markedly alter the predicted patterns and time course of ErbB3 and ErbB2 phosphorylation. Taken together, these results implicate membrane domain organization as an important modulator of signal initiation, motivating the design of novel experimental approaches to measure these important parameters across a wider range of receptor systems. PMID:27570763

  1. Cell surface display of poliovirus receptor on Escherichia coli, a novel method for concentrating viral particles in water.

    PubMed

    Abbaszadegan, Morteza; Alum, Absar; Abbaszadegan, Hamed; Stout, Valerie

    2011-08-01

    The lack of efficient methods for concentrating viruses in water samples leads to underreporting of viral contamination in source water. A novel strategy for viral concentration was developed using the expression of target virus receptors on bacterial cells. Poliovirus type 1, the most studied enterovirus, was used as a surrogate for enteric viruses. The human poliovirus receptor (hPVR) gene was expressed on the surface of Escherichia coli cells by using the ice nucleation protein (INP) gene. The hPVR gene was ligated to the 3' end of the INP gene after the removal of the stop codon. The resulting open reading frame (ORF) was used for the projection of hPVR onto the outer membrane of E. coli. Gene expression was tested by SDS-PAGE, Western blot, and dot blot analyses, and virion capture ability was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The application of engineered E. coli cells for capturing viruses in 1-liter samples of source and drinking water resulted in 75 to 99% procedural recovery efficiency. Cell surface display of viral receptors on bacterial cells opens a new prospect for an efficient and inexpensive alternative tool for capturing and concentrating waterborne viruses in water samples.

  2. A simple method to assess unsaturated zone time lag in the travel time from ground surface to receptor.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Marcelo R; Jones, Jon P; Frind, Emil O; Rudolph, David L

    2013-01-01

    In contaminant travel from ground surface to groundwater receptors, the time taken in travelling through the unsaturated zone is known as the unsaturated zone time lag. Depending on the situation, this time lag may or may not be significant within the context of the overall problem. A method is presented for assessing the importance of the unsaturated zone in the travel time from source to receptor in terms of estimates of both the absolute and the relative advective times. A choice of different techniques for both unsaturated and saturated travel time estimation is provided. This method may be useful for practitioners to decide whether to incorporate unsaturated processes in conceptual and numerical models and can also be used to roughly estimate the total travel time between points near ground surface and a groundwater receptor. This method was applied to a field site located in a glacial aquifer system in Ontario, Canada. Advective travel times were estimated using techniques with different levels of sophistication. The application of the proposed method indicates that the time lag in the unsaturated zone is significant at this field site and should be taken into account. For this case, sophisticated and simplified techniques lead to similar assessments when the same knowledge of the hydraulic conductivity field is assumed. When there is significant uncertainty regarding the hydraulic conductivity, simplified calculations did not lead to a conclusive decision. PMID:23274409

  3. Characterization of a Putative Receptor Binding Surface on Skint-1, a Critical Determinant of Dendritic Epidermal T Cell Selection*

    PubMed Central

    Salim, Mahboob; Knowles, Timothy J.; Hart, Rosie; Mohammed, Fiyaz; Woodward, Martin J.; Willcox, Carrie R.; Overduin, Michael; Hayday, Adrian C.; Willcox, Benjamin E.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic epidermal T cells (DETC) form a skin-resident γδ T cell population that makes key contributions to cutaneous immune stress surveillance, including non-redundant contributions to protection from cutaneous carcinogens. How DETC become uniquely associated with the epidermis was in large part solved by the identification of Skint-1, the prototypic member of a novel B7-related multigene family. Expressed only by thymic epithelial cells and epidermal keratinocytes, Skint-1 drives specifically the development of DETC progenitors, making it the first clear candidate for a selecting ligand for non-MHC/CD1-restricted T cells. However, the molecular mechanisms underpinning Skint-1 activity are unresolved. Here, we provide evidence that DETC selection requires Skint-1 expression on the surface of thymic epithelial cells, and depends upon specific residues on the CDR3-like loop within the membrane-distal variable domain of Skint-1 (Skint-1 DV). Nuclear magnetic resonance of Skint-1 DV revealed a core tertiary structure conserved across the Skint family, but a highly distinct surface charge distribution, possibly explaining its unique function. Crucially, the CDR3-like loop formed an electrostatically distinct surface, featuring key charged and hydrophobic solvent-exposed residues, at the membrane-distal tip of DV. These results provide the first structural insights into the Skint family, identifying a putative receptor binding surface that directly implicates Skint-1 in receptor-ligand interactions crucial for DETC selection. PMID:26917727

  4. The Phosphorylation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) by Engineered Surfaces with Electrostatically or Covalently Immobilized VEGF

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Sean M.; Chen, Tom T.; Iruela-Arispe, M. Luisa; Segura, Tatiana

    2010-01-01

    Growth factors are a class of signaling proteins that direct cell fate through interaction with cell surface receptors. Although a myriad of possible cell fates stem from a growth factor binding to its receptor, the signaling cascades that result in one fate over another are still being elucidated. One possible mechanism by which nature modulates growth factor signaling is through the method of presentation of the growth factor – soluble or immobilized (matrix bound). Here we present the methodology to study signaling of soluble versus immobilized VEGF through VEGFR-2. We have designed a strategy to covalently immobilize VEGF using its heparin-binding domain to orient the molecule (bind) and a secondary functional group to mediate covalent binding (lock). This bind-and-lock approach aims to allow VEGF to assume a bioactive orientation before covalent immobilization. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) demonstrated heparin and VEGF binding with surface densities of 60 ng/cm2 and 100 pg/cm2, respectively. ELISA experiments confirmed VEGF surface density and showed that electrostatically bound VEGF releases in cell medium and heparin solutions while covalently bound VEGF remains immobilized. Electrostatically bound VEGF and covalently bound VEGF phosphorylate VEGFR-2 in both VEGFR-2 transfected cells and VEGFR-2 endogenously producing cells. HUVECs plated on VEGF functionalized surfaces showed different morphologies between surface-bound VEGF and soluble VEGF. The surfaces synthesized in these studies allow for the study of VEGF/VEGFR-2 signaling induced by covalently bound, electrostatically bound, and soluble VEGF and may provide further insight into the design of materials for the generation of a mature and stable vasculature. PMID:19540581

  5. Ontogeny of the antibody-forming cell line in mice. IV. Appearance of cells bearing Fc receptors, complement receptors, and surface immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Y J; Parish, C R

    1977-02-01

    The ontogeny of Ig, FcR, and CR-bearing cells in liver and spleen has been followed by using rosetting procedures. These studies demonstrated a sequential appearance of surface receptors during development. Two types of Ig+ cells could be distinguished according to their rosette morphology and adherence to carbonyl iron: 1) an adherent cell which bound few erythrocytes was found predominantly in fetal liver from 13 days gestation and 2) a nonadherent cell which bound larger numbers of erythrocytes appeared in small numbers in fetal liver from day-16 gestation but represented the major Ig+ cell type after birth. Changes in the proportions of receptor-bearing populations occurred at two particular periods during ontogeny. The first was at birth, where an increase in the proportion of FcR+ cells occurred and the proportion of type 2 Ig+ cells rose rapidly. This probably represented the first appearance of FcR+ B lymphocytes even though cells bearing FcR were detected in fetal liver of all ages (days 12 to 18). The second period was around 10 days after birth when the proportion of Ig+ cells again increased concomitant with the appearance of CR+ nonadherent cells.

  6. Crystal aggregation in kidney stones; a polymer aggregation problem?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesson, J.; Beshensky, A.; Viswanathan, P.; Zachowicz, W.; Kleinman, J.

    2008-03-01

    Kidney stones most frequently form as aggregates of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals with organic layers between them, and the organic layers contain principally proteins. The pathway leading to the formation of these crystal aggregates in affected people has not been identified, but stone forming patients are thought to have a defect in the structure or distribution of urinary proteins, which normally protect against stone formation. We have developed two polyelectrolyte models that will induce COM crystal aggregation in vitro, and both are consistent with possible urinary protein compositions. The first model was based on mixing polyanionic and polycationic proteins, in portions such that the combined protein charge is near zero. The second model was based on reducing the charge density on partially charged polyanionic proteins, specifically Tamm-Horsfall protein, the second most abundant protein in urine. Both models demonstrated polymer phase separation at solution conditions where COM crystal aggregation was observed. Correlation with data from other bulk crystallization measurements suggest that the anionic side chains form critical binding interactions with COM surfaces that are necessary along with the phase separation process to induce COM crystal aggregation.

  7. Vitamin A Transport and the Transmembrane Pore in the Cell-Surface Receptor for Plasma Retinol Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ming; Kawaguchi, Riki; Ter-Stepanian, Mariam; Kassai, Miki; Sun, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin A and its derivatives (retinoids) play diverse and crucial functions from embryogenesis to adulthood and are used as therapeutic agents in human medicine for eye and skin diseases, infections and cancer. Plasma retinol binding protein (RBP) is the principal and specific vitamin A carrier in the blood and binds vitamin A at 1∶1 ratio. STRA6 is the high-affinity membrane receptor for RBP and mediates cellular vitamin A uptake. STRA6 null mice have severely depleted vitamin A reserves for vision and consequently have vision loss, even under vitamin A sufficient conditions. STRA6 null humans have a wide range of severe pathological phenotypes in many organs including the eye, brain, heart and lung. Known membrane transport mechanisms involve transmembrane pores that regulate the transport of the substrate (e.g., the gating of ion channels). STRA6 represents a new type of membrane receptor. How this receptor interacts with its transport substrate vitamin A and the functions of its nine transmembrane domains are still completely unknown. These questions are critical to understanding the molecular basis of STRA6′s activities and its regulation. We employ acute chemical modification to introduce chemical side chains to STRA6 in a site-specific manner. We found that modifications with specific chemicals at specific positions in or near the transmembrane domains of this receptor can almost completely suppress its vitamin A transport activity. These experiments provide the first evidence for the existence of a transmembrane pore, analogous to the pore of ion channels, for this new type of cell-surface receptor. PMID:24223695

  8. Syndecans as Cell Surface Receptors in Cancer Biology. A Focus on their Interaction with PDZ Domain Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bill; Montmasson, Marine; Terradot, Laurent; Rousselle, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Syndecans are transmembrane receptors with ectodomains that are modified by glycosaminoglycan chains. The ectodomains can interact with a wide variety of molecules, including growth factors, cytokines, proteinases, adhesion receptors, and extracellular matrix (ECM) components. The four syndecans in mammals are expressed in a development-, cell-type-, and tissue-specific manner and can function either as co-receptors with other cell surface receptors or as independent adhesion receptors that mediate cell signaling. They help regulate cell proliferation and migration, angiogenesis, cell/cell and cell/ECM adhesion, and they may participate in several key tumorigenesis processes. In some cancers, syndecan expression regulates tumor cell proliferation, adhesion, motility, and other functions, and may be a prognostic marker for tumor progression and patient survival. The short cytoplasmic tail is likely to be involved in these events through recruitment of signaling partners. In particular, the conserved carboxyl-terminal EFYA tetrapeptide sequence that is present in all syndecans binds to some PDZ domain-containing proteins that may function as scaffold proteins that recruit signaling and cytoskeletal proteins to the plasma membrane. There is growing interest in understanding these interactions at both the structural and biological levels, and recent findings show their high degree of complexity. Parameters that influence the recruitment of PDZ domain proteins by syndecans, such as binding specificity and affinity, are the focus of active investigations and are important for understanding regulatory mechanisms. Recent studies show that binding may be affected by post-translational events that influence regulatory mechanisms, such as phosphorylation within the syndecan cytoplasmic tail. PMID:26869927

  9. Binding of Recombinant Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Surface Glycoprotein to Feline Cells: Role of CXCR4, Cell-Surface Heparans, and an Unidentified Non-CXCR4 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    de Parseval, Aymeric; Elder, John H.

    2001-01-01

    To address the role of CXCR4 in the cell-surface attachment of the feline immunodeficency virus (FIV), a soluble fusion protein, gp95-Fc, consisting of the surface glycoprotein (SU, gp95) of either a primary (PPR) or cell line-adapted (34TF10) FIV strain was fused in frame with the Fc domain of human immunoglobulin G1. The recombinant SU-immunoadhesins were used as probes to investigate the cellular binding of FIV SU. In agreement with the host cell range properties of both viruses, binding of 34TF10 gp95-Fc was observed for all cell lines tested, whereas PPR gp95-Fc bound only to primary feline T cells. 34TF10 gp95-Fc also bound to Jurkat and HeLa cells, consistent with the ability of FIV to use human CXCR4 as a fusion receptor. As expected, 34TF10 gp95-Fc binding to Jurkat cells was blocked by addition of stromal cell-derived factor 1α (SDF-1α), as was binding to the 3201 feline lymphoma cell line. However, SDF-1α, RANTES, macrophage inflammatory protein 1β, and heparin all failed to inhibit the binding of either gp95-Fc to primary T cells, suggesting that a non-CXCR4 receptor is involved in the binding of FIV SU. In this regard, an unidentified 40-kDa protein species from the surface of primary T cells but not Jurkat and 3201 cells specifically coprecipitated with both gp95-Fc. Yet another type of binding of 34TF10 gp95-Fc to adherent kidney cells was noted. SDF-1α failed to block the binding of 34TF10 gp95-Fc to either HeLa, Crandel feline leukemia, or G355-5 cells. However, binding was severely impaired in the presence of soluble heparin, as well as after enzymatic removal of surface heparans or on cells deficient in heparan expression. These overall findings suggest that in addition to CXCR4, a non-CXCR4 receptor and cell-surface heparans also play an important role in FIV gp95 cell surface interactions on specific target cells. PMID:11312323

  10. Temporal differences in the activation of three classes of non-transmembrane protein tyrosine kinases following B-cell antigen receptor surface engagement.

    PubMed

    Saouaf, S J; Mahajan, S; Rowley, R B; Kut, S A; Fargnoli, J; Burkhardt, A L; Tsukada, S; Witte, O N; Bolen, J B

    1994-09-27

    We evaluated in WEHI 231 B cells the time-dependent responses of Lyn, Blk, Btk, Syk, and three members of the Jak family of protein tyrosine kinases following antibody-mediated surface engagement of the B-cell antigen receptor. Our results show that the enzyme activities of Lyn and Blk were stimulated within seconds of antigen receptor engagement and correlated with the initial tyrosine phosphorylation of the Ig alpha and Ig beta subunits of the B-cell antigen receptor. Btk enzyme activity was also transiently stimulated and was maximal at approximately 5 min after B-cell receptor surface binding. Syk activity gradually increased to a maximum at 10-30 min following receptor ligation and was found to parallel the association of Syk with the tyrosine phosphorylated Ig alpha and Ig beta subunits of the receptor. While the specific activities of the Jak1, Jak2, and Tyk2 protein tyrosine kinases were unaltered following B-cell receptor ligation, the abundance of Jak1 and Jak2 were increased 3- to 4-fold within 10 min of receptor engagement. These results demonstrate that multiple families of non-transmembrane protein tyrosine kinases are temporally regulated during the process of B-cell antigen receptor-initiated intracellular signal transduction. PMID:7524079

  11. Temporal differences in the activation of three classes of non-transmembrane protein tyrosine kinases following B-cell antigen receptor surface engagement.

    PubMed Central

    Saouaf, S J; Mahajan, S; Rowley, R B; Kut, S A; Fargnoli, J; Burkhardt, A L; Tsukada, S; Witte, O N; Bolen, J B

    1994-01-01

    We evaluated in WEHI 231 B cells the time-dependent responses of Lyn, Blk, Btk, Syk, and three members of the Jak family of protein tyrosine kinases following antibody-mediated surface engagement of the B-cell antigen receptor. Our results show that the enzyme activities of Lyn and Blk were stimulated within seconds of antigen receptor engagement and correlated with the initial tyrosine phosphorylation of the Ig alpha and Ig beta subunits of the B-cell antigen receptor. Btk enzyme activity was also transiently stimulated and was maximal at approximately 5 min after B-cell receptor surface binding. Syk activity gradually increased to a maximum at 10-30 min following receptor ligation and was found to parallel the association of Syk with the tyrosine phosphorylated Ig alpha and Ig beta subunits of the receptor. While the specific activities of the Jak1, Jak2, and Tyk2 protein tyrosine kinases were unaltered following B-cell receptor ligation, the abundance of Jak1 and Jak2 were increased 3- to 4-fold within 10 min of receptor engagement. These results demonstrate that multiple families of non-transmembrane protein tyrosine kinases are temporally regulated during the process of B-cell antigen receptor-initiated intracellular signal transduction. Images PMID:7524079

  12. A Conceptual Approach to Assimilating Remote Sensing Data to Improve Soil Moisture Profile Estimates in a Surface Flux/Hydrology Model. 2; Aggregation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schamschula, Marius; Crosson, William L.; Inguva, Ramarao; Yates, Thomas; Laymen, Charles A.; Caulfield, John

    1998-01-01

    This is a follow up on the preceding presentation by Crosson. The grid size for remote microwave measurements is much coarser than the hydrological model computational grids. To validate the hydrological models with measurements we propose mechanisms to aggregate the hydrological model outputs for soil moisture to allow comparison with measurements. Weighted neighborhood averaging methods are proposed to facilitate the comparison. We will also discuss such complications as misalignment, rotation and other distortions introduced by a generalized sensor image.

  13. Determinants in the β and δ subunit cytoplasmic loop regulate Golgi trafficking and surface expression of the muscle acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Rudell, Jolene Chang; Borges, Lucia S; Rudell, John B; Beck, Kenneth A; Ferns, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The molecular determinants that govern nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) assembly and trafficking are poorly defined, and those identified operate largely during initial receptor biogenesis in the endoplasmic reticulum. To identify determinants that regulate later trafficking steps, we performed an unbiased screen using chimeric proteins consisting of CD4 fused to the muscle AChR subunit cytoplasmic loops. In C2 mouse muscle cells, we found that CD4-β and δ subunit loops were expressed at very low levels on the cell surface, whereas the other subunit loops were robustly expressed on the plasma membrane. The low surface expression of CD4-β and δ loops was due to their pronounced retention in the Golgi apparatus and also to their rapid internalization from the plasma membrane. Both retention and recovery were mediated by the proximal 25-28 amino acids in each loop and were dependent on an ordered sequence of charged and hydrophobic residues. Indeed, βK353L and δK351L mutations increased surface trafficking of the CD4-subunit loops by >6-fold and also decreased their internalization from the plasma membrane. Similarly, combined βK353L and δK351L mutations increased the surface levels of assembled AChR expressed in HEK cells to 138% of wild-type levels. This was due to increased trafficking to the plasma membrane and not decreased AChR turnover. These findings identify novel Golgi retention signals in the β and δ subunit loops that regulate surface trafficking of assembled AChR and may help prevent surface expression of unassembled subunits. Together, these results define molecular determinants that govern a Golgi-based regulatory step in nicotinic AChR trafficking.

  14. Stoichiometry and Physical Chemistry of Promiscuous Aggregate-Based Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Coan, Kristin E. D.

    2009-01-01

    Many false positives in early drug discovery owe to nonspecific inhibition by colloid-like aggregates of organic molecules. Despite their prevalence, little is known about aggregate concentration, structure, or dynamic equilibrium; the binding mechanism, stoichiometry with, and affinity for enzymes remain uncertain. To investigate the elementary question of concentration, we counted aggregate particles using flow cytometry. For seven aggregate-forming molecules, aggregates were not observed until the concentration of monomer crossed a threshold, indicating a “critical aggregation concentration” (CAC). Above the CAC, aggregate count increased linearly with added organic material, while the particles dispersed when diluted below the CAC. The concentration of monomeric organic molecule is constant above the CAC, as is the size of the aggregate particles. For two compounds that form large aggregates, nicardipine and miconazole, we measured particle numbers directly by flow cytometry, determining that the aggregate concentration just above the CAC ranged from 5 to 30 fM. By correlating inhibition of an enzyme with aggregate count for these two drugs, we determined that the stoichiometry of binding is about 10 000 enzyme molecules per aggregate particle. Using measured volumes for nicardipine and miconazole aggregate particles (2.1 × 1011 and 4.7 × 1010 Å3, respectively), computed monomer volumes, and the observation that past the CAC all additional monomer forms aggregate particles, we find that aggregates are densely packed particles. Finally, given their size and enzyme stoichiometry, all sequestered enzyme can be comfortably accommodated on the surface of the aggregate. PMID:18588298

  15. Thermodynamics of Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Kenneth L.; Barz, Bogdan; Bachmann, Michael; Strodel, Birgit

    Amyloid protein aggregation characterizes many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Creutz- feldt-Jakob disease. Evidence suggests that amyloid aggregates may share similar aggregation pathways, implying simulation of full-length amyloid proteins is not necessary for understanding amyloid formation. In this study we simulate GNNQQNY, the N-terminal prion-determining domain of the yeast protein Sup35 to investigate the thermodynamics of structural transitions during aggregation. We use a coarse-grained model with replica-exchange molecular dynamics to investigate the association of 3-, 6-, and 12-chain GNNQQNY systems and we determine the aggregation pathway by studying aggregation states of GN- NQQNY. We find that the aggregation of the hydrophilic GNNQQNY sequence is mainly driven by H-bond formation, leading to the formation of /3-sheets from the very beginning of the assembly process. Condensation (aggregation) and ordering take place simultaneously, which is underpinned by the occurrence of a single heat capacity peak only.

  16. Novel insights into amylin aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Pillay, Karen; Govender, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Amylin is a peptide that aggregates into species that are toxic to pancreatic beta cells, leading to type II diabetes. This study has for the first time quantified amylin association and dissociation kinetics (association constant (ka) = 28.7 ± 5.1 L mol−1 s−1 and dissociation constant (kd) = 2.8 ± 0.6 ×10−4 s−1) using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Thus far, techniques used for the sizing of amylin aggregates do not cater for the real-time monitoring of unconstrained amylin in solution. In this regard we evaluated recently innovated nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA). In addition, both SPR and NTA were used to study the effect of previously synthesized amylin derivatives on amylin aggregation and to evaluate their potential as a cell-free system for screening potential inhibitors of amylin-mediated cytotoxicity. Results obtained from NTA highlighted a predominance of 100–300 nm amylin aggregates and correlation to previously published cytotoxicity results suggests the toxic species of amylin to be 200–300 nm in size. The results seem to indicate that NTA has potential as a new technique to monitor the aggregation potential of amyloid peptides in solution and also to screen potential inhibitors of amylin-mediated cytotoxicity. PMID:26019498

  17. Receptor Surface Models in the Classroom: Introducing Molecular Modeling to Students in a 3-D World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geldenhuys, Werner J.; Hayes, Michael; Van der Schyf, Cornelis J.; Allen, David D.; Malan, Sarel F.

    2007-01-01

    A simple, novel and generally applicable method to demonstrate structure-activity associations of a group of biologically interesting compounds in relation to receptor binding is described. This method is useful for undergraduates and graduate students in medicinal chemistry and computer modeling programs.

  18. Impact of Particle Aggregation on Nanoparticle Reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassby, David

    2011-12-01

    The prevalence of nanoparticles in the environment is expected to grow in the coming years due to their increasing pervasiveness in consumer and industrial applications. Once released into the environment, nanoparticles encounter conditions of pH, salinity, UV light, and other solution conditions that may alter their surface characteristics and lead to aggregation. The unique properties that make nanoparticles desirable are a direct consequence of their size and increased surface area. Therefore, it is critical to recognize how aggregation alters the reactive properties of nanomaterials, if we wish to understand how these properties are going to behave once released into the environment. The size and structure of nanoparticle aggregates depend on surrounding conditions, including hydrodynamic ones. Depending on these conditions, aggregates can be large or small, tightly packed or loosely bound. Characterizing and measuring these changes to aggregate morphology is important to understanding the impact of aggregation on nanoparticle reactive properties. Examples of decreased reactivity due to aggregation include the case where tightly packed aggregates have fewer available surface sites compared to loosely packed ones; also, photocatalytic particles embedded in the center of large aggregates will experience less light when compared to particles embedded in small aggregates. However, aggregation also results in an increase in solid-solid interfaces between nanoparticles. This can result in increased energy transfer between neighboring particles, surface passivation, and altered surface tension. These phenomena can lead to an increase in reactivity. The goal of this thesis is to examine the impacts of aggregation on the reactivity of a select group of nanomaterials. Additionally, we examined how aggregation impacts the removal efficiency of fullerene nanoparticles using membrane filtration. The materials we selected to study include ZnS---a metal chalcogenide

  19. Computational modeling indicates that surface pressure can be reliably conveyed to tactile receptors even amidst changes in skin mechanics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuxiang; Baba, Yoshichika; Lumpkin, Ellen A; Gerling, Gregory J

    2016-07-01

    Distinct patterns in neuronal firing are observed between classes of cutaneous afferents. Such differences may be attributed to end-organ morphology, distinct ion-channel complements, and skin microstructure, among other factors. Even for just the slowly adapting type I afferent, the skin's mechanics for a particular specimen might impact the afferent's firing properties, especially given the thickness and elasticity of skin can change dramatically over just days. Here, we show computationally that the skin can reliably convey indentation magnitude, rate, and spatial geometry to the locations of tactile receptors even amid changes in skin's structure. Using finite element analysis and neural dynamics models, we considered the skin properties of six mice that span a representative cohort. Modeling the propagation of the surface stimulus to the interior of the skin demonstrated that there can be large variance in stresses and strains near the locations of tactile receptors, which can lead to large variance in static firing rate. However, variance is significantly reduced when the stimulus tip is controlled by surface pressure and compressive stress is measured near the end organs. This particular transformation affords the least variability in predicted firing rates compared with others derived from displacement, force, strain energy density, or compressive strain. Amid changing skin mechanics, stimulus control by surface pressure may be more naturalistic and optimal and underlie how animals actively explore the tactile environment. PMID:27098029

  20. The interaction of protein-coated bionanoparticles and surface receptors reevaluated: how important is the number of bonds?

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjing; Voigt, Andreas; Sundmacher, Kai

    2016-08-14

    Specifically designed bionanoparticles with a function-oriented protein-coating layer interact with self-prepared receptor surfaces as the counterpart. Based on surface plasmon resonance biosensing experiments, a model framework is validated to estimate the number of bonds formed between these bionanoparticles and the receptor surface based on multivalent interactions. Our multi-site kinetic model is able to analyze the adsorption rate constants and the number of bonds from experimental data of natural and synthetic bionanoparticles. The influence of the mass transport on the adsorption kinetics is modeled including a diffusional boundary layer where a helpful analytical solution has been derived. Our model framework extends previous studies to include a higher number of bonds, ranging from 1 up to 1000. An almost linear relationship between the number of bonds and the adsorption amount of bionanoparticles makes the model framework suitable to predict, for example, ligand density and to further assess coating performance. The proposed model framework can serve as a design tool for multivalent interaction experiments under variable process conditions. PMID:27411954

  1. CARbodies: Human Antibodies Against Cell Surface Tumor Antigens Selected From Repertoires Displayed on T Cell Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Sánchez-Martín, David; Compte, Marta; Nuñez-Prado, Natalia; Diaz, Rosa M; Vile, Richard; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2013-01-01

    A human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody library was expressed on the surface of human T cells after transduction with lentiviral vectors (LVs). The repertoire was fused to a first-generation T cell receptor ζ (TCRζ)-based chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). We used this library to isolate antibodies termed CARbodies that recognize antigens expressed on the tumor cell surface in a proof-of-principle system. After three rounds of activation-selection there was a clear repertoire restriction, with the emergence dominant clones. The CARbodies were purified from bacterial cultures as soluble and active proteins. Furthermore, to validate its potential application for adoptive cell therapy, human T cells were transduced with a LV encoding a second-generation costimulatory CAR (CARv2) bearing the selected CARbodies. Transduced human primary T cells expressed significant levels of the CARbodies-based CARv2 fusion protein on the cell surface, and importantly could be specifically activated, after stimulation with tumor cells. This approach is a promising tool for the generation of antibodies fully adapted to the display format (CAR) and the selection context (cell synapse), which could extend the scope of current adoptive cell therapy strategies with CAR-redirected T cells. PMID:23695536

  2. Computational modeling indicates that surface pressure can be reliably conveyed to tactile receptors even amidst changes in skin mechanics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuxiang; Baba, Yoshichika; Lumpkin, Ellen A; Gerling, Gregory J

    2016-07-01

    Distinct patterns in neuronal firing are observed between classes of cutaneous afferents. Such differences may be attributed to end-organ morphology, distinct ion-channel complements, and skin microstructure, among other factors. Even for just the slowly adapting type I afferent, the skin's mechanics for a particular specimen might impact the afferent's firing properties, especially given the thickness and elasticity of skin can change dramatically over just days. Here, we show computationally that the skin can reliably convey indentation magnitude, rate, and spatial geometry to the locations of tactile receptors even amid changes in skin's structure. Using finite element analysis and neural dynamics models, we considered the skin properties of six mice that span a representative cohort. Modeling the propagation of the surface stimulus to the interior of the skin demonstrated that there can be large variance in stresses and strains near the locations of tactile receptors, which can lead to large variance in static firing rate. However, variance is significantly reduced when the stimulus tip is controlled by surface pressure and compressive stress is measured near the end organs. This particular transformation affords the least variability in predicted firing rates compared with others derived from displacement, force, strain energy density, or compressive strain. Amid changing skin mechanics, stimulus control by surface pressure may be more naturalistic and optimal and underlie how animals actively explore the tactile environment.

  3. Principles of antibody-mediated TNF receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Wajant, H

    2015-01-01

    From the beginning of research on receptors of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily (TNFRSF), agonistic antibodies have been used to stimulate TNFRSF receptors in vitro and in vivo. Indeed, CD95, one of the first cloned TNFRSF receptors, was solely identified as the target of cell death-inducing antibodies. Early on, it became evident from in vitro studies that valency and Fcγ receptor (FcγR) binding of antibodies targeting TNFRSF receptors can be of crucial relevance for agonistic activity. TNFRSF receptor-specific antibodies of the IgM subclass and secondary cross-linked or aggregation prone dimeric antibodies typically display superior agonistic activity compared with dimeric antibodies. Likewise, anchoring of antibodies to cell surface-expressed FcγRs potentiate their ability to trigger TNFRSF receptor signaling. However, only recently has the relevance of oligomerization and FcγR binding for the in vivo activity of antibody-induced TNFRSF receptor activation been straightforwardly demonstrated in vivo. This review discusses the crucial role of oligomerization and/or FcγR binding for antibody-mediated TNFRSF receptor stimulation in light of current models of TNFRSF receptor activation and especially the overwhelming relevance of these issues for the rational development of therapeutic TNFRSF receptor-targeting antibodies. PMID:26292758

  4. K Domain CR9 of Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Receptor-related Protein 1 (LRP1) Is Critical for Aggregated LDL-induced Foam Cell Formation from Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Costales, Paula; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Castellano, Jose; Revuelta-Lopez, Elena; Corral-Rodríguez, Maria Ángeles; Nasarre, Laura; Badimon, Lina; Llorente-Cortes, Vicenta

    2015-01-01

    Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP1) mediates the internalization of aggregated LDL (AgLDL), which in turn increases the expression of LRP1 in human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMCs). This positive feedback mechanism is thus highly efficient to promote the formation of hVSMC foam cells, a crucial vascular component determining the susceptibility of atherosclerotic plaque to rupture. Here we have determined the LRP1 domains involved in AgLDL recognition with the aim of specifically blocking AgLDL internalization in hVSMCs. The capacity of fluorescently labeled AgLDL to bind to functional LRP1 clusters was tested in a receptor-ligand fluorometric assay made by immobilizing soluble LRP1 “minireceptors” (sLRP1-II, sLRP1-III, and sLRP1-IV) recombinantly expressed in CHO cells. This assay showed that AgLDL binds to cluster II. We predicted three well exposed and potentially immunogenic peptides in the CR7–CR9 domains of this cluster (termed P1 (Cys1051–Glu1066), P2 (Asp1090–Cys1104), and P3 (Gly1127–Cys1140)). AgLDL, but not native LDL, bound specifically and tightly to P3-coated wells. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies raised against P3 prevented AgLDL uptake by hVSMCs and were almost twice as effective as anti-P1 and anti-P2 Abs in reducing intracellular cholesteryl ester accumulation. Moreover, anti-P3 Abs efficiently prevented AgLDL-induced LRP1 up-regulation and counteracted the down-regulatory effect of AgLDL on hVSMC migration. In conclusion, domain CR9 appears to be critical for LRP1-mediated AgLDL binding and internalization in hVSMCs. Our results open new avenues for an innovative anti-VSMC foam cell-based strategy for the treatment of vascular lipid deposition in atherosclerosis. PMID:25918169

  5. Reversal of aging-related emotional memory deficits by norepinephrine via regulating the stability of surface AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yi; Zhou, Jun; Li, Ming-Xing; Wu, Peng-Fei; Hu, Zhuang-Li; Ni, Lan; Jin, You; Chen, Jian-Guo; Wang, Fang

    2015-04-01

    Aging-related emotional memory deficit is a well-known complication in Alzheimer's disease and normal aging. However, little is known about its molecular mechanism. To address this issue, we examined the role of norepinephrine (NE) and its relevant drug desipramine in the regulation of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), surface expression of AMPA receptor, and associative fear memory in rats. We found that there was a defective regulation of NE content and AMPA receptor trafficking during fear conditioning, which were accompanied by impaired emotional memory and LTP in aged rats. Furthermore, we also found that the exogenous upregulation of NE ameliorated the impairment of LTP and emotional memory via enhancing AMPA receptor trafficking in aged rats, and the downregulation of NE impaired LTP in adult rats. Finally, acute treatment with NE or desipramine rescued the impaired emotional memory in aged rats. These results imply a pivotal role for NE in synaptic plasticity and associative fear memory in aging rats and suggest that desipramine is a potential candidate for treating aging-related emotional memory deficit.

  6. Metal concentrations in aggregate interiors, exteriors, whole aggregates, and bulk of Costa Rican soils

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcke, W.; Kretzschmar, S.; Bundt, M.; Zech, W.

    1999-10-01

    In many temperate soils the preferential weathering and leaching of aggregate surfaces and the nonaggregated material between aggregates depletes geogenic metals. It also shifts metals from strongly to more weakly bound metal forms. Deposited metals are sorbed preferentially on aggregate surfaces and between aggregates. The authors examined whether preferential desilication under tropical climate causes an enrichment in the aggregate exteriors in oxidic forms of metals. They also studied where deposited metals are bound in these soils. Aggregates (2--20 mm) were selected manually from the A horizons of eight Oxisols, six Andisols, two Mollisols, and two Inceptisols in Costa Rica. All samples were fractionated into interior and exterior portions and treated with a seven-step sequence to extract Al, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb, and Zn. Total concentrations of all metals except Zn were higher in the aggregate exteriors than in the interiors. The average Cd and Pb concentrations in easily extractable fractions were significantly higher in the aggregate exteriors. There were no significant differences in metal partitioning between interiors and exteriors except for Pb, which had higher proportions in extractable forms with NH{sub 2}OH {center{underscore}dot} HCl {gt} NH{sub 4} - acetate, pH 6.0 {gt} EDTA in the exteriors. There were few significant differences in metal concentrations and partitioning between bulk soil and whole aggregates. The results may be explained by (i) preferential desilication of the aggregate exteriors and (ii) preferential sorption of deposited heavy metals mainly in easily extractable forms.

  7. Vaccinia virus binds to the scavenger receptor MARCO on the surface of keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Daniel T; Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Wang, Zhenping; di Nardo, Anna; Gallo, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    Patients with altered skin immunity, such as individuals with atopic dermatitis (AD), can have a life-threatening disruption of the epidermis known as eczema vaccinatum after vaccinia virus (VV) infection of the skin. Here, we sought to better understand the mechanism(s) by which VV associates with keratinocytes. The class A scavenger receptor known as MARCO (macrophage receptor with collagenous structure) is expressed on human and mouse keratinocytes and found to be abundantly expressed in the skin of patients with AD. VV bound directly to MARCO, and overexpression of MARCO increased susceptibility to VV infection. Furthermore, ligands with affinity for MARCO, or excess soluble MARCO, competitively inhibited VV infection. These findings indicate that MARCO promotes VV infection and highlights potential new therapeutic strategies for prevention of VV infection in the skin.

  8. Simulations of kinetically irreversible protein aggregate structure.

    PubMed Central

    Patro, S Y; Przybycien, T M

    1994-01-01

    We have simulated the structure of kinetically irreversible protein aggregates in two-dimensional space using a lattice-based Monte-Carlo routine. Our model specifically accounts for the intermolecular interactions between hydrophobic and hydrophilic protein surfaces and a polar solvent. The simulations provide information about the aggregate density, the types of inter-monomer contacts and solvent content within the aggregates, the type and extent of solvent exposed perimeter, and the short- and long-range order all as a function of (i) the extent of monomer hydrophobic surface area and its distribution on the model protein surface and (ii) the magnitude of the hydrophobic-hydrophobic contact energy. An increase in the extent of monomer hydrophobic surface area resulted in increased aggregate densities with concomitant decreased system free energies. These effects are accompanied by increases in the number of hydrophobic-hydrophobic contacts and decreases in the solvent-exposed hydrophobic surface area of the aggregates. Grouping monomer hydrophobic surfaces in a single contiguous stretch resulted in lower aggregate densities and lower short range order. More favorable hydrophobic-hydrophobic contact energies produced structures with higher densities but the number of unfavorable protein-protein contacts was also observed to increase; greater configurational entropy produced the opposite effect. Properties predicted by our model are in good qualitative agreement with available experimental observations. Images FIGURE 6 FIGURE 13 PMID:8061184

  9. Natural aggregates of the conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, William H.

    1988-01-01

    Crushed stone and sand and gravel are the two main sources of natural aggregates. These materials are commonly used construction materials and frequently can be interchanged with one another. They are widely used throughout the United States, with every State except two producing crushed stone. Together they amount to about half the mining volume in the United States. Approximately 96 percent of sand and gravel and 77 percent of the crushed stone produced in the United States are used in the construction industry. Natural aggregates are widely distributed throughout the United States in a variety of geologic environments. Sand and gravel deposits commonly are the results of the weathering of bedrock and subsequent transportation and deposition of the material by water or ice (glaciers). As such, they commonly occur as river or stream deposits or in glaciated areas as glaciofluvial and other deposits. Crushed stone aggregates are derived from a wide variety of parent bedrock materials. Limestone and other carbonates account for approximately three quarters of the rocks used for crushed stone, with granite and other igneous rocks making up the bulk of the remainder. Limestone deposits are widespread throughout the Central and Eastern United States and are scattered in the West. Granites are widely distributed in the Eastern and Western United States, with few exposures in the Midwest. Igneous rocks (excluding granites) are largely concentrated in the Western United States and in a few isolated localities in the East. Even though natural aggregates are widely distributed throughout the United States, they are not universally available for consumptive use. Some areas are devoid of sand and gravel, and potential sources of crushed stone may be covered with sufficient unconsolidated material to make surface mining impractical. In some areas many aggregates do not meet the physical property requirements for certain uses, or they may contain mineral constituents that react

  10. Immunomodulatory oligonucleotides inhibit neutrophil migration by decreasing the surface expression of interleukin-8 and leukotriene B4 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Admyre, Charlotte; Axelsson, Lars-Göran; von Stein, Oliver; Zargari, Arezou

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils play important roles in many inflammatory diseases. The migration of neutrophils to the inflammatory site is tightly regulated by specific chemokines, of which interleukin-8 (IL-8) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) constitute key mediators by binding to the surface receptors CXCR1/2 and BLT1, respectively. Oligonucleotides (ODN) containing CpG motifs mediate potent immunomodulatory effects through binding to Toll-like receptor 9. So far, knowledge on how ODN can affect neutrophil migration during inflammation is lacking. This study demonstrates that several novel CpG ODN significantly down-regulate the surface expression of CXCR1/2 and BLT1. In addition, the ODN significantly blocked IL-8-induced and LTB4-induced neutrophil migration in vitro, as well as leucocyte migration in vivo demonstrated in mice by intravital microscopy and in a model of airway inflammation. The down-regulation of CXCR1 is rapid, occurring 15 min after ODN stimulation, and can be mediated through an endosomally independent mechanism. Inhibition of the IL-8 and LTB4 pathways may provide new opportunities of therapeutic intervention using ODN to reduce neutrophil infiltration during inflammation. PMID:25100544

  11. Stimulation of human neutrophils by soluble and insoluble immunoglobulin aggregates. Secretion of granule constituents and increased oxidation of glucose.

    PubMed Central

    Henson, P M; Oades, Z G

    1975-01-01

    Reaction of human neutrophils with aggregated immunoglobulin on nonphagocytosable surfaces results in secretion of granule enzymes (exocytosis of granules) and stimulation of glucose oxidation by the nexose monophosphate pathway (HMP). The role of HMP stimulation in the enzyme secretion and some requirements for the two neutrophil activities have been examined. It was found that (a) HMP stimulation could be selectively inhibited under conditions where release of granule enzymes remained unchanged or was enhanced, for example, by reduced glucose concentration or by 2-deoxyglucose. (b) Removal of Ca++ and addition of agents which increased the intracellular levels of cyclic AMP (cAMP), however, prevented both activities, while colchicine had greater inhibitory activity on HMP stimulation than upon secretion. (c) Neutrophils incubated in suspension with particulate aggregated gamma-globulin phagocytosed the particles and exhibited a stimulated HMP and released granule enzymes. In contrast, incubation in suspension with soluble aggregated gamma-globulin resulted in the stimulated HMP only. Granule evzymes were not liberated. 300-fold less soluble aggregates bound to a surface, however readily induced exocytosis of granules from adherent neutrophils. This demonstrates the importance of surface effects in the induction of secretion from neutrophils. Aggregated immunoglobulin reacting with neutrophil Fc receptors thus induces both degranulation (exocytosis) and increased HMP activity. The pathways leading to these events are separable although apparently sharing some common steps, including the initiating events. Images PMID:51031

  12. Leutropin/beta-adrenergic receptor chimeras bind choriogonadotropin and adrenergic ligands but are not expressed at the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Moyle, W R; Bernard, M P; Myers, R V; Marko, O M; Strader, C D

    1991-06-15

    In some G-protein-coupled receptors (e.g. beta-adrenergic receptor (beta 2 AR)), the ligand-binding pocket is contained within the hydrophobic transmembrane domain. In others (e.g. luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR)), the relative roles of the extracellular N-terminal domain and the transmembrane region in hormone binding are unknown. To study the roles of these domains, we prepared vectors encoding the rat LHR N-terminal domain alone (L- -), the LHR N-terminal domain fused to the transmembrane and C-terminal domains of the vesicular stomatitis virus-G protein (LVV), the LHR N-terminal domain fused to the transmembrane and C-terminal domains of the hamster beta 2 AR (LAA), and the beta 2 AR N-terminal domain fused to the transmembrane and C-terminal domains of the rat LHR (ALL). Membrane preparations obtained from COS-7 cells expressing the beta 2 AR or LAA bound the beta-adrenergic antagonist 125I-cyanopindolol with equal affinity, confirming the observation that the beta 2 AR transmembrane domain forms the hormone-binding site. Membranes from COS-7 cells transfected with LHR bound 125I-human choriomic gonadotropin (hCG). However, membranes from LAA-, L(- -)-, and LVV-transfected cells had low capacity to bind 125I-hCG unless they were solubilized with Triton X-100. The affinity of the detergent-solubilized receptors for 125I-hCG was similar to that of the LHR. We were unable to detect binding of 125I-hCG to ALL in the presence or absence of detergent. These observations suggest that, whereas the transmembrane region of the beta 2 AR is sufficient to bind adrenergic ligands, the N-terminal region of the LHR is required for binding of hCG. Although the N terminus of the LHR is sufficient to bind hCG, both the N terminus and the transmembrane domains of the LHR are required for receptor expression on the cell surface.

  13. M-CSF receptor mutations in hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids impair not only kinase activity but also surface expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hiyoshi, Masateru; Hashimoto, Michihiro; Yukihara, Mamiko; Bhuyan, Farzana; Suzu, Shinya

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Many mutations were identified in Fms as a putative genetic cause of HDLS. •All of the mutations tested severely impair the kinase activity. •Most of the mutations also impair the trafficking to the cell surface. •These defects further suggest that HDLS is caused by a loss of Fms function. -- Abstract: The tyrosine kinase Fms, the cell surface receptor for M-CSF and IL-34, is critical for microglial proliferation and differentiation in the brain. Recently, a number of mutations have been identified in Fms as a putative genetic cause of hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS), implying an important role of microglial dysfunction in HDLS pathogenesis. In this study, we initially confirmed that 11 mutations, which reside within the ATP-binding or major tyrosine kinase domain, caused a severe impairment of ligand-induced Fms auto-phosphorylation. Intriguingly, we found that 10 of the 11 mutants also showed a weak cell surface expression, which was associated with a concomitant increase in the low molecular weight hypo-N-glycosylated immature gp130Fms-like species. Indeed, the mutant proteins heavily accumulated to the Golgi-like perinuclear regions. These results indicate that all of the Fms mutations tested severely impair the kinase activity and most of the mutations also impair the trafficking to the cell surface, further suggesting that HDLS is caused by the loss of Fms function.

  14. Identification and isolation of a 140 kd cell surface glycoprotein with properties expected of a fibronectin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Pytela, R.; Pierschbacher, M.D.; Ruoslahti, E.

    1985-01-01

    Affinity chromatography was used to identify a putative cell surface receptor for fibronectin. A large cell-attachment-promoting fibronectin fragment was used as the affinity matrix, and specific elution was effected by using synthetic peptides containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp, which is derived from the cell recognition sequence in the fibronectin cell attachment site. A 140 kd protein was bound by the affinity matrix from octylglucoside extracts of MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells and specifically eluted with the synthetic peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro. The 140 kd protein was labeled by cell surface specific radioiodination and became incorporated into liposomes at a high efficiency. Liposomes containing this protein showed specific affinity toward fibronectin-coated surfaces, and this binding could be selectively inhibited by the synthetic cell-attachment peptide but not by inactive peptides. Affinity chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose showed that the 140 kd protein is a glycoprotein and, in combination with the fibronectin fragment chromatography, gave highly enriched preparations of the 140 kd protein. These properties suggest that the 140 kd glycoprotein is a membrane-embedded cell surface protein directly involved in the initial step of cell adhesion to fibronectin substrates.

  15. Polymorphic expression in the CD8alpha chain surface receptor of African lions (Panthera leo).

    PubMed

    Bull, Marta E; Gebhard, Douglas G; Tompkins, Wayne A F; Kennedy-Stoskopf, Suzanne

    2002-01-15

    Free-ranging African lion (Panthera leo) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were examined using flow cytometry and antibodies developed for use in the domestic cat to determine if phenotypic changes occurred in lion lymphocytes as a result of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection. The percentage of CD8 cells from lion peripheral blood was considerably lower than in the domestic cat. Lions with elevated levels of CD8+ cells were typically infected with FIV, similar to observations in the domestic cat. Antibodies against the alpha chain of the CD8 receptor (monoclonal antibody (mAb) 3.357) did not react consistently in all lions examined. Flow cytometric analysis determined that approximately 82 and 80% of the animals from Kruger and Hluhluwe-Umfolozi National Parks in South Africa reacted with the monoclonal antibody against the alpha chain of CD8 receptor, while only 17% of the lions in Etosha National Park in Namibia cross-reacted with the CD8alpha chain. There was no apparent correlation between FIV status and CD8alpha chain reactivity. The relative isolation of Etosha from the other two parks could explain the marked difference in CD8alpha chain expression and suggests that lions similar to other mammalian species demonstrate polymorphic expression of the CD8alpha chain (197).

  16. Neurexin-neuroligin adhesions capture surface-diffusing AMPA receptors through PSD-95 scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Mondin, Magali; Labrousse, Virginie; Hosy, Eric; Heine, Martin; Tessier, Béatrice; Levet, Florian; Poujol, Christel; Blanchet, Christophe; Choquet, Daniel; Thoumine, Olivier

    2011-09-21

    The mechanisms governing the recruitment of functional glutamate receptors at nascent excitatory postsynapses following initial axon-dendrite contact remain unclear. We examined here the ability of neurexin/neuroligin adhesions to mobilize AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) at postsynapses through a diffusion/trap process involving the scaffold molecule PSD-95. Using single nanoparticle tracking in primary rat and mouse hippocampal neurons overexpressing or lacking neuroligin-1 (Nlg1), a striking inverse correlation was found between AMPAR diffusion and Nlg1 expression level. The use of Nlg1 mutants and inhibitory RNAs against PSD-95 demonstrated that this effect depended on intact Nlg1/PSD-95 interactions. Furthermore, functional AMPARs were recruited within 1 h at nascent Nlg1/PSD-95 clusters assembled by neurexin-1β multimers, a process requiring AMPAR membrane diffusion. Triggering novel neurexin/neuroligin adhesions also caused a depletion of PSD-95 from native synapses and a drop in AMPAR miniature EPSCs, indicating a competitive mechanism. Finally, both AMPAR level at synapses and AMPAR-dependent synaptic transmission were diminished in hippocampal slices from newborn Nlg1 knock-out mice, confirming an important role of Nlg1 in driving AMPARs to nascent synapses. Together, these data reveal a mechanism by which membrane-diffusing AMPARs can be rapidly trapped at PSD-95 scaffolds assembled at nascent neurexin/neuroligin adhesions, in competition with existing synapses.

  17. A serotonin-induced N-glycan switch regulates platelet aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Mercado, Charles P.; Quintero, Maritza V.; Li, Yicong; Singh, Preeti; Byrd, Alicia K.; Talabnin, Krajang; Ishihara, Mayumi; Azadi, Parastoo; Rusch, Nancy J.; Kuberan, Balagurunathan; Maroteaux, Luc; Kilic, Fusun

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a multifunctional signaling molecule that plays different roles in a concentration-dependent manner. We demonstrated that elevated levels of plasma 5-HT accelerate platelet aggregation resulting in a hypercoagulable state in which the platelet surface becomes occupied by several glycoproteins. Here we study the novel hypothesis that an elevated level of plasma 5-HT results in modification of the content of N-glycans on the platelet surface and this abnormality is associated with platelet aggregation. Mass spectrometry of total surface glycoproteins on platelets isolated from wild-type mice infused for 24 hours with saline or 5-HT revealed that the content of glycoproteins on platelets from 5-HT-infused mice switched from predominantly N-acetyl-neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) to N-glycolyl-neuraminic acid (Neu5Gc). Cytidine monophosphate-N-acetylneuraminate hydroxylase (CMAH) synthesizes Neu5Gc from Neu5Ac. Up-regulation of Neu5Gc content on the platelet surface resulted from an increase in the catalytic function, not expression, of CMAH in platelets of 5-HT-infused mice. The highest level of Neu5Gc was observed in platelets of 5-HT-infused, 5-HT transporter-knock out mice, suggesting that the surface delineated 5-HT receptor on platelets may promote CMAH catalytic activity. These new findings link elevated levels of plasma 5-HT to altered platelet N-glycan content, a previously unrecognized abnormality that may favor platelet aggregation. PMID:24077408

  18. Surface characteristics of spacecraft components affect the aggregation of microorganisms and may lead to different survival rates of bacteria on Mars landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuerger, Andrew C.; Richards, Jeffrey T.; Hintze, Paul E.; Kern, Roger G.

    2005-01-01

    Layers of dormant endospores of Bacillus subtilis HA101 were applied to eight different spacecraft materials and exposed to martian conditions of low pressure (8.5 mbar), low temperature (-10 degrees C), and high CO(2) gas composition and irradiated with a Mars-normal ultraviolet (UV-visible- near-infrared spectrum. Bacterial layers were exposed to either 1 min or 1 h of Mars-normal UV irradiation, which simulated clear-sky conditions on equatorial Mars (0.1 tau). When exposed to 1 min of Mars UV irradiation, the numbers of viable endospores of B. subtilis were reduced three to four orders of magnitude for two brands of aluminum (Al), stainless steel, chemfilm-treated Al, clear-anodized Al, and black-anodized Al coupons. In contrast, bacterial survival was reduced only one to two orders of magnitude for endospores on the non-metal materials astroquartz and graphite composite when bacterial endospores were exposed to 1 min of Mars UV irradiation. When bacterial monolayers were exposed to 1 h of Mars UV irradiation, no viable bacteria were recovered from the six metal coupons listed above. In contrast, bacterial survival was reduced only two to three orders of magnitude for spore layers on astroquartz and graphite composite exposed to 1 h of Mars UV irradiation. Scanning electron microscopy images of the bacterial monolayers on all eight spacecraft materials revealed that endospores of B. subtilis formed large aggregates of multilayered spores on astroquartz and graphite composite, but not on the other six spacecraft materials. It is likely that the formation of multilayered aggregates of endospores on astroquartz and graphite composite is responsible for the enhanced survival of bacterial cells on these materials.

  19. Surface Characteristics of Spacecraft Components Affect the Aggregation of Microorganisms and May Lead to Different Survival Rates of Bacteria on Mars Landers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuerger, Andrew W.; Richards, Jeffrey T.; Hintze, Paul E.; Kern, Roger G.

    2005-08-01

    Layers of dormant endospores of Bacillus subtilis HA101 were applied to eight different spacecraft materials and exposed to martian conditions of low pressure (8.5 mbar), low temperature (-10°C), and high CO2 gas composition and irradiated with a Mars-normal ultraviolet (UV-visible- near-infrared spectrum. Bacterial layers were exposed to either 1 min or 1 h of Mars-normal UV irradiation, which simulated clear-sky conditions on equatorial Mars (0.1 tau). When exposed to 1 min of Mars UV irradiation, the numbers of viable endospores of B. subtilis were reduced three to four orders of magnitude for two brands of aluminum (Al), stainless steel, chemfilm-treated Al, clear-anodized Al, and black-anodized Al coupons. In contrast, bacterial survival was reduced only one to two orders of magnitude for endospores on the non-metal materials astroquartz and graphite composite when bacterial endospores were exposed to 1 min of Mars UV irradiation. When bacterial monolayers were exposed to 1 h of Mars UV irradiation, no viable bacteria were recovered from the six metal coupons listed above. In contrast, bacterial survival was reduced only two to three orders of magnitude for spore layers on astroquartz and graphite composite exposed to 1 h of Mars UV irradiation. Scanning electron microscopy images of the bacterial monolayers on all eight spacecraft materials revealed that endospores of B. subtilis formed large aggregates of multilayered spores on astroquartz and graphite composite, but not on the other six spacecraft materials. It is likely that the formation of multilayered aggregates of endospores on astroquartz and graphite composite is responsible for the enhanced survival of bacterial cells on these materials.

  20. BDNF contributes to both rapid and homeostatic alterations in AMPA receptor surface expression in nucleus accumbens medium spiny neurons

    PubMed Central

    Reimers, Jeremy M.; Loweth, Jessica A.; Wolf, Marina E.

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a critical role in plasticity at glutamate synapses and the effects of repeated cocaine exposure. We recently showed that intracranial injection of BDNF into the rat nucleus accumbens (NAc), a key region for cocaine addiction, rapidly increases AMPA receptor (AMPAR) surface expression. To further characterize BDNF’s role in both rapid AMPAR trafficking and slower, homeostatic changes in AMPAR surface expression, we investigated the effects of acute (30 min) and long-term (24 h) treatment with BDNF on AMPAR distribution in NAc medium spiny neurons from postnatal rats co-cultured with mouse prefrontal cortex (PFC) neurons to restore excitatory inputs. Immunocytochemical studies showed that acute BDNF treatment increased cell surface GluA1 and GluA2 levels, as well as their co-localization, on NAc neurons. This effect of BDNF, confirmed using a protein crosslinking assay, was dependent on ERK but not AKT signaling. In contrast, long-term BDNF treatment decreased AMPAR surface expression on NAc neurons. Based on this latter result, we tested the hypothesis that BDNF plays a role in AMPAR “scaling down” in response to a prolonged increase in neuronal activity produced by bicuculline (24 h). Supporting this hypothesis, decreasing BDNF signaling with the extracellular BDNF scavenger TrkB-Fc prevented the scaling down of GluA1 and GluA2 surface levels in NAc neurons normally produced by bicuculline. In conclusion, BDNF exerts bidirectional effects on NAc AMPAR surface expression, depending on duration of exposure. Furthermore, BDNF’s involvement in synaptic scaling in the NAc differs from its previously described role in the visual cortex. PMID:24712995

  1. Hydrophobic Surfaces of Spacecraft Components Enhance the Aggregation of Microorganisms and May Lead to Higher Survival Rates of Bacteria on Mars Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuerger, Andrew C.; Kern, Roger G.

    2004-01-01

    In order to minimize the forward contamination of Mars, spacecraft are assembled under cleanroom conditions that require several procedures to clean and sterilize components. Surface characteristics of spacecraft materials may contribute to microbial survival on the surface of Mars by protecting spores from sterilizing agents, including UV irradiation. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of surface characteristics of several spacecraft materials on the survival of Bacillus subtilis spores under simulated Martian conditions.

  2. Quantitative in vivo cell-surface receptor imaging in oncology: kinetic modeling and paired-agent principles from nuclear medicine and optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Wang, Yu; Pogue, Brian W.; Liu, Jonathan T. C.

    2015-07-01

    The development of methods to accurately quantify cell-surface receptors in living tissues would have a seminal impact in oncology. For example, accurate measures of receptor density in vivo could enhance early detection or surgical resection of tumors via protein-based contrast, allowing removal of cancer with high phenotype specificity. Alternatively, accurate receptor expression estimation could be used as a biomarker to guide patient-specific clinical oncology targeting of the same molecular pathway. Unfortunately, conventional molecular contrast-based imaging approaches are not well adapted to accurately estimating the nanomolar-level cell-surface receptor concentrations in tumors, as most images are dominated by nonspecific sources of contrast such as high vascular permeability and lymphatic inhibition. This article reviews approaches for overcoming these limitations based upon tracer kinetic modeling and the use of emerging protocols to estimate binding potential and the related receptor concentration. Methods such as using single time point imaging or a reference-tissue approach tend to have low accuracy in tumors, whereas paired-agent methods or advanced kinetic analyses are more promising to eliminate the dominance of interstitial space in the signals. Nuclear medicine and optical molecular imaging are the primary modalities used, as they have the nanomolar level sensitivity needed to quantify cell-surface receptor concentrations present in tissue, although each likely has a different clinical niche.

  3. Quantitative in vivo cell-surface receptor imaging in oncology: kinetic modeling & paired-agent principles from nuclear medicine and optical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Wang, Yu; Pogue, Brian W.; Liu, Jonathan T. C.

    2015-01-01

    The development of methods to accurately quantify cell-surface receptors in living tissues would have a seminal impact in oncology. For example, accurate measures of receptor density in vivo could enhance early detection or surgical resection of tumors via protein-based contrast, allowing removal of cancer with high phenotype specificity. Alternatively, accurate receptor expression estimation could be used as a biomarker to guide patient-specific clinical oncology targeting of the same molecular pathway. Unfortunately, conventional molecular contrast-based imaging approaches are not well adapted to accurately estimating the nanomolar-level cell-surface receptor concentrations in tumors, as most images are dominated by nonspecific sources of contrast such as high vascular permeability and lymphatic inhibition. This article reviews approaches for overcoming these limitations based upon tracer kinetic modeling and the use of emerging protocols to estimate binding potential and the related receptor concentration. Methods such as using single time point imaging or a reference-tissue approach tend to have low accuracy in tumors, whereas paired-agent methods or advanced kinetic analyses are more promising to eliminate the dominance of interstitial space in the signals. Nuclear medicine and optical molecular imaging are the primary modalities used, as they have the nanomolar level sensitivity needed to quantify cell-surface receptor concentrations present in tissue, although each likely has a different clinical niche. PMID:26134619

  4. Crystal Structure of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type a in Complex With the Cell Surface Co-Receptor GT1b-Insight Into the Toxin-Neuron Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Stenmark, P.; Dupuy, J.; Inamura, A.; Kiso, M.; Stevens, R.C.

    2009-05-26

    Botulinum neurotoxins have a very high affinity and specificity for their target cells requiring two different co-receptors located on the neuronal cell surface. Different toxin serotypes have different protein receptors; yet, most share a common ganglioside co-receptor, GT1b. We determined the crystal structure of the botulinum neurotoxin serotype A binding domain (residues 873-1297) alone and in complex with a GT1b analog at 1.7 A and 1.6 A, respectively. The ganglioside GT1b forms several key hydrogen bonds to conserved residues and binds in a shallow groove lined by Tryptophan 1266. GT1b binding does not induce any large structural changes in the toxin; therefore, it is unlikely that allosteric effects play a major role in the dual receptor recognition. Together with the previously published structures of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B in complex with its protein co-receptor, we can now generate a detailed model of botulinum neurotoxin's interaction with the neuronal cell surface. The two branches of the GT1b polysaccharide, together with the protein receptor site, impose strict geometric constraints on the mode of interaction with the membrane surface and strongly support a model where one end of the 100 A long translocation domain helix bundle swing into contact with the membrane, initiating the membrane anchoring event.

  5. [Platelet aggregation upon acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel treatment and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa content in patients with acute coronary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Khaspekova, S G; Ziuriaev, I T; Iakushkin, V V; Golubeva, N V; Ruda, M Ia; Mazurov, A V

    2011-01-01

    Interaction between aggregating activity of platelets and glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa (fibrinogen receptor) content on their surface was investigated in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Eighty nine ACS patients were included into the study - 69 with and 20 without elevation of ST segment. Blood was collected within the first hour of admission to the clinic (1 day), and then at 3-5 and 8-12 days. All patients received standard antiaggregant therapy - acetylsalicylic acid - ASA (thromboxane A2 synthesis inhibitor) and clopidogrel (ADP receptor antagonist). Platelet aggregation was analyzed at the first time point when patients had already taken ASA but not clopidogrel, and then (3-5 and 8- 12 days) upon combined therapy with both preparations. Aggregation was induced by 5 and 20 uM ADP and measured by turbidimetric method. In comparison with the initial level (1 day, ASA) at days 3-5, i.e. after development of clopidogrel effect, platelet aggregation was decreased by 54 and 40% upon its stimulation with 5 and 20 uM ADP, and was not further changed at days 8-12. GP IIb/IIIa content on platelet surface was determined by binding of 125I-labelled monoclonal antibody CRC64. GP IIb/IIIa number varied from 31100 to 73000 per platelet with the mean level of 48500 +/- 8400 (mean +/- standard deviation). No differences were detected between mean GP IIb/IIIa number at 1, 3-5 and 8-12 days after ACS onset. Upon repeat GP IIb/IIIa measurement coefficient of variation was 6.1% demonstrating the stability of this parameter in each patient. Positive correlation between platelet aggregation and GP IIb/IIIa content was detected at the first day - correlation coefficients (r) 0.425 and 0.470 for 5 and 20 uM ADP (n=57, p<0.001). However positive association between these parameters was not revealed at 3-5 and 8-12 days, when patients received not only ASA but clopidogrel as well (r from -0.054 to -0.237, p>0.05). These results indicates that variations of GP IIb/IIIa content

  6. Succession of Protists on Estuarine Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Wörner; Zimmerman-Timm; Kausch

    2000-08-01

    Colonization by and succession of bacteria and bacterivorous protists on laboratory-made aggregates were determined over a period of 14 days during winter and spring in 1997. Aggregates were generated from natural water from the limnetic zone of the Elbe Estuary using a tilting tube roller system. Within 1 h after the beginning of the experiments, macroaggregates started to form. Aggregates reached a maximum size of 1 mm with a tendency toward large sizes at the end of the experiment after the 10th day. On the first day, high bacterial densities of more than 10(9) cells ml(-1) were detected within the aggregates. The abundances of flagellates and ciliates within aggregates were also two or three orders of magnitude higher than in the surrounding water. Densities of aggregate associated organisms are comparable to those occuring in sediments. The first protistan colonizers on the aggregates were small heterotrophic flagellates, such as choanoflagellates and small euglenids. Later, beginning on the 4th day, small sarcodines and ciliates became abundant. The most abundant ciliates associated with aggregates were small species of the Hypotrichia, Cyrtophorida, and Hymenostomata. After 9 days, large omnivorous and carnivorous ciliates, such as large members of the Hypotrichia and the Pleurostomatida, occurred. In spring, large heterotrophic flagellates and amebae also appeared at this time. These findings indicated the existence of a succession of protists on newly formed aggregates and a microbial food net within the aggregates based on bacterial production. Additionally, most of the species observed during this study were adapted for living on surfaces. In natural environments they are more common in benthic than in pelagic environments. For them, aggregates are havens in the water column comparable to sediment communities.

  7. In vivo effect of fly ash on surface receptors of mice peritoneal macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Dogra, S.; Khanna, A.K.; Kaw, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    Functional activity of macrophages was studied in mice up to 15 days after intraperitoneal injection of 2.5 and 5.0 mg of fly ash using in vitro parameters. Fly ash did not cause any variation in the type of cellular response. The total cell number decreased significantly by 4 days after fly ash treatment but recovered subsequently. The decrease was dose dependent. Fly ash also caused a 50% depression in the FC receptor mediated phagocytosis of IgG coated sheep erythrocytes (SRBC) by macrophages at 2 days of dust treatment. However, the recovery began earlier with 2.5 mg fly ash than with 5.0 mg fly ash. These changes were not associated with any marked changes in esterase activity of macrophages following phagocytosis of fly ash.

  8. Aggregate size distribution of the soil loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, Judit Alexandra; Jakab, Gergely; Szabó, Boglárka; Józsa, Sándor; Szalai, Zoltán; Centeri, Csaba

    2016-04-01

    In agricultural areas the soil erosion and soil loss estimation is vital information in long-term planning. During the initial period of the erosion a part of the soil particles and aggregates get transportable and nutrients and organic matter could be transported due to the effect of water or wind. This preliminary phase was studied with laboratory-scale rainfall simulator. Developed surface crust and aggregate size composition of the runoff was examined in six different slope-roughness-moisture content combination of a Cambisol and a Regosol. The ratio of micro- and macro aggregates in the runoff indicate the stability of the aggregates and determine the transport capacity of the runoff. Both soil samples were taken from field where the water erosion is a potential hazard. During the experiment the whole amount of runoff and sediment was collected through sieve series to a bucket to separate the micro- and macro aggregates. In case of both samples the micro aggregates dominate in the runoff and the runoff rates are similar. Although the runoff of the Regosol - with dominant >1000μm macro aggregate content - contained almost nothing but <50μm sized micro aggregates. Meanwhile the runoff of the Cambisol - with more balanced micro and macro aggregate content - contained dominantly 50-250μm sized micro aggregates and in some case remarkable ratio 250-1000μm sized macro aggregates. This difference occurred because the samples are resistant against drop erosion differently. In case of both sample the selectivity of the erosion and substance matrix redistribution manifested in mineral crusts in the surface where the quartz deposited in place while the lighter organic matter transported with the sediment. The detachment of the aggregates and the redistribution of the particles highly effect on the aggregate composition of the runoff which is connected with the quality of the soil loss. So while the estimation of soil loss quantity is more or less is easy, measuring

  9. Oxidative Stress Increases Surface Toll-Like Receptor 4 Expression in Murine Macrophages Via Ceramide Generation.

    PubMed

    Tawadros, Patrick S; Powers, Kinga A; Ailenberg, Menachem; Birch, Simone E; Marshall, John C; Szaszi, Katalin; Kapus, Andras; Rotstein, Ori D

    2015-08-01

    Multiorgan failure is a major cause of late mortality following trauma. Oxidative stress generated during shock/resuscitation contributes to tissue injury by priming the immune system for an exaggerated response to subsequent inflammatory stimuli, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We recently reported that oxidative stress causes rapid recruitment of the LPS receptor Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) to membrane lipid rafts, thus increasing LPS responsiveness and cellular priming. We hypothesized that activation of Src family kinases by oxidants might contribute to these events. We utilized microscopy, flow cytometry, Western blotting, and thin-layer chromatography methods. Using hydrogen peroxide in vitro and hemorrhagic shock/resuscitation in vivo, oxidant-induced TLR4 translocation in macrophages occurred in an Src-dependent manner. Approaches supporting this conclusion included pharmacologic inhibition of the Src family kinases by PP2, Src inhibition by a molecular approach of cell transfection with Csk, and genetic inhibition of all Src kinases relevant to the monocyte/macrophage lineage in hckfgrlyn triple knockout mice. To evaluate the upstream molecules involved in Src activation, we evaluated the ability of oxidative stress to activate the bioactive lipid molecule ceramide. Oxidants induced ceramide generation in macrophages both in vitro and in vivo, an effect that appears to be due to activation of the acid sphingomyelinase. Using pharmacological approaches, ceramide was shown to be both necessary and sufficient to mediate TLR4 translocation to the plasma membrane in an Src-dependent manner. This study identifies a hierarchy of signaling molecules following oxidative stress that might represent novel targets for therapy in critical illness and organ injury.

  10. An investigation of interactions between hypocretin/orexin signaling and glutamate receptor surface expression in the rat nucleus accumbens under basal conditions and after cocaine exposure

    PubMed Central

    Plaza-Zabala, Ainhoa; Li, Xuan; Milovanovic, Mike; Loweth, Jessica A.; Maldonado, Rafael; Berrendero, Fernando; Wolf, Marina E.

    2013-01-01

    Hypocretin peptides are critical for the effects of cocaine on excitatory synaptic strength in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). However, little is known about their role in cocaine-induced synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). First, we tested whether hypocretin-1 by itself could acutely modulate glutamate receptor surface expression in the NAc, given that hypocretin-1 in the VTA reproduces cocaine’s effects on glutamate transmission. We found no effect of hypocretin-1 infusion on AMPA or NMDA receptor surface expression in the NAc, measured by biotinylation, either 30 min or 3 h after the infusion. Second, we were interested in whether changes in hypocretin receptor-2 (Hcrtr-2) expression contribute to cocaine-induced plasticity in the NAc. As a first step towards addressing this question, Hcrtr-2 surface expression was compared in the NAc after withdrawal from extended-access self-administration of saline (control) versus cocaine. We found that surface Hcrtr-2 levels remain unchanged following 14, 25 or 48 days of withdrawal from cocaine, a time period in which high conductance GluA2-lacking AMPA receptors progressively emerge in the NAc. Overall, our results fail to support a role for hypocretins in acute modulation of glutamate receptor levels in the NAc or a role for altered Hcrtr-2 expression in withdrawal-dependent synaptic adaptations in the NAc following cocaine self-administration. PMID:24262606

  11. BTK inhibition results in impaired CXCR4 chemokine receptor surface expression, signaling and function in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S-S; Chang, B Y; Chang, S; Tong, T; Ham, S; Sherry, B; Burger, J A; Rai, K R; Chiorazzi, N

    2016-01-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) is involved in the regulation of B-cell growth, migration and adhesion. The importance of BTK in cell trafficking is emphasized by the clonal contraction proceeded by lymphocytosis typical for the enzyme inhibitor, ibrutinib, in B-cell malignancies, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Here, we investigated BTK regulation of leukemic B-cell trafficking in a mouse model of aggressive TCL1 CLL-like disease. Inhibiting BTK by ibrutinib reduced surface membrane (sm) levels of CXCR4 but not CXCR5, CD49d and other adhesion/homing receptors. Decreased smCXCR4 levels resulted from blocking receptor signal transduction, which in turn aborted cycling from and to the membrane. This resulted in rapid re-distribution of CLL cells from spleens and lymph nodes into the circulation. CLL cells with impaired smCXCR4 from BTK inhibition failed to home to spleens. These functional changes mainly resulted from inhibition of CXCR4 phosphorylation at Ser339, mediated directly by blocking BTK enzymatic activity and indirectly by affecting the function of downstream targets PLCγ2 and PKCμ, and eventually synthesis of PIM-1 and BTK itself. Our data identify CXCR4 as a key regulator in BTK-mediated CLL-cell retention and have elucidated a complex set of not previously described mechanisms responsible for these effects. PMID:26582643

  12. BTK inhibition results in impaired CXCR4 chemokine receptor surface expression, signaling and function in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, S-S; Chang, B Y; Chang, S; Tong, T; Ham, S; Sherry, B; Burger, J A; Rai, K R; Chiorazzi, N

    2016-04-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) is involved in the regulation of B-cell growth, migration and adhesion. The importance of BTK in cell trafficking is emphasized by the clonal contraction proceeded by lymphocytosis typical for the enzyme inhibitor, ibrutinib, in B-cell malignancies, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Here, we investigated BTK regulation of leukemic B-cell trafficking in a mouse model of aggressive TCL1 CLL-like disease. Inhibiting BTK by ibrutinib reduced surface membrane (sm) levels of CXCR4 but not CXCR5, CD49d and other adhesion/homing receptors. Decreased smCXCR4 levels resulted from blocking receptor signal transduction, which in turn aborted cycling from and to the membrane. This resulted in rapid re-distribution of CLL cells from spleens and lymph nodes into the circulation. CLL cells with impaired smCXCR4 from BTK inhibition failed to home to spleens. These functional changes mainly resulted from inhibition of CXCR4 phosphorylation at Ser339, mediated directly by blocking BTK enzymatic activity and indirectly by affecting the function of downstream targets PLCγ2 and PKCμ, and eventually synthesis of PIM-1 and BTK itself. Our data identify CXCR4 as a key regulator in BTK-mediated CLL-cell retention and have elucidated a complex set of not previously described mechanisms responsible for these effects. PMID:26582643

  13. The linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA increases membrane surface localization of the α7 ACh receptor in a protein 4.1N-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Takeshi; Tsuchiya, Ayako; Tanaka, Akito; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2013-03-01

    In yeast two-hybrid screening, protein 4.1N, a scaffolding protein, was identified as a binding partner of the α7 ACh (acetylcholine) receptor. For rat hippocampal slices, the linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA {8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid} increased the association of the α7 ACh receptor with 4.1N, and the effect was inhibited by GF109203X, an inhibitor of PKC (protein kinase C), although DCP-LA did not induce PKC phosphorylation of 4.1N. For PC-12 cells, the presence of the α7 ACh receptor in the plasma membrane fraction was significantly suppressed by knocking down 4.1N. DCP-LA increased the presence of the α7 ACh receptor in the plasma membrane fraction, and the effect was still inhibited by knocking down 4.1N. In the monitoring of α7 ACh receptor mobilization, DCP-LA enhanced signal intensities for the α7 ACh receptor at the membrane surface in PC-12 cells, which was clearly prevented by knocking down 4.1N. Taken together, the results of the present study show that 4.1N interacts with the α7 ACh receptor and participates in the receptor tethering to the plasma membrane. The results also indicate that DCP-LA increases membrane surface localization of the α7 ACh receptor in a 4.1N-dependent manner under the control of PKC, but without phosphorylating 4.1N.

  14. The signaling phospholipid PIP3 creates a new interaction surface on the nuclear receptor SF-1

    SciTech Connect

    Blind, Raymond D.; Sablin, Elena P.; Kuchenbecker, Kristopher M.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Deacon, Ashley M.; Das, Debanu; Fletterick, Robert J.; Ingraham, Holly A.

    2014-10-06

    We previously reported that lipids PI(4,5)P2 (PIP2) and PI(3,4,5)P3 (PIP3) bind NR5A nuclear receptors to regulate their activity. Here, the crystal structures of PIP2 and PIP3 bound to NR5A1 (SF-1) define a new interaction surface that is organized by the solvent-exposed PIPn headgroups. We find that stabilization by the PIP3 ligand propagates a signal that increases coactivator recruitment to SF-1, consistent with our earlier work showing that PIP3 increases SF-1 activity. This newly created surface harbors a cluster of human mutations that lead to endocrine disorders, thus explaining how these puzzling mutations cripple SF-1 activity. Finally, we propose that this new surface acts as a PIP3-regulated interface between SF-1 and coregulatory proteins, analogous to the function of membrane-bound phosphoinositides.

  15. Structural basis of Nipah and Hendra virus attachment to their cell-surface receptor ephrin-B2.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Thomas A; Aricescu, A Radu; Gilbert, Robert J C; Grimes, Jonathan M; Jones, E Yvonne; Stuart, David I

    2008-06-01

    Nipah and Hendra viruses are emergent paramyxoviruses, causing disease characterized by rapid onset and high mortality rates, resulting in their classification as Biosafety Level 4 pathogens. Their attachment glycoproteins are essential for the recognition of the cell-surface receptors ephrin-B2 (EFNB2) and ephrin-B3 (EFNB3). Here we report crystal structures of both Nipah and Hendra attachment glycoproteins in complex with human EFNB2. In contrast to previously solved paramyxovirus attachment complexes, which are mediated by sialic acid interactions, the Nipah and Hendra complexes are maintained by an extensive protein-protein interface, including a crucial phenylalanine side chain on EFNB2 that fits snugly into a hydrophobic pocket on the viral protein. By analogy with the development of antivirals against sialic acid binding viruses, these results provide a structural template to target antiviral inhibition of protein-protein interactions.

  16. Receptor-independent, direct membrane binding leads to cell surface lipid sorting and Syk kinase activation in dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Gilbert; Sharma, Karan; Ward, Sandra M.; Desrosiers, Melanie D.; Stephens, Leslie A.; Schoel, W. Michael; Li, Tonglei; Lowell, Clifford A.; Ling, Chang-Chun; Amrein, Matthias W.; Shi, Yan

    2008-01-01

    Summary Binding of particulate antigens by antigen presenting cells (APC) is a critical step in immune activation. Previously, we demonstrated that uric acid crystals are potent adjuvants, initiating a robust adaptive immune response. However, the mechanisms of activation are unknown. Using atomic force microscopy as a tool for real time single cell activation analysis, we report that uric acid crystals can directly engage cellular membranes, particularly the cholesterol components, with a force substantially stronger than protein based cellular contacts. Binding of particulate substances activates Syk kinase-dependent signaling in dendritic cells (DCs). These observations suggest a mechanism whereby immune cell activation can be triggered by solid structures via membrane lipid alteration without the requirement for specific cell surface receptors, and a testable hypothesis for crystal-associated arthropathies, inflammation and adjuvanticity. PMID:18993083

  17. Isolation and characterization of phosphorylated oligosaccharides from alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase that are recognized by cell-surface receptors.

    PubMed

    von Figura, K; Klein, U

    1979-03-01

    Adsorptive endocytosis of lysosomal enzymes by fibroblasts and hepatocytes involves binding to cell surface receptors that recognize on lysosomal enzymes a phosphorylated carbohydrate, most likely a mannose 6-phosphate residue [Kaplan et al. (1977) Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 74, 2026-2030; Ullrich et al. (1978) Hoppe-Seyler's Z. Physiol. Chem. 359, 1591-1598]. Loss of alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase endocytosis after treatment with endoglucosaminidase H indicated that the recognition site of alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase is located on N-glycosidically linked oligosaccharides of the high mannose type. Acidic oligosaccharides with an average molecular weight of 2200 were liberated from alpha-N-acetylglucosaminidase by endoglucosaminidase H. These oligosaccharides were susceptible to degradation by alkaline phosphatase, alpha-mannosidase and beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase. At the non-reducing terminal these oligosaccharides bear phosphorylated mannose and/or N-acetylglucosamine residues. PMID:428391

  18. Low aggregation state diminishes ferrihydrite reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braunschweig, Juliane; Heister, Katja; Meckenstock, Rainer U.

    2013-04-01

    Ferrihydrite is an abundant iron(oxy)hydroxide in soils and sediments and plays an important role in microbial iron cycling due to its high reactivity. Therefore, it is often synthesized and used in geomicrobiological and mineralogical studies. The reactivities of synthetic ferrihydrites vary between different studies and synthesis protocols. Hence, we synthesized five different ferrihydrites and characterized them with XRD, FTIR, XPS, and BET specific surface area. The reactivity of the ferrihydrite samples towards ascorbic acid was examined and compared with microbial reduction rates by Geobacter sulfurreducens. FTIR and XRD results show the presence of secondary, higher crystalline iron oxide phases like goethite and akaganeite for two samples. Consequently, those samples revealed lower biotic and abiotic reduction rates compared to pure ferrihydrite. Comparison of reduction rates with the specific surface area of all ferrihydrites showed neither correlation with abiotic reductive dissolution nor with microbial reduction. Especially one sample, characterized by a very low aggregation state and presence of secondary minerals, revealed a poor reactivity. We speculate that apart from the occurring secondary minerals also the low aggregation state played an important role. Decreasing aggregation diminishes the amount of kinks and edges on the surfaces, which are produced at contact sites in aggregates. According to dissolution theories, dissolution mainly starts at those surface defects and slows down with decreasing amount of defects. Furthermore, the non-aggregated ferrihydrite is free of micropores, a further stimulant for dissolution. Independent repetitions of experiments and syntheses according to the same protocol but without formation of secondary minerals, confirmed the low reactivity of the non-aggregated ferrihydrite. In summary, our results indicate that a decreasing aggregation state of ferrihydrite to a certain size does increase the reactivity

  19. Aggregations in Flatworms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liffen, C. L.; Hunter, M.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a school project to investigate aggregations in flatworms which may be influenced by light intensity, temperature, and some form of chemical stimulus released by already aggregating flatworms. Such investigations could be adopted to suit many educational levels of science laboratory activities. (DS)

  20. Directed evolution of Her2/neu-binding IgG1-Fc for improved stability and resistance to aggregation by using yeast surface display.

    PubMed

    Traxlmayr, Michael W; Lobner, Elisabeth; Antes, Bernhard; Kainer, Manuela; Wiederkum, Susanne; Hasenhindl, Christoph; Stadlmayr, Gerhard; Rüker, Florian; Woisetschläger, Max; Moulder, Kevin; Obinger, Christian

    2013-04-01

    An Fcab (Fc antigen binding) is a crystallizable fragment of IgG having C-terminal structural loops of CH3 domains engineered for antigen binding. Since introduction of novel binding sites might impair the immunoglobulin fold, repairing strategies are needed for improving the biophysical properties of promising binders without decreasing affinity to the antigen. Here, a directed evolution protocol was developed and applied for stabilization of a Her2/neu-binding Fcab. Distinct loop regions of the parental binder were softly randomized by parsimonious mutagenesis, followed by heat incubation of the yeast displayed protein library and selection for retained antigen binding. Selected Fcabs were expressed solubly in Pichia pastoris and human embryonic kidney 293 cells and characterized. Fcab clones that retained their affinity to Her2/neu but exhibited a significantly increased conformational stability and resistance to aggregation could be evolved. Moreover, we demonstrate that simultaneous selection for binding to the antigen and to structurally specific ligands (FcγRI and an antibody directed against the CH2 domain) yields even more stable Fcabs. To sum up, this study presents a very potent and generally applicable method for improving the fold and stability of antibodies, antibody fragments and alternative binding scaffolds. PMID:23267121

  1. The three-dimensional structural surface of two beta-sheet scorpion toxins mimics that of an alpha-helical dihydropyridine receptor segment.

    PubMed Central

    Green, Daniel; Pace, Suzi; Curtis, Suzanne M; Sakowska, Magdalena; Lamb, Graham D; Dulhunty, Angela F; Casarotto, Marco G

    2003-01-01

    An alpha-helical II-III loop segment of the dihydropyridine receptor activates the ryanodine receptor calcium-release channel. We describe a novel manipulation in which this agonist's activity is increased by modifying its surface structure to resemble that of a toxin molecule. In a unique system, native beta-sheet scorpion toxins have been reported to activate skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor calcium channels with high affinity by binding to the same site as the lower-affinity alpha-helical dihydropyridine receptor segment. We increased the alignment of basic residues in the alpha-helical peptide to mimic the spatial orientation of active residues in the scorpion toxin, with a consequent 2-20-fold increase in the activity of the alpha-helical peptide. We hypothesized that, like the native peptide, the modified peptide and the scorpion toxin may bind to a common site. This was supported by (i) similar changes in ryanodine receptor channel gating induced by the native or modified alpha-helical peptide and the beta-sheet toxin, a 10-100-fold reduction in channel closed time, with a < or = 2-fold increase in open dwell time and (ii) a failure of the toxin to further activate channels activated by the peptides. These results suggest that diverse structural scaffolds can present similar conformational surface properties to target common receptor sites. PMID:12429019

  2. Classification and Characterization of Therapeutic Antibody Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Joubert, Marisa K.; Luo, Quanzhou; Nashed-Samuel, Yasser; Wypych, Jette; Narhi, Linda O.

    2011-01-01

    A host of diverse stress techniques was applied to a monoclonal antibody (IgG2) to yield protein particles with varying attributes and morphologies. Aggregated solutions were evaluated for percent aggregation, particle counts, size distribution, morphology, changes in secondary and tertiary structure, surface hydrophobicity, metal content, and reversibility. Chemical modifications were also identified in a separate report (Luo, Q., Joubert, M. K., Stevenson, R., Narhi, L. O., and Wypych, J. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 25134–25144). Aggregates were categorized into seven discrete classes, based on the traits described. Several additional molecules (from the IgG1 and IgG2 subtypes as well as intravenous IgG) were stressed and found to be defined with the same classification system. The mechanism of protein aggregation and the type of aggregate formed depends on the nature of the stress applied. Different IgG molecules appear to aggregate by a similar mechanism under the same applied stress. Aggregates created by harsh mechanical stress showed the largest number of subvisible particles, and the class generated by thermal stress displayed the largest number of visible particles. Most classes showed a disruption of the higher order structure, with the degree of disorder depending on the stress process. Particles in all classes (except thermal stress) were at least partially reversible upon dilution in pH 5 buffer. High copper content was detected in isolated metal-catalyzed aggregates, a stress previously shown to produce immunogenic aggregates. In conclusion, protein aggregates can be a very heterogeneous population, whose qualities are the result of the type of stress that was experienced. PMID:21454532

  3. Characterization of IgA and IgM binding and internalization by surface-expressed human Fcα/μ receptor.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Esther M; Trinh, K Ryan; Lim, Hana; Wims, Letitia A; Morrison, Sherie L

    2011-09-01

    The Fcα/μ receptor (Fcα/μR) is an unusual Fc receptor in that it binds to two different antibody isotypes, IgA and IgM. This receptor is of interest because it is thought to be involved in the capture of IgA- and IgM-immune complexes and antigen presentation. To further characterize this receptor, we were able to stably express human Fcα/μR on the surface of the 293T cell line. Using this system, we determined the affinity of the interactions of the receptor with IgA and IgM, which led to novel insights including the important finding that IgM polymers can bind to human Fcα/μR in the absence of J chain. This is in contrast to the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR), which requires the presence of J chain to bind to polymeric IgA and IgM. The dissociation constants (K(d)) of all of the different human IgA isotypes and allotypes for human Fcα/μR were determined, and we show that the N-linked glycans on IgA1 are not required for binding to the receptor. In addition, we demonstrate that IgA can be rapidly internalized by human Fcα/μR in the presence of cross-linking antibody.

  4. A cleavable signal peptide enhances cell surface delivery and heterodimerization of Cerulean-tagged angiotensin II AT1 and bradykinin B2 receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Quitterer, Ursula; Pohl, Armin; Langer, Andreas; Koller, Samuel; AbdAlla, Said

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} A new FRET-based method detects AT1/B2 receptor heterodimerization. {yields} First time application of AT1-Cerulean as a FRET donor. {yields} Method relies on signal peptide-enhanced cell surface delivery of AT1-Cerulean. {yields} A high FRET efficiency revealed efficient heterodimerization of AT1/B2R proteins. {yields} AT1/B2R heterodimers were functionally coupled to desensitization mechanisms. -- Abstract: Heterodimerization of the angiotensin II AT1 receptor with the receptor for the vasodepressor bradykinin, B2R, is known to sensitize the AT1-stimulated response of hypertensive individuals in vivo. To analyze features of that prototypic receptor heterodimer in vitro, we established a new method that uses fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and applies for the first time AT1-Cerulean as a FRET donor. The Cerulean variant of the green fluorescent protein as donor fluorophore was fused to the C-terminus of AT1, and the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) as acceptor fluorophore was fused to B2R. In contrast to AT1-EGFP, the AT1-Cerulean fusion protein was retained intracellularly. To facilitate cell surface delivery of AT1-Cerulean, a cleavable signal sequence was fused to the receptor's amino terminus. The plasma membrane-localized AT1-Cerulean resembled the native AT1 receptor regarding ligand binding and receptor activation. A high FRET efficiency of 24.7% between membrane-localized AT1-Cerulean and B2R-EYFP was observed with intact, non-stimulated cells. Confocal FRET microscopy further revealed that the AT1/B2 receptor heterodimer was functionally coupled to receptor desensitization mechanisms because activation of the AT1-Cerulean/B2R-EYFP heterodimer with a single agonist triggered the co-internalization of AT1/B2R. Receptor co-internalization was sensitive to inhibition of G protein-coupled receptor kinases, GRKs, as evidenced by a GRK-specific peptide inhibitor. In agreement with efficient AT1/B2R heterodimerization

  5. Cell surface lactate receptor GPR81 is crucial for cancer cell survival.

    PubMed

    Roland, Christina L; Arumugam, Thiruvengadam; Deng, Defeng; Liu, Shi He; Philip, Bincy; Gomez, Sobeyda; Burns, William R; Ramachandran, Vijaya; Wang, Huamin; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Logsdon, Craig D

    2014-09-15

    The mechanisms that allow cancer cells to adapt to the typical tumor microenvironment of low oxygen and glucose and high lactate are not well understood. GPR81 is a lactate receptor recently identified in adipose and muscle cells that has not been investigated in cancer. In the current study, we examined GPR81 expression and function in cancer cells. We found that GPR81 was present in colon, breast, lung, hepatocellular, salivary gland, cervical, and pancreatic carcinoma cell lines. Examination of tumors resected from patients with pancreatic cancer indicated that 94% (148 of 158) expressed high levels of GPR81. Functionally, we observed that the reduction of GPR81 levels using shRNA-mediated silencing had little effect on pancreatic cancer cells cultured in high glucose, but led to the rapid death of cancer cells cultured in conditions of low glucose supplemented with lactate. We also observed that lactate addition to culture media induced the expression of genes involved in lactate metabolism, including monocarboxylase transporters in control, but not in GPR81-silenced cells. In vivo, GPR81 expression levels correlated with the rate of pancreatic cancer tumor growth and metastasis. Cells in which GPR81 was silenced showed a dramatic decrease in growth and metastasis. Implantation of cancer cells in vivo was also observed to lead to greatly elevated levels of GPR81. These data support that GPR81 is important for cancer cell regulation of lactate transport mechanisms. Furthermore, lactate transport is important for the survival of cancer cells in the tumor microenvironment. Cancer Res; 74(18); 5301-10. ©2014 AACR.

  6. Cell surface lactate receptor GPR81 is crucial for cancer cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Roland, Christina L.; Arumugam, Thiruvengadam; Deng, Defeng; Liu, Shi He; Philip, Bincy; Gomez, Sobeyda; Burns, William R.; Ramachandran, Vijaya; Wang, Huamin; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Logsdon, Craig D.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms which allow cancer cells to adapt to the typical tumor microenvironment of low oxygen and glucose and high lactate are not well understood. GPR81 is a lactate receptor recently identified in adipose and muscle cells that has not been investigated in cancer. In the current study, we examined GPR81 expression and function in cancer cells. We found that GPR81 was present in colon, breast, lung, hepatocellular, salivary gland, cervical and pancreatic carcinoma cell lines. Examination of tumors resected from pancreatic cancer patients indicated that 94% (148/158) expressed high levels of GPR81. Functionally, we observed that the reduction of GPR81 levels using shRNA mediated silencing had little effect on pancreatic cancer cells cultured in high glucose, but led to the rapid death of cancer cells cultured in conditions of low glucose supplemented with lactate. We also observed that lactate addition to culture media induced the expression of genes involved in lactate metabolism including monocarboxylase transporters in control, but not in GPR81 silenced cells. In vivo, GPR81 expression levels correlated with the rate of pancreatic cancer tumor growth and metastasis. Cells in which GPR81 was silenced showed a dramatic decrease in growth and metastasis. Implantation of cancer cells in vivo was also observed to lead to greatly elevate levels of GPR81. These data support that GPR81 is important for cancer cell regulation of lactate transport mechanisms. Furthermore, lactate transport is important for the survival of cancer cells in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24928781

  7. Two step formation of metal aggregates by surface X-ray radiolysis under Langmuir monolayers: 2D followed by 3D growth

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Smita; Fauré, Marie-Claude; Goldmann, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Summary In order to form a nanostructured metallic layer below a Langmuir monolayer, radiolysis synthesis was carried out in an adapted geometry that we call surface X-ray radiolysis. In this procedure, an X-ray beam produced by a synchrotron beamline intercepts the surface of an aqueous metal-ion solution covered by a Langmuir monolayer at an angle of incidence below the critical angle for total internal reflection. Underneath the organic layer, the X-ray beam induces the radiolytic synthesis of a nanostructured metal–organic layer whose ultrathin thickness is defined by the vertical X-ray penetration depth. We have shown that increasing the X-ray flux on the surface, which considerably enhances the kinetics of the silver layer formation, results in a second growth regime of silver nanocrystals. Here the formation of the oriented thin layer is followed by the appearance of a 3D powder of silver clusters. PMID:26734531

  8. Time resolved study of three ruthenium(II) complexes at micellar surfaces: A new long excited state lifetime probe for determining critical micelle concentration of surfactant nano-aggregates.

    PubMed

    Patra, Digambara; Chaaban, Ahmad H; Darwish, Shaza; Saad, Huda A; Nehme, Ali S; Ghaddar, Tarek H

    2016-02-01

    Three different ruthenium complexes have been synthesized and their luminescence properties in different solvent environments are reported. Luminescence intensities and excited state lifetimes of Ru-I, Ru-II and Ru-III vary with solvent viscosity. The excited state lifetime of Ru-I linearly increases in the viscosity range 1.76-12,100cP. Ru-II shows two linear increases: one in the low and another in the high viscosity ranges, whereas Ru-III illustrates a linear enhancement only in the low viscosity range. Interestingly, luminescence intensities and excited state lifetimes of Ru-I, Ru-II and Ru-III are found to be sensitive to nano-aggregation. However, the surfactant head charge and that of the ruthenium center as well as the hydrophobic tail of the ancillary ligand of the complexes have a great role in deciding the nature of the interaction and on the excited state properties at micellar surfaces. It is proposed that the long lifetime of Ru-III in water could be due to the coiling of the carbon chain of the ancillary ligand around the ruthenium center. At micelle surface, this coiling of the carbon chain is lost due to the parallel alignment with surfactants and thus quenching of the excited state lifetime is seen. Furthermore, it is shown that the variation of the excited state lifetime with respect to the change in surfactant concentration is a result of the formation of micelles from the surfactant monomer, thus, a novel technique for the determination of the critical micelle concentration (cmc) based on the long excited state lifetime of Ru-III located at the micellar nano-aggregates is reported.

  9. A Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR)-based, simple, receptor-free and regeneratable Hg(2+) detection system.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Ho; Byun, Ju-Young; Yim, Sang-Youp; Kim, Min-Gon

    2016-04-15

    A simple, receptor-free and regeneratable Hg(2+) sensor, which utilizes localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) shifts of a gold nanorod (GNR), has been developed. Precipitation induced by coordination of Hg(2+) to citrate alters the local refractive index (RI) around the GNR surface on glass slide, promoting a red-shift in its LSPR absorption peak. This phenomenon is used to design a sensor that enables quantitative detection of Hg(2+) in the 1nM to 1mM concentration range with good linearity (0.9507 correlation coefficient) and limit of detection (LOD) is reached to 0.38nM. A high selectivity of this sensor for Hg(2+) is demonstrated by the specific LSPR red-shift of 27.67nm promoted by Hg(2+) in comparison to those caused by other metal ions. In addition, the reusability of the new sensor chip is shown by its successful reuse eight-times following successive washing/precipitation steps. Lastly, the sensor displays excellent recoveries in spiking test with real water samples, such as tap water, lake and river. The simple combination of precipitation of Hg(2+)-citrate complex and the LSPR red-shift has led to the design of a novel sensing strategy for Hg(2+) detection. PMID:26780697

  10. Detection of surface asialoglycoprotein receptor expression in hepatic and extra-hepatic cells using a novel monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Kil Lyong; Cho, Eun-Wie

    2006-07-01

    The asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) is a heterodimeric membrane protein which is involved in the internalization of desialylated glycoproteins and also in the binding and uptake of various pathogenic viruses. To facilitate the analysis of ASGPR expression, we generated a monoclonal antibody, termed ASSA-1, that is specific to the ASGPR H1 subunit based on ELISA and Western blots analysis. ASSA-1 also reacted to surface-displayed ASGPR in live cells thus enabling analysis of ASGPR expression by immunofluorescence flow cytometry, which we used to analyze established human liver cell lines previously confirmed to be positive for ASGPR mRNA expression. In agreement with previous reports, surface ASGPR was also detected in extra-hepatic cells and, surprisingly, even in human T cell lines, which was then further confirmed in activated, but not in resting, primary human peripheral blood lymphocytes. These observations suggest that ASGPR has a broad pattern of expression that even extends into cells from the immune system, which biological meanings still have to be analyzed. We expect that monoclonal antibody ASSA-1 will serve as a new powerful tool in analyzing the biological role of ASGPR in hepatic and extra-hepatic cells.

  11. Interactions between the two surface proteins of rotavirus may alter the receptor-binding specificity of the virus.

    PubMed Central

    Méndez, E; Arias, C F; López, S

    1996-01-01

    The infection of target cells by most animal rotavirus strains requires the presence of sialic acids (SAs) on the cell surface. We recently isolated variants from simian rotavirus RRV whose infectivity is no longer dependent on SAs and showed that the mutant phenotype segregates with the gene coding for VP4, one of the two surface proteins of rotaviruses (the other one being VP7). The nucleotide sequence of the VP4 gene of four independently isolated variants showed three amino acid changes, at positions 37 (Leu to Pro), 187 (Lys to Arg), and 267 (Tyr to Cys), in all mutant VP4 proteins compared with RRV VP4. The characterization of revertant viruses from two independent mutants showed that the arginine residue at position 187 changed back to lysine, indicating that this amino acid is involved in the determination of the mutant phenotype. Surprisingly, sequence analysis of reassortant virus DS1XRRV, which depends on SAs to infect the cell, showed that its VP4 gene is identical to the VP4 gene of the variants. Since the only difference between DS1XRRV and the RRV variants is the parental origin of the VP7 gene (human rotavirus DS1 in the reassortant), these findings suggest that the receptor-binding specificity of rotaviruses, via VP4, may be influenced by the associated VP7 protein. PMID:8551583

  12. Interplay of model ingredients affecting aggregate shape plasticity in diffusion-limited aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte-Neto, P.; Stošić, T.; Stošić, B.; Lessa, R.; Milošević, M. V.

    2014-07-01

    We analyze the combined effect of three ingredients of an aggregation model—surface tension, particle flow and particle source—representing typical characteristics of many aggregation growth processes in nature. Through extensive numerical experiments and for different underlying lattice structures we demonstrate that the location of incoming particles and their preferential direction of flow can significantly affect the resulting general shape of the aggregate, while the surface tension controls the surface roughness. Combining all three ingredients increases the aggregate shape plasticity, yielding a wider spectrum of shapes as compared to earlier works that analyzed these ingredients separately. Our results indicate that the considered combination of effects is fundamental for mod