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Sample records for surface solar irradiance

  1. Open Surface Solar Irradiance Observations - A Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menard, Lionel; Nüst, Daniel; Jirka, Simon; Maso, Joan; Ranchin, Thierry; Wald, Lucien

    2015-04-01

    The newly started project ConnectinGEO funded by the European Commission aims at improving the understanding on which environmental observations are currently available in Europe and subsequently providing an informational basis to close gaps in diverse observation networks. The project complements supporting actions and networking activities with practical challenges to test and improve the procedures and methods for identifying observation data gaps, and to ensure viability in real world scenarios. We present a challenge on future concepts for building a data sharing portal for the solar energy industry as well as the state of the art in the domain. Decision makers and project developers of solar power plants have identified the Surface Solar Irradiance (SSI) and its components as an important factor for their business development. SSI observations are crucial in the process of selecting suitable locations for building new plants. Since in-situ pyranometric stations form a sparse network, the search for locations starts with global satellite data and is followed by the deployment of in-situ sensors in selected areas for at least one year. To form a convincing picture, answers must be sought in the conjunction of these EO systems, and although companies collecting SSI observations are willing to share this information, the means to exchange in-situ measurements across companies and between stakeholders in the market are still missing. We present a solution for interoperable exchange of SSI data comprising in-situ time-series observations as well as sensor descriptions based on practical experiences from other domains. More concretely, we will apply concepts and implementations of the Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) framework of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). The work is based on an existing spatial data infrastructure (SDI), which currently comprises metadata, maps and coverage data, but no in-situ observations yet. This catalogue is already registered in the

  2. Surface solar irradiance from SCIAMACHY measurements: algorithm and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Stammes, P.; Mueller, R.

    2011-05-01

    Broadband surface solar irradiances (SSI) are, for the first time, derived from SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CartograpHY) satellite measurements. The retrieval algorithm, called FRESCO (Fast REtrieval Scheme for Clouds from the Oxygen A band) SSI, is similar to the Heliosat method. In contrast to the standard Heliosat method, the cloud index is replaced by the effective cloud fraction derived from the FRESCO cloud algorithm. The MAGIC (Mesoscale Atmospheric Global Irradiance Code) algorithm is used to calculate clear-sky SSI. The SCIAMACHY SSI product is validated against globally distributed BSRN (Baseline Surface Radiation Network) measurements and compared with ISCCP-FD (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project Flux Dataset) surface shortwave downwelling fluxes (SDF). For one year of data in 2008, the mean difference between the instantaneous SCIAMACHY SSI and the hourly mean BSRN global irradiances is -4 W m-2 (-1 %) with a standard deviation of 101 W m-2 (20 %). The mean difference between the globally monthly mean SCIAMACHY SSI and ISCCP-FD SDF is less than -12 W m-2 (-2 %) for every month in 2006 and the standard deviation is 62 W m-2 (12 %). The correlation coefficient is 0.93 between SCIAMACHY SSI and BSRN global irradiances and is greater than 0.96 between SCIAMACHY SSI and ISCCP-FD SDF. The evaluation results suggest that the SCIAMACHY SSI product achieves similar mean bias error and root mean square error as the surface solar irradiances derived from polar orbiting satellites with higher spatial resolution.

  3. Surface solar irradiance from SCIAMACHY measurements: algorithm and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Stammes, P.; Mueller, R.

    2011-02-01

    Broadband surface solar irradiances (SSI) are, for the first time, derived from SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CartograpHY) satellite measurements. The retrieval algorithm, called FRESCO (Fast REtrieval Scheme for Clouds from Oxygen A band) SSI, is similar to the Heliosat method. In contrast to the standard Heliosat method, the cloud index is replaced by the effective cloud fraction derived from the FRESCO cloud algorithm. The MAGIC (Mesoscale Atmospheric Global Irradiance Code) algorithm is used to calculate clear-sky SSI. The SCIAMACHY SSI product is validated against the globally distributed BSRN (Baseline Surface Radiation Network) measurements and compared with the ISCCP-FD (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project Flux Dataset) surface shortwave downwelling fluxes (SDF). For one year of data in 2008, the mean difference between the instantaneous SCIAMACHY SSI and the hourly mean BSRN global irradiances is -4 W m-2(-1%) with a standard deviation of 101 W m-2 (20%). The mean difference between the globally monthly mean SCIAMACHY SSI and ISCCP-FD SDF is less than -12 W m-2 (-2%) for every month in 2006 and the standard deviation is 62 W m-2 (12%). The correlation coefficient is 0.93 between SCIAMACHY SSI and BSRN global irradiances and is greater than 0.96 between SCIAMACHY SSI and ISCCP-FD SDF. The evaluation results suggest that the SCIAMACHY SSI product achieves similar mean bias error and root mean square error as the surface solar irradiances derived from polar orbiting satellites with higher spatial resolution.

  4. Solar UV irradiation conditions on the surface of Mars.

    PubMed

    Rontó, Györgyi; Bérces, Attila; Lammer, Helmut; Cockell, Charles S; Molina-Cuberos, Gregorio J; Patel, Manish R; Selsis, Franck

    2003-01-01

    The UV radiation environment on planetary surfaces and within atmospheres is of importance in a wide range of scientific disciplines. Solar UV radiation is a driving force of chemical and organic evolution and serves also as a constraint in biological evolution. In this work we modeled the transmission of present and early solar UV radiation from 200 to 400 nm through the present-day and early (3.5 Gyr ago) Martian atmosphere for a variety of possible cases, including dust loading, observed and modeled O3 concentrations. The UV stress on microorganisms and/or molecules essential for life was estimated by using DNA damaging effects (specifically bacteriophage T7 killing and uracil dimerization) for various irradiation conditions on the present and ancient Martian surface. Our study suggests that the UV irradiance on the early Martian surface 3.5 Gyr ago may have been comparable with that of present-day Earth, and though the current Martian UV environment is still quite severe from a biological viewpoint, we show that substantial protection can still be afforded under dust and ice.

  5. A technique for global monitoring of net solar irradiance at the ocean surface. I - Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frouin, Robert; Chertock, Beth

    1992-01-01

    An accurate long-term (84-month) climatology of net surface solar irradiance over the global oceans from Nimbus-7 earth radiation budget (ERB) wide-field-of-view planetary-albedo data is generated via an algorithm based on radiative transfer theory. Net surface solar irradiance is computed as the difference between the top-of-atmosphere incident solar irradiance (known) and the sum of the solar irradiance reflected back to space by the earth-atmosphere system (observed) and the solar irradiance absorbed by atmospheric constituents (modeled). It is shown that the effects of clouds and clear-atmosphere constituents can be decoupled on a monthly time scale, which makes it possible to directly apply the algorithm with monthly averages of ERB planetary-albedo data. Compared theoretically with the algorithm of Gautier et al. (1980), the present algorithm yields higher solar irradiance values in clear and thin cloud conditions and lower values in thick cloud conditions.

  6. Numerical modeling of solar irradiance on earth's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mera, E.; Gutierez, L.; Da Silva, L.; Miranda, E.

    2016-05-01

    Modeling studies and estimation of solar radiation in base area, touch from the problems of estimating equation of time, distance equation solar space, solar declination, calculation of surface irradiance, considering that there are a lot of studies you reported the inability of these theoretical equations to be accurate estimates of radiation, many authors have proceeded to make corrections through calibrations with Pyranometers field (solarimeters) or the use of satellites, this being very poor technique last because there a differentiation between radiation and radiant kinetic effects. Because of the above and considering that there is a weather station properly calibrated ground in the Susques Salar in the Jujuy Province, Republic of Argentina, proceeded to make the following modeling of the variable in question, it proceeded to perform the following process: 1. Theoretical Modeling, 2. graphic study of the theoretical and actual data, 3. Adjust primary calibration data through data segmentation on an hourly basis, through horizontal and adding asymptotic constant, 4. Analysis of scatter plot and contrast series. Based on the above steps, the modeling data obtained: Step One: Theoretical data were generated, Step Two: The theoretical data moved 5 hours, Step Three: an asymptote of all negative emissivity values applied, Solve Excel algorithm was applied to least squares minimization between actual and modeled values, obtaining new values of asymptotes with the corresponding theoretical reformulation of data. Add a constant value by month, over time range set (4:00 pm to 6:00 pm). Step Four: The modeling equation coefficients had monthly correlation between actual and theoretical data ranging from 0.7 to 0.9.

  7. Global surface solar irradiance product derived from SCIAMACHY FRESCO cloud fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Stammes, Piet; Müller, Richard

    The FRESCO cloud retrieval algorithm has been developed as a simple but fast and efficient algorithm for GOME and SCIAMACHY (Koelemeijer et al., 2001; Fournier et al., 2006; Wang et al., 2008). FRESCO employs the O2 A band at 760 nm to retrieve the effective cloud fraction and cloud pressure using a simple Lambertian cloud model. The effective cloud fraction is a combination of geometric cloud fraction and cloud optical thickness, which yield the same reflectance at the top of the atmosphere as the cloud in the scene. It is well-known that clouds reduce the surface solar irradiance. Therefore the all-sky irradiance can be derived from the clear-sky irradiance with a scaling factor related to the cloud index. The cloud index is very similar to the effective cloud fraction by definition. The MAGIC (Mesoscale Atmospheric Global Irradiance Code) software converts the cloud index to the surface solar irradiance using the Heliosat method (Mueller et al. 2009). The MAGIC algorithm is also used by the CM-SAF surface solar irradiance product for clear sky cases. We applied the MAGIC software to FRESCO effective cloud fraction with slight modifications. In this presentation we will show the FRESCO-SSI monthly mean product and the comparison with the BSRN global irradiance data at Cabauw, the Netherlands and surface solar irradiance measurement at Tibetan plateau in China.

  8. A technique for global monitoring of net solar irradiance at the ocean surface. II - Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chertock, Beth; Frouin, Robert; Gautier, Catherine

    1992-01-01

    The generation and validation of the first satellite-based long-term record of surface solar irradiance over the global oceans are addressed. The record is generated using Nimbus-7 earth radiation budget (ERB) wide-field-of-view plentary-albedo data as input to a numerical algorithm designed and implemented based on radiative transfer theory. The mean monthly values of net surface solar irradiance are computed on a 9-deg latitude-longitude spatial grid for November 1978-October 1985. The new data set is validated in comparisons with short-term, regional, high-resolution, satellite-based records. The ERB-based values of net surface solar irradiance are compared with corresponding values based on radiance measurements taken by the Visible-Infrared Spin Scan Radiometer aboard GOES series satellites. Errors in the new data set are estimated to lie between 10 and 20 W/sq m on monthly time scales.

  9. A new method for assessing surface solar irradiance: Heliosat-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Z.; Oumbe, A.; Blanc, P.; Lefèvre, M.; Wald, L.; Schroedter-Homscheidt, M.; Gesell, G.

    2012-04-01

    Downwelling shortwave irradiance at surface (SSI) is more and more often assessed by means of satellite-derived estimates of optical properties of the atmosphere. Performances are judged satisfactory for the time being but there is an increasing need for the assessment of the direct and diffuse components of the SSI. MINES ParisTech and the German Aerospace Center (DLR) are currently developing the Heliosat-4 method to assess the SSI and its components in a more accurate way than current practices. This method is composed by two parts: a clear sky module based on the radiative transfer model libRadtran, and a cloud-ground module using two-stream and delta-Eddington approximations for clouds and a database of ground albedo. Advanced products derived from geostationary satellites and recent Earth Observation missions are the inputs of the Heliosat-4 method. Such products are: cloud optical depth, cloud phase, cloud type and cloud coverage from APOLLO of DLR, aerosol optical depth, aerosol type, water vapor in clear-sky, ozone from MACC products (FP7), and ground albedo from MODIS of NASA. In this communication, we briefly present Heliosat-4 and focus on its performances. The results of Heliosat-4 for the period 2004-2010 will be compared to the measurements made in five stations within the Baseline Surface Radiation Network. Extensive statistic analysis as well as case studies are performed in order to better understand Heliosat-4 and have an in-depth view of the performance of Heliosat-4, to understand its advantages comparing to existing methods and to identify its defaults for future improvements. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under Grant Agreement no. 218793 (MACC project) and no. 283576 (MACC-II project).

  10. Simulation Study of Effects of Solar Irradiance and Sea Surface Temperature on Monsoons and Global Circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.; Mehta, V.; Lau, W. K.-M.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A recent version of the GEOS 2 GCM was used to isolate the roles of the annual cycles of solar irradiation and/or sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) on the simulated circulation and rainfall. Four 4-year long integrations were generated with the GCM. The first integration, called Control Case, used daily-interpolated SSTs from a 30 year monthly SST climatology that was obtained from the analyzed SST-data, while the solar irradiation at the top of the atmosphere was calculated normally at hourly intervals. The next two cases prescribed the SSTs or the incoming solar irradiance at the top of the atmosphere at their annual mean values, respectively while everything else was kept the same as in the Control Case. In this way the influence of the annual cycles of both external forcings was isolated.

  11. Measurements of solar ultraviolet irradiance with respect to the human body surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stick, Carsten; Harms, Volker; Pielke, Liane

    1994-07-01

    Solar UV irradiance is measured in Westerland, Germany (54.9 degree(s) N, 8.3 degree(s) E) in the immediate vicinity of the North Sea shoreline. Measurements have been done since July 1993, focussing on the biologically effective UV radiation and the human body geometry. A grid double monochromator radiometer (DM 150, Bentham Instruments Comp., Reading, England) is used to measure the spectral resolution of 1 nm. Weighting the spectral irradiance by the action spectrum for the erythema is more appropriate for determining the biological effectiveness than simply dividing the UV radiation into the UV-A and UV-B wavebands. The erythemal irradiance shows a close relation to the sun angle during the course of a day. The exposure times, calculated from the irradiance and the minimal erythemal doses, suggest that people might underestimate the risk of getting sunburnt before noon. Diffuse radiation scattered from the sky contribute about 70% of the erythemal irradiance at a 45 degree(s) sun angle. A receiver oriented directly to the sun, i.e. 45 degree(s) inclined, receives an additional 30% of the erythemal irradiance measured by a horizontally adjusted cosine response sensor. The relative irradiance of curved surfaces like the skin is determined by UV- B-sensitive paper placed around a cylinder. This device detected UV radiation reflected by the sea, which hardly is measured by horizontally adjusted receivers.

  12. Solar Irradiance Changes And Photobiological Effects At Earth's Surface Following Astrophysical Ionizing Radiation Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Brian; Neale, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth for decades. Although there is some direct biological damage on the surface from redistributed radiation several studies have indicated that the greatest long term threat is from ozone depletion and subsequent heightened solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. It is known that organisms exposed to this irradiation experience harmful effects such as sunburn and even direct damage to DNA, proteins, or other cellular structures. Simulations of the atmospheric effects of a variety of events (such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events) have been previously published, along with estimates of biological damage at Earth's surface. In the present work, we employed a radiative transfer model to expand and improve calculations of surface-level irradiance and biological impacts following an ionizing radiation event. We considered changes in surface-level UVB, UVA, and photosynthetically active radiation (visible light). Using biological weighting functions we have considered a wide range of effects, including: erythema and skin cancer in humans; inhibition of photosynthesis in the diatom Phaeodactylum sp. and dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans inhibition of carbon fixation in Antarctic phytoplankton; inhibition of growth of oat (Avena sativa L. cv. Otana) seedlings; and cataracts. We found that past work overestimated UVB irradiance, but that relative estimates for increase in exposure to DNA damaging radiation are still similar to our improved calculations. We also found that the intensity of biologically damaging radiation varies widely with organism and specific impact considered; these results have implications for biosphere-level damage following astrophysical ionizing radiation events. When considering changes in surface-level visible light irradiance, we found that, contrary to previous assumptions, a decrease in irradiance is only present for a short time in

  13. Solar total irradiance variations and the global sea surface temperature record

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, G.C. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder )

    1991-02-20

    The record of globally averaged sea surface temperature (SST) over the past 130 years shows a highly significant correlation with the envelope of the 11-year cycle of solar activity over the same period. This correlation could be explained by a variation in the sun's total irradiance (the solar constant) that is in phase with the solar-cycle envelope, supporting and updating an earlier conclusion by Eddy (1976) that such variations could have played a major role in climate change over the past millennium. Measurements of the total irradiance from spacecraft, rockets, and balloons over the past 25 years have provided evidence of long-term variations and have been used to develop a simple linear relationship between irradiance and the envelope of the sunspot cycle. This relationship has been used to force a one-dimensional model of the thermal structure of the ocean, consisting of a 100-m mixed layer coupled to a deep ocean and including a thermohaline circulation. The model was started in the mid-seventeenth century, at the time of the Maunder Minimum of solar activity, and mixed-layer temperatures were calculated at 6-month intervals up to the present. The total range of irradiance values during the period was about 1%, and the total range of SST was about 1C. Cool periods, when temperatures were about 0.5C below present-day values, were found in the early decades of both the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The results can be taken as indicating that solar variability has been an important contributor to global climate variations in recent decades. The growing atmospheric burden of greenhouse gases may well have played an important role in the immediate past.

  14. Dependence of Lunar Surface Charging on Solar Wind Plasma Conditions and Solar Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stubbs, T. J.; Farrell, W. M.; Halekas, J. S.; Burchill, J. K.; Collier, M. R.; Zimmerman, M. I.; Vondrak, R. R.; Delory, G. T.; Pfaff, R. F.

    2014-01-01

    The surface of the Moon is electrically charged by exposure to solar radiation on its dayside, as well as by the continuous flux of charged particles from the various plasma environments that surround it. An electric potential develops between the lunar surface and ambient plasma, which manifests itself in a near-surface plasma sheath with a scale height of order the Debye length. This study investigates surface charging on the lunar dayside and near-terminator regions in the solar wind, for which the dominant current sources are usually from the pohotoemission of electrons, J(sub p), and the collection of plasma electrons J(sub e) and ions J(sub i). These currents are dependent on the following six parameters: plasma concentration n(sub 0), electron temperature T(sub e), ion temperature T(sub i), bulk flow velocity V, photoemission current at normal incidence J(sub P0), and photo electron temperature T(sub p). Using a numerical model, derived from a set of eleven basic assumptions, the influence of these six parameters on surface charging - characterized by the equilibrium surface potential, Debye length, and surface electric field - is investigated as a function of solar zenith angle. Overall, T(sub e) is the most important parameter, especially near the terminator, while J(sub P0) and T(sub p) dominate over most of the dayside.

  15. Solar irradiance changes and photobiological effects at earth's surface following astrophysical ionizing radiation events.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Brian C; Neale, Patrick J; Snyder, Brock R

    2015-03-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth, primarily through depletion of stratospheric ozone and subsequent increase in surface-level solar ultraviolet radiation. Simulations of the atmospheric effects of a variety of events (such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events) have been previously published, along with estimates of biological damage at Earth's surface. In this work, we employed the Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible (TUV) radiative transfer model to expand and improve calculations of surface-level irradiance and biological impacts following an ionizing radiation event. We considered changes in surface-level UVB, UVA, and photosynthetically active radiation (visible light) for clear-sky conditions and fixed aerosol parameter values. We also considered a wide range of biological effects on organisms ranging from humans to phytoplankton. We found that past work overestimated UVB irradiance but that relative estimates for increase in exposure to DNA-damaging radiation are still similar to our improved calculations. We also found that the intensity of biologically damaging radiation varies widely with organism and specific impact considered; these results have implications for biosphere-level damage following astrophysical ionizing radiation events. When considering changes in surface-level visible light irradiance, we found that, contrary to previous assumptions, a decrease in irradiance is only present for a short time in very limited geographical areas; instead we found a net increase for most of the modeled time-space region. This result has implications for proposed climate changes associated with ionizing radiation events.

  16. The Variability of Solar Spectral Irradiance and Solar Surface Indices Through the Solar Activity Cycles 21-23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deniz Goker, Umit

    2016-07-01

    A study of variations of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) in the wavelength ranges 121.5 nm-300.5 nm for the period 1981-2009 is presented. We used various data for ultraviolet (UV) spectral lines and international sunspot number (ISSN) from interactive data centers as SME (NSSDC), UARS (GDAAC), SORCE (LISIRD) and SIDC, respectively. We developed a special software for extracting the data and reduced this data by using the MATLAB. In this respect, we revealed negative correlations of intensities of UV (289.5 nm-300.5 nm) emission lines originating in the solar chromosphere with the ISSN index during the unusually prolonged minimum between the solar cycles (SCs) 23 and 24. We also compared our results with the ground-based telescopes as Solar Irradiance Platform, Stanford Data (SFO), Kodaikanal Data (KKL) and NGDC Homepage (Rome and Learmonth Solar Observatories). We studied the variations of total solar irradiance (TSI), magnetic field, sunspots/sunspot groups, Ca II K-flux, faculae and plage areas data with these ground-based telescopes, respectively. We reduced the selected data using the Phyton programming language and plot with the IDL programme. Therefore, we found that there was a decrease in the area of bright faculae and chromospheric plages while the percentage of dark faculae and plage decrease, as well. However, these decreases mainly occurred in small sunspots, contrary to this, these terms in large sunspot groups were comparable to previous SCs or even larger. Nevertheless, negative correlations between ISSN and SSI data indicate that these emissions are in close connection with the classes of sunspots/sunspot groups and "PLAGE" regions. Finally, we applied the time series of the chemical elements correspond to the wavelengths 121.5 nm-300.5 nm and compared with the ISSN data. We found an unexpected increasing in the 298.5 nm for the Fe II element. The variability of Fe II (298.5 nm) is in close connection with the plage regions and the sizes of the

  17. Do modelled or satellite-based estimates of surface solar irradiance accurately describe its temporal variability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengulescu, Marc; Blanc, Philippe; Boilley, Alexandre; Wald, Lucien

    2017-02-01

    This study investigates the characteristic time-scales of variability found in long-term time-series of daily means of estimates of surface solar irradiance (SSI). The study is performed at various levels to better understand the causes of variability in the SSI. First, the variability of the solar irradiance at the top of the atmosphere is scrutinized. Then, estimates of the SSI in cloud-free conditions as provided by the McClear model are dealt with, in order to reveal the influence of the clear atmosphere (aerosols, water vapour, etc.). Lastly, the role of clouds on variability is inferred by the analysis of in-situ measurements. A description of how the atmosphere affects SSI variability is thus obtained on a time-scale basis. The analysis is also performed with estimates of the SSI provided by the satellite-derived HelioClim-3 database and by two numerical weather re-analyses: ERA-Interim and MERRA2. It is found that HelioClim-3 estimates render an accurate picture of the variability found in ground measurements, not only globally, but also with respect to individual characteristic time-scales. On the contrary, the variability found in re-analyses correlates poorly with all scales of ground measurements variability.

  18. Midwestern streamflow, precipitation, and atmospheric vorticity influenced by Pacific sea-surface temperatures and total solar-irradiance variations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, C.A.

    2006-01-01

    A solar effect on streamflow in the Midwestern United States is described and supported in a six-step physical connection between total solar irradiance (TSI), tropical sea-surface temperatures (SSTs), extratropical SSTs, jet-stream vorticity, surface-layer vorticity, precipitation, and streamflow. Variations in the correlations among the individual steps indicate that the solar/hydroclimatic mechanism is complex and has a time element (lag) that may not be constant. Correct phasing, supported by consistent spectral peaks between 0.092 and 0.096 cycles per year in all data sets within the mechanism is strong evidence for its existence. A significant correlation exists between total solar irradiance and the 3-year moving average of annual streamflow for Iowa (R = 0.67) and for the Mississippi River at St Louis, Missouri (R = 0.60), during the period 1950-2000. Published in 2005 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Impact of differences in the solar irradiance spectrum on surface reflectance retrieval with different radiative transfer codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staenz, K.; Williams, D. J.; Fedosejevs, G.; Teillet, P. M.

    1995-01-01

    Surface reflectance retrieval from imaging spectrometer data as acquired with the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) has become important for quantitative analysis. In order to calculate surface reflectance from remotely measured radiance, radiative transfer codes such as 5S and MODTRAN2 play an increasing role for removal of scattering and absorption effects of the atmosphere. Accurate knowledge of the exo-atmospheric solar irradiance (E(sub 0)) spectrum at the spectral resolution of the sensor is important for this purpose. The present study investigates the impact of differences in the solar irradiance function, as implemented in a modified version of 5S (M5S), 6S, and MODTRAN2, and as proposed by Green and Gao, on the surface reflectance retrieved from AVIRIS data. Reflectance measured in situ is used as a basis of comparison.

  20. An assessment of models which use satellite data to estimate solar irradiance at the earth's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raphael, C.; Hay, J. E.

    1984-05-01

    The performances of three models which use satellite data to estimate solar irradiance at the earth's surface are assessed using measured radiation data from a midlatitude location. Assessment of the models is made possible through the accurate earth location of the satellite imagery (to within + or - 2 pixels). Evaluations of the models for a variety of conditions reveal the need for revised coefficients for the Hay and Hanson (1978) model and Tarpley (1979) model and demonstrate the superior performance of the pysically-based Gautier et al. (1980) model on an hourly basis for partly cloudy and overcast conditions. However, compared to the clear-sky case all three models give poor results under partly cloudy and overcast conditions. An increase in the averaging period leads to marked decreases in the rms errors observed for the three models under all conditions, with the greatest improvement occuring for the Hay and Hanson model. Suggestions for improvements include a more accurate and explicit treatment of cloud absorption in all three models and the inclusion of the effects of aerosols under clear skies and the accurate and objective specification of a cloud threshold separating clear from partly cloudy and partly cloudy from overcast conditions in the Gautier et al. and Tarpley models.

  1. Air pollution is pushing wind speed into a regulator of surface solar irradiance in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. W.; Yang, Y. H.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhao, N.; Zhang, J. H.

    2014-05-01

    Analysis in 27 cities across China shows that surface solar irradiance (SSI) and wind speed track similar decadal trends in 1961-2011, suggesting wind speed as a possible regulator of SSI. This assumption is further confirmed by the continuously widening gap in annually averaged daily SSI between windy and windless clear-sky days with worsening air pollution. Wider gaps are noted for more polluted cities and seasons. The gap in SSI between windy and windless conditions could therefore serve as a good indicator for air quality. The regulatory effect of wind speed on SSI starts to be important when air pollution index exceeds the boundary of 125. A plausible mechanism of wind speed regulating SSI through interactions with aerosols is proposed. There are two cut-off points of 2.5 m s-1 and 3.5 m s-1 wind speeds. Winds <2.5 m s-1 noticeably disperse air pollutants and thereby enhance SSI. Above the 2.5 m s-1 threshold, air pollution and SSI become largely insensitive to changing wind speeds. Winds in excess of 3.5 m s-1 could enhance aerosol concentration probably by inducing dust-storms, which in turn attenuate SSI.

  2. A critical evaluation of modeled solar irradiance over California for hydrologic and land surface modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapo, Karl E.; Hinkelman, Laura M.; Sumargo, Edwin; Hughes, Mimi; Lundquist, Jessica D.

    2017-01-01

    Studies of land surface processes in complex terrain often require estimates of meteorological variables, i.e., the incoming solar irradiance (Qsi), to force land surface models. However, estimates of Qsi are rarely evaluated within mountainous environments. We evaluated four methods of estimating Qsi: the CERES Synoptic Radiative Fluxes and Clouds (SYN) product, MTCLIM, a regional reanalysis product derived from a long-term Weather Research and Forecast simulation, and Mountain Microclimate Simulation Model (MTCLIM). These products are evaluated over the Central Valley and Sierra Nevada mountains in California, a region with meteorology strongly impacted by complex topography. We used a spatially dense network of Qsi observations (n = 70) to characterize the spatial characteristics of Qsi uncertainty. Observation sites were grouped into five subregions, and Qsi estimates were evaluated against observations in each subregion. Large monthly biases (up to 80 W m-2) outside the observational uncertainty were found for all estimates in all subregions examined, typically reaching a maximum in the spring. We found that MTCLIM and SYN generally perform the best across all subregions. Differences between Qsi estimates were largest over the Sierra Nevada, with seasonal differences exceeding 50 W m-2. Disagreements in Qsi were especially pronounced when averaging over high-elevation basins, with monthly differences up to 80 W m-2. Biases in estimated Qsi predominantly occurred with darker than normal conditions associated with precipitation (a proxy for cloud cover), while the presence of aerosols and water vapor was unable to explain the biases. Users of Qsi estimates in regions of complex topography, especially those estimating Qsi to force land surface models, need to be aware of this source of uncertainty.

  3. Downward solar global irradiance at the surface in São Paulo city - The climatological effects of aerosol and clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasoe, M. A.; Rosário, N. M. E.; Barros, K. M.

    2017-01-01

    We analyzed the variability of downward solar irradiance reaching the surface at São Paulo city, Brazil, and estimated the climatological aerosol and cloud radiative effects. Eleven years of irradiance were analyzed, from 2005 to 2015. To distinguish the aerosol from the cloud effect, the radiative transfer code LibRadtran was used to calculate downward solar irradiance. Two runs were performed, one considering only ozone and water vapor daily variability, with AOD set to zero and the second allowing the three variables to change, according to mean climatological values. The difference of the 24 h mean irradiance calculated with and without aerosol resulted in the shortwave aerosol direct radiative effect, while the difference between the measured and calculated, including the aerosol, represented the cloud effect. Results showed that, climatologically, clouds can be 4 times more effective than aerosols. The cloud shortwave radiative effect presented a maximum reduction of about -170 W m-2 in January and a minimum in July, of -37 W m-2. The aerosol direct radiative effect was maximum in spring, when the transport of smoke from the Amazon and central parts of South America is frequent toward São Paulo. Around mid-September, the 24 h radiative effect due to aerosol only was estimated to be -50 W m-2. Throughout the rest of the year, the mean aerosol effect was around -20 W m-2 and was attributed to local urban sources. The effect of the cloud fraction on the cloud modification factor, defined as the ratio of all-sky irradiation to cloudless sky irradiation, showed dependence on the cloud height. Low clouds presented the highest impact while the presence of high clouds only almost did not affect solar transmittance, even in overcast conditions.

  4. Modeling of the environmental factors influence on solar irradiance reflectance and transmittance through the wind-ruffled sea surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wozniak, Slawomir B.

    1997-02-01

    The spectral model of solar irradiance transmittance through the wind - ruffled sea surface was developed. Modified dependencies for both wind - ruffled sea surface slope distribution based on Cox and Munk and foam coverage of the sea surface based on Gordon and Jacobs were used, with incorporation of effects of hydrometeorological factors and basin geometry. Snell and Fresnel laws were applied for light transmission through the surface. Spectral dependencies of light refraction in the range 350-18000 nm were taken into account. Polarization effects were neglected. This approach seems to be much more accurate than presented in known monographs, such as Mullamaa. This model is a part of the model of radiation inflow to the Baltic developed by the team from the Institute of Oceanology PAS Sopot.

  5. The Next Spaceflight Solar Irradiance Sensor: TSIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Greg; Pilewskie, Peter; Richard, Erik

    2016-05-01

    The Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) will continue measurements of the solar irradiance with improved accuracies and stabilities over extant spaceflight instruments. The two TSIS solar-observing instruments include the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) and the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) for measuring total- and spectral- solar-irradiance, respectively. The former provides the net energy powering the Earth’s climate system while the latter helps attribute where that energy is absorbed by the Earth’s atmosphere and surface. Both spaceflight instruments are assembled and being prepared for integration on the International Space Station. With operations commencing in late 2017, the TSIS is intended to overlap with NASA’s ongoing SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) mission, which launched in 2003 and contains the first versions of both the TIM and SIM instruments, as well as with the TSI Calibration Transfer Experiment (TCTE), which began total solar irradiance measurements in 2013. We summarize the TSIS’s instrument improvements and intended solar-irradiance measurements.

  6. Assessment of performances of sun zenith angle and altitude parameterisations of atmospheric radiative transfer for spectral surface downwelling solar irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wald, L.; Blanc, Ph.

    2010-09-01

    Satellite-derived assessments of surface downwelling solar irradiance are more and more used by engineering companies in solar energy. Performances are judged satisfactory for the time being. Nevertheless, requests for more accuracy are increasing, in particular in the spectral definition and in the decomposition of the global radiation into direct and diffuse radiations. One approach to reach this goal is to improve both the modelling of the radiative transfer and the quality of the inputs describing the optical state. Within their joint project Heliosat-4, DLR and MINES ParisTech have adopted this approach to create advanced databases of solar irradiance succeeding to the current ones HelioClim and SolEMi. Regarding the model, we have opted for libRadtran, a well-known model of proven quality. As many similar models, running libRadtran is very time-consuming when it comes to process millions or more pixels or grid cells. This is incompatible with real-time operational process. One may adopt the abacus approach, or look-up tables, to overcome the problem. The model is run for a limited number of cases, covering the whole range of values taken by the various inputs of the model. Abaci are such constructed. For each real case, the irradiance value is computed by interpolating within the abaci. In this way, real-time can be envisioned. Nevertheless, the computation of the abaci themselves requires large computing capabilities. In addition, searching the abaci to find the values to interpolate can be time-consuming as the abaci are very large: several millions of values in total. Moreover, it raises the extrapolation problem of parameter out-of-range during the utilisation of the abaci. Parameterisation, when possible, is a means to reduce the amount of computations to be made and subsequently, the computation effort to create the abaci, the size of the abaci, the extrapolation and the searching time. It describes in analytical manner and with a few parameters the

  7. Estimation of atmospheric turbidity and surface radiative parameters using broadband clear sky solar irradiance models in Rio de Janeiro-Brasil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, José L.; Karam, Hugo A.; Marques Filho, Edson P.; Pereira Filho, Augusto J.

    2016-02-01

    The main goal of this paper is to estimate a set of optimal seasonal, daily, and hourly values of atmospheric turbidity and surface radiative parameters Ångström's turbidity coefficient ( β), Ångström's wavelength exponent ( α), aerosol single scattering albedo ( ω o ), forward scatterance ( F c ) and average surface albedo ( ρ g ), using the Brute Force multidimensional minimization method to minimize the difference between measured and simulated solar irradiance components, expressed as cost functions. In order to simulate the components of short-wave solar irradiance (direct, diffuse and global) for clear sky conditions, incidents on a horizontal surface in the Metropolitan Area of Rio de Janeiro (MARJ), Brazil (22° 51' 27″ S, 43° 13' 58″ W), we use two parameterized broadband solar irradiance models, called CPCR2 and Iqbal C, based on synoptic information. The meteorological variables such as precipitable water ( u w ) and ozone concentration ( u o ) required by the broadband solar models were obtained from moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor on Terra and Aqua NASA platforms. For the implementation and validation processes, we use global and diffuse solar irradiance data measured by the radiometric platform of LabMiM, located in the north area of the MARJ. The data were measured between the years 2010 and 2012 at 1-min intervals. The performance of solar irradiance models using optimal parameters was evaluated with several quantitative statistical indicators and a subset of measured solar irradiance data. Some daily results for Ångström's wavelength exponent α were compared with Ångström's parameter (440-870 nm) values obtained by aerosol robotic network (AERONET) for 11 days, showing an acceptable level of agreement. Results for Ångström's turbidity coefficient β, associated with the amount of aerosols in the atmosphere, show a seasonal pattern according with increased precipitation during summer months (December

  8. Development and comparison of HP-41C software to predict solar irradiation of tilted surfaces, based upon cloud cover factors

    SciTech Connect

    Nawrocki, A.D.; Anderson, S.P.

    1982-01-01

    Summarized is a comparison between predicted and measured solar radiation and cloud cover data from NOAA weather stations and Solar Energy Meterological Research and Training Sites at various locations throughout the US, based upon a semiempirical method which was used recently to generate synthetic insolation data for correlation with measured solar performance under the SUEDE program. This method is unique, since it predicts irradiation of a tilted surface from sky cover estimates by weather observers, using a modified ASHRAE method to compute direct and diffuse insolation on a clear day. Data comparisons were made using an HP-41C programmable calculator, card reader, printer, and eight magnetic cards. Although a more detailed study with a larger data base is desirable, these particular findings, using hourly summations to obtain monthly averages in 1980, indicate that approximately -5 to 15% difference between measured and calculated monthly results is typical of continental US sites. A sensitivity study indicated that monthly percentage differences are reduced by centering ASHRAE constants and earth declination on the 15th day of each month instead of the 21st day.

  9. Computing Solar EUV Irradiance Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, H. P.

    2014-12-01

    The solar EUV irradiance plays a central role in determining the state of the Earth's upper atmosphere. The EUV irradiance at the shortest wavelengths, which is highly variable over time scales from seconds to decades, is particularly important for many aspects of space weather. Systematic spectrally resolved observations at the shortest EUV wavelengths, however, have been rare and there is a need to develop a methodology for estimating and forecasting the solar irradiance at all EUV wavelengths from sparse data sets. In this presentation we report on our efforts to use AIA DEM calculations to estimate the solar EUV irradiance at wavelength below 450 Å, where the emission is predominately optically thin. To validate our AIA DEM calculations we have performed extensive comparisons with simultaneous observations from the EVE instrument on SDO and the EIS instrument on Hinode and find that with the proper constraints we can generally reproduce the results obtained with detailed spectroscopic observations. Using a proxy for solar activity derived from photospheric magnetic field measurements we extend our model calculations to previous solar cycles and discuss how the model can be used to forecast EUV irradiance variability over short time scales. Finally, we speculate on what is needed to further develop semi-empirical and physical models for use in understanding the solar spectral irradiance at these wavelengths.

  10. Toward Improved Solar Irradiance Forecasts: Derivation of Downwelling Surface Shortwave Radiation in Arizona from Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Ki; Holmgren, William F.; Stovern, Michael; Betterton, Eric A.

    2016-07-01

    Over the past few decades, substantial progress has been made in the retrieval of surface shortwave radiation from satellite measurements for the Earth's energy budget as well as solar energy applications. We present a new algorithm to derive the downwelling surface shortwave radiation for the Southwestern US using geostationary satellite products. A look-up table generated by the Goddard Space Flight Center Radiative Transfer Model is employed to derive the shortwave radiation at the ground by comparing observed and modeled top of atmosphere shortwave albedo. The algorithm was compared to ground observation stations at three locations, such as the University of Arizona, the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and Desert Rock, NV. For all sky conditions, the average values of root-mean-square error between the instantaneous estimates and in situ measurements ranged from 84.2 to 89.4 W m-2 and were 30 W m-2 when evaluated on daily time scales. The error statistics were considerably better for clear sky than for cloudy sky. The average values of instantaneous root-mean-square error for the clear-sky conditions range from 39.4 to 43.7 W m-2, while average root-mean-square error for the cloudy-sky conditions is between 137.0 and 141.2 W m-2.

  11. Solar irradiance computations compared with observations at the Baseline Surface Radiation Network Payerne site

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, Daniela; Vuilleumier, Laurent; Long, Charles N.; Ohmura, Atsumu

    2008-07-18

    Radiative transfer model calculations of solar fluxes during cloud free periods often show considerable discrepancies with surface radiation observations. Many efforts have been undertaken to explain the differences between modeled and observed shortwave downward radiation (SDR). In this study, MODTRAN4v3r1TM (designed later simply as MODTRANTM) was used for model simulations and compared with high quality radiation observations of the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) site at Payerne, Switzerland. Results are presented for cloud free shortwave downward radiation calculations. The median differences of modeled minus observed global SDR are small (< 1%) and within the instrumental error. The differences of modeled and observed direct and diffuse SDR show larger discrepancies of -1.8% and 5.2% respectively. The diffuse SDR is generally overestimated by the model and more important, the model to observation linear regression slope and zero-intercept differs significantly from their ideal values of 1 and 0. Possible reasons for the discrepancies are presented and discussed and some modifications are investigated for decreasing such differences between modeled and observed diffuse SDR. However, we could not resolve all the discrepancies. The best agreement is obtained when comparing model simulations whose 550nm aerosol optical depth input is inferred from observations using nine spectral channels, and using BSRN observations performed with a new and more precise shading disk and sun tracker system. In this case, the median bias between model simulations and observed diffuse SDR is -0.4 Wm-2 (< 1%).

  12. Modeling Solar Lyman Alpha Irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, J.; Hudson, H. S.; Rottman, G. J.; Willson, R. C.; Donnelly, R. F.; London, J.

    1990-01-01

    Solar Lyman alpha irradiance is estimated from various solar indices using linear regression analyses. Models developed with multiple linear regression analysis, including daily values and 81-day running means of solar indices, predict reasonably well both the short- and long-term variations observed in Lyman alpha. It is shown that the full disk equivalent width of the He line at 1083 nm offers the best proxy for Lyman alpha, and that the total irradiance corrected for sunspot effect also has a high correlation with Lyman alpha.

  13. Electron irradiation of modern solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Miyahira, T. F.

    1977-01-01

    A number of modern solar cell types representing 1976 technology (as well as some older types) were irradiated with 1 MeV electrons (and a limited number with 2 MeV electrons and 10 MeV protons). After irradiation, the cells were annealed, with I-V curves measured under AMO at 30 C. The purpose was to provide data to be incorporated in the revision of the solar cell radiation handbook. Cell resistivities ranged from 2 to 20 ohm-cm, and cell thickness from 0.05 to 0.46 mm. Cell types examined were conventional, shallow junction, back surface field (BSF), textured, and textured with BSF.

  14. Analysis of the total solar irradiance composite and their contribution to global mean air surface temperature rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, N.

    2008-12-01

    Herein I discuss and propose updated satellite composites of the total solar irradiance covering the period 1978-2008. The composites are compiled from measurements made with the three ACRIM experiments. Measurements from the NIMBUS7/ERB, the ERBS/ERBE satellite experiments and a total solar irradiance proxy reconstruction are used to fill the gap from June 1989 to October 1991 between ACRIM1 and ACRIM2 experiments. The result of the analysis does suggests that the total solar irradiance did increase from 1980 to 2002. The climate implications of the alternative satellite composites are discussed by using a phenomenological climate model which depends on two characteristics time response at tau1 =0.4 year and tau2=8-12 years, as determined phenomenologically [Scafetta, JGR 2008]. Reconstructions of total solar irradiance signature on climate during the last four centuries are discussed. The solar variability appears to have significantly contributed to climate change during the last four centuries, including the last century. Indirectly, the model suggests that the preindustrial climate experienced a large variability which is incompatible with an Hockey Stick temperature graph.

  15. Comparison of ocean surface solar irradiance in the GLA General Circulation Model and satellite-based calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Chertock, B. ); Sud, Y.C. )

    1993-03-01

    A global, 7-year satellite-based record of ocean surface solar irradiance (SSI) is used to assess the realism of ocean SSI simulated by the nine-layer Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA) General Circulation Model (GCM). January and July climatologies of net SSI produced by the model are compared with corresponding satellite climatologies for the world oceans between 54[degrees]N and 54[degrees]S. This comparison of climatologies indicates areas of strengths and weaknesses in the GCM treatment of cloud-radiation interactions, the major source of model uncertainty. Realism of ocean SSI is also important for applications such as incorporating the GLA GCM into a coupled ocean-atmosphere GCM. The results show that the GLA GCM simulates too much SSI in the extratropics and too little in the tropics, especially in the summer hemisphere. These discrepancies reach magnitudes of 60 W m[sup [minus]2] and more. The discrepancies are particularly large in the July case off the western coast of North America. In this region of persistent marine stratus, the GCM climatological values exceed the satellite climatological values by as much as 131 W m[sup [minus]2]. Positive and negative discrepancies in SSI are shown to be consistent with discrepancies in planetary albedo.

  16. Comparison of ocean surface solar irradiance in the GLA General Circulation Model and satellite-based calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chertock, Beth; Sud, Y. C.

    1993-01-01

    A global, 7-year satellite-based record of ocean surface solar irradiance (SSI) is used to assess the realism of ocean SSI simulated by the nine-layer Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres (GLA) General Circulation Model (GCM). January and July climatologies of net SSI produced by the model are compared with corresponding satellite climatologies for the world oceans between 54 deg N and 54 deg S. This comparison of climatologies indicates areas of strengths and weaknesses in the GCM treatment of cloud-radiation interactions, the major source of model uncertainty. Realism of ocean SSI is also important for applications such as incorporating the GLA GCM into a coupled ocean-atmosphere GCM. The results show that the GLA GCM simulates too much SSI in the extratropics and too little in the tropics, especially in the summer hemisphere. These discrepancies reach magnitudes of 60 W/sq m and more. The discrepancies are particularly large in the July case off the western coast of North America. Positive and negative discrepancies in SSI are shown to be consistent with discrepancies in planetary albedo.

  17. Solar Activity and the Sea-surface Temperature Record-evidence of a Long-period Variation in Solar Total Irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, George C.

    1990-01-01

    There have been many suggestions over the years of a connection between solar activity and the Earth's climate on time scales long compared to the 11-year sunspot cycle. They have remained little more than suggestions largely because of the major uncertainties in the climate record itself, and the difficulty in trying to compile a global average from an assembly of measurements that are uneven in both quality and distribution. Different climate time response to solar activity, some suggesting a positive correlation, some a negative correlation, and some no correlation at all. The only excuse for making yet another such suggestion is that much effort has been devoted in recent years to compiling climate records for the past century or more that are internally consistent and believable, and that a decadal-scale record of solar total irradiance is emerging from spacecraft measurements, and can be used to set limits on the variation that is likely to have occurred on these time scales. The work described here was originally inspired by the observation that the time series of globally averaged sea-surface temperatures over the past 120 years or so, as compiled by the British Meteorological Office group (Folland and Kates, 1984), bore a resonable similarity to the long-term average sunspot number, which is an indicator of the secular variability of solar activity. The two time series are shown where the sunspot number is shown as the 135-month running mean, and the SST variation is shown as the departure from an arbitrary average value. The simplest explanation of the similarity, if one accepts it as other than coincidental, is that the sun's luminosity may have been varying more or less in step with the level of solar activity, or in other words that there is a close coupling between the sun's magnetic condition and its radiative output on time scales longer than the 11-year cycle. Such an idea is not new, and in fact the time series shown can be regarded as a modern

  18. Evaporation and Solar Irradiance as Regulators of Sea Surface Temparature in Annual and Interrannual Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy

    1994-01-01

    After numerical studies showed that global climate is sensitive to small changes in sea surface temperature (Ts), considerabel effort has been devoted to examine the role of surface fluxes in changing upper ocean heat balance and Ts, particularly in the tropical Pacific where interannual signals, such as El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO), have major economic and ecological impacts.

  19. Surface segregation during irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rehn, L.E.; Lam, N.Q.

    1985-10-01

    Gibbsian adsorption is known to alter the surface composition of many alloys. During irradiation, four additional processes that affect the near-surface alloy composition become operative: preferential sputtering, displacement mixing, radiation-enhanced diffusion and radiation-induced segregation. Because of the mutual competition of these five processes, near-surface compositional changes in an irradiation environment can be extremely complex. Although ion-beam induced surface compositional changes were noted as long as fifty years ago, it is only during the past several years that individual mechanisms have been clearly identified. In this paper, a simple physical description of each of the processes is given, and selected examples of recent important progress are discussed. With the notable exception of preferential sputtering, it is shown that a reasonable qualitative understanding of the relative contributions from the individual processes under various irradiation conditions has been attained. However, considerably more effort will be required before a quantitative, predictive capability can be achieved. 29 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Simple solar spectral model for direct and diffuse irradiance on horizontal and tilted planes at the earth's surface for cloudless atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, R.; Riordan, C.

    1984-12-01

    A new, simple model for calculating clear-sky direct and diffuse spectral irradiance on horizontal and tilted surfaces is presented. The model is based on previously reported simple algorithms and on comparisons with rigorous radiative transfer calculations and limited outdoor measurements. Equations for direct normal irradiance are outlined; and include: Raleigh scattering; aerosol scattering and absorption; water vapor absorption; and ozone and uniformly mixed gas absorption. Inputs to the model include solar zenith angle, collector tilt angle, atmospheric turbidity, amount of ozone and precipitable water vapor, surface pressure, and ground albedo. The model calculates terrestrial spectra from 0.3 to 4.0 ..mu..m with approximately 10 nm resolution. A major goal of this work is to provide researchers with the capability to calculate spectral irradiance for different atmospheric conditions and different collector geometries using microcomputers. A listing of the computer program is provided.

  1. Surface Disinfection Enabled by a Layer-by-Layer Thin Film of Polyelectrolyte-Stabilized Reduced Graphene Oxide upon Solar Near-Infrared Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hui, Liwei; Auletta, Jeffrey T; Huang, Zhiyu; Chen, Xiang; Xia, Fei; Yang, Shangfeng; Liu, Haitao; Yang, Lihua

    2015-05-20

    We report an antibacterial surface that kills airborne bacteria on contact upon minutes of solar near-infrared (NIR) irradiation. This antibacterial surface employs reduced graphene oxide (rGO), a well-known near-infrared photothermal conversion agent, as the photosensitizer and is prepared by assembling oppositely charged polyelectrolyte-stabilized rGO sheets (PEL-rGO) on a quartz substrate with the layer-by-layer (LBL) technique. Upon solar irradiation, the resulting PEL-rGO LBL multilayer efficiently generates rapid localized heating and, within minutes, kills >90% airborne bacteria, including antibiotic-tolerant persisters, on contact, likely by permeabilizing their cellular membranes. The observed activity is retained even when the PEL-rGO LBL multilayer is placed underneath a piece of 3 mm thick pork tissue, indicating that solar light in the near-infrared region plays dominant roles in the observed activity. This work may pave the way toward NIR-light-activated antibacterial surfaces, and our PEL-rGO LBL multilayer may be a novel surface coating material for conveniently disinfecting biomedical implants and common objects touched by people in daily life in the looming postantibiotic era with only minutes of solar exposure.

  2. Variability of solar ultraviolet irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, J. M.; Donnelly, R. F.; Hudson, H. S.; Rottman, G. J.; Willson, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    A model of solar Lyman alpha irradiance developed by multiple linear regression analysis, including the daily values and 81-day running means of the full disk equivalent width of the Helium line at 1083 nm, predicts reasonably well both the short- and long-term variations observed in Lyman alpha. In contrast, Lyman alpha models calculated from the 10.7-cm radio flux overestimate the observed variations in the rising portion and maximum period of solar cycle, and underestimates them during solar minimum. Models are shown of Lyman alpha based on the He-line equivalent width and 10.7-cm radio flux for those time intervals when no satellite observations exist, namely back to 1974 and after April 1989, when the measurements of the Solar Mesosphere Satellite were terminated.

  3. Future Satellite Observations of Solar Irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, R. F.; Rottman, G.; Woods, T.; Lawrence, G.; Harder, J.; McClintock, W.; Kopp, G.

    2003-01-01

    Required solar irradiance measurements for climate studies include those now being made by the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) and the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) onboard the SORCE satellite, part of the Earth Observing System fleet of NASA satellites. Equivalent or better measures of Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) and Spectral Solar Irradiance (SSI, 200 to 2000 nm) are planned for the post-2010 satellites of the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System ("OESS). The design life of SORCE is 5 years, so a "Solar Irradiance Gap Filler" EOS mission is being planned for launch in the 2007 time frame, to include the same TSI and SSI measurements. Besides avoiding any gap, overlap of the data sources is also necessary for determination of possible multi-decadal trends in solar irradiance. We discuss these requirements and the impacts of data gaps, and data overlaps, that may occur in the monitoring of the critical solar radiative forcing.

  4. Solar variability in irradiance and oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Jeff R.

    1995-01-01

    The signature of the solar cycle appears in helioseismic frequencies and splittings. It is known that the changing outer superadiabatic region of the sun is responsible for this. The deeper solar-cycle mechanism from the surface changes, and, in particular, how magnetic fields perturb the global modes, the solar irradiance and the luminosity, is discussed. The irradiance and helioseismic changes are described. The interpretation of seismic and photometric data is discussed, considering current one-dimensional models and phenomenology. It is discussed how the long term solar-cycle luminosity effect could be caused by changes occurring near the base of the convection zone (CZ). It is shown that a thin toroidal flux sheath at the top of the radiative zone changed the thermal stratification immediately below the CZ over a solar-cycle timescale in two ways: the temperature of the magnetized fluid becomes hotter than the surrounding fluid, and the temperature gradient steepens above the magnetized region. The testing of CZ dynamics and extension of numerical experiments to global scales are considered.

  5. Historical Variations in Solar UV Irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLand, M. T.

    2011-12-01

    Satellite measurements of solar UV variability have been made by at least fifteen different instruments since 1978. While it is difficult to keep a single UV irradiance instrument operating throughout a complete solar cycle, many of these instruments (Nimbus-7 SBUV, SME, NOAA-9 SBUV/2, NOAA-11 SBUV/2, UARS SUSIM, UARS SOLSTICE) were able to observe both maximum and minimum irradiance levels during either rising or declining phases of solar activity. Comparisons of these published results for solar cycles 21, 22, and 23 show consistent solar cycle irradiance changes at key wavelengths for terrestrial effects (e.g. 205 nm, 240 nm) within instrumental uncertainties. All historical data sets also show the same relative spectral dependence in the ultraviolet for both short-term (rotational) and long-term (solar cycle) variations. Empirical solar irradiance models that employ multiple proxy data sets to represent spectral irradiance produce long-term solar UV variations that are in good agreement with merged observational data through 2005. Recent UV irradiance data from the SORCE mission covering the declining phase of Cycle 23 present a different picture of long-term solar variations, with significantly larger temporal changes and different spectral dependence. We present comparisons of the SORCE irradiance data with previous solar UV observations and current model predictions. Scaling factors for use with solar UV proxy indexes have been derived from SORCE SIM and SORCE SOLSTICE data during 2004-2005. These scale factors, based on short-term irradiance variations, agree very well with results derived from concurrent NOAA-17 SBUV/2 and UARS SUSIM measurements. The 2004-2005 scale factors are consistent with previously derived scale factors that produce calculated long-term irradiance changes in good agreement with observations. The SORCE long-term solar UV irradiance results, corresponding to the early part of the mission, are consistent with undercorrection of

  6. Improving HelioClim-3 estimates of surface solar irradiance using the McClear clear-sky model and recent advances in atmosphere composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Z.; Gschwind, B.; Lefevre, M.; Wald, L.

    2014-11-01

    The HelioClim-3 database (HC3v3) provides records of surface solar irradiation every 15 min, estimated by processing images from the geostationary meteorological Meteosat satellites using climatological data sets of the atmospheric Linke turbidity factor. This technical note proposes a method to improve a posteriori HC3v3 by combining it with data records of the irradiation under clear skies from the new McClear clear-sky model, whose inputs are the advanced global aerosol property forecasts and physically consistent total column content in water vapour and ozone produced by the MACC (Monitoring Atmosphere Composition and Climate) projects. The method is validated by comparison with a series of ground measurements for 15 min and 1 h for 6 stations and for daily irradiation for 23 stations. The correlation coefficient is large, greater than respectively 0.92, 0.94, and 0.97, for 15 min, 1 h and daily irradiation. The bias ranges from -4 to 4% of the mean observed irradiation for most sites. The relative root mean square difference (RMSD) varies between 14 and 38% for 15 min, 12 and 33% for 1 h irradiation, and 6 and 20% for daily irradiation. As a rule of thumb, the farther from the nadir of the Meteosat satellite located at latitude 0° and longitude 0°, and the greater the occurrence of fragmented cloud cover, the greater the relative RMSD. The method improves HC3v3 in most cases, and with no degradation in the others. A systematic correction of HC3v3 with McClear is recommended.

  7. Toward Improved Solar Irradiance Forecasts: Comparison of Downwelling Surface Shortwave Radiation in Arizona Derived from Satellite with the Gridded Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Ki; Holmgren, William F.; Stovern, Michael; Betterton, Eric A.

    2016-08-01

    The downwelling surface shortwave radiation derived from geostationary satellite imagery was compared with the available datasets for the Southwestern United States. The averaged root mean square errors for our instantaneous estimates ranged from 95.0 to 122.7 W m-2, which is lower than those derived from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) products were used to compare the hourly mean solar insolation. The three hourly mean downwelling surface shortwave radiation was evaluated by comparing the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) and the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) products. Our estimates show the better performance than MERRA, NARR and CERES datasets because of coarse resolution that limits determining the solar dimming due to small clouds.

  8. Magnitudes and timescales of total solar irradiance variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Greg

    2016-07-01

    The Sun's net radiative output varies on timescales of minutes to gigayears. Direct measurements of the total solar irradiance (TSI) show changes in the spatially- and spectrally-integrated radiant energy on timescales as short as minutes to as long as a solar cycle. Variations of ~0.01% over a few minutes are caused by the ever-present superposition of convection and oscillations with very large solar flares on rare occasion causing slightly-larger measurable signals. On timescales of days to weeks, changing photospheric magnetic activity affects solar brightness at the ~0.1% level. The 11-year solar cycle shows variations of comparable magnitude with irradiances peaking near solar maximum. Secular variations are more difficult to discern, being limited by instrument stability and the relatively short duration of the space-borne record. Historical reconstructions of the Sun's irradiance based on indicators of solar-surface magnetic activity, such as sunspots, faculae, and cosmogenic isotope records, suggest solar brightness changes over decades to millennia, although the magnitudes of these variations have high uncertainties due to the indirect historical records on which they rely. Stellar evolution affects yet longer timescales and is responsible for the greatest solar variabilities. In this manuscript I summarize the Sun's variability magnitudes over different temporal regimes and discuss the irradiance record's relevance for solar and climate studies as well as for detections of exo-solar planets transiting Sun-like stars.

  9. Computation of glint, glare, and solar irradiance distribution

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Khalsa, Siri Sahib Singh

    2015-08-11

    Described herein are technologies pertaining to computing the solar irradiance distribution on a surface of a receiver in a concentrating solar power system or glint/glare emitted from a reflective entity. At least one camera captures images of the Sun and the entity of interest, wherein the images have pluralities of pixels having respective pluralities of intensity values. Based upon the intensity values of the pixels in the respective images, the solar irradiance distribution on the surface of the entity or glint/glare corresponding to the entity is computed.

  10. Solar irradiance measurements - Minimum through maximum solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. B., III; Gibson, M. A.; Shivakumar, N.; Wilson, R.; Kyle, H. L.; Mecherikunnel, A. T.

    1991-01-01

    The Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and the NOAA-9 spacecraft solar monitors were used to measure the total solar irradiance during the period October 1984 to December 1989. Decreasing trends in the irradiance measurements were observed as sunspot activity decreased to minimum levels in 1986; after 1986, increasing trends were observed as sunspot activity increased. The magnitude of the irradiance variability was found to be approximately 0.1 percent between sunspot minimum and maximum (late 1989). When compared with the 1984 to 1989 indices of solar magnetic activity, the irradiance trends appear to be in phase with the 11-year sunspot cycle. Both irradiance series yielded 1,365/sq Wm as the mean value of the solar irradiance, normalized to the mean earth/sun distance. The monitors are electrical substitution, active-cavity radiometers with estimated measurement precisions and accuracies of less than 0.02 and 0.2 percent, respectively.

  11. UV solar irradiance low during recent solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-10-01

    Solar irradiance, which varies with the 11-year solar cycle and on longer time scales, can affect temperatures and winds in the atmosphere, influencing Earth's climate. As the Sun currently wakes up from a period of low sunspot activity, researchers want to know how irradiance during the recent solar minimum compares to historical levels. In addition to understanding the total received power, it is important to know how various spectral bands behave, in particular, the ultraviolet, which causes heating and winds in the stratosphere. Lockwood analyzed solar ultraviolet spectral irradiance data from May 2003 to August 2005 from both the Solar Ultraviolet Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SUSIM) instrument on board the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) and the Solar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) instrument on the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) satellite. Using several different methods to intercalibrate the data, he developed a data composite that can be used to determine differences between the recent solar minimum and previous minima. The author found that solar irradiance during the recent sunspot minimum has been especially low. (Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, doi:10.1029/2010JD014746, 2011)

  12. Evidence for Trends, and Lack Thereof, in Surface Solar Irradiance as Seen in Calibration-error-free Records of Cloud Shortwave Transmission for the Past Three Decades at Five Globally Diverse Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutton, E. G.

    2004-05-01

    Prior to the mid 1970's there did not exist a method of making observations of solar irradiance to an absolute accuracy better than a few percent. Until the mid 1980s, even that low level of accuracy was only achievable through extraordinary effort because commercial pyranometers are known to drift in sensitivity by up to several percent per year under some conditions. To maintain a stable measurement it is necessary to physically relate routine field measurements to international reference standards using transfer standards. Prior to the early 1980s many of these transfer standards were of less than desirable stability, especially in some countries, and while at the same time international reference standards were just undergoing development. Since the early 1990's considerable effort has gone into maintaining the absolute accuracy of ground-based solar irradiance observations. A brief review of this documented history will be presented for background along with the long-term variability in a number of surface irradiance records. To further analyze long-term observational records extending back into the period of dubious calibration pedigree, rationing or differencing methods are often utilized where the parameter of interest is the short term change in radiation, often over diurnal cycles or between periods of clear and cloudy skies. These short term changes can be expressed in percent or as the ratio of the irradiance and hence only the linearity and zero of the irradiance sensor are required to be known and not sensor's correspondence to an absolute irradiance scale. In this manner, conditions that contribute to affecting the amount of solar irradiance reaching the ground can be monitored over the long term. Using this general differencing procedure, we have examined the long-term changes in clear sky and cloudy sky irradiance relative to closely associated reference irradiances thereby having a tool to continuously monitor the solar transmission of clouds or

  13. Temporal solar irradiance variability analysis using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tebabal, Ambelu; Damtie, Baylie; Nigussie, Melessew

    A feed-forward neural network which can account for nonlinear relationship was used to model total solar irradiance (TSI). A single layer feed-forward neural network with Levenberg-marquardt back-propagation algorithm have been implemented for modeling daily total solar irradiance from daily photometric sunspot index, and core-to-wing ratio of Mg II index data. In order to obtain the optimum neural network for TSI modeling, the root mean square error (RMSE) and mean absolute error (MAE) have been taken into account. The modeled and measured TSI have the correlation coefficient of about R=0.97. The neural networks (NNs) model output indicates that reconstructed TSI from solar proxies (photometric sunspot index and Mg II) can explain 94% of the variance of TSI. This modeled TSI using NNs further strengthens the view that surface magnetism indeed plays a dominant role in modulating solar irradiance.

  14. A Solar Irradiance Climate Data Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coddington, O.; Lean, J. L.; Pilewskie, P.; Snow, M.; Lindholm, D.

    2016-08-01

    We present a new climate data record for total solar irradiance and solar spectral irradiance between 1610 and the present day with associated wavelength and time-dependent uncertainties and quarterly updates. The data record, which is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Climate Data Record (CDR) program, provides a robust, sustainable, and scientifically defensible record of solar irradiance that is of sufficient length, consistency, and continuity for use in studies of climate variability and climate change on multiple time scales and for user groups spanning climate modeling, remote sensing, and natural resource and renewable energy industries. The data record, jointly developed by the University of Colorado’s Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), is constructed from solar irradiance models that determine the changes with respect to quiet sun conditions when facular brightening and sunspot darkening features are present on the solar disk where the magnitude of the changes in irradiance are determined from the linear regression of a proxy magnesium (Mg) II index and sunspot area indices against the approximately decade-long solar irradiance measurements of the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE). To promote long-term data usage and sharing for a broad range of users, the source code, the dataset itself, and supporting documentation are archived at NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). In the future, the dataset will also be available through the LASP Interactive Solar Irradiance Data Center (LISIRD) for user-specified time periods and spectral ranges of interest.

  15. Principal Component Analysis of Arctic Solar Irradiance Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabbette, Maura; Pilewskie, Peter; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    During the FIRE (First ISCPP Regional Experiment) Arctic Cloud Experiment and coincident SHEBA (Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean) campaign, detailed moderate resolution solar spectral measurements were made to study the radiative energy budget of the coupled Arctic Ocean - Atmosphere system. The NASA Ames Solar Spectral Flux Radiometers (SSFRs) were deployed on the NASA ER-2 and at the SHEBA ice camp. Using the SSFRs we acquired continuous solar spectral irradiance (380-2200 nm) throughout the atmospheric column. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to characterize the several tens of thousands of retrieved SSFR spectra and to determine the number of independent pieces of information that exist in the visible to near-infrared solar irradiance spectra. It was found in both the upwelling and downwelling cases that almost 100% of the spectral information (irradiance retrieved from 1820 wavelength channels) was contained in the first six extracted principal components. The majority of the variability in the Arctic downwelling solar irradiance spectra was explained by a few fundamental components including infrared absorption, scattering, water vapor and ozone. PCA analysis of the SSFR upwelling Arctic irradiance spectra successfully separated surface ice and snow reflection from overlying cloud into distinct components.

  16. The LASP Interactive Solar IRradiance Datacenter (LISIRD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, M.; Woods, T. N.; Eparvier, F. G.; Fontenla, J.; Harder, J.; McClintock, W. E.; Pankratz, C.; Richard, E.; Windnagel, A.; Woodraska, D.

    2005-12-01

    LASP has created an online resource for combined solar irradiance datasets from the SORCE, TIMED, UARS, and SME missions. The LASP Interactive Solar IRradiance Datacenter (LISIRD) not only provides unified access to the individual datasets, but also combines them for ease of use by scientists, educators, and the general public. In particular, LISIRD makes available composite spectra and time series. The TIMED SEE, SORCE SOLSTICE, and SORCE SIM instruments produce spectra that together cover the solar spectrum from 1 to 2700 nm. Through the LISIRD interface, the user can get data that bridges the various missions in both wavelength and time. LISIRD also hosts data products of interest to the space weather community. They have slightly different needs than the atmospheric modelers that are the typical users of irradiance data. For space weather applications, high time cadence and near real-time data delivery are key. For these users, we make our observations available shortly after spacecraft contact, and append the observations to a single data file which they can retrieve using anonymous ftp every few hours. The third component of LISIRD is the Solar Physical Radiation Model (SPRM) results of Fontenla et al. It provides a model of current solar activity, the synthetic spectral irradiance, and tools that permit one to model the solar activity source of the spectral irradiance variations.

  17. Fracture surfaces of irradiated composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milkovich, Scott M.; Sykes, George F., Jr.; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1987-01-01

    Electron microscopy was used to analyze the fracture surfaces of T300/934 graphite/epoxy unidirectional off-axis tensile coupons which were subjected to 1.0-MeV electron radiation at a rate of 50 Mrad/h for a total dose of 10 Grad. Fracture surfaces from irradiated and nonirradiated specimens tested at 116 K, room temperature, and 394 K were analyzed to assess the influence of radiation and temperature on the mode of failure and variations in constituent material as a function of environmental exposure. Micrographs of fracture surfaces indicate that irradiated specimens are more brittle than nonirradiated specimens at low temperatures. However, at elevated temperatures the irradiated specimens exhibit significantly more plasticity than nonirradiated specimens.

  18. Models of Solar Irradiance Variability and the Instrumental Temperature Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcus, S. L.; Ghil, M.; Ide, K.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of decade-to-century (Dec-Cen) variations in total solar irradiance (TSI) on global mean surface temperature Ts during the pre-Pinatubo instrumental era (1854-1991) are studied by using two different proxies for TSI and a simplified version of the IPCC climate model.

  19. Nanostructured Solar Irradiation Control Materials for Solar Energy Conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Jinho; Marshall, I. A.; Torrico, M. N.; Taylor, C. R.; Ely, Jeffry; Henderson, Angel Z.; Kim, J.-W.; Sauti, G.; Gibbons, L. J.; Park, C.; Lowther, S. E.; Lillehei, P. T.; Bryant, R. G.

    2012-01-01

    Tailoring the solar absorptivity (alpha(sub s)) and thermal emissivity (epsilon(sub T)) of materials constitutes an innovative approach to solar energy control and energy conversion. Numerous ceramic and metallic materials are currently available for solar absorbance/thermal emittance control. However, conventional metal oxides and dielectric/metal/dielectric multi-coatings have limited utility due to residual shear stresses resulting from the different coefficient of thermal expansion of the layered materials. This research presents an alternate approach based on nanoparticle-filled polymers to afford mechanically durable solar-absorptive and thermally-emissive polymer nanocomposites. The alpha(sub s) and epsilon(sub T) were measured with various nano inclusions, such as carbon nanophase particles (CNPs), at different concentrations. Research has shown that adding only 5 wt% CNPs increased the alpha(sub s) and epsilon(sub T) by a factor of about 47 and 2, respectively, compared to the pristine polymer. The effect of solar irradiation control of the nanocomposite on solar energy conversion was studied. The solar irradiation control coatings increased the power generation of solar thermoelectric cells by more than 380% compared to that of a control power cell without solar irradiation control coatings.

  20. Solar Rotational Modulations of Spectral Irradiance and Correlations with the Variability of Total Solar Irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jae N.; Cahalan, Robert F.; Wu, Dong L.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: We characterize the solar rotational modulations of spectral solar irradiance (SSI) and compare them with the corresponding changes of total solar irradiance (TSI). Solar rotational modulations of TSI and SSI at wavelengths between 120 and 1600 nm are identified over one hundred Carrington rotational cycles during 2003-2013. Methods: The SORCE (Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment) and TIMED (Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics)/SEE (Solar EUV Experiment) measured and SATIRE-S modeled solar irradiances are analyzed using the EEMD (Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition) method to determine the phase and amplitude of 27-day solar rotational variation in TSI and SSI. Results: The mode decomposition clearly identifies 27-day solar rotational variations in SSI between 120 and 1600 nm, and there is a robust wavelength dependence in the phase of the rotational mode relative to that of TSI. The rotational modes of visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) are in phase with the mode of TSI, but the phase of the rotational mode of ultraviolet (UV) exhibits differences from that of TSI. While it is questionable that the VIS to NIR portion of the solar spectrum has yet been observed with sufficient accuracy and precision to determine the 11-year solar cycle variations, the temporal variations over one hundred cycles of 27-day solar rotation, independent of the two solar cycles in which they are embedded, show distinct solar rotational modulations at each wavelength.

  1. Solar rotational modulations of spectral irradiance and correlations with the variability of total solar irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae N.; Cahalan, Robert F.; Wu, Dong L.

    2016-09-01

    Aims: We characterize the solar rotational modulations of spectral solar irradiance (SSI) and compare them with the corresponding changes of total solar irradiance (TSI). Solar rotational modulations of TSI and SSI at wavelengths between 120 and 1600 nm are identified over one hundred Carrington rotational cycles during 2003-2013. Methods: The SORCE (Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment) and TIMED (Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics)/SEE (Solar EUV Experiment) measured and SATIRE-S modeled solar irradiances are analyzed using the EEMD (Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition) method to determine the phase and amplitude of 27-day solar rotational variation in TSI and SSI. Results: The mode decomposition clearly identifies 27-day solar rotational variations in SSI between 120 and 1600 nm, and there is a robust wavelength dependence in the phase of the rotational mode relative to that of TSI. The rotational modes of visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) are in phase with the mode of TSI, but the phase of the rotational mode of ultraviolet (UV) exhibits differences from that of TSI. While it is questionable that the VIS to NIR portion of the solar spectrum has yet been observed with sufficient accuracy and precision to determine the 11-year solar cycle variations, the temporal variations over one hundred cycles of 27-day solar rotation, independent of the two solar cycles in which they are embedded, show distinct solar rotational modulations at each wavelength.

  2. Ionospheric Change and Solar EUV Irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojka, J. J.; David, M.; Jensen, J. B.; Schunk, R. W.

    2011-12-01

    The ionosphere has been quantitatively monitored for the past six solar cycles. The past few years of observations are showing trends that differ from the prior cycles! Our good statistical relationships between the solar radio flux index at 10.7 cm, the solar EUV Irradiance, and the ionospheric F-layer peak density are showing indications of divergence! Present day discussion of the Sun-Earth entering a Dalton Minimum would suggest change is occurring in the Sun, as the driver, followed by the Earth, as the receptor. The dayside ionosphere is driven by the solar EUV Irradiance. But different components of this spectrum affect the ionospheric layers differently. For a first time the continuous high cadence EUV spectra from the SDO EVE instrument enable ionospheric scientists the opportunity to evaluate solar EUV variability as a driver of ionospheric variability. A definitive understanding of which spectral components are responsible for the E- and F-layers of the ionosphere will enable assessments of how over 50 years of ionospheric observations, the solar EUV Irradiance has changed. If indeed the evidence suggesting the Sun-Earth system is entering a Dalton Minimum periods is correct, then the comprehensive EVE solar EUV Irradiance data base combined with the ongoing ionospheric data bases will provide a most fortuitous fiduciary reference baseline for Sun-Earth dependencies. Using the EVE EUV Irradiances, a physics based ionospheric model (TDIM), and 50 plus years of ionospheric observation from Wallops Island (Virginia) the above Sun-Earth ionospheric relationship will be reported on.

  3. The Total Solar Irradiance Climate Data Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewitte, Steven; Nevens, Stijn

    2016-10-01

    We present the composite measurements of total solar irradiance (TSI) as measured by an ensemble of space instruments. The measurements of the individual instruments are put on a common absolute scale, and their quality is assessed by intercomparison. The composite time series is the average of all available measurements. From 1984 April to the present the TSI shows a variation in phase with the 11 yr solar cycle and no significant changes of the quiet-Sun level in between the three covered solar minima.

  4. Studies of Solar EUV Irradiance from SOHO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Floyd, Linton

    2002-01-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance central and first order channel time series (COC and FOC) from the Solar EUV Monitor aboard the Solar and Heliospheric observatory (SOHO) issued in early 2002 covering the time period 1/1/96-31/1201 were analyzed in terms of other solar measurements and indices. A significant solar proton effect in the first order irradiance was found and characterized. When this effect is removed, the two irradiance time series are almost perfectly correlated. Earlier studies have shown good correlation between the FOC and the Hall core-to-wing ratio and likewise, it was the strongest component of the COC. Analysis of the FOC showed dependence on the F10.7 radio flux. Analysis of the CDC signals showed additional dependences on F10.7 and the GOES x-ray fluxes. The SEM FOC was also well correlated with thein 30.4 nm channel of the SOHO EUV Imaging Telescope (EIT). The irradiance derived from all four EIT channels (30.4 nm, 17.1 nm, 28.4 nm, and 19.5 nm) showed better correlation with MgII than F10.7.

  5. A discussion of plausible solar irradiance variations, 1700-1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, Douglas V.; Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1993-01-01

    From satellite observations the solar total irradiance is known to vary. Sunspot blocking, facular emission, and network emission are three identified causes for the variations. In this paper we examine several different solar indices measured over the past century that are potential proxy measures for the Sun's irradiance. These indices are (1) the equatorial solar rotation rate, (2) the sunspot structure, the decay rate of individual sunspots, and the number of sunspots without umbrae, and (3) the length and decay rate of the sunspot cycle. Each index can be used to develop a model for the Sun's total irradiance as seen at the Earth. Three solar indices allow the irradiance to be modeled back to the mid-1700s. The indices are (1) the length of the solar cycle, (2) the normalized decay rate of the solar cycle, and (3) the mean level of solar activity. All the indices are well correlated, and one possible explanation for their nearly simultaneous variations is changes in the Sun's convective energy transport. Although changes in the Sun's convective energy transport are outside the realm of normal stellar structure theory (e.g., mixing length theory), one can imagine variations arising from even the simplest view of sunspots as vertical tubes of magnetic flux, which would serve as rigid pillas affecting the energy flow patterns by ensuring larger-scale eddies. A composite solar irradiance model, based upon these proxies, is compared to the northern hemisphere temperature depatures for 1700-1992. Approximately 71% of the decadal variance in the last century can be modeled with these solar indices, although this analysis does not include anthropogenic or other variations which would affect the results. Over the entire three centuries, approx. 50% of the variance is modeled. Both this analysis and previous similar analyses have correlations of model solar irradiances and measured Earth surface temperatures that are significant at better than the 95% confidence level

  6. Solar absorption surface panel

    DOEpatents

    Santala, Teuvo J.

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  7. Solar EUV and UV spectral irradiances and solar indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floyd, Linton; Newmark, Jeff; Cook, John; Herring, Lynn; McMullin, Don

    2005-01-01

    Several experiments have measured solar EUV/UV flux in the last 10 15 years including SUSIM UARS, SOHO CELIAS SEM, and SOHO EIT and have generated multi-year spectral irradiance time series. Empirical models of these important sources of radiant energy are often based on solar activity proxies, most often, the solar 10.7 cm radio flux (F10.7). The short- and long-term correspondence of four solar activity index time series International Sunspot Number, the He 1083 Equivalent Width, F10.7, and the Mg II core-to-wing ratio are analyzed. All of these show well-correlated long-term behavior with F10.7 and Mg II showing the greatest long-term agreement among all of the index pairs. However, during the recent maximum period of solar cycle 23, both the ISN and He 1083 have diverged significantly from the others. Recent UV and EUV measurements are compared with Mg II and F10.7 to assess their value as solar activity proxies. In every case, Mg II was found to correlate more strongly than F10.7 with the UV and EUV time series which correspond to a range of solar atmospheric temperatures of 4000K 2 MK. This correspondence indicates that the mechanisms underlying irradiances changes from upper photospheric chromospheric, transition region, and lower coronal solar atmospheric layers are closely linked.

  8. Study of the MLB parameterisation for change in surface solar irradiance with sun zenith angle in clear sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Z.; Blanc, P.; Lefèvre, M.; Wald, L.; Oumbe, A.

    2011-08-01

    The MLB parameterisation (Modified Lambert-Beer, Mueller et al., 2004) describes the change in SSI with sun zenith angle (SZA) in clear-sky conditions. It applies to the direct and global SSI as well as their spectral distribution. We assess its performances by comparing its results to the outputs of the radiative transfer model libRadtran and standard interpolation procedures. The standard two-point fitting MLB function performs very well at SZA between 0° and 60° and fairly bad from 60° to 89.9°. A parameterisation made of four MLBs for four intervals (0°, 60°), (60°, 75°), (75°, 85°) and (85°, 89.9°) is also tested. This piecewise MLB parameterisation exhibits satisfactory performances at any SZA and outperforms standard linear interpolation techniques. 95 % of errors in global SSI are less than 1 W m-2 for each band and less than 5 W m-2 for total irradiance.

  9. The effects of sunspots on solar irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Silva, S.; Woodard, M.; Willson, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that the darkness of a sunspot on the visible hemisphere of the sun will reduce the solar irradiance on the earth. Approaches are discussed for obtaining a crude estimate of the irradiance deficit produced by sunspots and of the total luminosity reduction for the whole global population of sunspots. Attention is given to a photometric sunspot index, a global measure of spot flux deficit, and models for the compensating flux excess. A model is shown for extrapolating visible-hemisphere spot areas to the invisible hemisphere. As an illustration, this extrapolation is used to calculate a very simple model for the reradiation necessary to balance the flux deficit.

  10. Parameterization of Solar Global Uv Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feister, U.; Jaekel, E.; Gericke, K.

    Daily doses of solar global UV-B, UV-A, and erythemal irradiation have been param- eterized to be calculated from pyranometer data of global and diffuse irradiation as well as from atmospheric column ozone measured at Potsdam (52 N, 107 m asl). The method has been validated against independent data of measured UV irradiation. A gain of information is provided by use of the parameterization for the three UV compo- nents (UV-B, UV-A and erythemal) referring to average values of UV irradiation. Ap- plying the method to UV irradiation measured at the mountain site Hohenpeissenberg (48 N, 977 m asl) shows that the parameterization even holds under completely differ- ent climatic conditions. On a long-term average (1953 - 2000), parameterized annual UV irradiation values are by 15 % (UV-A) and 21 % (UV-B), respectively, higher at Hohenpeissenberg, than they are at Potsdam. Using measured input data from 27 Ger- man weather stations, the method has been also applied to estimate the spatial distribu- tion of UV irradiation across Germany. Daily global and diffuse irradiation measured at Potsdam (1937 -2000) as well as atmospheric column ozone measured at Potsdam between1964 - 2000 have been used to derive long-term estimates of daily and annual totals of UV irradiation that include the effects of changes in cloudiness, in aerosols and, at least for the period 1964 to 2000, also in atmospheric ozone. It is shown that the extremely low ozone values observed mainly after the volcanic eruptions of Mt. Pinatubo in 1991 have substantially enhanced UV-B irradiation in the first half of the 90ies of the last century. The non-linear long-term changes between 1968 and 2000 amount to +4% ...+5% for annual global and UV-A irradiation mainly due to changing cloudiness, and +14% ... +15% for UV-B and erythemal irradiation due to both chang- ing cloudiness and decreasing column ozone. Estimates of long-term changes in UV irradiation derived from data measured at other German sites are

  11. Solar Irradiance, Plage and SOHO UV Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopresto, James C.; Manross, Kevin

    1996-05-01

    Calcium K and H alpha plage and sunspot area have been monitored using Big Bear Observatory images on the INTERNET since November of 1992. The purpose of the project is to determine the correlation of changing plage area and solar irradiance changes. We also monitor changes in the K2 spec- tral index provided daily from Sacramento Peak. With the recent launching of the SOHO satellite, we are able to monitor the plage in the He II 304 Angstroms UV image. This image is near the top of the chromosphere nar or just under the transition region. The images show limb brightening as expected. Since it is widely believed that short time scale changes in the UV may be the dominant cause for low amplitude solar irradiance changes, the comparison of the "plage" ara in these UV images to those in conventional visible images should prove instructive.

  12. New insights on short-term solar irradiance forecast for space weather applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, L. A.; Dudok de Wit, T.; Balmaceda, L. A.; Dal Lago, A.; Da Silva, L. A.; Gonzalez, W. D.

    2013-12-01

    The conditions of the thermosphere, the ionosphere, the neutral atmosphere, and the oceans on time scales from days to millennia are highly dependent on the solar electromagnetic output, the solar irradiance. The development of physics-based solar irradiance models during the last decade improved significantly our understanding of the solar forcing on Earth's climate. These models are based on the assumption that most of the solar irradiance variability is related to the magnetic field structure of the Sun. Recently, these models were extended to allow short-term forecast (1 to 15 days) of the total and spectral solar irradiance. The extension of the irradiance models is based on solar surface magnetic flux models and/or artificial neural network models. Here, we discuss in details the irradiance forecast models based on observations of the solar surface magnetic field realized by the HMI instrument on board of SDO spacecraft. We constrained and validated the models by comparing the output of the models and observations of the solar irradiance made by instruments onboard The SORCE spacecraft. This study received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013, FP7-SPACE-2010-1) under the grant agreement nrs. 218816 (SOTERIA project, www.soteria-space.eu) and 261948 (ATMOP,www.atmop.eu), and by the CNPq/Brazil under the grant number 312488/2012-2. We also gratefully thank the instrument teams for making their data available.

  13. Solar flare irradiation records in Antarctic meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goswami, J. N.

    1981-01-01

    The observation of tracks from solar flare heavy nuclei in Antarctic meteorite samples is reported. In an analysis of nuclear track densities in eight L and H chondrites of low metamorphic grade, it was found that two interior specimens of sample 77216, an L-3 chondrite, contain olivine grains with track densities much higher than the average track densities, indicating precompaction irradiation by solar flares in different shielding conditions. Preliminary data from mass spectroscopic analyses show a large excess of noble gases, with a Ne-20/Ne-22 ratio of greater than or equal to 10, indicating the presence of solar-type noble gas. Results of track density measurements in the other Antarctic meteorites range from 10,000 to 4,000,000/sq cm, which is within the range observed in non-Antarctic L-group meteorites

  14. Total solar irradiance reconstruction using artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tebabal Yirdaw, Ambelu; Damtie, Baylie; Nigussie, Melessew; Bires, Abiyot; Yizengaw, Endawoke

    2015-08-01

    A feed-forward neural network which can account for nonlinear relationships was used to reconstruct total solar irradiance (TSI). A single layer feed forward neural network with back-propagation algorithm have been implemented for reconstructing daily total solar irradiance from daily photometric sunspot index, and core to wing ratio of Mg II index data. The data year from 1978 to 2013 was used for the training, validation and testing purpose. In order to obtain the optimum neural network for TSI reconstruction, the root mean square error (RMSE), mean absolute error (MAE) and regression coefficient have been taken into account. We have carried out the analysis is made by comparing the reconstructed TSI from neural networks (NNs ) and TSI measurement from satellite. We have found out that the reconstructed TSI and the PMOD composite have the correlation coefficient of about R=0.9307 over the span of the recorded, 1978 to 2013. The NNs model output indicates that reconstructed TSI from solar proxies (photometric index and MgII ) can explain 86.6% of the variance of TSI. Neural network is able to recreate TSI observations on a time scale of a day. This reconstructed TSI using NNs further strengthens the view that surface magnetism indeed plays a dominant role in modulating solar irradiance.

  15. Variability in solar irradiance observed at two contrasting Antarctic sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkov, Boyan H.; Láska, Kamil; Vitale, Vito; Lanconelli, Christian; Lupi, Angelo; Mazzola, Mauro; Budíková, Marie

    2016-05-01

    The features of erythemally weighted (EW) and short-wave downwelling (SWD) solar irradiances, observed during the spring-summer months of 2007-2011 at Johann Gregor Mendel (63°48‧S, 57°53‧W, 7 m a.s.l.) and Dome Concordia (75°06‧S, 123°21‧E, 3233 m a.s.l.) stations, placed at the Antarctic coastal region and on the interior plateau respectively, have been analysed and compared to each other. The EW and SWD spectral components have been presented by the corresponding daily integrated values and were examined taking into account the different geographic positions and different environmental conditions at both sites. The results indicate that at Mendel station the surface solar irradiance is strongly affected by the changes in the cloud cover, aerosols and albedo that cause a decrease in EW between 20% and 35%, and from 0% to 50% in SWD component, which contributions are slightly lower than the seasonal SWD variations evaluated to be about 71%. On the contrary, the changes in the cloud cover features at Concordia station produce only a 5% reduction of the solar irradiance, whilst the seasonal oscillations of 94% turn out to be the predominant mode. The present analysis leads to the conclusion that the variations in the ozone column cause an average decrease of about 46% in EW irradiance with respect to the value found in the case of minimum ozone content at each of the stations. In addition, the ratio between EW and SWD spectral components can be used to achieve a realistic assessment of the radiation amplification factor that quantifies the relationship between the atmospheric ozone and the surface UV irradiance.

  16. Multivariate Analysis of Solar Spectral Irradiance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilewskie, P.; Rabbette, M.

    2001-01-01

    Principal component analysis is used to characterize approximately 7000 downwelling solar irradiance spectra retrieved at the Southern Great Plains site during an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) shortwave intensive operating period. This analysis technique has proven to be very effective in reducing a large set of variables into a much smaller set of independent variables while retaining the information content. It is used to determine the minimum number of parameters necessary to characterize atmospheric spectral irradiance or the dimensionality of atmospheric variability. It was found that well over 99% of the spectral information was contained in the first six mutually orthogonal linear combinations of the observed variables (flux at various wavelengths). Rotation of the principal components was effective in separating various components by their independent physical influences. The majority of the variability in the downwelling solar irradiance (380-1000 nm) was explained by the following fundamental atmospheric parameters (in order of their importance): cloud scattering, water vapor absorption, molecular scattering, and ozone absorption. In contrast to what has been proposed as a resolution to a clear-sky absorption anomaly, no unexpected gaseous absorption signature was found in any of the significant components.

  17. Solar Irradiance Variations on Active Region Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labonte, B. J. (Editor); Chapman, G. A. (Editor); Hudson, H. S. (Editor); Willson, R. C. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The variations of the total solar irradiance is an important tool for studying the Sun, thanks to the development of very precise sensors such as the ACRIM instrument on board the Solar Maximum Mission. The largest variations of the total irradiance occur on time scales of a few days are caused by solar active regions, especially sunspots. Efforts were made to describe the active region effects on total and spectral irradiance.

  18. Reconstructing the Solar VUV Irradiance Over the Past 60 Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, Phillip C.

    2011-01-01

    Actual observations of the solar spectral irradiance are extremely limited on climate time scales; therefore, various empirical models use solar proxies to reconstruct the actual output of the Sun over long time scales. The Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) is an empirical model of the solar irradiance spectrum from 0.1 to 190 nm at 1 nm spectral resolution and on a I-minute time cadence. The goal of FISM is to provide accurate solar spectral irradiances over the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV: 0-200 nm) range as input for ionospheric and thermospheric. A brief overview of the proxies used in the FISM model will be given, and also discussed is how the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) will contribute to improving FISM estimates and its accuracies. Also presented will be a discussion of other solar irradiance proxies and measurements, and their associated uncertainties, used for solar spectral reconstructions.

  19. CIRA Solar Irradiances and Solar/Geomagnetic Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent

    Solar and geomagnetic inputs are required for use in empirical thermospheric density models. The constituent species in the thermosphere absorb spectrally resolved solar irradiances from soft X-ray (XUV) to Far Ultraviolet (FUV) wavelengths which deposit their energy at varying optical depths. In the high latitude regions, Joule heating and particle precipitation contribute secondary heating, which can be transported to lower latitudes by meridional winds. However, empirical models generally do not use the sophistication of spectrally resolved solar irradiances or Joule heating and particle precipitation. Instead, simplification of an energy input is accomplished in the form solar and geomagnetic surrogates, i.e., proxies and indices. A proxy is a substitute for a distinctly different energy input while an index expresses the activity level of an energy input. Recently, in addition to the traditional 10.7-cm flux (F10.7) that is a proxy for solar Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) irradiances, a new solar irradiance index (S10.7) and a new proxy (M10.7) have been developed for use in empirical thermospheric density models. These three solar indices and proxies best represent the complex interaction between the solar emission source (photosphere, chromosphere, corona) with the irradiances' penetration into the thermosphere (unit optical depth in the middle and lower thermosphere) and the length of time for energy transfer between thermospheric layers (thermal process of molecular conduction or kinetic process of molecular diffusion). The S10.7 index (previously called SEUV) accounts for the majority of the daily density variability with a 1-day lag, is reported in units of F10.7, is the chromospheric EUV energy between 26-34 nm as measured by the SOHO SEM instrument, and is deposited above 200 km. The M10.7 proxy accounts for the next significant factor of the daily density variability with a 5-day lag and is the Mg II core-to-wing ratio reported in units of F10.7. It is

  20. Solar Spectral Irradiance Changes During Cycle 24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchenko, Sergey; Deland, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    We use solar spectra obtained by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board the Aura satellite to detect and follow long-term (years) and short-term (weeks) changes in the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) in the 265-500 nm spectral range. During solar Cycle 24, in the relatively line-free regions the SSI changed by approximately 0.6% +/- 0.2% around 265 nm. These changes gradually diminish to 0.15% +/- 0.20% at 500 nm. All strong spectral lines and blends, with the notable exception of the upper Balmer lines, vary in unison with the solar "continuum." Besides the lines with strong chromospheric components, the most involved species include Fe I blends and all prominent CH, NH, and CN spectral bands. Following the general trend seen in the solar "continuum," the variability of spectral lines also decreases toward longer wavelengths. The long-term solar cycle SSI changes are closely, to within the quoted 0.1%-0.2% uncertainties, matched by the appropriately adjusted short-term SSI variations derived from the 27 day rotational modulation cycles. This further strengthens and broadens the prevailing notion about the general scalability of the UV SSI variability to the emissivity changes in the Mg II 280 nm doublet on timescales from weeks to years. We also detect subtle deviations from this general rule: the prominent spectral lines and blends at lambda approximately or greater than 350 nm show slightly more pronounced 27 day SSI changes when compared to the long-term (years) trends. We merge the solar data from Cycle 21 with the current Cycle 24 OMI and GOME-2 observations and provide normalized SSI variations for the 170-795 nm spectral region.

  1. The total and spectral solar irradiance and its possible variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thekaekara, M. P.

    1975-01-01

    The present status of knowledge of the total and spectral irradiance of the sun is briefly reviewed. Currently accepted values of the solar constant and the extraterrestrial solar spectral irradiance are presented along with a discussion of how they were derived. Data on the variability of the solar constant are shown to be conflicting and inconclusive. Some of the alleged sun-weather relationships are cited in support of the need of knowing more precisely the variations in total and spectral solar irradiance. An overview of a solar monitoring program is discussed, with special emphasis on the Solar Energy Monitor in Space experiment which was proposed for several spacecraft missions. It is a combination of a solar constant detector and a prism monochromator. The determination of absolute values and the possible variations of the total and spectral solar irradiance, from measurements outside of the atmosphere is discussed.

  2. Solar spectral irradiance variability in cycle 24: observations and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, Sergey V.; DeLand, Matthew T.; Lean, Judith L.

    2016-12-01

    Utilizing the excellent stability of the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), we characterize both short-term (solar rotation) and long-term (solar cycle) changes of the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) between 265 and 500 nm during the ongoing cycle 24. We supplement the OMI data with concurrent observations from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) and Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) instruments and find fair-to-excellent, depending on wavelength, agreement among the observations, and predictions of the Naval Research Laboratory Solar Spectral Irradiance (NRLSSI2) and Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction for the Satellite era (SATIRE-S) models.

  3. Deriving historical total solar irradiance from lunar borehole temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahara, Hiroko; Wen, Guoyong; Cahalan, Robert F.; Ohmura, Atsumu

    2008-01-01

    We study the feasibility of deriving historical TSI (Total Solar Irradiance) from lunar borehole temperatures. As the Moon lacks Earth's dynamic features, lunar borehole temperatures are primarily driven by solar forcing. Using Apollo observed lunar regolith properties, we computed present-day lunar regolith temperature profiles for lunar tropical, mid-latitude, and polar regions for two scenarios of solar forcing reconstructed by Lean (2000) and Wang et al. (2005). Results show that these scenarios can be distinguished by small but potentially detectable differences in temperature, on the order of 0.01 K and larger depending on latitude, within ~10 m depth of the Moon's surface. Our results provide a physical basis and guidelines for reconstructing historical TSI from data obtainable in future lunar exploration.

  4. Transformation of surface albedo to surface: Atmosphere surface and irradiance, and their spectral and temporal averages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nack, M. L.; Curran, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    The dependence of the albedo at the top of a realistic atmosphere upon the surface albedo, solar zenith angle, and cloud optical thickness is examined for the cases of clear sky, total cloud cover, and fractional cloud cover. The radiative transfer calculations of Dave and Braslau (1975) for particular values of surface albedo and solar zenith angle, and a single value of cloud optical thickness are used as the basis of a parametric albedo model. The question of spectral and temporal averages of albedos and reflected irradiances is addressed, and unique weighting functions for the spectral and temporal albedo averages are developed.

  5. Analysis of Cumulus Solar Irradiance Reflectance (CSIR) Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, John L.; Harshvardham

    1996-01-01

    Clouds are extremely important with regard to the transfer of solar radiation at the earth's surface. This study investigates Cumulus Solar Irradiance Reflection (CSIR) using ground-based pyranometers. CSIR events are short-term increases in solar radiation observed at the surface as a result of reflection off the sides of convective clouds. When sun-cloud observer geometry is favorable, these occurrences produce characteristic spikes in the pyranometer traces and solar irradiance values may exceed expected clear-sky values. Ultraviolet CSIR events were investigated during the summer of 1995 using Yankee Environmental Systems UVA-1 and UVB-1 pyranometers. Observed data were compared to clear-sky curves which were generated using a third degree polynomial best-fit line technique. Periods during which the observed data exceeded this clear-sky curve were identified as CSIR events. The magnitude of a CSIR event was determined by two different quantitative calculations. The MAC (magnitude above clear-sky) is an absolute measure of the difference between the observed and clear-sky irradiances. Maximum MAC values of 3.4 Wm(exp -2) and 0.069 Wm(exp -2) were observed at the UV-A and UV-B wavelengths, respectively. The second calculation determined the percentage above clear-sky (PAC) which indicated the relative magnitude of a CSIR event. Maximum UV-A and UV-B PAC magnitudes of 10.1% and 7.8%, respectively, were observed during the study. Also of interest was the duration of the CSIR events which is a function of sun-cloud-sensor geometry and the speed of cloud propagation over the measuring site. In both the UV-A and UV-B wavelengths, significant CSIR durations of up to 30 minutes were observed.

  6. Analysis of cumulus solar irradiance reflectance (CSIR) events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, John L.; Harshvardhan

    Clouds are extremely important with regard to the transfer of solar radiation at Earth's surface. This study investigates Cumulus Solar Irradiance Reflection (CSIR) using ground-based pyranometers. CSIR events are short-term increases in solar radiation observed at the surface as a result of reflection off the sides of convective clouds. When Sun-cloud observer geometry is favorable, these occurrences produce characteristic spikes in the pyranometer traces and solar irradiance values may exceed expected clear-sky values. Ultraviolet CSIR events were investigated during the summer of 1995 using UVA and UVB pyranometers. Observed data were compared to clear-sky curves which were generated using a third degree polynomial best-fit line technique. Periods during which the observed data exceeded this clear-sky curve were identified as CSIR events. The magnitude of a CSIR event was determined by two different quantitative calculations. The MAC (magnitude above clear-sky) is an absolute measure of the difference between the observed and clear-sky irradiances. Maximum MAC values of 3.4 Win -2 and 0.0169 Wm -2 were observed at the UV-A and UV-B wavelengths, respectively. The second calculation determined the percentage above clear-sky (PAC) which indicated the relative magnitude of a CSIR event. Maximum UV-A and UV-B PAC magnitudes of 10.1% and 7.8%, respectively, were observed during the study. Also of interest was the duration of the CSIR events which is a function of Sun-cloud-sensor geometry and the speed of cloud propagation over the measuring site. In both the UV-A and UV-B wavelengths, significant CSIR durations of up to 30 minutes were observed. C 1997 Elsevier Science B.V.

  7. Long-term Solar Irradiance Variability: 1984-1989 Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert B., III

    1990-01-01

    Long-term variability in the total solar irradiance has been observed in the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) solar monitor measurements. The monitors have been used to measure the irradiance from the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA-9 and NOAA-10 spacecraft platforms since October 25, 1984, January 23, 1985, and October 22, 1986, respectively. Before September 1986, the ERBS irradiance values were found to be decreasing -0.03 percent per year. This period was marked by decreasing solar magnetic activity. Between September 1986 and mid-1989, the irradiance values increased approximately 0.1 percent. The latter period was marked by increasing solar activity which was associated with the initiations of the sunspot cycle number 22 and of a new 22-year Hale solar magnetic cycle. Therefore, long-term solar-irradiance variability appears to be correlated directly with solar activity. The maximum smoothed sunspot number occurred during September 1989, according to the Sunspot Index Data Center. Therefore, the recent irradiance increasing trend should disappear during early 1990 and change into a decreasing trend if the observed irradiance variability is correlated more so with the 11-year sunspot cycle than the 22-year Hale cycle. The ERBE irradiance values are presented and compared with sunspot activity for the 1984 to 1989 period. The ERBE values are compared with those available from the Nimbus-7 and Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft experiments.

  8. Observing Changes of Surface Solar Irradiance in Oregon: A Comparison of Satellite and Ground-Based Long-Term Time-Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riihimaki, L. D.; Vignola, F. E.; Lohmann, S.; Meyer, R.

    2005-12-01

    Significant increases over time are found in direct normal irradiance (DNI) in Oregon using both ground and satellite-derived measurements of DNI. Linear regression of all locations in both data sets shows strong positive trends of .4% to .6% per year. Ground measurements are analyzed from 1980 (and at one site from 1978) until 2004. These 25 years of ground measurements come from three climatically diverse sites in the state of Oregon using an Eppley Normal Incidence Pyrheliometer (NIP). The NIP is a good candidate for long term trend analysis as its responsivity remains consistent over time. The sensitivity of the Eppley Precision Spectral Pyranometer (PSP) which measures total radiation, on the other hand, degrades over time, approximately .5% to 2% per year. This uniquely long data set is compared to DNI calculated from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). The ISCCP D series applied here has 280 km x 280 km boxes, each of which includes one of the ground based sites, giving cloud and atmospheric input data from 1983 until 2001. Radiative transfer calculations are done using the two-stream method from the library for radiative transfer (libRadtran). The three hourly satellite observations allow comparison of different time integration periods. Besides annual average comparisons, monthly averages are examined to look for seasonal variation and confirm that the observations show a regional trend. Ground measurements of DNI for this length of time are rare, making this study a unique opportunity to test the capability to calculate direct normal irradiance based on ISCCP results. The agreement of the ISCCP derived irradiances to the measurements is very good: the trends differ between .08 and .3 W/m{2 depending on the site. From 1998 through 2002 satellite data were used to produce a solar radiation database on a 0.1i° grid. Comparisons between the modeled beam irradiance for the coordinates of the ground based station will be compared to

  9. Solar irradiance variations due to active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Oster, L.; Schatten, K.H.; Sofia, S.

    1982-05-15

    We have been able to reproduce the variations of the solar irradiance observed by ACRIM to an accuracy of better than +- 0.4 W m/sup -2/, assuming that during the 6 month observation period in 1980 the solar luminosity was constant. The improvement over previous attempts is primarily due to the inclusion of faculae. The reproduction scheme uses simple geometrical data on spot and facula areas, and conventional parameters for the respective fluxes and angular dependencies. The quality of reproduction is not very sensitive to most of the details of these parameters; nevertheless, there conventional parameters cannot be very different from their actual values in the solar atmosphere. It is interesting that the time average of the integrated excess emission (over directions) of the faculae cancels out the integrated deficit produced by the spots, within an accuracy of about 10%. If this behavior were maintained over longer periods of time, say, on the order of an activity cycle, active regions could be viewed as a kind of lighthouse where the energy deficit near the normal direction, associated with the spots, is primarily reemitted close to the tangential directions by the faculae. The currently available data suggest that energy ''storage'' associated with the redirection of flux near active regions on the Sun is comparable to the lifetime of the faculae.

  10. Reconstruction of spectral solar irradiance since 1700 from simulated magnetograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasi-Espuig, M.; Jiang, J.; Krivova, N. A.; Solanki, S. K.; Unruh, Y. C.; Yeo, K. L.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: We present a reconstruction of the spectral solar irradiance since 1700 using the SATIRE-T2 (Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstructions for the Telescope era version 2) model. This model uses as input magnetograms simulated with a surface flux transport model fed with semi-synthetic records of emerging sunspot groups. Methods: The record of sunspot group areas and positions from the Royal Greenwich Observatory (RGO) is only available since 1874. We used statistical relationships between the properties of sunspot group emergence, such as the latitude, area, and tilt angle, and the sunspot cycle strength and phase to produce semi-synthetic sunspot group records starting in the year 1700. The semi-synthetic records are fed into a surface flux transport model to obtain daily simulated magnetograms that map the distribution of the magnetic flux in active regions (sunspots and faculae) and their decay products on the solar surface. The magnetic flux emerging in ephemeral regions is accounted for separately based on the concept of extended cycles whose length and amplitude are linked to those of the sunspot cycles through the sunspot number. The magnetic flux in each surface component (sunspots, faculae and network, and ephemeral regions) was used to compute the spectral and total solar irradiance (TSI) between the years 1700 and 2009. This reconstruction is aimed at timescales of months or longer although the model returns daily values. Results: We found that SATIRE-T2, besides reproducing other relevant observations such as the total magnetic flux, reconstructs the TSI on timescales of months or longer in good agreement with the PMOD composite of observations, as well as with the reconstruction starting in 1878 based on the RGO-SOON data. The model predicts an increase in the TSI of 1.2+0.2-0.3 Wm-2 between 1700 and the present. The spectral irradiance reconstruction is in good agreement with the UARS/SUSIM measurements as well as the Lyman-α composite. The

  11. Solar irradiance modulation by active regions from 1969 through 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Schatten, K.H.; Miller, N.; Sofia, S.; Oster, L.

    1982-01-01

    The solar irradiance variations resulting from sunspot deficits and facular excesses in emission have been calculated from 1969 through 1980. Agreement appears to exist between our calculations and the major features seen with the Nimbus 7 cavity pyrheliometer and with both the major and minor features detected by The Solar Maximum Mission ACRIM experiment. The 12-year irradiance variations we calculate suggest a larger variance with increased solar activity, and little change in the average irradiance with solar activity. The largest excursions over these 12 years show a 0.4% variation. Removal of the activity influences upon solar irradiance during the numerous rocket experiments observing the solar ''constant'' may allow a better value for this quantity to be determined.

  12. Modelling solar irradiance from HRV images of Meteosat Second Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cony, Marco; Zarzalejo, Luis; Polo, Jesús; Marchante, Ruth; Martín, Luis

    2010-05-01

    Knowledge of solar radiation at the earth's surface is a need in designing any solar energy application. In particular both photovoltaic and solar thermal systems required high accurate data of solar radiation components. Nowadays the use of satellite images as input to models for deriving solar irradiance time series is accepted as a reliable methodology with good accuracy. In this sense, there are several models aimed at this objective. Among them it can be pointed out the Heliosat-2 method, based upon the first generation of Meteosat satellites, which has been broadly used. Taken this approach as reference a modified model was proposed including additional independent variables to the cloud index, such as the moments of the cloud index distribution and the air mass. This model was successfully assessed with about 30 ground data sites in Spain showing a good response. However, since 2006 the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) is observing the earth-atmosphere system centred in zero longitude. This new satellite generation has improved technical characteristics compared to the former one, particularly those focused on radiometric, spectral, spatial and time resolutions. This work is aimed at describing the work to accommodate the former model based on Heliosat-2 to operate with the MSG images and characteristics. A comparison with the old model will be made in the overlapping period, 2006, and an assessment with available ground data will also be performed as well.

  13. Solar spectral irradiance and summary outputs using excel.

    PubMed

    Diffey, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The development of an Excel spreadsheet is described that calculates solar spectral irradiance between 290-3000 nm on an unshaded, horizontal surface under a cloudless sky at sea level, together with summary outputs such as global UV index, illuminance and percentage of energy in different wavebands. A deliberate goal of the project was to adopt the principle of Ockham's razor and to develop a model that is as simple as it can be commensurate with delivering results of adequate accuracy. Consequently, just four inputs are required-geographical latitude, month, day of month and time of day-resulting in a spreadsheet that is easily usable by anyone with an interest in sunlight and solar power irrespective of their background. The accuracy of the calculated data is sufficient for many applications where knowledge of the ultraviolet, visible and infrared levels in sunlight is of interest.

  14. Interpretation of solar irradiance monitor measurements through analysis of 3D MHD simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Criscuoli, S.; Uitenbroek, H.

    2014-06-20

    Measurements from the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) on board the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment mission indicate that solar spectral irradiance at visible and IR wavelengths varies in counter phase with the solar activity cycle. The sign of these variations is not reproduced by most of the irradiance reconstruction techniques based on variations of surface magnetism employed so far, and it is not yet clear whether SIM calibration procedures need to be improved or if instead new physical mechanisms must be invoked to explain such variations. We employ three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar photosphere to investigate the dependence of solar radiance in SIM visible and IR spectral ranges on variations of the filling factor of surface magnetic fields. We find that the contribution of magnetic features to solar radiance is strongly dependent on the location on the disk of the features, which are negative close to disk center and positive toward the limb. If features are homogeneously distributed over a region around the equator (activity belt), then their contribution to irradiance is positive with respect to the contribution of HD snapshots, but decreases with the increase of their magnetic flux for average magnetic flux larger than 50 G in at least two of the visible and IR spectral bands monitored by SIM. Under the assumption that the 50 G snapshots are representative of quiet-Sun regions, we thus find that the Spectral Irradiance can be in counter-phase with the solar magnetic activity cycle.

  15. Solar irradiance dictates settlement timing and intensity of marine mussels

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes-Santos, Isabel; Labarta, Uxío; Álvarez-Salgado, X. Antón; Fernández-Reiriz, Mª José

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the environmental factors driving larval settlement processes is crucial to understand the population dynamics of marine invertebrates. This work aims to go a step ahead and predict larval presence and intensity. For this purpose we consider the influence of solar irradiance, wind regime and continental runoff on the settlement processes. For the first time, we conducted a 5-years weekly monitoring of Mytilus galloprovincialis settlement on artificial suspended substrates, which allowed us to search for interannual variability in the settlement patterns. Comparison between the seasonal pattern of larval settlement and solar irradiance, as well as the well-known effect of solar irradiance on water temperature and food availability, suggest that solar irradiance indirectly influences the settlement process, and support the use of this meteorological variable to predict settlement occurrence. Our results show that solar irradiance allows predicting the beginning and end of the settlement cycle a month in advance: Particularly we have observed that solar irradiance during late winter indirectly drives the timing and intensity of the settlement onset, Finally, a functional generalise additive model, which considers the influence of solar irradiance and continental runoff on the settlement process, provides an accurate prediction of settlement intensity a fortnight in advance. PMID:27384527

  16. Solar irradiance dictates settlement timing and intensity of marine mussels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes-Santos, Isabel; Labarta, Uxío; Álvarez-Salgado, X. Antón; Fernández-Reiriz, Mª José

    2016-07-01

    Identifying the environmental factors driving larval settlement processes is crucial to understand the population dynamics of marine invertebrates. This work aims to go a step ahead and predict larval presence and intensity. For this purpose we consider the influence of solar irradiance, wind regime and continental runoff on the settlement processes. For the first time, we conducted a 5-years weekly monitoring of Mytilus galloprovincialis settlement on artificial suspended substrates, which allowed us to search for interannual variability in the settlement patterns. Comparison between the seasonal pattern of larval settlement and solar irradiance, as well as the well-known effect of solar irradiance on water temperature and food availability, suggest that solar irradiance indirectly influences the settlement process, and support the use of this meteorological variable to predict settlement occurrence. Our results show that solar irradiance allows predicting the beginning and end of the settlement cycle a month in advance: Particularly we have observed that solar irradiance during late winter indirectly drives the timing and intensity of the settlement onset, Finally, a functional generalise additive model, which considers the influence of solar irradiance and continental runoff on the settlement process, provides an accurate prediction of settlement intensity a fortnight in advance.

  17. Guide to solar reference spectra and irradiance models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent

    The international standard for determining solar irradiances was published by the International Standards Organization (ISO) in May 2007. The document, ISO 21348 Space Environment (natural and artificial) - Process for determining solar irradiances, describes the process for representing solar irradiances. We report on the next progression of standards work, i.e., the development of a guide that identifies solar reference spectra and irradiance models for use in engineering design or scientific research. This document will be produced as an AIAA Guideline and ISO Technical Report. It will describe the content of the reference spectra and models, uncertainties and limitations, technical basis, data bases from which the reference spectra and models are formed, publication references, and sources of computer code for reference spectra and solar irradiance models, including those which provide spectrally-resolved lines as well as solar indices and proxies and which are generally recognized in the solar sciences. The document is intended to assist aircraft and space vehicle designers and developers, heliophysicists, geophysicists, aeronomers, meteorologists, and climatologists in understanding available models, comparing sources of data, and interpreting engineering and scientific results based on different solar reference spectra and irradiance models.

  18. The observation of structural defects in neutron-irradiated lithium-doped silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, G. A.

    1971-01-01

    Electron microscopy has been used to observe the distribution and morphology of lattice defects introduced into lithium-doped silicon solar cells by neutron irradiation. Upon etching the surface of the solar cells after irradiation, crater-like defects are observed that are thought to be associated with the space charge region around vacancy clusters. Thermal annealing experiments showed that the crater defects were stable in the temperature range 300 to 1200 K in all of the lithium-doped samples. Some annealing of the crater defects was observed to occur in the undoped cells which were irradiated at the lowest doses.

  19. Absolute, Extreme-Ultraviolet, Solar Spectral Irradiance Monitor (AESSIM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Martin C. E.; Smith, Peter L.; Parkinson, W. H.; Kuehne, M.; Kock, M.

    1988-01-01

    AESSIM, the Absolute, Extreme-Ultraviolet, Solar Spectral Irradiance Monitor, is designed to measure the absolute solar spectral irradiance at extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths. The data are required for studies of the processes that occur in the earth's upper atmosphere and for predictions of atmospheric drag on space vehicles. AESSIM is comprised of sun-pointed spectrometers and newly-developed, secondary standards of spectral irradiance for the EUV. Use of the in-orbit standard sources will eliminate the uncertainties caused by changes in spectrometer efficiency that have plagued all previous measurements of the solar spectral EUV flux.

  20. Recent changes in solar irradiance in Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Stanhill, G.; Cohen, S.

    1997-08-01

    A significant decrease in the annual sums of global irradiance reaching the surface in Antarctica, averaging -0.28 W m{sup -2} yr{sup -1}, was derived from an analysis of all complete years of measurement available from 12 pyranometer stations, 10 of which were on the coast. The decrease was greater than could be attributed to the nonhomogeneous nature of the database, the estimated errors of measurement, or changes in the amount of cloud cover. The smaller database of radiation balance measurements available showed no statistically significant change. Possible causes of these results are discussed, as is the implication that the recent surface warming in Antarctica is not due to radiative forcing. 49 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Long-term downward trend in total solar irradiance

    SciTech Connect

    Willson, R.C.; Hudson, H.S.; Frohlich, C.; Brusa, R.W.

    1986-11-28

    The first 5 years (from 1980 to 1985) of total solar irradiance observations by the first Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor (ACRIM I) experiment on board the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft show a clearly defined downward trends of -0.019% per year. The existence of this trend has been confirmed by the internal self-calibrations of ACRIM I, by independent measurements from sounding rockets and balloons, and by observations from the Nimbus-7 spacecraft. The trend appears to be due to unpredicted variations of solar luminosity on time scales of years, and it may be related to solar cycle magnetic activity.

  2. Evidence of a long-term trend in total solar irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich, C.

    2009-07-01

    Aims: During the solar minimum of 2008, the value of total solar irradiance at 1 AU (TSI) was more than 0.2 Wm-2 lower than during the last minimum in 1996, indicating for the first time a directly observed long-term change. On the other hand, chromospheric indices and hence solar UV irradiance do not exhibit a similar change. Methods: Comparison of TSI with other activity parameters indicates that only the open solar magnetic field, BR, observed from satellites at 1 AU show a similar long-term behaviour. The values at the minima correlate well and the linear fit provides a direct physical relationship between TSI and BR during the minimum times. Results: This correlation allows an unambiguous reconstruction of TSI back in time, provided the open solar magnetic field can be determined from e.g. geomagnetic indices or cosmogenic radionucleides. Since the solar UV irradiance has no long-term trend, the mechanism for the secular change of TSI must differ from the effect of surface magnetism, as manifested by sunspots, faculae, and network which indeed explain well the intra-cycle variability of both total and spectral irradiance. Conclusions: The long-term trend of TSI is most probably caused by a global temperature change of the Sun that does not influence the UV irradiance in the same way as the surface magnetic fields. Appendix is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. Atmosphere, Ocean, Land, and Solar Irradiance Data Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, James; Ahmad, Suraiya

    2003-01-01

    The report present the atmosphere, ocean color, land and solar irradiation data sets. The data presented: total ozone, aerosol, cloud optical and physical parameters, temperature and humidity profiles, radiances, rain fall, drop size distribution.

  4. Analysis of clear hour solar irradiation for seven Canadian stations

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, J.; Sahami, K.

    1995-12-31

    Hourly global and diffuse irradiation and corresponding surface meteorological data have been analyzed for the seven Canadian stations at Edmonton, Goose Bay, Montreal, Port Hardy, Resolute, Toronto, and Winnipeg. The variation of the most probable clear hour values of clearness index k{sub t}, diffuse index k{sub d}, direct beam index k{sub b}, and Angstrom turbidity coefficient {beta} with solar elevation, atmospheric precipitable water, and snow depth are obtained. Values of these quantities are presented which are consistent with the attenuation and scattering of solar radiation by the atmosphere which is expected. The most probable values of {beta} tend to be lower than the average values of {beta} recently reported by Gueymard. The data indicate a drift in the calibration of the instruments used for measurements of the irradiation data for the stations at Goose Bay and Resolute. The data for the other five stations indicate that the instrument calibration is maintained over the years of the data. 4 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Performance of single crystalline silicon solar cell with irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chander, Subhash; Purohit, A.; Nehra, Anshu; Nehra, S. P.; Dhaka, M. S.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, the effect of irradiance on the performance parameters of single crystalline silicon solar cell is undertaken. The experiment was carried out employing solar cell simulator with varying irradiance in the range 115-550W/m2 at constant cell temperature 25°C. The results show that the short circuit current is found to be increased linearly with irradiance and the open circuit voltage is increased slightly. The fill factor, maximum power and cell efficiency are also found to be increased with irradiance. The efficiency is increased linearly at lower irradiance while slightly increased at higher. The results revealed that the irradiance has a dominant effect on the performance parameters. The results are in good agreement with the available literature.

  6. Variations in solar Lyman alpha irradiance on short time scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Variations in solar UV irradiance at Lyman alpha are studied on short time scales (from days to months) after removing the long-term changes over the solar cycle. The SME/Lyman alpha irradiance is estimated from various solar indices using linear regression analysis. In order to study the nonlinear effects, Lyman alpha irradiance is modeled with a 5th-degree polynomial as well. It is shown that the full-disk equivalent width of the He line at 1083 nm, which is used as a proxy for the plages and active network, can best reproduce the changes observed in Lyman alpha. Approximately 72 percent of the solar-activity-related changes in Lyman alpha irradiance arise from plages and the network. The network contribution is estimated by the correlation analysis to be about 19 percent. It is shown that significant variability remains in Lyman alpha irradiance, with periods around 300, 27, and 13.5d, which is not explained by the solar activity indices. It is shown that the nonlinear effects cannot account for a significant part of the unexplained variation in Lyman alpha irradiance. Therefore, additional events (e.g., large-scale motions and/or a systematic difference in the area and intensity of the plages and network observed in the lines of Ca-K, He 1083, and Lyman alpha) may explain the discrepancies found between the observed and estimated irradiance values.

  7. Surface solar radiation from geostationary satellites for renewable energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laszlo, Istvan; Liu, Hongqing; Heidinger, Andrew; Goldberg, Mitchell

    With the launch of the new Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, GOES-R, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) will begin a new era of geostationary remote sensing. One of its flagship instruments, the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), will expand frequency and coverage of multispectral remote sensing of atmospheric and surface properties. Products derived from ABI measurements will primarily be heritage meteorological products (cloud and aerosol properties, precipitation, winds, etc.), but some will be for interdisciplinary use, such as for the solar energy industry. The planned rapid observations (5-15 minutes) from ABI provide an opportunity to obtain information needed for solar energy applications where frequent observations of solar radiation reaching the surface are essential for planning and load management. In this paper we describe a physical, radiative-transfer-based algorithm for the retrieval of surface solar irradiance that uses atmospheric and surface parameters derived independently from multispectral ABI radiances. The algorithm is designed to provide basic radiation budget products (total solar irradiance at the surface), as well as products specifically needed for the solar energy industry (average, midday and clear-sky insolation, clear-sky days, diffuse and direct normal radiation, etc.). Two alternative algorithms, which require less ABI atmosphere and surface products or no explicit knowledge of the surface albedo, are also explored along with their limitations. The accuracy of surface solar radiation retrievals are assessed using long-term MODIS and GOES satellite data and surface measurements at the Surface Radiation (SURFRAD) network.

  8. White Paper on SBUV/2 Solar Irradiance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, Ernest; DeLand, Matthew T.; Cebula, Richard P.

    1996-01-01

    The importance of solar irradiance measurements by the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet, Model 2 (SBUV/2) instruments on NOAA's operational satellites is described. These measurements are necessary accurately monitor the long-term changes in the global column ozone amount, the altitude distribution of ozone in the upper stratosphere, and the degree to which ozone changes are caused by anthropogenic sources. Needed to accomplish these goals are weekly solar irradiance measurements at the operational ozone wavelengths, daily measurements of the Mg II proxy index, instrument-specific Mg II scale factors, and daily measurements of the solar spectral irradiance at photochemically important wavelengths. Two solar measurement schedules are provided: (1) a baseline schedule for all instruments except the NOAA-14 instrument and (2) a modified schedule for the NOAA-14 SBUV/2 instrument. This latter schedule is needed due to the NOAA-14 grating drive problems.

  9. On the variation of the Nimbus 7 total solar irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    For the interval December 1978 to April 1991, the value of the mean total solar irradiance, as measured by the Nimbus-7 Earth Radiation Budget Experiment channel 10C, was 1,372.02 Wm(exp -2), having a standard deviation of 0.65 Wm(exp -2), a coefficient of variation (mean divided by the standard deviation) of 0.047 percent, and a normal deviate z (a measure of the randomness of the data) of -8.019 (inferring a highly significant non-random variation in the solar irradiance measurements, presumably related to the action of the solar cycle). Comparison of the 12-month moving average (also called the 13-month running mean) of solar irradiance to those of the usual descriptors of the solar cycle (i.e., sunspot number, 10.7-cm solar radio flux, and total corrected sunspot area) suggests possibly significant temporal differences. For example, solar irradiance is found to have been greatest on or before mid 1979 (leading solar maximum for cycle 21), lowest in early 1987 (lagging solar minimum for cycle 22), and was rising again through late 1990 (thus, lagging solar maximum for cycle 22), having last reported values below those that were seen in 1979 (even though cycles 21 and 22 were of comparable strength). Presuming a genuine correlation between solar irradiance and the solar cycle (in particular, sunspot number) one infers that the correlation is weak (having a coefficient of correlation r less than 0.84) and that major excursions (both as 'excesses' and 'deficits') have occurred (about every 2 to 3 years, perhaps suggesting a pulsating Sun).

  10. A Solar Minimum Irradiance Spectrum for Wavelengths below 1200 Å

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Harry P.

    2005-03-01

    NRLEUV represents an independent approach to modeling the Sun's EUV irradiance and its variability. Our model utilizes differential emission measure distributions derived from spatially and spectrally resolved solar observations, full-disk solar images, and a database of atomic physics parameters to calculate the solar EUV irradiance. In this paper we present a new solar minimum irradiance spectrum for wavelengths below 1200 Å. This spectrum is based on extensive observations of the quiet Sun taken with the CDS and SUMER spectrometers on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the most recent version of the CHIANTI atomic physics database. In general, we find excellent agreement between this new irradiance spectrum and our previous quiet-Sun reference spectrum derived primarily from Harvard Skylab observations. Our analysis does show that the quiet-Sun emission measure above about 1 MK declines more rapidly than in our earlier emission measure distribution and that the intensities of the EUV free-bound continua at some wavelengths are somewhat smaller than indicated by the Harvard observations. Our new reference spectrum is also generally consistent with recent irradiance observations taken near solar minimum. There are, however, two areas of persistent disagreement. Our solar spectrum indicates that the irradiance measurements overestimate the contribution of the EUV free-bound continua at some wavelengths by as much as a factor of 10. Our model also cannot reproduce the observed irradiances at wavelengths below about 150 Å. Comparisons with spectrally resolved solar and stellar observations indicate that only a small fraction of the emission lines in the 60-120 Å wavelength range are accounted for in CHIANTI.

  11. Vacuum-ultraviolet instrumentation for solar irradiance and thermospheric airglow

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, T.N.; Rottman, G.J. . High Altitude Observatory); Bailey, S.M.; Solomon, S.C. . Lab. for Atmospheric and Space Physics)

    1994-02-01

    A NASA sounding rocket experiment was developed to study the solar extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectral irradiance and its effect on the upper atmosphere. Both the solar flux and the terrestrial molecular nitrogen via the Lyman-Birge-Hopfield bands in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) region were measured remotely from a sounding rocket on October 27, 1992. The rocket experiments also includes EUV instruments from Boston University, but only the National Center for Atmospheric Research's (NCAR)/University of Colorado's (CU) four solar instruments and one airglow instrument are discussed. The primary solar EUV instrument is a 0.25-m Rowland circle EUV spectrograph that has flown on three rockets since 1988 measuring the solar spectral irradiance from 30 to 110 nm with 0.2-nm resolution. Another solar irradiance instrument is an array of six silicon soft x-ray (XUV) photodiodes, each having different metallic filters coated directly on the photodiodes. The other solar irradiance instrument is a silicon avalanche photodiode coupled with pulse height analyzer electronics. The fourth solar instrument is a XUV imager that images the sun at 17.5 nm with a spatial resolution of 20 arc sec. The airglow spectrograph measures the terrestrial FUV airglow emissions along the horizon from 125 to 160 nm with 0.2-nm spectral resolution.

  12. Solar Simulator Represents the Mars Surface Solar Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Dawson, Stephen F.; Mueller, Robert L.; Mardesich, Nick; Rapp, Donald

    2009-01-01

    A report discusses the development of a Mars surface, laboratory-based solar simulator to create solar cells that can function better on Mars. The Mars Optimized Solar cell Technology (MOST) required defining the surface incident spectrum, developing an appropriate laboratory solar simulator measurement capability, and developing and testing commercial cells modified for the Mars surface spectrum.

  13. Compact Flyeye concentrator with improved irradiance uniformity on solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Zhenfeng; Yu, Feihong

    2013-08-01

    A Flyeye concentrator with improved irradiance distribution on the solar cell in a concentrator photovoltaic system is proposed. This Flyeye concentrator is composed of four surfaces: a refractive surface, mirror surface, freeform surface, and transmissive surface. Based on the principles of geometrical optics, the contours of the proposed Flyeye concentrator are calculated according to Fermat's principle, the edge-ray principle, and the ray reversibility principle without solving partial differential equations or using an optimization algorithm, therefore a slope angle control method is used to construct the freeform surface. The solid model is established by applying a symmetry of revolution around the optical axis. Additionally, the optical performance for the Flyeye concentrator is simulated and analyzed by Monte-Carlo method. Results show that the Flyeye concentrator optical efficiency of >96.2% is achievable with 1333× concentration ratio and ±1.3 deg acceptance angle, and 1.3 low aspect ratio (average thickness to entry aperture diameter ratio). Moreover, comparing the Flyeye concentrator specification to that of the Köhler concentrator and the traditional Fresnel-type concentrator, results indicate that this concentrator has the advantages of improved uniformity, reduced thickness, and increased tolerance to the incident sunlight.

  14. Quantifying solar spectral irradiance in aquatic habitats for the assessment of photoenhanced toxicity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barron, M.G.; Little, E.E.; Calfee, R.; Diamond, S.

    2000-01-01

    The spectra and intensity of solar radiation (solar spectral irradiance [SSI]) was quantified in selected aquatic habitats in the vicinity of an oil field on the California coast. Solar spectral irradiance measurements consisted of spectral scans (280-700 rim) and radiometric measurements of ultraviolet (UV): UVB (280-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm). Solar spectral irradiance measurements were taken at the surface and at various depths in two marsh ponds, a shallow wetland, an estuary lagoon, and the intertidal area of a high-energy sandy beach. Daily fluctuation in SSI showed a general parabolic relationship with time; maximum structure-activity relationship (SAR) was observed at approximate solar noon. Solar spectral irradiance measurements taken at 10-cm depth at approximate solar noon in multiple aquatic habitats exhibited only a twofold variation in visible light and UVA and a 4.5-fold variation in UVB. Visible light ranged from 11,000 to 19,000 ??W/cm2, UVA ranged from 460 to 1,100 ??W/cm2, and UVB ranged from 8.4 to 38 ??W/cm2. In each habitat, the attenuation of light intensity with increasing water depth was differentially affected over specific wavelengths of SSI. The study results allowed the development of environmentally realistic light regimes necessary for photoenhanced toxicity studies.

  15. Quantifying solar spectral irradiance in aquatic habitats for the assessment of photoenhanced toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, M.G.; Little, E.E.; Calfee, R.; Diamond, S.

    2000-04-01

    The spectra and intensity of solar radiation (solar spectral irradiance [SSI]) was quantified in selected aquatic habitats in the vicinity of an oil field on the California coast. Solar spectral irradiance measurements consisted of spectral scans and radiometric measurements of ultraviolet (UV): UVB and UVA. Solar spectral irradiance measurements were taken at the surface and at various depths in two marsh ponds, a shallow wetland, an estuary lagoon, and the intertidal area of a high-energy sandy beach. Daily fluctuation in SSI showed a general parabolic relationship with time; maximum structure-activity relationship (SAR) was observed at approximate solar noon. Solar spectral irradiance measurements taken at 10-cm depth at approximate solar noon in multiple aquatic habitats exhibited only a twofold variation in visible light and UVA and a 4.5-fold variation in UVB. Visible light ranged from 11,000 to 19,000 {micro}W/cm{sup 2}, UVA ranged from 460 to 1,100 {micro}W/cm{sup 2}, and UVB ranged from 8.4 to 38 {micro}W/cm{sup 2}. In each habitat, the attenuation of light intensity with increasing water depth was differentially affected over specific wavelengths of SSI. The study results allowed the development of environmentally realistic light regimes necessary for photoenhanced toxicity studies.

  16. Variations in Solar Activity and Irradiance and Their Implications for Energy Input Into the Terrestrial Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Daryl Gray

    This dissertation presents research into the question of how variations in the physical properties of resolved solar magnetic surface features combine to produce variations in the physical properties of the integrated Sun and the possible impacts of those variations on the terrestrial climate system. The core approach to the research was development of techniques to apply automated Bayesian statistical pattern recognition methods as implemented in the AutoClass software to magnetic and intensity-like solar images from the Mount Wilson Solar Observatory (MWO) 150 Foot Solar Telescope. The goals were to: (1) identify in an objective and quantifiable manner the solar surface features responsible for changes in solar irradiance, (2) enhance understanding of the evolution of these features and the resultant solar irradiance variations over the most recent solar cycles, (3) develop methods to identify the specific features responsible for variations in specific wavelengths, (4) use global observations of global solar irradiance indices to identify the spatially resolved features which contribute to them, (5) attempt to apply these results to specific topics of current interest in solar-stellar astronomy. Using these techniques, a method was developed to identify classes of features from thousands of MWO solar images based on the per pixel values of absolute magnetic field strength and an intensity measure known as a "ratio-gram" in MWO images. Using these classes along with observations from independent, usually satellite based, sources in different wavelengths, models were constructed of total solar irradiance (TSI) and solar UV indices. These models were able to reproduce with high correlations solar observations in a number of different solar wavelengths. These classes were also used to construct images mapping different wavelength emissions to the areas to the solar surface features from which they originated. These techniques proved able to reproduce with high

  17. Near-term Forecasting of Solar Total and Direct Irradiance for Solar Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, C. N.; Riihimaki, L. D.; Berg, L. K.

    2012-12-01

    Integration of solar renewable energy into the power grid, like wind energy, is hindered by the variable nature of the solar resource. One challenge of the integration problem for shorter time periods is the phenomenon of "ramping events" where the electrical output of the solar power system increases or decreases significantly and rapidly over periods of minutes or less. Advance warning, of even just a few minutes, allows power system operators to compensate for the ramping. However, the ability for short-term prediction on such local "point" scales is beyond the abilities of typical model-based weather forecasting. Use of surface-based solar radiation measurements has been recognized as a likely solution for providing input for near-term (5 to 30 minute) forecasts of solar energy availability and variability. However, it must be noted that while fixed-orientation photovoltaic panel systems use the total (global) downwelling solar radiation, tracking photovoltaic and solar concentrator systems use only the direct normal component of the solar radiation. Thus even accurate near-term forecasts of total solar radiation will under many circumstances include inherent inaccuracies with respect to tracking systems due to lack of information of the direct component of the solar radiation. We will present examples and statistical analyses of solar radiation partitioning showing the differences in the behavior of the total/direct radiation with respect to the near-term forecast issue. We will present an overview of the possibility of using a network of unique new commercially available total/diffuse radiometers in conjunction with a near-real-time adaptation of the Shortwave Radiative Flux Analysis methodology (Long and Ackerman, 2000; Long et al., 2006). The results are used, in conjunction with persistence and tendency forecast techniques, to provide more accurate near-term forecasts of cloudiness, and both total and direct normal solar irradiance availability and

  18. Nb2O5 Nanostructure Evolution on Nb Surfaces via Low-Energy He(+) Ion Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Novakowski, Theodore Joseph; Tripathi, Jitendra Kumar; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2016-12-21

    We propose low-energy, broad-beam He(+) ion irradiation as a novel processing technique for the generation of Nb2O5 surface nanostructures due to its relative simplicity and scalability in a commercial setting. Since there have been relatively few studies involving the interaction of high-fluence, low-energy He(+) ion irradiation and Nb (or its oxidized states), this systematic study explores both effects of fluence and sample temperature during irradiation on resulting surface morphology. Detailed normal and cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies reveal subsurface He bubble formation and elucidate potential driving mechanisms for nanostructure evolution. A combination of specular optical reflectivity and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is also used to gain additional information on roughness and stoichiometry of irradiated surfaces. Our investigations show significant surface modification for all tested irradiation conditions; the resulting surface structure size and geometry have a strong dependence on both sample temperature during irradiation and total ion fluence. Optical reflectivity measurements on irradiated surfaces demonstrate increased surface roughening with increasing ion fluence, and XPS shows higher oxidation levels for samples irradiated at lower temperatures, suggesting larger surface roughness and porosity. Overall, it was found that low-energy He(+) ion irradiation is an efficient processing technique for nanostructure formation, and surface structures are highly tunable by adjusting ion fluence and Nb2O5 sample temperature during irradiation. These findings may have excellent potential applications for solar energy conversion through improved efficiency due to effective light absorption.

  19. Characterization of solar cells for space applications. Volume 12: Electrical characteristics of Solarex BSF, 2-ohm-cm, 50-micron solar cells (1978 pilot line) as a function of intensity, temperature, and irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Beckert, D. M.; Downing, R. G.; Miyahira, T. F.; Weiss, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    Electrical characteristics of Solarex back-surface-field, 2-ohm-cm, 50-micron N/P silicon solar cells are presented in graphical and tabular format as a function of solar illumination intensity, temperature, and irradiation.

  20. Forecasting solar irradiation using WRF model and refining statistics for Northeastern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, E. B.; Lima, F. J. L.; Martins, F. R.

    2015-12-01

    Solar energy is referred to as variable generation sources because their electricity production varies based on the availability of sun irradiance. To accommodate this variability, electricity grid operators use a variety of tools to maintain a reliable electricity supply, one of them is to forecast solar irradiation, and to adjust other electricity sources as needed. This work reports an approach to forecast solar irradiation in the Brazilian Northeastern region (NEB) by using statistically post-processing data from mesoscale model outputs. The method assimilates the diversity of climate characteristics occurring in the region presenting the largest solar energy potentials in Brazil. Untreated solar irradiance forecasts for 24h in advance were obtained using the WRF model runs. Cluster analysis technique was employed to find out areas presenting similar climate characteristics and to reduce uncertainties. Comparison analysis between WRF model outputs and site-specific measured data were performed to evaluate the model skill in forecasting the surface solar irradiation. After that, post-processing of WRF outputs using artificial neural networks (ANNs) and multiple regression methods refined the short-term solar irradiation forecasts. A set of pre-selected variables of the WRF model outputs representing the forecasted atmospheric conditions were used as predictors by the ANNs. Several predictors were tested in the adjustment and simulation of the ANNs. We found the best ANNs architecture and a group of 10 predictors, with which more in-depth analyzes were carried out, including performance evaluation for fall and spring of 2011 (rainy and dry season in NEB). The site-specific measured solar radiation data came from 110 stations distributed throughout the NEB. Data for the rainy season were acquired from March to May, and for the dry season from September to November. We concluded that the untreated numerical forecasts of solar irradiation provided by WRF exhibited a

  1. The origin of Total Solar Irradiance variability on timescales less than a day

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Alexander; Krivova, Natalie; Schmutz, Werner; Solanki, Sami K.; Leng Yeo, Kok; Cameron, Robert; Beeck, Benjamin

    2016-07-01

    Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) varies on timescales from minutes to decades. It is generally accepted that variability on timescales of a day and longer is dominated by solar surface magnetic fields. For shorter time scales, several additional sources of variability have been proposed, including convection and oscillation. However, available simplified and highly parameterised models could not accurately explain the observed variability in high-cadence TSI records. We employed the high-cadence solar imagery from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the SATIRE (Spectral And Total Irradiance Reconstruction) model of solar irradiance variability to recreate the magnetic component of TSI variability. The recent 3D simulations of solar near-surface convection with MURAM code have been used to calculate the TSI variability caused by convection. This allowed us to determine the threshold timescale between TSI variability caused by the magnetic field and convection. Our model successfully replicates the TSI measurements by the PICARD/PREMOS radiometer which span the period of July 2010 to February 2014 at 2-minute cadence. Hence, we demonstrate that solar magnetism and convection can account for TSI variability at all timescale it has ever been measured (sans the 5-minute component from p-modes).

  2. A method for estimating direct normal solar irradiation from satellite data for a tropical environment

    SciTech Connect

    Janjai, Serm

    2010-09-15

    In order to investigate a potential use of concentrating solar power technologies and select an optimum site for these technologies, it is necessary to obtain information on the geographical distribution of direct normal solar irradiation over an area of interest. In this work, we have developed a method for estimating direct normal irradiation from satellite data for a tropical environment. The method starts with the estimation of global irradiation on a horizontal surface from MTSAT-1R satellite data and other ground-based ancillary data. Then a satellite-based diffuse fraction model was developed and used to estimate the diffuse component of the satellite-derived global irradiation. Based on this estimated global and diffuse irradiation and the solar radiation incident angle, the direct normal irradiation was finally calculated. To evaluate its performance, the method was used to estimate the monthly average hourly direct normal irradiation at seven pyrheliometer stations in Thailand. It was found that values of monthly average hourly direct normal irradiation from the measurements and those estimated from the proposed method are in reasonable agreement, with a root mean square difference of 16% and a mean bias of -1.6%, with respect to mean measured values. After the validation, this method was used to estimate the monthly average hourly direct normal irradiation over Thailand by using MTSAT-1R satellite data for the period from June 2005 to December 2008. Results from the calculation were displayed as hourly and yearly irradiation maps. These maps reveal that the direct normal irradiation in Thailand was strongly affected by the tropical monsoons and local topography of the country. (author)

  3. Surface changes of implants after laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechmann, Peter; Sadegh, Hamid M. M.; Goldin, Dan S.; Hennig, Thomas

    1999-05-01

    Periimplantitis is one of the major factors for the loss of dental implants. Due to the minor defense ability of the tissue surrounding the implant compared to natural teeth treatment of periimplantitis in the early stage is very important. Reducing bacteria with a laser might be the most successful step in therapy of periimplantitis. Aim of the study was to observe changes in surface morphology of seven different implants after irradiation with three different lasers. Two kinds of flat round samles were prepared by the manufacturers either identical to the body surface or to the cervical area of the corresponding implants. The samples were irradiated using different power settings. The lasers used were a CO2 laser (Uni Laser 450P, ASAH Medico Denmark; fiber guided, wavelength 10.6 μm, max. average power 8.3 W, "soft-pulse" and cw) an Er:YAG laser (KaVo Key Laser II, wavelength 2.94 μm, pulse duration 250-500μs, pulse energy 60-500 mJ, pulse repetition rate 1-15 Hz, focus diameter 620 μm, air-water cooling; Biberach, Germany; a frequency doubled Alexandrite laser (laboratory prototype, q-switched, fiber guided, wavelength 377 nm, pulse duration 1 μs, pulse repetition rate 30 Hz, water cooling). After irradiation the implant surfaces were investigated with a Scanning Electron Microscope. Ablation thresholds were determined. After CO2 laser irradiation no changes in surface morphology were observed whereas using the pulsed Er:YAG laser or frequency doubled Alexandrite laser even at low energies loss of integrity or melting of the surface was observed. The changes in surface morphology seem to depend very strongly on the type of surface coating.

  4. Impact of Cirrus Crystal Shape on Solar Spectral Irradiance: A Case Study for Subtropical Cirrus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendisch, Manfred; Pilewskie, Peter; Pommier, John; Howard, Steve; Yang, Ping; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Schmitt, Carl G.; Baumgardner, Darrel; Mayer, Barnhard

    2005-01-01

    Profiles of in situ measurements of ice crystal size distribution of subtropical cirrus were used to calculate solar spectral irradiances above and below the clouds. Spheres and nonspherical ice crystal habits (columns, hollows, plates, bullets, and aggregates) were assumed in the calculations. The simulation results were compared to irradiance measurements from the NASA Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer. The microphysical and radiation data were collected by three aircraft during CRYSTAL-FACE. Two cirrus cases (optical thickness of about 1 and 7) from two mission dates (26 and 23 July 2002) were investigated in detail. The measured downwelling and upwelling irradiance spectra above the cirrus could mostly be reproduced by the radiation model to within +/- 5-10% for most ice crystal habits. Below the cirrus the simulations disagreed with the measured irradiances due to surface albedo variability along the flight track, and nonoptimal colocation between the microphysical and irradiance measurements. The impact of shape characteristics of the crystals was important for the reflected irradiances above the optically thin cirrus, especially for small solar zenith angles, because in this case single-scattering dominated the solar radiation field. For the cirrus of moderate optical thickness the enhanced multiple scattering tended to diminish particular shape features caused by nonspherical single-scattering. Within the ice absorption bands the shape-related differences in the absorption characteristics of the individual nonspherical ice crystals were amplified if multiple scattering prevailed. Furthermore, it was found that below the cloud the shape sensitivity of the downwelling irradiance spectra is larger compared to the nonsphericity effects on reflected irradiances above the cirrus. Finally, it was shown that the calculated cirrus solar radiative forcing could vary by as much as 26% depending on the ice crystal habit.

  5. Spectrum line intensity as a surrogate for solar irradiance variations.

    PubMed

    Livingston, W C; Wallace, L; White, O R

    1988-06-24

    Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor (ACRIM) solar constant measurements from 1980 to 1986 are compared with ground-based, irradiance spectrophotometry of selected Fraunhofer lines. Both data sets were identically sampled and smoothed with an 85-day running mean, and the ACRIM total solar irradiance (S) values were corrected for sunspot blocking (S(c)). The strength of the mid-photospheric manganese 539.4-nanometer line tracks almost perfectly with ACRIM S(e), Other spectral features formed high in the photosphere and chromosphere also track well. These comparisons independently confirm the variability in the ACRIM S(e), signal, indicate that the source of irradiance is faculae, and indicate that ACRIM S(e), follows the 11-year activity cycle.

  6. Analyzing UV-B narrowband solar irradiance: comparison with erythemal and vitamin D production irradiances.

    PubMed

    Sola, Yolanda; Lorente, Jerónimo; Ossó, Albert

    2012-12-05

    The heliotherapy and the phototherapy are mainly focused on taking benefit of the therapeutic effects of the ultraviolet (UV) irradiance on different skin diseases. The use of UV-B narrowband lamps, with emissions centered at 311 nm, has spread out among the dermatologist community because of its high therapeutic effect in comparison with its low erythema dose. For cloudless sun exposure, the balance of solar erythemal and solar narrowband (NB)-equivalent irradiances depends on several factors such as the solar zenith angle (SZA), the total ozone column (TOC) and the altitude. For SZA below 55°, the ratio of solar UV-B narrowband and erythemal irradiances increases with the SZA whereas the ratio of vitamin D production and erythemal irradiances decreases with the SZA with the maximum around midday. Furthermore, the solar NB ratio also increases with the TOC because the shorter wavelengths of the erythemal action spectrum are more affected by the ozone absorption processes. Considering the daily variations of the ratio between narrowband and erythemal irradiance, sun exposures avoiding midday hours are recommended in order to prevent negative side-effects. However to accumulate great NB doses and sufficient vitamin D in winter months is difficult because the time exposures may be longer than the day duration.

  7. Measuring Broadband IR Irradiance in the Direct Solar Beam (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Reda, I.; Konings, J.; Xie, Y.; Dooraghi, M.; Sengupta, M.

    2015-03-01

    Solar and atmospheric science radiometers, e.g. pyranometers, pyrheliometers, and photovoltaic cells are calibrated with traceability to a consensus reference, which is maintained by Absolute Cavity Radiometers (ACRs). The ACR is an open cavity with no window, developed to measure extended broadband direct solar irradiance beyond the ultraviolet and infrared bands below and above 0.2 micrometers and 50 micrometers, respectively. On the other hand, pyranometers and pyrheliometers are developed to measure broadband shortwave irradiance from approximately 0.3 micrometers to 3 micrcometers, while the present photovoltaic cells are limited to approximately 0.3 micrometers to 1 micrometers. The broadband mismatch of ACR versus such radiometers causes discrepancy in radiometers' calibration methods that has not been discussed or addressed in the solar and atmospheric science literature. Pyrgeometers are also used for solar and atmospheric science applications and calibrated with traceability to consensus reference, yet calibrated during nighttime only, because no consensus reference has yet been established for the daytime longwave irradiance. This poster shows a method to measure the broadband IR irradiance in the direct solar beam from 3 micrometers to 50 micrometers, as first step that might be used to help develop calibration methods to address the mismatch between broadband ACR and shortwave radiometers, and the lack of a daytime reference for pyrgeometers. The irradiance was measured from sunrise to sunset for 5 days when the sun disk was cloudless; the irradiance varied from approximately 1 Wm-2 to 16 Wm-2 for solar zenith angle from 80 degres to 16 degrees respectively; estimated uncertainty is 1.5 Wm-2.

  8. Measuring Broadband IR Irradiance in the Direct Solar Beam (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Reda, I.

    2015-03-01

    Solar and atmospheric science radiometers, e.g. pyranometers, pyrheliometers, and photovoltaic cells are calibrated with traceability to a consensus reference, which is maintained by Absolute Cavity Radiometers (ACRs). The ACR is an open cavity with no window, developed to measure extended broadband direct solar irradiance beyond the ultraviolet and infrared bands below and above 0.2 um and 50 um, respectively. On the other hand, pyranometers and pyrheliometers are developed to measure broadband shortwave irradiance from approximately 0.3 um to 3 um, while the present photovoltaic cells are limited to approximately 0.3 um to 1 um. The broadband mismatch of ACR versus such radiometers causes discrepancy in radiometers' calibration methods that has not been discussed or addressed in the solar and atmospheric science literature. Pyrgeometers are also used for solar and atmospheric science applications and are calibrated with traceability to consensus reference, yet are calibrated during nighttime only, because no consensus reference has yet been established for the daytime longwave irradiance. This poster shows a method to measure the broadband IR irradiance in the direct solar beam from 3 um to 50 um, as a first step that might be used to help develop calibration methods to address the mismatch between broadband ACR and shortwave radiometers, and the lack of a daytime reference for pyrgeometers. The irradiance was measured from sunrise to sunset for 5 days when the sun disk was cloudless; the irradiance varied from approximately 1 Wm-2 to 16 Wm-2 for solar zenith angle from 80 degrees to 16 degrees respectively; estimated uncertainty is 1.5 Wm-2.

  9. Modeling the spectral solar irradiance in the SOTERIA Project Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Luis Eduardo; Dudok de Wit, Thierry; Kretzschmar, Matthieu; Cessateur, Gaël

    The evolution of the radiative energy input is a key element to understand the variability of the Earth's neutral and ionized atmospheric components. However, reliable observations are limited to the last decades, when observations realized above the Earth's atmosphere became possible. These observations have provide insights about the variability of the spectral solar irradiance on time scales from days to years, but there is still large uncertainties on the evolu-tion on time scales from decades to centuries. Here we discuss the physics-based modeling of the ultraviolet solar irradiance under development in the Solar-Terrestrial Investigations and Archives (SOTERIA) project framework. In addition, we compare the modeled solar emission with variability observed by LYRA instrument onboard of Proba2 spacecraft.

  10. Lyman alpha solar spectral irradiance line profile observations and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, Martin; Machol, Janet; Quemerais, Eric; Curdt, Werner; Kretschmar, Matthieu; Haberreiter, Margit

    2016-04-01

    Solar lyman alpha solar spectral irradiance measurements are available on a daily basis, but only the 1-nm integrated flux is typically published. The International Space Science Institute (ISSI) in Bern, Switzerland has sponsored a team to make higher spectral resolution data available to the community. Using a combination of SORCE/SOLSTICE and SOHO/SUMER observations plus empirical and semi-empirical modeling, we will produce a dataset of the line profile. Our poster will describe progress towards this goal.

  11. Solar ultraviolet irradiance observed from southern Argentina: September 1990 to March 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, J.E.; Soulen, P.F. ); Daiz, S.B.; Smolskaia, I. ); Booth, C.R.; Lucas, T.; Neuschuler, D. )

    1993-05-20

    The authors report on data which measures the solar ultraviolet irradiance between 300 and 310nm at Ushuaia, Argentina over the period Sept 1990 to Mar 1991. Ushuaia is 10[degrees] or more north of the Antarctic ozone hole, though it may or may not be in the fringe of the polar vortex. Over the Antarctic there has been an observed enhancement in solar ultraviolet irradiance on the surface of the Earth, though it has little relevance due to the sparse population density. In the northern hemisphere there has been observed an overall decrease in column ozone, but no recorded change in spectral irradiance, though there are several possible explanations for this observation. In the southern hemisphere the question of whether polar air masses could migrate north following the collapse of the polar vortex, and produce regions of depleted ozone, with consequent ultraviolet irradiance increase is looked at in this paper. Substantial increases in ultraviolet irradiance are observed from this observation period, but because of the limited data set it is difficult to say for sure that such an air mass migration was the origin. However, the net effect is still a substantial increase in solar ultraviolet irradiance, with possible biological consequences.

  12. Analysis of Solar Irradiation Anomalies in Long Term Over India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cony, M.; Polo, J.; Martin, L.; Navarro, A.; Serra, I.

    2012-04-01

    India has a high potential for solar energy applications due to its geographic position within the Sun Belt and the large number of cloudless days in many regions of the country. However, certain regions of India, particularly those largely populated, can exhibit large aerosol loading in the atmosphere as a consequence of anthropogenic emissions that could have a negative feedback in the solar resource potential. This effect, named as solar dimming, has already been observed in India, and in some other regions in the world, by some authors using ground data from the last two decades. The recent interest in the promotion of solar energy applications in India highlights the need of extending and improving the knowledge of the solar radiation resources in this country, since most of the long term measurements available correspond to global horizontal radiation and most of them are also located big cities or highly populated areas. In addition, accurate knowledge on the aerosol column quantification and on its dynamical behavior with high spatial resolution is particularly important in the case of India, due to their impact on direct normal irradiation. Long term studies of solar irradiation over India can be performed using monthly means of global hemispheric irradiation measurements from the Indian Meteorological Department. Ground data are available from 1964 till today through the World Radiation Data Centre that publish these values in the web. This work shows a long term analysis of solar irradiation in India using anomalies techniques and trends in ten places over India. Most of the places have exhibit a decreasing trend and negative anomalies confirming thus the darkening effect already reported by solar dimming studies. The analysis of anomalies has also found two periods of different behavior. From 1964 till 1988 the anomalies observed were positive and the last 20 years seems to be a period of negative anomalies. This observation is also consequent with

  13. Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) Project Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlisle, Candace; Wedge, Ronnice; Wu, Dong; Stello, Harry; Robinson, Renee

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of the Total and Spectral solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) is to acquire measurements to determine the direct and indirect effects of solar radiation on climate. TSIS total solar irradiance measurements will extend a 37-year long uninterrupted measurement record of incoming solar radiation, the dominant energy source driving the Earths climate and the most precise indicator of changes in the Suns energy output. TSIS solar spectral irradiance measurements will determine the regions of the Earths multi-layered atmosphere that are affected by solar variability, from which the solar forcing mechanisms causing changes in climate can be quantified. TSIS includes two instruments: the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) and the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM), integrated into a single payload. The TSIS TIM and SIM instruments are upgraded versions of the two instruments that are flying on the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) mission launched in January 2003. TSIS was originally planned for the nadir-pointing National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) spacecraft. The TSIS instrument passed a Critical Design Review (CDR) for NPOESS in December 2009. In 2010, TSIS was re-planned for the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Polar Free Flyer (PFF). The TSIS TIM, SIM, and associated electronics were built, tested, and successfully completed pre-ship review as of December 2013.In early 2014, NOAA and NASA agreed to fly TSIS on the International Space Station (ISS). In the FY16 Presidents Budget, NASA assumes responsibility for the TSIS mission on ISS. The TSIS project includes requirements, interface, design, build and test of the TSIS payload, including an updated pointing system, for accommodation on the ISS. It takes advantage of the prior development of the TSIS sensors and electronics. The International Space Station (ISS) program contributions include launch services and robotic installation of the TSIS payload

  14. Solar Spectral Proxy Irradiance from GOES (SSPRING): a model for solar EUV irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suess, Katherine; Snow, Martin; Viereck, Rodney; Machol, Janet

    2016-02-01

    Several currently operating instruments are able to measure the full EUV spectrum at sufficient wavelength resolution for use in upper-atmosphere modeling, the effects of space weather, and modeling satellite drag. However, no missions are planned at present to succeed the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) and Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) missions, which currently provide these data sources. To develop a suitable replacement for these measurements, we use two broadband EUV channels on the NOAA GOES satellites, the magnesium core-to-wing ratio (Mg II index) from the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) as well as EUV and Mg II time averages to model the EUV spectrum from 0.1 to 105 nm at 5-nm spectral resolution and daily time resolution. A Levenberg-Marquardt least squares fitting algorithm is used to determine a coefficient matrix that best reproduces a reference data set when multiplied by input data. The coefficient matrix is then applied to model data outside of the fitting interval. Three different fitting intervals are tested, with a variable fitting interval utilizing all days of data before the prediction date producing the best results. The correlation between the model results and the observed spectrum is found to be above 95% for the 0.1-50 nm range, and between 74% and 95% for the 50-105 nm range. We also find a favorable comparison between our results and the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM). These results provide a promising potential source for an empirical EUV spectral model after direct EUV measurements are no longer available, and utilize a similar EUV modeling technique as the upcoming GOES-R satellites.

  15. Basin-scale solar irradiance estimates in semiarid regions using GOES 7

    SciTech Connect

    Pinker, R.T.; Laszlo, I.; Kustas, W.P.

    1994-05-01

    This paper evaluates the ability of satellite observations from GOES 7 to provide basin-scale surface solar irradiance (SW) estimates in a semiarid region during a period of strong convective activity with highly variable cloud conditions. A physical inference model is used to derive the SW. Information of surface albedo is a prerequisite in all such models. In this study the albedo is first derived from the clear sky radiances as observed from the same satellite. 29 refs., 12 figs, 5 tabs.

  16. SORCE and Future Satellite Observations of Solar Irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, Robert F.; Rottman, G.; Woods, T.; Lawrence, G.; Kopp, G.; Harder, J.; McClintock, W.

    2003-01-01

    With solar activity just passing the maximum of cycle 23, SORCE is beginning a 5 year mission to measure total solar irradiance (TSI) with unprecedented accuracy using phase-sensitive detection, and to measure spectral solar irradiance (SSI) with unprecedented spectral coverage, from 1 to 2000 nm. The new Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) has 4 active cavity radiometers, any one of which can be used as a fixed-temperature reference against any other that is exposed to the Sun via a shutter that cycles at a rate designed to minimize noise at the shutter frequency. The new Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) is a dual Fery prism spectrometer that can employ either prism as a monochromatic source on the other prism, thus monitoring its transmission during the mission lifetime. Either prism can measure SSI from 200 to 2000 nm, employing the same phase-sensitive electrical substitution strategy as TIM. SORCE also carries dual SOLSTICE instruments to cover the spectral range 100-320 nm, similar to the instruments onboard UARS, and also an XUV Photometer System (XPS) similar to that on TIMED. SSI has now been added to TSI as a requirement of EOS and NPOESS, because different spectral components drive different components of the climate system - UV into upper atmosphere and stratospheric ozone, IR into tropospheric water vapor and clouds, and Visible into the oceans and biosphere. Succeeding satellite missions being planned for 2006 and 2011 will continue to monitor these critical solar variables.

  17. Preliminary Low Temperature Electron Irradiation of Triple Junction Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Mueller, Robert L.; Scrivner, Roy L.; Helizon, Roger S.

    2007-01-01

    For many years extending solar power missions far from the sun has been a challenge not only due to the rapid falloff in solar intensity (intensity varies as inverse square of solar distance) but also because some of the solar cells in an array may exhibit a LILT (low intensity low temperature) degradation that reduces array performance. Recent LILT tests performed on commercial triple junction solar cells have shown that high performance can be obtained at solar distances as great as approx. 5 AU1. As a result, their use for missions going far from the sun has become very attractive. One additional question that remains is whether the radiation damage experienced by solar cells under low temperature conditions will be more severe than when measured during room temperature radiation tests where thermal annealing may take place. This is especially pertinent to missions such as the New Frontiers mission Juno, which will experience cell irradiation from the trapped electron environment at Jupiter. Recent testing2 has shown that low temperature proton irradiation (10 MeV) produces cell degradation results similar to room temperature irradiations and that thermal annealing does not play a factor. Although it is suggestive to propose the same would be observed for low temperature electron irradiations, this has not been verified. JPL has routinely performed radiation testing on commercial solar cells and has also performed LILT testing to characterize cell performance under far sun operating conditions. This research activity was intended to combine the features of both capabilities to investigate the possibility of any room temperature annealing that might influence the measured radiation damage. Although it was not possible to maintain the test cells at a constant low temperature between irradiation and electrical measurements, it was possible to obtain measurements with the cell temperature kept well below room temperature. A fluence of 1E15 1MeV electrons was

  18. Surface Modification of a Nanoporous Carbon Photoanode upon Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Gomis-Berenguer, Alicia; Velo-Gala, Inmaculada; Rodríguez-Castellón, Enrique; Ania, Conchi O

    2016-11-23

    The photocorrosion of a nanoporous carbon photoanode, with low surface functionalization and high performance towards the photoelectrochemical oxidation of water using simulated solar light, was investigated. Two different light configurations were used to isolate the effect of the irradiation wavelength (UV and visible light) on the textural and chemical features of the carbon photoanode, and its long-term photocatalytic performance for the oxygen evolution reaction. A complete characterization of the carbon showed that the photocorrosion of carbon anodes of low functionalization follows a different pathway than highly functionalized carbons. The carbon matrix gets slightly oxidized, with the formation of carboxylic and carbonyl-like moieties in the surface of the carbon anode after light exposure. The oxidation of the carbon occurred due to the photogeneration of oxygen reactive species upon the decomposition of water during the irradiation of the photoanodes. Furthermore, the photoinduced surface reactions depend on the nature of the carbon anode and its ability to photogenerate reactive species in solution, rather than on the wavelength of the irradiation source. This surface modification is responsible for the decreased efficiency of the carbon photoanode throughout long illumination periods, due to the effect of the oxidation of the carbon matrix on the charge transfer. In this work, we have corroborated that, in the case of a low functionalization carbon material, the photocorrosion also occurs although it proceeds through a different pathway. The carbon anode gets gradually slightly oxidized due to the photogeneration of O-reactive species, being the incorporation of the O-groups responsible for the decreased performance of the anode upon long-term irradiation due to the effect of the oxidation of the carbon matrix on the electron transfer.

  19. 1978-1988 Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) Variability Trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert B., III; Priestley, Kory J.; Wilson, Robert S.; Al-Hajjah, Aiman; Paden, Jack; Pandey, Dhirendra K.; Thomas, Susan

    1999-01-01

    Total solar irradiance (TSI), normalized to the mean earth-sun distance, is analyzed to assess long-term solar variability which may affect climate. TSI data sets are reviewed primarily from the 1984-1999 Earth Radiation Budgets Satellite (ERBS), 1978-1993 Nimbus7, 1980-1989 Solar Maximum Mission (SMM), 19911998 Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS), and 1996-1998 Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/ Variability of solar IRradiance and Gravity Oscillations (VIRGO) Spacecraft missions. The data sets indicate that 1365 W/sq m [Watts per meter square] is the most likely TSI amplitude at minimum solar magnetic activity as indicated by minimum sunspot numbers. The TSI long-term variability component was found to vary with a period of approximately 10 years and with an amplitude of 2 W/sq m. An empirical TSI fit model, based upon 10.7-cm solar radio fluxes and prompt photometric sunspot indices, was used to characterize TSI variability. Comparisons among TSI measurements and empirical fit trends are reviewed as well as inconsistencies among current spacecraft TSI data set trends. The 1996-1998, SOHO/VIRGO measurement indicate stronger TSI increasing trends than those suggested by the corresponding ERBS and UARS measurement and by the empirical model fit. 1978-1999 TSI data sets are analyzed to identify the probable existence of another long-term TSI variability component.

  20. Ion-irradiation of complex hydrocarbons: implications for small Solar System bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, L.; Baratta, G.; Distefano, E.; Strazzulla, G.; Dotto, E.; Barucci, M.; Arnold, G.

    2003-04-01

    Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs) and cometary nuclei show remarkable color variations. In the visual and near-infrared spectral regions their colors may range from red to gray or bluish. This probably indicates that surface alteration processes such as space weathering and impact resurfacing plays an essential role in the color diversity of such bodies. In particular, some previous laboratory ion-irradiation experiments demonstrated a transformation of surface colors of ices from gray to red and further to gray. Additional possibility is a transformation of originally red dark refractory organic surface components into a gray carbonized material as a result of ion irradiation. We simulated such an "ageing" effect by an irradiation of a natural dark red organic samples (asphaltite and kerite). The samples were irradiated by 30-60 keV H+, N+ and Ar++ ions and their reflectance spectra were measured before and after irradiation. The results indicate that initially red spectra of organics progressively flatten with increasing ion fluences. The laboratory spectra have been compared with astronomical spectra of TNOs. We demonstrate that an observed variety of TNO’ spectral slopes can be reproduced by our laboratory spectra corresponding to different ion fluences. If we assume that fresh surfaces of some TNOs are red due to their refractory organic components, then their irradiation by ion populations in the Solar System in combination with collisional evolution exposing these fresh surfaces could have produced a variety of colors.

  1. Physical interpretation of variations in total solar irradiance

    SciTech Connect

    Foukal, P.

    1987-01-20

    Radiometry from the Solar Maximum Mission and Nimbus 7 satellites has demonstrated that the solar constant varies at a peak-to-peak level of up to 0.2% on time scales of weeks. The rotation and evolution of dark spots and bright faculae across the sun's disk accounts for most of that variation. Reasonable explanations have been put forward to explain how the spot-blocked heat flow might be stored and to explain the source of the intense radiation that gives rise to the increased irradiance produced by the bright magnetic faculae. Time-dependent models of the response of the solar convection zone to small perturbations also indicate that slower variations in total solar irradiance of camparable magnitude are likely. More precise observations of the total solar irradiance and radius over long time scales are required to demonstrate the existence of such climatologically relevant changes and to test models that would enable us to interpret and, possibly, to predict these changes. copyright American Geophysical Union 1987

  2. Reconstructing the Solar VUV Irradiance over the Past 60 Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    The Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) is an empirical model of the solar irradiance spectrum from 0.1 to 190 nm at I nm spectral resolution and on a 1-minute time cadence. The goal of FISM is to provide accurate solar spectral irradiances over the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV: 0-200 nm) range as input for ionospheric and thermospheric models, as well as climate studies over 60 years. A brief overview of the FISM model will be given, and also discussed is how the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) will contribute to improving FISM and its accuracies. Results will also be shown quantifying the VUV contributions to the total flare energy budget, and more importantly discuss the increased errors associated by not including flares in the solar energy input to the Earth's system. Concluding the talk will be a discussion of the proxies, and their associated uncertainties, used for solar spectral reconstructions prior to 1947 going back hundreds of years.

  3. Surface meteorology and Solar Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackhouse, Paul W. (Principal Investigator)

    The Release 5.1 Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) data contains parameters formulated for assessing and designing renewable energy systems. Parameters fall under 11 categories including: Solar cooking, solar thermal applications, solar geometry, tilted solar panels, energy storage systems, surplus product storage systems, cloud information, temperature, wind, other meteorological factors, and supporting information. This latest release contains new parameters based on recommendations by the renewable energy industry and it is more accurate than previous releases. On-line plotting capabilities allow quick evaluation of potential renewable energy projects for any region of the world. The SSE data set is formulated from NASA satellite- and reanalysis-derived insolation and meteorological data for the 10-year period July 1983 through June 1993. Results are provided for 1 degree latitude by 1 degree longitude grid cells over the globe. Average daily and monthly measurements for 1195 World Radiation Data Centre ground sites are also available. [Mission Objectives] The SSE project contains insolation and meteorology data intended to aid in the development of renewable energy systems. Collaboration between SSE and technology industries such as the Hybrid Optimization Model for Electric Renewables ( HOMER ) may aid in designing electric power systems that employ some combination of wind turbines, photovoltaic panels, or diesel generators to produce electricity. [Temporal_Coverage: Start_Date=1983-07-01; Stop_Date=1993-06-30] [Spatial_Coverage: Southernmost_Latitude=-90; Northernmost_Latitude=90; Westernmost_Longitude=-180; Easternmost_Longitude=180].

  4. Energetic proton irradiation history of the HED parent body regolith and implications for ancient solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M. N.; Garrison, D. H.; Palma, R. L.; Bogard, D. D.

    1997-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that the Kapoeta howardite, as well as several other meteorites, contain excess concentrations of cosmogenic neon in the darkened, solar-irradiated phase compared to the light, non-irradiated phase. The two explanations offered for the nuclear production of these Ne excesses in the parent body regolith are either from galactic particle (GCR) irradiation or from a greatly enhanced flux of energetic solar protons (SCR), as compared to the recent solar flux. Combining new isotopic data we obtained on acid-etched, separated feldspar from Kapoeta light and dark phases with literature data, we show that the cosmogenic 21Ne /22Ne ratio of light phase feldspar (0.80) is consistent with only GCR irradiation in space for ~3 Myr. However, the 21Ne/22Ne ratio (0.68) derived for irradiation of dark phase feldspar in the Kapoeta regolith indicates that cosmogenic Ne was produced in roughly equal proportions from galactic and solar protons. Considering a simple model of an immature Kapoeta parent body regolith, the duration of this early galactic exposure was only ~3-6 Myr, which would be an upper limit to the solar exposure time of individual grains. Concentrations of cosmogenic 21Ne in pyroxene separates and of cosmogenic 126Xe in both feldspar and pyroxene are consistent with this interpretation. The near-surface irradiation time of individual grains in the Kapoeta regolith probably varied considerably due to regolith mixing to an average GCR irradiation depth of ~10 cm. Because of the very different depth scales for production of solar ~Fe tracks, SCR Ne, and GCR Ne, the actual regolith exposure times for average grains probably differed correspondingly. However, both the SCR 21Ne and solar track ages appear to be longer because of enhanced production by early solar activity. The SCR/GCR production ratio of 21Ne inferred from the Kapoeta data is larger by a at least a factor of 10 and possibly as much as a factor of ~50 compared to recent solar

  5. The Impact of Different Absolute Solar Irradiance Values on Current Climate Model Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, David H.; Lean, Judith L.; Jonas, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Simulations of the preindustrial and doubled CO2 climates are made with the GISS Global Climate Middle Atmosphere Model 3 using two different estimates of the absolute solar irradiance value: a higher value measured by solar radiometers in the 1990s and a lower value measured recently by the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment. Each of the model simulations is adjusted to achieve global energy balance; without this adjustment the difference in irradiance produces a global temperature change of 0.48C, comparable to the cooling estimated for the Maunder Minimum. The results indicate that by altering cloud cover the model properly compensates for the different absolute solar irradiance values on a global level when simulating both preindustrial and doubled CO2 climates. On a regional level, the preindustrial climate simulations and the patterns of change with doubled CO2 concentrations are again remarkably similar, but there are some differences. Using a higher absolute solar irradiance value and the requisite cloud cover affects the model's depictions of high-latitude surface air temperature, sea level pressure, and stratospheric ozone, as well as tropical precipitation. In the climate change experiments it leads to an underestimation of North Atlantic warming, reduced precipitation in the tropical western Pacific, and smaller total ozone growth at high northern latitudes. Although significant, these differences are typically modest compared with the magnitude of the regional changes expected for doubled greenhouse gas concentrations. Nevertheless, the model simulations demonstrate that achieving the highest possible fidelity when simulating regional climate change requires that climate models use as input the most accurate (lower) solar irradiance value.

  6. Annealing characteristics of irradiated hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Payson, J. S.; Abdulaziz, S.; Li, Y.; Woodyard, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    It was shown that 1 MeV proton irradiation with fluences of 1.25E14 and 1.25E15/sq cm reduces the normalized I(sub SC) of a-Si:H solar cell. Solar cells recently fabricated showed superior radiation tolerance compared with cells fabricated four years ago; the improvement is probably due to the fact that the new cells are thinner and fabricated from improved materials. Room temperature annealing was observed for the first time in both new and old cells. New cells anneal at a faster rate than old cells for the same fluence. From the annealing work it is apparent that there are at least two types of defects and/or annealing mechanisms. One cell had improved I-V characteristics following irradiation as compared to the virgin cell. The work shows that the photothermal deflection spectroscopy (PDS) and annealing measurements may be used to predict the qualitative behavior of a-Si:H solar cells. It was anticipated that the modeling work will quantitatively link thin film measurements with solar cell properties. Quantitative predictions of the operation of a-Si:H solar cells in a space environment will require a knowledge of the defect creation mechanisms, defect structures, role of defects on degradation, and defect passivation and annealing mechanisms. The engineering data and knowledge base for justifying space flight testing of a-Si:H alloy based solar cells is being developed.

  7. Solar Cycle Spectral Irradiance Variation and Stratospheric Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolarski, R. S.; Swartz, W. H.; Jackman, C. H.; Fleming, E. L.

    2011-12-01

    Recent measurements from the SIM instrument on the SORCE satellite have been interpreted by Harder et al (Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L07801, doi:10.1029/2008GL036797, 2009) as implying a different spectral irradiance variation over the solar cycle than that put forward by Lean (Geophys. Res. Lett., 27, 2425-2428, 2000). When we inserted this new wavelength dependent solar cycle variation into our 3D CCM we found a different solar cycle dependence of the ozone concentration as a function of altitude from that we derived using the traditional Lean wavelength dependence. Examination of these results led us to realize that the main issue is the solar cycle variation of radiation at wavelengths less than 240 nm versus the solar cycle variation of radiation at wavelengths between 240 nm and 300 nm. The impact of wavelengths less than 240 nm occurs through photodissociation of O2 leading to the production of ozone. The impact of wavelengths between 240 nm and 300 nm occurs through photodissociation of O3 leading to an increase in O atoms and enhanced ozone destruction. Thus one wavelength region gives an in-phase relationship of ozone with the solar cycle while the other wavelength region gives an out-of-phase relationship of ozone with the solar cycle. We have used the Goddard two-dimensional (2D) photochemistry transport model to examine this relationship in more detail. We calculate the altitude and latitude sensitivity of ozone to changes in the solar UV irradiance as a function of wavelength. These results can be used to construct the ozone response to arbitrary wavelength dependencies of solar UV variation.

  8. Design and calibration of the solar irradiance monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dong-jun; Fang, Wei; Ye, Xin; Wang, Yu-peng; Gong, Cheng-hu; Zhang, Guang-wei

    2011-08-01

    The solar irradiance monitor (SIM), with the design accuracy of 5%, used to monitor the secular changes of the total solar irradiance on FY-3 satellite, takes the sun-scanning measurement method on-orbit. Compared to the sun-tracking measurement method, this method simplifies the structure and cuts the cost, but the measuring accuracy is affected by the sun-synchronous orbit, sunlight incidence angle and the installing angle of the SIM in the satellite. Through the ground calibration experiment, studies on the affection of different sunlight incidence angles to the measurement accuracy. First, by the satellite tool kit (STK) simulation software, simulates the orbital parameters of the sun-synchronous satellite, and calculates the Sun ascension and declination at any time. By the orbit coordinate transformation matrix gets the components of the Sun vectors to the axes of the satellite, and base on the components designs the field of view and the installing angles of the SIM. Then, designs and completes the calibration experiment to calibrate the affection of the incidence angles. Selecting 11 different angles between the sunlight and the satellite X-axis, measures the total solar irradiance by the SIM at each angle, and compares to the irradiances of the SIAR reference radiometers, and gets the coefficient curves of the three channels of the SIM. Finally, by the quadratic fitting, gets the correction equations on the incidence angles: 5 2 3 R1 5.71x10-5α2 - 2.453 10-5 α2 1.0302, R2 = 2.84×10-5α2-1.965x10-3α+1.0314 and R3 =1.72x10-5α2-4.184x10-4α+0.9946. The equations will improve the on-orbit measurement accuracy of the solar irradiance, and are very important to the on-orbit data processing after the satellite launched.

  9. Irradiance optimization of outdoor microalgal cultures using solar tracked photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Hindersin, Stefan; Leupold, Marco; Kerner, Martin; Hanelt, Dieter

    2013-03-01

    Photosynthetic activity and temperature regulation of microalgal cultures (Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus obliquus) under different irradiances controlled by a solar tracker and different cell densities were studied in outdoor flat panel photobioreactors. An automated process control unit regulated light and temperature as well as pH value and nutrient concentration in the culture medium. CO2 was supplied using flue gas from an attached combined block heat and power station. Photosynthetic activity was determined by pulse amplitude modulation fluorometry. Compared to the horizontal irradiance of 55 mol photons m(-2) d(-1) on a clear day, the solar tracked photobioreactors enabled a decrease and increase in the overall light absorption from 19 mol photons m(-2) d(-1) (by rotation out of direct irradiance) to 79 mol photons m(-2) d(-1) (following the position of the sun). At biomass concentrations below 1.1 g cell dry weight (CDW) L(-1), photoinhibition of about 35 % occurred at irradiances of ≥1,000 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) photosynthetic active radiation (PAR). Using solar tracked photobioreactors, photoinhibition can be reduced and at optimum biomass concentration (≥2.3 g CDW L(-1)), the culture was irradiated up to 2,000 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) to overcome light limitation with biomass yields of 0.7 g CDW mol photons(-1) and high photosynthetic activities indicated by an effective quantum yield of 0.68 and a maximum quantum yield of 0.80 (F v/F m). Overheating due to high irradiance was avoided by turning the PBR out of the sun or using a cooling system, which maintained the temperature close to the species-specific temperature optima.

  10. Irradiation and measurements of fluorinated ethylene-propylene-A on silicon solar cells in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsik, S. J.; Broder, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Silicon monoxide (SiO) coated silicon solar cells covered with fluorinated ethylene-propylene-A (FEP-A) were irradiated by 1-MeV electrons in vacuum. The effect of irradiation on the light transmittance of FEP-A was checked by measuring the short-circuit current of the cells while in vacuum after each dose increment, immediately after the irradiation, and again after a minimum elapsed time of 16 hr. The results indicated no apparent loss in transmission due to irradiation of FEP-A and no delamination from the SiO surface while the cells were in vacuum, but embrittlement of FEP-A occurred at the accumulated dose.

  11. Modeling total solar irradiance from PMOD composite using feed-forward neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tebabal, A.; Damtie, B.; Nigussie, M.; Bires, A.; Yizengaw, E.

    2015-12-01

    The variability of the solar activity dominates the variability of the earth's atmosphere, which affects human life and technology on earth. To understand the effects of solar activity on earth's atmosphere different efforts are underway to model the variations of total solar irradiance (TSI) associated to the variations of photometric sunspot index (PSI) and core to wing ratio of Mg II index, for example, linear regression approach. In this study, feed-forward neural networks (NNs) algorithm, which takes the non-linear relationship between the dependent and independent variables, has been implemented to model daily TSI using PSI and Mg II index. First, data between 1978 and 2008 have been used to train and validate NNs, through which the parameters such as weights and biases are estimated. Therefore, NNs has been used to predict TSI between the years 2008 and 2013 from test data. The output of NNs have been compared with PMOD composite TSI and result has shown good agreement. Linear correlation between NNs predicted TSI and PMOD composite is found to be about 0.9307 for the years between 1978 and 2013. This means that NNs predicted TSI from solar proxies explains about 86.6% of the variance of TSI for solar cycles 21-24, and over 90% during solar cycle 23. Predicting TSI using NNs further strengthens the view that surface magnetism indeed plays a dominant role in modulating solar irradiance.

  12. The Missing Solar Irradiance Spectrum: 1 to 7 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojka, J. J.; Lewis, M.; David, M.; Schunk, R. W.; Woods, T. N.; Eparvier, F. G.; Warren, H. P.

    2015-12-01

    During large X-class flares the Earth's upper atmospheric E-region responds immediately to solar photons in the 1 to 7 nm range. The response can change the E-region density by factors approaching 10, create large changes in conductivity, and plague HF communications. GOES-XRS provide 0.1 to 0.8 nm and a 0.05 to 0.4 nm integral channels; SOHO-SEM provided a 0 to 50 nm irradiance; TIMED and SORCE-XPS diode measurements also integrated down to 0.1 nm; and most recently SDO-EVE provided a 0.1 to 7 nm irradiance. For atmospheric response to solar flares the cadence is also crucial. Both GOES and SDO provided integral measurements at 10 seconds or better. Unfortunately these measurements have failed to capture the 1 to 7 nm spectral changes that occur during flares. It is these spectral changes that create the major impact since the ionization cross-section of the dominant atmospheric species, N2 and O2, both contain step function changes in the cross-sections. Models of the solar irradiance over this critical wavelength regime have suffered from the need to model the spectral variability based on incomplete measurements. The most sophisticated empirical model FISM [Chamberlin et al., 2008] used 1 nm spectral binning and various implementations of the above integral measurements to describe the 1 to 7 nm irradiance. Since excellent solar observations exist at other wavelengths it is possible to construct an empirical model of the solar atmosphere and then use this model to infer the spectral distribution at wavelengths below 5 nm. This differential emission measure approach has been used successfully in other contexts [e.g., Warren, 2005, Chamberlin et al., 2009]. This paper contrasts the broadband versus spectrally resolved descriptions of the incoming irradiance that affects the upper atmospheric E-layer. The results provide a prescription of what wavelength resolution would be needed to adequately measure the incoming solar irradiance in the 1 to 7 nm range.

  13. Measurement of the absolute solar UV irradiance and variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mentall, James E.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation in the wavelength interval 150-350 nm initiates chemical reactions in the lower mesosphere and the stratosphere through the photodissociation of ambient molecular species. This experiment measures the total solar irradiance, above the Earth's atmosphere, in this wavelength interval, using three spectrometers. Measurements are made from rockets on a once-a-year basis and are used with satellite observations to determine both the absolute irradiance and the long term variability of the sun in the UV. A fourth spectrometer is being added to the payload to measure the emission in the hydrogen Lyman-alpha emission at 121.67 nm.

  14. Effect of solar irradiation on extracellular enzymes of Aeromonas proteolytica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, B. G.

    1973-01-01

    The bacterium Aeromonas proteolytica was selected for studying the effects of solar irradiation on extracellular enzymes because it produces an endopeptidase that is capable of degrading proteins and a hemolysin that is active in lysing human erythrocytes. Possible alterations in the rate of enzyme production in response to the test conditions are currently underway and are not available for this preliminary report. Completed viability studies are indicative that little difference exists among the survival curves derived for cells exposed to various components of ultraviolet irradiation in space.

  15. Photometric measurements of solar irradiance variations due to sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, G. A.; Herzog, A. D.; Laico, D. E.; Lawrence, J. K.; Templer, M. S.

    1989-01-01

    A photometric telescope constructed to obtain photometric sunspot areas and deficits on a daily basis is described. Data from this Cartesian full disk telescope (CFDT) are analyzed with attention given to the period between June 4 and June 17, 1985 because of the availability of overlapping sunspot area and irradiance deficit data from high-resolution digital spectroheliograms made with the San Fernando Observatory 28 cm vacuum solar telescope and spectroheliograph. The CFDT sunspot deficits suggest a substantial irradiance contribution from faculae and active region plage.

  16. Evaluating solar radiation on a tilted surfaces - a study case in Timis (Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasar, C.; Prostean, O.; Prostean, G.

    2016-02-01

    In the last years the usage of solar energy has grown considerably in Romania, as well as in Europe, stimulated by various factors as government programs, green pricing policies, decreasing of photovoltaic components cost etc. Also, the rising demand of using Solar Energy Conversion Systems (SECS) is driven by the desire of individuals or companies to obtain energy from a clean renewable source. In many applications, remote consumers far from other energetic grids can use solar systems more cost-effectively than extending the grid to reach the location. Usually the solar energy is measured or forecast on horizontal surface, but in SECS there is needed the total solar radiation incident on the collector surface, that is oriented in a position that maximize the harvested energy. There are many models that convert the solar radiation from horizontal surface to a tilted surface, but they use empirical coefficients and the accuracy is influenced by different facts as geographical location or sky conditions. Such models were used considering measured values for solar radiation on horizontal plane, in the western part of Romania. Hourly values measured for global solar irradiation on the horizontal plane, diffuse solar irradiation on the horizontal plane and reflected solar irradiation by ground are used to compute the total solar radiation incident on different tilted surfaces. The calculated incident radiation is then compared with the real radiation measured on tilted surface in order to evaluate the performance of the considered conversion models.

  17. Accessing Solar Irradiance Data via LISIRD, the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics Interactive Solar Irradiance Datacenter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratz, C. K.; Wilson, A.; Snow, M. A.; Lindholm, D. M.; Woods, T. N.; Traver, T.; Woodraska, D.

    2015-12-01

    The LASP Interactive Solar Irradiance Datacenter, LISIRD, http://lasp.colorado.edu/lisird, allows the science community and the public to explore and access solar irradiance and related data sets using convenient, interactive or scriptable, standards-based interfaces. LISIRD's interactive plotting allows users to investigate and download irradiance data sets from a variety of sources, including space missions, ground observatories, and modeling efforts. LISIRD's programmatic interfaces allow software-level data retrievals and facilitate automation. This presentation will describe the current state of LISIRD, provide details of the data sets it serves, outline data access methods, identify key technologies in-use, and address other related aspects of serving spectral and other time series data. We continue to improve LISIRD by integrating new data sets, and also by advancing its data management and presentation capabilities to meet evolving best practices and community needs. LISIRD is hosted and operated by the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, LASP, which has been a leader in Atmospheric and Heliophysics science for over 60 years. LASP makes a variety of space-based measurements of solar irradiance, which provide crucial input for research and modeling in solar-terrestrial interactions, space physics, planetary, atmospheric, and climate sciences. These data sets consist of fundamental measurements, composite data sets, solar indices, space weather products, and models. Current data sets available through LISIRD originate from the SORCE, SDO (EVE), UARS (SOLSTICE), TIMED (SEE), and SME space missions, as well as several other space and ground-based projects. LISIRD leverages several technologies to provide flexible and standards-based access to the data holdings available through LISIRD. This includes internet-accessible interfaces that permit data access in a variety of formats, data subsetting, as well as program-level access from data analysis

  18. Temperature dependence of damage coefficient in electron irradiated solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faith, T. J.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of light-generated current vs cell temperature on electron-irradiated n/p silicon solar cells show the temperature coefficient of this current to increase with increasing fluence for both 10-ohm and 20-ohm cells. A relationship between minority-carrier diffusion length and light-generated current was derived by combining measurements of these two parameters: vs fluence at room temperature, and vs cell temperature in cells irradiated to a fluence of 1 x 10 to the 15th power e/sq cm. This relationship was used, together with the light-generated current data, to calculate the temperature dependence of the diffusion-length damage coefficient. The results show a strong decrease in the damage coefficient with increasing temperature in the range experienced by solar panels in synchronous earth orbit.

  19. Influence of synoptic weather patterns on solar irradiance variability in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parding, Kajsa; Hinkelman, Laura; Liepert, Beate; Ackerman, Thomas; Dagestad, Knut-Frode; Asle Olseth, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Solar radiation is important for many aspects of existence on Earth, including the biosphere, the hydrological cycle, and creatures living on the planet. Previous studies have reported decadal trends in observational records of surface shortwave (SW) irradiance around the world, too strong to be caused by varying solar output. These observed decadal trends have been dubbed "solar dimming and brightening" and are believed to be related to changes in atmospheric aerosols and cloud cover. Because the observed solar variability coincides with qualitative air pollution histories, the dimming and brightening have become almost synonymous with shortwave attenuation by anthropogenic aerosols. However, there are indications that atmospheric circulation patterns have influenced the dimming and brightening in some regions, e.g., Alaska and Scandinavia. In this work, we focus on the role of atmospheric circulation patterns in modifying shortwave irradiance. An examination of European SW irradiance data from the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA) shows that while there are periods of predominantly decreasing (~1970-1985) and increasing (~1985-2007) SW irradiance, the changes are not spatially uniform within Europe and in a majority of locations not statistically significant. To establish a connection between weather patterns and sunshine, regression models of SW irradiance are fitted using a daily classification of European weather called Grosswetterlagen (GWL). The GWL reconstructions of shortwave irradiance represent the part of the solar variability that is related to large scale weather patterns, which should be effectively separated from the influence of varying anthropogenic aerosol emissions. The correlation (R) between observed and reconstruced SW irradiance is between 0.31 and 0.75, depending on station and season, all statistically significant (p<0.05, estimated with a bootstrap test). In central and eastern parts of Europe, the observed decadal SW variability is

  20. Tuning surface porosity on vanadium surface by low energy He+ ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, J. K.; Novakowski, T. J.; Hassanein, A.

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, we report on tuning the surface porosity on vanadium surfaces using high-flux, low-energy He+ ion irradiation as function of sample temperature. Polished, mirror-finished vanadium samples were irradiated with 100 eV He+ ions at a constant ion-flux of 7.2 × 1020 ions m-2 s-1 for 1 h duration at constant sample temperatures in the wide range of 823-1173 K. Our results show that the surface porosity of V2O5 (naturally oxidized vanadium porous structure, after taking out from UHV) is strongly correlated to the sample temperature and is highly tunable. In fact, the surface porosity significantly increases with reducing sample temperature and reaches up to ∼87%. Optical reflectivity on these highly porous V2O5 surfaces show ∼0% optical reflectivity at 670 nm wavelength, which is very similar to that of "black metal". Combined with the naturally high melting point of V2O5, this very low optical reflectivity suggests potential application in solar power concentration technology. Additionally, this top-down approach guarantees relatively good contact between the different crystallites and avoids electrical conductivity limitations (if required). Since V2O5 is naturally a potential photocatalytic material, the resulting sub-micron-sized cube-shaped porous structures could be used in solar water splitting for hydrogen production in energy applications.

  1. Solar Surface Magneto-Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Robert F.

    2012-12-01

    We review the properties of solar magneto-convection in the top half of the convection zones scale heights (from 20 Mm below the visible surface to the surface, and then through the photosphere to the temperature minimum). Convection is a highly non-linear and nonlocal process, so it is best studied by numerical simulations. We focus on simulations that include sufficient detailed physics so that their results can be quantitatively compared with observations. The solar surface is covered with magnetic features with spatial sizes ranging from unobservably small to hundreds of megameters. Three orders of magnitude more magnetic flux emerges in the quiet Sun than emerges in active regions. In this review we focus mainly on the properties of the quiet Sun magnetic field. The Sun's magnetic field is produced by dynamo action throughout the convection zone, primarily by stretching and twisting in the turbulent downflows. Diverging convective upflows and magnetic buoyancy carry magnetic flux toward the surface and sweep the field into the surrounding downflow lanes where the field is dragged downward. The result is a hierarchy of undulating magnetic Ω- and U-loops of different sizes. New magnetic flux first appears at the surface in a mixed polarity random pattern and then collects into isolated unipolar regions due to underlying larger scale magnetic structures. Rising magnetic structures are not coherent, but develop a filamentary structure. Emerging magnetic flux alters the convection properties, producing larger, darker granules. Strong field concentrations inhibit transverse plasma motions and, as a result, reduce convective heat transport toward the surface which cools. Being cooler, these magnetic field concentrations have a shorter scale height and become evacuated. The field becomes further compressed and can reach strengths in balance with the surrounding gas pressure. Because of their small internal density, photons escape from deeper in the atmosphere. Narrow

  2. Method to Calculate Uncertainty Estimate of Measuring Shortwave Solar Irradiance using Thermopile and Semiconductor Solar Radiometers

    SciTech Connect

    Reda, I.

    2011-07-01

    The uncertainty of measuring solar irradiance is fundamentally important for solar energy and atmospheric science applications. Without an uncertainty statement, the quality of a result, model, or testing method cannot be quantified, the chain of traceability is broken, and confidence cannot be maintained in the measurement. Measurement results are incomplete and meaningless without a statement of the estimated uncertainty with traceability to the International System of Units (SI) or to another internationally recognized standard. This report explains how to use International Guidelines of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) to calculate such uncertainty. The report also shows that without appropriate corrections to solar measuring instruments (solar radiometers), the uncertainty of measuring shortwave solar irradiance can exceed 4% using present state-of-the-art pyranometers and 2.7% using present state-of-the-art pyrheliometers. Finally, the report demonstrates that by applying the appropriate corrections, uncertainties may be reduced by at least 50%. The uncertainties, with or without the appropriate corrections might not be compatible with the needs of solar energy and atmospheric science applications; yet, this report may shed some light on the sources of uncertainties and the means to reduce overall uncertainty in measuring solar irradiance.

  3. WHAT CAUSES THE INTER-SOLAR-CYCLE VARIATION OF TOTAL SOLAR IRRADIANCE?

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, N. B.; Kong, D. F.

    2015-12-15

    The Physikalisch Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos total solar irradiance (TSI), Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitoring TSI, and Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium TSI are three typical TSI composites. Magnetic Plage Strength Index (MPSI) and Mount Wilson Sunspot Index (MWSI) should indicate the weak and strong magnetic field activity on the solar full disk, respectively. Cross-correlation (CC) analysis of MWSI with three TSI composites shows that TSI should be weakly correlated with MWSI, and not be in phase with MWSI at timescales of solar cycles. The wavelet coherence (WTC) and partial wavelet coherence (PWC) of TSI with MWSI indicate that the inter-solar-cycle variation of TSI is also not related to solar strong magnetic field activity, which is represented by MWSI. However, CC analysis of MPSI with three TSI composites indicates that TSI should be moderately correlated and accurately in phase with MPSI at timescales of solar cycles, and that the statistical significance test indicates that the correlation coefficient of three TSI composites with MPSI is statistically significantly higher than that of three TSI composites with MWSI. Furthermore, the cross wavelet transform (XWT) and WTC of TSI with MPSI show that the TSI is highly related and actually in phase with MPSI at a timescale of a solar cycle as well. Consequently, the CC analysis, XWT, and WTC indicate that the solar weak magnetic activity on the full disk, which is represented by MPSI, dominates the inter-solar-cycle variation of TSI.

  4. What Causes the Inter-solar-cycle Variation of Total Solar Irradiance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, N. B.; Kong, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    The Physikalisch Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos total solar irradiance (TSI), Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitoring TSI, and Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium TSI are three typical TSI composites. Magnetic Plage Strength Index (MPSI) and Mount Wilson Sunspot Index (MWSI) should indicate the weak and strong magnetic field activity on the solar full disk, respectively. Cross-correlation (CC) analysis of MWSI with three TSI composites shows that TSI should be weakly correlated with MWSI, and not be in phase with MWSI at timescales of solar cycles. The wavelet coherence (WTC) and partial wavelet coherence (PWC) of TSI with MWSI indicate that the inter-solar-cycle variation of TSI is also not related to solar strong magnetic field activity, which is represented by MWSI. However, CC analysis of MPSI with three TSI composites indicates that TSI should be moderately correlated and accurately in phase with MPSI at timescales of solar cycles, and that the statistical significance test indicates that the correlation coefficient of three TSI composites with MPSI is statistically significantly higher than that of three TSI composites with MWSI. Furthermore, the cross wavelet transform (XWT) and WTC of TSI with MPSI show that the TSI is highly related and actually in phase with MPSI at a timescale of a solar cycle as well. Consequently, the CC analysis, XWT, and WTC indicate that the solar weak magnetic activity on the full disk, which is represented by MPSI, dominates the inter-solar-cycle variation of TSI.

  5. Excimer laser irradiation of metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinsman, Grant

    In this work a new method of enhancing CO2 laser processing by modifying the radiative properties of a metal surface is studied. In this procedure, an excimer laser (XeCl) or KrF) exposes the metal surface to overlapping pulses of high intensity, 10(exp 8) - 10(exp 9) W cm(exp -2), and short pulse duration, 30 nsec FWHM (Full Width Half Maximum), to promote structural and chemical change. The major processing effect at these intensities is the production of a surface plasma which can lead to the formation of a laser supported detonation wave (LSD wave). This shock wave can interact with the thin molten layer on the metal surface influencing to a varying degree surface oxidation and roughness features. The possibility of the expulsion, oxidation and redeposition of molten droplets, leading to the formation of micron thick oxide layers, is related to bulk metal properties and the incident laser intensity. A correlation is found between the expulsion of molten droplets and a Reynolds number, showing the interaction is turbulent. The permanent effects of these interactions on metal surfaces are observed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transient calorimetric measurements and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Observed surface textures are related to the scanning procedures used to irradiate the metal surface. Fundamental radiative properties of a metal surface, the total hemispherical emissivity, the near-normal spectral absorptivity, and others are examined in this study as they are affected by excimer laser radiation. It is determined that for heavily exposed Al surface, alpha' (10.6 microns) can be increased to values close to unity. Data relating to material removal rates and chemical surface modification for excimer laser radiation is also discussed. The resultant reduction in the near-normal reflectivity solves the fundamental problem of coupling laser radiation into highly reflective and conductive metals such as copper and aluminum. The

  6. Interannual variability of solar irradiance over the Amazon Basin including the 1982-83 El Nino Year

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinker, Rachel T.; Laszlo, I.

    1992-01-01

    Surface solar irradiance was derived over the extended Amazon Basin using AVHRR observations from polar-orbiting satellites during four July months (1983-1986). Observations from the geostationary satellite GOES for July 1983 were also used to assess diurnal effects. Both satellite datasets are part of the Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) B3 product. It was demonstrated that it is now possible to derive long-term surface solar irradiance, which can be useful in climate studies, and that the accuracy of the derived fields is sufficient to detect interannual differences that can exceed at times 70 W/sq m.

  7. Measurements and modeling of total solar irradiance in X-class solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Christopher Samuel; Chamberlin, Phillip Clyde; Hock, Rachel

    2014-05-20

    The Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) from NASA's SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment can detect changes in the total solar irradiance (TSI) to a precision of 2 ppm, allowing observations of variations due to the largest X-class solar flares for the first time. Presented here is a robust algorithm for determining the radiative output in the TIM TSI measurements, in both the impulsive and gradual phases, for the four solar flares presented in Woods et al., as well as an additional flare measured on 2006 December 6. The radiative outputs for both phases of these five flares are then compared to the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) irradiance output from the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) in order to derive an empirical relationship between the FISM VUV model and the TIM TSI data output to estimate the TSI radiative output for eight other X-class flares. This model provides the basis for the bolometric energy estimates for the solar flares analyzed in the Emslie et al. study.

  8. Measurements and Modeling of Total Solar Irradiance in X-class Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Christopher S.; Chamberlin, Phillip Clyde; Hock, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    The Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) from NASA's SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment can detect changes in the total solar irradiance (TSI) to a precision of 2 ppm, allowing observations of variations due to the largest X-class solar flares for the first time. Presented here is a robust algorithm for determining the radiative output in the TIM TSI measurements, in both the impulsive and gradual phases, for the four solar flares presented in Woods et al., as well as an additional flare measured on 2006 December 6. The radiative outputs for both phases of these five flares are then compared to the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) irradiance output from the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) in order to derive an empirical relationship between the FISM VUV model and the TIM TSI data output to estimate the TSI radiative output for eight other X-class flares. This model provides the basis for the bolometric energy estimates for the solar flares analyzed in the Emslie et al. study.

  9. Satellite Observations of Solar Irradiance and Sun-climate Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahalan, R.

    Solar activity is now near its maximum, with events such as the 2001"Bastille Day Event", a Coronal Mass Ejection which merited a full session at AGU's annual meet- ing - and two major sunspot groupings earlier this year, with associated variations in TSI (Total Solar Irradiance). We discuss recent satellite measurements of TSI by ACRIM 2 and 3 and Virgo, and new precision observations of TSI and SSI (Solar Spectral Irradiance) expected from the SORCE mission, planned to launch in fall 2002. SSI has been added to TSI as a required EOS and NPOESS measurement be- cause different spectral components provide energy inputs to different components of the climate system - UV into upper atmosphere and ozone, IR into lower atmo- sphere and clouds, and Visible into the biosphere. Succeeding satellite missions being planned for 2006 and 2010 will continue to monitor both TSI and SSI. We summarize current ideas about the potential impact of solar variability on Earth's climate on time scales from days to decades to centuries.

  10. Satellite Observations of Solar Irradiance and Sun-Climate Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, R.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Solar activity is now near its maximum, with events such as the 2001 "Bastille Day Event", a Coronal Mass Ejection which merited a full session at AGO'S annual meeting - and two major sunspot groupings earlier this year, with associated variations in TSI (Total Solar Irradiance). We discuss recent satellite measurements of TSI by ACRIM 2 and 3 And Virgo, and new precision observations of TSI and SSI (Solar Spectral Irradiance) expected from the SORCE mission, planned to launch in fall 2002. SSG has been added to TSI as a required EOS and NPOESS measurement because different spectral components provide energy inputs to different components of the climate system - UV into upper atmosphere and ozone, IR into lower atmosphere and clouds, and Visible into the biosphere. Succeeding satellite missions being planned for 2006 and 2010 will continue to monitor both TSI and SSI. We summarize current ideas about the potential impact of solar variability on Earth's climate on time scales from days to decades to centuries.

  11. Satellite Observations of Solar Irradiance and Sun-Climate Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, Robert; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Solar activity is now near its maximum, with events such as the 2001 "Bastille Day Event", a Coronal Mass Ejection which merited a full session at AGUs annual meeting - and two major sunspot groupings earlier this year, with associated variations in TSI (Total Solar Irradiance). We discuss recent satellite measurements of TSI by ACRIM 2 and 3 and Virgo, and new precision observations of TSI and SSI (Solar Spectral Irradiance) expected from the SORCE mission, planned to launch in fall 2002. SSI has been added to TSI as a required EOS and NPOESS measurement because different spectral components provide energy inputs to different components of the climate system - UV into upper atmosphere and ozone, IR into lower atmosphere and clouds, and Visible into the biosphere. Succeeding satellite missions being planned for 2006 and 2010 will continue to monitor both TSI and SSI. We summarize current ideas about the potential impact of solar variability on Earth's climate on time scales from days to decades to centuries.

  12. Direct solar radiation - Spectrum and irradiance derived from sun-photometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wobrock, Wolfram; Eiden, Reiner

    1988-06-01

    The continuous spectrum of the direct solar radiation from wavelength = 330 to 2690 nm, penetrating a cloudless atmosphere and arriving on the earth surface, is determined by measuring the solar irradiance in ten selected discrete spectral ranges defined by interference filters. Heretofore knowledge of the extraterrestrial solar spectrum has been required as well as of the transmittance functions to describe the spectral optical properties of the atmosphere. A set of appropriate and simple functions is given and discussed, which allows calculation of the molecular, aerosol, oxygen, and ozone optical thicknesses. The influence of atmospheric water vapor is considered through line by line calculations. The dominant and most fluctuating extinction parameters are the aerosol optical thickness and the content of precipitable water vapor. These are obtained by measurements with two sun photometers, developed according to the World Meteorological Organization recommendation. To test the derived solar spectrum at ground level the photometers are also run with nine broadband filters. The values observed differ little from those obtained by integration of the deduced spectral irradiance. Furthermore, the integral value of the resulting entire spectrum agrees reasonably well with the total direct irradiance gained from actinometer measurements.

  13. The observation of damage regions produced by neutron irradiation in lithium-doped silicon solar cells.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, S.; Sargent, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Study regions of lattice disorder produced in lithium-doped float-zone melted n/p-type silicon solar cells by irradiation with monoenergetic neutrons at doses between 10 to the 10th and 10 to the 13th per cu cm. The defect regions were revealed by chemically etching the surface of the solar cells and by observing carbon replicas in an electron microscope. It was found that the defect density increased with increasing irradiation dose and increased lithium content, whereas the average defect diameter was found to decrease. From thermal annealing experiments it was found that in the lithium-doped material the defect structure was stable at temperatures between 300 and 1200 K. This was found to be in contrast to the undoped material where at the lowest doses considerable annealing was observed to occur. These results are discussed in terms of the theoretical predictions and models of defect clusters proposed by Gossick (1959) and Crawford and Cleland (1959).

  14. The influence of solar system oscillation on the variability of the total solar irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yndestad, Harald; Solheim, Jan-Erik

    2017-02-01

    Total solar irradiance (TSI) is the primary quantity of energy that is provided to the Earth. The properties of the TSI variability are critical for understanding the cause of the irradiation variability and its expected influence on climate variations. A deterministic property of TSI variability can provide information about future irradiation variability and expected long-term climate variation, whereas a non-deterministic variability can only explain the past. This study of solar variability is based on an analysis of two TSI data series, one since 1700 A.D. and one since 1000 A.D.; a sunspot data series since 1610 A.D.; and a solar orbit data series from 1000 A.D. The study is based on a wavelet spectrum analysis. First, the TSI data series are transformed into a wavelet spectrum. Then, the wavelet spectrum is transformed into an autocorrelation spectrum to identify stationary, subharmonic and coincidence periods in the TSI variability. The results indicate that the TSI and sunspot data series have periodic cycles that are correlated with the oscillations of the solar position relative to the barycenter of the solar system, which is controlled by gravity force variations from the large planets Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. A possible explanation for solar activity variations is forced oscillations between the large planets and the solar dynamo. We find that a stationary component of the solar variability is controlled by the 12-year Jupiter period and the 84-year Uranus period with subharmonics. For TSI and sunspot variations, we find stationary periods related to the 84-year Uranus period. Deterministic models based on the stationary periods confirm the results through a close relation to known long solar minima since 1000 A.D. and suggest a modern maximum period from 1940 to 2015. The model computes a new Dalton-type sunspot minimum from approximately 2025 to 2050 and a new Dalton-type period TSI minimum from approximately 2040 to 2065.

  15. Development, Production and Validation of the NOAA Solar Irradiance Climate Data Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coddington, O.; Lean, J.; Pilewskie, P.; Snow, M. A.; Lindholm, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    A new climate data record of Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) and Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI), including source code and supporting documentation is now publicly available as part of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) Climate Data Record (CDR) Program. Daily and monthly averaged values of TSI and SSI, with associated time and wavelength dependent uncertainties, are estimated from 1882 to the present with yearly averaged values since 1610, updated quarterly for the foreseeable future. The new Solar Irradiance Climate Data Record, jointly developed by the University of Colorado at Boulder's Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), is constructed from solar irradiance models that determine the changes from quiet Sun conditions when bright faculae and dark sunspots are present on the solar disk. The magnitudes of the irradiance changes that these features produce are determined from linear regression of the proxy Mg II index and sunspot area indices against the approximately decade-long solar irradiance measurements made by instruments on the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) spacecraft. We describe the model formulation, uncertainty estimates, operational implementation and validation approach. Future efforts to improve the uncertainty estimates of the Solar Irradiance CDR arising from model assumptions, and augmentation of the solar irradiance reconstructions with direct measurements from the Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS: launch date, July 2017) are also discussed.

  16. Browsing, Understanding, and Accessing Solar Irradiance Data via LISIRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A.; Lindholm, D. M.; Pankratz, C. K.

    2012-12-01

    The Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, LASP, has been conducting research in Atmospheric and Space science for over 60 years. In particular, LASP has made a variety of space-based measurements of solar irradiance, which provide crucial input for research and modeling in solar-terrestrial interactions, space physics, planetary, atmospheric, and climate sciences. These data sets are generally time series of measurements, solar indices, and spectra. Unlike many Earth science data sets, they are not geolocated and so cannot be referenced via latitude and longitude coordinates. Thus they are not appropriate for or interoperable with many existing geo scientific data access and analysis tools and need somewhat specialized tools to aid users in their understanding and use. The LASP Solar Irradiance Data Center, LISIRD, http://lasp.colorado.edu/lisird, is designed to allow the science community and the public to explore and access solar irradiance and related data sets. LISIRD's interactive plotting allows users to investigate and download spectral data sets from a variety of missions. We have recently expanded our offerings and now serve TIMED SEE Level 2, Level 3, and Level 4 data sets. We continue to serve SORCE Solar Spectral Irradiance, Total Solar Irradiance, and Magnesium II and well as the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) and other data sets. LISIRD leverages middleware, the LASP Time series Server (LaTiS), that provides access to time series data based on time, wavelength, and parameter. LaTiS can read a wide variety of input formats from both local and remote sources, so many data sets can be served in their native format. It also supports dynamic data reformatting, so users can request the data and times in formats of their choice. LaTiS supports data subsetting so that users may download only regions of interest, and can stream the data directly into a computer program via a RESTful API in an automated fashion. We continue to improve LISIRD not

  17. Nimbus 7 Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) spectral scan solar irradiance and Earth radiance product user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlesinger, Barry M.; Cebula, Richard P.; Heath, Donald F.; Fleig, Albert J.

    1988-01-01

    The archived tape products from the spectral scan mode measurements of solar irradiance (SUNC tapes) and Earth radiance (EARTH tapes) by the Solar Backscatter UV (SBUV) instrument aboard Nimbus 7 are described. Incoming radiation from 160 to 400 nm is measured at intervals of 0.2 nm. The scan-to-scan repeatability of the solar irradiance measurements ranges from approximately 0.5 to 1 percent longward of 280 nm, to 2 percent around 210 nm and 4 percent near 175 nm. The repeatability of the Earth radiance values ranges from 2 to 3 percent at longer wavelengths and low zenith angles to 10 percent at shorter wavelengths and high zenith angles. The tape formats are described in detail, including file structure and contents of each type of record. Catalogs of the tapes and the time period covered are provided, along with lists of the days lacking solar irradiance measurements and the days dedicated to Earth radiance measurements. The method for production of the tapes is outlined and quality control measures are described. How radiances and irradiances are derived from the raw counts, the corrections for changes in instrument sensitivity, and related uncertainties are discussed.

  18. A Semantically Enabled Metadata Repository for Solar Irradiance Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A.; Cox, M.; Lindholm, D. M.; Nadiadi, I.; Traver, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, LASP, has been conducting research in Atmospheric and Space science for over 60 years, and providing the associated data products to the public. LASP has a long history, in particular, of making space-based measurements of the solar irradiance, which serves as crucial input to several areas of scientific research, including solar-terrestrial interactions, atmospheric, and climate. LISIRD, the LASP Interactive Solar Irradiance Data Center, serves these datasets to the public, including solar spectral irradiance (SSI) and total solar irradiance (TSI) data. The LASP extended metadata repository, LEMR, is a database of information about the datasets served by LASP, such as parameters, uncertainties, temporal and spectral ranges, current version, alerts, etc. It serves as the definitive, single source of truth for that information. The database is populated with information garnered via web forms and automated processes. Dataset owners keep the information current and verified for datasets under their purview. This information can be pulled dynamically for many purposes. Web sites such as LISIRD can include this information in web page content as it is rendered, ensuring users get current, accurate information. It can also be pulled to create metadata records in various metadata formats, such as SPASE (for heliophysics) and ISO 19115. Once these records are be made available to the appropriate registries, our data will be discoverable by users coming in via those organizations. The database is implemented as a RDF triplestore, a collection of instances of subject-object-predicate data entities identifiable with a URI. This capability coupled with SPARQL over HTTP read access enables semantic queries over the repository contents. To create the repository we leveraged VIVO, an open source semantic web application, to manage and create new ontologies and populate repository content. A variety of ontologies were used in

  19. Effect of electron irradiation in vacuum on FEP-A silicon solar cell covers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsik, S. J.; Broder, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Fluorinated ethylene-propylene-A (FEP-A) covers on silicon solar cells were irradiated with 1-MeV electrons, in vacuum, to an accumulated fluence equivalent to approximately 28 years in synchronous orbit. The effect of irradiation on the light transmittance of FEP-A was checked by measuring the short-circuit current of the cells after each dose increment. The results indicate no apparent overall loss in transmission due to irradiation of FEP-A. Filter wheel measurements revealed some darkening of the FEP-A at the blue end of the spectrum. Although no delamination from the cell surface was observed while in vacuum, embrittlement of FEP-A occurred at the accumulated dose.

  20. Modeling electron density, temperature distribution in the solar corona based on solar surface magnetic field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lago, A.; Rodríguez, J. M.; Vieira, L.; Coelho Stekel, T. R.; Costa, J. E. R.; Pinto, T. S. N.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic fields constitute a natural link between the Sun, the Earth and the Heliosphere in general. The solar dynamo action maintains and strengthens the magnetic field in the solar interior. The structure of the solar corona is mostly determined by the configuration and evolution of the magnetic field. While open magnetic field lines carry plasma into the heliosphere, closed field lines confine plasma. Additionally, key physical processes that impact the evolution of Earth's atmosphere on time-scale from days to millennia, such as the soft X-ray and EUV emission, are also determined by the solar magnetic field. However, observations of the solar spectral irradiance are restricted to the last few solar cycles and are subject to large uncertainties. Here we present a physics-based model to reconstruct in near-real time the evolution of the solar EUV emission based on the configuration of the magnetic field imprinted on the solar surface and assuming that the emission lines are optically thin. The structure of the coronal magnetic field is estimated employing a potential field source surface extrapolation based on the synoptic charts. The coronal plasma temperature and density are described by a hydrostatic model. The emission is estimated to employ the CHIANTI database. The performance of the model is compared to the emission observed by EVE instrument on board SDO spacecraft. The preliminary results and uncertainties are discussed in details. Furthermore, we examine the possibility of delivery the reconstruction of the solar spectral irradiance in near-real time using the infrastructure provided by the Brazilian Space weather program (EMBRACE/INPE). This work is partially supported by CNPq/Brazil under the grant agreement no. 140779/2015-9.

  1. Surface Irradiances Consistent With CERES-Derived Top-of-Atmosphere Shortwave and Longwave Irradiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, Seiji; Loeb, Norman G.; Rose, Fred G.; Doelling, David R.; Rutan, David A.; Caldwell, Thomas E.; Yu, Lisan; Weller, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    The estimate of surface irradiance on a global scale is possible through radiative transfer calculations using satellite-retrieved surface, cloud, and aerosol properties as input. Computed top-of-atmosphere (TOA) irradiances, however, do not necessarily agree with observation-based values, for example, from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES). This paper presents amethod to determine surface irradiances using observational constraints of TOA irradiance from CERES. A Lagrange multiplier procedure is used to objectively adjust inputs based on their uncertainties such that the computed TOA irradiance is consistent with CERES-derived irradiance to within the uncertainty. These input adjustments are then used to determine surface irradiance adjustments. Observations by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO), CloudSat, andModerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) that are a part of the NASA A-Train constellation provide the uncertainty estimates. A comparison with surface observations from a number of sites shows that the bias [root-mean-square (RMS) difference] between computed and observed monthlymean irradiances calculated with 10 years of data is 4.7 (13.3) W/sq m for downward shortwave and 22.5 (7.1) W/sq m for downward longwave irradiances over ocean and 21.7 (7.8) W m22 for downward shortwave and 21.0 (7.6) W/sq m for downward longwave irradiances over land. The bias andRMS error for the downward longwave and shortwave irradiances over ocean are decreased from those without constraint. Similarly, the bias and RMS error for downward longwave over land improves, although the constraint does not improve downward shortwave over land. This study demonstrates how synergetic use of multiple instruments (CERES,MODIS, CALIPSO, CloudSat, AIRS, and geostationary satellites) improves the accuracy of surface irradiance computations.

  2. High intensity solar irradiation testing of UV optics. [OSO-8 instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greyerbiehl, J. M.; Oberright, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    The Orbiting Solar Observatory-I (OSO-8 in orbit) incorporates two high resolution solar pointing spectrometers operating from 1000 A to 4000 A. Energy from the sun enters a Cassegrainian telescope and is focused on a slit while the solar disk is scanned to one arc-second resolution. The stability of the secondary mirrors reflectance was of concern since they would be exposed to intense focused solar energy up to 27 suns. A test program was initiated to simulate this energy input on sample UV mirrors of the MgF2 and LiF types and to evaluate their performance after irradiation. Tests were conducted to simulate the solar spectrum at high intensities (25 suns) and at a single wavelength near Lyman-alpha, but with twenty times the solar intensity at Lyman-alpha. Post-test measurements after every exposure were made at wavelengths from 1025 A to 1849 A. After 75 simulated 'orbits', reflectance changes due to temperature effects were noted to be less than 10%. Reductions in reflectance under high intensity solar radiation were generally greater than 10%. Polymerization of surface contaminations on the LiF mirrors reduced reflectances at short wavelengths by 40%.

  3. Surface Irradiation of Jupiter's Moon Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, M.; Tenishev, V.; Combi, M. R.; Jia, X.; Hansen, K. C.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2010-12-01

    currently under consideration by NASA (JEO) and ESA (JGO). We will show energy dependent surface irradiation maps and calculate the source of the sputtered exospheric neutrals.

  4. Panel Discussions on Total Solar Irradiance Variations and the Maunder Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, J. M.; White, O. R.

    1993-01-01

    For more than a decade, total solar irradiance has been monitored from several satellites, namely and Nimbus-7, Solar Maximum Mission (SMM), the NASA ERBS, NOAA9 and NOAA10,EURECA, and the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (SARS).

  5. Preliminary low temperature electron irradiation of triple junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Mueller, Robert L.; Scrivner, Roy L.; Helizon, Roger S.

    2005-01-01

    JPL has routinely performed radiation testing on commercial solar cells and has also performed LILT testing to characterize cell performance under far sun operating conditions. This research activity was intended to combine the features of both capabilities to investigate the possibility of any room temperature annealing that might influence the measured radiation damage. Although it was not possible to maintain the test cells at a constant low temperature between irradiation and electrical measurements, it was possible to obtain measurements with the cell temperature kept well below room temperature.

  6. Radiation damage in proton irradiated indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Hart, R. E., Jr.; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    1986-01-01

    Indium phosphide solar cells exposed to 10 MeV proton irradiations were found to have significantly greater radiation resistance than either GaAs or Si. Performance predictions were obtained for two proton dominated orbits and one in which both protons and electrons were significant cell degradation factors. Array specific power was calculated using lightweight blanket technology, a SEP array structure, and projected cell efficiencies. Results indicate that arrays using fully developed InP cells should out-perform those using GaAs or Si in orbits where radiation is a significant cell degradation factor.

  7. Solar EUV irradiance derived from a sounding rocket experiment on November 10, 1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Rottman, Gary J.

    1990-05-01

    Results are presented on the solar EUV irradiance measurements in the range 30-100 nm obtained in a sounding rocket experiment launched from the White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, on November 10, 1988. The observed solar EUV irradiance was found to be about 20 percent less than the solar EUV flux from a proxy model based on the daily 10.7-cm solar flux and its 81-day mean and the AE-E solar EUV data taken in the 1970s. The November 10 measurement of the solar EUV flux provides a good calibration reference spectrum for the solar EUV instruments on the San Marco satellite.

  8. Solar EUV irradiance derived from a sounding rocket experiment on November 10, 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Rottman, Gary J.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on the solar EUV irradiance measurements in the range 30-100 nm obtained in a sounding rocket experiment launched from the White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, on November 10, 1988. The observed solar EUV irradiance was found to be about 20 percent less than the solar EUV flux from a proxy model based on the daily 10.7-cm solar flux and its 81-day mean and the AE-E solar EUV data taken in the 1970s. The November 10 measurement of the solar EUV flux provides a good calibration reference spectrum for the solar EUV instruments on the San Marco satellite.

  9. Device performance and lifetime of polymer:fullerene solar cells with UV-ozone-irradiated hole-collecting buffer layers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungsoo; Nam, Sungho; Lee, Hyena; Kim, Hwajeong; Kim, Youngkyoo

    2011-11-18

    We report the influence of UV-ozone irradiation of the hole-collecting buffer layers on the performance and lifetime of polymer:fullerene solar cells. UV-ozone irradiation was targeted at the surface of the poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) layers by varying the irradiation time up to 600 s. The change of the surface characteristics in the PEDOT:PSS after UV-ozone irradiation was measured by employing optical absorption spectroscopy, photoelectron yield spectroscopy, and contact angle measurements, while Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques were introduced for more microscopic analysis. Results showed that the UV-ozone irradiation changed the chemical structure/composition of the surface of the PEDOT:PSS layers leading to the gradual increase of ionization potential with irradiation time in the presence of up-and-down variations in the contact angle (polarity). This surface property change was attributed to the formation of oxidative components, as evidenced by XPS and Auger electron images, which affected the sheet resistance of the PEDOT:PSS layers. Interestingly, device performance was slightly improved by short irradiation (up to 10 s), whereas it was gradually decreased by further irradiation. The short-duration illumination test showed that the lifetime of solar cells with the UV-ozone irradiated PEDOT:PSS layer was improved due to the protective role of the oxidative components formed upon UV-ozone irradiation against the attack of sulfonic acid groups in the PEDOT:PSS layer to the active layer.

  10. Ultraviolet spectral distribution and erythema-weighted irradiance from indoor tanning devices compared with solar radiation exposures.

    PubMed

    Sola, Yolanda; Baeza, David; Gómez, Miguel; Lorente, Jerónimo

    2016-08-01

    Concern regarding the impact of indoor tanning devices on human health has led to different regulations and recommendations, which set limits on erythema-weighted irradiance. Here, we analyze spectral emissions from 52 tanning devices in Spanish facilities and compare them with surface solar irradiance for different solar zenith angles. Whereas most of the devices emitted less UV-B radiation than the midday summer sun, the unweighted UV-A irradiance was 2-6 times higher than solar radiation. Moreover, the spectral distributions of indoor devices were completely different from that of solar radiation, differing in one order of magnitude at some UV-A wavelengths, depending on the lamp characteristics. In 21% of the devices tested, the erythema-weighted irradiance exceeded 0.3Wm(-2): the limit fixed by the European standard and the Spanish regulation. Moreover, 29% of the devices fall within the UV type 4 classification, for which medical advice is required. The high variability in erythema-weighted irradiance results in a wide range of exposure times to reach 1 standard erythemal dose (SED: 100Jm(-2)), with 62% of devices requiring exposures of <10min to reach 1 SED. Nevertheless, the unweighted UV-A dose during this time period would be from 1.4 to 10.3 times more than the solar UV-A dose.

  11. The new climate data record of total and spectral solar irradiance: Current progress and future steps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coddington, Odele; Lean, Judith; Rottman, Gary; Pilewskie, Peter; Snow, Martin; Lindholm, Doug

    2016-04-01

    We present a climate data record of Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) and Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI), with associated time and wavelength dependent uncertainties, from 1610 to the present. The data record was developed jointly by the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) at the University of Colorado Boulder and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) as part of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) Climate Data Record (CDR) Program, where the data record, source code, and supporting documentation are archived. TSI and SSI are constructed from models that determine the changes from quiet Sun conditions arising from bright faculae and dark sunspots on the solar disk using linear regression of proxies of solar magnetic activity with observations from the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM), Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM), and SOlar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE). We show that TSI can be separately modeled to within TIM's measurement accuracy from solar rotational to solar cycle time scales and we assume that SSI measurements are reliable on solar rotational time scales. We discuss the model formulation, uncertainty estimates, and operational implementation and present comparisons of the modeled TSI and SSI with the measurement record and with other solar irradiance models. We also discuss ongoing work to assess the sensitivity of the modeled irradiances to model assumptions, namely, the scaling of solar variability from rotational-to-cycle time scales and the representation of the sunspot darkening index.

  12. Free surface damage induced by irradiation of BCC iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korchuganov, Aleksandr V.

    2016-11-01

    The influence of the crystallographic orientation of bcc iron samples on the character of structural changes near the free surface irradiated with ions was studied in the framework of a molecular dynamics method. Irradiation of the (111) surface leads to the formation of craters surrounded by atoms escaped on the surface (adatoms). In the case of the (110) surface irradiation, a vacancy-type dislocation loop with the Burgers vector a <100> or a/2 <111> was formed. The number of adatoms and survived point defects was greater in the sample with the (110) surface than in the sample with the (111) surface for the atomic displacement cascade energies lower than 20 keV. The influence of the irradiated surface orientation on the number of generated point defects decreased with the increasing atomic displacement cascade energy.

  13. Recent variability of the solar spectral irradiance and its impact on climate modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermolli, I.; Matthes, K.; Dudok de Wit, T.; Krivova, N. A.; Tourpali, K.; Weber, M.; Unruh, Y. C.; Gray, L.; Langematz, U.; Pilewskie, P.; Rozanov, E.; Schmutz, W.; Shapiro, A.; Solanki, S. K.; Woods, T. N.

    2013-04-01

    measurements. However, the integral of the SSI computed with this model over the entire spectral range does not reproduce the measured cyclical changes of the total solar irradiance, which is an essential requisite for realistic evaluations of solar effects on the Earth's climate in CCMs. We show that within the range provided by the recent SSI observations and semi-empirical models discussed here, the NRLSSI model and SORCE observations represent the lower and upper limits in the magnitude of the SSI solar cycle variation. The results of the CCM simulations, forced with the SSI solar cycle variations estimated from the NRLSSI model and from SORCE measurements, show that the direct solar response in the stratosphere is larger for the SORCE than for the NRLSSI data. Correspondingly, larger UV forcing also leads to a larger surface response. Finally, we discuss the reliability of the available data and we propose additional coordinated work, first to build composite SSI data sets out of scattered observations and to refine current SSI models, and second, to run coordinated CCM experiments.

  14. Solar irradiance measurements by means of optical fibers and silicon detectors.

    PubMed

    Corrons, A; Pons, A

    1979-08-15

    An experimental system has been constructed for the continuous measurement of solar irradiance using silicon diode detectors not directly exposed to solar radiation. The received incident solar radiation is conducted from the roof of the building to the detectors by an optical fiber. An electronic computer receives the signal and processes it, introducing the necessary corrections to calculate the total solar irradiance in W m(-2). The system measures with a proved accuracy to better than 3%.

  15. Skin Cancer, Irradiation, and Sunspots: The Solar Cycle Effect

    PubMed Central

    Zurbenko, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Skin cancer is diagnosed in more than 2 million individuals annually in the United States. It is strongly associated with ultraviolet exposure, with melanoma risk doubling after five or more sunburns. Solar activity, characterized by features such as irradiance and sunspots, undergoes an 11-year solar cycle. This fingerprint frequency accounts for relatively small variation on Earth when compared to other uncorrelated time scales such as daily and seasonal cycles. Kolmogorov-Zurbenko filters, applied to the solar cycle and skin cancer data, separate the components of different time scales to detect weaker long term signals and investigate the relationships between long term trends. Analyses of crosscorrelations reveal epidemiologically consistent latencies between variables which can then be used for regression analysis to calculate a coefficient of influence. This method reveals that strong numerical associations, with correlations >0.5, exist between these small but distinct long term trends in the solar cycle and skin cancer. This improves modeling skin cancer trends on long time scales despite the stronger variation in other time scales and the destructive presence of noise. PMID:25126567

  16. Enhanced efficiency of the dye-sensitized solar cells by excimer laser irradiated carbon nanotube network counter electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Yun-San Fu, Wei-En; Yang, Po-Yu; Lee, I-Che; Chu, Chih-Chieh; Chou, Chia-Hsin; Cheng, Huang-Chung

    2014-02-03

    The carbon nanotube network decorated with Pt nanoparticles (PtCNT) irradiated by excimer laser as counter electrode (CE) of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) has been systematically demonstrated. The conversion efficiency would be improved from 7.12% to 9.28% with respect to conventional Pt-film one. It was attributed to the enhanced catalytic surface from Pt nanoparticles and the improved conductivity due to the adjoining phenomenon of PtCNTs irradiated by laser. Moreover, the laser annealing could also promote the interface contact between CE and conductive glass. Therefore, such a simple laser-irradiated PtCNT network is promising for the future flexible DSSCs applications.

  17. Evaluation of various procedures transposing global tilted irradiance to horizontal surface irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Housmans, Caroline; Bertrand, Cédric

    2017-02-01

    Many transposition models have been proposed in the literature to convert solar irradiance on the horizontal plane to that on a tilted plane. The inverse process, i.e. the conversion from tilted to horizontal is investigated here based upon seven months of in-plane global solar irradiance measurements recorded on the roof of the Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium's radiation tower in Uccle (Longitude 4.35° E, Latitude 50.79° N). Up to three pyranometers mounted on inclined planes of different tilts and orientations were involved in the inverse transposition process. Our results indicate that (1) the tilt to horizontal irradiance conversion is improved when measurements from more than one tilted pyranometer are considered (i.e. by using a multi-pyranometer approach) and (2) the improvement from using an isotropic model to anisotropic models in the inverse transposition problem is not significant.

  18. SOLAR SPECTRAL IRRADIANCE, SOLAR ACTIVITY, AND THE NEAR-ULTRA-VIOLET

    SciTech Connect

    Fontenla, J. M.; Stancil, P. C.; Landi, E. E-mail: stancil@physast.uga.edu

    2015-08-20

    The previous calculations of the Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI) by the Solar Radiation Physical Modeling, version 2 system, are updated in this work by including new molecular photodissociation cross-sections of important species, and many more levels and lines in its treatment of non-LTE radiative transfer. The current calculations including the new molecular photodissociation opacities produce a reduced over-ionizaton of heavy elements in the lower chromosphere and solve the problems with prior studies of the UV SSI in the wavelength range 160–400 nm and now reproduce the available observations with much greater accuracy. Calculations and observations of the near-UV at 0.1 nm resolution and higher are compared. The current set of physical models includes four quiet-Sun and five active-region components, from which radiance is computed for ten observing angles. These radiances are combined with images of the solar disk to obtain the SSI and Total Solar Irradiance and their variations. The computed SSI is compared with measurements from space at several nm resolution and agreement is found within the accuracy level of these measurements. An important result is that the near-UV SSI increase with solar activity is significant for the photodissociation of ozone in the terrestrial atmosphere because a number of highly variable upper chromospheric lines overlap the ozone Hartley band.

  19. Surface modification of multilayer graphene using Ga ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Quan; Shao, Ying; Ge, Daohan; Ren, Naifei; Yang, Qizhi

    2015-04-28

    The effect of Ga ion irradiation intensity on the surface of multilayer graphene was examined. Using Raman spectroscopy, we determined that the irradiation caused defects in the crystal structure of graphene. The density of defects increased with the increase in dwell times. Furthermore, the strain induced by the irradiation changed the crystallite size and the distance between defects. These defects had the effect of doping the multilayer graphene and increasing its work function. The increase in work function was determined using contact potential difference measurements. The surface morphology of the multilayer graphene changed following irradiation as determined by atomic force microscopy. Additionally, the adhesion between the atomic force microscopy tip and sample increased further indicating that the irradiation had caused surface modification, important for devices that incorporate graphene.

  20. Observations of Solar Cycle Variations in UV Spectral Irradiance Since 1978

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebula, R. P.; Deland, M. T.

    2010-12-01

    The spectrally resolved amplitude of solar UV irradiance variations over a solar cycle is an important parameter for estimating long-term changes in the Earth’s climate system. Satellite measurements of solar UV variability have been made by at least eight different instruments since 1978, covering both rising and declining phases of solar activity. Determining solar cycle variations from these data sets requires careful consideration of both time-dependent and wavelength-dependent uncertainties for each instrument. We have previously presented irradiance variation results for solar cycles 21, 22, and 23 using spectral irradiance data from Nimbus-7 SBUV, SME, NOAA-9 SBUV/2, NOAA-11 SBUV/2, UARS SUSIM, and UARS SOLSTICE. These results have shown consistent solar cycle irradiance changes within instrumental uncertainties, and also show the same relative spectral dependence for both short-term (rotational) and long-term (solar cycle) variations. In this work, we compare these results to recent UV irradiance data from the SORCE SIM and SORCE SOLSTICE instruments covering the declining phase of Cycle 23. Implementation of the SORCE solar data in atmospheric models leads to substantial changes in stratospheric heating and ozone concentrations compared to previous calculations. We will examine the agreement in solar cycle behavior between different irradiance data sets for their respective time periods, as well as the agreement with proxy model predictions of solar activity.

  1. ACRIM3 and the Total Solar Irradiance database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willson, Richard C.

    2014-08-01

    The effects of scattering and diffraction on the observations of the ACRIMSAT/ACRIM3 satellite TSI monitoring mission have been characterized by the preflight calibration approach for satellite total solar irradiance (TSI) sensors implemented at the LASP/TRF (Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics/Total Solar Irradiance Radiometer Facility). The TRF also calibrates the SI (International System of units) traceability to the NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) cryo-radiometric scale. ACRIM3's self-calibration agrees with NIST to within the uncertainty of the test procedure (˜500 ppm). A correction of ˜5000 ppm was found for scattering and diffraction that has significantly reduced the scale difference between the results of the ACRIMSAT/ACRIM3 and SORCE/TIM satellite experiments. Algorithm updates reflecting more than 10 years of mission experience have been made that further improve the ACRIM3 results by eliminating some thermally driven signal and increasing the signal to noise ratio. The result of these changes is a more precise and detailed picture of TSI variability. Comparison of the results from the ACRIM3, SORCE/TIM and SOHO/VIRGO satellite experiments demonstrate the near identical detection of TSI variability on all sub-annual temporal and amplitude scales during the TIM mission. The largest occurs at the rotational period of the primary solar activity longitudes. On the decadal timescale, while ACRIM3 and VIRGO results exhibit close agreement throughout, TIM exhibits a consistent 500 ppm upward trend relative to ACRIM3 and VIRGO. A solar magnetic activity area proxy for TSI has been used to demonstrate that the ACRIM TSI composite and its +0.037 %/decade TSI trend during solar cycles 21-23 is the most likely correct representation of the extant satellite TSI database. The occurrence of this trend during the last decades of the 20th century supports a more robust contribution of TSI variation to detected global temperature increase

  2. The Contribution of the Solcon Instrument to the Long Term Total Solar Irradiance Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewitte, S.; Joukoff, A.; Crommelynck, D.; Lee, R. B., III; Helizon, R.

    1999-01-01

    On century time scales, the variation in the total solar irradiance received by the earth is believed to be a major climate change driver. Therefore accurate and time stable measurements of the total solar irradiance are necessary. We present the latest contribution of the SOLar CONstant (SOLCON) instrument to these measurements, namely its measurements during the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker (IEH) 3 space shuttle flight, and its results: the verification of the ageing of the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS), and the measurement of the Space Absolute Radiometric Reference (SARR) adjustment coefficients for the Variability of solar IRradiance and Gravity Oscillations (VIRGO) radiometers.

  3. Surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafique, Mohsin; Chae, San; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated pure zirconium (99.8%). The Zr samples were irradiated by 3.5 MeV protons using MC-50 cyclotron accelerator at different doses ranging from 1 × 1013 to 1 × 1016 protons/cm2. Both un-irradiated and irradiated samples were characterized using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Universal Testing Machine (UTM). The average surface roughness of the specimens was determined by using Nanotech WSxM 5.0 develop 7.0 software. The FESEM results revealed the formation of bubbles, cracks and black spots on the samples' surface at different doses whereas the XRD results indicated the presence of residual stresses in the irradiated specimens. Williamson-Hall analysis of the diffraction peaks was carried out to investigate changes in crystallite size and lattice strain in the irradiated specimens. The tensile properties such as the yield stress, ultimate tensile stress and percentage elongation exhibited a decreasing trend after irradiation in general, however, an inconsistent behavior was observed in their dependence on proton dose. The changes in tensile properties of Zr were associated with the production of radiation-induced defects including bubbles, cracks, precipitates and simultaneous recovery by the thermal energy generated with the increase of irradiation dose.

  4. A Surface-Controlled Solar Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Crotty, G. T.

    1987-01-01

    Open-circuit voltage and cell efficiency increased. Proposed technique for controlling recombination velocity on solar-cell surfaces provides cells of increased efficiency and open-circuit voltage. In present cells, uncontrolled surface recombination velocity degrades opencircuit voltage and efficiency. In cell using proposed technique, transparent conducting layer, insulated from cell contacts, biased to enable variable control of surface recombination velocity.

  5. Correlation of solar irradiance and atmospheric temperature variations derived from spacecraft radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert B., III; Bolden, William C.; Gibson, M. A.; Paden, Jack; Pandey, Dhirendra K.; Thomas, Susan; Wilson, Robert S.

    1992-01-01

    Long-term changes in the mean global atmospheric temperature and the total solar irradiance were examined utilizing 1979-1989 spacecraft measurements. Outgoing longwave radiation at the top of the atmosphere was employed to infer global atmospheric temperatures. Evidence was determined that indicates the global temperatures should decline in the 1990-1997 period as the magnitude of the incoming solar irradiance declines with decreasing solar magnetic activity.

  6. A New Climate Data Record of Solar Spectral Irradiance from 1610 to Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coddington, O.; Lean, J.; Pilewskie, P.; Snow, M. A.; Lindholm, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    We present a climate data record of Solar Spectral Irradiance (SSI), with associated time and wavelength dependent uncertainties, from 1610 to the present. The data record was developed jointly by the University of Colorado at Boulder's Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) as part of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) Climate Data Record (CDR) Program, where the data record, source code, and supporting documentation are archived. SSI is constructed from models that determine the changes from quiet Sun conditions arising from bright faculae and dark sunspots on the solar disk using linear regression of proxies of solar magnetic activity with observations from the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM); the measurements are assumed to be reliable on solar rotational time scales. We extend the SSI record to longer time scales by reproducing the integral of the SSI with independent measurements of Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) measurements made by the SORCE Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM); TSI can be separately modeled to within TIM's measurement accuracy from solar rotational to solar cycle time scales. We discuss the model formulation, uncertainty estimates, and operational implementation and present comparisons of the modeled SSI with the measurement record and with other solar irradiance models. We also discuss future work to improve the Solar Irradiance Climate Data Record with new measurements from the Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS), different proxy representations of sunspot darkening and facular brightening, including the improved composite record of Mg II index being developed as part of the European-led SOlar Irradiance Data exploitation (SOLID) project, and to expand the uncertainty estimates to include model assumptions.

  7. Surface Modification of Polymer Substrates by Oxygen Ion Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Takaoka, G. H.; Ryuto, H.; Araki, R.; Yakushiji, T.

    2008-11-03

    Oxygen cluster ions and/or monomer ions were used for the sputtering and the surface modification of polymers such as polycarbonate (PC) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET). For the case of oxygen cluster ion irradiation, the sputtered depth increased with increase of the acceleration voltage, and the sputtering yield was much larger than that by the monomer ion irradiation. The sputtered particles represented the polymer structure, which indicated that the bond scission by the cluster ion irradiation resulted in an ejection of monomer molecule through the intermolecular collision. On the other hand, for the oxygen monomer ion irradiation, the implanted depth increased with increase of the acceleration voltage, and the bond scission occurred at the deep region through the binary collision with the high energetic ions. Therefore, the sputtering yield for the polymer surfaces decreased, and the sputtering effect became very small. Furthermore, the simultaneous use of oxygen cluster and monomer ions was more effective for oxidation of the PET surfaces rather than the monomer ion irradiation or the cluster ion irradiation. As a result, the contact angle measurement showed that the wettability of the PET surfaces irradiated by the simultaneous use of oxygen cluster and monomer ions was much enhanced.

  8. Silicon solar cell characterization at low temperatures and low illumination as a function of particulate irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F.; Little, S. A.; Peacock, C. L., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Various configurations of back surface reflector silicon solar cells including small (2 x 2) cm and large (approx. 6 x 6) cm cells with conventional and wraparound contacts were subjected to 1 MeV electron irradiation and characterized under both Earth orbital and deep space conditions of temperatures and illuminations. Current-Voltage (I-V) data were generated from +65 C to -150 C and at incident illuminations from 135.3 mW/sq cm to 5.4 mW/sq cm for these cells. Degradation in cell performance which is manifested only under deep space conditions is emphasized. In addition, the effect of particle irradiation on the high temperature and high intensity and low temperature and low intensity performance of the cells is described. The cells with wraparound contacts were found to have lower efficiencies at Earth orbital conditions than the cells with conventional contacts.

  9. Electrokinetic and surface chemical characterizations of an irradiated microfiltration polysulfone membrane: comparison of two irradiation doses.

    PubMed

    de Lara, R; Benavente, J

    2007-06-15

    The effect of ionizing radiation on the surface and electrokinetic characteristic parameters for a porous membrane of pore size 0.2 mum is determined and correlated with the irradiation dose (10 and 80 J/kg). Changes in NaCl permeability and membrane system electrical resistance determined from diffusion and impedance spectroscopy measurements are consistent with the increase of membrane pore radii/porosity, in agreement with SEM micrographs and reported results. Low irradiation dose seems to clean the membrane surface of impurities, according to XPS results, but the increase of irradiation doses could affect surface roughness. Due to the relatively high pore radius, ion transport numbers are practically independent of radiation and dose, but irradiation slightly modifies the membrane solution interface by increasing its weakly electronegative character, which could be of interest in the ultrafiltration of proteins or macromolecules.

  10. Detectability of active triangulation range finder: a solar irradiance approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huizhe; Gao, Jason; Bui, Viet Phuong; Liu, Zhengtong; Lee, Kenneth Eng Kian; Peh, Li-Shiuan; Png, Ching Eng

    2016-06-27

    Active triangulation range finders are widely used in a variety of applications such as robotics and assistive technologies. The power of the laser source should be carefully selected in order to satisfy detectability and still remain eye-safe. In this paper, we present a systematic approach to assess the detectability of an active triangulation range finder in an outdoor environment. For the first time, we accurately quantify the background noise of a laser system due to solar irradiance by coupling the Perez all-weather sky model and ray tracing techniques. The model is validated with measurements with a modeling error of less than 14.0%. Being highly generic and sufficiently flexible, the proposed model serves as a guide to define a laser system for any geographical location and microclimate.

  11. NEW SOLAR EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IRRADIANCE OBSERVATIONS DURING FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Thomas N.; Hock, Rachel; Eparvier, Frank; Jones, Andrew R.; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Klimchuk, James A.; Didkovsky, Leonid; Judge, Darrell; Mariska, John; Warren, Harry; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Webb, David F.; Bailey, Scott; Tobiska, W. Kent

    2011-10-01

    New solar extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance observations from the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) EUV Variability Experiment provide full coverage in the EUV range from 0.1 to 106 nm and continuously at a cadence of 10 s for spectra at 0.1 nm resolution and even faster, 0.25 s, for six EUV bands. These observations can be decomposed into four distinct characteristics during flares. First, the emissions that dominate during the flare's impulsive phase are the transition region emissions, such as the He II 30.4 nm. Second, the hot coronal emissions above 5 MK dominate during the gradual phase and are highly correlated with the GOES X-ray. A third flare characteristic in the EUV is coronal dimming, seen best in the cool corona, such as the Fe IX 17.1 nm. As the post-flare loops reconnect and cool, many of the EUV coronal emissions peak a few minutes after the GOES X-ray peak. One interesting variation of the post-eruptive loop reconnection is that warm coronal emissions (e.g., Fe XVI 33.5 nm) sometimes exhibit a second large peak separated from the primary flare event by many minutes to hours, with EUV emission originating not from the original flare site and its immediate vicinity, but rather from a volume of higher loops. We refer to this second peak as the EUV late phase. The characterization of many flares during the SDO mission is provided, including quantification of the spectral irradiance from the EUV late phase that cannot be inferred from GOES X-ray diagnostics.

  12. Soft X-ray irradiance measured by the Solar Aspect Monitor on the Solar Dynamic Observatory Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. Y.; Bailey, S. M.; Jones, A.; Woodraska, D.; Caspi, A.; Woods, T. N.; Eparvier, F. G.; Wieman, S. R.; Didkovsky, L. V.

    2016-04-01

    The Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM) is a pinhole camera on the Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory. SAM projects the solar disk onto the CCD through a metallic filter designed to allow only solar photons shortward of 7 nm to pass. Contamination from energetic particles and out-of-band irradiance is, however, significant in the SAM observations. We present a technique for isolating the 0.01-7 nm integrated irradiance from the SAM signal to produce the first results of broadband irradiance for the time period from May 2010 to May 2014. The results of this analysis agree with a similar data product from EVE's EUV SpectroPhotometer to within 25%. We compare our results with measurements from the Student Nitric Oxide Explorer Solar X-ray Photometer and the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics Solar EUV Experiment at similar levels of solar activity. We show that the full-disk SAM broadband results compared well to the other measurements of the 0.01-7 nm irradiance. We also explore SAM's capability toward resolving spatial contribution from regions of solar disk in irradiance and demonstrate this feature with a case study of several strong flares that erupted from active regions on 11 March 2011.

  13. Solar spectral irradiance and atmospheric transmission at Mauna Loa Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, G.E.

    1982-06-01

    A radiometer was operated at the Mauna Loa Observatory during calendar year 1980 to estimate the spectral irradiance of the sun and its possible fluctuation in time near the peak of solar activity. Data were also acquired on seasonal trends of atmospheric transmissivity above the marine mixing layer in the central Pacific. Spectral irradiance remained c constant to at least 1/2% at all wavelengths monitored. Furthermore its absolute magnitude was in agreement with the Labs and Neckel values to +- 2% except at blue wavelengths where the Mauna Loa values are from 4 to 12% higher and at lambda = 850 nm where the Mauna Loa value is 9% lower. The residual aerosol optical depth above Mauna Loa Observatory during 1980 averaged tau/sub 0/ = 0.020. An intrusion of dust into the central Pacific from the Gobi Desert (as deduced by the composition of collected particles) invaded the Central Pacific from Mar. to May 19890 and caused a perturbation in optical depth (at lambda = 500 nm) of ..delta..tau/sub 0/approx.0.01--0.02. The optical depth increment caused by the Mt. St. Helens volcano was <0.005 in the 2-month period following the eruption.

  14. Solar spectral irradiance and atmospheric transmission at Mauna Loa Observatory.

    PubMed

    Shaw, G E

    1982-06-01

    A radiometer was operated at the Mauna Loa Observatory during calendar year 1980 to estimate the spectral irradiance of the sun and its possible fluctuation in time near the peak of solar activity. Data were also acquired on seasonal trends of atmospheric transmissivity above the marine mixing layer in the central Pacific. Spectral irradiance remained constant to at least (1/2)% at all wavelengths monitored. Furthermore its absolute magnitude was in agreement with the Labs and Neckel values to +/-2% except at blue wavelengths where the Mauna Loa values are from 4 to 12% higher and at lambda = 850 nm where the Mauna Loa value is 9% lower. The residual aerosol optical depth above Mauna Loa Observatory during 1980 averaged tau(0) = 0.020. An intrusion of dust into the central Pacific from the Gobi Desert (as deduced by the composition of collected particles) invaded the Central Pacific from Mar. to May 1980 and caused a perturbation in optical depth (at lambda = 500 nm) of Deltatau(0) ~ 0.01-0.02. The optical depth increment caused by the Mt. St. Helens volcano was <0.005 in the 2-month period following the eruption.

  15. New model of Mars surface irradiation for the climate simulation chamber 'Artificial Mars'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasashvili, M. V.; Sabashvili, Sh. A.; Tsereteli, S. L.; Aleksidze, N. G.

    2013-04-01

    A new model of the Mars surface irradiation has been developed for the imitation of radiation-temperature parameters within Mars Climate Simulation Chamber (MCSC). In order to determine the values of annual and diurnal variations of the irradiance on the Martian surface, the Solar illumination E has been expressed by the distance r between the Sun and Mars and the Sun's altitude z in the Martian sky, along with its midday zenith distance z min. The arrangements of spring and autumn equinoxes as well as summer and winter solstice points in the Martian sky are discussed regarding the perihelion of Mars. Annual orbital points and variability of Solar z min for different planetary latitudes have been calculated for the 15 selected values of Mars's true anomaly, along with the illumination E for 12 hourly moments of Martian daytime on the Martian equator. These original calculations and the data which have been obtained are used for the construction of technical tools imitating variations of the surface irradiation and temperature within MCSC, programming of the supporting computer and the electric scheme, which provide proper remote control and set the environmental parameters that are analogues to the 24 hours 39 minutes circadian cycle on planet Mars. Spectral distribution as monochromatic irradiance, humidity control, atmospheric composition and other environmental parameters of planet Mars are also imitated and remotely controlled within MCSC, however, are not discussed in this particular article.

  16. The solar irradiance registered at a flat- hemispherical field of view- bolometric oscillation sensor on board PICARD satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ping; Karatekin, Ozgur; van Ruymbeke, Michel; Dewitte, Steven; Thuillier, Gerard

    2014-05-01

    The value of the Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) is varying over the 11-year sunspot cycle. The cycle amplitude is about 0.1% solar constant, which could be traced with the absolute radiometers onboard dedicated space missions. The operating principle of the absolute radiometer is measuring the electrical heating power of the heat sensing unit during the closed and opened phase of each measurement cycle. The difference between the power integrated cross the closed phase and the power integrated cross the open phase gives the value of the solar irradiance. The cadence of the measurement is usually from one to several minutes. The final TSI value in physics unit is obtained after taking into account the electronic calibration, correction of the instruments effects, and normalizing to 1 AU. The Bolometric Oscillation Sensor on board PICARD microsatellite is a new designed remote sensing instrument. The BOS is operated continually with a 10 seconds cadence to fill the time gaps between open and close phases of the SOVAP absolute radiometer. The BOS has two sensing surfaces, the main one with a light mass is black coated, the second surface is white painted with a heavier mass. The sensor has a hemispherical field of view. The heat flux absorbed by the main detector is thermally conducted by a thin shunt to the heat sink. The principle of the measurements is that the sum of the power of the blacked coated surface and the power along the shunt is equal to the incoming electromagnetic radiation. However as the BOS has a HFOV, the incoming radiation caught by it, has three kinds of origin: the solar irradiance, the reflected solar visible light form the Earth and the terrestrial infrared radiation. In this work, we are going to discuss the solar irradiance isolated from the measurements of the BOS instrument as well as the comparison with the sunspot number and the TSI composite from the VIRGO/SOHO and TIM/SORCE experiments.

  17. Solar Irradiance from 165 to 400 nm in 2008 and UV Variations in Three Spectral Bands During Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, M.; Bolsée, D.; Damé, L.; Hauchecorne, A.; Pereira, N.; Irbah, A.; Bekki, S.; Cessateur, G.; Foujols, T.; Thiéblemont, R.

    2016-12-01

    Accurate measurements of the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) and its temporal variations are of primary interest to better understand solar mechanisms, and the links between solar variability and Earth's atmosphere and climate. The SOLar SPECtrum (SOLSPEC) instrument of the Solar Monitoring Observatory (SOLAR) payload onboard the International Space Station (ISS) has been built to carry out SSI measurements from 165 to 3088 nm. We focus here on the ultraviolet (UV) part of the measured solar spectrum (wavelengths less than 400 nm) because the UV part is potentially important for understanding the solar forcing of Earth's atmosphere and climate. We present here SOLAR/SOLSPEC UV data obtained since 2008, and their variations in three spectral bands during Solar Cycle 24. They are compared with previously reported UV measurements and model reconstructions, and differences are discussed.

  18. Climate variability related to the 11 year solar cycle as represented in different spectral solar irradiance reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruschke, Tim; Kunze, Markus; Misios, Stergios; Matthes, Katja; Langematz, Ulrike; Tourpali, Kleareti

    2016-04-01

    Advanced spectral solar irradiance (SSI) reconstructions differ significantly from each other in terms of the mean solar spectrum, that is the spectral distribution of energy, and solar cycle variability. Largest uncertainties - relative to mean irradiance - are found for the ultraviolet range of the spectrum, a spectral region highly important for radiative heating and chemistry in the stratosphere and troposphere. This study systematically analyzes the effects of employing different SSI reconstructions in long-term (40 years) chemistry-climate model (CCM) simulations to estimate related uncertainties of the atmospheric response. These analyses are highly relevant for the next round of CCM studies as well as climate models within the CMIP6 exercise. The simulations are conducted by means of two state-of-the-art CCMs - CESM1(WACCM) and EMAC - run in "atmosphere-only"-mode. These models are quite different with respect to the complexity of the implemented radiation and chemistry schemes. CESM1(WACCM) features a chemistry module with considerably higher spectral resolution of the photolysis scheme while EMAC employs a radiation code with notably higher spectral resolution. For all simulations, concentrations of greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances, as well as observed sea surface temperatures (SST) are set to average conditions representative for the year 2000 (for SSTs: mean of decade centered over year 2000) to exclude anthropogenic influences and differences due to variable SST forcing. Only the SSI forcing differs for the various simulations. Four different forcing datasets are used: NRLSSI1 (used as a reference in all previous climate modeling intercomparisons, i.e. CMIP5, CCMVal, CCMI), NRLSSI2, SATIRE-S, and the SSI forcing dataset recommended for the CMIP6 exercise. For each dataset, a solar maximum and minimum timeslice is integrated, respectively. The results of these simulations - eight in total - are compared to each other with respect to their

  19. ISS-SOLAR: Total (TSI) and spectral (SSI) irradiance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidtke, G.; Fröhlich, C.; Thuillier, G.

    The primary objective of the ISS-SOLAR mission on Columbus (to be launched in 2006) is the quasi-continuous measurement of the solar irradiance variability with highest possible accuracy. For this reason the total spectral range will be recorded simultaneously from 3000 to 17 nm by three sets of instruments: SOVIM is combining two types of absolute radiometers and three-channel filter radiometers. SOLSPEC is composed of three double monochromators using concave gratings, covering the wavelength range from 3000 to 180 nm. SOL-ACES has four grazing incidence planar grating spectrometers plus two three-signal ionization chambers (two signals from a two stage chamber plus a third signal from a silicon diode at the end of the chamber) with exchangeable band pass filters to determine the absolute fluxes from 220 to 17 nm repeatedly during the mission. For the TSI the relative standard uncertainty (RSU) to be achieved is of the order of 0.15% and for the SSI from 1% in the IR/Vis, 2% in the UV, 5% in the FUV up to 10% in the XUV spectral regions. The general requirements for the TSI and SSI measurements and their conceptual realization within this payload will be discussed with emphasis on instrumental realization and calibration aspects.

  20. ISS-SOLAR: Total (TSI) and Spectral (SSI) Irradiance Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidtke, G.; Thuillier, G.; Fröhlich, C.

    Related to the climatic aspects in atmospheric science the primary objective of the ISS-SOLAR Mission on Columbus (to be launched in 2006) is the quasi-continuous measurement of the solar irradiance variation with highest possible accuracy. For this reason the total spectral range will be recorded simultaneously for the first time from 3000-16 nm by three sets of instruments: SOVIM(3) is combining two types of absolute radiometers and three-channel filterradiometers. SOLSPEC(2) is composed of three concave grating spectrometers with two monochromators, each, covering the wavelength range from 3000-180 nm. SOL-ACES(1) has four grazing incidence planar grating spectrometers plus two three-signal ionization chambers with exchangeable band pass filters to determine the absolute fluxes from 220-16 nm repeatedly during the mission. For the TSI the absolute accuracy to be achieved is of the order of 0.1 % and for the SSI from 1 % in the VIS, 2 % in the UV, 5 % in the FUV to 10 % in the XUV spectral regions. The general requirements for the TSI and SSI measurements and their conceptual realization within the payload will be discussed with emphasis on instrumental realization and calibration aspects.

  1. Aerosols attenuating the solar radiation collected by solar tower plants: The horizontal pathway at surface level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Thierry; Ramon, Didier; Dubus, Laurent; Bourdil, Charles; Cuevas-Agulló, Emilio; Zaidouni, Taoufik; Formenti, Paola

    2016-05-01

    Aerosols attenuate the solar radiation collected by solar tower plants (STP), along two pathways: 1) the atmospheric column pathway, between the top of the atmosphere and the heliostats, resulting in Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) changes; 2) the grazing pathway close to surface level, between the heliostats and the optical receiver. The attenuation along the surface-level grazing pathway has been less studied than the aerosol impact on changes of DNI, while it becomes significant in STP of 100 MW or more. Indeed aerosols mostly lay within the surface atmospheric layer, called the boundary layer, and the attenuation increases with the distance covered by the solar radiation in the boundary layer. In STP of 100 MW or more, the distance between the heliostats and the optical receiver becomes large enough to produce a significant attenuation by aerosols. We used measured aerosol optical thickness and computed boundary layer height to estimate the attenuation of the solar radiation at surface level at Ouarzazate (Morocco). High variabilities in aerosol amount and in vertical layering generated a significant magnitude in the annual cycle and significant inter-annual changes. Indeed the annual mean of the attenuation caused by aerosols over a 1-km heliostat-receiver distance was 3.7% in 2013, and 5.4% in 2014 because of a longest desert dust season. The monthly minimum attenuation of less than 3% was observed in winter and the maximum of more than 7% was observed in summer.

  2. Model Calculations of Solar Spectral Irradiance in the 3.7 Micron Band for Earth Remote Sensing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platnick, Steven; Fontenla, Juan M.

    2006-01-01

    Since the launch of the first Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instrument aboard TIROS-N, measurements in the 3.7 micron atmospheric window have been exploited for use in cloud detection and screening, cloud thermodynamic phase and surface snow/ice discrimination, and quantitative cloud particle size retrievals. The utility of the band has led to the incorporation of similar channels on a number of existing satellite imagers and future operational imagers. Daytime observations in the band include both reflected solar and thermal emission energy. Since 3.7 micron channels are calibrated to a radiance scale (via onboard blackbodies), knowledge of the top-of-atmosphere solar irradiance in the spectral region is required to infer reflectance. Despite the ubiquity of 3.7 micron channels, absolute solar spectral irradiance data comes from either a single measurement campaign (Thekaekara et al. 1969) or synthetic spectra. In this study, we compare historical 3.7 micron band spectral irradiance data sets with the recent semi-empirical solar model of the quiet-Sun by Fontenla et al. (2006). The model has expected uncertainties of about 2 % in the 3.7 pm spectral region. We find that channel-averaged spectral irradiances using the observations reported by Thekaekara et al. are 3.2-4.1% greater than those derived from the Fontenla et al. model for MODIS and AVHRR instrument bandpasses; the Kurucz spectrum (1995) as included in the MODTRAN4 distribution, gives channel-averaged irradiances 1.2-1.5 % smaller than the Fontenla model. For the MODIS instrument, these solar irradiance uncertainties result in cloud microphysical retrievals uncertainties comparable with other fundamental reflectance error sources.

  3. Modeled Dust Distributions and their Impact on Surface Irradiance at Wavelengths Vital to Phytoplankton Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colarco, A. M.; Gregg, W. W.; Colarco, P. R.; da Silva, A.

    2010-12-01

    A key component of an atmosphere represented by any radiative transfer model in order to generate realistic surface irradiances is the accurate representation of the absorption and scattering rates of atmospheric aerosols. When looking specifically at the effects of aerosol properties’ impact on ocean systems over time, the distribution and deposition rates of the dust component of aerosols becomes significant. The deposition of dust particles provides a source of iron in nutrient limited regions of the ocean, while the iron in dust attenuates light entering the ocean surface at wavelengths important to marine photosynthesis and other processes important to the ocean system. These processes depend on the input of solar irradiance in select bands primarily in the visible wavelengths. The Ocean-Atmosphere Spectral Irradiance Model (OASIM) has been shown to provide sufficiently accurate surface irradiances within the spectral bands of importance without sacrificing computer time, correlating very well with in situ measurements, resulting in root-mean-square differences of about 11%, and bias below 1%. The results of a study using the Global Earth Observation System (GEOS) version 5 aerosol product to parameterize the OASIM model will be presented. By using the modeled aerosol product, the specific effects of dust are able to be isolated from other aerosol types. This provides a global picture of impacts on irradiance of dust aerosols with high temporal resolution, and in selectable wavelength regions, unavailable from current satellite platform. The GEOS5 aerosol product was used to determine how sensitive surface irradiance is to dust concentrations and spatial distributions. The seasonal variability and spectral dependence of surface irradiance will also be shown.

  4. Charged Particle Alterations of Surfaces in the Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. E.

    1995-01-01

    The surfaces of 'airless' bodies in the solar system are exposed to the ambient plasma, micrometeorites, and the solar UV. The effects of these space weathering agents on surfaces in the solar system has been studied in this project. In the last three years work was carried out on volatile depletion at Mars, on sputtering of the lunar surface, on absorption by implanted S in vapor-deposited H2O and its relevance to observations of Europa's surface in the UV, and on the spectral changes produced on irradiating SO2 and its possible relevance to Io. In addition, the role of plasma-induced charging of E-ring grains was evaluated because of its relevance to E-ring particle source and the lifetime of the E-ring. Finally, the detection of sputtered material from Dione by the CAPS instrument on CASSINI was evaluated as a tool for analysis of satellite surface composition, and the role of sputtering on the ambient OH in the vicinity of the ice satellites and the E-ring was evaluated.

  5. The measurement of solar spectral irradiances at wavelengths between 40 and 4000 A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    Two 1/8-meter Ebert-Fastie spectrometers were refurbished and upgraded in order to measure the solar spectral irradiances between 1160 A and 3100 A. An evacuated 1/4-meter normal-incidence spectrometer was also fabricated for spectral irradiance measurements over the wavelength range from 1250 A to 250 A. Procedures were developed for the calibration of all three instruments utilizing standards at the National Bureau of Standards. The two 1/8-meter spectrometers were flown to measure the solar spectral irradiances near solar maximum on two different dates. Data from these flights were analyzed. The performance of the spectrometers, and the results of an analysis of the variabilities of the solar spectral irradiances over the solar cycles 20 and 21 are discussed.

  6. A Fundamental Study on Spectrum Center Estimation of Solar Spectral Irradiation by the Statistical Pattern Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, Aya; Suzuki, Kazumi; Wakao, Shinji; Kawasaki, Norihiro; Usami, Akira

    With a background of environmental problems and energy issues, it is expected that PV systems will be introduced rapidly and connected with power grids on a large scale in the future. For this reason, the concern to which PV power generation will affect supply and demand adjustment in electric power in the future arises and the technique of correctly grasping the PV power generation becomes increasingly important. The PV power generation depends on solar irradiance, temperature of a module and solar spectral irradiance. Solar spectral irradiance is distribution of the strength of the light for every wavelength. As the spectrum sensitivity of solar cell depends on kind of solar cell, it becomes important for exact grasp of PV power generation. Especially the preparation of solar spectral irradiance is, however, not easy because the observational instrument of solar spectral irradiance is expensive. With this background, in this paper, we propose a new method based on statistical pattern recognition for estimating the spectrum center which is representative index of solar spectral irradiance. Some numerical examples obtained by the proposed method are also presented.

  7. The Impact of the Revised Sunspot Record on Solar Irradiance Reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, G.; Krivova, N.; Wu, C. J.; Lean, J.

    2016-11-01

    Reliable historical records of the total solar irradiance (TSI) are needed to assess the extent to which long-term variations in the Sun's radiant energy that is incident upon Earth may exacerbate (or mitigate) the more dominant warming in recent centuries that is due to increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases. We investigate the effects that the new Sunspot Index and Long-term Solar Observations (SILSO) sunspot-number time series may have on model reconstructions of the TSI. In contemporary TSI records, variations on timescales longer than about a day are dominated by the opposing effects of sunspot darkening and facular brightening. These two surface magnetic features, retrieved either from direct observations or from solar-activity proxies, are combined in TSI models to reproduce the current TSI observational record. Indices that manifest solar-surface magnetic activity, in particular the sunspot-number record, then enable reconstructing historical TSI. Revisions of the sunspot-number record therefore affect the magnitude and temporal structure of TSI variability on centennial timescales according to the model reconstruction methods that are employed. We estimate the effects of the new SILSO record on two widely used TSI reconstructions, namely the NRLTSI2 and the SATIRE models. We find that the SILSO record has little effect on either model after 1885, but leads to solar-cycle fluctuations with greater amplitude in the TSI reconstructions prior. This suggests that many eighteenth- and nineteenth-century cycles could be similar in amplitude to those of the current Modern Maximum. TSI records based on the revised sunspot data do not suggest a significant change in Maunder Minimum TSI values, and from comparing this era to the present, we find only very small potential differences in the estimated solar contributions to the climate with this new sunspot record.

  8. Space observations of the variability of solar irradiance in the near and far ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. F.

    1972-01-01

    Satellite observations of the ultraviolet solar irradiance in selected wavelength bands between 1200 and 3000 a were made continuously by photometers consisting of broad-band sensors operated on Numbus 3 and 4 which were launched in April 1969 and 1970. In addition, spectrophotometer measurements of the solar irradiance were made with a dispersive instrument at 12 selected wavelengths from 2550 to 3400 a with a 10 a bandpass on Nimbus 4. Variations of the solar irradiance associated with the solar rotational period were observed since the launch of Nimbus 3. These variations are apparently associated with two source regions separated by about 180 deg in solar longitude. The change in irradiance with solar rotation was found to increase with decreasing wavelengths. Different types of the observed variations in uv solar irradiance can be classified in accordance with characteristics times, e.g. in the order of increasing periods as follows: (1)flare associated enhancements (2) 27-day variations due to solar rotation; (3) a possible biennial effect; and (4) long term variations associated with the 11-year solar cycle.

  9. Surface modification by electron irradiation for improved immunoassay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safrany, Agnes; Deelder, André

    1999-08-01

    Polystyrene microtitration (ELISA) plates modified by electron beam irradiation were used for a monoclonal antibody based sandwich immunoassay for quantitation of circulating anodic antigen levels in Schistosoma-infected individuals. The plates irradiated with 15 kGy showed 2-4-fold lower detection level compared to untreated plates, and a 10-fold lower antibody coating concentration than usually used was still detectable. These results were reproducible and the modified surfaces were stable even after 2 years when kept at room temperature.

  10. Multijunction Solar Cells Optimized for the Mars Surface Solar Spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmondson, Kenneth M.; Fetzer, Chris; Karam, Nasser H.; Stella, Paul; Mardesich, Nick; Mueller, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This paper gives an update on the performance of the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) which have been continually performing for more than 3 years beyond their original 90-day missions. The paper also gives the latest results on the optimization of a multijunction solar cell that is optimized to give more power on the surface of Mars.

  11. Solar Spectral Irradiance Variability of Some Chromospheric Emission Lines Through the Solar Activity Cycles 21-23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göker, Ü. D.; Gigolashvili, M. Sh.; Kapanadze, N.

    2017-02-01

    A study of variations of solar spectral irradiance (SSI) in the wavelength ranges 121.5 nm-300.5 nm for the period 1981-2009 is presented. We used various data for ultraviolet (UV) spectral lines and international sunspot number (ISSN) from interactive data centers such as SME (NSSDC), UARS (GDAAC), SORCE (LISIRD) and SIDC, respectively. We reduced these data by using the MATLAB software package. In this respect, we revealed negative correlations of intensities of UV (289.5 nm-300.5 nm) spectral lines originating in the solar chromosphere with the ISSN index during the unusually prolonged minimum between the solar activity cycles (SACs) 23 and 24. We also compared our results with the variations of solar activity indices obtained by the ground-based telescopes. Therefore, we found that plage regions decrease while facular areas are increasing in SAC 23. However, the decrease in plage regions is seen in small sunspot groups (SGs), contrary to this, these regions in large SGs are comparable to previous SACs or even larger as is also seen in facular areas. Nevertheless, negative correlations between ISSN and SSI data indicate that these variations are in close connection with the classes of sunspots/SGs, faculae and plage regions. Finally, we applied the time series analysis of spectral lines corresponding to the wavelengths 121.5 nm-300.5 nm and made comparisons with the ISSN data. We found an unexpected increase in the 298.5 nm line for the Fe II ion. The variability of Fe II ion 298.5 nm line is in close connection with the facular areas and plage regions, and the sizes of these solar surface indices play an important role for the SSI variability, as well. So, we compared the connection between the sizes of faculae and plage regions, sunspots/SGs, chemical elements and SSI variability. Our future work will be the theoretical study of this connection and developing of a corresponding model.

  12. The influence of cloud cover index on the accuracy of solar irradiance model estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F. R.; Silva, S. A. B.; Pereira, E. B.; Abreu, S. L.

    2008-04-01

    Cloud cover index ( CCI) obtained from satellite images contains information on cloud amount and their optical thickness. It is the chief climate data for the assessment of solar energy resources in most radiative transfer models, particularly for the model BRASIL-SR that is currently operational at CPTEC. The wide range of climate environments in Brazil turns CCI determination into a challenging activity and great effort has been directed to develop new methods and procedures to improve the accuracy of these estimations from satellite images (Martins 2001; Martins et al. 2003a; Ceballos et al. 2004). This work demonstrates the influence of CCI determination methods on estimates of surface solar irradiances obtained by the model BRASIL-SR comparing deviations among ground data and model results. Three techniques using visible and/or thermal infrared images of GOES-8 were employed to generate the CCI for input into the model BRASIL-SR. The ground-truth data was provided by the solar radiation station located at Caicó/PE, in Brazilian Northeast region, which is part of the UNEP/GEF project SWERA (Solar and Wind Energy Resources Assessment). Results have shown that the application of the bi-spectral techniques have reduced mean bias error up to 66% and root mean square error up to 50% when compared to the usual technique for CCI determination based on the straightforward determination of month-by-month extremes for maximum and minimum cloud states.

  13. Improvements in NOAA SURFRAD and ISIS sites for near real-time solar irradiance for verification of NWP solar forecasts for the DOE NOAA Solar Forecast Improvement Project (SFIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantz, K. O.; McComiskey, A. C.; Long, C. N.; Marquis, M.; Olson, J. B.; James, E.; Benjamin, S.; Clack, C.

    2015-12-01

    The DOE-NOAA Solar Forecasting Improvement Project's (SFIP) main goal is to improve solar forecasting and thereby increase penetration of solar renewable energy on the electric grid. NOAA's ISIS and SURFRAD network is part of this initiative by providing high quality solar irradiance measurements for verification of improvements in solar forecasting for the short-term, day ahead, and ramp events. There are 14 ISIS and SURFRAD stations across the continental United States. We will give an overview of recent improvements in the networks for this project. The NOAA SURFRAD team has three main components: 1) In addition to the existing stations, two mobile SURFRAD stations have been built and deployed for 1 year each at two separate solar utility plants. 2) NOAA SURFRAD/ISIS will update the communications at their sites to provide near real-time data for verification activities at the 14 sites. 3) Global horizontal irradiance (GHI), direct normal solar irradiance (DNI), and aerosol optical depth at various spatial and temporal averaging will be compared to forecasts from the 3-km High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) and an advanced version of the 13-km Rapid Refresh (RAP) models. We will explore statistical correlations between in-coming and out-going shortwave radiation and longwave radiation at the surface for specific meteorological regimes and how well these are captured by NWP models.

  14. Solar Cycle Modulation of Total Irradiance: an Empirical Model from 1874 to 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lean, J.; Foukal, P.

    1990-01-01

    Evidence acquired during the past decade indicates that over time scales of the solar cycle, enhanced emission from bright solar faculae cause significant variations in the sun's total irradiance even though, on shorter time scales, the most pronounced variations are those resulting from the passage of dark sunspots across the solar disc. An empirical model which accounts for the competing effects of dark sunspots and bright faculae has been developed from the available radiometry in cycle 21, and extended back to the beginning of solar cycle 12. According to this model, the largest 11-year modulation of total irradiance during the C20th occurred in the most recent cycle 21.

  15. The use of satellite data assimilation methods in regional NWP for solar irradiance forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurzrock, Frederik; Cros, Sylvain; Chane-Ming, Fabrice; Potthast, Roland; Linguet, Laurent; Sébastien, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    As an intermittent energy source, the injection of solar power into electricity grids requires irradiance forecasting in order to ensure grid stability. On time scales of more than six hours ahead, numerical weather prediction (NWP) is recognized as the most appropriate solution. However, the current representation of clouds in NWP models is not sufficiently precise for an accurate forecast of solar irradiance at ground level. Dynamical downscaling does not necessarily increase the quality of irradiance forecasts. Furthermore, incorrectly simulated cloud evolution is often the cause of inaccurate atmospheric analyses. In non-interconnected tropical areas, the large amplitudes of solar irradiance variability provide abundant solar yield but present significant problems for grid safety. Irradiance forecasting is particularly important for solar power stakeholders in these regions where PV electricity penetration is increasing. At the same time, NWP is markedly more challenging in tropic areas than in mid-latitudes due to the special characteristics of tropical homogeneous convective air masses. Numerous data assimilation methods and strategies have evolved and been applied to a large variety of global and regional NWP models in the recent decades. Assimilating data from geostationary meteorological satellites is an appropriate approach. Indeed, models converting radiances measured by satellites into cloud properties already exist. Moreover, data are available at high temporal frequencies, which enable a pertinent cloud cover evolution modelling for solar energy forecasts. In this work, we present a survey of different approaches which aim at improving cloud cover forecasts using the assimilation of geostationary meteorological satellite data into regional NWP models. Various approaches have been applied to a variety of models and satellites and in different regions of the world. Current methods focus on the assimilation of cloud-top information, derived from infrared

  16. Surface Plasmon-Assisted Solar Energy Conversion.

    PubMed

    Dodekatos, Georgios; Schünemann, Stefan; Tüysüz, Harun

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) from plasmonic noble metals in combination with semiconductors promises great improvements for visible light-driven photocatalysis, in particular for energy conversion. This review summarizes the basic principles of plasmonic photocatalysis, giving a comprehensive overview about the proposed mechanisms for enhancing the performance of photocatalytically active semiconductors with plasmonic devices and their applications for surface plasmon-assisted solar energy conversion. The main focus is on gold and, to a lesser extent, silver nanoparticles in combination with titania as semiconductor and their usage as active plasmonic photocatalysts. Recent advances in water splitting, hydrogen generation with sacrificial organic compounds, and CO2 reduction to hydrocarbons for solar fuel production are highlighted. Finally, further improvements for plasmonic photocatalysts, regarding performance, stability, and economic feasibility, are discussed for surface plasmon-assisted solar energy conversion.

  17. A comparison of solar total irradiance observations from spacecraft: 1985-1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mecherikunnel, A. T.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical comparison of the solar total irradiance measured from the Nimbus-7, the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM), the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS), and the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) spacecraft platforms, for the period 1985-1992. The mean irradiance, standard deviation, and the correlation among the daily irradiance remained high during periods of high solar activity. Linear regression models are established to estimate the irradiance measurements from one platform by the others. The results are consistent with the observations. However, the Nimbus-7 ERB responses show a drift during 1989-1992. The absolute irradiance observed by each instrument varies within the uncertainty associated with the corresponding radiometer.

  18. Five Years of Synthesis of Solar Spectral Irradiance from SDID/SISA and SDO/AIA Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontenla, J. M.; Codrescu, M.; Fedrizzi, M.; Fuller-Rowell, T.; Hill, F.; Landi, E.; Woods, T.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we describe the synthetic solar spectral irradiance (SSI) calculated from 2010 to 2015 using data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument, on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft. We used the algorithms for solar disk image decomposition (SDID) and the spectral irradiance synthesis algorithm (SISA) that we had developed over several years. The SDID algorithm decomposes the images of the solar disk into areas occupied by nine types of chromospheric and 5 types of coronal physical structures. With this decomposition and a set of pre-computed angle-dependent spectra for each of the features, the SISA algorithm is used to calculate the SSI. We discuss the application of the basic SDID/SISA algorithm to a subset of the AIA images and the observed variation occurring in the 2010–2015 period of the relative areas of the solar disk covered by the various solar surface features. Our results consist of the SSI and total solar irradiance variations over the 2010–2015 period. The SSI results include soft X-ray, ultraviolet, visible, infrared, and far-infrared observations and can be used for studies of the solar radiative forcing of the Earth’s atmosphere. These SSI estimates were used to drive a thermosphere–ionosphere physical simulation model. Predictions of neutral mass density at low Earth orbit altitudes in the thermosphere and peak plasma densities at mid-latitudes are in reasonable agreement with the observations. The correlation between the simulation results and the observations was consistently better when fluxes computed by SDID/SISA procedures were used.

  19. Initial Results of Aperture Area Comparisons for Exo-Atmospheric Total Solar Irradiance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. Carol; Litorja, Maritoni; Fowler, Joel B.; Butler, James J.

    2009-01-01

    In the measurement of exo-atmospheric total solar irradiance (TSI), instrument aperture area is a critical component in converting solar radiant flux to irradiance. In a May 2000 calibration workshop for the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) on the Earth Observing System (EOS) Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE), the solar irradiance measurement community recommended that NASA and NISI coordinate an aperture area measurement comparison to quantify and validate aperture area uncertainties and their overall effect on TSI uncertainties. From May 2003 to February 2006, apertures from 4 institutions with links to the historical TSI database were measured by NIST and the results were compared to the aperture area determined by each institution. The initial results of these comparisons are presented and preliminary assessments of the participants' uncertainties are discussed.

  20. Detection of solar wind-produced water in irradiated rims on silicate minerals.

    PubMed

    Bradley, John P; Ishii, Hope A; Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J; Ciston, James; Nielsen, Michael H; Bechtel, Hans A; Martin, Michael C

    2014-02-04

    The solar wind (SW), composed of predominantly ∼1-keV H(+) ions, produces amorphous rims up to ∼150 nm thick on the surfaces of minerals exposed in space. Silicates with amorphous rims are observed on interplanetary dust particles and on lunar and asteroid soil regolith grains. Implanted H(+) may react with oxygen in the minerals to form trace amounts of hydroxyl (-OH) and/or water (H2O). Previous studies have detected hydroxyl in lunar soils, but its chemical state, physical location in the soils, and source(s) are debated. If -OH or H2O is generated in rims on silicate grains, there are important implications for the origins of water in the solar system and other astrophysical environments. By exploiting the high spatial resolution of transmission electron microscopy and valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we detect water sealed in vesicles within amorphous rims produced by SW irradiation of silicate mineral grains on the exterior surfaces of interplanetary dust particles. Our findings establish that water is a byproduct of SW space weathering. We conclude, on the basis of the pervasiveness of the SW and silicate materials, that the production of radiolytic SW water on airless bodies is a ubiquitous process throughout the solar system.

  1. Accuracy and sensitivity analysis for 54 models of computing hourly diffuse solar irradiation on clear sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badescu, Viorel; Gueymard, Christian A.; Cheval, Sorin; Oprea, Cristian; Baciu, Madalina; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Iacobescu, Flavius; Milos, Ioan; Rada, Costel

    2013-02-01

    Fifty-four broadband models for computation of solar diffuse irradiation on horizontal surface were tested in Romania (South-Eastern Europe). The input data consist of surface meteorological data, column integrated data, and data derived from satellite measurements. The testing procedure is performed in 21 stages intended to provide information about the sensitivity of the models to various sets of input data. There is no model to be ranked "the best" for all sets of input data. However, some of the models performed better than others, in the sense that they were ranked among the best for most of the testing stages. The best models for solar diffuse radiation computation are, on equal footing, ASHRAE 2005 model (ASHRAE 2005) and King model (King and Buckius, Solar Energy 22:297-301, 1979). The second best model is MAC model (Davies, Bound Layer Meteor 9:33-52, 1975). Details about the performance of each model in the 21 testing stages are found in the Electronic Supplementary Material.

  2. Detection of solar wind-produced water in irradiated rims on silicate minerals

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, John P.; Ishii, Hope A.; Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J.; Ciston, James; Nielsen, Michael H.; Bechtel, Hans A.; Martin, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    The solar wind (SW), composed of predominantly ∼1-keV H+ ions, produces amorphous rims up to ∼150 nm thick on the surfaces of minerals exposed in space. Silicates with amorphous rims are observed on interplanetary dust particles and on lunar and asteroid soil regolith grains. Implanted H+ may react with oxygen in the minerals to form trace amounts of hydroxyl (−OH) and/or water (H2O). Previous studies have detected hydroxyl in lunar soils, but its chemical state, physical location in the soils, and source(s) are debated. If −OH or H2O is generated in rims on silicate grains, there are important implications for the origins of water in the solar system and other astrophysical environments. By exploiting the high spatial resolution of transmission electron microscopy and valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we detect water sealed in vesicles within amorphous rims produced by SW irradiation of silicate mineral grains on the exterior surfaces of interplanetary dust particles. Our findings establish that water is a byproduct of SW space weathering. We conclude, on the basis of the pervasiveness of the SW and silicate materials, that the production of radiolytic SW water on airless bodies is a ubiquitous process throughout the solar system. PMID:24449869

  3. Analysis of Ca II K images aiming to determine long-term trends in solar irradiance variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Anuradha; Ermolli, Ilaria; Krivova, Natalie; Solanki, Sami

    2013-04-01

    The change in radiative output of the Sun on time scales longer than a day is attributed to the variability in solar surface magnetic fields. Direct irradiance measurements are only available for less than four decades. To reconstruct long term trends in solar total and spectral irradiance, proxies of solar surface magnetism like sunspot, facular and network areas are needed. Currently, sunspot records alone are used for this purpose, from which the deduction of facular and network areas is rather indirect. Historical records of full disk images of the Sun taken in the Ca II K spectral line (393.3 nm) have the potential to provide far more direct information about the distribution and evolution of faculae and network elements. The latter appear as bright regions in the Ca II K spectroheliograms and their intensity is correlated with the magnetic field strength of the features on the solar surface. Solar full disk images in the Ca II K line have been recorded since the beginning of the 20th century at a number of solar observatories such as at Arcetri (Italy), Mount Wilson(California, US) and Kodaikanal (India). The images are available in digitized archives that contain the data processed for standard instrumental calibrations. To utilize these records for irradiance studies, the next step is to identify the bright magnetic features from the images using feature recognition techniques. We test different feature identification methods which are first applied to a set of recent images from the PSPT instrument at the Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, taken during three periods characterized by high, medium and low levels of activity. Then the performance of these methods to historical images from Arcetri, Mt. Wilson and Kodaikanal archives is tested. The results will be presented and discussed here.

  4. Morphological study of borosilicate glass surface irradiated by heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T. S.; Du, X.; Yuan, W.; Duan, B. H.; D. Zhang, J.; Chen, L.; Peng, H. B.; Yang, D.; Zhang, G. F.; Zhu, Z. H.

    2016-11-01

    Borosilicate glass is a candidate material for radiation waste formation and other optical applications in various fields. To understand the radiation effect of borosilicate glass, heavy ion (Arq+, Krq+ and Xeq+) irradiations were used to simulate the alpha and recoiled nuclei irradiations in this study. The surface morphology of glass has been compared to ion irradiation doses and ion energies. The surface topography evolution of irradiated samples is characterized by optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Micro-bumps are observed on the sample surface after irradiationwith 5 MeV Xeq+ over 5 × 1013 ions·cm-2. The size and density of the bumps increaseswith increasing irradiation dose. At a lowdose, bumps are on the nanometer (nm) scale and rather rare.While the dose is higher than 9 × 1015 ions·cm-2, the size of bumps is on the scale of a few microns, and the density is saturated. However, the height of the bumps increases froma fewnmto over 150nmwith further irradiation. The distribution of micro-bumps is nearly homogeneous. The bumps are condensed and swell up, and there is no crystallized structure according to the TEMdiffraction pattern. Elementmigration and concentrations are observedwith SIMS imaging. The arrayed micro-bumps are a new finding, and they might be used to change the surface properties. Bump formation is caused by phase separation, and volume swelling is induced by ion irradiation.

  5. SOLAR2000 irradiances for climate change research, aeronomy and space system engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobiska, W. Kent

    2004-01-01

    Improvements to spectral and temporal solar irradiances are often based upon increasingly accurate and precise measurements as well as upon better understood physics. This paper reports on one example in an emerging trend for solar irradiance models that can be characterized as hybrid irradiance modeling. Empirical and physics-based modeling of irradiances are combined and take advantage of strengths within both methods to provide a variety of solar irradiance products to science and engineering users. The SOLAR2000 (S2K) version 1.24 model (v1.24) described in this paper has gone through 17 upgrades since it was originally released in 1999 as v0.10 and now incorporates three theoretical continua, 13 rocket spectra, and time series data from five satellites using 17 instruments. S2K currently produces six integrated irradiance proxies for science and engineering applications in addition to spectrally resolved irradiances in three common wavelength formats. Integrated irradiance proxies include the E10.7 integrated EUV energy flux, QEUV total thermospheric EUV heating rate, PEUV hemispheric EUV power, T∞ exospheric temperature, RSN derived sunspot number, and S integrated spectrum. Besides three spectral wavelength and six integrated irradiance formats there are three time frames of historical, nowcast, and forecast irradiance products produced by four model grades. The Research Grade (RG) model is developed for aeronomical and climate change research, the Professional Grade (PG) model is developed for space system engineering applications, the Operational Grade (OP) model is developed for institutional and agency real-time operational space weather applications, and the System Grade (SY) model is developed for commercial operational and production applications. This report describes these model characteristics as well as the current state of operational irradiances which are now in the second release of a first generation forecast methodology. Forecast Generation

  6. Aniline chlorination by in situ formed Ag-Cl complexes under simulated solar light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xuefeng; Wang, Xiaowen; Dong, Liuliu; Chang, Fei; Luo, Yongming

    2015-01-01

    Ag speciation in a chloride medium was dependent upon the Cl/Ag ratio after releasing into surface water. In this study, the photoreaction of in situ formed Ag-Cl species and their effects on aniline photochlorination were systematically investigated. Our results suggested that formation of chloroaniline was strongly relevant to the Cl/Ag ratio and could be interpreted using the thermodynamically expected speciation of Ag in the presence of Cl-. AgCl was the main species responsible for the photochlorination of aniline. Both photoinduced hole and •OH drove the oxidation of Cl- to radical •Cl, which promoted the chlorination of aniline. Ag0 formation was observed from the surface plasmon resonance absorption during AgCl photoreaction. This study revealed that Ag+ released into Cl--containing water may result in the formation of chlorinated intermediates of organic compounds under solar light irradiation.

  7. Satellite Estimation of Spectral Surface UV Irradiance. 2; Effect of Horizontally Homogeneous Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krothov, N.; Herman, J. R.; Bhartia, P. K.; Ahmad, Z.a; Fioletov, V.

    1998-01-01

    The local variability of UV irradiance at the Earth's surface is mostly caused by clouds in addition to the seasonal variability. Parametric representations of radiative transfer RT calculations are presented for the convenient solution of the transmission T of ultraviolet radiation through plane parallel clouds over a surface with reflectivity R(sub s). The calculations are intended for use with the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) measured radiances to obtain the calculated Lambert equivalent scene reflectivity R for scenes with and without clouds. The purpose is to extend the theoretical analysis of the estimation of UV irradiance from satellite data for a cloudy atmosphere. Results are presented for a range of cloud optical depths and solar zenith angles for the cases of clouds over a low reflectivity surface R(sub s) less than 0.1, over a snow or ice surface R(sub s) greater than 0.3, and for transmission through a non-conservative scattering cloud with single scattering albedo omega(sub 0) = 0.999. The key finding for conservative scattering is that the cloud-transmission function C(sub T), the ratio of cloudy-to clear-sky transmission, is roughly C(sub T) = 1 - R(sub c) with an error of less than 20% for nearly overhead sun and snow-free surfaces. For TOMS estimates of UV irradiance in the presence of both snow and clouds, independent information about snow albedo is needed for conservative cloud scattering. For non-conservative scattering with R(sub s) greater than 0.5 (snow) the satellite measured scene reflectance cannot be used to estimate surface irradiance. The cloud transmission function has been applied to the calculation of UV irradiance at the Earth's surface and compared with ground-based measurements.

  8. Back surface reflectors for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chai, A. T.

    1980-01-01

    Sample solar cells were fabricated to study the effects of various back surface reflectors on the device performance. They are typical 50 micrometers thick, space quality, silicon solar cells except for variations of the back contact configuration. The back surfaces of the sample cells are polished to a mirror like finish, and have either conventional full contacts or grid finger contacts. Measurements and evaluation of various metallic back surface reflectors, as well as cells with total internal reflection, are presented. Results indicate that back surface reflectors formed using a grid finger back contact are more effective reflectors than cells with full back metallization and that Au, Ag, or Cu are better back surface reflector metals than Al.

  9. A new approach to the long-term reconstruction of the solar irradiance leads to large historical solar forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, A. I.; Schmutz, W.; Rozanov, E.; Schoell, M.; Haberreiter, M.; Shapiro, A. V.; Nyeki, S.

    2011-05-01

    Context. The variable Sun is the most likely candidate for the natural forcing of past climate changes on time scales of 50 to 1000 years. Evidence for this understanding is that the terrestrial climate correlates positively with the solar activity. During the past 10 000 years, the Sun has experienced the substantial variations in activity and there have been numerous attempts to reconstruct solar irradiance. While there is general agreement on how solar forcing varied during the last several hundred years - all reconstructions are proportional to the solar activity - there is scientific controversy on the magnitude of solar forcing. Aims: We present a reconstruction of the total and spectral solar irradiance covering 130 nm-10 μm from 1610 to the present with an annual resolution and for the Holocene with a 22-year resolution. Methods: We assume that the minimum state of the quiet Sun in time corresponds to the observed quietest area on the present Sun. Then we use available long-term proxies of the solar activity, which are 10Be isotope concentrations in ice cores and 22-year smoothed neutron monitor data, to interpolate between the present quiet Sun and the minimum state of the quiet Sun. This determines the long-term trend in the solar variability, which is then superposed with the 11-year activity cycle calculated from the sunspot number. The time-dependent solar spectral irradiance from about 7000 BC to the present is then derived using a state-of-the-art radiation code. Results: We derive a total and spectral solar irradiance that was substantially lower during the Maunder minimum than the one observed today. The difference is remarkably larger than other estimations published in the recent literature. The magnitude of the solar UV variability, which indirectly affects the climate, is also found to exceed previous estimates.We discuss in detail the assumptions that lead us to this conclusion. Appendix is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  10. Results of aperture area comparisons for exo-atmospheric total solar irradiance measurements.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B Carol; Litorja, Maritoni; Fowler, Joel B; Shirley, Eric L; Barnes, Robert A; Butler, James J

    2013-11-20

    Exo-atmospheric solar irradiance measurements made by the solar irradiance community since 1978 have incorporated limiting apertures with diameters measured by a number of metrology laboratories using a variety of techniques. Knowledge of the aperture area is a critical component in the conversion of radiant flux measurements to solar irradiance. A National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observing System (EOS) sponsored international comparison of aperture area measurements of limiting apertures provided by solar irradiance researchers was performed, the effort being executed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in coordination with the EOS Project Science Office. Apertures that had institutional heritage with historical solar irradiance measurements were measured using the absolute aperture measurement facility at NIST. The measurement technique employed noncontact video microscopy using high-accuracy translation stages. We have quantified the differences between the participating institutions' aperture area measurements and find no evidence to support the hypothesis that preflight aperture area measurements were the root cause of discrepancies in long-term total solar irradiance satellite measurements. Another result is the assessment of uncertainties assigned to methods used by participants. We find that uncertainties assigned to a participant's values may be underestimated.

  11. Implications of solar irradiance variability upon long-term changes in the Earth's atmospheric temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert B., III

    1992-01-01

    From 1979 through 1987, it is believed that variability in the incoming solar energy played a significant role in changing the Earth's climate. Using high-precision spacecraft radiometric measurements, the incoming total solar irradiance (total amount of solar power per unit area) and the Earth's mean, global atmospheric temperatures were found to vary in phase with each other. The observed irradiance and temperature changes appeared to be correlated with the 11-year cycle of solar magnetic activity. During the period from 1979 through 1985, both the irradiance and temperature decreased. From 1985 to 1987, they increased. The irradiance changed approximately 0.1 percent, while the temperature varied as much as 0.6 C. During the 1979-1987 period, the temperatures were forecasted to rise linearly because of the anthropogenic build-up of carbon dioxide and the hypothesized 'global warming', 'greenhouse effect', scenarios. Contrary to these scenarios, the temperatures were found to vary in a periodic manner in phase with the solar irradiance changes. The observed correlations between irradiance and temperature variabilily suggest that the mean, global temperature of the Earth may decline between 1990 and 1997 as solar magnetic activity decreases.

  12. New Solar Irradiance Measurements from the Miniature X-Ray Solar Spectrometer CubeSat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Caspi, Amir; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Jones, Andrew; Kohnert, Richard; Mason, James Paul; Moore, Christopher S.; Palo, Scott; Rouleau, Colden; Solomon, Stanley C.; Machol, Janet; Viereck, Rodney

    2017-02-01

    The goal of the Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) CubeSat is to explore the energy distribution of soft X-ray (SXR) emissions from the quiescent Sun, active regions, and during solar flares and to model the impact on Earth's ionosphere and thermosphere. The energy emitted in the SXR range (0.1–10 keV) can vary by more than a factor of 100, yet we have limited spectral measurements in the SXRs to accurately quantify the spectral dependence of this variability. The MinXSS primary science instrument is an Amptek, Inc. X123 X-ray spectrometer that has an energy range of 0.5–30 keV with a nominal 0.15 keV energy resolution. Two flight models have been built. The first, MinXSS-1, has been making science observations since 2016 June 9 and has observed numerous flares, including more than 40 C-class and 7 M-class flares. These SXR spectral measurements have advantages over broadband SXR observations, such as providing the capability to derive multiple-temperature components and elemental abundances of coronal plasma, improved irradiance accuracy, and higher resolution spectral irradiance as input to planetary ionosphere simulations. MinXSS spectra obtained during the M5.0 flare on 2016 July 23 highlight these advantages and indicate how the elemental abundance appears to change from primarily coronal to more photospheric during the flare. MinXSS-1 observations are compared to the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) X-ray Sensor (XRS) measurements of SXR irradiance and estimated corona temperature. Additionally, a suggested improvement to the calibration of the GOES XRS data is presented.

  13. Combined effects of wind and solar irradiance on the spatial variation of midday air temperature over a mountainous terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo-Ock; Kim, Jin-Hee; Kim, Dae-Jun; Shim, Kyo Moon; Yun, Jin I.

    2015-08-01

    When the midday temperature distribution in a mountainous region was estimated using data from a nearby weather station, the correction of elevation difference based on temperature lapse caused a large error. An empirical approach reflecting the effects of solar irradiance and advection was suggested in order to increase the reliability of the results. The normalized slope irradiance, which was determined by normalizing the solar irradiance difference between a horizontal surface and a sloping surface from 1100 to 1500 LST on a clear day, and the deviation relationship between the horizontal surface and the sloping surface at the 1500 LST temperature on each day were presented as simple empirical formulas. In order to simulate the phenomenon that causes immigrant air parcels to push out or mix with the existing air parcels in order to decrease the solar radiation effects, an advection correction factor was added to exponentially reduce the solar radiation effect with an increase in wind speed. In order to validate this technique, we estimated the 1500 LST air temperatures on 177 clear days in 2012 and 2013 at 10 sites with different slope aspects in a mountainous catchment and compared these values to the actual measured data. The results showed that this technique greatly improved the error bias and the overestimation of the solar radiation effect in comparison with the existing methods. By applying this technique to the Korea Meteorological Administration's 5-km grid data, it was possible to determine the temperature distribution at a 30-m resolution over a mountainous rural area south of Jiri Mountain National Park, Korea.

  14. Elimination of disinfection byproduct formation potential in reclaimed water during solar light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Qian-Yuan, Wu; Chao, Li; Ye, Du; Wen-Long, Wang; Huang, Huang; Hong-Ying, Hu

    2016-05-15

    Ecological storage of reclaimed water in ponds and lakes is widely applied in water reuse. During reclaimed water storage, solar light can degrade pollutants and improve water quality. This study investigated the effects of solar light irradiation on the disinfection byproduct formation potential in reclaimed water, including haloacetonitriles (HANs), trichloronitromethane (TCNM), trihalomethanes (THMs), haloketones (HKs) and chloral hydrate (CH). Natural solar light significantly decreased the formation potential of HANs, TCNM, and HKs in reclaimed water, but had a limited effect on the formation potential of THMs and CH. Ultraviolet (UV) light in solar radiation played a dominant role in the decrease of the formation potential of HANs, TCNM and HKs. Among the disinfection byproducts, the removal kinetic constant of dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) with irradiation dose was much larger than those for dichloropropanone (1,1-DCP), trichloropropanone (1,1,1-TCP) and TCNM. During solar irradiation, fluorescence spectra intensities of reclaimed water also decreased significantly. The removal of tyrosine (Tyr)-like and tryptophan (Trp)-like protein fluorescence spectra intensity volumes was correlated to the decrease in DCAN formation potential. Solar irradiation was demonstrated to degrade Trp, Tyr and their DCAN formation potential. The photolysis products of Trp after solar irradiation were detected as kynurenine and tryptamine, which had chloroform, CH and DCAN formation potential lower than those of Trp.

  15. Harnessing surface plasmons for solar energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. M.

    1983-01-01

    NASA research on the feasibility of solar-energy conversion using surface plasmons is reviewed, with a focus on inelastic-tunnel-diode techniques for power extraction. The need for more efficient solar converters for planned space missions is indicated, and it is shown that a device with 50-percent efficiency could cost up to 40 times as much per sq cm as current Si cells and still be competitive. The parallel-processing approach using broadband carriers and tunable diodes is explained, and the physics of surface plasmons on metal surfaces is outlined. Technical problems being addressed include phase-matching sunlight to surface plasmons, minimizing ohmic losses and reradiation in energy transport, coupling into the tunnels by mode conversion, and gaining an understanding of the tunnel-diode energy-conversion process. Diagrams illustrating the design concepts are provided.

  16. Measuring Broadband IR Irradiance in the Direct Solar Beam and Recent Developments

    SciTech Connect

    Reda, Ibrahim; Andreas, Afshin; Dooraghi, Mike; Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Kutchenreiter, Mark

    2016-12-14

    Solar and atmospheric science radiometers such as pyranometers, pyrheliometers, and photovoltaic cells are calibrated with traceability to a consensus reference which is maintained by Absolute Cavity Radiometers (ACRs). An ACR is an open cavity with no window, developed to measure the extended broadband spectrum of the terrestrial direct solar beam irradiance that extends beyond the ultraviolet and infrared bands; i.e. below 0.2 um and above 50 um, respectively. On the other hand, the pyranometers and pyrheliometers were developed to measure broadband shortwave irradiance from approximately 0.3 um to 3 um, while the present photovoltaic cells are limited to the spectral range of approximately 0.3 um to 1 um. The broadband mismatch of ACR versus such radiometers causes discrepancy in radiometers' calibration methods that has not been discussed or addressed in the solar and atmospheric science literature. Pyrgeometers, which measure the atmospheric longwave irradiance, are also used for solar and atmospheric science applications and calibrated with traceability to a consensus reference, yet they are calibrated during nighttime only, because no consensus reference has been established for the daytime longwave irradiance. This poster describes a method to measure the broadband longwave irradiance in the terrestrial direct solar beam from 3 um to 50 um, as a first step that might be used to help develop calibration methods to address the mismatch between broadband ACR and shortwave radiometers, and the lack of a daytime reference for pyrgeometers. The described method is used to measure the irradiance from sunrise to sunset; the irradiance varied from approximately 1 Wm-2 to 16 Wm-2 with an estimated uncertainty of 1.5 Wm-2, for a solar zenith angle range from 80 degrees to 16 degrees, respectively. Recent development shows that there is greater than 1.1 percent bias in measuring shortwave solar irradiance.

  17. Advancing Solar Irradiance Measurement for Climate-Related Studies: Accurate Constraint on Direct Aerosol Radiative Effect (DARE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Si-Chee; Ji, Q. Jack

    2011-01-01

    Earth's climate is driven primarily by solar radiation. As summarized in various IPCC reports, the global average of radiative forcing for different agents and mechanisms, such as aerosols or CO2 doubling, is in the range of a few W/sq m. However, when solar irradiance is measured by broadband radiometers, such as the fleet of Eppley Precision Solar Pyranometers (PSP) and equivalent instrumentation employed worldwide, the measurement uncertainty is larger than 2% (e.g., WMO specification of pyranometer, 2008). Thus, out of the approx. 184 W/sq m (approx.263 W/sq m if cloud-free) surface solar insolation (Trenberth et al. 2009), the measurement uncertainty is greater than +/-3.6 W/sq m, overwhelming the climate change signals. To discern these signals, less than a 1 % measurement uncertainty is required and is currently achievable only by means of a newly developed methodology employing a modified PSP-like pyranometer and an updated calibration equation to account for its thermal effects (li and Tsay, 2010). In this talk, we will show that some auxiliary measurements, such as those from a collocated pyrgeometer or air temperature sensors, can help correct historical datasets. Additionally, we will also demonstrate that a pyrheliometer is not free of the thermal effect; therefore, comparing to a high cost yet still not thermal-effect-free "direct + diffuse" approach in measuring surface solar irradiance, our new method is more economical, and more likely to be suitable for correcting a wide variety of historical datasets. Modeling simulations will be presented that a corrected solar irradiance measurement has a significant impact on aerosol forcing, and thus plays an important role in climate studies.

  18. Solar spectral irradiance variation and its impact on earth's atmosphere as observed by SCIAMACHY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, M.; Pagaran, J.; Burrows, J. P.; Dikty, S.; von Savigny, C.; DeLand, M. T.; Floyd, L. E.; Harder, J. W.; Langematz, U.

    2011-12-01

    SCIAMACHY is a UV/vis/NIR spectrometer aboard ENVISAT which provides routine observations of ozone and other trace gases in the earth's atmosphere since 2002. Ozone profile data are provided from limb, lunar, and solar occultation observations, while the nadir viewing geometry allows measurements of total ozone columns. For normalizing observed backscattered earth radiances for trace gas retrievals, daily measurements of solar irradiance at moderately high spectral resolution (<1.5 nm) from 230 nm to 2400 nm, with some gaps in the NIR, are made. From the solar observations a Mg II index can be derived that in combination with other satellite data becomes a useful solar UV activity proxy indicator during the satellite era (since 1978). Using solar proxies for faculae brightening and sunspot darkening fitted to SCIAMACHY irradiance time-series a SCIA proxy model has been derived that allows us to describe solar cycle irradiance changes covering several decades. This talk will present highlights from SCIAMACHY solar observations, comparisons with other satellite data, and presents results on solar influence on ozone, i. e. 27 day solar rotation signal in the upper stratosphere and solar cycle effects on polar ozone losses.

  19. On the Cause of Solar Differential Rotations in the Solar Interior and Near the Solar Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, L.

    2012-12-01

    A theoretical model is proposed to explain the cause of solar differential rotations observed in the solar interior and near the solar surface. We propose that the latitudinal differential rotation in the solar convection zone is a manifestation of an easterly wind in the mid latitude. The speed of the easterly wind is controlled by the magnitude of the poleward temperature gradient in the lower part of the solar convection zone. The poleward temperature gradient depends on the orientation and strength of the magnetic fields at different latitudes in the solar convection zone. The north-south asymmetry in the wind speed can lead to north-south asymmetry in the evolution of the solar cycle. The easterly wind is known to be unstable for a west-to-east rotating star or planet. Based on the observed differential rotations in the solar convection zone, we can estimate the easterly wind speed at about 60-degree latitude and determine the azimuthal wave number of the unstable wave modes along the zonal flow. The lowest azimuthal wave number is about m=7~8. This result is consistent with the average width of the elephant-trunk coronal hole shown in the solar X-ray images. The nonlinear evolution of the unstable easterly wind can lead to transpolar migration of coronal holes and can change the poloidal magnetic field in a very efficient way. In the study of radial differential rotation near the solar surface, we propose that the radial differential rotation depends on the radial temperature gradient. The radial temperature gradient depends on the magnetic field structure above the solar surface. The non-uniform magnetic field distribution above the solar surface can lead to non-uniform radial convections and formation of magnetic flux rope at different spatial scales. The possible cause of continuous formation and eruption of prominences near an active region will also be discussed.

  20. Ion irradiation of TNO surface analogue ice mixtures: the chemistry .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baratta, G. A.; Brunetto, R.; Caniglia, G.; Fulvio, D.; Ioppolo, S.; Leto, G.; Palumbo, M. E.; Spinella, F.; Strazzulla, G.

    Vis-NIR spectra of some Centaurs and Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs) indicate surfaces rich in H_2O, N_2, CO_2, CH_4 e CH_3OH. Cosmic ion irradiation is one of the processes driving the evolution of TNO surfaces. A main role is played by the chemistry induced by colliding ions; many molecular bonds are broken along the ion track, and this may lead to the formation of byproduct molecules. Starting from laboratory experiments, it is possible to infer the presence of molecules still undetected on TNOs. For instance, carbonic acid (H_2CO_3) is produced after irradiation of H_2O:CO_2 icy mixtures, while irradiation of H_2O:N_2 icy mixtures causes the production of N_2O, NO, and NO_2. From H_2O:CH_4:N_2 mixtures, many species are formed, such as CO, CO_2, HCN, HNCO, N_2O, and molecules including CN bonds. Moreover, ion irradiation may modify the relative intensity of NIR features, as in the case of solid methanol, whose 2.34 mu m band decreases in intensity with respect to the 2.27 mu m band, after increasing irradiation doses. We suggest that this effect may be observed on Centaur Pholus.

  1. Description and primary results of Total Solar Irradiance Monitor, a solar-pointing instrument on an Earth observing satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongrui; Fang, Wei; Li, Huiduan

    2015-04-01

    Solar driving mechanism for Earth climate has been a controversial problem for centuries. Long-time data of solar activity is required by the investigations of the solar driving mechanism, such as Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) record. Three Total Solar Irradiance Monitors (TSIM) have been developed by Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics for China Meteorological Administration to maintain continuities of TSI data series which lasted for nearly 4 decades.The newest TSIM has recorded TSI daily with accurate solar pointing on the FY-3C meteorological satellite since Oct 2013. TSIM/FY-3C has a pointing system for automatic solar tracking, onboard the satellite designed mainly for Earth observing. Most payloads of FY-3C are developed for observation of land, ocean and atmosphere. Consequently, the FY-3C satellite is a nadir-pointing spacecraft with its z axis to be pointed at the center of the Earth. Previous TSIMs onboard the FY-3A and FY-3B satellites had no pointing system, solar observations were only performed when the sun swept through field-of-view of the instruments. And TSI measurements are influenced inevitably by the solar pointing errors. Corrections of the solar pointing errors were complex. The problem is now removed by TSIM/FY-3C.TSIM/FY-3C follows the sun accurately by itself using its pointing system based on scheme of visual servo control. The pointing system is consisted of a radiometer package, two motors for solar tracking, a sun sensor and etc. TSIM/FY-3C has made daily observations of TSI for more than one year, with nearly zero solar pointing errors. Short time-scale variations in TSI detected by TSIM/FY-3C are nearly the same with VIRGO/SOHO and TIM/SORCE.Instrument details, primary results of solar pointing control, solar observations and etc will be given in the presentation.

  2. Contamination of Optical Surfaces Under Irradiation by Outgassed Volatile Products

    SciTech Connect

    Khasanshin, R. H.; Grigorevskiy, A. V.; Galygin, A. N.; Alexandrov, N. G.

    2009-01-05

    Deposition of outgassed products of a polymeric composite on model material surfaces being irradiated by electrons and protons with initial energies of E{sub e} = 40 keV and E{sub p} = 30 keV respectively was studied. It was shown that deposition of volatile products on model material surfaces being under ionizing radiations results in increase of organic film growth rate.

  3. Solar Versus Fission Surface Power for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.; Oleson, Steve; George, Pat; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Fincannon, James; Bogner, Amee; Jones, Robert E.; Turnbull, Elizabeth; McNatt, Jeremiah; Martini, Michael C.; Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Colozza, Anthony J.; Schmitz, Paul C.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    A multi-discipline team of experts from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) developed Mars surface power system point design solutions for two conceptual missions to Mars using In-situ resource utilization (ISRU). The primary goal of this study was to compare the relative merits of solar- versus fission-powered versions of each surface mission. First, the team compared three different solar-power options against a fission power system concept for a sub-scale, uncrewed demonstration mission. This “pathfinder” design utilized a 4.5 meter diameter lander. Its primary mission would be to demonstrate Mars entry, descent, and landing techniques. Once on the Martian surface, the lander’s ISRU payload would demonstrate liquid oxygen propellant production from atmospheric resources. For the purpose of this exercise, location was assumed to be at the Martian equator. The three solar concepts considered included a system that only operated during daylight hours (at roughly half the daily propellant production rate of a round-the-clock fission design), a battery-augmented system that operated through the night (matching the fission concept’s propellant production rate), and a system that operated only during daylight, but at a higher rate (again, matching the fission concept’s propellant production rate). Including 30% mass growth allowance, total payload masses for the three solar concepts ranged from 1,128 to 2,425 kg, versus the 2,751 kg fission power scheme. However, solar power masses increase as landing sites are selected further from the equator, making landing site selection a key driver in the final power system decision. The team also noted that detailed reliability analysis should be performed on daytime-only solar power schemes to assess potential issues with frequent ISRU system on/off cycling.

  4. Coloration and darkening of methane clathrate and other ices by charged particle irradiation - Applications to the outer solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. Reid; Murray, B. G. J. P. T.; Khare, B. N.; Sagan, Carl

    1987-01-01

    The results of laboratory experiments simulating the irradiation of hydrocarbon-H2O or hydrocarbon-H2O/NH3 clathrates by charged particles in the outer solar system are reported. Ices produced by condensing and boiling liquid CH4 on an H2O frost surface at 100 K or by cocondensing frosts from gaseous mixtures were exposed to coronal-discharge electron irradiation at 77 K, and the spectral properties of the irradiated surfaces were determined. Significant darkening of the initially white ices was observed at doses of 1 Gerg/sq cm, corresponding to 8-500 yrs of irradiation by Uranian magnetospheric electrons on the surfaces of the principal Uranian satellites, or to total destruction of CH4 in the upper 1 mm of the satellite surfaces after 0.05-3.0 Myr. It is estimated that 10 m or more of icy satellite or comet surfaces would be radiation-hardened to a CH4-free ice-tholin mixture over 4 Gyr.

  5. Exposure testing of solar absorber surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, S.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has been involved in supporting, monitoring and conducting exposure testing of solar materials for approximately ten years. The Laboratory has provided technical monitoring of the IITRI, DSET, Lockheed, and Berry contracts and has operated the Los Alamos exposure Facility for over five years. This report will outline some of the past exposure testing, the testing still in progress, and describe some of the major findings. While this report will primarily emphasize solar absorber surfaces, some of the significant findings relative to advanced glazing will be discussed.

  6. A I-V analysis of irradiated Gallium Arsenide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heulenberg, A.; Maurer, R. H.; Kinnison, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    A computer program was used to analyze the illuminated I-V characteristics of four sets of gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cells irradiated with 1-MeV electrons and 10-MeV protons. It was concluded that junction regions (J sub r) dominate nearly all GaAs cells tested, except for irradiated Mitsubishi cells, which appear to have a different doping profile. Irradiation maintains or increases the dominance by J sub r. Proton irradiation increases J sub r more than does electron irradiation. The U.S. cells were optimized for beginning of life (BOL) and the Japanese for end of life (EOL). I-V analysis indicates ways of improving both the BOL and EOL performance of GaAs solar cells.

  7. A I-V analysis of irradiated Gallium Arsenide solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heulenberg, A.; Maurer, R. H.; Kinnison, J. D.

    1991-08-01

    A computer program was used to analyze the illuminated I-V characteristics of four sets of gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cells irradiated with 1-MeV electrons and 10-MeV protons. It was concluded that junction regions (J sub r) dominate nearly all GaAs cells tested, except for irradiated Mitsubishi cells, which appear to have a different doping profile. Irradiation maintains or increases the dominance by J sub r. Proton irradiation increases J sub r more than does electron irradiation. The U.S. cells were optimized for beginning of life (BOL) and the Japanese for end of life (EOL). I-V analysis indicates ways of improving both the BOL and EOL performance of GaAs solar cells.

  8. Influence of Topographic Shading on Multi-decadal Average Solar Irradiance: Implications for Fine Scale Eco-physiological and Climate Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogren, W.; Bright, R. M.; Astrup, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    We have prepared a monthly topoclimatology covering the 385,000 km2 land area of Norway at 1 km2 resolution. The NASA/GEWEX Surface Radiation Budget (SRB) provides cloud cover as well as downwelling shortwave solar flux at the top of the atmosphere and surface, with global coverage at 1◦ spatial resolution, spanning 23 years at 3-hour temporal resolution. Solar positions and topographic influence are computed separately for each 1 km2 grid cell at each 3-hour timestep. Coupling the spatially coarse trends in cloudcover and irradiance from the course resolution SRB product with topography and solar position at significantly higher spatial resolution produces an improved dataset for linking seasonal trends in surface irradiance with a wide variety of physical and ecological processes sensitive to surface energy budgets.

  9. TiO2 film/Cu2O microgrid heterojunction with photocatalytic activity under solar light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junying; Zhu, Hailing; Zheng, Shukai; Pan, Feng; Wang, Tianmin

    2009-10-01

    Coupling a narrow-band-gap semiconductor with TiO(2) is an effective method to produce photocatalysts that work under UV-vis light irradiation. Usually photocatalytic coupled-semiconductors exist mainly as powders, and photocatalytic activity is only favored when a small loading amount of narrow-band-gap semiconductor is used. Here we propose a heavy-loading photocatalyst configuration in which 51% of the surface of the TiO(2) film is covered by a Cu(2)O microgrid. The coupled system shows higher photocatalytic activity under solar light irradiation than TiO(2) and Cu(2)O films. This improved performance is due to the efficient charge transfer between the two phases and the similar opportunity each has to be exposed to irradiation and adsorbates.

  10. Total solar irradiance variations: The construction of a composite and its comparison with models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froehlich, Claus; Lean, Judith

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of the total solar irradiance (TSI) during the last 18 years from spacecraft are reviewed. Corrections are determined for the early measurements made by the HF radiometer within the ERB experiment on NIMBUS 7 and the factor to refer active cavity radiometer irradiation monitoring (ACRIM) 2 to the ACRIM 1 irradiance scale. With these corrections, a composite TSI is constructed with a model that combines a magnetic brightness proxy with observed sunspot darkening and explains nearly 90 percent of the observed short and long term variance. Possible, but still unverified degradation of the radiometers hampers conclusions about irradiance changes on decadal time scales and longer.

  11. Solar energy converter using surface plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. M. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Sunlight is dispersed over a diffraction grating formed on the surface of a conducting film on a substrate. The angular dispersion controls the effective grating period so that a matching spectrum of surface plasmons is excited for parallel processing on the conducting film. The resulting surface plasmons carry energy to an array of inelastic tunnel diodes. This solar energy converter does not require different materials for each frequency band, and sunlight is directly converted to electricity in an efficient manner by extracting more energy from the more energetic photons.

  12. Electrostatic lofting variability of lunar dust under solar wind and solar uv irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cihan Örger, Necmi; Rodrigo Cordova Alarcon, Jose; Cho, Mengu; Toyoda, Kazuhiro

    2016-07-01

    It has been considered that lunar horizon glow is produced by forward scattering of the sunlight above the terminator region by the electrically charged dust grains. Previous lunar missions showed that lunar horizon glow is highly varying phenomenon; therefore, it is required to understand how this physical mechanism fundamentally occurs in order to be able to observe it. Therefore, terminator region and the dayside of the moon are the focus areas of this study in order to explain forward scattering of the sunlight towards night side region in the future steps of this work. In this paper, the results of lunar dust height calculations are presented as a function of solar zenith angle and solar wind properties. First, equilibrium surface potential, Debye length and surface electric field have been calculated to be used in the dust model to predict the lofting of lunar dust under various solar wind conditions. Dependence of the dust lofting on different parameters such as electron temperature or plasma density can be explained from the initial results. In addition, these results showed that zero potential occurs between subsolar point and terminator region as it is expected, where the maximum height of dust particles are minimum, and its position changes according to the solar wind properties and photoemission electron temperature. Relative to this work, a CubeSat mission is currently being developed in Kyushu Institute of Technology to observe lunar horizon glow.

  13. EUV dynamic spectral map-a new tool to look into the variety of solar irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Z.; Wang, Y.; Liu, K.

    2013-12-01

    As The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Launched on February 11, 2010 , the instrument EVE aboard on it has measured the solar extreme ultraviolet irradiance variations for three years. Due to flares solar radiation varies rapidly and for different spectrums has different responses . So the different type flares viewed by the EVE present different morphology . As for a longer term, the solar radiation also changes for solar rotation in 28 days and solar cycles for 11-year sunspot cycle. We come up with a new tool to display these changes-EUV dynamic spectral map.This paper will briefly present how we produce this map and make a classification of the solar flare base on the EUV map and shows the long-term EUV background emission variations of three years during the Solar Cycle 24.

  14. Solar vs. Fission Surface Power for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.; Oleson, Steve; George, Pat; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Fincannon, James; Bogner, Amee; Jones, Robert E.; Turnbull, Elizabeth; Martini, Michael C.; Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Colozza, Anthony J.; Schmitz, Paul C.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    A multi-discipline team of experts from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) developed Mars surface power system point design solutions for two conceptual missions. The primary goal of this study was to compare the relative merits of solar- versus fission-powered versions of each surface mission. First, the team compared three different solar power options against a fission power system concept for a sub-scale, uncrewed demonstration mission. The 4.5 meter (m) diameter pathfinder lander's primary mission would be to demonstrate Mars entry, descent, and landing techniques. Once on the Martian surface, the lander's In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) payload would demonstrate liquid oxygen propellant production using atmospheric resources. For the purpose of this exercise, location was assumed to be at the Martian equator. The three solar concepts considered included a system that only operated during daylight hours (at roughly half the daily propellant production rate of a round-the-clock fission design), a battery-augmented system that operated through the night (matching the fission concept's propellant production rate), and a system that operated only during daylight, but at a higher rate (again, matching the fission concept's propellant production rate). Including 30% mass growth allowance, total payload masses for the three solar concepts ranged from 1,116 to 2,396 kg, versus the 2,686 kg fission power scheme. However, solar power masses are expected to approach or exceed the fission payload mass at landing sites further from the equator, making landing site selection a key driver in the final power system decision. The team also noted that detailed reliability analysis should be performed on daytime-only solar power schemes to assess potential issues with frequent ISRU system on/off cycling. Next, the team developed a solar-powered point design solution for a conceptual four-crew, 500-day surface mission consisting of up to four landers per

  15. High resolution irradiance tailoring using multiple freeform surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bruneton, Adrien; Bäuerle, Axel; Wester, Rolf; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Loosen, Peter

    2013-05-06

    More and more lighting applications require the design of dedicated optics to achieve a given radiant intensity or irradiance distribution. Freeform optics has the advantage of providing such a functionality with a compact design. It was previously demonstrated in [Bäuerle et al., Opt. Exp. 20, 14477-14485 (2012)] that the up-front computation of the light path through the optical system (ray mapping) provides a satisfactory approximation to the problem, and allows the design of multiple freeform surfaces in transmission or in reflection. This article presents one natural extension of this work by introducing an efficient optimization procedure based on the physics of the system. The procedure allows the design of multiple freeform surfaces and can render high resolution irradiance patterns, as demonstrated by several examples, in particular by a lens made of two freeform surfaces projecting a high resolution logo (530 × 160 pixels).

  16. Albumin grafting on biomaterial surfaces using gamma-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, K.R.

    1993-01-01

    Surface modification has been used extensively in various fields to introduce desirable surface properties without affecting the bulk properties of the material. In the area of biomaterials, the approach of surface modification offers an effective alternative to the synthesis of new biomaterials. The specific objective of this study was to modify different biomaterial surfaces by albumin grafting to improve their blood compatibility. The modified surfaces were characterized for surface-induced platelet activation and thrombus formation. This behavior was correlated with the conditions used for grafting. In particular, albumin was functionalized to introduce pendant double bonds into the molecule. The functionalized albumin was covalently attached to various surfaces, such as dimethyldichlorosilane-coated glass, polypropylene, polycarbonate, poly(vinyl chloride), and polyethylene by gamma-irradiation. Platelet adhesion and activation on these surfaces was examined using video microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The extent of grafting was found to be dependent on the albumin concentration used for adsorption and the gamma-irradiation time. Release of the grafted albumin during exposure to blood was minimal. The albumin-grafted fibers maintained their thromboresistant properties even after storage at elevated temperatures for prolonged time periods. Finally, the approach was used to graft albumin on the PLEXUS Adult Hollow Fiber Oxygenators (Shiley). The blood compatibility of the grafted oxygenators improved significantly when compared to controls.

  17. Free Flyer Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) and Climate Services Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahalan, R.; Pilewskie, P.; Woods, T.

    2012-04-01

    NOAA's planned Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) mission will fly along with the NOAA user service payloads Advanced Data Collection System (ADCS) and Search and Rescue Satellite Aided Tracking (SARSAT). In order to guarantee continuity in the 33-year solar irradiance climate data record, TSIS must be launched in time to overlap with current on-orbit solar irradiance instruments. Currently TSIS is moving towards a launch readiness date of January 2015. TSIS provides for continuation of the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) and the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) currently onboard NASA's Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) platform, launched in January 2003. The difficulty of ensuring continuity has increased due to the launch failure of NASA's Glory mission with its improved TIM. Achieving the needed overlap must now rely on extending SORCE, and maintaining the TSIS schedule. TSIS is one component of a NASA-NOAA joint program (JPSS) planned to transition certain climate observations to operational mode. We summarize issues of continuity, improvements being made to the TIM and SIM sensors, and plans to provide for traceability of total and spectral irradiance measurements to ground-based cryogenic standards.

  18. Influence of spatiotemporally distributed irradiance data input on temperature evolution in parabolic trough solar field simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubolz, K.; Schenk, H.; Hirsch, T.

    2016-05-01

    Concentrating solar field operation is affected by shadowing through cloud movement. For line focusing systems the impact of varying irradiance has been studied before by several authors with simulations of relevant thermodynamics assuming spatially homogeneous irradiance or using artificial test signals. While today's simulation capabilities allow more and more a higher spatiotemporal resolution of plant processes there are only few studies on influence of spatially distributed irradiance due to lack of available data. Based on recent work on generating real irradiance maps with high spatial resolution this paper demonstrates their influence on solar field thermodynamics. For a case study an irradiance time series is chosen. One solar field section with several loops and collecting header is modeled for simulation purpose of parabolic trough collectors and oil as heat transfer medium. Assuming homogeneous mass flow distribution among all loops we observe spatially varying temperature characteristics. They are analysed without and with mass flow control and their impact on solar field control design is discussed. Finally, the potential of distributed irradiance data is outlined.

  19. Free Flyer Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) and Climate Services Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahalan, R.; Pilewskie, P.; Woods, T.

    2012-01-01

    NOAA's planned Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) mission will fly along with the NOAA user service payloads Advanced Data Collection System (ADCS) and Search and Rescue Satellite Aided Tracking (SARSAT). In ' order to guarantee continuity in the 33-year solar irradiance climate data record, TSIS must be launched in time to overlap with current on-orbit solar irradiance instruments. Currently TSIS is moving towards a launch rcadinss date of January 2015. TSIS provides for continuation of the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) and the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) ,currently onboard NASA's Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) platform, launched in January 2003. The difficulty of ensuring continuity has increased due to the launch failure of NASA's Glory mission with its improved TIM. Achieving the needed overlap must now rely on extending SORCE. and maintaining the TSIS schedule. TSIS is one component of a NASA-NOAA joint program (JPSS) planned to transition certain climate observations to operational mode. We summarize issues of continuity, improvements being made to the TIM and 81M sensors, and plans to provide for traceability of total and spectral irradiance measurements to ground-based cryogenic standards.

  20. An Experimental Approach to Thermal and Solar Weathering of Mercury's Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. M.; Elkins-Tanton, L. T.

    2010-12-01

    The surface of Mercury is heated to 450°C during the day and is periodically bombarded by the solar wind - processes that have likely been occurring for billions of years. Mercury’s ion tail is composed of ions including Na, K, and Ca and is thought to be the result of surface mineral damage from heat and irradiation processes, possibly including photon-stimulated desorption, thermal desorption, and impact vaporization. We are seeking to quantify the results of irradiation and thermal damage on likely surface minerals that make up the regolith by simulating space weathering. We irradiate anorthoclase, enstatite, diopside, and ilmenite with fast neutrons for 12hrs, and then heat these minerals to 1300°C. We also heat grains that have not been irradiated. The irradiation is equivalent to 40,000 Earth years on the surface of Mercury. The grains are analyzed in an electron microprobe before and after irradiation and/or heating. Our initial results take the form of compositional profiles from the interior to the exterior of grains, showing ion losses from both irradiation and heating; we compare our curves with those from diffusion models. The results of these studies should indicate the species and volumes of ions likely to be released from each mineral, and should pave the way for measuring spectra of damaged minerals in labs, with the goal of comparing the spectra of damaged minerals with spectra obtained from MESSENGER.

  1. Photocatalytic oxidation of pesticides by solar-irradiated TiO[sub 2] systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J.M.; Grinstead, J.H. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Research at the Tennessee Valley Authority's National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center has been directed toward the development of passive basin type solar evaporators as a simple means of reducing the volume of fertilizer and pesticide contaminated rinsewater generated at fertilizer and agrichemical dealerships. In conjunction with this work, investigations are also devoted to TiO[sub 2] catalyzed solar photooxidation as a potential procedure for destroying pesticides in dilute aqueous systems. Initial tests in which dilute samples of the herbicides; Bicep (atrazine and metolachlor), Lasso (alachlor), and Sencor (metribuzin); were recirculated continuously over TiO[sub 2] impregnated fiberglass gauze, under solar irradiation, gave promising results. In the case of metribuzin, solar irradiation induced oxidation appeared effective at concentrations as high as 600 ppM. Catalytic efficiency did not appear greatly affected by using tap water rather than distilled water to dilute the pesticides. Two solar reactor designs will be discussed.

  2. Photocatalytic oxidation of pesticides by solar-irradiated TiO{sub 2} systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J.M.; Grinstead, J.H. Jr.

    1992-12-01

    Research at the Tennessee Valley Authority`s National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center has been directed toward the development of passive basin type solar evaporators as a simple means of reducing the volume of fertilizer and pesticide contaminated rinsewater generated at fertilizer and agrichemical dealerships. In conjunction with this work, investigations are also devoted to TiO{sub 2} catalyzed solar photooxidation as a potential procedure for destroying pesticides in dilute aqueous systems. Initial tests in which dilute samples of the herbicides; Bicep (atrazine and metolachlor), Lasso (alachlor), and Sencor (metribuzin); were recirculated continuously over TiO{sub 2} impregnated fiberglass gauze, under solar irradiation, gave promising results. In the case of metribuzin, solar irradiation induced oxidation appeared effective at concentrations as high as 600 ppM. Catalytic efficiency did not appear greatly affected by using tap water rather than distilled water to dilute the pesticides. Two solar reactor designs will be discussed.

  3. Solar UVB and plant damage irradiances for different Argentinean regions.

    PubMed

    Micheletti, Maria Isabel; Piacentini, Rubén D

    2002-09-01

    We calculated the integrated UVB and plant damage irradiances for Argentina, a country in the Southern Hemisphere spread over a large latitudinal range. The irradiances were calculated for clear sky days using the Madronich code for the average conditions of the months corresponding to the summer and winter solstices and the fall and spring equinoxes. Ozone, aerosol and ground albedo typical for each region and for each period of the year have been considered. A comparison was made of the behavior of these irradiances at the different locations. A more pronounced time dependence of the plant damage irradiance was obtained because of the fact that the corresponding spectrum is largely concentrated at a small wavelength of the UVB interval. We established a correlation between both irradiances, which can be approximated by a quadratic function. Because the plant damage irradiance is a quantity that is not directly measured by instruments, we showed the utility of the correlation by determining this biological effectiveness from the integrated UVB irradiance measured at the Astronomical Observatory of Rosario, Argentina, on clear sky days of the year 2001, as a characteristic example of the midlatitude near-sea level location of a highly productive agricultural region, which can be extended to other regions of the world. The plant damage results are relative ones (as is the case for the erythemal irradiance). So, they can be used to determine the maximum/minimum and asymmetry ratios, to study the influence of atmospheric variables and to make comparisons with other geographical locations.

  4. Estimation of daily global solar irradiation under different sky conditions in central and southern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didari, Shohreh; Zand-Parsa, Shahrokh

    2017-02-01

    Daily global solar irradiation ( R s) is one of the main inputs in environmental modeling. Because of the lack of its measuring facilities, high-quality and long-term data are limited. In this research, R s values were estimated based on measured sunshine duration and cloud cover of our synoptic meteorological stations in central and southern Iran during 2008, 2009, and 2011. Clear sky solar irradiation was estimated from linear regression using extraterrestrial solar irradiation as the independent variable with normalized root mean square error (NRMSE) of 4.69 %. Daily R s was calibrated using measured sunshine duration and cloud cover data under different sky conditions during 2008 and 2009. The 2011 data were used for model validation. According to the results, in the presence of clouds, the R s model using sunshine duration data was more accurate when compared with the model using cloud cover data (NRMSE = 11. 69 %). In both models, with increasing sky cloudiness, the accuracy decreased. In the study region, more than 92 % of sunshine durations were clear or partly cloudy, which received close to 95 % of total solar irradiation. Hence, it was possible to estimate solar irradiation with a good accuracy in most days with the measurements of sunshine duration.

  5. Manipulation of the graphene surface potential by ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ochedowski, O.; Kleine Bussmann, B.; Schleberger, M.; Ban d'Etat, B.; Lebius, H.

    2013-04-15

    We show that the work function of exfoliated single layer graphene can be modified by irradiation with swift (E{sub kin}=92 MeV) heavy ions under glancing angles of incidence. Upon ion impact individual surface tracks are created in graphene on silicon carbide. Due to the very localized energy deposition characteristic for ions in this energy range, the surface area which is structurally altered is limited to Almost-Equal-To 0.01 {mu}m{sup 2} per track. Kelvin probe force microscopy reveals that those surface tracks consist of electronically modified material and that a few tracks suffice to shift the surface potential of the whole single layer flake by Almost-Equal-To 400 meV. Thus, the irradiation turns the initially n-doped graphene into p-doped graphene with a hole density of 8.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} holes/cm{sup 2}. This doping effect persists even after heating the irradiated samples to 500 Degree-Sign C. Therefore, this charge transfer is not due to adsorbates but must instead be attributed to implanted atoms. The method presented here opens up a way to efficiently manipulate the charge carrier concentration of graphene.

  6. A facile approach for TiO2-based superhydrophobic-superhydrophilic patterns by UV or solar irradiation without a photomask.

    PubMed

    Yanqing, Zhu; Jifu, Shi; Qizhang, Huang; Leilei, Wang; Gang, Xu

    2017-02-16

    A novel and facile approach to produce TiO2-based superhydrophobic-superhydrophilic patterns by UV or solar irradiation without a photomask is presented. The fabricated superhydrophobic-superhydrophilic patterns with excellent mechanical properties have long lifetimes in outdoor applications or other UV environments because of a self-supply of low surface tension material.

  7. Solar Ion Processing of Major Element Surface Compositions of Mature Mare Soils: Insights from Combined XPS and Analytical TEM Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Dukes, C.; Keller, L. P.; Baragiola, R.

    2012-01-01

    Solar wind ions are capable of altering the sur-face chemistry of the lunar regolith by a number of mechanisms including preferential sputtering, radiation-enhanced diffusion and sputter erosion of space weathered surfaces containing pre-existing compositional profiles. We have previously reported in-situ ion irradiation experiments supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and analytical TEM that show how solar ions potentially drive Fe and Ti reduction at the monolayer scale as well as the 10-100 nm depth scale in lunar soils [1]. Here we report experimental data on the effect of ion irradiation on the major element surface composition in a mature mare soil.

  8. Wavelength Dependence of Solar Flare Irradiation and its Influence on the Thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Yanshi; Richmond, Arthur D.; Deng, Yue; Qian, L.; Solomon, S.; Chamberlin, P.

    2012-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of solar flare enhancement is one of the important factors determining how the Thermosphere-Ionosphere (T-I) system response to flares. To investigate the wavelength dependence of solar flare, the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) has been run for 34 X-class flares. The results show that the percentage increases of solar irradiance at flare peak comparing to pre-flare condition have a clear wavelength dependence. In the wavelength range between 0 - 195 nm, it can vary from 1% to 10000%. The solar irradiance enhancement is largest ( 1000%) in the XUV range (0 - 25 nm), and is about 100% in EUV range (25 - 120 nm). The influence of different wavebands on the T-I system during the October 28th, 2003 flare (X17.2-class) has also been examined using the latest version of National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Thermosphere- Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE-GCM). While the globally integrated solar energy deposition is largest in the 0 - 14 nm waveband, the impact of solar irradiance enhancement on the thermosphere at 400 km is largest for 25 - 105 nm waveband. The effect of 122 - 195 nm is small in magnitude, but it decays slowly.

  9. Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulation for the near-ocean-surface high-resolution downwelling irradiance statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zao; Yue, Dick K. P.

    2014-05-01

    We present a numerical study of the near-surface underwater solar light statistics using the state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiative transfer (RT) simulations in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system. Advanced variance-reduction techniques and full program parallelization are utilized so that the model is able to simulate the light field fluctuations with high spatial [O(10-3 mm)] and temporal [O(10-3 s)] resolutions. In particular, we utilize the high-order correction technique for the beam-surface intersection points in the model to account for the shadowing effect of steep ocean surfaces, and therefore, the model is able to well predict the refraction and reflection of light for large solar zenith incidences. The Monte Carlo RT model is carefully validated by data-to-model comparisons using the Radiance in a Dynamic Ocean (RaDyO) experimental data. Based on the model, we are particularly interested in the probability density function (PDF) and coefficient of variation (CV) of the highly fluctuating downwelling irradiance. The effects of physical factors, such as the water turbidity of the ocean, solar incidence, and the detector size, are investigated. The results show that increased turbidity and detector size reduce the variability of the downwelling irradiance; the shadowing effect for large solar zenith incidence strongly enhances the variability of the irradiance at shallow depths.

  10. Gene Expression in the Scleractinian Acropora microphthalma Exposed to High Solar Irradiance Reveals Elements of Photoprotection and Coral Bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Starcevic, Antonio; Dunlap, Walter C.; Cullum, John; Shick, J. Malcolm; Hranueli, Daslav; Long, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    Background The success of tropical reef-building corals depends on the metabolic co-operation between the animal host and the photosynthetic performance of endosymbiotic algae residing within its cells. To examine the molecular response of the coral Acropora microphthalma to high levels of solar irradiance, a cDNA library was constructed by PCR-based suppression subtractive hybridisation (PCR-SSH) from mRNA obtained by transplantation of a colony from a depth of 12.7 m to near-surface solar irradiance, during which the coral became noticeably paler from loss of endosymbionts in sun-exposed tissues. Methodology/Principal Findings A novel approach to sequence annotation of the cDNA library gave genetic evidence for a hypothetical biosynthetic pathway branching from the shikimic acid pathway that leads to the formation of 4-deoxygadusol. This metabolite is a potent antioxidant and expected precursor of the UV-protective mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs), which serve as sunscreens in coral phototrophic symbiosis. Empirical PCR based evidence further upholds the contention that the biosynthesis of these MAA sunscreens is a ‘shared metabolic adaptation’ between the symbiotic partners. Additionally, gene expression induced by enhanced solar irradiance reveals a cellular mechanism of light-induced coral bleaching that invokes a Ca2+-binding synaptotagmin-like regulator of SNARE protein assembly of phagosomal exocytosis, whereby algal partners are lost from the symbiosis. Conclusions/Significance Bioinformatics analyses of DNA sequences obtained by differential gene expression of a coral exposed to high solar irradiance has revealed the identification of putative genes encoding key steps of the MAA biosynthetic pathway. Revealed also by this treatment are genes that implicate exocytosis as a cellular process contributing to a breakdown in the metabolically essential partnership between the coral host and endosymbiotic algae, which manifests as coral bleaching. PMID

  11. The delta-Sobolev approach for modeling solar spectral irradiance and radiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xuwu

    The development and evaluation of a solar radiation model is reported, which gives irradiance and radiance results at the bottom and top of an atmosphere of specified optical depth for each of 145 spectral intervals from 0.29 to 4.05 microns. Absorption by water vapor, aerosols, ozone, and uniformly mixed gases; scattering by molecules and aerosols; and non-Lambertian surface reflectance are included in the model. For solving the radiative transfer equation, an innovative delta-Sobolev method is developed. It applies a delta-function modification to the conventional Sobolev solutions in a way analogous to the delta-Eddington method. The irradiance solution by the delta-Sobolev method turns out to be mathematically identical to the delta-Eddington approximation. The radiance solution by the delta-Sobolov method provides a convenient way to obtain the directional distribution pattern of the radiation transfer field, a feature unable to be obtained by most commonly used approximation methods. Such radiance solutions are also especially useful in models for satellite remote sensing. The model is tested against the rigorous Dave model, which solves the radiation transfer problem by the spherical harmonic method, an accurate but very time consuming process. Good agreement between the current model results and those of Dave's model are observed. The advantages of the delta-Sobolev model are simplicity, reasonable accuracy and capability for implementation on a minicomputer or microcomputer.

  12. The Delta-Sobolev Approach for Modeling Solar Spectral Irradiance and Radiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xuwu

    This dissertation reports the development and evaluation of a solar radiation model, which gives irradiance and radiance results at the bottom and top of an atmosphere of specified optical depth for each of 145 spectral intervals from 0.29 to 4.05 mum. Absorption by water vapor, aerosols, ozone and uniformly mixed gases; scattering by molecules and aerosols; and non-Lambertian surface reflectance are included in the model. For solving the radiative transfer equation, an innovative delta-Sobolev method is developed. It applies a delta-function modification to the conventional Sobolev solutions in a way analogous to the delta-Eddington method. The irradiance solution by the delta-Sobolev method turns out to be mathematically identical to the delta-Eddington approximation. The radiance solution by the delta-Sobolev method provides a convenient way to obtain the directional distribution pattern of the radiation transfer field, a feature unable to be obtained by most commonly used approximate methods. Such radiance solutions are also especially useful in models for satellite remote sensing. The model is tested against the rigorous Dave model, which solves the radiative transfer problem by the Spherical Harmonic method, an accurate but very time consuming process. Good agreement between the current model results and those of Dave's model are observed. The advantages of the delta-Sobolev model are simplicity, reasonable accuracy and capability for implementation on a minicomputer or microcomputer.

  13. Schisandrin B protects against solar irradiation-induced oxidative injury in BJ human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Po Yee; Lam, Philip Y; Yan, Chung Wai; Ko, Kam Ming

    2011-06-01

    The effects of schisandrin B (Sch B) and its analogs on solar irradiation-induced oxidative injury were examined in BJ human fibroblasts. Sch B and schisandrin C (Sch C) increased cellular reduced glutathione (GSH) level and protected against solar irradiation-induced oxidative injury. The photoprotection was paralleled by decreases in the elastases-type protease activity and matrix-metalloproteinases-1 expression in solar-irradiated fibroblasts. The cytochrome P-450-mediated metabolism of Sch B or Sch C caused ROS production. The results suggest that by virtue of its pro-oxidant action and the subsequent glutathione antioxidant response, Sch B or Sch C may offer the prospect of preventing skin photo-aging.

  14. The Nimbus 7 solar total irradiance - A new algorithm for its derivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, Douglas V.; Kyle, H. L.; Hickey, John R.; Maschhoff, Robert H.

    1992-01-01

    A new analysis is presented of the Nimbus-7 cavity radiometer measurements of the solar total irradiance from November 1978 to July 1991. Several problems concerning Nimbus 7 measurements are identified, and a new algorithm is developed for deriving the solar irradiance from Nimbus-7 raw data, which removes more of the instrumental and geometrical influences on the measurements than did previous algorithms. Compared to previous analyses of Nimbus-7 radiometer, the new values are higher and somewhat less variable than the older values. Compared to SMM measurements, the new values agree with SMM data quite well as long as any solar activity is present, but when the sun is quiet and its irradiance variability is less than the Nimbus radiometer resolution, the comparison breaks down.

  15. Solar Extreme Ultraviolet and X-ray Irradiance Measurements for Thermosphere and Ionosphere Studies (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, T. N.; Caspi, A.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Eparvier, F. G.; Jones, A. R.; Sojka, J. J.; Solomon, S. C.; Viereck, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    The solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV: 10-120 nm) and soft X-ray (SXR: 0.1-10 nm) radiation is critical energy input for Earth's upper atmosphere above 80 km as a driver for photochemistry, ionosphere creation, temperature structure, and dynamics. Understanding the solar EUV and X-ray variations and their influences on Earth's atmosphere are important for myriad of space weather applications. The solar EUV and SXR spectral irradiances are currently being measured by NASA's Thermosphere, Ionosphere, Mesosphere, Energetics, and Dynamics (TIMED) Solar EUV Experiment (SEE), NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) EUV Variability Experiment (EVE), and NOAA's GOES X-Ray Sensor (XRS) and EUV Sensor (EUVS). The solar irradiance varies on all time scales, ranging from seconds to hours from solar flare events, to days from 27-day solar rotation, and to years and longer from 11-year solar cycle. The amount of variation is strongly wavelength dependent with smaller ~50% solar cycle variations seen in the EUV for transition region emissions and larger factor of 10 and more variations seen in the SXR for coronal emissions. These solar irradiance observations are expected to be continued and to overlap with NASA's future Global-scale Observations of the Limb and Disk (GOLD) and Ionospheric Connection (ICON) missions that focus on the study of the thermosphere and ionosphere. These current measurements are only broad band in the SXR, but there are plans to have new spectral SXR measurements from CubeSat missions that may also overlap with the GOLD and ICON missions.

  16. Analysis of Solar Spectral Irradiance Measurements from the SBUV/2-Series and the SSBUV Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebula, Richard P.; DeLand, Matthew T.; Hilsenrath, Ernest

    1997-01-01

    The NOAA-9 SBEV/2 instrument has made the first regular measurements ot solar UV activity over a complete solar cycle, beginning in March 1985 and continuing as of this writing. The NOAA-9 solar irradiance data set includes the minimum between Cycles 21-22 and the current minimum at the end of Cycle 22. Although overall solar activity is low during these periods, 27-day rotational modulation is frequently present. The episode of 13-day periodicity observed during September 1994 - March 1995 shows that phenomena previously associated with high levels of solar activity can occur at any point in the solar cycle. The 205 nm irradiance and Mg II index measured by NOAA-9 showed very similar behavior during the Cycle 21-22 minimum in 1985-1986, when 27-day periodicity dominated short-term solar variations, but behaved differently in 1994-1995 during the episode of 13-day periodicity. We plan further investigations into the physical causes of this result, since it affects the extent to which the Mg II index is an accurate proxy for 205 nm irradiance variations during such episodes. The NOAA-9 Mg II data are available.

  17. Observations of Solar Spectral Irradiance Change During Cycle 22 from NOAA-9 SBUV/2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLand, Matthew T.; Cebula, Richard P.; Hilsenrath, Ernest

    2003-01-01

    The NOM-9 Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet, model 2 (SBUV/2) instrument is one of a series of instruments providing daily solar spectral irradiance measurements in the middle and near ultraviolet since 1978. The SBUV/2 instruments are primarily designed to measure stratospheric profile and total column ozone, using the directional albedo as the input to the ozone processing algorithm. As a result, the SBUV/2 instrument does not have onboard monitoring of all time-dependent response changes. We have applied internal comparisons and vicarious (external) comparisons to determine the long-term instrument characterization for NOAA-9 SBUV/2 to derive accurate solar spectral irradiances from March 1985 to May 1997 spanning two solar cycle minima with a single instrument. The NOAA-9 data show an amplitude of 9.3(+/- 2.3)% (81-day averaged) at 200-205 nm for solar cycle 22. This is consistent with the result of (Delta)F(sub 200-205) = 8.3(+/- 2.6)% for cycle 21 from Nimbus-7 SBUV and (Delta)F(sub 200-205) = 10(+/- 2)% (daily values) for cycle 23 from UARS SUSIM. NOAA-9 data at 245-250 nm show a solar cycle amplitude of (Delta)F(sub 245-250) = 5.7(+/- 1.8)%. NOAA-9 SBUV/2 data can be combined with other instruments to create a 25-year record of solar UV irradiance.

  18. A Comparison of Variable Total and Ultraviolet Solar Irradiance Inputs to 20 th Century Global Warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foukal, P. V.

    2002-05-01

    Analysis of spaceborne radiometry has shown that the total solar irradiance variation over the past two activity cycles was approximately proportional to the weighted difference between areas of dark spots and bright faculae and enhanced network. Empirical models of ultraviolet irradiance variation indicate that its behavior is dominated by changes in area of the bright component alone, whose photometric contrast increases at shorter wavelength.This difference in time behavior of total and UV irradiances could help to discriminate between their relative importance in forcing of global warming. Our recent digitization of archival Ca K images from Mt Wilson and NSO provides the first direct measurement of variations in area of the bright component, extending between 1915 and 1999 (previous models have relied on the sunspot number or other proxies to estimate the bright - component contribution). We use these more direct measurements to derive the time behavior of solar total and UV irradiance variation, over this period .We find that they are significantly different;the total irradiance variation accounts for over 80 percent of the variance in global temperature during this period, while the ultraviolet irradiance variation accounts for only about 20 percent. The amplitude of total irradiance variation in our model is smaller than required to influence global warming,in current climate models.Also, the impact of sulfate aerosol variations on the extended cooling between the 1940's and 1970's must be better understood before the significance of correlations between 20 th century global warming, and any solar activity index can be properly assessed. Despite these caveats, the lower correlation we find between global temperature and UV,compared to total, irradiance requires consideration in the search for physical mechanisms linking solar activity and climate. This work was supported in part under NASA grant NAG5-7607 to CRI, Inc., and NAG5-10998 to the Applied Physics

  19. Space Weathering of airless bodies in the Solar System - Combining hypervelocity dust impacts with energetic irradiation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiege, K.; Bennett, C.; Guglielmino, M.; Orlando, T. M.; Trieloff, M.; Srama, R.

    2015-12-01

    The chemical and mineralogical characterization of meteorites and their parent asteroids provides us with information about the processes and conditions during the formation of the inner Solar System. However, linking meteorites to their parent bodies is problematic. Astronomical observations aim to reconstruct the surface properties of these bodies primarily by visible and infrared spectra, but space weathering severely modifies the optical, compositional and physical properties of thin surface layers and thus precludes proper identification of chemistry and mineralogy. The effects of space weathering have been experimentally studied mainly with respect to ion bombardment and sputtering. Other studies aimed to simulate the influence of micrometeoroid bombardment by using laser ablation techniques. However, there is sufficient evidence that laser ablation does not realistically lead to the same effects as produced during real micrometeorite impacts. We performed micrometeorite bombardment using a 2MV dust accelerator at the Institute for Space Systems at University of Stuttgart, Germany, capable of generating impact speeds up to 100 km s-1. These results are combined with energetic irradiation experiments at the Electron and Photon Induced Chemistry on Surfaces (EPICS) laboratory at Georgia Institute of Technology, USA. By simulating highly realistic irradiation conditions, we are able to investigate the processes of particle and solar wind irradiation on solid planetary surfaces and study the formation of e.g., nanophase iron in minerals, the effects on hydrous minerals regarding their volatile budgets, or possible OH-formation in nominally anhydrous minerals and relate these to their optical properties. Using a variety of minerals, this work aims to contribute to a better understanding of the general alteration mechanisms in space environments in dependence of weathering agent and available material. We here present the results of initial comparison analysis and

  20. Corroboration for the influence of a component of solar irradiance on subsurface radon signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinitz, G.; Piatibratova, O.; Kotlarsky, P.; Sturrock, P.; Maritn, C.

    2012-04-01

    Rn-222 occurs at highly varying levels as a trace component in subsurface air (geogas). This high variability is traced by alpha and gamma activity due to the decay of radon and its progeny. Nuclear radiation from radon in geogas and in experiments using air+radon within a confined volume exhibits systematic temporal variations. These variations are composed of periodic and non-periodic signals spanning several orders of magnitude in time - from annual to daily and sub-daily durations. Analysis of extensive data sets from three key sites 200 km apart in the arid desert of southern Israel [1-3] and from a 5-year experiment using alpha and gamma detectors [4] demonstrate that the periodic variations, observed to a depth of >100 meters, are related to an above surface driver probably due to a component of solar irradiance. Insight was also derived from the long term variations in the geological and the experimental time series [5], indicated by the occurrence of multi-year variations, and clear semiannual and ternary annual signals which are in addition to the annual periodicity. New confirmations are based on recognizing further cyclic phenomena, some of which are not linked with Earth related periodicities. A likehood analysis of the alpha and gamma time series in a long-term experiment is performed. A Combined Power Statistic formed from the gamma, alpha-H and alpha-L sensors inside the experimental tank shows that the time series of the gamma radiation contains an annual periodicity as well as a clear semi-annual and possibly a ternary-annual periodicity. The same analysis also resolves additional periodicities in the frequency range of 10-15 yr-1 in the gamma time series which are indicative of a relationship to rotation of the sun around its axis [6]. Observation of solar periodicities in the temporal pattern of the nuclear radiation of radon is a significant independent substantiation for the notion of the influence of a component in solar irradiance. An

  1. Search for periodicities of the Solar Irradiance Data from Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) using Rayleigh Power Spectrum Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Sankar Narayan; Bhattacharya, Gautam; Ghosh, Koushik; Raychaudhuri, Probhas

    2009-11-01

    The solar irradiance data plays a very important role for understanding of Solar internal Structure and the solar terrestrial relationships. The Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) is integrated solar energy flux over the entire spectrum which arrives at the top of the atmosphere at the mean sun earth distance. TSI has been monitored from several satellites, e.g. Nimbus 7, Solar Maximum Mission (SMM), The NASA, Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS), NOAA9, NOAA10, Eureca and the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) etc. From these observations it reveals that the total solar irradiance varies about a small fraction of 0.1 over solar cycle being higher during maximum solar activity condition. In the present paper we have analysed the solar irradiance data from ERBS during the time period from October 15, 1984 to October 15, 2003. First filtering the data by Simple Exponential Smoothing we have applied the Rayleigh Power Spectrum Analysis on the processed data in order to search for its time variation. Study exhibits multi-periodicities on these data around 7, 11, 42, 80, 104, 130, 160, 254, 536, 752, 1142, 1388, 2474 and 4951 days with very high confidence levels (more than 95%). Apart from these strong periods there are some other weak periods around 22, 47, 53, 67, 69, 149, 167, 365, 489 and 683 days. These periods are significantly similar with the periods of other solar activities which may suggest that solar irradiance may be associated with other solar activities.

  2. Solar irradiance observed at Summit, Greenland: Possible links to magnetic activity on short timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, John E.

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of ground-level visible sunlight (400-600 nm) from Summit, Greenland over the period August 2004 through October 2014 define the attenuation provided by cloudiness, including its dependence on solar elevation and season. The long-term mean cloud-attenuation increases with increasing solar zenith angle, consistent with radiative transfer calculations which treat a cloud as a plane parallel layer with a strong bias toward forward scattering and an albedo for diffuse radiation near 0.1. The ratio of measured irradiance to clear-sky irradiance for solar zenith angles greater than 66° has a small, but statistically significant, positive correlation with the previous day's magnetic activity as measured by the daily Ap index, but no clear relationship exists between the irradiance ratio and daily changes in the ground-level neutron flux measured at Thule over the time frame considered. A high value of Ap on one day tends to be followed by a day whose ground-level solar irradiance is slightly greater than would occur otherwise. In an average sense, the visible irradiance following a day with Ap>16 exceeds that following a day with Ap≤16 by 1.2-1.3% with a 95% confidence range of approximately ±1.0%. The results are broadly compatible with small changes in atmospheric scattering following magnetic disturbances.

  3. Initial solar irradiance determinations from Nimbus 7 cavity radiometer measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, J.R.; Stowe, L.L.; Jacobowitz, H.; Pellegrino, P.; Maschhoff, R.H.; House, F.; Vonder Haar, T.H.

    1980-04-18

    Preliminary results from solar radiation measurements from the earth radiation budget experiment on the Nimbus 7 satellite yield a mean value of 1376.0 watts per square meter for the solar constant from 16 November 1978 to 15 May 1979. The observed variability (root-mean-square deviation) is +- 0.73 watt per square meter (+- 0.05 percent) for the period.

  4. Initial solar irradiance determinations from nimbus 7 cavity radiometer measurements.

    PubMed

    Hickey, J R; Stowe, L L; Jacobowitz, H; Pellegrino, P; Maschhoff, R H; House, F; Vonder Haar, T H

    1980-04-18

    Preliminary results from solar radiation measurements from the earth radiation budget experiment on the Nimbus 7 satellite yield a mean value of 1376.0 watts per square meter for the "solar constant" from 16 November 1978 to 15 May 1979. The observed variability (root-mean-square deviation) is +/- 0.73 watt per square meter (+/- 0.05 percent) for the period.

  5. Schisandrin B protects against solar irradiation-induced oxidative stress in rat skin tissue.

    PubMed

    Lam, Philip Y; Yan, Chung Wai; Chiu, Po Yee; Leung, Hoi Yan; Ko, Kam Ming

    2011-04-01

    Schisandrin B (Sch B) and schisandrin C (Sch C), but not schisandrin A and dimethyl diphenyl bicarboxylate, protected rat skin tissue against solar irradiation-induced oxidative injury, as evidenced by a reversal of solar irradiation-induced changes in cellular reduced glutathione and α-tocopherol levels, as well as antioxidant enzyme activities and malondialdehyde production. The cytochrome P-450-mediated metabolism of Sch B or Sch C caused ROS production in rat skin microsomes. Taken together, Sch B or Sch C, by virtue of its pro-oxidant action and the subsequent eliciting of a glutathione antioxidant response, may prevent photo-aging of skin.

  6. Solar irradiance from Nimbus-7 compared with ground-based photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, G. A.; Cookson, A. M.; Hoyt, D. V.

    1994-01-01

    We have compared total solar irradiance from Nimbus-7 with ground-based photometry from the San Fernando Observatory (SFO) for 109 days between 1 June and 31 December, 1988. We have also included in some analyses NOAA-9 SBUV2 data or F10.7 radio flux. The Nimbus-7 data are from orbital samples, averaged to the mean time of observation at SFO. Using the same parameters as in Chapman et al. (1992), the multiple regression gives an R(exp 2) = 0.9131 and a 'solar minimum' irradiance, S(sub 0) = 1371.76 +/- 0.18 W/sq m for the best fit.

  7. Solar irradiance in the stratosphere - Implications for the Herzberg continuum absorption of O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, J. E.; Mentall, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    A set of solar irradiance observations is analyzed that were performed from the third Solar Absorption Balloon Experiment (SABE-3) as the payload ascended through the stratosphere from 32 to 39 km. Comparison of these data with calculations of the attenuated irradiance based on simultaneous ozone and pressure measurements made from the payload suggests a refinement of the cross section values used in photochemical models. More ultraviolet radiation in the 200-210 nm spectral region reaches the middle stratosphere than is predicted by the absorption data presently available. It is suggested that significantly smaller values for the Herzberg continuum of O2 be used in future models.

  8. Towards the automatic identification of cloudiness condition by means of solar global irradiance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, G.; Serrano, A.; Cancillo, M. L.

    2010-09-01

    This study focuses on the design of an automatic algorithm for classification of the cloudiness condition based only on global irradiance measurements. Clouds are a major modulating factor for the Earth radiation budget. They attenuate the solar radiation and control the terrestrial radiation participating in the energy balance. Generally, cloudiness is a limiting factor for the solar radiation reaching the ground, highly contributing to the Earth albedo. Additionally it is the main responsible for the high variability shown by the downward irradiance measured at ground level. Being a major source for the attenuation and high-frequency variability of the solar radiation available for energy purposes in solar power plants, the characterization of the cloudiness condition is of great interest. This importance is even higher in Southern Europe, where very high irradiation values are reached during long periods within the year. Thus, several indexes have been proposed in the literature for the characterization of the cloudiness condition of the sky. Among these indexes, those exclusively involving global irradiance are of special interest since this variable is the most widely available measurement in most radiometric stations. Taking this into account, this study proposes an automatic algorithm for classifying the cloudiness condition of the sky into three categories: cloud-free, partially cloudy and overcast. For that aim, solar global irradiance was measured by Kipp&Zonen CMP11 pyranometer installed on the terrace of the Physics building in the Campus of Badajoz (Spain) of the University of Extremadura. Measurements were recorded at one-minute basis for a period of study extending from 23 November 2009 to 31 March 2010. The algorithm is based on the clearness index kt, which is calculated as the ratio between the solar global downward irradiance measured at ground and the solar downward irradiance at the top of the atmosphere. Since partially cloudy conditions

  9. A comparison of solar irradiances measured by SBUV, SME, and rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlesinger, Barry M.; Heath, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) measurements of solar irradiance and predictions from the Mg 280-nm index are compared with each other and with coincident Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) and rocket measurements. The SBUV irradiances show a systematic decrease with time not seen in the rocket measurements; a correction for this decrease is introduced. The scatter and overall structure in the SME spectra is 3-5 percent, of the order of or larger than most of the changes predicted by the Mg index. The corrected SBUV ratio and the Mg index prediction for it agree to within 1 percent. Such agreement supports a common origin for variations between solar maximum and minimum and those for individual rotations: the degree to which active regions cover the visible hemisphere of the sun.

  10. Comparison of High-Frequency Solar Irradiance: Ground Measured vs. Satellite-Derived

    SciTech Connect

    Lave, Matthew; Weekley, Andrew

    2016-11-21

    High-frequency solar variability is an important to grid integration studies, but ground measurements are scarce. The high resolution irradiance algorithm (HRIA) has the ability to produce 4-sceond resolution global horizontal irradiance (GHI) samples, at locations across North America. However, the HRIA has not been extensively validated. In this work, we evaluate the HRIA against a database of 10 high-frequency ground-based measurements of irradiance. The evaluation focuses on variability-based metrics. This results in a greater understanding of the errors in the HRIA as well as suggestions for improvement to the HRIA.

  11. A Different View of Solar Spectral Irradiance Variations: Modeling Total Energy over Six-Month Intervals.

    PubMed

    Woods, Thomas N; Snow, Martin; Harder, Jerald; Chapman, Gary; Cookson, Angela

    A different approach to studying solar spectral irradiance (SSI) variations, without the need for long-term (multi-year) instrument degradation corrections, is examining the total energy of the irradiance variation during 6-month periods. This duration is selected because a solar active region typically appears suddenly and then takes 5 to 7 months to decay and disperse back into the quiet-Sun network. The solar outburst energy, which is defined as the irradiance integrated over the 6-month period and thus includes the energy from all phases of active region evolution, could be considered the primary cause for the irradiance variations. Because solar cycle variation is the consequence of multiple active region outbursts, understanding the energy spectral variation may provide a reasonable estimate of the variations for the 11-year solar activity cycle. The moderate-term (6-month) variations from the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) instruments can be decomposed into positive (in-phase with solar cycle) and negative (out-of-phase) contributions by modeling the variations using the San Fernando Observatory (SFO) facular excess and sunspot deficit proxies, respectively. These excess and deficit variations are fit over 6-month intervals every 2 months over the mission, and these fitted variations are then integrated over time for the 6-month energy. The dominant component indicates which wavelengths are in-phase and which are out-of-phase with solar activity. The results from this study indicate out-of-phase variations for the 1400 - 1600 nm range, with all other wavelengths having in-phase variations.

  12. In Search of Sun-Climate Connection Using Solar Irradiance Measurements and Climate Records

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiang, Richard K.; Kyle, H. Lee

    2000-01-01

    The Earth's temperature has risen approximately 0.5 degree-C in the last 150 years. Because the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide has increased nearly 30% since the industrial revolution, a common conjecture, supported by various climate models, is that anthropogenic greenhouse gases have contributed to global warming. Another probable factor for the warming is the natural variation of solar irradiance. Although the variation is as small as 0.1 % it is hypothesized that it contributes to part of the temperature rise. Warmer or cooler ocean temperature at one part of the Globe may manifest as abnormally wet or dry weather patterns some months or years later at another part of the globe. Furthermore, the lower atmosphere can be affected through its coupling with the stratosphere, after the stratospheric ozone absorbs the ultraviolet portion of the solar irradiance. In this paper, we use wavelet transforms based on Morlet wavelet to analyze the time-frequency properties in several datasets, including the Radiation Budget measurements, the long-term total solar irradiance time series, the long-term temperature at two locations for the North and the South Hemisphere. The main solar cycle, approximately 11 years, are identified in the long-term total solar irradiance time series. The wavelet transform of the temperature datasets show annual cycle but not the solar cycle. Some correlation is seen between the length of the solar cycle extracted from the wavelet transform and the North Hemisphere temperature time series. The absence of the 11-year cycle in a time series does not necessarily imply that the geophysical parameter is not affected by the solar cycle; rather it simply reflects the complex nature of the Earth's response to climate forcings.

  13. A Different View of Solar Spectral Irradiance Variations: Modeling Total Energy over Six-Month Intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Snow, Martin; Harder, Jerald; Chapman, Gary; Cookson, Angela

    2015-10-01

    A different approach to studying solar spectral irradiance (SSI) variations, without the need for long-term (multi-year) instrument degradation corrections, is examining the total energy of the irradiance variation during 6-month periods. This duration is selected because a solar active region typically appears suddenly and then takes 5 to 7 months to decay and disperse back into the quiet-Sun network. The solar outburst energy, which is defined as the irradiance integrated over the 6-month period and thus includes the energy from all phases of active region evolution, could be considered the primary cause for the irradiance variations. Because solar cycle variation is the consequence of multiple active region outbursts, understanding the energy spectral variation may provide a reasonable estimate of the variations for the 11-year solar activity cycle. The moderate-term (6-month) variations from the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) instruments can be decomposed into positive (in-phase with solar cycle) and negative (out-of-phase) contributions by modeling the variations using the San Fernando Observatory (SFO) facular excess and sunspot deficit proxies, respectively. These excess and deficit variations are fit over 6-month intervals every 2 months over the mission, and these fitted variations are then integrated over time for the 6-month energy. The dominant component indicates which wavelengths are in-phase and which are out-of-phase with solar activity. The results from this study indicate out-of-phase variations for the 1400 - 1600 nm range, with all other wavelengths having in-phase variations.

  14. Solar Wind Spectrometer on Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Sitting on the lunar surface, this Solar Wind Spectrometer is measuring the energies of the particles that make up the solar wind. This was one of the instruments used during the Apollo 12 mission. The second manned lunar landing mission, Apollo 12 launched from launch pad 39-A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on November 14, 1969 via a Saturn V launch vehicle. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard Apollo 12 was a crew of three astronauts: Alan L. Bean, pilot of the Lunar Module (LM), Intrepid; Richard Gordon, pilot of the Command Module (CM), Yankee Clipper; and Spacecraft Commander Charles Conrad. The LM, Intrepid, landed astronauts Conrad and Bean on the lunar surface in what's known as the Ocean of Storms while astronaut Richard Gordon piloted the CM, Yankee Clipper, in a parking orbit around the Moon. Lunar soil activities included the deployment of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP), finding the unmanned Surveyor 3 that landed on the Moon on April 19, 1967, and collecting 75 pounds (34 kilograms) of rock samples. Apollo 12 safely returned to Earth on November 24, 1969.

  15. Solar Material Twists on Sun’s Surface

    NASA Video Gallery

    Solar material twists above the sun’s surface in this close-up captured by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory on June 7-8, 2016, showcasing the turbulence caused by combative magnetic forces on the ...

  16. Global upper ocean heat storage response to radiative forcing from changing solar irradiance and increasing greenhouse gas/aerosol concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Warren B.; Cayan, Daniel R.; Lean, Judith

    1998-09-01

    We constructed gridded fields of diabatic heat storage changes in the upper ocean from 20°S to 60°N from historical temperature profiles collected from 1955 to 1996. We filtered these 42 year records for periods of 8 to 15 years and 15 to 30 years, producing depth-weighted vertical average temperature (DVT) changes from the sea surface to the top of the main pycnocline. Basin and global averages of these DVT changes reveal decadal and interdecadal variability in phase across the Indian, Pacific, Atlantic, and Global Oceans, each significantly correlated with changing surface solar radiative forcing at a lag of 0+/-2 years. Decadal and interdecadal changes in global average DVT are 0.06°+/-0.01°K and 0.04°K+/-0.01°K, respectively, the same as those expected from consideration of the Stefan-Boltzmann radiation balance (i.e., 0.3°K per Wm-2) in response to 0.1% changes in surface solar radiative forcing of 0.2 Wm-2 and 0.15 Wm-2, respectively. Global spatial patterns of DVT changes are similar to temperature changes simulated in coupled ocean-atmosphere models, suggesting that natural modes of Earth's variability are phase-locked to the solar irradiance cycle. A trend in global average DVT of 0.15°K over this 42 year record cannot be explained by changing surface solar radiative forcing. But when we consider the 0.5 Wm-2 increase in surface radiative forcing estimated from the increase in atmospheric greenhouse gas and aerosol (GGA) concentrations over this period [Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 1995], the Stefan-Boltzmann radiation balance yields this observed change. Moreover, the sum of solar and GGA surface radiative forcing can explain the relatively sharp increase in global and basin average DVT in the late 1970's.

  17. The Sun as a variable star: Solar and stellar irradiance variations; Colloquium of the International Astronomical Union, 143rd, Boulder, CO, Jun. 20-25, 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, Judit M. (Editor); Froehlich, Claus (Editor); Hudson, Hugh S. (Editor); Tobiska, W. Kent (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    Variations in solar and stellar irradiances have long been of interest. An International Astronomical Union (IAU) colloquium reviewed such relevant subjects as observations, theoretical interpretations, and empirical and physical models, with a special emphasis on climatic impact of solar irradiance variability. Specific topics discussed included: (1) General Reviews on Observations of Solar and Stellar Irradiance Variability; (2) Observational Programs for Solar and Stellar Irradiance Variability; (3) Variability of Solar and Stellar Irradiance Related to the Network, Active Regions (Sunspots and Plages), and Large-Scale Magnetic Structures; (4) Empirical Models of Solar Total and Spectral Irradiance Variability; (5) Solar and Stellar Oscillations, Irradiance Variations and their Interpretations; and (6) The Response of the Earth's Atmosphere to Solar Irradiance Variations and Sun-Climate Connections.

  18. Limitation of Ground-based Estimates of Solar Irradiance Due to Atmospheric Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, Guoyong; Cahalan, Robert F.; Holben, Brent N.

    2003-01-01

    The uncertainty in ground-based estimates of solar irradiance is quantitatively related to the temporal variability of the atmosphere's optical thickness. The upper and lower bounds of the accuracy of estimates using the Langley Plot technique are proportional to the standard deviation of aerosol optical thickness (approx. +/- 13 sigma(delta tau)). The estimates of spectral solar irradiance (SSI) in two Cimel sun photometer channels from the Mauna Loa site of AERONET are compared with satellite observations from SOLSTICE (Solar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment) on UARS (Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite) for almost two years of data. The true solar variations related to the 27-day solar rotation cycle observed from SOLSTICE are about 0.15% at the two sun photometer channels. The variability in ground-based estimates is statistically one order of magnitude larger. Even though about 30% of these estimates from all Level 2.0 Cimel data fall within the 0.4 to approx. 0.5% variation level, ground-based estimates are not able to capture the 27-day solar variation observed from SOLSTICE.

  19. A semiparametric spatio-temporal model for solar irradiance data

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, Joshua D.; Harvill, Jane L.; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2016-03-01

    Here, we evaluate semiparametric spatio-temporal models for global horizontal irradiance at high spatial and temporal resolution. These models represent the spatial domain as a lattice and are capable of predicting irradiance at lattice points, given data measured at other lattice points. Using data from a 1.2 MW PV plant located in Lanai, Hawaii, we show that a semiparametric model can be more accurate than simple interpolation between sensor locations. We investigate spatio-temporal models with separable and nonseparable covariance structures and find no evidence to support assuming a separable covariance structure. These results indicate a promising approach for modeling irradiance at high spatial resolution consistent with available ground-based measurements. Moreover, this kind of modeling may find application in design, valuation, and operation of fleets of utility-scale photovoltaic power systems.

  20. A semiparametric spatio-temporal model for solar irradiance data

    DOE PAGES

    Patrick, Joshua D.; Harvill, Jane L.; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2016-03-01

    Here, we evaluate semiparametric spatio-temporal models for global horizontal irradiance at high spatial and temporal resolution. These models represent the spatial domain as a lattice and are capable of predicting irradiance at lattice points, given data measured at other lattice points. Using data from a 1.2 MW PV plant located in Lanai, Hawaii, we show that a semiparametric model can be more accurate than simple interpolation between sensor locations. We investigate spatio-temporal models with separable and nonseparable covariance structures and find no evidence to support assuming a separable covariance structure. These results indicate a promising approach for modeling irradiance atmore » high spatial resolution consistent with available ground-based measurements. Moreover, this kind of modeling may find application in design, valuation, and operation of fleets of utility-scale photovoltaic power systems.« less

  1. Early Solar System irradiation quantified by linked vanadium and beryllium isotope variations in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sossi, Paolo A.; Moynier, Frédéric; Chaussidon, Marc; Villeneuve, Johan; Kato, Chizu; Gounelle, Matthieu

    2017-03-01

    X-ray emission in young stellar objects (YSOs) is orders of magnitude more intense than in main sequence stars1,2, suggestive of cosmic ray irradiation of surrounding accretion disks. Protoplanetary disk irradiation has been detected around YSOs by the Herschel Space Observatory3. In our Solar System, short-lived 10Be (with a half-life of 1.39 Myr)4, which cannot be produced by stellar nucleosynthesis, was discovered in the oldest Solar System solids, the calcium-aluminium-rich inclusions (CAIs)5. The high 10Be abundance, as well as the detection of other tracers6,7, suggest 10Be likely originates from cosmic ray irradiation caused by solar flares8-10. Nevertheless, the nature of these flares (gradual or impulsive), the target (gas or dust), and the duration and location of irradiation remain unknown. Here we use the vanadium isotopic composition, together with the initial 10Be abundance to quantify irradiation conditions in the early Solar System11. For the initial 10Be abundances recorded in most CAIs, 50V excesses of a few per mil (‰) relative to chondrites have been predicted8,9. We report 50V excesses in CAIs up to 4.4‰ that co-vary with 10Be abundance. Their co-variation dictates that excess 50V and 10Be were synthesized through irradiation of refractory dust. Modelling of the production rate of 50V and 10Be demonstrates that the dust was exposed to solar cosmic rays produced by gradual flares for less than 300 years at ≈0.1 au from the protosun.

  2. Evaluating the spatio-temporal performance of sky-imager-based solar irradiance analysis and forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Thomas; Kalisch, John; Lorenz, Elke; Heinemann, Detlev

    2016-03-01

    Clouds are the dominant source of small-scale variability in surface solar radiation and uncertainty in its prediction. However, the increasing share of solar energy in the worldwide electric power supply increases the need for accurate solar radiation forecasts. In this work, we present results of a very short term global horizontal irradiance (GHI) forecast experiment based on hemispheric sky images. A 2-month data set with images from one sky imager and high-resolution GHI measurements from 99 pyranometers distributed over 10 km by 12 km is used for validation. We developed a multi-step model and processed GHI forecasts up to 25 min with an update interval of 15 s. A cloud type classification is used to separate the time series into different cloud scenarios. Overall, the sky-imager-based forecasts do not outperform the reference persistence forecasts. Nevertheless, we find that analysis and forecast performance depends strongly on the predominant cloud conditions. Especially convective type clouds lead to high temporal and spatial GHI variability. For cumulus cloud conditions, the analysis error is found to be lower than that introduced by a single pyranometer if it is used representatively for the whole area in distances from the camera larger than 1-2 km. Moreover, forecast skill is much higher for these conditions compared to overcast or clear sky situations causing low GHI variability, which is easier to predict by persistence. In order to generalize the cloud-induced forecast error, we identify a variability threshold indicating conditions with positive forecast skill.

  3. Influence of crystal tilt on solar irradiance of cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Klotzsche, Susann; Macke, Andreas

    2006-02-10

    The single and multiple scattering and absorption properties of hexagonal ice columns with different degrees of particle orientation are modeled in the solar spectral range by means of a ray-tracing single-scattering code and a Monte Carlo radiative-transfer code. The scattering properties are most sensitive to particle orientation for the solar zenith angles of 50 degrees (asymmetry parameter) and 90 degrees (single-scattering albedo). Provided that the ice columns are horizontally oriented, the usual assumption of random orientation leads to an overestimation (underestimation) of the reflected (transmitted) solar broadband radiation at high Sun elevation and to an underestimation (overestimation) at medium solar zenith angles. The orientation effect is more (less) pronounced in scattering and transmission (absorption) for smaller ice crystals.

  4. Disinfection of contaminated water by using solar irradiation.

    PubMed

    Caslake, Laurie F; Connolly, Daniel J; Menon, Vilas; Duncanson, Catriona M; Rojas, Ricardo; Tavakoli, Javad

    2004-02-01

    Contaminated water causes an estimated 6 to 60 billion cases of gastrointestinal illness annually. The majority of these cases occur in rural areas of developing nations where the water supply remains polluted and adequate sanitation is unavailable. A portable, low-cost, and low-maintenance solar unit to disinfect unpotable water has been designed and tested. The solar disinfection unit was tested with both river water and partially processed water from two wastewater treatment plants. In less than 30 min in midday sunlight, the unit eradicated more than 4 log10 U (99.99%) of bacteria contained in highly contaminated water samples. The solar disinfection unit has been field tested by Centro Panamericano de Ingenieria Sanitaria y Ciencias del Ambiente in Lima, Peru. At moderate light intensity, the solar disinfection unit was capable of reducing the bacterial load in a controlled contaminated water sample by 4 log10 U and disinfected approximately 1 liter of water in 30 min.

  5. Pollen chemistry as a tool for reconstructing past solar and ultraviolet irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, Phillip; Fraser, Wesley; Lomax, Barry; Gosling, William

    2016-04-01

    Despite the importance of solar irradiance as a dominant control on Earth's energy budget, no proxy has been developed that can provide records on timescales of over 10 000 years. No independent empirical record of solar irradiance therefore exists prior to the Holocene, limiting our understanding of the relationships between solar energy inputs, global climate and biotic change over longer timescales. Here, we present a novel proxy based on the chemical composition of sporopollenin, the primary component of the outer walls of pollen and spores (sporomorphs). Sporopollenin chemistry is responsive to levels of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation exposure, via a concomitant change in the concentration of phenolic compounds. This relationship offers the possibility of using fossil sporomorph chemistry as a proxy for past UV-B flux, and by extension total solar irradiance (TSI). Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy provides an efficient, economical and non-destructive method for measuring phenolic compound concentration on small sample sizes (≤30 sporomorphs/sample). The high preservation potential of sporomorphs in the geologic record, and the conserved nature of sporopollenin chemistry and UV-B response across the Embryophyta, means that this new proxy has the potential to reconstruct UV-B and TSI flux over much longer timescales than has previously been possible. We demonstrate the utility of this proxy with two chemopalynological datasets. Orbital cyclicity is reconstructed using grass pollen from a 150 000 year long sediment record from Lake Bosumtwi in Ghana, and changes in solar output over the last 600 years are reconstructed using pine pollen from Nar Lake in Turkey. This proxy provides a new approach for quantifying and understanding the relationship between UV-B flux, solar insolation and past climate. The unpicking of this information offers the tantalising potential to determine how changes in solar irradiance have driven long-term changes in

  6. Mg 280-nm doublet as a monitor of changes in solar ultraviolet irradiance

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, D.F.; Schlesinger, B.M.

    1986-07-20

    Five years of 160- to 400-nm solar flux measurements by the Solar Backscattered Ultraviolet experiment on Nimbus 7 have been analyzed. The flux in the center of strong lines and at shorter wavelengths varies with periods that correspond to modulation by the rotation of active regions. The modulation is greater at the centers of strong lines and at shorter wavelengths, corresponding to radiation that originates at higher levels in the solar atmosphere. The ratio of the irradiance in the core of the Mg 280-nm line to the irradiance at neighboring wavelengths is used as an index of solar variation. A scaling factor is derived by comparing rotational modulation at other wavelengths with the rotational modulation of the index. The scaled Mg II 280-nm strength successfully represents both rotational and long-term variations across the Al absorption edge near 210 nm. This ratio can therefore provide an empirical representation of long-term ultraviolet solar variability. Scaling factors are derived and changes estimated at several ultraviolet wavelengths. At 204 nm, in the wavelength region that drives atmospheric photochemistry, the solar irradiance drops about 4% from its average level for 1979-1980 to late 1983. The total estimated range of variation of the 27-day averaged (one rotation) 204-nm irradiance is 6%, over the 5 years of measurements. A least squares fit shows that over the 5 years, 27-day averages of 10.7-cm radio flux and of the Mg II index follow a linear relation. The radio flux can therefore be used to estimate changes in the solar ultraviolet for times before the launch of Nimbus 7.

  7. Solar Irradiance from GOES Albedo performance in a Hydrologic Model Simulation of Snowmelt Runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumargo, E.; Cayan, D. R.; McGurk, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    In many hydrologic modeling applications, solar radiation has been parameterized using commonly available measures, such as the daily temperature range, due to scarce in situ solar radiation measurement network. However, these parameterized estimates often produce significant biases. Here we test hourly solar irradiance derived from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) visible albedo product, using several established algorithms. Focusing on the Sierra Nevada and White Mountain in California, we compared the GOES irradiance and that from a traditional temperature-based algorithm with incoming irradiance from pyranometers at 19 stations. The GOES based estimates yielded 21-27% reduction in root-mean-squared error (average over 19 sites). The derived irradiance is then prescribed as an input to Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS). We constrain our experiment to the Tuolumne River watershed and focus our attention on the winter and spring of 1996-2014. A root-mean-squared error reduction of 2-6% in daily inflow to Hetch Hetchy at the lower end of the Tuolumne catchment was achieved by incorporating the insolation estimates at only 8 out of 280 Hydrologic Response Units (HRUs) within the basin. Our ongoing work endeavors to apply satellite-derived irradiance at each individual HRU.

  8. The Solar Spectral Irradiance Measured on Board the International Space Station and the Picard Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillier, G. O.; Bolsee, D.; Schmidtke, G.; Schmutz, W. K.

    2011-12-01

    On board the International Space Station, the spectrometers SOL-ACES and SOLSPEC measure the solar spectrum irradiance from 17 to 150 nm and 170 to 2900 nm, respectively. On board PICARD launched on 15 June 2010, the PREMOS instrument consists in a radiometer and several sunphotometers operated at several fixed wavelengths. We shall present spectra at different solar activity levels as well as their quoted accuracy. Comparison with similar data from other missions presently running in space will be shown incorporating the PREMOS measurements. Some special solar events will be also presented and interpreted.

  9. Exospheric hydrogen density estimates from absorption dips in GOES solar irradiance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machol, J. L.; Loto'aniu, P. T. M.; Snow, M. A.; Viereck, R. A.; Woodraska, D.; Jones, A. R.; Bailey, J. J.; Gruntman, M.; Redmon, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    We use extreme ultraviolet (EUV) measurements of solar irradiance from GOES satellites to derive daily hydrogen (H) density distributions of the terrestrial upper atmosphere. GOES satellites are in geostationary orbit and measure solar irradiance in a wavelength band around the Lyman-alpha line. When the satellite is on the night-side of the Earth looking through the atmosphere at the Sun, the irradiance exhibits absorption/scattering loss. Using these daily dips in the measured irradiance, we can estimate a simple hydrogen density distribution for the exosphere based on the integrated scattering loss along the line of sight towards the Sun. We show preliminary results from this technique and compare the derived exospheric H density distributions with other data sets for different solar, geomagnetic and atmospheric conditions. The GOES observations will be available for many years into the future and so potentially can provide continuous monitoring of exospheric H density for use in full atmospheric models. These measurements may also provide a means to validate, calibrate and improve other exospheric models. Improved models will help with the understanding of the solar-upper atmospheric coupling and the decay of the ions in the magnetospheric ring current during geomagnetic storms. Long-term observations of trends can be used to monitor impacts of climate change and improved satellite drag models will help satellite operator adjust satellite orbits during geomagnetic storms. We discuss planned improvements to this technique.

  10. A Preliminary Analysis of Solar Irradiance Measurements at TNB Solar Research Centre for Optimal Orientation of Fixed Solar Panels installed in Selangor Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, A. M.; Ali, M. A. M.; Ahmad, B.; Shafie, R. M.; Rusli, R.; Aziz, M. A.; Hassan, J.; Wanik, M. Z. C.

    2013-06-01

    The well established rule for orienting fixed solar devices is to face south for places in the northern hemisphere and northwards for the southern hemisphere. However for regions near the equator such as in Selangor Malaysia, the position of the sun at solar noon is always near zenith both to the north and south depending on location and month of year. This paper reports an analysis of global solar radiation data taken at TNB Solar Research Centre, Malaysia. The solar radiation is measured using both shaded and exposed pyranometers together with a pyrheliometer which is mounted on a sun-tracker. The analysis on the solar measurements show that a near regular solar irradiation pattern had occurred often enough during the year to recommend an optimum azimuth orientation of installing the fixed solar panels tilted facing towards east. Even though all the solar measurements were done at a single location in TNBR Solar Research Centre at Bangi, for locations near the equator with similar weather pattern, the recommended azimuth direction of installing fixed solar panels and collectors tilted eastward will also be generally valid.

  11. Effect of the chosen solar irradiance dataset on simulations of a Future Grand Minimum: Results from a state-of-the-art Chemistry-Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiegl, T. C.; Langematz, U.

    2015-12-01

    The long-lasting minimum of Solar Cycle 23 as well as the overall weak maximum of Cycle 24 reveal the possibility for a return to Grand Solar Minimum conditions within the next decades. The past 1,000 years featured at least 5 excursions (lasting 60-100 years) of exceptionally low solar activity, induced by a weak magnetic field of the Sun. The last Grand Solar Minimum (the Maunder Minimum, 1645-1715) coincides with the Little Ice Age in Europe, a time of severe cold and hardship. The quantification of the implications of such a projected decrease in solar forcing is of ultimate importance, given the on-going public discussion of the role of carbon dioxide emissions for global warming, and the possible role a cooling due to decreasing solar activity could be ascribed to. However, existing model simulations that aim to answer these questions suffer from simplifications in the included parameterizations (e.g., no spectral radiation scheme), missing coupling with ocean models, or too low model tops. In addition, there is still no clear consensus about the actual strength of the Maunder Minimum, which is reflected in a range of spectral reconstruction datasets available. To estimate the range of climate response to different Maunder Minimum reconstructions, we compared 3 acknowledged solar datasets that show significant differences in both, total solar irradiance (TSI) and spectral irradiance (SSI) in a single model, first-time. For our purposes we choose to use the ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry Model (EMAC) coupled to a mixed-layer ocean. EMAC incorporates interactive ozone chemistry, a high-resolution shortwave radiation scheme as well as a high model top (0.01 hPa). To get a clean climate signal, all simulations were conducted in time slice mode under 1960 conditions. The experiments show distinct differences in near surface temperatures and reveal the important role of stratospheric processes for the response of surface climate to solar irradiance variations.

  12. Measurements of solar spectral downwelling irradiance in the water column of a large reservoir in Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potes, Miguel; João Costa, Maria; Salgado, Rui; Morais, Manuela; Bortoli, Daniele; Kostadinov, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    Periodic profiles of spectral downwelling irradiance were performed at Alqueva reservoir, southeast of Portugal, with a new apparatus developed by the team. The device presents a hemispherical tip (180° of FOV) allowing measurements to be independent of solar zenith angle. It is coupled to a portable spectroradiometer through a fiber bundle driven by a customized frame for protection and to keep the tip pointing to the zenith direction in underwater environment. The profiles obtained can be used to estimate the spectral and broadband light attenuation coefficients in the water column. The attenuation coefficients are relevant for the water surface layer energy budget, in particular, this coefficient is important in the computation of the water surface temperature, which is a key parameter for heat and moisture transfers between the reservoirs and the atmosphere, namely by the lake models. A comparison measurement was performed with this new apparatus (180° of FOV) and the previous device (22° of FOV) in order to demonstrate the importance of using the hemispherical radiance. The comparison show resembling results between both devices, however the previous device tends to underestimate the attenuation coefficient and increase the degree of uncertainty.

  13. Glyoxal and methylglyoxal concentrations in irradiated ocean surface microlayer samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, Christian; van Pinxteren, Manuela; Schneider, Linda; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2014-05-01

    Glyoxal and methylglyoxal are low molecular weight compounds which are volatile enough to be found in significant concentrations in ambient air but at the same time they are water soluble and can be detected in sea water. For the ocean, they are of interest in the cycling of organic carbon and in the atmosphere they potentially play a role for secondary organic aerosol formation. Ocean chemistry can also influence marine particle composition, when processed sea surface microlayer (SML)-material is ejected by bubble-burst or sea-spray mechanisms to form particles. The ocean has been reported to be either a source or a sink of carbonyls depending on the hemispheric location. Interestingly, the measured gas phase concentrations of glyoxal cannot be explained by the currently known source processes. Because the possibility of carbonyl formation under actinic irradiation in the sea surface microlayer was reported earlier, efforts have been made to characterize the influence of light on carbonyls in seawater using a series of SML samples irradiated under controlled laboratory conditions. Samples have been taken during 2011 and 2012 Polarstern cruises employing a glass plate sampling technique. Glyoxal and methylglyoxal were analyzed using O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine hydrochloride derivatization and GC-MS detection. Initial concentrations of glyoxal and methylglyoxal are in the range of 0.1 to 2.5 μg l-1. 100 ml sample aliquots were irradiated in a stirred, thermostated glass reactor using a xenon-lamp with an edge filter resulting in a transmission between 290 and 800 nm wavelength. Irradiation intervals were chosen between 30 and 250 minutes. Unexpectedly, the resulting concentration time profiles do not show similar behavior. There is not always a carbonyl increase with increasing irradiation time. In fact, carbonyl increase as well as decrease is seen in the concentration time profiles. The content of total organic carbon will be discussed as a

  14. Towards Building Reliable, High-Accuracy Solar Irradiance Database For Arid Climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munawwar, S.; Ghedira, H.

    2012-12-01

    Middle East's growing interest in renewable energy has led to increased activity in solar technology development with the recent commissioning of several utility-scale solar power projects and many other commercial installations across the Arabian Peninsula. The region, lying in a virtually rainless sunny belt with a typical daily average solar radiation exceeding 6 kWh/m2, is also one of the most promising candidates for solar energy deployment. However, it is not the availability of resource, but its characterization and reasonably accurate assessment that determines the application potential. Solar irradiance, magnitude and variability inclusive, is the key input in assessing the economic feasibility of a solar system. The accuracy of such data is of critical importance for realistic on-site performance estimates. This contribution aims to identify the key stages in developing a robust solar database for desert climate by focusing on the challenges that an arid environment presents to parameterization of solar irradiance attenuating factors. Adjustments are proposed based on the currently available resource assessment tools to produce high quality data for assessing bankability. Establishing and maintaining ground solar irradiance measurements is an expensive affair and fairly limited in time (recently operational) and space (fewer sites) in the Gulf region. Developers within solar technology industry, therefore, rely on solar radiation models and satellite-derived data for prompt resource assessment needs. It is imperative that such estimation tools are as accurate as possible. While purely empirical models have been widely researched and validated in the Arabian Peninsula's solar modeling history, they are known to be intrinsically site-specific. A primal step to modeling is an in-depth understanding of the region's climate, identifying the key players attenuating radiation and their appropriate characterization to determine solar irradiance. Physical approach

  15. Solar Irradiance observation from Fengyun3 meteorological satellites: recent results and future plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jin; Zhang, Peng; Qiu, Hong; Fang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    The Solar Irradiance Monitors (SIM) on-board Fengyun3 (FY3) satellites have been observing Total Solar Irradiance since June 2008. With the lessons from the first two satellites, the SIM on FY3C has two significant improvements by adding sun tracing system and temperature control system, which is named after SIM-II. The SIM-II measurements are first really traceable to World Radiometric Reference and building an on-orbit aging model. TSI from FY3C/SIM-II has been evaluated by comparing with SORCE/TIM and RMIB composite data. The result shows a good consistency. Monitoring of strong solar activity during Oct. 2014, FY3C/SIM-II and SORCE/TIM showed the similar result about solar energy change. For the future plan, we would like to have cooperation with RMIB and PMOD on TSI observation from FY3 early-morning orbit satellite which is designed to launch in 2018. We also plan to develop a new ability to capture daily variance in solar spectral irradiance on the early-morning orbit.

  16. Analysis of Solar Spectral Irradiance Measurements from the SBUV/2-Series and the SSBUV Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebula, Richard P.; DeLand, Matthew T.; Hilsenrath, Ernest

    1997-01-01

    During this period of performance, 1 March 1997 - 31 August 1997, the NOAA-11 SBUV/2 solar spectral irradiance data set was validated using both internal and external assessments. Initial quality checking revealed minor problems with the data (e.g. residual goniometric errors, that were manifest as differences between the two scans acquired each day). The sources of these errors were determined and the errors were corrected. Time series were constructed for selected wavelengths and the solar irradiance changes measured by the instrument were compared to a Mg II proxy-based model of short- and long-term solar irradiance variations. This analysis suggested that errors due to residual, uncorrected long-term instrument drift have been reduced to less than 1-2% over the entire 5.5 year NOAA-11 data record. Detailed statistical analysis was performed. This analysis, which will be documented in a manuscript now in preparation, conclusively demonstrates the evolution of solar rotation periodicity and strength during solar cycle 22.

  17. The Nimbus 7 solar total irradiance: A new algorithm for its derivation

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyt, D.V. ); Kyle, H.L. ); Hickey, J.R. ); Maschhoff, R.H. )

    1992-01-01

    The Nimbus 7 satellite has measured the solar total irradiance from November 1978 to July 1991 (153 months). These measurements are important both in solar physics and for climate change. In this paper the changing radiometer pointing, the zero offsets, the stability of the gain, the temperature sensitivity, and the influences of other platform instruments are all examined and their effects on the measurements influences of other platform instruments are all examined and their effects on the measurements considered. Only the question of relative accuracy (not absolute) is examined. The resulting derived solar irradiances are compared to previous analyses of the Nimbus 7 radiometer and to the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) measurements. Compared to previous analyses, the newly derived values are higher and somewhat less variable than the older values. Compared to the SMM measurements, both agree well so long as any solar activity is present. When the Sun becomes quiet, so its irradiance variability is less than the Nimbus 7 radiometer resolution, the comparison to the SMM results breaks down. Between 1980 and 1988 the correlation of the daily values is 0.83, compared to 0.62 using previously published values from both satellites. In 1980 when both satellites were operating without problems, Nimbus 7 was 0.3155% higher on average. For May 1984 to December 1988, Nimbus 7 was 0.3255% higher.

  18. Effects of solar UV irradiation on dynamics of ozone hole in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshichev, O.; Gabis, I.

    2005-01-01

    To study relationship between changes in solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiance and dynamics of the Antarctic ozone hole during the final breakup of the Antarctic polar vortex the composite Mg II index has been used as a proxy for the solar UV irradiance. The short-term changes in the UV-irradiation have been separated after removing the long- and middle term variations. Examination of maps of the total ozone distribution above Antarctica showed that the ozone hole collapse succeeds displacement of the hole center from the South Pole, where the absolute minimum of total ozone is usually located. Comparison with variations of the UV irradiation reveals that phase of the quick decay of the ozone hole is preceded by the maximal solar UV irradiation in course of the regular 27-days variation. Analysis of the vertical profiles of ozone density, temperature, wind speed and total column ozone above station Amundsen Scott showed that ozone hole is filled up in spring typically in two phases. During the first gradual phase the ozone filling occurs very slowly, whereas the second phase is characterized by sudden and sharp increase of the ozone content (about 50 100 Dobson units in few days). In this period the strong wind disturbances are observed in the higher stratosphere as well. Conclusion is made that rate of the ozone hole filling during the Antarctic later spring depends on the intensity of solar UV, and high level of the UV irradiation turns out to be sufficient to initiate the dynamical processes leading to the collapse of the winter circumpolar vortex.

  19. A methodology for calculating percentile values of annual direct normal solar irradiation series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peruchena, Carlos M. Fernández; Ramírez, Lourdes; Silva, Manuel; Lara, Vicente; Bermejo, Diego; Gastón, Martín; Moreno, Sara; Pulgar, Jesús; Liria, Juan; Macías, Sergio; Gonzalez, Rocio; Bernardos, Ana; Castillo, Nuria; Bolinaga, Beatriz; Valenzuela, Rita X.; Zarzalejo, Luis

    2016-05-01

    A detailed knowledge of the solar resource is a critical point in the performance of an economic feasibility analysis of solar thermal electricity plants. In particular, the Direct Normal solar Irradiance (DNI) is the most determining variable in its final energy yield. Inter-annual variations of DNI can be large and seriously compromise the viability of solar energy projects. In this work, a methodology for evaluating the statistical properties of annual DNI series is presented for generating inputs to risk assessments in an economic feasibility analysis of a solar power plant. The methodology relies on the construction of a cumulative distribution function of annual DNI values, which allows for the evaluation of both mean and extreme climate characterization at a particular location in the long term.

  20. Solar Irradiances Measured using SPN1 Radiometers: Uncertainties and Clues for Development

    SciTech Connect

    Badosa, Jordi; Wood, John; Blanc, Philippe; Long, Charles N.; Vuilleumier, Laurent; Demengel, Dominique; Haeffelin, Martial

    2014-12-08

    The fast development of solar radiation and energy applications, such as photovoltaic and solar thermodynamic systems, has increased the need for solar radiation measurement and monitoring, not only for the global component but also the diffuse and direct. End users look for the best compromise between getting close to state-of-the-art measurements and keeping capital, maintenance and operating costs to a minimum. Among the existing commercial options, SPN1 is a relatively low cost solar radiometer that estimates global and diffuse solar irradiances from seven thermopile sensors under a shading mask and without moving parts. This work presents a comprehensive study of SPN1 accuracy and sources of uncertainty, which results from laboratory experiments, numerical modeling and comparison studies between measurements from this sensor and state-of-the art instruments for six diverse sites. Several clues are provided for improving the SPN1 accuracy and agreement with state-of-the-art measurements.

  1. An Alternative Derivation of the Nimbus 7 Total Solar Irradiance Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoyt, Douglas V.; Kyle, H. Lee

    1990-01-01

    Nimbus 7 solar irradiance values have been made available to the scientific community through the open literature (e.g., Hickey et al., 1988) and through NASA data centers. A comparison of these measurements to the Solar Maximum Mission/Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor (SSM/ACRIM) time series indicated differences which might be caused in part by the method of converting the Nimbus 7 raw data counts to solar irradiance values. In an effort to see if the derivation of the solar irradiance could be improved, the raw counts were extracted from the tapes and analyzed to see how a new algorithm could be constructed. The basic form of the calibration remains the same as in the previous solar irradiance derivations. However, the input values to the equation differ from what was used before. In particular, improved values of the Earth-sun distance are incorporated and new temperature sensitivities were derived. Several problems with the instrument were uncovered which previously had not been noticed. The sun did not appear to cross the center of field of the radiometer but was systematically off by 1.5 to 2.5 degrees. The analog to digital convertor changed its properties in July 1980. The gain of the electronics apparently increased by 0.03 percent in September 1987. Applying these and other changes in the processing, the day to day variations appear much more like the SMM observations. In fact, the Nimbus 7 observations are sufficiently stable that a problem with the SSM observations in the spin mode period of 1981 to 1984 can be detected when the two time series are compared.

  2. Modelling the solar irradiance during the Maunder Minimum and the corresponding cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Garduno, R.; Mendoza, B.; Adem, J.

    1996-12-31

    Expressions to compute the solar irradiance as a function of the sun rotation rate, sunspot number and solar cycle length, are deduced. They yield a solar irradiance dimmed by about 0.5% during the Maunder Minimum (1660-1720). This parameter is put in the Adem thermodynamic model as an external forcing to simulate the corresponding climate change. Another forcing used is the preindustrial level of atmospheric CO{sub 2} which reinforces the cooling. The model generates three internal feedbacks: cryosphere, cloudiness and water vapor. The output is a cooling of about 0.5 to 1 C, with respect to present climate, depending on the forcings and feedbacks included. These results agree well with those from other authors and with the few historical records.

  3. Li and Ag Co-Doped ZnO Photocatalyst for Degradation of RO 4 Dye Under Solar Light Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Dhatshanamurthi, P; Shanthi, M

    2016-06-01

    The synthesis of Li doped Ag-ZnO (Li-Ag-ZnO) has been successfully achieved by a sonochemically assisted precipitation-decomposition method. The synthesized catalyst was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS), photoluminescence spectra (PL), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and BET surface area measurements. The photocatalytic activity of Li-Ag-ZnO was investigated for the degradation of Reactive orange 4 (RO 4) dye in aqueous solution under solar light irradiation. Co-dopants shift the absorbance of ZnO to the visible region. Li-Ag-ZnO is found to be more efficient than Ag-ZnO, Li-ZnO, commercial ZnO and prepared ZnO at pH 7 for the mineralization of RO 4 dye under solar light irradiation. The influences of operational parameters such as the amount of photocatalyst, dye concentration, initial pH on photo-mineralization of RO 4 have been analyzed. The mineralization of RO 4 dye has been confirmed by COD measurements. A degradation mechanism is proposed for the degradation of RO 4 under solar light. The catalyst was found to be more stable and reusable.

  4. Observed solar UV irradiance variations of importance to middle atmosphere energetics and photochemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    London, Julius

    1994-01-01

    Absorption of solar UV irradiance in the spectral interval 120-420 nm is chiefly responsible for radiative heating and photodissociation of important atmospheric constituents (e.g., O2, O3, H2O, NO2, etc.) in the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere. Thus, the absolute value and time perturbations of the UV irradiance could significantly affect the energetics, photochemistry, and subsequent dynamics of these regions. Analysis of preliminary data from the SOLSTICE (UARS) observations for a period of 244 days (3 Oct 1991-2 Jun 1992) is discussed in this paper. The data provide mean daily values of the spectral distribution of the observed irradiances at 1-nm resolution and their solar rotation and semirotation variations. The average amplitudes of the 27-day irradiance oscillations for the 244-day data period were 5.7% at Lyman-alpha (121 nm), 1% at 200 nm, 0.5% at 210 nm, and generally less than 0.2% at wavelengths longer than 280 nm. The average amplitudes of 13.5-day oscillations were, by and large, about half of these values. Solar irradiance variations at 10.7 cm are highly correlated with those at Ly-alpha and other chromospheric emission lines (r = 0.7 to 0.8) and only moderately correlated with irradiances at wavelengths of 180-208 nm (r = 0.5). The correlation decreases as the source region of the irradiance gets closer to the base of the photosphere. At the 2-nm interval 279-281 nm, however, which contains the cores of the Mg II h and k lines, the correlation is again approximately 0.8.

  5. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering activity of niobium surface after irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Victor G.; Vlakhov, Emil S.; Stan, George E.; Socol, Marcela; Zamfirescu, Marian; Albu, Catalina; Mihailescu, Natalia; Negut, Irina; Luculescu, Catalin; Ristoscu, Carmen; Mihailescu, Ion N.

    2015-11-28

    The chemical modification of the niobium (Nb) surface after irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses was investigated by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The physical-chemical analyses indicated that the laser treatment results in oxidation of the Nb surface, as well as in the formation of Nb hydrides. Remarkably, after the samples' washing in ethanol, a strong Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) signal originating from the toluene residual traces was evidenced. Further, it was observed that the laser irradiated Nb surface is able to provide a SERS enhancement of ∼1.3 × 10{sup 3} times for rhodamine 6G solutions. Thus, for the first time it was shown that Nb/Nb oxide surfaces could exhibit SERS functionality, and so one can expect applications in biological/biochemical screening or for sensing of dangerous environmental substances.

  6. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering activity of niobium surface after irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Victor G.; Vlakhov, Emil S.; Stan, George E.; Zamfirescu, Marian; Albu, Catalina; Mihailescu, Natalia; Negut, Irina; Luculescu, Catalin; Socol, Marcela; Ristoscu, Carmen; Mihailescu, Ion N.

    2015-11-01

    The chemical modification of the niobium (Nb) surface after irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses was investigated by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The physical-chemical analyses indicated that the laser treatment results in oxidation of the Nb surface, as well as in the formation of Nb hydrides. Remarkably, after the samples' washing in ethanol, a strong Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) signal originating from the toluene residual traces was evidenced. Further, it was observed that the laser irradiated Nb surface is able to provide a SERS enhancement of ˜1.3 × 103 times for rhodamine 6G solutions. Thus, for the first time it was shown that Nb/Nb oxide surfaces could exhibit SERS functionality, and so one can expect applications in biological/biochemical screening or for sensing of dangerous environmental substances.

  7. Effects of UV-ozone irradiation on copper doped nickel acetate and its applicability to perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeongmo; Lee, Hee Ryung; Kim, Hyeong Pil; Lin, Tengda; Kanwat, Anil; Mohd Yusoff, Abd. Rashid Bin; Jang, Jin

    2016-04-01

    The effects of UV-ozone (UVO) irradiation on copper-doped nickel acetate and its applicability to perovskite solar cells were investigated. UVO irradiation of copper-doped nickel acetate significantly increased the electrical conductivity (from 4.28 × 10-4 S cm-1 to 5.66 × 10-2 S cm-1), which is due to the increased carrier concentration (from 3.53 × 1013 cm-3 to 2.41 × 1016 cm-3), and the charge extraction efficiency was enhanced, leading to better compatibility with the hole transport layer. By UVO irradiation, the work function was increased from 4.95 eV to 5.33 eV by the surface dipole formation, which effectively reduced the interface barrier between the hole transport layer and the MAPbI3 light absorbing layer. UVO Irradiation of the underlying layer also allows the MAPbI3 precursors to form better morphology with highly arranged crystallinity. Compared to the cells using non-irradiated copper doped nickel acetate, UVO-irradiated copper-doped nickel acetate devices showed an enhanced open-circuit voltage (3% increase), short circuit current (16% increase), fill factor (5% increase), showing an enhanced power conversion efficiency of 12.2% (21% increase).The effects of UV-ozone (UVO) irradiation on copper-doped nickel acetate and its applicability to perovskite solar cells were investigated. UVO irradiation of copper-doped nickel acetate significantly increased the electrical conductivity (from 4.28 × 10-4 S cm-1 to 5.66 × 10-2 S cm-1), which is due to the increased carrier concentration (from 3.53 × 1013 cm-3 to 2.41 × 1016 cm-3), and the charge extraction efficiency was enhanced, leading to better compatibility with the hole transport layer. By UVO irradiation, the work function was increased from 4.95 eV to 5.33 eV by the surface dipole formation, which effectively reduced the interface barrier between the hole transport layer and the MAPbI3 light absorbing layer. UVO Irradiation of the underlying layer also allows the MAPbI3 precursors to form

  8. Local ultraviolet laser irradiation for gradients on biocompatible polymer surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nottrodt, Nadine; Leonhäuser, Dorothea; Bongard, Yvonne; Bremus-Köbberling, Elke; Gillner, Arnold

    2014-04-01

    Generation of supporting structures, which guide cell growth, is a challenging task in the field of tissue engineering. Cell guidance properties of a scaffold are important in the field of neuronal regeneration. Those guiding structures can provide guidance just by mechanical stimulus or by chemical stimuli like cell signaling molecules. For an enhanced guidance, chemical gradients are under investigation. With this study, we show that ultraviolet laser irradiation is a useful tool to activate polymer surfaces with a high temporal and spatial resolution. We demonstrated that poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) can be locally activated and functionalized with amine groups that can be used for immobilization of arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide. The immobilized RGD was detected by neuronal B35 cells. By defined pulse accumulation functionalization density on the surface can be varied for the generation of gradients. We demonstrated that PMMA and PCL have different process windows for functionalization. Although PMMA has a very small process window for activation, PCL allows the generation of stepwise functionalization. The presented technology can help to develop assays for the analysis of cell migration and neuronal regeneration due to flexible patterning easily realized by changing the irradiation parameters.

  9. Inferring surface solar absorption from broadband satellite measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, Robert D.; Vulis, Inna L.

    1989-01-01

    An atmospheric solar radiation model and surface albedo models that include wavelength dependence and surface anisotropy are combined to study the possibility of inferring the surface solar absorption from satellite measurements. The model includes ocean, desert, pasture land, savannah, and bog surface categories. Problems associated with converting narrowband measurements to broadband quantities are discussed, suggesting that it would be easier to infer surface solar absorption from broadband measurements directly. The practice of adopting a linear relationship between planetary and surface albedo to estimate surface albedos from satellite measurements is examined, showing that the linear conversion between broadband planetary and surface albedos is strongly dependent on vegetation type. It is suggested that there is a linear slope-offset relationship between surface and surface-atmosphere solar absorption.

  10. Operational high latitude surface irradiance products from polar orbiting satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godøy, Øystein

    2016-12-01

    It remains a challenge to find an adequate approach for operational estimation of surface incoming short- and longwave irradiance at high latitudes using polar orbiting meteorological satellite data. In this presentation validation results at a number of North Atlantic and Arctic Ocean high latitude stations are presented and discussed. The validation results have revealed that although the method works well and normally fulfil the operational requirements, there is room for improvement. A number of issues that can improve the estimates at high latitudes have been identified. These improvements are partly related to improved cloud classification using satellite data and partly related to improved handling of multiple reflections over bright surfaces (snow and sea ice), especially in broken cloud conditions. Furthermore, the availability of validation sites over open ocean and sea ice is a challenge.

  11. Reflection properties of hydrogen ions at helium irradiated tungsten surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doi, K.; Tawada, Y.; Lee, H. T.; Kato, S.; Tanaka, N.; Sasao, M.; Kisaki, M.; Nishiura, M.; Matsumoto, Y.; Kenmotsu, T.; Wada, M.; Ueda, Y.; Yamaoka, H.

    2016-02-01

    Nanostructured W surfaces prepared by He bombardment exhibit characteristic angular distributions of hydrogen ion reflection upon injection of 1 keV H+ beam. A magnetic momentum analyzer that can move in the vacuum chamber has measured the angular dependence of the intensity and the energy of reflected ions. Broader angular distributions were observed for He-irradiated tungsten samples compared with that of the intrinsic polycrystalline W. Both intensity and energy of reflected ions decreased in the following order: the polycrystalline W, the He-bubble containing W, and the fuzz W. Classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations based on Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target code suggests that lower atom density near the surface can make the reflection coefficients lower due to increasing number of collisions.

  12. Observed decadal variations in surface solar radiation and their causes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmura, Atsumu

    2009-05-01

    Long-term variations of global solar irradiance at the Earth's surface from the beginning of the observations to 2005 are analyzed for more than 400 sites. Further, likely causes for the variations, an estimation of the magnitudes of aerosol direct and indirect effects, and the temperature sensitivity of the climate system due to radiation changes are evaluated. The record of observed global radiation begins with an increasing phase from 1920s to late 1940s/early 1960s. This brightening period (first brightening phase) is followed by the decreasing trend lasting to late 1980s, known as the global dimming, which finally translates into the second brightening phase in many regions of the world. These decadal variations are to great extent caused by aerosol and cloud fluctuations. The total aerosol effect as well as its direct and indirect effects were evaluated mainly on the basis of the observations. To meet this goal, simultaneous observations of global solar radiation and zenith transmittance are necessary. Five such regions/sites in Europe and Japan satisfy these conditions. By using the 20-year dimming phase from 1960 to 1980 and the 15-year brightening phase from 1990 to 2005, it was found that the aerosol direct and indirect effects played about an equal weight in changing global solar radiation. The temperature sensitivity due to radiation change is estimated at 0.05 to 0.06 K/(W m-2). The first brightening phase lasting to 1940s/early 1960s does not show a compatibility with the variation of transmittance of the atmosphere and originated probably from a different cause.

  13. Decomposition Behavior of Curcumin during Solar Irradiation when Contact with Inorganic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandiyanto, A. B. D.; Wiryani, A. S.; Rusli, A.; Purnamasari, A.; Abdullah, A. G.; Riza, L. S.

    2017-03-01

    Curcumin is one of materials which have been widely used in medicine, Asian cuisine, and traditional cosmetic. Therefore, understanding the stability of curcumin has been widely studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the stability of curcumin solution against solar irradiation when making contact with inorganic material. As a model for the inorganic material, titanium dioxide (TiO2) was used. In the experimental method, the curcumin solution was irradiated using a solar irradiation. To confirm the stability of curcumin when contact with inorganic material, we added TiO2 micro particles with different concentrations. The results showed that the concentration of curcumin decreased during solar irradiation. The less concentration of curcumin affected the more decomposition rate obtained. The decomposition rate was increased greatly when TiO2 was added, in which the more TiO2 concentration added allowed the faster decomposition rate. Based on the result, we conclude that the curcumin is relatively stable as long as using higher concentration of curcumin and is no inorganic material existed. Then, the decomposition can be minimized by avoiding contact with inorganic material.

  14. The role of solar ultraviolet irradiation in zoster.

    PubMed Central

    Zak-Prelich, M.; Borkowski, J. L.; Alexander, F.; Norval, M.

    2002-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) suppresses many aspects of cell-mediated immunity but it is uncertain whether solar UV exposure alters resistance to human infectious diseases. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes varicella (chickenpox) and can reactivate from latency to cause zoster (shingles). The monthly incidence of chickenpox and zoster in a defined Polish population over 2 years was recorded and ground level solar UV was measured daily. There was a significant seasonality of UVR. Evidence of seasonal variation was found for all zoster cases and for zoster in males, with the lowest number of cases in the winter. The number of zoster cases with lesions occurring on exposed body sites (the face) demonstrated highly significant seasonality with a peak in July/August. Seasonal models for UVR and zoster cases showed similar temporal patterns. By contrast, for varicella, the maximum number of cases was found in March and the minimum in August/September, probably explained by the respiratory spread of VZV. It is tempting to speculate that the increase in solar UVR in the summer could induce suppression of cellular immunity, thus contributing to the corresponding rise in the incidence of zoster. PMID:12558343

  15. The effects of tungsten's pre-irradiation surface condition on helium-irradiated morphology

    DOE PAGES

    Garrison, Lauren M.; Kulcinski, Gerald L.

    2015-07-17

    Erosion is a concern associated with the use of tungsten as a plasma-facing component in fusion reactors. To compare the damage progression, polycrystalline tungsten (PCW) and (110) single crystal tungsten (SCW) samples were prepared with (1) a mechanical polish (MP) with roughness values in the range of 0.018–0.020 μm and (2) an MP and electropolish (MPEP) resulting in roughness values of 0.010–0.020 μm for PCW and 0.003–0.005 μm for SCW samples. Samples were irradiated with 30 keV He+ at 1173 K to fluences between 3 × 1021 and 6 × 1022 He/m2. The morphologies that developed after low-fluence bombardment weremore » different for each type of sample—MP SCW, MPEP SCW, MP PCW, and MPEP PCW. At the highest fluence, the SCW MPEP sample lost significantly more mass and developed a different morphology than the MP SCW sample. The PCW samples developed a similar morphology and had similar mass loss at the highest fluence. Surface preparation can have a significant effect on post-irradiation morphology that should be considered for the design of future fusion reactors such as ITER and DEMO.« less

  16. The effects of tungsten's pre-irradiation surface condition on helium-irradiated morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, Lauren M.; Kulcinski, Gerald L.

    2015-07-17

    Erosion is a concern associated with the use of tungsten as a plasma-facing component in fusion reactors. To compare the damage progression, polycrystalline tungsten (PCW) and (110) single crystal tungsten (SCW) samples were prepared with (1) a mechanical polish (MP) with roughness values in the range of 0.018–0.020 μm and (2) an MP and electropolish (MPEP) resulting in roughness values of 0.010–0.020 μm for PCW and 0.003–0.005 μm for SCW samples. Samples were irradiated with 30 keV He+ at 1173 K to fluences between 3 × 1021 and 6 × 1022 He/m2. The morphologies that developed after low-fluence bombardment were different for each type of sample—MP SCW, MPEP SCW, MP PCW, and MPEP PCW. At the highest fluence, the SCW MPEP sample lost significantly more mass and developed a different morphology than the MP SCW sample. The PCW samples developed a similar morphology and had similar mass loss at the highest fluence. Surface preparation can have a significant effect on post-irradiation morphology that should be considered for the design of future fusion reactors such as ITER and DEMO.

  17. Local short-term variability in solar irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohmann, Gerald M.; Monahan, Adam H.; Heinemann, Detlev

    2016-05-01

    Characterizing spatiotemporal irradiance variability is important for the successful grid integration of increasing numbers of photovoltaic (PV) power systems. Using 1 Hz data recorded by as many as 99 pyranometers during the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE), we analyze field variability of clear-sky index k* (i.e., irradiance normalized to clear-sky conditions) and sub-minute k* increments (i.e., changes over specified intervals of time) for distances between tens of meters and about 10 km. By means of a simple classification scheme based on k* statistics, we identify overcast, clear, and mixed sky conditions, and demonstrate that the last of these is the most potentially problematic in terms of short-term PV power fluctuations. Under mixed conditions, the probability of relatively strong k* increments of ±0.5 is approximately twice as high compared to increment statistics computed without conditioning by sky type. Additionally, spatial autocorrelation structures of k* increment fields differ considerably between sky types. While the profiles for overcast and clear skies mostly resemble the predictions of a simple model published by , this is not the case for mixed conditions. As a proxy for the smoothing effects of distributed PV, we finally show that spatial averaging mitigates variability in k* less effectively than variability in k* increments, for a spatial sensor density of 2 km-2.

  18. Solar ultraviolet irradiance for clear sky days incident at Rosario, Argentina: Measurements and model calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piacentini, R. D.; Alfano, O. M.; Albizzati, E. D.; Luccini, E. A.; Herman, J. R.

    2002-08-01

    Results of measurements are presented of clear-sky day solar UV irradiance (295-385 nm) in the August 1995 to June 1999 period at the Observatorio Astronómico de Rosario, Argentina, a place typical of the most populated Humid Pampa region of the country. The data give a detailed description of UV variation as a function of time in a given day and for different days of the year. Model calculations for clear-sky days at noon are done, employing the tropospheric ultraviolet visible radiation model (TUV) Madronich radiative transfer code, with the mean monthly ozone and aerosol content of the atmosphere and surface reflectivity provided by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS)/NASA instrument on board of the Earth Probe satellite. Two aerosol characteristics are tested in the model, rural-urban and mean urban, with the mean urban giving best agreement with the measurements. A simple mathematical expression is proposed for the ``mean'' typical curve, which gives a good approximation to the clear sky UV noon data for Rosario. It can be used for extending the results to nearby places and for comparison with other regions of the world having similar atmospheric and albedo conditions.

  19. Surface area and conductivity of polyaniline synthesized under UV irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budi, S.; Fitri, E.; Paristiowati, M.; Cahyana, U.; Pusparini, E.; Nasbey, H.; Imaddudin, A.

    2017-02-01

    This paper reports our study on the synthesis of high electrical conductivity and surface area polyaniline using oxidative polymerization under UV light irradiation. The formation of emeraldine structures of polyaniline was revealed by major absorption bands of FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) spectra attributed to C-N stretching, C=C stretching in the benzenoid ring, C=C stretching in the quinoid ring and QNH+B stretching. XRD (X-ray diffractometer) measurements confirmed typical diffraction patterns with a crystallinity of 13% and 16% for polyaniline prepared under non-stirred and stirred reaction, respectively. SEM (Scanning electron microscope) studies showed more uniform morphology of polyaniline was obtained with stirring reaction process compare to those prepared without stirring. Surface analysis using SAA (surface area analyzer) showed that pure polyaniline with the relatively high surface area of ca.28 m2/g was successfully prepared in this work. Based on four point probe measurement, the prepared polyaniline possesses high conductivity which is important in electrode application.

  20. EUV irradiance observations from SDO/EVE as a diagnostic of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milligan, Ryan O.

    For the past six years, the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory has been monitoring changes in the Sun's extreme ultraviolet output over a range of timescales. Its primary function is to provide measurements of the solar spectral irradiance that is responsible for driving fluctuations in Earth's ionosphere and thermosphere. However, despite its modest spectral resolution and lack of spatial information, the EVE spectral range contains many lines and continua that have become invaluable for diagnosing the response of the lower solar atmosphere itself to an injection of energy, particularly during a flare's impulsive phase. In addition, high temperature emission lines can also be used to track changes in temperature and density of flaring plasma in the corona. The high precision of EVE observations are therefore crucial in helping us understand particle acceleration and energy transport mechanisms during solar flares, as well as the origins of the Sun's most geoeffective emission.

  1. Solar radiation transmitted to the ground through cloud in relation to surface albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Brian G.

    1987-04-01

    The global solar radiation received at the earth's surface in the presence of cloud depends not only on the optical depth of the cloud and its other physical properties, but also on the albedo of the underlying surface. Multiple reflection of radiation between the cloud and a snow-covered surface, mainly in the visible spectrum, can increase the measured global solar radiation by a factor of 2 or more in overcast conditions. A quantitative account of this effect is required, applicable to any cloud conditions, if climatological records of solar radiation at high latitudes are to provide adequate figures, even for monthly means, at locations where the surface albedo differs appreciably from that of the observing station. Measurements made at an Antarctic offshore station (65°S, 64°W) are compared during two periods of extreme surface albedo (open water and fast ice surrounding the island station) and demonstrate that the effect increases, in amplitude and variability, with increasing cloud cover. The extreme cases are reconciled by a relatively simple numerical model, of general applicability, in which partial cloud cover is parameterized by sunshine duration. Absorption in the cloud and the effect of local land surfaces are taken into account. The model is applied predictively to sunshine and visual sea ice data throughout a 2-year period and successfully simulates the measured values of global solar radiation over a wide range of cloud and sea ice cover, enabling the irradiance for any value of surface albedo to be inferred.

  2. Absolute, Extreme-Ultraviolet Solar Spectral Irradiance Monitor (AESSIM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    4 SUN SUN (xO.2) Neon Argon Lexan Tin 0.5 0 Helium Krypton Aluminum Inoium C Carbon 0.5 0 E Helium Xenon Titanium Indium -0.5 0 Neon Nitric Oxide Tin...required, and some concepts for solar EUV monitoring missions. 3. ACTIVITIES 3.1 Low-Power AESSIM Calibration lamp A portable secondary ’standard’ of...the Harvard College Observatory (HCO) and then tested at PTB and HCO. We tested the lamp in laboratory optical systems that had been modified to allow

  3. Evaluation of the Delta-T SPN1 radiometer for the measurement of solar irradiance components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estelles, Victor; Serrano, David; Segura, Sara; Wood, John; Webb, Nick; Utrillas, Maria Pilar

    2016-04-01

    In this study we analyse the performance of an SPN1 radiometer built by Delta-T Devices Ltd. to retrieve global solar irradiance at ground and its components (diffuse, direct) in comparison with measurements from two Kipp&Zonen CMP21 radiometers and a Kipp&Zonen CHP1 pirheliometer, mounted on an active Solys-2 suntracker at the Burjassot site (Valencia, Spain) using data acquired every minute during years 2013 - 2015. The measurement site is close to sea level (60 m a.s.l.), near the Mediterranean coast (10 km) and within the metropolitan area of Valencia City (over 1.500.000 inhabitants). The SPN1 is an inexpensive and versatile instrument for the measurement of the three components of the solar radiation without any mobile part and without any need to azimuthally align the instrument to track the sun (http://www.delta-t.co.uk). The three components of the solar radiation are estimated from a combination of measurements performed by 7 different miniature thermopiles. The SPN1 pyranometer measures the irradiance between 400 and 2700 nm, and the nominal uncertainty for the individual readings is about 8% ± 10 W/m2 (5% for the daily averages). The pyranometer Kipp&Zonen CMP21 model is a secondary standard for the measurement of broadband solar global irradiance in horizontal planes. Two ventilated CMP21 are used for the measurement of the global and diffuse irradiances. The expected total daily uncertainty of the radiometer is estimated to be 2%. The pirheliometer Kipp&Zonen CHP1 is designed for the measurement of the direct irradiance. The principles are similar to the CMP21 pyranometer. The results of the comparison show that the global irradiance from the SPN1 compares very well with the CMP21, with absolute RMSD and MBD differences below the combined uncertainties (15 W/m2 and -5.4 W/m2, respectively; relative RMSD of 3.1%). Both datasets are very well correlated, with a correlation coefficient higher than 0.997 and a slope and intercept very close to 1 and 0

  4. Characterization of photosynthetic gas exchange in leaves under simulated adaxial and abaxial surfaces alternant irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zi-Shan; Li, Yu-Ting; Gao, Hui-Yuan; Yang, Cheng; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Previous investigations on photosynthesis have been performed on leaves irradiated from the adaxial surface. However, leaves usually sway because of wind. This action results in the alternating exposure of both the adaxial and abaxial surfaces to bright sunlight. To simulate adaxial and abaxial surfaces alternant irradiation (ad-ab-alt irradiation), the adaxial or abaxial surface of leaves were exposed to light regimes that fluctuated between 100 and 1,000 μmol m−2 s−1. Compared with constant adaxial irradiation, simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation suppressed net photosynthetic rate (Pn) and transpiration (E) but not water use efficiency. These suppressions were aggravated by an increase in alternant frequency of the light intensity. When leaves were transferred from constant light to simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation, the maximum Pn and E during the high light period decreased, but the rate of photosynthetic induction during this period remained constant. The sensitivity of photosynthetic gas exchange to simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation was lower on abaxial surface than adaxial surface. Under simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation, higher Pn and E were measured on abaxial surface compared with adaxial surface. Therefore, bifacial leaves can fix more carbon than leaves with two “sun-leaf-like” surfaces under ad-ab-alt irradiation. Photosynthetic research should be conducted under dynamic conditions that better mimic nature. PMID:27377989

  5. Characterization of photosynthetic gas exchange in leaves under simulated adaxial and abaxial surfaces alternant irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zi-Shan; Li, Yu-Ting; Gao, Hui-Yuan; Yang, Cheng; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2016-07-05

    Previous investigations on photosynthesis have been performed on leaves irradiated from the adaxial surface. However, leaves usually sway because of wind. This action results in the alternating exposure of both the adaxial and abaxial surfaces to bright sunlight. To simulate adaxial and abaxial surfaces alternant irradiation (ad-ab-alt irradiation), the adaxial or abaxial surface of leaves were exposed to light regimes that fluctuated between 100 and 1,000 μmol m(-2) s(-1). Compared with constant adaxial irradiation, simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation suppressed net photosynthetic rate (Pn) and transpiration (E) but not water use efficiency. These suppressions were aggravated by an increase in alternant frequency of the light intensity. When leaves were transferred from constant light to simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation, the maximum Pn and E during the high light period decreased, but the rate of photosynthetic induction during this period remained constant. The sensitivity of photosynthetic gas exchange to simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation was lower on abaxial surface than adaxial surface. Under simulated ad-ab-alt irradiation, higher Pn and E were measured on abaxial surface compared with adaxial surface. Therefore, bifacial leaves can fix more carbon than leaves with two "sun-leaf-like" surfaces under ad-ab-alt irradiation. Photosynthetic research should be conducted under dynamic conditions that better mimic nature.

  6. Photo-recovery of electron-irradiated GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulenberg, Andrew

    1995-01-01

    The first long-term (3000 hours) UV testing of unirradiated and 1 MeV electron-irradiated GaAs solar cells, with multilayer-coated coverslides to reduce solar array operating temperature, has produced some unexpected and important results. Two results, independent of the coverslide coatings, are of particular importance in terms of the predictability of GaAs solar-array lifetime in space: ( 1) The GaAs/Ge solar cells used for this series of tests displayed a much higher radiation degradation than that predicted based on JPL Solar Cell Radiation Handbook data. Covered cells degraded more in Isc than did bare cells. Short-term illumination at 60 C did not produce significant recovery (-1%) of the radiation damage. (2) However, electron radiation damage to these GaAs solar celIs anneals at 40 C when exposed to approximately 1 sun AM0 UV light sources for extended periods. The effect appears to be roughly linear with time (-1% of lsc per 1000 UVSH), is large (greater than or equal to 3%), and has not yet saturated (at 3000 hours). This photo-recovery of radiation damage to GaAs solar cells is a new effect and potentially important to the spacecraft community. The figure compares the effects of extended UV on irradiated and unirradiated GaAs solar cells with INTELSAT-6 Si cells. The effect and its generality, the extent of and conditions for photo-recovery, and the implications of such recovery for missions in radiation environments have not yet been determined.

  7. Radiance And Irradiance Of The Solar HeII 304 Emission Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMullin, D. R.; Floyd, L. E.; Auchère, F.

    2013-12-01

    For over 17 years, EIT and the later EUVI instruments aboard SoHO and STEREO, respectively, have provided a time series of radiant images in the HeII 30.4 nm transition region and three coronal emission lines (FeIX/X, FeXII, and FeXV). While the EIT measurements were gathered from positions approximately on the Earth-Sun axis, EUVI images have been gathered at angles ranging to more than ×90 degrees in solar longitude relative the Earth-Sun axis. Using a Differential Emission Measure (DEM) model, these measurements provide a basis for estimates of the spectral irradiance for the solar spectrum of wavelengths between 15 and 50 nm at any position in the heliosphere. In particular, we generate the He 30.4 spectral irradiance in all directions in the heliosphere and examine its time series in selected directions. Such spectra are utilized for two distinct purposes. First, the photoionization rate of neutral He at each position is calculated. Neutral He is of interest because it traverses the heliopause relatively undisturbed and therefore provides a measure of isotopic parameters beyond the heliosphere. Second, we use these generate a time series of estimates of the solar spectral luminosity in the HeII 30.4 nm emission line extending from the recent past solar cycle 23 minimum into the current weak solar cycle 24 enabling an estimate of its variation over the solar cycle. Because this 30.4~nm spectral luminosity is the sum of such radiation in all directions, its time series is devoid of the 27-day solar rotation periodicity present in indices typically used to represent solar activity.

  8. Variation of solar cell sensitivity and solar radiation on tilted surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klucher, T. M.

    1978-01-01

    The validity is studied that one of various insolation models used to compute solar radiation incident on tilted surfaces from global data measured on horizontal surfaces. The variation of solar cell sensitivity to solar radiation is determined over a wide range of atmospheric condition. A new model was formulated that reduced the deviations between measured and predicted insolation to less than 3 percent. Evaluation of solar cell sensitivity data indicates small change (2-3 percent) in sensitivity from winter to summer for tilted cells. The feasibility of using such global data as a means for calibrating terrestrial solar cells is discussed.

  9. Enhanced triboelectrification of the polydimethylsiloxane surface by ultraviolet irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong Hun; Yun, Byung Kil; Jung, Jong Hoon; Park, Jeong Young

    2016-03-01

    Study of the triboelectric charging effect has recently gained much attraction by proposing a new potential technical application in the field of energy harvesting. Transparent polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has some advantages in employing the triboelectric effect due to good conformity at nanometer scale and the simple fabrication process. In this study, we demonstrate that UV irradiation can enhance the performance of a PDMS-based nanotribogenerator. Contact atomic force microscopy combined with Kelvin probe force microscopy enables an in-depth investigation of the effect of UV illumination on local triboelectric charge generation and its decay in PDMS. We found that UV exposure not only facilitates triboelectric charge generation but also enhances charge redistribution, which is related to the wettability of the PDMS surface. This study provides insights into the fundamental understanding and design of triboelectric generator devices.

  10. SURFACE ALFVEN WAVES IN SOLAR FLUX TUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Goossens, M.; Andries, J.; Soler, R.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Arregui, I.; Terradas, J.

    2012-07-10

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere. Alfven waves and magneto-sonic waves are particular classes of MHD waves. These wave modes are clearly different and have pure properties in uniform plasmas of infinite extent only. Due to plasma non-uniformity, MHD waves have mixed properties and cannot be classified as pure Alfven or magneto-sonic waves. However, vorticity is a quantity unequivocally related to Alfven waves as compression is for magneto-sonic waves. Here, we investigate MHD waves superimposed on a one-dimensional non-uniform straight cylinder with constant magnetic field. For a piecewise constant density profile, we find that the fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves have the same properties as surface Alfven waves at a true discontinuity in density. Contrary to the classic Alfven waves in a uniform plasma of infinite extent, vorticity is zero everywhere except at the cylinder boundary. If the discontinuity in density is replaced with a continuous variation of density, vorticity is spread out over the whole interval with non-uniform density. The fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves do not need compression to exist unlike the radial overtones. In thin magnetic cylinders, the fundamental radial modes of the non-axisymmetric waves with phase velocities between the internal and the external Alfven velocities can be considered as surface Alfven waves. On the contrary, the radial overtones can be related to fast-like magneto-sonic modes.

  11. Comparison of the Changes in the Visible and Infrared Irradiance Observed by the SunPhotometers on EURECA to the UARS Total Solar and UV Irradiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, Judit

    1995-01-01

    Solar irradiance in the near-UV (335 nm), visible (500 nm) and infrared (778 nm) spectral bands has been measured by the SunPhotometers developed at the World Radiation Center, Davos, Switzerland on board the European Retrievable Carrier between August 1992 and May 1993. Study of the variations in the visible and infrared irradiance is important for both solar and atmospheric physics. The purpose of this paper is to examine the temporal variations observed in the visible and infrared spectral bands after eliminating the trend in the data mainly related to instrument degradation. The effect of active regions in these spectral irradiances is clearly resolved. Variations in the visible and infrared irradiances are compared to total solar irradiance observed by the SOVA2 radiometer on the EURECA platform and by the ACRIMII radiometer on UARS as well as to UV observations of the UARS and NOAA9 satellites. The space-borne spectral irradiance observations are compared to the photometric sunspot deficit and CaII K irradiance measured at the San Fernando Observatory, California State University at Northridge in order to study the effect of active regions in detail.

  12. Control of cell behavior on PTFE surface using ion beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Akane; Kobayashi, Tomohiro; Meguro, Takashi; Suzuki, Akihiro; Terai, Takayuki

    2009-05-01

    A polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surface is smooth and biologically inert, so that cells cannot attach to it. Ion beam irradiation of the PTFE surface forms micropores and a melted layer, and the surface is finally covered with a large number of small protrusions. Recently, we found that cells could adhere to this irradiated PTFE surface and spread over the surface. Because of their peculiar attachment behavior, these surfaces can be used as biological tools. However, the factors regulating cell adhesion are still unclear, although some new functional groups formed by irradiation seem to contribute to this adhesion. To control cell behavior on PTFE surfaces, we must determine the effects of the outermost irradiated surface on cell adhesion. In this study, we removed the thin melted surface layer by postirradiation annealing and investigated cell behavior on the surface. On the surface irradiated with 3 × 1016 ions/cm2, cells spread only on the remaining parts of the melted layer. From these results, it is clear that the melted layer had a capacity for cell attachment. When the surface covered with protrusions was irradiated with a fluence of 1 × 1017 ions/cm2, the distribution of cells changed after the annealing process from 'sheet shaped' into multicellular aggregates with diameters of around 50 μm. These results indicate that we can control cell behavior on PTFE surfaces covered with protrusions using irradiation and subsequent annealing. Multicellular spheroids can be fabricated for tissue engineering using this surface.

  13. Short-term prediction of solar irradiance using time-series analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, B.H. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    A new statistical model for solar irradiance prediction is described. The method makes use of the atmospheric parameterizations as well as a time-series model to forecast a sequence of global irradiance in the 3--10 min time frame. A survey of some of the prominent research of the recent past reveals a definite lack of irradiance models that approach subhourly intervals, especially in the range mentioned. In this article, accurate parameterizations of atmospheric phenomena are used in a prewhitening process so that a time-series model may be used effectively to forecast irradiance components up to an hour in advance in the 3--10 min time intervals. The model requires only previous global horizontal irradiance measurement at a site. Results show that when compared with actual data on two locations in the southeaster United States, the forecasts are quite accurate, and the model is site-independent. Under some instances, forecasts may be inaccurate when there are sudden transitional changes in the cloud cover moving across the sun. In order for the proposed irradiance model to predict such transitional changes correctly, frequent forecast updates become necessary.

  14. Measurement of solar radiation at the Earth's surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartman, F. L.

    1982-01-01

    The characteristics of solar energy arriving at the surface of the Earth are defined and the history of solar measurements in the United States presented. Radiation and meteorological measurements being made at solar energy meteorological research and training sites and calibration procedures used there are outlined. Data illustrating the annual variation in daily solar radiation at Ann Arbor, Michigan and the diurnal variation in radiation at Albuquerque, New Mexico are presented. Direct normal solar radiation received at Albuquerque is contrasted with that received at Maynard, Massachusetts. Average measured global radiation for a period of one year for four locations under clear skies, 50% cloud cover, and 100% cloud cover is given and compared with the solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere. The May distribution of mean daily direct solar radiation and mean daily global solar radiation over the United States is presented. The effects of turbidity on the direct and circumsolar radiation are shown.

  15. Comparison between satellite and instrumental solar irradiance data at the city of Athens, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markonis, Yannis; Dimoulas, Thanos; Atalioti, Athina; Konstantinou, Charalampos; Kontini, Anna; Pipini, Magdalini-Io; Skarlatou, Eleni; Sarantopoulos, Vasilis; Tzouka, Katerina; Papalexiou, Simon; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we examine and compare the statistical properties of satellite and instrumental solar irradiance data at the capital of Greece, Athens. Our aim is to determine whether satellite data are sufficient for the requirements of solar energy modelling applications. To this end we estimate the corresponding probability density functions, the auto-correlation functions and the parameters of some fitted simple stochastic models. We also investigate the effect of sample size to the variance in the temporal interpolation of daily time series. Finally, as an alternative, we examine if temperature can be used as a better predictor for the daily irradiance non-seasonal component instead of the satellite data. Acknowledgement: This research is conducted within the frame of the undergraduate course "Stochastic Methods in Water Resources" of the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA). The School of Civil Engineering of NTUA provided moral support for the participation of the students in the Assembly.

  16. Design and analysis of a curved cylindrical Fresnel lens that produces high irradiance uniformity on the solar cell.

    PubMed

    González, Juan C

    2009-04-10

    A new type of convex Fresnel lens for linear photovoltaic concentration systems is presented. The lens designed with this method reaches 100% of geometrical optical efficiency, and the ratio (Aperture area)/(Receptor area) is up to 75% of the theoretical limit. The main goal of the design is high uniformity of the radiation on the cell surface for each input angle inside the acceptance. The ratio between the maximum and the minimum irradiance on points of the solar cell is less than 2. The lens has been designed with the simultaneous multiple surfaces (SMS) method of nonimaging optics, and ray tracing techniques have been used to characterize its performance for linear symmetry systems.

  17. An investigation of the energy balance of solar active regions using the ACRIM irradiance data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, L. D.

    1986-01-01

    The detection of a significant correlation between the solar irradiance, corrected for flux deficit due to sunspots, and both the 205 nm flux and a photometric facular index were examined. A detailed analysis supports facular emission as the more likely source of correlation with the corrected radiance, rather then the error in sunspot correction. A computer program which simulates two dimensional convection in a compressible, stratified medium was investigated. Subroutines to calculate ionization and other thermodynamic variables were also completed.

  18. Ion irradiation: its relevance to the evolution of complex organics in the outer solar system.

    PubMed

    Strazzulla, G

    1997-01-01

    Ion irradiation of carbon containing ices produces several effects among which the formation of complex molecules and even refractory organic materials whose spectral color and molecular complexity both depend on the amount of deposited energy. Here results from laboratory experiments are summarized. Their relevance for the formation and evolution of simple molecules and complex organic materials on planetary bodies in the external Solar System is outlined.

  19. Far ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet rocket instrumentation for measuring the solar spectral irradiance and terrestrial airglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Bailey, Scott M.; Solomon, Stanley C.; Rottman, Gary J.

    1992-01-01

    A sounding-rocket experiment is being developed for the study of EUV spectral irradiance and its effects on the upper atmosphere, using three solar EUV instruments devised by the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics. These include a 25-cm Rowland circle EUV spectrograph, an array of Si X-UV photodiodes, and an X-UV imager with 20 arcsec resolution of the sun.

  20. The functional role of tabular structures for large reef fishes: avoiding predators or solar irradiance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerry, J. T.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2015-06-01

    Large reef fishes may often be seen sheltering under tabular structures on coral reefs. There are two principle explanations for this behaviour: avoidance of predation or avoidance of solar irradiance. This study sought supporting evidence to distinguish between these two explanations by examining the usage of tabular structures on a shallow mid-shelf reef of the Great Barrier Reef at midday and sunset. If predation avoidance is most important, usage should increase towards sunset; conversely, if avoidance of solar radiation is most important, more fishes should use cover at midday. Underwater video observations revealed that tabular structures were extensively used by large reef fishes at midday, being characterised by numerous species, especially Lutjanidae and Haemulidae. In contrast, at sunset, tabular structures were used by significantly fewer large reef fishes, being characterised mostly by species of unicornfish ( Naso spp.). Resident times of fishes using tabular structures were also significantly longer at midday (28:06 ± 5:55 min) than at sunset (07:47 ± 2:19 min). The results suggest that the primary function of tabular structures for large reef fishes is the avoidance of solar irradiance. This suggestion is supported by the position of fishes when sheltering. The majority of large reef fishes were found to shelter under the lip of tabular structure, facing outwards. This behaviour is thought to allow protection from harmful downwelling UV-B irradiance while allowing the fish to retain photopic vision and survey more of the surrounding area. These findings help to explain the importance of tabular structures for large reef fishes on coral reefs, potentially providing a valuable energetic refuge from solar irradiance.

  1. Cloud optical depth from total and UV solar irradiance measurements at two sites of the Atacama Desert in Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luccini, Eduardo; Rivas, Miguel; Rojas, Elisa

    2016-06-01

    The visible cloud optical depth (COD) for overcast stratocumulus was estimated at Arica (18.47°S, 70.31°W, 20 m above sea level (asl)) and Poconchile (18.45°S, 70.07°W, 560 m asl), northernmost Chilean sites distant about 30 km in the Atacama Desert, during morning hours for days in which cloudiness dissipates giving cloudless afternoons, from 10 min averaged measurements of total shortwave solar irradiance (ToSI) and ultraviolet solar irradiance (UVSI) during the period 2002-2005. One-dimensional radiative transfer model calculations were made to establish a theoretical relationship between the visible COD, the cloud effective transmittance in both ToSI (CETTo) and UVSI (CETUV), and the solar zenith angle (SZA). It is used to estimate COD from the previously measured CET by Luccini et al. (2011). Measurements in both ToSI and UVSI broadband ranges showed to be reliable to determine the visible COD within this frame. Overcast COD at the coastal site of Arica (typical COD ~ 15) is slightly larger than at the inland site of Poconchile (typical COD ~ 11). Maximum sensitivity of the retrieved CODs was found to variations in the cloud droplet effective radius, surface albedo and aerosol optical depth in both ranges, and in the total ozone column additionally in UVSI. The obtained CODs are linearly related but are higher compared with those from two other parametric methods using the same data. A simple rational expression of CET as a function of COD enables to estimate a mean (spectral and regional) surface albedo in each range that is in turn applicable to fit appropriately the ratio CETTo/CETUV. Instantaneous overpass MODIS-Terra satellite COD at 660 nm show a good agreement with simultaneous (within ± 5 min) ground-derived COD at both sites.

  2. Design principles and field performance of a solar spectral irradiance meter

    SciTech Connect

    Tatsiankou, V.; Hinzer, K.; Haysom, J.; Schriemer, H.; Emery, K.; Beal, R.

    2016-08-01

    A solar spectral irradiance meter (SSIM), designed for measuring the direct normal irradiance (DNI) in six wavelength bands, has been combined with models to determine key atmospheric transmittances and the resulting spectral irradiance distribution of DNI under all sky conditions. The design principles of the SSIM, implementation of a parameterized transmittance model, and field performance comparisons of modeled solar spectra with reference radiometer measurements are presented. Two SSIMs were tested and calibrated at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) against four spectroradiometers and an absolute cavity radiometer. The SSIMs' DNI was on average within 1% of the DNI values reported by one of NREL's primary absolute cavity radiometers. An additional SSIM was installed at the SUNLAB Outdoor Test Facility in September 2014, with ongoing collection of environmental and spectral data. The SSIM's performance in Ottawa was compared against a commercial pyrheliometer and a spectroradiometer over an eight month study. The difference in integrated daily spectral irradiance between the SSIM and the ASD spectroradiometer was found to be less than 1%. The cumulative energy density collected by the SSIM over this duration agreed with that measured by an Eppley model NIP pyrheliometer to within 0.5%. No degradation was observed.

  3. Solar ultraviolet irradiation induces decorin degradation in human skin likely via neutrophil elastase.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Xia, Wei; Liu, Ying; Remmer, Henriette A; Voorhees, John; Fisher, Gary J

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of human skin to solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiation induces matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) activity, which degrades type I collagen fibrils. Type I collagen is the most abundant protein in skin and constitutes the majority of skin connective tissue (dermis). Degradation of collagen fibrils impairs the structure and function of skin that characterize skin aging. Decorin is the predominant proteoglycan in human dermis. In model systems, decorin binds to and protects type I collagen fibrils from proteolytic degradation by enzymes such as MMP-1. Little is known regarding alterations of decorin in response to UV irradiation. We found that solar-simulated UV irradiation of human skin in vivo stimulated substantial decorin degradation, with kinetics similar to infiltration of polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells. Proteases that were released from isolated PMN cells degraded decorin in vitro. A highly selective inhibitor of neutrophil elastase blocked decorin breakdown by proteases released from PMN cells. Furthermore, purified neutrophil elastase cleaved decorin in vitro and generated fragments with similar molecular weights as those resulting from protease activity released from PMN cells, and as observed in UV-irradiated human skin. Cleavage of decorin by neutrophil elastase significantly augmented fragmentation of type I collagen fibrils by MMP-1. Taken together, these data indicate that PMN cell proteases, especially neutrophil elastase, degrade decorin, and this degradation renders collagen fibrils more susceptible to MMP-1 cleavage. These data identify decorin degradation and neutrophil elastase as potential therapeutic targets for mitigating sun exposure-induced collagen fibril degradation in human skin.

  4. In Situ Irradiation and Measurement of Triple Junction Solar Cells at Low Intensity, Low Temperature (LILT) Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, R.D.; Imaizumi, M.; Walters, R.J.; Lorentzen, J.R.; Messenger, S.R.; Tischler, J.G.; Ohshima, T.; Sato, S.; Sharps, P.R.; Fatemi, N.S.

    2008-01-01

    The performance of triple junction InGaP/(In)GaAs/Ge space solar cells was studied following high energy electron irradiation at low temperature. Cell characterization was carried out in situ at the irradiation temperature while using low intensity illumination, and, as such, these conditions reflect those found for deep space, solar powered missions that are far from the sun. Cell characterization consisted of I-V measurements and quantum efficiency measurements. The low temperature irradiations caused substantial degradation that differs in some ways from that seen after room temperature irradiations. The short circuit current degrades more at low temperature while the open circuit voltage degrades more at room temperature. A room temperature anneal after the low temperature irradiation produced a substantial recovery in the degradation. Following irradiation at both temperatures and an extended room temperature anneal, quantum efficiency measurement suggests that the bulk of the remaining damage is in the (In)GaAs sub-cell

  5. Simulation of the Mars Surface Solar Spectra for Optimized Performance of Triple-Junction Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmondson, Kenneth M.; Joslin, David E.; Fetzer, Chris M.; King, RIchard R.; Karam, Nasser H.; Mardesich, Nick; Stella, Paul M.; Rapp, Donald; Mueller, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The unparalleled success of the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) powered by GaInP/GaAs/Ge triple-junction solar cells has demonstrated a lifetime for the rovers that exceeded the baseline mission duration by more than a factor of five. This provides confidence in future longer-term solar powered missions on the surface of Mars. However, the solar cells used on the rovers are not optimized for the Mars surface solar spectrum, which is attenuated at shorter wavelengths due to scattering by the dusty atmosphere. The difference between the Mars surface spectrum and the AM0 spectrum increases with solar zenith angle and optical depth. The recent results of a program between JPL and Spectrolab to optimize GaInP/GaAs/Ge solar cells for Mars are presented. Initial characterization focuses on the solar spectrum at 60-degrees zenith angle at an optical depth of 0.5. The 60-degree spectrum is reduced to 1/6 of the AM0 intensity and is further reduced in the blue portion of the spectrum. JPL has modeled the Mars surface solar spectra, modified an X-25 solar simulator, and completed testing of Mars-optimized solar cells previously developed by Spectrolab with the modified X-25 solar simulator. Spectrolab has focused on the optimization of the higher efficiency Ultra Triple-Junction (UTJ) solar cell for Mars. The attenuated blue portion of the spectrum requires the modification of the top sub-cell in the GaInP/GaAs/Ge solar cell for improved current balancing in the triple-junction cell. Initial characterization confirms the predicted increase in power and current matched operation for the Mars surface 60-degree zenith angle solar spectrum.

  6. The Character of the Solar Wind, Surface Interactions, and Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, William M.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the key characteristics of the proton-rich solar wind and describe how it may interact with the lunar surface. We suggest that solar wind can be both a source and loss of water/OH related volatiles, and review models showing both possibilities. Energy from the Sun in the form of radiation and solar wind plasma are in constant interaction with the lunar surface. As such, there is a solar-lunar energy connection, where solar energy and matter are continually bombarding the lunar surface, acting at the largest scale to erode the surface at 0.2 Angstroms per year via ion sputtering [1]. Figure 1 illustrates this dynamically Sun-Moon system.

  7. Validation of Meteornom solar irradiation data for three regions in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, E. B.; Teixeira, V. A.; Martins, F. R.

    2015-12-01

    This work is a part of a study to identify available and reliable sources of solar irradiation data in Brazil - with a strong focus on their relevance for PV and CSP applications. One of these sources is the Meteonorm . Meteonorm is a comprehensive meteorological reference. It gives access to a catalogue of solar radiation data and meteorological data for solar applications and system design at any desired location in the world. The current report provides an evaluation of the solar irradiation data derived from version 7.0 of the Meteonorm software for Brazil. This evaluation was made by using the observation data of horizontal global solar irradiation from the SONDA/BSRN network for Petrolina (PTR), Brasilia (BRB), and São Martinho do Serra (SMS). These sites were chosen based on a careful data quality control, absence of daily gaps, and less than 60% of missing data per month. The Meteonorm data were generated with real input monthly average for each selected validation sites for the years 2011, 2013, and 2014. The analysis was performed by relative and cumulative frequency of annual and seasonal solar irradiance, based on the methodology proposed by Pierre Inechen, 2006. The results showed little interannual variability for the validation sites and presented a recurrent occurrence of the value of 1000W.m-2 for stations PTR and BRB. The Meteonorm was able to represent the high frequencies in these locations, however, presented an interannual variation greater than observed, and an overestimation of values. As for the seasonal analysis, it was possible to verify that the quarters which varied the most from one year to the next were the Dec-Jan-Feb and Sep-Oct-Nov in BRB station; Dec-Jan-Feb and Mar-Apr-May in the PTR station; and Dec-Jan-Feb in the SMS station. The Meteornorm was able identify the months of highest and lowest variability in the BRB and SMS stations, except PTR station which yielded a large

  8. Response of the upper atmosphere to variations in the solar soft x-ray irradiance. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Scott Martin

    1995-01-01

    Terrestrial far ultraviolet (FUV) airglow emissions have been suggested as a means for remote sensing the structure of the upper atmosphere. The energy which leads to the excitation of FUV airglow emissions is solar irradiance at extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray wavelengths. Solar irradiance at these wavelengths is known to be highly variable; studies of nitric oxide (NO) in the lower thermosphere have suggested a variability of more than an order of magnitude in the solar soft x-ray irradiance. To properly interpret the FUV airflow, the magnitude of the solar energy deposition must be known. Previous analyses have used the electron impact excited Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) bands of N2 to infer the flux of photoelectrons in the atmosphere and thus to infer the magnitude of the solar irradiance. This dissertation presents the first simultaneous measurements of the FUV airglow, the major atmospheric constituent densities, and the solar EUV and soft x-ray irradiances. The measurements were made on three flights of an identical sounding rocket payload at different levels of solar activity. The linear response in brightness of the LBH bands to variations in solar irradiance is demonstrated. In addition to the N2 LBH bands, atomic oxygen lines at 135.6 and 130.4 nm are also studied. Unlike the LBH bands, these emissions undergo radiative transfer effects in the atmosphere. The OI emission at 135.6 nm is found to be well modeled using a radiative transfer calculation and the known excitation processes. Unfortunately, the assumed processes leading to OI 130.4 nm excitation are found to be insufficient to reproduce the observed variability of this emission. Production of NO in the atmosphere is examined; it is shown that a lower than previously reported variability in the solar soft x-ray irradiance is required to explain the variability of NO.

  9. Shortwave Radiometer Calibration Methods Comparison and Resulting Solar Irradiance Measurement Differences: A User Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Reda, Ibrahim; Robinson, Justin

    2016-11-21

    Banks financing solar energy projects require assurance that these systems will produce the energy predicted. Furthermore, utility planners and grid system operators need to understand the impact of the variable solar resource on solar energy conversion system performance. Accurate solar radiation data sets reduce the expense associated with mitigating performance risk and assist in understanding the impacts of solar resource variability. The accuracy of solar radiation measured by radiometers depends on the instrument performance specification, installation method, calibration procedure, measurement conditions, maintenance practices, location, and environmental conditions. This study addresses the effect of different calibration methods provided by radiometric calibration service providers, such as NREL and manufacturers of radiometers, on the resulting calibration responsivity. Some of these radiometers are calibrated indoors and some outdoors. To establish or understand the differences in calibration methodology, we processed and analyzed field-measured data from these radiometers. This study investigates calibration responsivities provided by NREL's broadband outdoor radiometer calibration (BORCAL) and a few prominent manufacturers. The BORCAL method provides the outdoor calibration responsivity of pyranometers and pyrheliometers at 45 degree solar zenith angle, and as a function of solar zenith angle determined by clear-sky comparisons with reference irradiance. The BORCAL method also employs a thermal offset correction to the calibration responsivity of single-black thermopile detectors used in pyranometers. Indoor calibrations of radiometers by their manufacturers are performed using a stable artificial light source in a side-by-side comparison between the test radiometer under calibration and a reference radiometer of the same type. In both methods, the reference radiometer calibrations are traceable to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR). These different

  10. Presence of terrestrial atmospheric gas absorption bands in standard extraterrestrial solar irradiance curves in the near-infrared spectral region.

    PubMed

    Gao, B C; Green, R O

    1995-09-20

    The solar irradiance curves compiled by Wehrli [Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Publ. 615 (World Radiation Center, Davosdorf, Switzerland, 1985)] and by Neckel and Labs [Sol. Phys. 90, 205 (1984)] are widely used. These curves were obtained based on measurements of solar radiation from the ground and from aircraft platforms. Contaminations in these curves by atmospheric gaseous absorptions were inevitable. A technique for deriving the transmittance spectrum of the Sun's atmosphere from high-resolution (0.01 cm(-1)) solar occultation spectra measured above the Earth's atmosphere by the use of atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy (ATMOS) aboard the space shuttle is described. The comparisons of the derived ATMOS solar transmittance spectrum with the two solar irradiance curves show that he curve derived by Wehrli contains many absorption features in the 2.0-2.5-µm region that are not of solar origin, whereas the curve obtained by Neckel and Labs is completely devoid of weak solar absorption features that should be there. An Earth atmospheric oxygen band at 1.268 µm and a water-vapor band near 0.94 µm are likely present in the curve obtained by Wehrli. It is shown that the solar irradiance measurement errors in some narrow spectral intervals can be as large as 20%. An improved solar irradiance spectrum is formed by the incorporation of the solar transmittance spectrum derived from the ATMOS data into the solar irradiance spectrum from Neckel and Labs. The availability of a new solar spectrum from 50 to 50 000 cm(-1) from the U.S. Air Force Phillips Laboratory is also discussed.

  11. Degradation modeling of InGaP/GaAs/Ge triple-junction solar cells irradiated by protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maximenko, S. I.; Lumb, M. P.; Messenger, S. R.; Hoheisel, R.; Affouda, C.; Scheiman, D.; Gonzalez, M.; Lorentzen, J.; Jenkins, P. P.; Walters, R. J.

    2014-03-01

    Experimental results on triple-junction solar cells irradiated by 3 MeV proton irradiation to very high damage levels are presented. The minority carrier transport properties were obtained through quantum efficiency and EBIC measurements and an analytical drift-diffusion solver was used in understanding the results for different degradation levels where multiple damage mechanisms are evident.

  12. Universal anyons at the irradiated surface of topological insulator

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Chen, Wei; Wang, Baigeng; Xing, D. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Anyons have recently received great attention due to their promising application in topological quantum computation. The best validated system that enjoys the anyonic excitations are the Laughlin states. The quasi-particles in Laughlin states are neither fermions nor bosons but possess the discrete statistical angle θ = π/m, with m being an integer. Here we report a possible realization of the universal Abelian anyons, whose statistical angle can be tuned continuously by external parameters and can take any arbitrary values interpolating θ = 0 and θ = π. The proposed setup is the surface state of a three dimensional topological insulator driven by an amplitude-modulated circularly-polarized light. It is found that the external field leads to a particular Floquet phase, which is a two-spatial-dimensional analogy of the Weyl semimetal phase in the Floquet first Brillouin zone. The chiral anomaly of this phase results in a U(1) Chern-Simons gauge theory with a tunable Floquet Chern number. Owing to this underlying gauge field theory, the irradiated surface of topological insulator constitutes a promising platform for the observation of the universal anyons. PMID:26830323

  13. Impact of a potential 21st century "grand solar minimum" on surface temperatures and stratospheric ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anet, J. G.; Rozanov, E. V.; Muthers, S.; Peter, T.; BröNnimann, S.; Arfeuille, F.; Beer, J.; Shapiro, A. I.; Raible, C. C.; Steinhilber, F.; Schmutz, W. K.

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the effects of a recently proposed 21st century Dalton minimum like decline of solar activity on the evolution of Earth's climate and ozone layer. Three sets of two member ensemble simulations, radiatively forced by a midlevel emission scenario (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change RCP4.5), are performed with the atmosphere-ocean chemistry-climate model AOCCM SOCOL3-MPIOM, one with constant solar activity, the other two with reduced solar activity and different strength of the solar irradiance forcing. A future grand solar minimum will reduce the global mean surface warming of 2 K between 1986-2005 and 2081-2100 by 0.2 to 0.3 K. Furthermore, the decrease in solar UV radiation leads to a significant delay of stratospheric ozone recovery by 10 years and longer. Therefore, the effects of a solar activity minimum, should it occur, may interfere with international efforts for the protection of global climate and the ozone layer.

  14. Progress in Projecting Solar Radiation at the Earth's Surface in Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, W.; Fildier, B.; Feldman, D.

    2015-12-01

    Projecting changes in solar radiation at the Earth's surface in futureclimates is a critical input to forecast surface irradiance for solarenergy. We demonstrate the current state of the art using theensemble of opportunity assembled for the Coupled ModelIntercomparison Project (CMIP5) and the Fifth Assessment Report (AR5)of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The reliability of these projections depends upon the accuracy of theunderlying radiation codes, the fidelity of these codes to themeasured optical properties of key radiatively active atmosphericconstituents, and the realism of future projections of theseatmospheric constituents. These constituents include aerosols,clouds, water vapor, greenhouse gases that absorb near-infraredsunlight. Since the realism of future projections of anthropogenicaerosol species is contingent on the underlying scenario, we focus onthe other challenges in forecasting surface irradiance. Regarding accuracy, we demonstrate that current GCM shortwaveparameterizations often exhibit quite small errors relative tobenchmark radiative transfer codes. In addition, recent work hasbracketed the uncertainties in solar irradiance associated withcomplex cloud geometries. There is also an emerging consensus howcloud radiative effects will evolve in a warmer climate. However,there is evidence that current GCM codes still exhibit systematicerrors in the near-infrared water vapor bands, particularly for moistsub-tropical atmospheres. These errors will become more acute aswater vapor feedbacks, combined with global warming, increase thetotal precipitable water in the Earth's atmosphere.

  15. Mass fractionation of the lunar surface by solar wind sputtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Switkowski, Z. E.; Haff, P. K.; Tombrello, T. A.; Burnett, D. S.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation is conducted concerning the mass-fractionation effects produced in connection with the bombardment of the moon by the solar wind. Most of the material ejected by sputtering escapes the moon's gravity, but some returning matter settles back onto the lunar surface. This material, which is somewhat richer in heavier atoms than the starting surface, is incorporated into the heavily radiation-damaged outer surfaces of grains. The investigation indicates that sputtering of the lunar surface by the solar wind will give rise to significant surface heavy atom enrichments if the grain surfaces are allowed to come into sputtering equilibrium.

  16. Reduction of Fermi level pinning and recombination at polycrystalline CdTe surfaces by laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Simonds, Brian J.; Kheraj, Vipul; Palekis, Vasilios; Ferekides, Christos; Scarpulla, Michael A.

    2015-06-14

    Laser processing of polycrystalline CdTe is a promising approach that could potentially increase module manufacturing throughput while reducing capital expenditure costs. For these benefits to be realized, the basic effects of laser irradiation on CdTe must be ascertained. In this study, we utilize surface photovoltage spectroscopy (SPS) to investigate the changes to the electronic properties of the surface of polycrystalline CdTe solar cell stacks induced by continuous-wave laser annealing. The experimental data explained within a model consisting of two space charge regions, one at the CdTe/air interface and one at the CdTe/CdS junction, are used to interpret our SPS results. The frequency dependence and phase spectra of the SPS signal are also discussed. To support the SPS findings, low-temperature spectrally-resolved photoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence were also measured. The data show that a modest laser treatment of 250 W/cm{sup 2} with a dwell time of 20 s is sufficient to reduce the effects of Fermi level pinning at the surface due to surface defects.

  17. Synthesis of activated charcoal supported Bi-doped TiO2 nanocomposite under solar light irradiation for enhanced photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandraboss, V. L.; Kamalakkannan, J.; Senthilvelan, S.

    2016-11-01

    In this study, activated charcoal (AC) supported bismuth (Bi)-doped Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanocomposite was synthesized by precipitation method. The photocatalytic activity of AC-Bi/TiO2 was investigated for the degradation of methylene blue (MB) in aqueous solution under solar light irradiation. The incorporation of Bi3+ into the TiO2 lattice shifts the absorbance of TiO2 to the visible region then the addition of high adsorption capacity activated charcoal to improve the efficiency of TiO2. AC-Bi/TiO2 is found to be more efficient than Bi/TiO2 and undoped TiO2 for the degradation of MB under solar light irradiation. Surface morphology and bulk composition of the composite was obtained using high resolution-scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The crystal structure evolution and elemental composition were analyzed by combining Fourier transform-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectra show that the absorption edge for the composite with Bi3+ has red shift as compared with that of undoped TiO2. UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra demonstrated a decrease in the direct band gap of AC-Bi/TiO2. BET surface area, pore radius and pore volume of the materials were calculated by applying the BET equation to the sorption isotherms. The production of hydroxyl radicals (rad OH) on the surface of solar light irradiated materialswere detected by photoluminescence technique using coumarin as a probe molecule. The mechanism of photocatalytic effect of the AC-Bi/TiO2 was proposed for the degradation of MB under solar light irradiation.

  18. Surface pattern formation during MeV energy ion beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S. K.; Nair, K. G. M.; Kannan, R. Kamala; Kamruddin, M.; Panigrahi, B. K.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2012-06-05

    Surface patterning during high energy heavy ion irradiation is a relatively recent observation. We report in this paper the results of a study on the formation of self organized ripple patterns on silica surface irradiated with MeV energy gold ions.

  19. Long-term global temperature variations under total solar irradiance, cosmic rays, and volcanic activity.

    PubMed

    Biktash, Lilia

    2017-07-01

    The effects of total solar irradiance (TSI) and volcanic activity on long-term global temperature variations during solar cycles 19-23 were studied. It was shown that a large proportion of climate variations can be explained by the mechanism of action of TSI and cosmic rays (CRs) on the state of the lower atmosphere and other meteorological parameters. The role of volcanic signals in the 11-year variations of the Earth's climate can be expressed as several years of global temperature drop. Conversely, it was shown that the effects of solar, geophysical, and human activity on climate change interact. It was concluded that more detailed investigations of these very complicated relationships are required, in order to be able to understand issues that affect ecosystems on a global scale.

  20. Mars surface radiation exposure for solar maximum conditions and 1989 solar proton events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonsen, Lisa C.; Nealy, John E.

    1992-01-01

    The Langley heavy-ion/nucleon transport code, HZETRN, and the high-energy nucleon transport code, BRYNTRN, are used to predict the propagation of galactic cosmic rays (GCR's) and solar flare protons through the carbon dioxide atmosphere of Mars. Particle fluences and the resulting doses are estimated on the surface of Mars for GCR's during solar maximum conditions and the Aug., Sep., and Oct. 1989 solar proton events. These results extend previously calculated surface estimates for GCR's at solar minimum conditions and the Feb. 1956, Nov. 1960, and Aug. 1972 solar proton events. Surface doses are estimated with both a low-density and a high-density carbon dioxide model of the atmosphere for altitudes of 0, 4, 8, and 12 km above the surface. A solar modulation function is incorporated to estimate the GCR dose variation between solar minimum and maximum conditions over the 11-year solar cycle. By using current Mars mission scenarios, doses to the skin, eye, and blood-forming organs are predicted for short- and long-duration stay times on the Martian surface throughout the solar cycle.

  1. The Variation of the Solar Diameter and Irradiance:. Eclipse Observation of July 11, 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutchmy, Serge; Bazin, Cyril; Prado, Jean-Yves; Lamy, Philippe; Rocher, Patrick

    2013-03-01

    The variation of the solar diameter is the subject of hot debates due to the possible effect on the Earth climate and also due to different interpretations of long period solar variabilities, including the total irradiance. We shortly review the topic and show that rather long term variations, corresponding to a length well over a solar magnetic cycle, are interesting to consider. The very recently launched mission "Picard" is entirely devoted to the topic but will just permit a short term evaluation. At the time of the last solar total eclipse of 11/7/2010, several experiments were prepared to precisely measure the transit time of the Moon related to the precise value of the solar diameter. Preliminary results coming from the use of a specially designed CNES photometer, put on different atolls of the French Polynesia, are presented. In addition the results of new experiments devoted to fast observations of flash spectra, including their precise chrono-dating, are illustrated and discussed. A new definition of the edge of the Sun, free of spurious scattered light effects strongly affecting all out of eclipse evaluations, is emerging from these observations, in agreement with the most advanced attempts of modeling the outer layers of the photosphere. We also argue for a definite answer concerning the solar diameter measurement from eclipses based on a better precision of lunar profiles coming from lunar altimetry space experiments which will be possible in the following decades.

  2. Long-Term Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) Variability Trends: 1984-2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert Benjamin, III; Wilson, Robert S.; Thomas, Susan

    2004-01-01

    The incoming total solar irradiance (TSI), typically referred to as the solar constant, is being studied to identify long-term TSI changes, which may trigger global climate changes. The TSI is normalized to the mean earth-sun distance. Studies of spacecraft TSI data sets confirmed the existence of 0.1 %, long-term TSI variability component with a period of 10 years. The component varied directly with solar magnetic activity associated with recent 10-year sunspot cycles. The 0.1 % TSI variability component is clearly present in the spacecraft data sets from the 1984-2004, Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) active cavity radiometer (ACR) solar monitor; 1978-1993, Nimbus-7 HF; 1980-1989, Solar Maximum Mission [SMM] ACRIM; 1991-2004, Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) ACRIM; 1996-2003, Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/VIRGO, Space Science (ATLAS), 2000-2004, ACRIMSAT; and 2003-2004 SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) active cavity radiometer (ACR) missions. From October 1984, through March 2004, the ERBS/ERBE solar monitor was used to produce the longest continuous data set of total solar irradiance (TSI) variability measurements. The solar monitor is located on Shuttle Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and the NASA Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS). Maximum TSI values occurred during the 1989-1991, and 1998-2002, time frames; while minimum [quiet sun] TSI levels occurred during 1986 and 1996. Recent ERBS measurements indicate that the TSI is decreasing to forecasted, minimum levels by 2006. Using the discontinuous non-operational Nimbus-7, SMM ACRIM, and UARS ACRIM mission TSI data sets, Wilson and Mordvinor (2003) suggested the existence of an additional long-term TSI variability component, 0.05 %, with a period longer than a decade. Analyses of the ERBS/ERBE data set do not support the Wilson and Mordvinor analyses approach because it used the Nimbus-7 data set which exhibited a significant ACR response shift of 0.7 Wm-2

  3. Effects of Light and Electron Beam Irradiation on Halide Perovskites and Their Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Klein-Kedem, Nir; Cahen, David; Hodes, Gary

    2016-02-16

    Hybrid alkylammonium lead halide perovskite solar cells have, in a very few years of research, exceeded a light-to-electricity conversion efficiency of 20%, not far behind crystalline silicon cells. These perovskites do not contain any rare element, the amount of toxic lead used is very small, and the cells can be made with a low energy input. They therefore already conform to two of the three requirements for viable, commercial solar cells-efficient and cheap. The potential deal-breaker is their long-term stability. While reasonable short-term (hours) and even medium term (months) stability has been demonstrated, there is concern whether they will be stable for the two decades or more expected from commercial cells in view of the intrinsically unstable nature of these materials. In particular, they have a tendency to be sensitive to various types of irradiation, including sunlight, under certain conditions. This Account focuses on the effect of irradiation on the hybrid (and to a small degree, all-inorganic) lead halide perovskites and their solar cells. It is split up into two main sections. First, we look at the effect of electron beams on the materials. This is important, since such beams are used for characterization of both the perovskites themselves and cells made from them (electron microscopy for morphological and compositional characterization; electron beam-induced current to study cell operation mechanism; cathodoluminescence for charge carrier recombination studies). Since the perovskites are sensitive to electron beam irradiation, it is important to minimize beam damage to draw valid conclusions from such measurements. The second section treats the effect of visible and solar UV irradiation on the perovskites and their cells. As we show, there are many such effects. However, those affecting the perovskite directly need not necessarily always be detrimental to the cells, while those affecting the solar cells, which are composed of several other phases

  4. A simple framework for modelling the photochemical response to solar spectral irradiance variability in the stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muncaster, R.; Bourqui, M. S.; Chabrillat, S.; Viscardy, S.; Melo, S. M. L.; Charbonneau, P.

    2012-08-01

    The stratosphere is thought to play a central role in the atmospheric response to solar irradiance variability. Recent observations suggest that the spectral solar irradiance (SSI) variability involves significant time-dependent spectral variations, with variable degrees of correlation between wavelengths, and new reconstructions are being developed. In this paper, we propose a simplified modelling framework to characterise the effect of short term SSI variability on stratospheric ozone. We focus on the pure photochemical effect, for it is the best constrained one. The photochemical effect is characterised using an ensemble simulation approach with multiple linear regression analysis. A photochemical column model is used with interactive photolysis for this purpose. Regression models and their coefficients provide a characterisation of the stratospheric ozone response to SSI variability and will allow future inter-comparisons between different SSI reconstructions. As a first step in this study, and to allow comparison with past studies, we take the representation of SSI variability from the Lean (1997) solar minimum and maximum spectra. First, solar maximum-minimum response is analysed for all chemical families and partitioning ratios, and is compared with past studies. The ozone response peaks at 0.18 ppmv (approximately 3%) at 37 km altitude. Second, ensemble simulations are regressed following two linear models. In the simplest case, an adjusted coefficient of determination R2 larger than 0.97 is found throughout the stratosphere using two predictors, namely the previous day's ozone perturbation and the current day's solar irradiance perturbation. A better accuracy (R2 larger than 0.9992) is achieved with an additional predictor, the previous day's solar irradiance perturbation. The regression models also provide simple parameterisations of the ozone

  5. Possible impacts of a descent into a Grand Solar Minimum on extratropical regional surface climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maycock, A. C.; Ineson, S.; Gray, L. J.; Scaife, A. A.; Lockwood, M. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Sun's output varies on a number of characteristic timescales, the most well-known of which is the approximately 11-year solar cycle. It has been shown that the Sun also exhibits cycles with a period of ~200 years, so-called Grand Solar Cycles. Reconstructions indicate that levels of solar activity have been relatively high for the past ~70 years, and it has been suggested that the Sun might be expected to evolve towards a state of lower output; however, the timescale and extent of such a 'Grand Solar Minimum' event is highly uncertain. This study presents sensitivity experiments with a state-of-the-art climate model to investigate the impact of reaching very low levels of solar output, similar to those thought to have occurred during the Maunder Minimum, by the middle of the 21st century. We investigate the effect of uncertainties in spectral solar irradiance by using both the semi-empirical model of Lean et al., which gives a relatively modest change in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral region and is commonly used to represent solar variability in climate models, as well as the recent measurements from the SORCE satellite, which suggest a much larger change in the UV across the solar cycle for the period 2004-07. Under the assumption of there being a large change in the UV derived from a linear extrapolation of the SORCE data, it is shown that a period of very low solar activity would be associated with a more negative North Atlantic Oscillation index. This signature in the large-scale circulation is associated with changes in regional surface climate, including cooler temperatures across the UK and western Europe. In the experiment which assumes a smaller change in UV irradiance, the extratropical circulation responses in the stratosphere and troposphere are found to be of a consistent sign but smaller in magnitude. This highlights the importance of one possible mechanism for solar-climate interactions, namely the impact of tropical upper stratospheric heating on

  6. Cloud effects on atmospheric solar absorption in light of most recent surface and satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakuba, Maria Z.; Folini, Doris; Wild, Martin; Long, Charles N.; Schaepman-Strub, Gabriela; Stephens, Graeme L.

    2017-02-01

    At 36 locations worldwide, we estimate the cloud radiative effect (CREatm) on atmospheric solar absorption (ASRatm) by combining ground-based measurements of surface solar radiation (SSR) with collocated satellite-derived surface albedo and top-of-atmosphere net irradiance under both all-sky and clear-sky conditions. To derive continuous clear-sky SSR from Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) in-situ measurements of global and diffuse SSR, we make use of the Long and Ackerman (2000) algorithm that identifies clear-sky measurements and empirically fits diurnal clear-sky irradiance functions using the cosine of the solar zenith angle as the independent variable. The 11-year average (2000-2010) CREatm (all-sky minus clear-sky) is overall positive at around +11 Wm-2 using direct measurements form ground and space, and at 4 Wm-2 in the CERES EBAF dataset. This discrepancy arises from a potential overestimation in clear-sky absorption by the satellite product or underestimation by the combined BSRN/CERES dataset. The forcing ratio R shows that clouds enhance ASRatm most distinctly at desert-like locations that overall experience little occurrence of clouds. This relationship is captured by both the combined dataset and CERES EBAF.

  7. Comparison of Total Solar Irradiance with NASA/NSO Spectromagnetograph Data in Solar Cycles 22 and 23

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harrison P.; Branston, Detrick D.; Jones, Patricia B.; Popescu, Miruna D.

    2002-01-01

    An earlier study compared NASA/NSO Spectromagnetograph (SPM) data with spacecraft measurements of total solar irradiance (TSI) variations over a 1.5 year period in the declining phase of solar cycle 22. This paper extends the analysis to an eight-year period which also spans the rising and early maximum phases of cycle 23. The conclusions of the earlier work appear to be robust: three factors (sunspots, strong unipolar regions, and strong mixed polarity regions) describe most of the variation in the SPM record, but only the first two are associated with TSI. Additionally, the residuals of a linear multiple regression of TSI against SPM observations over the entire eight-year period show an unexplained, increasing, linear time variation with a rate of about 0.05 W m(exp -2) per year. Separate regressions for the periods before and after 1996 January 01 show no unexplained trends but differ substantially in regression parameters. This behavior may reflect a solar source of TSI variations beyond sunspots and faculae but more plausibly results from uncompensated non-solar effects in one or both of the TSI and SPM data sets.

  8. Transport of solar wind plasma onto the lunar nightside surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorburger, A.; Wurz, P.; Barabash, S.; Futaana, Y.; Wieser, M.; Bhardwaj, A.; Dhanya, M. B.; Asamura, K.

    2016-10-01

    We present first measurements of energetic neutral atoms that originate from solar wind plasma having interacted with the lunar nightside surface. We observe two distinct energetic neutral atom (ENA) distributions parallel to the terminator, the spectral shape, and the intensity of both of which indicate that the particles originate from the bulk solar wind flow. The first distribution modifies the dayside ENA flux to reach ˜6° into the nightside and is well explained by the kinetic temperature of the solar wind protons. The second distribution, which was not predicted, reaches from the terminator to up to 30° beyond the terminator, with a maximum at ˜102° in solar zenith angle. As most likely wake transport processes for this second distribution we identify acceleration by the ambipolar electric field and by the negatively charged lunar nightside surface. In addition, our data provide the first observation indicative of a global solar zenith angle dependence of positive dayside surface potentials.

  9. The optical band gap and surface free energy of polyethylene modified by electron beam irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Kader, A. M.

    2013-04-01

    In this study, investigations have been carried out on electron beam irradiated ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Polyethylene samples were irradiated with 1.5 MeV electron beam at doses ranging from 50 to 500 kGy. Modifications in optical properties and photoluminescence behavior of the polymer were evaluated by UV-vis and photoluminescence techniques. Changes of surface layer composition of UHMWPE produced by electron irradiations were studied by Rutherford back scattering spectrometry (RBS). The change in wettability and surface free energy induced by irradiations was also investigated. The optical absorption studies reveal that both optical band gap and Urbach's energy decreases with increasing electron dose. A correlation between energy gap and the number of carbon atoms in clusters is discussed. Photoluminescence spectra were reveal remarkable decrease in the integrated luminescence intensity with increasing irradiation dose. Contact angle measurements showed that wettability and surface free energy increases with increasing the irradiation dose.

  10. Importance of the Annual Cycles of SST and Solar Irradiance for Circulation and Rainfall: A Climate Model Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sud, Yogesh C.; Lau, William K. M.; Walker, G. K.; Mehta, V. M.

    2001-01-01

    Annual cycle of climate and precipitation is related to annual cycle of sunshine and sea-surface temperatures. Understanding its behavior is important for the welfare of humans worldwide. For example, failure of Asian monsoons can cause widespread famine and grave economic disaster in the subtropical regions. For centuries meteorologists have struggled to understand the importance of the summer sunshine and associated heating and the annual cycle of sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) on rainfall in the subtropics. Because the solar income is pretty steady from year to year, while SSTs depict large interannual variability as consequence of the variability of ocean dynamics, the influence of SSTs on the monsoons are better understood through observational and modeling studies whereas the relationship of annual rainfall to sunshine remains elusive. However, using NASA's state of the art climate model(s) that can generate realistic climate in a computer simulation, one can answer such questions. We asked the question: if there was no annual cycle of the sunshine (and its associated land-heating) or the SST and its associated influence on global circulation, what will happen to the annual cycle of monsoon rains? By comparing the simulation of a 4-year integration of a baseline Control case with two parallel anomaly experiments: 1) with annual mean solar and 2) with annual mean sea-surface temperatures, we were able to draw the following conclusions: (1) Tropical convergence zone and rainfall which moves with the Sun into the northern and southern hemispheres, specifically over the Indian, African, South American and Australian regions, is strongly modulated by the annual cycles of SSTs as well as solar forcings. The influence of the annual cycle of solar heating over land, however, is much stronger than the corresponding SST influence for almost all regions, particularly the subtropics; (2) The seasonal circulation patterns over the vast land-masses of the Northern

  11. 3D-Modeling of Vegetation from Lidar Point Clouds and Assessment of its Impact on Façade Solar Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peronato, G.; Rey, E.; Andersen, M.

    2016-10-01

    The presence of vegetation can significantly affect the solar irradiation received on building surfaces. Due to the complex shape and seasonal variability of vegetation geometry, this topic has gained much attention from researchers. However, existing methods are limited to rooftops as they are based on 2.5D geometry and use simplified radiation algorithms based on view-sheds. This work contributes to overcoming some of these limitations, providing support for 3D geometry to include facades. Thanks to the use of ray-tracing-based simulations and detailed characterization of the 3D surfaces, we can also account for inter-reflections, which might have a significant impact on façade irradiation. In order to construct confidence intervals on our results, we modeled vegetation from LiDAR point clouds as 3D convex hulls, which provide the biggest volume and hence the most conservative obstruction scenario. The limits of the confidence intervals were characterized with some extreme scenarios (e.g. opaque trees and absence of trees). Results show that uncertainty can vary significantly depending on the characteristics of the urban area and the granularity of the analysis (sensor, building and group of buildings). We argue that this method can give us a better understanding of the uncertainties due to vegetation in the assessment of solar irradiation in urban environments, and therefore, the potential for the installation of solar energy systems.

  12. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1994-05-31

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell is described wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga[sub 0.52]In[sub 0.48]P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer. 1 fig.

  13. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    1994-01-01

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga.sub.0.52 In.sub.0.48 P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer.

  14. Influence of alpha irradiation on pre and post solar exposed PM-355 polymeric nuclear track detector sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsalhi, M. S.; Baig, M. R.; Alfaramawi, K.; Alrasheedi, Mariam G.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of alpha irradiation before and after solar exposed PM-355 polymeric SSNTDs films was investigated. The absorption spectra for both non-irradiated and irradiated samples at different solar exposure time in different months showed a shift in the absorption edge towards lower wavelengths as the solar exposure time increases. This is probably ascribed to the presence of conjugate bonds. The fluorescence spectra indicated three distinguished peaks at approximately 330, 415 and 465 nm respectively. The first peak is attributed to the band gap while the other two peaks due to a probable formation of solid defects. The structure analysis using X-ray diffraction (XRD) proved the partial crystalline nature of the polymer with dominant amorphous phase. There was a slight increase in the XRD peak intensity for the sample irradiated by alpha particles indicating that the polymeric detector structure becomes more crystalline with a change in the crystallite size.

  15. Theory of back-surface-field solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonroos, O.

    1979-01-01

    Report describes simple concise theory of back-surface-field (BSF) solar cells (npp + junctions) based on Shockley's depletion-layer approximation and cites superiority of two-junction devices over conventional unijunction cells.

  16. Robustly photogenerating H2 in water using FeP/CdS catalyst under solar irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Huanqing; Lv, Xiao-Jun; Cao, Shuang; Zhao, Zong-Yan; Chen, Yong; Fu, Wen-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Photosplitting water for H2 production is a promising, sustainable approach for solar-to-chemical energy conversion. However, developing low-cost, high efficient and stable photocatalysts remains the major challenge. Here we report a composite photocatalyst consisting of FeP nanoparticles and CdS nanocrystals (FeP/CdS) for photogenerating H2 in aqueous lactic acid solution under visible light irradiation. Experimental results demonstrate that the photocatalyst is highly active with a H2-evolution rate of 202000 μmol h−1 g−1 for the first 5 h (106000 μmol h−1 g−1 under natural solar irradiation), which is the best H2 evolution activity, even 3-fold higher than the control in situ photo-deposited Pt/CdS system, and the corresponding to an apparent quantum efficiency of over 35% at 520 nm. More important, we found that the system exhibited excellent stability and remained effective after more than 100 h in optimal conditions under visible light irradiation. A wide-ranging analysis verified that FeP effectively separates the photoexcited charge from CdS and showed that the dual active sites in FeP enhance the activity of FeP/CdS photocatalysts. PMID:26818001

  17. Modeling of the middle atmosphere response to 27-day solar irradiance variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhodolov, Timofei; Rozanov, Eugene; Ball, William T.; Peter, Thomas; Schmutz, Werner

    2017-01-01

    The solar rotational variability (27-day) signal in the Earth's middle atmosphere has been studied for several decades, as it was believed to help in the understanding of the Sun's influence on climate at longer timescales. However, all previous studies have found that this signal is very uncertain, likely due to the influence of the internal variability of the atmosphere. Here, we applied an ensemble modeling approach in order to decrease internal random variations in the modeled time series. Using a chemistry-climate model (CCM), SOCOLv3, we performed two 30-member 3-year long (2003-2005) ensemble runs: with and without a rotational component in input irradiance fluxes. We also performed similar simulations with a 1-D model, in order to demonstrate the system behavior in the absence of any dynamical feedbacks and internal perturbations. For the first time we show a clear connection between the solar rotation and the stratospheric tropical temperature time-series. We show tropical temperature and ozone signal phase lag patterns that are in agreement with those from a 1-D model. Pronounced correlation and signal phase lag patterns allow us to properly estimate ozone and temperature sensitivities to irradiance changes. While ozone sensitivity is found to be in agreement with recent sensitivities reported for the 11-year cycle, temperature sensitivity appears to be at the lowest boundary of previously reported values. Analysis of temperature reanalysis data, separate ensemble members, and modeling results without a rotational component reveals that the atmosphere can produce random internal variations with periods close to 27 days even without solar rotational forcing. These variations are likely related to tropospheric wave-forcing and complicate the extraction of the solar rotational signal from observational time-series of temperature and, to a lesser extent, of ozone. Possible ways of further improving solar rotational signal extraction are discussed.

  18. Demonstrating the Error Budget for the Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory Through Solar Irradiance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thome, Kurtis; McCorkel, Joel; McAndrew, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission addresses the need to observe highaccuracy, long-term climate change trends and to use decadal change observations as a method to determine the accuracy of climate change. A CLARREO objective is to improve the accuracy of SI-traceable, absolute calibration at infrared and reflected solar wavelengths to reach on-orbit accuracies required to allow climate change observations to survive data gaps and observe climate change at the limit of natural variability. Such an effort will also demonstrate National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) approaches for use in future spaceborne instruments. The current work describes the results of laboratory and field measurements with the Solar, Lunar for Absolute Reflectance Imaging Spectroradiometer (SOLARIS) which is the calibration demonstration system (CDS) for the reflected solar portion of CLARREO. SOLARIS allows testing and evaluation of calibration approaches, alternate design and/or implementation approaches and components for the CLARREO mission. SOLARIS also provides a test-bed for detector technologies, non-linearity determination and uncertainties, and application of future technology developments and suggested spacecraft instrument design modifications. Results of laboratory calibration measurements are provided to demonstrate key assumptions about instrument behavior that are needed to achieve CLARREO's climate measurement requirements. Absolute radiometric response is determined using laser-based calibration sources and applied to direct solar views for comparison with accepted solar irradiance models to demonstrate accuracy values giving confidence in the error budget for the CLARREO reflectance retrieval.

  19. Hot oxygen escape from Mars: Simple scaling with solar EUV irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cravens, T. E.; Rahmati, A.; Fox, Jane L.; Lillis, R.; Bougher, S.; Luhmann, J.; Sakai, S.; Deighan, J.; Lee, Yuni; Combi, M.; Jakosky, B.

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of the atmosphere of Mars and the loss of volatiles over the lifetime of the solar system is a key topic in planetary science. An important loss process for atomic species, such as oxygen, is ionospheric photochemical escape. Dissociative recombination of O2+ ions (the major ion species) produces fast oxygen atoms, some of which can escape from the planet. Many theoretical hot O models have been constructed over the years, although a number of uncertainties are present in these models, particularly concerning the elastic cross sections of O atoms with CO2. Recently, the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution mission has been rapidly improving our understanding of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars and its interaction with the external environment (e.g., solar wind), allowing a new assessment of this important loss process. The purpose of the current paper is to take a simple analytical approach to the oxygen escape problem in order to (1) study the role that variations in solar radiation or solar wind fluxes could have on escape in a transparent fashion and (2) isolate the effects of uncertainties in oxygen cross sections on the derived oxygen escape rates. In agreement with several more elaborate numerical models, we find that the escape flux is directly proportional to the incident solar extreme ultraviolet irradiance and is inversely proportional to the backscatter elastic cross section. The amount of O lost due to ion transport in the topside ionosphere is found to be about 5-10% of the total.

  20. Patterning Surfaces on Azo-Based Multilayer Films via Surface Wrinkling Combined with Visible Light Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zong, Chuanyong; Zhao, Yan; Ji, Haipeng; Xie, Jixun; Han, Xue; Wang, Juanjuan; Cao, Yanping; Lu, Conghua; Li, Hongfei; Jiang, Shichun

    2016-08-01

    Here, a simple combined strategy of surface wrinkling with visible light irradiation to fabricate well tunable hierarchical surface patterns on azo-containing multilayer films is reported. The key to tailor surface patterns is to introduce a photosensitive poly(disperse orange 3) intermediate layer into the film/substrate wrinkling system, in which the modulus decrease is induced by the reversible photoisomerization. The existence of a photoinert top layer prevents the photoisomerization-induced stress release in the intermediate layer to some extent. Consequently, the as-formed wrinkling patterns can be modulated over a large area by light irradiation. Interestingly, in the case of selective exposure, the wrinkle wavelength in the exposed region decreases, while the wrinkles in the unexposed region are evolved into highly oriented wrinkles with the orientation perpendicular to the exposed/unexposed boundary. Compared with traditional single layer-based film/substrate systems, the multilayer system consisting of the photosensitive intermediate layer offers unprecedented advantages in the patterning controllability/universality. As demonstrated here, this simple and versatile strategy can be conveniently extended to functional multilayer systems for the creation of prescribed hierarchical surface patterns with optically tailored microstructures.

  1. Space Weathering Impact on Solar System Surfaces and Planetary Mission Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.

    2011-01-01

    We often look "through a glass, darkly" at solar system bodies with tenuous atmospheres and direct surface exposure to the local space environment. Space weathering exposure acts via universal space-surface interaction processes to produce a thin patina of outer material covering, potentially obscuring endogenic surface materials of greatest interest for understanding origins and interior evolution. Examples of obscuring exogenic layers are radiation crusts on cometary nuclei and iogenic components of sulfate hydrate deposits on the trailing hemisphere of Europa. Weathering processes include plasma ion implantation into surfaces, sputtering by charged particles and solar ultraviolet photons, photolytic chemistry driven by UV irradiation, and radiolytic chemistry evolving from products of charged particle irradiation. Regolith structure from impacts, and underlying deeper structures from internal evolution, affects efficacy of certain surface interactions, e.g. sputtering as affected by porosity and surface irradiation dosage as partly attenuated by local topographic shielding. These processes should be regarded for mission science planning as potentially enabling, e.g. since direct surface sputtering, and resultant surface-bound exospheres, can provide in-situ samples of surface composition to ion and neutral mass spectrometers on orbital spacecraft. Sample return for highest sensitivity compOSitional and structural analyses at Earth will usually be precluded by limited range of surface sampling, long times for return, and high cost. Targeted advancements in instrument technology would be more cost efficient for local remote and in-situ sample analysis. More realistic laboratory simulations, e.g. for bulk samples, are needed to interpret mission science observations of weathered surfaces. Space environment effects on mission spacecraft and science operations must also be specified and mitigated from the hourly to monthly changes in space weather and from longer

  2. On the Importance of the Flare's Late Phase for the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Eparvier, Frank; Jones, Andrew R.; Hock, Rachel; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Klimchuk, James A.; Didkovsky, Leonid; Judge, Darrell; Mariska, John; Bailey, Scott; Tobiska, W. Kent; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Webb, David F.; Warren, Harry

    2011-01-01

    The new solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance observations from NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) have revealed a new class of solar flares that are referred to as late phase flares. These flares are characterized by the hot 2-5 MK coronal emissions (e.g., Fe XVI 33.5 nm) showing large secondary peaks that appear many minutes to hours after an eruptive flare event. In contrast, the cool 0.7-1.5 MK coronal emissions (e.g., Fe IX 17.1 nm) usually dim immediately after the flare onset and do not recover until after the delayed second peak of the hot coronal emissions. We refer to this period of 1-5 hours after the fl amrea sin phase as the late phase, and this late phase is uniquely different than long duration flares associated with 2-ribbon flares or large filament eruptions. Our analysis of the late phase flare events indicates that the late phase involves hot coronal loops near the flaring region, not directly related to the original flaring loop system but rather with the higher post-eruption fields. Another finding is that space weather applications concerning Earth s ionosphere and thermosphere need to consider these late phase flares because they can enhance the total EUV irradiance flare variation by a factor of 2 when the late phase contribution is included.

  3. Modifications of in vitro skin penetration under solar irradiation: evaluation on flow-through diffusion cells.

    PubMed

    Gélis, Christelle; Mavon, Alain; Delverdier, Maxence; Paillous, Nicole; Vicendo, Patricia

    2002-06-01

    The effect of solar irradiation on ex vivo dermatomed hairless rat skin samples maintained in culture on flow-through diffusion cells for at least 24 h was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay and by histological observations. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements and kinetic analysis of the permeation of both tritiated water and 14C caffeine through the skin were performed after full-spectrum solar exposure involving the use of a xenon arc solar simulator. After a UV exposure of less than 420 mJ/cm2, skin integrity and permeation of both water and caffeine did not change significantly. In contrast, after a 420 mJ/cm2 UV exposure, the epidermis appeared more contracted, associated with an increase of 55% of TEWL and 220% of the skin permeation of tritiated water after 6 h. The data suggested a dramatic alteration of the skin barrier integrity. Moreover, the flux of 14C caffeine increased rapidly by 338% of the absorption of water 12 h after irradiation. These results reveal the presence of a threshold UV exposure that would not modify skin penetration.

  4. Modification of Fluorinated Al2O3 Surface by Irradiating H2 and O2 Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, Kazuhiro; Usami, Kenji; Takada, Noriharu; Sasaki, Koichi

    2009-12-01

    We irradiated H2 and O2 plasmas onto fluorinated Al2O3, which was prepared by exposing a virgin Al2O3 sample to an SF6/O2 plasma. The effects of the H2 plasma irradiation were the reduction of the AlOxFy (x + y = 1.5) and AlFx (x < 3) bonding components and the realization of smooth sample surface. It was observed that the irradiation of the H2 plasma induced Al-OH bonding. The Al-OH bonding was removed by the sequential irradiation of the O2 plasma after the H2 plasma irradiation. The O2 plasma irradiation also resulted in peroxidation and an increase in surface roughness.

  5. Analysis of solar radiation on the surface estimated from GWNU solar radiation model with temporal resolution of satellite cloud fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zo, Il-Sung; Jee, Joon-Bum; Lee, Kyu-Tae; Kim, Bu-Yo

    2016-08-01

    Preliminary analysis with a solar radiation model is generally performed for photovoltaic power generation projects. Therefore, model accuracy is extremely important. The temporal and spatial resolutions used in previous studies of the Korean Peninsula were 1 km × 1 km and 1-h, respectively. However, calculating surface solar radiation at 1-h intervals does not ensure the accuracy of the geographical effects, and this parameter changes owing to atmospheric elements (clouds, aerosol, ozone, etc.). Thus, a change in temporal resolution is required. In this study, one-year (2013) analysis was conducted using Chollian geostationary meteorological satellite data from observations recorded at 15-min intervals. Observation data from the intensive solar site at Gangneung-Wonju National University (GWNU) showed that the coefficient of determination (R²), which was estimated for each month and season, increased, whereas the standard error (SE) decreased when estimated in 15-min intervals over those obtained in 1-h intervals in 2013. When compared with observational data from 22 solar sites of the Korean Meteorological Administration (KMA), R2 was 0.9 or higher on average, and over- or under-simulated sites did not exceed 3 sites. The model and 22 solar sites showed similar values of annual accumulated solar irradiation, and their annual mean was similar at 4,998 MJ m-2 (3.87 kWh m-2). These results show a difference of approximately ± 70 MJ m-2 (± 0.05 kWh m-2) from the distribution of the Korean Peninsula estimated in 1-h intervals and a higher correlation at higher temporal resolution.

  6. Ion Irradiation of Ethane and Water Mixture Ice at 15 K: Implications for the Solar System and the ISM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Barros, A. L. F.; da Silveira, E. F.; Fulvio, D.; Rothard, H.; Boduch, P.

    2016-06-01

    Solid water has been observed on the surface of many different astronomical objects and is the dominant ice present in the universe, from the solar system (detected on the surface of some asteroids, planets and their satellites, trans-Neptunian objects [TNOs], comets, etc.) to dense cold interstellar clouds (where interstellar dust grains are covered with water-rich ices). Ethane has been detected across the solar system, from the atmosphere of the giant planets and the surface of Saturn’s satellite Titan to various comets and TNOs. To date, there were no experiments focused on icy mixtures of C2H6 and H2O exposed to ion irradiation simulating cosmic rays, a case study for many astronomical environments in which C2H6 has been detected. In this work, the radiolysis of a C2H6:H2O (2:3) ice mixture bombarded by a 40 MeV58Ni11+ ion beam is studied. The chemical evolution of the molecular species existing in the sample is monitored by a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The analysis of ethane, water, and molecular products in solid phase was performed. Induced chemical reactions in C2H6:H2O ice produce 13 daughter molecular species. Their formation and dissociation cross sections are determined. Furthermore, atomic carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen budgets are determined and used to verify the stoichiometry of the most abundantly formed molecular species. The results are discussed in the view of solar system and interstellar medium chemistry. The study presented here should be regarded as a first step in laboratory works dedicated to simulate the effect of cosmic radiation on multicomponent mixtures involving C2H6 and H2O.

  7. Global and diffuse solar irradiance modelling over north-western Europe using MAR regional climate model : validation and construction of a 30-year climatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaumet, Julien; Doutreloup, Sébastien; Fettweis, Xavier; Erpicum, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Solar irradiance modelling is crucial for solar resource management, photovoltaic production forecasting and for a better integration of solar energy in the electrical grid network. For those reasons, an adapted version of the Modèle Atmospheric Regional (MAR) is being developed at the Laboratory of Climatology of the University of Liège in order to provide high quality modelling of solar radiation, wind and temperature over north-western Europe. In this new model version, the radiation scheme has been calibrated using solar irradiance in-situ measurements and CORINE Land Cover data have been assimilated in order to improve the modelling of 10 m wind speed and near-surface temperature. In this study, MAR is forced at its boundary by ERA-40 reanalysis and its horizontal resolution is 10 kilometres. Diffuse radiation is estimated using global radiation from MAR outputs and a calibrated version of Ruiz-Arias et al., (2010) sigmoid model. This study proposes to evaluate the method performance for global and diffuse radiation modelling at both the hourly and daily time scale using data from the European Solar Radiation Atlas database for the weather stations of Uccle (Belgium) and Braunschweig (Germany). After that, a 30-year climatology of global and diffuse irradiance for the 1981-2010 period over western Europe is built. The created data set is then analysed in order to highlight possible regional or seasonal trends. The validity of the results is then evaluated after comparison with trends found in in-situ data or from different studies from the literature.

  8. Developments, characterization and proton irradiation damage tests of AlN detectors for VUV solar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BenMoussa, A.; Soltani, A.; Gerbedoen, J.-C.; Saito, T.; Averin, S.; Gissot, S.; Giordanengo, B.; Berger, G.; Kroth, U.; De Jaeger, J.-C.; Gottwald, A.

    2013-10-01

    For next generation spaceborne solar ultraviolet radiometers, innovative metal-semiconductor-metal detectors based on wurtzite aluminum nitride are being developed and characterized. A set of measurement campaigns and proton irradiation damage tests was carried out to obtain their ultraviolet-to-visible characterization and degradation mechanisms. First results on large area prototypes up to 4.3 mm diameter are presented here. In the wavelength range of interest, this detector is reasonably sensitive and stable under brief irradiation with a negligible low dark current (3-6 pA/cm2). No significant degradation of the detector performance was observed after exposure to protons of 14.4 MeV energy, showing a good radiation tolerance up to fluences of 1 × 1011 protons/cm2.

  9. Model for correcting global solar irradiance measured with rotating shadowband radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Hongyan; Chong, Wei; Sha, Yizhuo; Lv, Wenhua

    2012-04-01

    Global horizontal irradiance (GHI) measured with rotating shadowband radiometer (RSR) is not accurate enough due to thermal sensitivity and nonuniform spectral response of the photovoltaic detector equipped inside. The purpose of this work is to develop a multiple regressive model to correct the errors posed by the temperature and spectrum. The ratio of the reference global horizontal irradiance (RGHI) to the RSR measured GHI is defined as correction factor, based on which, the model is built via device temperature, air mass, and solar zenith angle. Evaluated from various statistical tests such as coefficient of correlation R2, mean bias deviation, root mean square deviation, t-statistic, skewness, and kurtosis, results show that the corrected RSR GHI can be comparable with the high-quality RGHI, which indicates the validity of the model.

  10. UV testing of solar cells: Effects of antireflective coating, prior irradiation, and UV source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulenberg, A.

    1993-01-01

    Short-circuit current degradation of electron irradiated double-layer antireflective-coated cells after 3000 hours ultraviolet (UV) exposure exceeds 3 percent; extrapolation of the data to 10(exp 5) hours (11.4 yrs.) gives a degradation that exceeds 10 percent. Significant qualitative and quantitative differences in degradation were observed in cells with double- and single-layer antireflective coatings. The effects of UV-source age were observed and corrections were made to the data. An additional degradation mechanism was identified that occurs only in previously electron-irradiated solar cells since identical unirradiated cells degrade to only 6 +/- 3 percent when extrapolated 10(exp 5) hours of UV illumination.

  11. Ionospheric model-observation comparisons: E layer at Arecibo Incorporation of SDO-EVE solar irradiances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojka, Jan J.; Jensen, Joseph B.; David, Michael; Schunk, Robert W.; Woods, Tom; Eparvier, Frank; Sulzer, Michael P.; Gonzalez, Sixto A.; Eccles, J. Vincent

    2014-05-01

    This study evaluates how the new irradiance observations from the NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) can, with its high spectral resolution and 10 s cadence, improve the modeling of the E region. To demonstrate this a campaign combining EVE observations with that of the NSF Arecibo incoherent scatter radar (ISR) was conducted. The ISR provides E region electron density observations with high-altitude resolution, 300 m, and absolute densities using the plasma line technique. Two independent ionospheric models were used, the Utah State University Time-Dependent Ionospheric Model (TDIM) and Space Environment Corporation's Data-Driven D Region (DDDR) model. Each used the same EVE irradiance spectrum binned at 1 nm resolution from 0.1 to 106 nm. At the E region peak the modeled TDIM density is 20% lower and that of the DDDR is 6% higher than observed. These differences could correspond to a 36% lower (TDIM) and 12% higher (DDDR) production rate if the differences were entirely attributed to the solar irradiance source. The detailed profile shapes that included the E region altitude and that of the valley region were only qualitatively similar to observations. Differences on the order of a neutral-scale height were present. Neither model captured a distinct dawn to dusk tilt in the E region peak altitude. A model sensitivity study demonstrated how future improved spectral resolution of the 0.1 to 7 nm irradiance could account for some of these model shortcomings although other relevant processes are also poorly modeled.

  12. An introduction to selective surfaces for solar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, W. E. J.

    1983-12-01

    The desired characteristics of spectrally selective surfaces for solar thermal applications include a high-level absorption of radiation in the solar region of the spectrum (from 0.3 to 2.5 microns) combined with a low value of emission in the IR region (greater than two microns). There are three energy collector temperature ranges for specific solar applications, taking into account a range from 25 to 40 C for swimming pools, a range from 40 to 150 C for space and water heating and air conditioning, and temperatures above 150 C for the production of steam and the generation of electricity. Flat plate and low concentrating collectors with suitable selective surfaces can be employed in connection with the first two temperature ranges. Various types of selective surfaces are presented in a table, giving attention to the absorptive properties for solar radiation and the emissive properties in the IR region.

  13. Surface modification and adhesion improvement of PTFE film by ion beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. W.; Hong, J. W.; Wye, M. Y.; Kim, J. H.; Kang, H. J.; Lee, Y. S.

    2004-06-01

    The polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) surfaces, modified by 1 kV Ar + or O 2+ ion beam irradiation, was investigated with in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron micrographs (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. The surface of PTFE films modified by Ar + ion irradiation was carbonized and the surface roughness increased with increasing ion doses. The surface of PTFE films modified by both Ar + ion in O 2 atmosphere and O 2+ ion irradiation formed the oxygen function group on PTFE surface, and the surface roughness change was relatively small. The adhesion improvement in Ar + ion irradiated PTFE surface is attributed to mechanical interlocking due to the surface roughness and CF-radical, but that in Ar + ion irradiation in an O 2 atmosphere was contributed by the CO complex and CF-radical with mechanical interlocking. The CO complex and CF-radical in O 2+ ion irradiated surface contributed to the adhesion.

  14. The Discrepancy Between Measured and Modeled Downwelling Solar Irradiance at the Ground: Dependence on Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilewski, P.; Rabbette, M.; Bergstrom, R.; Marquez, J.; Schmid, B.; Russell, P. B.

    2000-01-01

    Moderate resolution spectra of the downwelling solar irradiance at the ground in north central Oklahoma were measured during the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Intensive Observation Period in the fall of 1997. Spectra obtained under-cloud-free conditions were compared with calculations using a coarse resolution radiative transfer model to examine the dependency of model-measurement bias on water vapor. It was found that the bias was highly correlated with water vapor and increased at a rate of 9 Wm per cm of water. The source of the discrepancy remains undetermined because of the complex dependencies of other variables, most notably aerosol optical depth, on water vapor.

  15. Production of organic molecules in the outer solar system by proton irradiation - Laboratory simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scattergood, T.; Lesser, P.; Owen, T.

    1975-01-01

    Preliminary experiments to investigate the formation of colored polymers and other interesting molecules by the irradiation of gas mixtures with protons are discussed. As in previous experiments, colored polymers were produced. An important feature of the present work is the presence or absence of absorption at 5 microns in the different materials produced; Titan is quite dark at this wavelength and Io is fairly bright. Such features may provide criteria for accepting or rejecting various materials produced in these experiments as reasonable coloring agents for the outer solar system.

  16. Satellite observations of fog over Indo-Gangetic Plains and its influence on solar irradiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharol, Shailesh Kumar; Rani Sharma, Anu; Kvs, Badarinath; Roy, P. S.

    Every year, the Northern region of India, especially the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGPs) region ex-perience severe fog conditions during winter season due to typical meteorological, environmental and prevailing terrain conditions. The IGP region is highly influenced by western disturbances during winter season, which provide ideal conditions for accumulation of pollutants within the boundary layer and often results in fog formation. The formation of fog over IGPs is believed to create numerous health hazards, economic loss and cross-country transportation of aerosols. The fog is also expected to have impact on agriculture, general economy, global and regional climate. It has attracted the global scientific community attention to address the uncertainties pertaining to its formation and physico-chemical properties. The increase in aerosol concen-tration in the lower atmosphere due to biomass-burning events and anthropogenic activities provides more fog formation with water vapor present in atmosphere over IGP region. In the present study, we made an attempt to study the fog conditions that occurred over North In-dian region and long range transport of aerosols from fog region towards southern region during November, 2008 using multi-satellite data sets and ground based observations on aerosol prop-erties and solar irradiance at urban region of Hyderabad, India. False Color Composites (FCC) of IRS-P6 AWiFS, IRS-P4 OCM and Terra/Aqua MODIS images showed an intense fog/aerosol layer over IGP region on 07th -09th November, 2008. The Terra/Aqua MODIS AOD500 and OMI-AI observations showed high values over IGP region due to fog layer and long range trans-port of aerosols from IGP to Southern Indian region. CALIPSO LIDAR observation showed thick layer of fog/aerosols up to above northern/central Indian region with thickness ranging from 1.5 to 3 Kms. NCEP temperature anomaly variation at 700 hPa showed higher values over IGP region attributed upper atmospheric heating due to

  17. Displacement damage analysis and modified electrical equivalent circuit for electron and photon-irradiated silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjhangmehr, Afshin; Feghhi, Seyed Amir Hossein

    2014-10-01

    Solar modules and arrays are the conventional energy resources of space satellites. Outside the earth's atmosphere, solar panels experience abnormal radiation environments and because of incident particles, photovoltaic (PV) parameters degrade. This article tries to analyze the electrical performance of electron and photon-irradiated mono-crystalline silicon (mono-Si) solar cells. PV cells are irradiated by mono-energetic electrons and poly-energetic photons and immediately characterized after the irradiation. The mean degradation of the maximum power (Pmax) of silicon solar cells is presented and correlated using the displacement damage dose (Dd) methodology. This method simplifies evaluation of cell performance in space radiation environments and produces a single characteristic curve for Pmax degradation. Furthermore, complete analysis of the results revealed that the open-circuit voltage (Voc) and the filling factor of mono-Si cells did not significantly change during the irradiation and were independent of the radiation type and fluence. Moreover, a new technique is developed that adapts the irradiation-induced effects in a single-cell equivalent electrical circuit and adjusts its elements. The "modified circuit" is capable of modeling the "radiation damage" in the electrical behavior of mono-Si solar cells and simplifies the designing of the compensation circuits.

  18. Adsorption and photocatalytic degradation of pharmaceuticals and pesticides by carbon doped-TiO2 coated on zeolites under solar light irradiation.

    PubMed

    An, Ye; de Ridder, David Johannes; Zhao, Chun; Schoutteten, Klaas; Bussche, Julie Vanden; Zheng, Huaili; Chen, Gang; Vanhaecke, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the performance of zeolite-supported carbon-doped TiO(2) composite catalysts toward target pollutants under solar light irradiation, the adsorption and photocatalytic degradation of 18 pharmaceuticals and pesticides with distinguishing features (molecular size and volume, and photolysis) were investigated using mordenite zeolites with SiO(2)/Al(2)O(3) ratios of 18 and 240. Different quantities of carbon-doped TiO(2) were coated on the zeolites, and then the finished composite catalysts were tested in demineralized, surface, and hospital wastewater samples, respectively. The composite photocatalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and surface area and porosity analyses. Results showed that a dispersed layer of carbon-doped TiO(2) is formed on the zeolite surface; this layer blocks the micropores of zeolites and reduces their surface area. However, these reductions did not significantly affect adsorption onto the zeolites. Our results demonstrated that zeolite-supported carbon-doped TiO(2) systems can effectively degrade 18 pharmaceuticals and pesticides in demineralized water under natural and simulated solar light irradiation. In surface and hospital wastewaters, zeolite-supported carbon-doped TiO(2) systems present excellent anti-interference capability against radical scavengers and competitive organics for pollutants removal, and higher pollutants adsorption on zeolites evidently enhances the removal rate of target pollutants in surface and hospital wastewater samples with a complicated matrix.

  19. Investigation of Interpolation for Solar Irradiation in Non-Observed Point Based on Satellite Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoda, Yukio; Fujisawa, Sei; Seki, Tomomichi

    Penetrating the Photovoltaic Power Generation System (PV) on an enormous scale over a next decade has some crucial problems which affect on, for example, power grid stabilization and operation including existing power stations for electric power utilities. It would be therefore important for future operation to estimate power output generated by PV in advance. We focus on interpolation using observed solar irradiation (SI) and brightness of pixel on a satellite visible image for estimating SI even in non-observed point. Our results by single regression analysis between observed SI and brightness on a satellite image as cloudiness show that a shift of highest determination coefficient on each hour would represent solar movement and this higher determination coefficient would indicate a position which SI and cloud would cross. Finally assessment of error in this interpolation shows enough accuracy at least in daytime period, which is important for electricity utilities.

  20. Time variations of solar UV irradiance as measured by the SOLSTICE (UARS) instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    London, Julius; Rottman, Gary J.; Woods, Thomas N.; Wu, Fie

    1993-01-01

    An analysis is presented of solar ultraviolet irradiance measurements made by the SOLSTICE spectrometers on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). Reported observations cover the wavelength interval 119-420 nm, and the analysis discussed here is for the time period 26 Nov 1991 to 31 Dec 1992, during which time solar activity decreased in intensity. At the time of peak activity, the average 27-day variation had a relative amplitude of about 8 percent at Ly-alpha, tailing off to about 0.6 percent at 260 nm. It is shown that over the spectral interval 119-260 nm, the relative 27-day harmonic was about a factor of two larger during the strongly disturbed as compared with the moderately disturbed period.

  1. Reconstruction of the long term variations of the total solar irradiance from geomagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, K.; Nagovitsyn, Yu.; Kirov, B.

    2015-12-01

    The total solar irradiance (TSI) is considered one of the main factors determining the terrestrial climate, and its variations are included in many numerical models evaluating the effects of natural as compared to anthropogenic factors of climate change. For the purposes of climate change, it is important to estimate both past and future TSI variations, which are caused by variations of the solar magnetic fields. Various proxies are used for reconstructing the long term evolution of TSI, which have some inevitable limitations leading to big uncertainties. We suggest an independent proxy-geomagnetic activity records, and present a reconstruction of TSI which supports higher long term TSI variability than generally accepted, and a prediction for a decrease in TSI in the following cycles, which can be taken into account in models of the expected future climate variability.

  2. Surface Wettability Modification of Cyclic Olefin Polymer by Direct Femtosecond Laser Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing; Wang, Xincai; Zheng, Hongyu; Lam, Yee Cheong

    2015-01-01

    The effect of laser irradiation on surface wettability of cyclic olefin polymer (COP) was investigated. Under different laser parameters, a superhydrophilic or a superhydrophobic COP surface with a water contact angle (WCA) of almost 0° or 163°, respectively, could be achieved by direct femtosecond laser irradiation. The laser power deposition rate (PDR) was found to be a key factor on the wettability of the laser-treated COP surface. The surface roughness and surface chemistry of the laser-irradiated samples were characterized by surface profilometer and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively; they were found to be responsible for the changes of the laser-induced surface wettability. The mechanisms involved in the laser surface wettability modification process were discussed.

  3. Multi-facet concentrator of solar setup for irradiating the objects placed in a target plane with solar light

    DOEpatents

    Lewandowski, Allan A.; Yampolskiy, Vladislav; Alekseev, Valerie; Son, Valentin

    2001-01-01

    According to the proposed invention, this technical result is achieved so that many-facet concentrator of a solar setup for exposure of objects, placed in a target plane, to the action of solar radiation containing a supporting frame and facets differing by that the facets of the concentrator are chosen with spherical focusing reflective surfaces of equal focal lengths and with selective coatings reflecting a desired spectral fraction of solar radiation, and are arranged on the supporting frame symmetrically with respect to the common axis of the concentrator, their optical axes being directed to the single point on the optical axis of the concentrator located before the nominal focus point of the concentrator and determining the position of arranging the target plane.

  4. Evaluation of simulated photolysis rates and their response to solar irradiance variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhodolov, Timofei; Rozanov, Eugene; Ball, William T.; Bais, Alkiviadis; Tourpali, Kleareti; Shapiro, Alexander I.; Telford, Paul; Smyshlyaev, Sergey; Fomin, Boris; Sander, Rolf; Bossay, Sébastien; Bekki, Slimane; Marchand, Marion; Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Dhomse, Sandip; Haigh, Joanna D.; Peter, Thomas; Schmutz, Werner

    2016-05-01

    The state of the stratospheric ozone layer and the temperature structure of the atmosphere are largely controlled by the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) through its influence on heating and photolysis rates. This study focuses on the uncertainties in the photolysis rate response to solar irradiance variability related to the choice of SSI data set and to the performance of the photolysis codes used in global chemistry-climate models. To estimate the impact of SSI uncertainties, we compared several photolysis rates calculated with the radiative transfer model libRadtran, using SSI calculated with two models and observed during the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) satellite mission. The importance of the calculated differences in the photolysis rate response for ozone and temperature changes has been estimated using 1-D a radiative-convective-photochemical model. We demonstrate that the main photolysis reactions, responsible for the solar signal in the stratosphere, are highly sensitive to the spectral distribution of SSI variations. Accordingly, the ozone changes and related ozone-temperature feedback are shown to depend substantially on the SSI data set being used, which highlights the necessity of obtaining accurate SSI variations. To evaluate the performance of photolysis codes, we compared the results of eight, widely used, photolysis codes against two reference schemes. We show that, in most cases, absolute values of the photolysis rates and their response to applied SSI changes agree within 30%. However, larger errors may appear in specific atmospheric regions because of differences, for instance, in the treatment of Rayleigh scattering, quantum yields, or absorption cross sections.

  5. Direct-normal solar irradiance measurements and turbidity coefficient evaluation in central Spain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bllbao, Julia; Román, Roberto; Miguel, Argimiro

    2013-04-01

    In order to study the characteristics of solar direct radiation and the atmospheric turbidity in Valladolid, Spain, global, diffuse and direct irradiance data were recorded from May 2010 to December 2011, with a frequency of 10 minute. Measurements used were taken by the Energy and Atmosphere Group (http://www3.uva.es/renova), University of Valladolid, Spain at the Solar Radiometric Station (41,81°N 4.93°W, 840m a.s.l.) located on the Atmosphere Researcher Centre, Villalba de los Alcores, Valladolid, Spain. Sensors were installed in a Sun tracker (Solys 2, Kipp & Zonen) that blocks direct solar radiation using a shadow ball. The system consists of two pyranometers CMP-21 and one pyrheliometer CHP-1 (Kipp & Zonen), respectively. Based on these measurements, the characteristics of direct solar irradiance data were evaluated in order to know the main statistical parameters of the distribution. Angström turbidity coefficient values, beta, were estimated from direct solar irradiance and clear sky conditions. The beta coefficient values were obtained from MODIS satellite instrument, and the aerosol optical depth values, AOD(550nm), were evaluated. The turbidity coefficient beta shows seasonal variation, with higher values in summer (< 0.15) and lower in winter (< 0.05). It could be due to high temperatures in summer and less rainy days which would induce more atmospheric turbidity, increasing vertical convection and particles enhancement. The scattered graph of aerosol optical depth from satellite and the obtained from Angström expression has been plotted. The slope presents a value around the unity, 0.96, and the correlation coefficient shows a value of 0.6 . It was observed that turbidity coefficients increased in April 2011, and in order to now the origin the change, air masses trajectories, deduced from HYSPLIT model (http://ready.arl.noaa.gov/HYSPLIT.php) were studied. From the results it has been obtained that a situation of low pressures in the Atlantic

  6. Solar wind H-3 and C-14 abundances and solar surface processes. [in lunar soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fireman, E. L.; Defelice, J.; Damico, J.

    1976-01-01

    Tritium is measured as a function of depth in a Surveyor 3 sample. The upper limit for solar-wind-implanted tritium gives an H-3/H-1 limit for the solar wind of 10 to the -11th power. The temperature-release patterns of C-14 from lunar soils are measured. The C-14 release pattern from surface soils differs from a trench-bottom soil and gives positive evidence for the presence of C-14 in the solar wind with a C-14/H-1 ratio of approximately 6 by 10 to the -11th power. This C-14 content fixes a minimal magnitude for nuclear processes on the solar surface averaged over the past 10,000 yr. The H-3 and C-14 contents combine to require that either the mixing rate above the photosphere be rapid or that the H-3 produced by nuclear reactions be destroyed by secondary nuclear reactions before escaping in the solar wind.

  7. The angular distributions of ultraviolet spectral irradiance at different solar elevation angles under clear sky conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Hu, LiWen; Wang, Fang; Gao, YanYan; Zheng, Yang; Wang, Yu; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the angular distributions of UVA, UVB, and effective UV for erythema and vitamin D (vitD) synthesis, the UV spectral irradiances were measured at ten inclined angles (from 0° to 90°) and seven azimuths (from 0° to 180°) at solar elevation angle (SEA) that ranged from 18.8° to 80° in Shanghai (31.22° N, 121.55° E) under clear sky and the albedo of ground was 0.1. The results demonstrated that in the mean azimuths and with the back to the sun, the UVA, UVB, and erythemally and vitD-weighted irradiances increased with the inclined angles and an increase in SEA. When facing toward the sun at 0°-60° inclined angles, the UVA first increased and then decreased with an increase in SEA; at other inclined angles, the UVA increased with SEA. At 0°-40° inclined angles, the UVB and erythemally and vitD-weighted irradiances first increased and then decreased with an increase in SEA, and their maximums were achieved at SEA 68.7°; at other inclined angles, the above three irradiances increased with an increase in SEA. The maximum UVA, UVB, and erythemally and vitD-weighted irradiances were achieved at an 80° inclined angle at SEA 80° (the highest in our measurements); the cumulative exposure of the half day achieved the maximum at a 60° inclined angle, but not on the horizontal. This study provides support for the assessment of human skin sun exposure.

  8. Solar irradiance and aerosol optical properties during the CARES field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, J.; Kassianov, E.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of both broadband and spectral solar irradiances were made during the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) field campaign at the T0 and T1 sites. The broadband irradiances were measured using a typical Eppley Precision Spectral Pyranometer (PSP), while the spectral irradiances were measured by a Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) at six wavelengths (415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm). The aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA), and asymmetry parameter (AP), can be inferred from the MFRSR measurements for the first five of these wavelengths. Analyses of these data show three distinct aerosol regimes. The first period, at the beginning of the field campaign, was extremely clean, with AOD values at 500nm as low as 0.03 (with uncertainty of 0.02). Such clear air rivals that at other pristine locations, such as Barrow, Alaska, in late summer. Next, a brief episode of biomass burning took place on June 16, as indicated by increased AOD. Finally, towards the end of the campaign, progressively deteriorating air quality was observed with a concomitant increase in AOD, with values 0.1 (500 nm) and larger. However, at no time during the campaign did the air quality deteriorate to the extent that might be observed in less clean locations such as Mexico City, or more humid places were significant hydroscopic growth occurs. The broadband irradiances also reflect clean conditions, with midday total, hemispherical irradiances often exceeding 1000 W/m^2. We also show some initial results of columnar SSA and AP values derived during the three aerosol regimes. MFRSR data taken near the T1 site during the summer of 2009 also indicate generally clear skies, except during episodes of biomass burning when the AOD approaches 1.0 at 500 nm. Such dirty air was never observed during the CARES campaign.

  9. Surface damage in the small intestine of the mouse after X - or neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamlet, R.; Carr, K.E.; Nias, A.H.; Watt, C.

    1981-01-01

    Damage after X-irradiation includes lateral villous collapse, progressing after 3 - 5 days to villi which sometimes show signs of vertical collapse. After neutron irradiation vertical villous collapse is established earlier, with less swelling of villous tips. It seems, therefore, that at radiobiologically equivalent doses, neutron and X-irradiation produce different levels of surface damage, with neutron irradiation being the more destructive. Early villous tip damage may perhaps be due to disruption of susceptible cells already at the extrusion zone, or to stromal damage.

  10. Total solar irradiance as measured by the SOVAP radiometer onboard PICARD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, Mustapha; Chevalier, André; Conscience, Christian; Nevens, Stijn

    2016-09-01

    From the SOlar VAriability PICARD (SOVAP) space-based radiometer, we obtained a new time series of the total solar irradiance (TSI) during Solar Cycle 24. Based on SOVAP data, we obtained that the TSI input at the top of the Earth's atmosphere at a distance of one astronomical unit from the Sun is 1361.8 ± 2.4 W m-2 (1σ) representative of the 2008 solar minimum period. From 2010 to 2014, the amplitude of the changes has been of the order of ± 0.1%, corresponding to a range of about 2.7 W m-2. To determine the TSI from SOVAP, we present here an improved instrument equation. A parameter was integrated from a theoretical analysis that highlighted the thermo-electrical non-equivalence of the radiometric cavity. From this approach, we obtained values that are lower than those previously provided with the same type of instrument. The results in this paper supersede the previous SOVAP analysis and provide the best SOVAP-based TSI-value estimate and its temporal variation.

  11. Multijunction Solar Cell Technology for Mars Surface Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Mardesich, Nick; Ewell, Richard C.; Mueller, Robert L.; Endicter, Scott; Aiken, Daniel; Edmondson, Kenneth; Fetze, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Solar cells used for Mars surface applications have been commercial space qualified AM0 optimized devices. Due to the Martian atmosphere, these cells are not optimized for the Mars surface and as a result operate at a reduced efficiency. A multi-year program, MOST (Mars Optimized Solar Cell Technology), managed by JPL and funded by NASA Code S, was initiated in 2004, to develop tools to modify commercial AM0 cells for the Mars surface solar spectrum and to fabricate Mars optimized devices for verification. This effort required defining the surface incident spectrum, developing an appropriate laboratory solar simulator measurement capability, and to develop and test commercial cells modified for the Mars surface spectrum. This paper discusses the program, including results for the initial modified cells. Simulated Mars surface measurements of MER cells and Phoenix Lander cells (2007 launch) are provided to characterize the performance loss for those missions. In addition, the performance of the MER rover solar arrays is updated to reflect their more than two (2) year operation.

  12. Antifouling property of highly oleophobic substrates for solar cell surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukada, Kenta; Nishizawa, Shingo; Shiratori, Seimei

    2014-03-01

    Reduction of solar cell conversion efficiency by bird spoor or oil smoke is a common issue. Maintaining the surface of solar cells clean to retain the incident light is of utmost importance. In this respect, there has been growing interest in the area of superhydrophobicity for developing water repelling and self-cleaning surfaces. This effect is inspired by lotus leaves that have micro papillae covered with hydrophobic wax nanostructures. Superhydrophobic surfaces on transparent substrates have been developed for removing contaminants from solar cell surfaces. However, oil cannot be removed by superhydrophobic effect. In contrast, to prevent bird spoor, a highly oleophobic surface is required. In a previous study, we reported transparent-type fabrics comprising nanoparticles with a nano/micro hierarchical structure that ensured both oleophobicity and transparency. In the current study, we developed new highly oleophobic stripes that were constructed into semi-transparent oleophobic surfaces for solar cells. Solar cell performance was successfully maintained; the total transmittance was a key factor for determining conversion efficiency.

  13. On the surface physics affecting solar oscillation frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houdek, G.; Trampedach, R.; Aarslev, M. J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.

    2017-01-01

    Adiabatic oscillation frequencies of stellar models, computed with the standard mixing-length formulation for convection, increasingly deviate with radial order from observations in solar-like stars. Standard solar models overestimate adiabatic frequencies by as much as ˜ 20 μHz. In this Letter, we address the physical processes of turbulent convection that are predominantly responsible for the frequency differences between standard models and observations, also called `surface effects'. We compare measured solar frequencies from the Michelson Doppler Imager instrument on the SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory spacecraft with frequency calculations that include 3D hydrodynamical simulation results in the equilibrium model, non-adiabatic effects, and a consistent treatment of the turbulent pressure in both the equilibrium and stability computations. With the consistent inclusion of the above physics in our model computation, we are able to reproduce the observed solar frequencies to ≲3 μHz without the need of any additional ad hoc functional corrections.

  14. Solar wind and cosmic ray irradiation of grains and ices - application to erosion and synthesis of organic compounds in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocard, F.; Benit, J.; Meunier, J. P.; Bibring, R.; Vassent, B.

    1984-01-01

    Solar wind and cosmic and cosmic ray irradiation of grains induces physical and chemical effects including their erosion and the synthesis of molecular compounds within the implanted layers. The experiments performed with H2O ice implanted by keV ions are presented. The ion implantation is intended to simulate the irradiation of comets, ring grains, and satellites of outer planets, either by the primitive solar particles or by contemporary solar wind (SW) or solar cosmic rays (SCR) fluxes. The detection of molecules was obtained through in-situ infrared spectroscopy. A model is proposed for the formation of organic matter within icy solar system bodies which is in agreement with experimental results of erosion rates. The organic molecules, frozen-in within the icy mantles of the grains present in the protosolar nebula, would originate from their primitive irradiation. Such an irradiation would have taken place during an early stage of the proto-sun, when both the SW and SCR particles were more intense by orders of magnitude.

  15. A new solar irradiance calibration from 3295 A to 8500 A derived from absolute spectrophotometry of Vega

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, G. W.; Tueg, H.; White, N. M.

    1992-01-01

    By imaging sunlight diffracted by 20- and 30-micron diameter pinholes onto the entrance aperture of a photoelectric grating scanner, the solar spectral irradiance was determined relative to the spectrophotometric standard star Vega, observed at night with the same instrument. Solar irradiances are tabulated at 4 A increments from 3295 A to 8500 A. Over most of the visible spectrum, the internal error of measurement is less than 2 percent. This calibration is compared with earlier irradiance measurements by Neckel and Labs (1984) and by Arvesen et al. (1969) and with the high-resolution solar atlas by Kurucz et al. The three calibrations agree well in visible light but differ by as much as 10 percent in the ultraviolet.

  16. Ground-level spectral distribution of solar direct-normal irradiance and marine aerosol attenuation coefficients at Reunion Island

    SciTech Connect

    Vaxelaire, P.; Leveau, J.; Baldy, S. ); Menguy, G. )

    1991-01-01

    The ground-level spectral distribution of direct solar irradiance at Reunion Island was measured for six bands covering the spectrum of solar radiation. The measurements, distributed over one year, were made under clear sky conditions with a pyrheliometer (Eppley, NIP) and six large pass-band flat filters. Good stability of spectral irradiances as a function of solar height allows us to propose approximate relationships which significantly characterize the irradiance into each spectral band. Measurements at Reunion vary significantly from data obtained with the same apparatus in a northern hemisphere continental area (Lyon). The determination of aerosol attenuation coefficients, for different spectral bands, allows the establish of a mean curve, for these coefficients as a function of wavelength, characteristic for marine aerosols.

  17. Stratospheric observations of the attenuated solar irradiance in the Schumann-Runge band absorption region of molecular oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, J. E.; Hudson, R. D.; Mentall, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    A spectrometer flown on the first Solar Absorption Balloon Experiment (SABE-1) observed the attenuated solar irradiance between 184 and 202 nm from an altitude near 40 km. These measurements provide a check on the absorption cross sections of molecular oxygen in the spectral region of the Schumann-Runge bands. Comparison of the measurements with calculations based on cross sections derived from laboratory data shows a general agreement although the irradiance measurements have large error bars near the centers of the absorption bands. The results imply that the 184-200 nm solar irradiance that penetrates to the stratosphere can be computed to an accuracy of + or - 30% or better by using presently available cross sections.

  18. Photochemical transformation of zearalenone in aqueous solutions under simulated solar irradiation: Kinetics and influence of water constituents.

    PubMed

    Emídio, Elissandro S; Calisto, Vânia; de Marchi, Mary Rosa R; Esteves, Valdemar I

    2017-02-01

    The presence of estrogenic mycotoxins, such as zearalenone (ZEN), in surface waters is an emerging environmental issue. Little is known about its phototransformation behavior, which may influence its environmental fate. In this context, the phototransformation of ZEN was investigated in pure water, river water and estuarine water using simulated sunlight irradiation. Kinetic studies revealed that two concomitant processes contribute to the fate of ZEN under solar irradiation: photoisome