Science.gov

Sample records for surface-controlled nanoscale materials

  1. Nano-scale materials

    SciTech Connect

    Barrera, J.; Smith, D.C.; Devlin, D.J.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Highly selective, alumina-supported molybdenum carbonitrides were prepared by solution impregnation using the metal amide Mo{sub 2}(N(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}){sub 6} as a molecular precursor. On the basis of relative weight percents, these materials demonstrate a 5- to 8-fold increase in catalytic activity over similar materials prepared by traditional solid-state approaches. The catalytic activities of these materials are very dependent upon the type of alumina support used. Impregnation of Mo{sub m}C{sub x}N{sub y} into preformed alumina pellets resulted in a material that specifically isomerized n-heptane into equal amounts of 2- and 3-methylhexanes, as well as iso-butane. No evidence of aromatic products was observed at operating temperatures below 420{degrees}C. The product selectivity of the isomers was 56% at a n-heptane conversion efficiency of 57%. Impregnating Mo{sub m}C{sub x}N{sub y} into an alumina powder resulted in an extremely selective aromatized and dehydrogenated material. The products from this material consist only of aromatics and n-heptenes with less than 2% isomerization or cracking products.

  2. Biosafe Nanoscale Pharmaceutical Adjuvant Materials

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shubin; Li, Shengliang; Wang, Chongxi; Liu, Juan; Yang, Xiaolong; Wang, Paul C.; Zhang, Xin; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2014-01-01

    Thanks to developments in the field of nanotechnology over the past decades, more and more biosafe nanoscale materials have become available for use as pharmaceutical adjuvants in medical research. Nanomaterials possess unique properties which could be employed to develop drug carriers with longer circulation time, higher loading capacity, better stability in physiological conditions, controlled drug release, and targeted drug delivery. In this review article, we will review recent progress in the application of representative organic, inorganic and hybrid biosafe nanoscale materials in pharmaceutical research, especially focusing on nanomaterial-based novel drug delivery systems. In addition, we briefly discuss the advantages and notable functions that make these nanomaterials suitable for the design of new medicines; the biosafety of each material discussed in this article is also highlighted to provide a comprehensive understanding of their adjuvant attributes. PMID:25429253

  3. Bioinspired, functional nanoscale materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, In-Kook

    Functional nanomaterials in nature exhibit many unique functions and optical and mechanical properties. Examples of this include the dry adhesion of a gecko's foot, the reduced drag on a shark's skin, the high strength and toughness of nacre, and the superhydrophobic self-cleaning of a lotus leaf. This dissertation is devoted to creating unique and enhanced properties by mimicking such functional materials. We have developed a novel self-pumping membrane, which does not require an applied voltage. The self-pumping membrane harvests chemical energy from a surrounding fluid and uses it for accelerated mass transport across the membrane. A device such as this has promising applications in implantable or remotely operating autonomous devices and membrane-based purification systems. Reproducible and highly active surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates were developed using a bottom-up self-assembly technology. With their high sensitivity and good reproducibility, the developed nanostructures (gold nanoparticle and nanohole arrays) as SERS substrates are very promising for applications such as ultra-sensitive detectors for chemicals and reproducible sensors for chemical and biological molecules. Binary colloidal crystals were created using a simple, fast, and scalable spin-coating technology. Although further investigation of the procedure is needed to improve the ordering of particles in the individual layers, the developed assembly technology has a promising outlook in applications such as optical integrated circuits and high-speed optical computing. Inorganic-organic nanocomposites were realized by assembling synthesized gibbsite nanoplatelets using the electrophoretic deposition and infiltration of a monomer followed by polymerization. Via surface modifications of gibbsite nanoplatelets, nanocomposites were further reinforced with covalent linkages between the inorganic platelets and organic matrix.

  4. Nanoscale metal-organic materials.

    PubMed

    Carné, Arnau; Carbonell, Carlos; Imaz, Inhar; Maspoch, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Metal-organic materials are found to be a fascinating novel class of functional nanomaterials. The limitless combinations between inorganic and organic building blocks enable researchers to synthesize 0- and 1-D metal-organic discrete nanostructures with varied compositions, morphologies and sizes, fabricate 2-D metal-organic thin films and membranes, and even structure them on surfaces at the nanometre length scale. In this tutorial review, the synthetic methodologies for preparing these miniaturized materials as well as their potential properties and future applications are discussed. This review wants to offer a panoramic view of this embryonic class of nanoscale materials that will be of interest to a cross-section of researchers working in chemistry, physics, medicine, nanotechnology, materials chemistry, etc., in the next years.

  5. Nanoscale materials for hyperthermal theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Bennett E.; Roder, Paden B.; Zhou, Xuezhe; Pauzauskie, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the use of nanoscale materials has attracted considerable attention with the aim of designing personalized therapeutic approaches that can enhance both spatial and temporal control over drug release, permeability, and uptake. Potential benefits to patients include the reduction of overall drug dosages, enabling the parallel delivery of different pharmaceuticals, and the possibility of enabling additional functionalities such as hyperthermia or deep-tissue imaging (LIF, PET, etc.) that complement and extend the efficacy of traditional chemotherapy and surgery. This mini-review is focused on an emerging class of nanometer-scale materials that can be used both to heat malignant tissue to reduce angiogenesis and DNA-repair while simultaneously offering complementary imaging capabilities based on radioemission, optical fluorescence, magnetic resonance, and photoacoustic methods. PMID:25816102

  6. Nanoscale materials for hyperthermal theranostics

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Bennett E.; Roder, Paden B.; Zhou, Xuezhe; Pauzauskie, Peter J.

    2015-03-18

    Recently, the use of nanoscale materials has attracted considerable attention with the aim of designing personalized therapeutic approaches that can enhance both spatial and temporal control over drug release, permeability, and uptake. Potential benefits to patients include the reduction of overall drug dosages, enabling the parallel delivery of different pharmaceuticals, and the possibility of enabling additional functionalities such as hyperthermia or deep-tissue imaging (LIF, PET, etc.) that complement and extend the efficacy of traditional chemotherapy and surgery. Our mini review is focused on an emerging class of nanometer-scale materials that can be used both to heat malignant tissue to reduce angiogenesis and DNA-repair while simultaneously offering complementary imaging capabilities based on radioemission, optical fluorescence, magnetic resonance, and photoacoustic methods.

  7. Nanoscale materials for hyperthermal theranostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Bennett E.; Roder, Paden B.; Zhou, Xuezhe; Pauzauskie, Peter J.

    2015-04-01

    Recently, the use of nanoscale materials has attracted considerable attention with the aim of designing personalized therapeutic approaches that can enhance both spatial and temporal control over drug release, permeability, and uptake. Potential benefits to patients include the reduction of overall drug dosages, enabling the parallel delivery of different pharmaceuticals, and the possibility of enabling additional functionalities such as hyperthermia or deep-tissue imaging (LIF, PET, etc.) that complement and extend the efficacy of traditional chemotherapy and surgery. This mini-review is focused on an emerging class of nanometer-scale materials that can be used both to heat malignant tissue to reduce angiogenesis and DNA-repair while simultaneously offering complementary imaging capabilities based on radioemission, optical fluorescence, magnetic resonance, and photoacoustic methods.

  8. Nanoscale materials for hyperthermal theranostics

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, Bennett E.; Roder, Paden B.; Zhou, Xuezhe; Pauzauskie, Peter J.

    2015-03-18

    Recently, the use of nanoscale materials has attracted considerable attention with the aim of designing personalized therapeutic approaches that can enhance both spatial and temporal control over drug release, permeability, and uptake. Potential benefits to patients include the reduction of overall drug dosages, enabling the parallel delivery of different pharmaceuticals, and the possibility of enabling additional functionalities such as hyperthermia or deep-tissue imaging (LIF, PET, etc.) that complement and extend the efficacy of traditional chemotherapy and surgery. Our mini review is focused on an emerging class of nanometer-scale materials that can be used both to heat malignant tissue to reducemore » angiogenesis and DNA-repair while simultaneously offering complementary imaging capabilities based on radioemission, optical fluorescence, magnetic resonance, and photoacoustic methods.« less

  9. Nanoscale materials for hyperthermal theranostics.

    PubMed

    Smith, Bennett E; Roder, Paden B; Zhou, Xuezhe; Pauzauskie, Peter J

    2015-04-28

    Recently, the use of nanoscale materials has attracted considerable attention with the aim of designing personalized therapeutic approaches that can enhance both spatial and temporal control over drug release, permeability, and uptake. Potential benefits to patients include the reduction of overall drug dosages, enabling the parallel delivery of different pharmaceuticals, and the possibility of enabling additional functionalities such as hyperthermia or deep-tissue imaging (LIF, PET, etc.) that complement and extend the efficacy of traditional chemotherapy and surgery. This mini-review is focused on an emerging class of nanometer-scale materials that can be used both to heat malignant tissue to reduce angiogenesis and DNA-repair while simultaneously offering complementary imaging capabilities based on radioemission, optical fluorescence, magnetic resonance, and photoacoustic methods.

  10. New directions for nanoscale thermoelectric materials research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dresselhaus, M. S.; Chen, G.; Tang, M. Y.; Yang, R. G.; Lee, H.; Wang, D. Z.; Ren, F.; Fleurial, J. P.; Gogna, P.

    2005-01-01

    Many of the recent advances in enhancing the thermoelectric figure of merit are linked to nanoscale phenomena with both bulk samples containing nanoscale constituents and nanoscale materials exhibiting enhanced thermoelectric performance in their own right. Prior theoretical and experimental proof of principle studies on isolated quantum well and quantum wire samples have now evolved into studies on bulk samples containing nanostructured constituents. In this review, nanostructural composites are shown to exhibit nanostructures and properties that show promise for thermoelectric applications. A review of some of the results obtained to date are presented.

  11. Atom Probe Tomography of Nanoscale Electronic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, David J.; Prosa, Ty J.; Perea, Daniel E.; Inoue, Hidekazu; Mangelinck, D.

    2016-01-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is a mass spectrometry based on time-of-flight measurements which also concurrently produces 3D spatial information. The reader is referred to any of the other papers in this volume or to the following references for further information 4–8. The current capabilities of APT, such as detecting a low number of dopant atoms in nanoscale devices or segregation at a nanoparticle interface, make this technique an important component in the nanoscale metrology toolbox. In this manuscript, we review some of the applications of APT to nanoscale electronic materials, including transistors and finFETs, silicide contact microstructures, nanowires, and nanoparticles.

  12. Nanoscale lubrication of ionic surfaces controlled via a strong electric field.

    PubMed

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Kumar, Rajeev; Bocharova, Vera; Sumpter, Bobby G; Tselev, Alexander; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2015-01-01

    Frictional forces arise whenever objects around us are set in motion. Controlling them in a rational manner means gaining leverage over mechanical energy losses and wear. This paper presents a way of manipulating nanoscale friction by means of in situ lubrication and interfacial electrochemistry. Water lubricant is directionally condensed from the vapor phase at a moving metal-ionic crystal interface by a strong confined electric field, thereby allowing friction to be tuned up or down via an applied bias. The electric potential polarity and ionic solid solubility are shown to strongly influence friction between the atomic force microscope (AFM) tip and salt surface. An increase in friction is associated with the AFM tip digging into the surface, whereas reducing friction does not influence its topography. No current flows during friction variation, which excludes Joule heating and associated electrical energy losses. The demonstrated novel effect can be of significant technological importance for controlling friction in nano- and micro-electromechanical systems. PMID:25623295

  13. Nanoscale Lubrication of Ionic Surfaces Controlled via a Strong Electric Field

    PubMed Central

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Kumar, Rajeev; Bocharova, Vera; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Tselev, Alexander; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-01-01

    Frictional forces arise whenever objects around us are set in motion. Controlling them in a rational manner means gaining leverage over mechanical energy losses and wear. This paper presents a way of manipulating nanoscale friction by means of in situ lubrication and interfacial electrochemistry. Water lubricant is directionally condensed from the vapor phase at a moving metal-ionic crystal interface by a strong confined electric field, thereby allowing friction to be tuned up or down via an applied bias. The electric potential polarity and ionic solid solubility are shown to strongly influence friction between the atomic force microscope (AFM) tip and salt surface. An increase in friction is associated with the AFM tip digging into the surface, whereas reducing friction does not influence its topography. No current flows during friction variation, which excludes Joule heating and associated electrical energy losses. The demonstrated novel effect can be of significant technological importance for controlling friction in nano- and micro-electromechanical systems. PMID:25623295

  14. Nanoscale lubrication of ionic surfaces controlled via a strong electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Bocharova, Vera; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Tselev, Alexander; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Kumar, Rajeev

    2015-01-27

    Frictional forces arise whenever objects around us are set in motion. Controlling them in a rational manner means gaining leverage over mechanical energy losses and wear. This paper presents a way of manipulating nanoscale friction by means of in situ lubrication and interfacial electrochemistry. Water lubricant is directionally condensed from the vapor phase at a moving metal-ionic crystal interface by a strong confined electric field, thereby allowing friction to be tuned up or down via an applied bias. The electric potential polarity and ionic solid solubility are shown to strongly influence friction between the atomic force microscope (AFM) tip and salt surface. An increase in friction is associated with the AFM tip digging into the surface, whereas reducing friction does not influence its topography. No current flows during friction variation, which excludes Joule heating and associated electrical energy losses. Lastly, the demonstrated novel effect can be of significant technological importance for controlling friction in nano- and micro-electromechanical systems.

  15. Nanoscale lubrication of ionic surfaces controlled via a strong electric field

    DOE PAGES

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Bocharova, Vera; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Tselev, Alexander; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Kumar, Rajeev

    2015-01-27

    Frictional forces arise whenever objects around us are set in motion. Controlling them in a rational manner means gaining leverage over mechanical energy losses and wear. This paper presents a way of manipulating nanoscale friction by means of in situ lubrication and interfacial electrochemistry. Water lubricant is directionally condensed from the vapor phase at a moving metal-ionic crystal interface by a strong confined electric field, thereby allowing friction to be tuned up or down via an applied bias. The electric potential polarity and ionic solid solubility are shown to strongly influence friction between the atomic force microscope (AFM) tip andmore » salt surface. An increase in friction is associated with the AFM tip digging into the surface, whereas reducing friction does not influence its topography. No current flows during friction variation, which excludes Joule heating and associated electrical energy losses. Lastly, the demonstrated novel effect can be of significant technological importance for controlling friction in nano- and micro-electromechanical systems.« less

  16. Filter casting nanoscale porous materials

    DOEpatents

    Hayes, Joel Ryan; Nyce, Gregory Walker; Kuntz, Joshua David

    2012-07-24

    A method of producing nanoporous material includes the steps of providing a liquid, providing nanoparticles, producing a slurry of the liquid and the nanoparticles, removing the liquid from the slurry, and producing a monolith.

  17. Filter casting nanoscale porous materials

    DOEpatents

    Hayes, Joel Ryan; Nyce, Gregory Walker; Kuntz, Jushua David

    2013-12-10

    A method of producing nanoporous material includes the steps of providing a liquid, providing nanoparticles, producing a slurry of the liquid and the nanoparticles, removing the liquid from the slurry, and producing monolith.

  18. Nanoscale materials for engineering and medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheshwari, Gunjan; Mallik, Nilanjan; Abot, Jandro; Song, Albert; Head, Emily; Dadhania, Mitul; Shanov, Vesselin; Jayasinghe, Chaminda; Salunke, Pravahan; Lee, Lucy; Hurd, Douglas; Yun, YeoHeung; Yarmolenko, Sergey; Sankar, Jag; Phillips, Paul; Komoroski, Richard A.; Chu, Wen-Jang; Bhattacharya, Amit; Watts, Nelson; Schulz, Mark J.

    2008-03-01

    Materials with nanoscale features have new or improved properties compared to bulk materials. These properties depend on the composition, size, and shape of the material, and include high specific strength and modulus, low melting point, high electrical and thermal conductivity, a large surface area to volume ratio, nearly defect-free structure, magnetic and optical properties, and sensing and actuation properties. This talk will discuss synthesis, processing, and application of nanoscale materials for engineering and medicine. Recent advances in nanoparticle synthesis include development of "Black Cotton" which is centimeter long carbon nanotubes grown in arrays, improved carbon nanofiber material, and development of carbon nanosphere chain material which has the morphology of carbon onions chained together. Applications of these materials under development include spinning Black Cotton into thread to produce a new smart material with reinforcement, sensing, and actuation properties, use of nanotube arrays for electrodes and biosensors, catalyst loaded nanotubes for medical contrast agents, and nanosphere chains for manufacturing composite materials. Overall, this paper shows that "Nanoizing" materials and structures is a hot new technological science that is going to improve many aspects of our lives. These new materials are also generating intellectual property and new opportunities for small companies and universities.

  19. Directed Nanoscale Assembly of Graphene Based Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang Ouk

    Graphene based materials, including fullerene, carbon nanotubes and graphene, are two-dimensional polymeric materials consisting of sp2 hybrid carbons. Those carbon materials have attracted enormous research attention for their outstanding material properties along with molecular scale dimension. The optimized utilization of those materials in various application fields inevitably requires the subtle controllability of their structures and properties. In this presentation, our research achievements associated to directed nanoscale assembly of B- or N-doped graphene based materials will be introduced. Graphene based materials can be efficiently processed into various three-dimensional structures via self-assembly principles. Those carbon assembled structures with extremely large surface and high electro-conductivity are potentially useful for energy and environmental applications. Aqueous dispersion of graphene oxide shows liquid crystalline phase, whose spontaneous molecular ordering is useful for display or fiber spinning. Along with the structure control by directed nanoscale assembly, substitutional doping of graphene based materials with B- or N- can be attained via various chemical treatment methods. The resultant chemically modified carbon materials with tunable workfunction, charge carrier density and enhanced surface activity could be employed for various nanomaterials and nanodevices for improved functionalities and performances.

  20. Quantifying Nanoscale Order in Amorphous Materials via Fluctuation Electron Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogle, Stephanie Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Fluctuation electron microscopy (FEM) has been used to study the nanoscale order in various amorphous materials. The method is explicitly sensitive to 3- and 4-body atomic correlation functions in amorphous materials; this is sufficient to establish the existence of structural order on the nanoscale, even when the radial distribution function…

  1. Template synthesis of nanoscale materials using the membrane porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piraux, L.; Dubois, S.; Demoustier-Champagne, S.

    1997-08-01

    The template strategy combined with electrodeposition techniques have been successfully used to produce nanoscale objects in the cylindrical pores of track-etched polycarbonate membranes. Using this method, nanometer-size metallic wires, conductive polymer nanotubules, superconducting nanowires and quasi-one-dimensional magnetic multilayers have been fabricated. These nanoscale materials exhibit physical properties different from those found in the bulk.

  2. Investigation of nanoscale magnetic materials and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rench, David William

    A host of fundamentally and technologically intriguing phenomena can be observed in ferromagnetic systems, ranging from Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR) to spin structures that approximate the non-zero entropy state of water ice. In this dissertation, we consider systems of self-assembled MnAs nanoclusters in a doped GaAs matrix, a magnetically-doped topological insulator material, and magnetotransport devices constructed as artificial spin ices. We performed magnetic, structural, and electronic measurements in each of the projects herein to discover unique materials properties that range from new phase diagrams to electronic structure breaking and intriguing electrical characteristics that seem to defy the symmetry of the system that manifests them. We first explore the impact of co-doping a GaAs semiconductor matrix with magnetic and non-magnetic dopant ions (Mn and Be, respectively) and forcing phase separation to occur during the sample growth stage. The result of this phase-separated co-doped growth was the identification of two distinct materials classes: Type I materials, in which the phase separation produces ferromagnetic zinc blende (Mn,Ga)As nanoclusters with a narrow distribution of small diameters within a weakly Be-doped GaAs matrix, and Type II materials, in which an abrupt mixing of large NiAs-type MnAs nanoclusters and the small (Mn,Ga)As nanoclusters occurs. These two states are shown to also have accessible intermediate states in the case of a doped substrate and buffer layer. Magnetic measurements are performed to determine the dynamics of the unmixed Type I and the mixed Type II materials. Structural characteristization is done at the nanoscale in a variety of instruments to precisely determine the likely growth dynamics during sample synthesis and the resultant structures. The materials are found to be superparamagnetic with 10 K (Type I) and approximately 313 K (Type II) blocking temperatures with a strong dependence on Mn content during growth

  3. Nanoscale material design for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Hua

    Solar cell technology directly converts the clean, abundant energy of the sun into electricity. To build solar cell modules with low cost and high energy conversion efficiency, nanomaterials such as nanowires, nanotubes and quantum dots are very promising candidates, due to their novel thermal, electrical, and optical properties. This research seeks to use silicon nanowire, carbon nanotube, and semiconductor quantum dot to achieve high optical absorption and low electron-phonon coupling. Multiscale simulation and experiments are combined to investigate the thermal radiative properties of nanowire/nanotube array structures and the electron-phonon interaction in semiconductor quantum dots. Optical properties of nanowire/nanotube structures are numerically investigated by combined ab initio calculation and computational electromagnetic calculations. At the atomic scale, ab initio calculations based on density functional theory are performed to evaluate the spectral dielectric function of the material using the initial atomic structure as the only input parameter. This method considers different absorption mechanisms from far infrared to visible spectrum, and its effectiveness is demonstrated using the material GaAs and small carbon nanotubes. At the nanoscale, the predicted dielectric function of nanowire/nanotube is used as an input parameter in finite-difference time-domain method, so that the optical properties of devices such as nanowire/nanotube arrays can be obtained. Based on this scheme, we have shown that the vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotube arrays are nearly perfect absorber in the visible spectrum. Silicon nanowire arrays are less absorptive than carbon nanotube, but we propose and demonstrate that their optical absorption can be greatly enhanced by introducing structural randomness, including random positioning, diameter and length. The enhanced optical absorption implies potential enhancement of the overall efficiency of nanotube

  4. Bench-scale synthesis of nanoscale materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. F.; Darab, J. G.; Matson, D. W.; Linehan, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    A novel flow-through hydrothermal method used to synthesize nanoscale powders is introduced by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The process, Rapid Thermal Decomposition of precursors in Solution (RTDS), uniquely combines high-pressure and high-temperature conditions to rapidly form nanoscale particles. The RTDS process was initially demonstrated on a laboratory scale and was subsequently scaled up to accommodate production rates attractive to industry. The process is able to produce a wide variety of metal oxides and oxyhydroxides. The powders are characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopic methods, surface-area measurements, and x-ray diffraction. Typical crystallite sizes are less than 20 nanometers, with BET surface areas ranging from 100 to 400 sq m/g. A description of the RTDS process is presented along with powder characterization results. In addition, data on the sintering of nanoscale ZrO2 produced by RTDS are included.

  5. Bench-scale synthesis of nanoscale materials

    SciTech Connect

    Buehler, M.F.; Darab, J.G.; Matson, D.W.; Linehan, J.C.

    1993-12-01

    A novel flow-through hydrothermal method used to synthesize nanoscale powders is introduced by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The process, Rapid Thermal Decomposition of precursors in Solution (RTDS), combines high-pressure and high-temperature conditions to rapidly form nanoscale particles. The RTDS process was demonstrated on a laboratory scale and scaled up to accommodate production rates attractive to industry. The process is able to produce a wide variety of metal oxides and oxyhydroxides. The powders are characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopic methods, surface-area measurements, and x-ray diffraction. Typical crystallite sizes are less than 20 nanometers, with BET surface areas ranging from 100 to 400 m{sup 2}/g. A description of the RTDS process is presented along with powder characterization results. In addition, data on the sintering of nanoscale ZrO{sub 2} produced by RTDS are included.

  6. A Look Inside Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials

    ScienceCinema

    Divan, Ralu; Rosenthal, Dan; Rose, Volker; Wai Hla, Saw; Liu, Yuzi

    2016-07-12

    At a very small, or "nano" scale, materials behave differently. The study of nanomaterials is much more than miniaturization - scientists are discovering how changes in size change a material's properties. From sunscreen to computer memory, the applications of nanoscale materials research are all around us. Researchers at Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials are creating new materials, methods and technologies to address some of the world's greatest challenges in energy security, lightweight but durable materials, high-efficiency lighting, information storage, environmental stewardship and advanced medical devices.

  7. A Look Inside Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Divan, Ralu; Rosenthal, Dan; Rose, Volker; Wai Hla, Saw; Liu, Yuzi

    2014-01-29

    At a very small, or "nano" scale, materials behave differently. The study of nanomaterials is much more than miniaturization - scientists are discovering how changes in size change a material's properties. From sunscreen to computer memory, the applications of nanoscale materials research are all around us. Researchers at Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials are creating new materials, methods and technologies to address some of the world's greatest challenges in energy security, lightweight but durable materials, high-efficiency lighting, information storage, environmental stewardship and advanced medical devices.

  8. Fats, Oils, & Colors of a Nanoscale Material

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lisensky, George C.; Horoszewski, Dana; Gentry, Kenneth L.; Zenner, Greta M.; Crone, Wendy C .

    2006-01-01

    Phase changes and intermolecular forces are important physical science concepts but are not always easy to present in an active learning format. This article presents several interactive activities in which students plot the melting points of some fatty acids and explore the effect that the nanoscale size and shape of molecules have on the…

  9. Unique nanoscale morphologies underpinning organic gel-phase materials.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Andrew R; Smith, David K; Harrington, John P

    2005-11-01

    This study investigates the self-assembly of simple aliphatic diamines with a dendritic peptide. By controlling the molar ratio of this two-component system, new nanoscale morphologies were generated. In the presence of relatively long aliphatic chains (C10, C12) a transition from nanoscale fibres to platelets was observed on changing the molar ratio, whereas, for shorter spacer chains (e.g., C9 and C8), interesting and unique morphological changes were observed by low voltage field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (SEM), with "nanosquares" or nanoscale "rosette" structures being formed. Remarkably, these discrete nanoscale structures were able to form sample-spanning networks capable of supporting a gel-phase material; whereas, most gels are usually based on fibrillar assemblies. In addition to SEM, the gels were characterised by using thermal measurements and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The length of the diamine spacer and the molar ratio of components controlled the self-assembly process by modifying the spatial organisation of the dendritic head groups at the molecular level, which is transcribed into the aspect ratio of the self-assembled state at the microscopic level. Ultimately, this led to diamine-induced control of the macroscopic material's behaviour. When present in excess, the diamine controlled the observed nanoscale morphology as a consequence of undergoing a dendritically controlled nanocrystallisation process to form a network, an unusual and significant result.

  10. Recent advances in nanoscale bioinspired materials.

    PubMed

    Demirel, Melik C; Cetinkaya, Murat; Pena-Francesch, Abdon; Jung, Huihun

    2015-03-01

    Natural materials have been a fundamental part of human life since the dawn of civilization. However, due to exploitation of natural resources and cost issues, synthetic materials replaced bio-derived materials in the last century. Recent advances in bio- and nano-technologies pave the way for developing eco-friendly materials that could be produced easily from renewable resources at reduced cost and in a broad array of useful applications. This feature article highlights structural and functional characteristics of bio-derived materials, which will expedite the design fabrication and synthesis of eco-friendly and recyclable advanced nano-materials and devices.

  11. Nanoscale integration of two-dimensional materials by lateral heteroepitaxy.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Peter; Huang, Yuan; Sutter, Eli

    2014-08-13

    Materials integration in heterostructures with novel properties different from those of the constituents has become one of the most powerful concepts of modern materials science. Two-dimensional (2D) crystals represent a new class of materials from which such engineered structures can be envisioned. Calculations have predicted emergent properties in 2D heterostructures with nanoscale feature sizes, but methods for their controlled fabrication have been lacking. Here, we use sequential graphene and boron nitride growth on Ru(0001) to show that lateral heteroepitaxy, the joining of 2D materials by preferential incorporation of different atomic species into exposed 1D edges during chemical vapor deposition on a metal substrate, can be used for the bottom-up synthesis of 2D heterostructures with characteristic dimensions on the nanoscale. Our results suggest that on a proper substrate, this method lends itself to building nanoheterostructures from a wide range of 2D materials.

  12. New Materials for Supramolecular Nanoscale Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurow, Matthew

    The projects reported here seek to employ the very small---molecules, nanoparticles, films of materials far thinner than a human hair---to create diverse useful systems. We have focused our attention of a class of molecules which strongly absorb light and can be induced to interact with other materials to create devices which can harvest the energy in sunlight, change the way they respond to external stimulus based on the way they are being illuminated, and hopefully in the future make electronic devices more efficient, sustainable, smaller and broadly better. The majority of our most advanced current technologies are made by "top down" fabrication. Large portions of materials which do not demonstrate any of the strange properties which emerge when physical dimensions are severely limited, called bulk materials, are whittled down and painstakingly arranged sometimes one molecule at a time to make microchips and the screens in our cell phones. Another driving force of the research described here is to advance the idea of "self assembly" by which molecules can be designed to interact with each other in such a way that they arrange into a precise manner without needing to be moved one at a time. By advancing our knowledge of self assembled systems, especially those which interact with light, we have strived to make real progress towards new highly applicable functional technologies across many disciplines.

  13. Basics of Ion Scattering in Nanoscale Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Whitlow, Harry J.; Zhang, Yanwen

    2010-01-01

    Energetic ions interact with materials by collisions with the nuclei and electrons of the atoms that make up the material. In these collisions energy and momentum is transferred from the projectile particle which is a moving atom or ion, to the target particles (atomic nucleus or electron). Each collision leads to a slowing down of the moving projectile and also a deflection of the trajectory which gives rise to the term scattering which is often used synonymously to describe the energy transfer process. In this chapter, we introduce from an experimental viewpoint the underlying theory for interaction of ions for analysis and modification of nanometer scale materials. A more detailed theoretical overview of the topic can be found in the recent monographs by Sigmund. Detailed derivations of the formulae introduced will not be given here but can be found in standard texts that are indicated by references. The treatment here starts by considering an individual scattering event. The results are then used to consider the effects on the primary ion in the limit where a large number of collisions take place. Subsequently, the primary effects are considered in nanometer materials which approach the thin-medium limit where the primary particles encounter only limited number of scattering centers. Finally, the dissipation of the energy deposited by the primary projectiles in secondary processes such as cascades of displaced atoms and electrons will be considered in the thick and thin medium limits. This approach was chosen because it builds upon the standard concepts in ion-matter interactions that are well know and have been widely used in experimental measurements of the stopping force and applications such as Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), ion beam modification of materials etc.

  14. Nanoscale Materials? What They Could Do for Sensing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sliman, Ginny M.

    2006-02-01

    The unique characteristics of nanoscale materials make them a perfect fit for the sensor world. Integrating these materials into existing sensors can increase the sensitivity, selectivity and speed of the sensor—all of which could translate into enormous leaps in sensor performance. In addition, their high surface area and low volume provide a perfect setup for sensor miniaturization. Researchers at the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are integrating functionalized nanoporous silica and carbon nanotubes—both nanoscale materials—into a variety of sensor applications to meet urgent needs in fields ranging from biomedicine and environmental remediation to national security. The scientists’ goal is to set the stage for developing a miniaturized sensor that uses the smallest sample possible to detect the smallest concentration possible of molecules of interest.

  15. Plant virus directed fabrication of nanoscale materials and devices.

    PubMed

    Culver, James N; Brown, Adam D; Zang, Faheng; Gnerlich, Markus; Gerasopoulos, Konstantinos; Ghodssi, Reza

    2015-05-01

    Bottom-up self-assembly methods in which individual molecular components self-organize to form functional nanoscale patterns are of long-standing interest in the field of materials sciences. Such self-assembly processes are the hallmark of biology where complex macromolecules with defined functions assemble from smaller molecular components. In particular, plant virus-derived nanoparticles (PVNs) have drawn considerable attention for their unique self-assembly architectures and functionalities that can be harnessed to produce new materials for industrial and biomedical applications. In particular, PVNs provide simple systems to model and assemble nanoscale particles of uniform size and shape that can be modified through molecularly defined chemical and genetic alterations. Furthermore, PVNs bring the added potential to "farm" such bio-nanomaterials on an industrial scale, providing a renewable and environmentally sustainable means for the production of nano-materials. This review outlines the fabrication and application of several PVNs for a range of uses that include energy storage, catalysis, and threat detection.

  16. Nanoscale deformation measurements for reliability assessment of material interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Jürgen; Gollhardt, Astrid; Vogel, Dietmar; Michel, Bernd

    2006-03-01

    With the development and application of micro/nano electronic mechanical systems (MEMS, NEMS) for a variety of market segments new reliability issues will arise. The understanding of material interfaces is the key for a successful design for reliability of MEMS/NEMS and sensor systems. Furthermore in the field of BIOMEMS newly developed advanced materials and well known engineering materials are combined despite of fully developed reliability concepts for such devices and components. In addition the increasing interface-to volume ratio in highly integrated systems and nanoparticle filled materials are challenges for experimental reliability evaluation. New strategies for reliability assessment on the submicron scale are essential to fulfil the needs of future devices. In this paper a nanoscale resolution experimental method for the measurement of thermo-mechanical deformation at material interfaces is introduced. The determination of displacement fields is based on scanning probe microscopy (SPM) data. In-situ SPM scans of the analyzed object (i.e. material interface) are carried out at different thermo-mechanical load states. The obtained images are compared by grayscale cross correlation algorithms. This allows the tracking of local image patterns of the analyzed surface structure. The measurement results are full-field displacement fields with nanometer resolution. With the obtained data the mixed mode type of loading at material interfaces can be analyzed with highest resolution for future needs in micro system and nanotechnology.

  17. Resource Materials for Nanoscale Science and Technology Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisensky, George

    2006-12-01

    Nanotechnology and advanced materials examples can be used to explore science and engineering concepts, exhibiting the "wow" and potential of nanotechnology, introducing prospective scientists to key ideas, and educating a citizenry capable of making well-informed technology-driven decisions. For example, material syntheses an atomic layer at a time have already revolutionized lighting and display technologies and dramatically expanded hard drive storage capacities. Resource materials include kits, models, and demonstrations that explain scanning probe microscopy, x-ray diffraction, information storage, energy and light, carbon nanotubes, and solid-state structures. An online Video Lab Manual, where movies show each step of the experiment, illustrates more than a dozen laboratory experiments involving nanoscale science and technology. Examples that are useful at a variety of levels when instructors provide the context include preparation of self-assembled monolayers, liquid crystals, colloidal gold, ferrofluid nanoparticles, nickel nanowires, solar cells, electrochromic thin films, organic light emitting diodes, and quantum dots. These resources have been developed, refined and class tested at institutions working with the Materials Research Science and Engineering Center on Nanostructured Interfaces at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (http://mrsec.wisc.edu/nano).

  18. Broadband THz Spectroscopy of 2D Nanoscale Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lu; Tripathi, Shivendra; Huang, Mengchen; Hsu, Jen-Feng; D'Urso, Brian; Lee, Hyungwoo; Eom, Chang-Beom; Irvin, Patrick; Levy, Jeremy

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials such as graphene and transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) have attracted intense research interest in the past decade. Their unique electronic and optical properties offer the promise of novel optoelectronic applications in the terahertz regime. Recently, generation and detection of broadband terahertz (10 THz bandwidth) emission from 10-nm-scale LaAlO3/SrTiO3 nanostructures created by conductive atomic force microscope (c-AFM) lithography has been demonstrated . This unprecedented control of THz emission at 10 nm length scales creates a pathway toward hybrid THz functionality in 2D-material/LaAlO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures. Here we report initial efforts in THz spectroscopy of 2D nanoscale materials with resolution comparable to the dimensions of the nanowire (10 nm). Systems under investigation include graphene, single-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), and tungsten diselenide (WSe2) nanoflakes. 1. Y. Ma, et al., Nano Lett. 13, 2884 (2013). We gratefully acknowledge financial support from the following agencies and grants: AFOSR (FA9550-12-1-0268 (JL, PRI), FA9550-12-1-0342 (CBE)), ONR (N00014-13-1-0806 (JL, CBE), N00014-15-1-2847 (JL)), NSF DMR-1124131 (JL, CBE) and DMR-1234096 (CBE).

  19. Molecular Dynamics of Shock Wave Interaction with Nanoscale Structured Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Qananwah, Ahmad K.

    Typical theoretical treatments of shock wave interactions are based on a continuum approach, which cannot resolve the spatial variations in solids with nano-scale porous structure. Nano-structured materials have the potential to attenuate the strength of traveling shock waves because of their high surface-to-volume ratio. To investigate such interactions we have developed a molecular dynamics simulation model, based on Short Range Attractive interactions. A piston, modeled as a uni-directional repulsive force field translating at a prescribed velocity, impinges on a region of gas which is compressed to form a shock, which in turn is driven against an atomistic solid wall. Periodic boundary conditions are used in the directions orthogonal to the piston motion, and we have considered solids based on either embedded atom potentials (target structure) or tethered potential (rigid piston, holding wall). Velocity, temperature and stress fields are computed locally in both gas and solid regions, and displacements within the solid are interpreted in terms of its elastic constants. In this work we present results of the elastic behavior of solid structures subjected to shock wave impact and analysis of energy transport and absorption in porous materials. The results indicated that the presence of nano-porous material layers in front of a target wall reduced the stress magnitude detected inside and the energy deposited there by about 30 percent while, at the same time, its loading rate was decreased substantially.

  20. Atomistic methodologies for material properties of 2D materials at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen

    Research on two dimensional (2D) materials, such as graphene and MoS2, now involves thousands of researchers worldwide cutting across physics, chemistry, engineering and biology. Due to the extraordinary properties of 2D materials, research extends from fundamental science to novel applications of 2D materials. From an engineering point of view, understanding the material properties of 2D materials under various conditions is crucial for tailoring the electrical and mechanical properties of 2D-material-based devices at the nanoscale. Even at the nanoscale, molecular systems typically consist of a vast number of atoms. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations enable us to understand the properties of assemblies of molecules in terms of their structure and the microscopic interactions between them. From a continuum approach, mechanical properties and thermal properties, such as strain, stress, and heat capacity, are well defined and experimentally measurable. In MD simulations, material systems are considered to be discrete, and only interatomic potential, interatomic forces, and atom positions are directly obtainable. Besides, most of the fracture mechanics concepts, such as stress intensity factors, are not applicable since there is no singularity in MD simulations. However, energy release rate still remains to be a feasible and crucial physical quantity to characterize the fracture mechanical property of materials at the nanoscale. Therefore, equivalent definition of a physical quantity both in atomic scale and macroscopic scale is necessary in order to understand molecular and continuum scale phenomena concurrently. This work introduces atomistic simulation methodologies, based on interatomic potential and interatomic forces, as a tool to unveil the mechanical properties, thermal properties and fracture mechanical properties of 2D materials at the nanoscale. Among many 2D materials, graphene and MoS2 have attracted intense interest. Therefore, we applied our

  1. Lithium-based surfaces controlling fusion plasma behavior at the plasma-material interface

    SciTech Connect

    Allain, Jean Paul; Taylor, Chase N.

    2012-05-15

    The plasma-material interface and its impact on the performance of magnetically confined thermonuclear fusion plasmas are considered to be one of the key scientific gaps in the realization of nuclear fusion power. At this interface, high particle and heat flux from the fusion plasma can limit the material's lifetime and reliability and therefore hinder operation of the fusion device. Lithium-based surfaces are now being used in major magnetic confinement fusion devices and have observed profound effects on plasma performance including enhanced confinement, suppression and control of edge localized modes (ELM), lower hydrogen recycling and impurity suppression. The critical spatial scale length of deuterium and helium particle interactions in lithium ranges between 5-100 nm depending on the incident particle energies at the edge and magnetic configuration. Lithium-based surfaces also range from liquid state to solid lithium coatings on a variety of substrates (e.g., graphite, stainless steel, refractory metal W/Mo/etc., or porous metal structures). Temperature-dependent effects from lithium-based surfaces as plasma facing components (PFC) include magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability issues related to liquid lithium, surface impurity, and deuterium retention issues, and anomalous physical sputtering increase at temperatures above lithium's melting point. The paper discusses the viability of lithium-based surfaces in future burning-plasma environments such as those found in ITER and DEMO-like fusion reactor devices.

  2. Lithium-based surfaces controlling fusion plasma behavior at the plasma-material interfacea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allain, Jean Paul; Taylor, Chase N.

    2012-05-01

    The plasma-material interface and its impact on the performance of magnetically confined thermonuclear fusion plasmas are considered to be one of the key scientific gaps in the realization of nuclear fusion power. At this interface, high particle and heat flux from the fusion plasma can limit the material's lifetime and reliability and therefore hinder operation of the fusion device. Lithium-based surfaces are now being used in major magnetic confinement fusion devices and have observed profound effects on plasma performance including enhanced confinement, suppression and control of edge localized modes (ELM), lower hydrogen recycling and impurity suppression. The critical spatial scale length of deuterium and helium particle interactions in lithium ranges between 5-100 nm depending on the incident particle energies at the edge and magnetic configuration. Lithium-based surfaces also range from liquid state to solid lithium coatings on a variety of substrates (e.g., graphite, stainless steel, refractory metal W/Mo/etc., or porous metal structures). Temperature-dependent effects from lithium-based surfaces as plasma facing components (PFC) include magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability issues related to liquid lithium, surface impurity, and deuterium retention issues, and anomalous physical sputtering increase at temperatures above lithium's melting point. The paper discusses the viability of lithium-based surfaces in future burning-plasma environments such as those found in ITER and DEMO-like fusion reactor devices.

  3. Nanoscale tissue engineering: spatial control over cell-materials interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wheeldon, Ian; Farhadi, Arash; Bick, Alexander G.; Jabbari, Esmaiel; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Cells interact with the surrounding environment by making tens to hundreds of thousands of nanoscale interactions with extracellular signals and features. The goal of nanoscale tissue engineering is to harness the interactions through nanoscale biomaterials engineering in order to study and direct cellular behaviors. Here, we review the nanoscale tissue engineering technologies for both two- and three-dimensional studies (2- and 3D), and provide a holistic overview of the field. Techniques that can control the average spacing and clustering of cell adhesion ligands are well established and have been highly successful in describing cell adhesion and migration in 2D. Extension of these engineering tools to 3D biomaterials has created many new hydrogel and nanofiber scaffolds technologies that are being used to design in vitro experiments with more physiologically relevant conditions. Researchers are beginning to study complex cell functions in 3D, however, there is a need for biomaterials systems that provide fine control over the nanoscale presentation of bioactive ligands in 3D. Additionally, there is a need for 2- and 3D techniques that can control the nanoscale presentation of multiple bioactive ligands and the temporal changes in cellular microenvironment. PMID:21451238

  4. Method for producing electrodes using microscale or nanoscale materials obtained from hydrogendriven metallurgical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, James J.; Adzic, Gordana D.; Johnson, John R.; Vogt, Thomas; McBreen, James

    2003-09-02

    A method is provided for producing electrodes using microscale and nanoscale metal materials formed from hydrogen driven metallurgical processes; such a the HD (hydriding, dehydriding) process, the HDDR (hydriding, dehydriding, disproportionation, and recombination) process, and variants thereof.

  5. Nanoscale Magnetic Materials for Energy-Efficient Spin Based Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Incorvia, Jean Anne Currivan

    In this dissertation, I study the physical behavior of nanoscale magnetic materials and build spin-based transistors that encode information in magnetic domain walls. It can be argued that energy dissipation is the most serious problem in modern electronics, and one that has been resistant to a breakthrough. Wasted heat during computing both wastes energy and hinders further technology scaling. This is an opportunity for physicists and engineers to come up with creative solutions for more energy-efficient computing. I present the device we have designed, called domain wall logic (DW-Logic). Information is stored in the position of a magnetic domain wall in a ferromagnetic wire and read out using a magnetic tunnel junction. This hybrid design uses electrical current as the input and output, keeping the device compatible with charge- based transistors. I build an iterative model to predict both the micromagnetic and circuit behavior of DW- Logic, showing a single device can operate as a universal gate. The model shows we can build complex circuits including an 18-gate Full Adder, and allows us to predict the device switching energy compared to complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) transistors. Comparing ?15 nm feature nodes, I find DW-Logic made with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy materials, and utilizing both spin torque transfer and the Spin Hall effect, could operate with 1000x reduced switching energy compared to CMOS. I fabricate DW-Logic device prototypes and show in experiment they can act as AND and NAND gates. I demonstrate that one device can drive two subsequent devices, showing gain, which is a necessary requirement for fanout. I also build a clocked ring oscillator circuit to demonstrate successful bit propagation in a DW-Logic circuit and show that properly scaled devices can have improved operation. Through building the devices, I develop a novel fabrication method for patterning sub-25 nm magnetic wires with very low (˜ 2 nm) average edge

  6. Pulsed laser processing of electronic materials in micro/nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, David Jen

    2005-08-01

    Time-resolved pump-and-probe side-view imaging has been performed to investigate the energy coupling to the target specimen over a wide range of fluences. Plasmas generated during the laser ablation process are visualized and the decrease of the ablation efficiency in the high fluence regime (>10 J/cm2) is attributed to the strong interaction of the laser pulse with the laser-induced plasmas. The high intensity ultra-short laser pulses also trigger volumetric multi-photon absorption (MPA) processes that can be beneficial in applications such as three-dimensional bulk modification of transparent materials. Femtosecond laser pulses were used to fabricate straight and bent through-channels in the optical glass. Drilling was initiated from the rear surface to preserve consistent absorbing conditions of the laser pulse. Machining in the presence of a liquid solution assisted the debris ejection. Drilling process was further enhanced by introducing ultrasonic waves, thereby increasing the aspect ratio of drilled holes and improving the quality of the holes. In conventional lens focusing schemes, the minimum feature size is determined by the diffraction limit. Finer resolution is accomplished by combining pulsed laser radiation with Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopy (NSOM) probes. Short laser pulses are coupled to a fiber-based NSOM probes in order to ablate thin metal films. A detailed parametric study on the effects of probe aperture size, laser pulse energy, temporal width and environment gas is performed. The significance of lateral thermal diffusion is highlighted and the dependence of the ablation process on the imparted near-field distribution is revealed. As a promising application of laser ablation in nanoscale, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system has been built up based on NSOM ablation configuration. NSOM-LIBS is demonstrated with nanosecond pulsed laser excitation on Cr sample. Far-field collecting scheme by top objective lens was chosen as

  7. From computational materials science to nanoscale device physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Avik

    2008-10-01

    I will outline formal, computational and device level challenges for modeling and simulation of nanoelectronic devices and systems. Formal challenges involve developing the basic equations for quantum transport in the presence of strong many-body correlations (Coulomb Blockade), incoherent scattering (phonons) and time-dependent effects at the nano-micro interface (hysteretic switching and random telegraph noise). Computational challenges involve translating these equations into quantitative, predictive models, particularly at surfaces and interfaces, where we need practical semi-empirical descriptions with transferable parameters to handle hybrid regions. In addition, we need multiscaling and embedding techniques to merge these models with more detailed ``ab-initio'' descriptions of chemically significant moieties. Finally, Device level challenges involve identifying fundamental limits of existing device paradigms, such as molecular FETs, as well as exploring novel device operational principles. I will touch upon the fundamental issues that arise in context of each challenge, and possible means of solving them. I will then apply these ideas to a specific device architecture, namely, an ordered array of quantum dots grown on the surface of a nanoscale silicon transistor. All of the challenges identified above manifest themselves prominently in this geometry that operates at the nano-micro interface. Specifically, I will discuss how the strongly correlated electrons in the nanoscale dots ``talk'' to their weakly interacting macroscopic counterparts, how the interfacial electronic structure captures both long-ranged band correlations and short-ranged chemical correlations, and how the tunable coupling with the localized dot degrees of freedom can lead to novel physics, such as the experimentally observed blocking and unblocking of a nanotube current by correlated interactions between multiple oxide traps.

  8. Super-Resolution Molecular and Functional Imaging of Nanoscale Architectures in Life and Materials Science

    PubMed Central

    Habuchi, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Super-resolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy has been revolutionizing the way in which we investigate the structures, dynamics, and functions of a wide range of nanoscale systems. In this review, I describe the current state of various SR fluorescence microscopy techniques along with the latest developments of fluorophores and labeling for the SR microscopy. I discuss the applications of SR microscopy in the fields of life science and materials science with a special emphasis on quantitative molecular imaging and nanoscale functional imaging. These studies open new opportunities for unraveling the physical, chemical, and optical properties of a wide range of nanoscale architectures together with their nanostructures and will enable the development of new (bio-)nanotechnology. PMID:25152893

  9. Bioinspired nanoscale materials for biomedical and energy applications

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2014-01-01

    The demand for green, affordable and environmentally sustainable materials has encouraged scientists in different fields to draw inspiration from nature in developing materials with unique properties such as miniaturization, hierarchical organization and adaptability. Together with the exceptional properties of nanomaterials, over the past century, the field of bioinspired nanomaterials has taken huge leaps. While on the one hand, the sophistication of hierarchical structures endows biological systems with multi-functionality, the synthetic control on the creation of nanomaterials enables the design of materials with specific functionalities. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive, up-to-date overview of the field of bioinspired nanomaterials, which we have broadly categorized into biotemplates and biomimics. We discuss the application of bioinspired nanomaterials as biotemplates in catalysis, nanomedicine, immunoassays and in energy, drawing attention to novel materials such as protein cages. Furthermore, the applications of bioinspired materials in tissue engineering and biomineralization are also discussed. PMID:24740959

  10. Bioinspired Nanoscale Materials for Biomedical and Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2014-05-01

    The demand of green, affordable and environmentally sustainable materials has encouraged scientists in different fields to draw inspiration from nature in developing materials with unique properties such as miniaturization, hierarchical organization, and adaptability. Together with the exceptional properties of nanomaterials, over the past century, the field of bioinspired nanomaterials has taken huge leaps. While on one hand, the sophistication of hierarchical structures endow biological systems with multifunctionality, the synthetic control on the creation of nanomaterials enables the design of materials with specific functionalities. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive, up-to-date overview of the field of bioinspired nanomaterials, which we have broadly categorized into biotemplates and biomimics. We will discuss the application of bioinspired nanomaterials as biotemplates in catalysis, nanomedicine, immunoassays and in energy, drawing attention to novel materials such as protein cages. Further, the applications of bioinspired materials in tissue engineering and biomineralization will also be discussed.

  11. Deep eutectic solvents: sustainable media for nanoscale and functional materials.

    PubMed

    Wagle, Durgesh V; Zhao, Hua; Baker, Gary A

    2014-08-19

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) represent an alternative class of ionic fluids closely resembling room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), although, strictly speaking, they are distinguished by the fact that they also contain an organic molecular component (typically, a hydrogen bond donor like a urea, amide, acid, or polyol), frequently as the predominant constituent. Practically speaking, DESs are attractive alternatives to RTILs, sharing most of their remarkable qualities (e.g., tolerance to humidity, negligible vapor pressure, thermostability, wide electrochemical potential windows, tunability) while overcoming several limitations associated with their RTIL cousins. Particularly, DESs are typically, less expensive, more synthetically accessible (typically, from bulk commodity chemicals using solvent/waste-free processes), nontoxic, and biodegradable. In this Account, we provide an overview of DESs as designer solvents to create well-defined nanomaterials including shape-controlled nanoparticles, electrodeposited films, metal-organic frameworks, colloidal assemblies, hierarchically porous carbons, and DNA/RNA architectures. These breakthroughs illustrate how DESs can fulfill multiple roles in directing chemistry at the nanoscale: acting as supramolecular template, metal/carbon source, sacrificial agent (e.g., ammonia release from urea), and/or redox agent, all in the absence of formal stabilizing ligand (here, solvent and stabilizer are one and the same). The ability to tailor the physicochemical properties of DESs is central to controlling their interfacial behavior. The preorganized "supramolecular" nature of DESs provides a soft template to guide the formation of bimodal porous carbon networks or the evolution of electrodeposits. A number of essential parameters (viscosity, polarity, surface tension, hydrogen bonding), plus coordination with solutes/surfaces, all play significant roles in modulating species reactivity and mass transport properties governing the

  12. Deep eutectic solvents: sustainable media for nanoscale and functional materials.

    PubMed

    Wagle, Durgesh V; Zhao, Hua; Baker, Gary A

    2014-08-19

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) represent an alternative class of ionic fluids closely resembling room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), although, strictly speaking, they are distinguished by the fact that they also contain an organic molecular component (typically, a hydrogen bond donor like a urea, amide, acid, or polyol), frequently as the predominant constituent. Practically speaking, DESs are attractive alternatives to RTILs, sharing most of their remarkable qualities (e.g., tolerance to humidity, negligible vapor pressure, thermostability, wide electrochemical potential windows, tunability) while overcoming several limitations associated with their RTIL cousins. Particularly, DESs are typically, less expensive, more synthetically accessible (typically, from bulk commodity chemicals using solvent/waste-free processes), nontoxic, and biodegradable. In this Account, we provide an overview of DESs as designer solvents to create well-defined nanomaterials including shape-controlled nanoparticles, electrodeposited films, metal-organic frameworks, colloidal assemblies, hierarchically porous carbons, and DNA/RNA architectures. These breakthroughs illustrate how DESs can fulfill multiple roles in directing chemistry at the nanoscale: acting as supramolecular template, metal/carbon source, sacrificial agent (e.g., ammonia release from urea), and/or redox agent, all in the absence of formal stabilizing ligand (here, solvent and stabilizer are one and the same). The ability to tailor the physicochemical properties of DESs is central to controlling their interfacial behavior. The preorganized "supramolecular" nature of DESs provides a soft template to guide the formation of bimodal porous carbon networks or the evolution of electrodeposits. A number of essential parameters (viscosity, polarity, surface tension, hydrogen bonding), plus coordination with solutes/surfaces, all play significant roles in modulating species reactivity and mass transport properties governing the

  13. Nanoscale Materials Make for Large-Scale Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Since its dawning days, NASA has been at the forefront of developing and improving materials for aerospace applications. In particular, NASA requires dramatic advancements in material properties to enhance the performance, robustness, and reliability of its launch vehicles, spacecraft, and the International Space Station. Such advancements over the years include noise-abatement materials, fire-resistant fibers, heat-absorbing insulation, and light-but-strong moldable composites. In 1991, a new carbon fiber called a carbon nanotube was discovered and fully substantiated by a Japanese electron microscopist. Its dramatic strength and low density (20 times the tensile strength and one-sixth the density of steel) were turning the heads of materials scientists and engineers all around the world, including those who developed equipment for NASA. While NASA did not invent the carbon nanotube, it is working to advance the fibrous material for widespread, low-cost application in sending humans beyond low-Earth orbit, well into the outer reaches of the universe. Carbon nanotubes have the potential to reduce spacecraft weight by 50 percent or more, by replacing the heavier copper wires currently used, according to NASA scientists. Furthermore, NASA researchers have reported a new method for producing integrated circuits using carbon nanotubes instead of copper for interconnects. This technology has the capability to extend the life of the silicon chip industry by 10 years. Because of this growing interest in carbon nanotubes and their perpetual possibilities, NASA has funded both internal and external research in this field.

  14. Emerging ferroelectric transistors with nanoscale channel materials: the possibilities, the limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xia

    2016-03-01

    Combining the nonvolatile, locally switchable polarization field of a ferroelectric thin film with a nanoscale electronic material in a field effect transistor structure offers the opportunity to examine and control a rich variety of mesoscopic phenomena and interface coupling. It is also possible to introduce new phases and functionalities into these hybrid systems through rational design. This paper reviews two rapidly progressing branches in the field of ferroelectric transistors, which employ two distinct classes of nanoscale electronic materials as the conducting channel, the two-dimensional (2D) electron gas graphene and the strongly correlated transition metal oxide thin films. The topics covered include the basic device physics, novel phenomena emerging in the hybrid systems, critical mechanisms that control the magnitude and stability of the field effect modulation and the mobility of the channel material, potential device applications, and the performance limitations of these devices due to the complex interface interactions and challenges in achieving controlled materials properties. Possible future directions for this field are also outlined, including local ferroelectric gate control via nanoscale domain patterning and incorporating other emergent materials in this device concept, such as the simple binary ferroelectrics, layered 2D transition metal dichalcogenides, and the 4d and 5d heavy metal compounds with strong spin-orbit coupling.

  15. Final Report: Imaging of Buried Nanoscale Optically Active Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Appelbaum, Ian

    2011-07-05

    This is a final report covering work done at University of Maryland to develop a Ballistic Electron Emission Luminescence (BEEL) microscope. This technique was intended to examine the carrier transport and photon emission in deeply buried optically-active layers and thereby provide a means for materials science to unmask the detailed consequences of experimentally controllable growth parameters, such as quantum dot size, statistics and orientation, and defect density and charge recombination pathways.

  16. Nanoscale electro-optical measurements of photovoltaic materials using scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhitenev, Nikolai; Hamadani, Behrang; Haney, Paul; Jung, Suyong; Xu, Hua

    2011-03-01

    The efficiency of photovoltaic devices based on inorganic thin-films or organic polymer blends is often determined by the nanoscale structure and properties of internal and contact interfaces. Measurements of local photo-conductivity, along with other scanning probe based measurements, can link the structural properties to the performance providing the desired feedback for the device optimization. However, the nature of the tip-to-sample contact can be quite different from contact interfaces in devices strongly affecting the injection and collection of charge carriers and complicating the data analysis. Here, we present the characterization of photoconductive channels in a model bulk heterojunction organic solar cell based on a p-type polymer and n-type small molecule. We directly compare the properties of the tip-to-sample interface to the nanocontact interface. We explore the nanoscale photocurrent response on two complementary device architectures using conductive tips suitable for the appropriate charge (i.e., electrons vs. holes) collection. In addition to the measurements at the top surface, we examine the response from the bulk of the film using novel sectioning technique. Our results provide significant insight into the origin of nanoscale variations in photoresponse and nanoscale morphology of such materials.

  17. Evolution of topography and material removal during nanoscale grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, S. J.; Cihak-Bayr, U.; Vernes, A.; Betz, G.

    2015-11-01

    In this work we perform molecular dynamics simulations to quantify and parametrize the evolution of a bcc Fe work piece topography during nanometric grinding with multiple hard abrasive particles. The final surface quality depends on both the normal pressure and the abrasive geometry. We fit the time development of the substrate’s root mean squared roughness to an exponential function, allowing the definition of a run-in regime, during which the surface ‘forgets’ about its initial state, and a steady-state regime where the roughness no longer changes. The time constants associated with smoothing and material removal are almost inversely proportional to each other, highlighting the distinctiveness of these two simultaneously occurring processes. We also describe an attempt to reduce the time required to achieve the smoothest possible surface finish by periodically re-adjusting the normal pressure during the grinding process.

  18. Nanoscale insights on one- and two-dimensional material structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floresca, Herman Carlo

    The race for smaller, faster and more efficient devices has led researchers to explore the possibilities of utilizing nanostructures for scaling. These one-dimensional and two-dimensional materials have properties that are attractive for this purpose but are still not well controlled. Control comes with a complete understanding of the materials' electrical, thermal, optical and structural characteristics but is difficult to obtain due to their small scale. This work is intended to help researchers overcome the difficulty in studying nanostructures by providing techniques for analysis and insights of nanostructures that have not been previously available. Two nanostructures were studied: silicon nanowires and graphene. The nanowires were prepared for cross-section transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to discover the effects that controlled oxidation has on the dimensions and shape of the nanowires. Since cross-section TEM is not able to provide information about surface structure, a method for manipulating the wires with orientation control was developed. With this ability, all three orthogonal views of the nanowire were compiled for a comprehensive study on its structure in terms of shape and surface roughness. Graphene was used for a two-dimensional analytical technique that took advantage of customized computer programs for data acquisition, measurement and display. With the information provided, distinctions between grain boundary types in polycrystalline graphene were made and supported by statistical information from the software's output. It was also applied to a growth series of graphene samples in conjunction with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) maps. The results help point to origins of graphene's polycrystalline nature. This dissertation concludes with a thought towards the future by highlighting a method that can help analyze nanostructures, which may become incorporated into the structures of large

  19. Characterizing Electronic Inhomogeneities of Nanoscale Materials for Printable Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlitz, Ruth Anne S.

    Inhomogeneities in the electronic properties of boron-doped silicon nanowires and self-assembled nanodielectrics were characterized quantitatively. For silicon nanowires grown by the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism, radial and axial gradients in boron concentration due to preferentially-doped vapor-solid (VS) deposition on the nanowire side wall lead to significant intra- and inter- nanowire variability. Devices fabricated along the length of a single nanowire transition from behavior dominated by Schottky barriers at the Ni2Si source and drain contacts to linear behavior as the thickness of the VS material increases. For self-assembled nanodielectrics (SANDs), Weibull analysis demonstrates that a high degree of uniformity is achievable with molecular self-assembly. The dielectric breakdown voltage distribution for metal-insulator-semiconductor parallel-plate capacitors containing two types of SAND, Type III and Zr-SAND, were characterized. These devices exhibit a high degree of uniformity (beta ≥ 16 for some samples), and annealing at ≥ 300 °C does not degrade SAND properties. SANDs are also demonstrated to be compatible with electron-beam lithography, and attempts to fabricate Si nanowire SAND field-effect transistors are discussed. Finally, a simple strain platform for one-dimensional nanostructures is presented, and shifts in the Raman peaks of vanadium dioxide nanobeams under varying amounts of uniaxial tension are observed.

  20. Soft-x-ray spectroscopy study of nanoscale materials

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, J.-H.

    2005-07-30

    The ability to control the particle size and morphology of nanoparticles is of crucial importance nowadays both from a fundamental and industrial point of view considering the tremendous amount of high-tech applications. Controlling the crystallographic structure and the arrangement of atoms along the surface of nanostructured material will determine most of its physical properties. In general, electronic structure ultimately determines the properties of matter. Soft X-ray spectroscopy has some basic features that are important to consider. X-ray is originating from an electronic transition between a localized core state and a valence state. As a core state is involved, elemental selectivity is obtained because the core levels of different elements are well separated in energy, meaning that the involvement of the inner level makes this probe localized to one specific atomic site around which the electronic structure is reflected as a partial density-of-states contribution. The participation of valence electrons gives the method chemical state sensitivity and further, the dipole nature of the transitions gives particular symmetry information. The new generation synchrotron radiation sources producing intensive tunable monochromatized soft X-ray beams have opened up new possibilities for soft X-ray spectroscopy. The introduction of selectively excited soft X-ray emission has opened a new field of study by disclosing many new possibilities of soft X-ray resonant inelastic scattering. In this paper, some recent findings regarding soft X-ray absorption and emission studies of various nanostructured systems are presented.

  1. Modeling and simulation of nano-scale electronics based on novel low dimensional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yang

    Semiconductor technology has entered the nano-scale era, in which the featuring size of transistors is well below 100nm. Traditional Si-device has maintained the high speed development for about half a century, characterized by Moore's law. Nowadays, Si-based devices are still the main stream technology, semiconductor industry have invested a lot of efforts to maintain its vitality. However, its physical limits are inevitable. New device concepts have been proposed to upgrade or complement the current Si technology, in order to meet the new challenges in nano-scale electronics. Carbon based materials, from carbon nanotube to graphene, have added new possibilities to this drama. In this paper, graphene based electronics are explored numerically. It also added several chapters on other low dimensional materials such as topological insulators and TMDCs, due to the similarities of their Hamiltonian to graphene system ,and their present popularity in physics community. For all these devices, Nonequilibrium green's function (NEGF) method severs as the framework to capture the quantum transport feature in nano-scale. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  2. Porous silver nanosheets: a novel sensing material for nanoscale and microscale airflow sensors.

    PubMed

    Marzbanrad, Ehsan; Zhao, Boxin; Zhou, Norman Y

    2015-11-01

    Fabrication of nanoscale and microscale machines and devices is one of the goals of nanotechnology. For this purpose, different materials, methods, and devices should be developed. Among them, various types of miniaturized sensors are required to build the nanoscale and microscale systems. In this research, we introduce a new nanoscale sensing material, silver nanosheets, for applications such as nanoscale and microscale gas flow sensors. The silver nanosheets were synthesized through the reduction of silver ions by ascorbic acid in the presence of poly(methacrylic acid) as a capping agent, followed by the growth of silver in the shape of hexagonal and triangular nanoplates, and self-assembly and nanojoining of these structural blocks. At the end of this process, the synthesized nanosheets were floated on the solution. Then, their electrical and thermal stability was demonstrated at 120 °C, and their atmospheric corrosion resistance was clarified at the same temperature range by thermogravimetric analysis. We employed the silver nanosheets in fabricating airflow sensors by scooping out the nanosheets by means of a sensor substrate, drying them at room temperature, and then annealing them at 300 °C for one hour. The fabricated sensors were tested for their ability to measure airflow in the range of 1 to 5 ml min(-1), which resulted in a linear response to the airflow with a response and recovery time around 2 s. Moreover, continuous dynamic testing demonstrated that the response of the sensors was stable and hence the sensors can be used for a long time without detectable drift in their response.

  3. Porous silver nanosheets: a novel sensing material for nanoscale and microscale airflow sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzbanrad, Ehsan; Zhao, Boxin; Zhou, Norman Y.

    2015-11-01

    Fabrication of nanoscale and microscale machines and devices is one of the goals of nanotechnology. For this purpose, different materials, methods, and devices should be developed. Among them, various types of miniaturized sensors are required to build the nanoscale and microscale systems. In this research, we introduce a new nanoscale sensing material, silver nanosheets, for applications such as nanoscale and microscale gas flow sensors. The silver nanosheets were synthesized through the reduction of silver ions by ascorbic acid in the presence of poly(methacrylic acid) as a capping agent, followed by the growth of silver in the shape of hexagonal and triangular nanoplates, and self-assembly and nanojoining of these structural blocks. At the end of this process, the synthesized nanosheets were floated on the solution. Then, their electrical and thermal stability was demonstrated at 120 °C, and their atmospheric corrosion resistance was clarified at the same temperature range by thermogravimetric analysis. We employed the silver nanosheets in fabricating airflow sensors by scooping out the nanosheets by means of a sensor substrate, drying them at room temperature, and then annealing them at 300 °C for one hour. The fabricated sensors were tested for their ability to measure airflow in the range of 1 to 5 ml min-1, which resulted in a linear response to the airflow with a response and recovery time around 2 s. Moreover, continuous dynamic testing demonstrated that the response of the sensors was stable and hence the sensors can be used for a long time without detectable drift in their response.

  4. Integrating Si nanoscale building blocks into micro-sized materials to enable practical applications in lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Yi, Ran; Gordin, Mikhail L; Wang, Donghai

    2016-01-28

    This article highlights recent advances in micro-sized silicon anode materials composed of silicon nanoscale building blocks for lithium-ion batteries. These materials show great potential in practical applications since they combine good cycling stability, high rate performance, and high volumetric capacity. Different preparation methods are introduced and the features and performance of the resulting materials are discussed. Key take-away points are interspersed through the discussion, including comments on the roles of the nanoscale building blocks. Finally, we discuss current challenges and provide an outlook for future development of micro-sized silicon-based anode materials.

  5. Nano-scale optical and electrical probes of materials and processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen

    2007-03-01

    This report describes the investigations and milestones of the Nano-Scale Optical and Electrical Probes of Materials and Processes Junior/Senior LDRD. The goal of this LDRD was to improve our understanding of radiative and non-radiative mechanisms at the nanometer scale with the aim of increasing LED and solar cell efficiencies. These non-radiative mechanisms were investigated using a unique combination of optical and scanning-probe microscopy methods for surface, materials, and device evaluation. For this research we utilized our new near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) system to aid in understanding of defect-related emission issues for GaN-based materials. We observed micrometer-scale variations in photoluminescence (PL) intensity for GaN films grown on Cantilever Epitaxy pattern substrates, with lower PL intensity observed in regions with higher dislocation densities. By adding electrical probes to the NSOM system, the photocurrent and surface morphology could be measured concurrently. Using this capability we observed reduced emission in InGaN MQW LEDs near hillock-shaped material defects. In spatially- and spectrally-resolved PL studies, the emission intensity and measured wavelength varied across the wafer, suggesting the possibility of indium segregation within the InGaN quantum wells. Blue-shifting of the InGaN MQW wavelength due to thinning of quantum wells was also observed on top of large-scale ({micro}m) defect structures in GaN. As a direct result of this program, we have expanded the awareness of our new NSOM/multifunctional SPM capability at Sandia and formed several collaborations within Sandia and with NINE Universities. Possible future investigations with these new collaborators might include GaN-based compound semiconductors for green LEDs, nanoscale materials science, and nanostructures, novel application of polymers for OLEDs, and phase imprint lithography for large area 3D nanostructures.

  6. Combining Hard with Soft Materials in Nanoscale Under High-Pressure High-Temperature Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, B.; Gierlotka, S.; Swiderska-Sroda, A.; Fietkiewicz, K.; Kalisz, G.; Grzanka, E.; Stel'makh, S.; Palosz, W.

    2004-01-01

    Nano-composites with a primary nanocrystalline ceramic matrix and a secondary nanocrystalline material (metal or semiconductor) were synthesized by infiltration of an appropriate liquid into ceramic compacts under pressures of up to 8 GPa and temperatures of up to 2000 K. The purpose of our work is to obtain nanocomposites which constitute homoger?ous mixtures of two phases, both forming nano- grains of about 10 nm in size. The high pressure is used to bring the porosity of the compacted powders down to the nano-scale and force a given liquid into the nano-sized pores. The advantage of the infiltration technique is that, in a single, continuous process, we start with a nanocrystalline powder, compress it to form the matrix of the composite, and crystallize and/or synthesize a second nanomaterial in the matrix pores. The key limitation of this technology is, that the pores in the matrix need to stay open during the entire process of infiltration. Thus the initial powder should form a rigid skeleton, otherwise the so-called self-stop process can limit cr block a further flow of the liquid phase and hinder the process of the composite formation. Therefore powders of only very hard ceramic materials like diamond, Sic, or Alz03, which can withstand a substantial external load without undesired deformation, can be used as the primary phase. With this technique, using diamond and S i c ceramic powders infiltrated by liquid metals (AI, Zn, Sn, Ag, Au) and semiconductors (Si, Ge, GaAs, CdTe), we obtained nano-composites with the grain size in the range of 10 - 30 nm. Our work addresses the key problem in manufacturing bulk nanocrystalline materials, i.e. preservation of nano-scale during the fabrication process. In this paper we discuss basic technical and methodological problems associated with nano-infiltration based on the results obtained for Zn-Sic composites.

  7. Thermomechanically modulated nanoscale multilayered materials for application in electromagnetic gun systems

    SciTech Connect

    Otooni, M.A.; Brown, I.G.; Monteiro, O.

    1997-12-01

    Fired rails from electromagnetic railguns show severe damage from arcing and tribological mismatch. The authors have fabricated and studied several different nanoscale multilayered materials as possible routes to improve the thermal transport and thermomechanical properties of the rail and armature materials. A vacuum-arc-based plasma deposition technique with wide control of ion energy was used for the film synthesis, and high-energy high-dose (energy up to {approximately}150 keV, dose up to {approximately}1 {times} 10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}2}) metal ion implantation was also used. The multilayered film structures formed and investigated included sublayers of Ti, TiCo, ZrN, TaN and dlc (diamond-like carbon) in the following combinations: (1) ZrN on TiCo on TaN on dlc on a Cu substrate, (2) ZrN on TiCo on TaN on dlc on an Al substrate, (3) TiN on TiCo on TaN on a stainless steel substrate, and (4) Ti on TiCo on a stainless steel substrate. Individual sublayer film thickness was in the range of 400 {angstrom}--7{micro}. The surfaces were characterized by SEM, TEM, RBS, high energy electron diffraction, and microhardness measurements. Significant improvements in the material surface properties were obtained for virtually all of the surface structures investigated. Here the authors outline the material synthesis and surface modification techniques used and the materials characterization results obtained.

  8. Nanoscale Engineering of Heterostructured Anode Materials for Boosting Lithium-Ion Storage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gen; Yan, Litao; Luo, Hongmei; Guo, Shaojun

    2016-09-01

    Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), as one of the most important electrochemical energy-storage devices, currently provide the dominant power source for a range of devices, including portable electronic devices and electric vehicles, due to their high energy and power densities. The interest in exploring new electrode materials for LIBs has been drastically increasing due to the surging demands for clean energy. However, the challenging issues essential to the development of electrode materials are their low lithium capacity, poor rate ability, and low cycling stability, which strongly limit their practical applications. Recent remarkable advances in material science and nanotechnology enable rational design of heterostructured nanomaterials with optimized composition and fine nanostructure, providing new opportunities for enhancing electrochemical performance. Here, the progress as to how to design new types of heterostructured anode materials for enhancing LIBs is reviewed, in the terms of capacity, rate ability, and cycling stability: i) carbon-nanomaterials-supported heterostructured anode materials; ii) conducting-polymer-coated electrode materials; iii) inorganic transition-metal compounds with core@shell structures; and iv) combined strategies to novel heterostructures. By applying different strategies, nanoscale heterostructured anode materials with reduced size, large surfaces area, enhanced electronic conductivity, structural stability, and fast electron and ion transport, are explored for boosting LIBs in terms of high capacity, long cycling lifespan, and high rate durability. Finally, the challenges and perspectives of future materials design for high-performance LIB anodes are considered. The strategies discussed here not only provide promising electrode materials for energy storage, but also offer opportunities in being extended for making a variety of novel heterostructured nanomaterials for practical renewable energy applications.

  9. Note: Detector collimators for the nanoscale ordered materials diffractometer instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source.

    PubMed

    Tamalonis, A; Weber, J K R; Neuefeind, J C; Carruth, J; Skinner, L B; Alderman, O L G; Benmore, C J

    2015-09-01

    Five neutron collimator designs were constructed and tested at the nanoscale ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) instrument. Collimators were made from High Density PolyEthylene (HDPE) or 5% borated HDPE. In all cases, collimators improved the signal to background ratio and reduced detection of secondary scattering. In the Q-range 10-20 Å(-1), signal to background ratio improved by factors of approximately 1.6 and 2.0 for 50 and 100 mm deep collimators, respectively. In the Q-range 40-50 Å(-1), the improvement factors were 1.8 and 2.7. Secondary scattering as measured at Q ∼ 9.5 Å(-1) was significantly decreased when the collimators were installed. PMID:26429492

  10. Note: Detector collimators for the nanoscale ordered materials diffractometer instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Tamalonis, A.; Weber, J. K. R.; Neuefeind, J. C.; Carruth, J.; Skinner, L. B.; Alderman, O. L. G.; Benmore, C. J.

    2015-09-01

    Five neutron collimator designs were constructed and tested at the nanoscale ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) instrument. Collimators were made from High Density PolyEthylene (HDPE) or 5% borated HDPE. In all cases, collimators improved the signal to background ratio and reduced detection of secondary scattering. In the Q-range 10-20 (angstrom)-1, signal to background ratio improved by factors of approximately 1.6 and 2.0 for 50 and 100 mm deep collimators, respectively. In the Q-range 40-50 angstrom-1, the improvement factors were 1.8 and 2.7. Secondary scattering as measured at Q similar to 9.5 angstrom-1 was significantly decreased when the collimators were installed.

  11. Note: Detector collimators for the nanoscale ordered materials diffractometer instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Tamalonis, A.; Weber, J. K. R. Alderman, O. L. G.; Neuefeind, J. C.; Carruth, J.; Skinner, L. B.; Benmore, C. J.

    2015-09-15

    Five neutron collimator designs were constructed and tested at the nanoscale ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) instrument. Collimators were made from High Density PolyEthylene (HDPE) or 5% borated HDPE. In all cases, collimators improved the signal to background ratio and reduced detection of secondary scattering. In the Q-range 10-20 Å{sup −1}, signal to background ratio improved by factors of approximately 1.6 and 2.0 for 50 and 100 mm deep collimators, respectively. In the Q-range 40-50 Å{sup −1}, the improvement factors were 1.8 and 2.7. Secondary scattering as measured at Q ∼ 9.5 Å{sup −1} was significantly decreased when the collimators were installed.

  12. Note: Detector collimators for the nanoscale ordered materials diffractometer instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Tamalonis, A.; Weber, J. K. R.; Neuefeind, J. C.; Carruth, J.; Skinner, L. B.; Alderman, O. L. G.; Benmore, C. J.

    2015-09-09

    We constructed and tested five neutron collimator designs using the nanoscale ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) instrument. Collimators were made from High Density PolyEthylene (HDPE) or 5% borated HDPE. In all cases, collimators improved the signal to background ratio and reduced detection of secondary scattering. Moreover, in the Q-range 10-20 Å-1, signal to background ratio improved by factors of approximately 1.6 and 2.0 for 50 and 100 mm deep collimators, respectively. In the Q-range 40-50 Å-1, the improvement factors were 1.8 and 2.7. Secondary scattering as measured at Q similar to 9.5 Å-1 was significantly decreased when the collimators were installed.

  13. Note: Detector collimators for the nanoscale ordered materials diffractometer instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source

    DOE PAGES

    Tamalonis, A.; Weber, J. K. R.; Neuefeind, J. C.; Carruth, J.; Skinner, L. B.; Alderman, O. L. G.; Benmore, C. J.

    2015-09-09

    We constructed and tested five neutron collimator designs using the nanoscale ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) instrument. Collimators were made from High Density PolyEthylene (HDPE) or 5% borated HDPE. In all cases, collimators improved the signal to background ratio and reduced detection of secondary scattering. Moreover, in the Q-range 10-20 Å-1, signal to background ratio improved by factors of approximately 1.6 and 2.0 for 50 and 100 mm deep collimators, respectively. In the Q-range 40-50 Å-1, the improvement factors were 1.8 and 2.7. Secondary scattering as measured at Q similar to 9.5 Å-1 was significantly decreased when the collimators were installed.

  14. Note: Detector collimators for the nanoscale ordered materials diffractometer instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamalonis, A.; Weber, J. K. R.; Neuefeind, J. C.; Carruth, J.; Skinner, L. B.; Alderman, O. L. G.; Benmore, C. J.

    2015-09-01

    Five neutron collimator designs were constructed and tested at the nanoscale ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) instrument. Collimators were made from High Density PolyEthylene (HDPE) or 5% borated HDPE. In all cases, collimators improved the signal to background ratio and reduced detection of secondary scattering. In the Q-range 10-20 Å-1, signal to background ratio improved by factors of approximately 1.6 and 2.0 for 50 and 100 mm deep collimators, respectively. In the Q-range 40-50 Å-1, the improvement factors were 1.8 and 2.7. Secondary scattering as measured at Q ˜ 9.5 Å-1 was significantly decreased when the collimators were installed.

  15. Micro- and Nanoscale Energetic Materials as Effective Heat Energy Sources for Enhanced Gas Generators.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Beom; Kim, Kyung Ju; Cho, Myung Hoon; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Kyung Tae; Kim, Soo Hyung

    2016-04-13

    In this study, we systematically investigated the effect of micro- and nanoscale energetic materials in formulations of aluminum microparticles (Al MPs; heat source)/aluminum nanoparticles (Al NPs; heat source)/copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs; oxidizer) on the combustion and gas-generating properties of sodium azide microparticles (NaN3 MPs; gas-generating agent) for potential applications in gas generators. The burn rate of the NaN3 MP/CuO NP composite powder was only ∼0.3 m/s. However, the addition of Al MPs and Al NPs to the NaN3 MP/CuO NP matrix caused the rates to reach ∼1.5 and ∼5.3 m/s, respectively. In addition, the N2 gas volume flow rate generated by the ignition of the NaN3 MP/CuO NP composite powder was only ∼0.6 L/s, which was significantly increased to ∼1.4 and ∼3.9 L/s by adding Al MPs and Al NPs, respectively, to the NaN3 MP/CuO NP composite powder. This suggested that the highly reactive Al MPs and NPs, with the assistance of CuO NPs, were effective heat-generating sources enabling the complete thermal decomposition of NaN3 MPs upon ignition. Al NPs were more effective than Al MPs in the gas generators because of the increased reactivity induced by the reduced particle size. Finally, we successfully demonstrated that a homemade airbag with a specific volume of ∼140 mL could be rapidly and fully inflated by the thermal activation of nanoscale energetic material-added gas-generating agents (i.e., NaN3 MP/Al NP/CuO NP composites) within the standard time of ∼50 ms for airbag inflation.

  16. Micro- and Nanoscale Energetic Materials as Effective Heat Energy Sources for Enhanced Gas Generators.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Beom; Kim, Kyung Ju; Cho, Myung Hoon; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kim, Kyung Tae; Kim, Soo Hyung

    2016-04-13

    In this study, we systematically investigated the effect of micro- and nanoscale energetic materials in formulations of aluminum microparticles (Al MPs; heat source)/aluminum nanoparticles (Al NPs; heat source)/copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs; oxidizer) on the combustion and gas-generating properties of sodium azide microparticles (NaN3 MPs; gas-generating agent) for potential applications in gas generators. The burn rate of the NaN3 MP/CuO NP composite powder was only ∼0.3 m/s. However, the addition of Al MPs and Al NPs to the NaN3 MP/CuO NP matrix caused the rates to reach ∼1.5 and ∼5.3 m/s, respectively. In addition, the N2 gas volume flow rate generated by the ignition of the NaN3 MP/CuO NP composite powder was only ∼0.6 L/s, which was significantly increased to ∼1.4 and ∼3.9 L/s by adding Al MPs and Al NPs, respectively, to the NaN3 MP/CuO NP composite powder. This suggested that the highly reactive Al MPs and NPs, with the assistance of CuO NPs, were effective heat-generating sources enabling the complete thermal decomposition of NaN3 MPs upon ignition. Al NPs were more effective than Al MPs in the gas generators because of the increased reactivity induced by the reduced particle size. Finally, we successfully demonstrated that a homemade airbag with a specific volume of ∼140 mL could be rapidly and fully inflated by the thermal activation of nanoscale energetic material-added gas-generating agents (i.e., NaN3 MP/Al NP/CuO NP composites) within the standard time of ∼50 ms for airbag inflation. PMID:27007287

  17. Size and shape of grain boundary network components and their atomic structures in polycrystalline nanoscale materials

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tao; Li, Mo

    2015-10-28

    Microstructure in polycrystalline materials is composed of grain boundary plane, triple junction line, and vertex point. They are the integral parts of the grain boundary network structure and the foundation for the structure-property relations. In polycrystalline, especially nanocrystalline, materials, it becomes increasingly difficult to probe the atomistic structure of the microstructure components directly in experiment due to the size limitation. Here, we present a numerical approach using pair correlation function from atomistic simulation to obtain the detailed information for atomic order and disorder in the grain boundary network in nanocrystalline materials. We show that the atomic structures in the different microstructural components are related closely to their geometric size and shape, leading to unique signatures for atomic structure in microstructural characterization at nanoscales. The dependence varies systematically with the characteristic dimension of the microstructural component: liquid-like disorder is found in vertex points, but a certain order persists in triple junctions and grain boundaries along the extended dimensions of these microstructure components.

  18. The use of low-energy SIMS (LE-SIMS) for nanoscale fuel cell material development

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R. J. H.; Fearn, Sarah; Perkins, James; Kilner, John; Dowsett, M. G.; Biegalski, Michael D; Rouleau, Christopher M

    2011-01-01

    Low-energy secondary ion mass spectrometry has been used to investigate the matrix structure and interface attributes of a novel Ce0.85Sm0.15O2/CeO2 multilayer fuel cell material. Nanoscale oxide systems have shown enhanced ionic conductivities when produced to form highly oriented epitaxial structures. The Sm-doped CeO2 material system is of particular interest for fuel cell technology because of its inherently high ionic conductivity at low operating temperatures (600-800 C). For this study, a nanometer-scale Ce0.85Sm0.15O2/CeO2 multilayer was grown by pulsed laser deposition. The sample was annealed at 700 C in an oxygen ambience. High-resolution, low-energy depth profiling using Cs revealed some diffusion of the multilayer structure after annealing, along with a possible volume change for the Sm-doped layers. Changes in layer volume will lead to an increase in the mechanical strain and may cause the material to crack. The findings presented here suggest that the Ce0.85Sm0.15O2/CeO2 multilayer structure in its current form may not possess the level of thermal stability required for use within a fuel cell environment.

  19. Ni-Al Nanoscale Energetic Materials: Phenomena Involved During the Manufacturing of Bulk Samples by Cold Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacciochini, A.; Bourdon-Lafleur, S.; Poupart, C.; Radulescu, M.; Jodoin, B.

    2014-10-01

    It has been shown that the cold-gas dynamic spraying process, or simply cold spray, is a suitable technique to manufacture nanoscale energetic materials with high reactivity and low porosity. The current study focuses on the Ni-Al system, for which the reactivity has been increased by an initial mechanical activation achieved by the ball-milling technique, leading to lamellar nanostructured composite particles. The consolidation of this nanoscale energetic material using the cold-gas dynamic spray technique permits to retain the feedstock powder nanoscale structure in the coatings, which in turn retain the high reactivity features of the powder. However, it has been noticed that the stagnation temperature during the spray can lead to partial reaction of the highly reactive feedstock powder, which directly influences the reactivity of the coatings. In this study, different stages of the spray process were investigated: (i) the in-flight behavior of the nanoscale energetic material (powder) at different stagnation temperatures (from 300 to 800 °C); (ii) the substrate-temperature evolution as the function of gas temperature; and (iii) the impact of the powder on the substrate, related to particle's velocity and its influence on the nanostructure of the particles.

  20. The Nanoscale Ordered MAterials Diffractometer NOMAD at the Spallation Neutron Source SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Feygenson, Mikhail; Carruth, John William; Hoffmann, Ron; Chipley, Kenneth King; Neuefeind, Joerg C

    2012-01-01

    The Nanoscale Ordered Materials Diffractometer (NOMAD) is neutron time-of-flight diffractometer designed to determine pair dist ribution functions of a wide range of materials ranging from short range ordered liquids to long range ordered crystals. Due to a large neutron flux provided by the Spallation Neutron Source SNS and a large detector coverage neutron count-rates exceed comparable instruments by one to two orders of magnitude. This is achieved while maintaining a relatively high momentum transfer resolution of a $\\delta Q/Q \\sim 0.8\\%$ FWHM (typical), and an achievable $\\delta Q/Q$ of 0.24\\% FWHM (best). The real space resolution is related to the maximum momentum transfer; A maximum momentum transfer of 50\\AA$^{-1}$ can be achieved routinely and the maximum momentum transfer given by the detector configuration and the incident neutron spectrum is 125 \\AA$^{-1}$. High stability of the source and the detector allow small contrast isotope experiments to be performed. A detailed description of the instrument is given and the results of experiments with standard samples are discussed.

  1. Designing supramolecular porphyrin arrays that self-organize into nanoscale optical and magnetic materials

    PubMed Central

    Drain, Charles Michael; Batteas, James D.; Flynn, George W.; Milic, Tatjana; Chi, Ning; Yablon, Dalia G.; Sommers, Heather

    2002-01-01

    Tessellation of nine free-base porphyrins into a 3 × 3 array is accomplished by the self-assembly of 21 molecular entities of four different kinds, one central, four corner, and four side porphyrins with 12 trans Pd(II) complexes, by specifically designed and targeted intermolecular interactions. Strikingly, the self-assembly of 30 components into a metalloporphyrin nonamer results from the addition of nine equivalents of a first-row transition metal to the above milieu. In this case each porphyrin in the nonameric array coordinates the same metal such as Mn(II), Ni(II), Co(II), or Zn(II). This feat is accomplished by taking advantage of the highly selective porphyrin complexation kinetics and thermodynamics for different metals. In a second, hierarchical self-assembly process, nonspecific intermolecular interactions can be exploited to form nanoscaled three-dimensional aggregates of the supramolecular porphyrin arrays. In solution, the size of the nanoscaled aggregate can be directed by fine-tuning the properties of the component macrocycles, by choice of metalloporphyrin, and the kinetics of the secondary self-assembly process. As precursors to device formation, nanoscale structures of the porphyrin arrays and aggregates of controlled size may be deposited on surfaces. Atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy of these materials show that the choice of surface (gold, mica, glass, etc.) may be used to modulate the aggregate size and thus its photophysical properties. Once on the surface the materials are extremely robust. PMID:11880598

  2. Nanoscale/multilayer gradient materials for application in electromagnetic gun systems

    SciTech Connect

    Otooni, M.A.; Brown, I.G.; Anders, S.; Wang, Z.

    1996-12-31

    Analysis of fired rails from electromagnetic railguns indicates severe surface damage occurs due to high current arcing and tribological mismatch. The authors have explored the behavior of several nanoscale multilayered materials as possible routes to improve the thermomechanical properties of the rail and armature materials. Structures investigated include (i) Ti-Co alloy on Ta-Cu alloy on dlc (diamond-like carbon) on stainless steel; (ii) Ti-Co alloy on Ta-Cu alloy on dlc on Cu, (iii) Ti-Co alloy on Ta-Cu on Cu; and (iv) Ti-Co on Ta-Cu alloy on Al. The alloys were all 50:50 at% and film thicknesses were fin the range 400--1,000 {angstrom}. The films were formed using a repetitively pulsed vacuum arc plasma deposition method with substrate biasing- and IBAD-like techniques. The surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, optical microscopy, microhardness measurements, arc erosion resistance and scratch resistance tests. Preliminary results show improvement in the microhardness, arc erosion resistance and scratch resistance, most especially for the dlc-coated surfaces. This kind of multilayered approach to the fabrication of electromagnetic railgun and armature surfaces could be important for future advanced Electromagnetic EM Gun systems.

  3. Impact of nanoscale zero valent iron on geochemistry and microbial populations in trichloroethylene contaminated aquifer materials.

    PubMed

    Kirschling, Teresa L; Gregory, Kelvin B; Minkley, Edwin G; Lowry, Gregory V; Tilton, Robert D

    2010-05-01

    Nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) particles are a promising technology for reducing trichloroethylene (TCE) contamination in the subsurface. Prior to injecting large quantities of nanoparticles into the groundwater it is important to understand what impact the particles will have on the geochemistry and indigenous microbial communities. Microbial populations are important not only for nutrient cycling, but also for contaminant remediation and heavy metal immobilization. Microcosms were used to determine the effects of NZVI addition on three different aquifer materials from TCE contaminated sites in Alameda Point, CA, Mancelona, MI, and Parris Island, SC. The oxidation and reduction potential of the microcosms consistently decreased by more than 400 mV when NZVI was added at 1.5 g/L concentrations. Sulfate concentrations decreased in the two coastal aquifer materials, and methane was observed in the presence of NZVI in Alameda Point microcosms, but not in the other two materials. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) showed significant shifts in Eubacterial diversity just after the Fe(0) was exhausted, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analyses showed increases of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene (dsrA) and Archaeal 16s rRNA genes, indicating that reducing conditions and hydrogen created by NZVI stimulate both sulfate reducer and methanogen populations. Adding NZVI had no deleterious effect on total bacterial abundance in the microcosms. NZVI with a biodegradable polyaspartate coating increased bacterial populations by an order of magnitude relative to controls. The lack of broad bactericidal effect, combined with the stimulatory effect of polyaspartate coatings, has positive implications for NZVI field applications.

  4. 3D Magnetic Induction Maps of Nanoscale Materials Revealed by Electron Holographic Tomography

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of three-dimensional (3D) ferromagnetic nanoscale materials constitutes one of the key research areas of the current magnetism roadmap and carries great potential to impact areas such as data storage, sensing, and biomagnetism. The properties of such nanostructures are closely connected with their 3D magnetic nanostructure, making their determination highly valuable. Up to now, quantitative 3D maps providing both the internal magnetic and electric configuration of the same specimen with high spatial resolution are missing. Here, we demonstrate the quantitative 3D reconstruction of the dominant axial component of the magnetic induction and electrostatic potential within a cobalt nanowire (NW) of 100 nm in diameter with spatial resolution below 10 nm by applying electron holographic tomography. The tomogram was obtained using a dedicated TEM sample holder for acquisition, in combination with advanced alignment and tomographic reconstruction routines. The powerful approach presented here is widely applicable to a broad range of 3D magnetic nanostructures and may trigger the progress of novel spintronic nonplanar nanodevices. PMID:27182110

  5. Oxide films at the nanoscale: new structures, new functions, and new materials.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Livia; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2011-11-15

    We all make use of oxide ultrathin films, even if we are unaware of doing so. They are essential components of many common devices, such as mobile phones and laptops. The films in these ubiquitous electronics are composed of silicon dioxide, an unsurpassed material in the design of transistors. But oxide films at the nanoscale (typically just 10 nm or less in thickness) are integral to many other applications. In some cases, they form under normal reactive conditions and confer new properties to a material: one example is the corrosion protection of stainless steel, which is the result of a passive film. A new generation of devices for energy production and communications technology, such as ferroelectric ultrathin film capacitors, tunneling magnetoresistance sensors, solar energy materials, solid oxide fuel cells, and many others, are being specifically designed to exploit the unusual properties afforded by reduced oxide thickness. Oxide ultrathin films also have tremendous potential in chemistry, representing a rich new source of catalytic materials. About 20 years ago, researchers began to prepare model systems of truly heterogeneous catalysts based on thin oxide layers grown on single crystals of metal. Only recently, however, was it realized that these systems may behave quite differently from their corresponding bulk oxides. One of the phenomena uncovered is the occurrence of a spontaneous charge transfer from the metal support to an adsorbed species through the thin insulating layer (or vice versa). The importance of this property is clear: conceptually, the activation and bond breaking of adsorbed molecules begin with precisely the same process, electron transfer into an antibonding orbital. But electron transfer can also be harnessed to make a supported metal particle more chemically active, increase its adhesion energy, or change its shape. Most importantly, the basic principles underlying electron transfer and other phenomena (such as structural

  6. A robust nanoscale experimental quantification of fracture energy in a bilayer material system

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Denvid; Broderick, Kurt; Buehler, Markus J.; Büyüköztürk, Oral

    2014-01-01

    Accurate measurement of interfacial properties is critical any time two materials are bonded—in composites, tooth crowns, or when biomaterials are attached to the human body. Yet, in spite of this importance, reliable methods to measure interfacial properties between dissimilar materials remain elusive. Here we present an experimental approach to quantify the interfacial fracture energy Γi that also provides unique mechanistic insight into the interfacial debonding mechanism at the nanoscale. This approach involves deposition of an additional chromium layer (superlayer) onto a bonded system, where interface debonding is initiated by the residual tensile stress in the superlayer, and where the interface can be separated in a controlled manner and captured in situ. Contrary to earlier methods, our approach allows the entire bonded system to remain in an elastic range during the debonding process, such that Γi can be measured accurately. We validate the method by showing that moisture has a degrading effect on the bonding between epoxy and silica, a technologically important interface. Combining in situ through scanning electron microscope images with molecular simulation, we find that the interfacial debonding mechanism is hierarchical in nature, which is initiated by the detachment of polymer chains, and that the three-dimensional covalent network of the epoxy-based polymer may directly influence water accumulation, leading to the reduction of Γi under presence of moisture. The results may enable us to design more durable concrete composites that could be used to innovate transportation systems, create more durable buildings and bridges, and build resilient infrastructure. PMID:25097263

  7. NANOINTERACT: A rational approach to the interaction between nanoscale materials and living matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Iseult; Linse, Sara; Vyvyan Howard, C.; Stepnik, Maciej; Rydzynski, Konrad; Hanrahan, John; de Jong, Wim; Langevin, Dominique; Rädler, Joachim; Parak, Wolfgang; Volkov, Yuri; Radomski, Marek; Thomas, Robert; Klein, Jacob; Barron, Andrew A.; Janssen, Colin; Lyons, Fiona M.; Quinn, Francis; Swennen, Bert; Cuypers, Peter; Duffy, Angela; Dawson, Kenneth A.

    2009-05-01

    The importance of understanding the interactions between nanoscale materials and living matter has now begun to be appreciated by an extraordinaryly large range of stakeholders, including researchers, industry, governments and society, all of whom appreciate both the opportunities presented by and challenges raised by this arena of research. Not only does it open up new directions in nanomedicine and nanodiagnostics, but it also offers the chance to implement nanotechnology across all industry in a safe and responsible manner. The underlying reasons for this arena as a new scientific paradigm are real and durable. Less than 100 nm nanoparticles can enter cells, less that 40 nm they can enter cell nucleus, and less that 35 nm they can pass through the blood brain barrier. These are fundamental length scales of biological relevance that will ensure that engineered nanoscience will impinge on biology and medicine for many decades to come. One important issue is the current lack of reproducibility of the outcomes of many experiments in this arena. Differences are likely a consequence of such things as uncontrolled nanoparticle aggregation leading to unpredictable doses being presented to cells, interference of the nanoparticles themselves with many of the tests being applied, differences in the degree of confluency of the cells used, and a host of other factors. NanoInteract has shown how careful control of all aspects of the test system, combined with round robin type approaches, can help resolve these issues and begin to ensure that the field can become a quantitative science. The basic principle of NanoInteract is that given identical nanomaterials, cells and biological materials, and using a common protocol, experiments must yield identical answers. Thus, any deviations result from errors in (applying) the protocol which can be tracked and eliminated, until quantitatively reproducible results are obtained by any researcher in any location. This paper outlines the

  8. Peptide-Directed PdAu Nanoscale Surface Segregation: Toward Controlled Bimetallic Architecture for Catalytic Materials.

    PubMed

    Bedford, Nicholas M; Showalter, Allison R; Woehl, Taylor J; Hughes, Zak E; Lee, Sungsik; Reinhart, Benjamin; Ertem, S Piril; Coughlin, E Bryan; Ren, Yang; Walsh, Tiffany R; Bunker, Bruce A

    2016-09-27

    Bimetallic nanoparticles are of immense scientific and technological interest given the synergistic properties observed when two different metallic species are mixed at the nanoscale. This is particularly prevalent in catalysis, where bimetallic nanoparticles often exhibit improved catalytic activity and durability over their monometallic counterparts. Yet despite intense research efforts, little is understood regarding how to optimize bimetallic surface composition and structure synthetically using rational design principles. Recently, it has been demonstrated that peptide-enabled routes for nanoparticle synthesis result in materials with sequence-dependent catalytic properties, providing an opportunity for rational design through sequence manipulation. In this study, bimetallic PdAu nanoparticles are synthesized with a small set of peptides containing known Pd and Au binding motifs. The resulting nanoparticles were extensively characterized using high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and high-energy X-ray diffraction coupled to atomic pair distribution function analysis. Structural information obtained from synchrotron radiation methods was then used to generate model nanoparticle configurations using reverse Monte Carlo simulations, which illustrate sequence dependence in both surface structure and surface composition. Replica exchange with solute tempering molecular dynamics simulations were also used to predict the modes of peptide binding on monometallic surfaces, indicating that different sequences bind to the metal interfaces via different mechanisms. As a testbed reaction, electrocatalytic methanol oxidation experiments were performed, wherein differences in catalytic activity are clearly observed in materials with identical bimetallic composition. Taken together, this study indicates that peptides could be used to arrive at bimetallic surfaces with enhanced catalytic properties, which could be leveraged

  9. Nanoscale Phase Immiscibility in High-ZT Bulk Lead Telluride Thermoelectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, Steven Neal

    Renewable energy initiatives have increased interest in thermoelectric materials as an option for inexpensive and environmentally friendly waste heat-to-power generation. Unfortunately, low efficiencies have limited their wide-scale utilization. This work describes the synthesis and characterization of bulk nanostructured thermoelectric materials wherein natural phase immiscibility is manipulated to selectively generate nanoscale inclusions of a second phase that improve their efficiency through reductions in lattice thermal conductivity. The PbTe-PbS system exhibits natural phase separation by nucleation and growth or spinodal decomposition phase transformations depending on composition and temperature treatment. Through rapid quenching, nearly ideal solid solution alloys of PbTe-PbS are observed by powder X-ray diffraction. However, characterization by solid-state NMR and IR reflectivity show that solid solutions are obtained for rapidly quenched samples within the nucleation and growth region of the phase diagram, but samples within the spinodal decomposition region exhibit very slight phase immiscibility. We report the temperatures of phase separation using high temperature powder X-ray diffraction. Microscopy reveals that phase separation in PbTe-PbS naturally produces nanoinclusions. A decrease in lattice thermal conductivity is observed as a result of the solid solution-to-nanostructured phase transformation in this materials system, increasing thermoelectric figure of merit. Sn addition to PbTe-PbS produces a pseudobinary system of PbTe-PbSnS 2. This materials system produces microscale lamellae that effectively reduce lattice thermal conductivity. Unfortunately, the PbSnS2 inclusions also scatter electrons, reducing electrical conductivity and producing only a minimal increase in thermoelectric figure of merit. We additionally investigate PbSnS2 as prepared through Bridgman crystal growth. PbTe-PbS doped with Na appears to increase the kinetic rate of

  10. Modeling investigation of the stability and irradiation-induced evolution of nanoscale precipitates in advanced structural materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wirth, Brian

    2015-04-08

    Materials used in extremely hostile environment such as nuclear reactors are subject to a high flux of neutron irradiation, and thus vast concentrations of vacancy and interstitial point defects are produced because of collisions of energetic neutrons with host lattice atoms. The fate of these defects depends on various reaction mechanisms which occur immediately following the displacement cascade evolution and during the longer-time kinetically dominated evolution such as annihilation, recombination, clustering or trapping at sinks of vacancies, interstitials and their clusters. The long-range diffusional transport and evolution of point defects and self-defect clusters drive a microstructural and microchemical evolution that are known to produce degradation of mechanical properties including the creep rate, yield strength, ductility, or fracture toughness, and correspondingly affect material serviceability and lifetimes in nuclear applications. Therefore, a detailed understanding of microstructural evolution in materials at different time and length scales is of significant importance. The primary objective of this work is to utilize a hierarchical computational modeling approach i) to evaluate the potential for nanoscale precipitates to enhance point defect recombination rates and thereby the self-healing ability of advanced structural materials, and ii) to evaluate the stability and irradiation-induced evolution of such nanoscale precipitates resulting from enhanced point defect transport to and annihilation at precipitate interfaces. This project will utilize, and as necessary develop, computational materials modeling techniques within a hierarchical computational modeling approach, principally including molecular dynamics, kinetic Monte Carlo and spatially-dependent cluster dynamics modeling, to identify and understand the most important physical processes relevant to promoting the “selfhealing” or radiation resistance in advanced materials containing

  11. Micro- and nano-scale characterization to study the thermal degradation of cement-based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Seungmin Mondal, Paramita

    2014-06-01

    The degradation of hydration products of cement is known to cause changes in the micro- and nano-structure, which ultimately drive thermo-mechanical degradation of cement-based composite materials at elevated temperatures. However, a detailed characterization of these changes is still incomplete. This paper presents results of an extensive experimental study carried out to investigate micro- and nano-structural changes that occur due to exposure of cement paste to high temperatures. Following heat treatment of cement paste up to 1000 °C, damage states were studied by compressive strength test, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) atomic force microscopy (AFM) and AFM image analysis. Using experimental results and research from existing literature, new degradation processes that drive the loss of mechanical properties of cement paste are proposed. The development of micro-cracks at the interface between unhydrated cement particles and paste matrix, a change in C–S–H nano-structure and shrinkage of C–S–H, are considered as important factors that cause the thermal degradation of cement paste. - Highlights: • The thermal degradation of hydration products of cement is characterized at micro- and nano-scale using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). • The interface between unhydrated cement particles and the paste matrix is considered the origin of micro-cracks. • When cement paste is exposed to temperatures above 300 ºC, the nano-structure of C-S-H becomes a more loosely packed globular structure, which could be indicative of C-S-H shrinkage.

  12. Nanoscale Electrochemistry of sp(2) Carbon Materials: From Graphite and Graphene to Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Unwin, Patrick R; Güell, Aleix G; Zhang, Guohui

    2016-09-20

    -sphere redox processes. (ii) Demonstration of the high activity of basal plane HOPG toward other reactions, with no requirement for catalysis by step edges or defects, as exemplified by studies of proton-coupled electron transfer, redox transformations of adsorbed molecules, surface functionalization via diazonium electrochemistry, and metal electrodeposition. (iii) Rationalization of the complex interplay of different factors that determine electrochemistry at graphene, including the source (mechanical exfoliation from graphite vs chemical vapor deposition), number of graphene layers, edges, electronic structure, redox couple, and electrode history effects. (iv) New methodologies that allow nanoscale electrochemistry of 1D materials (SWNTs) to be related to their electronic characteristics (metallic vs semiconductor SWNTs), size, and quality, with high resolution imaging revealing the high activity of SWNT sidewalls and the importance of defects for some electrocatalytic reactions (e.g., the oxygen reduction reaction). The experimental approaches highlighted for carbon electrodes are generally applicable to other electrode materials and set a new framework and course for the study of electrochemical and interfacial processes.

  13. Lorentz contact resonance spectroscopy for nanoscale characterisation of structural and mechanical properties of biological, dental and pharmaceutical materials.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Dipesh; Dillon, Eoghan; Hau, Herman; Fu, Dong; Ramzan, Iqbal; Chrzanowski, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Scanning probe microscopy has been widely used to obtain topographical information and to quantify nanostructural properties of different materials. Qualitative and quantitative imaging is of particular interest to study material-material interactions and map surface properties on a nanoscale (i.e. stiffness and viscoelastic properties). These data are essential for the development of new biomedical materials. Currently, there are limited options to map viscoelastic properties of materials at nanoscale and at high resolutions. Lorentz contact resonance (LCR) is an emerging technique, which allows mapping viscoelasticity of samples with stiffness ranging from a few hundred Pa up to several GPa. Here we demonstrate the applicability of LCR to probe and map the viscoelasticity and stiffness of 'soft' (biological sample: cell treated with nanodiamond), 'medium hard' (pharmaceutical sample: pMDI canister) and 'hard' (human teeth enamel) specimens. The results allowed the identification of nanodiamond on the cells and the qualitative assessment of its distribution based on its nanomechanical properties. It also enabled mapping of the mechanical properties of the cell to demonstrate variability of these characteristics in a single cell. Qualitative imaging of an enamel sample demonstrated variations of stiffness across the specimen and precise identification of enamel prisms (higher stiffness) and enamel interrods (lower stiffness). Similarly, mapping of the pMDI canister wall showed that drug particles were adsorbed to the wall. These particles showed differences in stiffness at nanoscale, which suggested variations in surface composition-multiphasic material. LCR technique emerges as a valuable tool for probing viscoelasticity of samples of varying stiffness's. PMID:26518012

  14. Lorentz contact resonance spectroscopy for nanoscale characterisation of structural and mechanical properties of biological, dental and pharmaceutical materials.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Dipesh; Dillon, Eoghan; Hau, Herman; Fu, Dong; Ramzan, Iqbal; Chrzanowski, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Scanning probe microscopy has been widely used to obtain topographical information and to quantify nanostructural properties of different materials. Qualitative and quantitative imaging is of particular interest to study material-material interactions and map surface properties on a nanoscale (i.e. stiffness and viscoelastic properties). These data are essential for the development of new biomedical materials. Currently, there are limited options to map viscoelastic properties of materials at nanoscale and at high resolutions. Lorentz contact resonance (LCR) is an emerging technique, which allows mapping viscoelasticity of samples with stiffness ranging from a few hundred Pa up to several GPa. Here we demonstrate the applicability of LCR to probe and map the viscoelasticity and stiffness of 'soft' (biological sample: cell treated with nanodiamond), 'medium hard' (pharmaceutical sample: pMDI canister) and 'hard' (human teeth enamel) specimens. The results allowed the identification of nanodiamond on the cells and the qualitative assessment of its distribution based on its nanomechanical properties. It also enabled mapping of the mechanical properties of the cell to demonstrate variability of these characteristics in a single cell. Qualitative imaging of an enamel sample demonstrated variations of stiffness across the specimen and precise identification of enamel prisms (higher stiffness) and enamel interrods (lower stiffness). Similarly, mapping of the pMDI canister wall showed that drug particles were adsorbed to the wall. These particles showed differences in stiffness at nanoscale, which suggested variations in surface composition-multiphasic material. LCR technique emerges as a valuable tool for probing viscoelasticity of samples of varying stiffness's.

  15. Nanoscale characterisation by SANS and residual stresses determination by neutron diffraction related to materials and components of technological interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogante, Massimo; Rosta, Laszlo

    2005-06-01

    Neutron techniques, among the other non-destructive diagnostics, are becoming more and more relevant in investigating materials and components of industrial interest. In this paper, Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) for microstructural characterisation-especially related to the nanoscale-and Neutron Diffraction for Residual Stresses (RS) measurements are considered. The basic theoretical aspects and some industrial applications of each technique are described. In particular, RS determination in welding, in extruded specimens and in components for energy industry is reported. SANS measurements concerning materials and components for energy and automotive industry are finally presented.

  16. Nanoscale characterization of the thermal interface resistance of a heat-sink composite material by in situ TEM.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Naoyuki; Kakefuda, Yohei; Mori, Takao; Hirose, Kenji; Mitome, Masanori; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2015-11-20

    We developed an original method of in situ nanoscale characterization of thermal resistance utilizing a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The focused electron beam of the HRTEM was used as a contact-free heat source and a piezo-movable nanothermocouple was developed as a thermal detector. This method has a high flexibility of supplying thermal-flux directions for nano/microscale thermal conductivity analysis, and is a powerful way to probe the thermal properties of complex or composite materials. Using this method we performed reproducible measurements of electron beam-induced temperature changes in pre-selected sections of a heat-sink α-Al(2)O(3)/epoxy-based resin composite. Observed linear behavior of the temperature change in a filler reveals that Fourier's law holds even at such a mesoscopic scale. In addition, we successfully determined the thermal resistance of the nanoscale interfaces between neighboring α-Al(2)O(3) fillers to be 1.16 × 10(-8) m(2)K W(-1), which is 35 times larger than that of the fillers themselves. This method that we have discovered enables evaluation of thermal resistivity of composites on the nanoscale, combined with the ultimate spatial localization and resolution sample analysis capabilities that TEM entails.

  17. Nanoscale characterization of the thermal interface resistance of a heat-sink composite material by in situ TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Naoyuki; Kakefuda, Yohei; Mori, Takao; Hirose, Kenji; Mitome, Masanori; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2015-11-01

    We developed an original method of in situ nanoscale characterization of thermal resistance utilizing a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The focused electron beam of the HRTEM was used as a contact-free heat source and a piezo-movable nanothermocouple was developed as a thermal detector. This method has a high flexibility of supplying thermal-flux directions for nano/microscale thermal conductivity analysis, and is a powerful way to probe the thermal properties of complex or composite materials. Using this method we performed reproducible measurements of electron beam-induced temperature changes in pre-selected sections of a heat-sink α-Al2O3/epoxy-based resin composite. Observed linear behavior of the temperature change in a filler reveals that Fourier’s law holds even at such a mesoscopic scale. In addition, we successfully determined the thermal resistance of the nanoscale interfaces between neighboring α-Al2O3 fillers to be 1.16 × 10-8 m2K W-1, which is 35 times larger than that of the fillers themselves. This method that we have discovered enables evaluation of thermal resistivity of composites on the nanoscale, combined with the ultimate spatial localization and resolution sample analysis capabilities that TEM entails.

  18. DOE A9024 Final Report Functional and Nanoscale Materials Systems: Frontier Programs of Science at the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Jennifer A.

    2009-03-24

    The scientific programs of the FSMRL supported under the DOE A9024 Grant consisted of four interdisciplinary research clusters, as described. The clusters were led by Professors Tai Chiang (Physics), Jeffrey Moore (Chemistry), Paul Goldbart (Physics), and Steven Granick (Materials Science and Engineering). The completed work followed a dominant theme--Nanoscale Materials Systems--and emphasized studies of complex phenomena involving surfaces, interfaces, complex materials, dynamics, energetics, and structures and their transformations. A summary of our key accomplishments is provided for each cluster.

  19. Surface control of flexoelectricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stengel, Massimiliano

    2014-11-01

    The polarization response of a material to a strain gradient, known as flexoelectricity, holds great promise for novel electromechanical applications. Despite considerable recent progress, however, the effect remains poorly understood. From both the fundamental and practical viewpoints, it is of crucial importance to know whether the coupling coefficients are primarily governed by the properties of the bulk material or by the details of the sample surface. Here we provide, by means of first-principles calculations, quantitative evidence supporting the latter scenario. In particular, we demonstrate that a SrTiO3 film can yield a positive or negative voltage upon bending, depending on whether it is terminated by a TiO2 or SrO layer. This result points to a full control of the flexoelectric effect via surface/interface engineering, opening exciting new avenues for device design.

  20. Plasmonic/Nonlinear Optical Material Core/Shell Nanorods as Nanoscale Plasmon Modulators and Optical Voltage Sensors.

    PubMed

    Yin, Anxiang; He, Qiyuan; Lin, Zhaoyang; Luo, Liang; Liu, Yuan; Yang, Sen; Wu, Hao; Ding, Mengning; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2016-01-11

    Herein, we report the design and synthesis of plasmonic/non-linear optical (NLO) material core/shell nanostructures that can allow dynamic manipulation of light signals using an external electrical field and enable a new generation of nanoscale optical voltage sensors. We show that gold nanorods (Au NRs) can be synthesized with tunable plasmonic properties and function as the nucleation seeds for continued growth of a shell of NLO materials (such as polyaniline, PANI) with variable thickness. The formation of a PANI nanoshell allows dynamic modulation of the dielectric environment of the plasmonic Au NRs, and therefore the plasmonic resonance characteristics, by an external electrical field. The finite element simulation confirms that such modulation is originated from the field-induced modulation of the dielectric constant of the NLO shell. This approach is general, and the coating of the Au NRs with other NLO materials (such as barium titanate, BTO) is found to produce a similar effect. These findings can not only open a new pathway to active modulation of plasmonic resonance at the sub-wavelength scale but also enable the creation of a new generation of nanoscale optical voltage sensors (NOVS). PMID:26783058

  1. Enhanced reactivity of mechanically-activated nano-scale gasless reactive materials consolidated via the cold-spray technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacciochini, Antoine; Radulescu, Matei I.; Charron-Tousignant, Yannick; Van Dyke, Jason; Jodoin, Bertrand; Nganbe, Michel; Yandouzi, Mohammed; Lee, Julian

    2012-03-01

    The present study presents a novel method to prepare nano-scale energetic materials with high reactivity, vanishing porosity, structural integrity and arbitrary shape. The experiments have focused on the Ni-Al system. To increase the reactivity, an initial mechanical activation was achieved by the ball milling technique. The consolidation of the materials used the supersonic cold gas spray technique, where the particles are accelerated to high speeds and consolidated via plastic deformation upon impact, forming activated nanocomposites in arbitrary shapes with close to zero porosity. This technique permits to retain the microstructures in the powders and prevents any reactions during the consolidation phase. The material reactivity is addressed through the flame propagation velocity, which showed an increase in the flame speed of the cold sprayed samples by up to one order of magnitude compared to their cold pressed counterparts.

  2. Heat conduction in nanoscale materials: a statistical-mechanics derivation of the local heat flux.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiantao

    2014-09-01

    We derive a coarse-grained model for heat conduction in nanoscale mechanical systems. Starting with an all-atom description, this approach yields a reduced model, in the form of conservation laws of momentum and energy. The model closure is accomplished by introducing a quasilocal thermodynamic equilibrium, followed by a linear response approximation. Of particular interest is the constitutive relation for the heat flux, which is expressed nonlocally in terms of the spatial and temporal variation of the temperature. Nanowires made of copper and silicon are presented as examples. PMID:25314400

  3. Nanoscale materials applications: Thermoelectrical, biological, and optical applications with nanomanipulation technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyung-Min

    In a sub-wavelength scale, even approaching to the atomic scale, nanoscale physics shows various novel phenomena. Since it has been named, nanoscience and nanotechnology has been employed to explore and exploit this small scale world. For example, with various functionalized features, nanowire (NW) has been making its leading position in the researches of physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering as a miniaturized building block. Its individual characteristic shows superior and unique features compared with its bulk counterpart. As one part of these research efforts and progresses, and with a part of the fulfillment of degree study, novel methodologies and device structures in nanoscale were devised and developed to show the abilities of high performing thermoelectrical, biological, and optical applications. A single beta-SiC NW was characterized for its thermoelectric properties (thermal conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, and figure of merit) to compare with its bulk counterpart. The combined structure of Ag NW and ND was made to exhibit its ability of clear imaging of a fluorescent cell. And a plasmonic nanosture of silver (Ag) nanodot array and a beta-SiC NW was fabricated to show a high efficient light harvesting device that allows us to make a better efficient solar cell. Novel nanomanipulation techniques were developed and employed in order to fabricate all of these measurement platforms. Additionally, one of these methodological approaches was used to successfully isolate a few layer graphene.

  4. Enhanced reactivity of mechanically-activated nano-scale gasless reactive materials consolidated via the cold-spray technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacciochini, Antoine; Radulescu, Matei; Meydanoglu, Onur; Charron-Tousignant, Yannick; van Dyke, Jason; Jodoin, Bertrand; Nganbe, Michel; Yandouzi, Mohamed; Lee, Julian J.

    2011-06-01

    It has been speculated that gasless reactive systems can sustain supersonic detonations waves, provided the local decomposition rate is sufficiently fast and the initial density is sufficiently close to the theoretical maximal density. The present study presents a novel method to prepare nano-scale energetic materials with high reactivity, vanishing porosity, structural integrity and arbitrary shape. The experiments have focused on the Ni-Al system. To increase the reactivity, an initial mechanical activation was achieved by the technique of ball milling. The consolidation of the materials used the supersonic cold gas spray technique, where the particles are accelerated to high speeds and consolidated via plastic deformation upon impact, forming activated nano-composites in arbitrary shapes with close to zero porosity. This technique permits to retain the micro-structures in the powders and prevents any reactions during the consolidation phase. Deflagration tests of the obtained samples showed an increase in the deflagration rate by up to two orders of magnitude.

  5. Forming heterojunctions at the nanoscale for improved photoelectrochemical water splitting by semiconductor materials: case studies on hematite.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Matthew T; Lin, Yongjing; Yuan, Guangbi; Wang, Dunwei

    2013-07-16

    edge energetics with those of water redox reactions, can in principle be addressed by adding nanoscale charge collectors, forming buried junctions, and including additional light absorbers. These results highlight the power of forming homo- or heterojunctions at the nanoscale, which permits us to engineer the band structures of semiconductors to the specific application of water splitting. The key enabling factor is our ability to synthesize materials with precise control over the dimensions, crystallinity, and, most importantly, the interface quality at the nanoscale. While being able to tailor specific properties on a simple, earth-abundant device is not straightforward, the approaches we report here take significant steps towards efficient artificial photosynthesis, an energy harvesting technique necessary for the well-being of humanity.

  6. Multifunctional-layered materials for creating membrane-restricted nanodomains and nanoscale imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, P.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental platform that allows precise spatial positioning of biomolecules with an exquisite control at nanometer length scales is a valuable tool to study the molecular mechanisms of membrane bound signaling. Using micromachined thin film gold (Au) in layered architecture, it is possible to add both optical and biochemical functionalities in in vitro. Towards this goal, here, I show that docking of complementary DNA tethered giant phospholiposomes on Au surface can create membrane-restricted nanodomains. These nanodomains are critical features to dissect molecular choreography of membrane signaling complexes. The excited surface plasmon resonance modes of Au allow label-free imaging at diffraction-limited resolution of stably docked DNA tethered phospholiposomes, and lipid-detergent bicelle structures. Such multifunctional building block enables realizing rigorously controlled in vitro set-up to model membrane anchored biological signaling, besides serving as an optical tool for nanoscale imaging.

  7. Nanoscale investigation of the electrical properties in semiconductor polymer-carbon nanotube hybrid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbief, Simon; Hergué, Noémie; Douhéret, Olivier; Surin, Mathieu; Dubois, Philippe; Geerts, Yves; Lazzaroni, Roberto; Leclère, Philippe

    2012-03-01

    The morphology and electrical properties of hybrids of a semiconducting polymer (namely poly(3-hexylthiophene) P3HT) and carbon nanotubes are investigated at the nanoscale with a combination of Scanning Probe Microscopy techniques, i.e., Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy (C-AFM) and time-resolved Current Sensing Force Spectroscopy Atomic Force Microscopy (CSFS-AFM, or PeakForce TUNA™). This allows us to probe the electrical properties of the 15 nm wide P3HT nanofibers as well as the interface between the polymer and single carbon nanotubes. This is achieved by applying controlled, low forces on the tip during imaging, which allows a direct comparison between the morphology and the electrical properties at the nanometre scale.The morphology and electrical properties of hybrids of a semiconducting polymer (namely poly(3-hexylthiophene) P3HT) and carbon nanotubes are investigated at the nanoscale with a combination of Scanning Probe Microscopy techniques, i.e., Conductive Atomic Force Microscopy (C-AFM) and time-resolved Current Sensing Force Spectroscopy Atomic Force Microscopy (CSFS-AFM, or PeakForce TUNA™). This allows us to probe the electrical properties of the 15 nm wide P3HT nanofibers as well as the interface between the polymer and single carbon nanotubes. This is achieved by applying controlled, low forces on the tip during imaging, which allows a direct comparison between the morphology and the electrical properties at the nanometre scale. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr11888b

  8. Nanoscale control designs for systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Yue

    2014-02-01

    Nanoscale control is the science of the control of objects at dimensions with 100 nm or less and the manipulation of them at this level of precision. The desired attributes of systems under nanoscale control design are extreme high resolution, accuracy, stability, and fast response. An important perspective of investigation in nanoscale control design includes system modeling and precision control devices and materials at a nanoscale dimension, i.e., design of nanopositioners. Nanopositioners are mechatronic systems with an ultraprecise resolution down to a fraction of an atomic diameter and developed to move objects over a small range in nanoscale dimension. After reviewing a lot of existing literatures for nanoscale control designs, the way to successful nanoscale control is accurate position sensing and feedback control of the motion. An overview of nanoscale identification, linear, and nonlinear control technologies, and devices that are playing a key role in improving precision, accuracy, and response of operation of these systems are introduced in this research.

  9. Designing nanoscale constructs from atomic thin sheets of graphene, boron nitride and gold nanoparticles for advanced material applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasuja, Kabeer

    2011-12-01

    Nanoscale materials invite immense interest from diverse scientific disciplines as these provide access to precisely understand the physical world at their most fundamental atomic level. In concert with this aim of enhancing our understanding of the fundamental behavior at nanoscale, this dissertation presents research on three nanomaterials: Gold nanoparticles (GNPs), Graphene and ultra-thin Boron Nitride sheets (UTBNSs). The three-fold goals which drive this research are: incorporating mobility in nanoparticle based single-electron junction constructs, developing effective strategies to functionalize graphene with nano-forms of metal, and exfoliating ultrathin sheets of Boron Nitride. Gold nanoparticle based electronic constructs can achieve a new degree of operational freedom if nanoscale mobility is incorporated in their design. We achieved such a nano-electromechanical construct by incorporating elastic polymer molecules between GNPs to form 2-dimensional (2-D) molecular junctions which show a nanoscale reversible motion on applying macro scale forces. This GNP-polymer assembly works like a molecular spring opening avenues to maneuver nano components and store energy at nano-scale. Graphene is the first isolated nanomaterial that displays single-atom thickness. It exhibits quantum confinement that enables it to possess a unique combination of fascinating electronic, optical, and mechanical properties. Modifying the surface of graphene is extremely significant to enable its incorporation into applications of interest. We demonstrated the ability of chemically modified graphene sheets to act as GNP stabilizing templates in solution, and utilized this to process GNP composites of graphene. We discovered that GNPs synthesized by chemical or microwave reduction stabilize on graphene-oxide sheets to form snow-flake morphologies and bare-surfaces respectively. These hybrid nano constructs were extensively studied to understand the effect and nature of GNPs

  10. Cation exchange on the nanoscale: an emerging technique for new material synthesis, device fabrication, and chemical sensing.

    PubMed

    Rivest, Jessy B; Jain, Prashant K

    2013-01-01

    Cation exchange is an age-old technique for the chemical conversion of liquids or extended solids by place-exchanging the cations in an ionic material with a different set of cations. The technique is undergoing a major revival with the advent of high-quality nanocrystals: researchers are now able to overcome the limitations in bulk systems and fully exploit cation exchange for materials synthesis and discovery via rapid, low-temperature transformations in the solid state. In this tutorial review, we discuss cation exchange as a promising materials synthesis and discovery tool. Exchange on the nanoscale exhibits some unique attributes: rapid kinetics at room temperature (orders of magnitude faster than in the bulk) and the tuning of reactivity via control of nanocrystal size, shape, and surface faceting. These features make cation exchange a convenient tool for accessing nanocrystal compositions and morphologies for which conventional synthesis may not be established. A simple exchange reaction allows extension of nanochemistry to a larger part of the periodic table, beyond the typical gamut of II-VI, IV-VI, and III-V materials. Cation exchange transformations in nanocrystals can be topotactic and size- and shape-conserving, allowing nanocrystals synthesized by conventional methods to be used as templates for production of compositionally novel, multicomponent, or doped nanocrystals. Since phases and compositions resulting from an exchange reaction can be kinetically controlled, rather than governed by the phase diagram, nanocrystals of metastable and hitherto inaccessible compositions are attainable. Outside of materials synthesis, applications for cation exchange exist in water purification, chemical staining, and sensing. Since nanoscale cation exchange occurs rapidly at room temperature, it can be integrated with sensitive environments such as those in biological systems. Cation exchange is already allowing access to a variety of new materials and processes

  11. Breakthrough and future: nanoscale controls of compositions, morphologies, and mesochannel orientations toward advanced mesoporous materials.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Yusuke; Suzuki, Norihiro; Radhakrishnan, Logudurai; Wang, Liang

    2009-01-01

    Currently, ordered mesoporous materials prepared through the self-assembly of surfactants have attracted growing interests owing to their special properties, including uniform mesopores and a high specific surface area. Here we focus on fine controls of compositions, morphologies, mesochannel orientations which are important factors for design of mesoporous materials with new functionalities. This Review describes our recent progress toward advanced mesoporous materials. Mesoporous materials now include a variety of inorganic-based materials, for example, transition-metal oxides, carbons, inorganic-organic hybrid materials, polymers, and even metals. Mesoporous metals with metallic frameworks can be produced by using surfactant-based synthesis with electrochemical methods. Owing to their metallic frameworks, mesoporous metals with high electroconductivity and high surface areas hold promise for a wide range of potential applications, such as electronic devices, magnetic recording media, and metal catalysts. Fabrication of mesoporous materials with controllable morphologies is also one of the main subjects in this rapidly developing research field. Mesoporous materials in the form of films, spheres, fibers, and tubes have been obtained by various synthetic processes such as evaporation-mediated direct templating (EDIT), spray-dried techniques, and collaboration with hard-templates such as porous anodic alumina and polymer membranes. Furthermore, we have developed several approaches for orientation controls of 1D mesochannels. The macroscopic-scale controls of mesochannels are important for innovative applications such as molecular-scale devices and electrodes with enhanced diffusions of guest species.

  12. Dynamic Mechanical Properties, Crystallization Behavior and Morphology of Nanoscale Tin Fluorophosphate Glass/Polyamide 66 Hybrid Materials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huiwen; Yang, Jing; Yu, Honglin; Zou, Xiaoxuan; Jing, Bo; Dai, Wenli

    2016-04-01

    The dynamic mechanical properties, crystallization behavior and morphology of nanoscale Tg tin fluorophosphate glass (TFP glass)/polyamide 66 (PA66) hybrid materials were investigated by XRD, DSC and SEM. The experimental results showed that the Tg of TFP/PA66 hybrid decreased and the third relaxation in the highly filled hybrid appeared due to the interaction between the TFP glass and amide groups of PA66. The storage modulus of the hybrid materials increased with increase in the content of TFP at low temperatures but had little effect at high temperatures. This result was attributed to the stiffness depression of the TFP glass when the temperature rose above its Tg and the similar elasticity of the two phases because of the interaction between the components. The degree of crystallinity and a, y crystal content of PA66 both decreased due to the interaction between the two phases. In addition, the phase defect, the size distribution and the compatibility of TFP in the PA66 matrix were discussed by SEM, the results showed that the TFP appeared aggregation partly, but had the favorable compatibility in the PA66 matrix. PMID:27451779

  13. Fabrication and Optical Measurements of Nanoscale Meta-Materials:Terahertz and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Michael C.; Hao, Zhao; Liddle, Alex; Anderson, Erik H.; Padilla, Willie J.; Schurig, David; Smith, David R.

    2005-07-27

    Recently, artificial meta-materials have been reported [1] that have a negative index of refraction, which allows a homogeneous flat slab of the material to behave as a perfect lens [2], possibly even creating sub-diffraction limited focusing. These novel artificial materials have numerous potential applications in science, technology, and medicine [3], especially if their novel behavior can be extended to the technologically critical near-infrared and visible region. The meta-materials consist of split-ring resonators which provide a negativem, and metal strips which provide a negative e. First steps towards scaling the dimensions of these metamaterials have been recently taken with the fabrication of split-ring resonator structures showing magnetic resonances at about1 THz [4]and 100 THz [5]frequencies.

  14. Nanoscale Interfaces in Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cells: Physical Insights and Materials Engineering Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Kyle Wayne

    With growing global energy demand there will be an increased need for sources of renewable energy such as solar cells. To make these photovoltaic technologies more competitive with conventional energy sources such as coal and natural gas requires further reduction in manufacturing costs that can be realized by solution processing and roll-to-roll printing. Colloidal quantum dots are a bandgap tunable, solution processible, semiconductor material which may offer a path forward to efficient, inexpensive photovoltaics. Despite impressive progress in performance with these materials, there remain limitations in photocarrier collection that must be overcome. This dissertation focuses on the characterization of charge recombination and transport in colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics, and the application of this knowledge to the development of new and better materials. Core-shell, PbS-CdS, quantum dots were investigated in an attempt to achieve better surface passivation and reduce electronic defects which can limit performance. Optimization of this material led to improved open circuit voltage, exceeding 0.6 V for the first time, and record published performance of 6% efficiency. Using temperature-dependent and transient photovoltage measurements we explored the significance of interface recombination on the operation of these devices. Careful engineering of the electrode using atomic layer deposition of ZnO helped lead to better TiO2 substrate materials and allowed us to realize a nearly two-fold reduction in recombination rate and an enhancement upwards of 50 mV in open circuit voltage. Carrier extraction efficiency was studied in these devices using intensity dependent current-voltage data of an operational solar cell. By developing an analytical model to describe recombination loss within the active layer of the device we were able to accurately determine transport lengths ranging up to 90 nm. Transient absorption and photoconductivity techniques were used to study

  15. Nanoscale High Energetic Materials: A Polymeric Nitrogen Chain N8 Confined inside a Carbon Nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Rachid, Hakima; Hu, Anguang; Timoshevskii, Vladimir; Song, Yanfeng; Lussier, Louis-Simon

    2008-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of a new hybrid material, nanostructured polymeric nitrogen, where a polymeric nitrogen chain is encapsulated in a carbon nanotube. The electronic and structural properties of the new system are studied by means of ab initio electronic structure and molecular dynamics calculations. Finite temperature simulations demonstrate the stability of this nitrogen phase at ambient pressure and room temperature using carbon nanotube confinement. This nanostructured confinement may open a new path towards stabilizing polynitrogen or polymeric nitrogen at ambient conditions.

  16. On the role of characterization in the design of interfaces in nanoscale materials technology.

    PubMed

    Ringer, S P; Ratinac, K R

    2004-06-01

    This work reviews recent research on the design and control of interfaces in engineering nanomaterials. Four case studies are presented that demonstrate the power of a multimodal approach to the characterization of different types of interfaces. We have used a combination of conventional, high resolution, and analytical transmission electron microscopy, microbeam electron diffraction, and three-dimensional atom probe to study polymer-clay nanocomposites, turbine rotor steels used for power generation, multicomponent aluminum alloys, and nanocrystalline magnetic materials.

  17. High-Concentration Aqueous Dispersions of Nanoscale 2D Materials Using Nonionic, Biocompatible Block Copolymers.

    PubMed

    Mansukhani, Nikhita D; Guiney, Linda M; Kim, Peter J; Zhao, Yichao; Alducin, Diego; Ponce, Arturo; Larios, Eduardo; Yacaman, Miguel Jose; Hersam, Mark C

    2016-01-20

    Conditions for the dispersion of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) in aqueous solution at concentrations up to 0.12 mg mL(-1) using a range of nonionic, biocompatible block copolymers (i.e., Pluronics and Tetronics) are identified. Furthermore, the optimal Pluronic dispersant for MoS2 is found to be effective for a range of other 2D materials such as molybdenum diselenide, tungsten diselenide, tungsten disulfide, tin selenide, and boron nitride.

  18. Rotaxanes and Photovoltaic Materials Based on Pi-Conjugated Donors and Acceptors: Toward Energy Transduction on the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruns, Carson J.

    The flow of energy between its various forms is central to our understanding of virtually all natural phenomena, from the origins and fate of the universe to the mechanisms that underpin Life. Therefore, a deeper fundamental understanding of how to manage energy processes at the molecular scale will open new doors in science and technology. This dissertation describes organic molecules and materials that are capable of transducing various forms of energy on the nanoscale, namely, a class of mechanically interlocked molecules known as rotaxanes for electrochemical-to-mechanical energy transduction (Part I), and a class of thin films known as organic photovoltaics (OPVs) for solar-to-electric energy transduction (Part II). These materials are all based on conjugated molecules with a capacity to donate or accept pi-electrons. A contemporary challenge in molecular nanotechnology is the development of artificial molecular machines (AMMs) that mimic the ability of motor proteins (e.g. myosin, kinesin) to perform mechanical work by leveraging a combination of energy sources and rich structural chemistry. Part I describes the synthesis, characterization, molecular dynamics, and switching properties of a series of `daisy chain' and oligorotaxane AMM prototypes. All compounds are templated by charge transfer and hydrogen bonding interactions between pi-associated 1,5-dioxynaphthlene donors appended with polyether groups and pi-acceptors of either neutral (naphthalenediimide) or charged (4,4´-bipyridinium) varieties, and are synthesized using efficient one-pot copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition `click chemistry' protocols. The interlocked architectures of these rotaxanes enable them to express sophisticated secondary structures (i.e. foldamers) and mechanical motions in solution, which have been elucidated using dynamic 1H NMR spectroscopy. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations, cyclic voltammetry, and spectroelectrochemistry experiments have demonstrated

  19. In Vitro Evaluation of Nanoscale Hydroxyapatite-Based Bone Reconstructive Materials with Antimicrobial Properties.

    PubMed

    Ajduković, Zorica R; Mihajilov-Krstev, Tatjana M; Ignjatović, Nenad L; Stojanović, Zoran; Mladenović-Antić, Snezana B; Kocić, Branislava D; Najman, Stevo; Petrović, Nenad D; Uskoković, Dragan P

    2016-02-01

    In the field of oral implantology the loss of bone tissue prevents adequate patient care, and calls for the use of synthetic biomaterials with properties that resemble natural bone. Special attention is paid to the risk of infection after the implantation of these materials. Studies have suggested that some nanocontructs containing metal ions have antimicrobial properties. The aim of this study was to examine the antimicrobial and hemolytic activity of cobalt-substituted hydroxyapatite nanoparticles, compared to hydroxyapatite and hydroxyapatite/poly-lactide-co-glycolide. The antibacterial effects of these powders were tested against two pathogenic bacterial strains: Escherichia coi (ATCC 25922) and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923), using the disc diffusion method and the quantitative antimicrobial test in a liquid medium. The quantitative antimicrobial test showed that all of the tested biomaterials have some antibacterial properties. The effects of both tests were more prominent in case of S. aureus than in E coli. A higher percentage of cobalt in the crystal structure of cobalt-substituted hydroxyapatite nanoparticles led to an increased antimicrobial activity. All of the presented biomaterial samples were found to be non-hemolytic. Having in mind that the tested of cobalt-substituted hydroxyapatite (Ca/Co-HAp) material in given concentrations shows good hemocompatibility and antimicrobial effects, along with its previously studied biological properties, the conclusion can be reached that it is a potential candidate that could substitute calcium hydroxyapatite as the material of choice for use in bone tissue engineering and clinical practices in orthopedic, oral and maxillofacial surgery.

  20. Three-dimensional imaging of nanoscale materials by using coherent x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Jianwei

    2011-04-18

    X-ray crystallography is currently the primary methodology used to determine the 3D structure of materials and macromolecules. However, many nanostructures, disordered materials, biomaterials, hybrid materials and biological specimens are noncrystalline and, hence, their structures are not accessible by X-ray crystallography. Probing these structures therefore requires the employment of different approaches. A very promising technique currently under rapid development is X-ray diffraction microscopy (or lensless imaging), in which the coherent X-ray diffraction pattern of a noncrystalline specimen is measured and then directly phased to obtain a high-resolution image. Through the DOE support over the past three years, we have applied X-ray diffraction microscopy to quantitative imaging of GaN quantum dot particles, and revealed the internal GaN-Ga2O3 core shell structure in three dimensions. By exploiting the abrupt change in the scattering cross-section near electronic resonances, we carried out the first experimental demonstration of resonant X-ray diffraction microscopy for element specific imaging. We performed nondestructive and quantitative imaging of buried Bi structures inside a Si crystal by directly phasing coherent X-ray diffraction patterns acquired below and above the Bi M5 edge. We have also applied X-ray diffraction microscopy to nondestructive imaging of mineral crystals inside biological composite materials - intramuscular fish bone - at the nanometer scale resolution. We identified mineral crystals in collagen fibrils at different stages of mineralization and proposed a dynamic mechanism to account for the nucleation and growth of mineral crystals in the collagen matrix. In addition, we have also discovered a novel 3D imaging modality, denoted ankylography, which allows for complete 3D structure determination without the necessity of sample titling or scanning. We showed that when the diffraction pattern of a finite object is sampled at a

  1. AFM nanoscale indentation in air of polymeric and hybrid materials with highly different stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriano, Raffaella; Credi, Caterina; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano

    2014-08-01

    In this study, nanomechanical properties of a variety of polymeric materials was investigated by means of AFM. In particular, selecting different AFM probes, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) bulk samples, sol-gel hybrid thin films and hydrated hyaluronic acid hydrogels were indented in air to determine the elastic modulus. The force-distance curves and the indentation data were found to be greatly affected by the cantilever stiffness and by tip geometry. AFM indentation tests show that the choice of the cantilever spring constant and of tip shape is crucially influenced by elastic properties of samples. When adhesion-dominated interactions occur between the tip and the surface of samples, force-displacement curves reveal that a suitable functionalization of AFM probes allows the control of such interactions and the extraction of Young' modulus from AFM curves that would be otherwise unfeasible. By applying different mathematical models depending on AFM probes and materials under investigation, the values of Young's modulus were obtained and compared to those measured by rheological and dynamic mechanical analysis or to literature data. Our results show that a wide range of elastic moduli (10 kPa-10 GPa) can be determined by AFM in good agreement with those measured by conventional macroscopic measurements.

  2. Advancing Risk Analysis for Nanoscale Materials: Report from an International Workshop on the Role of Alternative Testing Strategies for Advancement.

    PubMed

    Shatkin, J A; Ong, Kimberly J; Beaudrie, Christian; Clippinger, Amy J; Hendren, Christine Ogilvie; Haber, Lynne T; Hill, Myriam; Holden, Patricia; Kennedy, Alan J; Kim, Baram; MacDonell, Margaret; Powers, Christina M; Sharma, Monita; Sheremeta, Lorraine; Stone, Vicki; Sultan, Yasir; Turley, Audrey; White, Ronald H

    2016-08-01

    The Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) has a history of bringing thought leadership to topics of emerging risk. In September 2014, the SRA Emerging Nanoscale Materials Specialty Group convened an international workshop to examine the use of alternative testing strategies (ATS) for manufactured nanomaterials (NM) from a risk analysis perspective. Experts in NM environmental health and safety, human health, ecotoxicology, regulatory compliance, risk analysis, and ATS evaluated and discussed the state of the science for in vitro and other alternatives to traditional toxicology testing for NM. Based on this review, experts recommended immediate and near-term actions that would advance ATS use in NM risk assessment. Three focal areas-human health, ecological health, and exposure considerations-shaped deliberations about information needs, priorities, and the next steps required to increase confidence in and use of ATS in NM risk assessment. The deliberations revealed that ATS are now being used for screening, and that, in the near term, ATS could be developed for use in read-across or categorization decision making within certain regulatory frameworks. Participants recognized that leadership is required from within the scientific community to address basic challenges, including standardizing materials, protocols, techniques and reporting, and designing experiments relevant to real-world conditions, as well as coordination and sharing of large-scale collaborations and data. Experts agreed that it will be critical to include experimental parameters that can support the development of adverse outcome pathways. Numerous other insightful ideas for investment in ATS emerged throughout the discussions and are further highlighted in this article.

  3. Advancing Risk Analysis for Nanoscale Materials: Report from an International Workshop on the Role of Alternative Testing Strategies for Advancement.

    PubMed

    Shatkin, J A; Ong, Kimberly J; Beaudrie, Christian; Clippinger, Amy J; Hendren, Christine Ogilvie; Haber, Lynne T; Hill, Myriam; Holden, Patricia; Kennedy, Alan J; Kim, Baram; MacDonell, Margaret; Powers, Christina M; Sharma, Monita; Sheremeta, Lorraine; Stone, Vicki; Sultan, Yasir; Turley, Audrey; White, Ronald H

    2016-08-01

    The Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) has a history of bringing thought leadership to topics of emerging risk. In September 2014, the SRA Emerging Nanoscale Materials Specialty Group convened an international workshop to examine the use of alternative testing strategies (ATS) for manufactured nanomaterials (NM) from a risk analysis perspective. Experts in NM environmental health and safety, human health, ecotoxicology, regulatory compliance, risk analysis, and ATS evaluated and discussed the state of the science for in vitro and other alternatives to traditional toxicology testing for NM. Based on this review, experts recommended immediate and near-term actions that would advance ATS use in NM risk assessment. Three focal areas-human health, ecological health, and exposure considerations-shaped deliberations about information needs, priorities, and the next steps required to increase confidence in and use of ATS in NM risk assessment. The deliberations revealed that ATS are now being used for screening, and that, in the near term, ATS could be developed for use in read-across or categorization decision making within certain regulatory frameworks. Participants recognized that leadership is required from within the scientific community to address basic challenges, including standardizing materials, protocols, techniques and reporting, and designing experiments relevant to real-world conditions, as well as coordination and sharing of large-scale collaborations and data. Experts agreed that it will be critical to include experimental parameters that can support the development of adverse outcome pathways. Numerous other insightful ideas for investment in ATS emerged throughout the discussions and are further highlighted in this article. PMID:27510619

  4. Engineering single-molecule, nanoscale, and microscale bio-functional materials via click chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniele, Michael Angelo-Anthony

    To expand the design envelope and supplement the materials library available to biomaterials scientists, the copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuCAAC) was explored as a route to design, synthesize and characterize bio-functional small-molecules, nanoparticles, and microfibers. In each engineered system, the use of click chemistry provided facile, bio-orthogonal control for materials synthesis; moreover, the results provided a methodology and more complete, fundamental understanding of the use of click chemistry as a tool for the synergy of biotechnology, polymer and materials science. Fluorophores with well-defined photophysical characteristics (ranging from UV to NIR fluorescence) were used as building blocks for small-molecule, fluorescent biosensors. Fluorophores were paired to exhibit fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) and used to probe the metabolic activity of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase (CARDO). The FRET pair exhibited a significant variation in PL response with exposure to the lysate of Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10, an organism which can degrade variants of both the donor and acceptor fluorophores. Nanoparticle systems were modified via CuCAAC chemistry to carry affinity tags for CARDO and were subsequently utilized for affinity based bioseparation of CARDO from crude cell lysate. The enzymes were baited with an azide-modified carbazolyl-moiety attached to a poly(propargyl acrylate) nanoparticle. Magnetic nanocluster systems were also modified via CuCAAC chemistry to carry fluorescent imaging tags. The iron-oxide nanoclusters were coated with poly(acrylic acid-co-propargyl acrylate) to provide a clickable surface. Ultimately, alternate Cu-free click chemistries were utilized to produce biohybrid microfibers. The biohybrid microfibers were synthesized under benign photopolymerization conditions inside a microchannel, allowing the encapsulation of viable bacteria. By adjusting pre-polymer solutions and laminar flow rates within the

  5. Enhancing heat capacity of colloidal suspension using nanoscale encapsulated phase-change materials for heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yan; Ding, Shujiang; Wu, Wei; Hu, Jianjun; Voevodin, Andrey A; Gschwender, Lois; Snyder, Ed; Chow, Louis; Su, Ming

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes a new method to enhance the heat-transfer property of a single-phase liquid by adding encapsulated phase-change nanoparticles (nano-PCMs), which absorb thermal energy during solid-liquid phase changes. Silica-encapsulated indium nanoparticles and polymer-encapsulated paraffin (wax) nanoparticles have been made using colloid method, and suspended into poly-alpha-olefin (PAO) and water for potential high- and low-temperature applications, respectively. The shells prevent leakage and agglomeration of molten phase-change materials, and enhance the dielectric properties of indium nanoparticles. The heat-transfer coefficients of PAO containing indium nanoparticles (30% by mass) and water containing paraffin nanoparticles (10% by mass) are 1.6 and 1.75 times higher than those of corresponding single-phase fluids. The structural integrity of encapsulation allows repeated use of such nanoparticles for many cycles in high heat generating devices. PMID:20527779

  6. Enhancing heat capacity of colloidal suspension using nanoscale encapsulated phase-change materials for heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yan; Ding, Shujiang; Wu, Wei; Hu, Jianjun; Voevodin, Andrey A; Gschwender, Lois; Snyder, Ed; Chow, Louis; Su, Ming

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes a new method to enhance the heat-transfer property of a single-phase liquid by adding encapsulated phase-change nanoparticles (nano-PCMs), which absorb thermal energy during solid-liquid phase changes. Silica-encapsulated indium nanoparticles and polymer-encapsulated paraffin (wax) nanoparticles have been made using colloid method, and suspended into poly-alpha-olefin (PAO) and water for potential high- and low-temperature applications, respectively. The shells prevent leakage and agglomeration of molten phase-change materials, and enhance the dielectric properties of indium nanoparticles. The heat-transfer coefficients of PAO containing indium nanoparticles (30% by mass) and water containing paraffin nanoparticles (10% by mass) are 1.6 and 1.75 times higher than those of corresponding single-phase fluids. The structural integrity of encapsulation allows repeated use of such nanoparticles for many cycles in high heat generating devices.

  7. A study on the formation of solid state nanoscale materials using polyhedral borane compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Jennifer V.

    The formation of boron containing materials using a variety of methods was explored. The pyrolysis of a metal boride precursor solution can be accomplished using a one-source method by combining TiCl4, B10H 14 and CH3CN in one reaction vessel and pyrolyzing it at temperatures above 900 °C. Amorphous dark blue colored films were obtained after the pyrolysis reactions. Well-defined spherical shaped grains or particles were observed by SEM. The amorphous films generated contained titanium, however, the determination of the boron content of the films was inconclusive. This one pot method making metal boride thin films has the advantage of being able to dictate the stoichiometry of the reactants. Another part of this work represents the first report of both the use of metal boride materials and the use of a titanium-based compound for the formation of nanotubes. This method provides a facile method for generating well-formed boron-containing carbon nanotubes in a "one-pot" process through an efficient aerosol process. The formation of metal boride corrosion resistant layers was also explored. It was shown that metallic substrates can be effectively boronized using paste mixtures containing boron carbide and borax. The formation of a Fe4B 2 iron boride phase was achieved, however, this iron boride phase does not give enough corrosion protection. The formation of a corrosion resistant metal boride coating with strong adhesion was accomplished by boronization of a thermal sprayed nickel layer on the surface of steel. Surfactants were explored as possible nanoreactors in which metal boride nanoparticles could be formed to use as nanotube growth catalyst via room temperature reaction. Different surfactants were used, but none of them successfully generated very well dispersed metal boride nanoparticles. Nanoparticles with varying shapes and sizes were generated which were highly amorphous. The carboxylic acid derivative of closo-C2B 10 cages was explored as a ligand in the

  8. Graphene-based platform for nano-scale infrared near-field spectroscopy of biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatib, Omar; Wood, Joshua D.; Doidge, Gregory P.; Damhorst, Gregory L.; Rangarajan, Aniruddh; Bashir, Rashid; Pop, Eric; Lyding, Joseph W.; Basov, Dimitri N.

    2014-03-01

    In biological and life sciences, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy serves as a noninvasive probe of vibrational fingerprints used to identify chemical and molecular species. Near-field spectroscopy, based on the illumination of an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip with an infrared laser, allows for determination of IR properties of a material at nanometer length scales. However, application of near-field IR spectroscopy to most biological systems has thus far been elusive. Physiological conditions required for experimentation are incompatible with typical implementations of nano-FTIR. Recently it became possible to trap water and small biomolecules underneath large-area graphene sheets grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The graphene layer serves as an IR-transparent cover that allows for a near-field interrogation of the underlying layers. We present near-field nano-imaging and spectroscopy data of unencapsulated Tobacco Mosaic Viruses (TMV), compared to those sandwiched between two large-area graphene sheets, and discuss the applicability of near-field IR spectroscopy to trapped biomolecules in aqueous environments.

  9. Nanoscale carbon materials from hydrocarbons pyrolysis: Structure, chemical behavior, utilisation for non-aqueous supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Savilov, Serguei V.; Strokova, Natalia E.; Ivanov, Anton S.; Arkhipova, Ekaterina A.; Desyatov, Andrey V.; Hui, Xia; Aldoshin, Serguei M.; Lunin, Valery V.

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • N-doped and regular carbon nanomaterials were obtained by pyrolitic technique. • Dynamic vapor sorption of different solvents reveals smaller S{sub BET} values. • Steric hindrance and specific chemical interactions are the reasons for this. • Nitrogen doping leads to raise of capacitance and coulombic efficiency with non-aqueous N-containing electrolyte. - Abstract: This work systematically studies adsorption properties of carbon nanomaterials that are synthesized through hydrocarbons that is a powerful technique to fabricate different kinds of carbon materials, e.g., nanotubes, nanoshells, onions, including nitrogen substituted. The adsorption properties of the as-synthesized carbons are achieved by low temperature nitrogen adsorption and organic vapors sorption. Heptane, acetonitrile, water, ethanol, benzene and 1-methylimidazole, which are of great importance for development of supercapacitors, are used as substrates. It is discovered that while nitrogen adsorption reveals a high specific surface area, this parameter for most of organic compounds is rather small depending not only on the size of its molecule but also on chemical interactions for a pair adsorbent–adsorbate. The experimental values of heat of adsorption for carbon and N-substituted structures, when Coulomb cross-coupling of nitrogen atoms in adsorbent and adsorbate takes place, confirms this supposition.

  10. Breath Figures of Nanoscale Bricks: A Universal Method for Creating Hierarchic Porous Materials from Inorganic Nanoparticles Stabilized with Mussel-Inspired Copolymers.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yuta; Shimomura, Masatsugu; Yabu, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    High-performance catalysts and photovoltaics are required for building an environmentally sustainable society. Because catalytic and photovoltaic reactions occur at the interfaces between reactants and surfaces, the chemical, physical, and structural properties of interfaces have been the focus of much research. To improve the performance of these materials further, inorganic porous materials with hierarchic porous architectures have been fabricated. The breath figure technique allows preparing porous films by using water droplets as templates. In this study, a valuable preparation method for hierarchic porous inorganic materials is shown. Hierarchic porous materials are prepared from surface-coated inorganic nanoparticles with amphiphilic copolymers having catechol moieties followed by sintering. Micron-scale pores are prepared by using water droplets as templates, and nanoscale pores are formed between the nanoparticles. The fabrication method allows the preparation of hierarchic porous films from inorganic nanoparticles of various shapes and materials.

  11. Rocket Science at the Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Wang, Joseph

    2016-06-28

    Autonomous propulsion at the nanoscale represents one of the most challenging and demanding goals in nanotechnology. Over the past decade, numerous important advances in nanotechnology and material science have contributed to the creation of powerful self-propelled micro/nanomotors. In particular, micro- and nanoscale rockets (MNRs) offer impressive capabilities, including remarkable speeds, large cargo-towing forces, precise motion controls, and dynamic self-assembly, which have paved the way for designing multifunctional and intelligent nanoscale machines. These multipurpose nanoscale shuttles can propel and function in complex real-life media, actively transporting and releasing therapeutic payloads and remediation agents for diverse biomedical and environmental applications. This review discusses the challenges of designing efficient MNRs and presents an overview of their propulsion behavior, fabrication methods, potential rocket fuels, navigation strategies, practical applications, and the future prospects of rocket science and technology at the nanoscale.

  12. Rocket Science at the Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Wang, Joseph

    2016-06-28

    Autonomous propulsion at the nanoscale represents one of the most challenging and demanding goals in nanotechnology. Over the past decade, numerous important advances in nanotechnology and material science have contributed to the creation of powerful self-propelled micro/nanomotors. In particular, micro- and nanoscale rockets (MNRs) offer impressive capabilities, including remarkable speeds, large cargo-towing forces, precise motion controls, and dynamic self-assembly, which have paved the way for designing multifunctional and intelligent nanoscale machines. These multipurpose nanoscale shuttles can propel and function in complex real-life media, actively transporting and releasing therapeutic payloads and remediation agents for diverse biomedical and environmental applications. This review discusses the challenges of designing efficient MNRs and presents an overview of their propulsion behavior, fabrication methods, potential rocket fuels, navigation strategies, practical applications, and the future prospects of rocket science and technology at the nanoscale. PMID:27219742

  13. Material properties and applications of blended organic thin films with nanoscale domains deposited by RIR-MAPLE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiff-Roberts, Adrienne D.; McCormick, Ryan D.; Ge, Wangyao

    2015-03-01

    Resonant-infrared, matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (RIR-MAPLE) has been used to deposit blended, organic thin-films with nanoscale domain sizes of constituent polymers, small molecules, or colloidal nanoparticles. In the emulsion-based RIR-MAPLE process, the target contains a nonpolar, organic solvent phase and a polar, water phase. The emulsion properties have a direct impact on the nanoscale morphology of single-component organic thin films, while the morphology of blended, organic thin films also depends on the RIR-MAPLE deposition mode. In addition to these fundamental aspects, applications of blended organic films (organic solar cells, anti-reflection coatings, and multi-functional surfaces) deposited by emulsion-based RIR-MAPLE are presented. Importantly, domain sizes in the blended films are critical to thin-film functionality.

  14. Dual-phase glassy/nanoscale icosahedral phase materials in Cu–Zr–Ti–Pd system alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Louzguine-Luzgin, Dmitri V.; Churyumov, A.Yu.

    2014-10-15

    The present work is devoted to an investigation of the formation kinetics, stability and homogeneity area of the nanoscale icosahedral phase formed on heating in the dual-phase glassy/quasicrystalline phase Cu–Zr–Ti–Pd alloys. The data obtained indicate that the Cu–Zr–Ti–Pd icosahedral phase is not a Cu-rich part of the compositional homogeneity area of the Zr–Cu–Pd one. Moreover, Ti, as well as Pd, is found to be an important element stabilizing quasicrystalline phase in the Cu–Zr–Ti–Pd alloys. The formation criteria for Cu- and Zr/Hf-based icosahedral phases are discussed based on the quasilattice constant to average atomic diameter ratio. Deviation from a certain ratio leads to destabilization of the icosahedral phase. By using the isothermal calorimetry traces transformation kinetics above and below the glass-transition region was analyzed. Some difference in the transformation kinetics above and below the glass-transition region allows us to suggest that possible structure changes occur upon glass-transition. - Highlights: • Formation kinetics, stability and homogeneity area of nanoscale icosahedral phase • Cu–Zr–Ti–Pd icosahedral phase is not a Cu-rich part of Zr–Cu–Pd one. • Ti, as well as Pd, is an important element stabilizing quasicrystalline phase. • Difference in transformation kinetics above and below glass-transition region.

  15. Introduction to the IEEE International Symposium on Applications of Ferroelectrics and International Symposium on Piezoresponse Force Microscopy and Nanoscale Phenomena in Polar Materials.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zuo-Guang; Tan, Xiaoli; Bokov, Alexei A

    2012-09-01

    The 20th IEEE International Symposium on Applications of Ferroelectrics (ISAF) was held on July 24-27, 2011, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, jointly with the International Symposium on Piezoresponse Force Microscopy and Nanoscale Phenomena in Polar Materials (PFM). Over a period of four days, approximately 400 scientists, engineers, and students from around the world presented their work and discussed the latest developments in the field of ferroelectrics, related materials, and their applications. It is particularly encouraging to see that a large number of students (115) were attracted to the joint conference and presented high-quality research works. This trend is not only important to this conference series, but more importantly, it is vital to the future of the ferroelectrics field.

  16. Nanoscale Graphene Disk: A Natural Functionally Graded Material-How is Fourier's Law Violated along Radius Direction of 2D Disk.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nuo; Hu, Shiqian; Ma, Dengke; Lu, Tingyu; Li, Baowen

    2015-10-07

    In this Paper, we investigate numerically and analytically the thermal conductivity of nanoscale graphene disks (NGDs), and discussed the possibility to realize functionally graded material (FGM) with only one material, NGDs. Different from previous studies on divergence/non-diffusive of thermal conductivity in nano-structures with different size, we found a novel non-homogeneous (graded) thermal conductivity along the radius direction in a single nano-disk structure. We found that, instead of a constant value, the NGD has a graded thermal conductivity along the radius direction. That is, Fourier's law of heat conduction is not valid in two dimensional graphene disk structures Moreover, we show the dependent of NGDs' thermal conductivity on radius and temperature. Our study might inspire experimentalists to develop NGD based versatile FGMs, improve understanding of the heat removal of hot spots on chips, and enhance thermoelectric energy conversion efficiency by two dimensional disk with a graded thermal conductivity.

  17. Nanoscale Graphene Disk: A Natural Functionally Graded Material-How is Fourier’s Law Violated along Radius Direction of 2D Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Nuo; Hu, Shiqian; Ma, Dengke; Lu, Tingyu; Li, Baowen

    2015-10-01

    In this Paper, we investigate numerically and analytically the thermal conductivity of nanoscale graphene disks (NGDs), and discussed the possibility to realize functionally graded material (FGM) with only one material, NGDs. Different from previous studies on divergence/non-diffusive of thermal conductivity in nano-structures with different size, we found a novel non-homogeneous (graded) thermal conductivity along the radius direction in a single nano-disk structure. We found that, instead of a constant value, the NGD has a graded thermal conductivity along the radius direction. That is, Fourier’s law of heat conduction is not valid in two dimensional graphene disk structures Moreover, we show the dependent of NGDs’ thermal conductivity on radius and temperature. Our study might inspire experimentalists to develop NGD based versatile FGMs, improve understanding of the heat removal of hot spots on chips, and enhance thermoelectric energy conversion efficiency by two dimensional disk with a graded thermal conductivity.

  18. Nanoscale Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yufeng; Tolic, Nikola; Masselon, Christophe D.; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Camp, David G.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2004-02-01

    This paper describes efforts to develop a liquid chromatography (LC)/mass spectrometry (MS) technology for ultra-sensitive proteomics studies, i.e. nanoscale proteomics. The approach combines high-efficiency nano-scale LC with advanced MS, including high sensitivity and high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) MS, to perform both single-stage MS and tandem MS (MS/MS) proteomic analyses. The technology developed enables large-scale protein identification from nanogram size proteomic samples and characterization of more abundant proteins from sub-picogram size complex samples. Protein identification in such studies using MS is feasible from <75 zeptomole of a protein, and the average proteome measurement throughput is >200 proteins/h and ~3 h/sample. Higher throughput (>1000 proteins/h) and more sensitive detection limits can be obtained using a “accurate mass and time” tag approach developed at our laboratory. These capabilities lay the foundation for studies from single or limited numbers of cells.

  19. Functionalising surfaces at the nanoscale using plasma technology.

    PubMed

    Moore, R

    2009-01-01

    Plasma technology offers a highly effective toolbox for nanoscale surface engineering of materials. The potential variety of nanoscale features and new properties that can be achieved are reviewed here.

  20. Nanoscale thermal transport.

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, D. G.; Ford, W. K.; Goodson, K. E.; Mahan, G. D.; Majumdar, A.; Maris, H. J.; Merlin, R.; Phillpot, S. R.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Illinois; Intel Corp.; Stanford Univ.; Penn State Univ.; Univ. of California at Berkeley; Brown Univ.; Univ. of Michigan

    2003-01-15

    Rapid progress in the synthesis and processing of materials with structure on nanometer length scales has created a demand for greater scientific understanding of thermal transport in nanoscale devices, individual nanostructures, and nanostructured materials. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation that have occurred in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces between materials become increasingly important on small length scales. The thermal conductance of many solid-solid interfaces have been studied experimentally but the range of observed interface properties is much smaller than predicted by simple theory. Classical molecular dynamics simulations are emerging as a powerful tool for calculations of thermal conductance and phonon scattering, and may provide for a lively interplay of experiment and theory in the near term. Fundamental issues remain concerning the correct definitions of temperature in nonequilibrium nanoscale systems. Modern Si microelectronics are now firmly in the nanoscale regime--experiments have demonstrated that the close proximity of interfaces and the extremely small volume of heat dissipation strongly modifies thermal transport, thereby aggravating problems of thermal management. Microelectronic devices are too large to yield to atomic-level simulation in the foreseeable future and, therefore, calculations of thermal transport must rely on solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation; microscopic phonon scattering rates needed for predictive models are, even for Si, poorly known. Low-dimensional nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes, are predicted to have novel transport properties; the first quantitative experiments of the thermal conductivity of nanotubes have recently been achieved using microfabricated measurement systems. Nanoscale porosity decreases the permittivity of amorphous dielectrics but porosity also strongly decreases the thermal conductivity. The

  1. Spectral Analysis of Surface Controlled Phonon Transport in Nanophononic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neogi, Sanghamitra; Donadio, Davide

    Phonon engineering in nanostructured semiconductors has shown promises to further advance the performance of energy applications beyond the state-of-the-art limit. In nanostructured materials, phonon transport is greatly affected by the surface nanoscale character. The concept of nanophononic metamaterial (NPM) was introduced recently to affect nanoscale thermal transport with the inclusion of local surface resonators. We carried out a systematic investigation of phonon transport in locally resonant silicon-based NPMs. We used classical equilibrium molecular dynamics and a Boltzmann transport equation approach with the relaxation time approximation to investigate the nature of phononic thermal transport in nanopatterned silicon membranes with thicknesses of the order of 10 nm and below. We find the presence of local surface resonators has a significant effect on the phonon dispersion and has a direct consequence of suppression of group velocities of phonons in the NPMs. We completed the investigation by relating nanoscale resonant character (geometry and material composition) with phonon scattering, and consequently, phonon transport in the locally resonant silicon membrane NPMs This project is funded by the program FP7-ENERGY-2012-1-2STAGE under Contract Number 309150.

  2. EDITORIAL: Nanoscale metrology Nanoscale metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapetek, P.; Koenders, L.

    2011-09-01

    This special issue of Measurement Science and Technology presents selected contributions from the NanoScale 2010 seminar held in Brno, Czech Republic. It was the 5th Seminar on Nanoscale Calibration Standards and Methods and the 9th Seminar on Quantitative Microscopy (the first being held in 1995). The seminar was jointly organized with the Czech Metrology Institute (CMI) and the Nanometrology Group of the Technical Committee-Length of EURAMET. There were two workshops that were integrated into NanoScale 2010: first a workshop presenting the results obtained in NANOTRACE, a European Metrology Research Project (EMRP) on displacement-measuring optical interferometers, and second a workshop about the European metrology landscape in nanometrology related to thin films, scanning probe microscopy and critical dimension. The aim of this workshop was to bring together developers, applicants and metrologists working in this field of nanometrology and to discuss future needs. For more information see www.co-nanomet.eu. The articles in this special issue of Measurement Science and Technology cover some novel scientific results. This issue can serve also as a representative selection of topics that are currently being investigated in the field of European and world-wide nanometrology. Besides traditional topics of dimensional metrology, like development of novel interferometers or laser stabilization techniques, some novel interesting trends in the field of nanometrology are observed. As metrology generally reflects the needs of scientific and industrial research, many research topics addressed refer to current trends in nanotechnology, too, focusing on traceability and improved measurement accuracy in this field. While historically the most studied standards in nanometrology were related to simple geometric structures like step heights or 1D or 2D gratings, now we are facing tasks to measure 3D structures and many unforeseen questions arising from interesting physical

  3. Nanoscale 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenders, Ludger; Ducourtieux, Sebastien

    2014-04-01

    The accurate determination of the properties of micro- and nano-structures is essential in research and development. It is also a prerequisite in process control and quality assurance in industry. In most cases, especially at the nanometer range, knowledge of the dimensional properties of structures is the fundamental base, to which further physical properties are linked. Quantitative measurements presuppose reliable and stable instruments, suitable measurement procedures as well as calibration artifacts and methods. This special issue of Measurement Science and Technology presents selected contributions from the NanoScale 2013 seminar held in Paris, France, on 25 and 26 April. It was the 6th Seminar on NanoScale Calibration Standards and Methods and the 10th Seminar on Quantitative Microscopy (the first being held in 1995). The seminar was jointly organized with the Nanometrology Group of the Technical Committee-Length of EURAMET, the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt and the Laboratoire National de Métrologie et d'Essais. Three satellite meetings related to nanometrology were coupled to the seminar. The first one was an open Symposium on Scanning Probe Microscopy Standardization organized by the ISO/TC 201/SC9 technical committee. The two others were specific meetings focused on two European Metrology Research Projects funded by the European Association of National Metrology Institutes (EURAMET) (see www.euramet.org), the first one focused on the improvement of the traceability for high accuracy devices dealing with sub-nm length measurement and implementing optical interferometers or capacitive sensors (JRP SIB08 subnano), the second one aiming to develop a new metrological traceability for the measurement of the mechanical properties of nano-objects (JRP NEW05 MechProNo). More than 100 experts from industry, calibration laboratories and metrology institutes from around the world joined the NanoScale 2013 Seminar to attend 23 oral and 64 poster

  4. EDITORIAL: Nanoscale metrology Nanoscale metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picotto, G. B.; Koenders, L.; Wilkening, G.

    2009-08-01

    Instrumentation and measurement techniques at the nanoscale play a crucial role not only in extending our knowledge of the properties of matter and processes in nanosciences, but also in addressing new measurement needs in process control and quality assurance in industry. Micro- and nanotechnologies are now facing a growing demand for quantitative measurements to support the reliability, safety and competitiveness of products and services. Quantitative measurements presuppose reliable and stable instruments and measurement procedures as well as suitable calibration artefacts to ensure the quality of measurements and traceability to standards. This special issue of Measurement Science and Technology presents selected contributions from the Nanoscale 2008 seminar held at the Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRIM), Torino, in September 2008. This was the 4th Seminar on Nanoscale Calibration Standards and Methods and the 8th Seminar on Quantitative Microscopy (the first being held in 1995). The seminar was jointly organized by the Nanometrology Group within EUROMET (The European Collaboration in Measurement Standards), the German Nanotechnology Competence Centre 'Ultraprecise Surface Figuring' (CC-UPOB), the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) and INRIM. A special event during the seminar was the 'knighting' of Günter Wilkening from PTB, Braunschweig, Germany, as the 1st Knight of Dimensional Nanometrology. Günter Wilkening received the NanoKnight Award for his outstanding work in the field of dimensional nanometrology over the last 20 years. The contributions in this special issue deal with the developments and improvements of instrumentation and measurement methods for scanning force microscopy (SFM), electron and optical microscopy, high-resolution interferometry, calibration of instruments and new standards, new facilities and applications including critical dimension (CD) measurements on small and medium structures and nanoparticle

  5. Heterogeneous Charge Carrier Dynamics in Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Materials: Nanoscale Lateral and Depth-Dependent Variation of Recombination Rates in Methylammonium Lead Halide Perovskite Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Bischak, Connor G; Sanehira, Erin M; Precht, Jake T; Luther, Joseph M; Ginsberg, Naomi S

    2015-07-01

    We reveal substantial luminescence yield heterogeneity among individual subdiffraction grains of high-performing methylammonium lead halide perovskite films by using high-resolution cathodoluminescence microscopy. Using considerably lower accelerating voltages than is conventional in scanning electron microscopy, we image the electron beam-induced luminescence of the films and statistically characterize the depth-dependent role of defects that promote nonradiative recombination losses. The highest variability in the luminescence intensity is observed at the exposed grain surfaces, which we attribute to surface defects. By probing deeper into the film, it appears that bulk defects are more homogeneously distributed. By identifying the origin and variability of a surface-specific loss mechanism that deleteriously impacts device efficiency, we suggest that producing films homogeneously composed of the highest-luminescence grains found in this study could result in a dramatic improvement of overall device efficiency. We also show that although cathodoluminescence microscopy is generally used only to image inorganic materials it can be a powerful tool to investigate radiative and nonradiative charge carrier recombination on the nanoscale in organic-inorganic hybrid materials.

  6. Using Plasmon Peaks in Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy to Determine the Physical and Mechanical Properties of Nanoscale Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, James M.

    2013-05-09

    In this program, we developed new theoretical and experimental insights into understanding the relationships among fundamental universality and scaling phenomena, the solid-state physical and mechanical properties of materials, and the volume plasmon energy as measured by electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). Particular achievements in these areas are summarized as follows: (i) Using a previously proposed physical model based on the universal binding-energy relation (UBER), we established close phenomenological connections regarding the influence of the valence electrons in materials on the longitudinal plasma oscillations (plasmons) and various solid-state properties such as the optical constants (including absorption and dispersion), elastic constants, cohesive energy, etc. (ii) We found that carbon materials, e.g., diamond, graphite, diamond-like carbons, hydrogenated and amorphous carbon films, exhibit strong correlations in density vs. Ep (or maximum of the volume plasmon peak) and density vs. hardness, both from available experimental data and ab initio DFT calculations. This allowed us to derive a three-dimensional relationship between hardness and the plasmon energy, that can be used to determine experimentally both hardness and density of carbon materials based on measurements of the plasmon peak position. (iii) As major experimental accomplishments, we demonstrated the possibility of in-situ monitoring of changes in the physical properties of materials with conditions, e.g., temperature, and we also applied a new plasmon ratio-imaging technique to map multiple physical properties of materials, such as the elastic moduli, cohesive energy and bonding electron density, with a sub-nanometer lateral resolution. This presents new capability for understanding material behavior. (iv) Lastly, we demonstrated a new physical phenomenon - electron-beam trapping, or electron tweezers - of a solid metal nanoparticle inside a liquid metal. This phenomenon is

  7. In situ neutron scattering study of nanoscale phase evolution in PbTe-PbS thermoelectric material

    DOE PAGES

    Ren, Fei; Schmidt, Robert; Keum, Jong K.; Qian, Bosen; Case, Eldon D.; Littrell, Ken C.; An, Ke

    2016-08-24

    Introducing nanostructural second phases has been proved to be an effective approach to reduce the lattice thermal conductivity and thus enhance the figure of merit for many thermoelectric materials. Furthermore studies of the formation and evolution of these second phases are central to understanding temperature dependent material behavior, improving thermal stabilities, as well as designing new materials. We examined powder samples of PbTe-PbS thermoelectric material using in situ neutron diffraction and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) techniques from room temperature to elevated temperature up to 663 K, to explore quantitative information on the structure, weight fraction, and size of themore » second phase. Neutron diffraction data showed the as-milled powder was primarily solid solution before heat treatment. During heating, PbS second phase precipitated out of the PbTe matrix around 480 K, while re-dissolution started around 570 K. The second phase remained separated from the matrix upon cooling. Furthermore, SANS data indicated there are two populations of nanostructures. The size of the smaller nanostructure increased from initially 5 nm to approximately 25 nm after annealing at 650 K, while the size of the larger nanostructure remained unchanged. Our study demonstrated that in situ neutron techniques are effective means to obtain quantitative information to study temperature dependent nanostructural behavior of thermoelectrics and likely other high-temperature materials.« less

  8. Dielectric spectroscopy at the nanoscale by atomic force microscopy: A simple model linking materials properties and experimental response

    SciTech Connect

    Miccio, Luis A. Colmenero, Juan; Kummali, Mohammed M.; Alegría, Ángel; Schwartz, Gustavo A.

    2014-05-14

    The use of an atomic force microscope for studying molecular dynamics through dielectric spectroscopy with spatial resolution in the nanometer scale is a recently developed approach. However, difficulties in the quantitative connection of the obtained data and the material dielectric properties, namely, frequency dependent dielectric permittivity, have limited its application. In this work, we develop a simple electrical model based on physically meaningful parameters to connect the atomic force microscopy (AFM) based dielectric spectroscopy experimental results with the material dielectric properties. We have tested the accuracy of the model and analyzed the relevance of the forces arising from the electrical interaction with the AFM probe cantilever. In this way, by using this model, it is now possible to obtain quantitative information of the local dielectric material properties in a broad frequency range. Furthermore, it is also possible to determine the experimental setup providing the best sensitivity in the detected signal.

  9. Predicting the Influence of Nano-Scale Material Structure on the In-Plane Buckling of Orthotropic Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Odegard, Gregory M.; Nemeth, Michael P.; Frankland, Sarah-Jane V.

    2004-01-01

    A multi-scale analysis of the structural stability of a carbon nanotube-polymer composite material is developed. The influence of intrinsic molecular structure, such as nanotube length, volume fraction, orientation and chemical functionalization, is investigated by assessing the relative change in critical, in-plane buckling loads. The analysis method relies on elastic properties predicted using the hierarchical, constitutive equations developed from the equivalent-continuum modeling technique applied to the buckling analysis of an orthotropic plate. The results indicate that for the specific composite materials considered in this study, a composite with randomly orientated carbon nanotubes consistently provides the highest values of critical buckling load and that for low volume fraction composites, the non-functionalized nanotube material provides an increase in critical buckling stability with respect to the functionalized system.

  10. In vitro Alternative Methodologies for Central Nervous System Assessment: A Critique using Nanoscale Materials as an Example.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identifying the potential health hazards to the central nervous system of a new family of materials presents many challenges. Whole-animal toxicity testing has been the tradition, but in vitro methods have been steadily gaining popularity. There are numerous challenges in testing...

  11. Using ICP-qMS to trace the uptake of nanoscale titanium dioxide by microalgae-potential disadvantages of vegetable reference material.

    PubMed

    Potouridis, Theodoros; Völker, Johannes; Alsenz, Heiko; Oetken, Matthias; Püttmann, Wilhelm

    2014-04-01

    As nanoscale materials have gained in economic importance over recent years, concerns about accumulation in the environment and, consequently, analysis of nanoparticles in biological material have increasingly become the focus of scientific research. A nanomaterial used in a wide range of food, consumer and household products is titanium dioxide (nTiO2). Monitoring of nTiO2 via determination of elemental titanium (Ti) can be very challenging because of a variety of possible interferences. This work describes problems during the development of a quantification method for titanium dioxide (TiO2) using inductively coupled plasma-quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-qMS). To evaluate the analytical method, certified vegetable reference material NCS DC 73349 was used. Interestingly, measurements of NCS DC 73349 seemed to result in acceptable recovery values-however, this was without considering interferences or conceivable differences in the natural isotopic abundance of the certified titanium calibration solution and NCS DC 73349. Actually, recoveries were lower than initially assumed. The potential interferences causing augmented recovery could be attributed to the presence of the elements sulfur (S) and phosphorus (P), which were able to form oxide ions and nitrogen-interfering species. The effect of such interfering cluster ions could be prevented by dry ashing as a sample preparation step, to evaporate S and P, before digestion with aqua regia in a high-pressure asher (HPA). Final practicability of the analysis method was proved by monitoring the uptake of nTiO2 by the microalgae Scenedesmus acutus in an environmental exposure study.

  12. Using ICP-qMS to trace the uptake of nanoscale titanium dioxide by microalgae-potential disadvantages of vegetable reference material.

    PubMed

    Potouridis, Theodoros; Völker, Johannes; Alsenz, Heiko; Oetken, Matthias; Püttmann, Wilhelm

    2014-04-01

    As nanoscale materials have gained in economic importance over recent years, concerns about accumulation in the environment and, consequently, analysis of nanoparticles in biological material have increasingly become the focus of scientific research. A nanomaterial used in a wide range of food, consumer and household products is titanium dioxide (nTiO2). Monitoring of nTiO2 via determination of elemental titanium (Ti) can be very challenging because of a variety of possible interferences. This work describes problems during the development of a quantification method for titanium dioxide (TiO2) using inductively coupled plasma-quadrupole mass spectrometry (ICP-qMS). To evaluate the analytical method, certified vegetable reference material NCS DC 73349 was used. Interestingly, measurements of NCS DC 73349 seemed to result in acceptable recovery values-however, this was without considering interferences or conceivable differences in the natural isotopic abundance of the certified titanium calibration solution and NCS DC 73349. Actually, recoveries were lower than initially assumed. The potential interferences causing augmented recovery could be attributed to the presence of the elements sulfur (S) and phosphorus (P), which were able to form oxide ions and nitrogen-interfering species. The effect of such interfering cluster ions could be prevented by dry ashing as a sample preparation step, to evaporate S and P, before digestion with aqua regia in a high-pressure asher (HPA). Final practicability of the analysis method was proved by monitoring the uptake of nTiO2 by the microalgae Scenedesmus acutus in an environmental exposure study. PMID:24604322

  13. Nanoscale science: Complex rules for soft systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2003-11-01

    The nanometre scale is a brave new world for scientists - mixing materials at such small dimensions can cause all sorts of surprising effects. New studies of experimental systems on the nanoscale further our understanding of these complex phenomena.

  14. In vivo micronucleus studies with 6 titanium dioxide materials (3 pigment-grade & 3 nanoscale) in orally-exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Donner, E M; Myhre, A; Brown, S C; Boatman, R; Warheit, D B

    2016-02-01

    Six pigment-grade (pg) or ultrafine (uf)/nanoscale (anatase and/or rutile) titanium dioxide (TiO2) particulates were evaluated for in vivo genotoxicity (OECD 474 Guidelines) in male and female rats by two different laboratories. All test materials were robustly characterized. The BET surface areas of the pg and uf samples ranged from 7 to 17 m(2)/g and 50 to 82 m(2)/g respectively. The materials were assessed for induction of micronuclei and toxicity in bone marrow by analyzing peripheral blood reticulocytes (RETs) by flow cytometry. Single oral gavage doses of 500, 1000 or 2000 mg/kg body weight (bw) of each material were implemented with concurrent negative (water) and positive controls (cyclophosphamide). Approximately 48 and 72 h after exposure, blood samples were collected and 20,000 RETs per animal were analyzed. For each of the six tests, there were no biologically or toxicologically relevant increases in the micronucleated RET frequency in any TiO2 exposed group at either time point at any dose level. In addition, there were a lack of biologically relevant decreases in %RETs among total erythrocytes. All six TiO2 test substances were negative for in vivo genotoxicity effects; however, it is noted that the exposure to target tissues was likely negligible. One pigment grade and one ultrafine material each were evaluated for potential systemic exposure/uptake from the gastrointestinal tract by analysis of TiO2 into blood and liver. No significant increases in TiO2 over controls were measured in blood (48 or 72 h) or liver (72 h) following exposures to 2000 mg/kg bw TiO2. These data indicate that there was no absorption of the test material from the gastrointestinal tract into the blood circulation and the lack of genotoxic effects is therefore attributed to a lack of exposure due to the inability of the test material to migrate from the gastrointestinal tract into the blood and then into target tissues.

  15. Development of high-brightness ultrafast electron microscope for studying nanoscale dynamics associated with strongly correlated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zhensheng

    Strongly correlated-electron materials are a class of materials that exhibit numerous intriguing emergent phenomena, including metal-to-insulator transition, colossal magnetoresistance, high-temperature superconductivity, etc. These phenomena are beyond the reach of the conventional solid state physics, which is based on the band theory. Instead, strong electron-electron correlations are found to play important roles, which leads to complicated interplay between different degrees of freedoms (charge, lattice, spins...). In this thesis, ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) is used to investigate the photo-induced ultrafast structural dynamics of strongly correlated materials, among which VO2 is taken as an exemplar system, one that reveals the fundamental physics behind photo-induced phase transitions, electron-electron correlation on nanometer scales, and the electron-phonon coupling in this exotic class of materials. The phenomena presented here are expected to have more general significance as they may reflect the physics to which other strongly correlated materials also conform. In polycrystalline VO2 thin films, the structural changes resulting from photoexcitation with femtosecond laser pulses with different wavelengths are observed to lead to non-thermal phase transitions, which require less energy compared to the phase transitions induced by thermal excitation. The details of the structural change are extracted from the UED results revealing stepwise atomic movements after photoexcitation, which suggests the phase transition starts with a dilation of the correlated d electrons. On the other hand, the structural phase transition is found to be decoupled from the metal-to-insulator transition when the sample dimension is reduced to the sub-micrometer scale, which is attributed to the interface charge doping effects from different substrates. A new phase (M3, monoclinic metallic phase) is distinguished, which has not been discussed by the existing theoretical

  16. Exploring nanoscale electrical and electronic properties of organic and polymeric functional materials by atomic force microscopy based approaches.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Vincenzo; Liscio, Andrea; Palma, Matteo; Surin, Mathieu; Lazzaroni, Roberto; Samorì, Paolo

    2007-08-28

    Beyond imaging, atomic force microscopy (AFM) based methodologies enable the quantitative investigation of a variety of physico-chemical properties of (multicomponent) materials with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers. This Feature Article is focused on two AFM modes, i.e. conducting and Kelvin probe force microscopies, which allow the study of electrical and electronic properties of organic thin films, respectively. These nanotools provide a wealth of information on (dynamic) characteristics of tailor-made functional architectures, opening pathways towards their technological application in electronics, catalysis and medicine.

  17. Flexoelectricity in Nanoscale Ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalan, Gustau

    2012-02-01

    All ferroelectrics are piezoelectric and thus have an intrinsic coupling between polarization and strain. There exists an additional electromechanical coupling, however, between polarization and strain gradients. Strain gradients are intrinsically vectorial fields and, therefore, they can in principle be used to modify both the orientation and the sign of the polarization, thanks to the coupling known as flexoelectricity. Flexoelectricity is possible even in paraelectric materials, but is generally stronger in ferroelectrics on account of their high permittivity (the flexoelectric coefficient is proportional to the dielectric constant). Moreover, strain gradients can be large at the nanoscale due to the smallness of the relaxation length and, accordingly, strong flexoelectric effects can be expected in nanoscale ferroelectrics. In this talk we will present two recent results that highlight the above features. In the first part, I will show how polarization tilting can be achieved in a nominally tetragonal ferroelectric (PbTiO3) thanks to the internal flexoelectric fields generated in nano-twinned epitaxial thin films. Flexoelectricity thus offers a purely physical means of achieving rotated polarizations, which are thought to be useful for enhanced piezoelectricity. In the second part, we will show how the large strain gradients generated by pushing the sharp tip of an atomic force microscope against the surface of a thin ferroelectric film can be used to actively switch its polarity by 180^o. This enables a new concept for ``multiferroic'' memory operation in which the memory bits are written mechanically and read electrically.

  18. Nanoscale relaxation oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Regan, Brian C.; Aloni, Shaul

    2009-04-07

    A nanoscale oscillation device is disclosed, wherein two nanoscale droplets are altered in size by mass transport, then contact each other and merge through surface tension. The device may also comprise a channel having an actuator responsive to mechanical oscillation caused by expansion and contraction of the droplets. It further has a structure for delivering atoms between droplets, wherein the droplets are nanoparticles. Provided are a first particle and a second particle on the channel member, both being made of a chargeable material, the second particle contacting the actuator portion; and electrodes connected to the channel member for delivering a potential gradient across the channel and traversing the first and second particles. The particles are spaced apart a specified distance so that atoms from one particle are delivered to the other particle by mass transport in response to the potential (e.g. voltage potential) and the first and second particles are liquid and touch at a predetermined point of growth, thereby causing merging of the second particle into the first particle by surface tension forces and reverse movement of the actuator. In a preferred embodiment, the channel comprises a carbon nanotube and the droplets comprise metal nanoparticles, e.g. indium, which is readily made liquid.

  19. Electroless deposition and nanolithography can control the formation of materials at the nano-scale for plasmonic applications.

    PubMed

    Coluccio, Maria Laura; Gentile, Francesco; Francardi, Marco; Perozziello, Gerardo; Malara, Natalia; Candeloro, Patrizio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2014-01-01

    The new revolution in materials science is being driven by our ability to manipulate matter at the molecular level to create structures with novel functions and properties. The aim of this paper is to explore new strategies to obtain plasmonic metal nanostructures through the combination of a top down method, that is electron beam lithography, and a bottom up technique, that is the chemical electroless deposition. This technique allows a tight control over the shape and size of bi- and three-dimensional metal patterns at the nano scale. The resulting nanostructures can be used as constituents of Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) substrates, where the electromagnetic field is strongly amplified. Our results indicate that, in electroless growth, high quality metal nanostructures with sizes below 50 nm may be easily obtained. These findings were explained within the framework of a diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) model, that is a simulation model that makes it possible to decipher, at an atomic level, the rules governing the evolution of the growth front; moreover, we give a description of the physical mechanisms of growth at a basic level. In the discussion, we show how these findings can be utilized to fabricate dimers of silver nanospheres where the size and shape of those spheres is controlled with extreme precision and can be used for very large area SERS substrates and nano-optics, for single molecule detection. PMID:24681672

  20. Electroless deposition and nanolithography can control the formation of materials at the nano-scale for plasmonic applications.

    PubMed

    Coluccio, Maria Laura; Gentile, Francesco; Francardi, Marco; Perozziello, Gerardo; Malara, Natalia; Candeloro, Patrizio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2014-03-27

    The new revolution in materials science is being driven by our ability to manipulate matter at the molecular level to create structures with novel functions and properties. The aim of this paper is to explore new strategies to obtain plasmonic metal nanostructures through the combination of a top down method, that is electron beam lithography, and a bottom up technique, that is the chemical electroless deposition. This technique allows a tight control over the shape and size of bi- and three-dimensional metal patterns at the nano scale. The resulting nanostructures can be used as constituents of Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) substrates, where the electromagnetic field is strongly amplified. Our results indicate that, in electroless growth, high quality metal nanostructures with sizes below 50 nm may be easily obtained. These findings were explained within the framework of a diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) model, that is a simulation model that makes it possible to decipher, at an atomic level, the rules governing the evolution of the growth front; moreover, we give a description of the physical mechanisms of growth at a basic level. In the discussion, we show how these findings can be utilized to fabricate dimers of silver nanospheres where the size and shape of those spheres is controlled with extreme precision and can be used for very large area SERS substrates and nano-optics, for single molecule detection.

  1. Electroless Deposition and Nanolithography Can Control the Formation of Materials at the Nano-Scale for Plasmonic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Coluccio, Maria Laura; Gentile, Francesco; Francardi, Marco; Perozziello, Gerardo; Malara, Natalia; Candeloro, Patrizio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2014-01-01

    The new revolution in materials science is being driven by our ability to manipulate matter at the molecular level to create structures with novel functions and properties. The aim of this paper is to explore new strategies to obtain plasmonic metal nanostructures through the combination of a top down method, that is electron beam lithography, and a bottom up technique, that is the chemical electroless deposition. This technique allows a tight control over the shape and size of bi- and three-dimensional metal patterns at the nano scale. The resulting nanostructures can be used as constituents of Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) substrates, where the electromagnetic field is strongly amplified. Our results indicate that, in electroless growth, high quality metal nanostructures with sizes below 50 nm may be easily obtained. These findings were explained within the framework of a diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) model, that is a simulation model that makes it possible to decipher, at an atomic level, the rules governing the evolution of the growth front; moreover, we give a description of the physical mechanisms of growth at a basic level. In the discussion, we show how these findings can be utilized to fabricate dimers of silver nanospheres where the size and shape of those spheres is controlled with extreme precision and can be used for very large area SERS substrates and nano-optics, for single molecule detection. PMID:24681672

  2. Dipole-Dipole Interaction Driven Self-Assembly of Merocyanine Dyes: From Dimers to Nanoscale Objects and Supramolecular Materials.

    PubMed

    Würthner, Frank

    2016-05-17

    -aggregates falls under kinetic control and is slowed tremendously with decreasing solvent polarity. Co-assembly of achiral and chiral merocyanine building blocks or two enantiomers of a chiral merocyanine in different ratios provided insight into "majority rules" and "sergeant-and-soldiers" effects as well as the autocatalytic fiber growth process. With regard to materials applications, it is important to note that the high propensity for dipolar aggregation was disadvantageous for many envisioned applications of these dyes in the area of nonlinear optics. However, this aggregation behavior proved to be advantageous for the recently demonstrated applications of D-π-A dyes, in particular, merocyanines as p-type organic semiconductors in organic electronics and photovoltaics. Thus, organic transistors with hole mobilities >0.5 cm(2)/(V s) and organic solar cells with power conversion efficiencies >6% could be achieved with merocyanine-based organic semiconductor molecules.

  3. Dipole-Dipole Interaction Driven Self-Assembly of Merocyanine Dyes: From Dimers to Nanoscale Objects and Supramolecular Materials.

    PubMed

    Würthner, Frank

    2016-05-17

    -aggregates falls under kinetic control and is slowed tremendously with decreasing solvent polarity. Co-assembly of achiral and chiral merocyanine building blocks or two enantiomers of a chiral merocyanine in different ratios provided insight into "majority rules" and "sergeant-and-soldiers" effects as well as the autocatalytic fiber growth process. With regard to materials applications, it is important to note that the high propensity for dipolar aggregation was disadvantageous for many envisioned applications of these dyes in the area of nonlinear optics. However, this aggregation behavior proved to be advantageous for the recently demonstrated applications of D-π-A dyes, in particular, merocyanines as p-type organic semiconductors in organic electronics and photovoltaics. Thus, organic transistors with hole mobilities >0.5 cm(2)/(V s) and organic solar cells with power conversion efficiencies >6% could be achieved with merocyanine-based organic semiconductor molecules. PMID:27064423

  4. Nanoscale waveguiding methods.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chia-Jean; Lin, Lih Y

    2007-05-01

    While 32 nm lithography technology is on the horizon for integrated circuit (IC) fabrication, matching the pace for miniaturization with optics has been hampered by the diffraction limit. However, development of nanoscale components and guiding methods is burgeoning through advances in fabrication techniques and materials processing. As waveguiding presents the fundamental issue and cornerstone for ultra-high density photonic ICs, we examine the current state of methods in the field. Namely, plasmonic, metal slot and negative dielectric based waveguides as well as a few sub-micrometer techniques such as nanoribbons, high-index contrast and photonic crystals waveguides are investigated in terms of construction, transmission, and limitations. Furthermore, we discuss in detail quantum dot (QD) arrays as a gain-enabled and flexible means to transmit energy through straight paths and sharp bends. Modeling, fabrication and test results are provided and show that the QD waveguide may be effective as an alternate means to transfer light on sub-diffraction dimensions.

  5. Nanoscale waveguiding methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chia-Jean; Lin, Lih Y.

    2007-05-01

    While 32 nm lithography technology is on the horizon for integrated circuit (IC) fabrication, matching the pace for miniaturization with optics has been hampered by the diffraction limit. However, development of nanoscale components and guiding methods is burgeoning through advances in fabrication techniques and materials processing. As waveguiding presents the fundamental issue and cornerstone for ultra-high density photonic ICs, we examine the current state of methods in the field. Namely, plasmonic, metal slot and negative dielectric based waveguides as well as a few sub-micrometer techniques such as nanoribbons, high-index contrast and photonic crystals waveguides are investigated in terms of construction, transmission, and limitations. Furthermore, we discuss in detail quantum dot (QD) arrays as a gain-enabled and flexible means to transmit energy through straight paths and sharp bends. Modeling, fabrication and test results are provided and show that the QD waveguide may be effective as an alternate means to transfer light on sub-diffraction dimensions.

  6. Nanoscale memristive radiofrequency switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Shuang; Ghadiri-Sadrabadi, Mohammad; Bardin, Joseph C.; Xia, Qiangfei

    2015-06-01

    Radiofrequency switches are critical components in wireless communication systems and consumer electronics. Emerging devices include switches based on microelectromechanical systems and phase-change materials. However, these devices suffer from disadvantages such as large physical dimensions and high actuation voltages. Here we propose and demonstrate a nanoscale radiofrequency switch based on a memristive device. The device can be programmed with a voltage as low as 0.4 V and has an ON/OFF conductance ratio up to 1012 with long state retention. We measure the radiofrequency performance of the switch up to 110 GHz and demonstrate low insertion loss (0.3 dB at 40 GHz), high isolation (30 dB at 40 GHz), an average cutoff frequency of 35 THz and competitive linearity and power-handling capability. Our results suggest that, in addition to their application in memory and computing, memristive devices are also a leading contender for radiofrequency switch applications.

  7. Probing elasticity at the nanoscale: Terahertz acoustic vibration of small metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Juvé, Vincent; Crut, Aurélien; Maioli, Paolo; Pellarin, Michel; Broyer, Michel; Del Fatti, Natalia; Vallée, Fabrice

    2010-05-12

    The acoustic response of surface-controlled metal (Pt) nanoparticles is investigated in the small size range, between 1.3 and 3 nm (i.e., 75-950 atoms), using time-resolved spectroscopy. Acoustic vibration of the nanoparticles is demonstrated, with frequencies ranging from 1.1 to 2.6 THz, opening the way to the development of THz acoustic resonators. The frequencies, measured with a noncontact optical method, are in excellent agreement with the prediction of a macroscopic approach based on the continuous elastic model, together with the bulk material elastic constants. This demonstrates the validity of this model at the nanoscale and the weak impact of size reduction on the elastic properties of a material, even for nanoparticles formed by less than 100 atoms.

  8. Nanoscale thermal probing

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yanan; Wang, Xinwei

    2012-01-01

    Nanoscale novel devices have raised the demand for nanoscale thermal characterization that is critical for evaluating the device performance and durability. Achieving nanoscale spatial resolution and high accuracy in temperature measurement is very challenging due to the limitation of measurement pathways. In this review, we discuss four methodologies currently developed in nanoscale surface imaging and temperature measurement. To overcome the restriction of the conventional methods, the scanning thermal microscopy technique is widely used. From the perspective of measuring target, the optical feature size method can be applied by using either Raman or fluorescence thermometry. The near-field optical method that measures nanoscale temperature by focusing the optical field to a nano-sized region provides a non-contact and non-destructive way for nanoscale thermal probing. Although the resistance thermometry based on nano-sized thermal sensors is possible for nanoscale thermal probing, significant effort is still needed to reduce the size of the current sensors by using advanced fabrication techniques. At the same time, the development of nanoscale imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging, provides a great potential solution to resolve the nanoscale thermal probing problem. PMID:22419968

  9. Bumpy, Sticky, and Shaky: Nanoscale Science and the Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Amy; Jones, Gail; Pearl, Thomas P.

    2008-01-01

    Nanoscience, or the study of the world at the size of a billionth of a meter, has the potential to help students see how all of the sciences are related. Behavior of materials at the nanoscale differs from materials at the macroscale. This article introduces three nanoscale properties and how they relate to various science domains. Three…

  10. Nanoscale quantitative measurement of the potential of charged nanostructures by electrostatic and Kelvin probe force microscopy: unraveling electronic processes in complex materials.

    PubMed

    Liscio, Andrea; Palermo, Vincenzo; Samorì, Paolo

    2010-04-20

    In microelectronics and biology, many fundamental processes involve the exchange of charges between small objects, such as nanocrystals in photovoltaic blends or individual proteins in photosynthetic reactions. Because these nanoscale electronic processes strongly depend on the structure of the electroactive assemblies, a detailed understanding of these phenomena requires unraveling the relationship between the structure of the nano-object and its electronic function. Because of the fragility of the structures involved and the dynamic variance of the electric potential of each nanostructure during the charge generation and transport processes, understanding this structure-function relationship represents a great challenge. This Account discusses how our group and others have exploited scanning probe microscopy based approaches beyond imaging, particularly Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM), to map the potential of different nanostructures with a spatial and voltage resolution of a few nanometers and millivolts, respectively. We describe in detail how these techniques can provide researchers several types of chemical information. First, KPFM allows researchers to visualize the photogeneration and splitting of several unitary charges between well-defined nano-objects having complementary electron-acceptor and -donor properties. In addition, this method maps charge injection and transport in thin layers of polycrystalline materials. Finally, KPFM can monitor the activity of immobilized chemical components of natural photosynthetic systems. In particular, researchers can use KPFM to measure the electric potential without physical contact between the tip and the nanostructure studied. These measurements exploit long-range electrostatic interactions between the scanning probe and the sample, which scale with the square of the probe-sample distance, d. While allowing minimal perturbation, these long-range interactions limit the resolution attainable in the measurement

  11. Developmental toxicity studies with 6 forms of titanium dioxide test materials (3 pigment-different grade & 3 nanoscale) demonstrate an absence of effects in orally-exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Warheit, D B; Boatman, R; Brown, S C

    2015-12-01

    Six different commercial forms and sizes of titanium dioxide particles were tested in separate developmental toxicity assays. The three pigment-grade (pg) or 3 ultrafine (uf)/nanoscale (anatase and/or rutile) titanium dioxide (TiO2) particle-types were evaluated for potential maternal and developmental toxicity in pregnant rats by two different laboratories. All studies were conducted according to OECD Guideline 414 (Prenatal Developmental Toxicity Study). In addition, all test materials were robustly characterized. The BET surface areas of the pg and uf samples ranged from 7 to 17 m(2)/g and 50-82 m(2)/g respectively (see Table 1). The test substances were formulated in sterile water. In all of the studies, the formulations were administered by oral gavage to time-mated rats daily beginning around the time of implantation and continuing until the day prior to expected parturition. In 3 of the studies (uf-1, uf-3, & pg-1), the formulations were administered to Crl:CD(SD) rats beginning on gestation day (GD) 6 through GD 20. In 3 additional studies (uf-2, and pg-2, pg-3 TiO2 particles), the formulations were administered to Wistar rats beginning on GD 5 through 19. The dose levels used in all studies were 0, 100, 300, or 1000 mg/kg/day; control group animals were administered the vehicle. During the in-life portions of the studies, body weights, food consumption, and clinical observations before and after dosing were collected on a daily basis. All dams were euthanized just prior to expected parturition (GD 21 for Crl:CD(SD) rats and GD 20 for Wistar rats). The gross necropsies included an examination and description of uterine contents including counts of corpora lutea, implantation sites, resorptions, and live and dead fetuses. All live fetuses were sexed, weighed, and examined externally and euthanized. Following euthanasia, fresh visceral and head examinations were performed on selected fetuses. The fetal carcasses were then processed and examined for skeletal

  12. Electrostatics at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Walker, David A; Kowalczyk, Bartlomiej; de la Cruz, Monica Olvera; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2011-04-01

    Electrostatic forces are amongst the most versatile interactions to mediate the assembly of nanostructured materials. Depending on experimental conditions, these forces can be long- or short-ranged, can be either attractive or repulsive, and their directionality can be controlled by the shapes of the charged nano-objects. This Review is intended to serve as a primer for experimentalists curious about the fundamentals of nanoscale electrostatics and for theorists wishing to learn about recent experimental advances in the field. Accordingly, the first portion introduces the theoretical models of electrostatic double layers and derives electrostatic interaction potentials applicable to particles of different sizes and/or shapes and under different experimental conditions. This discussion is followed by the review of the key experimental systems in which electrostatic interactions are operative. Examples include electroactive and "switchable" nanoparticles, mixtures of charged nanoparticles, nanoparticle chains, sheets, coatings, crystals, and crystals-within-crystals. Applications of these and other structures in chemical sensing and amplification are also illustrated.

  13. Nanoscale memristive radiofrequency switches.

    PubMed

    Pi, Shuang; Ghadiri-Sadrabadi, Mohammad; Bardin, Joseph C; Xia, Qiangfei

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency switches are critical components in wireless communication systems and consumer electronics. Emerging devices include switches based on microelectromechanical systems and phase-change materials. However, these devices suffer from disadvantages such as large physical dimensions and high actuation voltages. Here we propose and demonstrate a nanoscale radiofrequency switch based on a memristive device. The device can be programmed with a voltage as low as 0.4 V and has an ON/OFF conductance ratio up to 10(12) with long state retention. We measure the radiofrequency performance of the switch up to 110 GHz and demonstrate low insertion loss (0.3 dB at 40 GHz), high isolation (30 dB at 40 GHz), an average cutoff frequency of 35 THz and competitive linearity and power-handling capability. Our results suggest that, in addition to their application in memory and computing, memristive devices are also a leading contender for radiofrequency switch applications. PMID:26108890

  14. Atomistic Time-Domain Simulations of Light-Harvesting and Charge-Transfer Dynamics in Novel Nanoscale Materials for Solar Hydrogen Production.

    SciTech Connect

    Prezhdo, Oleg V.

    2012-03-22

    Funded by the DOE grant (i) we continued to study and analyze the atomistic detail of the electron transfer (ET) across the chromophore-TiO2 interface in Gratzel cell systems for solar hydrogen production. (ii) We extensively investigated the nature of photoexcited states and excited state dynamics in semiconductor quantum dots (QD) designed for photovoltaic applications. (iii) We continued a newly initiated research direction focusing on excited state properties and electron-phonon interactions in nanoscale carbon materials. Over the past year, the results of the DOE funded research were summarized in 3 review articles. 12 original manuscripts were written. The research results were reported in 28 invited talks at conferences and university seminars. 20 invitations were accepted for talks in the near future. 2 symposia at national and international meetings have being organized this year on topics closely related to the DOE funded project, and 2 more symposia have been planned for the near future. We summarized the insights into photoinduced dynamics of semiconductor QDs, obtained from our time-domain ab initio studies. QDs exhibit both molecular and bulk properties. Unlike either bulk or molecular materials, QD properties can be modified continuously by changing QD shape and size. However, the chemical and physical properties of molecular and bulk materials often contradict each other, which can lead to differing viewpoints about the behavior of QDs. For example, the molecular view suggests strong electron-hole and charge-phonon interactions, as well as slow energy relaxation due to mismatch between electronic energy gaps and phonon frequencies. In contrast, the bulk view advocates that the kinetic energy of quantum confinement is greater than electron-hole interactions, that charge-phonon coupling is weak, and that the relaxation through quasi-continuous bands is rapid. By synthesizing the bulk and molecular viewpoints, we clarified the controversies and

  15. DIET at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dujardin, G.; Boer-Duchemin, E.; Le Moal, E.; Mayne, A. J.; Riedel, D.

    2016-01-01

    We review the long evolution of DIET (Dynamics at surfaces Induced by Electronic Transitions) that began in the 1960s when Menzel, Gomer and Redhead proposed their famous stimulated desorption model. DIET entered the "nanoscale" in the 1990s when researchers at Bell Labs and IBM realized that the Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) could be used as an atomic size source of electrons to electronically excite individual atoms and molecules on surfaces. Resonant and radiant Inelastic Electron Tunneling (IET) using the STM have considerably enlarged the range of applications of DIET. Nowadays, "DIET at the nanoscale" covers a broad range of phenomena at the atomic-scale. This includes molecular dynamics (dissociation, desorption, isomerization, displacement, chemical reactions), vibrational spectroscopy and dynamics, spin spectroscopy and manipulation, luminescence spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and plasmonics. Future trends of DIET at the nanoscale offer exciting prospects for new methods to control light and matter at the nanoscale.

  16. Fabrication of Nanoscale Circuits on Inkjet-Printing Patterned Substrates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuoran; Su, Meng; Zhang, Cong; Gao, Meng; Bao, Bin; Yang, Qiang; Su, Bin; Song, Yanlin

    2015-07-01

    Nanoscale circuits are fabricated by assembling different conducting materials (e.g., metal nanoparticles, metal nano-wires, graphene, carbon nanotubes, and conducting polymers) on inkjet-printing patterned substrates. This non-litho-graphy strategy opens a new avenue for integrating conducting building blocks into nanoscale devices in a cost-efficient manner. PMID:26011403

  17. Nanoscale assemblies and their biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Doll, Tais A P F; Raman, Senthilkumar; Dey, Raja; Burkhard, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Nanoscale assemblies are a unique class of materials, which can be synthesized from inorganic, polymeric or biological building blocks. The multitude of applications of this class of materials ranges from solar and electrical to uses in food, cosmetics and medicine. In this review, we initially highlight characteristic features of polymeric nanoscale assemblies as well as those built from biological units (lipids, nucleic acids and proteins). We give special consideration to protein nanoassemblies found in nature such as ferritin protein cages, bacterial microcompartments and vaults found in eukaryotic cells and designed protein nanoassemblies, such as peptide nanofibres and peptide nanotubes. Next, we focus on biomedical applications of these nanoscale assemblies, such as cell targeting, drug delivery, bioimaging and vaccine development. In the vaccine development section, we report in more detail the use of virus-like particles and self-assembling polypeptide nanoparticles as new vaccine delivery platforms.

  18. Nanoscale assemblies and their biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Doll, Tais A. P. F.; Raman, Senthilkumar; Dey, Raja; Burkhard, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Nanoscale assemblies are a unique class of materials, which can be synthesized from inorganic, polymeric or biological building blocks. The multitude of applications of this class of materials ranges from solar and electrical to uses in food, cosmetics and medicine. In this review, we initially highlight characteristic features of polymeric nanoscale assemblies as well as those built from biological units (lipids, nucleic acids and proteins). We give special consideration to protein nanoassemblies found in nature such as ferritin protein cages, bacterial microcompartments and vaults found in eukaryotic cells and designed protein nanoassemblies, such as peptide nanofibres and peptide nanotubes. Next, we focus on biomedical applications of these nanoscale assemblies, such as cell targeting, drug delivery, bioimaging and vaccine development. In the vaccine development section, we report in more detail the use of virus-like particles and self-assembling polypeptide nanoparticles as new vaccine delivery platforms. PMID:23303217

  19. Mapping Elasticity at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, Gheorghe; Price, William

    2006-03-01

    In the last few years Atomic Force Acoustic Microscopy has been developed to investigate the elastic response of materials at the nanoscale ^[1],[2]. We have extended this technique to the real-time mapping of nanomechanical properties of material surfaces. This mapping allows us to investigate the local variation of elastic properties with nanometer resolution and to reduce the uncertainties that arise from single measurements. Quantitative measurements are acquired by first performing an accurate calibration of the elastic properties of the Atomic Force Microscope’s probes with respect to single crystal reference materials. A wide variety of surfaces with different mechanical properties have been investigated to illustrate the applicability of this technique. ^[1] U. Rabe et al., Surf. Interface Anal. 33 , 65 (2002)^[2] D.C. Hurley et al., J. Appl. Phys. 94, 2347 (2003)

  20. Nanoscale nuclei in phase change materials: Origin of different crystallization mechanisms of Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} and AgInSbTe

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Bong-Sub Bogle, Stephanie N.; Darmawikarta, Kristof; Abelson, John R.; Shelby, Robert M.; Retter, Charles T.; Burr, Geoffrey W.; Raoux, Simone

    2014-02-14

    Phase change memory devices are based on the rapid and reversible amorphous-to-crystalline transformations of phase change materials, such as Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} and AgInSbTe. Since the maximum switching speed of these devices is typically limited by crystallization speed, understanding the crystallization process is of crucial importance. While Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} and AgInSbTe show very different crystallization mechanisms from their melt-quenched states, the nanostructural origin of this difference has not been clearly demonstrated. Here, we show that an amorphous state includes different sizes and number of nanoscale nuclei, after thermal treatment such as melt-quenching or furnace annealing is performed. We employ fluctuation transmission electron microscopy to detect nanoscale nuclei embedded in amorphous materials, and use a pump-probe laser technique and atomic force microscopy to study the kinetics of nucleation and growth. We confirm that melt-quenched amorphous Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} includes considerably larger and more quenched-in nuclei than its as-deposited state, while melt-quenched AgInSbTe does not, and explain this contrast by the different ratio between quenching time and nucleation time in these materials. In addition to providing insights to the crystallization process in these technologically important devices, this study presents experimental illustrations of temperature-dependence of nucleation rate and growth speed, which was predicted by theory of phase transformation but rarely demonstrated.

  1. High-performance planar nanoscale dielectric capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özçelik, V. Ongun; Ciraci, S.

    2015-05-01

    We propose a model for planar nanoscale dielectric capacitors consisting of a single layer, insulating hexagonal boron nitride (BN) stripe placed between two metallic graphene stripes, all forming commensurately a single atomic plane. First-principles density functional calculations on these nanoscale capacitors for different levels of charging and different widths of graphene-BN stripes mark high gravimetric capacitance values, which are comparable to those of supercapacitors made from other carbon-based materials. Present nanocapacitor models allow the fabrication of series, parallel, and mixed combinations which offer potential applications in two-dimensional flexible nanoelectronics, energy storage, and heat-pressure sensing systems.

  2. Properties of nanoscale metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Fichtner, Maximilian

    2009-05-20

    Nanoscale hydride particles may exhibit chemical stabilities which differ from those of a macroscopic system. The stabilities are mainly influenced by a surface energy term which contains size-dependent values of the surface tension, the molar volume and an additional term which takes into account a potential reduction of the excess surface energy. Thus, the equilibrium of a nanoparticular hydride system may be shifted to the hydrogenated or to the dehydrogenated side, depending on the size and on the prefix of the surface energy term of the hydrogenated and dehydrogenated material. Additional complexity appears when solid-state reactions of complex hydrides are considered and phase segregation has to be taken into account. In such a case the reversibility of complex hydrides may be reduced if the nanoparticles are free standing on a surface. However, it may be enhanced if the system is enclosed by a nanoscale void which prevents the reaction partners on the dehydrogenated side from diffusing away from each other. Moreover, the generally enhanced diffusivity in nanocrystalline systems may lower the kinetic barriers for the material's transformation and, thus, facilitate hydrogen absorption and desorption. PMID:19420657

  3. Optical Spectroscopy at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xiaoping

    Recent advances in material science and fabrication techniques enabled development of nanoscale applications and devices with superior performances and high degree of integration. Exotic physics also emerges at nanoscale where confinement of electrons and phonons leads to drastically different behavior from those in the bulk materials. It is therefore rewarding and interesting to investigate and understand material properties at the nanoscale. Optical spectroscopy, one of the most versatile techniques for studying material properties and light-matter interactions, can provide new insights into the nanomaterials. In this thesis, I explore advanced laser spectroscopic techniques to probe a variety of different nanoscale phenomena. A powerful tool in nanoscience and engineering is scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Its capability in atomic resolution imaging and spectroscopy unveiled the mystical quantum world of atoms and molecules. However identification of molecular species under investigation is one of the limiting functionalities of the STM. To address this need, we take advantage of the molecular `fingerprints' - vibrational spectroscopy, by combining an infrared light sources with scanning tunneling microscopy. In order to map out sharp molecular resonances, an infrared continuous wave broadly tunable optical parametric oscillator was developed with mode-hop free fine tuning capabilities. We then combine this laser with STM by shooting the beam onto the STM substrate with sub-monolayer diamondoids deposition. Thermal expansion of the substrate is detected by the ultrasensitive tunneling current when infrared frequency is tuned across the molecular vibrational range. Molecular vibrational spectroscopy could be obtained by recording the thermal expansion as a function of the excitation wavelength. Another interesting field of the nanoscience is carbon nanotube, an ideal model of one dimensional physics and applications. Due to the small light absorption with

  4. Coal surface control for advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Morsi, B.I.; Chiang, S.H.; Sharkey, A.; Blachere, J.; Klinzing, G.; Araujo, G.; Bi, H.; Campbell, P.; Ciocco, M.; Hittle, L.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.

    1991-01-01

    The overall objective of the project is to develop techniques for coal surface control prior to the advanced physical fine coal cleaning process of selective agglomeration in order to achieve 90% pyrite sulfur rejection at an energy recovery greater than 90% based on run-of-mine coal. The surface control is meant to encompass surface modification during grinding and laboratory beneficiation testing. The project includes the following tasks: Project planning, method for analysis of samples, development of standard beneficiation test, grinding studies, modification of particle surface, and exploratory R D and support. 5 refs., 22 figs., 34 tabs.

  5. Surface nanoscale axial photonics.

    PubMed

    Sumetsky, M; Fini, J M

    2011-12-19

    Dense photonic integration promises to revolutionize optical computing and communications. However, efforts towards this goal face unacceptable attenuation of light caused by surface roughness in microscopic devices. Here we address this problem by introducing Surface Nanoscale Axial Photonics (SNAP). The SNAP platform is based on whispering gallery modes circulating around the optical fiber surface and undergoing slow axial propagation readily described by the one-dimensional Schrödinger equation. These modes can be steered with dramatically small nanoscale variation of the fiber radius, which is quite simple to introduce in practice. Extremely low loss of SNAP devices is achieved due to the low surface roughness inherent in a drawn fiber surface. In excellent agreement with the developed theory, we experimentally demonstrate localization of light in quantum wells, halting light by a point source, tunneling through potential barriers, dark states, etc. This demonstration has intriguing potential applications in filtering, switching, slowing light, and sensing.

  6. Nanoscale Engineering of Designer Cellulosomes.

    PubMed

    Gunnoo, Melissabye; Cazade, Pierre-André; Galera-Prat, Albert; Nash, Michael A; Czjzek, Mirjam; Cieplak, Marek; Alvarez, Beatriz; Aguilar, Marina; Karpol, Alon; Gaub, Hermann; Carrión-Vázquez, Mariano; Bayer, Edward A; Thompson, Damien

    2016-07-01

    Biocatalysts showcase the upper limit obtainable for high-speed molecular processing and transformation. Efforts to engineer functionality in synthetic nanostructured materials are guided by the increasing knowledge of evolving architectures, which enable controlled molecular motion and precise molecular recognition. The cellulosome is a biological nanomachine, which, as a fundamental component of the plant-digestion machinery from bacterial cells, has a key potential role in the successful development of environmentally-friendly processes to produce biofuels and fine chemicals from the breakdown of biomass waste. Here, the progress toward so-called "designer cellulosomes", which provide an elegant alternative to enzyme cocktails for lignocellulose breakdown, is reviewed. Particular attention is paid to rational design via computational modeling coupled with nanoscale characterization and engineering tools. Remaining challenges and potential routes to industrial application are put forward. PMID:26748482

  7. Electroanalysis at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Karen; O'Riordan, Alan

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the state of the art of silicon chip-based nanoelectrochemical devices for sensing applications. We first describe analyte mass transport to nanoscale electrodes and emphasize understanding the importance of mass transport for the design of nanoelectrode arrays. We then describe bottom-up and top-down approaches to nanoelectrode fabrication and integration at silicon substrates. Finally, we explore recent examples of on-chip nanoelectrodes employed as sensors and diagnostics, finishing with a brief look at future applications.

  8. Small is Different: Nanoscale Computational Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landman, Uzi

    2015-03-01

    Finite materials systems of reduced sizes exhibit discrete quantized energy level spectra and specific structures and morphologies, which are manifested in unique, nonscalable, size-dependent physical and chemical properties. Indeed, when the scale of materials structures is reduced to the nanoscale, emergent phenomena often occurs, that is not commonly expected, or deduced, from knowledge learned at larger sizes. Characterization and understanding of the size-dependent evolution of the properties of materials aggregates are among the major challenges of modern materials science. Computer-based classical and quantum computations and simulations are tools of discovery of nanoscale emergent behavior. We highlight such behavior in diverse systems, including: (i) Atomistic simulations of nanoscale liquid jets and bridges and the stochastic hydrodynamic description of their properties; (ii) Metal nanoclusters and their self-assembled superlattices exhibiting stabilities and properties originating from superatom electronic shell-closing, atom packing, and interactions between protecting ligands; (iii) Electric-field-induced shape-transitions and electrocrystallization of liquid droplets, and (iv) Symmetry-breaking and formation of highly-correlated Wigner molecules between electrons in 2D quantum dots and bosons in traps.

  9. Dynamic structural disorder in supported nanoscale catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rehr, J. J.; Vila, F. D.

    2014-04-07

    We investigate the origin and physical effects of “dynamic structural disorder” (DSD) in supported nano-scale catalysts. DSD refers to the intrinsic fluctuating, inhomogeneous structure of such nano-scale systems. In contrast to bulk materials, nano-scale systems exhibit substantial fluctuations in structure, charge, temperature, and other quantities, as well as large surface effects. The DSD is driven largely by the stochastic librational motion of the center of mass and fluxional bonding at the nanoparticle surface due to thermal coupling with the substrate. Our approach for calculating and understanding DSD is based on a combination of real-time density functional theory/molecular dynamics simulations, transient coupled-oscillator models, and statistical mechanics. This approach treats thermal and dynamic effects over multiple time-scales, and includes bond-stretching and -bending vibrations, and transient tethering to the substrate at longer ps time-scales. Potential effects on the catalytic properties of these clusters are briefly explored. Model calculations of molecule-cluster interactions and molecular dissociation reaction paths are presented in which the reactant molecules are adsorbed on the surface of dynamically sampled clusters. This model suggests that DSD can affect both the prefactors and distribution of energy barriers in reaction rates, and thus can significantly affect catalytic activity at the nano-scale.

  10. Nanoscale ear drum: Graphene based nanoscale sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdoshenko, Stas M.; Gomes da Rocha, Claudia; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2012-05-01

    The difficulty in determining the mass of a sample increases as its size diminishes. At the nanoscale, there are no direct methods for resolving the mass of single molecules or nanoparticles and so more sophisticated approaches based on electromechanical phenomena are required. More importantly, one demands that such nanoelectromechanical techniques could provide not only information about the mass of the target molecules but also about their geometrical properties. In this sense, we report a theoretical study that illustrates in detail how graphene membranes can operate as nanoelectromechanical mass-sensor devices. Wide graphene sheets were exposed to different types and amounts of molecules and molecular dynamic simulations were employed to treat these doping processes statistically. We demonstrate that the mass variation effect and information about the graphene-molecule interactions can be inferred through dynamical response functions. Our results confirm the potential use of graphene as a mass detector device with remarkable precision in estimating variations in mass at the molecular scale and other physical properties of the dopants.

  11. Nanotribology and Nanoscale Friction

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yi; Qu, Zhihua; Braiman, Yehuda; Zhang, Zhenyu; Barhen, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Tribology is the science and technology of contacting solid surfaces in relative motion, including the study of lubricants, lubrication, friction, wear, and bearings. It is estimated that friction and wear cost the U.S. economy 6% of the gross national product (Persson, 2000). For example, 5% of the total energy generated in an automobile engine is lost to frictional resistance. The study of nanoscale friction has a technological impact in reducing energy loss in machines, in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), and in the development of durable, low-friction surfaces and ultra-thin lubrication films.

  12. Characterizing Nanoscale Transient Communication.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yifan; Anwar, Putri Santi; Huang, Limin; Asvial, Muhamad

    2016-04-01

    We consider the novel paradigm of nanoscale transient communication (NTC), where certain components of the small-scale communication link are physically transient. As such, the transmitter and the receiver may change their properties over a prescribed lifespan due to their time-varying structures. The NTC systems may find important applications in the biomedical, environmental, and military fields, where system degradability allows for benign integration into life and environment. In this paper, we analyze the NTC systems from the channel-modeling and capacity-analysis perspectives and focus on the stochastically meaningful slow transience scenario, where the coherence time of degeneration Td is much longer than the coding delay Tc. We first develop novel and parsimonious models to characterize the NTC channels, where three types of physical layers are considered: electromagnetism-based terahertz (THz) communication, diffusion-based molecular communication (DMC), and nanobots-assisted touchable communication (TouchCom). We then revisit the classical performance measure of ϵ-outage channel capacity and take a fresh look at its formulations in the NTC context. Next, we present the notion of capacity degeneration profile (CDP), which describes the reduction of channel capacity with respect to the degeneration time. Finally, we provide numerical examples to demonstrate the features of CDP. To the best of our knowledge, the current work represents a first attempt to systematically evaluate the quality of nanoscale communication systems deteriorating with time.

  13. Simulating nanoscale semiconductor devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Salinger, Andrew Gerhard; Zhao, P.; Woolard, D. L.; Kelley, C. Tim; Lasater, Matthew S.

    2005-03-01

    The next generation of electronic devices will be developed at the nanoscale and molecular level, where quantum mechanical effects are observed. These effects must be accounted for in the design process for such small devices. One prototypical nanoscale semiconductor device under investigation is a resonant tunneling diode (RTD). Scientists are hopeful the quantum tunneling effects present in an RTD can be exploited to induce and sustain THz frequency current oscillations. To simulate the electron transport within the RTD, the Wigner-Poisson equations are used. These equations describe the time evolution of the electrons distribution within the device. In this paper, this model and a parameter study using this model will be presented. The parameter study involves calculating the steady-state current output from the RTD as a function of an applied voltage drop across the RTD and also calculating the stability of that solution. To implement the parameter study, the computational model was connected to LOCA (Library of Continuation Algorithms), a part of Sandia National Laboratories parallel solver project, Trilinos. Numerical results will be presented.

  14. Coal surface control for advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Morsi, B.I.; Chiang, S.H.; Sharkey, A.; Blachere, J.; Klinzing, G.; Araujo, G.; Cheng, Y.S.; Gray, R.; Streeter, R.; Bi, H.; Campbell, P.; Chiarlli, P.; Ciocco, M.; Hittle, L.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.; Perez, L.; Venkatadri, R.

    1992-01-01

    This final report presents the research work carried out on the Coal Surface Control for Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning Technologies project, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE/PETC). The project was to support the engineering development of the selective agglomeration technology in order to reduce the sulfur content of US coals for controlling SO[sub 2] emissions (i.e., acid rain precursors). The overall effort was a part of the DOE/PETCs Acid Rain Control Initiative (ARCI). The overall objective of the project is to develop techniques for coal surface control prior to the advanced physical fine coal cleaning process of selective agglomeration in order to achieve 85% pyrite sulfur rejection at an energy recovery greater than 85% based on run-of-mine coal. The surface control is meant to encompass surface modification during grinding and laboratory beneficiation testing. The project includes the following tasks: Project planning; methods for analysis of samples; development of standard beneficiation test; grinding studies; modification of particle surface; and exploratory R D and support. The coal samples used in this project include three base coals, Upper Freeport - Indiana County, PA, Pittsburgh NO. 8 - Belmont County, OH, and Illinois No. 6 - Randolph County, IL, and three additional coals, Upper Freeport - Grant County- WV, Kentucky No. 9 Hopkins County, KY, and Wyodak - Campbell County, WY. A total of 149 drums of coal were received.

  15. Quantum Tunneling Current in Nanoscale Plasmonic Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2014-10-01

    Recently, electron tunneling between plasmonic resonators is found to support quantum plasmon resonances, which may introduce new regimes in nano-optoelectronics and nonlinear optics. This revelation is of substantial interest to the fundamental problem of electron transport in nano-scale, for example, in a metal-insulator-metal junction (MIM), which has been continuously studied for decades. Here, we present a self-consistent model of electron transport in a nano-scale MIM, by solving the coupled Schrödinger and Poisson equations. The effects of space charge, exchange-correlation, anode emission, and material properties of the electrodes and insulator are examined in detail. The self-consistent calculations are compared with the widely used Simmons formula. Transition from the direct tunneling regime to the space-charge-limited regime is demonstrated. This work was supported by AFOSR.

  16. Programmed assembly of nanoscale structures using peptoids.

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Jianhua; Russell, Scott; Morishetti, Kiran; Robinson, David B.; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; Buffleben, George M.; Hjelm, Rex P.; Kent, Michael Stuart

    2011-02-01

    Sequence-specific polymers are the basis of the most promising approaches to bottom-up programmed assembly of nanoscale materials. Examples include artificial peptides and nucleic acids. Another class is oligo(N-functional glycine)s, also known as peptoids, which permit greater sidegroup diversity and conformational control, and can be easier to synthesize and purify. We have developed a set of peptoids that can be used to make inorganic nanoparticles more compatible with biological sequence-specific polymers so that they can be incorporated into nucleic acid or other biologically based nanostructures. Peptoids offer degrees of modularity, versatility, and predictability that equal or exceed other sequence-specific polymers, allowing for rational design of oligomers for a specific purpose. This degree of control will be essential to the development of arbitrarily designed nanoscale structures.

  17. Nanoscale control of the network morphology of high efficiency polymer fullerene solar cells by the use of high material concentration in the liquid phase.

    PubMed

    Radbeh, R; Parbaile, E; Bouclé, J; Di Bin, C; Moliton, A; Coudert, V; Rossignol, F; Ratier, B

    2010-01-22

    Despite the constant improvement of their power conversion efficiencies, organic solar cells based on an interpenetrating network of a conjugated polymer as donor and fullerene derivatives as acceptor materials still need to be improved for commercial use. In this context, we present a study on the optimization of solar cells based on poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) by varying a specific cell parameter, namely the concentration of the active layer components in the liquid phase before blend film deposition, in order to improve device performance and to better understand the relation between morphology and device operation. Our study shows a significant increase of the short-circuit current, open-circuit voltage and cell efficiency by properly choosing the formulation of the initial blend before film deposition. We demonstrate that the active layer morphology, which is strongly dependent on the initial material concentrations and the processing conditions, can greatly impact the electronic characteristics of the device, especially regarding charge recombination dynamics at the donor-acceptor interface. Our optimized P3HT:PCBM device exhibits both slow recombination and high photocurrent generation associated with an overall power conversion efficiency of 4.25% under 100 mW cm(-2) illumination (AM1.5G).

  18. Nanoscale control of the network morphology of high efficiency polymer fullerene solar cells by the use of high material concentration in the liquid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radbeh, R.; Parbaile, E.; Bouclé, J.; Di Bin, C.; Moliton, A.; Coudert, V.; Rossignol, F.; Ratier, B.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the constant improvement of their power conversion efficiencies, organic solar cells based on an interpenetrating network of a conjugated polymer as donor and fullerene derivatives as acceptor materials still need to be improved for commercial use. In this context, we present a study on the optimization of solar cells based on poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) by varying a specific cell parameter, namely the concentration of the active layer components in the liquid phase before blend film deposition, in order to improve device performance and to better understand the relation between morphology and device operation. Our study shows a significant increase of the short-circuit current, open-circuit voltage and cell efficiency by properly choosing the formulation of the initial blend before film deposition. We demonstrate that the active layer morphology, which is strongly dependent on the initial material concentrations and the processing conditions, can greatly impact the electronic characteristics of the device, especially regarding charge recombination dynamics at the donor-acceptor interface. Our optimized P3HT:PCBM device exhibits both slow recombination and high photocurrent generation associated with an overall power conversion efficiency of 4.25% under 100 mW cm-2 illumination (AM1.5G).

  19. Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, David G.; Braun, Paul V.; Chen, Gang; Clarke, David R.; Fan, Shanhui; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Keblinski, Pawel; King, William P.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Majumdar, Arun; Maris, Humphrey J.; Phillpot, Simon R.; Pop, Eric; Shi, Li

    2014-03-01

    A diverse spectrum of technology drivers such as improved thermal barriers, higher efficiency thermoelectric energy conversion, phase-change memory, heat-assisted magnetic recording, thermal management of nanoscale electronics, and nanoparticles for thermal medical therapies are motivating studies of the applied physics of thermal transport at the nanoscale. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces become increasingly important on small length scales. Research during the past decade has extended studies of interfaces between simple metals and inorganic crystals to interfaces with molecular materials and liquids with systematic control of interface chemistry and physics. At separations on the order of ˜ 1 nm , the science of radiative transport through nanoscale gaps overlaps with thermal conduction by the coupling of electronic and vibrational excitations across weakly bonded or rough interfaces between materials. Major advances in the physics of phonons include first principles calculation of the phonon lifetimes of simple crystals and application of the predicted scattering rates in parameter-free calculations of the thermal conductivity. Progress in the control of thermal transport at the nanoscale is critical to continued advances in the density of information that can be stored in phase change memory devices and new generations of magnetic storage that will use highly localized heat sources to reduce the coercivity of magnetic media. Ultralow thermal conductivity—thermal conductivity below the conventionally predicted minimum thermal conductivity—has been observed in nanolaminates and disordered crystals with strong anisotropy. Advances in metrology by time-domain thermoreflectance have made measurements of the thermal conductivity of a thin layer with micron-scale spatial resolution relatively routine. Scanning thermal microscopy and thermal

  20. Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 2003–2012

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, David G. Braun, Paul V.; Chen, Gang; Clarke, David R.; Fan, Shanhui; Goodson, Kenneth E.; Keblinski, Pawel; King, William P.; Mahan, Gerald D.; Majumdar, Arun; Maris, Humphrey J.; Phillpot, Simon R.; Pop, Eric; Shi, Li

    2014-03-15

    A diverse spectrum of technology drivers such as improved thermal barriers, higher efficiency thermoelectric energy conversion, phase-change memory, heat-assisted magnetic recording, thermal management of nanoscale electronics, and nanoparticles for thermal medical therapies are motivating studies of the applied physics of thermal transport at the nanoscale. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces become increasingly important on small length scales. Research during the past decade has extended studies of interfaces between simple metals and inorganic crystals to interfaces with molecular materials and liquids with systematic control of interface chemistry and physics. At separations on the order of ∼1 nm, the science of radiative transport through nanoscale gaps overlaps with thermal conduction by the coupling of electronic and vibrational excitations across weakly bonded or rough interfaces between materials. Major advances in the physics of phonons include first principles calculation of the phonon lifetimes of simple crystals and application of the predicted scattering rates in parameter-free calculations of the thermal conductivity. Progress in the control of thermal transport at the nanoscale is critical to continued advances in the density of information that can be stored in phase change memory devices and new generations of magnetic storage that will use highly localized heat sources to reduce the coercivity of magnetic media. Ultralow thermal conductivity—thermal conductivity below the conventionally predicted minimum thermal conductivity—has been observed in nanolaminates and disordered crystals with strong anisotropy. Advances in metrology by time-domain thermoreflectance have made measurements of the thermal conductivity of a thin layer with micron-scale spatial resolution relatively routine. Scanning thermal microscopy and

  1. Structural transitions in nanoscale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Mina

    In this work I investigate three different materials: nanoscale carbon systems, ferrofluid systems, and molecular-electronic devices. In particular, my study is focused on the theoretical understanding of structural changes and the associated electronic, mechanical, and magnetic properties of these materials. To study the equilibrium packing of fullerenes in carbon nanotube peapods optimization techniques were applied. In agreement with experimental measurements, my results for nanotubes containing fullerenes with 60--84 atoms indicate that the axial separation between the fullerenes is smaller than in the bulk crystal. The reduction of the inter-fullerene distance and also the structural relaxation of fullerenes result from a large internal pressure within the peapods. This naturally induced "static" pressure may qualify nanotubes as nanoscale autoclaves for chemical reactions. Combining total energy calculations with a search of phase space, I investigated the microscopic fusion mechanism of C60 fullerenes. I show that the (2+2) cycloaddition reaction, a necessary precursor for fullerene fusion, can be accelerated inside a nanotube. Fusion occurs along the minimum energy path as a finite sequence of Stone-Wales (SW) transformations. A detailed analysis of the transition states shows that Stone-Wales transformations are multi-step processes. I propose a new microscopic mechanism to explain the unusually fast fusion process of carbon nanotubes. The detailed pathway for two adjacent (5, 5) nanotubes to gradually merge into a (10, 10) tube, and the transition states have been identified. The propagation of the fused region is energetically favorable and proceeds in a morphology reminiscent of a Y-junction via a so called zipper mechanism, involving only SW bond rearrangements with low activation barriers. Using density functional theory, the equilibrium structure, stability, and electronic properties of nanostructured, hydrogen terminated diamond fragments have been

  2. Nanoscale Thermal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baloch, Kamal; Brintlinger, Todd; Qi, Yi; Goldhaber-Gordon, David; Cumings, John

    2007-03-01

    We present real time, in-situ, high resolution thermal imaging of metallic nanowires. The nanowires are grown on the front-side of silicon nitride membranes. Resistive heating along the wires produces thermal gradients which melt/freeze 20-200nm diameter indium islands deposited by thermal evaporation on the back-side of the membrane. These transitions can be imaged using a transmission electron microscope operating in dark-field mode such that contrast corresponds to the phase of an individual island. Global changes in temperature can be used to calibrate the melting point of individual islands and to account for the presence of the ˜100nm thick silicon nitride membrane. Thermal modeling confirms the imaged thermal behavior. This technique could be generally employed for thermal imaging of nanowires and nanotubes, wherein the nanoscale systems are imaged in-situ and under electrical bias. Results of local resistive heating in a carbon nanotube device will also be shown

  3. Anatomy of Nanoscale Propulsion.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vinita; Duan, Wentao; Butler, Peter J; Sen, Ayusman

    2015-01-01

    Nature supports multifaceted forms of life. Despite the variety and complexity of these forms, motility remains the epicenter of life. The applicable laws of physics change upon going from macroscales to microscales and nanoscales, which are characterized by low Reynolds number (Re). We discuss motion at low Re in natural and synthetic systems, along with various propulsion mechanisms, including electrophoresis, electrolyte diffusiophoresis, and nonelectrolyte diffusiophoresis. We also describe the newly uncovered phenomena of motility in non-ATP-driven self-powered enzymes and the directional movement of these enzymes in response to substrate gradients. These enzymes can also be immobilized to function as fluid pumps in response to the presence of their substrates. Finally, we review emergent collective behavior arising from interacting motile species, and we discuss the possible biomedical applications of the synthetic nanobots and microbots.

  4. Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerstenau, D.W.; Hanson, J.S.; Diao, J.; Harris, G.H.; De, A.; Sotillo, F. ); Somasundaran, P.; Harris, C.C.; Vasudevan, T.; Liu, D.; Li, C. ); Hu, W.; Zou, Y.; Chen, W. ); Choudhry, V.; Shea, S.; Ghosh, A.; Sehgal, R. )

    1992-03-01

    The initial goal of the research project was to develop methods of coal surface control in advanced froth flotation to achieve 90% pyritic sulfur rejection, while operating at Btu recoveries above 90% based on run-of-mine quality coal. Moreover, the technology is to concomitantly reduce the ash content significantly (to six percent or less) to provide a high-quality fuel to the boiler (ash removal also increases Btu content, which in turn decreases a coal's emission potential in terms of lbs SO{sub 2}/million Btu). (VC)

  5. Mapping photovoltaic performance with nanoscale resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kutes, Yasemin; Aguirre, Brandon A.; Bosse, James L.; Cruz-Campa, Jose L.; Zubia, David; Huey, Bryan D.

    2015-10-16

    Photo-conductive AFM spectroscopy (‘pcAFMs’) is proposed as a high-resolution approach for investigating nanostructured photovoltaics, uniquely providing nanoscale maps of photovoltaic (PV) performance parameters such as the short circuit current, open circuit voltage, maximum power, or fill factor. The method is demonstrated with a stack of 21 images acquired during in situ illumination of micropatterned polycrystalline CdTe/CdS, providing more than 42,000 I/V curves spatially separated by ~5 nm. For these CdTe/CdS microcells, the calculated photoconduction ranges from 0 to 700 picoSiemens (pS) upon illumination with ~1.6 suns, depending on location and biasing conditions. Mean short circuit currents of 2 pA, maximum powers of 0.5 pW, and fill factors of 30% are determined. The mean voltage at which the detected photocurrent is zero is determined to be 0.7 V. Significantly, enhancements and reductions in these more commonly macroscopic PV performance metrics are observed to correlate with certain grains and grain boundaries, and are confirmed to be independent of topography. Furthermore, these results demonstrate the benefits of nanoscale resolved PV functional measurements, reiterate the importance of microstructural control down to the nanoscale for 'PV devices, and provide a widely applicable new approach for directly investigating PV materials.

  6. Mapping photovoltaic performance with nanoscale resolution

    DOE PAGES

    Kutes, Yasemin; Aguirre, Brandon A.; Bosse, James L.; Cruz-Campa, Jose L.; Zubia, David; Huey, Bryan D.

    2015-10-16

    Photo-conductive AFM spectroscopy (‘pcAFMs’) is proposed as a high-resolution approach for investigating nanostructured photovoltaics, uniquely providing nanoscale maps of photovoltaic (PV) performance parameters such as the short circuit current, open circuit voltage, maximum power, or fill factor. The method is demonstrated with a stack of 21 images acquired during in situ illumination of micropatterned polycrystalline CdTe/CdS, providing more than 42,000 I/V curves spatially separated by ~5 nm. For these CdTe/CdS microcells, the calculated photoconduction ranges from 0 to 700 picoSiemens (pS) upon illumination with ~1.6 suns, depending on location and biasing conditions. Mean short circuit currents of 2 pA, maximummore » powers of 0.5 pW, and fill factors of 30% are determined. The mean voltage at which the detected photocurrent is zero is determined to be 0.7 V. Significantly, enhancements and reductions in these more commonly macroscopic PV performance metrics are observed to correlate with certain grains and grain boundaries, and are confirmed to be independent of topography. Furthermore, these results demonstrate the benefits of nanoscale resolved PV functional measurements, reiterate the importance of microstructural control down to the nanoscale for 'PV devices, and provide a widely applicable new approach for directly investigating PV materials.« less

  7. Molecular Photovoltaics in Nanoscale Dimension

    PubMed Central

    Burtman, Vladimir; Zelichonok, Alexander; Pakoulev, Andrei V.

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on the intrinsic charge transport in organic photovoltaic (PVC) devices and field-effect transistors (SAM-OFETs) fabricated by vapor phase molecular self-assembly (VP-SAM) method. The dynamics of charge transport are determined and used to clarify a transport mechanism. The 1,4,5,8-naphthalene-tetracarboxylic diphenylimide (NTCDI) SAM devices provide a useful tool to study the fundamentals of polaronic transport at organic surfaces and to discuss the performance of organic photovoltaic devices in nanoscale. Time-resolved photovoltaic studies allow us to separate the charge annihilation kinetics in the conductive NTCDI channel from the overall charge kinetic in a SAM-OFET device. It has been demonstrated that tuning of the type of conductivity in NTCDI SAM-OFET devices is possible by changing Si substrate doping. Our study of the polaron charge transfer in organic materials proposes that a cation-radical exchange (redox) mechanism is the major transport mechanism in the studied SAM-PVC devices. The role and contribution of the transport through delocalized states of redox active surface molecular aggregates of NTCDI are exposed and investigated. This example of technological development is used to highlight the significance of future technological development of nanotechnologies and to appreciate a structure-property paradigm in organic nanostructures. PMID:21339983

  8. Molecular photovoltaics in nanoscale dimension.

    PubMed

    Burtman, Vladimir; Zelichonok, Alexander; Pakoulev, Andrei V

    2011-01-05

    This review focuses on the intrinsic charge transport in organic photovoltaic (PVC) devices and field-effect transistors (SAM-OFETs) fabricated by vapor phase molecular self-assembly (VP-SAM) method. The dynamics of charge transport are determined and used to clarify a transport mechanism. The 1,4,5,8-naphthalene-tetracarboxylic diphenylimide (NTCDI) SAM devices provide a useful tool to study the fundamentals of polaronic transport at organic surfaces and to discuss the performance of organic photovoltaic devices in nanoscale. Time-resolved photovoltaic studies allow us to separate the charge annihilation kinetics in the conductive NTCDI channel from the overall charge kinetic in a SAM-OFET device. It has been demonstrated that tuning of the type of conductivity in NTCDI SAM-OFET devices is possible by changing Si substrate doping. Our study of the polaron charge transfer in organic materials proposes that a cation-radical exchange (redox) mechanism is the major transport mechanism in the studied SAM-PVC devices. The role and contribution of the transport through delocalized states of redox active surface molecular aggregates of NTCDI are exposed and investigated. This example of technological development is used to highlight the significance of future technological development of nanotechnologies and to appreciate a structure-property paradigm in organic nanostructures.

  9. Simple Methods for Production of Nanoscale Metal Oxide Films from Household Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Dean J.; Baliss, Michelle S.; Hinman, Jordan J.; Ziegenhorn, John W.; Andrews, Mark J.; Stevenson, Keith J.

    2013-01-01

    Production of thin metal oxide films was recently explored as part of an outreach program with a goal of producing nanoscale structures with household items. Household items coated with various metals or titanium compounds can be heated to produce colorful films with nanoscale thicknesses. As part of a materials chemistry laboratory experiment…

  10. Effect of nanoscale patterned interfacial roughness on interfacial toughness.

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Moody, Neville Reid; Mook, William M.; Kennedy, Marian S.; Bahr, David F.; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.

    2007-09-01

    The performance and the reliability of many devices are controlled by interfaces between thin films. In this study we investigated the use of patterned, nanoscale interfacial roughness as a way to increase the apparent interfacial toughness of brittle, thin-film material systems. The experimental portion of the study measured the interfacial toughness of a number of interfaces with nanoscale roughness. This included a silicon interface with a rectangular-toothed pattern of 60-nm wide by 90-nm deep channels fabricated using nanoimprint lithography techniques. Detailed finite element simulations were used to investigate the nature of interfacial crack growth when the interface is patterned. These simulations examined how geometric and material parameter choices affect the apparent toughness. Atomistic simulations were also performed with the aim of identifying possible modifications to the interfacial separation models currently used in nanoscale, finite element fracture analyses. The fundamental nature of atomistic traction separation for mixed mode loadings was investigated.

  11. Nanoscale electrochemistry using dielectric thin films as solid electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valov, Ilia; Lu, Wei D.

    2016-07-01

    It is now well known that at the nanoscale matters behave differently compared to bulk phases. Increased reactivity, deviations in structural, thermodynamic and kinetic properties make nanoscale materials and processes attractive for both fundamental research and applications. Here we show that nanometer thin films of materials with dielectric properties at the macroscopic level such as SiO2, Ta2O5 and HfO2 behave as solid electrolytes and exhibit evident ionic transport and electrochemical redox reactions. Experimental studies demonstrate that classical electrochemical potentiodynamic and steady state methods can be used to study the mass and charge transport at the nanoscale. We believe these reported properties of nanomatter open new opportunities for fundamental research and applications.

  12. Nanoscale shape-memory alloys for ultrahigh mechanical damping.

    PubMed

    San Juan, Jose; Nó, Maria L; Schuh, Christopher A

    2009-07-01

    Shape memory alloys undergo reversible transformations between two distinct phases in response to changes in temperature or applied stress. The creation and motion of the internal interfaces between these phases during such transformations dissipates energy, making these alloys effective mechanical damping materials. Although it has been shown that reversible phase transformations can occur in nanoscale volumes, it is not known whether these transformations have a sample size dependence. Here, we demonstrate that the two phases responsible for shape memory in Cu-Al-Ni alloys are more stable in nanoscale pillars than they are in the bulk. As a result, the pillars show a damping figure of merit that is substantially higher than any previously reported value for a bulk material, making them attractive for damping applications in nanoscale and microscale devices. PMID:19581892

  13. Nanoscale Phase Transitions under Extreme Conditions within an Ion Track

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiaming; Lang, Maik; Ewing, Rodney C.; Devanathan, R.; Weber, William; Toulemonde, M.

    2011-01-31

    The dynamics of track development due to the passage of relativistic heavy ions through solids is a long-standing issue relevant to nuclear materials, age dating of minerals, space exploration, and nanoscale fabrication of novel devices. We have integrated experimental and simulation approaches to investigate nanoscale phase transitions under the extreme conditions created within single tracks of relativistic ions in Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}(TiO{sub 2}){sub x} and Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2–x} Ti{sub x} O{sub 7}. Track size and internal structure depend on energy density deposition, irradiation temperature, and material composition. Based on the inelastic thermal spike model, molecular dynamics simulations follow the time evolution of individual tracks and reveal the phase transition pathways to the concentric track structures observed experimentally. Individual ion tracks have nanoscale core-shell structures that provide a unique record of the phase transition pathways under extreme conditions.

  14. Capillarity at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    van Honschoten, Joost W; Brunets, Nataliya; Tas, Niels R

    2010-03-01

    In this critical review we treat the phenomenon of capillarity in nanoscopic confinement, based on application of the Young-Laplace equation. In classical capillarity the curvature of the meniscus is determined by the confining geometry and the macroscopic contact angle. We show that in narrow confinement the influence of the disjoining pressure and the related wetting films have to be considered as they may significantly change the meniscus curvature. Nanochannel based static and dynamic capillarity experiments are reviewed. A typical effect of nanoscale confinement is the appearance of capillarity induced negative pressure. Special attention is paid to elasto-capillarity and electro-capillarity. The presence of electric fields leads to an extra stress term to be added in the Young-Laplace equation. A typical example is the formation of the Taylor cone, essential in the theory of electrospray. Measurements of the filling kinetics of nanochannels with water and aqueous salt solutions are discussed. These experiments can be used to characterize viscosity and apparent viscosity effects of water in nanoscopic confinement. In the final section we show four examples of appearances of capillarity in engineering and in nature (112 references).

  15. Nanoscale Electrostatics in Mitosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliardi, L. John; West, Patrick Michael

    2001-04-01

    Primitive biological cells had to divide with very little biology. This work simulates a physicochemical mechanism, based upon nanoscale electrostatics, which explains the anaphase A poleward motion of chromosomes. In the cytoplasmic medium that exists in biological cells, electrostatic fields are subject to strong attenuation by Debye screening, and therefore decrease rapidly over a distance equal to several Debye lengths. However, the existence of microtubules within cells changes the situation completely. Microtubule dimer subunits are electric dipolar structures, and can act as intermediaries that extend the reach of the electrostatic interaction over cellular distances. Experimental studies have shown that intracellular pH rises to a peak at mitosis, and decreases through cytokinesis. This result, in conjunction with the electric dipole nature of microtubule subunits and the Debye screened electrostatic force is sufficient to explain and unify the basic events during mitosis and cytokinesis: (1) assembly of asters, (2) motion of the asters to poles, (3) poleward motion of chromosomes (anaphase A), (4) cell elongation, and (5) cytokinesis. This paper will focus on a simulation of the dynamics if anaphase A motion based on this comprehensive model. The physicochemical mechanisms utilized by primitive cells could provide important clues regarding our understanding of cell division in modern eukaryotic cells.

  16. Thermometry at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Brites, Carlos D S; Lima, Patricia P; Silva, Nuno J O; Millán, Angel; Amaral, Vitor S; Palacio, Fernando; Carlos, Luís D

    2012-08-21

    Non-invasive precise thermometers working at the nanoscale with high spatial resolution, where the conventional methods are ineffective, have emerged over the last couple of years as a very active field of research. This has been strongly stimulated by the numerous challenging requests arising from nanotechnology and biomedicine. This critical review offers a general overview of recent examples of luminescent and non-luminescent thermometers working at nanometric scale. Luminescent thermometers encompass organic dyes, QDs and Ln(3+)ions as thermal probes, as well as more complex thermometric systems formed by polymer and organic-inorganic hybrid matrices encapsulating these emitting centres. Non-luminescent thermometers comprise of scanning thermal microscopy, nanolithography thermometry, carbon nanotube thermometry and biomaterials thermometry. Emphasis has been put on ratiometric examples reporting spatial resolution lower than 1 micron, as, for instance, intracellular thermometers based on organic dyes, thermoresponsive polymers, mesoporous silica NPs, QDs, and Ln(3+)-based up-converting NPs and β-diketonate complexes. Finally, we discuss the challenges and opportunities in the development for highly sensitive ratiometric thermometers operating at the physiological temperature range with submicron spatial resolution. PMID:22763389

  17. Nanoscale Materials and Architectures for Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Grulke, Eric A.; Sunkara, Mahendra K.

    2011-05-25

    The Kentucky EPSCoR Program supported an inter-university, multidisciplinary energy-related research cluster studying nanomaterials for converting solar radiation and residual thermal energy to electrical energy and hydrogen. It created a collaborative center of excellence based on research expertise in nanomaterials, architectures, and their synthesis. The project strengthened and improved the collaboration between the University of Louisville, the University of Kentucky, and NREL. The cluster hired a new faculty member for ultra-fast transient spectroscopy, and enabled the mentoring of one research scientist, two postdoctoral scholars and ten graduate students. Work was accomplished with three focused cluster projects: organic and photoelectrochemical solar cells, solar fuels, and thermionic energy conversion.

  18. Size-Dependent Accuracy of Nanoscale Thermometers.

    PubMed

    Alicki, Robert; Leitner, David M

    2015-07-23

    The accuracy of two classes of nanoscale thermometers is estimated in terms of size and system-dependent properties using the spin-boson model. We consider solid state thermometers, where the energy splitting is tuned by thermal properties of the material, and fluorescent organic thermometers, in which the fluorescence intensity depends on the thermal population of conformational states of the thermometer. The results of the theoretical model compare well with the accuracy reported for several nanothermometers that have been used to measure local temperature inside living cells.

  19. Coal surface control for advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Morsi, B.I.; Chiang, S-H.; Sharkey, A.; Blachere, J.; Klinzing, G.; Araujo, G.; Venkatadri, R.; Bi, H.; Campbell, P.; Ciocco, M.; Hittle, L.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.; Perez, L.

    1990-01-01

    Research continued on surface control of coal. This report describes Task 7 of the program. The following topics are discussed: quantitative distribution of iron species; surface functional groups; comparison of wet and dry ground samples; study of Illinois No. 6 coal wet ground using additives; study of wet grinding using tall oil; elemental distribution of coal samples wet ground without additives; elemental distribution of coal samples wet ground with tall oil; direct determination of pyrite by x-ray diffraction; electron microprobe measurements; morphology; zeta potential measurements; pyrite size distribution; statistical analysis of grinding study data; grinding using N-pentane; cyclohexane, and N-heptane; study of the effects of the grinding method and time; study of the effects of the agglomeration time; and the pentane to coal ratio. 13 refs.

  20. Nanoscale Fluid Mechanics and Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X; Xu, BX; Liu, L

    2014-05-29

    Under nanoconfinement, fluid molecules and ions exhibit radically different configurations, properties, and energetics from those of their bulk counterparts. These unique characteristics of nanoconfined fluids, along with the unconventional interactions with solids at the nanoscale, have provided many opportunities for engineering innovation. With properly designed nanoconfinement, several nanofluidic systems have been devised in our group in the past several years to achieve energy conversion functions with high efficiencies. This review is dedicated to elucidating the unique characteristics of nanofluidics, introducing several novel nanofluidic systems combining nanoporous materials with functional fluids, and to unveiling their working mechanisms. In all these systems, the ultra-large surface area available in nanoporous materials provides an ideal platform for seamlessly interfacing with nanoconfined fluids, and efficiently converting energy between the mechanical, thermal, and electrical forms. These systems have been demonstrated to have great potentials for applications including energy dissipation/absorption, energy trapping, actuation, and energy harvesting. Their efficiencies can be further enhanced by designing efforts based upon improved understanding of nanofluidics, which represents an important addition to classical fluid mechanics. Through the few systems exemplified in this review, the emerging research field of nanoscale fluid mechanics may promote more exciting nanofluidic phenomena and mechanisms, with increasing applications by encompassing aspects of mechanics, materials, physics, chemistry, biology, etc.

  1. Dustiness of Fine and Nanoscale Powders

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Douglas E.; Baron, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Dustiness may be defined as the propensity of a powder to form airborne dust by a prescribed mechanical stimulus; dustiness testing is typically intended to replicate mechanisms of dust generation encountered in workplaces. A novel dustiness testing device, developed for pharmaceutical application, was evaluated in the dustiness investigation of 27 fine and nanoscale powders. The device efficiently dispersed small (mg) quantities of a wide variety of fine and nanoscale powders, into a small sampling chamber. Measurements consisted of gravimetrically determined total and respirable dustiness. The following materials were studied: single and multiwalled carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofibers, and carbon blacks; fumed oxides of titanium, aluminum, silicon, and cerium; metallic nanoparticles (nickel, cobalt, manganese, and silver) silicon carbide, Arizona road dust; nanoclays; and lithium titanate. Both the total and respirable dustiness spanned two orders of magnitude (0.3–37.9% and 0.1–31.8% of the predispersed test powders, respectively). For many powders, a significant respirable dustiness was observed. For most powders studied, the respirable dustiness accounted for approximately one-third of the total dustiness. It is believed that this relationship holds for many fine and nanoscale test powders (i.e. those primarily selected for this study), but may not hold for coarse powders. Neither total nor respirable dustiness was found to be correlated with BET surface area, therefore dustiness is not determined by primary particle size. For a subset of test powders, aerodynamic particle size distributions by number were measured (with an electrical low-pressure impactor and an aerodynamic particle sizer). Particle size modes ranged from approximately 300nm to several micrometers, but no modes below 100nm, were observed. It is therefore unlikely that these materials would exhibit a substantial sub-100nm particle contribution in a workplace. PMID:23065675

  2. Large-area nanoscale patterning: chemistry meets fabrication.

    PubMed

    Henzie, Joel; Barton, Jeremy E; Stender, Christopher L; Odom, Teri W

    2006-04-01

    This Account describes a new paradigm for large-area nanoscale patterning that combines bottom-up and top-down approaches, merging chemistry with fabrication. This hybrid strategy uses simple nanofabrication techniques to control the alignment, size, shape, and periodicity of nanopatterns and chemical methods to control their materials properties and crystallinity. These tools are highly flexible and can create surface-patterned nanostructures with unusual properties and free-standing nanostructures that are multifunctional and monodisperse. The unprecedented scientific and technological opportunities enabled by nanoscale patterning over wafer-sized areas are discussed.

  3. Organic Micro/Nanoscale Lasers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Yao, Jiannian; Zhao, Yong Sheng

    2016-09-20

    Micro/nanoscale lasers that can deliver intense coherent light signals at (sub)wavelength scale have recently captured broad research interest because of their potential applications ranging from on-chip information processing to high-throughput sensing. Organic molecular materials are a promising kind of ideal platform to construct high-performance microlasers, mainly because of their superiority in abundant excited-state processes with large active cross sections for high gain emissions and flexibly assembled structures for high-quality microcavities. In recent years, ever-increasing efforts have been dedicated to developing such organic microlasers toward low threshold, multicolor output, broadband tunability, and easy integration. Therefore, it is increasingly important to summarize this research field and give deep insight into the structure-property relationships of organic microlasers to accelerate the future development. In this Account, we will review the recent advances in organic miniaturized lasers, with an emphasis on tunable laser performances based on the tailorable microcavity structures and controlled excited-state gain processes of organic materials toward integrated photonic applications. Organic π-conjugated molecules with weak intermolecular interactions readily assemble into regular nanostructures that can serve as high-quality optical microcavities for the strong confinement of photons. On the basis of rational material design, a series of optical microcavities with different structures have been controllably synthesized. These microcavity nanostructures can be endowed with effective four-level dynamic gain processes, such as excited-state intramolecular charge transfer, excited-state intramolecular proton transfer, and excimer processes, that exhibit large dipole optical transitions for strongly active gain behaviors. By tailoring these excited-state processes with molecular/crystal engineering and external stimuli, people have effectively

  4. Sensing at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna; Hierold, Christofer

    2013-11-01

    The merits of nanostructures in sensing may seem obvious, yet playing these attributes to their maximum advantage can be a work of genius. As fast as sensing technology is improving, expectations are growing, with demands for cheaper devices with higher sensitivities and an ever increasing range of functionalities and compatibilities. At the same time tough scientific challenges like low power operation, noise and low selectivity are keeping researchers busy. This special issue on sensing at the nanoscale with guest editor Christofer Hierold from ETH Zurich features some of the latest developments in sensing research pushing at the limits of current capabilities. Cheap and easy fabrication is a top priority. Among the most popular nanomaterials in sensing are ZnO nanowires and in this issue Dario Zappa and colleagues at Brescia University in Italy simplify an already cheap and efficient synthesis method, demonstrating ZnO nanowire fabrication directly onto silicon substrates [1]. Meanwhile Nicolae Barson and colleagues in Germany point out the advantages of flame spray pyrolysis fabrication in a topical review [2] and, maximizing on existing resources, researchers in Denmark and Taiwan report cantilever sensing using a US20 commercial DVD-ROM optical pickup unit as the readout source [3]. The sensor is designed to detect physiological concentrations of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor, a protein associated with inflammation due to HIV, cancer and other infectious diseases. With their extreme properties carbon nanostructures feature prominently in the issue, including the demonstration of a versatile and flexible carbon nanotube strain sensor [4] and a graphene charge sensor with sensitivities of the order of 1.3 × 10-3 e Hz-1/2 [5]. The issue of patterning for sensing devices is also tackled by researchers in the US who demonstrate a novel approach for multicomponent pattering metal/metal oxide nanoparticles on graphene [6]. Changes in electrical

  5. Nanoscale deicing by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Senbo; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2016-07-01

    Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice adhesion strength by an aqueous water layer, and provide atomistic details that support previous experimental studies. Our results contribute quantitative comparison of nanoscale adhesion strength of ice on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, and supply for the first time theoretical references for understanding the mechanics at the atomistic origins of macroscale ice adhesion.Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice

  6. Synthesis, dynamics and photophysics of nanoscale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkovic, Tihana

    The emerging field of nanotechnology, which spans diverse areas such as nanoelectronics, medicine, chemical and pharmaceutical industries, biotechnology and computation, focuses on the development of devices whose improved performance is based on the utilization of self-assembled nanoscale components exhibiting unique properties owing to their miniaturized dimensions. The first phase in the conception of such multifunctional devices based on integrated technologies requires the study of basic principles behind the functional mechanism of nanoscale components, which could originate from individual nanoobjects or result as a collective behaviour of miniaturized unit structures. The comprehensive studies presented in this thesis encompass the mechanical, dynamical and photophysical aspects of three nanoscale systems. A newly developed europium sulfide nanocrystalline material is introduced. Advances in synthetic methods allowed for shape control of surface-functionalized EuS nanocrystals and the fabrication of multifunctional EuS-CdSe hybrid particles, whose unique structural and optical properties hold promise as useful attributes of integrated materials in developing technologies. A comprehensive study based on a new class of multifunctional nanomaterials, derived from the basic unit of barcoded metal nanorods is presented. Their chemical composition affords them the ability to undergo autonomous motion in the presence of a suitable fuel. The nature of their chemically powered self-propulsion locomotion was investigated, and plausible mechanisms for various motility modes were presented. Furthermore functionalization of striped metallic nanorods has been realized through the incorporation of chemically controlled flexible hinges displaying bendable properties. The structural aspect of the light harvesting machinery of a photosynthetic cryptophyte alga, Rhodomonas CS24, and the mobility of the antenna protein, PE545, in vivo were investigated. Information obtained

  7. Thermoelectric effects in nanoscale junctions.

    PubMed

    Dubi, Yonatan; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2009-01-01

    Despite its intrinsic nonequilibrium origin, thermoelectricity in nanoscale systems is usually described within a static scattering approach which disregards the dynamical interaction with the thermal baths that maintain energy flow. Using the theory of open quantum systems, we show instead that unexpected properties, such as a resonant structure and large sign sensitivity, emerge if the nonequilibrium nature of this problem is considered. Our approach also allows us to define and study a local temperature, which shows hot spots and oscillations along the system according to the coupling of the latter to the electrodes. This demonstrates that Fourier's lawa paradigm of statistical mechanicsis generally violated in nanoscale junctions. PMID:19072125

  8. NANOSCALE BIOSENSORS IN ECOSYSTEM EXPOSURE RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    This powerpoint presentation presented information on nanoscale biosensors in ecosystem exposure research. The outline of the presentation is as follows: nanomaterials environmental exposure research; US agencies involved in nanosensor research; nanoscale LEDs in biosensors; nano...

  9. PREFACE: Superconductivity in ultrathin films and nanoscale systems Superconductivity in ultrathin films and nanoscale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Antonio; Bose, Sangita; Garcia-Garcia, Antonio Miguel

    2012-12-01

    The recent technological developments in the synthesis and characterization of high-quality nanostructures and developments in the theoretical techniques needed to model these materials, have motivated this focus section of Superconductor Science and Technology. Another motivation is the compelling evidence that all new superconducting materials, such as iron pnictides and chalcogenides, diborides (doped MgB2) and fullerides (alkali-doped C60 compounds), are heterostrucures at the atomic limit, such as the cuprates made of stacks of nanoscale superconducting layers intercalated by different atomic layers with nanoscale periodicity. Recently a great amount of interest has been shown in the role of lattice nano-architecture in controlling the fine details of Fermi surface topology. The experimental and theoretical study of superconductivity in the nanoscale started in the early 1960s, shortly after the discovery of the BCS theory. Thereafter there has been rapid progress both in experiments and the theoretical understanding of nanoscale superconductors. Experimentally, thin films, granular films, nanowires, nanotubes and single nanoparticles have all been explored. New quantum effects appear in the nanoscale related to multi-component condensates. Advances in the understanding of shape resonances or Fano resonances close to 2.5 Lifshitz transitions near a band edge in nanowires, 2D films and superlattices [1, 2] of these nanosized modules, provide the possibility of manipulating new quantum electronic states. Parity effects and shell effects in single, isolated nanoparticles have been reported by several groups. Theoretically, newer techniques based on solving Richardson's equation (an exact theory incorporating finite size effects to the BCS theory) numerically by path integral methods or solving the entire Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation in these limits have been attempted, which has improved our understanding of the mechanism of superconductivity in these confined

  10. Nanoscale octahedral molecular sieves: Syntheses, characterization, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia

    The major part of this research consists of studies on novel synthesis methods, characterization, and catalytic applications of nanoscale manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieves. The second part involves studies of new applications of bulk porous molecular sieve and layered materials (MSLM), zeolites, and inorganic powder materials for diminishing wound bleeding. Manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieves (OMS) are very important microporous materials. They have been used widely as bulk materials in catalysis, separations, chemical sensors, and batteries, due to their unique tunnel structures and useful properties. Novel methods have been developed to synthesize novel nanoscale octahedral molecular sieve manganese oxides (OMS) and metal-substituted OMS materials in order to modify their physical and chemical properties and to improve their catalytic applications. Different synthetic routes were investigated to find better, faster, and cheaper pathways to produce nanoscale or metal-substituted OMS materials. In the synthetic study of nanosize OMS materials, a combination of sol-gel synthesis and hydrothermal reaction was used to prepare pure crystalline nanofibrous todorokite-type (OMS-1) and cryptomelane-typed (OMS-2) manganese oxides using four alkali cations (Li+, K+, Na +, Rb+) and NH4+ cations. In the synthesis study of nanoscale and metal-substituted OMS materials, a combination of sol-gel synthesis and solid-state reaction was used to prepare transition metal-substituted OMS-2 nanorods, nanoneedles, and nanowires. Preparative parameters of syntheses, such as cation templates, heating temperature and time, were investigated in these syntheses of OMS-1 and OMS-2 materials. The catalytic activities of the novel synthetic nanoscale OMS materials has been evaluated on green oxidation of alcohols and toluene and were found to be much higher than their correspondent bulk materials. New applications of bulk manganese oxide molecular sieve and layered materials

  11. Apparatus for producing nanoscale ceramic powders

    DOEpatents

    Helble, Joseph J.; Moniz, Gary A.; Morse, Theodore F.

    1997-02-04

    An apparatus provides high temperature and short residence time conditions for the production of nanoscale ceramic powders. The apparatus includes a confinement structure having a multiple inclined surfaces for confining flame located between the surfaces so as to define a flame zone. A burner system employs one or more burners to provide flame to the flame zone. Each burner is located in the flame zone in close proximity to at least one of the inclined surfaces. A delivery system disposed adjacent the flame zone delivers an aerosol, comprising an organic or carbonaceous carrier material and a ceramic precursor, to the flame zone to expose the aerosol to a temperature sufficient to induce combustion of the carrier material and vaporization and nucleation, or diffusion and oxidation, of the ceramic precursor to form pure, crystalline, narrow size distribution, nanophase ceramic particles.

  12. Apparatus for producing nanoscale ceramic powders

    DOEpatents

    Helble, Joseph J.; Moniz, Gary A.; Morse, Theodore F.

    1995-09-05

    An apparatus provides high temperature and short residence time conditions for the production of nanoscale ceramic powders. The apparatus includes a confinement structure having a multiple inclined surfaces for confining flame located between the surfaces so as to define a flame zone. A burner system employs one or more burners to provide flame to the flame zone. Each burner is located in the flame zone in close proximity to at least one of the inclined surfaces. A delivery system disposed adjacent the flame zone delivers an aerosol, comprising an organic or carbonaceous carrier material and a ceramic precursor, to the flame zone to expose the aerosol to a temperature sufficient to induce combustion of the carrier material and vaporization and nucleation, or diffusion and oxidation, of the ceramic precursor to form pure, crystalline, narrow size distribution, nanophase ceramic particles.

  13. Carbon-bearing fluids at nanoscale interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, David; Ok, Salim; Phan, A; Rother, Gernot; Striolo, Alberto; Vlcek, Lukas

    2013-01-01

    The behaviour of fluids at mineral surfaces or in confined geometries (pores, fractures) typically differs from their bulk behaviour in many ways due to the effects of large internal surfaces and geometrical confinement. We summarize research performed on C-O-H fluids at nanoscale interfaces in materials of interest to the earth and material sciences (e.g., silica, alumina, zeolites, clays, rocks, etc.), emphasizing those techniques that assess microstructural modification and/or dynamical behaviour such as gravimetric analysis, small-angle (SANS) neutron scattering, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations will be described that provide atomistic characterization of interfacial and confined fluid behaviour as well as aid in the interpretation of the neutron scattering results.

  14. Sensing at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna; Hierold, Christofer

    2013-11-01

    The merits of nanostructures in sensing may seem obvious, yet playing these attributes to their maximum advantage can be a work of genius. As fast as sensing technology is improving, expectations are growing, with demands for cheaper devices with higher sensitivities and an ever increasing range of functionalities and compatibilities. At the same time tough scientific challenges like low power operation, noise and low selectivity are keeping researchers busy. This special issue on sensing at the nanoscale with guest editor Christofer Hierold from ETH Zurich features some of the latest developments in sensing research pushing at the limits of current capabilities. Cheap and easy fabrication is a top priority. Among the most popular nanomaterials in sensing are ZnO nanowires and in this issue Dario Zappa and colleagues at Brescia University in Italy simplify an already cheap and efficient synthesis method, demonstrating ZnO nanowire fabrication directly onto silicon substrates [1]. Meanwhile Nicolae Barson and colleagues in Germany point out the advantages of flame spray pyrolysis fabrication in a topical review [2] and, maximizing on existing resources, researchers in Denmark and Taiwan report cantilever sensing using a US20 commercial DVD-ROM optical pickup unit as the readout source [3]. The sensor is designed to detect physiological concentrations of soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor, a protein associated with inflammation due to HIV, cancer and other infectious diseases. With their extreme properties carbon nanostructures feature prominently in the issue, including the demonstration of a versatile and flexible carbon nanotube strain sensor [4] and a graphene charge sensor with sensitivities of the order of 1.3 × 10-3 e Hz-1/2 [5]. The issue of patterning for sensing devices is also tackled by researchers in the US who demonstrate a novel approach for multicomponent pattering metal/metal oxide nanoparticles on graphene [6]. Changes in electrical

  15. SonoPanel(TM) 1-3 Piezocomposite Panels for Active Surface Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentilman, R.; Bowen, L.; Fiore, D.; Pham, H.; Serwatka, W.

    1996-01-01

    Materials Systems Inc. has developed a cost-effective technology for producing 1-3 piezoelectric ceramic/polymer composites for use in active surface control. MSI's 103 piezocomposite SonoPanel(TM) transducers consist of an array of piezoelectric ceramic rods arranged in a compliant polymer matrix. The standard SonoPanel(TM) composite consists of 15 volume percent PZT-5H rods 1.1 mm diameter x 6.3 mm long in a matrix of soft polyurethane. Stiff face plates are then bonded to the 1-3 composite sheet for stress amplification when used as a sensor and to enhance the surface response uniformity when used as an actuator. Many variations on this composite design have been produced for specific application requirements.

  16. IR nanoscale spectroscopy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Eamonn; Yarrow, Fiona; Rice, James H.

    2011-10-01

    Sub diffraction limited infrared absorption imaging was applied to hemoglobin by coupling IR optics with an atomic force microscope. Comparisons between the AFM topography and IR absorption images of micron sized hemoglobin features are presented, along with nanoscale IR spectroscopic analysis of the metalloprotein.

  17. Nanoscale wicking methods and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Jijie (Inventor); Bronikowski, Michael (Inventor); Noca, Flavio (Inventor); Sansom, Elijah B. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A fluid transport method and fluid transport device are disclosed. Nanoscale fibers disposed in a patterned configuration allow transport of a fluid in absence of an external power source. The device may include two or more fluid transport components having different fluid transport efficiencies. The components may be separated by additional fluid transport components, to control fluid flow.

  18. Nanoscale Deformable Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strauss, Karl F.; Sheldon, Douglas J.

    2011-01-01

    Several missions and instruments in the conceptual design phase rely on the technique of interferometry to create detectable fringe patterns. The intimate emplacement of reflective material upon electron device cells based upon chalcogenide material technology permits high-speed, predictable deformation of the reflective surface to a subnanometer or finer resolution with a very high degree of accuracy. In this innovation, a layer of reflective material is deposited upon a wafer containing (perhaps in the millions) chalcogenic memory cells with the reflective material becoming the front surface of a mirror and the chalcogenic material becoming a means of selectively deforming the mirror by the application of heat to the chalcogenic material. By doing so, the mirror surface can deform anywhere from nil to nanometers in spots the size of a modern day memory cell, thereby permitting realtime tuning of mirror focus and reflectivity to mitigate aberrations caused elsewhere in the optical system. Modern foundry methods permit the design and manufacture of individual memory cells having an area of or equal to the Feature (F) size of the design (assume 65 nm). Fabrication rules and restraints generally require the instantiation of one memory cell to another no closer than 1.5 F, or, for this innovation, 90 nm from its neighbor in any direction. Chalcogenide is a semiconducting glass compound consisting of a combination of chalcogen ions, the ratios of which vary according to properties desired. It has been shown that the application of heat to cells of chalcogenic material cause a large alteration in resistance to the range of 4 orders of magnitude. It is this effect upon which chalcogenidebased commercial memories rely. Upon removal of the heat source, the chalcogenide rapidly cools and remains frozen in the excited state. It has also been shown that the chalcogenide expands in volume because of the applied heat, meaning that the coefficient of expansion of chalcogenic

  19. Nanoscale deicing by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Senbo; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2016-08-14

    Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice adhesion strength by an aqueous water layer, and provide atomistic details that support previous experimental studies. Our results contribute quantitative comparison of nanoscale adhesion strength of ice on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, and supply for the first time theoretical references for understanding the mechanics at the atomistic origins of macroscale ice adhesion. PMID:27431975

  20. Structure of nanoscale gas bubbles in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Caro, A. Schwen, D.; Martinez, E.

    2013-11-18

    A usual way to estimate the amount of gas in a bubble inside a metal is to assume thermodynamic equilibrium, i.e., the gas pressure P equals the capillarity force 2γ/R, with γ the surface energy of the host material and R the bubble radius; under this condition there is no driving force for vacancies to be emitted or absorbed by the bubble. In contrast to the common assumption that pressure inside a gas or fluid bubble is constant, we show that at the nanoscale this picture is no longer valid. P and density can no longer be defined as global quantities determined by an equation of state (EOS), but they become functions of position because the bubble develops a core-shell structure. We focus on He in Fe and solve the problem using both continuum mechanics and empirical potentials to find a quantitative measure of this effect. We point to the need of redefining an EOS for nanoscale gas bubbles in metals, which can be obtained via an average pressure inside the bubble. The resulting EOS, which is now size dependent, gives pressures that differ by a factor of two or more from the original EOS for bubble diameters of 1 nm and below.

  1. Nanomedicine-nanoscale drugs and delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surya

    2010-12-01

    Significant progress has been made in nanoscale drugs and delivery systems employing diverse chemical formulations to facilitate the rate of drug delivery and release from the human body. The biocompatible nanomaterials have been used in biological markers, contrast agents for biological imaging, healthcare products, pharmaceuticals, drug-delivery systems as well as in detection, diagnosis and treatment of various types of diseases. Nanomedicines offer delivery of potential drugs to human organs which were previously beyond reach of microscale drugs due to specific biological barriers. The nanoscale systems work as nanocarriers for the delivery of drugs. The nanocarriers are made of biocompatible and biodegradable materials such as synthetic proteins, peptides, lipids, polysaccharides, biodegradable polymers and fibers. This review article reports the recent developments in the field of nanomedicine covering biodegradable polymers, nanoparticles, cyclodextrin, dendrimeres, liposomes and lipid-based nanocarriers, nanofibers, nanowires and carbon nanotubes and their chemical functionalization for distribution to different organs, their solubility, surface, chemical and biological properties, stability and release systems. The toxicity and safety of nanomaterials on human health is also briefly discussed.

  2. PREFACE: Superconductivity in ultrathin films and nanoscale systems Superconductivity in ultrathin films and nanoscale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Antonio; Bose, Sangita; Garcia-Garcia, Antonio Miguel

    2012-12-01

    The recent technological developments in the synthesis and characterization of high-quality nanostructures and developments in the theoretical techniques needed to model these materials, have motivated this focus section of Superconductor Science and Technology. Another motivation is the compelling evidence that all new superconducting materials, such as iron pnictides and chalcogenides, diborides (doped MgB2) and fullerides (alkali-doped C60 compounds), are heterostrucures at the atomic limit, such as the cuprates made of stacks of nanoscale superconducting layers intercalated by different atomic layers with nanoscale periodicity. Recently a great amount of interest has been shown in the role of lattice nano-architecture in controlling the fine details of Fermi surface topology. The experimental and theoretical study of superconductivity in the nanoscale started in the early 1960s, shortly after the discovery of the BCS theory. Thereafter there has been rapid progress both in experiments and the theoretical understanding of nanoscale superconductors. Experimentally, thin films, granular films, nanowires, nanotubes and single nanoparticles have all been explored. New quantum effects appear in the nanoscale related to multi-component condensates. Advances in the understanding of shape resonances or Fano resonances close to 2.5 Lifshitz transitions near a band edge in nanowires, 2D films and superlattices [1, 2] of these nanosized modules, provide the possibility of manipulating new quantum electronic states. Parity effects and shell effects in single, isolated nanoparticles have been reported by several groups. Theoretically, newer techniques based on solving Richardson's equation (an exact theory incorporating finite size effects to the BCS theory) numerically by path integral methods or solving the entire Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation in these limits have been attempted, which has improved our understanding of the mechanism of superconductivity in these confined

  3. Tg and Cure of a Polycyanurate at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sindee; Li, Qingxiu

    2008-03-01

    Nanoscale constraint is known to have a significant impact on the thermal properties of materials. Although thermosetting resins have been cured in the presence of nanoparticles and nanotubes, cure of thermosetting resins under the well defined nanoscale constraints imposed by controlled pore glass (CPG) or similar matrices has not been previously documented. In this work, we investigate the isothermal curing under nanoscale constraint of a thermosetting resin, bisphenol M dicyanate ester (BMDC), which trimerizes to form a polycyanurate network material. Differential scanning calorimeter is used to monitor the evolution of the glass transition temperature (Tg) and the conversion during cure as a function of the diameter of the silanized control pore glass matrix which is used for confinement. A Tg depression is observed for both the bisphenol M dicyanate ester monomer and the polycyanurate networks; the depression is only a few degrees for the monomer, whereas a 56 K depression is observed for the ``fully-cured'' network in 11.5 nm pores. The nanoscale constraint is also found to accelerate the cure of the bisphenol M dicyanate ester, but it does not affect the normalized Tg versus conversion relationship. The appearance of a secondary Tg above the primary Tg in the smaller pores and the associated length scale are discussed.

  4. Nanoscale mass conveyors

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, Brian C.; Aloni, Shaul; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2008-03-11

    A mass transport method and device for individually delivering chargeable atoms or molecules from source particles is disclosed. It comprises a channel; at least one source particle of chargeable material fixed to the surface of the channel at a position along its length; a means of heating the channel; and a means for applying an controllable electric field along the channel, whereby the device transports the atoms or molecules along the channel in response to applied electric field. In a preferred embodiment, the mass transport device will comprise a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT), although other one dimensional structures may also be used. The MWNT or other structure acts as a channel for individual or small collections of atoms due to the atomic smoothness of the material. Also preferred is a source particle of a metal such as indium. The particles move by dissociation into small units, in some cases, individual atoms. The particles are preferably less than 100 nm in size.

  5. Nanoscale Structuring of Surfaces by Using Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Nicolas; Hess, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Controlled structuring of surfaces is interesting for a wide variety of areas, including microelectronic device fabrication, optical devices, bio(sensing), (electro-, photo)catalysis, batteries, solar cells, fuel cells, and sorption. A unique feature of atomic layer deposition (ALD) is the possibility to form conformal uniform coatings on arbitrarily shaped materials with controlled atomic-scale thickness. In this Minireview, we discuss the potential of ALD for the nanoscale structuring of surfaces, highlighting its versatile application to structuring both planar substrates and powder materials. Recent progress in the application of ALD to porous substrates has even made the nanoscale structuring of high-surface-area materials now feasible, thereby enabling novel applications, such as those in the fields of catalysis and alternative energy.

  6. Optical antennas as nanoscale resonators.

    PubMed

    Agio, Mario

    2012-02-01

    Recent progress in nanotechnology has enabled us to fabricate sub-wavelength architectures that function as antennas for improving the exchange of optical energy with nanoscale matter. We describe the main features of optical antennas for enhancing quantum emitters and review the designs that increase the spontaneous emission rate by orders of magnitude from the ultraviolet up to the near-infrared spectral range. To further explore how optical antennas may lead to unprecedented regimes of light-matter interactions, we draw a relationship between metal nanoparticles, radio-wave antennas and optical resonators. Our analysis points out how optical antennas may function as nanoscale resonators and how these may offer unique opportunities with respect to state-of-the-art microcavities.

  7. Li + ion diffusion in nanoscale alumina coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannes, Michelle; Bernstein, Noam

    Nanoscale coatings of alumina are used to stabilize surfaces for a variety of technologies. Diffusion of ions through these coatings is of primary importance: in some cases, diffusion is unwanted (e.g. corrosion) and in others (e.g. electrode materials), it is necessary. In this work DFT and AIMD calculations are used to investigate Li+ ion diffusion through a nano-layer of alumina, examining the phase (alpha, gamma, and amorphous), ion concentration, and electron count dependence. We look at the role of the surface itself in promoting diffusion. One of our main findings is that as the number of ions or charge increases, the diffusivity rises. We show how our data can explain electrochemical data from coated LiCoO2 cathodes and may point toward better and more efficient coatings for stabilizing electrodes.

  8. Cavitation dynamics on the nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Kotaidis, Vassilios; Plech, Anton

    2005-11-21

    The ultrafast excitation of gold nanoparticle sols causes a strong nonequilibrium heating of the particle lattice and subsequently of the water shell close to the particle surface. Above a threshold in laser fluence, which is defined by the onset of homogeneous nucleation, nanoscale vapor bubbles develop around the particles, expand and collapse again within the first nanosecond after excitation. We show the existence of cavitation on the nanometer and subnanosecond time scale, described within the framework of continuum thermodynamics.

  9. Effectiveness of the Young-Laplace equation at nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hailong; Cao, Guoxin

    2016-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, a new approach based on the behavior of pressurized water out of a nanopore (1.3–2.7 nm) in a flat plate is developed to calculate the relationship between the water surface curvature and the pressure difference across water surface. It is found that the water surface curvature is inversely proportional to the pressure difference across surface at nanoscale, and this relationship will be effective for different pore size, temperature, and even for electrolyte solutions. Based on the present results, we cannot only effectively determine the surface tension of water and the effects of temperature or electrolyte ions on the surface tension, but also show that the Young-Laplace (Y-L) equation is valid at nanoscale. In addition, the contact angle of water with the hydrophilic material can be further calculated by the relationship between the critical instable pressure of water surface (burst pressure) and nanopore size. Combining with the infiltration behavior of water into hydrophobic microchannels, the contact angle of water at nanoscale can be more accurately determined by measuring the critical pressure causing the instability of water surface, based on which the uncertainty of measuring the contact angle of water at nanoscale is highly reduced. PMID:27033874

  10. Effectiveness of the Young-Laplace equation at nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hailong; Cao, Guoxin

    2016-04-01

    Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, a new approach based on the behavior of pressurized water out of a nanopore (1.3-2.7 nm) in a flat plate is developed to calculate the relationship between the water surface curvature and the pressure difference across water surface. It is found that the water surface curvature is inversely proportional to the pressure difference across surface at nanoscale, and this relationship will be effective for different pore size, temperature, and even for electrolyte solutions. Based on the present results, we cannot only effectively determine the surface tension of water and the effects of temperature or electrolyte ions on the surface tension, but also show that the Young-Laplace (Y-L) equation is valid at nanoscale. In addition, the contact angle of water with the hydrophilic material can be further calculated by the relationship between the critical instable pressure of water surface (burst pressure) and nanopore size. Combining with the infiltration behavior of water into hydrophobic microchannels, the contact angle of water at nanoscale can be more accurately determined by measuring the critical pressure causing the instability of water surface, based on which the uncertainty of measuring the contact angle of water at nanoscale is highly reduced.

  11. Using theory and computation to model nanoscale properties

    PubMed Central

    Schatz, George C.

    2007-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the use of theory and computation to describe the structural, thermodynamic, mechanical, and optical properties of nanoscale materials. Nanoscience provides important opportunities for theory and computation to lead in the discovery process because the experimental tools often provide an incomplete picture of the structure and/or function of nanomaterials, and theory can often fill in missing features crucial to understanding what is being measured. However, there are important challenges to using theory as well, as the systems of interest are usually too large, and the time scales too long, for a purely atomistic level theory to be useful. At the same time, continuum theories that are appropriate for describing larger-scale (micrometer) phenomena are often not accurate for describing the nanoscale. Despite these challenges, there has been important progress in a number of areas, and there are exciting opportunities that we can look forward to as the capabilities of computational facilities continue to expand. Some specific applications that are discussed in this paper include: self-assembly of supramolecular structures, the thermal properties of nanoscale molecular systems (DNA melting and nanoscale water meniscus formation), the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes and diamond crystals, and the optical properties of silver and gold nanoparticles. PMID:17438274

  12. Recent advances in superhydrophobic nanomaterials and nanoscale systems.

    PubMed

    Nagappan, Saravanan; Park, Sung Soo; Ha, Chang-Sik

    2014-02-01

    This review describes the recent advances in the field of superhydrophobic nanomaterials and nanoscale systems. The term superhydrophobic is defined from the surface properties when the surface shows the contact angle (CA) higher than 150 degrees. This could be well known from the lotus effect due to the non-stick and self-cleaning properties of the lotus leaf (LL). We briefly introduced the methods of preparing superhydrophobic surfaces using top-down approaches, bottom-up approaches and a combination of top-down and bottom-up approaches and various ways to prepare superhydrophobic nanomaterials and nanoscale systems using the bio-inspired materials, polymer nanocomposites, metal nanoparticles graphene oxide (GO) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs). We also pointed out the recent applications of the superhydrophobic nanomaterials and nanoscale systems in oil-spill capture and separations, self-cleaning and self-healing systems, bio-medicals, anti-icing and anti-corrosive, electronics, catalysis, textile fabrics and papers etc. The review also highlights the visionary outlook for the future development and use of the superhydrophobic nanomaterials and nanoscale systems for a wide variety of applications. PMID:24749434

  13. Effectiveness of the Young-Laplace equation at nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hailong; Cao, Guoxin

    2016-04-01

    Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, a new approach based on the behavior of pressurized water out of a nanopore (1.3-2.7 nm) in a flat plate is developed to calculate the relationship between the water surface curvature and the pressure difference across water surface. It is found that the water surface curvature is inversely proportional to the pressure difference across surface at nanoscale, and this relationship will be effective for different pore size, temperature, and even for electrolyte solutions. Based on the present results, we cannot only effectively determine the surface tension of water and the effects of temperature or electrolyte ions on the surface tension, but also show that the Young-Laplace (Y-L) equation is valid at nanoscale. In addition, the contact angle of water with the hydrophilic material can be further calculated by the relationship between the critical instable pressure of water surface (burst pressure) and nanopore size. Combining with the infiltration behavior of water into hydrophobic microchannels, the contact angle of water at nanoscale can be more accurately determined by measuring the critical pressure causing the instability of water surface, based on which the uncertainty of measuring the contact angle of water at nanoscale is highly reduced.

  14. A hard X-ray nanoprobe beamline for nanoscale microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Winarski, Robert P.; Holt, Martin V.; Rose, Volker; Fuesz, Peter; Carbaugh, Dean; Benson, Christa; Shu, Deming; Kline, David; Stephenson, G. Brian; McNulty, Ian; Maser, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    The Hard X-ray Nanoprobe Beamline (or Nanoprobe Beamline) is an X-ray microscopy facility incorporating diffraction, fluorescence and full-field imaging capabilities designed and operated by the Center for Nanoscale Materials and the Advanced Photon Source at Sector 26 of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. This facility was constructed to probe the nanoscale structure of biological, environmental and material sciences samples. The beamline provides intense focused X-rays to the Hard X-ray Nanoprobe (or Nanoprobe) which incorporates Fresnel zone plate optics and a precision laser sensing and control system. The beamline operates over X-ray energies from 3 to 30 keV, enabling studies of most elements in the periodic table, with a particular emphasis on imaging transition metals. PMID:23093770

  15. Nanoscale Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Xiaoye

    Continuous downscaling in microelectronics has pushed conventional CMOS technology to its physical limits, while Moore's Law has correctly predicted the trend for decades, each step forward is accompanied with unprecedented technological difficulties and near-exponential increase in cost. At the same time, however, demands for low-power, low-cost and high-speed devices have never diminished, instead, even more stringent requirements have been imposed on device performances. It is therefore crucial to explore alternative materials and device architectures in order to alleviate the pressure caused by downscaling. To this end, we investigated two different approaches: (1) InSb nanowire based field effect transistors (NWFETs) and (2) single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) -- peptide nucleic acid (PNA) --SWCNT conjugate. Two types of InSb nanowires were synthesized by template-assisted electrochemistry and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) respectively. In both cases, NWFETs were fabricated by electron beam lithography (EBL) and crystallinity was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area diffraction (SAD) patterns. For electrochemistry nanowire, ambipolar conduction was observed with strong p-type conduction, the effect of thermal annealing on the conductivity was analyzed, a NWFET model that took into consideration the underlapped region in top-gated NWFET was proposed. Hole mobility in the channel was calculated to be 292.84 cm2V-1s -1 with a density of 1.5x1017/cm3. For CVD nanowire, the diameter was below 40nm with an average of 20nm. Vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) process was speculated to be the mechanism responsible for nanowire growth. The efficient gate control was manifested by high ION/I OFF ratio which was on the order of 106 and a small inverse subthreshold slope (<200 mV/decade). Scale analysis was used to successfully account for disparities observed among a number of sample devices. N-type conduction was found in all NWFETs with

  16. Electrochemical kinetics and dimensional considerations, at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, H.; Bandaru, P. R.

    2016-06-01

    It is shown that the consideration of the density of states variation in nanoscale electrochemical systems yields modulations in the rate constant and concomitant electrical currents. The proposed models extend the utility of Marcus-Hush-Chidsey (MHC) kinetics to a larger class of materials and could be used as a test of dimensional character. The implications of the study are of much significance to an understanding and modulation of charge transfer nanostructured electrodes.

  17. Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology (Program website, free access)   Currently there is no database matching your keyword search, but the NIST Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology website may be of interest. The Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology enables science and industry by providing essential measurement methods, instrumentation, and standards to support all phases of nanotechnology development, from discovery to production.

  18. A new regime of nanoscale thermal transport: Collective diffusion increases dissipation efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogeboom-Pot, Kathleen M.; Hernandez-Charpak, Jorge N.; Gu, Xiaokun; Frazer, Travis D.; Anderson, Erik H.; Chao, Weilun; Falcone, Roger W.; Yang, Ronggui; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Nardi, Damiano

    2015-03-23

    Understanding thermal transport from nanoscale heat sources is important for a fundamental description of energy flow in materials, as well as for many technological applications including thermal management in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics, thermoelectric devices, nanoenhanced photovoltaics, and nanoparticle-mediated thermal therapies. Thermal transport at the nanoscale is fundamentally different from that at the macroscale and is determined by the distribution of carrier mean free paths and energy dispersion in a material, the length scales of the heat sources, and the distance over which heat is transported. Past work has shown that Fourier’s law for heat conduction dramatically overpredicts the rate of heat dissipation from heat sources with dimensions smaller than the mean free path of the dominant heat-carrying phonons. In this work, we uncover a new regime of nanoscale thermal transport that dominates when the separation between nanoscale heat sources is small compared with the dominant phonon mean free paths. Surprisingly, the interaction of phonons originating from neighboring heat sources enables more efficient diffusive-like heat dissipation, even from nanoscale heat sources much smaller than the dominant phonon mean free paths. This finding suggests that thermal management in nanoscale systems including integrated circuits might not be as challenging as previously projected. In conclusion, we demonstrate a unique capability to extract differential conductivity as a function of phonon mean free path in materials, allowing the first (to our knowledge) experimental validation of predictions from the recently developed first-principles calculations.

  19. A new regime of nanoscale thermal transport: Collective diffusion increases dissipation efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hoogeboom-Pot, Kathleen M.; Hernandez-Charpak, Jorge N.; Gu, Xiaokun; Frazer, Travis D.; Anderson, Erik H.; Chao, Weilun; Falcone, Roger W.; Yang, Ronggui; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Nardi, Damiano

    2015-01-01

    Understanding thermal transport from nanoscale heat sources is important for a fundamental description of energy flow in materials, as well as for many technological applications including thermal management in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics, thermoelectric devices, nanoenhanced photovoltaics, and nanoparticle-mediated thermal therapies. Thermal transport at the nanoscale is fundamentally different from that at the macroscale and is determined by the distribution of carrier mean free paths and energy dispersion in a material, the length scales of the heat sources, and the distance over which heat is transported. Past work has shown that Fourier’s law for heat conduction dramatically overpredicts the rate of heat dissipation from heat sources with dimensions smaller than the mean free path of the dominant heat-carrying phonons. In this work, we uncover a new regime of nanoscale thermal transport that dominates when the separation between nanoscale heat sources is small compared with the dominant phonon mean free paths. Surprisingly, the interaction of phonons originating from neighboring heat sources enables more efficient diffusive-like heat dissipation, even from nanoscale heat sources much smaller than the dominant phonon mean free paths. This finding suggests that thermal management in nanoscale systems including integrated circuits might not be as challenging as previously projected. Finally, we demonstrate a unique capability to extract differential conductivity as a function of phonon mean free path in materials, allowing the first (to our knowledge) experimental validation of predictions from the recently developed first-principles calculations. PMID:25831491

  20. A new regime of nanoscale thermal transport: Collective diffusion increases dissipation efficiency

    DOE PAGES

    Hoogeboom-Pot, Kathleen M.; Hernandez-Charpak, Jorge N.; Gu, Xiaokun; Frazer, Travis D.; Anderson, Erik H.; Chao, Weilun; Falcone, Roger W.; Yang, Ronggui; Murnane, Margaret M.; Kapteyn, Henry C.; et al

    2015-03-23

    Understanding thermal transport from nanoscale heat sources is important for a fundamental description of energy flow in materials, as well as for many technological applications including thermal management in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics, thermoelectric devices, nanoenhanced photovoltaics, and nanoparticle-mediated thermal therapies. Thermal transport at the nanoscale is fundamentally different from that at the macroscale and is determined by the distribution of carrier mean free paths and energy dispersion in a material, the length scales of the heat sources, and the distance over which heat is transported. Past work has shown that Fourier’s law for heat conduction dramatically overpredicts the rate ofmore » heat dissipation from heat sources with dimensions smaller than the mean free path of the dominant heat-carrying phonons. In this work, we uncover a new regime of nanoscale thermal transport that dominates when the separation between nanoscale heat sources is small compared with the dominant phonon mean free paths. Surprisingly, the interaction of phonons originating from neighboring heat sources enables more efficient diffusive-like heat dissipation, even from nanoscale heat sources much smaller than the dominant phonon mean free paths. This finding suggests that thermal management in nanoscale systems including integrated circuits might not be as challenging as previously projected. In conclusion, we demonstrate a unique capability to extract differential conductivity as a function of phonon mean free path in materials, allowing the first (to our knowledge) experimental validation of predictions from the recently developed first-principles calculations.« less

  1. A new regime of nanoscale thermal transport: Collective diffusion increases dissipation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Hoogeboom-Pot, Kathleen M; Hernandez-Charpak, Jorge N; Gu, Xiaokun; Frazer, Travis D; Anderson, Erik H; Chao, Weilun; Falcone, Roger W; Yang, Ronggui; Murnane, Margaret M; Kapteyn, Henry C; Nardi, Damiano

    2015-04-21

    Understanding thermal transport from nanoscale heat sources is important for a fundamental description of energy flow in materials, as well as for many technological applications including thermal management in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics, thermoelectric devices, nanoenhanced photovoltaics, and nanoparticle-mediated thermal therapies. Thermal transport at the nanoscale is fundamentally different from that at the macroscale and is determined by the distribution of carrier mean free paths and energy dispersion in a material, the length scales of the heat sources, and the distance over which heat is transported. Past work has shown that Fourier's law for heat conduction dramatically overpredicts the rate of heat dissipation from heat sources with dimensions smaller than the mean free path of the dominant heat-carrying phonons. In this work, we uncover a new regime of nanoscale thermal transport that dominates when the separation between nanoscale heat sources is small compared with the dominant phonon mean free paths. Surprisingly, the interaction of phonons originating from neighboring heat sources enables more efficient diffusive-like heat dissipation, even from nanoscale heat sources much smaller than the dominant phonon mean free paths. This finding suggests that thermal management in nanoscale systems including integrated circuits might not be as challenging as previously projected. Finally, we demonstrate a unique capability to extract differential conductivity as a function of phonon mean free path in materials, allowing the first (to our knowledge) experimental validation of predictions from the recently developed first-principles calculations. PMID:25831491

  2. EXAFS and XANES analysis of oxides at the nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmin, Alexei; Chaboy, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide research activity at the nanoscale is triggering the appearance of new, and frequently surprising, materials properties in which the increasing importance of surface and interface effects plays a fundamental role. This opens further possibilities in the development of new multifunctional materials with tuned physical properties that do not arise together at the bulk scale. Unfortunately, the standard methods currently available for solving the atomic structure of bulk crystals fail for nanomaterials due to nanoscale effects (very small crystallite sizes, large surface-to-volume ratio, near-surface relaxation, local lattice distortions etc.). As a consequence, a critical reexamination of the available local-structure characterization methods is needed. This work discusses the real possibilities and limits of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analysis at the nanoscale. To this end, the present state of the art for the interpretation of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) is described, including an advanced approach based on the use of classical molecular dynamics and its application to nickel oxide nanoparticles. The limits and possibilities of X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) to determine several effects associated with the nanocrystalline nature of materials are discussed in connection with the development of ZnO-based dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMSs) and iron oxide nanoparticles. PMID:25485137

  3. Properties of nanoscale dielectrics from first principles computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ning

    In recent years, dielectric materials of nanoscale dimensions have aroused considerable interest. We mention two examples. First, in the semiconductor industry, in order to keep pace with Moore's law scaling, the thickness of gate oxide dielectric material is reaching nanoscale dimensions. Second, the high energy density capacitor industry is currently considering dielectric composites with a polymer host matrix filled with inorganic dielectric nanoparticles or polarizable organic molecules. The driving force for the former application is high dielectric constants (or high-k), and those for the latter are high-k and/or high dielectric breakdown strengths. Thus, it is important to characterize the electronic and dielectric properties of materials in the nano-regime, where surface and interface effects naturally play a dominant role. The primary goal of this work is to determine the extent to which such surface/interface effects modify the dielectric constants, band edges, and dielectric breakdown strengths of systems with at least one of their dimensions in the nano-regime. Towards that end, we have developed new computational methodologies at the first principles (density functional) level of theory. These methods have then been applied to several relevant and critical nanoscale systems, including Si:SiO2 and Si:HfO2 heterojunctions, and polymeric composites containing Cu-phthalocyanine and SiO2 nanoparticles.

  4. Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory Annual Report 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Hamza, A V

    2008-04-07

    The Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory's (NSCL) primary mission is to create and advance interdisciplinary research and development opportunities in nanoscience and technology. The NSCL is delivering on its mission providing Laboratory programs with scientific solutions through the use of nanoscale synthesis and characterization. While this annual report summarizes 2007 activities, we have focused on nanoporous materials, advanced high strength, nanostructured metals, novel 3-dimensional lithography and characterization at the nanoscale for the past 3 years. In these three years we have synthesized the first monolithic nanoporous metal foams with less than 10% relative density; we have produced ultrasmooth nanocrystalline diamond inertial confinement fusion capsules; we have synthesized 3-dimensional graded density structures from full density to 5% relative density using nanolithography; and we have established ultrasmall angle x-ray scattering as a non-destructive tool to determine the structure on the sub 300nm scale. The NSCL also has a mission to recruit and to train personnel for Lab programs. The NSCL continues to attract talented scientists to the Laboratory. Andrew Detor from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Sutapa Ghosal from the University of California, Irvine, Xiang Ying Wang from Shanghai Institute of Technology, and Arne Wittstock from University of Bremen joined the NSCL this year. The NSCL is pursuing four science and technology themes: nanoporous materials, advanced nanocrystalline materials, novel three-dimensional nanofabrication technologies, and nondestructive characterization at the mesoscale. The NSCL is also pursuing building new facilities for science and technology such as nanorobotics and atomic layer deposition.

  5. Characteristics for electrochemical machining with nanoscale voltage pulses.

    PubMed

    Lee, E S; Back, S Y; Lee, J T

    2009-06-01

    Electrochemical machining has traditionally been used in highly specialized fields, such as those of the aerospace and defense industries. It is now increasingly being applied in other industries, where parts with difficult-to-cut material, complex geometry and tribology, and devices of nanoscale and microscale are required. Electric characteristic plays a principal function role in and chemical characteristic plays an assistant function role in electrochemical machining. Therefore, essential parameters in electrochemical machining can be described current density, machining time, inter-electrode gap size, electrolyte, electrode shape etc. Electrochemical machining provides an economical and effective method for machining high strength, high tension and heat-resistant materials into complex shapes such as turbine blades of titanium and aluminum alloys. The application of nanoscale voltage pulses between a tool electrode and a workpiece in an electrochemical environment allows the three-dimensional machining of conducting materials with sub-micrometer precision. In this study, micro probe are developed by electrochemical etching and micro holes are manufactured using these micro probe as tool electrodes. Micro holes and microgroove can be accurately achieved by using nanoscale voltages pulses. PMID:19504864

  6. Stochastic behavior of nanoscale dielectric wall buckling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Lawrence H.; Levin, Igor; Cook, Robert F.

    2016-03-01

    The random buckling patterns of nanoscale dielectric walls are analyzed using a nonlinear multi-scale stochastic method that combines experimental measurements with simulations. The dielectric walls, approximately 200 nm tall and 20 nm wide, consist of compliant, low dielectric constant (low-k) fins capped with stiff, compressively stressed TiN lines that provide the driving force for buckling. The deflections of the buckled lines exhibit sinusoidal pseudoperiodicity with amplitude fluctuation and phase decorrelation arising from stochastic variations in wall geometry, properties, and stress state at length scales shorter than the characteristic deflection wavelength of about 1000 nm. The buckling patterns are analyzed and modeled at two length scales: a longer scale (up to 5000 nm) that treats randomness as a longer-scale measurable quantity, and a shorter-scale (down to 20 nm) that treats buckling as a deterministic phenomenon. Statistical simulation is used to join the two length scales. Through this approach, the buckling model is validated and material properties and stress states are inferred. In particular, the stress state of TiN lines in three different systems is determined, along with the elastic moduli of low-k fins and the amplitudes of the small-scale random fluctuations in wall properties—all in the as-processed state. The important case of stochastic effects giving rise to buckling in a deterministically sub-critical buckling state is demonstrated. The nonlinear multiscale stochastic analysis provides guidance for design of low-k structures with acceptable buckling behavior and serves as a template for how randomness that is common to nanoscale phenomena might be measured and analyzed in other contexts.

  7. Stochastic behavior of nanoscale dielectric wall buckling

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Lawrence H.; Levin, Igor; Cook, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    The random buckling patterns of nanoscale dielectric walls are analyzed using a nonlinear multi-scale stochastic method that combines experimental measurements with simulations. The dielectric walls, approximately 200 nm tall and 20 nm wide, consist of compliant, low dielectric constant (low-k) fins capped with stiff, compressively stressed TiN lines that provide the driving force for buckling. The deflections of the buckled lines exhibit sinusoidal pseudoperiodicity with amplitude fluctuation and phase decorrelation arising from stochastic variations in wall geometry, properties, and stress state at length scales shorter than the characteristic deflection wavelength of about 1000 nm. The buckling patterns are analyzed and modeled at two length scales: a longer scale (up to 5000 nm) that treats randomness as a longer-scale measurable quantity, and a shorter-scale (down to 20 nm) that treats buckling as a deterministic phenomenon. Statistical simulation is used to join the two length scales. Through this approach, the buckling model is validated and material properties and stress states are inferred. In particular, the stress state of TiN lines in three different systems is determined, along with the elastic moduli of low-k fins and the amplitudes of the small-scale random fluctuations in wall properties—all in the as-processed state. The important case of stochastic effects giving rise to buckling in a deterministically sub-critical buckling state is demonstrated. The nonlinear multiscale stochastic analysis provides guidance for design of low-k structures with acceptable buckling behavior and serves as a template for how randomness that is common to nanoscale phenomena might be measured and analyzed in other contexts. PMID:27330220

  8. Nanoscale solid-state cooling: a review.

    PubMed

    Ziabari, Amirkoushyar; Zebarjadi, Mona; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Shakouri, Ali

    2016-09-01

    The recent developments in nanoscale solid-state cooling are reviewed. This includes both theoretical and experimental studies of different physical concepts, as well as nanostructured material design and device configurations. We primarily focus on thermoelectric, thermionic and thermo-magnetic coolers. Particular emphasis is given to the concepts based on metal-semiconductor superlattices, graded materials, non-equilibrium thermoelectric devices, Thomson coolers, and photon assisted Peltier coolers as promising methods for efficient solid-state cooling. Thermomagnetic effects such as magneto-Peltier and Nernst-Ettingshausen cooling are briefly described and recent advances and future trends in these areas are reviewed. The ongoing progress in solid-state cooling concepts such as spin-calorimetrics, electrocalorics, non-equilibrium/nonlinear Peltier devices, superconducting junctions and two-dimensional materials are also elucidated and practical achievements are reviewed. We explain the thermoreflectance thermal imaging microscopy and the transient Harman method as two unique techniques developed for characterization of thermoelectric microrefrigerators. The future prospects for solid-state cooling are briefly summarized. PMID:27519021

  9. Nanoscale solid-state cooling: a review.

    PubMed

    Ziabari, Amirkoushyar; Zebarjadi, Mona; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Shakouri, Ali

    2016-09-01

    The recent developments in nanoscale solid-state cooling are reviewed. This includes both theoretical and experimental studies of different physical concepts, as well as nanostructured material design and device configurations. We primarily focus on thermoelectric, thermionic and thermo-magnetic coolers. Particular emphasis is given to the concepts based on metal-semiconductor superlattices, graded materials, non-equilibrium thermoelectric devices, Thomson coolers, and photon assisted Peltier coolers as promising methods for efficient solid-state cooling. Thermomagnetic effects such as magneto-Peltier and Nernst-Ettingshausen cooling are briefly described and recent advances and future trends in these areas are reviewed. The ongoing progress in solid-state cooling concepts such as spin-calorimetrics, electrocalorics, non-equilibrium/nonlinear Peltier devices, superconducting junctions and two-dimensional materials are also elucidated and practical achievements are reviewed. We explain the thermoreflectance thermal imaging microscopy and the transient Harman method as two unique techniques developed for characterization of thermoelectric microrefrigerators. The future prospects for solid-state cooling are briefly summarized.

  10. Nanoscale solid-state cooling: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziabari, Amirkoushyar; Zebarjadi, Mona; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Shakouri, Ali

    2016-09-01

    The recent developments in nanoscale solid-state cooling are reviewed. This includes both theoretical and experimental studies of different physical concepts, as well as nanostructured material design and device configurations. We primarily focus on thermoelectric, thermionic and thermo-magnetic coolers. Particular emphasis is given to the concepts based on metal-semiconductor superlattices, graded materials, non-equilibrium thermoelectric devices, Thomson coolers, and photon assisted Peltier coolers as promising methods for efficient solid-state cooling. Thermomagnetic effects such as magneto-Peltier and Nernst-Ettingshausen cooling are briefly described and recent advances and future trends in these areas are reviewed. The ongoing progress in solid-state cooling concepts such as spin-calorimetrics, electrocalorics, non-equilibrium/nonlinear Peltier devices, superconducting junctions and two-dimensional materials are also elucidated and practical achievements are reviewed. We explain the thermoreflectance thermal imaging microscopy and the transient Harman method as two unique techniques developed for characterization of thermoelectric microrefrigerators. The future prospects for solid-state cooling are briefly summarized.

  11. Nanoscale solid-state cooling: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziabari, Amirkoushyar; Zebarjadi, Mona; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Shakouri, Ali

    2016-09-01

    The recent developments in nanoscale solid-state cooling are reviewed. This includes both theoretical and experimental studies of different physical concepts, as well as nanostructured material design and device configurations. We primarily focus on thermoelectric, thermionic and thermo-magnetic coolers. Particular emphasis is given to the concepts based on metal–semiconductor superlattices, graded materials, non-equilibrium thermoelectric devices, Thomson coolers, and photon assisted Peltier coolers as promising methods for efficient solid-state cooling. Thermomagnetic effects such as magneto–Peltier and Nernst–Ettingshausen cooling are briefly described and recent advances and future trends in these areas are reviewed. The ongoing progress in solid-state cooling concepts such as spin-calorimetrics, electrocalorics, non-equilibrium/nonlinear Peltier devices, superconducting junctions and two-dimensional materials are also elucidated and practical achievements are reviewed. We explain the thermoreflectance thermal imaging microscopy and the transient Harman method as two unique techniques developed for characterization of thermoelectric microrefrigerators. The future prospects for solid-state cooling are briefly summarized.

  12. Young's Equation at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seveno, David; Blake, Terence D.; De Coninck, Joël

    2013-08-01

    In 1805, Thomas Young was the first to propose an equation to predict the value of the equilibrium contact angle of a liquid on a solid. Today, the force exerted by a liquid on a solid, such as a flat plate or fiber, is routinely used to assess this angle. Moreover, it has recently become possible to study wetting at the nanoscale using an atomic force microscope. Here, we report the use of molecular-dynamics simulations to investigate the force distribution along a 15 nm fiber dipped into a liquid meniscus. We find very good agreement between the measured force and that predicted by Young’s equation.

  13. Nanoscale spinel LiFeTiO4 for intercalation pseudocapacitive Li(+) storage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruiyong; Knapp, Michael; Yavuz, Murat; Ren, Shuhua; Witte, Ralf; Heinzmann, Ralf; Hahn, Horst; Ehrenberg, Helmut; Indris, Sylvio

    2015-01-14

    Intercalation pseudocapacitive Li(+) storage has been recognized recently in metal oxide materials, wherein Li(+) intercalation into the lattice is not solid-state diffusion-limited. This may bridge the performance gap between electrochemical capacitors and battery materials. To date, only a few materials with desired crystal structure and with well-defined nanoarchitectures have been found to exhibit such attractive behaviour. Herein, we report for the first time that nanoscale spinel LiFeTiO4 as a cathode material for Li-ion batteries exhibits intercalation pseudocapacitive Li(+) storage behaviour. Nanoscale LiFeTiO4 nanoparticles with native carbon coating were synthesized by a sol-gel route. A fast and large-amount of Li(+) storage (up to 1.6 Li(+) per formula unit over cycling) in the nanoscale LiFeTiO4 host has been achieved without compromising kinetics.

  14. PREFACE: Nanoscale science and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, Stefano

    2008-11-01

    , nanopowders) were discussed. Ab initio simulations on the atomic and electronic structure of single-walled BN nanotubes and nanoarches were illustrated by Yu F Zhukovskii. M B Muradov talked about nanoparticles of cadmium selenide and cadmium sulfide, which yield one of the perspective materials for application to solar cell elements, high-speed computing systems, catalyses and biomarkers in medicine. In the presentation, the process of transformation of nanoparticles cadmium of sulfide to nanoparticles of cadmium selenide by an ionic exchange from solutions of electrolytes was considered. The size of particles was controlled by the quantity of growth cycles. After manufacturing, the structures were investigated by atomic force microscope (AFM). Structures CdS:polymer transformed into CdSe:polymer with the help of ion-exchange. For the realization of the process of ionic exchange, solutions were prepared containing bivalent ions of selenium as follows: NaBH4 and Se in a weight parity 2:1 added in water 4NaBH4+2Se+7H2O→2NaHSe+Na2B4O7+14H2 In the prepared solution nanostructures CdS:polymer were immersed. Time of endurance was 2 h. After an ionic exchange the obtained structures were investigated by means of EDAX on a chemical composition. Results of analyses have shown that atoms of sulfur are completely replaced by selenium. The band gap of nanoparticles in comparison with initial samples is displaced in the long-wave area. It is connected with the fact that the width of the band gap of bulk crystals CdSe (1.74 eV) is smaller than the band gap of CdS (2.42 eV). Optical microscopy with spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit obtained by using near field techniques was the subject of S Prato's talk. Scanning near field optical microscopy (SNOM) has developed into a powerful tool to investigate local optical properties that depend on heterogeneity of materials at nanoscale and to study nanoenvironment of biosystems. Crucial topics in SNOM are: force sensitivity and

  15. Charge separation at nanoscale interfaces: Energy-level alignment including two-quasiparticle interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huashan; Lin, Zhibin; Lusk, Mark T. Wu, Zhigang

    2014-10-21

    The universal and fundamental criteria for charge separation at interfaces involving nanoscale materials are investigated. In addition to the single-quasiparticle excitation, all the two-quasiparticle effects including exciton binding, Coulomb stabilization, and exciton transfer are considered, which play critical roles on nanoscale interfaces for optoelectronic applications. We propose a scheme allowing adding these two-quasiparticle interactions on top of the single-quasiparticle energy level alignment for determining and illuminating charge separation at nanoscale interfaces. Employing the many-body perturbation theory based on Green's functions, we quantitatively demonstrate that neglecting or simplifying these crucial two-quasiparticle interactions using less accurate methods is likely to predict qualitatively incorrect charge separation behaviors at nanoscale interfaces where quantum confinement dominates.

  16. Nanoscale form dictates mesoscale function in plasmonic DNA-nanoparticle superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Michael B.; Ku, Jessie C.; Vaccarezza, Victoria M.; Schatz, George C.; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2015-05-01

    The nanoscale manipulation of matter allows properties to be created in a material that would be difficult or even impossible to achieve in the bulk state. Progress towards such functional nanoscale architectures requires the development of methods to precisely locate nanoscale objects in three dimensions and for the formation of rigorous structure-function relationships across multiple size regimes (beginning from the nanoscale). Here, we use DNA as a programmable ligand to show that two- and three-dimensional mesoscale superlattice crystals with precisely engineered optical properties can be assembled from the bottom up. The superlattices can transition from exhibiting the properties of the constituent plasmonic nanoparticles to adopting the photonic properties defined by the mesoscale crystal (here a rhombic dodecahedron) by controlling the spacing between the gold nanoparticle building blocks. Furthermore, we develop a generally applicable theoretical framework that illustrates how crystal habit can be a design consideration for controlling far-field extinction and light confinement in plasmonic metamaterial superlattices.

  17. Current nanoscience and nanoengineering at the Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, A. M.; Singh, R. S.; Singh, V. P.

    2006-07-01

    The Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CeNSE) at the University of Kentucky is a multidisciplinary group of faculty, students, and staff, with a shared vision and cutting-edge research facilities to study and develop materials and devices at the nanoscale. Current research projects at CeNSE span a number of diverse nanoscience thrusts in bio- engineering and medicine (nanosensors and nanoelectrodes, nanoparticle-based drug delivery), electronics (nanolithography, molecular electronics, nanotube FETs), nanotemplates for electronics and gas sensors (functionalization of carbon nanotubes, aligned carbon nanotube structures for gate-keeping, e-beam lithography with nanoscale precision), and nano--optoelectronics (nanoscale photonics for laser communications, quantum confinement in photovoltaic devices, and nanostructured displays). This paper provides glimpses of this research and future directions.

  18. Nanoscale form dictates mesoscale function in plasmonic DNA-nanoparticle superlattices.

    PubMed

    Ross, Michael B; Ku, Jessie C; Vaccarezza, Victoria M; Schatz, George C; Mirkin, Chad A

    2015-05-01

    The nanoscale manipulation of matter allows properties to be created in a material that would be difficult or even impossible to achieve in the bulk state. Progress towards such functional nanoscale architectures requires the development of methods to precisely locate nanoscale objects in three dimensions and for the formation of rigorous structure-function relationships across multiple size regimes (beginning from the nanoscale). Here, we use DNA as a programmable ligand to show that two- and three-dimensional mesoscale superlattice crystals with precisely engineered optical properties can be assembled from the bottom up. The superlattices can transition from exhibiting the properties of the constituent plasmonic nanoparticles to adopting the photonic properties defined by the mesoscale crystal (here a rhombic dodecahedron) by controlling the spacing between the gold nanoparticle building blocks. Furthermore, we develop a generally applicable theoretical framework that illustrates how crystal habit can be a design consideration for controlling far-field extinction and light confinement in plasmonic metamaterial superlattices.

  19. Plasmon-mediated chemical surface functionalization at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Mai; Lamouri, Aazdine; Salameh, Chrystelle; Lévi, Georges; Grand, Johan; Boubekeur-Lecaque, Leïla; Mangeney, Claire; Félidj, Nordin

    2016-04-01

    Controlling the surface grafting of species at the nanoscale remains a major challenge, likely to generate many opportunities in materials science. In this work, we propose an original strategy for chemical surface functionalization at the nanoscale, taking advantage of localized surface plasmon (LSP) excitation. The surface functionalization is demonstrated through aryl film grafting (derived from a diazonium salt), covalently bonded at the surface of gold lithographic nanostripes. The aryl film is specifically grafted in areas of maximum near field enhancement, as confirmed by numerical calculation based on the discrete dipole approximation method. The energy of the incident light and the LSP wavelength are shown to be crucial parameters to monitor the aryl film thickness of up to ~30 nm. This robust and versatile strategy opens up exciting prospects for the nanoscale confinement of functional layers on surfaces, which should be particularly interesting for molecular sensing or nanooptics.Controlling the surface grafting of species at the nanoscale remains a major challenge, likely to generate many opportunities in materials science. In this work, we propose an original strategy for chemical surface functionalization at the nanoscale, taking advantage of localized surface plasmon (LSP) excitation. The surface functionalization is demonstrated through aryl film grafting (derived from a diazonium salt), covalently bonded at the surface of gold lithographic nanostripes. The aryl film is specifically grafted in areas of maximum near field enhancement, as confirmed by numerical calculation based on the discrete dipole approximation method. The energy of the incident light and the LSP wavelength are shown to be crucial parameters to monitor the aryl film thickness of up to ~30 nm. This robust and versatile strategy opens up exciting prospects for the nanoscale confinement of functional layers on surfaces, which should be particularly interesting for molecular sensing

  20. Transport in closed nanoscale systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushong, Neil

    2005-03-01

    An alternative way to describe electrical transport in nanoscale systems has been recently proposed where two large but finite charged electrodes discharge across a nanoscale junction (M. Di Ventra and T. Todorov, J. Phys. Cond. Matt. 16, 8025 (2004)). We have applied this concept to describe the dynamics of a finite quasi-one dimensional gold wire using both a simple tight-binding model and time-dependent density-functional theory. After an initial transient, a quasi-steady state sets in whose lifetime increases with system size. This quasi-steady state is due to the wave properties of the electron wavefunctions and the resultant uncertainty principle and is established without inelastic effects. The corresponding current-voltage characteristics at steady state are in very good agreement with those calculated from the static scattering approach. We discuss local electron distributions, electrostatic potentials, and local resistivity dipoles formed at the quasi-steady state and compare these findings with the static open-boundary problem. A relation between information entropy and electron dynamics is discussed. Work supported by NSF.

  1. Optical/Electronic Heterogeneity of WSe2 at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyoung-Duck; Khatib, Omar; Kravtsov, Vasily; Ulbricht, Ronald; Clark, Genevieve; Xu, Xiaodong; Raschke, Markus

    Many classes of two-dimensional (2D) materials have emerged as a potential platform for novel electronic and optical devices. However, the physical properties are strongly influenced by nanoscale heterogeneities in the form of nucleation sites, defects, strains, and edges. Here we demonstrate nano-optical imaging of the associated influence on structure and electronic properties with sub-20 nm spatial resolution from combined tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) and photoluminescence (TEPL) spectroscopy and imaging. In monolayer WSe2 micro-crystals grown by physical vapor deposition (PVD), we observe significant variations in TERS and TEPL near crystal edges and atomic-scale grain boundaries (GBs), consistent with variations in strain and/or exciton diffusion. Specifically, theoretical exciton diffusion lengths (25 nm) at GBs and heterogeneous nanoscale (30-80 nm) PL emission including a spectral blue-shift at edges are experimentally probed. Further, we are able to engineer the local bandgap of WSe2 crystals by dynamic AFM-control in reversible (24 meV) and irreversible (48 meV) fashions, enabling systematic in-situ studies of the coupling of mechanical degrees of freedom to the nanoscale electronic properties in layered 2D materials.

  2. Heat transfer across the interface between nanoscale solids and gas.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chun; Fan, Wen; Cao, Jinbo; Ryu, Sang-Gil; Ji, Jie; Grigoropoulos, Costas P; Wu, Junqiao

    2011-12-27

    When solid materials and devices scale down in size, heat transfer from the active region to the gas environment becomes increasingly significant. We show that the heat transfer coefficient across the solid-gas interface behaves very differently when the size of the solid is reduced to the nanoscale, such as that of a single nanowire. Unlike for macroscopic solids, the coefficient is strongly pressure dependent above ∼10 Torr, and at lower pressures it is much higher than predictions of the kinetic gas theory. The heat transfer coefficient was measured between a single, free-standing VO(2) nanowire and surrounding air using laser thermography, where the temperature distribution along the VO(2) nanowire was determined by imaging its domain structure of metal-insulator phase transition. The one-dimensional domain structure along the nanowire results from the balance between heat generation by the focused laser and heat dissipation to the substrate as well as to the surrounding gas, and thus serves as a nanoscale power-meter and thermometer. We quantified the heat loss rate across the nanowire-air interface, and found that it dominates over all other heat dissipation channels for small-diameter nanowires near ambient pressure. As the heat transfer across the solid-gas interface is nearly independent of the chemical identity of the solid, the results reveal a general scaling relationship for gaseous heat dissipation from nanostructures of all solid materials, which is applicable to nanoscale electronic and thermal devices exposed to gaseous environments.

  3. Nanoscale electrical properties of epitaxial Cu3Ge film.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fan; Cai, Wei; Gao, Jia; Loo, Yueh-Lin; Yao, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Cu3Ge has been pursued as next-generation interconnection/contact material due to its high thermal stability, low bulk resistivity and diffusion barrier property. Improvements in electrical performance and structure of Cu3Ge have attracted great attention in the past decades. Despite the remarkable progress in Cu3Ge fabrication on various substrates by different deposition methods, polycrystalline films with excess Ge were frequently obtained. Moreover, the characterization of nanoscale electrical properties remains challenging. Here we show the fabrication of epitaxial Cu3Ge thin film and its nanoscale electrical properties, which are directly correlated with localized film microstructures and supported by HRTEM observations. The average resistivity and work function of epitaxial Cu3Ge thin film are measured to be 6 ± 1 μΩ cm and ~4.47 ± 0.02 eV respectively, qualifying it as a good alternative to Cu. PMID:27363582

  4. Nanoscale electrical properties of epitaxial Cu3Ge film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fan; Cai, Wei; Gao, Jia; Loo, Yueh-Lin; Yao, Nan

    2016-07-01

    Cu3Ge has been pursued as next-generation interconnection/contact material due to its high thermal stability, low bulk resistivity and diffusion barrier property. Improvements in electrical performance and structure of Cu3Ge have attracted great attention in the past decades. Despite the remarkable progress in Cu3Ge fabrication on various substrates by different deposition methods, polycrystalline films with excess Ge were frequently obtained. Moreover, the characterization of nanoscale electrical properties remains challenging. Here we show the fabrication of epitaxial Cu3Ge thin film and its nanoscale electrical properties, which are directly correlated with localized film microstructures and supported by HRTEM observations. The average resistivity and work function of epitaxial Cu3Ge thin film are measured to be 6 ± 1 μΩ cm and ~4.47 ± 0.02 eV respectively, qualifying it as a good alternative to Cu.

  5. Nanoscale electrical properties of epitaxial Cu3Ge film

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fan; Cai, Wei; Gao, Jia; Loo, Yueh-Lin; Yao, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Cu3Ge has been pursued as next-generation interconnection/contact material due to its high thermal stability, low bulk resistivity and diffusion barrier property. Improvements in electrical performance and structure of Cu3Ge have attracted great attention in the past decades. Despite the remarkable progress in Cu3Ge fabrication on various substrates by different deposition methods, polycrystalline films with excess Ge were frequently obtained. Moreover, the characterization of nanoscale electrical properties remains challenging. Here we show the fabrication of epitaxial Cu3Ge thin film and its nanoscale electrical properties, which are directly correlated with localized film microstructures and supported by HRTEM observations. The average resistivity and work function of epitaxial Cu3Ge thin film are measured to be 6 ± 1 μΩ cm and ~4.47 ± 0.02 eV respectively, qualifying it as a good alternative to Cu. PMID:27363582

  6. Instability of nanoscale metallic particles under electron irradiation in TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X. Y.; Zhang, S. G.; Xia, M. X.; Li, J. G.

    2016-03-01

    The stability of nano metallic glass under electron beam in transmission electron microscope (TEM) was investigated. The most common voltage of TEM used in metallic materials characterization was either 200 kV or 300 kV. Both situations were investigated in this work. An amorphous metallic particle with a dimension of a few hundred nanometers was tested under 300 keV electron irradiation. New phase decomposed from the parent phase was observed. Moreover, a crystal particle with the same composition and dimension was tested under 200 keV irradiation. Decomposition process also occurred in this situation. Besides, crystal orientation modification was observed during irradiation. These results proved that the electron beam in TEM have an effect on the stability of nanoscale samples during long time irradiation. Atomic displacement was induced and diffusion was enhanced by electron irradiation. Thus, artifacts would be induced when a nanoscale metallic sample was characterized in TEM.

  7. Fabrication of self-aligned, nanoscale, complex oxide varactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Richard X.; Toonen, Ryan C.; Hirsch, Samuel G.; Ivill, Mathew P.; Cole, Melanie W.; Strawhecker, Kenneth E.

    2015-01-01

    Applications in ferroelectric random access memory and superparaelectric devices require the fabrication of ferroelectric capacitors at the nanoscale that exhibit extremely small leakage currents. To systematically study the material-size dependence of ferroelectric varactor performance, arrays of parallel-plate structures have been fabricated with nanoscale dielectric diameters. Electron beam lithography and inductively coupled plasma dry etching have been used to fabricate arrays of ferroelectric varactors using top electrodes as a self-aligned etch mask. Parallel-plate test structures using RF-sputtered Ba0.6Sr0.4TiO3 thin-films were used to optimize the fabrication process. Varactors with diameters down to 20 nm were successfully fabricated. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics were measured to evaluate the significance of etch-damage and fabrication quality by ensuring low leakage currents through the structures.

  8. Nanoscale zinc antimonides: synthesis and phase stability.

    PubMed

    Schlecht, Sabine; Erk, Christoph; Yosef, Maekele

    2006-02-20

    Highly crystalline single-phase nanoparticles of the important thermoelectric materials Zn4Sb3 and ZnSb were prepared from solvochemically activated powders of elemental zinc and elemental antimony. Low-temperature reactions with reaction temperatures of 275-300 degrees C were applied using an excess of elemental zinc. The nanoscale thermoelectrics obtained were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and thermal analysis. nc-Zn4Sb3 showed particle sizes of 50-70 nm, whereas particle sizes of 15-20 nm were observed for nc-ZnSb. Calorimetric investigations showed an increased heat capacity, Cp, for nc-Zn4Sb3 with respect to the bulk material which could be reduced to the bulk value by annealing nc-Zn4Sb3 at 190 degrees C. Interestingly, nc-Zn4Sb3 showed exothermic decomposition into zinc-poorer ZnSn at 196 degrees C in an open system, indicating that Zn4Sb3 is metastable in nanocrystalline form at room temperature.

  9. Bulk and surface controlled diffusion of fission gas atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Anders D.

    2012-08-09

    {sub 2{+-}x}, which compare favorably to available experiments. This is an extension of previous work [13]. In particular, it applies improved chemistry models for the UO{sub 2{+-}x} nonstoichiometry and its impact on the fission gas activation energies. The derivation of these models follows the approach that used in our recent study of uranium vacancy diffusion in UO{sub 2} [14]. Also, based on the calculated DFT data we analyze vacancy enhanced diffusion mechanisms in the intermediate temperature regime. In addition to vacancy enhanced diffusion we investigate species transport on the (111) UO{sub 2} surface. This is motivated by the formation of small voids partially filled with fission gas atoms (bubbles) in UO{sub 2} under irradiation, for which surface diffusion could be the rate-limiting transport step. Diffusion of such bubbles constitutes an alternative mechanism for mass transport in these materials.

  10. Probing Li-ion Dynamics and Reactivity on the Nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, Sergei V; Balke, Nina; Jesse, Stephen; Tselev, Alexander; Kumar, Amit; Arruda, Thomas M; Guo, Senli; Proksch, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Progress in development and optimization of energy storage and conversion materials necessitates understanding their ionic and electrochemical functionality on the nanometer scale level of single grain cluster, grain, or extended defect. Classical electrochemical strategies based on Faradaic current detection are fundamentally limited on the nanoscale. Here, we review principles and recent applications of Electrochemical Strain Microscopy (ESM), a scanning probe microscopy (SPM) technique utilizing intrinsic coupling between ionic pehnomena and molar volumes. ESM imaging, as well as time and voltage spectroscopies, are illustrated for several Li-ion cathode and anode materials. Perspectives for future ESM development and applications to other ionic systems are discussed.

  11. Li-ion dynamics and reactivity on the nanoscale.

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, Sergei V; Balke, Nina; Jesse, Stephen; Tselev, Alexander; Kumar, Amit; Arruda, Thomas M; Guo, Senli; Proksch, Roger B

    2011-01-01

    Progress in the development and optimization of energy storage and conversion materials necessitates understanding their ionic and electrochemical functionality on the nanometer scale of single grain clusters, grains, or extended defects. Classical electrochemical strategies based on Faradaic current detection are fundamentally limited on the nanoscale. Here, we review principles and recent applications of electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM), a scanning probe microscopy (SPM) technique utilizing intrinsic coupling between ionic phenomena and molar volumes. ESM imaging, as well as time and voltage spectroscopies, are illustrated for several Li-ion cathode and anode materials. Finally, perspectives for future ESM developments and applications to other ionic systems are discussed.

  12. Nanoscale integration is the next frontier for nanotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Picraux, Samuel T

    2009-01-01

    Nanoscale integration of materials and structures is the next critical step to exploit the promise of nanomaterials. Many novel and fascinating properties have been revealed for nanostructured materials. But if nanotechnology is to live up to its promise we must incorporate these nanoscale building blocks into functional systems that connect to the micro- and macroscale world. To do this we will inevitably need to understand and exploit the resulting combined unique properties of these integrated nanosystems. Much science waits to be discovered in the process. Nanoscale integration extends from the synthesis and fabrication of individual nanoscale building blocks, to the assembly of these building blocks into composite structures, and finally to the formation of complex functional systems. As illustrated in Figure 1, the building blocks may be homogeneous or heterogeneous, the composite materials may be nanocomposite or patterned structures, and the functional systems will involve additional combinations of materials. Nanoscale integration involves assembling diverse nanoscale materials across length scales to design and achieve new properties and functionality. At each stage size-dependent properties, the influence of surfaces in close proximity, and a multitude of interfaces all come into play. Whether the final system involves coherent electrons in a quantum computing approach, the combined flow of phonons and electrons for a high efficiency thermoelectric micro-generator, or a molecular recognition structure for bio-sensing, the combined effects of size, surface, and interface will be critical. In essence, one wants to combine the novel functions available through nanoscale science to achieve unique multi-functionalities not available in bulk materials. Perhaps the best-known example of integration is that of combining electronic components together into very large scale integrated circuits (VLSI). The integrated circuit has revolutionized electronics in many

  13. Nanoscale cryptography: opportunities and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoumi, Massoud; Shi, Weidong; Xu, Lei

    2015-11-01

    While most of the electronics industry is dependent on the ever-decreasing size of lithographic transistors, this scaling cannot continue indefinitely. To improve the performance of the integrated circuits, new emerging and paradigms are needed. In recent years, nanoelectronics has become one of the most important and exciting forefront in science and engineering. It shows a great promise for providing us in the near future with many breakthroughs that change the direction of technological advances in a wide range of applications. In this paper, we discuss the contribution that nanotechnology may offer to the evolution of cryptographic hardware and embedded systems and demonstrate how nanoscale devices can be used for constructing security primitives. Using a custom set of design automation tools, it is demonstrated that relative to a conventional 45-nm CMOS system, performance gains can be obtained up to two orders of magnitude reduction in area and up to 50 % improvement in speed.

  14. Oxides on Nanoscale Platinum Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennessy, Daniel; Komanicky, Vladimir; Pierce, Michael S.; Chang, Kee-Chul; You, Hoydoo

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate the existence of oxide layers on nanoscale Pt interfaces annealed in an oxygen environment. The sample is a Pt single crystal cut at the midpoint between the 100 and 111 crystal directions; annealing in Ar produces a smooth surface, while annealing in air produces ~ 10 nm-sized 100 and 111 facets. Synchrotron x-ray crystal truncation rod (CTR) measurements indicate a bilayer Pt oxide structure on the nanofacets. Fitted Pt occupancies are consistent with a nearest-neighbor avoidance structure of the surface oxygen atoms. Electrochemical cycling of the faceted surface in CO-saturated solution removes the oxide and leaves clean, ordered facets. Pt single crystals of 100 and 111 surface orientations prepared the same way did not support an oxide layer. Work at ANL is supported by DOE-BES and work at SU by VEGA.

  15. Effect of film properties for non-linear DPL model in a nanoscale MOSFET with high-k material: ZrO2/HfO2/La2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shomali, Zahra; Ghazanfarian, Jafar; Abbassi, Abbas

    2015-07-01

    Numerical simulation of non-linear non-Fourier heat conduction within a nano-scale metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) is presented under the framework of Dual-Phase-Lag model including the boundary phonon scattering. The MOSFET is modeled in four cases of: (I) thin silicon slab, (II) including uniform heat generation, (III) double-layered buried oxide MOSFET with uniform heat generation in silicon-dioxide layer, and (IV) high-k/metal gate transistor. First, four cases are studied under four conditions of (a) constant bulk and (b) constant film thermal properties, (c) temperature-dependent properties of bulk silicon, and (d) temperature-dependent thermal properties of film silicon. The heat source and boundary conditions are similar to what existed in a real MOSFET. It is concluded that in all cases, considering the film properties lowers the temperature jump due to the reduction of the Knudsen number. Furthermore, the speed of heat flux penetration for film properties is less than that of the cases concerning bulk properties. Also, considering the temperature-dependent properties drastically changes the temperature and heat flux distributions within the transistor, which increases the diffusion speed and more, decreases the steady state time. Calculations for case (III) presents that all previous studies have underestimated the value of the peak temperature rise by considering the constant bulk properties of silicon. Also, it is found that among the high-k dielectrics investigated in case (IV), zirconium dioxide shows the least peak temperature rise. This presents that zirconium dioxide is a good candidate as far as the thermal issues are concerned.

  16. Quantum dot nanoscale heterostructures for solar energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Selinsky, Rachel S; Ding, Qi; Faber, Matthew S; Wright, John C; Jin, Song

    2013-04-01

    Quantum dot nanoscale semiconductor heterostructures (QDHs) are a class of materials potentially useful for integration into solar energy conversion devices. However, realizing the potential of these heterostructured systems requires the ability to identify and synthesize heterostructures with suitably designed materials, controlled size and morphology of each component, and structural control over their shared interface. In this review, we will present the case for the utility and advantages of chemically synthesized QDHs for solar energy conversion, beginning with an overview of various methods of heterostructured material synthesis and a survey of heretofore reported materials systems. The fundamental charge transfer properties of the resulting materials combinations and their basic design principles will be outlined. Finally, we will discuss representative solar photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical devices employing QDHs (including quantum dot sensitized solar cells, or QDSSCs) and examine how QDH synthesis and design impacts their performance.

  17. Nanoscale Cluster Detection in Massive Atom Probe Tomography Data

    SciTech Connect

    Seal, Sudip K; Yoginath, Srikanth B; Miller, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Recent technological advances in atom probe tomography (APT) have led to unprecedented data acquisition capabilities that routinely generate data sets containing hundreds of millions of atoms. Detecting nanoscale clusters of different atom types present in these enormous amounts of data and analyzing their spatial correlations with one another are fundamental to understanding the structural properties of the material from which the data is derived. Extant algorithms for nanoscale cluster detection do not scale to large data sets. Here, a scalable, CUDA-based implementation of an autocorrelation algorithm is presented. It isolates spatial correlations amongst atomic clusters present in massive APT data sets in linear time using a linear amount of storage. Correctness of the algorithm is demonstrated using large synthetically generated data with known spatial distributions. Benefits and limitations of using GPU-acceleration for autocorrelation-based APT data analyses are presented with supporting performance results on data sets with up to billions of atoms. To our knowledge, this is the first nanoscale cluster detection algorithm that scales to massive APT data sets and executes on commodity hardware.

  18. Nanoscale Strontium Titanate Photocatalysts for Overall Water Splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, Troy K.; Browning, Nigel D.; Osterloh, Frank

    2012-08-28

    SrTiO3 (STO) is a large band gap (3.2 eV) semiconductor that catalyzes the overall water splitting reaction under UV light irradiation in the presence of a NiO cocatalyst. As we show here, the reactivity persists in nanoscale particles of the material, although the process is less effective at the nanoscale. To reach these conclusions, Bulk STO, 30 ± 5 nm STO, and 6.5 ± 1 nm STO were synthesized by three different methods, their crystal structures verified with XRD and their morphology observed with HRTEM before and after NiO deposition. In connection with NiO, all samples split water into stoichiometric mixtures of H2 and O2, but the activity is decreasing from 28 μmol H2 g–1 h–1 (bulk STO), to 19.4 μmol H2 g–1 h–1 (30 nm STO), and 3.0 μmol H2 g–1 h–1 (6.5 nm STO). The reasons for this decrease are an increase of the water oxidation overpotential for the smaller particles and reduced light absorption due to a quantum size effect. Overall, these findings establish the first nanoscale titanate photocatalyst for overall water splitting.

  19. Nanoscale platinum printing on insulating substrates.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, C D; Higgins, M J; Sullivan, R P; Jamali, S S; Moulton, S E; Wallace, G G

    2013-12-20

    The deposition of noble metals on soft and/or flexible substrates is vital for several emerging applications including flexible electronics and the fabrication of soft bionic implants. In this paper, we describe a new strategy for the deposition of platinum electrodes on a range of materials, including insulators and flexible polymers. The strategy is enabled by two principle advances: (1) the introduction of a novel, low temperature strategy for reducing chloroplatinic acid to platinum using nitrogen plasma; (2) the development of a chloroplatinic acid based liquid ink formulation, utilizing ethylene glycol as both ink carrier and reducing agent, for versatile printing at nanoscale resolution using dip-pen nanolithography (DPN). The ink formulation has been printed and reduced upon Si, glass, ITO, Ge, PDMS, and Parylene C. The plasma treatment effects reduction of the precursor patterns in situ without subjecting the substrate to destructively high temperatures. Feature size is controlled via dwell time and degree of ink loading, and platinum features with 60 nm dimensions could be routinely achieved on Si. Reduction of the ink to platinum was confirmed by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) elemental analysis and x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. Feature morphology was characterized by optical microscopy, SEM and AFM. The high electrochemical activity of individually printed Pt features was characterized using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM).

  20. Nanoscale platinum printing on insulating substrates.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, C D; Higgins, M J; Sullivan, R P; Jamali, S S; Moulton, S E; Wallace, G G

    2013-12-20

    The deposition of noble metals on soft and/or flexible substrates is vital for several emerging applications including flexible electronics and the fabrication of soft bionic implants. In this paper, we describe a new strategy for the deposition of platinum electrodes on a range of materials, including insulators and flexible polymers. The strategy is enabled by two principle advances: (1) the introduction of a novel, low temperature strategy for reducing chloroplatinic acid to platinum using nitrogen plasma; (2) the development of a chloroplatinic acid based liquid ink formulation, utilizing ethylene glycol as both ink carrier and reducing agent, for versatile printing at nanoscale resolution using dip-pen nanolithography (DPN). The ink formulation has been printed and reduced upon Si, glass, ITO, Ge, PDMS, and Parylene C. The plasma treatment effects reduction of the precursor patterns in situ without subjecting the substrate to destructively high temperatures. Feature size is controlled via dwell time and degree of ink loading, and platinum features with 60 nm dimensions could be routinely achieved on Si. Reduction of the ink to platinum was confirmed by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) elemental analysis and x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. Feature morphology was characterized by optical microscopy, SEM and AFM. The high electrochemical activity of individually printed Pt features was characterized using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). PMID:24270681

  1. Neurons sense nanoscale roughness with nanometer sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, V; Maiorano, G; Rizzello, L; Sorce, B; Sabella, S; Cingolani, R; Pompa, P P

    2010-04-01

    The interaction between cells and nanostructured materials is attracting increasing interest, because of the possibility to open up novel concepts for the design of smart nanobiomaterials with active biological functionalities. In this frame we investigated the response of human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) to gold surfaces with different levels of nanoroughness. To achieve a precise control of the nanoroughness with nanometer resolution, we exploited a wet chemistry approach based on spontaneous galvanic displacement reaction. We demonstrated that neurons sense and actively respond to the surface nanotopography, with a surprising sensitivity to variations of few nanometers. We showed that focal adhesion complexes, which allow cellular sensing, are strongly affected by nanostructured surfaces, leading to a marked decrease in cell adhesion. Moreover, cells adherent on nanorough surfaces exhibit loss of neuron polarity, Golgi apparatus fragmentation, nuclear condensation, and actin cytoskeleton that is not functionally organized. Apoptosis/necrosis assays established that nanoscale features induce cell death by necrosis, with a trend directly related to roughness values. Finally, by seeding SH-SY5Y cells onto micropatterned flat and nanorough gold surfaces, we demonstrated the possibility to realize substrates with cytophilic or cytophobic behavior, simply by fine-tuning their surface topography at nanometer scale. Specific and functional adhesion of cells occurred only onto flat gold stripes, with a clear self-alignment of neurons, delivering a simple and elegant approach for the design and development of biomaterials with precise nanostructure-triggered biological responses.

  2. Nanoscale platinum printing on insulating substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, C. D.; Higgins, M. J.; Sullivan, R. P.; Jamali, S. S.; Moulton, S. E.; Wallace, G. G.

    2013-12-01

    The deposition of noble metals on soft and/or flexible substrates is vital for several emerging applications including flexible electronics and the fabrication of soft bionic implants. In this paper, we describe a new strategy for the deposition of platinum electrodes on a range of materials, including insulators and flexible polymers. The strategy is enabled by two principle advances: (1) the introduction of a novel, low temperature strategy for reducing chloroplatinic acid to platinum using nitrogen plasma; (2) the development of a chloroplatinic acid based liquid ink formulation, utilizing ethylene glycol as both ink carrier and reducing agent, for versatile printing at nanoscale resolution using dip-pen nanolithography (DPN). The ink formulation has been printed and reduced upon Si, glass, ITO, Ge, PDMS, and Parylene C. The plasma treatment effects reduction of the precursor patterns in situ without subjecting the substrate to destructively high temperatures. Feature size is controlled via dwell time and degree of ink loading, and platinum features with 60 nm dimensions could be routinely achieved on Si. Reduction of the ink to platinum was confirmed by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) elemental analysis and x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. Feature morphology was characterized by optical microscopy, SEM and AFM. The high electrochemical activity of individually printed Pt features was characterized using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM).

  3. Nanoscale optical tomography with cathodoluminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atre, Ashwin C.; Brenny, Benjamin J. M.; Coenen, Toon; García-Etxarri, Aitzol; Polman, Albert; Dionne, Jennifer A.

    2015-05-01

    Tomography has enabled the characterization of the Earth's interior, visualization of the inner workings of the human brain, and three-dimensional reconstruction of matter at the atomic scale. However, tomographic techniques that rely on optical excitation or detection are generally limited in their resolution by diffraction. Here, we introduce a tomographic technique—cathodoluminescence spectroscopic tomography—to probe optical properties in three dimensions with nanometre-scale spatial and spectral resolution. We first obtain two-dimensional cathodoluminescence maps of a three-dimensional nanostructure at various orientations. We then use the method of filtered back-projection to reconstruct the cathodoluminescence intensity at each wavelength. The resulting tomograms allow us to locate regions of efficient cathodoluminescence in three dimensions across visible and near-infrared wavelengths, with contributions from material luminescence and radiative decay of electromagnetic eigenmodes. The experimental signal can be further correlated with the radiative local density of optical states in particular regions of the reconstruction. We demonstrate how cathodoluminescence tomography can be used to achieve nanoscale three-dimensional visualization of light-matter interactions by reconstructing a three-dimensional metal-dielectric nanoresonator.

  4. Phase stability of zirconia at nanoscale.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabiryanov, Renat; Mei, W. N.

    2004-03-01

    There are three phases of ZrO2, namely cubic, tetragonal and monoclinic. Cubic phase of zirconia is usually stabilized by various dopants such as yttria and magnesia. However, it has been observed that these stablizers are indeed the source failure of doped ZrO2 in both orthopaedics and in ZrO2 used in high temperature applications. Recently, the cubic zirconia was fabricated as granular media with the grain sizes less than 17nm. We examine the phase stability in zirconia nanoparticles using first principle electronic structure method. We observe considerable relaxation of lattice in the monoclinic phase near the surface. This effect combined with surface tension and possibly vacancies in nanostructures are sources of stability of cubic zirconia at nanoscale. We performed calculation of the surface tension calculations for the pure (001) surface. The uniform compressive strain is applied in the plane of the slab to find the elastic response of the system. The slab is allowed to relax in the perpendicular direction. Uniform compressive strain in the plane of the slab causes increase in the distance between Zr and O layers for (001) surface (as a solid tends to preserve the volume). For cubic it gives -0.65N/m, while for monoclinic -0.48N/m. Furthermore, the solid-gas surface tension is a fundamental physical/chemical property of a solid, which affects its wetting properties. Therefore, cubic zirconia is more suitable to design the material combining wettability, ductility and hardness.

  5. Phonon thermal transport at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Richard Brian

    A comprehensive description of how heat and temperature evolve on nanometer to submicron length-scales does not yet exist because of gaps in our fundamental understanding of interfacial thermal transport and nondiffusive thermal transport. In this dissertation, I address these gaps in fundamental understanding. Interfaces often dominate the thermal response in nanoscale systems. However, a microscopic description of how heat is transported across crystal boundaries remains elusive. I present time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) experiments that improve our fundamental understanding of interfacial thermal transport. I show that, for clean interfaces between the two crystals, G derived from TDTR data usually lies in the range 0.25 Gmax < G < 0.7G max, where Gmax is the maximum possible conductance predicted by simple theory. Notable exceptions are Al/Si 0.99Ge0.01, and Al/Si0.2Ge0.8, where G < 0.25Gmax. Analyzing TDTR data of Al/SiGe alloys with either a two-channel diffusive model or a two-channel ballistic/diffusive model explains the unusually low thermal conductances. Both models predict a significant reduction in the effective thermal conductivity of semiconductor alloys near an interface as a result of disparate heat flux boundary conditions for different groups of phonons in combination with weak coupling between different groups of phonons in the near interface region of the crystal. While it is well established that Fourier theory can break down in nanoscale thermal transport problems, various theories for how and why Fourier theory breaks down do not adequately describe existing experiments. I characterize the relationship between the failure of Fourier theory, phonon mean-free-paths, important length-scales of the temperature-profile, and interfacial-phonon scattering by TDTR experiments on nonmetallic crystals. When crystals are heated by a laser with a radius of less than two microns, Fourier theory overpredicts the materials ability to carry heat away

  6. Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendra Bordia

    2009-07-31

    The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and

  7. Shear piezoelectricity in bone at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Yu, Min-Feng

    2010-10-01

    Recent demonstration of shear piezoelectricity in an isolated collagen fibril, which is the origin of piezoelectricity in bone, necessitates investigation of shear piezoelectric behavior in bone at the nanoscale. Using high resolution lateral piezoresponse force microcopy (PFM), shear piezoelectricity in a cortical bone sample was studied at the nanoscale. Subfibrillar structure of individual collagen fibrils with a periodicity of 60-70 nm were revealed in PFM map, indicating the direct contribution of collagen fibrils to the shear piezoelectricity of bone.

  8. Pure carbon nanoscale devices: Nanotube heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Chico, L.; Crespi, V.H.; Benedict, L.X.; Louie, S.G.; Cohen, M.L. |

    1996-02-01

    Introduction of pentagon-heptagon pair defects into the hexagonal network of a single carbon nanotube can change the helicity of the tube and alter its electronic structure. Using a tight-binding method to calculate the electronic structure of such systems we show that they behave as nanoscale metal/semiconductor or semiconductor/semiconductor junctions. These junctions could be the building blocks of nanoscale electronic devices made entirely of carbon. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  9. Simulation and Experimental Realization of a Nano-scale Thermal Cloak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xue; Xu, Xiangfan; Li, Baowen; Chen, Xudong; Thong, John T. L.

    Manipulation of heat flow at microstructures plays an important role in modern industry, especially for electronic and optoelectronic devices, for their performance and reliability are highly temperature dependent. Analogous to the invisible cloak in transformation optics, the thermal cloak can hide objects from heat and realize isothermal region in transformation thermodynamics. However, due to the macro-scale thermal properties may not be suitable for nano-materials, the realization of the nano-scale thermal cloak highly relies on the thermal transport in nanostructures. Here, we report our recent work of the realization of nano-scale thermal cloak based on the thermal property study of nano- materials via a spatially resolved thermal resistance measurement technique. The simulation and experiment verified its maintenance of isothermal region and heat protection capabilities. This work may provide a new way to manipulate heat transport in nano-scale devices.

  10. Nanoscale pillar arrays for separations

    DOE PAGES

    Kirchner, Teresa; Strickhouser, Rachel; Hatab, Nahla; Charlton, Jennifer; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Sepaniak, Michael J.

    2015-04-01

    The work presented herein evaluates silicon nano-pillar arrays for use in planar chromatography. Electron beam lithography and metal thermal dewetting protocols were used to create nano-thin layer chromatography platforms. With these fabrication methods we are able to reduce the size of the characteristic features in a separation medium below that used in ultra-thin layer chromatography; i.e. pillar heights are 1-2μm and pillar diameters are typically in the 200- 400nm range. In addition to the intrinsic nanoscale aspects of the systems, it is shown they can be further functionalized with nanoporous layers and traditional stationary phases for chromatography; hence exhibit broad-rangingmore » lab-on-a-chip and point-of-care potential. Because of an inherent high permeability and very small effective mass transfer distance between pillars, chromatographic efficiency can be very high but is enhanced herein by stacking during development and focusing while drying, yielding plate heights in the nm range separated band volumes. Practical separations of fluorescent dyes, fluorescently derivatized amines, and anti-tumor drugs are illustrated.« less

  11. Nanoscale pillar arrays for separations

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchner, Teresa; Strickhouser, Rachel; Hatab, Nahla; Charlton, Jennifer; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Sepaniak, Michael J.

    2015-04-01

    The work presented herein evaluates silicon nano-pillar arrays for use in planar chromatography. Electron beam lithography and metal thermal dewetting protocols were used to create nano-thin layer chromatography platforms. With these fabrication methods we are able to reduce the size of the characteristic features in a separation medium below that used in ultra-thin layer chromatography; i.e. pillar heights are 1-2μm and pillar diameters are typically in the 200- 400nm range. In addition to the intrinsic nanoscale aspects of the systems, it is shown they can be further functionalized with nanoporous layers and traditional stationary phases for chromatography; hence exhibit broad-ranging lab-on-a-chip and point-of-care potential. Because of an inherent high permeability and very small effective mass transfer distance between pillars, chromatographic efficiency can be very high but is enhanced herein by stacking during development and focusing while drying, yielding plate heights in the nm range separated band volumes. Practical separations of fluorescent dyes, fluorescently derivatized amines, and anti-tumor drugs are illustrated.

  12. Nanoscale Mixing of Soft Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Soo-Hyung; Lee, Sangwoo; Soto, Haidy E.; Lodge, Timothy P.; Bates, Frank S.

    2013-03-07

    Assessing the state of mixing on the molecular scale in soft solids is challenging. Concentrated solutions of micelles formed by self-assembly of polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-alt-propylene) (PS-PEP) diblock copolymers in squalane (C{sub 30}H{sub 62}) adopt a body-centered cubic (bcc) lattice, with glassy PS cores. Utilizing small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and isotopic labeling ({sup 1}H and {sup 2}H (D) polystyrene blocks) in a contrast-matching solvent (a mixture of squalane and perdeuterated squalane), we demonstrate quantitatively the remarkable fact that a commercial mixer can create completely random mixtures of micelles with either normal, PS(H), or deuterium-labeled, PS(D), cores on a well-defined bcc lattice. The resulting SANS intensity is quantitatively modeled by the form factor of a single spherical core. These results demonstrate both the possibility of achieving complete nanoscale mixing in a soft solid and the use of SANS to quantify the randomness.

  13. Charge transport in nanoscale junctions.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Tim; Kornyshev, Alexei; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2008-09-01

    Understanding the fundamentals of nanoscale charge transfer is pivotal for designing future nano-electronic devices. Such devices could be based on individual or groups of molecular bridges, nanotubes, nanoparticles, biomolecules and other 'active' components, mimicking wire, diode and transistor functions. These have operated in various environments including vacuum, air and condensed matter, in two- or three-electrode configurations, at ultra-low and room temperatures. Interest in charge transport in ultra-small device components has a long history and can be dated back to Aviram and Ratner's letter in 1974 (Chem. Phys. Lett. 29 277-83). So why is there a necessity for a special issue on this subject? The area has reached some degree of maturity, and even subtle geometric effects in the nanojunction and noise features can now be resolved and rationalized based on existing theoretical concepts. One purpose of this special issue is thus to showcase various aspects of nanoscale and single-molecule charge transport from experimental and theoretical perspectives. The main principles have 'crystallized' in our minds, but there is still a long way to go before true single-molecule electronics can be implemented. Major obstacles include the stability of electronic nanojunctions, reliable operation at room temperature, speed of operation and, last but not least, integration into large networks. A gradual transition from traditional silicon-based electronics to devices involving a single (or a few) molecule(s) therefore appears to be more viable from technologic and economic perspectives than a 'quantum leap'. As research in this area progresses, new applications emerge, e.g. with a view to characterizing interfacial charge transfer at the single-molecule level in general. For example, electrochemical experiments with individual enzyme molecules demonstrate that catalytic processes can be studied with nanometre resolution, offering a route towards optimizing biosensors at

  14. Voltage control of nanoscale magnetoelastic elements: theory and experiments (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carman, Gregory P.

    2015-09-01

    Electromagnetic devices rely on electrical currents to generate magnetic fields. While extremely useful this approach has limitations in the small-scale. To overcome the scaling problem, researchers have tried to use electric fields to manipulate a magnetic material's intrinsic magnetization (i.e. multiferroic). The strain mediated class of multiferroics offers up to 70% of energy transduction using available piezoelectric and magnetoelastic materials. While strain mediated multiferroic is promising, few studies exist on modeling/testing of nanoscale magnetic structures. This talk presents motivation, analytical models, and experimental data on electrical control of nanoscale single magnetic domain structures. This research is conducted in a NSF Engineering Research Center entitled Translational Applications for Nanoscale Multiferroics TANMS. The models combine micromagnetics (Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert) with elastodynamics using the electrostatic approximation producing eight fully coupled nonlinear partial differential equations. Qualitative and quantitative verification is achieved with direct comparison to experimental data. The modeling effort guides fabrication and testing on three elements, i.e. nanoscale rings (onion states), ellipses (single domain reorientation), and superparamagnetic elements. Experimental results demonstrate electrical and deterministic control of the magnetic states in the 5-500 nm structures as measured with Photoemission Electron Microscopy PEEM, Magnetic Force Microscopy MFM, or Lorentz Transmission Electron Microscopy TEM. These data strongly suggests efficient control of nanoscale magnetic spin states is possible with voltage.

  15. First evidence on phloem transport of nanoscale calcium oxide in groundnut using solution culture technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepa, Manchala; Sudhakar, Palagiri; Nagamadhuri, Kandula Venkata; Balakrishna Reddy, Kota; Giridhara Krishna, Thimmavajjula; Prasad, Tollamadugu Naga Venkata Krishna Vara

    2015-06-01

    Nanoscale materials, whose size typically falls below 100 nm, exhibit novel chemical, physical and biological properties which are different from their bulk counterparts. In the present investigation, we demonstrated that nanoscale calcium oxide particles (n-CaO) could transport through phloem tissue of groundnut unlike the corresponding bulk materials. n-CaO particles are prepared using sol-gel method. The size of the as prepared n-CaO measured (69.9 nm) using transmission electron microscopic technique (TEM). Results of the hydroponics experiment using solution culture technique revealed that foliar application of n-CaO at different concentrations (10, 50, 100, 500, 1,000 ppm) on groundnut plants confirmed the entry of calcium into leaves and stems through phloem compared to bulk source of calcium sprayed (CaO and CaNO3). After spraying of n-CaO, calcium content in roots, shoots and leaves significantly increased. Based on visual scoring of calcium deficiency correction and calcium content in plant parts, we may establish the fact that nanoscale calcium oxide particles (size 69.9 nm) could move through phloem tissue in groundnut. This is the first report on phloem transport of nanoscale calcium oxide particles in plants and this result points to the use of nanoscale calcium oxide particles as calcium source to the plants through foliar application, agricultural crops in particular, as bulk calcium application through foliar nutrition is restricted due to its non-mobility in phloem.

  16. When gold is not noble: Nanoscale gold catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, A.; Abbet, S.; Heiz, U.; Schneider, W.D.; Haekkinen, H.; Barnett, R.N.; Landman, U.

    1999-12-02

    While inert as bulk material, nanoscale gold particles dispersed on oxide supports exhibit a remarkable catalytic activity. Temperature-programmed reaction studies of the catalyzed combustion of CO on size-selected small monodispersed Au{sub n} (n {le} 20) gold clusters supported on magnesia, and first-principle simulations, reveal the microscopic origins of the observed unusual catalytic activity, with Au{sub 8} found to be the smallest catalytically active size. Partial electron transfer from the surface to the gold cluster and oxygen-vacancy F-center defects are shown to play an essential role in the activation of nanosize gold clusters as catalysts for the combustion reaction.

  17. Ultrafast pump-probe force microscopy with nanoscale resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahng, Junghoon; Brocious, Jordan; Fishman, Dmitry A.; Yampolsky, Steven; Nowak, Derek; Huang, Fei; Apkarian, Vartkess A.; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar; Potma, Eric Olaf

    2015-02-01

    We perform time-resolved pump-probe microscopy measurements by recording the local force between a sharp tip and the photo-excited sample as a readout mechanism for the material's nonlinear polarization. We show that the photo-induced force is sensitive to the same excited state dynamics as measured in an optical pump-probe experiment. Ultrafast pump-probe force microscopy constitutes a non-optical detection technique with nanoscale resolution that pushes pump-probe sensitivities close to the realm of single molecule studies.

  18. Modeling of the carrier dynamics in nonlinear semiconductor nanoscale resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moille, Gregory; Combrié, Sylvain; De Rossi, Alfredo

    2016-08-01

    The Green's function formalism is used in order to model the diffusion of free carriers in nonlinear semiconductor nanoscale resonators. In combination with the time-dependent coupled-mode equations, this leads to excellent agreement with measurements carried on a variety of samples and materials, using a minimal set of fitting parameters. The role of the geometry of the cavity is evidenced and the influence of linear and nonlinear absorption on the response of the resonator is discussed. This model can handle a broad range of phenomena: switching, self-pulsing, including resonant four-wave mixing.

  19. Investigation of Nanoscale Interactions by Means of Subharmonic Excitation.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, Matteo; Gadelrab, Karim; Stefancich, Marco; Armstrong, Peter; Li, Guang; Souier, Tewfik; Thomson, Neil H; Barcons, Victor; Font, Josep; Verdaguer, Albert; Phillips, Michael A; Santos, Sergio

    2012-08-16

    Multifrequency atomic force microscopy holds promise as a method to provide qualitative and quantitative information about samples with high spatial resolution. Here, we provide experimental evidence of the excitation of subharmonics in ambient conditions in the regions where capillary interactions are predicted to be the mechanism of excitation. We also experimentally decouple a second mechanism for subharmonic excitation that is highly independent of environmental conditions such as relative humidity. This implies that material properties could be mapped. Subharmonic excitation could lead to experimental determination of surface water affinity in the nanoscale whenever water interactions are the mechanism of excitation.

  20. EDITORIAL: Nanoscale phenomena in hydrogen storage Nanoscale phenomena in hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajo, John; Pinkerton, Fred; Stetson, Ned

    2009-05-01

    structures and catalyst systems that enhance diffusion. These and other issues concerning both molecularly and chemically bound hydrogen storage materials have begun to be addressed through an understanding of their behavior and their manipulation on the nanoscale. This special issue of Nanotechnology provides a current survey of this endeavor. The themes covered in this issue include the thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen storage materials at the nanoscale; the structure of nanoporous adsorbents; the structure of hydrogen adsorbed in nanosized pores, and the behavior of nanoparticulate, nanocrystalline and nanoconfined metal and complex hydrides, including the form and effects of catalysts. These themes are addressed through theoretical, computational and experimental approaches. Although an ideal hydrogen storage material has not yet been identified, the papers in this issue indicate that the ideal material will likely be highly structured on the nanometer scale. To optimize the capacity and interaction energy of adsorbents, the pore size, shape and volume will need to be carefully controlled. Similarly, the diffusion lengths in hydride materials will need to be matched to crystallite and particle size. Furthermore, the diffusion lengths themselves will need to be tailored through the use of dopants, placement of catalysts and control of interface energies. We are grateful to the contributors for the high quality of their submissions. We also thank the editorial and production staff for their efficient and professional work and their guidance in the production of this issue.

  1. Quantitative Tomography of Organic Photovoltaic Blends at the Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Pfannmöller, M; Heidari, H; Nanson, L; Lozman, O R; Chrapa, M; Offermans, T; Nisato, G; Bals, S

    2015-10-14

    The success of semiconducting organic materials has enabled green technologies for electronics, lighting, and photovoltaics. However, when blended together, these materials have also raised novel fundamental questions with respect to electronic, optical, and thermodynamic properties. This is particularly important for organic photovoltaic cells based on the bulk heterojunction. Here, the distribution of nanoscale domains plays a crucial role depending on the specific device structure. Hence, correlation of the aforementioned properties requires 3D nanoscale imaging of materials domains, which are embedded in a multilayer device. Such visualization has so far been elusive due to lack of contrast, insufficient signal, or resolution limits. In this Letter, we introduce spectral scanning transmission electron tomography for reconstruction of entire volume plasmon spectra from rod-shaped specimens. We provide 3D structural correlations and compositional mapping at a resolution of approximately 7 nm within advanced organic photovoltaic tandem cells. Novel insights that are obtained from quantitative 3D analyses reveal that efficiency loss upon thermal annealing can be attributed to subtle, fundamental blend properties. These results are invaluable in guiding the design and optimization of future devices in plastic electronics applications and provide an empirical basis for modeling and simulation of organic solar cells.

  2. Quantitative Tomography of Organic Photovoltaic Blends at the Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Pfannmöller, M; Heidari, H; Nanson, L; Lozman, O R; Chrapa, M; Offermans, T; Nisato, G; Bals, S

    2015-10-14

    The success of semiconducting organic materials has enabled green technologies for electronics, lighting, and photovoltaics. However, when blended together, these materials have also raised novel fundamental questions with respect to electronic, optical, and thermodynamic properties. This is particularly important for organic photovoltaic cells based on the bulk heterojunction. Here, the distribution of nanoscale domains plays a crucial role depending on the specific device structure. Hence, correlation of the aforementioned properties requires 3D nanoscale imaging of materials domains, which are embedded in a multilayer device. Such visualization has so far been elusive due to lack of contrast, insufficient signal, or resolution limits. In this Letter, we introduce spectral scanning transmission electron tomography for reconstruction of entire volume plasmon spectra from rod-shaped specimens. We provide 3D structural correlations and compositional mapping at a resolution of approximately 7 nm within advanced organic photovoltaic tandem cells. Novel insights that are obtained from quantitative 3D analyses reveal that efficiency loss upon thermal annealing can be attributed to subtle, fundamental blend properties. These results are invaluable in guiding the design and optimization of future devices in plastic electronics applications and provide an empirical basis for modeling and simulation of organic solar cells. PMID:26390367

  3. Nanoscale effects in the characterization of viscoelastic materials with atomic force microscopy: coupling of a quasi-three-dimensional standard linear solid model with in-plane surface interactions.

    PubMed

    Solares, Santiago D

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress has been accomplished in the development of experimental contact-mode and dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods designed to measure surface material properties. However, current methods are based on one-dimensional (1D) descriptions of the tip-sample interaction forces, thus neglecting the intricacies involved in the material behavior of complex samples (such as soft viscoelastic materials) as well as the differences in material response between the surface and the bulk. In order to begin to address this gap, a computational study is presented where the sample is simulated using an enhanced version of a recently introduced model that treats the surface as a collection of standard-linear-solid viscoelastic elements. The enhanced model introduces in-plane surface elastic forces that can be approximately related to a two-dimensional (2D) Young's modulus. Relevant cases are discussed for single- and multifrequency intermittent-contact AFM imaging, with focus on the calculated surface indentation profiles and tip-sample interaction force curves, as well as their implications with regards to experimental interpretation. A variety of phenomena are examined in detail, which highlight the need for further development of more physically accurate sample models that are specifically designed for AFM simulation. A multifrequency AFM simulation tool based on the above sample model is provided as supporting information. PMID:27335746

  4. Nanoscale effects in the characterization of viscoelastic materials with atomic force microscopy: Coupling of a quasi-three-dimensional standard linear solid model with in-plane surface interactions

    DOE PAGES

    Solares, Santiago D.

    2016-04-15

    Significant progress has been accomplished in the development of experimental contact-mode and dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods designed to measure surface material properties. However, current methods are based on one-dimensional (1D) descriptions of the tip-sample interaction forces, thus neglecting the intricacies involved in the material behavior of complex samples (such as soft viscoelastic materials) as well as the differences in material response between the surface and the bulk. In order to begin to address this gap, a computational study is presented where the sample is simulated using an enhanced version of a recently introduced model that treats the surfacemore » as a collection of standard-linear-solid viscoelastic elements. The enhanced model introduces in-plane surface elastic forces that can be approximately related to a two-dimensional (2D) Young's modulus. Relevant cases are discussed for single-and multifrequency intermittent-contact AFM imaging, with focus on the calculated surface indentation profiles and tip-sample interaction force curves, as well as their implications with regards to experimental interpretation. A variety of phenomena are examined in detail, which highlight the need for further development of more physically accurate sample models that are specifically designed for AFM simulation. As a result, a multifrequency AFM simulation tool based on the above sample model is provided as supporting information.« less

  5. Nanoscale effects in the characterization of viscoelastic materials with atomic force microscopy: coupling of a quasi-three-dimensional standard linear solid model with in-plane surface interactions.

    PubMed

    Solares, Santiago D

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress has been accomplished in the development of experimental contact-mode and dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods designed to measure surface material properties. However, current methods are based on one-dimensional (1D) descriptions of the tip-sample interaction forces, thus neglecting the intricacies involved in the material behavior of complex samples (such as soft viscoelastic materials) as well as the differences in material response between the surface and the bulk. In order to begin to address this gap, a computational study is presented where the sample is simulated using an enhanced version of a recently introduced model that treats the surface as a collection of standard-linear-solid viscoelastic elements. The enhanced model introduces in-plane surface elastic forces that can be approximately related to a two-dimensional (2D) Young's modulus. Relevant cases are discussed for single- and multifrequency intermittent-contact AFM imaging, with focus on the calculated surface indentation profiles and tip-sample interaction force curves, as well as their implications with regards to experimental interpretation. A variety of phenomena are examined in detail, which highlight the need for further development of more physically accurate sample models that are specifically designed for AFM simulation. A multifrequency AFM simulation tool based on the above sample model is provided as supporting information.

  6. Nanoscale effects in the characterization of viscoelastic materials with atomic force microscopy: coupling of a quasi-three-dimensional standard linear solid model with in-plane surface interactions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary Significant progress has been accomplished in the development of experimental contact-mode and dynamic-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods designed to measure surface material properties. However, current methods are based on one-dimensional (1D) descriptions of the tip–sample interaction forces, thus neglecting the intricacies involved in the material behavior of complex samples (such as soft viscoelastic materials) as well as the differences in material response between the surface and the bulk. In order to begin to address this gap, a computational study is presented where the sample is simulated using an enhanced version of a recently introduced model that treats the surface as a collection of standard-linear-solid viscoelastic elements. The enhanced model introduces in-plane surface elastic forces that can be approximately related to a two-dimensional (2D) Young’s modulus. Relevant cases are discussed for single- and multifrequency intermittent-contact AFM imaging, with focus on the calculated surface indentation profiles and tip–sample interaction force curves, as well as their implications with regards to experimental interpretation. A variety of phenomena are examined in detail, which highlight the need for further development of more physically accurate sample models that are specifically designed for AFM simulation. A multifrequency AFM simulation tool based on the above sample model is provided as supporting information. PMID:27335746

  7. Study of nanoscale damage evolution using embedded atom method potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potirniche, Gabriel; Horstemeyer, Mark; Gullet, Phillip

    2004-03-01

    Damage evolution at nanoscale has been studied using embedded atom method (EAM) potentials based on molecular dynamics principles. The simulations were performed using WARP, a parallel computing atomistic stress simulator based on Lennard-Jones (LJ) potentials for Aluminum. By varying the number of atoms from a few hundred to a few hundred thousands, we analyzed void nucleation, growth and coalescence at increasing material length scale. Rectangular specimens with and without voids were subjected to uniaxial tension up to a total strain of 50rates. Uniaxial stress-strain curves, void-volume fraction evolution and stress triaxiality were monitored. The results indicated that nucleation process is highly dependent on the material length scale, while the void growth and void coalescence mechanisms were almost indifferent to the increasing length scale. Material length scale mostly affects dislocation nucleation mechanisms that lead to void formation. Strain rate also significantly influences the stress-strain response during plastic deformation at various length scales.

  8. MEMS-enabled Dip Pen Nanolithography for directed nanoscale deposition and high-throughput nanofabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haaheim, J. R.; Nafday, O. A.; Levesque, T.; Fragala, J.; Shile, R.

    2009-02-01

    Precision nanoscale deposition is a fundamental requirement for nanoscience research, development, and commercial implementation. Dip Pen Nanolithography(R) (DPN) is an inherently additive SPM-based technique which operates under ambient conditions, making it suitable to deposit a wide range of biological and inorganic materials. This technique is fundamentally enabled by a portfolio of MEMS devices tailored for microfluidic ink delivery, directed placement of nanoscale materials via actuated cantilevers, and cm2 tip arrays for high-throughput nanofabrication. Multiplexed deposition of nanoscale materials is a challenging problem, but we have implemented InkWells(TM) to enable selective delivery of ink materials to different tips in multiple probe arrays, while preventing cross-contamination. Active Pens(TM) can take advantage of this, directly place a variety of materials in nanoscale proximity, and do so in a "clean" fashion since the cantilevers can be manipulated in Z. Further, massively parallel two-dimensional nanopatterning with DPN is now commercially available via NanoInk's 2D nano PrintArray(TM), making DPN a highthroughput, flexible and versatile method for precision nanoscale pattern formation. By fabricating 55,000 tip-cantilevers across a 1 cm2 chip, we leverage the inherent versatility of DPN and demonstrate large area surface coverage, routinely achieving throughputs of 3×107 μm2 per hour. Further, we have engineered the device to be easy to use, wire-free, and fully integrated with the NSCRIPTOR's scanner, stage, and sophisticated lithography routines. In this talk we discuss the methods of operating this commercially available device, and subsequent results showing sub-100 nm feature sizes and excellent uniformity (standard deviation < 16%). Finally, we will discuss applications enabled by this MEMS portfolio including: 1) rapidly and flexibly generating nanostructures; 2) chemically directed assembly and 3) directly writing biological materials.

  9. Nanoscale thermal and thermoelectric transport in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Hyuk Ju

    Hotspots on microchips are a major challenge for the semiconductor industry. To understand heat conduction from hotspots on silicon, measurements of the thermal resistance and transfer function have been performed using patterned nanoheater/sensor pairs with width from 100 nm up to 5000 nm at temperature range of 30 ˜ 300 K. Calculations of the thermal resistance based on a simple thermal model, considering resistances by spreading, interface, and localized heating match with the measurements. The results reveal several important trends indicating the prevalence of localized heating or sub-continuum transport phenomena in the vicinity of a nanoscale hotspot. Thermoelectric cooling is a possible solution to cope with the hotspot issue. Silicon, in a nanostructured form, is an interesting thermoelectric material, because of significantly reduced thermal conductivity. However, further improvement in thermoelectric efficiency is highly desirable. Thermopower measurements of silicon nanoribbons with an integrated gate have been performed. The gate in the device is used to provide strong carrier confinement and enable tunability of the carrier density over a wide range, which is fully compatible with conventional silicon processing and microelectronics. It therefore offers a promising alternative to doping when considering the thermoelectric engineering of nanostructures. An enhancement of thermoelectric power factor has been observed in silicon nanoribbons. This enhancement can be understood by considering its behavior as a function of carrier density. We identify the underlying mechanisms for the power factor in the nanoribbon, which include quantum confinement, low scattering due to the absence of dopants, and, at low temperatures, a significant phonon drag contribution.

  10. Nanoscale Metal Oxide Semiconductors for Gas Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Evans, Laura; Xu, Jennifer C.; VanderWal, Randy L.; Berger, Gordon M.; Kulis, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    A report describes the fabrication and testing of nanoscale metal oxide semiconductors (MOSs) for gas and chemical sensing. This document examines the relationship between processing approaches and resulting sensor behavior. This is a core question related to a range of applications of nanotechnology and a number of different synthesis methods are discussed: thermal evaporation- condensation (TEC), controlled oxidation, and electrospinning. Advantages and limitations of each technique are listed, providing a processing overview to developers of nanotechnology- based systems. The results of a significant amount of testing and comparison are also described. A comparison is made between SnO2, ZnO, and TiO2 single-crystal nanowires and SnO2 polycrystalline nanofibers for gas sensing. The TECsynthesized single-crystal nanowires offer uniform crystal surfaces, resistance to sintering, and their synthesis may be done apart from the substrate. The TECproduced nanowire response is very low, even at the operating temperature of 200 C. In contrast, the electrospun polycrystalline nanofiber response is high, suggesting that junction potentials are superior to a continuous surface depletion layer as a transduction mechanism for chemisorption. Using a catalyst deposited upon the surface in the form of nanoparticles yields dramatic gains in sensitivity for both nanostructured, one-dimensional forms. For the nanowire materials, the response magnitude and response rate uniformly increase with increasing operating temperature. Such changes are interpreted in terms of accelerated surface diffusional processes, yielding greater access to chemisorbed oxygen species and faster dissociative chemisorption, respectively. Regardless of operating temperature, sensitivity of the nanofibers is a factor of 10 to 100 greater than that of nanowires with the same catalyst for the same test condition. In summary, nanostructure appears critical to governing the reactivity, as measured by electrical

  11. Hybrid nanostructures using pi-conjugated polymers and nanoscale metals: synthesis, characteristics, and optoelectronic applications.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong Hyuk; Kim, Mi Suk; Joo, Jinsoo

    2010-07-01

    Pi-conjugated organic systems have been used as optoelectronic and sensing materials due to their characteristics of efficient light emission or absorption, and p-type charge transport. The hybrid nanostructures of pi-conjugated organic systems with nanoscale metals offer surface plasmon (SP)-enhanced luminescence, which can be applied to organic-based optoelectronics, photonics, and sensing. Various hybrid nanostructures using light-emitting polymers with nanoscale metals have been fabricated and have shown considerable enhancement of photoluminescence efficiency due to energy and charge transfer effects in SP resonance coupling. In this tutorial review, recent conceptual and technological achievements in light-emitting polymers-based hybrid nanostructures are described.

  12. The Properties of Confined Water and Fluid Flow at the Nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Schwegler, E; Reed, J; Lau, E; Prendergast, D; Galli, G; Grossman, J C; Cicero, G

    2009-03-09

    This project has been focused on the development of accurate computational tools to study fluids in confined, nanoscale geometries, and the application of these techniques to probe the structural and electronic properties of water confined between hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates, including the presence of simple ions at the interfaces. In particular, we have used a series of ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations and quantum Monte Carlo calculations to build an understanding of how hydrogen bonding and solvation are modified at the nanoscale. The properties of confined water affect a wide range of scientific and technological problems - including protein folding, cell-membrane flow, materials properties in confined media and nanofluidic devices.

  13. Cluster-assembled cubic zirconia films with tunable and stable nanoscale morphology against thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, F.; Sogne, E.; Lenardi, C.; Podestà, A.; Merlini, M.; Ducati, C.; Milani, P.

    2016-08-01

    Nanostructured zirconium dioxide (zirconia) films are very promising for catalysis and biotechnological applications: a precise control of the interfacial properties of the material at different length scales and, in particular, at the nanoscale, is therefore necessary. Here, we present the characterization of cluster-assembled zirconia films produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition possessing cubic structure at room temperature and controlled nanoscale morphology. We characterized the effect of thermal annealing in reducing and oxidizing conditions on the crystalline structure, grain dimensions, and topography. We highlight the mechanisms of film growth and phase transitions, which determine the observed interfacial morphological properties and their resilience against thermal treatments.

  14. Special Issue on the Second International Workshop on Micro- and Nano-Scale Thermal Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhuomin; Liu, Linhua; Zhu, Qunzhi; Mengüç, M. Pinar

    2015-06-01

    Micro- and nano-scale thermal radiation has become one of the fastest growing research areas because of advances in nanotechnology and the development of novel materials. The related research and development includes near-field radiation transfer, spectral and directional selective emitters and receivers, plasmonics, metamaterials, and novel nano-scale fabrication techniques. With the advances in these areas, important applications in energy harvesting such as solar cells and thermophotovoltaics, nanomanufacturing, biomedical sensing, thermal imaging as well as data storage with the localized heating/cooling have been pushed to higher levels.

  15. Nanoscale phenomena in ferroelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganpule, Chandan S.

    Ferroelectric materials are a subject of intense research as potential candidates for applications in non-volatile ferroelectric random access memories (FeRAM), piezoelectric actuators, infrared detectors, optical switches and as high dielectric constant materials for dynamic random access memories (DRAMs). With current trends in miniaturization, it becomes important that the fundamental aspects of scaling of ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties in these devices be studied thoroughly and their impact on the device reliability assessed. In keeping with this spirit of miniaturization, the dissertation has two broad themes: (a) Scaling of ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties and (b) The key reliability issue of retention loss. The thesis begins with a look at results on scaling studies of focused-ion-beam milled submicron ferroelectric capacitors using a variety of scanning probe characterization tools. The technique of piezoresponse microscopy, which is rapidly becoming an accepted form of domain imaging in ferroelectrics, has been used in this work for another very important application: providing reliable, repeatable and quantitative numbers for the electromechanical properties of submicron structures milled in ferroelectric films. This marriage of FIB and SPM based characterization of electromechanical and electrical properties has proven unbeatable in the last few years to characterize nanostructures qualitatively and quantitatively. The second half of this dissertation focuses on polarization relaxation in FeRAMs. In an attempt to understand the nanoscale origins of back-switching of ferroelectric domains, the time dependent relaxation of remnant polarization in epitaxial lead zirconate titanate (PbZr0.2Ti0.8O 3, PZT) ferroelectric thin films (used as a model system), containing a uniform 2-dimensional grid of 90° domains (c-axis in the plane of the film) has been examined using voltage modulated scanning force microscopy. A novel approach of

  16. Nanoscale Engineering in the Biosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Daniel J.; Whitlow, Harry J.

    Biological matter is one of the most diverse and important classes of materials. Products of living organisms (wood, bone, cotton, wool, leather, coal, oil, drugs, etc.) are vital to humanity as foodstuffs, energy sources, engineering and construction materials, and chemicals; and by the way, they shape the environment of the biosphere.

  17. Nanoscale heat transfer and thermoelectrics for alternative energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Richard

    2011-03-01

    In the area of alternative energy, thermoelectrics have experienced an unprecedented growth in popularity because of their ability to convert waste heat into electricity. Wired in reverse, thermoelectrics can act as refrigeration devices, where they are promising because they are small in size and lightweight, have no moving parts, and have rapid on/off cycles. However, due to their low efficiencies bulk thermoelectrics have historically been a niche market. Only in the last decade has thermoelectric efficiency exceeded ~ 20 % due to fabrication of nanostructured materials. Nanoscale materials have this advantage because electronic and acoustic confinement effects can greatly increase thermoelectric efficiency beyond bulk values. In this talk, I will introduce our work in the area of nanoscale heat transfer with the goal of more efficient thermoelectrics. I will discuss our experiments and methods to study acoustic confinement in nanostructures and present some of our new nanostructured thermoelectric materials. To study acoustic confinement we are building a nanoscale phonon spectrometer. The instrument can excite phonon modes in nanostructures in the ~ 100 s of GHz. Ballistic phonons from the generator are used to probe acoustic confinement and surface scattering effects. Transmission studies using this device will help optimize materials and morphologies for more efficient nanomaterial-based thermoelectrics. For materials, our group has synthesized nano-layer superlattices of Na x Co O2 . Sodium cobaltate was recently discovered to have a high Seebeck coeficent and is being studied as an oxide thermoelectric material. The thickness of our nano-layers ranges from 5 nm to 300 nm while the lengths can be varied between 10 μ m and 4 mm. Typical aspect ratios are 40 nm: 4 mm, or 1:100,000. Thermoelectric characterization of samples with tilted multiple-grains along the measurement axis indicate a thermoelectric efficiency on par with current polycrystalline samples

  18. Heat transfer at nanoscale contacts investigated with scanning thermal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assy, Ali; Gomès, Séverine

    2015-07-01

    This article investigates heat transfer at nanoscale contacts through scanning thermal microscopy (SThM) under vacuum conditions. Measurements were performed using two types of resistive SThM probes operating in active mode on germanium and silicon samples. The experiments measure the heat transfer through the nanoscale point contacts formed between the probe apex, platinum-rhodium alloy, or silicon nitride depending on the probe used, and the samples. The thermal resistance at the probe apex-sample interface becomes extremely important as the contact size becomes smaller or comparable to the phonon mean free path within the materials in contact. This resistance is derived from the measurements using a nanoconstriction model. Consistent to what is expected, the interfacial thermal resistance is found to be dependent on the tip and sample. Assuming perfect interfaces, the thermal boundary resistance Rb is determined for the different contacts. Results obtained for Rb range from 10-9 m2 K W-1 up to 14 × 10-9 m2 K W-1 and have the same order of magnitude of values previously published for other materials. The determination of the averaged phonon transmission coefficient t from the data is discussed, and coefficients t for the Si3N4/Ge and Si3N4/Si contacts are estimated based on the diffuse mismatch model (tSi3N4/Ge = 0.5 and tSi3N4/Si = 0.9).

  19. Diffraction of quantum dots reveals nanoscale ultrafast energy localization.

    PubMed

    Vanacore, Giovanni M; Hu, Jianbo; Liang, Wenxi; Bietti, Sergio; Sanguinetti, Stefano; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2014-11-12

    Unlike in bulk materials, energy transport in low-dimensional and nanoscale systems may be governed by a coherent "ballistic" behavior of lattice vibrations, the phonons. If dominant, such behavior would determine the mechanism for transport and relaxation in various energy-conversion applications. In order to study this coherent limit, both the spatial and temporal resolutions must be sufficient for the length-time scales involved. Here, we report observation of the lattice dynamics in nanoscale quantum dots of gallium arsenide using ultrafast electron diffraction. By varying the dot size from h = 11 to 46 nm, the length scale effect was examined, together with the temporal change. When the dot size is smaller than the inelastic phonon mean-free path, the energy remains localized in high-energy acoustic modes that travel coherently within the dot. As the dot size increases, an energy dissipation toward low-energy phonons takes place, and the transport becomes diffusive. Because ultrafast diffraction provides the atomic-scale resolution and a sufficiently high time resolution, other nanostructured materials can be studied similarly to elucidate the nature of dynamical energy localization. PMID:25099123

  20. Ultra-fast nano-scale phase transitions in systems driven far from equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caro, A.; Lopasso, E. M.; Caro, M.; Turchi, P. E. A.

    2004-03-01

    We study the thermodynamic forces acting on the evolution of the nanoscale regions excited by laser shots into solid targets. We analyze the role of diffusion, thermo-migration, and the liquidus-solidus two-phase field crossing, as the system cools down from the induced melt under different conditions of energy deposition. To determine the relevance of these thermodynamic forces, solute redistribution is evaluated using molecular dynamics simulations of equilibrium Au-Ni solid solutions. Our results show the combined effects of thermo-migration and solute redistribution that, depending on the material, can reinforce or cancel each other. These effects show that the combination of ultra-fast but nano-scale characteristics of these processes can be used to produce nanoscale modifications of composition in alloys

  1. Effects of surface and interface energies on the bending behavior of nanoscale multilayered beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K. F.; Wang, B. L.

    2013-12-01

    A modified continuum model of the nanoscale multilayered beams is established by incorporating surface and interface energies. Through the principle of minimum potential energy, the governing equations and boundary conditions are obtained. The closed-form solutions are presented and the overall Young's modulus of the beam is studied. The surface and interface energies are found to have a major influence on the bending behavior and the overall Young's modulus of the beam. The effect of surface and interface energies on the overall Young's modulus depends on the boundary condition of the beam, the values of the surface/interface elasticity constants and the initial surface/interface energy of the system. The results can be used to guide the determinations of the surface/interface elasticity properties and the initial surface/interface energies of the nanoscale multilayered materials through nanoscale beam bending experiments.

  2. Resonant Effects in Nanoscale Bowtie Apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Li; Qin, Jin; Guo, Songpo; Liu, Tao; Kinzel, Edward; Wang, Liang

    2016-06-01

    Nanoscale bowtie aperture antennas can be used to focus light well below the diffraction limit with extremely high transmission efficiencies. This paper studies the spectral dependence of the transmission through nanoscale bowtie apertures defined in a silver film. A realistic bowtie aperture is numerically modeled using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. Results show that the transmission spectrum is dominated by Fabry-Pérot (F-P) waveguide modes and plasmonic modes. The F-P resonance is sensitive to the thickness of the film and the plasmonic resonant mode is closely related to the gap distance of the bowtie aperture. Both characteristics significantly affect the transmission spectrum. To verify these numerical results, bowtie apertures are FIB milled in a silver film. Experimental transmission measurements agree with simulation data. Based on this result, nanoscale bowtie apertures can be optimized to realize deep sub-wavelength confinement with high transmission efficiency with applications to nanolithography, data storage, and bio-chemical sensing.

  3. Nanoscale Drug Delivery and Hyperthermia: The Materials Design and Preclinical and Clinical Testing of Low Temperature-Sensitive Liposomes Used in Combination with Mild Hyperthermia in the Treatment of Local Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landon, Chelsea D.; Park, Ji-Young; Needham, David; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    The overall objective of liposomal drug delivery is to selectively target drug delivery to diseased tissue, while minimizing drug delivery to critical normal tissues. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of temperature-sensitive liposomes in general and the Low Temperature-Sensitive Liposome (LTSL) in particular. We give a brief description of the material design of LTSL and highlight the likely mechanism behind temperature-triggered drug release. A complete review of the progress and results of the latest preclinical and clinical studies that demonstrate enhanced drug delivery with the combined treatment of hyperthermia and liposomes is provided as well as a clinical perspective on cancers that would benefit from hyperthermia as an adjuvant treatment for temperature-triggered chemotherapeutics. This review discusses the ideas, goals, and processes behind temperature-sensitive liposome development in the laboratory to the current use in preclinical and clinical settings. PMID:23807899

  4. Molecular mechanistic origin of nanoscale contact, friction, and scratch in complex particulate systems.

    PubMed

    Jalilvand, Soroosh; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh

    2015-02-11

    Nanoscale contact mechanisms, such as friction, scratch, and wear, have a profound impact on physics of technologically important particulate systems. Determining the key underlying interparticle interactions that govern the properties of the particulate systems has been long an engineering challenge. Here, we focus on particulate calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) as a model system and use atomistic simulations to decode the interplay between crystallographic directions, structural defects, and atomic species on normal and frictional forces. By exhibiting high material inhomogeneity and low structural symmetry, C-S-H provides an excellent system to explore various contact-induced nanoscale deformation mechanisms in complex particulate systems. Our findings provide a deep fundamental understanding of the role of inherent material features, such as van der Waals versus Coulombic interactions and the role of atomic species, in controlling the nanoscale normal contact, friction, and scratch mechanisms, thereby providing de novo insight and strategies for intelligent modulation of the physics of the particulate systems. This work is the first report on atomic-scale investigation of the contact-induced nanoscale mechanisms in structurally complex C-S-H materials and can potentially open new opportunities for knowledge-based engineering of several other particulate systems such as ceramics, sands, and powders and self-assembly of colloidal systems in general.

  5. Visualizing Nanoscale Distribution of Corrosion Cells by Open-Loop Electric Potential Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Honbo, Kyoko; Ogata, Shoichiro; Kitagawa, Takuya; Okamoto, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Naritaka; Sugimoto, Itto; Shima, Shohei; Fukunaga, Akira; Takatoh, Chikako; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2016-02-23

    Corrosion is a traditional problem but still one of the most serious problems in industry. To reduce the huge economic loss caused by corrosion, tremendous effort has been made to understand, predict and prevent it. Corrosion phenomena are generally explained by the formation of corrosion cells at a metal-electrolyte interface. However, experimental verification of their nanoscale distribution has been a major challenge owing to the lack of a method able to visualize the local potential distribution in an electrolytic solution. In this study, we have investigated the nanoscale corrosion behavior of Cu fine wires and a duplex stainless steel by in situ imaging of local corrosion cells by open-loop electric potential microscopy (OL-EPM). For both materials, potential images obtained by OL-EPM show nanoscale contrasts, where areas of higher and lower potential correspond to anodic areas (i.e., corrosion sites) and cathodic areas, respectively. This imaging capability allows us to investigate the real-time transition of local corrosion sites even when surface structures show little change. This is particularly useful for investigating reactions under surface oxide layers or highly corrosion-resistant materials as demonstrated here. The proposed technique should be applicable to the study of other redox reactions on a battery electrode or a catalytic material. The results presented here open up such future applications of OL-EPM in nanoscale electrochemistry. PMID:26811989

  6. Model Mismatch Paradigm for Probe based Nanoscale Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Pranav

    Scanning Probe Microscopes (SPMs) are widely used for investigation of material properties and manipulation of matter at the nanoscale. These instruments are considered critical enablers of nanotechnology by providing the only technique for direct observation of dynamics at the nanoscale and affecting it with sub Angstrom resolution. Current SPMs are limited by low throughput and lack of quantitative measurements of material properties. Various applications like the high density data storage, sub-20 nm lithography, fault detection and functional probing of semiconductor circuits, direct observation of dynamical processes involved in biological samples viz. motor proteins and transport phenomena in various materials demand high throughput operation. Researchers involved in material characterization at nanoscale are interested in getting quantitative measurements of stiffness and dissipative properties of various materials in a least invasive manner. In this thesis, system theoretic concepts are used to address these limitations. The central tenet of the thesis is to model, the known information about the system and then focus on perturbations of these known dynamics or model, to sense the effects due to changes in the environment such as changes in material properties or surface topography. Thus a model mismatch paradigm for probe based nanoscale imaging is developed. The topic is developed by presenting physics based modeling of a particular mode of operation of SPMs called the dynamic mode operation. This mode is modeled as a forced Lure system where a linear time invariant system is in feedback with an unknown static memoryless nonlinearity. Tools from averaging theory are used to tame this complex nonlinear system by approximating it as a linear system with time varying parameters. Material properties are thus transformed from being parameters of unknown nonlinear functions to being unknown coefficients of a linear plant. The first contribution of this thesis

  7. Nanoscale intimacy in bifunctional catalysts for selective conversion of hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Zečević, Jovana; Vanbutsele, Gina; de Jong, Krijn P; Martens, Johan A

    2015-12-10

    The ability to control nanoscale features precisely is increasingly being exploited to develop and improve monofunctional catalysts. Striking effects might also be expected in the case of bifunctional catalysts, which are important in the hydrocracking of fossil and renewable hydrocarbon sources to provide high-quality diesel fuel. Such bifunctional hydrocracking catalysts contain metal sites and acid sites, and for more than 50 years the so-called intimacy criterion has dictated the maximum distance between the two types of site, beyond which catalytic activity decreases. A lack of synthesis and material-characterization methods with nanometre precision has long prevented in-depth exploration of the intimacy criterion, which has often been interpreted simply as 'the closer the better' for positioning metal and acid sites. Here we show for a bifunctional catalyst--comprising an intimate mixture of zeolite Y and alumina binder, and with platinum metal controllably deposited on either the zeolite or the binder--that closest proximity between metal and zeolite acid sites can be detrimental. Specifically, the selectivity when cracking large hydrocarbon feedstock molecules for high-quality diesel production is optimized with the catalyst that contains platinum on the binder, that is, with a nanoscale rather than closest intimacy of the metal and acid sites. Thus, cracking of the large and complex hydrocarbon molecules that are typically derived from alternative sources, such as gas-to-liquid technology, vegetable oil or algal oil, should benefit especially from bifunctional catalysts that avoid locating platinum on the zeolite (the traditionally assumed optimal location). More generally, we anticipate that the ability demonstrated here to spatially organize different active sites at the nanoscale will benefit the further development and optimization of the emerging generation of multifunctional catalysts.

  8. Nanoscale intimacy in bifunctional catalysts for selective conversion of hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zecevic, Jovana; Vanbutsele, Gina; de Jong, Krijn P.; Martens, Johan A.

    2015-12-01

    The ability to control nanoscale features precisely is increasingly being exploited to develop and improve monofunctional catalysts. Striking effects might also be expected in the case of bifunctional catalysts, which are important in the hydrocracking of fossil and renewable hydrocarbon sources to provide high-quality diesel fuel. Such bifunctional hydrocracking catalysts contain metal sites and acid sites, and for more than 50 years the so-called intimacy criterion has dictated the maximum distance between the two types of site, beyond which catalytic activity decreases. A lack of synthesis and material-characterization methods with nanometre precision has long prevented in-depth exploration of the intimacy criterion, which has often been interpreted simply as ‘the closer the better’ for positioning metal and acid sites. Here we show for a bifunctional catalyst—comprising an intimate mixture of zeolite Y and alumina binder, and with platinum metal controllably deposited on either the zeolite or the binder—that closest proximity between metal and zeolite acid sites can be detrimental. Specifically, the selectivity when cracking large hydrocarbon feedstock molecules for high-quality diesel production is optimized with the catalyst that contains platinum on the binder, that is, with a nanoscale rather than closest intimacy of the metal and acid sites. Thus, cracking of the large and complex hydrocarbon molecules that are typically derived from alternative sources, such as gas-to-liquid technology, vegetable oil or algal oil, should benefit especially from bifunctional catalysts that avoid locating platinum on the zeolite (the traditionally assumed optimal location). More generally, we anticipate that the ability demonstrated here to spatially organize different active sites at the nanoscale will benefit the further development and optimization of the emerging generation of multifunctional catalysts.

  9. A Proximity-Based Programmable DNA Nanoscale Assembly Line

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Hongzhou; Chao, Jie; Xiao, Shou-Jun; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    2010-01-01

    Our ability to synthesize nanometer-scale particles with desired shapes and compositions offers the exciting prospect of generating new functional materials and devices by combining the particles in a controlled fashion into larger structures. Self-assembly can achieve this task efficiently, but may be subject to thermodynamic and kinetic limitations: Reactants, intermediates and products may collide with each other throughout the assembly timecourse to produce non-target instead of target species. An alternative approach to nanoscale assembly uses information-containing molecules such as DNA1 to control interactions and thereby minimize unwanted crosstalk between different components. In principle, this method should allow the stepwise and programmed construction of target products by fastening individually selected nanoscale components – much as an automobile is built on an assembly line. Here, we demonstrate that a nanoscale assembly line can indeed be realized by the judicious combination of three known DNA-based modules: a DNA origami2 tile that provides a framework and track for the assembly process, cassettes containing three distinct two-state DNA machines that serve as programmable cargo-donating devices3,4 and are attached4,5 in series to the tile, and a DNA walker that can move on the track from device to device and collect cargo. As the walker traverses the pathway prescribed by the origami tile track, it encounters sequentially the three DNA devices that can be independently switched between an ‘ON’ state allowing its cargo to be transferred to the walker, and an ‘OFF’ state where no transfer occurs. We use three different types of gold nanoparticles as cargo and show that the experimental system does indeed allow the controlled fabrication of the eight different products that can be obtained with three two-state devices. PMID:20463734

  10. Atomistic Design and Simulations of Nanoscale Machines and Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goddard, William A., III; Cagin, Tahir; Walch, Stephen P.

    2000-01-01

    Over the three years of this project, we made significant progress on critical theoretical and computational issues in nanoscale science and technology, particularly in:(1) Fullerenes and nanotubes, (2) Characterization of surfaces of diamond and silicon for NEMS applications, (3) Nanoscale machine and assemblies, (4) Organic nanostructures and dendrimers, (5) Nanoscale confinement and nanotribology, (6) Dynamic response of nanoscale structures nanowires (metals, tubes, fullerenes), (7) Thermal transport in nanostructures.

  11. Nanoscale coordination polymers for anticancer drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Rachel Huxford

    This dissertation reports the synthesis and characterization of nanoscale coordination polymers (NCPs) for anticancer drug delivery. Nanoparticles have been explored in order to address the limitations of small molecule chemotherapeutics. NCPs have been investigated as drug delivery vehicles as they can exhibit the same beneficial properties as the bulk metal-organic frameworks as well as interesting characteristics that are unique to nanomaterials. Gd-MTX (MTX = methotrexate) NCPs with a MTX loading of 71.6 wt% were synthesized and stabilized by encapsulation within a lipid bilayer containing anisamide (AA), a small molecule that targets sigma receptors which are overexpressed in many cancer tissues. Functionalization with AA allows for targeted delivery and controlled release to cancer cells, as shown by enhanced efficacy against leukemia cells. The NCPs were doped with Ru(bpy)32+ (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine), and this formulation was utilized as an optical imaging agent by confocal microscopy. NCPs containing the chemotherapeutic pemetrexed (PMX) were synthesized using different binding metals. Zr-based materials could not be stabilized by encapsulation with a lipid bilayer, and Gd-based materials showed that PMX had degraded during synthesis. However, Hf-based NCPs containing 19.7 wt% PMX were stabilized by a lipid coating and showed in vitro efficacy against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. Enhanced efficacy was observed for formulations containing AA. Additionally, NCP formulations containing the cisplatin prodrug disuccinatocisplatin were prepared; one of these formulations could be stabilized by encapsulation within a lipid layer. Coating with a lipid layer doped with AA rendered this formulation an active targeting agent. The resulting formulation proved more potent than free cisplatin in NSCLC cell lines. Improved NCP uptake was demonstrated by confocal microscopy and competitive binding assays. Finally, a Pt(IV) oxaliplatin prodrug was

  12. Investigating Nanoscale Electrochemistry with Surface- and Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zaleski, Stephanie; Wilson, Andrew J; Mattei, Michael; Chen, Xu; Goubert, Guillaume; Cardinal, M Fernanda; Willets, Katherine A; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2016-09-20

    The chemical sensitivity of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) methodologies allows for the investigation of heterogeneous chemical reactions with high sensitivity. Specifically, SERS methodologies are well-suited to study electron transfer (ET) reactions, which lie at the heart of numerous fundamental processes: electrocatalysis, solar energy conversion, energy storage in batteries, and biological events such as photosynthesis. Heterogeneous ET reactions are commonly monitored by electrochemical methods such as cyclic voltammetry, observing billions of electrochemical events per second. Since the first proof of detecting single molecules by redox cycling, there has been growing interest in examining electrochemistry at the nanoscale and single-molecule levels. Doing so unravels details that would otherwise be obscured by an ensemble experiment. The use of optical spectroscopies, such as SERS, to elucidate nanoscale electrochemical behavior is an attractive alternative to traditional approaches such as scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). While techniques such as single-molecule fluorescence or electrogenerated chemiluminescence have been used to optically monitor electrochemical events, SERS methodologies, in particular, have shown great promise for exploring electrochemistry at the nanoscale. SERS is ideally suited to study nanoscale electrochemistry because the Raman-enhancing metallic, nanoscale substrate duly serves as the working electrode material. Moreover, SERS has the ability to directly probe single molecules without redox cycling and can achieve nanoscale spatial resolution in combination with super-resolution or scanning probe microscopies. This Account summarizes the latest progress from the Van Duyne and Willets groups toward understanding nanoelectrochemistry using Raman spectroscopic methodologies. The first half of this Account highlights three techniques that have been recently used to probe few- or single-molecule electrochemical

  13. Investigating Nanoscale Electrochemistry with Surface- and Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zaleski, Stephanie; Wilson, Andrew J; Mattei, Michael; Chen, Xu; Goubert, Guillaume; Cardinal, M Fernanda; Willets, Katherine A; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2016-09-20

    The chemical sensitivity of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) methodologies allows for the investigation of heterogeneous chemical reactions with high sensitivity. Specifically, SERS methodologies are well-suited to study electron transfer (ET) reactions, which lie at the heart of numerous fundamental processes: electrocatalysis, solar energy conversion, energy storage in batteries, and biological events such as photosynthesis. Heterogeneous ET reactions are commonly monitored by electrochemical methods such as cyclic voltammetry, observing billions of electrochemical events per second. Since the first proof of detecting single molecules by redox cycling, there has been growing interest in examining electrochemistry at the nanoscale and single-molecule levels. Doing so unravels details that would otherwise be obscured by an ensemble experiment. The use of optical spectroscopies, such as SERS, to elucidate nanoscale electrochemical behavior is an attractive alternative to traditional approaches such as scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). While techniques such as single-molecule fluorescence or electrogenerated chemiluminescence have been used to optically monitor electrochemical events, SERS methodologies, in particular, have shown great promise for exploring electrochemistry at the nanoscale. SERS is ideally suited to study nanoscale electrochemistry because the Raman-enhancing metallic, nanoscale substrate duly serves as the working electrode material. Moreover, SERS has the ability to directly probe single molecules without redox cycling and can achieve nanoscale spatial resolution in combination with super-resolution or scanning probe microscopies. This Account summarizes the latest progress from the Van Duyne and Willets groups toward understanding nanoelectrochemistry using Raman spectroscopic methodologies. The first half of this Account highlights three techniques that have been recently used to probe few- or single-molecule electrochemical

  14. XEDS STEM Tomography For 3D Chemical Characterization Of Nanoscale Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Genc, Arda; Kovarik, Libor; Gu, Meng; Cheng, Huikai; Plachinda, Pavel; Pullan, Lee; Freitag, Bert; Wang, Chong M.

    2013-08-01

    We present a tomography technique which couples scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (XEDS) to resolve 3D distribution of elements in nanoscale materials. STEM imaging when combined with a symmetrically arranged XEDS detector design around the specimen overcomes many of the obstacles in 3D spectroscopic tomography of nanoscale materials and successfully elucidate the 3D chemical information in a large field of view of the TEM sample. We employed this technique to investigate 3D distribution of Nickel (Ni), Manganese (Mn) and Oxygen (O) in Li(NiMn)O2 battery cathode material. For this purpose, 2D elemental maps were acquired for a range of tilt angles and reconstructed to obtain 3D elemental distribution in an isolated Li(NiMnO2) nanoparticle. The results highlight the strength of this technique in 3D chemical analysis of nanoscale materials by successfully resolving Ni, Mn and O elemental distributions in 3D and discovering the new phenomenon of Ni surface segregation in this material. Furthermore, the comparison of simultaneously acquired HAADF STEM and XEDS STEM tomography results show that XEDS STEM tomography provides additional 3D chemical information of the material especially when there is low atomic number (Z) contrast in the material of interest.

  15. Controlled isotropic or anisotropic nanoscale growth of coordination polymers: formation of hybrid coordination polymer particles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Jung; Cho, Yea Jin; Cho, Won; Oh, Moonhyun

    2013-01-22

    The ability to fabricate multicompositional hybrid materials in a precise and controlled manner is one of the primary goals of modern materials science research. In addition, an understanding of the phenomena associated with the systematic growth of one material on another can facilitate the evolution of multifunctional hybrid materials. Here, we demonstrate precise manipulation of the isotropic and/or anisotropic nanoscale growth of various coordination polymers (CPs) to obtain heterocompositional hybrid coordination polymer particles. Chemical composition analyses conducted at every growth step reveal the formation of accurately assembled hybrid nanoscale CPs, and microscopy images are used to examine the morphology of the particles and visualize the hybrid structures. The dissimilar growth behavior, that is, growth in an isotropic or anisotropic fashion, is found to be dependent on the size of the metal ions involved within the CPs.

  16. Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory Annual Report 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Hamza, A V; Lesuer, D R

    2006-01-03

    The Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory's (NSCL) primary mission is to create and advance interdisciplinary research and development opportunities in nanoscience and technology. The initial emphasis of the NSCL has been on development of scientific solutions in support of target fabrication for the NIF laser and other stockpile stewardship experimental platforms. Particular emphasis has been placed on the design and development of innovative new materials and structures for use in these targets. Projects range from the development of new high strength nanocrystalline alloys to graded density materials to high Z nanoporous structures. The NSCL also has a mission to recruit and train personnel for Lab programs such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF), Defense and Nuclear Technologies (DNT), and Nonproliferation, Arms control and International security (NAI). The NSCL continues to attract talented scientists to the Laboratory.

  17. Nanoscale Electrical Properties of Oxide Heterostructures Revealed Via Introspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Cheng; Thiel, Stefan; Mannhart, Jochen; Levy, Jeremy

    2009-03-01

    Previous work shows that conductive regions can be formed via lateral nanoscale confinement of a quasi-two-dimensional electron gas at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface^2. Here we demonstrate how structures constructed in this method serve not only as novel nanoelectronic devices but also as tools for studying fundamental physics in the underlying material system. Nanowires, tunnel junctions, field effect transistors (FETs), together with associated phenomena that we observed such as negative differential resistance, provide insight into the mechanism responsible for the existence and spatial confinement of the interfacial metal-insulator transition. We discuss several examples of nanodevices and the constraints they place on models and mechanisms that govern their properties. ^2Cen et al, Nature Materials 7, 298 (2008).

  18. Surface control system for the 15 meter hoop-column antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, James B.; Ahl, Elvin L., Jr.; Butler, David H.; Peri, Frank, Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The 15-meter hoop-column antenna fabricated by the Harris Corporation under contract to the NASA Langley Research Center is described. The antenna is a deployable and restowable structure consisting of a central telescoping column, a 15-meter-diameter folding hoop, and a mesh reflector surface. The hoop is supported and positioned by 48 quartz cords attached to the column above the hoop, and by 24 graphite cords from the base of the antenna column. The RF reflective surface is a gold plated molybdenum wire mesh supported on a graphite cord truss structure which is attached between the hoop and the column. The surface contour is controlled by 96 graphite cords from the antenna base to the rear of the truss assembly. The antenna is actually a quadaperture reflector with each quadrant of the surface mesh shaped to produce an offset parabolic reflector. Results of near-field and structural tests are given. Controls structures and electromagnetics interaction, surface control system requirements, mesh control adjustment, surface control system actuator assembly, surface control system electronics, the system interface unit, and control stations are discussed.

  19. Probing and manipulating magnetization at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarth, Nitin

    2012-02-01

    Combining semiconductors with magnetism in hetero- and nano-structured geometries provides a powerful means of exploring the interplay between spin-dependent transport and nanoscale magnetism. We describe two recent studies in this context. First, we use spin-dependent transport in ferromagnetic semiconductor thin films to provide a new window into nanoscale magnetism [1]: here, we exploit the large anomalous Hall effect in a ferromagnetic semiconductor as a nanoscale probe of the reversible elastic behavior of magnetic domain walls and gain insight into regimes of domain wall behavior inaccessible to more conventional optical techniques. Next, we describe novel ways to create self-assembled hybrid semiconductor/ferromagnet core-shell nanowires [2] and show how magnetoresistance measurements in single nanowires, coupled with micromagnetic simulations, can provide detailed insights into the magnetization reversal process in nanoscale ferromagnets [3]. The work described here was carried out in collaboration with Andrew Balk, Jing Liang, Nicholas Dellas, Mark Nowakowski, David Rench, Mark Wilson, Roman Engel-Herbert, Suzanne Mohney, Peter Schiffer and David Awschalom. This work is supported by ONR, NSF and the NSF-MRSEC program.[4pt] [1] A. L. Balk et al., Phys. Rev.Lett. 107, 077205 (2011).[0pt] [2] N. J. Dellas et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 072505 (2010).[0pt] [3] J. Liang et al., in preparation.

  20. Enhanced nanoscale friction on fluorinated graphene.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sangku; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Jeon, Ki-Joon; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Park, Jeong Young

    2012-12-12

    Atomically thin graphene is an ideal model system for studying nanoscale friction due to its intrinsic two-dimensional (2D) anisotropy. Furthermore, modulating its tribological properties could be an important milestone for graphene-based micro- and nanomechanical devices. Here, we report unexpectedly enhanced nanoscale friction on chemically modified graphene and a relevant theoretical analysis associated with flexural phonons. Ultrahigh vacuum friction force microscopy measurements show that nanoscale friction on the graphene surface increases by a factor of 6 after fluorination of the surface, while the adhesion force is slightly reduced. Density functional theory calculations show that the out-of-plane bending stiffness of graphene increases up to 4-fold after fluorination. Thus, the less compliant F-graphene exhibits more friction. This indicates that the mechanics of tip-to-graphene nanoscale friction would be characteristically different from that of conventional solid-on-solid contact and would be dominated by the out-of-plane bending stiffness of the chemically modified graphene. We propose that damping via flexural phonons could be a main source for frictional energy dissipation in 2D systems such as graphene. PMID:22720882

  1. Benchtop Nanoscale Patterning Using Soft Lithography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meenakshi, Viswanathan; Babayan, Yelizaveta; Odom, Teri W.

    2007-01-01

    This paper outlines several benchtop nanoscale patterning experiments that can be incorporated into undergraduate laboratories or advanced high school chemistry curricula. The experiments, supplemented by an online video lab manual, are based on soft lithographic techniques such as replica molding, micro-molding in capillaries, and micro-contact…

  2. Adsorption Kinetics in Nanoscale Porous Coordination Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Nune, Satish K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; McGrail, Benard Peter; Annapureddy, Harsha V. R.; Dang, Liem X.; Mei, Donghai; Karri, Naveen; Alvine, Kyle J.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Arey, Bruce W.; Dohnalkova, Alice

    2015-10-07

    Nanoscale porous coordination polymers were synthesized using simple wet chemical method. The effect of various polymer surfactants on colloidal stability and shape selectivity was investigated. Our results suggest that the nanoparticles exhibited significantly improved adsorption kinetics compared to bulk crystals due to decreased diffusion path lengths and preferred crystal plane interaction.

  3. Direct temperature mapping of nanoscale plasmonic devices.

    PubMed

    Desiatov, Boris; Goykhman, Ilya; Levy, Uriel

    2014-02-12

    Side by side with the great advantages of plasmonics in nanoscale light confinement, the inevitable ohmic loss results in significant joule heating in plasmonic devices. Therefore, understanding optical-induced heat generation and heat transport in integrated on-chip plasmonic devices is of major importance. Specifically, there is a need for in situ visualization of electromagnetic induced thermal energy distribution with high spatial resolution. This paper studies the heat distribution in silicon plasmonic nanotips. Light is coupled to the plasmonic nanotips from a silicon nanowaveguide that is integrated with the tip on chip. Heat is generated by light absorption in the metal surrounding the silicon nanotip. The steady-state thermal distribution is studied numerically and measured experimentally using the approach of scanning thermal microscopy. It is shown that following the nanoscale heat generation by a 10 mW light source within a silicon photonic waveguide the temperature in the region of the nanotip is increased by ∼ 15 °C compared with the ambient temperature. Furthermore, we also perform a numerical study of the dynamics of the heat transport. Given the nanoscale dimensions of the structure, significant heating is expected to occur within the time frame of picoseconds. The capability of measuring temperature distribution of plasmonic structures at the nanoscale is shown to be a powerful tool and may be used in future applications related to thermal plasmonic applications such as control heating of liquids, thermal photovoltaic, nanochemistry, medicine, heat-assisted magnetic memories, and nanolithography.

  4. Traceable nanoscale measurement at NML-SIRIM

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlan, Ahmad M.; Abdul Hapip, A. I.

    2012-06-29

    The role of national metrology institute (NMI) has always been very crucial in national technology development. One of the key activities of the NMI is to provide traceable measurement in all parameters under the International System of Units (SI). Dimensional measurement where size and shape are two important features investigated, is one of the important area covered by NMIs. To support the national technology development, particularly in manufacturing sectors and emerging technology such nanotechnology, the National Metrology Laboratory, SIRIM Berhad (NML-SIRIM), has embarked on a project to equip Malaysia with state-of-the-art nanoscale measurement facility with the aims of providing traceability of measurement at nanoscale. This paper will look into some of the results from current activities at NML-SIRIM related to measurement at nanoscale particularly on application of atomic force microscope (AFM) and laser based sensor in dimensional measurement. Step height standards of different sizes were measured using AFM and laser-based sensors. These probes are integrated into a long-range nanoscale measuring machine traceable to the international definition of the meter thus ensuring their traceability. Consistency of results obtained by these two methods will be discussed and presented. Factors affecting their measurements as well as their related uncertainty of measurements will also be presented.

  5. Controlling and Measuring Electrochemical Processes at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipson, Albert Leonard

    New applications for electrochemistry require an improved ability to characterize and influence processes at the nanoscale. For instance, the ability to create controllable nanostructures in a scalable manner can enable the wide use of nanotechnology. Furthermore, batteries that are used in electric vehicles and other mobile applications need to be lighter, safer and last longer. The performance of batteries is often controlled by nanoscale phenomena such as the breakdown of the electrolyte into a solid electrolyte interphase layer (SEI). In this thesis, a variety of techniques are discussed that address these deficiencies in our abilities to understand and control nanoscale phenomena. In particular, the use of nanosphere lithography to pattern thin films of aluminum prior to anodization is described, which allows for nearly arbitrary control of the pore size, interpore spacing and aspect ratio. Next, the ability to enhance the lithiation capacity of crystalline SiC via high temperature graphitization is explored. In particular, it is shown that if the SiC is doped and has the native oxide removed that the lithiation capacity of the SiC can be approximately double that of graphite. Characterization of nanoscale electrochemical phenomena can be performed by a wide variety of in situ and ex situ techniques. For instance, the same graphitized SiC can be exploited as a model system that mimics the basal planes of graphite, which is amenable to in situ X-ray characterization. By this method crystalline and textured LiF was found to grow on this surface during cycling along with other amorphous solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) components. Scanning probe microscopy can also be employed to study Li-ion battery electrodes and the formation of SEI. In particular, the development of scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) as a technique for mapping both the topography and local ion current is examined. The application of SICM to study the inhibition of SEI formation via

  6. On the Interfacial Tunneling Current in Nanoscale Plasmonic Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Y. Y.; Zhang, Peng; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2015-11-01

    Recently, electron tunneling between plasmonic resonators is found to support quantum plasmon resonances, which may introduce new regimes in nano-optoelectronics and nonlinear optics. This is a fundamental problem of electron transport in nano-scale. Here, we present a self-consistent model of electron transport in a nano-scale metal-insulator (vacuum)-metal junction, by solving the coupled Schrödinger and Poisson equations. The effects of space charge, exchange-correlation, anode emission, and material properties of the electrodes and insulator are examined in detail. It is found that these effects may modify the current density by orders of magnitude from the widely used Simmons' formula. Transition from the direct tunneling regime to the space-charge-limited regime is demonstrated. For a given junction, simply increasing the driving field to field emission or space-charge-limited regime could significantly reduce the damping of the charge transfer plasmon due to quantum tunneling. This work was supported by AFOSR Grant No. FA9550-14-1-0309.

  7. Nanoscale fullerene compression of an yttrium carbide cluster.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianyuan; Fuhrer, Tim; Fu, Wujun; Ge, Jiechao; Bearden, Daniel W; Dallas, Jerry; Duchamp, James; Walker, Kenneth; Champion, Hunter; Azurmendi, Hugo; Harich, Kim; Dorn, Harry C

    2012-05-23

    The nanoscale parameters of metal clusters and lattices have a crucial influence on the macroscopic properties of materials. Herein, we provide a detailed study on the size and shape of isolated yttrium carbide clusters in different fullerene cages. A family of diyttrium endohedral metallofullerenes with the general formula of Y(2)C(2n) (n = 40-59) are reported. The high field (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and density functional theory (DFT) methods are employed to examine this yttrium carbide cluster in certain family members, Y(2)C(2)@D(5)(450)-C(100), Y(2)C(2)@D(3)(85)-C(92), Y(2)C(2)@C(84), Y(2)C(2)@C(3v)(8)-C(82), and Y(2)C(2)@C(s)(6)-C(82). The results of this study suggest that decreasing the size of a fullerene cage with the same (Y(2)C(2))(4+) cluster results in nanoscale fullerene compression (NFC) from a nearly linear stretched geometry to a constrained "butterfly" structure. The (13)C NMR chemical shift and scalar (1)J(YC) coupling parameters provide a very sensitive measure of this NFC effect for the (Y(2)C(2))(4+) cluster. The crystal structural parameters of a previously reported metal carbide, Y(2)C(3) are directly compared to the (Y(2)C(2))(4+) cluster in the current metallofullerene study.

  8. Laser-induced nanoscale superhydrophobic structures on metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Jagdheesh, R; Pathiraj, B; Karatay, E; Römer, G R B E; Huis in't Veld, A J

    2011-07-01

    The combination of a dual-scale (nano and micro) roughness with an inherent low-surface energy coating material is an essential factor for the development of superhydrophobic surfaces. Ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) machining/structuring is a promising technique for obtaining the dual-scale roughness. Sheets of stainless steel (AISI 304 L SS) and Ti-6Al-4V alloys were laser-machined with ultraviolet laser pulses of 6.7 ps, with different numbers of pulses per irradiated area. The surface energy of the laser-machined samples was reduced via application of a layer of perfluorinated octyltrichlorosilane (FOTS). The influence of the number of pulses per irradiated area on the geometry of the nanostructure and the wetting properties of the laser-machined structures has been studied. The results show that with an increasing number of pulses per irradiated area, the nanoscale structures tend to become predominantly microscale. The top surface of the microscale structures is seen covered with nanoscale protrusions that are most pronounced in Ti-6Al-4V. The laser-machined Ti-6Al-4V surface attained superhydrophobicity, and the improvement in the contact angle was >27% when compared to that of a nontextured surface.

  9. Design Optimization of Radionuclide Nano-Scale Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenfeld, D.W.; Tulenko, J.S.; Wang, J.; Smith, B.

    2004-10-06

    Radioisotopes have been used for power sources in heart pacemakers and space applications dating back to the 50's. Two key properties of radioisotope power sources are high energy density and long half-life compared to chemical batteries. The tritium battery used in heart pacemakers exceeds 500 mW-hr, and is being evaluated by the University of Florida for feasibility as a MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems) power source. Conversion of radioisotope sources into electrical power within the constraints of nano-scale dimensions requires cutting-edge technologies and novel approaches. Some advances evolving in the III-V and II-IV semiconductor families have led to a broader consideration of radioisotopes rather free of radiation damage limitations. Their properties can lead to novel battery configurations designed to convert externally located emissions from a highly radioactive environment. This paper presents results for the analytical computational assisted design and modeling of semiconductor prototype nano-scale radioisotope nuclear batteries from MCNP and EGS programs. The analysis evaluated proposed designs and was used to guide the selection of appropriate geometries, material properties, and specific activities to attain power requirements for the MEMS batteries. Plans utilizing high specific activity radioisotopes were assessed in the investigation of designs employing multiple conversion cells and graded junctions with varying band gap properties. Voltage increases sought by serial combination of VOC s are proposed to overcome some of the limitations of a low power density. The power density is directly dependent on the total active areas.

  10. Computer modelling of nanoscale diffusion phenomena at epitaxial interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michailov, M.; Ranguelov, B.

    2014-05-01

    The present study outlines an important area in the application of computer modelling to interface phenomena. Being relevant to the fundamental physical problem of competing atomic interactions in systems with reduced dimensionality, these phenomena attract special academic attention. On the other hand, from a technological point of view, detailed knowledge of the fine atomic structure of surfaces and interfaces correlates with a large number of practical problems in materials science. Typical examples are formation of nanoscale surface patterns, two-dimensional superlattices, atomic intermixing at an epitaxial interface, atomic transport phenomena, structure and stability of quantum wires on surfaces. We discuss here a variety of diffusion mechanisms that control surface-confined atomic exchange, formation of alloyed atomic stripes and islands, relaxation of pure and alloyed atomic terraces, diffusion of clusters and their stability in an external field. The computational model refines important details of diffusion of adatoms and clusters accounting for the energy barriers at specific atomic sites: smooth domains, terraces, steps and kinks. The diffusion kinetics, integrity and decomposition of atomic islands in an external field are considered in detail and assigned to specific energy regions depending on the cluster stability in mass transport processes. The presented ensemble of diffusion scenarios opens a way for nanoscale surface design towards regular atomic interface patterns with exotic physical features.

  11. Symposium GC: Nanoscale Charge Transport in Excitonic Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bommisetty, Venkat

    2011-06-23

    This paper provides a summary only and table of contents of the sessions. Excitonic solar cells, including all-organic, hybrid organic-inorganic and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), offer strong potential for inexpensive and large-area solar energy conversion. Unlike traditional inorganic semiconductor solar cells, where all the charge generation and collection processes are well understood, these excitonic solar cells contain extremely disordered structures with complex interfaces which results in large variations in nanoscale electronic properties and has a strong influence on carrier generation, transport, dissociation and collection. Detailed understanding of these processes is important for fabrication of highly efficient solar cells. Efforts to improve efficiency are underway at a large number of research groups throughout the world focused on inorganic and organic semiconductors, photonics, photophysics, charge transport, nanoscience, ultrafast spectroscopy, photonics, semiconductor processing, device physics, device structures, interface structure etc. Rapid progress in this multidisciplinary area requires strong synergetic efforts among researchers from diverse backgrounds. Such effort can lead to novel methods for development of new materials with improved photon harvesting and interfacial treatments for improved carrier transport, process optimization to yield ordered nanoscale morphologies with well defined electronic structures.

  12. Nanoscale rippling on polymer surfaces induced by AFM manipulation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nanoscale rippling induced by an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip can be observed after performing one or many scans over the same area on a range of materials, namely ionic salts, metals, and semiconductors. However, it is for the case of polymer films that this phenomenon has been widely explored and studied. Due to the possibility of varying and controlling various parameters, this phenomenon has recently gained a great interest for some technological applications. The advent of AFM cantilevers with integrated heaters has promoted further advances in the field. An alternative method to heating up the tip is based on solvent-assisted viscoplastic deformations, where the ripples develop upon the application of a relatively low force to a solvent-rich film. An ensemble of AFM-based procedures can thus produce nanoripples on polymeric surfaces quickly, efficiently, and with an unprecedented order and control. However, even if nanorippling has been observed in various distinct modes and many theoretical models have been since proposed, a full understanding of this phenomenon is still far from being achieved. This review aims at summarizing the current state of the art in the perspective of achieving control over the rippling process on polymers at a nanoscale level. PMID:26733086

  13. Nanoscale Catalysts for NMR Signal Enhancement by Reversible Exchange

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two types of nanoscale catalysts were created to explore NMR signal enhancement via reversible exchange (SABRE) at the interface between heterogeneous and homogeneous conditions. Nanoparticle and polymer comb variants were synthesized by covalently tethering Ir-based organometallic catalysts to support materials composed of TiO2/PMAA (poly(methacrylic acid)) and PVP (polyvinylpyridine), respectively, and characterized by AAS, NMR, and DLS. Following parahydrogen (pH2) gas delivery to mixtures containing one type of “nano-SABRE” catalyst particle, a target substrate, and ethanol, up to ∼(−)40-fold and ∼(−)7-fold 1H NMR signal enhancements were observed for pyridine substrates using the nanoparticle and polymer comb catalysts, respectively, following transfer to high field (9.4 T). These enhancements appear to result from intact particles and not from any catalyst molecules leaching from their supports; unlike the case with homogeneous SABRE catalysts, high-field (in situ) SABRE effects were generally not observed with the nanoscale catalysts. The potential for separation and reuse of such catalyst particles is also demonstrated. Taken together, these results support the potential utility of rational design at molecular, mesoscopic, and macroscopic/engineering levels for improving SABRE and HET-SABRE (heterogeneous-SABRE) for applications varying from fundamental studies of catalysis to biomedical imaging. PMID:26185545

  14. Nanoscale Silicon as a Catalyst for Graphene Growth: Mechanistic Insight from in Situ Raman Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Share, Keith; Carter, Rachel E.; Nikolaev, Pavel; Hooper, Daylong; Oakes, Landon; Cohn, Adam P.; Rao, Rahul; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Geohegan, David B.; Maruyama, Benji; et al

    2016-06-08

    Nanoscale carbons are typically synthesized by thermal decomposition of a hydrocarbon at the surface of a metal catalyst. Whereas the use of silicon as an alternative to metal catalysts could unlock new techniques to seamlessly couple carbon nanostructures and semiconductor materials, stable carbide formation renders bulk silicon incapable of the precipitation and growth of graphitic structures. In this article, we provide evidence supported by comprehensive in situ Raman experiments that indicates nanoscale grains of silicon in porous silicon (PSi) scaffolds act as catalysts for hydrocarbon decomposition and growth of few-layered graphene at temperatures as low as 700 K. Self-limiting growthmore » kinetics of graphene with activation energies measured between 0.32–0.37 eV elucidates the formation of highly reactive surface-bound Si radicals that aid in the decomposition of hydrocarbons. Nucleation and growth of graphitic layers on PSi exhibits striking similarity to catalytic growth on nickel surfaces, involving temperature dependent surface and subsurface diffusion of carbon. Lastly, this work elucidates how the nanoscale properties of silicon can be exploited to yield catalytic properties distinguished from bulk silicon, opening an important avenue to engineer catalytic interfaces combining the two most technologically important materials for modern applications—silicon and nanoscale carbons.« less

  15. Ascertaining effects of nanoscale polymeric interfaces on competitive protein adsorption at the individual protein level.

    PubMed

    Song, Sheng; Xie, Tian; Ravensbergen, Kristina; Hahm, Jong-in

    2016-02-14

    With the recent development of biomaterials and biodevices with reduced dimensionality, it is critical to comprehend protein adhesion processes to nanoscale solid surfaces, especially those occurring in a competitive adsorption environment. Complex sequences of adhesion events in competitive adsorption involving multicomponent protein systems have been extensively investigated, but our understanding is still limited primarily to macroscopic adhesion onto chemically simple surfaces. We examine the competitive adsorption behavior from a binary protein mixture containing bovine serum albumin and fibrinogen at the single protein level. We subsequently evaluate a series of adsorption and displacement processes occurring on both the macroscopic homopolymer and nanoscopic diblock copolymer surfaces, while systematically varying the protein concentration and incubation time. We identify the similarities and dissimilarities in competitive protein adsorption behavior between the two polymeric surfaces, the former presenting chemical uniformity at macroscale versus the latter exhibiting periodic nanointerfaces of chemically alternating polymeric segments. We then present our novel experimental finding of a large increase in the nanointerface-engaged residence time of the initially bound proteins and further explain the origin of this phenomenon manifested on nanoscale diblock copolymer surfaces. The outcomes of this study may provide timely insight into nanoscale competitive protein adsorption that is much needed in designing bioimplant and tissue engineering materials. In addition, the fundamental understanding gained from this study can be beneficial for the development of highly miniaturized biodevices and biomaterials fabricated by using nanoscale polymeric materials and interfaces.

  16. Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaessgen, Edward H.; Schoeppner, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has successfully developed an electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) process, a rapid metal deposition process that works efficiently with a variety of weldable alloys. The EBF3 process can be used to build a complex, unitized part in a layer-additive fashion, although the more immediate payoff is for use as a manufacturing process for adding details to components fabricated from simplified castings and forgings or plate products. The EBF3 process produces structural metallic parts with strengths comparable to that of wrought product forms and has been demonstrated on aluminum, titanium, and nickel-based alloys to date. The EBF3 process introduces metal wire feedstock into a molten pool that is created and sustained using a focused electron beam in a vacuum environment. Operation in a vacuum ensures a clean process environment and eliminates the need for a consumable shield gas. Advanced metal manufacturing methods such as EBF3 are being explored for fabrication and repair of aerospace structures, offering potential for improvements in cost, weight, and performance to enhance mission success for aircraft, launch vehicles, and spacecraft. Near-term applications of the EBF3 process are most likely to be implemented for cost reduction and lead time reduction through addition of details onto simplified preforms (casting or forging). This is particularly attractive for components with protruding details that would require a significantly large volume of material to be machined away from an oversized forging, offering significant reductions to the buy-to-fly ratio. Future far-term applications promise improved structural efficiency through reduced weight and improved performance by exploiting the layer-additive nature of the EBF3 process to fabricate tailored unitized structures with functionally graded microstructures and compositions.

  17. Surfaces, scales, and synthesis: Scientific reasoning at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bursten, Julia R.

    Philosophers interested in scientific methodology have focused largely on physics, biology, and cognitive science. They have paid considerably less attention to sciences such as chemistry and nanoscience, where not only are the subjects distinct, but the very aims differ: chemistry and nanoscience center around synthesis. Methods associated with synthesis do not fit well with description, explanation, and prediction that so dominate aims in philosophers paradigm sciences. In order to synthesize a substance or material, scientists need different kinds of information than they need to predict, explain, or describe. Consequently, they need different kinds of models and theories. Specifically, chemists need additional models of how reactions will proceed. In practice, this means chemists must model surface structure and behavior, because reactions occur on the surfaces of materials. Physics, and by extension much of philosophy of science, ignores the structure and behavior of surfaces, modeling surfaces only as boundary conditions with virtually no influence on material behavior. Such boundary conditions are not seen as part of the physical laws that govern material behavior, so little consideration has been given to their roles in improving scientists understanding of materials and aiding synthesis. But especially for theories that are used in synthesis, such neglect can lead to catastrophic modeling failures. In fact, as one moves down toward the nanoscale, the very concept of a material surface changes, with the consequence that nanomaterials behave differently than macroscopic materials made up of the same ele-ments. They conduct electricity differently, they appear differently colored, and they can play different roles in chemical reactions. This dissertation develops new philosophical tools to deal with these changes and give an account of theory and model use in the synthetic sciences. Particularly, it addresses the question of how models of materials at the

  18. Exploring fault rocks at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viti, Cecilia

    2010-05-01

    The mechanical properties of a fault are strongly dependent on mineralogy and microstructure of the fault rocks. X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods, combined with optical and scanning electron microscopies (OM and SEM, respectively), are the conventional tools to investigate bulk mineralogy and microstructures of the fault rocks. However, fault rocks are often formed by ultrafine-grained minerals (below 1 - 2 microns, i.e., below the resolution limits of OM and SEM), requiring the use of a high-resolution technique, such as the transmission electron microscopy (TEM), that combines images, diffraction and chemical data, down to the nanoscale. Here, I summarize a few examples of TEM study on fault rocks, obtained from both nature and deformation experiments and covering different kinds of rocks, from carbonates to ultramafics and quartz-feldspatic rocks. In particular: 1) Mineralogical and micro/nanostructural study of fault core samples from the Zuccale low-angle normal fault (Elba Island, Italy; carbonatic protolite). TEM investigation showed large amounts of oriented and interconnected talc lamellae, affected by intense interlayer delamination, giving rise to "sublamellae" down to 10 - 20 nm thick. This peculiar nanotexture suggests easy frictional sliding along an almost infinite number of sliding surfaces, thus explaining the weakness of this fault. 2) Mineralogical and micro/nanostructural characterization of the slip zones produced by high-velocity friction experiments on carbonatic and ultramafic rocks. TEM investigation of the slip zones revealed thermal decomposition (by frictional heating) of the starting minerals (dolomite and antigorite, respectively), and allowed the accurate characterization of the high-temperature, ultrafine-grained mineral assemblages (grain size from a few nm to 200 nm). 3) Mineralogical and micro/nanostructural study of a natural pseudotachylite in quartz-feldspatic rocks (northern Victoria land, Antarctica), showing thermal

  19. Nanoscale interface control for high-performance Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Yuhong; Nam, Seunghoon; Wi, Sungun; Hong, Saeromi; Park, Byungwoo

    2012-04-01

    Li-ion batteries have attracted great interest for the past decades, and now are one of the most important power sources for portable electronic devices, store electricity, hybrid electric vehicles (HEV), etc. However, Li-ion-battery technologies still have several problems related to the electrochemical performance (cycle-life performance and power density) or safety of the active electrode materials. There have been numerous breakthrough challenges to overcome these problems by extensive research. Among the various methods to improve the battery's electrochemical properties, nanoscale coating on active materials and control of the nanostructured morphology were proven as effective approaches over the last decade. In this review paper, enhanced electrochemical properties of the cathode and anode materials via nanoscale interface modification and the respective enhancing mechanisms will be discussed.

  20. Nanoscale metals and semiconductors for the storage of solar energy in chemical bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manthiram, Karthish

    nature of the light absorption mode of non-stoichiometric tungsten oxide, a material which has been explored as a photoanode for the photon driven oxidation of water. Chapter 5 examines the tunability of the light absorption mode of nanoscale copper sulfide, a material which has been explored as a photoabsorber for photovoltaics. An understanding of the light absorption mode of non-stoichiometric oxides and sulfides at the nanoscale is critical for the use of these materials in redox active environments.

  1. Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation. Final report, October 1, 1988--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerstenau, D.W.; Hanson, J.S.; Diao, J.; Harris, G.H.; De, A.; Sotillo, F.; Somasundaran, P.; Harris, C.C.; Vasudevan, T.; Liu, D.; Li, C.; Hu, W.; Zou, Y.; Chen, W.; Choudhry, V.; Shea, S.; Ghosh, A.; Sehgal, R.

    1992-03-01

    The initial goal of the research project was to develop methods of coal surface control in advanced froth flotation to achieve 90% pyritic sulfur rejection, while operating at Btu recoveries above 90% based on run-of-mine quality coal. Moreover, the technology is to concomitantly reduce the ash content significantly (to six percent or less) to provide a high-quality fuel to the boiler (ash removal also increases Btu content, which in turn decreases a coal`s emission potential in terms of lbs SO{sub 2}/million Btu). (VC)

  2. Nanoscale chemical templating of Si nanowires seeded with Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khayyat, Maha M.; Wacaser, Brent A.; Reuter, Mark C.; Ross, Frances M.; Sadana, Devendra K.; Chen, Tze-Chiang

    2013-06-01

    We describe a new approach for achieving controlled spatial placement of VLS-grown nanowires that uses an oxygen-reactive seed material and an oxygen-containing mask. Oxygen-reactive seed materials are of great interest for electronic applications, yet they cannot be patterned using the approaches developed for noble metal seed materials such as Au. This new process, nanoscale chemical templating, takes advantage of the reactivity of the blanket seed layer by depositing it over a patterned oxide that reacts with the seed material to prevent nanowire growth in undesired locations. Here we demonstrate this technique using Al as the seed material and SiO2 as the mask, and we propose that this methodology will be applicable to other reactive metals that are of interest for nanowire growth. The method has other advantages over conventional patterning approaches for certain applications including reducing patterning steps, flexibility in lithographic techniques, and high growth yields. We demonstrate its application with standard and microsphere lithography. We show a high growth yield and fidelity, with no NWs between openings and a majority of openings occupied by a single vertical nanowire, and discuss the dependence of yield on parameters.

  3. Growth of and defect reduction in nanoscale materials

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, Kenneth J.; Mickelson, William E.; Zettl, Alex K.

    2011-01-04

    Methods by which the growth of a nanostructure may be precisely controlled by an electrical current are described here. In one embodiment, an interior nanostructure is grown to a predetermined geometry inside another nanostructure, which serves as a reaction chamber. The growth is effected by a catalytic agent loaded with feedstock for the interior nanostructure. Another embodiment allows a preexisting marginal quality nanostructure to be zone refined into a higher-quality nanostructure by driving a catalytic agent down a controlled length of the nanostructure with an electric current. In both embodiments, the speed of nanostructure formation is adjustable, and the growth may be stopped and restarted at will. The catalytic agent may be doped or undoped to produce semiconductor effects, and the bead may be removed via acid etching.

  4. Light-driven nanoscale plasmonic motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Zentgraf, Thomas; Liu, Yongmin; Bartal, Guy; Zhang, Xiang

    2010-08-01

    When Sir William Crookes developed a four-vaned radiometer, also known as the light-mill, in 1873, it was believed that this device confirmed the existence of linear momentum carried by photons, as predicted by Maxwell's equations. Although Reynolds later proved that the torque on the radiometer was caused by thermal transpiration, researchers continued to search for ways to take advantage of the momentum of photons and to use it for generating rotational forces. The ability to provide rotational force at the nanoscale could open up a range of applications in physics, biology and chemistry, including DNA unfolding and sequencing and nanoelectromechanical systems. Here, we demonstrate a nanoscale plasmonic structure that can, when illuminated with linearly polarized light, generate a rotational force that is capable of rotating a silica microdisk that is 4,000 times larger in volume. Furthermore, we can control the rotation velocity and direction by varying the wavelength of the incident light to excite different plasmonic modes.

  5. Light-driven nanoscale plasmonic motors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming; Zentgraf, Thomas; Liu, Yongmin; Bartal, Guy; Zhang, Xiang

    2010-08-01

    When Sir William Crookes developed a four-vaned radiometer, also known as the light-mill, in 1873, it was believed that this device confirmed the existence of linear momentum carried by photons, as predicted by Maxwell's equations. Although Reynolds later proved that the torque on the radiometer was caused by thermal transpiration, researchers continued to search for ways to take advantage of the momentum of photons and to use it for generating rotational forces. The ability to provide rotational force at the nanoscale could open up a range of applications in physics, biology and chemistry, including DNA unfolding and sequencing and nanoelectromechanical systems. Here, we demonstrate a nanoscale plasmonic structure that can, when illuminated with linearly polarized light, generate a rotational force that is capable of rotating a silica microdisk that is 4,000 times larger in volume. Furthermore, we can control the rotation velocity and direction by varying the wavelength of the incident light to excite different plasmonic modes.

  6. Mapping plasmonic topological states at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinev, Ivan S.; Mukhin, Ivan S.; Slobozhanyuk, Alexey P.; Poddubny, Alexander N.; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.; Samusev, Anton K.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2015-07-01

    We report on the first experimental observation of topological edge states in zigzag chains of plasmonic nanodisks. We demonstrate that such edge states can be selectively excited with the linear polarization of the incident light, and visualize them directly by near-field scanning optical microscopy. Our work provides experimental verification of a novel paradigm for manipulating light at the nanoscale in topologically nontrivial structures.We report on the first experimental observation of topological edge states in zigzag chains of plasmonic nanodisks. We demonstrate that such edge states can be selectively excited with the linear polarization of the incident light, and visualize them directly by near-field scanning optical microscopy. Our work provides experimental verification of a novel paradigm for manipulating light at the nanoscale in topologically nontrivial structures. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00231a

  7. Interfacial Effects on Nanoscale Wrinkling in Gold-Covered Polystyrene.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Craig T; Paci, Jeffrey T; Lee, Won-Kyu; Engel, Clifford J; Odom, Teri W; Schatz, George C

    2016-09-21

    Nanoscale wrinkling on the surfaces of polymer-based materials can be precisely controlled by depositing thin metal films of varying thicknesses. The deposition of these films fundamentally alters the mechanical properties of the substrates in ways that are not simply described using traditional continuum mechanical frameworks. In particular, we find, by modeling within a finite element analysis approach, that the very act of depositing a metal film may alter the Young's modulus of the polymer substrate to depths of up to a few hundred nanometers, creating a modified interfacial skin layer. We find that simulated wrinkle patterns reproduce the experimentally observed features only when the modulus of this surface layer varies by more than ∼500 nm and is described using a sigmoidal gradient multiplier. PMID:27588822

  8. Nanoscale electron transport at the surface of a topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Sebastian; Bobisch, Christian A.

    2016-04-01

    The use of three-dimensional topological insulators for disruptive technologies critically depends on the dissipationless transport of electrons at the surface, because of the suppression of backscattering at defects. However, in real devices, defects are unavoidable and scattering at angles other than 180° is allowed for such materials. Until now, this has been studied indirectly by bulk measurements and by the analysis of the local density of states in close vicinity to defect sites. Here, we directly measure the nanoscale voltage drop caused by the scattering at step edges, which occurs if a lateral current flows along a three-dimensional topological insulator. The experiments were performed using scanning tunnelling potentiometry for thin Bi2Se3 films. So far, the observed voltage drops are small because of large contributions of the bulk to the electronic transport. However, for the use of ideal topological insulating thin films in devices, these contributions would play a significant role.

  9. Nanoscale electron transport at the surface of a topological insulator

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Sebastian; Bobisch, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional topological insulators for disruptive technologies critically depends on the dissipationless transport of electrons at the surface, because of the suppression of backscattering at defects. However, in real devices, defects are unavoidable and scattering at angles other than 180° is allowed for such materials. Until now, this has been studied indirectly by bulk measurements and by the analysis of the local density of states in close vicinity to defect sites. Here, we directly measure the nanoscale voltage drop caused by the scattering at step edges, which occurs if a lateral current flows along a three-dimensional topological insulator. The experiments were performed using scanning tunnelling potentiometry for thin Bi2Se3 films. So far, the observed voltage drops are small because of large contributions of the bulk to the electronic transport. However, for the use of ideal topological insulating thin films in devices, these contributions would play a significant role. PMID:27098939

  10. Hydrogen Bond Nanoscale Networks Showing Switchable Transport Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yong; Hui, Jun-Feng; Wang, Peng-Peng; Xiang, Guo-Lei; Xu, Biao; Hu, Shi; Zhu, Wan-Cheng; Lü, Xing-Qiang; Zhuang, Jing; Wang, Xun

    2012-08-01

    Hydrogen bond is a typical noncovalent bond with its strength only one-tenth of a general covalent bond. Because of its easiness to fracture and re-formation, materials based on hydrogen bonds can enable a reversible behavior in their assembly and other properties, which supplies advantages in fabrication and recyclability. In this paper, hydrogen bond nanoscale networks have been utilized to separate water and oil in macroscale. This is realized upon using nanowire macro-membranes with pore sizes ~tens of nanometers, which can form hydrogen bonds with the water molecules on the surfaces. It is also found that the gradual replacement of the water by ethanol molecules can endow this film tunable transport properties. It is proposed that a hydrogen bond network in the membrane is responsible for this switching effect. Significant application potential is demonstrated by the successful separation of oil and water, especially in the emulsion forms.

  11. Method and system for nanoscale plasma processing of objects

    DOEpatents

    Oehrlein, Gottlieb S.; Hua, Xuefeng; Stolz, Christian

    2008-12-30

    A plasma processing system includes a source of plasma, a substrate and a shutter positioned in close proximity to the substrate. The substrate/shutter relative disposition is changed for precise control of substrate/plasma interaction. This way, the substrate interacts only with a fully established, stable plasma for short times required for nanoscale processing of materials. The shutter includes an opening of a predetermined width, and preferably is patterned to form an array of slits with dimensions that are smaller than the Debye screening length. This enables control of the substrate/plasma interaction time while avoiding the ion bombardment of the substrate in an undesirable fashion. The relative disposition between the shutter and the substrate can be made either by moving the shutter or by moving the substrate.

  12. The mechanical behavior of nanoscale metallic multilayers: A survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Q.; Xie, J. Y.; Wang, F.; Huang, P.; Xu, K. W.; Lu, T. J.

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical behavior of nanoscale metallic multilayers (NMMs) has attracted much attention from both scientific and practical views. Compared with their monolithic counterparts, the large number of interfaces existing in the NMMs dictates the unique behavior of this special class of structural composite materials. While there have been a number of reviews on the mechanical mechanism of microlaminates, the rapid development of nanotechnology brought a pressing need for an overview focusing exclusively on a property-based definition of the NMMs, especially their size-dependent microstructure and mechanical performance. This article attempts to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date review on the microstructure, mechanical property and plastic deformation physics of NMMs. We hope this review could accomplish two purposes: (1) introducing the basic concepts of scaling and dimensional analysis to scientists and engineers working on NMM systems, and (2) providing a better understanding of interface behavior and the exceptional qualities the interfaces in NMMs display at atomic scale.

  13. Interfacial Effects on Nanoscale Wrinkling in Gold-Covered Polystyrene.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Craig T; Paci, Jeffrey T; Lee, Won-Kyu; Engel, Clifford J; Odom, Teri W; Schatz, George C

    2016-09-21

    Nanoscale wrinkling on the surfaces of polymer-based materials can be precisely controlled by depositing thin metal films of varying thicknesses. The deposition of these films fundamentally alters the mechanical properties of the substrates in ways that are not simply described using traditional continuum mechanical frameworks. In particular, we find, by modeling within a finite element analysis approach, that the very act of depositing a metal film may alter the Young's modulus of the polymer substrate to depths of up to a few hundred nanometers, creating a modified interfacial skin layer. We find that simulated wrinkle patterns reproduce the experimentally observed features only when the modulus of this surface layer varies by more than ∼500 nm and is described using a sigmoidal gradient multiplier.

  14. Spin dynamics simulations for a nanoscale Heisenberg antiferromagnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Zhuofei; Landau, D. P.; Brown, G.; Stocks, G. M.

    2010-03-01

    Thermoinduced magnetization(TiM) is a novel response which was predicted to occur in nanoscale antiferromagnetic materials. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations footnotetextG. Brown, A. Janotti, M. Eisenbach, and G. M. Stocks, Phys.Rev.B 72, 140405(2005) have shown that TiM is an intrinsic property of the antiferromagnetic classical Heisenberg model below the Neel temperature. To obtain a fundamental understanding of TiM, spin dynamics(SD) simulations are performed to study the spin wave behavior, which seems to be the cause of TiM. A classical Heisenberg model with an antiferromagnetic nearest-neighbor exchange interaction and uniaxial single-site anisotropy is studied. Simple-cubic lattices with free boundary conditions are used. We employed the fast spin dynamics algorithms with fourth-order Suzuki-Trotter decompositions of the exponential operator. Additional small excitation peaks due to surface effects are found in transverse S(q,w).

  15. Transfer molding of nanoscale oxides using water-soluble templates.

    PubMed

    Bass, John D; Schaper, Charles D; Rettner, Charles T; Arellano, Noel; Alharbi, Fahhad H; Miller, Robert D; Kim, Ho-Cheol

    2011-05-24

    We report a facile method for creating nanoscopic oxide structures over large areas that is capable of producing high aspect ratio nanoscale structures with feature sizes below 50 nm. A variety of nanostructured oxides including TiO(2), SnO(2) and organosilicates are formed using sol-gel and nanoparticle precursors by way of molding with water-soluble polymeric templates generated from silicon masters. Sequential stacking techniques are developed that generate unique 3-dimensional nanostructures with combinatorially mixed geometries, scales, and materials. Applicable to a variety of substrates, this scalable method allows access to a broad range of new thin film morphologies for applications in devices, catalysts, and functional surface coatings. PMID:21469708

  16. Methods and devices for fabricating three-dimensional nanoscale structures

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John A.; Jeon, Seokwoo; Park, Jangung

    2010-04-27

    The present invention provides methods and devices for fabricating 3D structures and patterns of 3D structures on substrate surfaces, including symmetrical and asymmetrical patterns of 3D structures. Methods of the present invention provide a means of fabricating 3D structures having accurately selected physical dimensions, including lateral and vertical dimensions ranging from 10s of nanometers to 1000s of nanometers. In one aspect, methods are provided using a mask element comprising a conformable, elastomeric phase mask capable of establishing conformal contact with a radiation sensitive material undergoing photoprocessing. In another aspect, the temporal and/or spatial coherence of electromagnetic radiation using for photoprocessing is selected to fabricate complex structures having nanoscale features that do not extend entirely through the thickness of the structure fabricated.

  17. Nanoscale strain engineering of graphene and graphene-based devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, N.-C.; Hsu, C.-C.; Teague, M. L.; Wang, J.-Q.; Boyd, D. A.; Chen, C.-C.

    2016-06-01

    Structural distortions in nano-materials can induce dramatic changes in their electronic properties. This situation is well manifested in graphene, a two-dimensional honeycomb structure of carbon atoms with only one atomic layer thickness. In particular, strained graphene can result in both charging effects and pseudo-magnetic fields, so that controlled strain on a perfect graphene lattice can be tailored to yield desirable electronic properties. Here, we describe the theoretical foundation for strain-engineering of the electronic properties of graphene, and then provide experimental evidence for strain-induced pseudo-magnetic fields and charging effects in monolayer graphene. We further demonstrate the feasibility of nano-scale strain engineering for graphene-based devices by means of theoretical simulations and nano-fabrication technology.

  18. Nanoconstruction by welding individual metallic nanowires together using nanoscale solder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Y.; Cullis, A. G.; Inkson, B. J.

    2010-07-01

    This work presents a new bottom-up nanowelding technique enabling building blocks to be assembled and welded together into complex 3D nanostructures using nanovolumes of metal solder. The building blocks of gold nanowires, (Co72Pt28/Pt)n multilayer nanowires, and nanosolder Sn99Au1 alloy nanowires were successfully fabricated by a template technique. Individual metallic nanowires were picked up and assembled together. Conductive nanocircuits were then welded together using similar or dissimilar nanosolder material. At the weld sites, nanoscale volumes of a chosen metal are deposited using nanosolder of a sacrificial nanowire, which ensures that the nanoobjects to be bonded retain their structural integrity. The whole nanowelding process is clean, controllable and reliable, and ensures both mechanically strong and electrically conductive contacts.

  19. Neural interfaces at the nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Pancrazio, Joseph J

    2008-01-01

    Bioelectrical neural interfaces provide a means of recording the activity from the nervous system and delivering therapeutic stimulation to restore neurological function lost during disease or injury. Although neural interfaces have reached clinical utility, reducing the size of the bioelectrical interface to minimize damage to neural tissue and maximize selectivity has proven problematic. Nanotechnology may offer a means of interfacing with the nervous system with unprecedented specificity. Emergent applications of nanotechnology to neuroscience include molecular imaging, drug delivery across the BBB, scaffolds for neural regeneration and bioelectrical interfaces. In particular, carbon nanotubes offer the promises of material stability and low electrical impedance at physical dimensions that could have a significant impact on the future on neural interfaces. The purpose of this review is to present recent advances in carbon nanotube-based bioelectrical interfaces for the nervous system and discuss research challenges and opportunities. PMID:19025456

  20. Buckling instabilities of nanoscale polymer films and colloidal particle layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurmessa, Bekele Jemama

    Nanoscale polymer films have numerous potential applications such as protective coatings, flexible electronics, energy harvesting devices, and drug delivery systems. For realization of these potential applications, the mechanical properties of these materials and the underlying physics need to be understood. This dissertation focuses on understanding the responses of nanoscale films to mechanical deformations. In this regard, an elastic instability was exploited to locally bend and impart a local tensile stress in a nanoscale polystyrene film, and directly measure the resulting residual stress caused by the bending. Our results indicate that the onset of permanent deformation for thin polystyrene films is an order of magnitude smaller than what has been reported for the bulk value. In addition, not only is the onset of failure strain found to be small but also it increases with increased confinement. Using similar processing techniques, the yield strain of a more complex material---poly(styrene-b-divinylpyridine)---was studied. Similar to the polystyrene films, failure in polystyrene-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine) is also initiated at extremely low strain and is influenced by thin film confinement effects. In addition, we have demonstrated that internal nanostructure of self-assembled polystyrene-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine) affects the onset of failure strain. Having introduced an idealized heterogeneity to a sample through ultraviolet/ozone treatment, we have created samples ranging from continuous thin films to sets of isolated plates. We demonstrated that, when subjected to mechanical deformation, the unbounded plates form isotropic undulations that persist even beyond high strain. In contrast, isolated plates undergo non-isotropic undulations in the range of high strains. The non-isotropic undulation shape has been described through a simple numerical modeling subjected to controlled boundary conditions. The agreement between experiment and numerical modeling is

  1. Nanoscale photonics using coupled hybrid plasmonic architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Charles; Su, Yiwen; Helmy, Amr S.

    2016-04-01

    Plasmonic waveguides, which support surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) propagating along metal-dielectric interfaces, offer strong field confinement and are ideal for the design of integrated nano-scale photonic devices. However, due to free-carrier absorption in the metal, the enhanced mode confinement inevitably entails an increase in the waveguide loss. This lowers the device figure-of-merit achievable with passive plasmonic components and in turn hinders the performance of active plasmonic components such as optical modulators.

  2. Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Hart, Bradley R.; Talley, Chad E.

    2008-06-10

    Nanoscale molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) having polymer features wherein the size, shape and position are predetermined can be fabricated using an xy piezo stage mounted on an inverted microscope and a laser. Using an AMF controller, a solution containing polymer precursors and a photo initiator are positioned on the xy piezo and hit with a laser beam. The thickness of the polymeric features can be varied from a few nanometers to over a micron.

  3. Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology Research Directions

    SciTech Connect

    Lowndes, D. H.; Alivisatos, A. P.; Alper, M.; Averback, R. S.; Jacob Barhen, J.; Eastman, J. A.; Imre, D.; Lowndes, D. H.; McNulty, I.; Michalske, T. A.; Ho, K-M; Nozik, A. J.; Russell, T. P.; Valentin, R. A.; Welch, D. O.; Barhen, J.; Agnew, S. R.; Bellon, P.; Blair, J.; Boatner, L. A.; Braiman, Y.; Budai, J. D.; Crabtree, G. W.; Feldman, L. C.; Flynn, C. P.; Geohegan, D. B.; George, E. P.; Greenbaum, E.; Grigoropoulos, C.; Haynes, T. E.; Heberlein, J.; Hichman, J.; Holland, O. W.; Honda, S.; Horton, J. A.; Hu, M. Z.-C.; Jesson, D. E.; Joy, D. C.; Krauss, A.; Kwok, W.-K.; Larson, B. C.; Larson, D. J.; Likharev, K.; Liu, C. T.; Majumdar, A.; Maziasz, P. J.; Meldrum, A.; Miller, J. C.; Modine, F. A.; Pennycook, S. J.; Pharr, G. M.; Phillpot, S.; Price, D. L.; Protopopescu, V.; Poker, D. B.; Pui, D.; Ramsey, J. M.; Rao, N.; Reichl, L.; Roberto, J.; Saboungi, M-L; Simpson, M.; Strieffer, S.; Thundat, T.; Wambsganss, M.; Wendleken, J.; White, C. W.; Wilemski, G.; Withrow, S. P.; Wolf, D.; Zhu, J. H.; Zuhr, R. A.; Zunger, A.; Lowe, S.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes important future research directions in nanoscale science, engineering and technology. It was prepared in connection with an anticipated national research initiative on nanotechnology for the twenty-first century. The research directions described are not expected to be inclusive but illustrate the wide range of research opportunities and challenges that could be undertaken through the national laboratories and their major national scientific user facilities with the support of universities and industry.

  4. EDITORIAL: Big science at the nanoscale Big science at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Mark

    2009-10-01

    In 1990, the journal Nanotechnology was the first academic publication dedicated to disseminating the results of research in what was then a new field of scientific endeavour. To celebrate the 20th volume of Nanotechnology, we are publishing a special issue of top research papers covering all aspects of this multidisciplinary science, including biology, electronics and photonics, quantum phenomena, sensing and actuating, patterning and fabrication, material synthesis and the properties of nanomaterials. In the early 1980s, scanning probe microscopes brought the concepts of matter and interactions at the nanoscale into visual reality, and hastened a flurry of activity in the burgeoning new field of nanoscience. Twenty years on and nanotechnology has truly come of age. The ramifications are pervasive throughout daily life in communication, health care and entertainment technology. For example, DVDs have now consigned videotapes to the ark and mobile phones are as prevalent as house keys, and these technologies already look set to be superseded by internet phones and Blu-Ray discs. Nanotechnology has been in the unique position of following the explosive growth of this discipline from its outset. The surge of activity in the field is notable in the number of papers published by the journal each year, which has skyrocketed. The journal is now published weekly, publishing over 1400 articles a year. What is more, the quality of these articles is also constantly improving; the average number of citations to articles within two years of publication, quantified by the ISI impact factor, continues to increase every year. The rate of activity in the field shows no signs of slowing down, as is evident from the wealth of great research published each week. The aim of the 20th volume special issue is to present some of the very best and most recent research in many of the wide-ranging fields covered by the journal, a celebration of the present state of play in nanotechnology and

  5. Resonant Effects in Nanoscale Bowtie Apertures.

    PubMed

    Ding, Li; Qin, Jin; Guo, Songpo; Liu, Tao; Kinzel, Edward; Wang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale bowtie aperture antennas can be used to focus light well below the diffraction limit with extremely high transmission efficiencies. This paper studies the spectral dependence of the transmission through nanoscale bowtie apertures defined in a silver film. A realistic bowtie aperture is numerically modeled using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. Results show that the transmission spectrum is dominated by Fabry-Pérot (F-P) waveguide modes and plasmonic modes. The F-P resonance is sensitive to the thickness of the film and the plasmonic resonant mode is closely related to the gap distance of the bowtie aperture. Both characteristics significantly affect the transmission spectrum. To verify these numerical results, bowtie apertures are FIB milled in a silver film. Experimental transmission measurements agree with simulation data. Based on this result, nanoscale bowtie apertures can be optimized to realize deep sub-wavelength confinement with high transmission efficiency with applications to nanolithography, data storage, and bio-chemical sensing. PMID:27250995

  6. Resonant Effects in Nanoscale Bowtie Apertures

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Li; Qin, Jin; Guo, Songpo; Liu, Tao; Kinzel, Edward; Wang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale bowtie aperture antennas can be used to focus light well below the diffraction limit with extremely high transmission efficiencies. This paper studies the spectral dependence of the transmission through nanoscale bowtie apertures defined in a silver film. A realistic bowtie aperture is numerically modeled using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. Results show that the transmission spectrum is dominated by Fabry-Pérot (F-P) waveguide modes and plasmonic modes. The F-P resonance is sensitive to the thickness of the film and the plasmonic resonant mode is closely related to the gap distance of the bowtie aperture. Both characteristics significantly affect the transmission spectrum. To verify these numerical results, bowtie apertures are FIB milled in a silver film. Experimental transmission measurements agree with simulation data. Based on this result, nanoscale bowtie apertures can be optimized to realize deep sub-wavelength confinement with high transmission efficiency with applications to nanolithography, data storage, and bio-chemical sensing. PMID:27250995

  7. Static electric field enhancement in nanoscale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepetit, Bruno; Lemoine, Didier; Márquez-Mijares, Maykel

    2016-08-01

    We study the effect of local atomic- and nano-scale protrusions on field emission and, in particular, on the local field enhancement which plays a key role as known from the Fowler-Nordheim model of electronic emission. We study atomic size defects which consist of right angle steps forming an infinite length staircase on a tungsten surface. This structure is embedded in a 1 GV/m ambient electrostatic field. We perform calculations based upon density functional theory in order to characterize the total and induced electronic densities as well as the local electrostatic fields taking into account the detailed atomic structure of the metal. We show how the results must be processed to become comparable with those of a simple homogeneous tungsten sheet electrostatic model. We also describe an innovative procedure to extrapolate our results to nanoscale defects of larger sizes, which relies on the microscopic findings to guide, tune, and improve the homogeneous metal model, thus gaining predictive power. Furthermore, we evidence analytical power laws for the field enhancement characterization. The main physics-wise outcome of this analysis is that limited field enhancement is to be expected from atomic- and nano-scale defects.

  8. Characterization of Nano-scale Aluminum Oxide Transport through Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norwood, S.; Reynolds, M.; Miao, Z.; Brusseau, M. L.; Johnson, G. R.

    2011-12-01

    Colloidal material (including that in the nanoparticle size range) is naturally present in most subsurface environments. Mobilization of these colloidal materials via particle disaggregation may occur through abrupt changes in flow rate and/or via chemical perturbations, such as rapid changes in ionic strength or solution pH. While concentrations of natural colloidal materials in the subsurface are typically small, those concentrations may be greatly increased at contaminated sites such as following the application of metal oxides for groundwater remediation efforts. Additionally, while land application of biosolids has become common practice in the United States as an alternative to industrial fertilizers, biosolids have been shown to contain a significant fraction of organic and inorganic nano-scale colloidal materials such as oxides of iron, titanium, and aluminum. Given their reactivity and small size, there are many questions concerning the potential migration of nano-scale colloidal materials through the soil column and their potential participation in the facilitated transport of contaminants, such as heavy metals and emerging pollutants. The purpose of this study was to investigate the transport behavior of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) nanoparticles through porous media. The impacts of pH, ionic strength, pore-water velocity (i.e., residence time), and aqueous-phase concentration on transport was investigated. All experiments were conducted with large injection pulses to fully characterize the impact of long-term retention and transport behavior relevant for natural systems wherein multiple retention processes may be operative. The results indicate that the observed nonideal transport behavior of the nano-scale colloids is influenced by multiple retention mechanisms/processes. Given the ubiquitous nature of these nano-scale colloids in the environment, a clear understanding of their transport and fate is necessary in further resolving the potential for

  9. Surface-controlled contact printing for nanowire device fabrication on a large scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roßkopf, D.; Strehle, S.

    2016-05-01

    Assembly strategies for functional nanowire devices that merge bottom-up and top-down technologies have been debated for over a decade. Although several breakthroughs have been reported, nanowire device fabrication techniques remain generally incompatible with large-scale and high-yield top-down microelectronics manufacturing. Strategies enabling the controlled transfer of nanowires from the growth substrate to pre-defined locations on a target surface would help to address this challenge. Based on the promising concept of mechanical nanowire transfer, we developed the technique of surface-controlled contact printing, which is based purely on dry friction between a nanowire and a target surface. Surface features, so-called catchers, alter the local frictional force or deposition probability and allow the positioning of single nanowires. Surface-controlled contact printing extends the current scope of nanowire alignment strategies with the intention to facilitate efficient nanowire device fabrication. This is demonstrated by the simultaneous assembly of 36 nanowire resistors within a chip area of greater than 2 cm2 aided only by mask-assisted photolithography.

  10. Nanoscale β-nuclear magnetic resonance depth imaging of topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Koumoulis, Dimitrios; Morris, Gerald D; He, Liang; Kou, Xufeng; King, Danny; Wang, Dong; Hossain, Masrur D; Wang, Kang L; Fiete, Gregory A; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Bouchard, Louis-S

    2015-07-14

    Considerable evidence suggests that variations in the properties of topological insulators (TIs) at the nanoscale and at interfaces can strongly affect the physics of topological materials. Therefore, a detailed understanding of surface states and interface coupling is crucial to the search for and applications of new topological phases of matter. Currently, no methods can provide depth profiling near surfaces or at interfaces of topologically inequivalent materials. Such a method could advance the study of interactions. Herein, we present a noninvasive depth-profiling technique based on β-detected NMR (β-NMR) spectroscopy of radioactive (8)Li(+) ions that can provide "one-dimensional imaging" in films of fixed thickness and generates nanoscale views of the electronic wavefunctions and magnetic order at topological surfaces and interfaces. By mapping the (8)Li nuclear resonance near the surface and 10-nm deep into the bulk of pure and Cr-doped bismuth antimony telluride films, we provide signatures related to the TI properties and their topological nontrivial characteristics that affect the electron-nuclear hyperfine field, the metallic shift, and magnetic order. These nanoscale variations in β-NMR parameters reflect the unconventional properties of the topological materials under study, and understanding the role of heterogeneities is expected to lead to the discovery of novel phenomena involving quantum materials.

  11. Nanoscale β-nuclear magnetic resonance depth imaging of topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Koumoulis, Dimitrios; Morris, Gerald D; He, Liang; Kou, Xufeng; King, Danny; Wang, Dong; Hossain, Masrur D; Wang, Kang L; Fiete, Gregory A; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Bouchard, Louis-S

    2015-07-14

    Considerable evidence suggests that variations in the properties of topological insulators (TIs) at the nanoscale and at interfaces can strongly affect the physics of topological materials. Therefore, a detailed understanding of surface states and interface coupling is crucial to the search for and applications of new topological phases of matter. Currently, no methods can provide depth profiling near surfaces or at interfaces of topologically inequivalent materials. Such a method could advance the study of interactions. Herein, we present a noninvasive depth-profiling technique based on β-detected NMR (β-NMR) spectroscopy of radioactive (8)Li(+) ions that can provide "one-dimensional imaging" in films of fixed thickness and generates nanoscale views of the electronic wavefunctions and magnetic order at topological surfaces and interfaces. By mapping the (8)Li nuclear resonance near the surface and 10-nm deep into the bulk of pure and Cr-doped bismuth antimony telluride films, we provide signatures related to the TI properties and their topological nontrivial characteristics that affect the electron-nuclear hyperfine field, the metallic shift, and magnetic order. These nanoscale variations in β-NMR parameters reflect the unconventional properties of the topological materials under study, and understanding the role of heterogeneities is expected to lead to the discovery of novel phenomena involving quantum materials. PMID:26124141

  12. Nanoscale β-nuclear magnetic resonance depth imaging of topological insulators

    PubMed Central

    Koumoulis, Dimitrios; Morris, Gerald D.; He, Liang; Kou, Xufeng; King, Danny; Wang, Dong; Hossain, Masrur D.; Wang, Kang L.; Fiete, Gregory A.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Bouchard, Louis-S.

    2015-01-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that variations in the properties of topological insulators (TIs) at the nanoscale and at interfaces can strongly affect the physics of topological materials. Therefore, a detailed understanding of surface states and interface coupling is crucial to the search for and applications of new topological phases of matter. Currently, no methods can provide depth profiling near surfaces or at interfaces of topologically inequivalent materials. Such a method could advance the study of interactions. Herein, we present a noninvasive depth-profiling technique based on β-detected NMR (β-NMR) spectroscopy of radioactive 8Li+ ions that can provide “one-dimensional imaging” in films of fixed thickness and generates nanoscale views of the electronic wavefunctions and magnetic order at topological surfaces and interfaces. By mapping the 8Li nuclear resonance near the surface and 10-nm deep into the bulk of pure and Cr-doped bismuth antimony telluride films, we provide signatures related to the TI properties and their topological nontrivial characteristics that affect the electron–nuclear hyperfine field, the metallic shift, and magnetic order. These nanoscale variations in β-NMR parameters reflect the unconventional properties of the topological materials under study, and understanding the role of heterogeneities is expected to lead to the discovery of novel phenomena involving quantum materials. PMID:26124141

  13. Quantitative nanoscale electrostatics of viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernando-Pérez, M.; Cartagena-Rivera, A. X.; Lošdorfer Božič, A.; Carrillo, P. J. P.; San Martín, C.; Mateu, M. G.; Raman, A.; Podgornik, R.; de Pablo, P. J.

    2015-10-01

    Electrostatics is one of the fundamental driving forces of the interaction between biomolecules in solution. In particular, the recognition events between viruses and host cells are dominated by both specific and non-specific interactions and the electric charge of viral particles determines the electrostatic force component of the latter. Here we probe the charge of individual viruses in liquid milieu by measuring the electrostatic force between a viral particle and the Atomic Force Microscope tip. The force spectroscopy data of co-adsorbed φ29 bacteriophage proheads and mature virions, adenovirus and minute virus of mice capsids is utilized for obtaining the corresponding density of charge for each virus. The systematic differences of the density of charge between the viral particles are consistent with the theoretical predictions obtained from X-ray structural data. Our results show that the density of charge is a distinguishing characteristic of each virus, depending crucially on the nature of the viral capsid and the presence/absence of the genetic material.Electrostatics is one of the fundamental driving forces of the interaction between biomolecules in solution. In particular, the recognition events between viruses and host cells are dominated by both specific and non-specific interactions and the electric charge of viral particles determines the electrostatic force component of the latter. Here we probe the charge of individual viruses in liquid milieu by measuring the electrostatic force between a viral particle and the Atomic Force Microscope tip. The force spectroscopy data of co-adsorbed φ29 bacteriophage proheads and mature virions, adenovirus and minute virus of mice capsids is utilized for obtaining the corresponding density of charge for each virus. The systematic differences of the density of charge between the viral particles are consistent with the theoretical predictions obtained from X-ray structural data. Our results show that the density of

  14. Nanoscale imaging of lithium ion distribution during in situ operation of battery electrode and electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Holtz, Megan E; Yu, Yingchao; Gunceler, Deniz; Gao, Jie; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Schwarz, Kathleen A; Arias, Tomás A; Abruña, Héctor D; Muller, David A

    2014-03-12

    A major challenge in the development of new battery materials is understanding their fundamental mechanisms of operation and degradation. Their microscopically inhomogeneous nature calls for characterization tools that provide operando and localized information from individual grains and particles. Here, we describe an approach that enables imaging the nanoscale distribution of ions during electrochemical charging of a battery in a transmission electron microscope liquid flow cell. We use valence energy-loss spectroscopy to track both solvated and intercalated ions, with electronic structure fingerprints of the solvated ions identified using an ab initio nonlinear response theory. Equipped with the new electrochemical cell holder, nanoscale spectroscopy and theory, we have been able to determine the lithiation state of a LiFePO4 electrode and surrounding aqueous electrolyte in real time with nanoscale resolution during electrochemical charge and discharge. We follow lithium transfer between electrode and electrolyte and image charging dynamics in the cathode. We observe competing delithiation mechanisms such as core-shell and anisotropic growth occurring in parallel for different particles under the same conditions. This technique represents a general approach for the operando nanoscale imaging of electrochemically active ions in the electrode and electrolyte in a wide range of electrical energy storage systems.

  15. Effect of nanoscale particles incorporation on microhardness of polymers for oral prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Zuccolotti, Bruna Carolina Rossatti; Moreno, Amalia; Vechiato Filho, Aljomar José; Paulini, Marcela Borghi; Santos, Daniela Micheline Dos

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the influence of the incorporation of pigments on surface hardness of four acrylic resins subjected to thermocycling and analyze their elemental composition using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Materials and Methods: Twenty-one discs of each resin were fabricated, whereas seven had no additive, seven had 3% of nanoscale pigments and last seven had 10% of them. The percentage was obtained by measuring the total weight of each resin disc. Besides, seven discs composed by only nanoscale pigments were also fabricated, totalizing 91 discs. The pigment was weighed by using an analytical balance (BEL Analytical Equipment, SP, Brazil). The surface hardness was measured through a hardness tester machine before and after thermocycling (5–55°C, for 2000 cycles). Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (P < 0.05). The chemical composition of the discs composed only by nanoscale pigments was analyzed with EDS test. Results: Hardness of all resins decreased after thermocycling. The lowest values were observed on the discs with 3% of nanoscale pigments and discs fabricated only with them. EDS showed the presence of titanium dioxide. Conclusion: Discs with 7% of pigments (after thermocycling) showed higher hardness values.

  16. Schottky Barrier Mapping to Nanoscale Dimensions Utilizing Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labella, Vincent; Balsano, Robert; Durcan, Chris; Nolting, Wes

    The Schottky barrier is the electrostatic barrier between a metal and a semiconductor that results in rectification and is found in many types of devices such as source drain contacts to sub 20-nm-node transistors. Nanoscale fluctuations in the Schottky barrier height can occur due to variations in bonding, compositional fluctuations in the materials, and the presence of defects. Measuring and mapping these electrostatic fluctuations to nanoscale dimensions can be achieved with ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM) an STM based technique. This presentation will demonstrate how the Schottky barrier height can be mapped to nanoscale dimensions using BEEM at 77K and under ultra-high vacuum. The STM tip is positioned on a regularly spaced grid and BEEM spectra are acquired from which the barrier height can be extracted. Maps and histograms can be generated by measuring and fitting thousands of these spectra. These maps provide detailed insight into the electrostatic fluctuations occurring at the buried interface with nanoscale resolution that cannot be accomplished with other bulk measurements.

  17. Effect of nanoscale particles incorporation on microhardness of polymers for oral prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Zuccolotti, Bruna Carolina Rossatti; Moreno, Amalia; Vechiato Filho, Aljomar José; Paulini, Marcela Borghi; Santos, Daniela Micheline Dos

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the influence of the incorporation of pigments on surface hardness of four acrylic resins subjected to thermocycling and analyze their elemental composition using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Materials and Methods: Twenty-one discs of each resin were fabricated, whereas seven had no additive, seven had 3% of nanoscale pigments and last seven had 10% of them. The percentage was obtained by measuring the total weight of each resin disc. Besides, seven discs composed by only nanoscale pigments were also fabricated, totalizing 91 discs. The pigment was weighed by using an analytical balance (BEL Analytical Equipment, SP, Brazil). The surface hardness was measured through a hardness tester machine before and after thermocycling (5–55°C, for 2000 cycles). Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (P < 0.05). The chemical composition of the discs composed only by nanoscale pigments was analyzed with EDS test. Results: Hardness of all resins decreased after thermocycling. The lowest values were observed on the discs with 3% of nanoscale pigments and discs fabricated only with them. EDS showed the presence of titanium dioxide. Conclusion: Discs with 7% of pigments (after thermocycling) showed higher hardness values. PMID:27630492

  18. "Contact" of nanoscale stiff films.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fut K; Zhang, Wei; Han, Yougun; Yoffe, Serge; Cho, Yungchi; Zhao, Boxin

    2012-06-26

    We investigated the contact behaviors of a nanoscopic stiff thin film bonded to a compliant substrate and derived an analytical solution for determining the elastic modulus of thin films. Microscopic contact deformations of the gold and polydopamine thin films (<200 nm) coated on polydimethylsiloxane elastomers were measured by indenting a soft tip and analyzed in the framework of the classical plate theory and Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) contact mechanics. The analysis of this thin film contact mechanics focused on the bending and stretching resistance of thin films and is fundamentally different from conventional indentation measurements where the focus is on the fracture and compression of the films. The analytical solution of the elastic modulus of nanoscopic thin films was validated experimentally using 50 and 100 nm gold thin films coated on polydimethylsiloxane elastomers. The technical application of this analysis was further demonstrated by measuring the elastic modulus of thin films of polydopamine, a recently discovered biomimetic universal coating material. Furthermore, the method presented here is able to quantify the contact behaviors of nanoscopic thin films, effectively providing fundamental design parameters, the elastic modulus, and the work of adhesion, crucial for transferring them effectively into practical applications. PMID:22616836

  19. Biomimetic Nanoscale Reactors and Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Mattias; Davidson, Max; Karlsson, Roger; Karlsson, Anders; Bergenholtz, Johan; Konkoli, Zoran; Jesorka, Aldo; Lobovkina, Tatsiana; Hurtig, Johan; Voinova, Marina; Orwar, Owe

    2004-01-01

    Methods based on self-assembly, self-organization, and forced shape transformations to form synthetic or semisynthetic enclosed lipid bilayer structures with several properties similar to biological nanocompartments are reviewed. The procedures offer unconventional micro- and nanofabrication routes to yield complex soft-matter devices for a variety of applications for example, in physical chemistry and nanotechnology. In particular, we describe novel micromanipulation methods for producing fluid-state lipid bilayer networks of nanotubes and surface-immobilized vesicles with controlled geometry, topology, membrane composition, and interior contents. Mass transport in nanotubes and materials exchange, for example, between conjugated containers, can be controlled by creating a surface tension gradient that gives rise to a moving boundary or by induced shape transformations. The network devices can operate with extremely small volume elements and low mass, to the limit of single molecules and particles at a length scale where a continuum mechanics approximation may break down. Thus, we also describe some concepts of anomalous fluctuation-dominated kinetics and anomalous diffusive behaviours, including hindered transport, as they might become important in studying chemistry and transport phenomena in these confined systems. The networks are suitable for initiating and controlling chemical reactions in confined biomimetic compartments for rationalizing, for example, enzyme behaviors, as well as for applications in nanofluidics, bioanalytical devices, and to construct computational and complex sensor systems with operations building on chemical kinetics, coupled reactions and controlled mass transport.

  20. Biomimetic nanoscale reactors and networks.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Mattias; Davidson, Max; Karlsson, Roger; Karlsson, Anders; Bergenholtz, Johan; Konkoli, Zoran; Jesorka, Aldo; Lobovkina, Tatsiana; Hurtig, Johan; Voinova, Marina; Orwar, Owe

    2004-01-01

    Methods based on self-assembly, self-organization, and forced shape transformations to form synthetic or semisynthetic enclosed lipid bilayer structures with several properties similar to biological nanocompartments are reviewed. The procedures offer unconventional micro- and nanofabrication routes to yield complex soft-matter devices for a variety of applications for example, in physical chemistry and nanotechnology. In particular, we describe novel micromanipulation methods for producing fluid-state lipid bilayer networks of nanotubes and surface-immobilized vesicles with controlled geometry, topology, membrane composition, and interior contents. Mass transport in nanotubes and materials exchange, for example, between conjugated containers, can be controlled by creating a surface tension gradient that gives rise to a moving boundary or by induced shape transformations. The network devices can operate with extremely small volume elements and low mass, to the limit of single molecules and particles at a length scale where a continuum mechanics approximation may break down. Thus, we also describe some concepts of anomalous fluctuation-dominated kinetics and anomalous diffusive behaviours, including hindered transport, as they might become important in studying chemistry and transport phenomena in these confined systems. The networks are suitable for initiating and controlling chemical reactions in confined biomimetic compartments for rationalizing, for example, enzyme behaviors, as well as for applications in nanofluidics, bioanalytical devices, and to construct computational and complex sensor systems with operations building on chemical kinetics, coupled reactions and controlled mass transport.

  1. PREFACE: Nanoscale science and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, Stefano

    2008-11-01

    Over the last decade, rapid progress in the field of nanoscience has been increasingly driving the attention of the scientific community as well as society at large on the corresponding technological applications, which are the object of so-called nanotechnology. A strong interest in assessing the current state of the art of this fast growing field, as well as stimulating research networking, prompted the organization of the International School and Workshop 'Nanoscience & Nanotechnology (n&n2007)', under the patronage of the Italian Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN), the University of Rome Tor Vergata, the Tor Vergata Polyclinic, and the Catholic University of Rome, with generous sponsorship from 3M, 2M Strumenti, MTS, Ape Research, Crisel Instruments, Veeco and Amira. The aims of this event were as follows: to foster the concrete planning of future devices based on innovative (nano)materials, involving both industrial entities and public research institutes; to allow sponsoring firms to present their instrumentation and success stories, based on current use by significant customers; to lend an opportunity for preparing and presenting joint projects, involving both industry and public research, see e.g. the EU 7th Framework Programs; to explore the possibility of integrating nanodevices from their concept into system projects. The conference http://www.lnf.infn.it/conference/nn2007/ gathered at Villa Mondragone in Monte Porzio Catone, Italy, with leading experts in research and innovative technologies in biology, medicine, aerospace, optoelectronics, materials and instrumentation, coming both from academic research and industrial areas, as well as national security and military defense experts in attendence. Several successful meetings in this field have taken place in the past, such as the Nanotubes & Nanostructures (N&N) School and Workshop Series [1, 2, 3, 4] including: N&N2000, S Margherita di Pula (Cagliari), Italy, 24 September-4 October 2000, http

  2. Quantitative nanoscale electrostatics of viruses.

    PubMed

    Hernando-Pérez, M; Cartagena-Rivera, A X; Lošdorfer Božič, A; Carrillo, P J P; San Martín, C; Mateu, M G; Raman, A; Podgornik, R; de Pablo, P J

    2015-11-01

    Electrostatics is one of the fundamental driving forces of the interaction between biomolecules in solution. In particular, the recognition events between viruses and host cells are dominated by both specific and non-specific interactions and the electric charge of viral particles determines the electrostatic force component of the latter. Here we probe the charge of individual viruses in liquid milieu by measuring the electrostatic force between a viral particle and the Atomic Force Microscope tip. The force spectroscopy data of co-adsorbed ϕ29 bacteriophage proheads and mature virions, adenovirus and minute virus of mice capsids is utilized for obtaining the corresponding density of charge for each virus. The systematic differences of the density of charge between the viral particles are consistent with the theoretical predictions obtained from X-ray structural data. Our results show that the density of charge is a distinguishing characteristic of each virus, depending crucially on the nature of the viral capsid and the presence/absence of the genetic material. PMID:26228582

  3. Interfacial Symmetry Control of Emergent Ferromagnetism at the Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Grutter, A J; Vailionis, A; Borchers, J A; Kirby, B J; Flint, C L; He, C; Arenholz, E; Suzuki, Y

    2016-09-14

    The emergence of complex new ground states at interfaces has been identified as one of the most promising routes to highly tunable nanoscale materials. Despite recent progress, isolating and controlling the underlying mechanisms behind these emergent properties remains among the most challenging materials physics problems to date. In particular, generating ferromagnetism localized at the interface of two nonferromagnetic materials is of fundamental and technological interest. Moreover, the ability to turn the ferromagnetism on and off would shed light on the origin of such emergent phenomena and is promising for spintronic applications. We demonstrate that ferromagnetism confined within one unit cell at the interface of CaRuO3 and CaMnO3 can be switched on and off by changing the symmetry of the oxygen octahedra connectivity at the boundary. Interfaces that are symmetry-matched across the boundary exhibit interfacial CaMnO3 ferromagnetism while the ferromagnetism at symmetry-mismatched interfaces is suppressed. We attribute the suppression of ferromagnetic order to a reduction in charge transfer at symmetry-mismatched interfaces, where frustrated bonding weakens the orbital overlap. Thus, interfacial symmetry is a new route to control emergent ferromagnetism in materials such as CaMnO3 that exhibit antiferromagnetism in bulk form. PMID:27472285

  4. Macro- to Nanoscale Heat and Mass Transfer: The Lagging Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazanfarian, Jafar; Shomali, Zahra; Abbassi, Abbas

    2015-07-01

    The classical model of the Fourier's law is known as the most common constitutive relation for thermal transport in various engineering materials. Although the Fourier's law has been widely used in a variety of engineering application areas, there are many exceptional applications in which the Fourier's law is questionable. This paper gathers together such applications. Accordingly, the paper is divided into two parts. The first part reviews the papers pertaining to the fundamental theory of the phase-lagging models and the analytical and numerical solution approaches. The second part wrap ups the various applications of the phase-lagging models including the biological materials, ultra-high-speed laser heating, the problems involving moving media, micro/nanoscale heat transfer, multi-layered materials, the theory of thermoelasticity, heat transfer in the material defects, the diffusion problems we call as the non-Fick models, and some other applications. It is predicted that the interest in the field of phase-lagging heat transport has grown incredibly in recent years because they show good agreement with the experiments across a wide range of length and time scales.

  5. Interfacial Symmetry Control of Emergent Ferromagnetism at the Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Grutter, A J; Vailionis, A; Borchers, J A; Kirby, B J; Flint, C L; He, C; Arenholz, E; Suzuki, Y

    2016-09-14

    The emergence of complex new ground states at interfaces has been identified as one of the most promising routes to highly tunable nanoscale materials. Despite recent progress, isolating and controlling the underlying mechanisms behind these emergent properties remains among the most challenging materials physics problems to date. In particular, generating ferromagnetism localized at the interface of two nonferromagnetic materials is of fundamental and technological interest. Moreover, the ability to turn the ferromagnetism on and off would shed light on the origin of such emergent phenomena and is promising for spintronic applications. We demonstrate that ferromagnetism confined within one unit cell at the interface of CaRuO3 and CaMnO3 can be switched on and off by changing the symmetry of the oxygen octahedra connectivity at the boundary. Interfaces that are symmetry-matched across the boundary exhibit interfacial CaMnO3 ferromagnetism while the ferromagnetism at symmetry-mismatched interfaces is suppressed. We attribute the suppression of ferromagnetic order to a reduction in charge transfer at symmetry-mismatched interfaces, where frustrated bonding weakens the orbital overlap. Thus, interfacial symmetry is a new route to control emergent ferromagnetism in materials such as CaMnO3 that exhibit antiferromagnetism in bulk form.

  6. Understanding electronic structure and transport properties in nanoscale junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhungana, Kamal B.

    Understanding the electronic structure and the transport properties of nanoscale materials are pivotal for designing future nano-scale electronic devices. Nanoscale materials could be individual or groups of molecules, nanotubes, semiconducting quantum dots, and biomolecules. Among these several alternatives, organic molecules are very promising and the field of molecular electronics has progressed significantly over the past few decades. Despite these progresses, it has not yet been possible to achieve atomic level control at the metal-molecule interface during a conductance measurement, which hinders the progress in this field. The lack of atomic level information of the interface also makes it much harder for theorist to interpret the experimental results. To identify the junction configuration that possibly exists during the experimental measurement of conductance in molecular junction, we created an ensemble of Ruthanium-bis(terpyridine) molecular devices, and studied the transport behavior in these molecular junctions. This helps us identifying the junction geometry that yields the experimentally measured current-voltage characteristics. Today's electronic devices mostly ignore the spin effect of an electron. The inclusion of spin effect of an electron on solid-state transistor allows us to build more efficient electronic devices; this also alleviates the problem of huge heat dissipation in the nanoscale electronic devices. Different materials have been utilized to build three terminals spin transistor since its inception in 1950. In search of suitable candidates for the molecular spin transistor, we have recently designed a spin-valve transistor based on an organometallic molecule; a large amplification (320 %) in tunnel magneto-resistance (TMR) is found to occur at an experimentally accessible gate field. This suggests that the organic molecules can be utilized for making the next generation three terminal spintronic devices. Similarly, we have designed a

  7. Enhancement of local piezoresponse in polymer ferroelectrics via nanoscale control of microstructure.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon-Young; Sharma, Pankaj; Phatak, Charudatta; Gosztola, David J; Liu, Yunya; Lee, Joonseok; Lee, Byeongdu; Li, Jiangyu; Gruverman, Alexei; Ducharme, Stephen; Hong, Seungbum

    2015-02-24

    Polymer ferroelectrics are flexible and lightweight electromechanical materials that are widely studied due to their potential application as sensors, actuators, and energy harvesters. However, one of the biggest challenges is their low piezoelectric coefficient. Here, we report a mechanical annealing effect based on local pressure induced by a nanoscale tip that enhances the local piezoresponse. This process can control the nanoscale material properties over a microscale area at room temperature. We attribute this improvement to the formation and growth of β-phase extended chain crystals via sliding diffusion and crystal alignment along the scan axis under high mechanical stress. We believe that this technique can be useful for local enhancement of piezoresponse in ferroelectric polymer thin films.

  8. Scanning near-field thermoelectric microscopy for subsurface nanoscale thermoelectric behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, K. Q.; Zeng, H. R.; Zhao, K. Y.; Li, G. R.; Shi, X.; Chen, L. D.

    2016-05-01

    A novel scanning near-field thermoelectric microscopy (STeM) was proposed and developed for characterizing subsurface, nanoscale Seebeck coefficient of thermoelectric energy materials. In STeM, near-field evanescent thermal wave was induced around the thermal probe's contact with the thermoelectric sample's surface via a periodically modulated heated thermal probe, giving rise to a thermoelectric near-field interaction with simultaneous excitation of three harmonic signals for local Seebeck coefficient derivation. The near-field STeM was capable of characterizing local Seebeck coefficient of thermoelectric materials with high lateral resolution at nanometer scale and more importantly provides a convenient, powerful tool for quantitative characterization of subsurface nanoscale thermoelectric properties.

  9. Discovering New Minerals at Micron to Nanoscales: A SEM-EBSD-EPMA Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.

    2014-12-01

    With high-resolution analytical field emission scanning electron microscope and electron probe microanalyzer, we are now capable to characterize Earth and planetary materials easier and faster down to nanoscales. Nanofeatures (such as inclusions, exsolution, zonation, coatings, pores) in minerals and rocks are being discovered. Nanominerals and nanoparticles are being revealed. New minerals and new materials are being identified. During our ongoing nanomineralogy investigation since 2006, more than twenty five new minerals have been discovered at micron to nanoscales. Fifteen of them are from the Allende meteorite, including new refractory minerals like allendeite, hexamolybdenum, tistarite, panguite and kangite, which are among the first solids formed in our solar system. Each of the new extraterrestrial minerals reveals distinctive forming environments, providing insights into nebula or parent-body processes. Presented here are a few nanomineralogy projects demonstrating how to find and characterize new minerals with an integrated SEM-EBSD-EPMA approach.

  10. Fabrication of Tunable, High-Refractive-Index Titanate-Silk Nanocomposites on the Micro- and Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Perotto, Giovanni; Cittadini, Michela; Tao, Hu; Kim, Sunghwan; Yang, Miaomiao; Kaplan, David L; Martucci, Alessandro; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G

    2015-11-01

    The combination of water-based titanate nanosheets dispersion and silk fibroin solution allows the realization of a versatile nanocomposite. Different fabrication techniques can be easily applied on these nanocomposites to manipulate the end form of these materials on the micro- and nanoscale. Easy tunability of the refractive index from n = 1.55 up to n = 1.97 is achieved, making it attractive for flexible, biopolymer-based optical devices. PMID:26414278

  11. Nanoscale contact engineering for Silicon/Silicide nanowire devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yung-Chen

    Metal silicides have been used in silicon technology as contacts to achieve high device performance and desired device functions. The growth and applications of silicide materials have recently attracted increasing interest for nanoscale device applications. Nanoscale silicide materials have been demonstrated with various synthetic approaches. Solid state reaction wherein high quality silicides form through diffusion of metal atoms into silicon nano-templates and the subsequent phase transformation caught significant attention for the fabrication of nanoscale Si devices. Very interestingly, studies on the diffusion and phase transformation processes at nanoscale have indicated possible deviations from the bulk and the thin film system. Here we studied growth kinetics, electronic properties and device applications of nanoscale silicides formed through solid state reaction. We have grown single crystal PtSi nanowires and PtSi/Si/PtSi nanowire heterostructures through solid state reaction. TEM studies show that the heterostructures have atomically sharp interfaces free of defects. Electrical measurement of PtSi nanowires shows a low resistivity of ˜28.6 μΩ·cm and a high breakdown current density beyond 108 A/cm2. Furthermore, using single-crystal PtSi/Si/PtSi nanowire heterostructures with atomically clean interfaces, we have fabricated p-channel enhancement mode transistors with the best reported performance for intrinsic silicon nanowires to date. In our results, silicide can provide a clean and no Fermi level pinning interface and then silicide can form Ohmic-contact behavior by replacing the source/drain metal with PtSi. It has been proven by our experiment by contacting PtSi with intrinsic Si nanowires (no extrinsic doping) to achieve high performance p-channel device. By utilizing the same approach, single crystal MnSi nanowires and MnSi/Si/MnSi nanowire heterojunction with atomically sharp interfaces can also been grown. Electrical transport studies on Mn

  12. Nanoscale viscoplastic behavior of smectic liquid crystals and its application in nanolithography

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Benjamin Steffen, Paul Bahr, Christian

    2014-02-21

    We report a unique combination of properties of smectic liquid crystal films that can be described as a viscoplastic behavior on the nanoscale: On the one hand, the films preserve imprinted surface patterns despite being permeated by a directed molecular flow of the film material. On the other hand, their surface morphology can easily be manipulated using an atomic force microscopy tip. Our results demonstrate a controlled molecular-scale deposition of material on the film surface, thereby enabling nanolithographic surface modification of a fluid material.

  13. Nanoscale structural and functional mapping of nacre by scanning probe microscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xilong; Miao, Hongchen; Li, Faxin

    2013-11-01

    Nacre has received great attention due to its nanoscale hierarchical structure and extraordinary mechanical properties. Meanwhile, the nanoscale piezoelectric properties of nacre have also been investigated but the structure-function relationship has never been addressed. In this work, firstly we realized quantitative nanomechanical mapping of nacre of a green abalone using atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM). The modulus of the mineral tablets is determined to be ~80 GPa and that of the organic biopolymer no more than 23 GPa, and the organic-inorganic interface width is determined to be about 34 +/- 9 nm. Then, we conducted both AFAM and piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) mapping in the same scanning area to explore the correlations between the nanomechanical and piezoelectric properties. The PFM testing shows that the organic biopolymer exhibits a significantly stronger piezoresponse than the mineral tablets, and they permeate each other, which is very difficult to reproduce in artificial materials. Finally, the phase hysteresis loops and amplitude butterfly loops were also observed using switching spectroscopy PFM, implying that nacre may also be a bio-ferroelectric material. The obtained nanoscale structural and functional properties of nacre could be very helpful in understanding its deformation mechanism and designing biomimetic materials of extraordinary properties.

  14. Failure and deformation mechanisms at macro- and nano-scales of alkali activated clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhar Das, Pradip; Bhattacharya, Manjima; Chanda, Dipak Kr; Dalui, Srikanta; Acharya, Saikat; Ghosh, Swapankumar; Mukhopadhyay, Anoop Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Here we report two qualitative models on failure and deformation mechanisms at macro- and nano-scales of alkali activated clay (AACL), a material of extraordinary importance as a low cost building material. The models were based on experimental data of compressive failure and nanoindentation response of the AACL materials. A 420% improvement in compressive strength (σ c) of the AACL was achieved after 28 days (d) of curing at room temperature and it correlated well with the decrements in the residual alkali and pH concentrations with the increase in curing time. Based on extensive post-mortem FE-SEM examinations, a schematic model for the compressive failure mechanism of AACL was proposed. In addition, the nanoindentation results of AACL provided the first ever experimental evidence of the presence of nano-scale plasticity and a nano-scale contact deformation resistance that increased with the applied load. These results meant the development of a unique strain tolerant microstructure in the AACL of Indian origin. The implications of these new observations were discussed in terms of a qualitative model based on the deformation of layered clay structure.

  15. Non-singular terminal dynamic surface control based integrated guidance and control design and simulation.

    PubMed

    Cong, Zhang; Yun-Jie, Wu

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a novel cascade type design model is transformed from the simulation model, which has a broader scope of application, for integrated guidance and control (IGC). A novel non-singular terminal dynamic surface control based IGC method is proposed. It can guarantee the missile with multiple disturbances fast hits the target with high accuracy, while considering the terminal impact angular constraint commendably. And the stability of the closed-loop system is strictly proved. The essence of integrated guidance and control design philosophy is reached that establishing a direct relation between guidance and attitude equations by "intermediate states" and then designing an IGC law for the obtained integrated cascade design model. Finally, a series of simulations and comparisons with a 6-DOF nonlinear missile that includes all aerodynamic effects are demonstrated to illustrate the effectiveness and advantage of the proposed IGC method.

  16. Adaptive fuzzy dynamic surface control for the chaotic permanent magnet synchronous motor using Nussbaum gain

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Shaohua

    2014-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of adaptive fuzzy dynamic surface control (DSC) for the permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) system with chaotic behavior, disturbance and unknown control gain and parameters. Nussbaum gain is adopted to cope with the situation that the control gain is unknown. And the unknown items can be estimated by fuzzy logic system. The proposed controller guarantees that all the signals in the closed-loop system are bounded and the system output eventually converges to a small neighborhood of the desired reference signal. Finally, the numerical simulations indicate that the proposed scheme can suppress the chaos of PMSM and show the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method.

  17. Adaptive fuzzy dynamic surface control for the chaotic permanent magnet synchronous motor using Nussbaum gain.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shaohua

    2014-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of adaptive fuzzy dynamic surface control (DSC) for the permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) system with chaotic behavior, disturbance and unknown control gain and parameters. Nussbaum gain is adopted to cope with the situation that the control gain is unknown. And the unknown items can be estimated by fuzzy logic system. The proposed controller guarantees that all the signals in the closed-loop system are bounded and the system output eventually converges to a small neighborhood of the desired reference signal. Finally, the numerical simulations indicate that the proposed scheme can suppress the chaos of PMSM and show the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method.

  18. Non-singular terminal dynamic surface control based integrated guidance and control design and simulation.

    PubMed

    Cong, Zhang; Yun-Jie, Wu

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a novel cascade type design model is transformed from the simulation model, which has a broader scope of application, for integrated guidance and control (IGC). A novel non-singular terminal dynamic surface control based IGC method is proposed. It can guarantee the missile with multiple disturbances fast hits the target with high accuracy, while considering the terminal impact angular constraint commendably. And the stability of the closed-loop system is strictly proved. The essence of integrated guidance and control design philosophy is reached that establishing a direct relation between guidance and attitude equations by "intermediate states" and then designing an IGC law for the obtained integrated cascade design model. Finally, a series of simulations and comparisons with a 6-DOF nonlinear missile that includes all aerodynamic effects are demonstrated to illustrate the effectiveness and advantage of the proposed IGC method. PMID:27049772

  19. Nanoscale superstructures assembled by polymerase chain reaction (PCR): programmable construction, structural diversity, and emerging applications.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Hua; Ma, Wei; Xu, Liguang; Wang, Libing; Xu, Chuanlai

    2013-11-19

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an essential tool in biotechnology laboratories and is becoming increasingly important in other areas of research. Extensive data obtained over the last 12 years has shown that the combination of PCR with nanoscale dispersions can resolve issues in the preparation DNA-based materials that include both inorganic and organic nanoscale components. Unlike conventional DNA hybridization and antibody-antigen complexes, PCR provides a new, effective assembly platform that both increases the yield of DNA-based nanomaterials and allows researchers to program and control assembly with predesigned parameters including those assisted and automated by computers. As a result, this method allows researchers to optimize to the combinatorial selection of the DNA strands for their nanoparticle conjugates. We have developed a PCR approach for producing various nanoscale assemblies including organic motifs such as small molecules, macromolecules, and inorganic building blocks, such as nanorods (NRs), metal, semiconductor, and magnetic nanoparticles (NPs). We start with a nanoscale primer and then modify that building block using the automated steps of PCR-based assembly including initialization, denaturation, annealing, extension, final elongation, and final hold. The intermediate steps of denaturation, annealing, and extension are cyclic, and we use computer control so that the assembled superstructures reach their predetermined complexity. The structures assembled using a small number of PCR cycles show a lower polydispersity than similar discrete structures obtained by direct hybridization between the nanoscale building blocks. Using different building blocks, we assembled the following structural motifs by PCR: (1) discrete nanostructures (NP dimers, NP multimers including trimers, pyramids, tetramers or hexamers, etc.), (2) branched NP superstructures and heterochains, (3) NP satellite-like superstructures, (4) Y-shaped nanostructures and DNA

  20. Nanoscale intimacy in bifunctional catalysts for selective conversion of hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Zečević, Jovana; Vanbutsele, Gina; de Jong, Krijn P.; Martens, Johan A.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to precisely control nanoscale features is increasingly exploited to develop and improve monofunctional catalysts1–4. Striking effects might also be expected in the case of bifunctional catalysts, which play an important role in hydrocracking of fossil and renewable hydrocarbon sources to provide high-quality diesel fuel5–7. Such bifunctional hydrocracking catalysts contain metal sites and acid sites, and for more than 50 years the so-called ‘intimacy criterion’8 has dictated the maximum distance between the two site types beyond which catalytic activity decreases. The lack of synthesis and material characterization methods with nanometer precision has long prevented in-depth exploration of the criterion, which has often been interpreted simply as ‘the closer the better’ for positioning metal and acid sites8–11. Here we show for a bifunctional catalyst, comprised of an intimate mixture of zeolite Y and alumina binder and with platinum (Pt) metal controllably deposited20,21 on either the zeolite or the binder, that close proximity between metal and zeolite acid sites can be detrimental: the selectivity when cracking large hydrocarbon feedstock molecules for high-quality diesel production is optimized with the catalyst that contains Pt on the binder, i.e. with a larger distance between metal and acid sites. Cracking of the large and complex hydrocarbon molecules typically derived from alternative sources such as gas-to-liquid technology, vegetable oil or algal oil6–7 should thus benefit especially from bifunctional catalysts that avoid locating Pt on the zeolite as the traditionally assumed optimal location. More generally, we anticipate that the ability to spatially organize different active sites at the nanoscale demonstrated here will benefit the further development and optimization of the newly emerging generation of multifunctional catalysts12–15. PMID:26659185

  1. Controlling high-throughput manufacturing at the nano-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Khershed P.

    2013-09-01

    Interest in nano-scale manufacturing research and development is growing. The reason is to accelerate the translation of discoveries and inventions of nanoscience and nanotechnology into products that would benefit industry, economy and society. Ongoing research in nanomanufacturing is focused primarily on developing novel nanofabrication techniques for a variety of applications—materials, energy, electronics, photonics, biomedical, etc. Our goal is to foster the development of high-throughput methods of fabricating nano-enabled products. Large-area parallel processing and highspeed continuous processing are high-throughput means for mass production. An example of large-area processing is step-and-repeat nanoimprinting, by which nanostructures are reproduced again and again over a large area, such as a 12 in wafer. Roll-to-roll processing is an example of continuous processing, by which it is possible to print and imprint multi-level nanostructures and nanodevices on a moving flexible substrate. The big pay-off is high-volume production and low unit cost. However, the anticipated cost benefits can only be realized if the increased production rate is accompanied by high yields of high quality products. To ensure product quality, we need to design and construct manufacturing systems such that the processes can be closely monitored and controlled. One approach is to bring cyber-physical systems (CPS) concepts to nanomanufacturing. CPS involves the control of a physical system such as manufacturing through modeling, computation, communication and control. Such a closely coupled system will involve in-situ metrology and closed-loop control of the physical processes guided by physics-based models and driven by appropriate instrumentation, sensing and actuation. This paper will discuss these ideas in the context of controlling high-throughput manufacturing at the nano-scale.

  2. Nanoscale control of low-dimensional spin structures in manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Wang; Iftikhar, Ahmed Malik; Renrong, Liang; Wen, Huang; Renkui, Zheng; Jinxing, Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Due to the upcoming demands of next-generation electronic/magnetoelectronic devices with low-energy consumption, emerging correlated materials (such as superconductors, topological insulators and manganites) are one of the highly promising candidates for the applications. For the past decades, manganites have attracted great interest due to the colossal magnetoresistance effect, charge-spin-orbital ordering, and electronic phase separation. However, the incapable of deterministic control of those emerging low-dimensional spin structures at ambient condition restrict their possible applications. Therefore, the understanding and control of the dynamic behaviors of spin order parameters at nanoscale in manganites under external stimuli with low energy consumption, especially at room temperature is highly desired. In this review, we collected recent major progresses of nanoscale control of spin structures in manganites at low dimension, especially focusing on the control of their phase boundaries, domain walls as well as the topological spin structures (e.g., skyrmions). In addition, capacitor-based prototype spintronic devices are proposed by taking advantage of the above control methods in manganites. This capacitor-based structure may provide a new platform for the design of future spintronic devices with low-energy consumption. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2014CB920902), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61306105 and 51572278), the Information Science and Technology (TNList) Cross-discipline Foundation from Tsinghua National Laboratory, China and the Fund from the State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, China.

  3. Measuring oxygen reduction/evolution reactions on the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Ciucci, Francesco; Morozovska, Anna N; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen

    2011-08-14

    The efficiency of fuel cells and metal-air batteries is significantly limited by the activation of oxygen reduction and evolution reactions. Despite the well-recognized role of oxygen reaction kinetics on the viability of energy technologies, the governing mechanisms remain elusive and until now have been addressable only by macroscopic studies. This lack of nanoscale understanding precludes optimization of material architecture. Here, we report direct measurements of oxygen reduction/evolution reactions and oxygen vacancy diffusion on oxygen-ion conductive solid surfaces with sub-10 nm resolution. In electrochemical strain microscopy, the biased scanning probe microscopy tip acts as a moving, electrocatalytically active probe exploring local electrochemical activity. The probe concentrates an electric field in a nanometre-scale volume of material, and bias-induced, picometre-level surface displacements provide information on local electrochemical processes. Systematic mapping of oxygen activity on bare and platinum-functionalized yttria-stabilized zirconia surfaces is demonstrated. This approach allows direct visualization of the oxygen reduction/evolution reaction activation process at the triple-phase boundary, and can be extended to a broad spectrum of oxygen-conductive and electrocatalytic materials.

  4. Polymer constitutive properties and adhesive effects at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacio, Manuel Luis Ballelos

    The development of new materials and devices depend on accurately determining its mechanical properties. As the length scale of device components decreases, nanoindentation is evolving into a desirable metrology tool due to its load and displacement resolution. This dissertation examines models for evaluating the elastic modulus (E), hardness (H), yield strength (sigmays) and adhesion energy (G) of glassy and rubbery polymers. Two types of glassy polymer films were examined---fully dense and porous. These films are of interest due to their potential as low dielectric constant ("low-k") materials for microelectronic systems. Quasi-static and creep indentation techniques were employed to determine the modulus, and results from the latter appear to give more reliable results as it accounts for viscoelastic effects. Hardness was also determined, and its relationship with the yield strength at the nanoscale follows the prediction of a model valid for macroscale testing, implying length scale connectivity. The same test methods were applied to films with 10, 20 and 35% porosity, where the observed 45 percent drop of the E and sigma ys with increasing porosity was described using a model that assumes the pores are closed cell systems. Temperature effects on yielding were also examined from 24 to 140°C, where the hardness was found to follow Eyring's rate theory. Another glassy polymer, polyethersulfone, was studied to determine the effect of arsenic ion implantation on surface mechanical properties. Implantation enhances the hardness only up to a certain threshold ion dose, beyond which it decreases due to sputtering of material from the surface. The adhesion energy of acrylic pressure sensitive adhesive-like networks was determined by nanoindentation. These rubbery polymers have been studied in the past using the JKR apparatus, which measures self-adhesion at the microscale. An unloading rate dependence analogous to the crack propagation rate behavior was observed for

  5. Nanoscale Structure at Mineral-Fluid Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturchio, N. C.; Sturchio, N. C.; Fenter, P.; Cheng, L.; Park, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, Z.; Nagy, K. L.; Schlegel, M. L.

    2001-12-01

    The nature of nanoparticles and their role in the natural environment is currently a subject of renewed interest. The high surface area (and surface area-to-volume ratio) of nanoparticles exerts a widespread influence on geochemical reactions and transport processes. A thorough understanding of the nanoscale world remains largely hypothetical, however, because of the challenges associated with characterizing nanoscale structures and processes. Recent insights gained from high-resolution synchrotron x-ray reflectivity measurements at the solid-fluid interfaces of macroscopic (i.e., mm-scale) mineral particles may provide relevant guidelines for expected nanoparticle surface structures. For example, at calcite-water and barite-water interfaces, undercoordinated surface cations bond with water species of variable protonation, and modest relaxations (to several hundredths of a nanometer) affect the outermost unit cells [1,2]. Undercoordinated tetrahedral ions at aluminosilicate surfaces also bond with water species, whereas interstitial or interlayer alkali or alkaline earth ions at the surface may readily exchange with hydronium or other ions; modest relaxations also affect the outermost unit cells [3,4]. Modulation of liquid water structure out to about one nanometer has been observed at the (001) cleavage surface of muscovite in deionized water, and may be present at other mineral-fluid interfaces [4]. Dissolution mechanisms at the orthoclase-water interface have been clarified by combining x-ray reflectivity and scanning force microscopy measurements [5]. Further progress in understanding nanoscale structures and processes at macroscopic mineral-water interfaces is likely to benefit nanoparticle studies. [1] Fenter et al. (2000) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 64, 1221-1228. [2] Fenter et al. (2001) J. Phys. Chem. B 105(34), 8112-8119. [3] Fenter et al. (2000) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 64, 3663-3673. [4] Cheng et al. (2001) Phys. Rev. Lett., (in press). [5] Teng et al

  6. In situ characterization of nanoscale catalysts during anodic redox processes

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Renu; Crozier, Peter; Adams, James

    2013-09-19

    Controlling the structure and composition of the anode is critical to achieving high efficiency and good long-term performance. In addition to being a mixed electronic and ionic conductor, the ideal anode material should act as an efficient catalyst for oxidizing hydrogen, carbon monoxide and dry hydrocarbons without de-activating through either sintering or coking. It is also important to develop novel anode materials that can operate at lower temperatures to reduce costs and minimized materials failure associated with high temperature cycling. We proposed to synthesize and characterize novel anode cermets materials based on ceria doped with Pr and/or Gd together with either a Ni or Cu metallic components. Ceria is a good oxidation catalyst and is an ionic conductor at room temperature. Doping it with trivalent rare earths such as Pr or Gd retards sintering and makes it a mixed ion conductor (ionic and electronic). We have developed a fundamental scientific understanding of the behavior of the cermet material under reaction conditions by following the catalytic oxidation process at the atomic scale using a powerful Environmental Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (ESTEM). The ESTEM allowed in situ monitoring of structural, chemical and morphological changes occurring at the cermet under conditions approximating that of typical fuel-cell operation. Density functional calculations were employed to determine the underlying mechanisms and reaction pathways during anode oxidation reactions. The dynamic behavior of nanoscale catalytic oxidation of hydrogen and methane were used to determine: ? Fundamental processes during anodic reactions in hydrogen and carbonaceous atmospheres ? Interfacial effects between metal particles and doped ceria ? Kinetics of redox reaction in the anode material

  7. Dynamic visualization of nanoscale vortex orbits.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, Matias; Samuely, Tomas; Raes, Bart; Van de Vondel, Joris; Moshchalkov, Victor V

    2014-03-25

    Due to the atomic-scale resolution, scanning tunneling microscopy is an ideal technique to observe the smallest objects. Nevertheless, it suffers from very long capturing times in order to investigate dynamic processes at the nanoscale. We address this issue, for vortex matter in NbSe2, by driving the vortices using an ac magnetic field and probing the induced periodic tunnel current modulations. Our results reveal different dynamical modes of the driven vortex lattices. In addition, by recording and synchronizing the time evolution of the tunneling current at each pixel, we visualize the overall dynamics of the vortex lattice with submillisecond time resolution and subnanometer spatial resolution.

  8. Nanoscale organic light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hiromichi; Wilkinson, John; Long, James P; Bussman, Konrad; Christodoulides, Joseph A; Kafafi, Zakya H

    2005-12-01

    This study reports the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale organic light-emitting diodes (nano-OLEDs) based on poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV). The nano-OLEDs were fabricated by spin casting MEH-PPV into cylindrical nanoholes lithographically patterned into silicon nitride. The electroluminescence (EL) spectrum of MEH-PPV was similar to its photoluminescence spectrum, confirming radiative decay from the same excited state. Device characteristics in the form of current density and EL versus applied electric field are presented and compared with those of a large-scale OLED.

  9. Visualizing viral assemblies in a nanoscale biosphere.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Brian L; Showalter, Shannon P; Dukes, Madeline J; Tanner, Justin R; Demmert, Andrew C; McDonald, Sarah M; Kelly, Deborah F

    2013-01-21

    We present a novel microfluidic platform to examine biological assemblies at high-resolution. We have engineered a functionalized chamber that serves as a "nanoscale biosphere" to capture and maintain rotavirus double-layered particles (DLPs) in a liquid environment. The chamber can be inserted into the column of a transmission electron microscope while being completely isolated from the vacuum system. This configuration allowed us to determine the structure of biological complexes at nanometer-resolution within a self-contained vessel. Images of DLPs were used to calculate the first 3D view of macromolecules in solution. We refer to this new fluidic visualization technology as in situ molecular microscopy.

  10. Nanoscale growth twins in sputtered metal films

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Amit; Anderoglu, Osman; Hoagland, Richard G; Zhang, X

    2008-01-01

    We review recent studies on the mechanical properties of sputtered Cu and 330 stainless steel films with {l_brace}1 1 1{r_brace} nanoscale growth twins preferentially oriented perpendicular to growth direction. The mechanisms of formation of growth twins during sputtering and the deformation mechanisms that enable usually high strengths in nanotwinned structures are highlighted. Growth twins in sputtered films possess good thermal stability at elevated temperature, providing an approach to extend the application of high strength nanostructured metals to higher temperatures.

  11. Nanoscale Semiconductor Devices as New Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, John; Parameswaran, Ramya; Tian, Bozhi

    2016-01-01

    Research on nanoscale semiconductor devices will elicit a novel understanding of biological systems. First, we discuss why it is necessary to build interfaces between cells and semiconductor nanoelectronics. Second, we describe some recent molecular biophysics studies with nanowire field effect transistor sensors. Third, we present the use of nanowire transistors as electrical recording devices that can be integrated into synthetic tissues and targeted intra- or extracellularly to study single cells. Lastly, we discuss future directions and challenges in further developing this area of research, which will advance biology and medicine. PMID:27213041

  12. Quantum Thermoelectric Effects on the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergfield, Justin; Stafford, Charles

    2011-03-01

    An exact expression for the heat current in a nanostructure coupled to multiple metallic electrodes is derived, including both electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions. We use this formalism to investigate quantum effects on the flow of charge and entropy, and find an enormous quantum enhancement of thermoelectric effects in the vicinity of higher-order interferences in the transmission spectrum of a nanoscale junction. A nonequilibrium quantum analysis of a single-molecule junction based on 3,3'-biphenyldithiol demonstrates a maximum operating efficiency of 27% of the Carnot limit. Nonlocal quantum corrections to thermoelectric transport coefficients in multiterminal geometries are predicted.

  13. Nanoscale investigation of organic - inorganic halide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacovich, S.; Divitini, G.; Vrućinić, M.; Sadhanala, A.; Friend, R. H.; Sirringhaus, H.; Deschler, F.; Ducati, C.

    2015-10-01

    Over the last few years organic - inorganic halide perovskite-based solar cells have exhibited a rapid evolution, reaching certified power conversion efficiencies now surpassing 20%. Nevertheless the understanding of the optical and electronic properties of such systems on the nanoscale is still an open problem. In this work we investigate two model perovskite systems (based on iodine - CH3NH3PbI3 and bromine - CH3NH3PbBr3), analysing the local elemental composition and crystallinity and identifying chemical inhomogeneities.

  14. Nanoscale optical reinforcement for enhanced reversible holography.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pengfei; Sun, Sam Qunhui; Baig, Sarfaraz; Wang, Michael R

    2012-01-30

    We demonstrate a nanoscale optical reinforcement concept for reversible holographic recording. The bone-muscle-like mechanism enables enhancement of holographic grating formation due to the collective alignment of liquid crystal (LC) molecules nearby photo-reconfigurable polymer backbones. The LC fluidity facilitates the ease of polymer chain transformation during the holographic recording while the polymer network stabilizes the LC collective orientation and the consequential optical enhancement after the recording. As such, the holographic recording possesses both long-term persistence and real-time rewritability. PMID:22330546

  15. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    DOEpatents

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

    2015-07-14

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  16. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    DOEpatents

    Bond, Tiziana C.; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James C.; Liu, Gang Logan

    2014-07-22

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  17. Nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced raman scattering and methods related thereto

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Tiziana C; Miles, Robin; Davidson, James; Liu, Gang Logan

    2015-11-03

    Methods for fabricating nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering, structures thus obtained, and methods to characterize the nanoscale array structures suitable for surface enhanced Raman scattering. Nanoscale array structures may comprise nanotrees, nanorecesses and tapered nanopillars.

  18. Effect of surface stress on stress intensity factors of a nanoscale crack via double cantilever beam model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Li, Xianfang; Tang, Guojin; Shen, Zhibin

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the influence of surface elasticity on crack growth for a nanoscale crack advance. A crack is modeled as a double cantilever beam with consideration of surface stress. Using the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory incorporating with surface effects, a governing equation of static bending is derived and bending solution of a cantilever nanowire is obtained for a concentrated force at the free end. Based on the viewpoint of energy balance, the elastic strain energy is given and energy release rate is determined. The influences of the Surface stress and the surface elasticity on crack growth are discussed. Obtained results indicate that consideration of the surface effects decreases stress intensity factors or energy release rates. The residual surface tension impedes propagation of a nanoscale crack and apparent fracture toughness of nanoscale materials is effectively enhanced. PMID:23646757

  19. Poroelasticity of cartilage at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Nia, Hadi Tavakoli; Han, Lin; Li, Yang; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan

    2011-11-01

    Atomic-force-microscopy-based oscillatory loading was used in conjunction with finite element modeling to quantify and predict the frequency-dependent mechanical properties of the superficial zone of young bovine articular cartilage at deformation amplitudes, δ, of ~15 nm; i.e., at macromolecular length scales. Using a spherical probe tip (R ~ 12.5 μm), the magnitude of the dynamic complex indentation modulus, |E*|, and phase angle, φ, between the force and tip displacement sinusoids, were measured in the frequency range f ~ 0.2-130 Hz at an offset indentation depth of δ(0) ~ 3 μm. The experimentally measured |E*| and φ corresponded well with that predicted by a fibril-reinforced poroelastic model over a three-decade frequency range. The peak frequency of phase angle, f(peak), was observed to scale linearly with the inverse square of the contact distance between probe tip and cartilage, 1/d(2), as predicted by linear poroelasticity theory. The dynamic mechanical properties were observed to be independent of the deformation amplitude in the range δ = 7-50 nm. Hence, these results suggest that poroelasticity was the dominant mechanism underlying the frequency-dependent mechanical behavior observed at these nanoscale deformations. These findings enable ongoing investigations of the nanoscale progression of matrix pathology in tissue-level disease.

  20. Probing Nanoscale Thermal Transport in Surfactant Solutions.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fangyu; Liu, Ying; Xu, Jiajun; He, Yadong; Hammouda, B; Qiao, Rui; Yang, Bao

    2015-01-01

    Surfactant solutions typically feature tunable nanoscale, internal structures. Although rarely utilized, they can be a powerful platform for probing thermal transport in nanoscale domains and across interfaces with nanometer-size radius. Here, we examine the structure and thermal transport in solution of AOT (Dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate) in n-octane liquids using small-angle neutron scattering, thermal conductivity measurements, and molecular dynamics simulations. We report the first experimental observation of a minimum thermal conductivity occurring at the critical micelle concentration (CMC): the thermal conductivity of the surfactant solution decreases as AOT is added till the onset of micellization but increases as more AOT is added. The decrease of thermal conductivity with AOT loading in solutions in which AOT molecules are dispersed as monomers suggests that even the interfaces between individual oleophobic headgroup of AOT molecules and their surrounding non-polar octane molecules can hinder heat transfer. The increase of thermal conductivity with AOT loading after the onset of micellization indicates that the thermal transport in the core of AOT micelles and across the surfactant-oil interfaces, both of which span only a few nanometers, are efficient. PMID:26534840

  1. Synthesis and properties of nanoscale titanium boride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimova, K. A.; Galevskiy, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.

    2015-09-01

    This work reports the scientific and technological grounds for plasma synthesis of titanium diboride, including thermodynamic and kinetic conditions of boride formation when titanium and titanium dioxide are interacting with products resulting from boron gasification in the nitrogen - hydrogen plasma flow, and two variations of its behavior using the powder mixtures: titanium - boron and titanium dioxide - boron. To study these technology variations, the mathematical models were derived, describing the relation between element contents in the synthesized products of titanium and free boron and basic parameters. The probable mechanism proposed for forming titanium diboride according to a "vapour - melt - crystal" pattern was examined, covering condensation of titanium vapour in the form of aerosol, boriding of nanoscale melt droplets by boron hydrides and crystallization of titanium - boron melt. The comprehensive physical - chemical certification of titanium diboride was carried out, including the study of its crystal structure, phase and chemical composition, dispersion, morphology and particle oxidation. Technological application prospects for use of titanium diboride nanoscale powder as constituent element in the wettable coating for carbon cathodes having excellent physical and mechanical performance and protective properties.

  2. Nanoscale device modeling: the Green's function method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Supriyo

    2000-10-01

    The non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism provides a sound conceptual basis for the devlopment of atomic-level quantum mechanical simulators that will be needed for nanoscale devices of the future. However, this formalism is based on concepts that are unfamiliar to most device physicists and chemists and as such remains relatively obscure. In this paper we try to achieve two objectives: (1) explain the central concepts that define the 'language' of quantum transport, and (2) illustrate the NEGF formalism with simple examples that interested readers can easily duplicate on their PCs. These examples all involve a short n+ +- n+- n+ +resistor whose physics is easily understood. However, the basic formulation is quite general and can even be applied to something as different as a nanotube or a molecular wire, once a suitable Hamiltonian has been identified. These examples also underscore the importance of performing self-consistent calculations that include the Poisson equation. The I-V characteristics of nanoscale structures is determined by an interesting interplay between twentieth century physics (quantum transport) and nineteenth century physics (electrostatics) and there is a tendency to emphasize one or the other depending on one's background. However, it is important to do justice to both aspects in order to derive real insights.

  3. Visualizing copper assisted graphene growth in nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Rosmi, Mohamad Saufi; Yusop, Mohd Zamri; Kalita, Golap; Yaakob, Yazid; Takahashi, Chisato; Tanemura, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Control synthesis of high quality large-area graphene on transition metals (TMs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is the most fascinating approach for practical device applications. Interaction of carbon atoms and TMs is quite critical to obtain graphene with precise layer number, crystal size and structure. Here, we reveal a solid phase reaction process to achieve Cu assisted graphene growth in nanoscale by in-situ transmission electron microscope (TEM). Significant structural transformation of amorphous carbon nanofiber (CNF) coated with Cu is observed with an applied potential in a two probe system. The coated Cu particle recrystallize and agglomerate toward the cathode with applied potential due to joule heating and large thermal gradient. Consequently, the amorphous carbon start crystallizing and forming sp(2) hybridized carbon to form graphene sheet from the tip of Cu surface. We observed structural deformation and breaking of the graphene nanoribbon with a higher applied potential, attributing to saturated current flow and induced Joule heating. The observed graphene formation in nanoscale by the in-situ TEM process can be significant to understand carbon atoms and Cu interaction. PMID:25523645

  4. Light-driven nanoscale plasmonic motors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming; Zentgraf, Thomas; Liu, Yongmin; Bartal, Guy; Zhang, Xiang

    2010-08-01

    When Sir William Crookes developed a four-vaned radiometer, also known as the light-mill, in 1873, it was believed that this device confirmed the existence of linear momentum carried by photons, as predicted by Maxwell's equations. Although Reynolds later proved that the torque on the radiometer was caused by thermal transpiration, researchers continued to search for ways to take advantage of the momentum of photons and to use it for generating rotational forces. The ability to provide rotational force at the nanoscale could open up a range of applications in physics, biology and chemistry, including DNA unfolding and sequencing and nanoelectromechanical systems. Here, we demonstrate a nanoscale plasmonic structure that can, when illuminated with linearly polarized light, generate a rotational force that is capable of rotating a silica microdisk that is 4,000 times larger in volume. Furthermore, we can control the rotation velocity and direction by varying the wavelength of the incident light to excite different plasmonic modes. PMID:20601945

  5. Computer simuations for the nano-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štich, I.

    2007-02-01

    A review of methods for computations for the nano-scale is presented. The paper should provide a convenient starting point into computations for the nano-scale as well as a more in depth presentation for those already working in the field of atomic/molecular-scale modeling. The argument is divided in chapters covering the methods for description of the (i) electrons, (ii) ions, and (iii) techniques for efficient solving of the underlying equations. A fairly broad view is taken covering the Hartree-Fock approximation, density functional techniques and quantum Monte-Carlo techniques for electrons. The customary quantum chemistry methods, such as post Hartree-Fock techniques, are only briefly mentioned. Description of both classical and quantum ions is presented. The techniques cover Ehrenfest, Born-Oppenheimer, and Car-Parrinello dynamics. The strong and weak points of both principal and technical nature are analyzed. In the second part we introduce a number of applications to demonstrate the different approximations and techniques introduced in the first part. They cover a wide range of applications such as non-simple liquids, surfaces, molecule-surface interactions, applications in nanotechnology, etc. These more in depth presentations, while certainly not exhaustive, should provide information on technical aspects of the simulations, typical parameters used, and ways of analysis of the huge amounts of data generated in these large-scale supercomputer simulations.

  6. Probing Nanoscale Thermal Transport in Surfactant Solutions.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fangyu; Liu, Ying; Xu, Jiajun; He, Yadong; Hammouda, B; Qiao, Rui; Yang, Bao

    2015-11-04

    Surfactant solutions typically feature tunable nanoscale, internal structures. Although rarely utilized, they can be a powerful platform for probing thermal transport in nanoscale domains and across interfaces with nanometer-size radius. Here, we examine the structure and thermal transport in solution of AOT (Dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate) in n-octane liquids using small-angle neutron scattering, thermal conductivity measurements, and molecular dynamics simulations. We report the first experimental observation of a minimum thermal conductivity occurring at the critical micelle concentration (CMC): the thermal conductivity of the surfactant solution decreases as AOT is added till the onset of micellization but increases as more AOT is added. The decrease of thermal conductivity with AOT loading in solutions in which AOT molecules are dispersed as monomers suggests that even the interfaces between individual oleophobic headgroup of AOT molecules and their surrounding non-polar octane molecules can hinder heat transfer. The increase of thermal conductivity with AOT loading after the onset of micellization indicates that the thermal transport in the core of AOT micelles and across the surfactant-oil interfaces, both of which span only a few nanometers, are efficient.

  7. Probing Nanoscale Thermal Transport in Surfactant Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Fangyu; Liu, Ying; Xu, Jiajun; He, Yadong; Hammouda, B.; Qiao, Rui; Yang, Bao

    2015-11-01

    Surfactant solutions typically feature tunable nanoscale, internal structures. Although rarely utilized, they can be a powerful platform for probing thermal transport in nanoscale domains and across interfaces with nanometer-size radius. Here, we examine the structure and thermal transport in solution of AOT (Dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate) in n-octane liquids using small-angle neutron scattering, thermal conductivity measurements, and molecular dynamics simulations. We report the first experimental observation of a minimum thermal conductivity occurring at the critical micelle concentration (CMC): the thermal conductivity of the surfactant solution decreases as AOT is added till the onset of micellization but increases as more AOT is added. The decrease of thermal conductivity with AOT loading in solutions in which AOT molecules are dispersed as monomers suggests that even the interfaces between individual oleophobic headgroup of AOT molecules and their surrounding non-polar octane molecules can hinder heat transfer. The increase of thermal conductivity with AOT loading after the onset of micellization indicates that the thermal transport in the core of AOT micelles and across the surfactant-oil interfaces, both of which span only a few nanometers, are efficient.

  8. Probing Nanoscale Thermal Transport in Surfactant Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Fangyu; Liu, Ying; Xu, Jiajun; He, Yadong; Hammouda, B.; Qiao, Rui; Yang, Bao

    2015-01-01

    Surfactant solutions typically feature tunable nanoscale, internal structures. Although rarely utilized, they can be a powerful platform for probing thermal transport in nanoscale domains and across interfaces with nanometer-size radius. Here, we examine the structure and thermal transport in solution of AOT (Dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate) in n-octane liquids using small-angle neutron scattering, thermal conductivity measurements, and molecular dynamics simulations. We report the first experimental observation of a minimum thermal conductivity occurring at the critical micelle concentration (CMC): the thermal conductivity of the surfactant solution decreases as AOT is added till the onset of micellization but increases as more AOT is added. The decrease of thermal conductivity with AOT loading in solutions in which AOT molecules are dispersed as monomers suggests that even the interfaces between individual oleophobic headgroup of AOT molecules and their surrounding non-polar octane molecules can hinder heat transfer. The increase of thermal conductivity with AOT loading after the onset of micellization indicates that the thermal transport in the core of AOT micelles and across the surfactant-oil interfaces, both of which span only a few nanometers, are efficient. PMID:26534840

  9. Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cover of the <span class=Nanoscale Silver Final report"> This final report presents a case study of engineered nanoscale silver (nano-Ag), focusing on...

  10. Method to determine thermal profiles of nanoscale circuitry

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander K; Begtrup, Gavi E

    2013-04-30

    A platform that can measure the thermal profiles of devices with nanoscale resolution has been developed. The system measures the local temperature by using an array of nanoscale thermometers. This process can be observed in real time using a high resolution imagining technique such as electron microscopy. The platform can operate at extremely high temperatures.

  11. Fracture and Failure in Micro- and Nano-Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charitidis, Costas A.

    Indentation and scratch in micro- and nano-scale are the most commonly used techniques for quantifying thin film and systems properties. Among them are different failure modes such as deformation, friction, fracture toughness, fatigue. Failure modes can be activated either by a cycle of indentation or by scratching of the samples to provide an estimation of the fracture toughness and interfacial fracture energies. In the present study, we report on the failure and fracture modes in two cases of engineering materials; that is transparent SiOx thin films onto poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) membranes and glass-ceramic materials. The SiOx/PET system meets the demands regarding scratch-resistance, wettability, biocompatibility, gas transmission, or friction, while maintaining the bulk characteristics of PET (such as easy processing, good mechanical properties, reasonably low permeability to oxygen and carbon dioxide gases (barrier properties), and good chemical coupling with antibacterial coatings). Glass-ceramic materials, since their first accidental production in the mid fifties by S.D. Stookey, have been used in a vast area of applications, from household cooktops and stoves, to missile nose cones and mirror mounts of orbital telescopes and from decorative wall coverings to medical applications. The fracture modes, namely transgranular and intergranular modes in glass-ceramic materials have paid less attention in literature comparing with ceramic materials. In the former case the crack paves its way irrespectively of the direction of the grain boundaries, i.e., the interfaces between the different phases. In the latter case the crack preferentially follows them, i.e., debonds the interfaces.

  12. Enhancing nanoscale SEM image segmentation and reconstruction with crystallographic orientation data and machine learning

    SciTech Connect

    Converse, Matthew I. Fullwood, David T.

    2013-09-15

    Current methods of image segmentation and reconstructions from scanning electron micrographs can be inadequate for resolving nanoscale gaps in composite materials (1–20 nm). Such information is critical to both accurate material characterizations and models of piezoresistive response. The current work proposes the use of crystallographic orientation data and machine learning for enhancing this process. It is first shown how a machine learning algorithm can be used to predict the connectivity of nanoscale grains in a Nickel nanostrand/epoxy composite. This results in 71.9% accuracy for a 2D algorithm and 62.4% accuracy in 3D. Finally, it is demonstrated how these algorithms can be used to predict the location of gaps between distinct nanostrands — gaps which would otherwise not be detected with the sole use of a scanning electron microscope. - Highlights: • A method is proposed for enhancing the segmentation/reconstruction of SEM images. • 3D crystallographic orientation data from a nickel nanocomposite is collected. • A machine learning algorithm is used to detect trends in adjacent grains. • This algorithm is then applied to predict likely regions of nanoscale gaps. • These gaps would otherwise be unresolved with the sole use of an SEM.

  13. Preventing nanoscale wear of atomic force microscopy tips through the use of monolithic ultrananocrystalline diamond probes.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Grierson, D S; Moldovan, N; Notbohm, J; Li, S; Jaroenapibal, P; O'Connor, S D; Sumant, A V; Neelakantan, N; Carlisle, J A; Turner, K T; Carpick, R W

    2010-05-21

    Nanoscale wear is a key limitation of conventional atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes that results in decreased resolution, accuracy, and reproducibility in probe-based imaging, writing, measurement, and nanomanufacturing applications. Diamond is potentially an ideal probe material due to its unrivaled hardness and stiffness, its low friction and wear, and its chemical inertness. However, the manufacture of monolithic diamond probes with consistently shaped small-radius tips has not been previously achieved. The first wafer-level fabrication of monolithic ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) probes with <5-nm grain sizes and smooth tips with radii of 30-40 nm is reported, which are obtained through a combination of microfabrication and hot-filament chemical vapor deposition. Their nanoscale wear resistance under contact-mode scanning conditions is compared with that of conventional silicon nitride (SiN(x)) probes of similar geometry at two different relative humidity levels (approximately 15 and approximately 70%). While SiN(x) probes exhibit significant wear that further increases with humidity, UNCD probes show little measurable wear. The only significant degradation of the UNCD probes observed in one case is associated with removal of the initial seed layer of the UNCD film. The results show the potential of a new material for AFM probes and demonstrate a systematic approach to studying wear at the nanoscale.

  14. Molecular dynamics studies on nanoscale gas transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barisik, Murat

    Three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of nanoscale gas flows are studied to reveal surface effects. A smart wall model that drastically reduces the memory requirements of MD simulations for gas flows is introduced. The smart wall molecular dynamics (SWMD) represents three-dimensional FCC walls using only 74 wall Molecules. This structure is kept in the memory and utilized for each gas molecule surface collision. Using SWMD, fluid behavior within nano-scale confinements is studied for argon in dilute gas, dense gas, and liquid states. Equilibrium MD method is employed to resolve the density and stress variations within the static fluid. Normal stress calculations are based on the Irving-Kirkwood method, which divides the stress tensor into its kinetic and virial parts. The kinetic component recovers pressure based on the ideal gas law. The particle-particle virial increases with increased density, while the surface-particle virial develops due to the surface force field effects. Normal stresses within nano-scale confinements show anisotropy induced primarily by the surface force-field and local variations in the fluid density near the surfaces. For dilute and dense gas cases, surface-force field that extends typically 1nm from each wall induces anisotropic normal stress. For liquid case, this effect is further amplified by the density fluctuations that extend beyond the three field penetration region. Outside the wall force-field penetration and density fluctuation regions the normal stress becomes isotropic and recovers the thermodynamic pressure, provided that sufficiently large force cut-off distances are utilized in the computations. Next, non-equilibrium SWMD is utilized to investigate the surface-gas interaction effects on nanoscale shear-driven gas flows in the transition and free molecular flow regimes. For the specified surface properties and gas-surface pair interactions, density and stress profiles exhibit a universal behavior inside the

  15. Wavelike charge density fluctuations and van der Waals interactions at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Ambrosetti, Alberto; Ferri, Nicola; DiStasio, Robert A; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2016-03-11

    Recent experiments on noncovalent interactions at the nanoscale have challenged the basic assumptions of commonly used particle- or fragment-based models for describing van der Waals (vdW) or dispersion forces. We demonstrate that a qualitatively correct description of the vdW interactions between polarizable nanostructures over a wide range of finite distances can only be attained by accounting for the wavelike nature of charge density fluctuations. By considering a diverse set of materials and biological systems with markedly different dimensionalities, topologies, and polarizabilities, we find a visible enhancement in the nonlocality of the charge density response in the range of 10 to 20 nanometers. These collective wavelike fluctuations are responsible for the emergence of nontrivial modifications of the power laws that govern noncovalent interactions at the nanoscale.

  16. Ascertaining effects of nanoscale polymeric interfaces on competitive protein adsorption at the individual protein level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Xie, Tian; Ravensbergen, Kristina; Hahm, Jong-In

    2016-02-01

    With the recent development of biomaterials and biodevices with reduced dimensionality, it is critical to comprehend protein adhesion processes to nanoscale solid surfaces, especially those occurring in a competitive adsorption environment. Complex sequences of adhesion events in competitive adsorption involving multicomponent protein systems have been extensively investigated, but our understanding is still limited primarily to macroscopic adhesion onto chemically simple surfaces. We examine the competitive adsorption behavior from a binary protein mixture containing bovine serum albumin and fibrinogen at the single protein level. We subsequently evaluate a series of adsorption and displacement processes occurring on both the macroscopic homopolymer and nanoscopic diblock copolymer surfaces, while systematically varying the protein concentration and incubation time. We identify the similarities and dissimilarities in competitive protein adsorption behavior between the two polymeric surfaces, the former presenting chemical uniformity at macroscale versus the latter exhibiting periodic nanointerfaces of chemically alternating polymeric segments. We then present our novel experimental finding of a large increase in the nanointerface-engaged residence time of the initially bound proteins and further explain the origin of this phenomenon manifested on nanoscale diblock copolymer surfaces. The outcomes of this study may provide timely insight into nanoscale competitive protein adsorption that is much needed in designing bioimplant and tissue engineering materials. In addition, the fundamental understanding gained from this study can be beneficial for the development of highly miniaturized biodevices and biomaterials fabricated by using nanoscale polymeric materials and interfaces.With the recent development of biomaterials and biodevices with reduced dimensionality, it is critical to comprehend protein adhesion processes to nanoscale solid surfaces, especially those

  17. Wavelike charge density fluctuations and van der Waals interactions at the nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Ambrosetti, Alberto; Ferri, Nicola; DiStasio, Robert A; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2016-03-11

    Recent experiments on noncovalent interactions at the nanoscale have challenged the basic assumptions of commonly used particle- or fragment-based models for describing van der Waals (vdW) or dispersion forces. We demonstrate that a qualitatively correct description of the vdW interactions between polarizable nanostructures over a wide range of finite distances can only be attained by accounting for the wavelike nature of charge density fluctuations. By considering a diverse set of materials and biological systems with markedly different dimensionalities, topologies, and polarizabilities, we find a visible enhancement in the nonlocality of the charge density response in the range of 10 to 20 nanometers. These collective wavelike fluctuations are responsible for the emergence of nontrivial modifications of the power laws that govern noncovalent interactions at the nanoscale. PMID:26965622

  18. Partitioned airs at microscale and nanoscale: thermal diffusivity in ultrahigh porosity solids of nanocellulose.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Koh; Kobayashi, Yuri; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2016-01-01

    High porosity solids, such as plastic foams and aerogels, are thermally insulating. Their insulation performance strongly depends on their pore structure, which dictates the heat transfer process in the material. Understanding such a relationship is essential to realizing highly efficient thermal insulators. Herein, we compare the heat transfer properties of foams and aerogels that have very high porosities (97.3-99.7%) and an identical composition (nanocellulose). The foams feature rather closed, microscale pores formed with a thin film-like solid phase, whereas the aerogels feature nanoscale open pores formed with a nanofibrous network-like solid skeleton. Unlike the aerogel samples, the thermal diffusivity of the foam decreases considerably with a slight increase in the solid fraction. The results indicate that for suppressing the thermal diffusion of air within high porosity solids, creating microscale spaces with distinct partitions is more effective than directly blocking the free path of air molecules at the nanoscale. PMID:26830144

  19. Partitioned airs at microscale and nanoscale: thermal diffusivity in ultrahigh porosity solids of nanocellulose.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Koh; Kobayashi, Yuri; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2016-02-02

    High porosity solids, such as plastic foams and aerogels, are thermally insulating. Their insulation performance strongly depends on their pore structure, which dictates the heat transfer process in the material. Understanding such a relationship is essential to realizing highly efficient thermal insulators. Herein, we compare the heat transfer properties of foams and aerogels that have very high porosities (97.3-99.7%) and an identical composition (nanocellulose). The foams feature rather closed, microscale pores formed with a thin film-like solid phase, whereas the aerogels feature nanoscale open pores formed with a nanofibrous network-like solid skeleton. Unlike the aerogel samples, the thermal diffusivity of the foam decreases considerably with a slight increase in the solid fraction. The results indicate that for suppressing the thermal diffusion of air within high porosity solids, creating microscale spaces with distinct partitions is more effective than directly blocking the free path of air molecules at the nanoscale.

  20. Three-dimensional nanoscale molecular imaging by extreme ultraviolet laser ablation mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Ilya; Filevich, Jorge; Dong, Feng; Woolston, Mark; Chao, Weilun; Anderson, Erik H.; Bernstein, Elliot R.; Crick, Dean C.; Rocca, Jorge J.; Menoni, Carmen S.

    2015-04-01

    Analytical probes capable of mapping molecular composition at the nanoscale are of critical importance to materials research, biology and medicine. Mass spectral imaging makes it possible to visualize the spatial organization of multiple molecular components at a sample's surface. However, it is challenging for mass spectral imaging to map molecular composition in three dimensions (3D) with submicron resolution. Here we describe a mass spectral imaging method that exploits the high 3D localization of absorbed extreme ultraviolet laser light and its fundamentally distinct interaction with matter to determine molecular composition from a volume as small as 50 zl in a single laser shot. Molecular imaging with a lateral resolution of 75 nm and a depth resolution of 20 nm is demonstrated. These results open opportunities to visualize chemical composition and chemical changes in 3D at the nanoscale.

  1. Atomistic simulation of the load dependence of nanoscale friction on suspended and supported graphene.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhijiang; Martini, Ashlie

    2014-12-16

    Suspended graphene exhibits distinct behavior in which nanoscale friction first increases and then decreases with load; this is in contrast to the monotonic increase of friction with load exhibited by most materials, including graphene supported by a substrate. In this work, these friction trends are reproduced for the first time using molecular dynamics simulations of a nanoscale probe scanning on suspended and supported graphene. The atomic-scale detail available in the simulations is used to correlate friction trends to the presence and size of a wrinkle on the graphene surface in front of the probe. The simulations also provide information about how frictional load dependence is affected by the size of the graphene, the size of the probe, and the strength of the interaction between graphene and probe.

  2. Nanoscale mapping of ion diffusion in a lithium-ion battery cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Balke, N.; Jesse, S.; Morozovska, A.; Eliseev, E.; Chung, D.; Kim, Y.; Adamczyk, L.; Garcia, R.

    2010-08-29

    The movement of lithium ions into and out of electrodes is central to the operation of lithium-ion batteries. Although this process has been extensively studied at the device level, it remains insufficiently characterized at the nanoscale level of grain clusters, single grains and defects. Here, we probe the spatial variation of lithium-ion diffusion times in the battery-cathode material LiCoO{sub 2} at a resolution of ~100 nm by using an atomic force microscope to both redistribute lithium ions and measure the resulting cathode deformation. The relationship between diffusion and single grains and grain boundaries is observed, revealing that the diffusion coefficient increases for certain grain orientations and single-grain boundaries. This knowledge provides feedback to improve understanding of the nanoscale mechanisms underpinning lithium-ion battery operation.

  3. Three-dimensional nanoscale molecular imaging by extreme ultraviolet laser ablation mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Ilya; Filevich, Jorge; Dong, Feng; Woolston, Mark; Chao, Weilun; Anderson, Erik H.; Bernstein, Elliot R.; Crick, Dean C.; Rocca, Jorge J.; Menoni, Carmen S.

    2015-01-01

    Analytical probes capable of mapping molecular composition at the nanoscale are of critical importance to materials research, biology and medicine. Mass spectral imaging makes it possible to visualize the spatial organization of multiple molecular components at a sample's surface. However, it is challenging for mass spectral imaging to map molecular composition in three dimensions (3D) with submicron resolution. Here we describe a mass spectral imaging method that exploits the high 3D localization of absorbed extreme ultraviolet laser light and its fundamentally distinct interaction with matter to determine molecular composition from a volume as small as 50 zl in a single laser shot. Molecular imaging with a lateral resolution of 75 nm and a depth resolution of 20 nm is demonstrated. These results open opportunities to visualize chemical composition and chemical changes in 3D at the nanoscale. PMID:25903827

  4. Synthesis of nano-scale silicon wires by excimer laser ablation at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, D. P.; Lee, C. S.; Bello, I.; Sun, X. S.; Tang, Y. H.; Zhou, G. W.; Bai, Z. G.; Zhang, Z.; Feng, S. Q.

    1998-02-01

    We report below synthesis of nano-scale silicon wires by using laser ablation at high temperature. By this approach we have been able to produce silicon nano wires (SiNW's) with a very high yield, a uniform diameter distribution and a high purity. The structure, morphology and chemical composition of the SiNWs have been characterized by using high resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution electron microscopy (HREM), as well as spectroscopy of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDAX). Our results should be of great interest to researchers working on mesoscopic physical phenomena, such as quantum confinement effects related to materials of reduced dimensions and should lead to the development of new applications for nano-scale devices, together with providing a powerful method for synthesis of similar one-dimensional conducting and semi-conducting wire.

  5. Scrutinizing the datasets obtained from nanoscale features of spider silk fibres

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Luciano P; Rech, Elibio L

    2014-01-01

    Spider silk fibres share unprecedented structural and mechanical properties which span from the macroscale to nanoscale and beyond. This is possible due to the molecular features of modular proteins termed spidroins. Thus, the investigation of the organizational scaffolds observed for spidroins in spider silk fibres is of paramount importance for reverse bioengineering. This dataset consists in describing a rational screening procedure to identify the nanoscale features of spider silk fibres. Using atomic force microscopy operated in multiple acquisition modes, we evaluated silk fibres from nine spider species. Here we present the complete results of the analyses and decrypted a number of novel features that could even rank the silk fibres according to desired mechanostructural features. This dataset will allow other researchers to select the most appropriate models for synthetic biology and also lead to better understanding of spider silk fibres extraordinary performance that is comparable to the best manmade materials. PMID:25977795

  6. Scrutinizing the datasets obtained from nanoscale features of spider silk fibres.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luciano P; Rech, Elibio L

    2014-01-01

    Spider silk fibres share unprecedented structural and mechanical properties which span from the macroscale to nanoscale and beyond. This is possible due to the molecular features of modular proteins termed spidroins. Thus, the investigation of the organizational scaffolds observed for spidroins in spider silk fibres is of paramount importance for reverse bioengineering. This dataset consists in describing a rational screening procedure to identify the nanoscale features of spider silk fibres. Using atomic force microscopy operated in multiple acquisition modes, we evaluated silk fibres from nine spider species. Here we present the complete results of the analyses and decrypted a number of novel features that could even rank the silk fibres according to desired mechanostructural features. This dataset will allow other researchers to select the most appropriate models for synthetic biology and also lead to better understanding of spider silk fibres extraordinary performance that is comparable to the best manmade materials. PMID:25977795

  7. Interfibrillar stiffening of echinoderm mutable collagenous tissue demonstrated at the nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Jingyi; Blowes, Liisa M.; Egertová, Michaela; Terrill, Nicholas J.; Wang, Wen; Elphick, Maurice R.; Gupta, Himadri S.

    2016-01-01

    The mutable collagenous tissue (MCT) of echinoderms (e.g., sea cucumbers and starfish) is a remarkable example of a biological material that has the unique attribute, among collagenous tissues, of being able to rapidly change its stiffness and extensibility under neural control. However, the mechanisms of MCT have not been characterized at the nanoscale. Using synchrotron small-angle X-ray diffraction to probe time-dependent changes in fibrillar structure during in situ tensile testing of sea cucumber dermis, we investigate the ultrastructural mechanics of MCT by measuring fibril strain at different chemically induced mechanical states. By measuring a variable interfibrillar stiffness (EIF), the mechanism of mutability at the nanoscale can be demonstrated directly. A model of stiffness modulation via enhanced fibrillar recruitment is developed to explain the biophysical mechanisms of MCT. Understanding the mechanisms of MCT quantitatively may have applications in development of new types of mechanically tunable biomaterials. PMID:27708167

  8. Carbon nanotube thermal interfaces enhanced with sprayed on nanoscale polymer coatings.

    PubMed

    Taphouse, John H; Bougher, Thomas L; Singh, Virendra; Abadi, Parisa Pour Shahid Saeed; Graham, Samuel; Cola, Baratunde A

    2013-03-15

    Vertical carbon nanotube (CNT) forests bonded at room temperature with sprayed on nanoscale polymer coatings are found by measurement to produce thermal resistances that are on a par with those of conventional metallic solders. These results are achieved by reducing the high contact resistance at CNT tips, which has hindered the development of high performance thermal interface materials based on CNTs. A spray coating process is developed for depositing nanoscale coatings of polystyrene and poly-3-hexylthiophene onto CNT forests, as a bonding agent that mitigates thermal resistance by enhancing the area available for heat transfer at CNT contacts. Resistances as low as 4.9 ± 0.3 mm(2) K W(-1) are achieved for the entire polymer coated CNT interface structure. The suitability of the spray coating process for large-scale implementation and the role of polymer and CNT forest thickness in determining the thermal resistance are also examined.

  9. Integrated chemical and biological systems in nanowire structures towards nano-scale sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Rose M.

    Nanowires composed of metal and conducting polymers with integrated proteins and chemical systems have been investigated as building blocks for next-generation nano-scale sensors and assemblies. These nanowires were fabricated by combining chemical and electrochemical methods of synthesis of gold and conducting polymers in nanopores of anodized alumina membranes. Polymer nanowires were synthesized from buffer solutions as a mean to promote a biocompatible environment for the incorporation of proteins. A variety of proteins were incorporated into the polymer matrix by entrapment during polymerization that imparted the polymer material with biological functionality. Another class of composite nanowires containing electro-active conducting polymer junctions was developed for applications in chemical sensor arrays. The methodologies described in this thesis provide an inexpensive and straightforward approach to the synthesis of anisotropic nanoparticles incorporating a variety of biological and inorganic species that can be integrated to current microelectronic technologies for the development of nano-scale sensor arrays.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of the indentation of nanoscale films on a substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redkov, A. V.; Osipov, A. V.; Kukushkin, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    It is shown that atomistic modeling of the indentation of thin films using the method of molecular dynamics (MD) has some advantages on the nanoscale level in comparison to the traditional method of finite elements. Effects revealed by the MD simulations, including delamination and cracking of the film under indenter and the formation and propagation of dislocations are considered. Elastic properties of a nanoscale film on substrate have been studied using the Tersoff potential in application to the silicon carbide film on silicon (SiC/Si). The results of MD simulation qualitatively agree with recent experimental data for indentation in the SiC/Si system. The influence of parameters of the Tersoff potential on the Young's modulus of simulated materials has been studied for silicon.

  11. Nanoscale characterization of isolated individual type I collagen fibrils: polarization and piezoelectricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minary-Jolandan, Majid; Yu, Min-Feng

    2009-02-01

    Piezoresponse force microscopy was applied to directly study individual type I collagen fibrils with diameters of ~100 nm isolated from bovine Achilles tendon. It was revealed that single collagen fibrils behave predominantly as shear piezoelectric materials with a piezoelectric coefficient on the order of 1 pm V-1, and have unipolar axial polarization throughout their entire length. It was estimated that, under reasonable shear load conditions, the fibrils were capable of generating an electric potential up to tens of millivolts. The result substantiates the nanoscale origin of piezoelectricity in bone and tendons, and implies also the potential importance of the shear load-transfer mechanism, which has been the principle basis of the nanoscale mechanics model of collagen, in mechanoelectric transduction in bone.

  12. Partitioned airs at microscale and nanoscale: thermal diffusivity in ultrahigh porosity solids of nanocellulose

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Koh; Kobayashi, Yuri; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2016-01-01

    High porosity solids, such as plastic foams and aerogels, are thermally insulating. Their insulation performance strongly depends on their pore structure, which dictates the heat transfer process in the material. Understanding such a relationship is essential to realizing highly efficient thermal insulators. Herein, we compare the heat transfer properties of foams and aerogels that have very high porosities (97.3–99.7%) and an identical composition (nanocellulose). The foams feature rather closed, microscale pores formed with a thin film-like solid phase, whereas the aerogels feature nanoscale open pores formed with a nanofibrous network-like solid skeleton. Unlike the aerogel samples, the thermal diffusivity of the foam decreases considerably with a slight increase in the solid fraction. The results indicate that for suppressing the thermal diffusion of air within high porosity solids, creating microscale spaces with distinct partitions is more effective than directly blocking the free path of air molecules at the nanoscale. PMID:26830144

  13. Partitioned airs at microscale and nanoscale: thermal diffusivity in ultrahigh porosity solids of nanocellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Koh; Kobayashi, Yuri; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2016-02-01

    High porosity solids, such as plastic foams and aerogels, are thermally insulating. Their insulation performance strongly depends on their pore structure, which dictates the heat transfer process in the material. Understanding such a relationship is essential to realizing highly efficient thermal insulators. Herein, we compare the heat transfer properties of foams and aerogels that have very high porosities (97.3-99.7%) and an identical composition (nanocellulose). The foams feature rather closed, microscale pores formed with a thin film-like solid phase, whereas the aerogels feature nanoscale open pores formed with a nanofibrous network-like solid skeleton. Unlike the aerogel samples, the thermal diffusivity of the foam decreases considerably with a slight increase in the solid fraction. The results indicate that for suppressing the thermal diffusion of air within high porosity solids, creating microscale spaces with distinct partitions is more effective than directly blocking the free path of air molecules at the nanoscale.

  14. Reactivity characteristics of nanoscale zerovalent iron--silica composites for trichloroethylene remediation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Tonghua; Zhan, Jingjing; He, Jibao; Day, Christopher; Lu, Yunfeng; McPherson, Gary L; Piringer, Gerhard; John, Vijay T

    2008-06-15

    Spherical silica particles containing nanoscale zerovalent iron were synthesized through an aerosol-assisted process. These particles are effective for groundwater remediation, with the environmentally benign silica particles serving as effective carriers for nanoiron transport. Incorporation of iron into porous sub-micrometer silica particles protects ferromagnetic iron nanoparticles from aggregation and may increase their subsurface mobility. Additionally, the presence of surface silanol groups on silica particles allows control of surface properties via silanol modification using organic functional groups. Aerosolized silica particles with functional alkyl moieties, such as ethyl groups on the surface, clearly adsorb solubilized trichloroethylene (TCE) in water. These materials may therefore act as adsorbents which have coupled reactivity characteristics. The nanoscale iron/silica composite particles with controlled surface properties have the potential to be efficiently applied for in situ source depletion and in the design of permeable reactive barriers.

  15. Nanoscale x-ray imaging of deep carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, W. L.; Lin, Y.; Yang, W.; Wang, J.

    2012-12-01

    Pure carbon exists in many forms under varying synthesis conditions, and when all the oxidized and reduced types are included, this represents a huge range of structures and bonding and interesting physics and chemistry. However, a lot is still unknown about their behavior at extreme conditions. For example, we still lack fundamental equation of state data for amorphous and poorly crystalline materials at high pressure. Nanoscale x-ray microscopy allows visualization of 3D shapes and textures and direct volume determination (including melts). Development of synchrotron transmission x-ray microscopes (TXM) with 30 nm spatial resolution has enabled volume determination by imaging with accuracy rivaling x-ray diffraction of crystalline solids. We will present recent TXM measurements provide accurate P-V determination of glassy carbon compressed to above 40 GPa in a diamond anvil cell, where we previously observed a new carbon allotrope with an amorphous structure and diamond-like strength. These results demonstrate the potential for improving our understanding the mechanisms of the structure and bonding changes in these materials at high pressure.

  16. Electromigration in Sintered Nanoscale Silver Films at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calata, Jesus N.; Lu, Guo-Quan; Ngo, Khai; Nguyen, Luu

    2014-01-01

    Sintered nanoscale silver is a promising interconnection material for semiconductor devices because it provides improved joint properties compared with solder and wire bonds. It has higher electrical and thermal conductivity and is capable of higher operating temperature. Joints with die shear strength above 20 MPa can be formed at around 250°C even without applied pressure. Sintered silver joints were also found to be an order of magnitude more reliable than solder joints and wire bonds. In this work, the electromigration behavior of sintered nanosilver material under conditions of high applied current density and elevated temperature was investigated. Thin strips of sintered nanosilver formed on ceramic substrates were tested under current densities exceeding 150 kA/cm2 at temperatures of 150°C and above. Results based on the percentage change in sample resistance showed that the sintered silver lasted at least ten times longer than aluminum wire bonds. Examination of failed strips revealed that hairline cracks formed during sintering were the main cause of failure. Otherwise, defect-free samples exhibited a 10-fold increase in lifetime over wire bonds under similar conditions.

  17. Anti-counterfeit nanoscale fingerprints based on randomly distributed nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jangbae; Yun, Je Moon; Jung, Jongwook; Song, Hyunjoon; Kim, Jin-Baek; Ihee, Hyotcherl

    2014-04-01

    Counterfeiting is conducted in almost every industry, and the losses caused by it are growing as today’s world trade continues to increase. In an attempt to provide an efficient method to fight such counterfeiting, we herein demonstrate anti-counterfeit nanoscale fingerprints generated by randomly distributed nanowires. Specifically, we prepare silver nanowires coated with fluorescent dyes and cast them onto the surface of transparent PET film. The resulting non-repeatable patterns characterized by the random location of the nanowires and their fluorescent colors provide unique barcodes suitable for anti-counterfeit purposes. Counterfeiting such a fingerprint pattern is impractical and expensive; the cost of replicating it would be higher than the value of the typical target item being protected. Fingerprint patterns can be visually authenticated in a simple and straightforward manner by using an optical microscope. The concept of generating unique patterns by randomness is not limited to the materials shown in this paper and should be readily applicable to other types of materials.

  18. PHOTOELECTROCHEMISTRY AND PHOTOCATALYSIS IN NANOSCALE INORGANIC CHEMICAL SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Mallouk

    2007-05-27

    The goal of our DOE-supported research has been to explore the use of solid state materials as organizing media for, and as active components of, artificial photosynthetic systems. In this work we strive to understand how photoinduced electron and energy transfer reactions occur in the solid state, and to elucidate design principles for using nanoscale inorganic materials in photochemical energy conversion schemes. A unifying theme in this project has been to move beyond the study of simple transient charge separation to integrated chemical systems that can effect permanent charge separation in the form of energy-rich chemicals. This project explored the use of zeolites as organizing media for electron donor-acceptor systems and artificial photosynthetic assemblies. Layer-by-layer synthetic methods were developed using lamellar semiconductors, and multi-step, visible light driven energy/electron transfer cascades were studied by transient specroscopic techniques. By combining molecular photosensitizers with lamellar semiconductors and intercalated catalyst particles, the first non-sacrificial systems for visible light driven hydrogen evolution were developed and studied. Oxygen evolving catalyst particles and semiconductor nanowires were also studied with the goal of achieving photocatalytic water splitting using visible light.

  19. Nanoscale Precipitation in a Maraging Steel Studied by APFIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiller, Krystyna; Hättestrand, Mats

    2004-06-01

    This article summarizes findings from our previous investigations and recent studies concerning precipitation in a maraging steel of type 13Cr-9Ni-2Mo-2Cu (at.%) with small additions of Ti (1 at.%) and Al (0.7 at.%). The material was investigated after aging at 475°C up to 400 h using both conventional and three-dimensional atom-probe analyses. The process of phase decomposition in the steel proved to be complicated. It consisted of precipitation of several phases with different chemistry. A Cu-rich phase was first to precipitate and Mo was last in the precipitation sequence. The influence of the complex precipitation path on the material properties is discussed. The investigation clearly demonstrated the usefulness of the applied techniques for investigation of nanoscale precipitation. It is also shown that, complementary methods (such as TEM and EFTEM) giving structural and chemical information on a larger scale must be applied to explain the good properties of the steel after prolonged aging.

  20. Nanoscale precipitation in a maraging steel studied by APFIM.

    PubMed

    Stiller, Krystyna; Hättestrand, Mats

    2004-06-01

    This article summarizes findings from our previous investigations and recent studies concerning precipitation in a maraging steel of type 13Cr-9Ni-2Mo-2Cu (at.%) with small additions of Ti (1 at.%) and Al (0.7 at.%). The material was investigated after aging at 475 degrees C up to 400 h using both conventional and three-dimensional atom-probe analyses. The process of phase decomposition in the steel proved to be complicated. It consisted of precipitation of several phases with different chemistry. A Cu-rich phase was first to precipitate and Mo was last in the precipitation sequence. The influence of the complex precipitation path on the material properties is discussed. The investigation clearly demonstrated the usefulness of the applied techniques for investigation of nanoscale precipitation. It is also shown that, complementary methods (such as TEM and EFTEM) giving structural and chemical information on a larger scale must be applied to explain the good properties of the steel after prolonged aging.