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Sample records for surgical oncology patients

  1. Quality of sleep in postoperative surgical oncologic patients.

    PubMed

    Barichello, Elizabeth; Sawada, Namie Okino; Sonobe, Helena Megumi; Zago, Márcia Maria Fontão

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate surgical-oncologic patients' quality of sleep through the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire. It is an exploratory study with transversal-observational design, in 46 postoperative head & neck and urology cancer patients. The PSQI questionnaire was used to evaluate the subjective quality of sleep and the occurrence of sleep disorders. Six PSQI components were statistically significant and 78.3% of the interviewees had impaired subjective quality of sleep. Among factors leading to sleep disorders we point out: taking too long to fall asleep; waking up in the middle of the night; getting up to go to the bathroom and napping during the day. This study is expected to sensitize the nursing team regarding the need to investigate quality of sleep and causes of its disorders in cancer survivors for an effective course of action. PMID:19820854

  2. Decision making in surgical oncology.

    PubMed

    Lamb, B; Green, J S A; Vincent, C; Sevdalis, N

    2011-09-01

    Decisions in surgical oncology are increasingly being made by multi-disciplinary teams (MDTs). Although MDTs have been widely accepted as the preferred model for cancer service delivery, the process of decision making has not been well described and there is little evidence pointing to the ideal structure of an MDT. Performance in surgery has been shown to depend on non-technical skills, such as decision making, as well as patient factors and the technical skills of the healthcare team. Application of this systems approach to MDT working allows the identification of factors that affect the quality of decision making for cancer patients. In this article we review the literature on decision making in surgical oncology and by drawing from the systems approach to surgical performance we provide a framework for understanding the process of decision making in MDTs. Technical factors that affect decision making include the information about patients, robust ICT and video-conferencing equipment, a minimum dataset with expert review of radiological and pathological information, implementation and recording of the MDTs decision. Non-technical factors with an impact on decision making include attendance of team members at meetings, leadership, teamwork, open discussion, consensus on decisions and communication with patients and primary care. Optimising these factors will strengthen the decision making process and raise the quality of care for cancer patients.

  3. Decision making in surgical oncology.

    PubMed

    Lamb, B; Green, J S A; Vincent, C; Sevdalis, N

    2011-09-01

    Decisions in surgical oncology are increasingly being made by multi-disciplinary teams (MDTs). Although MDTs have been widely accepted as the preferred model for cancer service delivery, the process of decision making has not been well described and there is little evidence pointing to the ideal structure of an MDT. Performance in surgery has been shown to depend on non-technical skills, such as decision making, as well as patient factors and the technical skills of the healthcare team. Application of this systems approach to MDT working allows the identification of factors that affect the quality of decision making for cancer patients. In this article we review the literature on decision making in surgical oncology and by drawing from the systems approach to surgical performance we provide a framework for understanding the process of decision making in MDTs. Technical factors that affect decision making include the information about patients, robust ICT and video-conferencing equipment, a minimum dataset with expert review of radiological and pathological information, implementation and recording of the MDTs decision. Non-technical factors with an impact on decision making include attendance of team members at meetings, leadership, teamwork, open discussion, consensus on decisions and communication with patients and primary care. Optimising these factors will strengthen the decision making process and raise the quality of care for cancer patients. PMID:20719499

  4. The Prevalence of HIV in Cancer Patients at the Surgical Oncology Unit of Donka University Hospital of Conakry (Guinea)

    PubMed Central

    Traore, Bangaly; Bah, Thierno Souleymane; Traore, Fode Amara; Sow, Mamadou Saliou; Diane, Solomana; Keita, Mamady; Cisse, Mohamed; Koulibaly, Moussa; Camara, Naby Daouda

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To determine the prevalence of HIV infection among patients seen at the surgical oncology unit of Donka (Conakry, Guinea). Method. We conducted a retrospective and descriptive study of HIV infection in cancer patients from May 2007 to December 2012. Social characteristics (age, gender, marital status, and education) and immune status (HIV type, CD4 count) were reviewed. Results. Out of 2598 cancer patients, 54 (2.1%) tested positive for HIV. There were 11 (20.4%) defining AIDS and 43 (79.6%) nondefining AIDS cancers. The most frequent cancers were breast (14) (26.0%), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (6) (11.1%), liver (6) (11.1%), eye and annexes (6) (11.1%), and cervical cancer (5) (9.3%). These patients were female in 34 (63.0%) and had a median age of 39 years and body mass index was 20,3 Kg/m2. They were unschooled in 40 (74.1%) and married in 35 (64.8%). CD4 count showed a median of 317 cells/mL. Antiretroviral treatment was performed in 40 (74.1%). Conclusion. HIV prevalence is higher in patients in our unit of surgical oncology. Breast cancer was the most common in this association. A national survey of a large sample is needed to determine the true prevalence and impact of HIV on cancer prognosis. PMID:26770197

  5. Clinical and oncological outcomes after surgical excision of parotid gland tumours in patients aged over 80 years.

    PubMed

    Fakhry, N; Aldosari, B; Michel, J; Giorgi, R; Collet, C; Santini, L; Giovanni, A; Dessi, P

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the surgical and long-term outcomes of a series of patients aged over 80 years, operated on for parotid neoplasms. Among 614 parotidectomies for neoplasms performed between 1998 and 2008, 34 patients (5.5%) aged over 80 years were identified retrospectively. Pathological examination showed a malignant tumour in 24 and a benign tumour in 10 cases. Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were determined by Kaplan-Meier analysis. A search for parameters that could influence the postoperative complication rate and long-term outcomes was carried out by univariate analysis. There was no postoperative death. Eight patients (24%) had postoperative complications. Malignant histopathology (P=0.05) and radical resection (P=0.033) were found to have a significant negative impact on the postoperative course. Focusing on malignant tumours, only histopathological type (metastasis vs primary tumour) was found to have a negative impact on OS. The 2- and 5-year OS rates were 86% and 86%, respectively, for primary tumours, and 67% and 29%, respectively, for metastasis (P=0.05). Malignant or benign histopathology had no impact on OS. Our results showed acceptable clinical and long-term oncological outcomes in very elderly patients operated on for parotid tumours, including malignant tumours.

  6. Preoperative quality of life and surgical outcomes in gynecologic oncology patients: A new predictor of operative risk?

    PubMed Central

    Doll, KM; Snavely, AC; Kalinowski, A; Irwin, DE; Bensen, JT; Bae-Jump, V; Boggess, JF; Soper, JT; Brewster, WR; Gehrig, PA

    2014-01-01

    Objective Quality of life (QoL) for women with gynecologic malignancies is predictive of chemotherapy related toxicity and overall survival but has not been studied in relation to surgical outcomes and hospital readmissions. Our goal was to evaluate the association between baseline, pre-operative QoL measures and 30-day post-operative morbidity and health resource utilization by gynecologic oncology patients. Methods We analyzed prospectively collected survey data from an institution-wide cohort study. Patients were enrolled from 8/2012 – 6/2013 and medical records data was abstracted (demographics, comorbid conditions, and operative outcomes). Responses from several validated health-related QoL instruments were collected. Bivariate tests and multivariable linear and logistic regression models were used to evaluate factors associated with QoL scores. Results Of 182 women with suspected gynecologic malignancies, 152 (84%) were surveyed pre-operatively and 148 (81%) underwent surgery. Uterine (94; 63.5%), ovarian (26; 17.5%), cervical (15; 10%), vulvar/vaginal (8; 5.4%), and other (5; 3.4%) cancers were represented. There were 37 (25%) cases of postoperative morbidity (PM), 18 (12%) unplanned ER visits, 9(6%) unplanned clinic visits, and 17 (11.5%) hospital readmissions(HR) within 30 days of surgery. On adjusted analysis, lower functional well-being scores resulted in increased odds of PM (OR 1.07, 95%CI 1.01-.1.21) and HR (OR 1.11, 95%CI 1.03-1.19). A subjective global assessment score was also strongly associated with HR (OR 1.89, 95%CI 1.14, 3.16). Conclusion Lower pre-operative QoL scores are significantly associated with post-operative morbidity and hospital readmission in gynecologic cancer patients. This relationship may be a novel indicator of operative risk. PMID:24726615

  7. Intraoperative OCT in Surgical Oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    South, Fredrick A.; Marjanovic, Marina; Boppart, Stephen A.

    The global incidence of cancer is rising, putting an increasingly heavy burden upon health care. The need to effectively detect and treat cancer is one of the most significant problems faced in health care today. Effective cancer treatment typically depends upon early detection and, for most solid tumors, successful removal of the cancerous tumor tissue via surgical procedures. Difficulties arise when attempting to differentiate between normal and tumor tissue during surgery. Unaided visual examination of the tissue provides only superficial, low-resolution information and often with little visual contrast. Many imaging modalities widely used for cancer screening and diagnostics are of limited use in the operating room due to low spatial resolution. OCT provides cellular resolution allowing for more precise localization of the tumor tissue. It is also relatively inexpensive and highly portable, making it well suited for intraoperative applications.

  8. Length of Stay in Ambulatory Surgical Oncology Patients at High Risk for Sleep Apnea as Predicted by STOP-BANG Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Faiz, Saadia A.; Hernandez, Mike; Bashoura, Lara; Cherian, Sujith V.; French, Katy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The STOP-BANG questionnaire has been used to identify surgical patients at risk for undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by classifying patients as low risk (LR) if STOP-BANG score < 3 or high risk (HR) if STOP-BANG score ≥ 3. Few studies have examined whether postoperative complications are increased in HR patients and none have been described in oncologic patients. Objective. This retrospective study examined if HR patients experience increased complications evidenced by an increased length of stay (LOS) in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU). Methods. We retrospectively measured LOS and the frequency of oxygen desaturation (<93%) in cancer patients who were given the STOP-BANG questionnaire prior to cystoscopy for urologic disease in an ambulatory surgery center. Results. The majority of patients in our study were men (77.7%), over the age of 50 (90.1%), and had BMI < 30 kg/m2 (88.4%). STOP-BANG results were obtained on 404 patients. Cumulative incidence of the time to discharge between HR and the LR groups was plotted. By 8 hours, LR patients showed a higher cumulative probability of being discharged early (80% versus 74%, P = 0.008). Conclusions. Urologic oncology patients at HR for OSA based on the STOP-BANG questionnaire were less likely to be discharged early from the PACU compared to LR patients.

  9. Length of Stay in Ambulatory Surgical Oncology Patients at High Risk for Sleep Apnea as Predicted by STOP-BANG Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, Diwakar D; Faiz, Saadia A; Hernandez, Mike; Kowalski, Alicia M; Bashoura, Lara; Goravanchi, Farzin; Cherian, Sujith V; Rebello, Elizabeth; Kee, Spencer S; French, Katy E

    2016-01-01

    Background. The STOP-BANG questionnaire has been used to identify surgical patients at risk for undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by classifying patients as low risk (LR) if STOP-BANG score < 3 or high risk (HR) if STOP-BANG score ≥ 3. Few studies have examined whether postoperative complications are increased in HR patients and none have been described in oncologic patients. Objective. This retrospective study examined if HR patients experience increased complications evidenced by an increased length of stay (LOS) in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU). Methods. We retrospectively measured LOS and the frequency of oxygen desaturation (<93%) in cancer patients who were given the STOP-BANG questionnaire prior to cystoscopy for urologic disease in an ambulatory surgery center. Results. The majority of patients in our study were men (77.7%), over the age of 50 (90.1%), and had BMI < 30 kg/m(2) (88.4%). STOP-BANG results were obtained on 404 patients. Cumulative incidence of the time to discharge between HR and the LR groups was plotted. By 8 hours, LR patients showed a higher cumulative probability of being discharged early (80% versus 74%, P = 0.008). Conclusions. Urologic oncology patients at HR for OSA based on the STOP-BANG questionnaire were less likely to be discharged early from the PACU compared to LR patients. PMID:27610133

  10. Length of Stay in Ambulatory Surgical Oncology Patients at High Risk for Sleep Apnea as Predicted by STOP-BANG Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Faiz, Saadia A.; Hernandez, Mike; Bashoura, Lara; Cherian, Sujith V.; French, Katy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The STOP-BANG questionnaire has been used to identify surgical patients at risk for undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by classifying patients as low risk (LR) if STOP-BANG score < 3 or high risk (HR) if STOP-BANG score ≥ 3. Few studies have examined whether postoperative complications are increased in HR patients and none have been described in oncologic patients. Objective. This retrospective study examined if HR patients experience increased complications evidenced by an increased length of stay (LOS) in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU). Methods. We retrospectively measured LOS and the frequency of oxygen desaturation (<93%) in cancer patients who were given the STOP-BANG questionnaire prior to cystoscopy for urologic disease in an ambulatory surgery center. Results. The majority of patients in our study were men (77.7%), over the age of 50 (90.1%), and had BMI < 30 kg/m2 (88.4%). STOP-BANG results were obtained on 404 patients. Cumulative incidence of the time to discharge between HR and the LR groups was plotted. By 8 hours, LR patients showed a higher cumulative probability of being discharged early (80% versus 74%, P = 0.008). Conclusions. Urologic oncology patients at HR for OSA based on the STOP-BANG questionnaire were less likely to be discharged early from the PACU compared to LR patients. PMID:27610133

  11. ESPEN Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition: non-surgical oncology.

    PubMed

    Bozzetti, F; Arends, J; Lundholm, K; Micklewright, A; Zurcher, G; Muscaritoli, M

    2009-08-01

    Parenteral nutrition offers the possibility of increasing or ensuring nutrient intake in patients in whom normal food intake is inadequate and enteral nutrition is not feasible, is contraindicated or is not accepted by the patient. These guidelines are intended to provide evidence-based recommendations for the use of parenteral nutrition in cancer patients. They were developed by an interdisciplinary expert group in accordance with accepted standards, are based on the most relevant publications of the last 30 years and share many of the conclusions of the ESPEN guidelines on enteral nutrition in oncology. Under-nutrition and cachexia occur frequently in cancer patients and are indicators of poor prognosis and, per se, responsible for excess morbidity and mortality. Many indications for parenteral nutrition parallel those for enteral nutrition (weight loss or reduction in food intake for more than 7-10 days), but only those who, for whatever reason cannot be fed orally or enterally, are candidates to receive parenteral nutrition. A standard nutritional regimen may be recommended for short-term parenteral nutrition, while in cachectic patients receiving intravenous feeding for several weeks a high fat-to-glucose ratio may be advised because these patients maintain a high capacity to metabolize fats. The limited nutritional response to the parenteral nutrition reflects more the presence of metabolic derangements which are characteristic of the cachexia syndrome (or merely the short duration of the nutritional support) rather than the inadequacy of the nutritional regimen. Perioperative parenteral nutrition is only recommended in malnourished patients if enteral nutrition is not feasible. In non-surgical well-nourished oncologic patients routine parenteral nutrition is not recommended because it has proved to offer no advantage and is associated with increased morbidity. A benefit, however, is reported in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

  12. Fighting Global Disparities in Cancer Care: A Surgical Oncology View.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, Harald J; Wobbes, Theo; Heineman, Erik; Haryono, Samuel; Aryandono, Teguh; Balch, Charles M

    2016-07-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death globally after cardiovascular disease. Long-term cancer survival has improved in the Western world due to early detection and the use of effective combined treatment modalities, as well as the development of effective immunotherapy and drug-targeted therapy. Surgery is still the mainstay for most solid tumors; however, low- and middle-income countries are facing an increasing lack of primary surgical care for easily treatable conditions, including breast, colon, and head and neck cancers. In this paper, a surgical oncology view is presented to elaborate how the Western surgical oncologist can take part in the 'surgical fight' against global disparities in cancer care, and a plea is made to strive for structural solutions, such as a partnership in surgical oncology training. The pros and cons of the use of eHealth and mHealth technologies and education programs for schools and the community are discussed as these create an opportunity to reach a large portion of the population in these countries, at low cost and with high impact. PMID:27038459

  13. [Rethinking clinical research in surgical oncology. From comic opera to quality control].

    PubMed

    Evrard, Serge

    2016-01-01

    The evidence base for the effectiveness of surgical interventions is relatively poor and data from large, randomized prospective studies are rare with often a poor quality. Many efforts have been made to increase the number of high quality randomized trials in surgery and theoretical proposals have been put forward to improve the situation, but practical implementation of these proposals is seriously lacking. The consequences of this policy are not trivial; with very few patients included in surgical oncology trials, this represents wasted opportunity for advances in cancer treatment. In this review, we cover the difficulties inherent to clinical research in surgical oncology, such as quality control, equipoise, accrual, and funding and promote alternative designs to the randomized controlled trial. Although the classic randomized controlled trial has a valid but limited place in surgical oncology, other prospective designs need to be promoted as a new deal. This new deal not only implicates surgeons but also journal editors, tender jury, as well as regulatory bodies to cover legal gaps currently surrounding surgical innovation.

  14. The principals of surgical oncology: diagnosis and staging.

    PubMed

    Liptak, Julius M

    2009-09-01

    The surgical treatment of neoplasms is one of the most common procedures performed in small animal practice. The proper approach to surgical oncology requires a knowledge of tumor types and their biologic behavior, different treatment modalities, and prognosis. A thorough physical examination is required to determine the presence and extent of a tumor, evaluate regional lymph nodes, and identify comorbid or paraneoplastic conditions that may influence anesthetic and surgical management. Various imaging modalities can be used for clinical staging to determine the location, size, and extent of a local tumor, as well as the presence of regional and distant metastasis. Biopsy of the tumor is often necessary to identify tumor type. Fine-needle aspiration, needle-core biopsy, incisional biopsy, or excisional biopsy may be used. The results of clinical staging tests and tumor biopsy are then used to ascertain treatment options and prognosis.

  15. Surgical education and training program development for gynecologic oncology: American perspective.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Mitchel S; Bodurka, Diane C

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide information about gynecologic oncology fellowship training and guidance in program development. The characteristics necessary for a physician to develop into a successful gynecologic oncologist include an extensive fund of knowledge related to the subspecialty, strong interpersonal skills, the ability to practice within the complex systems required for management of gynecologic cancer patients, surgical expertise, and the clinical ability to provide comprehensive oncologic care for these women. In order for a trainee to acquire these skills, a gynecologic oncology training program must accept only highly qualified individuals as fellows, have a dedicated core faculty, practice in a supportive environment that has appropriate facilities, and provide adequate clinical material. The gynecologic oncology training program must be organized with an emphasis on education of the fellows. Part of the educational program is formal (lectures, assigned reading, basic skill sets, etc.). Training in clinical and surgical skills is a day-to-day process that occurs during the course of patient care. One requirement of The American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ABOG) is that the fellow spends 12 months of protected time doing research. Fellows are also required to take 2 courses, one in biostatistics and one in cancer biology. A thesis of publishable quality is also required. All programs must perform ongoing quality assurance and reassessment of potential areas for improvement. ABOG is responsible for the accreditation and ongoing monitoring of the fellowship programs.

  16. The impact of sarcopenia on survival and complications in surgical oncology: A review of the current literature.

    PubMed

    Joglekar, Savita; Nau, Peter N; Mezhir, James J

    2015-10-01

    Sarcopenia is the subclinical loss of skeletal muscle and strength and has been extensively studied in both the cancer and surgical literature. Specifically, sarcopenia has gained significant recognition as an important prognostic factor for both complications and survival in cancer patients. Herein, we review the current literature to date highlighting the specific impact of sarcopenia in patients undergoing oncologic procedures.

  17. A structured strategy to combine education for advanced MIS training in surgical oncology training programs.

    PubMed

    Brar, S S; Wright, F; Okrainec, A; Smith, A J

    2011-09-01

    Changing realities in surgery and surgical technique have heightened the need for agile adaptation in training programs. Current guidelines reflect the growing acceptance and adoption of the use of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in oncology. North American general surgery residents are often not adequately skilled in advanced laparoscopic surgery skills at the completion of their residency. Presently, advanced laparoscopic surgery training during surgical oncology fellowship training occurs on an ad-hoc basis in many surgical oncology programs. We present a rational and template for a structured training in advanced minimally invasive surgical techniques during surgical oncology fellowship training. The structure of the program seeks to incorporate evidence-based strategies in MIS training from a comprehensive review of the literature, while maintaining essential elements of rigorous surgical oncology training. Fellows in this stream will train and certify in the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) course. Fellows will participate in the didactic oncology seminar series continuously throughout the 27 months training period. Fellows will complete one full year of dedicated MIS training, followed by 15 months of surgical oncology training. Minimal standards for case volume will be expected for MIS cases and training will be tailored to meet the career goals of the fellows. We propose that a formalized MIS-Surgical Oncology Fellowship will allow trainees to benefit from an effective training curriculum and furthermore, that will allow for graduates to lead in a cancer surgery milieu increasingly focused on minimally invasive approaches.

  18. Thyroid Disorders in the Oncology Patient.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Kari

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid disease and cancer diagnoses are common conditions likely to coexist. Optimal management requires appropriate diagnostic testing and consideration of a number of factors, including overall health status and prognosis. Hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism can lead to a number of symptoms that may affect not only quality of life but can interfere with the patient's ability to tolerate cancer treatment. Imaging studies performed for cancer staging can identify incidental structural abnormalities in the thyroid, which should be assessed with dedicated neck ultrasonography and possibly fine-needle aspiration. Incidental thyroid cancer is most often less urgent than the patient's presenting malignancy and can be addressed surgically when appropriate in the context of other treatments (i.e., chemotherapy). Providers working in an oncology setting, as well as primary care providers, should be aware of medications that are associated with hormonal abnormalities. Any patient with a history of neck or brain radiation therapy is at risk of developing hypothyroidism and possibly other endocrinopathies. Complex or very ill patients may benefit from a multidisciplinary approach that utilizes the experience of a knowledgeable endocrinologist. PMID:26649243

  19. Evaluation and Management of the Geriatric Urologic Oncology Patient

    PubMed Central

    McKibben, Maxim J.; Smith, Angela B.

    2014-01-01

    The geriatric population presents a unique set of challenges in urologic oncology. In addition to the known natural history of disease, providers must also consider patient factors such as functional and nutritional status, comorbidities and social support when determining the treatment plan. The development of frailty measures and biomarkers to estimate surgical risk shows promise, with several assessment tools predictive of surgical complications. Decreased dependence on chronologic age is important when assessing surgical fitness, as age cutoffs prevent appropriate treatment of many elderly patients who would benefit from surgery. Within bladder, kidney and prostate cancers, continued refinement of surgical techniques offers a broader array of options for the geriatric patient than previously available. PMID:25678987

  20. Thyroid Disorders in the Oncology Patient

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Kari

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid disease and cancer diagnoses are common conditions likely to coexist. Optimal management requires appropriate diagnostic testing and consideration of a number of factors, including overall health status and prognosis. Hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism can lead to a number of symptoms that may affect not only quality of life but can interfere with the patient’s ability to tolerate cancer treatment. Imaging studies performed for cancer staging can identify incidental structural abnormalities in the thyroid, which should be assessed with dedicated neck ultrasonography and possibly fine-needle aspiration. Incidental thyroid cancer is most often less urgent than the patient’s presenting malignancy and can be addressed surgically when appropriate in the context of other treatments (i.e., chemotherapy). Providers working in an oncology setting, as well as primary care providers, should be aware of medications that are associated with hormonal abnormalities. Any patient with a history of neck or brain radiation therapy is at risk of developing hypothyroidism and possibly other endocrinopathies. Complex or very ill patients may benefit from a multidisciplinary approach that utilizes the experience of a knowledgeable endocrinologist. PMID:26649243

  1. Robotic surgery in gynecologic oncology: evolution of a new surgical paradigm.

    PubMed

    Boggess, John F

    2007-01-01

    Robotic surgical platforms were first developed with telesurgery in mind. Conceptualized by NASA and the military to provide surgical expertise to remote locations, some telesurgical success has been documented, but progress has been held back by communication bandwidth limitations. Telepresence surgery, where the surgeon is in proximity to the patient but is provided with an ergonomic console equipped with three-dimensional vision and autonomous control of wristed laparoscopic surgical instruments and energy sources, has shown efficacy first in cardiac and then urologic cancer surgery. Interest is currently focused on the application of this technology in the field of gynecology, with techniques being described to perform simple hysterectomy, myomectomy, tubal anastomosis, and pelvic reconstruction procedures. This article will review the application of robotic- and computer-assisted surgery in the specialty of gynecologic oncology. PMID:25484936

  2. Robotic surgery in gynecologic oncology: evolution of a new surgical paradigm.

    PubMed

    Boggess, John F

    2007-01-01

    Robotic surgical platforms were first developed with telesurgery in mind. Conceptualized by NASA and the military to provide surgical expertise to remote locations, some telesurgical success has been documented, but progress has been held back by communication bandwidth limitations. Telepresence surgery, where the surgeon is in proximity to the patient but is provided with an ergonomic console equipped with three-dimensional vision and autonomous control of wristed laparoscopic surgical instruments and energy sources, has shown efficacy first in cardiac and then urologic cancer surgery. Interest is currently focused on the application of this technology in the field of gynecology, with techniques being described to perform simple hysterectomy, myomectomy, tubal anastomosis, and pelvic reconstruction procedures. This article will review the application of robotic- and computer-assisted surgery in the specialty of gynecologic oncology.

  3. Training in surgical oncology - the role of VR simulation.

    PubMed

    Lewis, T M; Aggarwal, R; Rajaretnam, N; Grantcharov, T P; Darzi, A

    2011-09-01

    There have been dramatic changes in surgical training over the past two decades which have resulted in a number of concerns for the development of future surgeons. Changes in the structure of cancer services, working hour restrictions and a commitment to patient safety has led to a reduction in training opportunities that are available to the surgeon in training. Simulation and in particular virtual reality (VR) simulation has been heralded as an effective adjunct to surgical training. Advances in VR simulation has allowed trainees to practice realistic full length procedures in a safe and controlled environment, where mistakes are permitted and can be used as learning points. There is considerable evidence to demonstrate that the VR simulation can be used to enhance technical skills and improve operating room performance. Future work should focus on the cost effectiveness and predictive validity of VR simulation, which in turn would increase the uptake of simulation and enhance surgical training.

  4. [Geriatric intervention in oncology for elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Saint-Jean, O; LeGuen, J

    2015-10-01

    Half of all cancers occur in patients older than 70 years. National cancer plans in France promote the emergence of geriatric oncology, whose aim is that every elder cancer patient receives a pertinent treatment, according to his frailty. Geriatric intervention has been evaluated in various conditions or patients since 30 years. Meta-analysis has shown the benefits on autonomy and mortality. But benefits are related to the organization of geriatric care, especially when integrated care is provided. Literature on geriatric oncology is relatively poor. But it is certain that a geriatric comprehensive assessment provided a lot of important information for the care of cancer patients, leading to a modification of cancer treatment in many cases. Randomized trials will soon begin to evaluate the benefits of geriatric integrated care for elder cancer patients, in terms of mortality and quality of life. Actually, in oncogeriatic coordination units, pilot organizations are developed for the satisfaction of patients and professionals.

  5. Oncological and Functional Outcome after Surgical Treatment of Early Glottic Carcinoma without Anterior Commissure Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Milovanovic, Jovica; Jotic, Ana; Djukic, Vojko; Pavlovic, Bojan; Trivic, Aleksandar; Krejovic-Trivic, Sanja; Milovanovic, Andjela; Milovanovic, Aleksandar; Artiko, Vera; Banko, Bojan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Glottic carcinoma can be successfully diagnosed in its early stages and treated with high percentage of success. Organ preservation and optimal functional outcomes could be achieved with wide array of surgical techniques for early glottic cancer, including endoscopic approaches or open laryngeal preserving procedures, making surgery the preferred method of treatment of early glottic carcinoma in the last few years. Material and Methods. Prospective study was done on 59 patients treated for Tis and T1a glottic carcinoma over a one-year time period in a tertiary medical center. Patients were treated with endoscopic laser cordectomy (types II–IV cordectomies according to European Laryngological Society classification of endoscopic cordectomies) and open cordectomy through laryngofissure. Follow-up period was 60 months. Clinical and oncological results were followed postoperatively. Voice quality after the treatment was assessed using multidimensional voice analysis 12 months after the treatment. Results. There were no significant differences between oncological and functional results among two groups of patients, though complications were more frequent in patients treated with open cordectomy. Conclusion. Endoscopic laser surgery should be the first treatment of choice in treatment of early glottic carcinomas, though open approach through laryngofissure should be available for selected cases where anatomical factors present limiting adequate tumor removal. PMID:24991554

  6. Plastic Surgery for the Oncological Patient

    PubMed Central

    Daigeler, Adrien; Harati, Kamran; Kapalschinski, Nicolai; Goertz, Ole; Hirsch, Tobias; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Kolbenschlag, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    The therapy of oncological patients has seen tremendous progress in the last decades. For most entities, it has been possible to improve the survival as well as the quality of life of the affected patients. To supply optimal cancer care, a multidisciplinary approach is vital. Together with oncologists, radiotherapists and other physicians, plastic surgeons can contribute to providing such care in all stages of treatment. From biopsies to the resection of advanced tumors, the coverage of the resulting defects and even palliative care, plastic surgery techniques can help to improve survival and quality of life as well as mitigate negative effects of radiation or the problems arising from exulcerating tumors in a palliative setting. This article aims to present the mentioned possibilities by illustrating selected cases and reviewing the literature. Especially in oncological patients, restoring their quality of life with the highest patient safety possible is of utmost importance. PMID:25593966

  7. A career in surgical oncology: finding meaning, balance, and personal satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Shanafelt, Tait

    2008-02-01

    The practice of surgical oncology provides opportunities for both personal distress as well as personal satisfaction. While many surgical oncologists experience career burnout, others derive great meaning and satisfaction from their work. In this article, we review the literature on surgeon burnout, discuss potential personal and professional consequences, and consider steps individual surgeons can take to promote personal and professional satisfaction.

  8. Improving patient safety in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Hendee, William R.; Herman, Michael G.

    2011-01-15

    Beginning in the 1990s, and emphasized in 2000 with the release of an Institute of Medicine report, healthcare providers and institutions have dedicated time and resources to reducing errors that impact the safety and well-being of patients. But in January 2010 the first of a series of articles appeared in the New York Times that described errors in radiation oncology that grievously impacted patients. In response, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine and the American Society of Radiation Oncology sponsored a working meeting entitled ''Safety in Radiation Therapy: A Call to Action''. The meeting attracted 400 attendees, including medical physicists, radiation oncologists, medical dosimetrists, radiation therapists, hospital administrators, regulators, and representatives of equipment manufacturers. The meeting was cohosted by 14 organizations in the United States and Canada. The meeting yielded 20 recommendations that provide a pathway to reducing errors and improving patient safety in radiation therapy facilities everywhere.

  9. Small renal masses in the elderly: Contemporary treatment approaches and comparative oncological outcomes of nonsurgical and surgical strategies

    PubMed Central

    Vetterlein, Malte W.; Jindal, Tarun; Becker, Andreas; Regier, Marc; Kluth, Luis A.; Tilki, Derya

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decades, there has been a significant stage migration in renal cell carcinoma and especially older patients are getting diagnosed more frequently with low stage disease, such as small renal masses ≤4 cm of size. Considering the particular risk profile of an older population, often presenting with a nonnegligible comorbidity profile and progressive renal dysfunction, treatment approaches beyond aggressive radical surgical procedures have come to the fore. We sought to give a contemporary overview of the available different treatment strategies for incidental small renal masses in an elderly population with the focus on comparative oncological outcomes of nonsurgical and surgical modalities. PMID:27437532

  10. Small renal masses in the elderly: Contemporary treatment approaches and comparative oncological outcomes of nonsurgical and surgical strategies.

    PubMed

    Vetterlein, Malte W; Jindal, Tarun; Becker, Andreas; Regier, Marc; Kluth, Luis A; Tilki, Derya; Chun, Felix K-H

    2016-07-01

    Over the last decades, there has been a significant stage migration in renal cell carcinoma and especially older patients are getting diagnosed more frequently with low stage disease, such as small renal masses ≤4 cm of size. Considering the particular risk profile of an older population, often presenting with a nonnegligible comorbidity profile and progressive renal dysfunction, treatment approaches beyond aggressive radical surgical procedures have come to the fore. We sought to give a contemporary overview of the available different treatment strategies for incidental small renal masses in an elderly population with the focus on comparative oncological outcomes of nonsurgical and surgical modalities. PMID:27437532

  11. The oncological patient in the palliative situation.

    PubMed

    Eychmueller, Steffen; Zwahlen, Diana; Fliedner, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Palliative care approaches the patient and his or her suffering with a biopsychosocial-spiritual model. Thus, it is the strength of palliative care to complement the diagnosis driven approach of medical cancer care by a problem and resources-based assessment, participatory care plan, and patient-directed interventions. Interventions need to reflect timely prognosis, target population (the patient, the family carer, the professional), and level of trust and remaining energy. In palliative care the relevance of psycho-oncological aspects in the care of the terminally ill is considerable in the understanding of the overall suffering of patients approaching death and their loved ones and in their care and support. There is little evidence to date in terms of clinical benefit of specific psycho-oncological interventions in the last months or weeks of life, but there is evidence on effects of stress reduction and reduced anxiety if locus of control can stay within the patient as long as possible. One major difficulty in psychosocial research at the end-of-life, however, is defining patient relevant outcomes. PMID:24305769

  12. Rehabilitation of Oncology Patients with Hard Palate Defects Part 2: Principles of Obturator Design.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rahat; Altaie, Asmaa; Nattress, Brian

    2015-06-01

    The first part of this series on the conventional rehabilitation of oncology patients with hard palate defects discussed the dental challenges posed by oncology patients and the surgical/restorative planning interface for conventional dental rehabilitation. This article will describe Aramany's classification of hard palate defects, Brown's classification of palatal defects and focus on the basic principles of obturator design which need to be appreciated when prosthetically rehabilitating a patient with a hard palate defect. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: A good understanding of basic removable prosthodontic theory relating to denture design, dental materials science and head and neck anatomy is a prerequisite when designing an obturator for a patient. PMID:26964444

  13. Making cancer visible--Dyes in surgical oncology.

    PubMed

    Yap, Kiryu K; Neuhaus, Susan J

    2016-03-01

    Dyes share an intricate relationship with oncology. Dyes can cause cancer as chemical carcinogens, but can also be harnessed against cancer when used as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. Histopathology, imaging, and newer molecular diagnostics all rely on dyes, and their use in sentinel lymph node biopsies and intra-operative imaging has helped drive a paradigm shift in cancer surgery towards minimally-invasive and organ sparing approaches with enhanced resection accuracy. As therapeutic agents, the cytotoxicity of specific dyes can be employed in direct chemo-ablation or in photodynamic therapy. The same agent can have dual functionalities in cancer detection and treatment, in a novel field known as theranostics. This is facilitated by newer generation dyes conjugated with tumour-targeting probes such as antibodies, and these bio-conjugate agents can also incorporate nanotechnology or radio-isotopes. Further advances will be closely aligned with our increasing understanding of molecular oncology, and will form a new generation of cancer detection and treatment agents that promote precision medicine for cancer. Dyes and their roles have evolved and been reinvented, but they remain relevant as ever. This review explores the fascinating history of dyes, and their place in the state-of-the-art of oncology.

  14. Protecting pediatric oncology patients from influenza.

    PubMed

    Kersun, Leslie S; Reilly, Anne F; Coffin, Susan E; Sullivan, Kathleen E

    2013-01-01

    Influenza is a common respiratory pathogen. Its severity can be unpredictable, but people with chronic illness are at increased risk of severe infection, complications, and death from influenza. This review examines evidence to support various strategies to protect pediatric oncology patients from influenza-related morbidity. Influenza vaccination should be considered standard. Additional evidence-supported measures include antiviral treatment, antiviral prophylaxis, cohorting of patients, and hospital infection control measures. Data from other high-risk populations support the vaccination of family members, double-dose or high-dose vaccination, and the use of barrier methods. These measures have the potential to optimize patient outcomes because there will be fewer treatment interruptions for acute illness. These strategies can also protect patients from prolonged hospitalizations and morbidity related to influenza.

  15. Cutaneous side effects of chemotherapy in pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Ceylan, Can; Kantar, Mehmet; Tuna, Arzu; Ertam, Ilgen; Aksoylar, Serap; Günaydın, Aslı; Çetingül, Nazan

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric oncology patients can present with various skin lesions related to both primary disease and immunosuppressive treatments. This study aimed to evaluate the cutaneous side effects of chemotherapy in pediatric oncology patients. Sixty-five pediatric oncology patients who were scheduled to undergo chemotherapy from May 2011 to May 2013 were included in the study. Three patients were excluded from the results, as 2 patients died during treatment and 1 patient withdrew from the study; therefore, a total of 62 patients were evaluated for mucocutaneous findings. Patients were grouped according to their oncological diagnoses and a statistical analysis was performed. There was no statistical significance in the incidence of cutaneous side effects of chemotherapy among the different diagnostic groups. Awareness among dermatologists of the possible cutaneous side effects of chemotherapy in pediatric patients and their causes can promote early diagnosis and treatment in this patient population.

  16. Patient-specific surgical simulation.

    PubMed

    Soler, Luc; Marescaux, Jacques

    2008-02-01

    Technological innovations of the twentieth century have provided medicine and surgery with new tools for education and therapy definition. Thus, by combining Medical Imaging and Virtual Reality, patient-specific applications providing preoperative surgical simulation have become possible.

  17. [Strategies for improving care of oncologic patients: SHARE Project results].

    PubMed

    Reñones Crego, María de la Concepción; Fernández Pérez, Dolores; Vena Fernández, Carmen; Zamudio Sánchez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Cancer treatment is a major burden for the patient and its family that requires an individualized management by healthcare professionals. Nurses are in charge of coordinating care and are the closest healthcare professionals to patient and family; however, in Spain, there are not standard protocols yet for the management of oncology patients. The Spanish Oncology Nursing Society developed between 2012 and 2014 the SHARE project, with the aim of establishing strategies to improve quality of life and nursing care in oncology patients. It was developed in 3 phases. First, a literature search and review was performed to identify nursing strategies, interventions and tools to improve cancer patients' care. At the second stage, these interventions were agreed within a group of oncology nursing experts; and at the third phase, a different group of experts in oncology care categorized the interventions to identify the ones with highest priority and most feasible to be implemented. As a result, 3 strategic actions were identified to improve nursing care during cancer treatment: To provide a named nurse to carry out the follow up process by attending to the clinic or telephonic consultation, develop therapeutic education with adapted protocols for each tumor type and treatment and ensure specific training for nurses on the management of the cancer patients. Strategic actions proposed in this paper aim to improve cancer patients' healthcare and quality of life through the development of advanced nursing roles based on a higher level of autonomy, situating nurses as care coordinators to assure an holistic care in oncology patients.

  18. Sport and oxidative stress in oncological patients.

    PubMed

    Knop, K; Schwan, R; Bongartz, M; Bloch, W; Brixius, K; Baumann, F

    2011-12-01

    Oxidative stress is thought to be an important factor in the onset, progression and recurrence of cancer. In order to investigate how it is influenced by physical activity, we measured oxidative stress and antioxidative capacity (aoC) in 12 women with breast cancer and 6 men with prostate cancer, before and after long hiking trips. Before the hike, the men had a ROS-concentration of 1.8±0.6 mM H2O2 and an aoC of 0.7±0.6 mM Trolox-equivalent (Tro), while the women had a ROS-concentration of 3.1±0.7 mM H2O2 and an aoC of 1.2±0.2 mM Tro. After the hike, women showed no significant change in ROS and a significant increase in aoC (1.3±0.2 mM Tro), while the ROS concentration in men increased significantly (2.1±0.3 mM H2O2) and their aoC decreased (0.25±0.1 mM Tro). After a regenerative phase, the ROS concentration of the men decreased to 1.7±0.4 mM H2O2 and their aoC recovered significantly (1.2±0.4 mM Tro), while the women presented no significant change in the concentration of H2O2 but showed an ulterior increase in antioxidant capacity (2.05±0.43 mM Tro). From this data we conclude that physical training programs as for example long distance hiking trips can improve the aoC in the blood of oncological patients.

  19. Sub-specialty training in head and neck surgical oncology in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Manganaris, Argyris; Black, Myles; Balfour, Alistair; Hartley, Christopher; Jeannon, Jean-Pierre; Simo, Ricard

    2009-07-01

    Sub-specialty training in otorhinolaryngology and head and neck surgery (ORL-HNS) is not standardised across European Union (EU) states and remains diverse. The objective of this study was to assess the current status of sub-specialty training programmes in head and neck surgical oncology within the European Union (EU-15). A postal questionnaire was distributed to 41 representative members of the European Federation of Otorhinolaryngological Societies (EUFOS) in the specialty of ORL-HNS in 15 EU states. The questionnaire included questions regarding the sub-specialty practice, structure, length, access, examination procedures and certification, future developments and also a space for individual comments. Thirty-one respondents (75.6%) from major training centres in 15 different European countries replied. Overall, the data revealed major diversity for all aspects analysed, between and within the different European countries. Only four EU states had formal sub-specialty training in head and neck surgical oncology. This includes Finland, Germany, The Netherlands, and the United Kingdom. In the rest of EU states, the last year of residency programmes is often spent as an introduction to one of the sub-specialties. Sub-specialty training in head and neck surgical oncology within the EU at present is clearly underdeveloped. Issuing a European diploma in ORL-HNS could be an initial step towards assessing the skills acquired during specialist training within the different European countries and formalising specialist training. This would establish a uniform measure for evaluating candidacy for sub-specialty training both across the EU and for USA, Canada or Australia.

  20. Exploratory survey of patients' needs and perceptions of psychosocial oncology.

    PubMed

    Preyde, Michele; Macdonald, Janice; Seegmiller, Merle

    2014-03-01

    Cancer is a major disease that affects a significant proportion of the population worldwide. With a decrease in mortality due to advancements in oncology treatment, there is an expanding role for psychosocial oncology. A satellite clinic for medical treatment (only chemotherapy) of cancer is available at the Guelph General Hospital (GGH). Patients accessing the chemotherapy clinic at GGH have minimal access to psychosocial or supportive care and it is not known if the existing services are addressing the psychosocial symptoms of cancer patients. Participants were asked to complete an anonymous survey which included self-report measures of depression, symptom severity, quality of life, and social support while receiving treatment at this facility. There was a great deal of variability in the patients' emotional symptoms at this satellite clinic, though many patients reported emotional difficulties. Greater social work presence may lead to better identification of patients who would benefit from psychosocial oncology services. PMID:24193219

  1. Percentage of Surgical Patients Receiving Recommended Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recommended Care Percentage of Surgical Patients Receiving Recommended Care This is a composite measure based on individual ... Age Group Percentage of Surgical Patients Receiving Recommended Care by Age Group uzrc-9bvr Download these data » ...

  2. [Strategies for improving care of oncologic patients: SHARE Project results].

    PubMed

    Reñones Crego, María de la Concepción; Fernández Pérez, Dolores; Vena Fernández, Carmen; Zamudio Sánchez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Cancer treatment is a major burden for the patient and its family that requires an individualized management by healthcare professionals. Nurses are in charge of coordinating care and are the closest healthcare professionals to patient and family; however, in Spain, there are not standard protocols yet for the management of oncology patients. The Spanish Oncology Nursing Society developed between 2012 and 2014 the SHARE project, with the aim of establishing strategies to improve quality of life and nursing care in oncology patients. It was developed in 3 phases. First, a literature search and review was performed to identify nursing strategies, interventions and tools to improve cancer patients' care. At the second stage, these interventions were agreed within a group of oncology nursing experts; and at the third phase, a different group of experts in oncology care categorized the interventions to identify the ones with highest priority and most feasible to be implemented. As a result, 3 strategic actions were identified to improve nursing care during cancer treatment: To provide a named nurse to carry out the follow up process by attending to the clinic or telephonic consultation, develop therapeutic education with adapted protocols for each tumor type and treatment and ensure specific training for nurses on the management of the cancer patients. Strategic actions proposed in this paper aim to improve cancer patients' healthcare and quality of life through the development of advanced nursing roles based on a higher level of autonomy, situating nurses as care coordinators to assure an holistic care in oncology patients. PMID:27237729

  3. Outcomes of Patients With Surgically and Pathologically Staged IIIA-IVB Pure Endometrioid-type Endometrial Cancer: A Taiwanese Gynecology Oncology Group (TGOG-2005) Retrospective Cohort Study (A STROBE-Compliant Article).

    PubMed

    Chen, Jen-Ruei; Chang, Ting-Chang; Fu, Hung-Chun; Lau, Hei-Yu; Chen, I-Hui; Ke, Yu-Min; Liang, Yu-Ling; Chiang, An-Jen; Huang, Chia-Yen; Chen, Yu-Chieh; Hong, Mun-Kun; Wang, Yu-Chi; Huang, Kuo-Feng; Hsiao, Sheng-Mou; Wang, Peng-Hui

    2016-04-01

    In the management of patients with advanced-stage pure endometrioid-type endometrial cancer (E-EC), such as positive lymph nodes (stage III) or stage IV, treatment options are severely limited. This article aims to investigate the outcome of women with FIGO III-IV E-EC (based on FIGO 2009 system). The retrospective cohort study, based on the Taiwanese Gynecologic Oncology Group (TGOG-2005), enrolled patients undergoing staging surgery to have a pathologically confirmed FIGO III-IV E-EC from 22-member hospitals between 1991 and 2010. This cohort included 541 patients (stage III, n = 464; stage IV, n = 77). Five-year overall survival (OS) was 70.4%. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 43 months (range 0-258 months) and median OS was 52 months (range 1-258 months). Multivariate analysis showed that FIGO stage, >1/2 myometrial invasion (hazard ratio [HR] 1.53, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12-2.09; P = 0.007), histological grade 3 (HR 2.0, 95% CI 1.47-2.75; P < 0.001), and metastases of pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes (PLN and PALN) (HR 2.75, 95% CI 1.13-6.72; P < 0.001) were independent risk factors for PFS. FIGO stage, >1/2 myometrial invasion (HR 1.89, 95% CI 1.34-2.64; P < 0.001), and histological grade 3 (HR 2.42, 95% CI 1.75-3.35; P < 0.001) influenced OS. Complete dissection of PLN and PALN (HR 0.27, 95% CI 0.16-0.45; P < 0.001, and HR 0.14, 95% CI 0.08-0.26; P < 0.001) and the following paclitaxel-based therapy (HR 0.61, 95% CI 0.79-0.92; P = 0.017, and HR 0.48; 95% CI 0.31-0.75; P = 0.001) provided the better PFS and OS, respectively. In management of women with FIGO III-V E-EC, combination of complete staging surgery (complete dissection of PLN and PALN is included) and the following paclitaxel-based therapy could provide the better chance to survive. Patients with tumor >1/2 myometrial invasion and histological grade 3 are risky for disease-related mortality. PMID:27082583

  4. Understanding the Differences Between Oncology Patients and Oncology Health Professionals Concerning Spirituality/Religiosity

    PubMed Central

    de Camargos, Mayara Goulart; Paiva, Carlos Eduardo; Barroso, Eliane Marçon; Carneseca, Estela Cristina; Paiva, Bianca Sakamoto Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study investigated whether spirituality/religiosity (S/R) plays an important role in the lives of cancer patients and in the work of health professionals who provide care for these patients. The correlations between spiritual quality of life (QOL) and the other QOL domain scores of patients and health professionals were also assessed. Moreover, QOL domain scores were compared between patients and health professionals. In this cross-sectional study, 1050 participants (525 oncology patients and 525 health professionals) were interviewed. Quality of life was assessed with the World Health Organization quality of life spiritual, religious, and personal beliefs (WHOQOL-SRPB). To compare the groups with respect to the instruments’ domains, a quantile regression and an analysis of covariance model were used. The WHOQOL-Bref and WHOQOL-SRPB domains were correlated by performing Pearson and partial correlation tests. It was demonstrated that 94.1% of patients considered it important that health professionals addressed their spiritual beliefs, and 99.2% of patients relied on S/R to face cancer. Approximately, 99.6% of the patients reported that S/R support is necessary during cancer treatment; 98.3% of health professionals agreed that spiritual and religious support was necessary for oncology patients. Positive correlations between spiritual QOL and the other QOL domains were observed. When compared among themselves, patients exhibited significantly higher levels of spiritual QOL. In conclusion, S/R was an important construct in the minds of cancer patients and health professionals. Both groups often use S/R resources in their daily lives, which seems to positively affect their perceptions of QOL. Further studies are needed to determine how health professionals effectively address S/R during oncology practice. PMID:26632743

  5. The importance of pharmacist providing patient education in oncology.

    PubMed

    Avery, Mia; Williams, Felecia

    2015-02-01

    The world's increasing diversity requires health care professionals to adjust delivery methods of teaching to accommodate different cultural values and beliefs. The ability to communicate effectively across languages and various cultural practices directly affects patient education outcomes. Pharmacist should be aware of varying modalities and considerations when counseling a patient diagnosed with cancer and undergoing chemotherapy. In more recent years, the medical profession has seen an increase in patient outcomes due to using the multidisciplinary team approach and has benefited by implementing Medication Therapy Management (MTM) programs at various institutions. For the clinical pharmacist, this would mean documentation for these services should be precise and accurate based on the specific patients needs. There are several factors involved in the care and therapy of the patient with cancer. Clinical oncology pharmacist should be aware of the ever-changing role in oncology and be able to implement new practices at their facility for better patient outcomes.

  6. A nurse practitioner patient care team: implications for pediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Golden, Julia Rose

    2014-01-01

    The role of the pediatric advanced practice registered nurse continues to evolve within the ever-changing field of health care. In response to increased demand for health care services and because of a variety of changes in the health care delivery system, nurse practitioner patient care teams are an emerging trend in acute care settings. Care provided by nurse practitioner teams has been shown to be effective, efficient, and comprehensive. In addition to shorter hospital stays and reduced costs, nurse practitioner teams offer increased quality and continuity of care, and improved patient satisfaction. Nurse practitioner patient care teams are well suited to the field of pediatric oncology, as patients would benefit from care provided by specialized clinicians with a holistic focus. This article provides health care professionals with information about the use of nurse practitioner patient care teams and implications for use in pediatric oncology.

  7. Immunonutrition in the surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Marik, P E; Flemmer, M

    2012-03-01

    Both malnutrition and the physical injury related to trauma and surgery increase the expression of T-helper 2 (Th2) lymphocytes which cause impaired cell mediated immunity. Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and sympathoadrenal system with the release of cortisol and catecholamines drive the development of Th2 cells. Th2 cytokines result in the accumulation of arginase-1 expressing myeloid-derived suppressor cells in lymphoid tissue. The myeloid-derived suppressor cells cause an arginine deficient state resulting in impaired lymphocyte function. Prostaglandin-E2 released following trauma plays a synergetic role with cortisol and catecholamines in driving these pathways. There is now increasing evidence that immunomodulating enteral formulas supplemented with arginine and omega-3 fatty acids can reverse many of the immune mediated changes and decrease the number of adverse outcomes after major surgery and trauma. These immunomodulating enteral formulas should be strongly considered in surgical patients undergoing major surgery and following severe trauma.

  8. Patient Appreciation Day in radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Dianne

    2014-08-01

    Patients undergoing radiation therapy struggle with many physical and emotional stressors. Many ways to help patients cope with stressors and improve the treatment experience are found in the literature, including humor, art, entertainment, and hospitality. At H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, the radiation therapy nurses and staff members use entertainment in an annual patient appreciation day event as one way to give back to the patients.

  9. Preoperative Evaluation of the Surgical Patient.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Frederick T

    2016-01-01

    Primary care physicians and specialists are frequently involved in the care of surgical patients. Changes in reimbursement have prompted re-examination of preoperative testing and health care expenditures. Physicians have additional incentives to improve health care delivery and reduce costs. The perioperative surgical home concept involves coordinating all aspects of patient care, including behavioral modifications, during the perioperative period. Evidence-based guidelines on preoperative evaluation are available to assist practitioners in managing cardiovascular disease, and communicating surgical risks. Shared decision making in the preoperative period can improve surgical outcomes and patient satisfaction. PMID:27443045

  10. Proximal femoral reconstruction with a constrained acetabulum in oncologic patients.

    PubMed

    Jawad, Muhammad Umar; Brien, Earl W

    2014-02-01

    Metallic endoprostheses are used for oncological reconstruction around the proximal femur and hip joint. Common modes of failure with hemiarthroplasty or standard hip arthroplasty after proximal femoral replacement include dislocation, late hip pain, and infection. The authors reviewed hospital records to identify patients undergoing constrained tripolar hip arthroplasty for oncological reasons between 2002 and 2012. Inclusion criterion was at least 12-cm proximal femoral resection, including patients with total femur reconstruction. A total of 33 patients were reviewed. Information regarding demographics, length of follow-up, treatment characteristics, and patient outcomes was extracted. Average follow-up for all patients was 912.33 days (30.4 months). Average follow-up was 1396.1 days for living patients and 428.6 days for deceased patients. Average estimated blood loss was 462.12 cc: an average of 1080 cc for patients undergoing total femoral resection and replacement and 315.8 cc for patients undergoing proximal femoral resection and replacement. Average operative time was 137.7 minutes: an average of 205 minutes for patients undergoing total femoral resection and replacement and 119.1 minutes for patients undergoing proximal femoral resection and replacement. Average Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score was 21.7. There were no dislocations in the cohort. A constrained tripolar device can be safely used for oncological proximal femoral reconstructions while minimizing the risk of dislocation. Positioning of the acetabular implant in neutral anatomic version in conjunction with a neutral-placed femoral component provides the greatest range of motion, reduction of liner impingement, and improved hip stability.

  11. Body Image and the Female Adolescent Oncology Patient.

    PubMed

    Burg, Alison Joy

    2016-01-01

    Female adolescent oncology patients undergo many physical changes throughout treatment that have challenging psychological, emotional, and social implications. Body image for this population is a subject that tends to be overlooked in the midst of the cancer experience. This article will examine the complex concept of body image and discuss why female adolescent patients are at such high risk for negative body image. Assessment and care strategies are needed to foster a positive body image, resiliency, and overall well-being. Although survivorship studies may offer insightful information about the effects of the cancer journey on long-term body image, focus should be on prevention and holistic care as part of the treatment itself. The health care team, especially nursing professionals, should acknowledge, recognize, and address this vital issue as a critical part of oncology care.

  12. Body Image and the Female Adolescent Oncology Patient.

    PubMed

    Burg, Alison Joy

    2016-01-01

    Female adolescent oncology patients undergo many physical changes throughout treatment that have challenging psychological, emotional, and social implications. Body image for this population is a subject that tends to be overlooked in the midst of the cancer experience. This article will examine the complex concept of body image and discuss why female adolescent patients are at such high risk for negative body image. Assessment and care strategies are needed to foster a positive body image, resiliency, and overall well-being. Although survivorship studies may offer insightful information about the effects of the cancer journey on long-term body image, focus should be on prevention and holistic care as part of the treatment itself. The health care team, especially nursing professionals, should acknowledge, recognize, and address this vital issue as a critical part of oncology care. PMID:25643971

  13. Training and certification of the surgical oncologist.

    PubMed

    Berman, Russell S; Weigel, Ronald J

    2014-12-01

    Surgical Oncology has evolved as a distinct subspecialty of General Surgery with a well-defined curriculum focused on surgical care of the cancer patient, specific areas of clinical and basic science research focus and specialty journals dedicated to the discipline. The Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO), originally formed as the James Ewing Society, has provided leadership in developing training programs in Surgical Oncology and for three decades has been involved in the approval and oversight of Surgical Oncology training programs. Over this time, Surgical Oncology Fellowship training has expanded and in 2013 there were 103 applicants for 56 fellowship positions in 21 programs. The basic tenants of Surgical Oncology training has remained devoted to the core principles of multidisciplinary care, surgical management of cancer patients and a focus on education in research, clinical trials, community outreach, patient advocacy and leadership in oncology. With the maturation of Surgical Oncology as a separate specialty, Surgical Oncology training programs are now accredited by the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and graduates of the programs will soon be offered subspecialty certification in Complex General Surgical Oncology (CGSO) by the American Board of Surgery, which has created a component Surgical Oncology Board (SOB). Similar expansion has occurred in other specialty areas including an expansion of Breast Fellowships, which are still being approved by the SSO. In the 2013 SSO Breast Oncology Match, there were 67 applicants for 54 positions in 39 Breast Fellowship programs. Continued advances in cancer biology and technology will challenge us to evolve training programs in Surgical Oncology to produce surgeons capable of advancing the multidisciplinary care of cancer patients.

  14. Doctor–patient relationship in oncologic radiology

    PubMed Central

    Ollivier, L; Leclère, J; Dolbeault, S; Neuenschwander, S

    2005-01-01

    Progress in medicine and changes in our society have led to an increasing number of patients with cancer and a change in the doctor–patient relationship. Patients rights are now defined in several countries by laws. The course of cancer involves numerous imaging examinations in which the radiologist is primarily involved. It is often the radiologist who discovers abnormalities and who must break the news to the patient. This task is made all the more difficult by the radiologist’s lack of specific training in the management of difficult situations such as announcing bad news. There is a high risk of inappropriate responses that can have a seriously damaging effect on the patient’s state of mind. Even with the best intentions, it can be very profitable to review and improve our relational modalities and to more effectively meet the patient’s increasing demand for information. The radiologist’s technical know-how is not sufficient, as he must also be able to give just the right amount of information based on his clinical competence, and his relationship with patients while respecting their wishes and their rights. PMID:16361141

  15. Electronic patient-reported outcome systems in oncology clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Antonia V; Jensen, Roxanne E; Basch, Ethan

    2012-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires assess topics a patient can report about his or her own health. This includes symptoms (eg, nausea, fatigue, diarrhea, pain, or frequent urination), physical functioning (eg, difficulty climbing stairs or difficulty fastening buttons), and mental health (eg, anxiety, fear, or worry). Electronic PRO (ePRO) systems are used in oncology clinical care because of 1) their ability to enhance clinical care by flagging important symptoms and saving clinicians time; 2) the availability of standardized methods for creating and implementing PROs in clinics; and 3) the existence of user-friendly platforms for patient self-reporting like tablet computers and automated telephone surveys. Many ePRO systems can provide actionable links to clinical care such as summary reports in a patient's electronic medical record and real-time e-mail alerts to providers when patients report acute needs. This review presents 5 examples of ePRO systems currently in use in oncology practice. These systems support multiple clinical activities, including assessment of symptoms and toxicities related to chemotherapy and radiation, postoperative surveillance, and symptom management during palliative care and hospice. Patient self-reporting is possible both at clinical visits and between visits over the Internet or by telephone. The implementation of an ePRO system requires significant resources and expertise, as well as user training. ePRO systems enable regular monitoring of patient symptoms, function, and needs, and can enhance the efficiency and quality of care as well as communication with patients.

  16. Oncology nurse honors pediatric caregivers and patients.

    PubMed

    Arcuri, Lauren

    2016-07-01

    Dunbar, a registered nurse at Presbyterian Hospital in Albuquerque, N.M., knows firsthand the struggles patients and their families endure during cancer treatment. Her son underwent a bone marrow transplant at age 22. In 2011, Dunbar organized an annual race to raise funds for families who have children with cancer. PMID:27526505

  17. Nutritional support of the pediatric oncology patient.

    PubMed

    Andrassy, R J; Chwals, W J

    1998-01-01

    The child with a malignancy frequently will have associated cachexia with significant weight loss and malnutrition. The reasons for this are multifactorial and may be related directly to the tumor, such as increased metabolic rate, circulating peptides leading to anorexia, and decreased intake due to poor appetite or gut involvement. There appears to be other reasons involved, including increased whole body protein breakdown, increased lipolysis, and increased gluconeogenesis. Release of certain cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and others may increase the cancer cachexia. Malnutrition in these children leads to intolerance of chemotherapy and radiotherapy as well as increased local and systemic infections. For many years, oncologists were hesitant to provide nutrition support to cancer patients for fear that tumor growth would be enhanced. Pediatric oncologists learned early that starvation plays no positive role in cancer therapy. Adjunctive nutritional support, either enterally or parenterally, supports the patient during therapy with surgery, chemotherapy, or radiation. Many studies have now shown that the nutritionally replete patient tolerates therapy better and in some pediatric malignancies may enhance survival.

  18. Dermatological Findings in Turkish Paediatric Haematology-Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Uksal, Umit; Ozturk, Pinar; Colgecen, Emine; Taslidere, Nazan; Patiroglu, Turkan; Ozdemir, Mehmet Akif; Torun, Yasemin Altuner; Borlu, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Diagnoses of skin, mucosae, hair and nail manifestations in malignant diseases are often challenging because of life-threatening drug reactions, opportunistic infections or skin involvement of primary processes. Description of morphology, configuration and distribution of lesions is important in order to differentiate the self-healing eruptions from serious side effects of chemotherapy. There are case reports from Turkey including dermatological manifestations of malignancies and case series in adult patients but there are no published large group studies assessing all manifestations in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphological features of dermatological findings in children with haemato-oncological diseases. Materials and Methods: The study was performed at the Erciyes University, Faculty of Medicine Pediatric Hematology-Oncology Clinic, Turkey. Three dermatologists daily consulted all patients admitted to the clinic during a one-year period. Results: The study group comprised of 157 children (79 female/78 male) aged 1–16 years (mean 7.19±4.63). Detailed dermatological examinations were performed, including oral-genital mucosae, hair and nails. Thorough skin examination revealed that 70% of the patients exhibited at least one dermatological finding. Generalized xerosis and hyperpigmentation were the most common findings among patients undergoing chemotherapy (24.19%). Multiple nevi on at least 10 covered areas were very frequent among patients undergoing long-term chemotherapy (18.47%). Three were identified as dysplastic nevus, but malignant transformation was not observed during the one-year study period. Conclusion: Regular dermatological consultation may help resolve the diagnostic and therapeutic problems in paediatric haemato-oncology clinics. PMID:27551173

  19. [Measuring quality of life in every oncological patient].

    PubMed

    Aaronson, Neil K; Sprangers, Mirjam A G

    2011-01-01

    There are indications that in cancer patients quality of life is a better predictor of survival than clinical measures such as tumour response and stage of disease. In addition, health care professionals' expectations about the effect of a particular treatment on quality of life often do not correspond with the experience of the patient. These are all reasons for every oncological patient to complete a short questionnaire on quality of life. Using this questionnaire can improve communication between care provider and patient, and also give the care provider insight into the problems that are important to the patient at that time. This insight could subsequently lead to counseling tailored to the patient, and, if necessary, modification of treatment or referral for supportive care. A second aim is to link information on quality of life to clinical pathways and treatment guidelines.

  20. Robotic surgery in urological oncology: patient care or market share?

    PubMed

    Kaye, Deborah R; Mullins, Jeffrey K; Carter, H Ballentine; Bivalacqua, Trinity J

    2015-01-01

    Surgical robotic use has grown exponentially in spite of limited or uncertain benefits and large costs. In certain situations, adoption of robotic technology provides value to patients and society. In other cases, however, the robot provides little or no increase in surgical quality, with increased expense, and, therefore, does not add value to health care. The surgical robot is expensive to purchase, maintain and operate, and can contribute to increased consumerism in relation to surgical procedures, and increased reliance on the technology, thus driving future increases in health-care expenditure. Given the current need for budget constraints, the cost-effectiveness of specific procedures must be evaluated. The surgical robot should be used when cost-effective, but traditional open and laparoscopic techniques also need to be continually fostered. PMID:25535000

  1. Perfecting patient flow in the surgical setting.

    PubMed

    Amato-Vealey, Elaine J; Fountain, Patricia; Coppola, Deborah

    2012-07-01

    Reduced surgical efficiency and productivity, delayed patient discharges, and prolonged use of hospital resources are the results of an OR that is unable to move patients to the postanesthesia care unit or other patient units. A primary reason for perioperative patient flow delay is the lack of hospital beds to accommodate surgical patients, which consequently causes backups of patients currently in the surgical suite. In one facility, implementing Six Sigma methodology helped to improve OR patient flow by identifying ways that frontline staff members could work more intelligently and more efficiently, and with less stress to streamline workflow and eliminate redundancy and waste in ways that did not necessitate reducing the number of employees. The results were improved employee morale, job satisfaction and safety, and an enhanced patient experience.

  2. Central Line Maintenance Bundles and CLABSIs in Ambulatory Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bundy, David G.; Chen, Allen R.; Milstone, Aaron M.; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Pehar, Miriana; Herpst, Cynthia; Fratino, Lisa; Miller, Marlene R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Pediatric oncology patients are frequently managed with central lines as outpatients, and these lines confer significant morbidity in this immune-compromised population. We aimed to investigate whether a multidisciplinary, central line maintenance care bundle reduces central line–associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) and bacteremias in ambulatory pediatric oncology patients. METHODS: We conducted an interrupted time-series study of a maintenance bundle concerning all areas of central line care. Each of 3 target groups (clinic staff, homecare agency nurses, and patient families) (1) received training on the bundle and its importance, (2) had their practice audited, and (3) were shown CLABSI rates through graphs, in-service training, and bulletin boards. CLABSI and bacteremia person-time incidence rates were collected for 23 months before and 24 months after beginning the intervention and were compared by using a Poisson regression model. RESULTS: The mean CLABSI rate decreased by 48% from 0.63 CLABSIs per 1000 central line days at baseline to 0.32 CLABSIs per 1000 central line days during the intervention period (P = .005). The mean bacteremia rate decreased by 54% from 1.27 bacteremias per 1000 central line days at baseline to 0.59 bacteremias per 1000 central line days during the intervention period (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Implementation of a multidisciplinary, central line maintenance care bundle significantly reduced CLABSI and bacteremia person-time incidence rates in ambulatory pediatric oncology patients with central lines. Further research is needed to determine if maintenance care bundles reduce ambulatory CLABSIs and bacteremia in other adult and pediatric populations. PMID:24101764

  3. The Rehabilitation of Oncological Patients Presenting Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    MICU, ELENA CLAUDIA; IRSAY, LASZLO

    2014-01-01

    The International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP 2011) defines neuropathic pain as “the pain caused by an injury or disease of the somatosensory portion of the nervous system”. The central neuropathic pain is defined as “the pain caused by an injury or disease of the central somatosensory central nervous system”, whereas the peripheral neuropathic pain is defined as “the pain caused by an injury or disease of the peripheral somatosensory nervous system” [1]. The peripheral neuropathy describes any affection of the peripheral nervous system. The etiology is vast, there being a number of over 100 possible causes, which causes the global morbidity rate to reach approximately 2.4%. The chronic nature of the pain superposes the everyday routine and leads to the high intake of medication for pain alleviation. The number of cases of neuroplasia has always increased today. This disturbing diagnosis which can potentiate the signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy as well as reduce and limit the treatment options associated with neuropathies. The treatment presupposes a multidisciplinary approach, while the solution to prevent complications involves the control of risk factors and pathophysiological treatment. Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CPIN) is a significant disabling symptom that is tightly connected to the administration of neurotoxic cytostatic agents used for the treatment of neoplasia. CPIN compromises the quality of life and produces pain or discomfort [2]. I have sought to produce a presentation of the medicated and physical-kinetic treatment options that have proved their effectiveness during clinical studies or random trials and can be applied to cancer patients presenting with symptoms associated with peripheral neuropathy, namely with neuropathic pain, and support it with arguments. PMID:26528000

  4. Ethics and genomic medicine, how to navigate decisions in surgical oncology.

    PubMed

    Devon, Karen M; Lerner-Ellis, Jordan P; Ganai, Sabha; Angelos, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Using genetic information to make medical decisions and tailor treatments to individuals will likely provide major benefits and become an important part of health care. Surgical oncologists must ethically apply scientific genetic information in a complex and evolving environment to the benefit of their patients. In this review we address ethical issues associated with: indications for genetic testing, informed consent for testing and therapy, confidentiality, targeted therapy, prophylactic surgery, and genetic testing in children.

  5. Oncological outcome after lung metastasis in patients presenting with localized chondrosarcoma at extremities: Tokai Musculoskeletal Oncology Consortium study

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Tomoki; Matsumine, Akihiko; Yamada, Satoshi; Tsukushi, Satoshi; Kawanami, Katsuhisa; Ohno, Takatoshi; Katagiri, Hirohisa; Sugiura, Hideshi; Yamada, Kenji; Yamada, Yoshihisa; Sudo, Akihiro; Nishida, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    The oncological outcome after lung metastasis in patients with chondrosarcoma of the extremities has not been reported. Between June 2000 and June 2013, 179 patients with chondrosarcoma in the extremities were treated at eleven hospitals. Twenty consecutive patients (11.2%) developed lung metastases after initial treatment of primary chondrosarcoma in the extremities. We investigated the oncological outcome of 20 chondrosarcoma patients with lung metastasis. There were 14 males and six females with a mean age of 49 years. The mean duration between primary surgery and appearance of lung metastases was 34 months. The mean follow-up period was 48 months. We excluded patients with lung metastasis at the time of presentation from this study. At the final follow-up, four of 20 patients had no evidence of disease, four were alive with disease, and twelve had died of disease. The 3- and 5-year survival rates after lung metastasis were 51.5% and 45.7%, respectively. Tumor grade, extrapulmonary metastasis, and treatment for lung metastases including metastasectomy and radiofrequency ablation were identified by univariate analysis to be significant prognostic factors for oncological analysis. In conclusion, this study evaluated the oncological outcome in patients with chondrosarcoma of the extremities with lung metastasis. Although a large-scale study might be required to confirm the results of this study, we suggest that metastasectomy and/or radiofrequency ablation should be considered to improve postmetastatic survival. PMID:27536136

  6. Outcome of the Gynecologic Oncology Patients Surveillance Network Program.

    PubMed

    Suprasert, Prapaporn; Suwansirikul, Songkiat; Charoenkwan, Kittipat; Cheewakriangkrai, Chalong; Suwansirikul, Songkiat

    2015-01-01

    The gynecologic oncology patients surveillance network program was conducted with the collaboration of 5 provincial hospitals located in the north of Thailand (Chiang Rai, Lamphun Nan, Phayao and Phrae). The aim was to identify ways of reducing the burden and the cost to the gynecologic cancer patients who needed to travel to the tertiary care hospital for follow up. The clinical data of each patient was transferred to the provincial hospital by the internet via the website www.gogcmu.or.th. All the general gynecologists who participated in this project attended the training course set up for the program. From January 2011 to February 2014, 854 patients who were willing to have their next follow-up at the network hospitals close to their home were enrolled this project. Almost of them were residents in Chiang Rai province and the most common disease was cervical cancer. After the project had been running for 1 year, 604 of the enrolled patients and 21 health-care personnel who had participated in this project were interviewed to assess its success. Some 85.3% of the patients and 100% of the health-care personnel were satisfied with this project. However, 60 patients had withdrawn, the most common reason being the lack of confidence in the follow up at the local provincial hospital. In conclusion, it is possible to initiate a gynecologic oncology patients' surveillance network program and the initiation could reduce the problems associated with and the cost the patients incurred as they journeyed to the tertiary care hospital. PMID:26163612

  7. Physicians' evaluations of patients' decisions to refuse oncological treatment

    PubMed Central

    van Kleffens, T; van Leeuwen, E

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To gain insight into the standards of rationality that physicians use when evaluating patients' treatment refusals. Design of the study: Qualitative design with indepth interviews. Participants: The study sample included 30 patients with cancer and 16 physicians (oncologists and general practitioners). All patients had refused a recommended oncological treatment. Results: Patients base their treatment refusals mainly on personal values and/or experience. Physicians mainly emphasise the medical perspective when evaluating patients' treatment refusals. From a medical perspective, a patient's treatment refusal based on personal values and experience is generally evaluated as irrational and difficult to accept, especially when it concerns a curative treatment. Physicians have a different attitude towards non-curative treatments and have less difficulty accepting a patient's refusal of these treatments. Thus, an important factor in the physician's evaluation of a treatment refusal is whether the treatment refused is curative or non-curative. Conclusion: Physicians mainly use goal oriented and patients mainly value oriented rationality, but in the case of non-curative treatment refusal, physicians give more emphasis to value oriented rationality. A consensus between the value oriented approaches of patient and physician may then emerge, leading to the patient's decision being understood and accepted by the physician. The physician's acceptance is crucial to his or her attitude towards the patient. It contributes to the patient's feeling free to decide, and being understood and respected, and thus to a better physician–patient relationship. PMID:15738431

  8. Follow-up of patients after resection for colorectal cancer: a position paper of the Canadian Society of Surgical Oncology and the Canadian Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Carole S.; McLeod, Robin S.

    1997-01-01

    Objective To provide recommendations for postoperative follow-up of patients with colorectal carcinoma. Options Postoperative follow-up surveillance versus no surveillance. Evidence A MEDLINE search for articles published between 1966 and February 1996 with the terms “colorectal neoplasm” and “follow-up studies.” Pertinent citations from references of reviewed articles were also retrieved. Methodology With the evidence-based methodology of the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination, a thorough review of the value of postoperative follow-up for colorectal cancer patients was performed. Studies were categorized according to their study design and submitted to critical appraisal. Randomized trials, cohort studies and descriptive studies were assessed. A benefit of follow-up was defined as an overall increase in survival. Recommendation To date, there is insufficient evidence to make a recommendation on the benefit of postoperative surveillance in colorectal cancer patients. Further clinical trials are needed to clarify the role of postoperative follow-up for patients after resection for colorectal cancer. PMID:9126121

  9. The role of plastic surgery in reconstruction after oncological surgery.

    PubMed

    Vamadeva, S V; Curnier, A

    2016-06-01

    One in three people is affected by cancer in their lifetime. Surgical treatment commonly has the greatest impact on long-term survival, so a large proportion of patients undergo major oncological resection. This is the first in a symposium of four articles describing plastic surgical reconstruction after oncological resection. PMID:27269747

  10. Rhabdomyolysis in Critically Ill Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmanovska, Biljana; Cvetkovska, Emilija; Kuzmanovski, Igor; Jankulovski, Nikola; Shosholcheva, Mirjana; Kartalov, Andrijan; Spirovska, Tatjana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Rhabdomyolysis is a syndrome of injury of skeletal muscles associated with myoglobinuria, muscle weakness, electrolyte imbalance and often, acute kidney injury as severe complication. The aim: of this study is to detect the incidence of rhabdomyolysis in critically ill patients in the surgical intensive care unit (ICU), and to raise awareness of this medical condition and its treatment among the clinicians. Material and methods: A retrospective review of all surgical and trauma patients admitted to surgical ICU of the University Surgical Clinic “Mother Teresa” in Skopje, Macedonia, from January 1st till December 31st 2015 was performed. Patients medical records were screened for available serum creatine kinase (CK) with levels > 200 U/l, presence of myoglobin in the serum in levels > 80 ng/ml, or if they had a clinical diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis by an attending doctor. Descriptive statistical methods were used to analyze the collected data. Results: Out of totally 1084 patients hospitalized in the ICU, 93 were diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis during the course of one year. 82(88%) patients were trauma patients, while 11(12%) were surgical non trauma patients. 7(7.5%) patients diagnosed with rhabdomyolysis developed acute kidney injury (AKI) that required dialysis. Average values of serum myoglobin levels were 230 ng/ml, with highest values of > 5000 ng/ml. Patients who developed AKI had serum myoglobin levels above 2000 ng/ml. Average values of serum CK levels were 400 U/l, with highest value of 21600 U/l. Patients who developed AKI had serum CK levels above 3000 U/l. Conclusion: Regular monitoring and early detection of elevated serum CK and myoglobin levels in critically ill surgical and trauma patients is recommended in order to recognize and treat rhabdomyolysis in timely manner and thus prevent development of AKI. PMID:27703296

  11. Daily Bathing with Chlorhexidine and Its Effects on Nosocomial Infection Rates in Pediatric Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Raulji, Chittalsinh M; Clay, Kristin; Velasco, Cruz; Yu, Lolie C

    2015-01-01

    Infections remain a serious complication in pediatric oncology patients. To determine if daily bathing with Chlorhexidine gluconate can decrease the rate of nosocomial infection in pediatric oncology patients, we reviewed rates of infections in pediatric oncology patients over a 14-month span. Intervention group received daily bath with Chlorhexidine, while the control group did not receive daily bath. The results showed that daily bath with antiseptic chlorhexidine as daily prophylactic antiseptic topical wash leads to decreased infection density amongst the pediatric oncology patients, especially in patients older than 12 years of age. Furthermore, daily chlorhexidine bathing significantly reduced the rate of hospital acquired infection in patients older than 12 years of age. The findings of this study suggest that daily bathing with chlorhexidine may be an effective measure of reducing nosocomial infection in pediatric oncology patients.

  12. Daily Bathing with Chlorhexidine and Its Effects on Nosocomial Infection Rates in Pediatric Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Raulji, Chittalsinh M; Clay, Kristin; Velasco, Cruz; Yu, Lolie C

    2015-01-01

    Infections remain a serious complication in pediatric oncology patients. To determine if daily bathing with Chlorhexidine gluconate can decrease the rate of nosocomial infection in pediatric oncology patients, we reviewed rates of infections in pediatric oncology patients over a 14-month span. Intervention group received daily bath with Chlorhexidine, while the control group did not receive daily bath. The results showed that daily bath with antiseptic chlorhexidine as daily prophylactic antiseptic topical wash leads to decreased infection density amongst the pediatric oncology patients, especially in patients older than 12 years of age. Furthermore, daily chlorhexidine bathing significantly reduced the rate of hospital acquired infection in patients older than 12 years of age. The findings of this study suggest that daily bathing with chlorhexidine may be an effective measure of reducing nosocomial infection in pediatric oncology patients. PMID:25918820

  13. Caregivers' perception of drug administration safety for pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Harris, Nariman; Badr, Lina Kurdahi; Saab, Raya; Khalidi, Aziza

    2014-01-01

    Medication errors (MEs) are reported to be between 1.5% and 90% depending on many factors, such as type of the institution where data were collected and the method to identify the errors. More significantly, the risk for errors with potential for harm is 3 times higher for children, especially those receiving chemotherapy. Few studies have been published on averting such errors with children and none on how caregivers perceive their role in preventing such errors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate pediatric oncology patient's caregivers' perception of drug administration safety and their willingness to be involved in averting such errors. A cross-sectional design was used to study a nonrandomized sample of 100 caregivers of pediatric oncology patients. Ninety-six of the caregivers surveyed were well informed about the medications their children receive and were ready to participate in error prevention strategies. However, an underestimation of potential errors uncovered a high level of "trust" for the staff. Caregivers echoed their apprehension for being responsible for potential errors. Caregivers are a valuable resource to intercept medication errors. However, caregivers may be hesitant to actively communicate their fears with health professionals. Interventions that aim at encouraging caregivers to engage in the safety of their children are recommended.

  14. Supracricoid laryngectomies: oncological and functional results for 152 patients.

    PubMed

    Leone, C A; Capasso, P; Russo, G; D'Errico, P; Cutillo, P; Orabona, P

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the oncological and functional outcomes in patients who underwent supracricoid laryngectomies with a crico-hyoidopexy (SCL-CHP) or a crico-hyoido-epiglottopexy (SCL-CHEP) for the treatment of primary and reccurent laryngeal cancer. A retrospective study was conducted on 152 consecutive patients seen from January 1996 to December 2006. Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method, and were compared according to the type of surgery and clinical stage of the tumour. The mean period before decannulation, nasogastric tube (NGT) removal and recovery of a normal diet and speech were evaluated, and statistical analyses were performed regarding the association with the type of surgery and arytenoidectomy. The median follow-up period was 49.9 months (range: 10-110 months). The 3- and 5-year OS were 87.5 and 83.5%, respectively, and 3- and 5-year DFS were 78.3 and 73.7%, respectively. For patients with early stages tumours, the 5-year OS and DFS were 92.3 and 84.6% respectively, whereas for patients with locally advanced stage tumours, the OS and DFS were 74.3 and 62.2%, respectively. Significant differences in OS and DFS for patients who had early or locally advanced cancers were found (p = 0.0004 and p = 0.0032, respectively). The rate of overall local control was 92.1%, while the mean period until decannulation or NGT removal was 25.1 and 16.6 days, respectively. The mean period until NGT removal was significantly different according to the type of surgery (p = 0.0001) and whether arytenoidectomy was performed (p = 0.0001). The reliable oncological and functional results of SCL for early and locally advanced laryngeal cancers are confirmed by our series of patients.

  15. [Surgical infections as patient safety problems].

    PubMed

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Kulin, László; Jósa, Valéria; Mayer, Akos

    2011-06-01

    Surgical infections are severe complications of surgical interventions and one of the most important patient safety issues. These are associated with increased morbidity, mortality, costs and decreased quality of life. Prevention of infections is essential, while one has to consider pre-, intra- and postoperative factors and procedures in the clinical practice. In this article we summarize the latest recommendations for clinicians based on the relevant published literature.

  16. [Oromaxillofacial surgical treatment in aging patients].

    PubMed

    Hausamen, J E; Schliephake, H

    1990-01-01

    The oral and maxillofacial surgical therapy of the elderly patient must include considerations of age-related physiological changes, both of inner organs and oral structures. Decreased hepatic and renal function may lead to delayed elimination of anaesthetic drugs and thereby make dose reductions necessary. Sclerosis or osteoporosis of jaw bones may render the surgical treatment of odontogenic diseases more difficult due to the increased fracture hazard. Painful ankylosis and rheumatic arthritis of the temporo-mandibular joint, tumors and fractures are common diseases of the elderly patient that a maxillofacial surgeon has to deal with. Furthermore, preprosthetic and reconstructive surgery is often required after jaw resections or severe atrophy. Due to the polypathy frequently present in elderly patients maxillofacial surgery requires particular indications, special surgical performance, and extensive postoperative care. By using all possible means, a satisfactory treatment can be achieved even in this age patients, whose quality of life can thus be improved.

  17. Role of culture of postoperative drainage fluid in the prediction of infection of the surgical site after major oncological operations of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Candau-Alvarez, A; Linares-Sicilia, M J; Dean-Ferrer, A; Pérez-Navero, J L

    2015-02-01

    Infection of the surgical site after major oncological operations of the head and neck increases mortality and morbidity. The aim of this prospective pilot study was to assess the efficacy of culturing the exudate from the drain after cervical neck dissection to see if it predicted such infection. We studied 40/112 patients with squamous cell cancer of the head and neck who were treated during the last two years and met our inclusion criteria. Six patients developed infections (15%). Reconstruction with pedicled rather than local or microvascular flaps, duration of operation of over 7 hours, the presence of a tracheostomy, and bilateral neck dissection were considered risk factors (p=0.01). Culture of drainage fluid on postoperative day 3 that grew no pathogens predicted that the site would not become infected, with a negative predictive value of 96%.

  18. Oncology nurse communication barriers to patient-centered care.

    PubMed

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Goldsmith, Joy; Ferrell, Betty

    2013-04-01

    Although quality communication has been identified as a necessary component to cancer care, communication skills training programs have yet to focus on the unique role of nurses. This study explored communication barriers as reported by seven nurse managers to better identify communication skills needed for oncology nurses to practice patient-centered care. Thematic analysis of transcripts was used to identify barriers to patient and family communication and desirable patient-centered nursing communication skills. Overall, the nurse managers reported that nurses experience patient and family communication difficulties as a result of inconsistent messages to patients and family from other healthcare staff. Physician assumptions about nursing left nurses feeling uncomfortable asking for clarification, creating a barrier to team communication processes. Patient-centered communication and care cannot be actualized for nurses unless team roles are clarified and nurses receive training in how to communicate with physicians, patients, and family. Therefore, the authors of this article created the COMFORT communication training protocol, and key concepts and resources for nurse communication training through COMFORT are detailed in this article.

  19. Development of an electronic radiation oncology patient information management system.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Abhijit; Asthana, Anupam Kumar; Aggarwal, Lalit Mohan

    2008-01-01

    The quality of patient care is critically influenced by the availability of accurate information and its efficient management. Radiation oncology consists of many information components, for example there may be information related to the patient (e.g., profile, disease site, stage, etc.), to people (radiation oncologists, radiological physicists, technologists, etc.), and to equipment (diagnostic, planning, treatment, etc.). These different data must be integrated. A comprehensive information management system is essential for efficient storage and retrieval of the enormous amounts of information. A radiation therapy patient information system (RTPIS) has been developed using open source software. PHP and JAVA script was used as the programming languages, MySQL as the database, and HTML and CSF as the design tool. This system utilizes typical web browsing technology using a WAMP5 server. Any user having a unique user ID and password can access this RTPIS. The user ID and password is issued separately to each individual according to the person's job responsibilities and accountability, so that users will be able to only access data that is related to their job responsibilities. With this system authentic users will be able to use a simple web browsing procedure to gain instant access. All types of users in the radiation oncology department should find it user-friendly. The maintenance of the system will not require large human resources or space. The file storage and retrieval process would be be satisfactory, unique, uniform, and easily accessible with adequate data protection. There will be very little possibility of unauthorized handling with this system. There will also be minimal risk of loss or accidental destruction of information. PMID:19052391

  20. Outcomes of gynecologic oncology patients undergoing robotic-assisted laparoscopic procedures in a university setting.

    PubMed

    Walters Haygood, Christen L; Fauci, Janelle M; Huddleston-Colburn, Mary Katherine; Huh, Warner K; Straughn, J Michael

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluated intraoperative complications and postoperative outcomes of gynecologic oncology patients undergoing robotic-assisted (RA) laparoscopic procedures in a university setting. A retrospective chart review evaluated all gynecologic oncology patients at the University of Alabama at Birmingham who underwent attempted RA procedures between August 2006 and October 2011. Patient demographics, medical/surgical history, intraoperative complications, postoperative outcomes, conversion rates, readmission rates, and length of stay were examined. Total complication rates were assessed over time for each surgeon. 681 patients underwent planned RA procedures by seven gynecologic oncologists. The mean body mass index was 33.5 kg/m(2) (range 16.6-71.0 kg/m(2)). 61.4 % were diagnosed with malignancy. The most common procedure was RA hysterectomy with unilateral/bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (37.2 %). Robotic staging was performed in 291 patients (45.1 %). Mean estimated blood loss was 75 ml (range 5-700 ml). 36 patients (5.3 %) were converted to laparotomy. The most common reason for conversion was adhesions (30.1 %), followed by uterine size (22.2 %). In 107 cases, a surgical modification was required for specimen removal including mini-laparotomy (24), extension of accessory port (36), morcellation (9), and difficult vaginal delivery (38). 3.7 % had intraoperative complications; 6 patients had a cystotomy and 5 had a vascular injury. Postoperatively, 20 patients had a febrile episode, 9 had wound complications, and 3 had a vaginal cuff dehiscence. 27 (4.2 %) patients were readmitted within 30 days. Complication rates and conversion rates were similar per surgeon. Total complication rates for evaluable surgeons were similar between the first 10 cases and subsequent 50 cases. Although patients undergoing RA procedures in a university setting are high risk, the conversion rate to laparotomy is low and intraoperative and postoperative complications are

  1. Thromboprophylaxis in non-surgical cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander T; Gurwith, Meredith M P; Dobromirski, Mark

    2012-04-01

    Acutely ill medical patients with cancer and cancer patients requiring non-surgical therapy are considered as non-surgical cancer patients and are at moderate to high risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE): approximately 10-30% of these patients may develop asymptomatic or symptomatic deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE), and the latter is a leading contributor to deaths in hospital. Other medical conditions associated with a high risk of VTE include cardiac disease, respiratory disease, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatological and infectious diseases. Pre-disposing risk factors in non-surgical cancer patients include a history of VTE, immobilisation, history of metastatic malignancy, complicating infections, increasing age, obesity hormonal or antiangiogenic therapies, thalidomide and lenalidomide therapy. Heparins, both unfractionated (UFH) and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) and fondaparinux have been shown to be effective agents in prevention of VTE in the medical setting with patients having a history of cancer. UFH and LMWH along with semuloparin also have a role in outpatients with cancer receiving chemotherapy. However, it has not yet been possible to demonstrate a significant effect on mortality rates in this population. UFH has a higher rate of bleeding complications than LMWH. Thromboprophylaxis has been shown to be effective in medical patients with cancer and may have an effect on cancer outcomes. Thromboprophylaxis in patients receiving chemotherapy remains controversial and requires further investigation. There is no evidence for the use of aspirin, warfarin or mechanical methods. We recommend either LMWH, or fondaparinux for the prevention of VTE in cancer patients with acute medical illnesses and UFH for those with significant severe renal impairment. For ambulatory cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy we recommend LMWH or semuloparin. These are safe and effective agents in the thromboprophylaxis of non-surgical cancer

  2. Illness perception differences between Russian- and Hebrew-speaking Israeli oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Popov, Nadia; Heruti, Irit; Levy, Sigal; Lulav-Grinwald, Doron; Bar-Sela, Gil

    2014-03-01

    Illness perception influences health and illness behaviors. This study was designed to estimate illness perception differences between Russian-speaking and Hebrew-speaking Israeli oncology patients. Changes in illness perception associated with time spent in Israel among Russian-speaking patients were also evaluated. Additionally, we evaluated differences in illness perception of patients exposed to Chernobyl's consequences. A total of 144 oncology patients (77 Hebrew-speaking, 67 Russian-speaking) completed personal data questionnaires and The illness perception questionnaire revised, translated into Russian for this study. Significantly more Russian-speaking oncology patients perceived their illness as chronic and having negative consequences on life (p < .01). Russian-speaking oncology patients tend to have a more negative perception of cancer compared to Hebrew-speaking patients. Time spent in Israel may create more positive perceptions of cancer among these patients. No illness perception differences were found concerning Chernobyl consequences.

  3. Enhanced Recovery after Surgery in a Single High-Volume Surgical Oncology Unit: Details Matter

    PubMed Central

    Vohra, Nasreen A.; Edwards, Kimberly V.; Zervos, Emmanuel E.

    2016-01-01

    Benefits of ERAS protocol have been well documented; however, it is unclear whether the improvement stems from the protocol or shifts in expectations. Interdisciplinary educational seminars were conducted for all health professionals. However, one test surgeon adopted the protocol. 394 patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery from June 2013 to April 2015 with a median age of 63 years were included. The implementation of ERAS protocol resulted in a decrease in the length of stay (LOS) and mortality, whereas the difference in cost was found to be insignificant. For the test surgeon, ERAS was associated with decreased LOS, cost, and mortality. For the control providers, the LOS, cost, mortality, readmission rates, and complications remained similar both before and after the implementation of ERAS. An ERAS protocol on the single high-volume surgical unit decreased the cost, LOS, and mortality. PMID:27648469

  4. Enhanced Recovery after Surgery in a Single High-Volume Surgical Oncology Unit: Details Matter.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Timothy L; Mosquera, Catalina; Koutlas, Nicholas J; Vohra, Nasreen A; Edwards, Kimberly V; Zervos, Emmanuel E

    2016-01-01

    Benefits of ERAS protocol have been well documented; however, it is unclear whether the improvement stems from the protocol or shifts in expectations. Interdisciplinary educational seminars were conducted for all health professionals. However, one test surgeon adopted the protocol. 394 patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery from June 2013 to April 2015 with a median age of 63 years were included. The implementation of ERAS protocol resulted in a decrease in the length of stay (LOS) and mortality, whereas the difference in cost was found to be insignificant. For the test surgeon, ERAS was associated with decreased LOS, cost, and mortality. For the control providers, the LOS, cost, mortality, readmission rates, and complications remained similar both before and after the implementation of ERAS. An ERAS protocol on the single high-volume surgical unit decreased the cost, LOS, and mortality. PMID:27648469

  5. Enhanced Recovery after Surgery in a Single High-Volume Surgical Oncology Unit: Details Matter

    PubMed Central

    Vohra, Nasreen A.; Edwards, Kimberly V.; Zervos, Emmanuel E.

    2016-01-01

    Benefits of ERAS protocol have been well documented; however, it is unclear whether the improvement stems from the protocol or shifts in expectations. Interdisciplinary educational seminars were conducted for all health professionals. However, one test surgeon adopted the protocol. 394 patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery from June 2013 to April 2015 with a median age of 63 years were included. The implementation of ERAS protocol resulted in a decrease in the length of stay (LOS) and mortality, whereas the difference in cost was found to be insignificant. For the test surgeon, ERAS was associated with decreased LOS, cost, and mortality. For the control providers, the LOS, cost, mortality, readmission rates, and complications remained similar both before and after the implementation of ERAS. An ERAS protocol on the single high-volume surgical unit decreased the cost, LOS, and mortality.

  6. [Surgical treatment of bronchiectases in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Danilov, G P; Makeeva, R P; Shornikov, V A; Zil'ber, E K; Akopov, A L

    2010-01-01

    The authors present experiences with surgical treatment of 29 patients (aged 50-64 years) with bronchiectases. Early and late results were analyzed. It was shown that complex approach to the estimation of the findings of radiography, spiral computed tomography, investigation of the external respiration function, fibrobronchoscopy and bronchoscopy, if necessary, allowed operating the patients older than 50 years with local forms of bronchiectases which gave good results. PMID:21137257

  7. Understanding the Differences Between Oncology Patients and Oncology Health Professionals Concerning Spirituality/Religiosity: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Camargos, Mayara Goulart de; Paiva, Carlos Eduardo; Barroso, Eliane Marçon; Carneseca, Estela Cristina; Paiva, Bianca Sakamoto Ribeiro

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated whether spirituality/religiosity (S/R) plays an important role in the lives of cancer patients and in the work of health professionals who provide care for these patients. The correlations between spiritual quality of life (QOL) and the other QOL domain scores of patients and health professionals were also assessed. Moreover, QOL domain scores were compared between patients and health professionals. In this cross-sectional study, 1050 participants (525 oncology patients and 525 health professionals) were interviewed. Quality of life was assessed with the World Health Organization quality of life spiritual, religious, and personal beliefs (WHOQOL-SRPB). To compare the groups with respect to the instruments' domains, a quantile regression and an analysis of covariance model were used. The WHOQOL-Bref and WHOQOL-SRPB domains were correlated by performing Pearson and partial correlation tests. It was demonstrated that 94.1% of patients considered it important that health professionals addressed their spiritual beliefs, and 99.2% of patients relied on S/R to face cancer. Approximately, 99.6% of the patients reported that S/R support is necessary during cancer treatment; 98.3% of health professionals agreed that spiritual and religious support was necessary for oncology patients. Positive correlations between spiritual QOL and the other QOL domains were observed. When compared among themselves, patients exhibited significantly higher levels of spiritual QOL. In conclusion, S/R was an important construct in the minds of cancer patients and health professionals. Both groups often use S/R resources in their daily lives, which seems to positively affect their perceptions of QOL. Further studies are needed to determine how health professionals effectively address S/R during oncology practice. PMID:26632743

  8. Prevention of VTE in Nonorthopedic Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, David A.; Wren, Sherry M.; Karanicolas, Paul J.; Arcelus, Juan I.; Heit, John A.; Samama, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: VTE is a common cause of preventable death in surgical patients. Methods: We developed recommendations for thromboprophylaxis in nonorthopedic surgical patients by using systematic methods as described in Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines. Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines in this supplement. Results: We describe several alternatives for stratifying the risk of VTE in general and abdominal-pelvic surgical patients. When the risk for VTE is very low (< 0.5%), we recommend that no specific pharmacologic (Grade 1B) or mechanical (Grade 2C) prophylaxis be used other than early ambulation. For patients at low risk for VTE (∼1.5%), we suggest mechanical prophylaxis, preferably with intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC), over no prophylaxis (Grade 2C). For patients at moderate risk for VTE (∼3%) who are not at high risk for major bleeding complications, we suggest low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) (Grade 2B), low-dose unfractionated heparin (Grade 2B), or mechanical prophylaxis with IPC (Grade 2C) over no prophylaxis. For patients at high risk for VTE (∼6%) who are not at high risk for major bleeding complications, we recommend pharmacologic prophylaxis with LMWH (Grade 1B) or low-dose unfractionated heparin (Grade 1B) over no prophylaxis. In these patients, we suggest adding mechanical prophylaxis with elastic stockings or IPC to pharmacologic prophylaxis (Grade 2C). For patients at high risk for VTE undergoing abdominal or pelvic surgery for cancer, we recommend extended-duration, postoperative, pharmacologic prophylaxis (4 weeks) with LMWH over limited-duration prophylaxis (Grade 1B). For patients at moderate to high risk for VTE who are at high risk for major bleeding complications or those in whom the consequences of bleeding are believed to be particularly severe, we suggest

  9. [SURGICAL TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH URETERAL RUPTURES].

    PubMed

    Komjakov, B K; Guliev, B G

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the causes of ureteral ruptures and the types surgical procedures used for their management. Over the period from 2006 to 2014, 7 patients with ureteral ruptures underwent surgical treatment in the Mechnikov N-WSMU clinic. All of them were males aged 50 to 71 years. In all cases, the ureter was injured during ureteroscopy and contact lithotripsy. In two patients the right ureter was cut off at the border of the upper and middle third, in four--at 3-4 cm below pyeloureteral segment, one patient diagnosed with a complete separation of the ureter from the kidney pelvis. Patients, who have suffered a detachment of the ureter in other hospitals, previously underwent surgical exploration of the retroperitoneal space, drainage of the kidney by pyelonephrostomy (5) and ureterocutaneostomy (1). In a case of a patient with an injury that occurred in our clinic, laparoscopic nephrectomy with autologous renal transplantation was carried out. Five patients with extended ureter defects underwent ileo-ureteroplasty. The patient with left ureterocutaneostomy underwent nephrovesical bypass. Patency of the upper urinary tract and kidney function were restored in all patients, all of them were relieved from external drains. The duration of the intestinal plastic averaged 160 minutes, laparoscopic nephrectomy with autologous transplantation--210 min and nephrovesical bypass--110 min. Blood transfusion was required only in autologous graft patient. The ureteral rupture is a serious complication of ureteral endourological procedures in upper urinary tract. It requires such complicated reconstructive operations as autologous transplantation of the kidney or intestinal ureteroplasty. PMID:26390553

  10. Perioperative preparation of the adolescent surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Busen, N H

    2001-02-01

    The perioperative preparation of adolescents for surgery provides a challenge to nurses and other health care providers because of the wide diversity in adolescents' age, physical maturation, and cognitive and psychosocial development. Perioperative issues, informed consent, and assent differ considerably depending on the age and developmental level of each adolescent. This article provides information about adolescent growth and development and approaches to managing adolescent surgical patients.

  11. [Anesthesiological management of the high-risk surgical patient].

    PubMed

    Bertoldi, G; Avalle, M

    1980-03-01

    Evaluation of the anaesthesiological risk in surgical patients is described and an account is given of results obtained with an association of ketamin and NLA II in 57 high-risk patients subjected to general surgical management.

  12. Enteral nutrition in hypermetabolic surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Cerra, F B; Shronts, E P; Raup, S; Konstantinides, N

    1989-07-01

    Enteral nutrition is usually administered with premixed formulas and in a volume determined by the estimated total caloric need of the patient. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the nutritional outcome when isocaloric amounts of three commercial products were given as enteral nutrition in hypermetabolic surgical ICU patients. To qualify for the study, the patients had to be hypermetabolic and must have received and retained the volume of enteral formula estimated to meet energy and nutritional requirements for at least eight consecutive days. Caloric needs were defined as 30 to 35 total cal/kg.day. All data were prospectively collected; all patients had moderate to high-level metabolic stress after surgical intervention. Thirty-five patients participated in the study: 18 received a formula that was 23% amino acids, 20% fat, and had a nonprotein calorie/nitrogen (NPC/N) ratio of 97:1; ten patients received a formula with NPC/N 125:1 that was 17.5% protein and 35% fat; and seven patients received a formula with an NPC/N of 149:1 that was 15.3% amino acids and 2.5% fat. All formulas were given via nasoduodenal tube by continuous pump technique. Patients who received the low NPC/N had significantly greater N retention (p less than .05), increased plasma transferrin levels (p less than .05), and a lower RQ (p less than .05). There was a strong correlation between NPC/N and N retention and the increase in plasma transferrin levels. Thus, dosing enteral nutrition by total estimated caloric need does not presume optimal nutritional outcome. Formula composition is an important determinant of nutritional effect; formulas that have a lower NPC/N with more N and reduced calories as glucose demonstrate better nutritional results.

  13. Resecting diffuse low-grade gliomas to the boundaries of brain functions: a new concept in surgical neuro-oncology.

    PubMed

    Duffau, H

    2015-12-01

    The traditional dilemma making surgery for diffuse low-grade gliomas (DLGGs) challenging is underlain by the need to optimize tumor resection in order to significantly increase survival versus the risk of permanent neurological morbidity. Development of neuroimaging led neurosurgeons to achieve tumorectomy according to the oncological limits provided by preoperative or intraoperative structural and metabolic imaging. However, this principle is not coherent, neither with the infiltrative nature of DLGGs nor with the limited resolution of current neuroimaging. Indeed, despite technical advances, MRI still underestimates the actual spatial extent of gliomas, since tumoral cells are present several millimeters to centimeters beyond the area of signal abnormalities. Furthermore, cortical and subcortical structures may be still crucial for brain functions despite their invasion by this diffuse tumoral disease. Finally, the lack of reliability of functional MRI has also been demonstrated. Therefore, to talk about "maximal safe resection" based upon neuroimaging is a non-sense, because oncological MRI does not show the tumor and functional MRI does not show critical neural pathways. This review proposes an original concept in neuro-oncological surgery, i.e. to resect DLGG to the boundaries of brain functions, thanks to intraoperative electrical mapping performed in awake patients. This paradigmatic shift from image-guided resection to functional mapping-guided resection, based upon an accurate study of brain connectomics and neuroplasticity in each patient throughout tumor removal has permitted to solve the classical dilemma, by increasing both survival and quality of life in DLGG patients. With this in mind, brain surgeons should also be neuroscientists.

  14. Oral Health Status of Patients Undergoing Treatment for Head and Neck Oncology in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Moore, Ciaran; Killough, Simon; Markey, Neill; Winning, Lewis; McKenna, Gerald

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to collect data on the oral health status of patients undergoing treatment for head and neck oncology across Northern Ireland. Data were collected on all patients referred to the Northern Ireland Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Oncology Team for discussion and treatment planning. Each patient underwent pre-treatment dental assessment in the Centre for Dentistry, Queen's University Belfast, between June 2013 and November 2014. Data were collected from clinical oral examinations supplemented with intra-oral radiographs. During the course of the study 96 patients were assessed and the levels of dental disease observed in this cohort were high. On clinical examination 43% were diagnosed with caries and 46% with periodontal disease. Ten patients were completely edentate. The disease profile of this patient group presents significant challenges to dental services tasked with rendering patients dentally fit prior to undergoing oncology treatment. PMID:27424336

  15. A survey of emotional difficulties of nurses who care for oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Oflaz, Fahriye; Arslan, Filiz; Uzun, Senay; Ustunsoz, Ayfer; Yilmazkol, Elif; Unlü, Emine

    2010-02-01

    Nurses who care for dying patients are under pressure emotionally because of their beliefs and values about death as well as the emotions and reactions of the patients and their families. This study examines the emotional difficulties of nurses caring for oncology patients in Turkey. The study used a descriptive survey design. The participants were 157 nurses from three medical oncology units in Ankara. Results showed that nurses had difficulty in talking to oncology patients about end-of-life issues and found that caring for dying patients affected their personal lives. This study also showed that the length of nurses' work experience had no effect on their feelings and perceptions toward terminally ill patients. However, the nurses who had more work experience were more likely to report difficulty in talking to patients. Most of the nurses expressed feelings of inadequacy and hopelessness about pain management and treatments.

  16. Which patients with resectable pancreatic cancer truly benefit from oncological resection: is it destiny or biology?

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lei; Wolfgang, Christopher L

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a dismal prognosis. A technically perfect surgical operation may still not provide a survival advantage for patients with technically resectable pancreatic cancer. Appropriate selection of patients for surgical resections is an imminent issue. Recent studies have provided an important clue on what serum biomarkers may be used to select out the patients who would unlikely benefit from the surgical resection.

  17. A comparison of preliminary oncologic outcome and postoperative complications between patients undergoing either open or robotic radical cystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Cusano, Antonio; Haddock, Peter; Jackson, Max; Staff, Ilene; Wagner, Joseph; Meraney, Anoop

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To compare complications and outcomes in patients undergoing either open radical cystectomy (ORC) or robotic-assisted radical cystectomy (RRC). Materials and Methods: We retrospectively identified patients that underwent ORC or RRC between 2003- 2013. We statistically compared preliminary oncologic outcomes of patients for each surgical modality. Results: 92 (43.2%) and 121 (56.8%) patients underwent ORC and RRC, respectively. While operative time was shorter for ORC patients (403 vs. 508 min; p<0.001), surgical blood loss and transfusion rates were significantly lower in RRC patients (p<0.001 and 0.006). Length of stay was not different between groups (p=0.221). There was no difference in the proportion of lymph node-positive patients between groups. However, RRC patients had a greater number of lymph nodes removed during surgery (18 vs. 11.5; p<0.001). There was no significant difference in the incidence of pre-existing comorbidities or in the Clavien distribution of complications between groups. ORC and RRC patients were followed for a median of 1.38 (0.55-2.7) and 1.40 (0.582.59) years, respectively (p=0.850). During this period, a lower proportion (22.3%) of RRC patients experienced disease recurrence vs. ORC patients (34.8%). However, there was no significant difference in time to recurrence between groups. While ORC was associated with a higher all-cause mortality rate (p=0.049), there was no significant difference in disease-free survival time between groups. Conclusions: ORC and RRC patients experience postoperative complications of similar rates and severity. However, RRC may offer indirect benefits via reduced surgical blood loss and need for transfusion. PMID:27564275

  18. The Use of Art in the Medical Decision-Making Process of Oncology Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czamanski-Cohen, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of written informed consent in the 1970s created expectations of shared decision making between doctors and patients that has led to decisional conflict for some patients. This study utilized a collaborative, intrinsic case study approach to the decision-making process of oncology patients who participated in an open art therapy…

  19. The Effectiveness of a Participatory Program on Fall Prevention in Oncology Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Li-Chi; Ma, Wei-Fen; Li, Tsai-Chung; Liang, Yia-Wun; Tsai, Li-Yun; Chang, Fy-Uan

    2015-01-01

    Falls are known to be one of the most common in patient adverse events. A high incidence of falls was reported on patients with cancer. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of a participatory program on patient's knowledge and self-efficacy of fall prevention and fall incidence in an oncology ward. In this quasi-experimental study,…

  20. Monitoring the critically ill surgical patient.

    PubMed Central

    Holliday, R L; Doris, P J

    1979-01-01

    Critically ill surgical patients account for approximately half the patients in an active multidisciplinary critical care unit. Hypovolemia and sepsis are common in such patients and affect a number of organ systems. Monitoring these systems provides therapeutically relevant information that may decrease morbidity and improve patient survival. Circulatory hemodynamics may be assessed by direct measurement of the arterial blood pressure, central venous and pulmonary artery pressure monitoring and cardiac output determination; the data thus obtained are valuable in guiding fluid replacement in the hypovolemic individual. The respiratory status may be assessed by bedside spirometry and measurement of arterial blood gas tensions to gauge pulmonary function and the need for assisted ventilation. Renal dysfunction is common in such patients; careful analysis of both urine and blood may identify prerenal as opposed to renal and postrenal factors. Monitoring of the gastrointestinal tract, especially for hemorrhage, is important. Finally, careful attention to nutritional status and provision of adequate protein and energy intake by mouth or by vein is a vital component of the optimal care of these patients. PMID:115566

  1. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection in hemato-oncological patients: A case control study in 144 patients

    PubMed Central

    Fuereder, Thorsten; Koni, Danjel; Gleiss, Andreas; Kundi, Michael; Makristathis, Athanasios; Zielinski, Christoph; Steininger, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Evidence on risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in hemato-oncologic patients is conflicting. We studied risk factors for CDI in a large, well-characterized cohort of hemato-oncological patients. 144 hemato-oncological patients were identified in this retrospective, single center study with a microbiologically confirmed CDI-associated diarrhea. Patients were compared with 144 age and sex matched hemato-oncologic patients with CDI negative diarrhea. Risk factors such as prior antimicrobial therapy, type of disease, chemotherapy and survival were evaluated. CDI-positive patients received more frequently any antimicrobial agent and antimicrobial combination therapy than CDI-negative patients (79% vs. 67%; OR = 2.26, p = 0.038 and OR = 2.62, p = 0.003, respectively). CDI positive patients were treated more frequently with antimicrobial agents active against C. difficile than CDI negative ones (25% vs. 13%; OR = 2.2, p = 0.039). The interval between last chemotherapy and onset of diarrhea was significantly shorter in patients without CDI (median, 17 days vs 36 days; p < 0.001). Our study demonstrates that chemotherapy is not a significant risk factor for CDI but for early onset CDI negative diarrhea. The predominant modifiable risk factor for CDI is in hemato-oncological patients antimicrobial treatment. These findings should be taken into account in the daily clinical practice to avoid CDI associated complications and excess health care costs. PMID:27510591

  2. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection in hemato-oncological patients: A case control study in 144 patients.

    PubMed

    Fuereder, Thorsten; Koni, Danjel; Gleiss, Andreas; Kundi, Michael; Makristathis, Athanasios; Zielinski, Christoph; Steininger, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Evidence on risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in hemato-oncologic patients is conflicting. We studied risk factors for CDI in a large, well-characterized cohort of hemato-oncological patients. 144 hemato-oncological patients were identified in this retrospective, single center study with a microbiologically confirmed CDI-associated diarrhea. Patients were compared with 144 age and sex matched hemato-oncologic patients with CDI negative diarrhea. Risk factors such as prior antimicrobial therapy, type of disease, chemotherapy and survival were evaluated. CDI-positive patients received more frequently any antimicrobial agent and antimicrobial combination therapy than CDI-negative patients (79% vs. 67%; OR = 2.26, p = 0.038 and OR = 2.62, p = 0.003, respectively). CDI positive patients were treated more frequently with antimicrobial agents active against C. difficile than CDI negative ones (25% vs. 13%; OR = 2.2, p = 0.039). The interval between last chemotherapy and onset of diarrhea was significantly shorter in patients without CDI (median, 17 days vs 36 days; p < 0.001). Our study demonstrates that chemotherapy is not a significant risk factor for CDI but for early onset CDI negative diarrhea. The predominant modifiable risk factor for CDI is in hemato-oncological patients antimicrobial treatment. These findings should be taken into account in the daily clinical practice to avoid CDI associated complications and excess health care costs. PMID:27510591

  3. Integrative Therapy Use for Management of Side Effects and Toxicities Experienced by Pediatric Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Shana S

    2014-01-01

    Integrative Therapies (IT), otherwise known as Complementary and Alternative Medicine, are widely used among pediatric oncology patients, despite a paucity of available evidence. This review summarizes surveys that describe the prevalence of IT use by pediatric oncology patients, both during therapy and in survivorship, as well as the modalities being used. Additionally, the evidence that exists for specific treatments that appear to be efficacious in controlling specific symptoms is described. Finally, there are recommendations for practitioners on how to best counsel patients about IT use. PMID:27417488

  4. Oncology nurses' communication challenges with patients and families: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Smita C; Manna, Ruth; Coyle, Nessa; Shen, Megan Johnson; Pehrson, Cassandra; Zaider, Talia; Hammonds, Stacey; Krueger, Carol A; Parker, Patricia A; Bylund, Carma L

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of effective communication in an oncology setting are multifold and include the overall well-being of patients and health professionals, adherence to treatment regimens, psychological functioning, and improvements in quality of life. Nevertheless, there are substantial barriers and communication challenges reported by oncology nurses. This study was conducted to present a summary of communication challenges faced by oncology nurses. From November 2012 to March 2014, 121 inpatient nurses working in the oncology setting participated in an online pre-training qualitative survey that asked nurses to describe common communication challenges in communicating empathy and discussing death, dying, and end-of-life (EOL) goals of care. The results revealed six themes that describe the challenges in communicating empathically: dialectic tensions, burden of carrying bad news, lack of skills for providing empathy, perceived institutional barriers, challenging situations, and perceived dissimilarities between the nurse and the patient. The results for challenges in discussing death, dying and EOL goals of care revealed five themes: dialectic tensions, discussing specific topics related to EOL, lack of skills for providing empathy, patient/family characteristics, and perceived institutional barriers. This study emphasizes the need for institutions to provide communication skills training to their oncology nurses for navigating through challenging patient interactions.

  5. Group Therapy with Patients in the Waiting Room of an Oncology Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnowitz, Edward; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes a therapy group for cancer patients, conducted by cotherapists in an oncology waiting room. Group members provided mutual support and shared concerns and coping methods. Medical staff members became more involved and were more able to address the affective needs of the patients and their families. (JAC)

  6. Training of breast surgical oncologists.

    PubMed

    Teshome, Mediget; Kuerer, Henry M

    2016-06-01

    Breast surgical oncology is a defined sub-specialty of general surgery with focus on the surgical management of breast disease and malignancy within a multidisciplinary context. Much of the training of breast surgical oncologists in the United States exists within a fellowship training structure with oversight and approval by the Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO). Rapid continuous changes in breast oncology practice have further substantiated dedicated expertise in breast surgical oncology. Training programs are structured to develop proficiency in fellows for advanced surgical techniques and clinical decision-making as well as exposure to the multidisciplinary aspects of breast cancer management. Components of a successful program include an intense multidisciplinary curriculum, engagement in clinical research and attention to strong mentorship. National curriculum and training requirements as well as supplemental resources assist in standardizing the fellowship experience. As surgical training and the field of breast oncology continues to evolve, so do fellowship training programs to ensure high quality breast surgical oncologists equipped to deliver high quality evidence based patient care while continuing to drive future research and trainee education. PMID:27197510

  7. Hepatocellular carcinoma in central Sydney: a 10 year review of patients seen in a medical oncology department

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Desmond; Findlay, Michael; Boyer, Michael; Tattersall, Martin H.

    1999-01-01

    AIM: To report a single Australian oncology unit’s experience with the management of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), in the context of a literature review of the current management issues. METHODS: Retrospective case record review of 76 patients with diagnosis of HCC referred to the unit between 1984 and 1995. RESULTS: Sixty-three patients had adequate records for analysis. Thirty-six (56%) were migrants with half from Southeast Asia. Twenty-four p atients had a documented viral aetiology. Nine (14%) of 51 patients with pathological confirmation of HCC had normal alpha-fetoprotein levels. Median survival of the 20 patients managed palliatively was 5 weeks compared to 16 weeks for the cohort overall. Surgery in 16 patients rendered all initially disease free with a median survival of 88 weeks. Chemoembolisation induced tumor responses in 5 of the 11 patients so treated. Systemic chemotherapy and tamoxifen treatment caused tumor response in two of 12 and one of 25 respectively. CONCLUSION: Prolonged survival of patients with HCC depends on early detection of small tumors suitable for surgical resection. Other active t reatments are palliative in intent and have limited success. In addition to tumor response and survival duration, the toxicities of therapies and the overall quality of life of patients need to be considered as important outcomes. Viral hepatitis prevention and screening of individuals at risk are strategies that are important for HCC management in communities where the disease is endemic. PMID:11819496

  8. Seroprevalence of Hepatitis B and C among Oncology Patients in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Kose, Sukran; Olmezoglu, Ali; Gozaydin, Ayhan

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the public-health issues worldwide. Approximately two billion people are infected with HBV, and about 350 million people are chronic carriers globally. About 3% of the world population is infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Oncology patients receiving packed red blood cell suspensions and other blood products usually are in the high-risk group for infections due to these viruses. The aim of the study was to detect the seroprevalence of hepatitis B and hepatitis C among chemotherapy patients at the Oncology Department of the Tepecik Education and Research Hospital. HBsAg, anti-HBs, anti-HBcIgM, anti-HBc total and anti-HCV assays were studied by enzyme immunoassay method (Diasorin, Italy) in serum samples of patients (n=448) referred to the Department of Oncology of the Tepecik Education and Research Hospital during 1 June 2006–1 January 2007. Of the 448 patients, 19 (4.2%) were HBsAg-positive, and three (0.7%) had anti-HCV positivity. In this study, the seroprevalence of HBV was similar to previous data in Turkey. This could be due to widespread vaccination programmes. The seroprevalence of low anti-HCV may be because of controlled blood transfusion. Oncology patients should be monitored for their protective antibody levels against HBV, and they must be included in the vaccination programme. Their anti-HCV status should also be checked as well. PMID:22283040

  9. [CROATIAN SOCIETY FOR MEDICAL ONCOLOGY CLINICAL GUIDELINES FOR DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT AND FOLLOW-UP OF PATIENTS WITH MELANOMA].

    PubMed

    Herceg, Davorin; Buzina, Daska Stulhofer; Ceović, Romana; Dotlić, Snjezana; Ilić, Ivana; Orehovec, Sanda Smuđ; Herceg, Gordana Horvatić; Mijatović, Davor; Separović, Robert; Silovski, Tajana; Vrbanec, Damir

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma in the Western world has an increasing incidence. One of the most important factor for the increase in incidence is sporadic, uncontrolled exposure to the sun. The basis for the treatment of primary melanoma is surgical treatment. Treatment of metastatic disease of melanoma in recent years experienced significant changes. BRAF and MEK inhibitors, immunotherapy with programmed cell-death immune checkpoint inhibitors (anti-PD-1-antibodies) are new options for the treatment of metastatic disease. A mulitidisiplinary team of Croatian Society for Medical Oncology provides recommendations for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of melanoma primarily driven to the discovery of new drugs and therapeutic options, that change the prognosis of patients with metastatic melanoma. PMID:27290810

  10. Improving the quality of patient handover on a surgical ward.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Alison

    2014-01-01

    The European Working Time Directive means safe patient hand over is imperative. It is the responsibility of every doctor and an issue of patient safety and clinical governance [1]. The aims of this project were to improve the quality of patient handover between combined assessment unit (CAU) and surgical ward FY1 doctors. The Royal College of Surgeons England (RCSEng) guidelines on surgical patient handover [1] were used as the standard. Data was collected throughout November 2013. A handover tool was then introduced and attached to the front of patient notes when a patient was transferred from CAU to the surgical ward. The doctor handing over the patient and the ward doctor receiving the handover signed this document. Policy was also changed so that handover should take place once the patient had received senior review on the CAU and was deemed appropriate for transfer to the surgical ward. Data from the handover tool was collated and checked against the list of surgical admission for February 2014. The number of patients handed over improved from 15 % to 45%. The quality of patient handover also improved. 0 patient handovers in November 2013 included all of the information recommended by the RCSEng guidelines. 100% of the patient handovers in February 2014 contained all the recommended information. Introduction of a handover tool and formalisation of timing of patient handover helped to improve quality and number of patients being handed over. Further work needs to be done to improve safe handover of surgical patients, particularly out of hours.

  11. [The experience of the "oncologic patient": (re)conceptualizing the informative act].

    PubMed

    Laranjeira, Carlos António

    2007-01-01

    The adaptation of the patient to the conditions of chronic illness makes the information given to the patient one of the most powerful strategies, capable of contributing to a change in the social representation of the patient, from that of a mere clinical case to that of a holistic being. The objective of this study was to investigate the scientific work published in periodicals indexed by the Medline and Lilacs databases between 1990 and 2006 as to the informative act and the different forms in which information is provided to oncology patients. This analysis of the literature led to the conclusion that there has been an increase in the volume of publications, underlining the role of the oncology patient as a catalyst for new strategies for psychosocial adjustment and revealing her key role through her status as a 'professional patient'.

  12. [The experience of the "oncologic patient": (re)conceptualizing the informative act].

    PubMed

    Laranjeira, Carlos António

    2007-01-01

    The adaptation of the patient to the conditions of chronic illness makes the information given to the patient one of the most powerful strategies, capable of contributing to a change in the social representation of the patient, from that of a mere clinical case to that of a holistic being. The objective of this study was to investigate the scientific work published in periodicals indexed by the Medline and Lilacs databases between 1990 and 2006 as to the informative act and the different forms in which information is provided to oncology patients. This analysis of the literature led to the conclusion that there has been an increase in the volume of publications, underlining the role of the oncology patient as a catalyst for new strategies for psychosocial adjustment and revealing her key role through her status as a 'professional patient'. PMID:18472547

  13. Use of Psychosocial Services Increases after a Social Worker-Mediated Intervention in Gynecology Oncology Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Yuko; Shah, Nina R.; Ward, Kristy K.; McHale, Michael T.; Alvarez, Edwin A.; Saenz, Cheryl C.; Plaxe, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the introduction of psychosocial services to gynecologic oncology outpatients by a social worker increases service use. During the initial six weeks (phase I), patients were referred for psychosocial services by clinic staff. During the second six weeks (phase II), a nurse introduced available…

  14. From Patient-Specific Mathematical Neuro-Oncology to Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Baldock, A. L.; Rockne, R. C.; Boone, A. D.; Neal, M. L.; Hawkins-Daarud, A.; Corwin, D. M.; Bridge, C. A.; Guyman, L. A.; Trister, A. D.; Mrugala, M. M.; Rockhill, J. K.; Swanson, K. R.

    2013-01-01

    Gliomas are notoriously aggressive, malignant brain tumors that have variable response to treatment. These patients often have poor prognosis, informed primarily by histopathology. Mathematical neuro-oncology (MNO) is a young and burgeoning field that leverages mathematical models to predict and quantify response to therapies. These mathematical models can form the basis of modern “precision medicine” approaches to tailor therapy in a patient-specific manner. Patient-specific models (PSMs) can be used to overcome imaging limitations, improve prognostic predictions, stratify patients, and assess treatment response in silico. The information gleaned from such models can aid in the construction and efficacy of clinical trials and treatment protocols, accelerating the pace of clinical research in the war on cancer. This review focuses on the growing translation of PSM to clinical neuro-oncology. It will also provide a forward-looking view on a new era of patient-specific MNO. PMID:23565501

  15. [Substantiation of active surgical tactics for patients with puerperal endometritis].

    PubMed

    Nikonov, A P; Ankirskaia, A S

    1991-01-01

    An active surgical tactics for managing patients (uterine wash and its cavity content vacuum aspiration) was applied in 34 patients with postnatal endometritis. Echography and hysteroscopy demonstrated that in 28 of 34 patients, the endometritis developed in the presence of pathological involvements into the uterine cavity, which made the use of surgical endometrial treatment justifiable. In addition, the surgical treatment substantially decreased the bacterial dissemination of the content in the uterine cavity. The proposed procedure enabled uterine extirpation to be avoided in 5 of 6 patients with partial suture inadequacy. PMID:2042714

  16. Young patients', parents', and survivors' communication preferences in paediatric oncology: Results of online focus groups

    PubMed Central

    Zwaanswijk, Marieke; Tates, Kiek; van Dulmen, Sandra; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M; Kamps, Willem A; Bensing, Jozien M

    2007-01-01

    Background Guidelines in paediatric oncology encourage health care providers to share relevant information with young patients and parents to enable their active participation in decision making. It is not clear to what extent this mirrors patients' and parents' preferences. This study investigated communication preferences of childhood cancer patients, parents, and survivors of childhood cancer. Methods Communication preferences were examined by means of online focus groups. Seven patients (aged 8–17), 11 parents, and 18 survivors (aged 8–17 at diagnosis) participated. Recruitment took place by consecutive inclusion in two Dutch university oncological wards. Questions concerned preferences regarding interpersonal relationships, information exchange and participation in decision making. Results Participants expressed detailed and multi-faceted views regarding their needs and preferences in communication in paediatric oncology. They agreed on the importance of several interpersonal and informational aspects of communication, such as honesty, support, and the need to be fully informed. Participants generally preferred a collaborative role in medical decision making. Differences in views were found regarding the desirability of the patient's presence during consultations. Patients differed in their satisfaction with their parents' role as managers of the communication. Conclusion Young patients' preferences mainly concur with current guidelines of providing them with medical information and enabling their participation in medical decision making. Still, some variation in preferences was found, which faces health care providers with the task of balancing between the sometimes conflicting preferences of young cancer patients and their parents. PMID:17996108

  17. Management of vitiligo patients with surgical interventions.

    PubMed

    Shokeen, Divya

    2016-05-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired depigmentation disorder of unknown etiology. Medical treatments are usually reasonably effective for nonstable vitiligo patches; however, for vitiligo patches that have been stable for a substantial period of time, surgical intervention should be considered. In this article, surgical interventions for vitiligo are reviewed, including split-thickness skin grafting, suction blister grafting, miniature punch grafting, and cultured melanocyte transplantation. PMID:27274556

  18. Endoscopic laser therapy of erosive-ulcerous and inflammatory damages of patients in oncological hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, Oleg N.; Kuvshinov, Yu. P.; Poddubny, Boris K.; Kartasheva, E. O.; Ungiadze, G. V.; Ponomarev, Igor V.; Mazurov, S. T.

    1996-01-01

    The results of laser therapy present in 374 patients with erosive-ulcerous and inflammatory damages of respiratory organs and of gastro-intestinal tract after oncological operations. Two types of laser namely endoscopic laser on the basis of He-Ne and Cu laser were used as sources of radiation. It was shown high therapeutic effectiveness of laser therapy. This method may be recommended for the above-mentioned category of the patients.

  19. Surgical Management of the Pediatric Cochlear Implant Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Seth M.; Haynes, David S.

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses the surgical management of children receiving cochlear implants. It identifies preoperative considerations to select patients likely to benefit, contraindications, some new surgical techniques, complications, special considerations (otitis media, meningitis, head growth, inner ear malformations, and cochlear obstruction).…

  20. Complications and oncologic outcomes of pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Somintara, Ongart; Lertsithichai, Panuwat; Kongdan, Youwanush; Supsamutchai, Chairat; Sukpanich, Rupporn

    2016-01-01

    Background There are several techniques for harvesting the pedicled transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap after mastectomy in breast cancer patients. We examined the whole muscle with partial sheath sparing technique and determined factors associated with its complications and oncological outcomes. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the results of 168 TRAM flaps performed between January 2003 and December 2010, focusing on complications and oncologic outcomes. Results Among the 168 pedicled TRAM flap procedures in 158 patients, flap complications occurred in 34%. Most of the flap complications included some degree of fat necrosis. There was no total flap loss. Flap complications were associated with elderly patients and the presence of major donor site complications. Abdominal bulging and hernia occurred in 12% of patients. The bi-pedicled TRAM flap and higher body mass index (BMI) were significant factors associated with increased donor site complications. Seven patients (4%) developed loco-regional recurrence. Within a median follow-up of 27 months, distant metastasis and death occurred in 6% and 4% of patients, respectively. Conclusions The pedicled TRAM flap using the whole muscle with partial sheath sparing technique in the present study is consistent with the results from previous studies in flap complication rates and oncological outcomes. PMID:27563562

  1. Fears, Uncertainties, and Hopes: Patient-Initiated Actions and Doctors' Responses During Oncology Interviews.

    PubMed

    Beach, Wayne A; Dozier, David M

    2015-01-01

    New cancer patients frequently raise concerns about fears, uncertainties, and hopes during oncology interviews. This study sought to understand when and how patients raise their concerns, how doctors responded to these patient-initiated actions, and implications for communication satisfaction. A subsampling of video recorded and transcribed encounters was investigated involving 44 new patients and 14 oncologists. Patients completed pre/post self-report measures about fears, uncertainties, and hopes as well as postevaluations of interview satisfaction. Conversation analysis was used to initially identify pairs of patient-initiated and doctor-responsive actions. A coding scheme was subsequently developed, and two independent coding teams, comprised of two coders each, reliably identified patient-initiated and doctor-responsive social actions. Interactional findings reveal that new cancer patients initiate actions much more frequently than previous research had identified, concerns are usually raised indirectly, and with minimal emotion. Doctors tend to respond to these concerns immediately, but with even less affect, and rarely partner with patients. From pre/post results, it was determined that the higher patients' reported fears, the higher their postvisit fears and lower their satisfaction. Patients with high uncertainty were highly proactive (e.g., asked more questions), yet reported even greater uncertainties after encounters. Hopeful patients also exited interviews with high hopes. Overall, new patients were very satisfied: oncology interviews significantly decreased patients' fears and uncertainties, while increasing hopes. Discussion raises key issues for improving communication and managing quality cancer care. PMID:26134261

  2. Patient-centered care in cancer treatment programs: the future of integrative oncology through psychoeducation.

    PubMed

    Garchinski, Christina M; DiBiase, Ann-Marie; Wong, Raimond K; Sagar, Stephen M

    2014-12-01

    The reciprocal relationship between the mind and body has been a neglected process for improving the psychosocial care of cancer patients. Emotions form an important link between the mind and body. They play a fundamental role in the cognitive functions of decision-making and symptom control. Recognizing this relationship is important for integrative oncology. We define psychoeducation as the teaching of self-evaluation and self-regulation of the mind-body process. A gap exists between research evidence and implementation into clinical practice. The patients' search for self-empowerment through the pursuit of complementary therapies may be a surrogate for inadequate psychoeducation. Integrative oncology programs should implement psychoeducation that helps patients to improve both emotional and cognitive intelligence, enabling them to better negotiate cancer treatment systems. PMID:25531048

  3. Integrated multimedia timeline of medical images and data for thoracic oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Aberle, D R; Dionisio, J D; McNitt-Gray, M F; Taira, R K; Cárdenas, A F; Goldin, J G; Brown, K; Figlin, R A; Chu, W W

    1996-05-01

    A prototype multimedia medical database has been developed to provide image and textual data for thoracic oncology patients undergoing treatment of advanced malignancies. The database integrates image data from the hospital picture archiving and communication system with textual reports from the radiology information system, alphanumeric data contained in the hospital information system, and other electronic medical data. The database presents information in a timeline format and also contains visualization programs that permit the user to view and annotate radiographic measurements in tabular or graphic form. The database provides an efficient and intuitive display of the changing status of oncology patients. The ability to integrate, manage, and access relevant multimedia information may substantially enhance communication among distributed multidisciplinary health care providers and may ensure greater consistency and completeness of patient-related data.

  4. Patients' Perspectives of Surgical Safety: Do They Feel Safe?

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Jennifer L.; Tillman, Matthew M.; Wehbe-Janek, Hania; Song, Juhee; Papaconstantinou, Harry T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Increased focus on reducing patient harm has led to surgical safety initiatives, including time-out, surgical safety checklists, and debriefings. The perception of the lay public of the surgical safety process is largely unknown. Methods A 20-question survey focused on perceptions of surgical safety practice was distributed to a random sample of patients following elective operations requiring hospitalization. Responses were measured by a 7-point Likert scale. Qualitative feedback was obtained through nonphysician-moderated sessions. Participation was voluntary and anonymous. Results Surveys were distributed to 345 patients of whom 102 (29.5%) responded. Overall, patients felt safe as evidenced by scores for the questions “I felt safe the day of my surgery” (6.53 ± 0.72) and “Mistakes rarely happen during surgery” (5.39 ± 1.51). Patients undergoing their first surgery and patients with higher income levels were associated with a significant decrease in specific safety perceptions. Qualitative feedback sessions identified the physician-patient relationship as the most important factor positively influencing patient safety perceptions. Conclusion Current surgical safety practice is perceived positively by our patients; however, patients still identify physician-patient interactions, relationships, and trust as the most positive factors influencing their perception of the safety environment. PMID:26130976

  5. Frequency of and predictors for withholding patient safety concerns among oncology staff: a survey study.

    PubMed

    Schwappach, D L B; Gehring, K

    2015-05-01

    Speaking up about patient safety is vital to avoid errors reaching the patient and to improve a culture of safety. This study investigated the prevalence of non-speaking up despite concerns for safety and aimed to identify predictors for withholding voice among healthcare professionals (HCPs) in oncology. A self-administered questionnaire assessed safety concerns, speaking up beliefs and behaviours among nurses and doctors from nine oncology departments. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify predictors for withholding safety concerns. A total of 1013 HCPs returned the completed survey (response rate 65%). Safety concerns were common among responders. Fifty-four per cent reported to recognise their colleagues making potentially harmful errors at least sometimes. A majority of responders reported at least some episodes of withholding concerns about patient safety. Thirty-seven per cent said they remained silent at least once when they had information that might have helped prevent an incident. Respondents believed that a high level of interpersonal, communication and coping skills are necessary to speak up about patient safety issues at their workplace. Higher levels of perceived advocacy for patient safety and psychological safety significantly decreased the frequency of withholding voice. Remaining silent about safety concerns is a common phenomenon in oncology. Improved strategies are needed to support staff in effective communication and make cancer care safer. PMID:25287114

  6. Nationwide outcome registrations to improve quality of care in rectal surgery. An initiative of the European Society of Surgical Oncology.

    PubMed

    van Gijn, Willem; Wouters, Michel W J M; Peeters, Koen C M J; van de Velde, Cornelis J H

    2009-06-15

    In recent years there have been significant improvements in rectal cancer treatment. New surgical techniques as well as effective neoadjuvant treatment regimens have contributed to these improvements. Key is to spread these advances towards every rectal cancer patient and to ensure that not only patients who are treated within the framework of clinical trials may benefit from these advancements. Throughout Europe there have been interesting quality programmes that have proved to facilitate the spread of up to date knowledge and skills among medical professionals resulting in improved treatment outcome. Despite these laudable efforts there is still a wide variation in treatment outcome between countries, regions and institutions, which calls for a European audit on cancer treatment outcome. PMID:19031492

  7. Urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin in critically ill surgical cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Delfino Duarte, Pericles Almeida; Fumagalli, Andreia Cristina; Wandeur, Vanessa; Becker, Delmiro

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (N-GAL) is an early biomarker of acute kidney injury (AKI) due to various etiologies. On the other hand, N-GAL is also elevated in patients with acute inflammatory conditions and in several solid neoplasms. The goal of this study was to assess the efficacy of N-GAL as a predictor of AKI and mortality in oncological surgical patients postoperatively in the intensive care unit (ICU). Methods: This was a prospective cohort observation study on adult cancer patients submitted to elective or emergency surgeries and admitted in the ICU. Urinary N-GAL was measured at the first 2 h after admission. AKI incidence and other complications were assessed, including hospital mortality. Results: A total of 22 patients were assessed (77% male, age 52.8 years, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II [APACHE II] 17.3) in whom the most frequent site of cancer was the gastrointestinal tract. AKI incidence was 13.6%. Urinary N-GAL was a predictor of AKI (22.0 ng/ml in patients without AKI vs. 239.1 ng/ml in patients with AKI, P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that the main predictors of AKI were age, APACHE II, and N-GAL. N-GAL was also higher, although not statistically significant in patients who died in the hospital. Conclusions: In oncological postoperative patients admitted to the ICU, urinary N-GAL was an independent predictor of AKI; moreover, its level was higher in the deceased patients. PMID:25983430

  8. Patient participation in the medical decision-making process in haemato-oncology--a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Ernst, J; Berger, S; Weißflog, G; Schröder, C; Körner, A; Niederwieser, D; Brähler, E; Singer, S

    2013-09-01

    Cancer patients are showing increased interest in shared decision-making. Patients with haematological illnesses, however, express considerably less desire for shared decision-making as compared with other oncological patient groups. The goal of the current project was to identify the reasons for the lower desire for shared decision-making among patients with haematological illness. We conducted qualitative, semi-structured interviews with 11 haematological patients (39-70 years old) after the beginning of therapy concerning the course and evaluation of medical shared decision-making. The patients were often overwhelmed by the complexity of the illness and the therapy and did not want to assume any responsibility in medical decision-making. They reported a great deal of distress and very traditional paternalistic role expectations with regards to their health care providers, which limited the patients' ability to partake in the decision-making process. In contrast to the socio-cultural support for many other oncological diseases, haematological diseases are not as well supported, e.g. there is a lack of self-help materials, systematic provision of information and support groups for patients, which may be related to a lower empowerment of this patient population. Results show the limits of patient participation in the context of highly complicated medical conditions. In addition to already researched preferences of the physicians and patients for shared decision-making, future research should pay greater attention to the process and other variables relevant to this aspect of the doctor-patient relationship.

  9. From one side to the other: what is essential? Perception of oncology patients and their caregivers in the beginning of oncology treatment and in palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Munhoz, Bruna Antenussi; Paiva, Henrique Soares; Abdalla, Beatrice Martinez Zugaib; Zaremba, Guilherme; Rodrigues, Andressa Macedo Paiva; Carretti, Mayra Ribeiro; Monteiro, Camila Ribeiro de Arruda; Zara, Aline; Silva, Jussara Oliveira; Assis, Widner Baptista; Auresco, Luciana Campi; Pereira, Leonardo Lopes; del Giglio, Adriana Braz; Lepori, Ana Claudia de Oliveira; Trufelli, Damila Cristina; del Giglio, Auro

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the perception of oncology patients and their caregivers upon diagnosis and beginning of the therapy and during palliative care. Methods A cross-sectional study at the oncology and palliative care outpatients clinics of the Faculdade de Medicina do ABC . Clinical and demographic data from patients and their caregivers were collected and questionnaires regarding the elements considered important in relation to the treatment were applied. Results We enrolled 32 patients and 23 caregivers that were initiating treatment at the oncology outpatient clinic, as well as 20 patients and 20 caregivers at the palliative care clinic. Regarding the patients treated at the oncology clinic, the issues considered most important were a physician available to discuss the disease and answer questions (84%), trust in the physician (81%), and a physician with accessible language (81%). For their caregivers, the following issues were considered extremely important: trust in the medical team that treats the patients (96%), and the same medical team taking care of their relatives (87%). As to patients treated at the palliative care clinic, trust in the physician (83%), to be with people considered important to them (78%), and to be treated preserving their dignity (72%) were considered extremely important. For their caregivers, to receive adequate information about the disease and the treatment’s risks and benefits (84%), and sincere communication of information about the disease (79%) were considered extremely relevant. Conclusion Confidence through good communication and consistency in care were fundamental values to achieve satisfaction among caregivers and patients with cancer during all the course of disease development. PMID:25628202

  10. The patient-centered medical home in oncology: from concept to reality.

    PubMed

    Page, Ray D; Newcomer, Lee N; Sprandio, John D; McAneny, Barbara L

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the cost of providing quality cancer care has been subject to an epic escalation causing concerns on the verge of a health care crisis. Innovative patient-management models in oncology based on patient-centered medical home (PCMH) principles, coupled with alternative payments to traditional fee for service (FFS), such as bundled and episodes payment are now showing evidence of effectiveness. These efforts have the potential to bend the cost curve while also improving quality of care and patient satisfaction. However, going forward with FFS alternatives, there are several performance-based payment options with an array of financial risks and rewards. Most novel payment options convey a greater financial risk and accountability on the provider. Therefore, the oncology medical home (OMH) can be a way to mitigate some financial risks by sharing savings with the payer through better global care of the patient, proactively preventing complications, emergency department (ED) visits, and hospitalizations. However, much of the medical home infrastructure that is required to reduced total costs of cancer care comes as an added expense to the provider. As best-of-practice quality standards are being elucidated and refined, we are now at a juncture where payers, providers, policymakers, and other stakeholders should work in concert to expand and implement the OMH framework into the variety of oncology practice environments to better equip them to assimilate into the new payment reform configurations of the future. PMID:25993243

  11. The fifth vital sign: chronic pain assessment of the adolescent oncology patient.

    PubMed

    Neale, Kelly Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Adolescent oncology patients with chronic pain require holistic management using interdisciplinary care, multimodal therapies, and family-centered treatment. Adolescents are at a crucial stage of development and require unique assessment that incorporates seeking their input, valuing their opinion, and establishing a developmentally appropriate treatment plan to give them a sense of control. This article discusses the essential elements of assessment that pediatric nurse practitioners should use when evaluating chronic pain in this unique patient population. A comprehensive assessment should determine the biological, psychosocial, and developmental functioning of the patient through objective and subjective measurements. The purpose of this literature review is to outline the mainstays of evaluating pain in a vulnerable population. Ascertaining the barriers that lead to underreporting and undertreating this symptom may lead to more effective management. This article assembles concepts established in research conducted on adolescents with nonmalignant chronic pain and studies on pain in the general pediatric oncology population to assist in evaluating adolescent oncology patients with chronic pain.

  12. Risk of Infectious Complications in Hemato-Oncological Patients Treated with Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Reinwald, Mark; Boch, Tobias; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Buchheidt, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Infectious complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with hemato-oncological diseases. Although disease-related immunosuppression represents one factor, aggressive treatment regimens, such as chemotherapy, stem cell transplantation, or antibody treatment, account for a large proportion of infectious side effects. With the advent of targeted therapies affecting specific kinases in malignant diseases, the outcome of patients has further improved. Nonetheless, dependent on the specific pathway targeted or off-target activity of the kinase inhibitor, therapy-associated infectious complications may occur. We review the most common and approved kinase inhibitors targeting a variety of hemato-oncological malignancies for their immunosuppressive potential and evaluate their risk of infectious side effects based on preclinical evidence and clinical data in order to raise awareness of the potential risks involved. PMID:27127405

  13. Oral-dental concerns of the pediatric oncology patient

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, K.

    1989-01-01

    One of the main concerns of all disciplines in health care today is maintaining the patient's quality of life and comfort during cancer therapy. Oral complications resulting from radiation or chemotherapy can be expected in a large percentage of patients. Conducting a dental evaluation and performing treatment before therapy can help prevent or lessen potential complications. With preventive care and fewer infections, the patient will be able to communicate with friends and family, and optimum care and comfort can be provided.

  14. Smoking behavior and patient education practices of oncology nurses in six countries.

    PubMed

    Lally, Robin M; Chalmers, Karen I; Johnson, Judith; Kojima, Misako; Endo, Emiko; Suzuki, Shizue; Lai, Yeur-Hur; Yang, Young-Hee; Degner, Lesley; Anderson, Elsie; Molassiotis, Alexander

    2008-09-01

    Worldwide, tobacco is the leading cause of preventable death, resulting in approximately 5 million deaths annually. Nurses are keenly positioned to work toward reducing tobacco-related illness and deaths. Therefore, guided by the health belief model, the purpose of this study was to explore the smoking behavior, beliefs, smoking cessation education practices, and existing smoking policies at the institutions of a sample of practicing oncology nurses in Canada, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, United Kingdom, and the United States. A 27-item structured survey, designed for this study in English and translated and reverse translated by the Asian countries, was distributed to a convenience sample of nurses attending oncology meetings in each country. Totally 759 surveys were completed and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Principle findings indicate that 4.5% of these nurses currently smoke, although 23.3% reported smoking previously. While many nurses (74%) reported frequently assessing the smoking status of patients, only 50% reported discussing cessation with their patients that smoke. Although the majority (80%) reported feeling comfortable with asking their patients about smoking, only 23% felt it was the nurse's role. The findings indicate that while internationally oncology nurses recognize the importance of smoking cessation, significant room for improvement exists in translating this into practice.

  15. Informal Financial Assistance for Patients With a Hematological Malignancy: Implications for Oncology Social Work Practice.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Pam

    2015-01-01

    The article presents original research findings on informal financial assistance for hematological patients; that is, the gifts from family, friends, and communities that help patients cope with the financial hardship associated with cancer. The qualitative study involved interviews with 45 hematology patients that were audio-recorded, transcribed, coded, and then thematically analyzed. The findings examine the differing perspectives that individuals and families bring to the notion of informal financial aid, provide examples of individuals who require and receive informal financial assistance, and conclude with descriptions of those who require informal financial assistance but it is not available. The implications of the findings for oncology social work practice are explored.

  16. Patient navigation in oncology nursing: an innovative blended learning model.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Joanne; Brudnoy, Liat; Soong, Tracy; Graham, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Nurses are ideally suited to assume professional patient navigation roles in cancer care. Continuing education and staff development are essential for nurses to implement their roles to the fullest potential. This article describes an innovative patient navigation course that was developed to meet the educational needs of nurses who work with patients who have been diagnosed with cancer or are undergoing evaluation for cancer. Adult learning principles and interactive teaching strategies facilitated learning that was relevant and applicable to all nurses. Of the 200 participants, 77.5% completed questionnaires before and after the course. The questionnaire administered after the course showed a statistically significant increase in average total confidence scores on knowledge and skills in the seven domains examined (p < .00 to .03). This change reflected improvements in overall confidence in key principles and role functions of patient navigation. The course provided an opportunity for nurses to enhance their individual practice in patient navigation in the following areas: meeting patient needs for emotional and supportive care; providing information and education; and facilitating coordination and continuity of care.

  17. Oncology patients' and professional nurses' perceptions of important nurse caring behaviors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Caring is the essence of nursing. Caring to be meaningful needs to be based on mutual agreement between nurses and patients as to what constitutes nurse caring behaviors. As a result, healthcare professional can enhance patients' satisfaction of care by providing appropriate caring behavior. However, previous research that combined multiple types of patients, nurses and institutions demonstrated disagreement in prioritizing important behaviors. This paper reports a study that aimed at determining the caring behaviors which oncology patients and oncology nurses perceive to be the most important. Methods This study is a comparative descriptive design that was conducted in an Iranian oncology centre. Convenience sampling was used to recruit 200 patients and 40 nurses to take part in the study. Data were collected over a period of 4 months in 2009 using the Caring Assessment Questionnaire, developed by Larson. Caring behaviors (n = 57) were ranked on a 5-point Likert-type scale and ordered in six subscales: "Being accessible", "Explains and facilitates", "Comforts", "Anticipates", "Trusting relationship", "Monitors and follows through". The data were analyzed using SPSS software version 13.0. The overall mean was calculated for each subscale to determine the rank distribution of the subscales. The nonparametric Mann-Whitney U test analysis of variables was used to compare patients' and nurses' scores on subscales. Results The results demonstrate that both groups considered the same order of importance of caring, the high ranking of "Monitors and Follows through and "Being Accessible" and the low ranking of "Comforts" and "Trusting Relationships". Also, Patients only ranked "Being accessible" (p = 0.04) and "Explains and facilitates" (p = 0.03) higher than nurses. Conclusions The oncology patients and nurses perceived highly physical aspects of caring and the results provide for nurses to be aware of the need, during their interactions with patients, to

  18. Digital Audio Recording of Initial Patient Visits to an Ocular Oncology Clinic: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Seider, Michael I; Damato, Bertil E

    2015-05-01

    It is challenging for patients to receive a new diagnosis of a life-threatening ocular tumor when visiting an ocular oncology clinic for the first time. Audio recording of patient-physician interactions has been shown to be an effective memory aid and stress-reducing technique for patients with various types of nonophthalmic cancer. This study evaluated a protocol for digitally recording the initial conversation between the ocular oncologist and the patient. Twenty patients were enrolled in the study, and 13 patients (65%) returned the survey. All of the patients who returned the survey reported being "very satisfied" with the audio recording, indicating that patients with a newly diagnosed ocular tumor were highly satisfied with the audio recording of their conversations with the ocular oncologist. Although larger studies are needed to confirm this conclusion, the initial results are encouraging. PMID:26057768

  19. Oncologic outcomes following metastasectomy in colorectal cancer patients developing distant metastases after initial treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Yoon; Suh, Kwang Wook

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We performed a comparative analysis of the clinicopathologic features and oncologic outcomes of colorectal cancer patients with metachronous versus synchronous metastasis, according to the prognostic factors. Methods Ninety-three patients who underwent curative resection for distant metastatic colorectal cancer were included in the study between December 2001 and December 2011. We assessed recurrence-free survival and overall survival in patients with distant metastasis who underwent curative surgery. Results The most common site of distant metastasis was lung alone (n = 19, 51.4%) in patients with metachronous metastasis, while liver alone was most common in those with synchronous metastasis (n = 40, 71.4%). Overall survival rate was significantly different between patients with synchronous metastasis and metachronous metastasis (34.0% vs. 53.7%; P = 0.013). Incomplete resection of the metastatic lesion was significantly related to poor overall survival in both, patients with synchronous metastasis, and metachronous metastasis. Conclusion Our study indicates that patients developing distant metastasis after initial treatment show a different metastatic pattern and better oncologic outcomes, as compared to those presenting with distant metastasis. Resection with tumor free margins significantly improves survival in patients with metachronous as well as synchronous metastasis. PMID:25960988

  20. Robotic, laparoscopic and open surgery for gastric cancer compared on surgical, clinical and oncological outcomes: a multi-institutional chart review. A study protocol of the International study group on Minimally Invasive surgery for GASTRIc Cancer—IMIGASTRIC

    PubMed Central

    Desiderio, Jacopo; Jiang, Zhi-Wei; Nguyen, Ninh T; Zhang, Shu; Reim, Daniel; Alimoglu, Orhan; Azagra, Juan-Santiago; Yu, Pei-Wu; Coburn, Natalie G; Qi, Feng; Jackson, Patrick G; Zang, Lu; Brower, Steven T; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Facy, Olivier; Tsujimoto, Hironori; Coratti, Andrea; Annecchiarico, Mario; Bazzocchi, Francesca; Avanzolini, Andrea; Gagniere, Johan; Pezet, Denis; Cianchi, Fabio; Badii, Benedetta; Novotny, Alexander; Eren, Tunc; Leblebici, Metin; Goergen, Martine; Zhang, Ben; Zhao, Yong-Liang; Liu, Tong; Al-Refaie, Waddah; Ma, Junjun; Takiguchi, Shuji; Lequeu, Jean-Baptiste; Trastulli, Stefano; Parisi, Amilcare

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gastric cancer represents a great challenge for healthcare providers and requires a multidisciplinary treatment approach in which surgery plays a major role. Minimally invasive surgery has been progressively developed, first with the advent of laparoscopy and recently with the spread of robotic surgery, but a number of issues are currently being debated, including the limitations in performing an effective extended lymph node dissection, the real advantages of robotic systems, the role of laparoscopy for Advanced Gastric Cancer, the reproducibility of a total intracorporeal technique and the oncological results achievable during long-term follow-up. Methods and analysis A multi-institutional international database will be established to evaluate the role of robotic, laparoscopic and open approaches in gastric cancer, comprising of information regarding surgical, clinical and oncological features. A chart review will be conducted to enter data of participants with gastric cancer, previously treated at the participating institutions. The database is the first of its kind, through an international electronic submission system and a HIPPA protected real time data repository from high volume gastric cancer centres. Ethics and dissemination This study is conducted in compliance with ethical principles originating from the Helsinki Declaration, within the guidelines of Good Clinical Practice and relevant laws/regulations. A multicentre study with a large number of patients will permit further investigation of the safety and efficacy as well as the long-term outcomes of robotic, laparoscopic and open approaches for the management of gastric cancer. Trial registration number NCT02325453; Pre-results. PMID:26482769

  1. Moving CLABSI Prevention Beyond the ICU: Risk Factors in Pediatric Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Matthew; Conway, Margaret; Wirth, Kathleen; Potter-Bynoe, Gail; Billett, Amy L.; Sandora, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) frequently complicate the use of central venous catheters (CVCs) among pediatric patients with cancer. Our objectives were to describe the microbiology and identify risk factors for hospital-onset CLABSI in this patient population. Design Retrospective case-control study. Setting Oncology and stem cell transplant units of a freestanding, 396-bed quaternary care pediatric hospital. Participants Case subjects (N=54) were patients with a diagnosis of malignancy and/or stem cell transplant recipients with CLABSI occurring during admission. Controls (N=108) were identified using risk set sampling of hospitalizations among patients with a CVC, matched on date of admission. Methods Multivariate conditional logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of CLABSI. Results The majority of CLABSI isolates were Gram-positive bacteria (58%). The most frequently isolated organism was Enterococcus faecium, and 6 of 9 isolates were resistant to vancomycin. In multivariate analyses, independent risk factors for CLABSI included platelet transfusion within the prior week (odds ratio [OR], 10.90 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 3.02–39.38], P<0.001) and CVC placement within the previous month (<1 week vs. ≥1 month: OR, 11.71 [95% CI, 1.98–69.20], P=0.02; ≥1 week and <1 month vs. ≥1 month: OR, 7.37 [95% CI, 1.85–29.36], P=0.004). Conclusions Adjunctive measures to prevent CLABSI among pediatric oncology patients may be most beneficial in the month following CVC insertion and in patients requiring frequent platelet transfusions. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci may be an emerging cause of CLABSI in hospitalized pediatric oncology patients and are unlikely to be treated by typical empiric antimicrobial regimens. PMID:22011534

  2. Toward strategies for cost containment in surgical patients.

    PubMed Central

    Drucker, W R; Gavett, J W; Kirshner, R; Messick, W J; Ingersoll, G

    1983-01-01

    The University of Rochester, Department of Surgery, in response to an experimental community-wide limit on hospital budgets, studied high-cost general surgical patients as a potential source of leverage for containment of hospital costs. It was found that a small number of patients impact significantly on hospital costs. In 1980, 3935 patients at Strong Memorial Hospital (SMH) had at least one contact with a general surgical patient care or intensive care unit; 261 patients (6.6%) had total 1980 charges of more than $20,000 each. They contributed 32% of the total of both general surgical charges and patient days. A subset of 2021 patients was selected to represent more precisely the general surgical patient. The 85 high-cost patients (4.2%) of this subset were chosen for intensive study. These patients generated a significant and disproportionate per cent of total (2021) general surgical charges (26.8%) and hospital days (27.6%). Average total charges were more than 8 times those of the complementary general surgical subset (1936). Nineteen of the 85 patients (22.3%) died in the hospital and 42 patients (49.4%) were dead within 2 1/2 years. Forty patients (of the 85) were then further identified as "complex", based on multiple, usually unrelated, illnesses and multiple annual admissions. Tending to be elderly with poor prognoses, 60% of them had died by April 1983. The major criterion of complexity was the lack of a well-focused medical problem; the cure for one problem simply relinquished primacy to another. A parallel study of hospital ancillary procedures disclosed a similar high-cost pattern. Of approximately 4000 ancillary procedures, 100 (2.5%) had annual charges of $100,000 or over, accounting for two-thirds of total 1980 ancillary charges. Roughly 20% of a single patient's ordered procedures accounted for 80% of the patient's ancillary charges, thus allowing concentrated study of a relatively small number of charges. Means for cost containment may be

  3. Toward strategies for cost containment in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Drucker, W R; Gavett, J W; Kirshner, R; Messick, W J; Ingersoll, G

    1983-09-01

    The University of Rochester, Department of Surgery, in response to an experimental community-wide limit on hospital budgets, studied high-cost general surgical patients as a potential source of leverage for containment of hospital costs. It was found that a small number of patients impact significantly on hospital costs. In 1980, 3935 patients at Strong Memorial Hospital (SMH) had at least one contact with a general surgical patient care or intensive care unit; 261 patients (6.6%) had total 1980 charges of more than $20,000 each. They contributed 32% of the total of both general surgical charges and patient days. A subset of 2021 patients was selected to represent more precisely the general surgical patient. The 85 high-cost patients (4.2%) of this subset were chosen for intensive study. These patients generated a significant and disproportionate per cent of total (2021) general surgical charges (26.8%) and hospital days (27.6%). Average total charges were more than 8 times those of the complementary general surgical subset (1936). Nineteen of the 85 patients (22.3%) died in the hospital and 42 patients (49.4%) were dead within 2 1/2 years. Forty patients (of the 85) were then further identified as "complex", based on multiple, usually unrelated, illnesses and multiple annual admissions. Tending to be elderly with poor prognoses, 60% of them had died by April 1983. The major criterion of complexity was the lack of a well-focused medical problem; the cure for one problem simply relinquished primacy to another. A parallel study of hospital ancillary procedures disclosed a similar high-cost pattern. Of approximately 4000 ancillary procedures, 100 (2.5%) had annual charges of $100,000 or over, accounting for two-thirds of total 1980 ancillary charges. Roughly 20% of a single patient's ordered procedures accounted for 80% of the patient's ancillary charges, thus allowing concentrated study of a relatively small number of charges. Means for cost containment may be

  4. Patient-Reported Outcomes Are Changing the Landscape in Oncology Care: Challenges and Opportunities for Payers

    PubMed Central

    Zagadailov, Erin; Fine, Michael; Shields, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Background A patient-reported outcome (PRO) is a subjective report that comes from a patient without interpretation by a clinician. Because of the increasingly significant role of PROs in the development and evaluation of new medicines, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a formal guidance to describe how PRO instruments will be reviewed and evaluated with respect to claims in approved medical product labeling. Meanwhile, PROs continue to appear in oncology clinical trials more frequently; however, it is unclear how payers and policymakers can use PRO data in the context of decision-making for cancer treatments. Objective The objective of this article is to discuss the challenges and opportunities of incorporating oncology-related PRO data into payer decision-making. Discussion Payer concerns with PRO instruments are often related to issues regarding measurement, relevance, quality, and interpretability of PROs. Payers may dismiss PROs that do not independently predict improved outcomes. The FDA guidance released in 2009 demonstrates, as evidenced by the case of ruxolitinib, how PRO questionnaires can be generated in a relevant, trustworthy, and meaningful way, which provides an opportunity for payers and policy decision makers to focus on how to use PRO data in their decision-making. This is particularly relevant in oncology, where a recent and sizable number of clinical trials include PRO measures. Conclusion As an increasing number of oncology medications enter the market with product labeling claims that contain PRO data, payers will need to better familiarize themselves with the opportunities associated with PRO questionnaires when making coverage decisions. PRO measures will continue to provide valuable information regarding the risk–benefit profile of novel agents. As such, PRO measures may provide evidence that should be considered in payers' decisions and discussions; however, the formal role of PROs and the pertinence of PROs in decision

  5. Helping patients to reduce tobacco consumption in oncology: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Lucchiari, Claudio; Masiero, Marianna; Botturi, Andrea; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    The present overview focuses on evidence of smoking cessation approaches in oncology settings with the aim to provide health personnel a critical perspective on how to help their patients. This narrative review is structured in two main sections: the first one describes the psycho-cognitive variables involved in the decision to continue smoking after a cancer diagnosis and during the treatment; the second section relates methods and tools may be recommended, being evidence-based, to support smoking cessation in oncology settings. Active smoking increases not only susceptibility to common cancers in the general population, but also increases disease severity and comorbidities in cancer patients. Nowadays, scientific evidence has identified many strategies to give up smoking, but a lack of knowledge exists for treatment of nicotine dependence in the cancer population. Health personnel is often ambiguous when approaching the problem, while their contribution is essential in guiding patients towards healthier choices. We argue that smoking treatments for cancer patients deserve more attention and that clinical features, individual characteristics and needs of the patient should be assessed in order to increase the attempts success rate. Health personnel that daily work and interact with cancer patients and their caregivers have a fundamental role in the promotion of the health changing. For this reason, it is important that they have adequate knowledge and resources in order to support cancer patients to stop tobacco cigarette smoking and promoting and healthier lifestyle. PMID:27504234

  6. Wait Times Experienced by Lung Cancer Patients in the BC Southern Interior to Obtain Oncologic Care: Exploration of the Intervals from First Abnormal Imaging to Oncologic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Rezwan; Boyce, Andrew; Halperin, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is associated with rapid disease progression, which can significantly progress over a duration of four to eight weeks. This study examines the time interval lung cancer patients from the interior of British Columbia (BC) experience while undergoing diagnostic evaluation, biopsy, staging, and preparation for treatment. Methods: A chart review of lung cancer patients (n=231) referred to the BC Cancer Agency Centre for the Southern Interior between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2011 was performed. Time zero was defined as the date of the first abnormal chest imaging. Time intervals, expressed as median averages, to specialist consult, biopsy, oncologic referral, initial oncology consultation, and commencement of oncologic treatment were obtained. Results: The median time interval from first abnormal chest imaging to a specialist consultation was 18 days (interquartile range, IQR, 7-36). An additional nine days elapsed prior to biopsy in the form of bronchoscopy, CT-guided biopsy, or sputum cytology (median; IQR, 3-21); if lobectomy was required, 18 days elapsed (median; IQR, 9-28). Eight days were required for pathologic diagnosis and subsequent referral to the cancer centre (median; IQR, 3-16.5). Once referral was received, 10 days elapsed prior to consultation with either a medical or radiation oncologist (median, IQR 5-18). Finally, eight days was required for initiation of radiation and/or chemotherapy (median; IQR, 1-15). The median wait time from detection of lung cancer on imaging to oncologic treatment in the form of radiation and/or chemotherapy was 65.5 days (IQR, 41.5-104.3).  Interpretation: Patients in the BC Southern Interior experience considerable delays in accessing lung cancer care. During this time, the disease has the potential to significantly progress and it is possible that a subset of patients may lose their opportunity for curative intent treatment. PMID:26543688

  7. Guiding Oncology Patients Through the Maze of Precision Medicine.

    PubMed

    Giuse, Nunzia Bettinsoli; Kusnoor, Sheila V; Koonce, Taneya Y; Naylor, Helen M; Chen, Sheau-Chiann; Blasingame, Mallory N; Anderson, Ingrid A; Micheel, Christine M; Levy, Mia A; Ye, Fei; Lovly, Christine M

    2016-01-01

    As the role of genomics in health care grows, patients increasingly require adequate genetic literacy to fully engage in their care. This study investigated a model for delivering consumer-friendly genetic information to improve understanding of precision medicine using health literacy and learning style principles. My Cancer Genome (MCG), a freely available cancer decision support tool, was used as a testbed. MCG content on a melanoma tumor mutation, BRAF V600E, was translated to a 6th-grade reading level, incorporating multiple learning modalities. A total of 90 patients and caregivers were recruited from a melanoma clinic at an academic medical center and randomized to 3 groups. Group A (control) received an exact copy of text from MCG. Group B was given the same content with hyperlinks to videos explaining key genetic concepts, identified and labeled by the team as knowledge pearls. Group C received the translated content with the knowledge pearls embedded. Changes in knowledge were measured through pre and post questionnaires. Group C showed the greatest improvement in knowledge. The study results demonstrate that providing information based on health literacy and learning style principles can improve patients' understanding of genetic concepts, thus increasing their likelihood of taking an active role in any decision making concerning their health. PMID:27043753

  8. The fetus as a patient. Surgical considerations.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, M R; Adzick, N S

    1991-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of human fetal defects has evolved rapidly over the past decade due to improved fetal imaging techniques and better understanding of fetal pathophysiology derived from animal models. The detection of a fetal anomaly may now lead to a change in the timing of delivery, a change in the mode of delivery, or prenatal treatment. Because most therapeutic maneuvers involve some risk to the fetus and mother, there must be a reasonable expectation that the procedure is feasible, safe, and effective before it can be attempted in humans. This requires reliable information about the pathophysiology and natural history of the disease process, the efficacy of fetal surgical intervention in ameliorating the disease, and the feasibility and safety of the proposed intervention. This paper focuses on the rationale and initial clinical experience with fetal surgery for a variety of life-threatening fetal anatomic defects. PMID:2009009

  9. “Il Corpo Ritrovato”: Dermocosmetological Skin Care Project for the Oncologic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Fabbrocini, G.; Romano, M. C.; Cameli, N.; Mariano, M.; Pastore, F.; Annunziata, M. C.; Mazzella, C.; De Vita, Valerio; Mauriello, Maria Chiara; Monfrecola, G.

    2011-01-01

    Neoplastic disease and its therapeutic options have a huge impact on the patient's quality of life from both the emotional and the working point of view. The project “Il Corpo Ritrovato” aims at creating an interdisciplinary network of physicians to improve the quality of life of the oncologic patient, focusing on such important aspects as dermocosmetological skin care but also on the evaluation of new therapeutic and diagnostic algorithms in order to make further progress in the field of prevention. PMID:22084736

  10. Information and communication technology (ICT) in oncology. Patients' and relatives' experiences and suggestions.

    PubMed

    Norum, Jan; Grev, Anne; Moen, Mari-Ann; Balteskard, Lise; Holthe, Kari

    2003-05-01

    Cancer patients and relatives worldwide are turning more and more to the internet to obtain health information. The goal of this survey was to clarify their experiences and suggestions on the implementation of information and communication technology (ICT) in oncology. A total of 127 patients and 60 relatives visiting the outpatient clinic at the Department of Oncology, University of North Norway (UNN), the regional office of the Norwegian Cancer Union (NCU) and the Montebello Centre were included in a questionnaire-based study. Participants were recruited during the period September 2001 to February 2002. There were 92 women and 95 men. We revealed that hospital doctors, followed by nurses and friends, were the most important informants. Two-thirds of patients and relatives had access to the internet, but fewer than one-third had searched the internet for medical information and only one-fifth had discussed information accessed with their doctor. Only one-tenth had visited a hospital website. Internet access was correlated with young age. Almost two-thirds suggested that e-mail and/or WAP (wireless application protocol) communication should be included in hospital-patient communication. Concerning hospital websites, waiting time, treatment offer and addresses were considered the top three topics of interest. In conclusion, the majority of cancer patients and relatives have access to the internet. They recommend ICT employed in patient-hospital communication and suggest waiting time, treatment offers and addresses the three most important topics on hospital websites.

  11. Treatment of colorectal cancer in older patients: International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) consensus recommendations 2013.

    PubMed

    Papamichael, D; Audisio, R A; Glimelius, B; de Gramont, A; Glynne-Jones, R; Haller, D; Köhne, C-H; Rostoft, S; Lemmens, V; Mitry, E; Rutten, H; Sargent, D; Sastre, J; Seymour, M; Starling, N; Van Cutsem, E; Aapro, M

    2015-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in Europe and worldwide, with the peak incidence in patients >70 years of age. However, as the treatment algorithms for the treatment of patients with CRC become ever more complex, it is clear that a significant percentage of older CRC patients (>70 years) are being less than optimally treated. This document provides a summary of an International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) task force meeting convened in Paris in 2013 to update the existing expert recommendations for the treatment of older (geriatric) CRC patients published in 2009 and includes overviews of the recent data on epidemiology, geriatric assessment as it relates to surgery and oncology, and the ability of older CRC patients to tolerate surgery, adjuvant chemotherapy, treatment of their metastatic disease including palliative chemotherapy with and without the use of the biologics, and finally the use of adjuvant and palliative radiotherapy in the treatment of older rectal cancer patients. An overview of each area was presented by one of the task force experts and comments invited from other task force members.

  12. The Cardio-oncology Program: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Care of Cancer Patients With Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Parent, Sarah; Pituskin, Edith; Paterson, D Ian

    2016-07-01

    Improved cancer survivorship has resulted in a growing number of Canadians affected by cancer and cardiovascular disease. As a consequence, cardio-oncology programs are rapidly emerging to treat cancer patients with de novo and preexisting cardiovascular disease. The primary goal of a cardio-oncology program is to preserve cardiovascular health to allow the timely delivery of cancer therapy and achieve disease-free remission. Multidisciplinary programs in oncology and cardiology have been associated with enhanced patient well-being and improved clinical outcomes. Because of the complex needs of these multisystem patients, a similar model of care is gaining acceptance. The optimal composition of the cardio-oncology team will typically involve support from cardiology, oncology, and nursing. Depending on the clinical scenario, additional consultation from dietetics, pharmacy, and social services might be required. Timely access to consultation and testing is another prerequisite for cardio-oncology programs because delays in treating cardiac complications and nonadherence to prescribed cancer therapy are each associated with poor outcomes. Recommended reasons for referral to cardio-oncology programs include primary prevention for those at high risk for cardiotoxicity and the secondary treatment of new or worsening cardiovascular disease in cancer patients and survivors. Management is multifaceted and can involve lifestyle education, pharmacotherapy, enhanced cardiovascular surveillance, and support services, such as exercise training. The lack of evidence to guide clinical decisions and recommendations in cardio-oncology is a major challenge and opportunity for health care professionals. Large multicentre prospective registries are needed to adequately power risk model calculations and generate hypotheses for novel interventions.

  13. TRAJECTORIES OF ANXIETY IN ONCOLOGY PATIENTS AND FAMILY CAREGIVERS DURING AND AFTER RADIATION THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Laura B.; Aouizerat, Bradley E.; Cooper, Bruce A.; Dodd, Marylin; Lee, Kathryn; West, Claudia; Paul, Steven M.; Wara, William; Swift, Patrick; Miaskowski, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Anxiety is common in patients undergoing radiation therapy (RT) and in their family caregivers (FCs). Little is known about individual differences in anxiety trajectories during and after RT. This study aimed to identify distinct latent classes of oncology patients and their FCs based on self-reported anxiety symptoms from the beginning to four months after the completion of RT. Method Using growth mixture modeling (GMM), longitudinal changes in Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S) scores among 167 oncology outpatients with breast, prostate, lung, or brain cancer and 85 FCs were evaluated to determine distinct anxiety symptom profiles. STAI-S scores were assessed just prior to, throughout the course of, and for four months following RT (total of 7 assessments). Baseline trait anxiety and depressive symptoms (during and after RT) were also assessed. Results The GMM analysis identified three latent classes of oncology patients and FCs with distinct trajectories of state anxiety: Low Stable (n=93, 36.9%), Intermediate Decelerating (n=82, 32.5%), and High (n=77, 30.6%) classes. Younger participants, women, ethnic minorities, and those with children at home were more likely to be classified in the High anxiety class. Higher levels of trait anxiety and depressive symptoms, at the initiation of RT, were associated with being in the High anxiety class. Conclusions Subgroups of patients and FCs with high, intermediate, and low mean levels of anxiety during and after RT were identified with GMM. Additional research is needed to better understand the heterogeneity of symptom experiences as well as comorbid symptoms in patients and FCs. PMID:21324418

  14. Integrative oncology for breast cancer patients: introduction of an expert-based model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Malignant breast neoplasms are among the most frequent forms of cancer in the Western world. Conventional treatment of breast cancer may include surgery, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy, radiation and/or immunotherapy, all of which are often accompanied by severe side effects. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments have been shown to be effective in alleviating those symptoms. Furthermore, with patient survival rates increasing, oncologists, psychologists and other therapists have to become more sensitive to the needs of cancer survivors that go beyond than the mere alleviation of symptoms. Many CAM methods are geared to treat the patient in a holistic manner and thus are also concerned with the patient’s psychological and spiritual needs. Discussion The use of certain CAM methods may become problematic when, as frequently occurs, patients use them indiscriminately and without informing their oncologists. Herbal medicines and dietary supplements, especially, may interfere with primary cancer treatments or have other detrimental effects. Thus, expertise in this highly specialized field of integrative medicine should be available to patients so that they can be advised about the benefits and negative effects of such preparations and practices. Being a beneficial combination of conventional and CAM care, integrative oncology makes possible the holistic approach to cancer care. The concept of integrative oncology for breast cancer is jointly practiced by the Department of Internal and Integrative Medicine, Kliniken Essen-Mitte, academic teaching hospital of the University of Duisburg-Essen, and the Breast Center at Kliniken Essen-Mitte in Germany. This model is introduced here; its scope is reviewed, and its possible implications for the practice of integrative medicine are discussed. Summary Evidence-based integrative care is crucial to the field of oncology in establishing state-of-the-art care for breast cancer patients. PMID:23170989

  15. Assessing the spiritual needs and practices of oncology patients in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Dedeli, Ozden; Yildiz, Emel; Yuksel, Safak

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the oncology patients' spiritual needs and activities. Besides, the study was to provide clinical evaluation of the feasibility and usefulness of the Patients Spiritual Needs Assessment Scale. This descriptive and cross-sectional study was performed by using a demographic and spiritual practices questionnaire, the Turkish version of the Patients Spiritual Needs Assessment Scale. The results of our study demonstrated that the most common spiritual needs of patients with cancer were "to address issues before death and dying" (100%), "feel a sense of peace and contentment" (94.8%), and "for companionship" (93.5%). Spiritually assessing a patient with cancer requires knowledge of how spiritual needs may manifest and how to talk with a client about his or her spiritual needs. These findings can help nurses to begin this process of providing spiritual care for patients with cancer. PMID:25658933

  16. Quality of life of patients surgically treated for ameloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lawal, Hammed Sikiru; Adebola, Rafel Adetokunbo; Arotiba, Juwon Tunde; Amole, Ibiyinka Olushola; Efunkoya, Akinwale Adeyemi; Omeje, Uchenna Kelvin; Amole, Taiwo Gboluwaga; Adeoye, Joshua Biodun

    2016-01-01

    Background: The surgical management of ameloblastoma can have a profound functional and psychological effect on a patient's quality of life (QoL). The aim of this study was to compare the pre- and post-operative QoL outcomes of patients requiring surgical treatment for ameloblastoma. Patients and Methods: A total number of 30 patients were identified as fulfilling the criteria for this study. They included 18 males and 12 females, aged between 14 and 47 years with a mean of 27.3 years (standard deviation 10.2). Each patient completed a modified version of the University of Washington QoL questionnaire version 4, a day to surgery and postoperatively on the 7th day, 3 months, and 6 months. Results: Following surgical treatment of patients for ameloblastoma, the QoL decreased immediately after surgery. It then gradually improved over time and exceeded the preoperative value at 6 months postoperatively. When analyzed with respect to location, posteriorly placed tumors had the best postoperative QoL outcome. Patients expressed concern more about their appearance preoperatively while postoperative concerns were mostly focused on their ability to chew. Conclusion: Significant improvement occurred in QoL scores following surgical management of ameloblastoma. The small sample size utilized in this study limits a definitive conclusion. A larger multicenter study is therefore recommended. PMID:27226682

  17. Effect of Preoperative Risk Group Stratification on Oncologic Outcomes of Patients with Adverse Pathologic Findings at Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Won Sik; Kim, Lawrence H. C.; Yoon, Cheol Yong; Rha, Koon Ho; Choi, Young Deuk; Hong, Sung Joon; Ham, Won Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background Current National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines recommend postoperative radiation therapy based only on adverse pathologic findings (APFs), irrespective of preoperative risk group. We assessed whether a model incorporating both the preoperative risk group and APFs could predict long-term oncologic outcomes better than a model based on APFs alone. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 4,404 men who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP) at our institution between 1992 and 2014. After excluding patients receiving neoadjuvant therapy or with incomplete pathological or follow-up data, 3,092 men were included in the final analysis. APFs were defined as extraprostatic extension (EPE), seminal vesicle invasion (SVI), or a positive surgical margin (PSM). The adequacy of model fit to the data was compared using the likelihood-ratio test between the models with and without risk groups, and model discrimination was compared with the concordance index (c-index) for predicting biochemical recurrence (BCR) and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). We performed multivariate Cox proportional hazard model and competing risk regression analyses to identify predictors of BCR and PCSM in the total patient group and each of the risk groups. Results Adding risk groups to the model containing only APFs significantly improved the fit to the data (likelihood-ratio test, p <0.001) and the c-index increased from 0.693 to 0.732 for BCR and from 0.707 to 0.747 for PCSM. A RP Gleason score (GS) ≥8 and a PSM were independently associated with BCR in the total patient group and also each risk group. However, only a GS ≥8 and SVI were associated with PCSM in the total patient group (GS ≥8: hazard ratio [HR] 5.39 and SVI: HR 3.36) and the high-risk group (GS ≥8: HR 6.31 and SVI: HR 4.05). Conclusion The postoperative estimation of oncologic outcomes in men with APFs at RP was improved by considering preoperative risk group stratification. Although a PSM was an

  18. Delivering care to oncology patients in the community: an innovative integrated approach.

    PubMed

    Hanan, Terry; Mullen, Louise; Laffoy, Marie; O'Toole, Eve; Richmond, Janice; Wynne, Mary

    2014-08-01

    A community oncology nursing programme was developed in Ireland between the hospital and community health services for patients receiving systemic cancer therapy, in response to a service need. A robust evaluation of the pilot programme was undertaken, which found that defined clinical procedures traditionally undertaken in hospitals were safely undertaken in the patient's home with no adverse effects. There was a dramatic decrease in hospital attendances for these defined clinical procedures, and hospital capacity was consequently freed up. Patients valued having aspects of their care delivered at home and reported that it improved their quality of life, including reduced hospital visits and travel time. Community nurses expanded their scope of practice and became partners with oncology day-ward nurses in caring for these patients. Community nurses developed the competence and confidence to safely deliver cancer care in the community. This initiative shows that defined elements of acute cancer care can be safely delivered in the community so long as the training and support are provided. The findings and recommendations of the evaluation resulted in university accreditation and approval for national roll-out of the programme. Integration of services between primary and secondary care is a key priority. This innovative programme is a good example of shared integrated care that benefits both patients and health-care providers. PMID:25089749

  19. Is the clinical use of cannabis by oncology patients advisable?

    PubMed

    Bar-Sela, Gil; Avisar, Adva; Batash, Ron; Schaffer, Moshe

    2014-06-01

    The use of the cannabis plant for various medical indications by cancer patients has been rising significantly in the past few years in several European countries, the US and Israel. The increase in use comes from public demand for the most part, and not due to a scientific basis. Cannabis chemistry is complex, and the isolation and extraction of the active ingredient remain difficult. The active agent in cannabis is unique among psychoactive plant materials, as it contains no nitrogen and, thus, is not an alkaloid. Alongside inconclusive evidence of increased risks of lung and head and neck cancers from prolonged smoking of the plant produce, laboratory evidence of the anti-cancer effects of plant components exists, but with no clinical research in this direction. The beneficial effects of treatment with the plant, or treatment with medicine produced from its components, are related to symptoms of the disease: pain, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite and weight loss. The clinical evidence of the efficacy of cannabis for these indications is only partial. However, recent scientific data from studies with THC and cannabidiol combinations report the first clinical indication of cancer-related pain relief. The difficulties of performing research into products that are not medicinal, such as cannabis, have not allowed a true study of the cannabis plant extract although, from the public point of view, such studies are greatly desirable. PMID:24606496

  20. Surgical site infection in patients submitted to heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Jussara Aparecida Souza do Nascimento; Ferretti-Rebustini, Renata Eloah de Lucena; Poveda, Vanessa de Brito

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: to analyze the occurrence and predisposing factors for surgical site infection in patients submitted to heart transplantation, evaluating the relationship between cases of infections and the variables related to the patient and the surgical procedure. Method: retrospective cohort study, with review of the medical records of patients older than 18 years submitted to heart transplantation. The correlation between variables was evaluated by using Fisher's exact test and Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test. Results: the sample consisted of 86 patients, predominantly men, with severe systemic disease, submitted to extensive preoperative hospitalizations. Signs of surgical site infection were observed in 9.3% of transplanted patients, with five (62.5%) superficial incisional, two (25%) deep and one (12.5%) case of organ/space infection. There was no statistically significant association between the variables related to the patient and the surgery. Conclusion: there was no association between the studied variables and the cases of surgical site infection, possibly due to the small number of cases of infection observed in the sample investigated. PMID:27579924

  1. Acuity-based nurse assignment and patient scheduling in oncology clinics.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bohui; Turkcan, Ayten

    2016-09-01

    The oncology clinics use different nursing care delivery models to provide chemotherapy treatment to cancer patients. Functional and primary care delivery models are the most commonly used methods in the clinics. In functional care delivery model, patients are scheduled for a chemotherapy appointment without considering availabilities of individual nurses, and nurses are assigned to patients according to patient acuities, nursing skill, and patient mix on a given day after the appointment schedule is determined. Patients might be treated by different nurses on different days of their treatment. In primary care delivery model, each patient is assigned to a primary nurse, and the patients are scheduled to be seen by the same nurse every time they come to the clinic for treatment. However, these clinics might experience high variability in daily nurse workload due to treatment protocols that should be followed strictly. In that case, part-time nurses can be utilized to share the excess workload of the primary nurses. The aim of this study is to develop optimization methods to reduce the time spent for nurse assignment and patient scheduling in oncology clinics that use different nursing care delivery models. For the functional delivery model, a multiobjective optimization model with the objectives of minimizing patient waiting times and nurse overtime is proposed to solve the nurse assignment problem. For the primary care delivery model, another multiobjective optimization model with the objectives of minimizing total overtime and total excess workload is proposed to solve the patient scheduling problem. Spreadsheet-based optimization tools are developed for easy implementation. Computational results show that the proposed models provide multiple nondominated solutions, which can be used to determine the optimal staffing levels.

  2. Caring for Surgical Patients With Piercings.

    PubMed

    Smith, Francis Duval

    2016-06-01

    Body piercing, a type of body modification that is practiced in many cultures, creates an unnatural tract through tissue that is then held open by artificial means. Today, professional body piercing is often performed in piercing establishments that are subject to dissimilar forms of regulation. The most frequently reported medical complication of body piercing and similar body modifications, such as dermal implantation, is infection. Patients with piercings who undergo surgery may have additional risks for infection, electrical burns, trauma, or airway obstruction. The published research literature on piercing prevalence, complications, regulations, education, and nursing care is outdated. The purpose of this article is to educate nurses on topics related to nursing care for patients with piercings and similar body modifications, including the history, prevalence, motivations for, and perceptions of body piercings as well as possible complications, devices used, locations, healing times, regulations, patient education, and other health concerns. PMID:27234793

  3. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in vascular surgical patients.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, G. J.; Pararajasingam, R.; Nasim, A.; Dennis, M. J.; Sayers, R. D.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection is emerging as a major problem in vascular surgical practice. The aim of this study was to review the management of patients with MRSA infection complicating vascular surgical operations. METHODS: Data were obtained from the vascular audit, case notes, intensive therapy unit (ITU) notes, high dependency unit (HDU) notes and microbiological records of patients who underwent either arterial reconstruction (n = 464) or limb amputation (n = 110) between April 1994 and October 1998. RESULTS: Forty-nine vascular surgical patients developed clinical MRSA infection (9%). Clinical MRSA infection in patients who had undergone aorto-iliac reconstruction (n = 18) was associated with a 56% mortality (n = 10) and the most common infections were bacteraemia (55%) and pneumonia (50%). MRSA infection occurred in 17 patients who had undergone infra-inguinal bypass and was associated with a 29% mortality (n = 5). The most common site of MRSA infection was the groin wound (76%) leading to anastomotic dehiscence and death in one patient (11%) and necessitating wound debridement in 4 patients (22%). MRSA infection of the groin wound in the presence of a prosthetic graft (n = 3) led to anastomotic dehiscence in 2 patients, and graft excision in 2 patients. Similar complications were not observed in the presence of an underlying autogeneous long saphenous vein graft (n = 16). MRSA infection following major lower limb amputation (n = 14) was associated with death in 5 patients (36%). Wound infection in 10 amputees (71%) led to revision of the amputation to a higher level in 2 (14%) and wound debridement in 2 (14%). CONCLUSIONS: MRSA infection has a high mortality in vascular surgical patients in general, and following aorto-iliac reconstruction in particular. Autogeneous vein may confer some protection against local complications following groin wound infection. Strategies aimed at reducing the incidence of infection

  4. Assessing Interpersonal and Communication Skills in Radiation Oncology Residents: A Pilot Standardized Patient Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Melody; Berman, Abigail T.; Hwang, Wei-Ting; LaMarra, Denise; Baffic, Cordelia; Suneja, Gita; Vapiwala, Neha

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: There is a lack of data for the structured development and evaluation of communication skills in radiation oncology residency training programs. Effective communication skills are increasingly emphasized by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and are critical for a successful clinical practice. We present the design of a novel, pilot standardized patient (SP) program and the evaluation of communication skills among radiation oncology residents. Methods and Materials: Two case scenarios were developed to challenge residents in the delivery of “bad news” to patients: one scenario regarding treatment failure and the other regarding change in treatment plan. Eleven radiation oncology residents paired with 6 faculty participated in this pilot program. Each encounter was scored by the SPs, observing faculty, and residents themselves based on the Kalamazoo guidelines. Results: Overall resident performance ratings were “good” to “excellent,” with faculty assigning statistically significant higher scores and residents assigning lower scores. We found inconsistent inter rater agreement among faculty, residents, and SPs. SP feedback was also valuable in identifying areas of improvement, including more collaborative decision making and less use of medical jargon. Conclusions: The program was well received by residents and faculty and regarded as a valuable educational experience that could be used as an annual feedback tool. Poor inter rater agreement suggests a need for residents and faculty physicians to better calibrate their evaluations to true patient perceptions. High scores from faculty members substantiate the concern that resident evaluations are generally positive and nondiscriminating. Faculty should be encouraged to provide honest and critical feedback to hone residents' interpersonal skills.

  5. [Meaning of premature discharge in surgical patients].

    PubMed

    Lacambra Montanuy, Lucía; Carrasco Aranda, M Teresa; Castro Milán, Patricia; Melchor Gómez, Magdalena

    2013-12-01

    In the last years, there have been some changes in our society related to the organization of the health system to optimize resources and serve the population. Because of the gradual aging of the population and increasing chronic pluripathologies, there is an increased health care demand, leading to the introduction of new technologies and minimally invasive surgery, helping quick reintegration of the patient in their daily activity. There is no agreed definition of early discharge but the patient is discharged from hospital sooner than indicated by the standards, provided that the medical condition, personal, social and family allows. The aim of our work is to know in depth the meaning of the experience of patients in relation to early discharge and home care associated and, knowing the deficiencies and needs perceived by patients during recovery in their midst. This will allow us to have a realistic and humanist view that will help us understand and improve the processes of care, planning and evaluation of different health complex situations.

  6. Pain management in the pediatric surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Vance Y; Zenger, David; Steele, Scott R

    2012-06-01

    Surgeons performing painful, invasive procedures in pediatric patients must be cognizant of both the potential short- and long-term detrimental effects of inadequate analgesia. This article reviews the available tools, sedation procedures, the management of intraoperative, postoperative, and postprocedural pain, and the issues surrounding neonatal addiction.

  7. Pain management in the pediatric surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Vance Y; Zenger, David; Steele, Scott R

    2012-06-01

    Surgeons performing painful, invasive procedures in pediatric patients must be cognizant of both the potential short- and long-term detrimental effects of inadequate analgesia. This article reviews the available tools, sedation procedures, the management of intraoperative, postoperative, and postprocedural pain, and the issues surrounding neonatal addiction. PMID:22595704

  8. Involvement of a Surgical Service Improves Patient Satisfaction in Patients Admitted with Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Schmocker, Ryan K.; Vang, Xia; Cherney Stafford, Linda M.; Leverson, Glen E.; Winslow, Emily R.

    2015-01-01

    Background For patients with small bowel obstruction (SBO), surgical care has been associated with improved outcomes; however it remains unknown how it impacts satisfaction. Methods Patients admitted for SBO who completed the hospital satisfaction survey were eligible. Only those with adhesions or hernias were included. Chart review extracted structural characteristics and outcomes. Results 47 patients were included; 74% (n=35) were admitted to a surgical service. 26% (n=12) were admitted to medicine, and 50% of those (n=6) had surgical consultation. Patients with surgical involvement as the consulting or primary service (SURG) had higher satisfaction with the hospital than those cared for by the medical service (80% SURG; 33% MED, p=0.015). SURG patients also had higher satisfaction with physicians (74% SURG; 44% MED; p=0.015). Conclusions Surgical involvement during SBO admissions is associated with increased patient satisfaction, and adds further weight to the recommendation that these patients be cared for by surgeons. PMID:25886702

  9. Surgical management of bilateral bronchiectases: results in 29 patients.

    PubMed

    Aghajanzadeh, Manucher; Sarshad, Ali; Amani, Hosin; Alavy, Ali

    2006-06-01

    Bronchiectasis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Staged bilateral segmental resection of the lungs is performed in selected patients. Our experience of surgical removal of 87 bilateral bronchiectases in 29 patients during an 11-year period was reviewed retrospectively. High-resolution computed tomography was performed preoperatively in all patients to locate the anatomic sites of bronchiectasis. The mortality and morbidity of the surgical procedure, clinical symptoms, age distribution, etiology, bacteriology, and operative procedures were analyzed. There were 22 males (76%) and 7 females (24%), aged 5 to 60 years, with a mean age of 30 years. Complications developed in 11 patients (38%); atelectasia was the most common (14%). There was one hospital death. Clinical symptoms disappeared in 19 (66%) patients, improved in 5 (17%), and were unchanged in 4 (14%). Staged bilateral resection for bronchiectases can be performed at any age with acceptable morbidity and mortality. PMID:16714699

  10. Precision oncology for patients with advanced cancer: the challenges of malignant snowflakes

    PubMed Central

    Kurzrock, Razelle; Giles, Francis J

    2015-01-01

    Precision oncology implies customizing treatment to the unique molecular and biologic characteristics of each individual and their cancer. Its implementation is being facilitated by remarkable technological advances in genomic sequencing, as well as the increasing availability of targeted and immunotherapeutic drugs. Yet, next generation sequencing may be a disruptive technology in that its results suggest that classic paradigms for clinical research and practice are a poor fit with the complex reality encountered in metastatic malignancies. Indeed, it is evident that advanced tumors have heterogeneous molecular landscapes that mostly differ between patients. Traditional modes of clinical research/practice are drug centered, with a strategy of finding commonalities between patients so that they can be grouped together and treated similarly. However, if each patient with metastatic cancer has a unique molecular portfolio, a new patient-centered, N-of-one approach that utilizes individually tailored treatment is needed. PMID:26030337

  11. Patient outcomes following surgical management of multinodular goiter

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yann-Sheng; Wu, Hsin-Yi; Yu, Ming-Chin; Hsu, Chih-Chieh; Chao, Tzu-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: the difference in the risk of thyroid malignancy for patients with multinodular goiter (MNG) and solitary nodular goiter (SNG) remains controversial. Although total thyroidectomy (TT) is the current preferred surgical option for MNG, permanent hypothyroidism in these patients may be a concern. Therefore, we discuss whether nontotal thyroidectomy is a reasonable alternative surgical option. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was performed for 1598 consecutive patients who underwent thyroid surgery for nodular goiter between January 2007 and December 2012. Numerous clinical parameters were collected and analyzed. Results: We reviewed 795 patients with MNG and 803 patients with SNG. The prevalence of malignancy on final pathology was significantly higher in the patients with MNG than in the patients with SNG (15.6% vs 10.1%, P = 0.001). However, a multivariate analysis revealed that this difference was insignificant (P = 0.50). Papillary carcinoma was the predominant type in both groups, but papillary microcarcinoma was more frequently found (41.1%) in the patients with MNG. The only multifocal cancers were of the papillary carcinoma histologic type, and the incidence of multifocal papillary carcinoma was significantly higher in the patients with MNG (23.4% vs 7.4%, P = 0.005). Reoperation was not required for the patients who underwent TT for goiter recurrence or incidental carcinoma. The overall rate of recurrence following nontotal thyroidectomy was 12.2%. Among the patients who underwent reoperation for goiter recurrence, 2 (20.0%) were complicated with permanent hypoparathyroidism. Among the patients who underwent a nontotal bilateral thyroidectomy, an average of 56.5% had permanent hypothyroidism. Conclusions: Multinodularity does not increase the risk of thyroid malignancy. However, patients with MNG who develop papillary carcinoma are at an increased risk of cancer multifocality. If a patient can tolerate lifelong thyroid hormone

  12. Encouraging Surgical ICU Patients to Get Moving Pays Off

    MedlinePlus

    ... FAQs Contact Us Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Latest Health News → Article URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161258.html Encouraging Surgical ICU Patients to Get Moving Pays Off They' ...

  13. [Croatian guidelines for perioperative enteral nutrition of surgical patients].

    PubMed

    Zelić, Marko; Bender, Darija Vranesić; Kelecić, Dina Ljubas; Zupan, Zeljko; Cicvarić, Tedi; Maldini, Branka; Durut, Iva; Rahelić, Velimir; Skegro, Mate; Majerović, Mate; Perko, Zdravko; Sustić, Alan; Madzar, Tomislav; Kovacić, Borna; Kekez, Tihomir; Krznarić, Zeljko

    2014-01-01

    Nutritional status of patients significantly affects the outcome of surgical treatment, whether it's about being obese or malnutrition with loss of muscle mass. Inadequate nutritional support in the perioperative period compromises surgical procedures even in patients who are adequately nourished. In this paper, particular attention was paid to malnourished patients, and their incidence in population hospitalized in surgical wards can be high up to 30%. Special emphasis was paid to the appropriateness of preoperative fasting and to the acceptance of new knowledge in this area of treatment. The aim of this working group was to make guidelines for perioperative nutritional support with different modalities of enteral nutrition. The development of these guidelines was attended by representatives of Croatian Medical Association: Croatian Society for Digestive Surgery, Croatian Society for Clinical Nutrition, Croatian Society of Surgery, Croatian Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Croatian Trauma Society and the Croatian Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care. The guidelines are designed as a set of questions that arise daily in clinical practice when preparing patients for surgery and after the surgical treatment, which relate to the assessment of nutritional status, perioperative nutritional support, duration of preoperative fasting period and the selection of food intake route. Assessment of nutritional status and the use of different modes of enteral nutrition should enter into standard protocols of diagnosis and treatment in the Croatian hospitals.

  14. Washed cell salvage in surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Meybohm, Patrick; Choorapoikayil, Suma; Wessels, Anke; Herrmann, Eva; Zacharowski, Kai; Spahn, Donat R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cell salvage is commonly used as part of a blood conservation strategy. However concerns among clinicians exist about the efficacy of transfusion of washed cell salvage. Methods: We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials in which patients, scheduled for all types of surgery, were randomized to washed cell salvage or to a control group with no cell salvage. Data were independently extracted, risk ratio (RR), and weighted mean differences (WMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Data were pooled using a random effects model. The primary endpoint was the number of patients exposed to allogeneic red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. Results: Out of 1140 search results, a total of 47 trials were included. Overall, the use of washed cell salvage reduced the rate of exposure to allogeneic RBC transfusion by a relative 39% (RR = 0.61; 95% CI 0.57 to 0.65; P < 0.001), resulting in an average saving of 0.20 units of allogeneic RBC per patient (weighted mean differences [WMD] = −0.20; 95% CI −0.22 to −0.18; P < 0.001), reduced risk of infection by 28% (RR = 0.72; 95% CI 0.54 to 0.97; P = 0.03), reduced length of hospital stay by 2.31 days (WMD = −2.31; 95% CI −2.50 to −2.11; P < 0.001), but did not significantly affect risk of mortality (RR = 0.92; 95% CI 0.63 to 1.34; P = 0.66). No statistical difference could be observed in the number of patients exposed to re-operation, plasma, platelets, or rate of myocardial infarction and stroke. Conclusions: Washed cell salvage is efficacious in reducing the need for allogeneic RBC transfusion and risk of infection in surgery. PMID:27495095

  15. [Cervical spine instability in the surgical patient].

    PubMed

    Barbeito, A; Guerri-Guttenberg, R A

    2014-03-01

    Many congenital and acquired diseases, including trauma, may result in cervical spine instability. Given that airway management is closely related to the movement of the cervical spine, it is important that the anesthesiologist has detailed knowledge of the anatomy, the mechanisms of cervical spine instability, and of the effects that the different airway maneuvers have on the cervical spine. We first review the normal anatomy and biomechanics of the cervical spine in the context of airway management and the concept of cervical spine instability. In the second part, we review the protocols for the management of cervical spine instability in trauma victims and some of the airway management options for these patients.

  16. Principles of thromboprophylaxis in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Husted, S E

    1991-01-01

    Thromboprophylactic treatment during surgery reduces mortality and morbidity. The type of prophylaxis may be individualized according to type of operation and presence of major risk factors, such as prior thromboembolism, malignancy, long duration of immobilization, and medical conditions. All patients over the age of 40, or even younger, who have major risk factors, and whose operations will last for more than 1 hour, may benefit from thromboprophylaxis. Available prophylactic methods allow for treatment with an acceptably low level of side effects and economic cost, when compared with the cost of diagnostics and treatment of thromboembolism.

  17. Patient-reported outcomes and the evolution of adverse event reporting in oncology.

    PubMed

    Trotti, Andy; Colevas, A Dimitrios; Setser, Ann; Basch, Ethan

    2007-11-10

    Adverse event (AE) reporting in oncology has evolved from informal descriptions to a highly systematized process. The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) is the predominant system for describing the severity of AEs commonly encountered in oncology clinical trials. CTCAE clinical descriptors have been developed empirically during more than 30 years of use. The method of data collection is clinician based. Limitations of the CTC system include potential for incomplete reporting and limited guidance on data analysis and presentation methods. The Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) is a comprehensive medical terminology system used for regulatory reporting and drug labeling. MedDRA does not provide for severity ranking of AEs. CTC-based data presentations are the primary method of AE data reporting used in scientific journals and oncology meetings. Patient-reported outcome instruments (PROs) cover the subjective domain of AEs. Exploratory work suggests PROs can be used with a high degree of patient engagement and compliance. Additional studies are needed to determine how PROs can be used to complement current AE reporting systems. Potential models for integrating PROs into AE reporting are described in this review. AE reporting methods will continue to evolve in response to changing therapies and growing interest in measuring the impact of cancer treatment on health status. Although integration of PROs into AE reporting may ultimately improve the comprehensiveness and quality of collected data, it may also increase the administrative burden and cost of conducting trials. Therefore, care must be used when developing health outcomes and safety data collection plans. PMID:17991931

  18. Predictive Factor of Surgical Efficacy in Male Patients with Prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Ting; Lian, Wei; Xing, Bing; Yao, Yong; Feng, Ming; Wang, Ren-Zhi

    2016-08-01

    Objective To analyze the predictive factor of surgical efficacy in male patients with prolactinoma. Method The clinical data of 184 male patients with prolactinoma who had undergone surgery were retrospectively analyzed.Results Before the surgery,the serum prolactin level from 150 to 204 952 ng/ml,the tumors sized 6 to 70 mm. Macroadenoma was seen in 152 cases (82.6%) and suprasellar adenoma with visual deficitsin 75 cases (40.7%). Complete resection was achieved in 149 patients. After surgical therapy,postoperative immediate prolactin level declined in 182 patients (98.4%);57 patients (31.0%)achieved initial remission,while the disease recurred in 26 patients (45.6%).Larger tumor had significantly lower rate of complete resection (P<0.05). The recurrence rate was significantly higher in the group with higher Ki-67 index (P<0.001). The recurrence rate was significantly lower in patients with intrasellar adenoma (P<0.001).No significant relationship was found between preoperative prolactin level and complete resection (P=0.306). Conclusions Tumor size can predictthe degree of surgical resection. The prognostic factors include tumor size,preoperative growth pattern of prolactinoma,and Ki-67 index.

  19. The utility of the surgical safety checklist for wound patients.

    PubMed

    Myers, Joseph W; Gilmore, Brent A; Powers, Kelly A; Kim, Paul J; Attinger, Christopher E

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of changes in patient care resulting from the use of a surgical safety checklist. Data were retrospectively obtained from 233 patients. The number and types of changes made to the patients' intra-operative management, based on the use of the checklist, were recorded. The number of patients whose management was modified as a result of the checklist was 113 (48%) out of 233. The total number of changes made was 132, and 18 patients had more than one modification made to their care plan. Further stratification was identified: among the 132 changes made, antibiotics were held or administered in 73 (55%), changes related to anaemia involving type and screen or transfusion occurred in 27 (20%), modifications made regarding anti-coagulation occurred in 8 (7%), beta-blockers were held in 2 (2%), an allergy was identified in 7 (5%), modifications made to the surgical procedure were 3 (2%) and a category labelled 'other' encompassed 9 (7%) changes. The surgical safety checklist is a standardised form of team communication that leads to modifications of the patient care plan in a large percentage of cases. The ever-increasing complexity of medicine means that patients are at greater risk of oversight and harm without the use of a checklist. PMID:25585543

  20. Self-destructive behavior in hospitalized medical and surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Kellner, C H; Best, C L; Roberts, J M; Bjorksten, O

    1985-06-01

    This article reviews the literature and presents data from the Psychiatric Consultation Service of the Medical University of South Carolina on self-destructive behavior in hospitalized medical and surgical patients. Fatal suicide attempts are rare and usually occur in patients with severe, painful chronic illnesses, psychosis, or dementia. Less overt forms of self-destructive behavior include refusal of medical treatment and uncooperative behavior.

  1. Provider practice models in ambulatory oncology practice: analysis of productivity, revenue, and provider and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Buswell, Lori A; Ponte, Patricia Reid; Shulman, Lawrence N

    2009-07-01

    Physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants often work in teams to deliver cancer care in ambulatory oncology practices. This is likely to become more prevalent as the demand for oncology services rises, and the number of providers increases only slightly.

  2. Associations between Charlson Comorbidity Index and surgical risk severity and the surgical outcomes in advanced-age patients.

    PubMed

    Larson, Kelly J; Hamlin, Ryan J; Sprung, Juraj; Schroeder, Darrell R; Weingarten, Toby N

    2014-06-01

    The Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) has not been assessed for elderly (95 years of age or older) surgical patients. We examined the association between the CCI and life-threatening complications and 30-day mortality rate. Medical records of patients 95 years old or older from 2004 through 2008 were reviewed for major postoperative morbidity or death. Logistic regression analyses of age, sex, the CCI, American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Surgical Risk Stratification, and surgical urgency were performed to identify associations with poor surgical outcome. One hundred eighty-seven patients were identified (mean [standard deviation] age, 96.6 [1.9] years; median [interquartile range] CCI, 4 [2 to 6]). Ninety patients (48.1%) underwent moderate-risk and 20 (10.7%) underwent high-risk surgical procedures. Twenty patients (10.7%) died within 30 postoperative days and 20 others had major morbidity. Only moderate-risk (P = 0.045) and high-risk surgical procedures (P = 0.001) were associated with poor outcome. Patients of advanced age have high rates of morbidity and death after surgical procedures. These events are associated with surgical risk stratification and are independent of patient comorbidities. Risks, benefits, and alternatives must be considered carefully and discussed with patients and their families before deciding to proceed with high-risk surgery.

  3. Umbilical hernia in patients with liver cirrhosis: A surgical challenge

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Julio C U; Claus, Christiano M P; Campos, Antonio C L; Costa, Marco A R; Blum, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Umbilical hernia occurs in 20% of the patients with liver cirrhosis complicated with ascites. Due to the enormous intraabdominal pressure secondary to the ascites, umbilical hernia in these patients has a tendency to enlarge rapidly and to complicate. The treatment of umbilical hernia in these patients is a surgical challenge. Ascites control is the mainstay to reduce hernia recurrence and postoperative complications, such as wound infection, evisceration, ascites drainage, and peritonitis. Intermittent paracentesis, temporary peritoneal dialysis catheter or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt may be necessary to control ascites. Hernia repair is indicated in patients in whom medical treatment is effective in controlling ascites. Patients who have a good perspective to be transplanted within 3-6 mo, herniorrhaphy should be performed during transplantation. Hernia repair with mesh is associated with lower recurrence rate, but with higher surgical site infection when compared to hernia correction with conventional fascial suture. There is no consensus on the best abdominal wall layer in which the mesh should be placed: Onlay, sublay, or underlay. Many studies have demonstrated several advantages of the laparoscopic umbilical herniorrhaphy in cirrhotic patients compared with open surgical treatment. PMID:27462389

  4. Psychosocial support for patients in pediatric oncology: the influences of parents, schools, peers, and technology.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Lalita K; Kato, Pamela M

    2003-01-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of pediatric cancer can be associated with profound psychosocial changes in the life of young patients. Although nurses, physicians, and other health care professionals are important sources of support, psychosocial support is also available through parents, schools, and peers. This article presents a review of the literature on how parents, schools, and peers affect the coping and adjustment of young patients with cancer and critically reviews interventions directed at improving functioning in these areas. Special attention is paid to recent interventions that exploit technology such as video games, CD-ROMs, and the Internet to provide creative new forms of support for patients in pediatric oncology. Existing research on both technological and interpersonal forms of intervention and support shows promising results, and suggestions for further study are provided.

  5. Tools for improving the characterization and visualization of changes in neuro-oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Hsu, William; Taira, Ricky K

    2010-11-13

    Capturing how a patient's medical problems change over time is important for understanding the progression of a disease, its effects, and response to treatment. We describe two prototype tools that are being developed as part of a data processing pipeline for standardizing, structuring, and visualizing problems and findings documented in clinical reports associated with neuro-oncology patients. Given a list of problems and findings identified using a natural language processing (NLP) system, we have created a mapping tool that assigns an observation of a problem to one of nine classes that describe change. The second tool utilizes iconic representations of the nine classes to generate a timeline interface, enabling users to pan, zoom, and filter the data. The result of this preliminary work is an automated approach for understanding and summarizing the evolution of a problem within the patient electronic medical record.

  6. [Brief interdisciplinary oncology: a model for ambulatory, multimodal treatment of tumor patients].

    PubMed

    Liersch, T; Wörmann, B; Rauschecker, H F; Kaufmann, C C; Hiddemann, W; Becker, H; Gatzemeier, W

    1997-01-01

    Since 10/1994 the Interdisziplinäre Kurzzeit-Onkologie (IKO) is an outpatient department for the treatment of patients with cancer used by the departments of hematology/oncology and surgery. Between 09/1995 and 02/1997, 818 patients received 2024 cytotoxic therapies with neoadjuvant (15%), adjuvant (65%) or palliative (20%) intention-mostly within multicenter clinical studies. Ambulatory operations like removal of lymph nodes for diagnosis or the implantation of venous catheter systems prepared the way for specialized modalities of cancer therapy. The high compliance and consent of patients, combined with better understanding of cancer therapy, resulted in an enhanced quality of life and optimized therapy. Standardization in diagnostics and fast realisation of interdisciplinary treatment schedules lead to reduction of costs and to enhancement of quality and security in cancer therapy.

  7. Effectiveness of Surgical Safety Checklists in Improving Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    Ragusa, Paul S; Bitterman, Adam; Auerbach, Brett; Healy, William A

    2016-01-01

    Wrong-site surgery is all too common. Despite more than a decade of campaigns by major organizations to prevent these events, there are still reports of such mistakes. This article reviews the recent literature on surgical safety checklists and other tools designed to prevent wrong-site surgery and improve patient safety in the operating room. Emphasis is placed on how well institutions comply with these guidelines, the perceptions and attitudes of those who are asked to implement them, and their effectiveness. The literature shows that the implementation of such protocols has improved patient safety. In general, these efforts are viewed favorably by operating room personnel. However, the role of these checklists and other tools in reducing wrong-sided surgeries has not been proven. The goal of the health care profession should be to continue to improve on the advances that have been made in implementing surgical checklists and preventing wrong-site surgery. Practitioners at the authors' institution are continuously searching for ways to improve on the current protocols to prevent wrong-site surgeries. The authors recently employed a protocol in which surgical instruments are kept in the back of the room, away from the patient, until completion of the surgical time-out. This practice helps to ensure that team members are not distracted or preoccupied with setting up equipment during the time-out. This approach also helps to mitigate the hierarchal style in the operating room. PMID:26942472

  8. Readability of American Online Patient Education Materials in Urologic Oncology: a Need for Simple Communication

    PubMed Central

    Pruthi, Amanda; Nielsen, Matthew E.; Raynor, Mathew C.; Woods, Michael E.; Wallen, Eric M.; Smith, Angela B.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine readability levels of reputable cancer and urologic websites addressing bladder, prostate, kidney and testicular cancers. Methods Online patient education materials (PEMs) for bladder, prostate, kidney and testicular malignancies were evaluated from the American Cancer Society, American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), National Cancer Institute (NCI), Urology Care Foundation (AUA-UCF), Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network (BCAN), Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF), Kidney Cancer Association (KCA), and Testicular Cancer Resource Center (TCRC). Grade level was determined using several readability indices, and analyses were performed based on cancer type, website, and content area (general, causes, risk factors and prevention, diagnosis and staging, treatment, and post-treatment). Results Estimated grade level of online PEMs ranged from 9.2 to 14.2 with an overall mean of 11.7. Websites for kidney cancer had the least difficult readability (11.3) and prostate cancer had the most difficult readability (12.1). Among specific websites, the most difficult readability levels were noted for the AUA-UCF website for bladder and prostate cancer and the KCA and TCRC for kidney and testes cancer. Readability levels within content areas varied based on disease and website. Conclusion Online PEMs in urologic oncology are written at a level above the average American reader. Simplification of these resources are necessary to improve patient understanding of urologic malignancy. PMID:25623686

  9. Palliative care in pediatric hematological oncology patients: experience of a tertiary hospital

    PubMed Central

    Valadares, Maria Thereza Macedo; Mota, Joaquim Antônio César; de Oliveira, Benigna Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the approach to palliative care for hematological oncology patients in the pediatric ward of a tertiary hospital. Methods This was a retrospective, descriptive study of 29 hematological oncology patients who died between 2009 and 2011. Data regarding the approach and prevalence of pain, prevalence of other symptoms, multidisciplinary team participation, communication between staff and family and limited invasive therapy were collected from the medical records. Results Twenty-seven (93.1%) patients displayed disease progression unresponsive to curative treatment. The median age at death was ten years old. Pain was the most prevalent symptom with all patients who reported pain receiving analgesic medications. The majority took weak (55.2%) and/or strong (65.5%) opioids. The patients were followed by pediatricians and a pediatric hematologist/oncologist. Participation of other professionals was also documented: 86.2% were followed by social services and 69% by psychologists, among others. There were explicit descriptions of limitation of invasive therapy in the medical records of 26 patients who died with disease progression. All these decisions were shared with the families. Conclusion Although the hospital where this study was conducted does not have a specialized team in pediatric palliative care, it meets all the requirements for developing a specific program. The importance of approaching pain and other prevalent symptoms in children with cancer involving a comprehensive multidisciplinary team is evident. Discussions were had with most of the families on limiting invasive therapy, but no record of a well-defined and coordinated treatment plan for palliative care was found. PMID:25453649

  10. Assessment of Telemedicine in Surgical Education and Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    Demartines, Nicolas; Mutter, Didier; Vix, Michel; Leroy, Joël; Glatz, Dieter; Rösel, Fritz; Harder, Felix; Marescaux, Jacques

    2000-01-01

    Objective To analyze the value of teleconferencing for patient care and surgical education by assessing the activity of an international academic network. Summary Background Data The uses of telemedicine include teleeducation, training, and consulting, and surgical teams are now involved, sharing diagnostic information and opinions without the need for travel. However, the value of telematics in surgery remains to be assessed. Methods During a 2-year period, weekly surgical teleconferences were held among six university hospitals in four European countries. To assess the accuracy of telediagnosis for surgical cases, 60 randomly selected cases were analyzed by a panel of surgeons. Participants’ opinions were analyzed by questionnaire. Results Seventy teleconferences (50 lectures and 271 case presentations) were held. Ninety-five of the 114 participants (83.3%) completed the final questionnaire. Eighty-six percent rated the surgical activity as good or excellent, 75.7% rated the scientific level as good or excellent, 55.8% rated the daily clinical activity as good or excellent, and 28.4% rated the manual surgical technique as good or excellent. The target organ was identified in all the cases; the organ structure and pathology were considered well defined in 93.3%, and the fine structure was considered well defined in 58.3%. Diagnosis was accurate in 17 cases (28.3%), probable in 25 (41.7%), possible but uncertain in 16 (26.7%), and not possible in 2 cases (3.3%). Discussion among the remote sites increased the rate of valuable therapeutic advice from 55% of cases before the discussion to 95% after the discussion. Eighty-six percent of the surgeons expressed satisfaction with telematics for medical education and patient care. Conclusions Participant satisfaction was high, transmission of clinical documents was accurate, and the opportunity to discuss case documentation and management significantly improved diagnostic potential, resulting in an accuracy rate of up

  11. A tele-oncology model replacing face-to-face specialist cancer care: perspectives of patients in North Queensland.

    PubMed

    Sabesan, Sabe; Kelly, Jenny; Evans, Rebecca; Larkins, Sarah

    2014-03-18

    We explored the experiences of patients using the Townsville Tele-oncology clinic, where most patients are no longer seen face-to-face. All medical oncology patients who received services via telehealth at the Townsville Cancer Centre in 2012 were invited to participate in an interview. None refused. Thirty two patients were interviewed by telephone and three via videoconference at their local health service facility. Data analysis identified five major themes (quality of the consultation; communication and relationships; familiarity with technology and initial fears; local services and support; and lack of coordination of services between the local rural hospital and the major regional hospital) and each major theme included a number of sub-themes. Most patients interviewed (69%) had not seen their oncology specialist face-to-face, but 86% of them found the video-consultation to be of high quality and were extremely satisfied with the interaction. The acceptance of teleconsultation appeared to be linked to the patients' trust with their local health system and staff. Overall, the tele-oncology model that replaced face-to-face care in North Queensland was accepted and welcomed by patients. PMID:24643950

  12. Implementation of a Central Line Maintenance Care Bundle in Hospitalized Pediatric Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Allen R.; Bundy, David G.; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Fratino, Lisa; Drucis, Kim M.; Panton, Stephanie Y.; Kokoszka, Michelle; Budd, Alicia P.; Milstone, Aaron M.; Miller, Marlene R.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether a multidisciplinary, best-practice central line maintenance care bundle reduces central line-associated blood stream infection (CLABSI) rates in hospitalized pediatric oncology patients and to further delineate the epidemiology of CLABSIs in this population. METHODS: We performed a prospective, interrupted time series study of a best-practice bundle addressing all areas of central line care: reduction of entries, aseptic entries, and aseptic procedures when changing components. Based on a continuous quality improvement model, targeted interventions were instituted to improve compliance with each of the bundle elements. CLABSI rates and epidemiological data were collected for 10 months before and 24 months after implementation of the bundle and compared in a Poisson regression model. RESULTS: CLABSI rates decreased from 2.25 CLABSIs per 1000 central line days at baseline to 1.79 CLABSIs per 1000 central line days during the intervention period (incidence rate ratio [IRR]: 0.80, P = .58). Secondary analyses indicated CLABSI rates were reduced to 0.81 CLABSIs per 1000 central line days in the second 12 months of the intervention (IRR: 0.36, P = .091). Fifty-nine percent of infections resulted from Gram-positive pathogens, 37% of patients with a CLABSI required central line removal, and patients with Hickman catheters were more likely to have a CLABSI than patients with Infusaports (IRR: 4.62, P = .02). CONCLUSIONS: A best-practice central line maintenance care bundle can be implemented in hospitalized pediatric oncology patients, although long ramp-up times may be necessary to reap maximal benefits. Further research is needed to determine if this CLABSI rate reduction can be sustained and spread. PMID:22945408

  13. Bacterial bloodstream infections and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern in pediatric hematology/oncology patients after anticancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mulla, Naima A; Taj-Aldeen, Saad J; El Shafie, Sittana; Janahi, Mohammed; Al-Nasser, Abdullah A; Chandra, Prem

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Bloodstream infections in pediatric hematology and oncology represent a major problem worldwide, but this has not been studied in Qatar. In this study, we investigated the burden of infection and the resistance pattern in the bacterial etiology, in the only tertiary pediatric hematology and oncology center in Qatar. Methods All pediatric cancer patients (n=185) were evaluated retrospectively during the period 2004–2011; a total of 70 (38%) patients were diagnosed with bloodstream infections. Bacterial etiology was determined, along with their susceptibility patterns. Neutropenia, duration of neutropenia, fever, duration of fever, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were evaluated throughout the study. Results A total of 70 patients (38%) were diagnosed with acute leukemias, lymphomas, solid tumors, or brain tumors; those patients experienced 111 episodes of bacteremia. The most common Gram-positive (n=64 [55%]) isolates were Staphylococcus epidermidis (n=26), Staphylococcus hominis (n=9), and Staphylococcus haemolyticus (n=7), and the common Gram-negative (n=52 [45%]) isolates were Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=14), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=10), and Escherichia coli (n=7). There was a significant association observed between fever with positive blood culture and different types of cancer (P=0.035). The majority of bacteremia (n=68 [61.3%]) occurred in nonneutropenic episodes. Elevated values of CRP (≥5 mg/L) were detected in 82 (95.3%) episodes and were negatively correlated with absolute neutrophil count (ANC) (r=−0.18; P=0.248) among all cases. However, the infection-related fatality rate was 2.2% (n=4), with three caused by Gram-negative pathogens. Multidrug resistant organisms were implicated in 33 (28.4%) cases and caused three of the mortality cases. Conclusion Multidrug resistant organisms cause mortality in pediatric cancer patients. Investigation of antimicrobial susceptibility of these organisms may guide successful antimicrobial therapy and improve

  14. Merging Children’s Oncology Group Data with an External Administrative Database Using Indirect Patient Identifiers: A Report from the Children’s Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yimei; Hall, Matt; Fisher, Brian T.; Seif, Alix E.; Huang, Yuan-Shung; Bagatell, Rochelle; Getz, Kelly D.; Alonzo, Todd A.; Gerbing, Robert B.; Sung, Lillian; Adamson, Peter C.; Gamis, Alan; Aplenc, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Clinical trials data from National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded cooperative oncology group trials could be enhanced by merging with external data sources. Merging without direct patient identifiers would provide additional patient privacy protections. We sought to develop and validate a matching algorithm that uses only indirect patient identifiers. Methods We merged the data from two Phase III Children’s Oncology Group (COG) trials for de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with the Pediatric Health Information Systems (PHIS). We developed a stepwise matching algorithm that used indirect identifiers including treatment site, gender, birth year, birth month, enrollment year and enrollment month. Results from the stepwise algorithm were compared against the direct merge method that used date of birth, treatment site, and gender. The indirect merge algorithm was developed on AAML0531 and validated on AAML1031. Results Of 415 patients enrolled on the AAML0531 trial at PHIS centers, we successfully matched 378 (91.1%) patients using the indirect stepwise algorithm. Comparison to the direct merge result suggested that 362 (95.7%) matches identified by the indirect merge algorithm were concordant with the direct merge result. When validating the indirect stepwise algorithm using the AAML1031 trial, we successfully matched 157 out of 165 patients (95.2%) and 150 (95.5%) of the indirectly merged matches were concordant with the directly merged matches. Conclusions These data demonstrate that patients enrolled on COG clinical trials can be successfully merged with PHIS administrative data using a stepwise algorithm based on indirect patient identifiers. The merged data sets can be used as a platform for comparative effectiveness and cost effectiveness studies. PMID:26606521

  15. Longitudinal Assessments of Quality of Life in Endometrial Cancer Patients: Effect of Surgical Approach and Adjuvant Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Tien; Menard, Chantal; Samant, Rajiv; Choan, E.; Hopkins, Laura; Faught, Wylam; Fung-Kee-Fung, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) is often considered for endometrial cancer. We studied the effect of RT and surgical treatment on patients' quality of life (QOL). Methods and Materials: All patients referred to the gynecologic oncology clinics with biopsy findings showing endometrial cancer were recruited. QOL assessments were performed using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL questionnaire-C30, version 3. Assessments were obtained at study entry and at regular 3-month intervals for a maximum of 2 years. Open-ended telephone interviews were done every 6 months. Linear mixed regression models were built using QOL domain scores as dependent variables, with the predictors of surgical treatment and adjuvant RT type. Results: A total of 40 patients were recruited; 80% of the surgeries were performed by laparotomy. Significant improvements were seen in most QOL domains with increased time from treatment. Adjuvant RT resulted in significantly more severe bowel symptoms and improvement in insomnia compared with conservative follow-up. No significant adverse effect from adjuvant RT was seen on the overall QOL. Bowel symptoms were significantly increased in patients treated with laparotomy compared with laparoscopy in the patients treated with whole pelvic RT. Qualitatively, about one-half of the patients noted improvements in their overall QOL during follow-up, with easy fatigability the most prevalent. Conclusion: No significant adverse effect was seen on patients' overall QOL with adjuvant pelvic RT after the recovery period. The acute adverse effects on patients' QOL significantly improved with an increasing interval from diagnosis.

  16. Split-Bolus Multidetector-Row Computed Tomography Technique for Characterization of Focal Liver Lesions in Oncologic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Scialpi, Michele; Pierotti, Luisa; Gravante, Sabrina; Rebonato, Alberto; Piscioli, Irene; D’Andrea, Alfredo; Schiavone, Raffaele; Palumbo, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Background In oncologic patients, the liver is the most common target for metastases. An accurate detection and characterization of focal liver lesions in patients with known primary extrahepatic malignancy are essential to define management and prognosis. Objectives To assess the diagnostic accuracy of the split-bolus multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) protocol in the characterization of focal liver lesions in oncologic patients. Patients and Methods We retrospectively analyzed the follow-up split-bolus 64-detector row CT protocol in 36 oncologic patients to characterize focal liver lesions. The split-bolus MDCT protocol by intravenous injection of two boluses of contrast medium combines the hepatic arterial phase (HAP) and hepatic enhancement during the portal venous phase (PVP) in a single-pass. Results The split-bolus MDCT protocol detected 208 lesions and characterized 186 (89.4%) of them: typical hemangiomas (n = 9), atypical hemangiomas (n = 3), cysts (n = 78), hypovascular (n = 93) and hypervascular (n = 3) metastases. Twenty two (10.6%) hypodense lesions were categorized as indeterminate (≤5 mm). The mean radiation dose was 24.5±6.5 millisieverts (mSv). Conclusion The designed split-bolus MDCT technique can be proposed alternatively to triphasic MDCT and in a single-pass to PVP in the initial staging and in the follow-up respectively in oncologic patients.

  17. Impact of Referral Protocols on the Dental Management of Patients Undergoing Treatment for Head and Neck Oncology in Northern Ireland.

    PubMed

    Moore, Ciaran; Killough, Simon; Markey, Neill; McLister, Conor; McKenna, Gerald

    2016-03-01

    Management of head and neck oncology necessitates an extensive multidisciplinary approach. Throughout Northern Ireland all oral care for Head and Neck Oncology patients is overseen within the Centre for Dentistry, Queens University Belfast via referral from the Head and Neck Multidisciplinary Team. The aim of this study was to develop and introduce a referral pro-forma to improve communication between members of the multidisciplinary team and ultimately expedite provision of oral care prior to patients undergoing treatment for Head and Neck Oncology. The study period ran from June 2013 until November 2014. All patients undergoing treatment for Head and Neck Oncology in Northern Ireland were included in the study. A referral pro-forma was introduced in June 2014 in an attempt to streamline the referral process. Data was gathered on patient waiting times, extraction protocols with comparisons made between the period before and after introduction of the pro-forma. In total 137 patients were included in the study: 96 patients were referred to the service using referral letters, confidential emails and via telephone; 41 patients were referred using the pro-forma. The introduction of the referral pro-forma resulted in a significant decrease in the mean number of days from referral to assessment (12 to 7 days) (p < 0.05) and significantly increased mean interval time between extractions and patients beginning radiotherapy (13 to 17 days) (p < 0.05). Significant improvements have been made with the introduction of the referral pro-forma where patients are waiting significantly less time for dental assessment and having extractions completed in a more timely manner therefore expediting the commencement of their oncology treatment. PMID:27039474

  18. Pediatric oncology nurses' attitudes related to discussing fertility preservation with pediatric cancer patients and their families.

    PubMed

    Vadaparampil, Susan T; Clayton, Heather; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; King, Lindsey M; Nieder, Michael; Wilson, Crystal

    2007-01-01

    This study explores nurses' attitudes toward the discussion of fertility preservation (FP) with pediatric cancer patients and their families. A cross-sectional survey was administered to attendees of a pediatric oncology conference. Of the 115 nurses who responded and comprised the study sample, most reported discussing risks of infertility or FP patients' families, that boys younger than 18 years should not be given erotic materials during semen collection, and difficulty locating FP facilities. The 3 patient factors most likely to encourage the discussion of FP are the patient being recently married or engaged, the patient asking about FP, and availability of patient education materials. While the results indicate that nurses do not regularly discuss FP with their patients, nurses perceive such discussion as being within their scope of practice. Therefore, with appropriate intervention, nurses may play a key role in facilitating discussions regarding FP with patients and families. PMID:17827491

  19. Hypercapnia Improves Tissue Oxygenation in Morbidly Obese Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hager, Helmut; Reddy, Dayakar; Mandadi, Goutham; Pulley, Debra; Eagon, J Chris; Sessler, Daniel I; Kurz, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    Risk of wound infection is increased in morbidly obese surgical patients, in part because a major determinant of wound infection risk, tissue oxygenation, is marginal. Unlike in lean patients, supplemental inspired oxygen (FIO2) only slightly improves tissue oxygenation in obese patients. Mild hypercapnia improves tissue oxygenation in lean, but has not been evaluated in obese patients. We thus tested the hypothesis that mild hypercapnia markedly improves tissue oxygenation in morbidly obese patients given FIO2 80% during major abdominal surgery. Thirty obese patients (body mass index 61.5±17 kg/m2) scheduled for open gastric bypass were randomly assigned to normocapnia (n=15, end-tidal PCO2 35 mmHg) or hypercapnia (n=15, end-tidal PCO2 50 mmHg); FIO2 was 80%. Anesthetic management and other confounding factors were controlled. Tissue oxygen tension was measured subcutaneously at the upper arm using a polarographic probe in a silastic tonometer. Demographic characteristics, cardiovascular measurements, and PaO2 (222±48 versus 230±68 mmHg in normocapnic versus hypercapnic; mean±SD, P=0.705) were comparable in the groups. Tissue oxygen tension, however, was greater in hypercapnic than in normocapnic patients (78±31 versus 56±13 mmHg, P=0.029). Mild hypercapnia increased tissue oxygenation by an amount believed to be clinically important and could potentially reduce the risk of surgical wound infection in morbidly obese patients. PMID:16931680

  20. Global radiation oncology waybill

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Garzón, Victor; Rovirosa, Ángeles; Ramos, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Background/aim Radiation oncology covers many different fields of knowledge and skills. Indeed, this medical specialty links physics, biology, research, and formation as well as surgical and clinical procedures and even rehabilitation and aesthetics. The current socio-economic situation and professional competences affect the development and future or this specialty. The aim of this article was to analyze and highlight the underlying pillars and foundations of radiation oncology, indicating the steps implicated in the future developments or competences of each. Methods This study has collected data from the literature and includes highlights from discussions carried out during the XVII Congress of the Spanish Society of Radiation Oncology (SEOR) held in Vigo in June, 2013. Most of the aspects and domains of radiation oncology were analyzed, achieving recommendations for the many skills and knowledge related to physics, biology, research, and formation as well as surgical and clinical procedures and even supportive care and management. Results Considering the data from the literature and the discussions of the XVII SEOR Meeting, the “waybill” for the forthcoming years has been described in this article including all the aspects related to the needs of radiation oncology. Conclusions Professional competences affect the development and future of this specialty. All the types of radio-modulation are competences of radiation oncologists. On the other hand, the pillars of Radiation Oncology are based on experience and research in every area of Radiation Oncology. PMID:24416572

  1. Surgical Options for Drug-Refractory Overactive Bladder Patients

    PubMed Central

    Starkman, Jonathan S; Smith, Christopher P; Staskin, David R

    2010-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB) is a symptom complex of urinary frequency, urinary urgency, and nocturia, with or without urgency incontinence. This syndrome is idiopathic in most instances without clearly defined pathophysiology. Studies clearly show that OAB negatively impacts health-related quality of life and impairs daily functioning in a large proportion of patients. Despite recent advances in drug delivery and improved tolerability of antimuscarinic drug class, a large percentage of patients remain refractory to conventional pharmacological therapy for this chronic condition. There are several unique and effective treatments that are available for this difficult population. We review the various surgical options within the urological armamentarium to treat patients with refractory OAB. PMID:20811558

  2. Different surgical strategies of patients with intravenous leiomyomatosis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guotao; Miao, Qi; Liu, Xingrong; Zhang, Chaoji; Liu, Jianzhou; Zheng, Yuehong; Shao, Jiang; Cheng, Ninghai; Du, Shunda; Hu, Zhan; Ren, Zhinan; Sun, Luxi

    2016-09-01

    Intravenous leiomyomatosis (IVL) is a rare benign tumor. The study aimed to assess outcomes of patients treated surgically for IVL.Between November 2002 and January 2015, 76 patients were treated for IVL. The stage of IVL was evaluated preoperatively by echocardiography and enhanced computerized tomography (CT) scan, and graded into 4 stages according to intravascular tumor progression. We recorded age, lower limb edema before surgery, surgical parameters, and hospitalization expenses. Patients were followed up every 6 months and tumor recurrence was assessed by CT and ultrasound. Patients were followed up for a mean of 4.5 ± 2.5 years (range 1-13 years) and there was no operative, hospital, or long-term mortality or were lost to follow-up.The rate of lower extremity edema, amount of blood loss, postoperative transfusion, length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay, postoperative hospitalization, and hospitalization expenses differed significantly between patients at different presurgery stages. Tumors recurred in 4 of 7 patients with stage I IVL that opted for surgery that preserved the ovaries and uterus. No recurrence was observed in patients graded stage II or more, in all of which the uterus and ovaries were removed. Recurrence was observed in only 4 of 76 cases of IVL, all of whom opted for surgery that spared the ovaries and uterus.Different surgical strategies should be decided based on the staging to completely remove the tumor and ensure the safety of patients. Removal of both ovaries is necessary for inhibiting tumor growth and avoiding recurrence. PMID:27631266

  3. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: what every provider of gynecologic oncology care should know.

    PubMed

    Duska, Linda R; Engelhard, Carolyn L

    2013-06-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) was signed into law by President Barack Obama in 2010. While initial implementation of the law began shortly thereafter, the full implementation will take place over the next few years. With respect to cancer care, the act was intended to make care more accessible, affordable, and comprehensive across different parts of the country. For our cancer patients and our practices, the ACA has implications that are both positive and negative. The Medicaid expansion and access to insurance exchanges are intended to increase the number of insured patients and thus improve access to care, but many states have decided to opt out of the Medicaid program and in these states access problems will persist. Screening programs will be put in place for insured patients but may supplant federally funded programs that are currently in place for uninsured patients and may not follow current screening guidelines. Both hospice and home health providers will be asked to provide more services with less funding, and quality measures, including readmission rates, will factor into reimbursement. Insured patients will have access to all phases of clinical trial research. There is a need for us as providers of Gynecologic Oncology care to be active in the implementation of the ACA in order to ensure that our patients and our practices can survive and benefit from the changes in health care reimbursement, with the ultimate goals of improving access to care and quality while reducing unsustainable costs. PMID:23500090

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of patients wearing a surgical traction halo.

    PubMed

    Hua, J; Fox, R A

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic resonance images of patients wearing a surgical halo may have unacceptable artifacts if the halo has a conductive loop structure. This study shows that the observed artifacts are predominantly due to eddy currents generated in the halo by switching field gradients, and that these artifacts can be substantially reduced by adjusting the phase encoding direction in MRI sequences so that it is parallel to the axis of the halo. PMID:8851441

  5. Cytokine Gene Variation is Associated with Depressive Symptom Trajectories in Oncology Patients and Family Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Laura B.; Aouizerat, Bradley E.; Langford, Dale J.; Cooper, Bruce A.; Dhruva, Anand; Cataldo, Janine K.; Baggott, Christina R.; Merriman, John D.; Dodd, Marylin; West, Claudia; Paul, Steven M.; Miaskowski, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Depressive symptoms are common in cancer patients and their family caregivers (FCs). While these symptoms are characterized by substantial interindividual variability, the factors that predict this variability remain largely unknown. This study sought to confirm latent classes of oncology patients and FCs with distinct depressive symptom trajectories and to examine differences in phenotypic and genotypic characteristics among these classes. Method Among 167 oncology outpatients with breast, prostate, lung, or brain cancer and 85 of their FCs, growth mixture modeling (GMM) was used to identify latent classes of individuals based on Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D) scores obtained prior to, during, and for four months following completion of radiation therapy. One hundred four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes in 15 candidate cytokine genes were interrogated for differences between the two largest latent classes. Multivariate logistic regression analyses assessed effects of phenotypic and genotypic characteristics on class membership. Results Four latent classes were confirmed: Resilient (56.3%), Subsyndromal (32.5%), Delayed (5.2%), and Peak (6.0%). Participants who were younger, female, non-white, and who reported higher baseline trait and state anxiety were more likely to be in the Subsyndromal, Delayed, or Peak groups. Variation in three cytokine genes (i.e., interleukin 1 receptor 2 [IL1R2], IL10, tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNFA]), age,and performance status predicted membership in the Resilient versus Subsyndromal classes. Conclusions Findings confirm the four latent classes of depressive symptom trajectories previously identified in a sample of breast cancer patients. Variations in cytokine genes may influence variability in depressive symptom trajectories. PMID:23187335

  6. Quality of life in patients with ulcerative colitis treated surgically

    PubMed Central

    Kozłowska, Katarzyna A.; Krokowicz, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Ulcerative colitis belongs to the group of inflammatory bowel diseases. The specific symptoms and chronic nature of the disease significantly affect the quality of patients’ lives. Quality-of-life assessment helps to define its determining factors as well as the efficiency of surgical procedures. Aim Quality-of-life evaluation of patients with ulcerative colitis treated surgically. Material and methods A retrospective review was carried out on 35 patients with ulcerative colitis, who were treated surgically in the Clinic of General and Colorectal Surgery, University of Medical Sciences in Poznan. The research tools used to assess the quality of life consisted of: the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire, a Polish version of the Short Form Health Survey-36, and a questionnaire. Results The mean of the IBDQ scale was 152.51, and the median was 161. In this scale, a higher score indicates better quality of life. The situation in the subjective SF-36 scale is reversed: a lower score indicates better quality of life. The mean of the SF-36 was 115.94, and the median was 58. Many discrepancies in the field (e.g. the influence of determining factors) create a niche for further studies. Conclusions Moreover, quality-of-life evaluation may lead to better patient care, understanding their problems or treatment modifications, and finally may become a kind of therapy efficiency parameter. PMID:25276253

  7. VTE primary prevention, including hospitalised medical and orthopaedic surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Granziera, Serena; Cohen, Alexander T

    2015-06-01

    Primary prevention is the key to managing a significant proportion of the burden of venous thromboembolism (VTE), defined as deep venous thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE). This is because VTE may lead to sudden death or are often misdiagnosed and therefore treatment is not feasible. Primary prevention usually commences in hospital as VTE following hospitalisation adds to the significant disease burden worldwide. Numerous medical, surgical and other risk factors have been recognised and studied as indications for prophylaxis. The risk of VTE continues following admission to hospital with a medical or surgical condition, usually long after discharge and therefore prolonged primary prophylaxis is often recommended. Clinical and observational studies in surgical patients show this risk extends for months and perhaps more than one year, for medical patients the risk extends for at least several weeks. For the specific groups of patients at higher risk of developing VTE primary prevention, either pharmaceutical or mechanical, is recommended. The aim of this review is to describe the population at risk, the main related risk factors and the approach to thromboprophylaxis in different populations.

  8. Patient-Physician Communication About Complementary and Alternative Medicine in a Radiation Oncology Setting

    SciTech Connect

    Ge Jin; Fishman, Jessica; Vapiwala, Neha; Li, Susan Q.; Desai, Krupali; Xie, Sharon X.; Mao, Jun J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the extensive use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among cancer patients, patient-physician communication regarding CAM therapies remains limited. This study quantified the extent of patient-physician communication about CAM and identified factors associated with its discussion in radiation therapy (RT) settings. Methods and Materials: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 305 RT patients at an urban academic cancer center. Patients with different cancer types were recruited in their last week of RT. Participants self-reported their demographic characteristics, health status, CAM use, patient-physician communication regarding CAM, and rationale for/against discussing CAM therapies with physicians. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify relationships between demographic/clinical variables and patients' discussion of CAM with radiation oncologists. Results: Among the 305 participants, 133 (43.6%) reported using CAM, and only 37 (12.1%) reported discussing CAM therapies with their radiation oncologists. In multivariate analyses, female patients (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.21-0.98) and patients with full-time employment (AOR 0.32, 95% CI 0.12-0.81) were less likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists. CAM users (AOR 4.28, 95% CI 1.93-9.53) were more likely to discuss CAM with their radiation oncologists than were non-CAM users. Conclusions: Despite the common use of CAM among oncology patients, discussions regarding these treatments occur rarely in the RT setting, particularly among female and full-time employed patients. Clinicians and patients should incorporate discussions of CAM to guide its appropriate use and to maximize possible benefit while minimizing potential harm.

  9. The meaning of DNR status: oncology nurses' experiences with patients and families.

    PubMed

    Jezewski, M A; Finnell, D S

    1998-06-01

    Patients, providers, and families are increasingly involved in end-of-life decisions (advance directives, health care proxy, do-not-resuscitate [DNR] status consents). These decisions can be complex processes whereby the participants in the process must come to terms with often painful and difficult decisions. The role perception of the nurse in end-of-life decision making is not well delineated. This chapter explores the results of a study that addresses the question, "What are the experiences of oncology nurses as they interact with patients and/or family members during the process of patients/families signing DNR consents. The grounded theory method of data collection and analysis was used to explore this question. The results of the study indicate that central to the process of consenting to DNR status is the degree of shared understanding about the meaning of DNR status among participants and the conflict that can occur when meanings are not shared. A model is presented that illustrates the connections between the meanings of DNR (patient, family, and provider) and congruence and conflict in the DNR consent process. Strategies are discussed that facilitate prevention or resolution of conflict in the DNR status decision-making process. Strategies used by the nurse to facilitate decision making by patient and families include communicating with, caring for, educating, advocating for, and collaborating with patients, families, and other providers. PMID:9615512

  10. Surgical Treatment in Patients with Cervical Osteomyelitis: Single Institute's Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Bang Sang; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; Park, Jung Yoon; Chin, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Keun-Su; Cho, Yong-Eun

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study practical guidelines and strategies in the treatment of cervical osteomyelitis. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 14 patients who underwent surgical treatment for cervical osteomyelitis from May 2000 to July 2008. We investigated their clinical course, antibiotic regimen, surgical methods, and laboratory and radiologic findings including X-ray, CT and MRI. Results 5 patients had primary spondylodiscitis, 5 patients had post operative spondylodiscitis and 4 patients had tuberculosis in cervical spine. The causative microorganisms were MRSA (5), P. aeruginosa (1), Methicillin resistant coagulase negative streptococcus (1), P. aeruginosa changed to MRSA (1), and 2 patients showed no growth on culture studies. Patients were treated 13.8 weeks (range, 5.4-25.8) with IV antibiotics and then treated for 58.2 days (range, 13-106) with oral antibiotics. Antituberculotic medications were used for a mean of 383.8 days. Patients were treated with anterior debridement and fusion (5), irrigation and debridement (5), simultaneous cervical anterior interbody and transthoracic thoracic interbody fusion (1). 3 patients underwent the planned 2-staged operation, which included an anterior debridement with or without fusion for the 1st operation and posterior instrumentation for 2nd operation. 10 patients (71.4%) had neurologic deficits at the time of diagnosis and 7 patients (70%) among them improved post-operatively. Conclusion Anterior cervical spine surgery is the preferable treatment option in patients with neurological deterioration, extensive bony destruction with expected kyphotic deformity, and uncontrolled infection being managed only with antibiotics. Antibiotics are also important for thorough treatment. PMID:25346763

  11. Attitudes of Oncologists, Oncology Nurses, and Patients from a Women's Clinic Regarding Medical Decision Making for Older and Younger Breast Cancer Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beisecker, Analee E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Administered Beisecker Locus of Authority in Decision Making: Breast Cancer survey to 67 oncologists, 94 oncology nurses, and 288 patients from women's clinic. All groups believed that physicians should have dominant role in decision making. Nurses felt that patients should have more input than patients or physicians felt they should. Physicians…

  12. Evaluation of Nosocomial Infection in Patients at hematology-oncology ward of Dr. Sheikh children’s hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ghassemi, A; Farhangi, H; Badiee, Z; Banihashem, A; Mosaddegh, MR

    2015-01-01

    Background Infections in critical care unit are high, and they are serious hospital problems. Infections acquired during the hospital stay are generally called nosocomial infections, initially known as infections arising after 48 h of hospital admission. The mostfrequent nosocomial infections (urinary, respiratory, gastroenteritis and blood stream infection) were common in patients at hospital.The aim was to study, the current status of nosocomial infection, rate of infection among hospitalized children at hematology-oncology ward of Dr. Sheikh children’s hospital, Mashhad, Iran. Materials and Methods Data were collected from 200 patient's records presented with symptoms of nosocomial infection at hematology-oncology ward of Dr. Sheikh children’s hospital from March 2014 to September 2014. Descriptive statistics using percentage was calculated. Results Incidence of nosocomial infections inpatients athematology-oncology ward was 31% (62/200). Of which 69.35% (43/62) blood stream infection being the most frequent; followed by 30.64% (19/62) was urinary tract infection (UTI), and the most common blood culture isolate was been Staphylococcus epidermidis 18 (41.86%), andour study showed that large numbers ofnosocomial UTIs causing by Gram‑negative bacteria. Conclusion This study showed blood stream infection and UTI are the common nosocomial infections among patients athematology-oncology ward. Early recognition of infections and short term use of invasive devices along with proper infection control procedures can significantly decrease the incidence of nosocomial infections in patients. PMID:26985350

  13. Effects of Video Games on the Adverse Corollaries of Chemotherapy in Pediatric Oncology Patients: A Single-Case Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolko, David J.; Rickard-Figueroa, Jorge L.

    1985-01-01

    Assessed effects of video games on adverse corollaries of chemotherapy in three pediatric oncology patients. Results indicated that access to video games resulted in reduction in the number of anticipatory symptoms experienced and observed, as well as a diminution in the aversiveness of chemotherapy side effects. (Author/NRB)

  14. Generating patient-specific pulmonary vascular models for surgical planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murff, Daniel; Co-Vu, Jennifer; O'Dell, Walter G.

    2015-03-01

    Each year in the U.S., 7.4 million surgical procedures involving the major vessels are performed. Many of our patients require multiple surgeries, and many of the procedures include "surgical exploration". Procedures of this kind come with a significant amount of risk, carrying up to a 17.4% predicted mortality rate. This is especially concerning for our target population of pediatric patients with congenital abnormalities of the heart and major pulmonary vessels. This paper offers a novel approach to surgical planning which includes studying virtual and physical models of pulmonary vasculature of an individual patient before operation obtained from conventional 3D X-ray computed tomography (CT) scans of the chest. These models would provide clinicians with a non-invasive, intricately detailed representation of patient anatomy, and could reduce the need for invasive planning procedures such as exploratory surgery. Researchers involved in the AirPROM project have already demonstrated the utility of virtual and physical models in treatment planning of the airways of the chest. Clinicians have acknowledged the potential benefit from such a technology. A method for creating patient-derived physical models is demonstrated on pulmonary vasculature extracted from a CT scan with contrast of an adult human. Using a modified version of the NIH ImageJ program, a series of image processing functions are used to extract and mathematically reconstruct the vasculature tree structures of interest. An auto-generated STL file is sent to a 3D printer to create a physical model of the major pulmonary vasculature generated from 3D CT scans of patients.

  15. Risk Factors for Urinary Tract Infections in Cardiac Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gillen, Jacob R.; Isbell, James M.; Michaels, Alex D.; Lau, Christine L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Risk factors for catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgical procedures have been well documented. However, the variables associated with CAUTIs in the cardiac surgical population have not been clearly defined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate risk factors associated with CAUTIs in patients undergoing cardiac procedures. Methods: All patients undergoing cardiac surgery at a single institution from 2006 through 2012 (4,883 patients) were reviewed. Patients with U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) criteria for CAUTI were identified from the hospital's Quality Assessment database. Pre-operative, operative, and post-operative patient factors were evaluated. Univariate and multivariable analyses were used to identify significant correlations between perioperative characteristics and CAUTIs. Results: There were 55 (1.1%) documented CAUTIs in the study population. On univariate analysis, older age, female gender, diabetes mellitus, cardiogenic shock, urgent or emergent operation, packed red blood cell (PRBC) units transfused, and intensive care unit length of stay (ICU LOS) were all significantly associated with CAUTI [p<0.05]. On multivariable logistic regression, older age, female gender, diabetes mellitus, and ICU LOS remained significantly associated with CAUTI. Additionally, there was a significant association between CAUTI and 30-d mortality on univariate analysis. However, when controlling for common predictors of operative mortality on multivariable analysis, CAUTI was no longer associated with mortality. Conclusions: There are several identifiable risk factors for CAUTI in patients undergoing cardiac procedures. CAUTI is not independently associated with increased mortality, but it does serve as a marker of sicker patients more likely to die from other comorbidities or complications. Therefore, awareness of the high-risk nature of these patients should lead to

  16. Integration of Early Specialist Palliative Care in Cancer Care: Survey of Oncologists, Oncology Nurses, and Patients

    PubMed Central

    Salins, Naveen; Patra, Lipika; Usha Rani, MR; Lohitashva, SO; Rao, Raghavendra; Ramanjulu, Raghavendra; Vallath, Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Palliative care is usually delivered late in the course of illness trajectory. This precludes patients on active disease modifying treatment from receiving the benefit of palliative care intervention. A survey was conducted to know the opinion of oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients about the role of early specialist palliative care in cancer. Methods: A nonrandomized descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted at a tertiary cancer care center in India. Thirty oncologists, sixty oncology nurses, and sixty patients were surveyed. Results: Improvement in symptom control was appreciated by oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients with respect to pain (Z = −4.10, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.84, P = 0.001), (Z = −6.20, P = 0.001); nausea and vomiting (Z = −3.75, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.3, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.1, P = 0.001); constipation (Z = −3.29, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.96, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.49, P = 0.001); breathlessness (Z = −3.57, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.03, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.99, P = 0.001); and restlessness (Z = −3.68, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.23, P = 0.001), (Z = −3.22, P = 0.001). Improvement in end-of-life care management was appreciated by oncologists and oncology nurses with respect to communication of prognosis (Z = −4.04, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.20, P = 0.001); discussion on limitation of life-sustaining treatment (Z = −3.68, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.53, P = 0.001); end-of-life symptom management (Z = −4.17, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.59, P = 0.001); perimortem care (Z = −3.86, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.80, P = 0.001); and bereavement support (Z = −3-80, P = 0.001), (Z = −4.95, P = 0.001). Improvement in health-related communication was appreciated by oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients with respect to communicating health related information in a sensitive manner (Z = −3.74, P = 0.001), (Z = −5.47, P = 0.001), (Z = −6.12, P = 0.001); conducting family meeting (Z = −3.12, P = 0.002), (Z = −4.60, P = 0

  17. [Patient guidelines in oncology: objectives, procedures and first experiences with this format].

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Corinna; Zowalla, Richard; Wiesner, Martin; Siegert, Svenja; Bothe, Lydia; Follmann, Markus

    2015-01-01

    For several years patient versions of guidelines have become mandatory in the German Guidelines Program in Oncology (GGPO). Based on the methodology that has been developed for the German National Disease Management Guidelines Program, patient versions of guidelines translate the recommendations of clinical practice guideline into plain language and provide information about the harms and benefits of the interventions being addressed in the guideline. They are developed by a group of guideline authors (experts as well as patients), they are consensus-based and aim to create transparency in recommendations for physicians and their rationales. An automated analysis of readability shows that patient versions of guidelines are specific to the target group of educated lay people. Moreover, the responses to a reader feedback questionnaire indicate that comprehensibility, level of detail and depth of information are considered highly relevant and positive by users. Thus, patient versions of guidelines meet the needs of a specific target group. Nevertheless, the development of other formats for readers with low levels of health literacy or cognitive competencies is desirable. Currently it remains unclear if these simplified formats are able to reflect the complexity of high quality clinical practice guidelines. PMID:26474649

  18. [Patient guidelines in oncology: objectives, procedures and first experiences with this format].

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Corinna; Zowalla, Richard; Wiesner, Martin; Siegert, Svenja; Bothe, Lydia; Follmann, Markus

    2015-01-01

    For several years patient versions of guidelines have become mandatory in the German Guidelines Program in Oncology (GGPO). Based on the methodology that has been developed for the German National Disease Management Guidelines Program, patient versions of guidelines translate the recommendations of clinical practice guideline into plain language and provide information about the harms and benefits of the interventions being addressed in the guideline. They are developed by a group of guideline authors (experts as well as patients), they are consensus-based and aim to create transparency in recommendations for physicians and their rationales. An automated analysis of readability shows that patient versions of guidelines are specific to the target group of educated lay people. Moreover, the responses to a reader feedback questionnaire indicate that comprehensibility, level of detail and depth of information are considered highly relevant and positive by users. Thus, patient versions of guidelines meet the needs of a specific target group. Nevertheless, the development of other formats for readers with low levels of health literacy or cognitive competencies is desirable. Currently it remains unclear if these simplified formats are able to reflect the complexity of high quality clinical practice guidelines.

  19. An exploratory, interview study of oncology patients' and health-care staff experiences of discussing resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Cox, Karen; Wilson, E; Jones, L; Fyfe, D

    2007-11-01

    There is little research about how patients and their families would like discussions surrounding resuscitation to take place. The purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate the experience of a discussion of resuscitation from the perspective of the participants. In-depth interviews were undertaken with 21 patients, of whom nine were interviewed together with a relative and 14 staff in an oncology setting. Data were analysed using a constant comparative method and coded using NVIVO qualitative data analysis software. Patients appeared to be accepting resuscitation discussions as necessary and important. A minority felt that the timing of the discussion could have been better, particularly if they were newly diagnosed or had recently commenced treatment. Relatives generally found the discussions more difficult and felt that discussions should take place much closer to death. Patients identified that they needed time and privacy during the discussion. Staff identified a need to present a sensitive and individualised discussion which took into account the key elements of timing, place, space, manner and pace. Patients acknowledged that the resuscitation discussion enabled them to begin to address issues relating to dying and end of life. For staff on-going communication skills training and support in this area were seen as important but often overlooked parts of the process.

  20. Radical cystectomy for bladder cancer: oncologic outcome in 271 Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Dong, Pei; Li, Yong-Hong; Liu, Zhuo-Wei; Yao, Kai; Han, Hui; Qin, Zi-Ke; Zhou, Fang-Jian

    2014-03-01

    Few large scale studies have reported the oncologic outcome of radical cystectomy for treating bladder cancer in China; hence, we lack long-term prognostic information. The aim of the current study was to determine the survival rate and prognostic factors of patients who underwent radical cystectomy for bladder cancer in a Chinese medical center. We retrospectively analyzed clinicopathologic data from 271 bladder cancer patients who underwent radical cystectomy between 2000 and 2011. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to identify independent prognostic predictors for this cohort. Median follow-up was 31.7 months (range, 0.2-139.1 months). Thirty-day mortality was (1.4%). The 5-year recurrence-free survival, cancer-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival rates were 61.6%, 72.9%, and 68.0%, respectively. The 5-year CSS rates of patients with T1-T4 disease were 90.7%, 85.0%, 51.0%, and 18.0%, respectively. Patients with organ-confined disease had a higher 5-year CSS rate than those with extravesical disease (81.4% vs. 34.9%, P < 0.001). For the 38 patients (14%) with lymph node involvement, the 5-year CSS rate was 27.7%-significantly lower than that of patients without lymph node metastasis (P < 0.001). The 5-year CSS rate was much higher in patients with low grade tumor than in those with high grade tumor (98.1% vs. 68.1%, P < 0.001). Multivariate Cox regression showed that patient age (hazard ratio, 2.045; P = 0.013) and T category (hazard ratio, 2.213; P < 0.001) were independent predictors for CSS. These results suggest that radical cystectomy is a safe and effective method for treating bladder cancer in Chinese patients. Old age and high T category were associated with poor prognosis in bladder cancer patients who underwent radical cystectomy.

  1. RECQ1 A159C Polymorphism Is Associated With Overall Survival of Patients With Resected Pancreatic Cancer: A Replication Study in NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9704

    PubMed Central

    Li, Donghui; Moughan, Jennifer; Crane, Christopher; Hoffman, John P.; Regine, William F.; Abrams, Ross A.; Safran, Howard; Liu, Chang; Chang, Ping; Freedman, Gary M.; Winter, Kathryn A.; Guha, Chandan; Abbruzzese, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To confirm whether a previously observed association between RECQ1 A159C variant and clinical outcome of resectable pancreatic cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiation is reproducible in another patient population prospectively treated with postoperative chemoradiation. Methods and Materials Patients were selected, according to tissue availability, from eligible patients with resected pancreatic cancer who were enrolled on the NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9704 trial of 5-fluorouacil (5-FU)-based chemoradiation preceded and followed by 5-FU or gemcitabine. Deoxyribonucleic acid was extracted from paraffin-embedded tissue sections, and genotype was determined using the Taqman method. The correlation between genotype and overall survival was analyzed using a Kaplan-Meier plot, log-rank test, and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models. Results In the 154 of the study’s 451 eligible patients with evaluable tissue, genotype distribution followed Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (ie, 37% had genotype AA, 43% AC, and 20% CC). The RECQ1 variant AC/CC genotype carriers were associated with being node positive compared with the AA carrier (P = .03). The median survival times (95% confidence interval [CI]) for AA, AC, and CC carriers were 20.6 (16.3–26.1), 18.8 (14.2–21.6), and 14.2 (10.3–21.0) months, respectively. On multivariate analysis, patients with the AC/CC genotypes were associated with worse survival than patients with the AA genotype (hazard ratio [HR] 1.54, 95% CI 1.07–2.23, P =.022). This result seemed slightly stronger for patients on the 5-FU arm (n = 82) (HR 1.64, 95% CI 0.99–2.70, P =.055) than for patients on the gemcitabine arm (n = 72, HR 1.46, 95% CI 0.81–2.63, P =.21). Conclusions Results of this study suggest that the RECQ1 A159C genotype may be a prognostic or predictive factor for resectable pancreatic cancer patients who are treated with adjuvant 5-FU before and after 5-FU-based chemoradiation

  2. Surgical options for patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

    PubMed

    Douglass, Laurie M; Salpekar, Jay

    2014-09-01

    Despite ongoing investigation into pharmacologic treatments for Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS), outcomes for chronic administration of medications remain disappointing. In many instances LGS is treatment refractory, resulting in poor prognoses that include intellectual disability, persisting seizures, and psychiatric conditions. For patients with treatment resistance to other modalities for LGS, a further option is surgical intervention. Evaluation for surgery should involve interictal electroencephalogram (EEG), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis, and age-appropriate neuropsychological/developmental assessment. Resective surgery, where seizure foci are removed, successfully controls seizures in many cases, particularly where lesionectomy or lobar resections are appropriate. Recent studies of resective surgery on individuals with LGS show promising results, with a high percentage of patients having improved seizure control. Corpus callosotomy is a palliative surgical approach that aims at controlling potentially injurious seizures, for example, atonic or drop seizures, by preventing the bilateral spread of epileptic activity. Once associated with a high risk for morbidity and mortality, microsurgical techniques and surgery limited to the anterior region of the callosum have greatly diminished complications of corpus callosotomy surgery. Vagus nerve stimulation, another palliative procedure, offers rates of seizure improvement similar to those of corpus callosotomy, with the exception of atonic seizure for which corpus callosotomy may lead to a greater reduction. Recent advances in surgical techniques offer encouraging options for treatment of LGS.

  3. Results of Surgical Therapy in Patients with Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vlad, Mihaela; Zosin, Ioana; Timar, Bogdan; Lazar, Fulger; Vlad, Adrian; Timar, Romulus; Cornianu, Marioara

    2016-08-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a rare form of malignancy, having an intermediate prognosis. Controversies exist regarding the best surgical approach. The aim of the study was to analyze the outcome in a group of patients with MTC, diagnosed and followed up in a single care center. We performed a retrospective analysis of all the patients diagnosed with MTC in the Department of Endocrinology from the County Emergency Hospital Timisoara between 1992 and 2012. The study group included 19 patients, 6 men (31.6 %), mean age 41.2 ± 12.5 years (20-72 years). The preoperative diagnosis was based on the protocol for nodular thyroid disease. Total or near-total thyroidectomy was performed in 10 out of 16 patients who could be operated. Postoperative follow-up included repeated measurements of serum calcitonin and imaging investigations. Nine out of the total of 19 (47.3 %) patients had hereditary forms of MTC. Most of the cases (84.2 %) were submitted to surgery. The median duration of follow-up was 84 months. The pTNM staging indicated that the majority of the patients with hereditary MTC were diagnosed in an earlier stage. Disease remission was achieved in 7 cases (43.8 %). Four patients, all with sporadic forms, died. Survival rates at 1, 5 and 10 years were significantly higher (p = 0.048) in patients with hereditary MTC. An early diagnosis of MTC allows a better surgical approach and an improved survival rate. We support the general recommendation that modified radical neck dissection is not necessary for all the patients with MTC. PMID:27574350

  4. Assessment of surgical wounds in the home health patient: definitions and accuracy with OASIS-C.

    PubMed

    Trexler, Rhonda A

    2011-10-01

    The number of surgical patients receiving home care continues to grow as hospitals discharge patients sooner. Home health clinicians must gain knowledge of the wound healing stages and surgical wound classification to collect accurate data in the Outcome and Assessment Information Set-C (OASIS-C). This article provides the information clinicians need to accurately assess surgical wounds and implement best practices for improving surgical wounds in the home health patient.

  5. Perioperative cardiovascular care for patients undergoing noncardiac surgical intervention.

    PubMed

    Eagle, Kim A; Vaishnava, Prashant; Froehlich, James B

    2015-05-01

    The field of perioperative medicine has garnered legitimacy during the past 3 decades. Adverse cardiovascular events in the perioperative period account for significant morbidity and mortality. Although testing patients preoperatively to detect ischemia and identify those who may benefit from modifications in care is a tempting strategy, risk assessment should account for posterior probability. Validated risk stratification tools, such as the Revised Cardiac Risk Index or the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program risk calculator, can assist in the identification of patients for whom preoperative noninvasive testing is justified and may change the plan of care. Furthermore, current guidelines emphasize that prophylactic coronary revascularization should not be performed exclusively for the purposes of reducing the risk of perioperative events. There has been enthusiasm for medical therapies that may reduce the risk of adverse cardiovascular events in the perioperative period. Current guidelines encourage the perioperative use of β-blockade in patients already receiving such therapy and caution against initiating such therapy on the day of the surgical procedure. Reduction of morbidity and mortality in the perioperative period relies on an understanding of the myriad physiological perturbations in this period and thoughtful selection of patients for further testing and treatment.

  6. Examining Noncardiac Surgical Procedures in Patients on Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Taghavi, Sharven; Jayarajan, Senthil N; Mangi, Abeel A; Hollenbach, Kathryn; Dauer, Elizabeth; Sjoholm, Lars O; Pathak, Abhijit; Santora, Thomas A; Goldberg, Amy J; Rappold, Joseph F

    2015-01-01

    As extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is increasingly used for patients with cardiac and/or pulmonary failure, the need for noncardiac surgical procedures (NCSPs) in these patients will continue to increase. This study examined the NCSP required in patients supported with ECMO and determined which variables affect outcomes. The National Inpatient Sample Database was examined for patients supported with ECMO from 2007 to 2010. There were 563 patients requiring ECMO during the study period. Of these, 269 (47.8%) required 380 NCSPs. There were 149 (39.2%) general surgical procedures, with abdominal exploration/bowel resection (18.2%) being most common. Vascular (29.5%) and thoracic procedures (23.4%) were also common. Patients requiring NCSP had longer median length of stay (15.5 vs. 9.2 days, p = 0.001), more wound infections (7.4% vs. 3.7%, p = 0.02), and more bleeding complications (27.9% vs. 17.3%, p = 0.01). The incidences of other complications and inpatient mortality (54.3% vs. 58.2%, p = 0.54) were similar. On logistic regression, the requirement of NCSPs was not associated with mortality (odds ratio [OR]: 0.91, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.68-1.23, p = 0.17). However, requirement of blood transfusion was associated with mortality (OR: 1.70, 95% CI: 1.06-2.74, p = 0.03). Although NCSPs in patients supported with ECMO does not increase mortality, it results in increased morbidity and longer hospital stay.

  7. Shared decision making in dermato-oncology: preference for involvement of melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Karoline J; Nashan, Dorothée; Meiss, Frank; Bengel, Jürgen; Reuter, Katrin

    2014-02-01

    Increasing importance is being conferred to the implementation of shared decision making (SDM) in clinical practice for medical, ethical, and sociological reasons. In Germany, SDM has recently been adopted as an explicit goal in the S3-melanoma treatment guideline. The aim of this study is to present data on how melanoma patients want to be involved in treatment decisions and second on the dynamic of these preferences for involvement. This was investigated in consecutively recruited melanoma patients (stages I-III) in two German Skin Cancer Centers as part of a longitudinal questionnaire study. The Control Preference Scale assessed patients' preferences at baseline (n=405) and was readministered 1 year later (n=314) to detect potential changes. In addition, the perceived realization of SDM in the adjuvant interferon-α treatment decision was investigated in a subgroup of patients (n=108) using the nine-item Shared Decision Making Questionnaire (SDM-Q-9). More than 80% of the patients want to play an active role (autonomous or collaborative) in treatment decisions and only 17% want to delegate their decision to the doctor. We found a significant preference shift within a year in 43% of the patients, predominantly toward more active involvement. The results of the SDM-Q-9 indicate a moderate degree of perceived participation, with differing perceived implementation of the individual the SDM process steps. With the majority of melanoma patients preferring an active role in treatment decisions and improvable implementation of the SDM process steps in clinical practice, our findings support the relevance of SDM in dermato-oncology.

  8. Discharge planning for the elderly ambulatory surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Burden, Nancy

    2004-12-01

    Discharge planning for the elderly ambulatory surgery patient should begin as soon as the patient's procedure is booked. Successful discharge planning relies on 1) comprehensive preoperative assessment; 2) effective communication among the surgical facility's caregivers, the physician's office, the patient, and the family; 3) consideration of the patient's preoperative status; and 4) a strong patient and family education plan. The challenges of planning the aftercare are compounded by the physical, social, financial, cognitive, and sensory changes related to the normal aging process as well as to systemic diseases, which are more prevalent in the older population than in younger patients. The elderly patient's discharge plan should identify and address age-related barriers to communication, incorporate the patient's existing physical and medical condition, diminish the negative effects of social support challenges, and address environmental issues that can be improved to support recovery. The elderly population often deals with the imperfect: isolation from family or friends, aging bodies, hearing and visual loss, financial limitations, and emotional challenges. Although the nurse cannot reverse these challenges of old age, he or she can still make a difference by providing guidance and resources to blunt the potential complications of surgery and anesthesia. PMID:15801349

  9. Surgical management of cleft lip in pedo-patients.

    PubMed

    Taware, C P; Kulkarni, S R

    1991-01-01

    The Present article describes in short etiology of cleft lip and cleft palate. With this in-born defect, patient develops crucial problems with feeding, phonation, overall growth and development of affected and allied soft and hard tissue structures. This in turn results in deformity and asymmetry which is going to affect functional requirements as well as aesthetic outlook. Hence it really becomes mandatory to correct this defect surgically as early as possible, at stipulated timings so as to avoid present and future anticipated problems. PMID:1820390

  10. Surgical management of cleft lip in pedo-patients.

    PubMed

    Taware, C P; Kulkarni, S R

    1991-01-01

    The Present article describes in short etiology of cleft lip and cleft palate. With this in-born defect, patient develops crucial problems with feeding, phonation, overall growth and development of affected and allied soft and hard tissue structures. This in turn results in deformity and asymmetry which is going to affect functional requirements as well as aesthetic outlook. Hence it really becomes mandatory to correct this defect surgically as early as possible, at stipulated timings so as to avoid present and future anticipated problems.

  11. Escalation of Oncologic Services at the End of Life Among Patients With Gynecologic Cancer at an Urban, Public Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Eijean; Rogers, Anna; Ji, Lingyun; Sposto, Richard; Church, Terry; Roman, Lynda; Tripathy, Debu; Lin, Yvonne G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Use of oncology-related services is increasingly scrutinized, yet precisely which services are actually rendered to patients, particularly at the end of life, is unknown. This study characterizes the end-of-life use of medical services by patients with gynecologic cancer at a safety-net hospital. Methods: Oncologic history and metrics of medical use (eg, hospitalizations, chemotherapy infusions, procedures) for patients with gynecologic oncology who died between December 2006 and February 2012 were evaluated. Mixed-effect regression models were used to test time effects and construct usage summaries. Results: Among 116 subjects, cervical cancer accounted for the most deaths (42%). The median age at diagnosis was 55 years; 63% were Hispanic, and 65% had advanced disease. Only 34% died in hospice care. The median times from do not resuscitate/do not intubate documentation and from last therapeutic intervention to death were 9 days and 55 days, respectively. Significant time effects for all services (eg, hospitalizations, diagnostics, procedures, treatments, clinic appointments) were detected during the patient's final year (P < .001), with the most dramatic changes occurring during the last 2 months. Patients with longer duration of continuity of care used significantly fewer resources toward the end of life. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first report enumerating medical services obtained by patients with gynecologic cancer in a large, public hospital during the end of life. Marked changes in interventions in the patient's final 2 months highlight the need for cost-effective, evidence-based metrics for delivering cancer care. Our data emphasize continuity of care as a significant determinant of oncologic resource use during this critical period. PMID:25604595

  12. Surgical strategy: matching the patient with the procedure.

    PubMed

    Hentz, Vincent R

    2002-08-01

    The general indications, timing, and choice of procedure can be determined by asking and answering the following questions appropriately: 1. Has the patient achieved neurologic, emotional, and social stability? 2. What is the patient's current level of motor and sensory resources and function? The number and strength of muscles remaining under good voluntary control are the most important variables. 3. Are the patient's expectations realistic? 4. Does the patient possess the necessary intelligence and motivation? Some procedures, such as arthrodesis of a specific joint, require little motivation to succeed; however, a complex set of muscle-tendon transfers requires a great deal of motor reeducation for the patient to achieve an optimal result. 5. Does the patient have the necessary time to invest in achieving a good result? The patient must be able to set aside the time necessary for postoperative immobilization in a cast or splint and for therapy and reeducation. 6. Are the necessary support services and personnel available and committed? 7. Have all preoperative obstacles to success been considered and has a plan developed to overcome any remaining obstacles? 8. Does the patient understand the potential complications and benefits? 9. Can the patient and professional team tolerate a complication, failure, or suboptimal result? Both the medical staff and the patient must be prepared for complications that may lead to a suboptimal outcome or frank failure. 10. Are the patient's current health and well-being ideal? 11. Is the surgical plan consistent with the patient's physical resources, goals, and expectations? 12. Does an alternate plan exist? 13. Does the surgeon understand the scope of the complications and how to salvage an acceptable result should a complication occur? PMID:12474600

  13. The Management of Patients after Surgical Treatment of Maxillofacial Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rolski, D.; Zawadzki, P.; Życińska, K.; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, E.

    2016-01-01

    Morphological and functional disturbances induced by postsurgical defects and loss of tissues in the stomatognathic system due to the treatment of tumors in the maxillofacial region determine the therapeutic needs of patients. The study aimed at clinical and epidemiological evaluation of patients under prosthetic treatment in order to establish the algorithm for rehabilitation. The study group was composed of the patients after midface surgery (45.74%); surgery in a lower part of the face (47.38%); mixed postoperative losses (3.44%); loss of face tissues and surgery in other locations in the head and neck region (3.44%). The supplementary treatment was applied in 69.63% of patients. Clinical and additional examinations were performed to obtain the picture of postoperative loss, its magnitude, and location to plan the strategy of prosthetic rehabilitation. The management algorithm for prosthetic rehabilitation in patients after surgical treatment of maxillofacial neoplasms was based on its division in stages. The location and magnitude of postoperative losses, as well as the implementation of supplementary treatment of the patients after treatment of maxillofacial tumors, influence the planning of prosthetic rehabilitation that plays a key role and facilitates the patients' return to their prior living situation, occupational and family lives. PMID:27747229

  14. A Prospective Follow-up of Patients Treated Surgically or Non-Surgically for Full-thickness Rotator Cuff Tears

    PubMed Central

    Gagnier, Joel Joseph; Oltean, Hanna N.; Bedi, Asheesh; Carpenter, James E.; Miller, Bruce S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of this project are: (1) to compare the efficacy of surgical versus non-surgical management of full-thickness rotator cuff tears, and (2) to detect variables that predict success within each treatment group. Methods: Patients who presented to our care for management of symptomatic full-thickness rotator cuff tears were enrolled in our Shoulder Registry and clinical data were collected prospectively. In addition to baseline demographic information, the following outcome measures were collected at baseline, 6 months, 1 year and annually up to 3 years: Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (WORC) Index, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Modified Marx Shoulder Activity Level Scale, VR-12, 100-point Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE) rating, 100-point visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, and a patient satisfaction scale. All patients were allocated treatment as recommended by the attending surgeon. We described all patient demographic characteristics, and performed linear and logistic regression for variables associated with treatment allocation and with treatment effects. We also used Student’ t-tests and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests where appropriate, to explore differences in treatment effects between the groups for all outcome measures at all time points. Results: A total of 292 patients were included with 155 allocated to surgery and 137 to non-surgical treatment. Those allocated to surgery were younger (58.6 years vs 65.2 years; P<.0001), less likely to have diabetes (12% vs 21%; P=0.05), more likely to have a known traumatic injury (71% vs 55%; P=0.002), and tended to be worse off on all outcome measures at baseline then the non-surgical group. Both the surgical group and non-surgical group improved on all outcome measures across the follow up period with several variables predicting changes at each time point. Table 1 contains the list of specific variables that predicted improved outcomes separately for both treatment

  15. A multiplex cytokine score for the prediction of disease severity in pediatric hematology/oncology patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Jun; Tang, Yong-Min; Song, Hua; Yang, Shi-Long; Xu, Wei-Qun; Shi, Shu-Wen; Zhao, Ning; Liao, Chan

    2013-11-01

    Although many inflammatory cytokines are prognostic in sepsis, the utility of cytokines in evaluating disease severity in pediatric hematology/oncology patients with septic shock was rarely studied. On the other hand, a single particular cytokine is far from ideal in guiding therapeutic intervention, but combination of multiple biomarkers improves the accuracy. In this prospective observational study, 111 episodes of septic shock in pediatric hematology/oncology patients were enrolled from 2006 through 2012. Blood samples were taken for inflammatory cytokine measurement by cytometric bead array (CBA) technology at the initial onset of septic shock. Interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 were significantly elevated in majority of patients, while tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ were markedly increased in patients with high pediatric index of mortality 2 (PIM2) score and non-survivors. All the four cytokines paralleled the PIM2 score and differentially correlated with hemodynamic disorder and fatal outcomes. The pediatric multiplex cytokine score (PMCS), which integrated the four cytokines into one score system, was related to hemodynamic disorder and mortality as well, but showed more powerful prediction ability than each of the four cytokines. PMCS was an independent predictive factor for fatal outcome, presenting similar discriminative power with PIM2, with accuracy of 0.83 (95% CI, 0.71-0.94). In conclusion, this study develops a cytokine scoring system based on CBA technique, which performs well in disease severity and fatality prediction in pediatric hematology/oncology patients with septic shock. PMID:24051223

  16. Patient-Reported Outcomes in Oncology Drug Labeling in the United States: A Framework for Navigating Early Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Alan L.; Hao, Yanni; Krohe, Meaghan; Yaworsky, Andrew; Mazar, Iyar; Foley, Catherine; Mehmed, Faisal; Globe, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite an increased use of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in oncology clinical trials, integrating the patient perspective into drug approval decisions and documentation has been challenging. Objectives To review important regulatory and measurement terminology, and to provide oncology outcomes researchers and those involved with building oncology programs with tools to plan PRO data collection, particularly in relation to drug efficacy claims for drug labeling in the United States. Discussion When contemplating a PRO measurement strategy for oncology clinical trials, outcomes researchers are challenged in several ways. First, given multiple stakeholders, researchers must communicate with their scientific, commercial, and regulatory colleagues using often misunderstood terms, such as “label,” “claim,” “end point,” “outcome,” and “concept.” Second, because stakeholders do not always have access to data from early-stage clinical trials and do not contribute to the target drug's profile in early development, researchers are often unable to address the most important question in building a measurement strategy: What do we want to say about our drug? To overcome these challenges, researchers can systematically develop an end point model to facilitate communication among drug development stakeholders using a common language and to link the building blocks of a PRO measurement strategy, including claims, concepts, questionnaires, and end points. We developed a model that characterizes a disease by its proximal signs and/or symptoms and increasingly distal health outcomes to provide researchers potential measurement concepts that can be instrumental in selecting PRO questionnaires for use in studies. Conclusion PRO data collected in clinical trials should be used in drug development to evaluate the drug's efficacy; it is encouraging that US regulators are willing to work with drug sponsors to overcome the challenges associated with the

  17. Patient-Reported Outcomes in Oncology Drug Labeling in the United States: A Framework for Navigating Early Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Alan L.; Hao, Yanni; Krohe, Meaghan; Yaworsky, Andrew; Mazar, Iyar; Foley, Catherine; Mehmed, Faisal; Globe, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite an increased use of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in oncology clinical trials, integrating the patient perspective into drug approval decisions and documentation has been challenging. Objectives To review important regulatory and measurement terminology, and to provide oncology outcomes researchers and those involved with building oncology programs with tools to plan PRO data collection, particularly in relation to drug efficacy claims for drug labeling in the United States. Discussion When contemplating a PRO measurement strategy for oncology clinical trials, outcomes researchers are challenged in several ways. First, given multiple stakeholders, researchers must communicate with their scientific, commercial, and regulatory colleagues using often misunderstood terms, such as “label,” “claim,” “end point,” “outcome,” and “concept.” Second, because stakeholders do not always have access to data from early-stage clinical trials and do not contribute to the target drug's profile in early development, researchers are often unable to address the most important question in building a measurement strategy: What do we want to say about our drug? To overcome these challenges, researchers can systematically develop an end point model to facilitate communication among drug development stakeholders using a common language and to link the building blocks of a PRO measurement strategy, including claims, concepts, questionnaires, and end points. We developed a model that characterizes a disease by its proximal signs and/or symptoms and increasingly distal health outcomes to provide researchers potential measurement concepts that can be instrumental in selecting PRO questionnaires for use in studies. Conclusion PRO data collected in clinical trials should be used in drug development to evaluate the drug's efficacy; it is encouraging that US regulators are willing to work with drug sponsors to overcome the challenges associated with the

  18. Memantine before Mastectomy Prevents Post-Surgery Pain: A Randomized, Blinded Clinical Trial in Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Véronique; Joly, Dominique; Villatte, Christine; Dubray, Claude; Durando, Xavier; Daulhac, Laurence; Coudert, Catherine; Roux, Delphine; Pereira, Bruno; Pickering, Gisèle

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuropathic pain following surgical treatment for breast cancer with or without chemotherapy is a clinical burden and patients frequently report cognitive, emotional and quality of life impairment. A preclinical study recently showed that memantine administered before surgery may prevent neuropathic pain development and cognitive dysfunction. With a translational approach, a clinical trial has been carried out to evaluate whether memantine administered before and after mastectomy could prevent the development of neuropathic pain, the impairment of cognition and quality of life. Method A randomized, pilot clinical trial included 40 women undergoing mastectomy in the Oncology Department, University Hospital, Clermont-Ferrand, France. Memantine (5 to 20 mg/day; n = 20) or placebo (n = 20) was administered for four weeks starting two weeks before surgery. The primary endpoint was pain intensity measured on a (0–10) numerical rating scale at three months post-mastectomy. Results Data analyses were performed using mixed models and the tests were two-sided, with a type I error set at α = 0.05. Compared with placebo, patients receiving memantine showed at three months a significant difference in post-mastectomy pain intensity, less rescue analgesia and a better emotional state. An improvement of pain symptoms induced by cancer chemotherapy was also reported. Conclusions This study shows for the first time the beneficial effect of memantine to prevent post-mastectomy pain development and to diminish chemotherapy-induced pain symptoms. The lesser analgesic consumption and better well-being of patients for at least six months after treatment suggests that memantine could be an interesting therapeutic option to diminish the burden of breast cancer therapy. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01536314 PMID:27050431

  19. Reproductive Health in the Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Patient: An Innovative Training Program for Oncology Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Vadaparampil, Susan T.; Hutchins, Nicole M.; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, approximately 69,200 AYAs were diagnosed with cancer, second only to heart disease for males in this age group. Despite recent guidelines from professional organizations and clinical research that AYA oncology patients want information about reproductive health topics and physician support for nurses to address these issues with patients, existing research finds few oncology nurses discuss this topic with patients due to barriers such as lack of training. This article describes an innovative eLearning training program, entitled Educating Nurses about Reproductive Issues in Cancer Healthcare (ENRICH). The threefold purpose of this article is to: (1) highlight major reproductive health concerns relevant to cancer patients, (2) describe the current status of reproductive health and oncology communication and the target audience for the training, and (3) present a systematic approach to curriculum development, including the content analysis and design stages as well as the utilization of feedback from a panel of experts. The resulting 10-week curriculum contains a broad-based approach to reproductive health communication aimed at creating individual- and practice-level change. PMID:23225072

  20. Reproductive health in the adolescent and young adult cancer patient: an innovative training program for oncology nurses.

    PubMed

    Vadaparampil, Susan T; Hutchins, Nicole M; Quinn, Gwendolyn P

    2013-03-01

    In 2008, approximately 69,200 adolescents and young adults (AYAs) were diagnosed with cancer, second only to heart disease for males in this age group. Despite recent guidelines from professional organizations and clinical research that AYA oncology patients want information about reproductive health topics and physician support for nurses to address these issues with patients, existing research finds few oncology nurses discuss this topic with patients due to barriers such as lack of training. This article describes an innovative eLearning training program, entitled Educating Nurses about Reproductive Issues in Cancer Healthcare. The threefold purpose of this article is to: (1) highlight major reproductive health concerns relevant to cancer patients, (2) describe the current status of reproductive health and oncology communication and the target audience for the training, and (3) present a systematic approach to curriculum development, including the content analysis and design stages as well as the utilization of feedback from a panel of experts. The resulting 10-week curriculum contains a broad-based approach to reproductive health communication aimed at creating individual- and practice-level change. PMID:23225072

  1. Patient-reported outcomes for US oncology labeling: review and discussion of score interpretation and analysis methods.

    PubMed

    Shields, Alan; Coon, Cheryl; Hao, Yanni; Krohe, Meaghan; Yaworsky, Andrew; Mazar, Iyar; Foley, Catherine; Globe, Denise

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes ways to approach the conceptual and practical challenges associated with interpreting the clinical meaning of scores produced by patient reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires, particularly when used to inform efficacy decisions for regulatory approval for oncology products. Score interpretation estimates are not inherent to PRO questionnaires per se, instead, vary dependent upon sample and study design characteristics. Scores from PRO measures can be interpreted at the individual and group level, and each carries its own set of statistics for evaluating differences. Oncology researchers have a variety of methods and data analytic strategies available to support their score interpretation needs, which should be considered in the context of their a priori knowledge of the target patient population, the hypothesized effects of treatment, the study design and assessment schedule, and the inferences and decisions to be made from the PRO data. PMID:26594897

  2. Nutritional assessment in surgical oncology patients: a comparative analysis between methods.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Carla de Magalhães; Sampaio, Ethiane de Jesus; Varjão, Maria Lúcia; Factum, Clarissa Simon; Ramos, Lilian Barbosa; Barreto-Medeiros, Jairza Maria

    2014-11-01

    Introducción y objetivos: La desnutrición en el paciente oncológico es responsable por el aumento de la morbilidady la mortalidady produce una disminución de su calidad de vida. En la actualidad, la identificación de la desnutrición se lleva a cabo por medio de métodos subjetivos y objetivos o por la unión de ambos. A pesar de la asociación de estos métodos como examen de rutina en la práctica clínica, son muy pocos los trabajos que evalúan la concordancia entre ellos. De ese modo, el objetivo de este estudio fue comparar diferentes métodos para evaluar el estado nutricional de los pacientes oncológicos quirúrgicos. Métodos: Se analizaron 173 pacientes oncológicos, ingresados para cirugía, se sometieron a una evaluación antropométrica y respondieron a SGA, PG-SGA y NRS- 2002. Se utilizó el test Kappa para evaluar el nível de concordancia entre los métodos. Resultados: Baja concordancia entre el IMC con el NRS-2002 (K=0,286), ASG(K=0,372) y ASG-PPP (K=0,173) fue identificado. Entre los métodos subjetivos, los resultados fueron mejores com ASG y ASG-PPP (K=0,690) y menor entre el NRS-2002 y los otros (ASG: K=0,345; ASG-PPP: K=0,322). Conclusión: Los resultados demostraron baja concordancia entre los métodos objetivos y subjetivos, lo que refuerza La importancia de la asociación de los indicadores en la evaluación nutricional de esta población. Aunque se ha encontrado baja concordancia entre los métodos de evaluación nutricional empleados en este estudio, los pacientes que presentaron una mayor reducción de las reservas corporales, fueron diagnosticados com un mayor grado de mal nutrición por los métodos subjetivos.

  3. Oncologic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg, D.G.; Rubin, P.; Youker, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on nuclear medicine. Topics considered include the classification of cancers, oncologic diagnosis, brain and spinal cord neoplasms, lymph node metastases, the larynx and hypopharynx, thyroid cancer, breast cancer, esophageal cancer, bladder cancer, tumors of the skeletal system, pediatric oncology, computed tomography and radiation therapy treatment planning, and the impact of future technology on oncologic diagnosis.

  4. Radical radiotherapy for early glottic cancer: Results in a series of 1087 patients from two Italian radiation oncology centers. II. The case of T2N0 disease

    SciTech Connect

    Frata, Paolo; Cellai, Enrico; Magrini, Stefano M. . E-mail: magrini@med.unibs.it; Bonetti, Bartolomea; Vitali, Elisabetta; Tonoli, Sandro; Buglione, Michela; Paiar, Fabiola; Barca, Raffaella; Fondelli, Simona; Polli, Caterina; Livi, Lorenzo; Biti, Gianpaolo

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate local control rates, late damage incidence, functional results, and second-tumor occurrence according to the different patient, tumor, and treatment features in a large bi-institutional series of T2 glottic cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 256 T2 glottic cancer cases treated consecutively with radical intent at the Florence University Radiation Oncology Department (FLO) and at the Radiation Oncology Department of University of Brescia, Istituto del Radio 'O. Alberti' (BS) were studied. Cumulative probability of local control (LC), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS) rates were calculated and compared in the different clinical and therapeutic subgroups by both univariate and multivariate analysis. Types of relapse and their surgical salvage were evaluated, along with the functional results of treatment. Late-damage incidence and second-tumor cumulative probability (STP) were also calculated. Results: In the entire series, 3-year, 5-year, and 10-year OS rates were, respectively, 73%, 59%, and 37%. Corresponding values for cumulative LC probability were 73%, 73%, and 70% and for DSS, 89%, 86%, and 85%, taking into account surgical salvage of relapsed cases. Seventy-three percent of the patients were cured with function preserved. Main determinants of a worse LC at univariate analysis were larger tumor extent and impaired cord mobility. At multivariate analysis, the same factors retained statistical significance. Twenty-year STP was 23%, with second-tumor deaths less frequent than larynx cancer deaths (20 of 256 vs. 30 of 256). Incidence of late damage was higher in the first decade of accrual (22%) than in the last decade (10%, p = 0.03); the same was true for severe late damage (9% vs. 1.8%). Conclusion: Present-day radical radiotherapy can be considered a standard treatment for T2 glottic cancer. Better results are obtained in patients with less extended disease. Late damage is relatively

  5. Radical radiotherapy for early glottic cancer: Results in a series of 1087 patients from two Italian radiation oncology centers. I. The case of T1N0 disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cellai, Enrico; Frata, Paolo; Magrini, Stefano M. . E-mail: magrini@med.unibs.it; Paiar, Fabiola; Barca, Raffaella; Fondelli, Simona; Polli, Caterina; Livi, Lorenzo; Bonetti, Bartolomea; Vitali, Elisabetta; De Stefani, Agostina; Buglione, Michela; Biti, Gianpaolo

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate local control rates, late damage incidence, functional results, and second tumor occurrence according to the different patient, tumor, and treatment features in a large bi-institutional series of T1 glottic cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 831 T1 glottic cancer cases treated consecutively with radical intent at the Florence University Radiation Oncology Department (FLO) and at the Radiation Oncology Department of University of Brescia-Istituto del Radio 'O. Alberti' (BS) were studied. Actuarial cumulative local control probability (LC), disease-specific (DSS), and overall survival (OS) rates have been calculated and compared in the different clinical and therapeutic subgroups with both univariate and multivariate analysis. Types of relapse and their surgical salvage have been evaluated, along with the functional results of treatment. Late damage incidence and second tumor cumulative probability (STP) have been also calculated. Results: In the entire series, 3-, 5-, and 10-year OS was equal to 86%, 77%, and 57%, respectively. Corresponding values for LC were 86%, 84%, and 83% and for DSS 96%, 95%, and 93%, taking into account surgical salvage of relapsed cases. Eighty-seven percent of the patients were cured with function preserved. Main determinants of a worse LC at univariate analysis were: male gender, earlier treatment period, larger tumor extent, anterior commissure involvement, and the use of Cobalt 60. At multivariate analysis, only gender, tumor extent, anterior commissure involvement, and beam type retained statistical significance. Higher total doses and larger field sizes are significantly related (logistic regression) with a higher late damage incidence. Scatterplot analysis of various combinations of field dimensions and total dose showed that field dimensions >35 and <49 cm{sup 2}, together with doses of >65 Gy, offer the best local control results together with an acceptably low late damage incidence

  6. Malnutrition and obesity in pediatric oncology patients: causes, consequences, and interventions.

    PubMed

    Co-Reyes, Erica; Li, Rhea; Huh, Winston; Chandra, Joya

    2012-12-15

    In children with cancer, suboptimal nutrition states are common consequences of the disease and its treatment. These nutrition states have been attributed to a number of etiologies dependent on the patient's tumor type and treatment, and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Interventions vary from psychosocial to pharmacological and surgical management. Further research is necessary to understand the epidemiology and etiology of these nutrition states. Of great importance is the development and implementation of effective interventions to optimize nutritional status among children with cancer during and after therapy.

  7. Complementary and alternative medicine use in pediatric oncology patients in eastern Turkey.

    PubMed

    Gözüm, Sebahat; Arikan, Duygu; Büyükavci, Mustafa

    2007-01-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) among children with cancer is becoming increasingly popular. Therefore, it is important to gain insight into the prevalence and factors related to the use of CAM. This study presents findings from a study of parents of 88 children with cancer who were receiving or had received conventional therapy for treatment of childhood cancer at a pediatric oncology unit in eastern Turkey. The findings indicated that 48.9% of the respondents reported the use of 1 or more CAM therapies. The most commonly used modality was herbal products such as herbal tea and herbal meal, mostly stinging nettle (Urtica dioica). The findings of this study indicate that CAM users were children who were an average of 3 years older than nonuser children and that CAM use was more prevalent among the children who had been diagnosed with cancer for a longer time than nonusers. There were no significant difference between users and nonusers regarding sociodemographic characteristics (such as age education level, economic status), hopelessness score of parents, gender of child, and treatment status. Healthcare providers should remain informed about the benefits and adverse effects of complementary and alternative therapies to discuss treatment options with patients and their families and to monitor treatment efficacy.

  8. Analysis of non-clonal chromosome abnormalities observed in hematologic malignancies among Southwest Oncology Group patients

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, T.S.; Dobin, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    From 1987-1994, the Southwest Oncology Group Cytogenetics Committee reviewed 1571 studies in 590 adult patient cases with ALL, AML, CML or CLL. These were analyzed for the presence of clinically important non-clonal abnormalities (NCA). Abnormalities were defined as non-clonal if one metaphase had a structural abnormality or an extra chromosome. Chromosome loss was not analyzed due to the possibility of random loss. In 72 cases (12%) comprising 136 studies, at least one NCA was observed. In 21 of these cases (29%), NCAs consisted of obvious clonal evolution or instability, and thus were not included in the analysis. At least one structural NCA was observed in which the abnormality differed from the mainline in 36 (50%) patients. Seventeen of the 36 cases had a normal mode. Nineteen of the 36 patients had an abnormal or normal/abnormal mode. At least one numerical NCA was found in 15 cases (21%). Fifteen cases (21%) contained at least one marker chromosome. Several cases involved NCA in more than one of the above divisions. NCAs could be classified into several categories: (1){open_quotes}the clone to come{close_quotes}, (2) evolving clones which then disappeared, (3) NCAs with putative clinical importance that never became clonal, (4) NCAs during remission identical to the preceding clonal abnormality, (5) NCAs which indicated clonal evolution or instability. Examples include one metaphase with t(9;22) or del(20q) or inv(16) or +8 which either preceded or followed clonal findings of the same aberration. Such findings should be communicated to the clinician.

  9. 3D surgical planning in patients affected by lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Carrasco, J A; Acha, B; Gómez-Cia, T; Lopez-Garcia, R A; Delgado, Carlos; Serrano, C

    2015-03-01

    Lipodystrophy is a pathological condition characterized by the focal or general absence of adipose tissue. Surgeons reset the patient's surface contours using injectable materials to recreate a normal physical appearance. However, due to difficulties in preoperative planning and intraoperative assessment, about 15% of the surgical procedures involved are reinterventions to improve volume or symmetry. This increases the need for an available, efficient tool capable of providing the surgeon with a good estimation of the volumes to be injected before the intervention proper begins. This work describes a virtual reality-based application for the surgical planning of facial lipodystrophy correction (FLIC). The tool uses points selected interactively by the surgeon to compute a curve that delimits the surface area to be operated on. It then automatically computes an estimated natural reconstructed surface and the quantity of volume that needs to be implanted during the intervention. Experiments have been carried out in which the filling volumes estimated using FLIC and ZBrush software were compared with the real volumes injected by the surgeon. ICCs higher than 0.97 indicate that there were no significant differences between the respective measurements, thus validating the tool proposed in this paper.

  10. Futility and the care of surgical patients: ethical dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Grant, Scott B; Modi, Parth K; Singer, Eric A

    2014-07-01

    Futility has been a contentious topic in medicine for several decades. Surgery in critical or end-of-life situations often raises difficult questions about futility. In this article, we discuss the definition of futility, methods for resolving futility disputes, and some ways to reframe the futility debate to a more fruitful discussion about the goals of care, better communication between surgeon and patient/surrogate, and palliative surgical care. Many definitions of futile therapy have been discussed. The most controversial of these is "qualitative futility" which describes a situation in which the treatment provided is likely to result in an unacceptable quality of life. This is an area of continued controversy because it has been impossible to identify universally held beliefs about acceptable quality of life. Many authors have described methods for resolving futility disputes, including community standards and legalistic multi-step due process protocols. Others, however, have abandoned the concept of futility altogether as an unhelpful term. Reframing the issue of futility as one of inadequate physician-patient communication, these authors have advocated for methods of improving communication and strengthening the patient-physician relationship. Finally, we discuss the utilization of consultants who may be of use in resolving futility disputes: ethics committees, palliative care specialists, pastoral care teams, and dedicated patient advocates. Involving these specialists in a futility conflict can help improve communication and provide invaluable assistance in arriving at the appropriate treatment decision.

  11. [Prophylaxis of complications after radical surgical intervention for mammary gland cancer in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Hrybach, S M; Borodaĭ, N V

    2014-10-01

    Surgical treatment of 80 patients, suffering mammary gland cancer (MGC), was conducted. The complications rate in elderly and young patients after radical surgical treatment was analyzed. There was established, that while preparation Traumastem P application in elderly patients, suffering MGC, the lymphorrhea volume and duration are reducing, what prevents complications in postoperative period.

  12. Patient perspectives: Kundalini yoga meditation techniques for psycho-oncology and as potential therapies for cancer.

    PubMed

    Shannahoff-Khalsa, David S

    2005-03-01

    The ancient system of Kundalini Yoga (KY) includes a vast array of meditation techniques. Some were discovered to be specific for treating psychiatric disorders and others are supposedly beneficial for treating cancers. To date, 2 clinical trials have been conducted for treating obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The first was an open uncontrolled trial and the second a single-blinded randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing a KY protocol against the Relaxation Response and Mindfulness Meditation (RRMM) techniques combined. Both trials showed efficacy on all psychological scales using the KY protocol; however, the RCT showed no efficacy on any scale with the RRMM control group. The KY protocol employed an OCD-specific meditation technique combined with other techniques that are individually specific for anxiety, low energy, fear, anger, meeting mental challenges, and turning negative thoughts into positive thoughts. In addition to OCD symptoms, other symptoms, including anxiety and depression, were also significantly reduced. Elements of the KY protocol other than the OCD-specific technique also may have applications for psycho-oncology patients and are described here. Two depression-specific KY techniques are described that also help combat mental fatigue and low energy. A 7-part protocol is described that would be used in KY practice to affect the full spectrum of emotions and distress that complicate a cancer diagnosis. In addition, there are KY techniques that practitioners have used in treating cancer. These techniques have not yet been subjected to formal clinical trials but are described here as potential adjunctive therapies. A case history demonstrating rapid onset of acute relief of intense fear in a terminal breast cancer patient using a KY technique specific for fear is presented. A second case history is reported for a surviving male diagnosed in 1988 with terminal prostate cancer who has used KY therapy long term as part of a self

  13. Complementary and alternative medicine use by gynecologic oncology patients in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Nazik, Evşen; Nazik, Hakan; Api, Murat; Kale, Ahmet; Aksu, Meltem

    2012-01-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) among women with gynecologic cancer is becoming increasingly popular. Therefore, it is important to gain insight into the prevalence and factors related to the use of CAM. The aim of this study was to assess the use of CAM in women with gynecologic cancer. This is a descriptive cross-sectional study. Data were obtained from 67 gynecological cancer patients at gynecologic oncology clinic of a hospital in Turkey between October 2009 to December 2010 using a questionnaire developed specifically for this study. The instrument included questions on socio-demographic information, disease specifics and complementary and alternative medicine usage. On the basis of women's responses, all participants were divided into 2 groups: CAM users and nonusers. The findings indicated that 61.2% of the women reported the use of 1 or more CAM therapies. There were no significant differences in the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics between CAM users and nonusers (P <0.05). The most frequently used CAM method was herbal therapy (90.2%) and the second was prayer (41.5%). The main sources of information about CAM were informal (friends/ family members). A considerable proportion (56.1%) of CAM users had discussed their CAM use with their physicians or nurses. Turkish women with gynecologic cancer frequently use CAM in addition to standard medical therapy. Nurses/ oncologists caring for women with gynecologic cancer should initiate a dialogue about usage of CAM, discussing the potential adverse effects of CAM and the patient's therapeutic goals.

  14. Building Bridges From Hospital to Home: Understanding the Transition Experience for the Newly Diagnosed Pediatric Oncology Patient.

    PubMed

    Branowicki, Patricia A; Vessey, Judith A; Temple, Kendal L Jackson; Lulloff, Amanda J

    2016-09-01

    Caregivers of pediatric oncology patients are expected to understand and adhere to a complex medical plan of care while at home; yet little is known about how to assess and evaluate the caregivers' abilities to adequately meet these demands. The purpose of this study was to describe the issues and daily challenges faced by caregivers as they transition from hospital to home after their child's cancer diagnosis. Patients and caregivers received a home visit by an expert pediatric oncology nurse within 72 hours postdischarge after initial diagnosis. The nursing narrative notes from these visits were analyzed using content analysis. Four explanatory themes emerged: (1) "We're doing okay," (2) "This isn't going so well," (3) "I could use a little help with this," and (4) "An RN in the house makes you feel safe and know what is correct." These analyses revealed many caregivers achieved mastery of caring for the child at home; however, an overwhelming majority of caregivers expressed questions or concerns to the nurse during the home visit, even those achieving mastery of care. A home visit by an expert pediatric oncology nurse assisted the caregiver in transitioning to caring for the child at home. Such programs should be considered when planning transition programs from hospital to home. PMID:26668212

  15. Using baldrige performance excellence program approaches in the pursuit of radiation oncology quality care, patient satisfaction, and workforce commitment.

    PubMed

    Sternick, Edward S

    2011-01-01

    The Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Improvement Act was signed into law in 1987 to advance US business competitiveness and economic growth. Administered by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Act created the Baldrige National Quality Program, recently renamed the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program. The comprehensive analytical approaches referred to as the Baldrige Healthcare Criteria, are very well-suited for the evaluation and sustainable improvement of radiation oncology management and operations. A multidisciplinary self-assessment approach is used for radiotherapy program evaluation and development in order to generate a fact-based, knowledge-driven system for improving quality of care, increasing patient satisfaction, enhancing leadership effectiveness, building employee engagement, and boosting organizational innovation. This methodology also provides a valuable framework for benchmarking an individual radiation oncology practice's operations and results against guidelines defined by accreditation and professional organizations and regulatory agencies. PMID:22655229

  16. Identifying oncological emergencies.

    PubMed

    Guddati, Achuta K; Kumar, Nilay; Segon, Ankur; Joy, Parijat S; Marak, Creticus P; Kumar, Gagan

    2013-01-01

    Prompt identification and treatment of life-threatening oncological conditions is of utmost importance and should always be included in the differential diagnosis. Oncological emergencies can have a myriad of presentations ranging from mechanical obstruction due to tumor growth to metabolic conditions due to abnormal secretions from the tumor. Notably, hematologic and infectious conditions may complicate the presentation of oncological emergencies. Advanced testing and imaging is generally required to recognize these serious presentations of common malignancies. Early diagnosis and treatment of these conditions can significantly affect the patient's clinical outcome. PMID:23873016

  17. Bringing Central Line–Associated Bloodstream Infection Prevention Home: Catheter Maintenance Practices and Beliefs of Pediatric Oncology Patients and Families

    PubMed Central

    Rinke, Michael L.; Chen, Allen R.; Milstone, Aaron M.; Hebert, Lindsay C.; Bundy, David G.; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Fratino, Lisa; Herpst, Cynthia; Kokoszka, Michelle; Miller, Marlene R.

    2015-01-01

    Background A study was conducted to investigate (1) the extent to which best-practice central line maintenance practices were employed in the homes of pediatric oncology patients and by whom, (2) caregiver beliefs about central line care and central line–associated blood stream infection (CLABSI) risk, (3) barriers to optimal central line care by families, and (4) educational experiences and preferences regarding central line care. Methods Researchers administered a survey to patients and families in a tertiary care pediatric oncology clinic that engaged in rigorous ambulatory and inpatient CLABSI prevention efforts. Results Of 110 invited patients and caregivers, 105 participated (95% response rate) in the survey (March–May 2012). Of the 50 respondents reporting that they or another caregiver change central line dressings, 48% changed a dressing whenever it was soiled as per protocol (many who did not change dressings per protocol also never personally changed dressings); 67% reported the oncology clinic primarily cares for their child’s central line, while 29% reported that an adult caregiver or the patient primarily cares for the central line. Eight patients performed their own line care “always” or “most of the time.” Some 13% of respondents believed that it was “slightly likely” or “not at all likely” that their child will get an infection if caregivers do not perform line care practices perfectly every time. Dressing change practices were the most difficult to comply with at home. Some 18% of respondents wished they learned more about line care, and 12% received contradictory training. Respondents cited a variety of preferences regarding line care teaching, although the majority looked to clinic nurses for modeling line care. Conclusions Interventions aimed at reducing ambulatory CLABSIs should target appropriate educational experiences for adult caregivers and patients and identify ways to improve compliance with best-practice care

  18. 3-D Storybook: Effects on Surgical Knowledge and Anxiety Among Four- to Six-Year-Old Surgical Patients.

    PubMed

    Macindo, John Rey B; Macabuag, Katherine R; Macadangdang, Carlo Miguel P; Macaranas, Margaux Valerie S; Macarilay, Marianne Jezelle Jem T; Madriñan, Natasha Nikki M; Villarama, Rouena S

    2015-07-01

    Inadequate surgical knowledge potentiates anxiety; however, no methodology simultaneously addresses anxiety and surgical knowledge. Our quasi-experimental study determined the effectiveness of a three-dimensional (3-D) storybook in increasing surgical knowledge and decreasing anxiety among young children scheduled for planned or required major surgeries. We studied 20 randomly assigned participants who received either the 3-D storybook or traditional health teaching. A presurgical knowledge questionnaire and modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale assessed surgical knowledge and anxiety. Data were analyzed with one-way and repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance. Results showed that both groups had higher knowledge scores (F = 8.94; P = .008) and lower anxiety scores (F = 5.13; P = .036) after the intervention. The children who received information from the 3-D storybook exhibited a significantly higher posttest knowledge score (F = 11.71; P = .003) and lower anxiety score (F = 10.05; P = .005) than the traditionally educated group of children. The 3-D storybook effectively increased surgical knowledge and decreased anxiety and could be used as an alternative method to prepare pediatric surgical patients.

  19. Impact of proton beam availability on patient treatment schedule in radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Miller, Eric D; Derenchuk, Vladimir; Das, Indra J; Johnstone, Peter A S

    2012-11-08

    Proton beam therapy offers unique physical properties with potential for reduced toxicity and better patient care. There is an increased interest in radiation oncology centers to acquire proton therapy capabilities. The operation of a proton treatment center is quite different than a photon-based clinic because of the more complex technology involved, as well as the single proton beam source serving multiple treatment rooms with no backup source available. There is limited published data which investigates metrics that can be used to determine the performance of a proton facility. The purpose of this study is to evaluate performance metrics of Indiana University Cyclotron Operations (IUCO), including availability, mean time between failures, and mean time to repair, and to determine how changes in these metrics impact patient treatments. We utilized a computerized maintenance management system to log all downtime occurrences and servicing operations for the facility. These data were then used to calculate the availability as well as the mean time between failures and mean time to repair. Impact on patient treatments was determined by analyzing delayed and missed treatments, which were recorded in an electronic medical record and database maintained by the therapists. The availability of the IUCO proton beam has been increasing since beginning of operation in 2003 and averaged 96.9% for 2009 through 2011. The mean time between failures and mean time to repair were also determined and correlated with improvements in the maintenance and operating procedures of the facility, as well as environmental factors. It was found that events less than 15 minutes in duration have minimal impact on treatment delays, while events lasting longer than one hour may result in missed treatments. The availability of the proton beam was more closely correlated with delayed than with missed treatments, demonstrating the utility and limitations of the availability metric. In conclusion, we

  20. Reversible Valproate Induced Pisa Syndrome and Parkinsonism in a Neuro-Oncology Patient with Depression and Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Botturi, Andrea; Silvani, Antonio; Pravettoni, Gabriella; Paoli, Riccardo Augusto; Lucchiari, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Neurological and psychiatric conditions frequently overlap in neuro-oncology. This overlapping negatively affects patients’ quality of life and decreases the ability of providers to manage specific symptoms by therapy modulation, especially when psychopharmacotherapy needs to be prescribed. We describe here a patient with recurrent brain tumor, symptomatic epilepsy and depression who developed Pisa syndrome and parkinsonism after several months of valproic acid use. An accurate recognition of symptoms and treatment side effect allowed an appropriate clinical approach so as to rapidly improve both movement disorder and depression without increasing the risk of developing seizure. This has improved the autonomy and quality of life in a patient with poor prognosis. PMID:27462241

  1. U.S. survey of surgical capabilities and experience with surgical procedures in patients with congenital haemophilia with inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, A; Cooper, D L

    2012-05-01

    General guidelines exist for the use of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) to maintain haemostasis during surgery in congenital haemophilia A and B patients with high responding inhibitors (CHwI). Individual surgical plans are required and based upon historical therapy response, adverse events and anticipated procedure. Surgical interventions are feasible, yet it remains unclear how many US hemophilia treatment centres (HTCs) perform procedures in this fragile population. To better understand the US HTC surgical experience in CHwI patients and the number/types of procedures performed, a 21-question survey was sent to 133 US HTCs, with follow-up for response clarification and to non-responders. 98/133 HTCs (74%) responded, with 87 currently treating CHwI patients. In the last decade, 76/85 HTCs performed 994 surgeries on CHwI patients. Sites were experienced in the following procedures: central line insertion/removal (73 HTCs), dental (58), orthopaedic (52), abdominal (23), cardiovascular (14) and otolaryngologic (11). Experience with orthopaedic surgeries included synovectomies - arthroscopic (23 HTCs), radioisotopic (22), and open (7); joint replacement (18); fracture repair (14); and arthrodesis (8). Treatment modalities included rFVIIa bolus (83 HTCs) or continuous infusions (9), plasma-derived activated prothrombin complex concentrate (pd-aPCC) (55), antifibrinolytics (51), topical haemostatic agents (29), factor VIII (16) and fibrin sealants (14). Protocols for bypassing agents were used by 31/92 (33%) HTCs. Most US HTCs surveyed care for CHwI patients (74%) and have experience in minor surgery; fewer HTCs reported complex orthopaedic surgical experience. Identification of best practices and surgical barriers is required to guide future initiatives to support these patients.

  2. Differences in demographic, clinical, and symptom characteristics and quality of life outcomes among oncology patients with different types of pain.

    PubMed

    Posternak, Victoria; Dunn, Laura B; Dhruva, Anand; Paul, Steven M; Luce, Judith; Mastick, Judy; Levine, Jon D; Aouizerat, Bradley E; Hammer, Marylin; Wright, Fay; Miaskowski, Christine

    2016-04-01

    The purposes of this study, in oncology outpatients receiving chemotherapy (n = 926), were to: describe the occurrence of different types of pain (ie, no pain, only noncancer pain [NCP], only cancer pain [CP], or both CP and NCP) and evaluate for differences in demographic, clinical, and symptom characteristics, and quality of life (QOL) among the 4 groups. Patients completed self-report questionnaires on demographic and symptom characteristics and QOL. Patients who had pain were asked to indicate if it was or was not related to their cancer or its treatment. Medical records were reviewed for information on cancer and its treatments. In this study, 72.5% of the patients reported pain. Of the 671 who reported pain, 21.5% reported only NCP, 37.0% only CP, and 41.5% both CP and NCP. Across the 3 pain groups, worst pain scores were in the moderate to severe range. Compared with the no pain group, patients with both CP and NCP were significantly younger, more likely to be female, have a higher level of comorbidity, and a poorer functional status. In addition, these patients reported: higher levels of depression, anxiety, fatigue, and sleep disturbance; lower levels of energy and attentional function; and poorer QOL. Patients with only NCP were significantly older than the other 3 groups. The most common comorbidities in the NCP group were back pain, hypertension, osteoarthritis, and depression. Unrelieved CP and NCP continue to be significant problems. Oncology outpatients need to be assessed for both CP and NCP conditions.

  3. Surgical innovation-enhanced quality and the processes that assure patient/provider safety: A surgical conundrum.

    PubMed

    Bruny, Jennifer; Ziegler, Moritz

    2015-12-01

    Innovation is a crucial part of surgical history that has led to enhancements in the quality of surgical care. This comprises both changes which are incremental and those which are frankly disruptive in nature. There are situations where innovation is absolutely required in order to achieve quality improvement or process improvement. Alternatively, there are innovations that do not necessarily arise from some need, but simply are a new idea that might be better. All change must assure a significant commitment to patient safety and beneficence. Innovation would ideally enhance patient care quality and disease outcomes, as well stimulate and facilitate further innovation. The tensions between innovative advancement and patient safety, risk and reward, and demonstrated effectiveness versus speculative added value have created a contemporary "surgical conundrum" that must be resolved by a delicate balance assuring optimal patient/provider outcomes. This article will explore this delicate balance and the rules that govern it. Recommendations are made to facilitate surgical innovation through clinical research. In addition, we propose options that investigators and institutions may use to address competing priorities.

  4. Surgical Approaches to the Oral Cavity Primary and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Jatin P.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: A variety of surgical approaches used to treat primary oral cavity tumors are described to delineate the technique and rationale behind each treatment choice. Methods and Materials: Size, location, proximity to bone, lymph node status, histology, and prior treatment considerations are employed to determine the most appropriate surgical approach for primary oral cavity tumors. Results: Oncologic outcomes and physical function show the best results from surgical treatment of many primary oral cavity, but necessitates careful selection of surgical approach. Conclusion: Each surgical approach must be selected based upon relevant tumor, patient and physician factors.

  5. INvolvement of breast CAncer patients during oncological consultations: a multicentre randomised controlled trial—the INCA study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Goss, Claudia; Ghilardi, Alberto; Deledda, Giuseppe; Buizza, Chiara; Bottacini, Alessandro; Del Piccolo, Lidia; Rimondini, Michela; Chiodera, Federica; Mazzi, Maria Angela; Ballarin, Mario; Bighelli, Irene; Strepparava, Maria Grazia; Molino, Annamaria; Fiorio, Elena; Nortilli, Rolando; Caliolo, Chiara; Zuliani, Serena; Auriemma, Alessandra; Maspero, Federica; Simoncini, Edda Lucia; Ragni, Fulvio; Brown, Richard; Zimmermann, Christa

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Studies on patient involvement show that physicians make few attempts to involve their patients who ask few questions if not facilitated. On the other hand, the patients who participate in the decision-making process show greater treatment adherence and have better health outcomes. Different methods to encourage the active participation during oncological consultation have been described; however, similar studies in Italy are lacking. The aims of the present study are to (1) assess the effects of a preconsultation intervention to increase the involvement of breast cancer patients during the consultation, and (2) explore the role of the attending companions in the information exchange during consultation. Methods and analysis All female patients with breast cancer who attend the Oncology Out-patient Services for the first time will provide an informed consent to participate in the study. They are randomly assigned to the intervention or to the control group. The intervention consists of the presentation of a list of relevant illness-related questions, called a question prompt sheet. The primary outcome measure of the efficacy of the intervention is the number of questions asked by patients during the consultation. Secondary outcomes are the involvement of the patient by the oncologist; the patient's perceived achievement of her information needs; the patient's satisfaction and ability to cope; the quality of the doctor–patient relationship in terms of patient-centeredness; and the number of questions asked by the patient's companions and their involvement during the consultation. All outcome measures are supposed to significantly increase in the intervention group. Ethics and dissemination The study was approved by the local Ethics Committee of the Hospital Trust of Verona. Study findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01510964 PMID:23645911

  6. Vision 20/20: Molecular-guided surgical oncology based upon tumor metabolism or immunologic phenotype: Technological pathways for point of care imaging and intervention

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Keith D.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Elliott, Jonathan T.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Strong, Theresa V.; Draney, Daniel R.; Feldwisch, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Surgical guidance with fluorescence has been demonstrated in individual clinical trials for decades, but the scientific and commercial conditions exist today for a dramatic increase in clinical value. In the past decade, increased use of indocyanine green based visualization of vascular flow, biliary function, and tissue perfusion has spawned a robust growth in commercial systems that have near-infrared emission imaging and video display capabilities. This recent history combined with major preclinical innovations in fluorescent-labeled molecular probes, has the potential for a shift in surgical practice toward resection guidance based upon molecular information in addition to conventional visual and palpable cues. Most surgical subspecialties already have treatment management decisions partially based upon the immunohistochemical phenotype of the cancer, as assessed from molecular pathology of the biopsy tissue. This phenotyping can inform the surgical resection process by spatial mapping of these features. Further integration of the diagnostic and therapeutic value of tumor metabolism sensing molecules or immune binding agents directly into the surgical process can help this field mature. Maximal value to the patient would come from identifying the spatial patterns of molecular expression in vivo that are well known to exist. However, as each molecular agent is advanced into trials, the performance of the imaging system can have a critical impact on the success. For example, use of pre-existing commercial imaging systems are not well suited to image receptor targeted fluorophores because of the lower concentrations expected, requiring orders of magnitude more sensitivity. Additionally the imaging system needs the appropriate dynamic range and image processing features to view molecular probes or therapeutics that may have nonspecific uptake or pharmacokinetic issues which lead to limitations in contrast. Imaging systems need to be chosen based upon objective

  7. Vision 20/20: Molecular-guided surgical oncology based upon tumor metabolism or immunologic phenotype: Technological pathways for point of care imaging and intervention.

    PubMed

    Pogue, Brian W; Paulsen, Keith D; Samkoe, Kimberley S; Elliott, Jonathan T; Hasan, Tayyaba; Strong, Theresa V; Draney, Daniel R; Feldwisch, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    Surgical guidance with fluorescence has been demonstrated in individual clinical trials for decades, but the scientific and commercial conditions exist today for a dramatic increase in clinical value. In the past decade, increased use of indocyanine green based visualization of vascular flow, biliary function, and tissue perfusion has spawned a robust growth in commercial systems that have near-infrared emission imaging and video display capabilities. This recent history combined with major preclinical innovations in fluorescent-labeled molecular probes, has the potential for a shift in surgical practice toward resection guidance based upon molecular information in addition to conventional visual and palpable cues. Most surgical subspecialties already have treatment management decisions partially based upon the immunohistochemical phenotype of the cancer, as assessed from molecular pathology of the biopsy tissue. This phenotyping can inform the surgical resection process by spatial mapping of these features. Further integration of the diagnostic and therapeutic value of tumor metabolism sensing molecules or immune binding agents directly into the surgical process can help this field mature. Maximal value to the patient would come from identifying the spatial patterns of molecular expression in vivo that are well known to exist. However, as each molecular agent is advanced into trials, the performance of the imaging system can have a critical impact on the success. For example, use of pre-existing commercial imaging systems are not well suited to image receptor targeted fluorophores because of the lower concentrations expected, requiring orders of magnitude more sensitivity. Additionally the imaging system needs the appropriate dynamic range and image processing features to view molecular probes or therapeutics that may have nonspecific uptake or pharmacokinetic issues which lead to limitations in contrast. Imaging systems need to be chosen based upon objective

  8. Vision 20/20: Molecular-guided surgical oncology based upon tumor metabolism or immunologic phenotype: Technological pathways for point of care imaging and intervention.

    PubMed

    Pogue, Brian W; Paulsen, Keith D; Samkoe, Kimberley S; Elliott, Jonathan T; Hasan, Tayyaba; Strong, Theresa V; Draney, Daniel R; Feldwisch, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    Surgical guidance with fluorescence has been demonstrated in individual clinical trials for decades, but the scientific and commercial conditions exist today for a dramatic increase in clinical value. In the past decade, increased use of indocyanine green based visualization of vascular flow, biliary function, and tissue perfusion has spawned a robust growth in commercial systems that have near-infrared emission imaging and video display capabilities. This recent history combined with major preclinical innovations in fluorescent-labeled molecular probes, has the potential for a shift in surgical practice toward resection guidance based upon molecular information in addition to conventional visual and palpable cues. Most surgical subspecialties already have treatment management decisions partially based upon the immunohistochemical phenotype of the cancer, as assessed from molecular pathology of the biopsy tissue. This phenotyping can inform the surgical resection process by spatial mapping of these features. Further integration of the diagnostic and therapeutic value of tumor metabolism sensing molecules or immune binding agents directly into the surgical process can help this field mature. Maximal value to the patient would come from identifying the spatial patterns of molecular expression in vivo that are well known to exist. However, as each molecular agent is advanced into trials, the performance of the imaging system can have a critical impact on the success. For example, use of pre-existing commercial imaging systems are not well suited to image receptor targeted fluorophores because of the lower concentrations expected, requiring orders of magnitude more sensitivity. Additionally the imaging system needs the appropriate dynamic range and image processing features to view molecular probes or therapeutics that may have nonspecific uptake or pharmacokinetic issues which lead to limitations in contrast. Imaging systems need to be chosen based upon objective

  9. Surgical complications associated with primary closure in patients with diabetic foot osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    García-Morales, Esther; Lázaro-Martínez, José Luis; Aragón-Sánchez, Javier; Cecilia-Matilla, Almudena; García-Álvarez, Yolanda; Beneit-Montesinos, Juan Vicente

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of complications associated with primary closure in surgical procedures performed for diabetic foot osteomyelitis compared to those healed by secondary intention. In addition, further evaluation of the surgical digital debridement for osteomyelitis with primary closure as an alternative to patients with digital amputation was also examined in our study. Methods Comparative study that included 46 patients with diabetic foot ulcerations. Surgical debridement of the infected bone was performed on all patients. Depending on the surgical technique used, primary surgical closure was performed on 34 patients (73.9%, Group 1) while the rest of the 12 patients were allowed to heal by secondary intention (26.1%, Group 2). During surgical intervention, bone samples were collected for both microbiological and histopathological analyses. Post-surgical complications were recorded in both groups during the recovery period. Results The average healing time was 9.9±SD 8.4 weeks in Group 1 and 19.1±SD 16.9 weeks in Group 2 (p=0.008). The percentage of complications was 61.8% in Group 1 and 58.3% in Group 2 (p=0.834). In all patients with digital ulcerations that were necessary for an amputation, a primary surgical closure was performed with successful outcomes. Discussion Primary surgical closure was not associated with a greater number of complications. Patients who received primary surgical closure had faster healing rates and experienced a lower percentage of exudation (p=0.05), edema (p<0.001) and reinfection, factors that determine the delay in wound healing and affect the prognosis of the surgical outcome. Further research with a greater number of patients is required to better define the cases for which primary surgical closure may be indicated at different levels of the diabetic foot. PMID:23050062

  10. SU-F-18C-06: Prospective Patient Evaluation of Iterative Reconstruction in Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R; Vance, S; Cattaneo, R; Schultz, L; Elshaikh, M; Chetty, I; Glide-Hurst, C

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This work incorporates iterative reconstruction (IR) into a dose reduction study to characterize image quality metrics, delineation, and dosimetric assessment, with the goal of reducing imaging dose in Radiation Oncology. Methods: Three-dimensional noise power spectrum (NPS) analysis characterized noise magnitude/texture (120 kVp, 50–200 mAs, IR levels 1–6 yielding noise reduction of 0.89–0.55 compared to filtered backprojection (FBP)). Task-specific Modulation Transfer Functions (MTFtask) were characterized across varied subject contrasts. A prospective dose reduction study (500 to 150 mAs) was conducted for 12 patients (43 inter-fraction CTs) for high-dose rate brachytherapy. Three physicians performed qualitative image assessment between full-dose FBP (FD-FBP, 500 mAs), low-dose FBP (LD-FBP, 150–250 mAs), and low-dose IRL5-6 (LD-IR) scans for image noise, cuff/bladder interface detectability, spatial resolution, texture, and segmentation confidence. Comparisons between LD-FBP and LD-IR were conducted for the following metrics: delineation (bladder and rectum evaluated via overlap indices (OI) and Dice similarity coefficients (DSC)), noise, boundary changes, dose calculation, and digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs). Results: NPS showed ∼50% reduction in noise magnitude and ∼0.1 1/mm spatial frequency shift with IRL6. The largest MTFtask decrease between FBP and IR was 0.08 A.U. Qualitative patient image evaluation revealed LD-IR was equivalent or slightly worse than FD-FBP, and superior to LD-FBP for all metrics except low contrast interface and texture. The largest CT number discrepancy from FBP occurred at a bone/tissue interface using IRL6 (−1.2 ± 4.9 HU (range: −17.6 – 12.5 HU)). No significant contour differences (OIs and DSCs = 0.85 – 0.95) and dose calculation discrepancy (<0.02%) were observed. DRRs preserved anatomical detail and demonstrated <2% difference in intensity between LD-FBP and LD-IRL6. Conclusion: While

  11. [Surgical intervention in severe acute pancreatitis--retrospective study of 79 patients of the RWTH Aachen Surgical Clinic].

    PubMed

    Lohmann, A; Kasperk, R; Schumpelick, V

    1998-01-01

    This is a report on the surgical intervention in 79 patients with acute pancreatitis, who were operated in the Department of Surgery of the University Clinic RWTH Aachen in the period from 1986 to 1993. The main objective was the stratification of pancreatitis according to the Ranson-Score, the analysis of the surgical treatment and the timing of operation depending on the clinical condition. The average Ranson-score was 3.3 (median 3). 56 patients had necroses, which were removed because of the deteriorating clinical condition. In these cases the average Ranson-score was 4.2 (median 4). Seven patients (8.9% of the total number and 12.5% of the patients with necroses of the pancreas) died. This small number is the result of a severity-adapted management in a modern intensive care-unit and the good cooperation with the Department of Internal Medicine.

  12. Factors Affecting Communication Patterns between Oncology Staff and Family Members of Deceased Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Granot, Tal; Gordon, Noa; Perry, Shlomit; Rizel, Shulamith; Stemmer, Salomon M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Perceptions of the role of oncology medical staff in supporting bereaved families have evolved with the transition to interdisciplinary cancer care. We investigated the interactions between oncology professionals and bereaved families. Methods This cross-sectional study involved all oncology medical staff at the Davidoff Center. Participants were given a questionnaire relating to bereavement follow-up. Responses were measured using a 5-point Likert scale. Results Of 155 staff members, 107 filled questionnaires with <20% missing data and were included in the analysis (α = 0.799; corrected, α = 0.821). Respondents included physicians (35%), nurses (46%), social workers (7%), psychologists (4%), or unspecified (8%); 85% were Jewish, and 60% had ≥10 years of oncology experience. Most respondents thought that contacting bereaved families was important (73%), and that it provided closure for staff (79%); 41% indicated that they contacted >50% of the families of their deceased patients. Contacting bereaved families was considered the responsibility of the physicians (90%), nurses (84%), or social workers (89%). The main barriers to contacting bereaved families were emotional overload (68%) and lack of time (63%); 60% indicated a need for additional communication tools for bereavement follow-up. In a multivariate analysis, profession (physician vs. nurse), primary workplace (outpatient setting vs. other), and self-defined religion were significant variables with respect to the perceived importance of contacting bereaved families and to actually contacting them. Other factors (e.g., age, gender) were non-significant. Conclusions Perspectives regarding bereavement actions differ significantly across medical professions, work settings, and self-defined religions. Additional guidance and education regarding bereavement actions is warranted. PMID:27683075

  13. Predictive Score Card in Lumbar Disc Herniation: Is It Reflective of Patient Surgical Success after Discectomy?

    PubMed

    Azimi, Parisa; Benzel, Edward C; Montazeri, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Does the Finneson-Cooper score reflect the true value of predicting surgical success before discectomy? The aim of this study was to identify reliable predictors for surgical success two year after surgery for patients with LDH. Prospective analysis of 154 patients with LDH who underwent single-level lumbar discectomy was performed. Pre- and post-surgical success was assessed by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) over a 2-year period. The Finneson-Cooper score also was used for evaluation of the clinical results. Using the ODI, surgical success was defined as a 30% (or more) improvement on the ODI score from the baseline. The ODI was considered the gold standard in this study. Finally, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive power of the Finneson-Cooper score in predicting surgical success were calculated. The mean age of the patients was 49.6 (SD = 9.3) years and 47.4% were male. Significant improvement from the pre- to post-operative ODI scores was observed (P < 0.001). Post-surgical success was 76.0% (n = 117). The patients' rating on surgical success assessments by the ODI discriminated well between sub-groups of patients who differed with respect to the Finneson-Cooper score. Regarding patients' surgical success, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the Finneson-Cooper ratings correlated with success rate. The findings indicated that the Finneson-Cooper score was reflective of surgical success before discectomy.

  14. Predictive Score Card in Lumbar Disc Herniation: Is It Reflective of Patient Surgical Success after Discectomy?

    PubMed

    Azimi, Parisa; Benzel, Edward C; Montazeri, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Does the Finneson-Cooper score reflect the true value of predicting surgical success before discectomy? The aim of this study was to identify reliable predictors for surgical success two year after surgery for patients with LDH. Prospective analysis of 154 patients with LDH who underwent single-level lumbar discectomy was performed. Pre- and post-surgical success was assessed by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) over a 2-year period. The Finneson-Cooper score also was used for evaluation of the clinical results. Using the ODI, surgical success was defined as a 30% (or more) improvement on the ODI score from the baseline. The ODI was considered the gold standard in this study. Finally, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive power of the Finneson-Cooper score in predicting surgical success were calculated. The mean age of the patients was 49.6 (SD = 9.3) years and 47.4% were male. Significant improvement from the pre- to post-operative ODI scores was observed (P < 0.001). Post-surgical success was 76.0% (n = 117). The patients' rating on surgical success assessments by the ODI discriminated well between sub-groups of patients who differed with respect to the Finneson-Cooper score. Regarding patients' surgical success, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the Finneson-Cooper ratings correlated with success rate. The findings indicated that the Finneson-Cooper score was reflective of surgical success before discectomy. PMID:27100287

  15. Internet-Based Survey Evaluating Use of Pain Medications and Attitudes of Radiation Oncology Patients Toward Pain Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Simone, Charles B. Vapiwala, Neha; Hampshire, Margaret K.; Metz, James M.

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: Pain is a common symptom among cancer patients, yet many patients do not receive adequate pain management. Few data exist quantifying analgesic use by radiation oncology patients. This study evaluated the causes of pain in cancer patients and investigated the reasons patients fail to receive optimal analgesic therapy. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved, Internet-based questionnaire assessing analgesic use and pain control was posted on the OncoLink (available at (www.oncolink.org)) Website. Between November 2005 and April 2006, 243 patients responded. They were predominantly women (73%), white (71%), and educated beyond high school (67%) and had breast (38%), lung (6%), or ovarian (6%) cancer. This analysis evaluated the 106 patients (44%) who underwent radiotherapy. Results: Of the 106 patients, 58% reported pain from their cancer treatment, and 46% reported pain directly from their cancer. The pain was chronic in 51% and intermittent in 33%. Most (80%) did not use medication to manage their pain. Analgesic use was significantly less in patients with greater education levels (11% vs. 36%, p = 0.002), with a trend toward lower use by whites (16% vs. 32%, p 0.082) and women (17% vs. 29%, p = 0.178). The reasons for not taking analgesics included healthcare provider not recommending medication (87%), fear of addiction or dependence (79%), and inability to pay (79%). Participants experiencing pain, but not taking analgesics, pursued alternative therapies for relief. Conclusions: Many radiation oncology patients experience pain from their disease and cancer treatment. Most study participants did not use analgesics because of concerns of addiction, cost, or failure of the radiation oncologist to recommend medication. Healthcare providers should have open discussions with their patients regarding pain symptoms and treatment.

  16. Management of prostate cancer in older patients: updated recommendations of a working group of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology.

    PubMed

    Droz, Jean-Pierre; Aapro, Matti; Balducci, Lodovico; Boyle, Helen; Van den Broeck, Thomas; Cathcart, Paul; Dickinson, Louise; Efstathiou, Eleni; Emberton, Mark; Fitzpatrick, John M; Heidenreich, Axel; Hughes, Simon; Joniau, Steven; Kattan, Michael; Mottet, Nicolas; Oudard, Stéphane; Payne, Heather; Saad, Fred; Sugihara, Toru

    2014-08-01

    In 2010, the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) developed treatment guidelines for men with prostate cancer who are older than 70 years old. In 2013, a new multidisciplinary SIOG working group was formed to update these recommendations. The consensus of the task force is that older men with prostate cancer should be managed according to their individual health status, not according to age. On the basis of a validated rapid health status screening instrument and simple assessment, the task force recommends that patients are classed into three groups for treatment: healthy or fit patients who should have the same treatment options as younger patients; vulnerable patients with reversible impairment who should receive standard treatment after medical intervention; and frail patients with non-reversible impairment who should receive adapted treatment.

  17. [Surgical correction of dislipodemia in patients with obesity].

    PubMed

    Fishman, M B; Mirchuk, K K; Chie, Ma; Muzhikov, S P

    2014-01-01

    The results of surgical treatment of 139 patients with metabolic syndrome, obesity and dislipodemia were analyzed. Modern bariatric operations (4 types) were performed by using laparoscopic method. There were regulated bandages of the stomach (RBS), lengthwise gastric resections (LGR), biliopancreatic and stomach bypass surgeries (BBS, SBS). Results of five-year follow-up indicated that restrictive operations on the stomach (RBS, LGR) aimed to correct overweight and dislipodemia had some limitations to application in a varying degree. The RBS operation should be appropriate to use for women of the young age group, when an initial body-weight index wasn't more than 43 kg/m2. The LGR operation was effective for men of the young age group and women in case of moderately expressed dislipodemia and in case when the initial body-weight index didn't exceed more than 45 kg/m2. Combined bariatric operations (BBS, SBS) were most likely effective on body weight and dislipodemia.

  18. Should oncological cases of upper urinary system be excluded at the beginning of the laparoscopic learning curve?

    PubMed Central

    Yüksel, Özgür Haki; Ötünçtemur, Alper; Özbek, Emin; Uruç, Fatih; Verit, Ayhan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The place of oncological cases of upper urinary system in the laparoscopic learning curve was investigated. Materials and Methods: A total of 139 patients from two different centers underwent laparoscopic operations and were included in this retrospective study. Results: Mean operative times for oncological, and non-oncological cases were 101.3 (range 60-450), and 102.7 (45-490) minutes respectively. Fourty-two (31.3 %) patients were oncological cases. In 4 oncological cases, the surgeons switched to open surgery because of massive bleeding and six (14.2 %) oncological cases required blood transfusions during peri/postoperative periods. Pulmonary embolism was observed in one oncological case. In one non-oncological case, the surgeon switched to open surgery because of intestinal perforation and 10 (9.7 %) non-oncological cases needed blood transfusions during peri/postoperative periods. In addition, some complications such as intestinal perforation (n=1), mechanical ileus (n=1), and pulmonary embolism (n=1) were observed during postoperative period. Intestinal perforation was repaired using laparoscopic (n=1) method. Mechanical ileus was approached with open surgical technique. Mean hospital stay of the patients in the oncological and non-oncological series were 4.5 (3-23) and 4.5 (3-30) days respectively. Conclusion: We think that renal oncological cases should be included in the spectrum of laparoscopic indications even at the beginning of the learning curve. Certainly, we still share the opinion that cancer cases which require highly challenging surgeries like radical cystectomy, and prostatectomy should be postponed till to gaining of higher level of experience. PMID:26401863

  19. Multiscale modeling and surgical planning for single ventricle heart patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Alison

    2011-11-01

    Single ventricle heart patients are among the most challenging for pediatric cardiologists to treat, and typically undergo a palliative course of three open-heart surgeries starting immediately after birth. We will present recent tools for modeling blood flow in single ventricle heart patients using a multiscale approach that couples a 3D Navier-Stokes domain to a 0D closed loop lumped parameter network comprised of circuit elements. This coupling allows us to capture the effect of changes in local geometry, such as shunt sizes, on global circulatory dynamics, such as cardiac output. A semi-implicit numerical method is formulated to solve the coupled system in which flow and pressure information is passed between the two domains at the inlets and outlets of the model. A finite element method with outflow stabilization is applied in the 3D Navier-Stokes domain, and the LPN system of ordinary differential equations is solved numerically using a Runge-Kutta method. These tools are coupled via automated scripts to a derivative-free optimization method. Optimization is used to systematically explore surgical designs using clinically relevant cost functions for two stages of single ventricle repair. First, we will present results from optimization of the first stage Blalock Taussig Shunt. Second, we will present results from optimization of a new Y-graft design for the third stage of single ventricle repair called the Fontan surgery. The Y-graft is shown, in simulations, to successfully improve hepatic flow distribution, a known clinical problem. Preliminary clinical experience with the Y-graft will be discussed.

  20. Physicians' perceptions of cancer care for elderly patients: a qualitative sociological study based on a pilot geriatric oncology program.

    PubMed

    Sifer-Rivière, Lynda; Girre, Véronique; Gisselbrecht, Mathilde; Saint-Jean, Olivier

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to document physicians' perceptions of cancer care for elderly patients within an oncogeriatric coordination pilot unit (UPCOG) created in Paris, France. We focused on how physicians apply new cancer care practices, how they establish new teamwork, and their experience of oncogeriatrics in everyday practice. Qualitative methods were used, including a literature review, observation of working sessions in the oncogeriatric pilot unit, and semi-structured interviews with 28 physicians. The results show how physicians' differing perceptions of geriatric oncology can hinder routine collaboration.

  1. Development of an Integrated Subspecialist Multidisciplinary Neuro-oncology Service.

    PubMed

    Price, Stephen J; Guilfoyle, Mathew; J Jefferies, Sarah; Harris, Fiona; Oberg, Ingela; G Burnet, Neil; Santarius, Thomas; Watts, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, the poor outcome for patients with malignant brain tumours led to therapeutic nihilism. In turn, this resulted in lack of interest in neurosurgical oncology subspecialisation, and less than ideal patient pathways. One problem of concern was the low rate of tumour resection. Between 1997 and 2006, 685 treated glioblastomas were identified. In the first four years only 40% of patients underwent tumour resection, rising to 55% in the last four years. Before revision of the pathway, the median length of hospital stay was 8 days, and 35% of patients received the results of their histology outside of a clinic setting. A pathway of care was established, in which all patients were discussed pre-operatively in an MDT meeting and then directed into a new surgical neuro-oncology clinic providing first point of contact. This limited the number of surgeons operating on adult glioma patients and aided recruitment into research studies. Now, three consultant neurosurgeons run this service, easily fulfilling IOG requirement to spend >50% of programmed activities in neuro-oncology. Nursing support has been critical to provide an integrated service. This model has allowed increased recruitment to clinical trials. The introduction of this service led to an increase in patients discussed pre-operatively in an MDT (66% rising to 87%; P=0.027), an increase in the rate of surgical resection (from 40% to 80%) and more patients being admitted electively (from 25% to 80%; P<0.001). There was a reduction in the median length of stay (8 days reduced to 4.5 days; P<0.001). For the cohort of GBM patients that went on to have chemoradiotherapy we improved median survival to 18 months, with 35% of patients alive at two years, comparable to international outcomes. Implementing a specialist neurosurgical oncology service begins with understanding the patient care pathway. Our patients have benefitted from the culture of subspecialisation and the excellent inter-disciplinary working

  2. Predictive Score Card in Lumbar Disc Herniation: Is It Reflective of Patient Surgical Success after Discectomy?

    PubMed Central

    Azimi, Parisa; Benzel, Edward C.; Montazeri, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Does the Finneson–Cooper score reflect the true value of predicting surgical success before discectomy? The aim of this study was to identify reliable predictors for surgical success two year after surgery for patients with LDH. Prospective analysis of 154 patients with LDH who underwent single-level lumbar discectomy was performed. Pre- and post-surgical success was assessed by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) over a 2-year period. The Finneson-Cooper score also was used for evaluation of the clinical results. Using the ODI, surgical success was defined as a 30% (or more) improvement on the ODI score from the baseline. The ODI was considered the gold standard in this study. Finally, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive power of the Finneson–Cooper score in predicting surgical success were calculated. The mean age of the patients was 49.6 (SD = 9.3) years and 47.4% were male. Significant improvement from the pre- to post-operative ODI scores was observed (P < 0.001). Post-surgical success was 76.0% (n = 117). The patients’ rating on surgical success assessments by the ODI discriminated well between sub-groups of patients who differed with respect to the Finneson–Cooper score. Regarding patients’ surgical success, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the Finneson-Cooper ratings correlated with success rate. The findings indicated that the Finneson–Cooper score was reflective of surgical success before discectomy. PMID:27100287

  3. Results of high-risk neutropenia therapy of hematology–oncology patients in a university hospital in Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    Boada Burutaran, Matilde; Guadagna, Regina; Grille, Sofia; Stevenazzi, Mariana; Guillermo, Cecilia; Diaz, Lilian

    2014-01-01

    Background Febrile neutropenia is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in hematology–oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy. The management of febrile neutropenia is typically algorithm-driven. The aim of this study was to assess the results of a standardized protocol for the treatment of febrile neutropenia. Methods A retrospective cohort study (2011–2012) was conducted of patients with high-risk neutropenia in a hematology–oncology service. Results Forty-four episodes of 17 patients with a median age of 48 years (range: 18–78 years) were included. The incidence of febrile neutropenia was 61.4%. The presence of febrile neutropenia was associated with both the duration and severity of neutropenia. Microbiological agents were isolated from different sources in 59.3% of the episodes with bacteremia isolated from blood being the most prevalent (81.3%). Multiple drug-resistant gram-negative bacilli were isolated in 62.5% of all microbiologically documented infections. Treatment of 63% of the episodes in which the initial treatment was piperacillin/tazobactam needed to be escalated to meropenem. The mortality rate due to febrile neutropenia episodes was 18.5%. Conclusion The high rate of gram-negative bacilli resistant to piperacillin/tazobactam (front-line antibiotics in our protocol) and the early need to escalate to carbapenems raises the question as to whether it is necessary to change the current protocol. PMID:25638764

  4. Financial Quality Control of In-Patient Chemotherapy in Germany: Are Additional Payments Cost-Covering for Pharmaco-Oncological Expenses?

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Volker R.; Mallmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Cost-covering in-patient care is increasingly important for hospital providers in Germany, especially with regard to expensive oncological pharmaceuticals. Additional payments (Zusatzentgelte; ZE) on top of flat rate diagnose-related group (DRG) reimbursement can be claimed by hospitals for in-patient use of selected medications. To verify cost coverage of in-patient chemotherapies, the costs of medication were compared to their revenues. Method From January to June 2010, a retrospective cost-revenue study was performed at a German obstetrics/gynecology university clinic. The hospital's pharmacy list of inpatient oncological therapies for breast and gynecological cancer was checked for accuracy and compared with the documented ZEs and the costs and revenues for each oncological application. Results N = 45 in-patient oncological therapies were identified in n = 18 patients, as well as n = 7 bisphosphonate applications; n = 11 ZEs were documented. Costs for oncological medication were € 33,752. The corresponding ZE revenues amounted to only € 13,980, resulting in a loss of € 19,772. All in-patient oncological therapies performed were not cost-covering. Data discrepancy, incorrect documentation and cost attribution, and process aborts were identified. Conclusions Routine financial quality control at the medicine-pharmacy administration interface is implemented, with monthly comparison of costs and revenues, as well as admission status. Non-cost-covering therapies for in-patients should be converted to out-patient therapies. Necessary adjustments of clinic processes are made according to these results, to avoid future losses. PMID:21673822

  5. Optimization of care for the pediatric surgical patient: Why now?

    PubMed

    Arca, Marjorie J; Goldin, Adam B; Oldham, Keith T

    2015-12-01

    In 2015, the American College of Surgeons (ACS) has begun to verify hospitals and ambulatory centers which meet consensus based optimal resource standards as "Children׳s Surgical Centers." The intent is to identify children-specific resources available within an institution and using a stratification system similar to the ACS Trauma Program match these to the needs of infants and children with surgical problems. This review briefly summarizes the history, supporting data and processes which drove this initiative.

  6. [Anxiolytic effect of preoperative showing of "anesthesia video" for surgical patients].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Y; Baba, S; Koh, H; Takagi, H; Ishihara, H; Matsuki, A

    1993-04-01

    Over 60% of preoperative surgical patients are reported to suffer from preoperative anxiety. Since 1986, an anesthesia video, explaining our routine anesthesia procedures has been shown to elective surgical patients preoperatively at our clinic. In 1990, as our anesthesia method was modified, we revised this video and evaluated the effect of this video on their preoperative anxiety. Female patients, in general, have much more anxiety than male patients, and the female patients of 30-59 years of age were the most anxious about their surgical operations not about anesthesia per se. The patients who were to undergo a major surgery, such as gynecological patients also belonged to the most anxious patient group. After demonstrating the video any patient group including gynecological patients of 30-59 years of age was less anxious about the upcoming anesthesia and surgery.

  7. [Microbial analysis of clinical material taken from patients at the Oncology Center, Maria Skłodowkda-Curie Institute in Warsaw in 1997].

    PubMed

    Fuksiewicz, A; Połowniak-Pracka, H; Ochman, E; Podsiadło, B

    1999-01-01

    An analysis was carried out of the microbiological investigations of clinical material samples obtained from the patients of two oncology centres belonging to the Warsaw Oncology Centre. Microorganisms cultured from urine, blood, catheters, smears of wounds and other materials were analysed. From 4839 clinical material samples from the Ursynów centre 1755 bacterial strains were isolated. From 423 samples from the centre in Wawelska Street 171 strains were obtained. In infections of patients from the centres the number of Gram-positive cocci was twice that of Gram-negative rods. In the investigated clinical material S. aureus was the most frequently isolated Gram-positive coccus, while E. coli was the most frequent species among Gram-negative bacteria. In the infections of oncological patients a considerable frequency was noted of yeast-like fungi, especially C. albicans. Particularly disquieting was the increasing number of isolates of C. glabrata and C. krusei strains resistant to fluconazole.

  8. Oncology legislative update.

    PubMed

    Holmes, H

    2000-11-01

    This article reviews current legislative and regulatory issues of importance to the oncology community. Topics include patient protection, Medicare support of clinical trials, research data protection, the Medical Innovation Tax Credit, National Cancer Institute appropriations, and medical record privacy issues. Other topics discussed included funding for stem-cell research, genetic therapy oversight, and coverage for uninsured patients.

  9. Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program for Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neilan, Barbara A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences is described, along with student reactions to the program. The summer elective program involves cancer lectures (one week) and clinical exposure (nine weeks) in medical, surgical, and pediatric oncology services, as well as self-directed learning…

  10. Payment Reform: Unprecedented and Evolving Impact on Gynecologic Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Apte, Sachin M.; Patel, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    With the signing of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act in April 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is now positioned to drive the development and implementation of sweeping changes to how physicians and hospitals are paid for the provision of oncology-related services. These changes will have a long-lasting impact on the sub-specialty of gynecologic oncology, regardless of practice structure, physician employment and compensation model, or local insurance market. Recently, commercial payers have piloted various models of payment reform via oncology-specific clinical pathways, oncology medical homes, episode payment arrangements, and accountable care organizations. Despite the positive results of some pilot programs, adoption remains limited. The goals are to eliminate unnecessary variation in cancer treatment, provide coordinated patient-centered care, while controlling costs. Yet, meaningful payment reform in oncology remains elusive. As the largest payer for oncology services in the United States, CMS has the leverage to make cancer services more value based. Thus far, the focus has been around pricing of physician-administered drugs with recent work in the area of the Oncology Medical Home. Gynecologic oncology is a unique sub-specialty that blends surgical and medical oncology, with treatment that often involves radiation therapy. This forward-thinking, multidisciplinary model works to keep the patient at the center of the care continuum and emphasizes care coordination. Because of the breadth and depth of gynecologic oncology, this sub-specialty has both the potential to be disrupted by payment reform as well as potentially benefit from the aspects of reform that can align incentives appropriately to improve coordination. Although the precise future payment models are unknown at this time, focused engagement of gynecologic oncologists and the full care team is imperative to assure that the practice remains patient centered

  11. Payment Reform: Unprecedented and Evolving Impact on Gynecologic Oncology.

    PubMed

    Apte, Sachin M; Patel, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    With the signing of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act in April 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is now positioned to drive the development and implementation of sweeping changes to how physicians and hospitals are paid for the provision of oncology-related services. These changes will have a long-lasting impact on the sub-specialty of gynecologic oncology, regardless of practice structure, physician employment and compensation model, or local insurance market. Recently, commercial payers have piloted various models of payment reform via oncology-specific clinical pathways, oncology medical homes, episode payment arrangements, and accountable care organizations. Despite the positive results of some pilot programs, adoption remains limited. The goals are to eliminate unnecessary variation in cancer treatment, provide coordinated patient-centered care, while controlling costs. Yet, meaningful payment reform in oncology remains elusive. As the largest payer for oncology services in the United States, CMS has the leverage to make cancer services more value based. Thus far, the focus has been around pricing of physician-administered drugs with recent work in the area of the Oncology Medical Home. Gynecologic oncology is a unique sub-specialty that blends surgical and medical oncology, with treatment that often involves radiation therapy. This forward-thinking, multidisciplinary model works to keep the patient at the center of the care continuum and emphasizes care coordination. Because of the breadth and depth of gynecologic oncology, this sub-specialty has both the potential to be disrupted by payment reform as well as potentially benefit from the aspects of reform that can align incentives appropriately to improve coordination. Although the precise future payment models are unknown at this time, focused engagement of gynecologic oncologists and the full care team is imperative to assure that the practice remains patient centered

  12. Development of a patient-specific surgical simulator for pediatric laparoscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Saber, Nikoo R; Menon, Vinay; St-Pierre, Jean C; Looi, Thomas; Drake, James M; Cyril, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a pediatric patient-specific surgical simulator for the planning, practice, and validation of laparoscopic surgical procedures prior to intervention, initially focusing on the choledochal cyst resection and reconstruction scenario. The simulator is comprised of software elements including a deformable body physics engine, virtual surgical tools, and abdominal organs. Hardware components such as haptics-enabled hand controllers and a representative endoscopic tool have also been integrated. The prototype is able to perform a number of surgical tasks and further development work is under way to simulate the complete procedure with acceptable fidelity and accuracy. PMID:24732536

  13. Different Clinical Utility of Oropharyngeal Bacterial Screening prior to Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in Oncological and Neurological Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dastych, Milan; Senkyrik, Michal; Pavlik, Tomas; Prokesova, Jitka; Jecmenova, Marketa; Dolina, Jiri; Hep, Ales

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to monitor oropharyngeal bacterial colonization in patients indicated for percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy (PEG). Methods. Oropharyngeal swabs were obtained from patients prior to PEG placement. A development of peristomal infection was evaluated. The analysis of oropharyngeal and peristomal site pathogens was done. Results. Consecutive 274 patients referred for PEG due to neurological disorder or cancer completed the study. Oropharyngeal colonization with pathogens was observed in 69% (190/274), dominantly in the neurologic subgroup of patients (P < 0.001). Peristomal infection occurred in 30 (10.9%) of patients and in 57% of them the correlation between oropharyngeal and peristomal agents was present. The presence of oropharyngeal pathogens was assessed as an important risk factor for the development of peristomal infection only in oncological patients (OR = 8.33, 95% CI: 1.66–41.76). Despite a high prevalence of pathogens in neurological patients, it did not influence the risk of peristomal infection with the exception for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriers (OR 4.5, 95% CI: 1.08–18.76). Conclusion. During oropharyngeal microbial screening prior to the PEG insertion, the detection of pathogens may be a marker of the increased risk of peristomal infection in cancer patients only. In neurological patients the benefit of the screening is limited to the detection of MRSA carriers. PMID:25243153

  14. Case management in oncology rehabilitation (CAMON): The effect of case management on the quality of life in patients with cancer after one year of ambulant rehabilitation. A study protocol for a randomized controlled clinical trial in oncology rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer diseases and their therapies have negative effects on the quality of life. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of case management in a sample of oncological outpatients with the intent of rehabilitation after cancer treatment. Case management wants to support the complex information needs of the patients in addition to the segmented structure of the health care system. Emphasis is put on support for self-management in order to enhance health - conscious behaviour, learning to deal with the burden of the illness and providing the opportunity for regular contacts with care providers. We present a study protocol to investigate the efficacy of a case management in patients following oncology rehabilitation after cancer treatment. Methods The trial is a multicentre, two-arm randomised controlled study. Patients are randomised parallel in either 'usual care' plus case management or 'usual care' alone. Patients with all types of cancer can be included in the study, if they have completed the therapy with chemo- and/or radiotherapy/surgery with curative intention and are expected to have a survival time >1 year. To determine the health-related quality of life the general questionnaire FACT G is used. The direct correlation between self-management and perceived self-efficacy is measured with the Jerusalem & Schwarzer questionnaire. Patients satisfaction with the care received is measured using the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care 5 As (PACIC-5A). Data are collected at the beginning of the trial and after 3, 6 and 12 months. The power analysis revealed a sample size of 102 patients. The recruitment of the centres began in 2009. The inclusion of patients began in May 2010. Discussion Case management has proved to be effective regarding quality of life of patients with chronic diseases. When it comes to oncology, case management is mainly used in cancer treatment, but it is not yet common in the rehabilitation of cancer patients

  15. [Results of surgical treatment of malignant brain tumors].

    PubMed

    Goldhahn, W E

    1987-05-29

    Although surgical treatment seldom cures any malignant brain tumours, it remains the basis of the management of these tumours. Studies by others and our own statistical studies demonstrate the absence of any real or significant improvement in survival time for most of the patients. Hence we must await progress in other oncological disciplines to provide a solution.

  16. Use of Disinfection Cap to Reduce Central-Line–Associated Bloodstream Infection and Blood Culture Contamination Among Hematology–Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kamboj, Mini; Blair, Rachel; Bell, Natalie; Son, Crystal; Huang, Yao-Ting; Dowling, Mary; Lipitz-Snyderman, Allison; Eagan, Janet; Sepkowitz, Kent

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In this study, we examined the impact of routine use of a passive disinfection cap for catheter hub decontamination in hematology–oncology patients. SETTING A tertiary care cancer center in New York City METHODS In this multiphase prospective study, we used 2 preintervention phases (P1 and P2) to establish surveillance and baseline rates followed by sequential introduction of disinfection caps on high-risk units (HRUs: hematologic malignancy wards, hematopoietic stem cell transplant units and intensive care units) (P3) and general oncology units (P4). Unit-specific and hospital-wide hospital-acquired central-line–associated bloodstream infection (HA-CLABSI) rates and blood culture contamination (BCC) with coagulase negative staphylococci (CONS) were measured. RESULTS Implementation of a passive disinfection cap resulted in a 34% decrease in hospital-wide HA-CLABSI rates (combined P1 and P2 baseline rate of 2.66–1.75 per 1,000 catheter days at the end of the study period). This reduction occurred only among high-risk patients and not among general oncology patients. In addition, the use of the passive disinfection cap resulted in decreases of 63% (HRUs) and 51% (general oncology units) in blood culture contamination, with an estimated reduction of 242 BCCs with CONS. The reductions in HA-CLABSI and BCC correspond to an estimated annual savings of $3.2 million in direct medical costs. CONCLUSION Routine use of disinfection caps is associated with decreased HA-CLABSI rates among high-risk hematology oncology patients and a reduction in blood culture contamination among all oncology patients. PMID:26394849

  17. Descriptive summary of patients seen at the surgical companies during Operation Iraqi Freedom-1.

    PubMed

    Walker, G Jay; Zouris, James; Galarneau, Michael F; Dye, Judy

    2007-01-01

    The Navy-Marine Corps Combat Trauma Registry is a data repository summarizing information from data sets describing injuries sustained and treatments administered to casualties from the point of injury to rehabilitation. Among the medical facilities contributing data to the Combat Trauma Registry during Operation Iraqi Freedom were the Marine Corps forward surgical companies. The surgical companies offer resuscitative surgery, medical treatment, and temporary holding facilities, in addition to preparing patients for evacuation. This article reviews the types of patients admitted and treatments provided at the surgical companies during the major combat period of Operation Iraqi Freedom. The surgical companies saw an average of 15 to 17 patients per day during this period. Less than 20% of the U.S. casualties seen were wounded in action. In contrast, >75% of the enemy prisoner of war presentations were for battle injuries. Less than 15% of the patients were held at the facilities for >24 hours.

  18. DISPARITIES IN PEDIATRIC ONCOLOGY PATIENT EDUCATION AND LINGUISTIC RESOURCES: RESULTS OF A NATIONAL SURVEY OF PEDIATRIC ONCOLOGISTS

    PubMed Central

    Slone, Jeremy S; Self, Elizabeth; Friedman, Debra; Heiman, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Background Extensive patient and family education is required at the time of a new diagnosis of pediatric cancer yet ittle data exist regarding the availability and linguistic competency of new cancer diagnosis education provided by pediatric oncology institutions. Procedure Using the American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology (ASPHO) membership list, a web-based survey was conducted among a cohort of pediatric oncologists to determine pediatric oncologists’ assessment of institutional resources for new cancer diagnosis education and the availability of linguistically appropriate education. Results Of 1,294 ASPHO members sent email survey invitations, 573 (44.3%) responded with 429 meeting eligibility criteria. Oncologists at academic institutions reported their institutions had more availability of resources for new diagnosis education compared with those from non-academic institutions (Mean 78.6 vs. 74.3; 0 [not at all] – 100 [well equipped]; p=0.05). The mean score increased with volume of new cancer diagnoses/year: small (<75) = 73.4; medium (75 – 149) = 76.7; large (≥ 150) = 84.5 (p <0.001). Oncologists at large volume institutions reported more availability of an established patient education protocol (50.8% vs. 38.1%, p <0.001) and increased use of dedicated non-physician staff (79.9% vs. 66.1%, p=0.02), but less use of websites for patient education (17.2% vs. 33.3%, p=0.001). Availability of linguistically appropriate education improved with increasing institution size: small (76.4), medium (82.3) and large (84.0) patient volume (p <0.011). Conclusion According to pediatric oncologists, a disparity in educational and linguistic resources for new pediatric cancer diagnosis education exists depending on institution type and size. PMID:24167088

  19. TextWithSurgeryPatients - A Research Hypothesis in Enhancing Education and Physical Assessment for Abdominal Surgical Patients.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Medical surgical nurses may not have the time or resources to provide effective pre- and post-operative instructions for patients in today's healthcare system. And, making timely physical assessments following discharge from the hospital is not always straightforward. Therefore, the risk for readmission associated with post-surgical complications is a concern. At present, mobile healthcare technologies and patient care are precipitously evolving and may serve as a resource to enhance communication between the healthcare provider and patient. A mobile telephone text message (short message service [SMS]) intervention for abdominal surgical patients may foster effective education (communication) and timely self-reported physical assessment in the home environment hence preventing deleterious outcomes. The aim of this research proposal is to identify the feasibility of using a SMS intervention via smart phones to improve health outcomes via timely communication, reach large numbers of at-risk surgical patients and, establish and sustain uniform protocols in a cost-efficient manner. PMID:27332251

  20. Could Harmonic Scalpel (Ultracision®) be considered the best device in surgical treatment of vulvar cancer of patients with implanted pace-maker? Proposal and rationale

    PubMed Central

    Gizzo, Salvatore; Andrisani, Alessandra; Ancona, Emanuele; Quaranta, Michela; Vitagliano, Amerigo; Noventa, Marco; Nardelli, Giovanni Battista; Ambrosini, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Vulvar cancer (VC) represents about 4% of gynecologic malignancies, its incidence increases with age and peak incidence is found between 70-79 years. In cases of locally advanced disease surgery is often required and radical vulvectomy, with or without mono-bilateral inguino-femoral lymphadenectomy, is standard management. Various devices have been implemented in gynecological surgery in an attempt to minimize or avoid frequent intra/postoperative complications linked to energy use, unfortunately the majority of these devices require monopolar or bipolar energy. Ultracision® represents a unique surgical device capable of performing both cutting and coagulation at different intensities without use of electric energy. The use of Ultracision® in the radical treatment of VC has advantages both in terms of intraoperative and postoperative complications responsible for the reduction of surgical time and blood loss, complete tissue removal according to oncological criteria, diminished desensitization of peripheral areas and reduction of wound complications. These advantages have been widely demonstrated and contribute to making Ultracision® a cost-effective option in the routine treatment of patients affected by vulvar cancer especially when considering its safety in cardiopathic patients with implanted pacemaker. If the impressive results achieved in radical vulvar surgery will be confirmed, scalpel use could be proposed as routine for surgery of the routinely in surgical approach of vulvar and perineal area, in both benign and malignant disease. PMID:26309660

  1. Perioperative nurses' knowledge of indicators for pressure ulcer development in the surgical patient population.

    PubMed

    Lupear, Susan Krauser; Overstreet, Maria; Krau, Stephen D

    2015-06-01

    Despite focused attention to improve the quality and safety of patient care, and the financial impact pressure ulcers (PUs) can have on a health care provider or institution, evidence supports that PUs continue to occur in other patient populations during admission to the hospital. An example of a patient population in which evidence indicates that the development of PUs occurs, is patients who have a surgical procedure. The article discusses a project designed to identify potential knowledge deficits among perioperative nurses of indicators for PU development in the surgical patient population.

  2. Chondrosarcoma of the Pelvis: Oncologic and Functional Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, Michael; Maier, Bernd; Koschnik, Martin; Mutschler, Wolf E.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose. Chondrosarcoma (CS) most commonly involves the pelvis. The factors that influence local and systemic control of pelvic CS and the functional outcome should be evaluated. Patients. Fifty-one patients (37 males and 14 females; mean age, 39.4 years) with pelvic CS were included in this retrospective study. Methods. The tumor stage, surgical treatment, surgical margin achieved, complications, incidence of local recurrence (LR), incidence of distant metastases, and the oncologic and functional status were evaluated. Oncologic outcome was estimated by the method of Kaplan and Meier, and the functional status was scored according to Musculoskeleral Tumor Society (MSTS) criteria. Analysis of variance was used to determine the factors that influence the oncologic and functional outcome. Results. Surgical stages were IA in three cases, IB in 23, IIB in 23, and III in two. Hemipelvectomy (H) was performed in 13 cases, internal hemipelvectomy (IH) with endoprosthetic replacement in 17, and continuity resection (CR) in 23.Two patients received IH and CR, one due to LR, and one due to instability. Radical or wide margins were achieved in 27 cases, marginal margins in 16, and intralesional margins in eight. Local complication required additional surgery in 10 cases due to local infections and/or hematomas.Two patients died perioperatively. In 48 out of the 49 remaining patients, follow-up was available with a mean duration of 73.4 months (range, 4–229 months).Twenty patients died of the disease, two patients are alive with metastases, four patients are disease free after LR, and 22 patients show no evidence of the disease. LR occurred in 10 cases (20.4%), and 17 patients (34.6%) developed distant metastases. Functional evaluation of the 28 survivors revealed good and excellent results in 19 cases, fair in three and poor in six.The mean MSTS score of all survivors was 69.2%, after H it was 37.6%, after IH was 61.4%, and after CR was 79.5%. Conclusion. In pelvic

  3. Do Physical Symptoms Predict the Outcome of Surgical Fusion in Patients with Discogenic Low Back Pain?

    PubMed Central

    Orita, Sumihisa; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Eguchi, Yawara; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Miyagi, Masayuki; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Gou; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Abe, Koki; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Kanamoto, Hiroto; Inoue, Gen; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Purpose To determine whether symptoms predict surgical outcomes for patients with discogenic low back pain (DLBP). Overview of Literature Specific diagnosis of DLBP remains difficult. Worsening of pain on flexion is a reported symptom of DLBP. This study sought to determine whether symptoms predict surgical outcomes for patients with DLBP. Methods We investigated 127 patients with low back pain (LBP) and no dominant radicular pain. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to select patients with disc degeneration at only one level. If pain was provoked during discography, we performed fusion surgery (87 patients). Visual analogue scale score and responses to a questionnaire regarding symptoms including worsening of pain on flexion or extension were assessed. Symptom sites before surgery were categorized into LBP alone, or LBP plus referred inguinal or leg pain. We followed 77 patients (average 3.0 years) and compared symptoms before surgery with surgical outcome. Results Sixty-three patients with a good outcome showed postsurgical pain relief (≥60% pain relief) and 14 patients with a poor outcome did not (<60% pain relief). In patients with good outcomes, worsening of LBP was evident in 65% of cases on flexion and in 35% on extension. However, these findings were not significantly different from those in patients with poor outcomes. The percentage of patients with LBP alone was significantly lower and the percentage of patients with LBP plus referred inguinal or leg pain was significantly higher in the group with good surgical outcome compared with patients in the group with poor surgical outcome (p<0.05). Conclusions Worsening of pain on extension may be a symptom of DLBP. Surgical outcomes were superior in patients with both LBP and either referred inguinal or leg pain compared with those having LBP alone. PMID:27340531

  4. Patterns of Care in Elderly Head-and-Neck Cancer Radiation Oncology Patients: A Single-Center Cohort Study

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shaohui; O'Sullivan, Brian; Waldron, John; Lockwood, Gina; Bayley, Andrew; Kim, John; Cummings, Bernard; Dawson, Laura A.; Hope, Andrew; Cho, John; Witterick, Ian; Chen, Eric X.; Ringash, Jolie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the patterns of care for elderly head-and-neck cancer patients with those of younger patients. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of all new mucosal head-and-neck cancer referrals to radiation oncology between July 1, 2003 and December 31, 2007 at our institution. The clinical characteristics, treatment pattern, tolerance, and outcomes were compared between the elderly (aged {>=}75 years) and younger (aged <75 years) cohorts. Results: A total of 2,312 patients, including 452 (20%) elderly and 1,860 (80%) younger patients, were studied. The elderly patients were more likely to be women (36% vs. 27%, p <.01) and to have other malignancies (23% vs. 13%, p <.01), Stage I or II disease (38% vs. 32%, p <.01), and N0 status (56% vs. 42%, p <.01). Treatment was less often curative in intent (79% vs. 93%, p <.01). For the 1,487 patients who received definitive radiotherapy (RT), no differences were found between the elderly (n = 238) and younger (n = 1,249) patients in treatment interruption, completion, or treatment-related death. Within the subset of 760 patients who received intensified treatment (concurrent chemoradiotherapy or hyperfractionated accelerated RT), no difference was seen between the elderly (n = 46) and younger (n = 714) patients in treatment interruption, completion, or treatment-related death. After a median follow-up of 2.5 years, the 2-year cause-specific survival rate after definitive RT was 72% (range, 65-78%) for the elderly vs. 86% (range, 84-88%) for the younger patients (p <.01). Conclusion: Elderly head-and-neck cancer patients exhibited different clinical characteristics and experienced different patterns of care from younger patients. Although age itself was an adverse predictor of cause-specific survival, its effect was modest. Elderly patients selected for definitive RT or intensified RT showed no evidence of impaired treatment tolerance.

  5. [Gann-chiryou Ninnteii--education of a fundamental (junior) oncology specialist].

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Masahiko

    2008-04-01

    The development of new active agents, along with rapid progress in biomedical technology in recent decades, has resulted in major progress in cancer treatment, but at the same time it has made cancer management much more complex: Medical treatment must now be supplemented by various other types of care. Cancer patients and their families require the best care and support through the entire process, and optimal treatment for patients cannot be provided without an oncology health care team that includes various specialists such as medical-, radiation-, and surgical oncologists, and other professionals. The oncology education system in Japan, however, is unable to comply with this demand at present, although educational programs for highly trained and dedicated oncology experts are rapidly developing. Oncologists, whether subspecialized in medical, pediatric, radiation, or surgical oncology, must comprehend a formidable knowledge base and then effectively interact with medical colleagues in a wide range of disciplines in cancer care. Since the rapid improvement of this poor oncology environment is urgently required, the Japanese Board of Cancer Therapy has made a proposal to develop a primary certification system for oncology, Gannchiryou Ninnteii: This system provides education for candidates in basic principles common to management and treatment of malignant diseases, which can enhance the quality of oncology care and also maintain the standards for certification of various oncology specialists who are now developing in Japan. Candidates are required to pass the certifying examination after satisfactory completion of graduate education in a specialty and the following training programs as a fundamental oncologist. The first certifying examination is scheduled in January, 2008. The details for certification were reviewed.

  6. [Evaluation of life quality in patients after surgical treatment due to neoplasmatic matastases in bones].

    PubMed

    Lorkowski, Jacek; Brongel, Leszek; Trybus, Marek; Hładki, Waldemar

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate life quality in patients with disseminated neoplasmatic process after surgical treatment of pathological fracture due to metastasis to long bones. The examination group consisted of 33 patients (25 women, 8 men) treated surgically (av. age 67 years). Pathological fracture was revealed in femoral bone in 28 patients (bilateral in one patient) and in humeral bone in 5 patients. In case of femoral bone fracture unipolar arthroplastic of hip joint was used or stable osteosynthesis with the use of intramedullar nail or AO plate; while in case of humeral bone fracture elastic osteosynthesis with Rush nail was used. Survival period in patients after surgical treatment of pathological fracture was 6 months. Life quality in patients after surgical treatment was estimated on the basis of clinical scale. All the patients considered surgical treatment to be the purposeful improvement of the standard of the last months of life. The result of treatment presented in the scale of clinical assessment, turned out satisfactory in the examined grouped; the result was considered satisfactory in movement range of the operated limb, muscular strength and capacity of walking. The result of the evaluation of self-service capacity was estimated as more than satisfactory. In conclusion, the main advantage of surgical therapy in patients with neoplasmatic metastases into long bones is the decrease of pain and the improvement of self-service, even in the cases of serious degree of neoplasmatic process. Surgical treatment in those patients should ensure a fast comeback to possibly maximal functionality of the limb. PMID:17469522

  7. Developing a tool for nurses to assess risk of infection in pediatric oncology patients in China: a modified Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yufeng; Cui, Yan; Wang, Hong; Wang, Fang; Lu, Chao; Shen, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Infections are identified as the most common preventable cause of death in pediatric oncology patients. Assessing and stratifying risk of infections are essential to prevent infection in these patients. To date, no tool can fulfill this demand in China. This study aimed to develop a nursing work-based and Chinese-specific tool for pediatric nurses to assess risk of infection in oncology patients. This research was a modified Delphi study. Based on a literature review, a 37-item questionnaire rating on a 0–5 scale was developed. Twenty-four experts from 8 hospitals in 6 provinces of China were consulted for three rounds. Consensus for each item in the first round was defined as: the rating mean was > 3 and the coefficient of variation (CV) was < 0.5. Consensus for each item in the second round was defined as CV < 0.3. Consensus among experts was defined as: P value of Kendall's coefficient of concordance (W) < 0.05. After three rounds of consultation, a two-part tool was developed: the Immune Status Scale (ISS) and the Checklist of Risk Factors of Infection (CRFI). There were 5 items in the ISS and 14 in the CRFI. Based on the ISS score, nurses could stratify children into the low-risk and high-risk groups. For high-risk children, nurses should screen risk factors of infection every day by the CRFI, and twice weekly for low-risk children. Further study is needed to verify this tool's efficacy.

  8. Longterm quality of life after oncologic surgery and microvascular free flap reconstruction in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Raschke, Gregor-Franziskus; Guentsch, Arndt; Roshanghias, Korosh; Eichmann, Francy; Schultze-Mosgau, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background Quality of life (QoL) has become increasingly important in cancer treatment. It refers to the patient’s perception of the effects of the disease and therapy, and their impact on daily functioning and general feeling of well being. Material and Methods n this prospective study, a total of 100 patients treated at our institution, completed the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 questionnaire and the specific EORTC QLQ-H&N35 module. The questionnaires were distributed to the patients between 12 and 60 months postoperatively. Results Global QoL score was 58.3 and mean score for functioning scale was 76.7. Fatigue (28.7 ± 26.1), followed by financial problems (27.7 ± 33.5), insomnia (26.7 ± 34.5) and pain (26.3 ± 29.9) had highest symptom score on QLQ-C30. Fatigue (r=-0.488), insomnia (r=-0.416) and pain (r =-0.448) showed highest value for significantly negative correlation to global QoL. In the H&N35 module, restriction of mouth opening (43.3 ± 38.6), dry mouth (40.7 ± 36.9), sticky saliva (37.3 ± 37.1) and eating in public (33.8 ± 31.9) were the four worst symptoms. Swallowing problem (r=-0.438), eating in public (r=-0.420) and persistent severe speech (r=-0.398) ranked as the three worst symptoms with highest value for significantly negative correlation to global QoL. Conclusions Longterm QoL after oncologic surgery and microvascular free flap reconstruction in patients with oral cancer is satisfactory. Measuring QoL should be considered as part of the evaluation of cancer treatment. Key words:Longterm quality of life, oral cancer, oncologic surgery, microvascular free flap reconstruction. PMID:27031070

  9. Pilomatrixoma of the breast in a patient with type 1 myotonic dystrophy: successful surgical approach.

    PubMed

    Fama', F; Ieni, A; Tchernev, G; Chokoeva, A A; Maximov, G K; Wollina, U; Lotti, T; Patterson, J W; Fioranelli, M; Roccia, M G; Guarneri, C; Gioffre-Florio, M

    2016-01-01

    Malherbe’s calcifying epithelioma is an uncommon cutaneous tumour that originates from the matrix cells of hair follicle. It was initially described by Malherbe as a benign calcifying epithelioma. Several ultra-structural and electron-microscopic studies later demonstrated its origin from matrix cells and the term pilomatrixoma was introduced. The treatment of this tumour remains mainly surgical. Malignant cases with post-surgical recurrences have been described in literature and recurrences have been related to an incomplete surgical treatment or tumour aggressiveness. We present the case of 31-year-old female patient with pilomatrixoma of the breast, which was very similar to fibroadenoma, in terms of size and other clinical features. We successfully treated this patient surgically, and the aesthetic results were good, despite the proximity of the tumour to the areola-nipple complex. Fifteen months later, the patient is doing well, free of any clinical local recurrence. PMID:27373126

  10. Barriers and Facilitators Associated with Non-Surgical Treatment Use for Osteoarthritis Patients in Orthopaedic Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hofstede, Stefanie N.; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J.; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P. M.; van den Ende, Cornelia H. M.; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction International evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) recommend to start with (a combination of) non-surgical treatments, and using surgical intervention only if a patient does not respond sufficiently to non-surgical treatment options. Despite these recommendations, there are strong indications that non-surgical treatments are not optimally used in orthopaedic practice. To improve the adoption of non-surgical treatments, more insight is needed into barriers and facilitators of these treatments. Therefore, this study assessed which barriers and facilitators are associated with the use and prescription of different non-surgical treatments before hip and knee OA in orthopaedic practice among patients and orthopaedic surgeons in the Netherlands. Materials and Methods We performed two internet-based surveys among 172 orthopaedic surgeons and 174 OA patients. Univariate association and multivariable regression techniques are used to identify barriers and facilitators associated with the use of non-surgical treatments. Results Most barriers and facilitators among patients were associated with the use of physical therapy, lifestyle advice and dietary therapy. Among orthopaedic surgeons, most were associated with prescription of acetaminophen, dietary therapy and physical therapy. Examples of barriers and facilitators among patients included “People in my environment had positive experiences with a surgery” (facilitator for education about OA), and “Advice of people in my environment to keep on moving” (facilitator for lifestyle and dietary advice). For orthopaedic surgeons, examples were “Lack of knowledge about guideline” (barrier for lifestyle advice), “Agreements/ deliberations with primary care” and “Easy communication with a dietician” (facilitators for dietary therapy). Also the belief in the efficacy of these treatments was associated with increased prescription. Conclusions

  11. [Criteria for the selection of surgical technic in patients with anatomical urinary stress incontinence].

    PubMed

    Iris de la Cruz, S

    1996-05-01

    In this paper it is described the minimum necessary investigation in the evaluation of the incontinent patient, the surgical methods accepted up to date for the treatment of genuine incontinence as well as the facts to be considered and the interrogatives to be solved for the candidate patient ready for surgery as a guide for the election of the most adecuate surgical procedure for the patient. This stands out that the position that the preoperatory measurement of pressure of the urethral closing can lead to the evolution in the operated patients.

  12. Facial aesthetic surgical goals in patients of different cultures.

    PubMed

    Rowe-Jones, Julian M

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of facial aesthetic surgery is to improve the patient's psychological well-being. To achieve this, the surgeon must understand the patient's body image and their aesthetic and psychological expectations. These factors must be judged in the context of their cultural background. The patient's cultural values must also be understood to optimize the doctor-patient relationship. PMID:25049120

  13. Cultural differences in spiritual care: findings of an Israeli oncologic questionnaire examining patient interest in spiritual care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As professional spiritual care (chaplaincy) is introduced to new cultures worldwide, it bears examining which elements of screening and care are universal and, for those elements showing cultural difference, to study them in each culture. No quantitative spiritual care patient study had previously been done in Israel. Our objectives were twofold: 1) to examine who wants spiritual care in Israel, including demographic and clinical variables, and to compare against other results worldwide to further develop universal screening protocols 2) to see what patients want from spiritual care specifically in the Israeli setting. Methods Self-administered patient questionnaire examining spirituality/religiosity, interest in spiritual care (subdivided by type of care), and key demographic, social, and clinical data. The study setting was an Israeli oncology center at which spiritual care had been recently introduced. Results Data from 364 oncology patient questionnaires found 41% interest in spiritual care, as compared to 35%-54% in American studies. Having previously been visited by a spiritual caregiver predicted patient interest in further spiritual care (AOR 2.4, 95% CI 1.2-4.6), suggesting that the new service is being well-received. Multivariate stepwise logistic regression analysis identified additional predictors of openness to receiving spiritual care: self-describing as somewhat/very spiritual vs. not spiritual (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 3.9 and 6.3, 95% CI 1.8-8.6 and 2.6-15.1) or traditional/religious vs. secular (AOR 2.2 and 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.6 and 1.1-4.0); and receiving one visit a week or less from family and friends (AOR 5.6, 95% CI 2.1-15.1). These findings are in line with previous American studies, suggesting universality across cultures that could be utilized in screening. Differences in demographic data and medical condition were not significant predictors of patient interest, suggesting a cultural difference, where age and education were

  14. Surgical management of osteonecrosis of the femoral head in patients with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Atul F; McGraw, Michael H; Israelite, Craig L

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is a known risk factor for osteonecrosis of the hip. Necrosis within the femoral head may cause severe pain, functional limitations, and compromise quality of life in this patient population. Early stages of avascular necrosis of the hip may be managed surgically with core decompression with or without autologous bone grafting. Total hip arthroplasty is the mainstay of treatment of advanced stages of the disease in patients who have intractable pain and are medically fit to undergo the procedure. The management of hip pathology in sickle cell disease presents numerous medical and surgical challenges, and the careful perioperative management of patients is mandatory. Although there is an increased risk of medical and surgical complications in patients with sickle cell disease, total hip arthroplasty can provide substantial relief of pain and improvement of function in the appropriately selected patient. PMID:26601059

  15. An Innovative Approach to the Surgical Time Out: A Patient-Focused Model.

    PubMed

    Kozusko, Steven D; Elkwood, Lily; Gaynor, Diane; Chagares, Stephen A

    2016-06-01

    The surgical time out is an integral component of patient safety in OR settings. At The Center for Outpatient Surgery (TCOPS), a team of nurses and plastic and breast surgeons evaluated discrepancies, wrong-site surgeries, near misses, team communication, and patient satisfaction to develop and implement a surgical checklist that would help improve efficiency and patient safety and reduce near misses. This checklist involves the surgical team and patient, and it includes preoperative, preincision, and postoperative time outs. Since 2011, 4,453 procedures have used the preoperative and preincision timeouts. Of those, 998 have used all three when we added the postoperative component. Since the implementation of the checklist, there have been zero discrepancies and zero wrong-site surgeries. Patients have expressed satisfaction with their inclusion in the preoperative time out. Staff members at TCOPS have noted excellent results, and the checklist can be adopted by other specialties. PMID:27234796

  16. Access to Cancer Services for Rural Colorectal Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Cai, Yong; Larson, Eric H.; Dobie, Sharon A.; Wright, George E.; Goodman, David C.; Matthews, Barbara; Hart, L. Gary

    2008-01-01

    Context: Cancer care requires specialty surgical and medical resources that are less likely to be found in rural areas. Purpose: To examine the travel patterns and distances of rural and urban colorectal cancer (CRC) patients to 3 types of specialty cancer care services--surgery, medical oncology consultation, and radiation oncology consultation.…

  17. Perceived roles of oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Lemonde, Manon; Payman, Naghmeh

    2015-01-01

    The Canadian Association of Nurses in Oncology (CANO) Standards of Care (2001) provides a framework that delineates oncology nursing roles and responsibilities. The purpose of this study was to explore how oncology nurses perceive their roles and responsibilities compared to the CANO Standards of Care. Six focus groups were conducted and 21 registered nurses (RNs) from a community-based hospital participated in this study. Transcripts were analyzed using qualitative inductive content analysis. Three themes were identified: (1) Oncology nurses perceive a gap between their defined roles and the reality of daily practice, as cancer care becomes more complex and as they provide advanced oncology care to more patients while there is no parallel adaptation to the health care system to support them, such as safe staffing; (2) Oncology nursing, as a specialty, requires sustained professional development and leadership roles; and (3) Oncology nurses are committed to providing continuous care as a reference point in the health care team by fostering interdisciplinary collaboration andfacilitating patient's navigation through the system. Organizational support through commitment to appropriate staffing and matching scope ofpractice to patient needs may lead to maximize the health and well-being of nurses, quality of patient care and organizational performance. PMID:26897865

  18. Impact of the difference in surgical site on the physique in gastrointestinal tract cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Tsuyoshi; Kubo, Akira; Kogure, Eisuke; Ishii, Takaya

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to observe physical function, physique (only BMI), and nutrition status (evaluated by serum albumin levels) from before surgery to after discharge among perioperative patients with gastrointestinal tract cancer and to examine the effect of difference in surgical site (i.e., stomach, colon, and rectum) in these patients. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects were 70 patients who underwent surgical treatment for gastrointestinal tract cancer [36 males and 34 females, aged 59.3 ± 11.4 years (mean ± SD)]. The subjects were classified into three levels according to surgical site (stomach, colon, and rectum). We evaluated patients’ physical function, physique, and nutrition status in the three points: before surgery, after surgery, and after discharge. The 6-minute walk distance was measured for physical function. Body mass index was measured for physique. The serum albumin level was measured for nutrition status. [Results] Significant declines in 6-minute walk distance, body mass index, and serum albumin were observed after surgery among the study subjects. In addition, a significant decline in body mass index was observed after discharge compared with before surgery. Regarding body mass index, a significant interaction between surgical site and evaluation times was observed for ANOVA. [Conclusion] These results suggest that BMI after discharge is significantly less than that before surgery and that body mass index changes from before surgery to after surgery are efficacy the difference of surgical site in patients who undergo surgical treatment for gastrointestinal tract cancer. PMID:26957730

  19. Hepatitis B Virus Screening for Patients With Cancer Before Therapy: American Society of Clinical Oncology Provisional Clinical Opinion Update

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jessica P.; Somerfield, Mark R.; Alston-Johnson, Devena E.; Cryer, Donna R.; Feld, Jordan J.; Kramer, Barnett S.; Sabichi, Anita L.; Wong, Sandra L.; Artz, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This updated provisional clinical opinion presents a revised opinion based on American Society of Clinical Oncology panel consensus in the context of an evolving database. Context Despite the 2010 provisional clinical opinion recommendation, there is still evidence of suboptimal hepatitis B virus (HBV) screening among patients at high risk for HBV infection or HBV reactivation after chemotherapy. This updated provisional clinical opinion introduces a risk-adaptive strategy to identify and treat patients with HBV infection to reduce their risk of HBV reactivation. Provisional Clinical Opinion Medical providers should screen by testing patients for HBV infection before starting anti-CD20 therapy or hematopoietic cell transplantation. Providers should also screen patients with risk factors for HBV infection. Screening should include both hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc), because reactivation can occur in patients who are HBsAg positive/anti-HBc positive or HBsAg negative/anti-HBc positive. Either total anti-HBc or anti-HBc immunoglobulin G (not immunoglobulin M) test should be used. Clinicians should start antiviral therapy for HBsAg-positive/anti-HBc–positive patients before or contemporaneously with cancer therapy and monitor HBsAg-negative/anti-HBc–positive patients for reactivation with HBV DNA and ALT levels, promptly starting antivirals if reactivation occurs. Clinicians can initiate antivirals for HBsAg-negative/anti-HBc–positive patients anticipating cancer therapies associated with a high risk of reactivation, or they can monitor HBV DNA and ALT levels and initiate on-demand antivirals. For patients who neither have HBV risk factors nor anticipate cancer therapy associated with a high risk of reactivation, current evidence does not support HBV screening before initiation of cancer therapy. Two panel members provided a minority viewpoint, involving a strategy of universal HBsAg and selective anti

  20. Pretreatment Quality of Life Predicts for Locoregional Control in Head and Neck Cancer Patients: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Farzan; Pajak, Thomas F.; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Konski, Andre A.; Coyne, James C.; Gwede, Clement K.; Garden, Adam S.; Spencer, Sharon A.; Jones, Christopher; Movsas, Benjamin

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the prospectively collected health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) data from patients enrolled in two Radiation Therapy Oncology Group randomized Phase III head and neck cancer trials (90-03 and 91-11) to assess their value as an independent prognostic factor for locoregional control (LRC) and/or overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: HRQOL questionnaires, using a validated instrument, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Head and Neck (FACT-H and N), version 2, were completed by patients before the start of treatment. OS and LRC were the outcome measures analyzed using a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model. Results: Baseline FACT-H and N data were available for 1,093 patients and missing for 417 patients. No significant difference in outcome was found between the patients with and without baseline FACT-H and N data (p = 0.58). The median follow-up time was 27.2 months for all patients and 49 months for surviving patients. Multivariate analyses were performed for both OS and LRC. Beyond tumor and nodal stage, Karnofsky performance status, primary site, cigarette use, use of concurrent chemotherapy, and altered fractionation schedules, the FACT-H and N score was independently predictive of LRC (but not OS), with p = 0.0038. The functional well-being component of the FACT-H and N predicted most significantly for LRC (p = 0.0004). Conclusions: This study represents, to our knowledge, the largest analysis of HRQOL as a prognostic factor in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients. The results of this study have demonstrated the importance of baseline HRQOL as a significant and independent predictor of LRC in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer.

  1. Multimodal intraoperative monitoring (MIOM) during surgical decompression of thoracic spinal stenosis in 36 patients

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, Martin A.; Grob, Dieter; Porchet, F.; Jeszenszky, Dezsö; Dvorak, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    A prospective study of 36 patients who received multimodal intraoperative monitoring (MIOM) during decompression of thoracic spinal stenosis between March 2000 and December 2005 was chosen as the study design. The objective was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of MIOM techniques used for monitoring spinal cord during surgical thoracic decompression. The background data revealed that the surgical decompression for thoracic spinal stenosis is less frequent than in other regions of the spine. However, due to the relative narrow spinal canal, neurological complications could be severe. The combination of monitoring ascending and descending pathways may provide an early alert to the surgeon in order to alter the surgical procedure, and avoid neurological complications. The methods involved evaluation of intraoperative somatosensory spinal and cerebral evoked potentials and motor evoked potentials of the spinal cord and muscles that were compared with post operative clinical neurological changes. 36 consecutive patients with thoracic spinal stenosis of different aetiologies were monitored by the means of MIOM during the surgical procedure. 31 patients had true negative while one patient had false positive findings. Three patients had true positive and one patient had false negative findings. This indicates a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 97%. The one case of false negative findings recovered completely within 3 months. In conclusion, the MIOM is an effective method of monitoring the spinal cord during surgical decompression of the thoracic spine. PMID:17610089

  2. Comparison of surgical septal myectomy to medical therapy alone in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and syncope.

    PubMed

    Orme, Nicholas M; Sorajja, Paul; Dearani, Joseph A; Schaff, Hartzell V; Gersh, Bernard J; Ommen, Steve R

    2013-02-01

    The presence of syncope despite medical therapy in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) is considered an indication for surgical myectomy; however, no study has examined the long-term effects on recurrent syncope and survival after surgery in these patients. We examined 239 patients with HC and a history of syncope who had undergone surgical myectomy (mean age 48 ± 17 years; 56% men). The patients were age- and gender-matched to patients with HC and syncope who were treated medically without myectomy (mean age 51 ± 16 years; 59% men). The median follow-up period was 4.7 years (0.8, 11.3). The recurrence rate of syncope was 11% in the myectomy patients and 40% in the medical group (p <0.0001). Multiple episodes of syncope, left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, and recent syncope were identified as baseline predictors of recurrent syncope. Survival free of all-cause mortality was greater for patients who had undergone surgical myectomy than for the medically treated patients (10-year estimate 82 ± 4% vs 69 ± 4%; p = 0.01). In conclusion, surgical myectomy in patients with HC and a history of syncope was associated with a reduction in recurrent syncope and increased survival.

  3. Breast cancer patients' narrative experiences about communication during the oncology care process: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Abt Sacks, A; Perestelo-Perez, L; Rodriguez-Martin, B; Cuellar-Pompa, L; Algara López, M; González Hernández, N; Serrano-Aguilar, P

    2016-09-01

    To analyse the perception about the information and communication received to evaluate oncologic care of breast cancer patients in Spain. Qualitative study based on conducting in-depth interviews. An inductive thematic analysis of the illness narratives was performed. Intentional theoretical sampling of 41 people diagnosed with breast cancer. The information provided during care process is assessed as appropriate, as it includes personalised skills focused on communication and considers organisational and contextual issues. In some cases, the information was considered partial, heterogeneous and at times contradictory, which revealed a lack of continuity. To provide and adequately cover information needs from the patient perspective, it is necessary to ensure access, both in its physical (material) and intellectual (comprehension) dimension, keeping in mind elements of social capital (social networks) and cultural capital (values, beliefs, non-verbal language) that facilitate or hinder access. The current state of transition to a horizontal model in the doctor-patient relationship, could account for the difficulties, deficits and contradictions in communication and information that breast cancer patients perceive in many contexts.

  4. Breast cancer patients' narrative experiences about communication during the oncology care process: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Abt Sacks, A; Perestelo-Perez, L; Rodriguez-Martin, B; Cuellar-Pompa, L; Algara López, M; González Hernández, N; Serrano-Aguilar, P

    2016-09-01

    To analyse the perception about the information and communication received to evaluate oncologic care of breast cancer patients in Spain. Qualitative study based on conducting in-depth interviews. An inductive thematic analysis of the illness narratives was performed. Intentional theoretical sampling of 41 people diagnosed with breast cancer. The information provided during care process is assessed as appropriate, as it includes personalised skills focused on communication and considers organisational and contextual issues. In some cases, the information was considered partial, heterogeneous and at times contradictory, which revealed a lack of continuity. To provide and adequately cover information needs from the patient perspective, it is necessary to ensure access, both in its physical (material) and intellectual (comprehension) dimension, keeping in mind elements of social capital (social networks) and cultural capital (values, beliefs, non-verbal language) that facilitate or hinder access. The current state of transition to a horizontal model in the doctor-patient relationship, could account for the difficulties, deficits and contradictions in communication and information that breast cancer patients perceive in many contexts. PMID:26412025

  5. Assessment of serologic immunity to diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis after treatment of Korean pediatric hematology and oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyo Jin; Lee, Jae-Wook; Chung, Nak-Gyun; Cho, Bin; Kim, Hack-Ki; Kang, Jin Han

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis antibody titers after antineoplastic treatment and to suggest an appropriate vaccination approach for pediatric hemato-oncologic patients. A total of 146 children with either malignancy in remission after cessation of therapy or bone marrow failure were recruited. All children had received routine immunization including diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccination before diagnosis of cancer. The serologic immunity to diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis was classified as: completely protective, partially protective, or non-protective. Non-protective serum antibody titer for diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis was detected in 6.2%, 11.6%, and 62.3% of patients, respectively, and partial protective serum antibody titer for diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis was seen in 37%, 28.1%, and 8.9% of patients. There was no significant correlation between the severity of immune defect and age, gender or underlying disease. Revaccination after antineoplastic therapy showed significantly higher levels of antibody for each vaccine antigen. Our data indicates that a large proportion of children lacked protective serum concentrations of antibodies against diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis. This suggests that reimmunization of these patients is necessary after completion of antineoplastic treatment. Also, prospective studies should be undertaken with the aim of devising a common strategy of revaccination.

  6. Surgical and prosthetic management of a complex edentulous patient for fabrication of complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Comut, A Alper; Somohano, Tanya

    2015-03-01

    Fabrication of well-fitting complete dentures becomes a challenge in the presence of epulis fissuratum in the maxilla or severely resorbed alveolar tissue in the mandible. This clinical report describes the surgical and prosthetic treatment of a patient who presented with both problems. The neutral zone technique was used to improve the stability of the mandibular complete denture. Both dentures were fabricated prior to surgical excision of the epulis fissuratum and inserted immediately following the surgery.

  7. [Optimization of approaches to the surgical treatment of patients with benign breast gland tumors].

    PubMed

    Usmanova, T É

    2014-06-01

    The results of 95 patients treatment with benign brest gland tumours (BBGT) were studied. For improve the results of treatment the introduction of surgical techniques that reduce the invasiveness of operations were applied. The performance of preoperative ultrasound (US) marking BB GT, cosmetically non-traumatic incisions, US dissector, combined cosmetic suture applay for the glandular tissue after sectoral resection of brest gland contribute to improving the results of surgical treatment, which is confirmed by the auspicious course of the early postoperative period.

  8. Evolving trends in surgically managed patients with proximal humerus fracture: are we different after ten years?

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Choon Chiet; Hey, Dennis Hwee Weng; Murphy, Diarmuid

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION New knowledge, and improved surgical hardware and fixation techniques have changed surgical management. We review the evolving trends of surgically managed proximal humerus fractures. METHODS Patients who underwent surgery for proximal humerus fractures from 1 January 2001 to 31 December 2010 were identified from the hospital’s electronic diagnosis and operative coding database. Data extracted from the database included patient demographics, comorbidities, clinical and radiological findings, operative techniques, and complications. RESULTS In total, 95 patients with 97 surgically managed proximal humerus fractures were identified. The median age of the patients was 50 (range 12–85) years, and the male to female ratio was 1.2:1.0. Male patients tended to present at a younger age than female patients (peak age 30–39 years vs. 70–79 years, p < 0.001). Two-part surgical neck fracture was the most common type of fracture (n = 33, 34.0%). Plate osteosynthesis was predominantly used for two- and three-part surgical neck fractures involving the greater tuberosity (p = 0.03, p = 0.0002, respectively). Hemiarthroplasty was commonly performed for four-part fractures (p < 0.001). Wound infections, implant failure, avascular necrosis of the humeral head and nonunion were seen in 8 (8.3%) cases. Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) had been in use since 2007 (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION Surgically managed proximal humerus fractures predominantly involved young men following high velocity injury and elderly women following osteoporotic fractures. Open plating was most commonly used for two- and three-part fractures, and hemiarthroplasty for four-part fractures. MIPO techniques have been practised in our institution since 2007. PMID:25631967

  9. Experiences of patients with cancer and their nurses on the conditions of spiritual care and spiritual interventions in oncology units

    PubMed Central

    Rassouli, Maryam; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Ghahramanian, Akram; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Alavi-Majd, Hamid; Nikanfar, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although nurses acknowledge that spiritual care is part of their role, in reality, it is performed to a lesser extent. The purpose of the present study was to explore nurses’ and patients’ experiences about the conditions of spiritual care and spiritual interventions in the oncology units of Tabriz. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted with a qualitative conventional content analysis approach in the oncology units of hospitals in Tabriz. Data were collected through purposive sampling by conducting unstructured interviews with 10 patients and 7 nurses and analyzed simultaneously. Robustness of data analysis was evaluated by the participants and external control. Results: Three categories emerged from the study: (1) “perceived barriers for providing spiritual care” including “lack of preparation for spiritual care,” “time and space constraints,” “unprofessional view,” and “lack of support”; (2) “communication: A way for Strengthening spirituality despite the limitations” including “manifestation of spirituality in the appearances and communicative behaviors of nurses” and “communication: Transmission of spiritual energy”; and (3) “religion-related spiritual experiences” including “life events as divine will and divine exam,” “death as reincarnation,” “trust in God,” “prayer/recourse to Holy Imams,” and “acceptance of divine providence.” Although nurses had little skills in assessing and responding to the patients’ spiritual needs and did not have the organizational and clergymen's support in dealing with the spiritual distress of patients, they were the source of energy, joy, hope, and power for patients by showing empathy and compassion. The patients and nurses were using religious beliefs mentioned in Islam to strengthen the patients’ spiritual dimension. Conclusions: According to the results, integration of spiritual care in the curriculum of nursing is recommended. Patients and

  10. Integrative oncology: an overview.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gary; Cassileth, Barrie

    2014-01-01

    Integrative oncology, the diagnosis-specific field of integrative medicine, addresses symptom control with nonpharmacologic therapies. Known commonly as "complementary therapies" these are evidence-based adjuncts to mainstream care that effectively control physical and emotional symptoms, enhance physical and emotional strength, and provide patients with skills enabling them to help themselves throughout and following mainstream cancer treatment. Integrative or complementary therapies are rational and noninvasive. They have been subjected to study to determine their value, to document the problems they ameliorate, and to define the circumstances under which such therapies are beneficial. Conversely, "alternative" therapies typically are promoted literally as such; as actual antitumor treatments. They lack biologic plausibility and scientific evidence of safety and efficacy. Many are outright fraudulent. Conflating these two very different categories by use of the convenient acronym "CAM," for "complementary and alternative therapies," confuses the issue and does a substantial disservice to patients and medical professionals. Complementary and integrative modalities have demonstrated safety value and benefits. If the same were true for "alternatives," they would not be "alternatives." Rather, they would become part of mainstream cancer care. This manuscript explores the medical and sociocultural context of interest in integrative oncology as well as in "alternative" therapies, reviews commonly-asked patient questions, summarizes research results in both categories, and offers recommendations to help guide patients and family members through what is often a difficult maze. Combining complementary therapies with mainstream oncology care to address patients' physical, psychologic and spiritual needs constitutes the practice of integrative oncology. By recommending nonpharmacologic modalities that reduce symptom burden and improve quality of life, physicians also enable

  11. Patient anxiety and surgical difficulty in impacted lower third molar extractions: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Aznar-Arasa, L; Figueiredo, R; Valmaseda-Castellón, E; Gay-Escoda, C

    2014-09-01

    Encountering patients who are fearful and anxious is common in dental practice and these factors can increase the complexity of dental procedures. A prospective cohort study was performed to assess whether patient anxiety influences the difficulty of impacted lower third molar extraction and to identify other predictive factors of surgical difficulty; 102 extractions done under local anaesthesia were assessed. Several preoperative variables were recorded (demographic, anatomical, and surgical) and patient anxiety was assessed through the use of various questionnaires. Extraction difficulty was measured using the operation time (OT) and a 100-mm visual analogue scale (difficulty VAS) completed by the surgeon. Patients with deep impacted third molars that required bone removal and tooth sectioning showed higher levels of preoperative anxiety. Significant correlations were found between questionnaire scores and the surgical difficulty (OT and difficulty VAS). OT was also related to age, depth of impaction, third molar angulations, proximity of the third molar roots to the mandibular canal, hard and soft tissue coverage, and the need to perform an ostectomy and tooth sectioning. Impacted lower third molar extraction is significantly more difficult in anxious patients. Other demographic, radiological, and surgical factors were also found to be significantly related to the surgical difficulty.

  12. A Novel Digital Patient-Reported Outcome Platform for Head and Neck Oncology Patients—A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Peltola, Maria K.; Lehikoinen, Joel S.; Sippola, Lauri T.; Saarilahti, Kauko; Mäkitie, Antti A.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The patient’s role in toxicity reporting is increasingly acknowledged. There is also a need for developing modern communication methods between the patient and the medical personnel. Furthermore, the increasing number of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients is reflected in the volume of treatment follow-up visits, which remains a challenge for the health care. Electronic patient-reported outcome (ePRO) measures may provide a cost-efficient way to organize follow-up for cancer patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS We tested a novel ePRO application called Kaiku®, which enables real-time, online collection of patient-reported outcomes, such as side effects caused by treatment and quality of life. We conducted a pilot study to assess the suitability of Kaiku® for HNC patients at the Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. Patients used Kaiku® during and one month after radiotherapy to report treatment-related side effects and quality of life. Two physicians and a nurse performed the practical electronic communication part of the study. RESULTS Five of the nine patients agreed to participate in the study: three of them had local early-stage larynx cancer (T2N0, T1aN0, and T2N0) and the remaining two patients had early-stage base of tongue cancer (T2N0 and T1N2b). The degree of side effects reported by the patients via Kaiku® ranged from mild to life threatening. The number of outcome data points on patients’ progress was significantly increased, which resulted in a better follow-up and improved communication between the patient and the care team. CONCLUSIONS Kaiku® seems to be a suitable tool to monitor side effects and quality of life during and after radiotherapy among HNC patients. Kaiku® and similar tools could be useful in organizing a cost-effective follow-up process for HNC patients. We recommend conducting a larger study to further assess the impact of an ePRO solution in routine clinical practice. ePRO solutions

  13. Patient views on financial relationships between surgeons and surgical device manufacturers

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Mark W.; Gross, Allan E.; McKneally, Martin F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Over the past decade, revelations of inappropriate financial relationships between surgeons and surgical device manufacturers have challenged the presumption that surgeons can collaborate with surgical device manufacturers without damaging public trust in the surgical profession. We explored postoperative Canadian patients’ knowledge and opinions about financial relationships between surgeons and surgical device manufacturers. Methods This complex issue was explored using qualitative methods. We conducted semistructured face-to-face interviews with postoperative patients in follow-up arthroplasty clinics at an academic hospital in Toronto, Canada. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and analyzed. Patient-derived concepts and themes were uncovered. Results We interviewed 33 patients. Five major themes emerged: 1) many patients are unaware of the existence of financial relationships between surgeons and surgical device manufacturers; 2) patients approve of financial relationships that support innovation and research but are opposed to relationships that involve financial incentives that benefit only the surgeon and the manufacturer; 3) patients do not support disclosure of financial relationships during the consent process as it may shift focus away from the more important risks; 4) patients support oversight at the professional level but reject the idea of government involvement in oversight; and 5) patients entrust their surgeons to make appropriate patient-centred choices. Conclusion This qualitative study deepens our understanding of financial relationships between surgeons and industry. Patients support relationships with industry that provide potential benefit to current or future patients. They trust our ability to self-regulate. Disclosure combined with appropriate oversight will strengthen public trust in professional collaboration with industry. PMID:26384147

  14. [Bladder drainage in patients undergoing the Pereyra surgical procedure].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Colorado, S; Villagrán, R; Escobar-Del Barco, L; Villalobos-Acosta, S; Kunhardt-Rasch, J; Delgado-Urdapilleta, J

    1996-07-01

    Postoperative acute urinary retention was evaluated in the patients who underwent Pereyra procedure. Comparison of suprapubic and urethral catheterization. Between January 1994 and July 1995, fifty two patients with urinary stress incontinence underwent Pereyra procedure, 31 female patient with suprapubic drainage (cistofix Ch 15) and 17 urethral catherization with a latex foley catheter. Sponatneous micturition and urinary retention was evaluated until the catheter was removed. Mean age was 43.8 years (32 a 66), the duration of suprapubic vesical drainage with suprapubic catheter were 3 days in 58.6% of the patients, and more than 3 days in 41.29%. Recatheterizacion in the patients with urethral drainage was more frequent. Urinary retention after 7 days was present in 23.99% with suprapubic vesical drainage and 28.5% with urethral catheter. Recatheterization is more frequent in patients with urethral catheter.

  15. Factors influencing patients seeking oral health care in the oncology dental support clinic at an urban university dental school setting.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Dale M; Walker, Mary P; Liu, Ying; Mitchell, Tanya Villalpando

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify predictors and/or factors associated with medically compromised patients seeking dental care in the oncology dental support clinic (ODSC) at the University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC) School of Dentistry. An 18-item survey was mailed to 2,541 patients who were new patients to the clinic from 2006 to 2011. The response rate was approximately 18% (n = 450). Analyses included descriptive statistics of percentages/frequencies as well as predictors based on correlations. Fifty percent of participants, 100 females and 119 males, identified their primary medical diagnosis as cancer. Total household income (p < .001) and the importance of receiving dental care (p < .001) were significant factors in relation to self-rated dental health. Perceived overall health (p < .001) also had a significant association with cancer status and the need for organ transplants. This study provided the ODSC at UMKC and other specialty clinics with vital information that can contribute to future planning efforts.

  16. Emergency surgical admissions in patients aged more than 80 years: a study over four decades.

    PubMed Central

    Menon, K. V.; Young, F. M.; Galland, R. B.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The proportion of older patients in the community is rising. The aim of this study was to determine the trend in emergency surgical admissions in patients over 80 years of age in 1997 compared with the previous three decades. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data were obtained on all patients over 80 years of age admitted as general surgical emergencies in 1997 to the Royal Berkshire and Battle Hospitals, Reading, UK. Reasons for admission, management, mortality and duration of hospital stay were recorded and compared with results from 1966, 1976 and 1989. RESULTS: During 1997, 4807 patients over the age of 80 years were admitted as emergencies to all specialities. Of these, 447 (9.3%) were surgical. This compares with 122 in 1966, 248 in 1976 and 339 in 1989. Emergency surgical workload in patients over 80 years of age had increased from 6.2% in 1966 to 12% in 1997. A random sample of 261 patients was analysed. In-patient mortality was 13.8% in 1997 compared with 21.8% for 1976 and 22.4% for 1989. Median length of stay was 8 days (range, 0-41 days) for 1997 and 1989 compared with 14 days in 1976. Twenty-four patients either needed admission to other specialities or need not have been admitted as emergencies at all and were classified as inappropriate admissions to the general surgical ward. CONCLUSIONS: The trend of increased number of patients over the age of 80 years being admitted as emergencies to general surgery continues through four decades. There has been a decrease in mortality and length of stay since 1966, but no decrease in length of stay in 1997 compared with 1989. Avoiding inappropriate admissions would result in a significant improvement in bed utilisation for elective surgery and help to reduce waiting lists. PMID:11103155

  17. Surgical Outcomes in Patients with High Spinal Instability Neoplasm Score Secondary to Spinal Giant Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Benjamin D.; Sankey, Eric W.; Goodwin, C. Rory; Kosztowski, Thomas A.; Lo, Sheng-Fu L.; Bydon, Ali; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Witham, Timothy F.; Sciubba, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective review. Objective To describe the surgical outcomes in patients with high preoperative Spinal Instability Neoplastic Score (SINS) secondary to spinal giant cell tumors (GCT) and evaluate the impact of en bloc versus intralesional resection and preoperative embolization on postoperative outcomes. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on 14 patients with GCTs of the spine who underwent surgical treatment prior to the use of denosumab. A univariate analysis was performed comparing the patient demographics, perioperative characteristics, and surgical outcomes between patients who underwent en bloc marginal (n = 6) compared with those who had intralesional (n = 8) resection. Results Six patients underwent en bloc resections and eight underwent intralesional resection. Preoperative embolization was performed in eight patients. All patients were alive at last follow-up, with a mean follow-up length of 43 months. Patients who underwent en bloc resection had longer average operative times (p = 0.0251), higher rates of early (p = 0.0182) and late (p = 0.0389) complications, and a higher rate of surgical revision (p = 0.0120). There was a 25% (2/8 patients) local recurrence rate for intralesional resection and a 0% (0/6 patients) local recurrence rate for en bloc resection (p = 0.0929). Conclusions Surgical excision of spinal GCTs causing significant instability, assessed by SINS, is associated with high intraoperative blood loss despite embolization and independent of resection method. En bloc resection requires a longer operative duration and is associated with a higher risk of complications when compared with intralesional resection. However, the increased morbidity associated with en bloc resection may be justified as it may minimize the risk of local recurrence. PMID:26835198

  18. [Choice of surgical treatment in patients with acute destructive pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Belik, B M; Chernov, V N; Alibekov, A Z

    2015-01-01

    Medical and diagnostic algorithm in patients with pancreatic necrosis is developed. It takes into consideration features and expansion of necrotic process in retroperitoneal space, objective severity of patients' condition according to SAPS scale and inflammatory process according to serum procalcitonin concentration. Comparative analysis revealed that the use of developed algorithm improves results of treatment.

  19. External Dacryocystorhinostomy: Characteristics and Surgical Outcomes in Patients with and without Previous Dacryocystitis.

    PubMed

    Rabina, Gilad; Golan, Shani; Neudorfer, Meira; Leibovitch, Igal

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To compare pre- and postoperative characteristics and surgical success rates of patients with and without previous episodes of dacryocystitis, who underwent external dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) for nasolacrimal duct obstruction (NLDO). Methods. The medical files of all patients who underwent external DCR between 2006 and 2011 in our institution were reviewed. The retrieved data of patients with and without previous episodes of dacryocystitis were compared. Surgical success was determined by postoperative followup of at least 6 months. Results. A total of 185 patients with NLDO underwent external DCR of whom 152 (100 females and 52 males, mean age 67 ± 15 years) met the inclusion criteria. Sixty had previous episodes of dacryocystitis and 92 did not. Left-side obstruction was more common than right-side obstruction among patients with previous episodes of dacryocystitis (48.3% versus 31.7%, resp., P = 0.031). Glaucoma patients were significantly more likely to develop dacryocystitis than patients without glaucoma (P = 0.002). The success rate of external DCR was 94.4% for patients with previous episodes of dacryocystitis and 86.7% for patients without (P = 0.337). Conclusions. The surgical outcomes of external DCR in patients with or without a previous episode of dacryocystitis were similar. Patients with glaucoma and NLDO had a significantly higher risk of developing dacryocystitis. PMID:24455195

  20. External Dacryocystorhinostomy: Characteristics and Surgical Outcomes in Patients with and without Previous Dacryocystitis

    PubMed Central

    Rabina, Gilad; Golan, Shani; Neudorfer, Meira; Leibovitch, Igal

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To compare pre- and postoperative characteristics and surgical success rates of patients with and without previous episodes of dacryocystitis, who underwent external dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) for nasolacrimal duct obstruction (NLDO). Methods. The medical files of all patients who underwent external DCR between 2006 and 2011 in our institution were reviewed. The retrieved data of patients with and without previous episodes of dacryocystitis were compared. Surgical success was determined by postoperative followup of at least 6 months. Results. A total of 185 patients with NLDO underwent external DCR of whom 152 (100 females and 52 males, mean age 67 ± 15 years) met the inclusion criteria. Sixty had previous episodes of dacryocystitis and 92 did not. Left-side obstruction was more common than right-side obstruction among patients with previous episodes of dacryocystitis (48.3% versus 31.7%, resp., P = 0.031). Glaucoma patients were significantly more likely to develop dacryocystitis than patients without glaucoma (P = 0.002). The success rate of external DCR was 94.4% for patients with previous episodes of dacryocystitis and 86.7% for patients without (P = 0.337). Conclusions. The surgical outcomes of external DCR in patients with or without a previous episode of dacryocystitis were similar. Patients with glaucoma and NLDO had a significantly higher risk of developing dacryocystitis. PMID:24455195

  1. Clinical-surgical treatment of temporomandibular joint disorder in a psoriatic arthritis patient

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Condylotomy is a surgical procedure that has been used as an option to treat temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients. This technique has the advantage of avoiding intra-capsular alterations that might be found involving other surgical procedures. Its use, even when unilateral, has positive effect on treatment of both joints. Methods In order to better evaluate the benefits of a clinical-surgical treatment for TMD, the present report describes the case of a psoriatic arthritis patient. The case was clinically characterized by dental malloclusion, and imaging exams showed joint degeneration of the right mandibular condyle. The patient was treated by condylotomy technique after a prosthetic oral rehabilitation. Results No clinical-radiological signs or symptoms of progression of articular disease were observed within a period of 16 months after surgery. Furthermore, there was functional stability of the temporomandibular joint, total absence of local pain and improvement of mouth opening. Conclusion The present study suggests that condylotomy can be considered as a valid option for the management of TMD, since it has low surgical morbidity and favorable clinical outcomes. In this case, the patient had a medical diagnosis of systemic disease presenting general pain and pain at the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), in addition of causal agent of TMD (dental malloclusion). The difficulty of finding a single etiology (malocclusion vs. systemic disease) did not exclude the indication of a clinical-surgical treatment to re-establish the balance of TMJ. PMID:23556553

  2. The optimal organization of gynecologic oncology services: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Fung-Kee-Fung, M.; Kennedy, E.B.; Biagi, J.; Colgan, T.; D’Souza, D.; Elit, L.M.; Hunter, A.; Irish, J.; McLeod, R.; Rosen, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background A system-level organizational guideline for gynecologic oncology was identified by a provincial cancer agency as a key priority based on input from stakeholders, data showing more limited availability of multidisciplinary or specialist care in lower-volume than in higher-volume hospitals in the relevant jurisdiction, and variable rates of staging for ovarian and endometrial cancer patients. Methods A systematic review assessed the relationship of the organization of gynecologic oncology services with patient survival and surgical outcomes. The electronic databases medline and embase (ovid: 1996 through 9 January 2015) were searched using terms related to gynecologic malignancies combined with organization of services, patterns of care, and various facility and physician characteristics. Outcomes of interest included overall or disease-specific survival, short-term survival, adequate staging, and degree of cytoreduction or optimal cytoreduction (or both) for ovarian cancer patients by hospital or physician type, and rate of discrepancy in initial diagnoses and intraoperative consultation between non-specialist pathologists and gyne-oncology–specialist pathologists. Results One systematic review and sixteen additional primary studies met the inclusion criteria. The evidence base as a whole was judged to be of lower quality; however, a trend toward improved outcomes with centralization of gynecologic oncology was found, particularly with respect to the gynecologic oncology care of patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer. Conclusions Improvements in outcomes with centralization of gynecologic oncology services can be attributed to a number of factors, including access to specialist care and multidisciplinary team management. Findings of this systematic review should be used with caution because of the limitations of the evidence base; however, an expert consensus process made it possible to create recommendations for implementation. PMID:26300679

  3. Anesthesia considerations for robotic surgery in gynecologic oncology.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Mohamed; Béïque, François; Al-Halal, Hani; Azar, Tania; Akkour, Khalid; Lau, Susie K; Gotlieb, Walter H

    2011-12-01

    Robot-assisted gynecologic surgery is performed with a pneumoperitoneum and prolonged maximum Trendelenburg position which can result in adverse physiologic effects. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of robot-assisted gynecologic oncology procedures and to identify anesthesia-related peri-operative adverse events. This is a case series performed on the first 133 patients who underwent a robot-assisted gynecologic oncology procedure at a tertiary care facility. Data was collected from electronically archived patient charts and from a prospective surgical database. Patient demographics were recorded and significant intra-operative and post-operative adverse events were reviewed. Robot-assisted surgery for gynecologic oncologic surgery with the use of extreme Trendelenburg in all patients was safely and successfully performed across a wide range of ages, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status scores and body mass indices. Although most patients developed various degree of facial edema, only 5% of patients had a delayed extubation. Transient intra-operative hypoxemia (O2 saturation < 90%) occurred in 3.75% (5/133) of patients and hypercapnia (CO2 > 45 mmHg) in 18% (24/133). The mean duration of surgery was 254 min and median hospital stay was 1 day. Anesthetic and peri-operative complications are rare for patients undergoing robot-assisted gynecologic oncology surgeries despite the prolonged use of maximum Trendelenburg positioning and pneumoperitoneum. Although there are new anesthetic challenges, these surgeries were safely performed in a wide range of patients with minimal blood loss, short hospital stay and no significant cardiopulmonary complications. PMID:27628112

  4. [Assessment of surgical risk in patients with lower limb chronic critical ischaemia].

    PubMed

    Kazakov, Iu I; Lukin, I B; Sokolova, N Iu; Strakhov, M A

    2016-01-01

    Analysed herein are both immediate and remote results of surgical treatment of 93 patients presenting with chronic atherosclerotic occlusion of the femoral-popliteal-tibial segment in the stage of critical ischaemia. The patients were subjected to autovenous femoropopliteal bypass grafting to the isolated arterial segment or balloon angioplasty with stenting of the superficial femoral artery. While choosing the method of arterial reconstruction we assessed concomitant diseases, primarily lesions of the coronary and cerebral circulation. In order to objectively evaluate the patient state, we worked out a scale for assessing surgical risk. Survival rate without amputation after three years in patients with low risk amounted to 71.4%, in those with moderate risk to 60.0%, and in high-risk patients to 43.3%. Patients with initially high risk were found to have a high incidence rate of cardiac and cerebrovascular complications, exceeding 40%. It was shown that the worked out system of assessing the level of surgical risk objectively reflects the prognosis of patient survival following a reconstructive operation. This system of assessment may be appropriate while choosing an optimal method of arterial reconstruction (bypassing operation or endovascular intervention) in patients with atherosclerotic lesions of arteries of the femoropopliteal-tibial segment and critical ischaemia accompanied by severe concomitant pathology. Patients with high surgical risk should preferably be subjected to endovascular reconstruction, while those with low surgical risk should better undergo open shunting bypassing operation, and for those with moderate risk it is acceptable to perform both methods of arterial reconstruction. PMID:27626262

  5. Postoperative Adverse Outcomes in Intellectually Disabled Surgical Patients: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jui-An; Liao, Chien-Chang; Chang, Chuen-Chau; Chang, Hang; Chen, Ta-Liang

    2011-01-01

    Background Intellectually disabled patients have various comorbidities, but their risks of adverse surgical outcomes have not been examined. This study assesses pre-existing comorbidities, adjusted risks of postoperative major morbidities and mortality in intellectually disabled surgical patients. Methods A nationwide population-based study was conducted in patients who underwent inpatient major surgery in Taiwan between 2004 and 2007. Four controls for each patient were randomly selected from the National Health Insurance Research Database. Preoperative major comorbidities, postoperative major complications and 30-day in-hospital mortality were compared between patients with and without intellectual disability. Use of medical services also was analyzed. Adjusted odds ratios using multivariate logistic regression analyses with 95% confidence intervals were applied to verify intellectual disability's impact. Results Controls were compared with 3983 surgical patients with intellectual disability. Risks for postoperative major complications were increased in patients with intellectual disability, including acute renal failure (odds ratio 3.81, 95% confidence interval 2.28 to 6.37), pneumonia (odds ratio 2.01, 1.61 to 2.49), postoperative bleeding (odds ratio 1.35, 1.09 to 1.68) and septicemia (odds ratio 2.43, 1.85 to 3.21) without significant differences in overall mortality. Disability severity was positively correlated with postoperative septicemia risk. Medical service use was also significantly higher in surgical patients with intellectual disability. Conclusion Intellectual disability significantly increases the risk of overall major complications after major surgery. Our findings show a need for integrated and revised protocols for postoperative management to improve care for intellectually disabled surgical patients. PMID:22046425

  6. Psychological modulation in patients surgically intervened for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Lara, F J Pérez; Carranque, G; Oehling, H; Hernández, J M; Oliva, H

    2014-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been related with certain psychological dimensions. The influence of mood, emotional intelligence, and perceived quality of life on clinical symptoms and outcome of antireflux surgery was evaluated in GERD patients with and without hiatal hernia. The study included 61 patients who were diagnosed with GERD between 2003 and 2008: 16 of them without hiatal hernia (group A) and 45 of them with hiatal hernia (group B). All of these patients had undergone laparoscopic antireflux surgery. Patients were clinically examined and evaluated with the following instruments: Short Form (SF)-36 Health Survey, Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index, Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) Scale, and Trait Meta-Mood Scale (TMMS)-24. Proportions were compared by using the chi-squared test; averages were compared by using the Student's t-test (with Bonferroni's correction). In general, our patients intervened for GERD showed results lower than normal or close to the lower limit of normal in the administered tests. Patients in the group without hernia were younger (P < 0.001) and with lower American Society of Anaesthesiologists risk. They showed higher scores in the SF-36 dimensions: Physical Functioning, Physical Role and Emotional Role, and lower scores in the Social Role (P < 0.001). They showed lower scores in the Emotional dimension of Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index (P = 0.0068) and worse results in the Hospital Anxiety and Depression subscales of Anxiety (P < 0.001) and Depression (not significant). Men in the group without hernia showed higher scores than men in the group with hernia in the TMMS subscales corresponding to Emotional Clarity and Emotional Repair (P < 0.001). Women in the group with hernia showed higher scores than women in the group without hernia regarding Emotional Clarity (P = 0.0012). GERD patients showed poor results in all the tests, and patients without hiatal hernia compared with patients with hernia showed

  7. Orthodontic and Orthognathic Surgical Treatment of a Pediatric OSA Patient

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A case report is presented which demonstrates the effectiveness of comprehensive orthodontic treatment combined with orthognathic surgery in the correction of malocclusion and reduction in the sequelae of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). The patient's severe OSA was improved to very mild as evaluated by full overnight polysomnogram. The orthodontic treatment included the expansion of both dental arches and mandibular advancement surgery. There was significant improvement in the patient's sleep continuity and architecture with the elimination of obstructive apneas. PMID:27668098

  8. Orthodontic and Orthognathic Surgical Treatment of a Pediatric OSA Patient

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A case report is presented which demonstrates the effectiveness of comprehensive orthodontic treatment combined with orthognathic surgery in the correction of malocclusion and reduction in the sequelae of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). The patient's severe OSA was improved to very mild as evaluated by full overnight polysomnogram. The orthodontic treatment included the expansion of both dental arches and mandibular advancement surgery. There was significant improvement in the patient's sleep continuity and architecture with the elimination of obstructive apneas.

  9. Orthodontic and Orthognathic Surgical Treatment of a Pediatric OSA Patient.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Gregory W

    2016-01-01

    A case report is presented which demonstrates the effectiveness of comprehensive orthodontic treatment combined with orthognathic surgery in the correction of malocclusion and reduction in the sequelae of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). The patient's severe OSA was improved to very mild as evaluated by full overnight polysomnogram. The orthodontic treatment included the expansion of both dental arches and mandibular advancement surgery. There was significant improvement in the patient's sleep continuity and architecture with the elimination of obstructive apneas. PMID:27668098

  10. Surgical treatment of iliotibial band friction syndrome. A retrospective study of 45 patients.

    PubMed

    Drogset, J O; Rossvoll, I; Grøntvedt, T

    1999-10-01

    Iliotibial band friction syndrome is an overuse injury mainly affecting runners, but also other athletes. The treatment of choice is conservative. If this treatment is unsuccessful, surgical treatment can be performed. The posterior half of the iliotibial band is transsected where it passes over the lateral epicondyle of the femur. Optionally the underlying bursa is removed. Between 1989 and 1996 45 patients were operated in Trondheim. The mean age was 27 (14-46) years. Of the patients, 22 (48.9%) had excellent results, 16 (35.5%) had good results, 6 (13.3%) had fair results and 1 (2.2%) patient had a poor result. One patient had a minor postoperative infection. Had the postoperative result been known beforehand, 75.6% of the patients would have been operated on again. We conclude that surgical treatment of iliotibial band friction syndrome produces good results in patients with insufficient relief of symptoms after conservative treatment.

  11. The current and future role of the medical oncologist in the professional care for cancer patients: a position paper by the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO).

    PubMed

    Popescu, R A; Schäfer, R; Califano, R; Eckert, R; Coleman, R; Douillard, J-Y; Cervantes, A; Casali, P G; Sessa, C; Van Cutsem, E; de Vries, E; Pavlidis, N; Fumasoli, K; Wörmann, B; Samonigg, H; Cascinu, S; Cruz Hernández, J J; Howard, A J; Ciardiello, F; Stahel, R A; Piccart, M

    2014-01-01

    The number of cancer patients in Europe is rising and significant advances in basic and applied cancer research are making the provision of optimal care more challenging. The concept of cancer as a systemic, highly heterogeneous and complex disease has increased the awareness that quality cancer care should be provided by a multidisciplinary team (MDT) of highly qualified healthcare professionals. Cancer patients also have the right to benefit from medical progress by receiving optimal treatment from adequately trained and highly skilled medical professionals. Built on the highest standards of professional training and continuing medical education, medical oncology is recognised as an independent medical specialty in many European countries. Medical oncology is a core member of the MDT and offers cancer patients a comprehensive and systemic approach to treatment and care, while ensuring evidence-based, safe and cost-effective use of cancer drugs and preserving the quality of life of cancer patients through the entire 'cancer journey'. Medical oncologists are also engaged in clinical and translational research to promote innovation and new therapies and they contribute to cancer diagnosis, prevention and research, making a difference for patients in a dynamic, stimulating professional environment. Medical oncologists play an important role in shaping the future of healthcare through innovation and are also actively involved at the political level to ensure a maximum contribution of the profession to Society and to tackle future challenges. This position paper summarises the multifarious and vital contributions of medical oncology and medical oncologists to today's and tomorrow's professional cancer care.

  12. Daily baseline skin care in the prevention, treatment, and supportive care of skin toxicity in oncology patients: recommendations from a multinational expert panel

    PubMed Central

    Bensadoun, René-Jean; Humbert, Phillipe; Krutman, Jean; Luger, Thomas; Triller, Raoul; Rougier, André; Seite, Sophie; Dreno, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Skin reactions due to radiotherapy and chemotherapy are a significant problem for an important number of cancer patients. While effective for treating cancer, they disturb cutaneous barrier function, causing a reaction soon after initiation of treatment that impacts patient quality of life. Managing these symptoms with cosmetics and nonpharmaceutical skin care products for camouflage or personal hygiene may be important for increasing patient self-esteem. However, inappropriate product choice or use could worsen side effects. Although recommendations exist for the pharmaceutical treatment of skin reactions, there are no recommendations for the choice or use of dermatologic skin care products for oncology patients. The present guidelines were developed by a board of European experts in dermatology and oncology to provide cancer care professionals with guidance for the appropriate use of non-pharmaceutical, dermocosmetic skin care management of cutaneous toxicities associated with radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy, including epidermal growth factor inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. The experts hope that these recommendations will improve the management of cutaneous side effects and hence quality of life for oncology patients. PMID:24353440

  13. Food intake and nutritional status influence outcomes in hospitalized hematology-oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Calleja Fernández, Alicia; Pintor de la Maza, Begoña; Vidal Casariego, Alfonso; Villar Taibo, Rocío; López Gómez, Juan José; Cano Rodríguez, Isidoro; Ballesteros Pomar, María D

    2015-06-01

    Introducción: la malnutrición en el paciente oncohematológico es importante debido a su prevalencia y a su morbimortalidad asociadas. El objetivo de este estudio fue analizar la prevalencia de malnutrición en el paciente oncohematológico y determinar si la ingesta o la malnutrición afectan a las complicaciones del paciente hospitalizado. Metodología: estudio de corte realizado en todos los pacientes admitidos en las plantas de oncología y hematología durante un periodo de 30 días. La valoración nutricional se realizó durante las 24 primeras horas tras el ingreso y se repitió a los 7 días de hospitalización, incluyendo Valoración Subjetiva Global, antropometría, recuerdo de 24 horas y estimación de las necesidades calóricas y proteicas. Las historias médicas fueron revisadas a los 30 días tras el alta. Resultados: setenta y tres pacientes fueron evaluados al ingreso y 29 a los siete días de su hospitalización. La prevalencia de malnutrición fue 47,7%. Al ingreso, los pacientes consumieron 71,6 (DE 22,0)% de las calorías prescritas y 68,2 (DE 22,0)% de las proteínas prescritas. La tasa de fallecimientos fue 2,8% entre los pacientes que consumieron ≥75% y 17,9% entre aquellos que consumieron.

  14. Minimally Invasive Surgery in Gynecologic Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Kristina M.; Neubauer, Nikki L.

    2013-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery has been utilized in the field of obstetrics and gynecology as far back as the 1940s when culdoscopy was first introduced as a visualization tool. Gynecologists then began to employ minimally invasive surgery for adhesiolysis and obtaining biopsies but then expanded its use to include procedures such as tubal sterilization (Clyman (1963), L. E. Smale and M. L. Smale (1973), Thompson and Wheeless (1971), Peterson and Behrman (1971)). With advances in instrumentation, the first laparoscopic hysterectomy was successfully performed in 1989 by Reich et al. At the same time, minimally invasive surgery in gynecologic oncology was being developed alongside its benign counterpart. In the 1975s, Rosenoff et al. reported using peritoneoscopy for pretreatment evaluation in ovarian cancer, and Spinelli et al. reported on using laparoscopy for the staging of ovarian cancer. In 1993, Nichols used operative laparoscopy to perform pelvic lymphadenectomy in cervical cancer patients. The initial goals of minimally invasive surgery, not dissimilar to those of modern medicine, were to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with surgery and therefore improve patient outcomes and patient satisfaction. This review will summarize the history and use of minimally invasive surgery in gynecologic oncology and also highlight new minimally invasive surgical approaches currently in development. PMID:23997959

  15. Cardiac Papillary Fibroelastoma: Single-Institution Experience with 14 Surgical Patients.

    PubMed

    Abu Saleh, Walid K; Al Jabbari, Odeaa; Ramlawi, Basel; Reardon, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    In general, treatment for symptomatic and asymptomatic cardiac papillary fibroelastoma is surgical resection-particularly of left-sided lesions, because of the risk of systemic embolization. However, few institutions have enough experience with these tumors to validate this approach. We present our institutional experience with papillary fibroelastoma and discuss our current approach. We searched our institution's cardiac tumor database, identified all patients diagnosed with cardiac papillary fibroelastoma from 1992 through 2014, and recorded the clinical and pathologic characteristics of each case. We found 14 patients (mean age, 60.5 ± 12.3 yr) who had 18 lesions. Eleven patients (79%) were symptomatic; however, we could not always definitively associate their symptoms with a cardiac tumor. Most lesions were solitary and ≤1.5 cm in diameter; half involved the left side of the heart. All 18 lesions were surgically excised. There were no operative or 30-day deaths, and no patient needed valve replacement postoperatively. There was one late death; at one year, another 3 patients were lost to follow-up, and the others were alive without tumor recurrence. Because of the embolic risk inherent to intracardiac masses and our relatively good postoperative outcomes, we recommend the surgical resection of all left-sided papillary fibroelastomas in surgical candidates, and we discuss with patients the advisability of resecting right-sided lesions.

  16. Patient Satisfaction of Surgical Treatment of Clitoral Phimosis and Labial Adhesions Caused by Lichen Sclerosus

    PubMed Central

    King, Michelle; Rieff, Mollie; Krapf, Jill; Goldstein, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Lichen sclerosus (LS) is a chronic inflammatory dermatosis, usually affecting the anogenital skin in women. This chronic inflammation can cause scarring of genitalia including narrowing of the introitus and phimosis of the clitoris. These architectural changes can lead to recurrent tearing during intercourse (vulvar granuloma fissuratum) and decreased clitoral sensation. Surgical correction of vulvar granuloma fissuratum (VGF) and clitoral phimosis can be performed, but there is little data on the patient satisfaction and complications following these surgical procedures. Aim To evaluate patient experience and outcomes in women undergoing surgical correction of scarring caused by anogenital LS. Methods A retrospective chart review of patients at a vulvar disorders clinic was performed to identify women who had undergone surgical correction of clitoral phimosis or lysis of vulvar adhesions for VGF due to LS. Twenty‐eight women were contacted via telephone between 4 and 130 months postoperatively. An eight‐question survey was used to determine patient experience and outcomes. Main Outcome Measures All participants completed an eight‐question survey to evaluate patient satisfaction with the surgery, effects on clitoral sensation, orgasm and pain with intercourse, postoperative symptoms or complications, and the presence of recurrent vulvar scarring. Results Participants reported that they were either very satisfied (44%) or satisfied (40%) with the procedure. Of the women who experienced decreased clitoral sensation prior to surgery, 75% endorsed increased clitoral sensitivity postoperatively. Of the women who had dyspareunia prior to surgery, the majority of women reported having pain‐free sex (33%) or improved but not completely pain‐free sex (58%) after surgery. There were no complications or symptoms made worse by the surgical procedures. Conclusions This study shows high patient satisfaction and low complication risk associated

  17. Using a screening tool to improve timely referral of patients from acute oncology-haematology to palliative care services

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Akhtari

    2013-01-01

    This project was done at specialist cancer hospital in Qatar. At a haematology-oncology inpatient department most patients were not getting access to palliative care unless they were at the very end stages of life. Data collected from 2008-2011 showed significant numbers of patients were dying within one month of their transfer to palliative care. There was no standard measure to identify the prospective palliative care patients. A multidisciplinary team developed a Palliative care referral screening tool based on the National Cancer Care Network guideline. Retrospective medical record review done from January to April 2012 showed a mean of 68% of patients who scored more than five were not consulted, 32% of patients who scored more than seven were not transferred to palliative care and seven percent died without any referral. The team used various kinds of quality planning, analysis and improvement tools in the form of process mapping, value analysis, Fish Bone diagrams, stakeholders' analysis and communication, physician survey, “Pareto's principal” (80 / 20 rule, the law of vital few) and other data collection tools. The palliative care referral process was standardised by preparing and implementing an objective scoring tool based on international best practice. It changed the referral culture and helped manage the psychological barriers of patients, families and caregivers. Extensive orientation and education of all key stakeholders was implemented. Monthly auditing of patient records was carried out. The aim has been achieved, exceeded and sustained, and we reduced the percentage of patients who scored more than five without palliative consultation from a mean of 68% to 16% and those who scored more than seven without palliative care transfer from a mean of thirty two percent to three percent, after four months of the project's implementation. Standardising the referral process and creating an objective referral tool is needed to facilitate safe

  18. Iron chelation with deferasirox for the treatment of secondary hemosiderosis in pediatric oncology patients: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Ktena, Yiouli P; Athanasiadou, Anastasia; Lambrou, George; Adamaki, Maria; Moschovi, Maria

    2013-08-01

    Pediatric oncology patients are often iron overloaded, due to the multiple blood transfusions necessary during the course of chemotherapy. Our aim is to report the efficacy and safety of deferasirox, an oral iron chelator, in this patient group. Deferasirox was administered to 13 children with malignancies in remission and iron overload. Ferritin, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, transaminases, and bilirubin were recorded at 4- to 8-week intervals, and hepatic and cardiac iron overload were assessed with magnetic resonance imaging before initiation of treatment. Deferasirox was administered for an average of 6 months (SD=4.5; range, 0.3 to 18.2). Two children presented with skin rash, 1 with gastrointestinal disturbances, and 1 with fully reversible acute renal failure. The mean monthly rate of change in ferritin levels was -10.8 μg/L before initiation of treatment (95% confidence interval [CI], -19.8 to -1.8; P=0.02) and -93.6 μg/L during deferasirox treatment (95% CI, -118.1 to -69.1; P<0.001). The difference in the monthly rate of change in ferritin levels before and after treatment initiation was -82.8 μg/L (95% CI, -111.6 to -53.9; P<0.001). Deferasirox was effective in reducing the iron burden. The adverse effects were easily monitored and managed. Further studies are warranted to investigate the effect of deferasirox on mortality and morbidity in this population.

  19. Early Benefit Assessments in Oncology in Germany: How Can a Clinically Relevant Endpoint Not Be Relevant to Patients?

    PubMed

    Ruof, Jörg; Flückiger, Olivier; Andre, Niko

    2015-09-01

    After 4 years of early benefit assessment (EBA) in Germany, it is becoming evident that the Federal Joint Committee (FJC) frequently considers well-established clinical endpoints as not being relevant to patients. Focusing on assessments of oncology medicines, we analysed the FJC's view on primary endpoints and compared it with the approach used by regulatory authorities. Mortality data were accepted by both stakeholders. Whereas regulatory authorities accepted primary morbidity endpoints such as progression-free survival and response rates, the FJC mostly excluded these from its assessments. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) data have been poorly reflected in the approval process; for EBAs, those data have rarely impacted on benefit ratings. We argue that agreement between regulatory authorities and the FJC is required regarding primary study endpoints that are relevant to patients, and that clarification of acceptable endpoints by the FJC, especially in the morbidity domain, has to be provided. Moreover, in order to fully acknowledge the benefit of a new medicinal product, mortality, morbidity and HRQoL should be weighted differentially, according to the condition. PMID:26286202

  20. [Using arts therapies in psycho-oncology: evaluation of an exploratory study implemented in an out-patient setting].

    PubMed

    Schiltz, L; Zimoch, A

    2013-01-01

    According to the state-of-the-art in health psychology and psycho-oncology, a cancerous disease, as well as the accompanying medical treatments, is a source ofintense emotional stress. As feelings of insecurity and anxiety are likely to induce negative effects on immune defences, those effects may overlap with the cancerous disease and complicate its evolution. As arts therapies tend to favour the imaginary and symbolic elaboration of the tensions of daily life, as well as the re appropriation of one's body and personal history, different artistic mediations may occupy an important function in the psychological follow-up of the patient. Following an exploratory study in a hospital, we carried out an action-research in an out-patient setting during six moths. The arts therapeutic treatment comprehended alternatively drawing and writing sessions while listening to music, opening tracks for a thorough verbal elaboration. The evaluation was based on psychometric scales (HADS and MDBF), rating scales for the pictorial and literary production and a semi-structured interview. According to the results of the quantitative analyses, based on non parametric statistical procedures for small groups and non metric data, as well as to the qualitative content analyses, arts therapies could become a valuable treating measure within a multidisciplinary bio-psycho-social approach.

  1. Prevalence of emotional symptoms in Chilean oncology patients before the start of chemotherapy: potential of the distress thermometer as an ultra-brief screening instrument

    PubMed Central

    Calderón, Jorge; Campla, Cristóbal; D’Aguzan, Nicole; Barraza, Soledad; Padilla, Oslando; Sánchez, Cesar; Palma, Silvia; González, Matías

    2014-01-01

    Emotional distress (ED) is greater for oncology patients in comparison with the general population, and this has implications for the quality of life of the patient and his/her family, adherence to the treatment, and eventually, survivorship. In general, the detection of these symptoms is low, which explains the need for detection systems appropriate to the clinical reality of the oncology team. The objective of this study is to evaluate for the first time the usefulness of an ultra-brief screening instrument [distress thermometer (DT)], in a group of Chilean oncology patients. A total of 166 outpatients were evaluated at the Cancer Center of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, before starting chemotherapy. Two screening instruments were applied: Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and DT. The application of HADS resulted in a prevalence of 32.7% of anxiety symptoms (HADS-A ≥ 8), 15.7% of depression symptoms (HADS-D ≥ 8), and 39.8% had a total score of HADS-T ≥ 11. The DT resulted in the prevalence of 32.5% of distress or ED (DT ≥ 5). The validity of the DT was evaluated as a screening tool in comparison with HADS, observing, in relation to the anxiety scale (HADS-A), a sensitivity of 88.9% and specificity of 78.4% (DT ≥ 4); depression (HADS-D), a sensitivity of 69.2% and specificity of 74.3% (DT ≥ 5); and in relation to the total scale (HADS-T), a sensitivity of 68.2% and specificity of 73.0% (DT ≥ 4). This study demonstrates the elevated prevalence of emotional symptoms in Chilean oncology patients, before the start of chemotherapy, and confirms the potential of the DT as a brief screening instrument with easy application. The DT will allow the clinician to increase the detection threshold in the Chilean oncology population, intervene in a timely manner, and contribute to the comprehensive handling of the oncology patient without affecting the time needed for assistance. PMID:24966889

  2. Surgical options for the young patient with glenohumeral arthritis.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Jonathan D; Abboud, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Young patients with glenohumeral arthritis are an ongoing treatment challenge. They typically have high demands of their shoulders, require long-term durability due to their young age, and often have altered local anatomy, through their disease process (instability arthropathy, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, etc.) or from previous surgery (capsulorraphy arthropathy, chondrolysis, etc.). Workup to evaluate underlying causes of early arthritis, and to exclude infectious causes are necessary. When nonoperative management fails, arthroscopic debridement, hemiarthroplasty (isolated, with glenoid reaming, or with biological interposition), and total shoulder arthroplasty are treatment options available to the treating surgeon. Debridement or hemiarthroplasty can provide pain relief for a subset of patients, but results have not been reproducible across the literature and have not been durable over time. Total shoulder arthroplasty provides the most reliable pain relief, but long-term glenoid loosening and wear continue to lead to high revision rates in this patient population. PMID:26980987

  3. Surgical options for the young patient with glenohumeral arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Jonathan D.; Abboud, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Young patients with glenohumeral arthritis are an ongoing treatment challenge. They typically have high demands of their shoulders, require long-term durability due to their young age, and often have altered local anatomy, through their disease process (instability arthropathy, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, etc.) or from previous surgery (capsulorraphy arthropathy, chondrolysis, etc.). Workup to evaluate underlying causes of early arthritis, and to exclude infectious causes are necessary. When nonoperative management fails, arthroscopic debridement, hemiarthroplasty (isolated, with glenoid reaming, or with biological interposition), and total shoulder arthroplasty are treatment options available to the treating surgeon. Debridement or hemiarthroplasty can provide pain relief for a subset of patients, but results have not been reproducible across the literature and have not been durable over time. Total shoulder arthroplasty provides the most reliable pain relief, but long-term glenoid loosening and wear continue to lead to high revision rates in this patient population. PMID:26980987

  4. Utilitarian prioritization of radiation oncology patients based on maximization of population tumour control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, M. A.; Li, W.; Jennings, L.; Kearvell, R.; Bydder, S.

    2013-06-01

    An objective method for establishing patient prioritization in the context of a radiotherapy waiting list is investigated. This is based on a utilitarian objective, being the greatest probability of local tumour control in the population of patients. A numerical simulation is developed and a clinical patient case-mix is used to determine the influence of the characteristics of the patient population on resulting optimal patient scheduling. With the utilitarian objective, large gains in tumour control probability (TCP) can be achieved for individuals or cohorts by prioritizing patients for that fraction of the patient population with relatively small sacrifices in TCP for a smaller fraction of the population. For a waiting list in steady state with five patients per day commencing treatment and leaving the list (and so with five patients per day entering the list), and a mean wait time of 35 days and a maximum of 90 days, optimized wait times ranged from a mean of one day for patients with tumour types with short effective doubling times to a mean of 66.9 days for prostate cancer patients. It is found that, when seeking the optimal daily order of patients on the waiting list in a constrained simulation, the relative rather than absolute value of TCP is the determinant of the resulting optimal waiting times. An increase in the mean waiting time mostly influences (increases) the optimal waiting times of patients with fast-growing tumours. The proportional representation of groups (separated by tumour type) in the patient population has an influence on the resulting distribution of optimal waiting times for patients in those groups, though has only a minor influence on the optimal mean waiting time for each group.

  5. Utilitarian prioritization of radiation oncology patients based on maximization of population tumour control.

    PubMed

    Ebert, M A; Li, W; Jennings, L; Kearvell, R; Bydder, S

    2013-06-21

    An objective method for establishing patient prioritization in the context of a radiotherapy waiting list is investigated. This is based on a utilitarian objective, being the greatest probability of local tumour control in the population of patients. A numerical simulation is developed and a clinical patient case-mix is used to determine the influence of the characteristics of the patient population on resulting optimal patient scheduling. With the utilitarian objective, large gains in tumour control probability (TCP) can be achieved for individuals or cohorts by prioritizing patients for that fraction of the patient population with relatively small sacrifices in TCP for a smaller fraction of the population. For a waiting list in steady state with five patients per day commencing treatment and leaving the list (and so with five patients per day entering the list), and a mean wait time of 35 days and a maximum of 90 days, optimized wait times ranged from a mean of one day for patients with tumour types with short effective doubling times to a mean of 66.9 days for prostate cancer patients. It is found that, when seeking the optimal daily order of patients on the waiting list in a constrained simulation, the relative rather than absolute value of TCP is the determinant of the resulting optimal waiting times. An increase in the mean waiting time mostly influences (increases) the optimal waiting times of patients with fast-growing tumours. The proportional representation of groups (separated by tumour type) in the patient population has an influence on the resulting distribution of optimal waiting times for patients in those groups, though has only a minor influence on the optimal mean waiting time for each group.

  6. Interprofessional patient-centred practice in oncology teams: utopia or reality?

    PubMed

    Bilodeau, Karine; Dubois, Sylvie; Pepin, Jacinthe

    2015-03-01

    Studies on interprofessional practice usually report professionals' viewpoints and document organizational, procedural and relational factors influencing that practice. Considering the importance of interprofessional patient-centred (IPPC) practice, it seems necessary to describe it in detail in an actual context of care, from the perspective of patients, their families and health-care professionals. The goal of this study was to describe IPPC practice throughout the continuum of cancer care. A qualitative multiple case study was completed with two interprofessional teams from a Canadian teaching hospital. Interviews were conducted with patients, their families and professionals, and observation was carried out. Three themes were illustrated by current team practice: welcoming the person as a unique individual, but still requiring the patient to comply; the paradoxical coexistence of patient-centred discourse and professional-centred practice; and triggering team collaboration with the culmination of the patient's situation. Several influential factors were described, including the way the team works; the physical environment; professionals' and patients'/family members' stance on the collaboration; professionals' stance on patients and their families; and patients' stance on professionals. Finally, themes describing the desired IPPC practice reflect the wish of most participants to be more involved. They were: providing support in line with the patient's experience and involvement; respecting patients by not imposing professionals' values and goals; and consistency and regularity in the collaboration of all members. PMID:25070427

  7. Interprofessional patient-centred practice in oncology teams: utopia or reality?

    PubMed

    Bilodeau, Karine; Dubois, Sylvie; Pepin, Jacinthe

    2015-03-01

    Studies on interprofessional practice usually report professionals' viewpoints and document organizational, procedural and relational factors influencing that practice. Considering the importance of interprofessional patient-centred (IPPC) practice, it seems necessary to describe it in detail in an actual context of care, from the perspective of patients, their families and health-care professionals. The goal of this study was to describe IPPC practice throughout the continuum of cancer care. A qualitative multiple case study was completed with two interprofessional teams from a Canadian teaching hospital. Interviews were conducted with patients, their families and professionals, and observation was carried out. Three themes were illustrated by current team practice: welcoming the person as a unique individual, but still requiring the patient to comply; the paradoxical coexistence of patient-centred discourse and professional-centred practice; and triggering team collaboration with the culmination of the patient's situation. Several influential factors were described, including the way the team works; the physical environment; professionals' and patients'/family members' stance on the collaboration; professionals' stance on patients and their families; and patients' stance on professionals. Finally, themes describing the desired IPPC practice reflect the wish of most participants to be more involved. They were: providing support in line with the patient's experience and involvement; respecting patients by not imposing professionals' values and goals; and consistency and regularity in the collaboration of all members.

  8. The development of audio-visual materials to prepare patients for medical procedures: an oncology application.

    PubMed

    Carey, M; Schofield, P; Jefford, M; Krishnasamy, M; Aranda, S

    2007-09-01

    This paper describes a systematic process for the development of educational audio-visual materials that are designed to prepare patients for potentially threatening procedures. Literature relating to the preparation of patients for potentially threatening medical procedures, psychological theory, theory of diffusion of innovations and patient information was examined. Four key principles were identified as being important: (1) stakeholder consultation, (2) provision of information to prepare patients for the medical procedure, (3) evidence-based content, and (4) promotion of patient confidence. These principles are described along with an example of the development of an audio-visual resource to prepare patients for chemotherapy treatment. Using this example, practical strategies for the application of each of the principles are described. The principles and strategies described may provide a practical, evidence-based guide to the development of other types of patient audio-visual materials.

  9. Surgical Management of the Patient with an Implanted Cardiac Device

    PubMed Central

    Madigan, John D.; Choudhri, Asim F.; Chen, Jonathan; Spotnitz, Henry M.; Oz, Mehmet C.; Edwards, Niloo

    1999-01-01

    Objective To identify the sources of electromagnetic interference (EMI) that may alter the performance of implanted cardiac devices and develop strategies to minimize their effects on patient hemodynamic status. Summary Background Data Since the development of the sensing demand pacemaker, EMI in the clinical setting has concerned physicians treating patients with such devices. Implanted cardiovertor defibrillators (ICDs) and ventricular assist devices (VADs) can also be affected by EMI. Methods All known sources of interference to pacemakers, ICDs, and VADs were evaluated and preventative strategies were devised. Results All devices should be thoroughly evaluated before and after surgery to make sure that its function has not been permanently damaged or changed. If electrocautery is to be used, pacemakers should be placed in a triggered or asynchronous mode; ICDs should have arrhythmia detection suspended before surgery. If defibrillation is to be used, the current flow between the paddles should be kept as far away from and perpendicular to the lead system as possible. Both pacemakers and ICDs should be properly shielded if magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, or radiation therapy is to be used. The effect of EMI on VADs depends on the model. Magnetic resonance imaging adversely affects all VADs except the Abiomed VAD, and therefore its use should be avoided in this population of patients. Conclusions The patient with an implanted cardiac device can safely undergo surgery as long as certain precautions are taken. PMID:10561087

  10. Flow Simulation to Enable Patient Specific Virtual Surgical Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, Kenneth; Taylor, Charles; Mueller, Jens

    2003-11-01

    The current paradigm for interventional and surgery planning for the treatment of cardiovascular disease relies exclusively on diagnostic imaging data to define the present state of the patient, empirical data to evaluate the efficacy of prior treatments for similar patients, and the judgement of the surgeon to decide on a preferred treatment. The individual variability and inherent complexity of human biological systems is such that diagnostic imaging and empirical data alone are insufficient to predict the outcome of a given treatment for an individual patient. We have proposed a new paradigm of predictive medicine in which the physician utilizes computational tools to construct and evaluate a combined anatomic/physiologic model to predict differential changes in blood flow for alternative treatment plans for an individual patient. Ideally, these systems would provide an integrated set of image segmentation, geometric solid modeling, automatic finite element mesh generation, computational mechanics and scientific visualization tools accessible through an intuitive human-computer interface. In this talk we focus on the flow simulation aspects of this project. Error estimators for transient flow analyses have been developed and implemented to focus computational resources on the areas where they may have provide the greatest improvement. We will describe these error estimators and apply them to adaptive as well as uniform refinement simulations and compare the accuracy and performance to available experimental data in porcine bypass models that have been carried out specifically for this purpose.

  11. Triaging early-stage lung cancer patients into non-surgical pathways: who, when, and what?

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Feng-Ming (Spring)

    2015-01-01

    More lung cancer patients are being diagnosed at an earlier stage due to improved diagnostic imaging techniques, a trend that is expected to accelerate with the dissemination of lung cancer screening. Surgical resection has always been considered the standard treatment for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, non-surgical treatment options for patients with early-stage NSCLC have evolved significantly over the past decade with many new and exciting alternative treatments now available. These alternative treatments include radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation (MWA), percutaneous cryoablation therapy (PCT), photodynamic therapy (PDT) and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), including stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy. We describe the established alternatives to surgical resection, their advantages and disadvantages, potential complications and efficacy. We then describe the optimal treatment approach for patients with early-stage NSCLC based on tumor operability, size and location. Finally, we discuss future directions and whether any alternative therapies will challenge surgical resection as the treatment of choice for patients with operable early-stage lung cancer. PMID:26380185

  12. Anaemia in the older surgical patient: a review of prevalence, causes, implications and management.

    PubMed

    Partridge, Judith; Harari, Danielle; Gossage, Jessica; Dhesi, Jugdeep

    2013-07-01

    This review provides the clinician with a summary of the causes, implications and potential treatments for the management of anaemia in the older surgical patient. The prevalence of anaemia increases with age and is frequently identified in older surgical patients. Anaemia is associated with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality. Allogenic blood transfusion is commonly used to treat anaemia but involves inherent risks and may worsen outcomes. Various strategies for the correction of pre- and postoperative anaemia have evolved. These include correction of nutritional deficiencies and the use of intravenous iron and erythropoesis stimulating therapy. Clear differences exist between the elective and emergency surgical populations and the translation of research findings into these individual clinical settings requires more work. This should lead to a standardized approach to the management of this frequently encountered clinical scenario.

  13. A review of rapid prototyped surgical guides for patient-specific total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, S P; Dawood, A; Richards, R; Henckel, J; Hart, A J

    2012-11-01

    Improvements in the surgical technique of total knee replacement (TKR) are continually being sought. There has recently been interest in three-dimensional (3D) pre-operative planning using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and CT. The 3D images are increasingly used for the production of patient-specific models, surgical guides and custom-made implants for TKR. The users of patient-specific instrumentation (PSI) claim that they allow the optimum balance of technology and conventional surgery by reducing the complexity of conventional alignment and sizing tools. In this way the advantages of accuracy and precision claimed by computer navigation techniques are achieved without the disadvantages of additional intra-operative inventory, new skills or surgical time. This review describes the terminology used in this area and debates the advantages and disadvantages of PSI.

  14. Surgical checklist application and its impact on patient safety in pediatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Oak, SN; Dave, NM; Garasia, MB; Parelkar, SV

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical care is an essential component of health care of children worldwide. Incidences of congenital anomalies, trauma, cancers and acquired diseases continue to rise and along with that the impact of surgical intervention on public health system also increases. It then becomes essential that the surgical teams make the procedures safe and error proof. The World Health Organization (WHO) has instituted the surgical checklist as a global initiative to improve surgical safety. Aims: To assess the acceptance, application and adherence to the WHO Safe Surgery Checklist in Pediatric Surgery Practice at a university teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: In a prospective study, spanning 2 years, the checklist was implemented for all patients who underwent operative procedures under general anesthesia. The checklist identified three phases of an operation, each corresponding to a specific period in the normal flow of work: Before the induction of anesthesia (“sign in”), before the skin incision (“time out”) and before the patient leaves the operating room (“sign out”). In each phase, an anesthesiologist,-“checklist coordinator”, confirmed that the anesthesia, surgery and nursing teams have completed the listed tasks before proceeding with the operation and exit. The checklist was used for 3000 consecutive patients. Results: No major perioperative errors were noted. In 54 (1.8%) patients, children had the same names and identical surgical procedure posted on the same operation list. The patient identification tag was missing in four (0.1%) patients. Mention of the side of procedures was missing in 108 (3.6%) cases. In 0.1% (3) of patients there was mix up of the mention of side of operation in the case papers and consent forms. In 78 (2.6%) patients, the consent form was not signed by parents/guardians or the side of the procedure was not quoted. Antibiotic orders were missing in five (0.2%) patients. In 12 (0.4%) cases, immobilization of

  15. Surgical Outcomes after Total Colectomy with Ileorectal Anastomosis in Patients with Medically Intractable Slow Transit Constipation

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Guiyun; Kim, Chan Wook; Kwak, Jae Young; Jang, Tae Young; Kim, Kyung Ho; Yang, Song Soo; Yoon, Yong Sik; Lim, Seok-Byung; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate outcomes of a total colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis in patients with slow transit constipation. Methods A retrospective review of 37 consecutive patients with slow transit constipation who underwent a total colectomy between 1994 and 2008 was undertaken. Preoperative and postoperative Wexner's constipation scores were collected and used to evaluate the outcomes after surgical treatment. Also patients' postoperative satisfaction scores were collected using a 4-point scale. Results The 37 patients consisted of 31 women and 6 men, with a median age of 41 years (range, 17 to 71 years). Pre- and post-operative Wexner's scores were collected from 33 patients (89.1%), and the mean preoperative Wexner's score was 19.3 (range, 11 to 24), which decreased to an average post-operative score of 2.3 (range, 0 to 8). Neither intraoperative complications nor postoperative mortalities were noted. Five patients (13.5%) had early postoperative complications, and the most common complication was postoperative ileus (10.8%). Seven patients (18.9%) had late postoperative complications, and postoperative ileus (10.8%) was also the most common. Twenty seven of 33 patients were satisfied with their surgical outcome (81.8%). Conclusion A total colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis might be an effective surgical procedure with acceptable morbidity to treat medically intractable slow transit constipation. PMID:21980588

  16. Surgical strategies of fertility preservation in female cancers.

    PubMed

    Grynberg, M; Frydman, R

    2014-10-01

    Conservative and functional surgery is increasingly used in surgical oncology. Although radical surgery remains the gold standard for treatment of cervical, endometrial and ovarian cancers, conservative approaches have been developed, aiming at preserving the potential of fertility of young patients. These procedures are proposed to selected patients, depending on histological parameters and prognostic factors as well. Therefore, a multidisciplinary approach is mandatory to weight the benefits and risks of fertility-sparing surgery. PMID:25245992

  17. Cervical Cancer in Ethiopia: Survival of 1,059 Patients Who Received Oncologic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Moelle, Ulrike; Begoihn, Matthias; Addissie, Adamu; Trocchi, Pietro; Yonas, Bekuretsion; Hezkiel, Petros; Stang, Andreas; Thomssen, Christoph; Vordermark, Dirk; Gemechu, Tufa; Gebrehiwot, Yirgu; Wondemagegnehu, Tigeneh; Aynalem, Abreha; Mathewos, Assefa

    2014-01-01

    Background. Almost 500,000 women are newly diagnosed with cervical cancer (CC) every year, the majority from developing countries. There is little information on the survival of these patients. Our primary objective was to evaluate consecutive CC patients presenting over 4 years at the only radiotherapy center in Ethiopia. Methods. All patients with CC from September 2008 to September 2012 who received radiotherapy and/or surgery were included (without brachytherapy). Vital status was obtained through telephone contact or patient cards. Results. Of 2,300 CC patients, 1,059 patients with standardized treatment were included. At the end of the study, 249 patients had died; surviving patients had a median follow-up of 16.5 months; the 10% and 90% percentiles were 3.0 and 32.7 months, respectively. Mean age was 49 years (21–91 years). The majority of patients presented with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IIb–IIIa (46.7%). Because of progression during the waiting time (median 3.8 months), this proportion declined to 19.3% at the beginning of radiotherapy. The 1- and 2-year overall survival probabilities were 90.4% and 73.6%. If assuming a worst-case scenario (i.e., if all patients not available for follow-up after 6 months had died), the 2-year survival probability would be 45.4%. Conclusion. This study gives a thorough 4-year overview of treated patients with CC in Ethiopia. Given the limited treatment availability, a relatively high proportion of patients survived 2 years. More prevention and early detection at all levels of the health care system are needed. Increasing the capacity for external-beam radiation as well as options for brachytherapy would facilitate treatment with curative intention. PMID:24951611

  18. Oncologic Impact of Fewer Than 12 Lymph Nodes in Patients Who Underwent Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Followed by Total Mesorectal Excision for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Ram; Han, Yoon Dae; Cho, Min Soo; Hur, Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Nam Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A minimum of 12 harvested lymph nodes (hLNs) are recommended in colorectal cancer. However, a paucity of hLNs is frequently presented after preoperative chemoradiation (pCRT) in rectal cancer and the significance of this is still uncertain. The aim of this study is to analyze the impact of hLNs on long-term oncologic outcomes. A total of 302 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who underwent pCRT and curative resection between 1989 and 2009 were reviewed. Patients were categorized into 2 groups according to the number of hLNs: <12 versus ≥12 LN. The 2 groups were compared with respect to 5-year disease-free and overall survival. The optimal number or ratio of hLNs was investigated in subgroup analysis according to LN status. The median follow-up was 57 months. Patient characteristics other than age did not differ between the 2 groups. The group with <12 LNs had more favorable ypTNM and ypN stage than those with ≥12 LNs. However, the long-term oncologic outcomes were not significantly different between the 2 groups. In subgroup analysis of ypN(−), the group with <5 hLNs had the most favorable oncologic outcomes. In ypN(+) cases, a higher LN ratio tended to be associated with poorer 5-year overall survival. The paucity of hLNs in locally advanced rectal cancer after chemoradiation did not imply poor oncologic outcomes in this study. In addition, <5 hLNs in ypN(−) patients could reflect a good tumor response rather than suboptimal radicality. PMID:26181550

  19. Psycho-oncological support for breast cancer patients: A brief overview of breast cancer services certification schemes and national health policies in Europe.

    PubMed

    Neamţiu, L; Deandrea, S; Pylkkänen, L; Freeman, C; López Alcalde, J; Bramesfeld, A; Saz-Parkinson, Z; Ulutürk, A; Lerda, D

    2016-10-01

    Psycho-oncology addresses the psychological, social, behavioural, and ethical aspects of cancer. Identification and proper management of the patients' psychosocial needs, as well as the needs of their caregivers and family are essential for a person-centred concept of breast cancer care. The aim of this overview is to describe how psychosocial support in breast cancer is incorporated in cancer-related policy documents, such as national cancer plans and breast cancer care certification schemes.

  20. Radiation Therapy and Psychological Distress in Gynecologic Oncology Patients: Outcomes and Recommendations for Enhancing Adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Jennifer A.; Andersen, Barbara L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Radiotherapy is used commonly in the treatment of gynecologic malignancies. Many patients experience emotional distress prior to the initiation of radiotherapy, during the course of treatment, or after the completion of treatment. This paper describes treatment experiences from the patients’ perspective, reviews the empirical data concerning patients’ emotional responses to these treatments, and overviews strategies for reducing patient distress. PMID:19844609

  1. The natural history of postoperative venous thromboemboli in gynecologic oncology: a prospective study of 382 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke-Pearson, D.L.; Synan, I.S.; Colemen, R.E.; Hinshaw, W.; Creasman, W.T.

    1984-04-15

    Three hundred eighty-two patients who underwent major operations for gynecologic malignancy were studied prospectively to determine the natural history of postoperative venous thromboemboli. Iodine 125-labeled fibrinogen leg counting, to diagnose deep venous thrombosis, was performed daily. Sixty-three patients (17%) developed postoperative venous thromboembolic complications. Deep venous thrombosis initially arose in the calf veins in 52 patients. Twenty-seven percent of these thrombi lysed spontaneously. Four percent of thrombi in the calf veins progressed to deep venous thrombosis in the femoral vein, and 4% resulted in pulmonary emboli. Nine other patients developed proximal deep venous thrombosis without prior thrombosis in the calf veins. One patient with proximal deep venous thrombosis also had a pulmonary embolus. Two patients with no evidence of deep venous thrombosis on prospective /sup 125/I-labeled fibrinogen leg counting developed pulmonary emboli, including one fatal pulmonary embolus that was found at autopsy to have arisen from the internal iliac veins. Fifty percent of all venous thromboemboli were detected within 48 hours of operation, although two patients developed significant deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary emboli after discharge from the hospital. These results add important information to our understanding of this disease process, and raise issues related to appropriate treatment and prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism in patients after gynecologic operations.

  2. Cancer patient-centered home care: a new model for health care in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Tralongo, Paolo; Ferraù, Francesco; Borsellino, Nicolò; Verderame, Francesco; Caruso, Michele; Giuffrida, Dario; Butera, Alfredo; Gebbia, Vittorio

    2011-01-01

    Patient-centered home care is a new model of assistance, which may be integrated with more traditional hospital-centered care especially in selected groups of informed and trained patients. Patient-centered care is based on patients’ needs rather than on prognosis, and takes into account the emotional and psychosocial aspects of the disease. This model may be applied to elderly patients, who present comorbid diseases, but it also fits with the needs of younger fit patients. A specialized multidisciplinary team coordinated by experienced medical oncologists and including pharmacists, psychologists, nurses, and social assistance providers should carry out home care. Other professional figures may be required depending on patients’ needs. Every effort should be made to achieve optimal coordination between the health professionals and the reference hospital and to employ shared evidence-based guidelines, which in turn guarantee safety and efficacy. Comprehensive care has to be easily accessible and requires a high level of education and knowledge of the disease for both the patients and their caregivers. Patient-centered home care represents an important tool to improve quality of life and help cancer patients while also being cost effective. PMID:21941445

  3. Introduction to pediatric oncology

    SciTech Connect

    McWhirter, W.R.; Masel, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book covers the varied and complex aspects of management in pediatric oncology. Emphasis is placed on a team approach and on establishing and maintaining an individualized, humanistic relationships with the patient. Numerous illustrations show modern imaging techniques that are proving most valuable in the investigation of suspected or confirmed childhood cancer. Physical and psychological side effects of short-term and long-term treatment are also discussed.

  4. The Use of Groups for Psychosocial Intervention with Medical/Surgical Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimpfer, David G.; DeMocker, Janice D.

    Although a connection between physical health and emotional well-being has long been recognized, health caregivers have only recently begun to focus on the influence of illness or disability on attitudes and behaviors. Groups have been organized for therapeutic, supportive, or orientational purposes with general medical-surgical patients. Group…

  5. [Optimising the stay of patients with a mental disorder in general medical or surgical units].

    PubMed

    Brignon, Béatrice; Brusseau, Pascale; Dollet, Denise; Giordana, Jean-Yves; Roelandt, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    The action research undertaken by health manager students at the Nice health manager training institution has helped to optimise the stay of patients with a mental disorder in general medical and surgical units. Based on the assessment of the training needs of caregivers working in these units, it enables the students to anticipate their future function. PMID:27389433

  6. Partial fingertip necrosis following a digital surgical procedure in a patient with primary Raynaud's phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Uygur, Safak; Tuncer, Serhan

    2014-12-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon is a common clinical disorder consisting of recurrent, long-lasting and episodic vasospasm of the fingers and toes often associated with exposure to cold. In this article, we present a case of partial fingertip necrosis following digital surgical procedure in a patient with primary Raynaud's phenomenon.

  7. Recruiting Terminally Ill Patients into Non-Therapeutic Oncology Studies: views of Health Professionals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Non-therapeutic trials in which terminally ill cancer patients are asked to undergo procedures such as biopsies or venipunctures for research purposes, have become increasingly important to learn more about how cancer cells work and to realize the full potential of clinical research. Considering that implementing non-therapeutic studies is not likely to result in direct benefits for the patient, some authors are concerned that involving patients in such research may be exploitive of vulnerable patients and should not occur at all, or should be greatly restricted, while some proponents doubt whether such restrictions are appropriate. Our objective was to explore clinician-researcher attitudes and concerns when recruiting patients who are in advanced stages of cancer into non-therapeutic research. Methods We conducted a qualitative exploratory study by carrying out open-ended interviews with health professionals, including physicians, research nurses, and study coordinators. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Analysis was carried out using grounded theory. Results The analysis of the interviews unveiled three prominent themes: 1) ethical considerations; 2) patient-centered issues; 3) health professional issues. Respondents identified ethical issues surrounding autonomy, respect for persons, beneficence, non-maleficence, discrimination, and confidentiality; bringing to light that patients contribute to science because of a sense of altruism and that they want reassurance before consenting. Several patient-centered and health professional issues are having an impact on the recruitment of patients for non-therapeutic research. Facilitators were most commonly associated with patient-centered issues enhancing communication, whereas barriers in non-therapeutic research were most often professionally based, including the doctor-patient relationship, time constraints, and a lack of education and training in research. Conclusions This paper aims to

  8. Postsurgical examination of functional outcome of patients having undergone surgical treatment of intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Slusarz, Robert; Beuth, Wojciech; Ksiazkiewicz, Barbara

    2009-03-01

    Research into outcomes from surgical intervention for intracranial aneurysms have focused on the clinical picture of the disease entity and death rate, comparison of different surgical methods, as well as the most common postoperative and postbleeding complications. From the nursing standpoint, the crucial element in assessing postoperative patients is the broadly understood functional outcome defining patients' ability to function in life, while at the same time recognising the impairments, in which patients will be dependent on the nursing staff. The aim of the study was to assess the functional outcomes of patients in the days following the surgical treatment. The research was carried out in Neurosurgical Department and Clinic, Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun, Poland. A longitudinal study was carried out with 128 patients having undergone removal of an intracranial aneurysm. In the research both the observation and measuring scores were used. Also Hunt and Hess Grades, the Glasgow Coma Score and the Glasgow Outcome Score were used. To assess functional outcomes of patients, the Functional Capacity Scale was used. The research shows that the functional outcome improves with time, see Statistical analysis (p < 0.001). In the majority of patients some functional outcome deficit was observed mainly in the areas such as relieving oneself and maintaining personal hygiene. The conclusions from the research are as follows: (1) following the surgical treatment of the intracranial aneurysm (day 1, 3, 6 and 9) the majority of patients displayed considerable lack of functional outcome, and were therefore dependent on the nursing staff and relatives (family and friends); (2) on discharge (final measurement) patients were largely self-dependent and displayed negligible impairments of functional outcome.

  9. Cancer-related neuropathic pain in out-patient oncology clinics: a European survey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although pain is frequently experienced by patients with cancer, it remains under-treated. The primary aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of cancer-related neuropathic pain (CRNP) in patients with chronic pain who attended an outpatient clinic for standard care in Europe (irrespective of the reason or stage of the cancer). The secondary aims of this study were to characterise pain and cancer in patients with CRNP (including treatment) and to evaluate the usefulness of the painDETECT (PD-Q) screening tool to help physicians identify a potential neuropathic component of cancer-related pain. Methods An observational, non-interventional, cross-sectional, multi-centre study of adult patients with cancer using patient and physician case report forms (CRFs). Patients with CRNP were identified by physicians’ clinical assessments after examining the completed PD-Q. Results A total of 951 patients visiting outpatient clinics across Europe were enrolled in this study between August 2010 and July 2011. Of these, 310 patients (32.60%; 95% confidence interval 29.62, 35.58) were identified as having CRNP. Twenty-nine of 39 (74.4%) physicians who completed the CRF relating to the PD-Q considered it a useful tool to help detect CRNP in daily practice and 28 of 39 (71.8%) indicated that they would use this tool in the future for most or some of their patients. Data from physicians before and after review of the completed PD-Qs showed a shift in clinical opinion (either to positive CRNP diagnosis [yes] or negative CRNP diagnosis [no]) in respect of 142 patients; about half of which (74) were categorised with an initial diagnosis of unknown. Opinions also shifted from a no to a yes diagnosis in 10 patients and from a yes to a no diagnosis in 51 patients. Conclusions Approximately one-third of adults with cancer experiencing chronic pain attending outpatient clinics as part of routine care were considered to have CRNP in the opinion of the physicians after

  10. Triple pathological findings in a surgically amenable patient with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy☆

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Fumin; Jewells, Valerie; Trembath, Dimitri G.; Hadar, Eldad; Shin, Hae Won

    2015-01-01

    Mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) is a well-recognized cause of intractable epilepsy; however, coexistence with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is less common. Middle fossa epidermoid cysts are rare and may involve the temporal lobe. Most epidermoids are clinically silent, slow-growing, and seldom associated with overt symptomatology, including seizures. We describe a patient with multiple comorbidities including left MTS and a large epidermoid cyst involving the left quadrigeminal plate cistern compressing upon the cerebellar vermis and tail of the left hippocampus, resulting in refractory left temporal lobe epilepsy. The patient underwent left anterior temporal lobectomy. The surgical pathology demonstrated a third pathological finding of left temporal FCD type Ia. The patient has been seizure-free since the surgery. This case provides additional information with regard to the understanding of epileptogenicity and surgical planning in patients with MTS and epidermoid cysts. PMID:26288757

  11. Coordinating perioperative care for the 'high risk' general surgical patient using risk prediction scoring.

    PubMed

    Hafiz, Shaziz; Lees, Nicholas Peter

    2016-01-01

    Identifying 'high risk' (> 5% mortality score) emergency general surgical patients early, allows appropriate perioperative care to be allocated by securing critical care beds and ensuring the presence of senior surgeons and senior anesthetists intraoperatively. Scoring systems can be used to predict perioperative risk and coordinate resources perioperatively. Currently it is unclear which estimate of risk correlates with current resource deployment. A retrospective study was undertaken assessing the relationship between deployment of perioperative resources: senior surgeon, senior anesthetist and critical care bed. The study concluded that almost all high risk patients with high POSSUM mortality and morbidity scores had a consultant senior surgeon present intraoperatively. Critically unwell patients with higher operative severity and perioperative morbidity scores received higher care (HDU/ICU) beds postoperatively, ensuring that they received appropriate care if their condition deteriorated. Therefore POSSUM scoring should be used perioperatively in emergency cases to coordinate appropriate perioperative care for high risk general surgical patients. PMID:26901929

  12. Quality of life in patients submitted to surgical treatment of idiopathic scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, João Bernardo Sancio Rocha; Saleme, Nathália Ambrozim Santos; Batista, José Lucas; Cardoso, Igor Machado; Jacob, Charbel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE : To evaluate quality of life, using the SF-36, in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) who un-derwent surgery for deformity correction, comparing the results in the pre-and post-operative period. METHODS : We evaluated 29 patients, 24 female, mean age 14.5 years, all patients had measurement of Cobb angle greater than 50º, and responded to the SF-36 questionnaire preope-ratively and on average two years after surgery. RESULTS : There was improvement in all eight domains studied by the SF-36 after surgical treatment, with statistically significant improvement of the domains functional capacity physical aspects, pain and general state. Vitality and mental heal-th were those with the lowest percentage of improvement postoperatively. CONCLUSION : Surgical treatment of defor-mity in all AIS improved the functional aspects assessed by the SF-36, representing, in practice, better quality of life for these patients. Evidence Level II, Prospective Study. PMID:27057138

  13. [Factitious diseases in oncology].

    PubMed

    Reich, Michel; Clermont, Amélie; Amela, Éric; Kotecki, Nuria

    2015-12-01

    Factitious diseases and pathomimias and particularly Munchausen's syndrome, due to their rarity, are poorly diagnosed by medical teams working in oncology. Consequences can be serious and result in unadapted surgery or non justified implementation of chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens. These patients simulate diseases in order to attract medical attention. They might become belligerent and are likely to promptly discharge themselves from hospital if they do not get the desired attention or are unmasked. With two following case reports and literature review, we would like to alert clinicians about difficulties encountered in diagnosis and management of factitious disorders. When faced with this diagnosis, the patient will tend to deny reality and break contact with the medical team who exposed him. Medical peregrinating behavior surrounded by conflicts with medical team, past psychiatric illness, history of working in the medical and paramedical field and social isolation can guide the diagnosis. Somaticians and especially surgeons working in the oncologic field must remain vigilant about this diagnosis and collaborate with either the psycho-oncologic team or the consultation-liaison psychiatric team. Some recommendations for medical professionals how to cope with these patients will be suggested. PMID:26597474

  14. [Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Radiobacter) as an infectious agent in an oncological patient].

    PubMed

    Franková, H; Churý, Z; Gaislerová, V; Jílková, J; Hejlová, N; Mach, J

    1999-05-01

    The authors submit the description of a 62-year-old patient with multiple myeloma where the causal agent of pyretic reactions was Agrobacterium tumefaciens (radiobacter). It was a patient with an implanted venous port which was colonized by the above bacterium. This finding most probably has not been described so far in the Czech literature. In the English literature the authors found 36 cases. The authors draw attention to the possible higher incidence of future infections caused by organisms hitherto considered non-pathogenic for man, in particular in immunocompromised patients.

  15. Art Therapy with an Oncology Care Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nainis, Nancy A.

    2005-01-01

    Oncology nurses are particularly vulnerable to "burnout" syndrome due to the intensity of their work and the ongoing losses they experience while providing oncology care to their patients. High levels of stress in the workplace left untended lead to high job turnover, poor productivity, and diminished quality of care for patients. Attention to…

  16. Independent determinants of early death in critically ill surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Müller, Mario H; Moubarak, Patricia; Wolf, Hilde; Küchenhoff, Helmut; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Hartl, Wolfgang H

    2008-07-01

    Abnormalities in cardiocirculatory, respiratory, or coagulatory parameters are frequent after major surgery, but so far, no study has investigated their predictive value for early intensive care unit (ICU) mortality. We aimed to describe and quantify the relation between these parameters that are routinely determined on ICU admission and early death after complex surgery. Individual patient data were available from a local ICU database. We performed a retrospective observational cohort study using prospectively collected data from March 1, 1993, through February 28, 2005. A cohort of 4,214 cases who were admitted to the ICU immediately after operation was analyzed. We studied age, sex, number of red blood cell units transfused on admission day, and admission values for heart rate, systolic blood pressure, hemoglobin concentration, partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, respiratory function (Pao2/Fio2 ratio), and body temperature for their association with 4-day mortality. Effects were adjusted for the underlying disease and for disease severity during the first 24 h after admission. We used generalized additive models to fit continuous variables individually before combining them into the final generalized model. We found an independent linear association between the number of transfused red blood cell units, partial thromboplastin time, and body temperature with acute outcome. A smoothed model described the independent interaction between admission blood pressure and early death. Only values of less than 80 mmHg were associated with an increased risk of 4-day mortality. According to these results, bleeding complications after ICU admission should be treated aggressively to prevent early death of the patient. However, normotensive conditions do not seem to be required to prevent early mortality. Whether rapid rewarming may improve outcome needs further rigorous study.

  17. Methemoglobinemia in a Pediatric Oncology Patient Receiving Sulfamethoxazole/Trimethoprim Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Timothy G.; Carroll, Megan G.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 6-month Final Diagnosis: Methemoglobinemia Symptoms: — Medication: Sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim Clinical Procedure: Methylene blue administration Specialty: Pediatrics and Neonatology Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: Methemoglobinemia due to the administration of sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim has been documented in a series of case reports. However, all of these reports are on adult patients, and all patients received at least daily administration of sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim for the treatment of active or suspected infection. Case Report: Herein we report the development of methemoglobinemia in a pediatric patient receiving sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim three times weekly for the prophylaxis of opportunistic infections. Conclusions: The clinician should always consider sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim, even when administered for opportunistic infection prophylaxis at reduced doses and intervals, as a possible cause of methemoglobinemia. PMID:27424851

  18. Use of herbs or vitamin/mineral/nutrient supplements by pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Turhan, Ayşe Bozkurt; Bör, Özcan

    2016-05-01

    Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is widespread and increasing. We sought to study the frequency and factors affecting of its use in children with cancer. We designed a questionnaire that was administered to the parents of children between September 2013 and March 2014. A total of 74 patients were enrolled into the study. Fifty patients (67.5%) had used one or more than one type of herbs or vitamin/mineral/nutrient. The most commonly used CAM treatment was grape molasses (36.6%). The main source of information to families was the internet. No correlation found between the use of CAM and parents' education status, the level of income, socioeconomic status, chemotherapy treatment. Patients with cancer highly tended to use CAM treatment without informing healthcare professionals. The integration of complementary methods to the conventional treatments is interesting and seem to respond to the needs of patients allowing a more comprehensive approach to care.

  19. Laser Doppler flowmetry and cardiac output in critically ill surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Eyer, S; Borgos, J; Strate, R G

    1987-08-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) accurately measures cutaneous microcirculatory blood flow. We compared change in LDF flow to change in thermodilution cardiac output in ten critically ill surgical patients. A subset analysis of three patients with low cardiac output (cardiac index less than 2 L/min X m2) showed no correlation. We conclude that, under these study conditions, LDF microcirculatory flow did not reflect macrocirculatory flow. We conjecture that overcoming cutaneous vasoregulation with thermal vasodilation may obviate these results.

  20. Patient Centeredness and Engagement in Quality-of-Care Oncology Research.

    PubMed

    Clauser, Steven B; Gayer, Christopher; Murphy, Elizabeth; Majhail, Navneet S; Baker, K Scott

    2015-05-01

    More than a decade after the Institute of Medicine (IOM) first studied the quality of cancer care, obstacles to achieving high-quality care remain, and studies suggest that cancer care is often not as patient centered, accessible, coordinated, or evidence based as it could be. Patients, their families, and clinicians face a wide range of complex and often confusing choices regarding their health and health care concerns and require trustworthy information to decide which options are best for them. The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) strives to fund clinical comparative effectiveness research, guided by patients, caregivers, and the broader health care community, that will provide high-integrity, evidence-based information to help people make informed health care decisions. This mission is well aligned with the IOM's recent conceptual framework and corresponding recommendations that recognize that addressing the needs of patients with cancer and their families is the most important component of a high-quality cancer care delivery system. PCORI seeks the opportunity to partner with diverse interdisciplinary research teams who demonstrate a strong commitment to the inclusion and engagement of patients and stakeholders as they work to develop high-quality cancer care delivery systems. We see rich opportunities for such partnership in the cancer care community, given the wealth of well-established patient advocacy groups and organizations and cutting-edge research institutions, all of which are working toward the common goal of improving the quality of cancer care for patients and their families. This article and the project it describes provide an example of an avenue for advancing this goal. PMID:25852140

  1. Outcomes of Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgical Decortication in 274 Patients with Tuberculous Empyema

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Baofu; Zhang, Jian; Ye, Zhongrui; Ye, Minhua; Ma, Dehua; Wang, Chunguo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The present work aimed to retrospectively assess the outcomes associated with decortication by video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) in patients with tuberculous empyema. Methods: Patients (n = 274) who underwent decortication by VATS for surgical management of pleural empyema between January 2000 to 2010 were included. Pre-, intra-, and post-operative characteristics were observed for all patients, which were followed up for 12 months to evaluate surgical outcomes such as postoperative complications and disease recurrence. Results: No patients required conversion to thoracotomy, and no death or postoperative bleeding was reported. The mean operation time was 104.5 ± 20.4 min, with 271.5 ± 41.3 ml intraoperative blood loss and median length of hospital stay of 7.2 ± 3.4 days. Of the 274 patients, 262 were followed up for 12 months; 26 (9.9%) patients showed complications, including incomplete lung re-expansion (11 patients) and persistent air leak (6 patients). While early disease recurrence was observed in 3 (1.1%) patients after surgery, late recurrence was reported for 6 (2.3%) individuals. Interestingly, the complication rate was much higher in patients with chronic empyema (15/34, 44.1%) than in subjects with acute empyema (11/228, 4.8%). Conclusions: Decortication by VATS decreases postsurgical complications, and results in decreased disease recurrence. This study demonstrated improved outcomes by decortication by VATS, even in patients with stage III tuberculous empyema. PMID:25818121

  2. Selection of Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma for Surgical Resection

    PubMed Central

    Rizk, Norman W.

    1985-01-01

    Cancer of the lung is rapidly increasing in incidence in both sexes and soon will overtake breast cancer as the most deadly cancer in women. Selection of patients with non-small-cell carcinoma for surgical resection is largely based on preoperative clinical staging, using the American Joint Committee on Cancer's TNM-based group staging protocol. Determining the presence or absence of mediastinal nodal metastasis is paramount and is currently best achieved by computed tomographic scanning of the chest and biopsy of enlarged nodes via mediastinoscopy. Certain types of stage III lesions, previously excluded from surgical treatment, are now recognized as operable. PMID:3909642

  3. Drainoscopy: a doorway to the abdomen in the post-surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Atallah, S; deBeche-Adams, T; Imam, Z; Amir, K

    2015-08-01

    The ability to optically visualize the abdominal cavity in the post-surgical patient can prove to be invaluable, particularly when imaging studies and exam findings can be difficult to interpret. Post-surgical drains are often used and provide a window into the abdominal cavity. In this proof-of-concept study, it is demonstrated that an ordinary drain can be used as a point of access and hence a doorway into the abdominal cavity. This technique has been termed drainoscopy, and the approach is demonstrated with video supplement.

  4. Epidemiology and outcome of candidaemia in patients with oncological and haematological malignancies: results from a population-based surveillance in Spain.

    PubMed

    Puig-Asensio, M; Ruiz-Camps, I; Fernández-Ruiz, M; Aguado, J M; Muñoz, P; Valerio, M; Delgado-Iribarren, A; Merino, P; Bereciartua, E; Fortún, J; Cuenca-Estrella, M; Almirante, B

    2015-05-01

    A prospective, population-based surveillance on candidaemia was implemented in five metropolitan areas of Spain from May 2010 to April 2011. We aimed to describe the distribution and susceptibility pattern of Candida species, and to evaluate risk factors for mortality in patients with oncological (solid tumours) and haematological malignancies. Adults (≥ 16 years) with cancer were included in the present report. Impact of therapeutic strategies on 7- and 30-day mortality were analysed by logistic regression, adjusting for propensity score by inverse weighting probability of receiving early antifungal treatment and catheter removal. We included 238 (32.6%) patients (195 oncological, 43 haematological). Compared with oncological patients, haematological patients were more likely to have received chemotherapy (53.5% versus 17.4%, p < 0.001) or corticosteroids (41.9% versus 21%, p < 0.001), and have neutropenia (44.2% versus 1.5%, p < 0.001). Overall, 14.8% of patients developed breakthrough candidaemia. Non-albicans Candida species (71.1% versus 55.6%, p 0.056) and Candida tropicalis (22.2% versus 7.6%, p 0.011) were more frequent in haematological patients. Based on EUCAST breakpoints, 27.6% of Candida isolates were non-susceptible to fluconazole. Resistance to echinocandins was negligible. Mortality at 7 and 30 days was 12.2% and 31.5%, respectively, and did not differ significantly between the patient groups. Prompt antifungal therapy together with catheter removal (≤ 48 hours) was associated with lower mortality at 7 days (adjusted OR 0.05; 95% CI 0.01-0.42) and 30 days (adjusted OR 0.27; 95% CI 0.16-0.46). In conclusion, non-albicans species are emerging as the predominant isolates, particularly in haematological patients. Prompt, adequate antifungal treatment plus catheter removal may lead to a reduction in mortality.

  5. Chronobiology, cognitive function and depressive symptoms in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Melissa Voigt

    2014-09-01

    Biological rhythms are essential for the regulation of many life processes. Disturbances of the circadian rhythm are known to affect human health, performance and well-being and the negative consequences are numerous and widespread. Cognitive dysfunction, fatigue, pain, sleep disturbances and mood disorders, such as anxiety and depression, are common problems arising around the time of surgery or in the course of a cancer diagnosis and subsequent treatment period. The importance of investigating prevention or treatment possibilities in these populations is significant due to the extent of the problems and the derived consequences on morbidity and mortality. Genetic predisposition to these problems is also an issue in focus. In this thesis we initially investigated whether the specific clock gene genotype PER(5/5) was associated with the development of postoperative cognitive dysfunction one week after non-cardiac surgery. We did not find any association, although this could have been due to the size of the study. Yet, if PER3(5/5) is associated with a higher incidence of postoperative cognitive dysfunction, the risk seems to be only modestly increased and by less than 10%. Melatonin is a hormone with well-known chronobiotic and hypnotic effects. In addition, exogenous melatonin is also known to have anxiolytic, analgesic, antidepressant and positive cognitive effects. Based on the lack of studies investigating these effects of melatonin, we conducted the MELODY trial in which we investigated the effect of 6 mg oral melatonin on depressive symptoms, anxiety, sleep, cognitive function and fatigue in patients with breast cancer in a three month time period after surgery. Melatonin had an effect on reducing the risk of developing depressive symptoms and also increased sleep efficiency perioperatively and total sleep time postoperatively. No effect was found on anxiety, sleep quality, sleepiness, general well-being or pain, however melatonin seemed to positively

  6. Hematologic toxicity in patients undergoing radical anti- cancer therapy: a cross-sectional analysis of patients in an oncology ward in India.

    PubMed

    Roy, Soumyajit; Mallick, Supriya; Raza, Md Waseem; Haresh, Kunhi Parambath; Gupta, Subhash; Sharma, Daya Nand; Julka, Pramod Kumar; Rath, Goura Kisore

    2014-01-01

    Burden of cancer is progressively increasing in developing countries like India which has also led to a steep rise in toxicity due to anti-cancer therapy. A cross-sectional analysis was here conducted for patients with different malignancies (except leukaemia) who while undergoing radical anti-cancer therapy were admitted to our oncology ward from January-July 2013. In a total of 280 patients, the total number of toxicity events was 473. Nine patients expired over this time period. Among the events, grade 2 anaemia the most common (n=189) while the most common grades of neutropenia and thrombocytopenia were grade 4 (n=114) and grade 2 (n=48), respectively. Among the tracable microbial etiologies, gram negative bacteria were the most commonly found pathogens. Treatment interruptions took place in 240 patients (median duration=8.8 days). Prolonged hospital admission, intensive care and artificial ventilation support was needed to be given in 48, 7 and 13 patients respectively. Advanced NSCLC, KPS <70, pancytopenia and artificial ventilation requirement were found to have a significant impact on death. Such studies show the prevailing practice from institutes of our country and may guide us formulating a guideline for managing such toxicities for this part of the world. PMID:24870762

  7. Thickness of the adductor pollicis muscle in nutritional assessment of surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Katarina Papera; Silva, Naira Marceli Fraga; Faioli, Amanda Barcelos; Barreto, Marina Abelha; de Moraes, Rafael Araújo Guedes; Guandalini, Valdete Regina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the correlation between thickness of the muscle adductor pollicis and anthropometric measurements, body mass index and Subjective Global Assessment in the nutritional assessment of surgical patients. Methods The study population comprised patients admitted to the general and reconstructive surgery unit of a university hospital in the city of Vitória (ES), Brazil. The inclusion criteria were patients evaluated in the first 48 hours of admission, aged ≥20 years, hemodynamically stable, with no edema or ascites. Data analysis was performed using the software Statistical Package for Social Science 21.0, significance level of 5%. Results The sample consisted of 150 patients that were candidates to surgery, mean age of 42.7±12.0 years. The most common reasons for hospitalization were surgical procedures, gastrintestinal diseases and neoplasm. Significant association was observed between thickness of adductor pollicis muscle and Subjective Global Assessment (p=0.021) and body mass index (p=0.008) for nutritional risk. Significant correlation was found between thickness of adductor pollicis muscle and arm muscle circumference, corrected arm muscle area, calf circumference and body mass index. There were no significant correlations between thickness of adductor pollicis muscle and triceps skinfold and age. Conclusion The use of thickness of adductor pollicis muscle proved to be an efficient method to detect malnutrition in surgical patients and it should be added to the screening process of hospitalized patients, since it is easy to perform, inexpensive and noninvasive. PMID:27074229

  8. Management of chronic empyema with unexpandable lung in poor surgical risk patients using an empyema tube

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Abhishek; Jantz, Michael A; Penley, Andrea M; Mehta, Hiren J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: High preoperative risk precludes decortication and other surgical interventions in some patients with chronic empyema. We manage such patients by converting the chest tube into an “empyema tube,” cutting the tube near the skin and securing the end with a sterile clip to allow for open pleural drainage. The patient is followed serially, and the tube gradually withdrawn based on radiological resolution and amount of drainage. Methods: Between 2010 and 2014, patients with chronic empyema and unexpandable lung, deemed high-risk surgical candidates, had staged chest tube removal, and were included for the study. The volume of fluid drained, culture results, duration of drainage, functional status, and comorbidities were recorded. Measurements and Results: Eight patients qualified. All had resolution of infection. The tube was removed after an average of 73.6 ± 49.73 (95% confidence interval [CI]) days. The mean duration of antibiotic treatment was 5.37 ± 1.04 (95% CI) weeks. None required surgery or experienced complications from an empyema tube. Conclusion: A strategy of empyema tube drainage with staged removal is an option in appropriately selected patients with chronic empyema, unexpandable lung, and poor surgical candidacy. PMID:27185989

  9. [Potentialities of conservative and surgical treatment of patients with congenital microphthalmia and anophthalmia].

    PubMed

    Kataev, M G; Filatova, I A; Verigo, E N; Kiriukhina, S L

    2000-01-01

    Congenital anophthalmia and microphthalmia were responsible for 1.7-1.8% cases of all cases treated at laboratory of plastic surgery and ocular prostheses. Clinical picture of the condition is described. The philosophy of rehabilitation of patients with congenital anophthalmia and microphthalmia is as follows: 1) no operations during the first years of life; 2) early staged fitting with prostheses; 3) surgical treatment in older age, when the resources of conservative extension of the cavity are exhausted. The authors emphasize that active conservative treatment should be preferred. Method for nonsurgical extension of the conjunctival cavity by staged insertion of prostheses is described. Positive and negative aspects of surgical treatments are discussed. The authors emphasize that surgical activity in early age is extremely harmful. Results of surgical treatment of 27 patients are presented. The patients were divided into 2 groups differing by the tasks of surgery: repair of consequences of previous operations (59.2% cases) and typical correction of the eye lids (40.8%). Clinical examples are offered.

  10. The relationship between direct-care RN specialty certification and surgical patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Diane K; Cramer, Emily; Potter, Catima; Gatua, Mary W; Stobinski, James X

    2014-11-01

    Specialty certification enhances patient safety in health care by validating that practice is consistent with standards of excellence. The purpose of this research was to explore the relationship between direct-care, specialty-certified nurses employed in perioperative units, surgical intensive care units (SICUs), and surgical units and nursing-sensitive patient outcomes in SICUs and surgical units. Lower rates of central-line-associated bloodstream infections in SICUs were significantly associated with higher rates of CPAN (certified postanesthesia nurse) (β = -0.09, P = .05) and CNOR/CRNFA (certified nurse operating room/certified RN first assistant) (β = -0.17, P = .00) certifications in perioperative units. Unexpectedly, higher rates of CNOR/CRNFA certification in perioperative units were associated with higher rates of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (β = 0.08, P = .03) and unit-acquired pressure ulcers (β = 0.13, P = .00), possibly because of a higher risk of pressure ulcers in the patient population. Additional research is needed to clarify this relationship. Our findings lend credence to perioperative, SICU, and surgical nurses participating in lifelong learning and continuous professional development, including achievement of specialty certification.

  11. Surgical errors and risks – the head and neck cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Harréus, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Head and neck surgery is one of the basic principles of head and neck cancer therapy. Surgical errors and malpractice can have fatal consequences for the treated patients. It can lead to functional impairment and has impact in future chances for disease related survival. There are many risks for head and neck surgeons that can cause errors and malpractice. To avoid surgical mistakes, thorough preoperative management of patients is mandatory. As there are ensuring operability, cautious evaluation of preoperative diagnostics and operative planning. Moreover knowledge of anatomical structures of the head and neck, of the medical studies and data as well as qualification in modern surgical techniques and the surgeons ability for critical self assessment are basic and important prerequisites for head and neck surgeons in order to make out risks and to prevent from mistakes. Additionally it is important to have profound knowledge in nutrition management of cancer patients, wound healing and to realize and to be able to deal with complications, when they occur. Despite all precaution and surgical care, errors and mistakes cannot always be avoided. For that it is important to be able to deal with mistakes and to establish an appropriate and clear communication and management for such events. The manuscript comments on recognition and prevention of risks and mistakes in the preoperative, operative and postoperative phase of head and neck cancer surgery. PMID:24403972

  12. [Complications of surgical stage of treatment in patients with cancer of cervix uteri stage IIB].

    PubMed

    Kryzhanivs'ka, A Ie

    2013-11-01

    The results of treatment of 127 patients, suffering cervix uteri cancer stage IIB in period of 1998 - 2012 yrs, were analyzed. Complications of surgical stage of the combined treatment have had occurred in 40.9% patients, including 40.5% patients, to whom neoadjuvant chemotherapy was conducted and in 41.5%--radiation therapy (RTH). The main postoperative complications--retroperitoneal lymphatic cysts--were revealed in 35.4% patients. The factors, raising the risk of postoperative complications occurrence, are following: the primary tumor spreading, metastatic affection of lymphatic nodes of pelvic cavity, preoperative conduction of RTH or chemotherapy.

  13. Surgical History of Sleep Apnea in Pediatric Patients with Chiari Type 1 Malformation.

    PubMed

    Pomeraniec, Isaac Jonathan; Ksendzovsky, Alexander; Yu, Pearl L; Jane, John A

    2015-10-01

    Sleep apnea represents a relative indication for posterior fossa decompression in pediatric patients with Chiari malformation type 1. Duraplasty was associated with improvement of sleep apnea in 100% of patients and dural splitting with improvement in 50% of patients. Duraplasty and dural splitting were associated with a similar reduction in tonsillar herniation on radiographic imaging of 58% (37% excluding tonsillectomy) and 35%, respectively. Longitudinal follow-up studies of patients with either neurologic deficits or severe symptoms will further elucidate the natural history of Chiari malformation type 1 and more appropriately gauge the risk-benefit tradeoff of surgical intervention.

  14. Plasma concentrations of posaconazole administered via nasogastric tube in patients in a surgical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Störzinger, Dominic; Borghorst, Stephan; Hofer, Stefan; Busch, Cornelius J; Lichtenstern, Christoph; Hempel, Georg; Weigand, Markus A; Hoppe-Tichy, Torsten

    2012-08-01

    Abdominal surgery may affect intestinal absorption and the resulting levels of posaconazole in the blood. We measured plasma posaconazole levels in surgical intensive care unit (SICU) patients and tried to develop a predictive population pharmacokinetics model. A total of 270 samples from 15 patients receiving posaconazole via nasogastric tube were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). SICU patients showed lower plasma drug concentrations, a higher apparent clearance, and a higher volume of distribution than those in hematology patients, possibly due to poor absorption.

  15. Surgical smoke.

    PubMed

    Fan, Joe King-Man; Chan, Fion Siu-Yin; Chu, Kent-Man

    2009-10-01

    Surgical smoke is the gaseous by-product formed during surgical procedures. Most surgeons, operating theatre staff and administrators are unaware of its potential health risks. Surgical smoke is produced by various surgical instruments including those used in electrocautery, lasers, ultrasonic scalpels, high speed drills, burrs and saws. The potential risks include carbon monoxide toxicity to the patient undergoing a laparoscopic operation, pulmonary fibrosis induced by non-viable particles, and transmission of infectious diseases like human papilloma virus. Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity are other concerns. Minimisation of the production of surgical smoke and modification of any evacuation systems are possible solutions. In general, a surgical mask can provide more than 90% protection to exposure to surgical smoke; however, in most circumstances it cannot provide air-tight protection to the user. An at least N95 grade or equivalent respirator offers the best protection against surgical smoke, but whether such protection is necessary is currently unknown. PMID:19892630

  16. Does referral to specialist paediatric palliative care services reduce hospital admissions in oncology patients at the end of life?

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, L K; van Laar, M; Miller, M; Aldridge, J; McKinney, P A; Parslow, R C; Feltbower, R G

    2013-01-01

    Background: Despite advances in the treatment of childhood cancer, some children continue to die from their disease. This study aimed to assess the impact of specialist paediatric palliative care services (SPPCSs) on the number of hospital admissions in children who subsequently died from cancer in Yorkshire, UK. Methods: An extract of patients aged 0–19 years from the Yorkshire Specialist Register of Cancer in Children and Young People (YSRCCYP) diagnosed from 1990 to 2009 were linked to inpatient hospital episodes data and a SPPCS database. Deaths were included if they occurred before 31 August 2011. Differences in hospital admission patterns were assessed using negative binomial regression and presented as incidence rate ratios (IRRs). Results: Of 2508 children on the YSRCCYP, 657 (26%) had died by the censoring date. A total of 211 children had been referred to the local SPPCS, of whom 182 (86%) had subsequently died. Referral to SPPCS was associated with a significant reduction in the rate of planned hospital admissions (IRR=0.60, 95% CI 0.43–0.85). Central nervous system tumours showed significant decreases for all planned and emergency admissions compared with all other diagnostic groups. Conclusion: Referral to SPPCS significantly reduced the number of planned hospital admissions for children and young people with cancer before their death, which are often integral to paediatric oncology treatment regimens. Overall, our findings show that SPPCS have a role in reducing hospital admissions during end of life care of paediatric cancer patients with potential personal, social and economic benefits. PMID:23449361

  17. A Targeted E-Learning Program for Surgical Trainees to Enhance Patient Safety in Preventing Surgical Infection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHugh, Seamus Mark; Corrigan, Mark; Dimitrov, Borislav; Cowman, Seamus; Tierney, Sean; Humphreys, Hilary; Hill, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical site infection accounts for 20% of all health care-associated infections (HCAIs); however, a program incorporating the education of surgeons has yet to be established across the specialty. Methods: An audit of surgical practice in infection prevention was carried out in Beaumont Hospital from July to November 2009. An…

  18. Risk Assessment of BRONJ in Oncologic Patients Treated with Bisphosphonates: Follow-Up to 18 Months.

    PubMed

    Sparabombe, Scilla; Vitali, Lucia; Nori, Alessandra; Berlin, Ricarda Sara; Mazur, Marta; Orsini, Giovanna; Putignano, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Bisphosphonates related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) is a pathological condition characterized by bone exposure or latent infection in patients treated with the drug. The aim of the study is to monitor the BRONJ level of risk health in patients with cancer, according to a preventive clinical protocol, which is firstly aimed at reducing risk factors such as the periodontal infections. Materials and Methods. 10 patients participated in the protocol and were evaluated at baseline and after 3 and 18 months of treatment with bisphosphonates, through full mouth plaque and bleeding scores (FMPS and FMBS), clinical attachment level (CAL) measurement, and the occurrence of osteonecrosis. Results. The mean plaque and bleeding were reduced and the CAL has not shown significant changes and in no cases was there manifestation of BRONJ. Conclusion. The protocol proved crucial for the maintenance of good oral health conditions by eliminating the risk of BRONJ during the observation period. PMID:25258628

  19. Risk Assessment of BRONJ in Oncologic Patients Treated with Bisphosphonates: Follow-Up to 18 Months

    PubMed Central

    Vitali, Lucia; Nori, Alessandra; Berlin, Ricarda Sara; Mazur, Marta; Orsini, Giovanna; Putignano, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Bisphosphonates related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) is a pathological condition characterized by bone exposure or latent infection in patients treated with the drug. The aim of the study is to monitor the BRONJ level of risk health in patients with cancer, according to a preventive clinical protocol, which is firstly aimed at reducing risk factors such as the periodontal infections. Materials and Methods. 10 patients participated in the protocol and were evaluated at baseline and after 3 and 18 months of treatment with bisphosphonates, through full mouth plaque and bleeding scores (FMPS and FMBS), clinical attachment level (CAL) measurement, and the occurrence of osteonecrosis. Results. The mean plaque and bleeding were reduced and the CAL has not shown significant changes and in no cases was there manifestation of BRONJ. Conclusion. The protocol proved crucial for the maintenance of good oral health conditions by eliminating the risk of BRONJ during the observation period. PMID:25258628

  20. The importance of cleanrooms for the treatment of haemato-oncological patients.

    PubMed

    Holý, Ondřej; Matoušková, Ivanka

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of cleanrooms in health care centres is to prevent hospital infections or leakage of a highly infectious agent (the source of haemorrhagic fevers, SARS, etc.) into the ambient environment and subsequently possibly threatening other individuals. Patients with haematological malignancies or after autologous or allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) rank among immunosuppressed individuals. Prolonged and deep neutropenia is considered a key risk factor of the occurrence of an exogenous infection. One of the possibilities of preventing an exogenous infection in these patients is to place them in a "cleanroom" for the crucial period of time. Cleanrooms are intensive care units with reverse isolation. The final part of the general article below provides an overview of the technology and types of cleanrooms for immunosuppressed patients in compliance with the current recommendations and technical standards.

  1. Surgical prevention of femoral neck fractures in elderly osteoporotic patients. A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Chiarello, Eugenio; Tedesco, Giuseppe; Cadossi, Matteo; Capra, Paola; Terrando, Silvio; Miti, Andrea; Giannini, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Fragility fractures of the femur are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The incidence of new contralateral hip fractures in elderly osteoporotic patients ranges from 7 to 12% within 2 years after the first fracture. Secondary prevention can be divided in: pharmacological therapy based on the prescription of anti-osteoporotic drugs with different mechanism of action and non-pharmacological therapy which is based on modification of environmental risk factors, on a healthy diet with daily supplements of calcium and vitamin D and calcium and on the use of hip protectors. Recently a new form of prevention is becoming achievable: surgical prevention; the rationale of surgical reinforcement is the need to increase the resistance of the femoral neck to the compression and distraction forces acting on it. In this paper we analyse all the experimental and “on the market” device available for the surgical prevention of femoral neck fracture. PMID:27252744

  2. Qualitative approach to patient-reported outcomes in oncology: protocol of a French study

    PubMed Central

    Orri, Massimiliano; Sibeoni, Jordan; Labey, Mathilde; Bousquet, Guilhem; Verneuil, Laurence; Revah-Levy, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The past decade has been characterised by movement from a doctor-centred to a patient-centred approach to treatment outcomes, in which doctors try to see the illness through their patients’ eyes. Patients, family members and doctors are the three participants in cancer care, but their perspectives about what have been helpful during cancer treatment have never simultaneously and explicitly compared in the same qualitative study. The aim of this study project is to explore patients’ perspectives about the care they receive, as well as families’ and doctors’ perspectives about what have been helpful for the patient. These three points of view will be compared and contrasted in order to analyse the convergences and divergences in these perspectives. Methods and analysis This is a national multicentre qualitative study. Participants will be constituted by three different subsamples: (1) patients with cancer (skin, breast, urological and lung cancers), (2) their relatives, and (3) their referring physicians. Recruitment will follow the purposive sample technique, and the final sample size will be determined by data saturation. Data will be collected through open-ended semistructured interviews and independently analysed with NVivo V.10 software by three researchers according to the principles of Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Ethics and dissemination The research protocol received approval from the University Paris Descartes review board (IRB number: 20140600001072), and participants will provide written consent. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to focus on the simultaneous exploration of the separate points of view of patients, families and doctors about the care received during the cancer care journey. We expect that our findings will help to improve communication and relationships between doctors, patients and families. Comparison of these three points of view will provide information about the convergences and

  3. [Immunity state of oncological patients during long-term treatment with tramal].

    PubMed

    Novikov, Iu A; Kon'kov, Sh Kh; Shumilov, E I

    1994-01-01

    Narcotic analgesics have an inhibiting effect on the immunity and that is why their use for pain relief in cancer patients cannot be regarded as adequate. The effect of a new synthetic analgesic tramal (tramal hydrochloride) on the immune system has been studied. Cellular immunity indexes, immunoglobulin level, and phagocytic activity of neutrophils have been determined before treatment and 1 and 2 weeks after the treatment started. The data obtained have shown that tramal does not inhibit the immune system. It has been also noted that pain relief in cancer patients improved the indexes of cellular and humoral immunity.

  4. Inadequate Surgical Decompression in Patients with Cervical Myelopathy: A Retrospective Review

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Amandeep; Rolfe, Kevin W.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design  Retrospective study. Objective  We reviewed cases of surgically treated cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) or chronic, degenerative myelopathy of the subaxial cervical spine to study the incidence of inadequate surgical decompression. Methods  We included all persons treated at our institution after a first surgical decompression for CSM over a 3-year period. Inadequate original surgical decompression was defined as neurologic decline within 12 months postoperatively and ongoing impingement of the spinal cord with <1-mm change in anteroposterior canal dimension from pre- to postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) leading to revision decompressive surgery. Revisions for other reasons were not counted as inadequate. Results  Of 50 patients, 5 (10%) required revision decompression for neurologic decline and inadequate change in space available for the cord on postoperative imaging; 4 patients declined within the first 6 months and 1 patient at 8 months postoperatively. None of the 5 declined further after posterior revision, but none recovered from the interval loss. All 5 had undergone anterior approaches, for an anterior inadequacy rate of 23% (5 of 22). None of the 28 patients having posterior or combined approach declined at 2 years or had <1-mm change on postoperative MRI. The difference between anterior and posterior approaches was statistically significant (p = 0.018). Conclusions  The rate of inadequate surgical decompression for CSM was greater than expected in this series and directly associated with an anterior approach. No cases of inadequacy occurred for posterior or combined approaches. Postoperative neuroradiographic imaging such as MRI should be entertained routinely for this entity or at least for anterior-only approaches. PMID:27555995

  5. Thinking in three's: changing surgical patient safety practices in the complex modern operating room.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Verna C

    2012-12-14

    The three surgical patient safety events, wrong site surgery, retained surgical items (RSI) and surgical fires are rare occurrences and thus their effects on the complex modern operating room (OR) are difficult to study. The likelihood of occurrence and the magnitude of risk for each of these surgical safety events are undefined. Many providers may never have a personal experience with one of these events and training and education on these topics are sparse. These circumstances lead to faulty thinking that a provider won't ever have an event or if one does occur the provider will intuitively know what to do. Surgeons are not preoccupied with failure and tend to usually consider good outcomes, which leads them to ignore or diminish the importance of implementing and following simple safety practices. These circumstances contribute to the persistent low level occurrence of these three events and to the difficulty in generating sufficient interest to resource solutions. Individual facilities rarely have the time or talent to understand these events and develop lasting solutions. More often than not, even the most well meaning internal review results in a new line to a policy and some rigorous enforcement mandate. This approach routinely fails and is another reason why these problems are so persistent. Vigilance actions alone have been unsuccessful so hospitals now have to take a systematic approach to implementing safer processes and providing the resources for surgeons and other stakeholders to optimize the OR environment. This article discusses standardized processes of care for mitigation of injury or outright prevention of wrong site surgery, RSI and surgical fires in an action-oriented framework illustrating the strategic elements important in each event and focusing on the responsibilities for each of the three major OR agents-anesthesiologists, surgeons and nurses. A Surgical Patient Safety Checklist is discussed that incorporates the necessary elements to

  6. Definition of major bleeding in clinical investigations of antihemostatic medicinal products in surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Schulman, S; Angerås, U; Bergqvist, D; Eriksson, B; Lassen, M R; Fisher, W

    2010-01-01

    The definition of major bleeding varies between studies on surgical patients, particularly regarding the criteria for surgical wound-related bleeding. This diversity contributes to the difficulties in comparing data between trials. The Scientific and Standardization Committee (SSC), through its subcommittee on Control of Anticoagulation, of the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis has previously published a recommendation for a harmonized definition of major bleeding in non-surgical studies. That definition has been adopted by the European Medicines Agency and is currently used in several non-surgical trials. A preliminary proposal for a parallel definition for surgical studies was presented at the 54(th) Annual Meeting of the SSC in Vienna, July 2008. Based on those discussions and further consultations with European and North American surgeons with experience from clinical trials a definition has been developed that should be applicable to all agents that interfere with hemostasis. The definition and the text that follows have been reviewed and approved by relevant co-chairs of the subcommittee and by the Executive Committee of the SSC. The intention is to seek approval of this definition from the regulatory authorities to enhance its incorporation into future clinical trial protocols.

  7. Violent Behavior in Cancer Patients--A Rarely Addressed Phenomenon in Oncological Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grube, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Dealing with violent cancer patients can be particularly challenging. The purpose of this study was to collect data on the frequency, quality, and underlying variables affecting violent behavior as well as to examine the role played by this behavior in the premature interruption of treatment. A total of 388 cancer inpatients were examined by…

  8. Oncology Nursing Education: Nursing Students' Commitment of "Presence" with the Dying Patient and the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Sandra M.; Hogan, Nancy S.

    2003-01-01

    Following a chaplain's lecture on the end of life, nursing students wrote reaction papers on appropriate ways to support dying patients and their families. Six processes emerged, including the core concept of the nurse's presence at the bedside. (Contains 23 references.) (SK)

  9. Patient/Caregiver influences for declining participation in supportive oncology trials.

    PubMed

    Buss, Mary K; DuBenske, Lori L; Dinauer, Susan; Gustafson, David H; McTavish, Fiona; Cleary, James F

    2008-04-01

    Enrolling adequate numbers of subjects to research projects that focus on the supportive needs of patients and caregivers is difficult, and this difficulty significantly impedes investigation of this important research area. We report reasons that patients or their informal caregivers declined to participate in one of two randomized, longitudinal clinical trials testing the Comprehensive Health Enhancement Support System (CHESS), a Web-based information and support scheme for people with advanced cancer and their primary informal caregivers. Patients were asked why they declined participation in these trials; their responses then were recorded and coded into themes. The leading reasons included factors related to using a computer (eg, lack of familiarity with using this technology, access to other resources), being attended to by a caregiver (eg, poor caregiver health, caregiver burden, patient doing well and not needing a caregiver), taking part in a study (eg, survey burden, privacy concerns, wording of the consent form), dealing with personal issues (eg, time commitment, timing of study, feelings of being overwhelmed, and coping styles), and lack of interest. By using eligibility criteria that largely parallel those for studies of chemotherapeutic regimens, this research project highlighted reasons why subjects decline participation in clinical trials. This information was specific to supportive care trials; it may help researchers plan recruitment strategies and enrollment targets.

  10. Changing models of care for emergency surgical and trauma patients in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Sachin; Goo, Tiong Thye; Tan, T’zu Jen; Tan, Kok Yang; Mak, Kenneth Seck Wai

    2016-01-01

    The last 15 years have seen changing patterns of injury in emergency surgery and trauma patients. The ability to diagnose, treat and manage these patients nonoperatively has led to a decline in interest in trauma surgery as a career. In addition, healthcare systems face multiple challenges, including limited resources, an ageing population and increasing subspecialisation of medical care, while maintaining government-directed standards and managing public expectations. In the West, these challenges have led to the emergence of a new subspecialty, ‘acute care surgery’, with some models of care providing dedicated acute surgical units or separating acute and elective streams with the existing manpower resources. The outcomes for emergency surgery patients and efficiency gains are promising. In Singapore, Khoo Teck Puat Hospital has implemented its first dedicated acute surgical unit. This article outlines the evolution of acute care surgery and its relevance to Asia. PMID:27353030

  11. Snoring Sounds Predict Obstruction Sites and Surgical Response in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Li-Ang; Lo, Yu-Lun; Yu, Jen-Fang; Lee, Gui-She; Ni, Yung-Lun; Chen, Ning-Hung; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Huang, Chung-Guei; Cheng, Wen-Nuan; Li, Hsueh-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Snoring sounds generated by different vibrators of the upper airway may be useful indicators of obstruction sites in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). This study aimed to investigate associations between snoring sounds, obstruction sites, and surgical responses (≥50% reduction in the apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] and <10 events/hour) in patients with OSAHS. This prospective cohort study recruited 36 OSAHS patients for 6-hour snoring sound recordings during in-lab full-night polysomnography, drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE), and relocation pharyngoplasty. All patients received follow-up polysomnography after 6 months. Fifteen (42%) patients with at least two complete obstruction sites defined by DISE were significantly, positively associated with maximal snoring sound intensity (40-300 Hz; odds ratio [OR], 1.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-1.49) and body mass index (OR, 1.48, 95% CI 1.02-2.15) after logistic regression analysis. Tonsil obstruction was significantly, inversely correlated with mean snoring sound intensity (301-850 Hz; OR, 0.84, 95% CI 0.74-0.96). Moreover, baseline tonsil obstruction detected by either DISE or mean snoring sound intensity (301-850 Hz), and AHI could significantly predict the surgical response. Our findings suggest that snoring sound detection may be helpful in determining obstruction sites and predict surgical responses.

  12. Snoring Sounds Predict Obstruction Sites and Surgical Response in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Li-Ang; Lo, Yu-Lun; Yu, Jen-Fang; Lee, Gui-She; Ni, Yung-Lun; Chen, Ning-Hung; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Huang, Chung-Guei; Cheng, Wen-Nuan; Li, Hsueh-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Snoring sounds generated by different vibrators of the upper airway may be useful indicators of obstruction sites in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). This study aimed to investigate associations between snoring sounds, obstruction sites, and surgical responses (≥50% reduction in the apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] and <10 events/hour) in patients with OSAHS. This prospective cohort study recruited 36 OSAHS patients for 6-hour snoring sound recordings during in-lab full-night polysomnography, drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE), and relocation pharyngoplasty. All patients received follow-up polysomnography after 6 months. Fifteen (42%) patients with at least two complete obstruction sites defined by DISE were significantly, positively associated with maximal snoring sound intensity (40-300 Hz; odds ratio [OR], 1.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-1.49) and body mass index (OR, 1.48, 95% CI 1.02-2.15) after logistic regression analysis. Tonsil obstruction was significantly, inversely correlated with mean snoring sound intensity (301-850 Hz; OR, 0.84, 95% CI 0.74-0.96). Moreover, baseline tonsil obstruction detected by either DISE or mean snoring sound intensity (301-850 Hz), and AHI could significantly predict the surgical response. Our findings suggest that snoring sound detection may be helpful in determining obstruction sites and predict surgical responses. PMID:27471038

  13. Individual and social concerns in American surgical education: paying patients, prepaid health insurance, Medicare and Medicaid.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, John S

    2010-05-01

    The education of the U.S. surgeon was traditionally based on a system in which surgeons-in-training cared for a population of largely indigent patients in a setting of graded responsibility. To ensure an ethically appropriate bargain, senior surgeons served as mentors, assumed ultimate responsibility for the patient, and supervised the surgical care of the ward patient by the surgical trainee. During the 20th century, changes in health care financing challenged this comfortable accommodation between charity care and medical education. As others have also written, the introduction of prepaid health insurance plans such as Blue Cross/Blue Shield in the early third of the century, the rapid expansion of employment-based health benefits during World War II, and the enactment of the Medicare and Medicaid legislation under Titles XVIII and XIX of the Social Security Act all contributed to a dramatic reduction in hospital ward (i.e., service) populations. The tension between education and patient care remains incompletely resolved; the proper balance between supervision and graded responsibility for the resident is ultimately worked out on an individual basis. Newer issues facing U.S. surgical education, including the justifiable demand for greater transparency, are likely to upset this suspended truce and lead to renewed discussions about such fundamental concepts as the definition of the resident and the role of the patient in the education of future surgeons. PMID:20520042

  14. Efficacies of surgical treatments based on Harris hip score in elderly patients with femoral neck fracture

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chengwei; Yang, Fengjian; Lin, Weilong; Fan, Yongqian

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To compare the efficacies of four surgical treatments, i.e., total hip arthroplasty (THA), internal fixation (IF), hemiarthroplasty (HA), and artificial femoral head replacement (artificial FHR), by performing a network meta-analysis based on Harris hip score (HHS) in elderly patients with femoral neck fracture. Methods: In strict accordance with specific inclusion and exclusion criteria, randomized controlled trails (RCTs) were screened and selected from a larger group of studies that were retrieved through a comprehensive search of scientific literature databases, further complimented by manual search. The resultant high-quality data from final selected studies were analyzed using Stata 12.0 software. Results: A total of 3680 studies were initially retrieved from database search, and 15 RCTs were eventually incorporated into this meta-analysis, containing 1781 elderly patients who had undergone various surgical treatments for femoral neck fracture (THA group = 604; HA group = 604; IF group = 495; artificial FHR group = 78). Our major result revealed a statistically significant difference in HHS of femoral neck fracture when HA and IF groups were compared with THA. No differences were detected in the HHS of femoral neck fracture undergoing artificial FHR and THA. The surface under the cumulative ranking curves (SUCRA) value of HHS, in elderly patients with femoral neck fracture after surgery, revealed that IF has the highest value. Conclusions: The current network meta-analysis results suggest that IF is the superlative surgical procedure for femoral neck fracture patients, and IF significantly improves the HHS in femoral neck fracture patients. PMID:26221216

  15. Management of spontaneous extramedullary spinal haematomas: results in eight patients after MRI diagnosis and surgical decompression.

    PubMed Central

    Langmayr, J J; Ortler, M; Dessl, A; Twerdy, K; Aichner, F; Felber, S

    1995-01-01

    Spinal cord compression due to extradural and subdural haemorrhage is a neurosurgical emergency. Differences in clinical presentation in relation to localisation of the haematoma, value of MRI as a diagnostic tool, surgical treatment, and prognosis were investigated in a retrospective case series of eight patients with extradural (n = four) and subdural (n = four) haematomas. Results of MRI were compared with operative findings and proved to be of high sensitivity in defining the type of bleeding and delineating craniocaudal extension and ventrodorsal location. Surgical treatment by decompressive laminectomy, haematoma evacuation, and postoperative high dose corticosteroids resulted in resolution of symptoms in five patients and improvement in the clinical situation in two patients. One patient with a chronic subdural haematoma had a second operation because of arachnoidal adhesions. One patient presented with a complete cord transection syndrome due to an acute subdural haematoma and remained paraplegic. It is concluded that prompt, reliable, and non-invasive diagnosis by MRI leads to efficient surgical treatment and a favourable outcome in this rare condition. Images PMID:7561928

  16. Snoring Sounds Predict Obstruction Sites and Surgical Response in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Li-Ang; Lo, Yu-Lun; Yu, Jen-Fang; Lee, Gui-She; Ni, Yung-Lun; Chen, Ning-Hung; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Huang, Chung-Guei; Cheng, Wen-Nuan; Li, Hsueh-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Snoring sounds generated by different vibrators of the upper airway may be useful indicators of obstruction sites in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). This study aimed to investigate associations between snoring sounds, obstruction sites, and surgical responses (≥50% reduction in the apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] and <10 events/hour) in patients with OSAHS. This prospective cohort study recruited 36 OSAHS patients for 6-hour snoring sound recordings during in-lab full-night polysomnography, drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE), and relocation pharyngoplasty. All patients received follow-up polysomnography after 6 months. Fifteen (42%) patients with at least two complete obstruction sites defined by DISE were significantly, positively associated with maximal snoring sound intensity (40–300 Hz; odds ratio [OR], 1.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05–1.49) and body mass index (OR, 1.48, 95% CI 1.02–2.15) after logistic regression analysis. Tonsil obstruction was significantly, inversely correlated with mean snoring sound intensity (301–850 Hz; OR, 0.84, 95% CI 0.74–0.96). Moreover, baseline tonsil obstruction detected by either DISE or mean snoring sound intensity (301–850 Hz), and AHI could significantly predict the surgical response. Our findings suggest that snoring sound detection may be helpful in determining obstruction sites and predict surgical responses. PMID:27471038

  17. Prevalence and Determinants of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms in Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shoar, Saeed; Naderan, Mohammad; Aghajani, Motahareh; Sahimi-Izadian, Elaheh; Hosseini-Araghi, Negin; Khorgami, Zhamak

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Mood disorders are prevalent in hospitalized patients. However, risk factors for early diagnosis have not been studied exclusively in surgical patients. Our study aimed to investigate the prevalence and determinants of depression and anxiety symptoms in surgical patients. Methods We included 392 surgical patients in this prospective cross-sectional study, which took place between June 2011 and June 2012. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was used to screen for symptoms of depression and anxiety at weekly interviews. Regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors for early (the day after admission) and late (one week or more) in-hospital psychiatry symptoms. Results Depression and anxiety symptoms increased from the time of admission toward longer hospital stay. Scores obtained in the second and third weeks of admission were associated with the need for surgery while HADS in the third week was associated with lack of familial support and being under the poverty line (p < 0.050). Regression model analysis showed that early depression was associated with female gender, and early anxiety was inversely affected by female gender and protected by higher education level. A history of mood disorder was a risk factor. Later anxiety was also associated with longer hospital stay. Conclusions Depression and anxiety symptoms are a major concern in surgical patients especially in females and those with a history of mood disorders or lower educational level. Patients with a longer hospital stay, in particular, those with underlying diseases, postoperative complications, lack of familial support, and the need for reoperation were also at increased risk. PMID:27162587

  18. Non surgical predicting factors for patient satisfaction after third molar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Balaguer-Martí, José-Carlos; Aloy-Prósper, Amparo; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David

    2016-01-01

    Background In the third molar surgery, it is important to focus not only on surgical skills, but also on patient satisfaction. Classically studies have been focused on surgery and surgeon’s empathy, but there are non-surgical factors that may influence patient satisfaction. Material and Methods A cross-sectional study was performed on 100 patients undergoing surgical extractions of impacted mandibular third molars treated from October 2013 to July 2014 in the Oral Surgery Unit of the University of Valencia. A questionnaire (20 questions) with a 10-point Likert scale was provided. The questionnaire assessed the ease to find the center, the ease to get oriented within the center, the burocratic procedures, the time from the first visit to the date of surgical intervention, waiting time in the waiting room, the comfort at the waiting room, the administrative staff (kindness and efficiency to solve formalities), medical staff (kindness, efficiency, reliability, dedication), personal data care, clarity in the information received (about the surgery, postoperative care and resolution of the doubts), available means and state of facilities. Outcome variables were overall satisfaction, and recommendation of the center. Statistical analysis was made using the multiple linear regression analysis. Results Significant correlations were found between all variables and overall satisfaction. The multiple regression model showed that the efficiency of the surgeon and the clarity of the information were statistically significant to overall satisfaction and recommendation of the center. The kindness of the administrative staff, available means, the state of facilities and the comfort at the waiting room were statistically significant to the recommendation of the center. Conclusions Patient satisfaction directly depends on the efficiency of the surgeon and clarity of the clinical information received about the procedure. Appreciation of these predictive factors may help clinicians

  19. Social Media and Oncology: The past, present, and future of electronic communication between physician and patient

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Mark A.; Dicker, Adam P.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between patient and physician is in flux with the advent of electronic media that are advancing and enhancing communication. We perform a retrospective, current, and forward-looking examination of the technologies by which information is exchanged within the healthcare community. The evolution from email and listservs to blogs and the modern social networks is described, with emphasis on the advantages and pitfalls of each medium, especially in regard to maintaining the standards of privacy and professionalism to which doctors are held accountable. We support the use of contemporary platforms like Twitter and Facebook for physicians to establish themselves as trustworthy online sources of medical knowledge, and anticipate ongoing collaboration between researchers, patients, and their advocates in trial design and accrual. PMID:26433557

  20. Social Media and Oncology: The Past, Present, and Future of Electronic Communication Between Physician and Patient.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Mark A; Dicker, Adam P

    2015-10-01

    The relationship between patient and physician is in flux with the advent of electronic media that are advancing and enhancing communication. We perform a retrospective, current, and forward-looking examination of the technologies by which information is exchanged within the healthcare community. The evolution from e-mail and listservs to blogs and the modern social networks is described, with emphasis on the advantages and pitfalls of each medium, especially in regard to maintaining the standards of privacy and professionalism to which doctors are held accountable. We support the use of contemporary platforms like Twitter and Facebook for physicians to establish themselves as trustworthy online sources of medical knowledge, and anticipate ongoing collaboration between researchers, patients, and their advocates in trial design and accrual.

  1. Social Media and Oncology: The Past, Present, and Future of Electronic Communication Between Physician and Patient.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Mark A; Dicker, Adam P

    2015-10-01

    The relationship between patient and physician is in flux with the advent of electronic media that are advancing and enhancing communication. We perform a retrospective, current, and forward-looking examination of the technologies by which information is exchanged within the healthcare community. The evolution from e-mail and listservs to blogs and the modern social networks is described, with emphasis on the advantages and pitfalls of each medium, especially in regard to maintaining the standards of privacy and professionalism to which doctors are held accountable. We support the use of contemporary platforms like Twitter and Facebook for physicians to establish themselves as trustworthy online sources of medical knowledge, and anticipate ongoing collaboration between researchers, patients, and their advocates in trial design and accrual. PMID:26433557

  2. Market and patient access to new oncology products in Europe: a current, multidisciplinary perspective.

    PubMed

    McCabe, C; Bergmann, L; Bosanquet, N; Ellis, M; Enzmann, H; von Euler, M; Jönsson, B; Kallen, K-J; Newling, D; Nüssler, V; Paschen, B; de Wilde, R; Wilking, N; Teale, C; Zwierzina, H

    2009-03-01

    To air challenging issues related to patient and market access to new anticancer agents, the Biotherapy Development Association--an international group focused on developing targeted cancer therapies using biological agents--convened a meeting on 29 November 2007 in Brussels, Belgium. The meeting provided a forum for representatives of pharmaceutical companies and academia to interact with European regulatory and postregulatory agencies. The goal was to increase all parties' understanding of their counterparts' roles in the development, licensure, and appraisal of new agents for cancer treatment, events guided by an understanding that cancer patients should have rapid and equitable access to life-prolonging treatments. Among the outcomes of the meeting were a greater understanding of the barriers facing drug developers in an evolving postregulatory world, clarity about what regulatory and postregulatory bodies expect to see in dossiers of new anticancer agents as they contemplate licensure and reimbursement, and several sets of recommendations to optimize patients' access to innovative, safe, effective, and fairly priced cancer treatments.

  3. Early Versus Delayed Initiation of Concurrent Palliative Oncology Care: Patient Outcomes in the ENABLE III Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bakitas, Marie A.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Li, Zhigang; Lyons, Kathleen D.; Hull, Jay G.; Li, Zhongze; Dionne-Odom, J. Nicholas; Frost, Jennifer; Dragnev, Konstantin H.; Hegel, Mark T.; Azuero, Andres; Ahles, Tim A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Randomized controlled trials have supported integrated oncology and palliative care (PC); however, optimal timing has not been evaluated. We investigated the effect of early versus delayed PC on quality of life (QOL), symptom impact, mood, 1-year survival, and resource use. Patients and Methods Between October 2010 and March 2013, 207 patients with advanced cancer at a National Cancer Institute cancer center, a Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and community outreach clinics were randomly assigned to receive an in-person PC consultation, structured PC telehealth nurse coaching sessions (once per week for six sessions), and monthly follow-up either early after enrollment or 3 months later. Outcomes were QOL, symptom impact, mood, 1-year survival, and resource use (hospital/intensive care unit days, emergency room visits, chemotherapy in last 14 days, and death location). Results Overall patient-reported outcomes were not statistically significant after enrollment (QOL, P = .34; symptom impact, P = .09; mood, P = .33) or before death (QOL, P = .73; symptom impact, P = .30; mood, P = .82). Kaplan-Meier 1-year survival rates were 63% in the early group and 48% in the delayed group (difference, 15%; P = .038). Relative rates of early to delayed decedents' resource use were similar for hospital days (0.73; 95% CI, 0.41 to 1.27; P = .26), intensive care unit days (0.68; 95% CI, 0.23 to 2.02; P = .49), emergency room visits (0.73; 95% CI, 0.45 to 1.19; P = .21), chemotherapy in last 14 days (1.57; 95% CI, 0.37 to 6.7; P = .27), and home death (27 [54%] v 28 [47%]; P = .60). Conclusion Early-entry participants' patient-reported outcomes and resource use were not statistically different; however, their survival 1-year after enrollment was improved compared with those who began 3 months later. Understanding the complex mechanisms whereby PC may improve survival remains an important research priority. PMID:25800768

  4. Surgical patients' and nurses' opinions and expectations about privacy in care.

    PubMed

    Akyüz, Elif; Erdemir, Firdevs

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the opinions and expectations of patients and nurses about privacy during a hospital admission for surgery. The study explored what enables and maintains privacy from the perspective of Turkish surgical patients and nurses. The study included 102 adult patients having surgery and 47 nurses caring for them. Data were collected via semistructured questionnaire by face-to-face interviews. The results showed that patients were mostly satisfied by the respect shown to their privacy by the nurses but were less confident of the confidentiality of their personal data. It was found that patients have expectations regarding nursing approaches and attitudes about acknowledging and respecting patient autonomy and confidentiality. It is remarkable that while nurses focused on the physical dimension of privacy, patients focused on informational and psychosocial dimensions of privacy, as well as its physical dimension.

  5. Changes in patient's quality of life comparing conservative and surgical treatment of venous leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Jankūnas, Vytautas; Rimdeika, Rytis; Jasenas, Marius; Samsanavicius, Donatas

    2004-01-01

    Leg ulcers of different etiology disable up to 1% of total population, and up to 15% individuals over 70 years old. It is an old disease, which troubles the patients and medical personnel and is hard to cure. It might take several years to cure the ulcer fully. Most of the patients with leg ulcers are being treated at home, not in the outpatient departments or hospitals; therefore there is not much information on how the ulcer affects the patient's everyday life and its quality. The researchers often analyze only the financial part of this disorder forgetting its human part: pain, social isolation, and decreased mobility. There are many questionnaires and methods to analyze the quality of life of the patients with leg ulceration. It is often unclear if we should treat the ulcer conservatively for a long time or if part of resources should be used for operation (skin grafting) and the time of treatment should be shortened. To see the advantage of both methods and the influence of the ulcer treatment to the quality of life we decided to estimate the functionality of surgical and conservative treatment. We have analyzed the case histories and the data of special questionnaires of 44 patients, which were treated in Department of Plastic Surgery and Burns of Kaunas University of Medicine Hospital in the period of 2001 January-2004 February and had large trophic leg ulcers (m=254 cm2) for 6 months or more. Ten patients were treated conservatively and 34 patients were treated by skin grafting. All of them were interviewed after 3-6 months. We found that the pain in the place of the ulcers has decreased for the patients, who were treated surgically. By making the differences of the pain more exact we found out, that the patients have been feeling pain before the operation and when interviewing them the second time they told that they felt discomfort, not pain. The intensity of pain remained the same for the patients treated conservatively. The regression of pain also

  6. The Status of Contemporary Image-Guided Modalities in Oncologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Eben L; Warram, Jason M; Bland, Kirby I; Zinn, Kurt R

    2014-01-01

    Surgical resection remains the cornerstone of therapy for patients with early stage solid malignancies and more than half of all cancer patients undergo surgery each year. The technical ability of the surgeon to obtain clear surgical margins at the initial resection remains crucial to improve overall survival and long-term morbidity. Current resection techniques are largely based on subjective and subtle changes associated with tissue distortion by invasive cancer. As a result, positive surgical margins occur in a significant portion of tumor resections, which is directly correlated with a poor outcome. A variety of cancer imaging techniques have been adapted or developed for intraoperative surgical guidance that have been shown to improve functional and oncologic outcomes in randomized clinical trials. There are also a large number of novel, cancer-specific contrast agents that are in early stage clinical trials and preclinical development that demonstrate significant promise to improve real-time detection of subclinical cancer in the operative setting. PMID:25599326

  7. Bezoar in a Pediatric Oncology Patient Treated with Coca-Cola

    PubMed Central

    Naramore, Sara; Virojanapa, Amy; Bell, Moshe; Jhaveri, Punit N.

    2015-01-01

    A bezoar is a mass of indigestible material. Bezoars can present with a gradual onset of non-specific gastrointestinal symptoms including abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. However, bezoars can result in more serious conditions such as intestinal bleeding or obstruction. Without quick recognition, particularly in susceptible individuals, the diagnosis and treatment can be delayed. Currently resolution is achieved with enzymatic dissolution, endoscopic fragmentation or surgery. We describe, to our knowledge, the first pediatric patient with lymphoma to have had a bezoar treated with Coca-Cola. PMID:26269699

  8. Bezoar in a Pediatric Oncology Patient Treated with Coca-Cola.

    PubMed

    Naramore, Sara; Virojanapa, Amy; Bell, Moshe; Jhaveri, Punit N

    2015-01-01

    A bezoar is a mass of indigestible material. Bezoars can present with a gradual onset of non-specific gastrointestinal symptoms including abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. However, bezoars can result in more serious conditions such as intestinal bleeding or obstruction. Without quick recognition, particularly in susceptible individuals, the diagnosis and treatment can be delayed. Currently resolution is achieved with enzymatic dissolution, endoscopic fragmentation or surgery. We describe, to our knowledge, the first pediatric patient with lymphoma to have had a bezoar treated with Coca-Cola.

  9. Surgical treatment outcomes of patients with bilateral warthin tumors in the parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Yoon, Tae Mi; Lee, Joon Kyoo; Lim, Sang Chul

    2014-01-01

    We describe the treatment outcomes of patients with bilateral Warthin tumors in the parotid gland according to surgical methods. The medical records of ten patients with bilateral Warthin tumors in the parotid gland who underwent surgery between 2004 and 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Ten patients were included in the study and 13 parotidectomies were performed. Patients with bilateral Warthin tumors in the parotid gland were divided into three groups according to the surgical methods used to treat these individuals. In group 1, the patients were closely observed without undergoing contralateral parotidectomy after unilateral parotidectomy. In group 2, the patients underwent concurrent bilateral parotidectomies. In group 3, the patient underwent contralateral parotidectomy 2 months after unilateral parotidectomy was performed. The overall rate of transient facial nerve dysfunction was 31%. Our findings suggest that concurrent superficial parotidectomy may be an appropriate method for treating bilateral Warthin tumors in the parotid gland, at least for desired patients. The symptoms of this type of tumor and physical examination findings are frequently non-specific and present in the unilateral parotid gland. Therefore, a high degree of discernment is needed and imaging techniques are essential for the determining the correct pre-operative diagnosis.

  10. [Surgical treatment of respiratory failure in young patients with diffuse lung emphysema].

    PubMed

    Gorbunkov, S D; Chernyĭ, S M; Akopov, A L; Varlamov, V V; Lukina, O V; Kiriukhina, L D; Agishev, A S; Gembitskaia, T E

    2012-01-01

    An analysis of results of examination and treatment of 8 young patients (from 25 to 17 years of age) with generalized emphysema of the lungs, pulmonary failure of the II and III degrees was made. The functional examination of the patients before operation has revealed changed respiration by obstructive type. Symptoms of dysplasia of the connective tissue were found in 4 patients. Surgical reduction of the lung volume was performed in 5 patients for correction of respiratory failure. There were neither serious complications nor lethality. Dyspnea by MMRC scale decreased in all the patients at minimum by 1 point during the first months after operation. Three years later 4 out of the operated patients (80%) had retained positive effect of operation. In patients who had no operative treatment the frequency of infectious complications, level of dyspnea during three years of follow-up remained at the same level, while functional indices continued worsening. The surgical method of treatment of severe respiratory failure allowed tolerance of physical exercise to be increased and quality of life of patients with diffuse lung emphysema to be improved. PMID:23488258

  11. Shared Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer: Implications for Preventive Health and Clinical Care in Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Christopher B; Davis, Margot K; Law, Angeline; Sulpher, Jeffrey

    2016-07-01

    The cardiovascular toxicity of cancer therapy has raised awareness of the importance of heart disease in cancer care among oncologists and cardiologists, leading to the new interdisciplinary field of cardio-oncology. Evidence is accumulating to suggest that risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease are also related to an increased incidence of cancer and excess cancer mortality. We review the epidemiologic evidence that smoking, obesity, poor diet, and inactivity can cause both heart disease and cancer. The importance of cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular risk factors in adversely affecting oncological outcomes and leading to increased cancer mortality is discussed. Cardiotoxicity prediction tools that incorporate cardiac disease and risk factors are described. Raising awareness about shared risk factors for cancer and heart disease may result in more effective advocacy to promote healthy lifestyle changes through the combined efforts of the historically separate specialties of cardiology and oncology. PMID:27343745

  12. Advances in caring for the older cancer patient: a report from the 2015 conference of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Stepney, Rob

    2016-01-01

    A paradox in cancer research is that the majority of patients enrolled in clinical trials are relatively young and fit while typical patients in daily practice are elderly and have comorbidities and impaired organ function. Given these differences, many major studies provide an imperfect guide to optimizing the treatment of the majority of patients. Since cancer incidence is highly correlated with age, and since the world's population is rapidly ageing, this problem can only increase. For this reason, oncologists and geriatricians need to collaborate in developing tools to systematically assess the health status of elderly patients and their fitness to receive cancer therapies of various intensity. Tailoring anti-cancer treatments and supportive care to individual needs should be seen as part of the move towards personalized medicine. Achieving this goal is as much of a challenge to developing and middle-income countries as it is to western nations. The 2015 annual conference of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) held in Prague, Czech Republic, November 2015 and had a global focus on advancing the science of geriatric oncology and supportive care. Central to this approach is the systematic assessment of life expectancy, independent functioning, and the physical and psychological health of older cancer patients. The assumption behind comprehensive geriatric assessment is that elderly cancer patients have complex needs. The implication is that effective intervention will require a multidisciplinary team. Examples of effective geriatric assessment, multidisciplinary working and supportive care were presented at the SIOG conference.

  13. Optimization of the extent of surgical treatment in patients with stage I in cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshova, A. L.; Kolomiets, L. A.; Sinilkin, I. G.; Chernov, V. I.; Lyapunov, A. Yu.

    2016-08-01

    The study included 26 patients with FIGO stage Ia1-Ib1 cervical cancer who underwent fertility-sparing surgery (transabdominaltrachelectomy). To visualize sentinel lymph nodes, lymphoscintigraphy with injection of 99mTc-labelled nanocolloid was performed the day before surgery. Intraoperative identification of sentinel lymph nodes using hand-held gamma probe was carried out to determine the radioactive counts over the draining lymph node basin. The sentinel lymph node detection in cervical cancer patients contributes to the accurate clinical assessment of the pelvic lymph node status, precise staging of the disease and tailoring of surgical treatment to individual patient.

  14. CogState computerized memory tests in patients with brain metastases: secondary endpoint results of NRG Oncology RTOG 0933.

    PubMed

    Caine, Chip; Deshmukh, Snehal; Gondi, Vinai; Mehta, Minesh; Tomé, Wolfgang; Corn, Benjamin W; Kanner, Andrew; Rowley, Howard; Kundapur, Vijayananda; DeNittis, Albert; Greenspoon, Jeffrey Noah; Konski, Andre A; Bauman, Glenn S; Raben, Adam; Shi, Wenyin; Wendland, Merideth; Kachnic, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) is associated with memory dysfunction. As part of NRG Oncology RTOG 0933, a phase II study of WBRT for brain metastases that conformally avoided the hippocampal stem cell compartment (HA-WBRT), memory was assessed pre- and post-HA-WBRT using both traditional and computerized memory tests. We examined whether the computerized tests yielded similar findings and might serve as possible alternatives for assessment of memory in multi-institution clinical trials. Adult patients with brain metastases received HA-WBRT to 30 Gy in ten fractions and completed Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (HVLT-R), CogState International Shopping List Test (ISLT) and One Card Learning Test (OCLT), at baseline, 2 and 4 months. Tests' completion rates were 52-53 % at 2 months and 34-42 % at 4 months. All baseline correlations between HVLT-R and CogState tests were significant (p ≤ 0.003). At baseline, both CogState tests and one component of HVLT-R differentiated those who were alive at 6 months and those who had died (p ≤ 0.01). At 4 months, mean relative decline was 7.0 % for HVLT-R Delayed Recall and 18.0 % for ISLT Delayed Recall. OCLT showed an 8.0 % increase. A reliable change index found no significant changes from baseline to 2 and 4 months for ISLT Delayed Recall (z = -0.40, p = 0.34; z = -0.68, p = 0.25) or OCLT (z = 0.15, p = 0.56; z = 0.41, p = 0.66). Study findings support the possibility that hippocampal avoidance may be associated with preservation of memory test performance, and that these computerized tests also may be useful and valid memory assessments in multi-institution adult brain tumor trials. PMID:26511494

  15. CogState computerized memory tests in patients with brain metastases: secondary endpoint results of NRG Oncology RTOG 0933.

    PubMed

    Caine, Chip; Deshmukh, Snehal; Gondi, Vinai; Mehta, Minesh; Tomé, Wolfgang; Corn, Benjamin W; Kanner, Andrew; Rowley, Howard; Kundapur, Vijayananda; DeNittis, Albert; Greenspoon, Jeffrey Noah; Konski, Andre A; Bauman, Glenn S; Raben, Adam; Shi, Wenyin; Wendland, Merideth; Kachnic, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) is associated with memory dysfunction. As part of NRG Oncology RTOG 0933, a phase II study of WBRT for brain metastases that conformally avoided the hippocampal stem cell compartment (HA-WBRT), memory was assessed pre- and post-HA-WBRT using both traditional and computerized memory tests. We examined whether the computerized tests yielded similar findings and might serve as possible alternatives for assessment of memory in multi-institution clinical trials. Adult patients with brain metastases received HA-WBRT to 30 Gy in ten fractions and completed Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (HVLT-R), CogState International Shopping List Test (ISLT) and One Card Learning Test (OCLT), at baseline, 2 and 4 months. Tests' completion rates were 52-53 % at 2 months and 34-42 % at 4 months. All baseline correlations between HVLT-R and CogState tests were significant (p ≤ 0.003). At baseline, both CogState tests and one component of HVLT-R differentiated those who were alive at 6 months and those who had died (p ≤ 0.01). At 4 months, mean relative decline was 7.0 % for HVLT-R Delayed Recall and 18.0 % for ISLT Delayed Recall. OCLT showed an 8.0 % increase. A reliable change index found no significant changes from baseline to 2 and 4 months for ISLT Delayed Recall (z = -0.40, p = 0.34; z = -0.68, p = 0.25) or OCLT (z = 0.15, p = 0.56; z = 0.41, p = 0.66). Study findings support the possibility that hippocampal avoidance may be associated with preservation of memory test performance, and that these computerized tests also may be useful and valid memory assessments in multi-institution adult brain tumor trials.

  16. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF UNSTABLE PELVIC RING FRACTURE IN SKELETALLY IMMATURE PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Joao Antonio Matheus; de Souza Portes Meirelles, Ricardo; Júnior, Luiz Augusto Peçanha Tavares; Goldsztajn, Flávio; Rocha, Tito; Mendes, Pedro Henrique Barros

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To present the outcomes from definitive surgical treatment for unstable fractures of the pelvic ring in children undergoing surgical reduction and stabilization. Methods: We studied 10 patients with immature skeletons who suffered unstable fractures of the pelvic ring and were treated between March 2004 and January 2008. The study was retrospective, based on clinical and radiographic evaluations. Results: The mean age at the time of the trauma was 8.8 years (2 to 13 years). Seven patients were female and three was male. There were eight cases of trauma caused by being run over, and one case each of a motorcycle accident and falling from a height. Five patients had other associated injuries such as fractures of the clavicle, femoral diaphysis, proximal humerus, lower leg bones, olecranon and bladder injury. All the patients evaluated showed an excellent clinical outcome. The pelvic asymmetry before surgery ranged from 0.7 to 2.9 cm (mean 1.45 cm), and dropped to values between 0.2 and 0.9 cm (mean 0.39 cm) after reduction. In no case was any change observed in pelvic asymmetry measured in the immediate postoperative period and at the end of follow-up. Conclusion: Pelvic ring fractures in skeletally immature patients are rare and surgical treatment is unusual. Several authors have questioned conservative treatment because of the complications encountered. Bone remodeling does not seem enough to cause an improvement in pelvic asymmetry, and this justifies the choice of surgical treatment for reduction and correction of pelvic ring deformities. PMID:27026968

  17. Quality analysis of patient information on surgical treatment of haemorrhoids on the internet

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, ND

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Haemorrhoids are the most common benign condition seen by colorectal surgeons. At clinic appointments, advice given about lifestyle modification or surgical interventions may not be understood fully by patients. Patients may use the internet for further research into their condition. However, the quality of such information has not been investigated before. This study assessed the quality of patient information on surgical treatment of haemorrhoids on the internet. Methods Four searches were carried out using the search terms ‘surgery for haemorrhoids’ and ‘surgery for piles’ on two search engines (Google and Yahoo). The first 50 results for each search were assessed. Sites were evaluated using the DISCERN instrument. Results In total, 200 websites were assessed, of which 144 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Of these, 63 (44%) were sponsored by herbal remedies for haemorrhoids. Eighty-nine (62%) mentioned conservative treatment options but eleven (8%) did not include surgery in their treatment options. Only 38 sites (27%) mentioned recurrence of haemorrhoids following surgery and 28 sites (20%) did not list any complications. Overall, 19 websites (14%) were judged as being of high quality, 66 (45%) as moderate quality and 58 (40%) as low quality. Conclusions The quality of information on the internet is highly variable and a significant proportion of websites assessed are poor. The majority of websites are sponsored by private companies selling alternative treatments for haemorrhoids. Clinicians should be prepared to advise their patients which websites can provide high-quality information on the surgical treatment of haemorrhoids. PMID:23838496

  18. The unfunded costs incurred by patients accessing plastic surgical care in Northern Saskatchewan

    PubMed Central

    Robb, Jessica L; Clapson, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    The Canadian health care system was designed to ensure that all Canadian citizens would receive equal access to health care. However, in rural areas of Canada, patients are required to travel long distances and pay significant out-of-pocket expenses to access health care. The present study attempted to quantify the added out-of-pocket costs that rural Saskatchewan residents must pay to receive plastic surgical specialist care compared with urban residents of Saskatoon. A cost analysis was performed to generate a numerical value that would represent a minimum cost for patients travelling from three different locations within the province. The cost analysis performed in the present study approximated that the unfunded costs for common plastic surgical procedures are, at a minimum, 30 times greater for rural patients in La Ronge compared with their urban counterparts in Saskatoon. The fundamental principle of the Canadian health care system is equal access to necessary health care for all Canadians. Despite this, inequalities persist. The present cost-analysis study demonstrated that the unfunded (out-of-pocket) expenses for rural Saskatchewan patients seeking plastic surgical treatment is significantly higher than for their urban counterparts. These unfunded costs represent a significant barrier to health care access in Canada and serve to propagate inequalities in the nation’s heath care system. PMID:25114619

  19. [Dignity therapy in oncology].

    PubMed

    Ripamonti, Carla Ida

    2016-04-01

    In oncology, little is known about dignity, dignity-related distress and the issues that influence the sense of dignity for patients. Dignity is personal, subject to changes depending on the experience and the path of life. In oncology some patients feel that their dignity is directly related to the disease, to physical and emotional symptoms, to the highest level of physical and cognitive autonomy and to the continuity of the self. Patient dignity inventory (PDI) is a validate tool designed to measure various sources of dignity-related distress among patients nearing the end of life and serve as a screening tool to assess a broad range of issues that influence the sense of dignity. Dignity therapy is a novel focused psychotherapy consisting in a brief semi-structured interview, audio-recorded and transcribed in order to obtain the "generativity document". The patients are invited to tell about their life history, and to leave words of guidance and offer instructions to pass along to their son, daughters, husband, wife, parents, others. The generativity document is the result of process of emotional and existential care for the patients and a gift for everybody will receive it. PMID:27093325

  20. [Dignity therapy in oncology].

    PubMed

    Ripamonti, Carla Ida

    2016-04-01

    In oncology, little is known about dignity, dignity-related distress and the issues that influence the sense of dignity for patients. Dignity is personal, subject to changes depending on the experience and the path of life. In oncology some patients feel that their dignity is directly related to the disease, to physical and emotional symptoms, to the highest level of physical and cognitive autonomy and to the continuity of the self. Patient dignity inventory (PDI) is a validate tool designed to measure various sources of dignity-related distress among patients nearing the end of life and serve as a screening tool to assess a broad range of issues that influence the sense of dignity. Dignity therapy is a novel focused psychotherapy consisting in a brief semi-structured interview, audio-recorded and transcribed in order to obtain the "generativity document". The patients are invited to tell about their life history, and to leave words of guidance and offer instructions to pass along to their son, daughters, husband, wife, parents, others. The generativity document is the result of process of emotional and existential care for the patients and a gift for everybody will receive it.

  1. Multimodal intraoperative monitoring (MIOM) during 409 lumbosacral surgical procedures in 409 patients

    PubMed Central

    Eggspuehler, Andreas; Grob, Dieter; Porchet, Francois; Jeszenszky, Dezsö; Dvorak, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    A prospective study on 409 patients who received multimodel intraoperative monitoring (MIOM) during lumbosacral surgical procedures between March 2000 and December 2005 was carried out. The objective of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of MIOM techniques used to monitor conus medullaris, cauda equina and nerve root function during lumbosacral decompression surgery. MIOM has increasingly become important to monitor ascending and descending pathways, giving immediate feedback information regarding any neurological deficit during the decompression and stabilisation procedure in the lumbosacral region. Intraoperative spinal- and cortical-evoked potentials, combined with continuous EMG- and motor-evoked potentials of the muscles, were evaluated and compared with postoperative clinical neurological changes. A total of 409 consecutive patients with lumbosacral spinal stenosis with or without instability were monitored by MIOM during the entire surgical procedure. A total of 388 patients presented true-negative findings while two patients presented false negative and 1 patient false-positive findings. Eighteen patients presented true-positive findings where neurological deficit after the operation was intraoperatively predicted. Of the 18 true-positive findings, 12 patients recovered completely; however, 6 patients recovered only partially. The sensitivity of MIOM applied during decompression and fusion surgery of the lumbosacral region was calculated as 90%, and the specificity was calculated as 99.7%. On the basis of the results of this study, MIOM is an effective method of monitoring the conus medullaris, cauda equina and nerve root function during surgery at the lumbosacral junctions and might reduce postoperative surgical-related complications and therefore improve the long-term results. PMID:17912559

  2. Surgical Management in Elderly Patients with Tuberculous Spondylodiscitis: Ten Year Mortality Audit Study

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Manish Kundanmal; Tikoo, Agnivesh; Nene, Abhay Madhusudan

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To evaluate the factors affecting immediate postoperative mortality in elderly patients with tuberculous spondylodiscitis. Overview of Literature Treatment of spinal tuberculosis in the elderly involves consideration of age and co-morbidities, and often leads to an extended conservative management. Surgical intervention in these patients becomes a complex decision. There are no studies on risk factors of mortality in surgically treated elderly with tuberculous spondylodiscitis. Methods Two hundred and seventy-six patients with spondylodiscitis were operated between 2005 and 2015. 20 consecutive patients over 70 years of age with and proven tuberculosis who met the inclusion/exclusion criteria were included. Demographic, clinical and radiological profile data with operative details of instrumentation, blood loss, surgical duration, and mortality were noted. There were 20 patients (6 males, 14 females) with a mean age of 73.5 years. The patients were divided into those with mortality (M) and those who survived (non-mortality, NM). Various variables were statistically tested for immediate postoperative medical complications and mortality. Results There were four mortalities (20%). Age, sex, number of medical co-morbidities, American Society of Anaesthesiologists grade, Frankel grade C or worse, number of vertebrae involved, number of levels fused, blood loss and operative time did not have statistically significant impact on immediate postoperative mortality. Only preoperative immobility duration was statistically higher in the M group (p=0.016) than in the NM group. Conclusions Preoperative immobility is associated with immediate postoperative mortality in elderly patients with spinal tuberculosis undergoing surgery. The findings identify preoperative immobility as a risk factor for mortality, which could contribute to a more detailed prognostic discussion between surgeon and patient before surgery. PMID:27790320

  3. A knowledge management system to study the quality of life in head and neck oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Joaquim; Silveira, Augusta; Rocha, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    The perception that an individual holds about his place in life, which depends upon his culture and values, defines this individual's Quality of Life (QoL). When applied in a health context this known as: Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL). The assessment of HRQoL is a Medical goal; it is used in clinical research, medical practice, health-related economic studies and in planning health management measures and strategies. Obtaining a patient self-assessment with QoL measuring instruments on the platform developed in this project, through user-friendly software, aids the study, promotes the creation of databases, and accelerates its statistical treatment. The possibility of graphically representing results that physician needs to analyze, immediately after the answer collection, makes this assessment a diagnosis instrument ready to be used routinely in clinical practice. Knowledge Management Systems (KMS) applied to this context enable knowledge creation and storage, and guide therapeutic decisions.

  4. A knowledge management system to study the quality of life in head and neck oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Joaquim; Silveira, Augusta; Rocha, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    The perception that an individual holds about his place in life, which depends upon his culture and values, defines this individual's Quality of Life (QoL). When applied in a health context this known as: Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL). The assessment of HRQoL is a Medical goal; it is used in clinical research, medical practice, health-related economic studies and in planning health management measures and strategies. Obtaining a patient self-assessment with QoL measuring instruments on the platform developed in this project, through user-friendly software, aids the study, promotes the creation of databases, and accelerates its statistical treatment. The possibility of graphically representing results that physician needs to analyze, immediately after the answer collection, makes this assessment a diagnosis instrument ready to be used routinely in clinical practice. Knowledge Management Systems (KMS) applied to this context enable knowledge creation and storage, and guide therapeutic decisions. PMID:21685582

  5. Patient-specific model of a scoliotic torso for surgical planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmouche, Rola; Cheriet, Farida; Labelle, Hubert; Dansereau, Jean

    2013-03-01

    A method for the construction of a patient-specific model of a scoliotic torso for surgical planning via inter-patient registration is presented. Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) of a generic model are registered to surface topography (TP) and X-ray data of a test patient. A partial model is first obtained via thin-plate spline registration between TP and X-ray data of the test patient. The MRIs from the generic model are then fit into the test patient using articulated model registration between the vertebrae of the generic model's MRIs in prone position and the test patient's X-rays in standing position. A non-rigid deformation of the soft tissues is performed using a modified thin-plate spline constrained to maintain bone rigidity and to fit in the space between the vertebrae and the surface of the torso. Results show average Dice values of 0:975 +/- 0:012 between the MRIs following inter-patient registration and the surface topography of the test patient, which is comparable to the average value of 0:976 +/- 0:009 previously obtained following intra-patient registration. The results also show a significant improvement compared to rigid inter-patient registration. Future work includes validating the method on a larger cohort of patients and incorporating soft tissue stiffness constraints. The method developed can be used to obtain a geometric model of a patient including bone structures, soft tissues and the surface of the torso which can be incorporated in a surgical simulator in order to better predict the outcome of scoliosis surgery, even if MRI data cannot be acquired for the patient.

  6. Percutaneous Cholecystostomy for Patients with Acute Cholecystitis and an Increased Surgical Risk

    SciTech Connect

    Overhagen, Hans van; Meyers, Hjalmar; Tilanus, Hugo W.; Jeekel, Johannes; Lameris, Johan S.

    1996-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate percutaneous cholecystostomy in patients with acute cholecystitis and an increased surgical risk. Methods: Thirty-three patients with acute cholecystitis (calculous, n= 22; acalculous, n= 11) underwent percutaneous cholecystostomy by means of a transhepatic (n= 21) or transperitoneal (n= 12) access route. Clinical and laboratory parameters were retrospectively studied to determine the benefit from cholecystostomy. Results: All procedures were technically successful. Twenty-two (67%) patients improved clinically within 48 hr; showing a significant decrease in body temperature (n= 13), normalization of the white blood cell count (n= 3), or both (n= 6). There were 6 (18%) minor/moderate complications (transhepatic access, n= 3; transperitoneal access, n= 3). Further treatment for patients with calculous cholecystitis was cholecystectomy (n= 9) and percutaneous and endoscopic stone removal (n= 8). Further treatment for patients with acalculous cholecystitis was cholecystectomy (n= 2) and gallbladder ablation (n= 2). There were 4 deaths (12%) either in hospital or within 30 days of drainage; none of the deaths was procedure-related. Conclusions: Percutaneous cholecystostomy is a safe and effective procedure for patients with acute cholecystitis. For most patients with acalculous cholecystitis percutaneous cholecystostomy may be considered a definitive therapy. In calculous disease this treatment is often only temporizing and a definitive surgical, endoscopic, or radiologic treatment becomes necessary.

  7. Attitudes of patients to elective surgical admissions over Christmas and Easter.

    PubMed

    Whiteley, M S; Williams, D J; Hocken, D

    1997-03-01

    It is often accepted by hospital staff that patients would prefer to be at home for the Christmas and Easter holiday periods. This is one of the reasons that elective surgery is reduced at these times. However there is very little evidence to prove whether this is true. To investigate this question 310 patients attending surgical or urological outpatients were given a self completion questionnaire asking them whether they would accept admission over these holidays if offered it. Overall 77 per cent of males and 76 per cent of females would accept admission over the Christmas period for elective surgery. This rises to 87 per cent and 88 per cent over the Easter period. Older patients, widows or widowers, retired patients and patients with subjectively severe symptoms and conditions were groups that independently accepted such admissions more readily than others. Contrary to the perceived opinion in hospital staff, in this sample of surgical and urological patients most patients appear willing to accept admission for elective surgery over the Christmas or Easter holiday periods.

  8. [The particularities of acute surgical diseases treatment of abdominal cavity organs in patients with haemophilia].

    PubMed

    Shutov, S A; Karagiulia, S R; Danishian, K I; Zorenko, V Iu; Grzhimolovskiĭ, A V; Polianskaia, T Iu; Shulutko, E M; Galstian, G M

    2014-01-01

    The experience of treatment of 366 patients with haemophilia who were urgently hospitalized in hеmatological Scientific Center over the last 10 years is presented in the article. There were 114 (31.1%) patients with acute diseases of abdominal cavity organs, 150 (41%) patients with bleeding from upper gastrointestinal tract, 102 (27.9%) patients with acute hematomas of retroperitoneal space. Urgent operations were performed in 48 (22.2%) patients who were hospitalized with clinical symptoms of acute abdomen syndrome. It was developed the criteria of diagnosis and choice of treatment tactic on the basis of the received results. Application of presented algorithms led to improve the quality of urgent surgical care to patients with haemophilia.

  9. Nursing postoperative visit as a quality indicator for surgical patient care.

    PubMed

    Silva, R; Martins, M M; Jardim, H G

    2016-06-01

    The postoperative visit as a quality indicator for surgical patient care, demands some consideration from perioperative nurses. We evaluated the nursing perioperative interventions on postoperative visits, and adjusted them to the needs of the patients with postoperative pain. Our study indicated that 73% of patients visited didn't have postoperative pain whereas 27% had pain. The pain is aggravated when the patient is mobilised, one of the most common signs and symptoms being gastrointestinal changes. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological measures were used in pain management. The results showed that the percentage of patients with postoperative visits needs to be improved. We aim to have high quality perioperative nursing interventions which raise levels of patient satisfaction. PMID:27498440

  10. Post-operative care to promote recovery for thoracic surgical patients: a nursing perspective

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The change in patient population leads to an inevitable transformation among the healthcare system. Over the past decades, thoracic surgical technique has been evolving from conventional open thoracotomy to minimally invasive video assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Thoracic nursing team of Prince of Wales Hospital (PWH) grows together with the evolution and aims at providing holistic and quality care to patients require thoracic operation. In order to enhance patient post-operative recovery, few strategies have been implemented including early mobilization, staff training and clinical audit. On the other hand, nursing case management approach was proved to be a cost-effective method in managing patients. It is also suitable for thoracic patients, especially for those who are suffering from thoracic neoplasm. It is believed that, the introduction of nursing case management approach would provide a better holistic care to the thoracic patients. PMID:26941973

  11. A Non-inferiority Pilot Study Comparing the Clinical Efficacy and Safety of Generic Wide-spectrum Antibiotic Use in Septic Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Araya, I; Fasce, G; Núñez, E; Opazo, J L; Saez, E; Hurtado, V; Contreras, S; Quiñones, L A

    2015-12-01

    The present study is a non-inferiority study based on a descriptive and comparative case series for comparison of generic vs. original intravenous antimicrobials in septic oncology patients at an oncology private ICU. 1906 cancer patients admitted to Arturo Lopez Perez Foundation, Chile, were included in this study. After recruitment, a first retrospective group of 206 septic cancer patients recorded from 1st January, 2008 until July 14th, 2010, treated with original antibiotics (cefoperazone-sulbactam, imipenem-cilastatin, piperacillin-tazobactam) were included for analyses and a second prospective group of 143 septic cancer patients recorded from July 15th, 2010 until January 02, 2013, treated with the