Science.gov

Sample records for survey meter test

  1. Arduino based radiation survey meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Nur Aira Abd; Lombigit, Lojius; Abdullah, Nor Arymaswati; Azman, Azraf; Dolah, Taufik; Muzakkir, Amir; Jaafar, Zainudin; Mohamad, Glam Hadzir Patai; Ramli, Abd Aziz Mhd; Zain, Rasif Mohd; Said, Fazila; Khalid, Mohd Ashhar; Taat, Muhamad Zahidee

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design of new digital radiation survey meter with LND7121 Geiger Muller tube detector and Atmega328P microcontroller. Development of the survey meter prototype is carried out on Arduino Uno platform. 16-bit Timer1 on the microcontroller is utilized as external pulse counter to produce count per second or CPS measurement. Conversion from CPS to dose rate technique is also performed by Arduino to display results in micro Sievert per hour (μSvhr-1). Conversion factor (CF) value for conversion of CPM to μSvhr-1 determined from manufacturer data sheet is compared with CF obtained from calibration procedure. The survey meter measurement results are found to be linear for dose rates below 3500 µSv/hr.

  2. Arduino based radiation survey meter

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Nur Aira Abd Lombigit, Lojius; Abdullah, Nor Arymaswati; Azman, Azraf; Dolah, Taufik; Jaafar, Zainudin; Mohamad, Glam Hadzir Patai; Ramli, Abd Aziz Mhd; Zain, Rasif Mohd; Said, Fazila; Khalid, Mohd Ashhar; Taat, Muhamad Zahidee; Muzakkir, Amir

    2016-01-22

    This paper presents the design of new digital radiation survey meter with LND7121 Geiger Muller tube detector and Atmega328P microcontroller. Development of the survey meter prototype is carried out on Arduino Uno platform. 16-bit Timer1 on the microcontroller is utilized as external pulse counter to produce count per second or CPS measurement. Conversion from CPS to dose rate technique is also performed by Arduino to display results in micro Sievert per hour (μSvhr{sup −1}). Conversion factor (CF) value for conversion of CPM to μSvhr{sup −1} determined from manufacturer data sheet is compared with CF obtained from calibration procedure. The survey meter measurement results are found to be linear for dose rates below 3500 µSv/hr.

  3. Modal Survey Test of the SOTV 2X3 Meter Off-Axis Inflatable Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engberg, Robert C.; Lassiter, John O.; McGee, Jennie K.

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has had several projects involving inflatable space structures. Projects in solar thermal propulsion have had the most involvement, primarily inflatable concentrators. A flight project called Shooting Star Experiment initiated the first detailed design, analysis and testing effort involving an inflatable concentrator that supported a Fresnel lens. The lens was to concentrate the sun's rays to provide an extremely large heat transfer for an experimental solar propulsion engine. Since the conclusion of this experiment, research and development activities for solar propulsion at Marshall Space Flight Center have continued both in the solar propulsion engine technology as well as inflatable space structures. Experience gained in conducting modal survey tests of inflatable structures for the Shooting Star Experiment has been used by dynamic test engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center to conduct a modal survey test on a Solar Orbital Transfer Vehicle (SOTV) off-axis inflatable concentrator. This paper describes how both previously learned test methods and new test methods that address the unique test requirements for inflatable structures were used. Effects of the inherent nonlinear response of the inflatable concentrator on test methods and test results are noted as well. Nine analytical mode shapes were successfully correlated to test mode shapes. The paper concludes with several "lessons learned" applicable to future dynamics testing and shows how Marshall Space Flight Center has utilized traditional and new methods for modal survey testing of inflatable space structures.

  4. [Radiation screening test for commercial food products and foodstuffs for food services using NaI (Tl) scintillation survey meter].

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Masaru; Takanashi, Yoshimitsu; Kihara, Akiko; Tsutake, Toyoshige; Mitsui, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    Screening tests were carried out for radioactive cesium in foods using a NaI (Tl) scintillation survey meter. The screening level was set at 250 Bq/kg, and specimens exceeding this level were scheduled to be sent to an external testing organization, which would conduct further tests using a germanium semiconductor detector. Some specimens that did not reach the screening level were also sent to the same organization. Foodstuffs used in commercial food products circulated in Chiba city were targeted, along with food services provided to schools and day care centers. In all, 495 specimens were tested; however, no specimens exceeded the screening level. The results of verification tests confirmed that no specimen exceeded the tentative regulatory limit.

  5. Critical review of directional neutron survey meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmer, Matthew J. I.; Gamage, Kelum A. A.; Taylor, Graeme C.

    2014-01-01

    Having been overlooked for many years, research is now starting to take into account the directional distribution of the neutron work place field. The impact of not taking this into account has led to overly conservative estimates of dose in neutron workplace fields. This paper provides a critical review of this existing research into directional survey meters which could improve these estimates of dose. Instruments which could be adapted for use as directional neutron survey meters are also considered within this review. Using Monte-Carlo techniques, two of the most promising existing designs are evaluated; a boron-doped liquid scintillator and a multi-detector directional spectrometer. As an outcome of these simulations, possible adaptations to these instruments are suggested with a view to improving the portability of the instrument.

  6. Shallow (2-meter) temperature surveys in Colorado

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Publication Date: 2012 Title: Colorado 2m Survey Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Reno Nevada Publisher: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Description: Shallow temperature surveys are useful in early-stage geothermal exploration to delineate surface outflow zones, with the intent to identify the source of upwelling, usually a fault. Detailed descriptions of the 2-meter survey method and equipment design can be found in Coolbaugh et al. (2007) and Sladek et al. (2007), and are summarized here. The survey method was devised to measure temperature as far below the zone of solar influence as possible, have minimal equilibration time, and yet be portable enough to fit on the back of an all-terrain vehicle (ATV); Figure 2). This method utilizes a direct push technology (DPT) technique where 2.3 m long, 0.54” outer diameter hollow steel rods are pounded into the ground using a demolition hammer. Resistance temperature devices (RTD) are then inserted into the rods at 2-meter depths, and allowed to equilibrate for one hour. The temperatures are then measured and recorded, the rods pulled out of the ground, and re-used at future sites. Usually multiple rods are planted over the course of an hour, and then the sampler returns back to the first station, measures the temperatures, pulls the rods, and so on, to eliminate waiting time. At Wagon Wheel Gap, 32 rods were planted around the hot springs between June 20 and July 1, 2012. The purpose was to determine the direction of a possible upflow fault or other structure. Temperatures at 1.5m and 2m depths were measured and recorded in the attribute table of this point shapefile. Several anomalous temperatures suggest that outflow is coming from a ~N60W striking fault or shear zone that contains the quartz-fluorite-barite veins of the adjacent patented mining claims. It should be noted that temperatures at 2m

  7. Review of literature on the testing of point-velocity current meters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thibodeaux, K.G.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is in the process of evaluating point-velocity current meters. As part of this evaluation process, a review of the literature pertaining to the testing of point-velocity current meters was conducted. A listing of current-meter testing found in the literature was compiled and is grouped according to the type of meter tested and the type of test conducted. Meter types included in the review were vertical- and horizontal-axis mechanical current meters and electromagnetic acoustic electronic current meters. Laser current meters are not included in the review because there are no practical laser meter designs for field velocity measurements. The results of the literature review indicated that there has not been a comprehensive testing of the commonly available current meters since the 1920's.

  8. Feasibility of Mossbauer survey meter for hydrocarbon and mineral reserves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of developing a Mossbauer survey meter for geophysical prospecting was investigated. Various critical requirements that will have to be met by the source and absorber crystals in such an instrument were identified. It was concluded that a survey meter based on (Rh-103 resonance (40 kev) yields Rh-103) isomeric transition is feasible and should be developed.

  9. Advanced smoke meter development survey and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitz, R. W.; Penney, C. M.; Stanforth, C. M.; Shaffernocker, W. M.

    1984-01-01

    Ideal smoke meter characteristics are determined to provide a basis for evaluation of candidate systems. Five promising techniques are analyzed in detail to evaluate compilance with the practical smoke meter requirements. Four of the smoke measurement concepts are optical methods: Modulated Transmission (MODTRAN), Cross Beam Absorption Counter (CBAC), Laser Induced Incandescence (LIN), and Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (PAS). A rapid response filter instrument called a Taper Element Oscillating Microbalance (TEOM) is also evaluated. For each technique, the theoretical principles are described, the expected performance is determined, and the advantages and disadvantages are discussed The expected performance is evaluated against each of the smoke meter specifications, and the key questions for further study are given. The most promising smoke meter technique analyzed was MODTRAN, which is a variation on a direct transmission measurement. The soot-laden gas is passed through a transmission cell, and the gas pressure is modulated by a speaker.

  10. The response of survey meters to pulsed radiation fields

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, R.C.; Ipe, N.E.

    1987-11-01

    The response of most survey meters to steady radiation fields is fairly well known and documented. However, hardly any data is available in the literature regarding the response of these instruments to pulsed radiation. Pulsed radiation fields are encountered, e.g., in the vicinity of linear electron accelerators or klystrons. An instrument that ordinarily responds well to the average dose rate spread out evenly in time may not be able to cope with such a high dose rate. Instruments which have long dead times such as Geiger Mueller and proportional counters tend to become saturated in such fields and only count repetition rate. Ionization chambers are less influenced, however, they must be operated with adequate voltage to overcome recombination losses. Scintillation survey meters may become non-linear at higher dose rates for pulsed radiation because the photomultiplier cannot handle the instantaneous currents that are required. Because of the need to test the response of different radiation detection instruments to pulsed fields, a pulsed x-ray facility has been built (I/sub p/87). A brief description of this facility is given along with tests of several different instruments. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Evaluating Metal Probe Meters for Soil Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershey, David R.

    1992-01-01

    Inexpensive metal probe meters that are sold by garden stores can be evaluated by students for their accuracy in measuring soil pH, moisture, fertility, and salinity. The author concludes that the meters are inaccurate and cannot be calibrated in standard units. However, the student evaluations are useful in learning the methods of soil analysis…

  12. Compensated count-rate circuit for radiation survey meter

    DOEpatents

    Todd, R.A.

    1980-05-12

    A count-rate compensating circuit is provided which may be used in a portable Geiger-Mueller (G-M) survey meter to ideally compensate for couting loss errors in the G-M tube detector. In a G-M survey meter, wherein the pulse rate from the G-M tube is converted into a pulse rate current applied to a current meter calibrated to indicate dose rate, the compensation circuit generates and controls a reference voltage in response to the rate of pulses from the detector. This reference voltage is gated to the current-generating circuit at a rate identical to the rate of pulses coming from the detector so that the current flowing through the meter is varied in accordance with both the frequency and amplitude of the reference voltage pulses applied thereto so that the count rate is compensated ideally to indicate a true count rate within 1% up to a 50% duty cycle for the detector. A positive feedback circuit is used to control the reference voltage so that the meter output tracks true count rate indicative of the radiation dose rate.

  13. Compensated count-rate circuit for radiation survey meter

    DOEpatents

    Todd, Richard A.

    1981-01-01

    A count-rate compensating circuit is provided which may be used in a portable Geiger-Mueller (G-M) survey meter to ideally compensate for counting loss errors in the G-M tube detector. In a G-M survey meter, wherein the pulse rate from the G-M tube is converted into a pulse rate current applied to a current meter calibrated to indicate dose rate, the compensated circuit generates and controls a reference voltage in response to the rate of pulses from the detector. This reference voltage is gated to the current-generating circuit at a rate identical to the rate of pulses coming from the detector so that the current flowing through the meter is varied in accordance with both the frequency and amplitude of the reference voltage pulses applied thereto so that the count rate is compensated ideally to indicate a true count rate within 1% up to a 50% duty cycle for the detector. A positive feedback circuit is used to control the reference voltage so that the meter output tracks true count rate indicative of the radiation dose rate.

  14. Handheld Multi-Gas Meters Market Survey Report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Gustavious; Wald-Hopkins, Mark David; Obrey, Stephen J.; Akhadov, Valida Dushdurova

    2016-06-23

    Handheld multi-gas meters (MGMs) are equipped with sensors to monitor oxygen (O2) levels and additional sensors to detect the presence of combustible or toxic gases in the environment. This report is limited to operational response-type MGMs that include at least four different sensors. These sensors can vary by type and by the chemical monitored. In real time, the sensors report the concentration of monitored gases in the atmosphere near the MGM. To provide emergency responders with information on handheld multi-gas meters, the System Assessment and Validation for Emergency Responders (SAVER) Program conducted a market survey. This market survey report is based on information gathered between November 2015 and February 2016 from vendors, Internet research, industry publications, an emergency responder focus group, and a government issued Request for Information (RFI) that was posted on the Federal Business Opportunities website.

  15. Meter Accuracy Seafloor Geodesy using Repeated Multibeam Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSanto, J. B.; Sandwell, D. T.

    2014-12-01

    Ship-board multibeam surveys are a useful tool in measuring tectonic deformation of the seafloor, having been used to measure the ~50 m of surface slip along the Japan trench during the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake with an uncertainty of 20 m (Fujiwara et al, 2011, Science). In this study, we investigate the improvement in positioning accuracy obtainable when comparing multibeam and sidescan surveys repeated along the same track to within 1/10 of the critical baseline and taken at a slow ship speed of 1 knot. We compare two surveys of the Juan de Fuca Ridge axis fitting these criteria with two coincident surveys of the Cocos Ridge, taken at 11 knots. Both pairs of surveys were collected using a Simrad EM120 sonar system aboard the RV Roger Revelle. We find the multibeam surveys of the Juan de Fuca ridge axis sufficient to measure displacements accurate to better than 2 m, a marked improvement over the 50 m accuracy of the Cocos ridge surveys. Likewise, we can measure displacement accurate to 2 m using the sidescan data from the Juan de Fuca surveys. This accuracy is sufficient to observe meter-level horizontal movements on the deep ocean associated with large earthquakes and landslides.

  16. Test results of the DOE/Sandia 17 meter VAWT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nellums, R. O.; Worstell, M. H.

    1979-01-01

    A review is given of the test program of a 17 meter Vertical Axis Wind Turbine VAWT. Performance test results are discussed including difficulties encountered during the VAWT operation along with ways of solving these problems.

  17. EDD-7 Electric Charge Point Meter test results

    SciTech Connect

    Mersman, C.R.

    1993-09-01

    The results of tests evaluating the electric switching portion of the EDD-7 Electric Charge Point Meter (ECPM) are presented. The ECPM is a modified parking meter that allows the purchase of 120 or 240 volt electric power. The ECPM is designed to make electricity available at any vehicle parking location. The test results indicate that the ECPM operated without failure thru a series of over current and ground fault tests at three different test temperatures. The magnitude of current required to trip the over current protection circuitry varied with temperature while the performance of the ground fault interruption circuitry did not change significantly with the test temperature.

  18. Discuss the testing problems of ultraviolet irradiance meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jun'an; Lin, Fangsheng

    2014-09-01

    Ultraviolet irradiance meters are widely used in many areas such as medical treatment, epidemic prevention, energy conservation and environment protection, computers, manufacture, electronics, ageing of material and photo-electric effect, for testing ultraviolet irradiance intensity. So the accuracy of value directly affects the sterile control in hospital, treatment, the prevention level of CDC and the control accuracy of curing and aging in manufacturing industry etc. Because the display of ultraviolet irradiance meters is easy to change, in order to ensure the accuracy, it needs to be recalibrated after being used period of time. By the comparison with the standard ultraviolet irradiance meters, which are traceable to national benchmarks, we can acquire the correction factor to ensure that the instruments working under accurate status and giving the accurate measured data. This leads to an important question: what kind of testing device is more accurate and reliable? This article introduces the testing method and problems of the current testing device for ultraviolet irradiance meters. In order to solve these problems, we have developed a new three-dimensional automatic testing device. We introduce structure and working principle of this system and compare the advantages and disadvantages of two devices. In addition, we analyses the errors in the testing of ultraviolet irradiance meters.

  19. 46 CFR 162.050-19 - Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig. 162.050-19... § 162.050-19 Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig. (a) This section contains requirements for test rigs used in approval testing of oil content meters and meter. A typical test rig is described...

  20. 46 CFR 162.050-19 - Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig. 162.050-19... § 162.050-19 Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig. (a) This section contains requirements for test rigs used in approval testing of oil content meters and meter. A typical test rig is described...

  1. 46 CFR 162.050-19 - Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig. 162.050-19... § 162.050-19 Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig. (a) This section contains requirements for test rigs used in approval testing of oil content meters and meter. A typical test rig is described...

  2. Modal Test of Six-Meter Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nijo; Buehrle, Ralph; Templeton, Justin; Lindell, Mike; Hancock, Sean M.

    2014-01-01

    A modal test was performed on the six-meter Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) test article to gain a firm understanding of the dynamic characteristics of the unloaded structure within the low frequency range. The tests involved various configurations of the HIAD to understand the influence of the tri-torus, the varying pressure within the toroids and the influence of straps. The primary test was conducted utilizing an eletrodynamic shaker and the results were verified using a step relaxation technique. The analysis results show an increase in the structure's stiffness with respect to increasing pressure. The results also show the rise of coupled modes with the tri-torus configurations. During the testing activity, the attached straps exhibited a behavior that is similar to that described as fuzzy structures in the literature. Therefore extensive tests were also performed by utilizing foam to mitigate these effects as well as understand the modal parameters of these fuzzy sub structures. Results are being utilized to update the finite element model of the six-meter HIAD and to gain a better understanding of the modeling of complex inflatable structures.

  3. Price current-meter standard rating development by the U.S. geological survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hubbard, E.F.; Schwarz, G.E.; Thibodeaux, K.G.; Turcios, L.M.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has developed new standard rating tables for use with Price type AA and pygmy current meters, which are employed to measure streamflow velocity. Current-meter calibration data, consisting of the rates of rotation of meters at several different constant water velocities, have shown that the original rating tables are no longer representative of the average responsiveness of newly purchased meters or meters in the field. The new rating tables are based on linear regression equations that are weighted to reflect the population mix of current meters in the field and weighted inversely to the variability of the data at each calibration velocity. For calibration velocities of 0.3 m/s and faster, at which most streamflow measurements are made, the new AA-rating predicts the true velocities within 1.5% and the new pygmy-meter rating within 2.0% for more than 95% of the meters. At calibration velocities, the new AA-meter rating is up to 1.4% different from the original rating, and the new pygmy-meter rating is up to 1.6% different.

  4. Testing of a 10-meter Quadrant Solar Sail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaspar, James L.; Mann, Troy; Behun, Vaughn; Macy, Brian; Barker, Peter; Murphy, David

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to address the technical challenges and requirements of modal testing a solar sail system (Fig. 1). Specific objectives of this work are to investigate the effectiveness (i.e. accuracy, precision, repeatability, etc.) of laser vibrometer measurements obtained on solar sail components (i.e. sail membrane quadrant and masts) actuated with various excitation methods in vacuum conditions. Results from this work will be used to determine the appropriate test technique for testing large scale full quadrant flight-like solar sail system hardware in vacuum conditions. This paper will focus on the dynamic tests conducted in-vacuum on a 10-meter solar sail quadrant development by AEC-ABLE as part of a ground demonstrator system development program funded by NASA's In-Space Propulsion program. One triangular shaped quadrant of a solar sail membrane (Fig. 2) was modal tested in a 1 Torr vacuum environment using various excitation techniques including, shaker excitation through the masts, magnetic excitation (Ref. 3), and surface-bonded piezoelectric patch actuators (Ref. 4 & 5). The excitation methods are evaluated for their applicability to in-vacuum ground testing and their traceability to the development of on-orbit flight test techniques. The solar sail masts (Fig. 3) were also tested in ambient atmospheric conditions and vacuum using various excitation techniques and these methods will also be assessed for their ground test capabilities and traceability to on-orbit flight testing.

  5. TESTING OF A 20-METER SOLAR SAIL SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaspar, Jim L.; Behun, Vaughan; Mann, Troy; Murphy, Dave; Macy, Brian

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the structural dynamic tests conducted in-vacuum on the Scalable Square Solar Sail (S(sup 4)) System 20-meter test article developed by ATK Space Systems as part of a ground demonstrator system development program funded by NASA's In-Space Propulsion program. These tests were conducted for the purpose of validating analytical models that would be required by a flight test program to predict in space performance. Specific tests included modal vibration tests on the solar sail system in a 1 Torr vacuum environment using various excitation locations and techniques including magnetic excitation at the sail quadrant corners, piezoelectric stack actuation at the mast roots, spreader bar excitation at the mast tips, and bi-morph piezoelectric patch actuation on the sail cords. The excitation methods are evaluated for their suitability to in-vacuum ground testing and their traceability to the development of on-orbit flight test techniques. The solar sail masts were also tested in ambient atmospheric conditions and these results are also discussed.

  6. TESTING OF A 20-METER SOLAR SAIL SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaspar, J. L.; Behun, V.; Mann, T.; Murphy D.; Macy, B.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the structural dynamic tests conducted in-vacuum on the Scalable Square Solar Sail (S(sup 4)) System 20-meter test article developed by ATK Space Systems as part of a ground demonstrator system development program funded by NASA's In-Space Propulsion program1-3. These tests were conducted for the purpose of validating analytical models that would be required by a flight test program to predict in space performance4. Specific tests included modal vibration tests on the solar sail system in a 1 Torr vacuum environment using various excitation locations and techniques including magnetic excitation at the sail quadrant corners, piezoelectric stack actuation at the mast roots, spreader bar excitation at the mast tips, and bi-morph piezoelectric patch actuation on the sail cords. The excitation methods were evaluated for their suitability to in-vacuum ground testing and their traceability to the development of on-orbit flight test techniques. The solar sail masts were also tested in ambient atmospheric conditions and these results are also discussed.

  7. Calibrating/testing meters in hot water test bench VM7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kling, E.; Stolt, K.; Lau, P.; Mattiasson, K.

    A Hot Water Test Bench, VM7, has been developed and constructed for the calibration and testing of volume and flowmeters, in a project at the National Volume Measurement Laboratory at the Swedish National Testing and Research Institute. The intended area of use includes use as a reference at audit measurements, e.g. for accredited laboratories, calibration of meters for the industry and for the testing of hot water meters. The objective of the project, which was initiated in 1989, was to design equipment with stable flow and with a minimal temperature drop even at very low flow rates. The principle of the design is a closed system with two pressure tanks at different pressures. The water is led from the high pressure tank through the test object and the volume standard, in the form of master meters or a piston prover alternatively, to the low pressure tank. Calibrations/tests are made comparing the indication of the test object to that of master meters covering the current flow rate. These are, in the same test cycle, calibrated to the piston prover. Alternatively, the test object can be calibrated directly to the piston prover.

  8. 46 CFR 162.050-27 - Oil content meter: Approval tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) of this section are repeated. (2) The water and metering pumps on the test rig are stopped for 8... test. No maintenance, including replacement of parts, may be performed on the meter during or between... supplied from the oil injection pipe of the test rig and water supplied from the mixture tank of the...

  9. 46 CFR 162.050-27 - Oil content meter: Approval tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) of this section are repeated. (2) The water and metering pumps on the test rig are stopped for 8... test. No maintenance, including replacement of parts, may be performed on the meter during or between... supplied from the oil injection pipe of the test rig and water supplied from the mixture tank of the...

  10. 46 CFR 162.050-19 - Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... § 162.050-19 Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig. (a) This section contains requirements for test... piping. (c) Each test rig must have a centrifugal pump that is designed to operate at 1,000...

  11. 46 CFR 162.050-19 - Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... § 162.050-19 Oil content meter and bilge alarm test rig. (a) This section contains requirements for test... piping. (c) Each test rig must have a centrifugal pump that is designed to operate at 1,000...

  12. Model validation of the Sandia 34-Meter Test Bed Turbine using substructure modal-testing

    SciTech Connect

    Carne, T.G.; Lauffer, J.P.; Gomez, A.J.; Ashwill, T.D.

    1989-01-01

    The Sandia 34-Meter Test Bed Turbine is a vertical-axis wind turbine, thirty-four meters in diameter, designed to provide a test-bed for research in aerodynamics, structures and control. In order to design a large wind turbine, knowledge of the modal frequencies and mode shapes is essential for predicting structural response. During the design, analytical or finite element models are utilized for estimates of these modal parameters. However, when hardware becomes available, modal testing can be used to verify or update the models. The concept of substructure modal testing was developed for the Sandia 34-Meter Test Bed in order to more fully evaluate the accuracy of the finite element model. Instead of performing only one test on the entire turbine, separate tests and analyses were performed on major substructures of the turbine, including three separate blade sections, the tower supported by the guy cables, and the entire turbine. The results were then compared to analytical predictions from the finite element models of the substructures and the entire turbine. 8 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. 46 CFR 162.050-27 - Oil content meter: Approval tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... test. No maintenance, including replacement of parts, may be performed on the meter during or between... provided in a specific test, the centrifugal pump shown in Figure 162.050-19 in § 162.050-19 must be...) The metering pump is turned off and the time at which the highest reading starts to decrease,...

  14. 46 CFR 162.050-27 - Oil content meter: Approval tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... test. No maintenance, including replacement of parts, may be performed on the meter during or between... provided in a specific test, the centrifugal pump shown in Figure 162.050-19 in § 162.050-19 must be...) The metering pump is turned off and the time at which the highest reading starts to decrease,...

  15. 46 CFR 162.050-27 - Oil content meter: Approval tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... test. No maintenance, including replacement of parts, may be performed on the meter during or between... provided in a specific test, the centrifugal pump shown in Figure 162.050-19 in § 162.050-19 must be...) The metering pump is turned off and the time at which the highest reading starts to decrease,...

  16. Study on the system-level test method of digital metering in smart substation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang; Yang, Min; Hu, Juan; Li, Fuchao; Luo, Ruixi; Li, Jinsong; Ai, Bing

    2017-03-01

    Nowadays, the test methods of digital metering system in smart substation are used to test and evaluate the performance of a single device, but these methods can only effectively guarantee the accuracy and reliability of the measurement results of a digital metering device in a single run, it does not completely reflect the performance when each device constitutes a complete system. This paper introduced the shortages of the existing test methods. A system-level test method of digital metering in smart substation was proposed, and the feasibility of the method was proved by the actual test.

  17. Response of six neutron survey meters in mixed fields of fast and thermal neutrons.

    PubMed

    Kim, S I; Kim, B H; Chang, I; Lee, J I; Kim, J L; Pradhan, A S

    2013-10-01

    Calibration neutron fields have been developed at KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) to study the responses of commonly used neutron survey meters in the presence of fast neutrons of energy around 10 MeV. The neutron fields were produced by using neutrons from the (241)Am-Be sources held in a graphite pile and a DT neutron generator. The spectral details and the ambient dose equivalent rates of the calibration fields were established, and the responses of six neutron survey meters were evaluated. Four single-moderator-based survey meters exhibited an under-responses ranging from ∼9 to 55 %. DINEUTRUN, commonly used in fields around nuclear reactors, exhibited an over-response by a factor of three in the thermal neutron field and an under-response of ∼85 % in the mixed fields. REM-500 (tissue-equivalent proportional counter) exhibited a response close to 1.0 in the fast neutron fields and an under-response of ∼50 % in the thermal neutron field.

  18. [Development and test of a wheat chlorophyll, nitrogen and water content meter].

    PubMed

    Yu, Bo; Sun, Ming; Han, Shu-Qing; Xia, Jin-Wen

    2011-08-01

    A portable meter was developed which can detect chlorophyll, nitrogen and moisture content of wheat leaf simultaneously, and can supply enough data for guiding fertilization and irrigation. This meter is composed of light path and electronic circuit. And this meter uses 660, 940 and 1450 nm LED together with narrow band filters as the active light source. The hardware circuit consists of micro-controller, LED drive circuit, detector, communication circuit, keyboard and LCD circuit. The meter was tested in the field and performed well with good repeatability and accuracy. The relative errors of chlorophyll and nitrogen test were about 10%, relative error for water content was 4%. The coefficients of variation of the three indices were all below 1.5%. All of these prove that the meter can be applied under the field condition to guide the wheat production.

  19. An in-line spin test program for diagnosing turbine meters

    SciTech Connect

    MacLean, R.; Schieber, W.

    1998-07-01

    This article presents an in situ or in-line method for measuring the rotor spin time without removing the meter cartridge. A major pipeline company has used this concept to monitor turbine meter conditions for the past six years. In doing so, it has significantly reduced the man-hours required for spin testing compared to conventional (free-standing) spin testing. A turbine meter manufacturer has now improved the procedure by making use of a laptop computer and a turbine meter monitoring program. The program, among its other features, measures the spin time and calculates the corresponding change in meter accuracy. Field trials of this new program in Ohio and Massachusetts have shown very repeatable results.

  20. The four-meter confrontation visual field test.

    PubMed

    Kodsi, S R; Younge, B R

    1992-01-01

    The 4-m confrontation visual field test has been successfully used at the Mayo Clinic for many years in addition to the standard 0.5-m confrontation visual field test. The 4-m confrontation visual field test is a test of macular function and can identify small central or paracentral scotomas that the examiner may not find when the patient is tested only at 0.5 m. Also, macular sparing in homonymous hemianopias and quadrantanopias may be identified with the 4-m confrontation visual field test. We recommend use of this confrontation visual field test, in addition to the standard 0.5-m confrontation visual field test, on appropriately selected patients to obtain the most information possible by confrontation visual field tests.

  1. A mercury flow meter for ion thruster testing. [response time, thermal sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbur, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    The theory of operation of the thermal flow meter is presented, and a theoretical model is used to determine design parameters for a device capable of measuring mercury flows in the range of 0 to 5 gm/hr. Flow meter construction is described. Tests performed using a positive displacement mercury pump as well as those performed with the device in the feed line of an operating thruster are discussed. A flow meter response time of about a minute and a sensitivity of about 10 mv/gm/hr are demonstrated. Additional work to relieve a sensitivity of the device to variations in ambient temperature is indicated to improve its quantitative performance.

  2. Design, fabrication, and test of a graphite/epoxy metering truss. [as applied to the LST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oken, S.; Skoumal, D. E.

    1975-01-01

    A graphite/epoxy metering truss as applied to the large space telescope was investigated. A full-scale truss was designed, fabricated and tested. Tests included static limit loadings, a modal survey and thermal-vacuum distortion evaluation. The most critical requirement was the demonstration of the dimensional stability provided by the graphite/epoxy truss concept. Crucial to the attainment of this objective was the ability to make very sophisticated thermal growth measurements which was provided by a seven beam laser interferometer. The design of the basic truss elements were tuned to provide the high degree of dimensional stability and stiffness required by the truss. The struts and spider assembly were fabricated with Fiberite's AS/934 and HMS/934 broadgoods. The rings utilized T300 graphite fabricate with the same materials. The predicted performance of the truss was developed using the NASTRAN program. These results showed conformance with the critical stiffness and thermal distortion requirements and correlated well with the test results.

  3. OOK power model based dynamic error testing for smart electricity meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuewei; Chen, Jingxia; Yuan, Ruiming; Jia, Xiaolu; Zhu, Meng; Jiang, Zhenyu

    2017-02-01

    This paper formulates the dynamic error testing problem for a smart meter, with consideration and investigation of both the testing signal and the dynamic error testing method. To solve the dynamic error testing problems, the paper establishes an on-off-keying (OOK) testing dynamic current model and an OOK testing dynamic load energy (TDLE) model. Then two types of TDLE sequences and three modes of OOK testing dynamic power are proposed. In addition, a novel algorithm, which helps to solve the problem of dynamic electric energy measurement’s traceability, is derived for dynamic errors. Based on the above researches, OOK TDLE sequence generation equipment is developed and a dynamic error testing system is constructed. Using the testing system, five kinds of meters were tested in the three dynamic power modes. The test results show that the dynamic error is closely related to dynamic power mode and the measurement uncertainty is 0.38%.

  4. Hardware and operating features of the adaptive wall test section for the 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.

    1989-01-01

    A 13- by 13-inch adaptive wall test section was installed in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel circuit. This test section has four solid walls and is configured for two-dimensional airfoil testing. The top and bottom walls are flexible and movable, whereas the sidwalls are rigid and fixed. The test section has a turntable to support airfoil models, a survey mechanism to probe the model wake, and provisions for a sidewall boundary-layer-control system. Details of the adaptive wall test section, the tunnel circuit modifications, the supporting instrumentation, the monitoring and control hardware, and the wall adaptation strategy are discussed. Sample results of shakedown tests with the test section empty and with an airfoil installed are also included.

  5. Ground Testing A 20-Meter Inflation Deployed Solar Sail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, Troy; Behun, Vaughn; Lichodziejewski, David; Derbes, Billy; Sleight, David

    2006-01-01

    Solar sails have been proposed for a variety of future space exploration missions and provide a cost effective source of propellantless propulsion. Solar sails span very large areas to capture and reflect photons from the Sun and are propelled through space by the transfer of momentum from the photons to the solar sail. The thrust of a solar sail, though small, is continuous and acts for the life of the mission without the need for propellant. Recent advances in materials and ultra-low mass gossamer structures have enabled a host of useful space exploration missions utilizing solar sail propulsion. The team of L Garde, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Ball Aerospace, and NASA Langley Research Center, under the direction of the NASA In-Space Propulsion Office (ISP), has been developing a scalable solar sail configuration to address NASA s future space propulsion needs. The 100-m baseline solar sail concept was optimized around the one astronomical unit (AU) Geostorm mission, and features a Mylar sail membrane with a striped-net sail suspension architecture with inflation-deployed sail support beams consisting of inflatable sub-Tg (glass transition temperature) rigidizable semi-monocoque booms and a spreader system. The solar sail has vanes integrated onto the tips of the support beams to provide full 3-axis control of the solar sail. This same structural concept can be scaled to meet the requirements of a number of other NASA missions. Static and dynamic testing of a 20m scaled version of this solar sail concept have been completed in the Space Power Facility (SPF) at the NASA Glenn Plum Brook facility under vacuum and thermal conditions simulating the operation of a solar sail in space. This paper details the lessons learned from these and other similar ground based tests of gossamer structures during the three year solar sail project.

  6. The Bushing Test Facility: A new megavolt-class, meter-scale vacuum insulation test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Butner, J.M.; Smith, J.D.; Honig, E.M.; Ingwersen, P.M.; Umphres, J.D.; Anderson, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    Construction of the Bushing Test Facility (BTF) was completed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in the fall of 1989. The BTF is a new megavolt-class, meter-scale vacuum insulation test facility built to meet two primary objectives: (1) to qualify high-voltage vacuum feedthrough bushings before their installation in the electron-beam diodes of the Aurora KrF laser amplifiers and (2) to investigate fundamental issues related to surface flashover and electrical breakdown in vacuum, thereby enabling us to improve the performance and reliability of high-voltage components for future laser systems. The BTF voltage source is a low-energy (<4.4-kJ), 1-MV Marx generator whose output pulse width is variable from 100 ns to a few microseconds. The large BTF test chamber (2.1 m in diameter and 1.5 m long) allows full-sized Aurora bushings or other large-scale vacuum insulators to be tested at background pressures down to about 10{sup {minus}7} torr. This paper will further describe the facility, its experimental checkout and first bushing tests, and the plans for future vacuum insulation research. 11 refs., 5 figs.

  7. TRL Assessment of Solar Sail Technology Development Following the 20-Meter System Ground Demonstrator Hardware Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Roy M.; Adams, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) Projects Office sponsored two separate, independent solar sail system design and development demonstration activities during 2002-2005. ATK Space Systems of Goleta, CA was the prime contractor for one development team and L' Garde, Inc. of Tustin, CA was the prime contractor for the other development team. The goal of these activities was to advance the technology readiness level (TRL) of solar sail propulsion from 3 towards 6 by the year 2006. Component and subsystem fabrication and testing were completed successfully, including the ground deployment of 10-meter and 20-meter demonstration hardware systems under vacuum conditions. The deployment and structural testing of the 20-meter solar sail systems was conducted in the 30 meter diameter Space Power Facility thermal-vacuum chamber at NASA Glenn Plum Brook in April though August, 2005. This paper will present the results of the TRL assessment following the solar sail technology development activities associated with the design, development, analysis and testing of the 20-meter system ground demonstrators.

  8. Optical Air Flow Measurements for Flight Tests and Flight Testing Optical Air Flow Meters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jentink, Henk W.; Bogue, Rodney K.

    2005-01-01

    Optical air flow measurements can support the testing of aircraft and can be instrumental to in-flight investigations of the atmosphere or atmospheric phenomena. Furthermore, optical air flow meters potentially contribute as avionics systems to flight safety and as air data systems. The qualification of these instruments for the flight environment is where we encounter the systems in flight testing. An overview is presented of different optical air flow measurement techniques applied in flight and what can be achieved with the techniques for flight test purposes is reviewed. All in-flight optical airflow velocity measurements use light scattering. Light is scattered on both air molecules and aerosols entrained in the air. Basic principles of making optical measurements in flight, some basic optical concepts, electronic concepts, optoelectronic interfaces, and some atmospheric processes associated with natural aerosols are reviewed. Safety aspects in applying the technique are shortly addressed. The different applications of the technique are listed and some typical examples are presented. Recently NASA acquired new data on mountain rotors, mountain induced turbulence, with the ACLAIM system. Rotor position was identified using the lidar system and the potentially hazardous air flow profile was monitored by the ACLAIM system.

  9. Design and calibration of a novel transient radiative heat flux meter for a spacecraft thermal test.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Chunchen; Hu, Peng; Cheng, Xiaofang

    2016-06-01

    Radiative heat flux measurement is significantly important for a spacecraft thermal test. To satisfy the requirements of both high accuracy and fast response, a novel transient radiative heat flux meter was developed. Its thermal receiver consists of a central thermal receiver and two thermal guarded annular plates, which ensure the temperature distribution of the central thermal receiver to be uniform enough for reasonably applying lumped heat capacity method in a transient radiative heat flux measurement. This novel transient radiative heat flux meter design can also take accurate measurements regardless of spacecraft surface temperature and incident radiation spectrum. The measurement principle was elaborated and the coefficients were calibrated. Experimental results from testing a blackbody furnace and an Xenon lamp show that this novel transient radiative heat flux meter can be used to measure transient radiative heat flux up to 1400 W/m(2) with high accuracy and the response time of less than 10 s.

  10. Design and calibration of a novel transient radiative heat flux meter for a spacecraft thermal test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Chunchen; Hu, Peng; Cheng, Xiaofang

    2016-06-01

    Radiative heat flux measurement is significantly important for a spacecraft thermal test. To satisfy the requirements of both high accuracy and fast response, a novel transient radiative heat flux meter was developed. Its thermal receiver consists of a central thermal receiver and two thermal guarded annular plates, which ensure the temperature distribution of the central thermal receiver to be uniform enough for reasonably applying lumped heat capacity method in a transient radiative heat flux measurement. This novel transient radiative heat flux meter design can also take accurate measurements regardless of spacecraft surface temperature and incident radiation spectrum. The measurement principle was elaborated and the coefficients were calibrated. Experimental results from testing a blackbody furnace and an Xenon lamp show that this novel transient radiative heat flux meter can be used to measure transient radiative heat flux up to 1400 W/m2 with high accuracy and the response time of less than 10 s.

  11. Fibrosis assessment using FibroMeter combined to first generation tests in hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Chindamo, Maria Chiara; Boursier, Jerome; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; Fouchard-Hubert, Isabelle; Pannain, Vera Lúcia Nunes; de Araújo Neto, João Marcello; Coelho, Henrique Sérgio Moraes; de Mello Perez, Renata; Calès, Paul; Villela-Nogueira, Cristiane Alves

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the performance of FibroMeterVirus3G combined to the first generation tests aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI) or Forns index to assess significant fibrosis in chronic hepatitis C (CHC). METHODS First generation tests APRI or Forns were initially applied in a derivation population from Rio de Janeiro in Brazil considering cut-offs previously reported in the literature to evaluate significant fibrosis. FibroMeterVirus3G was sequentially applied to unclassified cases from APRI or Forns. Accuracy of non-invasive combination of tests, APRI plus FibroMeterVirus3G and Forns plus FibroMeterVirus3G was evaluated in the Brazilian derivation population. APRI plus FibroMeterVirus3G combination was validated in a population of CHC patients from Angers in France. All patients were submitted to liver biopsy staged according to METAVIR score by experienced hepatopathologists. Significant fibrosis was considered as METAVIR F ≥ 2. The fibrosis stage classification was used as the reference for accuracy evaluation of non-invasive combination of tests. Blood samples for the calculation of serum tests were collected on the same day of biopsy procedure or within a maximum 3 mo interval and stored at -70 °C. RESULTS Seven hundred and sixty CHC patients were included (222 in the derivation population and 538 in the validation group). In the derivation population, the FibroMeterVirus3G AUROC was similar to APRI AUROC (0.855 vs 0.815, P = 0.06) but higher than Forns AUROC (0.769, P < 0.001). The best FibroMeterVirus3G cut-off to discriminate significant fibrosis was 0.61 (80% diagnostic accuracy; 75% in the validation population, P = 0.134). The sequential combination of APRI or Forns with FibroMeterVirus3G in derivation population presented similar performance compared to FibroMeterVirus3G used alone (79% vs 78% vs 80%, respectively, P = 0.791). Unclassified cases of significant fibrosis after applying APRI and Forns corresponded to 49% and 54

  12. Comparison of current meters used for stream gaging

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, Janice M.; Thibodeaux, Kirk G.; Kaehrle, William R.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is field and laboratory testing the performance of several current meters used throughout the world for stream gaging. Meters tested include horizontal-axis current meters from Germany, the United Kingdom, and the People's Republic of China, and vertical-axis and electromagnetic current meters from the United States. Summarized are laboratory test results for meter repeatability, linearity, and response to oblique flow angles and preliminary field testing results. All current meters tested were found to under- and over-register velocities; errors usually increased as the velocity and angle of the flow increased. Repeatability and linearity of all meters tested were good. In the field tests, horizontal-axis meters, except for the two meters from the People's Republic of China, registered higher velocity than did the vertical-axis meters.

  13. TRL Assessment of Solar Sail Technology Development Following the 20-Meter System Ground Demonstrator Hardware Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Edward E.; Young, Roy M.; Adams, Charles L.

    2007-01-01

    The NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) Projects Office has been sponsoring 2 separate, independent system design and development hardware demonstration activities during 2002-2005. ATK Space Systems of Goleta, CA was the prime contractor for one development team and L'Garde, Inc. of Tustin, CA was the prime contractor for the other development team. The goal of these activities was to advance the technology readiness level (TRL) of solar sail propulsion from 3 towards 6 by the year 2006. Component and subsystem fabrication and testing were completed successfully, including the ground deployment of 10-meter and 20-meter ground demonstration hardware systems under vacuum conditions. The deployment and structural testing of the 20-meter solar sail systems was conducted in the 30 meter diameter Space Power Facility thermal-vacuum chamber at NASA Glenn Plum Brook in April though August, 2005. This paper will present the results of the TRL assessment following the solar sail technology development activities associated with the design, development, analysis and testing of the 20-meter system ground demonstrators. Descriptions of the system designs for both the ATK and L'Garde systems will be presented. Changes, additions and evolution of the system designs will be highlighted. A description of the modeling and analyses activities performed by both teams, as well as testing conducted to raise the TRL of solar sail technology will be presented. A summary of the results of model correlation activities will be presented. Finally, technology gaps identified during the assessment and gap closure plans will be presented, along with "lessons learned", subsequent planning activities and validation flight opportunities for solar sail propulsion technology.

  14. Near-field testing of the 5-meter model of the tetrahedral truss antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kefauver, Neill; Cencich, Tom; Osborn, Jim; Osmanski, J. T.

    1986-01-01

    This report documents the technical results from near-field testing of the General Dynamics 5-meter model of the tetrahedral truss antenna at the Martin Marietta Denver Aerospace facility. A 5-meter square side of the tetrahedral served as the perimeter of the antenna, and a mesh surface and extensive surface contouring cord network was used to create a parabolic aperture shape to within an rms accuracy of 30 mils or better. Pattern measurements were made with offset feed systems radiating at frequencies of 7.73, 11.60, 2.27, and 4.26 (all in GHz). This report discusses the method of collecting the data, system measurement accuracy, the test data compiled, and diagostics and isolation of causes of pattern results. The technique of using near-field phase for measuring surface mechanical tolerances is included. Detailed far field antenna patterns and their implications are provided for all tests conducted.

  15. Near-field testing of the 5-meter model of the tetrahedral truss antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kefauver, Neill; Cencich, Tom; Osborn, Jim; Osmanski, J. T.

    1986-08-01

    This report documents the technical results from near-field testing of the General Dynamics 5-meter model of the tetrahedral truss antenna at the Martin Marietta Denver Aerospace facility. A 5-meter square side of the tetrahedral served as the perimeter of the antenna, and a mesh surface and extensive surface contouring cord network was used to create a parabolic aperture shape to within an rms accuracy of 30 mils or better. Pattern measurements were made with offset feed systems radiating at frequencies of 7.73, 11.60, 2.27, and 4.26 (all in GHz). This report discusses the method of collecting the data, system measurement accuracy, the test data compiled, and diagostics and isolation of causes of pattern results. The technique of using near-field phase for measuring surface mechanical tolerances is included. Detailed far field antenna patterns and their implications are provided for all tests conducted.

  16. An aerial radiological survey of the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, T J; Riedhauser, S R

    1999-12-01

    A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted an aerial radiological survey of the US Department of Energy's Nevada Test Site including three neighboring areas during August and September 1994. The survey team measured the terrestrial gamma radiation at the Nevada Test Site to determine the levels of natural and man-made radiation. This survey included the areas covered by previous surveys conducted from 1962 through 1993. The results of the aerial survey showed a terrestrial background exposure rate that varied from less than 6 microroentgens per hour (mR/h) to 50 mR/h plus a cosmic-ray contribution that varied from 4.5 mR/h at an elevation of 900 meters (3,000 feet) to 8.5 mR/h at 2,400 meters (8,000 feet). In addition to the principal gamma-emitting, naturally occurring isotopes (potassium-40, thallium-208, bismuth-214, and actinium-228), the man-made radioactive isotopes found in this survey were cobalt-60, cesium-137, europium-152, protactinium-234m an indicator of depleted uranium, and americium-241, which are due to human actions in the survey area. Individual, site-wide plots of gross terrestrial exposure rate, man-made exposure rate, and americium-241 activity (approximating the distribution of all transuranic material) are presented. In addition, expanded plots of individual areas exhibiting these man-made contaminations are given. A comparison is made between the data from this survey and previous aerial radiological surveys of the Nevada Test Site. Some previous ground-based measurements are discussed and related to the aerial data. In regions away from man-made activity, the exposure rates inferred from the gamma-ray measurements collected during this survey agreed very well with the exposure rates inferred from previous aerial surveys.

  17. Near-field Testing of the 15-meter Model of the Hoop Column Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, J.; Kefauver, N.; Cencich, T.; Osborn, J.; Osmanski, J.

    1986-01-01

    The technical results from near-field testing of the 15-meter model of the hoop column antenna at the Martin Marietta Denver Aerospace facility are documented. The antenna consists of a deployable central column and a 15 meter hoop, stiffened by cables into a structure with a high tolerance repeatable surface and offset feed location. The surface has been configured to have four offset parabolic apertures, each about 6 meters in diameter, and is made of gold plated molybdenum wire mesh. Pattern measurements were made with feed systems radiating at frequencies of 7.73, 11.60, 2.27, 2.225, and 4.26 (all in GHz). This report (Volume 1) covers the testing from an overall viewpoint and contains information of generalized interest for testing large antennas. This volume discusses the deployment of the antenna in the Martin Facility and the measurements to determine mechanical stability and trueness of the reflector surface, gives the test program outline, and gives a synopsis of antenna electromagnetic performance. Three techniques for measuring surface mechanical tolerances were used (theodolites, metric cameras, and near-field phase), but only the near-field phase approach is included. The report also includes an error analysis. A detailed listing of the antenna patterns are provided for the 2.225 Ghz feed in Volume 3 of this report, and for all other feeds in Volume 2.

  18. SOFIA telescope modal survey test and test-model correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keas, Paul; Brewster, Rick; Guerra, Jorge; Lampater, Ulrich; Kärcher, Hans; Teufel, Stefan; Wagner, Jörg

    2010-07-01

    The NASA/DLR Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) employs a 2.5-meter reflector telescope in a Boeing 747SP. The telescope is housed in an open cavity and will be subjected to aeroacoustic and inertial disturbances. The image stability goal for SOFIA is 0.2 arc-seconds (RMS). Throughout the development phase of the project, analytical models were employed to predict the image stability performance of the telescope, and to evaluate pointing performance improvement measures. These analyses clearly demonstrated that key aspects which determined performance were: 1) Disturbance environment and relevant load-paths 2) Telescope modal behavior 3) Sensor and actuator placement 4) Control algorithm design The SOFIA program is now entering an exciting phase in which the characteristics of the telescope and the cavity environment are being verified through ground and airborne testing. A modal survey test (MST) was conducted in early 2008 to quantify the telescope modal behavior. We will give a brief overview of analytical methods which have been employed to assess/improve the pointing stability performance of the SOFIA telescope. In this context, we will describe the motivation for the MST, and the pre-test analysis which determined the modes of interest and the required MST sensor/shaker placement. A summary will then be given of the FEM-test correlation effort, updated end-to-end simulation results, and actual data coming from telescope activation test flights.

  19. Dynamic and Static Shape Test/Analysis Correlation of a 10 Meter Quadrant Solar Sail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taleghani, Barmac K.; Lively, Peter S.; Gaspar, James L.; Murphy, David M.; Trautt, Thomas A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes finite element analyses and correlation studies to predict deformations and vibration modes/frequencies of a 10-meter quadrant solar sail system. Thin film membranes and booms were analyzed at the component and system-level. The objective was to verify the design and structural responses of the sail system and to mature solar sail technology to a TRL 5. The focus of this paper is in test/analysis correlation.

  20. First Accelerator Test of the Kinematic Lightweight Energy Meter (KLEM) Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bashindzhagyan, G.; Adams, J. H.; Bashindzhagyan, P.; Chilingarian, A.; Donnelly, J.; Drury, L.; Egorov, N.; Golubkov, S.; Grebenyuk, V.; Kalinin, A.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The essence of the KLEM (Kinematic Lightweight Energy Meter) instrument is to directly measure the elemental energy spectra of high-energy cosmic rays by determining the angular distribution of secondary particles produced in a target. The first test of the simple KLEM prototype has been performed at the CERN SPS test-beam with 180 GeV pions during 2001. The results of the first test analysis confirm that, using the KLEM method, the energy of 180 GeV pions can be measured with a relative error of about 67%, which is very close to the results of the simulation (65%).

  1. Status of advanced airfoil tests in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladson, C. L.; Ray, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    A joint NASA/U.S. industry program to test advanced technology airfoils in the Langley 0.3-meter Transonic Tunnel (TCT) was formulated under the Langley ACEE Project Office. The objectives include providing U.S. industry an opportunity to compare their most advanced airfoils to the latest NASA designs by means of high Reynolds number tests in the same facility. At the same time, industry would again experience in the design and construction of cryogenic test techniques. The status and details of the test program are presented. Typical aerodynamic results obtained, to date, are presented at chord Reynolds number up to 45 x 10(6) and are compared to results from other facilities and theory. Details of a joint agreement between NASA and the Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsantalt fur Luft- and Raumfahrt e.V. (DFVLR) for tests of two airfoils are also included. Results of these tests will be made available as soon as practical.

  2. NaK Plugging Meter Design for the Feasibility Test Loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. Boise; Godfroy, Thomas J.; Reid, Robert S.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2008-01-01

    The design and predicted performance of a plugging meter for use in the measurement of NaK impurity levels are presented. The plugging meter is incorporated into a Feasibility Test Loop (FTL), which is a small pumped-NaK loop designed to enable the rapid, small-scale evaluation of techniques such as in situ purification methods and to permit the measurement of bulk material transport effects (not mechanisms) under flow conditions that are representative of a fission surface power reactor. The FTL operates at temperatures similar to those found in a reactor, with a maximum hot side temperature of 900 K and a corresponding cold side temperature of 860 K. In the plugging meter a low flow rate bypass loop is cooled until various impurities (primarily oxides) precipitate out of solution. The temperatures at which these impurities precipitate are indicative of the level of impurities in the NaK. The precipitates incrementally plug a small orifice in the bypass loop, which is detected by monitoring changes in the liquid metal flow rate.

  3. 77 FR 40586 - Draft NIST Interagency Report (NISTIR) 7823, Advanced Metering Infrastructure Smart Meter...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ... Metering Infrastructure Smart Meter Upgradeability Test Framework; Request for Comments AGENCY: National... Metering Infrastructure Smart Meter Upgradeability Test Framework (Draft NISTIR 7823). This draft document... process for the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) Smart Meters. The target audience for Draft...

  4. Fabrication and Deployment Testing of Solar Sail Quadrants for a 20-Meter Solar Sail Ground Test System Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, Greg; Case, David; Moore, Jim

    2005-01-01

    A 20-meter Scalable Square Solar Sail (S(sup 4)) System was produced and successfully completed functional vacuum testing in NASA Glenn's Space Power Facility at Plum Brook Station Ohio in May 2005. The S(sup 4) system was designed and developed by ATK Space Systems, and the design and production of the Solar Sails for this system was carried out by SRS Technologies. The S(sup 4) system consists of a central structure with four deployable carbon fiber masts that support four triangular sails. SRS has developed an effective and efficient design for triangular sail quadrants that are supported at three points and provide a flat reflective surface with a high fill factor. This sail design is robust enough for deployments in a one atmosphere, one gravity environment and incorporates several advanced features including adhesiveless seaming of membrane strips, compliant edge borders to allow for film membrane cord strain mismatch without causing wrinkling and low mass (3% of total sail mass) ripstop. This paper will outline some of the sail design and fabrication processes and the mature production, packaging and deployment processes that have been developed. This paper will also detail the successful ambient and vacuum testing of the sails and the ATK spacecraft structure. Based on recent experience and testing, SRS is confidant that high Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 5-6 solar sails in the 40-120-meter size range with areal density in the 4-5 grams per square meters (sail minus structure) range can be produced with existing technology. Additional film production research will lead to further reductions in film thickness to less than 1 micron enabling production of sails with areal densities as low as 2.0 grams per square meters using the current design, resulting in a system areal densities as low as 5.3 grams per square meters (sail and structure). These areal densities are low enough to allow nearly all of the Solar Sail missions that have been proposed by the

  5. Design, fabrication and test of graphite/epoxy metering truss structure components, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The design, materials, tooling, manufacturing processes, quality control, test procedures, and results associated with the fabrication and test of graphite/epoxy metering truss structure components exhibiting a near zero coefficient of thermal expansion are described. Analytical methods were utilized, with the aid of a computer program, to define the most efficient laminate configurations in terms of thermal behavior and structural requirements. This was followed by an extensive material characterization and selection program, conducted for several graphite/graphite/hybrid laminate systems to obtain experimental data in support of the analytical predictions. Mechanical property tests as well as the coefficient of thermal expansion tests were run on each laminate under study, the results of which were used as the selection criteria for the single most promising laminate. Further coefficient of thermal expansion measurement was successfully performed on three subcomponent tubes utilizing the selected laminate.

  6. Computational investigation of the discharge coefficient of bellmouth flow meters in engine test facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebourn, Charles Lynn

    2002-11-01

    In this thesis computation of the discharge coefficient of bellmouth flow meters installed in engine test facilities is presented. The discharge coefficient is a critical parameter for accurately calculating flow rate in any flow meter which operates by means of creating a pressure differential. Engine airflow is a critical performance parameter and therefore, it is necessary for engine test facilities to accurately measure airflow. In this report the author investigates the use of computational fluid dynamics using finite difference methods to calculate the flow in bellmouth flow meters and hence the discharge coefficient at any measurement station desired. Experimental boundary layer and core flow data was used to verify the capability of the WIND code to calculate the discharge coefficient accurately. Good results were obtained for Reynolds numbers equal to or greater than about three million which is the primary range of interest. After verifying the WIND code performance, results were calculated for a range of Reynolds numbers and Mach numbers. Also the variation in discharge coefficient as a function of measurement location was examined. It is demonstrated that by picking the proper location for pressure measurement, sensitivity to measurement location can be minimized. Also of interest was the effect of bellmouth geometry. Calculations were performed to investigate the effect of duct to bellmouth diameter ratio and the eccentricity of the bellmouth contraction. In general the effects of the beta ratio were seen to be quite small. For the eccentricity, the variation in discharge coefficient was as high as several percent for axial locations less than half a diameter downstream from the throat. The second portion of the thesis examined the effect of a turbofan engine stationed just downstream of the bellmouth flow meter. The study approximated this effect by examining a single fan stage installed in the duct. This calculation was performed by making use of a

  7. A multispectral scanner survey of the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada. Date of survey: August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Brewster, S.B. Jr.; Howard, M.E.; Shines, J.E.

    1994-08-01

    The Multispectral Remote Sensing Department of the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted an airborne multispectral scanner survey of a portion of the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada. The survey was conducted on August 21 and 22, 1993, using a Daedalus AADS1268 scanner and coincident aerial color photography. Flight altitudes were 5,000 feet (1,524 meters) above ground level for systematic coverage and 1,000 feet (304 meters) for selected areas of special interest. The multispectral scanner survey was initiated as part of an interim and limited investigation conducted to gather preliminary information regarding historical hazardous material release sites which could have environmental impacts. The overall investigation also includes an inventory of environmental restoration sites, a ground-based geophysical survey, and an aerial radiological survey. The multispectral scanner imagery and coincident aerial photography were analyzed for the detection, identification, and mapping of man-made soil disturbances. Several standard image enhancement techniques were applied to the data to assist image interpretation. A geologic ratio enhancement and a color composite consisting of AADS1268 channels 10, 7, and 9 (mid-infrared, red, and near-infrared spectral bands) proved most useful for detecting soil disturbances. A total of 358 disturbance sites were identified on the imagery and mapped using a geographic information system. Of these sites, 326 were located within the Tonopah Test Range while the remaining sites were present on the imagery but outside the site boundary. The mapped site locations are being used to support ongoing field investigations.

  8. Are the average gait speeds during the 10meter and 6minute walk tests redundant in Parkinson disease?

    PubMed

    Duncan, Ryan P; Combs-Miller, Stephanie A; McNeely, Marie E; Leddy, Abigail L; Cavanaugh, James T; Dibble, Leland E; Ellis, Terry D; Ford, Matthew P; Foreman, K Bo; Earhart, Gammon M

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the relationships between average gait speed collected with the 10Meter Walk Test (Comfortable and Fast) and 6Minute Walk Test (6MWT) in 346 people with Parkinson disease (PD) and how the relationships change with increasing disease severity. Pearson correlation and linear regression analyses determined relationships between 10Meter Walk Test and 6MWT gait speed values for the entire sample and for sub-samples stratified by Hoehn & Yahr (H&Y) stage I (n=53), II (n=141), III (n=135) and IV (n=17). We hypothesized that redundant tests would be highly and significantly correlated (i.e. r>0.70, p<0.05) and would have a linear regression model slope of 1 and intercept of 0. For the entire sample, 6MWT gait speed was significantly (p<0.001) related to the Comfortable 10 Meter Walk Test (r=0.75) and Fast 10Meter Walk Test (r=0.79) gait speed, with 56% and 62% of the variance in 6MWT gait speed explained, respectively. The regression model of 6MWT gait speed predicted by Comfortable 10 Meter Walk gait speed produced slope and intercept values near 1 and 0, respectively, especially for participants in H&Y stages II-IV. In contrast, slope and intercept values were further from 1 and 0, respectively, for the Fast 10Meter Walk Test. Comfortable 10 Meter Walk Test and 6MWT gait speeds appeared to be redundant in people with moderate to severe PD, suggesting the Comfortable 10 Meter Walk Test can be used to estimate 6MWT distance in this population.

  9. Design, fabrication, and test of a Graphite/Epoxy Metering Shell (GEMS). [for the large space telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A program to design, fabricate and test a dimensionally stable metering structure in support of the large space telescope (LST) program is discussed. Graphite/epoxy was the material selected as the only viable candidate material which can meet the stringent thermal expansion criteria of the LST. A metering shell was designed and fabricated, with emphasis on dimensional stability in conjunction with low cost. Thermal expansion test coupons extracted from the layups of the skin panels indicated the attainment of a coefficient of thermal expansion of 0.0666 micrometers/m K. Subsequent thermal vacuum chamber tests on the complete metering shell demonstrated an expansion of the 2.95-meter overall length of 0.27 micrometers/K. Static and dynamics tests, which demonstrated adequacy with respect to limit loads and stiffness, were also accomplished.

  10. Vertically configured collimator for cryogenic vacuum testing of meter scale optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatke, Derek; Meyer, Steve; Siegel, Noah; Byrd, Don; Spuhler, Peter; Atcheson, Paul; Martella, Mark; Penniman, Edwin

    2007-09-01

    Ball Aerospace has constructed a new collimator for interferometric and image quality testing of meter scale optical systems under cryogenic, vacuum conditions. Termed the Vertical Collimator Assembly (VCA), it features 1.5 m diameter off-axis parabolic and calibration flat mirrors. In order to preserve as large a volume as possible for the unit under test, the main platform is suspended inside its vacuum chamber by a hexapod, with the parabolic mirror mounted overhead. A simultaneous interferometer facilitates collimator alignment and monitoring, as well as wavefront quality measurements for the test unit. Diffusely illuminated targets may be employed for through-focus image quality measurements with pinholes and bar targets. Mechanical alignment errors induced by thermal and structural perturbations are monitored with a three-beam distance measuring interferometer to enable mid-test compensation. Sources for both interferometer systems are maintained at atmospheric pressure while still directly mounted to the main platform, reducing vibration and stability problems associated with thermal vacuum testing. Because path lengths inside the ambient pressure vessels are extremely short, problems related to air turbulence and layering are also mitigated. In-chamber support equipment is insulated and temperature controlled, allowing testing while the chamber shrouds and test unit are brought to cryogenic temperatures.

  11. Fatigue Test Design: Scenarios for Biaxial Fatigue Testing of a 60-Meter Wind Turbine Blade

    SciTech Connect

    Post, Nathan

    2016-07-01

    Current practice in commercial certification of wind turbine blades is to perform separate flap and lead-lag fatigue tests. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has been researching and evaluating biaxial fatigue testing techniques and demonstrating various options, typically on smaller-scale test articles at the National Wind Technology Center. This report evaluates some of these biaxial fatigue options in the context of application to a multimegawatt blade certification test program at the Wind Technology Testing Center in Charlestown, Massachusetts.

  12. Test plan for the 34 meter vertical axis wind turbine test bed located at Bushland, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, W.A.

    1986-12-01

    A plan is presented for the testing and evaluation of a new 500 kw vertical axis wind turbine test bed. The plan starts with the initial measurements made during construction, proceeds through evaluation of the design, the development of control methods, and finally to the test bed phase where new concepts are evaluated and in-depth studies are performed.

  13. Evaluation and testing of metering pumps for high-level nuclear waste slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, M.E.; Perez, J.M. Jr.; Blair, H.T.

    1986-06-01

    The metering pump system that delivers high-level liquid wastes (HLLW) slurry to a melter is an integral subsystem of the vitrification process. The process of selecting a pump for this application began with a technical review of pumps typically used for slurry applications. The design and operating characteristics of numerous pumps were evaluated against established criteria. Two pumps, an air-displacement slurry (ADS) pump and an air-lift pump, were selected for further development. In the development activity, from FY 1983 to FY 1985, the two pumps were subjected to long-term tests using simulated melter feed slurries to evaluate the pumps' performances. Throughout this period, the designs of both pumps were modified to better adapt them for this application. Final reference designs were developed for both the air-displacement slurry pump and the air-lift pump. Successful operation of the final reference designs has demonstrated the feasibility of both pumps. A fully remote design of the ADS pump has been developed and is currently undergoing testing at the West Valley Demonstration Project. Five designs of the ADS pump were tested and evaluated. The initial four designs proved the operating concept of the ADS pump. Weaknesses in the ADS pump system were identified and eliminated in later designs. A full-scale air-lift pump was designed and tested as a final demonstration of the air-lift pump's capabilities.

  14. Validity and reliability of the 20 meter shuttle run test in military personnel.

    PubMed

    Aandstad, Anders; Holme, Ingar; Berntsen, Sveinung; Anderssen, Sigmund A

    2011-05-01

    is regularly monitored in military personnel, as occupational demands require a certain level of fitness. Distance run (eg, 2 mile) is typically carried out to measure aerobic fitness, but an alternative test could be the 20 meter shuttle run test (20 m SRT). The present study aimed to evaluate validity and reliability of this test in military personnel. An equation for predicting maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) was developed on 38 Home Guard soldiers and cross validated in 28 Air Force cadets. Reliability of the 20 m SRT, expressed as mean difference in estimated VO2max-- 95% limits of agreement, was -0.8 +/- 3.1 mL x kg(-1) min(-1). Mean difference +/- limits of agreement between estimated and measured VO2max was -0.4 +/- 6.2 mL.kg(-1)x min-'. The 20 m SRT seems to be a reliable test, although validity is less certain, as relatively high variability was observed between measured and estimated VO2max from the 20 m SRT.

  15. Test of prototype liquid-water-content meter for aircraft use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerber, Hermann E.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the effort undertaken to meet the objectives of National Science Foundation Grant ATM-9207345 titled 'Test of Prototype Liquid-Water-Content Meter for Aircraft Use.' Three activities were proposed for testing the new aircraft instrument, PVM-100A: (1) Calibrate the PVM-100A in a facility where the liquid-water-content (LWC) channel, and the integrated surface area channel (PSA) could be compared to standard means for LWC and PSA measurements. Scaling constant for the channels were to be determined in this facility. The fog/wind tunnel at ECN, Petten, The Netherlands was judged the most suitable facility for this effort. (2) Expose the PVM-100A to high wind speeds similar to those expected on research aircraft, and test the anti-icing heaters on the PVM-100A under typical icing conditions expected in atmospheric clouds. The high-speed icing tunnel at NRC, Ottawa, Canada was to be utilized. (3) Operate the PVM-100A on an aircraft during cloud penetrations to determine its stability and practicality for such measurements. The C-131A aircraft of the University of Washington was the aircraft of opportunity for these-tests, which were to be conducted during the 4-week Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June of 1992.

  16. Pressure distribution data from tests of 2.29-meter (7.5-ft.) span EET high-lift research model in Langley 4- by 7-meter tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, H. L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A 2.29 m (7.5 ft.) span high-lift research model equipped with full-span leading-edge slat and part-span double-slotted trailing-edge flap was tested in the Langley 4- by 7-Meter Tunnel to determine the low speed performance characteristics of a representative high aspect ratio suprcritical wing. These tests were performed in support of the Energy Efficient Transport (EET) program which is one element of the Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) project. Static longitudinal forces and moments and chordwise pressure distributions at three spanwise stations were measured for cruise, climb, two take-off flap, and two landing flap wing configurations. The tabulated and plotted pressure distribution data is presented without analysis or discussion.

  17. PROOF OF PRINCIPAL TEST TO FEED AND METER GRANULAR COAL INTO 450 psig GAS PRESSURE

    SciTech Connect

    Derek L. Aldred

    2000-04-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate proof of principal to feed and meter granular coal into 450 psig gas pressure for use with pressurized fluidized bed combustors. This report summarizes work undertaken in the first quarter of 2000 in support of that objective. At the end of the last quarter the pump had been re-designed to incorporate a larger torque hub and provide a substantial increase in drive train strength to prevent recurrence of failures experienced during earlier testing. Additional modifications were incorporated to improve the performance of the disk seals by improved location and adjustability, and the outlet was modified to incorporate a method to allow rapid adjustment of the outlet sealing column length without pump disassembly and rework being required. This quarter has been largely spent in manufacture of the new parts required, and in initial assembly, alignment and pinning of the revised configuration. The assembly is now complete and the pump is ready for installation into the test rig for the final series of tests.

  18. High Altitude Flight Test of a 40-Foot Diameter (12.2 meter) Ringsail Parachute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    High Altitude Flight Test of a 40-Foot Diameter (12.2 meter) Ringsail Parachute at Deployment Mach Number of 2.95. A 40-foot-nominal-diameter (12.2-meter) modified ringsail parachute was flight tested as part of the NASA Supersonic High Altitude Parachute Experiment (SHAPE) program. The 41-pound (18.6-kg) test parachute system was deployed from a 239.5-pound (108.6-kg) instrumented payload by means of a deployment mortar when the payload was at an altitude of 171,400 feet (52.3 km), a Mach number of 2.95, and a free-stream dynamic pressure of 9.2 lb/sq ft (440 N/m(exp 2)). The parachute deployed properly, suspension line stretch occurring 0.54 second after mortar firing with a resulting snatch-force loading of 932 pounds (4146 newtons). The maximum loading due to parachute opening was 5162 pounds (22 962 newtons) at 1.29 seconds after mortar firing. The first near full inflation of the canopy at 1.25 seconds after mortar firing was followed immediately by a partial collapse and subsequent oscillations of frontal area until the system had decelerated to a Mach number of about 1.5. The parachute then attained a shape that provided full drag area. During the supersonic part of the test, the average axial-force coefficient varied from a minimum of about 0.24 at a Mach number of 2.7 to a maximum of 0.54 at a Mach number of 1.1. During descent under subsonic conditions, the average effective drag coefficient was 0.62 and parachute-payload oscillation angles averaged about &loo with excursions to +/-20 degrees. The recovered parachute was found to have slight damage in the vent area caused by the attached deployment bag and mortar lid. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070031005. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  19. Design, fabrication and acoustic tests of a 36 inch (0.914 meter) statorless turbotip fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. G.; Stempert, D. L.; Uhl, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    The LF336/E is a 36 inch (0.914 meter) diameter fan designed to operate in a rotor-alone configuration. Design features required for modification of the existing LF336/A rotor-stator fan into the LF336/E statorless fan configuration are discussed. Tests of the statorless fan identified an aerodynamic performance deficiency due to inaccurate accounting of the fan exit swirl during the aerodynamic design. This performance deficiency, related to fan exit static pressure levels, produced about a 20 percent thrust loss. A study was then conducted for further evaluation of the fan exit flow fields typical of statorless fan systems. This study showed that through proper selection of fan design variables such as pressure ratio, radius ratio, and swirl distributions, performance of a statorless fan configuration could be improved with levels of thrust approaching the conventional rotor-stator fan system. Acoustic measurements were taken for the statorless fan system at both GE and NASA, and when compared to other lift fan systems, showed noise levels comparable to the quietest lift fan configuration which included rotor-stator spacing and acoustic treatment. The statorless fan system was also used to determine effects of rotor leading edge serrations on noise generations. A cascade test program identified the serration geometry based on minimum pressure losses, wake turbulence levels and noise generations.

  20. Sub-meter Range Precision of Seafloor Deformation Obtainable from Correlation of Repeated Raw Sidescan Sonar Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSanto, J. B.; Sandwell, D. T.; Chadwell, C. D.

    2015-12-01

    Despite recent advances in the field of seafloor geodesy, our ability to collect data to monitor for marine hazards or increase our understanding of offshore geologic processes remains limited by the exorbitant cost of data collection. We propose to measure horizontal seafloor displacements using raw sidescan data from repeated multibeam surveys. We grid the data in a natural range and azimuth coordinate frame, and estimate displacement from the peak offset of their normalized cross correlation. This method allows us to obtain sub-pixel accuracy in our displacement calculation as it involves averaging the data over a wide area. Our overall objective is to establish the accuracy of this method and determine how it depends on factors such as: ship speed, repeat track separation, seafloor characteristics, sound speed variations, and ping orientation. We analyze sidescan data archived at the NGDC database that vary over these parameters, finding that under optimal conditions we may obtain decimeter to meter level precision in the range direction and meter level precision in the azimuthal direction. The most important parameter is the ping orientation because small (~2-3 degrees) variations can drastically lower the maximum correlation value. Differing ship speed can cause large reductions in the correlation accuracy, although these effects are more pronounced in the azimuthal direction. Surprisingly, variations in sound speed are partially mitigated by data averaging over both sides of the ship. In addition, the characteristics of the seafloor seem to have minimal influence over the displacement accuracy.

  1. PROOF OF PRINCIPAL TEST TO FEED AND METER GRANULAR COAL INTO 450 psig GAS PRESSURE

    SciTech Connect

    Derek L. Aldred

    2000-07-01

    This research program is concerned with the development of a new form of feeder, known as the Stamet Posimetric O High Pressure Solids Feeder, to feed dry granular solids continuously and controllably into gas pressure. The device is a rotary mechanical feeder, which utilizes the interlocking and internal friction of the granular solids to drive the solids through into the outlet pressure in a continuous and controllable way, using a continuous solids material seal on the feeder outlet to control gas leakage. Earlier work sponsored under previous SBIR grants has successfully demonstrated the potential benefits of the Stamet machine over pressurized lock hopper or paste feeder methods. The objective of this project was to demonstrate proof of principal to feed and meter specified granular coal into 450 psig gas pressure for use with next generation pressurized fluidized bed combustors. This report encompasses the development of material transport properties testers, methods to predict feeder performance by calculation, and the modification and testing of Stamet feeders to feed the material supplied into pressure. Testers were made to measure material compressibility, bulk density, both internal and wall friction coefficients, and permeability under typical conditions experienced inside a Stamet high pressure feeder. This data is then used in support of ongoing efforts to develop calculations to predict the performance of Stamet pressure feeders with different materials and conditions. Three Stamet pressure feeders were modified to handle the fine granular or pulverized coal, and were tested under various conditions using different outlet arrangements. The initial testing identified difficulties in handling the fine materials, but through a series of calculations and tests, the issues were overcome and the material was successfully fed into pressure. In all cases the performance calculated based on the measured material properties and feeder geometry agreed well with

  2. A comparison of at-home walking and 10-meter walking test parameters of individuals with post-stroke hemiparesis.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Katsuhito; Hori, Hideaki; Muramatsu, Ken

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to clarify the difference in gait parameters of at-home walking and the 10-meter walking test results of individuals with hemiparesis. [Subjects] A total of 14 hemiparetic stroke recovery patients participated in this study. Inclusion criteria were: living at home, the ability to walk independently, and demonstrated low extremity on recovery stages III-V on the Brunnstrom Approach. The average age of the subjects was 66 years. [Methods] We used video surveillance and the inked footprint technique to record usual walking speed and maximum speed patterns both in subjects' homes and during the 10-meter walking test. From these methods, walking speed, stride length, and step rate were calculated. [Results] While both usual and maximum walking speeds of the 10-meter walking test correlated with stride length and step rate, at-home walking speeds only significantly correlated with stride length. [Conclusion] Walking patterns of the 10-meter walking test are quantifiably distinct from those demonstrated in patients' homes, and this difference is mainly characterized by stride length. In order to enhance in-home walking ability, exercises that improve length of stride rather than step rate should be recommended.

  3. Hardware survey for the avionics test bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobb, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    A survey of maor hardware items that could possibly be used in the development of an avionics test bed for space shuttle attached or autonomous large space structures was conducted in NASA Johnson Space Center building 16. The results of the survey are organized to show the hardware by laboratory usage. Computer systems in each laboratory are described in some detail.

  4. Wide Field Infra-Red Survey Telescope (WFIRST) 2.4-Meter Mission Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Content, D.; Aaron, K.; Alplanalp, L.; Anderson, K.; Capps, R.; Chang, Z.; Dooley, J.; Egerman, R.; Goullioud, R.; Klein, D.; Kruk, J.; Kuan, G.; Melton, M.; Ruffa, J.; Underhill, M.; Buren, D. Van

    2013-01-01

    The most recent study of the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission is based on reuse of an existing 2.4m telescope. This study was commissioned by NASA to examine the potential science return and cost effectiveness of WFIRST by using this significantly larger aperture telescope. We review the science program envisioned by the WFIRST 2012-2013 Science Definition Team (SDT), an overview of the mission concept, and the telescope design and status. Comparisons against the previous 1.3m and reduced cost 1.1m WFIRST design concepts are discussed. A significant departure from past point designs is the option for serviceability and the geostationary orbit location which enables servicing and replacement instrument insertion later during mission life. Other papers at this conference provide more in depth discussion of the wide field instrument and the optional exoplanet imaging coronagraph instrument.

  5. Fabrication end Deployment Testing of Meter Solar Sail Quadrants for a Scaleable Square Solar Sail Ground Test System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, Greg; Case, David; Moore, Jim

    2005-01-01

    In order for solar sail propulsion technologies to be considered as a viable option for a wide range of near term practical missions a predictable, stable, reliable, manufactureable, scaleable, and cost effective system must be developed and tested first on earth and then on orbit. The design and development of a Scaleable Square Solar Sail System (S^4) is well underway a t AEC-Able Engineering Co. Inc., and the design and production of the Solar Sails for this system is being carried out by SRS Technologies. In April and May of 2004 a single quadrant 10-meter system was tested at NASA LARC's vacuum chamber and a four quadrant 20-meter system has been designed and built for deployment and testing in the Spring of 2005 at NASA/Glenn Research Center's Plumb Brook Facility. SRS has developed an effective and efficient design for triangular sail quadrants that are supported are three points and provide a flat reflective surface with a high fill factor. This sail design is robust enough for deployments in a one atmosphere, one gravity environment and incorporates several advanced features including adhesiveless seaming of membrane strips, compliant edge borders to allow for film membrane cord strain mismatch without causing wrinkling and low mass (3% of total sail mass) ripstop. This paper will outline the sail design and fabrication process, the lessons learned and the resulting mature production, packaging and deployment processes that have been developed. It will also highlight the scalability of the equipment and processes that were developed to fabricate and package the sails. Based on recent experience, SRS is confidant that flight worthy solar sails in the 40-120-meter size range with areal density in the 4-5g/sq m (sail minus structure) range can be produced with existing technology. Additional film production research will lead to further reductions in film thickness to less than 1 micron enabling production of sails with areal densities as low as 20 g/sq m

  6. Data from tests of a R4 airfoil in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, R. V.; Johnson, W. G., Jr.; Hill, A. S.; Mueller, R.; Redeker, G.

    1984-01-01

    Aerodynamic data for the DFVLR R4 airfoil are presented in both graphic and tabular form. The R4 was tested in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT) at Mach number from 0.60 to 0.78 at angles of attack from -2.0 to 8.0 degrees. The airfoil was tested at Reynolds numbers of 4, 6, 10, 15, 30, and 40 million based on the 152.32 mm chord.

  7. Measuring Fitness of Kenyan Children with Polyparasitic Infections Using the 20-Meter Shuttle Run Test as a Morbidity Metric

    PubMed Central

    Bustinduy, Amaya L.; Thomas, Charles L.; Fiutem, Justin J.; Parraga, Isabel M.; Mungai, Peter L.; Muchiri, Eric M.; Mutuku, Francis; Kitron, Uriel; King, Charles H.

    2011-01-01

    Background To date, there has been no standardized approach to the assessment of aerobic fitness among children who harbor parasites. In quantifying the disability associated with individual or multiple chronic infections, accurate measures of physical fitness are important metrics. This is because exercise intolerance, as seen with anemia and many other chronic disorders, reflects the body's inability to maintain adequate oxygen supply (VO2 max) to the motor tissues, which is frequently linked to reduced quality-of-life in terms of physical and job performance. The objective of our study was to examine the associations between polyparasitism, anemia, and reduced fitness in a high risk Kenyan population using novel implementation of the 20-meter shuttle run test (20mSRT), a well-standardized, low-technology physical fitness test. Methodology/Principal Findings Four villages in coastal Kenya were surveyed during 2009–2010. Children 5–18 years were tested for infection with Schistosoma haematobium (Sh), malaria, filaria, and geohelminth infections by standard methods. After anthropometric and hemoglobin testing, fitness was assessed with the 20 mSRT. The 20 mSRT proved easy to perform, requiring only minimal staff training. Parasitology revealed high prevalence of single and multiple parasitic infections in all villages, with Sh being the most common (25–62%). Anemia prevalence was 45–58%. Using multiply-adjusted linear modeling that accounted for household clustering, decreased aerobic capacity was significantly associated with anemia, stunting, and wasting, with some gender differences. Conclusions/Significance The 20 mSRT, which has excellent correlation with VO2, is a highly feasible fitness test for low-resource settings. Our results indicate impaired fitness is common in areas endemic for parasites, where, at least in part, low fitness scores are likely to result from anemia and stunting associated with chronic infection. The 20 mSRT should be used as a

  8. Test-retest reliability study of a new improved Leg-O-meter, the Leg-O-meter II, in patients suffering from venous insufficiency of the lower limbs.

    PubMed

    Bérard, A; Zuccarelli, F

    2000-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the interobserver and test-retest reliability of the new improved Leg-O-Meter, the Leg-O-Meter II, an instrument designed to measure leg circumference. The new Leg-O-Meter consists of a tape measure fixed to a stand attached to a small board on which the patient is in standing position. Only the left limb is measured. For this study the tape measure of the Leg-O-Meter was fixed at 13 cm from the board. Subjects were recruited from patients consulting the phlebology clinic of Hopital St-Michel, Paris, France. Thirty-nine patients were asked to participate in the test phase and a subsample of 20 patients were asked to participate in addition to a retest phase 10 minutes after their first measurement. Patients were asked to enter a closed room where four independent and blinded observers consecutively took measurements of their left calf with the Leg-O-Meter II. Twenty patients were also asked to come back 10 minutes later for a second round of measurements. While waiting, patients were seated. Variables collected included leg circumference, presence of edema, clinical presentation, and venous insufficiency treatment history. The order of the observers was randomized between patients. Under the assumption of a two-way random effects model, an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to determine the reliability of a measure with the Leg-O-Meter II as well as the test-retest reliability. The interobserver and test-retest reliabilities of the Leg-O-Meter II were 98.28% [96.90%, 100.00%] CI95% and 95.90% [92.00%, 100.00%] CI95%, respectively. The Leg-O-Meter II has higher interobserver reliability and is easier to manipulate than the previous version. In addition, it has substantive test-retest reliability.

  9. Use of Medical Metered Dose Inhalers for Functionality Testing of Bioaerosol Detection and Identification Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    sizing devices such as optical particle counters. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Puffers Metered dose inhalers PSL Biostimulants Bacillus subtilis 16...simulants for pathogenic Bacillus anthracis spores. For PSLs or spore aerosols with geometric mean sizes of approximately 1 µm, the geometric standard...24 4.4 Bacillus Spore Aerosols: Variability Considerations and Effects of Actuator Type and Storage Time

  10. Commercial Sensory Survey Radiation Testing Progress Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Heidi N.; Dolphic, Michael D.; Thorbourn, Dennis O.; Alexander, James W.; Salomon, Phil M.

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program Sensor Technology Commercial Sensor Survey task is geared toward benefiting future NASA space missions with low-cost, short-duty-cycle, visible imaging needs. Such applications could include imaging for educational outreach purposes or short surveys of spacecraft, planetary, or lunar surfaces. Under the task, inexpensive commercial grade CMOS sensors were surveyed in fiscal year 2007 (FY07) and three sensors were selected for total ionizing dose (TID) and displacement damage dose (DDD) tolerance testing. The selected sensors had to meet selection criteria chosen to support small, low-mass cameras that produce good resolution color images. These criteria are discussed in detail in [1]. This document discusses the progress of radiation testing on the Micron and OmniVision sensors selected in FY07 for radiation tolerance testing.

  11. The bacterial contamination rate of glucose meter test strips in the hospital setting

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rubeaan, Khalid A.; Saeb, Amr T. M.; AlNaqeb, Dhekra M.; AlQumaidi, Hamed M.; AlMogbel, Turki A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the rate of bacterial contamination of the multi-use vial and single-use packed glucose meter strips, and to identify the type and frequency of various bacterial contamination in different hospital wards. Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted by a team from the Strategic Center for Diabetes Research in 7 general hospitals in the Central region of Saudi Arabia during the period from August to September 2014 to assess the bacterial contamination rate of the unused strips. A total of 10,447 strips were cultured using proper agar media and incubated both aerobically and anaerobically. Results: The total bacterial contamination rate for the multi-use vials glucose strips was 31.7%, while single-use packed strips were not contaminated at all. Ministry of Health hospitals had the highest contamination rates compared with other hospitals. Critical, obstetric, and surgical wards had the highest bacterial isolates number, where most were in the risk group 3 according to the National Institute of Health guidelines. Staphylococcus species were the most common bacteria found. Conclusion: Glucose meter strips should be recognized as a source of bacterial contamination that could be behind serious hospital acquired infections. The hospital infection control team should adopt proper measures to implement protocols for glucose meter cleaning and glucose strips handling. PMID:27570855

  12. Buckling tests of two 4.6-meter-diameter, magnesium ring-stiffened conical shells loaded under external pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. K.; DAVIS R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Two ring-stiffened magnesium conical shells with a 120 deg apex angle and a 4.6-meter diameter were loaded to failure by a uniform external pressure. The cones differed from one another only in the number of internal stiffening rings. Test specimen details, test procedure, and test results are discussed. Both buckling and prebuckling data are compared with appropriate theoretical predictions. Measured strains in skin and rings agreed well with theoretical predictions. Extensive imperfection measurements were made and reported on both cones in the as fabricated condition.

  13. Study on the temperature field effect analysis and test of the five-hundred-meter aperture spherical radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Li-qiang; Wang, Qi-ming

    2016-10-01

    The thermal problem is one of the important research contents of the design and operation about giant radio antenna. This kind of influence to the antenna has been concerned in the astronomy field. Due to the instantaneous temperature load and uncertainty, it is difficult to accurately analysis and effectively control about its effect. It has important significance to analyze the thermal problem of giant radio antenna to its design and operation. The research of solar cookers and temperature field on Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST) were preceded in detail. The tests of temperature distribute about 30 meters antenna in Mi-yun observatory station were performed. The research work including the parameters related to the sun, the flow algorithm of telescope site, mathematical model of solar cooker, analysis results of temperature field and corresponding control strategy, the temperature distribution test of 30 meters model. The results showed that: solar cookers could be weakened and controlled effectively of FAST. This work will provide a reference to design and operation of the FAST and same big antenna. It has certain theory significance, engineering significance and application value.

  14. Optical metrology for testing an all-composite 2-meter diameter mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catanzaro, B.; Thomas, James A.; Small, D.; Johnston, R.; Barber, D.; Connell, S.; Whitmore, S.; Cohen, E.

    2001-01-01

    The Herschel Space Observatory (formerly known as FIRST) consists of a 3.5 m space telescope designed for use in the long IR and sub-milimeter wavebands. To demonstrate the viability of a carbon fiber composite telescope for this application, Composite Optics Incorporated (COI) manufactured a fast (f/1), large (2 m), lightweight (10.1 kg/m squared) demonstration mirror. A key challenge in demonstrating the performance of this novel mirror was to characterize the surface accuracy at cryogenic (70 K) temperatures. A wide variety of optical metrology techniques were investigated and a brief survey of empirical test results and limitations of the various techniques will be presented in this paper. Two complementary infrared (IR)techniques operating at a wavelength of 10.6 microns were chosen for further development: (1) IR Twyman-Green Phase Shifting Interferometry (IR PSI) and (2) IR Shack-Hartmann (IR SH) Wavefront Sensing. Innovative design modifications made to an existing IR PSI to achieve high-resolution, scannable, infrared measurements of the composite mirror are described. The modified interferometer was capable of measuring surface gradients larger than 350 microradians. The design and results of measurements made with a custom-built IR SH Wavefrong Sensor operating at 10.6 microns are also presented. A compact experimental setup permitting simultaneous operation of both the IR PSI and IR SH tools is shown. The advantages and the limitations of the two key IR metrology tools are discussed.

  15. Intercomparison of environmental gamma doses measured with A NaI (Tl) survey meter and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) in the Poonch division of Azad Kashmir, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Rafique, Muhammad; Kearfott, Kimberlee J; Ahmad, Khalil; Akhter, Jabeen; Khan, Abdul Razzaq; Saeed, Raja Azhar; Rahman, Saeed Ur; Matiullah; Rajput, Muhammad Usman

    2014-12-01

    This study presents the intercomparison of the outdoor environmental gamma dose rates measured using a NaI (Tl) based survey meter along with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and estimation of excess lifetime cancer risk (ELCR), for the inhabitants of Poonch division of the Azad Kashmir, Pakistan. CaF2: Dy (TLD-200) card dosimeters were installed at height of 1 m from ground at fifteen different locations covering the entire Poonch division comprising of three districts. During three distinct two month time periods within the six month study period, all the installed dosimeters were exposed to outdoor environmental gamma radiations, retrieved and read out at Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Health Physics Division, PINSTECH laboratory, Islamabad. The ambient outdoor gamma dose rate measurements were also taken with NaI (Tl) based portable radiometric instrument at 1 m above the ground. To estimate the annual gamma doses, NaI (Tl) based survey data were used for one complete year following the deployment of the dosimeters. The mean annual gamma dose rates measured by TLDs and survey meter were found as 1.47±0.10 and 0.862±0.003 mGy/y respectively. Taking into account a 29% outdoor occupancy factor, the annual average effective dose rate for individuals was estimated as 0.298±0.04 and 0.175±0.03 mSv/y by TLDs and survey meter, respectively. For outdoor exposure, the ELCR was calculated from the TLD and survey meter measurements. The environmental outdoor average annual effective dose obtained in present study are less than the estimated world average terrestrial and cosmic gamma ray dose rate of 0.9 mSv/y reported in UNSCEAR 2000. The possible origins of gamma doses in the area and incompatibilities of results obtained from the two different measurement techniques are also discussed.

  16. Plugging meter

    DOEpatents

    Nagai, Akinori

    1979-01-01

    A plugging meter for automatically measuring the impurity concentration in a liquid metal is designed to have parallel passages including a cooling passage provided with a plugging orifice and with a flow meter, and a by-pass passage connected in series to a main passage having another flow meter, so that the plugging points may be obtained from the outputs of both flow meters. The plugging meter has a program signal generator, a flow-rate ratio setter and a comparator, and is adapted to change the temperature of the plugging orifice in accordance with a predetermined pattern or gradient, by means of a signal representative of the temperature of plugging orifice and a flow-rate ratio signal obtained from the outputs of both flow meters. This plugging meter affords an automatic and accurate measurement of a multi-plugging phenomenon taking place at the plugging orifice.

  17. [Survey and analysis of radiation safety management systems at medical institutions--second report: radiation measurement, calibration of radiation survey meters, and periodic check of installations, equipment, and protection instruments].

    PubMed

    Ohba, Hisateru; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko; Aburano, Tamio

    2006-01-20

    We carried out a questionnaire survey to determine the actual situation of radiation safety management measures in all medical institutions in Japan that had nuclear medicine facilities. The questionnaire consisted of questions concerning the evaluation of shielding capacity; radiation measurement; periodic checks of installations, equipment, and protection instruments; and the calibration of radiation survey meters. The analysis was undertaken according to region, type of establishment, and number of beds. The overall response rate was 60 percent. For the evaluation of shielding capacity, the outsourcing rate was 53 percent of the total. For the radiation measurements of "leakage radiation dose and radioactive contamination" and "contamination of radioactive substances in the air," the outsourcing rates were 28 percent and 35 percent of the total, respectively (p<0.001, according to region and establishment). For the periodic check of radiation protection instruments, the implementation rate was 98 percent, and the outsourcing rate was 32 percent for radiation survey meters and 47 percent for lead aprons. The non-implemented rate for calibration of radiation survey meters was 25 percent of the total (p<0.001, according to region and establishment). The outsourcing rate for calibration of radiation survey meters accounted for 87 percent of the total, and of these medical institutions, 72 percent undertook annual calibration. The implementation rate for patient exposure measurement was 20 percent of the total (p<0.001, according to number of beds), and of these medical institutions 46 percent recorded measurement outcome.

  18. A comparative study of terrestrial gamma dose rate in air measured by thermoluminescent dosimeter, portable survey meter and HPGe gamma spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Jun; Guo, Gui-Yin; He, Yi; Yang, Li-Tao; Shan, Zhen; Chen, Chao-Feng; Shang-Guan, Zhi-Hong

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, three different widely-used measurement techniques for environmental gamma dose rate were studied and compared, i.e., the thermoluminescent dosimeter, the portable survey meter and the spectrometric analysis. Thirteen investigation sites were selected, and the TLDs were arranged to accumulate the radiation signals during an interval of about one quarter, the instant dose rates by using a portable survey meter were collected around the site, and top surface soils were sampled in the surroundings for radionuclides analyzing in laboratory. The results from these methods were compared, which revealed high correlations. The differences and possible uncertainties for the three methods were analyzed, inspired a further study should be conducted to have more successful estimation of dose rate in surface air.

  19. [Development of a simple quantitative method for the strontium-89 concentration of radioactive liquid waste using the plastic scintillation survey meter for beta rays].

    PubMed

    Narita, Hiroto; Tsuchiya, Yuusuke; Hirase, Kiyoshi; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Fukushi, Masahiro

    2012-11-01

    Strontium-89 (89Sr: pure beta, E; 1.495 MeV-100%, halflife: 50.5 days) chloride is used as pain relief from bone metastases. An assay of 89Sr is difficult because of a pure beta emitter. For management of 89Sr, we tried to evaluate a simple quantitative method for the 59Sr concentration of radioactive liquid waste using scintillation survey meter for beta rays. The counting efficiency of the survey meter with this method was 35.95%. A simple 30 minutes measurement of 2 ml of the sample made the quantitative measurement of 89Sr practical. Reducing self-absorption of the beta ray in the solution by counting on the polyethlene paper improved the counting efficiency. Our method made it easy to manage the radioactive liquid waste under the legal restrictions.

  20. Mathematical modeling of a survey-meter used to measure radioactivity in human thyroids: Monte Carlo calculations of the device response and uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Khrutchinsky, Arkady; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Kutsen, Semion; Minenko, Victor; Khrouch, Valeri; Luckyanov, Nickolas; Voillequé, Paul; Bouville, André

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents results of Monte Carlo modeling of the SRP-68-01 survey meter used to measure exposure rates near the thyroid glands of persons exposed to radioactivity following the Chernobyl accident. This device was not designed to measure radioactivity in humans. To estimate the uncertainty associated with the measurement results, a mathematical model of the SRP-68-01 survey meter was developed and verified. A Monte Carlo method of numerical simulation of radiation transport has been used to calculate the calibration factor for the device and evaluate its uncertainty. The SRP-68-01 survey meter scale coefficient, an important characteristic of the device, was also estimated in this study. The calibration factors of the survey meter were calculated for (131)I, (132)I, (133)I, and (135)I content in the thyroid gland for six age groups of population: newborns; children aged 1 yr, 5 yr, 10 yr, 15 yr; and adults. A realistic scenario of direct thyroid measurements with an "extended" neck was used to calculate the calibration factors for newborns and one-year-olds. Uncertainties in the device calibration factors due to variability of the device scale coefficient, variability in thyroid mass and statistical uncertainty of Monte Carlo method were evaluated. Relative uncertainties in the calibration factor estimates were found to be from 0.06 for children aged 1 yr to 0.1 for 10-yr and 15-yr children. The positioning errors of the detector during measurements deviate mainly in one direction from the estimated calibration factors. Deviations of the device position from the proper geometry of measurements were found to lead to overestimation of the calibration factor by up to 24 percent for adults and up to 60 percent for 1-yr children. The results of this study improve the estimates of (131)I thyroidal content and, consequently, thyroid dose estimates that are derived from direct thyroid measurements performed in Belarus shortly after the Chernobyl accident.

  1. High Altitude Flight Test of a Reefed 12.2 Meter Diameter Disk-Gap-Band Parachute with Deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    High Altitude Flight Test of a Reefed 12.2 Meter Diameter Disk-Gap-Band Parachute with Deployment at Mach Number of 2.58. A reefed 12.2-meter nominal-diameter (40-ft) disk-gap-band parachute was flight tested as part of the NASA Supersonic High Altitude Parachute Experiment (SHAPE) program. A three-stage rocket was used to drive the instrumented payload to an altitude of 43.6 km (143,000 ft), a Mach number of 2.58, and a dynamic pressure of 972 N/m(exp 2) (20.3 lb/ft(exp 2)) where the parachute was deployed by means of a mortar. The parachute deployed satisfactorily and reached a partially inflated condition characterized by irregular variations in parachute projected area. A full, stable reefed inflation was achieved when the system had decelerated to a Mach number of about 1.5. The steady, reefed projected area was 49 percent of the steady, unreefed area and the average drag coefficient was 0.30. Disreefing occurred at a Mach number of 0.99 and a dynamic pressure of 81 N/m(exp 2) (1.7 lb/ft(exp 2)). The parachute maintained a steady inflated shape for the remainder of the deceleration portion of the flight and throughout descent. During descent, the average effective drag coefficient was 0.57. There was little, if any, coning motion, and the amplitude of planar oscillations was generally less than 10 degrees. The film also shows a wind tunnel test of a 1.7-meter-diameter parachute inflating at Mach number 2.0. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070031007. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  2. Flight Tests Results from Supersonic Deployment of an 18-Foot Diameter (5.49 meter) Towed Ballute Decelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayhue, Robert J.; Eckstrom, Clinton V.

    1969-01-01

    A ram-air-inflated, towed ballute decelerator having a maximum frontal diameter of 18 feet (5.49 meters) was deployed during free flight at a Mach number of 3.15 and a dynamic pressure of 38.5 lb/ft(exp 2) (1843.4 newtons/m(exp 2)). Deployment and extraction of the test ballute were normal but inflation stopped about 1 second after mortar firing and produced an average plateau drag force of 1500 pounds (6.7 kN) for about 1 second. Approximately 30 percent of expected total frontal area was obtained.

  3. Partial correlation between lower muscle thickness, 10-meter walk test, and the timed up & go test in children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Yun, Chang-Kyo; Kim, Won-Hyo; Kim, Seong-Gil

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between lower extremity muscle thickness and gait ability through the 10-meter walk and timed up and go tests. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 28 children (20 males and 8 females) with spastic cerebral palsy undergoing physical therapy at D hospital in D city, South Korea participated in this study. Partial correlation analysis was performed to analyze the correlation between lower extremity muscle thickness and gait ability (10-meter walk test and timed up and go test). [Results] There was a positive correlation between muscle thickness and the 10-meter walk test (RF=0.41 and VL=0.52). Correlation between the muscle thickness and the timed up and go had a negative correlation (VL=-0.45, MG=-0.51, and LG=-0.39). [Conclusion] In children with cerebral palsy, knee extensor muscles that are more developed increased gait ability and calf muscles that are more developed increased sit to stand ability.

  4. Reynolds number tests of an NPL 9510 airfoil in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, R. V.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation of the NPL 9510 airfoil was conducted in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel over the following ranges of test conditions: Mach number of 0.35 to 0.82, total temperature of 94 K to 300 K, total pressure of 1.20 to 5.81 atm, Reynolds number based on airfoil chord of 1.34 x 10 to the 6th power to 48.23 x 10 to the 6th power, and angle of attack of 0 deg to 6 deg. The drag creep previously reported by the British National Physics Laboratory at low Reynolds numbers was also found to be present at high Reynolds numbers; the section drag coefficient continued to decrease even at the highest Reynolds number tested. Tests made close to free-stream saturation did not produce altered aerodynamic coefficients due to condensation effects.

  5. Tabulation of data from tests of an NPL 9510 airfoil in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, R. V.

    1983-01-01

    The tabulated data from tests of a six inch chord NPL 9510 airfoil in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. The tests were performed over the following range of conditions: Mach numbers of 0.35 to 0.82, total temperature of 94 K to 300 K, total pressure of 1.20 to 5.81 atm, Reynolds number based on chord of 1.34 x 10 to the 6th to 48.23 x 10 to the 6th, and angle of attack of 0 deg to 6 deg. The NPL 9510 airfoil was observed to have decreasing drag coefficient up to the highest test Reynolds number.

  6. Finite Element Analysis and Test Correlation of a 10-Meter Inflation-Deployed Solar Sail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleight, David W.; Michii, Yuki; Lichodziejewski, David; Derbes, Billy; Mann. Troy O.; Slade, Kara N.; Wang, John T.

    2005-01-01

    Under the direction of the NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology Office, the team of L Garde, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Ball Aerospace, and NASA Langley Research Center has been developing a scalable solar sail configuration to address NASA's future space propulsion needs. Prior to a flight experiment of a full-scale solar sail, a comprehensive phased test plan is currently being implemented to advance the technology readiness level of the solar sail design. These tests consist of solar sail component, subsystem, and sub-scale system ground tests that simulate the vacuum and thermal conditions of the space environment. Recently, two solar sail test articles, a 7.4-m beam assembly subsystem test article and a 10-m four-quadrant solar sail system test article, were tested in vacuum conditions with a gravity-offload system to mitigate the effects of gravity. This paper presents the structural analyses simulating the ground tests and the correlation of the analyses with the test results. For programmatic risk reduction, a two-prong analysis approach was undertaken in which two separate teams independently developed computational models of the solar sail test articles using the finite element analysis software packages: NEiNastran and ABAQUS. This paper compares the pre-test and post-test analysis predictions from both software packages with the test data including load-deflection curves from static load tests, and vibration frequencies and mode shapes from vibration tests. The analysis predictions were in reasonable agreement with the test data. Factors that precluded better correlation of the analyses and the tests were uncertainties in the material properties, test conditions, and modeling assumptions used in the analyses.

  7. Structural Analysis and Test Comparison of a 20-Meter Inflation-Deployed Solar Sail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sleight, David W.; Mann, Troy; Lichodziejewski, David; Derbes, Billy

    2006-01-01

    Under the direction of the NASA In-Space Propulsion Technology Office, the team of L Garde, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Ball Aerospace, and NASA Langley Research Center has been developing a scalable solar sail configuration to address NASA s future space propulsion needs. Prior to a flight experiment of a full-scale solar sail, a comprehensive test program was implemented to advance the technology readiness level of the solar sail design. These tests consisted of solar sail component, subsystem, and sub-scale system ground tests that simulated the aspects of the space environment such as vacuum and thermal conditions. In July 2005, a 20-m four-quadrant solar sail system test article was tested in the NASA Glenn Research Center s Space Power Facility to measure its static and dynamic structural responses. Key to the maturation of solar sail technology is the development of validated finite element analysis (FEA) models that can be used for design and analysis of solar sails. A major objective of the program was to utilize the test data to validate the FEA models simulating the solar sail ground tests. The FEA software, ABAQUS, was used to perform the structural analyses to simulate the ground tests performed on the 20-m solar sail test article. This paper presents the details of the FEA modeling, the structural analyses simulating the ground tests, and a comparison of the pretest and post-test analysis predictions with the ground test results for the 20-m solar sail system test article. The structural responses that are compared in the paper include load-deflection curves and natural frequencies for the beam structural assembly and static shape, natural frequencies, and mode shapes for the solar sail membrane. The analysis predictions were in reasonable agreement with the test data. Factors that precluded better correlation of the analyses and the tests were unmeasured initial conditions in the test set-up.

  8. High Reynolds number tests of a Boeing BAC I airfoil in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. G., Jr.; Hill, A. S.; Ray, E. J.; Rozendaal, R. A.; Butler, T. W.

    1982-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of an advanced-technology airfoil was conducted in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT). This investigation represents the first in a series of NASA/U.X. industry two dimensional airfoil studies to be completed in the Advanced Technology Airfoil Test program. Test temperature was varied from ambient to about 100 K at pressures ranging from about 1.2 to 6.0 atm. Mach number was varied from about 0.40 to 0.80. These variables provided a Reynolds number (based on airfoil chord) range from about .0000044 to .00005. This investigation was specifically designed to: (1) test a Boeing advanced airfoil from low to flight-equivalent Reynolds numbers; (2) provide the industry participant (Boeing) with experience in cryogenic wind-tunnel model design and testing techniques; and (3) demonstrate the suitability of the 0.3-m TCT as an airfoil test facility. All the objectives of the cooperative test were met. Data are included which demonstrate the effects of fixed transition, Mach number, and Reynolds number on the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoil. Also included are remarks on the model design, the model structural integrity, and the overall test experience.

  9. Summary of test techniques used in the NASA Langley 0.3-meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawing, P. L.; Johnson, C. B.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes test techniques used to obtain data in the 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. Main sections include steady aerodynamic testing, unsteady aerodynamics, non-intrusive measurements, tunnel performance, and fluid mechanics. Test techniques with adequate previous documentation are briefly presented and referenced, and those for which no documentation yet exists are more thoroughly discussed. Attention is given to the model building and instrumentation technology necessary for testing at high Reynolds numbers in the presence of free transition. It is concluded that the testing techniques thus far demonstrated in the 0.3-m TCT are on par with modern transonic tunnels, and that the specialized techniques needed to exploit the advantages of cryogenic operation can be realized.

  10. Track/train dynamics test report modal survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigil, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The modal survey vibration test conducted on an 80 ton open hopper freight car is described. The test data, the post-test update of the modal survey test requirements and procedure, and an index to the test data are presented. Photographs of actual measurement locations and the test historical log are included.

  11. Your Glucose Meter

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco ... 164KB) En Español Basic Facts 7 Tips for Testing Your Blood Sugar and Caring for Your Meter ...

  12. Test Results for a 25 Meter Prototype Fault Current Limiting Hts Cable for Project Hydra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, C. M.; Duckworth, R. C.; Demko, J. A.; Ellis, A.; James, D. R.; Gouge, M. J.; Tuncer, E.

    2010-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has tested a 25-m long prototype High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) cable with inherent Fault-Current Limiting (FCL) capability at its HTS cable test facility. The HTS-FCL cable and terminations were designed and fabricated by Ultera, which is a joint venture between Southwire and nkt cables. System integration and HTS wire were provided by American Superconductor Corporation who was the overall team leader of the project. The ultimate goal of the 25-m HTS-FCL cable test program was to verify the design and ensure the operational integrity for the eventual installation of a ˜200-m fully functional HTS-FCL cable in the Consolidated Edison electric grid located in downtown New York City. The 25-m HTS-FCL cable consisted of a three-phase (3-Φ) HTS Triax™ design with a cold dielectric between the phases. The HTS-FCL cable had an operational voltage of 13.8 kV phase-to-phase (7967 V phase-to-ground) and an operating current of 4000 Arms per phase, which is the highest operating current to date of any HTS cable. The 25-m HTS-FCL cable was subjected to a series of cryogenic and electrical tests. Test results from the 25-m HTS-FCL cable are presented and discussed.

  13. 43 CFR 3162.4-2 - Samples, tests, and surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Samples, tests, and surveys. 3162.4-2... for Operating Rights Owners and Operators § 3162.4-2 Samples, tests, and surveys. (a) During the... tests, run logs, and make other surveys reasonably necessary to determine the presence, quantity,...

  14. 43 CFR 3162.4-2 - Samples, tests, and surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Samples, tests, and surveys. 3162.4-2... for Operating Rights Owners and Operators § 3162.4-2 Samples, tests, and surveys. (a) During the... tests, run logs, and make other surveys reasonably necessary to determine the presence, quantity,...

  15. 43 CFR 3162.4-2 - Samples, tests, and surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Samples, tests, and surveys. 3162.4-2... for Operating Rights Owners and Operators § 3162.4-2 Samples, tests, and surveys. (a) During the... tests, run logs, and make other surveys reasonably necessary to determine the presence, quantity,...

  16. 43 CFR 3162.4-2 - Samples, tests, and surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Samples, tests, and surveys. 3162.4-2... for Operating Rights Owners and Operators § 3162.4-2 Samples, tests, and surveys. (a) During the... tests, run logs, and make other surveys reasonably necessary to determine the presence, quantity,...

  17. Overview of the 6 Meter HIAD Inflatable Structure and Flexible TPS Static Load Test Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Greg; Kazemba, Cole; Johnson, Keith; Calomino, Anthony; Hughes, Steve; Cassell, Alan; Cheatwood, Neil

    2014-01-01

    To support NASAs long term goal of landing humans on Mars, technologies which enable the landing of heavy payloads are being developed. Current entry, decent, and landing technologies are not practical for this class of payloads due to geometric constraints dictated by current launch vehicle fairing limitations. Therefore, past and present technologies are now being explored to provide a mass and volume efficient solution to atmospheric entry, including Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerators (HIADs). At the beginning of 2014, a 6m HIAD inflatable structure with an integrated flexible thermal protection system (TPS) was subjected to a static load test series to verify the designs structural performance. The 6m HIAD structure was constructed in a stacked toroid configuration using nine inflatable torus segments composed of fiber reinforced thin films, which were joined together using adhesives and high strength textile woven structural straps to help distribute the loads throughout the inflatable structure. The 6m flexible TPS was constructed using multiple layers of high performance materials to protect the inflatable structure from heat loads that would be seen during atmospheric entry. To perform the static load test series, a custom test fixture was constructed. The fixture consisted of a structural tub rim with enough height to allow for displacement of the inflatable structure as loads were applied. The bottom of the tub rim had an airtight seal with the floor. The centerbody of the inflatable structure was attached to a pedestal mount as seen in Figure 1. Using an impermeable membrane seal draped over the test article, partial vacuum was pulled beneath the HIAD, resulting in a uniform static pressure load applied to the outer surface. During the test series an extensive amount of instrumentation was used to provide many data sets including: deformed shape, shoulder deflection, strap loads, cord loads, inflation pressures, and applied static load

  18. Design, motivation, and on-sky tests of an efficient fiber coupling unit for 1-meter class telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottom, Michael; Muirhead, Philip S.; Swift, Jonathan J.; Zhao, Ming; Gardner, Paul; Plavchan, Peter P.; Riddle, Reed L.; Herzig, Erich; Johnson, John A.; Wright, Jason T.; McCrady, Nate; Wittenmyer, Robert A.

    2014-08-01

    We present the science motivation, design, and on-sky test data of a high-throughput fiber coupling unit suitable for automated 1-meter class telescopes. The optical and mechanical design of the fiber coupling is detailed and we describe a flexible controller software designed specifically for this unit. The system performance is characterized with a set of numerical simulations, and we present on-sky results that validate the performance of the controller and the expected throughput of the fiber coupling. This unit was designed specifically for the MINERVA array, a robotic observatory consisting of multiple 0.7 m telescopes linked to a single high-resolution stabilized spectrograph for the purpose of exoplanet discovery using high-cadence radial velocimetry. However, this unit could easily be used for general astronomical purposes requiring fiber coupling or precise guiding.

  19. Sultan: an 8 Tesla, 1 meter bore test facility for the outer solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Pasotti, G.; Ricci, M.V.; Sacchetti, N.; Spadoni, M.

    1981-09-01

    In the framework of the international collaboration among SIN-Villigen (CH), ECN-Patten (NL) and CNEN-Frascati (I) aiming at the realization of the SULTAN (SUpraLeitender TestANlage) test facility the CNEN contribution is concerned with the realization of the outer part of the solenoid, i.e., the section which will provide the 6T field in the useful region, the remaining 2T being supplied by the coaxial ECN insert. A description of the 6T superconducting solenoid is presented. The main features are: (1) pancake structure wound by a Nb-Ti multifilamentary hollow cable; and (2) cooling by forced flow of slightly subcooled liquid helium. Details of the design, winding technique and structure, the hydraulic circuitry as well as the status report of the construction are discussed. 10 refs.

  20. Description of the US Army small-scale 2-meter rotor test system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phelps, Arthur E., III; Berry, John D.

    1987-01-01

    A small-scale powered rotor model was designed for use as a research tool in the exploratory testing of rotors and helicopter models. The model, which consists of a 29 hp rotor drive system, a four-blade fully articulated rotor, and a fuselage, was designed to be simple to operate and maintain in wind tunnels of moderate size and complexity. Two six-component strain-gauge balances are used to provide independent measurement of the rotor and fuselage aerodynamic loads. Commercially available standardized hardware and equipment were used to the maximum extent possible, and specialized parts were designed so that they could be fabricated by normal methods without using highly specialized tooling. The model was used in a hover test of three rotors having different planforms and in a forward flight investigation of a 21-percent-scale model of a U.S. Army scout helicopter equipped with a mast-mounted sight.

  1. Design, fabrication and test of a 4750 Newton-meter-second double Gimbal control moment gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Lewis; Golley, Paul; Krome, Henning; Blondin, Joseph; Gurrisi, Charles; Kolvek, John

    1989-01-01

    The development of a prototype Control Moment Gyroscope (CMG) is discussed. Physical characteristics and the results of functional testing are presented to demonstrate the level of system performance obtained. Particular attention is given to how the man-rated mission requirement influenced the choice of the materials, fabrication, and design details employed. Comparisons are made of the measured system responses against the prediction generated by computer simulation.

  2. Near-field testing of the 15-meter hoop-column antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Lyle C.; Adams, Richard R.; Bailey, M. C.; Belvin, W. Keith; Butler, David H.; Campbell, Thomas G.

    1989-01-01

    A 15-m-diameter antenna was tested to verify that dimensional tolerances for acceptable performance could be achieved and to verify structural, electromagnetic, and mechanical performance predictions. This antenna utilized the hoop column structure, a gold plated molybdenum mesh reflector, and 96 control cables to adjust the reflector conformance with a paraboloid. The dimensional conformance of the antenna structure and surface was measured with metric camera and theodolites. Near field pattern data were used to assess the electromagnetic performance at five frequencies from 2.225 to 11.6 GHz. The reflector surface was adjusted to greatly improve electromagnetic performance with a finite element model and the surface measurements. Measurement results show that antenna surface figure and adjustments and electromagnetic patterns agree well with predictions.

  3. Quality Test Various Existing dem in Indonesia Toward 10 Meter National dem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amhar, Fahmi

    2016-06-01

    Indonesia has various DEM from many sources and various acquisition date spreaded in the past two decades. There are DEM from spaceborne system (Radarsat, TerraSAR-X, ALOS, ASTER-GDEM, SRTM), airborne system (IFSAR, Lidar, aerial photos) and also terrestrial one. The research objective is the quality test and how to extract best DEM in particular area. The method is using differential GPS levelling using geodetic GPS equipment on places which is ensured not changed during past 20 years. The result has shown that DEM from TerraSAR-X and SRTM30 have the best quality (rmse 3.1 m and 3.5 m respectively). Based on this research, it was inferred that these parameters are still positively correlated with the basic concept, namely that the lower and the higher the spatial resolution of a DEM data, the more imprecise the resulting vertical height.

  4. Flow-Meter and Passive Diffusion Bag Tests and Potential Influences on the Vertical Distribution of Contaminants in Wells at Galena Airport, Galena, Alaska, August to October 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Peterson, J.E.

    2004-01-01

    Past activities at Galena Airport, a U.S. Air Force Base in Galena, Alaska, have resulted in ground-water contamination by volatile organic compounds. The primary contaminants are petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons. The U.S. Geological Survey and Earth Tech, in cooperation with the Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence, conducted investigations at Galena Airport from August to October 2002 using polyethylene diffusion bag samplers and borehole flow-meter testing to examine the vertical distribution of ground-water contamination in selected wells. This investigation was limited to the vicinity of building 1845 and to the area between building 1845 and the Yukon River. In addition, the U.S. Geological Survey was asked to determine whether additional wells are needed to more clearly define the nature and extent of the ground-water contamination at the Air Force Base. Little or no vertical water movement occurred under ambient conditions in the wells tested at Galena Airport, Alaska, in August 2002. All of the ambient vertical flows detected in wells were at rates less than the quantitative limit of the borehole flow meter (0.03 gallons per minute). In wells 06-MW-07 and 10-MW-01, no vertical flow was detected. In wells where ambient flow was detected, the direction of flow was downward. In general, concentrations of volatile organic compounds detected in the low-flow samples from wells at Galena Airport were approximately the same concentrations detected in the closest polyethylene diffusion bag sample for a wide variety of volatile organic compounds. The data indicate that the polyethylene diffusion bag sample results are consistent with the low-flow sample results. Vertical profiling of selected wells using polyethylene diffusion bag samplers at Galena Airport showed that from September 30 to October 1, 2002, little vertical change occurred in volatile organic compound concentrations along the screen length despite the fact that

  5. Solar Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The instrument pictured is an inexpensive solar meter which is finding wide acceptance among architects, engineers and others engaged in construction of solar energy facilities. It detects the amount of solar energy available at a building site, information necessary to design the most efficient type of solar system for a particular location. Incorporating technology developed by NASA's Lewis Research Center, the device is based upon the solar cell, which provides power for spacecraft by converting the sun's energy to electricity. The meter is produced by Dodge Products, Inc., Houston, Texas, a company formed to bring the technology to the commercial marketplace.

  6. Saturation meter

    DOEpatents

    Gregurech, S.

    1984-08-01

    A saturation meter for use in a pressurized water reactor plant comprising a differential pressure transducer having a first and second pressure sensing means and an alarm. The alarm is connected to the transducer and is preset to activate at a level of saturation prior to the formation of a steam void in the reactor vessel.

  7. Inter and Intra Rater Reliability of the 10 Meter Walk Test in the Community Dweller Adults with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    BAHRAMI, Fariba; NOORIZADEH DEHKORDI, Shohreh; DADGOO, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Objective We aimed to investigation the intra-rater and inter-raters reliability of the 10 meter walk test (10 MWT) in adults with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Materials & Methods Thirty ambulatory adults with spastic CP in the summer of 2014 participated (19 men, 11 women; mean age 28 ± 7 yr, range 18- 46 yr). Individuals were non-randomly selected by convenient sampling from the Ra’ad Rehabilitation Goodwill Complex in Tehran, Iran. They had GMFCS levels below IV (I, II, and III). Retest interval for inter-raters study lasted a week. During the tests, participants walked with their maximum speed. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) estimated reliability. Results The 10 MWT ICC for intra-rater was 0.98 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.96-0.99) for participants, and >0.89 in GMFCS subgroups (95% confidence interval (CI) lower bound>0.67). The 10 MWT inter-raters’ ICC was 0.998 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0/996-0/999), and >0.993 in GMFCS subgroups (95% confidence interval (CI) lower bound>0.977). Standard error of the measurement (SEM) values for both studies was small (0.02< SEM< 0.07). Conclusion Excellent intra-rater and inter-raters reliability of the 10 MWT in adults with CP, especially in the moderate motor impairments (GMFCS level III), indicates that this tool can be used in clinics to assess the results of interventions. PMID:28277557

  8. Pretest Report for the Full Span Propulsive Wing/Canard Model Test in the NASA Langley 4 x 7 Meter Low Speed Wind Tunnel Second Series Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, V. R.

    1986-01-01

    A full span propulsive wing/canard model is to be tested in the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) 4 x 7 meter low speed wind tunnel. These tests are a continuation of the tests conducted in Feb. 1984, NASA test No.290, and are being conducted under NASA Contract NAS1-17171. The purpose of these tests is to obtain extensive lateral-directional data with a revised fuselage concept. The wings, canards, and vertical tail of this second test series model are the same as tested in the previous test period. The fuselage and internal flow path have been modified to better reflect an external configuration suitable for a fighter airplane. Internal ducting and structure were changed as required to provide test efficiency and blowing control. The model fuselage tested during the 1984 tests was fabricated with flat sides to provide multiple wing and canard placement variations. The locations of the wing and canard are important variables in configuration development. With the establishment of the desired relative placement of the lifting surfaces, a typically shaped fuselage has been fabricated for these tests. This report provides the information necessary for the second series tests of the propulsive wing/canard model. The discussion in this report is limited to that affected by the model changes and to the second series test program. The pretest report information for test 290 which is valid for the second series test was published in Rockwell report NR 83H-79. This report is presented as Appendix 1 and the modified fuselage stress report is presented as Appendix 2 to this pretest report.

  9. Beta Tests and End-User Surveys: Are They Valid?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweetland, James H.

    1988-01-01

    Examines the impact of online systems designed to be searched by end users on the process of database and product evaluation. Two testing methods, beta tests and user surveys, are evaluated, and possible solutions to testing problems are suggested. (CLB)

  10. High Reynolds number tests of a Douglas DLBA 032 airfoil in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Charles B.; Dress, David A.; Hill, Acquilla S.; Wilcox, Peter A.; Bui, Minh H.

    1986-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation of a Douglas advanced-technology airfoil was conducted in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (0.3-m TCT). The temperature was varied from 227 K (409 R) to 100 K (180 R) at pressures ranging from about 159 kPa (1.57 atm) to about 514 kPa (5.07 atm). Mach number was varied from 0.50 to 0.78. These variables provided a Reynolds number range (based on airfoil chord) from 6.0 to 30.0 x 10 to the 6th power. This investigation was specifically designed to: (1) test a Douglas airfoil from moderately low to flight-equivalent Reynolds numbers, and (2) evaluate sidewall-boundary-layer effects on transonic airfoil performance characteristics by a systematic variation of Mach number, Reynolds number, and sidewall-boundary-layer removal. Data are included which demonstrate the effects of fixing transition, Mach number, Reynolds number, and sidewall-boundary-layer removal on the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoil. Also included are remarks on model design and model structural integrity.

  11. Transformer and Meter Tester

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoms, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    Numerically-controlled 5-axis machine tool uses transformer and meter to determine and indicate whether tool is in home position, but lacks built-in test mode to check them. Tester makes possible test, and repair of components at machine rather then replace them when operation seems suspect.

  12. Metering Characteristics of Carburetors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tice, Percival S; Dickinson, H C

    1919-01-01

    Report presents the results of an extensive experimental investigation of the performance of different types of carburetors as effecting the maintenance under all conditions of correct ratio between the weights of fuel and air. It also gives a description of the Bureau of Standards carburetor test plant, test equipment and measuring instruments used to determine the metering characteristics of carburetors.

  13. Field-testing of a Passive Surface Water Flux Meter for the Direct Measurement of Water and Solute Mass Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, E. C.; Jawitz, J. W.; Annable, M. D.; Klammler, H.; Hatfield, K.

    2007-05-01

    The measurement of water and solute mass discharges in surface water flow systems is a fundamental hydrologic task for ecological and economic decision making. However, due to the extensive monetary, labor, and time costs of traditional monitoring devices and methods, many water quality monitoring programs lack the resources necessary to provide comprehensive descriptions of surface water impairments. The Passive Surface Water Flux Meter (PSFM) is a recently developed passive sampling device that measures water and solute fluxes within flowing surface water bodies. Devoid of mechanical components and power supply requirements, the relatively low-maintenance, low-cost design of the PSFM gives it considerable potential as a tool for extensive, large-scale surface water quality characterization and monitoring. The novelty of the PSFM extends to its direct mass-based approach to solute flux measurement, as compared to conventional, indirect concentration-based approaches. During this field-testing campaign, the PSFM was deployed in flowing surface water bodies of north- central Florida. The device contained a dual-packed porous media cartridge that performed simultaneous ion exchange to determine phosphate mass flux and equilibrium tracer desorption to determine water flux within the stream. The PSFM demonstrated accurate measurement of steady-state water and phosphate mass fluxes to within 15% over a range of stream velocities, solute concentrations, and deployment durations. The PSFM design described here was found to perform well in steady-flow conditions. The device was also shown to be effective under transient conditions of limited variability, but full transient testing remains for future work.

  14. Aerodynamic performance and pressure distributions for a NASA SC(2)-0714 airfoil tested in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Renaldo V.; Hill, Acquilla S.; Ray, Edward J.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents in graphic and tabular forms the aerodynamic coefficient and surface pressure distribution data for a NASA SC(2)-0714 airfoil tested in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. The test was another in a series of tests involved in the joint NASA/U.S. Industry Advanced Technology Airfoil Tests program. This 14% thick supercritical airfoil was tested at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 0.76 and angles of attack from -2.0 to 6.0 degrees. The test Reynolds numbers were 4 million, 6 million, 10 million, 15 million, 30 million, 40 million, and 45 million.

  15. 1993 triggered lighnting test program: Environments within 20 meters of the lighting channel and small area temporary protection concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R.J.; Schnetzer, G.H.

    1994-03-01

    Vertical electric fields, azimuthal magnetic fields, and earth step potentials at ground level have been measured at 10 and 20 meters from the base of triggered lightning flashes. For incident stroke peak currents in the range of 4.4 to 29 kA, vertical electric field change amplitudes as high as 210 kV/m were observed at 10 m, with rise times of the order of a few microseconds. Magnetic fields were found to follow Ampere`s law closely at both 10 and 20 m. Earth step potentials measured over a 0.5-m radial distance at the 10-m and 20m stations were linear with and had the same waveforms as the stroke currents. The step voltages exhibited a l/r distance dependence between the two measurement distances. A model that incorporates the presence of a thin surface layer, due to rain water saturation, of much higher conductivity than the bulk of the underlying earth is proposed to explain the observed behavior. Tests were also carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of several concepts for protecting a small exposed object, such as a piece of ordnance at the site of a transportation accident, from either a direct strike or from the indirect effects of electromagnetic fields produced by a nearby lightning flash to ground. Photographs of the occurrence of significant radial filamentary arcing along the surface of the ground from the strike points were acquired. This type of arcing, with a maximum radial extent of at least 20 m, was observed on six of seven of triggered flashes and on all strokes of 15-kA peak amplitude or higher.

  16. An Aerial Radiological Survey of Selected Areas of Area 18 - Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Craig Lyons

    2009-07-31

    As part of the proficiency training for the Radiological Mapping mission of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), a survey team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis (RSL-Nellis) conducted an aerial radiological survey of selected areas of Area 18 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the purpose of mapping man-made radiation deposited as a result of the Johnnie Boy and Little Feller I tests. The survey area centered over the Johnnie Boy ground zero but also included the ground zero and deposition area of the Little Feller I test, approximately 7,000 feet (2133 meters) southeast of the Johnnie Boy site. The survey was conducted in one flight. The completed survey covered a total of 4.0 square miles. The flight lines (with the turns) over the surveyed areas are presented in Figure 1. One 2.5-hour-long flight was performed at an altitude of 100 ft above ground level (AGL) with 200 foot flight-line spacing. A test-line flight was conducted near the Desert Rock Airstrip to ensure quality control of the data. The test line is not shown in Figure 1. However, Figure 1 does include the flight lines for a ''perimeter'' flight. The path traced by the helicopter flying over distinct roads within the survey area can be used to overlay the survey data on a base map or image. The flight survey lines were flown in an east-west orientation perpendicular to the deposition patterns for both sites. This technique provides better spatial resolution when contouring the data. The data were collected by the AMS data acquisition system (REDAR V) using an array of twelve 2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch sodium iodide (NaI) detectors flown on-board a twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter. Data, in the form of gamma energy spectra, were collected every second over the course of the survey and were geo-referenced using a differential Global Positioning System. Spectral data allows the system to distinguish between ordinary fluctuations in natural background radiation levels and the signature produced by man

  17. 16-foot transonic tunnel test section flowfield survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yetter, J. A.; Abeyounis, W. K.

    1994-01-01

    A flow survey has been made of the test section of the NASA Langley Research Center 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at subsonic and supersonic speeds. The survey was performed using five five-hole pyramid-head probes mounted at 14 inch intervals on a survey rake. Probes were calibrated at freestream Mach numbers from 0.50 to 0.95 and from 1.18 to 1.23. Flowfield surveys were made at Mach numbers from 0.50 to 0.90 and at Mach 1.20. The surveys were made at tunnel stations 130.6, 133.6, and 136.0. By rotating the survey rake through 180 degrees, a cylindrical volume of the test section 4.7 feet in diameter and 5.4 feet long centered about the tunnel centerline was surveyed. Survey results showing the measured test section upflow and sideflow characteristics and local Mach number distributions are presented. The report documents the survey probe calibration techniques used, summarizes the procedural problems encountered during testing, and identifies the data discrepancies observed during the post-test data analysis.

  18. Fracture toughness testing data: A technology survey and bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuhrke, W. F.; Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Moya, N.; Mandel, G.

    1975-01-01

    Announced survey includes reports covering fracture toughness testing for various structural materials including information on plane strain and developing areas of mixed mode and plane strain test conditions. Bibliography references cite work and conclusions in fracture toughness testing and application of fracture toughness test data, and in fracture mechanics analysis.

  19. Feasibility of Acoustic Doppler Velocity Meters for the Production of Discharge Records from U.S. Geological Survey Streamflow-Gaging Stations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morlock, Scott E.; Nguyen, Hieu T.; Ross, Jerry H.

    2002-01-01

    It is feasible to use acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVM's) installed at U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow-gaging stations to compute records of river discharge. ADVM's are small acoustic current meters that use the Doppler principle to measure water velocities in a two-dimensional plane. Records of river discharge can be computed from stage and ADVM velocity data using the 'index velocity' method. The ADVM-measured velocities are used as an estimator or 'index' of the mean velocity in the channel. In evaluations of ADVM's for the computation of records of river discharge, the USGS installed ADVM's at three streamflow-gaging stations in Indiana: Kankakee River at Davis, Fall Creek at Millersville, and Iroquois River near Foresman. The ADVM evaluation study period was from June 1999 to February 2001. Discharge records were computed, using ADVM data from each station. Discharge records also were computed using conventional stage-discharge methods of the USGS. The records produced from ADVM and conventional methods were compared with discharge record hydrographs and statistics. Overall, the records compared closely from the Kankakee River and Fall Creek stations. For the Iroquois River station, variable backwater was present and affected the comparison; because the ADVM record compensates for backwater, the ADVM record may be superior to the conventional record. For the three stations, the ADVM records were judged to be of a quality acceptable to USGS standards for publications and near realtime ADVM-computed discharges are served on USGS real-time data World Wide Web pages.

  20. Near-field testing of the 15-meter model of the hoop column antenna. Volume 3: Near- and far-field plots for the JPL feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, J.; Kefauver, N.; Cencich, T.; Osborn, J.

    1986-01-01

    Technical results from near-field testing of the 15-meter model of the hoop column antenna at the Martin Marietta Denver Aerospace facility are discussed. The antenna consists of a deployable central column and a 15 meter hoop, stiffened by cables into a structure with a high tolerance repeatable surface and offset feed location. The surface has been configured to have four offset parabolic apertures, each about 6 meters in diameter, and is made of gold plated molybdenum wire mesh. Pattern measurements were made with feed system radiating at frequencies of 7.73, 11.60, 2.27, 2.225, and 4.26 (all in GHz). This report (Volume 3) gives the detailed patterns measured with the JPL feed (2.225 GHz). Volume 1 covers the testing from an overall viewpoint and contains information of generalized interest for testing large antennas, including the deployment of the antenna in the Martin Facility and the measurements to determine mechanical stability and trueness of the reflector surface, the test program outline, and a synopsis of antenna electromagnetic performance. A detailed listing of the antenna patterns for the LaRC feeds (7.3, 11.60, 2.27, and 4.26 GHz) are given in Volume 2 of this report.

  1. Near-field testing of the 15-meter model of the hoop column antenna. Volume 2: Near- and far-field plots for the LaRC feeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, J.; Kefauver, N.; Cencich, T.; Osborn, J.

    1986-01-01

    The technical results from near-field testing of the 15-meter model of the hoop column antenna at the Martin Marietta Denver Aerospace facility are described. The antenna consists of a deployable central column and a 15-meter hoop, stiffened by cable into a structure with a high tolerance repeatable surface and offset feed location. The surface has been configured to have four offset parabolic apertures, each about 6 meters in diameter, and is made of gold plated molybdenum wire mesh. Pattern measurements were made with feed systems radiating at frequencies of 7.73, 11.60, 2.27, 2.225, and 4.26 (all in GHz). This report (Volume II) gives the detailed patterns measured with the LaRC feeds (7.73, 11.60, 2.27, and 4.26 GHz). Volume I covers the testing from an overall viewpoint and contains information of generalized interest for testing large antennas, including the deployment of the antenna in the Martin Facility and the measurements to determine mechanical stability and trueness of the reflector surface, the test program outline, and a synopsis of antenna electromagnetic performance. A detailed listing of the antenna patterns are provided for the 2.225 Ghz feed in Volume III of this report.

  2. Optical watthour meter digitizer

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, W.H.

    1980-10-01

    As concern about energy conservation and energy-use efficiency increases, a simple and inexpensive instrument that would provide accurate, reliable and high-resolution data on electrical energy usage should find widespread application in research and industrial facilities. An instrument that would also provide one or more outputs compatible with a wide range of digital data acquisition systems would be especially appropriate, since the use of automatic data logging equipment is now common, even in small-scale and low-budget operations. An optical watthour meter digitizer was developed which meets these criteria. Based on the induction-type watthour meter, the digitizer provides an output pulse for a fixed amount of energy use. The digitizer senses the motion of the rotor disc of the meter by optically detecting passage of a nonreflective area painted on the underside of the disc. The passage of such area initiates a logic-compatible output pulse that can be used to measure power or energy usage in a variety of ways. The accuracy of the measurement is determined by the watthour meter. The resolution of the measurement is determined by the K/sub h/ constant (in watthours per revolution) of the meter and the number of equally spaced targets painted on the disc. The resolution of this device can be as small as a fraction of a watthour; the resolution of the manually read register on a watthour meter is typically a fraction of a kilowatthour. Several digitizers were fabricated, bench-tested, and installed in the field for long-term performance testing. All are performing satisfactorily.

  3. A Survey of Aviation English Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alderson, J. Charles

    2010-01-01

    The Lancaster Language Testing Research Group was commissioned in 2006 by the European Organisation for the Safety of Air Navigation (Eurocontrol) to conduct a validation study of the development of a test called ELPAC (English Language Proficiency for Aeronautical Communication), intended to assess the language proficiency of air traffic…

  4. Survey of tuberculin testing in Swedish zoos.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Susanna; Bernodt, Karin; Holmström, Andrea; Röken, Bengt

    2002-12-01

    Tuberculin test results from 214 animals in three Swedish zoos, tested between the years 1993 and 2000, were compiled from a questionnaire sent out to zoo veterinarians. Comparative testing with bovine and avian tuberculin was used on various sites of injection. A total of five skin test reactors were found: three cotton-top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus) in one zoo and two tapirs (Tapirus terrestris) in another zoo. Postmortem culture from one of the tapirs revealed growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and a stamping out policy was adopted in the herd. Tuberculosis in the primates was ruled out by further investigations. Zoo veterinarians should try to adopt a common scheme for the regular testing of zoo animals to improve the diagnostic ability and comparison of results between institutions.

  5. Test results of flight guidance for fuel conservative descents in a time-based metered air traffic environment. [terminal configured vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, C. E.; Person, L. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The NASA developed, implemented, and flight tested a flight management algorithm designed to improve the accuracy of delivering an airplane in a fuel-conservative manner to a metering fix at a time designated by air traffic control. This algorithm provides a 3D path with time control (4D) for the TCV B-737 airplane to make an idle-thrust, clean configured (landing gear up, flaps zero, and speed brakes retracted) descent to arrive at the metering fix at a predetermined time, altitude, and airspeed. The descent path is calculated for a constant Mach/airspeed schedule from linear approximations of airplane performance with considerations given for gross weight, wind, and nonstandard pressure and temperature effects. The flight management descent algorithms are described and flight test results are presented.

  6. Development and test results of a flight management algorithm for fuel conservative descents in a time-based metered traffic environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, C. E.; Cannon, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    A simple flight management descent algorithm designed to improve the accuracy of delivering an airplane in a fuel-conservative manner to a metering fix at a time designated by air traffic control was developed and flight tested. This algorithm provides a three dimensional path with terminal area time constraints (four dimensional) for an airplane to make an idle thrust, clean configured (landing gear up, flaps zero, and speed brakes retracted) descent to arrive at the metering fix at a predetermined time, altitude, and airspeed. The descent path was calculated for a constant Mach/airspeed schedule from linear approximations of airplane performance with considerations given for gross weight, wind, and nonstandard pressure and temperature effects. The flight management descent algorithm is described. The results of the flight tests flown with the Terminal Configured Vehicle airplane are presented.

  7. Accurate and efficient detection of pulmonary seed embolization in prostate iodine-125 permanent brachytherapy with a collimated gamma scintillation survey meter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qin-Sheng; Blair, Henry F

    2003-05-01

    Pulmonary seed embolization is frequently observed in permanent prostate brachytherapy. Postoperative chest radiographic examination does not always detect seed embolization. To overcome this deficiency, a low energy gamma scintillation survey meter was converted to a seed-migration detector by adding a cone-shaped single-hole collimation cap to the window end of the scintillation probe. The response functions of the seed-migration detector to iodine-125 (I-125) for different source-to-detector distances in air and in water were measured. The spatial discrimination power of the survey meter, represented by the full width at half maximum measured in water, is typically improved from more than 7 cm to about 3 cm. Seventy-nine patients with I-125 implantation were scanned with the seed-migration detector at the patients' 30-day postevaluation visit. Fifteen patients showed single-seed embolization to the chest region and four patients displayed two-seed embolization. In other words, 24% of the patients present with embolized seeds. The detection accuracy of each patient was validated by a comprehensive investigation procedure. The comprehensive investigation consists of reviewing the patient's treatment history, orally questioning the patient for possible seed loss via the urethra route outside the hospital, examining all available chest radiographs before and after the seed implantation, and counting the seeds on the postevaluation CT scans. In comparison, examinations relying only on the analysis of postoperative chest radiographs yielded a false-positive detection in four patients and a false-negative detection in two patients. Another advantage of the seed-migration detector is that multiple seed-migration scans can be performed without exposing the patient to any additional radiation, for this device is a passive detector. Our clinical implementation also demonstrated that the seed-migration detector is a convenient and cost-effective method. As a result of this

  8. Fisheye Photogrammetry: Tests and Methodologies for the Survey of Narrow Spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perfetti, L.; Polari, C.; Fassi, F.

    2017-02-01

    The research illustrated in this article aimed at identifying a good standard methodology to survey very narrow spaces during 3D investigation of Cultural Heritage. It is an important topic in today's era of BIM modelling applied to Cultural Heritage. Spaces like staircases, corridors and passages are very common in the architectural or archaeological fields, and obtaining a 3D-oriented survey of those areas can be a very complex task when completeness of the model and high precision are requested. Photogrammetry appears to be the most promising solution in terms of versatility and manoeuvrability also considering the quality of the required data. Fisheye lenses were studied and tested in depth because of their significant advantage in the field of view if compared with rectilinear lenses. This advantage alone can be crucial to reduce the total amount of photos and, as a consequence, to obtain manageable data, to simplify the survey phase and to significantly reduce the elaboration time. In order to overcome the main issue that arise when using fisheye lenses, which is the lack of rules that can be employed to design the survey, a general mathematical formulation to precisely estimate the GSD (Ground Sampling Distance) for every optical projection is presented here. A complete survey of a real complex case study was performed in order to test and stress the proposed methodology, and to handle a fisheye-based survey from beginning to end: the photogrammetric survey of the Minguzzi Staircase. It is a complex service spiral-staircase located in the Duomo di Milano with a total height of 25 meters and characterized by a narrow walkable space about 70 centimetres wide.

  9. Acoustic Ground-Impedance Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Helmoltz resonator used in compact, portable meter measures acoustic impedance of ground or other surfaces. Earth's surface is subject of increasing acoustical investigations because of its importance in aircraft noise prediction and measurment. Meter offers several advantages. Is compact and portable and set up at any test site, irrespective of landscape features, weather or other environmental condition.

  10. Calibration of the 13- by 13-inch adaptive wall test section for the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.; Hill, Acquilla S.

    1990-01-01

    A 13 by 13 inch adaptive wall test section was installed in the 0.3 Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel circuit. This new test section is configured for 2-D airfoil testing. It has four solid walls. The top and bottom walls are flexible and movable whereas the sidewalls are rigid and fixed. The wall adaptation strategy employed requires the test section wall shapes associated with uniform test section Mach number distributions. Calibration tests with the test section empty were conducted with the top and bottom walls linearly diverged to approach a uniform Mach number distribution. Pressure distributions were measured in the contraction cone, the test section, and the high speed diffuser at Mach numbers from 0.20 to 0.95 and Reynolds numbers from 10 to 100 x 10 (exp 6)/per foot.

  11. Test Predicting Alzheimer's Would Be Welcome, Survey Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162525.html Test Predicting Alzheimer's Would Be Welcome, Survey Finds 3 out of ... could tell them they were going to develop Alzheimer's disease, most American seniors would take it, a ...

  12. Observed Stellar Spectra As Templates For Gaia. I. The Asiago Red Clump Spectroscopic Survey At 1.22 Meter Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saguner, T.; Munari, U.; Vallenari, A.

    2011-02-01

    We aim to derive accurate, multi-epoch radial velocities and atmospheric parameters (Teff, log g and [M/H]) of a large sample of Red Clump stars. We acquired data of the target stars at high signal-to-noise (S/N) and medium resolution with the Asiago B&C spectrograph. Radial velocities were obtained by applying cross-correlation against observed IAU standard stars and atmospheric parameters via χ2 fit to a synthetic spectral library. Extensive tests were carried out with the multi-epoch observations of the programme stars and re-observations of the Red Clump stars that are taken from different catalogues in the literature. A total of 305 Red Clump stars (60 of them with a second epoch observation) were observed, and presented in an output catalogue that contains accurate radial velocities (σ(RV) = 2.6 km s-1), atmospheric parameters (σ(Teff) = 68 K, σ(log g) = 0.38 dex and σ([M/H]) = 0.17 dex), distances derived from spectrophotometry, space velocities (U,V,W) with additional astrometric and photometric data taken from literature. We aim to use our final catalogue to study the substructure and kinematics of the Galaxy.

  13. Testing New Survey Questions of Sexual Harassment and Sexual Assault

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Testing New Survey Questions of Sexual Harassment and Sexual Assault Juanita M. Firestone Richard J. Harris DEFENSE EQUAL...NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 09/30/2011 Technical Report Summer 2011 Testing New Survey Questions of Sexual ...Harassment and Sexual Assault Dr. Juanita M. Firestone and Dr. Richard J. Harris Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute (DEOMI) 366 Tuskegee

  14. Fracture toughness testing data: A technology survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuhrke, W. F.; Carpenter, J. L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Technical abstracts for about 90 significant documents relating to fracture toughness testing for various structural materials including information on plane strain and the developing areas of mixed mode and plane stress test conditions are presented. An overview of the state-of-the-art represented in the documents that have been abstracted is included. The abstracts in the report are mostly for publications in the period April 1962 through April 1974. The purpose of this report is to provide, in quick reference form, a dependable source for current information in the subject field.

  15. A flight management algorithm and guidance for fuel-conservative descents in a time-based metered air traffic environment: Development and flight test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    A simple airborne flight management descent algorithm designed to define a flight profile subject to the constraints of using idle thrust, a clean airplane configuration (landing gear up, flaps zero, and speed brakes retracted), and fixed-time end conditions was developed and flight tested in the NASA TSRV B-737 research airplane. The research test flights, conducted in the Denver ARTCC automated time-based metering LFM/PD ATC environment, demonstrated that time guidance and control in the cockpit was acceptable to the pilots and ATC controllers and resulted in arrival of the airplane over the metering fix with standard deviations in airspeed error of 6.5 knots, in altitude error of 23.7 m (77.8 ft), and in arrival time accuracy of 12 sec. These accuracies indicated a good representation of airplane performance and wind modeling. Fuel savings will be obtained on a fleet-wide basis through a reduction of the time error dispersions at the metering fix and on a single-airplane basis by presenting the pilot with guidance for a fuel-efficient descent.

  16. Preliminary test results of a flight management algorithm for fuel conservative descents in a time based metered traffic environment. [flight tests of an algorithm to minimize fuel consumption of aircraft based on flight time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, C. E.; Cannon, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    A flight management algorithm designed to improve the accuracy of delivering the airplane fuel efficiently to a metering fix at a time designated by air traffic control is discussed. The algorithm provides a 3-D path with time control (4-D) for a test B 737 airplane to make an idle thrust, clean configured descent to arrive at the metering fix at a predetermined time, altitude, and airspeed. The descent path is calculated for a constant Mach/airspeed schedule from linear approximations of airplane performance with considerations given for gross weight, wind, and nonstandard pressure and temperature effects. The flight management descent algorithms and the results of the flight tests are discussed.

  17. Survey-guided load research: An end-use analysis methodology test

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, W.M.

    1993-08-01

    Energy use by end-use equipment is a function of the rated capacity of the equipment, frequency of use, and duration of each use. Many end used include multiple states, each with a different capacity, frequency, and duration. Some equipment provides benefits that are related to other uses, resulting in an indirect linkage between the primary energy-using equipment and the end use. Water heaters are one example. End-use metering of energy-using equipment provides the most accurate measure of energy use. Nevertheless, this energy-use ``signal`` is buried in background ``noise`` due to variations in the capacity, frequency, and duration of each end use and end user. Reliable estimates of energy use depend on a variety of methods to increase the ``signal-to-noise`` ratio (i.e., reduce the variance). Research of the energy consumption of household end-uses contains some inherent sampling problems: intrusiveness, cost, extensive data generated, analyses are time and computationally intensive. The goal of the methodology test described in this paper was to address these problems through a method that focused end-use analyses on a limited set of issues and data for program evaluation purposes. The approach tested used a detailed survey of end-use metered subjects to identify the pattern of end-use behavior as an alternative to estimating the frequency and duration of each use from the end-use data itself.

  18. High Reynolds number tests of the cast 10-2/DOA 2 airfoil in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dress, D. A.; Stanewsky, E.; Mcguire, P. D.; Ray, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests of an advanced technology airfoil, the CAST 10-2/DOA 2, were conducted in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (0.3-m TCT). This was the third of a series of tests conducted in a cooperative airfoil research program between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Deutsche Forschungsund Versuchsanstalt fur Luft- und Raumfahrt e. V. For these tests, temperature was varied from 270 K to 110 K at pressures from 1.5 to 5.75 atmospheres. Mach number was varied from 0.60 to 0.80, and the Reynolds number (based on airfoil chord) was varied from 2 to 20 million. The aerodynamic data for the 7.62 cm chord airfoil model used in these tests is presented without analysis. Descriptions of the 0.3-m TCT, the airfoil model, the test instrumentation, and the testing procedures are included.

  19. 1-Meter Digital Elevation Model specification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arundel, Samantha T.; Archuleta, Christy-Ann M.; Phillips, Lori A.; Roche, Brittany L.; Constance, Eric W.

    2015-10-21

    In January 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey National Geospatial Technical Operations Center began producing the 1-Meter Digital Elevation Model data product. This new product was developed to provide high resolution bare-earth digital elevation models from light detection and ranging (lidar) elevation data and other elevation data collected over the conterminous United States (lower 48 States), Hawaii, and potentially Alaska and the U.S. territories. The 1-Meter Digital Elevation Model consists of hydroflattened, topographic bare-earth raster digital elevation models, with a 1-meter x 1-meter cell size, and is available in 10,000-meter x 10,000-meter square blocks with a 6-meter overlap. This report details the specifications required for the production of the 1-Meter Digital Elevation Model.

  20. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Nevada Test Site, Mercury, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Nevada Test Site (NTS), conducted June 22 through July 10, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by a multidisciplinary team of environmental specialists led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the NTS. The Survey covers all environment media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations and activities performed at the NTS, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan is being executed by the Battelle Columbus Division under contract with DOE. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the NTS Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the NTS Survey. 165 refs., 42 figs., 52 tabs.

  1. Survey of aircraft icing simulation test facilities in North America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, W.

    1981-01-01

    A survey was made of the aircraft icing simulation facilities in North America: there are 12 wind tunnels, 28 engine test facilities, 6 aircraft tankers and 14 low velocity facilities, that perform aircraft icing tests full or part time. The location and size of the facility, its speed and temperature range, icing cloud parameters, and the technical person to contact are surveyed. Results are presented in tabular form. The capabilities of each facility were estimated by its technical contact person. The adequacy of these facilities for various types of icing tests is discussed.

  2. Diagnostic Testing at UK Universities: An E-Mail Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillard, Jonathan; Levi, Margaret; Wilson, Robert

    2010-01-01

    In July 2009, an e-mail survey was sent to various UK universities to gain information regarding current practices concerning mathematics diagnostic testing, and to provide an update from the review "Diagnostic Testing for Mathematics" published by the LTSN MathsTEAM Project in 2003. A total of 38 university departments were contacted…

  3. The 100-meter timed test: Normative data in healthy males and comparative pilot outcome data for use in Duchenne muscular dystrophy clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Alfano, Lindsay N; Miller, Natalie F; Berry, Katherine M; Yin, Han; Rolf, Kimberly E; Flanigan, Kevin M; Mendell, Jerry R; Lowes, Linda P

    2017-02-17

    Timed walking tests are often used to measure function in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Our objective was to evaluate the 100 meter timed test (100m), a fixed distance test of maximal performance, for use in DMD. To this end, we sought to establish normative 100m performance in healthy controls, compare DMD performance to controls, and evaluate the reliability of 100m. Seventy-two boys with DMD (18 steroid-naïve, 54 on steroids) and 599 controls (4-14 years) completed the 100m as speedily as possible on a 25-meter track. Repeat testing was completed between 1 and 42 days later and again at 1 year in a subgroup of 96 control boys. Additionally 35 DMD boys were followed longitudinally (5-19 months). Descriptive statistics are presented by age and cohort. There was a significant difference in performance between groups (p < 0.01). Age and body mass index (BMI) significantly influenced 100m (p < 0.0001) in the control cohort. Test-retest reliability was excellent for both cohorts (ICC > 0.90, p < 0.001). Normative data can be used to determine percent-predicted 100m times to quantify the severity of running impairment in children with a motor deficit. Performance of 100m follows the natural history established by other outcome measures in DMD.

  4. Pressure distributions from high Reynolds number transonic tests of an NACA 0012 airfoil in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladson, Charles L.; Hill, Acquilla S.; Johnson, William G., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the 2-D test section of the Langley 0.3-meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel on a NACA 0012 airfoil to obtain aerodynamic data as a part of the Advanced Technology Airfoil Test (ATAT) program. The test program covered a Mach number range of 0.30 to 0.82 and a Reynolds number range of 3.0 to 45.0 x 10 to the 6th power. The stagnation pressure was varied between 1.2 and 6.0 atmospheres and the stagnation temperature was varied between 300 K and 90 K to obtain these test conditions. Tabulated pressure distributions and integrated force and moment coefficients are presented as well as plots of the surface pressure distributions. The data are presented uncorrected for wall interference effects and without analysis.

  5. Survey of US Correctional Institutions for Routine HCV Testing

    PubMed Central

    Kurth, Ann E.; Bazerman, Lauri; Solomon, Liza; Patry, Emily; Rich, Josiah D.; Kuo, Irene

    2015-01-01

    To ascertain HCV testing practices among US prisons and jails, we conducted a survey study in 2012, consisting of medical directors of all US state prisons and 40 of the largest US jails, that demonstrated a minority of US prisons and jails conduct routine HCV testing. Routine voluntary HCV testing in correctional facilities is urgently needed to increase diagnosis, enable risk-reduction counseling and preventive health care, and facilitate evaluation for antiviral treatment. PMID:25393180

  6. High Reynolds number tests of the CAST 10-2/DOA 2 airfoil in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dress, D. A.; Mcguire, P. D.; Stanewsky, E.; Ray, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of an advanced technology airfoil, the CAST 10-2/DOA 2, was conducted in the Langley 0.3 meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (0.3 m TCT). This was the first of a series of tests conducted in a cooperative National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fur Luft- und Raumfahrt e. V. (DFVLR) airfoil research program. Test temperature was varied from 280 K to 100 K to pressures from slightly above 1 to 5.8 atmospheres. Mach number was varied from 0.60 to 0.80, and the Reynolds number (based on airfoil chord) was varied from 4 x 10 to the 8th power to 45 x 10 to the 6th power. This report presents the experimental aerodynamic data obtained for the airfoil and includes descriptions of the airfoil model, the 0.3 m TCT, the test instrumentation, and the testing procedures.

  7. 40 CFR 201.23 - Test site, weather conditions and background noise criteria for measurement at a 30 meter (100...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... rail car operations and locomotive load cell test stands. 201.23 Section 201.23 Protection of... locomotive and rail car operations and locomotive load cell test stands. (a) The standard test site shall be... contribution from the operation of the load cell, if any, including load cell contribution during test....

  8. 40 CFR 201.23 - Test site, weather conditions and background noise criteria for measurement at a 30 meter (100...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... rail car operations and locomotive load cell test stands. 201.23 Section 201.23 Protection of... locomotive and rail car operations and locomotive load cell test stands. (a) The standard test site shall be... contribution from the operation of the load cell, if any, including load cell contribution during test....

  9. 40 CFR 201.23 - Test site, weather conditions and background noise criteria for measurement at a 30 meter (100...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... rail car operations and locomotive load cell test stands. 201.23 Section 201.23 Protection of... locomotive and rail car operations and locomotive load cell test stands. (a) The standard test site shall be... contribution from the operation of the load cell, if any, including load cell contribution during test....

  10. 40 CFR 201.23 - Test site, weather conditions and background noise criteria for measurement at a 30 meter (100...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... rail car operations and locomotive load cell test stands. 201.23 Section 201.23 Protection of... locomotive and rail car operations and locomotive load cell test stands. (a) The standard test site shall be... contribution from the operation of the load cell, if any, including load cell contribution during test....

  11. 40 CFR 201.23 - Test site, weather conditions and background noise criteria for measurement at a 30 meter (100...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... rail car operations and locomotive load cell test stands. 201.23 Section 201.23 Protection of... locomotive and rail car operations and locomotive load cell test stands. (a) The standard test site shall be... contribution from the operation of the load cell, if any, including load cell contribution during test....

  12. Survey of aircraft subcritical flight flutter testing methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenbaum, R.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a survey of U. S., British and French subcritical aircraft flight flutter testing methods are presented and evaluation of the applicability of these methods to the testing of the space shuttle are discussed. Ten U. S. aircraft programs covering the large civil transport aircraft and a variety of military aircraft are reviewed. In addition, three major French and British programs are covered by the survey. The significant differences between the U. S., French and British practices in the areas of methods of excitation, data acquisition, transmission and analysis are reviewed. The effect of integrating the digital computer into the flight flutter test program is discussed. Significant saving in analysis and flight test time are shown to result from the use of special digital computer routines and digital filters.

  13. High Altitude Flight Test of a Reefed 12.2 Meter Diameter Disk-Gap-Band Parachute with Deployment at Mach Number of 2.58

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grow, R. Bruce; Preisser, John S.

    1971-01-01

    A reefed 12.2-meter nominal-diameter (40-ft) disk-gap-band parachute was flight tested as part of the NASA Supersonic High Altitude Parachute Experiment (SHAPE) program. A three-stage rocket was used to drive the instrumented payload to an altitude of 43.6 km (143,000 ft), a Mach number of 2.58, and a dynamic pressure of 972 N/m(exp 2) (20.3 lb/ft(exp 2)) where the parachute was deployed by means of a mortar. The parachute deployed satisfactorily and reached a partially inflated condition characterized by irregular variations in parachute projected area. A full, stable reefed inflation was achieved when the system had decelerated to a Mach number of about 1.5. The steady, reefed projected area was 49 percent of the steady, unreefed area and the average drag coefficient was 0.30. Disreefing occurred at a Mach number of 0.99 and a dynamic pressure of 81 N/m(exp 2) (1.7 lb/ft(exp 2)). The parachute maintained a steady inflated shape for the remainder of the deceleration portion of the flight and throughout descent. During descent, the average effective drag coefficient was 0.57. There was little, if any, coning motion, and the amplitude of planar oscillations was generally less than 10 degrees. The film also shows a wind tunnel test of a 1.7-meter-diameter parachute inflating at Mach number 2.0.

  14. Aerial radiological survey of Area 11, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    1983-06-01

    An aerial radiological survey of Area 11's Plutonium Valley was conducted at the Nevada Test Site from 18 to 30 January 1982. Contour maps representing terrestrial exposure rates and soil concentrations of transuranics, /sup 235/U and /sup 137/Cs are presented on an aerial photograph. Inventories of the locale's transuranic and uranium activities are also included.

  15. MSFC Test Results for Selected Mirrors: Brush-Wellman/Goodrich 0.5 meter Joined-Beryllium Mirror; IABG 0.5 meter C/SiC Mirror; Xinetics 0.5 meter SiC Mirror; and Kodak 0.23 meter SiO2 Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James; Blackwell, Lisa; Matthews, Gary; Eng, Ron; Stahl, Phil; Hraba, John; Thornton, Gary

    2002-01-01

    The results of cryo tests performed at the XRCF on the above mirrors will be presented. Each mirror was tested from room-temperature to around 30 K. The first three were tested together on a 3-mirror stand in the large chamber using the PhaseCam interferometer, while the Kodak mirror was tested in the small chamber using the EPI interferometer.

  16. Cross-cultural differences in meter perception.

    PubMed

    Kalender, Beste; Trehub, Sandra E; Schellenberg, E Glenn

    2013-03-01

    We examined the influence of incidental exposure to varied metrical patterns from different musical cultures on the perception of complex metrical structures from an unfamiliar musical culture. Adults who were familiar with Western music only (i.e., simple meters) and those who also had limited familiarity with non-Western music were tested on their perception of metrical organization in unfamiliar (Turkish) music with simple and complex meters. Adults who were familiar with Western music detected meter-violating changes in Turkish music with simple meter but not in Turkish music with complex meter. Adults with some exposure to non-Western music that was unmetered or metrically complex detected meter-violating changes in Turkish music with both simple and complex meters, but they performed better on patterns with a simple meter. The implication is that familiarity with varied metrical structures, including those with a non-isochronous tactus, enhances sensitivity to the metrical organization of unfamiliar music.

  17. Buckling tests of three 4.6 meter diameter aluminum honeycomb sandwich conical shells loaded under external pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. K.; Davis, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Three aluminum honeycomb sandwich conical shells with a 120 apex angle and a 4.6-m (15.0-ft) base diameter were loaded to failure by a uniform external pressure. The cones differed from one another only in the thickness of their respective face sheets. Test specimen details, test procedure, and test results are discussed. Both buckling and prebuckling data are compared with appropriate theoretical predictions, and good agreement was obtained between test and theory. Extensive imperfection measurements were made and reported on the three cones in the as fabricated condition.

  18. The psychometric testing of the Nursing Teamwork Survey in Iceland.

    PubMed

    Bragadóttir, Helga; Kalisch, Beatrice J; Smáradóttir, Sigríður Bríet; Jónsdóttir, Heiður Hrund

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the psychometric properties of the Nursing Teamwork Survey-Icelandic (NTS-Icelandic), which was translated from US English to Icelandic. The Nursing Teamwork Survey, with 33 items, measures overall teamwork and five factors of teamwork: trust, team orientation, backup, shared mental models, and team leadership. The psychometric testing of the NTS-Icelandic was carried out on data from a pilot study and a national study. The sample for a pilot study included 123 nursing staff from five units, and the sample for a national study included 925 nursing staff from 27 inpatient units. The overall test-retest intraclass correlation coefficient in the pilot study was 0.693 (lower bound = 0.498, upper bound = 0.821) (p < 0.001). The Cronbach's alpha reliability for the total scale and subscales ranged from 0.737 to 0.911. A confirmatory factor analysis indicated a good fit of the data from the national study with the five-factor model for nursing teamwork. The NTS-Icelandic tested valid and reliable in this study. Study findings support further use of the Nursing Teamwork Survey internationally.

  19. Pressure distribution from high Reynolds number tests of a NASA SC(3)-0712(B) airfoil in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. G., Jr.; Hill, A. S.; Eichmann, O.

    1985-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of a NASA 12-percent-thick, advanced-technology supercritical airfoil was conducted in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT). This investigation represents another in the series of NASA/U.S. industry two-dimensional airfoil studies to be completed in the Advanced Technology Airfoil Tests program. Test temperature was varied from 220 K to 96 K at pressures ranging from 1.2 to 4.3 atm. Mach number was varied from 0.50 to 0.80. This investigation was designed to: (1) test a NASA advanced-technology airfoil from low to flight equivalent Reynolds numbers, (2) provide experience in cryogenic wind-tunnel model design and testing techniques, and (3) demonstrate the suitability of the 0.3-m TCT as an airfoil test facility. All the test objectives were met. The pressure data are presented without analysis in tabulated format and as plots of pressure coefficient versus position on the airfoil. This report was prepared for use in conjunction with the aerodynamic coefficient data published in NASA-TM-86371. Data are included which demonstrate the effects of fixed transition. Also included are remarks on the model design and fabrication.

  20. Design and initial testing of a one-bladed 30-meter-diameter rotor on the NASA/DOE mod-O wind turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, R. D.; Ensworth, C. B. F.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of a one-bladed horizontal-axis wind turbine has been of interest to wind turbine designers for many years. Many designs and economic analyses of one-bladed wind turbines have been undertaken by both United States and European wind energy groups. The analyses indicate significant economic advantages but at the same time, significant dynamic response concerns. In an effort to develop a broad data base on wind turbine design and operations, the NASA Wind Energy Project Office has tested a one-bladed rotor at the NASA/DOE Mod-O Wind Turbine Facility. This is the only known test on an intermediate-sized one-bladed rotor in the United States. The 15.2-meter-radius rotor consists of a tip-controlled blade and a counterweight assembly. A rigorous test series was conducted in the Fall of 1985 to collect data on rotor performance, drive train/generator dynamics, structural dynamics, and structural loads. This report includes background information on one-bladed rotor concepts, and Mod-O one-bladed rotor test configuration, supporting design analysis, the Mod-O one-blade rotor test plan, and preliminary test results.

  1. High Reynolds number tests of a NASA SC(3)-0712(B) airfoil in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. G., Jr.; Hill, A. S.; Eichmann, O.

    1985-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation of a NASA 12-percent-thick, advanced-technology supercritical airfoil was conducted in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT). This investigation represents another in the series of NASA/U.S. industry two-dimensional airfoil studies to be completed in the Advanced Technology Airfoil Tests program. Test temperature was varied from 220 K to 96 K at pressures ranging from 1.2 to 4.3 atm. Mach number was varied from 0.60 to 0.80. These variables provided a Reynolds number range from 4,400,000 to 40,000,000 based on a 15.24-cm (6.0-in.) airfoil chord. This investigation was designed to test a NASA advanced-technology airfoil from low to flight-equivalent Reynolds numbers, provide experience in cryogenic wind tunnel model design and testing techniques, and demonstrate the suitability of the 0.3-m TCT as an airfoil test facility. The aerodynamic results are presented as integrated force and moment coefficients and pressure distributions. Data are included which demonstrate the effects of fixed transition, Mach number, and Reynolds number on the aerodynamic characteristics. Also included are remarks on the model design, the model structural integrity, and the overall test experience.

  2. Pressure distributions from high Reynolds number tests of a Boeing BAC 1 airfoil in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. G., Jr.; Hill, A. S.

    1985-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation designed to test a Boeing advanced-technology airfoil from low to flight-equivalent Reynolds numbers has been completed in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. This investigation represents the first in a series of NASA/U.S. industry two-dimensional airfoil studies to be completed in the Advanced Technology Airfoil Test program. Test temperature was varied from ambient to about 100 K at pressures ranging from about 1.2 to 6.0 atm. Mach number was varied from about 0.40 to 0.80. These variables provided a Reynolds number (based on airfoil chord) range from 4.4 X 10 to the 6th power to 50.0 X 10 to the 6th power. All the test objectives were met. The pressure data are presented without analysis in plotted and tabulated formats for use in conjunction with the aerodynamic coefficient data published as NASA TM-81922. At the time of the test, these pressure data were considered proprietary and have only recently been made available by Boeing for general release. Data are included which demonstrate the effects of fixed transition. Also included are remarks on the model design, the model structural integrity, and the overall test experience.

  3. Highlights of experience with a flexible walled test section in the NASA Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Stephen W. D.; Ray, Edward J.

    1988-01-01

    The unique combination of adaptive wall technology with a contonuous flow cryogenic wind tunnel is described. This powerful combination allows wind tunnel users to carry out 2-D tests at flight Reynolds numbers with wall interference essentially eliminated. Validation testing was conducted to support this claim using well tested symmetrical and cambered airfoils at transonic speeds and high Reynolds numbers. The test section hardware has four solid walls, with the floor and ceiling flexible. The method of adapting/shaping the floor and ceiling to eliminate top and bottom wall interference at its source is outlined. Data comparisons for different size models tested and others in several sophisticated 2-D wind tunnels are made. In addition, the effects of Reynolds number, testing at high lift with associated large flexible wall movements, the uniqueness of the adapted wall shapes, and the effects of sidewall boundary layer control are examined. The 0.3-m TCT is now the most advanced 2-D research facility anywhere.

  4. A Test program to Determine the Feasibility of Installing Utility Meters in Military Family Housing, Developing Energy Ceilings, and Operating a Penalty Billing System for Occupants who Overconsume Energy. Volume I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    SUMMARY4 Ex~cutive Summary Organization This executive summary presents an overview of the metering test; estimated costs of implementation; and potential... Costs (Chapter 1) The estimated cost of metering the remaining approximately 300,000 units of DoD housing in the 50 States and U.S. posses- sions is... cost for procurement of necessary minicomputers and software to perform the norm calculation and produce the bills is $25,000,000 in 1981 dollars

  5. Radiac survey instrumentation. Final report on test operations procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-11-02

    This test operations procedure (TOP) prescribes engineering test procedures to determine the technical performance of radiac survey instrumentation. Comparison of test results with technical specifications permits evaluation of their suitability for an intended end use. Modern battlefield conditions have made it necessary that commanders have radiological information concerning contamination of occupied areas. Fall-out predictions provide some information; however, predictions must be confirmed by measurements. Radiacmeters have been developed to fulfill this measurement requirement. This TOP is limited to tests outlined herein, which are applicable to radiacmeters designed for ground and aerial survey. The following tests will measure: (a) Directional Response - The objective of this subtest is to determine the response of the test item to radiation coming from different directions. (b) Accuracy - The objective of this subtest is to determine whether measurements of radiation can be made accurately and repeatedly. (c) Response Time - The objective of this subtest is to determine the ability of radiacmeter to respond to rapidly changing radiation dose rates. (d) Drift - The objective of this subtest is to determine the drift characteristics of the radiacmeter. (e) Warm-up Time - The objective of this subtest is to determine the warm-up time required before the instrumentation can accurately indicate radiation.

  6. High Reynolds Number Test of the Boeing TR77 Airfoil in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Julio; Flechner, Stuart G.; Hill, Acquilla S.; Rozendaal, Roger A.

    1990-01-01

    A Boeing TR77 airfoil associated with the Advanced Technology Airfoil Test (ATAT) program was tested in the Langley 0.3 m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. Limited analysis of the data indicated that increasing Reynolds number for a fixed Mach number resulted in increased normal-force, nose-down pitching moment, and decreased drag coefficient. Increasing Mach number while keeping the Reynolds number constant yielded the expected increase in normal-force slopes, nose-down pitching moment coefficients, and decrease in angle of attack associated with maximum normal-force coefficient. Turbulent boundary layer flow was achieved over the airfoil at low Reynolds numbers for the test Mach number range using aluminum discs.

  7. Discussion series on PURPA related topics: metering

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgeon, J I

    1980-08-01

    Time-differentiated metering of electricity consumption and demand is required in both rate-structure experimentation and the implementation of most time-of-use rate designs. Time-differentiated metering takes three major forms: multi-register watthour meters, magnetic-tape recording meters, and remote automatic meter-reading systems. The majority of projects selected magnetic-tape meters for their flexibility with respect to rate structure, load-survey capabilities, and ready availability. The small-scale, experimental nature of the projects reduced the significance of the large difference in per-unit cost and operational/maintenance complexity between this form of metering and the multi-register form. Magnetic-tape meters are not likely candidates for system-wide implementation of time-differentiated metering. Automatic remote-meter-reading systems were not adequately available during the project years; those projects attempting to use these were unable to bring them to full operational status before project termination, due to the many problems of design, quality control, and equipment acquisition encountered. Delays in acquisition and problems of quality control also followed the selection of magnetic-tape meters and multi-register meters by a number of the projects. Though less complex than automatic remote-reading systems, these technologies are still new and more complex than standard watthour metering. Thus, both equipment vendors and utilities encountered numerous problems in getting properly functioning meters to the service entrances on time. A variety of factors contributed to installation delays, including unforeseen space limitations, incompatible wiring, problems of task organization, and customer reluctance.

  8. HIV testing in national population-based surveys: experience from the Demographic and Health Surveys.

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Vinod; Vaessen, Martin; Boerma, J. Ties; Arnold, Fred; Way, Ann; Barrere, Bernard; Cross, Anne; Hong, Rathavuth; Sangha, Jasbir

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the methods used in the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) to collect nationally representative data on the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and assess the value of such data to country HIV surveillance systems. METHODS: During 2001-04, national samples of adult women and men in Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Dominican Republic, Ghana, Mali, Kenya, United Republic of Tanzania and Zambia were tested for HIV. Dried blood spot samples were collected for HIV testing, following internationally accepted ethical standards. The results for each country are presented by age, sex, and urban versus rural residence. To estimate the effects of non-response, HIV prevalence among non-responding males and females was predicted using multivariate statistical models for those who were tested, with a common set of predictor variables. RESULTS: Rates of HIV testing varied from 70% among Kenyan men to 92% among women in Burkina Faso and Cameroon. Despite large differences in HIV prevalence between the surveys (1-16%), fairly consistent patterns of HIV infection were observed by age, sex and urban versus rural residence, with considerably higher rates in urban areas and in women, especially at younger ages. Analysis of non-response bias indicates that although predicted HIV prevalence tended to be higher in non-tested males and females than in those tested, the overall effects of non-response on the observed national estimates of HIV prevalence are insignificant. CONCLUSIONS: Population-based surveys can provide reliable, direct estimates of national and regional HIV seroprevalence among men and women irrespective of pregnancy status. Survey data greatly enhance surveillance systems and the accuracy of national estimates in generalized epidemics. PMID:16878227

  9. Evolution, calibration, and operational characteristics of the two-dimensional test section of the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladson, Charles L.; Ray, Edward J.

    1987-01-01

    Presented is a review of the development of the world's first cryogenic pressure tunnel, the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (0.3-m TCT). Descriptions of the instrumentation, data acquisition systems, and physical features of the two-dimensional 8- by 24-in, (20.32 by 60.96 cm) and advanced 13- by 13-in (33.02 by 33.02 cm) adaptive-wall test-section inserts of the 0.3-m TCT are included. Basic tunnel-empty Mach number distributions, stagnation temperature distributions, and power requirements are included. The Mach number capability of the facility is from about 0.20 to 0.90. Stagnation pressure can be varied from about 80 to 327 K.

  10. Noise data from tests of a 1.83 meter (6-ft-) diameter variable-pitch 1.2-pressure-ratio fan (QF-9)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, F. W.; Wazyniak, J. A.; Friedman, R.

    1975-01-01

    Acoustic and aerodynamic data for a 1.83-meter (6-ft.) diameter fan suitable for a quiet engine for short-takeoff-and-landing (STOL) aircraft are documented. The QF-9 rotor blades had an adjustable pitch feature which provided a means for testing at several rotor blade setting angles, including one for reverse thrust. The fan stage incorporated features for low noise. Far-field noise around the fan was measured without acoustic suppression over a range of operating conditions for six different rotor blade setting angles in the forward thrust configuration, and for one in the reverse configuration. Complete results of one-third-octave band analysis of the data are presented in tabular form. Also included are power spectra, data referred to the source, and sideline perceived noise levels.

  11. Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry determination of the metabolic changes during a maximal 400-meter swimming test.

    PubMed

    Petibois, C; Déléris, G

    2003-07-01

    We describe the metabolic changes in the blood that appeared during a maximal 400-m swimming test in 7 male swimmers by Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR spectrometry). A 400-m test (255.9 +/- 6.8 s) was performed during which stroke frequency and time to complete each pool distance were recorded. In three other tests, the first 100 m, 200 m, and 300 m were swam at the same stroke frequency and velocity. Capillary blood samples were taken at rest and after tests to analyze change in plasma contents by FT-IR spectrometry. Best swimmers were characterized by higher glycemia increase at the onset of exercise (r = -0.91; p < 0.01). Lactate increase was also higher after 300 m (r = -0.97; p < 0.01). Higher amounts of fatty acids were also available at the end of exercise, as assessed by the relationships found between swimming velocity and concentrations of albumin (r = 0.96; p < 0.01), apolipoprotein C 3 (r = 0.93; p < 0.01), triglycerides (r = -0.81; p < 0.05), and fatty acids (r = 0.97; p < 0.01). This metabolic response allowed the best swimmers to maintain longer their initial swimming velocity. The best swimmers presented also higher amino-acid concentration increase during exercise (r = 0.91; p < 0.01). Therefore, performance competence originated probably from better regulation in carbohydrate, lipid, and amino-acid metabolism.

  12. A Survey of Biodynamic Test Devices and Methods,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    failure. Animal tests are especially valuable in suggesting injury mechanisms that can occur under specified occupant-vehicle configurations. Comparison...Frequency RanCe 27000iz e.4, Number 1 e.4.a, on sled 21/2q e.4.b. on subject/dumrly f. Other Parameters Monitoreo : LUNG PRESSURE. BELT FORCES I IJ I...4.a. on ile_ _ _ v.4.u. un s.uject/ourvy I. Other Parameters Monitoreo : 40 NATO/AGARD Impact Test Facility Survey ID #33 1. Name and Address of

  13. A Matter of Meter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, David L.

    2006-01-01

    Writing verse is a learning experience. Arranging words, sounds and syllables can turn everyday language into metered language (language that can be measured), and metered language is the definition of verse. This article discusses the use of meter in helping students establish sets of syllables and lines that can be counted, enabling them to…

  14. Validity of a 5-meter multiple shuttle run test for assessing fitness of women field hockey players.

    PubMed

    Boddington, Michele K; Lambert, Michael I; Waldeck, Miriam R

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this study was to establish validity of a 5-m multiple shuttle test (5-m MST) using indirect (criterion and construct) and direct measures of performance. For criterion validity, comparisons were made between data from established fitness tests and a 5-m MST. Construct validity was determined by comparing results from a 5-m MST with subjects of different playing abilities. Direct validity was determined by comparing values attained from a 5-m MST with data from a time-motion study of field hockey. For criterion validity, the strongest relationship existed between the 20-m MST (42.7 +/- 7.1 ml.kg(-1).min(-1)) and total distance from the 5-m MST (650.9 +/- 59.2 m; r = 0.92). For construct validity, regional representative players covered more distance than club-level players (689.9 +/- 46.6 m vs. 661.1 +/- 31.0 m; p < 0.01). For direct validity, the highest correlation was found between total distance from the 5-m MST (706.0 +/- 37.5 m) and mean displacement during matches (61.0 +/- 6.0 m; r = 0.74). It was concluded that the 5-m MST had both indirect and direct validity for the fitness assessment of field hockey players. The data obtained from the 5-m MST directly relates to the physical fitness of the players during competition.

  15. Test and evaluation of the one-meter, fuel rod calorimeter at Mol, Belgium, 1-12 June 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Rodenburg, W.W.; Keddar, A.

    1982-10-29

    In order to test the performance of the l-m fuel rod calorimeter, measurements were made of fuel rods with three different plutonium isotopic compositions containing from 3.6 to 28.5 g of plutonium. Measurement times were nominally 2 h: 1 h for a fuel rod measurement and 1 h for a base-line measurement. From these measurements, the precision (1 S.D.) of the calorimeter power measurement is 1 mW over the range of 10 to 135 mW. For rods with powers greater than 50 mW, apparent biases of up to 3% were within measured and assumed experimental errors. It is not possible from these data to identify the source of biases of -5.8% and -7% found for two rods. A problem encountered with the electric rod calibration requires further study. 1 figure, 7 tables.

  16. Seismic surveys test on Innerhytta Pingo, Adventdalen, Svalbard Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boaga, Jacopo; Rossi, Giuliana; Petronio, Lorenzo; Accaino, Flavio; Romeo, Roberto; Wheeler, Walter

    2015-04-01

    We present the preliminary results of an experimental full-wave seismic survey test conducted on the Innnerhytta a Pingo, located in the Adventdalen, Svalbard Islands, Norway. Several seismic surveys were adopted in order to study a Pingo inner structure, from classical reflection/refraction arrays to seismic tomography and surface waves analysis. The aim of the project IMPERVIA, funded by Italian PNRA, was the evaluation of the permafrost characteristics beneath this open-system Pingo by the use of seismic investigation, evaluating the best practice in terms of logistic deployment. The survey was done in April-May 2014: we collected 3 seismic lines with different spacing between receivers (from 2.5m to 5m), for a total length of more than 1 km. We collected data with different vertical geophones (with natural frequency of 4.5 Hz and 14 Hz) as well as with a seismic snow-streamer. We tested different seismic sources (hammer, seismic gun, fire crackers and heavy weight drop), and we verified accurately geophone coupling in order to evaluate the different responses. In such peculiar conditions we noted as fire-crackers allow the best signal to noise ratio for refraction/reflection surveys. To ensure the best geophones coupling with the frozen soil, we dug snow pits, to remove the snow-cover effect. On the other hand, for the surface wave methods, the very high velocity of the permafrost strongly limits the generation of long wavelengths both with these explosive sources as with the common sledgehammer. The only source capable of generating low frequencies was a heavy drop weight system, which allows to analyze surface wave dispersion below 10 Hz. Preliminary data analysis results evidence marked velocity inversions and strong velocity contrasts in depth. The combined use of surface and body waves highlights the presence of a heterogeneous soil deposit level beneath a thick layer of permafrost. This is the level that hosts the water circulation from depth controlling

  17. Survey of US public attitudes toward pharmacogenetic testing.

    PubMed

    Haga, S B; O'Daniel, J M; Tindall, G M; Lipkus, I R; Agans, R

    2012-06-01

    To assess public attitudes and interest in pharmacogenetic (PGx) testing, we conducted a random-digit-dial telephone survey of US adults, achieving a response rate of 42% (n=1139). Most respondents expressed interest in PGx testing to predict mild or serious side effects (73±3.29 and 85±2.91%, respectively), guide dosing (91%) and assist with drug selection (92%). Younger individuals (aged 18-34 years) were more likely to be interested in PGx testing to predict serious side effects (vs aged 55+ years), as well as Whites, those with a college degree, and who had experienced side effects from medications. However, most respondents (78±3.14%) were not likely to have a PGx test if there was a risk that their DNA sample or test result could be shared without their permission. Given differences in interest among some groups, providers should clearly discuss the purpose of testing, alternative testing options (if available) and policies to protect patient privacy and confidentiality.

  18. Correlation Results for a Mass Loaded Vehicle Panel Test Article Finite Element Models and Modal Survey Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maasha, Rumaasha; Towner, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    High-fidelity Finite Element Models (FEMs) were developed to support a recent test program at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The FEMs correspond to test articles used for a series of acoustic tests. Modal survey tests were used to validate the FEMs for five acoustic tests (a bare panel and four different mass-loaded panel configurations). An additional modal survey test was performed on the empty test fixture (orthogrid panel mounting fixture, between the reverb and anechoic chambers). Modal survey tests were used to test-validate the dynamic characteristics of FEMs used for acoustic test excitation. Modal survey testing and subsequent model correlation has validated the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the FEMs. The modal survey test results provide a basis for the analysis models used for acoustic loading response test and analysis comparisons

  19. Flow-Field Survey in the Test Region of the SR-71 Aircraft Test Bed Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizukami, Masashi; Jones, Daniel; Weinstock, Vladimir D.

    2000-01-01

    A flat plate and faired pod have been mounted on a NASA SR-71A aircraft for use as a supersonic flight experiment test bed. A test article can be placed on the flat plate; the pod can contain supporting systems. A series of test flights has been conducted to validate this test bed configuration. Flight speeds to a maximum of Mach 3.0 have been attained. Steady-state sideslip maneuvers to a maximum of 2 deg have been conducted, and the flow field in the test region has been surveyed. Two total-pressure rakes, each with two flow-angle probes, have been placed in the expected vicinity of an experiment. Static-pressure measurements have been made on the flat plate. At subsonic and low supersonic speeds with no sideslip, the flow in the surveyed region is quite uniform. During sideslip maneuvers, localized flow distortions impinge on the test region. Aircraft sideslip does not produce a uniform sidewash over the test region. At speeds faster than Mach 1.5, variable-pressure distortions were observed in the test region. Boundary-layer thickness on the flat plate at the rake was less than 2.1 in. For future experiments, a more focused and detailed flow-field survey than this one would be desirable.

  20. Model Performance of Water-Current Meters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, J.M.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The measurement of discharge in natural streams requires hydrographers to use accurate water-current meters that have consistent performance among meters of the same model. This paper presents the results of an investigation into the performance of four models of current meters - Price type-AA, Price pygmy, Marsh McBirney 2000 and Swoffer 2100. Tests for consistency and accuracy for six meters of each model are summarized. Variation of meter performance within a model is used as an indicator of consistency, and percent velocity error that is computed from a measured reference velocity is used as an indicator of meter accuracy. Velocities measured by each meter are also compared to the manufacturer's published or advertised accuracy limits. For the meters tested, the Price models werer found to be more accurate and consistent over the range of test velocities compared to the other models. The Marsh McBirney model usually measured within its accuracy specification. The Swoffer meters did not meet the stringent Swoffer accuracy limits for all the velocities tested.

  1. Test Of Astronomy STandards TOAST Survey of K-12 Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Timothy F.; Slater, Stephanie; Stork, Debra J.

    2015-01-01

    Discipline-based education research in astronomy is focused on understanding the underlying mental mechanisms used by students when learning astronomy and teachers when teaching astronomy. Systematic surveys of K-12 teacher' knowledge in the domain of astronomy are conducted periodically in order to better focus and improve professional development. These surveys are most often done when doing contemporary needs assessments or when new assessment instruments are readily available. Designed by Stephanie J. Slater of the CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research, the 29-item multiple-choice format Test Of Astronomy STandards - TOAST is a carefully constructed, criterion-referenced instrument constructed upon a solid list of clearly articulated and widely agreed upon learning objectives. The targeted learning concepts tightly align with the consensus learning goals stated by the American Astronomical Society - Chair's Conference on ASTRO 101, the American Association of the Advancement of Science's Project 2061 Benchmarks, and the National Research Council's 1996 National Science Education Standards. Without modification, the TOAST is also aligned with the significantly less ambitious 2013 Next Generation Science Standards created by Achieve, Inc., under the auspices of the National Research Council. This latest survey reveals that K-12 teachers still hold many of the same fundamental misconceptions uncovered by earlier surveys. This includes misconceptions about the size, scale, and structure of the cosmos as well as misconceptions about the nature of physical processes at work in astronomy. This suggests that professional development in astronomy is still needed and that modern curriculum materials are best served if they provide substantial support for implementation.

  2. Cosmological tests of general relativity with future tomographic surveys.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gong-Bo; Pogosian, Levon; Silvestri, Alessandra; Zylberberg, Joel

    2009-12-11

    Future weak lensing surveys will map the evolution of matter perturbations and gravitational potentials, yielding a new test of general relativity on cosmic scales. They will probe the relations between matter overdensities, local curvature, and the Newtonian potential. These relations can be modified in alternative gravity theories or by the effects of massive neutrinos or exotic dark energy fluids. We introduce two functions of time and scale which account for any such modifications in the linear regime. We use a principal component analysis to find the eigenmodes of these functions that cosmological data will constrain. The number of constrained modes gives a model-independent forecast of how many parameters describing deviations from general relativity could be constrained, along with w(z). The modes' scale and time dependence tell us which theoretical models will be better tested.

  3. Test program element II blanket and shield thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing, experimental facility survey

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, A.G.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1981-12-01

    This report presents results of a survey conducted by EG and G Idaho to determine facilities available to conduct thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing for the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Test Program. In response to EG and G queries, twelve organizations (in addition to EG and G and General Atomic) expressed interest in providing experimental facilities. A variety of methods of supplying heat is available.

  4. Development of an Automated System to Test and Select CCDs for the Dark Energy Survey Camera (DECam)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubik, Donna; Dark Energy Survey Collaboration

    2009-01-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is a next generation sky survey aimed directly at understanding why the universe is expanding at an accelerating rate. The survey will use the Dark Energy Camera (DECam), a 3 square degree, 500 Megapixel mosaic camera mounted at the prime focus of the Blanco 4-meter telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, to observe 5000 square-degrees of sky through 5 filters (g, r, i, z, Y). DECam will be comprised of 74 CCDs: 62 2k x 4k CCDs for imaging and 12 2k x 2k CCDs for guiding and focus. The goal of the DES is to provide a factor of 3-5 improvement in the Dark Energy Task Force Figure of Merit using four complementary methods: weak gravitational lensing, galaxy cluster counts, baryon acoustic oscillations, and Type IA supernovae. This goal sets stringent technical requirements for the CCDs. Testing a large number of CCDs to determine which best meet the DES requirements would be a very time-consuming manual task. We have developed a system to automatically collect and analyze CCD test data. The test results are entered into an online SQL database which facilitates selection of those CCDs that best meet the technical specifications for charge transfer efficiency, linearity, full well, quantum efficiency, noise, dark current, cross talk, diffusion, and cosmetics.

  5. High Altitude Flight Test of a 40-Foot Diameter (12.2 meter) Ringsail Parachute at Deployment Mach Number of 2.95

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstrom, Clinton V.

    1970-01-01

    A 40-foot-nominal-diameter (12.2-meter) modified ringsail parachute was flight tested as part of the NASA Supersonic High Altitude Parachute Experiment (SHAPE) program. The 41-pound (18.6-kg) test parachute system was deployed from a 239.5-pound (108.6-kg) instrumented payload by means of a deployment mortar when the payload was at an altitude of 171,400 feet (52.3 km), a Mach number of 2.95, and a free-stream dynamic pressure of 9.2 lb/sq ft (440 N/m(exp 2)). The parachute deployed properly, suspension line stretch occurring 0.54 second after mortar firing with a resulting snatch-force loading of 932 pounds (4146 newtons). The maximum loading due to parachute opening was 5162 pounds (22 962 newtons) at 1.29 seconds after mortar firing. The first near full inflation of the canopy at 1.25 seconds after mortar firing was followed immediately by a partial collapse and subsequent oscillations of frontal area until the system had decelerated to a Mach number of about 1.5. The parachute then attained a shape that provided full drag area. During the supersonic part of the test, the average axial-force coefficient varied from a minimum of about 0.24 at a Mach number of 2.7 to a maximum of 0.54 at a Mach number of 1.1. During descent under subsonic conditions, the average effective drag coefficient was 0.62 and parachute-payload oscillation angles averaged about &loo with excursions to +/-20 degrees. The recovered parachute was found to have slight damage in the vent area caused by the attached deployment bag and mortar lid.

  6. Statewide survey of laboratories performing Mycobacterium tuberculosis testing in Minnesota.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, W A; Besser-Wiek, J M; Osterholm, M T; MacDonald, K L

    1996-01-01

    Rapid and accurate laboratory detection and identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, particularly multidrug-resistant strains, is critical to both public health control measures and patient management. The authors surveyed microbiology laboratories to evaluate whether their methods met national guidelines. As needed, laboratories received individualized recommendations for improvement. The laboratories were resurveyed a year later to assess changes in methods. Current guidelines recommend fluorochrome acid-fast smears, broth cultures, identification by nucleic acid probe or BACTEC-NAP, and BACTEC primary susceptibility panels, which should include pyrazinamide. Of 27 laboratories performing acid-fast smears, 15 used fluorochrome methods. Six of 16 laboratories performing mycobacterial cultures used broth media. Of six laboratories performing species identification, five used nucleic acid probes or BACTEC-NAP. Of five laboratories evaluating drug sensitivity, two used BACTEC and two included pyrazinamide in their protocols. Overall, 24 (89%) laboratories needed improvements; a year later, 16 (67%) of those had altered their methods or made definite plans to do so. Survey results suggest that health departments can facilitate improvements in laboratory testing for pathogens of public health importance. PMID:8606914

  7. A series of low-altitude aerial radiological surveys of selected regions within Areas 3, 5, 8, 9, 11, 18, and 25 at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Colton, D.P.

    1999-12-01

    A series of low-altitude, aerial radiological surveys of selected regions within Areas 3, 5, 8, 9, 11, 18,and 25 of the Nevada Test Site was conducted from December 1996 through June 1999. The surveys were conducted for the US Department of Energy by the Remote Sensing Laboratory, located in Las Vegas, Nevada, and maintained and operated by Bechtel Nevada. The flights were conducted at a nominal altitude of 15 meters above ground level along a set of parallel flight lines spaced 23 meters apart. The purpose of these low-altitude surveys was to measure, map, and define the areas of americium-241 activity. The americium contamination will be used to determine the areas of plutonium contamination. Americium-241 activity was detected within 8 of the 11 regions. The three regions where americium-241 was not detected were in the inactive Nuclear Rocket Development Station complex in Area 25, which encompassed the Test Cell A and Test Cell C reactor test stands and the Reactor Maintenance Assembly and Disassembly facility.

  8. Pulmonary testing using peak flow meters of very low birth weight children born in the perisurfactant era and school controls at age 10 years.

    PubMed

    Palta, Mari; Sadek-Badawi, Mona; Madden, Kathleen; Green, Christopher

    2007-09-01

    We determined lung function at age 10 years in very low birthweight (VLBW, tested by the Jaeger AM1 peak flow meter at age 10 years. Two hundred six VLBW and 79 controls had additional home monitoring. Abnormality was defined as observed/predicted ratio <0.8 for PEF, FEV(1), and FVC, and by criteria of Pelkonen for diurnal PEF variation. VLBW children were compared to controls, VLBW children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) to those without, and those with respiratory conditions to those without. PEF and FEV(1) showed high reproducibility (intraclass correlations, ICC 0.75-0.83). Controls and VLBW children with and without BPD differed significantly on all measures. Baseline test results did not differ across birth years, but PEF variation was less after surfactant availability (P = 0.04). Observed over predicted FEV(1) was the most sensitive in detecting differences between groups (P < 0.001), with mean (s.d.) 0.97 (0.12) for controls, 0.88 (0.14) for VLBW children without BPD, and 0.78 (0.13) for those with BPD. Odds ratios for abnormality were especially high with respiratory medication use during the first 5 years of life, 4.4 (95% CI: 2.0-9.8) for FEV(1) and 5.1 (95% CI: 2.0-13.2) for diurnal PEF variation. Our results show that respiratory abnormalities persist to at least age 10 years for VLBW children born in the surfactant era.

  9. Balanced Flow Meters without Moving Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Anthony R.; VanBuskirk, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Balanced flow meters are recent additions to an established class of simple, rugged flow meters that contain no moving parts in contact with flow and are based on measurement of pressure drops across objects placed in flow paths. These flow meters are highly accurate, minimally intrusive, easily manufacturable, and reliable. A balanced flow meter can be easily mounted in a flow path by bolting it between conventional pipe flanges. A balanced flow meter can be used to measure the flow of any of a variety of liquids or gases, provided that it has been properly calibrated. Relative to the standard orifice-plate flow meter, the balanced flow meter introduces less turbulence and two times less permanent pressure loss and is therefore capable of offering 10 times greater accuracy and repeatability with less dissipation of energy. A secondary benefit of the reduction of turbulence is the reduction of vibration and up to 15 times less acoustic noise generation. Both the balanced flow meter and the standard orifice-plate flow meter are basically disks that contain holes and are instrumented with pressure transducers on their upstream and downstream faces. The most obvious difference between them is that the standard orifice plate contains a single, central hole while the balanced flow meter contains multiple holes. The term 'balanced' signifies that in designing the meter, the sizes and locations of the holes are determined in an optimization procedure that involves balancing of numerous factors, including volumetric flow, mass flow, dynamic pressure, kinetic energy, all in an effort to minimize such undesired effects as turbulence, pressure loss, dissipation of kinetic energy, and non-repeatability and nonlinearity of response over the anticipated range of flow conditions. Due to proper balancing of these factors, recent testing demonstrated that the balanced flow-meter performance was similar to a Venturi tube in both accuracy and pressure recovery, but featured reduced

  10. Effect of vertical motion on current meters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kallio, Nicholas A.

    1966-01-01

    The effect of vertical motion on the performance of current meters at various stream velocities was evaluated to determine whether accurate discharge measurements can be made from a bobbing boat. Three types of current meters--Ott, Price, and vane types--were tested under conditions simulating a bobbing boat. A known frequency and amplitude of vertical motion were imparted to the current meter, and the related effect on the measured stream velocity was determined. One test of the Price meter was made under actual conditions, using a boat and standard measuring gear. The results of the test under actual conditions verified those obtained by simulating the vertical movements of a boat. The tests show that for stream velocities below 2.5 feet per second the accuracy of all three meters is significantly affected when the meters are subjected to certain conditions of vertical motion that can occur during actual field operations. Both the rate of vertical motion and the frequency of vertical oscillation affect the registration of the meter. The results of these tests, presented in the form of graphs and tables, can be used as a guide to determine whether wind and stream flow are within an acceptable range for a reliable discharge measurement from a boat.

  11. Designing, Testing, and Validating an Attitudinal Survey on an Environmental Topic: A Groundwater Pollution Survey Instrument for Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacosta-Gabari, Idoya; Fernandez-Manzanal, Rosario; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Dolores

    2009-01-01

    Research in environmental attitudes' assessment has significantly increased in recent years. The development of specific attitude scales for specific environmental problems has often been proposed. This paper describes the Groundwater Pollution Test (GPT), a 19-item survey instrument using a Likert-type scale. The survey has been used with…

  12. DC attenuation meter

    DOEpatents

    Hargrove, Douglas L.

    2004-09-14

    A portable, hand-held meter used to measure direct current (DC) attenuation in low impedance electrical signal cables and signal attenuators. A DC voltage is applied to the signal input of the cable and feedback to the control circuit through the signal cable and attenuators. The control circuit adjusts the applied voltage to the cable until the feedback voltage equals the reference voltage. The "units" of applied voltage required at the cable input is the system attenuation value of the cable and attenuators, which makes this meter unique. The meter may be used to calibrate data signal cables, attenuators, and cable-attenuator assemblies.

  13. Groundwater-Seepage Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walthall, Harry G.; Reay, William G.

    1993-01-01

    Instrument measures seepage of groundwater into inland or coastal body of water. Positioned at depth as great as 40 meters, and measures flow at low rate and low pressure differential. Auxiliary pressure meter provides data for correlation of flow of groundwater with tides and sea states. Seepage meter operates independently for several weeks. Its sampling rate adjusted to suit hydrologic conditions; to measure more frequently when conditions changing rapidly. Used in water-quality management and for biological and geological research. Potential industrial uses include measurement of seepage of caustic and corrosive liquids.

  14. Space Age Meter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Julie

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the history and evolution of measurement standards from 3000 BC to the modern metric system. Traces measurement techniques from comparisons with the human body to use of atomic clocks and lasers to establish the length of a meter. (JM)

  15. Peak flow meter (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A peak flow meter is commonly used by a person with asthma to measure the amount of air that can be ... become narrow or blocked due to asthma, peak flow values will drop because the person cannot blow ...

  16. Tsunami Questionnaire Survey in Heraklion Test Site, Crete Island, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papageorgiou, Antonia; Tsimi, Christina; Orfanogiannaki, Katerina; Papadopoulos, Gerassimos; Sachpazi, Maria; Lavigne, Franck; Grancher, Delphine

    2015-04-01

    The Heraklion city (Crete Island, Greece) has been chosen as one of the test-sites for the EU-FP7ASTARTE tsunami project. Heraklion is the biggest city in Crete Isl. and the fourth biggest in Greece with a population of about 120,000 which, however, during the summer vacation period nearly doubles. In the past, Heraklion was hit by strong, destructive tsunamis such as the ones of AD 8 August 1303, 10 October 1650 and 9 July 1956. The first and the third were caused by large tectonic earthquakes associated with the eastern segment of the Hellenic Arc the first and with the back-arc extensional regime the third. The one of 1650 was associated with the eruption of the Columbo submarine volcano in the Santorini volcanic complex. One of the activities scheduled for WP9 of ASTARTE project, which aims at building tsunami resilient societies in Europe, is dedicated to organize questionnaire surveys among the populations of the several ASTARTE test-sites. Although the questionnaire is comprised by more than 50 questions, the central concept is to better understand what people know about tsunamis and if they are ready to cope with risks associated with future tsunami occurrences. In Heraklion the survey was conducted during tourism peak season of July 2014, thus questionnaires were collected by both local people and tourists, thus representing a variety of countries. We attempted to keep balance between males and females, while the age ranged from 15 to 65. Totally, 113 persons were interviewed of which 62 were females and 51 males. From the point of view of origin, 58 out of 113 were local people and residents, 22 were Greek tourists and 29 foreign tourists. Generally, the questionnaire consists of four parts. In the first, people were asked about their relation with the area of Heraklion. In the second part, the questions considered the knowledge that people have on tsunamis as a natural, hazardous phenomenon. More precisely, people were asked questions such as what a

  17. DIGITAL Q METER

    DOEpatents

    Briscoe, W.L.

    1962-02-13

    A digital Q meter is described for measuring the Q of mechanical or electrical devices. The meter comprises in combination a transducer coupled to an input amplifier, and an upper and lower level discriminator coupled to the amplifier and having their outputs coupled to an anticoincidence gate. The output of the gate is connected to a scaler. The lower level discriminator is adjusted to a threshold level of 36.8 percent of the operating threshold level of the upper level discriminator. (AEC)

  18. Test description and preliminary pitot-pressure surveys for Langley Test Technique Demonstrator at Mach 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Ashby, George C., Jr.; Monta, William J.

    1992-01-01

    A propulsion/airframe integration experiment conducted in the NASA Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Tunnel using a 16.8-in.-long version of the Langley Test Technique Demonstrator configuration with simulated scramjet propulsion is described. Schlieren and vapor screen visualization of the nozzle flow field is presented and correlated with pitot-pressure flow-field surveys. The data were obtained at nominal free-stream conditions of Re = 2.8 x 10 exp 6 and a nominal engine total pressure of 100 psia. It is concluded that pitot-pressure surveys coupled to schlieren and vapor-screen photographs, and oil flows have revealed flow features including vortices, free shear layers, and shock waves occurring in the model flow field.

  19. A national quality assurance survey of Neisseria gonorrhoeae testing.

    PubMed

    Trembizki, Ella; Lahra, Monica; Stevens, Kerrie; Freeman, Kevin; Hogan, Tiffany; Hogg, Geoff; Lawrence, Andrew; Limnios, Athena; Pearson, Julie; Smith, Helen; Nissen, Michael; Sloots, Theo; Whiley, David

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to (1) conduct a national survey of Neisseria gonorrhoeae identification by National Neisseria Network (NNN) reference laboratories contributing data to the Australian Gonococcal Surveillance Programme and (2) determine the prevalence in Australia of strains of N. gonorrhoeae lacking gene sequences commonly targeted by in-house PCR assays for confirmation of gonococcal nucleic acid amplification tests. Gonococcal clinical isolates referred to NNN laboratories for the first half of 2012 were screened using in-house real-time PCR assays targeting multicopy opa, porA pseudogene and cppB genes. There were 2455 clinical gonococcal isolates received in the study period; 98.6 % (2420/2455) of isolates harboured all three gene targets, 0.12 % (3/2455) were porA-negative, 0.04 % (1/2455) opa-negative and 1.14 % (28/2455) cppB-negative by PCR. Notably, no isolates were simultaneously negative for two targets. However, three isolates failed to be amplified by all three PCR methods, one isolate of which was shown to be a commensal Neisseria strain by 16S rRNA sequencing. Using PCR as the reference standard the results showed that (1) identification of N. gonorrhoeae isolates by NNN laboratories was highly specific (99.96 %) and (2) strains of N. gonorrhoeae lacking gene sequences commonly targeted by in-house PCR assays are present but not widespread throughout Australia at this point in time.

  20. Arrival Metering Precision Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prevot, Thomas; Mercer, Joey; Homola, Jeffrey; Hunt, Sarah; Gomez, Ashley; Bienert, Nancy; Omar, Faisal; Kraut, Joshua; Brasil, Connie; Wu, Minghong, G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the background, method and results of the Arrival Metering Precision Study (AMPS) conducted in the Airspace Operations Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center in May 2014. The simulation study measured delivery accuracy, flight efficiency, controller workload, and acceptability of time-based metering operations to a meter fix at the terminal area boundary for different resolution levels of metering delay times displayed to the air traffic controllers and different levels of airspeed information made available to the Time-Based Flow Management (TBFM) system computing the delay. The results show that the resolution of the delay countdown timer (DCT) on the controllers display has a significant impact on the delivery accuracy at the meter fix. Using the 10 seconds rounded and 1 minute rounded DCT resolutions resulted in more accurate delivery than 1 minute truncated and were preferred by the controllers. Using the speeds the controllers entered into the fourth line of the data tag to update the delay computation in TBFM in high and low altitude sectors increased air traffic control efficiency and reduced fuel burn for arriving aircraft during time based metering.

  1. Preliminary test results of the joint FAA-USAF-NASA runway research program. Part 1: Traction measurements of several runways under wet and dry conditions with a Boeing 727, a diagonal-braked vehicle, and a mu-meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. B.; Yager, T. J.; Sleeper, R. K.; Merritt, L. R.

    1977-01-01

    The stopping distance, brake application velocity, and time of brake application were measured for two modern jet transports, along with the NASA diagonal-braked vehicle and the British Mu-Meter on several runways, which when wetted, cover the range of slipperiness likely to be encountered in the United States. Tests were designed to determine if correlation between the aircraft and friction measuring vehicles exists. The test procedure, data reduction techniques, and preliminary test results obtained with the Boeing 727, the Douglas DC-9, and the ground vehicles are given. Time histories of the aircraft test run parameters are included.

  2. Laboratory Diagnostics Market in East Africa: A Survey of Test Types, Test Availability, and Test Prices in Kampala, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Lee F.; Elbireer, Ali; Jackson, J. Brooks; Amukele, Timothy K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diagnostic laboratory tests are routinely defined in terms of their sensitivity, specificity, and ease of use. But the actual clinical impact of a diagnostic test also depends on its availability and price. This is especially true in resource-limited settings such as sub-Saharan Africa. We present a first-of-its-kind report of diagnostic test types, availability, and prices in Kampala, Uganda. Methods Test types (identity) and availability were based on menus and volumes obtained from clinical laboratories in late 2011 in Kampala using a standard questionnaire. As a measure of test availability, we used the Availability Index (AI). AI is the combined daily testing volumes of laboratories offering a given test, divided by the combined daily testing volumes of all laboratories in Kampala. Test prices were based on a sampling of prices collected in person and via telephone surveys in 2015. Findings Test volumes and menus were obtained for 95% (907/954) of laboratories in Kampala city. These 907 laboratories offered 100 different test types. The ten most commonly offered tests in decreasing order were Malaria, HCG, HIV serology, Syphilis, Typhoid, Urinalysis, Brucellosis, Stool Analysis, Glucose, and ABO/Rh. In terms of AI, the 100 tests clustered into three groups: high (12 tests), moderate (33 tests), and minimal (55 tests) availability. 50% and 36% of overall availability was provided through private and public laboratories, respectively. Point-of-care laboratories contributed 35% to the AI of high availability tests, but only 6% to the AI of the other tests. The mean price of the most commonly offered test types was $2.62 (range $1.83–$3.46). Interpretation One hundred different laboratory test types were in use in Kampala in late 2011. Both public and private laboratories were critical to test availability. The tests offered in point-of-care laboratories tended to be the most available tests. Prices of the most common tests ranged from $1

  3. Diagnosis of cystic fibrosis with chloride meter (Sherwood M926S chloride analyzer®) and sweat test analysis system (CFΔ collection system®) compared to the Gibson Cooke method.

    PubMed

    Emiralioğlu, Nagehan; Özçelik, Uğur; Yalçın, Ebru; Doğru, Deniz; Kiper, Nural

    2016-01-01

    Sweat test with Gibson Cooke (GC) method is the diagnostic gold standard for cystic fibrosis (CF). Recently, alternative methods have been introduced to simplify both the collection and analysis of sweat samples. Our aim was to compare sweat chloride values obtained by GC method with other sweat test methods in patients diagnosed with CF and whose CF diagnosis had been ruled out. We wanted to determine if the other sweat test methods could reliably identify patients with CF and differentiate them from healthy subjects. Chloride concentration was measured with GC method, chloride meter and sweat test analysis system; also conductivity was determined with sweat test analysis system. Forty eight patients with CF and 82 patients without CF underwent the sweat test, showing median sweat chloride values 98.9 mEq/L with GC method, 101 mmol/L with chloride meter, 87.8 mmol/L with sweat test analysis system. In non-CF group, median sweat chloride values were 16.8 mEq/L with GC method, 10.5 mmol/L with chloride meter, and 15.6 mmol/L with sweat test analysis system. Median conductivity value was 107.3 mmol/L in CF group and 32.1 mmol/L in non CF group. There was a strong positive correlation between GC method and the other sweat test methods with a statistical significance (r=0.85) in all subjects. Sweat chloride concentration and conductivity by other sweat test methods highly correlate with the GC method. We think that the other sweat test equipments can be used as reliably as the classic GC method to diagnose or exclude CF.

  4. Optimization of spectroscopic surveys for testing non-Gaussianity

    SciTech Connect

    Raccanelli, Alvise; Doré, Olivier; Dalal, Neal E-mail: Olivier.P.Dore@jpl.nasa.gov

    2015-08-01

    We investigate optimization strategies to measure primordial non-Gaussianity with future spectroscopic surveys. We forecast measurements coming from the 3D galaxy power spectrum and compute constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity parameters f{sub NL} and n{sub NG}. After studying the dependence on those parameters upon survey specifications such as redshift range, area, number density, we assume a reference mock survey and investigate the trade-off between number density and area surveyed. We then define the observational requirements to reach the detection of f{sub NL} of order 1. Our results show that power spectrum constraints on non-Gaussianity from future spectroscopic surveys can improve on current CMB limits, but the multi-tracer technique and higher order correlations will be needed in order to reach an even better precision in the measurements of the non-Gaussianity parameter f{sub NL}.

  5. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225 Intake-air flow meter. (a) Application. You may use an intake-air flow meter in combination with a chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter....

  6. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225 Intake-air flow meter. (a) Application. You may use an intake-air flow meter in combination with a chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter....

  7. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225 Intake-air flow meter. (a) Application. You may use an intake-air flow meter in combination with a chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter....

  8. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225 Intake-air flow meter. (a) Application. You may use an intake-air flow meter in combination with a chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter....

  9. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225 Intake-air flow meter. (a) Application. You may use an intake-air flow meter in combination with a chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter....

  10. 20 Meter Solar Sail Analysis and Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taleghani, B. K.; Lively, P. S.; Banik, J.; Murphy, D. M.; Trautt, T. A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes finite element analyses and correlation studies to predict deformations and vibration modes/frequencies of a 20-meter solar sail system developed by ATK Space Systems. Under the programmatic leadership of NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's In-Space Propulsion activity, the 20-meter solar sail program objectives were to verify the design, to assess structural responses of the sail system, to implement lessons learned from a previous 10-meter quadrant system analysis and test program, and to mature solar sail technology to a technology readiness level (TRL) of 5. For this 20 meter sail system, static and ground vibration tests were conducted in NASA Glenn Research Center's 100 meter diameter vacuum chamber at Plum Brook station. Prior to testing, a preliminary analysis was performed to evaluate test conditions and to determine sensor and actuator locations. After testing was completed, an analysis of each test configuration was performed. Post-test model refinements included updated properties to account for the mass of sensors, wiring, and other components used for testing. This paper describes the development of finite element models (FEM) for sail membranes and masts in each of four quadrants at both the component and system levels, as well as an optimization procedure for the static test/analyses correlation.

  11. Counting Uninsurance and Means-Tested Coverage in the American Community Survey: A Comparison to the Current Population Survey

    PubMed Central

    Boudreaux, Michel; Ziegenfuss, Jeanette Y; Graven, Peter; Davern, Michael; Blewett, Lynn A

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare health insurance coverage estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS) to the Current Population Survey (CPS-ASEC). Data Sources/Study Setting The 2008 ACS and CPS-ASEC, 2009. Study Design We compare age-specific national rates for all coverage types and state-level rates of uninsurance and means-tested coverage. We assess differences using t-tests and p-values, which are reported at <.05, <.01, and <.001. An F-test determines whether differences significantly varied by state. Principal Findings Despite substantial design differences, we find only modest differences in coverage estimates between the surveys. National direct purchase and state-level means-tested coverage levels for children show the largest differences. Conclusions We suggest that the ACS is well poised to become a useful tool to health services researchers and policy analysts, but that further study is needed to identify sources of error and to quantify its bias. PMID:21029089

  12. The Holloman Test Track Impact Area Archeological Survey

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-25

    John Hays (historic artifact expert), Kurt Menke (auger meistef), and Randy Harper, not only worked hard and well, but provided good humor and delicious...Knee- Track Survey Area (Chapter 3), a detailed description of bone, John Hays, Kurt Menke, and Randy Harper. Dr. the survey and laboratory methods...Bedrock nxrar Bin~ist Cairn Garden plot Well Structural Features Dquession Feld hous House extant Ws2ae roomjaca Isolat room/masonry Pidiouse Pithouse

  13. Neutron dose equivalent meter

    DOEpatents

    Olsher, Richard H.; Hsu, Hsiao-Hua; Casson, William H.; Vasilik, Dennis G.; Kleck, Jeffrey H.; Beverding, Anthony

    1996-01-01

    A neutron dose equivalent detector for measuring neutron dose capable of accurately responding to neutron energies according to published fluence to dose curves. The neutron dose equivalent meter has an inner sphere of polyethylene, with a middle shell overlying the inner sphere, the middle shell comprising RTV.RTM. silicone (organosiloxane) loaded with boron. An outer shell overlies the middle shell and comprises polyethylene loaded with tungsten. The neutron dose equivalent meter defines a channel through the outer shell, the middle shell, and the inner sphere for accepting a neutron counter tube. The outer shell is loaded with tungsten to provide neutron generation, increasing the neutron dose equivalent meter's response sensitivity above 8 MeV.

  14. Hydrogen meter for service in liquid sodium

    SciTech Connect

    McCown, J J

    1983-11-01

    This standard establishes the requirements for the design, materials, fabrication, quality assurance, examination, and acceptance testing of a hydrogen meter and auxiliary equipment for use in radioactive or nonradioactive liquid sodium service. The meter shall provide a continuous and accurate indication of the hydrogen impurity concentration over the range 0.03 to 10 ppM hydrogen in sodium at temperatures between 800 and 1000/sup 0/F (427 and 538/sup 0/C). The meter may also be used to rapidly monitor changes in hydrogen concentration, over the same concentration range, and, therefore can be used as a sensor for sodium-water reactions in LMFBR steam generators.

  15. Effects of simulated ice on the performance of price type-AA current meter rotors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, Janice M.

    1994-01-01

    Slush ice readily adheres to the standard metal rotor of the winter Price type-AA current meter and affects the ability of the meter to measure the flow velocity accurately. Tests conducted at the U.S. Geological Survey Hydraulics Laboratory at Stennis Space Center, Mississippi, attempt to quantify the effects of slush ice on the performance of standard Price type-AA meter metal rotors. Test data obtained for rotors filled with simulated slush are compared with data for solid-cup polymer and standard hollow-cup metal rotors. Partial filling of the cups only marginally affects rotor performance at velocities greater than 15.24 centimeters per second. However, when cups are filled or over-filled with simulated slush, rotor performance is noticeably affected. Errors associated with slush over-filling and filling of cups are also significant when flows are angled vertically.

  16. Too Few High-Risk Women Tested for Breast Cancer Gene: Survey

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Too Few High-Risk Women Tested for Breast Cancer Gene: Survey Only half got BRCA screen, and ... News) -- Though testing for two genes that raise breast cancer risk has been around for decades, a new ...

  17. Volcan de Colima, Mexico Deformation Analysys of Recent Dome Extrusion 2009-2014 Using Tilt Meter Surveys Confronted with Deformations Registered during Period 1998-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Ruiz, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    Volcán de Colima, Mexico is considered one of the most active Volcano in Mexico and it is located between the states of Colima and Jalisco in the Central West part of the Country. During the period of 2009-2014 occurred one extrusion inside the dome that was growth in 2007 originating deformations that will be analysed and compared with deformations measured before during the period of 1998-2007. Four dome extrusions have occurred during the recent activity stage from 1998-2014. During period of domes growth we show deformation of the Volcano edifice with sequences of inflation- deflation registered with a Tiltmeter net composed of 5 sensors deployed around the edifice. Measurements of deformation tilt changes during the period 2004-2014 at Volcán de Colima were characterized by a sequence of effusive-explosive episodes. These sequences occurred on October 2004, February 2007 and January 2014 were registered by sequences of inflation-deflation principally. The tiltmeter net used in this study is composed of 5 sensors installed around the volcano edifice at altitudes of 3060 masl (COIA), 3200 masl (PCJ1), 2590 masl (PC02), 2200 masl (EHJ1) and 2070 masl (PC01). The activity of Volcán de Colima during this period 1998-2014 can be summarized by the occurrence of four lava domes formed in November 1998, October 2004, February 2007, and January 2014. During this activity phase explosive sequences occurred in years 2005, 2012 and 2014. After the extrusion on February 2007 a deflation phase is registered with the tilt sensors until 2012 which explain the low activity that characterize the behavior of the volcano during these periods of time. Here we show the analysis of the activity during the 2009-2014 and compare the deformations surveys during these period with the occurred during the complete recent period of activity 1998-2014. This comparison is important to forecast the developing of the activity and help to prevent the volcanic Risk of the Population located

  18. 36 CFR 9.42 - Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys. 9.42 Section 9.42 Parks, Forests, and Public Property... Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys. Any technical data...

  19. 36 CFR 9.42 - Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys. 9.42 Section 9.42 Parks, Forests, and Public Property... Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys. Any technical data...

  20. 36 CFR 9.42 - Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys. 9.42 Section 9.42 Parks, Forests, and Public Property... Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys. Any technical data...

  1. 36 CFR 9.42 - Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys. 9.42 Section 9.42 Parks, Forests, and Public Property... Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys. Any technical data...

  2. 36 CFR 9.42 - Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys. 9.42 Section 9.42 Parks, Forests, and Public Property... Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys. Any technical data...

  3. The ethics of feedback of HIV test results in population-based surveys of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Maher, Dermot

    2013-12-01

    Population-based disease prevalence surveys raise ethical questions, including whether participants should be routinely told their test results. Ethical guidelines call for informing survey participants of any clinically relevant finding to enable appropriate management. However, in anonymous surveys of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, participants can "opt out" of being given their test results or are offered the chance to undergo voluntary HIV testing in local counselling and testing services. This is aimed at minimizing survey participation bias. Those who opt out of being given their HIV test results and who do not seek their results miss the opportunity to receive life-saving antiretroviral therapy. The justification for HIV surveys without routine feedback of results to participants is based on a public health utility argument: that the benefits of more rigorous survey methods - reduced participation bias - outweigh the benefits to individuals of knowing their HIV status. However, people with HIV infection have a strong immediate interest in knowing their HIV status. In consideration of the ethical value of showing respect for people and thereby alleviating suffering, an argument based on public health utility is not an appropriate justification. In anonymous HIV surveys as well as other prevalence surveys of treatable conditions in any setting, participation should be on the basis of routine individual feedback of results as an integral part of fully informed participation. Ensuring that surveys are ethically sound may stimulate participation, increase a broader uptake of HIV testing and reduce stigmatization of people who are HIV-positive.

  4. Elbow mass flow meter

    DOEpatents

    McFarland, Andrew R.; Rodgers, John C.; Ortiz, Carlos A.; Nelson, David C.

    1994-01-01

    Elbow mass flow meter. The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity.

  5. Testing sky brightness models against radial dependency: A dense two dimensional survey around the city of Madrid, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamorano, J.; Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Ocaña, F.; Pila-Díez, B.; Gómez Castaño, J.; Pascual, S.; Tapia, C.; Gallego, J.; Fernández, A.; Nievas, M.

    2016-09-01

    We present a study of the night sky brightness around the extended metropolitan area of Madrid using Sky Quality Meter (SQM) photometers. The map is the first to cover the spatial distribution of the sky brightness in the centre of the Iberian peninsula. These surveys are necessary to test the light pollution models that predict night sky brightness as a function of the location and brightness of the sources of light pollution and the scattering of light in the atmosphere. We describe the data-retrieval methodology, which includes an automated procedure to measure from a moving vehicle in order to speed up the data collection, providing a denser and wider survey than previous works with similar time frames. We compare the night sky brightness map to the nocturnal radiance measured from space by the DMSP satellite. We find that (i) a single source model is not enough to explain the radial evolution of the night sky brightness, despite the predominance of Madrid in size and population and (ii) that the orography of the region should be taken into account when deriving geo-specific models from general first-principles models. We show the tight relationship between these two luminance measures. This finding sets up an alternative roadmap to extended studies over the globe that will not require the local deployment of photometers or trained personnel.

  6. Joint NRC/EPA Sewage Sludge Radiological Survey: Survey Design & Test Site Results

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report contains the results of a radiological survey of nine publicly POTWs around the country, which was commissioned by the Sewage Sludge Subcommittee, to determine whether and to what extent radionuclides concentrate in sewage treatment wastes.

  7. Projective Test Use among School Psychologists: A Survey and Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hojnoski, Robin L.; Morrison, Rhonda; Brown, Melissa; Matthews, William J.

    2006-01-01

    The use of projective techniques by school psychologists has been a point of interest and debate, with a number of survey studies documenting usage. The purpose of this study is to update the status of projective use among school psychologists, with a specific focus on their use in the social emotional assessment of children in schools. In…

  8. Survey of hazardous materials used in nuclear testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, E.A.; Fabryka-Martin, J.

    1991-02-01

    The use of hazardous'' materials in routine underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site has been reviewed. In addition the inventory of test yields, originally reported in 1976 has been updated. A trail down-hole inventory'' has been conducted for a selected test. The inorganic hazardous materials introduced during testing (with the exception of lead and the fissionable materials) produce an incremental change in the quantity of such materials already present in the geologic media surrounding the test points. 1 ref., 3 tabs.

  9. Digital Receiver Phase Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcin, Martin; Abramovici, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The software of a commercially available digital radio receiver has been modified to make the receiver function as a two-channel low-noise phase meter. This phase meter is a prototype in the continuing development of a phase meter for a system in which radiofrequency (RF) signals in the two channels would be outputs of a spaceborne heterodyne laser interferometer for detecting gravitational waves. The frequencies of the signals could include a common Doppler-shift component of as much as 15 MHz. The phase meter is required to measure the relative phases of the signals in the two channels at a sampling rate of 10 Hz at a root power spectral density <5 microcycle/(Hz)1/2 and to be capable of determining the power spectral density of the phase difference over the frequency range from 1 mHz to 1 Hz. Such a phase meter could also be used on Earth to perform similar measurements in laser metrology of moving bodies. To illustrate part of the principle of operation of the phase meter, the figure includes a simplified block diagram of a basic singlechannel digital receiver. The input RF signal is first fed to the input terminal of an analog-to-digital converter (ADC). To prevent aliasing errors in the ADC, the sampling rate must be at least twice the input signal frequency. The sampling rate of the ADC is governed by a sampling clock, which also drives a digital local oscillator (DLO), which is a direct digital frequency synthesizer. The DLO produces samples of sine and cosine signals at a programmed tuning frequency. The sine and cosine samples are mixed with (that is, multiplied by) the samples from the ADC, then low-pass filtered to obtain in-phase (I) and quadrature (Q) signal components. A digital signal processor (DSP) computes the ratio between the Q and I components, computes the phase of the RF signal (relative to that of the DLO signal) as the arctangent of this ratio, and then averages successive such phase values over a time interval specified by the user.

  10. Concepts, tools, and strategies for effluent testing: An international survey

    EPA Science Inventory

    Whole effluent testing (also called Direct Toxicity Assessment) remains a critical long-term assessment tool for aquatic environmental protection. Use of animal alternative approaches for wastewater testing is expected to increase as more regulatory authorities routinely require ...

  11. EMMNet: sensor networking for electricity meter monitoring.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhi-Ting; Zheng, Jie; Ji, Yu-Sheng; Zhao, Bao-Hua; Qu, Yu-Gui; Huang, Xu-Dong; Jiang, Xiu-Fang

    2010-01-01

    Smart sensors are emerging as a promising technology for a large number of application domains. This paper presents a collection of requirements and guidelines that serve as a basis for a general smart sensor architecture to monitor electricity meters. It also presents an electricity meter monitoring network, named EMMNet, comprised of data collectors, data concentrators, hand-held devices, a centralized server, and clients. EMMNet provides long-distance communication capabilities, which make it suitable suitable for complex urban environments. In addition, the operational cost of EMMNet is low, compared with other existing remote meter monitoring systems based on GPRS. A new dynamic tree protocol based on the application requirements which can significantly improve the reliability of the network is also proposed. We are currently conducting tests on five networks and investigating network problems for further improvements. Evaluation results indicate that EMMNet enhances the efficiency and accuracy in the reading, recording, and calibration of electricity meters.

  12. EMMNet: Sensor Networking for Electricity Meter Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhi-Ting; Zheng, Jie; Ji, Yu-Sheng; Zhao, Bao-Hua; Qu, Yu-Gui; Huang, Xu-Dong; Jiang, Xiu-Fang

    2010-01-01

    Smart sensors are emerging as a promising technology for a large number of application domains. This paper presents a collection of requirements and guidelines that serve as a basis for a general smart sensor architecture to monitor electricity meters. It also presents an electricity meter monitoring network, named EMMNet, comprised of data collectors, data concentrators, hand-held devices, a centralized server, and clients. EMMNet provides long-distance communication capabilities, which make it suitable suitable for complex urban environments. In addition, the operational cost of EMMNet is low, compared with other existing remote meter monitoring systems based on GPRS. A new dynamic tree protocol based on the application requirements which can significantly improve the reliability of the network is also proposed. We are currently conducting tests on five networks and investigating network problems for further improvements. Evaluation results indicate that EMMNet enhances the efficiency and accuracy in the reading, recording, and calibration of electricity meters. PMID:22163551

  13. Archaeological Survey and Testing at Perry Lake, Jefferson County, Kansas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    affiliation, inferred site function , significance and National Register recommendation for sites located in the Perry Lake Survey...Executive Order 11593 "Protection and Enhancement of the Cultural Environment" dated 13 May 1971 , and Section 110 of the National Historic...the late spring and early summer usually converge with warm, moist maritime tropical (mT) air that is flowing north from the Gulf of Mexico. The

  14. Power Cycle Testing of Power Switches: A Literature Survey

    DOE PAGES

    GopiReddy, Lakshmi Reddy; Tolbert, Leon M.; Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-09-18

    Reliability of power converters and lifetime prediction has been a major topic of research in the last few decades, especially for traction applications. The main failures in high power semiconductors are caused by thermomechanical fatigue. Power cycling and temperature cycling are the two most common thermal acceleration tests used in assessing reliability. The objective of this paper is to study the various power cycling tests found in the literature and to develop generalized steps in planning application specific power cycling tests. A comparison of different tests based on the failures, duration, test circuits, and monitored electrical parameters is presented.

  15. Tip aerodynamics and acoustics test: A report and data survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Jeffrey L.; Watts, Michael E.

    1988-01-01

    In a continuing effort to understand helicopter rotor tip aerodynamics and acoustics, a flight test was conducted by NASA Ames Research Center. The test was performed using the NASA White Cobra and a set of highly instrumented blades. All aspects of the flight test instrumentation and test procedures are explained. Additionally, complete data sets for selected test points are presented and analyzed. Because of the high volume of data acquired, only selected data points are presented. However, access to the entire data set is available to the researcher on request.

  16. Simple Schlieren Light Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, David B.; Franke, John M.; Jones, Stephen B.; Leighty, Bradley D.

    1992-01-01

    Simple light-meter circuit used to position knife edge of schlieren optical system to block exactly half light. Enables operator to check quickly position of knife edge between tunnel runs to ascertain whether or not in alignment. Permanent measuring system made part of each schlieren system. If placed in unused area of image plane, or in monitoring beam from mirror knife edge, provides real-time assessment of alignment of schlieren system.

  17. Ride quality meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leatherwood, J. D.; Dempsey, T. K.; Clevenson, S. A.; Stephens, D. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A ride quality meter is disclosed that automatically transforms vibration and noise measurements into a single number index of passenger discomfort. The noise measurements are converted into a noise discomfort value. The vibrations are converted into single axis discomfort values which are then converted into a combined axis discomfort value. The combined axis discomfort value is corrected for time duration and then summed with the noise discomfort value to obtain a total discomfort value.

  18. Hand-Strength Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Elliot, Joe

    1987-01-01

    Special grip-strength meter designed for accurate, reproducible measurement of hand rehabilitation. Four strain gauges connected in Wheatstone bridge to measure deflection caused by gripping hand. Compressive force exerted by hand transmitted to measuring beams. Beams therefore deflected or strained, and mechanical strain sensed by strain gauges and converted into electrical signal. After amplification and conditioning, signal displayed on LED as measure of gripping strength of hand.

  19. Period meter for reactors

    DOEpatents

    Rusch, Gordon K.

    1976-01-06

    An improved log N amplifier type nuclear reactor period meter with reduced probability for noise-induced scrams is provided. With the reactor at low power levels a sampling circuit is provided to determine the reactor period by measuring the finite change in the amplitude of the log N amplifier output signal for a predetermined time period, while at high power levels, differentiation of the log N amplifier output signal provides an additional measure of the reactor period.

  20. The swift UVOT stars survey. I. Methods and test clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, Michael H.; Porterfield, Blair L.; Linevsky, Jacquelyn S.; Bond, Howard E.; Hoversten, Erik A.; Berrier, Joshua L.; Gronwall, Caryl A.; Holland, Stephen T.; Breeveld, Alice A.; Brown, Peter J. E-mail: blp14@psu.edu E-mail: caryl@astro.psu.edu E-mail: aab@mssl.ucl.ac.uk

    2014-12-01

    We describe the motivations and background of a large survey of nearby stellar populations using the Ultraviolet Optical Telescope (UVOT) on board the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission. UVOT, with its wide field, near-UV sensitivity, and 2.″3 spatial resolution, is uniquely suited to studying nearby stellar populations and providing insight into the near-UV properties of hot stars and the contribution of those stars to the integrated light of more distant stellar populations. We review the state of UV stellar photometry, outline the survey, and address problems specific to wide- and crowded-field UVOT photometry. We present color–magnitude diagrams of the nearby open clusters M67, NGC 188, and NGC 2539, and the globular cluster M79. We demonstrate that UVOT can easily discern the young- and intermediate-age main sequences, blue stragglers, and hot white dwarfs, producing results consistent with previous studies. We also find that it characterizes the blue horizontal branch of M79 and easily identifies a known post-asymptotic giant branch star.

  1. Infrared Testing of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Telescope Grism Using Computer Generated Holograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominguez, Margaret Z.; Content, David A.; Gong, Qian; Griesmann, Ulf; Hagopian, John G.; Marx, Catherine T; Whipple, Arthur L.

    2017-01-01

    Infrared Computer Generated Holograms (CGHs) were designed, manufactured and used to measure the performance of the grism (grating prism) prototype which includes testing Diffractive Optical Elements (DOE). The grism in the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) will allow the surveying of a large section of the sky to find bright galaxies.

  2. Testing the Factor Structure of the Family Quality of Life Survey--2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaacs, B.; Wang, M.; Samuel, P.; Ajuwon, P.; Baum, N.; Edwards, M.; Rillotta, F.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although the Family Quality of Life Survey--2006 (FQOLS-2006) is being used in research, there is little evidence to support its hypothesised domain structure. The purpose of this study was to test the domain structure of the survey using confirmatory factor analysis. Method: Samples from Australia, Canada, Nigeria and the USA were…

  3. Survey and Experimental Testing of Nongravimetric Mass Measurement Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakey, W. E.; Lorenz, R.

    1977-01-01

    Documentation presented describes the design, testing, and evaluation of an accelerated gravimetric balance, a low mass air bearing oscillator of the spring-mass type, and a centrifugal device for liquid mass measurement. A direct mass readout method was developed to replace the oscillation period readout method which required manual calculations to determine mass. A protoype 25 gram capacity micro mass measurement device was developed and tested.

  4. ET LOX modal survey analysis and test assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomas, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The results are presented of the analysis and modal test of the liquid oxygen tank and intertank of the space shuttle external tank. The analytical models, test article, and support hardware are described. Frequency and damping are compared on a mode-by-mode basis. The data assessment clearly confirms the validity of the analytical model and establishes a high level of confidence that the methodology will accurately predict modal characteristics of flight configurations.

  5. Acoustic velocity meter systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius

    1985-01-01

    Acoustic velocity meter (AVM) systems operate on the principles that the point-to-point upstream traveltime of an acoustic pulse is longer than the downstream traveltime and that this difference in traveltime can be accurately measured by electronic devices. An AVM system is capable of recording water velocity (and discharge) under a wide range of conditions, but some constraints apply: 1. Accuracy is reduced and performance is degraded if the acoustic path is not a continuous straight line. The path can be bent by reflection if it is too close to a stream boundary or by refraction if it passes through density gradients resulting from variations in either water temperature or salinity. For paths of less than 100 m, a temperature gradient of 0.1' per meter causes signal bending less than 0.6 meter at midchannel, and satisfactory velocity results can be obtained. Reflection from stream boundaries can cause signal cancellation if boundaries are too close to signal path. 2. Signal strength is attenuated by particles or bubbles that absorb, spread, or scatter sound. The concentration of particles or bubbles that can be tolerated is a function of the path length and frequency of the acoustic signal. 3. Changes in streamline orientation can affect system accuracy if the variability is random. 4. Errors relating to signal resolution are much larger for a single threshold detection scheme than for multiple threshold schemes. This report provides methods for computing the effect of various conditions on the accuracy of a record obtained from an AVM. The equipment must be adapted to the site. Field reconnaissance and preinstallation analysis to detect possible problems are critical for proper installation and operation of an AVM system.

  6. Portable wastewater flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, Robert M.

    1999-02-02

    A portable wastewater flow meter particularly adapted for temporary use at a single location in measuring the rate of liquid flow in a circular entrance conduit of a sewer manhole both under free flow and submerged, open channel conditions and under fill pipe, surcharged conditions, comprising an apparatus having a cylindrical external surface and an inner surface that constricts the flow through the apparatus in such a manner that a relationship exists between (1) the difference between the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the entrance of the apparatus and the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the constriction, and (2) the rate of liquid flow through the apparatus.

  7. Portable wastewater flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    A portable wastewater flow meter particularly adapted for temporary use at a single location in measuring the rate of liquid flow in a circular entrance conduit of a sewer manhole both under free flow and submerged, open channel conditions and under full pipe, surcharged conditions, comprising an apparatus having a cylindrical external surface and an inner surface that constricts the flow through the apparatus in such a manner that a relationship exists between (1) the difference between the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the entrance of the apparatus and the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the constriction, and (2) the rate of liquid flow through the apparatus.

  8. Direct reading inductance meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolby, R. B. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A direct reading inductance meter comprised of a crystal oscillator and an LC tuned oscillator is presented. The oscillators function respectively to generate a reference frequency, f(r), and to generate an initial frequency, f(0), which when mixed produce a difference equal to zero. Upon connecting an inductor of small unknown value in the LC circuit to change its resonant frequency to f(x), a difference frequency (f(r)-f(x)) is produced that is very nearly a linear function of the inductance of the inductor. The difference frequency is measured and displayed on a linear scale in units of inductance.

  9. Technology matrix for pre-test survey organic emissions screening

    SciTech Connect

    Alburty, D.S.; Trenholm, A.R.

    1999-07-01

    Increased interest in pre-screening point sources for emissions of organic hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) prior to full-scale emissions testing has focused attention on the evaluation of several HAP measurement methodologies that provide data relatively quickly, and at low cost. Pre-screening is used to evaluate the need for full-scale testing, ensure that the appropriate methods are selected for the full-scale tests, and help determine whether there are safety concerns for the testing. MRI developed a matrix for comparing costs, practical time requirements, compounds that were identified, practical quantitation limits, and other concerns regarding six emissions screening technologies. The purpose of the matrix was to assist in evaluating the technologies with regard to the data objectives of proposed full-scale tests. Use of on-site GC/MS, on-site FTIR spectroscopy, SUMMA canisters followed by laboratory analysis, field GC/FID, VOST, and Draeger tubes are described, and the pros and cons of each are discussed.

  10. Turbine meters for liquid measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Wass, D.J.; Allen, C.R.

    1995-12-01

    Liquid turbine meters operate in response to fundamental engineering principles, Operation with a single moving part produces excellent longevity and reliability. Liquid turbine meters display wide rangeability, high accuracy, excellent repeatability, low pressure drop and moderate cost. Liquid turbine meters may be applied to many different fluids with different physical properties and corrosive tendencies. The marriage of liquid turbine meters to electronic instruments allows instantaneous flow calculations and produces the flexibility to display data, store data, transmit data in the most convenient form. Liquid turbine meters should be the first flow measurement instrument considered for liquid measurement applications.

  11. Survey of electrical submersible systems design, application, and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, M.O.; Lea, J.F.

    1996-05-01

    The electrical submersible pump industry has numerous recommended practices and procedures addressing various facets of the operation. Ascertaining the appropriate technique is tedious. Seldom are all the documents available at one location. This synopsis of all the industry practices provides a ready reference for testing, design, and application of electrical submersible pumping systems. An extensive bibliography identifies significant documents for further reference.

  12. Plant chlorophyll content meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiering, Bruce A. (Inventor); Carter, Gregory A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A plant chlorophyll content meter is described which collects light reflected from a target plant and separates the collected light into two different wavelength bands. These wavelength bands, or channels, are described as having center wavelengths of 700 nm and 840 nm. The light collected in these two channels are processed using photo detectors and amplifiers. An analog to digital converter is described which provides a digital representation of the level of light collected by the lens and falling within the two channels. A controller provided in the meter device compares the level of light reflected from a target plant with a level of light detected from a light source, such as light reflected by a target having 100% reflectance, or transmitted through a diffusion receptor. The percent of reflection in the two separate wavelength bands from a target plant are compared to provide a ratio which indicates a relative level of plant physiological stress. A method of compensating for electronic drift is described where a sample is taken when a collection lens is covered to prevent light from entering the device. This compensation method allows for a more accurate reading by reducing error contributions due to electronic drift from environmental conditions at the location where a hand-held unit is used.

  13. Advanced metering techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Szydlowski, R.F.

    1993-01-01

    The goal of the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is to facilitate energy-efficiency improvements at federal facilities. This is accomplished by a balanced program of technology development, facility assessment, and use of cost-sharing procurement mechanisms. Technology development focuses upon the tools and procedures used to identify and evaluate efficiency improvements. For facility assessment, FEMP provides metering equipment and trained analysts to federal agencies exhibiting a commitment to improve energy-use efficiency. To assist in implementing energy-efficiency measures, FEMP helps federal agencies with identifying efficiency opportunities and in implementing energy-efficiency and demand-side management programs at federal sites. As the lead laboratory for FEMP, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) provides technical assistance to federal agencies to better understand and characterize energy systems. The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked PNL to provide technical assistance to characterize and modernize energy systems at FORSCOM installations. As part of that technical assistance, PNL performed an in-depth examination of automatic meter-reading system technologies currently available. The operating characteristics and relative merits of all the major systems were reviewed in the context of applicability to federal installations. That review is documented in this report.

  14. 10 meter airborne observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditto, Thomas D.; Ritter, Joseph M.

    2008-07-01

    Inside an aircraft fuselage there is little room for the mass of all the instrumentation of a ground-based observatory much less a primary objective aperture at the scale of 10 meters. We have proposed a solution that uses a primary objective grating (POG) which matches the considerable length of the aircraft, approximately 10 meters, and conforms to aircraft aerodynamics. Light collected by the POG is diffracted at an angle of grazing exodus inside the aircraft where it is disambiguated by an optical train that fits within to the interior tunnel. Inside the aircraft, light is focused by a parabolic mirror onto a spectrograph slit. The design has a special benefit in that all objects in the field-of-view of the free spectral range of the POG can have their spectra taken as the aircraft changes orientation. We suggest flight planes that will improve integration times, angular resolution and spectral resolution to acquire targets of high stellar magnitudes or alternatively increase the number of sources acquired per flight at the cost of sensitivity.

  15. Use of Coriolis meters in gas applications

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, T.; Pawlas, G.

    1995-12-31

    Coriolis mass flowmeters provide a solution for measuring the mass flow rate of gases directly. Recent calibration data on compressed air shows that the factory water calibration is also valid on air. In addition, a Coriolis meter is fundamentally linear resulting in an accurate measurement over a wide flow range. Data are presented based on testing performed on Micro Motion 25 mm, 50 mm, and 75 mm Coriolis mass flowmeters on compressed air. Test pressures ranging between 1.7 bar (25 psia) and 100 bar (1450 psia) and mass flow rates ranging between 100:1 to 10:1, depending on the meter size. All calibration points fell with {plus_minus}2%, with a significant portion of the data within {plus_minus}5%. Data are also presented for a 6 mm meter on natural gas at 100 bar; all data are within {plus_minus}0.5%. Repeatability data are presented for a 9 mm meter calibrated on 100 bar air for calibration run times between 10 and 60 seconds. Meter repeatability improved approximately 10 times to {plus_minus}0.15% when the calibration time was 60 seconds.

  16. A study of multiple-shaker modal survey testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallauer, W. L., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The principal objective was to examine and to assess the practical value of a method of multiple-shaker sinusoidal modal vibration testing known as Asher's method. Numerical studies which simulate the application of Asher's method and a unique experimental implementation of the method were completed. Another objective of the research was to develop and to demonstrate with numerical simulation a quantitative method for determining from transfer function data the number of dominant modes of vibration in sinusoidal structural response.

  17. Archaeological Survey and Testing at Hunter Army Airfield, Savannah, Georgia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    Site of Marsh Island containing HAAF-6 ...... .... 55 0 19. Sketch Map of Test Pit Array at HAAF-5 ...... . . . 58 20. Surface of Shell Midden at HAAF...snails regularly occur in small num- " bers in shell middens , but they are generally interpreted as commensal detritus feeders. Only Euglandina rosea...desirability of the best settle- ment locations: abandoned gardens represented that much less clearing requitcM- of the newcomers and aboriginal middens

  18. A theoretical survey of QED tests in highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, H.; Salomonson, S.; Sunnergren, P.; Lindgren, I.; Gustavsson, M. G. H.

    1997-06-01

    Recent progress in precision tests of QED in strong nuclear fields is presented and discussed. The discussion is focused on theoretical comparisons with experiment on the 1s Lamb-shift in H-like uranium, the two-electron Lamb-shift in He-like ions, the hyperfine structure of H-like bismuth and the bound-electron g-factor in H-like ions.

  19. Environmental Baseline Survey Tonopah Test Range Utility Easement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-05

    State of Nevada have been regulated by the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order ( FFACO ). The TIREBSF 6-6-0S.doc 4 May 5, 2005 TON OPAH TEST...RANGE UTILITY EASEMENT FFACO was negotiated between DOEISSO, the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), and the u.s. Department of...Defense (DoD). According to the FFACO Use Restrictions Map for TTR, the proposed utility easement would not come in contact with or impact any ERP sites

  20. Comparison of a few recording current meters in San Francisco Bay, CA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, R.T.

    1978-01-01

    A team of research scientists in the U.S. Geological Survey uses San Francisco Bay, California, as an outdoor laboratory to study complicated interactions of physical, chemical, and biological processes which take place in an estuarine environment. A current meter comparison study was conceived because of the need to select a suitable current meter to meet field requirements for current measurements in the Bay. The study took place in south San Francisco Bay, California, in the spring of 1977. An instrument tower which was designed to support instruments free from the conventional mooring line motions was constructed and emplaced in south San Francisco Bay. During a period of two months, four types of recording current meters have been used in the tests. The four types were: (1) Aanderaa, (2) tethered shroud-impeller, (3) drag-inclinometer, and (4) electromagnetic current meters. With the exception of the electromagnetic current meter, one of each type was mounted on the instrument tower, and one of each type was deployed on moorings near the instrument tower. In addition, a wind anemometer and a recording tide gauge were also installed on the tower. This paper discusses the characteristics of each instrument and the accuracy that each instrument can provide when used in an estuarine environment. We pay special attention to our experiences in the field operation with respect to handling of the instruments and to our experiences working up the raw data in the post-deployment data analysis.

  1. Two laboratory methods for the calibration of GPS speed meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yin; Sun, Qiao; Du, Lei; Yu, Mei; Bai, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The set-ups of two calibration systems are presented to investigate calibration methods of GPS speed meters. The GPS speed meter calibrated is a special type of high accuracy speed meter for vehicles which uses Doppler demodulation of GPS signals to calculate the measured speed of a moving target. Three experiments are performed: including simulated calibration, field-test signal replay calibration, and in-field test comparison with an optical speed meter. The experiments are conducted at specific speeds in the range of 40-180 km h-1 with the same GPS speed meter as the device under calibration. The evaluation of measurement results validates both methods for calibrating GPS speed meters. The relative deviations between the measurement results of the GPS-based high accuracy speed meter and those of the optical speed meter are analyzed, and the equivalent uncertainty of the comparison is evaluated. The comparison results justify the utilization of GPS speed meters as reference equipment if no fewer than seven satellites are available. This study contributes to the widespread use of GPS-based high accuracy speed meters as legal reference equipment in traffic speed metrology.

  2. Hydroacoustic Current Meters for the Measurement of Discharge in Shallow Rivers and Streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morlock, S.E.; Fisher, G.T.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is evaluating the use of hydroacoustic current meters for making discharge measurements in shallow rivers and streams. The USGS historically has made discharge measurements in shallow rivers using mechanical, impellor-type current meters attached to a wading rod. The evaluation project has focused on three categories of hydroacoustic meters: an acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) called a Flowtracker3, an acoustic Doppler velocity profiler (BoogieDopp), and bottom-tracking acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs). The USGS role in this project includes providing USGS discharge-computation methods and algorithms to instrument manufacturers and evaluating instruments in the laboratory and field. An ADV (Flowtracker) designed for making discharge measurements in shallow rivers, has been tested in a USGS tow tank and was found to meet USGS calibration standards for mechanical, impellor-type current meters. The Flowtracker was field tested by USGS offices in five states; the tests were conducted by comparing discharge measurements made with the ADV to discharge measurements made with mechanical, impellor-type current meters. In general, the comparisons of Flowtracker performance to mechanical-meter results were favorable. An acoustic Doppler velocity profiler (BoogieDopp) is being evaluated for making discharge measurements in shallow rivers. The Boogiedopp will measure vertical velocity profiles at stationary positions across a channel, and the velocity profiles will be used to compute discharge. Discharge-computation software based on USGS methods and algorithms is under development for the acoustic Doppler velocity profiler. The USGS will evaluate bottom-tracking ADCPs from two manufacturers for making discharge measurements in shallow water. The bottom-tracking feature allows ADCPs to compute discharge from a moving platform as the platform moves across the channel.

  3. A survey of recent EBR-II passive safety testing

    SciTech Connect

    Planchon, H.P.; Golden, G.H.; Sackett, J.I.; Singer, R.M.; Mohr, D.; Chang, L.K.; Feldman, E.E.; Sevy, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    During the last two years, the testing program at EBR-II has investigated the capabilities of liquid metal reactors (LMRs) to perform vital safety functions passively. In particular the tests have examined post shutdown decay heat removal by natural circulation and passive shutdown of the reactor after accidents which lead to undercooling. The undercooling accidents have been divided into two categories - the loss of flow without scram (LOFWS) (a family of events involving a loss of forced flow through the reactor), and the loss of heat sink without scram (LOHSWS) (a family of events involving a loss of the ability to transfer reactor heat to down stream components which generate steam and electricity.) The type of ''passive shutdown'' that has been examined is caused by natural processes - principally thermal expansion of the reactor structures, fuel and coolant. As used in this paper the term excludes automatic control of power, operator intervention or negative reactivity generated by special in-core devices. 18 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Free-free and fixed base modal survey tests of the Space Station Common Module Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driskill, T. C.; Anderson, J. B.; Coleman, A. D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the testing aspects and the problems encountered during the free-free and fixed base modal surveys completed on the original Space Station Common Module Prototype (CMP). The CMP is a 40-ft long by 14.5-ft diameter 'waffle-grid' cylinder built by the Boeing Company and housed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) near Huntsville, AL. The CMP modal survey tests were conducted at MSFC by the Dynamics Test Branch. The free-free modal survey tests (June '90 to Sept. '90) included interface verification tests (IFVT), often referred to as impedance measurements, mass-additive testing and linearity studies. The fixed base modal survey tests (Feb. '91 to April '91), including linearity studies, were conducted in a fixture designed to constrain the CMP in 7 total degrees-of-freedom at five trunnion interfaces (two primary, two secondary, and the keel). The fixture also incorporated an airbag off-load system designed to alleviate the non-linear effects of friction in the primary and secondary trunnion interfaces. Numerous test configurations were performed with the objective of providing a modal data base for evaluating the various testing methodologies to verify dynamic finite element models used for input to coupled load analysis.

  5. Microwave fluid flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Billeter, Thomas R.; Philipp, Lee D.; Schemmel, Richard R.

    1976-01-01

    A microwave fluid flow meter is described utilizing two spaced microwave sensors positioned along a fluid flow path. Each sensor includes a microwave cavity having a frequency of resonance dependent upon the static pressure of the fluid at the sensor locations. The resonant response of each cavity with respect to a variation in pressure of the monitored fluid is represented by a corresponding electrical output which can be calibrated into a direct pressure reading. The pressure drop between sensor locations is then correlated as a measure of fluid velocity. In the preferred embodiment the individual sensor cavities are strategically positioned outside the path of fluid flow and are designed to resonate in two distinct frequency modes yielding a measure of temperature as well as pressure. The temperature response can then be used in correcting for pressure responses of the microwave cavity encountered due to temperature fluctuations.

  6. GAS METERING PUMP

    DOEpatents

    George, C.M.

    1957-12-31

    A liquid piston gas pump is described, capable of pumping minute amounts of gas in accurately measurable quantities. The pump consists of a flanged cylindrical regulating chamber and a mercury filled bellows. Sealed to the ABSTRACTS regulating chamber is a value and having a gas inlet and outlet, the inlet being connected by a helical channel to the bellows. A gravity check valve is in the gas outlet, so the gas passes through the inlet and the helical channel to the bellows where the pumping action as well as the metering is accomplished by the actuation of the mercury filled bellows. The gas then flows through the check valve and outlet to any associated apparatus.

  7. Modernization of the DFA Moisture Meter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Dried Fruit Association (DFA) Dried Fruit Moisture Tester has been the standard technique for determining moisture in dried fruit for more than 50 years. This method of testing moisture is recognized world wide and is AOAC approved. The meter applies the results of conductivity measurements and ...

  8. Low-speed tests of a high-aspect-ratio, supercritical-wing transport model equipped with a high-lift flap system in the Langley 4- by 7-meter and Ames 12-foot pressure tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, H. L., Jr.; Kjelgaard, S. O.

    1983-01-01

    The Ames 12-Foot Pressure Tunnel was used to determine the effects of Reynolds number on the static longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of an advanced, high-aspect-ratio, supercritical wing transport model equipped with a full span, leading edge slat and part span, double slotted, trailing edge flaps. The model had a wing span of 7.5 ft and was tested through a free stream Reynolds number range from 1.3 to 6.0 x 10 to 6th power per foot at a Mach number of 0.20. Prior to the Ames tests, an investigation was also conducted in the Langley 4 by 7 Meter Tunnel at a Reynolds number of 1.3 x 10 to 6th power per foot with the model mounted on an Ames strut support system and on the Langley sting support system to determine strut interference corrections. The data obtained from the Langley tests were also used to compare the aerodynamic charactertistics of the rather stiff, 7.5-ft-span steel wing model tested during this investigation and the larger, and rather flexible, 12-ft-span aluminum-wing model tested during a previous investigation. During the tests in both the Langley and Ames tunnels, the model was tested with six basic wing configurations: (1) cruise; (2) climb (slats only extended); (3) 15 deg take-off flaps; (4) 30 deg take-off flaps; (5) 45 deg landing flaps; and (6) 60 deg landing flaps.

  9. NAVEL BASE VENTURA COUNTY, PORT HUENEME, CALIFORNIA EPA CHARACTERIZATION TEST CELL REPORT ON ELECTROMAGNETIC SURVEYS IN THE TEST CELL AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the geophysical surveys at the EPA Characterization Test Cell (CTC) area (Site) at Naval Base Ventura County, Port Hueneme, California is to locate geophysical anomalies indicative of metallic objects within the area of the cell. The goal was to provide backgroun...

  10. Testing for independence in J×K contingency tables with complex sample survey data.

    PubMed

    Lipsitz, Stuart R; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M; Sinha, Debajyoti; Hevelone, Nathanael; Giovannucci, Edward; Hu, Jim C

    2015-09-01

    The test of independence of row and column variables in a (J×K) contingency table is a widely used statistical test in many areas of application. For complex survey samples, use of the standard Pearson chi-squared test is inappropriate due to correlation among units within the same cluster. Rao and Scott (1981, Journal of the American Statistical Association 76, 221-230) proposed an approach in which the standard Pearson chi-squared statistic is multiplied by a design effect to adjust for the complex survey design. Unfortunately, this test fails to exist when one of the observed cell counts equals zero. Even with the large samples typical of many complex surveys, zero cell counts can occur for rare events, small domains, or contingency tables with a large number of cells. Here, we propose Wald and score test statistics for independence based on weighted least squares estimating equations. In contrast to the Rao-Scott test statistic, the proposed Wald and score test statistics always exist. In simulations, the score test is found to perform best with respect to type I error. The proposed method is motivated by, and applied to, post surgical complications data from the United States' Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) complex survey of hospitals in 2008.

  11. The Diagnostic Reading Test, Survey Section, Form E: A Reliability Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellegrine, R. J.

    The Diagnostic Reading Tests were designed to assess the reading skills of college students enrolled in reading centers. To assess the reliability of the Diagnostic Reading Tests, Survey Section, Form E (DRTE), a study was conducted with university freshmen as subjects. The DRTE was administered to 31 students in an Educational Opportunity Program…

  12. Status of Net Metering: Assessing the Potential to Reach Program Caps

    SciTech Connect

    Heeter, J.; Gelman, R.; Bird, L.

    2014-09-01

    Several states are addressing the issue of net metering program caps, which limit the total amount of net metered generating capacity that can be installed in a state or utility service territory. In this analysis, we examine net metering caps to gain perspective on how long net metering will be available in various jurisdictions under current policies. We also surveyed state practices and experience to understand important policy design considerations.

  13. Status of Net Metering: Assessing the Potential to Reach Program Caps (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Heeter, J.; Bird, L.; Gelman, R.

    2014-10-01

    Several states are addressing the issue of net metering program caps, which limit the total amount of net metered generating capacity that can be installed in a state or utility service territory. In this analysis, we examine net metering caps to gain perspective on how long net metering will be available in various jurisdictions under current policies. We also surveyed state practices and experience to understand important policy design considerations.

  14. Testing of a one-bladed 30-meter-diameter rotor on the DOE/NASA Mod-O wind turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ensworth, C. B. F., III; Corrigan, R. D.; Berkowitz, B. M.

    1988-01-01

    Tests were conducted on the DOE/NASA Mod-O 200-kW horizontal-axis wind turbine in a one-bladed rotor configuration. The objectives of the test were to evaluate the performance, loads, and dynamic characteristics of a one-bladed rotor, and then to compare these parameters with those of an aerodynamically similar two-bladed rotor configuration. Test operations showed that this intermediate-size (15.2-m radius) one-bladed rotor configuration can be operated successfully. Test results show that the one-bladed rotor had cyclic blade loads comparable to those of a two-bladed rotor. A moderate power penalty equivalent to a reduction in windspeed of 1 m/sec occurred with the one-bladed rotor when operated at a rotor speed 50 percent higher than that of the two-bladed rotor.

  15. Guidance on the Use of Hand-Held Survey Meters for radiological Triage: Time-Dependent Detector Count Rates Corresponding to 50, 250, and 500 mSv Effective Dose for Adult Males and Adult Females

    SciTech Connect

    Bolch, W.E.; Hurtado, J.L.; Lee, C.; Manger, Ryan P; Hertel, Nolan; Burgett, E.; Dickerson, W.

    2012-01-01

    In June 2006, the Radiation Studies Branch of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention held a workshop to explore rapid methods of facilitating radiological triage of large numbers of potentially contaminated individuals following detonation of a radiological dispersal device. Two options were discussed. The first was the use of traditional gamma cameras in nuclear medicine departments operated as makeshift wholebody counters. Guidance on this approach is currently available from the CDC. This approach would be feasible if a manageable number of individuals were involved, transportation to the relevant hospitals was quickly provided, and the medical staff at each facility had been previously trained in this non-traditional use of their radiopharmaceutical imaging devices. If, however, substantially larger numbers of individuals (100 s to 1,000 s) needed radiological screening, other options must be given to first responders, first receivers, and health physicists providing medical management. In this study, the second option of the workshop was investigated by the use of commercially available portable survey meters (either NaI or GM based) for assessing potential ranges of effective dose (G50, 50Y250, 250Y500, and 9500 mSv). Two hybrid computational phantoms were used to model an adult male and an adult female subject internally contaminated with 241Am, 60Cs, 137Cs, 131I, or 192Ir following an acute inhalation or ingestion intake. As a function of time following the exposure, the net count rates corresponding to committed effective doses of 50, 250, and 500 mSv were estimated via Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation for each of four different detector types, positions, and screening distances. Measured net count rates can be compared to these values, and an assignment of one of four possible effective dose ranges could be made. The method implicitly assumes that all external contamination has been removed prior to screening and that the measurements be

  16. Guidance on the Use of Hand-Held Survey Meters for Radiological Triage: Time-Dependent Detector Count Rates Corresponding to 50, 250, and 500 mSv Effective Dose for Adult Males and Adult Females

    PubMed Central

    Bolch, Wesley E.; Hurtado, Jorge L.; Lee, Choonsik; Manger, Ryan; Hertel, Nolan; Dickerson, William

    2013-01-01

    In June of 2006, the Radiation Studies Branch of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention held a workshop to explore rapid methods of facilitating radiological triage of large numbers of potentially contaminated individuals following detonation of a radiological dispersal device. Two options were discussed. The first was the use of traditional gamma-cameras in nuclear medicine departments operated as make-shift whole-body counters. Guidance on this approach is currently available from the CDC. This approach is feasible if a manageable number of individuals were involved, transportation to the relevant hospitals was quickly provided, and the medical staff at each facility had been previously trained in this non-traditional use of their radiopharmaceutical imaging devices. If, however, substantially large numbers of individuals (100s to 1000s) needed radiological screening, other options must be given to first responders, first receivers, and health physicists providing medical management. In this study, the second option of the workshop was investigated – the use of commercially available portable survey meters (either NaI or GM based) for assessing potential ranges of effective dose (<50, 50–250, 250–500, and >500 mSv). Two hybrid computational phantoms were used to model an adult male and an adult female subject internally contaminated with either 241Am, 60Cs, 137Cs, 131I, and 192Ir following an acute inhalation or ingestion intake. As a function of time following the exposure, the net count rates corresponding to committed effective doses of 50, 250, and 500 mSv were estimated via Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation for each of four different detectors types, positions, and screening distances. Measured count rates can be compared to these values and an assignment of one of four possible effective dose ranges could be made. The method implicitly assumes that all external contamination has been removed prior to screening, and that the

  17. Guidance on the use of handheld survey meters for radiological triage: time-dependent detector count rates corresponding to 50, 250, and 500 mSV effective dose for adult males and adult females.

    PubMed

    Bolch, Wesley E; Hurtado, Jorge L; Lee, Choonsik; Manger, Ryan; Burgett, Eric; Hertel, Nolan; Dickerson, William

    2012-03-01

    In June 2006, the Radiation Studies Branch of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention held a workshop to explore rapid methods of facilitating radiological triage of large numbers of potentially contaminated individuals following detonation of a radiological dispersal device. Two options were discussed. The first was the use of traditional gamma cameras in nuclear medicine departments operated as makeshift wholebody counters. Guidance on this approach is currently available from the CDC. This approach would be feasible if a manageable number of individuals were involved, transportation to the relevant hospitals was quickly provided, and the medical staff at each facility had been previously trained in this non-traditional use of their radiopharmaceutical imaging devices. If, however,substantially larger numbers of individuals (100’s to 1,000’s) needed radiological screening, other options must be given to first responders, first receivers, and health physicists providing medical management. In this study, the second option of the workshop was investigated--the use of commercially available portable survey meters (either NaI or GM based) for assessing potential ranges of effective dose (< 50, 50-250, 250-500,and >500 mSv). Two hybrid computational phantoms were used to model an adult male and an adult female subject internally contaminated with 241Am, 60Cs, 137Cs, 131I, or 192Ir following an acute inhalation or ingestion intake. As a function of time following the exposure, the net count rates corresponding to committed effective doses of 50, 250, and 500 mSv were estimated via Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation for each of four different detector types, positions, and screening distances.Measured net count rates can be compared to these values, and an assignment of one of four possible effective dose ranges could be made. The method implicitly assumes that all external contamination has been removed prior to screening and that the measurements be

  18. Three Axis Acoustic Current Meter.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-05-10

    MECHANICAL DESCRIPTION The ACM-i is housed in an aluminum case constructed of 6061-16 alloy (3000 ’meter working depth) or 7075-T6 alloy (6000 meter working...length 9.25 inches (23.5 cm) maximum diameter Materials: Al uminum housing (6061 alloy for 3000 meter option or 7075 alloy for 6000 meter option...housing through access hatch. 3. Purge unit with dry gas (dichiorodifluorome thane) by Injecting gas through hatch into copper tube running length of

  19. Creating needs? A review of survey data and concerns relevant to the commercialization of genetic testing.

    PubMed

    Caulfield, T; Wertz, D

    2001-01-01

    An increasing number of genetic tests are moving from the laboratory to the clinical setting. It seems an appropriate time to assess the interest and receptivity of the public toward genetic testing services. This is particularly so given the concerns that have been expressed about the commercialization of genetic testing technologies. To this end, the paper begins with an overview of the concerns and benefits associated with commercialization. This is followed by a review of a selection of survey data relevant to the potential 'genetic testing market' (i.e., the attitudes, perceptions and knowledge of the public, patients and professionals). We conclude that although emerging data and past experience suggest that the actual uptake of genetic tests may fall short of expectations, the strong public interest and perceived right of access disclosed in the survey research indicate a future potential for a large testing market. As such, the concerns associated warrant careful consideration.

  20. The Meteor Meter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggensperger, Martin B.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces the Meteor Scatter Project (MSP) in which high school students build an automated meteor observatory and learn to monitor meteor activity. Involves students in activities such as radio frequency survey, antenna design, antenna construction, manual meteor counts, and computer board configuration and installation. (YDS)

  1. Fuel meter for vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Harde, B.

    1987-10-13

    A fuel level meter for vehicles is described including an electrical measuring device comprising: a voltage source and a potentiometer resistor. The resistor comprises two ends connected between the voltage source and a movable contact, connected to a float disposed in a fuel tank, such that the position of the float is dependent on the level of fuel in the tank; a shuntable series resistance with a first side connected to the movable contact and to a first relay switch of a relay and a second side connected both to a first resistor and to the relay switch. The other side of the first resistor is connected to a first side of a rheostat and to an overvoltage protector means; a damping capacitor having one side connected between the relay switch and a second relay switch of the relay operable jointly with the first. The measuring device is connected between a second side of the rheostat and ground; wherein the relay switches are jointly movable between a position wherein a first side of the capacitor and the second side of the shuntable series resistance are both electrically connected to an input terminal of the measuring device such that a current flowing from the movable contact flows through the series resistor and the other side of the capacitor is coupled to a constant voltage, and a second position wherein the series resistance is shunted off, the overvoltage protector means is engaged in parallel with the measuring device, and the capacitor maintains the constant voltage.

  2. Neutral buoyancy test evaluation of hardware and extravehicular activity procedures for on-orbit assembly of a 14 meter precision reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heard, Walter L., Jr.; Lake, Mark S.

    1993-02-01

    A procedure that enables astronauts in extravehicular activity (EVA) to perform efficient on-orbit assembly of large paraboloidal precision reflectors is presented. The procedure and associated hardware are verified in simulated Og (neutral buoyancy) assembly tests of a 14 m diameter precision reflector mockup. The test article represents a precision reflector having a reflective surface which is segmented into 37 individual panels. The panels are supported on a doubly curved tetrahedral truss consisting of 315 struts. The entire truss and seven reflector panels were assembled in three hours and seven minutes by two pressure-suited test subjects. The average time to attach a panel was two minutes and three seconds. These efficient assembly times were achieved because all hardware and assembly procedures were designed to be compatible with EVA assembly capabilities.

  3. Neutral buoyancy test evaluation of hardware and extravehicular activity procedures for on-orbit assembly of a 14 meter precision reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heard, Walter L., Jr.; Lake, Mark S.

    1993-01-01

    A procedure that enables astronauts in extravehicular activity (EVA) to perform efficient on-orbit assembly of large paraboloidal precision reflectors is presented. The procedure and associated hardware are verified in simulated Og (neutral buoyancy) assembly tests of a 14 m diameter precision reflector mockup. The test article represents a precision reflector having a reflective surface which is segmented into 37 individual panels. The panels are supported on a doubly curved tetrahedral truss consisting of 315 struts. The entire truss and seven reflector panels were assembled in three hours and seven minutes by two pressure-suited test subjects. The average time to attach a panel was two minutes and three seconds. These efficient assembly times were achieved because all hardware and assembly procedures were designed to be compatible with EVA assembly capabilities.

  4. Acceptability of Testing Children for Tobacco-Smoke Exposure: A National Parent Survey

    PubMed Central

    Tanski, Susanne E.; McMillen, Robert C.; Ross, Kaile M.; Lipstein, Ellen A.; Hipple, Bethany J.; Friebely, Joan; Klein, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tests are available to measure children's exposure to tobacco smoke. One potential barrier to testing children for tobacco-smoke exposure is the belief that parents who smoke would not want their child tested. No previous surveys have assessed whether testing children for exposure to tobacco smoke in the context of their child's primary care visit is acceptable to parents. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether testing children for tobacco-smoke exposure is acceptable to parents. DESIGN AND METHODS: We conducted a national random-digit-dial telephone survey of households from September to November 2006. The sample was weighted by race and gender, based on the 2005 US Census, to be representative of the US population. RESULTS: Of 2070 eligible respondents contacted, 1803 (87.1%) completed the surveys. Among 477 parents in the sample, 60.1% thought that children should be tested for tobacco-smoke exposure at their child's doctor visit. Among the parental smokers sampled, 62.0% thought that children should be tested for tobacco-smoke exposure at the child's doctor visit. In bivariate analysis, lower parental education level, allowing smoking in the home, nonwhite race, and female gender were each associated (P < .05) with wanting the child tested for tobacco-smoke exposure. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of nonsmoking and smoking parents want their children tested for tobacco-smoke exposure during the child's health care visit. PMID:21422089

  5. Development of a super-pressure balloon with a diamond-shaped net --- result of a ground inflation test of a 2,000 cubic-meter balloon ---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yoshitaka; Nakashino, Kyoichi; Akita, Daisuke; Matsushima, Kiyoho; Shimadu, Shigeyuki; Goto, Ken; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Matsuo, Takuma

    2016-07-01

    A light super-pressure balloon has been developed using a method to cover a balloon with a diamond-shaped net of high-tensile fibers. The goal is to fly a payload of 900 kg to the altitude of 37 km with a 300,000 m^{3} balloon. Beginning from a demonstration test of the net-balloon with a 10 m^{3} balloon in 2010, we have been polished the net-balloon through ground inflation tests and flight tests, including a flight test of a 3,000 m ^{3} balloon in the tandem balloon configuration with a 15,000 m^{3} zero-pressure balloon in 2012, and a flight test of a 10 m^{3} balloon in the tandem balloon configuration with a 2 kg rubber balloon in 2013, as reported in the last COSPAR. In 2014, we developed a 5,000 m^{3} balloon and performed a ground inflation test to find that the balloon burst from a lip panel for termination with a differential pressure of 425 Pa. It was due to a stress concentration at the edge of a thick tape attached along the termination mechanism. In 2015, we modified the balloon by adding tapes on the lip panel to avoid the stress concentration, and also shorten the net length to leave some margin of the film and performed a ground inflation test again to find the balloon showed asymmetrical deployment and burst from the edge of the net with a differential pressure of 348 Pa. We consider it is due to the margin of the film along the circumferential direction, and proposed a gore shape which circumference length is kept as determined by the pumpkin shape of the balloon but setting meridian length longer than that. We developed a 10 m^{3} balloon with the gore design to find that the balloon deployed symmetrically and showed the burst pressure of 10,000 Pa. In 2016, we are going to develop a 2,000 m^{3} balloon with the gore design and perform its ground inflation test. In this paper, we are going to report its result with the sequence of the development.

  6. Test techniques: A survey paper on cryogenic tunnels, adaptive wall test sections, and magnetic suspension and balance systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, Robert A.; Dress, David A.; Wolf, Stephen W. D.; Britcher, Colin P.

    1989-01-01

    The ability to get good experimental data in wind tunnels is often compromised by things seemingly beyond our control. Inadequate Reynolds number, wall interference, and support interference are three of the major problems in wind tunnel testing. Techniques for solving these problems are available. Cryogenic wind tunnels solve the problem of low Reynolds number. Adaptive wall test sections can go a long way toward eliminating wall interference. A magnetic suspension and balance system (MSBS) completely eliminates support interference. Cryogenic tunnels, adaptive wall test sections, and MSBS are surveyed. A brief historical overview is given and the present state of development and application in each area is described.

  7. Calibration of GPS based high accuracy speed meter for vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yin; Sun, Qiao; Du, Lei; Yu, Mei; Bai, Jie

    2015-02-01

    GPS based high accuracy speed meter for vehicles is a special type of GPS speed meter which uses Doppler Demodulation of GPS signals to calculate the speed of a moving target. It is increasingly used as reference equipment in the field of traffic speed measurement, but acknowledged standard calibration methods are still lacking. To solve this problem, this paper presents the set-ups of simulated calibration, field test signal replay calibration, and in-field test comparison with an optical sensor based non-contact speed meter. All the experiments were carried out on particular speed values in the range of (40-180) km/h with the same GPS speed meter. The speed measurement errors of simulated calibration fall in the range of +/-0.1 km/h or +/-0.1%, with uncertainties smaller than 0.02% (k=2). The errors of replay calibration fall in the range of +/-0.1% with uncertainties smaller than 0.10% (k=2). The calibration results justify the effectiveness of the two methods. The relative deviations of the GPS speed meter from the optical sensor based noncontact speed meter fall in the range of +/-0.3%, which validates the use of GPS speed meter as reference instruments. The results of this research can provide technical basis for the establishment of internationally standard calibration methods of GPS speed meters, and thus ensures the legal status of GPS speed meters as reference equipment in the field of traffic speed metrology.

  8. A Comparison of Web-Based and Paper-Based Survey Methods: Testing Assumptions of Survey Mode and Response Cost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenlaw, Corey; Brown-Welty, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    Web-based surveys have become more prevalent in areas such as evaluation, research, and marketing research to name a few. The proliferation of these online surveys raises the question, how do response rates compare with traditional surveys and at what cost? This research explored response rates and costs for Web-based surveys, paper surveys, and…

  9. Wall adjustment strategy software for use with the NASA Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel adaptive wall test section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Stephen W. D.

    1988-01-01

    The Wall Adjustment Strategy (WAS) software provides successful on-line control of the 2-D flexible walled test section of the Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. This software package allows the level of operator intervention to be regulated as necessary for research and production type 2-D testing using and Adaptive Wall Test Section (AWTS). The software is designed to accept modification for future requirements, such as 3-D testing, with a minimum of complexity. The WAS software described is an attempt to provide a user friendly package which could be used to control any flexible walled AWTS. Control system constraints influence the details of data transfer, not the data type. Then this entire software package could be used in different control systems, if suitable interface software is available. A complete overview of the software highlights the data flow paths, the modular architecture of the software and the various operating and analysis modes available. A detailed description of the software modules includes listings of the code. A user's manual is provided to explain task generation, operating environment, user options and what to expect at execution.

  10. Microwave moisture meter for in-shell peanut kernels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    . A microwave moisture meter built with off-the-shelf components was developed, calibrated and tested in the laboratory and in the field for nondestructive and instantaneous in-shell peanut kernel moisture content determination from dielectric measurements on unshelled peanut pod samples. The meter ...

  11. Microwave Moisture Meter for Granular and Particulate Materials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A low-cost microwave moisture meter operating at a single frequency for instantaneous and nondestructive determination of moisture content of granular and particulate materials was developed, calibrated and tested with different kinds of grain and seed. The meter operates at a single microwave freq...

  12. Microwave Moisture Meter for Nodestructive and Instantaneous Peanut Grading Application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A low-cost microwave moisture meter built with off-the-shelf components was developed, calibrated and tested in the laboratory and in the field for the grading of peanuts. The meter allows rapid and nondestructive determination of kernel moisture content from measurements on unshelled peanut pods. T...

  13. 40 CFR 92.122 - Smoke meter calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Smoke meter calibration. 92.122 Section...) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.122 Smoke meter... zero control shall be adjusted under conditions of “no smoke” to give a recorder or data...

  14. Median and quantile tests under complex survey design using SAS and R.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yi; Caudill, Samuel P; Li, Ruosha; Caldwell, Kathleen L

    2014-11-01

    Techniques for conducting hypothesis testing on the median and other quantiles of two or more subgroups under complex survey design are limited. In this paper, we introduce programs in both SAS and R to perform such a test. A detailed illustration of the computations, macro variable definitions, input and output for the SAS and R programs are also included in the text. Urinary iodine data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) are used as examples for comparing medians between females and males as well as comparing the 75th percentiles among three salt consumption groups.

  15. The Metering Guide for Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qayoumi, Mohammed H.

    This volume provides a guide to management of utilities metering in educational facilities, especially colleges and universities. Chapter 1 gives an overview of why utility measurement, specifically the metering of energy consumption, is important in facilities management. Chapter 2 defines the basic units of measurement for both electric and…

  16. Teaching Meter: Why and How.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, John J.

    In poetry, the only escape from meter is mastery. An understanding of the physical basis of poetry contributes not only to the literary appreciation and analysis of poetry but also to effective communication and language usage in daily life. The ideal time to begin teaching meter is in early childhood, but many older students need to be…

  17. Wavelength meter having elliptical wedge

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.; Feldman, M.

    1992-12-01

    A wavelength meter is disclosed which can determine the wavelength of a laser beam from a laser source within an accuracy range of two parts in 10[sup 8]. The wavelength meter has wedge having an elliptically shaped face to the optical path of the laser source and includes interferometer plates which form a vacuum housing. 7 figs.

  18. Wavelength meter having elliptical wedge

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.; Feldman, Mark

    1992-01-01

    A wavelength meter is disclosed which can determine the wavelength of a laser beam from a laser source within an accuracy range of two parts in 10.sup.8. The wavelength meter has wedge having an elliptically shaped face to the optical path of the laser source and includes interferometer plates which form a vacuum housing.

  19. Anticipating response to predictive genetic testing for Alzheimer's disease: a survey of first-degree relatives.

    PubMed

    Roberts, J S

    2000-02-01

    Two hundred and three children and siblings of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) (age range: 30-92 years, 75% female) were surveyed regarding potential predictive testing options for the disorder. A mailed questionnaire posed various hypothetical scenarios and assessed the following variables: interest in testing, perceptions of its pros and cons, and psychological and demographic predictors of test intentions. In 5 of 6 scenarios, a majority of participants expressed intentions to pursue testing, with perceived pros outweighing cons. The most important reasons for seeking testing were informing later-life decisions and planning future AD care. Predictors of test intentions were male gender, information-seeking style, higher perceived AD threat, and appraisal of test pros versus cons. Situational factors such as available treatment options and certainty of test information also affected responses. Results suggest a positive view of predictive testing, with its limitations and risks underrated. Study findings may inform AD genetic counseling and health education efforts.

  20. Use of 3000 Bragg Grating Strain Sensors Distributed on Four Eight-meter Optical Fibers During Static Load Tests of a Composite Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childers, Brooks A.; Froggatt, Mark E.; Allison, Sidney G.; Moore, Thomas C., Sr.; Hare, David A.; Batten, Christopher F.; Jegley, Dawn C.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a fiber optic system to measure strain at thousands of locations along optical fibers where weakly reflecting Bragg gratings have been photoetched. The optical fibers were applied to an advanced composite transport wing along with conventional foil strain gages. A comparison of the fiber optic and foil gage systems used for this test will be presented including: a brief description of both strain data systems; a discussion of the process used for installation of the optical fiber; comparative data from the composite wing test; the processes used for the location and display of the high density fiber optic data. Calibration data demonstrating the potential accuracy of the fiber optic system will also be presented. The opportunities for industrial and commercial applications will be discussed. The fiber optic technique is shown to be a valuable augmentation to foil strain gages providing insight to structural behavior previously requiring reliance on modeling.

  1. Inlet noise on 0.5-meter-diameter NASA QF-1 fan as measured in an unmodified compressor aerodynamic test facility and in an anechoic chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelder, T. F.; Soltis, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    Narrowband analysis revealed grossly similar sound pressure level spectra in each facility. Blade passing frequency (BPF) noise and multiple pure tone (MPT) noise were superimposed on a broadband (BB) base noise. From one-third octave bandwidth sound power analyses the BPF noise (harmonics combined), and the MPT noise (harmonics combined, excepting BPF's) agreed between facilities within 1.5 db or less over the range of speeds and flows tested. Detailed noise and aerodynamic performance is also presented.

  2. Establishing survey validity and reliability for American Indians through "think aloud" and test-retest methods.

    PubMed

    Hauge, Cindy Horst; Jacobs-Knight, Jacque; Jensen, Jamie L; Burgess, Katherine M; Puumala, Susan E; Wilton, Georgiana; Hanson, Jessica D

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to use a mixed-methods approach to determine the validity and reliability of measurements used within an alcohol-exposed pregnancy prevention program for American Indian women. To develop validity, content experts provided input into the survey measures, and a "think aloud" methodology was conducted with 23 American Indian women. After revising the measurements based on this input, a test-retest was conducted with 79 American Indian women who were randomized to complete either the original measurements or the new, modified measurements. The test-retest revealed that some of the questions performed better for the modified version, whereas others appeared to be more reliable for the original version. The mixed-methods approach was a useful methodology for gathering feedback on survey measurements from American Indian participants and in indicating specific survey questions that needed to be modified for this population.

  3. Modal survey testing of the Lidar In-space Technology Experiment (LITE) - A Space Shuttle payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. B.; Coleman, A. D.; Driskill, T. C.; Lindell, M. C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the modal survey test of the Lidar In-space Technology Experiment (LITE), a Space Shuttle payload mounted in a Spacelab flight single pallet. The test was performed by the Dynamics Test Branch at Marshall Space Flight Center, AL and run in two phases. In the first phase, an unloaded orthogrid connected to the pallet with 52 tension struts was tested. This test included 73 measurement points in three directions. In the second phase, the pallet was integrated with mass simulators mounted on the flight support structure to represent the dynamics (weight and center of gravity) of the various components comprising the LITE experiment and instrumented at 213 points in 3 directions. The test article was suspended by an air bag system to simulate a free-free boundary condition. This paper presents the results obtained from the testing and analytical model correlation efforts. The effect of the suspension system on the test article is also discussed.

  4. Modal survey testing of the Lidar In-space Technology Experiment (LITE) - A Space Shuttle payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. B.; Coleman, A. D.; Driskill, T. C.; Lindell, M. C.

    This paper presents the results of the modal survey test of the Lidar In-space Technology Experiment (LITE), a Space Shuttle payload mounted in a Spacelab flight single pallet. The test was performed by the Dynamics Test Branch at Marshall Space Flight Center, AL and run in two phases. In the first phase, an unloaded orthogrid connected to the pallet with 52 tension struts was tested. This test included 73 measurement points in three directions. In the second phase, the pallet was integrated with mass simulators mounted on the flight support structure to represent the dynamics (weight and center of gravity) of the various components comprising the LITE experiment and instrumented at 213 points in 3 directions. The test article was suspended by an air bag system to simulate a free-free boundary condition. This paper presents the results obtained from the testing and analytical model correlation efforts. The effect of the suspension system on the test article is also discussed.

  5. Tests of a NACA 65(sub 1)-213 airfoil in the NASA Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plentovich, E. B.; Ladson, C. L.; Hill, A. S.

    1984-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation was conducted to study the two dimensional aerodynamic characteristics of the NACA 65 sub 1-213 airfoil over a wide range of Reynolds numbers. Test temperature ranged from ambient to about 100K at pressures ranging from about 1.2 to 6.0 atm. Mach number was varied from 0.22 to 0.80 and Reynolds number (based on airfoil chord) from 3 million to 40 million. Data are included which demonstrate the effects of fixed transition, Mach number, and Reynolds number on the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoil. A sample of data showing the effects of angle of attack on the pressure distribution is also given. The data are presented in an uncorrected form with no analysis.

  6. American College Health Association Annual Pap Test and Sexually Transmitted Infection Survey: 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, P. Davis; Roberts, Craig M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the cervical cytology and sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing patterns of US college health centers. Participants and Methods: A total of 128 self-selected US college health centers--representing more than 2 million college students--completed an online survey during February and March 2007. Results: Almost…

  7. Mechanical Waves Conceptual Survey: Its Modification and Conversion to a Standard Multiple-Choice Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barniol, Pablo; Zavala, Genaro

    2016-01-01

    In this article we present several modifications of the mechanical waves conceptual survey, the most important test to date that has been designed to evaluate university students' understanding of four main topics in mechanical waves: propagation, superposition, reflection, and standing waves. The most significant changes are (i) modification of…

  8. The Test-Retest Reliability of the Parent and School Survey (PASS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringenberg, Matthew C.; Funk, Vanessa; Mullen, Kacy; Wilford, Amy; Kramer, Jessica

    2005-01-01

    The Parent And School Survey (PASS) is an instrument designed to quickly, easily, and accurately measure parental involvement in their children's education. It is based on Epstein's six-construct framework, with four items devoted to each construct. A test-retest reliability study of the PASS was conducted with 40 subjects to refine the 24 items…

  9. Can Sanitary Surveys Replace Water Quality Testing? Evidence from Kisii, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Misati, Aaron Gichaba; Ogendi, George; Peletz, Rachel; Khush, Ranjiv; Kumpel, Emily

    2017-01-01

    Information about the quality of rural drinking water sources can be used to manage their safety and mitigate risks to health. Sanitary surveys, which are observational checklists to assess hazards present at water sources, are simpler to conduct than microbial tests. We assessed whether sanitary survey results were associated with measured indicator bacteria levels in rural drinking water sources in Kisii Central, Kenya. Overall, thermotolerant coliform (TTC) levels were high: all of the samples from the 20 tested dug wells, almost all (95%) of the samples from the 25 tested springs, and 61% of the samples from the 16 tested rainwater harvesting systems were contaminated with TTC. There were no significant associations between TTC levels and overall sanitary survey scores or their individual components. Contamination by TTC was associated with source type (dug wells and springs were more contaminated than rainwater systems). While sanitary surveys cannot be substituted for microbial water quality results in this context, they could be used to identify potential hazards and contribute to a comprehensive risk management approach. PMID:28178226

  10. Clostridium tetani in a Metropolitan Area: A Limited Survey Incorporating a Simplified in Vitro Identification Test

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, Thomas R.; Ley, H. L.

    1966-01-01

    In a limited survey, three toxigenic and one nontoxigenic strains of Clostridium tetani were isolated from 18 environmental samples from metropolitan Boston. No C. tetani was found in 100 samples of human feces, 20 samples of dog feces, and two samples of horse feces. A simple modification of the halo precipitin test was studied in conjunction with the mouse lethality test for tetanus toxigenicity and was found to be a useful, although not a wholly definitive, technique. Images Fig. 1 PMID:16349708

  11. Vortex shedding flow meter performance at high flow velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegwarth, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    In some of the ducts of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), the maximum liquid oxygen flow velocities approach 10 times those at which liquid flow measurements are normally made. The hydrogen gas flow velocities in other ducts exceed the maximum for gas flow measurement by more than a factor of 3. The results presented here show from water flow tests that vortex shedding flow meters of the appropriate design can measure water flow to velocities in excess of 55 m/s, which is a Reynolds number of about 2 million. Air flow tests have shown that the same meter can measure flow to a Reynolds number of at least 22 million. Vortex shedding meters were installed in two of the SSME ducts and tested with water flow. Narrow spectrum lines were obtained and the meter output frequencies were proportional to flow to + or - 0.5% or better over the test range with no flow conditioning, even though the ducts had multiple bends preceeding the meter location. Meters with the shedding elements only partially spanning the pipe and some meters with ring shaped shedding elements were also tested.

  12. Development of and Field-Test Results for the CAHPS PCMH Survey

    PubMed Central

    Scholle, Sarah Hudson; Vuong, Oanh; Ding, Lin; Fry, Stephanie; Gallagher, Patricia; Brown, Julie A.; Hays, Ron D.; Cleary, Paul D.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To develop and evaluate survey questions that assess processes of care relevant to Patient-Centered Medical Homes (PCMHs). Research Design We convened expert panels, reviewed evidence on effective care practices and existing surveys, elicited broad public input, and conducted cognitive interviews and a field test to develop items relevant to PCMHs that could be added to the CAHPS® Clinician & Group (CG-CAHPS) 1.0 Survey. Surveys were tested using a two-contact mail protocol in 10 adult and 33 pediatric practices (both private and community health centers) in Massachusetts. A total of 4,875 completed surveys were received (overall response rate of 25%). Analyses We calculated the rate of valid responses for each item. We conducted exploratory factor analyses and estimated item-to-total correlations, individual and site level reliability, and correlations among proposed multi-item composites. Results Ten items in four new domains (Comprehensiveness, Information, Self-Management Support, and Shared Decision-Making) and four items in two existing domains (Access and Coordination of Care) were selected to be supplemental items to be used in conjunction with the adult CG-CAHPS 1.0 survey. For the child version, four items in each of two new domains (Information and Self-Management Support) and five items in existing domains (Access, Comprehensiveness-Prevention, Coordination of Care) were selected. Conclusions This study provides support for the reliability and validity of new items to supplement the CG-CAHPS 1.0 survey to assess aspects of primary care that are important attributes of Patient-Centered Medical Homes. PMID:23064272

  13. Results of testing and evaluating a health physics instrument performance standard

    SciTech Connect

    Kenoyer, J.L.; Swinth, K.L.; Kathren, R.L.; Fleming, D.M.; Selby, J.M.; Vallario, E.J.; Federline, M.V.

    1983-09-01

    This paper presents data taken during testing of health physics instrumentation that provides information for the evaluation of the applicability and practicality of the proposed ANSI standard (N42.17) and the determination of the degree of conformance of currently available instruments to the proposed standard. The instruments tested included ionization chambers, Geiger Mueller detectors, alpha survey meters, neutron dose equivalent survey meters, and air monitors. (ACR)

  14. U.S. Air Force Turbine Engine Emission Survey. Volume II. Individual Engine Test Reports.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-08-01

    1» I MI HU III.I11M1,|IHIIPH|I»^^—»^ II 111.11 l|. I I | mi | . I I. I.,.L ENGINE J85 -5 17 ^ ^_._. rr •Wl...AD-AÜbl 665 UNCLASSIFIED SCOTT ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY INC PLUMSTEAOVILLE PA F/G 21/5 U.S. AIR FORCE TURBINE ENGINE EMISSION SURVEY...i run’ LEVEL CEEDOTR-7834 U.S. AIR FORCE TURBINE ENGINE EMISSION SURVEY VOL II INDIVIDUAL ENGINE TEST REPORTS v o-< 3 „ fi-^\\^92 ANTHONY F

  15. A Brief Historical Survey of Rocket Testing Induced Acoustic Environments at NASA SSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgood, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    A survey was conducted of all the various rocket test programs that have been performed since the establishment of NASA Stennis Space Center. The relevant information from each of these programs were compiled and used to quantify the theoretical noise source levels using the NASA approved methodology for computing "acoustic loads generated by a propulsion system" (NASA SP ]8072). This methodology, which is outlined in Reference 1, has been verified as a reliable means of determining the noise source characteristics of rocket engines. This information is being provided to establish reference environments for new government/business residents to ascertain whether or not their activities will generate acoustic environments that are more "encroaching" in the NASA Fee Area. In this report, the designation of sound power level refers to the acoustic power of the rocket engine at the engine itself. This is in contrast to the sound pressure level associated with the propagation of the acoustic energy in the surrounding air. The first part of the survey documents the "at source" sound power levels and their dominant frequency bands for the range of engines tested at Stennis. The second part of the survey discusses how the acoustic energy levels will propagate non ]uniformly from the test stands. To demonstrate this, representative acoustic sound pressure mappings in the NASA Stennis Fee Area were computed for typical engine tests on the B ]1 and E ]1 test stands.

  16. The One-Meter Dash

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Mattie J.

    1977-01-01

    A game for two teams employs dice, meter sticks, and Cuisenaire rods. The game gives practice in number facts, regrouping, and use of rods; it can also serve as an introduction to the metric system. (SD)

  17. Angular velocity and acceleration meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melamed, L.

    1972-01-01

    Meter uses a liquid crystalline film which changes coloration due to shear-stresses produced by a rotating disk. Device is advantageous in that it is not subject to bearing failure or electrical burnouts as are conventional devices.

  18. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, L.H.

    1994-08-16

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  19. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1995-01-01

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  20. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1994-01-01

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  1. Healthcare Energy Metering Guidance (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    This brochure is intended to help facility and energy managers plan and prioritize investments in energy metering. It offers healthcare-specific examples of metering applications, benefits, and steps that other health systems can reproduce. It reflects collaborative input from the U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories and the health system members of the DOE Hospital Energy Alliance's Benchmarking and Measurement Project Team.

  2. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    SciTech Connect

    Thacker, L.H.

    1995-10-17

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  3. A caloric output meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanas, R.

    Calorimeter for a klystron test facility was developed. The klystron high frequency power is dumped in a water cooled dummy load. Rise of water temperature and quantity of flowed water are converted into frequencies by a 2 Gyr measuring instrument. A microcomputer controls input and readout, on which the processed data are digitally displayed every 10 sec.

  4. Testing the origin of the CMB large-angle correlation deficit with a galaxy imaging survey

    SciTech Connect

    Hearin, Andrew P.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Gibelyou, Cameron E-mail: gibelyou@umich.edu

    2011-10-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature distribution measured by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) exhibits anomalously low correlation at large angles. Quantifying the degree to which this feature in the temperature data is in conflict with standard ΛCDM cosmology is somewhat ambiguous because of the a posteriori nature of the observation. One physical mechanism that has been proposed as a possible explanation for the deficit in the large-angle temperature correlations is a suppression of primordial power on ∼ Gpc scales. To distinguish whether the anomaly is a signal of new physics, such as suppressed primordial power, it would be invaluable to perform experimental tests of the authenticity of this signal in data sets which are independent of the WMAP temperature measurements or even other CMB measurements. We explore the possibility of testing models of power suppression with large-scale structure observations, and compare the ability of planned photometric and spectroscopic surveys to constrain the power spectrum. Of the surveys planned for the next decade, a spectroscopic redshift survey such as BigBOSS will have a greater number of radial modes available for study, but we find that this advantage is outweighed by the greater surface density of high-redshift sources that will be observed by photometric surveys such as LSST or Euclid. We also find that the ability to constrain primordial power suppression is insensitive to the precision of the calibration of photometric redshifts. We conclude that very-wide-area imaging surveys have the potential to probe viable models for the missing power but that it will be difficult to use such surveys to conclusively rule out primordial power suppression as the mechanism behind the observed anomaly.

  5. Digital Phase Meter for a Laser Heterodyne Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loya, Frank

    2008-01-01

    The Digital Phase Meter is based on a modified phase-locked loop. When phase alignment between the reference input and the phase-shifted metrological input is achieved, the loop locks and the phase shift of the digital phase shifter equals the phase difference that one seeks to measure. This digital phase meter is being developed for incorporation into a laser heterodyne interferometer in a metrological apparatus, but could also be adapted to other uses. Relative to prior phase meters of similar capability, including digital ones, this digital phase meter is smaller, less complex, and less expensive. The phase meter has been constructed and tested in the form of a field-programmable gate array (FPGA).

  6. Diffusion of molecular diagnostic lung cancer tests: a survey of german oncologists.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Julius Alexander

    2014-03-21

    This study was aimed at examining the diffusion of diagnostic lung cancer tests in Germany. It was motivated by the high potential of detecting and targeting oncogenic drivers. Recognizing that the diffusion of diagnostic tests is a conditio sine qua non for the success of personalized lung cancer therapies, this study analyzed the diffusion of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tests in Germany. Qualitative and quantitative research strategies were combined in a mixed-method design. A literature review and subsequent Key Opinion Leader interviews identified a set of qualitative factors driving the diffusion process, which were then translated into an online survey. The survey was conducted among a sample of 961 oncologists (11.34% response rate). The responses were analyzed in a multiple linear regression which identified six statistically significant factors driving the diffusion of molecular diagnostic lung cancer tests: reimbursement, attitude towards R&D, information self-assessment, perceived attitudes of colleagues, age and test-pathway strategies. Besides the important role of adequate reimbursement and relevant guidelines, the results of this study suggest that an increasing usage of test-pathway strategies, especially in an office-based setting, can increase the diffusion of molecular diagnostic lung cancer tests in the future.

  7. Adoption of pharmacogenomic testing by US physicians: results of a nationwide survey.

    PubMed

    Stanek, E J; Sanders, C L; Taber, K A Johansen; Khalid, M; Patel, A; Verbrugge, R R; Agatep, B C; Aubert, R E; Epstein, R S; Frueh, F W

    2012-03-01

    To develop a benchmark measure of US physicians' level of knowledge and extent of use of pharmacogenomic testing, we conducted an anonymous, cross-sectional, fax-based, national survey. Of 397,832 physicians receiving the survey questionnaire, 10,303 (3%) completed and returned it; the respondents were representative of the overall US physician population. The factors associated with the decision to test were evaluated using χ(2) and multivariate logistic regression. Overall, 97.6% of responding physicians agreed that genetic variations may influence drug response, but only 10.3% felt adequately informed about pharmacogenomic testing. Only 12.9% of physicians had ordered a test in the previous 6 months, and 26.4% anticipated ordering a test in the next 6 months. Early and future adopters of testing were more likely to have received training in pharmacogenomics, but only 29.0% of physicians overall had received any education in the field. Our findings highlight the need for more effective physician education on the clinical value, availability, and interpretation of pharmacogenomic tests.

  8. HIV testing during the Canadian immigration medical examination: a national survey of designated medical practitioners.

    PubMed

    Tran, Jennifer M; Li, Alan; Owino, Maureen; English, Ken; Mascarenhas, Lyndon; Tan, Darrell H S

    2014-01-01

    HIV testing is mandatory for individuals wishing to immigrate to Canada. Since the Designated Medical Practitioners (DMPs) who perform these tests may have varying experience in HIV and time constraints in their clinical practices, there may be variability in the quality of pre- and posttest counseling provided. We surveyed DMPs regarding HIV testing, counseling, and immigration inadmissibility. A 16-item survey was mailed to all DMPs across Canada (N = 203). The survey inquired about DMP characteristics, knowledge of HIV, attitudes and practices regarding inadmissibility and counseling, and interest in continuing medical education. There were a total of 83 respondents (41%). Participants frequently rated their knowledge of HIV diagnostics, cultural competency, and HIV/AIDS service organizations as "fair" (40%, 43%, and 44%, respectively). About 25%, 46%, and 11% of the respondents agreed/strongly agreed with the statements "HIV infected individuals pose a danger to public health and safety," "HIV-positive immigrants cause excessive demand on the healthcare system," and "HIV seropositivity is a reasonable ground for denial into Canada," respectively. Language was cited as a barrier to counseling, which focused on transmission risks (46% discussed this as "always" or "often") more than coping and social support (37%). There was a high level of interest (47%) in continuing medical education in this area. There are areas for improvement regarding DMPs' knowledge, attitudes, and practices about HIV infection, counseling, and immigration criteria. Continuing medical education and support for DMPs to facilitate practice changes could benefit newcomers who test positive through the immigration process.

  9. Survey of Expert Opinion on Intelligence: Causes of International Differences in Cognitive Ability Tests

    PubMed Central

    Rindermann, Heiner; Becker, David; Coyle, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    Following Snyderman and Rothman (1987, 1988), we surveyed expert opinions on the current state of intelligence research. This report examines expert opinions on causes of international differences in student assessment and psychometric IQ test results. Experts were surveyed about the importance of culture, genes, education (quantity and quality), wealth, health, geography, climate, politics, modernization, sampling error, test knowledge, discrimination, test bias, and migration. The importance of these factors was evaluated for diverse countries, regions, and groups including Finland, East Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, Southern Europe, the Arabian-Muslim world, Latin America, Israel, Jews in the West, Roma (gypsies), and Muslim immigrants. Education was rated by N = 71 experts as the most important cause of international ability differences. Genes were rated as the second most relevant factor but also had the highest variability in ratings. Culture, health, wealth, modernization, and politics were the next most important factors, whereas other factors such as geography, climate, test bias, and sampling error were less important. The paper concludes with a discussion of limitations of the survey (e.g., response rates and validity of expert opinions). PMID:27047425

  10. Prenotification, Incentives, and Survey Modality: An Experimental Test of Methods to Increase Survey Response Rates of School Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, Robin Tepper; Jacob, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Teacher and principal surveys are among the most common data collection techniques employed in education research. Yet there is remarkably little research on survey methods in education, or about the most cost-effective way to raise response rates among teachers and principals. In an effort to explore various methods for increasing survey response…

  11. Insert metering plates for gas turbine nozzles

    DOEpatents

    Burdgick, Steven S.; Itzel, Gary; Chopra, Sanjay; Abuaf, Nesim; Correia, Victor H.

    2004-05-11

    The invention comprises a metering plate which is assembled to an impingement insert for use in the nozzle of a gas turbine. The metering plate can have one or more metering holes and is used to balance the cooling flow within the nozzle. A metering plate with multiple holes reduces static pressure variations which result from the cooling airflow through the metering plate. The metering plate can be assembled to the insert before or after the insert is inserted into the nozzle.

  12. A review of aerial radiological surveys of Nevada Test Site fallout fields 1951 through 1970

    SciTech Connect

    1987-12-01

    Aerial surveys of offsite fallout radiation fields from the Nevada Test Site began in the early 1950s and continued throughout the above-ground testing period. The results of the aerial surveys were used to support ground data in determining the extent of the fallout patterns. For the series of tests conducted in 1953 and 1955, the primary uncertainty of the results was knowing the location of the aircraft. Navigation was made from aeronautical charts of a scale 1:1,000,000, and errors in location of several miles were experienced. Another problem was that exposure rate readings made in the aircraft of 1 milliroentgen per hour or lower were not reliable. Exposure rate measurements above 1 milliroentgen per hour were more accurate, however, and are considered reliable to within a factor of two or three in predicting 3-foot exposure rate levels. For the 1957 series, the aircraft position data were quite accurate. Ground-level exposure rates predicted from aerial data obtained by the United States Geological Survey aircraft for the five-detector array were considered reliable to within +-40% or better for most of the surveys. When the single detector was used, the accuracy decreased to about a factor of two. Relative count rates obtained by the aircraft operated by the Atomic Energy Commission, Raw Materials Division, are probably valid, but quantitative determination of 3-foot exposure rates are not. The Aerial Radiological Monitoring System performed all the aerial surveys in the 1960s. However, the air-to-ground conversion factors used were too low. Using a corrected conversion factor, the predicted 3-foot exposure rates should be valid to +-40% in most fallout fields if all other parameters are considered. 40 refs., 30 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Survey of state insurance commissioners concerning genetic testing and life insurance

    SciTech Connect

    McEwen, J.E.; McCarty, K.; Reilly, P.R. )

    1992-10-01

    Rapid advances in genetic testing have stimulated growing concern about the potential for misuse of genetic data by insurance companies, employers, and other third parties. Thus far, reports of genetically based discrimination in life insurance have been anecdotal. Reasoning that state insurance commissioners were likely to be aware of (1) the extent of current use of and interest in genetic tests by life insurers and (2) consumer complaints about insurance being denied because of genetic condition or because of genetic test results, the authors conducted a survey of that group. They received responses from 42 of the 51 jurisdictions. Results suggest (1) that those who regulate the life insurance industry do not yet perceive genetic testing to pose a significant problem in how insurers rate applicants, (2) that life insurers have much legal latitude to require genetic tests, and (3) that so far few consumers have formally complained to commissioners about the use of genetic data by life insurers.

  14. Mechanical waves conceptual survey: Its modification and conversion to a standard multiple-choice test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barniol, Pablo; Zavala, Genaro

    2016-06-01

    In this article we present several modifications of the mechanical waves conceptual survey, the most important test to date that has been designed to evaluate university students' understanding of four main topics in mechanical waves: propagation, superposition, reflection, and standing waves. The most significant changes are (i) modification of several test questions that had some problems in their original design, (ii) standardization of the number of options for each question to five, (iii) conversion of the two-tier questions to multiple-choice questions, and (iv) modification of some questions to make them independent of others. To obtain a final version of the test, we administered both the original and modified versions several times to students at a large private university in Mexico. These students were completing a course that covers the topics tested by the survey. The final modified version of the test was administered to 234 students. In this study we present the modifications for each question, and discuss the reasons behind them. We also analyze the results obtained by the final modified version and offer a comparison between the original and modified versions. In the Supplemental Material we present the final modified version of the test. It can be used by teachers and researchers to assess students' understanding of, and learning about, mechanical waves.

  15. Solutions For Smart Metering Under Harsh Environmental Condicions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunicina, N.; Zabasta, A.; Kondratjevs, K.; Asmanis, G.

    2015-02-01

    The described case study concerns application of wireless sensor networks to the smart control of power supply substations. The solution proposed for metering is based on the modular principle and has been tested in the intersystem communication paradigm using selectable interface modules (IEEE 802.3, ISM radio interface, GSM/GPRS). The solution modularity gives 7 % savings of maintenance costs. The developed solution can be applied to the control of different critical infrastructure networks using adapted modules. The proposed smart metering is suitable for outdoor installation, indoor industrial installations, operation under electromagnetic pollution, temperature and humidity impact. The results of tests have shown a good electromagnetic compatibility of the prototype meter with other electronic devices. The metering procedure is exemplified by operation of a testing company's workers under harsh environmental conditions.

  16. Circumstellar shells resolved in the IRAS survey data. I - Data processing procedure, results, and confidence tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, K.; Phillips, T. G.; Knapp, G. R.

    1993-01-01

    We have examined the IRAS 60 and 100 micron survey data covering 512 evolved stars and young planetary nebulae for evidence of spatially resolved structure. A simple model, consisting of a central unresolved source surrounded by a resolved isothermal shell, was fitted to the data for each star. Seventy-six stars were found to be resolved in the 60 micron data. Tests have been performed to verify that the extended structure seen is not an artifact of the data-processing algorithm.

  17. TESTING GROUND BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES TO REFINE ELECTROMAGNETIC SURVEYS NORTH OF THE 300 AREA HANFORD WASHINGTON

    SciTech Connect

    PETERSEN SW

    2010-12-02

    Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys were flown during fiscal year (FY) 2008 within the 600 Area in an attempt to characterize the underlying subsurface and to aid in the closure and remediation design study goals for the 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU). The rationale for using the AEM surveys was that airborne surveys can cover large areas rapidly at relatively low costs with minimal cultural impact, and observed geo-electrical anomalies could be correlated with important subsurface geologic and hydrogeologic features. Initial interpretation of the AEM surveys indicated a tenuous correlation with the underlying geology, from which several anomalous zones likely associated with channels/erosional features incised into the Ringold units were identified near the River Corridor. Preliminary modeling resulted in a slightly improved correlation but revealed that more information was required to constrain the modeling (SGW-39674, Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Report, 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, 600 Area, Hanford Site). Both time-and frequency domain AEM surveys were collected with the densest coverage occurring adjacent to the Columbia River Corridor. Time domain surveys targeted deeper subsurface features (e.g., top-of-basalt) and were acquired using the HeliGEOTEM{reg_sign} system along north-south flight lines with a nominal 400 m (1,312 ft) spacing. The frequency domain RESOLVE system acquired electromagnetic (EM) data along tighter spaced (100 m [328 ft] and 200 m [656 ft]) north-south profiles in the eastern fifth of the 200-PO-1 Groundwater OU (immediately adjacent to the River Corridor). The overall goal of this study is to provide further quantification of the AEM survey results, using ground based geophysical methods, and to link results to the underlying geology and/or hydrogeology. Specific goals of this project are as follows: (1) Test ground based geophysical techniques for the efficacy in delineating underlying geology; (2) Use ground

  18. Point-of-care testing in UK primary care: a survey to establish clinical needs

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Philip J; Van den Bruel, Ann; Jones, Caroline H D; Plüddemann, Annette; Heneghan, Carl; Thompson, Matthew J; Price, Christopher P; Howick, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Background. A number of point-of-care diagnostic tests are commercially available in the UK, however, not much is known regarding GPs’ desire for these tests or the clinical areas of interest. Objective. We sought to establish for which conditions point-of-care tests (POCTs) would be most helpful to UK GPs for diagnosis, reduction of referrals, and monitoring of chronic conditions. Methods. A total of 1635 regionally representative GPs were invited to complete an online cross-sectional survey between 31 September and 16 October 2012. Results. A total of 1109 (68%) GPs responded to the survey. The most frequently cited conditions were urinary tract infections for diagnosis (47% of respondents), pulmonary embolism/deep vein thrombosis for referral reduction (47%) and international normalized ratio/anticoagulation for monitoring (49%). Conclusions. This survey has identified the conditions for which UK GPs would find POCTs most helpful. Comments by respondents suggest that quite radical system-level adjustments will be required to allow primary care clinicians to capitalize on the potential benefits of POCTs. PMID:27048525

  19. An Improved Platform Levelling System for Airborne Gravity Meters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, N.

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in sensor technology have enabled Lacoste and Romberg type relative gravity meters to improve in accuracy to the point where other non-sensor related sources of error serve to limit the overall accuracy of the system. One of these sources of error is derived from the inability of the platform, in which the sensor is mounted, to keep the sensor perfectly level during survey flight. Off level errors occur when the aircraft is unable to maintain straight and level flight along a survey line. The levelling platform of a typical Lacoste and Romberg type dynamic gravity meter utilizes a complex feedback loop involving both accelerometers and gyroscopes with an output connected to torque motors mounted to the platform to sense an off level situation and correct for it. The current system is limited by an inability of the platform to distinguish between an acceleration of the platform due to a change in heading, altitude or speed of the aircraft and a true change in the local gravity vertical. Both of these situations cause the platform to tilt in reponse however the aircraft acceleration creates an error in the gravity measurement. These off level errors can be corrected for to a limited degree depending on the algorithm used and the size and duration of the causal acceleration. High precision GPS now provides accurate real time position information which can be used to determine if an accleration is a real level change or due to an anomalous acceleration. The correct implementation of the GPS position can significantly improve the accuracy of the platform levelling including keeping the platform level during course reversals or drape flying during a survey. This can typically improve the quality of the gravity data before any processing corrections. The enhanced platform also reduces the time taken to stabilize the platform at the beginning of a survey line therefore improving the efficiency of the data collection. This paper discusses the method and

  20. How do people respond to self-test results? A cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Self-tests, tests on medical conditions that can be performed by consumers without consulting a doctor first, are frequently used. Nevertheless, there are concerns about the safety of self-testing, as it may delay diagnosis and appropriate treatment in the case of inappropriate use of the test, or false-negative results. It is unclear whether self-tests stimulate appropriate follow-up behaviour. Our aim was to examine the frequency of self-test use, consumers' response to self-test results in terms of their confidence in the result, reassurance by the test result, and follow-up behaviour. Methods A two step cross-sectional survey was designed. A random sample of 6700 Internet users in an existing Internet panel received an online questionnaire on the use of self-tests. Self-tests were defined as tests on body materials, initiated by consumers with the aim to diagnose a disease or risk factor. A second questionnaire on consumers' response to self-test results was sent to the respondents that were identified as a self-tester in the first questionnaire (n = 703). Results 18.1% (799/4416) of the respondents had ever performed a self-test, the most frequently used tests being those for diabetes (5.3%), kidney disease (4.9%), cholesterol (4.5%), urinary tract infection (1.9%) and HIV/AIDS and Chlamydia (both 1.6%). A total of 78.1% of the testers with a normal test result and 81.4% of those with an abnormal result reported confidence in this result. Almost all (95.6%) of the testers with a normal result felt reassured. After a normal result, 78.1% did not take any further action and 5.8% consulted a doctor. The corresponding figures after an abnormal test result were 9.3% and 72.2%, respectively. Conclusions Respondents who had performed a self-test seemed to base their follow-up behaviour on the result of the test. They had confidence in the test result, and were often reassured by a normal result. After an abnormal result, most self-testers sought medical

  1. 40 CFR 761.306 - Sampling 1 meter square surfaces by random selection of halves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sampling 1 meter square surfaces by...(b)(3) § 761.306 Sampling 1 meter square surfaces by random selection of halves. (a) Divide each 1 meter square portion where it is necessary to collect a surface wipe test sample into two equal (or...

  2. 40 CFR 761.306 - Sampling 1 meter square surfaces by random selection of halves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sampling 1 meter square surfaces by...(b)(3) § 761.306 Sampling 1 meter square surfaces by random selection of halves. (a) Divide each 1 meter square portion where it is necessary to collect a surface wipe test sample into two equal (or...

  3. A Sr-90/Y-90 field calibrator for performance testing of beta-gamma survey instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Olsher, R.H.; Haynie, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    ANSI and regulatory agency guidelines prescribe periodic performance tests for radiation protection instrumentation. Reference readings should be obtained for one point on each scale or decade normally used. A small and lightweight calibrator has been developed that facilitates field testing of beta-gamma survey instruments. The calibrator uses a 45 microcurie Sr-90/Y-90 beta source with a filter wheel to generate variable dose rates in the range from 4 to 400 mrad/hr. Thus, several ranges may be checked by dialing in appropriate filters. The design, use, and typical applications of the calibrator are described.

  4. Routine feedback of test results to participants in clinic- and survey-based surveillance of HIV.

    PubMed

    Baggaley, Rachel; Johnson, Cheryl; Garcia Calleja, Jesus Maria; Sabin, Keith; Obermeyer, Carla; Taegtmeyer, Miriam; Zaba, Basia; El-Hayek, Carol; Singh, Jerome Amir

    2015-05-01

    Surveillance for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in low- and middle-income countries started in the 1980s. However, the questions of whether the results of HIV tests should be given to participants, and if so how, has still not been resolved. In the absence of effective treatment, it was considered acceptable to withhold results from HIV-positive participants. However, when antiretroviral treatment is available, some argue for beneficence - that it is the researcher's duty to return the test results to all those who provide samples for surveillance. The corollary is that only participants who wish to receive their test results would be eligible to participate in surveys. Others argue for autonomy - that to obtain a more representative result for the general population, surveys should not exclude participants who do not wish to receive their test results. This round table discussion takes a closer look at those two arguments. We believe that the global community should work towards routine feedback of HIV surveillance while ensuring that participants receive and understand their test results.

  5. Routine feedback of test results to participants in clinic- and survey-based surveillance of HIV

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Cheryl; Garcia Calleja, Jesus Maria; Sabin, Keith; Obermeyer, Carla; Taegtmeyer, Miriam; Zaba, Basia; El-Hayek, Carol; Singh, Jerome Amir

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Surveillance for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in low- and middle-income countries started in the 1980s. However, the questions of whether the results of HIV tests should be given to participants, and if so how, has still not been resolved. In the absence of effective treatment, it was considered acceptable to withhold results from HIV-positive participants. However, when antiretroviral treatment is available, some argue for beneficence – that it is the researcher’s duty to return the test results to all those who provide samples for surveillance. The corollary is that only participants who wish to receive their test results would be eligible to participate in surveys. Others argue for autonomy – that to obtain a more representative result for the general population, surveys should not exclude participants who do not wish to receive their test results. This round table discussion takes a closer look at those two arguments. We believe that the global community should work towards routine feedback of HIV surveillance while ensuring that participants receive and understand their test results. PMID:26229207

  6. LINEAR COUNT-RATE METER

    DOEpatents

    Henry, J.J.

    1961-09-01

    A linear count-rate meter is designed to provide a highly linear output while receiving counting rates from one cycle per second to 100,000 cycles per second. Input pulses enter a linear discriminator and then are fed to a trigger circuit which produces positive pulses of uniform width and amplitude. The trigger circuit is connected to a one-shot multivibrator. The multivibrator output pulses have a selected width. Feedback means are provided for preventing transistor saturation in the multivibrator which improves the rise and decay times of the output pulses. The multivibrator is connected to a diode-switched, constant current metering circuit. A selected constant current is switched to an averaging circuit for each pulse received, and for a time determined by the received pulse width. The average output meter current is proportional to the product of the counting rate, the constant current, and the multivibrator output pulse width.

  7. Characterization and acceptance testing of fully depleted thick CCDs for the large synoptic survey telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, Ivan V.; Haupt, Justine; O'Connor, Paul; Smith, Thomas; Takacs, Peter; Neal, Homer; Chiang, Jim

    2016-07-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) camera will be made as a mosaic assembled of 189 large format Charge Coupled Devices (CCD). They are n-channel, 100 micron thick devices operated in the over depleted regime. There are 16 segments, 1 million pixels each, that are read out through separate amplifiers. The image quality and readout speed expected from LSST camera translates into strict acceptance requirements for individual sensors. Prototype sensors and preproduction CCDs were delivered by vendors and they have been used for developing test procedures and protocols. Building upon this experience, two test stands were designed and commissioned at Brookhaven National Laboratory for production electro-optical testing. In this article, the sensor acceptance criteria are outlined and discussed, the test stand design and used equipment are presented and the results from commissioning sensor runs are shown.

  8. The utility of blood glucose meters in biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, Jennifer; Vermerris, Wilfred

    2005-06-01

    Most methods used to measure glucose concentrations in biotechnological settings are labour-intensive and/or expensive. With this in mind we have investigated the possibility of employing blood glucose meters, the use of which has the benefit of being fast, convenient and inexpensive, for this purpose. Accu-Chek Advantage (Roche Diagnostics, Indianapolis, IN, U.S.A.) and Precision QID (Medisense, Abbott Laboratories, Indianapolis, IN, U.S.A.) meters were tested using glucose samples of known concentration, at pH 7.5 and 4.8. The Accu-Chek Advantage meter uses strips containing the enzyme glucose dehydrogenase. This meter showed a linear response for glucose concentrations between 0.50 and 6.0 g/litre, and the effect of pH was small. The Precision QID meter uses strips containing the enzyme glucose oxidase and is more sensitive to pH. The displayed glucose concentrations at low pH values were consistently lower than at higher pH values. At both pH values the response curve reached a plateau, which limited the effective range of this meter to a range of 0.30-2.5 g/litre. Unlike the Precision QID meter, the Accu-Chek Advantage meter also responded to xylose and arabinose. A synergistic effect of combining sugars was observed when a mixture of sugars consisting of glucose and arabinose, or glucose and xylose, was applied: the displayed concentrations were consistently higher than was expected on the basis of the individual calibration curves. The use of glucose meters is a fast and convenient alternative to existing methods and may be of particular use for screening purposes where a high degree of accuracy is not crucial. The choice of meter should depend on the application, and in this respect the pH, expected concentration range and the presence of other sugars are among the factors that should be considered.

  9. Tests of simulated Gaia BP/RP spectra with LDS (Low Dispersion Spectroscopy) photographic sky surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudec, René; Hudec, Lukáš

    2011-12-01

    The LDS (Low Dispersion Spectroscopy) performed in various extended sky surveys with optical telescopes using objective prism and photographic plates offers an interesting opportunity to test simulated low-dispersion spectra for the Gaia BP/RP photometers and to compare them with real data, especially for objects with strong emission lines. We present a review of astrophysics with LDS performed in the past, as well as an overview of existing extended sky surveys (with photographic plates) providing LDS data. Some of them provide almost complete coverage of the northern or southern hemisphere (e.g. the Northern and Southern Mt Wilson - Michigan Hα surveys or the German La Paz Bolivia Southern Spectral Sky Survey). We show examples of these data and discuss a comparison of existing LDS plate data with expected/simulated Gaia BP/RP data. We show examples of real data for objects with very strong and wide emission features confirming that such features will be detectable with Gaia BP/RP. We also discuss the importance of Gaia RP/BP low-dispersion spectroscopy for astrophysical studies.

  10. Pros and cons of solid state metering

    SciTech Connect

    Via, R.B.

    1995-10-01

    This paper addresses the problems and benefits of microprocessor based metering systems for electric power. The topics of the paper include historical aspects of power metering, mechanical meters, operating environments of power meters, reliability, cost, industry and customer acceptance, service life, and ease of adaptability to new rate structures.

  11. Support for hospital-based HIV testing and counseling: a national survey of hospital marketing executives.

    PubMed Central

    Boscarino, J A; Steiber, S R

    1995-01-01

    Today, hospitals are involved extensively in social marketing and promotional activities. Recently, investigators from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimated that routine testing of hospital patients for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) could identify more than 100,000 patients with previously unrecognized HIV infections. Several issues are assessed in this paper. These include hospital support for voluntary HIV testing and AIDS education and the impact that treating AIDS patients has on the hospital's image. Also tested is the hypothesis that certain hospitals, such as for-profit institutions and those outside the AIDS epicenters, would be less supportive of hospital-based AIDS intervention strategies. To assess these issues, a national random sample of 193 executives in charge of hospital marketing and public relations were surveyed between December 1992 and January 1993. The survey was part of an ongoing annual survey of hospitals and included questions about AIDS, health education, marketing, patient satisfaction, and hospital planning. Altogether, 12.4 percent of executives indicated their hospital had a reputation for treating AIDS patients. Among hospitals without an AIDS reputation, 34.1 percent believed developing one would be harmful to the hospital's image, in contrast to none in hospitals that had such a reputation (chi 2 = 11.676, df = 1, P = .0006). Although 16.6 percent did not know if large-scale HIV testing should be implemented, a near majority (47.7 percent) expressed some support. In addition, 15 percent reported that HIV-positive physicians on the hospital's medical staff should not be allowed to practice medicine, but 32.1 percent indicated that they should.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7638335

  12. Improving Inpatient Surveys: Web-Based Computer Adaptive Testing Accessed via Mobile Phone QR Codes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The National Health Service (NHS) 70-item inpatient questionnaire surveys inpatients on their perceptions of their hospitalization experience. However, it imposes more burden on the patient than other similar surveys. The literature shows that computerized adaptive testing (CAT) based on item response theory can help shorten the item length of a questionnaire without compromising its precision. Objective Our aim was to investigate whether CAT can be (1) efficient with item reduction and (2) used with quick response (QR) codes scanned by mobile phones. Methods After downloading the 2008 inpatient survey data from the Picker Institute Europe website and analyzing the difficulties of this 70-item questionnaire, we used an author-made Excel program using the Rasch partial credit model to simulate 1000 patients’ true scores followed by a standard normal distribution. The CAT was compared to two other scenarios of answering all items (AAI) and the randomized selection method (RSM), as we investigated item length (efficiency) and measurement accuracy. The author-made Web-based CAT program for gathering patient feedback was effectively accessed from mobile phones by scanning the QR code. Results We found that the CAT can be more efficient for patients answering questions (ie, fewer items to respond to) than either AAI or RSM without compromising its measurement accuracy. A Web-based CAT inpatient survey accessed by scanning a QR code on a mobile phone was viable for gathering inpatient satisfaction responses. Conclusions With advances in technology, patients can now be offered alternatives for providing feedback about hospitalization satisfaction. This Web-based CAT is a possible option in health care settings for reducing the number of survey items, as well as offering an innovative QR code access. PMID:26935793

  13. 40 CFR 1065.640 - Flow meter calibration calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... 1065.640 Section 1065.640 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.640 Flow meter...: Table 2 of § 1065.640—C fCFV versus β and γ for CFV Flow Meters C fCFV β γ exh =1.385 γ dexh = γ air =...

  14. 40 CFR 1065.640 - Flow meter calibration calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... 1065.640 Section 1065.640 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.640 Flow meter... Flow Meters C fCFV β γ exh =1.385 γ dexh = γ air = 1.399 0.000 0.6822 0.6846 0.400 0.6857 0.6881...

  15. 40 CFR 1065.640 - Flow meter calibration calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... 1065.640 Section 1065.640 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.640 Flow meter... Flow Meters C fCFV β γ exh =1.385 γ dexh = γ air = 1.399 0.000 0.6822 0.6846 0.400 0.6857 0.6881...

  16. 40 CFR 1065.640 - Flow meter calibration calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... 1065.640 Section 1065.640 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.640 Flow meter... Flow Meters C fCFV b g exh =1.385 g dexh = g air = 1.399 0.000 0.6822 0.6846 0.400 0.6857 0.6881...

  17. 40 CFR 1065.640 - Flow meter calibration calculations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... 1065.640 Section 1065.640 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.640 Flow meter...: Table 2 of § 1065.640—C fCFV versus β and γ for CFV Flow Meters C fCFV β γ exh =1.385 γ dexh = γ air =...

  18. Direct-reading inductance meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolbly, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    Meter indicates from 30 nH to 3 micro H. Reference inductor of 15 micro H is made by winding 50 turns of Number 26 Formvar wire on Micrometal type 50-2 (or equivalent) core. Circuit eliminates requirement for complex instrument compensation prior to taking coil inductance measurement and thus is as easy to operate as common ohmmeter.

  19. A Redesigned DFA Moisture Meter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The DFA moisture meter has been internationally recognized as the standard for determining moisture content of dried fruit in general and is AOAC Official Method 972.2 for measuring moisture in prunes and raisins since 1972. The device has remained virtually unchanged since its inception, with its o...

  20. Integration and verification testing of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Travis; Bond, Tim; Chiang, James; Gilmore, Kirk; Digel, Seth; Dubois, Richard; Glanzman, Tom; Johnson, Tony; Lopez, Margaux; Newbry, Scott P.; Nordby, Martin E.; Rasmussen, Andrew P.; Reil, Kevin A.; Roodman, Aaron J.

    2016-08-01

    We present an overview of the Integration and Verification Testing activities of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) Camera at the SLAC National Accelerator Lab (SLAC). The LSST Camera, the sole instrument for LSST and under construction now, is comprised of a 3.2 Giga-pixel imager and a three element corrector with a 3.5 degree diameter field of view. LSST Camera Integration and Test will be taking place over the next four years, with final delivery to the LSST observatory anticipated in early 2020. We outline the planning for Integration and Test, describe some of the key verification hardware systems being developed, and identify some of the more complicated assembly/integration activities. Specific details of integration and verification hardware systems will be discussed, highlighting some of the technical challenges anticipated.

  1. Lead testing of children and homes: results of a national telephone survey.

    PubMed Central

    Binder, S; Matte, T D; Kresnow, M; Houston, B; Sacks, J J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. This study was designed to estimate the percentage of young children in the United States who have been tested for lead and the percentage of dwellings in the United States in which the paint has been tested for lead. METHODS. A national random digit dial telephone survey of 5238 households was conducted in 1994. Weighted national estimates and 95% confidence intervals for outcomes of interest were calculated. RESULTS. About 24% of U.S. children ages 0 to 6 years were estimated to have been tested for lead. Higher rates of testing were reported for children living in homes constructed prior to 1960, those living in homes with low household income, those living in rental units, and those living in the Northeast. Lead paint testing was performed for only an estimated 9% of U.S. housing units. Older homes were not more likely to have been tested than newer ones. CONCLUSION. A high proportion of pre-school children have apparently not been screened for lead exposure, even among subgroups at increased risk. Most dwellings of pre-school children have not been tested for lead paint. These data suggest that most at-risk children are not being reached by current approaches to lead poisoning prevention. PMID:8711102

  2. Note: Ultrasonic liquid flow meter for small pipes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Zong, Guanghua

    2012-02-01

    An ultrasonic flow meter for small pipes is presented. For metal pipe diameter smaller than 10 mm, clamp-on ultrasonic contrapropagation flow meters may encounter difficulties if cross talk or the short acoustic path contributes to large uncertainty in transit time measurement. Axial inline flow meters can avoid these problems, but they may introduce other problems if the transducer port is not properly positioned. Three types of pipe connecting tees are compared using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method. CFD shows the 45° tee has more uniform velocity distribution over the measuring section. A prototype flow meter using the 45° tee was designed and tested. The zero flow experiment shows the flow meter has a maximum of 0.002 m∕s shift over 24 h. The flow meter is calibrated by only 1 meter factor. After calibration, inaccuracy lower than 0.1% of reading was achieved in the laboratory, for a measuring range from 15 to 150 g∕s (0.29 to 2.99 m∕s; Re = 2688 to 26,876).

  3. A Survey of Vegetation and Wildland Fire Hazards on the Nevada Test Site, September 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Nevada, Bechtel

    2004-09-01

    In the spring of 2004 a survey was conducted by Bechtel Nevada Ecological Services on the Nevada Test Site to characterize vegetation resources and climatic components of the environment that contribute to wildland fires. The field surveyed assessed 211 sites along major Nevada Test Site corridors for the abundance of native perennial and annual species and invasive weeds. The abundance of fine-textured (grasses and herbs) and coarse-textured (woody) biomass was visually estimated on numerical scales ranging from one to five. Wildland fires are costly to control and to mitigate once they occur. Revegetation of burned areas is very slow without reseeding or transplanting with native species and other rehabilitation efforts. Untreated areas become much more vulnerable to future fires once invasive species, rather than native species, colonize a burned area.The annual assessment of wildland fire hazards on the Nevada Test Site is scheduled to be implemented each spring in the near future with results being reported directly to the U.S. Department of Energy and the Bechtel Nevada Fire Marshal.

  4. Instrument Development: Examining the Appropriateness of Student and Teacher Surveys for Determining the Need for Testing Accommodations. Technical Report #31

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Julie; Ketterlin-Geller, Leanne; Tindal, Gerald

    2004-01-01

    This technical report documents the procedures followed in developing student and teacher surveys to gather information about the accommodations students are accustomed to receiving and those that might be beneficial on a mathematics test delivered on the computer. It provides documentation of the technical adequacy of the survey instruments, as…

  5. Carrier screening for cystic fibrosis in US genetic testing laboratories: a survey of laboratory directors.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, D J; Katsanis, S H; Javitt, G H; Murphy, J A; Scott, J A; Hudson, K L

    2008-10-01

    Initial guidelines for cystic fibrosis (CF) carrier screening were issued in 2001 by the American College of Medical Genetics and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and updated in 2004. It is unknown how these guidelines have influenced laboratory practice. This study examined the uptake of two components of these guidelines for CF screening in genetic testing laboratories. A survey of directors of US genetic testing laboratories was conducted. Of 190 respondents, 178 answered questions about CF testing. Nearly half (49%) performed some type of DNA testing for CF; most of these (92%) performed CF carrier screening. Ten percent used a 23-mutation panel for CF screening. The results of 5T tests were reported as a reflex test by 79% of laboratories, while 8% always returned 5T results and 7% never returned them. Seven percent of laboratories adopted both guidelines, 80% adopted one of the two guidelines, and 13% had not adopted either recommendation, suggesting that factors other than clinical guidelines may influence laboratories' CF screening practices. Further studies are needed to determine whether the adoption of CF screening guidelines has significant clinical or economic effects on population-based CF screening programs.

  6. An in situ survey of Clean Slate 1, 2, and 3, Tonopah Test Range, Central Nevada. Date of survey: September--November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    A ground-based in situ radiological survey was conducted downwind of the Clean Slate 1, 2, and 3 nuclear safety test sites at the Tonopah Test Range in central Nevada from September through November 1993. The purpose of the study was to corroborate the americium-241 ({sup 241}Am) soil concentrations that were derived from the aerial radiological survey of the Clean Slate areas, which was conducted from August through October 1993. The presence of {sup 241}Am was detected at 140 of the 190 locations, with unrecoverable or lost data accounting for fifteen (15) of the sampling points. Good agreement was obtained between the aerial and in situ results.

  7. [The Predictive Ability of Entrance Testing and a Survey of Socio-Economic Characteristics at Lake Land College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lach, Ivan J.

    The predictive ability of required tests as to grade point averages (GPA) and a survey of students' socio-economic characteristics are reported on in two separate studies from Lake Land College (Illinois). In the first paper a comparative study of required reading and mathematics tests and the American College Test (ACT) as to their ability to…

  8. Software for automated testing and characterization of CCDs for Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prouza, Michael; Kubánek, Petr; O'Connor, Paul; Kotov, Ivan; Frank, James; Antilogus, Pierre

    2010-07-01

    We present the latest modifications of the open source observatory control software package RTS2. New features were developed specifically for the automated testing of CCD chips for the mosaic camera of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. Currently, the system is in operation at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, USA and at Laboratoire de Physique Nucĺeaire et des Hautes ´Energies in Paris, France. RTS2 software is currently used to characterize the sensors from various vendors and will be used first for selection and then for testing of production CCD sensors. With our system we are able to automatically obtain a series of images for analysis. Data is used to study many aspects of sensor characteristics, including wavelength dependence of quantum efficiency, the dark current, and the linearity of the CCD response as a function of back-bias voltage and temperature. We also can measure a point spread function over the whole surface of the CCD sensors.

  9. A user interface for the Kansas Geological Survey slug test model.

    PubMed

    Esling, Steven P; Keller, John E

    2009-01-01

    The Kansas Geological Survey (KGS) developed a semianalytical solution for slug tests that incorporates the effects of partial penetration, anisotropy, and the presence of variable conductivity well skins. The solution can simulate either confined or unconfined conditions. The original model, written in FORTRAN, has a text-based interface with rigid input requirements and limited output options. We re-created the main routine for the KGS model as a Visual Basic macro that runs in most versions of Microsoft Excel and built a simple-to-use Excel spreadsheet interface that automatically displays the graphical results of the test. A comparison of the output from the original FORTRAN code to that of the new Excel spreadsheet version for three cases produced identical results.

  10. The administration and interpretation of the rapid exchange grip test: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Shechtman, Orit; Goodall, Sara K

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine if the administration and interpretation of the rapid exchange grip (REG) test vary among hand therapists nationally. The REG is used to determine sincerity of effort of grip strength. There are inconsistencies in the literature regarding the administration and interpretation of the REG, as various studies use different testing protocols and diverse interpretation criteria for what constitutes a sincere effort. As a result, we expected to find a lack of standardization in the administration and interpretation of the REG in clinical practice. We conducted a random nationwide survey of 200 hand therapists. The questionnaire items regarding the administration of the REG included patient position, test instructions, handle settings, handling of the dynamometer, hand switch rate, number of repetitions, and techniques used to record the score. The items for the interpretation of the REG involved questions regarding comparative tests. We found that the REG test lacks standardized administration protocols and interpretation criteria among therapists nationwide. The lack of standardization is likely to affect the reliability and validity of the REG and to hinder the therapist's ability to accurately report its outcomes. The implications of lack of standardization in assessment techniques to the profession are discussed.

  11. A microcomputer based system for current-meter data acquisition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, R.T.; Gartner, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is conducting current measurements as part of an interdisciplinary study of the San Francisco Bay estuarine system. The current meters used in the study record current speed, direction, temperature, and conductivity in digital codes on magnetic tape cartridges. Upon recovery of the current meters, the data tapes are translated by a tape reader into computer codes for further analyses. Quite often the importance of the data processing phase of a current-measurement program is underestimated and downplayed. In this paper a data-processing system which performs the complete data processing and analyses is described. The system, which is configured around an LSI-11 microcomputer, has been assembled to provide the capabilities of data translation, reduction, and tabulation and graphical display immediately following recovery of current meters. The flexibility inherent in a microcomputer has made it available to perform many other research functions which would normally be done on an institutional computer.

  12. A Survey of New Trends in Symbolic Execution for Software Testing and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasareanu, Corina S.; Visser, Willem

    2009-01-01

    Symbolic execution is a well-known program analysis technique which represents values of program inputs with symbolic values instead of concrete (initialized) data and executes the program by manipulating program expressions involving the symbolic values. Symbolic execution has been proposed over three decades ago but recently it has found renewed interest in the research community, due in part to the progress in decision procedures, availability of powerful computers and new algorithmic developments. We provide a survey of some of the new research trends in symbolic execution, with particular emphasis on applications to test generation and program analysis. We first describe an approach that handles complex programming constructs such as input data structures, arrays, as well as multi-threading. We follow with a discussion of abstraction techniques that can be used to limit the (possibly infinite) number of symbolic configurations that need to be analyzed for the symbolic execution of looping programs. Furthermore, we describe recent hybrid techniques that combine concrete and symbolic execution to overcome some of the inherent limitations of symbolic execution, such as handling native code or availability of decision procedures for the application domain. Finally, we give a short survey of interesting new applications, such as predictive testing, invariant inference, program repair, analysis of parallel numerical programs and differential symbolic execution.

  13. Background Radiation Survey of the Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Center

    SciTech Connect

    Colin Okada

    2010-09-16

    In preparation for operations at the Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Complex (Rad/NucCTEC), the Department of Homeland Security Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DHS/DNDO) requested that personnel from the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) conduct a survey of the present radiological conditions at the facility. The measurements consist of the exposure rate from a high-pressure ion chamber (HPIC), high-resolution spectra from a high-purity germanium (HPGe) system in an in situ configuration, and low-resolution spectra from a sodium iodide (NaI) detector in a radiation detection backpack. Measurements with these systems were collected at discrete locations within the facility. Measurements were also collected by carrying the VECTOR backpack throughout the complex to generate a map of the entire area. The area was also to be surveyed with the Kiwi (an array of eight-2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch NaI detectors) from the Aerial Measuring Systems; however, conflicts with test preparation activities at the site prevented this from being accomplished.

  14. Federal Building Metering Guidance (per 42 U.S.C. 8253(e), Metering of Energy Use)

    SciTech Connect

    2014-11-01

    Guidance defines which federal buildings are appropriate to meter, provides metering prioritization recommendations for agencies with limited resources, and discusses the requirement for agencies to submit metering implementation plans to the U.S. Department of Energy.

  15. Government Program Briefing: Smart Metering

    SciTech Connect

    Doris, E.; Peterson, K.

    2011-09-01

    This document is adapted and updated from a memo delivered to the City Council of New Orleans, the office of the Mayor of New Orleans, the Chairperson of the Citizen Stakeholders Group (New Orleans Energy Task Force) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Project Officer in March 2008. This briefing piece provides an overview of the benefits, costs, and challenges of smart metering.

  16. Reflective-tube absorption meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaneveld, J. Ronald V.; Bartz, Robert; Kitchen, James C.

    1990-09-01

    The design and calibration of a proposed in situ spectral absorption meter is evaluated using a laboratory prototype. The design includes a silver coated (second-surface) glass tube, a tungsten light source (stabilized by means of optical feedback), a monochromator, and a solid state detector. The device measures the absorption coefficient plus a portion of the volume scattering function. Theoretical analyses and laboratory experiments which explore the magnitude and variation of the errors due to scattering and internal reflections are described. Similar analyses are performed on the Cary 1 18 Spectrophotometer to allow cross calibration. Algorithms to yield the abscrption coefficient and the zenith-sun diffuse attenuation coefficient are presented and evaluated. Simultaneous measurement of the beam attenuation or backscattering coefficient allows use of algoriThms with much narrower error bands. The various methods of obtaining absorption and diffuse attenuation values are compared. Procedures for using reverse osmosis filtration to produce a clean water calibration standard are described. An absorption spectrum for pure water is obtained. Development of the absorption meter is proceeding along two lines: 1) a two-wavelength side-by-side LED is being fabricated to allow an in situ chlorophyll a absorption meter to be constructed, and 2) scientific projects using a shipboard or laboratory flow.-through pumping system are being planned.

  17. Nevada Test Site Area 25, Radiological Survey and Cleanup Project, 1974-1983 (a revised final report). Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.G.

    1984-12-01

    This report describes the radiological survey, decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Area 25 facilities and land areas incorporated in the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (NRDS). Buildings, facilities and support systems used after 1959 for nuclear reactor and engine testing were surveyed for the presence of radioactive contamination. The radiological survey portion of the project encompassed portable instrument surveys and removable contamination surveys (swipe) for beta plus gamma and alpha radioactive contamination of facilities, equipment and land areas. Soil sampling was also accomplished. The majority of Area 25 facilities and land areas have been returned to unrestricted use. Remaining radiologically contaminated areas are posted with warning signs and barricades. 9 references, 23 figures.

  18. Balanced Flow Metering and Conditioning: Technology for Fluid Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Anthony R.

    2006-01-01

    Revolutionary new technology that creates balanced conditions across the face of a multi-hole orifice plate has been developed, patented and exclusively licensed for commercialization. This balanced flow technology simultaneously measures mass flow rate, volumetric flow rate, and fluid density with little or no straight pipe run requirements. Initially, the balanced plate was a drop in replacement for a traditional orifice plate, but testing revealed substantially better performance as compared to the orifice plate such as, 10 times better accuracy, 2 times faster (shorter distance) pressure recovery, 15 times less acoustic noise energy generation, and 2.5 times less permanent pressure loss. During 2004 testing at MSFC, testing revealed several configurations of the balanced flow meter that match the accuracy of Venturi meters while having only slightly more permanent pressure loss. However, the balanced meter only requires a 0.25 inch plate and has no upstream or downstream straight pipe requirements. As a fluid conditioning device, the fluid usually reaches fully developed flow within 1 pipe diameter of the balanced conditioning plate. This paper will describe the basic balanced flow metering technology, provide performance details generated by testing to date and provide implementation details along with calculations required for differing degrees of flow metering accuracy.

  19. A survey of residual analysis and a new test of residual trend.

    PubMed

    McDowell, J J; Calvin, Olivia L; Klapes, Bryan

    2016-05-01

    A survey of residual analysis in behavior-analytic research reveals that existing methods are problematic in one way or another. A new test for residual trends is proposed that avoids the problematic features of the existing methods. It entails fitting cubic polynomials to sets of residuals and comparing their effect sizes to those that would be expected if the sets of residuals were random. To this end, sampling distributions of effect sizes for fits of a cubic polynomial to random data were obtained by generating sets of random standardized residuals of various sizes, n. A cubic polynomial was then fitted to each set of residuals and its effect size was calculated. This yielded a sampling distribution of effect sizes for each n. To test for a residual trend in experimental data, the median effect size of cubic-polynomial fits to sets of experimental residuals can be compared to the median of the corresponding sampling distribution of effect sizes for random residuals using a sign test. An example from the literature, which entailed comparing mathematical and computational models of continuous choice, is used to illustrate the utility of the test.

  20. The Alcock Paczy'nski test with Baryon Acoustic Oscillations: systematic effects for future surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepori, Francesca; Di Dio, Enea; Viel, Matteo; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Durrer, Ruth

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the Alcock Paczy'nski (AP) test applied to the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) feature in the galaxy correlation function. By using a general formalism that includes relativistic effects, we quantify the importance of the linear redshift space distortions and gravitational lensing corrections to the galaxy number density fluctuation. We show that redshift space distortions significantly affect the shape of the correlation function, both in radial and transverse directions, causing different values of galaxy bias to induce offsets up to 1% in the AP test. On the other hand, we find that the lensing correction around the BAO scale modifies the amplitude but not the shape of the correlation function and therefore does not introduce any systematic effect. Furthermore, we investigate in details how the AP test is sensitive to redshift binning: a window function in transverse direction suppresses correlations and shifts the peak position toward smaller angular scales. We determine the correction that should be applied in order to account for this effect, when performing the test with data from three future planned galaxy redshift surveys: Euclid, the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) and the Square Kilometer Array (SKA).

  1. 40 CFR 92.122 - Smoke meter calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Smoke meter calibration. 92.122... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.122 Smoke... test: (a) The zero control shall be adjusted under conditions of “no smoke” to give a recorder or...

  2. 40 CFR 92.122 - Smoke meter calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Smoke meter calibration. 92.122... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.122 Smoke... test: (a) The zero control shall be adjusted under conditions of “no smoke” to give a recorder or...

  3. 40 CFR 92.122 - Smoke meter calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Smoke meter calibration. 92.122... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.122 Smoke... test: (a) The zero control shall be adjusted under conditions of “no smoke” to give a recorder or...

  4. 40 CFR 92.122 - Smoke meter calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Smoke meter calibration. 92.122... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.122 Smoke... test: (a) The zero control shall be adjusted under conditions of “no smoke” to give a recorder or...

  5. What Can Student Perception Surveys Tell Us about Teaching? Empirically Testing the Underlying Structure of the Tripod Student Perception Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Tanner LeBaron; Kelcey, Benjamin; Ruzek, Erik

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a theory-based analysis of the underlying structure of the Tripod student perception survey instrument using the Measures of Effective Teaching (MET) database (N = 1,049 middle school math class sections; N = 25,423 students). Multilevel item factor analyses suggested that an alternative bifactor structure best fit the Tripod items,…

  6. Sourcebook of locations of geophysical surveys in tunnels and horizontal holes, including results of seismic refraction surveys, Rainier Mesa, Aqueduct Mesa, and Area 16, Nevada Test Site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carroll, R.D.; Kibler, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    Seismic refraction surveys have been obtained sporadically in tunnels in zeolitized tuff at the Nevada Test Site since the late 1950's. Commencing in 1967 and continuing to date (1982), .extensive measurements of shear- and compressional-wave velocities have been made in five tunnel complexes in Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas and in one tunnel complex in Shoshone Mountain. The results of these surveys to 1980 are compiled in this report. In addition, extensive horizontal drilling was initiated in 1967 in connection with geologic exploration in these tunnel complexes for sites for nuclear weapons tests. Seismic and electrical surveys were conducted in the majority of these holes. The type and location of these tunnel and borehole surveys are indexed in this report. Synthesis of the seismic refraction data indicates a mean compressional-wave velocity near the nuclear device point (WP) of 23 tunnel events of 2,430 m/s (7,970 f/s) with a range of 1,846-2,753 m/s (6,060-9,030 f/s). The mean shear-wave velocity of 17 tunnel events is 1,276 m/s (4,190 f/s) with a range of 1,140-1,392 m/s (3,740-4,570 f/s). Experience indicates that these velocity variations are due chiefly to the extent of fracturing and (or) the presence of partially saturated rock in the region of the survey.

  7. How to use your peak flow meter

    MedlinePlus

    ... get your child used to them. Find Your Personal Best To find your personal best peak flow ... peak flow meter; Bronchial asthma - peak flow meter Images How to measure peak flow References Durrani SR, ...

  8. Quantum speed meter based on dissipative coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyatchanin, Sergey P.; Matsko, Andrey B.

    2017-01-01

    We consider dissipative coupling Fabry-Perot cavity, i.e. its input mirror transmittance depends on position of probe mass. We show that dissipative coupling provide possibility to realize quantum speed meter by natural way, without additional setup for subtraction of position x(t) and delayed position x(t-τ). Quantum speed meter is a quantum non demolition (QND) meter which allow to overcome Standatd Quantum Limit — we show it for speed meter based on dissipative coupling.

  9. Integrating seepage heterogeneity with the use of ganged seepage meters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberry, D.O.

    2005-01-01

    The usefulness of standard half-barrel seepage meters for measurement of fluxes between groundwater, and surface water is limited by the small bed area that each measurement represents and the relatively large associated labor costs. Standard half-barrel cylinders were ganged together to allow one measurement of the summed seepage through all of the meters, reducing labor cost and increasing the representative area of measurement. Comparisons of ganged versus individual-meter measurements at two lakes, under both inseepage and outseepage conditions, indicate little loss of efficiency resulting from routing seepage water through the ganging system. Differences between summed and ganged seepage rates were not significant for all but the fastest rates of seepage. At flow rates greater than about 250 mL min-1, ganged values were as low as 80% of summed values. Ganged-meter head losses also were calculated to determine their significance relative to hydraulic-head gradients measured at the field sites. The calculated reduction in hydraulic gradient beneath the seepage meters was significant only for the largest measured seepage rates. A calibration tank was used to determine single-meter and ganged-meter efficiencies compared to known seepage rates. Single-cylinder seepage meters required an average correction factor of 1.05 to convert measured to actual values, whereas the ganged measurements made in the tank required a larger correction factor of 1.14. Although manual measurements were used in these tests, the concept of ganging seepage cylinders also would be useful when used in conjunction with automated flowmeters. ?? 2005, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

  10. Embedded solution for a microwave moisture meter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this paper, the conversion of a PC or laptop-controlled microwave moisture meter to a stand-alone meter hosting its own embedded system is discussed. The moisture meter is based on the free-space transmission measurement technique and uses low-intensity microwaves to measure the attenuation and p...

  11. 10 CFR 451.7 - Metering requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Metering requirements. 451.7 Section 451.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION RENEWABLE ENERGY PRODUCTION INCENTIVES § 451.7 Metering requirements... renewable energy facility must be measured by a standard metering device that— (a) Meets generally...

  12. 10 CFR 451.7 - Metering requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Metering requirements. 451.7 Section 451.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION RENEWABLE ENERGY PRODUCTION INCENTIVES § 451.7 Metering requirements... renewable energy facility must be measured by a standard metering device that— (a) Meets generally...

  13. 10 CFR 451.7 - Metering requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Metering requirements. 451.7 Section 451.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION RENEWABLE ENERGY PRODUCTION INCENTIVES § 451.7 Metering requirements... renewable energy facility must be measured by a standard metering device that— (a) Meets generally...

  14. 10 CFR 451.7 - Metering requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Metering requirements. 451.7 Section 451.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION RENEWABLE ENERGY PRODUCTION INCENTIVES § 451.7 Metering requirements... renewable energy facility must be measured by a standard metering device that— (a) Meets generally...

  15. 10 CFR 451.7 - Metering requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Metering requirements. 451.7 Section 451.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION RENEWABLE ENERGY PRODUCTION INCENTIVES § 451.7 Metering requirements... renewable energy facility must be measured by a standard metering device that— (a) Meets generally...

  16. The measurement of personal values in survey research: a test of alternative rating procedures.

    PubMed

    McCarty, J A; Shrum, L J

    2000-01-01

    When survey researchers are interested in measuring the personal values of respondents, they often use a rating rather than a ranking method because it is easier and faster to administer and yields data that are amenable to parametric statistical analyses. However, because personal values are inherently positive constructs, respondents often exhibit little differentiation among the values and end-pile their ratings toward the positive end of the scale. Such lack of differentiation may potentially affect the statistical properties of the values and the ability to detect relationships with other variables. Two experiments were conducted via mail surveys to general population samples to test alternative rating methods designed to increase differentiation and reduce end-piling in the rating of personal values. The results suggest that a procedure in which respondents first pick their most and least important values, then rate them (most-least), provides more differentiation and less end-piling than a simple rating procedure (rate-only). Increased differentiation for the most-least method influenced the fit of latent structure and resulted in more robust relations between the values ratings and other criterion variables. These results generalized across type of values scale, number of values rated, and number of rating points.

  17. Aesthetic and emotional effects of meter and rhyme in poetry.

    PubMed

    Obermeier, Christian; Menninghaus, Winfried; von Koppenfels, Martin; Raettig, Tim; Schmidt-Kassow, Maren; Otterbein, Sascha; Kotz, Sonja A

    2013-01-01

    Metrical patterning and rhyme are frequently employed in poetry but also in infant-directed speech, play, rites, and festive events. Drawing on four line-stanzas from nineteenth and twentieth German poetry that feature end rhyme and regular meter, the present study tested the hypothesis that meter and rhyme have an impact on aesthetic liking, emotional involvement, and affective valence attributions. Hypotheses that postulate such effects have been advocated ever since ancient rhetoric and poetics, yet they have barely been empirically tested. More recently, in the field of cognitive poetics, these traditional assumptions have been readopted into a general cognitive framework. In the present experiment, we tested the influence of meter and rhyme as well as their interaction with lexicality in the aesthetic and emotional perception of poetry. Participants listened to stanzas that were systematically modified with regard to meter and rhyme and rated them. Both rhyme and regular meter led to enhanced aesthetic appreciation, higher intensity in processing, and more positively perceived and felt emotions, with the latter finding being mediated by lexicality. Together these findings clearly show that both features significantly contribute to the aesthetic and emotional perception of poetry and thus confirm assumptions about their impact put forward by cognitive poetics. The present results are explained within the theoretical framework of cognitive fluency, which links structural features of poetry with aesthetic and emotional appraisal.

  18. Aesthetic and Emotional Effects of Meter and Rhyme in Poetry

    PubMed Central

    Obermeier, Christian; Menninghaus, Winfried; von Koppenfels, Martin; Raettig, Tim; Schmidt-Kassow, Maren; Otterbein, Sascha; Kotz, Sonja A.

    2013-01-01

    Metrical patterning and rhyme are frequently employed in poetry but also in infant-directed speech, play, rites, and festive events. Drawing on four line-stanzas from nineteenth and twentieth German poetry that feature end rhyme and regular meter, the present study tested the hypothesis that meter and rhyme have an impact on aesthetic liking, emotional involvement, and affective valence attributions. Hypotheses that postulate such effects have been advocated ever since ancient rhetoric and poetics, yet they have barely been empirically tested. More recently, in the field of cognitive poetics, these traditional assumptions have been readopted into a general cognitive framework. In the present experiment, we tested the influence of meter and rhyme as well as their interaction with lexicality in the aesthetic and emotional perception of poetry. Participants listened to stanzas that were systematically modified with regard to meter and rhyme and rated them. Both rhyme and regular meter led to enhanced aesthetic appreciation, higher intensity in processing, and more positively perceived and felt emotions, with the latter finding being mediated by lexicality. Together these findings clearly show that both features significantly contribute to the aesthetic and emotional perception of poetry and thus confirm assumptions about their impact put forward by cognitive poetics. The present results are explained within the theoretical framework of cognitive fluency, which links structural features of poetry with aesthetic and emotional appraisal. PMID:23386837

  19. Development of the Stress of Immigration Survey: A Field Test Among Mexican Immigrant Women.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Rosa Maria; Nápoles, Anna Maria; Gregorich, Steven; Paul, Steven; Lee, Kathryn A; Stewart, Anita L

    2016-01-01

    The Stress of Immigration Survey (SOIS) is a screening tool used to assess immigration-related stress. The mixed methods approach included concept development, pretesting, field testing, and psychometric evaluation in a sample of 131 low-income women of Mexican descent. The 21-item SOIS screens for stress related to language, immigrant status, work issues, yearning for family and home country, and cultural dissonance. Mean scores ranged from 3.6 to 4.4 (a scale of 1-5, higher is more stress). Cronbach α values were more than 0.80 for all subscales. The SOIS may be a useful screening tool for detecting high levels of immigration-related stress in low-income Mexican immigrant women.

  20. Synopsis of early field test results from the gravity gradiometer survey system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brzezowski, S.; Gleason, D.; Goldstein, J.; Heller, W.; Jekeli, Christopher; White, J.

    1989-01-01

    Although the amount of data yielded by the initial airborne and surface tests was modest, it was sufficient to demonstrate that the full gravity gradient tensor was successfully measured from moving platforms both in the air and on the surface. The measurements were effectively continuous with spatial along-track resolution limited only by choice of integration lengths taken to reduce noise. The airborne data were less noisy (800 E squared/Hz typical) than were the Gravity Gradiometer Survey System (GGSS) measurements taken at the surface (5000 E squared/Hz typical). Single tracks of surface gravity disturbances recovered from airborne data were accurate to 3 to 4 mgal in each component of gravity when compared to 5 x 5 mean gravity anomalies over a 90 km track. Multitrack processing yielded 2 to 3 mgal when compared to 5 x 5 mean anomalies. Deflection of the vertical recovery over a distance of 150 km was about one arcsecond.

  1. Flap survey test of a combined surface blowing model: Flow measurements at static flow conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukushima, T.

    1978-01-01

    The Combined Surface Blowing (CSB) V/STOL lift/propulsion system consists of a blown flap system which deflects the exhaust from a turbojet engine over a system of flaps deployed at the trailing edge of the wing. Flow measurements consisting of velocity measurements using split film probes and total measure surveys using a miniature Kiel probe were made at control stations along the flap systems at two spanwise stations, the centerline of the nozzle and 60 percent of the nozzle span outboard of the centerline. Surface pressure measurements were made in the wing cove and the upper surface of the first flap element. The test showed a significant flow separation in the wing cove. The extent of the separation is so large that the flow into the first flap takes place only at the leading edge of the flap. The velocity profile measurements indicate that large spanwise (3 dimensional) flow may exist.

  2. Five meter diameter conical furlable antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortenberry, J. W.; Freeland, R. E.; Moore, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation was made to demonstrate that a 5-meter-diameter, furlable, conical reflector antenna utilizing a line source feed can be fabricated utilizing composite materials and to prove that the antenna can function mechanically and electrically as prototype flight hardware. The design, analysis, and testing of the antenna are described. An RF efficiency of 55% at 8.5 GHz and a surface error of 0.64 mm rms were chosen as basic design requirements. Actual test measurements yielded an efficiency of 53% (49.77 dB gain) and a surface error of 0.61 mm rms. Atmospherically induced corrosion of the reflector mesh resulted in the RF performance degradation. An assessment of the antenna as compared to the current state of the art technology was made. This assessment included cost, surface accuracy and RF performance, structural and mechanical characteristics, and possible applications.

  3. Hydrogeologic data from the US Geological Survey test wells near Waycross, Ware County, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matthews, S.E.; Krause, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    Two wells were constructed near Waycross, Ware County, Georgia, from July 1980 to May 1981 to collect stratigraphic, structural, geophysical, hydrologic, hydraulic, and geochemical information for the U.S. Geological Survey Tertiary Limestone Regional Aquifer-System Analysis. Data collection included geologic sampling and coring, borehole geophysical logging, packer testing, water-level measuring, water-quality sampling, and aquifer testing. In the study area, the Tertiary limestone aquifer system is about 1,300 feet thick and is confined and overlain by about 610 feet of clastic sediments. The aquifer system consists of limestone, dolomite, and minor evaporites and has high porosity and permeability. A 4-day continuous discharge aquifer test was conducted, from which a transmissivity of about 1 million feet squared per day and a storage coefficient of 0.0001 were calculated. Water from the upper part of the aquifer is of a calcium bicarbonate type. The deeper highly mineralized zone produces a sodium bicarbonate type water in which concentrations of magnesium, sulfate, chloride, sodium, and some trace metals increase with depth. (USGS)

  4. Survey of family history taking and genetic testing in pediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Saul, Robert A; Trotter, Tracy; Sease, Kerry; Tarini, Beth

    2017-04-01

    Family health history collection and genetic testing are core elements for the successful translation of genomics into primary care practice. Yet, little is known about how pediatric providers implement these elements in practice. We surveyed the membership of the American Academy of Pediatrics regarding family health history (FHH) collection and genetic testing in the primary care setting. Three hundred forty-nine (349) responses were analyzed with the initial response rate of 43.3%. Four principal findings were noted-(1) family health history is still recognized as a critical part of the medical evaluation; (2) perceived obstacles for FHH are time in obtaining the FHH and concerns about the family's knowledge of their FHH; (3) a 3-generation family history is out of the scope of routine care and alternate methods should be considered; (4) most primary care providers (PCPs) do not feel comfortable ordering, interpreting, and counseling regarding current genetic testing. Expanded genetic/genomic education at multiple levels (undergraduate medical education, graduate medical education, and maintenance of certification) is clearly indicated to allow PCPs to integrate these vital elements into a current evaluation (acute care or health maintenance) in the primary care setting.

  5. Testing the abundant center model using range-wide demographic surveys of two coastal dune plants.

    PubMed

    Samis, Karen E; Eckert, Christopher G

    2007-07-01

    It is widely accepted that species are most abundant at the center of their geographic ranges and become progressively rarer toward range limits. Although the abundant center model (ACM) has rarely been tested with range-wide surveys, it influences much thinking about the ecology and evolution of species' distributions. We tested ACM predictions using two unrelated but ecologically similar plants, Camissonia cheiranthifolia and Abronia umbellata. We intensively sampled both throughout their one-dimensional distributions within the Pacific coastal dunes of North America, from northern Baja California, Mexico, to southern Oregon, USA. Data from > 1100 herbarium specimens indicated that these limits have been stable for at least the last 100 years. Range-wide field surveys detected C. cheiranthifolia at 87% of 124 sites and A. umbellata at 54% of 113 sites, but site occupancy did not decline significantly toward range limits for either species. Permutation analysis did not detect a significant fit of geographical variation in local density to the ACM. Mean density did not correlate negatively with mean individual performance (plant size or number of seeds/plant), probably because both species occur at low densities. Although size and seeds per plant varied widely, central populations tended to have the highest values for size only. For C. cheiranthifolia, we observed asymmetry in the pattern of variation between the northern and southern halves of the range consistent with the long-standing prediction that range limits are imposed by different ecological factors in different parts of the geographical distribution. However, these asymmetries were difficult to interpret and likely reflect evolutionary differentiation as well as plastic responses to ecological variation. Both density and seeds per plant contributed to variation in seed production per unit area. In C. cheiranthifolia only, sites with highest seed production tended to occur at the range center, as

  6. Selective reporting of antibiotic susceptibility test results in European countries: an ESCMID cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Pulcini, Céline; Tebano, Gianpiero; Mutters, Nico T; Tacconelli, Evelina; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Kahlmeter, Gunnar; Jarlier, Vincent

    2017-02-01

    Selective reporting of antibiotic susceptibility test (AST) results is one possible laboratory-based antibiotic stewardship intervention. The primary aim of this study was to identify where and how selective reporting of AST results is implemented in Europe both in inpatient and in outpatient settings. An ESCMID cross-sectional, self-administered, internet-based survey was conducted among all EUCIC (European Committee on Infection Control) or EUCAST (European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing) national representatives in Europe and Israel. Of 38 countries, 36 chose to participate in the survey. Selective reporting of AST results was implemented in 11/36 countries (31%), was partially implemented in 4/36 (11%) and was limited to local initiatives or was not adopted in 21/36 (58%). It was endorsed as standard of care by health authorities in only three countries. The organisation of selective reporting was everywhere discretionally managed by each laboratory, with a pronounced intra- and inter-country variability. The most frequent application was in uncomplicated community-acquired infections, particularly urinary tract and skin and soft-tissue infections. The list of reported antibiotics ranged from a few first-line options, to longer reports where only last-resort antibiotics were hidden. Several barriers to implementation were reported, mainly lack of guidelines, poor system support, insufficient resources, and lack of professionals' capability. In conclusion, selective reporting of AST results is poorly implemented in Europe and is applied with a huge heterogeneity of practices. Development of an international framework, based on existing initiatives and identified barriers, could favour its dissemination as one important element of antibiotic stewardship programmes.

  7. Interactive-Engagement vs. Traditional Methods: A Six-Thousand-Student Survey of Mechanics Test Data for Introductory Physics Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hake, Richard R.

    A survey of pre/post test data using the Halloun-Hestenes Mechanics Diagnostic test or more recent Force Concept Inventory is reported for 62 introductory physics courses enrolling a total number of students N=6542. A consistent analysis over diverse student populations in high schools, colleges, and universities is obtained if a rough measure of…

  8. Will Genetic Testing for Complex Diseases Increase Motivation to Quit Smoking? Anticipated Reactions in a Survey of Smokers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, Saskia C.; Wardle, Jane

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to improve understanding of smokers' potential reactions to genetic testing for smoking-related diseases. One thousand twenty-four respondents completed a postal survey; 186 were smokers. Questions addressed anticipated psychological and behavioral reactions to genetic test results using hypothetical scenarios. Of…

  9. The Effect of the Social Security Earnings Test on Male Labor Supply: New Evidence from Survey and Administrative Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haider, Steven J.; Loughran, David S.

    2008-01-01

    Despite numerous empirical studies, there is surprisingly little agreement about whether the Social Security earnings test affects male labor supply. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the labor supply effects of the earnings test using longitudinal administrative earnings data and more commonly used survey data. We find that…

  10. The effects of vertical motion on the performance of current meters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thibodeaux, K.G.; Futrell, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    A series of tests to determine the correction coefficients for Price type AA and Price type OAA current meters, when subjected to vertical motion in a towing tank, have been conducted. During these tests, the meters were subjected to vertical travel that ranged from 1.0 to 4.0 ft and vertical rates of travel that ranged from 0.33 to 1.20 ft/sec while being towed through the water at speeds ranging from 0 to 8 ft/sec. The tests show that type AA and type OAA current meters are affected adversely by the rate of vertical motion and the distance of vertical travel. In addition, the tests indicate that when current meters are moved vertically, correction coefficients must be applied to the observed meter velocities to correct for the registration errors that are induced by the vertical motion. The type OAA current meter under-registers and the type AA current meter over-registers in observed meter velocity. These coefficients for the type OAA current meter range from 0.99 to 1.49 and for the type AA current meter range from 0.33 to 1.07. When making current meter measurements from a boat or a cableway, errors in observed current meter velocity will occur when the bobbing of a boat or cableway places the current meter into vertical motion. These errors will be significant when flowing water is < 2 ft/sec and the rate of vertical motion is > 0.3 ft/sec. (Author 's abstract)

  11. Portable fluorescence meter with reference backscattering channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilin, Dmitriy V.; Grishanov, Vladimir N.; Zakharov, Valery P.; Burkov, Dmitriy S.

    2016-09-01

    Methods based on fluorescence and backscattering are intensively used for determination of the advanced glycation end products (AGE) concentration in the biological tissues. There are strong correlation between the AGE concentration and the severity of such diseases like diabetes, coronary heart disease and renal failure. This fact can be used for diagnostic purposes in medical applications. Only few investigations in this area can be useful for development of portable and affordable in vivo AGE meter because the most of them are oriented on using spectrometers. In this study we describe the design and the results of tests on volunteers of portable fluorescence meter based on two photodiodes. One channel of such fluorimeter is used for measurement of the autofluorescence (AF) intensity, another one - for the intensity of elastically scattered radiation, which can be used as a reference. This reference channel is proposed for normalization of the skin autofluorescence signal to the human skin photo type. The fluorimeter, that was developed is relatively compact and does not contain any expensive optical and electronic components. The experimental results prove that proposed tool can be used for the AGE estimation in human skin.

  12. Surveying Future Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlstrom, John E.

    2016-06-01

    The now standard model of cosmology has been tested and refined by the analysis of increasingly sensitive, large astronomical surveys, especially with statistically significant millimeter-wave surveys of the cosmic microwave background and optical surveys of the distribution of galaxies. This talk will offer a glimpse of the future, which promises an acceleration of this trend with cosmological information coming from new surveys across the electromagnetic spectrum as well as particles and even gravitational waves.

  13. A survey of Lab Tests Online-UK users: a key resource for patients to empower and help them understand their laboratory test results.

    PubMed

    Leyland, Rebecca; Freedman, Danielle B

    2016-11-01

    Background Lab Tests Online-UK celebrated its 10th anniversary in 2014 and to mark the occasion the first comprehensive survey of website users was undertaken. Methods A pop-up box with a link to Survey Monkey was used to offer website users the chance to participate in the survey, which was live from 4 March 2014 to 11 April 2014. Results Six hundred and sixty-one participants started the questionnaire and 338 completed all of the demographic questions. Although the website is designed and aimed at patients and the public, a significant number of respondents were health-care professionals (47%). The majority of survey participants found the Lab Tests Online-UK website via a search engine and were visiting the site for themselves. The majority of participants found what they were looking for on the website and found the information very easy or fairly easy to understand. The patient respondents were keen to see their laboratory test results (87%), but the majority did not have access (60%) at the time of the survey. Conclusions This survey provides good evidence that the Lab Tests Online-UK website is a useful resource for patients and health-care professionals alike. It comes at a poignant time as the release of results direct to patients starts with access to their medical records. The Lab Tests Online-UK website has a key role in enabling patients to understand their lab test results, and therefore empowering them to take an interest and engage in their own healthcare.

  14. Quality assurance practices in Europe: a survey of molecular genetic testing laboratories.

    PubMed

    Berwouts, Sarah; Fanning, Katrina; Morris, Michael A; Barton, David E; Dequeker, Elisabeth

    2012-11-01

    In the 2000s, a number of initiatives were taken internationally to improve quality in genetic testing services. To contribute to and update the limited literature available related to this topic, we surveyed 910 human molecular genetic testing laboratories, of which 291 (32%) from 29 European countries responded. The majority of laboratories were in the public sector (81%), affiliated with a university hospital (60%). Only a minority of laboratories was accredited (23%), and 26% was certified. A total of 22% of laboratories did not participate in external quality assessment (EQA) and 28% did not use reference materials (RMs). The main motivations given for accreditation were to improve laboratory profile (85%) and national recognition (84%). Nearly all respondents (95%) would prefer working in an accredited laboratory. In accredited laboratories, participation in EQA (P<0.0001), use of RMs (P=0.0014) and availability of continuous education (CE) on medical/scientific subjects (P=0.023), specific tasks (P=0.0018), and quality assurance (P<0.0001) were significantly higher than in non-accredited laboratories. Non-accredited laboratories expect higher restriction of development of new techniques (P=0.023) and improvement of work satisfaction (P=0.0002) than accredited laboratories. By using a quality implementation score (QIS), we showed that accredited laboratories (average score 92) comply better than certified laboratories (average score 69, P<0.001), and certified laboratories better than other laboratories (average score 44, P<0.001), with regard to the implementation of quality indicators. We conclude that quality practices vary widely in European genetic testing laboratories. This leads to a potentially dangerous situation in which the quality of genetic testing is not consistently assured.

  15. 20 Meter Solar Sail Analysis and Correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taleghani, B.; Lively, P.; Banik, J.; Murphy, D.; Trautt, T.

    2005-01-01

    This presentation discusses studies conducted to determine the element type and size that best represents a 20-meter solar sail under ground-test load conditions, the performance of test/Analysis correlation by using Static Shape Optimization Method for Q4 sail, and system dynamic. TRIA3 elements better represent wrinkle patterns than do QUAD3 elements Baseline, ten-inch elements are small enough to accurately represent sail shape, and baseline TRIA3 mesh requires a reasonable computation time of 8 min. 21 sec. In the test/analysis correlation by using Static shape optimization method for Q4 sail, ten parameters were chosen and varied during optimization. 300 sail models were created with random parameters. A response surfaces for each targets which were created based on the varied parameters. Parameters were optimized based on response surface. Deflection shape comparison for 0 and 22.5 degrees yielded a 4.3% and 2.1% error respectively. For the system dynamic study testing was done on the booms without the sails attached. The nominal boom properties produced a good correlation to test data the frequencies were within 10%. Boom dominated analysis frequencies and modes compared well with the test results.

  16. Performance of Thermal Mass Flow Meters in a Variable Gravitational Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooker, John E.; Ruff, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    The performance of five thermal mass flow meters, MKS Instruments 179A and 258C, Unit Instruments UFM-8100, Sierra Instruments 830L, and Hastings Instruments HFM-200, were tested on the KC-135 Reduced Gravity Aircraft in orthogonal, coparallel, and counterparallel orientations relative to gravity. Data was taken throughout the parabolic trajectory where the g-level varied from 0.01 to 1.8 times normal gravity. Each meter was calibrated in normal gravity in the orthogonal position prior to flight followed by ground testing at seven different flow conditions to establish a baseline operation. During the tests, the actual flow rate was measured independently using choked-flow orifices. Gravitational acceleration and attitude had a unique effect on the performance of each meter. All meters operated within acceptable limits at all gravity levels in the calibrated orthogonal position. However, when operated in other orientations, the deviations from the reference flow became substantial for several of the flow meters. Data analysis indicated that the greatest source of error was the effect of orientation, followed by the gravity level. This work emphasized that when operating thermal flow meters in a variable gravity environment, it is critical to orient the meter in the same direction relative to gravity in which it was calibrated. Unfortunately, there was no test in normal gravity that could predict the performance of a meter in reduced gravity. When operating in reduced gravity, all meters indicated within 5 percent of the full scale reading at all flow conditions and orientations.

  17. HIV testing in re-education through labour camps in Guangxi Autonomous Region, China (a cross-sectional survey)

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Lorraine; Reekie, Joanne; Liu, Wei; Chen, Yi; Wu, Zunyou; Li, Jianghong; Zhang, Lei; Wand, Handan; Donovan, Basil; Butler, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Objective HIV testing is mandatory in re-education-through-labour camps (laojiaosuo) in China yet no studies have reported on the process. Methods The survey response rate was 100% although 29 detainees were excluded because they were under 18 years of age. A cross-sectional face-to-face survey was conducted in three labour camps in Guangxi, located in the south-western region of China. Results Of the 755 detainees surveyed, 725 (96%) reported having a blood test in the labour camps of whom 493 (68%) thought this included an HIV test. 61 detainees self-reported they were HIV infected, their status confirmed by medical records, if available. Of these, 53 (87%) recalled receiving post-test HIV education, and 15 (25%) were currently receiving HIV antiretroviral therapy. Pretest education on HIV was provided to 233/725 (32%) detainees. The study further reports on detainees’ reactions and feelings towards non-disclosure and disclosure of their HIV test results in the labour camps. Conclusions Mandatory testing is almost universal in the labour camps although a proportion of detainees were unaware that this included an HIV test. HIV test results should be disclosed to all labour camp detainees to reduce their distress of not knowing and prevent misconceptions about their HIV status. Labour camps provide another opportunity to implement universal treatment (‘Test and Treat’) to prevent the spread of HIV. PMID:25739879

  18. Development and testing of the Clinical Post-Conference Learning Environment Survey.

    PubMed

    Letizia, M; Jennrich, J

    1998-01-01

    Clinical postconference is an integral component of the required laboratory hours in undergraduate baccalaureate nursing education. Empirical evidence supporting the educational benefits of this activity are nearly nonexistent. This article describes the development and psychometric testing of a self-report instrument designed to measure clinical postconference learning environments as perceived by undergraduate nursing students and faculty. The Clinical Post-Conference Learning Environment Survey (CPCLES) consists of 54 items and has been tested with more than 500 participants in three schools of nursing in the Midwest. Based on theoretical support and comprehensive review of the literature, six components of the learning environment are measured in two forms of the instrument; an actual scale and an importance scale. Content validity, internal consistency, and test-retest reliability are discussed. Using the CPCLES, perceptions of undergraduate nursing students and faculty were measured. Significant differences between the actual components of the learning environment and the correlated ratings of the importance of these components were found. Faculty perceived a significantly greater amount of teacher support, task orientation, and innovation in the postconference learning environment than did undergraduate students. No differences were noted between faculty and students regarding the importance of the learning environment components. This study presents findings with the use of the first instrument developed to measure clinical postconference learning environments. The congruence and discrepancy among and between learning groups' perceptions carry implications for educational practices in this setting. Subseqent investigations using this tool may be able to link the perceived learning environment to valued cognitive, affective, and behavioral learning outcomes.

  19. REDUCING PRODUCED WATER WITH DENSITY AND CONDUCTIVITY METERS

    SciTech Connect

    Jason T. Smith

    2004-08-01

    The work performed was an attempt to reduce the amount of produced water by using the well bore as an oil-water separator. The use of a flow meter, density meter and/or conductivity meter controlling a pumping unit would be used to achieve this goal. The natural physical differences between oil and water are easily detected inside the production stream with proper equipment. A coriolis mass meter, conductivity meter, data recorder, timer and relays were purchased and housed in a purpose-built field cabinet. The metering unit was hooked to four wells over the course of the project, Spencer No.8, Applegate Gray Unit No.1 (AGU No.1), Vollmer No.4 and Mohr No.1. All are located in the Illinois Basin, three with artificial lift pumps and one flowing well. Depth of producing formations ranges from a maximum of 846.13 m (2776 ft) to minimum of 316.69 m (1039 ft). All wells were completed in one formation of Mississippian or Pennsylvanian age. The data recorded were analyzed to determine what events could be detected. Events included pure oil or higher oil-cut fluid reaching the pump or reaching the metering equipment, the pump operating under capacity, and the well ''pumped down''. Based on how much oil and water is present in a fluid column, the pressure the fluid column imparts on a formation can be calculated. By knowing the amount of oil and water in a well bore and the maximum height water can reach, production equipment can be configured to only produce oil. However, the configuration may not be profitable. It became apparent during the course of this research the wells tested do not have an oil-water contact deep enough so traditional pumping equipment can be configured to recover oil by the proposed method. This method may work more successfully in deeper basins. Other interesting anomalies were also detected in the data.

  20. Portable fluorescence meter for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilin, Dmitriy V.; Grishanov, Vladimir N.

    2016-04-01

    Recently, there are great deals of skin fluorescence studies for diagnostic purposes in medicine. Measurement of the intensity of autofluorescence (AF) is suitable method for diagnostic, because it does not require traumatic procedures. Skin AF is widely used by doctors in order to assess the concentration of advanced glycation endproduct (AGE). There are no in vivo fluorescence meters made in Russia, which are affordable, portable, easy-to-use and easily replicable. This paper is devoted to study of the fluorimeter and its mathematical model of spectral characteristics that were developed by authors. Fluorimeter and its software are fully operational and they were given to doctors for testing in the real clinic conditions in order to get a set of AF statistics for patients.

  1. Floating patterns of metered dose inhalers.

    PubMed

    Wolf, B L; Cochran, K R

    1997-01-01

    As long as metered dose inhalers have existed, patients have sought a reliable method to determine if a given canister was still potent. Concerning beta agonists, the answer to this question may be lifesaving. Issues of compliance have made dating canisters or counting doses impractical. Likewise, previous claims of floating characteristics are unreliable. In tap water, we float-tested 13 commonly used inhalers three times each, observing variations as they were incrementally actuated, emptying their contents. One essential pattern was observed. Almost all prescription-size canisters sink when full; all float by the time one-third of their contents is gone. Orientation of prescription-size canisters changes in a distinct pattern especially near 90% depletion. Sample-size canisters showed some variance. Results suggest that the pharmaceutical industry should include individual floating characteristics as part of the package insert as they provide a reproducible means of gauging contents.

  2. Commissioning subsystems of the 10 meter prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prins, Nathan; Fricke, Tobin; Mow-Lowry, Conor; Hanke, Manuela

    2015-04-01

    The best attempts at detecting the elusive gravitational waves are with L-shaped interferometers. Over the summer of 2014, I helped install subsystems of the 10 meter prototype, a gravitational wave interferometer designed to reach the Standard Quantum Limit (SQL), at the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics in Hannover, Germany through the University of Florida's International REU. While there, the frequency reference cavity was aligned and the mode matching the cavity began. We also worked on installing and testing the intensity stabilization servo, which consisted of an out-of-vacuum photodiode for each the in-loop and out-of-loop sensing that were being connected to the LIGO Control and Data System.

  3. Test result communication in primary care: a survey of current practice

    PubMed Central

    Litchfield, Ian; Bentham, Louise; Lilford, Richard; McManus, Richard J; Hill, Ann; Greenfield, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of blood tests ordered in primary care continues to increase and the timely and appropriate communication of results remains essential. However, the testing and result communication process includes a number of participants in a variety of settings and is both complicated to manage and vulnerable to human error. In the UK, guidelines for the process are absent and research in this area is surprisingly scarce; so before we can begin to address potential areas of weakness there is a need to more precisely understand the strengths and weaknesses of current systems used by general practices and testing facilities. Methods We conducted a telephone survey of practices across England to determine the methods of managing the testing and result communication process. In order to gain insight into the perspectives from staff at a large hospital laboratory we conducted paired interviews with senior managers, which we used to inform a service blueprint demonstrating the interaction between practices and laboratories and identifying potential sources of delay and failure. Results Staff at 80% of practices reported that the default method for communicating normal results required patients to telephone the practice and 40% of practices required that patients also call for abnormal results. Over 80% had no fail-safe system for ensuring that results had been returned to the practice from laboratories; practices would otherwise only be aware that results were missing or delayed when patients requested results. Persistent sources of missing results were identified by laboratory staff and included sample handling, misidentification of samples and the inefficient system for collating and resending misdirected results. Conclusions The success of the current system relies on patients both to retrieve results and in so doing alert staff to missing and delayed results. Practices appear slow to adopt available technological solutions despite their potential for

  4. Note: A real-time beam current density meter

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Junliang; Yu Deyang; Ruan Fangfang; Xue Yingli; Wang Wei

    2013-03-15

    We have developed a real-time beam current density meter for charged particle beams. It measures the mean current density by collimating a uniform and large diameter primary beam. The suppression of the secondary electrons and the deflection of the beam were simulated, and it was tested with a 105 keV Ar{sup 7+} ion beam.

  5. 40 CFR 1065.230 - Raw exhaust flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Raw exhaust flow meter. 1065.230 Section 1065.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.230 Raw...

  6. 40 CFR 1065.230 - Raw exhaust flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Raw exhaust flow meter. 1065.230 Section 1065.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.230 Raw...

  7. 40 CFR 1065.220 - Fuel flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.220 Fuel flow meter. (a) Application. You may use fuel flow in combination with a chemical balance of fuel, inlet air, and... batch-sampled concentrations. (iii) For calculating the dilution air flow for background correction...

  8. 40 CFR 1065.220 - Fuel flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.220 Fuel flow meter. (a) Application. You may use fuel flow in combination with a chemical balance of fuel, inlet air, and... batch-sampled concentrations. (iii) For calculating the dilution air flow for background correction...

  9. 40 CFR 1065.230 - Raw exhaust flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Raw exhaust flow meter. 1065.230 Section 1065.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.230 Raw...

  10. 40 CFR 1065.230 - Raw exhaust flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Raw exhaust flow meter. 1065.230 Section 1065.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.230 Raw...

  11. 40 CFR 1065.220 - Fuel flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.220 Fuel flow meter...) between the fuel, inlet air, and raw exhaust to calculate raw exhaust flow as described in § 1065.650, as... calibration and verifications in § 1065.320. (c) Recirculating fuel. In any fuel-flow measurement, account...

  12. 40 CFR 1065.220 - Fuel flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.220 Fuel flow meter. (a) Application. You may use fuel flow in combination with a chemical balance of fuel, inlet air, and... batch-sampled concentrations. (iii) For calculating the dilution air flow for background correction...

  13. 40 CFR 1065.230 - Raw exhaust flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Raw exhaust flow meter. 1065.230 Section 1065.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.230 Raw...

  14. 40 CFR 1065.220 - Fuel flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.220 Fuel flow meter...) between the fuel, inlet air, and raw exhaust to calculate raw exhaust flow as described in § 1065.650, as... calibration and verifications in § 1065.320. (c) Recirculating fuel. In any fuel-flow measurement, account...

  15. Automated semi-spherical irradiance meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tecpoyotl-Torres, M.; Vera-Dimas, J. G.; Escobedo-Alatorre, J.; Cabello-Ruiz, R.; Varona, J.

    2011-09-01

    In this semi-spherical meter, a single detector is used to realize all measurements, which is located on the extreme of a rectangular ring (assumed as joined two mobile branches in order to compensate the weights), describing half-meridians from 0° up to 170°. The illumination source under test is located at the center of the mobile support, which can rotate 360° horizontally. The two combined movements allow us to obtain a semi-spherical geometry. The number of measurement points is determined by the two step-motors located under the mobile support of the luminary and on one of the two fixed arms, which support the mobile rectangular ring, respectively. The mechanical arrangement has the enough rigidity to support the precision required for the acquisition stage, based on a dsPIC. The main advantages of this arrange are: Its low costs (using recyclable materials only such as "electronic waste"), a reliable detection based on a single photo-detector, with an integrated amplification stage, and the mechanical design. The received power by the detector is useful to obtain the irradiance profile of the lighting sources under test. The semi-spherical geometry of the meter makes it useful for the analysis of directive and non directive sources, in accordance with the angle described by the mobile ring. In this work, special attention is given to LED lamps due to its impact in several sceneries of the daily life. A comparison between the irradiance patterns of two LED lamps is also given.

  16. Long Island Smart Metering Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2012-03-30

    The Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) Smart Meter Pilots provided invaluable information and experience for future deployments of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI), including the deployment planned as part of LIPA's Smart Grid Demonstration Project (DE-OE0000220). LIPA will incorporate lessons learned from this pilot in future deployments, including lessons relating to equipment performance specifications and testing, as well as equipment deployment and tracking issues. LIPA ultimately deployed three AMI technologies instead of the two that were originally contemplated. This enabled LIPA to evaluate multiple systems in field conditions with a relatively small number of meter installations. LIPA experienced a number of equipment and software issues that it did not anticipate, including issues relating to equipment integration, ability to upgrade firmware and software over the air (as opposed to physically interacting with every meter), and logistical challenges associated with tracking inventory and upgrade status of deployed meters. In addition to evaluating the technology, LIPA also piloted new Time-of-Use (TOU) rates to assess customer acceptance of time-differentiated pricing and to evaluate whether customers would respond by adjusting their activities from peak to non-peak periods. LIPA developed a marketing program to educate customers who received AMI in the pilot areas and to seek voluntary participation in TOU pricing. LIPA also guaranteed participating customers that, for their initial year on the rates, their electricity costs under the TOU rate would not exceed the amount they would have paid under the flat rates they would otherwise enjoy. 62 residential customers chose to participate in the TOU rates, and every one of them saved money during the first year. 61 of them also elected to stay on the TOU rate without the cost guarantee at the end of that year. The customer who chose not to continue on the rate was also the one who achieved the

  17. COMPARISON OF RECORDING CURRENT METERS USED FOR MEASURING VELOCITIES IN SHALLOW WATERS OF SAN FRANCISCO BAY, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, Jeffrey W.; Oltmann, Richard N.

    1985-01-01

    The authors determine the feasibility of collecting reliable current-meter data in shallow water under natural conditions. The study involved field testing four types of recording current meters (different speed sensors) and comparing data recorded by the meters under different field conditions. Speeds recorded by the current meters at slack water and during maximum flows were compared during calm and windy conditions at various tide levels.

  18. Reflection-Type Oil-Film Skin-Friction Meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; Weinstein, Leonard M.

    1993-01-01

    Oil-film skin-friction meter for both flight and wind-tunnel applications uses internal reflection and is self-contained, compact unit. Contained in palm-sized housing, in which source of light, mirrors, and sensor mounted rigidly in alignment. Entire unit mounted rigidly under skin of aircraft or wind tunnel, eliminating any relative vibration between optical elements and skin of aircraft or wind tunnel. Meter primarily applicable to flight and wind-tunnel tests, also used in chemical-processing plants.

  19. In-Vacuum Photogrammetry of a 10-Meter Solar Sail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Chris G.; Jones, Thomas W.; Lunsford, Charles B.; Pappa, Richard S.

    2005-01-01

    In July 2004, a 10-meter solar sail structure developed by L Garde, Inc. was tested in vacuum at the NASA Glenn 30-meter Plum Brook Space Power Facility in Sandusky, Ohio. The three main objections of the test were to demonstrate unattended deployment from a stowed configuration, to measure the deployed shape of the sail at both ambient and cryogenic room temperatures, and to measure the deployed structural dynamic characteristics (vibration modes). This paper summarizes the work conducted to fulfill the second test objective. The deployed shape was measured photogrammetrically in vacuum conditions with four 2-megapixel digital video cameras contained in custom made pressurized canisters. The canisters included high-intensity LED ring lights to illuminate a grid of retroreflective targets distributed on the solar sail. The test results closely matched pre-test photogrammetry numerical simulations and compare well with ABAQUS finite-element model predictions.

  20. Modelling and calibration of a ring-shaped electrostatic meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianyong; Zhou, Bin; Xu, Chuanlong; Wang, Shimin

    2009-02-01

    Ring-shaped electrostatic flow meters can provide very useful information on pneumatically transported air-solids mixture. This type of meters are popular in measuring and controlling the pulverized coal flow distribution among conveyors leading to burners in coal-fired power stations, and they have also been used for research purposes, e.g. for the investigation of electrification mechanism of air-solids two-phase flow. In this paper, finite element method (FEM) is employed to analyze the characteristics of ring-shaped electrostatic meters, and a mathematic model has been developed to express the relationship between the meter's voltage output and the motion of charged particles in the sensing volume. The theoretical analysis and the test results using a belt rig demonstrate that the output of the meter depends upon many parameters including the characteristics of conditioning circuitry, the particle velocity vector, the amount and the rate of change of the charge carried by particles, the locations of particles and etc. This paper also introduces a method to optimize the theoretical model via calibration.

  1. Privacy, technology, and norms: the case of Smart Meters.

    PubMed

    Horne, Christine; Darras, Brice; Bean, Elyse; Srivastava, Anurag; Frickel, Scott

    2015-05-01

    Norms shift and emerge in response to technological innovation. One such innovation is Smart Meters - components of Smart Grid energy systems capable of minute-to-minute transmission of consumer electricity use information. We integrate theory from sociological research on social norms and privacy to examine how privacy threats affect the demand for and expectations of norms that emerge in response to new technologies, using Smart Meters as a test case. Results from three vignette experiments suggest that increased threats to privacy created by Smart Meters are likely to provoke strong demand for and expectations of norms opposing the technology and that the strength of these normative rules is at least partly conditional on the context. Privacy concerns vary little with actors' demographic characteristics. These findings contribute to theoretical understanding of norm emergence and have practical implications for implementing privacy protections that effectively address concerns of electricity users.

  2. Testing general relativity with growth rate measurement from Sloan Digital Sky Survey - III. Baryon Oscillations Spectroscopic Survey galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Shadab; Ho, Shirley; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Schneider, Donald P.

    2015-10-01

    The measured redshift (z) of an astronomical object is a combination of Hubble recession, gravitational redshift and peculiar velocity. The line-of-sight distance to a galaxy inferred from redshift is affected by the peculiar velocity component of galaxy redshift, which is observed as an anisotropy in the correlation function. This anisotropy allows us to measure the linear growth rate of matter (fσ8). We measure the fσ8 at z = 0.57 using the CMASS sample from Data Release 11 of Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS III) Baryon Oscillations Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). The galaxy sample consists of 690 826 massive galaxies in the redshift range 0.43-0.7 covering 8498 deg2. Here, we report the first simultaneous measurement of fσ8 and background cosmological parameters using Convolution Lagrangian Perturbation Theory (CLPT) with Gaussian streaming model (Gaussian Streaming Redshift Space Distortions - GSRSD). We arrive at a constraint of fσ8 = 0.462 ± 0.041 (9 per cent accuracy) at effective redshift (bar{z}=0.57) when we include Planck cosmic microwave background likelihood while marginalizing over all other cosmological parameters. We also measure bσ8 = 1.19 ± 0.03, H(z = 0.57) = 89.2 ± 3.6 km s-1 Mpc-1 and DA(z = 0.57) = 1401 ± 23 Mpc. Our analysis also improves the constraint on Ωc h2 = 0.1196 ± 0.0009 by a factor of 3 when compared to the Planck only measurement(Ωc h2 = 0.1196 ± 0.0031). Our results are consistent with Planck Λ cold dark matter (CDM)-general relativity (GR) prediction and all other CMASS measurements, even though our theoretical models are fairly different. This consistency suggests that measurement of fσ8 from redshift space distortions at multiple redshifts will be a sensitive probe of the theory of gravity that is largely model independent, allowing us to place model-independent constraints on alternative models of gravity.

  3. Test-retest reliability of Yale Physical Activity Survey among older Mexican American adults: a pilot investigation.

    PubMed

    Pennathur, Arunkumar; Magham, Rohini; Contreras, Luis Rene; Dowling, Winifred

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the work reported in this paper is to assess test-retest reliability of Yale Physical Activity Survey Total Time, Estimated Energy Expenditure, Activity Dimension Indices, and Activities Check-list in older Mexican American men and women. A convenience-based healthy sample of 49 (42 women and 7 men) older Mexican American adults recruited from senior recreation centers aged 68 to 80 years volunteered to participate in this pilot study. Forty-nine older Mexican American adults filled out the Yale Physical Activity Survey for this study. Fifteen (12 women and 3 men) of the 49 volunteers responded twice to the Yale Physical Activity Survey after a 2-week period, and helped assess the test-retest reliability of the Yale Physical Activity Survey. Results indicate that based on a 2-week test-retest administration, the Yale Physical Activity Survey was found to have moderate (rhoI= .424, p < .05) to good reliability (rs = .789, p < .01) for physical activity assessment in older Mexican American adults who responded.

  4. Suppression of Systematic Errors of Electronic Distance Meters for Measurement of Short Distances.

    PubMed

    Braun, Jaroslav; Štroner, Martin; Urban, Rudolf; Dvoček, Filip

    2015-08-06

    In modern industrial geodesy, high demands are placed on the final accuracy, with expectations currently falling below 1 mm. The measurement methodology and surveying instruments used have to be adjusted to meet these stringent requirements, especially the total stations as the most often used instruments. A standard deviation of the measured distance is the accuracy parameter, commonly between 1 and 2 mm. This parameter is often discussed in conjunction with the determination of the real accuracy of measurements at very short distances (5-50 m) because it is generally known that this accuracy cannot be increased by simply repeating the measurement because a considerable part of the error is systematic. This article describes the detailed testing of electronic distance meters to determine the absolute size of their systematic errors, their stability over time, their repeatability and the real accuracy of their distance measurement. Twenty instruments (total stations) have been tested, and more than 60,000 distances in total were measured to determine the accuracy and precision parameters of the distance meters. Based on the experiments' results, calibration procedures were designed, including a special correction function for each instrument, whose usage reduces the standard deviation of the measurement of distance by at least 50%.

  5. Suppression of Systematic Errors of Electronic Distance Meters for Measurement of Short Distances

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Jaroslav; Štroner, Martin; Urban, Rudolf; Dvořáček, Filip

    2015-01-01

    In modern industrial geodesy, high demands are placed on the final accuracy, with expectations currently falling below 1 mm. The measurement methodology and surveying instruments used have to be adjusted to meet these stringent requirements, especially the total stations as the most often used instruments. A standard deviation of the measured distance is the accuracy parameter, commonly between 1 and 2 mm. This parameter is often discussed in conjunction with the determination of the real accuracy of measurements at very short distances (5–50 m) because it is generally known that this accuracy cannot be increased by simply repeating the measurement because a considerable part of the error is systematic. This article describes the detailed testing of electronic distance meters to determine the absolute size of their systematic errors, their stability over time, their repeatability and the real accuracy of their distance measurement. Twenty instruments (total stations) have been tested, and more than 60,000 distances in total were measured to determine the accuracy and precision parameters of the distance meters. Based on the experiments’ results, calibration procedures were designed, including a special correction function for each instrument, whose usage reduces the standard deviation of the measurement of distance by at least 50%. PMID:26258777

  6. The VIMOS VLT Deep Survey. Testing the gravitational instability paradigm at z ~ 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinoni, C.; Guzzo, L.; Cappi, A.; Le Fèvre, O.; Mazure, A.; Meneux, B.; Pollo, A.; Iovino, A.; McCracken, H. J.; Scaramella, R.; de la Torre, S.; Virey, J. M.; Bottini, D.; Garilli, B.; Le Brun, V.; Maccagni, D.; Picat, J. P.; Scodeggio, M.; Tresse, L.; Vettolani, G.; Zanichelli, A.; Adami, C.; Arnouts, S.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Charlot, S.; Ciliegi, P.; Contini, T.; Foucaud, S.; Franzetti, P.; Gavignaud, I.; Ilbert, O.; Lamareille, F.; Marano, B.; Mathez, G.; Merighi, R.; Paltani, S.; Pellò, R.; Pozzetti, L.; Radovich, M.; Vergani, D.; Zamorani, G.; Zucca, E.; Abbas, U.; Bondi, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Brinchmann, J.; Buzzi, A.; Cucciati, O.; de Ravel, L.; Gregorini, L.; Mellier, Y.; Merluzzi, P.; Perez-Montero, E.; Taxil, P.; Temporin, S.; Walcher, C. J.

    2008-08-01

    We have reconstructed the three-dimensional density fluctuation maps to z˜ 1.5 using the distribution of galaxies observed in the VVDS-Deep survey. We use this overdensity field to measure the evolution of the probability distribution function and its lower-order moments over the redshift interval 0.7< z <1.5. We apply a self-consistent reconstruction scheme which includes a complete non-linear description of galaxy biasing and which has been thoroughly tested on realistic mock samples. We find that the variance and skewness of the galaxy distribution evolve over this redshift interval in a way that is remarkably consistent with predictions of first- and second-order perturbation theory. This finding confirms the standard gravitational instability paradigm over nearly 9 Gyr of cosmic time and demonstrates the importance of accounting for the non-linear component of galaxy biasing to consistently reproduce the higher-order moments of the galaxy distribution and their evolution.

  7. Survey of Occupational Allergic Contact Dermatitis and Patch Test among Clothing Employees in Beijing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Xin; Gao, Bing-Ai; Cheng, Hai-Yan

    2017-01-01

    Occupational population-based epidemiological data relating to occupational contact allergies in the Chinese clothing industry are limited. To investigate the prevalence of occupational allergic contact dermatitis (OACD) and to identify the causative allergens among clothing employees in China, a cross-sectional study was conducted in 529 clothing employees at 12 clothing factories in Beijing. All employees were subjected to an interview using self-administered questionnaire and skin examination, and those who were diagnosed with occupational contact dermatitis (OCD) were patch tested. In the present survey, we found that the overall 1-year prevalence of OACD among the clothing employees was 8.5%. The 1-year prevalence of OACD among workers (10.8%) was significantly higher than that among managers (3.2%). The lesions were primarily on the hands and wrists in workers, but the face and neck in managers. The major allergens were nickel sulfate and cobalt dichloride in workers and colophony and p-tert-butylphenol formaldehyde resin in managers. In conclusion, workers are at a higher risk of OACD compared with managers in the Chinese clothing industry. In addition to hand dermatitis in workers, airborne contact dermatitis on the face and neck should be also addressed in managers.

  8. Survey of Occupational Allergic Contact Dermatitis and Patch Test among Clothing Employees in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Xin; Gao, Bing-Ai; Cheng, Hai-Yan; Li, Lin-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Occupational population-based epidemiological data relating to occupational contact allergies in the Chinese clothing industry are limited. To investigate the prevalence of occupational allergic contact dermatitis (OACD) and to identify the causative allergens among clothing employees in China, a cross-sectional study was conducted in 529 clothing employees at 12 clothing factories in Beijing. All employees were subjected to an interview using self-administered questionnaire and skin examination, and those who were diagnosed with occupational contact dermatitis (OCD) were patch tested. In the present survey, we found that the overall 1-year prevalence of OACD among the clothing employees was 8.5%. The 1-year prevalence of OACD among workers (10.8%) was significantly higher than that among managers (3.2%). The lesions were primarily on the hands and wrists in workers, but the face and neck in managers. The major allergens were nickel sulfate and cobalt dichloride in workers and colophony and p-tert-butylphenol formaldehyde resin in managers. In conclusion, workers are at a higher risk of OACD compared with managers in the Chinese clothing industry. In addition to hand dermatitis in workers, airborne contact dermatitis on the face and neck should be also addressed in managers.

  9. Tolerancing, alignment and test of the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) optical assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primeau, Brian; Balonek, Gregory; MacDonald, Robert; Chrisp, Michael; Chesbrough, Christian; Andre, James; Clark, Kristin

    2016-09-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will carry four visible waveband seven-element refractive f/1.4 lenses, each with a 34 degree diagonal field of view. This paper describes the tolerancing, assembly and alignment methods developed during the build of the TESS Risk Reduction Unit optical system. Lens assembly tolerances were derived from a sensitivity analysis using an image quality metric customized for mission performance. The optomechanical design consists of a two-stage lens housing that provides access for active alignment of each lens using a Trioptics OptiCentric measurement system. Thermal stresses and alignment shifts are mitigated by mounting the optics with cast RTV silicone spacers into individually aligned bezels, and custom fixtures were developed to aid in RTV bonding with reduced alignment error. The lens assembly was tested interferometrically over the field of view at room temperature and results were used to successfully predict lens performance and compensator adjustments and detector shim thickness for the -75C operational temperature and pressure.

  10. Multipath ultrasonic flow meters for gas measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, M.P.

    1995-11-01

    This paper gives an introduction to the practical application of ultrasonic gas flow meters. A general outline of the theory and methods applied using multipath flow meters. The multi-path type meter provides state of the art gas flow measurements and its accuracy and reliability satisfy the requirements for custody transfer. A typical multi-path device can achieve accuracies better than 0.2%.

  11. Program computes orifice-meter flow rate

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.R.

    1981-10-12

    Useful for designing new metering stations or figuring flow rates through existing ones, the program developed for the Tl-59 programmable calculator computes the gas flow rate through an orifice-meter run. The user inputs are the orifice diameter, meter run ID, flowing gas temperature, density, flowing gas pressure, and differential pressure. The program's results are more accurate than those of flow charts or slide-rule-type calculators.

  12. Need to improve routine HIV testing of U.S. Veterans in care: results of an Internet survey.

    PubMed

    Valdiserri, Ronald O; Nazi, Kim; McInnes, D Keith; Ross, David; Kinsinger, Linda

    2010-06-01

    Late diagnosis of HIV infection contributes to poor medical outcomes and helps sustain continued transmission of virus. Published evidence suggests that despite current public health recommendations, patients receiving care in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) system are not being routinely tested for HIV infection. Using a sample of computer-literate veterans, we conducted a survey of recent testing experiences. My HealtheVet (MHV) is a secure website allowing registered Veterans to access limited personal VHA health information. Using the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Survey, an electronic questionnaire on "health screening" was conducted in late Fall/early winter 2008-2009. A random sample (4%) of MHV users were surveyed; approximately 17% completed the survey and responses ranged from 31,237 to 33,074. Only 9% of the respondents indicated that they had been offered a test for HIV in the last 12 months compared to 83% who had been offered cholesterol screening, 65% blood sugar screening and 19% who had been offered testing for Hepatitis C virus (HCV). Of those who had been offered HIV testing, 91% indicated that they'd had the test performed. Of note, the percentage of respondents who indicated that they would "very likely" accept a test, if offered, was similar for HIV (73%), HCV (79%), cholesterol (75%), and blood sugar (75%). Although these results cannot be generalized to all Veterans in care, they suggest that routine testing for HIV has not been taking place and support recent VHA policy changes to remove barriers to HIV testing.

  13. Evaluation of the apparent losses caused by water meter under-registration in intermittent water supply.

    PubMed

    Criminisi, A; Fontanazza, C M; Freni, G; Loggia, G La

    2009-01-01

    Apparent losses are usually caused by water theft, billing errors, or revenue meter under-registration. While the first two causes are directly related to water utility management and may be reduced by improving company procedures, water meter inaccuracies are considered to be the most significant and hardest to quantify. Water meter errors are amplified in networks subjected to water scarcity, where users adopt private storage tanks to cope with the intermittent water supply. The aim of this paper is to analyse the role of two variables influencing the apparent losses: water meter age and the private storage tank effect on meter performance. The study was carried out in Palermo (Italy). The impact of water meter ageing was evaluated in laboratory by testing 180 revenue meters, ranging from 0 to 45 years in age. The effects of the private water tanks were determined via field monitoring of real users and a mathematical model. This study demonstrates that the impact on apparent losses from the meter starting flow rapidly increases with meter age. Private water tanks, usually fed by a float valve, overstate meter under-registration, producing additional apparent losses between 15% and 40% for the users analysed in this study.

  14. Development of the 15 meter diameter hoop column antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The building of a deployable 15-meter engineering model of the 100 meter antenna based on the point-design of an earlier task of this contract, complete with an RF-capable surface is described. The 15 meter diameter was selected so that the model could be tested in existing manufacturing, near-field RF, thermal vacuum, and structural dynamics facilities. The antenna was designed with four offset paraboloidal reflector surfaces with a focal length of 366.85 in and a primary surface accuracy goal of .069 in rms. Surface adjustment capability was provided by manually resetting the length of 96 surface control cords which emanated from the lower column extremity. A detailed description of the 15-meter Hoop/Column Antenna, major subassemblies, and a history of its fabrication, assembly, deployment testing, and verification measurements are given. The deviation for one aperture surface (except the outboard extremity) was measured after adjustments in follow-on tests at the Martin Marietta Near-field Facility to be .061 in; thus the primary surface goal was achieved.

  15. Survey of the Methods and Reporting Practices in Published Meta-analyses of Test Performance: 1987 to 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahabreh, Issa J.; Chung, Mei; Kitsios, Georgios D.; Terasawa, Teruhiko; Raman, Gowri; Tatsioni, Athina; Tobar, Annette; Lau, Joseph; Trikalinos, Thomas A.; Schmid, Christopher H.

    2013-01-01

    We performed a survey of meta-analyses of test performance to describe the evolution in their methods and reporting. Studies were identified through MEDLINE (1966-2009), reference lists, and relevant reviews. We extracted information on clinical topics, literature review methods, quality assessment, and statistical analyses. We reviewed 760…

  16. Perceived Effects of State-Mandated Testing Programs on Teaching and Learning: Findings from a National Survey of Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedulla, Joseph J.; Abrams, Lisa M.; Madaus, George F.; Russell, Michael K.; Ramos, Miguel A.; Miao, Jing

    Results from a national survey of teachers are reported for five types of state testing programs, those with: (1) high stakes for districts, schools, or teachers, and students; (2) high stakes for districts, schools, and teachers, and moderate stakes for students; (3) high stakes for districts, schools, and teachers, and low stakes for students;…

  17. Tracing Sources of Information Pollution: A Survey and Experimental Test of Print Media's Labeling Policy for Feature Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Glen T.; Curtin, Patricia A.

    1995-01-01

    Surveys editors and ad managers, finding that print media typically have an unwritten policy to label feature ads as advertisements. Tests the efficacy of such labeling, finding that feature ads borrow from the editorial credibility of a publication and that the current labeling policy does not adequately address the problem. (SR)

  18. 49 CFR 173.5a - Oilfield service vehicles, mechanical displacement meter provers, and roadway striping vehicles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... meter prover identifier; (ii) Type of test or inspection performed; (iii) Test date (month/year); (iv... to perform them as required by this section. (5) A meter prover that fails the periodic test and...), and the type of test or inspection as follows: (i) V for external visual inspection; and (ii) P...

  19. 49 CFR 173.5a - Oilfield service vehicles, mechanical displacement meter provers, and roadway striping vehicles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... meter prover identifier; (ii) Type of test or inspection performed; (iii) Test date (month/year); (iv... to perform them as required by this section. (5) A meter prover that fails the periodic test and...), and the type of test or inspection as follows: (i) V for external visual inspection; and (ii) P...

  20. Drug Testing Incoming Residents and Medical Students in Family Medicine Training: A Survey of Program Policies and Practices

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Paul F.; Semelka, Michael W.; Bigdeli, Laleh

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite well-established negative consequences, high rates of substance use and related disorders continue to be reported. Physicians in training are not immune from this, or the associated risks to their health and careers, while impaired physicians are a threat to patient safety. Objective We surveyed family medicine residency programs' practices relating to drug testing of medical students and incoming residents. The survey asked about the extent to which residency programs are confronted with trainees testing positive for prohibited substances, and how they respond. Methods The survey was sent to the directors of family medicine residency programs. A total of 205 directors (47.2%) completed the survey. Results A majority of the responding programs required drug testing for incoming residents (143, 68.9%). Most programs did not require testing of medical students (161, 81.7%). Few programs reported positive drug tests among incoming residents (9, 6.5%), and there was only 1 reported instance of a positive result among medical students (1, 3.3%). Respondents reported a range of responses to positive results, with few reporting that they would keep open training spots or offer supportive services for a medical student who tested positive. Conclusions Changing laws legalizing certain drugs may require corresponding changes in the focus on drug testing and associated issues in medical training; however, many residency program directors were not aware of their institution's current policies. Programs will need to reexamine drug testing policies as new generations of physicians, growing up under altered legal circumstances concerning drug use, progress to clinical training. PMID:26217424

  1. Survey of Aviation Medical Examiners: Information and Attitudes about the Pre-Employment and Pre-Appointment Drug Testing Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    urine specimens for pre - employment or pre -appointment drug testing for FAA...BY ITEM 1. ARE YOU AN AVIATION MEDICAL EXAMINER WHO COLLECTS URINE SPECIMENS FOR PRE - EMPLOYMENT OR PRE -APPOINTMENT DRUG TESTING FOR FAA EMPLOYEES? I...believe I have done more than one pre - employment in the past year. My comments are of little or no value to your survey. We have done so few drug screening

  2. Cultural Resources Survey, Harry S. Truman Dam and Reservoir Project, Missouri. Volume 7. Archeological Test Excavations: 1975

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    of historical, architectural, archeolovical surveys c~onducted between 1975 and 1977. Volume I contains an outline of Osage River history to serve as a...AND RESERVOIR PROJECT VOLUME VII ARCHEOLOGICAL TEST EXCAVATIONS: 1975 by Stephen A. Chomko 0 0 A PROJECT CONDUCTED FOR THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT U...Miller. 75 pp. Volume VII: ARCHEOLOGICAL TEST EXCAVATIONS in THE HRRY S. TRUMAN RESERVOIR, missoURIt 1975 , by Stephen A. Chomko. volume VIII

  3. Infer More, Describe Less: More Powerful Survey Conclusions through Easy Inferential Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hightower, Christy; Scott, Kerry

    2012-01-01

    Many librarians use data from surveys to make decisions about how to spend money or allocate staff, often making use of popular online tools like Survey Monkey. In this era of reduced budgets, low staffing, stiff competition for new resources, and increasingly complex choices, it is especially important that librarians know how to get strong,…

  4. Testing the Validity and Reliability of the Worry Survey among Urban African American Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Andrea, Michael; Daniels, Judy; Gaughen, Kiaka J. S.

    1998-01-01

    Examines the Worry Survey (adapted from the Adolescent Health Survey) as regards the developmental concerns of urban African American youths (N=495). Results show that internal consistency of the factor-item ratings on the Personal and Family Worry subscales were acceptable. Less evidence of the reliability was noted among the Peer and…

  5. The NASA/AFRL Meter Class Autonomous Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowardin, H.; Lederer, S.; Buckalew, B.; Frith, J.; Hickson, P.; Glesne, T.; Anz-Meador, P.; Barker, E.; Stansbery, G.; Kervin, P.

    2016-01-01

    For the past decade, the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office (ODPO) has relied on using various ground-based telescopes in Chile to acquire statistical survey data as well as photometric and spectroscopic data of orbital debris in geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO). The statistical survey data have been used to supply the Orbital Debris Engineering Model (ORDEM) v.3.0 with debris detections in GEO to better model the environment at altitudes where radar detections are limited. The data produced for the statistical survey ranged from 30 to 40 nights per year, which only accounted for 10% of the possible observing time. Data collection was restricted by ODPO resources and weather conditions. In order to improve the statistical sampling in GEO, as well as observe and sample other orbits, NASA's ODPO with support from the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), has constructed a new observatory dedicated to orbital debris - the Meter Class Autonomous Telescope (MCAT) on Ascension Island. This location provides MCAT with the unique ability to access targets orbiting at an altitude of less than 1,000 km and low inclinations (< 20 deg). This orbital regime currently has little to no coverage by the U.S. Space Surveillance Network. Unlike previous ODPO optical assets, the ability to operate autonomously will allow rapid response observations of break-up events, an observing mode that was only available via radar tasking prior to MCAT's deployment. The primary goal of MCAT is to statistically characterize GEO via daily tasking files uploaded from ODPO. These tasking files define which operating mode to follow, providing the field center, rates, and/or targets to observe over the entire observing period. The system is also capable of tracking fast-moving targets in low Earth orbit (LEO), middle Earth orbit (MEO), as well as highly eccentric orbits like geostationary transfer orbits. On 25 August 2015, MCAT successfully acquired scientific first light, imaging the Bug Nebula and

  6. Dead-time compensation for a logarithmic display rate meter

    DOEpatents

    Larson, John A.; Krueger, Frederick P.

    1988-09-20

    An improved circuit is provided for application to a radiation survey meter that uses a detector that is subject to dead time. The circuit compensates for dead time over a wide range of count rates by producing a dead-time pulse for each detected event, a live-time pulse that spans the interval between dead-time pulses, and circuits that average the value of these pulses over time. The logarithm of each of these values is obtained and the logarithms are subtracted to provide a signal that is proportional to a count rate that is corrected for the effects of dead time. The circuit produces a meter indication and is also capable of producing an audible indication of detected events.

  7. Dead-time compensation for a logarithmic display rate meter

    DOEpatents

    Larson, J.A.; Krueger, F.P.

    1987-10-05

    An improved circuit is provided for application to a radiation survey meter that uses a detector that is subject to dead time. The circuit compensates for dead time over a wide range of count rates by producing a dead-time pulse for each detected event, a live-time pulse that spans the interval between dead-time pulses, and circuits that average the value of these pulses over time. The logarithm of each of these values is obtained and the logarithms are subtracted to provide a signal that is proportional to a count rate that is corrected for the effects of dead time. The circuit produces a meter indication and is also capable of producing an audible indication of detected events. 5 figs.

  8. Demonstration and Validation of a Fractured Rock Passive Flux Meter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    objective of this project was to demonstrate and validate a new closed- hole passive sensing technology for fractured media: the Fractured Rock Passive...OTV logs. ......................... 104 Figure 44. Test K: (A) black and white image of visual features from a portion of the FRPFM sock. (B...Passive flux Meter (FRPFM) Figure 45. Test K: (A) Black and white image of visual features from a portion of the FRPFM sock. (B) Visual features with

  9. 49 CFR 210.31 - Operation standards (stationary locomotives at 30 meters).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Operation standards (stationary locomotives at 30 meters). 210.31 Section 210.31 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... REGULATIONS Inspection and Testing § 210.31 Operation standards (stationary locomotives at 30 meters). (a)...

  10. 49 CFR 210.31 - Operation standards (stationary locomotives at 30 meters).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Operation standards (stationary locomotives at 30 meters). 210.31 Section 210.31 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... REGULATIONS Inspection and Testing § 210.31 Operation standards (stationary locomotives at 30 meters). (a)...

  11. 40 CFR 1065.245 - Sample flow meter for batch sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.245... difference between a diluted exhaust sample flow meter and a dilution air meter to calculate raw exhaust flow... diluted exhaust and sample-flow measurements and their upstream pressures and temperatures remain...

  12. 40 CFR 1065.245 - Sample flow meter for batch sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.245... difference between a diluted exhaust sample flow meter and a dilution air meter to calculate raw exhaust flow... diluted exhaust and sample-flow measurements and their upstream pressures and temperatures remain...

  13. 40 CFR 1065.245 - Sample flow meter for batch sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.245... difference between a diluted exhaust sample flow meter and a dilution air meter to calculate raw exhaust flow... diluted exhaust and sample-flow measurements and their upstream pressures and temperatures remain...

  14. 40 CFR 1065.245 - Sample flow meter for batch sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.245... difference between a diluted exhaust sample flow meter and a dilution air meter to calculate raw exhaust flow... diluted exhaust and sample-flow measurements and their upstream pressures and temperatures remain...

  15. 40 CFR 1065.245 - Sample flow meter for batch sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.245... difference between a diluted exhaust sample flow meter and a dilution air meter to calculate raw exhaust flow... diluted exhaust and sample-flow measurements and their upstream pressures and temperatures remain...

  16. Testing the lognormality of the galaxy and weak lensing convergence distributions from Dark Energy Survey maps

    SciTech Connect

    Clerkin, L.; Kirk, D.; Manera, M.; Lahav, O.; Abdalla, F.; Amara, A.; Bacon, D.; Chang, C.; Gaztañaga, E.; Hawken, A.; Jain, B.; Joachimi, B.; Vikram, V.; Abbott, T.; Allam, S.; Armstrong, R.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Carrasco Kind, M.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lima, M.; Melchior, P.; Miquel, R.; Nord, B.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Walker, A. R.

    2016-08-30

    It is well known that the probability distribution function (PDF) of galaxy density contrast is approximately lognormal; whether the PDF of mass fluctuations derived from weak lensing convergence (kappa_WL) is lognormal is less well established. We derive PDFs of the galaxy and projected matter density distributions via the Counts in Cells (CiC) method. We use maps of galaxies and weak lensing convergence produced from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data over 139 deg^2. We test whether the underlying density contrast is well described by a lognormal distribution for the galaxies, the convergence and their joint PDF. We confirm that the galaxy density contrast distribution is well modeled by a lognormal PDF convolved with Poisson noise at angular scales from 10-40 arcmin (corresponding to physical scales of 3-10 Mpc). We note that as kappa_WL is a weighted sum of the mass fluctuations along the line of sight, its PDF is expected to be only approximately lognormal. We find that the kappa_WL distribution is well modeled by a lognormal PDF convolved with Gaussian shape noise at scales between 10 and 20 arcmin, with a best-fit chi^2/DOF of 1.11 compared to 1.84 for a Gaussian model, corresponding to p-values 0.35 and 0.07 respectively, at a scale of 10 arcmin. Above 20 arcmin a simple Gaussian model is sufficient. The joint PDF is also reasonably fitted by a bivariate lognormal. As a consistency check we compare the variances derived from the lognormal modelling with those directly measured via CiC. Our methods are validated against maps from the MICE Grand Challenge N-body simulation.

  17. Testing the lognormality of the galaxy and weak lensing convergence distributions from Dark Energy Survey maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clerkin, L.; Kirk, D.; Manera, M.; Lahav, O.; Abdalla, F.; Amara, A.; Bacon, D.; Chang, C.; Gaztañaga, E.; Hawken, A.; Jain, B.; Joachimi, B.; Vikram, V.; Abbott, T.; Allam, S.; Armstrong, R.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Carrasco Kind, M.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lima, M.; Melchior, P.; Miquel, R.; Nord, B.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Walker, A. R.

    2017-04-01

    It is well known that the probability distribution function (PDF) of galaxy density contrast is approximately lognormal; whether the PDF of mass fluctuations derived from weak lensing convergence (κWL) is lognormal is less well established. We derive PDFs of the galaxy and projected matter density distributions via the counts-in-cells (CiC) method. We use maps of galaxies and weak lensing convergence produced from the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data over 139 deg2. We test whether the underlying density contrast is well described by a lognormal distribution for the galaxies, the convergence and their joint PDF. We confirm that the galaxy density contrast distribution is well modelled by a lognormal PDF convolved with Poisson noise at angular scales from 10 to 40 arcmin (corresponding to physical scales of 3-10 Mpc). We note that as κWL is a weighted sum of the mass fluctuations along the line of sight, its PDF is expected to be only approximately lognormal. We find that the κWL distribution is well modelled by a lognormal PDF convolved with Gaussian shape noise at scales between 10 and 20 arcmin, with a best-fitting χ2/dof of 1.11 compared to 1.84 for a Gaussian model, corresponding to p-values 0.35 and 0.07, respectively, at a scale of 10 arcmin. Above 20 arcmin a simple Gaussian model is sufficient. The joint PDF is also reasonably fitted by a bivariate lognormal. As a consistency check, we compare the variances derived from the lognormal modelling with those directly measured via CiC. Our methods are validated against maps from the MICE Grand Challenge N-body simulation.

  18. Proton recoil scintillator neutron rem meter

    DOEpatents

    Olsher, Richard H.; Seagraves, David T.

    2003-01-01

    A neutron rem meter utilizing proton recoil and thermal neutron scintillators to provide neutron detection and dose measurement. In using both fast scintillators and a thermal neutron scintillator the meter provides a wide range of sensitivity, uniform directional response, and uniform dose response. The scintillators output light to a photomultiplier tube that produces an electrical signal to an external neutron counter.

  19. Field experience with gas turbine meters

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, W.H.

    1984-04-01

    This paper discusses a company's experience and problems with turbine meters in a large offshore system. With the increased cost and decreasing reserves of natural gas, greater demands will be placed on gas measurement. Turbine meters have lent themselves well to the task and will continue to find more applications in the natural gas industry.

  20. Simplified Processing Method for Meter Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, Kimberly M.; Colotelo, Alison H. A.; Downs, Janelle L.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Henderson, Jordan W.; Montgomery, Sadie A.; Vernon, Christopher R.; Parker, Steven A.

    2015-11-01

    Simple/Quick metered data processing method that can be used for Army Metered Data Management System (MDMS) and Logistics Innovation Agency data, but may also be useful for other large data sets. Intended for large data sets when analyst has little information about the buildings.