Science.gov

Sample records for surviving tough times

  1. Presidential Survival in Tough Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Raymond C.

    Surviving the position of college president requires the development of a presidential survival kit filled with idiosyncratic items not normally associated with formal educational training. Strength, agility, control, and the ability to improvise are some of the talents required of a college president. In addition, the longevity and success of a…

  2. Lessons from Cacti: How to Survive the Prickles of Life during Tough Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigger, Alan S.; Bigger, Linda B.

    2009-01-01

    The saguaro cactus looked a little like humans, in different shapes and sizes. How on earth do they survive in a climate that seems so inhospitable? It is possible to learn lessons for life from a cactus, if one can only get beyond the thorns, and that these lessons will assist one to survive during tough or prickly times. These plants survive…

  3. Tough Questions for Tough Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrett, William; Budge, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Six high-performing/high-poverty schools provide insights into what it takes to make a dramatic turnaround. School leaders had to make tough calls--and many of those decisions were about how to use resources. The budget in a high-performing, high-poverty school is a moral document, reflective of the school's beliefs about the conditions necessary…

  4. Four Takes on Tough Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebell, Michael A.; Odden, Allan; Rolle, Anthony; Guthrie, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Educational Leadership talks with four experts in the fields of education policy and finance about how schools can weather the current financial crisis. Michael A. Rebell focuses on the recession and students' rights; Allan Odden suggests five steps schools can take to improve in tough times; Anthony Rolle describes the tension between equity and…

  5. Proactive executives: prospering in tough times.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, J

    1991-03-20

    Smart hospitals are not only surviving the current recession, some are even thriving. While economic slumps lead many executives to batten down the hatches and shift into a defensive management mode, experts say the real solution for hospitals lies in innovative, proactive management. In the economically battered Northeast, this strategy is working well for a pediatric hospital in Philadelphia and a large New York City medical center. But it's also working at a broad range of hospitals across the country. What do these very diverse institutions have in common? While each is moving forward to develop strategies and programs suited to its circumstances, all eschew the bunker mentality that comes to mind in tough times. In the words of one CEO, "You go out, decide what has to happen, and then make it happen--despite the fact that there are 8,000 reasons why it shouldn't happen."

  6. Refinery suppliers face tough times

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, D.; Walsh, K.

    1997-03-12

    Despite a handful of bright spots in hydroprocessing and petrochemical sectors, economic woes plague much of the refinery and petrochemical catalysts business, as suppliers are feeling the impact of mature markets and refiners` ongoing cost cutting. Industry experts say the doldrums could spur further restructuring in the catalyst business, with suppliers scrambling for market share and jockeying for position in growing sectors. Expect further consolidation over the next several years, says Pierre Bonnifay, president of IFP Enterprises (New York). {open_quotes}There are still too many players for the mature [refinery catalyst] markets.{close_quotes} Others agree. {open_quotes}Only about seven [or] eight major suppliers will survive,{close_quotes} says Robert Allsmiller, v.p./refinery and petrochemical catalysts at United Catalysts Inc. (UCI; Louisville, KY). {open_quotes}Who they [will be] is still up in the air.{close_quotes}

  7. Staying Motivated During Tough Times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Jennifer H.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the problem of team motivation on a project. Our team was working with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). The task consisted of figuring out how to safely control and land an airliner using just the thrust from the engines. This is called Throttles-Only Control (TOC). We weren't allowed to modify the airliner in any way, given the time and cost involved, and we had to use a stock airliner with line pilots. The idea was to give the pilots an emergency checklist which would provide them with the most useful information in the shortest time to learn how to fly TOC. The DHS Program office that was supporting us had its funding redirected, due to new priorities. The process of staying motivated for finishing as much of the project as possible is described.

  8. Survivability Versus Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyner, James J., Sr.

    2014-01-01

    Develop Survivability vs Time Model as a decision-evaluation tool to assess various emergency egress methods used at Launch Complex 39B (LC 39B) and in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) on NASAs Kennedy Space Center. For each hazard scenario, develop probability distributions to address statistical uncertainty resulting in survivability plots over time and composite survivability plots encompassing multiple hazard scenarios.

  9. Tough times call for bigger brains.

    PubMed

    Roth, Timothy C; Pravosudov, Vladimir V

    2009-05-01

    Memory is crucial for survival in many animals. Spatial memory in particular is important for food-caching species and may be influenced by selective pressures such as climate. The influence of climate on memory may be facilitated through the hippocampus (Hp), the part of the brain responsible in part for spatial memory. In a recent paper, we conducted the first large-scale test of the relationship between memory, the climate and the brain in a single food-caching species, the black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus). We found that birds from more harsh northern climates had significantly larger hippocampal volumes and more neurons than those from more mild southern latitudes. This work suggests that environmental pressures are capable of influencing specific brain regions, which may result in enhanced memory, and hence survival, in harsh climates. This work gives us a better understanding of how the brain responds to different environments and how animals can adapt to their environment in general.

  10. Tough Times: Strategic Planning as a War Canoe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how to make strategic planning a more valuable tool for higher education in today's tough times. Strategic planning is really the answer to five straightforward questions. The first three represent the plan itself, while the last two are what makes the plan vital and dynamic: (1) Why do we exist?; (2) What do…

  11. Sharing Ideas: Tough Times Encourage Colleges to Collaborate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fain, Paul; Blumenstyk, Goldie; Sander, Libby

    2009-01-01

    Tough times are encouraging colleges to share resources in a variety of areas, including campus security, research, and degree programs. Despite its veneer of cooperation, higher education is a competitive industry, where resource sharing is eyed warily. But the recession is chipping away at that reluctance, and institutions are pursuing…

  12. Surviving Tight Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neugebauer, Roger

    2002-01-01

    Discusses several strategies recommended by small business experts to help for-profit and non-profit child care centers survive a financial crisis. Strategies include: identifying the source of the problem, monitoring cash flow, reducing or deferring expenditures, expediting regular income and exploring new sources of income, patiently working…

  13. The effect of magnetic field intensity and treatment time on graphene / epoxy composites’ fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Z. Q.; Zhang, L.; Fu, S.; Yuan, R. H.; Dong, Z. W.; Ren, X. M.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of the intensity of the magnetic field and the treatment time on the fracture toughness of graphene/epoxy composites is researched. Also, the mechanism of the effect of the magnetic field on the fracture toughness of graphene/epoxy composites and a method to improve the impact resistance is explored. Then, three-point bending tests are employed to characterize the fracture toughness of graphene/epoxy composite. The results show that the intervention of magnetic field could induce GNS to generated orientation arrangement, improving the fracture toughness of the graphene/epoxy composite. When the intensity of the magnetic field was increased, the growth rate of the fracture toughness slowed. However, when 2T magnetic was used to synthetically process the material, and when the processing time was less than 50 min, the fracture toughness of the composite material increased significantly.

  14. Probabilistic Survivability Versus Time Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyner, James J., Sr.

    2015-01-01

    This technical paper documents Kennedy Space Centers Independent Assessment team work completed on three assessments for the Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Program to assist the Chief Safety and Mission Assurance Officer (CSO) and GSDO management during key programmatic reviews. The assessments provided the GSDO Program with an analysis of how egress time affects the likelihood of astronaut and worker survival during an emergency. For each assessment, the team developed probability distributions for hazard scenarios to address statistical uncertainty, resulting in survivability plots over time. The first assessment developed a mathematical model of probabilistic survivability versus time to reach a safe location using an ideal Emergency Egress System at Launch Complex 39B (LC-39B); the second used the first model to evaluate and compare various egress systems under consideration at LC-39B. The third used a modified LC-39B model to determine if a specific hazard decreased survivability more rapidly than other events during flight hardware processing in Kennedys Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB).Based on the composite survivability versus time graphs from the first two assessments, there was a soft knee in the Figure of Merit graphs at eight minutes (ten minutes after egress ordered). Thus, the graphs illustrated to the decision makers that the final emergency egress design selected should have the capability of transporting the flight crew from the top of LC 39B to a safe location in eight minutes or less. Results for the third assessment were dominated by hazards that were classified as instantaneous in nature (e.g. stacking mishaps) and therefore had no effect on survivability vs time to egress the VAB. VAB emergency scenarios that degraded over time (e.g. fire) produced survivability vs time graphs that were line with aerospace industry norms.

  15. Tough Choices or Tough Times: Bolder Steps for Education Philanthropy? Notes and Resources from the GFE Foundation Leaders Institute (Tamaya, New Mexico, October 19, 2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackinnon, Anne

    2007-01-01

    In late 2006, the National Center on Education and the Economy released "Tough Choices or Tough Times: The Report of the New Commission on the Skills of the American Workforce." With compelling language, the report updated and sharpened the findings of the center's influential 1990 report, "America's Choice: High Skills or Low Wages," which called…

  16. Tough Choices or Tough Times: The Report of the New Commission on the Skills of the American Workforce. Revised and Expanded Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jossey-Bass, An Imprint of Wiley, 2008

    2008-01-01

    "Tough Choices or Tough Times," the report of the New Commission on the Skills of the American Workforce, shows how the dynamics of the global economy will lead to a steady decline in the American standard of living if this country does not undertake the first thorough overhaul of its education system in a century. This new revised and expanded…

  17. Helping States, Helping Students: Improving Education in Tough Times. 2011 Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board (SREB), 2011

    2011-01-01

    The 2011 Southern Regional Education Board annual report describes SREB's recent achievements and how the organization has helped its 16 member states improve education in tough economic times. The report highlights program activities and also includes remarks from the Board Chair and President, acknowledgment of financial contributors, and lists…

  18. The Frugal Librarian: Thriving in Tough Economic Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smallwood, Carol, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Fewer employees, shorter hours, diminished collection budgets, reduced programs and services--all at a time of record library usage. In this book, library expert Carol Smallwood demonstrates that despite the obvious downsides, the necessity of doing business differently can be positive, leading to partnering, sharing, and innovating. This…

  19. Collection Development "Personal Finance": Thrift for Tough Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heckman, Lucy

    2009-01-01

    The current economic crisis has naturally reached into one's pocket and made many people anxious about their own finances. As consumers ride out these treacherous times, where can they go to find advice on managing and paying down their debt, protecting their investments, incomes, and retirement plans, and applying for mortgages in a tight credit…

  20. When times get tough, what happens to TQM? Case study.

    PubMed

    Niven, D

    1993-01-01

    When Mueller Chemical Company's biggest customer, Ameriton, demanded that MCC install a total quality management system five years ago, the effort seemed worth it. Morale improved dramatically at the German company, as did quality and productivity. But now, in this fictional case study, Ameriton has gone bankrupt. As a result, MCC has had to cut its work force, and senior managers are meeting to decide whether TQM should be part of the downsized MCC. Horst Koblitz, director of TQM, and Division Manager Eva Stichen both vote yes. Stichen's division, which never supplied Ameriton, has turned its process-control system into the company's best thanks to TQM. The division is more cost-efficient, product defects are nearly nonexistent, and its safety record is spotless. As Koblitz notes, Ameriton's failure is no reason to abandon all that MCC has built. Furthermore, shareholders and customers would think that MCC was panicking. MCC just needs to tailor its TQM program to a smaller organization. But CFO Georg Becker doesn't think MCC has the time or resources for fine-tuning. And as he sees it, that might be just as well. The distractions that came with TQM took MCC away from its goal of becoming the chemicals market leader in Europe. While the company organized teams, developed measurement systems, and filled out quality reports, its competitors took away much of the market share MCC was after. TQM was a good long-term approach, but it didn't come with a plan for MCC's current situation. And CEO and Chairman Dieter Mueller won't compromise; TQM must either stay or go.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Effect of Holding Time in the (α + γ) Temperature Range on Toughness of Specially Austempered Ductile Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Toshiro; Yamada, Shinya

    1996-07-01

    Austempered ductile iron (ADI) finds wide application in the industry because of its high strength and toughness. The QB' process has been developed to produce a fine microstructure with high fracture toughness in ADI. This process involves reaustenitizing a prequenched ductile iron in the (α + γ) temperature range followed by an isothermal treatment in the bainitic transformation tem-perature range. In the present work, the effect of holding time in the (α + γ) temperature range on the structure and un-notched toughness of ADI has been studied. Prior to the austempering treatment, the as-cast ductile iron was heat treated to obtain martensitic, ferritic, and pearlitic matrix structures. In the case of prequenched material (martensitic matrix), the un-notched impact toughness increased as a function of holding time in the (α + γ) temperature range. The reaustenitization heat treatment also resulted in the precipitation of fine carbide particles, identified as (Fe,Cr,Mn)3C. It was shown that the increase in holding time in the (α + γ) temperature range leads to a reduction in the number of carbide particles. In the case of a ferritic prior structure, a long duration hold in the (α + γ) temperature range resulted in the coarsening of the structure with a marginal increase in the tough-ness. In the case of a pearlitic prior structure, the toughness increased with holding time. This was attributed to the decomposition of the relatively stable carbide around the eutectic cell boundary with longer holding times.

  2. Linking age, survival, and transit time distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrese, Salvatore; Porporato, Amilcare

    2015-10-01

    Although the concepts of age, survival, and transit time have been widely used in many fields, including population dynamics, chemical engineering, and hydrology, a comprehensive mathematical framework is still missing. Here we discuss several relationships among these quantities by starting from the evolution equation for the joint distribution of age and survival, from which the equations for age and survival time readily follow. It also becomes apparent how the statistical dependence between age and survival is directly related to either the age dependence of the loss function or the survival-time dependence of the input function. The solution of the joint distribution equation also allows us to obtain the relationships between the age at exit (or death) and the survival time at input (or birth), as well as to stress the symmetries of the various distributions under time reversal. The transit time is then obtained as a sum of the age and survival time, and its properties are discussed along with the general relationships between their mean values. The special case of steady state case is analyzed in detail. Some examples, inspired by hydrologic applications, are presented to illustrate the theory with the specific results. This article was corrected on 11 Nov 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  3. Effect of holding time in the ({alpha} + {gamma}) temperature range on toughness of specially austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, T.; Yamada, S.

    1996-07-01

    Austempered ductile iron (ADI) finds wide application in the industry because of its high strength and toughness. The QB{prime} process has been developed to produce a fine microstructure with high fracture toughness in ADI. This process involves reaustenitizing a prequenched ductile iron in the ({alpha} + {gamma}) temperature range followed by an isothermal treatment in the bainitic transformation temperature range. In the present work, the effect of holding time in the ({alpha} + {gamma}) temperature range on the structure and un-notched toughness of ADI has been studied. Prior to the austempering treatment, the as-cast ductile iron was heat treated to obtain martensitic, ferritic, and pearlitic matrix structures. In the case of prequenched material (martensitic matrix), the un-notched impact toughness increased as a function of holding time in the ({alpha} + {gamma}) temperature range. The reaustenitization heat treatment also resulted in the precipitation of fine carbide particles, identified as (Fe,Cr,Mn){sub 3}C. It was shown that the increase in holding time in the ({alpha} + {gamma}) temperature range leads to a reduction in the number of carbide particles. In the case of a ferritic prior structure, a long duration hold in the ({alpha} + {gamma}) temperature range resulted in the coarsening of the structure with a marginal increase in the toughness. In the case of a pearlitic prior structure, the toughness increased with holding time. This was attributed to the decomposition of the relatively stable carbide around the eutectic cell boundary with longer holding times.

  4. Risk-adjusted monitoring of survival times

    SciTech Connect

    Sego, Landon H.; Reynolds, Marion R.; Woodall, William H.

    2009-02-26

    We consider the monitoring of clinical outcomes, where each patient has a di®erent risk of death prior to undergoing a health care procedure.We propose a risk-adjusted survival time CUSUM chart (RAST CUSUM) for monitoring clinical outcomes where the primary endpoint is a continuous, time-to-event variable that may be right censored. Risk adjustment is accomplished using accelerated failure time regression models. We compare the average run length performance of the RAST CUSUM chart to the risk-adjusted Bernoulli CUSUM chart, using data from cardiac surgeries to motivate the details of the comparison. The comparisons show that the RAST CUSUM chart is more efficient at detecting a sudden decrease in the odds of death than the risk-adjusted Bernoulli CUSUM chart, especially when the fraction of censored observations is not too high. We also discuss the implementation of a prospective monitoring scheme using the RAST CUSUM chart.

  5. [Effects of load and loading time on fracture toughness with indentation method].

    PubMed

    Okada, T; Shinya, A; Yokozuka, S

    1990-10-01

    For clinical application of ceramics such as porcelains that are frequently used as crown restoration materials, it is important to quantitatively evaluate and determine brittleness. This quality is expressed as a fracture toughness value, KIC, but no distinct method for its determination has yet been established. In order to standardize conditions for the determination of KIC by the indentation method, effects of indentation load and loading time on KIC of calcium phosphate crystalline ceramics (CP) were studied at various Vickers indentation loads and various loading times in CP plate-like segments. Furthermore, plate-like segments of each of CP, apatite (AP), mica-beta-spodumene (MIS) and mica (MIC) groups were subjected to experiment at various indentation loads at a fixed loading time to study the effects of indentation load on KIC in four kinds of Castable Ceramics. The results are summarized as follows: 1) The Vickers hardness degree of CP was decreased with an increase in indentation load and loading time, reaching the maximum value (499Hv) at 1kgf of indentation load and 5s of loading time. 2) The value of half of the crack length of CP was increased with an increase in indentation load and loading time, reaching a maximum (530 microns) at 20kgf of indentation load and 30s of loading time. 3) KIC of CP reached the maximum value (2.78MNm-3/2) at 5kgf of indentation load and 5s of loading time, and the minimum (1.52MNm-3/2) at 20kgf of indentation load and 30s of loading time. 4) Optimal experimental conditions for KIC of CP determined by indentation method were 5kgf or 10kgf of indentation load and 15s of loading time. 5) KIC values (MNm-3/2) determined at 5kgf of indentation load and 15s of loading time for CP, AP, MIS and MI were 2.27, 0.95, 1.82 and 1.81, respectively. 6) The course of cracks due to indentation force showed a linear pattern of intra-granular fracture. 7) The cracks were revealed to show median cracks by fractography.

  6. Predicting survival time for cold exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikuisis, Peter

    1995-06-01

    The prediction of survival time (ST) for cold exposure is speculative as reliable controlled data of deep hypothermia are unavailable. At best, guidance can be obtained from case histories of accidental exposure. This study describes the development of a mathematical model for the prediction of ST under sedentary conditions in the cold. The model is based on steady-state heat conduction in a single cylinder comprised of a core and two concentric annular shells representing the fat plus skin and the clothing plus still boundary layer, respectively. The ambient condition can be either air or water; the distinction is made by assigning different values of insulation to the still boundary layer. Metabolic heat production ( M) is comprised of resting and shivering components with the latter predicted by temperature signals from the core and skin. Where the cold exposure is too severe for M to balance heat loss, ST is largely determined by the rate of heat loss from the body. Where a balance occurs, ST is governed by the endurance time for shivering. End of survival is marked by the deep core temperature reaching a value of 30° C. The model was calibrated against survival data of cold water (0 to 20° C) immersion and then applied to cold air exposure. A sampling of ST predictions for the nude exposure of an average healthy male in relatively calm air (1 km/h wind speed) are the following: 1.8, 2.5, 4.1, 9.0, and >24 h for -30, -20, -10, 0, and 10° C, respectively. With two layers of loose clothing (average thickness of 1 mm each) in a 5 km/h wind, STs are 4.0, 5.6, 8.6, 15.4, and >24 h for -50, -40, -30, -20, and -10° C. The predicted STs must be weighted against the extrapolative nature of the model. At present, it would be prudent to use the predictions in a relative sense, that is, to compare or rank-order predicted STs for various combinations of ambient conditions and clothing protection.

  7. Risk-adjusted monitoring of survival times.

    PubMed

    Sego, Landon H; Reynolds, Marion R; Woodall, William H

    2009-04-30

    We consider the monitoring of surgical outcomes, where each patient has a different risk of post-operative mortality due to risk factors that exist prior to the surgery. We propose a risk-adjusted (RA) survival time CUSUM chart (RAST CUSUM) for monitoring a continuous, time-to-event variable that may be right-censored. Risk adjustment is accomplished using accelerated failure time regression models. We compare the average run length performance of the RAST CUSUM chart with the RA Bernoulli CUSUM chart using data from cardiac surgeries to motivate the details of the comparison. The comparisons show that the RAST CUSUM chart is more efficient at detecting a sudden increase in the odds of mortality than the RA Bernoulli CUSUM chart, especially when the fraction of censored observations is relatively low or when a small increase in the odds of mortality occurs. We also discuss the impact of the amount of training data used to estimate chart parameters as well as the implementation of the RAST CUSUM chart during prospective monitoring.

  8. Relationship between meat toughness and properties of connective tissue from cows and young bulls heat treated at low temperatures for prolonged times.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Line; Ertbjerg, Per; Løje, Hanne; Risbo, Jens; van den Berg, Frans W J; Christensen, Mette

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the current study was to elucidate whether cows and young bulls require different combinations of heating temperature and heating time to reduce toughness of the meat. The combined effect of heating temperature and time on toughness of semitendinosus muscle from the two categories of beef was investigated and the relationship to properties of connective tissue was examined. Measurements of toughness, collagen solubility, cathepsin activity and protein denaturation of beef semitendinosus heated at temperatures between 53°C and 63°C for up to 19 1/2 h were conducted. The results revealed that slightly higher temperatures and prolonged heating times were required to reduce toughness of semitendinosus from cows to the same level as in young bulls. Reduced toughness of semitendinosus as a result of low temperature for prolonged time is suggested to result from weakening of the connective tissue, caused partly by denaturation or conformational changes of the proteins and/or by solubilization of collagen.

  9. Time series modeling of system self-assessment of survival

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, H.; Kolarik, W.J.

    1999-06-01

    Self-assessment of survival for a system, subsystem or component is implemented by assessing conditional performance reliability in real-time, which includes modeling and analysis of physical performance data. This paper proposes a time series analysis approach to system self-assessment (prediction) of survival. In the approach, physical performance data are modeled in a time series. The performance forecast is based on the model developed and is converted to the reliability of system survival. In contrast to a standard regression model, a time series model, using on-line data, is suitable for the real-time performance prediction. This paper illustrates an example of time series modeling and survival assessment, regarding an excessive tool edge wear failure mode for a twist drill operation.

  10. A Note on Standard Errors for Survival Curves in Discrete-Time Survival Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca; Sklar, Jeffrey C.

    2005-01-01

    Cox (1972) proposed a discrete-time survival model that is somewhat analogous to the proportional hazards model for continuous time. Efron (1988) showed that this model can be estimated using ordinary logistic regression software, and Singer and Willett (1993) provided a detailed illustration of a particularly flexible form of the model that…

  11. Indiana Emergent Bilingual Student Time to Reclassification: A Survival Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, April M.; Morita-Mullaney, Trish; Singh, Malkeet

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we employed a discrete-time survival analysis model to examine Indiana emergent bilingual time to reclassification as fluent English proficient. The data consisted of five years of statewide English language proficiency scores. Indiana has a large and rapidly growing Spanish-speaking emergent bilingual population, and these students…

  12. Scaling of expected survival time in a stochastic harvesting model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, Harold; Radin, Michael; Wiandt, Tamas

    We explore the dynamics of modified version of a standard fishery model (Gordon-Schafer-Munro), with additive and multiplicative noise, under a quota-based harvest. A harvest quota induces an effective strong Allee effect (a positive unstable steady state population level, below which populations die out), with expected survival time following generalized Ornstein-Uhlenbeck dynamics. In particular, for additive noise, the expected survival time is exponential in s3/σ2, where s is the difference between stable and unstable steady state populations and σ the noise level. Thus survival time depends sensitively upon harvest quota (which determines steady state population), perhaps a warning to avoid future collapses such as that of the Atlantic cod fishery.

  13. Joint Analysis of Survival Time and Longitudinal Categorical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jaeun; Cai, Jianwen; Zeng, Donglin; Olshan, Andrew F.

    2013-01-01

    In biomedical or public health research, it is common for both survival time and longitudinal categorical outcomes to be collected for a subject, along with the subject’s characteristics or risk factors. Investigators are often interested in finding important variables for predicting both survival time and longitudinal outcomes which could be correlated within the same subject. Existing approaches for such joint analyses deal with continuous longitudinal outcomes. New statistical methods need to be developed for categorical longitudinal outcomes. We propose to simultaneously model the survival time with a stratified Cox proportional hazards model and the longitudinal categorical outcomes with a generalized linear mixed model. Random effects are introduced to account for the dependence between survival time and longitudinal outcomes due to unobserved factors. The Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm is used to derive the point estimates for the model parameters, and the observed information matrix is adopted to estimate their asymptotic variances. Asymptotic properties for our proposed maximum likelihood estimators are established using the theory of empirical processes. The method is demonstrated to perform well in finite samples via simulation studies. We illustrate our approach with data from the Carolina Head and Neck Cancer Study (CHANCE) and compare the results based on our simultaneous analysis and the separately conducted analyses using the generalized linear mixed model and the Cox proportional hazards model. Our proposed method identifies more predictors than by separate analyses. PMID:26052353

  14. Transformation or Decline? Using Tough Times to Create Higher-Performing Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Karen Hawley

    2011-01-01

    Instead of doing less with less during these fiscally challenging times, school districts can seize the moment to usher in school transformation that will leave the schools, families, and communities better off. They could follow the lead of districts such as Baltimore City, Syracuse, and Charlotte-Mecklenburg to think outside traditional cost…

  15. Tough by name, tough by nature.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Few beds, one would imagine, could withstand three-quarters of a ton landing on them, but this was the challenge successfully met by a box bed from a furniture manufacturer for challenging behaviour environments, Tough Furniture, when, to reassure a customer that the bed could accommodate 30-stone patients, 13 of the company's staff jumped repeatedly on it to ensure that it would survive intact in a real-world setting. Such testing may seem extreme, but is vital, since much of the company's furniture is destined for environments where patients will abuse, and indeed attempt to destroy, components. As MD David Vesty explained to HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, when he visited the company's Shropshire headquarters, it is through manufacturing premium quality cabinet furniture that is both attractive and distinctly non-institutional, but will equally withstand the harshest use, that the company has ensured that its products can live up to the brand name. PMID:26281428

  16. Survival-time statistics for sample space reducing stochastic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Avinash Chand

    2016-04-01

    Stochastic processes wherein the size of the state space is changing as a function of time offer models for the emergence of scale-invariant features observed in complex systems. I consider such a sample-space reducing (SSR) stochastic process that results in a random sequence of strictly decreasing integers {x (t )},0 ≤t ≤τ , with boundary conditions x (0 )=N and x (τ ) = 1. This model is shown to be exactly solvable: PN(τ ) , the probability that the process survives for time τ is analytically evaluated. In the limit of large N , the asymptotic form of this probability distribution is Gaussian, with mean and variance both varying logarithmically with system size: <τ >˜lnN and στ2˜lnN . Correspondence can be made between survival-time statistics in the SSR process and record statistics of independent and identically distributed random variables.

  17. Triumph in Tough Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponder, Anne

    2009-01-01

    The downturn in the economy of the author's state, North Carolina, so far is less severe than that of much of the rest of the nation, due to their diversified economy, financial discipline, constitutional mandate for a balanced budget, "rainy day" fund, and many years of consistent investment in higher education. In the University of North…

  18. These Tough Economic Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desrochers, John E.; Cowan, Katherine C.; Christner, Ray W.

    2009-01-01

    Research has shown that students' social, emotional, and behavioral health affects their academic achievement. This has enormous implications for teachers, school mental health providers, and the students themselves. A student who is hungry, disengaged, preoccupied, or behaviorally disruptive simply is not going to respond as well to even the best…

  19. Retention in Tough Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaye, Beverly; Jordan-Evans, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    Interviews with 25 global talent leaders discuss keeping good people and the challenges and emerging practices for retaining employees. Sidebars discuss retention tips and what keeps people on the job. (JOW)

  20. Survival times of pre-1950 US women radium dial workers

    SciTech Connect

    Stehney, A.F.

    1994-05-01

    Survival times of US women radium dial workers to the end of 1989 were examined by life table methods. Included were 1301 women rust employed before 1930 and 1242 first employed in 1930-1949. Expected numbers of deaths were estimated from age- and time-specific death rates for US white females. In the early group, 85 deaths from the well-known radium-induced cancers - bone sarcomas and head carcinomas - were observed, but only 724 deaths from aH other causes were observed vs 755 expected. Life shortening ({plus_minus}S.E.) of 1.8 {plus_minus}0.5 y compared to the general population of US white females was calculated from the time distribution of all deaths in the pre-1930 group. In the 1930--1949 group, 350 deaths were observed vs 343 expected and no bone sarcomas or head carcinomas occurred. Among women who survived at least 2 y after rust measurement of body radium, a significant excess of observed vs expected deaths was found only for radium intakes greater than 1.85 MBq of {sup 226}Ra + {sup 228}Ra, and no trend of deaths or reduction of life expectancy was found with length of employment.

  1. Mean exit time and survival probability within the CTRW formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero, M.; Masoliver, J.

    2007-05-01

    An intense research on financial market microstructure is presently in progress. Continuous time random walks (CTRWs) are general models capable to capture the small-scale properties that high frequency data series show. The use of CTRW models in the analysis of financial problems is quite recent and their potentials have not been fully developed. Here we present two (closely related) applications of great interest in risk control. In the first place, we will review the problem of modelling the behaviour of the mean exit time (MET) of a process out of a given region of fixed size. The surveyed stochastic processes are the cumulative returns of asset prices. The link between the value of the MET and the timescale of the market fluctuations of a certain degree is crystal clear. In this sense, MET value may help, for instance, in deciding the optimal time horizon for the investment. The MET is, however, one among the statistics of a distribution of bigger interest: the survival probability (SP), the likelihood that after some lapse of time a process remains inside the given region without having crossed its boundaries. The final part of the manuscript is devoted to the study of this quantity. Note that the use of SPs may outperform the standard “Value at Risk" (VaR) method for two reasons: we can consider other market dynamics than the limited Wiener process and, even in this case, a risk level derived from the SP will ensure (within the desired quintile) that the quoted value of the portfolio will not leave the safety zone. We present some preliminary theoretical and applied results concerning this topic.

  2. Test-Free Fracture Toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Computational simulation results can give the prediction of damage growth and progression and fracture toughness of composite structures. The experimental data from literature provide environmental effects on the fracture behavior of metallic or fiber composite structures. However, the traditional experimental methods to analyze the influence of the imposed conditions are expensive and time consuming. This research used the CODSTRAN code to model the temperature effects, scaling effects and the loading effects of fiberbraided composite specimens with and without fiber-optic sensors on the damage initiation and energy release rates. The load-displacement relationship and fracture toughness assessment approach is compared with the test results from literature and it is verified that the computational simulation, with the use of established material modeling and finite element modules, adequately tracks the changes of fracture toughness and subsequent fracture propagation for any fiberbraided composite structure due to the change of fiber orientations, presence of large diameter optical fibers, and any loading conditions.

  3. Modeling Discrete Survival Time Using Genomic Feature Data

    PubMed Central

    Ferber, Kyle; Archer, Kellie J

    2015-01-01

    Researchers have recently shown that penalized models perform well when applied to high-throughput genomic data. Previous researchers introduced the generalized monotone incremental forward stagewise (GMIFS) method for fitting overparameterized logistic regression models. The GMIFS method was subsequently extended by others for fitting several different logit link ordinal response models to high-throughput genomic data. In this study, we further extended the GMIFS method for ordinal response modeling using a complementary log-log link, which allows one to model discrete survival data. We applied our extension to a publicly available microarray gene expression dataset (GSE53733) with a discrete survival outcome. The dataset included 70 primary glioblastoma samples from patients of the German Glioma Network with long-, intermediate-, and short-term overall survival. We tested the performance of our method by examining the prediction accuracy of the fitted model. The method has been implemented as an addition to the ordinalgmifs package in the R programming environment. PMID:25861216

  4. Generating survival times to simulate Cox proportional hazards models with time-varying covariates.

    PubMed

    Austin, Peter C

    2012-12-20

    Simulations and Monte Carlo methods serve an important role in modern statistical research. They allow for an examination of the performance of statistical procedures in settings in which analytic and mathematical derivations may not be feasible. A key element in any statistical simulation is the existence of an appropriate data-generating process: one must be able to simulate data from a specified statistical model. We describe data-generating processes for the Cox proportional hazards model with time-varying covariates when event times follow an exponential, Weibull, or Gompertz distribution. We consider three types of time-varying covariates: first, a dichotomous time-varying covariate that can change at most once from untreated to treated (e.g., organ transplant); second, a continuous time-varying covariate such as cumulative exposure at a constant dose to radiation or to a pharmaceutical agent used for a chronic condition; third, a dichotomous time-varying covariate with a subject being able to move repeatedly between treatment states (e.g., current compliance or use of a medication). In each setting, we derive closed-form expressions that allow one to simulate survival times so that survival times are related to a vector of fixed or time-invariant covariates and to a single time-varying covariate. We illustrate the utility of our closed-form expressions for simulating event times by using Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the statistical power to detect as statistically significant the effect of different types of binary time-varying covariates. This is compared with the statistical power to detect as statistically significant a binary time-invariant covariate.

  5. Accelerating Child Survival and Development in Dark Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, James P.

    Measures were proposed that would enable UNICEF, in association with others and despite prevailing difficult economic circumstances, to more effectively bring well-being and hope to hundreds of millions of children. Specific proposals were designed to help most countries accelerate child survival and development. Most particularly, it was…

  6. Crunch Time for the Diplomas: Will They Survive?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Mike

    2009-01-01

    This article looks at the introduction of the diplomas as part of the 14-19 reforms in England. It questions whether they can survive the low initial take-up from students, the lack of interest from key parts of the schools sector, and the confusing messages about what sort of qualification they are meant to be. It also asks whether the diplomas…

  7. Project Rescue! Helping a Lost but Determined CIO Navigate the Tough New World of Higher Education IT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laster, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    This column explores the world of Gene, a composite CIO who leads a sizable IT organization for a top 100 university somewhere in America. The author's goal is to help him navigate the tough times ahead of higher education IT. The author peeks into Gene's daily goings-on, investigates his problems, and helps him to not only survive, but prosper.

  8. Power Analysis for Trials with Discrete-Time Survival Endpoints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jozwiak, Katarzyna; Moerbeek, Mirjam

    2012-01-01

    Studies on event occurrence aim to investigate if and when subjects experience a particular event. The timing of events may be measured continuously using thin precise units or discretely using time periods. The latter metric of time is often used in social science research and the generalized linear model (GLM) is an appropriate model for data…

  9. Tough Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vosteen, L. F. (Compiler); Johnson, N. J. (Compiler); Teichman, L. A. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    Papers and working group summaries are presented which address composite material behavior and performance improvement. Topic areas include composite fracture toughness and impact characterization, constituent properties and interrelationships, and matrix synthesis and characterization.

  10. Smart textiles: Tough cotton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, Alba G.; Hinestroza, Juan P.

    2008-08-01

    Cotton is an important raw material for producing soft textiles and clothing. Recent discoveries in functionalizing cotton fibres with nanotubes may offer a new line of tough, wearable, smart and interactive garments.

  11. TOUGH2 software qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.; Simmons, A.; Wu, Y.S.; Moridis, G.

    1996-02-01

    TOUGH2 is a numerical simulation code for multi-dimensional coupled fluid and heat flow of multiphase, multicomponent fluid mixtures in porous and fractured media. It belongs to the MULKOM ({open_quotes}MULti-KOMponent{close_quotes}) family of codes and is a more general version of the TOUGH simulator. The MULKOM family of codes was originally developed with a focus on geothermal reservoir simulation. They are suited to modeling systems which contain different fluid mixtures, with applications to flow problems arising in the context of high-level nuclear waste isolation, oil and gas recovery and storage, and groundwater resource protection. TOUGH2 is essentially a subset of MULKOM, consisting of a selection of the better tested and documented MULKOM program modules. The purpose of this package of reports is to provide all software baseline documents necessary for the software qualification of TOUGH2.

  12. TOUGH Short Course for Scientists and Engineers

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalsky, Michael B.; Finsterle, Stefan

    2006-08-01

    The TOUGH family of codes is a suite of computer programs for the simulation of multiphase fluid and heat flows in porous and fractured media with applications to geothermal reservoir engineering, nuclear waste disposal in geologic formations, geologic carbon sequestration, gas hydrate research, vadose zone hydrology, environmental remediation, oil and gas reservoir engineering, and other mass transport and energy transfer problems in complex geologic settings. TOUGH has been developed in the Earth Sciences Division of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Many modifications and enhancements have been made to TOUGH (at LBNL and elsewhere) from the time it was first released in 1987. TOUGH and its various descendants (such as iTOUGH2, T2VOC, TMVOC, EWASG, TOUGHREACT, TOUGH+ and many more) are currently in use in approximately 300 research laboratories, private companies, and universities in 33 countries. The LBNL group, headed by Karsten Pruess, serves as custodian of the code. The TOUGH simulators were developed for problems involving strongly heat-driven flow. To describe these phenomena a multi-phase approach to fluid and heat flow is used, which fully accounts for the movement of gaseous and liquid phases, their transport of latent and sensible heat, and phase transitions between liquid and vapor. TOUGH takes account of fluid flow in both liquid and gaseous phases--and, in certain modules, a non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL)--occurring under pressure, viscous, and gravity forces according to Darcy's law. Interference between the phases is represented by means of relative permeability functions. The code includes Klinkenberg effects and binary diffusion in the gas phase, and capillary and phase adsorption effects for the liquid phase. Heat transport occurs by means of conduction (with thermal conductivity dependent on water saturation), convection, and binary diffusion, which includes both sensible and latent heat. The goal of this training course is to

  13. Survival time estimation using Injury Severity Score (ISS) in homicide cases.

    PubMed

    Cros, Jérôme; Alvarez, Jean-Claude; Sbidian, Emilie; Charlier, Philippe; de la Grandmaison, Geoffroy Lorin

    2013-12-10

    The aim of our study was to assess the value of ISS to estimate survival time in a retrospective study of all homicidal deaths in the Western suburbs of Paris between 1994 and 2008. Stab wounds were the most common cause of death. Survival time between assault and death, determined in 107 cases out of 511 homicide cases, ranged from 0 min to 25 days (mean 39 h). There was an overall significant association between the survival time and the ISS score. ISS and survival time were strongly associated with male victims and a clear trend was seen with women. Regarding the type of wounds, a trend was seen with gunshot wounds and blunt injuries, but not with stab wounds. There was no influence of blood toxicological results and resuscitation attempts. Overall, ISS was a good predictor of a survival under 30 min.

  14. A Straight-Talk Survival Guide for Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Facione, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Times are very tough. The great majority of colleges are looking at 2009 and 2010 and beyond, in anticipation of the deepest budget cuts in more than a generation. But as bad as the financial situation may be, colleges can survive if they take swift and strong emergency action. It is time for some straight talk, starting with the realization that…

  15. TOUGH-Fx

    2005-09-01

    TOUGH-Fx represents the next generation of family of codes for the solution of problems of fluid flow and heat transport in complex geologic media. TOUGH-Fx is the successor to the TOUGH2 family of codes developed by LBNL and used extensively all over the world, It is written in FORTRAN 9512003, uses the advanced capabilities of the new language, and was designed to take advantage of the benefits of object-oriented programming. The code can simulate flowmore » and transport of important (economically and environmentally) fluids in the subsurface, as well as heat transport and any changes of phase that occur within the temperature range of the process/phenomenon under study. TOUGH-Fx is the generic name that describes the main components of the computational engine used by the code. For the simulation of a particular process. TOUGH-Fx needs a module (or modules) that describe the equation of state (EOS) of the fluids involved in the process. Thus, simulation of different processes are possible by using the main TOUGH-Fx and invoking the corresponding EOS modules. Such modules include the EOS of water, the EQS of air and other gases, the EOS of volatile organic substances, the EOS or liquid hydrocarbons, etc.« less

  16. Tough and tender: embodied categorization of gender.

    PubMed

    Slepian, Michael L; Weisbuch, Max; Rule, Nicholas O; Ambady, Nalini

    2011-01-01

    Emerging evidence has shown that human thought can be embodied within physical sensations and actions. Indeed, abstract concepts such as morality, time, and interpersonal warmth can be based on metaphors that are grounded in bodily experiences (e.g., physical temperature can signal interpersonal warmth). We hypothesized that social-category knowledge is similarly embodied, and we tested this hypothesis by examining a sensory metaphor related to categorical judgments of gender. We chose the dimension of "toughness" (ranging from tough to tender), which is often used to characterize differences between males and females. Across two studies, the proprioceptive experience of toughness (vs. tenderness) was manipulated as participants categorized sex-ambiguous faces as male or female. Two different manipulations of proprioceptive toughness predictably biased the categorization of faces toward "male." These findings suggest that social-category knowledge is at least partially embodied. PMID:21106884

  17. Tough, bio-inspired hybrid materials

    SciTech Connect

    Munch, Etienne; Launey, Maximimilan E.; Alsem, Daan H.; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2008-10-06

    The notion of mimicking natural structures in the synthesis of new structural materials has generated enormous interest but has yielded few practical advances. Natural composites achieve strength and toughness through complex hierarchical designs extremely difficult to replicate synthetically. Here we emulate Nature's toughening mechanisms through the combination of two ordinary compounds, aluminum oxide and polymethylmethacrylate, into ice-templated structures whose toughness can be over 300 times (in energy terms) that of their constituents. The final product is a bulk hybrid ceramic material whose high yield strength and fracture toughness ({approx}200 MPa and {approx}30 MPa{radical}m) provide specific properties comparable to aluminum alloys. These model materials can be used to identify the key microstructural features that should guide the synthesis of bio-inspired ceramic-based composites with unique strength and toughness.

  18. Tough and tender: embodied categorization of gender.

    PubMed

    Slepian, Michael L; Weisbuch, Max; Rule, Nicholas O; Ambady, Nalini

    2011-01-01

    Emerging evidence has shown that human thought can be embodied within physical sensations and actions. Indeed, abstract concepts such as morality, time, and interpersonal warmth can be based on metaphors that are grounded in bodily experiences (e.g., physical temperature can signal interpersonal warmth). We hypothesized that social-category knowledge is similarly embodied, and we tested this hypothesis by examining a sensory metaphor related to categorical judgments of gender. We chose the dimension of "toughness" (ranging from tough to tender), which is often used to characterize differences between males and females. Across two studies, the proprioceptive experience of toughness (vs. tenderness) was manipulated as participants categorized sex-ambiguous faces as male or female. Two different manipulations of proprioceptive toughness predictably biased the categorization of faces toward "male." These findings suggest that social-category knowledge is at least partially embodied.

  19. Time-specific variation in passerine nest survival: new insights for old questions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grant, T.A.; Shaffer, T.L.; Madden, E.M.; Pietz, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    Nest survival likely varies with nest age and date, but until recently researchers had only limited tools to efficiently address those sources of variability. Beginning with Mayfield (1961), many researchers have averaged survival rates within time-specific categories (e.g. egg and nestling stages; early and late nesting dates). However, Mayfield's estimator assumes constant survival within categories, and violations of that assumption can lead to biased estimates. We used the logistic-exposure method to examine nest survival as a function of nest age and date in Clay-colored Sparrows (Spizella pallida) and Vesper Sparrows (Pooecetes gramineus) breeding in north-central North Dakota. Daily survival rates increased during egg laying, decreased during incubation to a low shortly after hatch, and then increased during brood rearing in both species. Variation in survival with nest age suggests that traditional categorical averaging using Mayfield's or similar methods would have been inappropriate for this study; similar variation may bias results of other studies. Nest survival also varied with date. For both species, survival was high during the peak of nest initiations in late May and early June and declined throughout the remainder of the nesting season. Models of nest survival that incorporate time-specific information may provide insights that are unavailable from averaged data.

  20. Test-Free Fracture Toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnetyan, Levon; Chamis, Christos C. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Computational simulation results can give the prediction of damage growth and progression and fracture toughness of composite structures. The experimental data from literature provide environmental effects on the fracture behavior of metallic or fiber composite structures. However, the traditional experimental methods to analyze the influence of the imposed conditions are expensive and time consuming. This research used the CODSTRAN code to model the temperature effects, scaling effects and the loading effects of fiber/braided composite specimens with and without fiber-optic sensors on the damage initiation and energy release rates. The load-displacement relationship and fracture toughness assessment approach is compared with the test results from literature and it is verified that the computational simulation, with the use of established material modeling and finite element modules, adequately tracks the changes of fracture toughness and subsequent fracture propagation for any fiber/braided composite structure due to the change of fiber orientations, presence of large diameter optical fibers, and any loading conditions.

  1. What makes a leaf tough? Patterns of correlated evolution between leaf toughness traits and demographic rates among 197 shade-tolerant woody species in a neotropical forest.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Jared W; Kitajima, Kaoru; Burleigh, J Gordon; Kress, W John; Erickson, David L; Wright, S Joseph

    2011-06-01

    Slow-growing juveniles of shade-tolerant plant species are predicted to have tough leaves because of the high cost of leaf replacement in shade relative to potential carbon gain. We assessed the degree of correlated evolution among eight traits associated with leaf toughness and the relationships of those traits with the growth and mortality rates of 197 tree and shrub species from the understory of the 50-ha forest dynamics plot on Barro Colorado Island, Panama. Path analysis with phylogenetically independent contrasts revealed that leaves attained material toughness (resistance to fracture per unit fracture area) through increases in tissue density, percent cellulose per unit dry mass, and vein fracture toughness. Lamina density and cellulose content evolved independently and thus represent different paths to material toughness. Structural toughness (resistance to fracture per unit fracture length) depended on material toughness and lamina thickness. Mortality rates of individuals 1-10 cm in stem diameter were negatively correlated with material toughness and lamina density but were independent of structural toughness and cell wall fiber contents. Leaf toughness traits were uncorrelated with relative growth rates. Results imply that material toughness enhances resistance to natural enemies, which increases survival and offsets the biomass allocation cost of producing tough leaves in the shaded understory.

  2. Survival is linked with reaction time and spatial memory in African striped mice.

    PubMed

    Maille, Audrey; Schradin, Carsten

    2016-08-01

    Studying the association between fitness and cognition in free-living animals is a fundamental step in the elucidation of the evolution of cognition. We assessed whether survival until the onset of the breeding season was related to reaction time or spatial memory in the African striped mouse Rhabdomys pumilio, a rodent that has to survive summer drought before breeding. We tested a total of 90 individuals at the beginning of summer. Female survival was related to a faster response to predation stimuli. Male survival increased with greater spatial memory, possibly because it is important for males to remember the configuration of the environment during dispersal. This study revealed that individual variation in reaction time and spatial memory can be related to survival probability, which is important for understanding the selection pressures acting on basic cognitive traits. PMID:27484646

  3. Analysis of time-dependent covariates in a regressive relative survival model.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Roch; Gouvernet, Joanny

    2005-12-30

    Relative survival is a method for assessing prognostic factors for disease-specific mortality. However, most relative survival models assume that the effect of covariate on disease-specific mortality is fixed-in-time, which may not hold in some studies and requires adapted modelling. We propose an extension of the Esteve et al. regressive relative survival model that uses the counting process approach to accommodate time-dependent effect of a predictor's on disease-specific mortality. This approach had shown its robustness, and the properties of the counting process give a simple and attractive computational solution to model time-dependent covariates. Our approach is illustrated with the data from the Stanford Heart Transplant Study and with data from a hospital-based study on invasive breast cancer. Advantages of modelling time-dependent covariates in relative survival analysis are discussed.

  4. Predictors of long time survival after lung cancer surgery: A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Kjetil; Nilsen, Tom Ivar Lund; Hatlen, Elisabeth; Sørensen, Karina Søvik; Hole, Torstein; Haaverstad, Rune

    2008-01-01

    Background There have been few reports regarding long time survival after lung cancer surgery. The influence of age and pulmonary function on long time survival is still not fully discovered. Some reports suggest that hospitals with a high surgical volume have better results. The aim of this study was to evaluate lung cancer surgery performed in a county hospital in terms of 30 days mortality, complications and predictors of long time survival. Methods All patients operated with non-small cell lung cancer in the period 1993–2006 were reviewed, and 148 patients were included in the study. 30 days mortality and complications were analyzed by univariate analysis. Kaplan Meier plots were performed to display some of the univariate variables. Cox regression analysis was performed to find Hazard Ratios (HR) that predicted long time survival in univariate and multivariate analysis. Results The overall 30 days mortality rate was 2.7%, whereas 36.3% had one or more complications after surgery. The median survival time was 3.4 years. In multivariate Cox regression analysis advanced preoperative stage predicted reduced long time survival with HR (95%CI) 1.63 (0.92, 2.89) and 4.16 (1.92, 9.05) for patients in stage IB and II-IV respectively, when compared to patients in stage IA. Age ≥ 70 years and FEV1<80% predicted reduced long time survival with HR (95%CI) 2.23 (1.41, 3.54) and 1.93 (1.14, 3.28) respectively, compared to age<70 years and FEV1 ≥ 80%. Conclusion Thirty days mortality and complication rate showed that lung cancer surgery can be performed safely in a county hospital with experienced thoracic surgeons. Early preoperative stage, age below 70 years and normal pulmonary function predicted long time survival. PMID:18954454

  5. TOUGH User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.

    1987-08-01

    This document contains a technical description of the TOUGH computer program, which was developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for simulating the coupled transport of water, vapor, air and heat in porous and fractured media. The physical processes taken into account in TOUGH are discussed, and the governing equations actually solved by the simulator are stated in full detail. A brief overview is given of the mathematical and numerical methods, and the code architecture. The report provides detailed instructions for preparing input decks. Code applications are illustrated by means of six sample problems.

  6. Discrete-Time Survival Factor Mixture Analysis for Low-Frequency Recurrent Event Histories

    PubMed Central

    Masyn, Katherine E.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the latent class analysis framework for modeling single event discrete-time survival data is extended to low-frequency recurrent event histories. A partial gap time model, parameterized as a restricted factor mixture model, is presented and illustrated using juvenile offending data. This model accommodates event-specific baseline hazard probabilities and covariate effects; event recurrences within a single time period; and accounts for within- and between-subject correlations of event times. This approach expands the family of latent variable survival models in a way that allows researchers to explicitly address questions about unobserved heterogeneity in the timing of events across the lifespan. PMID:24489519

  7. Estimating latent time of maturation and survival costs of reproduction in continuous time from capture-recapture data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ergon, T.; Yoccoz, N.G.; Nichols, J.D.; Thomson, David L.; Cooch, Evan G.; Conroy, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    In many species, age or time of maturation and survival costs of reproduction may vary substantially within and among populations. We present a capture-mark-recapture model to estimate the latent individual trait distribution of time of maturation (or other irreversible transitions) as well as survival differences associated with the two states (representing costs of reproduction). Maturation can take place at any point in continuous time, and mortality hazard rates for each reproductive state may vary according to continuous functions over time. Although we explicitly model individual heterogeneity in age/time of maturation, we make the simplifying assumption that death hazard rates do not vary among individuals within groups of animals. However, the estimates of the maturation distribution are fairly robust against individual heterogeneity in survival as long as there is no individual level correlation between mortality hazards and latent time of maturation. We apply the model to biweekly capture?recapture data of overwintering field voles (Microtus agrestis) in cyclically fluctuating populations to estimate time of maturation and survival costs of reproduction. Results show that onset of seasonal reproduction is particularly late and survival costs of reproduction are particularly large in declining populations.

  8. Tough Choices in Difficult Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheer, Sage Ann

    2002-01-01

    Key areas school districts have used in making the decision to purchase technology applications include: what the district hopes to achieve by purchasing the system; how the proposed system will support the district's vision and help achieve the strategic plan; what the effect of the proposed solution will be on staffing; and what type of timeline…

  9. Tough Times for Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuckett, Alan; Aldridge, Fiona

    2011-01-01

    The key message of NIACE's 2011 survey of adult participation in learning is that recession is bad for lifelong learning for anyone over the age of 25. The survey highlights the central importance of workplaces as sites of adult learning--and the challenges posed to a learning society when opportunities to learn reduce. It shows that the gap…

  10. Tactics for Tough Budget Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Ann M.

    2011-01-01

    How does one maintain high goals for instruction with dwindling funds? On a district level, the ability to do more with less is just not possible. It is the capability to reposition available resources that achieves critical goals. One way to visualize this concept is to think of a stretched elastic band. When that band is extended, it changes its…

  11. A survival tree method for the analysis of discrete event times in clinical and epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Matthias; Küchenhoff, Helmut; Hoerauf, Achim; Tutz, Gerhard

    2016-02-28

    Survival trees are a popular alternative to parametric survival modeling when there are interactions between the predictor variables or when the aim is to stratify patients into prognostic subgroups. A limitation of classical survival tree methodology is that most algorithms for tree construction are designed for continuous outcome variables. Hence, classical methods might not be appropriate if failure time data are measured on a discrete time scale (as is often the case in longitudinal studies where data are collected, e.g., quarterly or yearly). To address this issue, we develop a method for discrete survival tree construction. The proposed technique is based on the result that the likelihood of a discrete survival model is equivalent to the likelihood of a regression model for binary outcome data. Hence, we modify tree construction methods for binary outcomes such that they result in optimized partitions for the estimation of discrete hazard functions. By applying the proposed method to data from a randomized trial in patients with filarial lymphedema, we demonstrate how discrete survival trees can be used to identify clinically relevant patient groups with similar survival behavior.

  12. A survival tree method for the analysis of discrete event times in clinical and epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Matthias; Küchenhoff, Helmut; Hoerauf, Achim; Tutz, Gerhard

    2016-02-28

    Survival trees are a popular alternative to parametric survival modeling when there are interactions between the predictor variables or when the aim is to stratify patients into prognostic subgroups. A limitation of classical survival tree methodology is that most algorithms for tree construction are designed for continuous outcome variables. Hence, classical methods might not be appropriate if failure time data are measured on a discrete time scale (as is often the case in longitudinal studies where data are collected, e.g., quarterly or yearly). To address this issue, we develop a method for discrete survival tree construction. The proposed technique is based on the result that the likelihood of a discrete survival model is equivalent to the likelihood of a regression model for binary outcome data. Hence, we modify tree construction methods for binary outcomes such that they result in optimized partitions for the estimation of discrete hazard functions. By applying the proposed method to data from a randomized trial in patients with filarial lymphedema, we demonstrate how discrete survival trees can be used to identify clinically relevant patient groups with similar survival behavior. PMID:26358826

  13. Joint Modeling of Longitudinal Data and Discrete-Time Survival Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Feiyou; Stein, Catherine M.; Elston, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    A predictive joint shared parameter model is proposed for discrete time-to-event and longitudinal data. A discrete survival model with frailty and a generalized linear mixed model for the longitudinal data are joined to predict the probability of events. This joint model focuses on predicting discrete time-to-event outcome, taking advantage of repeated measurements. We show that the probability of an event in a time window can be more precisely predicted by incorporating the longitudinal measurements. The model was investigated by comparison with a two-step model and a discrete time survival model. Results from both a study on the occurrence of tuberculosis and simulated data show that the joint model is superior to the other models in discrimination ability, especially as the latent variables related to both survival times and the longitudinal measurements depart from 0. PMID:23709103

  14. Joint modeling of longitudinal data and discrete-time survival outcome.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Feiyou; Stein, Catherine M; Elston, Robert C

    2016-08-01

    A predictive joint shared parameter model is proposed for discrete time-to-event and longitudinal data. A discrete survival model with frailty and a generalized linear mixed model for the longitudinal data are joined to predict the probability of events. This joint model focuses on predicting discrete time-to-event outcome, taking advantage of repeated measurements. We show that the probability of an event in a time window can be more precisely predicted by incorporating the longitudinal measurements. The model was investigated by comparison with a two-step model and a discrete-time survival model. Results from both a study on the occurrence of tuberculosis and simulated data show that the joint model is superior to the other models in discrimination ability, especially as the latent variables related to both survival times and the longitudinal measurements depart from 0.

  15. Estimating survival rates with time series of standing age-structure data.

    PubMed

    Udevitz, Mark S; Gogan, Peter J P

    2012-04-01

    It has long been recognized that age-structure data contain useful information for assessing the status and dynamics of wildlife populations. For example, age-specific survival rates can be estimated with just a single sample from the age distribution of a stable, stationary population. For a population that is not stable, age-specific survival rates can be estimated using techniques such as inverse methods that combine time series of age-structure data with other demographic data. However, estimation of survival rates using these methods typically requires numerical optimization, a relatively long time series of data, and smoothing or other constraints to provide useful estimates. We developed general models for possibly unstable populations that combine time series of age-structure data with other demographic data to provide explicit maximum likelihood estimators of age-specific survival rates with as few as two years of data. As an example, we applied these methods to estimate survival rates for female bison (Bison bison) in Yellowstone National Park, USA. This approach provides a simple tool for monitoring survival rates based on age-structure data.

  16. Estimating survival rates with time series of standing age-structure data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Udevitz, Mark S.; Gogan, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    It has long been recognized that age-structure data contain useful information for assessing the status and dynamics of wildlife populations. For example, age-specific survival rates can be estimated with just a single sample from the age distribution of a stable, stationary population. For a population that is not stable, age-specific survival rates can be estimated using techniques such as inverse methods that combine time series of age-structure data with other demographic data. However, estimation of survival rates using these methods typically requires numerical optimization, a relatively long time series of data, and smoothing or other constraints to provide useful estimates. We developed general models for possibly unstable populations that combine time series of age-structure data with other demographic data to provide explicit maximum likelihood estimators of age-specific survival rates with as few as two years of data. As an example, we applied these methods to estimate survival rates for female bison (Bison bison) in Yellowstone National Park, USA. This approach provides a simple tool for monitoring survival rates based on age-structure data.

  17. Survival time of the susceptible-infected-susceptible infection process on a graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Bovenkamp, Ruud; Van Mieghem, Piet

    2015-09-01

    The survival time T is the longest time that a virus, a meme, or a failure can propagate in a network. Using the hitting time of the absorbing state in an uniformized embedded Markov chain of the continuous-time susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) Markov process, we derive an exact expression for the average survival time E [T ] of a virus in the complete graph KN and the star graph K1 ,N -1. By using the survival time, instead of the average fraction of infected nodes, we propose a new method to approximate the SIS epidemic threshold τc that, at least for KN and K1 ,N -1, correctly scales with the number of nodes N and that is superior to the epidemic threshold τc(1 )=1/λ1 of the N-intertwined mean-field approximation, where λ1 is the spectral radius of the adjacency matrix of the graph G . Although this new approximation of the epidemic threshold offers a more intuitive understanding of the SIS process, it remains difficult to compare outbreaks in different graph types. For example, the survival in an arbitrary graph seems upper bounded by the complete graph and lower bounded by the star graph as a function of the normalized effective infection rate τ/τc(1 ). However, when the average fraction of infected nodes is used as a basis for comparison, the virus will survive in the star graph longer than in any other graph, making the star graph the worst-case graph instead of the complete graph. Finally, in non-Markovian SIS, the distribution of the spreading attempts over the infectious period of a node influences the survival time, even if the expected number of spreading attempts during an infectious period (the non-Markovian equivalent of the effective infection rate) is kept constant. Both early and late infection attempts lead to shorter survival times. Interestingly, just as in Markovian SIS, the survival times appear to be exponentially distributed, regardless of the infection and curing time distributions.

  18. Survival time of the susceptible-infected-susceptible infection process on a graph.

    PubMed

    van de Bovenkamp, Ruud; Van Mieghem, Piet

    2015-09-01

    The survival time T is the longest time that a virus, a meme, or a failure can propagate in a network. Using the hitting time of the absorbing state in an uniformized embedded Markov chain of the continuous-time susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) Markov process, we derive an exact expression for the average survival time E[T] of a virus in the complete graph K_{N} and the star graph K_{1,N-1}. By using the survival time, instead of the average fraction of infected nodes, we propose a new method to approximate the SIS epidemic threshold τ_{c} that, at least for K_{N} and K_{1,N-1}, correctly scales with the number of nodes N and that is superior to the epidemic threshold τ_{c}^{(1)}=1/λ_{1} of the N-intertwined mean-field approximation, where λ_{1} is the spectral radius of the adjacency matrix of the graph G. Although this new approximation of the epidemic threshold offers a more intuitive understanding of the SIS process, it remains difficult to compare outbreaks in different graph types. For example, the survival in an arbitrary graph seems upper bounded by the complete graph and lower bounded by the star graph as a function of the normalized effective infection rate τ/τ_{c}^{(1)}. However, when the average fraction of infected nodes is used as a basis for comparison, the virus will survive in the star graph longer than in any other graph, making the star graph the worst-case graph instead of the complete graph. Finally, in non-Markovian SIS, the distribution of the spreading attempts over the infectious period of a node influences the survival time, even if the expected number of spreading attempts during an infectious period (the non-Markovian equivalent of the effective infection rate) is kept constant. Both early and late infection attempts lead to shorter survival times. Interestingly, just as in Markovian SIS, the survival times appear to be exponentially distributed, regardless of the infection and curing time distributions. PMID:26465527

  19. Survival time of the susceptible-infected-susceptible infection process on a graph.

    PubMed

    van de Bovenkamp, Ruud; Van Mieghem, Piet

    2015-09-01

    The survival time T is the longest time that a virus, a meme, or a failure can propagate in a network. Using the hitting time of the absorbing state in an uniformized embedded Markov chain of the continuous-time susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) Markov process, we derive an exact expression for the average survival time E[T] of a virus in the complete graph K_{N} and the star graph K_{1,N-1}. By using the survival time, instead of the average fraction of infected nodes, we propose a new method to approximate the SIS epidemic threshold τ_{c} that, at least for K_{N} and K_{1,N-1}, correctly scales with the number of nodes N and that is superior to the epidemic threshold τ_{c}^{(1)}=1/λ_{1} of the N-intertwined mean-field approximation, where λ_{1} is the spectral radius of the adjacency matrix of the graph G. Although this new approximation of the epidemic threshold offers a more intuitive understanding of the SIS process, it remains difficult to compare outbreaks in different graph types. For example, the survival in an arbitrary graph seems upper bounded by the complete graph and lower bounded by the star graph as a function of the normalized effective infection rate τ/τ_{c}^{(1)}. However, when the average fraction of infected nodes is used as a basis for comparison, the virus will survive in the star graph longer than in any other graph, making the star graph the worst-case graph instead of the complete graph. Finally, in non-Markovian SIS, the distribution of the spreading attempts over the infectious period of a node influences the survival time, even if the expected number of spreading attempts during an infectious period (the non-Markovian equivalent of the effective infection rate) is kept constant. Both early and late infection attempts lead to shorter survival times. Interestingly, just as in Markovian SIS, the survival times appear to be exponentially distributed, regardless of the infection and curing time distributions.

  20. Intraspecific variation in desiccation survival time of Aedes aegypti (L.) mosquito eggs of Australian origin.

    PubMed

    Faull, Katherine J; Williams, Craig R

    2015-12-01

    Aedes aegypti (L.) mosquitoes preferentially oviposit in natural and artificial receptacles where their eggs are able to withstand drying as water levels fluctuate. Desiccation-resistant eggs also increase the potential for establishment in non-native habitats while providing logistical impediments to control programs. Viability and mean survival times of eggs stored under three dryness conditions for up to 367 days were investigated among three field-derived colonies of Australian Ae. aegypti to understand variation in desiccation survival. Further investigations compared egg survival between an established colony and its wild counterpart. Our results confirmed that Ae. aegypti eggs can withstand desiccation for extended periods of time with approximately 2-15% egg viability recorded after one year and viability remaining above 88% under all conditions through 56 days. Intraspecific variations in egg survival times were recorded, suggesting local adaptation while each of the colonies demonstrated a consistent preference for higher humidity. Egg volume varied between the populations, suggesting a relationship between egg volume and survival time, with the marginally larger eggs (Charters Towers and Innisfail) having greater desiccation resistance over the range of conditions. The strong survivorship of Charters Towers eggs in dry, warm conditions demonstrates the adaptive significance of a desiccation-resistant egg. PMID:26611964

  1. Intraspecific variation in desiccation survival time of Aedes aegypti (L.) mosquito eggs of Australian origin.

    PubMed

    Faull, Katherine J; Williams, Craig R

    2015-12-01

    Aedes aegypti (L.) mosquitoes preferentially oviposit in natural and artificial receptacles where their eggs are able to withstand drying as water levels fluctuate. Desiccation-resistant eggs also increase the potential for establishment in non-native habitats while providing logistical impediments to control programs. Viability and mean survival times of eggs stored under three dryness conditions for up to 367 days were investigated among three field-derived colonies of Australian Ae. aegypti to understand variation in desiccation survival. Further investigations compared egg survival between an established colony and its wild counterpart. Our results confirmed that Ae. aegypti eggs can withstand desiccation for extended periods of time with approximately 2-15% egg viability recorded after one year and viability remaining above 88% under all conditions through 56 days. Intraspecific variations in egg survival times were recorded, suggesting local adaptation while each of the colonies demonstrated a consistent preference for higher humidity. Egg volume varied between the populations, suggesting a relationship between egg volume and survival time, with the marginally larger eggs (Charters Towers and Innisfail) having greater desiccation resistance over the range of conditions. The strong survivorship of Charters Towers eggs in dry, warm conditions demonstrates the adaptive significance of a desiccation-resistant egg.

  2. The survival time of chocolates on hospital wards: covert observational study

    PubMed Central

    Moualed, Daniel J; Nicolson, Phillip L R; Adjei, Felicia D; Cakebread, Holly E; Duehmke, Rudolf M; Martin, Claire A

    2013-01-01

    Objective To quantify the consumption of chocolates in a hospital ward environment. Design Multicentre, prospective, covert observational study. Setting Four wards at three hospitals (where the authors worked) within the United Kingdom. Participants Boxes of Quality Street (Nestlé) and Roses (Cadbury) on the ward and anyone eating these chocolates. Intervention Observers covertly placed two 350 g boxes of Quality Street and Roses chocolates on each ward (eight boxes were used in the study containing a total of 258 individual chocolates). These boxes were kept under continuous covert surveillance, with the time recorded when each chocolate was eaten. Main outcome measure Median survival time of a chocolate. Results 191 out of 258 (74%) chocolates were observed being eaten. The mean total observation period was 254 minutes (95% confidence interval 179 to 329). The median survival time of a chocolate was 51 minutes (39 to 63). The model of chocolate consumption was non-linear, with an initial rapid rate of consumption that slowed with time. An exponential decay model best fitted these findings (model R2=0.844, P<0.001), with a survival half life (time taken for 50% of the chocolates to be eaten) of 99 minutes. The mean time taken to open a box of chocolates from first appearance on the ward was 12 minutes (95% confidence interval 0 to 24). Quality Street chocolates survived longer than Roses chocolates (hazard ratio for survival of Roses v Quality Street 0.70, 95% confidence interval 0.53 to 0.93, P=0.014). The highest percentages of chocolates were consumed by healthcare assistants (28%) and nurses (28%), followed by doctors (15%). Conclusions From our observational study, chocolate survival in a hospital ward was relatively short, and was modelled well by an exponential decay model. Roses chocolates were preferentially consumed to Quality Street chocolates in a ward setting. Chocolates were consumed primarily by healthcare assistants and nurses, followed by doctors

  3. Proceedings of the TOUGH workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.

    1990-09-01

    A workshop on applications and enhancements of the TOUGH/MULKOM family of multiphase fluid and heat flow simulation programs was held at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory on September 13--14, 1990. The workshop was attended by 62 scientists from seven countries with interests in geothermal reservoir engineering, nuclear waste isolation, unsaturated zone hydrology, environmental problems, and laboratory and field experimentation. The meeting featured 21 technical presentations, extended abstracts of which are reproduced in the present volume in unedited form. Simulator applications included processes on a broad range of space scales, from centimeters to kilometers, with transient times from seconds to geologic time scales. A number of code enhancements were reported that increased execution speeds for large 3-D problems by factors of order 20, reduced memory requirements, and improved user-friendliness. The workshop closed with an open discussion session that focussed on future needs and means for interaction in the TOUGH user community. Input from participants was gathered by means of a questionnaire that is reproduced in the appendix. 171 refs., 91 figs., 16 tabs.

  4. Fracture toughness of graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Ma, Lulu; Fan, Feifei; Zeng, Zhi; Peng, Cheng; Loya, Phillip E; Liu, Zheng; Gong, Yongji; Zhang, Jiangnan; Zhang, Xingxiang; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Zhu, Ting; Lou, Jun

    2014-04-29

    Perfect graphene is believed to be the strongest material. However, the useful strength of large-area graphene with engineering relevance is usually determined by its fracture toughness, rather than the intrinsic strength that governs a uniform breaking of atomic bonds in perfect graphene. To date, the fracture toughness of graphene has not been measured. Here we report an in situ tensile testing of suspended graphene using a nanomechanical device in a scanning electron microscope. During tensile loading, the pre-cracked graphene sample fractures in a brittle manner with sharp edges, at a breaking stress substantially lower than the intrinsic strength of graphene. Our combined experiment and modelling verify the applicability of the classic Griffith theory of brittle fracture to graphene. The fracture toughness of graphene is measured as the critical stress intensity factor of and the equivalent critical strain energy release rate of 15.9 J m(-2). Our work quantifies the essential fracture properties of graphene and provides mechanistic insights into the mechanical failure of graphene.

  5. Examining the Influence of Campus Climate on Students' Time to Degree: A Multilevel Discrete-Time Survival Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Ji; Castellanos, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Utilizing longitudinal data of 3477 students from 28 institutions, we examine the effects of structural diversity and quality of interracial relation on students' persistence towards graduation within six years. We utilize multilevel discrete-time survival analysis to account for the longitudinal persistence patterns as well as the nested…

  6. Survival time of endodontically treated teeth: a 7-year retrospective clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldea, Bogdan; Canjau, Silvana; Popescu, Dragos; Tudor, Anca; Todea, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective clinical study was to examine the survival time of endodontically treated teeth (ETT) and the factors that may influence the failure risk, over a period of up to 7 years. The files of 67 patients that received metal free post and core restorations using a standardized technique were analyzed. The survival probability was assessed using Kaplan-Meyer analysis and Log Rank (Matel-Cox). Cox regression was used to assess the risk of failure and to identify possible covariates. The average survival time of the ETT was 6.6 Years. The cumulative failure rate was 5.82% for all type of the restored endodontically treated teeth. The main failure type was encountered in the cervical area of the teeth, and due to the extensive hard tissue loss, the teeth were extracted.

  7. Fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, M.N.; Komatsu, S.

    1995-12-01

    The effect of austenitizing temperature, austempering temperature and austempering time on the fracture toughness of austempered ductile iron have been presented and discussed in this paper. Statistical design of experiments with a 2{sup 3} matrix was used to determine the effect of the individual variables and their interactions. The desirable combination of the three variables is suggested based on the analysis.

  8. Epidermal growth factor prolongs survival time of tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Amagase, H; Tamura, K; Okuhira, M; Kakimoto, M; Amano, H; Hashimoto, K; Fuwa, T; Tsukagoshi, S

    1990-05-01

    We observed that human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) alone prolonged the survival time of mice bearing various murine syngeneic tumors as well as athymic nude mice bearing human xenografts. No changes in the subcutaneous solid tumor mass volume were observed. Prolongation of survival time by hEGF was observed in mice bearing murine epidermoid carcinoma (BSC) and human gastric carcinoma (KATO III), but not in murine epidermoid carcinoma (KLN205) or human epidermoid carcinoma (A431). Human tumor cells such as A431, KATO III, and murine tumor cells, KLN205, BSC had roughly 2 X 10(6), 3 X 10(4), 1.3 X 10(3) and 1 X 10(3) EGF receptors/cell, respectively. Although KLN205 and BSC tumor cells maintained nearly the same number of EGF receptors, the effects of hEGF were very different. Although A431 tumor cells had nearly 100 times more receptors than KATO III cells, the prolongation of survival time of mice bearing A431 by hEGF was no better than that of mice bearing KATO III. Accordingly, it appears that this prolongation of survival time by hEGF is independent of the number of EGF receptors on tumor cells. In addition, hEGF was shown to inhibit experimental pulmonary metastasis of murine BSC tumor, but was ineffective with murine KLN205 tumor. These results suggest that prolongation of survival time by hEGF may result from the inhibition of tumor cell metastasis and EGF may play a role in preventing the metastasis of certain malignant neoplasms unrelated to its effects through the EGF receptor on tumor cells.

  9. Recidivism and Survival Time: Racial Disparity among Jail Ex-Inmates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Hyunzee; Spjeldnes, Solveig; Yamatani, Hide

    2010-01-01

    Incarcerated men, most of whom are recidivists, are disproportionately black. Much literature about prison ex-inmates reports on this disparity, yet little is known about racial disparity in recidivism rates among jail ex-inmates. This study examined recidivism rates and survival time (period from release date to rearrest) among male ex-inmates…

  10. Parental Monitoring during Early Adolescence Deters Adolescent Sexual Initiation: Discrete-Time Survival Mixture Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, David Y. C.; Murphy, Debra A.; Hser, Yih-Ing

    2011-01-01

    We used discrete-time survival mixture modeling to examine 5,305 adolescents from the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth regarding the impact of parental monitoring during early adolescence (ages 14-16) on initiation of sexual intercourse and problem behavior engagement (ages 14-23). Four distinctive parental-monitoring groups were…

  11. A multivariate model for the meta-analysis of study level survival data at multiple times.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Dan; Rollins, Katie; Coughlin, Patrick

    2014-09-01

    Motivated by our meta-analytic dataset involving survival rates after treatment for critical leg ischemia, we develop and apply a new multivariate model for the meta-analysis of study level survival data at multiple times. Our data set involves 50 studies that provide mortality rates at up to seven time points, which we model simultaneously, and we compare the results to those obtained from standard methodologies. Our method uses exact binomial within-study distributions and enforces the constraints that both the study specific and the overall mortality rates must not decrease over time. We directly model the probabilities of mortality at each time point, which are the quantities of primary clinical interest. We also present I(2) statistics that quantify the impact of the between-study heterogeneity, which is very considerable in our data set.

  12. The L(1/2) regularization approach for survival analysis in the accelerated failure time model.

    PubMed

    Chai, Hua; Liang, Yong; Liu, Xiao-Ying

    2015-09-01

    The analysis of high-dimensional and low-sample size microarray data for survival analysis of cancer patients is an important problem. It is a huge challenge to select the significantly relevant bio-marks from microarray gene expression datasets, in which the number of genes is far more than the size of samples. In this article, we develop a robust prediction approach for survival time of patient by a L(1/2) regularization estimator with the accelerated failure time (AFT) model. The L(1/2) regularization could be seen as a typical delegate of L(q)(0survival analysis by the L(1/2) regularized AFT model compared with other L1 type regularization methods. The proposed procedures are applied to five real DNA microarray datasets to efficiently predict the survival time of patient based on a set of clinical prognostic factors and gene signatures.

  13. 33 CFR 150.503 - What are the time interval requirements for maintenance on survival craft falls?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the time interval requirements for maintenance on survival craft falls? 150.503 Section 150.503 Navigation and Navigable Waters... maintenance on survival craft falls? (a) Each fall used in a launching device for survival craft or...

  14. User's Guide for TOUGH2-MP - A Massively Parallel Version of the TOUGH2 Code

    SciTech Connect

    Earth Sciences Division; Zhang, Keni; Zhang, Keni; Wu, Yu-Shu; Pruess, Karsten

    2008-05-27

    TOUGH2-MP is a massively parallel (MP) version of the TOUGH2 code, designed for computationally efficient parallel simulation of isothermal and nonisothermal flows of multicomponent, multiphase fluids in one, two, and three-dimensional porous and fractured media. In recent years, computational requirements have become increasingly intensive in large or highly nonlinear problems for applications in areas such as radioactive waste disposal, CO2 geological sequestration, environmental assessment and remediation, reservoir engineering, and groundwater hydrology. The primary objective of developing the parallel-simulation capability is to significantly improve the computational performance of the TOUGH2 family of codes. The particular goal for the parallel simulator is to achieve orders-of-magnitude improvement in computational time for models with ever-increasing complexity. TOUGH2-MP is designed to perform parallel simulation on multi-CPU computational platforms. An earlier version of TOUGH2-MP (V1.0) was based on the TOUGH2 Version 1.4 with EOS3, EOS9, and T2R3D modules, a software previously qualified for applications in the Yucca Mountain project, and was designed for execution on CRAY T3E and IBM SP supercomputers. The current version of TOUGH2-MP (V2.0) includes all fluid property modules of the standard version TOUGH2 V2.0. It provides computationally efficient capabilities using supercomputers, Linux clusters, or multi-core PCs, and also offers many user-friendly features. The parallel simulator inherits all process capabilities from V2.0 together with additional capabilities for handling fractured media from V1.4. This report provides a quick starting guide on how to set up and run the TOUGH2-MP program for users with a basic knowledge of running the (standard) version TOUGH2 code, The report also gives a brief technical description of the code, including a discussion of parallel methodology, code structure, as well as mathematical and numerical methods used

  15. Optimal designs in longitudinal trials with varying treatment effects and discrete-time survival endpoints.

    PubMed

    Safarkhani, Maryam; Moerbeek, Mirjam

    2015-09-30

    It is plausible to assume that the treatment effect in a longitudinal study will vary over time. It can become either stronger or weaker as time goes on. Here, we extend previous work on optimal designs for discrete-time survival analysis to trials with the treatment effect varying over time. In discrete-time survival analysis, subjects are measured in discrete time intervals, while they may experience the event at any point in time. We focus on studies where the width of time intervals is fixed beforehand, meaning that subjects are measured more often when the study duration increases. The optimal design is defined as the optimal combination of the number of subjects, the number of measurements for each subject, and the optimal proportion of subjects assigned to the experimental condition. We study optimal designs for different optimality criteria and linear cost functions. We illustrate the methodology of finding optimal designs using a clinical trial that studies the effect of an outpatient mental health program on reducing substance abuse among patients with severe mental illness. We observe that optimal designs depend to some extent on the rate at which group differences vary across time intervals and the direction of these changes over time. We conclude that an optimal design based on the assumption of a constant treatment effect is not likely to be efficient if the treatment effect varies across time. PMID:26179808

  16. Supplemental ascorbate in the supportive treatment of cancer: Prolongation of survival times in terminal human cancer.

    PubMed

    Cameron, E; Pauling, L

    1976-10-01

    Ascorbic acid metabolism is associated with a number of mechanisms known to be involved in host resistance to malignant disease. Cancer patients are significantly depleted of ascorbic acid, and in our opinion this demonstrable biochemical characteristic indicates a substantially increased requirement and utilization of this substance to potentiate these various host resistance factors. The results of a clinical trial are presented in which 100 terminal cancer patients were given supplemental ascorbate as part of their routine management. Their progress is compared to that of 1000 similar patients treated identically, but who received no supplemental ascorbate. The mean survival time is more than 4.2 times as great for the ascorbate subjects (more than 210 days) as for the controls (50 days). Analysis of the survival-time curves indicates that deaths occur for about 90% of the ascorbate-treated patients at one-third the rate for the controls and that the other 10% have a much greater survival time, averaging more than 20 times that for the controls. The results clearly indicate that this simple and safe form of medication is of definite value in the treatment of patients with advanced cancer.

  17. Increasing chimerism after allogeneic stem cell transplantation is associated with longer survival time.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaowen; Alatrash, Gheath; Ning, Jing; Jakher, Haroon; Stafford, Patricia; Zope, Madhushree; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Jones, Roy B; Champlin, Richard E; Thall, Peter F; Andersson, Borje S

    2014-08-01

    Donor chimerism after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is commonly used to predict overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). Because chimerism is observed at 1 or more times after allo-SCT and not at baseline, if chimerism is in fact associated with OS or DFS, then the occurrence of either disease progression or death informatively censors (terminates) the observed chimerism process. This violates the assumptions underlying standard statistical regression methods for survival analysis, which may lead to biased conclusions. To assess the association between the longitudinal post-allo-SCT donor chimerism process and OS or DFS, we analyzed data from 195 patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (n = 157) or myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 38) who achieved complete remission after allo-SCT following a reduced-toxicity conditioning regimen of fludarabine/intravenous busulfan. Median follow-up was 31 months (range, 1.1 to 105 months). Fitted joint longitudinal-survival time models showed that a binary indicator of complete (100%) donor chimerism and increasing percent of donor T cells were significantly associated with longer OS, whereas decreasing percent of donor T cells was highly significantly associated with shorter OS. Our analyses illustrate the usefulness of modeling repeated post-allo-SCT chimerism measurements as individual longitudinal processes jointly with OS and DFS to estimate their relationships.

  18. A Simple Scoring System Predicting the Survival Time of Patients with Bone Metastases after RT

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen-Yi; Li, Hui-Fang; Su, Meng; Lin, Rui-Fang; Chen, Xing-Xing; Zhang, Ping; Zou, Chang-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to develop a scoring system to predict the survival time of patients with bone metastases after radiation therapy (RT). The scoring system can guide physicians to a better selection of appropriate treatment regimens. Materials and Methods The medical records of 125 patients with bone metastases treated with RT between January 2007 and September 2010 were reviewed retrospectively. Fifteen potential prognostic factors were investigated: sex, age, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), type of primary tumor, resection of tumor before bone metastases, interval between primary tumor diagnosis and diagnosis of bone metastases, Carcinoembryonic Antigen(CEA), lung metastases before bone metastases, liver metastases before bone metastases, brain metastases before bone metastases, stage, T, N, M, and degree of cellular differentiation. Results In an univariate analysis, 10 factors were significantly associated with survival time after bone metastasis: sex, KPS, breast cancer, esophageal cancer, colorectal cancer, interval between tumor diagnosis and diagnosis of bone metastases, CEA, lung metastases before bone metastases, T-staging, and differentiation. In a multivariate analysis, 7 factors were found to be significant: sex, KPS, esophageal cancer, colorectal cancer, interval between tumor diagnosis and diagnosis of bone metastases, T-staging, and differentiation. The median survival of all patients with bone metastases after RT was 14.1 months. There were significant differences in the median survival of patients with bone metastases after RT of 4.9 months, 10.5 months, and 29.7 months in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively (P<0.001). Conclusion According to this scoring system, the survival time of patients after bone metastasis can be estimated. PMID:27438606

  19. Time and size at seaward migration influence the sea survival of Salmo salar.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, N; Jonsson, B

    2014-05-01

    Whether time of seaward migration of young Atlantic salmon Salmo salar influences their subsequent survival and growth was investigated in the River Imsa, south-western Norway. Salmo salar were tagged when moving downstream through a trap near the outlet between 1976 and 2010 and recaptured on their adult return. Most descended as smolts in April and May, but some descended during the other months of the year. Annual variation in timing of the smolt migration was significantly correlated with variation in water temperature during spring. Mean total body length of the descending S. salar varied with month of seaward migration. The sea survival of S. salar emigrating from the River Imsa between January and May was 2·8 times higher than for those descending between June and December. The sea survival of the various cohorts decreased with increasing river temperature in April to May, prior to the smolt migration, and decreasing day number when the smolts moved to sea. The size of smolts descending the river between April and May did not affect the survival at sea as much as it affected the survival of migrants descending in any other month of the year. The majority of the downstream migrating S. salar were 2 years old, but proportionally, more 1 year olds moved downstream in the autumn than in the rest of the year. Mean duration between downstream migration of the young and the return migration of the grilse was shortest (12·7 months) for those descending in July and August and longest for those descending in October (21 months). Mean monthly specific growth rate was highest for those migrating downstream between May and July and lowest for those emigrating in September. Based on the present results, it was hypothesized that S. salar emigrating between April and August migrated directly out into the ocean, while those that emigrated between October and March stayed in the estuary until the subsequent spring.

  20. Predicting the Survival Time for Bladder Cancer Using an Additive Hazards Model in Microarray Data

    PubMed Central

    TAPAK, Leili; MAHJUB, Hossein; SADEGHIFAR, Majid; SAIDIJAM, Massoud; POOROLAJAL, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    Background: One substantial part of microarray studies is to predict patients’ survival based on their gene expression profile. Variable selection techniques are powerful tools to handle high dimensionality in analysis of microarray data. However, these techniques have not been investigated in competing risks setting. This study aimed to investigate the performance of four sparse variable selection methods in estimating the survival time. Methods: The data included 1381 gene expression measurements and clinical information from 301 patients with bladder cancer operated in the years 1987 to 2000 in hospitals in Denmark, Sweden, Spain, France, and England. Four methods of the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator, smoothly clipped absolute deviation, the smooth integration of counting and absolute deviation and elastic net were utilized for simultaneous variable selection and estimation under an additive hazards model. The criteria of area under ROC curve, Brier score and c-index were used to compare the methods. Results: The median follow-up time for all patients was 47 months. The elastic net approach was indicated to outperform other methods. The elastic net had the lowest integrated Brier score (0.137±0.07) and the greatest median of the over-time AUC and C-index (0.803±0.06 and 0.779±0.13, respectively). Five out of 19 selected genes by the elastic net were significant (P<0.05) under an additive hazards model. It was indicated that the expression of RTN4, SON, IGF1R and CDC20 decrease the survival time, while the expression of SMARCAD1 increase it. Conclusion: The elastic net had higher capability than the other methods for the prediction of survival time in patients with bladder cancer in the presence of competing risks base on additive hazards model. PMID:27114989

  1. Warming affects hatching time and early season survival of eastern tent caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Abarca, Mariana; Lill, John T

    2015-11-01

    Climate change is disrupting species interactions by altering the timing of phenological events such as budburst for plants and hatching for insects. We combined field observations with laboratory manipulations to investigate the consequences of climate warming on the phenology and performance of the eastern tent caterpillar (Malacosoma americanum). We evaluated the effects of warmer winter and spring regimes on caterpillar hatching patterns and starvation endurance, traits likely to be under selection in populations experiencing phenological asynchrony, using individuals from two different populations (Washington, DC, and Roswell, GA). We also quantified the proximate and extended fitness effects of early food deprivation and recorded spring phenology of local caterpillars and their host plants. In addition, we conducted laboratory assays to determine if caterpillars are using plant chemical cues to fine-tune their hatching times. Warmer winter temperatures induced earlier hatching and caterpillars from GA survived starvation for periods that were 30% longer than caterpillars from DC. Warmer spring regimes reduced the starvation endurance of caterpillars overwintering in the wild but not in the laboratory. Early starvation dramatically reduced hatchling survival; however, surviving caterpillars did not show detrimental effects on pupal mass or development time. In the field, hatching preceded budburst in both 2013 and 2014 and the period of optimal foliage quality was 2 weeks shorter in 2013. Hatching time was unaffected by exposure to plant volatiles. Overall, we found that warmer temperatures can trigger late-season asynchrony by accelerating plant phenology and caterpillars from different populations exhibit differential abilities to cope with environmental unreliability.

  2. Fracture toughness of anisotropic graphites

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.R.; Kehne, M.T.

    1985-01-01

    Fracture toughness measurements have been made at 0, 30, 45, 60, and 90/sup 0/ from the extrusion axis on a reasonably anisotropic graphite, grade AGOT. It was found that the fracture toughness did not vary appreciably with orientation. An observed variation in strength was found to be the result of defect orientation.

  3. On "Tough" Movement in Spanish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reider, Michael

    1993-01-01

    A survey of native Spanish speakers from both Spain and Latin America found that the choice of predicate adjectives governing "tough" constructions in Spanish (e.g., "el libro es facil de leer") varies by individual, but some patterns did emerge that suggest "tough" constructions and "it is" constructions are transformationally related. (17…

  4. PMR Composites Of Increased Toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D.; Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1988-01-01

    Toughness increased without sacrificing processability or hot strength. Resin composition provides best overall balance of composite toughness and retention of mechanical properties at 600 degree F (316 degree C) with processability obtained by substituting 20 mole percent of diamine used in PMR-15 resins with diamine containing twice number of flexible phenyl connecting groups.

  5. Reduction in predicted survival times in cold water due to wind and waves.

    PubMed

    Power, Jonathan; Simões Ré, António; Barwood, Martin; Tikuisis, Peter; Tipton, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Recent marine accidents have called into question the level of protection provided by immersion suits in real (harsh) life situations. Two immersion suit studies, one dry and the other with 500 mL of water underneath the suit, were conducted in cold water with 10-12 males in each to test body heat loss under three environmental conditions: calm, as mandated for immersion suit certification, and two combinations of wind plus waves to simulate conditions typically found offshore. In both studies mean skin heat loss was higher in wind and waves vs. calm; deep body temperature and oxygen consumption were not different. Mean survival time predictions exceeded 36 h for all conditions in the first study but were markedly less in the second in both calm and wind and waves. Immersion suit protection and consequential predicted survival times under realistic environmental conditions and with leakage are reduced relative to calm conditions.

  6. Reduction in predicted survival times in cold water due to wind and waves.

    PubMed

    Power, Jonathan; Simões Ré, António; Barwood, Martin; Tikuisis, Peter; Tipton, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Recent marine accidents have called into question the level of protection provided by immersion suits in real (harsh) life situations. Two immersion suit studies, one dry and the other with 500 mL of water underneath the suit, were conducted in cold water with 10-12 males in each to test body heat loss under three environmental conditions: calm, as mandated for immersion suit certification, and two combinations of wind plus waves to simulate conditions typically found offshore. In both studies mean skin heat loss was higher in wind and waves vs. calm; deep body temperature and oxygen consumption were not different. Mean survival time predictions exceeded 36 h for all conditions in the first study but were markedly less in the second in both calm and wind and waves. Immersion suit protection and consequential predicted survival times under realistic environmental conditions and with leakage are reduced relative to calm conditions. PMID:25766418

  7. Effect of loading time on the survival rate of anodic oxidized implants: prospective multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seok-Gyu; Yun, Pil-Young; Park, Hyun-Sik; Shim, June-Sung; Hwang, Jung-Won

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate the effect of early loading on survival rate or clinical parameter of anodic oxidized implants during the 12-month postloading period. MATERIALS AND METHODS Total 69 implants were placed in 42 patients. Anodic oxidized implants (GS II, Osstem Cor., Busan, Korea) placed on the posterior mandibles were divided into two groups, according to their prosthetic loading times: test group (2 to 6 weeks), and control group (3 to 4 months). The implant survival rates were determined during one-year postloading period and analyzed by Kaplan-Meier method. The radiographic peri-implant bone loss and periodontal parameters were also evaluated and statistically analyzed by unpaired t-test. RESULTS Total 69 implants were placed in 42 patients. The cumulative postloading implant survival rates were 88.89% in test group, compared to 100% in control group (P<.05). Periimplant marginal bone loss (T: 0.27±0.54 mm, C: 0.40±0.55 mm) and periodontal parameters showed no significant difference between the groups (P>.05). CONCLUSION Within the limitation of the present study, implant survival was affected by early loading on the anodic oxidized implants placed on posterior mandibles during one-year follow-up. Early implant loading did not influence peri-implant marginal bone loss, and periodontal parameters. PMID:22439096

  8. Survivable architectures for time and wavelength division multiplexed passive optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Elaine

    2014-08-01

    The increased network reach and customer base of next-generation time and wavelength division multiplexed PON (TWDM-PONs) have necessitated rapid fault detection and subsequent restoration of services to its users. However, direct application of existing solutions for conventional PONs to TWDM-PONs is unsuitable as these schemes rely on the loss of signal (LOS) of upstream transmissions to trigger protection switching. As TWDM-PONs are required to potentially use sleep/doze mode optical network units (ONU), the loss of upstream transmission from a sleeping or dozing ONU could erroneously trigger protection switching. Further, TWDM-PONs require its monitoring modules for fiber/device fault detection to be more sensitive than those typically deployed in conventional PONs. To address the above issues, three survivable architectures that are compliant with TWDM-PON specifications are presented in this work. These architectures combine rapid detection and protection switching against multipoint failure, and most importantly do not rely on upstream transmissions for LOS activation. Survivability analyses as well as evaluations of the additional costs incurred to achieve survivability are performed and compared to the unprotected TWDM-PON. Network parameters that impact the maximum achievable network reach, maximum split ratio, connection availability, fault impact, and the incremental reliability costs for each proposed survivable architecture are highlighted.

  9. Mediation Analysis with Survival Outcomes: Accelerated Failure Time vs. Proportional Hazards Models

    PubMed Central

    Gelfand, Lois A.; MacKinnon, David P.; DeRubeis, Robert J.; Baraldi, Amanda N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Survival time is an important type of outcome variable in treatment research. Currently, limited guidance is available regarding performing mediation analyses with survival outcomes, which generally do not have normally distributed errors, and contain unobserved (censored) events. We present considerations for choosing an approach, using a comparison of semi-parametric proportional hazards (PH) and fully parametric accelerated failure time (AFT) approaches for illustration. Method: We compare PH and AFT models and procedures in their integration into mediation models and review their ability to produce coefficients that estimate causal effects. Using simulation studies modeling Weibull-distributed survival times, we compare statistical properties of mediation analyses incorporating PH and AFT approaches (employing SAS procedures PHREG and LIFEREG, respectively) under varied data conditions, some including censoring. A simulated data set illustrates the findings. Results: AFT models integrate more easily than PH models into mediation models. Furthermore, mediation analyses incorporating LIFEREG produce coefficients that can estimate causal effects, and demonstrate superior statistical properties. Censoring introduces bias in the coefficient estimate representing the treatment effect on outcome—underestimation in LIFEREG, and overestimation in PHREG. With LIFEREG, this bias can be addressed using an alternative estimate obtained from combining other coefficients, whereas this is not possible with PHREG. Conclusions: When Weibull assumptions are not violated, there are compelling advantages to using LIFEREG over PHREG for mediation analyses involving survival-time outcomes. Irrespective of the procedures used, the interpretation of coefficients, effects of censoring on coefficient estimates, and statistical properties should be taken into account when reporting results. PMID:27065906

  10. Residency time, migration route and survival of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar smolts in a Canadian fjord.

    PubMed

    Dempson, J B; Robertson, M J; Pennell, C J; Furey, G; Bloom, M; Shears, M; Ollerhead, L M N; Clarke, K D; Hinks, R; Robertson, G J

    2011-06-01

    Atlantic salmon Salmo salar smolts (n = 181) from two rivers were surgically implanted with acoustic transmitters and released to determine migration route, residency time and survival in a 50 km long estuarine fjord located on the south coast of Newfoundland, Canada. Data obtained from automated receivers placed throughout the Bay d'Espoir fjord indicated that migrating smolts used different routes to reach the outer areas of the fjord. The duration of time that smolts spent in the immediate estuary zone also differed between the two localities (7 and 17 days) although the total time smolts were resident in the fjord was similar and extensive (40 days). Many smolts were resident for periods of 4-8 weeks moving back and forth in the outer part of the fjord where maximum water depths range from 300 to 700 m. Survival in the estuary zone was greater for smolts with prolonged residency in estuarine habitat. Overall smolt survival to the fjord exit was moderately high (54-85%), indicating that the initial phase of migration did not coincide with a period of unusually high mortality. PMID:21651545

  11. Egg Developmental Time and Survival of Chrysomya megacephala and Chrysomya putoria (Diptera: Calliphoridae) Under Different Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Alonso, M A; Souza, C M; Linhares, A X; Thyssen, P J

    2015-07-01

    Chrysomya megacephala (F.) and Chrysomya putoria (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Calliphoridae) are considered of forensic, medical, and veterinary importance in Brazil because of their necrophagous and synanthropic behaviour. The development of flies can be influenced by temperature, and species from the same genus usually have different responses to external variables. The egg development of blow fly can be a useful complementary technique to estimate the minimum postmortem interval. Thus, this study aimed to compare the egg developmental time and survival of C. megacephala and C. putoria at different temperatures to determine the optimal temperature for egg development and the linear regression for developmental time and temperature, thereby determining the minimum threshold (t) and thermal summation constant (K) for each species. Adults of both species were collected in the region of Campinas city, São Paulo state, Brazil. Eggs were incubated at eight constant temperatures between 05 ± 1°C and 35 ± 1°C and the egg developmental time and survival were evaluated. There was no egg survival at 5 and 10°C. The K for C. megacephala and C. putoria were 179.41 HD and 189.94 HD, respectively. The regression slopes and t (10°C) were similar for both species. The optimal temperature for egg survival was between 25 and 35°C, for C. megacephala and 20 and 30°C, for C. putoria. The present data were similar to most data available in the literature, but differences in the same species are a possibility.

  12. Patient Survival in Renal Allograft Failure: A Time-dependent Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaee, Moghaddameh; Azmandian, Jalal; Zeraati, Hojjat; Mahmoodi, Mahmood; Mohammad, Kazem; Fazeli, Faramarz; Ebadzadeh, Mohammad-Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background: To improve patient survival after a renal transplant, it is important to detect which variables affect it. Objectives: This study aimed to assess the effect of renal allograft failure on patient survival. Patients and Methods: This retrospective cohort study included 405 renal transplant patients from Kerman University of Medical Sciences hospital, Kerman, Iran from 2004 to 2010. Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate survival rates of patients, and time-dependent Cox regression was used to examine the effect of allograft failure on patient survival. Results: During 4.06 years (median) of follow-up 28 (6.9%) patients died and 20 (71.4%) of dead patients had allograft failure. Survival rate of patients with allograft failure at 1-, 3-, 5-, and 7-year were 0.98, 0.8, 0.53, and 0.53, respectively; in patients with allograft function these values were 0.99, 0.98, 0.97, and 0.96, respectively. The unadjusted death rate was 0.5 per 100 patient years for the maintained allograft function, which increased to 9 per 100 patient years for patients following allograft failure. In fully adjusted model the risk of death increased in patients with allograft failure (HR = 2.09; 95% CI: 1.56-2.81), pretransplant diabetes (HR = 2.81; 95% CI: 1.2-6.7), patients with BMI ≥ 25 (vs. 18.5 ≤ BMI < 25) (HR = 3.56; 95% CI: 1.09-11.6). With an increase in recipient age this risk increased (HR = 1.04 per year increase; 95% CI: 1.01-6.7). Receiving a living kidney transplant decreased this risk (HR = 0.52; 95% CI: 0.39-0.69). Conclusions: An increase in recipient age and BMI, affliction with diabetes, allograft failure, and receiving deceased kidney transplant increased the risk of death. PMID:24719808

  13. Measurement of Survival Time in Brachionus Rotifers: Synchronization of Maternal Conditions.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Gen; Yoshinaga, Tatsuki; Gribble, Kristin E; Welch, David M; Ushio, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Rotifers are microscopic cosmopolitan zooplankton used as models in ecotoxicological and aging studies due to their several advantages such as short lifespan, ease of culture, and parthenogenesis that enables clonal culture. However, caution is required when measuring their survival time as it is affected by maternal age and maternal feeding conditions. Here we provide a protocol for powerful and reproducible measurement of the survival time in Brachionus rotifers following a careful synchronization of culture conditions over several generations. Empirically, poor synchronization results in early mortality and a gradual decrease in survival rate, thus resulting in weak statistical power. Indeed, under such conditions, calorie restriction (CR) failed to significantly extend the lifespan of B. plicatilis although CR-induced longevity has been demonstrated with well-synchronized rotifer samples in past and present studies. This protocol is probably useful for other invertebrate models, including the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, because maternal age effects have also been reported in these species. PMID:27500471

  14. The tumour microenvironment influences survival and time to transformation in follicular lymphoma in the rituximab era.

    PubMed

    Blaker, Yngvild Nuvin; Spetalen, Signe; Brodtkorb, Marianne; Lingjaerde, Ole Christian; Beiske, Klaus; Østenstad, Bjørn; Sander, Birgitta; Wahlin, Björn Engelbrekt; Melen, Christopher Michael; Myklebust, June Helen; Holte, Harald; Delabie, Jan; Smeland, Erlend Bremertun

    2016-10-01

    The tumour microenvironment influences outcome in patients with follicular lymphoma (FL), but its impact on transformation is less studied. We investigated the prognostic significance of the tumour microenvironment on transformation and survival in FL patients treated in the rituximab era. We examined diagnostic and transformed biopsies from 52 FL patients using antibodies against CD3, CD4, CD8, CD21 (CR2), CD57 (B3GAT1), CD68, FOXP3, TIA1, PD-1 (PDCD1), PD-L1 (CD274) and PAX5. Results were compared with a second cohort of 40 FL patients without signs of transformation during a minimum of five years observation time. Cell numbers and localization were semi-quantitatively assessed. Better developed CD21+  follicular dendritic cell (FDC) meshworks at diagnosis was a negative prognostic factor for overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS) and time to transformation (TTT) in patients with subsequently transformed FL. Remnants of FDC meshworks at transformation were associated with shorter OS and PFS from transformation. High degrees of intrafollicular CD68+ and PD-L1+  macrophage infiltration, high total area scores and an extrafollicular/diffuse pattern of FOXP3+  T cells and high intrafollicular scores of CD4+  T cells at diagnosis were associated with shorter TTT. Scores of several T-cell subset markers from the combined patient cohorts were predictive for transformation, especially CD4 and CD57. PMID:27341313

  15. Prostate-specific antigen doubling time and survival in patients with advanced metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Loberg, Robert D; Fielhauer, Jeffery R; Pienta, Brian A; Dresden, Scott; Christmas, Patty; Kalikin, Linda M; Olson, Karin B; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2003-12-29

    The relation between tumor kinetics and disease progression in patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) has not been well described. Biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer is characterized by detectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels after treatment and occurs in approximately 30% of patients after therapy for apparent localized disease. An increase in PSA almost always occurs before clinical evidence of disease. The ability to identify early biochemical failure in patients to assess disease aggressiveness and guide changes in treatment needs to be examined. We examined serial PSA data from 249 patients with metastatic disease to assess PSA doubling time (PSADT) in hormone-naive prostate cancer (HNPC) and HRPC states. In a subset of patients, the relation of PSADT to Gleason score and survival was studied. PSADT decreased from 37.5 +/- 4.5 weeks to 15.6 +/- 1.6 weeks (mean +/- SEM) in patients with HNPC versus HRPC. In this small study, PSADT did not correlate with Gleason score, survival from start of hormonal treatment, length of time receiving hormone therapy, or survival in the HRPC state. The decrease in PSADT with disease state may help provide insight into understanding the biology of late-stage disease.

  16. Identifying novel clinical surrogates to assess human bone fracture toughness

    PubMed Central

    Granke, Mathilde; Makowski, Alexander J; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Does, Mark D; Nyman, Jeffry S

    2015-01-01

    Fracture risk does not solely depend on strength but also on fracture toughness, i.e. the ability of bone material to resist crack initiation and propagation. Because resistance to crack growth largely depends on bone properties at the tissue level including collagen characteristics, current X-ray based assessment tools may not be suitable to identify age-, disease-, or treatment-related changes in fracture toughness. To identify useful clinical surrogates that could improve the assessment of fracture resistance, we investigated the potential of 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and reference point indentation (RPI) to explain age-related variance in fracture toughness. Harvested from cadaveric femurs (62 human donors), single-edge notched beam (SENB) specimens of cortical bone underwent fracture toughness testing (R-curve method). NMR-derived bound water showed the strongest correlation with fracture toughness properties (r=0.63 for crack initiation, r=0.35 for crack growth, and r=0.45 for overall fracture toughness; p<0.01). Multivariate analyses indicated that the age-related decrease in different fracture toughness properties were best explained by a combination of NMR properties including pore water and RPI-derived tissue stiffness with age as a significant covariate (adjusted R2 = 53.3%, 23.9%, and 35.2% for crack initiation, crack growth, and overall toughness, respectively; p<0.001). These findings reflect the existence of many contributors to fracture toughness and emphasize the utility of a multimodal assessment of fracture resistance. Exploring the mechanistic origin of fracture toughness, glycation-mediated, non-enzymatic collagen crosslinks and intra-cortical porosity are possible determinants of bone fracture toughness and could explain the sensitivity of NMR to changes in fracture toughness. Assuming fracture toughness is clinically important to the ability of bone to resist fracture, our results suggest that improvements in fracture

  17. A Bayesian Weibull survival model for time to infection data measured with delay.

    PubMed

    Kostoulas, Polychronis; Nielsen, Søren S; Browne, William J; Leontides, Leonidas

    2010-05-01

    Survival analysis methods can be used to identify factors associated with the time to induction of infection. In the absence of a perfect test, detection of infection is generally delayed and depends on the duration of the latent infection period. We assess, via simulations, the impact of ignoring the delayed detection of infection on estimated survival times and propose a Bayesian Weibull regression model, which adjusts for the delayed detection of infection. The presence of non-differential detection delay seriously biased the baseline hazard and the shape of the hazard function. For differential detection delay, the associated regression coefficients were also biased. The extent of bias largely depended on the longevity of the delay. In all considered simulation scenarios our model led to corrected estimates. We utilized the proposed model in order to assess the age at natural infection with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in Danish dairy cattle from the analysis of available time to milk-seropositivity data that detected infection with delay. The proposed model captured the inverse relationship between the incidence rate of infection and that of seroconversion with time: susceptibility to infection decreases with time (shape parameter under the proposed model was rho=0.56<1), while older animals had a higher probability of sero-converting (rho=2.67>1, under standard Weibull regression). Cows infected earlier in their lives were more likely to subsequently shed detectable levels of MAP and, hence, be a liability to herd-mates. Our approach can be particularly useful in the case of chronic infections with a long latent infection period, which, if ignored, severely affects survival estimates.

  18. Tough Choices in Tough Times: Debt and Medication Nonadherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalousova, Lucie; Burgard, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    Debt is a ubiquitous component of households' financial portfolios. Yet we have scant understanding of how household debt constrains spending on needed health care. Diverse types of debt have different financial properties and recent work has shown that they may have varying implications for spending on needed health care. In this article, we…

  19. Tough choices in tough times: debt and medication nonadherence.

    PubMed

    Kalousova, Lucie; Burgard, Sarah A

    2014-04-01

    Debt is a ubiquitous component of households' financial portfolios. Yet we have scant understanding of how household debt constrains spending on needed health care. Diverse types of debt have different financial properties and recent work has shown that they may have varying implications for spending on needed health care. In this article, we explore the associations between indebtedness and medication nonadherence. First, we consider overall debt levels and then we disaggregate debt into types. We use a population-based sample of 434 residents of southeast Michigan who had been prescribed medications, collected in 2009-2010, the wake of the Great Recession. We find no association between medication nonadherence and total indebtedness. However, when we assess each type of debt separately, we find that having medical or credit card debt is positively associated with medication nonadherence, even net of household income, net worth, and other characteristics. Furthermore, patients with greater amounts of medical or credit card debt are more likely to be nonadherent than those with less. Our results suggest that credit card debt and medical debt may have serious implications for the relative affordability of prescription medications. These associations have been overlooked in past research and deserve further examination.

  20. TOUGH V2.1

    2011-06-01

    TOUGH2 is a numerical simulator for nonisothermal flows of multicomponent, multiphase fluids in one-, two-, and three-dimensional porous and fracture media. The chief applications for which TOUGH2 is designed are in geothermal reservoir engineering, nuclear waste disposal, environmental assessment and remediation, geologic carbon sequestration, and unsaturated and saturated zone hydrology. The TOUGH2 V2.1 package is an upgrade of TOUGH2 V2.0 (CR-1574) and includes the following improvements and enhancements relative to TOUGH2 V2.0: - Includes allmore » known bug fixes - The module TMVOC (CR-1820) is fully integrated - The module ECO2N (CR-2202) is fully integrated - A fluid property module ECO2M has been added, that can seamlessly model CO2 storage and leakage scenarios, including transitions between super- and sub-critical fluids, and phase changes between liquid and gaseous CO2. The TOUGH2 V2.1 package also supports all legacy fluid property modules, i.e., those packaged into TOUGH2 V2.0 (CR-1574), which includes T2VOC (CR-1254).« less

  1. Fracture toughness of mountain gorilla (Gorilla gorilla beringei) food plants.

    PubMed

    Elgart-Berry, Alison

    2004-04-01

    Mountain gorillas, the largest extant primates, subsist almost entirely on plant matter. Moreover, their diet includes a substantial amount of structural material, such as bark and stems, which other primates tend to avoid. Accordingly, the robust masticatory apparatus of gorillas may be adaptive to this presumably tough diet; however, quantitative information on this subject is lacking. In this study the fracture toughness of mountain gorilla foods was examined for the first time. Samples of 44 food plants from Bwindi-Impenetrable National Park (BINP) and Mgahinga Gorilla National Park (MGNP) were tested. These parks are inhabited by two gorilla populations that regarded by some as being distinct at the subspecific taxonomic level. Although food toughness did not differ between the two populations, both diets contained tough items. Tree barks were the toughest food items (varying from 0.23 to 8.2 kJ/m2), followed by shrub barks, pith, and stems. The toughness of leaves and fruit was negligible compared to that of bark. The toughness of bamboo was low in comparison to the toughest food items. Accordingly, the prominent toughness of bark, pith, and stems may be key factors in the evolution of orofacial robusticity in mountain gorillas.

  2. Evaluation of apparent fracture toughness of articular cartilage and hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yinghua; Rennerfeldt, Deena A.; Friis, Elizabeth A.; Gehrke, Stevin H.; Detamore, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, biomaterials-based tissue-engineering strategies, including the use of hydrogels, have offered great promise for repairing articular cartilage. Mechanical failure testing in outcome analyses is of crucial clinical importance to the success of engineered constructs. Interpenetrating networks (IPNs) are gaining more attention, due to their superior mechanical integrity. This study provided a combination testing method of apparent fracture toughness, which was applied to both articular cartilage and hydrogels. The apparent fracture toughnesses of two groups, hydrogels and articular cartilage, were evaluated based on the modified single-edge notch test and ASTM standards on the single-edge notch test and compact tension test. The results demonstrated that the toughness for articular cartilage (348 ± 43 MPa/mm½) was much higher than that for hydrogels. With a toughness value of 10.8 ± 1.4 MPa/mm½, IPNs of agarose and poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEG-DA) looked promising. The IPNs were 1.4 times tougher than PEG-DA alone, although still over an order of magnitude less tough than cartilage. A new method was developed to evaluate hydrogels and cartilage in a manner that enabled a more relevant direct comparison for fracture testing of hydrogels for cartilage tissue engineering. Moreover, a target toughness value for cartilage of using this direct comparison method has been identified (348 ± 43 MPa/mm½), and the toughness discrepancy to be overcome between hydrogels and cartilage has been quantified. PMID:24700577

  3. It's About Time: A Survival Approach to Gestational Weight Gain and Preterm Delivery.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Emily M; Hinkle, Stefanie N; Schisterman, Enrique F

    2016-03-01

    There is substantial interest in understanding the impact of gestational weight gain on preterm delivery (delivery <37 weeks). The major difficulty in analyzing the association between gestational weight gain and preterm delivery lies in their mutual dependence on gestational age, as weight naturally increases with increasing pregnancy duration. In this study, we untangle this inherent association by reframing preterm delivery as time to delivery and assessing the relationship through a survival framework, which is particularly amenable to dealing with time-dependent covariates, such as gestational weight gain. We derive the appropriate analytical model for assessing the relationship between weight gain and time to delivery when weight measurements at multiple time points are available. Since epidemiologic data may be limited to weight gain measurements taken at only a few time points or at delivery only, we conduct simulation studies to illustrate how several strategically timed measurements can yield unbiased risk estimates. Analysis of the study of successive small-for-gestational-age births demonstrates that a naive analysis that does not account for the confounding effect of time on gestational weight gain suggests a strong association between higher weight gain and later delivery (hazard ratio: 0.89, 95% confidence interval = 0.84, 0.93). Properly accounting for the confounding effect of time using a survival model, however, mitigates this bias (hazard ratio: 0.98, 95% confidence interval = 0.97, 1.00). These results emphasize the importance of considering the effect of gestational age on time-varying covariates during pregnancy, and the proposed methods offer a convenient mechanism to appropriately analyze such data.See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/EDE/B13. PMID:26489043

  4. Warming affects hatching time and early season survival of eastern tent caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Abarca, Mariana; Lill, John T

    2015-11-01

    Climate change is disrupting species interactions by altering the timing of phenological events such as budburst for plants and hatching for insects. We combined field observations with laboratory manipulations to investigate the consequences of climate warming on the phenology and performance of the eastern tent caterpillar (Malacosoma americanum). We evaluated the effects of warmer winter and spring regimes on caterpillar hatching patterns and starvation endurance, traits likely to be under selection in populations experiencing phenological asynchrony, using individuals from two different populations (Washington, DC, and Roswell, GA). We also quantified the proximate and extended fitness effects of early food deprivation and recorded spring phenology of local caterpillars and their host plants. In addition, we conducted laboratory assays to determine if caterpillars are using plant chemical cues to fine-tune their hatching times. Warmer winter temperatures induced earlier hatching and caterpillars from GA survived starvation for periods that were 30% longer than caterpillars from DC. Warmer spring regimes reduced the starvation endurance of caterpillars overwintering in the wild but not in the laboratory. Early starvation dramatically reduced hatchling survival; however, surviving caterpillars did not show detrimental effects on pupal mass or development time. In the field, hatching preceded budburst in both 2013 and 2014 and the period of optimal foliage quality was 2 weeks shorter in 2013. Hatching time was unaffected by exposure to plant volatiles. Overall, we found that warmer temperatures can trigger late-season asynchrony by accelerating plant phenology and caterpillars from different populations exhibit differential abilities to cope with environmental unreliability. PMID:26093630

  5. Time-Dependence of the Survival Probability of Quarkonia in Quark-Gluon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mah Hussin, Noor Sabrina; Shalaby, Asmaa; Petridis, Athanasios

    2015-10-01

    The time-dependent Schrödinger equation is used to study the formation of quarkonia and their propagation in Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). The initial bound (ground) state is computed using imaginary-time propagation in a confining potential. The QGP is simulated with a confining potential of an extended asymptotic freedom region. The interior of the QGP potential may correspond to a vacuum that differs from that of the exterior region. The initial state propagates through this potential in real time. The survival probability is calculated versus time for various potential parameters and relative momenta of the quarkonium by projecting the interacting wavefunction onto its freely-propagating counterpart. In these calculations the staggered-leap frog method is used with special attention paid to the issue of stability. It is found that quarkonium decay is typically non-exponential. Fast moving states decay faster. Connection with experimental results is done by means of cross-section ratios.

  6. A Parallelized Pumpless Artificial Placenta System Significantly Prolonged Survival Time in a Preterm Lamb Model.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yuichiro; Matsuda, Tadashi; Usuda, Haruo; Watanabe, Shimpei; Kitanishi, Ryuta; Saito, Masatoshi; Hanita, Takushi; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu

    2016-05-01

    An artificial placenta (AP) is an arterio-venous extracorporeal life support system that is connected to the fetal circulation via the umbilical vasculature. Previously, we published an article describing a pumpless AP system with a small priming volume. We subsequently developed a parallelized system, hypothesizing that the reduced circuit resistance conveyed by this modification would enable healthy fetal survival time to be prolonged. We conducted experiments using a premature lamb model to test this hypothesis. As a result, the fetal survival period was significantly prolonged (60.4 ± 3.8 vs. 18.2 ± 3.2 h, P < 0.01), and circuit resistance and minimal blood lactate levels were significantly lower in the parallel circuit group, compared with our previous single circuit group. Fetal physiological parameters remained stable until the conclusion of the experiments. In summary, parallelization of the AP system was associated with reduced circuit resistance and lactate levels and allowed preterm lamb fetuses to survive for a significantly longer period when compared with previous studies. PMID:26644374

  7. Nest survival patterns in Eurasian Bittern: effect of nest age, time and habitat variables

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Determining the key factors affecting the reproductive success of nesting birds is crucial in order to better understand the population dynamics of endangered species and to introduce effective conservation programmes for them. Inhabiting a variety of wetland habitats, aquatic birds actively select safe nesting sites so as to protect their nests against predators. The main aim of the present work was to assess the effect of temporal and habitat variables on the daily nest survival rate of Eurasian Bitterns colonizing semi–natural fishpond habitat in eastern Poland. MARK software was used for the modelling. Eurasian Bittern nests were most vulnerable to depredation at the beginning of the breeding season. This was probably because the reedbed vegetation at this time was not yet dense enough to effectively conceal the nests. There was a positive relationship between nest age and the daily survival rate. Two of the habitat variables analysed were of the greatest significance: water depth and vegetation density. In the Eurasian Bittern population studied here, nests built over deep water and in dense vegetation had the best chances of survival. The results of this work may be useful in the preparation of plans for the conservation and management of populations of this rare and endangered species. Conservation and restoration efforts that attempt to maintain high water levels will be especially beneficial to this avian species that is dependent on wetland ecosystems for breeding. PMID:27350897

  8. A Parallelized Pumpless Artificial Placenta System Significantly Prolonged Survival Time in a Preterm Lamb Model.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yuichiro; Matsuda, Tadashi; Usuda, Haruo; Watanabe, Shimpei; Kitanishi, Ryuta; Saito, Masatoshi; Hanita, Takushi; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu

    2016-05-01

    An artificial placenta (AP) is an arterio-venous extracorporeal life support system that is connected to the fetal circulation via the umbilical vasculature. Previously, we published an article describing a pumpless AP system with a small priming volume. We subsequently developed a parallelized system, hypothesizing that the reduced circuit resistance conveyed by this modification would enable healthy fetal survival time to be prolonged. We conducted experiments using a premature lamb model to test this hypothesis. As a result, the fetal survival period was significantly prolonged (60.4 ± 3.8 vs. 18.2 ± 3.2 h, P < 0.01), and circuit resistance and minimal blood lactate levels were significantly lower in the parallel circuit group, compared with our previous single circuit group. Fetal physiological parameters remained stable until the conclusion of the experiments. In summary, parallelization of the AP system was associated with reduced circuit resistance and lactate levels and allowed preterm lamb fetuses to survive for a significantly longer period when compared with previous studies.

  9. Nest survival patterns in Eurasian Bittern: effect of nest age, time and habitat variables.

    PubMed

    Polak, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Determining the key factors affecting the reproductive success of nesting birds is crucial in order to better understand the population dynamics of endangered species and to introduce effective conservation programmes for them. Inhabiting a variety of wetland habitats, aquatic birds actively select safe nesting sites so as to protect their nests against predators. The main aim of the present work was to assess the effect of temporal and habitat variables on the daily nest survival rate of Eurasian Bitterns colonizing semi-natural fishpond habitat in eastern Poland. MARK software was used for the modelling. Eurasian Bittern nests were most vulnerable to depredation at the beginning of the breeding season. This was probably because the reedbed vegetation at this time was not yet dense enough to effectively conceal the nests. There was a positive relationship between nest age and the daily survival rate. Two of the habitat variables analysed were of the greatest significance: water depth and vegetation density. In the Eurasian Bittern population studied here, nests built over deep water and in dense vegetation had the best chances of survival. The results of this work may be useful in the preparation of plans for the conservation and management of populations of this rare and endangered species. Conservation and restoration efforts that attempt to maintain high water levels will be especially beneficial to this avian species that is dependent on wetland ecosystems for breeding. PMID:27350897

  10. Chaotic dynamics of Comet 1P/Halley: Lyapunov exponent and survival time expectancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Gutiérrez, M. A.; Reyes-Ruiz, M.; Pichardo, B.

    2015-03-01

    The orbital elements of Comet Halley are known to a very high precision, suggesting that the calculation of its future dynamical evolution is straightforward. In this paper we seek to characterize the chaotic nature of the present day orbit of Comet Halley and to quantify the time-scale over which its motion can be predicted confidently. In addition, we attempt to determine the time-scale over which its present day orbit will remain stable. Numerical simulations of the dynamics of test particles in orbits similar to that of Comet Halley are carried out with the MERCURY 6.2 code. On the basis of these we construct survival time maps to assess the absolute stability of Halley's orbit, frequency analysis maps to study the variability of the orbit, and we calculate the Lyapunov exponent for the orbit for variations in initial conditions at the level of the present day uncertainties in our knowledge of its orbital parameters. On the basis of our calculations of the Lyapunov exponent for Comet Halley, the chaotic nature of its motion is demonstrated. The e-folding time-scale for the divergence of initially very similar orbits is approximately 70 yr. The sensitivity of the dynamics on initial conditions is also evident in the self-similarity character of the survival time and frequency analysis maps in the vicinity of Halley's orbit, which indicates that, on average, it is unstable on a time-scale of hundreds of thousands of years. The chaotic nature of Halley's present day orbit implies that a precise determination of its motion, at the level of the present-day observational uncertainty, is difficult to predict on a time-scale of approximately 100 yr. Furthermore, we also find that the ejection of Halley from the Solar system or its collision with another body could occur on a time-scale as short as 10 000 yr.

  11. Fracture toughness of Alloy 600 and EN82H weld in air and water

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W.J.; Brown, C.M.

    1999-06-01

    The fracture toughness of Alloy 600 and its weld, EN82H, was characterized in 54 C to 338 C air and hydrogenated water. Elastic-plastic J{sub IC} testing was performed due to the inherent high toughness of these materials. Alloy 600 exhibited excellent fracture toughness under all test conditions. While EN82H welds displayed excellent toughness in air and high temperature water, a dramatic toughness degradation occurred in water at temperatures below 149 C. Comparison of the cracking response in low temperature water with that for hydrogen-precharged specimens tested in air demonstrated that the loss in toughness is due to a hydrogen-induced intergranular cracking mechanism. At loading rates about approx. 1000 MPa {radical}m/h, the toughness in low temperature water is improved because there is insufficient time for hydrogen to embrittle grain boundaries. Electron fractographic examinations were performed to correlate macroscopic properties with key microstructural features and operative fracture mechanisms.

  12. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Treatment Time Impacts Overall Survival in Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, Matthew T.; Ojerholm, Eric; Roses, Robert E.; Plastaras, John P.; Metz, James M.; Mamtani, Ronac; Stripp, Diana; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Datta, Jashodeep

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Prolonged radiation therapy treatment time (RTT) is associated with worse survival in several tumor types. This study investigated whether delays during adjuvant radiation therapy impact overall survival (OS) in gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was queried for patients with resected gastric cancer who received adjuvant radiation therapy with National Comprehensive Cancer Network–recommended doses (45 or 50.4 Gy) between 1998 and 2006. RTT was classified as standard (45 Gy: 33-36 days, 50.4 Gy: 38-41 days) or prolonged (45 Gy: >36 days, 50.4 Gy: >41 days). Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the association between the following factors and OS: RTT, interval from surgery to radiation therapy initiation, interval from surgery to radiation therapy completion, radiation therapy dose, demographic/pathologic and operative factors, and other elements of adjuvant multimodality therapy. Results: Of 1591 patients, RTT was delayed in 732 (46%). Factors associated with prolonged RTT were non-private health insurance (OR 1.3, P=.005) and treatment at non-academic facilities (OR 1.2, P=.045). Median OS and 5-year actuarial survival were significantly worse in patients with prolonged RTT compared with standard RTT (36 vs 51 months, P=.001; 39 vs 47%, P=.005); OS worsened with each cumulative week of delay (P<.0004). On multivariable analysis, prolonged RTT was associated with inferior OS (hazard ratio 1.2, P=.002); the intervals from surgery to radiation therapy initiation or completion were not. Prolonged RTT was particularly detrimental in patients with node positivity, inadequate nodal staging (<15 nodes examined), and those undergoing a cycle of chemotherapy before chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: Delays during adjuvant radiation therapy appear to negatively impact survival in gastric cancer. Efforts to minimize cumulative interruptions to <7 days should be considered.

  13. Survival Times of Meter-Sized Rock Boulders on the Surface of Airless Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basilevsky, A. T.; Head, J. W.; Horz, F.; Ramsley, K.

    2015-01-01

    This study considers the survival times of meter-sized rock boulders on the surfaces of several airless bodies. As the starting point, we employ estimates of the survival times of such boulders on the surface of the Moon by[1], then discuss the role of destruction due to day-night temperature cycling, consider the meteorite bombardment environment on the considered bodies in terms of projectile flux and velocities and finally estimate the survival times. Survival times of meter-sized rocks on lunar surface: The survival times of hand specimen-sized rocks exposed to the lunar surface environment were estimated based on experiments modeling the destruction of rocks by meteorite impacts, combined with measurements of the lunar surface meteorite flux, (e.g.,[2]). For estimations of the survival times of meter-sized lunar boulders, [1] suggested a different approach based on analysis of the spatial density of boulders on the rims of small lunar craters of known absolute age. It was found that for a few million years, only a small fraction of the boulders ejected by cratering process are destroyed, for several tens of million years approx.50% are destroyed, and for 200-300 Ma, 90 to 99% are destroyed. Following [2] and other works, [1] considered that the rocks are mostly destroyed by meteorite impacts. Destruction of rocks by thermal-stress. However, high diurnal temperature variations on the surface of the Moon and other airless bodies imply that thermal stresses may also be a cause of surface rock destruction. Delbo et al. [3] interpreted the observed presence of fine debris on the surface of small asteroids as due to thermal surface cycling. They stated that because of the very low gravity on the surface of these bodies, ejecta from meteorite impacts should leave the body, so formation there of fine debris has to be due to thermal cycling. Based on experiments on heating-cooling of cm-scale pieces of ordinary and carbonaceous chondrites and theoretical modeling of

  14. Super-tough carbon-nanotube fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, Alan B.; Collins, Steve; Muñoz, Edgar; Razal, Joselito M.; Ebron, Von Howard; Ferraris, John P.; Coleman, Jonathan N.; Kim, Bog G.; Baughman, Ray H.

    2003-06-01

    The energy needed to rupture a fibre (its toughness) is five times higher for spider silk than for the same mass of steel wire, which has inspired efforts to produce spider silk commercially. Here we spin 100-metre-long carbon-nanotube composite fibres that are tougher than any natural or synthetic organic fibre described so far, and use these to make fibre supercapacitors that are suitable for weaving into textiles.

  15. Biologically-equivalent dose and long-term survival time in radiation treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaider, Marco; Hanin, Leonid

    2007-10-01

    Within the linear-quadratic model the biologically-effective dose (BED)—taken to represent treatments with an equal tumor control probability (TCP)—is commonly (and plausibly) calculated according to BED(D) = -log[S(D)]/α. We ask whether in the presence of cellular proliferation this claim is justified and examine, as a related question, the extent to which BED approximates an isoeffective dose (IED) defined, more sensibly, in terms of an equal long-term survival probability, rather than TCP. We derive, under the assumption that cellular birth and death rates are time homogeneous, exact equations for the isoeffective dose, IED. As well, we give a rigorous definition of effective long-term survival time, Teff. By using several sets of radiobiological parameters, we illustrate potential differences between BED and IED on the one hand and, on the other, between Teff calculated as suggested here or by an earlier recipe. In summary: (a) the equations currently in use for calculating the effective treatment time may underestimate the isoeffective dose and should be avoided. The same is the case for the tumor control probability (TCP), only more so; (b) for permanent implants BED may be a poor substitute for IED; (c) for a fractionated treatment schedule, interpreting the observed probability of cure in terms of a TCP formalism that refers to the end of the treatment (rather than Teff) may result in a miscalculation (underestimation) of the initial number of clonogens.

  16. Using Concurrent Cardiovascular Information to Augment Survival Time Data from Orthostatic Tilt Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiveson, Alan H.; Fiedler, James; Lee, Stuart M. M.; Westby, Christian M.; Stenger, Michael B.; Platts, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    Orthostatic Intolerance (OI) is the propensity to develop symptoms of fainting during upright standing. OI is associated with changes in heart rate, blood pressure and other measures of cardiac function. Problem: NASA astronauts have shown increased susceptibility to OI on return from space missions. Current methods for counteracting OI in astronauts include fluid loading and the use of compression garments. Multivariate trajectory spread is greater as OI increases. Pairwise comparisons at the same time within subjects allows incorporation of pass/fail outcomes. Path length, convex hull area, and covariance matrix determinant do well as statistics to summarize this spread Missing data problems Time series analysis need many more time points per OTT session treatment of trend? how incorporate survival information?

  17. Space-time Bayesian survival modeling of chronic wasting disease in deer.

    PubMed

    Song, Hae-Ryoung; Lawson, Andrew

    2009-09-01

    The primary objectives of this study are to describe the spatial and temporal variation in disease prevalence of chronic wasting disease (CWD), to assess the effect of demographic factors such as age and sex on disease prevalence and to model the disease clustering effects over space and time. We propose a Bayesian hierarchical survival model where latent parameters capture temporal and spatial trends in disease incidence, incorporating several individual covariates and random effects. The model is applied to a data set which consists of 65085 harvested deer in Wisconsin from 2002 to 2006. We found significant sex effects, spatial effects, temporal effects and spatio-temporal interacted effects in CWD infection in deer in Wisconsin. The risk of infection for male deer was significantly higher than that of female deer, and CWD has been significantly different over space, time, and space and time based on the harvest samples.

  18. TOUGH-Fx/Hydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George Julius

    2005-02-01

    TOUGH-Fx/HYORATL can model the non-isothermal gas release. phase behavior and flow of fluids and heat in complex geologic media. The code can simulate production from natural gas hydrate deposits in the subsurtace (i.e., in the permafrost and in deep ocean sediments), as well as laboratory experiments of hydrate dissociation/formation in porous/fractured media. T006H-Fx/HYDRATE vi .0 includes both an equilibrium and a kinetic model of hydrate Ibmiation and dissociation. The model accounts for heat and up to four mass components-- i.e., water, CH4, hydrate, and water-soluble inhibitors such as salts or alcohols. These are partitioned among four possible phases (gas phase, liquid phase, ice phase and hydrate phase). Hydrate dIssociation or formation, phase changes, and the corresponding thermal effects are fully described, as are the effects of inhibitors. The model can describe all possible hydrate dissociation mechanisms, i.e., depressurization, thermal stimulation, salting-out effects, and inhibItor-Induced effects.

  19. TOUGH-Fx/Hydrate

    2005-02-01

    TOUGH-Fx/HYORATL can model the non-isothermal gas release. phase behavior and flow of fluids and heat in complex geologic media. The code can simulate production from natural gas hydrate deposits in the subsurtace (i.e., in the permafrost and in deep ocean sediments), as well as laboratory experiments of hydrate dissociation/formation in porous/fractured media. T006H-Fx/HYDRATE vi .0 includes both an equilibrium and a kinetic model of hydrate Ibmiation and dissociation. The model accounts for heat and upmore » to four mass components-- i.e., water, CH4, hydrate, and water-soluble inhibitors such as salts or alcohols. These are partitioned among four possible phases (gas phase, liquid phase, ice phase and hydrate phase). Hydrate dIssociation or formation, phase changes, and the corresponding thermal effects are fully described, as are the effects of inhibitors. The model can describe all possible hydrate dissociation mechanisms, i.e., depressurization, thermal stimulation, salting-out effects, and inhibItor-Induced effects.« less

  20. Unusual effects of some vegetable oils on the survival time of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, M Z; Watanabe, S; Kobayashi, T; Nagatsu, A; Sakakibara, J; Okuyama, H

    1997-07-01

    Preliminary experiments have shown that a diet containing 10% rapeseed oil (low-erucic acid) markedly shortens the survival time of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive (SHRSP) rats under 1% NaCl loading as compared with diets containing perilla oil or soybean oil. High-oleate safflower oil and high-oleate sunflower oil were found to have survival time-shortening activities comparable to that of rapeseed oil; olive oil had slightly less activity. A mixture was made of soybean oil, perilla oil, and triolein partially purified from high-oleate sunflower oil to adjust the fatty acid composition to that of rapeseed oil. The survival time of this triolein/mixed oil group was between those of the rapeseed oil and soybean oil groups. When 1% NaCl was replaced with tap water, the survival time was prolonged by approximately 80%. Under these conditions, the rapeseed oil and evening primrose oil shortened the survival time by approximately 40% as compared with n-3 fatty acid-rich perilla and fish oil; lard, soybean oil, and safflower oil with relatively high n-6/n-3 ratios shortened the survival time by roughly 10%. The observed unusual survival time-shortening activities of some vegetable oils (rapeseed, high-oleate safflower, high-oleate sunflower, olive, and evening primrose oil) may not be due to their unique fatty acid compositions, but these results suggest that these vegetable oils contain factor(s) which are detrimental to SHRSP rats.

  1. Integrated survival analysis using an event-time approach in a Bayesian framework

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, Daniel P.; Dreitz, VJ; Heisey, Dennis M.

    2015-01-01

    Event-time or continuous-time statistical approaches have been applied throughout the biostatistical literature and have led to numerous scientific advances. However, these techniques have traditionally relied on knowing failure times. This has limited application of these analyses, particularly, within the ecological field where fates of marked animals may be unknown. To address these limitations, we developed an integrated approach within a Bayesian framework to estimate hazard rates in the face of unknown fates. We combine failure/survival times from individuals whose fates are known and times of which are interval-censored with information from those whose fates are unknown, and model the process of detecting animals with unknown fates. This provides the foundation for our integrated model and permits necessary parameter estimation. We provide the Bayesian model, its derivation, and use simulation techniques to investigate the properties and performance of our approach under several scenarios. Lastly, we apply our estimation technique using a piece-wise constant hazard function to investigate the effects of year, age, chick size and sex, sex of the tending adult, and nesting habitat on mortality hazard rates of the endangered mountain plover (Charadrius montanus) chicks. Traditional models were inappropriate for this analysis because fates of some individual chicks were unknown due to failed radio transmitters. Simulations revealed biases of posterior mean estimates were minimal (≤ 4.95%), and posterior distributions behaved as expected with RMSE of the estimates decreasing as sample sizes, detection probability, and survival increased. We determined mortality hazard rates for plover chicks were highest at <5 days old and were lower for chicks with larger birth weights and/or whose nest was within agricultural habitats. Based on its performance, our approach greatly expands the range of problems for which event-time analyses can be used by eliminating the

  2. Integrated survival analysis using an event-time approach in a Bayesian framework

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Daniel P; Dreitz, Victoria J; Heisey, Dennis M

    2015-01-01

    Event-time or continuous-time statistical approaches have been applied throughout the biostatistical literature and have led to numerous scientific advances. However, these techniques have traditionally relied on knowing failure times. This has limited application of these analyses, particularly, within the ecological field where fates of marked animals may be unknown. To address these limitations, we developed an integrated approach within a Bayesian framework to estimate hazard rates in the face of unknown fates. We combine failure/survival times from individuals whose fates are known and times of which are interval-censored with information from those whose fates are unknown, and model the process of detecting animals with unknown fates. This provides the foundation for our integrated model and permits necessary parameter estimation. We provide the Bayesian model, its derivation, and use simulation techniques to investigate the properties and performance of our approach under several scenarios. Lastly, we apply our estimation technique using a piece-wise constant hazard function to investigate the effects of year, age, chick size and sex, sex of the tending adult, and nesting habitat on mortality hazard rates of the endangered mountain plover (Charadrius montanus) chicks. Traditional models were inappropriate for this analysis because fates of some individual chicks were unknown due to failed radio transmitters. Simulations revealed biases of posterior mean estimates were minimal (≤ 4.95%), and posterior distributions behaved as expected with RMSE of the estimates decreasing as sample sizes, detection probability, and survival increased. We determined mortality hazard rates for plover chicks were highest at <5 days old and were lower for chicks with larger birth weights and/or whose nest was within agricultural habitats. Based on its performance, our approach greatly expands the range of problems for which event-time analyses can be used by eliminating the

  3. Integrated survival analysis using an event-time approach in a Bayesian framework.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Daniel P; Dreitz, Victoria J; Heisey, Dennis M

    2015-02-01

    Event-time or continuous-time statistical approaches have been applied throughout the biostatistical literature and have led to numerous scientific advances. However, these techniques have traditionally relied on knowing failure times. This has limited application of these analyses, particularly, within the ecological field where fates of marked animals may be unknown. To address these limitations, we developed an integrated approach within a Bayesian framework to estimate hazard rates in the face of unknown fates. We combine failure/survival times from individuals whose fates are known and times of which are interval-censored with information from those whose fates are unknown, and model the process of detecting animals with unknown fates. This provides the foundation for our integrated model and permits necessary parameter estimation. We provide the Bayesian model, its derivation, and use simulation techniques to investigate the properties and performance of our approach under several scenarios. Lastly, we apply our estimation technique using a piece-wise constant hazard function to investigate the effects of year, age, chick size and sex, sex of the tending adult, and nesting habitat on mortality hazard rates of the endangered mountain plover (Charadrius montanus) chicks. Traditional models were inappropriate for this analysis because fates of some individual chicks were unknown due to failed radio transmitters. Simulations revealed biases of posterior mean estimates were minimal (≤ 4.95%), and posterior distributions behaved as expected with RMSE of the estimates decreasing as sample sizes, detection probability, and survival increased. We determined mortality hazard rates for plover chicks were highest at <5 days old and were lower for chicks with larger birth weights and/or whose nest was within agricultural habitats. Based on its performance, our approach greatly expands the range of problems for which event-time analyses can be used by eliminating the

  4. Age and Sex of Mice Markedly Affect Survival Times Associated with Hyperoxic Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Prows, Daniel R; Gibbons, William J; Smith, Jessica J; Pilipenko, Valentina; Martin, Lisa J

    2015-01-01

    Mortality associated with acute lung injury (ALI) remains substantial, with recent estimates of 35-45% similar to those obtained decades ago. Although evidence for sex-related differences in ALI mortality remains equivocal, death rates differ markedly for age, with more than 3-fold increased mortality in older versus younger patients. Strains of mice also show large differences in ALI mortality. To tease out genetic factors affecting mortality, we established a mouse model of differential hyperoxic ALI (HALI) survival. Separate genetic analyses of backcross and F2 populations generated from sensitive C57BL/6J (B) and resistant 129X1/SvJ (X1) progenitor strains identified two quantitative trait loci (QTLs; Shali1 and Shali2) with strong, equal but opposite, within-strain effects on survival. Congenic lines confirmed these opposing QTL effects, but also retained the low penetrance seen in the 6-12 week X1 control strain. Sorting mice into distinct age groups revealed that 'age at exposure' inversely correlated with survival time and explained reduced penetrance of the resistance trait. While B mice were already sensitive by 6 weeks old, X1 mice maintained significant resistance up to 3-4 weeks longer. Reanalysis of F2 data gave analogous age-related findings, and also supported sex-specific linkage for Shali1 and Shali2. Importantly, we have demonstrated in congenic mice that these age effects on survival correspond with B alleles for Shali1 (6-week old mice more sensitive) and Shali2 (10-week old mice more resistant) placed on the X1 background. Further studies revealed significant sex-specific survival differences in subcongenics for both QTLs. Accounting for age and sex markedly improved penetrance of both QTLs, thereby reducing trait variability, refining Shali1 to <8.5Mb, and supporting several sub-QTLs within the Shali2 interval. Together, these congenics will allow age- and sex-specific studies to interrogate myriad subphenotypes affected during ALI

  5. Gene expression profiling of canine osteosarcoma reveals genes associated with short and long survival times

    PubMed Central

    Selvarajah, Gayathri T; Kirpensteijn, Jolle; van Wolferen, Monique E; Rao, Nagesha AS; Fieten, Hille; Mol, Jan A

    2009-01-01

    Background Gene expression profiling of spontaneous tumors in the dog offers a unique translational opportunity to identify prognostic biomarkers and signaling pathways that are common to both canine and human. Osteosarcoma (OS) accounts for approximately 80% of all malignant bone tumors in the dog. Canine OS are highly comparable with their human counterpart with respect to histology, high metastatic rate and poor long-term survival. This study investigates the prognostic gene profile among thirty-two primary canine OS using canine specific cDNA microarrays representing 20,313 genes to identify genes and cellular signaling pathways associated with survival. This, the first report of its kind in dogs with OS, also demonstrates the advantages of cross-species comparison with human OS. Results The 32 tumors were classified into two prognostic groups based on survival time (ST). They were defined as short survivors (dogs with poor prognosis: surviving fewer than 6 months) and long survivors (dogs with better prognosis: surviving 6 months or longer). Fifty-one transcripts were found to be differentially expressed, with common upregulation of these genes in the short survivors. The overexpressed genes in short survivors are associated with possible roles in proliferation, drug resistance or metastasis. Several deregulated pathways identified in the present study, including Wnt signaling, Integrin signaling and Chemokine/cytokine signaling are comparable to the pathway analysis conducted on human OS gene profiles, emphasizing the value of the dog as an excellent model for humans. Conclusion A molecular-based method for discrimination of outcome for short and long survivors is useful for future prognostic stratification at initial diagnosis, where genes and pathways associated with cell cycle/proliferation, drug resistance and metastasis could be potential targets for diagnosis and therapy. The similarities between human and canine OS makes the dog a suitable pre

  6. Age and Sex of Mice Markedly Affect Survival Times Associated with Hyperoxic Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Prows, Daniel R.; Gibbons, William J.; Smith, Jessica J.; Pilipenko, Valentina; Martin, Lisa J.

    2015-01-01

    Mortality associated with acute lung injury (ALI) remains substantial, with recent estimates of 35–45% similar to those obtained decades ago. Although evidence for sex-related differences in ALI mortality remains equivocal, death rates differ markedly for age, with more than 3-fold increased mortality in older versus younger patients. Strains of mice also show large differences in ALI mortality. To tease out genetic factors affecting mortality, we established a mouse model of differential hyperoxic ALI (HALI) survival. Separate genetic analyses of backcross and F2 populations generated from sensitive C57BL/6J (B) and resistant 129X1/SvJ (X1) progenitor strains identified two quantitative trait loci (QTLs; Shali1 and Shali2) with strong, equal but opposite, within-strain effects on survival. Congenic lines confirmed these opposing QTL effects, but also retained the low penetrance seen in the 6–12 week X1 control strain. Sorting mice into distinct age groups revealed that ‘age at exposure’ inversely correlated with survival time and explained reduced penetrance of the resistance trait. While B mice were already sensitive by 6 weeks old, X1 mice maintained significant resistance up to 3–4 weeks longer. Reanalysis of F2 data gave analogous age-related findings, and also supported sex-specific linkage for Shali1 and Shali2. Importantly, we have demonstrated in congenic mice that these age effects on survival correspond with B alleles for Shali1 (6-week old mice more sensitive) and Shali2 (10-week old mice more resistant) placed on the X1 background. Further studies revealed significant sex-specific survival differences in subcongenics for both QTLs. Accounting for age and sex markedly improved penetrance of both QTLs, thereby reducing trait variability, refining Shali1 to <8.5Mb, and supporting several sub-QTLs within the Shali2 interval. Together, these congenics will allow age- and sex-specific studies to interrogate myriad subphenotypes affected during ALI

  7. Survival time prediction of patients with glioblastoma multiforme tumors using spatial distance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Mu; Hall, Lawrence O.; Goldgof, Dmitry B.; Gillies, Robert J.; Gatenby, Robert A.

    2013-02-01

    Regional variations in tumor blood flow and necrosis are commonly observed in cross sectional imaging of clinical cancers. We hypothesize that radiologically-defined regional variations in tumor characteristics can be used to define distinct "habitats" that reflect the underlying evolutionary dynamics. Here we present an experimental framework to extract spatially-explicit variations in tumor features (habitats) from multiple MRI sequences performed on patients with Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM). The MRI sequences consist of post gadolinium T1-weighted, FLAIR, and T2-weighted images from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Our strategy is to identify spatially distinct, radiologically-defined intratumoral habitats by characterizing each small tumor regions based on their combined properties in 3 different MRI sequences. Initial tumor identification was performed by manually drawing a mask on a T1-weighted post contrast image slice. The extracted tumor was segmented into an enhancing and non-enhancing region by the Otsu segmentation algorithm, followed by a mask mapping procedure onto the corresponding FLAIR and T2-weighted images. Then Otsu was applied on the FLAIR and T2 images separately. We find that tumor heterogeneity measured through Distance Features (DF) can be used as a strong predictor of survival time. In an initial cohort of 16 cases slow progressing tumors have lower DF values (are less heterogeneous) compared to those with fast progression and short survival times.

  8. Molecular clock evidence for survival of Antarctic cyanobacteria (Oscillatoriales, Phormidium autumnale) from Paleozoic times.

    PubMed

    Strunecký, Otakar; Elster, Josef; Komárek, Jiří

    2012-11-01

    Cyanobacteria are well adapted to freezing and desiccation; they have been proposed as possible survivors of comprehensive Antarctic glaciations. Filamentous types from the order Oscillatoriales, especially the species Phormidium autumnale Kützing ex Gomont 1892, have widely diverse morphotypes that dominate in Antarctic aquatic microbial mats, seepages, and wet soils. Currently little is known about the dispersion of cyanobacteria in Antarctica and of their population history. We tested the hypothesis that cyanobacteria survived Antarctic glaciations directly on site after the Gondwana breakup by using the relaxed and strict molecular clock in the analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. We estimated that the biogeographic history of Antarctic cyanobacteria belonging to P. autumnale lineages has ancient origins. The oldest go further back in time than the breakup of Gondwana and originated somewhere on the supercontinent between 442 and 297 Ma. Enhanced speciation rate was found around the time of the opening of the Drake Passage (c. 31-45 Ma) with beginning of glaciations (c. 43 Ma). Our results, based primarily on the strains collected in maritime Antarctica, mostly around James Ross Island, support the hypothesis that long-term survival took place in glacial refuges. The high morphological diversification of P. autumnale suggested the coevolution of lineages and formation of complex associations with different morphologies, resulting in a specific endemic Antarctic cyanobacterial flora.

  9. Tolazoline decreases survival time during microwave-induced lethal heat stress in anesthetized rats

    SciTech Connect

    Jauchem, J.R.; Chang, K.S.; Frei, M.R.

    1996-03-01

    Effects of {alpha}-adrenergic antagonists have been studied during environmental heating but not during microwave-induced heating. Tolazoline may exert some of its effects via {alpha}-adrenergic blockade. In the present study, ketamine-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 2450-MHz microwaves at an average power density of 60 mW/cm{sup 2} (whole-body specific absorption rate of approximately 14 W/kg) until lethal temperatures were attained. The effects of tolazoline (10 mg/kg body weight) on physiological responses (including changes in body temperature, heart rate, blood pressure, and respiratory rate) were examined. Survival time was significantly shorter in the tolazoline group than in saline-treated animals. In general, heart rate and blood pressure responses were similar to those that occur during environmental heat stress. Heart rate, however, was significantly elevated in animals that received tolazoline, both before and during terminal microwave exposure. It is possible that changes associated with the elevated heart rate (e.g., less cardiac filling) in tolazoline-treated animals resulted in greater susceptibility to microwave-induced heating and the lower survival time. 47 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Frozen in Time? Microbial strategies for survival and carbon metabolism over geologic time in a Pleistocene permafrost chronosequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackelprang, R.; Douglas, T. A.; Waldrop, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Permafrost soils have received tremendous interest due to their importance as a global carbon store with the potential to be thawed over the coming centuries. Instead of being 'frozen in time,' permafrost contains active microbes. Most metagenomic studies have focused on Holocene aged permafrost. Here, we target Pleistocene aged ice and carbon rich permafrost (Yedoma), which can differ in carbon content and stage of decay. Our aim was to understand how microbes in the permafrost transform organic matter over geologic time and to identify physiological and biochemical adaptations that enable long-term survival. We used next-generation sequencing to characterize microbial communities along a permafrost age gradient. Samples were collected from the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) Permafrost Tunnel near Fox, AK, which penetrates a hillside providing access to permafrost ranging in age from 12 to 40 kyr. DNA was extracted directly from unthawed samples. 16S rRNA amplicon (16S) and shotgun metagenome sequencing revealed significant age-driven differences. First, microbial diversity declines with permafrost age, likely due to long-term exposure to environmental stresses and a reduction in metabolic resources. Second, we observed taxonomic differences among ages, with an increasing abundance of Firmicutes (endospore-formers) in older samples, suggesting that dormancy is a common survival strategy in older permafrost. Ordination of 16S and metagenome data revealed age-based clustering. Genes differing significantly between age categories included those involved in lipopolysaccharide assembly, cold-response, and carbon processing. These data point to the physiological adaptations to long-term frozen conditions and to the metabolic processes utilized in ancient permafrost. In fact, a gene common in older samples is involved in cadaverine production, which could potentially explain the putrefied smell of Pleistocene aged permafrost. Coupled with soil

  11. Tough2{_}MP: A parallel version of TOUGH2

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Keni; Wu, Yu-Shu; Ding, Chris; Pruess, Karsten

    2003-04-09

    TOUGH2{_}MP is a massively parallel version of TOUGH2. It was developed for running on distributed-memory parallel computers to simulate large simulation problems that may not be solved by the standard, single-CPU TOUGH2 code. The new code implements an efficient massively parallel scheme, while preserving the full capacity and flexibility of the original TOUGH2 code. The new software uses the METIS software package for grid partitioning and AZTEC software package for linear-equation solving. The standard message-passing interface is adopted for communication among processors. Numerical performance of the current version code has been tested on CRAY-T3E and IBM RS/6000 SP platforms. In addition, the parallel code has been successfully applied to real field problems of multi-million-cell simulations for three-dimensional multiphase and multicomponent fluid and heat flow, as well as solute transport. In this paper, we will review the development of the TOUGH2{_}MP, and discuss the basic features, modules, and their applications.

  12. Survival of Bacillus pumilus spores for a prolonged period of time in real space conditions.

    PubMed

    Vaishampayan, Parag A; Rabbow, Elke; Horneck, Gerda; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J

    2012-05-01

    To prevent forward contamination and maintain the scientific integrity of future life-detection missions, it is important to characterize and attempt to eliminate terrestrial microorganisms associated with exploratory spacecraft and landing vehicles. Among the organisms isolated from spacecraft-associated surfaces, spores of Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 exhibited unusually high resistance to decontamination techniques such as UV radiation and peroxide treatment. Subsequently, B. pumilus SAFR-032 was flown to the International Space Station (ISS) and exposed to a variety of space conditions via the European Technology Exposure Facility (EuTEF). After 18 months of exposure in the EXPOSE facility of the European Space Agency (ESA) on EuTEF under dark space conditions, SAFR-032 spores showed 10-40% survivability, whereas a survival rate of 85-100% was observed when these spores were kept aboard the ISS under dark simulated martian atmospheric conditions. In contrast, when UV (>110 nm) was applied on SAFR-032 spores for the same time period and under the same conditions used in EXPOSE, a ∼7-log reduction in viability was observed. A parallel experiment was conducted on Earth with identical samples under simulated space conditions. Spores exposed to ground simulations showed less of a reduction in viability when compared with the "real space" exposed spores (∼3-log reduction in viability for "UV-Mars," and ∼4-log reduction in viability for "UV-Space"). A comparative proteomics analysis indicated that proteins conferring resistant traits (superoxide dismutase) were present in higher concentration in space-exposed spores when compared to controls. Also, the first-generation cells and spores derived from space-exposed samples exhibited elevated UVC resistance when compared with their ground control counterparts. The data generated are important for calculating the probability and mechanisms of microbial survival in space conditions and assessing microbial contaminants

  13. Tough blends of polylactide and castor oil.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Megan L; Paxton, Jessica M; Hillmyer, Marc A

    2011-09-01

    Poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) is a renewable resource polymer derived from plant sugars with several commercial applications. Broader implementation of the material is limited due to its inherent brittleness. We show that the addition of 5 wt % castor oil to PLLA significantly enhances the overall tensile toughness with minimal reductions in the modulus and no plasticization of the PLLA matrix. In addition, we used poly(ricinoleic acid)-PLLA diblock copolymers, synthesized entirely from renewable resources, as compatibilizers for the PLLA/castor oil blends. Ricinoleic acid, the majority fatty acid comprising castor oil, was polymerized through a lipase-catalyzed condensation reaction. The resulting polymers contained a hydroxyl end-group that was subsequently used to initiate the ring-opening polymerization of l-lactide. The binary PLLA/castor oil blend exhibited a tensile toughness seven times greater than neat PLLA. The addition of block copolymer allowed for control over the morphology of the blends, and even further improvement in the tensile toughness was realized-an order of magnitude larger than that of neat PLLA.

  14. Dynamic fracture toughness determined using molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Swadener, J. G.; Baskes, M. I.; Nastasi, Michael Anthony,

    2004-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of fracture in crystalline silicon are conducted in order to determine the dynamic fracture toughness. The MD simulations show how the potential energy released during fracture is partitioned into surface energy, energy stored in defects and kinetic energy. First, the MD fracture simulations are shown to produce brittle fracture and be in reasonable agreement with experimental results. Then dynamic hcture toughness is calculated as the sum of the surface energy and the energy stored as defects directly from the MD models. Models oriented to produce fracture on either (111) or (101) planes are used. For the (101) fracture orientation, equilibrium crack speeds of greater than 80% of the Rayleigh wave speed are obtained. Crack speeds initially show a steep increase with increasing energy release rate followed by a much more gradual increase. No plateau in crack speed is observed for static energy release rates up to 20 J/m{sup 2}. At the point where the change in crack speed behavior occur, the dynamic fracture toughness (J{sub d}) is still within 10% of two times the surface energy (2{gamma}{sub 0}) and changing very slowly. From these MD simulations, it appears that the change in crack speed behavior is due to a change in the kinetic energy generation during dynamic fracture. In addition, MD simulations of facture in silicon with defects were conducted. The addition of defects increases the inelastic dissipation and the energy stored in defects.

  15. Time to lowest postoperative carcinoembryonic antigen level is predictive on survival outcome in rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Huichuan; Luo, Yanxin; Wang, Xiaolin; Bai, Liangliang; Huang, Pinzhu; Wang, Lei; Huang, Meijin; Deng, Yanhong; Wang, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    This study was to investigate whether the time to the lowest postoperative CEA can predict cancer survival. We enrolled 155 rectal cancer patients in this retrospective and longitudinal cohort study. Deepness of response (DpR) of CEA refers to the relative change of the lowest postoperative CEA level from baseline, and time to DpR (TTDpR) refers to the time from surgery to the lowest postoperative CEA level. The median of TTDpR and DpR was 4.5 (range, 3.0–18.0) weeks and −67% (range, −99% to 114%) respectively. Patients with TTDpR 4.5 weeks. Using TTDpR as a continuous variable, the HR of DFS and OS was 1.13 (95% CI 1.06–1.22, P = 0.001) and 1.17 (95% CI 1.07–1.29, P = 0.001) respectively. On multivariate analysis, the predictive value of prolonged TTDpR remained [adjusted HRs: 1.12 (95% CI 1.03–1.21, P = 0.006) and 1.17 (95% CI 1.06–1.28, P = 0.001)]. These findings remained significant in patients with normal preoperative CEA. Our results showed prolonged TTDpR of CEA independently predicted unfavorable survival outcomes, regardless of whether preoperative CEA was elevated or not. PMID:27658525

  16. Anomalous scaling law of strength and toughness of cellulose nanopaper

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongli; Zhu, Shuze; Jia, Zheng; Parvinian, Sepideh; Li, Yuanyuan; Vaaland, Oeyvind; Hu, Liangbing; Li, Teng

    2015-01-01

    The quest for both strength and toughness is perpetual in advanced material design; unfortunately, these two mechanical properties are generally mutually exclusive. So far there exists only limited success of attaining both strength and toughness, which often needs material-specific, complicated, or expensive synthesis processes and thus can hardly be applicable to other materials. A general mechanism to address the conflict between strength and toughness still remains elusive. Here we report a first-of-its-kind study of the dependence of strength and toughness of cellulose nanopaper on the size of the constituent cellulose fibers. Surprisingly, we find that both the strength and toughness of cellulose nanopaper increase simultaneously (40 and 130 times, respectively) as the size of the constituent cellulose fibers decreases (from a mean diameter of 27 μm to 11 nm), revealing an anomalous but highly desirable scaling law of the mechanical properties of cellulose nanopaper: the smaller, the stronger and the tougher. Further fundamental mechanistic studies reveal that reduced intrinsic defect size and facile (re)formation of strong hydrogen bonding among cellulose molecular chains is the underlying key to this new scaling law of mechanical properties. These mechanistic findings are generally applicable to other material building blocks, and therefore open up abundant opportunities to use the fundamental bottom-up strategy to design a new class of functional materials that are both strong and tough. PMID:26150482

  17. Supplemental ascorbate in the supportive treatment of cancer: reevaluation of prolongation of survival times in terminal human cancer.

    PubMed

    Cameron, E; Pauling, L

    1978-09-01

    A study has been made of the survival times of 100 terminal cancer patients who were given supplemental ascorbate, usually 10 g/day, as part of their routine management and 1000 matched controls, similar patients who had received the same treatment except for the ascorbate. The two sets of patients were in part the same as those used in our earlier study [Cameron, E. & Pauling, L. (1976) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 73, 3685-3689]. Tests confirm that the ascorbate-treated patients and the matched controls are representative subpopulations of the same population of "untreatable" patients. Survival times were measured not only from the date of "untreatability" but also from the precisely known date of first hospital attendance for the cancer that eventually reached the terminal stage. The ascorbate-treated patients were found to have a mean survival time about 300 days greater than that of the controls. Survival times greater than 1 yr after the date of untreatability were observed for 22% of the ascorbate-treated patients and for 0.4% of the controls. The mean survival time of these 22 ascorbate-treated patients is 2.4 yr after reaching the apparently terminal stage; 8 of the ascorbate-treated patients are still alive, with a mean survival time after untreatability of 3.5 yr.

  18. Irradiation shortens the survival time of red cells deficient in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenasee

    SciTech Connect

    Westerman, M.P.; Wald, N.; Diloy-Puray, M.

    1980-03-01

    X radiation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient red cells causes distinct shortening of their survival time. This is accompanied by significant lowering of reduced glutathione content and is not observed in similarly prepared and treated normal cells. The damage is most likely related to irradiation-induced formation of activated oxygen products and to their subsequent effects on the cells. Neither methemoglobin increases nor Heinz body formation were observed, suggesting that hemolysis occurred prior to these changes. The study provides a model for examining the effects of irradiation and activated oxygen on red cells and suggests that patients with G6PD deficiency who receive irradiation could develop severe hemolysis in certain clinical settings.

  19. A model of survival times for predator populations: the case of the army ants.

    PubMed

    Britton, N F; Partridge, L W; Franks, N R

    1999-05-01

    We develop a method to estimate the expected time of survival of a predator population as a function of the size of the habitat island on which it lives and the dynamic parameters of the population and its prey. The model may be thought of either as a patch occupancy model for a structured population or as a model of metapopulation type. The method is applied to a keystone predator species, the neotropical army ant Eciton burchelli. Predictions are made as to how many of the islands and habitat islands in and around Gatun Lake in the Panama Canal, most of which were formed when the canal was dug, can be expected to support such a population today, and these are compared with data. PMID:17883227

  20. Indium-111 labeled platelet survival time studies in patients with prosthetic heart valves

    SciTech Connect

    Martinovitch, U.; Carrick, P.; Lieberman, L.M.

    1985-05-01

    Platelet survival time (PST) studies are useful to demonstrate whether or not patients with prosthetic heart valves have normal or shortened PST. During treatment for recurrent TIAs the PST will signal whether the patient is returning towards a normal PST. Using Indium-111 labeled platelets (ILP) the authors studied 10 patients suffering recurrent TIAs after prosthetic valve surgery to determine whether low dose aspirin increased their PST toward normal and whether the treatment had a beneficial effect on their TIA episodes. The authors conclude that low dose aspirin therapy as studied by ILP has no beneficial effect on PST or in preventing recurrent TIA. ILP is an important technique that allows the physician to identify those patients with shortened PST and to determine response to therapy.

  1. Time-varying effects of prognostic factors associated with disease-free survival in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Loki; Pu, Minya; Parker, Barbara A; Thomson, Cynthia A; Caan, Bette J; Flatt, Shirley W; Madlensky, Lisa; Hajek, Richard A; Al-Delaimy, Wael K; Saquib, Nazmus; Gold, Ellen B; Pierce, John P

    2009-06-15

    Early detection and effective treatments have dramatically improved breast cancer survivorship, yet the risk of relapse persists even 15 years after the initial diagnosis. It is important to identify prognostic factors for late breast cancer events. The authors investigated time-varying effects of tumor characteristics on breast-cancer-free survival using data on 3,088 breast cancer survivors from 4 US states who participated in a randomized dietary intervention trial in 1995-2006, with maximum follow-up through 15 years (median, 9 years). A piecewise constant penalized spline approach incorporating time-varying coefficients was adopted, allowing for deviations from the proportional hazards assumption. This method is more flexible than standard approaches, provides direct estimates of hazard ratios across time intervals, and is computationally tractable. Having a stage II or III tumor was associated with a 3-fold higher hazard of breast cancer than having a stage I tumor during the first 2.5 years after diagnosis; this hazard ratio decreased to 2.1 after 7.7 years, but higher tumor stage remained a significant risk factor. Similar diminishing effects were found for poorly differentiated tumors. Interestingly, having a positive estrogen receptor status was protective up to 4 years after diagnosis but detrimental after 7.7 years (hazard ratio = 1.5). These results emphasize the importance of careful statistical modeling allowing for possibly time-dependent effects in long-term survivorship studies. PMID:19403844

  2. Time-Varying Effects of Prognostic Factors Associated With Disease-Free Survival in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Loki; Pu, Minya; Parker, Barbara A.; Thomson, Cynthia A.; Caan, Bette J.; Flatt, Shirley W.; Madlensky, Lisa; Hajek, Richard A.; Al-Delaimy, Wael K.; Saquib, Nazmus; Gold, Ellen B.

    2009-01-01

    Early detection and effective treatments have dramatically improved breast cancer survivorship, yet the risk of relapse persists even 15 years after the initial diagnosis. It is important to identify prognostic factors for late breast cancer events. The authors investigated time-varying effects of tumor characteristics on breast-cancer-free survival using data on 3,088 breast cancer survivors from 4 US states who participated in a randomized dietary intervention trial in 1995–2006, with maximum follow-up through 15 years (median, 9 years). A piecewise constant penalized spline approach incorporating time-varying coefficients was adopted, allowing for deviations from the proportional hazards assumption. This method is more flexible than standard approaches, provides direct estimates of hazard ratios across time intervals, and is computationally tractable. Having a stage II or III tumor was associated with a 3-fold higher hazard of breast cancer than having a stage I tumor during the first 2.5 years after diagnosis; this hazard ratio decreased to 2.1 after 7.7 years, but higher tumor stage remained a significant risk factor. Similar diminishing effects were found for poorly differentiated tumors. Interestingly, having a positive estrogen receptor status was protective up to 4 years after diagnosis but detrimental after 7.7 years (hazard ratio = 1.5). These results emphasize the importance of careful statistical modeling allowing for possibly time-dependent effects in long-term survivorship studies. PMID:19403844

  3. Time-specific patterns of nest survival for ducks and passerines breeding in North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaffer, Terry L.; Grant, Todd A.

    2012-01-01

    In many bird species, survival can vary with the age of the nest, with the date a nest was initiated, or among years within the same nesting area. A literature review showed that patterns of survival vary in relation to nest age and date and are often contradictory. Inconsistencies could be a result of temporal variation in the environment or life-history differences among species. We examined patterns of nest survival in relation to nest age, date, and year for several duck and passerine species nesting at a single location in North Dakota during 1998–2003. We predicted that if environment shaped nest survival patterns, then temporal patterns in survival might be similar among three species of upland nesting ducks, and also among three species of grassland passerines nesting at the same site. We expected that survival patterns would differ between ducks and passerines because of relatively disparate life histories and differences in predators that prey on their nests. Nest survival was rarely constant among years, seasonally, or with age of the nest for species that we studied. As predicted, the pattern of survival was similar among duck species, driven mainly by differences in nest survival associated with nest initiation date. The pattern of survival also was similar among passerine species, but nest survival was more influenced by nest age than by date. Our findings suggest that some but not all variation in temporal patterns of nest survival in grassland birds reported in the literature can be explained on the basis of temporal environmental variation. Because patterns of survival were dissimilar among ducks and passerines, it is likely that mechanisms such as predation or brood parasitism have variable influences on productivity of ducks and passerines nesting in the same area. Our results indicate that biologists and managers should not assume that temporal environmental variations, especially factors that affect nest survival, act similarly on all

  4. Ferrofluid flow for TOUGH2

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis; Moridis, George

    1998-03-24

    We have developed EOS7M, a ferrofluid flow and transport module for TOUGH2. EOS7M calculates the magnetic forces on ferrofluid caused by an external magnetic field and allows simulation of flow and advective transport of ferrofluid-water mixtures through porous media. Such flow problems are strongly coupled and well suited to the TOUGH2 framework. Preliminary applications of EOS7M to some simple pressure and flow problems for which experiments were carried out in the lab show good qualitative agreement with the laboratory results.

  5. Differences in the timing of cardio-respiratory development determine whether marine gastropod embryos survive or die in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Rudin-Bitterli, Tabitha S; Spicer, John I; Rundle, Simon D

    2016-04-01

    Physiological plasticity of early developmental stages is a key way by which organisms can survive and adapt to environmental change. We investigated developmental plasticity of aspects of the cardio-respiratory physiology of encapsulated embryos of a marine gastropod, Littorina obtusata, surviving exposure to moderate hypoxia (PO2 =8 kPa) and compared the development of these survivors with that of individuals that died before hatching. Individuals surviving hypoxia exhibited a slower rate of development and altered ontogeny of cardio-respiratory structure and function compared with normoxic controls (PO2 >20 kPa). The onset and development of the larval and adult hearts were delayed in chronological time in hypoxia, but both organs appeared earlier in developmental time and cardiac activity rates were greater. The velum, a transient, 'larval' organ thought to play a role in gas exchange, was larger in hypoxia but developed more slowly (in chronological time), and velar cilia-driven, rotational activity was lower. Despite these effects of hypoxia, 38% of individuals survived to hatching. Compared with those embryos that died during development, these surviving embryos had advanced expression of adult structures, i.e. a significantly earlier occurrence and greater activity of their adult heart and larger shells. In contrast, embryos that died retained larval cardio-respiratory features (the velum and larval heart) for longer in chronological time. Surviving embryos came from eggs with significantly higher albumen provisioning than those that died, suggesting an energetic component for advanced development of adult traits. PMID:26896537

  6. Impact of collaborative care on survival time for dogs with congestive heart failure and revenue for attending primary care veterinarians.

    PubMed

    Lefbom, Bonnie K; Peckens, Neal K

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the effects of in-person collaborative care by primary care veterinarians (pcDVMs) and board-certified veterinary cardiologists (BCVCs) on survival time of dogs after onset of congestive heart failure (CHF) and on associated revenue for the attending pcDVMs. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. ANIMALS 26 small-breed dogs treated for naturally occurring CHF secondary to myxomatous mitral valve disease at a multilocation primary care veterinary hospital between 2008 and 2013. PROCEDURES Electronic medical records were reviewed to identify dogs with confirmed CHF secondary to myxomatous mitral valve disease and collect information on patient care, survival time, and pcDVM revenue. Data were compared between dogs that received collaborative care from the pcDVM and a BCVC and dogs that received care from the pcDVM alone. RESULTS Dogs that received collaborative care had a longer median survival time (254 days) than did dogs that received care from the pcDVM alone (146 days). A significant positive correlation was identified between pcDVM revenue and survival time for dogs that received collaborative care (ie, the longer the dog survived, the greater the pcDVM revenue generated from caring for that patient). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Findings suggested that collaborative care provided to small-breed dogs with CHF by a BCVC and pcDVM could result in survival benefits for affected dogs and increased revenue for pcDVMs, compared with care provided by a pcDVM alone.

  7. Impact of collaborative care on survival time for dogs with congestive heart failure and revenue for attending primary care veterinarians.

    PubMed

    Lefbom, Bonnie K; Peckens, Neal K

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the effects of in-person collaborative care by primary care veterinarians (pcDVMs) and board-certified veterinary cardiologists (BCVCs) on survival time of dogs after onset of congestive heart failure (CHF) and on associated revenue for the attending pcDVMs. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. ANIMALS 26 small-breed dogs treated for naturally occurring CHF secondary to myxomatous mitral valve disease at a multilocation primary care veterinary hospital between 2008 and 2013. PROCEDURES Electronic medical records were reviewed to identify dogs with confirmed CHF secondary to myxomatous mitral valve disease and collect information on patient care, survival time, and pcDVM revenue. Data were compared between dogs that received collaborative care from the pcDVM and a BCVC and dogs that received care from the pcDVM alone. RESULTS Dogs that received collaborative care had a longer median survival time (254 days) than did dogs that received care from the pcDVM alone (146 days). A significant positive correlation was identified between pcDVM revenue and survival time for dogs that received collaborative care (ie, the longer the dog survived, the greater the pcDVM revenue generated from caring for that patient). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Findings suggested that collaborative care provided to small-breed dogs with CHF by a BCVC and pcDVM could result in survival benefits for affected dogs and increased revenue for pcDVMs, compared with care provided by a pcDVM alone. PMID:27308884

  8. Analysis of multilevel grouped survival data with time-varying regression coefficients.

    PubMed

    Wong, May C M; Lam, K F; Lo, Edward C M

    2011-02-10

    Correlated or multilevel grouped survival data are common in medical and dental research. Two common approaches to analyze such data are the marginal and the random-effects approaches. Models and methods in the literature generally assume that the treatment effect is constant over time. A researcher may be interested in studying whether the treatment effects in a clinical trial vary over time, say fade out gradually. This is of particular clinical value when studying the long-term effect of a treatment. This paper proposed to extend the random effects grouped proportional hazards models by incorporating the possibly time-varying covariate effects into the model in terms of a state-space formulation. The proposed model is very flexible and the estimation can be performed using the MCMC approach with non-informative priors in the Bayesian framework. The method is applied to a data set from a prospective clinical trial investigating the effectiveness of silver diamine fluoride (SDF) and sodium fluoride (NaF) varnish in arresting active dentin caries in the Chinese preschool children. It is shown that the treatment groups with caries removal prior to the topical fluoride applications are most effective in shortening the arrest times in the first 6-month interval, but their effects fade out rapidly since then. The effects of treatment groups without caries removal prior to topical fluoride application drop at a very slow rate and can be considered as more or less constant over time. The applications of SDF solution is found to be more effective than the applications of NaF vanish.

  9. Time Interval between Trauma and Arthroscopic Meniscal Repair Has No Influence on Clinical Survival.

    PubMed

    van der Wal, Robert J P; Thomassen, Bregje J W; Swen, Jan-Willem A; van Arkel, Ewoud R A

    2016-07-01

    Arthroscopic meniscal repair is the gold standard for longitudinal peripheral meniscal tears. The time interval between trauma and meniscal repair remains controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate failure rates and clinical outcome of arthroscopic meniscal repair in relation to chronicity of injury. A total of 238 meniscal repairs were performed in 234 patients. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) was reconstructed in almost all ACL-deficient knees (130 out of 133). Time interval between injury and repair was divided into acute (< 2 weeks), subacute (> 2 to < 12 weeks), and chronic (> 12 weeks). Patients completed postal questionnaires to evaluate clinical outcome and failure rates. Study instruments included Lysholm, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), and Tegner scoring systems. At a median follow-up of 41 months (interquartile range [IQR], 34-53 months) 55 medial and 10 lateral meniscal repairs failed (overall failure rate, 27%). There was a significant higher failure rate for medial meniscal repair (p < 0.05) and ACL-deficient knees without ACL reconstruction. Functional outcome scores showed only significant differences on the KOOS subscale "function in daily living" (95% confidence interval, 1.05-15.27, p < 0.05). No significant difference was found for any interval between trauma and repair. The interval between trauma and arthroscopic meniscal repair has no influence on the failure rate. Differences in survival rate of meniscal repair are more dependent on location of the lesion and ACL status, rather than chronicity of injury.

  10. Tough, but Where's the Love?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coussey, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Every government wants to appear to be tough on asylum seekers. But in failing to offer newcomers immediate access to English language learning one runs the risk of missing out on significant economic and social cohesion benefits. In this article, the author argues that asylum seekers need to get English language support in their first six months…

  11. iTOUGH2 Command Reference

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, Stefan

    2002-06-18

    iTOUGH2 is a program for parameter estimation, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty propagation analysis. It is based on the TOUGH2 simulator for non-isothermal multiphase flow in fractured and porous media. This report contains a detailed description of all iTOUGH2 commands.

  12. iTOUGH2 Sample Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, Stefan

    2002-06-18

    iTOUGH2 is a program for parameter estimation, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty propagation analysis. It is based on the TOUGH2 simulator for non-isothermal multiphase flow in fractured and porous media. This report contains a collection of iTOUGH2 sample problems.

  13. Improving the toughness of ultrahigh strength steel

    SciTech Connect

    Soto, Koji

    2002-08-15

    The ideal structural steel combines high strength with high fracture toughness. This dissertation discusses the toughening mechanism of the Fe/Co/Ni/Cr/Mo/C steel, AerMet 100, which has the highest toughness/strength combination among all commercial ultrahigh strength steels. The possibility of improving the toughness of this steel was examined by considering several relevant factors.

  14. Time preference and its relationship with age, health, and survival probability

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Li-Wei; Szrek, Helena; Pereira, Nuno Sousa; Pauly, Mark V.

    2009-01-01

    Although theories from economics and evolutionary biology predict that one's age, health, and survival probability should be associated with one's subjective discount rate (SDR), few studies have empirically tested for these links. Our study analyzes in detail how the SDR is related to age, health, and survival probability, by surveying a sample of individuals in townships around Durban, South Africa. In contrast to previous studies, we find that age is not significantly related to the SDR, but both physical health and survival expectations have a U-shaped relationship with the SDR. Individuals in very poor health have high discount rates, and those in very good health also have high discount rates. Similarly, those with expected survival probability on the extremes have high discount rates. Therefore, health and survival probability, and not age, seem to be predictors of one's SDR in an area of the world with high morbidity and mortality. PMID:20376300

  15. Growing up tough: Comparing the effects of food toughness on juvenile feeding in Sapajus libidinosus and Trachypithecus phayrei crepusculus.

    PubMed

    Chalk-Wilayto, Janine; Ossi-Lupo, Kerry; Raguet-Schofield, Melissa

    2016-09-01

    Studies of primate feeding ontogeny provide equivocal support for reduced juvenile proficiency. When immatures exhibit decreased feeding competency, these differences are attributed to a spectrum of experience- and strength-related constraints and are often linked to qualitative assessments of food difficulty. However, few have investigated age-related differences in feeding ability relative to mechanical property variation across the diet, both within and among food types. In this study, we combined dietary toughness and feeding behavior data collected in the wild from cross-sectional samples of two primate taxa, Sapajus libidinosus and Trachypithecus phayrei crepusculus, to test the prediction that small-bodied juveniles are less efficient at processing tough foods than adults. We defined feeding efficiency as the time spent to ingest and masticate one food item (item bout length) and quantified the toughness and size of foods processed during those feeding bouts. To make the datasets comparable, we limited the dataset to foods processed by more than one age class and opened without tools. The overall toughness of foods processed by both species overlapped considerably, and juveniles and adults in both taxa processed foods of comparable toughness. Feeding efficiency decreased in response to increasing food toughness in leaf monkeys and in response to food size in both taxa. Age was found to be a significant predictor of bout length in leaf monkeys, but not in bearded capuchins. Juvenile S. libidinosus processed smaller fruits than adults, suggesting they employ behavioral strategies to mitigate the effect of consuming large (and occasionally large and tough) foods. We suggest future intra- and interspecific research of juvenile feeding competency utilize intake rates scaled by food size and geometry, as well as by detailed measures of feeding time (e.g., ingestion vs. mastication), in addition to food mechanical properties to facilitate comparisons across

  16. Growing up tough: Comparing the effects of food toughness on juvenile feeding in Sapajus libidinosus and Trachypithecus phayrei crepusculus.

    PubMed

    Chalk-Wilayto, Janine; Ossi-Lupo, Kerry; Raguet-Schofield, Melissa

    2016-09-01

    Studies of primate feeding ontogeny provide equivocal support for reduced juvenile proficiency. When immatures exhibit decreased feeding competency, these differences are attributed to a spectrum of experience- and strength-related constraints and are often linked to qualitative assessments of food difficulty. However, few have investigated age-related differences in feeding ability relative to mechanical property variation across the diet, both within and among food types. In this study, we combined dietary toughness and feeding behavior data collected in the wild from cross-sectional samples of two primate taxa, Sapajus libidinosus and Trachypithecus phayrei crepusculus, to test the prediction that small-bodied juveniles are less efficient at processing tough foods than adults. We defined feeding efficiency as the time spent to ingest and masticate one food item (item bout length) and quantified the toughness and size of foods processed during those feeding bouts. To make the datasets comparable, we limited the dataset to foods processed by more than one age class and opened without tools. The overall toughness of foods processed by both species overlapped considerably, and juveniles and adults in both taxa processed foods of comparable toughness. Feeding efficiency decreased in response to increasing food toughness in leaf monkeys and in response to food size in both taxa. Age was found to be a significant predictor of bout length in leaf monkeys, but not in bearded capuchins. Juvenile S. libidinosus processed smaller fruits than adults, suggesting they employ behavioral strategies to mitigate the effect of consuming large (and occasionally large and tough) foods. We suggest future intra- and interspecific research of juvenile feeding competency utilize intake rates scaled by food size and geometry, as well as by detailed measures of feeding time (e.g., ingestion vs. mastication), in addition to food mechanical properties to facilitate comparisons across

  17. Toughness of fiber reinforced shotcrete

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, D.R.; Chen, L.; Beaupre, D.

    1995-12-31

    Fibers are added to shotcrete to improve energy absorption and impact resistance, to provide crack resistance and crack control, and to provide apparent ductility, i.e., an ability to continue to carry load after the shotcrete matrix has cracked. In order to be able to quantify the benefits of fiber addition, a variety of different toughness measuring systems have been developed in different countries. Most commonly used are flexural toughness systems which determine load vs. deflection responses and relate the area under the curve to some absolute or dimensionless index energy parameter. In North America the ASTM C1018 test method is most commonly used. In Japan the JSCE-SF4 test procedure is used. A variety of procedures have been used in Europe, but the template approach of the Norwegian Guidelines NBP No. 7, seems to be finding favor. This paper briefly assesses the relative advantages and disadvantages of the various methods of characterizing toughness. It then provides recommendations for a new procedure which uses the ASTM C1018 test method for generating the flexural load vs. deflection curve, but analyzes the data using a modified version of the Norwegian template approach. The load vs. deflection curve is directly compared against four residual strength curves and the fiber reinforced shotcrete assigned one of four toughness performance levels. It is believed that this new procedure should provide suitable within and between laboratory reproducibility and be more suitable for purposes of differentiating between different fiber types and addition rates and specifying toughness for fiber reinforced shotcrete products than any of the existing methods.

  18. Survival times of meter-sized rock boulders on the surface of airless bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilevsky, A. T.; Head, J. W.; Horz, F.; Ramsley, K.

    2015-11-01

    Rock boulders are typical features of the surfaces of many airless bodies, so the possibility of estimating their potential survival times may provide insights into the rates of surface-modification processes. As an opening point of this study we employ estimates of the survival times of meter-sized boulders on the surface of the Moon based on analysis of the spatial density of boulders on the rims of small lunar craters of known absolute age (Basilevsky et al., 2013), and apply them, with necessary corrections, to boulders on other bodies. In this approach the major factor of rock destruction is considered to be impacts of meteorites. However another factor of the rock destruction, thermal fatigue due to day-night cycling, does exist and it was claimed by Delbo et al. (2014) as being more important than meteorite impacts. They concluded this on the basis of known presence of fine material on the surface of small asteroids, claiming that due to extremely low gravity on those bodies, the products of meteorite bombardment should leave these bodies, and thus their presence indicates that the process of thermal fatigue should be much more effective there. Delbo et al. (2014) made laboratory experiments on heating-cooling centimeter-sized samples of chondrites and, applying some assumptions and theoretical modeling concluded that, for example, at 1 AU distance from the Sun, the lifetime of 10 cm rock fragments on asteroids with period of rotation from 2.2 to 6 h should be only ~103 to 104 years (that is ~3.5×106 to 1.5×107 thermal cycles) and the larger the rock, the faster it should be destroyed. In response to those conclusions we assessed the results of earlier laboratory experiments, which show that only a part of comminuted material produced by high-velocity impacts into solid rocks is ejected from the crater while another part is not ejected but stays exposed on the target surface and is present in its subsurface. This means that the presence of

  19. Dietary magnesium and copper affect survival time and neuroinflammation in chronic wasting disease.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Tracy A; Spraker, Terry R; Gidlewski, Thomas; Cummings, Bruce; Hill, Dana; Kong, Qingzhong; Balachandran, Aru; VerCauteren, Kurt C; Zabel, Mark D

    2016-05-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD), the only known wildlife prion disease, affects deer, elk and moose. The disease is an ongoing and expanding problem in both wild and captive North American cervid populations and is difficult to control in part due to the extreme environmental persistence of prions, which can transmit disease years after initial contamination. The role of exogenous factors in CWD transmission and progression is largely unexplored. In an effort to understand the influence of environmental and dietary constituents on CWD, we collected and analyzed water and soil samples from CWD-negative and positive captive cervid facilities, as well as from wild CWD-endozootic areas. Our analysis revealed that, when compared with CWD-positive sites, CWD-negative sites had a significantly higher concentration of magnesium, and a higher magnesium/copper (Mg/Cu) ratio in the water than that from CWD-positive sites. When cevidized transgenic mice were fed a custom diet devoid of Mg and Cu and drinking water with varied Mg/Cu ratios, we found that higher Mg/Cu ratio resulted in significantly longer survival times after intracerebral CWD inoculation. We also detected reduced levels of inflammatory cytokine gene expression in mice fed a modified diet with a higher Mg/Cu ratio compared to those on a standard rodent diet. These findings indicate a role for dietary Mg and Cu in CWD pathogenesis through modulating inflammation in the brain.

  20. Constraining Disk Survival Times using the Statistical Properties of Proplyds in the Orion Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretke, K. A.; Bally, J.

    2003-12-01

    The Orion Nebula, one of the closest and richest star forming regions, is an ideal laboratory for observing young stars. We perform a statistical study of the stars in this region, comparing photometric and spectroscopic data collected by Hillenbrand (1997) with images obtained using the Hubble Space Telescope collected by O'Dell and Wong (1996), Bally et. al. (2000), and new velocity-resolved Fabry-Perot data cubes that trace jets and outflows. We explore the relationships between stellar age and proplyd characteristics such as externally ionized structure and size and the presence or absence of outflows. Theoretical models predict that external photoevaporation will disperse minimum solar nebula circumstellar disks within 105 years. However, we identify objects that challenge this model as the central stars embedded in several proplyds have ages greater than half a million years. We place new constraints on the survival times of circumstellar disks in the Orion nebula based on the ages of their central stars. This research is supported by NASA grants GO8324, GO9125, and NCC2-1052 (Astrobiology).

  1. Does status of attachment influence survival time of zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha, exposed to chlorination?

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Sanjeevi; Van Der Velde, Gerard; Jenner, Henk A

    2002-02-01

    Mussels colonize cooling water circuits of power stations by attaching themselves to the pipe or conduit walls using byssus threads. Once manually detached, they quickly try to reattach by producing new byssus threads. In many published reports on antifouling bioassays, the test specimens are exposed to the biocide in an unattached state. These mussels, while trying to reattach, are likely to expose themselves more frequently to the toxic compound when compared to firmly attached mussels. The results of the assay, therefore, could vary, depending on the status of the mussels used. In this paper, we test the hypothesis that the status of attachment could influence the toxicity response of mussels and show that byssally attached zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha (Pallas), is more resistant to chlorine than unattached ones. An average increase of 27% in the survival time was observed for attached mussels over unattached ones in the chlorine concentration range of 0.25 to 3 mg/L. It is conclusively shown that the increase in sensitivity of the unattached mussels was related to an increase in the byssal activity, quantified presently as the byssogenesis index. The results indicate that future laboratory toxicity experiments involving mussels should be carried out using byssally attached ones.

  2. Dietary magnesium and copper affect survival time and neuroinflammation in chronic wasting disease

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Tracy A.; Spraker, Terry R.; Gidlewski, Thomas; Cummings, Bruce; Hill, Dana; Kong, Qingzhong; Balachandran, Aru; VerCauteren, Kurt C.; Zabel, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chronic wasting disease (CWD), the only known wildlife prion disease, affects deer, elk and moose. The disease is an ongoing and expanding problem in both wild and captive North American cervid populations and is difficult to control in part due to the extreme environmental persistence of prions, which can transmit disease years after initial contamination. The role of exogenous factors in CWD transmission and progression is largely unexplored. In an effort to understand the influence of environmental and dietary constituents on CWD, we collected and analyzed water and soil samples from CWD-negative and positive captive cervid facilities, as well as from wild CWD-endozootic areas. Our analysis revealed that, when compared with CWD-positive sites, CWD-negative sites had a significantly higher concentration of magnesium, and a higher magnesium/copper (Mg/Cu) ratio in the water than that from CWD-positive sites. When cevidized transgenic mice were fed a custom diet devoid of Mg and Cu and drinking water with varied Mg/Cu ratios, we found that higher Mg/Cu ratio resulted in significantly longer survival times after intracerebral CWD inoculation. We also detected reduced levels of inflammatory cytokine gene expression in mice fed a modified diet with a higher Mg/Cu ratio compared to those on a standard rodent diet. These findings indicate a role for dietary Mg and Cu in CWD pathogenesis through modulating inflammation in the brain. PMID:27216881

  3. Dietary magnesium and copper affect survival time and neuroinflammation in chronic wasting disease.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Tracy A; Spraker, Terry R; Gidlewski, Thomas; Cummings, Bruce; Hill, Dana; Kong, Qingzhong; Balachandran, Aru; VerCauteren, Kurt C; Zabel, Mark D

    2016-05-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD), the only known wildlife prion disease, affects deer, elk and moose. The disease is an ongoing and expanding problem in both wild and captive North American cervid populations and is difficult to control in part due to the extreme environmental persistence of prions, which can transmit disease years after initial contamination. The role of exogenous factors in CWD transmission and progression is largely unexplored. In an effort to understand the influence of environmental and dietary constituents on CWD, we collected and analyzed water and soil samples from CWD-negative and positive captive cervid facilities, as well as from wild CWD-endozootic areas. Our analysis revealed that, when compared with CWD-positive sites, CWD-negative sites had a significantly higher concentration of magnesium, and a higher magnesium/copper (Mg/Cu) ratio in the water than that from CWD-positive sites. When cevidized transgenic mice were fed a custom diet devoid of Mg and Cu and drinking water with varied Mg/Cu ratios, we found that higher Mg/Cu ratio resulted in significantly longer survival times after intracerebral CWD inoculation. We also detected reduced levels of inflammatory cytokine gene expression in mice fed a modified diet with a higher Mg/Cu ratio compared to those on a standard rodent diet. These findings indicate a role for dietary Mg and Cu in CWD pathogenesis through modulating inflammation in the brain. PMID:27216881

  4. High-toughness graphite/epoxy composite material experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felbeck, David K.

    1993-01-01

    This experiment was designed to measure the effect of near-earth space exposure on three mechanical properties of specially toughened 5208/T300 graphite/epoxy composite materials. The properties measured are elastic modulus, strength, and fracture toughness. Six toughness specimens and nine tensile specimens were mounted on an external frame during the 5.8-year orbit of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Three identical sets of specimens were manufactured at the outset: the flight set, a zero-time non-flight set, and a total-time non-flight set.

  5. A dynamic Bayesian network approach for time-specific survival probability prediction in patients after ventricular assist device implantation.

    PubMed

    Exarchos, Themis P; Rigas, George; Goletsis, Yorgos; Stefanou, Kostas; Jacobs, Steven; Trivella, Maria-Giovanna; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present a decision support tool for the calculation of time-dependent survival probability for patients after ventricular assist device implantation. Two different models have been developed, a short term one which predicts survival for the first three months and a long term one that predicts survival for one year after implantation. In order to model the time dependencies between the different time slices of the problem, a dynamic Bayesian network (DBN) approach has been employed. DBNs order to capture the temporal events of the patient disease and the temporal data availability. High accuracy results have been reported for both models. The short and long term DBNs reached an accuracy of 96.97% and 93.55% respectively. PMID:25570664

  6. Correlation of Biological Characteristics of Smolts with Survival and Travel Time, 1987 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rondorf, Dennis W.; Beeman, John W.; Free, Mary E.

    1988-06-01

    The biological characteristics of smolts were examined to determine their effect on estimates of survival in the Columbia and Snake rivers. Freeze branded groups of steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri) from Lyons Ferry State Fish Hatchery (SFH) and Wells SFH and spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) from Winthrop National Fish Hatchery (NFH) were used to estimate survival. Past estimates of survival, using a ratio of test and control fish recaptured at McNary Dam, have resulted in estimates > 100%, presumably due to some unknown bias. Study objectives were to determine if stress and descaling, degree of smoltification, and prevalence of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) differed among test and control groups of fish, thereby biasing survival estimates. 19 refs., 20 figs., 10 tabs.

  7. Ultrasonic ranking of toughness of tungsten carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Hull, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using ultrasonic attenuation measurements to rank tungsten carbide alloys according to their fracture toughness was demonstrated. Six samples of cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) were examined. These varied in cobalt content from approximately 2 to 16 weight percent. The toughness generally increased with increasing cobalt content. Toughness was first determined by the Palmqvist and short rod fracture toughness tests. Subsequently, ultrasonic attenuation measurements were correlated with both these mechanical test methods. It is shown that there is a strong increase in ultrasonic attenuation corresponding to increased toughness of the WC-Co alloys. A correlation between attenuation and toughness exists for a wide range of ultrasonic frequencies. However, the best correlation for the WC-Co alloys occurs when the attenuation coefficient measured in the vicinity of 100 megahertz is compared with toughness as determined by the Palmqvist technique.

  8. Flow cytometric and radioisotopic determinations of platelet survival time in normal cats and feline leukemia virus-infected cats

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, R.M.; Boyce, J.T.; Kociba, G.J.

    1986-01-01

    This study demonstrates the potential usefulness of a flow cytometric technique to measure platelet survival time in cats utilizing autologous platelets labeled in vitro with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). When compared with a 51Cr method, no significant differences in estimated survival times were found. Both the 51Cr and FITC-labeling procedures induced similar changes in platelet shape and collagen-induced aggregation. Platelets labeled with FITC had significantly greater volumes compared with those of glutaraldehyde-fixed platelets. These changes were primarily related to the platelet centrifugation and washing procedures rather than the labels themselves. This novel technique potentially has wide applicability to cell circulation time studies as flow cytometry equipment becomes more readily available. Problems with the technique are discussed. In a preliminary study of the platelet survival time in feline leukemia virus (FeLV)-infected cats, two of three cats had significantly reduced survival times using both flow cytometric and radioisotopic methods. These data suggest increased platelet turnover in FeLV-infected cats.

  9. Collagen IV-Modified Scaffolds Improve Islet Survival and Function and Reduce Time to Euglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Woon Teck; Salvay, David M.; Silliman, Michael A.; Zhang, Xiaomin; Bannon, Zachary G.; Kaufman, Dixon B.; Lowe, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Islet transplantation on extracellular matrix (ECM) protein-modified biodegradable microporous poly(lactide-co-glycolide) scaffolds is a potential curative treatment for type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Collagen IV-modified scaffolds, relative to control scaffolds, significantly decreased the time required to restore euglycemia from 17 to 3 days. We investigated the processes by which collagen IV-modified scaffolds enhanced islet function and mediated early restoration of euglycemia post-transplantation. We characterized the effect of collagen IV-modified scaffolds on islet survival, metabolism, and insulin secretion in vitro and early- and intermediate-term islet mass and vascular density post-transplantation and correlated these with early restoration of euglycemia in a syngeneic mouse model. Control scaffolds maintained native islet morphologies and architectures as well as collagen IV-modified scaffolds in vivo. The islet size and vascular density increased, while β-cell proliferation decreased from day 16 to 113 post-transplantation. Collagen IV-modified scaffolds promoted islet cell viability and decreased early-stage apoptosis in islet cells in vitro—phenomena that coincided with enhanced islet metabolic function and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. These findings suggest that collagen IV-modified scaffolds promote the early restoration of euglycemia post-transplantation by enhancing islet metabolism and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. These studies of ECM proteins, in particular collagen IV, and islet function provide key insights for the engineering of a microenvironment that would serve as a platform for enhancing islet transplantation as a viable clinical therapy for T1DM. PMID:23713524

  10. Analysis of individual- and time-specific covariate effects on survival of Serinus serinus in north-eastern Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conroy, M.J.; Senar, J.C.; Domenech, J.

    2002-01-01

    We developed models for the analysis of recapture data for 2678 serins (Serinus serinus) ringed in north-eastern Spain since 1985. We investigated several time- and individual-specific factors as potential predictors of overall mortality and dispersal patterns, and of gender and age differences in these patterns. Time-specific covariates included minimum daily temperature, days below freezing, and abundance of a strong competitor, siskins (Carduelis spinus) during winter, and maximum temperature and rainfall during summer. Individual covariates included body mass (i.e. body condition), and wing length (i.e. flying ability), and interactions between body mass and environmental factors. We found little support of a predictive relationship between environmental factors and survival, but good evidence of relationships between body mass and survival, especially for juveniles. Juvenile survival appears to vary in a curvilinear manner with increasing mass, suggesting that there may exist an optimal mass beyond which increases are detrimental. The mass-survival relationship does seem to be influenced by at least one environmental factor, namely the abundance of wintering siskins. When siskins are abundant, increases in body mass appear to relate strongly to increasing survival. When siskin numbers are average or low the relationship is largely reversed, suggesting that the presence of strong competition mitigates the otherwise largely negative aspects of greater body mass. Wing length in juveniles also appears to be related positively to survival, perhaps largely due to the influence of a few unusually large juveniles with adult-like survival. Further work is needed to test these relationships, ideally under experimentation.

  11. Determine the Influence of Time Held in “Knockdown” Anesthesia on Survival and Stress of Surgically Implanted Juvenile Salmonids

    SciTech Connect

    Woodley, Christa M.; Wagner, Katie A.; Knox, Kasey M.

    2012-01-31

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed for the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers Portland District (USACE) to address questions related to survival and performance measures of juvenile salmonids as they pass through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). Researchers using JSATS acoustic transmitters (ATs) were tasked with standardizing the surgical implantation procedure to ensure that the stressors of handling and surgery on salmonids were consistent and less likely to cause effects of tagging in survival studies. Researchers questioned whether the exposure time in 'knockdown' anesthesia (or induction) to prepare fish for surgery could influence the survival of study fish (CBSPSC 2011). Currently, fish are held in knockdown anesthesia after they reach Stage 4 anesthesia until the completion of the surgical implantation of a transmitter, varies from 5 to 15 minutes for studies conducted in the Columbia Basin. The Columbia Basin Surgical Protocol Steering Committee (CBSPSC ) expressed concern that its currently recommended 10-minute maximum time limit during which fish are held in anesthetic - tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222, 80 mg L-1 water) - could increase behavioral and physiological costs, and/or decrease survival of outmigrating juvenile salmonids. In addition, the variability in the time fish are held at Stage 4 could affect the data intended for direct comparison of fish within or among survival studies. Under the current recommended protocol, if fish exceed the 10-minute time limit, they are to be released without surgical implantation, thereby increasing the number of fish handled and endangered species 'take' at the bypass systems for FCRPS survival studies.

  12. Tough, Soluble, Aromatic, Thermoplastic Copolyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Tough, soluble, aromatic, thermoplastic copolyimides were prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride, 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,4'-oxydianiline. These copolyimides were found to be soluble in common amide solvents such as N,N'-dimethyl acetamide, N-methylpyrrolidinone, and dimethylformamide allowing them to be applied as the fully imidized copolymer and to be used to prepare a wide range of articles.

  13. The interlaminar fracture toughness of woven graphite/epoxy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Joan G.; Deaton, Jerry W.

    1989-01-01

    The interlaminar fracture toughness of 2-D graphite/epoxy woven composites was determined as a function of stacking sequence, thickness, and weave pattern. Plain, oxford, 5-harness satin, and 8-harness satin weaves of T300/934 material were evaluated by the double cantilever beam test. The fabric material had a G (sub Ic) ranging from 2 to 8 times greater than 0 degrees unidirectional T300/934 tape material. The interlaminar fracture toughness of a particular weave style was dependent on whether the stacking sequence was symmetric or asymmetric and, in some cases, on the fabric orientation.

  14. Time to Thrive, Not Just Survive: Accumulating Advantage for Women in Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolison, Debra

    2005-04-01

    Our departments of science, technology, mathematics, and engineering (STEM) need more women as faculty, and not only to show their undergraduates that a career in academia is a viable path. Their absence warns us that an unhealthy environment exists: unhealthy to those scientists who want fulfilling lives beyond academe and unhealthy to those women, who once they demonstrate productivity, scholarship, and mentorship, still reap less respect, space, salary, funding, and awards than their male colleagues. The recalcitrance of too many of our research universities toward diversifying their faculty is a national disgrace in that these universities covet a diversified student body, but do not reflect that pool of talent onto their faculty. Similar difficulties are apparent among the staff of National and Federal laboratories. Self-reform is not getting it done, and is especially frustrating in light of the historic opportunity to change the demographics as scientists and engineers hired in the 1960s retire. Is it time to apply the logic of Title IX--the loss of Federal funds--for the entrenched inability to increase the number of women represented on STEM faculties? Such a threat may be the impetus necessary for university administrators to create departmental environments that women are willing to call home. The July 2004 release of the GAO report on Women's Participation in the Sciences (which also surveyed DOE facilities) reminded those Federal agencies that fund scientific research that Title IX is the law and that these agencies must begin Title IX assessments of compliance in the STEM departments and institutions they fund. It is past time that women thrive, not just survive in their career homes. Using the mechanistic philosophy of Title IX--denial of resources to recalacitrant departments and laboratories--may be the start of a truly inclusive scientific enterprise in the United States. We must accept this opportunity to redirect the nature of the research

  15. Perceived Peer Behavior and the Timing of Sexual Debut in Rwanda: A Survival Analysis of Youth Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babalola, Stella

    2004-01-01

    This paper uses survival methods to assess the relationship between perceived peer behavior and the timing of first sex among Rwandan youth. The data derive from a 2001 survey among youth aged 15-24 years in four provinces: Kigali Ville, Butare, Kibuye, and Umutara. A total of 1327 male and female youth were interviewed through a structured…

  16. Tough Like Metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Under an SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) with Lewis Research Center, Advanced Ceramics Corporation developed a family of high temperature and doped boron nitride coating that offer improvement in interface durability of SiC/SiC composites. The new materials are 1,000 times more durable and greatly extend composite lifetimes. The development of this was commercialized with assistance from Lewis and Advanced Ceramic's own money and is supplying several composites manufacturers with new interface coating from an expanded in-line tow coating facility.

  17. The influence of zinc chloride and zinc oxide nanoparticles on air-time survival in freshwater mussels.

    PubMed

    Gagné, François; Auclair, Joëlle; Peyrot, Caroline; Wilkinson, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the cumulative effects of exposure to either dissolved zinc or nanozinc oxide (nanoZnO) and air-time survival in freshwater mussels. Mussels were exposed to each forms of zinc for 96h then placed in air to determine survival time. A sub-group of mussels before and after 7days of exposure to air were kept aside for the determination of the following biomarkers: arachidonate-dependent cyclooxygenase (COX) and peroxidase (inflammation and oxidative stress), lipid metabolism (total lipids, esterases activity, HO-glycerol, acetyl CoA and phospholipase A2) and lipid damage (lipid peroxidation [LPO]). The results showed that air-time survival was decreased from a mean value of 18.5days to a mean value of 12days in mussels exposed to 2.5mg/L of nanoZnO although it was not lethal based on shell opening at concentrations below 50mg/L after 96h. In mussels exposed to zinc only, the median lethal concentration was estimated at 16mg/L (10-25 95% CI). The air-time survival did not significantly change in mussels exposed to the same concentration of dissolved Zn. Significant weight losses were observed at 0.5mg/L of nanoZnO and at 2.5mg/L for dissolved zinc chloride, and were also significantly correlated with air-time survival (r=0.53; p<0.01). Air exposure significantly increased COX activity in control mussels and in mussels exposed to 0.5mg/L of nanoZnO and zinc chloride. The data also suggested fatty acid breakdown and β-oxidation. Mussels exposed to contaminants are more susceptible to prolonged exposure to air during low water levels.

  18. In a Tough Economy, Charlotte Makes a Play for Football

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Libby

    2008-01-01

    Despite tough economic times, the University of North Carolina at Charlotte hopes to win trustees' approval to raise funds to field a Division I-AA football team. Athletics officials and supporters at Charlotte are hopeful that they will raise the more than $45-million in capital expenses necessary to get the program up and running. However, the…

  19. Mentally Tough: The Power To Do Your Best.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Peter J.; And Others

    The principles of Mentally Tough were developed to help professional athletes to do their best each time they went out to play. This book brings these strategies to junior and senior high school students. The exercises and activities are intended to teach students how to control their energy level and emotional states so they can always perform…

  20. Fracture toughness testing of polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.

    1992-01-01

    A review of the interlaminar fracture indicates that a standard specimen geometry is needed to obtain consistent fracture toughness measurements in polymer matrix composites. In general, the variability of measured toughness values increases as the toughness of the material increases. This variability could be caused by incorrect sizing of test specimens and/or inconsistent data reduction procedures. A standard data reduction procedure is therefore needed as well, particularly for the tougher materials. Little work has been reported on the effects of fiber orientation, fiber architecture, fiber surface treatment or interlaminar fracture toughness, and the mechanisms by which the fibers increase fracture toughness are not well understood. The little data that is available indicates that woven fiber reinforcement and fiber sizings can significantly increase interlaminar fracture toughness.

  1. E-Resources in Tough Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Librarians must get the most for their money and look to technology for new solutions. Several respondents think poor budgets mean more reliance on online databases and electronic full texts with less purchase of print. Companies that produce both media are likely to continue as long as there is a market for both, but they are gearing up for the…

  2. Managing board relationships in tough times.

    PubMed

    Commins, Kimberly; Render, John

    2003-01-01

    Scandals have dominated newspaper headlines, bringing corporate directors under increasing scrutiny. These issues continue to elicit public outrage about wrongdoing and ultimately resulted in standards for for-profit corporate board members through the enactment of the Sarbanes Oxley Act in 2002. Although all board members must address corporate responsibility issues, directors of health care organizations also have responsibilities unique to the health care industry that must be met in relation to corporate compliance requirements.

  3. How to keep cool in tough times.

    PubMed

    Muller-Smith, P

    1999-02-01

    Reengineering is no longer an event that has a beginning and an end. It is an ongoing process of change that continues to occur in all types of businesses. Because there is no longer the sense of security that doing a job well will guarantee continued employment, workers have to approach career planning from a different perspective. Moving up the career ladder in a single organization can no longer serve as the benchmark of success. The contemporary approach to success will be more geared toward the ability to constantly reinvent your unique set of job skills that are transferable from one job setting to another, thus ensuring employability.

  4. Raising Resilient Children during Tough Economic Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tom, A.; Yuen, S.; Fong, G.; Nemoto, M.; Hisatake, T.; Choy, A.; Chang, W.

    2009-01-01

    Financial hardship can result from many different circumstances--a poor economy, the loss of a job, underemployment, the prolonged illness of a family member, divorce, poor money management, or a combination of several factors. Whatever the cause, the resulting impact on a family can be stressful for all members, including children. Stress from…

  5. 1970s: Camping in Tough Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camping Magazine, 1999

    1999-01-01

    In the 1970s, camps were challenged by economic recession, growing administrative demands, and changing attitudes and interests of campers and staff. An illustrative article from 1972, "Facing the Camping Future with Confidence" (Michael F. Buynak), discusses hidden costs in camp operation and the need for camp administration to shift from…

  6. University Technology Transfer: In Tough Economic Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Joshua B.; Campbell, Eric G.

    2009-01-01

    In 1907, Frederick Cottrell, professor of chemistry at the University of California-Berkeley and father of the modern academic patent, worried that if universities became too directly involved in patenting and licensing operations, their thirst for profits could lead to the erosion of the openness necessary for academic science to flourish. For…

  7. Staying True?: Progressive Leadership in Tough Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pignatelli, Frank

    2012-01-01

    A system of accountability in public schools predicated upon standardized testing accompanied by high-stakes consequences for leaders, as well as teachers and students, has posed a daunting challenge to educational leaders who align themselves with core tenets of progressive education. This essay explores what it might mean--and take--to stay true…

  8. Multi-scale Multi-mechanism Design of Tough Hydrogels: Building Dissipation into Stretchy Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuanhe

    2014-01-01

    As swollen polymer networks in water, hydrogels are usually brittle. However, hydrogels with high toughness play critical roles in many plant and animal tissues as well as in diverse engineering applications. Here we review the intrinsic mechanisms of a wide variety of tough hydrogels developed over past few decades. We show that tough hydrogels generally possess mechanisms to dissipate substantial mechanical energy but still maintain high elasticity under deformation. The integrations and interactions of different mechanisms for dissipating energy and maintaining elasticity are essential to the design of tough hydrogels. A matrix that combines various mechanisms is constructed for the first time to guide the design of next-generation tough hydrogels. We further highlight that a particularly promising strategy for the design is to implement multiple mechanisms across multiple length scales into nano-, micro-, meso-, and macro-structures of hydrogels. PMID:24834901

  9. Time-trends on incidence and survival in a nationwide and unselected cohort of patients with skeletal osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Johannesen, Tom B⊘rge; Berner, Aasmund; Haugland, Hans Kristian; Bjerkehagen, Bodil; B⊘hler, Per J.; Bruland, Øyvind S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background This study describes time-trends on epidemiology, subtypes and histopathological entities of osteosarcoma (OS) in a nationwide and unselected cohort of OS patients in Norway between 1975 and 2009. Few nationwide studies are published, and we still have particularly limited knowledge regarding patients not included in clinical trials comprising about half of the OS population. Method Histologically verified skeletal OS for all subgroups were included, resulting in 473 eligible cases from a total of 702 evaluated patients. To ensure completeness, the present cohort was based on all cases reported to the Norwegian Cancer Registry, complemented with data from all Norwegian hospitals involved in sarcoma management. Survival analyses were performed with overall and sarcoma-specific survival as endpoints. Results Mean annual age-standard incidence amounted to about 3.8 per million in male and 2.8 per million in female with no clear time-trends. The male to female ratio was 1.4. Peak incidence was observed in the second decade for both genders. Conventional OS comprised 71.2% of all cases, while low grade OS represented 10.4% and telangiectatic OS only 1.3%. The most common primary site of OS was femur and tibia, respectively. The axial to appendicular ratio increased with the age. The overall 10-year survival did increase from about 30% during the late 1970s to around 50% 20 years later, with no subsequent improvement during the last two decades. Axial tumours, age above 40 years and overt metastatic disease at time of diagnosis were all negative prognostic factors. Conclusion No improvement in the overall survival for OS since the 1990s was documented. The survival rates are still poor for elderly people, patients with axial disease and in the primary metastatic setting. The average incidence rate of skeletal OS in Norway was in line with international figures. PMID:24957555

  10. Mental toughness in sport: motivational antecedents and associations with performance and psychological health.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, John W; Gucciardi, Daniel F; Ntoumanis, Nikos; Mallett, Cliff J; Mallet, Cliff J

    2014-06-01

    We argue that basic psychological needs theory (BPNT) offers impetus to the value of mental toughness as a mechanism for optimizing human functioning. We hypothesized that psychological needs satisfaction (thwarting) would be associated with higher (lower) levels of mental toughness, positive affect, and performance and lower (higher) levels of negative affect. We also expected that mental toughness would be associated with higher levels of positive affect and performance and lower levels of negative affect. Further, we predicted that coaching environments would be related to mental toughness indirectly through psychological needs and that psychological needs would indirectly relate with performance and affect through mental toughness. Adolescent cross-country runners (136 male and 85 female, M(age) = 14.36) completed questionnaires pertaining to BPNT variables, mental toughness, and affect. Race times were also collected. Our findings supported our hypotheses. We concluded that BPNT is generative in understanding some of the antecedents and consequences of mental toughness and is a novel framework useful for understanding mental toughness.

  11. Managing hospitals in turbulent times: do organizational changes improve hospital survival?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S Y; Alexander, J A

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine (1) the degree to which organizational changes affected hospital survival; (2) whether core and peripheral organizational changes affected hospital survival differently; and (3) how simultaneous organizational changes affected hospital survival. DATA SOURCES: AHA Hospital Surveys, the Area Resource File, and the AHA Hospital Guides, Part B: Multihospital Systems. STUDY DESIGN: The study employed a longitudinal panel design. We followed changes in all community hospitals in the continental United States from 1981 through 1994. The dependent variable, hospital closure, was examined as a function of multiple changes in a hospital's core and peripheral structures as well as the hospital's organizational and environmental characteristics. Cox regression models were used to test the expectations that core changes increased closure risk while peripheral changes decreased such risk, and that simultaneous core and peripheral changes would lead to higher risk of closure. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Results indicated more peripheral than core changes in community hospitals. Overall, findings contradicted our expectations. Change in specialty, a core change, was beneficial for hospitals, because it reduced closure risk. The two most frequent peripheral changes, downsizing and leadership change, were positively associated with closure. Simultaneous organizational changes displayed a similar pattern: multiple core changes reduced closure risk, while multiple peripheral changes increased the risk. These patterns held regardless of the level of uncertainty in hospital environments. CONCLUSIONS: Organizational changes are not all beneficial for hospitals, suggesting that hospital leaders should be both cautious and selective in their efforts to turn their hospitals around. PMID:10536977

  12. Time-related survival effects of two gluconasturtiin hydrolysis products on the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber.

    PubMed

    van Ommen Kloeke, A E Elaine; Jager, Tjalling; van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Ellers, Jacintha; van Pomeren, Marinda; Krommenhoek, Thibault; Styrishave, Bjarne; Hansen, Martin; Roelofs, Dick

    2012-11-01

    Glucosinolates are compounds produced by commercial crops which can hydrolyse in a range of natural toxins that may exert detrimental effects on beneficial soil organisms. This study examined the effects of 2-phenylethyl isothiocyanate and 3-phenylpropionitrile on the survival and growth of the woodlouse Porcellio scaber exposed for 28 d. 2-Phenylethyl isothiocyanate dissipated from the soil with half-lives ranging from 19 to 96 h. Exposure through soil showed toxic effects only on survival. The LC50s after 28 d were significantly different at 65.3 mg kg(-1) for 2-phenylethyl isothiocyanate and 155 mg kg(-1) for 3-phenylpropionitrile. A toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic (TKTD) approach, however, revealed that both compounds in fact have very similar effect patterns. The TKTD model was better suited to interpret the survival data than descriptive dose-response analysis (LC(x)), accounting for the fast dissipation of the compounds in the soil. Found effects were within environmentally relevant concentrations. Care should therefore be taken before allowing these natural toxins to enter soil ecosystems in large quantities.

  13. High strength, tough alloy steel

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Gareth; Rao, Bangaru V. N.

    1979-01-01

    A high strength, tough alloy steel is formed by heating the steel to a temperature in the austenite range (1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.) to form a homogeneous austenite phase and then cooling the steel to form a microstructure of uniformly dispersed dislocated martensite separated by continuous thin boundary films of stabilized retained austenite. The steel includes 0.2-0.35 weight % carbon, at least 1% and preferably 3-4.5% chromium, and at least one other substitutional alloying element, preferably manganese or nickel. The austenite film is stable to subsequent heat treatment as by tempering (below 300.degree. C.) and reforms to a stable film after austenite grain refinement.

  14. Hydrogen fracture toughness tester completion

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Michael J.

    2015-09-30

    The Hydrogen Fracture Toughness Tester (HFTT) is a mechanical testing machine designed for conducting fracture mechanics tests on materials in high-pressure hydrogen gas. The tester is needed for evaluating the effects of hydrogen on the cracking properties of tritium reservoir materials. It consists of an Instron Model 8862 Electromechanical Test Frame; an Autoclave Engineering Pressure Vessel, an Electric Potential Drop Crack Length Measurement System, associated computer control and data acquisition systems, and a high-pressure hydrogen gas manifold and handling system.

  15. Using simulation to interpret a discrete time survival model in a complex biological system: fertility and lameness in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Christopher D; Huxley, Jonathan N; Green, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    The ever-growing volume of data routinely collected and stored in everyday life presents researchers with a number of opportunities to gain insight and make predictions. This study aimed to demonstrate the usefulness in a specific clinical context of a simulation-based technique called probabilistic sensitivity analysis (PSA) in interpreting the results of a discrete time survival model based on a large dataset of routinely collected dairy herd management data. Data from 12,515 dairy cows (from 39 herds) were used to construct a multilevel discrete time survival model in which the outcome was the probability of a cow becoming pregnant during a given two day period of risk, and presence or absence of a recorded lameness event during various time frames relative to the risk period amongst the potential explanatory variables. A separate simulation model was then constructed to evaluate the wider clinical implications of the model results (i.e. the potential for a herd's incidence rate of lameness to influence its overall reproductive performance) using PSA. Although the discrete time survival analysis revealed some relatively large associations between lameness events and risk of pregnancy (for example, occurrence of a lameness case within 14 days of a risk period was associated with a 25% reduction in the risk of the cow becoming pregnant during that risk period), PSA revealed that, when viewed in the context of a realistic clinical situation, a herd's lameness incidence rate is highly unlikely to influence its overall reproductive performance to a meaningful extent in the vast majority of situations. Construction of a simulation model within a PSA framework proved to be a very useful additional step to aid contextualisation of the results from a discrete time survival model, especially where the research is designed to guide on-farm management decisions at population (i.e. herd) rather than individual level.

  16. Migratory timing, marine survival and growth of anadromous brown trout Salmo trutta in the River Imsa, Norway.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, B; Jonsson, N

    2009-02-01

    The aim of the paper was to study sea migration, growth and survival of brown trout Salmo trutta of the River Imsa, 1976-2005. The migratory S. trutta were individually tagged and fish leaving or entering the river were monitored daily in traps located near the river mouth. The mean annual duration of the sea sojourn was 6-9 months for first-time migrants moving to sea between January and June. It was 8-18 months for those migrating to sea between July and December. Veteran migrants stayed 12 months or less at sea and most returned to the river in August. Early ascending fish stayed the longest in fresh water because most returned to sea in April to May. The day number of 50% cumulative smolt descent correlated negatively with mean water temperature in February to March and the February North Atlantic Oscillation index (NAOI). Mean annual sea growth during the first 2 years after smolting was higher for S. trutta spending the winter at sea than those wintering in the River Imsa. First year's sea growth was lower for S. trutta descending in spring than autumn. For first-time migrants, it correlated negatively with the February NAOI of the smolt year. Sea survival was higher for spring than autumn descending first-time migratory S. trutta with a maximum in May (14.9%). Number of anadromous S. trutta returning to the river increased linearly with the size of the cohort moving to sea, with no evidence of density-dependent sea mortality. Sea survival of S. trutta smolts moving to sea between January and June correlated positively both with the annual number of Atlantic Salmo salar smolts, the specific growth rate at sea, and time of seaward migration in spring. This is the first study indicating how environmental factors at the time of seaward migration influence the sea survival of S. trutta.

  17. Juvenile Passage Program : A Plan for Estimating Smolt Travel Time and Survival in the Snake and Columbia Rivers

    SciTech Connect

    Skalski, J. R.; Giorgi, Albert E.

    1993-10-01

    A plan for developing a program to evaluate juvenile salmon passage is presented that encompasses the Snake (Lower Granite to McNary Dams), Mid-Columbia (Wells to McNary Dams), and Lower Columbia (McNary to Bonneville Dams) segments of the Snake/Columbia River system. This plan focuses on the use of PIT-tag technology to routinely estimate travel times and reach survival of outmigrating yearling and subyearling Chinook, sockeye, and steelhead during spring and summer months. The proposed program outlines tagging studies that could be implemented in (a) 1992, (b) near term (1993--94), and (c) long term (1995 to the next decade). The evolution of this program over time parallels plans to establish additional PIT-tag detector and slide-gate systems at Little Goose, Lower Monumental, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams. The eventual ability to concurrently estimate travel time and survival of release groups will permit evaluation of travel time-survival-flow relationships and identify possible mortality {open_quotes}hot spots{close_quotes} for remediation.

  18. Cyclicality, Mortality, and the Value of Time: The Case of Coffee Price Fluctuations and Child Survival in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Grant; Urdinola, B. Piedad

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrate procyclical mortality in wealthy countries, but there are reasons to expect a countercyclical relationship in developing nations. We investigate how child survival in Colombia responds to fluctuations in world Arabica coffee prices – and document starkly procyclical child deaths. In studying this result’s behavioral underpinnings, we highlight that: (1) The leading determinants of child health are inexpensive but require considerable time, and (2) As the value of time declines with falling coffee prices, so does the relative price of health. We find a variety of direct evidence consistent with the primacy of time in child health production. PMID:22090662

  19. Effects of flavorings, storage conditions, and storage time on survival of Staphylococcus aureus in Sürk cheese.

    PubMed

    Masatcioğlu, Tuğrul M; Avşar, Yahya K

    2005-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the cumulative effects of flavorings (chili pepper, thyme, mint, cumin, nutmeg, allspice, clove, cinnamon, black pepper, salt, and hot red pepper paste), storage conditions, and storage time on the survival of Staphylococcus aureus in Sürk cheese and to monitor the associated chemical changes. Sürk cheese, a traditional Turkish cheese, was produced by heating diluted nonfat yogurt and adding flavorings to the resultant acid-heat curd. The cheese was later inoculated with S. aureus, shaped conically, and stored aerobically for mold growth and anaerobically in olive oil for 30 days at room temperature. The moisture content of aerobically stored cheese decreased over time and led to increases in total solids, salt, salt-in-moisture, and ash content during ripening (P < 0.05). The presence or absence of the flavorings had no significant effect, whereas storage conditions and storage duration decreased the survival of S. aureus (P < 0.05).

  20. Estimating incremental cost-effectiveness ratios and their confidence intervals with different terminating events for survival time and costs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuai; Zhao, Hongwei

    2013-07-01

    Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) is an important component of the economic evaluation of new treatment options. In many clinical and observational studies of costs, censored data pose challenges to the CEA. We consider a special situation where the terminating events for the survival time and costs are different. Traditional methods for statistical inference offer no means for dealing with censored data in these circumstances. To address this gap, we propose a new method for deriving the confidence interval for the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. The simulation studies and real data example show that our method performs very well for some practical settings, revealing a great potential for application to actual settings in which terminating events for the survival time and costs differ.

  1. Effects of interspecific competition, predation, and their interaction on survival and development time of immature Anopheles quadrimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Knight, Tiffany M; Chase, Jonathan M; Goss, Charles W; Knight, Jennifer J

    2004-12-01

    We examined the effect of predation by the backswimmer (Notonecta undulata; Hemiptera: Notonectidae), competition by zooplankton and snails, and both predation and competition on the survival and development time of larval Anopheles quadrimaculatus mosquitoes in experimental mesocosms. We found that both predation and interspecific competition greatly reduced the survivorship of larvae and the number of larvae emerging into adulthood. Treatments with both predators and competitors had fewer larvae transitioning among instars and into adulthood but not in an additive way. In addition, mosquito larvae in the presence of predators and competitors took two days longer to emerge than where predators and competitions were absent. Our work provides evidence that biotic interactions, such as predation and competition, can strongly regulate the number of mosquito larvae by reducing the number of larvae that survive through instars and to emergence and by increasing the generation time.

  2. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis survival during fermentation of soured milk products detected by culture and quantitative real time PCR methods.

    PubMed

    Klanicova, B; Slana, I; Roubal, P; Pavlik, I; Kralik, P

    2012-07-01

    Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP), etiological agent of paratuberculosis in ruminants, is able to survive extreme conditions like very low pH (stomach), high temperature (pasteurization) or low temperature (refrigerated storage). Cheese, infant powder milk, cream and other milk and dairy products might thus be considered as possible sources of MAP for humans. The aim of this study was to investigate the survival of two MAP field isolates during fermentation of three different types of soured milk products (SMP; yogurt, acidophilus milk and kefir) under laboratory conditions. Pasteurized MAP-free milk was artificially contaminated with 10(6)MAPcells/mL and survival and absolute numbers of MAP were monitored during fermentation (4 or 16 h) and after six weeks of storage at 4°C by culture and quantitative real time PCR (qPCR). Viability of MAP was determined by culture using Herrold's egg yolk medium and Middlebrook 7H10 with antibiotics, supplemented with Mycobactin J and incubated at 37°C for up to 12 weeks. The absolute numbers of MAP were quantified by previously published qPCR assays targeting F57 and IS900 loci in MAP genome. We herein confirm that MAP can survive pH reduction, however, longer exposure to pH below 4 in SMP seems to be critical because it inhibits growth. Therefore, it is suggested that probiotic cultures that can decrease pH below 4 during fermentation could provide better inactivation of MAP in SMP.

  3. Tough composite materials: Recent developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vosteen, L. F. (Editor); Johnston, N. J. (Editor); Teichman, L. A. (Editor); Blankenship, C. P. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The present volume broadly considers topics in composite fracture toughness and impact behavior characterization, composite system constituent properties and their interrelationships, and matrix systems' synthesis and characterization. Attention is given to the characterization of interlaminar crack growth in composites by means of the double cantilever beam specimen, the characterization of delamination resistance in toughened resin composites, the effect of impact damage and open holes on the compressive strength of tough resin/high strain fiber laminates, the effect of matrix and fiber properties on compression failure mechanisms and impact resistance, the relation of toughened neat resin properties to advanced composite mechanical properties, and constituent and composite properties' relationships in thermosetting matrices. Also treated are the effect of cross-link density on the toughening mechanism of elastomer-modified epoxies, the chemistry of fiber/resin interfaces, novel carbon fibers and their properties, the development of a heterogeneous laminating resin, solvent-resistant thermoplastics, NASA Lewis research in advanced composites, and opportunities for the application of composites in commercial aircraft transport structures.

  4. Fracture toughness of Antrim shale

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Mubeen, A.

    1980-05-01

    Fracture toughness of Antrim shale cores from Dow Chemical's Sanilac County test site in Michigan were measured by the burst test method developed by Clifton et al. (1976). These tests were conducted to establish a preliminary data base to be used for the designing of a bed preparation method and prediction of rock fracture behavior under various loading conditions such as explosives and hydraulic fracturing for in-situ processing of oil shale. The test method was chosen because the thick-walled cylinder provides a loading and specimen configuration similar to in-situ hydraulic fracturing operations and the specimens can be conveniently prepared from diamond drill cores for laboratory tests. Further, the nature of variation of crack tip stress intensity in this specimen is such that K/sub IC/ does not depend on initial crack length, and crack propagation need not be monitored. The test results show that the fracture toughness of typical Antrim shale core range from 930 to 1080 psi ..sqrt..in. while the limestone specimens, a basement rock, range from 1240 to 1430 psi ..sqrt..in. These values are close to that of lean Western oil shale from Anvil point, Colorado (Schmidt, 1977), i.e., 980 psi ..sqrt..in.

  5. Effect of intestinal microflora on the survival time of mice exposed to lethal whole-body. gamma. irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Onoue, M.; Uchida, K.; Yokokura, T.; Takahashi, T.; Mutai, M.

    1981-11-01

    The effect of intestinal microflora on the survival time of mice exposed to 2-kR whole-body ..gamma.. irradiation was studied using germfree, monoassociated, and conventionalized ICR mice. The germfree mice were monoassociated with 1 of 11 bacterial strains, which were isolated from the fresh feces of conventional mice, 2 weeks prior to irradiation. All mice died within 3 weeks after irradiation. Monoassociation with Fusobacterium sp., Streptococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, or Pseudomonas sp. significantly reduced the mean survival time compared to that of germfree mice. In contrast, monoassociation with Clostridium sp., Bifidobacterium pseudolongum, or Lactobacillus acidophilus significantly prolonged the mean survival time compared to that of germfree mice. This suggests that the latter organisms may perform some activity to protect the mice from radiation injury. In this histopathological autopsy examination, the main lesions were hypocellularity in hematopoietic organs and hemorrhage in various organs. Neither karyorrhexis nor desquamation of intestinal mucosal cells was observed in any mice. From these observations, it is suggested that the death of these mice was related to hematopoietic damage. Bacterial invasion into various organs was observed in conventionalized and Pseudomonas-, E. coli-, or S. faecalis-monoassociated mice but not in Clostridium-, B. pseudolongum-, L. acidophilus-, or Fusobacterium-monoassociated mice.

  6. "Under the Tough Old Stars": Ecopedagogical Essays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jardine, David W.

    This book reviews the pedagogy and ecology of education and the philosophical and historical conditions of these theories, and discusses problems of the curriculum. Contents include: (1) "Introduction: Learning to Work Under the Tough Old Stars"; (2) "Under the Tough Old Stars: Meditation on Pedagogical Hyperactivity and the Mood of Environmental…

  7. Fracture toughness of hot-pressed beryllium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemon, D. D.; Brown, W. F., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation into the fracture toughness, sustained-load flaw growth, and fatigue-crack propagation resistance of S200E hot-pressed beryllium at room temperature. It also reviews the literature pertaining to the influence of various factors on the fracture toughness of hot-pressed beryllium determined using fatigue-cracked specimens.

  8. A laboratory means to produce tough aluminum sheet from powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singleton, O. R.; Royster, D. M.; Thomas, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    The rapid solidification of aluminum alloys as powder and the subsequent fabrication processes can be used to develop and tailor alloys to satisfy specific aerospace design requirements, including high strength and toughness. Laboratory procedures to produce aluminum powder-metallurgy (PM) materials are efficient but require evidence that the laboratory methods used can produce a product with superior properties. This paper describes laboratory equipment and procedures which can be used to produce tough aluminum PM sheet. The processing of a 2124 + 0.9 percent Zr aluminum alloy powder is used as an example. The fully hardened sheet product is evaluated in terms of properties and microstructure. The key features of the vacuum hot press pressing operation used to consolidate the powder are described. The 2124 + 0.9 percent Zr - T8 temper aluminum sheet produced was both strong (460-490 MPa yield strength) and tough (Kahn Tear unit-propagation- energy values over three times those typical for ingot metallurgy 2024-T81). Both the longitudinal and longitudinal-transverse directions of the sheet were tested. The microstructure was well refined with subgrains of one or two micrometers. Fine dispersoids of Al3Zr in the precipitate free regions adjacent to boundaries are believed to contribute to the improved toughness.

  9. A laboratory means to produce tough aluminum sheet from powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, O. R.; Royster, D. M.; Thomas, J. R.

    The rapid solidification of aluminum alloys as powder and the subsequent fabrication processes can be used to develop and tailor alloys to satisfy specific aerospace design requirements, including high strength and toughness. Laboratory procedures to produce aluminum powder-metallurgy (PM) materials are efficient but require evidence that the laboratory methods used can produce a product with superior properties. This paper describes laboratory equipment and procedures which can be used to produce tough aluminum PM sheet. The processing of a 2124 + 0.9 percent Zr aluminum alloy powder is used as an example. The fully hardened sheet product is evaluated in terms of properties and microstructure. The key features of the vacuum hot press pressing operation used to consolidate the powder are described. The 2124 + 0.9 percent Zr - T8 temper aluminum sheet produced was both strong (460-490 MPa yield strength) and tough (Kahn Tear unit-propagation- energy values over three times those typical for ingot metallurgy 2024-T81). Both the longitudinal and longitudinal-transverse directions of the sheet were tested. The microstructure was well refined with subgrains of one or two micrometers. Fine dispersoids of Al3Zr in the precipitate free regions adjacent to boundaries are believed to contribute to the improved toughness.

  10. Effects of direct and indirect bleach on dentin fracture toughness.

    PubMed

    Tam, L E; Noroozi, A

    2007-12-01

    There are concerns that tooth-whitening procedures irreversibly damage tooth structure. We investigated the hypothesis that dental bleaches significantly affect dentin structural integrity. The objective was to evaluate the effects of peroxide bleaches on dentin fracture toughness. Compact test specimens, composed of human dentin, were used (n = 10/group). Bleach (16% or 10% carbamide peroxide or 3% hydrogen peroxide) or control material, containing 0.1% sodium fluoride, was applied directly or indirectly to dentin through enamel (6 hrs/day) for 2 or 8 weeks. Fracture toughness results were analyzed by ANOVA and Fisher's LSD test (p < 0.05). There were significant decreases in mean fracture toughness after two- and eight-week direct (19-34% and 61-68%, respectively) and indirect (up to 17% and 37%, respectively) bleach application. The in vitro reduction in dentin fracture toughness caused by the application of peroxide bleaches was greater for the direct application method, longer application time, and higher bleach concentration.

  11. Tough Choices: Making It Work When Work Doesn't Pay: Narratives from Texas Working Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finet, Dayna

    2005-01-01

    Tough Choices begins not with a hypothesis, but rather a question. Statistically, the Center for Public Policy Priorities knows that low-income Texas families are engaged in a juggling act--struggling to survive on limited income. If the center could ask even a few of them how they manage, what would they tell them? What does it mean to earn too…

  12. Effect of Elevated Temperature and Loading Rate on Delamination Fracture Toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, J. R.; Allen, D. H.; Bradley, W. L.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of temperature and loading rate on delamination growth were studied. The delamination fracture toughness of IM7/K3B was measured at 149 C, 177 C, and 204 C. At each temperature the tests were performed with a variety of loading rates so that the delamination initiated over the range of time from 0.5 sec to 24 hrs. The double cantilever beam (DCB) test was used to measure fracture toughness. The results showed that the delamination resistance is a complicated function of both time and temperature with the effect of temperature either increasing or decreasing the fracture toughness depending on the time scale. The results also showed that the fracture toughness changed by as much as a factor of three as the time scale changed over the five orders of magnitude tested.

  13. Comparing proportional hazards and accelerated failure time models for survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Orbe, Jesus; Ferreira, Eva; Núñez-Antón, Vicente

    2002-11-30

    This paper describes a method proposed for a censored linear regression model that can be used in the context of survival analysis. The method has the important characteristic of allowing estimation and inference without knowing the distribution of the duration variable. Moreover, it does not need the assumption of proportional hazards. Therefore, it can be an interesting alternative to the Cox proportional hazards models when this assumption does not hold. In addition, implementation and interpretation of the results is simple. In order to analyse the performance of this methodology, we apply it to two real examples and we carry out a simulation study. We present its results together with those obtained with the traditional Cox model and AFT parametric models. The new proposal seems to lead to more precise results.

  14. Wind Speed during Migration Influences the Survival, Timing of Breeding, and Productivity of a Neotropical Migrant, Setophaga petechia

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Anna; Rock, Christine A.; Quinlan, Sam P.; Martin, Michaela; Green, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Over the course of the annual cycle, migratory bird populations can be impacted by environmental conditions in regions separated by thousands of kilometers. We examine how climatic conditions during discrete periods of the annual cycle influence the demography of a nearctic-neotropical migrant population of yellow warblers (Setophaga petechia), that breed in western Canada and overwinter in Mexico. We demonstrate that wind conditions during spring migration are the best predictor of apparent annual adult survival, male arrival date, female clutch initiation date and, via these timing effects, annual productivity. We find little evidence that conditions during the wintering period influence breeding phenology and apparent annual survival. Our study emphasizes the importance of climatic conditions experienced by migrants during the migratory period and indicates that geography may play a role in which period most strongly impacts migrant populations. PMID:24828427

  15. Wind speed during migration influences the survival, timing of breeding, and productivity of a neotropical migrant, Setophaga petechia.

    PubMed

    Drake, Anna; Rock, Christine A; Quinlan, Sam P; Martin, Michaela; Green, David J

    2014-01-01

    Over the course of the annual cycle, migratory bird populations can be impacted by environmental conditions in regions separated by thousands of kilometers. We examine how climatic conditions during discrete periods of the annual cycle influence the demography of a nearctic-neotropical migrant population of yellow warblers (Setophaga petechia), that breed in western Canada and overwinter in Mexico. We demonstrate that wind conditions during spring migration are the best predictor of apparent annual adult survival, male arrival date, female clutch initiation date and, via these timing effects, annual productivity. We find little evidence that conditions during the wintering period influence breeding phenology and apparent annual survival. Our study emphasizes the importance of climatic conditions experienced by migrants during the migratory period and indicates that geography may play a role in which period most strongly impacts migrant populations.

  16. Tough Decisions for Premature Triplets.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Ashley; Vergales, Brooke D; Paget-Brown, Alix; Mercurio, Mark; Lantos, John D

    2016-02-01

    When infants are born at the borderline of viability, doctors and parents have to make tough decisions about whether to institute intensive care or provide only palliative care. Often, these decisions are made in moments of profound emotional turmoil, and parents receive different information from different health professionals. Communication can become garbled. It may be difficult to tell when and whether the patient's clinical condition has changed enough so that certain choices that had once been permissible become impermissible. In this "Ethics Rounds," we present a case of triplets born at the borderline of viability. We sought comments from the triplets' parents, the doctors and ethicist who were caring for the infants, and a bioethicist/neonatologist from another hospital. PMID:26738882

  17. Tough soluble aromatic thermoplastic copolyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Tough, soluble, aromatic, thermoplastic copolyimides were prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride, 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,4'-oxydianiline. Alternatively, these copolyimides may be prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride with 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,4'-oxydiisocyanate. Also, the copolyimide may be prepared by reacting the corresponding tetra acid and ester precursors of 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride and 3,4,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride with 3,4'-oxydianiline. These copolyimides were found to be soluble in common amide solvents such as N,N'-dimethyl acetamide, N-methylpyrrolidinone, and dimethylformamide allowing them to be applied as the fully imidized copolymer and to be used to prepare a wide range of articles.

  18. Improved toughness of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Impact energy absorbing layers (EALs) comprised of partially densified silicon carbide were formed in situ on fully sinterable silicon carbide substrates. After final sintering, duplex silicon carbide structures resulted which were comprised of a fully sintered, high density silicon carbide substrate or core, overlayed with an EAL of partially sintered silicon carbide integrally bonded to its core member. Thermal cycling tests proved such structures to be moderately resistant to oxidation and highly resistant to thermal shock stresses. The strength of the developed structures in some cases exceeded but essentially it remained the same as the fully sintered silicon carbide without the EAL. Ballistic impact tests indicated that substantial improvements in the toughness of sintered silicon carbide were achieved by the use of the partially densified silicon carbide EALs.

  19. Tough Decisions for Premature Triplets.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Ashley; Vergales, Brooke D; Paget-Brown, Alix; Mercurio, Mark; Lantos, John D

    2016-02-01

    When infants are born at the borderline of viability, doctors and parents have to make tough decisions about whether to institute intensive care or provide only palliative care. Often, these decisions are made in moments of profound emotional turmoil, and parents receive different information from different health professionals. Communication can become garbled. It may be difficult to tell when and whether the patient's clinical condition has changed enough so that certain choices that had once been permissible become impermissible. In this "Ethics Rounds," we present a case of triplets born at the borderline of viability. We sought comments from the triplets' parents, the doctors and ethicist who were caring for the infants, and a bioethicist/neonatologist from another hospital.

  20. Effect of Li level, artificial aging, and TiB2 reinforcement on the fracture toughness of Weldalite (tm) 049-type alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Plane strain fracture toughness (K sub IC) was evaluated for Weldalite (tm) 049 with and without TiB2 reinforcement. For the nonreinforced variant, changes in toughness were measured for various aging conditions and lithium levels. Toughness testing was carried out on fatigue precracked compact tension (CT) specimens at 24 C, as per ASTM standard E-399. Toughness was measured as a function of aging time at 160 C for the two Weldalite 049(1.3) heats. The composition of these heats differed only in that 0.03 wt pct. Ti was added to one as an additional grain refiner. Both heats showed a decrease in toughness with increasing aging time, although toughness values for one were significantly higher than for the other. This greater toughness may be due to a subtle change in the grain size resulting for the presence of Ti or, alternatively, to differences in texture or substructure formed during extrusion.

  1. The fracture toughness of borides formed on boronized cold work tool steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Ugur; Sen, Saduman

    2003-06-15

    In this study, the fracture toughness of boride layers of two borided cold work tool steels have been investigated. Boriding was carried out in a salt bath consisting of borax, boric acid, ferro-silicon and aluminum. Boriding was performed at 850 and 950 deg. C for 2 to 7 h. The presence of boride phases were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Hardness and fracture toughness of borides were measured via Vickers indenter. Increasing of boriding time and temperature leads to reduction of fracture toughness of borides. Metallographic examination showed that boride layer formed on cold work tool steels was compact and smooth.

  2. Enhancements to the TOUGH2 Simulator as Implemented in iTOUGH2

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    iTOUGH2 is a program for parameter estimation, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty propagation analysis. It is based on the TOUGH2 simulator for non-isothermal multiphase, multicomponent flow and transport in fractured and porous media [Pruess, 1987, 1991, 2005, 2011; Falta et al., 1995; Pruess et al., 1999, 2002, 2012; Doughty, 2013]. The core of iTOUGH2 contains slightly modified versions of TOUGH2 modules. Most code modifications are editorial and do not affect the simulation results. As a result, standard TOUGH2 input files can be used in iTOUGH2, and identical results are obtained if iTOUGH2 is run in forward mode. However, a number of modifications have been made as described in this report. They enhance the functionality, flexibilitu, and eas-of-use of the forward simulator. This report complements the reports iTOUGH2 User's Guide, iTOUGH2 Command Referecne, and the collection of tutorial examples in iTOUGH2 Sample Problems.

  3. Neurogenesis and the Spacing Effect: Learning over Time Enhances Memory and the Survival of New Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sisti, Helene M.; Glass, Arnold L.; Shors, Tracey J.

    2007-01-01

    Information that is spaced over time is better remembered than the same amount of information massed together. This phenomenon, known as the spacing effect, was explored with respect to its effect on learning and neurogenesis in the adult dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation. Because the cells are generated over time and because learning…

  4. Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels during thermal aging in LWR systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K. )

    1991-06-01

    A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components due to thermal aging during service in light water rectors (LWRs) at 280--330{degrees}C (535--625{degrees}F). The fracture toughness J-R curve and Charpy-impact energy of aged cast stainless steels are estimated from known mineral in formation. Fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel is estimated from the extent and kinetics of thermal embrittlement. The extent of thermal embrittlement is characterized by the room-temperature normalized'' Charpy-impact energy. A correlation for the extent of embrittlement at saturation,'' i.e., the minimum impact energy that would be achieved for the material after long-term aging, is given in terms of a material parameter, {Phi}, which is determined from the chemical composition. The fracture toughness J-R curve for the material is then obtained from correlations between room-temperature Charpy-impact energy and fracture toughness parameters. Fracture toughness as a function of time and temperature of reactor service is estimated from the kinetics of thermal embrittlement, which is determined from chemical composition. A common lower-bound'' J-R curve for cast stainless steels with unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given material specification, ferrite content, and temperature. Examples for estimating impact strength and fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are describes. 24 refs., 39 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Estimation of fracture toughness of cast stainless steels in LWR (light water reactor) systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.

    1990-10-01

    A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting fracture toughness J-R curves and impact strength of aged cast stainless steels from known material information. The saturation'' fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel, i.e., the minimum fracture toughness that would ever be achieved for the material after long-term service, is estimated from the degree of embrittlement at saturation. Degree of embrittlement is characterized in terms of room-temperature Charpy-impact energy. The variation of the impact energy at saturation for different materials is described in terms of a material parameter {Phi}, which is determined from the chemical composition and ferrite morphology. The fracture toughness J-R curve for the material is then obtained from correlations between room-temperature Charpy-impact energy and fracture toughness. Fracture toughness as a function of time and temperature of reactor service is estimated from the kinetics of embrittlement, which is determined from the chemical composition. Examples for estimating impact strength and fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are described. A common lower-bound'' J-R curve for cast stainless steels with unknown chemical composition is also defined. 15 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Vitamin D Depletion in Pregnancy Decreases Survival Time, Oxygen Saturation, Lung Weight and Body Weight in Preterm Rat Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Lykkedegn, Sine; Sorensen, Grith Lykke; Beck-Nielsen, Signe Sparre; Pilecki, Bartosz; Duelund, Lars; Marcussen, Niels; Christesen, Henrik Thybo

    2016-01-01

    Animal studies suggest a role of vitamin D in fetal lung development although not studied in preterm animals. We tested the hypothesis that vitamin D depletion aggravates respiratory insufficiency in preterm rat offspring. Furthermore, the effects of vitamin D depletion on growth and lung surfactant were investigated. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned low vitamin D (VDL) or control diet before mating and followed with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (s-25(OH)D) determinations. After cesarean section at gestational day 19 (E19) or day 22 (E22), placental weight, birth weight, crown-rump-length (CRL), oxygenation (SaO2) at 30 min and survival time were recorded. The pup lungs were analyzed for phospholipid levels, surfactant protein A-D mRNA and the expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). S-25(OH)D was significantly lower in the VDL group at cesarean section (12 vs. 30nmol/L, p<0.0001). Compared to the controls, E19 VDL pups had lower birth weight (2.13 vs. 2.29g, p<0.001), lung weight (0.09 vs. 0.10g, p = 0.002), SaO2 (54% vs. 69%, p = 0.002) as well as reduced survival time (0.50 vs. 1.25h, p<0.0001). At E22, the VDL-induced pulmonary differences were leveled out, but VDL pups had lower CRL (4.0 vs. 4.5cm, p<0.0001). The phospholipid levels and the surfactant protein mRNA expression did not differ between the dietary groups. In conclusion, Vitamin D depletion led to lower oxygenation and reduced survival time in the preterm offspring, associated with reduced lung weight and birth weight. Further studies of vitamin D depletion in respiratory insufficiency in preterm neonates are warranted. PMID:27571350

  7. Timing of Adjuvant Radioactive Iodine Therapy Does Not Affect Overall Survival in Low- and Intermediate-Risk Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Suman, Paritosh; Wang, Chi-Hsiung; Moo-Young, Tricia A; Prinz, Richard A; Winchester, David J

    2016-09-01

    There is no consensus regarding the timing of adjuvant radioactive iodine therapy (RAI) therapy in low- and intermediate-risk papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). We analyzed the impact of adjuvant RAI on overall survival (OS) in low- and intermediate-risk PTC. The National Cancer Data Base was queried from 2004 to 2011 for pN0M0 PTC patients having near/subtotal or total thyroidectomy and adjuvant RAI. Tumors ≤1 cm with negative margins were low risk while 1.1- to 4-cm tumors with negative margins or ≤1 cm with microscopic margins were termed intermediate risk. RAI in ≤3 months and between 3 and 12 months was termed as early and delayed, respectively. Survival analysis was performed after adjusting for patient and tumor-related variables. There were 7,306 low-risk and 16,609 intermediate-risk patients. Seventeen per cent low-risk and 15 per cent intermediate-risk patients had delayed RAI. Kaplan-Meier analysis did not show a difference in OS for early versus delayed RAI administration in low- (10-year OS 94.5% vs 94%, P = 0.627) or intermediate-risk (10-year OS 95.3% vs 95.9%, P = 0.944) patients. In adjusted survival analysis, RAI timing did not affect OS in all patients (hazard ratios = 0.98, 95% confidence interval = 0.71-1.34, P = 0.887). In conclusion, the timing of postthyroidectomy adjuvant RAI therapy does not affect OS in low- or intermediate-risk PTC. PMID:27670568

  8. Vitamin D Depletion in Pregnancy Decreases Survival Time, Oxygen Saturation, Lung Weight and Body Weight in Preterm Rat Offspring.

    PubMed

    Lykkedegn, Sine; Sorensen, Grith Lykke; Beck-Nielsen, Signe Sparre; Pilecki, Bartosz; Duelund, Lars; Marcussen, Niels; Christesen, Henrik Thybo

    2016-01-01

    Animal studies suggest a role of vitamin D in fetal lung development although not studied in preterm animals. We tested the hypothesis that vitamin D depletion aggravates respiratory insufficiency in preterm rat offspring. Furthermore, the effects of vitamin D depletion on growth and lung surfactant were investigated. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned low vitamin D (VDL) or control diet before mating and followed with serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (s-25(OH)D) determinations. After cesarean section at gestational day 19 (E19) or day 22 (E22), placental weight, birth weight, crown-rump-length (CRL), oxygenation (SaO2) at 30 min and survival time were recorded. The pup lungs were analyzed for phospholipid levels, surfactant protein A-D mRNA and the expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). S-25(OH)D was significantly lower in the VDL group at cesarean section (12 vs. 30nmol/L, p<0.0001). Compared to the controls, E19 VDL pups had lower birth weight (2.13 vs. 2.29g, p<0.001), lung weight (0.09 vs. 0.10g, p = 0.002), SaO2 (54% vs. 69%, p = 0.002) as well as reduced survival time (0.50 vs. 1.25h, p<0.0001). At E22, the VDL-induced pulmonary differences were leveled out, but VDL pups had lower CRL (4.0 vs. 4.5cm, p<0.0001). The phospholipid levels and the surfactant protein mRNA expression did not differ between the dietary groups. In conclusion, Vitamin D depletion led to lower oxygenation and reduced survival time in the preterm offspring, associated with reduced lung weight and birth weight. Further studies of vitamin D depletion in respiratory insufficiency in preterm neonates are warranted. PMID:27571350

  9. Arsenic trioxide inhibits accelerated allograft rejection mediated by alloreactive CD8(+) memory T cells and prolongs allograft survival time.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun; Guan, Tianjun; Gao, Chang; Lin, Yingying; Yan, Guoliang; Zhu, Maoshu; Lv, Chongshan; Xia, Junjie; Qi, Zhongquan

    2015-09-01

    CD8(+) memory T (Tm) cells are a significant barrier to transplant tolerance induction in alloantigen-primed recipients, and are insensitive to existing clinical immunosuppressants. Here, we studied the inhibition of CD8(+) Tm cells by arsenic trioxide (As2O3) for the first time. Alloantigen-primed CD8(+) Tm cells were transferred to T cell immunodeficient nude mice. The mice were subjected to heart allotransplantation, and treated with As2O3. The transplant survival time was determined, and the inhibitory effects of As2O3 on CD8(+) Tm cell-mediated immune rejection were assessed through serological studies and inspection of the transplanted heart and lymphoid organs. We found that As2O3 treatment prolonged the mean survival time of the graft and reduced the number of CD8(+) Tm cells in the spleen and lymph nodes. The expression of the genes encoding interleukin (IL)-2, and IFN-γ was reduced, while expression of IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β was increased in the transplant. Our findings show that As2O3 treatment inhibits allograft rejection mediated by alloreactive CD8(+) Tm cells in the mouse heart transplantation model.

  10. Diabetes Mellitus as a Risk Factor in Glaucoma’s Physiopathology and Surgical Survival Time: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, João Paulo; Amado, Duarte; Pinto, Luís Abegão; Ferreira, Joana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glaucoma is a multifactorial condition under serious influence of many risk factors. The role of diabetes mellitus (DM) in glaucoma etiology or progression remains inconclusive. Although, the diabetic patients have different healing mechanism comparing to the general population and it has a possible-negative role on surgical outcomes. This review article attempts to analyze the association of both diseases, glaucoma and DM, before and after the surgery. The epidemiological studies, based mainly in population prevalence analyzes, have shown opposite outcomes in time and even in the most recent articles also the association remains inconclusive. On the contrary, the experimental models based on animal induced chronic hyperglycemia have shown an important association of both diseases, explained by common neurodegenerative mechanisms. Diabetic patients have a different wound healing process in the eye viz-a-viz other organs. The healing process is more and it results in lower surgical survival time, higher intraocular pressure (IOP) levels and, therefore, these patients usually need more medication to lower the IOP. Both randomized and nonrandomized retrospective and experimental molecular studies have shown the association between DM and glaucoma. Further studies are needed to get better explanations about outcomes on more recent surgical procedures and with the exponential use of antifibrotics. How to cite this article: Costa L, Cunha JP, Amado D, Pinto LA, Ferreira J. Diabetes Mellitus as a Risk Factor in Glaucoma’s Physiopathology and Surgical Survival Time: A Literature Review. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2015;9(3):81-85. PMID:26997842

  11. Assessment of chronic effects of tebuconazole on survival, reproduction and growth of Daphnia magna after different exposure times.

    PubMed

    Sancho, E; Villarroel, M J; Ferrando, M D

    2016-02-01

    The effect of the fungicide tebuconazole (0.41, 0.52, 0.71 and 1.14mg/L) on survival, reproduction and growth of Daphnia magna organisms was monitored using 14 and 21 days exposure tests. A third experiment was performed by exposing D. magna to the fungicide for 14 days followed by 7 days of recovery (14+7). In order to test fungicide effects on D. magna, parameters as survival, mean whole body length, mean total number of neonates per female, mean number of broods per female, mean brood size per female, time to first brood/reproduction and intrinsic rate of natural increase (r) were used. Reproduction was seriously affected by tebuconazole. All tebuconazole concentrations tested affected the number of broods per female and day to first brood. At 14-days test, number of neonates per female and body size decreased by concentrations of tebuconazole higher than 0.52mg/L, whereas at 21-days test both parameters were affected at all the concentrations tested. Survival of the daphnids after 14 days fungicide exposure did not exhibited differences among experimental and control groups. In this experiment r value was reduced (in a 22%) when animals were exposed to concentrations of 0.71mg/L and 1.14mg/L. Survival of daphnids exposed during 21 days to 1.14mg/L declined, and the intrinsic rate of natural increase (r) decreased in a 30 % for tebuconazole concentrations higher than 0.41mg/L. Longevity of daphnids pre-exposed to tebuconazole for 14 days and 7 days in clean water did not show differences from control values and all of them survived the 21 days of the test. However, after 7 days in fungicide free medium animals were unable to restore control values for reproductive parameters and length. The maximum acceptable toxicant concentration (MATC) was calculated using the r values as parameter of evaluation. MATC estimations were 0.61mg/L and 0.46mg/L for 14 and 21 days, respectively. Results showed that the number of neonates per female was the highest sensitive

  12. Expectation-maximization algorithms for learning a finite mixture of univariate survival time distributions from partially specified class values

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Youngrok

    2013-05-15

    Heterogeneity exists on a data set when samples from di erent classes are merged into the data set. Finite mixture models can be used to represent a survival time distribution on heterogeneous patient group by the proportions of each class and by the survival time distribution within each class as well. The heterogeneous data set cannot be explicitly decomposed to homogeneous subgroups unless all the samples are precisely labeled by their origin classes; such impossibility of decomposition is a barrier to overcome for estimating nite mixture models. The expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm has been used to obtain maximum likelihood estimates of nite mixture models by soft-decomposition of heterogeneous samples without labels for a subset or the entire set of data. In medical surveillance databases we can find partially labeled data, that is, while not completely unlabeled there is only imprecise information about class values. In this study we propose new EM algorithms that take advantages of using such partial labels, and thus incorporate more information than traditional EM algorithms. We particularly propose four variants of the EM algorithm named EM-OCML, EM-PCML, EM-HCML and EM-CPCML, each of which assumes a specific mechanism of missing class values. We conducted a simulation study on exponential survival trees with five classes and showed that the advantages of incorporating substantial amount of partially labeled data can be highly signi cant. We also showed model selection based on AIC values fairly works to select the best proposed algorithm on each specific data set. A case study on a real-world data set of gastric cancer provided by Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program showed a superiority of EM-CPCML to not only the other proposed EM algorithms but also conventional supervised, unsupervised and semi-supervised learning algorithms.

  13. 46 CFR 54.05-6 - Toughness test temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Toughness test temperatures. 54.05-6 Section 54.05-6... Toughness Tests § 54.05-6 Toughness test temperatures. Each toughness test must be conducted at temperatures not warmer than −20 °F or 10 °F below the minimum service temperature, whichever is lower, except...

  14. 46 CFR 54.05-6 - Toughness test temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Toughness test temperatures. 54.05-6 Section 54.05-6... Toughness Tests § 54.05-6 Toughness test temperatures. Each toughness test must be conducted at temperatures not warmer than −20 °F or 10 °F below the minimum service temperature, whichever is lower, except...

  15. 46 CFR 54.05-6 - Toughness test temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Toughness test temperatures. 54.05-6 Section 54.05-6... Toughness Tests § 54.05-6 Toughness test temperatures. Each toughness test must be conducted at temperatures not warmer than −20 °F or 10 °F below the minimum service temperature, whichever is lower, except...

  16. 46 CFR 54.05-6 - Toughness test temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Toughness test temperatures. 54.05-6 Section 54.05-6... Toughness Tests § 54.05-6 Toughness test temperatures. Each toughness test must be conducted at temperatures not warmer than −20 °F or 10 °F below the minimum service temperature, whichever is lower, except...

  17. 46 CFR 54.05-6 - Toughness test temperatures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Toughness test temperatures. 54.05-6 Section 54.05-6... Toughness Tests § 54.05-6 Toughness test temperatures. Each toughness test must be conducted at temperatures not warmer than −20 °F or 10 °F below the minimum service temperature, whichever is lower, except...

  18. Effect of high temperature fatigue on the fracture toughness of a nickel-base alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, S.K.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was to investigate the effect of cyclic loading at high temperature on the fracture toughness of a precipitate hardened alloy. A ..gamma..' precipitate hardened Inconcel X-750 alloy was chosen because of its importance in practical applications as well as its relatively well defined microstructure compared to other superalloys. This paper presents a study of the variation of the relative fracture toughness of this alloy during continuous and hold-time fatigue at 973/sup 0/K.

  19. [Influence of prehospital response times in the survival of trauma patients in Navarre].

    PubMed

    Ali Ali, B; Fortún Moral, M; Belzunegui Otano, T; Teijeira Álvarez, R; Reyero Díez, D; Cabodevilla Górriz, A

    2015-01-01

    The relation between response times and mortality of polytrauma patients in the so-called "golden hour" continues to be a subject of debate. The purpose of this study is to determine the variables related to mortality in these patients and the influence of response times of the Emergency Medical Services in this mortality. To this end, the data in the "Major Trauma of Navarre" Register (retrospective cohort of polytrauma patients attended to by the Navarre Health Service) were analyzed for the four year period between 2010 and 2013. Of the 217 trauma cases available for the analysis, 42 (19%) died. No significant association was found in the multi-variate analysis between the different response times and mortality: arrival at the scene (odds ratio (OR) 1.0; 95% confidence interval (CI) from 0.99 to 1.01), in the scenario (OR 1.00; 95% CI from 0.98 to 1.02) and total time (OR 1.00; 95% CI from 0.99 to 1.01). The variables that influenced mortality are patient age and severity of injuries measured by the prehospital Triage-Revised Trauma Score (T-RTS) and the New Injury Severity Score (NISS). The mortality of polytrauma patients attended to by the emergency system in our region is influenced by age and by the intensity of the aggression suffered, determined by the prehospital T-RTS and by the NISS. The response times of the hospital do not have a significant influence. PMID:26486533

  20. Toughness and strength of nanocrystalline graphene

    PubMed Central

    Shekhawat, Ashivni; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2016-01-01

    Pristine monocrystalline graphene is claimed to be the strongest material known with remarkable mechanical and electrical properties. However, graphene made with scalable fabrication techniques is polycrystalline and contains inherent nanoscale line and point defects—grain boundaries and grain-boundary triple junctions—that lead to significant statistical fluctuations in toughness and strength. These fluctuations become particularly pronounced for nanocrystalline graphene where the density of defects is high. Here we use large-scale simulation and continuum modelling to show that the statistical variation in toughness and strength can be understood with ‘weakest-link' statistics. We develop the first statistical theory of toughness in polycrystalline graphene, and elucidate the nanoscale origins of the grain-size dependence of its strength and toughness. Our results should lead to more reliable graphene device design, and provide a framework to interpret experimental results in a broad class of two-dimensional materials. PMID:26817712

  1. Low expansion superalloy with improved toughness

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Darrell F.; Stein, Larry I.; Hwang, Il S.

    1995-01-01

    A high strength, low coefficient of thermal expansion superalloy exhibiting improved toughness over a broad temperature range down to about 4.degree. K. The composition is adapted for use with wrought superconducting sheathing.

  2. Toughness and strength of nanocrystalline graphene

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shekhawat, Ashivni; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2016-01-28

    Pristine monocrystalline graphene is claimed to be the strongest material known with remarkable mechanical and electrical properties. However, graphene made with scalable fabrication techniques is polycrystalline and contains inherent nanoscale line and point defects—grain boundaries and grain-boundary triple junctions—that lead to significant statistical fluctuations in toughness and strength. These fluctuations become particularly pronounced for nanocrystalline graphene where the density of defects is high. Here we use large-scale simulation and continuum modelling to show that the statistical variation in toughness and strength can be understood with ‘weakest-link’ statistics. We develop the first statistical theory of toughness in polycrystalline graphene, and elucidatemore » the nanoscale origins of the grain-size dependence of its strength and toughness. Lastly, our results should lead to more reliable graphene device design, and provide a framework to interpret experimental results in a broad class of two-dimensional materials.« less

  3. Low expansion superalloy with improved toughness

    DOEpatents

    Smith, D.F.; Stein, L.I.; Hwang, I.S.

    1995-06-20

    A high strength, low coefficient of thermal expansion superalloy exhibiting improved toughness over a broad temperature range down to about 4 K is disclosed. The composition is adapted for use with wrought superconducting sheathing.

  4. Effects of flavorings, storage conditions, and storage time on survival of Staphylococcus aureus in Sürk cheese.

    PubMed

    Masatcioğlu, Tuğrul M; Avşar, Yahya K

    2005-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the cumulative effects of flavorings (chili pepper, thyme, mint, cumin, nutmeg, allspice, clove, cinnamon, black pepper, salt, and hot red pepper paste), storage conditions, and storage time on the survival of Staphylococcus aureus in Sürk cheese and to monitor the associated chemical changes. Sürk cheese, a traditional Turkish cheese, was produced by heating diluted nonfat yogurt and adding flavorings to the resultant acid-heat curd. The cheese was later inoculated with S. aureus, shaped conically, and stored aerobically for mold growth and anaerobically in olive oil for 30 days at room temperature. The moisture content of aerobically stored cheese decreased over time and led to increases in total solids, salt, salt-in-moisture, and ash content during ripening (P < 0.05). The presence or absence of the flavorings had no significant effect, whereas storage conditions and storage duration decreased the survival of S. aureus (P < 0.05). PMID:16013393

  5. [Effect of waiting time for radiotherapy on five-year overall survival in women with cervical cancer, 1995-2010].

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Maria Isabel do; Silva, Gulnar Azevedo E

    2015-11-01

    Overall 5-year survival and factors associated with death were evaluated in a cohort of 342 women with cervical cancer referred to radiotherapy in the Baixada Fluminense, in Greater Metropolitan Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Overall 5-year survival was 25.3%, reaching 60.8% in women with stage IIA or less. The model adjusted by extended Cox proportional regression showed an increase in mortality risk for patients with stages IIB-IIIB (HR = 1.89; 95%CI: 1.214; 2.957) and IVA-IVB (HR = 5.78; 95%CI: 2.973; 11.265). Cytology in asymptomatic women (HR = 0.58; 95%CI: 0.362; 0.961) and referral for first consultation in an oncology service in the Baixada Fluminense (HR = 0.60; 95%CI: 0.418; 0.875) were the main protective factors identified by the study. Waiting time (> 60 versus ≤ 60 days) was not statistically significant, but a delay of 4 days worsened the outcome. The 60-day limit for initiating radiotherapy should be respected, because delay greater than 64 days showed a significant association between all waiting time cut-off points and 5-year mortality risk. PMID:26840822

  6. Child survival in Beirut during wartime: time trends and socio-religious differentials.

    PubMed

    Deeb, M; Khlat, M; Courbage, Y

    1997-02-01

    The authors investigated changes in socioreligious differentials of mortality over time using baseline information from maternity registries in Beirut in 1984 and 1991. Mother's age, number of children ever born, number of children alive, hospitalization class, and religion of newborn were recorded. Brass and Macrae's technique was used to convert the proportion dead among children ever born to mothers in age group 30-34 years into mortality estimates for 1978 and 1985. Using hospitalization class as a proxy for social class, religious differentials in child mortality were explored by logistic regression analysis within each period. A reduction over time of religious-based child mortality differences was observed in Beirut, in agreement with the pattern found for religious-based fertility differences. Relative to other countries in the region, the war in Lebanon has slowed down the decline in child mortality.

  7. Tough strong iron alloys for cryogenic service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    Series of alloys with minor additions of reactive metals possesses outstanding strength and toughness at cryogenic temperatures. Effective metal additons include aluminum, niobium, titanium, and vanadium. Strengthening of series is achieved by thermomechanical processing and by precipitate strengthening while maintaining high level of toughness. Possible applications include liquefied natural-gas storage and transmission, structural members in superconducting machinery, and welding rod for other alloys such as nine nickel steels.

  8. Tough, High-Performance, Thermoplastic Addition Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H.; Proctor, K. Mason; Gleason, John; Morgan, Cassandra; Partos, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Series of addition-type thermoplastics (ATT's) exhibit useful properties. Because of their addition curing and linear structure, ATT polymers have toughness, like thermoplastics, and easily processed, like thermosets. Work undertaken to develop chemical reaction forming stable aromatic rings in backbone of ATT polymer, combining high-temperature performance and thermo-oxidative stability with toughness and easy processibility, and minimizing or eliminating necessity for tradeoffs among properties often observed in conventional polymer syntheses.

  9. A discrete-time survival model with random effects for designing and analyzing repeated low-dose challenge experiments.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chaeryon; Huang, Ying; Miller, Christopher J

    2015-04-01

    Repeated low-dose (RLD) challenge designs are important in HIV vaccine research. Current methods for RLD designs rely heavily on an assumption of homogeneous risk of infection among animals, which, upon violation, can lead to invalid inferences and underpowered study designs. We propose to fit a discrete-time survival model with random effects that allows for heterogeneity in the risk of infection among animals and allows for predetermined challenge dose changes over time. Based on this model, we derive likelihood ratio tests and estimators for vaccine efficacy. A two-stage approach is proposed for optimizing the RLD design under cost constraints. Simulation studies demonstrate good finite sample properties of the proposed method and its superior performance compared to existing methods. We illustrate the application of the heterogeneous infection risk model on data from a real simian immunodeficiency virus vaccine study using Rhesus Macaques. The results of our study provide useful guidance for future RLD experimental design.

  10. The bond survival time variation of polymorphic amyloid fibrils in the mechanical insight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myeongsang; Baek, Inchul; Chang, Hyun Joon; Yoon, Gwonchan; Na, Sungsoo

    2014-04-01

    The structure-property relationships of biological materials such as amyloid fibrils are important to developing therapeutic strategies for amyloid-related diseases. The mechanical characterization of biological materials can provide insight into such relationships. In this study, polymorphic human islet polypeptide (hIAPP) fibrils were constructed with molecular modeling, and a constant-force bending simulation was performed to characterize the different mechanical behaviors of polymorphic hIAPP protofibrils. Our simulation results showed that, owing to their different intramolecular interactions, the fracture times of polymorphic hIAPP protofibrils depend on polymorphic structures.

  11. Heat loss and hypothermia in free diving: Estimation of survival time under water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilella-Arzo, Marcel; Alcaraz, Antonio; Aguilella, Vicente M.

    2003-04-01

    The heat exchange between a diver and the colder surrounding water is analyzed on the basis of the fundamental equations of thermal transport. To estimate the decrease in the diver's body temperature as a function of time, we discuss the complex interplay of several factors including the body heat production rate, the role of the diver's wet suit, and the way different heat exchange mechanisms (conduction, convection, and radiation) contribute to thermal transport. This knowledge could be useful to prevent physiological disorders that occur when the human body temperature drops below 35 °C.

  12. Cytomegalovirus infection does not impact on survival or time to first treatment in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Damery, Sarah; Hudson, Christopher; Maurer, Matthew J.; Cerhan, James R.; Pachnio, Annette; Begum, Jusnara; Slager, Susan L.; Fegan, Christopher; Man, Stephen; Pepper, Christopher; Shanafelt, Tait D.; Pratt, Guy; Moss, Paul A. H.

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a widely prevalent herpes virus which establishes a state of chronic infection. The establishment of CMV‐specific immunity controls viral reactivation and leads to the accumulation of very large numbers of virus‐specific T cells which come to dominate the immune repertoire. There is concern that this may reduce the immune response to heterologous infections and HCMV infection has been associated with reduced survival in elderly people. Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B‐CLL) suffer from a state of immune suppression but have a paradoxical increase in the magnitude of the CMV‐specific T cell and humoral immune response. As such, there is now considerable interest in how CMV infection impacts on the clinical outcome of patients with B‐CLL. Utilizing a large prospective cohort of patients with B‐CLL (n = 347) we evaluated the relationship between HCMV seropositivity and patient outcome. HCMV seropositive patients had significantly worse overall survival than HCMV negative patients in univariate analysis (HR = 2.28, 95% CI: 1.34–3.88; P = 0.002). However, CMV seropositive patients were 4 years older than seronegative donors and this survival difference was lost in multivariate modeling adjusted for age and other validated prognostic markers (P = 0.34). No significant difference was found in multivariate modeling between HCMV positive and negative patients in relation to the time to first treatment (HR = 1.12, 95% CI: 0.68–1.84; P = 0.65). These findings in a second independent cohort of 236 B‐CLL patients were validated. In conclusion no evidence that HCMV impacts on the clinical outcome of patients with B‐CLL was found. Am. J. Hematol. 91:776–781, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27124884

  13. Method to increase the toughness of aluminum-lithium alloys at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankaran, Krishnan K. (Inventor); Sova, Brian J. (Inventor); Babel, Henry W. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method to increase the toughness of the aluminum-lithium alloy C458 and similar alloys at cryogenic temperatures above their room temperature toughness is provided. Increasing the cryogenic toughness of the aluminum-lithium alloy C458 allows the use of alloy C458 for cryogenic tanks, for example for launch vehicles in the aerospace industry. A two-step aging treatment for alloy C458 is provided. A specific set of times and temperatures to age the aluminum-lithium alloy C458 to T8 temper is disclosed that results in a higher toughness at cryogenic temperatures compared to room temperature. The disclosed two-step aging treatment for alloy 458 can be easily practiced in the manufacturing process, does not involve impractical heating rates or durations, and does not degrade other material properties.

  14. Effects of the timing of initial feeding on growth and survival of spotted mandarin fish Siniperca scherzeri larvae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Wang, Y J; Hu, M H; Fan, Q X; Chenung, S G; Shin, P K S; Li, H; Cao, L

    2009-10-01

    The effects of delayed first feeding on growth and survival of spotted mandarin fish Siniperca scherzeri larvae were examined under controlled conditions. Morphometric characters [yolk-sac volume, oil globule volume, head depth (H(D)), body depth (B(D)), eye diameter (E(D)), musculature height (M(H)), mouth diameter (M(D)) and total length (L(T))], body mass (M), specific growth rate (S(GR)) and survival were evaluated under different first-feeding time (2, 3, 4 and 5 days after hatching). Larvae began to feed exogenously at 2 days after hatching (DAH) and the point of no return (P(NR)) occurred between 5 and 6 DAH at 23 degrees C, range +/-1.0 degrees C. The yolk volume of larvae first-fed at 2 days had a significant difference compared with that of larvae first-fed at 3, 4 and 5 days on 3 and 4 DAH. The larvae first-fed at 2 days achieved comparatively better growth performance than that of 3, 4 and 5 days. On 5 DAH, all morphometric characters had significant differences between 2 and 5 days and 2 and 4 days initial feeding, respectively. Total mortality was recorded on 9 DAH for the larvae first-fed at 5 days. On 12 DAH, significant differences were observed between 2 and 4 days and 3 and 4 days initial feeding for all morphometric characters. From 16 DAH to the end of experiment, all growth variables of the larvae first-fed at 2 days were significantly higher than those in other treatments. The S(GR) (2-9 DAH) first-fed at 2 and 3 days were significantly higher than 4 and 5 day treatments, and the S(GR) (9-16 DAH) first-fed at 2 days was significantly higher than 3 and 4 day treatments. There was no significant difference, however, of S(GR) (16-28 DAH) among treatments. Survival rate was significantly higher at 2 days initial feeding (27.42%) when compared with 3 (15.96%) and 4 days (7.92%) initial feeding at the end of experiment. The present study suggests that the first feeding of S. scherzeri larvae should be initiated at 2 days after hatching for

  15. Effect of Migration Pathway on Travel Time and Survival of Acoustic-Tagged Juvenile Salmonids in the Columbia River Estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Harnish, Ryan A.; Johnson, Gary E.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Hughes, Michael S.; Ebberts, Blaine D.

    2012-02-01

    Off-channel areas (side channels, tidal flats, sand bars, and shallow-water bays) may serve as important migration corridors through estuarine environments for salmon and steelhead smolts. Relatively large percentages (21-33%) of acoustic-tagged yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts were detected migrating through off-channel areas of the Columbia River estuary in 2008. The probability of survival for off-channel migrants (0.78-0.94) was similar to or greater than the survival probability of main channel migrants (0.67-0.93). Median travel times were similar for all species or run types and migration pathways we examined, ranging from 1-2 d. The route used by smolts to migrate through the estuary may affect their vulnerability to predation. Acoustic-tagged steelhead that migrated nearest to avian predator nesting colonies experienced higher predation rates (24%) than those that migrated farthest from the colonies (10%). The use of multiple migration pathways may be advantageous to out-migrating smolts because it helps to buffer against high rates of mortality, which may occur in localized areas, and helps to minimize inter- and intraspecific competition.

  16. Improving the toughness of ultrahigh strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Koji

    2002-01-01

    The ideal structural steel combines high strength with high fracture toughness. This dissertation discusses the toughening mechanism of the Fe/Co/Ni/Cr/Mo/C steel, AerMet 100, which has the highest toughness/strength combination among all commercial ultrahigh strength steels. The possibility of improving the toughness of this steel was examined by considering several relevant factors. Chapter 1 reviews the mechanical properties of ultrahigh strength steels and the physical metallurgy of AerMet 100. It also describes the fracture mechanisms of steel, i.e. ductile microvoid coalescence, brittle transgranular cleavage, and intergranular separation. Chapter 2 examines the strength-toughness relationship for three heats of AerMet 100. A wide variation of toughness is obtained at the same strength level. The toughness varies despite the fact that all heat fracture in the ductile fracture mode. The difference originates from the inclusion content. Lower inclusion volume fraction and larger inclusion spacing gives rise to a greater void growth factor and subsequently a higher fracture toughness. The fracture toughness value, JIc, is proportional to the particle spacing of the large non-metallic inclusions. Chapter 3 examines the ductile-brittle transition of AerMet 100 and the effect of a higher austenitization temperature, using the Charpy V-notch test. The standard heat treatment condition of AerMet 100 shows a gradual ductile-brittle transition due to its fine effective grain size. Austenitization at higher temperature increases the prior austenite grain size and packet size, leading to a steeper transition at a higher temperature. Both transgranular cleavage and intergranular separation are observed in the brittle fracture mode. Chapter 4 examines the effect of inclusion content, prior austenite grain size, and the amount of austenite on the strength-toughness relationship. The highest toughness is achieved by low inclusion content, small prior austenite grain size

  17. Racial Disparities in Colorectal Carcinoma Incidence, Severity and Survival Times Over 10 Years: A Retrospective Single Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Hafiz Muhammad Sharjeel; Tetangco, Eula; Shah, Natasha; Kabir, Christopher; Raddawi, Hareth

    2016-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Although studies have been performed on malignancy behavior in African Americans and Caucasians, scant data are present on other minority racial groups. Methods A retrospective single center study was performed where 1,860 patient charts with a diagnosis of CRC from January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2014 were reviewed. Data collected on each patient included age, gender, ethnicity, primary site and histological stage at the time of diagnosis. Survival time over the course of 5 years was documented for patients from January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2009. Comparisons were made amongst different racial groups for the above mentioned factors. Results Study population consisted of 27.09% African Americans, 65.61% Caucasians, 3.86% Hispanics, 0.54% South Asians, 1.03% Arabs, 0.54% Asians and 0.22% American Indians. Mean age of CRC presentation was found to be significantly different (P < 0.05) between the three largest racial groups: 71 years for Caucasians, 69 years for African Americans, and 61 years for Hispanics. African Americans (27.09%) and Hispanics (28.79%) presented predominantly at stage IV in comparison to other racial groups. Caucasians presented predominantly at stage III (24.84%). The rectum was the most common site of CRC across all racial groups with the exception of Asians, where sigmoid colon was the predominant site (30%). Adenocarcinoma remained the predominant cancer type in all groups. Hispanics had relatively higher incidence rate of carcinoid tumor (12.68%). Survival time analysis showed that Caucasians tend to have better survival probability over 5 years after initial diagnosis as compared to African Americans and Hispanic (P < 0.05). Conclusion There is lack of studies performed on minority racial groups in North America. Our study highlighted some important clinical differences of CRC presentation in different racial groups which are not

  18. Strength-toughness requirements for thick-walled high pressure vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapp, Joseph A.

    1992-05-01

    The strength and toughness requirements of materials used in high pressure vessels has been the subject of some discussion in the meetings of the Materials Task Group of the Special Working Group - High Pressure Vessels. A fracture mechanics analysis has been performed to theoretically establish the required toughness for a high pressure vessel. The analysis is based on the validity requirement for plane-strain fracture of fracture toughness test specimens. This means that at fracture, the crack length, uncracked ligament, and vessel length must each be greater than fifty times the crack tip plastic zone since for brittle fracture to occur. For high pressure piping applications, the limiting physical dimension is the uncracked ligament, since it can be assumed that the other dimensions are always greater than fifty times the crack tip plastic zone. To perform the fracture mechanics analysis, several parameters must be known, including vessel dimensions, material strength, degree of autofrettage, and design pressure. Remarkably, the results of the analysis show that the effects of radius ratio, pressure, and degree of autofrettage can be ignored when establishing strength and toughness requirements for design code purposes. The only parameters that enter into the calculation are yield strength, toughness and vessel thickness. The final results can easily be represented as a graph of yield strength against toughness on which several curves, one for each vessel thickness, are plotted.

  19. Survival analysis of timing of first marriage among women of reproductive age in Nigeria: regional differences.

    PubMed

    Adebowale, Stephen A; Fagbamigbe, Francis A; Okareh, Titus O; Lawal, Ganiyu O

    2012-12-01

    Early marriage is common among women in developing countries. Age at first marriage (AFM) has health implication on women and their under-five children. In Nigeria, few studies have explored AFM; the current study was designed to fill the gap. Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey, 2008 dataset on married women aged 15-49 (N = 24,986) was used. Chi-square, OLS regression and Cox proportional hazard models were used in the analysis. The mean AFM was 17.8 +/- 4.8 years and significant difference existed between the mean AFM of women in the North (16.0 +/- 3.6) and South (20.4 +/- 5.0) (p < 0.001). Region, education, religion, residence, nutritional status, age at first sexual intercourse and children ever born were significantly associated with timing of first marriage (p < 0.001). Majority of the women married between ages 15-19 years (43.1%), while very few married late (2.3%) and about 27.0% married too early (less than 15 years). Early marriage was more common in all the regions in the North than the South and the hazard was highest in the North West and North East. Women who reside in rural area (H.R = 1.15; C.I = 1.11-1.18) married early than their counterparts in the urban area. Age at first marriage was directly related to levels of education (p < 0.001). Muslim women married early (H.R = 1.34; C.I = 1.29-1.39) than Christians. Three models were generated from the data. Women married too early in Nigeria with Teenage marriage more common in the North than the South. Education has influence on AFM; therefore, women should have at least secondary education before marriage in Nigeria.

  20. TOUGH+ v1.5 Core Code

    2015-08-27

    TOUGH+ v1.5 is a numerical code for the simulation of multi-phase, multi-component flow and transport of mass and heat through porous and fractured media, and represents the third update of the code since its first release [Moridis et al., 2008]. TOUGH+ is a successor to the TOUGH2 [Pruess et al., 1991; 2012] family of codes for multi-component, multiphase fluid and heat flow developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is written in standard FORTRANmore » 95/2003, and can be run on any computational platform (workstations, PC, Macintosh). TOUGH+ v1.5 employs dynamic memory allocation, thus minimizing storage requirements. It has a completely modular structure, follows the tenets of Object-Oriented Programming (OOP), and involves the advanced features of FORTRAN 95/2003, i.e., modules, derived data types, the use of pointers, lists and trees, data encapsulation, defined operators and assignments, operator extension and overloading, use of generic procedures, and maximum use of the powerful intrinsic vector and matrix processing operations. TOUGH+ v1.5 is the core code for its family of applications, i.e., the part of the code that is common to all its applications. It provides a description of the underlying physics and thermodynamics of non-isothermal flow, of the mathematical and numerical approaches, as well as a detailed explanation of the general (common to all applications) input requirements, options, capabilities and output specifications. The core code cannot run by itself: it needs to be coupled with the code for the specific TOUGH+ application option that describes a particular type of problem. The additional input requirements specific to a particular TOUGH+ application options and related illustrative examples can be found in the corresponding User’s Manual.« less

  1. TOUGH+ v1.5 Core Code

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George J.

    2015-08-27

    TOUGH+ v1.5 is a numerical code for the simulation of multi-phase, multi-component flow and transport of mass and heat through porous and fractured media, and represents the third update of the code since its first release [Moridis et al., 2008]. TOUGH+ is a successor to the TOUGH2 [Pruess et al., 1991; 2012] family of codes for multi-component, multiphase fluid and heat flow developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It is written in standard FORTRAN 95/2003, and can be run on any computational platform (workstations, PC, Macintosh). TOUGH+ v1.5 employs dynamic memory allocation, thus minimizing storage requirements. It has a completely modular structure, follows the tenets of Object-Oriented Programming (OOP), and involves the advanced features of FORTRAN 95/2003, i.e., modules, derived data types, the use of pointers, lists and trees, data encapsulation, defined operators and assignments, operator extension and overloading, use of generic procedures, and maximum use of the powerful intrinsic vector and matrix processing operations. TOUGH+ v1.5 is the core code for its family of applications, i.e., the part of the code that is common to all its applications. It provides a description of the underlying physics and thermodynamics of non-isothermal flow, of the mathematical and numerical approaches, as well as a detailed explanation of the general (common to all applications) input requirements, options, capabilities and output specifications. The core code cannot run by itself: it needs to be coupled with the code for the specific TOUGH+ application option that describes a particular type of problem. The additional input requirements specific to a particular TOUGH+ application options and related illustrative examples can be found in the corresponding User’s Manual.

  2. On the fracture toughness of advanced materials

    SciTech Connect

    Launey, Maximilien E.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2008-11-24

    Few engineering materials are limited by their strength; rather they are limited by their resistance to fracture or fracture toughness. It is not by accident that most critical structures, such as bridges, ships, nuclear pressure vessels and so forth, are manufactured from materials that are comparatively low in strength but high in toughness. Indeed, in many classes of materials, strength and toughness are almost mutually exclusive. In the first instance, such resistance to fracture is a function of bonding and crystal structure (or lack thereof), but can be developed through the design of appropriate nano/microstructures. However, the creation of tough microstructures in structural materials, i.e., metals, polymers, ceramics and their composites, is invariably a compromise between resistance to intrinsic damage mechanisms ahead of the tip of a crack (intrinsic toughening) and the formation of crack-tip shielding mechanisms which principally act behind the tip to reduce the effective 'crack-driving force' (extrinsic toughening). Intrinsic toughening is essentially an inherent property of a specific microstructure; it is the dominant form of toughening in ductile (e.g., metallic) materials. However, for most brittle (e.g., ceramic) solids, and this includes many biological materials, it is largely ineffective and toughening conversely must be developed extrinsically, by such shielding mechanisms as crack bridging. From a fracture mechanics perspective, this results in toughening in the form of rising resistance-curve behavior where the fracture resistance actually increases with crack extension. The implication of this is that in many biological and high-strength advanced materials, toughness is developed primarily during crack growth and not for crack initiation. This is an important realization yet is still rarely reflected in the way that toughness is measured, which is invariably involves the use of single-value (crack-initiation) parameters such as the

  3. Survival Impact of Increasing Time to Treatment Initiation for Patients With Head and Neck Cancer in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Colin T.; Handorf, Elizabeth A.; Egleston, Brian L.; Wang, Lora S.; Mehra, Ranee; Flieder, Douglas B.; Ridge, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the overall survival (OS) impact from increasing time to treatment initiation (TTI) for patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods Using the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB), we examined patients who received curative therapy for the following sites: oral tongue, oropharynx, larynx, and hypopharynx. TTI was the number of days from diagnosis to initiation of curative treatment. The effect of TTI on OS was determined by using Cox regression models (MVA). Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) identified TTI thresholds via conditional inference trees to estimate the greatest differences in OS on the basis of randomly selected training and validation sets, and repeated this 1,000 times to ensure robustness of TTI thresholds. Results A total of 51,655 patients were included. On MVA, TTI of 61 to 90 days versus less than 30 days (hazard ratio [HR], 1.13; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.19) independently increased mortality risk. TTI of 67 days appeared as the optimal threshold on the training RPA, statistical significance was confirmed in the validation set (P < .001), and the 67-day TTI was the optimal threshold in 54% of repeated simulations. Overall, 96% of simulations validated two optimal TTI thresholds, with ranges of 46 to 52 days and 62 to 67 days. The median OS for TTI of 46 to 52 days or fewer versus 53 to 67 days versus greater than 67 days was 71.9 months (95% CI, 70.3 to 73.5 months) versus 61 months (95% CI, 57 to 66.1 months) versus 46.6 months (95% CI, 42.8 to 50.7 months), respectively (P < .001). In the most recent year with available data (2011), 25% of patients had TTI of greater than 46 days. Conclusion TTI independently affects survival. One in four patients experienced treatment delay. TTI of greater than 46 to 52 days introduced an increased risk of death that was most consistently detrimental beyond 60 days. Prolonged TTI is currently affecting survival. PMID:26628469

  4. Survival analysis of time to uptake of modern contraceptives among sexually active women of reproductive age in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Adebowale, Ayo Stephen; Morhason-Bello, ImranOludare

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the timing of modern contraceptive uptake among married and never-married women in Nigeria. Design A retrospective cross-sectional study. Data and method We used nationally representative 2013 Demographic and Health Survey data in Nigeria. Modern contraceptive uptake time was measured as the period between first sexual intercourse and first use of a modern contraceptive. Non-users of modern contraceptives were censored on the date of the survey. Kaplan–Meier survival curves were used to determine the rate of uptake. A Cox proportional-hazards model was used to determine variables influencing the uptake at 5% significance level. Participants A total of 33 223 sexually active women of reproductive age. Outcome measure Time of uptake of a modern contraceptive after first sexual intercourse. Results The median modern contraceptive uptake time was 4 years in never-married and 14 years among ever-married women. Significant differences in modern contraceptive uptake existed in respondents’ age, location, education and wealth status. Never-married women were about three times more likely to use a modern contraceptive than ever-married women (aHR=3.24 (95% CI 2.82 to 3.65)). Women with higher education were six times more likely to use a modern contraceptive than those without education (aHR=6.18 (95% CI 5.15 to 7.42)). Conclusions The rate of modern contraceptive uptake is low, and timing of contraceptive uptake during or after first sexual intercourse differed according to marital status. Age and number of children ever born influenced modern contraceptive uptake among the never-married women, but religion and place of residence were associated with the probability of modern contraceptive uptake among ever-married women. PMID:26671948

  5. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MENTAL TOUGHNESS, STRESS, AND BURNOUT AMONG ADOLESCENTS: A LONGITUDINAL STUDY WITH SWISS VOCATIONAL STUDENTS (.).

    PubMed

    Gerber, Markus; Feldmeth, Anne Karina; Lang, Christin; Brand, Serge; Elliot, Catherine; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Pühse, Uwe

    2015-12-01

    Past research has shown that higher stress is associated with increased burnout symptoms. The purpose of this study was to test whether mental toughness protects against symptoms of burnout and whether mental toughness moderates the relationship between perceived stress and burnout over time. Fifty-four vocational students (M age = 18.1 yr., SD = 1.2; 27 males, 27 females) completed self-report questionnaires twice, 10 mo. apart. Perceived stress, mental toughness, and burnout were measured using the Adolescent Stress Questionnaire (ASQ), the Mental Toughness Questionnaire (MTQ), and the Shirom-Melamed Burnout Measure (SMBM). Students who perceived higher stress and lower mental toughness scores reported higher burnout symptoms. Although no significant interaction effects were found between stress and mental toughness in the prediction of burnout, the graphical inspection of the interactions indicated that among students with high stress, those with high mental toughness remained below the cutoff for mild burnout, whereas an increase in burnout symptoms was observable among peers with low mental toughness.

  6. TRITIUM AND DECAY HELIUM EFFECTS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF STAINLESS STEEL WELDMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M; Scott West, S; Michael Tosten, M

    2007-08-31

    J-Integral fracture toughness tests were conducted on tritium-exposed-and-aged Types 304L and 21-6-9 stainless steel weldments in order to measure the combined effects of tritium and its decay product, helium-3 on the fracture toughness properties. Initially, weldments have fracture toughness values about three times higher than base-metal values. Delta-ferrite phase in the weld microstructure improved toughness provided no tritium was present in the microstructure. After a tritium-exposure-and-aging treatment that resulted in {approx}1400 atomic parts per million (appm) dissolved tritium, both weldments and base metals had their fracture toughness values reduced to about the same level. The tritium effect was greater in weldments (67 % reduction vs. 37% reduction) largely because the ductile discontinuous delta-ferrite interfaces were embrittled by tritium and decay helium. Fracture toughness values decreased for both base metals and weldments with increasing decay helium content in the range tested (50-200 appm).

  7. A Neuropsychological Model of Mentally Tough Behavior.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Lew; Bell, James; Beattie, Stuart

    2014-02-01

    Four studies were conducted with two primary objectives: (a) to conceptualize and measure mental toughness from a behavioral perspective and (b) to apply relevant personality theory to the examination of between-person differences in mentally tough behavior. Studies 1 (N = 305 participants from a range of different sports) and 2 (N = 110 high-level cricketers) focused on the development of an informant-rated mental toughness questionnaire that assessed individual differences in ability to maintain or enhance performance under pressure from a wide range of stressors. Studies 3 (N = 214) and 4 (N = 196) examined the relationship between reinforcement sensitivities and mentally tough behavior in high-level cricketers. The highest levels of mental toughness reported by coaches occurred when cricketers were sensitive to punishment and insensitive to reward. Study 4 suggested that such players are predisposed to identify threatening stimuli early, which gives them the best possible opportunity to prepare an effective response to the pressurized environments they encounter. The findings show that high-level cricketers who are punishment sensitive, but not reward sensitive, detect threat early and can maintain goal-directed behavior under pressure from a range of different stressors.

  8. A Neuropsychological Model of Mentally Tough Behavior.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Lew; Bell, James; Beattie, Stuart

    2014-02-01

    Four studies were conducted with two primary objectives: (a) to conceptualize and measure mental toughness from a behavioral perspective and (b) to apply relevant personality theory to the examination of between-person differences in mentally tough behavior. Studies 1 (N = 305 participants from a range of different sports) and 2 (N = 110 high-level cricketers) focused on the development of an informant-rated mental toughness questionnaire that assessed individual differences in ability to maintain or enhance performance under pressure from a wide range of stressors. Studies 3 (N = 214) and 4 (N = 196) examined the relationship between reinforcement sensitivities and mentally tough behavior in high-level cricketers. The highest levels of mental toughness reported by coaches occurred when cricketers were sensitive to punishment and insensitive to reward. Study 4 suggested that such players are predisposed to identify threatening stimuli early, which gives them the best possible opportunity to prepare an effective response to the pressurized environments they encounter. The findings show that high-level cricketers who are punishment sensitive, but not reward sensitive, detect threat early and can maintain goal-directed behavior under pressure from a range of different stressors. PMID:23437782

  9. The conflicts between strength and toughness.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Robert O

    2011-11-01

    The attainment of both strength and toughness is a vital requirement for most structural materials; unfortunately these properties are generally mutually exclusive. Although the quest continues for stronger and harder materials, these have little to no use as bulk structural materials without appropriate fracture resistance. It is the lower-strength, and hence higher-toughness, materials that find use for most safety-critical applications where premature or, worse still, catastrophic fracture is unacceptable. For these reasons, the development of strong and tough (damage-tolerant) materials has traditionally been an exercise in compromise between hardness versus ductility. Drawing examples from metallic glasses, natural and biological materials, and structural and biomimetic ceramics, we examine some of the newer strategies in dealing with this conflict. Specifically, we focus on the interplay between the mechanisms that individually contribute to strength and toughness, noting that these phenomena can originate from very different lengthscales in a material's structural architecture. We show how these new and natural materials can defeat the conflict of strength versus toughness and achieve unprecedented levels of damage tolerance within their respective material classes. PMID:22020005

  10. The conflicts between strength and toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, Robert O.

    2011-11-01

    The attainment of both strength and toughness is a vital requirement for most structural materials; unfortunately these properties are generally mutually exclusive. Although the quest continues for stronger and harder materials, these have little to no use as bulk structural materials without appropriate fracture resistance. It is the lower-strength, and hence higher-toughness, materials that find use for most safety-critical applications where premature or, worse still, catastrophic fracture is unacceptable. For these reasons, the development of strong and tough (damage-tolerant) materials has traditionally been an exercise in compromise between hardness versus ductility. Drawing examples from metallic glasses, natural and biological materials, and structural and biomimetic ceramics, we examine some of the newer strategies in dealing with this conflict. Specifically, we focus on the interplay between the mechanisms that individually contribute to strength and toughness, noting that these phenomena can originate from very different lengthscales in a material's structural architecture. We show how these new and natural materials can defeat the conflict of strength versus toughness and achieve unprecedented levels of damage tolerance within their respective material classes.

  11. Conditional survival estimates improve over time for patients with advanced melanoma: results from a population-based analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yan; Chang, George J.; Hu, Chung-Yuan; Askew, Robert L.; Ross, Merrick I.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Mansfield, Paul F.; Lucci, Anthony; Cormier, Janice N.

    2009-01-01

    Background Conditional survival (CS) has emerged as a clinically relevant measure of prognosis for cancer survivors. The objective of this analysis was to provide melanoma-specific CS estimates to help clinicians promote more informed patient decision-making. Methods Patients with melanoma and at least 5 years of follow-up were identified from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registry (1988–2000). Using the methods of Kaplan and Meier, stage-specific 5-year CS estimates were independently calculated for survivors for each year following diagnosis. Stage-specific multivariate Cox regression models including baseline survivor functions were used to calculate adjusted melanoma-specific CS for different subgroups of patients further stratified by age, gender, race, marital status, anatomic tumor location, and tumor histology. Results Five-year CS estimates for stage I patients remained constant at 97% annually, while for patients with stages II, III and IV disease, 5-year CS estimates from time 0 (diagnosis) to 5 years improved from 72% to 86%, 51% to 87%, and 19% to 84%, respectively. Multivariate CS analysis revealed that differences in stages II through IV CS based on age, gender and race decreased over time. Conclusions Five-year melanoma-specific CS estimates improve dramatically over time for survivors with advanced stages of disease. These prognostic data are critical to patients for both treatment and non-treatment related life decisions. PMID:20187100

  12. Expression of S1P metabolizing enzymes and receptors correlate with survival time and regulate cell migration in glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Bien-Möller, Sandra; Lange, Sandra; Holm, Tobias; Böhm, Andreas; Paland, Heiko; Küpper, Johannes; Herzog, Susann; Weitmann, Kerstin; Havemann, Christoph; Vogelgesang, Silke; Marx, Sascha; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Schroeder, Henry W.S.; Rauch, Bernhard H.

    2016-01-01

    A signaling molecule which is involved in proliferation and migration of malignant cells is the lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). There are hints for a potential role of S1P signaling in malignant brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) which is characterized by a poor prognosis. Therefore, a comprehensive expression analysis of S1P receptors (S1P1-S1P5) and S1P metabolizing enzymes in human GBM (n = 117) compared to healthy brain (n = 10) was performed to evaluate their role for patient's survival. Furthermore, influence of S1P receptor inhibition on proliferation and migration were studied in LN18 GBM cells. Compared to control brain, mRNA levels of S1P1, S1P2, S1P3 and S1P generating sphingosine kinase-1 were elevated in GBM. Kaplan-Meier analyses demonstrated an association between S1P1 and S1P2 with patient's survival times. In vitro, an inhibitory effect of the SphK inhibitor SKI-II on viability of LN18 cells was shown. S1P itself had no effect on viability but stimulated LN18 migration which was blocked by inhibition of S1P1 and S1P2. The participation of S1P1 and S1P2 in LN18 migration was further supported by siRNA-mediated silencing of these receptors. Immunoblots and inhibition experiments suggest an involvement of the PI3-kinase/AKT1 pathway in the chemotactic effect of S1P in LN18 cells. In summary, our data argue for a role of S1P signaling in proliferation and migration of GBM cells. Individual components of the S1P pathway represent prognostic factors for patients with GBM. Perspectively, a selective modulation of S1P receptor subtypes could represent a therapeutic approach for GBM patients and requires further evaluation. PMID:26887055

  13. Fracture toughness and strength of 96% alumina

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.B.; Chinn, R.E.; McNerney, K.R.; Brog, T.K.; Kim, C.Y.; Krutyholowa, M.W.; Chen, N.W.; Haun, M.J.

    1997-05-01

    There exists a need to understand the controlling factors that simultaneously impact strength and toughness in 96% alumina. The enhancement of both strength and toughness enables designers to extend the use limits and reliability for structural ceramics. This article presents mechanical property results from a group study examining the use of different alkaline-earth aluminosilicate intergranular compositions containing magnesium, calcium and strontium oxides (RO) in 96% alumina. Principal results address trends in indentation strength toughness and modulus of rupture. Trends in the data are presented relative to existing theories of thermal expansion mismatch toughening, grain-bridging crack-wake effect and crack deflection mechanisms. Strength is addressed in terms of strength after indentation, crack growth of indentation flaws and Weibull characterization for the strength distribution.

  14. TOUGH2 User's Guide Version 2

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Moridis, G.J.

    1999-11-01

    TOUGH2 is a numerical simulator for nonisothermal flows of multicomponent, multiphase fluids in one, two, and three-dimensional porous and fractured media. The chief applications for which TOUGH2 is designed are in geothermal reservoir engineering, nuclear waste disposal, environmental assessment and remediation, and unsaturated and saturated zone hydrology. TOUGH2 was first released to the public in 1991; the 1991 code was updated in 1994 when a set of preconditioned conjugate gradient solvers was added to allow a more efficient solution of large problems. The current Version 2.0 features several new fluid property modules and offers enhanced process modeling capabilities, such as coupled reservoir-wellbore flow, precipitation and dissolution effects, and multiphase diffusion. Numerous improvements in previously released modules have been made and new user features have been added, such as enhanced linear equation solvers, and writing of graphics files. The T2VOC module for three-phase flows of water, air and a volatile organic chemical (VOC), and the T2DM module for hydrodynamic dispersion in 2-D flow systems have been integrated into the overall structure of the code and are included in the Version 2.0 package. Data inputs are upwardly compatible with the previous version. Coding changes were generally kept to a minimum, and were only made as needed to achieve the additional functionalities desired. TOUGH2 is written in standard FORTRAN77 and can be run on any platform, such as workstations, PCs, Macintosh, mainframe and supercomputers, for which appropriate FORTRAN compilers are available. This report is a self-contained guide to application of TOUGH2 to subsurface flow problems. It gives a technical description of the TOUGH2 code, including a discussion of the physical processes modeled, and the mathematical and numerical methods used. Illustrative sample problems are presented along with detailed instructions for preparing input data.

  15. Fracture Toughness Prediction for MWCNT Reinforced Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep

    2013-09-01

    This report describes the development of a micromechanics model to predict fracture toughness of multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced ceramic composites to guide future experimental work for this project. The modeling work described in this report includes (i) prediction of elastic properties, (ii) development of a mechanistic damage model accounting for matrix cracking to predict the composite nonlinear stress/strain response to tensile loading to failure, and (iii) application of this damage model in a modified boundary layer (MBL) analysis using ABAQUS to predict fracture toughness and crack resistance behavior (R-curves) for ceramic materials containing MWCNTs at various volume fractions.

  16. Influence of estrus expression prior to fixed-time AI on embryo survival to maternal recognition of pregnancy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estradiol has been reported to play a critical role in pregnancy establishment and embryonic survival. Our objective was to focus on the role of preovulatory estradiol in embryo survival from fertilization to maternal recognition of pregnancy. Beef cows (n = 29) were synchronized with the CO-Synch p...

  17. An exploratory discrete-time multilevel analysis of the effect of social support on the survival of elderly people in China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhixin; Jones, Kelvyn; Wang, Wenfei Winnie

    2015-04-01

    This study undertakes a survival analysis of elderly persons in China using Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey 2002-2008. Employing discrete-time multilevel models, we explored the effect of social support on the survival of elderly people in China. This study focuses on objective (living arrangements and received support) and subjective activities (perceived support) of social support, finding that the effect of different activities of social support on the survival of elderly people varies according to the availability of different support resources. Specifically, living with a spouse, financial independence, perceiving care support from any resource is associated with higher survival rates for elderly people. Separate analysis focusing on urban elderly and rural elderly revealed broadly similar results. There is a larger difference between those perceiving care support from family or social service and not perceiving care support in urban areas comparing to those in rural areas. Those who cannot pay medical expenses are the least likely to survive. The higher level of economic development in province has no significant effect on the survival of elderly people for the whole sample model and the elderly people in urban areas; however, there is a negative influence on the survival of the rural elderly people.

  18. An exploratory discrete-time multilevel analysis of the effect of social support on the survival of elderly people in China

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhixin; Jones, Kelvyn; Wang, Wenfei Winnie

    2015-01-01

    This study undertakes a survival analysis of elderly persons in China using Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey 2002–2008. Employing discrete-time multilevel models, we explored the effect of social support on the survival of elderly people in China. This study focuses on objective (living arrangements and received support) and subjective activities (perceived support) of social support, finding that the effect of different activities of social support on the survival of elderly people varies according to the availability of different support resources. Specifically, living with a spouse, financial independence, perceiving care support from any resource is associated with higher survival rates for elderly people. Separate analysis focusing on urban elderly and rural elderly revealed broadly similar results. There is a larger difference between those perceiving care support from family or social service and not perceiving care support in urban areas comparing to those in rural areas. Those who cannot pay medical expenses are the least likely to survive. The higher level of economic development in province has no significant effect on the survival of elderly people for the whole sample model and the elderly people in urban areas; however, there is a negative influence on the survival of the rural elderly people. PMID:25703671

  19. Fluid-driven cracks in an elastic matrix in the toughness-dominated limit.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ching-Yao; Zheng, Zhong; Dressaire, Emilie; Stone, Howard A

    2016-10-13

    The dynamics of fluid-driven cracks in an elastic matrix is studied experimentally. We report the crack radius R(t) as a function of time, as well as the crack shapes w(r,t) as a function of space and time. A dimensionless parameter, the pressure ratio Δpf/Δpv, is identified to gauge the relative importance between the toughness (Δpf) and viscous (Δpv) effects. In our previous paper (Lai et al. 2015 Proc. R. Soc. A 471, 20150255. (doi:10.1098/rspa.2015.0255)), we investigated the viscous limit experimentally when the toughness-related stresses are negligible for the crack propagation. In this paper, the experimental parameters, i.e. Young's modulus E of the gelatin, viscosity μ of the fracturing liquid and the injection flow rate Q, were chosen so that the viscous effects in the flow are negligible compared with the toughness effects, i.e. Δpf/Δpv≫1. In this limit, the crack dynamics can be described by the toughness-dominated scaling laws, which give the crack radius R(t)∝t(2/5) and the half maximum crack thickness W(t)∝t(1/5) The experimental results are in good agreement with the predictions of the toughness scaling laws: the experimental data for crack radius R(t) for a wide range of parameters (E,μ,Q) collapse after being rescaled by the toughness scaling laws, and the rescaled crack shapes w(r,t) also collapse to a dimensionless shape, which demonstrates the self-similarity of the crack shape. The appropriate choice of the viscous or toughness scaling laws is important to accurately describe the crack dynamics.This article is part of the themed issue 'Energy and the subsurface'. PMID:27597782

  20. Investigating Whether and When English Learners are Reclassified into Mainstream Classrooms in the United States: A Discrete-Time Survival Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slama, Rachel B.

    2014-01-01

    Using eight waves of longitudinal data on a statewide kindergarten cohort of English learners (ELs), I examined ELs' tenure in language-learning programs and their academic performance following reclassification as fluent English proficient. I employed discrete-time survival analysis to estimate the average time to and grade of reclassification…

  1. Notch Fracture Toughness of Glasses: Dependence on Rate, Age, and Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasoya, Manish; Rycroft, Chris H.; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the fracture toughness (resistance) of glasses is a fundamental problem of prime theoretical and practical importance. Here we theoretically study its dependence on the loading rate, the age (history) of the glass, and the notch radius ρ . Reduced-dimensionality analysis suggests that the notch fracture toughness results from a competition between the initial, age- and history-dependent, plastic relaxation time scale τ0pl and an effective loading time scale τext(K˙ I,ρ ) , where K˙ I is the tensile stress-intensity-factor rate. The toughness is predicted to scale with √{ρ } independently of ξ ≡τext/τ0pl for ξ ≪1 , to scale as T √{ρ }log (ξ ) for ξ ≫1 (related to thermal activation, where T is the temperature), and to feature a nonmonotonic behavior in the crossover region ξ ˜O (1 ) (related to plastic yielding dynamics). These predictions are verified using 2D computations, providing a unified picture of the notch fracture toughness of glasses. The theory highlights the importance of time-scale competition and far-from-steady-state elasto-viscoplastic dynamics for understanding the toughness and shows that the latter varies quite significantly with the glass age (history) and applied loading rate. Experimental support for bulk metallic glasses is presented, and possible implications for applications are discussed.

  2. Mechanical Behavior of Tough Hydrogels for Structural Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illeperuma, Widusha Ruwangi Kaushalya

    Hydrogels are widely used in many commercial products including Jell-O, contact lenses, and superabsorbent diapers. In recent decades, hydrogels have been under intense development for biomedical applications, such as scaffolds in tissue engineering, carriers for drug delivery, and valves in microfluidic systems. But the scope is severely limited as conventional hydrogels are weak and brittle and are not very stretchable. This thesis investigates the approaches that enhance the mechanical properties of hydrogels and their structural applications. We discov¬ered a class of exceptionally stretchable and tough hydrogels made from poly-mers that form networks via ionic and covalent crosslinks. Although such a hydrogel contains ~90% water, it can be stretched beyond 20 times its initial length, and has a fracture energy of ~9000 J/m2. The combination of large stretchability, remarkable toughness, and recoverability of stiffness and toughness, along with easy synthesis makes this material much superior over existing hydrogels. Extreme stretchability and blunted crack tips of these hydrogels question the validity of traditional fracture testing methods. We re-examine a widely used pure shear test method to measure the fracture energy. With the experimental and simulation results, we conclude that the pure shear test method can be used to measure fracture energy of extremely stretchable materials. Even though polyacrylamide-alginate hydrogels have an extremely high toughness, it has a relatively low stiffness and strength. We improved the stiffness and strength by embedding fibers. Most hydrogels are brittle, allowing the fibers to cut through the hydrogel when the composite is loaded. But tough hydrogel composites do not fail by the fibers cutting the hydrogel; instead, it undergoes large deforming by fibers sliding through the matrix. Hydrogels were not considered as materials for structural applications. But with enhanced mechanical properties, they have opened up

  3. Adipose-derived Stem Cell Conditioned Media Extends Survival time of a mouse model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fontanilla, Christine V; Gu, Huiying; Liu, Qingpeng; Zhu, Timothy Z; Zhou, Changwei; Johnstone, Brian H; March, Keith L; Pascuzzi, Robert M; Farlow, Martin R; Du, Yansheng

    2015-11-20

    Adipose stromal cells (ASC) secrete various trophic factors that assist in the protection of neurons in a variety of neuronal death models. In this study, we tested the effects of human ASC conditional medium (ASC-CM) in human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) transgenic mouse model expressing mutant superoxide dismutase (SOD1(G93A)). Treating symptomatic SOD1(G93A) mice with ASC-CM significantly increased post-onset survival time and lifespan. Moreover, SOD1(G93A) mice given ASC-CM treatment showed high motor neuron counts, less activation of microglia and astrocytes at an early symptomatic stage in the spinal cords under immunohistochemical analysis. SOD1(G93A) mice treated with ASC-CM for 7 days showed reduced levels of phosphorylated p38 (pp38) in the spinal cord, a mitogen-activated protein kinase that is involved in both inflammation and neuronal death. Additionally, the levels of α-II spectrin in spinal cords were also inhibited in SOD1(G93A) mice treated with ASC-CM for 3 days. Interestingly, nerve growth factor (NGF), a neurotrophic factor found in ASC-CM, played a significant role in the protection of neurodegeneration inSOD1(G93A) mouse. These results indicate that ASC-CM has the potential to develop into a novel and effective therapeutic treatment for ALS.

  4. Adipose-derived Stem Cell Conditioned Media Extends Survival time of a mouse model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fontanilla, Christine V.; Gu, Huiying; Liu, Qingpeng; Zhu, Timothy Z.; Zhou, Changwei; Johnstone, Brian H.; March, Keith L.; Pascuzzi, Robert M.; Farlow, Martin R.; Du, Yansheng

    2015-01-01

    Adipose stromal cells (ASC) secrete various trophic factors that assist in the protection of neurons in a variety of neuronal death models. In this study, we tested the effects of human ASC conditional medium (ASC-CM) in human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) transgenic mouse model expressing mutant superoxide dismutase (SOD1G93A). Treating symptomatic SOD1G93A mice with ASC-CM significantly increased post-onset survival time and lifespan. Moreover, SOD1G93A mice given ASC-CM treatment showed high motor neuron counts, less activation of microglia and astrocytes at an early symptomatic stage in the spinal cords under immunohistochemical analysis. SOD1G93A mice treated with ASC-CM for 7 days showed reduced levels of phosphorylated p38 (pp38) in the spinal cord, a mitogen-activated protein kinase that is involved in both inflammation and neuronal death. Additionally, the levels of α-II spectrin in spinal cords were also inhibited in SOD1G93A mice treated with ASC-CM for 3 days. Interestingly, nerve growth factor (NGF), a neurotrophic factor found in ASC-CM, played a significant role in the protection of neurodegeneration inSOD1G93A mouse. These results indicate that ASC-CM has the potential to develop into a novel and effective therapeutic treatment for ALS. PMID:26586020

  5. Veins Improve Fracture Toughness of Insect Wings

    PubMed Central

    Dirks, Jan-Henning; Taylor, David

    2012-01-01

    During the lifetime of a flying insect, its wings are subjected to mechanical forces and deformations for millions of cycles. Defects in the micrometre thin membranes or veins may reduce the insect’s flight performance. How do insects prevent crack related material failure in their wings and what role does the characteristic vein pattern play? Fracture toughness is a parameter, which characterises a material’s resistance to crack propagation. Our results show that, compared to other body parts, the hind wing membrane of the migratory locust S. gregaria itself is not exceptionally tough (1.04±0.25 MPa√m). However, the cross veins increase the wing’s toughness by 50% by acting as barriers to crack propagation. Using fracture mechanics, we show that the morphological spacing of most wing veins matches the critical crack length of the material (1132 µm). This finding directly demonstrates how the biomechanical properties and the morphology of locust wings are functionally correlated in locusts, providing a mechanically ‘optimal’ solution with high toughness and low weight. The vein pattern found in insect wings thus might inspire the design of more durable and lightweight artificial ‘venous’ wings for micro-air-vehicles. Using the vein spacing as indicator, our approach might also provide a basis to estimate the wing properties of endangered or extinct insect species. PMID:22927966

  6. Tough Ceramic Mimics Mother of Pearl

    ScienceCinema

    Ritchie, Robert

    2016-07-12

    Berkeley Lab scientists have mimicked the structure of mother of pearl to create what may well be the toughest ceramic ever produced. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2008/12/05/scientists-create-tough-ceramic-that-mimics-mother-of-pearl/

  7. Animacy and the Acquisition of "Tough" Adjectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Misha

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on two novel word-learning experiments examining children's use of subject animacy to categorize novel adjectives as either "tough" adjectives (e.g., "easy," "hard") or control adjectives ("afraid," "eager"). In Experiment 1, a group of 4- to 7-year-olds watched videos…

  8. Proceedings of the TOUGH Symposium 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George J.; Doughty, Christine; Finsterle, Stefan; Sonnenthal, Eric

    2009-10-01

    Welcome to the TOUGH Symposium 2009. Within this volume are the Symposium Program for eighty-nine papers to be presented in both oral and poster formats. The full papers are available as pdfs linked from the Symposium Program posted on the TOUGH Symposium 2009 website http://esd.lbl.gov/newsandevents/events/toughsymposium09/program.html Additional updated information including any changes to the Program will also be available at the website. The papers cover a wide range of application areas and reflect the continuing trend toward increased sophistication of the TOUGH codes. A CD containing the proceedings papers will be published immediately following the Symposium and sent to all participants. As in the prior Symposium, selected papers will be invited for submission to a number of journals for inclusion in Special Issues focused on applications and developments of the TOUGH codes. These journals include, Transport in Porous Media, Geothermics, Energy Conversion and Management, Journal of Nuclear Science and Technology, and the Vadose Zone Journal.

  9. Tough Ceramic Mimics Mother of Pearl

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Berkeley Lab scientists have mimicked the structure of mother of pearl to create what may well be the toughest ceramic ever produced. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2008/12/05/scientists-create-tough-ceramic-that-mimics-mother-of-pearl/

  10. Laboratory Powder Metallurgy Makes Tough Aluminum Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royster, D. M.; Thomas, J. R.; Singleton, O. R.

    1993-01-01

    Aluminum alloy sheet exhibits high tensile and Kahn tear strengths. Rapid solidification of aluminum alloys in powder form and subsequent consolidation and fabrication processes used to tailor parts made of these alloys to satisfy such specific aerospace design requirements as high strength and toughness.

  11. 46 CFR 154.605 - Toughness test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Toughness test. 154.605 Section 154.605 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Materials §...

  12. Veins improve fracture toughness of insect wings.

    PubMed

    Dirks, Jan-Henning; Taylor, David

    2012-01-01

    During the lifetime of a flying insect, its wings are subjected to mechanical forces and deformations for millions of cycles. Defects in the micrometre thin membranes or veins may reduce the insect's flight performance. How do insects prevent crack related material failure in their wings and what role does the characteristic vein pattern play? Fracture toughness is a parameter, which characterises a material's resistance to crack propagation. Our results show that, compared to other body parts, the hind wing membrane of the migratory locust S. gregaria itself is not exceptionally tough (1.04±0.25 MPa√m). However, the cross veins increase the wing's toughness by 50% by acting as barriers to crack propagation. Using fracture mechanics, we show that the morphological spacing of most wing veins matches the critical crack length of the material (1132 µm). This finding directly demonstrates how the biomechanical properties and the morphology of locust wings are functionally correlated in locusts, providing a mechanically 'optimal' solution with high toughness and low weight. The vein pattern found in insect wings thus might inspire the design of more durable and lightweight artificial 'venous' wings for micro-air-vehicles. Using the vein spacing as indicator, our approach might also provide a basis to estimate the wing properties of endangered or extinct insect species.

  13. Precise survival time and physical activity after fatal left ventricle injury from sharp pointed weapon: a case report and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Angélique; Kolopp, Martin; Coudane, Henry; Martrille, Laurent

    2016-09-01

    Survival time and physical activity following fatal injury are especially important during investigation of homicide cases and the estimation of a victim's survival time and physical activity following a fatal injury from a sharp weapon is a commonly raised issue, particularly at trial. According to the literature, survival time and physical activity after cardiac damage are short-term estimates without high accuracy. We report the homicide case of a young man who died as a result of a left ventricle injury caused by a sharp pointed weapon. This case is based on evidence from a video surveillance camera that recorded the whole scene after the fatal injury: The victim showed an adapted physical activity for 38 s, although the left ventricle incision measured 2 cm. Despite several cases in the literature, it is not possible to correlate precisely the size of the wounds and the acting capability.

  14. Precise survival time and physical activity after fatal left ventricle injury from sharp pointed weapon: a case report and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Angélique; Kolopp, Martin; Coudane, Henry; Martrille, Laurent

    2016-09-01

    Survival time and physical activity following fatal injury are especially important during investigation of homicide cases and the estimation of a victim's survival time and physical activity following a fatal injury from a sharp weapon is a commonly raised issue, particularly at trial. According to the literature, survival time and physical activity after cardiac damage are short-term estimates without high accuracy. We report the homicide case of a young man who died as a result of a left ventricle injury caused by a sharp pointed weapon. This case is based on evidence from a video surveillance camera that recorded the whole scene after the fatal injury: The victim showed an adapted physical activity for 38 s, although the left ventricle incision measured 2 cm. Despite several cases in the literature, it is not possible to correlate precisely the size of the wounds and the acting capability. PMID:26914799

  15. Fracture toughness testing data: A technology survey and bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuhrke, W. F.; Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Moya, N.; Mandel, G.

    1975-01-01

    Announced survey includes reports covering fracture toughness testing for various structural materials including information on plane strain and developing areas of mixed mode and plane strain test conditions. Bibliography references cite work and conclusions in fracture toughness testing and application of fracture toughness test data, and in fracture mechanics analysis.

  16. 46 CFR 54.05-5 - Toughness test specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Toughness Tests § 54.05-5 Toughness test specimens. (a) Charpy V-notch impact tests. Where required, Charpy... used to qualify materials within the scope of this subpart. Each set of Charpy impact tests shall... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Toughness test specimens. 54.05-5 Section...

  17. The limit of strength and toughness of steel

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Zhen

    2001-12-17

    The ideal structural steel combines high strength with high fracture toughness. This dissertation discusses the governing principles of strength and toughness, along with the approaches that can be used to improve these properties and the inherent limits to how strong and tough a steel can be.

  18. Fracture toughness of human bone under tension.

    PubMed

    Norman, T L; Vashishth, D; Burr, D B

    1995-03-01

    The longitudinal fracture toughnesses of human cortical bone were compared to those of bovine cortical bone to test the hypothesis that although human osteonal bone is significantly weaker and more compliant than primary (plexiform) bone, it is not less tough than primary bone. The fracture toughness indices, critical strain energy release rate (Gc) and critical stress intensity factor (Kc), were determined for human Haversian bone and bovine bone under tension (Mode I) loading using the compact tension method. The effects of thickness, crack growth range and anisotropy on fracture indices for slow stable crack growth in cortical bone were determined. Plane strain assumptions required for application of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) to bone were investigated. Longitudinal oriented fracture toughness tests were used to assess the crack inhibiting effect of human bone microstructure on fracture resistance. Human bone Kc calculated from the stress concentration formula for 2 and 3 mm thick specimens equaled 4.32 and 4.05 MN m-3/2, respectively. Human bone Gc calculated from the compliance method equaled 827 N m-1 for 2 mm thick specimens and 595 N m-1 for 3 mm thick specimens. It was found that crack growth range, thickness and material assumptions affect fracture toughness. Kc calculated from Gc using an anisotropic relation provided the lowest estimate of Kc and equaled 3.31 MN m-3/2 for 2 mm thick specimens and 2.81 MN m-3/2 for 3 mm thick specimens. Both Kc and Gc were significantly reduced after being adjusted to ASTM standard thickness using ratios determined from bovine bone. The fracture toughness of bovine bone relative to human bone ranged from 1.08 to 1.66. This was compared to the longitudinal strength of bovine bone relative to the longitudinal strength of human bone which is approximately equal to 1.5. We found that even though human bone is significantly weaker than bovine bone, relative to its strength, the toughness of human and bovine bone

  19. Anuran larval developmental plasticity and survival in response to variable salinity of ecologically relevant timing and magnitude.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Brian D; Pell, Rebecca J; Byrne, Phillip G; Reina, Richard D

    2014-12-01

    Salinity in affected freshwater ecosystems fluctuates with seasonal rainfall, tidal flux, rates of evaporation, chemical runoff and the influence of secondary salinization. Environmental stressors such as salinity can have lasting effects on anuran development, yet little is known about the effects of fluctuating salinity on tadpole ontogeny or the effects of differing magnitudes of salinity exposure, as would occur in natural wetland systems. We examined how salinity fluctuations affected survival, growth and development of Litoria ewingii by exposing tadpoles to a range of salinity concentrations (5.6-10.85 ppt) at three different stages of development (hind limb-bud formation; toe differentiation and forearm development). We also investigated the plasticity of tadpole growth rates in response to non-lethal, transient salinity influxes, specifically examining the capacity for compensatory growth and its relationship to the timing, magnitude or frequency of salinity exposure. Our results show that later-stage tadpoles are more tolerant to elevated salinity than those exposed at a younger age, and that exposure to high salinity later in life suppresses the potential for compensatory growth. Tadpoles exposed to transient low salinity lost less mass during metamorphosis than animals in constant salinity treatments, indicating a possible alternate to compensatory growth. Exposure to near-lethal salinities early in development did not alter tadpole responses to subsequent salinity stress. Our results provide some of the first evidence that both the timing and magnitude of transient environmental stressors can have an effect on anuran development and developmental trade-offs in a stressful environment.

  20. Evaluation of the 2008 Predictions of Run-Timing and Survival of Wild Migrant Yearling Chinook and Steelhead on the Columbia and Snake Rivers.

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, W. Nicholas; Iltis, Susannah; Anderson, James J.

    2009-01-01

    Columbia Basin Research uses the COMPASS model on a daily basis during the outmigration of Snake River Chinook and steelhead smolts to predict downstream passage and survival. Fish arrival predictions and observations from program RealTime along with predicted and observed environmental conditions are used to make in-season predictions of arrival and survival to various dams in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. For 2008, calibrations of travel and survival parameters for two stocks of fish-Snake River yearling PIT-tagged wild chinook salmon (chin1pit) and Snake River PIT-tagged steelhead (lgrStlhd)-were used to model travel and survival of steelhead and chinook stocks from Lower Granite Dam (LWG) or McNary Dam (MCN) to Bonneville Dam (BON). This report summarizes the success of the COMPASS/RealTime process to model these migrations as they occur. We compared model results on timing and survival to data from two sources: stock specific counts at dams and end-of-season control survival estimates (Jim Faulkner, NOAA, pers. comm. Dec. 16, 2008). The difference between the predicted and observed day of median passage and the Mean Absolute Deviation (MAD) between predicted and observed arrival cumulative distributions are measures of timing accuracy. MAD is essentially the average percentage error over the season. The difference between the predicted and observed survivals is a measure of survival accuracy. Model results and timing data were in good agreement from LWG to John Day Dam (JDA). Predictions of median passage days for the chin1pit and lgrStlhd stocks were 0 and 2 days (respectively) later than observed. MAD for chin1pit and lgrStlhd stocks at JDA were 2.3% and 5.9% (respectively). Between JDA and BON modeling and timing data were not as well matched. At BON, median passage predictions were 6 and 10 days later than observed and MAD values were 7.8% and 16.0% respectively. Model results and survival data were in good agreement from LWG to MCN. COMPASS predicted

  1. Gas pressure sintering of silicon nitride to optimize fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Tiegs, T.N.; Nunn, S.D.; Beavers, T.M.; Menchhofer, P.A.; Barker, D.L.; Coffey, D.W.

    1995-06-01

    Gas-pressure sintering (GPS) can be used to densify silicon nitride containing a wide variety of sintering additives. Parameters affecting the sintering behavior include densification temperature, densification time, grain growth temperature, grain growth time and heating rates. The Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-6% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-2% A1{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples sintered to high densities at all conditions used in the present study, whereas the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-Sr{sub 2}La{sub 4}Yb{sub 4}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2} samples required the highest temperatures and longest times to achieve densities {ge}98 % T. D. The main effect on the fracture toughness for Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-6% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-2% A1{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples was the use of a lower densification temperature, which was 1900C in the present study. For the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-Sr{sub 2}La{sub 4}Yb{sub 4}SiO4{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2} composition, fracture toughness was sensitive to and improved by a slower heating rate (10c/min), a lower densification temperature (1900`), a higher grain growth temperature (2000C), and a longer grain growth time (2 h).

  2. Technology Tools for the Tough Tasks: Plug in for Great Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Fran

    2012-01-01

    There are a lot of easy-to-use online tools that can help teachers and administrators with the tough tasks involved in running efficient, responsive, and intentional programs. The efficiencies offered through these systems allow busy educators to spend less time managing information and more time doing the work that matters the most--working with…

  3. Long-term consequences of variation in timing and manner of fry introduction on juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) growth, survival, and life-history expression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Letcher, B.H.; Dubreuil, T.; O'Donnell, M. J.; Obedzinski, M.; Griswold, K.; Nislow, K.H.

    2004-01-01

    We tested the influence of introduction time and the manner of introduction on growth, survival, and life-history expression of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). Introduction treatments included three fry stocking times and stream rearing of embryos. Despite poor growth conditions during the early stocking period, early-stocked fish were larger throughout the entire study period, likely the result of prior residence advantage. This interpretation was reinforced by the laboratory study, where early-stocked fish outgrew late-stocked fish when reared together, but not when they were reared separately. In contrast to growth, abundance of stocked fish was greatest for fish stocked during the middle period, and this stocking group produced the greatest number of smolts. Despite smaller size, survival of stream-incubated fish was generally greater than survival of stocked fish. Introduction timing had a pronounced effect on smolt age but a weak effect on extent of parr maturation. Overall, these observations indicate that small differences (???2 weeks) in introduction time can have long-term effects on size, survival, and life-history expression. Results suggest stabilizing selection on introduction times, mediated by the interaction between prior residence (advantage to fish introduced earlier) and habitat suitability (advantage to fish introduced later). ?? 2004 NRC Canada.

  4. Survival of timber rattlesnakes (Crotalus horridus) estimated by capture-recapture models in relation to age, sex, color morph, time, and birthplace

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, W.S.; Kery, M.; Hines, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Juvenile survival is one of the least known elements of the life history of many species, in particular snakes. We conducted a mark-recapture study of Crotalus horridus from 1978-2002 in northeastern New York near the northern limits of the species' range. We marked 588 neonates and estimated annual age-, sex-, and morph-specific recapture and survival rates using the Cormack-Jolly-Seber (CJS) model. Wild-caught neonates (field-born, n = 407) and neonates produced by captive-held gravid females (lab-born, n = 181) allowed comparison of the birthplace, or lab treatment effect, in estimated survival. Recapture rates declined from about 10-20% over time while increasing from young to older age classes. Estimated survival rates (S ' 1 SE) in the first year were significantly higher among field-born (black morph: S = 0.773 ' 0.203; yellow morph: S = 0.531 ' 0.104) than among lab-born snakes (black morph: S = 0.411 ' 0.131; yellow morph: S = 0.301 ' 0.081). Lower birth weights combined with a lack of field exposure until release apparently contributed to the lower survival rate of lab-born snakes. Subsequent survival estimates for 2-4-yr-old snakes were S = 0.845 ' 0.084 for the black morph and S = 0.999 (SE not available) for the yellow morph, and for >= 5-yr-old snakes S = 0.958 ' 0.039 (black morph) and S = 0.822 ' 0.034 (yellow morph). The most parsimonious model overall contained an independent time trend for survival of each age, morph, and lab-treatment group. For snakes of the first two age groups (ages 1 yr and 2-4 yr), survival tended to decline over the years for both morphs, while for adult snakes (5 yr and older), survival was constant or even slightly increased. Our data on survival and recapture are among the first rigorous estimates of these parameters in a rattlesnake and among the few yet available for any viperid snake. These data are useful for analyses of the life-history strategy, population dynamics, and conservation of this long-lived snake.

  5. Survival of timber rattlesnakes (Crotalus horridus) estimated by capture-recapture models in relation to age, sex, color morph, time, and birthplace

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, W.S.; Kery, M.; Hines, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Juvenile survival is one of the least known elements of the life history of many species, in particular snakes. We conducted a mark-recapture study of Crotalus horridus from 1978-2002 in northeastern New York near the northern limits of the species' range. We marked 588 neonates and estimated annual age-, sex-, and morph-specific recapture and survival rates using the Cormack-Jolly-Seber (CJS) model. Wild-caught neonates (field-born, n = 407) and neonates produced by captive-held gravid females (lab-born, n = 181) allowed comparison of the birthplace, or lab treatment effect, in estimated survival. Recapture rates declined from about 10-20% over time while increasing from young to older age classes. Estimated survival rates (S ?? 1 SE) in the first year were significantly higher among field-born (black morph: S = 0.773 ?? 0.203; yellow morph: S = 0.531 ?? 0.104) than among lab-born snakes (black morph: S = 0.411 ?? 0.131; yellow morph: S = 0.301 ?? 0.081). Lower birth weights combined with a lack of field exposure until release apparently contributed to the lower survival rate of labborn snakes. Subsequent survival estimates for 2-4-yr-old snakes were S = 0.845 ?? 0.084 for the black morph and S = 0.999 (SE not available) for the yellow morph, and for ???5-yr-old snakes S = 0.958 ?? 0.039 (black morph) and S = 0.822 ?? 0.034 (yellow morph). The most parsimonious model overall contained an independent time trend for survival of each age, morph, and lab-treatment group. For snakes of the first two age groups (ages 1 yr and 2-4 yr), survival tended to decline over the years for both morphs, while for adult snakes (5 yr and older), survival was constant or even slightly increased. Our data on survival and recapture are among the first rigorous estimates of these parameters in a rattlesnake and among the few yet available for any viperid snake. These data are useful for analyses of the life-history strategy, population dynamics, and conservation of this long-lived snake

  6. The effects of ambient temperature and mixing time of glass ionomer cement material on the survival rate of proximal ART restorations in primary molars

    PubMed Central

    Kemoli, Arthur M

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Temperature fluctuations and material mixing times are likely to affect the consistency and integrity of the material mixture, and hence the restoration made out of it. The purpose of the present study was to determine the influence of the ambient temperature and the mixing time of glass ionomer cement (GIC) restorative material on the survival rate of proximal atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) restorations placed in primary molars. Materials and Methods: A total of 804 restorations were placed in the primary molars of 6-8-year-olds using the ART approach. The restorations were then followed for a period of 2 years and evaluated at given intervals. The data collected were analyzed using SPSS computer statistical program, and the results tested and compared using the Chi-square, Kaplan Meier survival analysis and Cox Proportional hazard statistical tests. Results: The cumulative survival rate of the restorations dropped from the initial 94.4% to 30.8% at the end of 2 years. The higher survival rate of the restorations was associated with the experienced operators and assistants when using the rubber dam isolation method. However, there was no statistically significant difference in the survival rate of the restorations when related to the room temperature and the mixing time of the GIC materials used in spite of the variations in the temperature recoded and the methods used in mixing the materials. Conclusion: The ambient temperature and mixing time of GIC did not have a significant effect on the survival of the proximal ART restorations. PMID:24808692

  7. Increasing pipeline mechanical integrity through the management of mechanical and toughness data

    SciTech Connect

    Biagiotti, S.F. Jr.; Battisti, J.A.

    1996-07-01

    On October 22, 1991, prompted by two brittle fractures that initiated after pipe movement events, the Office of Pipeline Safety (OPS) issued an Alert Notice requiring pipeline owners and operators of gas or hazardous liquid pipeline facilities to conduct analyses before moving pipelines, whether or not the pipelines are pressurized at the time of movement. Since most operators have not typically maintained detailed information on the material characteristics of all steel pipelines in operation (i.e. fracture toughness properties), the OPS recommended that samples of new pipe, stock pipe, and pipe removed from service should be tested and the results accumulated into a database. To this end, Marathon Pipe Line (MPL) Company developed an in-house database system to manage mechanical, toughness, and weldability properties of pipeline materials. Marathon`s approach to the management of pipeline toughness and mechanical data is presented herein. During the design phase of a planned pipe movement, such as a line lowering, engineers consult the database for mechanical and toughness information related to the grade, size, and line section of interest. Based on the mechanical and toughness historical data, a safe line lowering condition is recommended. Over the last two years, more than 1,200 sets of data on more than 200 line sections have been entered into the database.

  8. Risk of Early Onset Substance Use among Students with and without Mild Academic Disabilities: Results of a Discrete-Time Survival Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepper, Annelies; Koning, Ina; Vollebergh, Wilma; Monshouwer, Karin

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the age of onset of substance use among 536 students with mild academic disabilities and 906 students without academic disabilities, and the extent to which emotional, conduct, and hyperactivity problems explain the differences between these two groups. Using discrete-time survival analysis, the results of this study showed…

  9. Surviving death-anxieties in liquid modern times: examining Zygmunt Bauman's cultural theory of death and dying.

    PubMed

    Higo, Masa

    2012-01-01

    Despite his prominence as a leading contemporary social theorist, Zygmunt Bauman's long-term writing on the cultural theory of death and dying has largely been overlooked in the sociological literature of death and dying, particularly in the United States. Bauman uniquely theorizes how we survive death-anxieties today: Contemporary, liquid modern culture has engaged us in ceaseless pursuit of the unattainable consumer sensation of bodily fitness as a way to suppress and thus survive our death-anxieties. Bauman also argues that the prevalence of this cultural formula to survive death-anxieties has simultaneously increased, more than ever before in social history, the volume of individual responsibility for restlessly coping with existential anxieties in the societies of consumers. While unique and insightful, his theoretical argument has a limitation; largely succeeding Freud's classic view of mortality, Bauman's contemporary theory may lead us to neglect potentially important social, cultural, and historical variations in how mortality has been understood.

  10. Surviving death-anxieties in liquid modern times: examining Zygmunt Bauman's cultural theory of death and dying.

    PubMed

    Higo, Masa

    2012-01-01

    Despite his prominence as a leading contemporary social theorist, Zygmunt Bauman's long-term writing on the cultural theory of death and dying has largely been overlooked in the sociological literature of death and dying, particularly in the United States. Bauman uniquely theorizes how we survive death-anxieties today: Contemporary, liquid modern culture has engaged us in ceaseless pursuit of the unattainable consumer sensation of bodily fitness as a way to suppress and thus survive our death-anxieties. Bauman also argues that the prevalence of this cultural formula to survive death-anxieties has simultaneously increased, more than ever before in social history, the volume of individual responsibility for restlessly coping with existential anxieties in the societies of consumers. While unique and insightful, his theoretical argument has a limitation; largely succeeding Freud's classic view of mortality, Bauman's contemporary theory may lead us to neglect potentially important social, cultural, and historical variations in how mortality has been understood. PMID:23057247

  11. Resin blending for toughness in balloon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, M. P.; Harrison, I. R.

    1993-01-01

    The influence of chain architecture on toughness is examined by testing blends of HDPE with different types of low density PEs. The LDPE and LLDPE used have reported similar molecular weights, and densities. Two structural factors differentiate these polymers, long chain branching is peculiar to LDPE, and the short chain branching distribution of the two polymers are different. LDPE has branches which are evenly distributed among all chains. In contrast, the short chain branches in LLDPE are distributed heterogeneously. LLDPE and ULDPE have similar branch distributions but, ULDPE has a higher average number of branches per 1000 carbons and consequently a lower density. The effect which these structural differences have on mechanical properties can be used to investigate which parameters control toughness in PE materials.

  12. Interlaminar fracture toughness of thermoplastic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, J. A.; Johnston, N. J.; Obrien, T. K.

    1988-01-01

    Edge delamination tension and double cantilever beam tests were used to characterize the interlaminar fracture toughness of continuous graphite-fiber composites made from experimental thermoplastic polyimides and a model thermoplastic. Residual thermal stresses, known to be significant in materials processed at high temperatures, were included in the edge delamination calculations. In the model thermoplastic system (polycarbonate matrix), surface properties of the graphite fiber were shown to be significant. Critical strain energy release rates for two different fibers having similar nominal tensile properties differed by 30 to 60 percent. The reason for the difference is not clear. Interlaminar toughness values for the thermoplastic polyimide composites (LARC-TPI and polyimidesulfone) were 3 to 4 in-lb/sq in. Scanning electron micrographs of the EDT fracture surfaces suggest poor fiber/matrix bonding. Residual thermal stresses account for up to 32 percent of the strain energy release in composites made from these high-temperature resins.

  13. Tough germanium nanoparticles under electrochemical cycling.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wentao; Yang, Hui; Fan, Feifei; Liu, Yang; Liu, Xiao Hua; Huang, Jian Yu; Zhu, Ting; Zhang, Sulin

    2013-04-23

    Mechanical degradation of the electrode materials during electrochemical cycling remains a serious issue that critically limits the capacity retention and cyclability of rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. Here we report the highly reversible expansion and contraction of germanium nanoparticles under lithiation-delithiation cycling with in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). During multiple cycles to the full capacity, the germanium nanoparticles remained robust without any visible cracking despite ∼260% volume changes, in contrast to the size-dependent fracture of silicon nanoparticles upon the first lithiation. The comparative in situ TEM study of fragile silicon nanoparticles suggests that the tough behavior of germanium nanoparticles can be attributed to the weak anisotropy of the lithiation strain at the reaction front. The tough germanium nanoparticles offer substantial potential for the development of durable, high-capacity, and high-rate anodes for advanced lithium-ion batteries.

  14. Effect of groove on bone fracture toughness.

    PubMed

    Norman, T L; Vashishth, D; Burr, D B

    1992-12-01

    When testing for the effects of bone orientation on mode I fracture toughness, compact tension specimens are grooved with a V-notch to provide a crack guide. The effect of grooving on the expressions for the critical stress intensity factor (Kc) and the critical strain energy release rate (Gc) for mode I fracture toughness was investigated. Experiments were performed using grooved and ungrooved bovine compact tension specimens. The results indicate that the standard expression used to determine Kc for a compact tension specimen requires modification. The thickness (B) must be modified to account for the thickness between the grooves (Bn). The thickness used in the standard expression is replaced by an effective thickness written as (BBn)0.5. It was also found that the thickness between the grooves should be used in the standard formula for Gc. PMID:1491024

  15. Advanced Vadose Zone Simulations Using TOUGH

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, S.; Doughty, C.; Kowalsky, M.B.; Moridis, G.J.; Pan,L.; Xu, T.; Zhang, Y.; Pruess, K.

    2007-02-01

    The vadose zone can be characterized as a complex subsurfacesystem in which intricate physical and biogeochemical processes occur inresponse to a variety of natural forcings and human activities. Thismakes it difficult to describe, understand, and predict the behavior ofthis specific subsurface system. The TOUGH nonisothermal multiphase flowsimulators are well-suited to perform advanced vadose zone studies. Theconceptual models underlying the TOUGH simulators are capable ofrepresenting features specific to the vadose zone, and of addressing avariety of coupled phenomena. Moreover, the simulators are integratedinto software tools that enable advanced data analysis, optimization, andsystem-level modeling. We discuss fundamental and computationalchallenges in simulating vadose zone processes, review recent advances inmodeling such systems, and demonstrate some capabilities of the TOUGHsuite of codes using illustrative examples.

  16. Fracture toughness and crack growth of Zerodur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viens, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    The fracture toughness and crack growth parameters of Zerodur, a low expansion glass ceramic material, were determined. The fracture toughness was determined using indentation techniques and was found to be 0.9 MPa x m(sup 1/2). The crack growth parameters were determined using indented biaxial specimens subjected to static and dynamic loading in an aqueous environment. The crack growth parameters n and 1n(B) were found to be 30.7 and -6.837, respectively. The crack growth parameters were also determined using indented biaxial specimens subjected to dynamic loading in an ambient 50 percent relative humidity environment. The crack growth parameters n and 1n(B) at 50 percent relative humidity were found to be 59.3 and -17.51, respectively.

  17. "Striving Readers" Tough to Measure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehr, Mary Ann

    2009-01-01

    Many students at the Edward Coles Model for Excellence World Language Academy or the Rachel Carson Elementary School in Chicago--schools that takes part in the Striving Readers program--say they came to enjoy reading for the first time or became better readers through the program, now in its fourth year. The federal program supports the…

  18. Effect of radiotherapy delay in overall treatment time on local control and survival in head and neck cancer: Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    González Ferreira, José A.; Jaén Olasolo, Javier; Azinovic, Ignacio; Jeremic, Branislav

    2015-01-01

    Treatment delays in completing radiotherapy (RT) for many neoplasms are a major problem affecting treatment outcome, as increasingly shown in the literature. Overall treatment time (OTT) could be a critical predictor of local tumor control and/or survival. In an attempt to establish a protocol for managing delays during RT, especially for heavily overloaded units, we have extensively reviewed the available literature on head and neck cancer. We confirmed a large deleterious effect of prolonged OTT on both local control and survival of these patients. PMID:26549990

  19. Resin selection criteria for tough composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1983-01-01

    Resin selection criteria are derived using a structured methodology consisting of an upward integrated mechanistic theory and its inverse (top-down structured theory). These criteria are expressed in a "criteria selection space" which are used to identify resin bulk properties for improved composite "toughness". The resin selection criteria correlate with a variety of experimental data including laminate strength, elevated temperature effects and impact resistance.

  20. High strength and high toughness steel

    DOEpatents

    Parker, Earl R.; Zackay, Victor F.

    1979-01-01

    A structural steel which possess both high strength and high toughness and has particular application of cryogenic uses. The steel is produced by the utilization of thermally induced phase transformation following heating in a three-phase field in iron-rich alloys of the Fe-Ni-Ti system, with a preferred composition of 12% nickel, 0.5% titanium, the remainder being iron.

  1. Fracture toughness testing data. A bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Moya, N.; Stuhrke, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    This bibliography is comprised of approximately 800 reference citations related to the mechanics of failure in aerospace structures. Most of the references are for documents that include fracture toughness testing data and its application or documents on the availability and usefulness of fracture mechanics analysis methodology. The bibliography represents a search of the literature published in the period April 1962 through April 1974 and is largely limited to documents published in the United States.

  2. High toughness-high strength iron alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An iron alloy is provided which exhibits strength and toughness characteristics at cryogenic temperatures. The alloy consists essentially of about 10 to 16 percent by weight nickel, about 0.1 to 1.0 percent by weight aluminum, and 0 to about 3 percent by weight copper, with the balance being essentially iron. The iron alloy is produced by a process which includes cold rolling at room temperature and subsequent heat treatment.

  3. Fracture toughness of hydroxyapatite/mica composite, packed hydroxyapatite, alumina ceramics, silicon nitride and -carbide.

    PubMed

    Nordström, E G; Yokobori, A T; Yokobori, T; Aizawa, Y

    1998-01-01

    By using the fracture toughness estimation method based on two-dimensional map, it was found that the ductility of the high porosity hydroxyapatite/mice composite was comparable with silicon carbide. It was measured to be higher than that of packed hydroxyapatite. Alumina ceramics with more than 96% aluminium oxide showed a higher fracture toughness than the composite material. When bending strength was compared, the strength of the composite was two or three times lower than that of packed hydroxyapatite and much lower than the other studied materials. The composite material showed high porosity, which in turn gives it a lower bending strength. However, the high porosity is more favourable for biocompatibility.

  4. THE INFLUENCE OF MODEL TIME STEP ON THE RELATIVE SENSITIVITY OF POPULATION GROWTH TO SURVIVAL, GROWTH AND REPRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Matrix population models are often used to extrapolate from life stage-specific stressor effects on survival and reproduction to population-level effects. Demographic elasticity analysis of a matrix model allows an evaluation of the relative sensitivity of population growth rate ...

  5. Short-time survival and engraftment of bone marrow stromal cells in an ectopic model of bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Paolo; Scaglione, Silvia; Daga, Antonio; Ilengo, Cristina; Cilli, Michele; Quarto, Rodolfo

    2010-02-01

    In tissue-engineered applications bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are combined with scaffolds to target bone regeneration; animal models have been devised and the cells' long-term engraftment has been widely studied. However, in regenerated bone, the cell number is severely reduced with respect to the initially seeded BMSCs. This reflects the natural low cellularity of bone but underlines the selectivity of the differentiation processes. In this respect, we evaluated the short-term survival of BMSCs, transduced with the luciferase gene, after implantation of cell-seeded scaffolds in a nude mouse model. Cell proliferation/survival was assessed by bioluminescence imaging: light production was decreased by 30% on the first day, reaching a 50% loss within 48 h. Less than 5% of the initial signal remained after 2 months in vivo. Apoptotic BMSCs were detected within the first 2 days of implantation. Interestingly, the initial frequency of clonogenic progenitors matched the percentage of in vivo surviving cells. Cytokines and inflammation may contribute to the apoptotic onset at the implant milieu. However, preculturing cells with tumor necrosis factor alpha enhanced survival, allowing detection of 8.1% of the seeded BMSCs 2 months after implantation. Thus culturing conditions may reduce the apoptotic overload of seeded osteoprogenitors, strengthening the constructs' osteogenic potential.

  6. p53 and bcl-2 expression in high-grade B-cell lymphomas: correlation with survival time.

    PubMed Central

    Piris, M. A.; Pezzella, F.; Martinez-Montero, J. C.; Orradre, J. L.; Villuendas, R.; Sanchez-Beato, M.; Cuena, R.; Cruz, M. A.; Martinez, B.; Pezella F [corrected to Pezzella, F. ].

    1994-01-01

    B-cell high-grade lymphomas are heterogeneous in terms of histology, clinical presentation, treatment response and prognosis. As bcl-2 and p53 gene deregulations are frequently involved in several types of lymphoid malignancies, we aimed our investigation at the study of the relation between bcl-2 and p53 expression and survival probability in a group of 119 patients with B-cell high-grade lymphoma. These were obtained from the Virgen de la Salud Hospital, Toledo, Spain (73 cases), John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK (31 cases), and the Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy (15 cases). The relation between bcl-2 protein expression and survival was small, depending on the primary localisation of the tumour (in lymph node of mucosae), and lacked a significant correlation with overall survival. In contrast with this, p53 expression was related to survival probability in our series, this relation being both significant and independent of histological diagnosis. p53-positive patients showed a sudden decrease in life expectancy in the first months after diagnosis. Multivariant regression analysis confirmed that the only parameters significantly related with survival were extranodal origin, which is associated with a better prognosis, and p53 expression, which indicates a poor prognosis. Simultaneous expression of bcl-2 and p53 was associated with a poorer prognosis than p53 alone. This is particularly significant for large B-cell lymphomas presenting in lymph nodes. The cumulative poor effect of both p53 and bcl-2 in large B-cell lymphomas, which is more significant in nodal tumours, could confirm the existence of a multistep genetic deregulation in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. This indicates that the genetic mechanisms controlling apoptosis and their disregulation are critical steps in the progression of lymphomas. PMID:8297731

  7. Joint modeling of longitudinal ordinal data and competing risks survival times and analysis of the NINDS rt-PA stroke trial

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Elashoff, Robert M.; Li, Gang; Saver, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Existing joint models for longitudinal and survival data are not applicable for longitudinal ordinal outcomes with possible non-ignorable missing values caused by multiple reasons. We propose a joint model for longitudinal ordinal measurements and competing risks failure time data, in which a partial proportional odds model for the longitudinal ordinal outcome is linked to the event times by latent random variables. At the survival endpoint, our model adopts the competing risks framework to model multiple failure types at the same time. The partial proportional odds model, as an extension of the popular proportional odds model for ordinal outcomes, is more flexible and at the same time provides a tool to test the proportional odds assumption. We use a likelihood approach and derive an EM algorithm to obtain the maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters. We further show that all the parameters at the survival endpoint are identifiable from the data. Our joint model enables one to make inference for both the longitudinal ordinal outcome and the failure times simultaneously. In addition, the inference at the longitudinal endpoint is adjusted for possible non-ignorable missing data caused by the failure times. We apply the method to the NINDS rt-PA stroke trial. Our study considers the modified Rankin Scale only. Other ordinal outcomes in the trial, such as the Barthel and Glasgow scales can be treated in the same way. PMID:19943331

  8. Use of Synergistic Interactions to Fabricate Strong, Tough, and Conductive Artificial Nacre Based on Graphene Oxide and Chitosan.

    PubMed

    Wan, Sijie; Peng, Jingsong; Li, Yuchen; Hu, Han; Jiang, Lei; Cheng, Qunfeng

    2015-10-27

    Graphene is the strongest and stiffest material, leading to the development of promising applications in many fields. However, the assembly of graphene nanosheets into macrosized nanocomposites for practical applications remains a challenge. Nacre in its natural form sets the "gold standard" for toughness and strength, which serves as a guide to the assembly of graphene nanosheets into high-performance nanocomposites. Here we show the strong, tough, conductive artificial nacre based on graphene oxide through synergistic interactions of hydrogen and covalent bonding. Tensile strength and toughness was 4 and 10 times higher, respectively, than that of natural nacre. The exceptional integrated strong and tough artificial nacre has promising applications in aerospace, artificial muscle, and tissue engineering, especially for flexible supercapacitor electrodes due to its high electrical conductivity. The use of synergistic interactions is a strategy for the development of high-performance nanocomposites. PMID:26352293

  9. iTOUGH2 Universal Optimization Using the PEST Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, S.A.

    2010-07-01

    iTOUGH2 (http://www-esd.lbl.gov/iTOUGH2) is a computer program for parameter estimation, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty propagation analysis [Finsterle, 2007a, b, c]. iTOUGH2 contains a number of local and global minimization algorithms for automatic calibration of a model against measured data, or for the solution of other, more general optimization problems (see, for example, Finsterle [2005]). A detailed residual and estimation uncertainty analysis is conducted to assess the inversion results. Moreover, iTOUGH2 can be used to perform a formal sensitivity analysis, or to conduct Monte Carlo simulations for the examination for prediction uncertainties. iTOUGH2's capabilities are continually enhanced. As the name implies, iTOUGH2 is developed for use in conjunction with the TOUGH2 forward simulator for nonisothermal multiphase flow in porous and fractured media [Pruess, 1991]. However, iTOUGH2 provides FORTRAN interfaces for the estimation of user-specified parameters (see subroutine USERPAR) based on user-specified observations (see subroutine USEROBS). These user interfaces can be invoked to add new parameter or observation types to the standard set provided in iTOUGH2. They can also be linked to non-TOUGH2 models, i.e., iTOUGH2 can be used as a universal optimization code, similar to other model-independent, nonlinear parameter estimation packages such as PEST [Doherty, 2008] or UCODE [Poeter and Hill, 1998]. However, to make iTOUGH2's optimization capabilities available for use with an external code, the user is required to write some FORTRAN code that provides the link between the iTOUGH2 parameter vector and the input parameters of the external code, and between the output variables of the external code and the iTOUGH2 observation vector. While allowing for maximum flexibility, the coding requirement of this approach limits its applicability to those users with FORTRAN coding knowledge. To make iTOUGH2 capabilities accessible to many application models

  10. Determination of dynamic fracture toughness using a new experimental technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cady, Carl M.; Liu, Cheng; Lovato, Manuel L.

    2015-09-01

    In other studies dynamic fracture toughness has been measured using Charpy impact and modified Hopkinson Bar techniques. In this paper results will be shown for the measurement of fracture toughness using a new test geometry. The crack propagation velocities range from ˜0.15 mm/s to 2.5 m/s. Digital image correlation (DIC) will be the technique used to measure both the strain and the crack growth rates. The boundary of the crack is determined using the correlation coefficient generated during image analysis and with interframe timing the crack growth rate and crack opening can be determined. A comparison of static and dynamic loading experiments will be made for brittle polymeric materials. The analysis technique presented by Sammis et al. [1] is a semi-empirical solution, however, additional Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics analysis of the strain fields generated as part of the DIC analysis allow for the more commonly used method resembling the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) experiment. It should be noted that this technique was developed because limited amounts of material were available and crack growth rates were to fast for a standard CTOD method.

  11. Effects of combinations of malathion and cypermethrin on survivability and time of metamorphosis of tadpoles of Indian cricket frog (Fejervarya limnocharis).

    PubMed

    Nataraj, Makkimane B; Krishnamurthy, Sannanegunda V

    2012-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the effect of environmentally realistic concentrations of two commonly used pesticides viz., malathion and cypermethrin, using a fully 3 × 3 factorial experiments on the survivability and time of metamorphosis in a common rice paddy field frog (cricket frog) Fejervarya limnocharis under laboratory conditions. The results suggest that cypermethrin is more toxic than malathion and combinations of higher concentrations of cypermethrin (50 μg/L) with malathion (250 and 500 μg/L) are more deleterious to the survivability of tadpoles. With increasing cypermethrin concentration, the survivability of tadpole decreased (r = -0.986, P = 0.108). But cypermethrin alone induced early metamorphosis among the surviving tadpoles. However, there was a delay in the time required for metamorphosis induced by malathion and its combination with cypermethrin. The delay in metamorphosis may indicate the altered physiological fitness of the individual. The emergent froglets will be subjected to environmental stressors like high temperature and less humidity of post-monsoon tropical climate that could enhance negative influence triggered by pesticides.

  12. Linking reproduction and survival can improve model estimates of vital rates derived from limited time-series counts of pinnipeds and other species.

    PubMed

    Battaile, Brian C; Trites, Andrew W

    2013-01-01

    We propose a method to model the physiological link between somatic survival and reproductive output that reduces the number of parameters that need to be estimated by models designed to determine combinations of birth and death rates that produce historic counts of animal populations. We applied our Reproduction and Somatic Survival Linked (RSSL) method to the population counts of three species of North Pacific pinnipeds (harbor seals, Phoca vitulina richardii (Gray, 1864); northern fur seals, Callorhinus ursinus (L., 1758); and Steller sea lions, Eumetopias jubatus (Schreber, 1776))--and found our model outperformed traditional models when fitting vital rates to common types of limited datasets, such as those from counts of pups and adults. However, our model did not perform as well when these basic counts of animals were augmented with additional observations of ratios of juveniles to total non-pups. In this case, the failure of the ratios to improve model performance may indicate that the relationship between survival and reproduction is redefined or disassociated as populations change over time or that the ratio of juveniles to total non-pups is not a meaningful index of vital rates. Overall, our RSSL models show advantages to linking survival and reproduction within models to estimate the vital rates of pinnipeds and other species that have limited time-series of counts. PMID:24324541

  13. 'Diamond Jenness': A Tough Grind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This microscopic imager mosaic of the target area called 'Diamond Jenness' was taken after NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity ground into the surface with its rock abrasion tool for a second time.

    Opportunity has bored nearly a dozen holes into the inner walls of 'Endurance Crater.' On sols 177 and 178 (July 23 and July 24, 2004), the rover worked double-duty on Diamond Jenness. Surface debris and the bumpy shape of the rock resulted in a shallow and irregular hole, only about 2 millimeters (0.08 inch) deep. The final depth was not enough to remove all the bumps and leave a neat hole with a smooth floor. This extremely shallow depression was then examined by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

    On Sol 178, Opportunity's 'robotic rodent' dined on Diamond Jenness once again, grinding almost an additional 5 millimeters (about 0.2 inch). The rover then applied its Moessbauer spectrometer to the deepened hole. This double dose of Diamond Jenness enabled the science team to examine the rock at varying layers. Results from those grindings are currently being analyzed.

    The image mosaic is about 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) across.

  14. Effect of Polyprenyl Immunostimulant on the survival times of three cats with the dry form of feline infectious peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Legendre, Alfred M; Bartges, Joseph W

    2009-08-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is considered a fatal disease. Three cats with dry form FIP were treated with Polyprenyl Immunostimulant. Two of the three cats are still on treatment and are alive and well 2 years after diagnosis. The third cat survived 14 months but was treated for only 4.5 months. Further studies are necessary to assess the potential of the Polyprenyl Immunostimulant.

  15. Complex karyotype in mantle cell lymphoma is a strong prognostic factor for the time to treatment and overall survival, independent of the MCL international prognostic index.

    PubMed

    Sarkozy, Clémentine; Terré, Christine; Jardin, Fabrice; Radford, Isabelle; Roche-Lestienne, Catherine; Penther, Dominique; Bastard, Christian; Rigaudeau, Sophie; Pilorge, Sylvain; Morschhauser, Franck; Bouscary, Didier; Delarue, Richard; Farhat, Hassan; Rousselot, Philippe; Hermine, Olivier; Tilly, Hervé; Chevret, Sylvie; Castaigne, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is usually an aggressive disease. However, a few patients do have an "indolent" evolution (iMCL) defined by a long survival time without intensive therapy. Many studies highlight the prognostic role of additional genetic abnormalities, but these abnormalities are not routinely tested for and do not yet influence the treatment decision. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic impact of these additional abnormalities detected by conventional cytogenetic testing, as well as their relationships with the clinical characteristics and their value in identifying iMCL. All consecutive MCL cases diagnosed between 1995 and 2011 at four institutions were retrospectively selected on the basis of an informative karyotype with a t(11;14) translocation at the time of diagnosis. A total of 125 patients were included and followed for an actual median time of 35 months. The median overall survival (OS) and survival without treatment (TFS) were 73.7 and 1.3 months, respectively. In multivariable Cox models, a high mantle cell lymphoma international prognostic index score, a complex karyotype, and blastoid morphology were independently associated with a shortened OS. Spleen enlargement, nodal presentation, extra-hematological involvement, and complex karyotypes were associated with shorter TFS. A score based on these factors allowed for the identification of "indolent" patients (median TFS 107 months) from other patients (median TFS: 1 month). In conclusion, in this multicentric cohort of MCL patients, a complex karyotype was associated with a shorter survival time and allowed for the identification of iMCL at the time of diagnosis. PMID:24249260

  16. Low-Temperature Toughness of the Austempered Offshore Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, C.; Yang, T. C.; Huang, C. Y.; Shiue, R. K.

    2016-10-01

    This study investigates low-temperature toughness of the offshore steel with two different austempering heat treatments. Toughness of upper bainite is significantly lower than that of lower bainite. Low impact toughness of the upper bainite is caused by the presence of martensite-austenite (MA) and increasing the amount of low-angle lath boundaries in upper bainite package. EBSD equipped in the SEM demonstrates an effective approach to analyze the misorientation angle of lath boundaries in upper bainite packet.

  17. The effect of electric discharge machined notches on the fracture toughness of several structural alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, J.A.; Link, R.E.

    1993-09-01

    Recent computational studies of the stress and strain fields at the tip of very sharp notches have shown that the stress and strain fields are very weakly dependent on the initial geometry of the notch once the notch has been blunted to a radius that is 6 to 10 times the initial root radius. It follows that if the fracture toughness of a material is sufficiently high so that fracture initiation does not occur in a specimen until the crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD) reaches a value from 6 to 10 times the size of the initial notch tip diameter, then the fracture toughness will be independent of whether a fatigue crack or a machined notch served as the initial crack. In this experimental program the fracture toughness (J{sub Ic} and J resistance (J-R) curve, and CTOD) for several structure alloys was measured using specimens with conventional fatigue cracks and with EDM machined notches. The results of this program have shown, in fact, that most structural materials do not achieve initiation CTOD values on the order of 6 to 10 times the radius of even the smallest EDM notch tip presently achievable. It is found furthermore that tougher materials do not seem to be less dependent on the type of notch tip present. Some materials are shown to be much more dependent on the type of notch tip used, but no simple pattern is found that relates this observed dependence to the material strength toughness, or strain hardening rate.

  18. Longer waiting times for early stage cervical cancer patients undergoing radical hysterectomy are associated with diminished long-term overall survival

    PubMed Central

    Nanthamongkolkul, Kulisara

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of surgical waiting time on clinical outcome in early stage cervical cancer. Methods The cohort consisted of 441 patients diagnosed with stages IA2-IB1cervical cancer who underwent radical hysterectomy and pelvic node dissection. The patients were divided into two groups based on surgical waiting time. The associations between waiting time and other potential prognostic factors with clinical outcome were evaluated. Results The median surgical waiting time was 43 days. Deep stromal invasion (hazard ratio [HR], 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4 to 4.6; p=0.003) and lymph node metastasis (HR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.3 to 6.7; p=0.026) were identified as independent prognostic factors for recurrence-free survival while no prognostic significance of surgical waiting time was found (p=0.677). On multivariate analysis of overall survival (OS), only deep stromal invasion (HR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.3 to 5.0; p=0.009) and lymph node metastasis (HR, 3.6; 95% CI, 1.5 to 8.6; p=0.009) were identified as independent prognostic factors for OS. Although OS showed no significant difference between short (≤8 weeks) and long (>8 weeks) waiting times, multivariate analysis of OS with time-varying effects revealed that a waiting time longer than 8 weeks was associated with poorer long-term survival (after 5 years; HR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.3 to 9.2; p=0.021). Conclusion A longer surgical waiting time was associated with diminished long-term OS of early stage cervical cancer patients. PMID:26404122

  19. Toughness in block copolymer modified epoxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Declet-Perez, Carmelo

    One of the major shortcomings preventing the widespread use of epoxy resins in engineering applications is the inherent brittleness of these materials. The incorporation of small amounts of amphiphilic block copolymers into the formulation is one of the most promising strategies to toughen epoxies. These molecules are known to form nanostructures in the epoxy resin that can be preserved upon curing. This strategy is very attractive since significant enhancements in toughness can be obtained without detrimental effects on other properties of the matrix. Despite many examples of successful implementation, an in-depth understanding of the factors that lead to toughness in block copolymer modified epoxies is still elusive. The goal of this dissertation is to understand, first, the deformation mechanisms leading to toughness and, second, how different formulation parameters affect these processes. In this work we used two types of block copolymer modifiers, which produced nanostructures with different physical properties. These block copolymers self-assembled into well-dispersed spherical micelles with either rubbery or glassy cores in various epoxy formulations. Both of these modifiers toughened different epoxy formulations, although to different extents. The rubbery core micelles consistently outperformed the glassy core micelles by roughly a factor of two. While the toughening afforded by the rubbery core micelles was consistent with the current understanding of toughening, the results from the glassy core micelles could not be explained with the same reasoning. In order to understand the deformation mechanisms leading to different levels of toughness, we performed small-angle x-ray scattering experiments while simultaneously deforming our material. This combination of techniques, referred to as in-situ SAXS, allowed us to monitor changes in the structure of the block copolymer micelles as a result of the applied load. With this technique, we showed that the rubbery

  20. iTOUGH2 V7.0

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-01

    iTOUGH2 (inverse TOUGH2) provides inverse modeling capabilities for TOUGH2, a simulator for multi-dimensional, multi-phase, multi-component, non-isothermal flow and transport in fractured porous media. iTOUGH2 performs sensitivity analyses, parameter estimation, and uncertainty propagation analyses in geosciences and reservoir engineering and other application areas. iTOUGH2 supports a number of different combinations of fluids and components (equation-of-state (EOS) modules). In addition, the optimization routines implemented in iTOUGH2 can also be used for sensitivity analysis, automatic model calibration, and uncertainty quantification of any external code that uses text-based input and output files. iTOUGH2 solves the inverse problem by minimizing a non-linear objective function of the weighted differences between model output and the corresponding observations. Multiple minimization algorithms (derivativefree, gradient-based, and second-order; local and global) are available. iTOUGH2 also performs Latin Hypercube Monte Carlo simulations for uncertainty propagation analyses. A detailed residual and error analysis is provided. This upgrade includes (a) global sensitivity analysis methods, (b) joint hydrogeophysical inversion methods, (c) additional input features and output analyses, (d) increased forward simulation capabilities, (e) reducedorder modeling capabilities, (f) parallel execution of multicore PCs and Linux clusters, and (g) bug fixes. More details can be found at http://esd.lbl.gov/iTOUGH2 and the publications cited in Part II, H.

  1. iTOUGH2 V7.0

    2013-07-01

    iTOUGH2 (inverse TOUGH2) provides inverse modeling capabilities for TOUGH2, a simulator for multi-dimensional, multi-phase, multi-component, non-isothermal flow and transport in fractured porous media. iTOUGH2 performs sensitivity analyses, parameter estimation, and uncertainty propagation analyses in geosciences and reservoir engineering and other application areas. iTOUGH2 supports a number of different combinations of fluids and components (equation-of-state (EOS) modules). In addition, the optimization routines implemented in iTOUGH2 can also be used for sensitivity analysis, automatic model calibration, andmore » uncertainty quantification of any external code that uses text-based input and output files. iTOUGH2 solves the inverse problem by minimizing a non-linear objective function of the weighted differences between model output and the corresponding observations. Multiple minimization algorithms (derivativefree, gradient-based, and second-order; local and global) are available. iTOUGH2 also performs Latin Hypercube Monte Carlo simulations for uncertainty propagation analyses. A detailed residual and error analysis is provided. This upgrade includes (a) global sensitivity analysis methods, (b) joint hydrogeophysical inversion methods, (c) additional input features and output analyses, (d) increased forward simulation capabilities, (e) reducedorder modeling capabilities, (f) parallel execution of multicore PCs and Linux clusters, and (g) bug fixes. More details can be found at http://esd.lbl.gov/iTOUGH2 and the publications cited in Part II, H.« less

  2. Leaf cellulose density as the key determinant of inter- and intra-specific variation in leaf fracture toughness in a species-rich tropical forest.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Kaoru; Wright, S Joseph; Westbrook, Jared W

    2016-06-01

    Leaves as the main photosynthetic organ of plants must be well protected against various hazards to achieve their optimal lifespans. Yet, within-species variation and the material basis of leaf strength have been explored for very few species. Here, we present a large dataset of leaf fracture toughness from a species-rich humid tropical forest on Barro Colorado Island, Panama, reporting both among- and within-species variation in relation to light environment (sun-lit canopy versus shaded understorey) and ontogeny (seedlings versus adults). In this dataset encompassing 281 free-standing woody species and 428 species-light combinations, lamina fracture toughness varied ca 10 times. A central objective of our study was to identify generalizable patterns in the structural and material basis for interspecific variation in leaf lamina fracture toughness. The leaf lamina is a heterogeneous structure in which strong materials in cell walls, such as cellulose and lignin, contribute disproportionately to fracture toughness. We found significant increases in leaf fracture toughness from shade to sun and from seedling leaves to adult leaves. Both within and across species, leaf fracture toughness increased with total bulk density (dry biomass per unit volume) and cellulose mass concentration, but decreased with mass concentrations of lignin and hemicelluose. These bivariate relationships shift between light environments, but leaf cellulose density (cellulose mass per unit leaf volume) exhibits a common relationship with lamina fracture toughness between light environments and through ontogeny. Hence, leaf cellulose density is probably a universal predictor of leaf fracture toughness. PMID:27274796

  3. Abundance, Timing of Migration, and Egg-to-Smolt Survival of Juvenile Chum Salmon, Kwethluk River, Alaska, 2007 and 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burril, Sean E.; Zimmerman, Christian E.; Finn, James E.; ,; Gillikin, Daniel; ,

    2010-01-01

    To better understand and partition mortality among life stages of chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta), we used inclined-plane traps to monitor the migration of juveniles in the Kwethluk River, Alaska in 2007 and 2008. The migration of juvenile chum salmon peaked in mid-May and catch rates were greatest when water levels were rising. Movement of chum salmon was diurnal with highest catch rates occurring during the hours of low light (that is, 22:00 to 10:00). Trap efficiency ranged from 0.37 to 4.04 percent (overall efficiency = 1.94 percent). Total abundance of juvenile chum salmon was estimated to be 2.0 million fish in 2007 and 2.9 million fish in 2008. On the basis of the estimate of chum salmon females passing the Kwethluk River weir and age-specific fecundity, we estimated the potential egg deposition (PED) upstream of the weir and trapping site. Egg-to-smolt survival, calculated by dividing the estimate of juvenile chum salmon emigrating past the weir site by the estimate of PED, was 4.6 percent in 2007 and 5.2 percent in 2008. In addition to chum salmon, Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha), coho salmon (O. kisutch), sockeye salmon (O. nerka), and pink salmon (O. gorbuscha), as well as ten other fish species, were captured in the traps. As with chum salmon, catch of these species increased during periods of increasing discharge and peaked during hours of low light. This study successfully determined the characteristics of juvenile salmon migrations and estimated egg-to-smolt survival for chum salmon. This is the first estimate of survival for any juvenile salmon in the Arctic-Yukon-Kuskokwim region of Alaska and demonstrates an approach that can help to partition mortality between freshwater and marine life stages, information critical to understanding the dynamics of salmon in this region.

  4. TOUGH+/GasH20 study of the effects of a heat source buried in theMartian permafrost

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, George J.; Pruess, Karsten

    2006-05-12

    We use TOUGH+/GasH2O to study the effects of a heat sourceburied in the Martian permafrost to evaluate the possibility ofestablishing a wet zone of liquid water, in which terrestrialmicroorganisms could survive and multiply. Analysis of the problemindicates that (1) only a limited permafrost volume (not exceeding 0.35 min radius) is affected, (2) a "wet" zone with limited amounts of liquidwater de-velops (not exceeding 8 and 0.7 kg for a 250 W and a 62.5 Wsource, respectively), (3) the wet zone per-sists for a long time,becomes practically stationary after t = 20 sols because of venting intothe Martian atmosphere, and its thickness is limited and decreases slowlyover time, (4) a "dry" zone (where SG>0.9) evolves, continues toexpand (albeit slowly) with time, but its extent remains limited, and (5)the ice front surrounding the wet zone is self-sharpening. For a range ofinitial conditions investigated, evolution of the liquid water massoccurs at approximately the same rate, reaches roughly the same maximum,and occurs at about the same time (10 to 20 sols; 1 sol = 24.39hours).

  5. The significance of crack-resistance curves to the mixed-mode fracture toughness of human cortical bone

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Launey, Maximilien E.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2010-03-25

    The majority of fracture mechanics studies on the toughness of bone have been performed under tensile loading. However, it has recently been shown that the toughness of human cortical bone in the transverse (breaking) orientation is actually much lower in shear (mode II) than in tension (mode I); a fact that is physiologically relevant as in vivo bone is invariably loaded multiaxially. Since bone is a material that derives its fracture resistance primarily during crack growth through extrinsic toughening mechanisms, such as crack deflection and bridging, evaluation of its toughness is best achieved through measurements of the crack-resistance or R-curve, which describes the fracture toughness as a function of crack extension. Accordingly, in this study, we attempt to measure for the first time the R-curve fracture toughness of human cortical bone under physiologically relevant mixed-mode loading conditions. We show that the resulting mixed-mode (mode I + II) toughness depends strongly on the crack trajectory and is the result of the competition between the paths of maximum mechanical driving force and 'weakest' microstructural resistance.

  6. Study on the Hot Processing Parameters-Impact Toughness Correlation of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaohui; Zeng, Weidong; Sun, Yu; Han, Yuanfei; Zhao, Yongqing

    2016-05-01

    In this research, the hot processing parameters-impact toughness correlation of Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy is studied. Fifty-four groups of hot processing treatments with different forging temperatures (930, 950, 970 °C), deformation degrees (20, 50, 80%), annealing temperatures (600, 700, 800 °C), and annealing time (1 and 5 h) were conducted. The orthogonal design was used to find the primary hot processing parameters influencing the impact toughness of Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The results show that the annealing temperature can exert the biggest influence on impact toughness. Low annealing temperature is essential to achieve high impact toughness value. In addition, the BP neural network was used to describe the quantitative correlation between hot processing parameters and impact toughness. The results show that the BP neural network exhibits good performance in predicting the impact toughness of Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The prediction error is within 5%. The BP neural network and the orthogonal design method are mutually confirmed in the present work. Finally, based on the microstructure analysis, the reasons responsible for above experimental results are explained.

  7. A race against time: can CO-OPs and provider start-ups survive in the health insurance marketplaces?

    PubMed

    Eggbeer, Bill

    2015-12-01

    > The Affordable Care Act's state and federal health insurance marketplaces, designed to provide affordable insurance coverage to individuals and small groups, are proving hostile territory to new market entrants. Efforts to inject competition into the marketplaces are being challenged by the wide-scale withdrawal o consumer-operated and oriented plans (CO-OPs). Meanwhile, premiums appear likely to increase for consumers as plans seek to balance medical losses. Flaws in the "Three R's" (reinsurance, risk corridors, and risk-adjustment) program are viewed as a threat to the survival of CO-OPs and start-ups. PMID:26793946

  8. Interphase effect on intralaminar fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Hrivnak, J.A.; Dagastine, R.R.; McCullough, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    In fiber reinforced thermoset composites there is a growing body of experimental evidence which has pointed to a region at the fiber/matrix boundary with properties that differ from the fiber or matrix. This region extends beyond the two dimensional interface at the fiber/matrix boundary to have a finite thickness with chemical and structural property gradients. This leads to the concept of an interphase region. The interphase has a large effect on the thermal and mechanical properties of the composite such as fracture toughness, glass transition temperature and the coefficient of thermal expansion. Understanding the interphase region becomes crucial to tailoring a composite to a desired set of properties.

  9. Cleavage oriented iron single crystal fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hribernik, Michael Louis

    Fundamental understanding of atomic level mechanisms controlling cleavage fracture in bcc metals, and the corresponding brittle to ductile transition (BDT) has been a long sought, 'grand challenge' of science. This is particularly true for the BDT in Fe, which is among vital elements that underpin our technological civilization. A key obstacle to developing an understanding of the BDT in Fe is the absence of a reliable database on the temperature dependence of toughness in Fe. In ferritic alloys, the micro-arrest toughness of ferrite, Kmu(T), is hypothesized to control macroscopic cleavage. As a surrogate for Kmu(T), special techniques were developed to measure the arrest toughness, Ka(T), for cleavage oriented, Fe single crystals. Further, the mechanisms controlling cleavage and the BDT should be reflected in the loading rate dependence of static-dynamic initiation toughness, K Ic and KId. Thus KIc/d(T) were also measured for K-rate from 10-1 to 104 MPa√m/s. These studies led to the following conclusions: (1) Ka is semi-brittle, increasing from an average of ≈ 3.5 MPa√m at -196°C to ≈ 9 MPa√m at 0°C. (2) The (100) Ka are similar in the [010] and [011] and orientations, but cleavage does not occur on (110) planes. (3) The Ka for unalloyed Fe is about 150°C lower than that for Fe-3wt%Si, suggesting that equivalent Ka may occur at equivalent lattice sigmay. (4) Higher K-rate shift K Ic/d(T) curves to higher T. (5) The shifts of the KIc/d(T) and Ka(T) curves can be understood and modeled based on dislocation dynamics concepts for the glide of screw dislocations with a stress (and T) controlled activation energy, Ea, with a maximum value of about ≈ 0.5 eV. (6) This Ea is consistent with a double kink nucleation mechanism. Etch pit, slip trace and ledge patterns on side, fracture and sectioned surfaces of the crystals were characterized to study dislocation activity associated with cleavage and the BDT. The results showed extensive dislocation activity on

  10. Fracture toughness testing data: A technology survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuhrke, W. F.; Carpenter, J. L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Technical abstracts for about 90 significant documents relating to fracture toughness testing for various structural materials including information on plane strain and the developing areas of mixed mode and plane stress test conditions are presented. An overview of the state-of-the-art represented in the documents that have been abstracted is included. The abstracts in the report are mostly for publications in the period April 1962 through April 1974. The purpose of this report is to provide, in quick reference form, a dependable source for current information in the subject field.

  11. Experimental and Analytical Investigations on Plane Strain Toughness for 7085 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuey, R. T.; Barlat, F.; Karabin, M. E.; Chakrabarti, D. J.

    2009-02-01

    Data are presented on plane strain fracture toughness, yield strength, and strain hardening for three orientations of samples from quarter-thickness ( t/4) and midthickness ( t/2) locations of alloy 7085 plates with different gages aged past peak strength with different 2nd step aging times (T7X). These data are fit to an expression adapted from Hahn and Rosenfield (1968), in which toughness is proportional to strain hardening, the square root of yield strength, and the square root of a critical strain ɛ c . Strain-hardening exponent n is replaced by an alternative measure, since the stress-strain data do not follow a power law. With increased overaging, the increase of strain hardening dominates the decrease of strength, such that toughness increases. The critical strain, which represents the influence of the microstructure on toughness, has no trend with overaging time. Constituents and grain boundary precipitates, thought to be the microstructural elements most differentiating alloy 7085 from alloy 7050, are quantified at t/4 and at t/2 on one plate. From this the greater critical strain at t/2 than at t/4 is mainly attributed to greater effective spacing of constituents. Critical strain is also greater with longitudinal loading and crack propagating in the long transverse direction, but definite understanding of this will require better anisotropic fracture mechanics and further microstructural characterization.

  12. Toughness and adhesion in an acqueous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Hugh

    2005-03-01

    Highly swollen crosslinked polymers gels are normally very brittle because there are no significant energy dissipation mechanisms that operate close to the crack tip. The presence of the low molecular weight swelling agent suppresses the viscoelastic process that would normally generate resistance to crack propagation in a crosslinked elastomer. We have examined the effect of forming a random copolymer of a hydrophilic monomer with a small amount of hydrophobic monomer so that the hydrophobic monomers associate. The association was demonstrated by the rheology of the uncrosslinked material. The breakup of these hydrophobic associations gives an energy dissipation mechanism and thereby was found to increase the toughness of the swollen gel. Adhesion of a hydrophobic material, such as PDMS, to a range of substrates is expected to be very different in an aqueous environment than in air. We have used the JKR technique to examine both the work of adhesion (contact formation) and the interface toughness between PDMS lenses and a number of substrates of different hydrophilicity both in air and under water. The water was found to have a profound effect on the measured adhesion.

  13. Determining Ductile Fracture Toughness in Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiang; Nanstad, Randy K; Sokolov, Mikhail A; Manneschmidt, Eric T

    2014-01-01

    Ductile fracture toughness determination, such as the J-integral versus crack growth resistance (J-R) curve, is a useful tool for evaluating material structural integrity in the presence of pre-existing defects. The J-R curve represents a way to calculate the work (energy) per unit fracture surface area needed to drive the crack growth. A typical J-R curve is shown in Fig. 1 from which the material fracture toughness near the initiation of stable crack growth (Jq) can be derived. In addition, tearing modulus (TR), representing the material resistance to stable crack growth, can be calculated based on the slope of the J-R curve between two exclusion lines (red dashed lines in Fig. 1). Since the introduction of the J-R curve, extensive efforts have been continuously devoted to develop simplified and reliable methods for determining the material J-R curve. This article briefly reviews three widely-used J-R curve test methods in metals, i.e. elastic unloading compliance (EUC), normalization, and direct current potential drop (DCPD). The main difference in these methods relates to the determination of the crack size. More details of performing the J-R curve determination can be found in ASTM standard E1820-11.

  14. Phase Behavior and Significantly Enhanced Toughness in Polylactide Graft Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Megan; Theryo, Grayce; Jing, Feng; Hillmyer, Marc

    2011-03-01

    Polylactide (PLA), a biodegradable polyester derived from plant sugars, is commercially available and used in a variety of applications ranging from serviceware to resorbable sutures. One limitation to diversifying the applications of the material is its inherent brittleness. Graft copolymers containing PLA arms and a rubbery aliphatic polymer backbone were synthesized by a combination of ring-opening metathesis and ring-opening transesterification polymerizations. The high degree of incompatibility between the arms and backbone resulted in microphase separation of the graft copolymer at increasingly low fractions of the backbone polymer, as evidenced by small-angle x-ray scattering. In graft copolymers with a rubbery content of only 5 wt percent, the tensile strain at break was observed to be as high as twenty times that of neat PLA. Studies are underway to provide insight into the critical polymer molecular parameters for enhanced toughness and the deformation mechanisms.

  15. Crack toughness evaluation of hot pressed and forged beryllium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, M. H.; Bubsey, R. T.; Brown, W. F., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Beryllium fracture toughness test specimens were fatigue cracked using reversed cycling with a compression load two to three times the tension load. In worked beryllium, textures may be produced which result in fatigue cracks that are out of plane with the starter notch. Specimens of hot pressed stock exhibited load displacement records which were nonlinear throughout their course. Fracture specimens of both hot pressed and forged stock showed essentially no reduction of thickness and the fracture surfaces were flat and normal to the load axis. However, the stress intensity factor at maximum load increased with decreasing thickness. Load-displacement and electric potential records for the hot pressed beryllium specimens exhibited several anomalies such as negative residual crack mouth displacements and a decrease in electrical potential with increasing load.

  16. Effect of noise and detector sensitivity on a dynamical process: inverse power law and Mittag-Leffler interevent time survival probabilities.

    PubMed

    Pramukkul, Pensri; Svenkeson, Adam; Grigolini, Paolo

    2014-02-01

    We study the combined effects of noise and detector sensitivity on a dynamical process that generates intermittent events mimicking the behavior of complex systems. By varying the sensitivity level of the detector we move between two forms of complexity, from inverse power law to Mittag-Leffler interevent time survival probabilities. Here fluctuations fight against complexity, causing an exponential truncation to the survival probability. We show that fluctuations of relatively weak intensity have a strong effect on the generation of Mittag-Leffler complexity, providing a reason why stretched exponentials are frequently found in nature. Our results afford a more unified picture of complexity resting on the Mittag-Leffler function and encompassing the standard inverse power law definition. PMID:25353422

  17. Effect of noise and detector sensitivity on a dynamical process: Inverse power law and Mittag-Leffler interevent time survival probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramukkul, Pensri; Svenkeson, Adam; Grigolini, Paolo

    2014-02-01

    We study the combined effects of noise and detector sensitivity on a dynamical process that generates intermittent events mimicking the behavior of complex systems. By varying the sensitivity level of the detector we move between two forms of complexity, from inverse power law to Mittag-Leffler interevent time survival probabilities. Here fluctuations fight against complexity, causing an exponential truncation to the survival probability. We show that fluctuations of relatively weak intensity have a strong effect on the generation of Mittag-Leffler complexity, providing a reason why stretched exponentials are frequently found in nature. Our results afford a more unified picture of complexity resting on the Mittag-Leffler function and encompassing the standard inverse power law definition.

  18. Effect of Initial Population Density of Criconemella xenoplax on Reducing Sugars, Free Amino Acids, and Survival of Peach Seedlings over Time.

    PubMed

    Nyczepir, A P; Reilly, C C; Okie, W R

    1987-07-01

    Percentage of mortality, growth suppression, and changes in free amino acid and reducing sugar content in root and (or) stem tissue of Nemaguard peach seedlings were studied in the greenhouse in relation to time and eight different initial population densities (Pi) of Criconemella xenoplax. After 90 and 180 days, free amino acid content in root tissue significantly increased with increasing nematode numbers. Suppression of root volume, dry root and stem weight, height increase, plant survival, and content of reducing sugars in root tissue were detected at 180 and 270 days and following pruning. All criteria were negatively correlated with nematode Pi. Changes in growth, metabolic parameters, and survival percentage were attributed to Pi density of C. xenoplax, duration of the experiment, and nematode reproduction rate.

  19. Music Travel in Tough Times: Yes, It Broadens the Mind--But It also Empties the Wallet. Nevertheless, Many Music Teachers Are Still Finding Ways to Keep Their Students on the Move, Even during a Recession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poliniak, Susan

    2009-01-01

    It is certainly no secret that people are living in a difficult economic climate. In these times of belt-tightening, both institutional and personal, budgets for arts education are being slashed and individual donations are plummeting. Music teachers in particular know well the impact of these developments on their programs, and they know that…

  20. 46 CFR 54.05-5 - Toughness test specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Toughness Tests § 54.05-5 Toughness test specimens. (a) Charpy V-notch impact tests. Where required, Charpy... reference, see § 54.01-1), “Notched Bar Impact Testing of Metallic Materials”, using the Type A specimen... used to qualify materials within the scope of this subpart. Each set of Charpy impact tests...

  1. 46 CFR 54.05-5 - Toughness test specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Toughness Tests § 54.05-5 Toughness test specimens. (a) Charpy V-notch impact tests. Where required, Charpy... reference, see § 54.01-1), “Notched Bar Impact Testing of Metallic Materials”, using the Type A specimen... used to qualify materials within the scope of this subpart. Each set of Charpy impact tests...

  2. 46 CFR 54.05-5 - Toughness test specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Toughness Tests § 54.05-5 Toughness test specimens. (a) Charpy V-notch impact tests. Where required, Charpy... reference, see § 54.01-1), “Notched Bar Impact Testing of Metallic Materials”, using the Type A specimen... used to qualify materials within the scope of this subpart. Each set of Charpy impact tests...

  3. Proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycans improve toughness of biocompatible double network hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Nakajima, Tasuku; Yang, Jing Jing; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Liu, Jian; Lu, Jishun; Mizumoto, Shuji; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Kitamura, Nobuto; Yasuda, Kazunori; Daniels, A U D; Gong, Jian Ping

    2014-01-22

    Based on the molecular stent concept, a series of tough double-network hydrogels (St-DN gels) made from the components of proteoglycan aggregates - chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (1), chondroitin sulfate (2), and sodium hyaluronate (3) - are successfully developed in combination with a neutral biocompatible polymer. This work demonstrates a promising method to create biopolymer-based tough hydrogels for biomedical applications. PMID:24431128

  4. 46 CFR 57.06-5 - Production toughness testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Production toughness testing. 57.06-5 Section 57.06-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING WELDING AND BRAZING Production Tests § 57.06-5 Production toughness testing. (a) In addition to the test specimens required...

  5. 46 CFR 57.06-5 - Production toughness testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Production toughness testing. 57.06-5 Section 57.06-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING WELDING AND BRAZING Production Tests § 57.06-5 Production toughness testing. (a) In addition to the test specimens required...

  6. 46 CFR 57.06-5 - Production toughness testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Production toughness testing. 57.06-5 Section 57.06-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING WELDING AND BRAZING Production Tests § 57.06-5 Production toughness testing. (a) In addition to the test specimens required...

  7. 46 CFR 57.06-5 - Production toughness testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Production toughness testing. 57.06-5 Section 57.06-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING WELDING AND BRAZING Production Tests § 57.06-5 Production toughness testing. (a) In addition to the test specimens required...

  8. 46 CFR 57.06-5 - Production toughness testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Production toughness testing. 57.06-5 Section 57.06-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING WELDING AND BRAZING Production Tests § 57.06-5 Production toughness testing. (a) In addition to the test specimens required...

  9. Effect of Powder Injection on the Interfacial Fracture Toughness of Plasma-Sprayed Zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okajima, Yoshifumi; Nakamura, Toshio; Sampath, Sanjay

    2013-03-01

    Adhesive strength of the plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating is one of the most important parameters which influence their durability and reliability during service. While many methods exist to measure the adhesive strength, in general, they require cumbersome and time-consuming specimen preparation. Furthermore, considerations of the adhesion strength from the point-of-view of fracture toughness or for that matter, their systematic correlation to both processing variances are limited. Consequently, there is an opportunity to both simplify the measurement procedure and establish correlations among methods and linkages between processing parameters and interfacial fracture toughness. In this paper, we report results on adhesion strength of plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating on aluminum substrates based on both interfacial indentation test (to measure interfacial fracture toughness) and the modified tensile adhesive test. Carrier gas flow for powder injection into the plasma torch was systematically varied to introduce variances in particle melting with concomitant impact on the measured adhesive strength. The results indicate the correlation between the particle melting index and the measured interfacial fracture toughness.

  10. How Tough is Human Cortical Bone? In-Situ Measurements on Realistically Short Cracks

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, Robert O; Koester, K. J.; Ager III, J. W.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2008-05-10

    Bone is more difficult to break than to split. Although this is well known, and many studies exist on the behavior of long cracks in bone, there is a need for data on the orientation-dependent crack-growth resistance behavior of human cortical bone which accurately assesses its toughness at appropriate size-scales. Here we use in-situ mechanical testing in the scanning electron microscope and x-ray computed tomography to examine how physiologically-pertinent short (<600 mu m) cracks propagate in both the transverse and longitudinal orientations in cortical bone, using both crack-deflection/twist mechanics and nonlinear-elastic fracture mechanics to determine crack-resistance curves. We find that after only 500 mu m of cracking, the driving force for crack propagation was more than five times higher in the transverse (breaking) direction than in the longitudinal (splitting) direction due to major crack deflections/twists principally at cement sheathes. Indeed, our results show that the true transverse toughness of cortical bone is far higher than previously reported. However, the toughness in the longitudinal orientation, where cracks tend to follow the cement lines, is quite low at these small crack sizes; it is only when cracks become several millimeters in length that bridging mechanisms can develop leading to the (larger-crack) toughnesses generally quoted for bone.

  11. Enhancing Scalability and Efficiency of the TOUGH2_MP for LinuxClusters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Keni; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2006-04-17

    TOUGH2{_}MP, the parallel version TOUGH2 code, has been enhanced by implementing more efficient communication schemes. This enhancement is achieved through reducing the amount of small-size messages and the volume of large messages. The message exchange speed is further improved by using non-blocking communications for both linear and nonlinear iterations. In addition, we have modified the AZTEC parallel linear-equation solver to nonblocking communication. Through the improvement of code structuring and bug fixing, the new version code is now more stable, while demonstrating similar or even better nonlinear iteration converging speed than the original TOUGH2 code. As a result, the new version of TOUGH2{_}MP is improved significantly in its efficiency. In this paper, the scalability and efficiency of the parallel code are demonstrated by solving two large-scale problems. The testing results indicate that speedup of the code may depend on both problem size and complexity. In general, the code has excellent scalability in memory requirement as well as computing time.

  12. Molecular mechanistic origin of the toughness of natural adhesives, fibres and composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Bettye L.; Schäffer, Tilman E.; Viani, Mario; Thompson, James B.; Frederick, Neil A.; Kindt, Johannes; Belcher, Angela; Stucky, Galen D.; Morse, Daniel E.; Hansma, Paul K.

    1999-06-01

    Natural materials are renowned for their strength and toughness,,,,. Spider dragline silk has a breakage energy per unit weight two orders of magnitude greater than high tensile steel,, and is representative of many other strong natural fibres,,. The abalone shell, a composite of calcium carbonate plates sandwiched between organic material, is 3,000 times more fracture resistant than a single crystal of the pure mineral,. The organic component, comprising just a few per cent of the composite by weight, is thought to hold the key to nacre's fracture toughness,. Ceramics laminated with organic material are more fracture resistant than non-laminated ceramics,, but synthetic materials made of interlocking ceramic tablets bound by a few weight per cent of ordinary adhesives do not have a toughness comparable to nacre. We believe that the key to nacre's fracture resistance resides in the polymer adhesive, and here we reveal the properties of this adhesive by using the atomic force microscope to stretch the organic molecules exposed on the surface of freshly cleaved nacre. The adhesive fibres elongate in a stepwise manner as folded domains or loops are pulled open. The elongation events occur for forces of a few hundred piconewtons, which are smaller than the forces of over a nanonewton required to break the polymer backbone in the threads. We suggest that this `modular' elongation mechanism might prove to be quite general for conveying toughness to natural fibres and adhesives, and we predict that it might be found also in dragline silk.

  13. Laser notching ceramics for reliable fracture toughness testing

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, Holly D.; Elmer, John W.; Freeman, Dennis C.; Schaefer, Ronald D.; Derkach, Oleg; Gallegos, Gilbert F.

    2015-09-19

    A new method for notching ceramics was developed using a picosecond laser for fracture toughness testing of alumina samples. The test geometry incorporated a single-edge-V-notch that was notched using picosecond laser micromachining. This method has been used in the past for cutting ceramics, and is known to remove material with little to no thermal effect on the surrounding material matrix. This study showed that laser-assisted-machining for fracture toughness testing of ceramics was reliable, quick, and cost effective. In order to assess the laser notched single-edge-V-notch beam method, fracture toughness results were compared to results from other more traditional methods, specifically surface-crack in flexure and the chevron notch bend tests. Lastly, the results showed that picosecond laser notching produced precise notches in post-failure measurements, and that the measured fracture toughness results showed improved consistency compared to traditional fracture toughness methods.

  14. Laser notching ceramics for reliable fracture toughness testing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Barth, Holly D.; Elmer, John W.; Freeman, Dennis C.; Schaefer, Ronald D.; Derkach, Oleg; Gallegos, Gilbert F.

    2015-09-19

    A new method for notching ceramics was developed using a picosecond laser for fracture toughness testing of alumina samples. The test geometry incorporated a single-edge-V-notch that was notched using picosecond laser micromachining. This method has been used in the past for cutting ceramics, and is known to remove material with little to no thermal effect on the surrounding material matrix. This study showed that laser-assisted-machining for fracture toughness testing of ceramics was reliable, quick, and cost effective. In order to assess the laser notched single-edge-V-notch beam method, fracture toughness results were compared to results from other more traditional methods, specificallymore » surface-crack in flexure and the chevron notch bend tests. Lastly, the results showed that picosecond laser notching produced precise notches in post-failure measurements, and that the measured fracture toughness results showed improved consistency compared to traditional fracture toughness methods.« less

  15. Tough poly(arylene ether) thermoplastics as modifiers for bismaleimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenzenberger, H. D.; Roemer, W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Jensen, B. J.

    1989-01-01

    Several aspects of research on thermoplastics as toughness modifiers are discussed, including the contribution of the backbone chemistry and the concentration of the poly(arylene ether) thermoplastic to fracture toughness, influence of the molecular weight of the poly(arylene ether) thermoplastic on neat resin fracture toughness, and the morphology of the thermoplastic modified networks. The results show that fracture toughness of brittle bismaleimide resins can be improved significantly with poly(arylene ether) thermoplastic levels of 20 percent by weight, and that high molecular weight poly(arylene ether) based on bisphenol A provides the highest degree of toughening. Preliminary composite evaluation shows that improvements in neat resin toughness translate into carbon fabric composite.

  16. Fracture Toughness in Advanced Monolithic Ceramics - SEPB Versus SEVENB Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, S. R.; Gyekenyesi, J. P.

    2005-01-01

    Fracture toughness of a total of 13 advanced monolithic ceramics including silicon nitrides, silicon carbide, aluminas, and glass ceramic was determined at ambient temperature by using both single edge precracked beam (SEPB) and single edge v-notched beam (SEVNB) methods. Relatively good agreement in fracture toughness between the two methods was observed for advanced ceramics with flat R-curves; whereas, poor agreement in fracture toughness was seen for materials with rising R-curves. The discrepancy in fracture toughness between the two methods was due to stable crack growth with crack closure forces acting in the wake region of cracks even in SEVNB test specimens. The effect of discrepancy in fracture toughness was analyzed in terms of microstructural feature (grain size and shape), toughening exponent, and stable crack growth determined using back-face strain gaging.

  17. Prostate-specific antigen doubling time predicts clinical outcome and survival in prostate cancer patients treated with combined radiation and hormone therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Andrew K. . E-mail: aklee@mdanderson.org; Levy, Larry B.; Cheung, Rex; Kuban, Deborah

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: To determine whether prostate-specific antigen (PSA) doubling time predicts clinical outcomes in patients with prostate cancer that has been treated with combined radiation and hormone therapy. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the medical records of 621 men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer treated with radiation therapy and hormone therapy between 1989 and 2003. 'Any' clinical failure was defined as any distant, nodal, or local failure, or the use of salvage therapy. 'True' clinical failure was defined as any distant, nodal, or local failure. PSA doubling time was calculated by using the log PSA values from patients with a PSA failure as defined by the American Society of Therapeutic Radiology Oncology consensus statement. One hundred thirty-seven men were at intermediate risk for PSA failure (as determined by T2b, Gleason score of 7, or PSA 10.1-0 ng/mL) and 484 men were at high risk for failure (T2c-4; Gleason 8-10; or PSA >20 ng/mL). Pretreatment PSA value, Gleason score, tumor stage, timing and duration of hormone therapy, radiation therapy dose, and PSA doubling time were analyzed for any associations with time to clinical failure by using Cox regression analysis. Estimates of survival were calculated by using the Kaplan-Meier method. Pairwise comparisons were made by using the log-rank test. Results: Sixty-two men experienced any clinical failure, and 22 men experienced true clinical failure. Multivariate analysis revealed that pretreatment PSA (p = 0.013), Gleason score (p = 0.0019), and a PSA doubling time (PSADT) {<=}8 months (p < 0.001) were independently associated with time to any clinical failure. Tumor stage, hormone therapy timing, hormone therapy duration, and radiation therapy dose were not statistically significant on multivariate or univariate analysis. Only hormone therapy duration (p 0.008) and PSADT {<=}8 months (<0.001) were significantly associated with time to true clinical failure. The estimated 5-year rate of any clinical

  18. Comparison of nested case-control and survival analysis methodologies for analysis of time-dependent exposure

    PubMed Central

    Essebag, Vidal; Platt, Robert W; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Pilote, Louise

    2005-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies of exposures that vary with time require an additional level of methodological complexity to account for the time-dependence of exposure. This study compares a nested case-control approach for the study of time-dependent exposure with cohort analysis using Cox regression including time-dependent covariates. Methods A cohort of 1340 subjects with four fixed and seven time-dependent covariates was used for this study. Nested case-control analyses were repeated 100 times for each of 4, 8, 16, 32, and 64 controls per case, and point estimates were compared to those obtained using Cox regression on the full cohort. Computational efficiencies were evaluated by comparing central processing unit times required for analysis of the cohort at sizes 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32 times its initial size. Results Nested case-control analyses yielded results that were similar to results of Cox regression on the full cohort. Cox regression was found to be 125 times slower than the nested case-control approach (using four controls per case). Conclusions The nested case-control approach is a useful alternative for cohort analysis when studying time-dependent exposures. Its superior computational efficiency may be particularly useful when studying rare outcomes in databases, where the ability to analyze larger sample sizes can improve the power of the study. PMID:15670334

  19. Piscivory in juvenile walleyes: Relative importance of prey species, timing of spawning of prey fish, and density on growth and survival

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolar, C.S.; Wahl, David H.; Hooe, M.L.

    2003-01-01

    We examined the effect of the timing of spawning by prey fish and the species of prey fish on the growth and survival of juvenile walleye Stizostedion vitreum. We expected that age-0 walleyes would grow more in ponds when stocked about the same time as the spawning of gizzard shad Dorosoma cepedianum than when stocked about 6 weeks after spawning. We found, however, that the timing of larval gizzard shad presence did not affect walleye growth or survival. Also contrary to our expectations, walleyes from ponds with bluegill Lepomis macrochirus grew more (by 9% in total length and 38% in mass) than those from ponds with gizzard shad. However, the density of gizzard shad was lower than that of bluegills, particularly after the first few weeks of the experiment. Bluegills remained within the gape limits of walleyes throughout the experiment, whereas gizzard shad outgrew their vulnerability to predation. Late-spawned gizzard shad remained vulnerable to walleye predation only slightly longer than did those from early spawned ponds. The survival of age-0 walleyes was unaffected by water temperature, the timing of spawning by prey fish, prey species, or density. Our results suggest that even though walleyes typically grow faster in systems with gizzard shad as prey than in those with bluegills, juvenile walleyes can still grow well in bluegill-dominated systems. In some systems, high densities of a less beneficial prey (e.g., abundant bluegills rather than less abundant gizzard shad) may overcome the growth differences of juvenile walleyes that would be expected based on the differences in prey species alone. A wide variation in individual walleye growth in our ponds, even within prey treatments, indicated the complexity of interactions among the factors affecting juvenile walleye growth.

  20. The Impact of Alemtuzumab and Basiliximab Induction on Patient Survival and Time to Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome in Double Lung Transplantation Recipients.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Y; Jayarajan, S N; Taghavi, S; Cordova, F C; Patel, N; Shiose, A; Leotta, E; Criner, G J; Guy, T S; Wheatley, G H; Kaiser, L R; Toyoda, Y

    2016-08-01

    We examined the effect of alemtuzumab and basiliximab induction therapy on patient survival and freedom from bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) in double lung transplantation. The United Network for Organ Sharing database was reviewed for adult double lung transplant recipients from 2006 to 2013. The primary outcome was risk-adjusted all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes included time to BOS. There were 6117 patients were identified, of whom 738 received alemtuzumab, 2804 received basiliximab, and 2575 received no induction. Alemtuzumab recipients had higher lung allocation scores compared with basiliximab and no-induction recipients (41.4 versus 37.9 versus 40.7, p < 0.001) and were more likely to require mechanical ventilation before to transplantation (21.7% versus 6.5% versus 6.2%, p < 0.001). Median survival was longer for alemtuzumab and basiliximab recipients compared with patients who received no induction (2321 versus 2352 versus 1967 days, p = 0.001). Alemtuzumab (hazard ratio 0.80, 95% confidence interval 0.67-0.95, p = 0.009) and basiliximab induction (0.88, 0.80-0.98, p = 0.015) were independently associated with survival on multivariate analysis. At 5 years, alemtuzumab recipients had a lower incidence of BOS (22.7% versus 55.4 versus 55.9%), and its use was independently associated with lower risk of developing BOS on multivariate analysis. While both induction therapies were associated with improved survival, patients who received alemtuzumab had greater median freedom from BOS. PMID:26833657

  1. The Impact of Alemtuzumab and Basiliximab Induction on Patient Survival and Time to Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome in Double Lung Transplantation Recipients.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Y; Jayarajan, S N; Taghavi, S; Cordova, F C; Patel, N; Shiose, A; Leotta, E; Criner, G J; Guy, T S; Wheatley, G H; Kaiser, L R; Toyoda, Y

    2016-08-01

    We examined the effect of alemtuzumab and basiliximab induction therapy on patient survival and freedom from bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) in double lung transplantation. The United Network for Organ Sharing database was reviewed for adult double lung transplant recipients from 2006 to 2013. The primary outcome was risk-adjusted all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes included time to BOS. There were 6117 patients were identified, of whom 738 received alemtuzumab, 2804 received basiliximab, and 2575 received no induction. Alemtuzumab recipients had higher lung allocation scores compared with basiliximab and no-induction recipients (41.4 versus 37.9 versus 40.7, p < 0.001) and were more likely to require mechanical ventilation before to transplantation (21.7% versus 6.5% versus 6.2%, p < 0.001). Median survival was longer for alemtuzumab and basiliximab recipients compared with patients who received no induction (2321 versus 2352 versus 1967 days, p = 0.001). Alemtuzumab (hazard ratio 0.80, 95% confidence interval 0.67-0.95, p = 0.009) and basiliximab induction (0.88, 0.80-0.98, p = 0.015) were independently associated with survival on multivariate analysis. At 5 years, alemtuzumab recipients had a lower incidence of BOS (22.7% versus 55.4 versus 55.9%), and its use was independently associated with lower risk of developing BOS on multivariate analysis. While both induction therapies were associated with improved survival, patients who received alemtuzumab had greater median freedom from BOS.

  2. Duration-dependent effects of clinically relevant oral alendronate doses on cortical bone toughness in beagle dogs

    PubMed Central

    Burr, David B.; Liu, Ziyue; Allen, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) have been shown to significantly reduce bone toughness in vertebrae within one year when given at clinical doses to dogs. Although BPs also reduce toughness in cortical bone when given at high doses, their effect on cortical bone material properties when given at clinical doses is less clear. In part, this may be due to the use of small sample sizes that were powered to demonstrate differences in bone mineral density rather than bone’s material properties. Our lab has conducted several studies in which dogs were treated with alendronate at a clinically relevant dose. The goal of this study was to examine these published and unpublished data collectively to determine whether there is a significant time-dependent effect of alendronate on toughness of cortical bone. This analysis seemed particularly relevant given the recent occurrence of atypical femoral fractures in humans. Differences in the toughness of ribs taken from dogs derived from five separate experiments were measured. The dogs were orally administered saline (CON, 1 ml/kg/day) or alendronate (ALN) at a clinical dose (0.2 mg/kg/day). Treatment duration ranged from 3 months to 3 years. Groups were compared using ANOVA, and time trends analyzed with linear regression analysis. Linear regressions of the percent difference in toughness between CON and ALN at each time point revealed a significant reduction in toughness with longer exposure to ALN. The downward trend was primarily driven by a downward trend in post-yield toughness, whereas toughness in the pre-yield region was not changed relative to CON. These data suggest that a longer duration of treatment with clinical doses of ALN results in deterioration of cortical bone toughness in a time-dependent manner. As the duration of treatment is lengthened, the cortical bone exhibits increasingly brittle behavior. This may be important in assessing the role that long-term BP treatments play in the risk of atypical fractures of femoral

  3. Fracture toughness for copper oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Goretta, Kenneth C.; Kullberg, Marc L.

    1993-01-01

    An oxide-based strengthening and toughening agent, such as tetragonal Zro.sub.2 particles, has been added to copper oxide superconductors, such as superconducting YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x (123) to improve its fracture toughness (K.sub.IC). A sol-gel coating which is non-reactive with the superconductor, such as Y.sub.2 BaCuO.sub.5 (211) on the ZrO.sub.2 particles minimized the deleterious reactions between the superconductor and the toughening agent dispersed therethrough. Addition of 20 mole percent ZrO.sub.2 coated with 211 yielded a 123 composite with a K.sub.IC of 4.5 MPa(m).sup.0.5.

  4. Fracture toughness for copper oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Goretta, K.C.; Kullberg, M.L.

    1993-04-13

    An oxide-based strengthening and toughening agent, such as tetragonal ZrO[sub 2] particles, has been added to copper oxide superconductors, such as superconducting YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub x] (123) to improve its fracture toughness (K[sub IC]). A sol-gel coating which is non-reactive with the superconductor, such as Y[sub 2]BaCuO[sub 5] (211) on the ZrO[sub 2] particles minimized the deleterious reactions between the superconductor and the toughening agent dispersed therethrough. Addition of 20 mole percent ZrO[sub 2] coated with 211 yielded a 123 composite with a K[sub IC] of 4.5 MPa(m)[sup 0.5].

  5. Tough, processable simultaneous semi-interpenetrating polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A high temperature semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN) was developed which had significantly improved processability, damage tolerance and mechanical performance, when compared to the commercial Thermid.RTM. materials. This simultaneous semi-IPN was prepared by mixing a thermosetting polyimide with a thermoplastic monomer precursor solution (NR-15082) and allowing them to react upon heating. This reaction occurs at a rate which decreases the flow and broadens the processing window. Upon heating at a higher temperature, there is an increase in flow. Because of the improved flow properties, broadened processing window and enhanced toughness, high strength polymer matrix composites, adhesives and molded articles can now be prepared from the acetylene endcapped polyimides which were previously inherently brittle and difficult to process.

  6. Tough, processable simultaneous semi-interpenetrating polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN) was developed which had significantly improved processability, damage tolerance, and mechanical performance when compared to the commercial Thermid materials. This simultaneous semi-IPN was prepared by mixing a thermosetting polyimide with a thermoplastic monomer precursor solution (NR150B2) and allowing them to react upon heating. This reaction occurs at a rate which decreases the flow and broadens the processing window. Upon heating at a higher temperature, there is an increase in flow. Because of the improved flow properties, broadened processing window and enhanced toughness, high strength polymer matrix composites, adhesives and molded articles can now be prepared from the acetylene endcapped polyimides which were previously inherently brittle and difficult to process.

  7. Development of tough, moisture resistant laminating resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, R. A.; Harrison, E. S.

    1982-01-01

    Tough, moisture resistant laminating resins for employment with graphite fibers were developed. The new laminating resins exhibited cost, handleability and processing characteristics equivalent to 394K (250 F) curing epoxies. The laminating resins were based on bisphenol A dicyanate and monofunctional cyanates with hydrophobic substituents. These resins sorb only small quantities of moisture at equilibrium (0.5% or less) with minimal glass transition temperature depression and represent an improvement over epoxies which sorb around 2% moisture at equilibrium. Toughening was accomplished by the precipitation of small diameter particles of butadiene nitrile rubber throughout the resin matrix. The rubber domains act as microcrack termini and energy dissipation sites, allowing increased stress accommodation prior to catastrophic failure. A unique blend of amine terminated butadiene nitrile elastomer (MW 2,000) and a high nitrile content butadiene nitrile rubber yielded the desired resin morphology.

  8. The loss of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) reduces bone toughness and fracture toughness.

    PubMed

    Makowski, Alexander J; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Wadeer, Sandra A; Whitehead, Jack M; Rowland, Barbara J; Granke, Mathilde; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Yang, Xiangli; Nyman, Jeffry S

    2014-05-01

    Even though age-related changes to bone tissue affecting fracture risk are well characterized, only a few matrix-related factors have been identified as important to maintaining fracture resistance. As a gene critical to osteoblast differentiation, activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is possibly one of these important factors. To test the hypothesis that the loss of ATF4 affects the fracture resistance of bone beyond bone mass and structure, we harvested bones from Atf4+/+ and Atf4-/- littermates at 8 and 20 weeks of age (n≥9 per group) for bone assessment across several length scales. From whole bone mechanical tests in bending, femurs from Atf4-/- mice were found to be brittle with reduced toughness and fracture toughness compared to femurs from Atf4+/+ mice. However, there were no differences in material strength and in tissue hardness, as determined by nanoindentation, between the genotypes, irrespective of age. Tissue mineral density of the cortex at the point of loading as determined by micro-computed tomography was also not significantly different. However, by analyzing local composition by Raman Spectroscopy (RS), bone tissue of Atf4-/- mice was found to have higher mineral to collagen ratio compared to wild-type tissue, primarily at 20 weeks of age. From RS analysis of intact femurs at 2 orthogonal orientations relative to the polarization axis of the laser, we also found that the organizational-sensitive peak ratio, ν1Phosphate per Amide I, changed to a greater extent upon bone rotation for Atf4-deficient tissue, implying bone matrix organization may contribute to the brittleness phenotype. Target genes of ATF4 activity are not only important to osteoblast differentiation but also in maintaining bone toughness and fracture toughness.

  9. Effect of time before storage and storage temperature on survival of Salmonella inoculated on fresh-cut melons.

    PubMed

    Ukuku, Dike O; Sapers, Gerald M

    2007-05-01

    The effects of a waiting period at room temperature ( approximately 22 degrees C) before refrigerating fresh-cut watermelon, cantaloupe and honeydew pieces contaminated with Salmonella on survival of the inoculated pathogen were investigated. Whole cantaloupes, honeydew melons and watermelons were washed with water, and fresh-cut pieces from individual melons were prepared and inoculated with a five strain cocktail of Salmonella at 10(5)cfu/ml. Populations of aerobic mesophilic bacteria, yeast and mold and Pseudomonas spp. were higher for fresh-cut cantaloupe than for fresh-cut watermelon and honeydew immediately after preparation. Populations of Salmonella, aerobic mesophilic bacteria, yeast and mold and Pseudomonas ssp. in fresh-cut melons left at room temperature for up to 5h before refrigeration were significantly (P<0.05) higher than populations in fresh-cut melons stored at 5 degrees C immediately after preparation. Populations of Salmonella recovered in fresh-cut melon after inoculation with the cocktail of Salmonella strains averaged 2 log(10)cfu/g for all three types of melons. Populations in fresh-cut watermelon and honeydew pieces declined by 1 log when stored immediately at 5 degrees C for 12 days, while the populations in fresh-cut cantaloupe did not show significant (P>0.05) changes. Populations of Salmonella in fresh-cut melons stored immediately at 10 degrees C for 12 days increased significantly (P<0.05) from 2.0 to 3.0 log(10)cfu/g in watermelon, 1.9 to 3.0 log(10)cfu/g in honeydew and 2.0 to 3.6 log(10)cfu/g in cantaloupe pieces. Holding freshly prepared, contaminated fresh-cut melon pieces at 22 degrees C for 3h or more prior to refrigerated storage would increase the chances of Salmonella proliferation, especially if the fresh-cut melons were subsequently stored at an abusive temperature.

  10. Time to focus child survival programmes on the newborn: assessment of levels and causes of infant mortality in rural Pakistan.

    PubMed Central

    Fikree, Fariyal F.; Azam, Syed Iqbal; Berendes, Heinz W.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Population-based surveys were conducted in selected clusters of Pakistan's least developed provinces, Balochistan and North-West Frontier Province (NWFP), including the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), to assess levels and causes of neonatal and postneonatal mortality. METHODS: Interviews were conducted in a total of 54 834 households: Balochistan, 20 486; NWFP, 26 175; and FATA, 8173. Trained interviewers administered questionnaires after obtaining verbal informed consent from the respondents. Verbal autopsy interviews were conducted for infant deaths reported for the previous year. FINDINGS: The infant mortality rate based on combined data from the different sites was 99.7 per 1000 live births (range 129.0-70.1). The contribution of neonatal deaths to all infant deaths was much higher for NWFP (67.2%), where the overall rate was lowest, than for Balochistan (50.8%) and FATA (56.8%). Around 70% of all neonatal deaths occurred in the early neonatal period. The three main clinical causes of infant deaths were diarrhoea syndrome (21.6%), tetanus (11.7%) and acute respiratory infections (11.6%). In the neonatal period, however, tetanus (18.3%), small size for gestational age or low birth weight (15.3%), and birth injury (12.0%) accounted for nearly half (45.6%) of all deaths, while the contributions of diarrhoea syndrome (5.1%) and acute respiratory infections (6.0%) were less significant (11.1%). Tetanus was the cause of death for 21.7% and 17.1% of all infant deaths in FATA and NWFP respectively. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that there should be a shift in child survival programmes to give greater emphasis to maternal and neonatal health, in particular to maternal tetanus immunization, safe delivery and cord care. PMID:12075362

  11. A novel pillar indentation splitting test for measuring fracture toughness of thin ceramic coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastiani, M.; Johanns, K. E.; Herbert, E. G.; Carassiti, F.; Pharr, G. M.

    2015-06-01

    The fracture toughness of thin ceramic films is an important material property that plays a role in determining the in-service mechanical performance and adhesion of this important class of engineering materials. Unfortunately, measurement of thin film fracture toughness is affected by influences from the substrate and the large residual stresses that can exist in the films. In this paper, we explore a promising new technique that potentially overcomes these issues based on nanoindentation testing of micro-pillars produced by focused ion beam milling of the films. By making the pillar diameter approximately equal to its length, the residual stress in the upper portion of the pillar is almost fully relaxed, and when indented with a sharp Berkovich indenter, the pillars fracture by splitting at reproducible loads that are readily quantified by a sudden displacement excursion in the load displacement behaviour. Cohesive finite element simulations are used for analysis and development of a simple relationship between the critical load at failure, pillar radius and fracture toughness for a given material. The main novel aspect of this work is that neither crack geometries nor crack sizes need to be measured post test. In addition, the residual stress can be measured at the same time with toughness, by comparison of the indentation results obtained on the stress-free pillars and the as-deposited film. The method is tested on three different hard coatings created by physical vapour deposition, namely titanium nitride, chromium nitride and a CrAlN/Si3N4 nanocomposite. Results compare well to independently measured values of fracture toughness for the three brittle films. The technique offers several benefits over existing methods.

  12. A novel pillar indentation splitting test for measuring fracture toughness of thin ceramic coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastiani, Marco; Johanns, K. E.; Herbert, Erik G.; Carassiti, Fabio; Pharr, George Mathews

    2014-05-16

    Fracture toughness is an important material property that plays a role in determining the in-service mechanical performance and adhesion of thin ceramic films. Unfortunately, measuring thin film fracture toughness is affected by influences from the substrate and the large residual stresses that can exist in the films. In this paper, we explore a promising new technique that potentially overcomes these problems based on nanoindentation testing of micro-pillars produced by focused ion beam milling of the films. By making the pillar diameter approximately equal to its length, the residual stress in the pillar’s upper portion is almost fully relaxed, and when indented with a sharp Berkovich indenter, the pillars fracture by splitting at reproducible loads that are readily quantified by a sudden displacement excursion in the load displacement behavior. Cohesive finite element simulations are used to analyze and develop, for a given material, a simple relation between the critical load at failure, pillar radius, and fracture toughness. The main novel aspect of this work is that neither crack geometries nor crack sizes need to be measured post test. Furthermore, the residual stress can be measured at the same time with toughness, by comparing the indentation results from the stress-free pillars and the as-deposited film. The method is tested on three different hard coatings formed by physical vapor deposition: titanium nitride, chromium nitride, and a CrAlN/Si3N4 nanocomposite. Results compare well to independently measured values of fracture toughness for the three brittle films. The technique offers several benefits over existing methods.

  13. A novel pillar indentation splitting test for measuring fracture toughness of thin ceramic coatings

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sebastiani, Marco; Johanns, K. E.; Herbert, Erik G.; Carassiti, Fabio; Pharr, George Mathews

    2014-05-16

    Fracture toughness is an important material property that plays a role in determining the in-service mechanical performance and adhesion of thin ceramic films. Unfortunately, measuring thin film fracture toughness is affected by influences from the substrate and the large residual stresses that can exist in the films. In this paper, we explore a promising new technique that potentially overcomes these problems based on nanoindentation testing of micro-pillars produced by focused ion beam milling of the films. By making the pillar diameter approximately equal to its length, the residual stress in the pillar’s upper portion is almost fully relaxed, and whenmore » indented with a sharp Berkovich indenter, the pillars fracture by splitting at reproducible loads that are readily quantified by a sudden displacement excursion in the load displacement behavior. Cohesive finite element simulations are used to analyze and develop, for a given material, a simple relation between the critical load at failure, pillar radius, and fracture toughness. The main novel aspect of this work is that neither crack geometries nor crack sizes need to be measured post test. Furthermore, the residual stress can be measured at the same time with toughness, by comparing the indentation results from the stress-free pillars and the as-deposited film. The method is tested on three different hard coatings formed by physical vapor deposition: titanium nitride, chromium nitride, and a CrAlN/Si3N4 nanocomposite. Results compare well to independently measured values of fracture toughness for the three brittle films. The technique offers several benefits over existing methods.« less

  14. Aging effects on the fracture toughness of SiC whisker reinforced 2XXX aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnaparkhi, P. L.; Rack, H. J.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of aging (at 150 C) time on the fracture toughness behavior of a 2XXX alloy (Al-3.55Cu-1.29Mg-0.01Fe-trace Mn) reinforced with 5 vol pct F-8 SiC whiskers was investigated by measuring hardness and electrical conductivity followed by fracture toughness tests on center-cracked specimens. The ageing time-hardening response plots showed that, independent of whisker orientation, the initial rapid increase in hardness was followed by a more gradual increase, with a broad hardness peak between 32 and 128 hrs of aging. Coincident with the hardness changes, the electrical conductivity initially decreased, reached a minimum, and then increased at aging times beyond 32 hrs. Examination by SEM indicated that the initial increase in hardness and decrease in conductivity was due to the GPB zone formation, while the subsequent increase in electrical conductivity and decrease in hardness (overaging) was due to S nucleation and growth.

  15. TH-E-BRF-05: Comparison of Survival-Time Prediction Models After Radiotherapy for High-Grade Glioma Patients Based On Clinical and DVH Features

    SciTech Connect

    Magome, T; Haga, A; Igaki, H; Sekiya, N; Masutani, Y; Sakumi, A; Mukasa, A; Nakagawa, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Although many outcome prediction models based on dose-volume information have been proposed, it is well known that the prognosis may be affected also by multiple clinical factors. The purpose of this study is to predict the survival time after radiotherapy for high-grade glioma patients based on features including clinical and dose-volume histogram (DVH) information. Methods: A total of 35 patients with high-grade glioma (oligodendroglioma: 2, anaplastic astrocytoma: 3, glioblastoma: 30) were selected in this study. All patients were treated with prescribed dose of 30–80 Gy after surgical resection or biopsy from 2006 to 2013 at The University of Tokyo Hospital. All cases were randomly separated into training dataset (30 cases) and test dataset (5 cases). The survival time after radiotherapy was predicted based on a multiple linear regression analysis and artificial neural network (ANN) by using 204 candidate features. The candidate features included the 12 clinical features (tumor location, extent of surgical resection, treatment duration of radiotherapy, etc.), and the 192 DVH features (maximum dose, minimum dose, D95, V60, etc.). The effective features for the prediction were selected according to a step-wise method by using 30 training cases. The prediction accuracy was evaluated by a coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) between the predicted and actual survival time for the training and test dataset. Results: In the multiple regression analysis, the value of R{sup 2} between the predicted and actual survival time was 0.460 for the training dataset and 0.375 for the test dataset. On the other hand, in the ANN analysis, the value of R{sup 2} was 0.806 for the training dataset and 0.811 for the test dataset. Conclusion: Although a large number of patients would be needed for more accurate and robust prediction, our preliminary Result showed the potential to predict the outcome in the patients with high-grade glioma. This work was partly supported by

  16. Effect of minor reactive metal additions on fracture toughness of iron: 12-percent nickel alloy at-196 deg and 25 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzke, W. R.; Stephens, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    The slow bend precracked Charpy fracture toughness and tensile behavior of arc-melted and hot-rolled Fe-12Ni alloys containing up to 4 atomic percent reactive metal additions were determined at -196 C and 25 C after water quenching from three annealing temperatures. The fracture toughness of Fe-12Ni at -196 C was improved by small amounts of Al, Ce, Hf, La, Nb, Ta, Ti, V, Y, and Zr, but not by Si. Cryogenic toughness was improved up to 7.5 times that of binary Fe-12Ni and varied with the reactive metal, its concentration, and the annealing temperature.

  17. THE EFFECTS OF HYDROGEN, TRITIUM, AND HEAT TREATMENT ON THE DEFORMATION AND FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.; Tosten, M.; Chapman, G.

    2013-09-06

    The deformation and fracture toughness properties of forged stainless steels pre-charged with tritium were compared to the deformation and fracture toughness properties of the same steels heat treated at 773 K or 873 K and precharged with hydrogen. Forged stainless steels pre-charged with tritium exhibit an aging effect: Fracture toughness values decrease with aging time after precharging because of the increase in concentration of helium from tritium decay. This study shows that forged stainless steels given a prior heat treatment and then pre-charged with hydrogen also exhibit an aging effect: Fracture toughness values decrease with increasing time at temperature. A microstructural analysis showed that the fracture toughness reduction in the heat-treated steels was due to patches of recrystallized grains that form within the forged matrix during the heat treatment. The combination of hydrogen and the patches of recrystallized grains resulted in more deformation twinning. Heavy deformation twinning on multiple slip planes was typical for the hydrogen-charged samples; whereas, in the non-charged samples, less twinning was observed and was generally limited to one slip plane. Similar effects occur in tritium pre-charged steels, but the deformation twinning is brought on by the hardening associated with decay helium bubbles in the microstructure.

  18. Tritium Effects on Fracture Toughness of Stainless Steel Weldments

    SciTech Connect

    MORGAN, MICHAEL; CHAPMAN, G. K.; TOSTEN, M. H.; WEST, S. L.

    2005-05-12

    The effects of tritium on the fracture toughness properties of Type 304L and Type 21-6-9 stainless steel weldments were measured. Weldments were tritium-charged-and-aged and then tested in order to measure the effect of the increasing decay helium content on toughness. The results were compared to uncharged and hydrogen-charged samples. For unexposed weldments having 8-12 volume percent retained delta ferrite, fracture toughness was higher than base metal toughness. At higher levels of weld ferrite, the fracture toughness decreased to values below that of the base metal. Hydrogen-charged and tritium-charged weldments had lower toughness values than similarly charged base metals and toughness decreased further with increasing weld ferrite content. The effect of decay helium content was inconclusive because of tritium off-gassing losses during handling, storage and testing. Fracture modes were dominated by the dimpled rupture process in unexposed weldments. In hydrogen and tritium-exposed weldments, the fracture modes depended on the weld ferrite content. At high ferrite contents, hydrogen-induced transgranular fracture of the weld ferrite phase was observed.

  19. Dynamic fracture toughness evaluation by measurement of CTOD

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, W.N. Jr.; Douglas, A.S.; Shapiro, J.M.

    1988-02-01

    Quantification of the dynamic fracture toughness of structural materials is essential to a wide range of problems-from nuclear accidents to ordnance applications. However, the difficulties associated with accurate measurements of crack under dynamic loading are considerable. Thus there are no standardized procedures and few reliable results. A systematic study of the dynamic fracture toughness of SAE-01 tool steel, 4340 and HY100 steels, and a tungsten are described using the Interferometric Strain/Displacement Gage (ISDG) system which has very high frequency resolution. The ISDG system is used to measure the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) 100 microns behind a fatigue crack tip in a three-point bend specimen. Static measurements on similar specimens serve to calibrate the method and ensure consistency with the accepted procedures for static fracture toughness testing. Finite element analyses are used to obtain full field information at the point of initiation and to assess the material characteristics which lead to changes in toughness with loading rate. The major advantage of the method is that information is obtained very close to the crack tip, so that stress wave loading effects are accounted for. Results show that 4340 steel, which is strain-rate insensitive, has no significant change in toughness with loading rate. Measurable toughness dependence on loading rate is found for HY-100 and tungsten, which are approximately 15 percent tougher under dynamic conditions. The SAE-01 tool steel shows a significant increase (50 percent) in fracture toughness for dynamic over static loading.

  20. A workflow for handling heterogeneous 3D models with the TOUGH2 family of codes: Applications to numerical modeling of CO 2 geological storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audigane, Pascal; Chiaberge, Christophe; Mathurin, Frédéric; Lions, Julie; Picot-Colbeaux, Géraldine

    2011-04-01

    This paper is addressed to the TOUGH2 user community. It presents a new tool for handling simulations run with the TOUGH2 code with specific application to CO 2 geological storage. This tool is composed of separate FORTRAN subroutines (or modules) that can be run independently, using input and output files in ASCII format for TOUGH2. These modules have been developed specifically for modeling of carbon dioxide geological storage and their use with TOUGH2 and the Equation of State module ECO2N, dedicated to CO 2-water-salt mixture systems, with TOUGHREACT, which is an adaptation of TOUGH2 with ECO2N and geochemical fluid-rock interactions, and with TOUGH2 and the EOS7C module dedicated to CO 2-CH 4 gas mixture is described. The objective is to save time for the pre-processing, execution and visualization of complex geometry for geological system representation. The workflow is rapid and user-friendly and future implementation to other TOUGH2 EOS modules for other contexts (e.g. nuclear waste disposal, geothermal production) is straightforward. Three examples are shown for validation: (i) leakage of CO 2 up through an abandoned well; (ii) 3D reactive transport modeling of CO 2 in a sandy aquifer formation in the Sleipner gas Field, (North Sea, Norway); and (iii) an estimation of enhanced gas recovery technology using CO 2 as the injected and stored gas to produce methane in the K12B Gas Field (North Sea, Denmark).

  1. Expression of the macrophage antigen CD163 in rectal cancer cells is associated with early local recurrence and reduced survival time.

    PubMed

    Shabo, Ivan; Olsson, Hans; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Svanvik, Joar

    2009-10-15

    Expression of the macrophage antigen CD163 in breast cancer cells is recently shown to be related to early distant recurrence and shortened survival. In this study, 163 patients with rectal cancer, included in the Swedish rectal cancer trial and followed up for a median of 71 months, were examined for the expression of CD163 in the primary tumors. The cancer cells expressed CD163 in the primary tumors in 23% (n = 32) of the patients. In pretreatment biopsies from 101 patients, 10 had CD163-positive cancers and these patients had earlier local recurrence (p < 0.044) and reduced survival time (p < 0.045) compared with those with CD163-negative tumors. When studying surgical specimens from 61 patients randomized to preoperative irradiation (5 x 5 Gy delivered in 1 week), it was found that 31% were CD163 positive whereas the corresponding figure was only 17% for 78 patients who were nonirradiated (p < 0.044), which tentatively may be consistent with X-rays inducing fusion. In CD163-positive tumors there was a reduced apoptotic activity as measured with the Termina deoxynucleotidyl Transferase Biotin-dUTP Nick End Labeling (TUNEL) technique (p = 0.018). There tended also to be an increased proliferation activity measured as an expression of Ki-67 non significant (NS). It is concluded that primary rectal cancers may express CD-163, and this phenotypic macrophage trait is related to early local recurrence, shorter survival time and reduced apoptosis. Furthermore, the expression of CD163 is more common after irradiation. PMID:19582880

  2. N-Acetylaspartate Synthase Deficiency Corrects the Myelin Phenotype in a Canavan Disease Mouse Model But Does Not Affect Survival Time.

    PubMed

    Maier, Helena; Wang-Eckhardt, Lihua; Hartmann, Dieter; Gieselmann, Volkmar; Eckhardt, Matthias

    2015-10-28

    Canavan disease (CD) is a severe, lethal leukodystrophy caused by deficiency in aspartoacylase (ASPA), which hydrolyzes N-acetylaspartate (NAA). In the brains of CD patients, NAA accumulates to high millimolar concentrations. The pathology of the disease is characterized by loss of oligodendrocytes and spongy myelin degeneration in the CNS. Whether accumulating NAA, absence of NAA-derived acetate, or absence of any unknown functions of the ASPA enzyme is responsible for the pathology of the disease is not fully understood. We generated ASPA-deficient (Aspa(nur7/nur7)) mice that are also deficient for NAA synthase Nat8L (Nat8L(-/-)/Aspa(nur7/nur7)). These mice have no detectable NAA. Nevertheless, they exhibited normal myelin content, myelin sphingolipid composition, and full reversal of spongy myelin and axonal degeneration. Surprisingly, although pathology was fully reversed, the survival time of the mice was not prolonged. In contrast, Aspa(nur7/nur7) mice with only one intact Nat8L allele accumulated less NAA, developed a less severe pathology, phenotypic improvements, and, importantly, an almost normal survival time. Therefore, inhibition of NAA synthase is a promising therapeutic option for CD. The reduced survival rate of Nat8L(-/-)/Aspa(nur7/nur7) mice, however, indicates that complete inhibition of NAA synthase may bear unforeseeable risks for the patient. Furthermore, we demonstrate that acetate derived from NAA is not essential for myelin lipid synthesis and that loss of NAA-derived acetate does not cause the myelin phenotype of Aspa(nur7/nur7) mice. Our data clearly support the hypothesis that NAA accumulation is the major factor in the development of CD.

  3. Gender and timing during ontogeny matter: effects of a temporary high temperature on survival, body size and colouration in Harmonia axyridis.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Michal; Nedvěd, Oldřich

    2013-01-01

    The ambient temperature experienced during development is a crucial factor affecting survival and adult phenotype in ectotherms. Moreover, the exact response of individuals to different temperature regimes is frequently sex-specific. This sex-specific response can result in varying levels of sexual dimorphism according to the experienced conditions. The majority of studies have investigated the effects of temperature on individuals reared under a constant temperature regime throughout their whole preimaginal development, whereas information on stage-dependent variation in temperature effects is scarce. Here we investigate how the stage at which elevated temperature is experienced influences survival, adult body size and colouration in the harlequin ladybird Harmonia axyridis form succinea. The effects of timing of exposure to elevated temperature on the adult phenotype are assessed separately for males and females. Control individuals were reared at a constant temperature of 20 °C. Beetles in other treatments were additionally exposed to 33 °C for 48 hours during the following developmental stages: egg, 1(st) to 2(nd) larval instar, 3(rd) larval instar, 4(th) larval instar and pupa. Exposure to an elevated temperature during the early developmental stages resulted in lower survival, but the adult phenotype of survivors was almost unaffected. Exposure to an elevated temperature during the later developmental stages (4(th) larval instar or pupa) resulted in the decreased melanisation of elytra, decreased structural body size and increased dry mass. Furthermore, the timing of high temperature exposure affected the degree of sexual dimorphism in elytral melanisation and dry mass. We demonstrate that the effects of elevated temperature can vary according to the developmental stage at exposure. Detailed information on how ambient temperature affects the developmental biology of ectotherms is crucial for modeling population growth and predicting the spread of invasive

  4. The Use of Doublers in Delamination Toughness Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, James R.; Demarco, Kevin; Whitley, Karen S.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the data reduction equations for common delamination toughness tests are rederived for use with specimens which have bonded doublers. The common toughness tests considered here are the double cantilever beam (DCB) for mode I toughness; the end notch flexure (3ENF) and 4 point ENF (4ENF) for mode II toughness; and the mixed mode bending (MMB) test for testing under combined mode I and mode II loading. Because the addition of the doublers changes the bending stiffness of the specimens, these data reduction equations may need to be corrected. Doublers were added to the delamination test specimens to solve a premature failure problem. Delamination toughness is normally tested using a beam with an imbedded insert so that one end of the specimen is split into two arms. If the specimen is too thin, or if the toughness of the material is too high, an arm of the specimen may fail in bending before the delamination grows. When this occurs, the toughness of the material cannot be determined. To delay the bending failure so that delamination growth occurs, doubler plates were bonded to both top and bottom surfaces of the specimen. A doubler parameter, beta, which describes how much the use of doubler plates changed the ratio of full thickness to delaminated bending stiffnesses, was defined. When changes to the data reduction equations were required, the changes were minor when written in terms of the beta parameter. The doubler plate technique was demonstrated by measuring the mixed-mode fracture toughness of a carbon-carbon composite using test specimens which would otherwise have failed before delamination growth occurred. The doubler plate technique may solve several problems that can be encountered when testing delamination fracture toughness.

  5. Fracture toughness of oxide-dispersion strengthened copper

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.

    1996-10-01

    The fracture toughness of an oxide-dispersion strengthened copper alloy AL-15 has been examined at room temperature and 250{degrees}C, in air and in vacuum (< 10{sup {minus}6} torr). Increasing test temperature causes a significant decrease in the fracture toughness of this material, in either air or vacuum environments. In addition, specimens oriented in the T-L orientation (crack growth parallel to the extrusion direction) show significantly lower toughness than those in the L-T orientation (crack growth perpendicular to the extrusion direction).

  6. The use of propensity score methods with survival or time-to-event outcomes: reporting measures of effect similar to those used in randomized experiments.

    PubMed

    Austin, Peter C

    2014-03-30

    Propensity score methods are increasingly being used to estimate causal treatment effects in observational studies. In medical and epidemiological studies, outcomes are frequently time-to-event in nature. Propensity-score methods are often applied incorrectly when estimating the effect of treatment on time-to-event outcomes. This article describes how two different propensity score methods (matching and inverse probability of treatment weighting) can be used to estimate the measures of effect that are frequently reported in randomized controlled trials: (i) marginal survival curves, which describe survival in the population if all subjects were treated or if all subjects were untreated; and (ii) marginal hazard ratios. The use of these propensity score methods allows one to replicate the measures of effect that are commonly reported in randomized controlled trials with time-to-event outcomes: both absolute and relative reductions in the probability of an event occurring can be determined. We also provide guidance on variable selection for the propensity score model, highlight methods for assessing the balance of baseline covariates between treated and untreated subjects, and describe the implementation of a sensitivity analysis to assess the effect of unmeasured confounding variables on the estimated treatment effect when outcomes are time-to-event in nature. The methods in the paper are illustrated by estimating the effect of discharge statin prescribing on the risk of death in a sample of patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction. In this tutorial article, we describe and illustrate all the steps necessary to conduct a comprehensive analysis of the effect of treatment on time-to-event outcomes.

  7. Chinese hamster V79 cells harbor potentially lethal damage which is neither fixed nor repaired for long times after attaining maximal survival under growth conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, N.M.S.; Nori, D.; Mayer, P.J.; Lange, C.S.

    1995-03-01

    The kinetics of the repair and fixation of potentially lethal damage (PLD) was studied in log-phase Chinese hamster V79 cells. The postirradiation (10 Gy) survival of cells treated with hypertonic saline increased when these cells were incubated further in conditioned medium but not in growth medium, indicating that damage which is neither fixed by hypertonic saline nor amenable to repair in growth medium is nonetheless repaired in conditioned medium. Recovery of X-irradiated cells incubated in growth medium or in conditioned medium was maximal by about 70 min and was two times higher in conditioned medium than in growth medium. Cells incubated in growth medium for 70-120 min postirradiation continued to repair damage when subsequently shifted to conditioned medium only. Thus PLD is not fixed by the time the recovery plateau has been attained in growth medium, and this unfixed PLD can still be repaired when cells are shifted to conditioned medium. To study the kinetics of fixation of PLD (without hypertonic saline), the survival of cells incubated in growth medium for up to 9 h postirradiation was compared with that for cells incubated in conditioned medium. These results show that the damage was neither fixed nor misrepaired in growth medium but rather remained unrepaired for up to 2 h, and that damage fixation in growth medium does not begin until after 2 h and is completed by 6 h postirradiation. 21 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Gene Expression Mapping of Histone Deacetylases and Co-factors, and Correlation with Survival Time and 1H-HRMAS Metabolomic Profile in Human Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Dali-Youcef, Nassim; Froelich, Sébastien; Moussallieh, François-Marie; Chibbaro, Salvatore; Noël, Georges; Namer, Izzie J.; Heikkinen, Sami; Auwerx, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Primary brain tumors are presently classified based on imaging and histopathological techniques, which remains unsatisfaying. We profiled here by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) the transcripts of eighteen histone deacetylases (HDACs) and a subset of transcriptional co-factors in non-tumoral brain samples from 15 patients operated for epilepsia and in brain tumor samples from 50 patients diagnosed with grade II oligodendrogliomas (ODII, n = 9), grade III oligodendrogliomas (ODIII, n = 22) and glioblastomas (GL, n = 19). Co-factor transcripts were significantly different in tumors as compared to non-tumoral samples and distinguished different molecular subgroups of brain tumors, regardless of tumor grade. Among all patients studied, the expression of HDAC1 and HDAC3 was inversely correlated with survival, whereas the expression of HDAC4, HDAC5, HDAC6, HDAC11 and SIRT1 was significantly and positively correlated with survival time of patients with gliomas. 1H-HRMAS technology revealed metabolomically distinct groups according to the expression of HDAC1, HDAC4 and SIRT1, suggesting that these genes may play an important role in regulating brain tumorigenesis and cancer progression. Our study hence identified different molecular fingerprints for subgroups of histopathologically similar brain tumors that may enable the prediction of outcome based on the expression level of co-factor genes and could allow customization of treatment. PMID:25791281

  9. Toughness and sulfide stress cracking resistance of 13Cr stainless steel OCTG manufactured by ausforming process

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Yukio; Yamane, Yasuyoshi; Tamaki, Katsuomi

    1995-10-01

    An ausformed and tempered 13Cr martensitic stainless steel newly developed for OCTG gives a better SSC resistance and a higher low temperature toughness than the conventional, quenched and tempered 13Cr steel. The value of Sc obtained by the NACE three point bent beam test for the ausformed and tempered 13Cr steel with the yield strength of 640MPa reaches 10.0 ({times}10ksi) as a result of carbide spheroidization during ausforming, which is compared with 8.0 ({times}10ksi) for the conventional 13Cr steel with the same strength. This treatment also gives a higher low temperature toughness of 150J in Charpy absorbed energy at 0 C owing to fine microstructure, which is compared with 70J for the conventional 13Cr steel.

  10. Cool Tools, Tough Times: Maintaining a Focus on Technology Infusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britten, Jody S.; Clausen, Jon M.

    2009-01-01

    Nationwide the effects of the current economic situation are trickling down to impact our schools. School transportation options are narrowing, the housing market is impacting property taxes, and efforts in technology are at a stand still (Bobkoff, 2009; Hopkinson, 2009; Mummolo, 2008). Simultaneously there is a need for schools to meet society's…

  11. Being Relevant in Tough Times: TRIUMF's Five-Year Plan

    ScienceCinema

    Tim, Mayer [TRIUMF

    2016-07-12

    Perhaps better known to the international community than its own neighbors, TRIUMF is Canada's national laboratory for particle and nuclear physics.  Working with the Canadian scientific community, TRIUMF has formulated a new vision to transform the laboratory and deliver a whole new level of performance and impact.  The plan capitalizes on platform technologies (superconducting RF cavities for accelerator physics and radiotracers in nuclear medicine) and exploits Canada's role in ATLAS and the LHC.  I will describe the key elements of the plan and discuss the science-policy landscape in which TRIUMF must make its case.

  12. Straight-Talk--Tough Issues: Tenure in Times of Retrenchment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Alvin

    1983-01-01

    Argues that academic freedom is sustained by the tenure system and that retrenchment that involves the elimination of tenured faculty positions or programs has the potential of weakening academic freedom. (PD)

  13. Staying Focused during Tough Economic Times: Consolidating Our Research Base

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Today school library media specialists operate in an environment of daily challenges and controversies. "No Child Left Behind" established mandates that all educators are scrambling to meet. No matter how people feel about the way the legislation is being carried out, it is difficult to argue against its purpose--that all educators must find ways…

  14. Making Tough Choices: Retrenchment and Reallocations during Hard Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaither, Gerald; DeWitt, Robby

    1991-01-01

    Prairie View A&M University's (Texas) experiences are offered as lessons in how to establish institutional priorities and procedures for retrenchment. Thirty-one specific cost-reduction strategies and policy changes are presented, and the evolution of a formal, institutionalized budget process, nonexistent until fiscal year 1991, is described.…

  15. Breast cancer in tough economic times: disruptive technology emerging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretz, Phillip; Lynch, Richard

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of melding three emerging technologies: Pharmacogenomics, Modified Military Digital Infrared and Halo to establish their capability in diagnosing ultra-small breast cancers as well as other cancers. Mammography, ultrasound and MRI technologies have been available for over forty years, however, there is still no uniform utilization by women, costs continue to escalate and problems persist like high false positive rates for MRI and high false negative rates for mammography. Of the first 500 IR patients, 499 were female and 1 male. Of 550 OncoVue patients, 129 opted to undergo IR. A total of 19 were lost to follow-up. Patients who were negative on IR: 419/500 (84%). Of these, 63/419 went to biopsy because of findings of other diagnostic modalities. Of these 61/63 with negative IR had a negative biopsy. Of two missed, one was the fault of the investigator but was included. In this series 2/500 were false negative (0.4%). The sensitivity was 96% and the specificity was 79%. In total, 46 cancers were identified including five outside the breast (e.g. 2 lung cancers). A total of 92 MRIs were done and in 71/92 patients IR and MRI agreed. Using these three modalities the smallest cancer found was a 4 mm invasive cancer. The study demonstrated that these diagnostic techniques can dramatically lower cost and provide results at least as good as the older paradigms. Further research and a multicenter clinical trial are necessary to shift the paradigm of breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  16. Negotiating in School Districts when Times Are Tough

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolph, David

    2012-01-01

    When the economy is depressed, resources are limited, mandates are overwhelming, and the organizational climate in the district is souring, education leaders and teachers union officials often brace themselves for contentious negotiations. Poor economic conditions affect the district's ability to offer raises, maintain current benefit levels, and…

  17. Tough Times Push More Small Colleges to Join Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Scott

    2013-01-01

    The author reports on how colleges could work together more closely in areas like the library, the colleges' technology infrastructure, human resources and payroll, and, ultimately, their academic programs. Higher education has some famous collaborations--the best-known among them are the Claremont Colleges, where seven institutions, each with a…

  18. Six Preparedness Strategies for Librarians in Tough Economic Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKellar, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    It is no secret that library budgets are in a downward spiral like the rest of the economy. The recent annual budget survey by the "Library Journal" indicates that per capita funding for libraries will decline 1.6%, and total library budgets will be reduced by 2.6% in FY 2010. Librarians are all too familiar with this bad news, and some of them…

  19. Effects of a brain-engraftable microglial cell line expressing anti-prion scFv antibodies on survival times of mice infected with scrapie prions.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Koji; Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Mori, Tsuyoshi; Muramatsu, Naomi; Miyamoto, Takahito; Yano, Masashi; Miyata, Hironori; Ootsuyama, Akira; Sawada, Makoto; Matsuda, Haruo; Kaji, Ryuji; Sakaguchi, Suehiro

    2011-10-01

    We first verified that a single chain Fv fragment against prion protein (anti-PrP scFv) was secreted by HEK293T cells and prevented prion replication in infected cells. We then stably expressed anti-PrP scFv in brain-engraftable murine microglial cells and intracerebrally injected these cells into mice before or after infection with prions. Interestingly, the injection before or at an early time point after infection attenuated the infection marginally but significantly prolonged survival times of the mice. These suggest that the ex vivo gene transfer of anti-PrP scFvs using brain-engraftable cells could be a possible immunotherapeutic approach against prion diseases.

  20. Effect of Length of Time before Incorporation on Survival of Pathogenic Bacteria Present in Livestock Wastes Applied to Agricultural Soil

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, M. L.; Walters, L. D.; Moore, A.; Crookes, K. M.; Avery, S. M.

    2004-01-01

    In response to reports that the contamination of food can occur during the on-farm primary phase of food production, we report data that describes a possible cost-effective intervention measure. The effect of time before soil incorporation of livestock wastes spread to land on the rate of decline of zoonotic agents present in the waste was investigated. Fresh livestock wastes were inoculated with laboratory-cultured Salmonella, Listeria, and Campylobacter spp. and Escherichia coli O157 before they were spead onto soil. Incorporation of the spread wastes was either immediate, delayed for 1 week, or did not occur at all. Bacterial decline was monitored over time and found to be significantly more rapid for all waste types when they were left on the soil surface. There were no significant differences in initial bacterial decline rates when wastes were spread in summer or winter. Our results indicate that not incorporating contaminated livestock wastes into soil is a potential intervention measure that may help to limit the spread of zoonotic agents further up the food chain. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to current advice for livestock waste disposal. PMID:15345389

  1. Southern States Lagging in Tough Smoking Bans, CDC Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159529.html Southern States Lagging in Tough Smoking Bans, CDC Says Only 6 in 10 Americans covered by state or local laws banning smoking in public places To use the sharing features ...

  2. Physical hydrogels composed of polyampholytes demonstrate high toughness and viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tao Lin; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Kuroda, Shinya; Ihsan, Abu Bin; Akasaki, Taigo; Sato, Koshiro; Haque, Md. Anamul; Nakajima, Tasuku; Gong, Jian Ping

    2013-10-01

    Hydrogels attract great attention as biomaterials as a result of their soft and wet nature, similar to that of biological tissues. Recent inventions of several tough hydrogels show their potential as structural biomaterials, such as cartilage. Any given application, however, requires a combination of mechanical properties including stiffness, strength, toughness, damping, fatigue resistance and self-healing, along with biocompatibility. This combination is rarely realized. Here, we report that polyampholytes, polymers bearing randomly dispersed cationic and anionic repeat groups, form tough and viscoelastic hydrogels with multiple mechanical properties. The randomness makes ionic bonds of a wide distribution of strength. The strong bonds serve as permanent crosslinks, imparting elasticity, whereas the weak bonds reversibly break and re-form, dissipating energy. These physical hydrogels of supramolecular structure can be tuned to change multiple mechanical properties over wide ranges by using diverse ionic combinations. This polyampholyte approach is synthetically simple and dramatically increases the choice of tough hydrogels for applications.

  3. Physical hydrogels composed of polyampholytes demonstrate high toughness and viscoelasticity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao Lin; Kurokawa, Takayuki; Kuroda, Shinya; Ihsan, Abu Bin; Akasaki, Taigo; Sato, Koshiro; Haque, Md Anamul; Nakajima, Tasuku; Gong, Jian Ping

    2013-10-01

    Hydrogels attract great attention as biomaterials as a result of their soft and wet nature, similar to that of biological tissues. Recent inventions of several tough hydrogels show their potential as structural biomaterials, such as cartilage. Any given application, however, requires a combination of mechanical properties including stiffness, strength, toughness, damping, fatigue resistance and self-healing, along with biocompatibility. This combination is rarely realized. Here, we report that polyampholytes, polymers bearing randomly dispersed cationic and anionic repeat groups, form tough and viscoelastic hydrogels with multiple mechanical properties. The randomness makes ionic bonds of a wide distribution of strength. The strong bonds serve as permanent crosslinks, imparting elasticity, whereas the weak bonds reversibly break and re-form, dissipating energy. These physical hydrogels of supramolecular structure can be tuned to change multiple mechanical properties over wide ranges by using diverse ionic combinations. This polyampholyte approach is synthetically simple and dramatically increases the choice of tough hydrogels for applications.

  4. Making the Tough Decisions: Excellence in Music Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBlanc, Albert

    1984-01-01

    In order to improve teacher education programs in music, music educators must stop passing the buck. They must have tough entry standards and make the hard decisions necessary to enforce them. They must also intellectualize the curriculum. (RM)

  5. 46 CFR 54.05-5 - Toughness test specimens.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... paragraph (c)(3) of this section. (3) If, for heat treated base material, the required toughness results are...-half inch) or product shape, or is otherwise inapplicable (because of heat treatment, chemistry,...

  6. Critical Fracture Toughness Measurements of an Antarctic Ice Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christmann, Julia; Müller, Ralf; Webber, Kyle; Isaia, Daniel; Schader, Florian; Kippstuhl, Sepp; Freitag, Johannes; Humbert, Angelika

    2014-05-01

    Fracture toughness is a material parameter describing the resistance of a pre-existing defect in a body to further crack extension. The fracture toughness of glacial ice as a function of density is important for modeling efforts aspire to predict calving behavior. In the presented experiments this fracture toughness is measured using an ice core from Kohnen Station, Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica. The samples were sawed in an ice lab at the Alfred Wegener Institute in Bremerhaven at -20°C and had the dimensions of standard test samples with thickness 14 mm, width 28 mm and length 126 mm. The samples originate from a depth of 94.6 m to 96 m. The grain size of the samples was also identified. The grain size was found to be rather uniform. The critical fracture toughness is determined in a four-point bending approach using single edge V-notch beam samples. The initial notch length was around 2.5 mm and was prepared using a drilling machine. The experimental setup was designed at the Institute of Materials Science at Darmstadt. In this setup the force increases linearly, until the maximum force is reached, where the specific sample fractures. This procedure was done in an ice lab with a temperature of -15°C. The equations to calculate the fracture toughness for pure bending are derived from an elastic stress analysis and are given as a standard test method to detect the fracture toughness. An X-ray computer tomography (CT scanner) was used to determine the ice core densities. The tests cover densities from 843 kg m-3 to 871 kg m-3. Thereby the influence of the fracture toughness on the density was analyzed and compared to previous investigations of this material parameter. Finally the dependence of the measured toughness on thickness, width, and position in the core cross-section was investigated.

  7. Fracture toughness of advanced ceramics at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, George D.; Salem, Jonathan; Bar-On, Isa; Cho, Kyu; Foley, Michael; Fang, HO

    1992-01-01

    Results of round-robin fracture toughness tests on advanced ceramics are reported. A gas-pressure silicon nitride and a zirconia-toughened alumina were tested using three test methods: indentation fracture, indentation strength, and single-edge precracked beam. The latter two methods have produced consistent results. The interpretation of fracture toughness test results for the zirconia alumina composite is shown to be complicated by R-curve and environmentally assisted crack growth phenomena.

  8. Fracture toughness of polybutadiene at cryogenic temperatures. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Burford, R.P.

    1983-04-01

    An estimate of fracture toughness of crosslined polybutadiene rubber at -180 degrees C has been made using the double torsin method. By using suitable specimen dimensions and strain rates, controlled crack propagatin can be achieved, together with a constant compliance to crack length ratio. Strain energy release rated for this polymer, crosslinked with either dicumyl peroxide or sulphur, were found to be an order of magnitude higher than for linear, glassy thermoplastics. Crazing is considered to contribute to the high toughness observed.

  9. Interfacial fracture toughness of alumina/niobium systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, M.G. ); O'Dowd, N.P.; Shih, C.F. . Div. of Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    The interfacial fracture toughness of an alumina/niobium composite has been measured as a function of phase angle. The interface was formed by solid-state bonding bulk Coor's AD-999 fine-grain alumina with a commercial purity niobium at 1600{degrees}C for 0.5 hr under a pressure of 10.5 MPa. The alumina/niobium system has a number of features which makes it ideal for an investigation of interfacial fracture toughness. From HREM data we estimate that the width of the interface is no more than 10 atomic planes. Furthermore the thermal expansion coefficients of the two materials differ by less than 5% so residual stresses due to the bonding process are small. Using symmetric and asymmetric four point bend specimens we have measured the fracture toughness of homogenous alumina and that of the alumina/niobium bimaterial in combinations of in-plane shear and tension. The fracture toughness of the homogenous alumina is relatively insensitive to the loading phase. The measured fracture toughness K{sub c} of the interface, however, depended strongly on phase angle. We were unable to obtain valid alumina/niobium interfacial toughness data at negative phase angles as the fracture initiates in the alumina and not at the interface. In symmetric bending at a phase angle {approx}5{degrees}, we measured a nominal interface toughness of 4.0 MPa{radical}m, comparable to the homogeneous alumina. We found that the toughness increased with loading phase angle to a value of K{sub c} {approx} 9 MPa{radical}m at a phase between 25{degrees} and 40{degrees}. Preliminary calculations and experiments suggest that this effect is due to an asymmetric stress distribution, with respect to the interface, and plastic deformation in the niobium. 12 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Correlations between ultrasonic and fracture toughness factors in metallic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1978-01-01

    A heuristic mathematical basis was proposed for the experimental correlations found between ultrasonic propagation factors and fracture toughness factors in metallic materials. A crack extension model was developed wherein spontaneous stress (elastic) waves produced during microcracking are instrumental in promoting the onset of unstable crack extension. Material microstructural factors involved in the process are measurable by ultrasonic probing. Experimental results indicate that ultrasonic attenuation and velocity measurements will produce significant correlations with fracture toughness properties and also yield strength.

  11. The shear fracture toughness, KIIc, of graphite

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Burchell, Timothy D.; Erdman, III, Donald L.

    2015-11-05

    In this study, the critical shear stress intensity factor, KIIc, here-in referred to as the shear fracture toughness, KIIc (MPa m), of two grades of graphite are reported. The range of specimen volumes was selected to elucidate any specimen size effect, but smaller volume specimen tests were largely unsuccessful, shear failure did not occur between the notches as expected. This was probably due to the specimen geometry causing the shear fracture stress to exceed the compressive failure stress. In subsequent testing the specimen geometry was altered to reduce the compressive footprint and the notches (slits) made deeper to reduce themore » specimen's ligament length. Additionally, we added the collection of Acoustic Emission (AE) during testing to assist with the identification of the shear fracture load. The means of KIIc from large specimens for PCEA and NBG-18 are 2.26 MPa m with an SD of 0.37 MPa m and 2.20 MPa m with an SD of 0.53 MPa m, respectively. The value of KIIc for both graphite grades was similar, although the scatter was large. In this work we found the ratio of KIIc/KIc ≈ 1.6. .« less

  12. Survival of Xiphinema index in Vineyard Soil and Retention of Grapevine fanleaf virus Over Extended Time in the Absence of Host Plants.

    PubMed

    Demangeat, Gérard; Voisin, Roger; Minot, Jean-Claude; Bosselut, Nathalie; Fuchs, Marc; Esmenjaud, Daniel

    2005-10-01

    ABSTRACT Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV) is transmitted specifically from grapevine to grapevine by the ectoparasitic root-feeding nematode Xiphinema index. Limited information is available on the survival of X. index in vineyard soil and on the retention of GFLV by X. index over extended periods of time. We addressed these two issues by quantifying the numbers of living X. index recovered from soil samples that were collected in three naturally GFLV-infected vineyards in France and subsequently stored at 7 or 20 degrees C in the absence of host plants. Our data indicated a two- to eightfold decrease in X. index numbers but the recovery of 8 to 10 living fourth-stage juveniles (J4) and adults per kilogram of soil after 4 years of storage regardless of temperature. In addition, GFLV was detected readily in all groups of 20 isolated X. index adults and J4 (except for J4 that were kept 4 years at 20 degrees C) by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction using total nematode RNAs and a primer set located in conserved regions at the 3' end of viral genomic RNA 2. Our findings on the long-term survival of viruliferous X. index under adverse conditions emphasize the need for new control strategies against GFLV.

  13. Methodology for lognormal modelling of malignant pleural mesothelioma survival time distributions: a study of 5580 case histories from Europe and USA.

    PubMed

    Mould, Richard F; Lahanas, Michael; Asselain, Bernard; Brewster, David; Burgers, Sjaak A; Damhuis, Ronald A M; De Rycke, Yann; Gennaro, Valerio; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila

    2004-09-01

    A truncated left-censored and right-censored lognormal model has been validated for representing pleural mesothelioma survival times in the range 5-200 weeks for data subsets grouped by age for males, 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79 and 80+ years and for all ages combined for females. The cases available for study were from Europe and USA and totalled 5580. This is larger than any other pleural mesothelioma cohort accrued for study. The methodology describes the computation of reference baseline probabilities, 5-200 weeks, which can be used in clinical trials to assess results of future promising treatment methods. This study is an extension of previous lognormal modelling by Mould et al (2002 Phys. Med. Biol. 47 3893-924) to predict long-term cancer survival from short-term data where the proportion cured is denoted by C and the uncured proportion, which can be represented by a lognormal, by (1 - C). Pleural mesothelioma is a special case when C = 0.

  14. Empirical study of correlated survival times for recurrent events with proportional hazards margins and the effect of correlation and censoring

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In longitudinal studies where subjects experience recurrent incidents over a period of time, such as respiratory infections, fever or diarrhea, statistical methods are required to take into account the within-subject correlation. Methods For repeated events data with censored failure, the independent increment (AG), marginal (WLW) and conditional (PWP) models are three multiple failure models that generalize Cox’s proportional hazard model. In this paper, we revise the efficiency, accuracy and robustness of all three models under simulated scenarios with varying degrees of within-subject correlation, censoring levels, maximum number of possible recurrences and sample size. We also study the methods performance on a real dataset from a cohort study with bronchial obstruction. Results We find substantial differences between methods and there is not an optimal method. AG and PWP seem to be preferable to WLW for low correlation levels but the situation reverts for high correlations. Conclusions All methods are stable in front of censoring, worsen with increasing recurrence levels and share a bias problem which, among other consequences, makes asymptotic normal confidence intervals not fully reliable, although they are well developed theoretically. PMID:23883000

  15. Variable ecological effects of hurricanes: the importance of seasonal timing for survival of lizards on Bahamian islands.

    PubMed

    Schoener, Thomas W; Spiller, David A; Losos, Jonathan B

    2004-01-01

    Two recent hurricanes passed directly over the northern Bahamas 2 years apart, allowing a comparison of their effects on lizard populations inhabiting exactly the same islands. The hurricanes differed in two ways: one struck during the reproductive season and was relatively severe; the other struck after most reproduction had taken place and was milder. The late-season hurricane produced a significant relation between population reduction and lowness of the island that lasted at least through two seasons; the earlier hurricane produced no such relationship. The late-season hurricane wiped out populations of lizards on two islands (two of the three lowest) that the earlier hurricane failed to exterminate even though it was stronger. We relate these effects to the fact that the study lizards regenerated from the earlier hurricane only via the egg stage, whereas eggs were unavailable when the later storm struck and regeneration was via hatched lizards. We discriminate and illustrate four kinds of hurricanes, cross-classified by two contrasts: earlier vs. later and stronger vs. weaker. A later, stronger hurricane completely exterminated lizard populations at a second Bahamian site, whereas an earlier, weaker hurricane had no detectable effect at a third Bahamian site. We suggest that, in addition to severity, the timing of a hurricane as it coincides with reproductive scheduling or other phenological aspects may determine the magnitude of its effect on a variety of organisms.

  16. Tropical tree rings reveal preferential survival of fast-growing juveniles and increased juvenile growth rates over time.

    PubMed

    Rozendaal, Danaë M A; Brienen, Roel J W; Soliz-Gamboa, Claudia C; Zuidema, Pieter A

    2010-02-01

    Long-term juvenile growth patterns of tropical trees were studied to test two hypotheses: fast-growing juvenile trees have a higher chance of reaching the canopy ('juvenile selection effect'); and tree growth has increased over time ('historical growth increase'). Tree-ring analysis was applied to test these hypotheses for five tree species from three moist forest sites in Bolivia, using samples from 459 individuals. Basal area increment was calculated from ring widths, for trees < 30 cm in diameter. For three out of five species, a juvenile selection effect was found in rings formed by small juveniles. Thus, extant adult trees in these species have had higher juvenile growth rates than extant juvenile trees. By contrast, rings formed by somewhat larger juveniles in four species showed the opposite pattern: a historical growth increase. For most size classes of > 10 cm diameter none of the patterns was found. Fast juvenile growth may be essential to enable tropical trees to reach the forest canopy, especially for small juvenile trees in the dark forest understorey. The historical growth increase requires cautious interpretation, but may be partially attributable to CO(2) fertilization.

  17. Timing of expression of the core clock gene Bmal1 influences its effects on aging and survival

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guangrui; Chen, Lihong; Grant, Gregory R.; Paschos, Georgios; Song, Wen-Liang; Musiek, Erik S.; Lee, Vivian; McLoughlin, Sarah C.; Grosser, Tilo; Cotsarelis, George; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2016-01-01

    The absence of Bmal1, a core clock gene, results in a loss of circadian rhythms, an acceleration of aging, and a shortened life span in mice. To address the importance of circadian rhythms in the aging process, we generated conditional Bmal1 knockout mice that lacked the BMAL1 protein during adult life and found that wild-type circadian variations in wheel-running activity, heart rate, and blood pressure were abolished. Ocular abnormalities and brain astrogliosis were conserved irrespective of the timing of Bmal1 deletion. However, life span, fertility, body weight, blood glucose levels, and age-dependent arthropathy - which are altered in standard Bmal1 knockout mice - remained unaltered, while atherosclerosis and hair growth improved, in the conditional adult-life Bmal1 knockout mice, despite abolition of clock function. Hepatic RNA-Seq revealed that expression of oscillatory genes was dampened in the adult-life Bmal1 knockout mice, while overall gene expression was largely unchanged. Thus, many phenotypes in conventional Bmal1 knockout mice, hitherto attributed to disruption of circadian rhythms, reflect the loss of properties of BMAL1 that are independent of its role in the clock. These findings prompt re-evaluation of the systemic consequences of disruption of the molecular clock. PMID:26843191

  18. Experimental study on the survival of the water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms--Pontederiaceae) under different oil doses and times of exposure.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Aline; Piedade, Maria Teresa Fernandez

    2014-12-01

    In the last decades, petroleum activities have increased in the Brazilian Amazon where there is oil exploration on the Urucu River, a tributary of the Amazon River, about 600 km from the city of Manaus. Particularly, transportation via the Amazon River to reach the oil refinery in Manaus may compromise the integrity of the large floodplains that flank hundreds of kilometers of this major river. In the Amazon floodplains, plant growth and nutrient cycling are related to the flood pulse. When oil spills occur, floating oil on the water surface is dispersed through wind and wave action in the littoral region, thus affecting the vegetation of terrestrial and aquatic environments. If pollutants enter the system, they are absorbed by plants and distributed in the food chain via plant consumption, mortality, and decomposition. The effect of oil on the growth and survival of vegetation in these environments is virtually unknown. The water hyacinth [Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms] has a pantropical distribution but is native to the Amazon, often growing in high-density populations in the floodplains where it plays an important role as shelter and food source for aquatic and terrestrial biota. The species is well known for its high capacity to absorb and tolerate high levels of heavy metal ions. To study the survival and response of water hyacinth under six different oil doses, ranging from 0 to 150 ml l(-1), and five exposure times (1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 days), young individuals distributed in a completely randomized design experiment composed of vessels with a single individual each were followed over a 50-day period (30-day acclimatization, 20 days under oil treatments). Growth parameters, biomass, visual changes in the plants, and pH were recorded at 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 days. Increasing the time of oil exposure caused a decrease in biomass, ratio of live/dead biomass and length of leaves, and an increase in the number of dead leaves. Dose of oil and time of exposure

  19. Experimental study on the survival of the water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms--Pontederiaceae) under different oil doses and times of exposure.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Aline; Piedade, Maria Teresa Fernandez

    2014-12-01

    In the last decades, petroleum activities have increased in the Brazilian Amazon where there is oil exploration on the Urucu River, a tributary of the Amazon River, about 600 km from the city of Manaus. Particularly, transportation via the Amazon River to reach the oil refinery in Manaus may compromise the integrity of the large floodplains that flank hundreds of kilometers of this major river. In the Amazon floodplains, plant growth and nutrient cycling are related to the flood pulse. When oil spills occur, floating oil on the water surface is dispersed through wind and wave action in the littoral region, thus affecting the vegetation of terrestrial and aquatic environments. If pollutants enter the system, they are absorbed by plants and distributed in the food chain via plant consumption, mortality, and decomposition. The effect of oil on the growth and survival of vegetation in these environments is virtually unknown. The water hyacinth [Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms] has a pantropical distribution but is native to the Amazon, often growing in high-density populations in the floodplains where it plays an important role as shelter and food source for aquatic and terrestrial biota. The species is well known for its high capacity to absorb and tolerate high levels of heavy metal ions. To study the survival and response of water hyacinth under six different oil doses, ranging from 0 to 150 ml l(-1), and five exposure times (1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 days), young individuals distributed in a completely randomized design experiment composed of vessels with a single individual each were followed over a 50-day period (30-day acclimatization, 20 days under oil treatments). Growth parameters, biomass, visual changes in the plants, and pH were recorded at 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 days. Increasing the time of oil exposure caused a decrease in biomass, ratio of live/dead biomass and length of leaves, and an increase in the number of dead leaves. Dose of oil and time of exposure

  20. Fracture Toughness Properties of Gd123 Superconducting Bulks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, H.; Murakami, A.

    Fracture toughness properties of melt growth GdBa2Cu3Ox (Gd123) large single domain superconducting bulks with Ag2O of 10 wt% and Pt of 0.5 wt%; 45 mm in diameter and 25 mm in thickness with low void density were evaluated at 77 K through flexural tests of specimens cut from the bulks, and compared to those of a conventional Gd123 with voids. The densified Gd123 bulks were prepared with a seeding and temperature gradient method; first melt processed in oxygen, then crystal growth in air; two-step regulated atmosphere heat treatment. The plane strain fracture toughness, KIC was obtained by the three point flexure test of the specimens with through precrack, referring to the single edge pre-cracked beam (SEPB) method, according to the JIS-R-1607, Testing Methods for Fracture Toughness of High Performance Ceramics. The results show that the fracture toughness of the densified Gd123 bulk with low void density was higher than that of the standard Gd123 bulk with voids, as well as the flexural strength previously reported. We also compared the fracture toughness of as-grown bulks with that of annealed bulks. The relation between the microstructure and the fracture toughness of the Gd123 bulk was clearly shown.

  1. Self-concept organisation and mental toughness in sport.

    PubMed

    Meggs, Jennifer; Ditzfeld, Christopher; Golby, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The present study examines the relationship between individual differences in evaluative self-organisation and mental toughness in sport, proposing that motivation and emotional resiliency (facets of mental toughness) stem from differences in core self. A cross-sectional assessment of 105 athletes competing at a range of performance levels took part in an online study including measures of self-reported mental toughness (Sport Mental Toughness Questionnaire; Sheard, M., Golby, J., & van Wersch, A. (2009). Progress towards construct validation of the Sports Mental Toughness Questionnaire (SMTQ). European Journal of Psychological Assessment, 25(3), 186-193. doi:10.1027/1015-5759.25.3.186) and self-organisation (self-descriptive attribute task; Showers, C. J. (2002). Integration and compartmentalisation: A model of self-structure and self-change. In D. Cervone & W. Mischel (Eds.), Advances in personality science (pp. 271-291). New York, NY: Guilford Press). As predicted, global mental toughness was associated with self-concept positivity, which was particularly high in individuals with positive-integrative self-organisation (individuals who distribute positive and negative self-attributes evenly across multiple selves). Specifically, positive integration was associated with constancy (commitment to goal achievement despite obstacles and the potential for failure), which extends presumably from positive integratives' emotional stability and drive to resolve negative self-beliefs.

  2. Tough bonding of hydrogels to diverse non-porous surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuk, Hyunwoo; Zhang, Teng; Lin, Shaoting; Parada, German Alberto; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2016-02-01

    In many animals, the bonding of tendon and cartilage to bone is extremely tough (for example, interfacial toughness ~800 J m-2 refs ,), yet such tough interfaces have not been achieved between synthetic hydrogels and non-porous surfaces of engineered solids. Here, we report a strategy to design tough transparent and conductive bonding of synthetic hydrogels containing 90% water to non-porous surfaces of diverse solids, including glass, silicon, ceramics, titanium and aluminium. The design strategy is to anchor the long-chain polymer networks of tough hydrogels covalently to non-porous solid surfaces, which can be achieved by the silanation of such surfaces. Compared with physical interactions, the chemical anchorage results in a higher intrinsic work of adhesion and in significant energy dissipation of bulk hydrogel during detachment, which lead to interfacial toughness values over 1,000 J m-2. We also demonstrate applications of robust hydrogel-solid hybrids, including hydrogel superglues, mechanically protective hydrogel coatings, hydrogel joints for robotic structures and robust hydrogel-metal conductors.

  3. How tough is bone? Application of elastic-plastic fracture mechanics to bone.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jiahau; Mecholsky, John J; Clifton, Kari B

    2007-02-01

    Bone, with a hierarchical structure that spans from the nano-scale to the macro-scale and a composite design composed of nano-sized mineral crystals embedded in an organic matrix, has been shown to have several toughening mechanisms that increases its toughness. These mechanisms can stop, slow, or deflect crack propagation and cause bone to have a moderate amount of apparent plastic deformation before fracture. In addition, bone contains a high volumetric percentage of organics and water that makes it behave nonlinearly before fracture. Many researchers used strength or critical stress intensity factor (fracture toughness) to characterize the mechanical property of bone. However, these parameters do not account for the energy spent in plastic deformation before bone fracture. To accurately describe the mechanical characteristics of bone, we applied elastic-plastic fracture mechanics to study bone's fracture toughness. The J integral, a parameter that estimates both the energies consumed in the elastic and plastic deformations, was used to quantify the total energy spent before bone fracture. Twenty cortical bone specimens were cut from the mid-diaphysis of bovine femurs. Ten of them were prepared to undergo transverse fracture and the other 10 were prepared to undergo longitudinal fracture. The specimens were prepared following the apparatus suggested in ASTM E1820 and tested in distilled water at 37 degrees C. The average J integral of the transverse-fractured specimens was found to be 6.6 kPa m, which is 187% greater than that of longitudinal-fractured specimens (2.3 kPa m). The energy spent in the plastic deformation of the longitudinal-fractured and transverse-fractured bovine specimens was found to be 3.6-4.1 times the energy spent in the elastic deformation. This study shows that the toughness of bone estimated using the J integral is much greater than the toughness measured using the critical stress intensity factor. We suggest that the J integral method is

  4. Fracture toughness (K{sub IC}) data reduction program

    SciTech Connect

    Heiman, M.R.

    1998-09-01

    This report documents the development, verification, and use instructions for an automated K{sub IC} data reduction program written in the Hewlett Packard Visual Engineering Environment (HP VEE) programming language. Currently, when the standard test method Plane-Strain Fracture Toughness of Metallic materials (K{sub IC}), is performed, the data is reduced manually. Date reduction includes 15 detailed calculations required by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) E399 to determine the validity of the computed K{sub IC} value. Manual data reduction is both time consuming, tedious, and prone to errors. Since all K{sub IC} tests are completed using a data acquisition system to digitally record time, load, and crack opening displacement (COD); automation of K{sub IC} data reduction using a computer program to perform all calculations rapidly, enables processing of a large amount of data. The K{sub IC} data reduction program reduces any computer American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) data file. Thus, the K{sub IC} data reduction program is also used to over check tests performed at other facilities. The program was qualified based on mechanical properties of commercial alloy specimens.

  5. Deterioration in Fracture Toughness of 304LN Austenitic Stainless Steel Due to Sensitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Swati; Kain, V.; Ray, A.; Roy, H.; Sivaprasad, S.; Tarafder, S.; Ray, K. K.

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this report is to examine the influence of sensitization on the mechanical properties of AISI grade 304LN stainless steel with special emphasis on its fracture toughness. A series of stainless steel samples has been sensitized by holding at 1023 K for different time periods ranging from 1 to 100 hours followed by water quenching. The degree of sensitization (DOS) for each type of the varyingly heat-treated samples has been measured by an electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation (EPR) test. The microstructures of these samples have been characterized by optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, together with measurements of their hardness and tensile properties. The fracture toughness of the samples has been measured by the ball indentation (BI) technique and the results are validated by conducting conventional J-integral tests. It is revealed for the first time that the fracture toughness and ductility of AISI 304LN stainless steel deteriorate significantly with increased DOS, while the tensile strength (TS) values remain almost unaltered. The results have been critically discussed in terms of the depletion of solid solution strengtheners, the nature of the grain boundary precipitations, and the strain-induced martensite formation with the increasing DOS of the 304LN stainless steel.

  6. Effects of stitching on fracture toughness of uniweave textile graphite/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankar, Bhavani V.; Sharma, Suresh

    1995-01-01

    The effects of through-the-thickness stitching on impact damage resistance, impact damage tolerance, and Mode 1 and Mode 2 fracture toughness of textile graphite/epoxy laminates were studied experimentally. Graphite/epoxy laminates were fabricated from AS4 graphite uniweave textiles and 3501-6 epoxy using Resin Transfer Molding. The cloths were stitched with Kevlar(tm) and glass yarns before resin infusion. Delamination was implanted during processing to simulate impact damage. Sublaminate buckling tests were performed in a novel fixture to measure Compression After Impact (CAI) strength of stitched laminates. The results show that CAI strength can be improved up to 400% by through-the-thickness stitching. Double Cantilever Beam tests were performed to study the effect of stitching on Mode 1 fracture toughness G(sub 1c). It was found that G(sub 1c) increased 30 times for a low stitching density of 16 stitches/sq in. Mode 2 fracture toughness was measured by testing the stitched beams in End Notch Flexure tests. Unlike in the unstitiched beams, crack propagation in the stitched beams was steady. The current formulas for ENF tests were not found suitable for determining G(sub 2C) for stitched beams. Hence two new methods were developed - one based on crack area measured from ultrasonic C-scanning and the other based on equivalent crack area measured from the residual stiffness of the specimen. The G(sub 2c) was found to be at least 5-15 times higher for the stitched laminates. The mechanisms by which stitching increases the CAI strength and fracture toughness are discussed.

  7. Use of forces from instrumented Charpy V-notch testing to determine crack-arrest toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Iskander, S.K.; Nanstad, R.K.; Sokolov, M.A.; McCabe, D.E.; Hutton, J.T.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of this investigation is an estimation of the crack-arrest toughness, particularly of irradiated materials, from voltage versus time output of an instrumented setup during a test on a Charpy V-notch (CVN) specimen. This voltage versus time trace (which can be converted to force versus displacement) displays events during fracture of the specimen. Various stages of the fracture process can be identified on the trace, including an arrest point indicating arrest of brittle fracture. The force at arrest, F{sub a}, versus test temperature, T, relationship is examined to explore possible relationships to other experimental measures of crack-arrest toughness such as the drop-weight nil-ductility temperature (NDT), or crack-arrest toughness, K{sub a}. For a wide range of weld and plate materials, the temperature at which F{sub a} = 2.45 kN correlates with NDT with a standard deviation, sigma, of about 11 K. Excluding the so-called low upper-shelf energy (USE) welds from the analysis resulted in F{sub a} = 4.12 kN and {sigma} = 6.6 K. The estimates of the correlation of the temperature for F{sub a} = 7.4 kN with the temperature at 100-MPa{radical}m level for a mean American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) type K{sub Ia} curve through crack-arrest toughness values show that prediction of conservative values of K{sub a} are possible.

  8. The toughness of secondary cell wall and woody tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, P. W.; Tan, H. T. W.; Cheng, P. Y.

    1997-01-01

    The 'across grain' toughness of 51 woods has been determined on thin wet sections using scissors. The moisture content of sections and the varying sharpness of the scissor blades had little effect on the results. In thin sections (less than 0.6mm), toughness rose linearly with section thickness. The intercept toughness at zero thickness, estimated from regression analysis, was proportional to relative density, consistent with values reported for non-woody plant tissues. Extrapolation of the intercept toughness of these woods and other plant tissues/materials to a relative density of 1.0 predicted a toughness of 3.45kJ m-2 , which we identify with the intrinsic toughness of the cell wall. This quantity appears to predict published results from KIC tests on woods and is related to the propensity for crack deflection. The slope of the relationship between section thickness and toughness, describing the work of plastic buckling of cells, was not proportional to relative density, the lightest (balsa) and heaviest (lignum vitae) woods fracturing with less plastic work than predicted. The size of the plastic zone around the crack tip was estimated to be 0.5mm in size. From this, the hypothetical overall toughness of a thick (greater than 1 mm) block of solid cell wall material was calculated as 39.35 kJ m-2, due to both cell wall resistance (10 per cent) and the plastic buckling of cells (90 per cent). This value successfully predicts the toughness of most commercial woods (of relative densities between 0.2 and 0.8) from 'work area' tests in tension and bending. Though density was the most important factor, both fibre width/fibre length (in hardwoods) and lignin/cellulose ratios were negatively correlated with the work of plastic buckling, after correcting for density. At low densities the work of plastic buckling in the longitudinal radial (LR) direction exceeded that in longitudinal tangential (LT), but the reverse was true for relative densities above 0.25. This could

  9. Effect of the radiation intensity, water turbidity and exposure time on the survival of Cryptosporidium during simulated solar disinfection of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Couso, Hipólito; Fontán-Sainz, María; McGuigan, Kevin G; Ares-Mazás, Elvira

    2009-10-01

    The solar disinfection (SODIS) technique is a highly effective process that makes use of solar energy to inactivate pathogenic microorganisms in drinking water in developing countries. The pathogenic protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum is often found in surface waters and is associated with waterborne outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis. In the present study, a complete multi-factorial mathematical model was used to investigate the combined effects of the intensity of solar radiation (200, 600 and 900W/m(2) in the 320nm to 10microm range), water turbidity (5, 100 and 300 NTU) and exposure time (4, 8 and 12h) on the viability and infectivity of C. parvum oocysts during simulated SODIS procedures at a constant temperature of 30 degrees C. All three factors had significant effects (p<0.05) on C. parvum survival, as did the interactions of water turbidity with radiation intensity and radiation intensity with exposure time. However, the parameter with the greatest effect was the intensity of radiation; levels > or =600W/m(2) and times of exposure between 8 and 12h were required to reduce the oocyst infectivity in water samples with different degrees of turbidity.

  10. Dynamic Fracture Initiation Toughness at Elevated Temperatures With Application to the New Generation of Titanium Aluminide Alloys. Chapter 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shazly, Mostafa; Prakash, Vikas; Draper, Susan; Shukla, Arun (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    Recently, a new generation of titanium aluminide alloy, named Gamma-Met PX, has been developed with better rolling and post-rolling characteristics. I'revious work on this alloy has shown the material to have higher strengths at room and elevated temperatures when compared with other gamma titanium aluminides. In particular, this new alloy has shown increased ductility at elevated temperatures under both quasi-static and high strain rate uniaxial compressive loading. However, its high strain rate tensile ductility at room and elevated temperatures is limited to approx. 1%. In the present chapter, results of a study to investigate the effects of loading rate and test temperature on the dynamic fracture initiation toughness in Gamma-Met PX are presented. Modified split Hopkinson pressure bar was used along with high-speed photography to determine the crack initiation time. Three-point bend dynamic fracture experiments were conducted at impact speeds of approx. 1 m/s and tests temperatures of up-to 1200 C. The results show that thc dynamic fracture initiation toughness decreases with increasing test temperatures beyond 600 C. Furthermore, thc effect of long time high temperature air exposure on the fracture toughness was investigated. The dynamic fracture initiation toughness was found to decrease with increasing exposure time. The reasons behind this drop are analyzed and discussed.

  11. Fracture toughness of Alloy 690 and EN52 weld in air and water

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.M.; Mills, W.J.

    1999-06-01

    The effect of low and high temperature water with high hydrogen on the fracture toughness of Alloy 690 and its weld, EN52, was characterized using elastic-plastic J{sub IC} methodology. While both materials display excellent fracture resistance in air and elevated temperature (>93 C) water, a dramatic degradation in toughness is observed in 54 C water. The loss of toughness is associated with a hydrogen-induced intergranular cracking mechanism where hydrogen is picked up from the water. Comparison of the cracking behavior in low temperature water with that for hydrogen-precharged specimens tested in air indicates that the critical local hydrogen content required to cause low temperature embrittlement is on the order of 120 to 160 ppm. Loading rate studies show that the cracking resistance is significantly improved at rates above ca. 1000 MPa{radical}m/h because there is insufficient time to produce grain boundary embrittlement. Electron fractographic examinations were performed to correlate cracking behavior with microstructural features and operative fracture mechanics.

  12. Liquid crystal self-templating approach to ultrastrong and tough biomimic composites.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaozhen; Xu, Zhen; Liu, Zheng; Gao, Chao

    2013-01-01

    Materials with both high strength and toughness are in great demand for a wide range of applications, requiring strict design of ingredients and hierarchically ordered architecture from nano- to macro-scale. Nacre achieves such a target in the long natural evolution by alternative alignment of inorganic nanoplatelets and biomacromolecules. To mimic nacre, various strategies were developed, approaching nacre-comparable performance in limited size. How to remarkably exceed nacre in both property and size is a key issue to further the advancement of composites. Here we present liquid crystal self-templating methodology to make the next generation of ultrastrong and tough nacre-mimics continuously. The hierarchically assembled composites show the highest tensile strength (652 MPa) among nacre mimics, five to eight times as high as that of nacre (80-135 MPa), and excellent ductility with toughness of 18 MJ m(-3), one to two orders of magnitude greater than that of nacre (0.1 ~ 1.8 MJ m(-3)).

  13. The Effect of Curing Temperature on the Fracture Toughness of Fiberglass Epoxy Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Thomas J.

    The curing reaction in a thermoset polymer matrix composite is often accelerated by the addition of heat in an oven or autoclave. The heat added increases the rate of the polymerization reaction and cross-linking in the material. The cure cycle used (temperature, pressure and time) can therefore alter the final material properties. This research focuses on how the curing temperature (250, 275, 300 °F) affects the yield strength and the mode I interlaminar fracture toughness, GI, of a unidirectional S-2 glass epoxy composite. The test method that was used for the tension test was ASTM D3039 and the test method for the mode I interlaminar fracture toughness, the double cantilever beam (DCB) test, was ASTM D5528. The DCB specimens were fabricated with a non-adhesive insert at the midplane of the composite that serves as the initiatior of the delamination. Opening forces were then applied to the specimen, causing the crack propagation. The results show that increasing the cure temperature by 50 °F increased the tensile strength by 10% (86.54 - 94.73 ksi) and decreased the fracture toughness 20% (506.23 - 381.31 J/m 2). Thus, the curing temperature can cause a trade-off between these two properties, which means that the curing cycle will need to be altered based on the intended use and the required material properties.

  14. Liquid crystal self-templating approach to ultrastrong and tough biomimic composites

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaozhen; Xu, Zhen; Liu, Zheng; Gao, Chao

    2013-01-01

    Materials with both high strength and toughness are in great demand for a wide range of applications, requiring strict design of ingredients and hierarchically ordered architecture from nano- to macro-scale. Nacre achieves such a target in the long natural evolution by alternative alignment of inorganic nanoplatelets and biomacromolecules. To mimic nacre, various strategies were developed, approaching nacre-comparable performance in limited size. How to remarkably exceed nacre in both property and size is a key issue to further the advancement of composites. Here we present liquid crystal self-templating methodology to make the next generation of ultrastrong and tough nacre-mimics continuously. The hierarchically assembled composites show the highest tensile strength (652 MPa) among nacre mimics, five to eight times as high as that of nacre (80–135 MPa), and excellent ductility with toughness of 18 MJ m−3, one to two orders of magnitude greater than that of nacre (0.1 ~ 1.8 MJ m−3). PMID:23918042

  15. Liquid crystal self-templating approach to ultrastrong and tough biomimic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaozhen; Xu, Zhen; Liu, Zheng; Gao, Chao

    2013-08-01

    Materials with both high strength and toughness are in great demand for a wide range of applications, requiring strict design of ingredients and hierarchically ordered architecture from nano- to macro-scale. Nacre achieves such a target in the long natural evolution by alternative alignment of inorganic nanoplatelets and biomacromolecules. To mimic nacre, various strategies were developed, approaching nacre-comparable performance in limited size. How to remarkably exceed nacre in both property and size is a key issue to further the advancement of composites. Here we present liquid crystal self-templating methodology to make the next generation of ultrastrong and tough nacre-mimics continuously. The hierarchically assembled composites show the highest tensile strength (652 MPa) among nacre mimics, five to eight times as high as that of nacre (80-135 MPa), and excellent ductility with toughness of 18 MJ m-3, one to two orders of magnitude greater than that of nacre (0.1 ~ 1.8 MJ m-3).

  16. Microscale resolution fracture toughness profiling at the zirconia-porcelain interface in dental prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunt, Alexander J. G.; Mohanty, Gaurav; Neo, Tee K.; Michler, Johann; Korsunsky, Alexander M.

    2015-12-01

    The high failure rate of the Yttria Partially Stabilized Zirconia (YPSZ)-porcelain interface in dental prostheses is influenced by the micro-scale mechanical property variation in this region. To improve the understanding of this behavior, micro-scale fracture toughness profiling by nanoindentation micropillar splitting is reported for the first time. Sixty 5 μm diameter micropillars were machined within the first 100 μm of the interface. Berkovich nanoindentation provided estimates of the bulk fracture toughness of YPSZ and porcelain that matched the literature values closely. However, the large included tip angle prevented precise alignment of indenter with the pillar center. Cube corner indentation was performed on the remainder of the pillars and calibration between nanoindentation using different tip shapes was used to determine the associated conversion factors. YPSZ micropillars failed by gradual crack propagation and bulk values persisted to within 15 μm from the interface, beyond which scatter increased and a 10% increase in fracture toughness was observed that may be associated with grain size variation at this location. Micropillars straddling the interface displayed preferential fracture within porcelain parallel to the interface at a location where nano-voiding has previously been observed and reported. Pure porcelain micropillars exhibited highly brittle failure and a large reduction of fracture toughness (by up to ~90%) within the first 50 μm of the interface. These new insights constitute a major advance in understanding the structure-property relationship of this important bi-material interface at the micro-scale, and will improve micromechanical modelling needed to optimize current manufacturing routes and reduce failure.

  17. Beyond Survival

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steffenson, Dave

    1975-01-01

    The author argues that environmentalists need to realize that the present ecological crisis is essentially a value crisis, not merely a fight for survival alone. He envisions a complete value change for the human population and advocates the incorporation of value strategies into all environmental education programs immediately. (MA)

  18. Fracture toughness evaluations of TP304 stainless steel pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Rudland, D.L.; Brust, F.W.; Wilkowski, G.M.

    1997-02-01

    In the IPIRG-1 program, the J-R curve calculated for a 16-inch nominal diameter, Schedule 100 TP304 stainless steel (DP2-A8) surface-cracked pipe experiment (Experiment 1.3-3) was considerably lower than the quasi-static, monotonic J-R curve calculated from a C(T) specimen (A8-12a). The results from several related investigations conducted to determine the cause of the observed toughness difference are: (1) chemical analyses on sections of Pipe DP2-A8 from several surface-cracked pipe and material property specimen fracture surfaces indicate that there are two distinct heats of material within Pipe DP2-A8 that differ in chemical composition; (2) SEN(T) specimen experimental results indicate that the toughness of a surface-cracked specimen is highly dependent on the depth of the initial crack, in addition, the J-R curves from the SEN(T) specimens closely match the J-R curve from the surface-cracked pipe experiment; (3) C(T) experimental results suggest that there is a large difference in the quasi-static, monotonic toughness between the two heats of DP2-A8, as well as a toughness degradation in the lower toughness heat of material (DP2-A8II) when loaded with a dynamic, cyclic (R = {minus}0.3) loading history.

  19. The Transcriptional Response of Neurotrophins and Their Tyrosine Kinase Receptors in Lumbar Sensorimotor Circuits to Spinal Cord Contusion is Affected by Injury Severity and Survival Time

    PubMed Central

    Hougland, M. Tyler; Harrison, Benjamin J.; Magnuson, David S. K.; Rouchka, Eric C.; Petruska, Jeffrey C.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) results in changes to the anatomical, neurochemical, and physiological properties of cells in the central and peripheral nervous system. Neurotrophins, acting by binding to their cognate Trk receptors on target cell membranes, contribute to modulation of anatomical, neurochemical, and physiological properties of neurons in sensorimotor circuits in both the intact and injured spinal cord. Neurotrophin signaling is associated with many post-SCI changes including maladaptive plasticity leading to pain and autonomic dysreflexia, but also therapeutic approaches such as training-induced locomotor improvement. Here we characterize expression of mRNA for neurotrophins and Trk receptors in lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cord after two different severities of mid-thoracic injury and at 6 and 12 weeks post-SCI. There was complex regulation that differed with tissue, injury severity, and survival time, including reversals of regulation between 6 and 12 weeks, and the data suggest that natural regulation of neurotrophins in the spinal cord may continue for months after birth. Our assessments determined that a coordination of gene expression emerged at the 12-week post-SCI time point and bioinformatic analyses address possible mechanisms. These data can inform studies meant to determine the role of the neurotrophin signaling system in post-SCI function and plasticity, and studies using this signaling system as a therapeutic approach. PMID:23316162

  20. Posttreatment prostatic-specific antigen doubling time as a surrogate endpoint for prostate cancer-specific survival: An analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 92-02

    SciTech Connect

    Valicenti, Richard K. . E-mail: Richard.Valicenti@mail.tju.edu; DeSilvio, Michelle; Hanks, Gerald E.; Porter, Arthur; Brereton, Harmar; Rosenthal, Seth A.; Shipley, William U.; Sandler, Howard M.

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: We evaluated whether posttreatment prostatic-specific antigen doubling time (PSADT) was predictive of prostate cancer mortality by testing the Prentice requirements for a surrogate endpoint. Methods and Materials: We analyzed posttreatment PSA measurements in a cohort of 1,514 men with localized prostate cancer (T2c-4 and PSA level <150 ng/mL), treated and monitored prospectively on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 92-02. From June 1992 to April 1995, men were randomized to neoadjuvant androgen deprivation and 65-70 Gy of radiation therapy (n = 761), or in combination with 24 months of adjuvant androgen deprivation (n = 753). Using an adjusted Cox proportional hazards model, we tested if PSADT was prognostic and independent of randomized treatment in this cohort. The endpoints were time to PSADT (assuming first-order kinetics for a minimum of 3 rising PSA measurements) and cancer-specific survival (CSS). Results: After a median follow-up time of 5.9 years, randomized treatment was a significant predictor for CSS (p{sub Cox} = 0.002), PSADT <6 months (p{sub Cox} < 0.001), PSADT <9 months (p{sub Cox} < 0.001), and PSADT <12 months (p{sub Cox} < 0.001) but not for PSADT <3 (p{sub Cox} = 0.4). The significant posttreatment PSADTs were also significant predictors of CSS (p{sub Cox}< 0.001). After adjusting for T stage, Gleason score and PSA, all of Prentice's requirements were not met, indicating that the effect of PSADT on CSS was not independent of the randomized treatment. Conclusions: Prostatic specific antigen doubling time is significantly associated with CSS, but did not meet all of Prentice's requirements for a surrogate endpoint of CSS. Thus, the risk of dying of prostate cancer is not fully explained by PSADT.

  1. Survival rate and expression of Heat-shock protein 70 and Frost genes after temperature stress in Drosophila melanogaster lines that are selected for recovery time from temperature coma.

    PubMed

    Udaka, Hiroko; Ueda, Chiaki; Goto, Shin G

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the physiological mechanisms underlying temperature tolerance using Drosophila melanogaster lines with rapid, intermediate, or slow recovery from heat or chill coma that were established by artificial selection or by free recombination without selection. Specifically, we focused on the relationships among their recovery from heat or chill coma, survival after severe heat or cold, and survival enhanced by rapid cold hardening (RCH) or heat hardening. The recovery time from heat coma was not related to the survival rate after severe heat. The line with rapid recovery from chill coma showed a higher survival rate after severe cold exposure, and therefore the same mechanisms are likely to underlie these phenotypes. The recovery time from chill coma and survival rate after severe cold were unrelated to RCH-enhanced survival. We also examined the expression of two genes, Heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and Frost, in these lines to understand the contribution of these stress-inducible genes to intraspecific variation in recovery from temperature coma. The line showing rapid recovery from heat coma did not exhibit higher expression of Hsp70 and Frost. In addition, Hsp70 and Frost transcription levels were not correlated with the recovery time from chill coma. Thus, Hsp70 and Frost transcriptional regulation was not involved in the intraspecific variation in recovery from temperature coma.

  2. Time to Let Go of the Illusion that Psychotherapy Extends the Survival of Cancer Patients: Reply to Kraemer, Kuchler, and Spiegel (2009)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyne, James C.; Thombs, Brett D.; Stefanek, Michael; Palmer, Steven C.

    2009-01-01

    Replies to comments from Kraemer, Kuchler, and Spiegel on the authors original article Psychotherapy and survival in cancer: The conflict between hope and evidence. The authors recently reviewed evidence related to the notion that psychotherapy extends survival in cancer patients (J. C. Coyne, M. Stefanek, & S. C. Palmer, 2007). The authors found…

  3. Non-AIDS defining cancers in the D:A:D Study - time trends and predictors of survival: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-AIDS defining cancers (NADC) are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-positive individuals. Using data from a large international cohort of HIV-positive individuals, we described the incidence of NADC from 2004–2010, and described subsequent mortality and predictors of these. Methods Individuals were followed from 1st January 2004/enrolment in study, until the earliest of a new NADC, 1st February 2010, death or six months after the patient’s last visit. Incidence rates were estimated for each year of follow-up, overall and stratified by gender, age and mode of HIV acquisition. Cumulative risk of mortality following NADC diagnosis was summarised using Kaplan-Meier methods, with follow-up for these analyses from the date of NADC diagnosis until the patient’s death, 1st February 2010 or 6 months after the patient’s last visit. Factors associated with mortality following NADC diagnosis were identified using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression. Results Over 176,775 person-years (PY), 880 (2.1%) patients developed a new NADC (incidence: 4.98/1000PY [95% confidence interval 4.65, 5.31]). Over a third of these patients (327, 37.2%) had died by 1st February 2010. Time trends for lung cancer, anal cancer and Hodgkin’s lymphoma were broadly consistent. Kaplan-Meier cumulative mortality estimates at 1, 3 and 5 years after NADC diagnosis were 28.2% [95% CI 25.1-31.2], 42.0% [38.2-45.8] and 47.3% [42.4-52.2], respectively. Significant predictors of poorer survival after diagnosis of NADC were lung cancer (compared to other cancer types), male gender, non-white ethnicity, and smoking status. Later year of diagnosis and higher CD4 count at NADC diagnosis were associated with improved survival. The incidence of NADC remained stable over the period 2004–2010 in this large observational cohort. Conclusions The prognosis after diagnosis of NADC, in particular lung cancer and disseminated cancer, is poor but has improved

  4. Effect of nanoscale patterned interfacial roughness on interfacial toughness.

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Moody, Neville Reid; Mook, William M.; Kennedy, Marian S.; Bahr, David F.; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.

    2007-09-01

    The performance and the reliability of many devices are controlled by interfaces between thin films. In this study we investigated the use of patterned, nanoscale interfacial roughness as a way to increase the apparent interfacial toughness of brittle, thin-film material systems. The experimental portion of the study measured the interfacial toughness of a number of interfaces with nanoscale roughness. This included a silicon interface with a rectangular-toothed pattern of 60-nm wide by 90-nm deep channels fabricated using nanoimprint lithography techniques. Detailed finite element simulations were used to investigate the nature of interfacial crack growth when the interface is patterned. These simulations examined how geometric and material parameter choices affect the apparent toughness. Atomistic simulations were also performed with the aim of identifying possible modifications to the interfacial separation models currently used in nanoscale, finite element fracture analyses. The fundamental nature of atomistic traction separation for mixed mode loadings was investigated.

  5. New routes to improve toughness of rubber-modified epoxies

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    Significant progress has been made in modeling the toughening mechanisms in rubber-modified epoxies due to the efforts of many researchers. The result of these efforts has led to an increased awareness of the roles of rubber particle bridging, rubber particle cavitation, matrix dilation, and matrix shear banding on the enhancement of fracture toughness. However, there are still many questions regarding rubber-toughening which remain unanswered. This talk will focus on the importance and the roles of the interphase region between the epoxy matrix and the rubber particle and of the overall particle morphology on the toughness enhancement in rubber-modified epoxies. It will be demonstrated that additional toughness enhancement may be achieved by means not included in any of the toughening models proposed to date. Methods to incorporate these effects into existing toughening models will be discussed.

  6. Tough Stretchable Physically-Cross-linked Electrospun Hydrogel Fiber Mats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yiming; Wang, Chao; Wiener, Clinton G; Hao, Jinkun; Shatas, Sophia; Weiss, R A; Vogt, Bryan D

    2016-09-01

    Nature uses supramolecular interactions and hierarchical structures to produce water-rich materials with combinations of properties that are challenging to obtain in synthetic systems. Here, we demonstrate hierarchical supramolecular hydrogels from electrospun, self-associated copolymers with unprecedented elongation and toughness for high porosity hydrogels. Hydrophobic association of perfluoronated comonomers provides the physical cross-links for these hydrogels based on copolymers of dimethyl acrylamide and 2-(N-ethylperfluorooctane sulfonamido)ethyl methacrylate (FOSM). Intriguingly, the hydrogel fiber mats show an enhancement in toughness in comparison to compression molded bulk hydrogels. This difference is attributed to the size distribution of the hydrophobic aggregates where narrowing the distribution in the electrospun material enhances the toughness of the hydrogel. These hydrogel fiber mats exhibit extensibility more than double that of the bulk hydrogel and a comparable modulus despite the porosity of the fiber mat leading to >25 wt % increase in water content. PMID:27548013

  7. A joint fracture toughness evaluation of hot-pressed beryllium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, H.; Sargent, G. A.; Brown, W. F., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Fracture toughness tests at room temperature were made on three-point bend specimens cut from hot-pressed beryllium obtained from two suppliers. The test specimens had dimensions conforming to ASTM fracture toughness standard E399-72. A total of 42 specimens were machined from each batch of material. Six specimens from each batch were then distributed to seven independent laboratories for testing. The test data from the laboratories were collected and analyzed for differences between the laboratories and the two batches of material. It is concluded that ASTM 399-72 can be used as a valid test procedure for determining the fracture toughness of beryllium, providing that Kf(max) in fatigue cracking could be up to 80 percent of the K(0) value.

  8. The Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVII : Effects of Ocean Covariates and Release Timing on First Ocean-Year Survival of Fall Chinook Salmon from Oregon and Washington Coastal Hatcheries.

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, Caitlin; Skalski, John R.

    2001-05-01

    Effects of oceanographic conditions, as well as effects of release-timing and release-size, on first ocean-year survival of subyearling fall chinook salmon were investigated by analyzing CWT release and recovery data from Oregon and Washington coastal hatcheries. Age-class strength was estimated using a multinomial probability likelihood which estimated first-year survival as a proportional hazards regression against ocean and release covariates. Weight-at-release and release-month were found to significantly effect first year survival (p < 0.05) and ocean effects were therefore estimated after adjusting for weight-at-release. Negative survival trend was modeled for sea surface temperature (SST) during 11 months of the year over the study period (1970-1992). Statistically significant negative survival trends (p < 0.05) were found for SST during April, June, November and December. Strong pairwise correlations (r > 0.6) between SST in April/June, April/November and April/December suggest the significant relationships were due to one underlying process. At higher latitudes (45{sup o} and 48{sup o}N), summer upwelling (June-August) showed positive survival trend with survival and fall (September-November) downwelling showed positive trend with survival, indicating early fall transition improved survival. At 45{sup o} and 48{sup o}, during spring, alternating survival trends with upwelling were observed between March and May, with negative trend occurring in March and May, and positive trend with survival occurring in April. In January, two distinct scenarios of improved survival were linked to upwelling conditions, indicated by (1) a significant linear model effect (p < 0.05) showing improved survival with increasing upwelling, and (2) significant bowl-shaped curvature (p < 0.05) of survival with upwelling. The interpretation of the effects is that there was (1) significantly improved survival when downwelling conditions shifted to upwelling conditions in January (i

  9. Processing and testing of high toughness silicon nitride ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tikare, Veena; Sanders, William A.; Choi, Sung R.

    1993-01-01

    High toughness silicon nitride ceramics were processed with the addition of small quantities of beta-Si3N4 whiskers in a commercially available alpha-Si3N4 powder. These whiskers grew preferentially during sintering resulting in large, elongated beta-grains, which acted to toughen the matrix by crack deflection and grain pullout. The fracture toughness of these samples seeded with beta-Si3N4 whiskers ranged from 8.7 to 9.5 MPa m(exp 0.5) depending on the sintering additives.

  10. Semi-interpenetrating polymer network's of polyimides: Fracture toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Marion Glenn

    1988-01-01

    The objective was to improve the fracture toughness of the PMR-15 thermosetting polyimide by co-disolving LaRC-TPI, a thermoplastic polyimide. The co-solvation of a thermoplastic into a thermoset produces an interpenetration of the thermoplastic polymer into the thermoset polyimide network. A second research program was planned around the concept that to improve the fracture toughness of a thermoset polyimide polymer, the molecular weight between crosslink points would be an important macromolecular topological parameter in producing a fracture toughened semi-IPN polyimide.

  11. Sleep restriction reduces the survival time and aggravates the neurological dysfunction and memory impairments in an animal model of cerebral hypoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Lenise Jihe; Coelho, Fernando Morgadinho; Araujo, Paula; Tedesco, Roberto Carlos; Souza, Rodrigo Barbosa; Tufik, Sergio; Andersen, Monica Levy

    2016-08-01

    Cerebral blood flow is associated with the cerebrovascular prognosis. Sleep restriction (SR) may be a limiting factor of the prognosis after a cerebrovascular event, impairing the neurological recovery. We aimed to investigate the effects of SR on mortality rate and on behavioral and histological parameters of animals submitted to permanent cerebral hypoperfusion. Sixty male Wistar rats were distributed in 4 groups, according to the protocol of common carotid artery occlusion (CCAO) and SR: nSR+nCCAO, SR+nCCAO, nSR+CCAO, and SR+CCAO. The groups SR+nCCAO and SR+CCAO were submitted to SR during 10 days. The cerebral hypoperfusion was induced by the permanent CCAO. Neurological function and memory were assessed over 14 days of cerebral hypoperfusion. Analysis of neuropathological alterations were performed in the CA1 region of hippocampus. The mortality rate was 40% in the nSR+CCAO and SR+CCAO groups. SR significantly reduced the survival time of animals submitted to CCAO. After 7 and 14 days of cerebral hypoperfusion, 11% and 33% of the nSR+CCAO and SR+CCAO animals showed severe neurological dysfunction, respectively. A significant association between a high frequency of memory impairments with the group SR+CCAO was observed. The neuropathological alterations in CA1 region of hippocampus were similar among the groups. SR potentiates the negative effects of cerebral hypoperfusion conditions, suggesting that SR could be a factor associated with a worse prognosis after a cerebrovascular event.

  12. Variations of motility and survival with storage time at 4°C of epididymal spermatozoa Ouled-Djellal breed rams in Eastern Algeria

    PubMed Central

    Safsaf, B.; Belkadi, S.; Belkacem, L.; Mamache, B.; Tlidjane, M.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate some reproduction performances in Ouled-Djellal rams. Materials and Methods: This study involved genital organs removed after slaughter from 54 rams at the municipal slaughterhouse of Batna (East Algeria). Results: The measurements of survival and mobility of epididymal sperm followed at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h after collection, revealed significant (p<0.05) to highly significant differences (p>0.001) according to time. Thus, concerning the sperm motility the values were 91.00±2.40%, 89.20±2.40%, 77.00±6.20% and 62.60±1.20% at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively. Indeed, in live sperm, the viability rates were 82.15±1.48%, 77.67±1.74%, 66.56±1.95% and 52.30±1.46% at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively. Conclusion: This study revealed that epididymal spermatozoa stored at 04°C for 72 h kept their mobility and vitality at nearly a half of their the original parameters. PMID:27047092

  13. Density of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes correlates with extent of brain edema and overall survival time in patients with brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Berghoff, Anna S; Fuchs, Elisabeth; Ricken, Gerda; Mlecnik, Bernhard; Bindea, Gabriela; Spanberger, Thomas; Hackl, Monika; Widhalm, Georg; Dieckmann, Karin; Prayer, Daniela; Bilocq, Amelie; Heinzl, Harald; Zielinski, Christoph; Bartsch, Rupert; Birner, Peter; Galon, Jerome; Preusser, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The immune microenvironment of the brain differs from that of other organs and the role of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in brain metastases (BM), one of the most common and devastating complication of cancer, is unclear. We investigated TIL subsets and their prognostic impact in 116 BM specimens using immunohistochemistry for CD3, CD8, CD45RO, FOXP3, PD1 and PD-L1. The Immunoscore was calculated as published previously. Overall, we found TIL infiltration in 115/116 (99.1%) BM specimens. PD-L1 expression was evident in 19/67 (28.4%) BM specimens and showed no correlation with TIL density (p > 0.05). TIL density was not associated with corticosteroid administration (p > 0.05). A significant difference in infiltration density according to TIL subtype was present (p < 0.001; Chi Square); high infiltration was most frequently observed for CD3+ TILs (95/116; 81.9%) and least frequently for PD1+ TILs (18/116; 15.5%; p < 0.001). Highest TIL density was observed in melanoma, followed by renal cell cancer and lung cancer BM (p < 0.001). The density of CD8+ TILs correlated positively with the extent of peritumoral edema seen on pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging (p = 0.031). The density of CD3+ (15 vs. 6 mo; p = 0.015), CD8+ (15 vs. 11 mo; p = 0.030) and CD45RO+ TILs (18 vs. 8 mo; p = 0.006) showed a positive correlation with favorable median OS times. Immunoscore showed significant correlation with survival prognosis (27 vs. 10 mo; p < 0.001). The prognostic impact of Immunoscore was independent from established prognostic parameters at multivariable analysis (HR 0.612, p < 0.001). In conclusion, our data indicate that dense TILs infiltrates are common in BM and correlate with the amount of peritumoral brain edema and survival prognosis, thus identifying the immune system as potential biomarker for cancer patients with CNS affection. Further studies are needed to substantiate our findings. PMID:26942067

  14. Effects of hydrogen on the mixed mode I/III toughness of a high-purity rotor steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, A.M.; Hirth, J.P. ); Moody, N.R.; Gordon, J.A. )

    1993-06-01

    Recently, the authors reported the effects of hydrogen on the mixed mode 1/111 toughness of a high-purity Ni-Cr-Mo-V rotor steel. The steel was tested both in the uncharged and hydrogen-charged conditions. It was shown that the presence of hydrogen degraded the overall J toughness incrementally by approximately 30 pct, with the degree of degradation increasing with the mode III component. Also, in the uncharged condition, the J toughness decreased to a minimum as the mode I/III ratio decreased and increased again for pure mode III loading. However, the authors could not determine if a similar variation of toughness was displayed by the hydrogen-charged steel, because the pure mode III tests could not be completed at that time. The pure mode III tests are now complete, and these new results are presented in this communication. The chemical composition of the steel used in these studies was 0.25C-3.7Ni-1.7Cr-0.4Mo-0.12V-0.05Mn- 0.02Si-0.003(P,Sn,As)-O.002Sb-0.0015 S (wt pct).

  15. Development of composite material test methodology for fractue toughness/damage tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bower, M. V.

    1986-01-01

    Fracture toughness testing techniques for composite materials are reviewed for simplicity, applicability to filament wound systems, and correlation with fracture mechanics preinciples. Toughness test results are repesented for homogeneous epoxy and graphite reinforced epoxy.

  16. Anti-Pollution Backlash in Illinois: Can A Tough Protection Program Survive?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Sally

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the characteristics of the 1970 Illinois environmental program and the backlash activities taken by the Illinois General Assembly during the spring 1973 session. Indicates that the momentum of pollution fight is weakened by declining public support. (CC)

  17. SURVIV for survival analysis of mRNA isoform variation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shihao; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Chengyang; Wu, Ying Nian; Xing, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The rapid accumulation of clinical RNA-seq data sets has provided the opportunity to associate mRNA isoform variations to clinical outcomes. Here we report a statistical method SURVIV (Survival analysis of mRNA Isoform Variation), designed for identifying mRNA isoform variation associated with patient survival time. A unique feature and major strength of SURVIV is that it models the measurement uncertainty of mRNA isoform ratio in RNA-seq data. Simulation studies suggest that SURVIV outperforms the conventional Cox regression survival analysis, especially for data sets with modest sequencing depth. We applied SURVIV to TCGA RNA-seq data of invasive ductal carcinoma as well as five additional cancer types. Alternative splicing-based survival predictors consistently outperform gene expression-based survival predictors, and the integration of clinical, gene expression and alternative splicing profiles leads to the best survival prediction. We anticipate that SURVIV will have broad utilities for analysing diverse types of mRNA isoform variation in large-scale clinical RNA-seq projects. PMID:27279334

  18. High toughness carbon cloth composites for low temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronca, Sara; Forte, Giuseppe; Mascia, Leno; Rastogi, Sanjay

    2016-05-01

    Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymers based on a thermoplastic, high performance matrix such as Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene have been produced using two different routes and it was found that in-situ polymerization of the matrix is a possible way forward to achieve a combination of high strength and high toughness in composites.

  19. On the in vitro fracture toughness of human dentin

    SciTech Connect

    Imbeni, V.; Nalla, R.K.; Bosi, C.; Kinney, J.H.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2002-02-05

    The in vitro fracture toughness of human dention has been reported to be of the order of 3 MPa sqrt m. This result, however is based on a single study for a single orientation, and furthermore involves notched, rather than fatigue precracked, test samples.

  20. Please, Not Another Push to Get Tough on Student Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, M. Scott

    2011-01-01

    Standardized academic testing, under-performing schools, demands for high standards in America's schools and current levels of student dropouts have resulted in renewed calls for "getting tough on student retention." The push for student retention is demanded by school boards and others in spite of the overwhelming research evidence that student…