Science.gov

Sample records for sustaining incompatible intentions

  1. The Essence of Conscious Conflict: Subjective Effects of Sustaining Incompatible Intentions

    PubMed Central

    Morsella, Ezequiel; Gray, Jeremy R.; Krieger, Stephen C.; Bargh, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Conflict constitutes one of the fundamental ‘tuggings and pullings’ of the human experience. Yet, the link between the various kinds of conflict in the nervous system and subjective experience remains unexplained. We tested a hypothesis that predicts why both the ‘hot’ conflicts involving self-control and motivation, and the ‘cooler’ response conflicts of the laboratory, lead to changes in subjective experience. From this standpoint, these changes arise automatically from the activation of incompatible skeletomotor intentions, because the primary function of consciousness is to integrate such intentions for adaptive skeletal muscle output. Accordingly, we demonstrated for the first time that merely sustaining incompatible intentions (to move right and left) in a motionless state produces stronger subjective effects than sustaining compatible intentions. The results held equally strongly for two different effector systems involving skeletal muscle: arm movements and finger movements. In contrast, no such effects were found with conflict in a smooth muscle effector system. Together, these findings illuminate aspects of the nature of subjective experience and the role of incompatible intentions in affect and failures of self-control. PMID:19803593

  2. Supporting Sustainable Food Consumption: Mental Contrasting with Implementation Intentions (MCII) Aligns Intentions and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Loy, Laura S.; Wieber, Frank; Gollwitzer, Peter M.; Oettingen, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    With growing awareness that sustainable consumption is important for quality of life on earth, many individuals intend to act more sustainably. In this regard, interest in reducing meat consumption is on the rise. However, people often do not translate intentions into actual behavior change. To address this intention-behavior gap, we tested the self-regulation strategy of mental contrasting with implementation intentions (MCII). Here, people identify and imagine a desired future and current obstacles standing in its way. They address the obstacles with if-then plans specifying when, where, and how to act differently. In a 5-week randomized controlled experimental study, we compared an information + MCII intervention with an information-only control intervention. As hypothesized, only MCII participants’ intention of reducing their meat consumption was predictive of their actual reduction, while no correspondence between intention and behavior change was found for control participants. Participants with a moderate to strong intention to reduce their meat consumption reduced it more in the MCII than in the control condition. Thus, MCII helped to narrow the intention-behavior gap and supported behavior change for those holding moderate and strong respective intentions. PMID:27199840

  3. Supporting Sustainable Food Consumption: Mental Contrasting with Implementation Intentions (MCII) Aligns Intentions and Behavior.

    PubMed

    Loy, Laura S; Wieber, Frank; Gollwitzer, Peter M; Oettingen, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    With growing awareness that sustainable consumption is important for quality of life on earth, many individuals intend to act more sustainably. In this regard, interest in reducing meat consumption is on the rise. However, people often do not translate intentions into actual behavior change. To address this intention-behavior gap, we tested the self-regulation strategy of mental contrasting with implementation intentions (MCII). Here, people identify and imagine a desired future and current obstacles standing in its way. They address the obstacles with if-then plans specifying when, where, and how to act differently. In a 5-week randomized controlled experimental study, we compared an information + MCII intervention with an information-only control intervention. As hypothesized, only MCII participants' intention of reducing their meat consumption was predictive of their actual reduction, while no correspondence between intention and behavior change was found for control participants. Participants with a moderate to strong intention to reduce their meat consumption reduced it more in the MCII than in the control condition. Thus, MCII helped to narrow the intention-behavior gap and supported behavior change for those holding moderate and strong respective intentions. PMID:27199840

  4. Supporting Sustainable Food Consumption: Mental Contrasting with Implementation Intentions (MCII) Aligns Intentions and Behavior.

    PubMed

    Loy, Laura S; Wieber, Frank; Gollwitzer, Peter M; Oettingen, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    With growing awareness that sustainable consumption is important for quality of life on earth, many individuals intend to act more sustainably. In this regard, interest in reducing meat consumption is on the rise. However, people often do not translate intentions into actual behavior change. To address this intention-behavior gap, we tested the self-regulation strategy of mental contrasting with implementation intentions (MCII). Here, people identify and imagine a desired future and current obstacles standing in its way. They address the obstacles with if-then plans specifying when, where, and how to act differently. In a 5-week randomized controlled experimental study, we compared an information + MCII intervention with an information-only control intervention. As hypothesized, only MCII participants' intention of reducing their meat consumption was predictive of their actual reduction, while no correspondence between intention and behavior change was found for control participants. Participants with a moderate to strong intention to reduce their meat consumption reduced it more in the MCII than in the control condition. Thus, MCII helped to narrow the intention-behavior gap and supported behavior change for those holding moderate and strong respective intentions.

  5. ABO incompatibility

    MedlinePlus

    Transfusion reaction - hemolytic; Acute hemolytic transfusion reaction; AHTR; Blood incompatibility - ABO ... to another type of blood can cause a reaction. This is important when someone needs to receive ...

  6. The influence of ethical values and food choice motivations on intentions to purchase sustainably sourced foods.

    PubMed

    Dowd, Kylie; Burke, Karena J

    2013-10-01

    This study examined a three-step adaptation of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) applied to the intention of consumers to purchase sustainably sourced food. The sample consisted of 137 participants, of which 109 were female, who were recruited through a farmers market and an organic produce outlet in an Australian capital city. Participants completed an online questionnaire containing the TPB scales of attitude, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control and intention; measures of positive moral attitude and ethical self identity; and food choice motives. Hierarchical multiple regression was used to examine the predictive utility of the TPB in isolation (step 1) and the TPB expanded to include the constructs of moral attitude and ethical self-identity (step 2). The results indicated the expansion of the TPB to include these constructs added significantly to the predictive model measuring intention to purchase sustainably sourced food. The third step in the adaptation utilised this expanded TPB model and added a measure of retail channel (where consumers reported buying fresh produce) and 9 food choice motives, in order to assess the predictive utility of the inclusion of choice motivations in this context. Of the 8 food choice motives examined, only health and ethical values significantly predicted intention to purchase sustainably sourced food. However, with the addition of food choice motives, ethical self-identity was no longer a significant predictor of intention to purchase sustainably sourced food. Overall the adapted TPB model explained 76% of the variance in intention to purchase sustainably sourced food. PMID:23770118

  7. The influence of ethical values and food choice motivations on intentions to purchase sustainably sourced foods.

    PubMed

    Dowd, Kylie; Burke, Karena J

    2013-10-01

    This study examined a three-step adaptation of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) applied to the intention of consumers to purchase sustainably sourced food. The sample consisted of 137 participants, of which 109 were female, who were recruited through a farmers market and an organic produce outlet in an Australian capital city. Participants completed an online questionnaire containing the TPB scales of attitude, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control and intention; measures of positive moral attitude and ethical self identity; and food choice motives. Hierarchical multiple regression was used to examine the predictive utility of the TPB in isolation (step 1) and the TPB expanded to include the constructs of moral attitude and ethical self-identity (step 2). The results indicated the expansion of the TPB to include these constructs added significantly to the predictive model measuring intention to purchase sustainably sourced food. The third step in the adaptation utilised this expanded TPB model and added a measure of retail channel (where consumers reported buying fresh produce) and 9 food choice motives, in order to assess the predictive utility of the inclusion of choice motivations in this context. Of the 8 food choice motives examined, only health and ethical values significantly predicted intention to purchase sustainably sourced food. However, with the addition of food choice motives, ethical self-identity was no longer a significant predictor of intention to purchase sustainably sourced food. Overall the adapted TPB model explained 76% of the variance in intention to purchase sustainably sourced food.

  8. An Expectancy-Value Model for Sustained Enrolment Intentions of Senior Secondary Physics Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Jessy; Barker, Katrina

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the predictive influences of achievement motivational variables that may sustain students' engagement in physics and influence their future enrolment plans in the subject. Unlike most studies attempting to address the decline of physics enrolments through capturing students' intention to enrol in physics before ever…

  9. An Expectancy-Value Model for Sustained Enrolment Intentions of Senior Secondary Physics Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Jessy; Barker, Katrina

    2015-08-01

    This study investigates the predictive influences of achievement motivational variables that may sustain students' engagement in physics and influence their future enrolment plans in the subject. Unlike most studies attempting to address the decline of physics enrolments through capturing students' intention to enrol in physics before ever studying the subject, this study is novel because it captures the perceptions of students currently enrolled in senior secondary physics and their subsequent enrolment intentions after completing modules from the physics curriculum. Participants comprised of senior secondary students in year 11 completing their first year of physics in Australia across nine high schools in New South Wales. The Sustained Enrolment Models for Physics (SEMP), which drew upon the Expectancy-Value (EV) theoretical foundation, proposed predictive relations among students' achievement motivation, sustained engagement, and enrolment intentions in relation to physics. The data showed a good fit to the theoretically developed model for all four physics topics from the year 11 curriculum. The path coefficients of the models demonstrated the strength of relationships among the variables for each of the topics. The topic specificity of SEMPs allowed the mapping of students' motivational patterns at a more sensitive level than the domain-specific level and suggested that the relative influence of motivational precursors can vary by topic. This study advanced the EV research knowledge that, while values may be significant, it is the expectancies that largely predict students' sustained choice intentions in relation to physics. Implications for these findings are discussed.

  10. College and University Dining Services Administrators' Intention to Adopt Sustainable Practices: Results from US Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chao-Jung; Gregoire, Mary B.; Arendt, Susan; Shelley, Mack C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine college and university dining services administrators' (CUDSAs) intention to adopt sustainable practices. Design/methodology/approach: The theory of planned behavior (TPB) including constructs of subjective norm (SN), attitude, perceived behavior control, and personal norm (PN), formed the…

  11. Evaluation of the impact of Brazil's sustainability on the behavioral intentions of stakeholders toward the country.

    PubMed

    Giraldi, Janaina de Moura Engracia

    2016-02-01

    This paper examines the influence of sustainability as a dimension of country image on behavioral intentions (so-called conations) of stakeholders toward Brazil. In addition, sustainable consumption, a moderating variable of the country-of-origin effect (not been identified in other studies), and consumers' gender and familiarity with the country are investigated as moderating variables. The empirical research is of a descriptive nature, and in terms of data collection, a survey method has been used on a sample of undergraduate students from foreign institutions. In total, 427 questionnaires have been considered in the analysis. The results of a multiple regression analyses show that the dimensions of country image (affective, political, technical and sustainability) are reliable factors that have a positive influence on conations toward Brazil, with the affective dimension exerting the strongest influence. Further comparisons show that the sustainability dimension is more important in shaping the conations of female respondents and those with low familiarity with Brazil, whereas the political dimension is more relevant in shaping the conations of male respondents and those with high familiarity with Brazil. Finally, the sustainability dimension has a minor influence on individuals with higher levels of sustainable consumption. PMID:26195177

  12. Evaluation of the impact of Brazil's sustainability on the behavioral intentions of stakeholders toward the country.

    PubMed

    Giraldi, Janaina de Moura Engracia

    2016-02-01

    This paper examines the influence of sustainability as a dimension of country image on behavioral intentions (so-called conations) of stakeholders toward Brazil. In addition, sustainable consumption, a moderating variable of the country-of-origin effect (not been identified in other studies), and consumers' gender and familiarity with the country are investigated as moderating variables. The empirical research is of a descriptive nature, and in terms of data collection, a survey method has been used on a sample of undergraduate students from foreign institutions. In total, 427 questionnaires have been considered in the analysis. The results of a multiple regression analyses show that the dimensions of country image (affective, political, technical and sustainability) are reliable factors that have a positive influence on conations toward Brazil, with the affective dimension exerting the strongest influence. Further comparisons show that the sustainability dimension is more important in shaping the conations of female respondents and those with low familiarity with Brazil, whereas the political dimension is more relevant in shaping the conations of male respondents and those with high familiarity with Brazil. Finally, the sustainability dimension has a minor influence on individuals with higher levels of sustainable consumption.

  13. Sustaining Young People's Enrolment Intentions in Relation to Physics: Development and Validation of a Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Jessy; Barker, Katrina

    2014-01-01

    Currently there is a need for measures to examine the issue of sustaining students' enrolment intentions over an extended period of study in physics, a subject which is generally perceived as hard and demanding by students. This paper addresses this gap in research by describing the development and the assessment of psychometric properties of…

  14. Incompatibility and Mental Fatigue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herzog, Thomas R.; Hayes, Lauren J.; Applin, Rebecca C.; Weatherly, Anna M.

    2011-01-01

    A straightforward prediction from attention restoration theory is that the level of incompatibility in a person's life should be positively correlated with that person's level of mental (or directed attention) fatigue. The authors tested this prediction by developing a new self-report measure of incompatibility in which they attempted to isolate…

  15. Beyond good intentions: The role of proactive coping in achieving sustained behavioural change in the context of diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Thoolen, Bart Johan; de Ridder, Denise; Bensing, Jozien; Gorter, Kees; Rutten, Guy

    2009-03-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of a brief self-management intervention to support patients recently diagnosed with type-2 diabetes to achieve sustained improvements in their self-care behaviours. Based on proactive coping, the intervention emphasizes the crucial role of anticipation and planning in maintaining self-care behaviours. In a randomised controlled trial among recent screen-detected patients, participants who received the intervention were compared with usual-care controls, examining changes in proximal outcomes (intentions, self-efficacy and proactive coping), self-care behaviour (diet, physical activity and medication) and weight over time (0, 3 and 12 months). Subsequently, the contribution of proactive coping in predicting maintenance of behavioural change was analysed using stepwise hierarchical regression analyses, controlling for baseline self-care behaviour, patient characteristics, and intentions and self-efficacy as measured after the course. The intervention was effective in improving proximal outcomes and behaviour with regard to diet and physical activity, resulting in significant weight loss at 12 months. Furthermore, proactive coping was a better predictor of long-term self-management than either intentions or self-efficacy. Proactive coping thus offers new insights into behavioural maintenance theory and can be used to develop effective self-management interventions. PMID:20204991

  16. Disrupting Neoliberal Discourse in Critical Sustainability Education: A Qualitative Analysis of Intentional Language Framing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cachelin, Adrienne; Rose, Jeff; Paisley, Karen

    2015-01-01

    While education for sustainability is a critical task that is gaining ground in a plethora of educational contexts, it is frequently rendered ineffective in the face of neoliberal practice and discourse. Here we examine the pervasive impacts of neoliberalism on education for sustainability, looking specifically at discursive formations that shape…

  17. Home Economics Teachers' Intentions and Engagement in Teaching Sustainable Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haapala, Irja; Biggs, Simon; Cederberg, Riitta; Kosonen, Anna-Liisa

    2014-01-01

    Home Economics (HE) teachers can have a central role in teaching sustainable development (SD) to young adolescents through everyday household management and the promotion of personally and globally sustainable well-being. How well the teachers cope with this task is not well known. The objective of this study was to survey Finnish HE…

  18. Moving beyond Legislation to Create and Sustain Intentionality in Reading Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putman, S. Michael; Smith, Lawrence L.; Cassady, Jerrell C.

    2009-01-01

    Current legislation has exerted tremendous influence on the instructional methods used by reading teachers. Historically, however, neither mandated curriculum nor forced change has proven consistently successful in helping sustain long-term change in teachers' instructional practices or student achievement gains. Using theories of motivation and…

  19. Bridging the gap between sustainable technology adoption and protecting natural resources: Predicting intentions to adopt energy management technologies in California

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Bingye; Sintov, Nicole

    2016-10-24

    To achieve energy savings, emerging energy management technologies and programs require customer adoption. Although a variety of models can be used to explain the adoption of energy management technologies and programs, they overlook the seemingly unconventional element of level of affiliation with nature. In fact, connectedness to nature has been identified as an important driver of many pro-environmental behaviors, but its role in pro-environmental technology adoption is also not well understood. Can affiliation with nature help to bridge the apparent gap—and complex chain of events—between sustainable technology adoption and protecting natural resources? Based on survey data from 856 southern Californiamore » residents, this study investigated the influence of connectedness to nature and other factors on intentions to adopt five energy management technologies and programs: using three platforms to monitor home energy use (website, mobile phone application, in-home display); signing up for a time-of-use pricing plan; and participating in demand response events. Regression results showed that nature connectedness was the strongest predictor of all outcomes such that higher nature connectedness predicted greater likelihood of technology and program adoption. In conclusion, these findings suggest that connectedness to nature may facilitate “bridging the logic gap” between sustainable innovation adoption and environmental protection.« less

  20. An invitation to quantum incompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinosaari, Teiko; Miyadera, Takayuki; Ziman, Mário

    2016-03-01

    In the context of a physical theory, two devices, A and B, described by the theory are called incompatible if the theory does not allow the existence of a third device C that would have both A and B as its components. Incompatibility is a fascinating aspect of physical theories, especially in the case of quantum theory. The concept of incompatibility gives a common ground for several famous impossibility statements within quantum theory, such as ‘no-cloning’ and ‘no information without disturbance’ these can be all seen as statements about incompatibility of certain devices. The purpose of this paper is to give a concise overview of some of the central aspects of incompatibility.

  1. Self-incompatibility in Brassicaceae crops: lessons for interspecific incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Kitashiba, Hiroyasu; Nasrallah, June B

    2014-05-01

    Most wild plants and some crops of the Brassicaceae express self-incompatibility, which is a mechanism that allows stigmas to recognize and discriminate against "self" pollen, thus preventing self-fertilization and inbreeding. Self-incompatibility in this family is controlled by a single S locus containing two multiallelic genes that encode the stigma-expressed S-locus receptor kinase and its pollen coat-localized ligand, the S-locus cysteine-rich protein. Physical interaction between receptor and ligand encoded in the same S locus activates the receptor and triggers a signaling cascade that results in inhibition of "self" pollen. Sequence information for many S-locus haplotypes in Brassica species has spurred studies of dominance relationships between S haplotypes and of S-locus structure, as well as the development of methods for S genotyping. Furthermore, molecular genetic studies have begun to identify genes that encode putative components of the self-incompatibility signaling pathway. In parallel, standard genetic analysis and QTL analysis of the poorly understood interspecific incompatibility phenomenon have been initiated to identify genes responsible for the inhibition of pollen from other species by the stigma. Herewith, we review recent studies of self-incompatibility and interspecific incompatibility, and we propose a model in which a universal pollen-inhibition pathway is shared by these two incompatibility systems. PMID:24987288

  2. Plates with Incompatible Prestrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Lewicka, Marta; Schäffner, Mathias

    2016-07-01

    We study effective elastic behavior of the incompatibly prestrained thin plates, where the prestrain is independent of thickness and uniform through the plate's thickness h. We model such plates as three-dimensional elastic bodies with a prescribed pointwise stress-free state characterized by a Riemannian metric G, and seek the limiting behavior as {h to 0}. We first establish that when the energy per volume scales as the second power of h, the resulting {Γ} -limit is a Kirchhoff-type bending theory. We then show the somewhat surprising result that there exist non-immersible metrics G for whom the infimum energy (per volume) scales smaller than h 2. This implies that the minimizing sequence of deformations carries nontrivial residual three-dimensional energy but it has zero bending energy as seen from the limit Kirchhoff theory perspective. Another implication is that other asymptotic scenarios are valid in appropriate smaller scaling regimes of energy. We characterize the metrics G with the above property, showing that the zero bending energy in the Kirchhoff limit occurs if and only if the Riemann curvatures R 1213, R 1223 and R 1212 of G vanish identically. We illustrate our findings with examples; of particular interest is an example where {G_{2 × 2}}, the two-dimensional restriction of G, is flat but the plate still exhibits the energy scaling of the Föppl-von Kármán type. Finally, we apply these results to a model of nematic glass, including a characterization of the condition when the metric is immersible, for {G = Id3 + γ n ⊗ n} given in terms of the inhomogeneous unit director field distribution { n in R^3}.

  3. Sustainability.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chein-Chi; DiGiovanni, Kimberly; Mei, Ying; Wei, Li

    2016-10-01

    This review on Sustainability covers selected 2015 publications on the focus of Sustainability. It is divided into the following sections : • Sustainable water and wastewater utilities • Sustainable water resources management • Stormwater and green infrastructure • Sustainability in wastewater treatment • Life cycle assessment (LCA) applications • Sustainability and energy in wastewater industry, • Sustainability and asset management.

  4. Sustainability.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chein-Chi; DiGiovanni, Kimberly; Mei, Ying; Wei, Li

    2016-10-01

    This review on Sustainability covers selected 2015 publications on the focus of Sustainability. It is divided into the following sections : • Sustainable water and wastewater utilities • Sustainable water resources management • Stormwater and green infrastructure • Sustainability in wastewater treatment • Life cycle assessment (LCA) applications • Sustainability and energy in wastewater industry, • Sustainability and asset management. PMID:27620092

  5. Sustaining "Truth": Changes in Youth Tobacco Attitudes and Smoking Intentions after 3 Years of a National Antismoking Campaign

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrelly, Matthew C.; Davis, Kevin C.; Duke, Jennifer; Messeri, Peter

    2009-01-01

    This study examines how the American Legacy Foundation's "truth[R]" campaign and Philip Morris's "Think. Don't Smoke" (TDS) campaign have influenced youth's tobacco-related attitudes, beliefs and intentions during the first 3 years of the truth campaign. We use data from eight nationally representative cross-sectional telephone surveys of 35,074…

  6. Sustaining 'truth': changes in youth tobacco attitudes and smoking intentions after 3 years of a national antismoking campaign.

    PubMed

    Farrelly, Matthew C; Davis, Kevin C; Duke, Jennifer; Messeri, Peter

    2009-02-01

    This study examines how the American Legacy Foundation's 'truth' campaign and Philip Morris's 'Think. Don't Smoke' (TDS) campaign have influenced youth's tobacco-related attitudes, beliefs and intentions during the first 3 years of the truth campaign. We use data from eight nationally representative cross-sectional telephone surveys of 35 074 12- to 17-year olds to estimate cross-sectional time series logistic regressions that assess the association between recall of truth and TDS and attitudes, beliefs, and intentions toward smoking. An alternative measure of exposure to TDS was also used. Findings indicate that exposure to truth advertisements (ads) was associated with steady positive changes in attitudes, beliefs and intentions to smoke, whereas exposure to Philip Morris ads was associated with more favorable beliefs and attitudes toward the tobacco industry. Our findings suggest that well-executed antismoking campaigns can positively and consistently change youth's beliefs and attitudes, whereas a tobacco industry-sponsored campaign can have a counterproductive influence. PMID:18203679

  7. Integrating Sustainable Consumption into Environmental Education: A Case Study on Environmental Representations, Decision Making and Intention to Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadjichambis, Andreas Ch.; Paraskeva-Hadjichambi, Demetra; Ioannou, Hara; Georgiou, Yiannis; Manoli, Constantinos C.

    2015-01-01

    During the last decades, current consumption patterns have been recurrently blamed for rendering both the environment and our lifestyles unsustainable. Young children are considered a critical group in the effort to make a shift towards sustainable consumption (environmentally friendly consumption). However, young people should be able to consider…

  8. The Influence of Situational Emotions on the Intention for Sustainable Consumer Behaviour in a Student-Centred Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fröhlich, Gabriele; Sellmann, Daniela; Bogner, Franz X.

    2013-01-01

    Within the curriculum guidelines for Bavaria, we designed a hands-on educational programme for teaching sustainability with regard to agriculture, food and consumerism, partly implemented on a farm as an out-of-school learning setting. The participants were fifth graders ("N"?=?176). The research followed a quasi-experimental design and…

  9. Plant Reproduction: Self-Incompatibility to Go.

    PubMed

    Tovar-Mendez, Alejandro; McClure, Bruce

    2016-02-01

    In a new study, the Papaver rhoeas (poppy family) self-incompatibility system has been transferred into Arabidopsis thaliana, a distantly related plant with a very different floral structure. The simple poppy self-incompatibility system may finally make it possible to introduce this potentially valuable trait into any plant. PMID:26859267

  10. Deep Ecology and Outdoor Recreation--Incompatible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Karla A.

    1990-01-01

    This article defines deep ecology and contrasts this philosophy for thinking and living with the views of traditional and liberal environmentalists. The article also explores areas of compatibility and incompatibility between deep ecology and outdoor recreation/education. (IAH)

  11. Mapping of hybrid incompatibility loci in Nasonia.

    PubMed Central

    Gadau, J; Page, R E; Werren, J H

    1999-01-01

    According to theory, F(2) hybrid breakdown (lethality or sterility) is due to incompatibilities between interacting genes of the different species (i.e., the breaking up of coadapted gene complexes). Detection of such incompatibilities is particularly straightforward in haplodiploid species, because virgin F(1) hybrid females will produce haploid recombinant F(2) males. This feature allows for screening of the complete genome for recessive genetic incompatibilities. Crosses were performed between Nasonia vitripennis (v) and its sibling species N. giraulti (g). First, a linkage map was produced using RAPD markers. RAPD markers showed an overall bias toward vitripennis alleles, a pattern not predicted by the basic two-interactor Dobzhansky-Muller model. Recovery patterns of visible markers were consistent with those of linked RAPD markers. If particular genetic interactions between two loci are causing hybrid lethality, then those genotypes should be underrepresented or absent among adult F(2) males. Four sets of significant incompatibilities were detected by performing pairwise comparisons of markers on different chromosomes. Likely explanations for the observed patterns are maternal effect-zygotic gene incompatibilities or clustering of incompatibility loci. Due to the short generation time, advantages of haplodiploidy, and availability of markers, Nasonia promises to be a productive system for investigating the genetics of hybrid inviability. PMID:10581280

  12. Widespread Genomic Incompatibilities in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Snoek, L. Basten; Orbidans, Helen E.; Stastna, Jana J.; Aartse, Aafke; Rodriguez, Miriam; Riksen, Joost A.G.; Kammenga, Jan E.; Harvey, Simon C.

    2014-01-01

    In the Bateson-Dobzhansky-Muller (BDM) model of speciation, incompatibilities emerge from the deleterious interactions between alleles that are neutral or advantageous in the original genetic backgrounds, i.e., negative epistatic effects. Within species such interactions are responsible for outbreeding depression and F2 (hybrid) breakdown. We sought to identify BDM incompatibilities in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans by looking for genomic regions that disrupt egg laying; a complex, highly regulated, and coordinated phenotype. Investigation of introgression lines and recombinant inbred lines derived from the isolates CB4856 and N2 uncovered multiple incompatibility quantitative trait loci (QTL). These QTL produce a synthetic egg-laying defective phenotype not seen in CB4856 and N2 nor in other wild isolates. For two of the QTL regions, results are inconsistent with a model of pairwise interaction between two loci, suggesting that the incompatibilities are a consequence of complex interactions between multiple loci. Analysis of additional life history traits indicates that the QTL regions identified in these screens are associated with effects on other traits such as lifespan and reproduction, suggesting that the incompatibilities are likely to be deleterious. Taken together, these results indicate that numerous BDM incompatibilities that could contribute to reproductive isolation can be detected and mapped within C. elegans. PMID:25128438

  13. A Genetic Incompatibility Accelerates Adaptation in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Bui, Duyen T; Dine, Elliot; Anderson, James B; Aquadro, Charles F; Alani, Eric E

    2015-07-01

    During mismatch repair (MMR) MSH proteins bind to mismatches that form as the result of DNA replication errors and recruit MLH factors such as Mlh1-Pms1 to initiate excision and repair steps. Previously, we identified a negative epistatic interaction involving naturally occurring polymorphisms in the MLH1 and PMS1 genes of baker's yeast. Here we hypothesize that a mutagenic state resulting from this negative epistatic interaction increases the likelihood of obtaining beneficial mutations that can promote adaptation to stress conditions. We tested this by stressing yeast strains bearing mutagenic (incompatible) and non-mutagenic (compatible) mismatch repair genotypes. Our data show that incompatible populations adapted more rapidly and without an apparent fitness cost to high salt stress. The fitness advantage of incompatible populations was rapid but disappeared over time. The fitness gains in both compatible and incompatible strains were due primarily to mutations in PMR1 that appeared earlier in incompatible evolving populations. These data demonstrate a rapid and reversible role (by mating) for genetic incompatibilities in accelerating adaptation in eukaryotes. They also provide an approach to link experimental studies to observational population genomics. PMID:26230253

  14. Studying Sustainable Development: Problems and Possibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jickling, Bob

    1994-01-01

    The incompatibility between educating for "sustainable development" and the broader concept of education is discussed, pointing out the imprecision of the term "sustainable development." Alternative, and more educationally justifiable, approaches to studying environmental education and development are explored. (SLD)

  15. Sustain

    SciTech Connect

    2013-08-20

    Current building energy simulation technology requires excessive labor, time and expertise to create building energy models, excessive computational time for accurate simulations and difficulties with the interpretation of the results. These deficiencies can be ameliorated using modern graphical user interfaces and algorithms which take advantage of modern computer architectures and display capabilities. To prove this hypothesis, we developed an experimental test bed for building energy simulation. This novel test bed environment offers an easy-to-use interactive graphical interface, provides access to innovative simulation modules that run at accelerated computational speeds, and presents new graphics visualization methods to interpret simulation results. Our system offers the promise of dramatic ease of use in comparison with currently available building energy simulation tools. Its modular structure makes it suitable for early stage building design, as a research platform for the investigation of new simulation methods, and as a tool for teaching concepts of sustainable design. Improvements in the accuracy and execution speed of many of the simulation modules are based on the modification of advanced computer graphics rendering algorithms. Significant performance improvements are demonstrated in several computationally expensive energy simulation modules. The incorporation of these modern graphical techniques should advance the state of the art in the domain of whole building energy analysis and building performance simulation, particularly at the conceptual design stage when decisions have the greatest impact. More importantly, these better simulation tools will enable the transition from prescriptive to performative energy codes, resulting in better, more efficient designs for our future built environment.

  16. Sustain

    2013-08-20

    Current building energy simulation technology requires excessive labor, time and expertise to create building energy models, excessive computational time for accurate simulations and difficulties with the interpretation of the results. These deficiencies can be ameliorated using modern graphical user interfaces and algorithms which take advantage of modern computer architectures and display capabilities. To prove this hypothesis, we developed an experimental test bed for building energy simulation. This novel test bed environment offers an easy-to-use interactivemore » graphical interface, provides access to innovative simulation modules that run at accelerated computational speeds, and presents new graphics visualization methods to interpret simulation results. Our system offers the promise of dramatic ease of use in comparison with currently available building energy simulation tools. Its modular structure makes it suitable for early stage building design, as a research platform for the investigation of new simulation methods, and as a tool for teaching concepts of sustainable design. Improvements in the accuracy and execution speed of many of the simulation modules are based on the modification of advanced computer graphics rendering algorithms. Significant performance improvements are demonstrated in several computationally expensive energy simulation modules. The incorporation of these modern graphical techniques should advance the state of the art in the domain of whole building energy analysis and building performance simulation, particularly at the conceptual design stage when decisions have the greatest impact. More importantly, these better simulation tools will enable the transition from prescriptive to performative energy codes, resulting in better, more efficient designs for our future built environment.« less

  17. Incompatible measurements on quantum causal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlák, Michal; Reitzner, Daniel; Chiribella, Giulio; Ziman, Mário

    2016-05-01

    The existence of incompatible measurements, epitomized by Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, is one of the distinctive features of quantum theory. So far, quantum incompatibility has been studied for measurements that test the preparation of physical systems. Here we extend the notion to measurements that test dynamical processes, possibly consisting of multiple time steps. Such measurements are known as testers and are implemented by interacting with the tested process through a sequence of state preparations, interactions, and measurements. Our first result is a characterization of the incompatibility of quantum testers, for which we provide necessary and sufficient conditions. Then we propose a quantitative measure of incompatibility. We call this measure the robustness of incompatibility and define it as the minimum amount of noise that has to be added to a set of testers in order to make them compatible. We show that (i) the robustness is lower bounded by the distinguishability of the sequence of interactions used by the tester and (ii) maximum robustness is attained when the interactions are perfectly distinguishable. The general results are illustrated in the concrete example of binary testers probing the time evolution of a single-photon polarization.

  18. Intentional replantation.

    PubMed

    Madison, S

    1986-12-01

    Intentional replantation is an accepted endodontic procedure for treating teeth in cases in which intracanal and/or surgical endodontic treatments are not recommended. Although not a frequently used technique, intentional replantation is a treatment option that dentists should consider. An unusual case is described in which intentional replantation was required to maintain the tooth in the dentition. A 31 month follow-up evaluation revealed an asymptomatic, functional tooth with no radiographic signs of pathosis.

  19. Incompatible Sets of Gradients and Metastability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, J. M.; James, R. D.

    2015-12-01

    We give a mathematical analysis of a concept of metastability induced by incompatibility. The physical setting is a single parent phase, just about to undergo transformation to a product phase of lower energy density. Under certain conditions of incompatibility of the energy wells of this energy density, we show that the parent phase is metastable in a strong sense, namely it is a local minimizer of the free energy in an L 1 neighbourhood of its deformation. The reason behind this result is that, due to the incompatibility of the energy wells, a small nucleus of the product phase is necessarily accompanied by a stressed transition layer whose energetic cost exceeds the energy lowering capacity of the nucleus. We define and characterize incompatible sets of matrices, in terms of which the transition layer estimate at the heart of the proof of metastability is expressed. Finally we discuss connections with experiments and place this concept of metastability in the wider context of recent theoretical and experimental research on metastability and hysteresis.

  20. Rapid evolution of Wolbachia incompatibility types.

    PubMed

    Duron, Olivier; Bernard, Jennifer; Atyame, Célestine M; Dumas, Emilie; Weill, Mylène

    2012-11-01

    In most insects, the endosymbiont Wolbachia induces cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI), an embryonic mortality observed when infected males mate either with uninfected females or with females infected by an incompatible Wolbachia strain. Although the molecular mechanism of CI remains elusive, it is classically viewed as a modification-rescue model, in which a Wolbachia mod function disables the reproductive success of the sperm of infected males, unless eggs are infected and express a compatible resc function. The extent to which the modification-rescue model can predict highly complex CI pattern remains a challenging issue. Here, we show the rapid evolution of the mod-resc system in the Culex pipiens mosquito. We have surveyed four incompatible laboratory isofemale lines over 50 generations and observed in two of them that CI has evolved from complete to partial incompatibility (i.e. the production of a mixture of compatible and incompatible clutches). Emergence of the new CI types depends only on Wolbachia determinants and can be simply explained by the gain of new resc functions. Evolution of CI types in Cx. pipiens thus appears as a gradual process, in which one or several resc functions can coexist in the same individual host in addition to the ones involved in the self-compatibility. Our data identified CI as a very dynamic process. We suggest that ancestral and mutant Wolbachia expressing distinct resc functions can co-infect individual hosts, opening the possibility for the mod functions to evolve subsequently. This gives a first clue towards the understanding of how Wolbachia reached highly complex CI pattern in host populations.

  1. Intentional replantation.

    PubMed

    Dryden, J A

    1989-01-01

    When conventional endodontic treatment or retreatment and surgery are not feasible, a clinician may choose to replant the defective tooth. Intentional replantation consists of extracting the tooth, finding and correcting the defect, and replanting the tooth in its socket. This article describes five case reports in which intentional replantation was used as a last resort. Four (80%) of the five patients were successfully treated.

  2. Shared Intentionality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasello, Michael; Carpenter, Malinda

    2007-01-01

    We argue for the importance of processes of shared intentionality in children's early cognitive development. We look briefly at four important social-cognitive skills and how they are transformed by shared intentionality. In each case, we look first at a kind of individualistic version of the skill--as exemplified most clearly in the behavior of…

  3. 46 CFR 150.120 - Definition of incompatible cargoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES § 150.120 Definition of incompatible cargoes. Except as described in § 150.150, a cargo of hazardous material is incompatible with another cargo listed in Table I if the chemical groups...

  4. 46 CFR 150.120 - Definition of incompatible cargoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES § 150.120 Definition of incompatible cargoes. Except as described in § 150.150, a cargo of hazardous material is incompatible with another cargo listed in Table I if the chemical groups...

  5. 46 CFR 150.120 - Definition of incompatible cargoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES § 150.120 Definition of incompatible cargoes. Except as described in § 150.150, a cargo of hazardous material is incompatible with another cargo listed in Table I if the chemical groups...

  6. 46 CFR 150.120 - Definition of incompatible cargoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES § 150.120 Definition of incompatible cargoes. Except as described in § 150.150, a cargo of hazardous material is incompatible with another cargo listed in Table I if the chemical groups...

  7. 46 CFR 150.120 - Definition of incompatible cargoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES § 150.120 Definition of incompatible cargoes. Except as described in § 150.150, a cargo of hazardous material is incompatible with another cargo listed in Table I if the chemical groups...

  8. 40 CFR 265.177 - Special requirements for incompatible wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... wastes. 265.177 Section 265.177 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) INTERIM STATUS STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT... incompatible wastes. (a) Incompatible wastes, or incompatible wastes and materials, (see appendix V...

  9. Programmed cell death and hybrid incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Frank, S A; Barr, C M

    2003-01-01

    We propose a new theory to explain developmental aberrations in plant hybrids. In our theory, hybrid incompatibilities arise from imbalances in the mechanisms that cause male sterility in hermaphroditic plants. Mitochondria often cause male sterility by killing the tapetal tissue that nurtures pollen mother cells. Recent evidence suggests that mitochondria destroy the tapetum by triggering standard pathways of programmed cell death. Some nuclear genotypes repress mitochondrial male sterility and restore pollen fertility. Normal regulation of tapetal development therefore arises from a delicate balance between the disruptive effects of mitochondria and the defensive countermeasures of the nuclear genes. In hybrids, incompatibilities between male-sterile mitochondria and nuclear restorers may frequently upset the regulatory control of programmed cell death, causing tapetal abnormalities and male sterility. We propose that hybrid misregulation of programmed cell death may also spill over into other tissues, explaining various developmental aberrations observed in hybrids.

  10. Wolbachia and cytoplasmic incompatibility in mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Sinkins, Steven P

    2004-07-01

    Wolbachia are maternally inherited bacteria that induce cytoplasmic incompatibility in mosquitoes, and are able to use these patterns of sterility to spread themselves through populations. For this reason they have been proposed as a gene drive system for mosquito genetic replacement, as well as for the reduction of population size or for modulating population age structure in order to reduce disease transmission. Here, recent progress in the study of mosquito Wolbachia is reviewed. We now have much more comprehensive estimates of the parameters that can affect the spread of Wolbachia through natural populations from low starting frequencies, and for waves of spread to be maintained in the face of partial barriers to gene flow. In Aedes albopictus these dynamics are extremely favourable, with very high maternal transmission fidelity and levels of incompatibility recorded. Correspondence between measurements taken in the lab and field is much better than in the Drosophila simulans model system. Important research goals are also discussed, including Wolbachia transformation, interspecific transfer and the elucidation of the mechanisms of incompatibility and rescue; all will be aided by a wealth of new Wolbachia genome information.

  11. The Use of Paradoxical Intention in the Treatment of Panic Attacks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dattilio, Frank M.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the counseling use of paradoxical intention, in which clients are told to perform responses that seem incompatible with the goal for which they are seeking help. The use of paradoxical intention in the treatment of panic attacks is described and a case example is included. The nature and implementation of the technique are discussed.…

  12. Protoplasmic Incompatibility in PODOSPORA ANSERINA: a Possible Function for Incompatibility Genes.

    PubMed

    Boucherie, H; Bernet, J

    1980-10-01

    The suppression of protoplasmic incompatibility resulting from nonallelic gene interactions has been obtained by the coupled effect of mutations in the modA and modB genes (Bernet 1971). Due to their female sterility, modA modB strains provide an experimental tool to determine whether or not the mod and incompatibility loci are involved in a function other than protoplasmic incompatibility. Present results show that modA modB female sterility is a nonautonomous trait since heterokaryotic mycelia that include a modA modB nucleus and a female fertile nucleus (wild-type, modA or modB) produce modA modB protoperithecia, which are also formed by culture on medium supplemented with specific amino acids. Using modA modB strains, which are sterile at 32 degrees and fertile at 26 degrees , we have shown that the mod genes have no specific sequential timing. Indeed, the mod mutations may prevent the achievement of the female sexual cycle at any developmental stage from before early differentiation of protoperithecia until ascospore maturation. Employing different modA and modB mutations, we have shown that protoperithecia in modA modB cultures are generally distributed in female fertile rings; this result indicates that protoperithecia occur only in mycelial areas that have a restricted range of age at the time that modA modB thalli complete growth. Furthermore, nonsense mutations of incompatibility genes suppress the modA modB female fertile rings or restrict their width, suggesting that incompatibility loci, like the mod loci, are involved in protoperithecium formation. Taken together, these results lead to the postulate that mod and incompatibility genes do not determine, sensu stricto, protoperithecial function, as previously supposed (Boucherie and Bernet 1974), but may be involved in the homeostatic control of stationary cell functions essential for the complete development of the female sexual cycle.

  13. Approximating incompatible von Neumann measurements simultaneously

    SciTech Connect

    Heinosaari, Teiko; Jivulescu, Maria Anastasia; Reitzner, Daniel; Ziman, Mario

    2010-09-15

    We study the problem of performing orthogonal qubit measurements simultaneously. Since these measurements are incompatible, one has to accept additional imprecision. An optimal joint measurement is the one with the least possible imprecision. All earlier considerations of this problem have concerned only joint measurability of observables, while in this work we also take into account conditional state transformations (i.e., instruments). We characterize the optimal joint instrument for two orthogonal von Neumann instruments as being the Lueders instrument of the optimal joint observable.

  14. Genetic analysis of interspecific incompatibility in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Udagawa, H; Ishimaru, Y; Li, F; Sato, Y; Kitashiba, H; Nishio, T

    2010-08-01

    In interspecific pollination of Brassica rapa stigmas with Brassica oleracea pollen grains, pollen tubes cannot penetrate stigma tissues. This trait, called interspecific incompatibility, is similar to self-incompatibility in pollen tube behaviors of rejected pollen grains. Since some B. rapa lines have no interspecific incompatibility, genetic analysis of interspecific incompatibility was performed using two F(2) populations. Analysis with an F(2) population between an interspecific-incompatible line and a self-compatible cultivar 'Yellow sarson' having non-functional alleles of S-locus genes and MLPK, the stigmas of which are compatible with B. oleracea pollen grains, revealed no involvement of the S locus and MLPK in the difference of their interspecific incompatibility phenotypes. In QTL analysis of the strength of interspecific incompatibility, three peaks of LOD scores were found, but their LOD scores were as high as the threshold value, and the variance explained by each QTL was small. QTL analysis using another F(2) population derived from selected parents having the highest and lowest levels of interspecific incompatibility revealed five QTLs with high LOD scores, which did not correspond to those found in the former population. The QTL having the highest LOD score was found in linkage group A02. The effect of this QTL on interspecific incompatibility was confirmed by analyzing backcrossed progeny. Based on synteny of this QTL region with Arabidopsis thaliana chromosome 5, a possible candidate gene, which might be involved in interspecific incompatibility, is discussed.

  15. Genetic analysis of interspecific incompatibility in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Udagawa, H; Ishimaru, Y; Li, F; Sato, Y; Kitashiba, H; Nishio, T

    2010-08-01

    In interspecific pollination of Brassica rapa stigmas with Brassica oleracea pollen grains, pollen tubes cannot penetrate stigma tissues. This trait, called interspecific incompatibility, is similar to self-incompatibility in pollen tube behaviors of rejected pollen grains. Since some B. rapa lines have no interspecific incompatibility, genetic analysis of interspecific incompatibility was performed using two F(2) populations. Analysis with an F(2) population between an interspecific-incompatible line and a self-compatible cultivar 'Yellow sarson' having non-functional alleles of S-locus genes and MLPK, the stigmas of which are compatible with B. oleracea pollen grains, revealed no involvement of the S locus and MLPK in the difference of their interspecific incompatibility phenotypes. In QTL analysis of the strength of interspecific incompatibility, three peaks of LOD scores were found, but their LOD scores were as high as the threshold value, and the variance explained by each QTL was small. QTL analysis using another F(2) population derived from selected parents having the highest and lowest levels of interspecific incompatibility revealed five QTLs with high LOD scores, which did not correspond to those found in the former population. The QTL having the highest LOD score was found in linkage group A02. The effect of this QTL on interspecific incompatibility was confirmed by analyzing backcrossed progeny. Based on synteny of this QTL region with Arabidopsis thaliana chromosome 5, a possible candidate gene, which might be involved in interspecific incompatibility, is discussed. PMID:20414635

  16. [Intentional replantation].

    PubMed

    Brouwer, T J; Raghoebar, G M

    1990-01-01

    In case of an unsuccessful endodontic treatment apicectomy often may cure the periapical inflammation. If for technical reasons periapical surgery is not possible, many of these teeth can be preserved by means of intentional replantation. The indications and contra-indications, the technical procedure and two case histories are described.

  17. ABO Incompatible Kidney Transplantation—Current Status and Uncertainties

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Milljae; Kim, Sung-Joo

    2011-01-01

    In the past, ABO blood group incompatibility was considered an absolute contraindication for kidney transplantation. Progress in defined desensitization practice and immunologic understanding has allowed increasingly successful ABO incompatible transplantation during recent years. This paper focused on the history, disserted outcomes, desensitization modalities and protocols, posttransplant immunologic surveillance, and antibody-mediated rejection in transplantation with an ABO incompatible kidney allograft. The mechanism underlying accommodation and antibody-mediated injury was also described. PMID:22174989

  18. Incompatible quantum measurements admitting a local-hidden-variable model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintino, Marco Túlio; Bowles, Joseph; Hirsch, Flavien; Brunner, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    The observation of quantum nonlocality, i.e., quantum correlations violating a Bell inequality, implies the use of incompatible local quantum measurements. Here we consider the converse question. That is, can any set of incompatible measurements be used in order to demonstrate Bell inequality violation? Our main result is to construct a local hidden variable model for an incompatible set of qubit measurements. Specifically, we show that if Alice uses this set of measurements, then for any possible shared entangled state and any possible dichotomic measurements performed by Bob, the resulting statistics are local. This represents significant progress towards proving that measurement incompatibility does not imply Bell nonlocality in general.

  19. Arrow physicians: are economics and medicine philosophically incompatible?

    PubMed

    Tsang, Sandro

    2015-06-01

    Economics is en route to its further expansion in medicine, but many in the medical community remain unconvinced that its impact will be positive. Thus, a philosophical enquiry into the compatibility of economics and medicine is necessary to resolve the disagreements. The fundamental mission of medicine obliges physicians to practise science and compassion to serve the patient's best interests. Conventional (neoclassical) economics assumes that individuals are self-interested and that competitive markets will emerge optimal states. Economics is seemingly incompatible with the emphasis of putting patients' interests first. This idea is refuted by Professor Kenneth Arrow's health economics seminal paper. Arrow emphasizes that medical practice involves agency, knowledge, trust and professionalism, and physician-patient relation critically affects care quality. The term Arrow Physician is used to mean a humanistic carer who has a concern for the patient and acts on the best available evidence with health equity in mind. To make this practice sustainable, implementing appropriate motivations, constitutions and institutions to enable altruistic agency is critical. There is substantial evidence that polycentric governance can encourage building trust and reciprocity, so as to avoid depletion of communal resources. This paper proposes building trusting institutions through granting altruistic physicians adequate autonomy to direct resources based on patients' technical needs. It also summarizes the philosophy bases of medicine and economics. It, therefore, contributes to developing a shared language to facilitate intellectual dialogues, and will encourage trans-disciplinary research into medical practice. This should lead to medicine being reoriented to care for whole persons again.

  20. 40 CFR 264.313 - Special requirements for incompatible wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... wastes. 264.313 Section 264.313 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Landfills § 264.313 Special requirements for incompatible wastes. Incompatible...

  1. 40 CFR 265.282 - Special requirements for incompatible wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special requirements for incompatible wastes. 265.282 Section 265.282 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Land Treatment § 265.282 Special requirements for incompatible...

  2. 40 CFR 265.282 - Special requirements for incompatible wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special requirements for incompatible wastes. 265.282 Section 265.282 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Land Treatment § 265.282 Special requirements for incompatible...

  3. 40 CFR 265.257 - Special requirements for incompatible wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Waste Piles § 265.257 Special requirements for incompatible wastes. (a... the same pile, unless § 265.17(b) is complied with. (b) A pile of hazardous waste that is incompatible with any waste or other material stored nearby in other containers, piles, open tanks, or...

  4. 40 CFR 265.230 - Special requirements for incompatible wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... wastes. 265.230 Section 265.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) INTERIM STATUS STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT... wastes. Incompatible wastes, or incompatible wastes and materials, (see appendix V for examples) must...

  5. 40 CFR 264.313 - Special requirements for incompatible wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... wastes. 264.313 Section 264.313 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Landfills § 264.313 Special requirements for incompatible wastes. Incompatible...

  6. 40 CFR 264.313 - Special requirements for incompatible wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... wastes. 264.313 Section 264.313 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Landfills § 264.313 Special requirements for incompatible wastes. Incompatible...

  7. Evolution and Molecular Control of Hybrid Incompatibility in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; E, Zhiguo; Lin, Hong-Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Postzygotic reproductive isolation (RI) plays an important role in speciation. According to the stage at which it functions and the symptoms it displays, postzygotic RI can be called hybrid inviability, hybrid weakness or necrosis, hybrid sterility, or hybrid breakdown. In this review, we summarized new findings about hybrid incompatibilities in plants, most of which are from studies on Arabidopsis and rice. Recent progress suggests that hybrid incompatibility is a by-product of co-evolution either with “parasitic” selfish elements in the genome or with invasive microbes in the natural environment. We discuss the environmental influences on the expression of hybrid incompatibility and the possible effects of environment-dependent hybrid incompatibility on sympatric speciation. We also discuss the role of domestication on the evolution of hybrid incompatibilities. PMID:27563306

  8. A genomic approach to identify hybrid incompatibility genes

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Jacob C.; Phadnis, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Uncovering the genetic and molecular basis of barriers to gene flow between populations is key to understanding how new species are born. Intrinsic postzygotic reproductive barriers such as hybrid sterility and hybrid inviability are caused by deleterious genetic interactions known as hybrid incompatibilities. The difficulty in identifying these hybrid incompatibility genes remains a rate-limiting step in our understanding of the molecular basis of speciation. We recently described how whole genome sequencing can be applied to identify hybrid incompatibility genes, even from genetically terminal hybrids. Using this approach, we discovered a new hybrid incompatibility gene, gfzf, between Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans, and found that it plays an essential role in cell cycle regulation. Here, we discuss the history of the hunt for incompatibility genes between these species, discuss the molecular roles of gfzf in cell cycle regulation, and explore how intragenomic conflict drives the evolution of fundamental cellular mechanisms that lead to the developmental arrest of hybrids. PMID:27230814

  9. Evolution and Molecular Control of Hybrid Incompatibility in Plants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; E, Zhiguo; Lin, Hong-Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Postzygotic reproductive isolation (RI) plays an important role in speciation. According to the stage at which it functions and the symptoms it displays, postzygotic RI can be called hybrid inviability, hybrid weakness or necrosis, hybrid sterility, or hybrid breakdown. In this review, we summarized new findings about hybrid incompatibilities in plants, most of which are from studies on Arabidopsis and rice. Recent progress suggests that hybrid incompatibility is a by-product of co-evolution either with "parasitic" selfish elements in the genome or with invasive microbes in the natural environment. We discuss the environmental influences on the expression of hybrid incompatibility and the possible effects of environment-dependent hybrid incompatibility on sympatric speciation. We also discuss the role of domestication on the evolution of hybrid incompatibilities. PMID:27563306

  10. Potential intravenous drug incompatibilities in a pediatric unit

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Karla Dalliane Batista; Leopoldino, Ramon Weyler Duarte; Martins, Rand Randall; Veríssimo, Lourena Mafra

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To investigate potential intravenous drug incompatibilities and related risk factors in a pediatric unit. Methods A cross-sectional analytical study conducted in the pediatric unit of a university hospital in Brazil. Data on prescriptions given to children aged 0-15 years from June to October 2014 were collected. Prescriptions that did not include intravenous drugs and prescriptions with incomplete dosage regimen or written in poor handwriting were excluded. Associations between variables and the risk of potential incompatibility were investigated using the Student’s t test and ANOVA; the level of significance was set at 5% (p<0.05). Relative risks were calculated for each drug involved in potential incompatibility with 95% confidence interval. Results A total of 222 children participated in the study; 132 (59.5%) children were male and 118 (53.2%) were aged between 0 and 2 years. The mean length of stay was 7.7±2.3 days. Dipyrone, penicillin G and ceftriaxona were the most commonly prescribed drugs. At least one potential incompatibility was detected in about 85% of children (1.2 incompatibility/patient ratio). Most incompatibilities detected fell into the non-tested (93.4%), precipitation (5.5%), turbidity (0.7%) or chemical decomposition (0.4%) categories. The number of drugs and prescription of diazepam, phenytoin, phenobarbital or metronidazole were risk factors for potential incompatibility. Conclusion Most pediatric prescriptions involved potential incompatibilities, with higher prevalence of non-tested incompatibilities. The number of drugs and prescription of diazepam, phenobarbital, phenytoin or metronidazole were risk factors for potential incompatibilities. PMID:27462891

  11. Decoding Intention at Sensorimotor Timescales

    PubMed Central

    Salvaris, Mathew; Haggard, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The ability to decode an individual's intentions in real time has long been a ‘holy grail’ of research on human volition. For example, a reliable method could be used to improve scientific study of voluntary action by allowing external probe stimuli to be delivered at different moments during development of intention and action. Several Brain Computer Interface applications have used motor imagery of repetitive actions to achieve this goal. These systems are relatively successful, but only if the intention is sustained over a period of several seconds; much longer than the timescales identified in psychophysiological studies for normal preparation for voluntary action. We have used a combination of sensorimotor rhythms and motor imagery training to decode intentions in a single-trial cued-response paradigm similar to those used in human and non-human primate motor control research. Decoding accuracy of over 0.83 was achieved with twelve participants. With this approach, we could decode intentions to move the left or right hand at sub-second timescales, both for instructed choices instructed by an external stimulus and for free choices generated intentionally by the participant. The implications for volition are considered. PMID:24523855

  12. Evolution of Wolbachia cytoplasmic incompatibility types.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Stephen L

    2004-10-01

    The success of obligate endosymbiotic Wolbachia infections in insects is due in part to cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI), whereby Wolbachia bacteria manipulate host reproduction to promote their invasion and persistence within insect populations. The observed diversity of CI types raises the question of what the evolutionary pathways are by which a new CI type can evolve from an ancestral type. Prior evolutionary models assume that Wolbachia exists within a host individual as a clonal infection. While endosymbiotic theory predicts a general trend toward clonality, Wolbachia provides an exception in which there is selection to maintain diversity. Here, evolutionary trajectories are discussed that assume that a novel Wolbachia variant will co-exist with the original infection type within a host individual as a superinfection. Relative to prior models, this assumption relaxes requirements and allows additional pathways for the evolution of novel CI types. In addition to describing changes in the Wolbachia infection frequency associated with the hypothesized evolutionary events, the predicted impact of novel CI variants on the host population is also described. This impact, resulting from discordant evolutionary interests of symbiont and host, is discussed as a possible cause of Wolbachia loss from the host population or host population extinction. The latter is also discussed as the basis for an applied strategy for the suppression of insect pest populations. Model predictions are discussed relative to a recently published Wolbachia genome sequence and prior characterization of CI in naturally and artificially infected insects.

  13. Genetics of Vegetative Incompatibility in Cryphonectria parasitica

    PubMed Central

    Cortesi, Paolo; Milgroom, Michael G.

    1998-01-01

    Vegetative incompatibility in the chestnut blight fungus, Cryphonectria parasitica, in Europe is controlled by six unlinked vic loci, each with two alleles. Four previously identified vic loci (vic1, vic2, vic3, and vic4) were polymorphic in European vegetative compatibility (vc) types. Two new loci, vic6 and vic7, also were identified among European vc types. In one cross, vic genes segregated independently at five loci, and 194 progeny were assigned to 32 vc types; none of these loci were linked. A total of 64 vc types were identified from all crosses. All 64 genotypes possible from six vic loci, each with two alleles (26 = 64), were identified and assigned to vc types. Based on our model, vc types v-c 5 and v-c 10, which had been used in previous genetic studies, differ by only five vic genes. Future studies of vc types in C. parasitica can use knowledge of vic genotypes for analysis of population genetic structure based on vic allele frequencies and to determine the effect of each vic gene on virus transmission between vc types. PMID:9687462

  14. Is phosphorus predictably incompatible in igneous processes?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, C. A.; Barnes, S.

    1984-01-01

    Siderophile element abundances are central to recent models for core formation in the Earth and Moon and the origin of the Moon. It is important to identify siderophile elements whose behavior in igneous processes is predictable, so that primary mantle abundances can be deduced by subtracting out the effects of igneous processes. Newsom's model for core formation in the Moon requires subchondritic P, and suggests that P was depleted due to volatility. Experiments were conducted to determine P olivine/liquid distribution coefficients. Preliminary results indicate that P can be compatible with olivine during rapid cooling, but is not during isothermal crystallization with long growth times, and tends to be expelled during annealing. It is therefore not likely that P is compatible under any widespread igneous conditions, and the incompatible behavior of P in lunar crustal rocks can be safety assumed. In addition, low fO2 is insufficient to cause P compatibility, so it is unlikely that P-rich silicates formed during the early evolution of the Earth or Moon. These results indicate that P is depleted in the Moon.

  15. Intent Specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveson, Nancy G.

    1995-01-01

    We have been investigating the implications of using abstractions based on intent rather than the aggregation and information-hiding abstractions commonly used in software en- gineering: Cognitive psychologists have shown that intent abstraction is consistent with human problem-solving processes. We believe that new types of specifications and designs based on this concept can assist in understanding and specifying requirements, capturing the most important design rationale information in an efficient and economical way, and supporting the process of identifying and analyzing required changes to minimize the introduction of errors. The goal of hierarchical abstraction is to allow both top-down and bottom-up reasoning about a complex system. In computer science, we have made much use of (1) part-whole abstractions where each level of a hierarchy represents an aggregation of the components at a lower level and of (2) information-hiding abstractions where each level contains the same conceptual information but hides some details about the concepts, that is, each level is a refinement of the information at a higher level.

  16. Semiosis stems from logical incompatibility in organic nature: Why biophysics does not see meaning, while biosemiotics does.

    PubMed

    Kull, Kalevi

    2015-12-01

    We suggest here a model of the origin of the phenomenal world via the naturalization of logical conflict or incompatibility (which is broader than, but includes logical contradiction). Physics rules out the reality of meaning because of the method of formalization, which requires that logical conflicts cannot be part of the model. We argue that (a) meaning-making requires a logical conflict; (b) logical conflict assumes a phenomenal present; (c) phenomenological specious present occurs in living systems as widely as meaning-making; (d) it is possible to provide a physiological description of a system in which the phenomenal present appears and choices are made; (e) logical conflict, or incompatibility itself, is the mechanism of intentionality; (f) meaning-making is assured by scaffolding, which is a product of earlier choices, or decision-making, or interpretation. This model can be seen as a model of semiosis. It also allows putting physiology and phenomenology (or physics and semiotics) into a natural connection.

  17. Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities and adaptation to a shared environment

    PubMed Central

    Orr, H. Allen

    2009-01-01

    Natural selection might drive the evolution of postzygotic reproductive isolation even when allopatric populations adapt to identical environments, an idea first suggested by Muller (1942). Here we analyze this scenario mathematically, focusing on the evolution of a Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibility between populations. Our results identify a potential problem with Muller’s scenario: adaptation to identical environments can often involve substitution of the same alleles, precluding formation of a hybrid incompatibility. Our results show that the probability of evolving a Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibility falls as selection coefficients among beneficial alleles become less similar. PMID:19142201

  18. Arrow physicians: are economics and medicine philosophically incompatible?

    PubMed

    Tsang, Sandro

    2015-06-01

    Economics is en route to its further expansion in medicine, but many in the medical community remain unconvinced that its impact will be positive. Thus, a philosophical enquiry into the compatibility of economics and medicine is necessary to resolve the disagreements. The fundamental mission of medicine obliges physicians to practise science and compassion to serve the patient's best interests. Conventional (neoclassical) economics assumes that individuals are self-interested and that competitive markets will emerge optimal states. Economics is seemingly incompatible with the emphasis of putting patients' interests first. This idea is refuted by Professor Kenneth Arrow's health economics seminal paper. Arrow emphasizes that medical practice involves agency, knowledge, trust and professionalism, and physician-patient relation critically affects care quality. The term Arrow Physician is used to mean a humanistic carer who has a concern for the patient and acts on the best available evidence with health equity in mind. To make this practice sustainable, implementing appropriate motivations, constitutions and institutions to enable altruistic agency is critical. There is substantial evidence that polycentric governance can encourage building trust and reciprocity, so as to avoid depletion of communal resources. This paper proposes building trusting institutions through granting altruistic physicians adequate autonomy to direct resources based on patients' technical needs. It also summarizes the philosophy bases of medicine and economics. It, therefore, contributes to developing a shared language to facilitate intellectual dialogues, and will encourage trans-disciplinary research into medical practice. This should lead to medicine being reoriented to care for whole persons again. PMID:25850973

  19. Pollen factors controlling self-incompatibility strength in Japanese pear.

    PubMed

    Hiratsuka, Shin; Fujimura, Makoto; Hayashida, Taishi; Nishikawa, Yutaka; Nada, Kazuyoshi

    2012-12-01

    Japanese pear has a genetically controlled self-incompatibility system, but both the pollen-tube growth in a semi in vivo assay and fruit set after self-pollination differ considerably among cultivars. The percentage of styles in which pollen tubes have reached the base ranges from 0 to 36 %, a value determined by culture of styles in vitro, and fruit set ranges from 0.6 to 15.2 %. Based on these data, we have assigned a value for the self-incompatibility weakness to each cultivar. Here, we showed that pollen factors control the degree of self-incompatibility. When the pollen-tube growth of 13 cultivars was compared in a completely compatible 'Hougetsu' (S (1) S (7)) style, it differed a fair amount among cultivars and showed a significantly positive relation to self-incompatibility weakness (r = 0.707). The degree of self-incompatibility of pear is, therefore, determined by pollen factor(s) unrelated to the S-locus. Although the fruit set and fruit growth of 'Hougetsu' were not affected by the pollen donor, a positive relationship was also observed between seed number and self-incompatibility weakness (r = 0.972). However, in a style with no S-RNase production (genotype: S (4) (sm) S (4) (sm) ), the relationship disappeared (r = 0.341) and pollen-tube growth was promoted by 12-36 % except in one cultivar. These results suggest that S-RNase functions as a cytotoxin on compatible pollen in a cultivar-dependent manner, and that the degree of inhibition is determined by pollen factor(s) unrelated to the S-locus. The pollen factor also functions on S-RNase in incompatible styles, resulting in a different degree of self-incompatibility.

  20. Breaking Gaussian incompatibility on continuous variable quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Heinosaari, Teiko; Kiukas, Jukka; Schultz, Jussi

    2015-08-15

    We characterise Gaussian quantum channels that are Gaussian incompatibility breaking, that is, transform every set of Gaussian measurements into a set obtainable from a joint Gaussian observable via Gaussian postprocessing. Such channels represent local noise which renders measurements useless for Gaussian EPR-steering, providing the appropriate generalisation of entanglement breaking channels for this scenario. Understanding the structure of Gaussian incompatibility breaking channels contributes to the resource theory of noisy continuous variable quantum information protocols.

  1. Vegetative incompatibility among monoconidial isolates of Bipolaris sorokiniana.

    PubMed

    Poloni, A; Pessi, I S; Frazzon, A P G; Van Der Sand, S T

    2009-02-01

    Bipolaris sorokiniana is a phytopathogenic fungus that causes diseases of cereal crops, such as leaf-spot disease, common root rot, and black point of grain. Because of its great morphological, physiological, and genetic variability, this fungus is difficult to control. The aim of this investigation was to study the variability of isolates of B. sorokiniana by means of vegetative incompatibility. Thirty-five isolates of B. sorokiniana from different geographical regions in Brazil and other countries were used. The vegetative incompatibility between the isolates and the influences of different culture media on these reactions were evaluated. The total protein profile of the isolates was analyzed when the isolates were cultured separately, and in cultures of compatibility and incompatibility reactions. Eighteen of 31 confrontations showed vegetative incompatibility. The results obtained with different culture media for the vegetative compatibility/incompatibility genotypes suggested that the type of substratum influences these reactions. No differences in protein profiles among the isolates were observed. This result suggests that there is no induction of expression of different proteins in vegetative incompatibility reactions.

  2. Noise robustness of the incompatibility of quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinosaari, Teiko; Kiukas, Jukka; Reitzner, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    The existence of incompatible measurements is a fundamental phenomenon having no explanation in classical physics. Intuitively, one considers given measurements to be incompatible within a framework of a physical theory, if their simultaneous implementation on a single physical device is prohibited by the theory itself. In the mathematical language of quantum theory, measurements are described by POVMs (positive operator valued measures), and given POVMs are by definition incompatible if they cannot be obtained via coarse-graining from a single common POVM; this notion generalizes noncommutativity of projective measurements. In quantum theory, incompatibility can be regarded as a resource necessary for manifesting phenomena such as Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) Bell inequality violations or Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering which do not have classical explanation. We define operational ways of quantifying this resource via the amount of added classical noise needed to render the measurements compatible, i.e., useless as a resource. In analogy to entanglement measures, we generalize this idea by introducing the concept of incompatibility measure, which is monotone in local operations. In this paper, we restrict our consideration to binary measurements, which are already sufficient to explicitly demonstrate nontrivial features of the theory. In particular, we construct a family of incompatibility monotones operationally quantifying violations of certain scaled versions of the CHSH Bell inequality, prove that they can be computed via a semidefinite program, and show how the noise-based quantities arise as special cases. We also determine maximal violations of the new inequalities, demonstrating how Tsirelson's bound appears as a special case. The resource aspect is further motivated by simple quantum protocols where our incompatibility monotones appear as relevant figures of merit.

  3. Rural intentions

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Diane J.; Hakes, Jacquie; Bai, Meera; Tolhurst, Helen; Dickinson, James A.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To investigate the reasons for family medicine graduates’ career choices. DESIGN Qualitative study using focus groups and one-on-one interviews. SETTING University of Calgary in Alberta. PARTICIPANTS Seventeen male and female second-year family medicine residents, representing a range of ages and areas of origin, enrolled in the 2004 urban and rural south streams of the family medicine residency program at the University of Calgary. METHOD During the final month of training, 2 focus groups were conducted to determine graduating students’ career choices and the reasons for them. After focus-group data were analyzed, a questionnaire was constructed and subsequently administered to participants during face-to-face or telephone interviews. MAIN FINDINGS Most residents initially planned to do urban locums in order to gain experience. In the long term, they planned to open practices in urban areas for lifestyle and family reasons. Many residents from the rural stream had no long-term plans to establish rural practices. Most residents said they felt prepared for practice, but many indicated that an optional third year of paid training, with an emphasis on emergency medicine, obstetrics, and pediatrics, would be desirable. Reasons cited for not practising in rural areas were related to workload, lifestyle issues, family obligations, and perceived lack of medical support in the community. Only 4 female graduates and 1 male graduate intended to practise obstetrics. The main reason residents gave for this was inadequate training in obstetrics during residency. Finances were cited as a secondary reason for many choices, and might in fact be more important than at first apparent. CONCLUSION Despite its intention to recruit family medicine graduates to rural areas and to obstetrics, the University of Calgary residency training program was not successful in recruiting physicians to these areas. The program likely needs to re-examine the effectiveness of

  4. Cytoplasmic Incompatibility and Bacterial Density in Nasonia Vitripennis

    PubMed Central

    Breeuwer, JAJ.; Werren, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    Cytoplasmically (maternally) inherited bacteria that cause reproductive incompatibility between strains are widespread among insects. In the parasitoid wasp Nasonia, incompatibility results in improper condensation and fragmentation of the paternal chromosomes in fertilized eggs. Some form of genome imprinting may be involved. Because of haplodiploidy, incompatibility results in conversion of (diploid) female eggs into (haploid) males. Experiments show that bacterial density is correlated with compatibility differences between male and female Nasonia. Males from strains with high bacterial numbers are incompatible with females from strains with lower numbers. Temporal changes in compatibility of females after tetracycline treatment are generally correlated with decreases in bacterial levels in eggs. However, complete loss of bacteria in mature eggs precedes conversion of eggs to the ``asymbiont'' compatibility type by 3-4 days. This result is consistent with a critical ``imprinting'' period during egg maturation, when cytoplasmic bacteria determine compatibility. Consequent inheritance of reduced bacterial numbers in F(1) progeny has different effects on compatibility type of subsequent male vs. female progeny. In some cases, partial incompatibility occurs which results in reduced offspring numbers, apparently due to incomplete paternal chromosome elimination resulting in aneuploidy. PMID:8244014

  5. Compatibility and incompatibility in S-RNase-based systems

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Bruce; Cruz-García, Felipe; Romero, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Background S-RNase-based self-incompatibility (SI) occurs in the Solanaceae, Rosaceae and Plantaginaceae. In all three families, compatibility is controlled by a polymorphic S-locus encoding at least two genes. S-RNases determine the specificity of pollen rejection in the pistil, and S-locus F-box proteins fulfill this function in pollen. S-RNases are thought to function as S-specific cytotoxins as well as recognition proteins. Thus, incompatibility results from the cytotoxic activity of S-RNase, while compatible pollen tubes evade S-RNase cytotoxicity. Scope The S-specificity determinants are known, but many questions remain. In this review, the genetics of SI are introduced and the characteristics of S-RNases and pollen F-box proteins are briefly described. A variety of modifier genes also required for SI are also reviewed. Mutations affecting compatibility in pollen are especially important for defining models of compatibility and incompatibility. In Solanaceae, pollen-side mutations causing breakdown in SI have been attributed to the heteroallelic pollen effect, but a mutation in Solanum chacoense may be an exception. This has been interpreted to mean that pollen incompatibility is the default condition unless the S-locus F-box protein confers resistance to S-RNase. In Prunus, however, S-locus F-box protein gene mutations clearly cause compatibility. Conclusions Two alternative mechanisms have been proposed to explain compatibility and incompatibility: compatibility is explained either as a result of either degradation of non-self S-RNase or by its compartmentalization so that it does not have access to the pollen tube cytoplasm. These models are not necessarily mutually exclusive, but each makes different predictions about whether pollen compatibility or incompatibility is the default. As more factors required for SI are identified and characterized, it will be possible to determine the role each process plays in S-RNase-based SI. PMID:21803740

  6. Adaptive Significance of Vegetative Incompatibility in NEUROSPORA CRASSA

    PubMed Central

    Hartl, Daniel L.; Dempster, Everett R.; Brown, Spencer W.

    1975-01-01

    Certain features reminiscent of sexuality occur in the vegetative life cycle of some filamentous fungi such as Neurospora crassa. Hyphal fusions can occur between genetically different individuals, thereby endowing the new composite mycelium, a heterokaryon, with some of the advantages of heterozygosity usually associated with diploid organisms. In N. crassa , however, there are a number of incompatibility loci which prevent formation of heterokaryons unless the alleles at the incompatibility loci are identical in the two mycelia. The selection pressures that maintain incompatibility polymorphisms are not known. We suggest here that they are maintained because they prevent a kind of exploitation of heterokaryons by nuclei that are nonadaptive in homokaryons but that enjoy a proliferative advantage over other nuclei in heterokaryons. A mathematical model that abstracts the major features of the vegetative life cycle of Neurosopra crassa has been developed, and the action of selection in this model and various extensions of it is such as to maintain polymorphisms of vegetative incompatibility factors. PMID:128487

  7. A simple genetic incompatibility causes hybrid male sterility in mimulus.

    PubMed

    Sweigart, Andrea L; Fishman, Lila; Willis, John H

    2006-04-01

    Much evidence has shown that postzygotic reproductive isolation (hybrid inviability or sterility) evolves by the accumulation of interlocus incompatibilities between diverging populations. Although in theory only a single pair of incompatible loci is needed to isolate species, empirical work in Drosophila has revealed that hybrid fertility problems often are highly polygenic and complex. In this article we investigate the genetic basis of hybrid sterility between two closely related species of monkeyflower, Mimulus guttatus and M. nasutus. In striking contrast to Drosophila systems, we demonstrate that nearly complete hybrid male sterility in Mimulus results from a simple genetic incompatibility between a single pair of heterospecific loci. We have genetically mapped this sterility effect: the M. guttatus allele at the hybrid male sterility 1 (hms1) locus acts dominantly in combination with recessive M. nasutus alleles at the hybrid male sterility 2 (hms2) locus to cause nearly complete hybrid male sterility. In a preliminary screen to find additional small-effect male sterility factors, we identified one additional locus that also contributes to some of the variation in hybrid male fertility. Interestingly, hms1 and hms2 also cause a significant reduction in hybrid female fertility, suggesting that sex-specific hybrid defects might share a common genetic basis. This possibility is supported by our discovery that recombination is reduced dramatically in a cross involving a parent with the hms1-hms2 incompatibility.

  8. Variance-based uncertainty relations for incompatible observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Cao, Ning-Ping; Fei, Shao-Ming; Long, Gui-Lu

    2016-09-01

    We formulate uncertainty relations for arbitrary finite number of incompatible observables. Based on the sum of variances of the observables, both Heisenberg-type and Schrödinger-type uncertainty relations are provided. These new lower bounds are stronger in most of the cases than the ones derived from some existing inequalities. Detailed examples are presented.

  9. 40 CFR 264.257 - Special requirements for incompatible wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... wastes. 264.257 Section 264.257 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Waste Piles § 264.257 Special requirements for incompatible wastes. (a)...

  10. 40 CFR 264.282 - Special requirements for incompatible wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... wastes. 264.282 Section 264.282 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Land Treatment § 264.282 Special requirements for incompatible wastes. The owner...

  11. 40 CFR 264.230 - Special requirements for incompatible wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... wastes. 264.230 Section 264.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Surface Impoundments § 264.230 Special requirements for incompatible...

  12. 40 CFR 264.199 - Special requirements for incompatible wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... wastes. 264.199 Section 264.199 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Tank Systems § 264.199 Special requirements for incompatible wastes. (a)...

  13. Genetic incompatibility drives mate choice in a parasitic wasp

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Allelic incompatibility between individuals of the same species should select for mate choice based on the genetic make-up of both partners at loci that influence offspring fitness. As a consequence, mate choice may be an important driver of allelic diversity. A complementary sex determination (CSD) system is responsible for intraspecific allelic incompatibility in many species of ants, bees, and wasps. CSD may thus favour disassortative mating and in this, resembles the MHC of the vertebrate immune system, or the self-incompatibility (SI) system of higher plants. Results Here we show that in the monogamous parasitic wasp Bracon brevicornis (Wesmael), females are able to reject partners with incompatible alleles. Forcing females to accept initially rejected partners resulted in sex ratio distortion and partial infertility of offspring. Conclusions CSD-disassortative mating occurred independent of kin recognition and inbreeding avoidance in our experiment. The fitness consequences of mate choice are directly observable, not influenced by environmental effects, and more severe than in comparable systems (SI or MHC), on individuals as well as at the population level. Our results thus demonstrate the strong potential of female mate choice for maintaining high offspring fitness in this species. PMID:23895372

  14. 40 CFR 264.313 - Special requirements for incompatible wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special requirements for incompatible wastes. 264.313 Section 264.313 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Landfills §...

  15. 40 CFR 265.313 - Special requirements for incompatible wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special requirements for incompatible wastes. 265.313 Section 265.313 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) INTERIM STATUS STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES...

  16. 40 CFR 265.313 - Special requirements for incompatible wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... wastes. 265.313 Section 265.313 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) INTERIM STATUS STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Landfills § 265.313 Special requirements for incompatible...

  17. 40 CFR 265.282 - Special requirements for incompatible wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... wastes. 265.282 Section 265.282 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) INTERIM STATUS STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Land Treatment § 265.282 Special requirements for incompatible...

  18. 40 CFR 265.257 - Special requirements for incompatible wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... wastes. 265.257 Section 265.257 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) INTERIM STATUS STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Waste Piles § 265.257 Special requirements for incompatible wastes....

  19. 40 CFR 265.199 - Special requirements for incompatible wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... wastes. 265.199 Section 265.199 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) INTERIM STATUS STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Tank Systems § 265.199 Special requirements for incompatible wastes....

  20. Information complementarity: A new paradigm for decoding quantum incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huangjun

    2015-01-01

    The existence of observables that are incompatible or not jointly measurable is a characteristic feature of quantum mechanics, which lies at the root of a number of nonclassical phenomena, such as uncertainty relations, wave--particle dual behavior, Bell-inequality violation, and contextuality. However, no intuitive criterion is available for determining the compatibility of even two (generalized) observables, despite the overarching importance of this problem and intensive efforts of many researchers. Here we introduce an information theoretic paradigm together with an intuitive geometric picture for decoding incompatible observables, starting from two simple ideas: Every observable can only provide limited information and information is monotonic under data processing. By virtue of quantum estimation theory, we introduce a family of universal criteria for detecting incompatible observables and a natural measure of incompatibility, which are applicable to arbitrary number of arbitrary observables. Based on this framework, we derive a family of universal measurement uncertainty relations, provide a simple information theoretic explanation of quantitative wave--particle duality, and offer new perspectives for understanding Bell nonlocality, contextuality, and quantum precision limit. PMID:26392075

  1. Information complementarity: A new paradigm for decoding quantum incompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Huangjun

    2015-01-01

    The existence of observables that are incompatible or not jointly measurable is a characteristic feature of quantum mechanics, which lies at the root of a number of nonclassical phenomena, such as uncertainty relations, wave—particle dual behavior, Bell-inequality violation, and contextuality. However, no intuitive criterion is available for determining the compatibility of even two (generalized) observables, despite the overarching importance of this problem and intensive efforts of many researchers. Here we introduce an information theoretic paradigm together with an intuitive geometric picture for decoding incompatible observables, starting from two simple ideas: Every observable can only provide limited information and information is monotonic under data processing. By virtue of quantum estimation theory, we introduce a family of universal criteria for detecting incompatible observables and a natural measure of incompatibility, which are applicable to arbitrary number of arbitrary observables. Based on this framework, we derive a family of universal measurement uncertainty relations, provide a simple information theoretic explanation of quantitative wave—particle duality, and offer new perspectives for understanding Bell nonlocality, contextuality, and quantum precision limit. PMID:26392075

  2. 40 CFR 264.230 - Special requirements for incompatible wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... wastes. 264.230 Section 264.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Surface Impoundments § 264.230 Special requirements for incompatible...

  3. 40 CFR 264.257 - Special requirements for incompatible wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... wastes. 264.257 Section 264.257 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Waste Piles § 264.257 Special requirements for incompatible wastes. (a)...

  4. 40 CFR 264.199 - Special requirements for incompatible wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... wastes. 264.199 Section 264.199 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Tank Systems § 264.199 Special requirements for incompatible wastes. (a)...

  5. 40 CFR 264.282 - Special requirements for incompatible wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... wastes. 264.282 Section 264.282 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Land Treatment § 264.282 Special requirements for incompatible wastes. The owner...

  6. 40 CFR 264.177 - Special requirements for incompatible wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... wastes. 264.177 Section 264.177 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Use and Management of Containers § 264.177 Special requirements for incompatible...

  7. 40 CFR 264.199 - Special requirements for incompatible wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... wastes. 264.199 Section 264.199 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Tank Systems § 264.199 Special requirements for incompatible wastes. (a)...

  8. 40 CFR 264.282 - Special requirements for incompatible wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... wastes. 264.282 Section 264.282 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Land Treatment § 264.282 Special requirements for incompatible wastes. The owner...

  9. 40 CFR 264.177 - Special requirements for incompatible wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... wastes. 264.177 Section 264.177 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Use and Management of Containers § 264.177 Special requirements for incompatible...

  10. 40 CFR 264.257 - Special requirements for incompatible wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... wastes. 264.257 Section 264.257 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Waste Piles § 264.257 Special requirements for incompatible wastes. (a)...

  11. 40 CFR 264.230 - Special requirements for incompatible wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... wastes. 264.230 Section 264.230 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Surface Impoundments § 264.230 Special requirements for incompatible...

  12. Intentionality, Representation, and Anticipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Preester, Helena

    2002-09-01

    Both Brentano and Merleau-Ponty have developed an account of intentionality, which nevertheless differ profoundly in the following respect. According to Brentano, intentionality mainly is a matter of mental presentations. This marks the beginning of phenomenology's difficult relation with the nature of the intentional reference. Merleau-Ponty, on the other hand, has situated intentionality on the level of the body, a turn which has important implications for the nature of intentionality. Intentionality no longer is primarily based on having (re)presentations, but is rooted in the dynamics of the living body. To contrast those approaches enables us to make clear in what way intentionality is studied nowadays. On the one hand, intentionality is conceived of as a matter of formal-syntactical causality in cognitive science, and in particular in classical-computational theory. On the other hand, a interactivist approach offers a more Merleau-Ponty-like point of view, in which autonomy, embodiment and interaction are stressed.

  13. Intentional replantation: report of a successful case.

    PubMed

    Barnett, R J; Burton, W E; Nuckles, D B

    1992-11-01

    Irreversible iatrogenic damage sometimes occurs during dental treatment. In certain cases, intentional extraction, repair, and replantation can be used to save the damaged tooth. This case report describes the successful replantation of a premolar that had sustained a large root perforation.

  14. Red blood cell-incompatible allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rowley, S D; Donato, M L; Bhattacharyya, P

    2011-09-01

    Transplantation of hematopoietic progenitor cells from red cell-incompatible donors occurs in 30-50% of patients. Immediate and delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions are expected complications of red cell-disparate transplantation and both ABO and other red cell systems such as Kidd and rhesus can be involved. The immunohematological consequences of red cell-incompatible transplantation include delayed red blood cell recovery, pure red cell aplasia and delayed hemolysis from viable lymphocytes carried in the graft ('passenger lymphocytes'). The risks of these reactions, which may be abrupt in onset and fatal, are ameliorated by graft processing and proper blood component support. Red blood cell antigens are expressed on endothelial and epithelial tissues in the body and could serve to increase the risk of GvHD. Mouse models indicate that blood cell antigens may function as minor histocompatibility antigens affecting engraftment. Similar observations have been found in early studies of human transplantation for transfused recipients, although current conditioning and immunosuppressive regimens appear to overcome this affect. No deleterious effects from the use of red cell-incompatible hematopoietic grafts on transplant outcomes, such as granulocyte and platelet engraftments, the incidences of acute or chronic GvHD, relapse risk or OS, have been consistently demonstrated. Most studies, however, include limited number of patients, varying diagnoses and differing treatment regimens, complicating the detection of an effect of ABO-incompatible transplantation. Classification of patients by ABO phenotype ignoring the allelic differences of these antigens also may obscure the effect of red cell-incompatible transplantation on transplant outcomes. PMID:21897398

  15. Drug incompatibilities in the adult intensive care unit of a university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Marsilio, Naiane Roveda; da Silva, Daiandy; Bueno, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to identify the physical and chemical incompatibilities among the drugs administered intravenously to patients admitted to an adult intensive care unit. We also aimed to establish pharmaceutical guidelines for administering incompatible drugs. Methods This cross-sectional, prospective, and quantitative study was conducted from July to September 2015. Drug incompatibilities were identified based on an analysis of the patient prescriptions available in the hospital online management system. A pharmaceutical intervention was performed using the guidelines on the preparation and administration of incompatible drugs. Adherence to those guidelines was subsequently assessed among the nursing staff. Results A total of 100 prescriptions were analyzed; 68 were incompatible with the intravenous drugs prescribed. A total of 271 drug incompatibilities were found, averaging 4.0 ± 3.3 incompatibilities per prescription. The most commonly found drug incompatibilities were between midazolam and hydrocortisone (8.9%), between cefepime and midazolam (5.2%), and between hydrocortisone and vancomycin (5.2%). The drugs most commonly involved in incompatibilities were midazolam, hydrocortisone, and vancomycin. The most common incompatibilities occurred when a drug was administered via continuous infusion and another was administered intermittently (50%). Of the 68 prescriptions that led to pharmaceutical guidelines, 45 (66.2%) were fully adhered to by the nursing staff. Conclusion Patients under intensive care were subjected to a high rate of incompatibilities. Drug incompatibilities can be identified and eliminated by the pharmacist on the multidisciplinary team, thereby reducing undesirable effects among patients. PMID:27410410

  16. Covalent Fusion of layered Incompatible Gels in Immiscible Solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Santidan; Singh, Awaneesh; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Balazs, Anna C.

    We carry out dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations to model a two layered stackable gel where the gels are incompatible and are present in immiscible solvent. The bottom layer of the gel is created first and then a solution of new initiators, monomers and cross-linkers is introduced on top of it. These components then undergo polymerization and form the second gel layer. We study all possible combinations of free radical polymerization (FRP) and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) mechanisms with the two layers of the gel. For example, the bottom layer gel is created via ATRP, whereas the top layer gel follows FRP. Our focus is to do a systematic study of all these combinations and find out the factors responsible for combining two incompatible gels in immiscible solvents.

  17. Ignitable, corrosive, reactive, and incompatible wastes information brief

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    Under RCRA Subtitle C, a solid waste can be deemed hazardous if, among other things, it exhibits one or more of the hazardous characteristics identified in 40 CFR 261, Subpart C. These characteristics are ignitability, corrosivity, reactivity, or toxicity. This information brief discusses issues related to the management of wastes exhibiting one or more of the three physical waste characteristics -- ignitability, corrosivity, and reactivity. Generators of ignitable, corrosive and reactive wastes must take special precautions to ensure the safe handling of these wastes and to prevent any contact with other incompatible wastes or materials that could result in potentially dangerous situations. Regulatory definitions, an overview of the applicable compliance requirements, and special considerations for the safe handling of these characteristic hazardous or incompatible wastes are provided in this report.

  18. Identification of incompatibility alleles in the tetraploid species sour cherry.

    PubMed

    Tobutt, K R; Bosković, R; Cerović, R; Sonneveld, T; Ruzić, D

    2004-03-01

    The incompatibility genetics of sour cherry ( Prunus cerasus), an allotetraploid species thought to be derived from sweet cherry (diploid) and ground cherry (tetraploid), were investigated by test crossing and by analysis of stylar ribonucleases which are known to be the products of incompatibility alleles in sweet cherry. Stylar extracts of 36 accessions of sour cherry were separated electrophoretically and stained for ribonuclease activity. The zymograms of most accessions showed three bands, some two or four. Of the ten bands seen, six co-migrated with bands that in sweet cherry are attributed to the incompatibility alleles S(1), S(3), S(4), S(6, ) S(9) and S(13). 'Cacanski Rubin', 'Erdi Botermo B', 'Koros' and 'Ujfehertoi Furtos', which showed bands apparently corresponding to S(1) and S(4), were test pollinated with the sweet cherry 'Merton Late' ( S(1) S(4)). Monitoring pollen tube growth, and, in one case, fruit set, showed that these crosses were incompatible and that the four sour cherries indeed have the alleles S(1) and S(4). Likewise, test pollination of 'Marasca Piemonte', 'Marasca Savena' and 'Morello, Dutch' with 'Noble' ( S(6) S(13)) showed that these three sour cherries have the alleles S(6) and S(13). S(13) was very frequent in sour cherry cultivars, but is rare in sweet cherry cultivars, whereas with S(3) the situation is reversed. It was suggested that the other four bands are derived from ground cherry and one of these, provisionally attributed to S(B), occurred frequently in a small set of ground cherry accessions surveyed. Analysing some progenies from sour by sweet crosses by S allele-specific PCR and monitoring the success of some sweet by sour crosses were informative. They indicated mostly disomic inheritance, with sweet cherry S alleles belonging to one locus and, presumably, the ground cherry alleles to the other, and helped clarify the genomic arrangement of the alleles and the interactions in heteroallelic pollen. PMID:14689184

  19. Identification of Chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium) Self-Incompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fan; Zhang, Feng-Jiao; Chen, Fa-Di; Fang, Wei-Min

    2014-01-01

    There has been a heated argument over self-incompatibilityof chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium) among chrysanthemum breeders. In order to solve the argument, we investigated pistil receptivity, seed set, and compatible index of 24 chrysanthemum cultivars. It was found that the 24 cultivars averagely had 3.7–36.3 pollen grains germinating on stigmas at 24 hours after self-pollination through the fluorescence microscope using aniline blue staining method. However, only 10 of them produced self-pollinated seeds, and their seed sets and compatible indexes were 0.03–56.50% and 0.04–87.50, respectively. The cultivar “Q10-33-1” had the highest seed set (56.50%) and compatible index (87.50), but ten of its progeny had a wide range of separation in seed set (0–37.23%) and compatible index (0–68.65). The results indicated that most of chrysanthemum cultivars were self-incompatible, while a small proportion of cultivars were self-compatible. In addition, there is a comprehensive separation of self-incompatibility among progeny from the same self-pollinated self-compatible chrysanthemum cultivar. Therefore, it is better to emasculate inflorescences during chrysanthemum hybridization breeding when no information concerning its self-incompatibility characteristics is available. However, if it is self-incompatible and propagated by vegetative methods, it is unnecessary to carry out emasculation when it is used as a female plant during hybridization breeding. PMID:24592176

  20. Selfish evolution of cytonuclear hybrid incompatibility in Mimulus.

    PubMed

    Case, Andrea L; Finseth, Findley R; Barr, Camille M; Fishman, Lila

    2016-09-14

    Intraspecific coevolution between selfish elements and suppressors may promote interspecific hybrid incompatibility, but evidence of this process is rare. Here, we use genomic data to test alternative models for the evolution of cytonuclear hybrid male sterility in Mimulus In hybrids between Iron Mountain (IM) Mimulus guttatus × Mimulus nasutus, two tightly linked M. guttatus alleles (Rf1/Rf2) each restore male fertility by suppressing a local mitochondrial male-sterility gene (IM-CMS). Unlike neutral models for the evolution of hybrid incompatibility loci, selfish evolution predicts that the Rf alleles experienced strong selection in the presence of IM-CMS. Using whole-genome sequences, we compared patterns of population-genetic variation in Rf at IM to a neighbouring population that lacks IM-CMS. Consistent with local selection in the presence of IM-CMS, the Rf region shows elevated FST, high local linkage disequilibrium and a distinct haplotype structure at IM, but not at Cone Peak (CP), suggesting a recent sweep in the presence of IM-CMS. In both populations, Rf2 exhibited lower polymorphism than other regions, but the low-diversity outliers were different between CP and IM. Our results confirm theoretical predictions of ubiquitous cytonuclear conflict in plants and provide a population-genetic mechanism for the evolution of a common form of hybrid incompatibility. PMID:27629037

  1. Strain incompatibility and residual strains in ferroelectric single crystals

    PubMed Central

    Pramanick, A.; Jones, J. L.; Tutuncu, G.; Ghosh, D.; Stoica, A. D.; An, K.

    2012-01-01

    Residual strains in ferroelectrics are known to adversely affect the material properties by aggravating crack growth and fatigue degradation. The primary cause for residual strains is strain incompatibility between different microstructural entities. For example, it was shown in polycrystalline ferroelectrics that residual strains are caused due to incompatibility between the electric-field-induced strains in grains with different crystallographic orientations. However, similar characterization of cause-effect in multidomain ferroelectric single crystals is lacking. In this article, we report on the development of plastic residual strains in [111]-oriented domain engineered BaTiO3 single crystals. These internal strains are created due to strain incompatibility across 90° domain walls between the differently oriented domains. The average residual strains over a large crystal volume measured by in situ neutron diffraction is comparable to previous X-ray measurements of localized strains near domain boundaries, but are an order of magnitude lower than electric-field-induced residual strains in polycrystalline ferroelectrics. PMID:23226595

  2. Semiosis stems from logical incompatibility in organic nature: Why biophysics does not see meaning, while biosemiotics does.

    PubMed

    Kull, Kalevi

    2015-12-01

    We suggest here a model of the origin of the phenomenal world via the naturalization of logical conflict or incompatibility (which is broader than, but includes logical contradiction). Physics rules out the reality of meaning because of the method of formalization, which requires that logical conflicts cannot be part of the model. We argue that (a) meaning-making requires a logical conflict; (b) logical conflict assumes a phenomenal present; (c) phenomenological specious present occurs in living systems as widely as meaning-making; (d) it is possible to provide a physiological description of a system in which the phenomenal present appears and choices are made; (e) logical conflict, or incompatibility itself, is the mechanism of intentionality; (f) meaning-making is assured by scaffolding, which is a product of earlier choices, or decision-making, or interpretation. This model can be seen as a model of semiosis. It also allows putting physiology and phenomenology (or physics and semiotics) into a natural connection. PMID:26260779

  3. Is Sustainability Sustainable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonevac, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The most important concept in current environmental thinking is "sustainability". Environmental policies, economic policies, development, resource use--all of these things, according to the consensus, ought to be sustainable. But what is sustainability? What is its ethical foundation? There is little consensus about how these questions ought to be…

  4. Public perceptions of incompatibility between "science and religion".

    PubMed

    Baker, Joseph O

    2012-04-01

    Narratives of conflict regarding the connections between science and religion receive considerable attention in multiple forums of public discourse. These discussions tend to focus on philosophical, abstract, and/or polemical, rather than empirical issues. Data from a 2007 national survey indicate that a relatively small proportion of American adults perceive incompatibility between science and religion. Those who do are divided evenly into groups privileging science and privileging religion. These groups are markedly different with regard to sociodemographic and religious characteristics. Overall, I advocate a theoretical perspective on "science and religion" that is culturally constructionist, but methodologically empiricist.

  5. [Control of fertilization by self-incompatibility mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Fobis-Loisy, Isabelle; Gaude, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    Flowering plants (angiosperms) are the most prevalent and evolutionarily advanced group of plants. Reproductive strategies that promote cross-fertilization have played an essential role in the success of angiosperms as they contribute to genetic variability among plant species. A major genetic barrier to self-fertilization is self-incompatibility (SI), which allows female reproductive cells to discriminate between self- and non-self pollen and specifically reject self-pollen. In this review, we describe three SI mechanisms showing that different flowering plant families use distinct molecules for recognition of self as well as diverse biochemical pathways to arrest pollen tube growth.

  6. Sustainability Base: The Self-guided "Tour"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grymes, Rosalind; Poll, Scott

    2012-01-01

    This series of 6 information sheets was designed to familiarize readers with the performance capabilities of Sustainability Base. The set described the design intentions and operational characteristics of this LEED Platinum facility

  7. Self-incompatibility-induced programmed cell death in field poppy pollen involves dramatic acidification of the incompatible pollen tube cytosol.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Katie A; Bosch, Maurice; Haque, Tamanna; Teng, Nianjun; Poulter, Natalie S; Franklin-Tong, Vernonica E

    2015-03-01

    Self-incompatibility (SI) is an important genetically controlled mechanism to prevent inbreeding in higher plants. SI involves highly specific interactions during pollination, resulting in the rejection of incompatible (self) pollen. Programmed cell death (PCD) is an important mechanism for destroying cells in a precisely regulated manner. SI in field poppy (Papaver rhoeas) triggers PCD in incompatible pollen. During SI-induced PCD, we previously observed a major acidification of the pollen cytosol. Here, we present measurements of temporal alterations in cytosolic pH ([pH]cyt); they were surprisingly rapid, reaching pH 6.4 within 10 min of SI induction and stabilizing by 60 min at pH 5.5. By manipulating the [pH]cyt of the pollen tubes in vivo, we show that [pH]cyt acidification is an integral and essential event for SI-induced PCD. Here, we provide evidence showing the physiological relevance of the cytosolic acidification and identify key targets of this major physiological alteration. A small drop in [pH]cyt inhibits the activity of a soluble inorganic pyrophosphatase required for pollen tube growth. We also show that [pH]cyt acidification is necessary and sufficient for triggering several key hallmark features of the SI PCD signaling pathway, notably activation of a DEVDase/caspase-3-like activity and formation of SI-induced punctate actin foci. Importantly, the actin binding proteins Cyclase-Associated Protein and Actin-Depolymerizing Factor are identified as key downstream targets. Thus, we have shown the biological relevance of an extreme but physiologically relevant alteration in [pH]cyt and its effect on several components in the context of SI-induced events and PCD.

  8. Rapid establishment of genetic incompatibility through natural epigenetic variation.

    PubMed

    Durand, Stéphanie; Bouché, Nicolas; Perez Strand, Elsa; Loudet, Olivier; Camilleri, Christine

    2012-02-21

    Epigenetic variation is currently being investigated with the aim of deciphering its importance in both adaptation and evolution [1]. In plants, epimutations can underlie heritable phenotypic diversity [2-4], and epigenetic mechanisms might contribute to reproductive barriers between [5] or within species [6]. The extent of epigenetic variation begins to be appreciated in Arabidopsis [7], but the origin of natural epialleles and their impact in the wild remain largely unknown. Here we show that a genetic incompatibility among Arabidopsis thaliana strains is related to the epigenetic control of a pair of duplicate genes involved in fitness: a transposition event results in a rearranged paralogous structure that causes DNA methylation and transcriptional silencing of the other copy. We further show that this natural, strain-specific epiallele is stable over numerous generations even after removal of the duplicated, rearranged gene copy through crosses. Finally, we provide evidence that the rearranged gene copy triggers de novo DNA methylation and silencing of the unlinked native gene by RNA-directed DNA methylation. Our findings suggest an important role of naturally occurring epialleles originating from structural variation in rapidly establishing genetic incompatibilities following gene duplication events.

  9. A general stochastic model for sporophytic self-incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Billiard, Sylvain; Tran, Viet Chi

    2012-01-01

    Disentangling the processes leading populations to extinction is a major topic in ecology and conservation biology. The difficulty to find a mate in many species is one of these processes. Here, we investigate the impact of self-incompatibility in flowering plants, where several inter-compatible classes of individuals exist but individuals of the same class cannot mate. We model pollen limitation through different relationships between mate availability and fertilization success. After deriving a general stochastic model, we focus on the simple case of distylous plant species where only two classes of individuals exist. We first study the dynamics of such a species in a large population limit and then, we look for an approximation of the extinction probability in small populations. This leads us to consider inhomogeneous random walks on the positive quadrant. We compare the dynamics of distylous species to self-fertile species with and without inbreeding depression, to obtain the conditions under which self-incompatible species can be less sensitive to extinction while they can suffer more pollen limitation.

  10. Proteomics analysis of compatibility and incompatibility in grafted cucumber seedlings.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qing; Guo, Shi-Rong; Li, Lin; An, Ya-Hong; Shu, Sheng; Sun, Jin

    2016-08-01

    Graft compatibility between rootstock and scion is the most important factor influencing the survival of grafted plants. In this study, we used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) to investigate differences in leaf proteomes of graft-compatible and graft-incompatible cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.)/pumpkin (Cucurbita L.) combinations. Cucumber seedlings were used as the scions and two pumpkin cultivars with strongly contrasting grafting compatibilities were used as the rootstocks. Non-grafted and self-grafted cucumber seedlings served as control groups. An average of approximately 500 detectable spots were observed on each 2-DE gel. A total of 50 proteins were differentially expressed in response to self-grafting, compatible-rootstock grafting, and incompatible-rootstock grafting and were all successfully identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. The regulation of Calvin cycle, photosynthetic apparatus, glycolytic pathway, energy metabolism, protein biosynthesis and degradation, and reactive oxygen metabolism will probably contribute to intensify the biomass and photosynthetic capacity in graft-compatible combinations. The improved physiological and growth characteristics of compatible-rootstock grafting plants are the result of the higher expressions of proteins involved in photosynthesis, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, and protein metabolism. At the same time, the compatible-rootstock grafting regulation of stress defense, amino acid metabolism, and other metabolic functions also plays important roles in improvement of plant growth. PMID:27070289

  11. Method for applying photographic resists to otherwise incompatible substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuhr, W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A method for applying photographic resists to otherwise incompatible substrates, such as a baking enamel paint surface, is described wherein the uncured enamel paint surface is coated with a non-curing lacquer which is, in turn, coated with a partially cured lacquer. The non-curing lacquer adheres to the enamel and a photo resist material satisfactorily adheres to the partially cured lacquer. Once normal photo etching techniques are employed the lacquer coats can be easily removed from the enamel leaving the photo etched image. In the case of edge lighted instrument panels, a coat of uncured enamel is placed over the cured enamel followed by the lacquer coats and the photo resists which is exposed and developed. Once the etched uncured enamel is cured, the lacquer coats are removed leaving an etched panel.

  12. Effect of Vehicle Incompatibility on Child Occupant Injury Risk

    PubMed Central

    Kallan, Michael J.; Arbogast, Kristy B.; Durbin, Dennis R.

    2005-01-01

    With the vehicle fleet of family transportation in the United States continuing to evolve primarily through the increasing number of light truck vehicles (LTV), studying the effects of vehicle incompatibility has become increasingly important. Using data collected from a population-based sample of child-involved crashes in insured vehicles, we explored the effect of variations in crash partner vehicle type on child occupant injury risk, stratified by direction of impact. Children in passenger cars and LTVs involved in onside collisions were at an increased risk of serious injury if struck by a LTV as compared to a passenger vehicle (passenger cars and minivans). Though smaller in magnitude, this trend was also present in offside and rear crashes as well. PMID:16179154

  13. Is Quantum Mechanics Incompatible with Newton's First Law?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinowitz, Mario

    2008-04-01

    Quantum mechanics (QM) clearly violates Newton’s First Law of Motion (NFLM) in the quantum domain for one of the simplest problems, yielding an effect in a force-free region much like the Aharonov-Bohm effect. In addition, there is an incompatibility between the predictions of QM in the classical limit, and that of classical mechanics (CM) with respect to NFLM. A general argument is made that such a disparity may be found commonly for a wide variety of quantum predictions in the classical limit. Alternatives to the Schrödinger equation are considered that might avoid this problem. The meaning of the classical limit is examined. Critical views regarding QM by Schrödinger, Bohm, Bell, Clauser, and others are presented to provide a more complete perspective.

  14. S-RNase-based self-incompatibility in Petunia inflata

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiaoying; Sun, Penglin; Kao, Teh-hui

    2011-01-01

    Background For the Solanaceae-type self-incompatibility, also possessed by Rosaceae and Plantaginaceae, the specificity of self/non-self interactions between pollen and pistil is controlled by two polymorphic genes at the S-locus: the S-locus F-box gene (SLF or SFB) controls pollen specificity and the S-RNase gene controls pistil specificity. Scope This review focuses on the work from the authors' laboratory using Petunia inflata (Solanaceae) as a model. Here, recent results on the identification and functional studies of S-RNase and SLF are summarized and a protein-degradation model is proposed to explain the biochemical mechanism for specific rejection of self-pollen tubes by the pistil. Conclusions The protein-degradation model invokes specific degradation of non-self S-RNases in the pollen tube mediated by an SLF, and can explain compatible versus incompatible pollination and the phenomenon of competitive interaction, where SI breaks down in pollen carrying two different S-alleles. In Solanaceae, Plantaginaceae and subfamily Maloideae of Rosaceae, there also exist multiple S-locus-linked SLF/SFB-like genes that potentially function as the pollen S-gene. To date, only three such genes, all in P. inflata, have been examined, and they do not function as the pollen S-gene in the S-genotype backgrounds tested. Interestingly, subfamily Prunoideae of Rosaceae appears to possess only a single SLF/SFB gene, and competitive interaction, observed in Solanaceae, Plantaginaceae and subfamily Maloideae, has not been observed. Thus, although the cytotoxic function of S-RNase is an integral part of SI in Solanaceae, Plantaginaceae and Rosaceae, the function of SLF/SFB may have diverged. This highlights the complexity of the S-RNase-based SI mechanism. The review concludes by discussing some key experiments that will further advance our understanding of this self/non-self discrimination mechanism. PMID:21193481

  15. Epstein-Barr virus-positive multiple myeloma following an ABO incompatible second renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kirushnan, B; Subbarao, B; Prabhu, P

    2016-01-01

    ABO incompatible kidney transplant recipients receive higher dose of immunosuppression. Previous data indicate that the incidence of malignancy is not higher in these patients. Compared to the general population, renal transplant recipients are at 4.4-fold higher risk of developing myeloma. We describe a case of posttransplant multiple myeloma in an ABO incompatible renal transplant recipient of a second graft. PMID:27512301

  16. A fine-scale genetic analysis of hybrid incompatibilities in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Presgraves, Daven C

    2003-03-01

    The sterility and inviability of species hybrids is thought to evolve by the accumulation of genes that cause generally recessive, incompatible epistatic interactions between species. Most analyses of the loci involved in such hybrid incompatibilities have suffered from low genetic resolution. Here I present a fine-resolution genetic screen that allows systematic counting, mapping, and characterizing of a large number of hybrid incompatibility loci in a model genetic system. Using small autosomal deletions from D. melanogaster and a hybrid rescue mutation from D. simulans, I measured the viability of hybrid males that are simultaneously hemizygous for a small region of the D. simulans autosomal genome and hemizygous for the D. melanogaster X chromosome. These hybrid males are exposed to the full effects of any recessive-recessive epistatic incompatibilities present in these regions. A screen of approximately 70% of the D. simulans autosomal genome reveals 20 hybrid-lethal and 20 hybrid-semilethal regions that are incompatible with the D. melanogaster X. In further crosses, I confirm the epistatic nature of hybrid lethality by showing that all of the incompatibilities are rescued when the D. melanogaster X is replaced with a D. simulans X. Combined with information from previous studies, these results show that the number of recessive incompatibilities is approximately eightfold larger than the number of dominant ones. Finally, I estimate that a total of approximately 191 hybrid-lethal incompatibilities separate D. melanogaster and D. simulans, indicating extensive functional divergence between these species' genomes.

  17. Geographic Distribution and Inheritance of Three Cytoplasmic Incompatibility Types in Drosophila Simulans

    PubMed Central

    Montchamp-Moreau, C.; Ferveur, J. F.; Jacques, M.

    1991-01-01

    Wolbachia-like microorganisms have been implicated in unidirectional cytoplasmic incompatibility between strains of Drosophila simulans. Reduced egg eclosion occurs when females from uninfected strains (type W) are crossed with males from infected strains (type R). Here we characterize a third incompatibility type (type S) which is also correlated with the presence of Wolbachia-like microorganisms. Despite the fact that the symbionts cannot be morphologically distinguished, we observed complete bidirectional incompatibility between R and S strains. This indicates that the determinants of incompatibility are different in the two infected types. S/W incompatibility is unidirectional and similar to R/W incompatibility. A worldwide survey of D. simulans strains showed that type S incompatibility was found only in insular populations which harbor the mitochondrial type SiI. Both W and R types were found among mainland and island populations harboring the worldwide mitochondrial type SiII. Type S incompatibility could be involved in the reinforcement of the geographical isolation of SiI populations. PMID:1743484

  18. Supervisee Incompatibility and Its Influence on Triadic Supervision: An Examination of Doctoral Student Supervisors' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hein, Serge F.; Lawson, Gerard; Rodriguez, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    A qualitative study was conducted to explore supervisors' experiences of supervisee incompatibility in triadic supervision. In-depth interviews were completed with 9 doctoral student supervisors in a counselor education program, and a whole-text analysis generated 3 categories. Supervisee incompatibility took a wide variety of forms and negatively…

  19. Epstein-Barr virus-positive multiple myeloma following an ABO incompatible second renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kirushnan, B.; Subbarao, B.; Prabhu, P.

    2016-01-01

    ABO incompatible kidney transplant recipients receive higher dose of immunosuppression. Previous data indicate that the incidence of malignancy is not higher in these patients. Compared to the general population, renal transplant recipients are at 4.4-fold higher risk of developing myeloma. We describe a case of posttransplant multiple myeloma in an ABO incompatible renal transplant recipient of a second graft. PMID:27512301

  20. A fine-scale genetic analysis of hybrid incompatibilities in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Presgraves, Daven C

    2003-01-01

    The sterility and inviability of species hybrids is thought to evolve by the accumulation of genes that cause generally recessive, incompatible epistatic interactions between species. Most analyses of the loci involved in such hybrid incompatibilities have suffered from low genetic resolution. Here I present a fine-resolution genetic screen that allows systematic counting, mapping, and characterizing of a large number of hybrid incompatibility loci in a model genetic system. Using small autosomal deletions from D. melanogaster and a hybrid rescue mutation from D. simulans, I measured the viability of hybrid males that are simultaneously hemizygous for a small region of the D. simulans autosomal genome and hemizygous for the D. melanogaster X chromosome. These hybrid males are exposed to the full effects of any recessive-recessive epistatic incompatibilities present in these regions. A screen of approximately 70% of the D. simulans autosomal genome reveals 20 hybrid-lethal and 20 hybrid-semilethal regions that are incompatible with the D. melanogaster X. In further crosses, I confirm the epistatic nature of hybrid lethality by showing that all of the incompatibilities are rescued when the D. melanogaster X is replaced with a D. simulans X. Combined with information from previous studies, these results show that the number of recessive incompatibilities is approximately eightfold larger than the number of dominant ones. Finally, I estimate that a total of approximately 191 hybrid-lethal incompatibilities separate D. melanogaster and D. simulans, indicating extensive functional divergence between these species' genomes. PMID:12663535

  1. Role of peroxynitrite in programmed cell death induced in self-incompatible pollen

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Irene; Romero-Puertas, Maria C.; Rodríguez Serrano, María; Sandalio, Luisa M.; Olmedilla, Adela

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species and NO are involved in the signaling pathway of programmed cell death (PCD). Information concerning the role of these molecules in self-incompatible pollination is scarce especially in non-model species studied in vivo. We recently reported that in the olive tree, compatible and self-incompatible pollen have different levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and that PCD is induced in self-incompatible pollen. Levels of O2.- and NO are higher in pollen after self-incompatible pollination than after compatible pollination. The presence of these reactive species was concomitant with the presence of peroxynitrite. Similar results were obtained on pollen-germination experiments both in vivo and in vitro. These data, together with observations made after treating pollinated flowers with scavengers, suggest that peroxynitrite plays a role in PCD induced after self-incompatible pollination and we propose here a model to describe the way in which it might work. PMID:22751302

  2. An Examination of Maryland Community College Trustees' Intentions to Promote Succession Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snowden, Daphne Renee

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine Maryland community college trustees' intentions to promote succession planning. This study focused on community college trustees' understandings of their roles and responsibilities related to sustainability of institutions, their knowledge of the leadership crisis, and their intentions to promote…

  3. Current techniques for AB0-incompatible living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rummler, Silke; Bauschke, Astrid; Bärthel, Erik; Jütte, Heike; Maier, Katrin; Ziehm, Patrice; Malessa, Christina; Settmacher, Utz

    2016-09-24

    For a long time, it was considered medical malpractice to neglect the blood group system during transplantation. Because there are far more patients waiting for organs than organs available, a variety of attempts have been made to transplant AB0-incompatible (AB0i) grafts. Improvements in AB0i graft survival rates have been achieved with immunosuppression regimens and plasma treatment procedures. Nevertheless, some grafts are rejected early after AB0i living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) due to antibody mediated rejection or later biliary complications that affect the quality of life. Therefore, the AB0i LDLT is an option only for emergency situations, and it requires careful planning. This review compares the treatment possibilities and their effect on the patients' graft outcome from 2010 to the present. We compared 11 transplant center regimens and their outcomes. The best improvement, next to plasma treatment procedures, has been reached with the prophylactic use of rituximab more than one week before AB0i LDLT. Unfortunately, no standardized treatment protocols are available. Each center treats its patients with its own scheme. Nevertheless, the transplant results are homogeneous. Due to refined treatment strategies, AB0i LDLT is a feasible option today and almost free of severe complications. PMID:27683633

  4. High Strength Development at Incompatible Semicrystalline Polymer-Polymer Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, C. H.; Wool, Richard

    2007-03-01

    For incompatible A/B interfaces, the strength G1c is related to the equilibrium width w (normalized to the tube diameter) of the interface by G1c/G* = (w-1), where G* is the virgin strength [R.P. Wool, C.R, Chimie, 9 (2006) 25]. However, the interface strength is quite weak due to very limited interdiffusion. The mechanism of high strength development of a series of thermoplastic polyurethane elastomers (TPU) bonding with ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymers (EVOH) was investigated. During cool down of the A/B interface in the co-extruded melt, there exits a unique process window---the α-β window-which promotes considerable strength development. We used the differences in melting points and the volume contraction during asymmetric crystallization to generate influxes (σ nano-nails/unit area), where an influx occurs by the fluid being pulled into the crystallizing side. TPU samples with higher degree of crystallization typically exhibited higher peel strengths, due to the formation of both inter- and intra- spherulitic influxes of nano-dimension across the interface. The peel energy now behaves as G1c˜ σL^2, where L is the length of the influx and L>>w. Annealing between the α and βt relaxation temperatures of the EVOH generated additional influxes which provided significant connectivity and peel strength.

  5. Stereocomplex Formation in Incompatible Racemic Chiral Polylactide Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lu; Zhu, Lei

    2006-03-01

    Stereocomplexes in incompatible racemic chiral polylactide (PLA) block copolymers have not been widely studied. In this work, we synthesized PLLA and PDLA containing block copolymers by ring opening polymerization of L- and D-lactides from hydroxyl-terminated hydrophilic [poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)] and hydrophobic [poly(ethylene-co-1,2-butylene) (PEB)] oligomers, respectively. Two samples PEO-b-PLLA (2,000-5,400) and PEB-b-PDLA (4,200-5,400) were chosen. The stereocomplexes were cast from equal molar blends of above two block copolymers in chloroform solution, followed by two different thermal treatments before stereocomplex formation; The blend was either heated to 250 C and quickly quench to 160 C or heated to 250 C for 15 min and quench to 160 C for stereocomplex crystal growth. Before the formation of stereocomplexes, lamellar and cylindrical morphologies were observed in blends for the first and second thermal treatments, respectively, as evidenced by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). After complete crystal growth, the 100% stereocomplexes was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD). The morphologies of stereocomplexes grown from these two pre-existing microphases (lamellar vs. cylindrical) were studied by time-resolved SAXS and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  6. Polyurethane-foam-component incompatibilities. [As access deterrent

    SciTech Connect

    Wischmann, K.B.

    1982-01-01

    Access deterrent foams are generated by mixing separately stored and pressurized isocyanate and polyol components upon demand. This specially designed rigid polyurethane foam system must survive ambient storage and still give acceptable foams. The polyol component, a polypropylene oxide diol adduct of phosphoric acid, in the presence of moisture apparently hydrolyzes to phosphoric acid which attacks the container and alters the foaming action. The phosphate ester adduct's fire-retardant characteristics were sacrificed in favor of a superior aging polyol component. Thus, a second foam formulation which did not contain any phosphoric acid adducts while exhibiting virtually identical foaming properties was aged under accelerated conditions. These conditions consisted of aging at room temperature, 60 and 71/sup 0/C, whereby lifetime predictions could be made by Arrhenius modeling. Specifically, the amine equivalent was followed in the isocyanate component while acid number and hydroxyl equivalent were determined in the polyol component. Interestingly, the isocyanate behaved in a predictable manner; however, again problems were encountered with the polyol component. A reaction between the polyol and the blowing agent, Freon 11, was found to give high acid content abruptly following a temperature dependent initiation period. Attempts to add inhibitors to lengthen this initiation period failed. These unsolved incompatibility problems have resulted in a foam system of uncertain quality and unknown lifetime. A third foam system is currently under investigation. 4 figures, 5 tables.

  7. Does a parthenogenesis-inducing Wolbachia induce vestigial cytoplasmic incompatibility?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraaijeveld, Ken; Reumer, Barbara M.; Mouton, Laurence; Kremer, Natacha; Vavre, Fabrice; van Alphen, Jacques J. M.

    2011-03-01

    Wolbachia is a maternally inherited bacterium that manipulates the reproduction of its host. Recent studies have shown that male-killing strains can induce cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) when introgressed into a resistant host. Phylogenetic studies suggest that transitions between CI and other Wolbachia phenotypes have also occurred frequently, raising the possibility that latent CI may be widespread among Wolbachia. Here, we investigate whether a parthenogenesis-inducing Wolbachia strain can also induce CI. Parthenogenetic females of the parasitoid wasp Asobara japonica regularly produce a small number of males that may be either infected or not. Uninfected males were further obtained through removal of the Wolbachia using antibiotics and from a naturally uninfected strain. Uninfected females that had mated with infected males produced a slightly, but significantly more male-biased sex ratio than uninfected females that had mated with uninfected males. This effect was strongest in females that mated with males that had a relatively high Wolbachia titer. Quantitative PCR indicated that infected males did not show higher ratios of nuclear versus mitochondrial DNA content. Wolbachia therefore does not cause diploidization of cells in infected males. While these results are consistent with CI, other alternatives such as production of abnormal sperm by infected males cannot be completely ruled out. Overall, the effect was very small (9%), suggesting that if CI is involved it may have degenerated through the accumulation of mutations.

  8. Current techniques for AB0-incompatible living donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rummler, Silke; Bauschke, Astrid; Bärthel, Erik; Jütte, Heike; Maier, Katrin; Ziehm, Patrice; Malessa, Christina; Settmacher, Utz

    2016-01-01

    For a long time, it was considered medical malpractice to neglect the blood group system during transplantation. Because there are far more patients waiting for organs than organs available, a variety of attempts have been made to transplant AB0-incompatible (AB0i) grafts. Improvements in AB0i graft survival rates have been achieved with immunosuppression regimens and plasma treatment procedures. Nevertheless, some grafts are rejected early after AB0i living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) due to antibody mediated rejection or later biliary complications that affect the quality of life. Therefore, the AB0i LDLT is an option only for emergency situations, and it requires careful planning. This review compares the treatment possibilities and their effect on the patients’ graft outcome from 2010 to the present. We compared 11 transplant center regimens and their outcomes. The best improvement, next to plasma treatment procedures, has been reached with the prophylactic use of rituximab more than one week before AB0i LDLT. Unfortunately, no standardized treatment protocols are available. Each center treats its patients with its own scheme. Nevertheless, the transplant results are homogeneous. Due to refined treatment strategies, AB0i LDLT is a feasible option today and almost free of severe complications. PMID:27683633

  9. Current techniques for AB0-incompatible living donor liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rummler, Silke; Bauschke, Astrid; Bärthel, Erik; Jütte, Heike; Maier, Katrin; Ziehm, Patrice; Malessa, Christina; Settmacher, Utz

    2016-01-01

    For a long time, it was considered medical malpractice to neglect the blood group system during transplantation. Because there are far more patients waiting for organs than organs available, a variety of attempts have been made to transplant AB0-incompatible (AB0i) grafts. Improvements in AB0i graft survival rates have been achieved with immunosuppression regimens and plasma treatment procedures. Nevertheless, some grafts are rejected early after AB0i living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) due to antibody mediated rejection or later biliary complications that affect the quality of life. Therefore, the AB0i LDLT is an option only for emergency situations, and it requires careful planning. This review compares the treatment possibilities and their effect on the patients’ graft outcome from 2010 to the present. We compared 11 transplant center regimens and their outcomes. The best improvement, next to plasma treatment procedures, has been reached with the prophylactic use of rituximab more than one week before AB0i LDLT. Unfortunately, no standardized treatment protocols are available. Each center treats its patients with its own scheme. Nevertheless, the transplant results are homogeneous. Due to refined treatment strategies, AB0i LDLT is a feasible option today and almost free of severe complications.

  10. Reproductive Isolation of Hybrid Populations Driven by Genetic Incompatibilities

    PubMed Central

    Schumer, Molly; Cui, Rongfeng; Rosenthal, Gil G.; Andolfatto, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Despite its role in homogenizing populations, hybridization has also been proposed as a means to generate new species. The conceptual basis for this idea is that hybridization can result in novel phenotypes through recombination between the parental genomes, allowing a hybrid population to occupy ecological niches unavailable to parental species. Here we present an alternative model of the evolution of reproductive isolation in hybrid populations that occurs as a simple consequence of selection against genetic incompatibilities. Unlike previous models of hybrid speciation, our model does not incorporate inbreeding, or assume that hybrids have an ecological or reproductive fitness advantage relative to parental populations. We show that reproductive isolation between hybrids and parental species can evolve frequently and rapidly under this model, even in the presence of substantial ongoing immigration from parental species and strong selection against hybrids. An interesting prediction of our model is that replicate hybrid populations formed from the same pair of parental species can evolve reproductive isolation from each other. This non-adaptive process can therefore generate patterns of species diversity and relatedness that resemble an adaptive radiation. Intriguingly, several known hybrid species exhibit patterns of reproductive isolation consistent with the predictions of our model. PMID:25768654

  11. The Politics of Intentionality in Englishes: Provincializing Capitalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jerry Won

    2016-01-01

    This article theorizes how the privileging of "intentional" deviations from ostensibly mainstream Englishes represents a form of epistemic violence that replicates and sustains the logics of coloniality, presuming the inherent and chronic inferiority of nonmainstream cultural forms, practices, and institutions. In response, this article…

  12. N2pc is modulated by stimulus-stimulus, but not by stimulus-response incompatibilities.

    PubMed

    Cespón, J; Galdo-Álvarez, S; Díaz, F

    2013-04-01

    Studies of the N2pc in Simon-type tasks have revealed inconsistent results. That is, N2pc was only modulated when a stimulus-stimulus (S-S) overlap covaries with the stimulus-response (S-R) overlap. The present study aimed to establish whether N2pc is modulated by the S-R or by the S-S overlap. Therefore, we designed a Simon task requiring response to a colour stimulus (an arrow) with two irrelevant dimensions (position and direction). The following conditions were thus generated: compatible direction-compatible position (CDCP); incompatible direction-compatible position (IDCP); compatible direction-incompatible position (CDIP); and incompatible direction-incompatible position (IDIP). In IDCP and CDIP, both irrelevant dimensions conveyed contradictory spatial information (S-S incompatibility), while compatibility between both irrelevant dimensions occurred in CDCP and IDIP (the direction indicated was compatible with stimulus position). The N2pc amplitude was smaller in IDCP and CDIP than in CDCP and IDIP, what suggests that N2pc was modulated by S-S incompatibility and not by S-R incompatibilities. PMID:23380335

  13. Effects of A and B Wolbachia and host genotype on interspecies cytoplasmic incompatibility in Nasonia.

    PubMed

    Bordenstein, S R; Werren, J H

    1998-04-01

    Wolbachia endosymbionts cause postmating reproductive isolation between the sibling species Nasonia vitripennis and N. giraulti. Most Nasonia are doubly infected with a representative from each of the two major Wolbachia groups (A and B). This study investigates the role of single (A or B) and double (A and B) Wolbachia infections in interspecies cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) and host genomic influences on the incompatibility phenotype. Results show that the single A Wolbachia harbored in N. vitripennis (wAv) is bidirectionally incompatible with the single A Wolbachia harbored in N. giraulti (wAg). Results also indirectly show that the N. vitripennis wBv is bidirectionally incompatible with the N. giraulti wBg. The findings support current phylogenetic evidence that suggests these single infections have independent origins and were acquired via horizontal transfer. The wAv Wolbachia expresses partial CI in the N. vitripennis nuclear background. However, following genomic replacement by introgression, wAv expresses complete CI in the N. giraulti background and remains bidirectionally incompatible with wAg. Results show that double infections can reinforce interspecies reproductive isolation through the addition of incompatibility types and indicate that the host genome can influence incompatibility levels. This study has implications for host-symbiont coevolution and the role of Wolbachia in speciation.

  14. Life history mediates mate limitation and population viability in self-incompatible plant species

    PubMed Central

    Thrall, Peter H; Encinas-Viso, Francisco; Hoebee, Susan E; Young, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    Genetically controlled self-incompatibility systems represent links between genetic diversity and plant demography with the potential to directly impact on population dynamics. We use an individual-based spatial simulation to investigate the demographic and genetic consequences of different self-incompatibility systems for plants that vary in reproductive capacity and lifespan. The results support the idea that, in the absence of inbreeding effects, populations of self-incompatible species will often be smaller and less viable than self-compatible species, particularly for shorter-lived organisms or where potential fecundity is low. At high ovule production and low mortality, self-incompatible and self-compatible species are demographically similar, thus self-incompatibility does not automatically lead to reduced mate availability or population viability. Overall, sporophytic codominant self-incompatibility was more limiting than gametophytic or sporophytic dominant systems, which generally behaved in a similar fashion. Under a narrow range of conditions, the sporophytic dominant system maintained marginally greater mate availability owing to the production of S locus homozygotes. While self-incompatibility reduces population size and persistence for a broad range of conditions, the actual number of S alleles, beyond that required for reproduction, is important for only a subset of life histories. For these situations, results suggest that addition of new S alleles may result in significant demographic rescue. PMID:24683451

  15. Evidence for Maternal-Fetal Genotype Incompatibility as a Risk Factor for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Christina G. S.

    2010-01-01

    Prenatal/obstetric complications are implicated in schizophrenia susceptibility. Some complications may arise from maternal-fetal genotype incompatibility, a term used to describe maternal-fetal genotype combinations that produce an adverse prenatal environment. A review of maternal-fetal genotype incompatibility studies suggests that schizophrenia susceptibility is increased by maternal-fetal genotype combinations at the RHD and HLA-B loci. Maternal-fetal genotype combinations at these loci are hypothesized to have an effect on the maternal immune system during pregnancy which can affect fetal neurodevelopment and increase schizophrenia susceptibility. This article reviews maternal-fetal genotype incompatibility studies and schizophrenia and discusses the hypothesized biological role of these ‘‘incompatibility genes”. It concludes that research is needed to further elucidate the role of RHD and HLA-B maternal-fetal genotype incompatibility in schizophrenia and to identify other genes that produce an adverse prenatal environment through a maternal-fetal genotype incompatibility mechanism. Efforts to develop more sophisticated study designs and data analysis techniques for modeling maternal-fetal genotype incompatibility effects are warranted. PMID:20379378

  16. Non-destructive testing and assessment of dynamic incompatibility between third-party piping and drain valve systems: an industrial case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Keen Kuan; Noroozi, Siamak; Rahman, Abdul Ghaffar Abdul; Dupac, Mihai; Eng, Hoe Cheng; Chao Ong, Zhi; Khoo, Shin Yee; Vinney, John E.

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents the outcome of an industrial case study that involved condition monitoring of piping system that showed signs of excess fatigue due to flow-induced vibration. Due to operational requirements, a novel non-destructive assessment stratagem was adopted using different vibration analysis techniques - such as experimental modal analysis and operating deflection shapes - and complemented by visual inspection. Modal analysis carried out near a drain valve showed a dynamic weakness problem (several high-frequency flow-induced vibration frequency peaks), hence condition-based monitoring was used. This could easily be linked to design problem associated with the dynamic incompatibility due to dissimilar stiffness between two third-party supplied pipe and valve systems. It was concluded that this is the main cause for these problem types especially when systems are supplied by third parties, but assembled locally, a major cause of dynamic incompatibility. It is the local assembler's responsibility to develop skills and expertise needed to sustain the operation of these plants. This paper shows the technique used as result of one such initiative. Since high amplitude, low-frequency displacement can cause low cycle fatigue, attention must be paid to ensure flow remains as steady state as possible. The ability to assess the level of design incompatibility and the level of modification required using non-destructive testing is vital if these systems are to work continuously.

  17. Genetic diversity and fitness in small populations of partially asexual, self-incompatible plants.

    PubMed

    Navascués, M; Stoeckel, S; Mariette, S

    2010-05-01

    How self-incompatibility systems are maintained in plant populations is still a debated issue. Theoretical models predict that self-incompatibility systems break down according to the intensity of inbreeding depression and number of S-alleles. Other studies have explored the function of asexual reproduction in the maintenance of self-incompatibility. However, the population genetics of partially asexual, self-incompatible populations are poorly understood and previous studies have failed to consider all possible effects of asexual reproduction or could only speculate on those effects. In this study, we investigated how partial asexuality may affect genetic diversity at the S-locus and fitness in small self-incompatible populations. A genetic model including an S-locus and a viability locus was developed to perform forward simulations of the evolution of populations of various sizes. Drift combined with partial asexuality produced a decrease in the number of alleles at the S-locus. In addition, an excess of heterozygotes was present in the population, causing an increase in mutation load. This heterozygote excess was enhanced by the self-incompatibility system in small populations. In addition, in highly asexual populations, individuals produced asexually had some fitness advantages over individuals produced sexually, because sexual reproduction produces homozygotes of the deleterious allele, contrary to asexual reproduction. Our results suggest that future research on the function of asexuality for the maintenance of self-incompatibility will need to (1) account for whole-genome fitness (mutation load generated by asexuality, self-incompatibility and drift) and (2) acknowledge that the maintenance of self-incompatibility may not be independent of the maintenance of sex itself.

  18. 46 CFR 150.130 - Loading a cargo on vessels carrying cargoes with which it is incompatible.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... it is incompatible. 150.130 Section 150.130 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... carrying cargoes with which it is incompatible. Except as described in § 150.160, the person in charge of a... any cargo in table I with which it is incompatible by two barriers such as formed by a: (1)...

  19. Significance of isoagglutinin titer in ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Won, Dahae; Choe, Wonho; Kim, Hee-jung; Kwon, Seog-Woon; Han, Duck-Jong; Park, Su-Kil

    2014-10-01

    ABO-incompatible (ABO-i) kidney transplantation (KT) has emerged for overcoming the shortage of organ donors. Although this technique initially achieved only low graft survival due to isoagglutinin, recently developed desensitization protocols have improved survival to levels that are comparable to ABO-compatible KT. However, isoagglutinin is still regarded as a major obstacle to ABO-i KT. In this study, we evaluate the impact of isoagglutinin titer on clinical outcomes as well as factors that may influence isoagglutinin titers. In total, data from 95 patients who underwent ABO-i KT were analyzed. Preoperatively, rituximab administration and plasmapheresis were performed until the titer was reduced to ≤1:4. Retrospective analysis included blood group; timing and dosage of rituximab; isoagglutinin titer; number of plasmapheresis; and clinical outcomes including graft survival and serum creatinine. Graft survival was 95.8% (n = 91) and average serum creatinine at 1- and 1.5-year post-ABOi-KT was 1.3. Three patients died of sepsis. The identified predictors of titer-rebound after transplant were short interval (<7 days) between rituximab and first plasmapheresis (P = 0.004); high initial titer (≥256) (P = 0.023); low titer-reduction rate (P < 0.001); and blood group O (P < 0.001). One patient who experienced a rebound developed antibody-mediated rejection. With low-dose (200 mg) rituximab, the change in isoagglutinin titer-rebound was not significant and the infection rate was significantly decreased (P = 0.001). In conclusion, isoagglutinin titer-rebound within the first 2 weeks after KT may be a risk factor for rejection. The factors identified as affecting titer-rebound after KT were high initial isoagglutinin titer, low titer-reduction rate, short interval, and blood group O.

  20. Incompatible Land Uses and the Topology of Cumulative Risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejano, Raul P.; Smith, C. Scott

    2006-02-01

    The extensive literature on environmental justice has, by now, well defined the essential ingredients of cumulative risk, namely, incompatible land uses and vulnerability. Most problematic is the case when risk is produced by a large aggregation of small sources of air toxics. In this article, we test these notions in an area of Southern California, Southeast Los Angeles (SELA), which has come to be known as Asthmatown. Developing a rapid risk mapping protocol, we scan the neighborhood for small potential sources of air toxics and find, literally, hundreds of small point sources within a 2-mile radius, interspersed with residences. We also map the estimated cancer risks and noncancer hazard indices across the landscape. We find that, indeed, such large aggregations of even small, nondominant sources of air toxics can produce markedly elevated levels of risk. In this study, the risk profiles show additional cancer risks of up to 800 in a million and noncancer hazard indices of up to 200 in SELA due to the agglomeration of small point sources. This is significant (for example, estimates of the average regional point-source-related cancer risk range from 125 to 200 in a million). Most importantly, if we were to talk about the risk contour as if they were geological structures, we would observe not only a handful of distinct peaks, but a general “mountain range” running all throughout the study area, which underscores the ubiquity of risk in SELA. Just as cumulative risk has deeply embedded itself into the fabric of the place, so, too, must intervention seek to embed strategies into the institutions and practices of SELA. This has implications for advocacy, as seen in a recently initiated participatory action research project aimed at building health research capacities into the community in keeping with an ethic of care.

  1. The intentionality bias in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Peyroux, Elodie; Strickland, Brent; Tapiero, Isabelle; Franck, Nicolas

    2014-11-30

    The tendency to over-interpret events of daily life as resulting from voluntary or intentional actions is one of the key aspects of schizophrenia with persecutory delusions. Here, we ask whether this characteristic may emerge from the abnormal activity of a basic cognitive process found in healthy adults and children: the intentionality bias, which refers to the implicit and automatic inclination to interpret human actions as intentional (Rosset, 2008, Cognition 108, 771-780). In our experiment, patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls were shown sentences describing human actions in various linguistic contexts, and were asked to indicate whether the action was intentional or not. The results indicated that people with schizophrenia exhibited a striking bias to over attribute intentionality regardless of linguistic context, contrary to healthy controls who did not exhibit such a general intentionality bias. Moreover, this study provides some insight into the cognitive mechanisms underlying this bias: an inability to inhibit the automatic attribution of intentionality.

  2. Against the Quantitative-Qualitative Incompatibility Thesis or Dogmas Die Hard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Kenneth R.

    1988-01-01

    Employs a pragmatic philosophical perspective to argue that there is no incompatibility at either the level of practice or that of epistemology between qualitative and quantitative methods of educational research. (FMW)

  3. Management of ABO-incompatible living-donor liver transplantation: past and present trends.

    PubMed

    Raut, Vikram; Uemoto, Shinji

    2011-03-01

    Based on the concept that the liver is a "privileged organ," which resists acute rejection, Thomas Starzl introduced liver transplantation across the ABO blood group. However, with improved survival after liver transplantation came reports of an increased incidence of acute rejection, biliary and vascular complications, and decreased survival after ABO-incompatible liver transplantation. As a result, ABO-incompatible liver transplantations are performed only in emergencies when ABO-compatible grafts are unavailable. In living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT), donors are restricted to family members; therefore, breaking ABO blood group barriers becomes inevitable. This inevitable situation has forced liver transplant surgeons to exploit many innovative techniques to overcome the challenges of ABO-incompatible liver transplantation. This review looks at the history and current practices of ABO-incompatible LDLT to provide insight so that the protocol can be improved further.

  4. The paradox of clonality and the evolution of self-incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Vallejo-Marín, Mario

    2007-07-01

    In the January issue of New Phytologist Vallejo-Marín and O'Brien1 documented that in the genus Solanum (Solanaceae) clonality and self-incompatibility, a common genetic mechanism enforcing cross-fertilization, co-occur more often than expected by chance. Using a phylogenetic approach the authors showed that the statistical association between clonality and self-incompatibility persists even after taking into account phylogenetic relationships among species, uncertainty in the phylogenetic reconstruction, and associations between clonality and life history (annual/perennial). Vallejo-Marín and O'Brien1 suggest that clonality and self-incompatibility tend to co-occur because clonality, by allowing the persistence and propagation of a genotype in environments with limited pollinator or mate availability, reduces the selective pressure favoring the breakdown of self-incompatibility. In addition to promoting the maintenance of self-incompatibility, when clonality results in the spatial aggregation of genetically identical individuals, clonality may promote its breakdown by restricting pollen transfer between different genotypes. Here I call attention to these contradictory predictions of the effects of clonality on the evolution of self-incompatibility, and suggest that the outcome of this paradox depend on both the extent to which clonal propagation compensates for limited seed production, and on the extent to which clonality reduces pollen transfer between genotypes.

  5. Vegetative incompatibility in the het-6 region of Neurospora crassa is mediated by two linked genes.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M L; Micali, O C; Hubbard, S P; Mir-Rashed, N; Jacobson, D J; Glass, N L

    2000-01-01

    Non-self-recognition during asexual growth of Neurospora crassa involves restriction of heterokaryon formation via genetic differences at 11 het loci, including mating type. The het-6 locus maps to a 250-kbp region of LGIIL. We used restriction fragment length polymorphisms in progeny with crossovers in the het-6 region and a DNA transformation assay to identify two genes in a 25-kbp region that have vegetative incompatibility activity. The predicted product of one of these genes, which we designate het-6(OR), has three regions of amino acid sequence similarity to the predicted product of the het-e vegetative incompatibility gene in Podospora anserina and to the predicted product of tol, which mediates mating-type vegetative incompatibility in N. crassa. The predicted product of the alternative het-6 allele, HET-6(PA), shares only 68% amino acid identity with HET-6(OR). The second incompatibility gene, un-24(OR), encodes the large subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, which is essential for de novo synthesis of DNA. A region in the carboxyl-terminal portion of UN-24 is associated with incompatibility and is variable between un-24(OR) and the alternative allele un-24(PA). Linkage analysis indicates that the 25-kbp un-24-het-6 region is inherited as a block, suggesting that a nonallelic interaction may occur between un-24 and het-6 and possibly other loci within this region to mediate vegetative incompatibility in the het-6 region of N. crassa. PMID:10880472

  6. Degradation of glyoxalase I in Brassica napus stigma leads to self-incompatibility response.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian; Jamshed, Muhammad; Samuel, Marcus A

    2015-01-01

    Self-incompatibility (rejection of 'self'-pollen) is a reproductive barrier that allows hermaphroditic flowering plants to prevent inbreeding, to promote outcrossing and hybrid vigour. The self-incompatibility response in Brassica involves allele-specific interaction between the pollen small cysteine-rich, secreted protein ligand (SCR/SP11) and the stigmatic S-receptor kinase (SRK), which leads to the activation of the E3 ubiquitin ligase ARC1 (Armadillo repeat-containing 1), resulting in proteasomal degradation of compatibility factors needed for successful pollination. Despite this, targets of ARC1 and the intracellular signalling network that is regulated by these targets, have remained elusive. Here we show that glyoxalase I (GLO1), an enzyme that is required for the detoxification of methylglyoxal (MG, a cytotoxic by-product of glycolysis), is a stigmatic compatibility factor required for pollination to occur and is targeted by the self-incompatibility system. Suppression of GLO1 was sufficient to reduce compatibility, and overexpression of GLO1 in self-incompatible Brassica napus stigmas resulted in partial breakdown of the self-incompatibility response. ARC1-mediated destruction of GLO1 after self-pollination results in increased MG levels and a concomitant increase in MG-modified proteins (including GLO1), which are efficiently targeted for destruction in the papillary cells, leading to pollen rejection. Our findings demonstrate the elegant nature of plants to use a metabolic by-product to regulate the self-incompatibility response. PMID:27251720

  7. Expression and inheritance of sporophytic self-incompatibility in synthetic allohexaploid Senecio cambrensis (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Brennan, Adrian C; Hiscock, Simon J

    2010-04-01

    Allopolyploid speciation is common in plants and is frequently associated with shifts from outcrossing, for example self-incompatibility, to inbreeding (i.e. selfing). Senecio cambrensis is a recently evolved allohexaploid species that formed following hybridization between diploid self-incompatible S. squalidus and tetraploid self-compatible S. vulgaris. Studies of reproduction in wild populations of S. cambrensis have concluded that it is self-compatible. Here, we investigated self-compatibility in synthetic lines of S. cambrensis generated via hybridization and colchicine-induced polyploidization and wild S. cambrensis using controlled crossing experiments. Synthetic F(1)S. cambrensis individuals were all self-compatible but, in F(2) and later generations, self-incompatible individuals were identified at frequencies of 6.7-9.2%. Self-incompatibility was also detected in wild sampled individuals at a frequency of 12.2%. The mechanism and genetics of self-incompatibility were tested in synthetic S. cambrensis and found to be similar to those of its paternal parent S. squalidus (i.e. sporophytic). These results show, for the first time, that functional sporophytic self-incompatibility can be inherited and expressed in allopolyploids as early as the second (F(2)) generation. Wild S. cambrensis should therefore be considered as possessing a mixed mating system with the potential for evolution towards either inbreeding or outcrossing. PMID:19895670

  8. Contrasting levels of variability between cytoplasmic genomes and incompatibility types in the mosquito Culex pipiens.

    PubMed

    Guillemaud, T; Pasteur, N; Rousset, F

    1997-02-22

    Reproductive incompatibilities called cytoplasmic incompatibilities are known to affect a large number of arthropod species and are mediated by Wolbachia, a maternally transmitted microorganism. The crossing relationships between strains of potential hosts define their incompatibility types and it is generally assumed that differences between strains of Wolbachia induce different crossing types. Among all the described host species, the mosquito, Culex pipiens, displays the greatest variability of cytoplasmic incompatibility crossing types. We analysed mitochondrial and bacterial DNA variability in Culex pipiens in order to investigate some possible causes of incompatibility crossing type variability. We sequenced fragments of the ftsZ gene, and the A + T-rich control region of the mtDNA. We also sequenced the second subunit of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase (COII) gene, in Culex pipiens and a closely related species, C. torrentium, in order to verify the usefulness of the A + T-rich region for the present purposes. No variability was found in the Wolbachia ftsZ gene fragment, and very limited variation of the mitochondrial marker whatever the compatibility type or the origin of the host. A low variability was found in the A + T-rich region and comparison of divergence of the A + T-rich region and COII gene between C. pipiens and C. torrentium did not reveal any special constraints affecting this region. In contrast to observations in other host species, variability of incompatibility crossing types is not due to multiple infections by distantly related Wolbachia strains. PMID:9061971

  9. Contrasting levels of variability between cytoplasmic genomes and incompatibility types in the mosquito Culex pipiens.

    PubMed Central

    Guillemaud, T; Pasteur, N; Rousset, F

    1997-01-01

    Reproductive incompatibilities called cytoplasmic incompatibilities are known to affect a large number of arthropod species and are mediated by Wolbachia, a maternally transmitted microorganism. The crossing relationships between strains of potential hosts define their incompatibility types and it is generally assumed that differences between strains of Wolbachia induce different crossing types. Among all the described host species, the mosquito, Culex pipiens, displays the greatest variability of cytoplasmic incompatibility crossing types. We analysed mitochondrial and bacterial DNA variability in Culex pipiens in order to investigate some possible causes of incompatibility crossing type variability. We sequenced fragments of the ftsZ gene, and the A + T-rich control region of the mtDNA. We also sequenced the second subunit of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase (COII) gene, in Culex pipiens and a closely related species, C. torrentium, in order to verify the usefulness of the A + T-rich region for the present purposes. No variability was found in the Wolbachia ftsZ gene fragment, and very limited variation of the mitochondrial marker whatever the compatibility type or the origin of the host. A low variability was found in the A + T-rich region and comparison of divergence of the A + T-rich region and COII gene between C. pipiens and C. torrentium did not reveal any special constraints affecting this region. In contrast to observations in other host species, variability of incompatibility crossing types is not due to multiple infections by distantly related Wolbachia strains. PMID:9061971

  10. Sustainability Frontiers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selby, David

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces Sustainability Frontiers, a newly formed, international, not-for-profit alliance of sustainability and global educators dedicated to challenging and laying bare the assumptions, exposing the blind spots, and transgressing the boundaries of mainstream understandings of sustainability-related education. Among the orthodoxies…

  11. Intention seekers: conspiracist ideation and biased attributions of intentionality.

    PubMed

    Brotherton, Robert; French, Christopher C

    2015-01-01

    Conspiracist beliefs are widespread and potentially hazardous. A growing body of research suggests that cognitive biases may play a role in endorsement of conspiracy theories. The current research examines the novel hypothesis that individuals who are biased towards inferring intentional explanations for ambiguous actions are more likely to endorse conspiracy theories, which portray events as the exclusive product of intentional agency. Study 1 replicated a previously observed relationship between conspiracist ideation and individual differences in anthropomorphisation. Studies 2 and 3 report a relationship between conspiracism and inferences of intentionality for imagined ambiguous events. Additionally, Study 3 again found conspiracist ideation to be predicted by individual differences in anthropomorphism. Contrary to expectations, however, the relationship was not mediated by the intentionality bias. The findings are discussed in terms of a domain-general intentionality bias making conspiracy theories appear particularly plausible. Alternative explanations are suggested for the association between conspiracism and anthropomorphism. PMID:25970175

  12. Intention Seekers: Conspiracist Ideation and Biased Attributions of Intentionality

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspiracist beliefs are widespread and potentially hazardous. A growing body of research suggests that cognitive biases may play a role in endorsement of conspiracy theories. The current research examines the novel hypothesis that individuals who are biased towards inferring intentional explanations for ambiguous actions are more likely to endorse conspiracy theories, which portray events as the exclusive product of intentional agency. Study 1 replicated a previously observed relationship between conspiracist ideation and individual differences in anthropomorphisation. Studies 2 and 3 report a relationship between conspiracism and inferences of intentionality for imagined ambiguous events. Additionally, Study 3 again found conspiracist ideation to be predicted by individual differences in anthropomorphism. Contrary to expectations, however, the relationship was not mediated by the intentionality bias. The findings are discussed in terms of a domain-general intentionality bias making conspiracy theories appear particularly plausible. Alternative explanations are suggested for the association between conspiracism and anthropomorphism. PMID:25970175

  13. Extreme incompatibility of helium during mantle melting: Evidence from undegassed mid-ocean ridge basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, David W.; Michael, Peter J.; Shea, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    We report total helium concentrations (vesicles + glass) for a suite of thirteen ultradepleted mid-ocean ridge basalts (UD-MORBs) that were previously studied for volatile contents (CO2, H2O) plus major and trace elements. The selected basalts are undersaturated in CO2 + H2O at their depths of eruption and represent rare cases of undegassed MORBs. Sample localities from the Atlantic (2), Indian (1) and Pacific (7) Oceans collectively show excellent linear correlations (r2 = 0.75- 0.92) between the concentrations of helium and the highly incompatible elements C, K, Rb, Ba, Nb, Th and U. Three basalts from Gakkel Ridge in the Arctic were also studied but show anomalous behavior marked by excess lithophile trace element abundances. In the Atlantic-Pacific-Indian suite, incompatible element concentrations vary by factors of 3-4.3, while helium concentration varies by a factor of 13. The strong correlations between the concentrations of helium and incompatible elements are explained by helium behavior as the most incompatible element during mantle melting. Partial melting of an ultradepleted mantle source, formed as a residue of earlier melt extraction, accounts for the observed concentrations. The earlier melting event involved removal of a small degree melt (∼1%) at low but non-zero porosity (0.01-0.5%), leading to a small amount of melt retention that strongly leveraged the incompatible element budget of the ultradepleted mantle source. Equilibrium melting models that produce the range of trace element and helium concentrations from this source require a bulk solid/melt distribution coefficient for helium that is lower than that for other incompatible elements by about a factor of ten. Alternatively, the bulk solid/melt distribution coefficient for helium could be similar to or even larger than that for other incompatible elements, but the much larger diffusivity of helium in peridotite leads to its more effective incompatibility and efficient extraction from a

  14. The S receptor kinase determines self-incompatibility in Brassica stigma.

    PubMed

    Takasaki, T; Hatakeyama, K; Suzuki, G; Watanabe, M; Isogai, A; Hinata, K

    2000-02-24

    The self-incompatibility possessed by Brassica is an intraspecific reproductive barrier by which the stigma rejects self-pollen but accepts non-self-pollen for fertilization. The molecular/biochemical bases of recognition and rejection have been intensively studied. Self-incompatibility in Brassica is sporophytically controlled by the polymorphic S locus. Two tightly linked polymorphic genes at the S locus, S receptor kinase gene (SRK) and S locus glycoprotein gene (SLG), are specifically expressed in the papillar cells of the stigma, and analyses of self-compatible lines of Brassica have suggested that together they control stigma function in self-incompatibility interactions. Here we show, by transforming self-incompatible plants of Brassica rapa with an SRK28 and an SLG28 transgene separately, that expression of SRK28 alone, but not SLG28 alone, conferred the ability to reject self (S28)-pollen on the transgenic plants. We also show that the ability of SRK28 to reject S28 pollen was enhanced by SLG28. We conclude that SRK alone determines S haplotype specificity of the stigma, and that SLG acts to promote a full manifestation of the self-incompatibility response.

  15. Strength through unity: spatial affinity between morphs improves fitness in incompatible heterostylous Melochia (Malvaceae) species.

    PubMed

    Faife-Cabrera, Michel; Navarro, Luis; Ferrero, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    In heterostylous plants, both stylar polymorphism and incompatibility system favor legitimate pollination among individuals. Weak or partial expression of incompatibility may ensure progeny when mates or pollinators are scarce in unstable habitats, but under these conditions plants with heteromorphic incompatibility would be in disadvantage. In this work we determine how the spatial distribution of morphs and the effect of proximity to the nearest potential mates affect plants' reproductive output in four Melochia species. The general prediction of decreasing reproductive success with an increasing isolation of floral morphs in plants with heteromorphic incompatibility was corroborated only in one species (i.e. M. tomentosa). Meanwhile, the other species exhibit a spatial affinity between morphs (i.e. the number of individuals with the nearest neighbor of the opposite morph exceeds expectations upon a random distribution). For M. savannarum and M. villosa we could not detect any effect of proximity to potential mates on the seed-ovule ratio. This may be due to: (1) existence of pollinators with long flying distances, like butterflies, in the populations and/or, (2) the possible occurrence of resource limitation. Spatial affinity between morphs in populations of heterostylous plants with heteromorphic incompatibility system increases reproductive success and may facilitate colonization of ephemeral habitats.

  16. Dobzhansky-Muller and Wolbachia-Induced Incompatibilities in a Diploid Genetic System

    PubMed Central

    Telschow, Arndt; Hilgenboecker, Kirsten; Hammerstein, Peter; Werren, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic incompatibilities are supposed to play an important role in speciation. A general (theoretical) problem is to explain the persistence of genetic diversity after secondary contact. Previous theoretical work has pointed out that Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities (DMI) are not stable in the face of migration unless local selection acts on the alleles involved in incompatibility. With local selection, genetic variability exists up to a critical migration rate but is lost when migration exceeds this threshold value. Here, we investigate the effect of intracellular bacteria Wolbachia on the stability of hybrid zones formed after the Dobzhansky Muller model. Wolbachia are known to cause a cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) within and between species. Incorporating intracellular bacteria Wolbachia can lead to a significant increase of critical migration rates and maintenance of divergence, primarily because Wolbachia-induced incompatibility acts to reduce frequencies of F1 hybrids. Wolbachia infect up to two-thirds of all insect species and it is therefore likely that CI co-occurs with DMI in nature. The results indicate that both isolating mechanisms strengthen each other and under some circumstances act synergistically. Thus they can drive speciation processes more forcefully than either when acting alone. PMID:24759973

  17. The evolution of polyandry II: post-copulatory defenses against genetic incompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Zeh, J. A.; Zeh, D. W.

    1997-01-01

    Fundamental to the recently-proposed hypothesis that females mate with more than one male as a hedge against genetic incompatibility is the premise that mechanisms are available to polyandrous females which enable them to safeguard their reproductive investment against the threat of incompatibility between maternal and paternal genomes. Accumulation of sperm from several males shifts the arena for sexual selection from the external environment to the female reproductive tract where, we suggest, interactions at the molecular and cellular levels provide females with direct mechanisms for assessing genetic compatibility. We present examples from the literature to illustrate how sperm competition and female choice of sperm can enable polyandrous females to minimize the risk of fertilization by genetically-incompatible sperm. Polyandry and multiple paternity also create the opportunity to reduce the cost of genetic incompatibility by reallocation of maternal resources from defective to viable offspring. This is likely to be a critically important post-copulatory mechanism for viviparous females whose intimate immunological relationship with developing embryos makes them particularly vulnerable to genetic incompatibility arising from intragenomic conflict and other processes acting at the suborganismal level.

  18. Transcriptional Regulation of Culex pipiens Mosquitoes by Wolbachia Influences Cytoplasmic Incompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Simon; Kambris, Zakaria; Sutton, Elizabeth R.; Bonsall, Michael B.; Parkhill, Julian; Sinkins, Steven P.

    2013-01-01

    Cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) induced by the endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis causes complex patterns of crossing sterility between populations of the Culex pipiens group of mosquitoes. The molecular basis of the phenotype is yet to be defined. In order to investigate what host changes may underlie CI at the molecular level, we examined the transcription of a homolog of the Drosophila melanogaster gene grauzone that encodes a zinc finger protein and acts as a regulator of female meiosis, in which mutations can cause sterility. Upregulation was observed in Wolbachia-infected C. pipiens group individuals relative to Wolbachia-cured lines and the level of upregulation differed between lines that were reproductively incompatible. Knockdown analysis of this gene using RNAi showed an effect on hatch rates in a Wolbachia infected Culex molestus line. Furthermore, in later stages of development an effect on developmental progression in CI embryos occurs in bidirectionally incompatible crosses. The genome of a wPip Wolbachia strain variant from Culex molestus was sequenced and compared with the genome of a wPip variant with which it was incompatible. Three genes in inserted or deleted regions were newly identified in the C. molestus wPip genome, one of which is a transcriptional regulator labelled wtrM. When this gene was transfected into adult Culex mosquitoes, upregulation of the grauzone homolog was observed. These data suggest that Wolbachia-mediated regulation of host gene expression is a component of the mechanism of cytoplasmic incompatibility. PMID:24204251

  19. Antagonism between local dispersal and self-incompatibility systems in a continuous plant population.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Reed A

    2009-06-01

    Many self-incompatible plant species exist in continuous populations in which individuals disperse locally. Local dispersal of pollen and seeds facilitates inbreeding because pollen pools are likely to contain relatives. Self-incompatibility promotes outbreeding because relatives are likely to carry incompatible alleles. Therefore, populations can experience an antagonism between these forces. In this study, a novel computational model is used to explore the effects of this antagonism on gene flow, allelic diversity, neighbourhood sizes, and identity by descent. I confirm that this antagonism is sensitive to dispersal levels and linkage. However, the results suggest that there is little to no difference between the effects of gametophytic and sporophytic self-incompatibility systems (GSI and SSI) on unlinked loci. More importantly, both GSI and SSI affect unlinked loci in a manner similar to obligate outcrossing without mating types. This suggests that the primary evolutionary impact of self-incompatibility systems may be to prevent selfing, and prevention of biparental inbreeding might be a beneficial side-effect.

  20. Children's Understanding of Drivers' Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foot, Hugh C.; Thomson, James A.; Tolmie, Andrew K.; Whelan, Kirstie M.; Morrison, Sheila; Sarvary, Penelope

    2006-01-01

    To become more skilled as pedestrians, children need to acquire a view of the traffic environment as one in which road users are active agents with different intentions and objectives. This paper describes a simulation study designed to explore children's understanding of drivers' intentions. It also investigated the effect of training children's…

  1. Intention, History, and Artifact Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Paul

    1996-01-01

    Claims that people determine whether something is a member of a given artifact kind by inferring that it was successfully created with the intention that it belong to that kind. Discusses function-based and intentional-historical accounts of artifact concepts. Concludes that a rich set of inferential capacities is needed to constitute a theory of…

  2. The intentionality bias and schizotypy.

    PubMed

    Moore, J W; Pope, A

    2014-01-01

    The "intentionality bias" refers to our automatic tendency to judge other people's actions to be intentional. In this experiment we extended research on this effect in two key ways. First, we developed a novel nonlinguistic task for assessing the intentionality bias. This task used video stimuli of ambiguous movements. Second, we investigated the relationship between the strength of this bias and schizotypy (schizophrenia-like symptoms in healthy individuals). Our results showed that the intentionality bias was replicated for the video stimuli and also that this bias is stronger in those individuals scoring higher on the schizotypy rating scales. Overall these findings lend further support for the existence of the intentionality bias. We also discuss the possible relevance of these findings for our understanding of certain symptoms of schizophrenic illness.

  3. An aquaporin-like gene required for the Brassica self-incompatibility response.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, S; Nasrallah, J B; Dixit, R; Preiss, S; Nasrallah, M E

    1997-06-01

    Self-incompatibility in Brassica refers to the rejection of self-related pollen and is mediated by a receptor protein kinase localized to the plasma membrane of the stigma epidermis in the flower. The recessive mutation mod eliminates self-incompatibility in the stigma. In mod mutants, self-compatibility was shown to be associated with the absence of transcripts encoded by an aquaporin-related gene. This observation suggests that a water channel is required for the self-incompatibility response of Brassica, which is consistent with the concept that regulation of water transfer from the stigma to pollen is a checkpoint in the early events of pollination in the crucifer family.

  4. Plasma exchange in small intestinal transplantation between ABO-incompatible individuals: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, QIUHUI; HU, XINGBIN; XIA, AIJUN; YI, JING; AN, QUNXING; ZHANG, XIANQING

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the application of plasma exchange in small intestinal transplantation between ABO blood type-incompatible patients. A small intestinal transplantation case between ABO-incompatible individuals is hereby presented and analyzed. The main treatment included plasma exchange, splenectomy and immunosuppression. The patient undergoing small intestinal transplantation exhibited stable vital signs. A mild acute rejection reaction developed ~2 weeks after the surgery, which the patient successfully overcame. The subsequent colonoscopy and pathological examination revealed no signs of acute rejection. In conclusion, plasma exchange in combination with anti-immune rejection therapy proved to be an effective scheme for the management of small intestinal transplantation between ABO-incompatible patients. PMID:24649066

  5. Chromosome-Wide Impacts on the Expression of Incompatibilities in Hybrids of Tigriopus californicus

    PubMed Central

    Willett, Christopher S.; Lima, Thiago G.; Kovaleva, Inna; Hatfield, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome rearrangements such as inversions have been recognized previously as contributing to reproductive isolation by maintaining alleles together that jointly contribute to deleterious genetic interactions and postzygotic reproductive isolation. In this study, an impact of potential incompatibilities merely residing on the same chromosome was found in crosses of populations of the copepod Tigriopus californicus. When genetically divergent populations of this copepod are crossed, hybrids show reduced fitness, and deviations from expected genotypic ratios can be used to determine regions of the genome involved in deleterious interactions. In this study, a set of markers was genotyped for a cross of two populations of T. californicus, and these markers show widespread deviations from Mendelian expectations, with entire chromosomes showing marked skew. Despite the importance of mtDNA/nuclear interactions in incompatibilities in this system in previous studies, in these crosses the expected patterns stemming from these interactions are not widely apparent. Females lack recombination in this species, and a striking difference is observed between male and female backcrosses. This suggests that the maintenance of multiple loci on individual chromosomes can enable some incompatibilities, perhaps playing a similar role in the initial rounds of hybridization to chromosomal rearrangements in preserving sets of alleles together that contribute to incompatibilities. Finally, it was observed that candidate pairs of incompatibility regions are not consistently interacting across replicates or subsets of these crosses, despite the repeatability of the deviations at many of the single loci themselves, suggesting that more complicated models of Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities may need to be considered. PMID:27172190

  6. Factors Affecting Hurricane Evacuation Intentions.

    PubMed

    Lazo, Jeffrey K; Bostrom, Ann; Morss, Rebecca E; Demuth, Julie L; Lazrus, Heather

    2015-10-01

    Protective actions for hurricane threats are a function of the environmental and information context; individual and household characteristics, including cultural worldviews, past hurricane experiences, and risk perceptions; and motivations and barriers to actions. Using survey data from the Miami-Dade and Houston-Galveston areas, we regress individuals' stated evacuation intentions on these factors in two information conditions: (1) seeing a forecast that a hurricane will hit one's area, and (2) receiving an evacuation order. In both information conditions having an evacuation plan, wanting to keep one's family safe, and viewing one's home as vulnerable to wind damage predict increased evacuation intentions. Some predictors of evacuation intentions differ between locations; for example, Florida respondents with more egalitarian worldviews are more likely to evacuate under both information conditions, and Florida respondents with more individualist worldviews are less likely to evacuate under an evacuation order, but worldview was not significantly associated with evacuation intention for Texas respondents. Differences by information condition also emerge, including: (1) evacuation intentions decrease with age in the evacuation order condition but increase with age in the saw forecast condition, and (2) evacuation intention in the evacuation order condition increases among those who rely on public sources of information on hurricane threats, whereas in the saw forecast condition evacuation intention increases among those who rely on personal sources. Results reinforce the value of focusing hurricane information efforts on evacuation plans and residential vulnerability and suggest avenues for future research on how hurricane contexts shape decision making. PMID:26299597

  7. Factors Affecting Hurricane Evacuation Intentions.

    PubMed

    Lazo, Jeffrey K; Bostrom, Ann; Morss, Rebecca E; Demuth, Julie L; Lazrus, Heather

    2015-10-01

    Protective actions for hurricane threats are a function of the environmental and information context; individual and household characteristics, including cultural worldviews, past hurricane experiences, and risk perceptions; and motivations and barriers to actions. Using survey data from the Miami-Dade and Houston-Galveston areas, we regress individuals' stated evacuation intentions on these factors in two information conditions: (1) seeing a forecast that a hurricane will hit one's area, and (2) receiving an evacuation order. In both information conditions having an evacuation plan, wanting to keep one's family safe, and viewing one's home as vulnerable to wind damage predict increased evacuation intentions. Some predictors of evacuation intentions differ between locations; for example, Florida respondents with more egalitarian worldviews are more likely to evacuate under both information conditions, and Florida respondents with more individualist worldviews are less likely to evacuate under an evacuation order, but worldview was not significantly associated with evacuation intention for Texas respondents. Differences by information condition also emerge, including: (1) evacuation intentions decrease with age in the evacuation order condition but increase with age in the saw forecast condition, and (2) evacuation intention in the evacuation order condition increases among those who rely on public sources of information on hurricane threats, whereas in the saw forecast condition evacuation intention increases among those who rely on personal sources. Results reinforce the value of focusing hurricane information efforts on evacuation plans and residential vulnerability and suggest avenues for future research on how hurricane contexts shape decision making.

  8. Molecular and quantitative signatures of biparental inbreeding depression in the self-incompatible tree species Prunus avium.

    PubMed

    Jolivet, C; Rogge, M; Degen, B

    2013-05-01

    Genetic diversity strongly influences populations' adaptability to changing environments and therefore survival. Sustainable forest management practices have multiple roles including conservation of genetic resources and timber production. In this study, we aimed at better understanding the variation in genetic diversity among adult and offspring individuals, and the effects of mating system on offspring survival and growth in wild cherry, Prunus avium. We analysed adult trees and open pollinated seed-families from three stands in Germany at eight microsatellite loci and one incompatibility system locus and conducted paternity analyses. Seed viability testing and seed sowing in a nursery allowed further testing for the effects of pollen donor diversity and genetic similarity between mates on the offspring performance at the seed and seedling stages. Our results were contrasting across stands. Loss of genetic diversity from adult to seedling stages and positive effect of mate diversity on offspring performance occurred in one stand only, whereas biparental inbreeding depression and significant decrease in fixation index from adults to seedlings was detected in two stands. We discussed the effects of stand genetic diversity on the magnitude of biparental inbreeding depression at several life-stages and its consequences on the management of genetic resources in P. avium.

  9. Molecular and quantitative signatures of biparental inbreeding depression in the self-incompatible tree species Prunus avium

    PubMed Central

    Jolivet, C; Rogge, M; Degen, B

    2013-01-01

    Genetic diversity strongly influences populations' adaptability to changing environments and therefore survival. Sustainable forest management practices have multiple roles including conservation of genetic resources and timber production. In this study, we aimed at better understanding the variation in genetic diversity among adult and offspring individuals, and the effects of mating system on offspring survival and growth in wild cherry, Prunus avium. We analysed adult trees and open pollinated seed-families from three stands in Germany at eight microsatellite loci and one incompatibility system locus and conducted paternity analyses. Seed viability testing and seed sowing in a nursery allowed further testing for the effects of pollen donor diversity and genetic similarity between mates on the offspring performance at the seed and seedling stages. Our results were contrasting across stands. Loss of genetic diversity from adult to seedling stages and positive effect of mate diversity on offspring performance occurred in one stand only, whereas biparental inbreeding depression and significant decrease in fixation index from adults to seedlings was detected in two stands. We discussed the effects of stand genetic diversity on the magnitude of biparental inbreeding depression at several life-stages and its consequences on the management of genetic resources in P. avium. PMID:23211795

  10. Intentions of older homebound women with regard to reaching help quickly.

    PubMed

    Porter, Eileen J; Ganong, Lawrence H; Matsuda, Sandy

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of this longitudinal phenomenological study were to describe intentions of older women relative to reaching help quickly (RHQ), to place those intentions in personal-social context, and to compare intentions of subscribers to a personal emergency response system (PERS) and nonsubscribers. The 40 participants were aged 85 or older, resided alone, and needed help to leave home. Two contextual features ("recognizing my risk of being unable to RHQ" and "recognizing my need for a RHQ device to sustain myself") were basic to two phenomena ("negotiating reliance on people to reach quickly if I need help" and "reducing my risk of being unable to RHQ"). There was greater variation in intentions and context within each of the two naturally occurring groups (subscribers and nonsubscribers) than between them. Practitioners cannot assume that women intend to use available RHQ devices in specific situations; preventive nursing involves proactive exploration of intentions relative to RHQ.

  11. Expression analysis of self-incompatibility-associated genes in non-heading Chinese cabbage.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Wang, C; Ge, T T; Wang, J J; Liu, T K; Hou, X L; Li, Y

    2014-01-01

    In Brassicaceae, a self-incompatibility (SI) system mediates pollen-pistil interactions. Self-pollen could be recognized and rejected by incompatible pistils. Several components involved in the SI response have been determined, including S-locus receptor kinase (SRK), S-locus cysteine-rich protein/S-locus protein 11, and arm repeat-containing protein 1 (ARC1). However, the components involved in the SI system of Brassicaceae are not fully understood. Here, we detected expression patterns of 24 SI-related genes in non-heading Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris ssp chinensis Makino) after compatible and incompatible pollination, and potential interaction relationships of these genes were predicted. SRK and ARC1 transcripts increased initially 0.25 h after incompatible pollination, while kinase-associated protein phosphatase had an expression pattern that was opposite that of SRK transcripts during self-pollination. Plant U-box 8 was not required in the SI response of non-heading Chinese cabbage. Our results showed that the SI signal of non-heading Chinese cabbage could occur within 0.25 h after self-pollination. The hypothetical interaction relationships indicated that plastid-lipid-associated protein and malate dehydrogenase could be negatively regulated by chaperonin 10, glutathione transferase, cytidylate kinase/uridylate kinase, and methionine synthase by indirect interactions. Our findings could be helpful to better understand potential roles of these components in the SI system of non-heading Chinese cabbage. PMID:25062491

  12. Quantitatively determined self-incompatibility : 3. Genetical variability in Borago officinalis.

    PubMed

    Leach, C R; Mayo, O

    1991-05-01

    It is shown by simulation that a hypothetical multilocus, quantitatively determined self-incompatibility system, whether gametophytic or sporophytic, should maintain variability in small populations at a higher level than would panmixia. Studies of more than 20 isozyme loci show that borage has almost no variability.

  13. RNA1 is sufficient to mediate plasmid ColE1 incompatibility in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fitzwater, T; Tamm, J; Polisky, B

    1984-05-25

    The multicopy plasmid ColE1 specifies a small RNA designated RNA1 that has been implicated in copy number control and incompatibility. We have inserted a 148 base-pair ColE1 DNA fragment containing a promoter-less RNA1 gene into a plasmid vector downstream from the tryptophan promoter of Serratia marcesens . The ColE1 RNA1 produced by this plasmid is not functional in vivo due to the presence of 49 nucleotides appended to the 5'-terminus of the wild-type RNA1 sequence. Deletions of these sequences by Bal3l nuclease in vitro and genetic selection for ColE1 incompatibility function in vivo permitted isolation of a plasmid expressing wild-type ColE1 RNA1 initiated properly from the S. marcesens trp promoter. These experiments demonstrate that RNA1 is sufficient to mediate ColE1 incompatibility in vivo. In addition, several plasmids were isolated that contain altered RNA1 genes. These alterations consist of additions or deletions of sequences at the 5'-terminus of RNA1. Analysis of the ability of these altered RNA1 molecules to express incompatibility in vivo suggests that the 5'-terminal region of RNA1 is crucial for its function.

  14. A bacterial symbiont in the Bacteroidetes induces cytoplasmic incompatibility in the parasitoid wasp Encarsia pergandiella.

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Martha S; Perlman, Steve J; Kelly, Suzanne E

    2003-01-01

    Vertically transmitted symbionts of arthropods have been implicated in several reproductive manipulations of their hosts. These include cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI), parthenogenesis induction in haplodiploid species (PI), feminization and male killing. One symbiont lineage in the alpha-Proteobacteria, Wolbachia, is the only bacterium known to cause all of these effects, and has been thought to be unique in causing CI, in which the fecundity of uninfected females is reduced after mating with infected males. Here, we provide evidence that an undescribed symbiont in the Bacteroidetes group causes CI in a sexual population of the parasitic wasp Encarsia pergandiella. Wasps were crossed in all four possible combinations of infected and uninfected individuals. In the cross predicted to be incompatible, infected (I) males x uninfected (U) females, progeny production was severely reduced, with these females producing only 12.6% of the number of progeny in other crosses. The incompatibility observed in this haplodiploid species was the female mortality type; dissections showed that most progeny from the incompatible cross died as eggs. The 16S rDNA sequence of this symbiont is 99% identical to a parthenogenesis-inducing symbiont in other Encarsia, and 96% identical to a feminizing symbiont in haplodiploid Brevipalpus mites. Thus, this recently discovered symbiont lineage is capable of inducing three of the four principal manipulations of host reproduction known to be caused by Wolbachia. PMID:14561283

  15. 48 CFR 970.0371-6 - Incompatibility between regular duties and private interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Improper Business Practices and Personal Conflicts of Interest 970.0371-6 Incompatibility between regular duties and private interests. (a) Employees of a management and operating contractor shall not be permitted to...

  16. Self-incompatibility in Papaver: advances in integrating the signalling network.

    PubMed

    Eaves, Deborah J; Flores-Ortiz, Carlos; Haque, Tamanna; Lin, Zongcheng; Teng, Nianjun; Franklin-Tong, Vernonica E

    2014-04-01

    Self-fertilization, which results in reduced fitness of offspring, is a common problem in hermaphrodite angiosperms. To prevent this, many plants utilize SI (self-incompatibility), which is determined by the multi-allelic S-locus, that allows discrimination between self (incompatible) and non-self (compatible) pollen by the pistil. In poppy (Papaver rhoeas), the pistil S-determinant (PrsS) is a small secreted protein which interacts with the pollen S-determinant PrpS, a ~20 kDa novel transmembrane protein. Interaction of matching pollen and pistil S-determinants results in self-recognition, initiating a Ca²⁺-dependent signalling network in incompatible pollen. This triggers several downstream events, including alterations to the cytoskeleton, phosphorylation of sPPases (soluble inorganic pyrophosphatases) and an MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase), increases in ROS (reactive oxygen species) and nitric oxide (NO), and activation of several caspase-like activities. This results in the inhibition of pollen tube growth, prevention of self-fertilization and ultimately PCD (programmed cell death) in incompatible pollen. The present review focuses on our current understanding of the integration of these signals with their targets in the SI/PCD network. We also discuss our recent functional expression of PrpS in Arabidopsis thaliana pollen.

  17. Early detection of graft incompatibility in apricot (Prunus armeniaca) using in vitro techniques.

    PubMed

    Errea, Pilar; Garay, Lilibeth; Marín, Juan Antonio

    2001-05-01

    Graft compatibility has been studied in vitro using callus tissues of apricot (Prunus armeniaca) and different Prunus rootstocks to form scion/rootstock combinations with different degrees of graft compatibility. In these species, incompatibility is manifested by a breakdown of the trees at the union area that can occur some years after grafting. Here, the possibility of obtaining an early detection method to determine graft incompatibility is explored by callus fusion in vitro. The adhesion of the two callus partners, the development of the cells at the contact surface (cell arrangement, intensity of cell-wall staining), and the presence of lipid and phenolic compounds have been studied during the first 3 weeks after grafting in both compatible and incompatible combinations. Differences were observed at the second and the third week of callus co-culture in most of the characters determined, although these differences were present as early as the first week in the case of phenolic compounds. The behaviour of the grafts grown in vitro was correlated to that of the same combinations in the field, suggesting that callus fusion in vitro could be a possible and reliable method for an early detection of graft incompatibility in different Prunus combinations.

  18. 48 CFR 970.0371-6 - Incompatibility between regular duties and private interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Improper Business Practices and Personal Conflicts of Interest 970.0371-6 Incompatibility between regular duties and private interests. (a) Employees of a management and operating contractor shall not be permitted to...

  19. Objective Work-Nonwork Conflict: From Incompatible Demands to Decreased Work Role Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haun, Sascha; Steinmetz, Holger; Dormann, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Research on work-nonwork conflict (WNC) is based on the assumption that incompatible demands from the work and the nonwork domain hamper role performance. This assumption implies that role demands from both domains interact in predicting role performance, but research has been largely limited to main effects. In this multi-source study, we analyze…

  20. Managing Counterinformings: An Interactional Practice for Soliciting Information that Facilitates Reconciliation of Speakers' Incompatible Positions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Jeffrey D.

    2009-01-01

    This article is a conversation-analytic examination of situations where one speaker responds to another in a way that publicly exposes that the two speakers hold an incompatible position on a same matter, and in a way that claims that the respondent holds epistemic authority over the matter. These types of responsive actions (i.e.,…

  1. Arabidopsis cell death in compatible and incompatible interactions with Alternaria brassicicola.

    PubMed

    Su'udi, Mukhamad; Kim, Min Gab; Park, Sang-Ryeol; Hwang, Duk-Ju; Bae, Shin-Chul; Ahn, Il-Pyung

    2011-06-01

    Two strains of necrotrophic Alternaria brassicicola, Ab40857 and Ab42464, are virulent on Korean cabbage and several wild types of Arabidopsis thaliana. Interaction between Ab42464 and Col-0 was compatible, whereas interaction between Ab40857 and Col-0 was incompatible. The loss of defense, no death (dnd) 1 function abrogated the compatibility between Ab42464 and Col-0, and the accelerated cell death (acd) 2 mutation attenuated the Col-0's resistance against Ab40857. These two fungal strains induced PR1 transcription in Col-0. Ab40857 accelerated transcription of PDF1.2, THI2.1, CAT, and POX by 12 h compared to those challenged with Ab42464. More abundant cell death was observed in Col-0 infected with Ab42464, however, callose deposition was evident in the incompatible interaction. Remarkably, Ab40857-infected areas of acd2-2 underwent rampant cell death and Ab42464 triggered callose production in dnd1-1. Furthermore, the incompatibility between Ab40857 and Col-0 was nullified by the coronatine-insensitive 1 (coi1) and phytoalexin-deficient 3 (pad3) mutations but not by nonexpresser of PR genes (npr1) and pad4. Ab40857 induced abundant cell death in pad3. Taken together, cell death during the early infection stage is a key determinant that discriminates between a compatible interaction and an incompatible one, and the resistance within Col-0 against Ab40857 is dependent on a defense-signaling pathway mediated by jasmonic acid and PAD3.

  2. Sustainable Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadwell, Louise; Dillon, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Green schools have moved into a new era that focuses on building a culture of sustainability in every aspect of learning in schools. In the early stages of sustainability education, the focus was on recycling and turning off the lights. Now, students and adults together are moving into the areas of advocacy and action that are based on a deep…

  3. Sustainability 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, David

    2008-01-01

    Sustainability is one of the leading issues of this time. Climate change is real, and widespread commitment and creativity are needed to combat its negative effects. Higher education is the seedbed of the sustainability movement. Much climate research and environmental science takes place on college and university campuses, which are, by their…

  4. Evil intent and design responsibility.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Bart

    2004-04-01

    Mass casualty attacks in recent years have demonstrated the need to include "evil intent" as a design consideration. Three recent actual or potential weapons of mass destruction (WMD) attacks did not involve nuclear bombs or other devices designed as weapons, but rather benign objects used with evil intent. Just as unplanned events such as hurricanes, earthquakes, fires, and user misuse have been codified into design requirements based on the likelihood and potential impact of the event, "evil intent" has to become part of the design process for buildings, vehicles, equipment, and other items. The endstate should be reasonable additions to existing codes and standards such that it is clear what is and is not designed for. In the absence of specific design guidance, professionals with appropriate expertise can assess potential for "evil intent" and provide recommendations to design out or warn against this potential harm to public safety, particularly when codified requirements are not present.

  5. Counterfactual Thinking Facilitates Behavioral Intentions

    PubMed Central

    Smallman, Rachel; Roese, Neal J.

    2009-01-01

    People often ponder what might have been, and these counterfactual inferences have been linked to behavior regulation. Counterfactuals may enhance performance by either a content-specific pathway (via shift in behavioral intentions) and/or a content-neutral pathway (via mindsets or motivation). Three experiments provided new specification of the content-specific pathway. A sequential priming paradigm revealed that counterfactual judgments facilitated RTs to complete behavioral intention judgments relative to control judgments and to a no-judgment baseline (Experiment 1). This facilitation effect was found only for intention judgments that matched the information content of the counterfactual (Experiment 2) and only for intention judgments as opposed to a different judgment that nevertheless focused on the same information content (Experiment 3). These findings clarify the content-specific pathway by which counterfactuals influence behavior. PMID:20161221

  6. Runaway Climate Change as Challenge to the "Closing Circle" of Education for Sustainable Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selby, David; Kagawa, Fumiyo

    2010-01-01

    Education for sustainable development (ESD) is the latest and thickest manifestation of the "closing circle" of policy-driven environmental education. Characterised by definitional haziness, a tendency to blur rather than lay bare inconsistencies and incompatibilities, and a cozy but ill-considered association with the globalisation agenda, the…

  7. A Mutation in an Hsp90 Gene Affects the Sexual Cycle and Suppresses Vegetative Incompatibility in the Fungus Podospora Anserina

    PubMed Central

    Loubradou, G.; Begueret, J.; Turcq, B.

    1997-01-01

    Vegetative incompatibility is widespread in fungi but its molecular mechanism and biological function are still poorly understood. A way to study vegetative incompatibility is to investigate the function of genes whose mutations suppress this phenomenon. In Podospora anserina, these genes are known as mod genes. In addition to suppressing vegetative incompatibility, mod mutations cause some developmental defects. This suggests that the molecular mechanisms of vegetative incompatibility and development pathways are interconnected. The mod-E1 mutation was isolated as a suppressor of the developmental defects of the mod-D2 strain. We show here that mod-E1 also partially suppresses vegetative incompatibility, strengthening the link between development and vegetative incompatibility. mod-E1 is the first suppressor of vegetative incompatibility characterized at the molecular level. It encodes a member of the Hsp90 family, suggesting that development and vegetative incompatibility use common steps of a signal transduction pathway. The involvement of mod-E in the sexual cycle has also been further investigated. PMID:9335595

  8. 14 CFR 420.67 - Separation distance requirements for handling incompatible energetic liquids that are co-located.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...: Pounds of energetic liquid = gallons × density of energetic liquid (pounds per gallon). (c) Determination... handling incompatible energetic liquids that are co-located. 420.67 Section 420.67 Aeronautics and Space... for handling incompatible energetic liquids that are co-located. (a) Separation of energetic...

  9. Genotype × environment interactions in populations possessing Ga1-s and ga1 alleles for cross incompatibility in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pop corn (Zea mays L.) inbred lines with genotype Ga1S/Ga1S are normally cross incompatible to dent corn (Z. mays L.) pollen with genotype ga1/ga1 but the reciprocal cross is fully receptive resulting in full seed set. However, in previous studies the incompatibility reaction of heterozygous plants ...

  10. Design intent tool: User guide

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Evan; Abell, Daniel; Bell, Geoffrey; Faludi, Jeremy; Greenberg, Steve; Hitchcock, Rob; Piette, Mary Ann; Sartor, Dalei; Stum, Karl

    2002-08-23

    This database tool provides a structured approach to recording design decisions that impact a facility's design intent in areas such as energy efficiency.Owners and de signers alike can plan, monitor and verify that a facility's design intent is being met during each stage of the design process. Additionally, the Tool gives commissioning agents, facility operators and future owners and renovators an understanding of how the building and its subsystems are intended to operate, and thus track and benchmark performance.

  11. Neural substrates underlying intentional empathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Yang, Xuedong; Wang, Xiaoying; Northoff, Georg; Han, Shihui

    2012-01-01

    Although empathic responses to stimuli with emotional contents may occur automatically, humans are capable to intentionally empathize with other individuals. Intentional empathy for others is even possible when they do not show emotional expressions. However, little is known about the neuronal mechanisms of this intentionally controlled empathic process. To investigate the neuronal substrates underlying intentional empathy, we scanned 20 healthy Chinese subjects, using fMRI, when they tried to feel inside the emotional states of neutral or angry faces of familiar (Asian) and unfamiliar (Caucasian) models. Skin color evaluation of the same stimuli served as a control task. Compared to a baseline condition, the empathy task revealed a network of established empathy regions, including the anterior cingulate cortex, bilateral inferior frontal cortex and bilateral anterior insula. The contrast of intentional empathy vs skin color evaluation, however, revealed three regions: the bilateral inferior frontal cortex, whose hemodynamic responses were independent of perceived emotion and familiarity and the right-middle temporal gyrus, whose activity was modulated by emotion but not by familiarity. These findings extend our understanding of the role of the inferior frontal cortex and the middle temporal gyrus in empathy by demonstrating their involvement in intentional empathy. PMID:21511824

  12. Apparent response incompatibility effects on P3 latency depend on the task.

    PubMed

    Pfefferbaum, A; Christensen, C; Ford, J M; Kopell, B S

    1986-11-01

    Ten young women were tested with an ERP paradigm that used the words 'left,' 'right,' 'LEFT,' 'RIGHT' as stimuli. The stimulus sequence was presented as several separate runs with varying response instructions. Subjects were instructed to respond according to the meaning of the stimulus in the (WORD task), to the case in which the stimulus was written (CASE task), or to both the case and meaning of the stimulus (CASE/WORD) task. In each task, half the trials called for a response that was incompatible with the stimulus. For the WORD task, compatible and incompatible trials were presented as separate blocks of trials. For all 3 tasks an additional stimulus sequence was presented in which the words were degraded with superimposed visual random noise. Reaction time (RT) in the CASE/WORD task was more than 100 msec later than in the other tasks. In the WORD and CASE/WORD tasks, RT was delayed more than 100 msec when the response was incompatible with the stimulus. Degrading the stimulus additionally delayed RT by about 100 msec. In the WORD and CASE tasks, error RTs were earlier than correct RTs. P3 latency was measured with a single-trial latency adjustment algorithm. P3 latency was delayed in the CASE/WORD task compared to the other 2 tasks. P3 was delayed by degrading the stimuli. Contrary to some previous reports, P3 was delayed by about 70 msec when incompatible responses were required, but only in the WORD task. Taken together with error and RT data, these P3 latency data are consistent with the notion that the task causes subjects to adopt different strategies and hence different types of processing (i.e., serial vs. parallel). Depending on the type of processing, P3 may appear to be affected by response incompatibility.

  13. Genetic and cellular analysis of cross-incompatibility in Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yongxian; Kermicle, Jerry L; Evans, Matthew M S

    2014-03-01

    Three genetic systems conferring cross-incompatibility have been described in Zea mays: Teosinte crossing barrier1-strong (Tcb1-s) found in teosinte, and Gametophyte factor1-strong (Ga1-s) and Ga2-s found in maize and teosinte. The reproductive barrier between maize and some weedy teosintes is controlled by the Tcb1-s locus. Multi-generation inheritance experiments on two independent Tcb1-s lineages show that the Tcb1-s barrier is unstable in some maize lines. Reciprocal crosses between Tcb1-s tester plants and three recombinants in the Tcb1-s mapping region demonstrate that the Tcb1-s haplotype contains separable male and female components. In vivo assays of the dynamics of pollen tube growth and pollen tube morphology during rejection of incompatible pollen in silks carrying the Tcb1-s, Ga1-s, or Ga2-s barriers showed that, in all three, pollen tube growth is slower than in compatible crosses at early stages and had ceased by 24 h after pollination. In all three crossing barrier systems, incompatible pollen tubes have clustered callose plugs in contrast to pollen tubes of compatible crosses. Incompatible pollen tubes growing in the Tcb1-s, Ga1-s, and Ga2-s silks have different morphologies: straight, curved, and kinked, respectively. The distinct morphologies suggest that these crossing barriers block incompatible pollen through different mechanisms. This study lays the foundation for cloning the Tcb1 genes and provides clues about the cellular mechanisms involved in pollen rejection in the Tcb1-s, Ga1-s, and Ga2-s crossing barriers.

  14. Factor Composition of the Suicide Intent Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mieczkowski, Tammy A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Analyzed Suicide Intent Scale using data from 98 psychiatric inpatients who had attempted suicide. Analysis resulted in two-factor solution: Lethal Intent factor contained items pertaining to subjective level of lethal intent; Planning factor contained items related to objective planning for attempt. Findings suggest that Suicide Intent Scale can…

  15. Intentionality to Learn, in an Academic Domain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulikowich, Jonna M.; Alexander, Patricia A.

    2010-01-01

    Research Findings: All human activity, beyond the simplest of reflexes or biological reactions, is a manifestation of intentions. When those intentions are directed toward changes in one's understanding or performance, they can be labeled "intentionality to learn". In this article, we overview particular premises about intentionality to learn and…

  16. Self-Incompatibility-Induced Programmed Cell Death in Field Poppy Pollen Involves Dramatic Acidification of the Incompatible Pollen Tube Cytosol1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Katie A.; Bosch, Maurice; Haque, Tamanna; Teng, Nianjun; Poulter, Natalie S.; Franklin-Tong, Vernonica E.

    2015-01-01

    Self-incompatibility (SI) is an important genetically controlled mechanism to prevent inbreeding in higher plants. SI involves highly specific interactions during pollination, resulting in the rejection of incompatible (self) pollen. Programmed cell death (PCD) is an important mechanism for destroying cells in a precisely regulated manner. SI in field poppy (Papaver rhoeas) triggers PCD in incompatible pollen. During SI-induced PCD, we previously observed a major acidification of the pollen cytosol. Here, we present measurements of temporal alterations in cytosolic pH ([pH]cyt); they were surprisingly rapid, reaching pH 6.4 within 10 min of SI induction and stabilizing by 60 min at pH 5.5. By manipulating the [pH]cyt of the pollen tubes in vivo, we show that [pH]cyt acidification is an integral and essential event for SI-induced PCD. Here, we provide evidence showing the physiological relevance of the cytosolic acidification and identify key targets of this major physiological alteration. A small drop in [pH]cyt inhibits the activity of a soluble inorganic pyrophosphatase required for pollen tube growth. We also show that [pH]cyt acidification is necessary and sufficient for triggering several key hallmark features of the SI PCD signaling pathway, notably activation of a DEVDase/caspase-3-like activity and formation of SI-induced punctate actin foci. Importantly, the actin binding proteins Cyclase-Associated Protein and Actin-Depolymerizing Factor are identified as key downstream targets. Thus, we have shown the biological relevance of an extreme but physiologically relevant alteration in [pH]cyt and its effect on several components in the context of SI-induced events and PCD. PMID:25630437

  17. Unusual heterostyly: style dimorphism and self-incompatibility are not tightly associated in Lithodora and Glandora (Boraginaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, V.; Arroyo, J.; Castro, S.; Navarro, L.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Heterostyly is a floral polymorphism characterized by the reciprocal position of stamens and stigmas in different flower morphs in a population. This reciprocal herkogamy is usually associated with an incompatibility system that prevents selfing and intra-morph fertilization, termed a heteromorphic incompatibility system. In different evolutionary models explaining heterostyly, it has been alternately argued that heteromorphic incompatibility either preceded or followed the evolution of reciprocal herkogamy. In some models, reciprocal herkogamy and incompatibility have been hypothesized to be linked together during the evolution of the heterostylous system. Methods We examine the incompatibility systems in species with different stylar polymorphisms from the genera Lithodora and Glandora (Boraginaceae). We then test whether evolution towards reciprocal herkogamy is associated with the acquisition of incompatibility. To this end, a phylogeny of these genera and related species is reconstructed and the morphological and reproductive changes that occurred during the course of evolution are assessed. Key Results Both self-compatibility and self-incompatibility are found within the studied genera, along with different degrees of intra-morph compatibility. We report for the first time extensive variability among members of the genus Glandora and related species in terms of the presence or absence of intraspecies polymorphism and heteromorphic incompatibility. Overall, our results do not support a tight link between floral polymorphism and incompatibility systems. Conclusions The independent evolution of stylar polymorphism and incompatibility appears to have occurred in this group of plants. This refutes the canonical view that there is strong linkage between these reproductive traits. PMID:21985797

  18. Naturally Occurring Incompatibilities between Different Culex pipiens pallens Populations as the Basis of Potential Mosquito Control Measures

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Zhu, Changliang; Zhang, Donghui

    2013-01-01

    Background Vector-borne diseases remain a threat to public health, especially in tropical countries. The incompatible insect technique has been explored as a potential control strategy for several important insect vectors. However, this strategy has not been tested in Culex pipiens pallens, the most prevalent mosquito species in China. Previous works used introgression to generate new strains that matched the genetic backgrounds of target populations while harboring a new Wolbachia endosymbiont, resulting in mating competitiveness and cytoplasmic incompatibility. The generation of these incompatible insects is often time-consuming, and the long-term stability of the newly created insect-Wolbachia symbiosis is uncertain. Considering the wide distribution of Cx. pipiens pallens and hence possible isolation of different populations, we sought to test for incompatibilities between natural populations and the possibility of exploiting these incompatibilities as a control strategy. Methodology/Principal Findings Three field populations were collected from three geographic locations in eastern China. Reciprocal cross results showed that bi-directional patterns of incompatibility existed between some populations. Mating competition experiments indicated that incompatible males could compete with cognate males in mating with females, leading to reduced overall fecundity. F1 offspring from incompatible crosses maintained their maternal crossing types. All three populations tested positive for Wolbachia. Removal of Wolbachia by tetracycline rendered matings between these populations fully compatible. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that naturally occurring patterns of cytoplasmic incompatibility between Cx. pipiens pallens populations can be the basis of a control strategy for this important vector species. The observed incompatibilities are caused by Wolbachia. More tests including field trials are warranted to evaluate the feasibility of this strategy as a

  19. Family medicine residents’ practice intentions

    PubMed Central

    Grierson, Lawrence E.M.; Fowler, Nancy; Kwan, Matthew Y.W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess residents’ practice intentions since the introduction of the College of Family Physicians of Canada’s Triple C curriculum, which focuses on graduating family physicians who will provide comprehensive care within traditional and newer models of family practice. Design A survey based on Ajzen’s theory of planned behaviour was administered on 2 occasions. Setting McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont. Participants Residents (n = 135) who were enrolled in the Department of Family Medicine Postgraduate Residency Program at McMaster University in July 2012 and July 2013; 54 of the 60 first-year residents who completed the survey in 2012 completed it again in 2013. Main outcome measures The survey was modeled so as to measure the respondents’ intentions to practise with a comprehensive scope; determine the degree to which their attitudes, subjective norms, and perceptions of control about comprehensive practice influence those intentions; and investigate how these relationships change as residents progress through the curriculum. The survey also queried the respondents about their intentions with respect to particular medical services that underpin comprehensive practice. Results The responses indicate that the factors modeled by the theory of planned behaviour survey account for 60% of the variance in the residents’ intentions to adopt a comprehensive scope of practice upon graduation, that there is room for curricular improvement with respect to encouraging residents to practise comprehensive care, and that targeting subjective norms about comprehensive practice might have the greatest influence on improving resident intentions. Conclusion The theory of planned behaviour presents an effective approach to assessing curricular effects on resident practice intentions while also providing meaningful information for guiding further program evaluation efforts in the Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University. PMID:26889508

  20. Sustainable Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auerbach, Raymond

    1994-01-01

    Discusses South African national development priorities, sustainable development, and the future of agriculture and presents three scenarios of possible national action: production for sale and export, household food security, and conservation of natural resources. (MKR)

  1. Sustainable Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmandt, Jurgen; Ward, C. H.; Marilu Hastings, Assisted By

    2000-04-01

    Demographers predict that the world population will double during the first half of the 21st century before it will begin to level off. In this volume, a group of prominent authors examine what societal changes must occur to meet this challenge to the natural environment and the transformational changes that we must experience to achieve sustainability. Frances Cairncross, Herman E. Daly, Stephen H. Schneider and others provide a broad discussion of sustainable development. They detail economic and environmental, as well as spiritual and religious, corporate and social, scientific and political factors. Sustainable Development: The Challenge of Transition offers many insightful policy recommendations about how business, government, and individuals must change their current values, priorities, and behavior to meet present and future challenges. It will appeal to scholars and decision makers interested in global change, environmental policy, population growth, and sustainable development, and also to corporate environmental managers.

  2. Beyond human intentions and emotions

    PubMed Central

    Juan, Elsa; Frum, Chris; Bianchi-Demicheli, Francesco; Wang, Yi-Wen; Lewis, James W.; Cacioppo, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Although significant advances have been made in our understanding of the neural basis of action observation and intention understanding in the last few decades by studies demonstrating the involvement of a specific brain network (action observation network; AON), these have been largely based on experimental studies in which people have been considered as strictly isolated entities. However, we, as social species, spend much more of our time performing actions interacting with others. Research shows that a person's position along the continuum of perceived social isolation/bonding to others is associated with a variety of physical and mental health effects. Thus, there is a crucial need to better understand the neural basis of intention understanding performed in interpersonal and emotional contexts. To address this issue, we performed a meta-analysis using of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies over the past decade that examined brain and cortical network processing associated with understanding the intention of others actions vs. those associated with passionate love for others. Both overlapping and distinct cortical and subcortical regions were identified for intention and love, respectively. These findings provide scientists and clinicians with a set of brain regions that can be targeted for future neuroscientific studies on intention understanding, and help develop neurocognitive models of pair-bonding. PMID:23543838

  3. Beyond human intentions and emotions.

    PubMed

    Juan, Elsa; Frum, Chris; Bianchi-Demicheli, Francesco; Wang, Yi-Wen; Lewis, James W; Cacioppo, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Although significant advances have been made in our understanding of the neural basis of action observation and intention understanding in the last few decades by studies demonstrating the involvement of a specific brain network (action observation network; AON), these have been largely based on experimental studies in which people have been considered as strictly isolated entities. However, we, as social species, spend much more of our time performing actions interacting with others. Research shows that a person's position along the continuum of perceived social isolation/bonding to others is associated with a variety of physical and mental health effects. Thus, there is a crucial need to better understand the neural basis of intention understanding performed in interpersonal and emotional contexts. To address this issue, we performed a meta-analysis using of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies over the past decade that examined brain and cortical network processing associated with understanding the intention of others actions vs. those associated with passionate love for others. Both overlapping and distinct cortical and subcortical regions were identified for intention and love, respectively. These findings provide scientists and clinicians with a set of brain regions that can be targeted for future neuroscientific studies on intention understanding, and help develop neurocognitive models of pair-bonding. PMID:23543838

  4. Sustainable markets for sustainable energy

    SciTech Connect

    Millan, J.; Smyser, C.

    1997-12-01

    The author discusses how the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is involved in sustainable energy development. It presently has 50 loans and grants for non conventional renewable energy projects and ten grants for efficiency programs for $600 and $17 million respectively, representing 100 MW of power. The IDB is concerned with how to create a sustainable market for sustainable energy projects. The IDB is trying to work with government, private sector, NGOs, trading allies, credit sources, and regulators to find proper roles for such projects. He discusses how the IDB is working to expand its vision and objectives in renewable energy projects in Central and South America.

  5. Involvement of MLPK Pathway in Intraspecies Unilateral Incompatibility Regulated by a Single Locus with Stigma and Pollen Factors.

    PubMed

    Takada, Yoshinobu; Sato, Takahiro; Suzuki, Go; Shiba, Hiroshi; Takayama, Seiji; Watanabe, Masao

    2013-03-11

    Plants have evolved many systems to prevent undesirable fertilization. Among these, incompatibility is a well-organized system in which pollen germination or pollen-tube growth is inhibited in pistils. We previously found that a novel one-way pollen-stigma incompatibility response (Unilateral Incompatibility; UI) occurred between two self-incompatible Brassica rapa plants, a Turkish line and a Japanese cultivated hybrid variety "Osome." Pollen from the Turkish line is rejected on the stigma of "Osome" line but the reverse cross is compatible; such a UI phenotype closely resembles self-incompatibility (SI). The pollen factor of this UI has been genetically explained by a single locus which is different from the S-locus. In this study, we performed further genetic analyses on this intraspecies UI and showed that the stigma factor was also controlled by a single locus, and we named the loci corresponding to the stigma and pollen factors of the intraspecies UI as SUI (Stigmatic Unilateral Incompatibility) and PUI (Pollen Unilateral Incompatibility) loci, respectively. Interestingly, segregation analysis for SUI and PUI indicated that they are closely linked to each other and behave as a single unit. To investigate the effect of an SI-related gene, MLPK, in this UI, we produced segregation lines for SUI and mlpk. A distorted segregation ratio of SUI phenotype in mlpk background indicated involvement of MLPK in SUI, suggesting the existence of an MLPK-dependent novel pollen-stigma recognition mechanism.

  6. Neural Correlates of Intentional Communication

    PubMed Central

    Noordzij, Matthijs L.; Newman-Norlund, Sarah E.; de Ruiter, Jan Peter; Hagoort, Peter; Levinson, Stephen C.; Toni, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    We know a great deal about the neurophysiological mechanisms supporting instrumental actions, i.e., actions designed to alter the physical state of the environment. In contrast, little is known about our ability to select communicative actions, i.e., actions directly designed to modify the mental state of another agent. We have recently provided novel empirical evidence for a mechanism in which a communicator selects his actions on the basis of a prediction of the communicative intentions that an addressee is most likely to attribute to those actions. The main novelty of those findings was that this prediction of intention recognition is cerebrally implemented within the intention recognition system of the communicator, is modulated by the ambiguity in meaning of the communicative acts, and not by their sensorimotor complexity. The characteristics of this predictive mechanism support the notion that human communicative abilities are distinct from both sensorimotor and linguistic processes. PMID:21151781

  7. Morality, Intentionality, and Intergroup Attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Killen, Melanie; Rizzo, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Morality is at the core of what it means to be social. Moral judgments require the recognition of intentionality, that is, an attribution of the target’s intentions towards another. Most research on the origins of morality has focused on intragroup morality, which involves applying morality to individuals in one’s own group. Yet, increasingly, there has been new evidence that beginning early in development, children are able to apply moral concepts to members of an outgroup as well, and that this ability appears to be complex. The challenges associated with applying moral judgments to members of outgroups includes understanding group dynamics, the intentions of others who are different from the self, and having the capacity to challenge stereotypic expectations of others who are different from the ingroup. Research with children provides a window into the complexities of moral judgment and raises new questions, which are ripe for investigations into the evolutionary basis of morality. PMID:25717199

  8. Can cytoplasmic incompatibility inducing Wolbachia promote the evolution of mate preferences?

    PubMed

    Champion de Crespigny, F E; Butlin, R K; Wedell, N

    2005-07-01

    The maternally inherited bacterium, Wolbachia pipientis, manipulates host reproduction by rendering uninfected females reproductively incompatible with infected males (cytoplasmic incompatibility, CI). Hosts may evolve mechanisms, such as mate preferences, to avoid fitness costs of Wolbachia infection. Despite the potential importance of mate choice for Wolbachia population dynamics, this possibility remains largely unexplored. Here we model the spread of an allele encoding female mate preference for uninfected males alongside the spread of CI inducing Wolbachia. Mate preferences can evolve but the spread of the preference allele depends on factors associated with both Wolbachia infection and the preference allele itself. Incomplete maternal transmission of Wolbachia, fitness costs and low CI, improve the spread of the preference allele and impact on the population dynamics of Wolbachia. In addition, mate preferences are found in infected individuals. These results have important consequences for the fate of Wolbachia and studies addressing mate preferences in infected populations.

  9. Genetic analysis of barrage line formation during mycelial incompatibility in Rosellinia necatrix.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kenichi; Inoue, Kanako; Nakamura, Hitoshi; Hamanaka, Taiki; Ohta, Tatsuro; Kitazawa, Hirotomo; Kida, Chiaki; Kanematsu, Satoko; Park, Pyoyun

    2011-01-01

    When mycelia of Rosellinia necatrix encounter mycelia of a different genetic strain, distinct barrage lines are formed between the two. These barrages have variable features such as pigmented pseudosclerotia structures, a clear zone, fuzzy hair-like mycelia, or tuft-like mycelia, suggesting that mycelial incompatibility triggers a number of cellular reactions. In this study, to evaluate cellular reactions we performed genetic analysis of mycelial incompatibility of R. nectarix, using 20 single ascospore isolates from single perithecia. Mycelial interaction zones were removed by spatula and cellular reactions studied on oatmeal agar media. The interaction zones were categorized into types such as sharp or wide lines, with or without melanin, and combinations of these. Although various reaction types were observed, we were able to identify a single genetic factor that appears to be responsible for the barrage line formation within oatmeal agar medium. DNA polymorphism analysis identified parental isolates and revealed that R. necatrix has a heterothallic life cycle. PMID:21215958

  10. Grain boundaries as reservoirs of incompatible elements in the Earth's mantle.

    PubMed

    Hiraga, Takehiko; Anderson, Ian M; Kohlstedt, David L

    2004-02-19

    The concentrations and locations of elements that strongly partition into the fluid phase in rocks provide essential constraints on geochemical and geodynamical processes in Earth's interior. A fundamental question remains, however, as to where these incompatible elements reside before formation of the fluid phase. Here we show that partitioning of calcium between the grain interiors and grain boundaries of olivine in natural and synthetic olivine-rich aggregates follows a thermodynamic model for equilibrium grain-boundary segregation. The model predicts that grain boundaries can be the primary storage sites for elements with large ionic radius--that is, incompatible elements in the Earth's mantle. This observation provides a mechanism for the selective extraction of these elements and gives a framework for interpreting geochemical signatures in mantle rocks.

  11. Compartmentalization of incompatible reagents within Pickering emulsion droplets for one-pot cascade reactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hengquan; Fu, Luman; Wei, Lijuan; Liang, Jifen; Binks, Bernard P

    2015-01-28

    It is a dream that future synthetic chemistry can mimic living systems to process multistep cascade reactions in a one-pot fashion. One of the key challenges is the mutual destruction of incompatible or opposing reagents, for example, acid and base, oxidants and reductants. A conceptually novel strategy is developed here to address this challenge. This strategy is based on a layered Pickering emulsion system, which is obtained through lamination of Pickering emulsions. In this working Pickering emulsion, the dispersed phase can separately compartmentalize the incompatible reagents to avoid their mutual destruction, while the continuous phase allows other reagent molecules to diffuse freely to access the compartmentalized reagents for chemical reactions. The compartmentalization effects and molecular transport ability of the Pickering emulsion were investigated. The deacetalization-reduction, deacetalization-Knoevenagel, deacetalization-Henry and diazotization-iodization cascade reactions demonstrate well the versatility and flexibility of our strategy in processing the one-pot cascade reactions involving mutually destructive reagents.

  12. Malus pumila 'Spy 227' and Apple stem pitting virus: graft incompatibility and epinasty.

    PubMed

    Brakta, Ajay; Handa, Anil; Thakur, P D; Tomar, Manica; Kumar, Pardeep

    2015-06-01

    Apple stem pitting foveavirus (ASPV) is one of the most important and widespread virus infecting apples in the world. Of late, the virus has been found to be invariably associated with most of the apple plantations of Shimla district of Himachal Pradesh based on DAS-ELISA results. Bioassay of viruses in vegetatively propagated crops including apple is considered to be an essential component in indexing programmes for the production of virus free propagating material. Woody indicator Malus pumila 'Spy 227' was used for the detection of ASPV through double grafting method. Graft incompatibility and epinasty symptoms were observed on Malus pumila Spy 227 indicator plants. Further, molecular identification of the virus isolate was done by cloning and sequencing of the test isolate. Partial sequence analysis of the coat protein gene showed 89 % nucleotide identity in BLASTN analysis with ASPV isolate from China (Accession No. JF895517). This is the first record of ASPV producing Graft incompatibility on Spy 227 indicator plants.

  13. Intentional replantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cotter, Michael R; Panzarino, John

    2006-06-01

    Nonsurgical retreatment and surgical endodontics are not always viable solutions to endodontic disease. Access for retreatment may be limited by posts. Surgical endodontics may be limited by anatomical features including bone thickness and nerve and sinus proximity. Anatomical limitations and complex restorations may prevent implant placement. Intentional replantation is considered by many as a procedure of last resort when nonsurgical or surgical endodontics is contra-indicated. The treatment described demonstrates intentional replantation as a procedure to be considered when endodontic procedures or a dental implant are not possible.

  14. Cytoplasmic male sterility contributes to hybrid incompatibility between subspecies of Arabidopsis lyrata.

    PubMed

    Aalto, Esa A; Koelewijn, Hans-Peter; Savolainen, Outi

    2013-10-03

    In crosses between evolutionarily diverged populations, genomic incompatibilities may result in sterile hybrids, indicating evolution of reproductive isolation. In several plant families, crosses within a population can also lead to male sterile progeny because of conflict between the maternally and biparentally inherited genomes. We examined hybrid fertility between subspecies of the perennial outcrossing self-incompatible Lyrate rockcress (Arabidopsis lyrata) in large reciprocal F2 progenies and three generations of backcrosses. In one of the reciprocal F2 progenies, almost one-fourth of the plants were male-sterile. Correspondingly, almost one-half of the plants in one of the four reciprocal backcross progenies expressed male sterility. In an additional four independent F2 and backcross families, three segregated male sterility. The observed asymmetrical hybrid incompatibility is attributable to male sterility factors in one cytoplasm, for which the other population lacks effective fertility restorers. Genotyping of 96 molecular markers and quantitative trait locus mapping revealed that only 60% of the plants having the male sterile cytoplasm and lacking the corresponding restorers were phenotypically male-sterile. Genotyping data showed that there is only one restorer locus, which mapped to a 600-kb interval at the top of chromosome 2 in a region containing a cluster of pentatricopeptide repeat genes. Male fertility showed no trade-off with seed production. We discuss the role of cytoplasm and genomic conflict in incipient speciation and conclude that cytoplasmic male sterility-lowering hybrid fitness is a transient effect with limited potential to form permanent reproductive barriers between diverged populations of hermaphrodite self-incompatible species.

  15. Risk estimation of HNA-3 incompatibility and alloimmunization in Thai populations.

    PubMed

    Nathalang, Oytip; Intharanut, Kamphon; Siriphanthong, Kanokpol; Nathalang, Siriporn; Leetrakool, Nipapan

    2015-01-01

    Severe transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is often due to antibodies in blood components directed against human neutrophil antigen (HNA)-3a. This study aimed to report the genotype frequencies of the HNA-3 system and to estimate the potential risk of HNA-3 incompatibility and alloimmunization in two Thai populations. Eight hundred DNA samples obtained from 500 unrelated healthy blood donors at the National Blood Centre, Thai Red Cross Society, Bangkok and 300 samples from the Blood Bank, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand were included. HNA-3 genotyping was performed using an in-house polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) technique. The observed frequencies of the HNA-3a/3a, HNA-3a/3b, and HNA-3b/3b genotypes were 0.528, 0.380, and 0.092 in central Thais and 0.600, 0.350, and 0.050 in northern Thais, respectively. The frequencies were used to estimate HNA-3 incompatibility and risk of HNA-3a alloimmunization. The HNA-3 incompatibility in central Thais (33.28%) was higher than northern Thais (28.75%), corresponding to a significantly higher probability of HNA-3a alloimmunization (P<0.05) similar to Japanese and Chinese populations. This study showed the high risk of HNA-3 incompatibility and alloimmunization, especially in central Thai blood donors. A molecular-based identification of the HNA-3 genotype of female donors is suggested to reduce the risk of TRALI following plasma and whole blood allogeneic transfusion.

  16. Offsite radiological consequence calculation for the bounding mixing of incompatible materials accident

    SciTech Connect

    SANDGREN, K.R.

    2003-03-21

    This document quantifies the offsite radiological consequence of the bounding mixing of incompatible materials accident for comparison with the 25 rem Evaluation Guideline established in DOE-STD-3009, Appendix A. The bounding accident is an inadvertent addition of acid to a waste tank containing high levels of caustic. Conservative input parameters were applied in accordance with the guidance provided. The calculated offsite dose does not challenge the Evaluation Guideline.

  17. Artificial triple Wolbachia infection in Aedes albopictus yields a new pattern of unidirectional cytoplasmic incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yuqing; Gavotte, Laurent; Mercer, David R; Dobson, Stephen L

    2010-09-01

    Obligately intracellular Wolbachia bacteria infect numerous invertebrates and often manipulate host reproduction to facilitate the spread of infection. An example of reproductive manipulation is Wolbachia-induced cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI), which occurs commonly in insects. This CI has been the focus both of basic scientific studies of naturally occurring invasion events and of applied investigations on the use of Wolbachia as a vehicle to drive desired genotypes into insect populations ("gene drive" or "population replacement" strategies). The latter application requires an ability to generate artificial infections that cause a pattern of unidirectional incompatibility with the targeted host population. A suggested target of population replacement strategies is the mosquito Aedes albopictus (Asian tiger mosquito), an important invasive pest and disease vector. Aedes albopictus individuals are naturally "superinfected" with two Wolbachia types: wAlbA and wAlbB. Thus, generating a strain that is unidirectionally incompatible with field populations requires the introduction of an additional infection into the preexisting superinfection. Although prior reports demonstrate an ability to transfer Wolbachia infections to A. albopictus artificially, including both intra- and interspecific Wolbachia transfers, previous efforts have not generated a strain capable of invading natural populations. Here we describe the generation of a stable triple infection by introducing Wolbachia wRi from Drosophila simulans into a naturally superinfected A. albopictus strain. The triple-infected strain displays a pattern of unidirectional incompatibility with the naturally infected strain. This unidirectional CI, combined with a high fidelity of maternal inheritance and low fecundity effects, suggests that the artificial cytotype could serve as an appropriate vehicle for gene drive.

  18. Prdm9 Incompatibility Controls Oligospermia and Delayed Fertility but No Selfish Transmission in Mouse Intersubspecific Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Mihola, Ondřej; Piálek, Jaroslav; Forejt, Jiří; Trachtulec, Zdenek

    2014-01-01

    PR-domain 9 (Prdm9) is the first hybrid sterility gene identified in mammals. The incompatibility between Prdm9 from Mus musculus domesticus (Mmd; the B6 strain) and the Hstx2 region of chromosome (Chr) X from M. m. musculus (Mmm; the PWD strain) participates in the complete meiotic arrest of mouse intersubspecific (PWD×B6)F1 hybrid males. Other studies suggest that also semisterile intersubspecific hybrids are relevant for mouse speciation, but the genes responsible remain unknown. To investigate the causes of this semisterility, we analyzed the role of Prdm9 and Chr X in hybrids resulting from the crosses of PWK, another Mmm-derived inbred strain. We demonstrate that Prdm9 and Chr X control the partial meiotic arrest and reduced sperm count in (PWK×B6)F1 males. Asynapsis of heterosubspecific chromosomes and semisterility were partially suppressed by removal of the B6 allele of Prdm9. Polymorphisms between PWK and PWD on Chr X but not in the Prdm9 region were responsible for the modification of the outcome of Prdm9 - Chr X F1 hybrid incompatibility. Furthermore, (PWK×B6)F1 hybrid males displayed delayed fertility dependent on the Prdm9 incompatibility. While the Drosophila hybrid sterility gene Overdrive causes both delayed fertility and increased transmission of its own chromosome to the offspring, the segregation of Chr X and the Prdm9 region from the mouse (PWK×B6)F1 males was normal. Our results indicate extended functional consequences of Prdm9 - Chr X intersubspecific incompatibility on the fertility of hybrids and should influence the design of fertility analyses in hybrid zones and of laboratory crosses between Mmm and Mmd strains. PMID:24756080

  19. Multiple infections and diversity of cytoplasmic incompatibility in a haplodiploid species.

    PubMed

    Mouton, L; Henri, H; Boulétreau, M; Vavre, F

    2005-02-01

    Cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) is a sperm-egg incompatibility commonly induced by the intracellular endosymbiont bacterium Wolbachia that, in diploid species, results in embryo mortality. In haplodiploid species, two types of CI exist depending on whether the incompatible fertilized eggs develop into males (male development (MD)) or abort (female mortality (FM)). CI allows multiple infections to be maintained in host populations, and thus allows interactions to occur between co-infecting strains. In Leptopilina heterotoma, three Wolbachia strains coexist naturally (wLhet1, wLhet2, wLhet3). When these three strains are all present, they induce a CI of FM type, whereas wLhet1 alone expresses a CI phenotype intermediate between MD and FM. Here, we compare CI effects in crosses involving insect lines sharing the same nuclear background, but harboring different mixtures of strains. Mating experiments showed that: (i) wLhet2 and wLhet3 also induce an intermediate CI when acting alone, and show a bidirectional incompatibility; (ii) there is no interaction between the co-infecting strains in CI expression; (iii) the diversity of Wolbachia present within a male host influences the expression of CI: an increase in the number of strains is correlated with a decrease in the proportion of the MD type, which is also correlated with an increase in bacterial density. All these data suggest that the CI of FM type results from a stronger effect than the MD type, which conflicts with the conventional hypotheses used to explain CI diversity in haplodiploids, and could provide some new information about CI mechanisms in insects. PMID:15562287

  20. Arabidopsis Cell Death in Compatible and Incompatible Interactions with Alternaria brassicicola

    PubMed Central

    Su’udi, Mukhamad; Kim, Min Gab; Park, Sang-Ryeol; Hwang, Duk-Ju; Bae, Shin-Chul; Ahn, Il-Pyung

    2011-01-01

    Two strains of necrotrophic Alternaria brassicicola, Ab40857 and Ab42464, are virulent on Korean cabbage and several wild types of Arabidopsis thaliana. Interaction between Ab42464 and Col-0 was compatible, whereas interaction between Ab40857 and Col-0 was incompatible. The loss of defense, no death (dnd) 1 function abrogated the compatibility between Ab42464 and Col-0, and the accelerated cell death (acd) 2 mutation attenuated the Col-0’s resistance against Ab40857. These two fungal strains induced PR1 transcription in Col-0. Ab40857 accelerated transcription of PDF1.2, THI2.1, CAT, and POX by 12 h compared to those challenged with Ab42464. More abundant cell death was observed in Col-0 infected with Ab42464, however, callose deposition was evident in the incompatible interaction. Remarkably, Ab40857-infected areas of acd2-2 underwent rampant cell death and Ab42464 triggered callose production in dnd1-1. Furthermore, the incompatibility between Ab40857 and Col-0 was nullified by the coronatine- insensitive 1 (coi1) and phytoalexin-deficient 3 (pad3) mutations but not by nonexpresser of PR genes (npr1) and pad4. Ab40857 induced abundant cell death in pad3. Taken together, cell death during the early infection stage is a key determinant that discriminates between a compatible interaction and an incompatible one, and the resistance within Col-0 against Ab40857 is dependent on a defensesignaling pathway mediated by jasmonic acid and PAD3. PMID:21688205

  1. Effects of recombination on hitchhiking diversity in the Brassica self-incompatibility locus complex.

    PubMed

    Takuno, Shohei; Fujimoto, Ryo; Sugimura, Tetsu; Sato, Keiichi; Okamoto, Shunsuke; Zhang, Shao-Ling; Nishio, Takeshi

    2007-10-01

    In self-incompatibility, a number of S haplotypes are maintained by frequency-dependent selection, which results in trans-specific S haplotypes. The region of several kilobases (approximately 40-60 kb) from SP6 to SP2, including self-incompatibility-related genes and some adjacent genes in Brassica rapa, has high nucleotide diversity due to the hitchhiking effect, and therefore we call this region the "S-locus complex." Recombination in the S-locus complex is considered to be suppressed. We sequenced regions of >50 kb of the S-locus complex of three S haplotypes in B. rapa and found higher nucleotide diversity in intergenic regions than in coding regions. Two highly similar regions of >10 kb were found between BrS-8 and BrS-46. Phylogenetic analysis using trans-specific S haplotypes (called interspecific pairs) of B. rapa and B. oleracea suggested that recombination reduced the nucleotide diversity in these two regions and that the genes not involved in self-incompatibility in the S-locus complex and the kinase domain, but not the S domain, of SRK have also experienced recombination. Recombination may reduce hitchhiking diversity in the S-locus complex, whereas the region from the S domain to SP11 would disfavor recombination.

  2. Style self-incompatibility gene products of Nicotlana alata are ribonucleases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure, Bruce A.; Haring, Volker; Ebert, Paul R.; Anderson, Marilyn A.; Simpson, Richard J.; Sakiyama, Fumio; Clarke, Adrienne E.

    1989-12-01

    SELF-INCOMPATIBILITY in flowering plants is often controlled by a single nuclear gene (the S-gene) having several alleles1. This gene prevents fertilization by self-pollen or by pollen bearing either of the two S- alleles expressed in the style. Sequence analysis shows that three alleles of the S gene of Nicotiana alata encode style glycoproteins2,3 with regions of defined homology. Two of the homologous regions also show precise homology with ribonucleases T2 (ref. 4) and Rh (ref. 5). We report here that glycoproteins corresponding to the S1, S2, S3, S6 and S7 alleles isolated from style extracts of N. alata6 are ribonucleases. These style S-gene-encoded glycoproteins account for most of the ribonuclease activity recovered from style extracts. The ribonuclease specific activity of style extracts of the self-incompatible species N. alata is 100-1,000-fold higher than that of the related self-compatible species N. tabacum. These observations implicate ribonuclease activity in the mechanism of gametophytic self-incompatibility.

  3. High-resolution mapping reveals hundreds of genetic incompatibilities in hybridizing fish species

    PubMed Central

    Schumer, Molly; Cui, Rongfeng; Powell, Daniel L; Dresner, Rebecca; Rosenthal, Gil G; Andolfatto, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Hybridization is increasingly being recognized as a common process in both animal and plant species. Negative epistatic interactions between genes from different parental genomes decrease the fitness of hybrids and can limit gene flow between species. However, little is known about the number and genome-wide distribution of genetic incompatibilities separating species. To detect interacting genes, we perform a high-resolution genome scan for linkage disequilibrium between unlinked genomic regions in naturally occurring hybrid populations of swordtail fish. We estimate that hundreds of pairs of genomic regions contribute to reproductive isolation between these species, despite them being recently diverged. Many of these incompatibilities are likely the result of natural or sexual selection on hybrids, since intrinsic isolation is known to be weak. Patterns of genomic divergence at these regions imply that genetic incompatibilities play a significant role in limiting gene flow even in young species. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02535.001 PMID:24898754

  4. Self-incompatibility in Papaver: identification of the pollen S-determinant PrpS.

    PubMed

    Poulter, Natalie S; Wheeler, Michael J; Bosch, Maurice; Franklin-Tong, Vernonica E

    2010-04-01

    Many flowering plants are hermaphrodite, posing the problem of self-fertilization and the subsequent loss of the genetic fitness of the offspring. To prevent this, many plants have developed a genetically controlled mechanism called self-incompatibility (SI). When the male and female S-determinants match, self (incompatible) pollen is recognized and rejected before fertilization can occur. In poppy (Papaver rhoeas), the pistil S-determinant (PrsS) is a small secreted protein that interacts with incompatible pollen, initiating a Ca(2+)-dependent signalling network. SI triggers several downstream events, including depolymerization of the cytoskeleton, phosphorylation of two soluble inorganic pyrophosphatases and an MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase). This culminates in PCD (programmed cell death) involving several caspase-like activities. The recent discovery of the Papaver pollen S-determinant PrpS marks a significant step forward in the understanding of the Papaver SI system. PrpS encodes a ~20 kDa predicted transmembrane protein which has no homology with known proteins. It is specifically expressed in pollen, linked to the pistil S-determinant, and displays the high polymorphism expected of an S-locus determinant. The present review focuses on the discovery and characterization of PrpS which strongly support the hypothesis that Papaver SI is triggered by the interaction of PrsS and PrpS.

  5. Diversity and linkage of genes in the self-incompatibility gene family in Arabidopsis lyrata.

    PubMed Central

    Charlesworth, Deborah; Mable, Barbara K; Schierup, Mikkel H; Bartolomé, Carolina; Awadalla, Philip

    2003-01-01

    We report studies of seven members of the S-domain gene family in Arabidopsis lyrata, a member of the Brassicaceae that has a sporophytic self-incompatibility (SI) system. Orthologs for five loci are identifiable in the self-compatible relative A. thaliana. Like the Brassica stigmatic incompatibility protein locus (SRK), some of these genes have kinase domains. We show that several of these genes are unlinked to the putative A. lyrata SRK, Aly13. These genes have much lower nonsynonymous and synonymous polymorphism than Aly13 in the S-domains within natural populations, and differentiation between populations is higher, consistent with balancing selection at the Aly13 locus. One gene (Aly8) is linked to Aly13 and has high diversity. No departures from neutrality were detected for any of the loci. Comparing different loci within A. lyrata, sites corresponding to hypervariable regions in the Brassica S-loci (SLG and SRK) and in comparable regions of Aly13 have greater replacement site divergence than the rest of the S-domain. This suggests that the high polymorphism in these regions of incompatibility loci is due to balancing selection acting on sites within or near these regions, combined with low selective constraints. PMID:12930757

  6. Study on Incompatibility of Traditional Chinese Medicine: Evidence from Formula Network, Chemical Space, and Metabolism Room

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Wu, Hong-Ying; Jin, Jin; Yu, Guang-Yun; He, Xin; Wang, Hao; Shen, Xiu; Zhou, Ze-Wei; Liu, Pei-Xun; Fan, Sai-Jun

    2013-01-01

    A traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) formula network including 362 TCM formulas was built by using complex network methodologies. The properties of this network were analyzed including network diameter, average distance, clustering coefficient, and average degree. Meanwhile, we built a TCM chemical space and a TCM metabolism room under the theory of chemical space. The properties of chemical space and metabolism room were calculated and analyzed. The properties of the medicine pairs in “eighteen antagonisms and nineteen mutual inhibitors,” an ancient rule for TCM incompatibility, were studied based on the TCM formula network, chemical space, and metabolism room. The results showed that the properties of these incompatible medicine pairs are different from those of the other TCM based on the analysis of the TCM formula network, chemical space, and metabolism room. The lines of evidence derived from our work demonstrated that the ancient rule of TCM incompatibility, “eighteen antagonisms and nineteen mutual inhibitors,” is probably scientifically based. PMID:24369478

  7. Identification of Bradyrhizobium elkanii Genes Involved in Incompatibility with Soybean Plants Carrying the Rj4 Allele

    PubMed Central

    Faruque, Omar M.; Miwa, Hiroki; Yasuda, Michiko; Fujii, Yoshiharu; Kaneko, Takakazu; Sato, Shusei

    2015-01-01

    Symbioses between leguminous plants and soil bacteria known as rhizobia are of great importance to agricultural production and nitrogen cycling. While these mutualistic symbioses can involve a wide range of rhizobia, some legumes exhibit incompatibility with specific strains, resulting in ineffective nodulation. The formation of nodules in soybean plants (Glycine max) is controlled by several host genes, which are referred to as Rj genes. The soybean cultivar BARC2 carries the Rj4 gene, which restricts nodulation by specific strains, including Bradyrhizobium elkanii USDA61. Here we employed transposon mutagenesis to identify the genetic locus in USDA61 that determines incompatibility with soybean varieties carrying the Rj4 allele. Introduction of the Tn5 transposon into USDA61 resulted in the formation of nitrogen fixation nodules on the roots of soybean cultivar BARC2 (Rj4 Rj4). Sequencing analysis of the sequence flanking the Tn5 insertion revealed that six genes encoding a putative histidine kinase, transcriptional regulator, DNA-binding transcriptional activator, helix-turn-helix-type transcriptional regulator, phage shock protein, and cysteine protease were disrupted. The cysteine protease mutant had a high degree of similarity with the type 3 effector protein XopD of Xanthomonas campestris. Our findings shed light on the diverse and complicated mechanisms that underlie these highly host-specific interactions and indicate the involvement of a type 3 effector in Rj4 nodulation restriction, suggesting that Rj4 incompatibility is partly mediated by effector-triggered immunity. PMID:26187957

  8. Single gene control of postzygotic self-incompatibility in poke milkweed, Asclepias exaltata L.

    PubMed Central

    Lipow, S R; Wyatt, R

    2000-01-01

    Most individuals of Asclepias exaltata are self-sterile, but all plants lack prezygotic barriers to self-fertilization. To determine whether postzygotic rejection of self-fertilized ovules is due to late-acting self-incompatibility or to extreme, early acting inbreeding depression, we performed three diallel crosses among self-sterile plants related as full-sibs. The full-sibs segregated into four compatibility classes, suggesting that late acting self-incompatibility is controlled by a single gene (S-locus). Crosses between plants sharing one or both alleles at the S-locus are incompatible. An additional diallel cross was done among full-sib progeny from a cross of a self-sterile and a self-fertile plant. These progeny grouped into two compatibility classes, and plants within classes displayed varying levels of self-fertility. This suggests that the occasional self-fertility documented in natural pollinations is caused by pseudo-self-fertility alleles that alter the functioning of the S-locus. PMID:10655239

  9. Effect of temperature on Wolbachia density and impact on cytoplasmic incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Mouton, L; Henri, H; Bouletreau, M; Vavre, F

    2006-01-01

    The outcome and the evolution of host-symbiont associations depend on environmental constraints, but responses are difficult to predict since they arise from a complex interaction between the host, the parasite and the environment. The situation can be even more complex when multiple parasite genotypes, with potentially different responses to environmental changes, coexist within a single host. In this paper, we investigated the effect of the temperature (from 14 to 26 degrees C) during the host development on the density of 3 strains of the intracellular bacterium Wolbachia that coexist within the wasp Leptopilina heterotoma. In this species, Wolbachia induces cytoplasmic incompatibility, a sperm-egg incompatibility that allows it to spread and persist in host populations. Using real-time quantitative PCR we found that (i) Wolbachia density is temperature-specific and highest at 26 degrees C; (ii) the order of the abundance of the 3 Wolbachia strains does not vary with temperature changes; (iii) the response of bacterial density to temperature occurs within a single insect generation, during the egg-to-adult developmental period; (iv) in this species, temperature-related changes in Wolbachia density do not influence cytoplasmic incompatibility. PMID:16393353

  10. A conserved role for the ARC1 E3 ligase in Brassicaceae self-incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Indriolo, Emily; Goring, Daphne R

    2014-01-01

    Ubiquitination plays essential roles in the regulation of many processes in plants including pollen rejection in self-incompatible species. In the Brassicaceae (mustard family), self-incompatibility drives the rejection of self-pollen by preventing pollen hydration following pollen contact with the stigmatic surface. Self-pollen is recognized by a ligand-receptor pair: the pollen S-locus cysteine rich/S-locus protein 11 (SCR/SP11) ligand and the pistil S receptor kinase (SRK). Following self-pollen contact, the SCR/SP11 ligand on the pollen surface binds to SRK on the pistil surface, and the SRK-activated signaling pathway is initiated. This pathway includes the armadillo repeat containing 1 (ARC1) protein, a member of the plant U-box (PUB) family of E3 ubiquitin ligases. ARC1 is a functional E3 ligase and is required downstream of SRK for the self-incompatibility response. This mini review highlights our recent progress in establishing ARC1's conserved role in self-pollen rejection in Brassica and Arabidopsis species and discusses future research directions in this field. PMID:24847339

  11. Identification of Bradyrhizobium elkanii Genes Involved in Incompatibility with Soybean Plants Carrying the Rj4 Allele.

    PubMed

    Faruque, Omar M; Miwa, Hiroki; Yasuda, Michiko; Fujii, Yoshiharu; Kaneko, Takakazu; Sato, Shusei; Okazaki, Shin

    2015-10-01

    Symbioses between leguminous plants and soil bacteria known as rhizobia are of great importance to agricultural production and nitrogen cycling. While these mutualistic symbioses can involve a wide range of rhizobia, some legumes exhibit incompatibility with specific strains, resulting in ineffective nodulation. The formation of nodules in soybean plants (Glycine max) is controlled by several host genes, which are referred to as Rj genes. The soybean cultivar BARC2 carries the Rj4 gene, which restricts nodulation by specific strains, including Bradyrhizobium elkanii USDA61. Here we employed transposon mutagenesis to identify the genetic locus in USDA61 that determines incompatibility with soybean varieties carrying the Rj4 allele. Introduction of the Tn5 transposon into USDA61 resulted in the formation of nitrogen fixation nodules on the roots of soybean cultivar BARC2 (Rj4 Rj4). Sequencing analysis of the sequence flanking the Tn5 insertion revealed that six genes encoding a putative histidine kinase, transcriptional regulator, DNA-binding transcriptional activator, helix-turn-helix-type transcriptional regulator, phage shock protein, and cysteine protease were disrupted. The cysteine protease mutant had a high degree of similarity with the type 3 effector protein XopD of Xanthomonas campestris. Our findings shed light on the diverse and complicated mechanisms that underlie these highly host-specific interactions and indicate the involvement of a type 3 effector in Rj4 nodulation restriction, suggesting that Rj4 incompatibility is partly mediated by effector-triggered immunity. PMID:26187957

  12. Rh Incompatibility

    MedlinePlus

    ... bloodstream, especially during delivery. If you're Rh-negative and your baby is Rh-positive, your body will react to the baby's blood as a ... baby, it can include supplements to help the body to make red blood cells and blood transfusions. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  13. Rh incompatibility

    MedlinePlus

    ... affected unless the mother had past miscarriages or abortions that sensitized her immune system. This because it ... injections: During every pregnancy After a miscarriage or abortion After prenatal tests such as amniocentesis and chorionic ...

  14. Survival Benefit with Kidney Transplants from HLA-Incompatible Live Donors

    PubMed Central

    Orandi, B.J.; Luo, X.; Massie, A.B.; Garonzik-Wang, J.M.; Lonze, B.E.; Ahmed, R.; Van Arendonk, K.J.; Stegall, M.D.; Jordan, S.C.; Oberholzer, J.; Dunn, T.B.; Ratner, L.E.; Kapur, S.; Pelletier, R.P.; Roberts, J.P.; Melcher, M.L.; Singh, P.; Sudan, D.L.; Posner, M.P.; El-Amm, J.M.; Shapiro, R.; Cooper, M.; Lipkowitz, G.S.; Rees, M.A.; Marsh, C.L.; Sankari, B.R.; Gerber, D.A.; Nelson, P.W.; Wellen, J.; Bozorgzadeh, A.; Gaber, A.O.; Montgomery, R.A.; Segev, D.L.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND A report from a high-volume single center indicated a survival benefit of receiving a kidney transplant from an HLA-incompatible live donor as compared with remaining on the waiting list, whether or not a kidney from a deceased donor was received. The generalizability of that finding is unclear. METHODS In a 22-center study, we estimated the survival benefit for 1025 recipients of kidney transplants from HLA-incompatible live donors who were matched with controls who remained on the waiting list or received a transplant from a deceased donor (waiting-list-or-transplant control group) and controls who remained on the waiting list but did not receive a transplant (waiting-list-only control group). We analyzed the data with and without patients from the highest-volume center in the study. RESULTS Recipients of kidney transplants from incompatible live donors had a higher survival rate than either control group at 1 year (95.0%, vs. 94.0% for the waiting-list-or-transplant control group and 89.6% for the waiting-list-only control group), 3 years (91.7% vs. 83.6% and 72.7%, respectively), 5 years (86.0% vs. 74.4% and 59.2%), and 8 years (76.5% vs. 62.9% and 43.9%) (P<0.001 for all comparisons with the two control groups). The survival benefit was significant at 8 years across all levels of donor-specific antibody: 89.2% for recipients of kidney transplants from incompatible live donors who had a positive Luminex assay for anti-HLA antibody but a negative flow-cytometric cross-match versus 65.0% for the waiting-list-or-transplant control group and 47.1% for the waiting-list-only control group; 76.3% for recipients with a positive flow-cytometric cross-match but a negative cytotoxic cross-match versus 63.3% and 43.0% in the two control groups, respectively; and 71.0% for recipients with a positive cytotoxic cross-match versus 61.5% and 43.7%, respectively. The findings did not change when patients from the highest-volume center were excluded. CONCLUSIONS This

  15. Intentional replantation: a case study.

    PubMed

    Kahan, R S; Gulabivala, K

    1995-12-01

    Intentional replantation (IR) involves the extraction, extra-oral endodontic treatment and replantation of a tooth. Its use dates back over 1000 years, but it is rarely considered by the modern dental practitioner. This paper describes the treatment of a patient using this technique, and discusses its relative advantages and disadvantages.

  16. Entrepreneurial Intention as Developmental Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obschonka, Martin; Silbereisen, Rainer K.; Schmitt-Rodermund, Eva

    2010-01-01

    What predicts adults' entrepreneurial intentions? Utilizing a cross-sectional sample of 496 German scientists, we investigated a path model for the effects of entrepreneurial personality (Big Five profile), control beliefs, and recalled early entrepreneurial competence in adolescence (early inventions, leadership, commercial activities) on two…

  17. Models of College Persistence Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Donald W.

    2010-01-01

    While withdrawal from higher education may be the result of many reasons both within and beyond the control of the student or the institution, the intent of not returning to higher education indicates the acceptance of a permanent disassociation with the pursuit of the higher education endeavor. It is of paramount importance in understanding the…

  18. Infants Infer Intentions from Prosody

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakkalou, Elena; Gattis, Merideth

    2012-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to examine infants' ability to discern intentions from lexical and prosodic cues. Two groups of 14-18-month-olds participated in these studies. In both studies, infants watched an adult perform a sequence of two-step actions on novel toys that produced an end-result. In the first study actions were marked intentionally…

  19. The perceived intentionality of groups.

    PubMed

    Bloom, P; Veres, C

    1999-05-01

    Heider and Simmel [Heider, F., Simmel, M., 1944. An experimental study of apparent behavior. American Journal of Psychology 57, 243-259] found that people spontaneously describe depictions of simple moving objects in terms of purposeful and intentional action. Not all intentional beings are objects, however, and people often attribute purposeful activity to non-object individuals such as countries, basketball teams, and families. This raises the question of whether the same effect found by Heider and Simmel would hold for non-object individuals such as groups. We replicate and extend the original study, using both objects and groups as stimuli, and introducing two control conditions with groups that are not engaged in structured movement. We found that under the condition that best promoted the attribution of intentionality, moving groups are viewed as purposeful and goal-directed entities to the same extent that moving objects are. These results suggest that the psychological distinction between the notion of 'intentional entity' and the notion of 'object' can be found even in the perception of moving geometrical figures.

  20. Self-incompatibility in Petunia inflata: the relationship between a self-incompatibility locus F-box protein and its non-self S-RNases.

    PubMed

    Sun, Penglin; Kao, Teh-hui

    2013-02-01

    The highly polymorphic S (for self-incompatibility) locus regulates self-incompatibility in Petunia inflata; the S-RNase regulates pistil specificity, and multiple S-locus F-box (SLF) genes regulate pollen specificity. The collaborative non-self recognition model predicts that, for any S-haplotype, an unknown number of SLFs collectively recognize all non-self S-RNases to mediate their ubiquitination and degradation. Using a gain-of-function assay, we examined the relationships between S2-SLF1 (for S2-allelic product of Type-1 SLF) and four S-RNases. The results suggest that S2-SLF1 interacts with S7- and S13-RNases, and the previously identified S1- and S3-RNases, but not with S5- or S11-RNase. An artificial microRNA expressed by the S2-SLF1 promoter, but not by the vegetative cell-specific promoter, Late Anther Tomato 52, suppressed expression of S2-SLF1 in S2 pollen, suggesting that SLF1 is specific to the generative cell. The S2 pollen with S2-SLF1 suppressed was compatible with S3-, S5-, S7-, S11-, and S13-carrying pistils, confirming that other SLF proteins are responsible for detoxifying S5- and S11-RNases and suggesting that S2-SLF1 is not the only SLF in S2 pollen that interacts with S3-, S7-, and S13-RNases. Petunia may have evolved at least two types of SLF proteins to detoxify any non-self S-RNase to minimize the deleterious effects of mutation in any SLF.

  1. Exergy sustainability.

    SciTech Connect

    Robinett, Rush D. III; Wilson, David Gerald; Reed, Alfred W.

    2006-05-01

    Exergy is the elixir of life. Exergy is that portion of energy available to do work. Elixir is defined as a substance held capable of prolonging life indefinitely, which implies sustainability of life. In terms of mathematics and engineering, exergy sustainability is defined as the continuous compensation of irreversible entropy production in an open system with an impedance and capacity-matched persistent exergy source. Irreversible and nonequilibrium thermodynamic concepts are combined with self-organizing systems theories as well as nonlinear control and stability analyses to explain this definition. In particular, this paper provides a missing link in the analysis of self-organizing systems: a tie between irreversible thermodynamics and Hamiltonian systems. As a result of this work, the concept of ''on the edge of chaos'' is formulated as a set of necessary and sufficient conditions for stability and performance of sustainable systems. This interplay between exergy rate and irreversible entropy production rate can be described as Yin and Yang control: the dialectic synthesis of opposing power flows. In addition, exergy is shown to be a fundamental driver and necessary input for sustainable systems, since exergy input in the form of power is a single point of failure for self-organizing, adaptable systems.

  2. Neonatal BO Incompatibility Is Associated With a Positive Cord Blood Direct Antiglobulin Test in Infants of Black Ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Özgönenel, Bülent; Kukreja, Geetika; O'Malley, Barbara; Bluth, Martin H

    2015-11-01

    ABO hemolytic disease of the newborn occurs almost exclusively in infants of blood group A and B who are born to group O mothers. Positive Direct Antiglobulin Test (DAT) can identify those infants who are at risk of developing the ABO hemolytic disease. Earlier studies have suggested that BO incompatibility is associated with a positive DAT in black infants. In this study we sought to determine whether ABO incompatibility type could be associated with a higher rate of DAT positivity or clinical hemolytic disease. We reviewed the electronic medical records of all ABO-incompatible births over a 2-year period. There were 1537 ABO-incompatible births during the study period. DAT was more commonly positive among BO incompatible (21.5% in BO vs. 14.8% in AO, P=0.001) and black (18.8% in blacks vs. 10.8% in nonblacks, P=0.003) infants. DAT positivity was significantly associated with both severe hyperbilirubinemia (P=0.028) and hemolytic anemia (P<0.001). BO incompatibility was significantly associated with hemolytic anemia, but not severe hyperbilirubinemia, in the infants tested. PMID:26422285

  3. Intentional Mathematics Teaching in Early Childhood Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Myoungwhon; Conderman, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Studies and discussions around "good teaching practices" have often identified intentionality as the chief characteristic of outstanding teachers. Intentional teachers are identified as maintaining the habit of informed reflection as they plan, teach, reflect on, and revise the effectiveness of their practices. Intentional teaching strategies are…

  4. Career Intentions of Australian Physical Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mäkelä, Kasper; Whipp, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate Australian physical education (PE) teachers' career intentions and factors influencing their intentions. A sample (N = 234) of Western Australian PE teachers responded to a questionnaire determining PE teachers' work and the primary motivators for intention to leave the profession. Half (51.3%) of the…

  5. On the positive correlation between education and fertility intentions in Europe: Individual- and country-level evidence.

    PubMed

    Testa, Maria Rita

    2014-09-01

    Increasing shares of European women are making large investments in their human capital. Whether and to what extent these investments are in conflict with reproductive behaviour are issues that have repercussions for fertility levels. Using two Eurobarometer survey data (2006 and 2011) on individuals clustered in the 27 EU countries, I investigate the relationship between women's education and lifetime fertility intentions. Results suggest that a positive association between women's level of education and lifetime fertility intentions exists at both the individual and country levels, as well as in a micro-macro integrated framework. The main explanation for these findings--which remains to be proven by future research--is that, in institutional contexts allowing highly educated women to have large families, women of reproductive ages are more prone to make investments in both human capital and family size, because these choices are not seen as incompatible alternatives.

  6. On the positive correlation between education and fertility intentions in Europe: Individual- and country-level evidence☆

    PubMed Central

    Testa, Maria Rita

    2014-01-01

    Increasing shares of European women are making large investments in their human capital. Whether and to what extent these investments are in conflict with reproductive behaviour are issues that have repercussions for fertility levels. Using two Eurobarometer survey data (2006 and 2011) on individuals clustered in the 27 EU countries, I investigate the relationship between women's education and lifetime fertility intentions. Results suggest that a positive association between women's level of education and lifetime fertility intentions exists at both the individual and country levels, as well as in a micro–macro integrated framework. The main explanation for these findings—which remains to be proven by future research—is that, in institutional contexts allowing highly educated women to have large families, women of reproductive ages are more prone to make investments in both human capital and family size, because these choices are not seen as incompatible alternatives. PMID:26047540

  7. On the positive correlation between education and fertility intentions in Europe: Individual- and country-level evidence.

    PubMed

    Testa, Maria Rita

    2014-09-01

    Increasing shares of European women are making large investments in their human capital. Whether and to what extent these investments are in conflict with reproductive behaviour are issues that have repercussions for fertility levels. Using two Eurobarometer survey data (2006 and 2011) on individuals clustered in the 27 EU countries, I investigate the relationship between women's education and lifetime fertility intentions. Results suggest that a positive association between women's level of education and lifetime fertility intentions exists at both the individual and country levels, as well as in a micro-macro integrated framework. The main explanation for these findings--which remains to be proven by future research--is that, in institutional contexts allowing highly educated women to have large families, women of reproductive ages are more prone to make investments in both human capital and family size, because these choices are not seen as incompatible alternatives. PMID:26047540

  8. Teaching Sustainability/Teaching Sustainably

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartels, Kirsten Allen, Ed.; Parker, Kelly A., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Over the coming decades, every academic discipline will have to respond to the paradigm of more sustainable life practices because students will be living in a world challenged by competition for resources and climate change, and will demand that every academic discipline demonstrate substantial and corresponding relevance. This book takes as its…

  9. Intention Concepts and Brain-Machine Interfacing

    PubMed Central

    Thinnes-Elker, Franziska; Iljina, Olga; Apostolides, John Kyle; Kraemer, Felicitas; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Aertsen, Ad; Ball, Tonio

    2012-01-01

    Intentions, including their temporal properties and semantic content, are receiving increased attention, and neuroscientific studies in humans vary with respect to the topography of intention-related neural responses. This may reflect the fact that the kind of intentions investigated in one study may not be exactly the same kind investigated in the other. Fine-grained intention taxonomies developed in the philosophy of mind may be useful to identify the neural correlates of well-defined types of intentions, as well as to disentangle them from other related mental states, such as mere urges to perform an action. Intention-related neural signals may be exploited by brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) that are currently being developed to restore speech and motor control in paralyzed patients. Such BMI devices record the brain activity of the agent, interpret (“decode”) the agent’s intended action, and send the corresponding execution command to an artificial effector system, e.g., a computer cursor or a robotic arm. In the present paper, we evaluate the potential of intention concepts from philosophy of mind to improve the performance and safety of BMIs based on higher-order, intention-related control signals. To this end, we address the distinction between future-, present-directed, and motor intentions, as well as the organization of intentions in time, specifically to what extent it is sequential or hierarchical. This has consequences as to whether these different types of intentions can be expected to occur simultaneously or not. We further illustrate how it may be useful or even necessary to distinguish types of intentions exposited in philosophy, including yes- vs. no-intentions and oblique vs. direct intentions, to accurately decode the agent’s intentions from neural signals in practical BMI applications. PMID:23162504

  10. Sustainable development.

    PubMed

    Dudani, A T

    1996-01-01

    Many attempts have been made over the last decade to define sustainable development (SD). However, it is much easier to describe one's expectations of SD. The discussion over SD grew in the wake of the Brundlandt Commission report, Our Common Future (OCF), which describes SD as a process of change in which resources, the direction of investment, orientation of technological development, and institutional change all enhance the potential to meet human needs today and in the future. The OCF stresses the interrelationship between SD and economic development such that nothing can be at the expense of environmental destruction. Close cooperation is needed at the domestic and international political, social, and economic levels and spheres in order to achieve long-term SD. The author discusses the state of affairs in the US and sustainable agriculture and SD.

  11. Sustainable NREL

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory prides itself on not only advancing the renewable energy, but "walking the talk" when it comes to sustainable practices. "When you look at our laboratories, you will see energy efficiency in action, but you'll also see renewable energy. We walk the walk and we talk the talk. We believe in it and we want to live it also."

  12. Sustainable NREL

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory prides itself on not only advancing the renewable energy, but "walking the talk" when it comes to sustainable practices. "When you look at our laboratories, you will see energy efficiency in action, but you'll also see renewable energy. We walk the walk and we talk the talk. We believe in it and we want to live it also."

  13. Decoding intention: A neuroergonomic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Grafton, Scott T.; Tipper, Christine M.

    2011-01-01

    Decoding the intentions of other people based on non-linguistic cues such as their body movement is a major requirement of many jobs. Whether it is maintaining security at an airport or negotiating with locals in a foreign country, there is a need to augment maximize the effectiveness of training or real-time performance in this decoding process. This review considers the potential utility of neuroergonomic solutions, and in particular, of electroencephalographic (EEG) methods for augmenting action understanding. Focus is given to body movements and hand-object interactions, where there is a rapid growth in relevant science. The interpretation of EEG-based signals is reinforced by a consideration of functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments demonstrating underlying brain mechanisms that support goal oriented action. While no EEG method is currently implemented as a practical application for enhancing the understanding of unspoken intentions, there are a number of promising approaches that merit further development. PMID:21651985

  14. Attention, intention, and strategy in preparatory control

    PubMed Central

    Ruge, Hannes; Braver, Todd; Meiran, Nachshon

    2009-01-01

    The neural mechanisms underlying different forms of preparatory control were examined using event-related fMRI. Preparatory brain activation was monitored in relation to different types of advance information: (1) random task cues indicating which of two possible tasks to perform upon subsequent target presentation, (2) task-ambiguous target stimuli, or 3) targets for which the correct response could be pre-determined. Three types of activation pattern were observed in different brain regions. First, more posterior regions of lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) and parietal cortex were activated by both advance task cues and advance targets, but with increased and more sustained activation for the latter. Second, more anterior regions of LPFC and parietal cortex were selectively activated by advance targets. Importantly, in these regions preparatory activation was not further modulated by the availability of advance response information. In contrast, preparatory activation in a third set of brain regions, including medial frontal cortex, reflected the utilization of advance response information, but by only a subset of participants. These results suggest three types of preparatory control: attentional (stimulus-oriented), intentional (action-oriented), and a possibly strategic component that might determine inter-individual differences in response readiness. Notably, the absence of regions selectively or even preferentially activated during cue-based preparation argues against certain conceptualizations of task-selective attention under cued task switching conditions. PMID:19397862

  15. Wolbachia-induced unidirectional cytoplasmic incompatibility and speciation: mainland-island model.

    PubMed

    Telschow, Arndt; Flor, Matthias; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Hammerstein, Peter; Werren, John H

    2007-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Wolbachia are among the most common endosymbionts in the world. In many insect species these bacteria induce a sperm-egg incompatibility between the gametes of infected males and uninfected females, commonly called unidirectional cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI). It is generally believed that unidirectional CI cannot promote speciation in hosts because infection differences between populations will be unstable and subsequent gene flow will eliminate genetic differences between diverging populations. In the present study we investigate this question theoretically in a mainland-island model with migration from mainland to island. Our analysis shows that (a) the infection polymorphism is stable below a critical migration rate, (b) an (initially) uninfected "island" can better maintain divergence at a selected locus (e.g. can adapt locally) in the presence of CI, and (c) unidirectional CI selects for premating isolation in (initially) uninfected island populations if they receive migration from a Wolbachia-infected mainland. Interestingly, premating isolation is most likely to evolve if levels of incompatibility are intermediate and if either the infection causes fecundity reductions or Wolbachia transmission is incomplete. This is because under these circumstances an infection pattern with an infected mainland and a mostly uninfected island can persist in the face of comparably high migration. We present analytical results for all three findings: (a) a lower estimation of the critical migration rate in the presence of local adaptation, (b) an analytical approximation for the gene flow reduction caused by unidirectional CI, and (c) a heuristic formula describing the invasion success of mutants at a mate preference locus. These findings generally suggest that Wolbachia-induced unidirectional CI can be a factor in divergence and speciation of hosts.

  16. Recognition specificity of self-incompatibility maintained after the divergence of Brassica oleracea and Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Ryo; Sato, Keiichi; Fujimoto, Ryo; Nishio, Takeshi

    2002-01-01

    The determinants of recognition specificity of self-incompatibility in Brassica are SRK in the stigma and SP11/SCR in the pollen, respectively. In the pair of S haplotypes BrS46 (S46 in B. rapa) and BoS7 (S7 in B. oleracea), which have highly similar SRK alleles, the SP11 alleles were found to be similar, with 96.1% identity in the deduced amino acid sequence. Two other pairs of S haplotypes, BrS47 and BoS12, and BrS8 and BoS32, having highly similar SRK and SP11 alleles between the two species were also found. The haplotypes in each pair are considered to have been derived from a single S haplotype in the ancestral species. The allotetraploid produced by interspecific hybridization between homozygotes of BrS46 and BoS15 showed incompatibility with a BoS7 homozygote and compatibility with other B. oleracea S haplotypes in reciprocal crossings. This result indicates that BrS46 and BoS7 have maintained the same recognition specificity after the divergence of the two species and that amino acid substitutions found in such cases in both SRK alleles and SP11 alleles do not alter the recognition specificity. DNA blot analysis of SRK, SP11, SLG and other S-locus genes showed different DNA fragment sizes between the interspecific pairs of S haplotypes. A much lower level of sequence similarity was observed outside the genes of SRK and SP11 between BrS46 and BoS7. These results suggest that the DNA sequences of the regions intervening between the S-locus genes were diversified after or at the time of speciation. This is the first report demonstrating the presence of common S haplotypes in different plant species and presenting definite evidence of the trans-specific evolution of self-incompatibility genes.

  17. Inheritance and interactions of incompatibility alleles in the tetraploid sour cherry.

    PubMed

    Bosković, R I; Wolfram, B; Tobutt, K R; Cerović, R; Sonneveld, T

    2006-01-01

    Three progenies of sour cherry (Prunus cerasus) were analysed to correlate self-(in)compatibility status with S-RNase phenotype in this allotetraploid hybrid of sweet and ground cherry. Self-(in)compatibility was assessed in the field and by monitoring pollen tube growth after selfing. The S-RNase phenotypes were determined by isoelectric focusing of stylar proteins and staining for RNase activity and, for the parents, confirmed by PCR. Seedling phenotypes were generally consistent with disomic segregation of S-RNase alleles. The genetic arrangements of the parents were deduced to be 'Köröser' (self-incompatible) S1S4.S(B) S(D), 'Schattenmorelle' (self-compatible) S6S13.S(B)S(B), and clone 43.87 (self-compatible) S4S13.S(B)S(B), where "." separates the two homologous genomes. The presence of S4 and S6 alleles at the same locus led to self-incompatibility, whereas S13 and S(B) at homologous loci led to self-compatibility. The failure of certain heteroallelic genotypes in the three crosses or in the self-incompatible seedlings indicates that S4 and S6 are dominant to S(B). However, the success of S13S(B) pollen on styles expressing corresponding S-RNases indicates competitive interaction or lack of pollen-S components. In general, the universal compatibility of S13S(B) pollen may explain the frequent occurrence of S13 and S(B) together in sour cherry cultivars. Alleles S(B) and S(D), that are presumed to derive from ground cherry, and S13, presumably from sweet cherry, were sequenced. Our findings contribute to an understanding of inheritance of self-(in)compatibility, facilitate screening of progenies for self-compatibility and provide a basis for studying molecular interactions in heteroallelic pollen. PMID:16307228

  18. In vitro study of simultaneous infusion of incompatible drugs in multilumen catheters.

    PubMed

    Collins, J L; Lutz, R J

    1991-05-01

    Multilumen catheters are commonly used to simultaneously administer incompatible drugs to critically ill patients. Though there are no known documented reports that this practice has been responsible for harmful events in patients, likewise there are no published data to verify the safety and efficacy of this practice. This study utilized an in vitro model flow system to examine the physicochemical phenomena that occur when two incompatible drugs (phenytoin and total parenteral nutrition) are simultaneously administered through multilumen catheters. Flow conditions and drug infusions in the venous model were designed to mimic the in vivo clinical situation to evaluate two central venous catheter types, a double- and a triple-lumen catheter. Video recordings were made of drug interactions, and assays of phenytoin concentration were performed on samples of the circulating fluid. White clouds of phenytoin precipitation were observed near the tip of the double-lumen catheter but not the triple-lumen catheter. Infusion through the double-lumen catheter resulted in an average of 6% loss of phenytoin to precipitate, which, on microscopic examination, appeared as spindle-shaped crystals 25 to 50 microns in length and 5 to 10 microns wide. In some cases, millimeter-size fragments of phenytoin precipitate were seen to dislodge from the tip of the double-lumen catheter. The adjacent orifices at the tip of the end hole of the double-lumen catheter appeared to permit interaction of the two effusing streams of the incompatible drugs, whereas the staggered orifices of the triple-lumen catheter reduce this interaction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Genetic Elucidation of Nitric Oxide Signaling in Incompatible Plant-Pathogen Interactions[w

    PubMed Central

    Zeier, Jürgen; Delledonne, Massimo; Mishina, Tatiana; Severi, Emmanuele; Sonoda, Masatoshi; Lamb, Chris

    2004-01-01

    Recent experiments indicate that nitric oxide (NO) plays a pivotal role in disease resistance and several other physiological processes in plants. However, most of the current information about the function of NO in plants is based on pharmacological studies, and additional approaches are therefore required to ascertain the role of NO as an important signaling molecule in plants. We have expressed a bacterial nitric oxide dioxygenase (NOD) in Arabidopsis plants and/or avirulent Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato to study incompatible plant-pathogen interactions impaired in NO signaling. NOD expression in transgenic Arabidopsis resulted in decreased NO levels in planta and attenuated a pathogen-induced NO burst. Moreover, NOD expression in plant cells had very similar effects on plant defenses compared to NOD expression in avirulent Pseudomonas. The defense responses most affected by NO reduction during the incompatible interaction were decreased H2O2 levels during the oxidative burst and a blockage of Phe ammonia lyase expression, the key enzyme in the general phenylpropanoid pathway. Expression of the NOD furthermore blocked UV light-induced Phe ammonia lyase and chalcone synthase gene expression, indicating a general signaling function of NO in the activation of the phenylpropanoid pathway. NO possibly functions in incompatible plant-pathogen interactions by inhibiting the plant antioxidative machinery, and thereby ensuring locally prolonged H2O2 levels. Additionally, albeit to a lesser extent, we observed decreases in salicylic acid production, a diminished development of hypersensitive cell death, and a delay in pathogenesis-related protein 1 expression during these NO-deficient plant-pathogen interactions. Therefore, this genetic approach confirms that NO is an important regulatory component in the signaling network of plant defense responses. PMID:15347797

  20. Wolbachia-Induced Unidirectional Cytoplasmic Incompatibility and Speciation: Mainland-Island Model

    PubMed Central

    Telschow, Arndt; Flor, Matthias; Kobayashi, Yutaka; Hammerstein, Peter; Werren, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Wolbachia are among the most common endosymbionts in the world. In many insect species these bacteria induce a sperm-egg incompatibility between the gametes of infected males and uninfected females, commonly called unidirectional cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI). It is generally believed that unidirectional CI cannot promote speciation in hosts because infection differences between populations will be unstable and subsequent gene flow will eliminate genetic differences between diverging populations. In the present study we investigate this question theoretically in a mainland-island model with migration from mainland to island. Our analysis shows that (a) the infection polymorphism is stable below a critical migration rate, (b) an (initially) uninfected “island” can better maintain divergence at a selected locus (e.g. can adapt locally) in the presence of CI, and (c) unidirectional CI selects for premating isolation in (initially) uninfected island populations if they receive migration from a Wolbachia-infected mainland. Interestingly, premating isolation is most likely to evolve if levels of incompatibility are intermediate and if either the infection causes fecundity reductions or Wolbachia transmission is incomplete. This is because under these circumstances an infection pattern with an infected mainland and a mostly uninfected island can persist in the face of comparably high migration. We present analytical results for all three findings: (a) a lower estimation of the critical migration rate in the presence of local adaptation, (b) an analytical approximation for the gene flow reduction caused by unidirectional CI, and (c) a heuristic formula describing the invasion success of mutants at a mate preference locus. These findings generally suggest that Wolbachia-induced unidirectional CI can be a factor in divergence and speciation of hosts. PMID:17684548

  1. Adding Perches for Cross-Pollination Ensures the Reproduction of a Self-Incompatible Orchid

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-Qiang; Rao, Wen-Hui; Zhang, Yu-Ting; Tang, Guang-Da; Huang, Lai-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Outcrossing is known to carry genetic advantages in comparison with inbreeding. In many cases, flowering plants develop a self-incompatibility mechanism, along with a floral component adaptation mechanism, to avoid self-pollination and to promote outbreeding. Orchids commonly have a lip in their flower that functions as the a visiting plate for insect pollinators. Aside from the lip, however, many species (including Coelogyne rigida) have sheaths around the axis of inflorescence. The function of these sheaths remains unknown, and has long been a puzzle to researchers. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the function of these sheaths in relation to the lip and the pollinators, as well as their role in the modes of pollination and reproduction of Coelogyne rigida in 30 flowering populations of orchids in the limestone area of Southeast Yunnan, China. We found that self-incompatible C. rigida developed specialized bird perches around the basal axis of inflorescence to attract sunbirds and to complement their behavioral tendency to change foraging locations frequently. This self-incompatibility mechanism operates separately from the floral component adaptation mechanism. This mechanism thus prevents bees from repeatedly visiting the floral lip of the same plant which, in turn, results in autogamy. In this way, instead of preventing autogamy, C. rigida responds to these negative effects through a highly efficient cross-pollination method that successfully transfers pollen to different plants. Conclusions The proposed method ensures reproductive success, while offsetting the infertile self-pollination by insects, thereby reducing mating costs and addressing the lack of cross-pollination. The adaptation provides a novel and striking example of structural adaptation that promotes cross-pollination in angiosperms. PMID:23308277

  2. Intention-Disguised Algorithmic Trading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, William; Syverson, Paul; Liu, Zhenming; Thorpe, Christopher

    Large market participants (LMPs) must often execute trades while keeping their intentions secret. Sometimes secrecy is required before trades are completed to prevent other traders from anticipating (and exploiting) the price impact of their trades. This is known as "front-running". In other cases, LMPs with proprietary trading strategies wish to keep their positions secret even after trading because their strategies and positions contain valuable information. LMPs include hedge funds, mutual funds, and other specialized market players.

  3. Slow motion increases perceived intent.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Eugene M; Burns, Zachary C; Converse, Benjamin A

    2016-08-16

    To determine the appropriate punishment for a harmful action, people must often make inferences about the transgressor's intent. In courtrooms and popular media, such inferences increasingly rely on video evidence, which is often played in "slow motion." Four experiments (n = 1,610) involving real surveillance footage from a murder or broadcast replays of violent contact in professional football demonstrate that viewing an action in slow motion, compared with regular speed, can cause viewers to perceive an action as more intentional. This slow motion intentionality bias occurred, in part, because slow motion video caused participants to feel like the actor had more time to act, even when they knew how much clock time had actually elapsed. Four additional experiments (n = 2,737) reveal that allowing viewers to see both regular speed and slow motion replay mitigates the bias, but does not eliminate it. We conclude that an empirical understanding of the effect of slow motion on mental state attribution should inform the life-or-death decisions that are currently based on tacit assumptions about the objectivity of human perception.

  4. Slow motion increases perceived intent

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Eugene M.; Burns, Zachary C.; Converse, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    To determine the appropriate punishment for a harmful action, people must often make inferences about the transgressor’s intent. In courtrooms and popular media, such inferences increasingly rely on video evidence, which is often played in “slow motion.” Four experiments (n = 1,610) involving real surveillance footage from a murder or broadcast replays of violent contact in professional football demonstrate that viewing an action in slow motion, compared with regular speed, can cause viewers to perceive an action as more intentional. This slow motion intentionality bias occurred, in part, because slow motion video caused participants to feel like the actor had more time to act, even when they knew how much clock time had actually elapsed. Four additional experiments (n = 2,737) reveal that allowing viewers to see both regular speed and slow motion replay mitigates the bias, but does not eliminate it. We conclude that an empirical understanding of the effect of slow motion on mental state attribution should inform the life-or-death decisions that are currently based on tacit assumptions about the objectivity of human perception. PMID:27482091

  5. Slow motion increases perceived intent.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Eugene M; Burns, Zachary C; Converse, Benjamin A

    2016-08-16

    To determine the appropriate punishment for a harmful action, people must often make inferences about the transgressor's intent. In courtrooms and popular media, such inferences increasingly rely on video evidence, which is often played in "slow motion." Four experiments (n = 1,610) involving real surveillance footage from a murder or broadcast replays of violent contact in professional football demonstrate that viewing an action in slow motion, compared with regular speed, can cause viewers to perceive an action as more intentional. This slow motion intentionality bias occurred, in part, because slow motion video caused participants to feel like the actor had more time to act, even when they knew how much clock time had actually elapsed. Four additional experiments (n = 2,737) reveal that allowing viewers to see both regular speed and slow motion replay mitigates the bias, but does not eliminate it. We conclude that an empirical understanding of the effect of slow motion on mental state attribution should inform the life-or-death decisions that are currently based on tacit assumptions about the objectivity of human perception. PMID:27482091

  6. Creationism and intelligent design are incompatible with scientific progress: A response to Shanta and Vêdanta.

    PubMed

    Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    In a recent opinion paper, B.K. Shanta claims science leaves no room for the subjective aspect of consciousness, and in doing so, attacks both origin of life and evolutionary research. He claims Vêdanta, one of the 6 orthodox schools of Hindu philosophy, offers an explanation: "the origin of everything material and nonmaterial is sentient and absolute." Here I discuss how the pseudoscience of these creationist views, which are aligned with Intelligent Design, are incompatible with scientific progress and should not be published in scientific journals.

  7. Interallelic and intergenic incompatibilities of the Prdm9 (Hst1) gene in mouse hybrid sterility.

    PubMed

    Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondřej; Simeček, Petr; Gregorová, Soňa; Schimenti, John C; Matsui, Yasuhisa; Baudat, Frédéric; de Massy, Bernard; Piálek, Jaroslav; Forejt, Jiří; Trachtulec, Zdenek

    2012-01-01

    The Dobzhansky-Muller model of incompatibilities explains reproductive isolation between species by incorrect epistatic interactions. Although the mechanisms of speciation are of great interest, no incompatibility has been characterized at the gene level in mammals. The Hybrid sterility 1 gene (Hst1) participates in the arrest of meiosis in F(1) males of certain strains from two Mus musculus subspecies, e.g., PWD from M. m. musculus and C57BL/6J (henceforth B6) from M. m. domesticus. Hst1 has been identified as a meiotic PR-domain gene (Prdm9) encoding histone 3 methyltransferase in the male offspring of PWD females and B6 males, (PWD×B6)F(1). To characterize the incompatibilities underlying hybrid sterility, we phenotyped reproductive and meiotic markers in males with altered copy numbers of Prdm9. A partial rescue of fertility was observed upon removal of the B6 allele of Prdm9 from the azoospermic (PWD×B6)F(1) hybrids, whereas removing one of the two Prdm9 copies in PWD or B6 background had no effect on male reproduction. Incompatibility(ies) not involving Prdm9(B6) also acts in the (PWD×B6)F(1) hybrids, since the correction of hybrid sterility by Prdm9(B6) deletion was not complete. Additions and subtractions of Prdm9 copies, as well as allelic replacements, improved meiotic progression and fecundity also in the progeny-producing reciprocal (B6×PWD)F(1) males. Moreover, an increased dosage of Prdm9 and reciprocal cross enhanced fertility of other sperm-carrying male hybrids, (PWD×B6-C3H.Prdm9)F(1), harboring another Prdm9 allele of M. m. domesticus origin. The levels of Prdm9 mRNA isoforms were similar in the prepubertal testes of all types of F(1) hybrids of PWD with B6 and B6-C3H.Prdm9 despite their different prospective fertility, but decreased to 53% after removal of Prdm9(B6). Therefore, the Prdm9(B6) allele probably takes part in posttranscriptional dominant-negative hybrid interaction(s) absent in the parental strains.

  8. Creationism and intelligent design are incompatible with scientific progress: A response to Shanta and Vêdanta.

    PubMed

    Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    In a recent opinion paper, B.K. Shanta claims science leaves no room for the subjective aspect of consciousness, and in doing so, attacks both origin of life and evolutionary research. He claims Vêdanta, one of the 6 orthodox schools of Hindu philosophy, offers an explanation: "the origin of everything material and nonmaterial is sentient and absolute." Here I discuss how the pseudoscience of these creationist views, which are aligned with Intelligent Design, are incompatible with scientific progress and should not be published in scientific journals. PMID:27066185

  9. On the Interconnection of Incompatible Solid Finite Element Meshes Using Multipoint Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    Incompatible meshes, i.e., meshes that physically must have a common boundary, but do not necessarily have coincident grid points, can arise in the course of a finite element analysis. For example, two substructures may have been developed at different times for different purposes and it becomes necessary to interconnect the two models. A technique that uses only multipoint constraints, i.e., MPC cards (or MPCS cards in substructuring), is presented. Since the method uses only MPC's, the procedure may apply at any stage in an analysis; no prior planning or special data is necessary.

  10. Creationism and intelligent design are incompatible with scientific progress: A response to Shanta and Vêdanta

    PubMed Central

    Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In a recent opinion paper, B.K. Shanta claims science leaves no room for the subjective aspect of consciousness, and in doing so, attacks both origin of life and evolutionary research. He claims Vêdanta, one of the 6 orthodox schools of Hindu philosophy, offers an explanation: “the origin of everything material and nonmaterial is sentient and absolute.” Here I discuss how the pseudoscience of these creationist views, which are aligned with Intelligent Design, are incompatible with scientific progress and should not be published in scientific journals. PMID:27066185

  11. Role of delayed nuclear envelope breakdown and mitosis in Wolbachia-induced cytoplasmic incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Tram, Uyen; Sullivan, William

    2002-05-10

    The bacterium Wolbachia manipulates reproduction in millions of insects worldwide; the most common effect is cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI). We found that CI resulted from delayed nuclear envelope breakdown of the male pronucleus in Nasonia vitripennis. This caused asynchrony between the male and female pronuclei and, ultimately, loss of paternal chromosomes at the first mitosis. When Wolbachia were present in the egg, synchrony was restored, which explains suppression of CI in these crosses. These results suggest that Wolbachia target cell cycle regulatory proteins. A striking consequence of CI is that it alters the normal pattern of reciprocal centrosome inheritance in Nasonia.

  12. Genetic evidence that two independent S-loci control RNase-based self-incompatibility in diploid strawberry.

    PubMed

    Bosković, Radovan I; Sargent, Daniel J; Tobutt, Kenneth R

    2010-03-01

    The self-incompatibility mechanism that reduces inbreeding in many plants of the Rosaceae is attributed to a multi-allelic S locus which, in the Prunoideae and Maloideae subfamilies, comprises two complementary genes, a stylar-expressed S-RNase and a pollen-expressed SFB. To elucidate incompatibility in the subfamily Rosoideae, stylar-specific RNases and self-(in)compatibility status were analysed in various diploid strawberries, especially Fragaria nubicola and F. viridis, both self-incompatible, and F. vesca, self-compatible, and in various progenies derived from them. Unexpectedly, two unlinked RNase loci, S and T, were found, encoding peptides distinct from Prunoideae and Maloideae S-RNases; the presence of a single active allele at either is sufficient to confer self-incompatibility. By contrast, in diploid Maloideae and Prunoideae a single locus encodes S-RNases that share several conserved regions and two active alleles are required for self-incompatibility. Our evidence implicates the S locus in unilateral inter-specific incompatibility and shows that S and T RNases can, remarkably, confer not only allele-specific rejection of cognate pollen but also unspecific rejection of Sn Tn pollen, where n indicates a null allele, consistent with the the presence of the pollen component, SFB, activating the cognitive function of these RNases. Comparison of relevant linkage groups between Fragaria and Prunus suggests that Prunus S-RNases, unique in having two introns, may have resulted from gene conversion in an ancestor of Prunus. In addition, it is shown that there is a non-S locus that is essential for self-incompatibility in diploid Fragaria.

  13. Analysis of a Plant Complex Resistance Gene Locus Underlying Immune-Related Hybrid Incompatibility and Its Occurrence in Nature

    PubMed Central

    Alcázar, Rubén; von Reth, Marcel; Bautor, Jaqueline; Chae, Eunyoung; Weigel, Detlef; Koornneef, Maarten; Parker, Jane E.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying speciation in plants include detrimental (incompatible) genetic interactions between parental alleles that incur a fitness cost in hybrids. We reported on recessive hybrid incompatibility between an Arabidopsis thaliana strain from Poland, Landsberg erecta (Ler), and many Central Asian A. thaliana strains. The incompatible interaction is determined by a polymorphic cluster of Toll/interleukin-1 receptor-nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat (TNL) RPP1 (Recognition of Peronospora parasitica1)-like genes in Ler and alleles of the receptor-like kinase Strubbelig Receptor Family 3 (SRF3) in Central Asian strains Kas-2 or Kond, causing temperature-dependent autoimmunity and loss of growth and reproductive fitness. Here, we genetically dissected the RPP1-like Ler locus to determine contributions of individual RPP1-like Ler (R1–R8) genes to the incompatibility. In a neutral background, expression of most RPP1-like Ler genes, except R3, has no effect on growth or pathogen resistance. Incompatibility involves increased R3 expression and engineered R3 overexpression in a neutral background induces dwarfism and sterility. However, no individual RPP1-like Ler gene is sufficient for incompatibility between Ler and Kas-2 or Kond, suggesting that co-action of at least two RPP1-like members underlies this epistatic interaction. We find that the RPP1-like Ler haplotype is frequent and occurs with other Ler RPP1-like alleles in a local population in Gorzów Wielkopolski (Poland). Only Gorzów individuals carrying the RPP1-like Ler haplotype are incompatible with Kas-2 and Kond, whereas other RPP1-like alleles in the population are compatible. Therefore, the RPP1-like Ler haplotype has been maintained in genetically different individuals at a single site, allowing exploration of forces shaping the evolution of RPP1-like genes at local and regional population scales. PMID:25503786

  14. Sustaining automobility

    SciTech Connect

    Pasek, J.E.; Schneider, R.W.; Sciance, F.S.

    1996-12-31

    This year marks the 100th anniversary of the automobile in America. This paper discusses the history of the automobile, its value to personal transportation, and the challenges faced in making the automobile energy efficient and environmentally compatible. Also included are some thoughts on how personal mobility can be sustained into the future. Understanding the history of transportation innovation and the reasons for the huge success of the automobile can help point the way to the successful innovations that will improve mankind`s mobility in the future and at the same time continue to make it cleaner, safer, and more energy efficient.

  15. Evolution Controversy: A Phenomenon Prompted by the Incompatibility between Science and Religious Beliefs

    PubMed Central

    Paz-y-Miño-C, Guillermo; Espinosa, Avelina

    2016-01-01

    The incompatibility between science and the belief in supernatural causation helps us understand why people do not accept evolution. Belief disrupts, distorts, delays, or stops (3Ds + S) the acceptance of scientific evidence. Here we examine the evolution controversy under three predictions of the incompatibility hypothesis. First, chronological-conflict-and-accommodation, which explains the historical re-emergence of antagonism between evolution and religion when advances in science continue to threaten the belief in supernatural causation; in such situations, creationists’ rejection of and subsequent partial acceptance of the new scientific discoveries are expected. Second, change in evolution's acceptance as function of educational attainment, which explains the positive association between acceptance of evolution and level of education. And third, change in evolution's acceptance as function of religiosity, which explains the negative association between acceptance of evolution and level of religious beliefs. We rely on an ample assessment of the attitudes toward evolution by highly-educated audiences (i.e. research faculty, educators of prospective teachers, and college students in the United States) to characterize the associations among the understanding of science and evolution, personal religious convictions, and conservative ideology. We emphasize that harmonious coexistence between science and religion is illusory. If co-persisting in society, their relationship will fluctuate from moderate to intense antagonism. PMID:26877774

  16. Successful treatment of severe rhesus D-incompatible pregnancy with repeated double-filtration plasmapheresis.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Koichi; Yamaguchi, Koushi; Sato, Mai; Ogura, Masao; Ito, Shuichi; Okada, Tomomi; Wada, Seiji; Sago, Haruhiko

    2015-10-01

    Fetal anemia is caused by Rhesus (RhD) sensitization as a result of RhD incompatibility during pregnancy. The severe form of this disease can cause hydrops fetalis leading to intrauterine death. We experienced a highly sensitized 39-year-old woman with B Rh-negative blood. She had a history of three induced abortions and experienced perinatal death associated with hydrops fetalis. During the pregnancy prior to her most recent one, she was treated with double-filtration plasmapheresis (DFPP), high dose γ-globulin and intrauterine fetal blood transfusion (IUT). For her most recent pregnancy, we performed only weekly or fortnightly DFPP from 13 weeks until delivery. Anti-D antibody titer was maintained between 32 and 256 without any signs of fetal anemia. IUT was not required at any stage of the pregnancy. No adverse events were observed. She successfully delivered a healthy male infant weighing 2,289 g by Cesarean section at 35 weeks. Repeated DFPP may be an effective and safe strategy to reduce antibody titers in highly sensitized women with RhD-incompatible pregnancy, avoiding the need for IUT. PMID:25413689

  17. Detection of Self Incompatibility Genotypes in Prunus africana: Characterization, Evolution and Spatial Analysis.

    PubMed

    Nantongo, Judith Ssali; Eilu, Gerald; Geburek, Thomas; Schueler, Silvio; Konrad, Heino

    2016-01-01

    In flowering plants, self-incompatibility is an effective genetic mechanism that prevents self-fertilization. Most Prunus tree species exhibit a homomorphic gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) system, in which the pollen phenotype is encoded by its own haploid genome. To date, no identification of S-alleles had been done in Prunus africana, the only member of the genus in Africa. To identify S-RNase alleles and hence determine S-genotypes in African cherry (Prunus africana) from Mabira Forest Reserve, Uganda, primers flanking the first and second intron were designed and these amplified two bands in most individuals. PCR bands on agarose indicated 26 and 8 different S-alleles for second and first intron respectively. Partial or full sequences were obtained for all these fragments. Comparison with published S-RNase data indicated that the amplified products were S-RNase alleles with very high interspecies homology despite the high intraspecific variation. Against expectations for a locus under balancing selection, frequency and spatial distribution of the alleles in a study plot was not random. Implications of the results to breeding efforts in the species are discussed, and mating experiments are strongly suggested to finally prove the functionality of SI in P. africana. PMID:27348423

  18. Comparative genetics of hybrid incompatibility: sterility in two Solanum species crosses.

    PubMed

    Moyle, Leonie C; Nakazato, Takuya

    2008-07-01

    The genetic basis of hybrid sterility can provide insight into the genetic and evolutionary origins of species barriers. We examine the genetics of hybrid incompatibility between two diploid plant species in the plant clade Solanum sect. Lycopersicon. Using a set of near-isogenic lines (NILs) representing the wild species Solanum pennellii (formerly Lycopersicon pennellii) in the genetic background of the cultivated tomato S. lycopersicum (formerly L. esculentum), we found that hybrid pollen and seed infertility are each based on a modest number of loci, male (pollen) and other (seed) incompatibility factors are roughly comparable in number, and seed-infertility QTL act additively or recessively. These findings are remarkably consistent with our previous analysis in a different species pair, S. lycopersicum x S. habrochaites. Data from both studies contrast strongly with data from Drosophila. Finally, QTL for pollen and seed sterility from the two Solanum studies were chromosomally colocalized, indicating a shared evolutionary history for these QTL, a nonrandom genomic distribution of loci causing sterility, and/or a proclivity of certain genes to be involved in hybrid sterility. We show that comparative mapping data can delimit the probable timing of evolution of detected QTL and discern which sterility loci likely evolved earliest among species.

  19. Detection of Self Incompatibility Genotypes in Prunus africana: Characterization, Evolution and Spatial Analysis.

    PubMed

    Nantongo, Judith Ssali; Eilu, Gerald; Geburek, Thomas; Schueler, Silvio; Konrad, Heino

    2016-01-01

    In flowering plants, self-incompatibility is an effective genetic mechanism that prevents self-fertilization. Most Prunus tree species exhibit a homomorphic gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) system, in which the pollen phenotype is encoded by its own haploid genome. To date, no identification of S-alleles had been done in Prunus africana, the only member of the genus in Africa. To identify S-RNase alleles and hence determine S-genotypes in African cherry (Prunus africana) from Mabira Forest Reserve, Uganda, primers flanking the first and second intron were designed and these amplified two bands in most individuals. PCR bands on agarose indicated 26 and 8 different S-alleles for second and first intron respectively. Partial or full sequences were obtained for all these fragments. Comparison with published S-RNase data indicated that the amplified products were S-RNase alleles with very high interspecies homology despite the high intraspecific variation. Against expectations for a locus under balancing selection, frequency and spatial distribution of the alleles in a study plot was not random. Implications of the results to breeding efforts in the species are discussed, and mating experiments are strongly suggested to finally prove the functionality of SI in P. africana.

  20. Lunar prospector measurements of the distribution of incompatible elements gadolinium, samarium and thorium

    SciTech Connect

    Elphic, R.C.; Lawrence, D.J.; Feldman, W.C.; Barraclough, B.L.; Maurice, S.; Binder, A.B.; Lucey, P.G.

    1999-04-01

    Lunar Prospector neutron spectrometer (NS) and gamma ray spectrometer (GRS) observations have been used to map out the distribution of incompatible elements on the lunar surface. Specifically, the GRS data provide maps of the distribution of thorium and potassium while the NS data provide information on the distribution of iron and titanium, and the rare earth elements gadolinium and samarium. Using results of analysis of Celementine spectral reflectance (CSR) data, the Fe- and Ti-contributions to the NS data can be removed, leaving primarily rare earth element contributions from Gd and Sm. The Th and K maps correlate with the inferred Gd and Sm maps (r {approximately} 0.93), but there are regions of significant disagreement. One of these is in the KREEP-rich circum-Imbrium ring. No clear explanation has emerged for this disagreement, though Th, K, Gd and Sm have differing degrees of incompatibility. These results clearly are important to discussions of the geochemistry of the Procellarum-Imbrium Th-rich Terrane and the South-Pole-Aitken Terrane.

  1. Natural Framework for Device-Independent Quantification of Quantum Steerability, Measurement Incompatibility, and Self-Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shin-Liang; Budroni, Costantino; Liang, Yeong-Cherng; Chen, Yueh-Nan

    2016-06-01

    We introduce the concept of assemblage moment matrices, i.e., a collection of matrices of expectation values, each associated with a conditional quantum state obtained in a steering experiment. We demonstrate how it can be used for quantum states and measurements characterization in a device-independent manner, i.e., without invoking any assumption about the measurement or the preparation device. Specifically, we show how the method can be used to lower bound the steerability of an underlying quantum state directly from the observed correlation between measurement outcomes. Combining such device-independent quantifications with earlier results established by Piani and Watrous [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 060404 (2015)], our approach immediately provides a device-independent lower bound on the generalized robustness of entanglement, as well as the usefulness of the underlying quantum state for a type of subchannel discrimination problem. In addition, by proving a quantitative relationship between steering robustness and the recently introduced incompatibility robustness, our approach also allows for a device-independent quantification of the incompatibility between various measurements performed in a Bell-type experiment. Explicit examples where such bounds provide a kind of self-testing of the performed measurements are provided.

  2. Donor- and recipient-derived immunity in ABO incompatible living-related liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Alexandra; Fiedler, Melanie; Beckebaum, Susanne; Cicinnati, Vito R; Herzer, Kerstin; Lenz, Veronika; Witzke, Oliver; Paul, Andreas; Roggendorf, Michael; Horn, Peter A; Lindemann, Monika

    2015-09-01

    This report describes how donor- and recipient-derived immunity was influenced by immunosuppressive treatment of ABO incompatibility (rituximab and immunoadsorption/plasmaphereses) in the long-term. We present an 8-year course of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) immunity, isohemagglutinins and B cell numbers. Whereas cellular HBV immunity was transferred from the HBV vaccinated donor (blood group A1) to the HBV naïve recipient (blood group 0), humoral HBV specific immune transfer was lacking. Starting at month 17 after transplantation, the recipient was vaccinated six times against HBV. Anti-HBs did not appear until the sixth vaccination at month 44. Immunoadsorption prior to transplantation reduced anti-A1 IgG titers from 256 to 2. Titers after transplantation remained low (⩽64). B cell numbers were below standard values up to month 26, then normalized and exceeded normal values from year 7 to 8 post transplantation. In conclusion, donor-derived B cell immunity was lost but recipient-derived immunity persisted after ABO incompatible transplantation.

  3. Error-tradeoff and error-disturbance relations for incompatible quantum measurements.

    PubMed

    Branciard, Cyril

    2013-04-23

    Heisenberg's uncertainty principle is one of the main tenets of quantum theory. Nevertheless, and despite its fundamental importance for our understanding of quantum foundations, there has been some confusion in its interpretation: Although Heisenberg's first argument was that the measurement of one observable on a quantum state necessarily disturbs another incompatible observable, standard uncertainty relations typically bound the indeterminacy of the outcomes when either one or the other observable is measured. In this paper, we quantify precisely Heisenberg's intuition. Even if two incompatible observables cannot be measured together, one can still approximate their joint measurement, at the price of introducing some errors with respect to the ideal measurement of each of them. We present a tight relation characterizing the optimal tradeoff between the error on one observable vs. the error on the other. As a particular case, our approach allows us to characterize the disturbance of an observable induced by the approximate measurement of another one; we also derive a stronger error-disturbance relation for this scenario. PMID:23564344

  4. Malus pumila 'Spy 227' and Apple stem pitting virus: graft incompatibility and epinasty.

    PubMed

    Brakta, Ajay; Handa, Anil; Thakur, P D; Tomar, Manica; Kumar, Pardeep

    2015-06-01

    Apple stem pitting foveavirus (ASPV) is one of the most important and widespread virus infecting apples in the world. Of late, the virus has been found to be invariably associated with most of the apple plantations of Shimla district of Himachal Pradesh based on DAS-ELISA results. Bioassay of viruses in vegetatively propagated crops including apple is considered to be an essential component in indexing programmes for the production of virus free propagating material. Woody indicator Malus pumila 'Spy 227' was used for the detection of ASPV through double grafting method. Graft incompatibility and epinasty symptoms were observed on Malus pumila Spy 227 indicator plants. Further, molecular identification of the virus isolate was done by cloning and sequencing of the test isolate. Partial sequence analysis of the coat protein gene showed 89 % nucleotide identity in BLASTN analysis with ASPV isolate from China (Accession No. JF895517). This is the first record of ASPV producing Graft incompatibility on Spy 227 indicator plants. PMID:26436128

  5. Incompatibility between Nuclear and Mitochondrial Genomes Contributes to an Interspecies Reproductive Barrier.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hong; Marti Gutierrez, Nuria; Morey, Robert; Van Dyken, Crystal; Kang, Eunju; Hayama, Tomonari; Lee, Yeonmi; Li, Ying; Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca; Wolf, Don P; Laurent, Louise C; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2016-08-01

    Vertebrate cells carry two different genomes, nuclear (nDNA) and mitochondrial (mtDNA), both encoding proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation. Because of the extensive interactions, adaptive coevolution of the two genomes must occur to ensure normal mitochondrial function. To investigate whether incompatibilities between these two genomes could contribute to interspecies reproductive barriers, we performed reciprocal mtDNA replacement (MR) in zygotes between widely divergent Mus m. domesticus (B6) and conplastic Mus m. musculus (PWD) mice. Transfer of MR1 cybrid embryos (B6nDNA-PWDmtDNA) supported normal development of F1 offspring with reduced male fertility but unaffected reproductive fitness in females. Furthermore, donor PWD mtDNA was faithfully transmitted through the germline into F2 and F3 generations. In contrast, reciprocal MR2 (PWDnDNA-B6mtDNA) produced high embryonic loss and stillborn rates, suggesting an association between mitochondrial function and infertility. These results strongly suggest that functional incompatibility between nuclear and mitochondrial genomes contributes to interspecies reproductive isolation in mammals. PMID:27425585

  6. Maintenance of self-incompatibility in peripheral populations of a circumboreal woodland subshrub

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ai-Qin; Xiong, Ying-Ze; Huang, Shuang-Quan

    2014-01-01

    Compared with self-incompatible (SI) species, species that shift to self-compatibility (SC) are more likely to colonize a new habitat. Self-incompatibility and fruit-set failure have been widely reported in European populations of Linnaea borealis (twinflower), whereas at the eastern margin of its North American distribution it showed potential SC. We investigated the breeding system of L. borealis in northwestern China, the eastern margin of the species' distribution in Eurasia. Pollinators, breeding system and pollen limitation were examined in a nature reserve with thousands of L. borealis individuals. To investigate whether fruit set was limited by mating opportunity, we compared fruit set in high-, medium- and low-density patches of L. borealis. To examine whether clonal reproduction resulted in higher fruit-set failure, we compared fruit set among different sizes of clonal ramets. Flies contributed most pollinator visits in the studied population. It was strictly SI and natural fruit set depended on insect visits. Patch density comparisons showed that L. borealis was not pollen limited in low-density patches that had significantly fewer flowers. However, it produced significantly fewer fruits per flower when clonal ramet size increased, suggesting that the high failure of fruit set in larger clones with more flowers may be caused by geitonogamy. Generalist pollinators and clonal reproduction may help L. borealis to colonize in marginal areas without the transition of the breeding system from SI to SC, but experiencing fruit-set failure resulting from geitonogamy within clones. PMID:25336338

  7. Detection of Self Incompatibility Genotypes in Prunus africana: Characterization, Evolution and Spatial Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nantongo, Judith Ssali; Eilu, Gerald; Geburek, Thomas; Schueler, Silvio; Konrad, Heino

    2016-01-01

    In flowering plants, self-incompatibility is an effective genetic mechanism that prevents self-fertilization. Most Prunus tree species exhibit a homomorphic gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) system, in which the pollen phenotype is encoded by its own haploid genome. To date, no identification of S-alleles had been done in Prunus africana, the only member of the genus in Africa. To identify S-RNase alleles and hence determine S-genotypes in African cherry (Prunus africana) from Mabira Forest Reserve, Uganda, primers flanking the first and second intron were designed and these amplified two bands in most individuals. PCR bands on agarose indicated 26 and 8 different S-alleles for second and first intron respectively. Partial or full sequences were obtained for all these fragments. Comparison with published S-RNase data indicated that the amplified products were S-RNase alleles with very high interspecies homology despite the high intraspecific variation. Against expectations for a locus under balancing selection, frequency and spatial distribution of the alleles in a study plot was not random. Implications of the results to breeding efforts in the species are discussed, and mating experiments are strongly suggested to finally prove the functionality of SI in P. africana. PMID:27348423

  8. Outcomes of ABO-Incompatible Kidney Transplantation in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, John R.; Berger, Jonathan C.; Warren, Daniel S.; James, Nathan; Montgomery, Robert A.; Segev, Dorry L.

    2012-01-01

    Background ABO incompatible (ABOi) kidney transplantation is an important modality to facilitate living donor transplant for incompatible pairs. To date, reports of the outcomes from this practice in the United States have been limited to single-center studies. Methods Using the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients, we identified 738 patients who underwent live-donor ABOi kidney transplantation between January 1, 1995 and March 31, 2010. These were compared with matched controls that underwent ABO compatible (ABOc) live-donor kidney transplantation. Subgroup analyses among ABOi recipients were performed according to donor blood type, recipient blood type, and transplant center ABOi volume. Results When compared to ABOc matched controls, long-term patient survival of ABOi recipients was not significantly different between the cohorts (p=0.2). However, graft loss was significantly higher, particularly in the first 14 days post-transplant (SHR 2.34, 95% CI 1.43–3.84, p=0.001), with little to no difference beyond day 14 (SHR 1.28, 95% CI 0.99–1.54, p=0.058). In subgroup analyses among ABOi recipients, no differences in survival were seen by donor blood type, recipient blood type, or transplant center ABOi volume. Conclusions These results support the use and dissemination of ABOi transplantation when a compatible live donor is not available, but caution that the highest period of risk is immediately post-transplant. PMID:22290268

  9. Transitions from reproductive systems governed by two self-incompatible loci to one in fungi.

    PubMed

    Vuilleumier, Séverine; Alcala, Nicolas; Niculita-Hirzel, Hélène

    2013-02-01

    Self-incompatibility (SI), a reproductive system broadly present in plants, chordates, fungi, and protists, might be controlled by one or several multiallelic loci. How a transition in the number of SI loci can occur and the consequences of such events for the population's genetics and dynamics have not been studied theoretically. Here, we provide analytical descriptions of two transition mechanisms: linkage of the two SI loci (scenario 1) and the loss of function of one incompatibility gene within a mating type of a population with two SI loci (scenario 2). We show that invasion of populations by the new mating type form depends on whether the fitness of the new type is lowered, and on the allelic diversity of the SI loci and the recombination between the two SI loci in the starting population. Moreover, under scenario 1, it also depends on the frequency of the SI alleles that became linked. We demonstrate that, following invasion, complete transitions in the reproductive system occurs under scenario 2 and is predicted only for small populations under scenario 1. Interestingly, such events are associated with a drastic reduction in mating type number.

  10. Defect-induced incompatability of elastic strains: dislocations within the Landau theory of martensitic phase transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Groger, Roman1; Lockman, Turab; Saxena, Avadh

    2008-01-01

    In dislocation-free martensites the components of the elastic strain tensor are constrained by the Saint-Venant compatibility condition which guarantees continuity of the body during external loading. However, in dislocated materials the plastic part of the distortion tensor introduces a displacement mismatch that is removed by elastic relaxation. The elastic strains are then no longer compatible in the sense of the Saint-Venant law and the ensuing incompatibility tensor is shown to be proportional to the gradients of the Nye dislocation density tensor. We demonstrate that the presence of this incompatibility gives rise to an additional long-range contribution in the inhomogeneous part of the Landau energy functional and to the corresponding stress fields. Competition among the local and long-range interactions results in frustration in the evolving order parameter (elastic) texture. We show how the Peach-Koehler forces and stress fields for any distribution of dislocations in arbitrarily anisotropic media can be calculated and employed in a Fokker-Planck dynamics for the dislocation density. This approach represents a self-consistent scheme that yields the evolutions of both the order parameter field and the continuous dislocation density. We illustrate our method by studying the effects of dislocations on microstructure, particularly twinned domain walls, in an Fe-Pd alloy undergoing a martensitic transformation.

  11. The phenolic content and its involvement in the graft incompatibility process of various pear rootstocks (Pyrus communis L.).

    PubMed

    Hudina, Metka; Orazem, Primoz; Jakopic, Jerneja; Stampar, Franci

    2014-03-01

    This study investigates the influence of various rootstocks for pear on the phytochemical composition in the phloem above and below the graft union and the role of phenols in pear graft incompatibility. Assays of phloem with cambium from 4-year-old 'Conference', 'Abate Fetel' and 'Williams' pear trees grafted on different rootstocks: Quince MA, Quince BA 29, Fox 11, Farold 40 (Daygon), seedling Pyrus communis L. and own rooted (P. communis L.) were analyzed with HPLC-MS. The most abundant phenolic compound in phloem above and below the graft union was arbutin, followed by procyanidin B1 and chlorogenic acid. In 'Conference' and 'Abate Fetel', higher arbutin content levels were measured above the graft union, while in the incompatible scion of 'Williams' on quince MA higher arbutin content levels were measured below the graft union. In all three observed cultivars (in 'Conference' the difference was not significant) grafted on Fox 11 rootstock, the highest content of arbutin was measured below the graft union. The results indicate that not only catechin and procyanidin B1, but also arbutin and several flavonols could be involved in graft incompatibility. All cultivars grafted on quince rootstocks had higher levels of epicatechin and procyanidin B2 below the graft union, even though some differences were not significant. It seems that those phenols do not affect pear incompatibility. A severe incompatibility between Fox 11 rootstock and 'Williams' was detected.

  12. Network mechanisms of intentional learning

    PubMed Central

    Hampshire, Adam; Hellyer, Peter J.; Parkin, Beth; Hiebert, Nole; MacDonald, Penny; Owen, Adrian M.; Leech, Robert; Rowe, James

    2016-01-01

    The ability to learn new tasks rapidly is a prominent characteristic of human behaviour. This ability relies on flexible cognitive systems that adapt in order to encode temporary programs for processing non-automated tasks. Previous functional imaging studies have revealed distinct roles for the lateral frontal cortices (LFCs) and the ventral striatum in intentional learning processes. However, the human LFCs are complex; they house multiple distinct sub-regions, each of which co-activates with a different functional network. It remains unclear how these LFC networks differ in their functions and how they coordinate with each other, and the ventral striatum, to support intentional learning. Here, we apply a suite of fMRI connectivity methods to determine how LFC networks activate and interact at different stages of two novel tasks, in which arbitrary stimulus-response rules are learnt either from explicit instruction or by trial-and-error. We report that the networks activate en masse and in synchrony when novel rules are being learnt from instruction. However, these networks are not homogeneous in their functions; instead, the directed connectivities between them vary asymmetrically across the learning timecourse and they disengage from the task sequentially along a rostro-caudal axis. Furthermore, when negative feedback indicates the need to switch to alternative stimulus–response rules, there is additional input to the LFC networks from the ventral striatum. These results support the hypotheses that LFC networks interact as a hierarchical system during intentional learning and that signals from the ventral striatum have a driving influence on this system when the internal program for processing the task is updated. PMID:26658925

  13. Network mechanisms of intentional learning.

    PubMed

    Hampshire, Adam; Hellyer, Peter J; Parkin, Beth; Hiebert, Nole; MacDonald, Penny; Owen, Adrian M; Leech, Robert; Rowe, James

    2016-02-15

    The ability to learn new tasks rapidly is a prominent characteristic of human behaviour. This ability relies on flexible cognitive systems that adapt in order to encode temporary programs for processing non-automated tasks. Previous functional imaging studies have revealed distinct roles for the lateral frontal cortices (LFCs) and the ventral striatum in intentional learning processes. However, the human LFCs are complex; they house multiple distinct sub-regions, each of which co-activates with a different functional network. It remains unclear how these LFC networks differ in their functions and how they coordinate with each other, and the ventral striatum, to support intentional learning. Here, we apply a suite of fMRI connectivity methods to determine how LFC networks activate and interact at different stages of two novel tasks, in which arbitrary stimulus-response rules are learnt either from explicit instruction or by trial-and-error. We report that the networks activate en masse and in synchrony when novel rules are being learnt from instruction. However, these networks are not homogeneous in their functions; instead, the directed connectivities between them vary asymmetrically across the learning timecourse and they disengage from the task sequentially along a rostro-caudal axis. Furthermore, when negative feedback indicates the need to switch to alternative stimulus-response rules, there is additional input to the LFC networks from the ventral striatum. These results support the hypotheses that LFC networks interact as a hierarchical system during intentional learning and that signals from the ventral striatum have a driving influence on this system when the internal program for processing the task is updated.

  14. Distinct electrophysiological potentials for intention in action and prior intention for action.

    PubMed

    Vinding, Mikkel C; Jensen, Mads; Overgaard, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The role of conscious intention in relation to motoric movements has become a major topic of investigation in neuroscience. Traditionally, reports of conscious intention have been compared to various features of the readiness-potential (RP)--an electrophysiological signal that appears before voluntary movements. Experiments, however, tend to study intentions in immediate relation to movements (proximal intentions), thus ignoring other aspects of intentions such as planning or deciding in advance of movement (distal intentions). The current study examines the difference in electrophysiological activity between proximal intention and distal intention, using electroencephalography (EEG). Participants had to form an intention to move and then wait 2.5 sec before performing the actual movement. In this way, the electrophysiological activity related to forming a conscious intention was separated from any confounding activity related to automated motor activity. This was compared to conditions in which participants had to act as soon as they had the intention and a condition where participants acted upon an external cue 2.5 sec prior to movement. We examined the RP for the three conditions. No difference was found in early RP, but late RP differed significantly depending on the type of intention. In addition, we analysed signals during a longer time-interval starting before the time of distal intention formation until after the actual movement concluded. Results showed a slow negative electrophysiological "intention potential" above the mid-frontal areas at the time participants formed a distal intention. This potential was only found when the distal intention was self-paced and not when the intention was formed in response to an external cue.

  15. A conceptual model of intentional comfort touch.

    PubMed

    Connor, Ann; Howett, Maeve

    2009-06-01

    This article discusses the application and integration of intentional comfort touch as a holistic nursing practice. A review of the literature on touch and its related concepts is included. Although nurses use touch frequently in patient encounters, it is not always used intentionally or deliberately to enhance care. The article compares and contrasts intentional comfort touch with nonintentional or procedural touch. The use of intentional comfort touch in innovative clinical settings with diverse and at-risk populations is described. Based on clinical experiences and the current literature, a conceptual model of intentional comfort touch is proposed. The application of touch is discussed as is the meaning and importance of intentional touch for students, faculty, and patients. PMID:19443699

  16. Design and Construction Documents Associated with N232, Sustainability Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zornetzer, Steven F.; Schuler, Raymond F.; Grymes, Rosalind A.

    2014-01-01

    This request comprehensively covers documents associated with the design and construction of Sustainability Base, N232. The intent of this project specifically envisioned broad dissemination of these materials to others undertaking the design and construction of high-performing energy- and resource-efficient buildings in comparable climate zones.

  17. Sustainability Science Needs Sustainable Data!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, R. R.; Chen, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    Sustainability science (SS) is an 'emerging field of research dealing with the interactions between natural and social systems, and with how those interactions affect the challenge of sustainability: meeting the needs of present and future generations while substantially reducing poverty and conserving the planet's life support systems' (Kates, 2011; Clark, 2007). Bettencourt & Kaur (2011) identified more than 20,000 scientific papers published on SS topics since the 1980s with more than 35,000 distinct authors. They estimated that the field is currently growing exponentially, with the number of authors doubling approximately every 8 years. These scholars are undoubtedly using and generating a vast quantity and variety of data and information for both SS research and applications. Unfortunately we know little about what data the SS community is actually using, and whether or not the data that SS scholars generate are being preserved for future use. Moreover, since much SS research is conducted by cross-disciplinary, multi-institutional teams, often scattered around the world, there could well be increased risks of data loss, reduced data quality, inadequate documentation, and poor long-term access and usability. Capabilities and processes therefore need to be established today to support continual, reliable, and efficient preservation of and access to SS data in the future, especially so that they can be reused in conjunction with future data and for new studies not conceived in the original data collection activities. Today's long-term data stewardship challenges include establishing sustainable data governance to facilitate continuing management, selecting data to ensure that limited resources are focused on high priority SS data holdings, securing sufficient rights to allow unforeseen uses, and preparing data to enable use by future communities whose specific research and information needs are not yet known. Adopting sustainable models for archival

  18. Factor composition of the Suicide Intent Scale.

    PubMed

    Mieczkowski, T A; Sweeney, J A; Haas, G L; Junker, B W; Brown, R P; Mann, J J

    1993-01-01

    An exploratory analysis of the Suicide Intent Scale was performed on a sample of 98 psychiatric inpatients who had made suicide attempts. The factor analysis was performed using a method for polychotomous data, and resulted in a two-factor solution. The Lethal Intent factor contained items pertaining to the subjective level of lethal intent, while the Planning factor contained items largely related to objective planning for the attempt. Preliminary analysis of these factors suggest that the Suicide Intent Scale can be used to evaluate two separate aspects of suicidal behavior.

  19. Assessing communicative intents: a situated pragmatics approach.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, L E

    2000-01-01

    The analysis of communicative intents is described as it has developed over time, beginning with J.L. Austin's work published in 1975. Recommendations for best practice are offered in which a situated approach is advocated. Key elements of this approach are a focus on contextual variables and open-ended, rather than list-oriented, assessments of range of intents. It is argued that intents must be assessed relative to the environment, with documentation of environmental variables such as barriers to communicative opportunity. Further, caution is urged in using lists of intents as the sole guide to analysis, because such lists serve to limit awareness of individual differences and multifunctionality of utterances.

  20. The Transcriptome of Compatible and Incompatible Interactions of Potato (Solanum tuberosum) with Phytophthora infestans Revealed by DeepSAGE Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gyetvai, Gabor; Sønderkær, Mads; Göbel, Ulrike; Basekow, Rico; Ballvora, Agim; Imhoff, Maren; Kersten, Birgit; Nielsen, Kåre-Lehman; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2012-01-01

    Late blight, caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, is the most important disease of potato (Solanum tuberosum). Understanding the molecular basis of resistance and susceptibility to late blight is therefore highly relevant for developing resistant cultivars, either by marker-assissted selection or by transgenic approaches. Specific P. infestans races having the Avr1 effector gene trigger a hypersensitive resistance response in potato plants carrying the R1 resistance gene (incompatible interaction) and cause disease in plants lacking R1 (compatible interaction). The transcriptomes of the compatible and incompatible interaction were captured by DeepSAGE analysis of 44 biological samples comprising five genotypes, differing only by the presence or absence of the R1 transgene, three infection time points and three biological replicates. 30.859 unique 21 base pair sequence tags were obtained, one third of which did not match any known potato transcript sequence. Two third of the tags were expressed at low frequency (<10 tag counts/million). 20.470 unitags matched to approximately twelve thousand potato transcribed genes. Tag frequencies were compared between compatible and incompatible interactions over the infection time course and between compatible and incompatible genotypes. Transcriptional changes were more numerous in compatible than in incompatible interactions. In contrast to incompatible interactions, transcriptional changes in the compatible interaction were observed predominantly for multigene families encoding defense response genes and genes functional in photosynthesis and CO2 fixation. Numerous transcriptional differences were also observed between near isogenic genotypes prior to infection with P. infestans. Our DeepSAGE transcriptome analysis uncovered novel candidate genes for plant host pathogen interactions, examples of which are discussed with respect to possible function. PMID:22328937

  1. Evidence for female mortality in Wolbachia-mediated cytoplasmic incompatibility in haplodiploid insects: epidemiologic and evolutionary consequences.

    PubMed

    Vavre, F; Fleury, F; Varaldi, J; Fouillet, P; Boulétreau, M

    2000-02-01

    Until now, only two Wolbachia-mediated cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) types have been described in haplodiploid species, the first in Nasonia (Insect) and the second in Tetranychus (Acari). They both induce a male-biased sex ratio in the incompatible cross. In Nasonia, CI does not reduce fertility since incompatible eggs develop as haploid males, whereas in Tetranychus CI leads to a partial mortality of incompatible eggs, thus reducing the fertility of females. Here, we study Wolbachia infection in a Drosophila parasitoid, Leptopilina heterotoma (Hymenoptera: Figitidae). A survey of Wolbachia infection shows that all natural populations tested are totally infected. Crosses between infected males and cured females show complete incompatibility: almost no females are produced. Moreover, incompatible eggs die early during their development, unlike Nasonia. This early death allows the parasitized Drosophila larva to achieve its development and to emerge. Thus, uninfected females crossed with infected males have reduced offspring production consisting only of males. Evidence of this CI type in insects demonstrates that the difference in CI types of Nasonia and Tetranychus is not due to specific factors of insects or acari. Using theoretical models, we compare the invasion processes of different strategies of Wolbachia: CI in diploid species, the two CI types in haplodiploid species, and parthenogenesis (the classical effect in haplodiploid species). Models show that CI in haplodiploid species is less efficient than in diploid ones. However, the Leptopilina type is advantageous compared to the Nasonia type. Parthenogenesis may be more or less advantageous, depending on the infection cost and on the proportion of fertilized eggs. Finally, we can propose different processes of Wolbachia strategy evolution in haplodiploid species from Nasonia CI type to Leptopilina CI type or parthenogenesis. PMID:10937195

  2. Intention, history, and artifact concepts.

    PubMed

    Bloom, P

    1996-07-01

    What determines our intuitions as to which objects are members of specific artifact kinds? Prior research suggests that factors such as physical appearance, current use, and intended function are not at the core of concepts such as chair, clock and pawn. The theory presented here, based on Levinson's (1993) intentional-historical theory of our concept of art, is that we determine that something is a member of a given artifact kind by inferring that it was successfully created with the intention to belong to that kind. This theory can explain why some properties (such as shape) are more important than others (such as color) when we determine kind membership and can account for why certain objects are judged to be members of artifact kinds even though they are highly dissimilar from other members of the kinds. It can also provide a framework for explaining the conditions under which broken objects cease to be members of their kinds and new artifacts can come into existence. This account of our understanding of artifact concepts is argued to be consistent with more general "essentialist" theories of our understanding of concepts corresponding to proper names and natural kind terms.

  3. Micro gel column technique is fit for detecting mixed fields post ABO incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Min-Fang; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Min

    2015-04-01

    How to choose suitable serologic method for assessment of the actual stages of ABO chimera is more important to establish transfusion strategy for patients post-ABO incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We reported ABO phenotypes of a patient post-ABO minor incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from 1+ weak agglutination by tube method was obviously reaffirmed to mixed fields with 4+ positive reaction by micro gel column card. Hence, blood bank technologists must continually work together with hematologist to establish appropriate transfusion strategy, and micro gel column technique can be more appropriate for detecting mixed fields during the whole period of transplantation. PMID:25578650

  4. "Our Common World" Belongs to "Us": Constructions of Otherness in Education for Sustainable Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ideland, Malin; Malmberg, Claes

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyse how good intentions in Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) discursively construct and maintain differences between "Us" and "Them". The empirical material consists of textbooks about sustainable development used in Swedish schools. An analysis of how "Us" and…

  5. A membrane-anchored protein kinase involved in Brassica self-incompatibility signaling.

    PubMed

    Murase, Kohji; Shiba, Hiroshi; Iwano, Megumi; Che, Fang-Sik; Watanabe, Masao; Isogai, Akira; Takayama, Seiji

    2004-03-01

    Self-incompatibility (SI) response in Brassica is initiated by haplotype-specific interactions between the pollen-borne ligand S locus protein 11/SCR and its stigmatic S receptor kinase, SRK. This binding induces autophosphorylation of SRK, which is then thought to trigger a signaling cascade that leads to self-pollen rejection. A recessive mutation of the modifier (m) gene eliminates the SI response in stigma. Positional cloning of M has revealed that it encodes a membrane-anchored cytoplasmic serine/threonine protein kinase, designated M locus protein kinase (MLPK). Transient expression of MLPK restores the ability of mm papilla cells to reject self-pollen, suggesting that MLPK is a positive mediator of Brassica SI signaling.

  6. Alteration of the self-incompatibility phenotype in Brassica by transformation of the antisense SLG gene.

    PubMed

    Shiba, H; Kimura, N; Takayama, S; Hinata, K; Suzuki, A; Isogai, A

    2000-05-01

    Self-incompatible (SI) Brassica rapa (syn. B. campestris) was transformed with an antisense SLG gene by using SLG8 cDNA isolated from the B. campestris S8 homozygote. Two transformed lines were obtained and analyzed. Northern blot and Western blot analyses revealed that endogenous SLG and SRK were greatly reduced of the transcriptional and translational levels in the transformant. Pollination experiments confirmed that their SI phenotype had broken down. In addition, the progeny with the antisense SLG gene, resulting from self- or cross-pollination of the transgenic plant, also showed the self-compatible phenotype. The breakdown of SI in the tranformants was due to the change in property of the stigma and not of the pollen. These results provide strong evidence that SLG and/or SRK is implicated in the pollen-stigma recognition of SI and that they act only as stigmatic factors.

  7. Proteome comparison following self- and across-pollination in self-incompatible apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.).

    PubMed

    Feng, Jianrong; Chen, Xuesen; Yuan, Zhaohe; He, Tianming; Zhang, Lijie; Wu, Yan; Liu, Wen; Liang, Qing

    2006-07-01

    The study compared the protein differences between self- and across-pollinated self-incompatible (SI) apricots by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-electrospray ion trap tandem mass spectrometry, the results showed that nine protein spots were expressed in self-pollinated pistil and only one was expressed in cross-pollinated pistils. Sixteen and three protein spots were up- and down-regulated in cross-pollinated pistils, respectively, compared with self-pollinated pistils. Seven protein spots were identified unambiguously by SEQUEST in NCBI protein database: Actin-12, enolase, MYB transcription-factor-like protein, heat-shock protein 70 were upregulated in cross-pollinated pistils compared with self-pollinated pistils; and actin-7, actin-8 and fructose bisphosphate aldolase-like protein were detected only in self-pollinated pistils.

  8. Self-incompatibility: Smi silences through a novel sRNA pathway.

    PubMed

    Finnegan, E Jean; Liang, Dacheng; Wang, Ming-Bo

    2011-05-01

    Self-incompatibility in Brassicaceae is determined by the interaction between S-Locus Protein 11 (SP11) on the pollen and S-receptor kinase (SRK) in the stigma. Pollen from heterozygotes generally displays products of both SP11 alleles, but in some heterozygotes SP11 expression is monoallelic, with one allele (SP11(R)) being silenced by promoter methylation. An exciting development in understanding the mechanism behind monoallelic silencing came recently when Y. Tarutani et al. [Nature 2010;466:983-986] identified a 24-nucleotide sRNA (termed Smi) derived from a non-coding gene within the dominant S-haplotype, and suggested that Smi directs promoter methylation. We propose that rather than having a direct effect on DNA methylation, Smi is the first step in a novel cis-acting siRNA pathway that directs widespread monoallelic SP11(R) promoter methylation. PMID:21306936

  9. Tailor-Made Onion-Like Stereocomplex Crystals in Incompatible Enantiomeric Polylactide Containing Block Copolymer Blends

    SciTech Connect

    Sun,L.; Zhu, L.; Rong, L.; Hsiao, B.

    2006-01-01

    Stereocomplexes formed by blending enantiomeric PLA block copolymers have demonstrated great potential for applications in biomedical devices. Here, we successfully synthesized well-defined enantiomeric PLA containing block copolymers by living ring-opening polymerization of L- and D-lactides from hydroxyl-terminated hydrophilic [poly(ethylene oxide) or PEO] and hydrophobic [poly(ethylene-co-1,2-butylene) or PEB] oligomers. Quantitative stereocomplex formation was achieved by equimolar mixing of the incompatible PEO-b-PLLA and PEB-b-PDLA. Intriguingly, in the blend of PEB-b-PDLA and PEO-b-PLLA with different PEB and PEO molecular weights, onion-like stereocomplex crystals were observed because of unbalanced surface stresses caused by different PEO and PEB molecular weights.

  10. Evidence for nuclear-cytoplasmic incompatibility between Allium fistulosum and A. cepa.

    PubMed

    Ulloa-G, M; Corgan, J N; Dunford, M

    1995-04-01

    An F2 population (Allium fistulosum x A. cepa) of 20plants, 10 BC1,[(A. fistulosum x A. cepa) x A. cepa], and 50 BC2 plants, [(A. fistulosum x A. cepa) x A. cepa] x A. cepa were studied cytogenetically and characterized for four isozyme alleles plus various morphological characteristics. All of the progenies were in A. fistulosum (the bunching onion) cytoplasm. In the F2 population we observed non-random chromosomal and allelic segregation, suppression of bulb onion allelic expression, and abnormalities in mitosis and meiosis. Most BC2 plants resembled A. cepa (the bulbing onion) morphologically, but anthers, filaments, pistils, and petals were abnormal. Only 3 plants, and these were most nearly like the F1 hybrid morphologically, produced any seeds.The data and observations support the hypothesis of nuclear-cytoplasmic incompatibility interactions between the bunching and bulb onion species. PMID:24174037

  11. Self-incompatibility: Smi silences through a novel sRNA pathway.

    PubMed

    Finnegan, E Jean; Liang, Dacheng; Wang, Ming-Bo

    2011-05-01

    Self-incompatibility in Brassicaceae is determined by the interaction between S-Locus Protein 11 (SP11) on the pollen and S-receptor kinase (SRK) in the stigma. Pollen from heterozygotes generally displays products of both SP11 alleles, but in some heterozygotes SP11 expression is monoallelic, with one allele (SP11(R)) being silenced by promoter methylation. An exciting development in understanding the mechanism behind monoallelic silencing came recently when Y. Tarutani et al. [Nature 2010;466:983-986] identified a 24-nucleotide sRNA (termed Smi) derived from a non-coding gene within the dominant S-haplotype, and suggested that Smi directs promoter methylation. We propose that rather than having a direct effect on DNA methylation, Smi is the first step in a novel cis-acting siRNA pathway that directs widespread monoallelic SP11(R) promoter methylation.

  12. Incompatibility group P-1 bla+ plasmids do not increase penicillin resistance of Pseudomonas acidovorans.

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, D L; Warren, R A

    1979-01-01

    Incompatibility group P-1 plasmids with the bla+ genotype were transferred from various Escherichia coli strains to Pseudomonas acidovorans strain 29. When resistance to ampicillin was used as the criterion, none of these plasmids appeared able to express their Bla+ phenotype in this host. When the plasmids were subsequently transferred back from these ampicillin-sensitive P. acdiovorans transcipients to E. coli strains, it was found that the Bla+ phenotype was again expressed. Although beta-lactamase was not detected in cultures of P. acidovorans transcipients, macroiodometric determinations of beta-lactamase activity made on broken cell suspensions revealed that beta-lactamase was indeed synthesized. It was concluded that P. acidovorans strain 29 allows expression of the bla gene within the cell but that this organism is unable to excrete the enzyme. PMID:383693

  13. Phase Transitions and Honeycomb Morphology in an Incompatible Blend of Enantiomeric Polylactide Block Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lu; Ginorio, Jorge; Zhu, Lei; Rong, Lixia; Sics, Igor; Hsiao, Benjamin

    2007-03-01

    Enantiomeric PLAs, poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) and poly(D-lactide) (PDLA), are known to form stereocomplexes. In this work, by using controlled ring-opening polymerization of L- and D-lactides from monohydroxyl-terminated hydrophilic poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and hydrophobic poly(ethylene-co-1-butene) (PEB) oligomers, respectively, well-defined PEO-b-PLLA (2k-5.4k) and PEB-b-PDLA (4.2-5.4k) block copolymers were synthesized. Quantitative stereocomplex formation was achieved by casting an equimolar mixture of incompatible PEO-b-PLLA and PEB-b-PDLA from chloroform at room temperature. Depending on different thermal histories, either lamellar or inverted cylindrical morphology was observed in the molten state. Intriguingly, novel honeycomb morphology with the minor PEB component forming the matrix was observed in the inverted cylindrical phase.

  14. Maximal incompatibility of locally classical behavior and global causal order in multiparty scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumeler, ńmin; Feix, Adrien; Wolf, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    Quantum theory in a global spacetime gives rise to nonlocal correlations, which cannot be explained causally in a satisfactory way; this motivates the study of theories with reduced global assumptions. Oreshkov, Costa, and Brukner [Nat. Commun. 3, 1092 (2012), 10.1038/ncomms2076] proposed a framework in which quantum theory is valid locally but where, at the same time, no global spacetime, i.e., predefined causal order, is assumed beyond the absence of logical paradoxes. It was shown for the two-party case, however, that a global causal order always emerges in the classical limit. Quite naturally, it has been conjectured that the same also holds in the multiparty setting. We show that, counter to this belief, classical correlations locally compatible with classical probability theory exist that allow for deterministic signaling between three or more parties incompatible with any predefined causal order.

  15. Proteomics changes during the incompatible interaction between cowpea and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (Penz.) Penz and Sacc.

    PubMed

    Moura, Hudson Fernando N; Vasconcelos, Ilka M; Souza, Carlos Eduardo A; Silva, Fredy D A; Moreno, Frederico B M B; Lobo, Marina D P; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana C O; Moura, Arlindo A; Costa, José H; Oliveira, José Tadeu A

    2014-03-01

    Anthracnose represents an important disease of cowpea [Vigna unguiculata L. (Walp.)] caused by the hemibiothrophic fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides that drastically reduces cowpea field production. In this study we investigated some biochemical aspects underlying the incompatible interaction between a resistant cowpea genotype and C. gloeosporioides using a proteomic approach. Analyses of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis patterns and protein identification indicate C. gloeosporioides infection-dependent cowpea leaf proteome changes associated with metabolism, photosynthesis, response to stress, oxidative burst and scavenging, defense signaling, and pathogenesis-related proteins. Moreover the C. gloeosporioides responsive proteins interaction network in cowpea revealed the interconnected modulation of key cellular processes involving particularly antioxidants proteins, photosynthetic apparatus forming proteins and proteins of the energetic metabolism that interact with each other suggesting that their expression changes are also important for resistance of cowpea to C. gloeosporioides.

  16. Bortezomib in ABO-incompatible kidney transplant desensitization: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wong, Nikki L; O'Connell, Philip; Chapman, Jeremy R; Nankivell, Brian; Kable, Kathy; Webster, A C; Wong, Germaine

    2015-03-01

    Positive B cell crossmatch accompanied by high levels of pre-transplant human leukocyte antigen donor-specific antibodies are associated with adverse graft outcomes in kidney transplant recipients. Targeting plasma cells, the main antibody producing cells, with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib may be a promising desensitization strategy. We report using a combination of bortezomib and plasmapheresis to desensitize a highly sensitized kidney transplant recipient for an ABO-incompatible living donor kidney transplant. The flow cytometric B cell crossmatch was positive on presentation. After treatment, the anti-A titres fell from 1:64 to 1:4, and a negative B flow cytometric crossmatch was achieved prior to transplantation. The combined approach of bortezomib to abrogate antibody production at the plasma cell level, followed by plasmapheresis and low-dose intravenous immunoglobulin to remove in-circulation alloantibodies, has proven to be effective in our case. Bortezomib may play a role in highly sensitized renal transplants.

  17. Somatic hybrid plants from sexually incompatible woody species: Citrus reticulata and Citropsis gilletiana.

    PubMed

    Grosser, J W; Gmitter, F G; Tusa, N; Chandler, J L

    1990-04-01

    Allotetraploid intergeneric somatic hybrid plants between Citrus reticulata Blanco cv. Cleopatra mandarin and Citropsis gilletiana Swing. & M. Kell. (common name Gillet's cherry orange) were regenerated following protoplast fusion. Cleopatra protoplasts were isolated from an ovule-derived embryogenic suspension culture and fused chemically with leaf-derived protoplasts of Citropsis gilletiana. Cleopatra mandarin and somatic hybrid plants were regenerated via somatic embryogenesis. Hybrid plant identification was based on differential leaf morphology, root-tip cell chromosome number, and electrophoretic analyses of phosphoglucose mutase (PGM) and phosphohexose isomerase (PHI) isozyme banding patterns. This is the first somatic hybrid within the Rutaceae reported that does not have Citrus sinensis (sweet orange) as a parent, and the first produced with a commercially important citrus rootstock and a complementary but sexually incompatible, related species.

  18. Evidence for nuclear-cytoplasmic incompatibility between Allium fistulosum and A. cepa.

    PubMed

    Ulloa-G, M; Corgan, J N; Dunford, M

    1995-04-01

    An F2 population (Allium fistulosum x A. cepa) of 20plants, 10 BC1,[(A. fistulosum x A. cepa) x A. cepa], and 50 BC2 plants, [(A. fistulosum x A. cepa) x A. cepa] x A. cepa were studied cytogenetically and characterized for four isozyme alleles plus various morphological characteristics. All of the progenies were in A. fistulosum (the bunching onion) cytoplasm. In the F2 population we observed non-random chromosomal and allelic segregation, suppression of bulb onion allelic expression, and abnormalities in mitosis and meiosis. Most BC2 plants resembled A. cepa (the bulbing onion) morphologically, but anthers, filaments, pistils, and petals were abnormal. Only 3 plants, and these were most nearly like the F1 hybrid morphologically, produced any seeds.The data and observations support the hypothesis of nuclear-cytoplasmic incompatibility interactions between the bunching and bulb onion species.

  19. Convergent evolution at the gametophytic self-incompatibility system in Malus and Prunus.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Bruno; Vieira, Jorge; Cunha, Ana E; Fonseca, Nuno A; Iezzoni, Amy; van Nocker, Steve; Vieira, Cristina P

    2015-01-01

    S-RNase-based gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) has evolved once before the split of the Asteridae and Rosidae. This conclusion is based on the phylogenetic history of the S-RNase that determines pistil specificity. In Rosaceae, molecular characterizations of Prunus species, and species from the tribe Pyreae (i.e., Malus, Pyrus, Sorbus) revealed different numbers of genes determining S-pollen specificity. In Prunus only one pistil and pollen gene determine GSI, while in Pyreae there is one pistil but multiple pollen genes, implying different specificity recognition mechanisms. It is thus conceivable that within Rosaceae the genes involved in GSI in the two lineages are not orthologous but possibly paralogous. To address this hypothesis we characterised the S-RNase lineage and S-pollen lineage genes present in the genomes of five Rosaceae species from three genera: M. × domestica (apple, self-incompatible (SI); tribe Pyreae), P. persica (peach, self-compatible (SC); Amygdaleae), P. mume (mei, SI; Amygdaleae), Fragaria vesca (strawberry, SC; Potentilleae), and F. nipponica (mori-ichigo, SI; Potentilleae). Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the Malus and Prunus S-RNase and S-pollen genes belong to distinct gene lineages, and that only Prunus S-RNase and SFB-lineage genes are present in Fragaria. Thus, S-RNase based GSI system of Malus evolved independently from the ancestral system of Rosaceae. Using expression patterns based on RNA-seq data, the ancestral S-RNase lineage gene is inferred to be expressed in pistils only, while the ancestral S-pollen lineage gene is inferred to be expressed in tissues other than pollen.

  20. Sporophytic self-incompatibility genes and mating system variation in Arabis alpina

    PubMed Central

    Tedder, A.; Ansell, S. W.; Lao, X.; Vogel, J. C.; Mable, B. K.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Sporophytic self-incompatibility (SI) prevents inbreeding in many members of the Brassicaceae, and has been well documented in a variety of high-profile species. Arabis alpina is currently being developed as a model system for studying the ecological genetics of arctic–alpine environments, and is the focus of numerous studies on population structure and alpine phylogeography. Although it is highly inbreeding throughout most of its range, populations in central Italy have been identified that show inbreeding coefficients (FIS) more typical of self-incompatible relatives. The purpose of this study was to establish whether this variation is due to a functioning SI system. Methods Outcrossing rate estimates were calculated based on 16 allozyme loci and self-compatibility assessed based on controlled pollinations for six Italian populations that have previously been shown to vary in FIS values. Putative SRK alleles (the gene controlling the female component of SI in other Brassicaceae) amplified from A. alpina were compared with those published for other species. Linkage of putative SRK alleles and SI phenotypes was assessed using a diallel cross. Key Results Functional avoidance of inbreeding is demonstrated in three populations of A. alpina, corresponding with previous FIS values. The presence is described of 15 putative SRK-like alleles, which show high sequence identity to known alleles from Brassica and Arabidopsis and the high levels of synonymous and nonsynonymous variation typical of genes under balancing selection. Also, orthologues of two other members of the S-receptor kinase gene family, Aly8 (ARK3) and Aly9 (AtS1) are identified. Further to this, co-segregation between some of the putative S-alleles and compatibility phenotypes was demonstrated using a full-sibling cross design. Conclusions The results strongly suggest that, as with other species in the Brassicaceae, A. alpina has a sporophytic SI system but shows variation in the

  1. Population genetics of self-incompatibility in a clade of relict cliff-dwelling plant species.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jose L; Brennan, Adrian C; Mejías, José A

    2016-01-01

    The mating systems of species in small or fragmented populations impact upon their persistence. Small self-incompatible (SI) populations risk losing S allele diversity, responsible for the SI response, by drift thereby limiting mate availability and leading to population decline or SI system breakdown. But populations of relict and/or endemic species have resisted these demographic conditions over long periods suggesting their mating systems have adapted. To address a lack of empirical data on this topic, we studied the SI systems of three relict cliff-dwelling species of Sonchus section Pustulati (Asteraceae): S. masguindalii, S. fragilis and S. pustulatus in the western Mediterranean region. We performed controlled pollinations within and between individuals to measure index of SI (ISI) expression and identify S alleles in multiple population samples. Sonchus masguindalii and S. pustulatus showed strong SI (ISI = 0.6-1.0) compared to S. fragilis (ISI = 0.1-0.7). Just five S alleles were estimated for Spanish S. pustulatus and a moderate 11-15 S alleles for Moroccan S. pustulatus and S. fragilis, respectively. The fact that autonomous fruit set was generally improved by active self-pollination in self-compatible S. fragilis suggests that individuals with weak SI can show a wide range of outcrossing levels dependent on the degree of self or outcross pollen that pollinators bear. We conclude that frequent S allele dominance interactions that mask the incompatibility interactions of recessive S alleles leading to higher mate availability and partial breakdown of SI leading to mixed mating, both contribute to reproductive resilience in this group.

  2. Variability of the self-incompatibility reaction in Brassica oleracea L. with S 15 haplotype.

    PubMed

    Hadj-Arab, Houria; Chèvre, Anne-Marie; Gaude, Thierry; Chable, Véronique

    2010-06-01

    Self-incompatibility (SI) is thought to have played a key role in the evolution of species as it promotes their outcrossing through the recognition and rejection of self-pollen grains. In most species, SI is under the control of a complex, multiallelic S-locus. The recognition system is associated with quantitative variations of the strength of the SI reaction; the origin of these variations is still not elucidated. To define the genetic regulations involved, we studied the variability of the SI response in homozygous S 15 S 15 plants in cauliflower. These plants were obtained from a self-progeny of a self-compatible (SC) plant heterozygous for S 15, which was generated after five selfing generations from one strongly self-incompatible initial plant. We found a continuous phenotypic variation for SI response in the offspring plants homozygous for the S 15 haplotype, from the strict SI reaction to self-compatibility, with a great proportion of the plants being partially self-compatible (PSC). Decrease in SI levels was also observed during the life of the flower. The number of pollen tubes passing through the stigma barrier was higher when counted 3 or 5 days after pollination than one day after pollination. Analysis of the expression of the two key genes regulating self-pollen recognition in cauliflower, the S-locus receptor kinase (SRK) and S-locus cysteine-rich (SCR/SP11) genes, revealed that self-compatibility or PSC was associated with decreased SRK or SCR/SP11 expression. Our work shows the particularly high level of phenotypic plasticity of the SI response associated with certain S-haplotypes in cauliflower. PMID:20490967

  3. Convergent Evolution at the Gametophytic Self-Incompatibility System in Malus and Prunus

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Ana E.; Fonseca, Nuno A.; Iezzoni, Amy; van Nocker, Steve; Vieira, Cristina P.

    2015-01-01

    S-RNase-based gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) has evolved once before the split of the Asteridae and Rosidae. This conclusion is based on the phylogenetic history of the S-RNase that determines pistil specificity. In Rosaceae, molecular characterizations of Prunus species, and species from the tribe Pyreae (i.e., Malus, Pyrus, Sorbus) revealed different numbers of genes determining S-pollen specificity. In Prunus only one pistil and pollen gene determine GSI, while in Pyreae there is one pistil but multiple pollen genes, implying different specificity recognition mechanisms. It is thus conceivable that within Rosaceae the genes involved in GSI in the two lineages are not orthologous but possibly paralogous. To address this hypothesis we characterised the S-RNase lineage and S-pollen lineage genes present in the genomes of five Rosaceae species from three genera: M. × domestica (apple, self-incompatible (SI); tribe Pyreae), P. persica (peach, self-compatible (SC); Amygdaleae), P. mume (mei, SI; Amygdaleae), Fragaria vesca (strawberry, SC; Potentilleae), and F. nipponica (mori-ichigo, SI; Potentilleae). Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the Malus and Prunus S-RNase and S-pollen genes belong to distinct gene lineages, and that only Prunus S-RNase and SFB-lineage genes are present in Fragaria. Thus, S-RNase based GSI system of Malus evolved independently from the ancestral system of Rosaceae. Using expression patterns based on RNA-seq data, the ancestral S-RNase lineage gene is inferred to be expressed in pistils only, while the ancestral S-pollen lineage gene is inferred to be expressed in tissues other than pollen. PMID:25993016

  4. Regulation of the S-locus receptor kinase and self-incompatibility in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Strickler, Susan R; Tantikanjana, Titima; Nasrallah, June B

    2013-02-01

    Intraspecific mate selectivity often is enforced by self-incompatibility (SI), a barrier to self-pollination that inhibits productive pollen-pistil interactions. In the Brassicaceae, SI specificity is determined by two highly-polymorphic proteins: the stigmatic S-locus receptor kinase (SRK) and its pollen coat-localized ligand, the S-locus cysteine-rich protein (SCR). Arabidopsis thaliana is self fertile, but several of its accessions can be made to express SI, albeit to various degrees, by transformation with functional SRK-SCR gene pairs isolated from its close self-incompatible relative, Arabidopsis lyrata. Here, we use a newly identified induced mutation that suppresses the SI phenotype in stigmas of SRK-SCR transformants of the Col-0 accession to investigate the regulation of SI and the SRK transgene. This mutation disrupts NRPD1a, a gene that encodes a plant-specific nuclear RNA polymerase required for genomic methylation and production of some types of silencing RNAs. We show that NRPD1a, along with the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase RDR2, is required for SI in some A. thaliana accessions. We also show that Col-0 nrpd1a mutants exhibit decreased accumulation of SRK transcripts in stigmas, which is not, however, responsible for loss of SI in these plants. Together, our analysis of the nrpd1a mutation and of SRK promoter activity in various accessions reveals that the SRK transgene is subject to several levels of regulation, which vary substantially by tissue type and by accession. This study thus helps explain the well-documented differences in expression of SI exhibited by SRK-SCR transformants of different A. thaliana accessions.

  5. Population genetics of self-incompatibility in a clade of relict cliff-dwelling plant species.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jose L; Brennan, Adrian C; Mejías, José A

    2016-01-01

    The mating systems of species in small or fragmented populations impact upon their persistence. Small self-incompatible (SI) populations risk losing S allele diversity, responsible for the SI response, by drift thereby limiting mate availability and leading to population decline or SI system breakdown. But populations of relict and/or endemic species have resisted these demographic conditions over long periods suggesting their mating systems have adapted. To address a lack of empirical data on this topic, we studied the SI systems of three relict cliff-dwelling species of Sonchus section Pustulati (Asteraceae): S. masguindalii, S. fragilis and S. pustulatus in the western Mediterranean region. We performed controlled pollinations within and between individuals to measure index of SI (ISI) expression and identify S alleles in multiple population samples. Sonchus masguindalii and S. pustulatus showed strong SI (ISI = 0.6-1.0) compared to S. fragilis (ISI = 0.1-0.7). Just five S alleles were estimated for Spanish S. pustulatus and a moderate 11-15 S alleles for Moroccan S. pustulatus and S. fragilis, respectively. The fact that autonomous fruit set was generally improved by active self-pollination in self-compatible S. fragilis suggests that individuals with weak SI can show a wide range of outcrossing levels dependent on the degree of self or outcross pollen that pollinators bear. We conclude that frequent S allele dominance interactions that mask the incompatibility interactions of recessive S alleles leading to higher mate availability and partial breakdown of SI leading to mixed mating, both contribute to reproductive resilience in this group. PMID:27154621

  6. Population genetics of self-incompatibility in a clade of relict cliff-dwelling plant species

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Jose L.; Brennan, Adrian C.; Mejías, José A.

    2016-01-01

    The mating systems of species in small or fragmented populations impact upon their persistence. Small self-incompatible (SI) populations risk losing S allele diversity, responsible for the SI response, by drift thereby limiting mate availability and leading to population decline or SI system breakdown. But populations of relict and/or endemic species have resisted these demographic conditions over long periods suggesting their mating systems have adapted. To address a lack of empirical data on this topic, we studied the SI systems of three relict cliff-dwelling species of Sonchus section Pustulati (Asteraceae): S. masguindalii, S. fragilis and S. pustulatus in the western Mediterranean region. We performed controlled pollinations within and between individuals to measure index of SI (ISI) expression and identify S alleles in multiple population samples. Sonchus masguindalii and S. pustulatus showed strong SI (ISI = 0.6–1.0) compared to S. fragilis (ISI = 0.1–0.7). Just five S alleles were estimated for Spanish S. pustulatus and a moderate 11-15 S alleles for Moroccan S. pustulatus and S. fragilis, respectively. The fact that autonomous fruit set was generally improved by active self-pollination in self-compatible S. fragilis suggests that individuals with weak SI can show a wide range of outcrossing levels dependent on the degree of self or outcross pollen that pollinators bear. We conclude that frequent S allele dominance interactions that mask the incompatibility interactions of recessive S alleles leading to higher mate availability and partial breakdown of SI leading to mixed mating, both contribute to reproductive resilience in this group. PMID:27154621

  7. Within-species diversity of Wolbachia-induced cytoplasmic incompatibility in haplodiploid insects.

    PubMed

    Vavre, F; Dedeine, F; Quillon, M; Fouillet, P; Fleury, F; Bouletreau, M

    2001-08-01

    Wolbachia-induced cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) can have two consequences in haplodiploid insects: fertilized eggs either die (female mortality, FM) or they develop into haploid males (male development, MD). Origin of this diversity remains poorly understood, but current hypotheses invoke variation in damage suffered by paternal chromosomes in incompatible eggs, thus intermediate CI types should be expected. Here, we show the existence of such a particular CI type. In the parasitoid wasp Leptopilina heterotoma, we compared CI effects in crosses involving lines derived from a single inbred line with various Wolbachia infection statuses (natural tri-infection, mono-infection, or no infection). Tri-infected males induce a FM CI type when crossed with either uninfected or mono-infected females. Crossing mono-infected males with uninfected females results in almost complete CI with both reduced offspring production, indicating partial mortality of fertilized eggs, and increased number of sons, showing haploid male development of others. Mono-infected males thus induce an intermediate Cl type when mated with uninfected females. The first evidence of this expected particular CI type demonstrates that no discontinuity separates MD and FM CI types, which appear to be end points of a phenotypic continuum. Second, different CI types can occur within a given species and even within offspring of a single pair. Third, phenotypic expression of the particular CI type induced by a given Wolbachia variant depends on other bacterial variants that co-infect the same tissues. These results support the idea that haplodiploids should be helpful in clarifying evolutionary pathways of insect-Wolbachia associations. PMID:11580031

  8. Sustainable Scientists

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Evan

    2008-12-31

    Scientists are front and center in quantifying and solving environmental problems. Yet, as a spate of recent news articles in scientific journals point out, much can be done to enhance sustainability within the scientific enterprise itself, particularly by trimming the energy use associated with research facilities and the equipment therein (i,ii,iii, iv). Sponsors of research unwittingly spend on the order of $10 billion each year on energy in the U.S. alone, and the underlying inefficiencies drain funds from the research enterprise while causing 80 MT CO2-equivalent greenhouse-gas emissions (see Box). These are significant sums considering the opportunity costs in terms of the amount of additional research that could be funded and emissions that could be reduced if the underlying energy was used more efficiently. By following commercially proven best practices in facility design and operation, scientists--and the sponsors of science--can cost-effectively halve these costs, while doing their part to put society on alow-carbon diet.

  9. Does Stock Market Performance Influence Retirement Intentions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goda, Gopi Shah; Shoven, John B.; Slavov, Sita Nataraj

    2012-01-01

    Media reports predicted that the stock market decline in October 2008 would cause changes in retirement intentions, due to declines in retirement assets. We use panel data from the Health and Retirement Study to investigate the relationship between stock market performance and retirement intentions during 1998-2008, a period that includes the…

  10. Law School Intentions of Undergraduate Business Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonds, Thomas; Flanagan, David J.; Palmer, Timothy B.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine factors that influence business students' intentions to enroll in law school. Scant research has focused on factors that influence business students' decisions to enroll in law school. This paper attempts to fill that gap. Hypotheses about student intentions are based on Ajzen & Fishbein's (1977) Theory…

  11. Intentions to Use Virtual Worlds for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Jia; Eder, Lauren B.

    2009-01-01

    Virtual worlds are becoming increasingly sophisticated, showing potential as an effective platform for a variety of collaborative activities, including learning. This study examines students' intentions to use the virtual world Second Life (SL) for education, and explores factors associated with their intentions. Based on the Technology Acceptance…

  12. Intentional replantation of a lower premolar.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jeff

    2004-12-01

    Intentional replantation is the purposeful extraction of a tooth to perform extraoral endodontic treatment, curettage of apical soft tissue when present and the replacement of the tooth in its socket. This paper demonstrates the use of intentional replantation as a technique to successfully treat a case where conventional endodontic retreatment and apical surgery were considered unfeasible.

  13. The Simultaneity of Beginning Teachers' Practical Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Teachers use their practical intentions--their in-the-moment goals and concerns--to craft their spontaneous classroom decisions. This research study explored the content of (and relationship between) beginning teachers' practical intentions by asking six student teachers in mathematics to participate in a stimulated recall interview of their…

  14. Transformation: A Description of Intentional Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Margaret

    This paper examines an intentional learning theory by identifying the influential factors that foster individual learning differences. A psychological model is included that presents four unique learning orientations, built on a foundation of causal beliefs. This model of intentional learning assimilates the combined influence of conative,…

  15. 49 CFR 661.18 - Intentional violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Intentional violations. 661.18 Section 661.18 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BUY AMERICA REQUIREMENTS § 661.18 Intentional violations. A person shall...

  16. 49 CFR 661.18 - Intentional violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Intentional violations. 661.18 Section 661.18 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BUY AMERICA REQUIREMENTS § 661.18 Intentional violations. A person shall...

  17. Entrepreneurship Education: Workshops and Entrepreneurial Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruett, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Using data collected from participants in an entrepreneurship education workshop series, the author examined the series' impact and tested a model of entrepreneurial intentions incorporating social and psychological factors. He found that entrepreneurial disposition and workshop participation significantly influenced intentions, exposure to role…

  18. Children's Picture Interpretation: Appearance or Intention?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armitage, Emma; Allen, Melissa L.

    2015-01-01

    Pictures are defined by their creator's intentions and resemblance to their real world referents. Here we examine whether young children follow a realist route (e.g., focusing on how closely pictures resemble their referents) or intentional route (e.g., focusing on what a picture is intended to represent by its artist) when identifying a picture's…

  19. Intention in School Choice among Finnish Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raty, Hannu

    2013-01-01

    The study explored Finnish parents' intention in making school choices and the relationship of those intentions to demographic and attitudinal factors. It was found that the great majority of parents had not seriously considered choosing a school other than the neighbouring one. Parents living in urban areas, or those supporting a selective…

  20. Counselor Intentionality and Effective Helping. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, John J.

    This digest on counselor intentionality notes that the counseling profession has historically searched for characteristics and behaviors that contribute to successful helping relationships. It identifies one such characteristic, the counselor's level and degree of intentionality, as relating to the notion that successful counselors select their…

  1. School Social Workers' Intent to Stay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caselman, Tonia D.; Brandt, Mary D.

    2007-01-01

    This study presents findings from a survey that examined school social workers' intent to stay in the field of school social work. Forty-eight school social workers from a midwestern state participated in the study. Effect size estimates were used to examine the relationship between social workers' intent to stay and years of experience,…

  2. Product Characteristics and Internet Shopping Intentions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vijayasarathy, Leo R.

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of electronic commerce and online marketing focuses on an empirical study that investigated differences between Internet shopping intentions for products categorized by cost and tangibility. Highlights include hypotheses; respondent characteristics; results that showed that intentions to shop using the Internet differ by tangibility of…

  3. 49 CFR 661.18 - Intentional violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Intentional violations. 661.18 Section 661.18 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BUY AMERICA REQUIREMENTS § 661.18 Intentional violations. A person shall...

  4. 49 CFR 661.18 - Intentional violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Intentional violations. 661.18 Section 661.18 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BUY AMERICA REQUIREMENTS § 661.18 Intentional violations. A person shall...

  5. 49 CFR 661.18 - Intentional violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Intentional violations. 661.18 Section 661.18 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BUY AMERICA REQUIREMENTS § 661.18 Intentional violations. A person shall...

  6. Authorial Intent in the Composition Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Ian

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the disjunction between, on the one hand, critical theory's critique of the privileging of authorial intent in protocols of textual interpretation, and, on the other hand, continued obeisance to authorial intent in composition textbooks and pedagogy. By unpacking the implications of this disjunction, I show the limitations…

  7. Entrepreneurial Intentions in Developing and Developed Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iakovleva, Tatiana; Kolvereid, Lars; Stephan, Ute

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study proposes to use the Theory of Planned Behaviour to predict entrepreneurial intentions among students in five developing and nine developed countries. The purpose is to investigate whether entrepreneurial intention and its antecedents differ between developing and developed countries, and to test the theory in the two groups of…

  8. Discrepancy between Snack Choice Intentions and Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weijzen, Pascalle L. G.; de Graaf, Cees; Dijksterhuis, Garmt B.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate dietary constructs that affect the discrepancy between intentioned and actual snack choice. Design: Participants indicated their intentioned snack choice from a set of 4 snacks (2 healthful, 2 unhealthful). One week later, they actually chose a snack from the same set. Within 1 week after the actual choice, they completed…

  9. Mind-Wandering With and Without Intention.

    PubMed

    Seli, Paul; Risko, Evan F; Smilek, Daniel; Schacter, Daniel L

    2016-08-01

    The past decade has seen a surge of research examining mind-wandering, but most of this research has not considered the potential importance of distinguishing between intentional and unintentional mind-wandering. However, a recent series of papers have demonstrated that mind-wandering reported in empirical investigations frequently occurs with and without intention, and, more crucially, that intentional and unintentional mind-wandering are dissociable. This emerging literature suggests that, to increase clarity in the literature, there is a need to reconsider the bulk of the mind-wandering literature with an eye toward deconvolving these two different cognitive experiences. In this review we highlight recent trends in investigations of the intentionality of mind-wandering, and we outline a novel theoretical framework regarding the mechanisms underlying intentional and unintentional mind-wandering.

  10. Sustainable NREL - Site Sustainability Plan FY 2015

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2015-01-01

    NREL's Site Sustainability Plan FY 2015 reports on sustainability plans for the lab for the year 2015 based on Executive Order Goals and provides the status on planned actions cited in the FY 2014 report.

  11. Combining the Sterile Insect Technique with the Incompatible Insect Technique: I-Impact of Wolbachia Infection on the Fitness of Triple- and Double-Infected Strains of Aedes albopictus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dongjing; Zheng, Xiaoying; Xi, Zhiyong; Bourtzis, Kostas; Gilles, Jeremie R. L.

    2015-01-01

    The mosquito species Aedes albopictus is a major vector of the human diseases dengue and chikungunya. Due to the lack of efficient and sustainable methods to control this mosquito species, there is an increasing interest in developing and applying the sterile insect technique (SIT) and the incompatible insect technique (IIT), separately or in combination, as population suppression approaches. Ae. albopictus is naturally double-infected with two Wolbachia strains, wAlbA and wAlbB. A new triple Wolbachia-infected strain (i.e., a strain infected with wAlbA, wAlbB, and wPip), known as HC and expressing strong cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) in appropriate matings, was recently developed. In the present study, we compared several fitness traits of three Ae. albopictus strains (triple-infected, double-infected and uninfected), all of which were of the same genetic background (“Guangzhou City, China”) and were reared under the same conditions. Investigation of egg-hatching rate, survival of pupae and adults, sex ratio, duration of larval stages (development time from L1 to pupation), time to emergence (development time from L1 to adult emergence), wing length, female fecundity and adult longevity indicated that the presence of Wolbachia had only a minimal effect on host fitness. Based on this evidence, the HC strain is currently under consideration for mass rearing and application in a combined SIT-IIT strategy to control natural populations of Ae. albopictus in mainland China. PMID:25849812

  12. Dual Perspectives on Theory in Clinical Practice: Practice Makes Perfect: The Incompatibility of Practicing Speech and Meaningful Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamhi, Alan G.

    2000-01-01

    This article uses a case study to suggest that some children view speech-language therapy as a separate situation for learning practicing new sounds and language forms whereas the purpose of talking outside of therapy is meaningful communication. Clinical implications of this potential incompatibility between practicing speech and communicating…

  13. Hybrid incompatibilities in the parasitic wasp genus Nasonia: negative effects of hemizygosity and the identification of transmission ratio distortion loci.

    PubMed

    Koevoets, T; Niehuis, O; van de Zande, L; Beukeboom, L W

    2012-03-01

    The occurrence of hybrid incompatibilities forms an important stage during the evolution of reproductive isolation. In early stages of speciation, males and females often respond differently to hybridization. Haldane's rule states that the heterogametic sex suffers more from hybridization than the homogametic sex. Although haplodiploid reproduction (haploid males, diploid females) does not involve sex chromosomes, sex-specific incompatibilities are predicted to be prevalent in haplodiploid species. Here, we evaluate the effect of sex/ploidy level on hybrid incompatibilities and locate genomic regions that cause increased mortality rates in hybrid males of the haplodiploid wasps Nasonia vitripennis and Nasonia longicornis. Our data show that diploid F(1) hybrid females suffer less from hybridization than haploid F(2) hybrid males. The latter not only suffer from an increased mortality rate, but also from behavioural and spermatogenic sterility. Genetic mapping in recombinant F(2) male hybrids revealed that the observed hybrid mortality is most likely due to a disruption of cytonuclear interactions. As these sex-specific hybrid incompatibilities follow predictions based on Haldane's rule, our data accentuate the need to broaden the view of Haldane's rule to include species with haplodiploid sex determination, consistent with Haldane's original definition.

  14. Simple Y-autosomal incompatibilities cause hybrid male sterility in reciprocal crosses between Drosophila virilis and D. americana.

    PubMed

    Sweigart, Andrea L

    2010-03-01

    Postzygotic reproductive isolation evolves when hybrid incompatibilities accumulate between diverging populations. Here, I examine the genetic basis of hybrid male sterility between two species of Drosophila, Drosophila virilis and D. americana. From these analyses, I reach several conclusions. First, neither species carries any autosomal dominant hybrid male sterility alleles: reciprocal F(1) hybrid males are perfectly fertile. Second, later generation (backcross and F(2)) hybrid male sterility between D. virilis and D. americana is not polygenic. In fact, I identified only three genetically independent incompatibilities that cause hybrid male sterility. Remarkably, each of these incompatibilities involves the Y chromosome. In one direction of the cross, the D. americana Y is incompatible with recessive D. virilis alleles at loci on chromosomes 2 and 5. In the other direction, the D. virilis Y chromosome causes hybrid male sterility in combination with recessive D. americana alleles at a single QTL on chromosome 5. Finally, in contrast with findings from other Drosophila species pairs, the X chromosome has only a modest effect on hybrid male sterility between D. virilis and D. americana.

  15. Somatic incompatibility and genetic structure of fungal crops in sympatric Atta colombica and Acromyrmex echinatior leaf-cutting ants

    PubMed Central

    Kooij, Pepijn W.; Poulsen, Michael; Schiøtt, Morten; Boomsma, Jacobus J.

    2015-01-01

    Obligate mutualistic symbioses rely on mechanisms that secure host-symbiont commitments to maximize host benefits and prevent symbiont cheating. Previous studies showed that somatic incompatibilities correlate with neutral-marker-based genetic distances between fungal symbionts of Panamanian Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants, but the extent to which this relationship applies more generally remained unclear. Here we showed that genetic distances accurately predicted somatic incompatibility for Acromyrmex echinatior symbionts irrespective of whether neutral microsatellites or AFLP markers were used, but that such correlations were weaker or absent in sympatric Atta colombica colonies. Further analysis showed that the symbiont clades maintained by A. echinatior and A. colombica were likely to represent separate gene pools, so that neutral markers were unlikely to be similarly correlated with incompatibility loci that have experienced different selection regimes. We suggest that evolutionarily derived claustral colony founding by Atta queens may have removed selection for strong incompatibility in Atta fungi, as this condition makes the likelihood of symbiont swaps much lower than in Acromyrmex, where incipient nests stay open because queens have to forage until the first workers emerge. PMID:26865859

  16. The Theory of Incompatibilities: A Conceptual Framework for Responding to the Educational Needs of Mexican American Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardenas, Jose A.; Cardenas, Blandina

    According to the Cardenas-Cardenas Theory of Incompatibilities, Black, Mexican American, and economically disadvantaged children have not enjoyed the same success in school as that of the typical middle-class American because of a lack of compatibility between the characteristics of minority children and the characteristics of a typical…

  17. Measurement incompatibility and Schrödinger-Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering in a class of probabilistic theories

    SciTech Connect

    Banik, Manik

    2015-05-15

    Steering is one of the most counter intuitive non-classical features of bipartite quantum system, first noticed by Schrödinger at the early days of quantum theory. On the other hand, measurement incompatibility is another non-classical feature of quantum theory, initially pointed out by Bohr. Recently, Quintino et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 160402 (2014)] and Uola et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 160403 (2014)] have investigated the relation between these two distinct non-classical features. They have shown that a set of measurements is not jointly measurable (i.e., incompatible) if and only if they can be used for demonstrating Schrödinger-Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering. The concept of steering has been generalized for more general abstract tensor product theories rather than just Hilbert space quantum mechanics. In this article, we discuss that the notion of measurement incompatibility can be extended for general probability theories. Further, we show that the connection between steering and measurement incompatibility holds in a border class of tensor product theories rather than just quantum theory.

  18. Initial invasion of gametophytic self-incompatibility alleles in the absence of tight linkage between pollen and pistil S alleles.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Satoki; Wakoh, Haluka

    2014-08-01

    In homomorphic self-incompatibility (SI) systems of plants, the loci controlling the pollen and pistil types are tightly linked, and this prevents the generation of compatible combinations of alleles expressing pollen and pistil types, which would result in self-fertilization. We modeled the initial invasion of the first pollen and pistil alleles in gametophytic SI to determine whether these alleles can stably coexist in a population without tight linkage. We assume pollen and pistil loci each carry an incompatibility allele S and an allele without an incompatibility function N. We assume that pollen with an S allele are incompatible with pistils carrying S alleles, whereas other crosses are compatible. Ovules in pistils carrying an S allele suffer viability costs because recognition consumes resources. We found that the cost of carrying a pistil S allele allows pollen and pistil S alleles to coexist in a stable equilibrium if linkage is partial. This occurs because parents that carry pistil S alleles but are homozygous for pollen N alleles cannot avoid self-fertilization; however, they suffer viability costs. Hence, pollen N alleles are selected again. When pollen and pistil S alleles can coexist in a polymorphic equilibrium, selection will favor tighter linkage.

  19. Identification of SSR Markers Linked to the Gametophytic Self-Incompatibility Locus in Red Clover (Trifolium pratense)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Self-pollination is prevented in red clover by a gametophytic self-incompatibility system (SI). This SI system is likely controlled by two tightly linked genes, effectively creating a single locus. While SI genes have been identified in some plants, they have not been identified in red clover or o...

  20. X-autosome incompatibilities in Drosophila melanogaster: tests of Haldane’s rule and geographic patterns within species

    PubMed Central

    Lachance, Joseph; True, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Substantial genetic variation exists in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster. This segregating variation includes alleles at different loci that interact to cause lethality or sterility (synthetic incompatibilities). Fitness epistasis in natural populations has important implications for speciation and the rate of adaptive evolution. To assess the prevalence of epistatic fitness interactions, we placed naturally occurring X chromosomes into genetic backgrounds derived from different geographic locations. Considerable amounts of synthetic incompatibilities were observed between X chromosomes and autosomes: greater than 44% of all combinations were either lethal or sterile. Sex-specific lethality and sterility were also tested to determine whether Haldane's rule holds for within-species variation. Surprisingly, we observed an excess of female sterility in genotypes that were homozygous, but not heterozygous, for the X chromosome. The recessive nature of these incompatibilities is similar to that predicted for incompatibilities underlying Haldane’s rule. Our study also found higher levels of sterility and lethality for genomes that contain chromosomes from different geographical regions. These findings are consistent with the view that genomes are co-adapted gene complexes and that geography affects the likelihood of epistatic fitness interactions. PMID:20455929

  1. Genetic Map-Based Location of the Red Clover (Trifolium pratense L.) Gametophytic Self-incompatibility Locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red clover is a hermaphadidic allogamous diploid (2n = 2x = 14) with a homomorphic gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) system red clover (Trifolium pratense L.). Red clover GSI has long been studied and it is thought that the genetic control of GSI constitutes a single locus. Although GSI gene...

  2. Phylogeny of replication initiator protein TrfA reveals a highly divergent clade of incompatibility group P1 plasmids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Incompatibility group P-1 (incP-1) includes broad host range plasmids of Gram negative bacteria and are classified into five subgroups (alpha, beta, gamma, delta, and epsilon). The incP-1 replication module consists of the trfA gene, encoding the replication initiator protein TrfA, and the origin o...

  3. Incompatibility Between X Chromosome Factor and Pericentric Heterochromatic Region Causes Lethality in Hybrids Between Drosophila melanogaster and Its Sibling Species

    PubMed Central

    Cattani, M. Victoria; Presgraves, Daven C.

    2012-01-01

    The Dobzhansky–Muller model posits that postzygotic reproductive isolation results from the evolution of incompatible epistatic interactions between species: alleles that function in the genetic background of one species can cause sterility or lethality in the genetic background of another species. Progress in identifying and characterizing factors involved in postzygotic isolation in Drosophila has remained slow, mainly because Drosophila melanogaster, with all of its genetic tools, forms dead or sterile hybrids when crossed to its sister species, D. simulans, D. sechellia, and D. mauritiana. To circumvent this problem, we used chromosome deletions and duplications from D. melanogaster to map two hybrid incompatibility loci in F1 hybrids with its sister species. We mapped a recessive factor to the pericentromeric heterochromatin of the X chromosome in D. simulans and D. mauritiana, which we call heterochromatin hybrid lethal (hhl), which causes lethality in F1 hybrid females with D. melanogaster. As F1 hybrid males hemizygous for a D. mauritiana (or D. simulans) X chromosome are viable, the lethality of deficiency hybrid females implies that a dominant incompatible partner locus exists on the D. melanogaster X. Using small segments of the D. melanogaster X chromosome duplicated onto the Y chromosome, we mapped a dominant factor that causes hybrid lethality to a small 24-gene region of the D. melanogaster X. We provide evidence suggesting that it interacts with hhlmau. The location of hhl is consistent with the emerging theme that hybrid incompatibilities in Drosophila involve heterochromatic regions and factors that interact with the heterochromatin. PMID:22446316

  4. 46 CFR 150.130 - Loading a cargo on vessels carrying cargoes with which it is incompatible.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Loading a cargo on vessels carrying cargoes with which it is incompatible. 150.130 Section 150.130 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES § 150.130 Loading a cargo on...

  5. 46 CFR 150.130 - Loading a cargo on vessels carrying cargoes with which it is incompatible.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Loading a cargo on vessels carrying cargoes with which it is incompatible. 150.130 Section 150.130 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES § 150.130 Loading a cargo on...

  6. 46 CFR 150.130 - Loading a cargo on vessels carrying cargoes with which it is incompatible.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Loading a cargo on vessels carrying cargoes with which it is incompatible. 150.130 Section 150.130 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES § 150.130 Loading a cargo on...

  7. 46 CFR 150.130 - Loading a cargo on vessels carrying cargoes with which it is incompatible.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Loading a cargo on vessels carrying cargoes with which it is incompatible. 150.130 Section 150.130 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES § 150.130 Loading a cargo on...

  8. Detecting false intent using eye blink measures

    PubMed Central

    Marchak, Frank M.

    2013-01-01

    Eye blink measures have been shown to be diagnostic in detecting deception regarding past acts. Here we examined—across two experiments with increasing degrees of ecological validity—whether changes in eye blinking can be used to determine false intent regarding future actions. In both experiments, half of the participants engaged in a mock crime and then transported an explosive device with the intent of delivering it to a “contact” that would use it to cause a disturbance. Eye blinking was measured for all participants when presented with three types of questions: relevant to intent to transport an explosive device, relevant to intent to engage in an unrelated illegal act, and neutral questions. Experiment 1 involved standing participants watching a video interviewer with audio presented ambiently. Experiment 2 involved standing participants questioned by a live interviewer. Across both experiments, changes in blink count during and immediately following individual questions, total number of blinks, and maximum blink time length differentiated those with false intent from truthful intent participants. In response to questions relevant to intent to deliver an explosive device vs. questions relevant to intent to deliver illegal drugs, those with false intent showed a suppression of blinking during the questions when compared to the 10 s period after the end of the questions, a lower number of blinks, and shorter maximum blink duration. The results are discussed in relation to detecting deception about past activities as well as to the similarities and differences to detecting false intent as described by prospective memory and arousal. PMID:24130546

  9. Mediator of moderators: temporal stability of intention and the intention-behavior relation.

    PubMed

    Sheeran, Paschal; Abraham, Charles

    2003-02-01

    Intention certainty, past behavior, self-schema, anticipated regret, and attitudinal versus normative control all have been found to moderate intention-behavior relations. It is argued that moderation occurs because these variables produce "strong" intentions. Stability of intention over time is a key index of intention strength. Consequently, it was hypothesized that temporal stability of intention would mediate moderation by these other moderators. Participants (N = 185) completed questionnaire measures of theory of planned behavior constructs and moderator variables at two time points and subsequently reported their exercise behavior. Findings showed that all of the moderators, including temporal stability, were associated with significant improvements in consistency between intention and behavior. Temporal stability also mediated the effects of the other moderators, supporting the study hypothesis. PMID:15272948

  10. Mediator of moderators: temporal stability of intention and the intention-behavior relation.

    PubMed

    Sheeran, Paschal; Abraham, Charles

    2003-02-01

    Intention certainty, past behavior, self-schema, anticipated regret, and attitudinal versus normative control all have been found to moderate intention-behavior relations. It is argued that moderation occurs because these variables produce "strong" intentions. Stability of intention over time is a key index of intention strength. Consequently, it was hypothesized that temporal stability of intention would mediate moderation by these other moderators. Participants (N = 185) completed questionnaire measures of theory of planned behavior constructs and moderator variables at two time points and subsequently reported their exercise behavior. Findings showed that all of the moderators, including temporal stability, were associated with significant improvements in consistency between intention and behavior. Temporal stability also mediated the effects of the other moderators, supporting the study hypothesis.

  11. Sustainable Campus: Engaging the Community in Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Too, Linda; Bajracharya, Bhishna

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify the major factors necessary for engaging university campus community in sustainability. While general awareness in sustainability issues has improved in recent years through mass media coverage, this knowledge is not always translated into actual sustainable practice. Studies have indicated that…

  12. Self-Regulation Strategies Improve Self-Discipline in Adolescents: Benefits of Mental Contrasting and Implementation Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duckworth, Angela Lee; Grant, Heidi; Loew, Benjamin; Oettingen, Gabriele; Gollwitzer, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Adolescents struggle with setting and striving for goals that require sustained self-discipline. Research on adults indicates that goal commitment is enhanced by mental contrasting (MC), a strategy involving the cognitive elaboration of a desired future with relevant obstacles of present reality. Implementation intentions (II), which identify the…

  13. 75 FR 32240 - Notice of Withdrawal of the Notice of Intent for Klingle Road Environmental Impact Statement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-07

    ... Intent (NOI) (Federal Register Vol. 69, No 52; FR Doc 04-6027) to prepare an Environmental Impact... June 2008, the District of Columbia Council passed legislation called the Klingle Road Sustainable Development Amendment Act of 2008 (DC Law 17-219; DC Official Code Sec. 9-115.11). This legislation...

  14. Molecular genetic analysis of the candidate gene for MOD, a locus required for self-incompatibility in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Fukai, E; Nishio, T; Nasrallah, M E

    2001-05-01

    The MIP-MOD (for MOD-locus associated Major Intrinsic Protein) gene encodes an aquaporin-like product, and has been reported to be a candidate for the MOD gene which is required for the self-incompatibility response in Brassica rapa. In an antisense suppression experiment designed to investigate the role of MIP-MOD, we found that levels of MIP-MOD mRNA in the stigmas of fourteen antisense transgenics, as well as in the self-incompatible cultivar Osome (Osm), were much lower than in the stigmas of the self-incompatible S8 homozygous (S8) strain. Therefore, we analyzed the molecular structure of the MIP-MOD gene in three B. rapa strains: S8, Osm, and the self-compatible var. Yellow Sarson (YS). Nucleotide sequence analysis of the MIP-MOD genes isolated from the three strains revealed that all three encode the same amino acid sequence and that YS and Osm contain the same MIP-MOD allele, designated MIP-MOD(YS). Analysis of other self-incompatible B. rapa strains that are homozygous for the MIP-MOD(YS) allele indicated that high levels of MIP-MOD transcripts are not essential for the self-incompatibility response. Furthermore, a MOD mutant generated by gamma-irradiation was found to contain a wild-type MIP-MOD gene that is expressed at normal levels. These data suggest that MIP-MOD is not MOD itself. We suggest that this gene should be renamed MLM (for MIP gene linked to MOD).

  15. The Effect of ABO Blood Incompatibility on Corneal Transplant Failure in Conditions with Low Risk of Graft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Steven P.; Stark, Walter J.; Doyle Stulting, R.; Lass, Jonathan H.; Sugar, Alan; Pavilack, Mark A.; Smith, Patricia W.; Tanner, Jean Paul; Dontchev, Mariya; Gal, Robin L.; Beck, Roy W.; Kollman, Craig; Mannis, Mark J.; Holland, Edward J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether corneal graft survival over a five-year follow-up period was affected by ABO blood type compatibility in participants in the Cornea Donor Study undergoing corneal transplantation principally for Fuchs’ dystrophy or pseudophakic corneal edema, conditions at low risk for graft rejection. Design Multi-center prospective, double-masked, clinical trial Methods ABO blood group compatibility was determined for 1,002 donors and recipients. During a five-year follow-up period, episodes of graft rejection were documented, and graft failures were classified as to whether or not they were due to immunologic rejection. Endothelial cell density was determined by a central reading center for a subset of subjects. Results ABO donor-recipient incompatibility was not associated with graft failure due to any cause including graft failure due to rejection, or with the occurrence of a rejection episode. The five-year cumulative incidence of graft failure due to rejection was 6% for recipients with ABO recipient-donor compatibility and 4% for those with ABO incompatibility (hazard ratio 0.65, 95% confidence interval 0.33 to 1.25, p=0.20). The five-year incidence for a definite rejection episode, irrespective of whether graft failure ultimately occurred, was 12% for ABO compatible compared with 8% for ABO incompatible cases (p=0.09). Among clear grafts at five years, percent loss of endothelial cells was similar in ABO compatible and incompatible cases. Conclusions In patients undergoing penetrating keratoplasty for Fuchs’ dystrophy or pseudophakic corneal edema, ABO matching is not indicated since ABO incompatibility does not increase the risk of transplant failure due to graft rejection. PMID:19056078

  16. Linking Self-Incompatibility, Dichogamy, and Flowering Synchrony in Two Euphorbia Species: Alternative Mechanisms for Avoiding Self-Fertilization?

    PubMed Central

    Narbona, Eduardo; Ortiz, Pedro L.; Arista, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Background Plant species have several mechanisms to avoid selfing such as dichogamy or a self-incompatibility response. Dichogamy in a single flower may reduce autogamy but, to avoid geitonogamy, plants must show flowering synchronization among all their flowers (i.e. synchronous dichogamy). It is hypothesized that one species would not simultaneously show synchronous dichogamy and self-incompatibility because they are redundant mechanisms to reduce selfing; however, this has not been accurately assessed. Methodology/Principal Findings This expectation was tested over two years in two natural populations of the closely related Mediterranean spurges Euphorbia boetica and E. nicaeensis, which completely avoid autogamy by protogyny at the cyathia level. Both spurges showed a high population synchrony (Z<79), and their inflorescences flower synchronously. In E. nicaeensis, there was no overlap among the cyathia in anthesis of successive inflorescence levels and the overlap between sexual phases of cyathia of the same inflorescence level was uncommon (4–16%). In contrast, E. boetica showed a high overlap among consecutive inflorescence levels (74–93%) and between sexual phases of cyathia of the same inflorescence level (48–80%). The flowering pattern of both spurges was consistent in the two populations and over the two successive years. A hand-pollination experiment demonstrated that E. nicaeensis was strictly self-compatible whereas E. boetica was partially self-incompatible. Conclusions/Significance We propose that the complex pattern of synchronized protogyny in E. nicaeensis prevents geitonogamous crosses and, consequently, avoids selfing and inbreeding depression. In E. boetica, a high probability of geitonogamous crosses may occur but, alternatively, this plant escapes selfing through a self-incompatibility response. We posit that synchronous dichogamy and physiological self-incompatibility do not co-occur in the same species because each process is

  17. Intention estimation in brain-machine interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Joline M.; Nuyujukian, Paul; Kao, Jonathan C.; Chestek, Cynthia A.; Ryu, Stephen I.; Shenoy, Krishna V.

    2014-02-01

    Objective. The objective of this work was to quantitatively investigate the mechanisms underlying the performance gains of the recently reported ‘recalibrated feedback intention-trained Kalman Filter’ (ReFIT-KF). Approach. This was accomplished by designing variants of the ReFIT-KF algorithm and evaluating training and online data to understand the neural basis of this improvement. We focused on assessing the contribution of two training set innovations of the ReFIT-KF algorithm: intention estimation and the two-stage training paradigm. Main results. Within the two-stage training paradigm, we found that intention estimation independently increased target acquisition rates by 37% and 59%, respectively, across two monkeys implanted with multiunit intracortical arrays. Intention estimation improved performance by enhancing the tuning properties and the mutual information between the kinematic and neural training data. Furthermore, intention estimation led to fewer shifts in channel tuning between the training set and online control, suggesting that less adaptation was required during online control. Retraining the decoder with online BMI training data also reduced shifts in tuning, suggesting a benefit of training a decoder in the same behavioral context; however, retraining also led to slower online decode velocities. Finally, we demonstrated that one- and two-stage training paradigms performed comparably when intention estimation is applied. Significance. These findings highlight the utility of intention estimation in reducing the need for adaptive strategies and improving the online performance of BMIs, helping to guide future BMI design decisions.

  18. Intention Estimation in Brain Machine Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Joline M.; Nuyujukian, Paul; Kao, Jonathan C.; Chestek, Cynthia A.; Ryu, Stephen I.; Shenoy, Krishna V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this work was to quantitatively investigate the mechanisms underlying the performance gains of the recently reported ‘recalibrated feedback intention-trained Kalman Filter’ (ReFIT-KF). Approach This was accomplished by designing variants of the ReFIT-KF algorithm and evaluating training and online data to understand the neural basis of this improvement. We focused on assessing the contribution of two training set innovations of the ReFIT-KF algorithm: intention estimation and the two-stage training paradigm. Main Results Within the two-stage training paradigm, we found that intention estimation independently increased target acquisition rates by 37% and 59%, respectively, across two monkeys implanted with multiunit intracortical arrays. Intention estimation improved performance by enhancing the tuning properties and the mutual information between the kinematic and neural training data. Furthermore, intention estimation led to fewer shifts in channel tuning between the training set and online control, suggesting that less adaptation was required during online control. Retraining the decoder with online BMI training data also reduced shifts in tuning, suggesting a benefit of training a decoder in the same behavioral context; however, retraining also led to slower online decode velocities. Finally, we demonstrated that one- and two-stage training paradigms performed comparably when intention estimation is applied. Significance These findings highlight the utility of intention estimation in reducing the need of adaptive strategies and improving the online performance of BMIs, helping to guide future BMI design decisions. PMID:24654266

  19. Job Turnover Intentions Among Pharmacy Faculty

    PubMed Central

    Conklin, Mark H.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To determine the primary reasons why pharmacy faculty intend to remain or leave their current institution and why they left their most recent academic institution, and the relative contribution of various organizational and individual characteristics toward explaining variance in turnover intentions. Methods A survey instrument was e-mailed to pharmacy faculty members asking respondents to indicate up to 5 reasons for their intentions and up to 5 reasons why they left a previous institution. The survey also elicited perceptions on quality of work life in addition to demographic and institutional data, upon which turnover intentions were regressed using a forward-conditional procedure. Organizational commitment as a moderator of turnover intentions was regressed over the remaining variables not acting directly on employer intentions. Results Just over 1 in 5 respondents indicated intentions to leave their current academic institution. Excessive workload, seeking a new challenge, poor salary, and poor relationships with college or school administrators were frequently cited as reasons for leaving. Turnover intentions are influenced directly by department chair support and organizational commitment, which moderates various support and satisfaction variables. Conclusions Pharmacy faculty members’ decision to remain or leave an institution is dependent upon developing a sense of commitment toward the institution. Commitment is facilitated by support from the institution and department chair, in addition to a sense of satisfaction with the teaching environment. PMID:17786250

  20. Motivation, intentionality, and mind wandering: Implications for assessments of task-unrelated thought.

    PubMed

    Seli, Paul; Cheyne, James Allan; Xu, Mengran; Purdon, Christine; Smilek, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    Researchers of mind wandering frequently assume that (a) participants are motivated to do well on the tasks they are given, and (b) task-unrelated thoughts (TUTs) that occur during task performance reflect unintentional, unwanted thoughts that occur despite participants' best intentions to maintain task-focus. Given the relatively boring and tedious nature of most mind-wandering tasks, however, there is the possibility that some participants have little motivation to do well on such tasks, and that this lack of motivation might in turn result in increases specifically in intentional TUTs. In the present study, we explored these possibilities, finding that individuals reporting lower motivation to perform well on a sustained-attention task reported more intentional relative to unintentional TUTs compared with individuals reporting higher motivation. Interestingly, our results indicate that the extent to which participants engage in intentional versus unintentional TUTs does not differentially relate to performance: both types of off-task thought were found to be equally associated with performance decrements. Participants with low levels of task-motivation also engaged in more overall TUTs, however, and this increase in TUTs was associated with greater performance decrements. We discuss these findings in the context of the literature on mind wandering, highlighting the importance of assessing the intentionality of TUTs and motivation to perform well on tasks assessing mind wandering.

  1. Implementation Intentions and Colorectal Screening

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, K. Allen; Daley, Christine M.; Epp, Aaron; James, Aimee; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Geana, Mugur; Born, Wendi; Engelman, Kimberly K.; Shellhorn, Jeremy; Hester, Christina M.; LeMaster, Joseph; Buckles, Daniel; Ellerbeck, Edward F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Low-income and racial/ethnic minority populations experience disproportionate colorectal cancer (CRC) burden and poorer survival. Novel behavioral strategies are needed to improve screening rates in these groups. Purpose To test a theoretically based “implementation intentions” intervention for improving CRC screening among unscreened adults in urban safety-net clinics. Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting/participants Adults (N=470) aged ≥50 years, due for CRC screening, from urban safety-net clinics were recruited. Intervention The intervention (conducted in 2009–2011) was delivered via touchscreen computers that tailored informational messages to decisional stage and screening barriers. The computer then randomized participants to generic health information on diet and exercise (Comparison group) or “implementation intentions” questions and planning (Experimental group) specific to the CRC screening test chosen (fecal immunochemical test or colonoscopy). Main outcome measures The primary study outcome was completion of CRC screening at 26 weeks based on test reports (analysis conducted in 2012–2013). Results The study population had a mean age of 57 years, and was 42% non-Hispanic African American, 28% non-Hispanic white, and 27% Hispanic. Those receiving the implementation intentions–based intervention had higher odds (AOR=1.83, 95% CI=1.23, 2.73) of completing CRC screening than the Comparison group. Those with higher self-efficacy for screening (AOR=1.57, 95% CI=1.03, 2.39), history of asthma (AOR=2.20, 95% CI=1.26, 3.84), no history of diabetes (AOR=1.86, 95% CI=1.21, 2.86), and reporting they had never heard that “cutting on cancer” makes it spread (AOR=1.78, 95% CI=1.16, 2.72) were more likely to complete CRC screening. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that programs incorporating an implementation intentions approach can contribute to successful completion of CRC screening even among very low-income and

  2. Occurrence of ABO And RhD Incompatibility with Rh Negative Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Izetbegovic, Sebija

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Hemolytic disease of the newborn was first described in the medical literature 1609, when it was diagnosed in one French housewife. In 1932 Diamond and colleagues described the mutual relationship of fetal hydrops, jaundice, anemia and erythoblastosis, which was later called fetal erytroblastosis. Hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) in the strict sense is considered disease whose basis is accelerated immune destruction of fetal/child erythrocytes that are bound to IgG antibodies of maternal origin. These antibodies are directed against antigens of father’s origin, which are present in the fetal/children’s erythrocytes and that the mother’s immune system recognizes them as foreign antigens. Goal: The goal is that in the period from January 1st 2011 to October 23st 2013 determine the frequency of ABO and Rh D incompatibilities in our sample of pregnant women/mothers, and to underscore the importance of regular check of ABO Rh D negative pregnant women and application specific Rh D protection. Material and methods: In the General Hospital “Prim. Dr. Abdulah Nakas” in Sarajevo by retrospective study are followed several relevant variables. Immune alloantibodies were detected in vivo by indirect Coombs test (ICT) with serum mother and O test erythrocytes, by direct Coombs test (DCT) with erythrocytes of a newborn. Results: The total number of births ABO Rh D negative was 596 (14%) and ABO Rh D positive mothers 4261 (86%). Of the total number of Rh D negative mothers there was A Rh D: negative mothers 42%; O Rh D negative 33%; B Rh D: negative 17% and AB Rh D: negative 8%. Most of immune antibodies appear in mothers with O Rh D: negative blood type. The emergence of immune antibodies in the Rh D negative mothers was 1%, the appearance of ABO incompatibilities amounted to 2.3% of our sample. Conclusion: In order to reduce the occurrence of alloimmunization of the mother to erythrocyte antigens of the newborn that can lead to major complications

  3. Intentional torts claims in medical cases.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, Tina; Madden, Bill

    2006-02-01

    Civil liability legislation enacted in each Australian jurisdiction following the Ipp Report recommendations created a clear divide between "negligence" and "intentional" torts. The common law action for trespass to the person is to varying extents maintained in the approaches taken by the State and Territory legislatures. This article explores the potential application of intentional torts claims in a medical context in light of recent case law. It identifies advantages for plaintiffs who plead intentional tort claims, including onus of proof, causation, remoteness, the quantum of compensatory damages and the availability of aggravated and exemplary damages.

  4. The joint evolution and maintenance of self-incompatibility with gynodioecy or androdioecy.

    PubMed

    Van de Paer, Céline; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre; Vernet, Philippe; Billiard, Sylvain

    2015-04-21

    Mating systems show two kinds of frequent transitions: from hermaphroditism to dioecy, gynodioecy or androdioecy, or from self-incompatibility (SI) to self-compatibility (SC). While models have mostly investigated these two kinds of transitions as independent, empirical observations suggest that, to some extent, they can evolve jointly. Here, we study the joint evolution and maintenance of SI and androdioecy or SI and gynodioecy by the means of phenotypic models. Our models focus on three parameters: the unisexuals׳ advantage relative to that of the hermaphrodites due to resource reallocation, inbreeding depression and the selfing rate. We assume no pollen limitation or discounting. We show that SI helps the maintenance of androdioecy, but favors the loss of gynodioecy, and also that androdioecy facilitates the maintenance of SI, whereas gynodioecy does not affect it. We finally investigate how gynodioecy and androdioecy may affect the diversification of SI groups, especially considering an evolutionary pathway through SC intermediates. We show that while androdioecy prevents the increase of the number of SI groups, under certain conditions of inbreeding depression and selfing rates, gynodioecy allows it.

  5. Host genotype determines cytoplasmic incompatibility type in the haplodiploid genus Nasonia.

    PubMed

    Bordenstein, Seth R; Uy, Julieanne J; Werren, John H

    2003-05-01

    In haplodiploid species, Wolbachia-induced cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) can be expressed in one of two ways: as a "conversion" of diploid fertilized eggs into haploid males or as embryonic mortality. Here we describe CI-type variation within the parasitic wasp genus Nasonia and genetically analyze the basis of this variation. We reach four main conclusions: (i) CI is expressed primarily as conversion in N. vitripennis, but as embryonic mortality in the sibling species N. giraulti and N. longicornis; (ii) the difference in CI type between N. giraulti (mortality) and N. vitripennis (conversion) is determined by host nuclear genotype rather than by Wolbachia differences; (iii) N. vitripennis "conversion genes" are recessive in hybrid females; and (iv) a difference in CI level between the sibling species N. giraulti and N. longicornis is due to the different Wolbachia infections in the species rather than to the host genotype. These results show that host nuclear genes can influence the type of CI present in a species. On the basis of these findings, we propose a model for how different CI types evolve in haplodiploids due to selection on nuclear genes modifying CI.

  6. Patterns of male sterility in a grasshopper hybrid zone imply accumulation of hybrid incompatibilities without selection.

    PubMed

    Shuker, David M; Underwood, Karen; King, Tania M; Butlin, Roger K

    2005-12-01

    It is now widely accepted that post-zygotic reproductive isolation is the result of negative epistatic interactions between derived alleles fixed independently at different loci in diverging populations (the Dobzhansky-Muller model). What is less clear is the nature of the loci involved and whether the derived alleles increase in frequency through genetic drift, or as a result of natural or sexual selection. If incompatible alleles are fixed by selection, transient polymorphisms will be rare and clines for these alleles will be steep where divergent populations meet. If they evolve by drift, populations are expected to harbour substantial genetic variation in compatibility and alleles will introgress across hybrid zones once they recombine onto a genetic background with which they are compatible. Here we show that variation in male sterility in a naturally occurring Chorthippus parallelus grasshopper hybrid zone conforms to the neutral expectations. Asymmetrical clines for male sterility have long tails of introgression and populations distant from the zone centre show significant genetic variation for compatibility. Our data contrast with recent observations on 'speciation genes' that have diverged as a result of strong natural selection.

  7. Structure of the male determinant factor for Brassica self-incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Masaki; Takayama, Seiji; Sasaki, Kei-Ichi; Jee, Jun-Goo; Kojima, Chojiro; Isogai, Akira; Shirakawa, Masahiro

    2003-09-19

    Many flowering plants possess a self-incompatibility system to prevent inbreeding. In Brassica rapa, self/non-self recognition in mating is established through S-haplotype-specific interactions between stigma receptors and S-locus protein 11 (SP11, also called S-locus cysteine-rich protein) that is encoded at the highly polymorphic S-locus. Here we describe the solution structure of the SP11 protein of the S8-haplotype (S8-SP11), which specifically binds to the stigma factor of the same haplotype. It folds into an alpha/beta sandwich structure that resembles those of plant defensins. Residues important for structural integrity are highly conserved among the allelic SP11s, suggesting the existence of a common folding pattern. Structure-based sequence alignment and homology modeling of allelic SP11 identified a hyper-variable (HV) region, which is thought to form a loop that bulges out from the body of the protein that is amenable to solvent exposure. We suggest that the HV region could serve as a specific binding site for the stigma receptor.

  8. Mapping of quantitative trait loci for high level of self-incompatibility in Brassica rapa L.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Katsunori; Horisaki, Atsushi; Niikura, Satoshi; Narusaka, Yoshihiro; Abe, Hiroshi; Yoshiaki, Hitoshi; Ishida, Masahiko; Fukuoka, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Satoru

    2010-04-01

    The level of self-incompatibility (SI) is important to the purity of F1 seeds produced using the SI system of Brassica vegetables. To analyze the genetic basis of the level of SI, we generated an F2 population derived from a cross between a turnip inbred line showing a high level of SI and a Chinese cabbage inbred line showing a low level, and evaluated the level of SI under insect pollination in two years. We constructed a detailed linkage map of Brassica rapa from the F2 progeny, consisting of SSR, SNP, indel, and CAPS loci segregating into 10 linkage groups covering approximately 700 cM. Five quantitative trait loci (QTL) for high-level SI were identified. The phenotypic variation explained by the QTL ranged between 7.2% and 23.8%. Two QTL were detected in both years. Mapping of SI-related genes revealed that these QTL were co-localized with SLG on R07 and MLPK on R03. This is the first report of QTL for high-level SI evaluated under insect pollination in a Brassica vegetable. Our results could be useful for the marker-assisted selection of parental lines with a stable SI.

  9. Effect of incompatibility stress on the fit of metal-ceramic crowns.

    PubMed

    Anusavice, K J; Carroll, J E

    1987-08-01

    The interactive effect of coping thickness and a positive thermal contraction mismatch between metal and porcelain on the fit of metal-ceramic crowns has not yet been experimentally determined. Previous studies have suggested that marginal distortion may be due to contraction differences, although finite element analyses indicate that these distortion effects should be negligible. The marginal gap between metal-ceramic crowns and prepared dies was determined under conditions designed to exaggerate distortion effects. These included the use of thin metal copings (0.1 and 0.2 mm), a chamfer preparation, an alloy with relatively poor creep resistance, and a large thermal contraction mismatch between the alloy and porcelain layers. Gap changes which resulted during porcelain firing cycles were relatively small, but larger marginal discrepancies developed in crowns prepared with a compatible porcelain during grinding and abrasive blasting procedures. This study conclusively demonstrates that incompatibility stress induced by a positive contraction mismatch is not a primary cause of marginal or generalized distortion of metal-ceramic crowns and suggests that external grinding and internal abrasive blasting of crowns are more likely causes of this effect. PMID:3305635

  10. Reproductive isolation is mediated by pollen incompatibility in sympatric populations of two Arnebia species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin-Lin; Zhang, Chan; Tian, Bin; Sun, Xu-Dong; Guo, Wen; Zhang, Ting-Feng; Yang, Yong-Ping; Duan, Yuan-Wen

    2015-12-01

    To explore uncertain aspects of the processes that maintain species boundaries, we evaluated contributions of pre- and postpollination reproductive isolation mechanisms in sympatric populations of Arnebia guttata and A. szechenyi. For this, we investigated their phylogenetic relationships, traits, microenvironments, pollinator visits, action of natural selection on floral traits, and the outcome of hand pollination between the two species. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that A. szechenyi is a derived species that could be closely related to A. guttata, and both could be diploid species. Arnebia guttata flowers have larger parts than A. szechenyi flowers, but smaller nectar guides. Soil supporting A. szechenyi had higher water contents than soil supporting neighboring populations of A. guttata (in accordance with their geographical distributions). The pollinators shared by the two species preferred A. szechenyi flowers, but interspecific visitations were frequent. We found evidence of conflicting selection pressures on floral tube length, flower diameter and nectar guide size mediated via male fitness, and on flower diameter and floral tube diameter via female fitness. Hand-pollination experiments indicate complete pollen incompatibility between the two species. Our results suggest that postpollination prezygotic mechanisms are largely responsible for reproductive isolation of sympatric populations of the two Arnebia species. PMID:26811758

  11. Molecular genetics, physiology and biology of self-incompatibility in Brassicaceae.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masao; Suwabe, Keita; Suzuki, Go

    2012-01-01

    Self-incompatibility (SI) is defined as the inability to produce zygotes after self-pollination in a fertile hermaphrodite plant, which has stamens and pistils in the same flower. This structural organization of the hermaphrodite flower increases the risk of self-pollination, leading to low genetic diversity. To avoid this problem plants have established several pollination systems, among which the most elegant system is surely SI. The SI trait can be observed in Brassica crops, including cabbage, broccoli, turnip and radish. To produce hybrid seed of these crops efficiently, the SI trait has been employed in an agricultural context. From another point of view, the recognition reaction of SI during pollen-stigma interaction is an excellent model system for cell-cell communication and signal transduction in higher plants. In this review, we describe the molecular mechanisms of SI in Brassicaceae, which have been dissected by genetic, physiological, and biological approaches, and we discuss the future prospects in relation to associated scientific fields and new technologies. PMID:23229748

  12. Mapping of quantitative trait loci for high level of self-incompatibility in Brassica rapa L.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Katsunori; Horisaki, Atsushi; Niikura, Satoshi; Narusaka, Yoshihiro; Abe, Hiroshi; Yoshiaki, Hitoshi; Ishida, Masahiko; Fukuoka, Hiroyuki; Matsumoto, Satoru

    2010-04-01

    The level of self-incompatibility (SI) is important to the purity of F1 seeds produced using the SI system of Brassica vegetables. To analyze the genetic basis of the level of SI, we generated an F2 population derived from a cross between a turnip inbred line showing a high level of SI and a Chinese cabbage inbred line showing a low level, and evaluated the level of SI under insect pollination in two years. We constructed a detailed linkage map of Brassica rapa from the F2 progeny, consisting of SSR, SNP, indel, and CAPS loci segregating into 10 linkage groups covering approximately 700 cM. Five quantitative trait loci (QTL) for high-level SI were identified. The phenotypic variation explained by the QTL ranged between 7.2% and 23.8%. Two QTL were detected in both years. Mapping of SI-related genes revealed that these QTL were co-localized with SLG on R07 and MLPK on R03. This is the first report of QTL for high-level SI evaluated under insect pollination in a Brassica vegetable. Our results could be useful for the marker-assisted selection of parental lines with a stable SI. PMID:20616857

  13. Trans-acting small RNA determines dominance relationships in Brassica self-incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Tarutani, Yoshiaki; Shiba, Hiroshi; Iwano, Megumi; Kakizaki, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Go; Watanabe, Masao; Isogai, Akira; Takayama, Seiji

    2010-08-19

    A diploid organism has two copies of each gene, one inherited from each parent. The expression of two inherited alleles is sometimes biased by the effects known as dominant/recessive relationships, which determine the final phenotype of the organism. To explore the mechanisms underlying these relationships, we have examined the monoallelic expression of S-locus protein 11 genes (SP11), which encode the male determinants of self-incompatibility in Brassica. We previously reported that SP11 expression was monoallelic in some S heterozygotes, and that the promoter regions of recessive SP11 alleles were specifically methylated in the anther tapetum. Here we show that this methylation is controlled by trans-acting small non-coding RNA (sRNA). We identified inverted genomic sequences that were similar to the recessive SP11 promoters in the flanking regions of dominant SP11 alleles. These sequences were specifically expressed in the anther tapetum and processed into 24-nucleotide sRNA, named SP11 methylation inducer (Smi). Introduction of the Smi genomic region into the recessive S homozygotes triggered the methylation of the promoter of recessive SP11 alleles and repressed their transcription. This is an example showing sRNA encoded in the flanking region of a dominant allele acts in trans to induce transcriptional silencing of the recessive allele. Our finding may provide new insights into the widespread monoallelic gene expression systems. PMID:20725042

  14. Characterization of a putative S locus encoded receptor protein and its role in self-incompatibility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) were raised against purified SLSG and polyclonal antisera were raised against purified trpE/SLR1 fusion proteins. MAbH8 reacts with a protein epitope on SLSG. MAbH8 and the anit-SLR1 antisera were used with immunogold labeling to show SLSG and SLR1 proteins are localized in papillar cell walls in the stigma. MAbH8 reacts with SLSG from CRM+ cells but not CRM-cells; amino acid sequence identity between the two classes was only 65%, vs. 80% within the CRM+ class. SLSG is necessary but not sufficient for self-incompatibility. Variable molecular weight (MW) SLSG proteins are derived from the same SLG gene. MW variations in both SLSG and SLR1 are due to changes in glycosylation and phosphorylation state. SLSG is not detectable in mature pollen, but is expressed during microspore development. Using a SLG probe, a gene for a putative receptor with protein kinase activity was identified.

  15. Cytoplasmic incompatibility in the parasitic wasp Encarsia inaron: disentangling the roles of Cardinium and Wolbachia symbionts.

    PubMed

    White, J A; Kelly, S E; Perlman, S J; Hunter, M S

    2009-05-01

    Many bacterial endosymbionts of insects are capable of manipulating their host's reproduction for their own benefit. The most common strategy of manipulation is cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI), in which embryonic mortality results from matings between uninfected females and infected males. In contrast, embryos develop normally in infected females, whether or not their mate is infected, and infected progeny are produced. In this way, the proportion of infected females increases in the insect population, thereby promoting the spread of the maternally inherited bacteria. However, what happens when multiple endosymbionts inhabit the same host? The parasitoid wasp Encarsia inaron is naturally infected with two unrelated endosymbionts, Cardinium and Wolbachia, both of which have been documented to cause CI in other insects. Doubly infected wasps show the CI phenotype. We differentially cured E. inaron of each endosymbiont, and crossed hosts of different infection status to determine whether either or both bacteria caused the observed CI phenotype in this parasitoid, and whether the two symbionts interacted within their common host. We found that Wolbachia caused CI in E. inaron, but Cardinium did not. We did not find evidence that Cardinium was able to modify or rescue Wolbachia-induced CI, nor did we find that Cardinium caused progeny sex ratio distortion, leaving the role of Cardinium in E. inaron a mystery.

  16. Self-incompatibility systems: barriers to self-fertilization in flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Rea, Anne C; Nasrallah, June B

    2008-01-01

    Flowering plants (angiosperms) are the most prevalent and evolutionarily advanced group of plants. Success of these plants is owed to several unique evolutionary adaptations that aid in reproduction: the flower, the closed carpel, double fertilization, and the ultimate products of fertilization, seeds enclosed in the fruit. Angiosperms exhibit a vast array of reproductive strategies, including both asexual and sexual, the latter of which includes both self-fertilization and cross-fertilization. Asexual reproduction and self-fertilization are important reproductive strategies in a variety of situations, such as when mates are scarce or when the environment remains relatively stable. However, reproductive strategies promoting cross-fertilization are critical to angiosperm success, since they contribute to the creation of genetically diverse populations, which increase the probability that at least one individual in a population will survive given changing environmental conditions. The evolution of several physical and genetic barriers to self-fertilization or fertilization among closely related individuals is thus widespread in angiosperms. A major genetic barrier to self-fertilization is self-incompatibility (SI), which allows female reproductive cells to discriminate between "self" and "non-self" pollen, and specifically reject self pollen. Evidence for the importance of SI in angiosperm evolution lies in the highly diverse set of mechanisms used by various angiosperm families for recognition of self pollen tube development and preventing self-fertilization.

  17. Quantitative Proteomic Analyses of Molecular Mechanisms Associated with Cytoplasmic Incompatibility in Drosophila melanogaster Induced by Wolbachia.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lin-Ling; Chen, Xiulan; Zong, Qiong; Zhao, Ting; Wang, Jia-Lin; Zheng, Ya; Zhang, Ming; Wang, Zailong; Brownlie, Jeremy C; Yang, Fuquan; Wang, Yu-Feng

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the molecular mechanisms of cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) induced by Wolbachia bacteria in Drosophila melanogaster, we applied an isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomic assay to identify differentially expressed proteins extracted from spermathecae and seminal receptacles (SSR) of uninfected females mated with either 1-day-old Wolbachia-uninfected (1T) or infected males (1W) or 5-day-old infected males (5W). In total, 1317 proteins were quantified; 83 proteins were identified as having at least a 1.5-fold change in expression when 1W was compared with 1T. Differentially expressed proteins were related to metabolism, immunity, and reproduction. Wolbachia changed the expression of seminal fluid proteins (Sfps). Wolbachia may disrupt the abundance of proteins in SSR by affecting ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated proteolysis. Knocking down two Sfp genes (CG9334 and CG2668) in Wolbachia-free males resulted in significantly lower embryonic hatch rates with a phenotype of chromatin bridges. Wolbachia-infected females may rescue the hatch rates. This suggests that the changed expression of some Sfps may be one of the mechanisms of CI induced by Wolbachia. This study provides a panel of candidate proteins that may be involved in the interaction between Wolbachia and their insect hosts and, through future functional studies, may help to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of Wolbachia-induced CI.

  18. ABO-incompatible renal transplantation in developing world - crossing the immunological (and mental) barrier.

    PubMed

    Jha, P K; Bansal, S B; Sethi, S K; Jain, M; Sharma, R; Nandwani, A; Phanish, M K; Duggal, R; Tiwari, A K; Ghosh, P; Ahlawat, R; Kher, V

    2016-01-01

    ABO incompatibility has been considered as an important immunological barrier for renal transplantation. With the advent of effective preconditioning protocols, it is now possible to do renal transplants across ABO barrier. We hereby present a single center retrospective analysis of all consecutive ABOi renal transplants performed from November 2011 to August 2014. Preconditioning protocol consisted of rituximab, plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and maintenance immunosuppression consisted of tacrolimus, mycophenolate sodium, and prednisolone. The outcome of these ABOi transplants was compared with all other consecutive ABO-compatible (ABOc) renal transplants performed during same time. Twenty ABOi renal transplants were performed during the study period. Anti-blood group antibody titer varied from 1:2 to 1:512. Patient and graft survival was comparable between ABOi and ABOc groups. Biopsy proven acute rejection rate was 15% in ABOi group, which was similar to ABOc group (16.29%). There were no antibody-mediated rejections in ABOi group. The infection rate was also comparable. We conclude that the short-term outcome of ABOi and ABOc transplants is comparable. ABOi transplants should be promoted in developing countries to expand the donor pool.

  19. Trouble with the Lorentz law of force: incompatibility with special relativity and momentum conservation.

    PubMed

    Mansuripur, Masud

    2012-05-11

    The Lorentz law of force is the fifth pillar of classical electrodynamics, the other four being Maxwell's macroscopic equations. The Lorentz law is the universal expression of the force exerted by electromagnetic fields on a volume containing a distribution of electrical charges and currents. If electric and magnetic dipoles also happen to be present in a material medium, they are traditionally treated by expressing the corresponding polarization and magnetization distributions in terms of bound-charge and bound-current densities, which are subsequently added to free-charge and free-current densities, respectively. In this way, Maxwell's macroscopic equations are reduced to his microscopic equations, and the Lorentz law is expected to provide a precise expression of the electromagnetic force density on material bodies at all points in space and time. This Letter presents incontrovertible theoretical evidence of the incompatibility of the Lorentz law with the fundamental tenets of special relativity. We argue that the Lorentz law must be abandoned in favor of a more general expression of the electromagnetic force density, such as the one discovered by Einstein and Laub in 1908. Not only is the Einstein-Laub formula consistent with special relativity, it also solves the long-standing problem of "hidden momentum" in classical electrodynamics.

  20. Protecting a quantum state from environmental noise by an incompatible finite-time measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Brasil, Carlos Alexandre; Castro, L. A. de; Napolitano, R. d. J.

    2011-08-15

    We show that measurements of finite duration performed on an open two-state system can protect the initial state from a phase-noisy environment, provided the measured observable does not commute with the perturbing interaction. When the measured observable commutes with the environmental interaction, the finite-duration measurement accelerates the rate of decoherence induced by the phase noise. For the description of the measurement of an observable that is incompatible with the interaction between system and environment, we have found an approximate analytical expression, valid at zero temperature and weak coupling with the measuring device. We have tested the validity of the analytical predictions against an exact numerical approach, based on the superoperator-splitting method, that confirms the protection of the initial state of the system. When the coupling between the system and the measuring apparatus increases beyond the range of validity of the analytical approximation, the initial state is still protected by the finite-time measurement, according with the exact numerical calculations.

  1. Trouble with the Lorentz law of force: incompatibility with special relativity and momentum conservation.

    PubMed

    Mansuripur, Masud

    2012-05-11

    The Lorentz law of force is the fifth pillar of classical electrodynamics, the other four being Maxwell's macroscopic equations. The Lorentz law is the universal expression of the force exerted by electromagnetic fields on a volume containing a distribution of electrical charges and currents. If electric and magnetic dipoles also happen to be present in a material medium, they are traditionally treated by expressing the corresponding polarization and magnetization distributions in terms of bound-charge and bound-current densities, which are subsequently added to free-charge and free-current densities, respectively. In this way, Maxwell's macroscopic equations are reduced to his microscopic equations, and the Lorentz law is expected to provide a precise expression of the electromagnetic force density on material bodies at all points in space and time. This Letter presents incontrovertible theoretical evidence of the incompatibility of the Lorentz law with the fundamental tenets of special relativity. We argue that the Lorentz law must be abandoned in favor of a more general expression of the electromagnetic force density, such as the one discovered by Einstein and Laub in 1908. Not only is the Einstein-Laub formula consistent with special relativity, it also solves the long-standing problem of "hidden momentum" in classical electrodynamics. PMID:23003039

  2. Molecular genetics, physiology and biology of self-incompatibility in Brassicaceae

    PubMed Central

    WATANABE, Masao; SUWABE, Keita; SUZUKI, Go

    2012-01-01

    Self-incompatibility (SI) is defined as the inability to produce zygotes after self-pollination in a fertile hermaphrodite plant, which has stamens and pistils in the same flower. This structural organization of the hermaphrodite flower increases the risk of self-pollination, leading to low genetic diversity. To avoid this problem plants have established several pollination systems, among which the most elegant system is surely SI. The SI trait can be observed in Brassica crops, including cabbage, broccoli, turnip and radish. To produce hybrid seed of these crops efficiently, the SI trait has been employed in an agricultural context. From another point of view, the recognition reaction of SI during pollen-stigma interaction is an excellent model system for cell-cell communication and signal transduction in higher plants. In this review, we describe the molecular mechanisms of SI in Brassicaceae, which have been dissected by genetic, physiological, and biological approaches, and we discuss the future prospects in relation to associated scientific fields and new technologies. PMID:23229748

  3. Transmission advantage favors selfing allele in experimental populations of self-incompatible Witheringia solanacea (solanaceae).

    PubMed

    Stone, Judy L; VanWyk, Emily J; Hale, Jennifer R

    2014-07-01

    The evolution of self-fertilization is one of the most commonly traversed transitions in flowering plants, with profound implications for population genetic structure and evolutionary potential. We investigated factors influencing this transition using Witheringia solanacea, a predominantly self-incompatible (SI) species within which self-compatible (SC) genotypes have been identified. We showed that self-compatibility in this species segregates with variation at the S-locus as inherited by plants in F1 and F2 generations. To examine reproductive assurance and the transmission advantage of selfing, we placed SC and SI genotypes in genetically replicated gardens and monitored male and female reproductive success, as well as selfing rates of SC plants. Self-compatibility did not lead to increased fruit or seed set, even under conditions of pollinator scarcity, and the realized selfing rate of SC plants was less than 10%. SC plants had higher fruit abortion rates, consistent with previous evidence showing strong inbreeding depression at the embryonic stage. Although the selfing allele did not provide reproductive assurance under observed conditions, it also did not cause pollen discounting, so the transmission advantage of selfing should promote its spread. Given observed numbers of S-alleles and selfing rates, self-compatibility should spread even under conditions of exceedingly high initial inbreeding depression.

  4. Stimulus-response incompatibility activates cortex proximate to three eye fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merriam, E. P.; Colby, C. L.; Thulborn, K. R.; Luna, B.; Olson, C. R.; Sweeney, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate cortical activation during the performance of three oculomotor tasks that impose increasing levels of cognitive demand. (1) In a visually guided saccade (VGS) task, subjects made saccades to flashed targets. (2) In a compatible task, subjects made leftward and rightward saccades in response to foveal presentation of the uppercase words "LEFT" or "RIGHT." (3) In a mixed task, subjects made rightward saccades in response to the lowercase word "left" and leftward saccades in response to the lowercase word "right" on incompatible trials (60%). The remaining 40% of trials required compatible responses to uppercase words. The VGS and compatible tasks, when compared to fixation, activated the three cortical eye fields: the supplementary eye field (SEF), the frontal eye field (FEF), and the parietal eye field (PEF). The mixed task, when compared to the compatible task, activated three additional cortical regions proximate to the three eye fields: (1) rostral to the SEF in medial frontal cortex; (2) rostral to the FEF in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC); (3) rostral and lateral to the PEF in posterior parietal cortex. These areas may contribute to the suppression of prepotent responses and in holding novel visuomotor associations in working memory. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  5. Overcoming self-incompatibility in grasses: a pathway to hybrid breeding.

    PubMed

    Do Canto, Javier; Studer, Bruno; Lubberstedt, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Allogamous grasses exhibit an effective two-locus gametophytic self-incompatibility (SI) system, limiting the range of breeding techniques applicable for cultivar development. Current breeding methods based on populations are characterized by comparably low genetic gains for important traits such as biomass yield. To implement more efficient breeding schemes, the overall understanding of the SI system is crucial as are the mechanisms involved in the breakdown of SI. Self-fertile variants in outcrossing grasses have been studied, and the current level of knowledge includes approximate gene locations, linked molecular markers and first hypotheses on their mode of action. Environmental conditions increasing seed set upon self-pollination have also been described. Even though some strategies were proposed to take advantage of self-fertility, there have, so far, not been changes in the methods applied in cultivar development for allogamous grasses. In this review, we describe the current knowledge about self-fertility in allogamous grasses and outline strategies to incorporate this trait for implementation in synthetic and hybrid breeding schemes. PMID:27577253

  6. Non-self- and self-recognition models in plant self-incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Sota; Kubo, Ken-Ichi; Takayama, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which flowering plants choose their mating partners have interested researchers for a long time. Recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of non-self-recognition in some plant species have provided new insights into self-incompatibility (SI), the trait used by a wide range of plant species to avoid self-fertilization and promote outcrossing. In this Review, we compare the known SI systems, which can be largely classified into non-self- or self-recognition systems with respect to their molecular mechanisms, their evolutionary histories and their modes of evolution. We review previous controversies on haplotype evolution in the gametophytic SI system of Solanaceae species in light of a recently elucidated non-self-recognition model. In non-self-recognition SI systems, the transition from self-compatibility (SC) to SI may be more common than previously thought. Reversible transition between SI and SC in plants may have contributed to their adaptation to diverse and fluctuating environments. PMID:27595657

  7. Comparison of somatic and sexual incompatibility between Datura innoxia and Atropa belladonna.

    PubMed

    Krumbiegel, G; Schieder, O

    1981-12-01

    After protoplast fusion somatic hybrid calli were obtained by complementation selection between an albino mutant of Datura innoxia and the wildtype of Atropa belladonna (Krumbiegel and Schieder, 1979. Planta 145, 371-375). In the present study experiments are described concerning leaf and shoot induction on several media supplemented with different combinations and concentrations of hormones. Except for fleshy leaves and embryos, no well-formed shoot could be obtained. However, under standard culture conditions after one and a half years, one line produced numerous green shoots, showing a reduced number of chromosomes from Atropa belladonna. The loss of some chromosomes decreased the degree of somatic incompatibility. The additional appearance of shoots with albino sectors, of total albino shoots, and of green shoots showing a different phenotype, demonstrated that the elimination of the chromosomes occurred not only once, but several times. At least one shoot nearly stable in chromosome content and green subline could be obtained possessing only 6 chromosomes of Atropa belladonna and the original chromosome number of Datura innoxia. Experiments were carried out to test the feasibility of producing sexual hybrids through in vivo and in vitro methods by cross pollination. However, no embryos, seeds, or plantlets were obtained, thus demonstrating that protoplast fusion is the only possibility for obtaining hybrids between these two species.

  8. De novo mTOR inhibitor-based immunosuppression in ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Koch, Martina; Wiech, Thorsten; Marget, Matthias; Peine, Sven; Thude, Hansjörg; Achilles, Eike G; Fischer, Lutz; Lehnhardt, Anja; Thaiss, Friedrich; Nashan, Bjoern

    2015-11-01

    ABO-incompatible (ABOi) kidney transplantation (KTx) has become an accepted therapeutic option in renal replacement therapy for patients without a blood group-compatible living donor. Using different desensitization strategies, most centers apply B-cell depletion with rituximab and maintenance immunosuppression (IS) with tacrolimus and mycophenolic acid. This high load of total IS leads to an increased rate of surgical complications and virus infections in ABOi patients. Our aim was to establish ABOi KTx using an immunosuppressive regimen, which is effective in preventing acute rejection without increasing the risk for viral infections. Therefore, we selected a de novo immunosuppressive protocol with low-dose calcineurin inhibitor and the mTOR inhibitor everolimus for our ABOi program. Here, we report the first 25 patients with a complete three-yr follow-up treated with this regimen. Three-yr patient survival and graft survival were 96% and 83%. The rate of acute T-cell-mediated rejections was low (12%). Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection was evident in one patient only (4%). Surgical complications were common (40%), but mild in 80% of cases. We demonstrate that ABOi KTx with a de novo mTOR inhibitor-based regimen is feasible without severe surgical or immunological complications and a low rate of viral infections.

  9. Vegetative and generative maintenance of self-incompatibility in six accessions of German chamomile

    PubMed Central

    Faehnrich, Bettina; Wagner, Sarah; Franz, Chlodwig

    2016-01-01

    Self-incompatible (SI) plants are able to form ideal mother lines for hybrid crossing in hermaphroditic plants, assuring fertilization from the desired father line. To find out suitable ways to maintain SI was the aim of this study. Among 220 plants of German chamomile (Matricaria recutita (L.) Rauschert) within six accessions SI-genotypes were selected. SI was determined as staying seedless in three flower heads per plant. Initial SI-plants formed the basic paternal generation (P1) of i) maintaining the same genotypes over six months and repeating seed set analysis (P2) and of ii) conducting crossings in three versions (SI × SI, SI × NSI (not SI evaluated plants) and NSI × SI), thereby producing the F1 population. F1 exhibited 78% SI and P2 62% SI, indicating a higher environmental than genetic influence on SI. But heritability, calculated from the results of SI × SI crossings, showed high values (h2 = 0.71). Within generative propagation, the influence of generation/crossing version was highly significant (p = 0.001) and the cultivar ‘Degumille’ explored the highest value of SI (86%) after SI × NSI crossings. Therefore, the intra-cultivar combination of ‘Degumille’ SI mother plants crossed with NSI father plants can be recommended as the most promising version to maintain SI in chamomile. PMID:27436956

  10. Vegetative and generative maintenance of self-incompatibility in six accessions of German chamomile.

    PubMed

    Faehnrich, Bettina; Wagner, Sarah; Franz, Chlodwig

    2016-06-01

    Self-incompatible (SI) plants are able to form ideal mother lines for hybrid crossing in hermaphroditic plants, assuring fertilization from the desired father line. To find out suitable ways to maintain SI was the aim of this study. Among 220 plants of German chamomile (Matricaria recutita (L.) Rauschert) within six accessions SI-genotypes were selected. SI was determined as staying seedless in three flower heads per plant. Initial SI-plants formed the basic paternal generation (P1) of i) maintaining the same genotypes over six months and repeating seed set analysis (P2) and of ii) conducting crossings in three versions (SI × SI, SI × NSI (not SI evaluated plants) and NSI × SI), thereby producing the F1 population. F1 exhibited 78% SI and P2 62% SI, indicating a higher environmental than genetic influence on SI. But heritability, calculated from the results of SI × SI crossings, showed high values (h(2) = 0.71). Within generative propagation, the influence of generation/crossing version was highly significant (p = 0.001) and the cultivar 'Degumille' explored the highest value of SI (86%) after SI × NSI crossings. Therefore, the intra-cultivar combination of 'Degumille' SI mother plants crossed with NSI father plants can be recommended as the most promising version to maintain SI in chamomile. PMID:27436956

  11. Stem Cell Emergence and Hemopoietic Activity Are Incompatible in Mouse Intraembryonic Sites

    PubMed Central

    Godin, Isabelle; Garcia-Porrero, Juan Antonio; Dieterlen-Lièvre, Françoise; Cumano, Ana

    1999-01-01

    In the mouse embryo, the generation of candidate progenitors for long-lasting hemopoiesis has been reported in the paraaortic splanchnopleura (P-Sp)/aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region. Here, we address the following question: can the P-Sp/AGM environment support hemopoietic differentiation as well as generate stem cells, and, conversely, are other sites where hemopoietic differentiation occurs capable of generating stem cells? Although P-Sp/AGM generates de novo hemopoietic stem cells between 9.5 and 12.5 days post coitus (dpc), we show here that it does not support hemopoietic differentiation. Among mesoderm-derived sites, spleen and omentum were shown to be colonized by exogenous cells in the same fashion as the fetal liver. Cells colonizing the spleen were multipotent and pursued their evolution to committed progenitors in this organ. In contrast, the omentum, which was colonized by lymphoid-committed progenitors that did not expand, cannot be considered as a hemopoietic organ. From these data, stem cell generation appears incompatible with hemopoietic activity. At the peak of hemopoietic progenitor production in the P-Sp/AGM, between 10.5 and 11.5 dpc, multipotent cells were found at the exceptional frequency of 1 out of 12 total cells and 1 out of 4 AA4.1+ cells. Thus, progenitors within this region constitute a pool of undifferentiated hemopoietic cells readily accessible for characterization. PMID:10429669

  12. Wolbachia endosymbiont responsible for cytoplasmic incompatibility in a terrestrial crustacean: effects in natural and foreign hosts.

    PubMed

    Moret, Y; Juchault, P; Rigaud, T

    2001-03-01

    Wolbachia bacteria are vertically transmitted endosymbionts that disturb the reproduction of many arthropods thereby enhancing their spread in host populations. Wolbachia are often responsible for changes of sex ratios in terrestrial isopods, a result of the feminization of genotypic males. Here we found that the Wolbachia hosted by Cylisticus convexus (wCc) caused unidirectional cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI), an effect commonly found in insects. To understand the diversity of Wolbachia-induced effects in isopods, wCc were experimentally transferred in a novel isopod host, Armadillidium vulgare. wCc conserved the ability to induce CI. However, Wolbachia were not transmitted to the eggs, so the capacity to restore the compatibility in crosses involving two transinfected individuals was lost. The feminizing Wolbachia hosted by A. vulgare was unable to rescue CI induced by wCc. These results showed that Wolbachia in isopods did not evolved broadly to induce feminization, and that CI and the feminizing effect are probably due to different mechanisms. In addition, wCc reduces the mating capacity of infected C. convexus males, suggesting that the bacteria might alter reproductive behaviour. The maintenance of wCc in host populations is discussed. PMID:11488969

  13. METHODOLOGY FOR EXAMINING SYSTEM AGING DUE TO INTERACTIONS BETWEEN CHEMICALLY INCOMPATIBLE MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    J. DENINGER; J. TANSKI

    1999-04-01

    We start with a stored and unused population of fielded engineered units that are composed of chemically incompatible materials. The units age primarily through heterogeneous chemical reactions between the materials resulting in possible degradation in performance. The engineered units are unused in storage, but may be called into actual service at any time. We sample several units from the population per year and perform a number of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques, such as radiography, low-frequency vibration analysis, and ultrasonic imaging on the selected units. From those units, some are selected for destructive testing (D-test) involving disassembly and testing of internal parts and components. Chemical analyses, mechanical properties measurements and other tests are performed. All of the above steps provide information that is used in the system simulation mathematical model. The system simulation model incorporates chemical reactions and gas-solid transport processes, along with changes in both the surface and bulk properties of the solids. Model results are used to suggest improvements in NDE analyses of the units and improvements in component and material analyses. Model results give trending indications of individual component and overall system changes over time, plus some understanding of the mechanisms involved which allow science-based predictions of the aged state of the units in future times. The NDE, D-test, and model results can also be used to assess statistically the reliability and performance of the overall aging population of units.

  14. Bell-Boole Inequality: Nonlocality or Probabilistic Incompatibility of Random Variables?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2008-06-01

    The main aim of this report is to inform the quantum information community about investigations on the problem of probabilistic compatibility of a family of random variables: a possibility to realize such a family on the basis of a single probability measure (to construct a single Kolmogorov probability space). These investigations were started hundred of years ago by J. Boole (who invented Boolean algebras). The complete solution of the problem was obtained by Soviet mathematician Vorobjev in 60th. Surprisingly probabilists and statisticians obtained inequalities for probabilities and correlations among which one can find the famous Bell’s inequality and its generalizations. Such inequalities appeared simply as constraints for probabilistic compatibility. In this framework one can not see a priori any link to such problems as nonlocality and “death of reality” which are typically linked to Bell’s type inequalities in physical literature. We analyze the difference between positions of mathematicians and quantum physicists. In particular, we found that one of the most reasonable explanations of probabilistic incompatibility is mixing in Bell’s type inequalities statistical data from a number of experiments performed under different experimental contexts.

  15. Impact of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor-human leukocyte antigens ligand incompatibility among renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Alam, S.; Rangaswamy, D.; Prakash, S.; Sharma, R. K.; Khan, M. I.; Sonawane, A.; Agrawal, S.

    2015-01-01

    Killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene shows a high degree of polymorphism. Natural killer cell receptor gets activated once they bind to self-human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) with specific ligand. KIR gene and HLA ligand incompatibility due to the presence/absence of KIR in the recipient and the corresponding HLA ligand in the allograft may impact graft survival in solid organ transplantation. This study evaluates the effect of matches between KIR genes and known HLA ligands. KIR genotypes were determined using sequence specific primer polymerase chain reaction. Presence of certain KIR in a recipient, where the donor lacked the corresponding HLA ligand was considered a mismatch. The allograft was considered matched when both KIR receptor and HLA alloantigen reveald compatibility among recipient and donor. The data revealed better survival among individuals with matched inhibitory KIR receptors and their corresponding HLA ligands (KIR2DL2/DL3-HLAC2, KIR3DL1-HLABw4). On the contrary, no adverse effect was seen for matched activating KIR receptors and their corresponding HLA ligands. One of the activating gene KIR2DS4 showed risk (P = 0.0413, odds ratio = 1.91, 95% confidence interval = 1.02-3.57) association with renal allograft rejection. We conclude that the presence of inhibitory KIR gene leads to better survival; whereas activating motifs show no significant role in renal allograft survival. PMID:25684869

  16. Impact of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor-human leukocyte antigens ligand incompatibility among renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Alam, S; Rangaswamy, D; Prakash, S; Sharma, R K; Khan, M I; Sonawane, A; Agrawal, S

    2015-01-01

    Killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene shows a high degree of polymorphism. Natural killer cell receptor gets activated once they bind to self-human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) with specific ligand. KIR gene and HLA ligand incompatibility due to the presence/absence of KIR in the recipient and the corresponding HLA ligand in the allograft may impact graft survival in solid organ transplantation. This study evaluates the effect of matches between KIR genes and known HLA ligands. KIR genotypes were determined using sequence specific primer polymerase chain reaction. Presence of certain KIR in a recipient, where the donor lacked the corresponding HLA ligand was considered a mismatch. The allograft was considered matched when both KIR receptor and HLA alloantigen reveald compatibility among recipient and donor. The data revealed better survival among individuals with matched inhibitory KIR receptors and their corresponding HLA ligands (KIR2DL2/DL3-HLAC2, KIR3DL1-HLABw4). On the contrary, no adverse effect was seen for matched activating KIR receptors and their corresponding HLA ligands. One of the activating gene KIR2DS4 showed risk (P = 0.0413, odds ratio = 1.91, 95% confidence interval = 1.02-3.57) association with renal allograft rejection. We conclude that the presence of inhibitory KIR gene leads to better survival; whereas activating motifs show no significant role in renal allograft survival.

  17. Molecular modeling of S-RNases involved in almond self-incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Fernández I Martí, Angel; Wirthensohn, Michelle; Alonso, José M; Socias I Company, Rafel; Hrmova, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) is a mechanism in flowering plants, to prevent inbreeding and promote outcrossing. GSI is under the control of a specific locus, known as the S-locus, which contains at least two genes, the RNase and the SFB. Active S-RNases in the style are essential for rejection of haploid pollen, when the pollen S-allele matches one of two S-alleles of the diploid pistil. However, the nature of their mutual interactions at genetic and biochemical levels remain unclear. Thus, detailed understanding of the protein structure involved in GSI may help in discovering how the proteins involved in GSI may function and how they fulfill their biological roles. To this end, 3D models of the SC (S(f)) and two SI (S(8) and S(23)) S-RNases of almond were constructed, using comparative modeling tools. The modeled structures consisted of mixed α and β folds, with six helices and six β-strands. However, the self-compatible (S(f)) RNase contained an additional extended loop between the conserved domains RC4 and C5, which may be involved in the manifestation of self-compatibility in almond.

  18. Molecular modeling of S-RNases involved in almond self-incompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Fernández i Martí, Àngel; Wirthensohn, Michelle; Alonso, José M.; Socias i Company, Rafel; Hrmova, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) is a mechanism in flowering plants, to prevent inbreeding and promote outcrossing. GSI is under the control of a specific locus, known as the S-locus, which contains at least two genes, the RNase and the SFB. Active S-RNases in the style are essential for rejection of haploid pollen, when the pollen S-allele matches one of two S-alleles of the diploid pistil. However, the nature of their mutual interactions at genetic and biochemical levels remain unclear. Thus, detailed understanding of the protein structure involved in GSI may help in discovering how the proteins involved in GSI may function and how they fulfill their biological roles. To this end, 3D models of the SC (Sf) and two SI (S8 and S23) S-RNases of almond were constructed, using comparative modeling tools. The modeled structures consisted of mixed α and β folds, with six helices and six β-strands. However, the self-compatible (Sf) RNase contained an additional extended loop between the conserved domains RC4 and C5, which may be involved in the manifestation of self-compatibility in almond. PMID:22754558

  19. Correcting incompatible DN values and geometric errors in nighttime lights time series images

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Naizhuo; Zhou, Yuyu; Samson, Eric L.

    2014-09-19

    The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s Operational Linescan System (DMSP-OLS) nighttime lights imagery has proven to be a powerful remote sensing tool to monitor urbanization and assess socioeconomic activities at large scales. However, the existence of incompatible digital number (DN) values and geometric errors severely limit application of nighttime light image data on multi-year quantitative research. In this study we extend and improve previous studies on inter-calibrating nighttime lights image data to obtain more compatible and reliable nighttime lights time series (NLT) image data for China and the United States (US) through four steps: inter-calibration, geometric correction, steady increase adjustment, and population data correction. We then use gross domestic product (GDP) data to test the processed NLT image data indirectly and find that sum light (summed DN value of pixels in a nighttime light image) maintains apparent increase trends with relatively large GDP growth rates but does not increase or decrease with relatively small GDP growth rates. As nighttime light is a sensitive indicator for economic activity, the temporally consistent trends between sum light and GDP growth rate imply that brightness of nighttime lights on the ground is correctly represented by the processed NLT image data. Finally, through analyzing the corrected NLT image data from 1992 to 2008, we find that China experienced apparent nighttime lights development in 1992-1997 and 2001-2008 respectively and the US suffered from nighttime lights decay in large areas after 2001.

  20. Reverse evolution leads to genotypic incompatibility despite functional and active site convergence

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenbach, Miriam; Jackson, Colin J; Campbell, Eleanor C; Hollfelder, Florian; Tokuriki, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the extent to which enzyme evolution is reversible can shed light on the fundamental relationship between protein sequence, structure, and function. Here, we perform an experimental test of evolutionary reversibility using directed evolution from a phosphotriesterase to an arylesterase, and back, and examine the underlying molecular basis. We find that wild-type phosphotriesterase function could be restored (>104-fold activity increase), but via an alternative set of mutations. The enzyme active site converged towards its original state, indicating evolutionary constraints imposed by catalytic requirements. We reveal that extensive epistasis prevents reversions and necessitates fixation of new mutations, leading to a functionally identical sequence. Many amino acid exchanges between the new and original enzyme are not tolerated, implying sequence incompatibility. Therefore, the evolution was phenotypically reversible but genotypically irreversible. Our study illustrates that the enzyme's adaptive landscape is highly rugged, and different functional sequences may constitute separate fitness peaks. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06492.001 PMID:26274563

  1. Dislocations via incompatibilities in phase-field models of microstructure evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröger, R.; Marchand, B.; Lookman, T.

    2016-08-01

    We develop a phase-field model that describes the elastic distortion of a ferroelastic material with cubic anisotropy due to an arbitrary dislocation network and a uniform external load. The dislocation network is characterized using the Nye tensor and enters the formulation via a set of incompatibility constraints for the internal strain field. The long-range elastic response of the material is obtained by minimization of the free energy that accounts for higher-order terms of the order parameters and symmetry-adapted strain gradients. The influence of dislocations on the microstructure is studied using a static equilibrium analysis of a material without dislocations and with a random array of parallel edge dislocations. A minimal continuum dislocation dynamics is then used to investigate the simultaneous evolution of the network of geometrically necessary dislocations and the internal strain field. The model developed here is directly applicable to single-phase cubic crystals with an arbitrary degree of anisotropy as well as to ferroelastic materials undergoing temperature-driven cubic-to-tetragonal phase transitions.

  2. Rapid mobilization of membrane lipids in wheat leaf sheaths during incompatible interactions with Hessian fly.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lieceng; Liu, Xuming; Wang, Haiyan; Khajuria, Chitvan; Reese, John C; Whitworth, R Jeff; Welti, Ruth; Chen, Ming-Shun

    2012-07-01

    Hessian fly (HF) is a biotrophic insect that interacts with wheat on a gene-for-gene basis. We profiled changes in membrane lipids in two isogenic wheat lines: a susceptible line and its backcrossed offspring containing the resistance gene H13. Our results revealed a 32 to 45% reduction in total concentrations of 129 lipid species in resistant plants during incompatible interactions within 24 h after HF attack. A smaller and delayed response was observed in susceptible plants during compatible interactions. Microarray and real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses of 168 lipid-metabolism-related transcripts revealed that the abundance of many of these transcripts increased rapidly in resistant plants after HF attack but did not change in susceptible plants. In association with the rapid mobilization of membrane lipids, the concentrations of some fatty acids and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) increased specifically in resistant plants. Exogenous application of OPDA increased mortality of HF larvae significantly. Collectively, our data, along with previously published results, indicate that the lipids were mobilized through lipolysis, producing free fatty acids, which were likely further converted into oxylipins and other defense molecules. Our results suggest that rapid mobilization of membrane lipids constitutes an important step for wheat to defend against HF attack.

  3. The Papaver rhoeas S determinants confer self-incompatibility to Arabidopsis thaliana in planta.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zongcheng; Eaves, Deborah J; Sanchez-Moran, Eugenio; Franklin, F Christopher H; Franklin-Tong, Vernonica E

    2015-11-01

    Self-incompatibility (SI) is a major genetically controlled system used to prevent inbreeding in higher plants. S determinants regulate allele-specific rejection of "self" pollen by the pistil. SI is an important model system for cell-to-cell recognition and signaling and could be potentially useful for first-generation (F1) hybrid breeding. To date, the transfer of S determinants has used the complementation of orthologs to "restore" SI in close relatives. We expressed the Papaver rhoeas S determinants PrsS and PrpS in Arabidopsis thaliana. This enabled pistils to reject pollen expressing cognate PrpS. Moreover, plants coexpressing cognate PrpS and PrsS exhibit robust SI. This demonstrates that PrsS and PrpS are sufficient for a functional synthetic S locus in vivo. This transfer of novel S determinants into a highly divergent species (>140 million years apart) with no orthologs suggests their potential utility in crop production. PMID:26542572

  4. Silicone implant incompatibility syndrome (SIIS): a frequent cause of ASIA (Shoenfeld's syndrome).

    PubMed

    Cohen Tervaert, J W; Kappel, R M

    2013-07-01

    Silicon has a molecular mass of 28 daltons. In nature, silicon is found as silicon dioxide (silica) or in a variety of silicates (e.g., in talc or asbestos). Furthermore, silicon is present in silicones, polymerized siloxanes, which are often used as medical silicones in breast implants. Silicon exposure is associated with different systemic autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, progressive systemic sclerosis, and vasculitis. Remarkably, silicon in silicone-filled breast implants is considered to be safe, not increasing the risk of developing autoimmune diseases. We analyzed the impact of silicone-filled breast implants on the immune system in 32 consecutive patients attending a specialized autoimmunity clinic. All 32 patients had silicone implant incompatibility syndrome and complaints fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of ASIA (autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants). Furthermore, in 17 of the 32 patients, a systemic autoimmune disease was diagnosed, and 15 of the 32 patients had an impaired humoral immune system. Patients developed symptoms and signs after long-term follow-up, suggesting that these symptoms and signs started after implant aging and/or rupture. We postulate that silicon in silicone-filled breast implants may increase the risk of developing (auto) immune diseases and immune deficiencies.

  5. Conditions for the Emergence of Shared Norms in Populations with Incompatible Preferences

    PubMed Central

    Helbing, Dirk; Yu, Wenjian; Opp, Karl-Dieter; Rauhut, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    Understanding norms is a key challenge in sociology. Nevertheless, there is a lack of dynamical models explaining how one of several possible behaviors is established as a norm and under what conditions. Analysing an agent-based model, we identify interesting parameter dependencies that imply when two behaviors will coexist or when a shared norm will emerge in a heterogeneous society, where different populations have incompatible preferences. Our model highlights the importance of randomness, spatial interactions, non-linear dynamics, and self-organization. It can also explain the emergence of unpopular norms that do not maximize the collective benefit. Furthermore, we compare behavior-based with preference-based punishment and find interesting results concerning hypocritical punishment. Strikingly, pressuring others to perform the same public behavior as oneself is more effective in promoting norms than pressuring others to meet one’s own private preference. Finally, we show that adaptive group pressure exerted by randomly occuring, local majorities may create norms under conditions where different behaviors would normally coexist. PMID:25166137

  6. Self-incompatibility systems: barriers to self-fertilization in flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Rea, Anne C; Nasrallah, June B

    2008-01-01

    Flowering plants (angiosperms) are the most prevalent and evolutionarily advanced group of plants. Success of these plants is owed to several unique evolutionary adaptations that aid in reproduction: the flower, the closed carpel, double fertilization, and the ultimate products of fertilization, seeds enclosed in the fruit. Angiosperms exhibit a vast array of reproductive strategies, including both asexual and sexual, the latter of which includes both self-fertilization and cross-fertilization. Asexual reproduction and self-fertilization are important reproductive strategies in a variety of situations, such as when mates are scarce or when the environment remains relatively stable. However, reproductive strategies promoting cross-fertilization are critical to angiosperm success, since they contribute to the creation of genetically diverse populations, which increase the probability that at least one individual in a population will survive given changing environmental conditions. The evolution of several physical and genetic barriers to self-fertilization or fertilization among closely related individuals is thus widespread in angiosperms. A major genetic barrier to self-fertilization is self-incompatibility (SI), which allows female reproductive cells to discriminate between "self" and "non-self" pollen, and specifically reject self pollen. Evidence for the importance of SI in angiosperm evolution lies in the highly diverse set of mechanisms used by various angiosperm families for recognition of self pollen tube development and preventing self-fertilization. PMID:18649276

  7. Comparison of clinical outcomes between ABO-compatible and ABO-incompatible spousal donor kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Woo Yeong; Kang, Seong Sik; Park, Sung Bae; Park, Ui Jun; Kim, Hyong Tae; Cho, Won Hyun; Han, Seungyeup

    2016-01-01

    Background Kidney transplantation (KT) is the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease patients. The spouse is a major donor in living KT. Clinical outcomes of spousal donor KT are not inferior to those of living related donor KT. In this study, we compared clinical outcomes between ABO-compatible (ABOc) and ABO-incompatible (ABOi) spousal donor KTs. Methods Thirty-two cases of spousal donor KT performed from January 2011 to August 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. Twenty-one ABOc KTs and 11 ABOi KTs were performed. We investigated patient survival, graft survival, acute rejection, graft function, and complications. Results During follow-up, patient and graft survival rates were 100% in both groups. There were no significant differences in the incidence of delayed graft function, acute rejection, and the change in graft function between the 2 groups. Medical and surgical complications were not significantly different between the groups. Conclusion The clinical outcomes of ABOc and ABOi spousal donor KTs were equivalent. In ABOi KT, an emotionally motivated spousal donor KT may be a good alternative to the problem of the absolute shortage of kidney donations. PMID:27069858

  8. Complement Interception Across Humoral Incompatibility in Solid Organ Transplantation: A Clinical Perspective.

    PubMed

    Biglarnia, Ali-Reza; Ekdahl, Kristina N; Nilsson, Bo

    2015-01-01

    The humoral barrier in transplant biology is the result of preformed donor-specific antibodies (DSAs), directed either against human leukocyte antigens (HLA) or non-HLA antigens such as blood group (ABO) molecules. The term "sensitization" applies to patients carrying these antibodies. Transplantation is widely accepted as a life-saving opportunity for patients with terminal end-organ disease. However, in sensitized patients, transplant outcome is hampered by antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) as a consequence of DSA exposure. Furthermore, sensitized patients have limited access to "matched" organs from the both living and deceased donor pool.Considering the crucial role of the complement system in the pathophysiology of AMR and the availability of complement intervention therapeutics, there is a growing interest in complement-targeting strategies. This review highlights the emerging importance of monitoring and modulation of the complement system in the context of enabling transplantation across humoral incompatibility in sensitized recipients with preformed anti-HLA or natural anti-ABO antibodies. It also discusses the significance of the complement system in the induction of accommodation and further emphasizes current and future perspectives of novel complement therapeutics.

  9. Overcoming self-incompatibility in grasses: a pathway to hybrid breeding.

    PubMed

    Do Canto, Javier; Studer, Bruno; Lubberstedt, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Allogamous grasses exhibit an effective two-locus gametophytic self-incompatibility (SI) system, limiting the range of breeding techniques applicable for cultivar development. Current breeding methods based on populations are characterized by comparably low genetic gains for important traits such as biomass yield. To implement more efficient breeding schemes, the overall understanding of the SI system is crucial as are the mechanisms involved in the breakdown of SI. Self-fertile variants in outcrossing grasses have been studied, and the current level of knowledge includes approximate gene locations, linked molecular markers and first hypotheses on their mode of action. Environmental conditions increasing seed set upon self-pollination have also been described. Even though some strategies were proposed to take advantage of self-fertility, there have, so far, not been changes in the methods applied in cultivar development for allogamous grasses. In this review, we describe the current knowledge about self-fertility in allogamous grasses and outline strategies to incorporate this trait for implementation in synthetic and hybrid breeding schemes.

  10. Sustaining Writing Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Amy M.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines ways in which the fundamentals of both writing studies and sustainability studies overlap and complement each other, ultimately moving toward a theory of writing that not only is sustainable, but that also sustains writing practice across a variety of areas. For example, in order to be sustainable, both writing and…

  11. 2010 Campus Sustainability Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    With this review of campus sustainability efforts in 2010, the editors aim to give readers--those who are often immersed in the day-to-day particulars of sustainability efforts--the same chance to take a step back and take a broader look at where they stand with sustainability in higher education. This inaugural 2010 Campus Sustainability Review…

  12. SUSTAINABILITY AND COMPLEX SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The important question in sustainability is not whether the world is sustainable, but whether a humanly acceptable regime of the world is sustainable. World commission on environment and development defines sustainability as ‘development that meets the needs of the present withou...

  13. Designing sustainable acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Cory, Alistair

    2008-01-01

    The need to provide sustainable hospitals lies in the fact that we have an obligation to act responsibly towards good stewardship of our environment and the world's precious resources, ensuring a healthy future for coming generations. As such, a sustainable hospital must sit squarely in a sustainable society, and the global and local context should be considered when designing a sustainable health facility.

  14. Organizing for Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, William M.; Hamburger, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    A successful campus sustainability effort catalyzes broad engagement of the campus community and integration of sustainability principles into the academic and operational components of campus life. Although many universities have embraced sustainability as a new core value, others have been more sluggish in adopting sustainability principles to…

  15. Distribution of S haplotypes and its relationship with restorer-maintainers of self-incompatibility in cultivated Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingguo; Ma, Chaozhi; Tang, Jiayou; Tang, Wei; Tu, Jinxing; Shen, Jinxiong; Fu, Tingdong

    2008-07-01

    Brassica napus (AACC, 2n = 38) is a self-compatible amphidiploid plant that arose from the interspecies hybridization of two self-incompatible species, B. rapa (AA, 2n = 20) and B. oleracea (CC, 2n = 18). Self-incompatibility (S) haplotypes in one self-incompatible line and 124 cultivated B. napus lines were detected using S-locus-specific primers, and their relationships with restorer-maintainers were investigated. Two class I (S-I ( SLG ) a and S-I ( SLG ) b) and four class II (S-II ( SLG ) a, S-II ( SLG ) b, S-II ( SP11 ) a and S-II ( SP11 ) b) S haplotypes were observed, of which S-II ( SP11 ) b was newly identified. The nucleotide sequence of SP11 showed little similarity to the reported SP11 alleles. The lines were found to express a total of eleven S genotypes. The self-incompatible line had a specific genotype consisting of S-II ( SP11 ) a, similar to B. rapa S-60, and S-II ( SLG ) a, similar to B. oleracea S-15. Restorers expressed six genotypes: the most common genotype contained S-I ( SLG ) a, similar to B. rapa S-47, and S-II ( SLG ) b, similar to B. oleracea S-15. Maintainers expressed nine genotypes: the predominant genotype was homozygous for two S haplotypes, S-II ( SLG ) a and S-II ( SP11 ) b. One genotype was specific to restorers and four genotypes were specific to maintainers, whereas five genotypes were expressed in both restorers and maintainers. This suggests that there is no definitive correlation between the distribution of S genotypes and restorer-maintainers of self-incompatibility. The finding that restorers and maintainers express unique genotypes, and share some common genotypes, would be valuable for detecting the interaction of S haplotypes in inter- or intra-genomes as well as for developing markers-assisted selection in self-incompatibility hybrid breeding.

  16. SNAPSHOT: A MODERN, SUSTAINABLE HOLDUP MEASUREMENT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, Nathan C; Younkin, James R; Smith, Steven E; Chapman, Jeffrey Allen; Dunn, Michael E; Stewart, Scott L

    2016-01-01

    SNAPSHOT is a software platform designed to eventually replace Holdup Measurement System 4 (HMS 4), which is the current state-of-the-art for acquisition and analysis of nondestructive assay measurement data for in situ nuclear materials, holdup, in support of criticality safety and material control and accounting. HMS 4 is over 10 years old and is currently unsustainable due to hardware and software incompatibilities that have arisen from advances in detector electronics, primarily updates to multi-channel analyzers (MCAs), and both computer and handheld operating systems. SNAPSHOT is a complete redesign of HMS 4 that addresses the issue of compatibility with modern MCAs and operating systems and that is designed with a flexible architecture to support long-term sustainability. It also provides an updated and more user friendly interface and is being developed under an NQA 1 software quality assurance (SQA) program to facilitate site acceptance for safety-related applications. This paper provides an overview of the SNAPSHOT project including details of the software development process, the SQA program, and the architecture designed to support sustainability.

  17. Intentional replantation to prevent predictable endodontic failures.

    PubMed

    Nosonowitz, D M; Stanley, H R

    1984-04-01

    A clinical approach to intentional replantation with indications and contradictions is presented. A histopathologic analysis of a tooth that was replanted and then removed 22 years later is illustrated.

  18. Intentional replantation of periodontally compromised hopeless tooth.

    PubMed

    Nagappa, G; Aspalli, Shivanand; Devanoorkar, Archana; Shetty, Sudhir; Parab, Prachi

    2013-09-01

    Aesthetic considerations have influenced the management of dental maladies in varying degrees for many years. Even single tooth mal-alignment makes the patient to approach a dentist. Intentional replantation is a procedure in which an intentional tooth extraction is performed followed by reinsertion of the extracted tooth. Many authors agree that it should be reserved as the last resort to save a tooth after other procedures have failed or would likely to fail. The main reason of failure in replanted teeth is root resorption, specifically ankylosis or replacement resorption. Although the success rate is not always high, intentional replantation may be a treatment alternative that deserves consideration to maintain the natural dentition and avoid extraction of the tooth. Here is case report of a patient desiring alignment of malpositioned periodontally involved anterior single tooth due to various causes treated by intentional replantation.

  19. Intentional replantation of periodontally compromised hopeless tooth

    PubMed Central

    Nagappa, G.; Aspalli, Shivanand; Devanoorkar, Archana; Shetty, Sudhir; Parab, Prachi

    2013-01-01

    Aesthetic considerations have influenced the management of dental maladies in varying degrees for many years. Even single tooth mal-alignment makes the patient to approach a dentist. Intentional replantation is a procedure in which an intentional tooth extraction is performed followed by reinsertion of the extracted tooth. Many authors agree that it should be reserved as the last resort to save a tooth after other procedures have failed or would likely to fail. The main reason of failure in replanted teeth is root resorption, specifically ankylosis or replacement resorption. Although the success rate is not always high, intentional replantation may be a treatment alternative that deserves consideration to maintain the natural dentition and avoid extraction of the tooth. Here is case report of a patient desiring alignment of malpositioned periodontally involved anterior single tooth due to various causes treated by intentional replantation. PMID:24174765

  20. Exploring U.S. Men's Birth Intentions

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Laura Duberstein; Kost, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    Objectives While recently there have been renewed interest in women's childbearing intentions, the authors sought to bring needed research attention to understanding men's childbearing intentions. Methods Nationally representative data from 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth was used to examine pregnancy intentions and happiness for all births reported by men in the five years preceding the interview. We used bivariate statistical tests of associations between intention status, happiness about the pregnancy, and fathers' demographic characteristics, including joint race/ethnicity and union status subgroups. Multivariate logistic regressions were used to calculate adjusted odds ratios of a birth being intended, estimated separately by father's union status at birth. Using comparable data and measures from the male and female NSFG surveys, we tested for gender differences intentions and happiness, and examined the sensitivity of our results to potential underreporting of births by men. Results Nearly four out of ten of births to men were reported as unintended, with significant variation by men's demographic traits. Non-marital childbearing was more likely to be intended among Hispanic and black men. Sixty-two percent of births received a 10 on the happiness scale. Happiness about the pregnancy varied significantly by intention status. Men were significantly happier than women about the pregnancies, with no significant difference in intention status. Potential underreporting of births by men had little impact on these patterns. Conclusions This study brings needed focus to men's childbearing intentions and improves our understanding of the context of their role as fathers. Men need to be included in strategies to prevent unintended pregnancy. PMID:23793481

  1. [Evidence about the power of intention].

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Ernesto

    2008-12-01

    Intention is defined as a directed thought to perform a determined action. Thoughts targeted to an end can affect inanimate objects and practically all living things from unicelular organisms to human beings. The emission of light particles (biophotons) seems to be the mechanism through which an intention produces its effects. All living organisms emit a constant current of photons as a mean to direct instantaneous nonlocal signals from one part of the body to another and to the outside world. Biophotons are stored in the intracelular DNA. When the organism is sick changes in biophotons emissions are produced.Direct intention manifests itself as an electric and magnetic energy producing an ordered flux of photons. Our intentions seem to operate as highly coherent frequencies capable of changing the molecular structure of matter. For the intention to be effective it is necessary to choose the appropriate time. In fact, living beings are mutually synchronized and to the earth and its constant changes of magnetic energy. It has been shown that the energy of thought can also alter the environment. Hypnosis, stigmata phenomena and the placebo effect can also be considered as types of intention, as instructions to the brain during a particular state of consciousness. Cases of spontaneous cures or of remote healing of extremely ill patients represent instances of an exceedingly great intention to control diseases menacing our lives. The intention to heal as well as the beliefs of the sick person on the efficacy of the healing influences promote his healing. In conclusion, studies on thought and consciousness are emerging as fundamental aspects and not as mere epiphenomena that are rapidly leading to a profound change in the paradigms of Biology and Medicine.

  2. Changing Physician Behavior With Implementation Intentions: Closing the Gap Between Intentions and Actions.

    PubMed

    Saddawi-Konefka, Daniel; Schumacher, Daniel J; Baker, Keith H; Charnin, Jonathan E; Gollwitzer, Peter M

    2016-09-01

    In medical education, even well-intentioned learners struggle to change their practice. This intention-action gap is a well-described phenomenon. Strong commitment to changing behaviors is important, but by itself it is only a modest predictor of goal attainment.Implementation intentions are an extensively studied strategy from cognitive psychology that have been shown to close the intention-action gap and increase goal attainment across myriad domains. Implementation intentions are "if-then" plans that specify an anticipated future situation and a planned response-"If I encounter situation X, then I will respond with action Y." They differ from simple goals, which specify only a desired behavior or outcome-"I intend to perform action Z." Despite this subtle difference, they have shown substantial effectiveness over goals alone in increasing goal attainment.In this article, the authors first describe implementation intentions, review the substantial body of evidence demonstrating their effectiveness, and explain the underlying psychological mechanisms. They then illustrate the connections between implementation intentions and established learning theory. The final section focuses on forming effective implementation intentions in medical education. The authors provide concrete examples across the continuum of learners (from medical students to attending physicians) and competencies, and make recommendations for when and how to employ implementation intentions. PMID:27008360

  3. Attempted suicide, suicidal intent, and alcohol.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, A S; Stenager, E; Brahe, U B

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to relate suicidal intent to the suicide method chosen and the medical lethality of the suicidal act, and to discuss how ingestion of alcohol impacts these three factors. The study was based upon interviews with 139 suicidal patients admitted to the Department of Psychiatry of Odense University Hospital. The results indicated a tendency for suicide attempters using wrist-cutting to score low on the Suicidal Intent Scale. Patients using kinds of self-injury other than self-poisoning or wrist-cutting scored high. In the case of self-poisoning, suicidal intent did not influence the choice of toxic agent, nor was the choice of method and/or choice of toxic agent affected by alcohol ingestion. A correlation between suicidal intent and the lethality of the suicide attempt was seen only among patients without a diagnosis of alcohol dependence. Alcohol-dependent patients who made highly lethal attempts scored relatively low on the Suicidal Intent Scale. The results indicate that the lethality of the suicidal act is only an incomplete guide to a patient's suicidal intent. However, it should be stressed that, despite the fact that alcohol-dependent suicide attempters may not strongly wish to die, they are nonetheless at high risk for making fatal suicide attempts.

  4. Context-Aware Online Commercial Intention Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Derek Hao; Shen, Dou; Sun, Jian-Tao; Yang, Qiang; Chen, Zheng

    With more and more commercial activities moving onto the Internet, people tend to purchase what they need through Internet or conduct some online research before the actual transactions happen. For many Web users, their online commercial activities start from submitting a search query to search engines. Just like the common Web search queries, the queries with commercial intention are usually very short. Recognizing the queries with commercial intention against the common queries will help search engines provide proper search results and advertisements, help Web users obtain the right information they desire and help the advertisers benefit from the potential transactions. However, the intentions behind a query vary a lot for users with different background and interest. The intentions can even be different for the same user, when the query is issued in different contexts. In this paper, we present a new algorithm framework based on skip-chain conditional random field (SCCRF) for automatically classifying Web queries according to context-based online commercial intention. We analyze our algorithm performance both theoretically and empirically. Extensive experiments on several real search engine log datasets show that our algorithm can improve more than 10% on F1 score than previous algorithms on commercial intention detection.

  5. Hf and Nd Isotope Evidence for Production of an Incompatible Trace Element Enriched Crustal Reservoir in Early Earth (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandon, A. D.; Debaille, V.; Lapen, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    The final significant stage of accretion of the Earth was likely a collision between proto-Earth and a Mars sized impactor that formed the Moon. This event is thought to have produced enough thermal energy to melt all or most of the Earth, with a consequent magma ocean (MO). During subsequent cooling, the Earth would have formed its protocrust and corresponding mantle lithosphere, consisting of solidified basalt-komatiitic melt, in combination with buoyant cumulates and late stage residual melts from the MO. Relative to the convecting mantle, portions of this protolithosphere are likely to have been enriched in incompatible trace elements (ITE) in sufficient quantities to contain a significant amount of the bulk Earth’s budget for rare earth elements, U, Th, and Hf. If the protolithosphere was negatively buoyant, it may have overturned at or near the final stages of MO crystallization and a significant portion of that material may have been transported into the deep mantle where it resided and remixed into the convecting mantle over Earth history [1,2]. If the protolithosphere remained positively buoyant, its crust would have likely begun to erode from surface processes, and subsequently recycled back into the mantle over time as sediment and altered crust, once a subduction mechanism arose. The Nd and Hf isotopic compositions of Earth’s earliest rocks support the idea that an early-formed ITE-enriched reservoir was produced. The maxima in 142Nd/144Nd for 3.85 to 3.64 Ga rocks from Isua, Greenland decreases from +20 ppm to +12 ppm relative to the present day mantle value, respectively [3]. This indicates mixing of an early-formed ITE enriched reservoir back into the convecting mantle. In addition, zircons from the 3.1 Ga Jack Hills conglomerate indicate that material with an enriched 176Lu/177Hf of ~0.02 and an age of 4.4 Ga or greater was present at the Earth’s surface over the first 2 Ga of Earth history, supporting the scenario of a positively buoyant

  6. Development of the Work Intention Inventory Short-Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimon, Kim; Zigarmi, Drea

    2015-01-01

    The Work Intention Inventory (WII: Zigarmi, Nimon, Houson, Witt, & Diehl, 2012) was designed to assess five measures of work intention. Measuring employee intentions is important to consider when evaluating outcomes associated with employee engagement or work passion as research indicates intentions are strong predictors of behavior. Following…

  7. A simple, high-throughput modeling approach reveals insights into the mechanism of gametophytic self-incompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Ashkani, Jahanshah; Rees, D. J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Specificity in the GSI response results from the S-haplotype-specific molecular interaction of S-locus F-box (SLF/SFB) and SRNase proteins in the self-incompatibility locus (S-locus). The answer to the question of how these two components of the S-locus (SRNase and SLF/SFB) interact has been gathered from several models. Since there is not enough evidence as to which one is the definitive model, none of them can be ruled out. Despite the identification of interacting protein elements, the mechanism by which SLF/SFB and SRNase interact to differently trigger the self-incompatibility among families and subfamilies remain uncertain. The high-throughput modeling approach demonstrates structural visions into the possible existence of a Collaborative Non-Self Recognition model in apple. These findings postulate several prospects for future investigation providing useful information to guide the implementation of breeding strategies. PMID:27721467

  8. Distinct effects of pollinator dependence and self-incompatibility on pollen limitation in South African biodiversity hotspots.

    PubMed

    Rodger, James G; Ellis, Allan G

    2016-06-01

    Global synthesis indicates that limitation of plant fecundity by pollen receipt (pollen limitation) is positively related to regional plant diversity and is higher for self-incompatible than self-compatible species. While self-incompatible species are always dependent on pollinating agents, self-compatible species may be pollinator-dependent or autofertile. This should cause variation in pollen limitation among self-compatible species, with lower pollen limitation in autofertile species because they do not depend on pollinators. We hypothesized that the intensity of pollen limitation in self-incompatible compared with pollinator-dependent self-compatible species should depend on whether pollen limitation is determined more by quantity than quality of pollen received. We compared pollen limitation between these three groups using a dataset of 70 biotically pollinated species from biodiverse regions of South Africa. Comparison with a global dataset indicated that pollen limitation in the South African biodiversity hotspots was generally comparable to other regions, despite expectations of higher pollen limitation based on the global plant diversity-pollen limitation relationship. Pollen limitation was lowest for autofertile species, as expected. It was also higher for pollinator-dependent self-compatible species than self-incompatible species, consistent with increased pollen-quality limitation in the former group due to negative consequences of pollinator-mediated self-pollination. However, there was a higher frequency of plants with zygomorphic flowers, which were also more pollen-limited, among pollinator-dependent self-compatible species. Thus, we could not attribute this difference in pollen limitation exclusively to a difference in pollen quality. Nevertheless, our results indicate that comparative studies should control for both pollinator dependence and self-incompatiblity when evaluating effects of other factors on pollen limitation. PMID:27277954

  9. Early plasmapheresis followed by high-dose γ-globulin treatment saved a severely Rho-incompatible pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Isojima, Sakiko; Hisano, Michi; Suzuki, Teruaki; Sago, Haruhiko; Murashima, Atsuko; Yamaguchi, Koushi

    2011-01-01

    An alloimmunized pregnancy induces anemia in the fetus and can ultimately lead to fetal hydrops and intrauterine fetal death. A woman with a severe Rho-incompatible pregnancy had experienced frequent pregnancies with fetomaternal transfusion without receiving RhIg and had high anti-D antibody titers present from early pregnancy. We succeeded in long-term inhibition of antibody production using plasmapheresis followed by high-dose γ-globulin treatment in early pregnancy.

  10. Current trends in platelet transfusions practice: The role of ABO-RhD and human leukocyte antigen incompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Valsami, Serena; Dimitroulis, Dimitrios; Gialeraki, Argyri; Chimonidou, Maria; Politou, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusions have contributed to the revolutionary modern treatment of hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. Despite the long-term application of platelet transfusion in therapeutics, all aspects of their optimal use (i.e., in cases of ABO and/or Rh (D incompatibility) have not been definitively determined yet. We reviewed the available data on transfusion practices and outcome in ABO and RhD incompatibility and platelet refractoriness due to anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. Transfusion of platelets with major ABO-incompatibility is related to reduced posttransfusion platelet (PLT) count increments, compared to ABO-identical and minor, but still are equally effective in preventing clinical bleeding. ABO-minor incompatible transfusions pose the risk of an acute hemolytic reaction of the recipient that is not always related to high anti-A, B donor titers. ABO-identical PLT transfusion seems to be the most effective and safest therapeutic strategy. Exclusive ABO-identical platelet transfusion policy could be feasible, but alternative approaches could facilitate platelet inventory management. Transfusion of platelets from RhD positive donors to RhD negative patients is considered to be effective and safe though is associated with low rate of anti-D alloimmunization due to contaminating red blood cells. The prevention of D alloimmunization is recommended only for women of childbearing age. HLA alloimmunization is a major cause of platelet refractoriness. Managing patients with refractoriness with cross-matched or HLA-matched platelets is the current practice although data are still lacking for the efficacy of this practice in terms of clinical outcome. Leukoreduction contributes to the reduction of both HLA and anti-D alloimmunization. PMID:26420927

  11. Campus sustainable food projects: critique and engagement.

    PubMed

    Barlett, Peggy F

    2011-01-01

    Campus sustainable food projects recently have expanded rapidly. A review of four components - purchasing goals, academic programs, direct marketing, and experiential learning - shows both intent and capacity to contribute to transformational change toward an alternative food system. The published rationales for campus projects and specific purchasing guidelines join curricular and cocurricular activities to evaluate, disseminate, and legitimize environmental, economic, social justice, and health concerns about conventional food. Emerging new metrics of food service practices mark a potential shift from rhetoric to market clout, and experiential learning builds new coalitions and can reshape relations with food and place. Campus projects are relatively new and their resilience is not assured, but leading projects have had regional, state, and national impact. The emergence of sustainability rankings in higher education and contract-based compliance around purchasing goals suggests that if support continues, higher education's leadership can extend to the broader agrifood system.

  12. Campus sustainable food projects: critique and engagement.

    PubMed

    Barlett, Peggy F

    2011-01-01

    Campus sustainable food projects recently have expanded rapidly. A review of four components - purchasing goals, academic programs, direct marketing, and experiential learning - shows both intent and capacity to contribute to transformational change toward an alternative food system. The published rationales for campus projects and specific purchasing guidelines join curricular and cocurricular activities to evaluate, disseminate, and legitimize environmental, economic, social justice, and health concerns about conventional food. Emerging new metrics of food service practices mark a potential shift from rhetoric to market clout, and experiential learning builds new coalitions and can reshape relations with food and place. Campus projects are relatively new and their resilience is not assured, but leading projects have had regional, state, and national impact. The emergence of sustainability rankings in higher education and contract-based compliance around purchasing goals suggests that if support continues, higher education's leadership can extend to the broader agrifood system. PMID:21560268

  13. Accumulation of nonfunctional S-haplotypes results in the breakdown of gametophytic self-incompatibility in tetraploid Prunus.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Nathanael R; Yamane, Hisayo; Tao, Ryutaro; Iezzoni, Amy F

    2006-02-01

    The transition from self-incompatibility (SI) to self-compatibility (SC) is regarded as one of the most prevalent transitions in Angiosperm evolution, having profound impacts on the genetic structure of populations. Yet, the identity and function of mutations that result in the breakdown of SI in nature are not well understood. This work provides the first detailed genetic description of the breakdown of S-RNase-mediated gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) in a polyploid species that exhibits genotype-dependent loss of SI. Genetic analyses of six natural sour cherry (Rosaceae, Prunus cerasus) selections identified seven independent, nonfunctional S-haplotypes with disrupted pistil component (stylar-S) and/or pollen component (pollen-S) function. A genetic model demonstrating that the breakdown of SI in sour cherry is due to the accumulation of a minimum of two nonfunctional S-haplotypes within a single individual is developed and validated. Our finding that sour cherry is SI when only one nonfunctional S-haplotype is present has significant evolutionary implications since nonfunctional S-haplotypes would be maintained in the population without causing an abrupt shift to SC. Furthermore, we demonstrate that heteroallelic sour cherry pollen is self-incompatible, which is counter to the well-documented phenomenon in the Solanaceae where SC accompanying polyploidization is frequently due to the SC of heteroallelic pollen. PMID:16219786

  14. Usefulness of SNPs as Supplementary Markers in a Paternity Case with 3 Genetic Incompatibilities at Autosomal and Y Chromosomal Loci

    PubMed Central

    Lindner, Iris; von Wurmb-Schwark, Nicole; Meier, Patrick; Fimmers, Rolf; Büttner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background In kinship testing, investigation of 15 short tandem repeats (STRs) usually provides decisive genetic information for resolving relationship cases. However, in complex deficiency cases, in cases with more than 2 mutations at different STR loci or when close (untested) relatives of the alleged father are suggested to be the biological father of the child, STR typing alone may not be sufficient. In these cases, the application of supplementary markers such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is recommended. Methods We describe a paternity case with 3 genetic incompatibilities (Penta D, VWA, and DYS385) between the alleged father and the child after analyzing 23 autosomal and 16 Y chromosomal STR loci. The question arose as to whether the alleged father could be excluded and a related person could be the biological father of the child, or whether the observed genetic incompatibilities were mutations. Interestingly, the 2 excluded full brothers of the alleged father possessed identical genetic incompatibilities at locus VWA and DYS385 as the alleged father. Results and Conclusions Additional performance of a 50-plex SNP assay demonstrated that the observed mismatches were indeed mutations and the alleged father was the biological father of the child. The results show the usefulness of SNPs as supplementary markers in relationship testing when STR analyses show ambiguous results. PMID:24847187

  15. Brownian dynamics simulation study on the self-assembly of incompatible star-like block copolymers in dilute solution.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Zhu, You-Liang; Liu, Hong; Lu, Zhong-Yuan

    2012-04-14

    We study the self-assembly of symmetric star-like block copolymers (A(x))(y)(B(x))(y)C in dilute solution by using Brownian dynamics simulations. In the star-like block copolymer, incompatible A and B components are both solvophobic, and connected to the center bead C of the polymer. Therefore, this star-like block copolymer can be taken as a representative of soft and deformable Janus particles. In our Brownian dynamics simulations, these "soft Janus particles" are found to self-assemble into worm-like lamellar structures, loose aggregates and so on. By systematically varying solvent conditions and temperature, we build up the phase diagram to illustrate the effects of polymer structure and temperature on the aggregate structures. At lower temperatures, we can observe large worm-like lamellar aggregates. Upon increasing the temperature, some block copolymers detach from the aggregate; this phenomenon is especially sensitive for the polymers with less arms. The aggregate structure will be quite disordered when the temperature is high. The incompatibility between the two parts in the star-like block copolymer also affects the self-assembled structures. We find that the worm-like structure is longer and narrower as the incompatibility between the two parts is stronger. PMID:22395808

  16. Quantitative and Microscopic Assessment of Compatible and Incompatible Interactions between Chickpea Cultivars and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceris Races

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Fernández, Daniel; Landa, Blanca B.; Kang, Seogchan; Jiménez-Díaz, Rafael M.; Navas-Cortés, Juan A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Fusarium wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceris, a main threat to global chickpea production, is managed mainly by resistant cultivars whose efficiency is curtailed by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceris races. Methodology We characterized compatible and incompatible interactions by assessing the spatial-temporal pattern of infection and colonization of chickpea cvs. P-2245, JG-62 and WR-315 by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceris races 0 and 5 labeled with ZsGreen fluorescent protein using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Findings The two races colonized the host root surface in both interactions with preferential colonization of the root apex and subapical root zone. In compatible interactions, the pathogen grew intercellularly in the root cortex, reached the xylem, and progressed upwards in the stem xylem, being the rate and intensity of stem colonization directly related with the degree of compatibility among Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceris races and chickpea cultivars. In incompatible interactions, race 0 invaded and colonized ‘JG-62’ xylem vessels of root and stem but in ‘WR-315’, it remained in the intercellular spaces of the root cortex failing to reach the xylem, whereas race 5 progressed up to the hypocotyl. However, all incompatible interactions were asymptomatic. Conclusions The differential patterns of colonization of chickpea cultivars by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. ciceris races may be related to the operation of multiple resistance mechanisms. PMID:23613839

  17. Nuclear-mitochondrial incompatibility in interorder rhesus monkey-cow embryos derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Daekee; Koo, Ok-Jae; Kim, Min-Jung; Jang, Goo; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2016-10-01

    Monkey interorder somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) using enucleated cow oocytes yielded poor blastocysts development and contradictory results among research groups. Determining the reason for this low blastocyst development is a prerequisite for optimizing iSCNT in rhesus monkeys. The aim of this study was to elucidate nuclear-mitochondrial incompatibility of rhesus monkey-cow iSCNT embryos and its relationship to low blastocyst development. Cytochrome b is a protein of complex III of the electron transport chain (ETC). According to meta-analysis of amino acid sequences, the homology of cytochrome b is 75 % between rhesus monkeys and cattle. To maintain the function of ETC after iSCNT, 4n iSCNT embryos were produced by fusion of non-enucleated cow oocytes and rhesus monkey somatic cells. The blastocyst development rate of 4n iSCNT embryos was higher than that of 2n embryos (P < 0.01). Formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an indirect indicator of ETC activity of cells. The ROS levels of 4n iSCNT embryos was higher than that of 2n embryos (P < 0.01). Collectively, rhesus monkey iSCNT embryos reconstructed with cow oocytes have nuclear-mitochondrial incompatibility due to fundamental species differences between rhesus monkeys and cattle. Nuclear-mitochondrial incompatibility seems to correlate with low ETC activity and extremely low blastocyst development of rhesus monkey-cow iSCNT embryos.

  18. Health and sustainability.

    PubMed

    Kjӕrgård, Bente; Land, Birgit; Bransholm Pedersen, Kirsten

    2014-09-01

    In the present article, we explore how sustainable development strategies and health promotion strategies can be bridged. The concept of the 'duality of structure' is taken as our starting point for understanding the linkages between health promotion and sustainable development, and for uncovering the structural properties or conditions which either enable or constrain sustainable public health initiatives. We argue that strategies towards health promotion are not sufficiently integrated with strategies for sustainable development, and thus political strategies aimed at solving health problems or sustainability problems may cause new, undesired and unforeseen environmental or health problems. First, we explore how the relation between health and sustainability is articulated in international policy documents. Next, we develop a model for understanding the relation between health promotion and sustainability. Third, we use examples from agriculture and food production to illustrate that health and sustainability are mutually enabling and constraining. We conclude that while the renewed focus on food security and food inequalities has brought the health and sustainability dimensions of the food system onto the political agenda, the conceptualization of duality between health and sustainability could be a new platform for a critical and theoretical stance towards the market-oriented food system strategy. Thinking along the lines of duality means that the integration of health promotion strategies and sustainable development strategies cannot be based on an approach to integration in which either health or sustainability is given precedence over the other. From a duality perspective, integration means conceiving sustainability from a health perspective and health from a sustainability perspective.

  19. Outcome after Desensitization in HLA or ABO-Incompatible Kidney Transplant Recipients: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Kauke, Teresa; Klimaschewski, Sandra; Schoenermarck, Ulf; Fischereder, Michael; Dick, Andrea; Guba, Markus; Stangl, Manfred; Werner, Jens; Meiser, Bruno; Habicht, Antje

    2016-01-01

    Background The shortage of deceased donors led to an increase of living donor kidney (LDK) transplantations performed in the presence of donor-specific antibodies (DSA) or ABO incompatibility (ABOi) using various desensitization protocols. Methods We herein analyzed 26 ABOi and 8 Luminex positive DSA patients who were successfully desensitized by anti-CD20, antigen-specific immunoadsorption and/or plasmapheresis to receive an LDK transplant. Twenty LDK recipients with non-donor-specific HLA-antibodies (low risk) and 32 without anti-HLA antibodies (no risk) served as control groups. Results 1-year graft survival rate and renal function was similar in all 4 groups (creatinine: 1.63 ± 0.5 vs 1.78 ± 0.6 vs 1.64 ± 0.5 vs 1.6 ± 0.3 mg/dl in ABOi, DSA, low risk and no risk group). The incidence of acute T-cell mediated rejections did not differ between the 4 groups (15% vs 12, 5% vs 15% vs 22% in ABOi, DSA, low risk and no risk), while antibody-mediated rejections were only found in the DSA (25%) and ABOi (7.5%) groups. Incidence of BK nephropathy (BKVN) was significantly more frequent after desensitization as compared to controls (5/34 vs 0/52, p = 0.03). Conclusion We demonstrate favorable short-term allograft outcome in LDK transplant recipients after desensitization. However, the desensitization was associated with an increased risk of BKVN. PMID:26730981

  20. Between- and within-host species selection on cytoplasmic incompatibility-inducing Wolbachia in haplodiploids.

    PubMed

    Vavre, Fabrice; Fouillet, Pierre; Fleury, Frédéric

    2003-02-01

    The most common effect of the endosymbiont Wolbachia is cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI), a form of postzygotic reproductive isolation that occurs in crosses where the male is infected by at least one Wolbachia strain that the female lacks. We revisited two puzzling features of Wolbachia biology: how Wolbachia can invade a new species and spread among populations, and how the association, once established in a host species, can evolve, with emphasis on the possible process of infection loss. These questions are particularly relevant in haplodiploid species, where males develop from unfertilized eggs, and females from fertilized eggs. When CI occurs in such species, fertilized eggs either die (female mortality type: FM), or develop into males (male development type: MD), raising one more question: how transition among CI types is possible. We reached the following conclusions: (1) the FM type is a better invader and should be retained preferentially after a new host is captured; (2) given the assumptions of the models, FM and MD types are selected on neither the bacterial side nor the host side; (3) selective pressures acting on both partners are more or less congruent in the FM type, but divergent in the MD type; (4) host and symbiont evolution can drive infection to extinction for all CI types, but the MD type is more susceptible to the phenomenon; and (5) under realistic conditions, transition from MD to FM type is possible. Finally, all these results suggest that the FM type should be more frequent than the MD type, which is consistent with the results obtained so far in haplodiploids.

  1. Molecular characterization of tol, a mediator of mating-type-associated vegetative incompatibility in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Shiu, P K; Glass, N L

    1999-01-01

    The mating-type locus in the haploid filamentous fungus, Neurospora crassa, controls mating and sexual development. The fusion of reproductive structures of opposite mating type, A and a, is required to initiate sexual reproduction. However, the fusion of hyphae of opposite mating type during vegetative growth results in growth inhibition and cell death, a process that is mediated by the tol locus. Mutations in tol are recessive and suppress mating-type-associated heterokaryon incompatibility. In this study, we describe the cloning and characterization of tol. The tol gene encodes a putative 1011-amino-acid polypeptide with a coiled-coil domain and a leucine-rich repeat. Both regions are required for tol activity. Repeat-induced point mutations in tol result in mutants that are wild type during vegetative growth and sexual reproduction, but that allow opposite mating-type individuals to form a vigorous heterokaryon. Transcript analyses show that tol mRNA is present during vegetative growth but absent during a cross. These data suggest that tol transcription is repressed to allow the coexistence of opposite mating-type nuclei during the sexual reproductive phase. tol is expressed in a mat A, mat a, A/a partial diploid and in a mating-type deletion strain, indicating that MAT A-1 and MAT a-1 are not absolutely required for transcription or repression of tol. These data suggest that TOL may rather interact with MAT A-1 and/or MAT a-1 (or downstream products) to form a death-triggering complex. PMID:9927450

  2. Secondary Evolution of a Self-Incompatibility Locus in the Brassicaceae Genus Leavenworthia

    PubMed Central

    Chantha, Sier-Ching; Herman, Adam C.; Platts, Adrian E.; Vekemans, Xavier; Schoen, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Self-incompatibility (SI) is the flowering plant reproductive system in which self pollen tube growth is inhibited, thereby preventing self-fertilization. SI has evolved independently in several different flowering plant lineages. In all Brassicaceae species in which the molecular basis of SI has been investigated in detail, the product of the S-locus receptor kinase (SRK) gene functions as receptor in the initial step of the self pollen-rejection pathway, while that of the S-locus cysteine-rich (SCR) gene functions as ligand. Here we examine the hypothesis that the S locus in the Brassicaceae genus Leavenworthia is paralogous with the S locus previously characterized in other members of the family. We also test the hypothesis that self-compatibility in this group is based on disruption of the pollen ligand-producing gene. Sequence analysis of the S-locus genes in Leavenworthia, phylogeny of S alleles, gene expression patterns, and comparative genomics analyses provide support for both hypotheses. Of special interest are two genes located in a non-S locus genomic region of Arabidopsis lyrata that exhibit domain structures, sequences, and phylogenetic histories similar to those of the S-locus genes in Leavenworthia, and that also share synteny with these genes. These A. lyrata genes resemble those comprising the A. lyrata S locus, but they do not function in self-recognition. Moreover, they appear to belong to a lineage that diverged from the ancestral Brassicaceae S-locus genes before allelic diversification at the S locus. We hypothesize that there has been neo-functionalization of these S-locus-like genes in the Leavenworthia lineage, resulting in evolution of a separate ligand-receptor system of SI. Our results also provide support for theoretical models that predict that the least constrained pathway to the evolution of self-compatibility is one involving loss of pollen gene function. PMID:23690750

  3. Physiological and genetic analysis of CO2-induced breakdown of self-incompatibility in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Lao, Xintian; Suwabe, Keita; Niikura, Satoshi; Kakita, Mitsuru; Iwano, Megumi; Takayama, Seiji

    2014-03-01

    Self-incompatibility (SI) of the Brassicaceae family can be overcome by CO2 gas treatment. This method has been used for decades as an effective means to obtain a large amount of inbred seeds which can then be used for F1 hybrid seed production; however, the molecular mechanism by which CO2 alters the SI pathway has not been elucidated. In this study, to obtain new insights into the mechanism of CO2-induced SI breakdown, the focus was on two inbred lines of Brassica rapa (syn. campestris) with different CO2 sensitivity. Physiological examination using X-ray microanalysis suggested that SI breakdown in the CO2-sensitive line was accompanied by a significant accumulation of calcium at the pollen-stigma interface. Pre-treatment of pollen or pistil with CO2 gas before pollination showed no effect on the SI reaction, suggesting that some physiological process after pollination is necessary for SI to be overcome. Genetic analyses using F1 progeny of a CO2-sensitive × CO2-insensitive cross suggested that CO2 sensitivity is a semi-dominant trait in these lines. Analysis of F2 progeny suggested that CO2 sensitivity could be a quantitative trait, which is controlled by more than one gene. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses identified two major loci, BrSIO1 and BrSIO2, which work additively in overcoming SI during CO2 treatment. No QTL was detected at the loci previously shown to affect SI stability, suggesting that CO2 sensitivity is determined by novel genes. The QTL data presented here should be useful for determining the responsible genes, and for the marker-assisted selection of desirable parental lines with stable but CO2-sensitive SI in F1 hybrid breeding. PMID:24376255

  4. Explanatory Pluralism and the (Dis)Unity of Science: The Argument from Incompatible Counterfactual Consequences.

    PubMed

    Gijsbers, Victor

    2016-01-01

    What is the relationship between different sciences or research approaches that deal with the same phenomena, for instance, with the phenomena of the human mind? Answers to this question range from a monist perspective according to which one of these approaches is privileged over the others, through an integrationist perspective according to which they must strive to form a unity greater than the sum of its parts, to an isolationist perspective according to which each of them has its own autonomous sphere of validity. In order to assess these perspectives in this article, I discuss the debates about the unity of science and about explanatory pluralism. The most pressing issue turns out to be the choice between the integrative and the isolationist perspective: the question is whether the integrative tendencies in science should be fully indulged in or whether they should be held in check by acknowledging that a certain amount of isolation is necessary. I argue that the issue can be further distilled into the question of whether two true explanations of the same fact can ever fail to be combinable into one single explanation. I show that this can indeed be the case, namely, when the explanations have incompatible counterfactual consequences, something that is often the case when we try to combine explanations from different sciences or research approaches. These approaches thus embody perspectives on the world that are to a certain extent autonomous. This leads to the conclusion that although interdisciplinarity may have many advantages, we should not take the project of integration too far. At the end of the day, the different research approaches with their different perspectives and insights must remain precisely that: different and somewhat disunified.

  5. A field theory of distortion incompatibility for coupled fracture and plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fressengeas, Claude; Taupin, Vincent

    2014-08-01

    The displacement discontinuity arising between the crack surfaces is assigned to smooth areal/tensorial densities of crystal defects referred to as disconnections, through the incompatibility of the continuous distortion tensor. In a dual way, the disconnections are defined as line defects terminating surfaces where the displacement encounters a discontinuity. A conservation argument for their strength (the crack opening displacement) provides a natural framework for their dynamics in the form of a transport law for the disconnection densities. Similar methodology is applied to the discontinuity of the plastic displacement arising from the presence of dislocations in the body, which results in the concurrent involvement of the dislocation density tensor in the analysis. The present model can therefore be viewed as an extension of the mechanics of dislocation fields to the case where continuity of the body is disrupted by cracks. From the continuity of the elastic distortion tensor, it is expected that the stress field remains bounded everywhere in the body, including at the crack tip. Thermodynamic arguments provide the driving forces for disconnection and dislocation motion, and guidance for the formulation of constitutive relationships insuring non-negative dissipation. The conventional Peach-Koehler force on dislocations is retrieved in the analysis, and a Peach-Koehler-type force on disconnections is defined. A threshold in the disconnection driving force vs. disconnection velocity constitutive relationship provides for a Griffith-type fracture criterion. Application of the theory to the slit-crack (Griffith-Inglis crack) in elastic and elasto-plastic solids through finite element modeling shows that it allows recovering earlier results on the stress field around cracks, and that crack propagation can be consistently described by the transport scheme. Shielding/anti-shielding of cracks by dislocations is considered to illustrate the static/dynamic interactions

  6. On the origin of self-incompatibility haplotypes: transition through self-compatible intermediates.

    PubMed Central

    Uyenoyama, M K; Zhang, Y; Newbigin, E

    2001-01-01

    Self-incompatibility (SI) in flowering plants entails the inhibition of fertilization by pollen that express specificities in common with the pistil. In species of the Solanaceae, Rosaceae, and Scrophulariaceae, the inhibiting factor is an extracellular ribonuclease (S-RNase) secreted by stylar tissue. A distinct but as yet unknown gene (provisionally called pollen-S) appears to determine the specific S-RNase from which a pollen tube accepts inhibition. The S-RNase gene and pollen-S segregate with the classically defined S-locus. The origin of a new specificity appears to require, at minimum, mutations in both genes. We explore the conditions under which new specificities may arise from an intermediate state of loss of self-recognition. Our evolutionary analysis of mutations that affect either pistil or pollen specificity indicates that natural selection favors mutations in pollen-S that reduce the set of pistils from which the pollen accepts inhibition and disfavors mutations in the S-RNase gene that cause the nonreciprocal acceptance of pollen specificities. We describe the range of parameters (rate of receipt of self-pollen and relative viability of inbred offspring) that permits the generation of a succession of new specificities. This evolutionary pathway begins with the partial breakdown of SI upon the appearance of a mutation in pollen-S that frees pollen from inhibition by any S-RNase presently in the population and ends with the restoration of SI by a mutation in the S-RNase gene that enables pistils to reject the new pollen type. PMID:11290732

  7. Physiological and genetic analysis of CO2-induced breakdown of self-incompatibility in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Self-incompatibility (SI) of the Brassicaceae family can be overcome by CO2 gas treatment. This method has been used for decades as an effective means to obtain a large amount of inbred seeds which can then be used for F1 hybrid seed production; however, the molecular mechanism by which CO2 alters the SI pathway has not been elucidated. In this study, to obtain new insights into the mechanism of CO2-induced SI breakdown, the focus was on two inbred lines of Brassica rapa (syn. campestris) with different CO2 sensitivity. Physiological examination using X-ray microanalysis suggested that SI breakdown in the CO2-sensitive line was accompanied by a significant accumulation of calcium at the pollen–stigma interface. Pre-treatment of pollen or pistil with CO2 gas before pollination showed no effect on the SI reaction, suggesting that some physiological process after pollination is necessary for SI to be overcome. Genetic analyses using F1 progeny of a CO2-sensitive×CO2-insensitive cross suggested that CO2 sensitivity is a semi-dominant trait in these lines. Analysis of F2 progeny suggested that CO2 sensitivity could be a quantitative trait, which is controlled by more than one gene. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses identified two major loci, BrSIO1 and BrSIO2, which work additively in overcoming SI during CO2 treatment. No QTL was detected at the loci previously shown to affect SI stability, suggesting that CO2 sensitivity is determined by novel genes. The QTL data presented here should be useful for determining the responsible genes, and for the marker-assisted selection of desirable parental lines with stable but CO2-sensitive SI in F1 hybrid breeding. PMID:24376255

  8. Comparative Genomics Suggests an Independent Origin of Cytoplasmic Incompatibility in Cardinium hertigii

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Suzanne E.; Cass, Bodil N.; Müller, Anneliese; Woyke, Tanja; Malfatti, Stephanie A.; Hunter, Martha S.; Horn, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Terrestrial arthropods are commonly infected with maternally inherited bacterial symbionts that cause cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI). In CI, the outcome of crosses between symbiont-infected males and uninfected females is reproductive failure, increasing the relative fitness of infected females and leading to spread of the symbiont in the host population. CI symbionts have profound impacts on host genetic structure and ecology and may lead to speciation and the rapid evolution of sex determination systems. Cardinium hertigii, a member of the Bacteroidetes and symbiont of the parasitic wasp Encarsia pergandiella, is the only known bacterium other than the Alphaproteobacteria Wolbachia to cause CI. Here we report the genome sequence of Cardinium hertigii cEper1. Comparison with the genomes of CI–inducing Wolbachia pipientis strains wMel, wRi, and wPip provides a unique opportunity to pinpoint shared proteins mediating host cell interaction, including some candidate proteins for CI that have not previously been investigated. The genome of Cardinium lacks all major biosynthetic pathways but harbors a complete biotin biosynthesis pathway, suggesting a potential role for Cardinium in host nutrition. Cardinium lacks known protein secretion systems but encodes a putative phage-derived secretion system distantly related to the antifeeding prophage of the entomopathogen Serratia entomophila. Lastly, while Cardinium and Wolbachia genomes show only a functional overlap of proteins, they show no evidence of laterally transferred elements that would suggest common ancestry of CI in both lineages. Instead, comparative genomics suggests an independent evolution of CI in Cardinium and Wolbachia and provides a novel context for understanding the mechanistic basis of CI. PMID:23133394

  9. Incompatibilities of lornoxicam with 4 antiemetic medications in polyolefin bags during simulated intravenous administration

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Bao-xia; Li, Peng; Shi, Xiao-ya; Chen, Fu-chao; Wang, Lin-hai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The administration of drugs by patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) is routinely practiced for the management of postoperative pain. It is common for 2 or more drugs to be combined in PCA solutions. The combination of analgesics and antiemetic agents is frequently required. Unfortunately, the compatibility and stability of lornoxicam and antiemetic agents, such as droperidol, ondansetrone, granisetron, and tropisetron, has not been determined. The aim of this study was to evaluate the compatibility and stability of solutions containing lornoxicam with the 4 antiemetic agents in combination for PCA administration. In our study, test samples were prepared in triplicate by adding 40 mg lornoxicam and 5 mg droperidol, 8 mg ondansetron, 6 mg granisetron, or 5 mg tropisetron to 100-mL polyolefin bags of sodium chloride 0.9% and stored at 25 °C. The analgesic mixture samples were visually inspected for precipitation, cloudiness, and discoloration at each sampling interval. Drug concentrations were determined using high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis. No loss of lornoxicam occurred with any of the 4 antiemetic agents tested for up to 48 hours. However, the contents of droperidol, ondansetron, granisetron, and tropisetron were significant loss >48 hours. After storage of 4.0 to 48.0 hours, the presence of a slight precipitate was observed in all the injection combinations. The results indicate that combinations of lornoxicam with droperidol, ondansetrone, granisetron, or tropisetron in infusion solution during simulated intravenous PCA administration were incompatibility when stored protected from light at 25 °C. PMID:27336868

  10. Physiological and genetic analysis of CO2-induced breakdown of self-incompatibility in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Lao, Xintian; Suwabe, Keita; Niikura, Satoshi; Kakita, Mitsuru; Iwano, Megumi; Takayama, Seiji

    2014-03-01

    Self-incompatibility (SI) of the Brassicaceae family can be overcome by CO2 gas treatment. This method has been used for decades as an effective means to obtain a large amount of inbred seeds which can then be used for F1 hybrid seed production; however, the molecular mechanism by which CO2 alters the SI pathway has not been elucidated. In this study, to obtain new insights into the mechanism of CO2-induced SI breakdown, the focus was on two inbred lines of Brassica rapa (syn. campestris) with different CO2 sensitivity. Physiological examination using X-ray microanalysis suggested that SI breakdown in the CO2-sensitive line was accompanied by a significant accumulation of calcium at the pollen-stigma interface. Pre-treatment of pollen or pistil with CO2 gas before pollination showed no effect on the SI reaction, suggesting that some physiological process after pollination is necessary for SI to be overcome. Genetic analyses using F1 progeny of a CO2-sensitive × CO2-insensitive cross suggested that CO2 sensitivity is a semi-dominant trait in these lines. Analysis of F2 progeny suggested that CO2 sensitivity could be a quantitative trait, which is controlled by more than one gene. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses identified two major loci, BrSIO1 and BrSIO2, which work additively in overcoming SI during CO2 treatment. No QTL was detected at the loci previously shown to affect SI stability, suggesting that CO2 sensitivity is determined by novel genes. The QTL data presented here should be useful for determining the responsible genes, and for the marker-assisted selection of desirable parental lines with stable but CO2-sensitive SI in F1 hybrid breeding.

  11. Effects of incompatible boundary information in EIT on the convergence behavior of an iterative algorithm.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mengxing; Wang, Wei; Wheeler, James; McCormick, Malcolm; Dong, Xiuzhen

    2002-06-01

    In electrical impedance tomography, currents are applied to the body through electrodes that are attached to the surface and the corresponding surface voltages are measured. Based on these boundary measurements, the internal admittivity distribution of the body can be reconstructed. In order to improve the image quality it is necessary and useful to apply physiologically meaningful prior information into the image reconstruction. Such prior information usually can be obtained from other sources. For example, information on the object's boundary shape and internal structure can be obtained from computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scan. However, this type of prior information may change from time to time and from person to person. As these changes are limited anatomically and physiologically, the prior information including the possible changes can be presented in a number of variational forms. The aim of this paper is to find which form of prior information is more compatible for a specific imaged object at the time of imaging. This paper proposes a new method for selecting the most appropriate form of prior information, through the procedure of iterative image reconstruction by using the information obtained from boundary measurements. The method is based on the principle that incompatible prior information causes errors which are able to affect the image reconstruction's convergence behavior. In this method, according to the various forms of prior information available, several image reconstruction configurations are designed. Then, through monitoring the convergence behavior in an iterative image reconstruction, the configuration with compatible prior information can be found among those different configurations. As an example, the prior information regarding the imaged object's boundary shape and internal structure was studied by computer simulation. Results were shown and discussed.

  12. Caenorhabditis briggsae Recombinant Inbred Line Genotypes Reveal Inter-Strain Incompatibility and the Evolution of Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Joseph A.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Staisch, Julia E.; Chamberlin, Helen M.; Gupta, Bhagwati P.; Baird, Scott E.; Haag, Eric S.

    2011-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis briggsae is an emerging model organism that allows evolutionary comparisons with C. elegans and exploration of its own unique biological attributes. To produce a high-resolution C. briggsae recombination map, recombinant inbred lines were generated from reciprocal crosses between two strains and genotyped at over 1,000 loci. A second set of recombinant inbred lines involving a third strain was also genotyped at lower resolution. The resulting recombination maps exhibit discrete domains of high and low recombination, as in C. elegans, indicating these are a general feature of Caenorhabditis species. The proportion of a chromosome's physical size occupied by the central, low-recombination domain is highly correlated between species. However, the C. briggsae intra-species comparison reveals striking variation in the distribution of recombination between domains. Hybrid lines made with the more divergent pair of strains also exhibit pervasive marker transmission ratio distortion, evidence of selection acting on hybrid genotypes. The strongest effect, on chromosome III, is explained by a developmental delay phenotype exhibited by some hybrid F2 animals. In addition, on chromosomes IV and V, cross direction-specific biases towards one parental genotype suggest the existence of cytonuclear epistatic interactions. These interactions are discussed in relation to surprising mitochondrial genome polymorphism in C. briggsae, evidence that the two strains diverged in allopatry, the potential for local adaptation, and the evolution of Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities. The genetic and genomic resources resulting from this work will support future efforts to understand inter-strain divergence as well as facilitate studies of gene function, natural variation, and the evolution of recombination in Caenorhabditis nematodes. PMID:21779179

  13. Explanatory Pluralism and the (Dis)Unity of Science: The Argument from Incompatible Counterfactual Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Gijsbers, Victor

    2016-01-01

    What is the relationship between different sciences or research approaches that deal with the same phenomena, for instance, with the phenomena of the human mind? Answers to this question range from a monist perspective according to which one of these approaches is privileged over the others, through an integrationist perspective according to which they must strive to form a unity greater than the sum of its parts, to an isolationist perspective according to which each of them has its own autonomous sphere of validity. In order to assess these perspectives in this article, I discuss the debates about the unity of science and about explanatory pluralism. The most pressing issue turns out to be the choice between the integrative and the isolationist perspective: the question is whether the integrative tendencies in science should be fully indulged in or whether they should be held in check by acknowledging that a certain amount of isolation is necessary. I argue that the issue can be further distilled into the question of whether two true explanations of the same fact can ever fail to be combinable into one single explanation. I show that this can indeed be the case, namely, when the explanations have incompatible counterfactual consequences, something that is often the case when we try to combine explanations from different sciences or research approaches. These approaches thus embody perspectives on the world that are to a certain extent autonomous. This leads to the conclusion that although interdisciplinarity may have many advantages, we should not take the project of integration too far. At the end of the day, the different research approaches with their different perspectives and insights must remain precisely that: different and somewhat disunified. PMID:27014099

  14. Deep venous thrombosis: The valve cusp hypoxia thesis and its incompatibility with modern orthodoxy.

    PubMed

    Malone, P Colm; Agutter, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    The valve cusp hypoxia thesis (VCHT) of the aetiology of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) was adumbrated in this journal in 1977 and fully articulated in 2008, the original hypothesis having been strongly corroborated by experiments published in 1981 and 1984. It presents a unitary account of the pathogenesis of venous thrombosis and embolism that is rooted in the pathophysiological tradition of Hunter, Virchow, Lister, Welch and Aschoff, a tradition traceable back to Harvey. In this paper we summarise the thesis in its mature form, consider its compatibility with recent advances in the DVT field, and ask why it has not yet been assimilated into the mainstream literature, which during the past half century has been dominated by a haematology-orientated 'consensus model'. We identify and discuss seven ways in which the VCHT is incompatible with these mainstream beliefs about the aetiology of venous thrombosis, drawing attention to: (1) the spurious nature of 'Virchow's triad'; (2) the crucial differences between 'venous thrombus' and 'clot'; the facts that (3) venous thrombi form in the valve pockets (VVPs), (4) DVT is not a primarily haematological condition, (5) the so-called 'thrombophilias' are not thrombogenic per se; (6) the conflict between the single unitary aetiology of DVT and the tacit assumption that the condition is 'multicausal'; (7) the inability of anticoagulants to prevent the initiation of venous thrombogenesis, though they do prevent the growth of thrombi to clinically significant size. In discussing point (7), we show that the VCHT indicates new approaches to mechanical prophylaxis against DVT. These approaches are then formulated as experimentally testable hypotheses, and we suggest methods for testing them preclinically using animal trials. PMID:26804599

  15. Inbreeding depression in Solanum carolinense (Solanaceae), a species with a plastic self-incompatibility response

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Solanum carolinense (horsenettle) is a highly successful weed with a gametophytic self-incompatibility (SI) system. Previous studies reveal that the strength of SI in S. carolinense is a plastic trait, associated with particular S-alleles. The importance of this variation in self-fertility on the ability of horsenettle to found and establish new populations will depend, to a large extent, on the magnitude of inbreeding depression. We performed a series of greenhouse and field experiments to determine the magnitude of inbreeding depression in S. carolinense, whether inbreeding depression varies by family, and whether the estimates of inbreeding depression vary under field and greenhouse conditions. We performed a series of controlled self- and cross-pollinations on 16 genets collected from a large population in Pennsylvania to obtain progeny with different levels of inbreeding. We grew the selfed and outcrossed progeny in the greenhouse and under field conditions and recorded various measures of growth and reproductive output. Results In the greenhouse study we found (1) a reduction in flower, fruit and seed production per fruit in inbred (selfed) progeny when compared to outbred (outcrossed) progeny; (2) a reduction in growth of resprouts obtained from rhizome cuttings of selfed progeny; and (3) an increase in the ability to self-fertilize in the selfed progeny. In the field, we found that (1) outcrossed progeny produced more leaves than their selfed siblings; (2) herbivory seems to add little to inbreeding depression; and (3) outcrossed plants grew faster and were able to set more fruits than selfed plants. Conclusion Solanum carolinense experiences low levels of inbreeding depression under greenhouse conditions and slightly more inbreeding depression under our field conditions. The combined effects of low levels of inbreeding depression and plasticity in the strength of SI suggest that the production of selfed progeny may play an important role in the

  16. Explaining the face-inversion effect: the face-scheme incompatibility (FSI) model.

    PubMed

    Rakover, Sam S

    2013-08-01

    The face-inversion effect (FIE) can be viewed as being based on two kinds of findings. According to the face(UI) effect, perception and recognition are better for faces presented upright (U) than for faces presented inverted (I). According to the face/object(UI) effect, inversion impairs the processing of faces more than the processing of nonfacial objects (e.g., buildings or cars). Part I of this article focuses on the face(UI) effect and the configural-processing hypothesis, which is considered the most popular explanatory hypothesis of the FIE. In this hypothesis, it is proposed that inversion impairs the processing of configural information (the spatial relations between features) but hardly (if at all) impairs the processing of featural information (e.g., eyes, nose, and mouth). Part II of the article starts from the conclusion reached in part I, that the configural-processing hypothesis has not succeeded in explaining a substantial number of the findings and in resolving certain theoretical problems. The part then goes on to outline a new alternative model, the face-scheme incompatibility (FSI) model, which contends with these theoretical problems, accounts for the configural-processing hypothesis, succeeds in explaining a considerable portion of the empirical findings related to the face(UI) effect, and proposes a relatively new research program on the concept of the face scheme. The basic assumption of the FSI model is that schemes and prototypes are involved in processing a visual stimulus of a face and in transforming it to a "meaning-bearing" face, and that different schemes are involved if the face is presented upright or inverted. PMID:23381811

  17. Post column derivatisation analyses review. Is post-column derivatisation incompatible with modern HPLC columns?

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew; Pravadali-Cekic, Sercan; Dennis, Gary R; Shalliker, R Andrew

    2015-08-19

    Post Column derivatisation (PCD) coupled with high performance liquid chromatography or ultra-high performance liquid chromatography is a powerful tool in the modern analytical laboratory, or at least it should be. One drawback with PCD techniques is the extra post-column dead volume due to reaction coils used to enable adequate reaction time and the mixing of reagents which causes peak broadening, hence a loss of separation power. This loss of efficiency is counter-productive to modern HPLC technologies, -such as UHPLC. We reviewed 87 PCD methods published from 2009 to 2014. We restricted our review to methods published between 2009 and 2014, because we were interested in the uptake of PCD methods in UHPLC environments. Our review focused on a range of system parameters including: column dimensions, stationary phase and particle size, as well as the geometry of the reaction loop. The most commonly used column in the methods investigated was not in fact a modern UHPLC version with sub-2-micron, (or even sub-3-micron) particles, but rather, work-house columns, such as, 250 × 4.6 mm i.d. columns packed with 5 μm C18 particles. Reaction loops were varied, even within the same type of analysis, but the majority of methods employed loop systems with volumes greater than 500 μL. A second part of this review illustrated briefly the effect of dead volume on column performance. The experiment evaluated the change in resolution and separation efficiency of some weak to moderately retained solutes on a 250 × 4.6 mm i.d. column packed with 5 μm particles. The data showed that reaction loops beyond 100 μL resulted in a very serious loss of performance. Our study concluded that practitioners of PCD methods largely avoid the use of UHPLC-type column formats, so yes, very much, PCD is incompatible with the modern HPLC column. PMID:26343427

  18. Deep venous thrombosis: The valve cusp hypoxia thesis and its incompatibility with modern orthodoxy.

    PubMed

    Malone, P Colm; Agutter, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    The valve cusp hypoxia thesis (VCHT) of the aetiology of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) was adumbrated in this journal in 1977 and fully articulated in 2008, the original hypothesis having been strongly corroborated by experiments published in 1981 and 1984. It presents a unitary account of the pathogenesis of venous thrombosis and embolism that is rooted in the pathophysiological tradition of Hunter, Virchow, Lister, Welch and Aschoff, a tradition traceable back to Harvey. In this paper we summarise the thesis in its mature form, consider its compatibility with recent advances in the DVT field, and ask why it has not yet been assimilated into the mainstream literature, which during the past half century has been dominated by a haematology-orientated 'consensus model'. We identify and discuss seven ways in which the VCHT is incompatible with these mainstream beliefs about the aetiology of venous thrombosis, drawing attention to: (1) the spurious nature of 'Virchow's triad'; (2) the crucial differences between 'venous thrombus' and 'clot'; the facts that (3) venous thrombi form in the valve pockets (VVPs), (4) DVT is not a primarily haematological condition, (5) the so-called 'thrombophilias' are not thrombogenic per se; (6) the conflict between the single unitary aetiology of DVT and the tacit assumption that the condition is 'multicausal'; (7) the inability of anticoagulants to prevent the initiation of venous thrombogenesis, though they do prevent the growth of thrombi to clinically significant size. In discussing point (7), we show that the VCHT indicates new approaches to mechanical prophylaxis against DVT. These approaches are then formulated as experimentally testable hypotheses, and we suggest methods for testing them preclinically using animal trials.

  19. Sustaining Rural Communities through Sustainable Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikerd, John

    A 5-year collaborative project between Missouri, Michigan State, and Nebraska Universities to provide new opportunities for rural community self-development through sustainable agriculture had mixed results. This happened because community members did not understand the principles of sustainability, and because the extension education system was…

  20. The Road to Sustainability. Sustainability Workbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Alliance, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Sustainability seems generally thought to mean raising money. But money is only part of the equation. Money cannot be raised without a quality program, a quality program demonstrates results, effective results are based on sound management practices, etc. Sustainability therefore, is many things that in combination make something capable of…