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Sample records for swarms field experiment

  1. Swarm: ESA's Magnetic Field Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drinkwater, M. R.; Haagmans, R.; Floberghagen, R.; Plank, G.; Menard, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Swarm is the fifth Earth Explorer mission in ESA's Living Planet Programme, and is scheduled for launch in 2012. The objective of the Swarm mission is to provide the best-ever survey of the geomagnetic field and its temporal evolution using a constellation of 3 identical satellites. The Mission shall deliver data that allow access to new insights into the Earth system by improved scientific understanding of the Earth's interior and near-Earth electromagnetic environment. After launch and triple satellite release at an initial altitude of about 490 km, a pair of the satellites will fly side-by-side with slowly decaying altitude, while the third satellite will be lifted to 530 km to complete the Swarm constellation. High-precision and high-resolution measurements of the strength, direction and variation of the magnetic field, complemented by precise navigation, accelerometer and electric field measurements, will provide the observations required to separate and model various sources of the geomagnetic field and near-Earth current systems. The mission science goals are to provide a unique view into Earth core dynamics, mantle conductivity, crustal magnetisation, ionospheric and magnetospheric current systems and upper atmosphere dynamics - ranging from understanding the geodynamo to contributing to space weather. The scientific objectives and results from recent scientific studies will be presented. In addition the current status of the project, which is presently approaching the final stage of the development phase, will be addressed. A consortium of European scientific institutes is developing a distributed processing system to produce geophysical (Level 2) data products to the Swarm user community. The setup of Swarm ground segment and the contents of the data products will be addressed. More information on the Swarm mission can be found at the mission web site (see URL below).

  2. The Swarm Initial Field Model for the 2014 Geomagnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Nils; Hulot, Gauthier; Lesur, Vincent; Finlay, Christopher C.; Beggan, Ciaran; Chulliat, Arnaud; Sabaka, Terence J.; Floberghagen, Rune; Friis-Christensen, Eigil; Haagmans, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Data from the first year of ESA's Swarm constellation mission are used to derive the Swarm Initial Field Model (SIFM), a new model of the Earth's magnetic field and its time variation. In addition to the conventional magnetic field observations provided by each of the three Swarm satellites, explicit advantage is taken of the constellation aspect by including east-west magnetic intensity gradient information from the lower satellite pair. Along-track differences in magnetic intensity provide further information concerning the north-south gradient. The SIFM static field shows excellent agreement (up to at least degree 60) with recent field models derived from CHAMP data, providing an initial validation of the quality of the Swarm magnetic measurements. Use of gradient data improves the determination of both the static field and its secular variation, with the mean misfit for east-west intensity differences between the lower satellite pair being only 0.12 nT.

  3. Ionospheric field modeling from Swarm satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chulliat, A.; Vigneron, P.; Hulot, G.

    2015-12-01

    Data based modeling of the magnetic field originating in the Earth's ionosphere is challenging due to the multiple time scales involved and the small spatial scales of some of the current systems, especially the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) that flows along the magnetic dip-equator. We developed and algorithm, the Dedicated Ionospheric Field Inversion (DIFI) chain, that inverts a combination of Swarm satellite and ground observatory data at mid- to low-latitudes and provides models of the solar-quiet (Sq) and EEJ magnetic fields on the ground and at satellite altitude. The basis functions of these models are spherical harmonics in quasi-dipole coordinates and Fourier series describing the 24h, 12h, 8h and 6h periodicies, as well as the annual and semi-annual variations. A 1-D conductivity model of the Earth and a 2-D conductivity model of the oceans and continents are used to separate the primary ionospheric field from its induced counterpart. In this presentation we'll report on various models obtained using the DIFI algorithm from the most recent Swarm data available. In particular, we'll focus on how these models compare to earlier models such as CM4 derived from previous satellite missions, and to independent ground data not used in the inversion. We'll also address the question of the magnitude of the Sq field on the night-side, which is of practical interest to the core field modeling community, as was apparent during the preparation of the last IGRF.

  4. Gravity field models derived from Swarm GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira da Encarnação, João; Arnold, Daniel; Bezděk, Aleš; Dahle, Christoph; Doornbos, Eelco; van den IJssel, Jose; Jäggi, Adrian; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten; Sebera, Josef; Visser, Pieter; Zehentner, Norbert

    2016-07-01

    It is of great interest to numerous geophysical studies that the time series of global gravity field models derived from Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data remains uninterrupted after the end of this mission. With this in mind, some institutes have been spending efforts to estimate gravity field models from alternative sources of gravimetric data. This study focuses on the gravity field solutions estimated from Swarm global positioning system (GPS) data, produced by the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern, the Astronomical Institute (ASU, Czech Academy of Sciences) and Institute of Geodesy (IfG, Graz University of Technology). The three sets of solutions are based on different approaches, namely the celestial mechanics approach, the acceleration approach and the short-arc approach, respectively. We derive the maximum spatial resolution of the time-varying gravity signal in the Swarm gravity field models to be degree 12, in comparison with the more accurate models obtained from K-band ranging data of GRACE. We demonstrate that the combination of the GPS-driven models produced with the three different approaches improves the accuracy in all analysed monthly solutions, with respect to any of them. In other words, the combined gravity field model consistently benefits from the individual strengths of each separate solution. The improved accuracy of the combined model is expected to bring benefits to the geophysical studies during the period when no dedicated gravimetric mission is operational.

  5. Swarm field dynamics and functional morphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Millonas, M.M. Santa Fe Inst., NM )

    1993-01-01

    A class of models with application to swarm behavior as well as many other types of complex systems is studied with an emphasis on analytic techniques and results. Special attention is given to the role played by fluctuations in determining the behavior of such systems. In particular it is suggested that such fluctuations may play an active role, and not just the usual passive one, in the organization of structure in the vicinity of a non-equilibrium phase transition. One model, that of an ant swarm, is analyzed in more detail as an illustration of these ideas.

  6. Swarm field dynamics and functional morphogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Millonas, M.M. |

    1993-02-01

    A class of models with application to swarm behavior as well as many other types of complex systems is studied with an emphasis on analytic techniques and results. Special attention is given to the role played by fluctuations in determining the behavior of such systems. In particular it is suggested that such fluctuations may play an active role, and not just the usual passive one, in the organization of structure in the vicinity of a non-equilibrium phase transition. One model, that of an ant swarm, is analyzed in more detail as an illustration of these ideas.

  7. Core field accelerations from Swarm and ground observatory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsiaros, S.; Finlay, C. C.; Olsen, N.; Gillet, N.; Tøffner-clausen, L.

    2015-12-01

    On sub-decadal timescales the evolution of Earth's core-generated magnetic field is characterized by localized acceleration events, including oscillations. Our observational knowledge of these features, which are an important signature of the dynamics taking place within the core, is however still at a rudimentary stage. In this contribution we describe how observations from the Swarm multi-satellite mission, combined with data from ground observatories, can now be used to study the most recent field accelerations. An updated version of the CHAOS time-dependent geomagnetic field model will be presented, with a focus on details of the selection and incorporation of Swarm data including field gradient estimates. Comparisons between field accelerations observed by Swarm and at ground observatories will be presented. Implications for the strengthening and weakening of the field at specific locations at Earth's surface will be described. Finally, we will discuss the resolution of acceleration events at the core surface and possible underlying core flows.

  8. Interaction field modeling of mini-UAV swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, William W.; Ro, Kapseong; Szu, Harold

    2006-05-01

    A behavior-based, simple interaction model inspired by molecular interaction field depicted by the Lennard-Jones function is examined for the averaged interaction in swarming. The modeled kinematic equation of motion contains only one variable, instead of a multiple state variable dependence a more complete dynamics entails. The model assumes a spatial distribution of the potential associate with the swarm. The model has been applied to examine the formation of swarm and the results are reported. The modeling can be reflected in an equilibrium theory for the operation of a swarm of mini-UAVs pioneered by Szu, where every member serves the mission while exploiting other's loss, resulting in a zero-sum game among the team members.

  9. Swarm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Hugh

    2002-01-01

    Describes an eighth grade art project for which students created bug swarms on scratchboard. Explains that the project also teaches students about design principles, such as balance. Discusses how the students created their drawings. (CMK)

  10. Gravity field models derived from Swarm GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Teixeira da Encarnação, João; Arnold, Daniel; Bezděk, Aleš; Dahle, Christoph; Doornbos, Eelco; van den IJssel, Jose; Jäggi, Adrian; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten; Sebera, Josef; Visser, Pieter; Zehentner, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The GPS instruments on-board the three Earth's Magnetic Field and Environment Explorer (Swarm) satellites provide the opportunity to measure the gravity field model at basin-wide spatial scales. In spite of being a geo-magnetic satellite mission, Swarm's GPS receiver collects highly accurate hl-SST data (van den IJssel et al., 2015), which has been exploited to produce gravity field models at a number of institutes, namely at the Astronomical Institute (ASU) of the Czech Academy of Sciences (Bezděk et al., 2014), the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern (AIUB, Jäggi et al., 2015) and the Institute of Geodesy (IfG) of the Graz University of Technology (Zehentner et al., 2015). With the help of GRACE gravity field models, which are derived from much more accurate ll-SST data, we investigate the best combination strategy for producing a superior model on the basis of the solutions produced by the three institutes, similarly to the approach taken by the European Gravity Service for Improved Emergency Management project (http://egsiem.eu). We demonstrate that the Swarm-derived gravity field models are able to resolve monthly solutions with 1666km spatial resolutions (roughly up to degree 12). We illustrate how these monthly solutions correlate with GRACE-derived monthly solutions, for the period of 2014 - 2015, as well as indicate which geographical areas are measured more or less accurately.

  11. Swarm Observations of Field-Aligned Currents: Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, G.; Chi, P. J.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Stolle, C.; Luhr, H.; Park, J.; Rauberg, J.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we report the results of a few case studies of multi-point magnetic field measurements of field-aligned currents (FACs) from Swarm constellation mission to understand their temporal and spatial characteristics. During the commissioning phase, the three Swarm spacecraft were in an identical polar orbit with a string-of-pearl configuration with small separations. During the science operational phase (since April, 2014), the three spacecraft were placed in slightly different polar orbits: one spacecraft in a higher altitude orbit (507km x 512km) and two side-by-side in lower altitude orbits (459km x 462km). We analyze a few FAC events in both orbital phases and during periods of active geomagnetic conditions. The multi-point observations enable us to examine the FACs' temporal evolution and separate their temporal and spatial variations.

  12. Swarm - providing a new view of the Earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandea, Mioara

    2016-04-01

    Since decades, geomagnetic ground data have been obtained from magnetic observatories and repeat stations, being the main source of information on spatial and temporal variations of the geomagnetic field. Measurements obtained from Oersted, CHAMP and SAC-C satellites provide a new global perspective. The datasets provided by these satellites, over the past decades, have given us the ability to obtain an improved description of the geomagnetic field. With the launch of Swarm constipation in 2013, we were for the first time able to view the Earth's magnetic field variations with an unprecedented accuracy - providing a truly unique window into a large number of key processes within the Earth system, many of which are difficult to fully observe in any other way. Swarm has provided data that are not only critically valuable on their own, but also as an excellent complement to other geophysical data, as gravity data, for example. Here, a review of the history of magnetic mapping from space is given, the realization of the value of measuring the magnetic field by a constellation is underlined, and some key science findings of the mission are highlighted.

  13. Multi-point Magnetic Field Observations of Field-Aligned Currents from Swarm Constellation Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Guan; Chi, Peter; Lühr, Hermann; Gjerloev, Jesper; Stolle, Claudia; Park, Jaeheung; Rauberg, Jan

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we report the results of case studies of multi-point magnetic field measurements of field-aligned currents (FACs) from Swarm constellation mission to understand their temporal characteristics and hemispheric asymmetry. For science operations (since April, 2014), the three spacecraft were placed in slightly different polar orbits: Swarm B spacecraft in a higher altitude orbit (507km x 512km) and Swarm A and C side-by-side in lower altitude orbits (459km x 462km). In the beginning of the science operational phase, the longitudinal separations of the orbital planes were small, and Swarm A/C pair and Swarm B were nearly out of phase in the orbit. This unique orbit configuration provides opportunities to study some new features of FACs. Specifically, the Swarm satellites make multiple crossings of a FAC region within a few hours. Such data enable us to study temporal variations in several time scales, from 1 minute up to about 3 hours. Furthermore, the three satellites make nearly simultaneous observations of FACs in northern and southern hemispheres, which provide us an opportunity to study the hemispheric asymmetry.

  14. A Model of the Earth's Magnetic Field From Two Years of Swarm Satellite Constellation Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, N.; Finlay, C. C.; Kotsiaros, S.

    2015-12-01

    Two years of data from ESA's Swarm constellation mission are used to derive a model of the Earth's magnetic field and its time variation (secular variation). The model describes contributions from the core and lithosphere as well as large-scale contributions from the magnetosphere (and its Earth-induced counterpart). We use data from geomagnetic quiet times and co-estimate the Euler angles describing the rotation between the vector magnetometer instrument frame and the North-East-Center (NEC) frame. In addition to the magnetic field observations provided by each of the three Swarm satellites and alongtrack first differences we include the East-west magnetic gradient information provided by the lower Swarm satellite pair, thereby explicitly taking advantage of the constellation aspect of Swarm. We assess the spatial and temporal model resolution that can be obtained from two years of Swarm satellite data by comparison with other recent models that also include non-Swarm magnetic observations.

  15. First results from the Swarm Dedicated Ionospheric Field Inversion chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chulliat, A.; Vigneron, P.; Hulot, G.

    2016-06-01

    Data-based modeling of the magnetic field originating in the Earth's ionosphere is challenging due to the multiple timescales involved and the small spatial scales of some of the current systems, especially the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) that flows along the magnetic dip equator. The Dedicated Ionospheric Field Inversion (DIFI) algorithm inverts a combination of Swarm satellite and ground observatory data at mid- to low latitudes and provides models of the solar-quiet (Sq) and EEJ magnetic fields on the ground and at satellite altitude. The basis functions of these models are spherical harmonics in quasi-dipole coordinates and Fourier series describing the 24-, 12-, 8- and 6-h periodicities, as well as the annual and semiannual variations. A 1-D conductivity model of the Earth and a 2-D conductivity model of the oceans and continents are used to separate the primary ionospheric field from its induced counterpart. First results from the DIFI algorithm confirm several well-known features of the seasonal variability and westward drift speed of the Sq current systems. They also reveal a peculiar seasonal variability of the Sq field in the Southern hemisphere and a longitudinal variability reminiscent of the EEJ wave-4 structure in the same hemisphere. These observations suggest that the Sq and EEJ currents might be electrically coupled, but only for some seasons and longitudes and more so in the Southern hemisphere than in the Northern hemisphere.

  16. NanoSWARM: A Nano-satellite Mission to Measure Particles and Fields Around the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrick-Bethell, I.

    2015-12-01

    The NanoSWARM mission concept uses a fleet of cubesats around the Moon to address a number of open problems in planetary science: 1) The mechanisms of space weathering, 2) The origins of planetary magnetism, 3) The origins, distributions, and migration processes of surface water on airless bodies, and 4) The physics of small-scale magnetospheres. To accomplish these goals, NanoSWARM targets scientifically rich features on the Moon known as swirls. Swirls are high-albedo features correlated with strong magnetic fields and low surface-water. NanoSWARM cubesats will make the first near-surface (<1 km altitude) measurements of solar wind flux and magnetic fields at swirls. NanoSWARM cubesats will also perform low-altitude neutron measurements to provide key constraints on the distribution of polar hydrogen concentrations, which are important volatile sinks in the lunar water cycle. To release its cubesats, NanoSWARM uses a high-heritage mother ship in a low altitude, polar, circular orbit. NanoSWARM's results will have direct applications to the geophysics, volatile distribution, and plasma physics of numerous other bodies, in particular asteroids and the terrestrial planets. The technologies and methods used by NanoSWARM will enable many new cubesat missions in the next decade. NanoSWARM was proposed as a NASA Discovery mission in February 2015.

  17. NanoSWARM - A nano-satellite mission to measure particles and fields around the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrick-Bethell, Ian; Russell, Christopher; Pieters, Carle; Weiss, Benjamin; Halekas, Jasper; Poppe, Andrew; Larson, Davin; Lawrence, David; Elphic, Richard; Hayne, Paul; Blakely, Richard; Kim, Khan-Hyuk; Choi, Young-Jun; Jin, Ho; Hemingway, Doug; Nayak, Michael; Puig-Suari, Jordi; Jaroux, Belgacem; Warwick, Steven

    2015-04-01

    The NanoSWARM mission concept uses a fleet of cubesats around the Moon to address a number of open problems in planetary science: 1) The mechanisms of space weathering, 2) The origins of planetary magnetism, 3) The origins, distributions, and migration processes of surface water on airless bodies, and 4) The physics of small-scale magnetospheres. To accomplish these goals, NanoSWARM targets scientifically rich features on the Moon known as swirls. Swirls are high-albedo features correlated with strong magnetic fields and low surface-water. NanoSWARM cubesats will make the first near-surface (<500 m altitude) measurements of solar wind flux and magnetic fields at swirls. NanoSWARM cubesats will also perform low-altitude neutron measurements to provide key constraints on the distribution of polar hydrogen concentrations, which are important volatile sinks in the lunar water cycle. To release its cubesats, NanoSWARM uses a high-heritage mother ship in a low altitude, polar, circular orbit. NanoSWARM's results will have direct applications to the geophysics, volatile distribution, and plasma physics of numerous other bodies, in particular asteroids and the terrestrial planets. The technologies and methods used by NanoSWARM will enable many new cubesat missions in the next decade, and expand the cubesat paradigm into deep space. NanoSWARM will be proposed as a NASA Discovery mission in early 2015.

  18. Modelling Electrostatic Sheath Effects on Swarm Electric Field Instrument Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchand, R.; Burchill, J. K.; Knudsen, D. J.

    2010-10-01

    The Electric Field Instrument (EFI) was designed to measure ionospheric ion flow velocities, temperatures and distribution functions at the ram face of the European Space Agency’s Swarm spacecraft. These flow velocities, combined with the known orbital velocity of the satellite and local magnetic field, will be used to infer local electric fields from the relation E=- v× B. EFI is among a class of many particle sensors and flow meters mounted on satellites to monitor in situ plasma conditions. The interpretation of the measurements made with EFI and similar sensors relies on a spacecraft sheath model. A common approach, valid in the relatively cold and dense ionospheric plasma, is to assume a potential drop in a thin sheath through which particle deflection and energisation can be calculated analytically. In such models, sheath effects only depend on the spacecraft floating potential, and on the angle of incidence of particles with respect to the normal to the surface. Corrections to measurements are therefore local as they do not depend on the geometry of nearby objects. In an actual plasma, satellites are surrounded by electrostatic sheaths with a finite thickness. As a result, local corrections to particle distribution functions can only be seen as an approximation. A correct interpretation of measured particle fluxes or particle distribution functions must, at least in principle, account for the extent and shape of the sheath in the vicinity of the measuring instrument. This in turn requires a careful analysis of the interaction of the satellite with the surrounding plasma, while accounting for detailed aspects of the geometry, as well as for several physical effects. In this paper, the validity of the thin sheath model is tested by comparing its predictions with detailed PIC (Particle In Cell) calculations of satellite-plasma interaction. Deviations attributed to sheath finite thickness effects are calculated for EFI measurements, with representative plasma

  19. Proterozoic Geomagnetic Field Geometry from Mafic Dyke Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panzik, J. E.; Evans, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    Pre-Mesozoic continental reconstructions and paleoclimatic inferences from paleomagnetism rely critically upon the assumption of a time-averaged geocentric axial dipole (GAD) magnetic field. We have been testing the GAD assumption empirically, by compiling paleomagnetic remanence directional variations among coeval volcanic rock suites distributed over large areas of the Earth's surface. We compute virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) from site-mean remanence data using either a pure GAD model, or alternative models with varying amounts of zonal quadrupole or octupole fields. Rastering through quadrupole vs. octupole space, we produce contour plots of precision/dispersion for the mean of VGPs in each computation. Using the 0-5 Ma volcanics global database as a test, our method shows results consistent with the compilations of Schneider & Kent (1990, Rev. Geophys. 28, 71-96) and McElhinny et al. (1996, JGR 101, 25007-25027), notably reproducing the reversal asymmetry in a significant (order 3%) quadrupolar contribution. Performing the same test on ancient mafic dyke swarms, the Karoo-Ferrar large igneous province (ca. 0.18 Ga) and the central Atlantic magmatic province (CAMP) (0.20 Ga) datasets are consistent with a range of models, including both GAD and independent estimates of non-GAD contributions derived from global tectonic reconstructions (Torsvik & Van der Voo, 2002, GJI 151, 771-794). The method is limited by paleolongitudinal restriction of ancient LIPs, for similarly restrictive sub-sampling of the 0-5 Ma volcanic data can generate results that differ dramatically from the global mean (e.g., the far-sided offset of VGPs relative to the spin axis). Analysis of pre-Pangean datasets is limited by the uncertainty of tectonic reconstructions, but within solely the intact North American (Laurentian) craton, the Franklin (ca. 0.72), Mackenzie (ca. 1.27) and Matachewan (2.45 Ga) dyke swarms are used as Pre-Mesozoic targets that have large areal coverage. None of the

  20. Electrical Power System- Experience Return after the Recent Launch of the Three Swarm Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernando, Lucia; Mourra, Olivier; Caon, Antonio; Schautz, Max; Amann, Manfred; Bergaglio, Bruno

    2014-08-01

    The three Swarm Satellites were launched the 22nd November 2013, by a Russian Rockot launcher at UTC time 12:02:29. The first contact took place at 13:33:51 (UTC time).The aim of this paper is to provide to the reader a return of experience of the electrical activities per- formed in AIT during Launch Campaign, and, to present the Swarm Electrical Power System (EPS) behaviour observed during Launch and Early Orbit Operations (LEOP).

  1. Orbit and Gravity Field Solutions from Swarm GPS Observations - First Result

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeggi, A.; Dahle, C.; Arnold, D.; Bock, H.; Flechtner, F.

    2014-12-01

    Although ESA's Earth Explorer Mission Swarm is primarily dedicated to measure the Earth's magnetic field, it may also serve as a gravity field mission. Equipped with GPS receivers, accelerometers, star-tracker assemblies and laser retro-reflectors, the three Swarm satellites are potentially capable to be used as a high-low satellite-to-satellite tracking (hl-SST) observing system, following the missions CHAMP (first single-satellite hl-SST mission), GRACE (twin-satellite mission with additional ultra-precise low-low SST and GOCE (single-satellite mission additionally equipped with a gradiometer). GRACE, dedicated to measure the time-variability of the gravity field, is the only mission still in orbit, but its lifetime will likely end before launch of its follow-on mission GRACE-FO in August 2017 primarily due to aging of the onboard batteries after meanwhile more than 12 years of operation. Swarm is probably a good candidate to provide time-variable gravity field solutions and to close a potential gap between GRACE and GRACE-FO. Consisting of three satellites, Swarm also offers to use inter-satellite GPS-derived baselines as additional observations. However, as of today it is not clear if such information will substantially improve the gravity field solutions. Nevertheless, the properties of the Swarm constellation with two lower satellites flying in a pendulum-like orbit and a slightly differently inclined third satellite at higher altitude still represent a unique observing system raising expectations at least compared to CHAMP derived time-variable gravity field solutions. Whatever processing method will be applied for Swarm gravity field recovery, its success strongly depends on the quality of the Swarm Level 1b data as well as the quality of the derived Swarm orbits. With first Level 1b data sets available since mid of May 2014 (excluding accelerometer data), first results for Swarm orbits and baselines, as well as Swarm gravity field solutions are presented

  2. June 2006 seismic swarm and dike injection event beneath the Michoacan-Guanajuato volcanic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, T. F.; Gardine, M.; West, M.

    2008-12-01

    A seismic swarm of approximately 700 events, magnitude 2.5-3.5, occurred in June of 2006 approximately 15 km from the summit of the cinder cone Paricutin, in the Michoacan-Guanajuato Volcanic Field in central Mexico. The swarm was detected and located as part of an effort to develop a catalog of regional seismicity using stations fortuitously in place as part of two concurrent IRIS/PASSCAL supported projects- the Mapping of the Rivera Subduction Zone (MARS) project run by the University of Texas at Austin and New Mexico State University, and the Colima Volcano Deep Seismic Experiment (CODEX), run by the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Over a two-week period in June 2006, relocated hypocenters clearly show a shallowing trend with time, indicative of a possible dike injection event. The rate of injection appears to be 346 m/day. Following the injection, there is a period of earthquakes, which all occurred at approximately 5 km in depth, but which migrated southwards. The waveforms of all of these events show similarities within three major groupings: from May 28 to June 1, June 2 to June 9 (which marks the end of the ascent), and from June 9 to July 2.

  3. A lithospheric magnetic field model derived from the Swarm satellite magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulot, G.; Thebault, E.; Vigneron, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Swarm constellation of satellites was launched in November 2013 and has since then delivered high quality scalar and vector magnetic field measurements. A consortium of several research institutions was selected by the European Space Agency (ESA) to provide a number of scientific products which will be made available to the scientific community. Within this framework, specific tools were tailor-made to better extract the magnetic signal emanating from Earth's the lithospheric. These tools rely on the scalar gradient measured by the lower pair of Swarm satellites and rely on a regional modeling scheme that is more sensitive to small spatial scales and weak signals than the standard spherical harmonic modeling. In this presentation, we report on various activities related to data analysis and processing. We assess the efficiency of this dedicated chain for modeling the lithospheric magnetic field using more than one year of measurements, and finally discuss refinements that are continuously implemented in order to further improve the robustness and the spatial resolution of the lithospheric field model.

  4. Comparison of auroral ionospheric and field-aligned currents derived from Swarm and ground magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juusola, L.; Kauristie, K.; Vanhamäki, H.; Aikio, A.; Kamp, M.

    2016-09-01

    Derivation of the auroral ionospheric currents from magnetic field measurements can produce drastically different results depending on the data and method used. We have cross tested several methods for obtaining instantaneous field-aligned and horizontal currents from Swarm satellite and International Monitor for Auroral Geomagnetic Effects (IMAGE) ground magnetic field measurements. We found that Swarm can yield latitude profiles of the east-west component of the divergence-free current density at most at ˜200 km resolution, typically resolving the electrojets. The north-south divergence-free component, on the other hand, is not always well reproduced due to the small longitudinal distance between the side-by-side flying satellite pair. Swarm can yield the field-aligned and curl-free current density at a wider range of latitude resolutions (˜7.5-200 km) than the divergence-free current density. While 7.5 km is suitable for comparison with auroras, 200 km typically resolves the Regions 1 and 2 field-aligned currents. IMAGE can yield maps of the divergence-free current density at ˜50 km resolution. Induced telluric currents should be accounted for in the derivation. Not accounting for them in the Swarm analysis, however, does not appear to introduce significant errors. Ionospheric conductances can be estimated by combining the total horizontal current density, consisting of the curl-free and divergence-free components, with the electric field measurements. Our results indicate that Swarm can only yield these at ˜200 km scale size when there is no significant dependence on longitude. However, combining the divergence-free current from IMAGE with the curl-free current and electric field from Swarm could yield conductance maps at ˜50 km resolution.

  5. Ionospheric conductances and currents of a morning sector auroral arc from Swarm-A electric and magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juusola, L.; Archer, W. E.; Kauristie, K.; Burchill, J. K.; Vanhamäki, H.; Aikio, A. T.

    2016-11-01

    We show the first ionospheric Hall and Pedersen conductances derived from Swarm magnetic and electric field measurements during a crossing of a morning sector auroral arc. Only Swarm-A was used, with assumptions of negligible azimuthal gradients and vanishing eastward electric field. We find upward field-aligned current, enhanced Hall and Pedersen conductances, and relatively weak electric field coincident with the arc. Poleward of the arc, the field-aligned current was downward, conductances lower, and the electric field enhanced. The arc was embedded in a westward electrojet, immediately equatorward of the peak current density. The equatorward portion of the electrojet could thus be considered conductance dominant and the poleward portion electric field dominant. Although the electric field measured by Swarm was intense, resulting in conductances lower than those typically reported, comparable electric fields have been observed earlier. These results demonstrate how Swarm data can significantly contribute to our understanding of the ionospheric electrodynamics.

  6. Swarm - The European Space Agency's Constellation Mission: Mapping Earth's Magnetic and Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floberghagen, Rune

    2016-07-01

    Launched on 22 November 2013, the three-satellite Swarm constellation is about halfway into its four-year nominal mission. Embarking identical, high accuracy and high spatial as well as temporal resolution instrumentation on all satellites, the mission has ambitious goals reaching from the deep Earth interior (the liquid outer core) all the way out to the solar-terrestrial interaction in the magnetosphere. One may safely state that the mission addresses a diverse range of science issues, and therefore acts as a true discoverer in many fields. Measurements of the magnetic field (magnitude and vector components), the electric field (through ion drift velocity, ion density, ion temperature, electron density, electron temperature and spacecraft potential), the gas density and horizontal winds as well as precise positioning are supported by a range of derived products for the magnetic field, geophysics, aeronomy and space physics communities. Indeed, Swarm is at the forefront of cross-cutting science issues that involve significant parts of the space and earth physics community. In recent data exploitation and science projects we have also seen a high number of coupling studies emerging. This contribution details the status and achievements of the mission in the field of magnetic field, electric field and geospace research. It furthermore discusses the the Agency's further plans, beyond the currently foreseen nominal end of mission in spring 2018. The role of Swarm for space weather research will also be discussed.

  7. Thermal ion imagers and Langmuir probes in the Swarm electric field instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, D. J.; Burchill, J. K.; Buchert, S. C.; Eriksson, A. I.; Gill, R.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Åhlen, L.; Smith, M.; Moffat, B.

    2017-02-01

    The European Space Agency's three Swarm satellites were launched on 22 November 2013 into nearly polar, circular orbits, eventually reaching altitudes of 460 km (Swarm A and C) and 510 km (Swarm B). Swarm's multiyear mission is to make precision, multipoint measurements of low-frequency magnetic and electric fields in Earth's ionosphere for the purpose of characterizing magnetic fields generated both inside and external to the Earth, along with the electric fields and other plasma parameters associated with electric current systems in the ionosphere and magnetosphere. Electric fields perpendicular to the magnetic field B→ are determined through ion drift velocity v→i and magnetic field measurements via the relation E→⊥=-v→i×B→. Ion drift is derived from two-dimensional images of low-energy ion distribution functions provided by two Thermal Ion Imager (TII) sensors viewing in the horizontal and vertical planes; v→i is corrected for spacecraft potential as determined by two Langmuir probes (LPs) which also measure plasma density ne and electron temperature Te. The TII sensors use a microchannel-plate-intensified phosphor screen imaged by a charge-coupled device to generate high-resolution distribution images (66 × 40 pixels) at a rate of 16 s-1. Images are partially processed on board and further on the ground to generate calibrated data products at a rate of 2 s-1; these include v→i, E→⊥, and ion temperature Ti in addition to electron temperature Te and plasma density ne from the LPs.

  8. Boltzmann analyses of swarm experiments over the years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitchford, Leanne

    2013-09-01

    Art Phelps was one of the ``grand old men'' in field of gaseous electronics. He was a graduate student when the GEC got started and he attended almost all of the meetings over the years. During his remarkably long career, he produced a number of the classic papers in our field as a glance at Web of Science will show. Art was my mentor and friend, and I had the privilege of working with him for many years on various topics related mainly to electron scattering and transport in weakly ionized gases. In this talk, I will discuss the originality of some of his early work on these subjects in the context of their times, focusing in particular on his publications from the mid-1960's with his colleagues from Westinghouse Research Laboratories. These report the first numerical solutions of the Boltzmann equation for electrons, to my knowledge, and they inspired much subsequent work related to the extraction of quantitative information about low-energy electron scatting with simple gases from measurements of macroscopic parameters (mobility, diffusion,..). I will outline some of the work he and I did together in this topical area using more sophisticated numerical techniques. This and other work in the field eventually led to the establishment of the ongoing GEC Plasma Data Exchange Project which now involves a number of people (the LXCat team), as discussed in Tuesday's workshop. The LXCat team had completed work on noble gases and had just started working on evaluations of cross sections for simple molecules when Art died. We are fortunate to have had his involvement on these projects. Art had ideas for future work in these areas, and some are included in a long e-mail message from Art a couple of years ago that I will share because it includes some suggestions [to the community] for future work.

  9. Field-aligned currents distribution as derived from the Swarm satellite constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhr, H.; Kervalishvili, G.; Rauberg, J.; Michaelis, I.

    2015-12-01

    The seminal studies of Iijima and Potemra have outlined the major distribution features of field-aligned currents (FACs) in a local time versus magnetic latitude frame. The related plot showing the Region 1 and 2 FAC belts has been the reference in many studies as the baseline configuration during the past decades. What did we learn more since then? ESA's constellation mission Swarm provides the opportunity to derive more reliable FAC estimates from multi-satellite magnetic field measurements. We make use of the Swarm A/C satellite pair, which flies side-by-side at a separation of 1.4° in longitude. By considering along-track differences over 5 s the four readings at the corners of an almost symmetrical quad are used for calculating the mean vertical current density flowing through the encircled area. FACs are estimated by mapping the vertical current component onto the field direction. Within the auroral oval current estimates from single and dual-satellite solutions agree generally well. Significant differences are frequently observed in the polar cap. Here underlying assumptions for single-satellite solutions are obviously not well satisfied. Another characteristic derived from the multi-satellite observations: FACs can be divided into two classes. For scale sizes up to some ten kilometers rapid temporal variations are observed. These FACs are related to kinetic Alfvén waves. The other class with scale lengths of more than 150 km can be regarded as stationary current systems lasting for more than a minute.

  10. Filamentary field-aligned currents at the polar cap region during northward interplanetary magnetic field derived with the Swarm constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lühr, Hermann; Huang, Tao; Wing, Simon; Kervalishvili, Guram; Rauberg, Jan; Korth, Haje

    2016-10-01

    ESA's Swarm constellation mission makes it possible for the first time to determine field-aligned currents (FACs) in the ionosphere uniquely. In particular at high latitudes, the dual-satellite approach can reliably detect some FAC structures which are missed by the traditional single-satellite technique. These FAC events occur preferentially poleward of the auroral oval and during times of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation. Most events appear on the nightside. They are not related to the typical FAC structures poleward of the cusp, commonly termed NBZ. Simultaneously observed precipitating particle spectrograms and auroral images from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites are consistent with the detected FACs and indicate that they occur on closed field lines mostly adjacent to the auroral oval. We suggest that the FACs are associated with Sun-aligned filamentary auroral arcs. Here we introduce in an initial study features of the high-latitude FAC structures which have been observed during the early phase of the Swarm mission. A more systematic survey over longer times is required to fully characterize the so far undetected field aligned currents.

  11. Statistical analysis of geomagnetic field intensity differences between ASM and VFM instruments onboard Swarm constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Michelis, Paola; Tozzi, Roberta; Consolini, Giuseppe

    2017-02-01

    From the very first measurements made by the magnetometers onboard Swarm satellites launched by European Space Agency (ESA) in late 2013, it emerged a discrepancy between scalar and vector measurements. An accurate analysis of this phenomenon brought to build an empirical model of the disturbance, highly correlated with the Sun incidence angle, and to correct vector data accordingly. The empirical model adopted by ESA results in a significant decrease in the amplitude of the disturbance affecting VFM measurements so greatly improving the vector magnetic data quality. This study is focused on the characterization of the difference between magnetic field intensity measured by the absolute scalar magnetometer (ASM) and that reconstructed using the vector field magnetometer (VFM) installed on Swarm constellation. Applying empirical mode decomposition method, we find the intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) associated with ASM-VFM total intensity differences obtained with data both uncorrected and corrected for the disturbance correlated with the Sun incidence angle. Surprisingly, no differences are found in the nature of the IMFs embedded in the analyzed signals, being these IMFs characterized by the same dominant periodicities before and after correction. The effect of correction manifests in the decrease in the energy associated with some IMFs contributing to corrected data. Some IMFs identified by analyzing the ASM-VFM intensity discrepancy are characterized by the same dominant periodicities of those obtained by analyzing the temperature fluctuations of the VFM electronic unit. Thus, the disturbance correlated with the Sun incidence angle could be still present in the corrected magnetic data. Furthermore, the ASM-VFM total intensity difference and the VFM electronic unit temperature display a maximal shared information with a time delay that depends on local time. Taken together, these findings may help to relate the features of the observed VFM-ASM total intensity

  12. Magnetic field fluctuations observed by the Swarm constellation in the nighttime mid-latitude topside ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Luhr, H.; Kervalishvili, G.; Rauberg, J.; Michaelis, I.; Stolle, C.; Kwak, Y. S.

    2015-12-01

    Using single-satellite observations on Low-Earth-Orbits (LEO), some previous studies suggested that electric and magnetic field fluctuations observed in the nighttime mid-latitude ionosphere originate from medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs). With the inherently 1-dimensional sampling, however, those studies could not confirm whether (1) the electric and magnetic field fluctuations are spatial structures rather than temporal variations, and (2) horizontal shapes of the field fluctuation regions generally have mirror symmetry with respect to the magnetic equator, just as MSTIDs do. In this presentation we analyze magnetic field data sampled by three identical Swarm satellites. The results support the idea of a close connection between mid-latitude magnetic fluctuations (MMFs) and MSTIDs in the nighttime sector. Combined with the relationship between MMFs and MSTIDs, the MMF climatology can be used for extending that of MSTIDs, which has been poorly investigated over oceans. In addition, we have conducted a scale size analysis and found that coherence lengths of MMFs are typically shorter than 150 km. We also discuss the possibility that the MMF regions are aligned with the background magnetic field.

  13. Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venter, Gerhard; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski Jaroslaw

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show how the search algorithm known as particle swarm optimization performs. Here, particle swarm optimization is applied to structural design problems, but the method has a much wider range of possible applications. The paper's new contributions are improvements to the particle swarm optimization algorithm and conclusions and recommendations as to the utility of the algorithm, Results of numerical experiments for both continuous and discrete applications are presented in the paper. The results indicate that the particle swarm optimization algorithm does locate the constrained minimum design in continuous applications with very good precision, albeit at a much higher computational cost than that of a typical gradient based optimizer. However, the true potential of particle swarm optimization is primarily in applications with discrete and/or discontinuous functions and variables. Additionally, particle swarm optimization has the potential of efficient computation with very large numbers of concurrently operating processors.

  14. Wake field acceleration experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    Where and how will wake field acceleration devices find use for other than, possibly, accelerators for high energy physics. I don't know that this can be responsibly answered at this time. What I can do is describe some recent results from an ongoing experimental program at Argonne which support the idea that wake field techniques and devices are potentially important for future accelerators. Perhaps this will spawn expanded interest and even new ideas for the use of this new technology. The Argonne program, and in particular the Advanced Accelerator Test Facility (AATF), has been reported in several fairly recent papers and reports. But because this is a substantially new audience for the subject, I will include a brief review of the program and the facility before describing experiments. 10 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Investigation of a Seismic Swarm in the Krýsuvík Geothermal Field, SW Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Zhang, H.; Fehler, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    Iceland is an active part of the mid-ocean ridge system with active volcanism and near-surface thermal features, that are exploited for geothermal energy. The Krýsuvík region is one of the high temperature geothermal areas in the Reykjanes Peninsula in southwest Iceland that is an area of active interest for geothermal development. It is also an area that has experienced several swarms of seismicity and associated uplift. As part of a larger project to develop improved techniques for imaging geothermal fields using seismic and electromagnetic techniques, we have operated a seismic network on the Reykjanes Peninsula in collaboration with Uppsala University and Reykjavic University. During this deployment, we were fortunate to record a seismic swarm in the Krýsuvík region during which roughly thirty thousand earthquakes occurred. Combining data from our seismic network with that from 10 seismographs of the SIL (South Iceland Lowland) seismic network we are investigating the events that occurred during a swarm recorded between August 2010 and July 2011. The swarm was most active in February 2011. The seismicity occurred predominantly along a N-S trending fault, which is consistent with the results obtained from coseismic GPS displacements, and a NE-SW trending fault that is parallel to the plate boundary. This detailed map of subsurface fault directions is of great value for stress field evaluation in this area. Our next goal is to evaluate whether temporal velocity change accompanied the seismic swarm. This will be done using interferometry of ambient noise between station pairs. In this step, we will choose different station pairs that have a variety angels relative to the most active N-S trending fault to investigate the spatial and propagation-dependent velocity change along with its relation to results obtained by others from analysis of GPS data from the region. Finally, tomography calculated using TomoDD may give details of the spatial relation between

  16. Flows around bacterial swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauparas, Justas; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Flagellated bacteria on nutrient-rich substrates can differentiate into a swarming state and move in dense swarms across surfaces. A recent experiment (HC Berg, Harvard University) measured the flow in the fluid around the swarm. A systematic chiral flow was observed in the clockwise direction (when viewed from above) ahead of a E.coli swarm with flow speeds of about 10 μm/s, about 3 times greater than the radial velocity at the edge of the swarm. The working hypothesis is that this flow is due to the flagella of cells stalled at the edge of a colony which extend their flagellar filaments outwards, moving fluid over the virgin agar. In this talk we quantitatively test his hypothesis. We first build an analytical model of the flow induced by a single flagellum in a thin film and then use the model, and its extension to multiple flagella, to compare with experimental measurements.

  17. A nonequilibrium statistical field theory of swarms and other spatially extended complex systems

    SciTech Connect

    Millonas, M.M. Santa Fe Inst., NM )

    1993-01-01

    A class of models with applications to swarm behavior as well as many other types of spatially extended complex biological and physical systems is studied. Internal fluctuations can play an active role in the organization of the phase structure of such systems. Consequently, it is not possible to fully understand the behavior of these systems without explicitly incorporating the fluctuations. In particular, for the class of models studied here the effect of internal fluctuations due to finite size is a renormalized decrease in the temperature near the point of spontaneous symmetry breaking. We briefly outline how these models can be applied to the behavior of an ant swarm.

  18. A nonequilibrium statistical field theory of swarms and other spatially extended complex systems

    SciTech Connect

    Millonas, M.M. |

    1993-07-01

    A class of models with applications to swarm behavior as well as many other types of spatially extended complex biological and physical systems is studied. Internal fluctuations can play an active role in the organization of the phase structure of such systems. Consequently, it is not possible to fully understand the behavior of these systems without explicitly incorporating the fluctuations. In particular, for the class of models studied here the effect of internal fluctuations due to finite size is a renormalized decrease in the temperature near the point of spontaneous symmetry breaking. We briefly outline how these models can be applied to the behavior of an ant swarm.

  19. Combining CHAMP and Swarm Satellite Data to Invert the Lithospheric Magnetic Field in the Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yaodong; Wang, Zhengtao; Jiang, Weiping; Zhang, Bingbing; Li, Fupeng; Guo, Fei

    2017-01-26

    CHAMP and Swarm satellite magnetic data are combined to establish the lithospheric magnetic field over the Tibetan Plateau at satellite altitude by using zonal revised spherical cap harmonic analysis (R-SCHA). These data are integrated with geological structures data to analyze the relationship between magnetic anomaly signals and large-scale geological tectonic over the Tibetan Plateau and to explore the active tectonic region based on the angle of the magnetic anomaly. Results show that the model fitting error is small for a layer 250-500 km high, and the RMSE of the horizontal and radial geomagnetic components is better than 0.3 nT. The proposed model can accurately describe medium- to long-scale lithospheric magnetic anomalies. Analysis indicates that a negative magnetic anomaly in the Tibetan Plateau significantly differs with a positive magnetic anomaly in the surrounding area, and the boundary of the positive and negative regions is generally consistent with the geological tectonic boundary in the plateau region. Significant differences exist between the basement structures of the hinterland of the plateau and the surrounding area. The magnetic anomaly in the Central and Western Tibetan Plateau shows an east-west trend, which is identical to the direction of the geological structures. The magnetic anomaly in the eastern part is arc-shaped and extends along the northeast direction. Its direction is significantly different from the trend of the geological structures. The strongest negative anomaly is located in the Himalaya block, with a central strength of up to -9 nT at a height of 300 km. The presence of a strong negative anomaly implies that the Curie isotherm in this area is relatively shallow and deep geological tectonic activity may exist.

  20. Combining CHAMP and Swarm Satellite Data to Invert the Lithospheric Magnetic Field in the Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yaodong; Wang, Zhengtao; Jiang, Weiping; Zhang, Bingbing; Li, Fupeng; Guo, Fei

    2017-01-01

    CHAMP and Swarm satellite magnetic data are combined to establish the lithospheric magnetic field over the Tibetan Plateau at satellite altitude by using zonal revised spherical cap harmonic analysis (R-SCHA). These data are integrated with geological structures data to analyze the relationship between magnetic anomaly signals and large-scale geological tectonic over the Tibetan Plateau and to explore the active tectonic region based on the angle of the magnetic anomaly. Results show that the model fitting error is small for a layer 250–500 km high, and the RMSE of the horizontal and radial geomagnetic components is better than 0.3 nT. The proposed model can accurately describe medium- to long-scale lithospheric magnetic anomalies. Analysis indicates that a negative magnetic anomaly in the Tibetan Plateau significantly differs with a positive magnetic anomaly in the surrounding area, and the boundary of the positive and negative regions is generally consistent with the geological tectonic boundary in the plateau region. Significant differences exist between the basement structures of the hinterland of the plateau and the surrounding area. The magnetic anomaly in the Central and Western Tibetan Plateau shows an east–west trend, which is identical to the direction of the geological structures. The magnetic anomaly in the eastern part is arc-shaped and extends along the northeast direction. Its direction is significantly different from the trend of the geological structures. The strongest negative anomaly is located in the Himalaya block, with a central strength of up to −9 nT at a height of 300 km. The presence of a strong negative anomaly implies that the Curie isotherm in this area is relatively shallow and deep geological tectonic activity may exist. PMID:28134755

  1. Swarm Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzmann, Gerard J.; Joshi, Rajeev; Groce, Alex

    2008-01-01

    Reportedly, supercomputer designer Seymour Cray once said that he would sooner use two strong oxen to plow a field than a thousand chickens. Although this is undoubtedly wise when it comes to plowing a field, it is not so clear for other types of tasks. Model checking problems are of the proverbial "search the needle in a haystack" type. Such problems can often be parallelized easily. Alas, none of the usual divide and conquer methods can be used to parallelize the working of a model checker. Given that it has become easier than ever to gain access to large numbers of computers to perform even routine tasks it is becoming more and more attractive to find alternate ways to use these resources to speed up model checking tasks. This paper describes one such method, called swarm verification.

  2. Daphnia swarms: from single agent dynamics to collective vortex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordemann, Anke; Balazsi, Gabor; Caspari, Elizabeth; Moss, Frank

    2003-05-01

    Swarm theories have become fashionable in theoretical physics over the last decade. They span the range of interactions from individual agents moving in a mean field to coherent collective motions of large agent populations, such as vortex-swarming. But controlled laboratory tests of these theories using real biological agents have been problematic due primarily to poorly known agent-agent interactions (in the case of e.g. bacteria and slime molds) or the large swarm size (e.g. for flocks of birds and schools of fish). Moreover, the entire range of behaviors from single agent interactions to collective vortex motions of the swarm have here-to-fore not been observed with a single animal. We present the results of well defined experiments with the zooplankton Daphnia in light fields showing this range of behaviors. We interpret our results with a theory of the motions of self-propelled agents in a field.

  3. Robot Swarms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morring, Frank, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Engineers and interns at this NASA field center are building the prototype of a robotic rover that could go where no wheeled rover has gone before-into the dark cold craters at the lunar poles and across the Moon s rugged highlands-like a walking tetrahedron. With NASA pushing to meet President Bush's new exploration objectives, the robots taking shape here today could be on the Moon in a decade. In the longer term, the concept could lead to shape-shifting robot swarms designed to explore distant planetary surfaces in advance of humans. "If you look at all of NASA s projections of the future, anyone s projections of the space program, they re all rigid-body architecture," says Steven Curtis, principal investigator on the effort. "This is not rigid-body. The whole key here is flexibility and reconfigurability with a capital R."

  4. Collective motion patterns of swarms with delay coupling: Theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Szwaykowska, Klementyna; Schwartz, Ira B; Mier-Y-Teran Romero, Luis; Heckman, Christoffer R; Mox, Dan; Hsieh, M Ani

    2016-03-01

    The formation of coherent patterns in swarms of interacting self-propelled autonomous agents is a subject of great interest in a wide range of application areas, ranging from engineering and physics to biology. In this paper, we model and experimentally realize a mixed-reality large-scale swarm of delay-coupled agents. The coupling term is modeled as a delayed communication relay of position. Our analyses, assuming agents communicating over an Erdös-Renyi network, demonstrate the existence of stable coherent patterns that can be achieved only with delay coupling and that are robust to decreasing network connectivity and heterogeneity in agent dynamics. We also show how the bifurcation structure for emergence of different patterns changes with heterogeneity in agent acceleration capabilities and limited connectivity in the network as a function of coupling strength and delay. Our results are verified through simulation as well as preliminary experimental results of delay-induced pattern formation in a mixed-reality swarm.

  5. Benchmark calculations of nonconservative charged-particle swarms in dc electric and magnetic fields crossed at arbitrary angles.

    PubMed

    Dujko, S; White, R D; Petrović, Z Lj; Robson, R E

    2010-04-01

    A multiterm solution of the Boltzmann equation has been developed and used to calculate transport coefficients of charged-particle swarms in gases under the influence of electric and magnetic fields crossed at arbitrary angles when nonconservative collisions are present. The hierarchy resulting from a spherical-harmonic decomposition of the Boltzmann equation in the hydrodynamic regime is solved numerically by representing the speed dependence of the phase-space distribution function in terms of an expansion in Sonine polynomials about a Maxwellian velocity distribution at an internally determined temperature. Results are given for electron swarms in certain collisional models for ionization and attachment over a range of angles between the fields and field strengths. The implicit and explicit effects of ionization and attachment on the electron-transport coefficients are considered using physical arguments. It is found that the difference between the two sets of transport coefficients, bulk and flux, resulting from the explicit effects of nonconservative collisions, can be controlled either by the variation in the magnetic field strengths or by the angles between the fields. In addition, it is shown that the phenomena of ionization cooling and/or attachment cooling/heating previously reported for dc electric fields carry over directly to the crossed electric and magnetic fields. The results of the Boltzmann equation analysis are compared with those obtained by a Monte Carlo simulation technique. The comparison confirms the theoretical basis and numerical integrity of the moment method for solving the Boltzmann equation and gives a set of well-established data that can be used to test future codes and plasma models.

  6. Artificial Potential Field Controllers for Robust Communications in a Network of Swarm Robots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-18

    mass. Wolves use packs to hunt and fish form schools for protection and hydrodynamic efficiency. When robots work together in a swarm they display some...FireFly2 from Point Grey Research. This camera was selected because it can provide a high resolution (640×480 pixels) color image in standard formats for...feasibleVel(2,1)],’mo-’) 81 F Technical specifications for FireFly2 camera Point Grey Research is a product engineering and technology company founded in

  7. Lower crustal earthquake swarms beneath Mammoth Mountain, California - evidence for the magmatic roots to the Mammoth Mountain mafic volcanic field?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, D. P.; Shelly, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    Mammoth Mountain is a cluster of dacitic domes erupted ~ 68 ka. It stands on the SW topographic rim of Long Valley caldera in eastern CA. Structurally, it is outboard of the caldera ring-fracture system and its magmatic system is genetically distinct from that of the caldera. It resides within a field of mafic (basaltic) vents that erupted between 190 - 8 ka. A series of phreatic explosions from the north flank of the mountain some 700 ybp attest to the infusion of heat to shallow depths shortly prior to the 600 ybp eruptions of the Inyo Domes 6 to 12 km north of the Mountain. Unrest beneath Mammoth Mountain since 1980 has included 1) swarms of brittle-failure earthquakes in the upper 10 km of the crust that define concentric elliptical ring-like patterns centered beneath the summit, 2) mid-crustal (depths 10 to 20 km) long-period volcanic earthquakes, 3) the onset of diffuse CO2 degassing in 1990 following an 11-month-long swarm of shallow (<10 km), brittle-failure earthquakes in 1989, 4) occasional very-long-period earthquakes at depths of ~ 3 km, and 5) brief swarms of lower-crustal, brittle-failure earthquakes at depths of 20 to 30 km, including sizable episodes June 16-17, 2006 and September 29-30, 2009. Seismic waveform correlation analysis at multiple stations reveals that these lower-crustal, brittle-failure swarms consist of tens to hundreds of repeated similar events and also serves to identify many events not included in the Northern California Seismic Network (NCSN) catalog. In the case of the 2009 episode, an evolution in waveform is clearly discernible over the sequence, suggesting a corresponding evolution in source location or mechanism. Work is ongoing to take advantage of the waveform similarity to estimate precise hypocentral locations of these events in order to distinguish between these possibilities.We suggest that the brittle-failure earthquakes at depths of 20 to 30 km are occurring within the more mafic mid- to lower-crust, which can remain

  8. Long Swarms and Short Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, S. R.

    2011-12-01

    Many earthquake swarms at volcanoes last several months, then have a sharp uptick in rate in the hours before eruption. Examples include 2006 Augustine, 8.5 months then 10 hours; 1992 Spurr, 10 months then 4 hours; 1994 Rabaul, ~1 year then 27 hours; 2008 Kasatochi, 6 weeks then 2 days; and 2011 Puyuehue Cordon Caulle, 5 weeks then 2 days. For the well studied Augustine case, broadband data showed that very long period (VLP) energy accompanied 221 of 722 located earthquakes in the 10 hours before the first explosive eruption on 11 January 2006. This was revealed by low-pass filtering and the period of the VLP signal was 50 sec. The Augustine broadband stations were campaign instruments at distances of 2-3 km from the vent. No similar VLP energy has been found in events during the 8.5 month long swarm. Okmok volcano had a short swarm only lasting 5 hours prior to its 12 July 2008 eruption. Low-pass filtering of data from broadband station OKSO, 10 km from the vent, showed that 23 of 42 located events had VLP energy with a period of 30-40 sec. Events from Kasatochi volcano were scanned on station ATKA. Here the broadband station is much farther away at 88 km but the earthquakes in the short swarm 7 August 2008 were much larger with many M>3 events. The station suffered data gaps so only a few hours of data were scanned but numerous events were observed with VLP energy starting just after the P phase. Low-pass filtering showed VLP energy with a period of 10-12 sec. No VLP energy has been found in events of the preceding 6 week long swarm. These observations at three different volcanoes suggest that the short swarms represent a different process than the long swarms. The long swarms likely reflect pressure increases in the surrounding country rock caused by increasing magma pressure. The short swarms in contrast, appear to represent discrete pulses of magma injection at shallow depths. For all three volcanoes the earthquakes looked like typical volcano-tectonic (VT

  9. Elastic and inelastic collisions of swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbruster, Dieter; Martin, Stephan; Thatcher, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Scattering interactions of swarms in potentials that are generated by an attraction-repulsion model are studied. In free space, swarms in this model form a well-defined steady state describing the translation of a stable formation of the particles whose shape depends on the interaction potential. Thus, the collision between a swarm and a boundary or between two swarms can be treated as (quasi)-particle scattering. Such scattering experiments result in internal excitations of the swarm or in bound states, respectively. In addition, varying a parameter linked to the relative importance of damping and potential forces drives transitions between elastic and inelastic scattering of the particles. By tracking the swarm's center of mass, a refraction rule is derived via simulations relating the incoming and outgoing directions of a swarm hitting the wall. Iterating the map derived from the refraction law allows us to predict and understand the dynamics and bifurcations of swarms in square boxes and in channels.

  10. Turbulence of swarming sperm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creppy, Adama; Praud, Olivier; Druart, Xavier; Kohnke, Philippa L.; Plouraboué, Franck

    2015-09-01

    Collective motion of self-sustained swarming flows has recently provided examples of small-scale turbulence arising where viscous effects are dominant. We report the first observation of universal enstrophy cascade in concentrated swarming sperm consistent with a body of evidence built from various independent measurements. We found a well-defined k-3 power-law decay of a velocity field power spectrum and relative dispersion of small beads consistent with theoretical predictions in 2D turbulence. Concentrated living sperm displays long-range, correlated whirlpool structures of a size that provides an integral scale of turbulence. We propose a consistent explanation for this quasi-2D turbulence based on self-structured laminated flow forced by steric interactions and alignment, a state of active matter that we call "swarming liquid crystal." We develop scaling arguments consistent with this interpretation.

  11. CM5, a Pre-Swarm Comprehensive Geomagnetic Field Model Derived from Over 12 Yr of CHAMP, Orsted, SAC-C and Observatory Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabaka, Terence J.; Olsen, Nils; Tyler, Robert H.; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive magnetic field model named CM5 has been derived from CHAMP, Ørsted and SAC-C satellite and observatory hourly-means data from 2000 August to 2013 January using the Swarm Level-2 Comprehensive Inversion (CI) algorithm. Swarm is a recently launched constellation of three satellites to map the Earth's magnetic field. The CI technique includes several interesting features such as the bias mitigation scheme known as Selective Infinite Variance Weighting (SIVW), a new treatment for attitude error in satellite vector measurements, and the inclusion of 3-D conductivity for ionospheric induction. SIVW has allowed for a much improved lithospheric field recovery over CM4 by exploiting CHAMP along-track difference data yielding resolution levels up to spherical harmonic degree 107, and has allowed for the successful extraction of the oceanic M2 tidal magnetic field from quiet, nightside data. The 3-D induction now captures anomalous Solar-quiet features in coastal observatory daily records. CM5 provides a satisfactory, continuous description of the major magnetic fields in the near-Earth region over this time span, and its lithospheric, ionospheric and oceanic M2 tidal constituents may be used as validation tools for future Swarm Level-2 products coming from the CI algorithm and other dedicated product algorithms.

  12. Velocity correlations in laboratory insect swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, R.; Ouellette, N. T.

    2015-12-01

    In contrast to animal groups such as bird flocks or migratory herds that display net, directed motion, insect swarms do not possess global order. Without such order, it is difficult to define and characterize the transition to collective behavior in swarms; nevertheless, visual observation of swarms strongly suggests that swarming insects do behave collectively. It has recently been suggested that correlation rather than order is the hallmark of emergent collective behavior. Here, we report measurements of spatial velocity correlation functions in laboratory mating swarms of the non-biting midge Chironomus riparius. Although we find some correlation at short distances, our swarms are in general only weakly correlated, in contrast to what has been observed in field studies. Our results hint at the potentially important role of environmental conditions on collective behavior, and suggest that general indicators of the collective nature of swarming are still needed.

  13. Mojave remote sensing field experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, Raymond E.; Petroy, S. B.; Plaut, J. J.; Shepard, Michael K.; Evans, D.; Farr, T.; Greeley, Ronald; Gaddis, L.; Lancaster, N.

    1991-01-01

    The Mojave Remote Sensing Field Experiment (MFE), conducted in June 1988, involved acquisition of Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS); C, L, and P-band polarimetric radar (AIRSAR) data; and simultaneous field observations at the Pisgah and Cima volcanic fields, and Lavic and Silver Lake Playas, Mojave Desert, California. A LANDSAT Thematic Mapper (TM) scene is also included in the MFE archive. TM-based reflectance and TIMS-based emissivity surface spectra were extracted for selected surfaces. Radiative transfer procedures were used to model the atmosphere and surface simultaneously, with the constraint that the spectra must be consistent with field-based spectral observations. AIRSAR data were calibrated to backscatter cross sections using corner reflectors deployed at target sites. Analyses of MFE data focus on extraction of reflectance, emissivity, and cross section for lava flows of various ages and degradation states. Results have relevance for the evolution of volcanic plains on Venus and Mars.

  14. Nuclide-migration field experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Erdal, B.R.; Wolfsberg, K.; Johnstone, J.K.; Erickson, K.L.; Friedman, A.M.; Fried, S.; Hines, J.J.

    1981-03-01

    When considering groundwater flow and radionuclide retention in the complex flow systems that can occur in geologic formations, one has a serious problem in determining if laboratory studies are being performed under conditions appropriate to natural systems. This document is the project plan for a program designed to begin to address these problems. The project is being carried out jointly by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and Argonne National Laboratory. The work has three principal objectives: (1) to develop the experimental, instrumental, and safety techniques necessary to conduct controlled, small-scale radionuclide migration field experiments, including those involving actinides; (2) to use these techniques to define radionuclide migration through rock by performing generic, at-depth experiments under closely monitored conditions; and (3) to determine whether available lithologic, geochemical, and hydrologic properties together with existing or developing transport models are sufficient and appropriate to describe real field conditions.

  15. Early Soil Moisture Field Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmugge, T.

    2008-12-01

    Before the large scale field experiments described in the call for papers, there were a number of experiments devoted to a single parameter, e.g. soil moisture. In the early 1970's, before the launch of the first microwave radiometer by NASA, there were a number of aircraft experiments to determine utility of these sensors for land observations. For soil moisture, these experiments were conducted in southwestern United States over irrigated agricultural areas which could provide a wide range of moisture conditions on a given day. The radiometers covered the wavelength range from 0.8 to 21 cm. These experiments demonstrated that it is possible to observe soil moisture variations remotely using a microwave radiometer with a sensitivity of about 3 K / unit of soil moisture. The results also showed that the longer wavelengths were better, with a radiometer at the 21 cm wavelength giving the best results. These positive results led to the development of Push Broom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR) and the Electrically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR) instruments at the 21-cm wavelength. They have been used extensively in the large-scale experiments such as HAPEX-MOBILHY, FIFE, Monsoon90, SMEX, etc. The multi-beam nature of these instruments makes it possible to obtain more extensive coverage and thus to map spatial variations of surface soil moisture. Examples of the early results along with the more recent soil moisture maps will be presented.

  16. Ethiopian Tertiary dike swarms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohr, P. A.

    1971-01-01

    Mapping of the Ethiopian rift and Afar margins revealed the existence of Tertiary dike swarms. The structural relations of these swarms and the fed lava pile to monoclinal warping of the margins partly reflect a style of continental margin tectonics found in other parts of the world. In Ethiopia, however, conjugate dike trends appear to be unusually strongly developed. Relation of dikes to subsequent margin faulting is ambiguous, and there are instances where the two phenomena are spatially separate and of differing trends. There is no evidence for lateral migration with time of dike injection toward the rift zone. No separate impingement of Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, and African rift system stress fields on the Ethiopian region can be demonstrated from the Tertiary dike swarms. Rather, a single, regional paleostress field existed, suggestive of a focus beneath the central Ethiopian plateau. This stress field was dominated by tension: there is no cogent evidence for shearing along the rift margins. A gentle compression along the rift floor is indicated. A peculiar sympathy of dike hade directions at given localities is evident.

  17. Verification of Emergent Behaviors in Swarm-based Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouff, Christopher; Vanderbilt, Amy; Hinchey, Mike; Truszkowski, Walt; Rash, James

    2004-01-01

    The emergent properties of swarms make swarm-based missions powerful, but at the same time more difficult to design and to assure that the proper behaviors will emerge. We are currently investigating formal methods and techniques for verification and validation of swarm-based missions. The Autonomous Nano-Technology Swarm (ANTS) mission is being used as an example and case study for swarm-based missions to experiment and test current formal methods with intelligent swarms. Using the ANTS mission, we have evaluated multiple formal methods to determine their effectiveness in modeling and assuring swarm behavior. This paper introduces how intelligent swarm technology is being proposed for NASA missions, and gives the results of a comparison of several formal methods and approaches for specifying intelligent swarm-based systems and their effectiveness for predicting emergent behavior.

  18. Swarm Economics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazadi, Sanza; Lee, John

    The Hamiltonian Method of Swarm Design is applied to the design of an agent based economic system. The method allows the design of a system from the global behaviors to the agent behaviors, with a guarantee that once certain derived agent-level conditions are satisfied, the system behavior becomes the desired behavior. Conditions which must be satisfied by consumer agents in order to bring forth the `invisible hand of the market' are derived and demonstrated in simulation. A discussion of how this method might be extended to other economic systems and non-economic systems is presented.

  19. Flagellar flows around bacterial swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauparas, Justas; Lauga, Eric

    2016-08-01

    Flagellated bacteria on nutrient-rich substrates can differentiate into a swarming state and move in dense swarms across surfaces. A recent experiment measured the flow in the fluid around an Escherichia coli swarm [Wu, Hosu, and Berg, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 108, 4147 (2011)], 10.1073/pnas.1016693108. A systematic chiral flow was observed in the clockwise direction (when viewed from above) ahead of the swarm with flow speeds of about 10 μ m /s , about 3 times greater than the radial velocity at the edge of the swarm. The working hypothesis is that this flow is due to the action of cells stalled at the edge of a colony that extend their flagellar filaments outward, moving fluid over the virgin agar. In this work we quantitatively test this hypothesis. We first build an analytical model of the flow induced by a single flagellum in a thin film and then use the model, and its extension to multiple flagella, to compare with experimental measurements. The results we obtain are in agreement with the flagellar hypothesis. The model provides further quantitative insight into the flagella orientations and their spatial distributions as well as the tangential speed profile. In particular, the model suggests that flagella are on average pointing radially out of the swarm and are not wrapped tangentially.

  20. Prompt penetration electric fields and the extreme topside ionospheric response to the June 22-23, 2015 geomagnetic storm as seen by the Swarm constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafyeva, Elvira; Zakharenkova, Irina; Alken, Patrick

    2016-09-01

    Using data from the three Swarm satellites, we study the ionospheric response to the intense geomagnetic storm of June 22-23, 2015. With the minimum SYM-H excursion of -207 nT, this storm is so far the second strongest geomagnetic storm in the current 24th solar cycle. A specific configuration of the Swarm satellites allowed investigation of the evolution of the storm-time ionospheric alterations on the day- and the nightside quasi-simultaneously. With the development of the main phase of the storm, a significant dayside increase of the vertical total electron content (VTEC) and electron density Ne was first observed at low latitudes on the dayside. From ~22 UT of 22 June to ~1 UT of 23 June, the dayside experienced a strong negative ionospheric storm, while on the nightside an extreme enhancement of the topside VTEC occurred at mid-latitudes of the northern hemisphere. Our analysis of the equatorial electrojet variations obtained from the magnetic Swarm data indicates that the storm-time penetration electric fields were, most likely, the main driver of the observed ionospheric effects at the initial phase of the storm and at the beginning of the main phase. The dayside ionosphere first responded to the occurrence of the strong eastward equatorial electric fields. Further, penetration of westward electric fields led to gradual but strong decrease of the plasma density on the dayside in the topside ionosphere. At this stage, the disturbance dynamo could have contributed as well. On the nightside, the observed extreme enhancement of the Ne and VTEC in the northern hemisphere (i.e., the summer hemisphere) in the topside ionosphere was most likely due to the combination of the prompt penetration electric fields, disturbance dynamo and the storm-time thermospheric circulation. From ~2.8 UT, the ionospheric measurements from the three Swarm satellites detected the beginning of the second positive storm on the dayside, which was not clearly associated with electrojet

  1. Science Experiments, Field and Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davido, Frank, Comp.

    Included is a compilation of 21 simple experiments for use by elementary teachers and aides. The experiments are grouped into these categories: plants, insects, and senses. The materials required are not specialized and would generally be available in the classroom or from a local store. A number of films are recommended and are available from the…

  2. Particle Swarm Transport in Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.; Mackin, T.; Boomsma, E.

    2012-12-01

    intersections were larger in width than the individual fractures, enabling the swarm to expand freely because of less confinement from the fracture walls. When swarms were released in a fracture network supporting an ambient flow rate, the ability to transport cohesive swarms through the fracture network was a function of the flow rate and swarm volume. For low ambient flow rates (< 4 μl/min), the gravitational force on the swarm dominated, and swarm transport followed a path similar to that for a quiescent fluid. For flow rates > 4 μl/min, large swarms (30 μl) remained cohesive (i.e. low loss of particles) as swarms were driven through the network both in the direction of and opposite to the direction of gravity. These experiments demonstrate conditions under which colloidal-size contaminants can be driven through a fracture network. High-speed transport of cohesive swarms depends on the volume of the swarm and the ambient flow rates that provide a balance of forces that prevents significant loss of particle from the swarm or deposition of particles along the flow path. Swarms that are transported cohesively travel along a highly localized path through a fracture network. Acknowledgment: The authors wish to acknowledge support of this work by the Geosciences Research Program, Office of Basic Energy Sciences US Department of Energy (DE-FG02-09ER16022) and NSF REU program in the Physics Department at Purdue University.

  3. Field Experiments in Litter Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finnie, William C.

    1973-01-01

    A series of urban and highway litter experiments in Richmond (Virginia), St. Louis, and Philadelphia indicated well-designed litter cans reduced littering about 15 percent along city streets and nearly 30 percent along highways. Also, the propensity to litter is critically affected by the characteristics of the individual and environmental…

  4. Family Oriented Field Experience in Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Karen A.

    A family-oriented geography field course about the southwestern United States was conducted in 1978 by a community college in Michigan (Delta College). Course activities took place in Colorado. The major purpose of the field experience was to offer learning experiences to family groups rather than to individual students. For purposes of the field…

  5. Field experiences with intelligent pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.N.; Duvivier, J.P.; Lefevre, D.E.; Robb, G.A.

    1996-08-01

    Oil and gas production operations use intelligent pigs for corrosion inspection of gathering systems and pipelines worldwide. The authors have been involved with intelligent pig inspections which have been conducted on over 155 different pipelines owned by one international corporation. A variety of intelligent pig vendors have been used with tools ranging from standard first generation magnetic flux leakage (MFL) to high-resolution MFL to standard and custom made ultrasonic (UT) tools. Experiences encountered during these inspections are discussed and resolutions to many of the problems are described.

  6. From theory to field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vos, Bram

    2016-04-01

    Peter Raats' achievements in Haren (NL) 1986-1997 were based on a solid theoretical insight in hydrology and transport process in soil. However, Peter was also the driving force behind many experimental studies and applied research. This will be illustrated by a broad range of examples ranging from the dynamics of composting processes of organic material; modelling and monitoring nutrient leaching at field-scale; wind erosion; water and nutrient dynamics in horticultural production systems; oxygen diffusion in soils; and processes of water and nutrient uptake by plant roots. Peter's leadership led to may new approaches and the introduction of innovative measurement techniques in Dutch research; ranging from TDR to nutrient concentration measurements in closed fertigation systems. This presentation will give a brief overview how Peter's theoretical and mathematical insights accelerated this applied research.

  7. Indirect Reciprocity; A Field Experiment

    PubMed Central

    van Apeldoorn, Jacobien; Schram, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Indirect reciprocity involves cooperative acts towards strangers, either in response to their kindness to third parties (downstream) or after receiving kindness from others oneself (upstream). It is considered to be important for the evolution of cooperative behavior amongst humans. Though it has been widely studied theoretically, the empirical evidence of indirect reciprocity has thus far been limited and based solely on behavior in laboratory experiments. We provide evidence from an online environment where members can repeatedly ask and offer services to each other, free of charge. For the purpose of this study we created several new member profiles, which differ only in terms of their serving history. We then sent out a large number of service requests to different members from all over the world. We observe that a service request is more likely to be rewarded for those with a profile history of offering the service (to third parties) in the past. This provides clear evidence of (downstream) indirect reciprocity. We find no support for upstream indirect reciprocity (in this case, rewarding the service request after having previously received the service from third parties), however. Our evidence of downstream indirect reciprocity cannot be attributed to reputational effects concerning one’s trustworthiness as a service user. PMID:27043712

  8. Velocity Structure in the West Bohemia Seismic Zone: Velocity Models Retrieved from different Earthquake Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrakis, C.; Löberich, E.; Kieslich, A.; Calo, M.; Vavrycuk, V.; Buske, S.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake swarms, fluid migration and gas springs are indications of the ongoing geodynamic processes within the West Bohemia seismic zone located at the Czech-German border. The possible relationship between the fluids, gas and seismicity is of particular interest and has motivated numerous past, ongoing and future studies, including a multidisciplinary monitoring proposal through the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP). The most seismically active area within the West Bohemia seismic zone is located at the Czech town Nový Kostel. The Nový Kostel zone experiences frequent swarms of several hundreds to thousands of earthquakes over a period of weeks to several months. The seismicity is always located in the same area and depth range (~5-15 km), however the activated fault segments and planes differ. For example, the 2008 swarm activated faults along the southern end of the seismic zone, the 2011 swarm activated the northern segment, and the recent 2014 swarm activated the middle of the seismic zone. This indicates changes to the local stress field, and may relate to fluid migration and/or the complicated tectonic situation. The West Bohemia Seismic Network (WEBNET) is ideally located for studying the Nový Kostel swarm area and provides good azimuthal coverage. Here, we use the high quality P- and S-wave arrival picks recorded by WEBNET to calculate swarm-dependent velocity models for the 2008 and 2011 swarms, and an averaged (swarm independent) model using earthquakes recorded between 1991 and 2011. To this end, we use double-difference tomography to calculate P- and S-wave velocity models. The models are compared and examined in terms of swarm-dependent velocities and structures. Since the P-to-S velocity ratio is particularly sensitive to the presence of pore fluids, we derive ratio models directly from the inverted P- and S-wave models in order to investigate the potential influence of fluids on the seismicity. Finally, clustering

  9. Natural or Induced: Identifying Natural and Induced Swarms from Pre-production and Co-production Microseismic Catalogs at the Coso Geothermal Field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoenball, Martin; Kaven, Joern; Glen, Jonathan M. G.; Davatzes, Nicholas C.

    2015-01-01

    Increased levels of seismicity coinciding with injection of reservoir fluids have prompted interest in methods to distinguish induced from natural seismicity. Discrimination between induced and natural seismicity is especially difficult in areas that have high levels of natural seismicity, such as the geothermal fields at the Salton Sea and Coso, both in California. Both areas show swarm-like sequences that could be related to natural, deep fluid migration as part of the natural hydrothermal system. Therefore, swarms often have spatio-temporal patterns that resemble fluid-induced seismicity, and might possibly share other characteristics. The Coso Geothermal Field and its surroundings is one of the most seismically active areas in California with a large proportion of its activity occurring as seismic swarms. Here we analyze clustered seismicity in and surrounding the currently produced reservoir comparatively for pre-production and co-production periods. We perform a cluster analysis, based on the inter-event distance in a space-time-energy domain to identify notable earthquake sequences. For each event j, the closest previous event i is identified and their relationship categorized. If this nearest neighbor’s distance is below a threshold based on the local minimum of the bimodal distribution of nearest neighbor distances, then the event j is included in the cluster as a child to this parent event i. If it is above the threshold, event j begins a new cluster. This process identifies subsets of events whose nearest neighbor distances and relative timing qualify as a cluster as well as a characterizing the parent-child relationships among events in the cluster. We apply this method to three different catalogs: (1) a two-year microseismic survey of the Coso geothermal area that was acquired before exploration drilling in the area began; (2) the HYS_catalog_2013 that contains 52,000 double-difference relocated events and covers the years 1981 to 2013; and (3) a

  10. Teaching Representation Translations with Magnetic Field Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillotson, Wilson Andrew; McCaskey, Timothy; Nasser, Luis

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a laboratory exercise designed to help students translate between different field representations. It starts with students qualitatively mapping field lines for various bar magnet configurations and continues with a Hall probe experiment in which students execute a series of scaffolded tasks, culminating in the prediction and…

  11. Overview of Field Experience - Degradation Rates & Lifetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Dirk; Kurtz, Sarah

    2015-09-14

    The way a PV module fails may depend not only on its design and the materials used in its construction, but also on the weather it experiences, the way it is mounted, and the quality control during its manufacture. This presentation gives an overview of Field Experience - what degradation rates and what lifetimes are being observed in various regions.

  12. Chip-scale spacecraft swarms: Dynamics, control, and exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, Lorraine

    Chip-scale spacecraft (chipsats) swarms will open new avenues for space exploration, both near Earth and in interplanetary space. The ability to create distributed sensor networks through swarms of low-cost, low-mass spacecraft shall enable the exploration of asteroids, icy moons, and the Earths magnetosphere become more feasible. This research develops new techniques for analyzing swarm dynamics, both in the limited case of the Kepler problem, and in general gravity environments, investigates several techniques for providing chipsat propulsion, and develops possible mission strategies. This work applies the Kustaanheimo-Stiefel (KS) transformation to the stochastic exploration presented by chipsat swarms. The contributions towards understanding swarm dynamics include analytical and numerical study of swarms in the purely Kepler problem as well as in general potential fields. A study of swarm evolution near an asteroid provides an example of the richness of behaviors that can be provided by chip-scale spacecraft swarms. Swarm actuation can be achieved through a number of means. This research presents a novel attitude control and propulsion system for chipsat swarms near Earth using a mutliple electrodynamic tethers. A numerical study of tether configurations for the greatest control authority is also presented. In addition, active solar sails are evaluated for swarm actuation beyond Earth, and a visualization of available control authority is presented. An example mission of swarm deployment near the Earth-Moon Lagrange point highlights the utility of swarm-based exploration. The candidate mission shows that a swarm with minimal actuation and a simple control scheme might provide distributed sensors in the region for a year or more, or dissipate quickly if uncontrolled. Such a chip-spacecraft mission would be a valuable precursor to further space development in these regions.

  13. Teaching Representation Translations with Magnetic Field Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillotson, Wilson Andrew; McCaskey, Timothy; Nasser, Luis

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a laboratory exercise designed to help students translate between different field representations. It starts with students qualitatively mapping field lines for various bar magnet configurations and continues with a Hall probe experiment in which students execute a series of scaffolded tasks, culminating in the prediction and measurement of the spatial variation of magnetic field components along a line near magnets. We describe the experimental tasks, various difficulties students have throughout, and ways this lab makes even their incorrect predictions better. We suggest that developing lab activities of this nature brings a new dimension to the ways students learn and interact with field concepts.

  14. Swarm Intelligence in Text Document Clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Potok, Thomas E

    2008-01-01

    Social animals or insects in nature often exhibit a form of emergent collective behavior. The research field that attempts to design algorithms or distributed problem-solving devices inspired by the collective behavior of social insect colonies is called Swarm Intelligence. Compared to the traditional algorithms, the swarm algorithms are usually flexible, robust, decentralized and self-organized. These characters make the swarm algorithms suitable for solving complex problems, such as document collection clustering. The major challenge of today's information society is being overwhelmed with information on any topic they are searching for. Fast and high-quality document clustering algorithms play an important role in helping users to effectively navigate, summarize, and organize the overwhelmed information. In this chapter, we introduce three nature inspired swarm intelligence clustering approaches for document clustering analysis. These clustering algorithms use stochastic and heuristic principles discovered from observing bird flocks, fish schools and ant food forage.

  15. [Experiences with varroatosis control (field cases)].

    PubMed

    Sabolic, M; Liebig, G

    1989-01-01

    The prevalence of Varroa jacobsoni in 20 bee-farms with an average of 371 swarms in the administrative districts of Tübingen and Stuttgart was investigated between 1983 and 1987. In summer as well as after each treatment the debris was examined regularly. On 19 bee-farms the population dynamics of the mites showed a similar pattern. During the first year after the varroatosis diagnosis we found an average of 30-50 mites after autumn treatment. This number increased to 300-600 varroa mites during the second and to several thousand during the third and fourth year. Evidently, the late autumn/early winter treatment of the more heavily infected swarms (during the third or fourth year after diagnosis) with Perizin or Folbex-VA-neu was usually insufficient to prevent damage or even a complete breakdown. In such swarms formic acid in form of the Illertisser mite plate must be applied as early as August or at the latest in September (after the end of the honey season). On one of the 20 bee-farms the development of the varroa mite infection differed from the other 19 farms. In this case the mite infection developed very slowly. The husbandry and environmental conditions could not explain this phenomenon. We think that this warrants further investigations.

  16. Swarming UAS II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-05

    employed biomimicry to model a swarm of UAS as a colony of ants, where each UAS dynamically updates a global memory map, allowing pheromone-like...matter of design, DSE-R-0808 employed biomimicry to model a swarm of UAS as a colony of ants, where each UAS dynamically updates a global memory map

  17. Emergent motion patterns of delay-coupled swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwaykowska, Klementyna; Mier-Y-Teran-Romero, Luis; Schwartz, Ira

    Emergent pattern-forming behaviours of aggregates of interacting autonomous agents are a topic of great interest in complex systems research, with applications including biology, environmental monitoring, and defence. We model, and experimentally verify, pattern formation in a swarm of delay-coupled agents, using a simple but general model of agent interactions. Using mean-field dynamics, we perform a thorough analytical study of the bifurcation structure as a function of network connectivity and delay to describe the emergence of pattern formation. We show that swarm motion patterns observed for a homogeneous swarm with all-to-all communication are robust to decreasing network connectivity and to heterogeneity in the parameters governing individual agent behaviours. We perform systematic numerical studies to show where the mean-field theory deviates from simulation and experiment. This research is funded by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) (Contract No. N0001412WX20083 and NRL Base Funding Contract No. N0001414WX00023). KS holds a NRC Research Associateship Award. LMR is a post-doctoral fellow at JHU, supported by NIH.

  18. Swarming in bounded domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbruster, Dieter; Motsch, Sébastien; Thatcher, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    The Vicsek model is a prototype for the emergence of collective motion. In free space, it is characterized by a swarm of particles all moving in the same direction. Since this dynamic does not include attraction among particles, the swarm, while aligning in velocity space, has no spatial coherence. Adding specular reflection at the boundaries generates global spatial coherence of the swarms while maintaining its velocity alignment. We investigate numerically how the geometry of the domain influences the Vicsek model using three type of geometry: a channel, a disk and a rectangle. Varying the parameters of the Vicsek model (e.g. noise levels and influence horizons), we discuss the mechanisms that generate spatial coherence and show how they create new dynamical solutions of the swarming motions in these geometries. Several observables are introduced to characterize the simulated patterns (e.g. mass profile, center of mass, connectivity of the swarm).

  19. Random Assignment: Practical Considerations from Field Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunford, Franklyn W.

    1990-01-01

    Seven qualitative issues associated with randomization that have the potential to weaken or destroy otherwise sound experimental designs are reviewed and illustrated via actual field experiments. Issue areas include ethics and legality, liability risks, manipulation of randomized outcomes, hidden bias, design intrusiveness, case flow, and…

  20. Teacher Knowledge Development in Early Field Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingersoll, Casey; Jenkins, Jayne M.; Lux, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of physical education preservice teacher knowledge development has been primarily limited to study of a single semester of early field experience (EFE), with findings from these investigations driving EFE design. The purpose of this research was to investigate what types of knowledge develop and how knowledge evolves and interacts to…

  1. Emergency preparedness activities during an ongoing seismic swarm: the experience of the 2011-2012 Pollino (Southern Italy) sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masi, A.; Mucciarelli, M.; Chiauzzi, L.; De Costanzo, G.; Loperte, G.

    2012-04-01

    Facing natural disasters effects can be a very difficult task lacking suitable activities and tools to preventively prepare the involved community (people, authorities, professionals, …) to the expected events. Therefore, a suite of preventive actions should be carried out to mitigate natural risks, in particular working to reduce the territorial vulnerability with respect to the specific natural hazard at hand, and to increase people response capacity. In fact, building social capacity helps to increase the risk perception and the people capacity to adapt to and cope with natural hazards. Since October 2011 a seismic swarm is affecting the Pollino mountain range, Southern Italy. At present the sequence is still ongoing, with more than 500 events with M>1, at least 40 well perceived by the population and a maximum magnitude at 3.6. The area mainly affected by the seismic sequence includes 12 villages, with a total population of about 50.000 inhabitants and, according to the current seismic hazard map it has high seismicity level. Such area was hit by a magnitude Ml=5.7 event in 1998 that produced macroseismic intensity not higher that VII-VIII degree of MCS scale and caused one dead, some injured and widespread damage in at least six municipalities. During the sequence, the National Department of Civil Protection (DPC) and the Civil Protection of Basilicata Region decided to put in action some measures aimed at verifying and enhancing emergency preparedness. These actions have been carried out with a constant and fruitful collaboration among the main stakeholders involved (scientific community, local and national governmental agencies, civil protection volunteers, etc) trough the following main activities: 1. collaboration between scientific community and the local and national offices of Civil Protection especially in the relationship with local authorities (e.g. mayors, which are civil protection authorities in their municipality); 2. interaction between DPC

  2. Adaptive Remote-Sensing Techniques Implementing Swarms of Mobile Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, S.M.; Loubriel, G.M.; Rbinett, R.D. III; Stantz, K.M.; Trahan, M.W.; Wagner, J.S.

    1999-04-01

    This paper focuses on our recent work at Sandia National Laboratories toward engineering a physics-based swarm of mobile vehicles for distributed sensing applications. Our goal is to coordinate a sensor array that optimizes sensor coverage and multivariate signal analysis by implementing artificial intelligence and evolutionary computational techniques. These intelligent control systems integrate both globally operating decision-making systems and locally cooperative information-sharing modes using genetically-trained neural networks. Once trained, neural networks have the ability to enhance real-time operational responses to dynamical environments, such as obstacle avoidance, responding to prevailing wind patterns, and overcoming other natural obscurants or interferences (jammers). The swarm realizes a collective set of sensor neurons with simple properties incorporating interactions based on basic community rules (potential fields) and complex interconnecting functions based on various neural network architectures, Therefore, the swarm is capable of redundant heterogeneous measurements which furnishes an additional degree of robustness and fault tolerance not afforded by conventional systems, while accomplishing such cognitive tasks as generalization, error correction, pattern recognition, and sensor fission. The robotic platforms could be equipped with specialized sensor devices including transmit/receive dipole antennas, chemical or biological sniffers in combination with recognition analysis tools, communication modulators, and laser diodes. Our group has been studying the collective behavior of an autonomous, multi-agent system applied to emerging threat applications. To accomplish such tasks, research in the fields of robotics, sensor technology, and swarms are being conducted within an integrated program. Mission scenarios under consideration include ground penetrating impulse radar (GPR) for detection of under-ground structures, airborne systems, and plume

  3. Spatial and temporal evolution of a microseismic swarm induced by water injection in the Arkema-Vauvert salt field (southern France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godano, Maxime; Bardainne, Thomas; Regnier, Marc; Deschamps, Anne; Valette, Marc

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates a microseismic swarm induced by injection operations in the Arkema-Vauvert salt field. The seismic activity in this field is monitored only by two permanent 3-component stations deployed in two wells. This study focuses on a period of 21 months (2004 January-2005 September) during which 1214 seismic events are located. The seismic activity is divided into three periods correlating with the water injection operations, highlighting a migration of the seismicity toward a thrust fault connecting the injection well and the production well. A waveform analysis reveals S-wave anisotropy, and focal mechanisms are computed using P, Sv and Sh amplitudes manually measured on anisotropy-corrected seismograms. First, synthetic resolution tests assess the reliability of the focal mechanisms determination from the two 3-component stations deployed in the field. Synthetic data are generated for 1056 earthquakes with various focal mechanisms and are perturbed with noise. The results indicate that the type of focal mechanism is correctly retrieved for 74 per cent of the synthetic earthquakes, but the uncertainties of the strike and rake are significant (from 15 to 45?). Next, the focal mechanisms are computed for 532 real earthquakes. The solutions primarily correspond to a dip-slip/thrust fault type with subvertical NE-SW and subhorizontal N-S to NW-SE nodal planes. Correlations between the focal mechanisms and the spatio-temporal distribution of the seismic activity are noteworthy. The study shows it is possible to reliably retrieve double-couple focal mechanisms for some faulting geometries with two 3-component seismological stations. However, the reliability of the focal mechanism retrieval depends on the station configuration. Therefore, the addition of further stations would improve the results.

  4. Magnetic field homogeneity for neutron EDM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Melissa

    2016-09-01

    The neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) is an observable which, if non-zero, would violate time-reversal symmetry, and thereby charge-parity symmetry of nature. New sources of CP violation beyond those found in the standard model of particle physics are already tightly constrained by nEDM measurements. Our future nEDM experiment seeks to improve the precision on the nEDM by a factor of 30, using a new ultracold neutron (UCN) source that is being constructed at TRIUMF. Systematic errors in the nEDM experiment are driven by magnetic field inhomogeneity and instability. The goal field inhomogeneity averaged over the experimental measurement cell (order of 1 m) is 1 nT/m, at a total magnetic field of 1 microTesla. This equates to roughly 10-3 homogeneity. A particularly challenging aspect of the design problem is that nearby magnetic materials will also affect the magnetic inhomogeneity, and this must be taken into account in completing the design. This poster will present the design methodology and status of the main coil for the experiment where we use FEA software (COMSOL) to simulate and analyze the magnetic field. Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council.

  5. From hybrid swarms to swarms of hybrids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The introgression of modern humans (Homo sapiens) with Neanderthals 40,000 YBP after a half-million years of separation, may have led to the best example of a hybrid swarm on earth. Modern trade and transportation in support of the human hybrids has continued to introduce additional species, genotyp...

  6. Guidance and control of swarms of spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Daniel James

    control uses a finite horizon to apply the most up-to-date control sequence while simultaneously calculating a new assignment and trajectory based on updated state information. Using a finite horizon allows collisions to only be considered between spacecraft that are near each other at the current time. This relaxes the all-to-all communication assumption so that only neighboring agents need to communicate. Experimental validation is done using the formation flying testbed. The swarm-reconfiguration algorithms are tested using multiple quadrotors. Experiments have been performed using sequential convex programming for offline trajectory planning, model predictive control and sequential convex programming for real-time trajectory generation, and the variable-swarm, distributed auction algorithm for optimal assignment. These experiments show that the swarm-reconfiguration algorithms can be implemented in real time using actual hardware. In general, this dissertation presents guidance and control algorithms that maintain and reconfigure swarms of spacecraft while maintaining the shape of the swarm, preventing collisions between the spacecraft, and minimizing the amount of propellant used.

  7. Utilizing Urban Environments for Effective Field Experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacAvoy, S. E.; Knee, K.

    2014-12-01

    Research surveys suggest that students are demanding more applied field experiences from their undergraduate environmental science programs. For geoscience educators at liberal arts colleges without field camps, university vehicles, or even geology departments, getting students into the field is especially rewarding - and especially challenging. Here, we present strategies that we have used in courses ranging from introductory environmental science for non-majors, to upper level environmental methods and geology classes. Urban locations provide an opportunity for a different type of local "field-work" than would otherwise be available. In the upper-level undergraduate Environmental Methods class, we relied on a National Park area located a 10-minute walk from campus for most field exercises. Activities included soil analysis, measuring stream flow and water quality parameters, dendrochronology, and aquatic microbe metabolism. In the non-majors class, we make use of our urban location to contrast water quality in parks and highly channelized urban streams. Here we share detailed lesson plans and budgets for field activities that can be completed during a class period of 2.5 hours with a $75 course fee, show how these activities help students gain quantitative competency, and provide student feedback about the classes and activities.

  8. IMP 8. Volume 1: EM field experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The electromagnetic fields experiment on IMP-J used two electric dipole antennas and a triaxial search coil magnetic antenna to sense the electric and magnetic field of plasma waves in space. The electric dipole antennas consisted of a fine wire, 0.021 inches in diameter, with a nominal extended tip-to-tip length of 400 ft. The outermost 50 ft. of each element was conducting and the rest of the antenna was covered with an insulating coating. The search coil antennas each consisted of a high mu core with two separate windings of 40,000 turns each to sense ac magnetic fields. The search coils had a length of 18 inches tip-to-tip and are mounted on the end of a boom. The axes of the x prime and y prime search coil antennas were parallel to the x prime and y prime electric antenna axes.

  9. The FIELDS experiment for Solar Probe Plus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bale, S.; Spp/Fields Team

    2010-12-01

    Many of our basic ideas on the plasma physics of acceleration, energy flow, and dissipation, and structure of the solar wind have never been rigorously confronted by direct experimental measurements in the region where these processes are actually occurring. Although Alfven waves, shocks, and magnetic reconnection are often invoked as heating mechanisms, there have never been any direct measurements of Alfvenic waves nor the associated Poynting flux nor any measurements of ion or electron kinetic energy flux in the region from 10 R_s to 30 R_s where the final stages of wind acceleration are believed to occur. The radial profiles of both slow and fast solar wind acceleration are based on remote-sensing measurements and have been obtained for only a few selected events. Thus, the spatial radial and perpendicular scales of the acceleration process have been averaged by line-of-sight effects and the possibility of intense localized acceleration cannot be ruled out. The Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission calls for the high quality fields and particles measurements required to solve the coronal heating and wind acceleration problem. The SPP 'FIELDS' experiment measures the electric and magnetic fields fundamental to the plasma physics of the structured and turbulent solar wind, flux ropes, collisionless shocks, and magnetic reconnection. FIELDS will make the first-ever measurements of the DC/Low-Frequency electric field inside of 1 AU allowing for in situ, high cadence measurements of the Poynting vector, the Elsasser variables, and E/B diagnostics of the wave spectrum to fce in the solar wind. SPP/FIELDS measures the radio wave (type III and II) signatures of microflares, energized electrons, and CME propagation. SPP/ FIELDS measures the plasma electron density to ~2% accuracy and the core electron temperature to ~5-10% accuracy more than 90% of the time at perihelion. FIELDS will also measure the in situ density fluctuation spectrum and structures at a very high cadence (

  10. Autonomous and Autonomic Swarms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Michael G.; Rash, James L.; Truszkowski, Walter F.; Rouff, Christopher A.; Sterritt, Roy

    2005-01-01

    A watershed in systems engineering is represented by the advent of swarm-based systems that accomplish missions through cooperative action by a (large) group of autonomous individuals each having simple capabilities and no global knowledge of the group s objective. Such systems, with individuals capable of surviving in hostile environments, pose unprecedented challenges to system developers. Design and testing and verification at much higher levels will be required, together with the corresponding tools, to bring such systems to fruition. Concepts for possible future NASA space exploration missions include autonomous, autonomic swarms. Engineering swarm-based missions begins with understanding autonomy and autonomicity and how to design, test, and verify systems that have those properties and, simultaneously, the capability to accomplish prescribed mission goals. Formal methods-based technologies, both projected and in development, are described in terms of their potential utility to swarm-based system developers.

  11. Swarms: Optimum aggregations of spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, H. L.

    1980-01-01

    Swarms are aggregations of spacecraft or elements of a space system which are cooperative in function, but physically isolated or only loosely connected. For some missions the swarm configuration may be optimum compared to a group of completely independent spacecraft or a complex rigidly integrated spacecraft or space platform. General features of swarms are induced by considering an ensemble of 26 swarms, examples ranging from Earth centered swarms for commercial application to swarms for exploring minor planets. A concept for a low altitude swarm as a substitute for a space platform is proposed and a preliminary design studied. The salient design feature is the web of tethers holding the 30 km swarm in a rigid two dimensional array in the orbital plane. A mathematical discussion and tutorial in tether technology and in some aspects of the distribution of services (mass, energy, and information to swarm elements) are included.

  12. The Fate of Colloidal Swarms in Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.; Olander, M. K.

    2009-12-01

    In the next 10-20 years, nano- and micro-sensor engineering will advance to the stage where sensor swarms could be deployed in the subsurface to probe rock formations and the fluids contained in them. Sensor swarms are groups of nano- or micro- sensors that are maintained as a coherent group to enable either sensor-to-sensor communication and/or coherent transmission of information as a group. The ability to maintain a swarm of sensors depends on the complexity of the flow paths in the rock, on the size and shape of the sensors and on the chemical interaction among the sensors, fluids, and rock surfaces. In this study, we investigate the effect of fracture aperture and fluid currents on the formation, evolution and break-up of colloidal swarms under gravity. Transparent cubic samples (100 mm x 100 mm x 100 mm) containing synthetic fractures with uniform and non-uniform aperture distributions were used to quantify the effect of aperture on swarm formation, swarm velocity, and swarm geometry using optical imaging. A fracture with a uniform aperture distribution was fabricated from two polished rectangular prisms of acrylic. A fracture with a non-uniform aperture distribution was created with a polished rectangular acrylic prism and an acrylic replica of an induced fracture surface from a carbonate rock. A series of experiments were performed to determine how swarm movement and geometry are affected as the walls of the fracture are brought closer together from 50 mm to 1 mm. During the experiments, the fracture was fully saturated with water. We created the swarms using two different particle sizes in dilute suspension (~ 1.0% by mass) . The particles were 3 micron diameter fluorescent polymer beads and 25 micron diameter soda-lime glass beads. The swarm behavior was imaged using an optical fluorescent imaging system composed of a CCD camera illuminated by a 100 mW diode-pumped doubled YAG laser. A swam was created when approximately 0.01 g drop of the suspension was

  13. Dynamics of Bacterial Swarming

    PubMed Central

    Darnton, Nicholas C.; Turner, Linda; Rojevsky, Svetlana; Berg, Howard C.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract When vegetative bacteria that can swim are grown in a rich medium on an agar surface, they become multinucleate, elongate, synthesize large numbers of flagella, produce wetting agents, and move across the surface in coordinated packs: they swarm. We examined the motion of swarming Escherichia coli, comparing the motion of individual cells to their motion during swimming. Swarming cells' speeds are comparable to bulk swimming speeds, but very broadly distributed. Their speeds and orientations are correlated over a short distance (several cell lengths), but this correlation is not isotropic. We observe the swirling that is conspicuous in many swarming systems, probably due to increasingly long-lived correlations among cells that associate into groups. The normal run-tumble behavior seen in swimming chemotaxis is largely suppressed, instead, cells are continually reoriented by random jostling by their neighbors, randomizing their directions in a few tenths of a second. At the edge of the swarm, cells often pause, then swim back toward the center of the swarm or along its edge. Local alignment among cells, a necessary condition of many flocking theories, is accomplished by cell body collisions and/or short-range hydrodynamic interactions. PMID:20483315

  14. Across the Arctic Teachers Experience Field Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnick, W. K.; Warburton, J.; Wiggins, H. V.; Marshall, S. A.; Darby, D. A.

    2005-12-01

    From studying snow geese on the North Slope of Alaska to sediment coring aboard the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Healy in the Arctic Ocean, K-12 teachers embark on scientific expeditions as part of a program that strives to make science in the Arctic a "virtual" reality. In the past two years, seventeen K-12 teachers have participated in Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating (TREC), a program that pairs teachers with researchers to improve science education through arctic field experiences. TREC builds on the scientific and cultural opportunities of the Arctic, linking research and education through topics that naturally engage students and the wider public. TREC includes expeditions as diverse as studying plants at Toolik Field Station, a research facility located 150 miles above the Arctic Circle; climate change studies in Norway's Svalbard archipelago; studying rivers in Siberia; or a trans-arctic expedition aboard the USCGC Healy collecting an integrated geophysical data set. Funded by the National Science Foundation Office of Polar Programs, TREC offers educators experiences in scientific inquiry while encouraging the public and students to become active participants in the scientific inquiry by engaging them virtually in arctic research. TREC uses online outreach elements to convey the research experience to a broad audience. While in remote field locations, teachers and researchers interact with students and the public through online seminars and live calls from the field, online journals with accompanying photos, and online bulletin boards. Since the program's inception in 2004, numerous visitors have posted questions or interacted with teachers, researchers, and students through the TREC website (http://www.arcus.org/trec). TREC teachers are required to transfer their experience of research and current science into their classroom through the development of relevant activities and resources. Teachers and researchers are encouraged to participate

  15. Magnetic Field Experiment Data Analysis System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, D. B.; Zanetti, L. J.; Suther, L. L.; Potemra, T. A.; Anderson, B. J.

    1995-01-01

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) Magnetic Field Experiment Data Analysis System (MFEDAS) has been developed to process and analyze satellite magnetic field experiment data from the TRIAD, MAGSAT, AMPTE/CCE, Viking, Polar BEAR, DMSP, HILAT, UARS, and Freja satellites. The MFEDAS provides extensive data management and analysis capabilities. The system is based on standard data structures and a standard user interface. The MFEDAS has two major elements: (1) a set of satellite unique telemetry processing programs for uniform and rapid conversion of the raw data to a standard format and (2) the program Magplot which has file handling, data analysis, and data display sections. This system is an example of software reuse, allowing new data sets and software extensions to be added in a cost effective and timely manner. Future additions to the system will include the addition of standard format file import routines, modification of the display routines to use a commercial graphics package based on X-Window protocols, and a generic utility for telemetry data access and conversion.

  16. Scale analysis of equatorial plasma irregularities derived from Swarm constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Chao; Stolle, Claudia; Lühr, Hermann; Park, Jaeheung; Fejer, Bela G.; Kervalishvili, Guram N.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the scale sizes of equatorial plasma irregularities (EPIs) using measurements from the Swarm satellites during its early mission and final constellation phases. We found that with longitudinal separation between Swarm satellites larger than 0.4°, no significant correlation was found any more. This result suggests that EPI structures include plasma density scale sizes less than 44 km in the zonal direction. During the Swarm earlier mission phase, clearly better EPI correlations are obtained in the northern hemisphere, implying more fragmented irregularities in the southern hemisphere where the ambient magnetic field is low. The previously reported inverted-C shell structure of EPIs is generally confirmed by the Swarm observations in the northern hemisphere, but with various tilt angles. From the Swarm spacecrafts with zonal separations of about 150 km, we conclude that larger zonal scale sizes of irregularities exist during the early evening hours (around 1900 LT).

  17. Hybrid dynamics in delay-coupled swarms with ``mothership'' networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindes, Jason; Schwartz, Ira

    Swarming behavior continues to be a subject of immense interest because of its centrality in many naturally occurring systems in biology and physics. Moreover, the development of autonomous mobile agents that can mimic the behavior of swarms and can be engineered to perform complex tasks without constant intervention is a very active field of practical research. Here we examine the effects on delay-coupled swarm pattern formation from the inclusion of a small fraction of highly connected nodes, ``motherships'', in the swarm interaction network. We find a variety of new behaviors and bifurcations, including new hybrid motions of previously analyzed patterns. Both numerical and analytic techniques are used to classify the dynamics and construct the phase diagram. The implications for swarm control and robustness from topological heterogeneity are also discussed. This research was funded by the office of Naval Research (ONR), and was performed while JH held a National Research Council Research Associateship Award.

  18. Technology-Focused Early Field Experiences in Preservice Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lux, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Although a broad body of research exists on field experiences in teacher education, one specific area of inquiry lacking substantial current research is that of technology-focused early field experiences, or field experiences that occur prior to student teaching and more formal clinical experiences. To address this gap, I conducted this…

  19. Imparting magnetic dipole heterogeneity to internalized iron oxide nanoparticles for microorganism swarm control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Paul Seung Soo; Becker, Aaron; Ou, Yan; Julius, Anak Agung; Kim, Min Jun

    2015-03-01

    Tetrahymena pyriformis is a single cell eukaryote that can be modified to respond to magnetic fields, a response called magnetotaxis. Naturally, this microorganism cannot respond to magnetic fields, but after modification using iron oxide nanoparticles, cells are magnetized and exhibit a constant magnetic dipole strength. In experiments, a rotating field is applied to cells using a two-dimensional approximate Helmholtz coil system. Using rotating magnetic fields, we characterize discrete cells' swarm swimming which is affected by several factors. The behavior of the cells under these fields is explained in detail. After the field is removed, relatively straight swimming is observed. We also generate increased heterogeneity within a population of cells to improve controllability of a swarm, which is explored in a cell model. By exploiting this straight swimming behavior, we propose a method to control discrete cells utilizing a single global magnetic input. Successful implementation of this swarm control method would enable teams of microrobots to perform a variety of in vitro microscale tasks impossible for single microrobots, such as pushing objects or simultaneous micromanipulation of discrete entities.

  20. Swarming: Flexible Roaming Plans

    PubMed Central

    Partridge, Jonathan D.

    2013-01-01

    Movement over an agar surface via swarming motility is subject to formidable challenges not encountered during swimming. Bacteria display a great deal of flexibility in coping with these challenges, which include attracting water to the surface, overcoming frictional forces, and reducing surface tension. Bacteria that swarm on “hard” agar surfaces (robust swarmers) display a hyperflagellated and hyperelongated morphology. Bacteria requiring a “softer” agar surface (temperate swarmers) do not exhibit such a dramatic morphology. For polarly flagellated robust swarmers, there is good evidence that restriction of flagellar rotation somehow signals the induction of a large number of lateral flagella, but this scenario is apparently not relevant to temperate swarmers. Swarming bacteria can be further subdivided by their requirement for multiple stators (Mot proteins) or a stator-associated protein (FliL), secretion of essential polysaccharides, cell density-dependent gene regulation including surfactant synthesis, a functional chemotaxis signaling pathway, appropriate cyclic (c)-di-GMP levels, induction of virulence determinants, and various nutritional requirements such as iron limitation or nitrate availability. Swarming strategies are as diverse as the bacteria that utilize them. The strength of these numerous designs stems from the vantage point they offer for understanding mechanisms for effective colonization of surface niches, acquisition of pathogenic potential, and identification of environmental signals that regulate swarming. The signature swirling and streaming motion within a swarm is an interesting phenomenon in and of itself, an emergent behavior with properties similar to flocking behavior in diverse systems, including birds and fish, providing a convenient new avenue for modeling such behavior. PMID:23264580

  1. Particle Swarm Optimization Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The Particle Swarm Optimization Toolbox is a library of evolutionary optimization tools developed in the MATLAB environment. The algorithms contained in the library include a genetic algorithm (GA), a single-objective particle swarm optimizer (SOPSO), and a multi-objective particle swarm optimizer (MOPSO). Development focused on both the SOPSO and MOPSO. A GA was included mainly for comparison purposes, and the particle swarm optimizers appeared to perform better for a wide variety of optimization problems. All algorithms are capable of performing unconstrained and constrained optimization. The particle swarm optimizers are capable of performing single and multi-objective optimization. The SOPSO and MOPSO algorithms are based on swarming theory and bird-flocking patterns to search the trade space for the optimal solution or optimal trade in competing objectives. The MOPSO generates Pareto fronts for objectives that are in competition. A GA, based on Darwin evolutionary theory, is also included in the library. The GA consists of individuals that form a population in the design space. The population mates to form offspring at new locations in the design space. These offspring contain traits from both of the parents. The algorithm is based on this combination of traits from parents to hopefully provide an improved solution than either of the original parents. As the algorithm progresses, individuals that hold these optimal traits will emerge as the optimal solutions. Due to the generic design of all optimization algorithms, each algorithm interfaces with a user-supplied objective function. This function serves as a "black-box" to the optimizers in which the only purpose of this function is to evaluate solutions provided by the optimizers. Hence, the user-supplied function can be numerical simulations, analytical functions, etc., since the specific detail of this function is of no concern to the optimizer. These algorithms were originally developed to support entry

  2. Complexity and Fly Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cates, Grant; Murray, Joelle

    Complexity is the study of phenomena that emerge from a collection of interacting objects and arises in many systems throughout physics, biology, finance, economics and more. Certain kinds of complex systems can be described by self-organized criticality (SOC). An SOC system is one that is internally driven towards some critical state. Recent experimental work suggests scaling behavior of fly swarms-one of the hallmarks of an SOC system. Our goal is to look for SOC behavior in computational models of fly swarms.

  3. Magnetospheric ULF wave studies in the frame of Swarm mission: new advanced tools for automated detection of pulsations in magnetic and electric field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasis, Georgios; Daglis, Ioannis A.; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Georgiou, Marina; Giamini, Sigiava A.; Sandberg, Ingmar; Haagmans, Roger

    2014-05-01

    The rekindling of the interest in space science in the last 15 years has led to many successful satellite missions in the Earth's magnetosphere and topside ionosphere, which were able to provide the scientific community with high-quality data on the magnetic and electric fields surrounding our planet. This data pool will be further enriched by the measurements of ESA's Swarm mission, a constellation of three satellites in different polar orbits, flying at altitudes from 400 to 550 km, which was launched on the 22nd of November 2013. Aiming at the best scientific exploitation of this corpus of accumulated data, we have developed a set of analysis tools that can cope with measurements of various spacecraft, at various regions of the magnetosphere and in the topside ionosphere. Our algorithms are based on a combination of wavelet spectral methods and artificial neural network techniques and are suited for the detection of waves and wave-like disturbances as well as the extraction of several physical parameters. Our recent work demonstrates the applicability of our developed analysis tools, both for individual case studies and statistical analysis of ultra low frequency (ULF) waves. We provide evidence for a rare simultaneous observation of a ULF wave event in the Earth's magnetosphere, topside ionosphere and surface: we have found a specific time interval during the Halloween 2003 magnetic storm, when the Cluster and CHAMP spacecraft were in good local time (LT) conjunction, and have examined the ULF wave activity in the Pc3 (22-100 mHz), Pc4 (7-22 mHz) and Pc5 (1-7 mHz) bands using data from the Geotail, Cluster and CHAMP missions, as well as the CARISMA, GIMA and IMAGE magnetometer networks. Our study shows that the same wave event, characterized by increased activity in the high end of the Pc3 band, was simultaneously observed by all three satellite missions and by certain stations of ground networks. This observation provides a strong argument in favour of the

  4. Project MAFEX: Report on Preservice Field Experiences in Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Mark R.

    Project MAFEX (Meta-Analysis of Field Experience) used standard meta-analysis techniques to synthesize the available body of research concerning preservice field experience programs. Several important questions were considered: (1) What types of field experience programs are most and least effective? (2) Are there common characteristics of field…

  5. Transport of Particle Swarms Through Variable Aperture Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boomsma, E.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2012-12-01

    Particle transport through fractured rock is a key concern with the increased use of micro- and nano-size particles in consumer products as well as from other activities in the sub- and near surface (e.g. mining, industrial waste, hydraulic fracturing, etc.). While particle transport is often studied as the transport of emulsions or dispersions, particles may also enter the subsurface from leaks or seepage that lead to particle swarms. Swarms are drop-like collections of millions of colloidal-sized particles that exhibit a number of unique characteristics when compared to dispersions and emulsions. Any contaminant or engineered particle that forms a swarm can be transported farther, faster, and more cohesively in fractures than would be expected from a traditional dispersion model. In this study, the effects of several variable aperture fractures on colloidal swarm cohesiveness and evolution were studied as a swarm fell under gravity and interacted with the fracture walls. Transparent acrylic was used to fabricate synthetic fracture samples with (1) a uniform aperture, (2) a converging region followed by a uniform region (funnel shaped), (3) a uniform region followed by a diverging region (inverted funnel), and (4) a cast of a an induced fracture from a carbonate rock. All of the samples consisted of two blocks that measured 100 x 100 x 50 mm. The minimum separation between these blocks determined the nominal aperture (0.5 mm to 20 mm). During experiments a fracture was fully submerged in water and swarms were released into it. The swarms consisted of a dilute suspension of 3 micron polystyrene fluorescent beads (1% by mass) with an initial volume of 5μL. The swarms were illuminated with a green (525 nm) LED array and imaged optically with a CCD camera. The variation in fracture aperture controlled swarm behavior. Diverging apertures caused a sudden loss of confinement that resulted in a rapid change in the swarm's shape as well as a sharp increase in its velocity

  6. C-2-Upgrade Field Reversed Configuration Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Artem

    2016-10-01

    In the C-2 field-reversed configuration (FRC) experiment, tangential neutral beam injection (20 - 40 keV hydrogen, 4 MW total), coupled with electrically-biased plasma guns at the plasma ends, magnetic end plugs, and advanced surface conditioning, led to dramatic reductions in turbulence-driven losses and greatly improved plasma stability. Under such conditions, highly reproducible FRCs with a significant fast-ion population and total plasma temperature of about 1 keV were achieved. The FRC's were macroscopically stable and decayed on characteristic transport time scales of a few milliseconds. In order to sustain an FRC configuration, the C-2 device was upgraded with a new neutral beam injection (NBI) system, which can deliver a total of 10 + MW of hydrogen beam power, by far the largest ever used in a compact toroid plasma experiment. Compared to C-2, the beam energy was lowered to 15 keV and angled injection geometry was adopted to provide better beam coupling to the FRC. The upgraded neutral beams produce a dominant fast ion population that makes a dramatic beneficial impact on the overall plasma performance. Specifically: (1) high-performance, advanced beam-driven FRCs were produced and sustained for times significantly longer (5 + ms) than all characteristic plasma decay times without the beams, (2) the sustainment is fully correlated with neutral beam injection, (3) confinement of fast ions is close to the classical limit, and (4) new, benign collective fast ion effects were observed. Collectively, these accomplishments represent a dramatic advance towards the scientific validation of the FRC-based approach to fusion. This talk will provide a comprehensive overview of the C-2U device and recent experimental advances.

  7. Quantifying and Tracing Information Cascades in Swarms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X. Rosalind; Miller, Jennifer M.; Lizier, Joseph T.; Prokopenko, Mikhail; Rossi, Louis F.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a novel, information-theoretic, characterisation of cascades within the spatiotemporal dynamics of swarms, explicitly measuring the extent of collective communications. This is complemented by dynamic tracing of collective memory, as another element of distributed computation, which represents capacity for swarm coherence. The approach deals with both global and local information dynamics, ultimately discovering diverse ways in which an individual’s spatial position is related to its information processing role. It also allows us to contrast cascades that propagate conflicting information with waves of coordinated motion. Most importantly, our simulation experiments provide the first direct information-theoretic evidence (verified in a simulation setting) for the long-held conjecture that the information cascades occur in waves rippling through the swarm. Our experiments also exemplify how features of swarm dynamics, such as cascades’ wavefronts, can be filtered and predicted. We observed that maximal information transfer tends to follow the stage with maximal collective memory, and principles like this may be generalised in wider biological and social contexts. PMID:22808095

  8. Experiments with Low Voltage Field Emission EPMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournelle, J.; Cathey, H. E.

    2014-12-01

    We report results from 5-7 keV Field Emission EPMA experiments on selected natural minerals and synthetic materials to illustrate some strengths -- and pitfalls --of low keV FE-EPMA. In a silicate mineral in pseudotachylite from South Mountain, AZ (Goodwin, 1999), the spatial resolution (equation of Merlet & Llovet, 2012, with an 80 nm diameter beam) at 7 keV for Si Ka is calculated to be 588 nm, 391 nm for Ca Ka and 641 nm for Fe La. This pseudotachylite contains abundant 5-10 um sieve-textured crystals full of inclusions with low BSE intensity. Previous 15 keV work suggested the sieve phase was amphibole. At 7 keV, it is possible to identify the compositions of the submicron inclusions as SiO2 and a K-rich alumino-silicate phase; the host composition is epidote. The enhanced resolution of FE-EPMA reveals problems with some microanalytical standards. Vicenzi and Rose (2008) showed submicron inclusions in the Smithsonian Kakanui hornblende standard. Our 7 keV experiments show the ~400 nm inclusions consist of a silicate phase (glass?), Fe-Ti oxide and possibly a gas bubble, concentrated along planes or grain boundaries. SEM imaging of an inclusion analyzed with a focused FE beam shows radiating trails of debris on the hornblende host, consistent with residue from a popped vapor bubble in the inclusion. How should FE-EPMA handle standards that may have inclusions? Use a focused beam avoiding inclusions? Sometimes, perhaps. However, we used a defocused beam to "average" the phases. The results show little or no deviation from the published wet chemical analysis. Operation at reduced keV may require use of non-traditional X-ray lines (e.g. Gopon et al, 2013 for Fe Ll vs Fe La). Experiments at 5 keV were also performed upon a synthetic material enriched in Nd (Nd-Mg-Zn). Fischer & Baun (1967) demonstrated problems with the Ma/Mb lines of REE; we find that use of the Nd Mz line is necessary in order to achieve reasonable results in this material (98 wt% total, Nd 36 wt

  9. Extraterrestrial Virtual Field Experience: Water at Meridiani

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggan-Haas, D.; Million, C.; Sullivan, R. J., Jr.; Hayes, A. G., Jr.; Ross, R. M.; St Clair, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Spacecraft Planetary Imaging Facility (SPIF) at Cornell University, in collaboration with Million Concepts and the Paleontological Research Institute (PRI), has developed the Extraterrestrial Virtual Field Experience (EVFE), a web-based, game-like and inquiry-driven classroom activity targeted to middle school through undergraduate introductory Earth science classrooms. Students play the role of mission scientists for a NASA rover mission, tasked with targeting the rover's scientific instruments to investigate a specific scientific question about the landing site. As with the real mission, the student operators must optimize the efficient use of limited resources and time against the need to make observations to address working hypotheses. The activity uses only real--not artificial or simulated--mission data, and students are guided throughout by a "Mission Manager" who provides hints and advice about the scientific meaning of observations within the broader context of the mission objectives. The MER Opportunity EVFE is a pilot effort, the first of five EVFE modules planned a rate of one per year that will feature different NASA missions and scientific topics. The MER Opportunity EVFE has already been developed and focuses on the investigation of the history of water on Mars at the Meridiani landing site of the Opportunity rover. The module includes a teacher guide and is currently available to educators through the SPIF website.

  10. Technology Supported Cognitive Apprenticeship Transforms the Student Teaching Field Experience: Improving the Student Teaching Field Experience for All Triad Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alger, Christianna; Kopcha, Theodore J.

    2011-01-01

    Despite issues of fragmentation, isolation, and disconnection from the university associated with the student teaching field experience, the field experience plays a critical role in teacher education. In this article, the authors provide an overview of eSupervision, a technology-based innovation to improve the student teaching field experience by…

  11. [Study on whorl swarming growth phenomenon of Proteus mirabilis].

    PubMed

    He, Xianyuan; Liao, Sixiang; Liu, Junkang; Li, Kun; Liu, Yanxia; Yu, Lurong

    2015-02-01

    The present paper is aimed to explore the origins of Proteus mirabilis (PM) whorl swarming growth phenomenon. The whorl swarming growth phenomenon of PM was observed by changed bacterial culture inoculation time, humidity, vaccination practices, cultured flat placement, magnetic field, pH and other factors. Bacterial ring spiral direction of rotation is counterclockwise and the volatile growth process of PM was whorl swarming growth phenomenon. Spiro fluctuation phenomenon was of high frequency in the sealing tanks by cultured anytime inoculation, wherever inoculation technique applied or not, the presence or absence of the magnetic field, and wherever the dish position was. The experimental results showed that the whorl swarming growth phenomenon of PM requires specific pH environment, in which the facts may be relative to its genetic characteristics and the Earths rotation.

  12. Particle Swarms in Fractures: Open Versus Partially Closed Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boomsma, E.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    In the field, fractures may be isolated or connected to fluid reservoirs anywhere along the perimeter of a fracture. These boundaries affect fluid circulation, flow paths and communication with external reservoirs. The transport of drop like collections of colloidal-sized particles (particle swarms) in open and partially closed systems was studied. A uniform aperture synthetic fracture was constructed using two blocks (100 x 100 x 50 mm) of transparent acrylic placed parallel to each other. The fracture was fully submerged a tank filled with 100cSt silicone oil. Fracture apertures were varied from 5-80 mm. Partially closed systems were created by sealing the sides of the fracture with plastic film. The four boundary conditions study were: (Case 1) open, (Case 2) closed on the sides, (Case 3) closed on the bottom, and (Case 4) closed on both the sides and bottom of the fracture. A 15 μL dilute suspension of soda-lime glass particles in oil (2% by mass) were released into the fracture. Particle swarms were illuminated using a green (525 nm) LED array and imaged with a CCD camera. The presence of the additional boundaries modified the speed of the particle swarms (see figure). In Case 1, enhanced swarm transport was observed for a range of apertures, traveling faster than either very small or very large apertures. In Case 2, swarm velocities were enhanced over a larger range of fracture apertures than in any of the other cases. Case 3 shifted the enhanced transport regime to lower apertures and also reduced swarm speed when compared to Case 2. Finally, Case 4 eliminated the enhanced transport regime entirely. Communication between the fluid in the fracture and an external fluid reservoir resulted in enhanced swarm transport in Cases 1-3. The non-rigid nature of a swarm enables drag from the fracture walls to modify the swarm geometry. The particles composing a swarm reorganize in response to the fracture, elongating the swarm and maintaining its density. Unlike a

  13. Particle Swarm Optimization With Interswarm Interactive Learning Strategy.

    PubMed

    Qin, Quande; Cheng, Shi; Zhang, Qingyu; Li, Li; Shi, Yuhui

    2016-10-01

    The learning strategy in the canonical particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is often blamed for being the primary reason for loss of diversity. Population diversity maintenance is crucial for preventing particles from being stuck into local optima. In this paper, we present an improved PSO algorithm with an interswarm interactive learning strategy (IILPSO) by overcoming the drawbacks of the canonical PSO algorithm's learning strategy. IILPSO is inspired by the phenomenon in human society that the interactive learning behavior takes place among different groups. Particles in IILPSO are divided into two swarms. The interswarm interactive learning (IIL) behavior is triggered when the best particle's fitness value of both the swarms does not improve for a certain number of iterations. According to the best particle's fitness value of each swarm, the softmax method and roulette method are used to determine the roles of the two swarms as the learning swarm and the learned swarm. In addition, the velocity mutation operator and global best vibration strategy are used to improve the algorithm's global search capability. The IIL strategy is applied to PSO with global star and local ring structures, which are termed as IILPSO-G and IILPSO-L algorithm, respectively. Numerical experiments are conducted to compare the proposed algorithms with eight popular PSO variants. From the experimental results, IILPSO demonstrates the good performance in terms of solution accuracy, convergence speed, and reliability. Finally, the variations of the population diversity in the entire search process provide an explanation why IILPSO performs effectively.

  14. Selectively-informed particle swarm optimization

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yang; Du, Wenbo; Yan, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Particle swarm optimization (PSO) is a nature-inspired algorithm that has shown outstanding performance in solving many realistic problems. In the original PSO and most of its variants all particles are treated equally, overlooking the impact of structural heterogeneity on individual behavior. Here we employ complex networks to represent the population structure of swarms and propose a selectively-informed PSO (SIPSO), in which the particles choose different learning strategies based on their connections: a densely-connected hub particle gets full information from all of its neighbors while a non-hub particle with few connections can only follow a single yet best-performed neighbor. Extensive numerical experiments on widely-used benchmark functions show that our SIPSO algorithm remarkably outperforms the PSO and its existing variants in success rate, solution quality, and convergence speed. We also explore the evolution process from a microscopic point of view, leading to the discovery of different roles that the particles play in optimization. The hub particles guide the optimization process towards correct directions while the non-hub particles maintain the necessary population diversity, resulting in the optimum overall performance of SIPSO. These findings deepen our understanding of swarm intelligence and may shed light on the underlying mechanism of information exchange in natural swarm and flocking behaviors. PMID:25787315

  15. Investigating Ground Swarm Robotics Using Agent Based Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    sensors and explosive detectors. These will be laid out further in Chapter II. Swarm robotics has attracted much attention because of the numerous key... attractive and repulsive force fields, which then control the dispersion and coverage of the swarm. Last but not least, Batalin and Sukhatme (2002) focused...of animals such as cockroaches , crickets, snakes and even lobsters (Ayers et al., 2002). Each of these species is highly efficient in mobility in

  16. Geomagnetic Jerks in the Swarm Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, William; Beggan, Ciaran; Macmillan, Susan

    2016-08-01

    The timely provision of geomagnetic observations as part of the European Space Agency (ESA) Swarm mission means up-to-date analysis and modelling of the Earth's magnetic field can be conducted rapidly in a manner not possible before. Observations from each of the three Swarm constellation satellites are available within 4 days and a database of close-to-definitive ground observatory measurements is updated every 3 months. This makes it possible to study very recent variations of the core magnetic field. Here we investigate rapid, unpredictable internal field variations known as geomagnetic jerks. Given that jerks represent (currently) unpredictable changes in the core field and have been identified to have happened in 2014 since Swarm was launched, we ask what impact this might have on the future accuracy of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF). We assess the performance of each of the IGRF-12 secular variation model candidates in light of recent jerks, given that four of the nine candidates are novel physics-based predictive models.

  17. Particle Swarm Transport through Immiscible Fluid Layers in a Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teasdale, N. D.; Boomsma, E.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2011-12-01

    Immiscible fluids occur either naturally (e.g. oil & water) or from anthropogenic processes (e.g. liquid CO2 & water) in the subsurface and complicate the transport of natural or engineered micro- or nano-scale particles. In this study, we examined the effect of immiscible fluids on the formation and evolution of particle swarms in a fracture. A particle swarm is a collection of colloidal-size particles in a dilute suspension that exhibits cohesive behavior. Swarms fall under gravity with a velocity that is greater than the settling velocity of a single particle. Thus a particle swarm of colloidal contaminants can potentially travel farther and faster in a fracture than expected for a dispersion or emulsion of colloidal particles. We investigated the formation, evolution, and break-up of colloidal swarms under gravity in a uniform aperture fracture as hydrophobic/hydrophyllic particle swarms move across an oil-water interface. A uniform aperture fracture was fabricated from two transparent acrylic rectangular prisms (100 mm x 50 mm x 100 mm) that are separated by 1, 2.5, 5, 10 or 50 mm. The fracture was placed, vertically, inside a glass tank containing a layer of pure silicone oil (polydimethylsiloxane) on distilled water. Along the length of the fracture, 30 mm was filled with oil and 70 mm with water. Experiments were conducted using silicone oils with viscosities of 5, 10, 100, or 1000 cSt. Particle swarms (5 μl) were comprised of a 1% concentration (by mass) of 25 micron glass beads (hydrophilic) suspended in a water drop, or a 1% concentration (by mass) of 3 micron polystyrene fluorescent beads (hydrophobic) suspended in a water drop. The swarm behavior was imaged using an optical fluorescent imaging system composed of a CCD camera and by green (525 nm) LED arrays for illumination. Swarms were spherical and remained coherent as they fell through the oil because of the immiscibility of oil and water. However, as a swarm approached the oil-water interface, it

  18. Field experiences in science teacher preparation programs of Missouri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhea, Marilyn Sue Alvis

    The purpose of this study was to collect and analyze data pertinent to identifying the differences and similarities in the design and implementation of field experiences for pre-service science teachers in institutions of higher education in the State of Missouri. Directors of field experience from 25 Institutions of Higher Education (IHE) that prepare both elementary and secondary science teachers and 5 additional IHE that prepare only elementary teachers were surveyed using a 48-item Likert scale instrument designed for this study. Data were collected on the hours of field experience in relation to science and other methods classes, distribution of field experience hours across the program, and total hours of field experience required. Comparisons were made between elementary and secondary science teacher preparation programs. Five areas of field experience were surveyed: design of early field experience, design of student teaching, support provided by IHE for cooperating schools, field experience assessment practices, and relationships between pre-service teachers, cooperating teachers and IHE educators. Analyses of the responses indicate statistically significant differences in the number of field experience hours between IRE programs for both early field experience (p < .05) and student teaching (p < .01). Differences in number of field experience hours by level of certification were not significant. Correlation of scores was significant between the elementary and secondary levels for both early field experience design (r = .97) and student teaching design (r = .75). No other significant correlation was found. This study found highly heterogeneous practices regarding field experience exist in Missouri IHE programs. When reported practices are compared to standards set in the professional literature, as a group Missouri IHE science teacher preparation programs could be described as traditional apprenticeships or quasi-professional development school programs.

  19. Precise science orbits for the Swarm satellite constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den IJssel, Jose; Encarnação, João; Doornbos, Eelco; Visser, Pieter

    2015-09-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) Swarm mission was launched on 22 November 2013 to study the dynamics of the Earth's magnetic field and its interaction with the Earth system. The mission consists of three identical satellites, flying in carefully selected near polar orbits. Two satellites fly almost side-by-side at an initial altitude of about 480 km, and will descend due to drag to around 300 km during the mission lifetime. The third satellite was placed in a higher orbit of about 530 km altitude, and therefore descends much more slowly. To geolocate the Swarm observations, each satellite is equipped with an 8-channel, dual-frequency GPS receiver for Precise Orbit Determination (POD). Onboard laser retroreflectors provide the opportunity to validate the orbits computed from the GPS observations using Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) data. Precise Science Orbits (PSOs) for the Swarm satellites are computed by the Faculty of Aerospace Engineering at Delft University of Technology in the framework of the Swarm Satellite Constellation Application and Research Facility (SCARF). The PSO product consists of both a reduced-dynamic and a kinematic orbit solution. After a short description of the Swarm GPS data characteristics, the adopted POD strategy for both orbit types is explained and first PSO results from more than one year of Swarm GPS data are presented. Independent SLR validation shows that the reduced-dynamic Swarm PSOs have an accuracy of better than 2 cm, while the kinematic orbits have a slightly reduced accuracy of about 4-5 cm. Orbit comparisons indicate that the consistency between the reduced-dynamic and kinematic Swarm PSO for most parts of the Earth is at the 4-5 cm level. Close to the geomagnetic poles and along the geomagnetic equator, however, the kinematic orbits show larger errors, which are probably due to ionospheric scintillations that affect the Swarm GPS receivers over these areas.

  20. Methane Screening in JET Reverse Field Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Strachan; B. Alper; G. Corrigan; S.K. Erents; C. Giroud; A. Korotkov; H. Leggate; G.F. Mathews; R.A. Pitts; M. Stamp; J. Spence

    2004-05-17

    JET plasmas with reverse magnetic field feature a different SOL flow than those with normal field. The observed carbon fueling efficiency from injecting methane gas was similar in reverse and normal field. EDGE2D modeling used an externally applied force to create the SOL flows, without specifying the origin of the force. The resulting flow agreed reasonably with the experimental values between the separatrix and 4 cm mid-plane depth in the SOL. The effect of the flow on the calculated carbon screening was 5 to 15% higher carbon fueling efficiency for the low flow velocity with reverse field.

  1. Exploring Group Cohesion in a Higher Education Field Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malcarne, Brian Keith

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain understanding into the experience of group cohesion for university students participating in an academic field experience. A mixed methods approach was used following a two-phase, sequential research design to help provide a more complete explanation of how group cohesion was impacted by the field experience.…

  2. Integrating Research into LIS Field Experiences in Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Selinda Adelle; Hoffmann, Kristin; Dawson, Diane

    2009-01-01

    Field experiences function as a link between LIS theory and practice. Students should be provided with an experience that is a true reflection of the professional environment. The increasing focus on research by academic librarians provides an opportunity and responsibility to integrate research into the field experiences of LIS students.…

  3. An Improved Cockroach Swarm Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Obagbuwa, I. C.; Adewumi, A. O.

    2014-01-01

    Hunger component is introduced to the existing cockroach swarm optimization (CSO) algorithm to improve its searching ability and population diversity. The original CSO was modelled with three components: chase-swarming, dispersion, and ruthless; additional hunger component which is modelled using partial differential equation (PDE) method is included in this paper. An improved cockroach swarm optimization (ICSO) is proposed in this paper. The performance of the proposed algorithm is tested on well known benchmarks and compared with the existing CSO, modified cockroach swarm optimization (MCSO), roach infestation optimization RIO, and hungry roach infestation optimization (HRIO). The comparison results show clearly that the proposed algorithm outperforms the existing algorithms. PMID:24959611

  4. Analysis of image thresholding segmentation algorithms based on swarm intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Lu, Kai; Gao, Yinghui; Yang, Bo

    2013-03-01

    Swarm intelligence-based image thresholding segmentation algorithms are playing an important role in the research field of image segmentation. In this paper, we briefly introduce the theories of four existing image segmentation algorithms based on swarm intelligence including fish swarm algorithm, artificial bee colony, bacteria foraging algorithm and particle swarm optimization. Then some image benchmarks are tested in order to show the differences of the segmentation accuracy, time consumption, convergence and robustness for Salt & Pepper noise and Gaussian noise of these four algorithms. Through these comparisons, this paper gives qualitative analyses for the performance variance of the four algorithms. The conclusions in this paper would give a significant guide for the actual image segmentation.

  5. Formation Control of Robotic Swarm Using Bounded Artificial Forces

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Yabing; Peng, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Formation control of multirobot systems has drawn significant attention in the recent years. This paper presents a potential field control algorithm, navigating a swarm of robots into a predefined 2D shape while avoiding intermember collisions. The algorithm applies in both stationary and moving targets formation. We define the bounded artificial forces in the form of exponential functions, so that the behavior of the swarm drove by the forces can be adjusted via selecting proper control parameters. The theoretical analysis of the swarm behavior proves the stability and convergence properties of the algorithm. We further make certain modifications upon the forces to improve the robustness of the swarm behavior in the presence of realistic implementation considerations. The considerations include obstacle avoidance, local minima, and deformation of the shape. Finally, detailed simulation results validate the efficiency of the proposed algorithm, and the direction of possible futrue work is discussed in the conclusions. PMID:24453809

  6. Field Trips as Valuable Learning Experiences in Geography Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krakowka, Amy Richmond

    2012-01-01

    Field trips have been acknowledged as valuable learning experiences in geography. This article uses Kolb's (1984) experiential learning model to discuss how students learn and how field trips can help enhance learning. Using Kolb's experiential learning theory as a guide in the design of field trips helps ensure that field trips contribute to…

  7. From hybrid swarms to swarms of hybrids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Szalanski, Allen L; Gaskin, John F.; Young, Nicholas E.; West, Amanda; Jarnevich, Catherine S.; Tripodi, Amber

    2014-01-01

    Science has shown that the introgression or hybridization of modern humans (Homo sapiens) with Neanderthals up to 40,000 YBP may have led to the swarm of modern humans on earth. However, there is little doubt that modern trade and transportation in support of the humans has continued to introduce additional species, genotypes, and hybrids to every country on the globe. We assessed the utility of species distributions modeling of genotypes to assess the risk of current and future invaders. We evaluated 93 locations of the genus Tamarix for which genetic data were available. Maxent models of habitat suitability showed that the hybrid, T. ramosissima x T. chinensis, was slightly greater than the parent taxa (AUCs > 0.83). General linear models of Africanized honey bees, a hybrid cross of Tanzanian Apis mellifera scutellata and a variety of European honey bee including A. m. ligustica, showed that the Africanized bees (AUC = 0.81) may be displacing European honey bees (AUC > 0.76) over large areas of the southwestern U.S. More important, Maxent modeling of sub-populations (A1 and A26 mitotypes based on mDNA) could be accurately modeled (AUC > 0.9), and they responded differently to environmental drivers. This suggests that rapid evolutionary change may be underway in the Africanized bees, allowing the bees to spread into new areas and extending their total range. Protecting native species and ecosystems may benefit from risk maps of harmful invasive species, hybrids, and genotypes.

  8. Precise Orbit Solution for Swarm Using Space-Borne GPS Data and Optimized Pseudo-Stochastic Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bingbing; Wang, Zhengtao; Zhou, Lv; Feng, Jiandi; Qiu, Yaodong; Li, Fupeng

    2017-01-01

    Swarm is a European Space Agency (ESA) project that was launched on 22 November 2013, which consists of three Swarm satellites. Swarm precise orbits are essential to the success of the above project. This study investigates how well Swarm zero-differenced (ZD) reduced-dynamic orbit solutions can be determined using space-borne GPS data and optimized pseudo-stochastic pulses under high ionospheric activity. We choose Swarm space-borne GPS data from 1–25 October 2014, and Swarm reduced-dynamic orbits are obtained. Orbit quality is assessed by GPS phase observation residuals and compared with Precise Science Orbits (PSOs) released by ESA. Results show that pseudo-stochastic pulses with a time interval of 6 min and a priori standard deviation (STD) of 10−2 mm/s in radial (R), along-track (T) and cross-track (N) directions are optimized to Swarm ZD reduced-dynamic precise orbit determination (POD). During high ionospheric activity, the mean Root Mean Square (RMS) of Swarm GPS phase residuals is at 9–11 mm, Swarm orbit solutions are also compared with Swarm PSOs released by ESA and the accuracy of Swarm orbits can reach 2–4 cm in R, T and N directions. Independent Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) validation indicates that Swarm reduced-dynamic orbits have an accuracy of 2–4 cm. Swarm-B orbit quality is better than those of Swarm-A and Swarm-C. The Swarm orbits can be applied to the geomagnetic, geoelectric and gravity field recovery. PMID:28335538

  9. Precise Orbit Solution for Swarm Using Space-Borne GPS Data and Optimized Pseudo-Stochastic Pulses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bingbing; Wang, Zhengtao; Zhou, Lv; Feng, Jiandi; Qiu, Yaodong; Li, Fupeng

    2017-03-20

    Swarm is a European Space Agency (ESA) project that was launched on 22 November 2013, which consists of three Swarm satellites. Swarm precise orbits are essential to the success of the above project. This study investigates how well Swarm zero-differenced (ZD) reduced-dynamic orbit solutions can be determined using space-borne GPS data and optimized pseudo-stochastic pulses under high ionospheric activity. We choose Swarm space-borne GPS data from 1-25 October 2014, and Swarm reduced-dynamic orbits are obtained. Orbit quality is assessed by GPS phase observation residuals and compared with Precise Science Orbits (PSOs) released by ESA. Results show that pseudo-stochastic pulses with a time interval of 6 min and a priori standard deviation (STD) of 10(-2) mm/s in radial (R), along-track (T) and cross-track (N) directions are optimized to Swarm ZD reduced-dynamic precise orbit determination (POD). During high ionospheric activity, the mean Root Mean Square (RMS) of Swarm GPS phase residuals is at 9-11 mm, Swarm orbit solutions are also compared with Swarm PSOs released by ESA and the accuracy of Swarm orbits can reach 2-4 cm in R, T and N directions. Independent Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) validation indicates that Swarm reduced-dynamic orbits have an accuracy of 2-4 cm. Swarm-B orbit quality is better than those of Swarm-A and Swarm-C. The Swarm orbits can be applied to the geomagnetic, geoelectric and gravity field recovery.

  10. Minimizing magnetic fields for precision experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Altarev, I.; Fierlinger, P.; Lins, T.; Marino, M. G.; Nießen, B.; Petzoldt, G.; Reisner, M.; Stuiber, S. Sturm, M.; Taggart Singh, J.; Taubenheim, B.; Rohrer, H. K.; Schläpfer, U.

    2015-06-21

    An increasing number of measurements in fundamental and applied physics rely on magnetically shielded environments with sub nano-Tesla residual magnetic fields. State of the art magnetically shielded rooms (MSRs) consist of up to seven layers of high permeability materials in combination with highly conductive shields. Proper magnetic equilibration is crucial to obtain such low magnetic fields with small gradients in any MSR. Here, we report on a scheme to magnetically equilibrate MSRs with a 10 times reduced duration of the magnetic equilibration sequence and a significantly lower magnetic field with improved homogeneity. For the search of the neutron's electric dipole moment, our finding corresponds to a 40% improvement of the statistical reach of the measurement. However, this versatile procedure can improve the performance of any MSR for any application.

  11. The Cyborg Astrobiologist: first field experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Patrick Charles; Ormö, Jens; Díaz Martínez, Enrique; Rodríguez Manfredi, José Antonio; Gómez Elvira, Javier; Ritter, Helge; Oesker, Markus; Ontrup, Jörg

    2004-07-01

    We present results from the first geological field tests of the "Cyborg Astrobiologist", which is a wearable computer and video camcorder system that we are using to test and train a computer-vision system towards having some of the autonomous decision-making capabilities of a field-geologist and field-astrobiologist. The Cyborg Astrobiologist platform has thus far been used for testing and development of the following algorithms and systems: robotic acquisition of quasi-mosaics of images; real-time image segmentation; and real-time determination of interesting points in the image mosaics. The hardware and software systems function reliably, and the computer-vision algorithms are adequate for the first field tests. In addition to the proof-of-concept aspect of these field tests, the main result of these field tests is the enumeration of those issues that we can improve in the future, including: detection and accounting for shadows caused by three-dimensional jagged edges in the outcrop; reincorporation of more sophisticated texture-analysis algorithms into the system; creation of hardware and software capabilities to control the camera's zoom lens in an intelligent manner; and, finally, development of algorithms for interpretation of complex geological scenery. Nonetheless, despite these technical inadequacies, this Cyborg Astrobiologist system, consisting of a camera-equipped wearable-computer and its computer-vision algorithms, has demonstrated its ability in finding genuinely interesting points in real-time in the geological scenery, and then gathering more information about these interest points in an automated manner.

  12. The STEREO/IMPACT Magnetic Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acuña, M. H.; Curtis, D.; Scheifele, J. L.; Russell, C. T.; Schroeder, P.; Szabo, A.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2008-04-01

    The magnetometer on the STEREO mission is one of the sensors in the IMPACT instrument suite. A single, triaxial, wide-range, low-power and noise fluxgate magnetometer of traditional design—and reduced volume configuration—has been implemented in each spacecraft. The sensors are mounted on the IMPACT telescoping booms at a distance of ˜3 m from the spacecraft body to reduce magnetic contamination. The electronics have been designed as an integral part of the IMPACT Data Processing Unit, sharing a common power converter and data/command interfaces. The instruments cover the range ±65,536 nT in two intervals controlled by the IDPU (±512 nT; ±65,536 nT). This very wide range allows operation of the instruments during all phases of the mission, including Earth flybys as well as during spacecraft test and integration in the geomagnetic field. The primary STEREO/IMPACT science objectives addressed by the magnetometer are the study of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), its response to solar activity, and its relationship to solar wind structure. The instruments were powered on and the booms deployed on November 1, 2006, seven days after the spacecraft were launched, and are operating nominally. A magnetic cleanliness program was implemented to minimize variable spacecraft fields and to ensure that the static spacecraft-generated magnetic field does not interfere with the measurements.

  13. Thought Field Therapy: A Former Insider's Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pignotti, Monica

    2007-01-01

    Thought Field Therapy (TFT) is a novel therapy that employs finger tapping on purported acupressure points. Over the past decade, TFT, promoted on the Internet and through testimonials of fast cures, has gained popularity with therapists, including clinical social workers. Although TFT claims to cure a wide variety of psychological and physical…

  14. The Falklands war: Army field surgical experience.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, D. S.; Batty, C. G.; Ryan, J. M.; McGregor, W. S.

    1983-01-01

    In the recent Falklands campaign four Army Field Surgical Teams were deployed in the two phases of the war. They functioned as Advanced Surgical Centres and operated on 233 casualties. There were 3 deaths. The patterns of wounding and the methods of casualty management are discussed and compared with other recent campaigns. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6614760

  15. Field experience with gas turbine meters

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, W.H.

    1984-04-01

    This paper discusses a company's experience and problems with turbine meters in a large offshore system. With the increased cost and decreasing reserves of natural gas, greater demands will be placed on gas measurement. Turbine meters have lent themselves well to the task and will continue to find more applications in the natural gas industry.

  16. Emerging Trends in Teacher Preparation: The Future of Field Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slick, Gloria Appelt, Ed.

    This is the fourth in a series of four books presenting a variety of field experience program models and philosophies that drive the programs provided to preservice teachers during their undergraduate teacher preparation. This book focuses on critical issues facing teaching education in the future, in particular field experiences. Major themes…

  17. Concerns of Teacher Candidates in an Early Field Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Sau Hou

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined the concerns of teacher candidates in an early field experience. Thirty-five teacher candidates completed the Teacher Concerns Checklist (TCC, Fuller & Borich, 2000) at the beginning, middle and end of their early field experiences. Results showed that teacher candidates ranked impact as the highest concern, self as…

  18. Preparing Middle School Teachers: Using Collaborative Middle School Field Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramey, Linda K.

    Wright State University, Ohio, has developed an undergraduate degree in Middle Childhood Education with extensive content preparation and initial field experiences. Participants complete an undergraduate program in two specialized areas accompanied by 15 hours of teacher education professional coursework and field experiences in urban and suburban…

  19. The Field Experience: Creating Successful Programs for New Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slick, Gloria Appelt, Ed.

    This is the first in a series of four books presenting a variety of field experience program models and philosophies that drive the programs provided to preservice teachers during their undergraduate teacher preparation. This publications focuses on developing and evaluating an effective field experience program. Several common themes emerge from…

  20. Assisting Your Preservice Teacher to Be Successful during Field Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brett, Christine

    2006-01-01

    Field experience (junior practicum and student teaching) is considered by many to be the most influential part of a teacher preparation program (Cruickshank & Aramalin, 1986; Tannehill & Zakrajsek, 1988). During field experiences, preservice teachers (hereafter referred to as PSTs) are guided by a cooperating teacher (hereafter referred to as a…

  1. Field experience in gravel packing the Dourado field, offshore Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, F.C.R.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the completion operations in the Dourado field, with emphasis on four major gravel packing problems: (1) formation taking excessive gravel; (2) failure of the gravel pack screens; (3) severe well productivity decline and (4) an unusual production casing buckling. The problem occurred in a new area of the field where the main reservoir, the Calumbi sandstone, is largely intercalated with plastic, water sensitive shale streaks. Presumably, stresses developed during gravel packing set off the creepage tendency of these streaks, which might be intensified by hydration upon rock imbibition with water-based completion and gravel carrier fluids. The result was a continuous migration of shale into adjacent permeable layers, leaving behind progressive void space, which allows for the excessive pumping of gravel. As the well was flowed, check-valve effect naturally ensued as lumps of dispersed shales concentrates around the wellbore; hence the decline on well productivity. Another consequence of the shale behavior was a detrimental effect in the wellbore stability, which reflected in buckling of the casing in front of the perforated interval. Finally, the screen failure, a less conjectural problem, was attributed only to poor manufacturing quality.

  2. Volcanic earthquake swarms at Mt. Erebus, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminuma, Katsutada; Ueki, Sadato; Juergen, Kienle

    1985-04-01

    Mount Erebus is an active volcano in Antarctica located on Ross Island. A convecting lava lake occupies the summit crater of Mt. Erebus. Since December 1980 the seismic activity of Mt. Erebus has been continuously monitored using a radio-telemetered network of six seismic stations. The seismic activity observed by the Ross Island network during the 1982-1983 field season shows that: (1)Strombolian eruptions occur frequently at the Erebus summit lava lake at rates of 2-5 per day; (2)centrally located earthquakes map out a nearly vertical, narrow conduit system beneath the lava lake; (3)there are other source regions of seismicity on Ross Island, well removed from Mt. Erebus proper. An intense earthquake swarm recorded in October 1982 near Abbott Peak, 10 km northwest of the summit of Mt. Erebus, and volcanic tremor accompanying the swarm, may have been associated with new dike emplacement at depth.

  3. Coherent Pattern Prediction in Swarms of Delay-Coupled Agents

    PubMed Central

    Mier-y-Teran-Romero, Luis; Forgoston, Eric; Schwartz, Ira B.

    2013-01-01

    We consider a general swarm model of self-propelling agents interacting through a pairwise potential in the presence of noise and communication time delay. Previous work has shown that a communication time delay in the swarm induces a pattern bifurcation that depends on the size of the coupling amplitude. We extend these results by completely unfolding the bifurcation structure of the mean field approximation. Our analysis reveals a direct correspondence between the different dynamical behaviors found in different regions of the coupling-time delay plane with the different classes of simulated coherent swarm patterns. We derive the spatiotemporal scales of the swarm structures, as well as demonstrate how the complicated interplay of coupling strength, time delay, noise intensity, and choice of initial conditions can affect the swarm. In particular, our studies show that for sufficiently large values of the coupling strength and/or the time delay, there is a noise intensity threshold that forces a transition of the swarm from a misaligned state into an aligned state. We show that this alignment transition exhibits hysteresis when the noise intensity is taken to be time dependent. PMID:24255625

  4. A Comprehensive Review of Swarm Optimization Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many swarm optimization algorithms have been introduced since the early 60’s, Evolutionary Programming to the most recent, Grey Wolf Optimization. All of these algorithms have demonstrated their potential to solve many optimization problems. This paper provides an in-depth survey of well-known optimization algorithms. Selected algorithms are briefly explained and compared with each other comprehensively through experiments conducted using thirty well-known benchmark functions. Their advantages and disadvantages are also discussed. A number of statistical tests are then carried out to determine the significant performances. The results indicate the overall advantage of Differential Evolution (DE) and is closely followed by Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), compared with other considered approaches. PMID:25992655

  5. A comprehensive review of swarm optimization algorithms.

    PubMed

    Ab Wahab, Mohd Nadhir; Nefti-Meziani, Samia; Atyabi, Adham

    2015-01-01

    Many swarm optimization algorithms have been introduced since the early 60's, Evolutionary Programming to the most recent, Grey Wolf Optimization. All of these algorithms have demonstrated their potential to solve many optimization problems. This paper provides an in-depth survey of well-known optimization algorithms. Selected algorithms are briefly explained and compared with each other comprehensively through experiments conducted using thirty well-known benchmark functions. Their advantages and disadvantages are also discussed. A number of statistical tests are then carried out to determine the significant performances. The results indicate the overall advantage of Differential Evolution (DE) and is closely followed by Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), compared with other considered approaches.

  6. Frog Swarms: Earthquake Precursors or False Alarms?

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Rachel A.; Conlan, Hilary

    2013-01-01

    juvenile animals migrating away from their breeding pond, after a fruitful reproductive season. As amphibian populations undergo large fluctuations in numbers from year to year, this phenomenon will not occur on a yearly basis but will depend on successful reproduction, which is related to numerous climatic and geophysical factors. Hence, most large swarms of amphibians, particularly those involving very small frogs and occurring in late spring or summer, are not unusual and should not be considered earthquake precursors. In addition, it is likely that reports of several mass migration of small toads prior to the Great Sichuan Earthquake in 2008 were not linked to the subsequent M = 7.9 event (some occurred at a great distance from the epicentre), and were probably co-incidence. Statistical analysis of the data indicated frog swarms are unlikely to be connected with earthquakes. Reports of unusual behaviour giving rise to earthquake fears should be interpreted with caution, and consultation with experts in the field of earthquake biology is advised. PMID:26479746

  7. Classroom and Field Experiments for Florida's Environmental Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Jim

    This booklet is intended to help teachers in Florida manage the growing interest in environmental education. Fourteen experiments are grouped into the environmental areas of the water cycle, groundwater, water pollution, waste and water treatment, air pollution, and field experiments. Experiments include demonstrations of the water cycle, the…

  8. Components of Swarm Intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    David Bruemmer; Donald Dudenhoeffer; Matthew Anderson; Mark McKay

    2004-03-01

    This paper discusses the successes and failures over the past three years as efforts at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) have developed and evaluated robot behaviors that promote the emergence of swarm intelligence. Using a team of 12 small robots with the ability to respond to light and sound, the INEEL has investigated the fundamental advantages of swarm behavior as well as the limitations of this approach. The paper discusses the ways in which biology has inspired this work and the ways in which adherence to the biological model has proven to be both a benefit and hindrance to developing a fieldable system. The paper outlines how a hierarchical command and control structure can be imposed in order to permit human control at a level of group abstraction and discusses experimental results that show how group performance scales as different numbers of robots are utilized. Lastly, the paper outlines the applications for which the resulting capabilities have been applied and demonstrated.

  9. Field experience with various slicing methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoo, H. I.

    1982-01-01

    Wafer slicing using internal diameter (ID) saw, multiblade slurry (MBS) saw and multiwire slurry (MWS) saw techniques were evaluated. Wafer parameters such as bow, taper, and roughness which may not be important factors for solar cell fabrication, were considerably better for ID saw than those of the MBS and MWS saw. Analysis of add-on slicing cost indicated that machine productivity seems to be a major limiting factor for ID saw, while expendible material costs are a major factor for both MBS and MWS saw. Slicing experience indicated that the most important factors controling final wafer cost are: (1) silicon cost (wafer thickness + kerf loss); (2) add-on slicing cost, and (3) mechanical yield. There is a very strong interaction between these parameters, suggesting a necessity of optimization of these parameters.

  10. Mod-2 wind turbine field operations experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, L. H.

    1985-01-01

    The three-machine, 7.5 MW Goodnoe Hills located near Goldendale, Washington and is now in a research/experimental operations phase that offers a unique opportunity to study the effects of single and multiple wind turbines interacting with each other, the power grid; and the environment. Following a brief description of the turbine and project history, this paper addresses major problem areas and research and development test results. Field operations, both routine and nonroutine, are discussed. Routine operation to date has produced over 13,379,000 KWh of electrical energy during 11,064 hr of rotation. Nonroutine operation includes suspended activities caused by a crack in the low speed shaft that necessitated a redesign and reinstallation of this assembly on all three turbines. With the world's largest cluster back in full operation, two of the turbines will be operated over the next years to determine their value as energy producer. The third unit will be used primarily for conducting research tests requiring configuration changes to better understand the wind turbine technology. Technical areas summarized pertain to system performance and enhancements. Specific research tests relating to acoustics, TV interference, and wake effects conclude the paper.

  11. A Gravitational Experiment Involving Inhomogeneous Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, T.; Yin, Ming; Vargas, Jose

    2004-02-01

    Unification of gravitation with other forms of interactions, particularly with electromagnetism, will have tremendous impacts on technology and our understanding of nature. The economic impact of such an achievement will also be unprecedented and far more extensive than the impact experienced in the past century due to the unification of electricity with magnetism and optics. Theoretical unification of gravitation with electromagnetism using classical differential geometry has been pursued since the late nineteen twenties, when Einstein and Cartan used teleparallelism for the task. Recently, Vargas and Torr have followed the same line of research with more powerful mathematics in a more general geometric framework, which allows for the presence of other interactions. Their approach also uses Kähler generalization of Cartan's exterior calculus, which constitutes a language appropriate for both classical and quantum physics. Given the compelling nature of teleparallelism (path-independent equality of vectors at a distance) and the problems still existing with energy-momentum in general relativity, it is important to seek experimental evidence for such expectations. Such experimental programs are likely to provide quantitative guidance to the further development of current and future theories. We too, have undertaken an experimental search for potential electrically induced gravitational (EIG) effects. This presentation describes some of the practical concerns that relates to our investigation of electrical influences on laboratory size test masses. Preliminary results, appear to indicate a correlation between the application of a spatially inhomogeneous electric field and the appearance of an additional force on the test mass. If confirmed, the presence of such a force will be consistent with the predictions of Vargas-Torr. More importantly, proven results will shed new light and clearer understanding of the interactions between gravitational and electromagnetic

  12. Inverse turbulent cascade in swarming sperm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creppy, Adama; Praud, Olivier; Druart, Xavier; Kohnke, Philippa; Plouraboue, Franck; Inra, Cnrs, Umr, F-37380 Nouzilly, France Team; Université de Toulouse, Inpt, Ups, Imft, Umr 5502, France Team

    2014-11-01

    Collective motion of self-sustained swarming flows has recently provided examples of small scale turbulence arising where viscosity effects are dominant. We report the first observation of an universal inverse enstrophy cascade in concentrated swarming sperm consistent with a body of evidence built from various independent measurements. We found a well-defined k-3 power-law decay of velocity field power-spectrum and relative dispersion of small beads consistent with theoretical predictions in two-dimensional turbulence. Concentrated living sperm displays long-range, correlated whirlpool structures the size of which provides turbulence's integral scale. We propose a consistent explanation for this quasi-two-dimensional turbulence based on self-structured laminated flow forced by steric interaction and alignment, a state of active matter that we call ``swarming liquid crystal.'' We develop scaling arguments consistent with this interpretation. The implication of multi-scale collective dynamics of sperm's collective motility for fertility assessment is discussed. This work has been supported by the French Agence Nationale pour la Recherche (ANR) in the frame of the Contract MOTIMO (ANR-11-MONU-009-01). We thank Pierre Degond, Eric Climent, Laurent Lacaze and Frédéric Moulin for interesting discussions.

  13. Drift studies--comparison of field and wind tunnel experiments.

    PubMed

    Stadler, R; Regenauer, W

    2005-01-01

    Drift at pesticide application leads to a pollution of non-target crops, non-target species and surface water. Spray drift is influenced by many factors like environmental conditions, vegetation, technical conditions, and physical properties of the tank mixes and influenced by Chemicals. Field experiments to characterise spray drift effects with the risk of permanent changing weather conditions can be supported by wind tunnel experiments. Wind tunnel experiments do not lead to the same soil deposition curves like field experiments, but the ratio of drift reduction potential is comparable.

  14. FIELD EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING AT CDG AIRPORTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaroson, R.

    2009-12-01

    Richard Ramaroson1,4, Klaus Schaefer2, Stefan Emeis2, Carsten Jahn2, Gregor Schürmann2, Maria Hoffmann2, Mikhael Zatevakhin3, Alexandre Ignatyev3. 1ONERA, Châtillon, France; 4SEAS, Harvard University, Cambridge, USA; 2FZK, Garmisch, Germany; (3)FSUE SPbAEP, St Petersburg, Russia. 2-month field campaigns have been organized at CDG airports in autumn 2004 and summer 2005. Air quality and ground air traffic emissions have been monitored continuously at terminals and taxi-runways, along with meteorological parameters onboard trucks and with a SODAR. This paper analyses the commercial engine emissions characteristics at airports and their effects on gas pollutants and airborne particles coupled to meteorology. LES model results for PM dispersion coupled to microphysics in the PBL are compared to measurements. Winds and temperature at the surface and their vertical profiles have been stored with turbulence. SODAR observations show the time-development of the mixing layer depth and turbulent mixing in summer up to 800m. Active low level jets and their regional extent have been observed and analyzed. PM number and mass size distribution, morphology and chemical contents are investigated. Formation of new ultra fine volatile (UFV) particles in the ambient plume downstream of running engines is observed. Soot particles are mostly observed at significant level at high power thrusts at take-off (TO) and on touch-down whereas at lower thrusts at taxi and aprons ultra the UFV PM emissions become higher. Ambient airborne PM1/2.5 is closely correlated to air traffic volume and shows a maximum beside runways. PM number distribution at airports is composed mainly by volatile UF PM abundant at apron. Ambient PM mass in autumn is higher than in summer. The expected differences between TO and taxi emissions are confirmed for NO, NO2, speciated VOC and CO. NO/NO2 emissions are larger at runways due to higher power. Reactive VOC and CO are more produced at low powers during idling at

  15. Swarming behavior in plant roots.

    PubMed

    Ciszak, Marzena; Comparini, Diego; Mazzolai, Barbara; Baluska, Frantisek; Arecchi, F Tito; Vicsek, Tamás; Mancuso, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between individuals that are guided by simple rules can generate swarming behavior. Swarming behavior has been observed in many groups of organisms, including humans, and recent research has revealed that plants also demonstrate social behavior based on mutual interaction with other individuals. However, this behavior has not previously been analyzed in the context of swarming. Here, we show that roots can be influenced by their neighbors to induce a tendency to align the directions of their growth. In the apparently noisy patterns formed by growing roots, episodic alignments are observed as the roots grow close to each other. These events are incompatible with the statistics of purely random growth. We present experimental results and a theoretical model that describes the growth of maize roots in terms of swarming.

  16. Multidisciplinary Field Training in Undergraduate Physical Geography: Russian Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasimov, Nikolay S.; Chalov, Sergey R.; Panin, Andrey V.

    2013-01-01

    Field training is seen as a central component of the discipline of Physical Geography and an essential part of the undergraduate curriculum. This paper explores the structure and relationships between fieldwork and theoretical courses and the abundant experiences of field training in the undergraduate curriculum of 37 Russian universities. It…

  17. Electric Dipole Moment Experiment Systematic from Electric Field Discharge Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, B.; Gould, Harvey

    2014-09-01

    A magnetic field, in the direction of the electric field and synchronous with the electric field reversal, will mimic an EDM signal. One might expect a discharge across the electric field plates to produce magnetic fields with only small or vanishing components parallel to the electric field, minimizing its systematic effect. Our experimental model, using simulated discharge currents, found otherwise: the discharge current may be at an angle to the normal, and thus generate a normal magnetic field. Comparison of data from the experimental model with the results from calculations will be presented, along with estimates of the time-averaged normal magnetic field seen by atoms in an electron EDM experiment using a fountain of laser-cooled francium, as a function of discharge current.

  18. On the design of experiments to study extreme field limits

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Chen, M.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Koga, J. K.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Chen, P.; Mur, V. D.; Narozhny, N. B.; Popov, V. S.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Korn, G.

    2012-12-21

    We propose experiments on the collision of high intensity electromagnetic pulses with electron bunches and on the collision of multiple electromagnetic pulses for studying extreme field limits in the nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic waves. The effects of nonlinear QED will be revealed in these laser plasma experiments.

  19. TPE-1R (M) reversed field pinch experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, T.; Hirano, Y.; Maejima, Y.; Ogawa, K.

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the engineering aspects of the design, tests, and performances of the toroidal device TPE-1RM with which plasma physics researches on ''Reversed Field Pinch''configurations are carried out and this is an intermediate scale like HBTX-1A, ZT-40M, and ETA-BETA II. In TPE-1RM experiments are being performed in order to obtain an optimum reversed field configurations for MHD stability. The main description in this report is devoted to the metal vacuum vessel and specially contrived electrical circuit for field programming control techniques. The experiments with this device have been successful both from the technical and physcial points of view.

  20. A sensor fusion field experiment in forest ecosystem dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James A.; Ranson, K. Jon; Williams, Darrel L.; Levine, Elissa R.; Goltz, Stewart M.

    1990-01-01

    The background of the Forest Ecosystem Dynamics field campaign is presented, a progress report on the analysis of the collected data and related modeling activities is provided, and plans for future experiments at different points in the phenological cycle are outlined. The ecological overview of the study site is presented, and attention is focused on forest stands, needles, and atmospheric measurements. Sensor deployment and thermal and microwave observations are discussed, along with two examples of the optical radiation measurements obtained during the experiment in support of radiative transfer modeling. Future activities pertaining to an archival system, synthetic aperture radar, carbon acquisition modeling, and upcoming field experiments are considered.

  1. Field Experiences for Young Children: Planning and Implementing Field Trips, Classroom Visitors and Collecting Trips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Anne; Warner, Jane

    This document provides guidelines and suggestions for taking preschool children on field trips. Rationale for field trips, safety considerations, planning, preparation through classroom activities, parent involvement and keeping a field experience reference file are among the topics discussed. Examples of trips to a supermarket and to hear a high…

  2. An illustrated gardener's guide to transgenic Arabidopsis field experiments.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Martin; Jänkänpää, Hanna Johansson; Moen, Jon; Jansson, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Field studies with transgenic Arabidopsis lines have been performed over 8 yr, to better understand the influence that certain genes have on plant performance. Many (if not most) plant phenotypes cannot be observed under the near constant, low-stress conditions in growth chambers, making field experiments necessary. However, there are challenges in performing such experiments: permission must be obtained and regulations obeyed, the profound influence of uncontrollable biotic and abiotic factors has to be considered, and experimental design has to be strictly controlled. The aim here is to provide inspiration and guidelines for researchers who are not used to setting up such experiments, allowing others to learn from our mistakes. This is believed to be the first example of a 'manual' for field experiments with transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Many of the challenges encountered are common for all field experiments, and many researchers from ecological backgrounds are skilled in such methods. There is huge potential in combining the detailed mechanistic understanding of molecular biologists with ecologists' expertise in examining plant performance under field conditions, and it is suggested that more interdisciplinary collaborations will open up new scientific avenues to aid analyses of the roles of genetic and physiological variation in natural systems.

  3. Influencing attitudes toward science through field experiences in biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Deborah Mcintyre

    The purpose of this study was to determine how student attitudes toward science are influenced by field experiences in undergraduate biology courses. The study was conducted using two institutions of higher education including a 2-year lower-level and a 2-year upper-level institution. Data were collected through interviews with student participants, focus group discussions, students' journal entries, and field notes recorded by the researcher during the field activities. Photographs and video recordings were also used as documentation sources. Data were collected over a period of 34 weeks. Themes that emerged from the qualitative data included students' beliefs that field experiences (a) positively influence student motivation to learn, (b) increase student ability to learn the concepts being taught, and (c) provide opportunities for building relationships and for personal growth. The findings of the study reinforce the importance of offering field-study programs at the undergraduate level to allow undergraduate students the opportunity to experience science activities in a field setting. The research study was framed by the behavioral and developmental theories of attitude and experience including the Theory of Planned Behavior (Ajzen, 1991) and the Theory of Experiential Learning (Kolb, 1984).

  4. Multicomponent reactive transport modeling of uranium bioremediation field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yilin; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Morrison, Stan J.; Amonette, James P.; Long, Philip E.

    2009-10-01

    A reaction network integrating abiotic and microbially mediated reactions has been developed to simulate biostimulation field experiments at a former Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) site in Rifle, Colorado. The reaction network was calibrated using data from the 2002 field experiment, after which it was applied without additional calibration to field experiments performed in 2003 and 2007. The robustness of the model specification is significant in that (1) the 2003 biostimulation field experiment was performed with 3 times higher acetate concentrations than the previous biostimulation in the same field plot (i.e., the 2002 experiment), and (2) the 2007 field experiment was performed in a new unperturbed plot on the same site. The biogeochemical reactive transport simulations accounted for four terminal electron-accepting processes (TEAPs), two distinct functional microbial populations, two pools of bioavailable Fe(III) minerals (iron oxides and phyllosilicate iron), uranium aqueous and surface complexation, mineral precipitation and dissolution. The conceptual model for bioavailable iron reflects recent laboratory studies with sediments from the UMTRA site that demonstrated that the bulk (˜90%) of initial Fe(III) bioreduction is associated with phyllosilicate rather than oxide forms of iron. The uranium reaction network includes a U(VI) surface complexation model based on laboratory studies with Rifle site sediments and aqueous complexation reactions that include ternary complexes (e.g., calcium-uranyl-carbonate). The bioreduced U(IV), Fe(II), and sulfide components produced during the experiments are strongly associated with the solid phases and may play an important role in long-term uranium immobilization.

  5. Magnetic field experiment for Voyagers 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behannon, K. W.; Aluna, M. H.; Burlaga, L. F.; Lepping, R. P.; Ness, N. F.; Neubauer, F. M.

    1977-01-01

    The magnetic field experiment to be carried on the Voyager 1 and 2 missions consists of dual low field (LFM) and high field magnetometer (HFM) systems. The dual systems provide greater reliability and, in the case of the LFM's, permit the separation of spacecraft magnetic fields from the ambient fields. Additional reliability is achieved through electronics redundancy. The wide dynamic ranges of plus or minus 0.5G for the LFM's and plus or minus 20G for the HFM's, low quantization uncertainty of plus or minus 0.002 gamma in the most sensitive (plus or minus 8 gamma) LFM range, low sensor RMS noise level of 0.006 gamma, and use of data compaction schemes to optimize the experiment information rate all combine to permit the study of a broad spectrum of phenomena during the mission. Planetary fields at Jupiter, Saturn, and possibly Uranus; satellites of these planets; solar wind and satellite interactions with the planetary fields; and the large-scale structure and microscale characteristics of the interplanetary magnetic field are studied. The interstellar field may also be measured.

  6. Collective motion in Proteus mirabilis swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haoran, Xu

    Proteus mirabilisis a Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium. It is widely distributed in soil and water, and it is well known for exhibiting swarming motility on nutrient agar surfaces. In our study, we focused on the collective motility of P. mirabilis and uncovered a range of interesting phenomena. Here we will present our efforts to understand these phenomena through experiments and simulation. Mailing address: Room 306 Science Centre North Block, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. Hong Kong SAR. Phone: +852-3943-6354. Fax: +852-2603-5204. E-mail:xhrphx@gmail.com.

  7. Numerical simulation of the 2008 West-Bohemian earthquake swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, Thomas; Hamidi, Sahar; Galvan, Boris; Miller, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    CO2 has long been suspected of driving the Bohemian earthquake swarms because of the migrating nature of the swarms and expressions of CO2 degassing at the surface. Modeling to date primarily employed linear diffusion models, but more sophisticated modeling that includes a coupled fluid - and rock mechanical model has been lacking. In this work, we apply a model that couples mechanics to heat and flow of a super-critical CO2 through a fracture network. We present a continuum mechanical approach to derive the seismic moment magnitude using the deviatoric strain as an indicator of rupturing processes during individual events. We use a peak-detection algorithm to identify rapid changes in deviatoric strain, indicative of slip events. This method has been shown to work very well in dry and fluid-induced fracturing experiments at the laboratory scale, and in this work we extend the method to the scale of the West Bohemia/Vogtland earthquake swarms. We show very good agreement between model results and observations of the 2008 swarm, further supporting the hypothesis that the Bohemian earthquake swarms are predominately fluid-driven.

  8. Characteristics of equatorial electrojet derived from Swarm satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Neethal; Vichare, Geeta; Sinha, A. K.

    2017-03-01

    The vector magnetic field measurements from three satellite constellation, Swarm mission (Alpha 'Swarm-A', Bravo 'Swarm-B', and Charlie 'Swarm-C') during the quiet days (daily ∑Kp ⩽ 10) of the years 2014-2015 are used to study the characteristic features of equatorial electrojet (EEJ). A program is developed to identify the EEJ signature in the X (northward) component of the magnetic field recorded by the satellite. An empirical model is fitted into the observed EEJ signatures separately for both the hemispheres, to obtain the parameters of electrojet current such as peak current density, total eastward current, the width of EEJ, position of the electrojet axis, etc. The magnetic field signatures of EEJ at different altitudes are then estimated. Swarm B and C are orbiting at different heights (separation ∼50 km) and during the month of April 2014, both the satellites were moving almost simultaneously over nearby longitudes. Therefore, we used those satellite passes to validate the methodology used in the present study. The magnetic field estimates at the location of Swarm-C obtained using the observations of Swarm B are compared with the actual observations of Swarm-C. A good correlation between the actual and the computed values (correlation coefficient = 0.98) authenticates the method of analysis. The altitudinal variation of the amplitude and the width of the EEJ signatures are also depicted. The ratio of the total eastward flowing forward to westward return currents is found to vary between 0.1 and 1.0. The forward and return current values in the northern hemisphere are found to be ∼0.5 to 2 times of those in the southern hemisphere, thereby indicating the hemispheric asymmetry. The latitudinal extents of the forward and return currents are found to have longitudinal dependence similar to that of the amplitude and the width of EEJ showing four peak structures. Local time dependence of EEJ parameters has also been investigated. In general, the results

  9. Lab and field experiments: are they the same animal?

    PubMed

    Calisi, Rebecca M; Bentley, George E

    2009-06-01

    To advance our understanding of biological processes we often plan our experiments based on published data. This can be confusing though, as data from experiments performed in a laboratory environment are sometimes different from, or completely opposite to, findings from similar experiments performed in the "real world". In this mini-review, we discuss instances where results from laboratory experiments differ as a result of laboratory housing conditions, and where they differ from results gathered in the field environment. Experiments involving endocrinology and behavior appear to be particularly susceptible to influence from the environment in which they are performed. As such, we have attempted to promote discussion of the influence of housing environment on the reproductive axis, circadian biology and behavior, immune function, stress biology, neuroplasticity and photoperiodism. For example, why should a rodent species be diurnal in one housing environment yet nocturnal in another? Are data that are gathered from experiments in the laboratory applicable to the field environment, and vice-versa? We hope not only to highlight the need for experiments in both lab and field when looking at complex biological systems, but also to promote frank discussion of discordant data. Perhaps, just as study of individual variation has been gaining momentum in recent years, data from variation between experimental arenas can provide us with novel lines of research.

  10. Torsion-balance experiments and ultra-low-mass fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrano, William

    2017-01-01

    Many of the solutions to outstanding problems in modern cosmology posit new, ultra-light fields. Unifying General Relativity and Quantum Mechanics appears to require new ultra-light fields at some level. Such fields are also invoked to drive inflation and dark energy. Ultra-light fields may also make up much or all of the dark matter density of the universe. Torsion pendulums, a technology that dates to the 18th century, remain one of the most sensitive experimental techniques to search for ultra-light, weakly interacting fields. I will explain how torsion balance experiments can search for beyond-the-standard-model fields using laboratory-based as well as galactic sources, and the important cosmological implications of these measurements. I will also describe a new experimental signature for which certain torsion balance geometries make very sensitive direct dark matter detectors over a broad range of interesting dark matter parameter space.

  11. NATO TG-25 joint field experiment in distributed sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, Brian; Vu, Hao; Srour, Nino

    2003-09-01

    NATO's Task Group (TG-25) on acoustic and seismic sensing is responsible for assessing the potential technologies that can be cooperatively developed and shared within NATO's countries to provide effective, robust and low-cost battlefield sensor systems. The primary applications will be detection and/or classification of ground troops, ground vehicles, airborne vehicles, artillery and sniper. TG-25 has 3 main objectives: (1) to establish acoustic and seismic standards and data exchange procedures, (2) to compare, analyze, exchange, and develop analytical techniques, computational models and signal processing algorithms, and (3) to plan and conduct joint field experiments. In this paper, we discuss participation in the joint NATO field experiment conducted in France in October 2002. The experiment's goal is to demonstrate interoperability of unattended ground sensors from various participating nations. Results of the experiments will be briefed and discussed. Keywords: TG-25, unattended ground sensor, vehicle tracking

  12. Exact quantum field mappings between different experiments on quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wamba, Etienne; Pelster, Axel; Anglin, James R.

    2016-10-01

    Experiments on trapped quantum gases can probe challenging regimes of quantum many-body dynamics, where strong interactions or nonequilibrium states prevent exact solutions. Here we present a different kind of exact result, which applies even in the absence of actual solutions: a class of space-time mappings of different experiments onto each other. Since our result is an identity relating second-quantized field operators in the Heisenberg picture of quantum mechanics, it is extremely general; it applies to arbitrary measurements on any mixtures of Bose or Fermi gases, in arbitrary initial states. It represents a strong prediction of quantum field theory which can be tested in current laboratories, and whose practical applications include perfect simulation of interesting experiments with other experiments which may be easier to perform.

  13. Validation of full-field techniques: discussion of experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hack, E.; Burguete, R.; Siebert, T.; Davighi, A.; Mottershead, J.; Lampeas, G.; Ihle, A.; Patterson, E.; Pipino, A.

    2010-06-01

    Validation and calibration of optical full-field techniques that are used to measure strain and displacement in experimental mechanics is a prerequisite for validating numerical stress analyses. ICEM14 brings together practising engineers from around the world to exchange their experience regarding validation and calibration from everyday measurements with different optical techniques. The discussion addresses the following issues: (i) experience in calibrating measurement equipment based on imaging; (ii) reference measurements and calibration artefacts; (iii) validation of finite element analyses by comparison to experimental data; and (iv) uncertainties in full-field measurements.

  14. Visualization of Biosurfactant Film Flow in a Bacillus subtilis Swarm Colony on an Agar Plate

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyunghoon; Kim, Jung Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Collective bacterial dynamics plays a crucial role in colony development. Although many research groups have studied the behavior of fluidic swarm colonies, the detailed mechanics of its motion remains elusive. Here, we developed a visualization method using submicron fluorescent beads for investigating the flow field in a thin layer of fluid that covers a Bacillus subtilis swarm colony growing on an agar plate. The beads were initially embedded in the agar plate and subsequently distributed spontaneously at the upper surface of the expanding colony. We conducted long-term live cell imaging of the B. subtilis colony using the fluorescent tracers, and obtained high-resolution velocity maps of microscale vortices in the swarm colony using particle image velocimetry. A distinct periodic fluctuation in the average speed and vorticity of flow in swarm colony was observed at the inner region of the colony, and correlated with the switch between bacterial swarming and growth phases. At the advancing edge of the colony, both the magnitudes of velocity and vorticity of flow in swarm colony were inversely correlated with the spreading speed of the swarm edge. The advanced imaging tool developed in this study would facilitate further understanding of the effect of micro vortices in swarm colony on the collective dynamics of bacteria. PMID:26343634

  15. Swarm intelligence in bioinformatics: methods and implementations for discovering patterns of multiple sequences.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhihua; Zhang, Yi

    2014-02-01

    As a promising and innovative research field, bioinformatics has attracted increasing attention recently. Beneath the enormous number of open problems in this field, one fundamental issue is about the accurate and efficient computational methodology that can deal with tremendous amounts of data. In this paper, we survey some applications of swarm intelligence to discover patterns of multiple sequences. To provide a deep insight, ant colony optimization, particle swarm optimization, artificial bee colony and artificial fish swarm algorithm are selected, and their applications to multiple sequence alignment and motif detecting problem are discussed.

  16. Natural attenuation of xenobiotic compounds: Anaerobic field injection experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ruegge, K.; Bjerg, P.L.; Mosbaek, H.; Christensen, T.H.

    1995-12-31

    Currently, a continuous field injection experiment is being performed in the anaerobic part of a pollution plume downgradient of the Grindsted Landfill in Denmark. This natural gradient experiment includes an injection of 18 different xenobiotic compounds with bromide as a tracer. The injection is taking place under methanogenic/sulfate-reducing conditions and the compounds will, as they migrate with the groundwater, pass through a zone where the redox conditions have been determined as iron-reducing.

  17. Causal mechanisms of seismo-EM phenomena during the 1965-1967 Matsushiro earthquake swarm.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Yuji; Yamabe, Tsuneaki; Okumura, Nobuo

    2017-03-21

    The 1965-1967 Matsushiro earthquake swarm in central Japan exhibited two unique characteristics. The first was a hydro-mechanical crust rupture resulting from degassing, volume expansion of CO2/water, and a crack opening within the critically stressed crust under a strike-slip stress. The other was, despite the lower total seismic energy, the occurrence of complexed seismo-electromagnetic (seismo-EM) phenomena of the geomagnetic intensity increase, unusual earthquake lights (EQLs) and atmospheric electric field (AEF) variations. Although the basic rupture process of this swarm of earthquakes is reasonably understood in terms of hydro-mechanical crust rupture, the associated seismo-EM processes remain largely unexplained. Here, we describe a series of seismo-EM mechanisms involved in the hydro-mechanical rupture process, as observed by coupling the electric interaction of rock rupture with CO2 gas and the dielectric-barrier discharge of the modelled fields in laboratory experiments. We found that CO2 gases passing through the newly created fracture surface of the rock were electrified to generate pressure-impressed current/electric dipoles, which could induce a magnetic field following Biot-Savart's law, decrease the atmospheric electric field and generate dielectric-barrier discharge lightning affected by the coupling effect between the seismic and meteorological activities.

  18. Causal mechanisms of seismo-EM phenomena during the 1965–1967 Matsushiro earthquake swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, Yuji; Yamabe, Tsuneaki; Okumura, Nobuo

    2017-03-01

    The 1965–1967 Matsushiro earthquake swarm in central Japan exhibited two unique characteristics. The first was a hydro-mechanical crust rupture resulting from degassing, volume expansion of CO2/water, and a crack opening within the critically stressed crust under a strike-slip stress. The other was, despite the lower total seismic energy, the occurrence of complexed seismo-electromagnetic (seismo-EM) phenomena of the geomagnetic intensity increase, unusual earthquake lights (EQLs) and atmospheric electric field (AEF) variations. Although the basic rupture process of this swarm of earthquakes is reasonably understood in terms of hydro-mechanical crust rupture, the associated seismo-EM processes remain largely unexplained. Here, we describe a series of seismo-EM mechanisms involved in the hydro-mechanical rupture process, as observed by coupling the electric interaction of rock rupture with CO2 gas and the dielectric-barrier discharge of the modelled fields in laboratory experiments. We found that CO2 gases passing through the newly created fracture surface of the rock were electrified to generate pressure-impressed current/electric dipoles, which could induce a magnetic field following Biot-Savart’s law, decrease the atmospheric electric field and generate dielectric-barrier discharge lightning affected by the coupling effect between the seismic and meteorological activities.

  19. Causal mechanisms of seismo-EM phenomena during the 1965–1967 Matsushiro earthquake swarm

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, Yuji; Yamabe, Tsuneaki; Okumura, Nobuo

    2017-01-01

    The 1965–1967 Matsushiro earthquake swarm in central Japan exhibited two unique characteristics. The first was a hydro-mechanical crust rupture resulting from degassing, volume expansion of CO2/water, and a crack opening within the critically stressed crust under a strike-slip stress. The other was, despite the lower total seismic energy, the occurrence of complexed seismo-electromagnetic (seismo-EM) phenomena of the geomagnetic intensity increase, unusual earthquake lights (EQLs) and atmospheric electric field (AEF) variations. Although the basic rupture process of this swarm of earthquakes is reasonably understood in terms of hydro-mechanical crust rupture, the associated seismo-EM processes remain largely unexplained. Here, we describe a series of seismo-EM mechanisms involved in the hydro-mechanical rupture process, as observed by coupling the electric interaction of rock rupture with CO2 gas and the dielectric-barrier discharge of the modelled fields in laboratory experiments. We found that CO2 gases passing through the newly created fracture surface of the rock were electrified to generate pressure-impressed current/electric dipoles, which could induce a magnetic field following Biot-Savart’s law, decrease the atmospheric electric field and generate dielectric-barrier discharge lightning affected by the coupling effect between the seismic and meteorological activities. PMID:28322263

  20. Evolution of Collective Behaviors for a Real Swarm of Aquatic Surface Robots

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Miguel; Costa, Vasco; Gomes, Jorge; Rodrigues, Tiago; Silva, Fernando; Oliveira, Sancho Moura; Christensen, Anders Lyhne

    2016-01-01

    Swarm robotics is a promising approach for the coordination of large numbers of robots. While previous studies have shown that evolutionary robotics techniques can be applied to obtain robust and efficient self-organized behaviors for robot swarms, most studies have been conducted in simulation, and the few that have been conducted on real robots have been confined to laboratory environments. In this paper, we demonstrate for the first time a swarm robotics system with evolved control successfully operating in a real and uncontrolled environment. We evolve neural network-based controllers in simulation for canonical swarm robotics tasks, namely homing, dispersion, clustering, and monitoring. We then assess the performance of the controllers on a real swarm of up to ten aquatic surface robots. Our results show that the evolved controllers transfer successfully to real robots and achieve a performance similar to the performance obtained in simulation. We validate that the evolved controllers display key properties of swarm intelligence-based control, namely scalability, flexibility, and robustness on the real swarm. We conclude with a proof-of-concept experiment in which the swarm performs a complete environmental monitoring task by combining multiple evolved controllers. PMID:26999614

  1. Evolution of Collective Behaviors for a Real Swarm of Aquatic Surface Robots.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Miguel; Costa, Vasco; Gomes, Jorge; Rodrigues, Tiago; Silva, Fernando; Oliveira, Sancho Moura; Christensen, Anders Lyhne

    2016-01-01

    Swarm robotics is a promising approach for the coordination of large numbers of robots. While previous studies have shown that evolutionary robotics techniques can be applied to obtain robust and efficient self-organized behaviors for robot swarms, most studies have been conducted in simulation, and the few that have been conducted on real robots have been confined to laboratory environments. In this paper, we demonstrate for the first time a swarm robotics system with evolved control successfully operating in a real and uncontrolled environment. We evolve neural network-based controllers in simulation for canonical swarm robotics tasks, namely homing, dispersion, clustering, and monitoring. We then assess the performance of the controllers on a real swarm of up to ten aquatic surface robots. Our results show that the evolved controllers transfer successfully to real robots and achieve a performance similar to the performance obtained in simulation. We validate that the evolved controllers display key properties of swarm intelligence-based control, namely scalability, flexibility, and robustness on the real swarm. We conclude with a proof-of-concept experiment in which the swarm performs a complete environmental monitoring task by combining multiple evolved controllers.

  2. Particle Swarm Optimization with Double Learning Patterns.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yuanxia; Wei, Linna; Zeng, Chuanhua; Chen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) is an effective tool in solving optimization problems. However, PSO usually suffers from the premature convergence due to the quick losing of the swarm diversity. In this paper, we first analyze the motion behavior of the swarm based on the probability characteristic of learning parameters. Then a PSO with double learning patterns (PSO-DLP) is developed, which employs the master swarm and the slave swarm with different learning patterns to achieve a trade-off between the convergence speed and the swarm diversity. The particles in the master swarm and the slave swarm are encouraged to explore search for keeping the swarm diversity and to learn from the global best particle for refining a promising solution, respectively. When the evolutionary states of two swarms interact, an interaction mechanism is enabled. This mechanism can help the slave swarm in jumping out of the local optima and improve the convergence precision of the master swarm. The proposed PSO-DLP is evaluated on 20 benchmark functions, including rotated multimodal and complex shifted problems. The simulation results and statistical analysis show that PSO-DLP obtains a promising performance and outperforms eight PSO variants.

  3. Multicomponent reactive transport modeling of uranium bioremediation field experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Yilin; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Morrison, Stan J.; Amonette, James E.; Long, Philip E.

    2009-10-15

    Biostimulation field experiments with acetate amendment are being performed at a former uranium mill tailings site in Rifle, Colorado, to investigate subsurface processes controlling in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater. An important part of the research is identifying and quantifying field-scale models of the principal terminal electron-accepting processes (TEAPs) during biostimulation and the consequent biogeochemical impacts to the subsurface receiving environment. Integrating abiotic chemistry with the microbially mediated TEAPs in the reaction network brings into play geochemical observations (e.g., pH, alkalinity, redox potential, major ions, and secondary minerals) that the reactive transport model must recognize. These additional constraints provide for a more systematic and mechanistic interpretation of the field behaviors during biostimulation. The reaction network specification developed for the 2002 biostimulation field experiment was successfully applied without additional calibration to the 2003 and 2007 field experiments. The robustness of the model specification is significant in that 1) the 2003 biostimulation field experiment was performed with 3 times higher acetate concentrations than the previous biostimulation in the same field plot (i.e., the 2002 experiment), and 2) the 2007 field experiment was performed in a new unperturbed plot on the same site. The biogeochemical reactive transport simulations accounted for four TEAPs, two distinct functional microbial populations, two pools of bioavailable Fe(III) minerals (iron oxides and phyllosilicate iron), uranium aqueous and surface complexation, mineral precipitation, and dissolution. The conceptual model for bioavailable iron reflects recent laboratory studies with sediments from the Old Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) site that demonstrated that the bulk (~90%) of Fe(III) bioreduction is associated with the phyllosilicates rather than the iron oxides

  4. Dynamic field-frequency lock for tracking magnetic field fluctuations in electron spin resonance experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asfaw, Abraham; Tyryshkin, Alexei; Lyon, Stephen

    Global magnetic field fluctuations present significant challenges to pulsed electron spin resonance experiments on systems with long spin coherence times. We will discuss results from experiments in which we follow instantaneous changes in magnetic field by locking to the free induction decay of a proton NMR signal using a phase-locked loop. We extend conventional field-frequency locking techniques used in NMR to follow slow magnetic field drifts by using a modified Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) pulse sequence in which the phase of the pi-pulses follows the phase of the proton spins at all times. Hence, we retain the ability of the CPMG pulse sequence to refocus local magnetic field inhomogeneities without refocusing global magnetic field fluctuations. In contrast with conventional field-frequency locking techniques, our experiments demonstrate the potential of this method to dynamically track global magnetic field fluctuations on timescales of about 2 seconds and with rates faster than a kHz. This frequency range covers the dominant noise frequencies in our electron spin resonance experiments as previously reported.

  5. Field Experiences Using iPads: Impact of Experience on Preservice Teachers' Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Jill A.; Bicheler, Rachel; Robinson, Callan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological case study was to investigate the lived experiences of preservice music teachers using iPads to engage secondary general music students in creating and performing music during field teaching experiences. Two questions guided this research study: (a) What are these preservice teachers' perceptions of their…

  6. Infusing Coteaching into the General Education Field Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Deborah J.; Fisch, Audrey A.

    2013-01-01

    With the proliferation of inclusion, teacher education programs must prepare general education candidates to work collaboratively in a coteaching environment. This study addresses a coteaching assignment introduced into the general education field experience course for secondary content majors. The candidates enrolled had no previous preparation…

  7. Creating Dissonance in Pre-Service Teachers' Field Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenhardt, Sara; Besnoy, Kevin; Steele, Emily

    2012-01-01

    The study is practical in nature and addresses the call for investigating effective aspects of field experiences in teacher preparation. The authors designed a framework of assignments requiring the pre-service teachers to collect data about two diverse elementary students in their assigned elementary classroom during the twelve weeks of their…

  8. Field experiments on an intelligent towed vehicle ``Flying Fish``

    SciTech Connect

    Koterayama, W.; Yamaguchi, S.; Nakamura, M.

    1995-12-31

    A depth, pitch and roll controllable towed vehicle, ``Flying Fish`` is being developed to measure the ocean current, temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, chlorophyll and total inorganic hydrocarbon. The first field experiments on its performance were carried out in the Japan sea last summer. The motion data of the ``Flying Fish`` are compared with those of numerical simulations.

  9. An Experiment In Field-Based Elementary Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swann, Margaret H.

    The Experimental Program in Elementary Education (EXEL) at Shepherd College in West Virginia began in 1973 with authorization by the West Virginia State Department of Education. The program was developed with the hope of producing more confident and competent teachers. EXEL provides continuous field experience from the second semester of the…

  10. Quality and Early Field Experiences: Partnering with Junior Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piro, Jody S.; Anderson, Gina; Fredrickson, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the perceptions of preservice teacher candidates who participated in a pilot partnership between a public teacher education preparation program and Junior Achievement (JA). The partnership was grounded in the premise that providing early field experiences to preservice teacher candidates was a necessary requirement of quality…

  11. The Impact of Field Experience on Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Sau Hou

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this session is to describe a research project that involved preservice teacher education candidates in a field experience incorporating individualized tutoring for at-risk elementary students. Specifically, do these struggling elementary readers improve their reading? The first and second graders (n = 190) were all given the…

  12. Rational Ignorance in Education: A Field Experiment in Student Plagiarism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dee, Thomas S.; Jacob, Brian A.

    2012-01-01

    Plagiarism appears to be a common problem among college students, yet there is little evidence on the effectiveness of interventions designed to minimize plagiarism. This study presents the results of a field experiment that evaluated the effects of a web-based educational tutorial in reducing plagiarism. We found that assignment to the treatment…

  13. Exploring International Multicultural Field Experiences in Educational Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilder, Hilary; Ferris, Sharmila Pixy; An, Heejung

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore an online field experience between technology facilitator candidates in the USA and K-12 teachers in Namibia, to improve candidates' understanding of diversity and equity issues in the successful incorporation of information and communication technologies (ICT) in teaching and learning.…

  14. The First Field Experience: Perspectives of Preservice and Cooperating Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brian, Mary; Stoner, Julia; Appel, Kelli; House, Jennifer J.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined perspectives of field experiences among preservice teachers and their cooperating teachers because of debate in the politically charged atmosphere of No Child Left Behind regarding teacher preparation programs. Nine pairs of preservice and cooperating teachers were observed and interviewed over the course of a semester to…

  15. Swarming UAVs mission design strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Kuo-Chi

    2007-04-01

    This paper uses a behavioral hierarchy approach to reduce the mission solution space and make the mission design easier. A UAV behavioral hierarchy is suggested, which is derived from three levels of behaviors: basic, individual and group. The individual UAV behavior is a combination of basic, lower level swarming behaviors with priorities. Mission design can be simplified by picking the right combination of individual swarming behaviors, which will emerge the needed group behaviors. Genetic Algorithm is used in both lower-level basic behavior design and mission design.

  16. Electric field measurements during the Condor critical velocity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, M. C.; Pfaff, R. F.; Haerendel, G.

    1986-01-01

    The instrumentation of the Condor critical velocity Ba experiment (Wescott et al., 1986) for the measurements of the energetic particles and the electric field associated with a Ba explosion is described. The Ba explosion created a complex electric field pulse detected in situ by a single-axis double electric-field probe on a separate spacecraft. The measurements provide evidence of several important links in the critical-velocity chain, and are consistent with two hypotheses. The first hypothesis involves the creation of large polarization electric field due to charge separation; the second hypothesis implies a polarization of the beam by currents flowing across it. The chain of physical processes inferred from the observations is in agreement with most theories for the Alfven process.

  17. NATO SET-093 joint field experiment at Bourges, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marty, C.; Bruel, F.; Prieur, D.; Naz, P.; Miller, L. S.

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes the NATO Task Group SET-093/RTG53/MSE (referred to as TG-53 in this report) Acoustic Detection of Weapons Firing Joint Field Experiment II conducted at the Etablissement Technique de Bourges (ETBS), Bourges, France, during 16 to 27 June 2008. This field experiment is a follow-on to the NATO TG-53 Acoustic Detection of Weapons Firing Joint Field Experiment I conducted at the Yuma Proving Grounds (YPG), Yuma, Arizona, USA, during 31 October to 4 November 2005 [1]. The objectives of the joint experiment were: (i) to collect acoustic signatures of direct and indirect firings from weapons' such as small arms, mortars, artillery, rockets, and C4 explosives, (ii) to analyze the propagation effects of grassy, wooded, and urban terrains, (iii) to share signatures collected from a variety of acoustic sensors, on the ground and in the air, distributed over a wide area, and (iv) to demonstrate the interoperability of disparate sensors developed by the various nations involved. The participating NATO countries , including France, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, Canada, and the United States of America, and Israel as well as part of the Mediterranean dialogue countries, deployed nearly 90 sensors and sensor systems over the test range area.

  18. Designing a Field Experience Tracking System in the Area of Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Wu; Watson, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the quality of field experience, support field experience cooperation and streamline field experience management, the purpose of this paper is to describe the experience in using Activity Theory to design and develop a web-based field experience tracking system for a special education program. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  19. Precision magnetic field mapping for CERN experiment NA62

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, John R.; Ruggiero, Giuseppe; Bergsma, Felix

    2016-12-01

    In the CERN experiment NA62, low-mass straw-tube tracking-chambers have been designed to operate in vacuum and, in conjunction with precisely mapped magnetic fields, enable the determination of the trajectories of the charged decay products of a 75 GeV/c K+ with high accuracy. This is particularly important for the crucial measurement of the branching fraction for the decay K+ → π + ν ν, which has the potential to reveal BSM physics. The charged particles passing through the magnetic field of a dipole magnet receive a transverse-momentum kick, ΔP T = 270 MeV/c, which the physics requires to be determined to better than one part in a thousand. This puts stringent constraints on the required accuracy and precision of the magnetic field components at all points through which charged particles pass. Before reaching the dipole magnet the particles travel through an evacuated steel tank of length 90 m, where residual magnetic fields of typical size 50 μT modify the trajectories of the charged particles and require measurement with a precision of better than 10 μT. In this paper we describe in detail the different approaches to the measurement and analysis of the magnetic field for the two regions, the corrections to the raw data necessary to produce the final field map, and the physics validation procedures showing that the required accuracy and precision of the field maps have been achieved.

  20. A Parallel Particle Swarm Optimizer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    by a computationally demanding biomechanical system identification problem, we introduce a parallel implementation of a stochastic population based...concurrent computation. The parallelization of the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm is detailed and its performance and characteristics demonstrated for the biomechanical system identification problem as example.

  1. Recent magneto-inertial fusion experiments on the field reversed configuration heating experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degnan, J. H.; Amdahl, D. J.; Domonkos, M.; Lehr, F. M.; Grabowski, C.; Robinson, P. R.; Ruden, E. L.; White, W. M.; Wurden, G. A.; Intrator, T. P.; Sears, J.; Weber, T.; Waganaar, W. J.; Frese, M. H.; Frese, S. D.; Camacho, J. F.; Coffey, S. K.; Makhin, V.; Roderick, N. F.; Gale, D. G.; Kostora, M.; Lerma, A.; McCullough, J. L.; Sommars, W.; Kiuttu, G. F.; Bauer, B.; Fuelling, S. R.; Siemon, R. E.; Lynn, A. G.; Turchi, P. J.

    2013-09-01

    Magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) approaches take advantage of an embedded magnetic field to improve plasma energy confinement by reducing thermal conduction relative to conventional inertial confinement fusion (ICF). MIF reduces required precision in the implosion and the convergence ratio. Since 2008 (Wurden et al 2008 IAEA 2008 Fusion Energy Conf. (Geneva, Switzerland, 13-18 October) IC/P4-13 LA-UR-08-0796) and since our prior refereed publication on this topic (Degnan et al 2008 IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 36 80), AFRL and LANL have developed further one version of MIF. We have (1) reliably formed, translated, and captured field reversed configurations (FRCs) in magnetic mirrors inside metal shells or liners in preparation for subsequent compression by liner implosion; (2) imploded a liner with interior magnetic mirror field, obtaining evidence for compression of a 1.36 T field to 540 T (3) performed a full system experiment of FRC formation, translation, capture, and imploding liner compression operation; (4) identified by comparison of 2D-MHD simulation and experiments factors limiting the closed-field lifetime of FRCs to about half that required for good liner compression of FRCs to multi-keV, 1019 ion cm-3, high energy density plasma (HEDP) conditions; and (5) designed and prepared hardware to increase that closed-field FRC lifetime to the required amount. Those lifetime experiments are now underway, with the goal of at least doubling closed-field FRC lifetimes and performing FRC implosions to HEDP conditions this year. These experiments have obtained imaging evidence of FRC rotation, and of initial rotation control measures slowing and stopping such rotation. Important improvements in fidelity of simulation to experiment have been achieved, enabling improved guidance and understanding of experiment design and performance.

  2. Active experiments in the ionosphere and geomagnetic field variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivokon, V. P.; Cherneva, N. V.; Khomutov, S. Y.; Serovetnikov, A. S.

    2014-11-01

    Variations of ionospheric-magnetospheric relation energy, as one of the possible outer climatology factors, may be traced on the basis of analysis of natural geophysical phenomena such as ionosphere artificial radio radiation and magnetic storms. Experiments on active impact on the ionosphere have been carried out for quite a long time in Russia as well. The most modern heating stand is located in Alaska; it has been used within the HAARP Program. The possibility of this stand to affect geophysical fields, in particular, the geomagnetic field is of interest.

  3. Neutron spin turners with a rotating magnetic field: first experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnarchuk, V. I.; Kraan, W. H.; Rekveldt, M. T.; Ioffe, A.

    2008-03-01

    Spin turners are the key elements of a neutron spin-echo spectrometer with rotating magnetic fields. Here we describe the results of experiments with thin-film spin turners made of 25 µm amorphous ferromagnetic foils, whose in-plane magnetization is rotated by a weak external rotating field. The behaviour of the polarization vector of a 0.2 nm neutron beam is analysed in 3D after transmission through such a foil and, apart from a non-negligible depolarization, the results show that they are in good accordance with simulations. This observed depolarization is due to a domain structure with a net magnetization.

  4. ITER Test Blanket Module Error Field Simulation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffer, M. J.

    2010-11-01

    Recent experiments at DIII-D used an active-coil mock-up to investigate effects of magnetic error fields similar to those expected from two ferromagnetic Test Blanket Modules (TBMs) in one ITER equatorial port. The largest and most prevalent observed effect was plasma toroidal rotation slowing across the entire radial profile, up to 60% in H-mode when the mock-up local ripple at the plasma was ˜4 times the local ripple expected in front of ITER TBMs. Analysis showed the slowing to be consistent with non-resonant braking by the mock-up field. There was no evidence of strong electromagnetic braking by resonant harmonics. These results are consistent with the near absence of resonant helical harmonics in the TBM field. Global particle and energy confinement in H-mode decreased by <20% for the maximum mock-up ripple, but <5% at the local ripple expected in ITER. These confinement reductions may be linked with the large velocity reductions. TBM field effects were small in L-mode but increased with plasma beta. The L-H power threshold was unaffected within error bars. The mock-up field increased plasma sensitivity to mode locking by a known n=1 test field (n = toroidal harmonic number). In H-mode the increased locking sensitivity was from TBM torque slowing plasma rotation. At low beta, locked mode tolerance was fully recovered by re-optimizing the conventional DIII-D ``I-coils'' empirical compensation of n=1 errors in the presence of the TBM mock-up field. Empirical error compensation in H-mode should be addressed in future experiments. Global loss of injected neutral beam fast ions was within error bars, but 1 MeV fusion triton loss may have increased. The many DIII-D mock-up results provide important benchmarks for models needed to predict effects of TBMs in ITER.

  5. Elucidating GPR Response to Biological Activity: Field and Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoflias, G. P.; Schillig, P. C.; McGlashan, M. A.; Roberts, J. A.; Devlin, J. F.

    2010-12-01

    Recent studies of the geophysical signatures of biological processes in earth environments have resulted in the emergent field of “biogeophysics”. The ability to monitor remotely and to quantify active biological processes in the subsurface can have transformative implications to a wide range of investigations, including the bioremediation of contaminated sites. Previous studies have demonstrated that ground-penetrating radar (GPR) can be used to detect the products of microbial activity in the subsurface, such as changes in bulk electrical conductivity, mineral dissolution and precipitation, and the formation of biogenic gas. We present field and laboratory experiments that offer insights to the response of GPR signals to microbial activity. In the field, time-lapse borehole radar tomography was used to monitor biodegradation of a hydrocarbon plume over a period of two years. A dense grid of fourteen borehole pairs monitoring the bioactive region showed radar wave velocity changes of +/-4% and signal attenuation changes of +/-25%. These GPR observations correlated spatially and temporally to independent measurements of groundwater velocity and geochemical variations that occurred in response to microbial activity. The greatest relative changes in radar wave velocity of propagation and attenuation were observed in the region of enhanced bacterial stimulation where biomass growth was the greatest. Radar wave velocity and attenuation decreased during periods of enhanced biostimulation. Two laboratory experiments were conducted to further assess radar response to biomass growth. The first experiment monitored GPR wave transmission through a water-saturated quartz-sand reactor during the course of enhanced biostimulation. Radar wave velocity initially decreased as a result of bacterial activity and subsequently increased rapidly as biogenic gas formed in the pore space. Radar signal attenuation increased during the course of the experiment as a result of an

  6. Field Experiences with Floating Breakwaters in the Eastern United States.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    7AD-AL ’b76 MARINE RESOURCE MANAGEMENT INC CAMBRIDGE MA FIG 1 3/2 FIELD EXPERIENCES WITH FLOATING BREAKWATERS IN THE EASTERN UNIT--ETC(U) JUL 82 A...Resource Management , Inc. 12 Arrow Street [31679 Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 If. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE Department of the...Development. The report was prepared by Andrew V. Baird, Marine Resource Management , Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts, and Neil W. Ross, who provided

  7. An Integral, Multidisciplinary and Global Geophysical Field Experience for Undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, O.; Carrillo, D. J.; Pérez-Campos, X.

    2007-05-01

    The udergraduate program of Geophysical Engineering at the School of Engineering, of the Univesidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), went through an update process that concluded in 2006. As part of the program, the student takes three geophysical prospecting courses (gravity and magnetics, electric, electromagnetics, and seismic methods). The older program required a three-week field experience for each course in order to gradute. The new program considers only one extended field experience. This work stresses the importance of international academic exchange, where undergraduate students could participate, such as the Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience (SAGE), and interaction with research programs, such as the MesoAmerican Subduction Experiment (MASE). Also, we propose a scheeme for this activity based on those examples; both of them have in common real geophysical problems, from which students could benefit. Our proposal covers academic and logistic aspects to be taken into account, enhancing the relevance of interaction between other academic institutions, industry, and UNAM, in order to obtain a broader view of geophysics.

  8. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Schneck, K.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter–nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implicationsmore » of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.« less

  9. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeño, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-18

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. Here. we demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. In conclusion, we discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  10. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective field theory (EFT) of dark matter–nucleon scattering for current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral differences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  11. Self-organizing control strategy for asteroid intelligent detection swarm based on attraction and repulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Meiyan; Wang, Zhaokui; Zhang, Yulin

    2017-01-01

    The self-organizing control strategy for asteroid intelligent detection swarm, which is considered as a space application instance of intelligent swarm, is developed. The leader-follower model for the asteroid intelligent detection swarm is established, and the further analysis is conducted for massive asteroid and small asteroid. For a massive asteroid, the leader spacecraft flies under the gravity field of the asteroid. For a small asteroid, the asteroid gravity is negligible, and a trajectory planning method is proposed based on elliptic cavity virtual potential field. The self-organizing control strategy for the follower spacecraft is developed based on a mechanism of velocity planning and velocity tracking. The simulation results show that the self-organizing control strategy is valid for both massive asteroid and small asteroid, and the exploration swarm forms a stable configuration.

  12. Swarm GPS Receiver Performance under the Influence of Ionospheric Scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Le; Schön, Steffen

    2016-04-01

    The Swarm mission launched on 22 November 2013 is ESA's first constellation of satellites to study the dynamics of the Earth's magnetic field and its interaction with the Earth system. This mission consists of three identical satellites in near-polar orbits , two flying almost side-by-side at an initial altitude of 460 km, the third flying in a higher orbit of about 530 km. Each satellite is equipped with a high precision 8-channels dual-frequency receiver for the precise orbit determination, which is also the essential fundament in order to take full advantage of the data information provided by this constellation, e.g. for the recovery of gravity field. The quality of the final orbit determination depends on the observation data from the receivers. In this contribution, we will analyze the performance of the Swarm on-board receivers, especially under the influence of ionospheric scintillation caused by ionospheric irregularities. This is a prerequisite for high quality satellite positioning as well as a sound study of the ionosphere. Ionospheric scintillation can lead to the phase disturbances, cycle slips or even loss of signal tracking. The RINEX observation data from Swarm Level 1b products are used to analyze the Swarm receiver performance. We will demonstrate the signal strength, code and phase noise, different linear combinations (geometry free, ionosphere free), as well as GDOP values for the 3 Swarm satellites. The first results show that the observation data are severely disturbed and the signals could be lost around the geomagnetic equator and geomagnetic poles where the ionosphere is active. The results also show that the receivers are more stable in those areas after the update in October 2015.

  13. Collective Behaviour without Collective Order in Wild Swarms of Midges

    PubMed Central

    Attanasi, Alessandro; Cavagna, Andrea; Del Castello, Lorenzo; Giardina, Irene; Melillo, Stefania; Parisi, Leonardo; Pohl, Oliver; Rossaro, Bruno; Shen, Edward; Silvestri, Edmondo; Viale, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    Collective behaviour is a widespread phenomenon in biology, cutting through a huge span of scales, from cell colonies up to bird flocks and fish schools. The most prominent trait of collective behaviour is the emergence of global order: individuals synchronize their states, giving the stunning impression that the group behaves as one. In many biological systems, though, it is unclear whether global order is present. A paradigmatic case is that of insect swarms, whose erratic movements seem to suggest that group formation is a mere epiphenomenon of the independent interaction of each individual with an external landmark. In these cases, whether or not the group behaves truly collectively is debated. Here, we experimentally study swarms of midges in the field and measure how much the change of direction of one midge affects that of other individuals. We discover that, despite the lack of collective order, swarms display very strong correlations, totally incompatible with models of non-interacting particles. We find that correlation increases sharply with the swarm's density, indicating that the interaction between midges is based on a metric perception mechanism. By means of numerical simulations we demonstrate that such growing correlation is typical of a system close to an ordering transition. Our findings suggest that correlation, rather than order, is the true hallmark of collective behaviour in biological systems. PMID:25057853

  14. Plasma Rotation Control Experiment in a Strongly Diverging Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasaka, Kenichiro; Furuta, Kanshi; Yoshimura, Shinji; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Tanaka, Masayoshi Y.

    2016-10-01

    It has been recognized that the plasma rotation affects the plasma flow structure along the magnetic field line. However, the effect of plasma rotation on structure formation in a strongly diverging magnetic field with magnetized electrons and unmagnetized ions has not been fully understood, so far. Understanding the flow structure formation in an ion-unmagnetized plasma is essential to control ion streamline detachment from the magnetic field line and also necessary to study the astrophysical phenomena in laboratory. In order to clarify the effect of plasma rotation in a diverging magnetic field, we have performed the plasma rotation control experiment in the HYPER-II device at Kyushu Univ., Japan. A set of cylindrical electrode was utilized to control the radial electric field, and the profile of azimuthal E × B rotation has been changed. We present the experimental results on the electron density pileup and the flow reversal appeared in the rotating plasma. This study was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 16K05633.

  15. An immune-inspired swarm aggregation algorithm for self-healing swarm robotic systems.

    PubMed

    Timmis, J; Ismail, A R; Bjerknes, J D; Winfield, A F T

    2016-08-01

    Swarm robotics is concerned with the decentralised coordination of multiple robots having only limited communication and interaction abilities. Although fault tolerance and robustness to individual robot failures have often been used to justify the use of swarm robotic systems, recent studies have shown that swarm robotic systems are susceptible to certain types of failure. In this paper we propose an approach to self-healing swarm robotic systems and take inspiration from the process of granuloma formation, a process of containment and repair found in the immune system. We use a case study of a swarm performing team work where previous works have demonstrated that partially failed robots have the most detrimental effect on overall swarm behaviour. We have developed an immune inspired approach that permits the recovery from certain failure modes during operation of the swarm, overcoming issues that effect swarm behaviour associated with partially failed robots.

  16. Massless scalar field and solar-system experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Formiga, J. B.

    2011-04-15

    The solution of Einstein's field equations with the energy-momentum tensor of a massless scalar field is known as the Fisher solution. It is well known that this solution has a naked singularity due to the ''charge''{Sigma} of the massless scalar field. Here I obtain the radial null geodesic of the Fisher solution and use it to confirm that there is no black hole. In addition, I use the parametrized post-Newtonian formalism to show that the Fisher spacetime predicts the same effects on solar-system experiments as the Schwarzschild one does, as long as we impose a limit on {Sigma}. I show that this limit is not a strong constraint and we can even take values of {Sigma} bigger than M. By using the exact formula of the redshift and some assumptions, I evaluate this limit for the experiment of Pound and Snider [Phys. Rev. 140, B788 (1965)]. It turns out that this limit is {Sigma}<5.8x10{sup 3} m.

  17. On the tensile strength of insect swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    2016-08-01

    Collective animal groups are often described by the macroscopic patterns they form. Such global patterns, however, convey limited information about the nature of the aggregation as a whole. Here, we take a different approach, drawing on ideas from materials testing to probe the macroscopic mechanical properties of mating swarms of the non-biting midge Chironomus riparius. By manipulating ground-based visual features that tend to position the swarms in space, we apply an effective tensile load to the swarms, and show that we can quasi-statically pull single swarms apart into multiple daughter swarms. Our results suggest that swarms surprisingly have macroscopic mechanical properties similar to solids, including a finite Young’s modulus and yield strength, and that they do not flow like viscous fluids.

  18. Development of Micro UAV Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürkle, Axel; Leuchter, Sandro

    Some complex application scenarios for micro UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles) call for the formation of swarms of multiple drones. In this paper a platform for the creation of such swarms is presented. It consists of modified commercial quadrocopters and a self-made ground control station software architecture. Autonomy of individual drones is generated through a micro controller equipped video camera. Currently it is possible to fly basic maneuvers autonomously, such as take-off, fly to position, and landing. In the future the camera's image processing capabilities will be used to generate additional control information. Different co-operation strategies for teams of UAVs are currently evaluated with an agent based simulation tool. Finally complex application scenarios for multiple micro UAVs are presented.

  19. Equilibrium evolution in oscillating-field current-drive experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollam, K. J.; Anderson, J. K.; Blair, A. P.; Craig, D.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Ebrahimi, F.; O'Connell, R.; Reusch, J. A.; Sarff, J. S.; Stephens, H. D.; Stone, D. R.; Brower, D. L.; Deng, B. H.; Ding, W. X.

    2010-08-01

    Oscillating-field current drive (OFCD) is a proposed method of steady-state toroidal plasma sustainment in which ac poloidal and toroidal loop voltages are applied to produce a dc plasma current. OFCD is added to standard, inductively sustained reversed-field pinch plasmas in the Madison Symmetric Torus [R. N. Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)]. Equilibrium profiles and fluctuations during a single cycle are measured and analyzed for different relative phases between the two OFCD voltages and for OFCD off. For OFCD phases leading to the most added plasma current, the measured energy confinement is slightly better than that for OFCD off. By contrast, the phase of the maximum OFCD helicity-injection rate also has the maximum decay rate, which is ascribed to transport losses during discrete magnetic-fluctuation events induced by OFCD. Resistive-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the experiments reproduce the observed phase dependence of the added current.

  20. SRNL RADIONUCLIDE FIELD LYSIMETER EXPERIMENT: BASELINE CONSTRUCTION AND IMPLEMENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, K.; Kaplan, D.; Bagwell, L.; Powell, B.; Almond, P.; Emerson, H.; Hixon, A.; Jablonski, J.; Buchanan, C.; Waterhouse, T.

    2012-10-17

    The purpose of this document is to compile information regarding experimental design, facility design, construction, radionuclide source preparation, and path forward for the ten year Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Radionuclide Field Lysimeter Experiment at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This is a collaborative effort by researchers at SRNL and Clemson University. The scientific objectives of this study are to: Study long-term radionuclide transport under conditions more representative of vadose zone conditions than laboratory experiments; Provide more realistic quantification of radionuclide transport and geochemistry in the vadose zone, providing better information pertinent to radioactive waste storage solutions than presently exists; Reduce uncertainty and improve justification for geochemical models such as those used in performance assessments and composite analyses.

  1. EFEDA - European field experiment in a desertification-threatened area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolle, H.-J.; Andre, J.-C.; Arrue, J. L.; Barth, H. K.; Bessemoulin, P.; Brasa, A.; De Bruin, H. A. R.; Cruces, J.; Dugdale, G.; Engman, E. T.

    1993-01-01

    During June 1991 more than 30 scientific teams worked in Castilla-La Mancha, Spain, studying the energy and water transfer processes between soil, vegetation, and the atmosphere in semiarid conditions within the coordinated European research project EFEDA (European Field Experiment in Desertification-threatened Areas). Measurements were made from the microscale (e.g., measurements on single plants) up to a scale compatible with the grid size of global models. For this purpose three sites were selected 70 km apart and heavily instrumented at a scale in the order of 30 sq km. Aircraft missions, satellite data, and movable equipment were deployed to provide a bridge to the larger scale. This paper gives a description of the experimental design along with some of the preliminary results of this successful experiment.

  2. A field experiment: reducing interpersonal discrimination toward pregnant job applicants.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Whitney Botsford; Walker, Sarah Singletary; Hebl, Michelle Mikki R; King, Eden B

    2013-09-01

    The current research targets 4 potential stereotypes driving hostile attitudes and discriminatory behaviors toward pregnant women: incompetence, lack of commitment, inflexibility, and need for accommodation. We tested the relative efficacy of reducing concerns related to each of the stereotypes in a field experiment in which female confederates who sometimes wore pregnancy prostheses applied for jobs in a retail setting. As expected, ratings from 3 perspectives (applicants, observers, and independent coders) converged to show that pregnant applicants received more interpersonal hostility than did nonpregnant applicants. However, when hiring managers received (vs. did not receive) counterstereotypic information about certain pregnancy-related stereotypes (particularly lack of commitment and inflexibility), managers displayed significantly less interpersonal discrimination. Explicit comparisons of counterstereotypic information shed light on the fact that certain information may be more effective in reducing discrimination than others. We conclude by discussing how the current research makes novel theoretical contributions and describe some practical organizational implications for understanding and improving the experiences of pregnant workers.

  3. Asymptotic Dynamics of Attractive-Repulsive Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leverentz, Andrew J.; Topaz, Chad M.; Bernoff, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    We classify and predict the asymptotic dynamics of a class of swarming models. The model consists of a conservation equation in one dimension describing the movement of a population density field. The velocity is found by convolving the density with a kernel describing attractive-repulsive social interactions. The kernel's first moment and its limiting behavior at the origin determine whether the population asymptotically spreads, contracts, or reaches steady state. For the spreading case, the dynamics approach those of the porous medium equation. The widening, compactly supported population has edges that behave like traveling waves whose speed, density, and slope we calculate. For the contracting case, the dynamics of the cumulative density approach those of Burgers' equation. We derive an analytical upper bound for the finite blow-up time after which the solution forms one or more delta-functions.

  4. Insect monitoring with fluorescence lidar techniques: field experiments.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zuguang; Brydegaard, Mikkel; Lundin, Patrik; Wellenreuther, Maren; Runemark, Anna; Svensson, Erik I; Svanberg, Sune

    2010-09-20

    Results from field experiments using a fluorescence lidar system to monitor movements of insects are reported. Measurements over a river surface were made at distances between 100 and 300 m, detecting, in particular, damselflies entering the 355 nm pulsed laser beam. The lidar system recorded the depolarized elastic backscattering and two broad bands of laser-induced fluorescence, with the separation wavelength at 500 nm. Captured species, dusted with characteristic fluorescent dye powders, could be followed spatially and temporally after release. Implications for ecological research are discussed.

  5. Cartoon music in a candy store: a field experiment.

    PubMed

    Le Guellec, Hélène; Guéguen, Nicolas; Jacob, Céline; Pascual, Alexandre

    2007-06-01

    An experiment on consumers' behavior was carried out in a new field context. According to a random assignment, 60 customers from ages 12 to 14 years who entered a candy store were exposed to Top Forty music which was usually played in this store, music from cartoons (Captain Flame, Candy, Olive & Tom, etc.), or no music. Analysis showed that customers spent significantly more time in the store when cartoon music was played, but the two styles of music were not related to the amount of money spent.

  6. The South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study: Nearshore Hydrodynamics Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, K. A.; Voulgaris, G.; Demir, H.; Work, P. A.; Hanes, D. M.

    2004-12-01

    As part of the South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study (SCCES) a nearshore field experiment was carried out for five days in December 2003 just north of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, providing measurements of the waves, currents and morphological evolution. This experiment occurred concurrently with an extensive field campaign several kilometers offshore which included measurements of the waves and currents on and near a significant sand shoal. The purpose of the nearshore experiment was to aid in the identification of the effect of the offshore shoal on the nearshore processes. The resulting dataset will be used for verification of numerical models being used to investigate the hydrodynamics of the region. The experiment was carried out from December 10 to December 15 and consisted of measurements of the waves and currents, extensive surveys of the bathymetry every day, grab samples of the sediments, and video imagery. The hydrodynamics were measured using two Sontek Triton downward-looking Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters and two Nortek AquaDopp profilers arranged in a cross-shore line from inside the swash to several surf zone widths past the breakers. The bathymetric surveying was accomplished using both a differential GPS system and a total station. Surveying was performed each day in order to capture the morphological changes. On the last day, seven sediment samples were taken along a single cross-section to determine the sediment characteristics across the beach. Additionally, a video camera was located on a balcony of the top floor of a nearby hotel providing an excellent field of view of the entire experimental area. Digital video was captured directly onto a computer during all daylight hours and many control points were surveyed in each day to facilitate rectification of the imagery. A variety of conditions were encountered during the experiment, including two storm fronts which passed through, generating wind speeds up to 15 m/s. The first storm generated

  7. Collective control of spacecraft swarms for space exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, Marco; Palmerini, Giovanni B.

    2009-11-01

    Swarms are characterized in nature by a dynamic behaviour which is quite appealing for researchers involved in numerous fields of study, like robotics, computer science, pure mathematics and space sciences. Global group organization acquired in absence of centralized control is the feature of natural swarms which is most interesting to reproduce. This study proposes to make use of some evolutionary robotics findings in order to obtain the autonomous group organization in the framework of a deeper knowledge of the astrodynamics. The main task which will be accomplished is the implementation of the control laws for the single satellite. A careful tuning of the parameters at member level is necessary in order to gain an autonomously evolving global behaviour in a number of space missions of immediate interest. In remote sensing missions, for example, trains of a small number of satellites are already orbiting and integrating their collected data: in near future entire swarms of agents could accomplish this task, and should be controlled in order to acquire and maintain the desired leader-follower configuration. Another example can be seen in deep space exploration of unknown celestial bodies, where the migration of the entire swarm from a reference orbit to a (previously unknown) targeted one is an issue; the same group migration is of interest in Earth orbit, when transferring from parking to operational orbit. Finally, self-assembly of rigid-like virtual structures is also simulated. This paper shows that all these cases are autonomously performed by the swarm by correctly implementing four simple rules at individual level, which assess the primal needs for any satellite: avoid collision, remain grouped, align to the neighbor, reach a goal.

  8. Lagrange Interpolation Learning Particle Swarm Optimization

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, comprehensive learning particle swarm optimization (CLPSO) has attracted the attention of many scholars for using in solving multimodal problems, as it is excellent in preserving the particles’ diversity and thus preventing premature convergence. However, CLPSO exhibits low solution accuracy. Aiming to address this issue, we proposed a novel algorithm called LILPSO. First, this algorithm introduced a Lagrange interpolation method to perform a local search for the global best point (gbest). Second, to gain a better exemplar, one gbest, another two particle’s historical best points (pbest) are chosen to perform Lagrange interpolation, then to gain a new exemplar, which replaces the CLPSO’s comparison method. The numerical experiments conducted on various functions demonstrate the superiority of this algorithm, and the two methods are proven to be efficient for accelerating the convergence without leading the particle to premature convergence. PMID:27123982

  9. Investigating the auroral electrojets using Swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ashley; Macmillan, Susan; Beggan, Ciaran; Whaler, Kathy

    2016-04-01

    The auroral electrojets are large horizontal currents that flow within the ionosphere in ovals around the polar regions. They are an important aspect of space weather and their position and intensity vary with solar wind conditions and geomagnetic activity. The electrojet positions are also governed by the Earth's main magnetic field. During more active periods, the auroral electrojets typically move equatorward and become more intense. This causes a range of effects on Earth and in space, including geomagnetically induced currents in power transmission networks, disturbance to radio communications and increased drag on satellites due to expansion of the atmosphere. They are also indicative of where the aurora are visible. Monitoring of the auroral electrojets in the pre-satellite era was limited to the network of ground-based magnetic observatories, from which the traditional AE activity indices are produced. These suffer in particular from the stations' poor distribution in position and so this motivates the use of satellite-based measurements. With polar low-Earth orbit satellites carrying magnetometers, all latitudes can be sampled with excellent resolution. This poster presents an investigation using Swarm's magnetometer data to detect the electrojets as the spacecraft move above them. We compare and contrast two approaches, one which uses vector data and the other which uses scalar data (Hamilton and Macmillan 2013, Vennerstrom and Moretto, 2013). Using ideas from both approaches we determine the oval positions and intensities from Swarm and earlier satellites. The variation in latitude and intensity with solar wind conditions, geomagnetic activity and secular variation of the main field is investigated. We aim to elucidate the relative importance of these factors. Hamilton, B. and Macmillan, S., 2013. Investigation of decadal scale changes in the auroral oval positions using Magsat and CHAMP data. Poster at IAGA 12th Scientific Assembly, 2013. http

  10. Parameter estimation for chaotic systems based on improved boundary chicken swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shaolong; Yan, Renhuan

    2016-10-01

    Estimating unknown parameters for chaotic system is a key problem in the field of chaos control and synchronization. Through constructing an appropriate fitness function, parameter estimation of chaotic system could be converted to a multidimensional parameter optimization problem. In this paper, a new method base on improved boundary chicken swarm optimization (IBCSO) algorithm is proposed for solving the problem of parameter estimation in chaotic system. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no published research work on chicken swarm optimization for parameters estimation of chaotic system. Computer simulation based on Lorenz system and comparisons with chicken swarm optimization, particle swarm optimization, and genetic algorithm shows the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed method.

  11. A meta-analysis of human-system interfaces in unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) swarm management.

    PubMed

    Hocraffer, Amy; Nam, Chang S

    2017-01-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to systematically evaluate the current state of research on human-system interfaces for users controlling semi-autonomous swarms composed of groups of drones or unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). UAV swarms pose several human factors challenges, such as high cognitive demands, non-intuitive behavior, and serious consequences for errors. This article presents findings from a meta-analysis of 27 UAV swarm management papers focused on the human-system interface and human factors concerns, providing an overview of the advantages, challenges, and limitations of current UAV management interfaces, as well as information on how these interfaces are currently evaluated. In general allowing user and mission-specific customization to user interfaces and raising the swarm's level of autonomy to reduce operator cognitive workload are beneficial and improve situation awareness (SA). It is clear more research is needed in this rapidly evolving field.

  12. An improved particle swarm optimization algorithm for reliability problems.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peifeng; Gao, Liqun; Zou, Dexuan; Li, Steven

    2011-01-01

    An improved particle swarm optimization (IPSO) algorithm is proposed to solve reliability problems in this paper. The IPSO designs two position updating strategies: In the early iterations, each particle flies and searches according to its own best experience with a large probability; in the late iterations, each particle flies and searches according to the fling experience of the most successful particle with a large probability. In addition, the IPSO introduces a mutation operator after position updating, which can not only prevent the IPSO from trapping into the local optimum, but also enhances its space developing ability. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has stronger convergence and stability than the other four particle swarm optimization algorithms on solving reliability problems, and that the solutions obtained by the IPSO are better than the previously reported best-known solutions in the recent literature.

  13. Identifying Discrimination at Work: The Use of Field Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Pager, Devah; Western, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Antidiscrimination law offers protection to workers who have been treated unfairly on the basis of their race, gender, religion, or national origin. In order for these protections to be invoked, however, potential plaintiffs must be aware of and able to document discriminatory treatment. Given the subtlety of contemporary forms of discrimination, it is often difficult to identify discrimination when it has taken place. The methodology of field experiments offers one approach to measuring and detecting hiring discrimination, providing direct observation of discrimination in real-world settings. In this article, we discuss the findings of two recent field experiments measuring racial discrimination in low wage labor markets. This research provides several relevant findings for researchers and those interested in civil rights enforcement: (1) it produces estimates of the rate of discrimination at the point of hire; (2) it yields evidence about the interactions associated with discrimination (many of which reveal the subtlety with which contemporary discrimination is practiced); and (3) it provides a vehicle for both research on and enforcement of antidiscrimination law. PMID:24163481

  14. Multiscale modelling and analysis of collective decision making in swarm robotics.

    PubMed

    Vigelius, Matthias; Meyer, Bernd; Pascoe, Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    We present a unified approach to describing certain types of collective decision making in swarm robotics that bridges from a microscopic individual-based description to aggregate properties. Our approach encompasses robot swarm experiments, microscopic and probabilistic macroscopic-discrete simulations as well as an analytic mathematical model. Following up on previous work, we identify the symmetry parameter, a measure of the progress of the swarm towards a decision, as a fundamental integrated swarm property and formulate its time evolution as a continuous-time Markov process. Contrary to previous work, which justified this approach only empirically and a posteriori, we justify it from first principles and derive hard limits on the parameter regime in which it is applicable.

  15. A Survey of Formal Methods for Intelligent Swarms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truszkowski, Walt; Rash, James; Hinchey, Mike; Rouff, Chrustopher A.

    2004-01-01

    Swarms of intelligent autonomous spacecraft, involving complex behaviors and interactions, are being proposed for future space exploration missions. Such missions provide greater flexibility and offer the possibility of gathering more science data than traditional single spacecraft missions. The emergent properties of swarms make these missions powerful, but simultaneously far more difficult to design, and to assure that the proper behaviors will emerge. These missions are also considerably more complex than previous types of missions, and NASA, like other organizations, has little experience in developing or in verifying and validating these types of missions. A significant challenge when verifying and validating swarms of intelligent interacting agents is how to determine that the possible exponential interactions and emergent behaviors are producing the desired results. Assuring correct behavior and interactions of swarms will be critical to mission success. The Autonomous Nano Technology Swarm (ANTS) mission is an example of one of the swarm types of missions NASA is considering. The ANTS mission will use a swarm of picospacecraft that will fly from Earth orbit to the Asteroid Belt. Using an insect colony analogy, ANTS will be composed of specialized workers for asteroid exploration. Exploration would consist of cataloguing the mass, density, morphology, and chemical composition of the asteroids, including any anomalous concentrations of specific minerals. To perform this task, ANTS would carry miniaturized instruments, such as imagers, spectrometers, and detectors. Since ANTS and other similar missions are going to consist of autonomous spacecraft that may be out of contact with the earth for extended periods of time, and have low bandwidths due to weight constraints, it will be difficult to observe improper behavior and to correct any errors after launch. Providing V&V (verification and validation) for this type of mission is new to NASA, and represents the

  16. Dimensioning IRGA gas sampling systems: laboratory and field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubinet, Marc; Joly, Lilian; Loustau, Denis; De Ligne, Anne; Chopin, Henri; Cousin, Julien; Chauvin, Nicolas; Decarpenterie, Thomas; Gross, Patrick

    2016-03-01

    Both laboratory and field experiments were carried out in order to define suitable configuration ranges for the gas sampling systems (GSSs) of infrared gas analyzers (IRGAs) used in eddy covariance measurements.

    In the laboratory, an original dynamic calibration bench was developed in order to test the frequency attenuation and pressure drop generated by filters. In the field, three IRGAs of the same type equipped with different filters or different rain caps were installed and run and the real frequency response of the complete setup was tested. The main results are as follows. - Filters may have a strong impact on the pressure drop in the GSS and this impact increases with flow rate. - Conversely, no impact of the tested filters on cut-off frequency was found, GSSs with and without filters presenting similar cut-off frequencies. - The main limiting factor of cut-off frequency in the field was found to be the rain cap design. In addition, the impact of this design on pressure drop was also found to be noteworthy.

  17. Dimensioning IRGA gas sampling system : laboratory and field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubinet, Marc; Joly, Lilian; Loustau, Denis; De Ligne, Anne; Chopin, Henri; Cousin, Julien; De Carpenterie, Thomas; Gross, Patrick; Chauvin, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Both laboratory and field experiments were carried out in order to define suitable configuration ranges for the gas sampling systems (GSS) of infrared gas analyzers (IRGA) used in eddy covariance measurements. In the laboratory, an original dynamic calibration bench was developed in order to test the frequency attenuation and pressure drop generated by filters. In the field, three IRGAs of the same type equipped with different filters or different rain caps were installed and run and the real frequency response of the complete set-up was tested. The main results are that: - Filters may have a strong impact on the pressure drop in the GSS and this impact increases with flow rate. - On the contrary, no impact of the tested filters on cut off frequency was found, GSS with and without filters presenting similar cut off frequencies. - The main limiting factor of cut off frequency in the field was found to be the rain cap design. In addition, the impact of this design on pressure drop was also found noteworthy.

  18. [Runoff Pollution Experiments of Paddy Fields Under Different Irrigation Patterns].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing-wen; Su, Bao-lin; Huang, Ning-bo; Guan, Yu-tang; Zhao, Kun

    2016-03-15

    To study runoff and non-point source pollution of paddy fields and to provide a scientific basis for agricultural water management of paddy fields, paddy plots in the Jintan City and the Liyang City were chosen for experiments on non-point source pollution, and flood irrigation and intermittent irrigation patterns were adopted in this research. The surface water level and rainfall were observed during the growing season of paddies, and the runoff amount from paddy plots and loads of total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) were calculated by different methods. The results showed that only five rain events of totally 27 rainfalls and one artificially drainage formed non-point source pollution from flood irrigated paddy plot, which resulted in a TN export coefficient of 49.4 kg · hm⁻² and a TP export coefficient of 1.0 kg · hm⁻². No any runoff event occurred from the paddy plot with intermittent irrigation even in the case of maximum rainfall of 95.1 mm. Runoff from paddy fields was affected by water demands of paddies and irrigation or drainage management, which was directly correlated to surface water level, rainfall amount and the lowest ridge height of outlets. Compared with the flood irrigation, intermittent irrigation could significantly reduce non-point source pollution caused by rainfall or artificial drainage.

  19. Field experiments using SPEAR: a speech control system for UGVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhatpar, Siddharth R.; Blanco, Chris; Czerniak, Jeffrey; Hoffman, Orin; Juneja, Amit; Pruthi, Tarun; Liu, Dongqing; Karlsen, Robert; Brown, Jonathan

    2009-05-01

    This paper reports on a Field Experiment carried out by the Human Research and Engineering Directorate at Ft. Benning to evaluate the efficacy of using speech to control an Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) concurrently with a handcontroller. The SPEAR system, developed by Think-A-Move, provides speech-control of UGVs. The system picks up user-speech in the ear canal with an in-ear microphone. This property allows it to work efficiently in high-noise environments, where traditional speech systems, employing external microphones, fail. It has been integrated with an iRobot PackBot 510 with EOD kit. The integrated system allows the hand-controller to be supplemented with speech for concurrent control. At Ft. Benning, the integrated system was tested by soldiers from the Officer Candidate School. The Experiment had dual focus: 1) Quantitative measurement of the time taken to complete each station and the cognitive load on users; 2) Qualitative evaluation of ease-of-use and ergonomics through soldier-feedback. Also of significant benefit to Think-A-Move was soldier-feedback on the speech-command vocabulary employed: What spoken commands are intuitive, and how the commands should be executed, e.g., limited-motion vs. unlimited-motion commands. Overall results from the Experiment are reported in the paper.

  20. Data management for interdisciplinary field experiments: OTTER project support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelici, Gary; Popovici, Lidia; Skiles, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    The ability of investigators of an interdisciplinary science project to properly manage the data that are collected during the experiment is critical to the effective conduct of science. When the project becomes large, possibly including several scenes of large-format remotely sensed imagery shared by many investigators requiring several services, the data management effort can involve extensive staff and computerized data inventories. The OTTER (Oregon Transect Ecosystem Research) project was supported by the PLDS (Pilot Land Data System) with several data management services, such as data inventory, certification, and publication. After a brief description of these services, experiences in providing them are compared with earlier data management efforts and some conclusions regarding data management in support of interdisciplinary science are discussed. In addition to providing these services, a major goal of this data management capability was to adopt characteristics of a pro-active attitude, such as flexibility and responsiveness, believed to be crucial for the effective conduct of active, interdisciplinary science. These are also itemized and compared with previous data management support activities. Identifying and improving these services and characteristics can lead to the design and implementation of optimal data management support capabilities, which can result in higher quality science and data products from future interdisciplinary field experiments.

  1. Modelling of Ocean Induced Magnetic Signals in Swarm Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einspigel, D.; Velimsky, J.; Martinec, Z.; Sachl, L.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that the motion of sea water in the Earth's main magnetic field induces the secondary magnetic field which can be measured by satellite, land-based or sea surface magnetic measurements, despite being rather weak, reaching intensities of up to a few nT. We focus on the extraction of ocean induced signals from Swarm satellite data and their interpretation by a comparison with synthetic signals. Results of our modeling and data processing efforts will be presented. We use two ocean circulation models: 1) DEBOT, a barotropic model of ocean tide flow and 2) LSOMG, a baroclinic model of global ocean circulation; and two different approaches for modelling the secondary magnetic field: 1) a single-layer approximation model and 2) a three-dimensional time-domain electromagnetic induction model. Swarm data are analyzed along night-time tracks of the satellites. Only a small amount of the data can be used for the analysis of ocean-induced signals because of permanently present strong signals from the magnetosphere and disruptive effects of polar electrojets. Nevertheless, the extracted signals from selected Swarm data tracks show a relatively good coincidence with predicted signals.

  2. Swarm Absolute Scalar Magnetometers first in-orbit results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratter, Isabelle; Léger, Jean-Michel; Bertrand, François; Jager, Thomas; Hulot, Gauthier; Brocco, Laura; Vigneron, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The ESA Swarm mission will provide the best ever survey of the Earth's magnetic field and its temporal evolution. This will be achieved by a constellation of three identical satellites, launched together on the 22nd of November 2013. In order to observe the magnetic field thoroughly, each satellite carries two magnetometers: a Vector Field Magnetometer (VFM) coupled with a star tracker camera, to measure the direction of the magnetic field in space, and an Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM), to measure its intensity. The ASM is the French contribution to the Swarm mission. This new generation instrument was designed by CEA-Leti and developed in close partnership with CNES, with scientific support from IPGP. Its operating principle is based on the atomic spectroscopy of the helium 4 metastable state. It makes use of the Zeeman's effect to transduce the magnetic field into a frequency, the signal being amplified by optical pumping. The primary role of the ASM is to provide absolute measurements of the magnetic field's strength at 1 Hz, for the in-flight calibration of the VFM. As the Swarm magnetic reference, the ASM scalar performance is crucial for the mission's success. Thanks to its innovative design, the ASM offers the best precision, resolution and absolute accuracy ever attained in space, with similar performance all along the orbit. In addition, thanks to an original architecture, the ASM implements on an experimental basis a capacity for providing simultaneously vector measurements at 1 Hz. This new feature makes it the first instrument capable of delivering both scalar and vector measurements simultaneously at the same point. Swarm offers a unique opportunity to validate the ASM vector data in orbit by comparison with the VFM's. Furthermore, the ASM can provide scalar data at a much higher sampling rate, when run in "burst" mode at 250 Hz, with a 100 Hz measurement bandwidth. An analysis of the spectral content of the magnetic field above 1 Hz becomes thus

  3. Electric Field Double Probe Measurements for Ionospheric Space Plasma Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfaff, R.

    1999-01-01

    Double probes represent a well-proven technique for gathering high quality DC and AC electric field measurements in a variety of space plasma regimes including the magnetosphere, ionosphere, and mesosphere. Such experiments have been successfully flown on a variety of spacecraft including sounding rockets and satellites. Typical instrument designs involve a series of trades, depending on the science objectives, type of platform (e.g., spinning or 3-axis stabilized), expected plasma regime where the measurements will be made, available telemetry, budget, etc. In general, ionospheric DC electric field instruments that achieve accuracies of 0.1 mV/m or better, place spherical sensors at large distances (10m or more) from the spacecraft body in order to extend well beyond the spacecraft wake and sheath and to achieve large signal-to-noise ratios for DC and long wavelength measurements. Additional sets of sensors inboard of the primary, outermost sensors provide useful additional information, both for diagnostics of the plasma contact potentials, which particularly enhance the DC electric field measurements on non-spinning spacecraft, and for wavelength and phase velocity measurements that use the spaced receiver or "interferometer" technique. Accurate attitude knowledge enables B times V contributions to be subtracted from the measured potentials, and permits the measured components to be rotated into meaningful geophysical reference frames. We review the measurement technique for both DC and wave electric field measurements in the ionosphere discussing recent advances involving high resolution burst memories, multiple baseline double probes, new sensor surface materials, biasing techniques, and other considerations.

  4. Surface swarming motility by Pectobacterium atrosepticum is a latent phenotype that requires O antigen and is regulated by quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Steven D; Hale, Nicola; Chung, Jade C S; Hodgkinson, James T; Spring, David R; Welch, Martin

    2013-11-01

    We describe a previously cryptic phenotype associated with the opportunistic phytopathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum (Pca): surface swarming. We found that when Pca was spotted onto plates containing <0.5% (w/v) agar, the culture produced copious amounts of extracellular matrix material containing highly motile cells. Once produced, this 'slime layer' spread rapidly across the plate either as an advancing front or as tendrils. Transposon mutagenesis was used to identify mutants that were affected in swarming. Hypo-swarmer mutants mostly carried insertions in a horizontally acquired island (HAI5), which encodes a cluster of genes involved in O antigen biosynthesis. Hyper-swarmer mutants mostly carried insertions in hexY, a known antagonist of the class I flagellar master regulator, FlhD4C2. In addition, we found that the nucleoid protein, histone-like nuclear structuring protein 2 (H-NS2), also regulated swarming behaviour. A mutant in which hns2 was overexpressed displayed a hyper-swarming phenotype, whereas a mutant in which the hns2 ORF was inactivated had a hypo-swarming phenotype. Swarming was also regulated by quorum sensing (QS) and by the carbon source being utilized. We show, using a range of epistasis experiments, that optimal swarming requires both motility and O antigen biosynthesis, and that H-NS2 and QS both promote swarming through their effects on motility.

  5. Mercury's Gravity Field from BepiColombo MORE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marabucci, M.; Genova, A.; Iess, L.

    2012-04-01

    The Mercury Orbiter Radioscience Experiment (MORE) is one of the main instruments on board the BepiColombo Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO), designed to provide an accurate estimation of Mercury's gravity field by means of highly stable, multi-frequency radio links in X and Ka band. The state-of-the-art microwave equipment enables simultaneous two-way links in X/X (7.2 GHz uplink/8.4 GHz downlink), X/Ka (7.2/32.5 GHz) and Ka/Ka band (34/32.5 GHz), providing range rate accuracies of 3 micron/s (at 1000 s integration time) at nearly all elongation angles. Range observables accurate to 20 cm (two-way) will be attained using a novel, wideband (24 Mcps) ranging system, based upon a pseudo-noise modulation scheme. The multifrequency link, adopted for the first time by the Cassini mission to Saturn [1,2], allows a nearly complete cancellation of the plasma noise both in Doppler and range measurements and hence an accurate determination of Mercury's gravity field and ephemerides. The orbit determination of spacecraft in deep space is generally carried out by means of batch filters, for recovering the trajectory and the model parameters (i.e. gravity field coefficients). The complexity of Mercury's environment penalizes strongly the accuracy of the orbit determination because of the non-gravitational perturbations, such as the solar radiation pressure. Although the non-gravitational accelerations of the MPO will be measured by a highly sensitive accelerometer (the Italian Spring Accelerometer, ISA), a classical, global batch filter proved to be inadequate for precise orbit propagation due to numerical instabilities. Therefore, a different approach has been devised, where the information accumulated previously is exploited in a batch-sequential filter. This paper reports on a new set of numerical simulations carried out with this strategy. The simulation setup takes into account the latest changes in the spacecraft design, the mission profile and the tracking system. We

  6. Microwave Remote Sensing and the Cold Land Processes Field Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward J.; Cline, Don; Davis, Bert; Hildebrand, Peter H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Cold Land Processes Field Experiment (CLPX) has been designed to advance our understanding of the terrestrial cryosphere. Developing a more complete understanding of fluxes, storage, and transformations of water and energy in cold land areas is a critical focus of the NASA Earth Science Enterprise Research Strategy, the NASA Global Water and Energy Cycle (GWEC) Initiative, the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX), and the GEWEX Americas Prediction Project (GAPP). The movement of water and energy through cold regions in turn plays a large role in ecological activity and biogeochemical cycles. Quantitative understanding of cold land processes over large areas will require synergistic advancements in 1) understanding how cold land processes, most comprehensively understood at local or hillslope scales, extend to larger scales, 2) improved representation of cold land processes in coupled and uncoupled land-surface models, and 3) a breakthrough in large-scale observation of hydrologic properties, including snow characteristics, soil moisture, the extent of frozen soils, and the transition between frozen and thawed soil conditions. The CLPX Plan has been developed through the efforts of over 60 interested scientists that have participated in the NASA Cold Land Processes Working Group (CLPWG). This group is charged with the task of assessing, planning and implementing the required background science, technology, and application infrastructure to support successful land surface hydrology remote sensing space missions. A major product of the experiment will be a comprehensive, legacy data set that will energize many aspects of cold land processes research. The CLPX will focus on developing the quantitative understanding, models, and measurements necessary to extend our local-scale understanding of water fluxes, storage, and transformations to regional and global scales. The experiment will particularly emphasize developing a strong synergism between process

  7. Osmotic Pressure in a Bacterial Swarm

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Liyan; Wu, Yilin; Hosu, Basarab G.; Tang, Jay X.; Berg, Howard C.

    2014-01-01

    Using Escherichia coli as a model organism, we studied how water is recruited by a bacterial swarm. A previous analysis of trajectories of small air bubbles revealed a stream of fluid flowing in a clockwise direction ahead of the swarm. A companion study suggested that water moves out of the agar into the swarm in a narrow region centered ∼30 μm from the leading edge of the swarm and then back into the agar (at a smaller rate) in a region centered ∼120 μm back from the leading edge. Presumably, these flows are driven by changes in osmolarity. Here, we utilized green/red fluorescent liposomes as reporters of osmolarity to verify this hypothesis. The stream of fluid that flows in front of the swarm contains osmolytes. Two distinct regions are observed inside the swarm near its leading edge: an outer high-osmolarity band (∼30 mOsm higher than the agar baseline) and an inner low-osmolarity band (isotonic or slightly hypotonic to the agar baseline). This profile supports the fluid-flow model derived from the drift of air bubbles and provides new (to our knowledge) insights into water maintenance in bacterial swarms. High osmotic pressure at the leading edge of the swarm extracts water from the underlying agar and promotes motility. The osmolyte is of high molecular weight and probably is lipopolysaccharide. PMID:25140422

  8. Soil response to chemicals used in a field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jezierska-Tys, S.; Rutkowska, A.

    2013-03-01

    The effect of chemicals (Reglone 200 SL and Elastiq 550 EC) on soil microorganisms and their enzymatic activity was estimated. The study was conducted in a field experiment which was set up in the split-block design and comprised three treatments. Soil samples were taken six times, twice in each year of study. The results showed that the application of chemicals generally had no negative effect on the number of soil microorganisms. The application of Reglone 200 SL caused an increase of proteolytic and ureolytic activity and affected the activity of dehydrogenases, acid and alkaline phosphatases in the soil. The soil subjected of Elastiq 550 EC was characterized by lower activity of dehydrogenases, protease, urease and alkaline phosphatase.

  9. Prosocial Behavior and Subjective Insecurity in Violent Contexts: Field Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Vélez, María Alejandra; Trujillo, Carlos Andres; Moros, Lina; Forero, Clemente

    2016-01-01

    Subjective insecurity is a key determinant of different forms of prosocial behavior. In Study 1, we used field experiments with farmers in Colombian villages exposed to different levels of violence to investigate how individual perceptions of insecurity affect cooperation, trust, reciprocity and altruism. To do so, we developed a cognitive-affective measure of subjective insecurity. We found that subjective insecurity has a negative effect on cooperation but influences trust and altruism positively. In Study 2, carried out three years after Study 1, we repeated the initial design with additional measures of victimization. Our goal was to relate subjective insecurity with actual victimization. The findings of Study 2 support the initial results, and are robust and consistent for cooperative behavior and trust when including victimization as a mediator. Different indicators of victimization are positively correlated with subjective insecurity and an aggregate index of victimization has a negative effect on cooperation but exerts a positive influence on trust. PMID:27472437

  10. Monitoring instrument field experiments at Oregon Institute of Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Danielson, M.J.; Smith, R.P.

    1980-09-01

    The field tests were conducted under reducing and oxidizing conditions. Corrosion rates with zero oxygen were about 1.1 mils per year (mpy) for both copper and steel coupons, which is quite low for carbon steel. There was a problem controlling the oxygen level in the oxygenated experiments; however, it was found that corrosion rates increased with the presence of oxygen. Corrosion rates for the steel and copper coupons were 4 and 2 mpy, respectively; copper coupled to cast iron corroded at 8 mpy. Commercial corrosion rate measuring equipment determined the general corrosion rate of carbon steel farily well but overestimated copper corrosion rates. The redox electrode was a very sensitive indicator of the entry of oxygen.

  11. Use of multitemporal SPOT data in first ISLSCP field experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asrar, Ghassem; Murphy, R. E.; Hall, F. G.; Sellers, P. J.

    1991-01-01

    The use of multitemporal SPOT data in a coordinated field experiment is described with objectives to understand the processes that control the biosphere-atmosphere exchanges of heat, mass, momentum and radiation at a range of spatial and temporal scales; and quantify processes associated with these biosphere-atmosphere exchanges with the aid of multispectral and multitemporal remotely sensed data. The study was conducted in a 15 sq km area located in the tall grass prairie region of midwestern U.S. over a period of three years from 1987 through 1989. A combination of ground based, airborne and space based remotely sensed data were used in a variety of interdisciplinary investigations. An overview of the results from studies that used SPOT multispectral and multitemporal data is presented.

  12. Optical Networking in a Swarm of Microrobots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradi, Paolo; Schmickl, Thomas; Scholz, Oliver; Menciassi, Arianna; Dario, Paolo

    Swarm Microrobotics aims to apply Swarm Intelligence algorithms and strategies to a large number of fabricated miniaturized autonomous or semi-autonomous agents, allowing collective, decentralized and self-organizing behaviors of the robots. The ability to establish basic information networking is fundamental in such swarm systems, where inter-robot communication is the base of emergent behaviors. Optical communication represents so far probably the only feasible and suitable solution for the constraints and requirements imposed by the development of a microrobotic swarm. This paper introduces a miniaturized optical communication module for millimeter-sized autonomous robots and presents a computer-simulated demonstration of its basic working principle to exploit bio-inspired swarm strategies.

  13. ARM Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, L Ruby

    2016-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s ARM Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) field campaign contributes to CalWater 2015, a multi-agency field campaign that aims to improve understanding of atmospheric rivers and aerosol sources and transport that influence cloud and precipitation processes. The ultimate goal is to reduce uncertainties in weather predictions and climate projections of droughts and floods in California. With the DOE G-1 aircraft and ARM Mobile Facility 2 (AMF2) well equipped for making aerosol and cloud measurements, ACAPEX focuses specifically on understanding how aerosols from local pollution and long-range transport affect the amount and phase of precipitation associated with atmospheric rivers. ACAPEX took place between January 12, 2015 and March 8, 2015 as part of CalWater 2015, which included four aircraft (DOE G-1, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration [NOAA] G-IV and P-3, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration [NASA] ER-2), the NOAA research ship Ron Brown, carrying onboard the AMF2, National Science Foundation (NSF)-sponsored aerosol and precipitation measurements at Bodega Bay, and the California Department of Water Resources extreme precipitation network.

  14. Frac-and-pack stimulation: Application, design, and field experience

    SciTech Connect

    Roodhart, L.P.; Fokker, P.A.; Davies, D.R.; Shlyapobersky, J.; Wong, G.K.

    1994-03-01

    This paper discusses the criteria for selecting wells to be frac-and-packed. The authors show how systematic study of the inflow performance can be used to assess the potential of frac-and-packed wells, to identify the controlling factors, and to optimize design parameters. They also show that fracture conductivity is often the key to successful treatment. This conductivity depends largely on proppant size; formation permeability damage around the created fracture has less effect. Appropriate allowance needs to be made for flow restrictions caused by the presence of the perforations, partial penetration, and non-Darcy effects. They describe the application of the overpressure-calibrated hydraulic fracture model in frac-and-pack treatment design, and discuss some operational considerations with reference to field examples. The full potential of this promising new completion method can be achieved only if the design is tailored to the individual well. This demands high-quality input data, which can be obtained only from a calibration test. This paper presents their strategy for frac-and-pack design, drawing on examples from field experience. They also point out several areas that the industry needs to address, such as the sizing of proppant in soft formations and the interaction between fracturing fluids and resin in resin-coated proppant.

  15. Magnetic Field Experiment on Yinghuo-1 at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hua

    Magnetic Field Experiment on Yinghuo-1 at Mars Hua Zhao, G. W. Zhu, J. D. Wang, M. F. Yu, L. Li, Y. Q. Sun, S. W. Chen, H. Z. Liao, and B. Zhou Center for Space Science and Applied Research (CSSAR), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China Abstract: A micro-satellite, Yinghuo-1, would be launched with Phobos-Grunt in October, 2009 to investigate the space environment around Mars. YH-1 and Phobos-Grunt forms a twopoint measurement configuration in the Martian space environment, and equipped with similar magnetic field and plasma detecting payload on two spacecraft would give some coordinated exploration around Mars. YH-1 would orbit Mars with periapsis of 800 km above the Martian surface, and apoapsis about 80000 km to the center of Mars. The orbit inclination is in the range of 0—7o to the Martian equator. A flux-gate type magnetometer, with two sensors, is developed for YH-1 spacecraft. Two sensors are mounted on one-side of the deployable solar panel with a radial separation about 45 cm to function as a gradiometer to minimize the affects of platform remanence. The dynamic range of √ magnetometer is with a 16-bit ADC converter, and the the noise level is better than 0.01 nT/ Hz, to measure three-component magnetic field from DC to 10Hz. Flux-gate magnetometer would work together with the Plasma Package onboard of YH-1 to investigate the Martian bow shock, magnetosheath, magnetic pileup region (MPR). A detail description of the flux-gate magnetometer is presented in this paper, with some test and calibration results.

  16. Macroalgal mats and species abundance: a field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, S. C.

    1987-11-01

    A field experiment was carried out whereby the density of macroalgae ( Enteromorpha spp.) was manipulated and the resultant changes in sediment infaunal density were monitored. Four densities of Enteromorpha spp. were used: 0,0·3, 1, and 3 kg FW m -2, corresponding to control, low-, medium-, and high-density plots. The experiment ran from May to October 1985 and was sampled on three occasions. By July, the density of Corophium volutator was reduced at all weed levels when compared to control plots, whereas densities of Hydrobia ulvae, Macoma balthica, Nereis diversicolor, and Capitella capitata, all increased. Samples taken in October when the weed mats were buried in the sediment showed fewer differences than in July. Macoma, Nereis, and Capitella were still significantly more abundant at medium and high weed densities. Corophium showed no significant treatment effect. There was, however, a highly significant difference in population size structure for Corophium. Measurements of sediment redox potential and silt content under medium- and high-density plots revealed rapid anoxia with a significant increase in siltation.

  17. Geothermal well stimulation - program summary and the Beowawe field experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Verity, R.V.

    1983-12-01

    Republic Geothermal, Inc. and its subcontractors have planned and executed laboratory studies and eight well stimulation field experiments under the Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP). The program, begun in February 1979, has concentrated on extending petroleum industry stimulation technology for use by the geothermal industry. The most recent experiment was in a naturally fractured Chevron well at Beowawe and involved an acid stimulation of a damaged interval which yielded a 2.3-fold increase in injectivity. Overall results to date have shown that stimulation is viable where adequate reservoirs are penetrated by wells encountering formation damage or locally tight formations. However, wells in marginal naturally fractured reservoirs have not been saved by the types of well stimulation jobs performed thus far. A recent discovery is that many wells can possibly be made outstanding producers by widening and propping compliant natural fractures. Confirmation of this constitutes unfinished business of the GRWSP, adn offers one of the greatest potential opportunities for enhancing the economics of geothermal power production.

  18. The field experiments on the HTO washout from the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Golubev, A.V.; Mavrin, S.V.; Golubeva, V.N.; Stengach, A.V.; Balashov, Y.S.; Kovalenko, V.P.; Solomatin, I.I.

    2015-03-15

    HTO (tritiated water) wash-out from the atmosphere is one of the key processes governing the HTO transport from the atmosphere into soil and plants. Experimental studies of the HTO interaction with water drops were carried out both in laboratories and in the field. In the course of experiments, the following rain characteristics were recorded: rain intensity, size distribution of drops, and falling velocities and their dependence on drop diameter. A laser optical device was designed and used to measure the distribution of the drop radius and velocities during the period of experiment. The tritium source was placed at a height of 30 m. Rainwater samples were collected in plastic bottles and their HTO activity was determined by liquid scintillation techniques. The data obtained for the experimental values of the scavenging rate are within the range from 4.12*10{sup -5} to 1.57*10{sup -4} s{sup -1} and correspond to the precipitation intensity from 0.3 to 1.26 mm/hour. These results are in sufficiently good agreement with the results of earlier papers.

  19. How Many Insects Does It Take to Make a Swarm?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouellette, Nicholas

    2014-03-01

    Aggregations of social animals, such as flocks of birds, schools of fish, or swarms of insects, are beautiful, natural examples of self-organized behavior far from equilibrium. They tend to display a range of emergent properties, from enhanced sensing to the rapid propagation of information throughout the aggregate. Many classes of models have been proposed to describe these systems, including agent-based models that specify explicit social forces between individuals and continuum models that abstract the interactions between individuals into some smooth advecting velocity field. Assessing these various modeling approaches requires comparison with empirical data. We will discuss measurements of laboratory mating swarms of the non-biting midge Chironomus riparius in the context of model assessment. In particular, we focus on the question of the small-number limit: how large must the population be before collective properties emerge?

  20. The equatorial electrojet current modelling from SWARM satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benaissa, Mahfoud

    2016-07-01

    Equatorial ElectroJet (EEJ) is an intense eastward electric current circulating in the ionospheric magnetic equator band between 100 and 130 km of altitude in E region. These currents vary by day, by season, by solar activity, and also with the main magnetic field of internal origin. The irregularity of the ionosphere has a major impact on the performance of communication systems and navigation (GPS), industry.... Then it becomes necessary study the characteristics of EEJ. In this paper, we present a study of the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) phenomenon along one year (2014) period. In addition, the satellite data used in this study are obtained with SWARM satellite scalar magnetometer data respecting magnetically quiet days with KP < 2. In this paper, we process to separate and extract the electrojet intensity signal from other recorded signal-sources interfering with the main signal and reduce considerably the signal to noise ratio during the SWARM measurements. This pre-processing step allows removing all external contributions in regard to EEJ intensity value. Key words: Ionosphere (Equatorial ionosphere; Electric fields and currents; Equatorial electrojet (EEJ)); SWARM.

  1. Research on particle swarm optimization algorithm based on optimal movement probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jianhong; Zhang, Han; He, Baofeng

    2017-01-01

    The particle swarm optimization algorithm to improve the control precision, and has great application value training neural network and fuzzy system control fields etc.The traditional particle swarm algorithm is used for the training of feed forward neural networks,the search efficiency is low, and easy to fall into local convergence.An improved particle swarm optimization algorithm is proposed based on error back propagation gradient descent. Particle swarm optimization for Solving Least Squares Problems to meme group, the particles in the fitness ranking, optimization problem of the overall consideration, the error back propagation gradient descent training BP neural network, particle to update the velocity and position according to their individual optimal and global optimization, make the particles more to the social optimal learning and less to its optimal learning, it can avoid the particles fall into local optimum, by using gradient information can accelerate the PSO local search ability, improve the multi beam particle swarm depth zero less trajectory information search efficiency, the realization of improved particle swarm optimization algorithm. Simulation results show that the algorithm in the initial stage of rapid convergence to the global optimal solution can be near to the global optimal solution and keep close to the trend, the algorithm has faster convergence speed and search performance in the same running time, it can improve the convergence speed of the algorithm, especially the later search efficiency.

  2. Toxin Synthesis and Mucin Breakdown Are Related to Swarming Phenomenon in Clostridium septicum

    PubMed Central

    Macfarlane, Sandra; Hopkins, Mark J.; Macfarlane, George T.

    2001-01-01

    Clostridium septicum is responsible for several diseases in humans and animals. The bacterium is capable of a simple kind of multicellular behavior known as swarming. In this investigation, environmental and physiologic factors affecting growth and swarm cell formation in C. septicum were studied over a range of dilution rates (D = 0.02 to 0.65 h−1) in glucose-limited, glucose-excess, and mucin-limited chemostats. Cellular differentiation was observed at low specific growth rates, irrespective of the carbon and energy source, showing that swarming occurred in response to nutrient depletion. Differential expression of virulence determinants was detected in swarm cells. Hemolysin was secreted by short motile rods but not swarm cells, whereas in cultures grown with glucose, only swarm cells formed DNase, hyaluronidase, and neuraminidase. However, neuraminidase and, to a lesser degree, hyaluronidase were induced in short motile rods in mucin-limited cultures. Both swarm cells and short rods were cytotoxic to Vero cells. Mucin was chemotaxic to C. septicum, and large amounts of mucin-degrading enzymes (β-galactosidase, N-acetyl β-glucosaminidase, glycosulfatase, and neuraminidase) were produced. Synthesis of these enzymes was catabolite regulated. In chemostat experiments, glycosulfatase secretion occurred only in swarm cells at low dilution rates in mucin-limited cultures. Determinations of oligosaccharide utilization demonstrated that N-acetylglucosamine, galactose, and N-acetylgalactosamine were the main carbon sources for C. septicum in mucin. Neuraminic acid was not assimilated, showing that neuraminidase does not have a direct nutritional function in this pathogen. PMID:11160009

  3. Type IV pili interactions promote intercellular association and moderate swarming of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Anyan, Morgen E.; Amiri, Aboutaleb; Harvey, Cameron W.; Tierra, Giordano; Morales-Soto, Nydia; Driscoll, Callan M.; Alber, Mark S.; Shrout, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous bacterium that survives in many environments, including as an acute and chronic pathogen in humans. Substantial evidence shows that P. aeruginosa behavior is affected by its motility, and appendages known as flagella and type IV pili (TFP) are known to confer such motility. The role these appendages play when not facilitating motility or attachment, however, is unclear. Here we discern a passive intercellular role of TFP during flagellar-mediated swarming of P. aeruginosa that does not require TFP extension or retraction. We studied swarming at the cellular level using a combination of laboratory experiments and computational simulations to explain the resultant patterns of cells imaged from in vitro swarms. Namely, we used a computational model to simulate swarming and to probe for individual cell behavior that cannot currently be otherwise measured. Our simulations showed that TFP of swarming P. aeruginosa should be distributed all over the cell and that TFP−TFP interactions between cells should be a dominant mechanism that promotes cell−cell interaction, limits lone cell movement, and slows swarm expansion. This predicted physical mechanism involving TFP was confirmed in vitro using pairwise mixtures of strains with and without TFP where cells without TFP separate from cells with TFP. While TFP slow swarm expansion, we show in vitro that TFP help alter collective motion to avoid toxic compounds such as the antibiotic carbenicillin. Thus, TFP physically affect P. aeruginosa swarming by actively promoting cell−cell association and directional collective motion within motile groups to aid their survival. PMID:25468980

  4. Multiswarm comprehensive learning particle swarm optimization for solving multiobjective optimization problems

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiang; Zhang, Xueqing

    2017-01-01

    Comprehensive learning particle swarm optimization (CLPSO) is a powerful state-of-the-art single-objective metaheuristic. Extending from CLPSO, this paper proposes multiswarm CLPSO (MSCLPSO) for multiobjective optimization. MSCLPSO involves multiple swarms, with each swarm associated with a separate original objective. Each particle’s personal best position is determined just according to the corresponding single objective. Elitists are stored externally. MSCLPSO differs from existing multiobjective particle swarm optimizers in three aspects. First, each swarm focuses on optimizing the associated objective using CLPSO, without learning from the elitists or any other swarm. Second, mutation is applied to the elitists and the mutation strategy appropriately exploits the personal best positions and elitists. Third, a modified differential evolution (DE) strategy is applied to some extreme and least crowded elitists. The DE strategy updates an elitist based on the differences of the elitists. The personal best positions carry useful information about the Pareto set, and the mutation and DE strategies help MSCLPSO discover the true Pareto front. Experiments conducted on various benchmark problems demonstrate that MSCLPSO can find nondominated solutions distributed reasonably over the true Pareto front in a single run. PMID:28192508

  5. Swarms, swarming and entanglements of fungal hyphae and of plant roots

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Peter W.; Fisahn, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    There has been recent interest in the possibility that plant roots can show oriented collective motion, or swarming behavior. We examine the evidence supportive of root swarming and we also present new observations on this topic. Seven criteria are proposed for the definition of a swarm, whose application can help identify putative swarming behavior in plants. Examples where these criteria are fulfilled, at many levels of organization, are presented in relation to plant roots and root systems, as well as to the root-like mycelial cords (rhizomorphs) of fungi. The ideas of both an “active” swarming, directed by a signal which imposes a common vector on swarm element aggregation, and a “passive” swarming, where aggregation results from external constraint, are introduced. Active swarming is a pattern of cooperative behavior peculiar to the sporophyte generation of vascular plants and is the antithesis of the competitive behavior shown by the gametophyte generation of such plants, where passive swarming may be found. Fungal mycelial cords could serve as a model example of swarming in a multi-cellular, non-animal system. PMID:24255743

  6. Options for the Further Orbit Evolution of the Swarm Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieg, Detlef; Diekmann, Frank

    2016-08-01

    The three satellites of ESA's magnetic field mission Swarm were launched into a common low Earth circular orbit in November 2013 to measure precisely the magnetic signals from Earth's core, mantle, crust and oceans, as well as the ionosphere and magnetosphere. Since completion of the orbit acquisition phase in April 2014 one satellite (Swarm-B) is flying in a higher orbit with an inclination of 87.8deg and an altitude decaying from 520km. The other two satellites are Swarm-A (trailing) and Swarm-C (leading). They form the lower pair with an initial altitude of 473km, an inclination of 87.4 deg and an ascending node difference of 1.4 deg. The original mission analysis foresaw a decay of the lower pair down to 300km altitude within 4 years after launch. The target altitude of the launcher injection orbit was selected accordingly with some margin due to uncertainties in the solar activity prediction. However the final altitude selection had to be provided more than half a year before launch. Following several launch delays, the major part of the mission falls now beyond the maximum of the current solar cycle. Because of the lower radio flux and geomagnetic activity, the air drag forces are now much lower and the actual decay takes longer.As a first countermeasure the target for the inclination difference between Swarm-B and Swarm-A/C was reduced to 0.4deg shortly before the start of the orbit acquisition manoeuvre sequence early 2014 such that the LTAN drift between the orbit planes of B and A/C has been reduced to 1.5h per year to avoid a too large difference towards the end of the mission.First the paper describes the routine orbit determination approach by ESOC flight dynamics, which is used to determine absolute drag scale factors. Based on the in- flight calibrated values, long-term orbit predictions are calculated every half a year and can be compared against the actual observed decay. This gives good confidence for the prediction of the future altitude

  7. Swarming dynamics in bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hepeng; Be'Er, Avraham; Smith, Rachel; Florin, E.-L.; Swinney, Harry L.

    2009-11-01

    Swarming is a widespread phenomenon observed in both biological and non-biological systems. Large mammal herds, fish schools, and bird flocks are among the most spectacular examples. Many theoretical and numerical efforts have been made to unveil the general principles of the phenomenon, but systematic experimental studies have been very limited. We determine the characteristic velocity, length, and time scales for bacterial motion in swarming colonies of Paenibacillus dendritiformis growing on semi-solid agar substrates. The bacteria swim within a thin fluid layer, and they form long-lived jets and vortices. These coherent structures lead to anisotropy in velocity spatial correlations and to a two-step relaxation in velocity temporal correlations. The mean squared displacement of passive tracers exhibits a short-time regime with nearly ballistic transport and a diffusive long-time regime. We find that various definitions of the correlation length all lead to length scales that are, surprisingly, essentially independent of the mean bacterial speed, while the correlation time is linearly proportional to the ratio of the correlation length to the mean speed.

  8. A Swarm of Ancient Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-12-01

    We know of about 150 of the rich collections of old stars called globular clusters that orbit our galaxy, the Milky Way. This sharp new image of Messier 107, captured by the Wide Field Imager on the 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile, displays the structure of one such globular cluster in exquisite detail. Studying these stellar swarms has revealed much about the history of our galaxy and how stars evolve. The globular cluster Messier 107, also known as NGC 6171, is a compact and ancient family of stars that lies about 21 000 light-years away. Messier 107 is a bustling metropolis: thousands of stars in globular clusters like this one are concentrated into a space that is only about twenty times the distance between our Sun and its nearest stellar neighbour, Alpha Centauri, across. A significant number of these stars have already evolved into red giants, one of the last stages of a star's life, and have a yellowish colour in this image. Globular clusters are among the oldest objects in the Universe. And since the stars within a globular cluster formed from the same cloud of interstellar matter at roughly the same time - typically over 10 billion years ago - they are all low-mass stars, as lightweights burn their hydrogen fuel supply much more slowly than stellar behemoths. Globular clusters formed during the earliest stages in the formation of their host galaxies and therefore studying these objects can give significant insights into how galaxies, and their component stars, evolve. Messier 107 has undergone intensive observations, being one of the 160 stellar fields that was selected for the Pre-FLAMES Survey - a preliminary survey conducted between 1999 and 2002 using the 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile, to find suitable stars for follow-up observations with the VLT's spectroscopic instrument FLAMES [1]. Using FLAMES, it is possible to observe up to 130 targets at the same time, making it particularly well suited

  9. Impact of Swarm GPS receiver updates on POD performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den IJssel, Jose; Forte, Biagio; Montenbruck, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    The Swarm satellites are equipped with state-of-the-art Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, which are used for the precise geolocation of the magnetic and electric field instruments, as well as for the determination of the Earth's gravity field, the total electron content and low-frequency thermospheric neutral densities. The onboard GPS receivers deliver high-quality data with an almost continuous data rate. However, the receivers show a slightly degraded performance when flying over the geomagnetic poles and the geomagnetic equator, due to ionospheric scintillation. Furthermore, with only eight channels available for dual-frequency tracking, the amount of collected GPS tracking data is relatively low compared with various other missions. Therefore, several modifications have been implemented to the Swarm GPS receivers. To optimise the amount of collected GPS data, the GPS antenna elevation mask has slowly been reduced from 10° to 2°. To improve the robustness against ionospheric scintillation, the bandwidths of the GPS receiver tracking loops have been widened. Because these modifications were first implemented on Swarm-C, their impact can be assessed by a comparison with the close flying Swarm-A satellite. This shows that both modifications have a positive impact on the GPS receiver performance. The reduced elevation mask increases the amount of GPS tracking data by more than 3 %, while the updated tracking loops lead to around 1.3 % more observations and a significant reduction in tracking losses due to severe equatorial scintillation. The additional observations at low elevation angles increase the average noise of the carrier phase observations, but nonetheless slightly improve the resulting reduced-dynamic and kinematic orbit accuracy as shown by independent satellite laser ranging (SLR) validation. The more robust tracking loops significantly reduce the large carrier phase observation errors at the geomagnetic poles and along the geomagnetic

  10. Obtaining electron attachment cross sections by means of linear inversion of swarm parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabie, M.; Haefliger, P.; Chachereau, A.; Franck, C. M.

    2015-02-01

    We investigate electron attachment to strongly attaching gases as a function of the electron energy. The total electron attachment cross section of this electronegative sample gas is determined from the effective ionization rate constant νeff/N measured in a swarm experiment using the buffer gases N2 and CO2 with minor proportions (≲0.8%) of the sample gas SF6, and C3F8 respectively. The measured rate constants νeff/N for varying reduced electric field strengths E/N are unfolded from the electron energy distribution of the buffer gases. Different unfolding routines for so-called ill-posed problems are tested to find robust solutions for the attachment cross section. Finally, we propose Tikhonov regularization, which is a well defined algorithm for discrete linear inversion problems, as most efficient. Our method gives rise to an approximate and clearly defined solution for the attachment cross section, and it is described in detail.

  11. An Oceanographic Decision Support System for Scientific Field Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maughan, T.; Das, J.; McCann, M. P.; Rajan, K.

    2011-12-01

    Thom Maughan, Jnaneshwar Das, Mike McCann, Danelle Cline, Mike Godin, Fred Bahr, Kevin Gomes, Tom O'Reilly, Frederic Py, Monique Messie, John Ryan, Francisco Chavez, Jim Bellingham, Maria Fox, Kanna Rajan Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute Moss Lading, California, United States Many of the coastal ocean processes we wish to observe in order to characterize marine ecosystems have large spatial extant (tens of square km) and are dynamic moving kilometers in a day with biological processes spanning anywhere from minutes to days. Some like harmful algal blooms generate toxins which can significantly impact human health and coastal economies. In order to obtain a viable understanding of the biogeochemical processes which define their dynamics and ecology, it is necessary to persistently observe, track and sample within and near the dynamic fields using augmented methods of observation such as autonomous platforms like AUVs, gliders and surface craft. Field experiments to plan, execute and manage such multitude of assets are challenging. To alleviate this problem the autonomous systems group with its collaborators at MBARI and USC designed, built and fielded a prototype Oceanographic Decision Support System (ODSS) that provides situational awareness and a single portal to visualize and plan deployments for the large scale October 2010 CANON field program as well as a series of 2 week field programs in 2011. The field programs were conducted in Monterey Bay, a known 'red tide' incubator, and varied from as many as twenty autonomous platforms, four ships and 2 manned airplanes to coordinated AUV operations, drifters and a single ship. The ODSS web-based portal was used to assimilate information from a collection of sources at sea, including AUVs, moorings, radar data as well as remote sensing products generated by partner organizations to provide a synthesis of views useful to predict the movement of a chlorophyll patch in the confines of the northern Monterey Bay

  12. Field experiments of nonlocal sediment transport on a steep hillslope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiBiase, R.; Booth, A. M.; Ganti, V.; Scheingross, J. S.; Lamb, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Steep rocky hillslopes dominate the areal extent of rapidly uplifting mountain ranges, and pose a significant hazard to encroaching population centers. Existing models for hillslope sediment transport developed for soil-mantled landscapes are poorly suited to explain the evolution of steep hillslopes characterized by: (1) intermittent or patchy soil cover, (2) slopes that exceed the angle of repose, and (3) transport events that often involve long travel distances. Recently, nonlocal formulations of hillslope sediment transport laws that account for long travel distances have been proposed to overcome the limitations of traditional continuum-based models. However, their application to natural landscapes has been limited owing to few field constraints on key parameters, and computational difficulties expanding the framework to two-dimensions. To address this knowledge gap, we performed a series of field experiments on natural hillslopes to inform a simple particle-based model of hillslope sediment transport. We compiled the distribution of average velocity and transport distance for over 300 stones ranging in diameter from 2-10 cm using a video camera and laser range-finder. To characterize surface roughness, we used a tripod-based laser scanner to generate a 1 cm-resolution digital elevation model of each 30 m long hillslope. We find that hillslope travel distance follows a heavy-tailed distribution that varies systematically with the ratio of particle diameter to roughness height, in general agreement to published laboratory experiments. Mean particle velocity ranges from 1-3 m/s and scales weakly with distance traveled. Our modeling exercise reveals three key effects that should be included in any treatment of steep hillslope evolution: (1) there is a strong grain-size and surface roughness dependence on sediment transport distance, (2) sediment storage on slopes steeper than the angle of repose is possible due to vegetation or topographic roughness, and (3

  13. High field electron spin resonance experiments on spin - Peierls compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palme, W.; Schmidt, S.; Lüthi, B.; Boucher, J. P.; Weiden, M.; Hauptmann, R.; Geibel, C.; Revcolevschi, A.; Dhalenne, G.

    1998-05-01

    The spin-Peierls (SP) transition is still one of the most challenging effects in quasi-one-dimensional magnetism. A few years ago the first inorganic spin-Peierls compound CuGeO 3 with TSP=14.3 K was discovered, and recently α‧-NaV 2O 5 was found to be another inorganic SP system with the highest transition temperature so far observed: TSP=35 K. Electron spin resonance (ESR) is the only direct way to probe electron spin dynamics in magnetic fields higher than 12 T, where a transition to an incommensurate magnetic phase can occur. We present ESR results on single crystals of pure and Si-doped CuGeO 3 and pure α‧-NaV 2O 5. Our experiments were done in a wide frequency range 35-440 GHz in magnetic fields up to 16 T, covering a large temperature range 1.5-100 K. The temperature dependence of the ESR absorption in the D-phase in α‧-NaV 2O 5 points to transitions among triplet states, which are separated from the singlet ground state by an energy gap Δ≈85 K for T →0 . In contrast to χ( T) the ESR absorption does not stay finite for T →0 . In the incommensurate phase of slightly Si-doped CuGeO 3 (0.2% Si) ESR signals were observed, but their behaviour is much different from the ones in the pure compound.

  14. The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, M. C.; Brune, W. H.; Cantrell, C. A.; Rutledge, S. A.; Crawford, J. H.; Huntrieser, H.; Homeyer, C. R.; Nault, B.; Cohen, R. C.; Pan, L.; Ziemba, L. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field experiment took place in the central U.S. in May and June 2012 and had the objectives of characterizing the effect of thunderstorms on the chemical composition of the lower atmosphere and determining the chemical aging of upper troposphere (UT) convective outflow plumes. DC3 employed ground-based radars, lightning mapping arrays, and weather balloon soundings in conjunction with aircraft measurements sampling the composition of the inflow and outflow of a variety of thunderstorms in northeast Colorado, West Texas to central Oklahoma, and northern Alabama. A unique aspect of the DC3 strategy was to locate and sample the convective outflow a day after active convection in order to measure the chemical transformations within the UT convective plume. The DC3 data are being analyzed to investigate transport and dynamics of the storms, scavenging of soluble trace gases and aerosols, production of nitrogen oxides by lightning, relationships between lightning flash rates and storm parameters, and chemistry in the UT that is affected by the convection. In this presentation, we give an overview of the DC3 field campaign and highlight results from the campaign that are relevant to the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere region. These highlights include stratosphere-troposphere exchange in connection with thunderstorms, the 0-12 hour chemical aging and new particle formation in the UT outflow of a dissipating mesoscale convective system observed on June 21, 2012, and UT chemical aging in convective outflow as sampled the day after convection occurred and modeled in the Weather Research and Forecasting coupled with Chemistry model.

  15. Characterization of swarming motility in Citrobacter freundii.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yanguang; Wang, Jing; Chen, Zhijin; Xiong, Kun; Xu, Qiwang; Hu, Fuquan

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial swarming motility is a flagella-dependent translocation on the surface environment. It has received extensive attention as a population behavior involving numerous genes. Here, we report that Citrobacter freundii, an opportunistic pathogen, exhibits swarming movement on a solid medium surface with appropriate agar concentration. The swarming behavior of C. freundii was described in detail. Insertional mutagenesis with transposon Mini-Tn5 was carried out to discover genetic determinants related to the swarming of C. freundii. A number of swarming genes were identified, among which flhD, motA, motB, wzx, rfaL, rfaJ, rfbX, rfaG, rcsD, rcsC, gshB, fabF, dam, pgi, and rssB have been characterized previously in other species. In mutants related to lipopolysaccharide synthesis and RcsCDB signal system, a propensity to form poorly motile bacterial aggregates on the agar surface was observed. The aggregates hampered bacterial surface migration. In several mutants, the insertion sites were identified to be in the ORF of yqhC, yeeZ, CKO_03941, glgC, and ttrA, which have never been shown to be involved in swarming. Our results revealed several novel characteristics of swarming motility in C. freundii which are worthy of further study.

  16. Status of SRNL radiological field lysimeter experiment-Year 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.; Roberts, K.; Bagwell, L.

    2013-10-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Radiological Field Lysimeter Experiment is a one-of-a-kind field facility designed to study radionuclide geochemical processes at a larger spatial scale (from grams to tens of kilograms sediment) and temporal scale (from months to 10 years) than is readily afforded through laboratory studies. The lysimeter facility is intended to capture the natural heterogeneity of moisture and temperature regimes in the vadose zone, the unsaturated subsurface region between the surface soil and the underlying aquifer. The 48 lysimeter columns, which contain various radionuclides (and stable iodine), were opened to rainfall infiltration on July 5, 2012. The objective of this report is to provide a status of the lysimeter facility operations and to compile data collected during FY13, including leachate volume, rainfall, and soil moisture and temperature in situ probe data. Radiological leachate data are not presented in this document but will be the subject of a separate document.1 Leachate samples were collected quarterly and shipped to Clemson University for radiological analyses. Rainfall, leachate volume, moisture and temperature probe data were collected continuously. During operations of the facility this year, there were four safety or technical concerns that required additional maintenance: 1) radioactivity was detected in one of the overflow bottles (captured water collected from the secondary containment that does not come in contact with the radiological source material); 2) rainwater accumulated within the sample-bottle storage sheds; 3) overflow containers collected more liquid than anticipated; and 4) significant spider infestation occurred in the sample-bottle storage sheds. To address the first three concerns, each of the lysimeter columns was re-plumbed to improve and to minimize the number of joint unions. To address the fourth concern regarding spiders, new sample-bottle water sheds were purchased and a pest control

  17. A measurement system applicable for landslide experiments in the field.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wen-Zhao; Xu, Xiang-Zhou; Wang, Wen-Long; Yang, Ji-Shan; Liu, Ya-Kun; Xu, Fei-Long

    2016-04-01

    Observation of gravity erosion in the field with strong sunshine and wind poses a challenge. Here, a novel topography meter together with a movable tent addresses the challenge. With the topography meter, a 3D geometric shape of the target surface can be digitally reconstructed. Before the commencement of a test, the laser generator position and the camera sightline should be adjusted with a sight calibrator. Typically, the topography meter can measure the gravity erosion on the slope with a gradient of 30°-70°. Two methods can be used to obtain a relatively clear video, despite the extreme steepness of the slopes. One method is to rotate the laser source away from the slope to ensure that the camera sightline remains perpendicular to the laser plane. Another way is to move the camera farther away from the slope in which the measured volume of the slope needs to be corrected; this method will reduce distortion of the image. In addition, installation of tent poles with concrete columns helps to surmount the altitude difference on steep slopes. Results observed by the topography meter in real landslide experiments are rational and reliable.

  18. Test plan for FY-94 digface characterization field experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Josten, N.E.; Roybal, L.G.

    1994-08-01

    The digface characterization concept has been under development at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) since fiscal year (FY) 1992 through the support of the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program. A digface characterization system conducts continuous subsurface characterization simultaneously with retrieval of hazardous and radioactive waste from buried waste sites. The system deploys multiple sensors at the retrieval operation digface and collects data that provide a basis for detecting, locating, and classifying buried materials and hazardous conditions before they are disturbed by the retrieval equipment. This test plan describes ongoing efforts to test the digface characterization concept at the INEL`s Cold Test Pit using a simplified prototype deployment apparatus and off-the-shelf sensors. FY-94 field experiments will explore problems in object detection and classification. Detection and classification of objects are fundamental to three of the four primary functions of digface characterization during overburden removal. This test plan establishes procedures for collecting and validating the digface characterization data sets. Analysis of these data will focus on testing and further developing analysis methods for object detection and classification during overburden removal.

  19. Cooperation and conflict: field experiments in Northern Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Antonio S.; Mace, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    The idea that cohesive groups, in which individuals help each other, have a competitive advantage over groups composed of selfish individuals has been widely suggested as an explanation for the evolution of cooperation in humans. Recent theoretical models propose the coevolution of parochial altruism and intergroup conflict, when in-group altruism and out-group hostility contribute to the group's success in these conflicts. However, the few empirical attempts to test this hypothesis do not use natural groups and conflate measures of in-group and unbiased cooperative behaviour. We conducted field experiments based on naturalistic measures of cooperation (school/charity donations and lost letters' returns) with two religious groups with an on-going history of conflict—Catholics and Protestants in Northern Ireland. Conflict was associated with reduced donations to out-group schools and the return of out-group letters, but we found no evidence that it influences in-group cooperation. Rather, socio-economic status was the major determinant of cooperative behaviour. Our study presents a challenge to dominant perspectives on the origins of human cooperation, and has implications for initiatives aiming to promote conflict resolution and social cohesion. PMID:25143042

  20. A measurement system applicable for landslide experiments in the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wen-Zhao; Xu, Xiang-Zhou; Wang, Wen-Long; Yang, Ji-Shan; Liu, Ya-Kun; Xu, Fei-Long

    2016-04-01

    Observation of gravity erosion in the field with strong sunshine and wind poses a challenge. Here, a novel topography meter together with a movable tent addresses the challenge. With the topography meter, a 3D geometric shape of the target surface can be digitally reconstructed. Before the commencement of a test, the laser generator position and the camera sightline should be adjusted with a sight calibrator. Typically, the topography meter can measure the gravity erosion on the slope with a gradient of 30°-70°. Two methods can be used to obtain a relatively clear video, despite the extreme steepness of the slopes. One method is to rotate the laser source away from the slope to ensure that the camera sightline remains perpendicular to the laser plane. Another way is to move the camera farther away from the slope in which the measured volume of the slope needs to be corrected; this method will reduce distortion of the image. In addition, installation of tent poles with concrete columns helps to surmount the altitude difference on steep slopes. Results observed by the topography meter in real landslide experiments are rational and reliable.

  1. Field performance of the Walker Branch throughfall displacement experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, P.J.; Todd, D.E.; Edwards, N.T.; Huston, M.A.

    1994-10-06

    The authors are conducting a large-scale manipulative field experiments in an upland oak forest on the Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee USA to identify important ecosystem responses that might result from future precipitation changes. The manipulation of soil moisture is being implemented by a gravity-driven transfer of throughfall precipitation from one treatment plot to another. Throughfall is intercepted in {approx} 2,000 subcanopy troughs (0.3 x 5 m) suspended above the forest floor of the dry plots ({approx} 33% of the ground area is covered) and transferred by gravity flow across an ambient plot for subsequent distribution onto the wet treatment plot. Percent soil water is being monitored with time domain reflectometers at 310 sampling locations across the site. The experimental system is able to produce statistically significant differences in soil water content in years having both extremely dry and extremely wet conditions. Furthermore, comparisons of pre- and post-installation soil temperature measurements have documented the ability of the experimental design to produce these changes without changing the microclimate of the forest understory.

  2. VIIRS Aerosol Products During the SEAC4RS Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remer, L. A.; Munchak, L. A.; Huang, J.; Martins, J. V.; Espinosa, R.; Orozco, D.

    2014-12-01

    The Studies of Emissions, Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) field experiment that took place during August and September 2013 offered an in depth portrait of the aerosol system over much of the continental United States. Heavily instrumented aircraft, including the NASA DC-8 sampled a wide variety of aerosol types including transported Saharan dust, both fresh and aged smoke from western wildfires, urban pollution plumes and also biogenic aerosol produced by the "green volcano" in the vegetated Ozarks. Complementing these aircraft measurements was an enhanced array of AERONET stations sprinkled across the country and also concentrated in a mesoscale array near the home base of Houston Texas. This rich collection of suborbital aerosol information permits a more comprehensive evaluation of the VIIRS aerosol product that includes validation of the products across the mesoscale and choices of case studies in which we can delve deeper into the VIIRS retrieval to test algorithm assumptions. We will compare VIIRS retrievals during SEAC4RS with MODIS retrievals, with AERONET observations and retrievals, and with measurements and retrievals from the Polar Imaging Nephelometer (PI-Neph) that flew aboard the NASA DC-8.

  3. Micro-scale hydrological field experiments in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minea, Gabriel; Moroşanu, Gabriela A.

    2016-02-01

    The paper (communication) presents an overview of hydrologic field experiments at micro-scale in Romania. In order to experimentally investigate micro (plot)-scale hydrological impact of soil erosion, the National Institute of Hydrology and Water Management founded Voineşti Experimental Basin (VES) in 1964 and the Aldeni Experimental Basins (AEB) in 1984. AEB and VES are located in the Curvature Subcarpathians. Experimental plots are organized in a double systems and have an area of 80 m2 (runoff plots) at AEB and 300 m2 (water balance plots) at VES. Land use of plot: first plot "grass-land" is covered with perennial grass and second plot (control) consists in "bare soil". Over the latter one, the soil is hoeing, which results in a greater development of infiltration than in the first plot. Experimental investigations at micro-scale are aimed towards determining the parameters of the water balance equation, during natural and artificial rainfalls, researching of flows and soil erosion processes on experimental plots, extrapolating relations involving runoff coefficients from a small scale to medium scale. Nowadays, the latest evolutions in data acquisition and transmission equipment are represented by sensors (such as: sensors to determinate the soil moisture content). Exploitation and dissemination of hydrologic data is accomplished by research themes/projects, year-books of basic data and papers.

  4. Beam extraction experiment with field-emission arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizuka, H.; Watanabe, A.; Shiho, M.

    1995-12-31

    An experimental project aimed to develop FEL drivers using a field-emission array is under way. The subject covers design and fabrication of novel micro-emitters, operation of FEAs, beam formation and emittance diagnostics. So far the generation of a focused beam has been demonstrated with an array of double-gated microemitters. Active control of FEAs has greatly improved the stability of the emission current. Large FEAs with an emitting area of up to 2 x 2 cm{sup 2} have been fabricated for the production of high-current beams. DC beams (1 - 5 keV < 100 {mu}A) extracted from Spindt cathodes were propagated over 1 m and projected on a fluorescent screen. Separate images of FEA tips were observed and emittance measurement has been carried out. The cathode is going to be replaced by a double-gated FEA to improve the beam quality. Pulsed extraction of high currents will also be tested, employing a non-gated FEA as the cathode of a 1 MV induction linac. Results of these experiments will be presented and perspectives concerning the FEA gun will be discussed.

  5. Geothermal injection treatment: process chemistry, field experiences, and design options

    SciTech Connect

    Kindle, C.H.; Mercer, B.W.; Elmore, R.P.; Blair, S.C.; Myers, D.A.

    1984-09-01

    The successful development of geothermal reservoirs to generate electric power will require the injection disposal of approximately 700,000 gal/h (2.6 x 10/sup 6/ 1/h) of heat-depleted brine for every 50,000 kW of generating capacity. To maintain injectability, the spent brine must be compatible with the receiving formation. The factors that influence this brine/formation compatibility and tests to quantify them are discussed in this report. Some form of treatment will be necessary prior to injection for most situations; the process chemistry involved to avoid and/or accelerate the formation of precipitate particles is also discussed. The treatment processes, either avoidance or controlled precipitation approaches, are described in terms of their principles and demonstrated applications in the geothermal field and, when such experience is limited, in other industrial use. Monitoring techniques for tracking particulate growth, the effect of process parameters on corrosion and well injectability are presented. Examples of brine injection, preinjection treatment, and recovery from injectivity loss are examined and related to the aspects listed above.

  6. Idaho field experiment 1981. Volume 2: measurement data

    SciTech Connect

    Start, G E; Sagendorf, J F; Ackermann, G R; Cate, J H; Hukari, N F; Dickson, C R

    1984-04-01

    The 1981 Idaho Field Experiment was conducted in southeastern Idaho over the upper Snake River Plain. Nine test-day case studies were conducted between July 15 and 30, 1981. Releases of SF/sub 6/ gaseous tracer were made for 8-hour periods from 46m above ground. Tracer was sampled hourly, for 12 sequential hours, at about 100 locations within an area 24km square. Also, a single total integrated sample of about 30 hours duration was collected at approximately 100 sites within an area 48 by 72km square (using 6km spacings). Extensive tower profiles of meteorology at the release point were collected. RAWINSONDES, RABALS and PIBALS were collected at 3 to 5 sites. Horizontal, low-altitude winds were monitored using the INEL MESONET. SF/sub 6/ tracer plume releases were marked with co-located oil fog releases and bi-hourly sequential launches of tetroon pairs. Aerial LIDAR observations of the oil fog plume and airborne samples of SF/sub 6/ were collected. High altitude aerial photographs of daytime plumes were collected. Volume II lists the data in tabular form or cites the special supplemental reports by other participating contractors. While the primary user file and the data archive are maintained on 9 track/1600 cpi magnetic tapes, listings of the individual values are provided for the user who either cannot utilize the tapes or wishes to preview the data. The accuracies and quality of these data are described.

  7. Dynamic Predictive Simulations of Agent Swarms (DDDAS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-09

    UAV   swarms .  Each  project... swarms  of   UAVs .  As  the  numbers  of   UAVs  in  the  military  inventory  increase   operator  shortage...overload  is  becoming  a  problem;  groups  or   swarms  of  semi-­‐ autonomous   UAVs  will  need  to  be  controlled

  8. Swarm Intelligence Optimization and Its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Caichang; Lu, Lu; Liu, Yuanchao; Peng, Wenxiu

    Swarm Intelligence is a computational and behavioral metaphor for solving distributed problems inspired from biological examples provided by social insects such as ants, termites, bees, and wasps and by swarm, herd, flock, and shoal phenomena in vertebrates such as fish shoals and bird flocks. An example of successful research direction in Swarm Intelligence is ant colony optimization (ACO), which focuses on combinatorial optimization problems. Ant algorithms can be viewed as multi-agent systems (ant colony), where agents (individual ants) solve required tasks through cooperation in the same way that ants create complex social behavior from the combined efforts of individuals.

  9. A Solution Quality Assessment Method for Swarm Intelligence Optimization Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gai-Ge; Zou, Kuansheng; Zhang, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, swarm intelligence optimization has become an important optimization tool and wildly used in many fields of application. In contrast to many successful applications, the theoretical foundation is rather weak. Therefore, there are still many problems to be solved. One problem is how to quantify the performance of algorithm in finite time, that is, how to evaluate the solution quality got by algorithm for practical problems. It greatly limits the application in practical problems. A solution quality assessment method for intelligent optimization is proposed in this paper. It is an experimental analysis method based on the analysis of search space and characteristic of algorithm itself. Instead of “value performance,” the “ordinal performance” is used as evaluation criteria in this method. The feasible solutions were clustered according to distance to divide solution samples into several parts. Then, solution space and “good enough” set can be decomposed based on the clustering results. Last, using relative knowledge of statistics, the evaluation result can be got. To validate the proposed method, some intelligent algorithms such as ant colony optimization (ACO), particle swarm optimization (PSO), and artificial fish swarm algorithm (AFS) were taken to solve traveling salesman problem. Computational results indicate the feasibility of proposed method. PMID:25013845

  10. A solution quality assessment method for swarm intelligence optimization algorithms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaojun; Wang, Gai-Ge; Zou, Kuansheng; Zhang, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, swarm intelligence optimization has become an important optimization tool and wildly used in many fields of application. In contrast to many successful applications, the theoretical foundation is rather weak. Therefore, there are still many problems to be solved. One problem is how to quantify the performance of algorithm in finite time, that is, how to evaluate the solution quality got by algorithm for practical problems. It greatly limits the application in practical problems. A solution quality assessment method for intelligent optimization is proposed in this paper. It is an experimental analysis method based on the analysis of search space and characteristic of algorithm itself. Instead of "value performance," the "ordinal performance" is used as evaluation criteria in this method. The feasible solutions were clustered according to distance to divide solution samples into several parts. Then, solution space and "good enough" set can be decomposed based on the clustering results. Last, using relative knowledge of statistics, the evaluation result can be got. To validate the proposed method, some intelligent algorithms such as ant colony optimization (ACO), particle swarm optimization (PSO), and artificial fish swarm algorithm (AFS) were taken to solve traveling salesman problem. Computational results indicate the feasibility of proposed method.

  11. Does swarming cause honey bees to update their solar ephemerides?

    PubMed

    Towne, William F; Baer, Christopher M; Fabiny, Sarah J; Shinn, Lisa M

    2005-11-01

    Spatial orientation in the social insects offers several examples of specialized learning mechanisms that underlie complex learning tasks. Here we study one of these systems: the processes by which honey bees update, or fail to update, their memories of the sun's daily pattern of movement (the solar ephemeris function) in relation to the landscape. Specifically, we ask whether bees that have initially learned the solar ephemeris function relative to a conspicuous treeline at their natal site can later realign the ephemeris to a differently oriented treeline. We first confirm and clarify an earlier finding that bees transplanted passively (by being carried) do not re-learn the solar ephemeris in relation to the new treeline. When they cannot detect the sun directly, as on overcast days, these transplanted bees use a solar ephemeris function appropriate for their natal site, despite days or weeks of experience at the new site. We then ask whether bees put through a swarming process as they are transplanted are induced to re-learn the solar ephemeris function at the new site, as swarming is a natural process wherein bees transplant themselves. Most of the swarmed bees failed to re-learn, even though they did extensive learning flights (in comparison with those of non-swarmed controls) as they first emerged from the hive at the new site. We hypothesize that the bees' representation of the solar ephemeris function is stored in an encapsulated cognitive module in which the ephemeris is inextricably linked to the reference landscape in which it was learned.

  12. The Evolution of the South Atlantic Anomaly by Swarm Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavón-Carrasco, F. J.; De Santis, A.; Qamili, E.

    2015-12-01

    The South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) is a large depression of the Earth's magnetic field strength characterized by values of geomagnetic field intensity around 30% lower than expected for those latitudes and covers a large area in the South Atlantic Ocean and South America. This peculiar feature of the present geomagnetic field has an internal origin in a prominent patch of reversed polarity flux in the Earth's outer core. The study of the SAA is an important challenge nowadays, not only for the geomagnetic and paleomagnetic community, but also for other areas focused on the Earth Observation because of the reducing protective role of the geomagnetic field against the charged particles coming from the Sun and forming the solar wind. The SAA has showed to be a persistent feature of the geomagnetic field since its extent at the Earth's surface has increased during the last four centuries and even accelerated more recently. In this context, the ESA Swarm satellite mission is providing detailed measurements of the intensity and directional elements of the geomagnetic field with high-precision and resolution never reached in the former space missions. This work aims to analyze in detail in space and time the SAA from the core-mantle boundary up to satellite altitudes using the dataset provided by the Swarm satellites and all the available ground-based data.

  13. Anomalous transport in fracture networks: field scale experiments and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, P. K.; Le Borgne, T.; Bour, O.; Dentz, M.; Juanes, R.

    2012-12-01

    Anomalous transport is widely observed in different settings and scales of transport through porous and fractured geologic media. A common signature of anomalous transport is the late-time power law tailing in breakthrough curves (BTCs) during tracer tests. Various conceptual models of anomalous transport have been proposed, including multirate mass transfer, continuous time random walk, and stream tube models. Since different conceptual models can produce equally good fits to a single BTC, tracer test interpretation has been plagued with ambiguity. Here, we propose to resolve such ambiguity by analyzing BTCs obtained from both convergent and push-pull flow configurations at two different fracture planes. We conducted field tracer tests in a fractured granite formation close to Ploemeur, France. We observe that BTC tailing depends on the flow configuration and the injection fracture. Specifically the tailing disappears under push-pull geometry, and when we injected at a fracture with high flux (Figure 1). This indicates that for this fractured granite, BTC tailing is controlled by heterogeneous advection and not by matrix diffusion. To explain the change in tailing behavior for different flow configurations, we employ a simple lattice network model with heterogeneous conductivity distribution. The model assigns random conductivities to the fractures and solves the Darcy equation for an incompressible fluid, enforcing mass conservation at fracture intersections. The mass conservation constraint yields a correlated random flow through the fracture system. We investigate whether BTC tailing can be explained by the spatial distribution of preferential flow paths and stagnation zones, which is controlled by the conductivity variance and correlation length. By combining the results from the field tests and numerical modeling, we show that the reversibility of spreading is a key mechanism that needs to be captured. We also demonstrate the dominant role of the injection

  14. Scalar transport by planktonic swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Ortiz, Monica; Dabiri, John O.

    2012-11-01

    Nutrient and energy transport in the ocean is primarily governed by the action of physical phenomena. In previous studies it has been suggested that aquatic fauna may significantly contribute to this process through the action of the induced drift mechanism. In this investigation, the role of planktonic swarms as ecosystem engineers is assessed through the analysis of scalar transport within a stratified water column. The vertical migration of Artemia salina is controlled via luminescent signals on the top and bottom of the column. The scalar transport of fluorescent dye is visualized and quantified through planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF). Preliminary results show that the vertical movement of these organisms enhances scalar transport relative to control cases in which only buoyancy forces and diffusion are present. Funded by the BSF program (2011553).

  15. High Magnetic field generation for laser-plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, B B; Froula, D H; Davis, P F; Ross, J S; Fulkerson, S; Bower, J; Satariano, J; Price, D; Glenzer, S H

    2006-05-01

    An electromagnetic solenoid was developed to study the effect of magnetic fields on electron thermal transport in laser plasmas. The solenoid, which is driven by a pulsed power system suppling 30 kJ, achieves magnetic fields of 13 T. The field strength was measured on the solenoid axis with a magnetic probe and optical Zeeman splitting. The measurements agree well with analytical estimates. A method for optimizing the solenoid design to achieve magnetic fields exceeding 20 T is presented.

  16. Experiments of Flow Field Influenced by Vegetation Distribution on Floodplain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin-Fu; Wang, Shun-Chang; Chen, Su-Chin

    2015-04-01

    The vegetation on floodplain can block river flow, raise flood level, and scour riverbed downstream the vegetation region. However, it can also protect the dike, reduce flood velocity, and increase the stability of channel. This experiment analyzed the relationship between vegetation distribution and flow field. We designed three vegetation arrangement pattern of unilateral vegetation, unilateral interval vegetation and no vegetation, respectively. The unilateral vegetation was defined as a 4.9 m length and 0.5 m width with vegetative area in one side of the experiment flume. The unilateral interval vegetation was defined as the same dimension of vegetative area but inserted 2 gaps with 1 m interval, and the vegetative area was separated into 3 blocks. The model of a single plant was assembled with stem and frond. The stem was a woody cylinder with 10 cm height and 2.2 cm in diameter. The other part was plastic frond with 10 cm in height. The flume was 20 m length, 1 m width and 0.7 m height with 2 kinds of bed slopes in 0.001 and 0.002, and 3 different discharges in 0.2 m3/s, 0.145 m3/s and 0.0855 m3/s. The velocity was measured by 2-D electromagnetic velocimeter (ACM2-R2). In addition, water depth was measured by Vernier calipers. The velocity distribution showed that the current were divided into two parts. In the part of inside vegetation area, water level uplifted when flow entering the vegetation area, and it declined until the current leaving vegetation area. Compared with the current in the other half part of flume, the magnitudes of uplift were about 50% in both case of unilateral vegetation and unilateral interval vegetation. Downstream the vegetation area edge, the water level dropped immediately and violently. The water depth was shallower than that in the other half non-vegetation part, and the decline magnitude were 48% and 39% in cases of unilateral vegetation and unilateral interval vegetation, respectively. To explain this phenomenon, we measured

  17. Field Experiment Provides Ground Truth for Surface NMR Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, R. J.; Abraham, J. D.; Cannia, J. C.; Dlubac, K. I.; Grau, B.; Grunewald, E. D.; Irons, T.; Song, Y.; Walsh, D.

    2010-12-01

    Effective and sustainable long-term management of fresh water resources requires accurate information about the availability of water in groundwater aquifers. Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) can provide a direct link to the presence of water in the pore space of geological materials through the detection of the nuclear magnetization of the hydrogen nuclei (protons) in the pore water. Of interest for groundwater applications is the measurement of the proton-NMR relaxation time constant, referred to as T2. This parameter is sensitive to the geometry of the water-filled pore space and can be related to the hydraulic conductivity. NMR logging instruments, which have been available since the 1980’s, provide direct measurements of T2 in boreholes. Surface NMR (SNMR) is a non-invasive geophysical method that uses a loop of wire on the surface to probe the NMR properties of groundwater aquifers to a depth of ~100 m, without the need for the drilling of boreholes. SNMR provides reliable measurements of a different NMR time constant referred to as T2*, that is related to, but not necessarily equivalent to, T2. The relationship between T2* and T2 is likely to depend upon the physical environment and the composition of the sampled material. In order to advance the use of SNMR as a non-invasive means of characterizing groundwater aquifers, we must answer the fundamental question: When probing a groundwater aquifer, what information is provided by T2*, the time constant measured with SNMR? Our approach was to conduct a field experiment in Nebraska, in an area underlain by the Quaternary Alluvium and Tertiary Ogallala aquifers. We first used SNMR to obtain a 1D profile of T2* to a depth of ~60 m. We then drilled a well inside the area of the SNMR loop, to a depth of ~150 m, and used the drill cuttings to describe the composition of the geologic material at the site. The borehole was kept open for 2 days to acquire logging NMR T2 measurements over the total depth. Three

  18. Temporal variation of frictional strength in an earthquake swarm in NE Japan caused by fluid migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Keisuke; Hasegawa, Akira; Yoshida, Takeyoshi

    2016-08-01

    Temporal variations of the fault frictional strength was investigated based on the diversity of focal mechanisms in the source area of the Yamagata-Fukushima border earthquake swarm, a significant earthquake swarm that occurred in central Tohoku, NE Japan, which started just after the 2011 M9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. The focal mechanisms of events in this swarm activity were determined using P wave polarity data as well as short-period (1.5-2.5 Hz) waveform data from the direct P wave. The stress field in the source area of this swarm was estimated by applying stress tensor inversions to these focal mechanism data. Based on the estimated stress field, and under the assumption of uniform stress, we calculated relative frictional strengths for individual focal mechanisms. The calculated relative frictional strengths vary over a wide range, but their average value exhibits a characteristic temporal variation, which is at first small, but steadily increases with time for 100 to 150 days, and then becomes approximately constant. We confirmed this characteristic temporal variation of the average relative frictional strength by assuming the stress to be nonuniform. Similar temporal variations of the average relative frictional strength are obtained for even these cases, confirming the variation. The most likely cause for the observed temporal variation of the average relative frictional strength is the temporal variation of the pore fluid pressure in the source area of the swarm, facilitated by the Tohoku-Oki earthquake and the subsequent fluid diffusion.

  19. Genetic Particle Swarm Optimization–Based Feature Selection for Very-High-Resolution Remotely Sensed Imagery Object Change Detection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiang; Chen, Yunhao; Jiang, Weiguo

    2016-01-01

    In the field of multiple features Object-Based Change Detection (OBCD) for very-high-resolution remotely sensed images, image objects have abundant features and feature selection affects the precision and efficiency of OBCD. Through object-based image analysis, this paper proposes a Genetic Particle Swarm Optimization (GPSO)-based feature selection algorithm to solve the optimization problem of feature selection in multiple features OBCD. We select the Ratio of Mean to Variance (RMV) as the fitness function of GPSO, and apply the proposed algorithm to the object-based hybrid multivariate alternative detection model. Two experiment cases on Worldview-2/3 images confirm that GPSO can significantly improve the speed of convergence, and effectively avoid the problem of premature convergence, relative to other feature selection algorithms. According to the accuracy evaluation of OBCD, GPSO is superior at overall accuracy (84.17% and 83.59%) and Kappa coefficient (0.6771 and 0.6314) than other algorithms. Moreover, the sensitivity analysis results show that the proposed algorithm is not easily influenced by the initial parameters, but the number of features to be selected and the size of the particle swarm would affect the algorithm. The comparison experiment results reveal that RMV is more suitable than other functions as the fitness function of GPSO-based feature selection algorithm. PMID:27483285

  20. Distributed Beamforming in a Swarm UAV Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    opportunistic random arrays with the concept of swarm UAVs. A considerable amount of research has already been done about the feasibility and advantages of...a widely dispersed wirelessly networked opportunistic array may anticipate many advantages over single platform-borne opportunistic arrays. Major...distribution is unlimited DISTRIBUTED BEAMFORMING IN A SWARM UAV NETWORK İbrahim KOCAMAN 1st Lieutenant, Turkish Air Force B.S., Turkish Air Force

  1. Emergent behavioural phenotypes of swarming models revealed by mimicking a frustrated anti-ferromagnet

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, D. J. G.; Turner, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Self-propelled particle (SPP) models are often compared with animal swarms. However, the collective animal behaviour observed in experiments often leaves considerable unconstrained freedom in the structure of a proposed model. Essentially, multiple models can describe the observed behaviour of animal swarms in simple environments. To tackle this degeneracy, we study swarms of SPPs in non-trivial environments as a new approach to distinguish between candidate models. We restrict swarms of SPPs to circular (periodic) channels where they polarize in one of two directions (like spins) and permit information to pass through windows between neighbouring channels. Co-alignment between particles then couples the channels (anti-ferromagnetically) so that they tend to counter-rotate. We study channels arranged to mimic a geometrically frustrated anti-ferromagnet and show how the effects of this frustration allow us to better distinguish between SPP models. Similar experiments could therefore improve our understanding of collective motion in animals. Finally, we discuss how the spin analogy can be exploited to construct universal logic gates, and therefore swarming systems that can function as Turing machines. PMID:26423438

  2. Male motion coordination in anopheline mating swarms

    PubMed Central

    Shishika, Daigo; Manoukis, Nicholas C.; Butail, Sachit; Paley, Derek A.

    2014-01-01

    The Anopheles gambiae species complex comprises the primary vectors of malaria in much of sub-Saharan Africa. Most of the mating in these species occurs in swarms composed almost entirely of males. Intermittent, organized patterns in such swarms have been observed, but a detailed description of male-male interactions has not previously been available. We identify frequent, time-varying interactions characterized by periods of parallel flight in data from 8 swarms of Anopheles gambiae and 3 swarms of Anopheles coluzzii filmed in 2010 and 2011 in the village of Donéguébogou, Mali. We use the cross correlation of flight direction to quantify these interactions and to induce interaction graphs, which show that males form synchronized subgroups whose size and membership change rapidly. A swarming model with damped springs between each male and the swarm centroid shows good agreement with the correlation data, provided that local interactions represented by damping of relative velocity between males are included. PMID:25212874

  3. Field Experiments Aimed To The Analysis of Flood Generation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carriero, D.; Iacobellis, V.; Oliveto, G.; Romano, N.; Telesca, V.; Fiorentino, M.

    The study of the soil moisture dynamics and of the climate-soil-vegetation interac- tion is essential for the comprehension of possible climatic change phenomena, as well as for the analysis of occurrence of extreme hydrological events. In this trend the theoretically-based distribution of floods recently derived by Fiorentino and Ia- cobellis, [ŞNew insights about the climatic and geologic control on the probability distribution of floodsT, Water Resources Research, 2001, 37: 721-730] demonstrated, by an application in some Southern Italy basins, that processes at the hillslope scale strongly influence the basin response by means of the different mechanisms of runoff generation produced by various distributions of partial area contributing. This area is considered as a stochastic variable whose pdf position parameter showed strong de- pendence on the climate as it can seen in the studied basins behavior: in dry zones, where there is the prevalence of the infiltration excess (Horton) mechanism, the basin water loss parameter decreases as basin area increases and the flood peak source area depends on the permeability of soils; in humid zones, with the prevalence of satu- ration excess (Dunne) process, the loss parameter seems independent from the basin area and very sensitive to simple climatic index while only small portion of the area invested by the storm contributes to floods. The purpose of this work is to investigate the consistency of those interpretations by means of field experiments at the hillslope scale to establish a parameterization accounting for soil physical and hydraulic prop- erties, vegetation characteristics and land-use. The research site is the catchment of River Fiumarella di Corleto, which is located in Basilicata Region, Italy, and has a drainage area of approximately 32 km2. The environment has a rather dynamic geo- morphology and very interesting features from the soil-landscape modeling viewpoint [Santini A., A. Coppola, N. Romano, and

  4. Exploring the Role of Field Experience Context in Preservice Teachers' Development as Mathematics Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Sandi; Nesmith, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Although the importance of field experience is supported and attended to by teacher education programs across the United States, there have been numerous national reports and research findings stressing the need for major improvements in the preparation of teachers with an emphasis on more authentic experiences. Quality field experiences have the…

  5. School's IN for Summer: An Alternative Field Experience for Elementary Science Methods Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanuscin, Deborah L.; Musikul, Kusalin

    2007-01-01

    Field experiences are critical to teacher learning and enhance the effectiveness of methods courses; however, when methods courses are offered in the summer, traditional school-based field experiences are not possible. This article describes an alternative campus-based experience created as part of an elementary science methods course. The Summer…

  6. Communication, Community, and Disconnection: Pre-Service Teachers in Virtual School Field Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkens, Christian; Eckdahl, Kelli; Morone, Mike; Cook, Vicki; Giblin, Thomas; Coon, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the experiences of 11 graduate-level pre-service teachers completing Virtual School Field Experiences (VSFEs) with cooperating teachers in fully online, asynchronous high school courses in New York State. The VSFEs included a 7-week online teacher training course, and a 7-week online field experience. Pre-service teachers…

  7. Swarm's Absolute Scalar Magnetometers Burst Mode Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coisson, P.; Vigneron, P.; Hulot, G.; Crespo Grau, R.; Brocco, L.; Lalanne, X.; Sirol, O.; Leger, J. M.; Jager, T.; Bertrand, F.; Boness, A.; Fratter, I.

    2014-12-01

    Each of the three Swarm satellites embarks an Absolute Scalar Magnetometer (ASM) to provide absolute scalar measurements of the magnetic field with high accuracy and stability. Nominal data acquisition of these ASMs is 1 Hz. But they can also run in a so-called "burst mode" and provide data at 250 Hz. During the commissioning phase of the mission, seven burst mode acquisition campaigns have been run simultaneously for all satellites, obtaining a total of ten days of burs-mode data. These campaigns allowed the identification of issues related to the operations of the piezo-electric motor and the heaters connected to the ASM, that do not impact the nominal 1 Hz scalar data. We analyze the burst mode data to identify high frequency geomagnetic signals, focusing the analysis in two regions: the low latitudes, where we seek signatures of ionospheric irregularities, and the high latitudes, to identify high frequency signals related to polar region currents. Since these campaigns have been conducted during the initial months of the mission, the three satellites where still close to each other, allowing to analyze the spatial coherency of the signals. Wavelet analysis have revealed 31 Hz signals appearing in the night-side in the equatorial region.

  8. Determination of equilibrium electron temperature and times using an electron swarm model with BOLSIG+ calculated collision frequencies and rate coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusateri, Elise N.; Morris, Heidi E.; Nelson, Eric M.; Ji, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events produce low-energy conduction electrons from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. It is important to understand how conduction electrons interact with air in order to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation. An electron swarm model can be used to monitor the time evolution of conduction electrons in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure. Here a swarm model is developed that is based on the coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) described by Higgins et al. (1973), hereinafter HLO. The ODEs characterize the swarm electric field, electron temperature, electron number density, and drift velocity. Important swarm parameters, the momentum transfer collision frequency, energy transfer collision frequency, and ionization rate, are calculated and compared to the previously reported fitted functions given in HLO. These swarm parameters are found using BOLSIG+, a two term Boltzmann solver developed by Hagelaar and Pitchford (2005), which utilizes updated cross sections from the LXcat website created by Pancheshnyi et al. (2012). We validate the swarm model by comparing to experimental effective ionization coefficient data in Dutton (1975) and drift velocity data in Ruiz-Vargas et al. (2010). In addition, we report on electron equilibrium temperatures and times for a uniform electric field of 1 StatV/cm for atmospheric heights from 0 to 40 km. It is shown that the equilibrium temperature and time are sensitive to the modifications in the collision frequencies and ionization rate based on the updated electron interaction cross sections.

  9. Determination of equilibrium electron temperature and times using an electron swarm model with BOLSIG+ calculated collision frequencies and rate coefficients

    DOE PAGES

    Pusateri, Elise N.; Morris, Heidi E.; Nelson, Eric M.; ...

    2015-08-04

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events produce low-energy conduction electrons from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. It is important to understand how conduction electrons interact with air in order to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation. An electron swarm model can be used to monitor the time evolution of conduction electrons in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure. Here a swarm model is developed that is based on the coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) described by Higgins et al. (1973), hereinafter HLO. The ODEs characterize the swarm electric field, electron temperature, electron number density, and drift velocity. Importantmore » swarm parameters, the momentum transfer collision frequency, energy transfer collision frequency, and ionization rate, are calculated and compared to the previously reported fitted functions given in HLO. These swarm parameters are found using BOLSIG+, a two term Boltzmann solver developed by Hagelaar and Pitchford (2005), which utilizes updated cross sections from the LXcat website created by Pancheshnyi et al. (2012). We validate the swarm model by comparing to experimental effective ionization coefficient data in Dutton (1975) and drift velocity data in Ruiz-Vargas et al. (2010). In addition, we report on electron equilibrium temperatures and times for a uniform electric field of 1 StatV/cm for atmospheric heights from 0 to 40 km. We show that the equilibrium temperature and time are sensitive to the modifications in the collision frequencies and ionization rate based on the updated electron interaction cross sections.« less

  10. Determination of equilibrium electron temperature and times using an electron swarm model with BOLSIG+ calculated collision frequencies and rate coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Pusateri, Elise N.; Morris, Heidi E.; Nelson, Eric M.; Ji, Wei

    2015-08-04

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events produce low-energy conduction electrons from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. It is important to understand how conduction electrons interact with air in order to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation. An electron swarm model can be used to monitor the time evolution of conduction electrons in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure. Here a swarm model is developed that is based on the coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) described by Higgins et al. (1973), hereinafter HLO. The ODEs characterize the swarm electric field, electron temperature, electron number density, and drift velocity. Important swarm parameters, the momentum transfer collision frequency, energy transfer collision frequency, and ionization rate, are calculated and compared to the previously reported fitted functions given in HLO. These swarm parameters are found using BOLSIG+, a two term Boltzmann solver developed by Hagelaar and Pitchford (2005), which utilizes updated cross sections from the LXcat website created by Pancheshnyi et al. (2012). We validate the swarm model by comparing to experimental effective ionization coefficient data in Dutton (1975) and drift velocity data in Ruiz-Vargas et al. (2010). In addition, we report on electron equilibrium temperatures and times for a uniform electric field of 1 StatV/cm for atmospheric heights from 0 to 40 km. We show that the equilibrium temperature and time are sensitive to the modifications in the collision frequencies and ionization rate based on the updated electron interaction cross sections.

  11. Predicting Performance in an Advanced Undergraduate Geological Field Camp Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykas, Matthew J.; Valentino, David W.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the factors that contribute to students' success in conducting geological field work. Undergraduate students (n = 49; 51% female; mean age = 22 y) who were enrolled in the 5-wk State University of New York at Oswego (SUNY Oswego) geology field program volunteered to participate in this study. At the beginning of the field…

  12. Swarming behavior of Aedes polynesiensis (Diptera: Culicidae) and characterization of swarm markers in American Samoa.

    PubMed

    Tuten, H C; Stone, C M; Dobson, S L

    2013-07-01

    We characterize the swarming behavior of male Aedes polynesiensis (Marks) in American Samoa. Instead of swarming around a blood host, males used the base of certain trees as a marker. Repeated sampling proved nondestructive and allowed us to investigate the impact of static (e.g., tree species) and dynamic (e.g., barometric pressure) characters on the likelihood of swarm presence and intensity. Tree circumference and oviposition activity (number of Ae. polynesiensis reared from oviposition cups) were significant positive predictors of the number of males in a swarm. Tree circumference and diameter were significantly positively associated, and canopy height was significantly negatively associated, with swarm occurrence. Comparisons between males swarming early and late during the swarming period allowed for insight into swarm composition in terms of male size and the amount of putative fluid (e.g., nectar) in the crop, indicators of energetic reserves. Males collected during the late period had significantly larger wings and less crop contents than did males of the early cohort. Because the ecology of male Ae. polynesiensis remains understudied, we consider how the current results could facilitate further studies related to applied autocidal strategies as well as the evolution of host-based mating behavior.

  13. Triggered Swarms and Induced Aftershock Sequences in Geothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, R.; Turcotte, D. L.; Yikilmaz, M. B.; Kellogg, L. H.; Rundle, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Natural geothermal systems, which are used for energy generation, are usually associated with high seismic activity. This can be related to the large-scale injection and extraction of fluids to enhance geothermal recovery. This results in the changes of the pore pressure and pore-elastic stress field and can stimulate the occurrence of earthquakes. These systems are also prone to triggering of seismicity by the passage of seismic waves generated by large distant main shocks. In this study, we analyze clustering and triggering of seismicity at several geothermal fields in California. Particularly, we consider the seismicity at the Geysers, Coso, and Salton Sea geothermal fields. We analyze aftershock sequences generated by local large events with magnitudes greater than 4.0 and earthquake swarms generated by several significant long distant main shocks. We show that the rate of the aftershock sequences generated by the local large events in the two days before and two days after the reference event can be modelled reasonably well by the time dependent Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model. On the other hand, the swarms of activity triggered by large distant earthquakes cannot be described by the ETAS model. To model the increase in the rate of seismicity associated with triggering by large distant main shocks we introduce an additional time-dependent triggering mechanism into the ETAS model. In almost all cases the frequency-magnitude statistics of triggered sequences follow Gutenberg-Richter scaling to a good approximation. The analysis indicates that the seismicity triggered by relatively large local events can initiate sequences similar to regular aftershock sequences. In contrast, the distant main shocks trigger swarm like activity with faster decaying rates.

  14. What have we Learned after a Decade of Experiments and Monitoring at the NEES@UCSB Permanently Instrumented Field Sites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steidl, J. H.; Civilini, F.; Seale, S. H.; Hegarty, P.

    2013-12-01

    The Wildlife Liquefaction Array (WLA) and Garner Valley Downhole Array (GVDA) located in southern California are facilities that for the last decade have been supported under the National Science Foundations George E. Brown, Jr., Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) program. These densely instrumented geotechnical and structural engineering field sites continuously record both acceleration and pore pressure, with accelerometers located on the surface and at various depths below the surface, and pore pressure transducers installed at depth within the liquefiable layers. Permanently instrumented structures for examining soil-foundation-structure interaction and a permanent cross-hole array at the sites have transformed these sites into multi-disciplinary earthquake engineering research facilities. Over the last decade, local and regional seismic activity, including multiple extremely active earthquake swarms, have produced a valuable new data set providing a unique opportunity to observe site response and the evolution of pore pressure generation with time throughout the liquefiable layer at an unprecedented level of detail. In addition to the earthquakes provided by nature, active testing experiments using the mobile shakers from NEES@UTexas and NEES@UCLA have produced an equally valuable data set on both site characterization studies and soil-foundation-structure interaction. The new observations of pore pressure and acceleration with depth are providing in situ empirical evidence documenting the range of ground motion levels at which the onset of nonlinear behavior and excess pore pressure begins, augmenting previous case history data, and laboratory data from cyclic tri-axial and centrifuge testing. The largest static pore pressure increases observed in the 'NEES' decade of monitoring were generated by four events at the WLA site, ranging in magnitude from 4.6 to 5.4 and all at distances less than 10km from the site. The largest peak horizontal

  15. Transmitter antenna placement in indoor environments using particle swarm optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talepour, Zeinab; Tavakoli, Saeed; Ahmadi-Shokouh, Javad

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this article is to suitably locate the minimum number of transmitter antennas in a given indoor environment to achieve good propagation coverage. To calculate the electromagnetic field in various points of the environment, we develop a software engine, named ray-tracing engine (RTE), in Matlab. To achieve realistic calculations, all parameters of geometry and material of building are considered. Particle swarm optimisation is employed to determine good location of transmitters. Simulation results show that a full coverage is obtained through suitably locating three transmitters.

  16. Hybridization Hotspots at Bat Swarming Sites

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanowicz, Wiesław; Piksa, Krzysztof; Tereba, Anna

    2012-01-01

    During late summer and early autumn in temperate zones of the Northern Hemisphere, thousands of bats gather at caves, mainly for the purpose of mating. We demonstrated that this swarming behavior most probably leads not only to breeding among bats of the same species but also interbreeding between different species. Using 14 nuclear microsatellites and three different methods (the Bayesian assignment approaches of STRUCTURE and NEWHYBRIDS and a principal coordinate analysis of pairwise genetic distances), we analyzed 375 individuals belonging to three species of whiskered bats (genus Myotis) at swarming sites across their sympatric range in southern Poland. The overall hybridization rate varied from 3.2 to 7.2%. At the species level, depending on the method used, these values ranged from 2.1–4.6% in M. mystacinus and 3.0–3.7% in M. brandtii to 6.5–30.4% in M. alcathoe. Hybrids occurred in about half of the caves we studied. In all three species, the sex ratio of hybrids was biased towards males but the observed differences did not differ statistically from those noted at the population level. In our opinion, factors leading to the formation of these admixed individuals and their relatively high frequency are: i) swarming behaviour at swarming sites, where high numbers of bats belonging to several species meet; ii) male-biased sex ratio during the swarming period; iii) the fact that all these bats are generally polygynous. The highly different population sizes of different species at swarming sites may also play some role. Swarming sites may represent unique hybrid hotspots, which, as there are at least 2,000 caves in the Polish Carpathians alone, may occur on a massive scale not previously observed for any group of mammal species in the wild. Evidently, these sites should be treated as focal points for the conservation of biodiversity and evolutionary processes. PMID:23300912

  17. PMSM Driver Based on Hybrid Particle Swarm Optimization and CMAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Ji; Cao, Shaozhong

    A novel hybrid particle swarm optimization (PSO) and cerebellar model articulation controller (CMAC) is introduced to the permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) driver. PSO can simulate the random learning among the individuals of population and CMAC can simulate the self-learning of an individual. To validate the ability and superiority of the novel algorithm, experiments and comparisons have been done in MATLAB/SIMULINK. Analysis among PSO, hybrid PSO-CMAC and CMAC feed-forward control is also given. The results prove that the electric torque ripple and torque disturbance of the PMSM driver can be reduced by using the hybrid PSO-CMAC algorithm.

  18. The path planning of UAV based on orthogonal particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Wei, Haiguang; Zhou, Chengping; Li, Shujing

    2013-10-01

    To ensure the attack mission success rate, a trajectory with high survivability and accepted path length and multiple paths with different attack angles must be planned. This paper proposes a novel path planning algorithm based on orthogonal particle swarm optimization, which divides population individual and speed vector into independent orthogonal parts, velocity and individual part update independently, this improvement advances optimization effect of traditional particle swarm optimization in the field of path planning, multiple paths are produced by setting different attacking angles, this method is simulated on electronic chart, the simulation result shows the effect of this method.

  19. Long-range Acoustic Interactions in Insect Swarms: An Adaptive Gravity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbonos, Dan; Ianconescu, Reuven; Puckett, James G.; Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T.; Gov, Nir S.

    The collective motion of groups of animals emerges from the net effect of the interactions between individual members of the group. In many cases, such as birds, fish, or ungulates, these interactions are mediated by sensory stimuli that predominantly arise from nearby neighbors. But not all stimuli in animal groups are short range. Here, we consider mating swarms of midges, which interact primarily via long-range acoustic stimuli. We exploit the similarity in form between the decay of acoustic and gravitational sources to build a model for swarm behavior. By accounting for the adaptive nature of the midges' acoustic sensing, we show that our ``adaptive gravity'' model makes mean-field predictions that agree well with experimental observations of laboratory swarms. Our results highlight the role of sensory mechanisms and interaction range in collective animal behavior. The adaptive interactions that we present here open a new class of equations of motion, which may appear in other biological contexts.

  20. ULF wave power features in the topside ionosphere revealed by Swarm observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Balasis, Georgios; Daglis, Ioannis A.

    2015-04-01

    Recently developed automated methods for deriving the characteristics of ultra low frequency (ULF) waves are applied to the Swarm datasets in order to retrieve, on an operational basis, new information about the near-Earth electromagnetic environment. Processing Swarm measurements with these methods helps to elucidate the processes influencing the generation and propagation of ULF waves, which in turn play a crucial role in magnetospheric dynamics. Here we present the first ULF wave observations by Swarm, obtained by applying our analysis tools to the latest months of the mission (i.e., after the constellation attained its final configuration) using scalar magnetic field data. We find that different local times (LTs) correspond to the maximum wave activity seen by the upper satellite and the lower pair of satellites. If these initial results were to be confirmed, it could imply significant spatial variability of ULF wave turbulence in the upper ionosphere.

  1. Missile launch detection electric field perturbation experiment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, R.J.; Rynne, T.M.

    1993-04-28

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and SARA Inc. participated in the ATMD missile launch activities that occurred at WSMR during January 1993. LLNL and SARA deployed sensors for monitoring of basic phenomena. An attempt was made to measure perturbations of the earth geo-potential during the launch of a Lance missile. The occurrence of the perturbation is expected from the conducting body of the missile and the exhaust plume. A set of voltage-probe antennas were used to monitor the local electric field perturbation from the launch at ranges of approximately 1 km. Examination of the data acquired during the launch period failed to show identifiable correlation of the field variations with the launch event. Three reasons are ascribed to this lack of event data: (1) The electric field potential variations have a limited spatial correlation length - the fields measured in one region have little correlation to measurements made at distances of a kilometer away. The potential variations are related to localized atmospheric disturbances and are generally unpredictable. A value for the spatial correlation length is also not known. (2) The conductivity of the plume and missile body are not adequate to produce a field perturbation of adequate magnitude. Phenomena related to the exhaust plume and missile may exist and be outside of the collection range of the equipment employed for these measurements. (3) The presence of 60 Hz power line noise was of sufficient magnitude to irreversibly contaminate measurements.

  2. Taking Them into the Field: Mathematics Teacher Candidate Learning about Equity-Oriented Teaching Practices in a Mediated Field Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Sara Sunshine

    2012-01-01

    Teacher education programs have been criticized as too theoretical with university courses disconnected from the practical realities of classrooms. This single case study investigates a model of teacher education that worked to bridge the coursework-fieldwork gap in teacher education. The Mediated Field Experience (MFE) is a field experience…

  3. A Winner Determination Algorithm for Combinatorial Auctions Based on Hybrid Artificial Fish Swarm Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Genrang; Lin, ZhengChun

    The problem of winner determination in combinatorial auctions is a hotspot electronic business, and a NP hard problem. A Hybrid Artificial Fish Swarm Algorithm(HAFSA), which is combined with First Suite Heuristic Algorithm (FSHA) and Artificial Fish Swarm Algorithm (AFSA), is proposed to solve the problem after probing it base on the theories of AFSA. Experiment results show that the HAFSA is a rapidly and efficient algorithm for The problem of winner determining. Compared with Ant colony Optimization Algorithm, it has a good performance with broad and prosperous application.

  4. Swarming and mating behavior of male Anopheles arabiensis Patton (Diptera: Culicidae) in an area of the Sterile Insect Technique Project in Dongola, northern Sudan.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mo'awia M; Zain, Hussam M; Basheer, Mohammed A; Elhaj, Hassab-Elrasoul F; El-Sayed, Badria B

    2014-04-01

    The problems facing the conventional mosquito control methods including resistance to insecticides have led to the development of alternative methods such as the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) to suppress populations of the malaria vector Anopheles arabiensis in northern Sudan. This method entails the release of large numbers of irradiated males to compete against wild conspecifics for mating with virgin females in the field. The swarming and mating behaviors of this species were conducted at two field sites during the period 2009-2012 in Dongola, northern Sudan. Observations were made in the field sites and in a contained semi-field enclosure. In addition, participation of released irradiated-marked males in the swarms of wild mosquito was investigated. Swarms were observed on sunset in the vicinity of larval habitats around irrigation channel and stopped with the onset of the darkness about 21-25 min after the start. Swarms were observed above visual markers such as palm trees, bare ground, and manure. Several couples were observed leaving the swarms in copula in the direction of the sunlight. The majority of copulations were observed within 12-15 min of the start of swarming. Relatively low insemination rates (28%) of females collected from coupling pairs were observed. Irradiated-marked males were observed to join the natural swarms regularly, indicating their probable competitiveness with the other wild males. These findings enhance the feasibility of staging an SIT campaign against malaria vector in Northern State-Sudan.

  5. It is an Experience, Not a Lesson: The Nature of High School Students' Experiences at a Biological Field Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, Marc E.

    The purpose of this case study was to describe the nature of high school students' experiences in the immersive four-day field experience at Stone Laboratory Biological Field Station including excursions to Kelley's Island and South Bass Island. Six tenth, eleventh, and twelfth grade students participated through interviews, photovoice, observations, and a survey. Pretrip semi-structured interviews were conducted to understand each participant student's relationship with science. Participants were given cameras to record their field trip experiences to relate what they found interesting, important, and exciting. Back at school after the field trip, the participants were asked to choose their five most meaningful photographs, and write a short essay to describe the significance of each image. A posttrip semi-structured interview explored each participant's experiences during the field trip. An unstructured interview was conducted to discuss each participant's full photograph gallery from the field trip. Interview transcripts were member checked with one minor wording change. Analysis consisted of open coding using apriori codes derived from the ecological framework and emergent codes derived from the data. Coding was duplicated through multiple readers. Significant findings included: 1) Prior experience, prior knowledge, and funds of knowledge added relevance and value to an experience, facilitating interest development; 2) Experiences appeared to be more meaningful when all the senses were stimulated; 3) Friends and peers were an essential part of a quality experience; 4) Quality experiences included a wow factor, or sudden awareness; 5) Teachers needed to be within the experience, not the focus of the experience, and needed to be available to answer questions, be enthusiastic when a discovery was made, and promote student reflection concerning their perceptions and discoveries; 6) A quality informal learning situation incorporated the cognitive/affective, physical

  6. International Field Experiences: The Impact of Class, Gender and Race on the Perceptions and Experiences of Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malewski, Erik; Phillion, JoAnn

    2009-01-01

    We explore ways class, gender and race complicate perceptions and experiences of preservice teachers during an international field experience in Honduras. Data were collected over 5 years through observations, group discussions, course assignments, and on-site focus group interviews and post-trip individual interviews. An inductive approach…

  7. Multiswarm PSO with supersized swarms - Initial performance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluhacek, Michal; Senkerik, Roman; Zelinka, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper it is discussed and briefly experimentally investigated the performance of multi-swarm PSO with super-sized swarms. The selection of proper population size is crucial for successful PSO using. This work follows previous promising research.

  8. Self-organized sorting limits behavioral variability in swarms

    PubMed Central

    Copenhagen, Katherine; Quint, David A.; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Swarming is a phenomenon where collective motion arises from simple local interactions between typically identical individuals. Here, we investigate the effects of variability in behavior among the agents in finite swarms with both alignment and cohesive interactions. We show that swarming is abolished above a critical fraction of non-aligners who do not participate in alignment. In certain regimes, however, swarms above the critical threshold can dynamically reorganize and sort out excess non-aligners to maintain the average fraction close to the critical value. This persists even in swarms with a distribution of alignment interactions, suggesting a simple, robust and efficient mechanism that allows heterogeneously mixed populations to naturally regulate their composition and remain in a collective swarming state or even differentiate among behavioral phenotypes. We show that, for evolving swarms, this self-organized sorting behavior can couple to the evolutionary dynamics leading to new evolutionarily stable equilibrium populations set by the physical swarm parameters. PMID:27550316

  9. Near-field radiative thermal transport: From theory to experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bai Fiorino, Anthony; Meyhofer, Edgar; Reddy, Pramod

    2015-05-15

    Radiative thermal transport via the fluctuating electromagnetic near-field has recently attracted increasing attention due to its fundamental importance and its impact on a range of applications from data storage to thermal management and energy conversion. After a brief historical account of radiative thermal transport, we summarize the basics of fluctuational electrodynamics, a theoretical framework for the study of radiative heat transfer in terms of thermally excited propagating and evanescent electromagnetic waves. Various approaches to modeling near-field thermal transport are briefly discussed, together with key results and proposals for manipulation and utilization of radiative heat flow. Subsequently, we review the experimental advances in the characterization of both near-field heat flow and energy density. We conclude with remarks on the opportunities and challenges for future explorations of radiative heat transfer at the nanoscale.

  10. Structural Preconditions of West Bohemia Earthquake Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotný, M.; Špičák, A.; Weinlich, F. H.

    2013-07-01

    The West Bohemia and adjacent Vogtland are well known for quasi-periodical earthquake swarms persisting for centuries. The seismogenic area near Nový Kostel involved about 90 % of overall earthquake activity clustered here in space and time. The latest major earthquake swarm took place in August-September 2011. In 1994 and 1997, two minor earthquake swarms appeared in another location, near Lazy. Recently, the depth-recursive tomography yielded a velocity image with an improved resolution along the CEL09 refraction profile passing between these swarm areas. The resolution, achieved in the velocity image and its agreement with the inverse gravity modeling along the collateral 9HR reflection profile, enabled us to reveal the key structural background of these West Bohemia earthquake swarms. The CEL09 velocity image detected two deeply rooted high-velocity bodies adjacent to the Nový Kostel and Lazy focal zones. They correspond to two Variscan mafic intrusions influenced by the SE inclined slab of Saxothuringian crust that subducted beneath the Teplá-Barrandian terrane in the Devonian era. In their uppermost SE inclined parts, they roof both focal zones. The high P-wave velocities of 6,100-6,200 m/s, detected in both roofing caps, indicate their relative compactness and impermeability. The focal domains themselves are located in the almost gradient-free zones with the swarm foci spread near the axial planes of profound velocity depressions. The lower velocities of 5,950-6,050 m/s, observed in the upper parts of focal zones, are indicative of less compact rock complexes corrugated and tectonically disturbed by the SE bordering magma ascents. The high-velocity/high-density caps obviously seal the swarm focal domains because almost no magmatic fluids of mantle origin occur in the Nový Kostel and Lazy seismogenic areas of the West Bohemia/Vogtland territory, otherwise rich in the mantle-derived fluids. This supports the hypothesis of the fluid triggering of earthquake

  11. Periodic Reversals in Paenibacillus dendritiformis Swarming

    PubMed Central

    Strain, Shinji K.; Hernández, Roberto A.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Florin, E.-L.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial swarming is a type of motility characterized by a rapid and collective migration of bacteria on surfaces. Most swarming species form densely packed dynamic clusters in the form of whirls and jets, in which hundreds of rod-shaped rigid cells move in circular and straight patterns, respectively. Recent studies have suggested that short-range steric interactions may dominate hydrodynamic interactions and that geometrical factors, such as a cell's aspect ratio, play an important role in bacterial swarming. Typically, the aspect ratio for most swarming species is only up to 5, and a detailed understanding of the role of much larger aspect ratios remains an open challenge. Here we study the dynamics of Paenibacillus dendritiformis C morphotype, a very long, hyperflagellated, straight (rigid), rod-shaped bacterium with an aspect ratio of ∼20. We find that instead of swarming in whirls and jets as observed in most species, including the shorter T morphotype of P. dendritiformis, the C morphotype moves in densely packed straight but thin long lines. Within these lines, all bacteria show periodic reversals, with a typical reversal time of 20 s, which is independent of their neighbors, the initial nutrient level, agar rigidity, surfactant addition, humidity level, temperature, nutrient chemotaxis, oxygen level, illumination intensity or gradient, and cell length. The evolutionary advantage of this unique back-and-forth surface translocation remains unclear. PMID:23603739

  12. Earthquake swarms on Mount Erebus, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminuma, Katsutada; Baba, Megumi; Ueki, Sadato

    1986-12-01

    Mount Erebus (3794 m), located on Ross Island in McMurdo Sound, is one of the few active volcanoes in Antartica. A high-sensitivity seismic network has been operated by Japanese and US parties on and around the Volcano since December, 1980. The results of these observations show two kinds of seismic activity on Ross Island: activity concentrated near the summit of Mount Erebus associated with Strombolian eruptions, and micro-earthquake activity spread through Mount Erebus and the surrounding area. Seismicity on Mount Erebus has been quite high, usually exceeding 20 volcanic earthquakes per day. They frequently occur in swarms with daily counts exceeding 100 events. Sixteen earthquake swarms with more than 250 events per day were recorded by the seismic network during the three year period 1982-1984, and three notable earthquake swarms out of the sixteen were recognized, in October, 1982 (named 82-C), March-April, 1984 (84-B) and July, 1984 (84-F). Swarms 84-B and 84-F have a large total number of earthquakes and large Ishimoto-Iida's "m"; hence these two swarms are presumed to constitute on one of the precursor phenomena to the new eruption, which took place on 13 September, 1984, and lasted a few months.

  13. Dark matter effective field theory scattering in direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Schneck, K.; Cabrera, B.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Mandic, V.; Rogers, H. E.; Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, W.; Mahapatra, R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-05-01

    We examine the consequences of the effective eld theory (EFT) of dark matter-nucleon scattering or current and proposed direct detection experiments. Exclusion limits on EFT coupling constants computed using the optimum interval method are presented for SuperCDMS Soudan, CDMS II, and LUX, and the necessity of combining results from multiple experiments in order to determine dark matter parameters is discussed. We demonstrate that spectral di*erences between the standard dark matter model and a general EFT interaction can produce a bias when calculating exclusion limits and when developing signal models for likelihood and machine learning techniques. We also discuss the implications of the EFT for the next-generation (G2) direct detection experiments and point out regions of complementarity in the EFT parameter space.

  14. Global meteorological data facility for real-time field experiments support and guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shipham, Mark C.; Shipley, Scott T.; Trepte, Charles R.

    1988-01-01

    A Global Meteorological Data Facility (GMDF) has been constructed to provide economical real-time meteorological support to atmospheric field experiments. After collection and analysis of meteorological data sets at a central station, tailored meteorological products are transmitted to experiment field sites using conventional ground link or satellite communication techniques. The GMDF supported the Global Tropospheric Experiment Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment (GTE-ABLE II) based in Manaus, Brazil, during July and August 1985; an arctic airborne lidar survey mission for the Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSC) experiment during January 1986; and the Genesis of Atlantic Lows Experiment (GALE) during January, February and March 1986. GMDF structure is similar to the UNIDATA concept, including meteorological data from the Zephyr Weather Transmission Service, a mode AAA GOES downlink, and dedicated processors for image manipulation, transmission and display. The GMDF improved field experiment operations in general, with the greatest benefits arising from the ability to communicate with field personnel in real time.

  15. Focus on Geography--Team Themes and Field Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daly, John L.

    1990-01-01

    Describes an approach used by the Wayland, Massachusetts, middle school to organizing students into instructional teams. Explains that each instructional team is organized into a "house" named after a significant individual around whom the curriculum and theme for field trips is designed. Highlights the Rachel Carson House activities of…

  16. Early Field Experience in Career and Technical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smalley, Scott Walter

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the three studies in this dissertation was to enhance career and technical education in the area of agriculture, business, and family and consumer sciences. This dissertation contains three papers: (1) a Delphi study identifying the purpose, expected outcomes, and methods of documenting preservice teacher early field experience…

  17. Soil Science as a Field Discipline - Experiences in Iowa, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burras, C. Lee

    2015-04-01

    Effective field understanding of soils is crucial. This is true everywhere but especially so in Iowa, a 15 million hectare state in the central USA's "corn belt." Iowa is intensely farmed and almost exclusively privately owned. Many regions of Iowa have had over 90% of their land area in row crops for the past 60 years. In these regions two very common land management strategies are tile drainage (1.5 million km total) and high rates of fertilization (e.g., 200 kg N/ha-yr for cropland) Iowa also has problematic environmental issues including high rates of erosion, excessive sediment and nutrient pollution in water bodies and episodic catastrophic floods. Given the preceding the Agronomy, Environmental Science and Sustainable Agriculture programs at Iowa State University (ISU) offer a strong suite of soil science classes - undergraduate through graduate. The objective of this presentation is to review selected field based soil science courses offered by those programs. This review includes contrasting and comparing campus-based and immersion classes. Immersion classes include ones offered at Iowa Lakeside Laboratory, as "soil judging" and internationally. Findings over the past 20 years are consistent. Students at all levels gain soil science knowledge, competency and confidence proportional to the amount of time spent in field activities. Furthermore their professional skepticism is sharpened. They are also preferentially hired even in career postings that do not require fieldwork. In other words, field learning results in better soil science professionals who have highly functional and sought after knowledge.

  18. Mechanisms of nitrogen retention in forest ecosystems - A field experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitousek, P. M.; Matson, P. A.

    1984-01-01

    Intensive forest management led to elevated losses of nitrogen from a recently harvested loblolly pine plantation in North Carolina. Measurements of nitrogen-15 retention in the field demonstrated that microbial uptake of nitrogen during the decomposition of residual organic material was the most important process retaining nitrogen. Management practices that remove this material cause increased losses of nitrogen to aquatic ecosystems and the atmosphere.

  19. The Field Trip Book: Study Travel Experiences in Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Ronald V.

    2010-01-01

    Looking for social studies adventures to help students find connections to democratic citizenship? Look no further! This book provides just the answer teachers need for engaging students in field trips as researching learners with emphasis on interdisciplinary social studies plus skills in collecting and reporting data gathered from field…

  20. Visual Analysis of Swarm and Geomagnetic Model Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillan Pedrosa, Daniel; Triebnig, Gerhard

    2016-08-01

    ESA Swarm data is available for anyone to use via the virtual research platform "VirES for Swarm" (http://vires.services). A highly interactive data manipulation and retrieval interface is provided for the magnetic products of the European Space Agency (ESA) Swarm constellation mission. It includes tools for studying various Earth magnetic models and for comparing them to the Swarm satellite measurements and given solar activity levels.

  1. Human-Swarm Interactions Based on Managing Attractors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    influence can cause the swarm to switch between attractors. We further claim that using quorum sensing allows a human to manage trade- offs between...attractors of dynamic systems, bio-inspired swarms, quorum sensing 1. INTRODUCTION Swarms provide complex behaviors out of simple agents following simple...the notion of quorum sensing , as found in biological systems and show how this can be applied to a swarm. In addition to increasing the scalability of

  2. Well-planning programs give students field-like experience

    SciTech Connect

    Sifferman, T.R.; Chapman, L.

    1983-01-01

    The University of Tulsa recently was given a package of computer well planning and drilling programs that will enable petroleum engineering students to gain valuable experience in designing well programs while still in school. Comprehensive homework assignments are now given in areas of drilling fluids programing, hydraulics, directional wells and surveying. Additional programs are scheduled for next semester.

  3. Laboratory Experiment in Semiconductor Surface-Field Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, F. R.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    A laboratory instructional program involving metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) devices is described. In the first of a two-part experiment, students become familiar with the important parameters of a simple MIS device and learn measurement techniques; in the second part, device fabrication procedures are learned. (DT)

  4. International Field Experiences Promote Professional Development for Sustainability Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, R. Bruce; Kimmel, Courtney; Robertson, David P.; Mortimer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to describe, explain and evaluate a graduate education program that provides international project experiences and builds competencies related to collaborative problem-solving, cultural capacity to work globally and sustainable development. Design/methodology/approach: Qualitative analysis of survey data from 28 students…

  5. Rocky 7 prototype Mars rover field geology experiments 1. Lavic Lake and sunshine volcanic field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arvidson, R. E.; Acton, C.; Blaney, D.; Bowman, J.; Kim, S.; Klingelhofer, G.; Marshall, J.; Niebur, C.; Plescia, J.; Saunders, R.S.; Ulmer, C.T.

    1998-01-01

    Experiments with the Rocky 7 rover were performed in the Mojave Desert to better understand how to conduct rover-based, long-distance (kilometers) geological traverses on Mars. The rover was equipped with stereo imaging systems for remote sensing science and hazard avoidance and 57Fe Mo??ssbauer and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers for in situ determination of mineralogy of unprepared rock and soil surfaces. Laboratory data were also obtained using the spectrometers and an X ray diffraction (XRD)/XRF instrument for unprepared samples collected from the rover sites. Simulated orbital and descent image data assembled for the test sites were found to be critical for assessing the geologic setting, formulating hypotheses to be tested with rover observations, planning traverses, locating the rover, and providing a regional context for interpretation of rover-based observations. Analyses of remote sensing and in situ observations acquired by the rover confirmed inferences made from orbital and simulated descent images that the Sunshine Volcanic Field is composed of basalt flows. Rover data confirmed the idea that Lavic Lake is a recharge playa and that an alluvial fan composed of sediments with felsic compositions has prograded onto the playa. Rover-based discoveries include the inference that the basalt flows are mantled with aeolian sediment and covered with a dense pavement of varnished basalt cobbles. Results demonstrate that the combination of rover remote sensing and in situ analytical observations will significantly increase our understanding of Mars and provide key connecting links between orbital and descent data and analyses of returned samples. Copyright 1998 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Community-Based Field Experiences in Teacher Education: Possibilities for a Pedagogical Third Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallman, Heidi L.

    2012-01-01

    The present article discusses the importance of community-based field experiences as a feature of teacher education programs. Through a qualitative case study, prospective teachers' work with homeless youth in an after-school initiative is presented. Framing community-based field experiences in teacher education through "third space" theory, the…

  7. Examining the Content of Preservice Teachers' Reflections of Early Field Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subramaniam, Karthigeyan

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an exploratory study that examined the content of preservice elementary teachers' reflections of their documented early field experiences of science teaching in authentic contexts. The study used an early field experience model that was focused on the objective of profiling an elementary science teacher as the practical…

  8. Issues in Field Experience Assessment in Teacher Education in a Standards-Based Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Sylvia Yee Fan

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a study that shows the use of professional standards in field experience assessment in initial teacher education. A Professional Development Progress Map was developed in field experience assessment in a teacher education institution in Hong Kong. The study enriches our understanding of the holistic nature of assessing…

  9. Which Field Experiences Best Prepare Future School Leaders? An Analysis of Kentucky's Principal Preparation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodson, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the effectiveness of field experiences in preparing school principals for the exigencies of the job. Current school principals throughout Kentucky were surveyed regarding their perceptions of the utility and comparative effectiveness of field experiences in the principal preparation program (PPP) each attended. Surveys were…

  10. Using Field Experiments to Change the Template of How We Teach Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    List, John A.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author explains why field experiments can improve what we teach and how we teach economics. Economists no longer operate as passive observers of economic phenomena. Instead, they participate actively in the research process by collecting data from field experiments to investigate the economics of everyday life. This change can…

  11. The Influence of Technology-Rich Early Childhood Field Experiences on Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lux, Nicholas; Lux, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Despite a comprehensive body of research on field experiences in teacher education, technology-rich early field experiences in early childhood environments is one particular area of inquiry lacking substantive current research. Therefore, this study was conducted to better understand how preservice teachers' perceptions of global concepts related…

  12. Sites for Student Field Experiences in Refugee Mental Health. Task VI--Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoshino, George; And Others

    This report on sites for student field experiences in refugee mental health has been prepared by the University of Minnesota's Mental Health Technical Assistance Center for the state refugee assistance programs. After a brief introduction describing the mission of the Technical Assistance Center, the characteristics of field experience in mental…

  13. The Effects of Primary Sources and Field Trip Experience on the Knowledge Retention of Multicultural Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, James; Knapp, Doug; Benton, Gregory M.

    2007-01-01

    Although small in scope, this study attempted to analyze the impacts of primary sources and field trip experiences on multicultural education through first-hand narrative interviews, one year after the experience. In particular, it assessed the recollections of students who participated in a one-half-day field trip to George Washington Carver…

  14. Impact of a Paid Urban Field Experience on Teacher Candidates' Willingness to Work in Urban Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grande, Marya; Burns, Barbara; Schmidt, Raquel; Marable, Michele A.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a paid field experience designed to investigate teacher candidates' willingness to teach in urban schools. Seventy-three teacher candidates each participated in an urban field experience including 90 hours of tutoring and 12 hours of training. Data from pre and post surveys indicated no significant difference as the number…

  15. ETIPS: Using Cases with Virtual Schools to Prepare for, Extend, and Deepen Preservice Teachers' Field Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dexter, Sara L.; Riedel, Eric; Scharber, Cassandra

    2008-01-01

    Field experiences are identified as an important component in the preparation of new teachers. As such, methods to supplement field experiences with pre- and post-activities that ready preservice teachers to effectively learn from them warrant further examination. This paper presents one tool that has been used successfully to improve preservice…

  16. Life on the Reservation: Cross-Cultural Field Experiences and Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Belinda Conrad; Dinkins, Elizabeth G.

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-first century classrooms are filled with increasingly diverse student populations. Effective teacher preparation programs must include explicit course work in culturally responsive pedagogies and field experiences that place educators in new sociocultural contexts. Field experiences in cross-cultural, place-based settings have the potential…

  17. Focusing, Situating, and Grounding Micro-Level Evaluation Field Experiences: An Instructional Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skolits, Gary J.; Woodard, Thelma; Morrow, Jennifer Ann; Kaesbauer, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Evaluator training field experiences seek to reinforce applicable content knowledge and promote applied skills. For students, even a small-scale field experience focusing on limited components of a larger evaluation process can seem particularly challenging. Students often do not recognize the relevance of established evaluation resources capable…

  18. Vegetation and soils field research data base: Experiment summaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biehl, L. L.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Bauer, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Understanding of the relationships between the optical, spectral characteristics and important biological-physical parameters of earth-surface features can best be obtained by carefully controlled studies over fields and plots where complete data describing the condition of targets are attainable and where frequent, timely spectral measurement can be obtained. Development of a vegetation and soils field research data base was initiated in 1972 at Purdue University's Laboratory for Applications of Remote Sensing and expanded in the fall of 1974 by NASA as part of LACIE. Since then, over 250,000 truck-mounted and helicopter-borne spectrometer/multiband radiometer observations have been obtained of more than 50 soil series and 20 species of crops, grasses, and trees. These data are supplemented by an extensive set of biophysical and meteorological data acquired during each mission. The field research data form one of the most complete and best-documented data sets acquired for agricultural remote sensing research. Thus, they are well-suited to serve as a data base for research to: (1) quantiatively determine the relationships of spectral and biophysical characteristics of vegetation, (2) define future sensor systems, and (3) develop advanced data analysis techniques.

  19. Measuring microbial fitness in a field reciprocal transplant experiment.

    PubMed

    Boynton, Primrose J; Stelkens, Rike; Kowallik, Vienna; Greig, Duncan

    2016-06-22

    Microbial fitness is easy to measure in the laboratory, but difficult to measure in the field. Laboratory fitness assays make use of controlled conditions and genetically modified organisms, neither of which are available in the field. Among other applications, fitness assays can help researchers detect adaptation to different habitats or locations. We designed a competitive fitness assay to detect adaptation of Saccharomyces paradoxus isolates to the habitat they were isolated from (oak or larch leaf litter). The assay accurately measures relative fitness by tracking genotype frequency changes in the field using digital droplet PCR (DDPCR). We expected locally adapted S. paradoxus strains to increase in frequency over time when growing on the leaf litter type from which they were isolated. The DDPCR assay successfully detected fitness differences among S. paradoxus strains, but did not find a tendency for strains to be adapted to the habitat they were isolated from. Instead, we found that the natural alleles of the hexose transport gene we used to distinguish S. paradoxus strains had significant effects on fitness. The origin of a strain also affected its fitness: strains isolated from oak litter were generally fitter than strains from larch litter. Our results suggest that dispersal limitation and genetic drift shape S. paradoxus populations in the forest more than local selection does, although further research is needed to confirm this. Tracking genotype frequency changes using DDPCR is a practical and accurate microbial fitness assay for natural environments.

  20. Overview of results from the MST reversed field pinch experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarff, J. S.; Almagri, A. F.; Anderson, J. K.; Borchardt, M.; Cappechi, W.; Carmody, D.; Caspary, K.; Chapman, B. E.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Duff, J.; Eilerman, S.; Falkowski, A.; Forest, C. B.; Galante, M.; Goetz, J. A.; Holly, D. J.; Koliner, J.; Kumar, S.; Lee, J. D.; Liu, D.; McCollam, K. J.; McGarry, M.; Mirnov, V. V.; Morton, L.; Munaretto, S.; Nornberg, M. D.; Nonn, P. D.; Oliva, S. P.; Parke, E.; Pueschel, M. J.; Reusch, J. A.; Sauppe, J.; Seltzman, A.; Sovinec, C. R.; Stone, D.; Theucks, D.; Thomas, M.; Triana, J.; Terry, P. W.; Waksman, J.; Whelan, G. C.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Lin, L.; Demers, D. R.; Fimognari, P.; Titus, J.; Auriemma, F.; Cappello, S.; Franz, P.; Innocente, P.; Lorenzini, R.; Martines, E.; Momo, B.; Piovesan, P.; Puiatti, M.; Spolaore, M.; Terranova, D.; Zanca, P.; Davydenko, V. I.; Deichuli, P.; Ivanov, A. A.; Polosatkin, S.; Stupishin, N. V.; Spong, D.; Craig, D.; Stephens, H.; Harvey, R. W.; Cianciosa, M.; Hanson, J. D.; Breizman, B. N.; Li, M.; Zheng, L. J.

    2015-10-01

    An overview of recent results from the MST reversed field pinch programme is presented. With neutral beam injection, bursty energetic particle (EP) modes are observed. The profiles of the magnetic and density fluctuations associated with these EP modes are measured using a far infrared interferometer-polarimeter. Equilibrium reconstructions of the quasi-single-helicity 3D helical state are provided by the V3FIT code that now incorporates several of MST's advanced diagnostics. The orientation of the helical structure is controlled using a new resonant magnetic perturbation technique. Gyrokinetic simulations based on experimental equilibria predict unstable trapped-electron modes (TEMs), and small-scale density fluctuations are detected in improved-confinement plasmas with TEM-like features. Upgraded pellet injection permits study of density and beta limits over MST's full range of operation, and an MST-record line-average density of 0.9 × 1020 m3 (n/nG = 1.4) has been obtained. Impurity ion temperature measurements reveal a charge-to-mass-ratio dependence in the rapid heating that occurs during a sawtooth crash. Runaway of NBI-born fast ions during the impulsive sawtooth event agrees with test-particle theory. Magnetic self-organization studies include measurements of the dynamo emf with an applied ac inductive electric field using oscillating field current drive.

  1. Emergent dynamics of laboratory insect swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Douglas H.; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    2013-01-01

    Collective animal behaviour occurs at nearly every biological size scale, from single-celled organisms to the largest animals on earth. It has long been known that models with simple interaction rules can reproduce qualitative features of this complex behaviour. But determining whether these models accurately capture the biology requires data from real animals, which has historically been difficult to obtain. Here, we report three-dimensional, time-resolved measurements of the positions, velocities, and accelerations of individual insects in laboratory swarms of the midge Chironomus riparius. Even though the swarms do not show an overall polarisation, we find statistical evidence for local clusters of correlated motion. We also show that the swarms display an effective large-scale potential that keeps individuals bound together, and we characterize the shape of this potential. Our results provide quantitative data against which the emergent characteristics of animal aggregation models can be benchmarked.

  2. Field experiments of success-breeds-success dynamics

    PubMed Central

    van de Rijt, Arnout; Kang, Soong Moon; Restivo, Michael; Patil, Akshay

    2014-01-01

    Seemingly similar individuals often experience drastically different success trajectories, with some repeatedly failing and others consistently succeeding. One explanation is preexisting variability along unobserved fitness dimensions that is revealed gradually through differential achievement. Alternatively, positive feedback operating on arbitrary initial advantages may increasingly set apart winners from losers, producing runaway inequality. To identify social feedback in human reward systems, we conducted randomized experiments by intervening in live social environments across the domains of funding, status, endorsement, and reputation. In each system we consistently found that early success bestowed upon arbitrarily selected recipients produced significant improvements in subsequent rates of success compared with the control group of nonrecipients. However, success exhibited decreasing marginal returns, with larger initial advantages failing to produce much further differentiation. These findings suggest a lesser degree of vulnerability of reward systems to incidental or fabricated advantages and a more modest role for cumulative advantage in the explanation of social inequality than previously thought. PMID:24778230

  3. The Camp Pendleton Experiment in Battalion Level Field Feeding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-07-01

    Two 30KW generators were used to provide the required electrical power to operate the reefers, lights , water heater and pump, and other labor...dehydrated mashed potatoes , etc.). During the fourth week of the experiment, five meals were prepared using B- ratlon Hems. These meals were...TABLE 13. FOOD PREPARATION TIMES Food Item Quantity for 900 Portions Control XM-75/XM-76 Dinner Items: Vegetables Mashed Potatoes Baked

  4. Viking satellite program - preliminary results from the APL Magnetic Field Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Potemra, T.A.; Zanetti, L.J.; Erlandson, R.E.; Gustafsson, G.; Acuna, M.H.

    1986-12-01

    Sweden's Viking satellite, launched in February 1986, has been conducting plasma process observations in the earth magnetosphere and auroral regions; the U.S.-supplied APL Magnetic Field Experiment aboard Viking is used to determine field-aligned Birkeland current characteristics in previously unsampled regions of near-earth space. The Magnetic Field Experiment has an equivalent spatial resolution of 12 m in the auroral ionosphere when making measurements near apogee. The purposes of Viking's other instruments and their relationship to the Magnetic Field Experiment are discussed.

  5. The Viking satellite program - Preliminary results from the APL Magnetic Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potemra, Thomas A.; Zanetti, Lawrence J.; Erlandson, Robert E.; Gustafsson, Georg; Acuna, Mario H.

    1986-12-01

    Sweden's Viking satellite, launched in February 1986, has been conducting plasma process observations in the earth magnetosphere and auroral regions; the U.S.-supplied APL Magnetic Field Experiment aboard Viking is used to determine field-aligned Birkeland current characteristics in previously unsampled regions of near-earth space. The Magnetic Field Experiment has an equivalent spatial resolution of 12 m in the auroral ionosphere when making measurements near apogee. The purposes of Viking's other instruments and their relationship to the Magnetic Field Experiment are discussed.

  6. The Viking satellite program - Preliminary results from the APL Magnetic Field Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potemra, Thomas A.; Zanetti, Lawrence J.; Erlandson, Robert E.; Gustafsson, Georg; Acuna, Mario H.

    1986-01-01

    Sweden's Viking satellite, launched in February 1986, has been conducting plasma process observations in the earth magnetosphere and auroral regions; the U.S.-supplied APL Magnetic Field Experiment aboard Viking is used to determine field-aligned Birkeland current characteristics in previously unsampled regions of near-earth space. The Magnetic Field Experiment has an equivalent spatial resolution of 12 m in the auroral ionosphere when making measurements near apogee. The purposes of Viking's other instruments and their relationship to the Magnetic Field Experiment are discussed.

  7. Bacterial Swarming: social behaviour or hydrodynamics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermant, Jan

    2010-03-01

    Bacterial swarming of colonies is typically described as a social phenomenon between bacteria, whereby groups of bacteria collectively move atop solid surfaces. This multicellular behavior, during which the organized bacterial populations are embedded in an extracellular slime layer, is connected to important features such as biofilm formation and virulence. Despite the possible intricate quorum sensing mechanisms that regulate swarming, several physico-chemical phenomena may play a role in the dynamics of swarming and biofilm formation. Especially the striking fingering patterns formed by some swarmer colonies on relatively soft sub phases have attracted the attention as they could be the signatures of an instability. Recently, a parallel has been drawn between the swarming patterns and the spreading of viscous drops under the influence of a surfactant, which lead to similar patterns [1]. Starting from the observation that several of the molecules, essential in swarming systems, are strong biosurfactants, the possibility of flows driven by gradients in surface tension, has been proposed. This Marangoni flows are known to lead to these characteristic patterns. For Rhizobium etli not only the pattern formation, but also the experimentally observed spreading speed has been shown to be consistent with the one expected for Marangoni flows for the surface pressures, thickness, and viscosities that have been observed [2]. We will present an experimental study of swarming colonies of the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the pattern formation, the surfactant gradients and height profiles in comparison with predictions of a thin film hydrodynamic model.[4pt] [1] Matar O.K. and Troian S., Phys. Fluids 11 : 3232 (1999)[0pt] [2] Daniels, R et al., PNAS, 103 (40): 14965-14970 (2006)

  8. First experiments probing the collision of parallel magnetic fields using laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Fox, W.; Igumenshchev, I.; Seguin, F. H.; Town, R. P.; Frenje, J. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-04-08

    Novel experiments to study the strongly-driven collision of parallel magnetic fields in β~10, laser-produced plasmas have been conducted using monoenergetic proton radiography. These experiments were designed to probe the process of magnetic flux pileup, which has been identified in prior laser-plasma experiments as a key physical mechanism in the reconnection of anti-parallel magnetic fields when the reconnection inflow is dominated by strong plasma flows. In the present experiments using colliding plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields, the magnetic flux is found to be conserved and slightly compressed in the collision region. Two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict a stronger flux compression and amplification of the magnetic field strength, and this discrepancy is attributed to the three-dimensional (3D) collision geometry. Future experiments may drive a stronger collision and further explore flux pileup in the context of the strongly-driven interaction of magnetic fields.

  9. First experiments probing the collision of parallel magnetic fields using laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, M. J. Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Fox, W.; Igumenshchev, I.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Town, R. P. J.

    2015-04-15

    Novel experiments to study the strongly-driven collision of parallel magnetic fields in β ∼ 10, laser-produced plasmas have been conducted using monoenergetic proton radiography. These experiments were designed to probe the process of magnetic flux pileup, which has been identified in prior laser-plasma experiments as a key physical mechanism in the reconnection of anti-parallel magnetic fields when the reconnection inflow is dominated by strong plasma flows. In the present experiments using colliding plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields, the magnetic flux is found to be conserved and slightly compressed in the collision region. Two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell simulations predict a stronger flux compression and amplification of the magnetic field strength, and this discrepancy is attributed to the three-dimensional (3D) collision geometry. Future experiments may drive a stronger collision and further explore flux pileup in the context of the strongly-driven interaction of magnetic fields.

  10. Distributed Sensing and Cooperating Control for Swarms of Robotic vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Dohrmann, C.R.; Goldsmith, S.Y.; Hurtado, J.E.; Robinett, R.D.

    1998-10-09

    each agent sampling and sharing his information with others. Co- operative control is accomplished by each agent using its neighbors information to determine a control (or TECHNICAL DEVELOPMENT In this section we highlight the technical development of our distributed sensing and cooperative control ap- proach to effectively control a large swarm of au- tonomous, robotic vehicles. Recall that the agents are tasked with locating the chemical plume source within a chemical plume field. In our simulations, we assume that the agents are outfitted with a GPS sensor, which provides their cur- rent location, and a chemical "sniffer," which allows them to detect the strength of the chemical plume at their current location. Furthermore, we assume that the robots have onboard processing capability, and are able to communicate with one another via RF modems together with bit packing and error correction tech- niques, like those discussed by Lewis et al [4]. Thus, each agent is able to communicate and share informa- tion with all others (i.e., there is global communica- tion). In this mode, at a particular instant in time, the agents sample the chemical plume field and post this information and their current location for the oth- ers. The agents then assemble the information and de- termine a projected target of where they believe the chemical source is located. The position update for each agent is then based upon its current position and the position of the projected target.

  11. The experience from field operation of a subsea multiphase booster

    SciTech Connect

    De Donno, S.; Colombi, P.; Chiesa, G.; Ferrari Aggradi, G.

    1995-12-31

    The subsea multiphase production -- based on the transportation over long distance of the untreated oil-well fluids (oil, water and gas) -- is expected to be one of the most efficient tool for economic exploitation of deep offshore and marginal fields. A long term testing campaign on a multiphase screw pump was successfully completed in 1990 at the AGIP Trecate onshore oil field and the results confirmed the industrial viability for such a kind of equipment for surface application. Then, a subsea version of an improved multiphase twin screw pump has been integrated into a Subsea Multiphase Boosting Unit and installed on the Prezioso Field, offshore Sicily, in Summer 1994. Long term testing under real operating conditions were initiated after a successful start-up of the Unit. To the Authors` knowledge, this is the first world-wide subsea installation of an electrically driven multiphase pump operating with live oil. The paper presents first a description of the marine twin screw pump concept adopted for the subsea application including the main features of the complete boosting unit and the adopted solutions to allow it to operate under different conditions. Then, the project implementation activities from the onshore integration through the installation, commissioning and start-up operations are described. Moreover, the results of the initial functional tests are discussed with particular reference to the screw pump hydraulic performance as well as to the behavior of the pump pressure compensation and seal/lube oil systems. Transient and steady state conditions experienced by the system are finally characterized and the early evidences of its long term performance are discussed.

  12. Scaling of sand flux over bedforms- experiments to field scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElroy, B. J.; Mahon, R. C.; Ashley, T.; Alexander, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Bed forms are one of the few geomorphic phenomena whose field and laboratory geometric scales have significant overlap. This is similarly true for scales of sediment transport. Whether in the lab or field, at low transport stages and high Rouse numbers where suspension is minimal, sand fluxes scale nonlinearly with transport stage. At high transport stages, and low Rouse numbers where suspension is substantial, sand transport scales with rouse number. In intermediate cases deformation of bed forms is a direct result of the exchange of sediment between the classically suspended and bed load volumes. These parameters are straightforwardly measured in the laboratory. However, practical difficulties and cost ineffectiveness often exclude bed-sediment measurements from studies and monitoring efforts aimed at estimating sediment loads in rivers. An alternative to direct sampling is through the measurement of evolution of bed topography constrained by sediment-mass conservation. Historically, the topographic-evolution approach has been limited to systems with negligible transport of sand in suspension. As was shown decades ago, pure bed load transport is responsible for the mean migration of trains of bed forms when no sediment is exchanged between individual bed forms. In contrast, the component of bed-material load that moves in suspension is responsible for changes in the size, shape, and spacing of evolving bed forms; collectively this is called deformation. The difference between bed-load flux and bed-material-load flux equals the flux of suspended bed material. We give a partial demonstration of this using available field and laboratory data and comparing them across geometric and sediment transport scales.

  13. Continuous Swarm Surveillance via Distributed Priority Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howden, David

    With recent and ongoing improvements to unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) endurance and availability, they are in a unique position to provide long term surveillance in risky environments. This paper presents a swarm intelligence algorithm for executing an exhaustive and persistent search of a non-trivial area of interest using a decentralized UAV swarm without long range communication. The algorithm allows for an environment containing arbitrary arrangements of no-fly zones, non-uniform levels of priority and dynamic priority changes in response to target acquisition or external commands. Performance is quantitatively analysed via comparative simulation with another leading algorithm of its class.

  14. Swarms of UAVs and fighter aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Trahan, M.W.; Wagner, J.S.; Stantz, K.M.; Gray, P.C.; Robinett, R.

    1998-11-01

    This paper describes a method of modeling swarms of UAVs and/or fighter aircraft using particle simulation concepts. Recent investigations into the use of genetic algorithms to design neural networks for the control of autonomous vehicles (i.e., robots) led to the examination of methods of simulating large collections of robots. This paper describes the successful implementation of a model of swarm dynamics using particle simulation concepts. Several examples of the complex behaviors achieved in a target/interceptor scenario are presented.

  15. Software Engineering and Swarm-Based Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinchey, Michael G.; Sterritt, Roy; Pena, Joaquin; Rouff, Christopher A.

    2006-01-01

    We discuss two software engineering aspects in the development of complex swarm-based systems. NASA researchers have been investigating various possible concept missions that would greatly advance future space exploration capabilities. The concept mission that we have focused on exploits the principles of autonomic computing as well as being based on the use of intelligent swarms, whereby a (potentially large) number of similar spacecraft collaborate to achieve mission goals. The intent is that such systems not only can be sent to explore remote and harsh environments but also are endowed with greater degrees of protection and longevity to achieve mission goals.

  16. A full field, 3-D velocimeter for microgravity crystallization experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodkey, Robert S.; Russ, Keith M.

    1991-01-01

    The programming and algorithms needed for implementing a full-field, 3-D velocimeter for laminar flow systems and the appropriate hardware to fully implement this ultimate system are discussed. It appears that imaging using a synched pair of video cameras and digitizer boards with synched rails for camera motion will provide a viable solution to the laminar tracking problem. The algorithms given here are simple, which should speed processing. On a heavily loaded VAXstation 3100 the particle identification can take 15 to 30 seconds, with the tracking taking less than one second. It seeems reasonable to assume that four image pairs can thus be acquired and analyzed in under one minute.

  17. What is Particle Swarm optimization? Application to hydrogeophysics (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández Martïnez, J.; García Gonzalo, E.; Mukerji, T.

    2009-12-01

    Inverse problems are generally ill-posed. This yields lack of uniqueness and/or numerical instabilities. These features cause local optimization methods without prior information to provide unpredictable results, not being able to discriminate among the multiple models consistent with the end criteria. Stochastic approaches to inverse problems consist in shifting attention to the probability of existence of certain interesting subsurface structures instead of "looking for a unique model". Some well-known stochastic methods include genetic algorithms and simulated annealing. A more recent method, Particle Swarm Optimization, is a global optimization technique that has been successfully applied to solve inverse problems in many engineering fields, although its use in geosciences is still limited. Like all stochastic methods, PSO requires reasonably fast forward modeling. The basic idea behind PSO is that each model searches the model space according to its misfit history and the misfit of the other models of the swarm. PSO algorithm can be physically interpreted as a damped spring-mass system. This physical analogy was used to define a whole family of PSO optimizers and to establish criteria, based on the stability of particle swarm trajectories, to tune the PSO parameters: inertia, local and global accelerations. In this contribution we show application to different low-cost hydrogeophysical inverse problems: 1) a salt water intrusion problem using Vertical Electrical Soundings, 2) the inversion of Spontaneous Potential data for groundwater modeling, 3) the identification of Cole-Cole parameters for Induced Polarization data. We show that with this stochastic approach we are able to answer questions related to risk analysis, such as what is the depth of the salt intrusion with a certain probability, or giving probabilistic bounds for the water table depth. Moreover, these measures of uncertainty are obtained with small computational cost and time, allowing us a very

  18. Tools and Setups for Experiments with AC and Rotating Magnetic Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponikvar, D.

    2010-01-01

    A rotating magnetic field is the basis for the transformation of electrical energy to mechanical energy. School experiments on the rotating magnetic field are rare since they require the use of specially prepared mechanical setups and/or relatively large, three-phase power supplies to achieve strong magnetic fields. This paper proposes several…

  19. Targeting the Poor: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Alatas, Vivi; Banerjee, Abhijit; Hanna, Rema; Olken, Benjamin A.; Tobias, Julia

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports an experiment in 640 Indonesian villages on three approaches to target the poor: proxy-means tests (PMT), where assets are used to predict consumption; community targeting, where villagers rank everyone from richest to poorest; and a hybrid. Defining poverty based on PPP$2 per-capita consumption, community targeting and the hybrid perform somewhat worse in identifying the poor than PMT, though not by enough to significantly affect poverty outcomes for a typical program. Elite capture does not explain these results. Instead, communities appear to apply a different concept of poverty. Consistent with this finding, community targeting results in higher satisfaction. PMID:25197099

  20. Targeting the Poor: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Alatas, Vivi; Banerjee, Abhijit; Hanna, Rema; Olken, Benjamin A; Tobias, Julia

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports an experiment in 640 Indonesian villages on three approaches to target the poor: proxy-means tests (PMT), where assets are used to predict consumption; community targeting, where villagers rank everyone from richest to poorest; and a hybrid. Defining poverty based on PPP$2 per-capita consumption, community targeting and the hybrid perform somewhat worse in identifying the poor than PMT, though not by enough to significantly affect poverty outcomes for a typical program. Elite capture does not explain these results. Instead, communities appear to apply a different concept of poverty. Consistent with this finding, community targeting results in higher satisfaction.

  1. The 1987 Federal field exercise: The DOE experience

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, M.V.; Gant, K.S.

    1989-06-01

    The second full-scale field exercise of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) was held at the Zion Nuclear Power Station, Zion, Illinois, in June 1987. The exercise incorporated the annual compliance exercise for the Zion plant and involved the operating utility, Commonwealth Edison Company, the states of Illinois and Wisconsin, local governments, volunteer groups, and representatives from 12 federal agencies. The 3-day exercise was played from many locations in the Zion area; Springfield, Illinois; Madison, Wisconsin; and Washington, DC. Approximately 1000 people participated in the exercise, which used a scenario in which an accident at the plant resulted in the release of radioactive material outside the plant boundary. The US Department of Energy (DOE) had major responsibilities during the planning, playing, and critiquing of the exercise; these functions are outlined in the report. This document describes the DOE participation in the planning and response during the exercise. During a radiological emergency, the FRERP gives DOE the responsibility for coordinating the federal radiological monitoring and assessment activities in support of the states and the cognizant federal agency. At Zion, a self-sufficient Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center was established by DOE at a nearby fairground in which over 200 people from DOE, the two states, and other federal agencies participated. Before the field exercise, a tabletop exercise and a dry run were held for training purposes. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Overview of results from the MST reversed field pinch experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarff, J. S.; Almagri, A. F.; Anderson, J. K.; Borchardt, M.; Carmody, D.; Caspary, K.; Chapman, B. E.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Duff, J.; Eilerman, S.; Falkowski, A.; Forest, C. B.; Goetz, J. A.; Holly, D. J.; Kim, J.-H.; King, J.; Ko, J.; Koliner, J.; Kumar, S.; Lee, J. D.; Liu, D.; Magee, R.; McCollam, K. J.; McGarry, M.; Mirnov, V. V.; Nornberg, M. D.; Nonn, P. D.; Oliva, S. P.; Parke, E.; Reusch, J. A.; Sauppe, J. P.; Seltzman, A.; Sovinec, C. R.; Stephens, H.; Stone, D.; Theucks, D.; Thomas, M.; Triana, J.; Terry, P. W.; Waksman, J.; Bergerson, W. F.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Lin, L.; Demers, D. R.; Fimognari, P.; Titus, J.; Auriemma, F.; Cappello, S.; Franz, P.; Innocente, P.; Lorenzini, R.; Martines, E.; Momo, B.; Piovesan, P.; Puiatti, M.; Spolaore, M.; Terranova, D.; Zanca, P.; Belykh, V.; Davydenko, V. I.; Deichuli, P.; Ivanov, A. A.; Polosatkin, S.; Stupishin, N. V.; Spong, D.; Craig, D.; Harvey, R. W.; Cianciosa, M.; Hanson, J. D.

    2013-10-01

    An overview of recent results from the MST programme on physics important for the advancement of the reversed field pinch (RFP) as well as for improved understanding of toroidal magnetic confinement more generally is reported. Evidence for the classical confinement of ions in the RFP is provided by analysis of impurity ions and energetic ions created by 1 MW neutral beam injection (NBI). The first appearance of energetic-particle-driven modes by NBI in a RFP plasma is described. MST plasmas robustly access the quasi-single-helicity state that has commonalities to the stellarator and ‘snake’ formation in tokamaks. In MST the dominant mode grows to 8% of the axisymmetric field strength, while the remaining modes are reduced. Predictive capability for tearing mode behaviour has been improved through nonlinear, 3D, resistive magnetohydrodynamic computation using the measured resistivity profile and Lundquist number, which reproduces the sawtooth cycle dynamics. Experimental evidence and computational analysis indicates two-fluid effects, e.g., Hall physics and gyro-viscosity, are needed to understand the coupling of parallel momentum transport and current profile relaxation. Large Reynolds and Maxwell stresses, plus separately measured kinetic stress, indicate an intricate momentum balance and a possible origin for MST's intrinsic plasma rotation. Gyrokinetic analysis indicates that micro-tearing modes can be unstable at high beta, with a critical gradient for the electron temperature that is larger than for tokamak plasmas by roughly the aspect ratio.

  3. Field experience with a mobile tomographic nondestructive assay system

    SciTech Connect

    Prettyman, T.H.; Betts, S.E.; Taggart, D.P.; Estep, R.J.; Nicholas, N.J.; Lucas, M.C.; Harlan, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    A mobile tomographic gamma-ray scanner (TGS) developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory was recently demonstrated at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site and is currently in use at Los Alamos waste storage areas. The scanner was developed to assay radionuclides in low-level, transuranic, and mixed waste in containers ranging in size from 2 ft{sup 3} boxes to 83-gallon overpacks. The tomographic imaging capability provides a complete correction for source distribution and matrix attenuation effects, enabling accurate assays of Pu-239 and other gamma-ray emitting isotopes. In addition, the system can reliably detect self-absorbing material such as plutonium metal shot, and can correct for bias caused by self-absorption. The system can be quickly configured to execute far-field scans, segmented gamma-ray scans, and a host of intermediate scanning protocols, enabling higher throughput (up to 20 drums per 8-hour shift). In this paper, we will report on the results of field trials of the mobile system at Rocky Flats and Los Alamos. Assay accuracy is confirmed for cases in which TGS assays can be compared with assays (e.g. with calorimetry) of individual packages within the drums. The mobile tomographic technology is expected to considerably reduce characterization costs at DOE production and environmental technology sites.

  4. Pesticide uptake in potatoes: model and field experiments.

    PubMed

    Juraske, Ronnie; Vivas, Carmen S Mosquera; Velásquez, Alexander Erazo; Santos, Glenda García; Moreno, Mónica B Berdugo; Gomez, Jaime Diaz; Binder, Claudia R; Hellweg, Stefanie; Dallos, Jairo A Guerrero

    2011-01-15

    A dynamic model for uptake of pesticides in potatoes is presented and evaluated with measurements performed within a field trial in the region of Boyacá, Colombia. The model takes into account the time between pesticide applications and harvest, the time between harvest and consumption, the amount of spray deposition on soil surface, mobility and degradation of pesticide in soil, diffusive uptake and persistence due to crop growth and metabolism in plant material, and loss due to food processing. Food processing steps included were cleaning, washing, storing, and cooking. Pesticide concentrations were measured periodically in soil and potato samples from the beginning of tuber formation until harvest. The model was able to predict the magnitude and temporal profile of the experimentally derived pesticide concentrations well, with all measurements falling within the 90% confidence interval. The fraction of chlorpyrifos applied on the field during plant cultivation that eventually is ingested by the consumer is on average 10(-4)-10(-7), depending on the time between pesticide application and ingestion and the processing step considered.

  5. Two-Channel Rectangular Dielectric Wake Field Accelerator Structure Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sotnikov, G. V.; Marshall, T. C.; Shchelkunov, S. V.; Didenko, A.; Hirshfield, J. L.

    2009-01-22

    A design is presented for a two-channel 30-GHz rectangular dielectric wake field accelerator structure being built for experimental tests at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). This structure allows for a transformer ratio T much greater than two, and permits continuous coupling of energy from drive bunches to accelerated bunches. It consists of three planar slabs of cordierite ceramic ({epsilon} = 4.7) supported within a rectangular copper block, forming a drive channel 12 mmx6 mm, and an accelerator channel 2 mmx6 mm. When driven by a 50 nC, 14 MeV single bunch available at ANL, theory predicts an acceleration field of 6 MeV/m, and T = 12.6. Inherent transverse wake forces introduce deflections and some distortion of bunch profiles during transit through the structure that are estimated to be tolerable. Additionally, a cylindrical two-channel DWFA is introduced which shares many advantages of the rectangular structure including high T, and the added virtue of axisymmetry that eliminates lowest-order transverse deflecting forces.

  6. Resolving the Physics of Error Field Correction Through Error Field Proxy Experiments in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttery, R. J.; Ferraro, N. M.; La Haye, R. J.; Schaffer, M. J.; Strait, E. J.; Hanson, J. M.; Park, J.-K.; Reimerdes, H.

    2012-10-01

    Recent studies have determined the scale and likely origins of limitations to error field correction by using DIII-D's multiple coil arrays to apply known large amplitude proxy error fields and attempting correction with additional coils of different structure. It was found that even with pure n=1 proxy fields and carefully optimized correction field, the benefits of correction were substantially limited, at the ˜50% level in terms of low density access. This indicates coupling of residual fields either through higher order resonances and/or through non-resonant braking of the plasma The interpretation is confirmed by modeling with the IPEC code, which shows that the correction process reduces resonant components, but increases non-resonant NTV damping, thus decreasing rotation and easing penetration of residual resonant fields. The result is significant, suggesting multiple field components must be compensated to achieve good correction, and that the best approach may be to minimize the total field in the plasma by cancelling error fields close to their source or close to the plasma.

  7. The swarming motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is blocked by cranberry proanthocyanidins and other tannin-containing materials.

    PubMed

    O'May, Che; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2011-05-01

    Bacterial motility plays a key role in the colonization of surfaces by bacteria and the subsequent formation of resistant communities of bacteria called biofilms. Derivatives of cranberry fruit, predominantly condensed tannins called proanthocyanidins (PACs) have been reported to interfere with bacterial adhesion, but the effects of PACs and other tannins on bacterial motilities remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated whether cranberry PAC (CPAC) and the hydrolyzable tannin in pomegranate (PG; punicalagin) affected the levels of motilities exhibited by the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This bacterium utilizes flagellum-mediated swimming motility to approach a surface, attaches, and then further spreads via the surface-associated motilities designated swarming and twitching, mediated by multiple flagella and type IV pili, respectively. Under the conditions tested, both CPAC and PG completely blocked swarming motility but did not block swimming or twitching motilities. Other cranberry-containing materials and extracts of green tea (also rich in tannins) were also able to block or impair swarming motility. Moreover, swarming bacteria were repelled by filter paper discs impregnated with many tannin-containing materials. Growth experiments demonstrated that the majority of these compounds did not impair bacterial growth. When CPAC- or PG-containing medium was supplemented with surfactant (rhamnolipid), swarming motility was partially restored, suggesting that the effective tannins are in part acting by a rhamnolipid-related mechanism. Further support for this theory was provided by demonstrating that the agar surrounding tannin-induced nonswarming bacteria was considerably less hydrophilic than the agar area surrounding swarming bacteria. This is the first study to show that natural compounds containing tannins are able to block P. aeruginosa swarming motility and that swarming bacteria are repelled by such compounds.

  8. Seismic swarm associated with the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi Volcano, Alaska: Earthquake locations and source parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, N.A.; Prejean, S.; Hansen, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    An energetic seismic swarm accompanied an eruption of Kasatochi Volcano in the central Aleutian volcanic arc in August of 2008. In retrospect, the first earthquakes in the swarm were detected about 1 month prior to the eruption onset. Activity in the swarm quickly intensified less than 48 h prior to the first large explosion and subsequently subsided with decline of eruptive activity. The largest earthquake measured as moment magnitude 5.8, and a dozen additional earthquakes were larger than magnitude 4. The swarm exhibited both tectonic and volcanic characteristics. Its shear failure earthquake features were b value = 0.9, most earthquakes with impulsive P and S arrivals and higher-frequency content, and earthquake faulting parameters consistent with regional tectonic stresses. Its volcanic or fluid-influenced seismicity features were volcanic tremor, large CLVD components in moment tensor solutions, and increasing magnitudes with time. Earthquake location tests suggest that the earthquakes occurred in a distributed volume elongated in the NS direction either directly under the volcano or within 5-10 km south of it. Following the MW 5.8 event, earthquakes occurred in a new crustal volume slightly east and north of the previous earthquakes. The central Aleutian Arc is a tectonically active region with seismicity occurring in the crusts of the Pacific and North American plates in addition to interplate events. We postulate that the Kasatochi seismic swarm was a manifestation of the complex interaction of tectonic and magmatic processes in the Earth's crust. Although magmatic intrusion triggered the earthquakes in the swarm, the earthquakes failed in context of the regional stress field. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Seismic swarm associated with the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi Volcano, Alaska: earthquake locations and source parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Natalia G.; Prejean, Stephanie G.; Hansen, Roger A.

    2011-01-01

    An energetic seismic swarm accompanied an eruption of Kasatochi Volcano in the central Aleutian volcanic arc in August of 2008. In retrospect, the first earthquakes in the swarm were detected about 1 month prior to the eruption onset. Activity in the swarm quickly intensified less than 48 h prior to the first large explosion and subsequently subsided with decline of eruptive activity. The largest earthquake measured as moment magnitude 5.8, and a dozen additional earthquakes were larger than magnitude 4. The swarm exhibited both tectonic and volcanic characteristics. Its shear failure earthquake features were b value = 0.9, most earthquakes with impulsive P and S arrivals and higher-frequency content, and earthquake faulting parameters consistent with regional tectonic stresses. Its volcanic or fluid-influenced seismicity features were volcanic tremor, large CLVD components in moment tensor solutions, and increasing magnitudes with time. Earthquake location tests suggest that the earthquakes occurred in a distributed volume elongated in the NS direction either directly under the volcano or within 5-10 km south of it. Following the MW 5.8 event, earthquakes occurred in a new crustal volume slightly east and north of the previous earthquakes. The central Aleutian Arc is a tectonically active region with seismicity occurring in the crusts of the Pacific and North American plates in addition to interplate events. We postulate that the Kasatochi seismic swarm was a manifestation of the complex interaction of tectonic and magmatic processes in the Earth's crust. Although magmatic intrusion triggered the earthquakes in the swarm, the earthquakes failed in context of the regional stress field.

  10. A Challenging Trio in Space 'Routine' Operations of the Swarm Satellite Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diekmann, Frank-Jurgen; Clerigo, Ignacio; Albini, Giuseppe; Maleville, Laurent; Neto, Alessandro; Patterson, David; Nino, Ana Piris; Sieg, Detlef

    2016-08-01

    Swarm is the first ESA Earth Observation Mission with three satellites flying in a semi-controlled constellation. The trio is operated from ESA's satellite control centre ESOC in Darmstadt, Germany. The Swarm Flight Operations Segment consists of the typical elements of a satellite control system at ESOC, but had to be carefully tailored for this innovative mission. The main challenge was the multi-satellite system of Swarm, which necessitated the development of a Mission Control System with a multi-domain functionality, both in hardware and software and covering real-time and backup domains. This was driven by the need for extreme flexibility for constellation operations and parallel activities.The three months of commissioning in 2014 were characterized by a very tight and dynamically changing schedule of activities. All operational issues could be solved during that time, including the challenging orbit acquisition phase to achieve the final constellation.Although the formal spacecraft commissioning phase was concluded in spring 2014, the investigations for some payload instruments continue even today. The Electrical Field Instruments are for instance still being tested in order to characterize and improve science data quality. Various test phases also became necessary for the Accelerometers on the Swarm satellites. In order to improve the performance of the GPS Receivers for better scientific exploitation and to minimize the failures due to loss of synchronization, a number of parameter changes were commanded via on-board patches.Finally, to minimize the impact on operations, a new strategy had to be implemented to handle single/multi bit errors in the on-board mass Memories, defining when to ignore and when to restore the memory via a re-initialisation.The poster presentation summarizes the Swarm specific ground segment elements of the FOS and explains some of the extended payload commissioning operations, turning Swarm into a most demanding and challenging

  11. Developing Personal and Professional Identity: Teaming, Dialogue, and Inquiry in the Sophomore Professional Field Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Ruth J.; Sherman, Sharon J.; Rothstein, Michael; Lupo, Theresa R.

    This paper examines a model of supervision/field experience proposed for teacher candidates in the sophomore professional experience of a teacher preparation program. The approach envisions the sophomore experience as a dialogic process in which students and teachers construct knowledge and nurture dispositions needed for development of personal…

  12. Women's hairstyle and men's behavior: A field experiment.

    PubMed

    Guéguen, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    Little research has examined the effect of women's hairstyles on people's behavior. In a field study, male and female passersby, walking alone in the street, were observed while walking behind a female-confederate who dropped a glove and apparently was unaware of her loss. The confederate had long dark hair arranged in three different hairstyles: one with her hair falling naturally on her shoulders and her back, one with her hair tied in a ponytail, and one with her hair twisted in a bun. Results reported that the hairstyle had no effect on female passersby's helping behavior. However, it was found that the hairstyle influenced male passersby with men helping the confederate more readily when her hair fell naturally on her neck, shoulders and upper back.

  13. Field experience & usage of the Sentinel treatment plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hiscock, K.C.

    1994-12-31

    A process of chemically induced flocculation followed by filtration through activated carbon has been shown to be very effective in removing pesticides from waste water prior to disposal or re-use. Large plants treating up to 100 m{sup 3} per day have been used in agrochemical manufacturing for the past twenty years. This system has been miniaturized to produce a batch treatment family of self-contained plants from 20 litres to 5000 litres. These plans have found their way into thirty-three countries worldwide, treating rinsate from research stations, field trial teams, research universities, farmers, horticulturists as well as ag-chem producers, packers, formulators and storers. In worldwide results, removal of active ingredients to the lowest level of detection have been consistently achieved.

  14. Aircraft measurements and analysis of severe storms: 1975 field experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, P. C.

    1976-01-01

    Three aircraft and instrumentation systems were acquired in support of the severe storm surveillance program. The data results indicate that the original concept of a highly mobile research aircraft capability for obtaining detailed measurements of wind, temperature, dew point, etc., near and within specifically designated severe storms is entirely feasible and has been demonstrated for the first time by this program. This program is unique in that it is designed to be highly mobile in order to move to and/or with the developing storm systems to obtain the necessary measurements. Previous programs have all been fixed to a particular location and therefore have had to wait for the storms to come within their network. The present research is designed around a highly mobile aircraft measurements group in order to maximize the storm cases during the field measurements program.

  15. A preliminary assessment of field transport experiments using encapsulated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Petrich, C.R.; Knaebel, D.B.; Ralston, D.R.; Crawford, R.L.; Stormo, K.E.

    1995-12-31

    Microencapsulation of nonindigenous degradative organisms is a technique that enhances microorganism survival. An intermediate-scale field tracer test was conducted to evaluate the transport of encapsulated-cell microbeads and other particles in a shallow, confined, heterogeneous aquifer consisting of unconsolidated silts, sands, and gravels under induced-gradient, uniform flow conditions. Tracers included bromide; 2-, 5-, and 15-{micro}m-diameter polystyrene microspheres; and encapsulated Flavobacterium microbeads ranging in diameter from approximately 2 to 80 {micro}m. Results suggest that aquifer heterogeneity was a dominant factor in bromide- and particle-transport patterns. Encapsulated-cell migration appeared to be retarded with respect to the bromide and microsphere tracers. Results of this study also indicate that encapsulated-cell particle sizes and encapsulation material characteristics may be important factors affecting the transport of encapsulated cells in a subsurface environment.

  16. A swarm-assisted integrated communication and sensing network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Patrick J.; Rubin, Izhak

    2004-07-01

    We present a design concept for an integrated communication and sensor network that employs swarms of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). UAVs are deployed in two types of swarms: sensor swarms or communication swarms. Sensor swarms are motivated by the belief that adversaries will force future confrontations into urban settings, where advantages in surveillance and weapons are diminished. A sensor system is needed which can provide high-resolution imagery and an unobstructed view of a hazardous environment fraught with obstructions. These requirements can be satisfied by a swarm of inexpensive UAVs which "work together" by arranging themselves into a flight configuration that optimizes their integrated sensing capability. If a UAV is shot down, the swarm reconfigures its topology to continue the mission with the surviving assets. We present a methodology that integrates the agents into a formation that enhances the sensing operations while minimizing the transmission of control information for topology adaptation. We demonstrate the performance tradeoff between search time and number of UAVs employed, and present an algorithm that determines the minimum swarm size necessary to meet a targeted search completion time within probabilistic guarantees. A communication swarm provides an infrastructure to distribute information provided by the sensor swarms, and enables communication between dispersed ground locations. UAVs are "guided" to locations that provide the best support for an underlying ground-based communication network and for dissemination of data collected by sensor swarms.

  17. The lure of local SETI: Fifty years of field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ailleris, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    With the commemoration in October 2007 of the Sputnik launch, space exploration celebrated its 50th anniversary. Despite impressive technological and scientific achievements the fascination for space has weakened during the last decades. One contributing factor has been the gradual disappearance of mankind's hope of discovering extraterrestrial life within its close neighbourhood. In striking contrast and since the middle of the 20th century, a non-negligible proportion of the population have already concluded that intelligent beings from other worlds do exist and visit Earth through space vehicles popularly called Unidentified Flying Objects (UFOs). In light of the continuous public interest for the UFO enigma symbolized by the recent widely diffused media announcements on the release of French and English governmental files; and considering the approach of broadening the strategies of the "Active SETI" approach and the existence of a rich multi-disciplinary UFO documentation of potential interest for SETI; this paper describes some past scientific attempts to demonstrate the physical reality of the phenomena and potentially the presence on Earth of probes of extraterrestrial origin. Details of the different instrumented field studies deployed by scientists and organizations during the period 1950-1990 in the USA, Canada and Europe are provided. In conclusion it will be argued that while continuing the current radio/optical SETI searches, there is the necessity to maintain sustaining attention to the topic of anomalous aerospace phenomena and to develop new rigorous research approaches.

  18. How deep cells feel: Mean-field Computations and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxboim, Amnon; Sen, Shamik; Discher, Dennis E.

    2009-03-01

    Most cells in solid tissues exert contractile forces that mechanically couple them to elastic surroundings and that significantly influence cell adhesion, cytoskeletal organization and differentiation. However, strains within the depths of matrices are often unclear and are likely relevant to thin matrices, such as basement membranes, relative to cell size as well as to defining how far cells can ``feel.'' We present experimental results for cell spreading on thin, ligand- coated gels and for prestress in stem cells in relation to gel stiffness. Matrix thickness affects cell spread area, focal adhesions and cytoskeleton organization in stem cells, which we will compare to differentiated cells. We introduce a finite element computation to estimate the elastostatic deformations within the matrix on which a cell is placed. Interfacial strains between cell and matrix show large deviations only when soft matrices are a fraction of cell dimensions, proving consistent with experiments. 3-D cell morphologies that model stem cell-derived neurons, myoblasts, and osteoblasts show that a cylinder-shaped myoblast induces the highest strains, consistent with the prominent contractility of muscle. Groups of such cells show a weak crosstalk via matrix strains only when cells are much closer than a cell-width. Cells thus feel on length scales closer to that of adhesions than on cellular scales.

  19. Applicability of sniffing team observations: experience of field measurements.

    PubMed

    Van Langenhove, H; Van Broeck, G

    2001-01-01

    Sniffing measurement campaigns are a commonly used technique in Flanders to estimate the impact of an odour emission source. The Department of Organic Chemistry at Ghent University has developed its own sniffing strategy throughout the last ten years. The method uses, in essence, the technique of plotting odour perception areas and calculation of total odour emission rates based on maximum odour perception distance. 566 sniffing measurements, executed from 1990 until 1999 around industrial and agricultural odour sources were collected in a database for statistical analysis. Short-term dispersion modelling was executed using four different models, two of them based on Bultynck-Malet dispersion parameters, and two based on Pasquill dispersion parameters. Results from this analysis demonstrate some causes of variance in calculated emissions and show the fitness of each model. From the results of the sniffing teams, which are expressed as sniffing units (SU) instead of odour units (OU, OUE) to underline the difference in methodological approach, the overall odorous emission can be calculated, using short-term atmospheric dispersion models. In a second step, long-term dispersion models can be used to calculate isopercentile contour plots. According to our experience the short-term atmospheric model is a source of "noise" in the method since calculated standard deviations on calculated emissions are larger than standard deviations in the observed maximum distance for odour perception. This will be illustrated by presenting results from the evaluation of composting plants and animal farm houses.

  20. Collective behaviors of two-component swarms.

    PubMed

    You, Sang Koo; Kwon, Dae Hyuk; Park, Yong-ik; Kim, Sun Myong; Chung, Myung-Hoon; Kim, Chul Koo

    2009-12-07

    We present a particle-based simulation study on two-component swarms where there exist two different types of groups in a swarm. Effects of different parameters between the two groups are studied systematically based on Langevin's equation. It is shown that the mass difference can introduce a protective behavior for the lighter members of the swarm in a vortex state. When the self-propelling strength is allowed to differ between two groups, it is observed that the swarm becomes spatially segregated and finally separated into two components at a certain critical value. We also investigate effects of different preferences for shelters on their collective decision making. In particular, it is found that the probability of selecting a shelter from the other varies sigmoidally as a function of the number ratio. The model is shown to describe the dynamics of the shelter choosing process of the cockroach-robot mixed group satisfactorily. It raises the possibility that the present model can be applied to the problems of pest control and fishing using robots and decoys.

  1. Swarming and the Future of Conflict

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    then mount linear, omnidirectional attacks – Like guerrillas, activist groups • Wolves, hyenas also instructive – Pack organization: mobile small units...swarming in nature is found among ani- mals that move in packs. Wolves and hyenas are prominent in this class, which features small, mobile units—as

  2. A Loop Current experiment: Field and remote measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Peter; Lugo-Fernández, Alexis; Sheinbaum, Julio

    2016-12-01

    An overview of a new comprehensive observational study of the Loop Current (LC) in the eastern Gulf of Mexico that encompassed full-depth and near-bottom moorings, pressure-equipped inverted echo sounders (PIES) and remote sensing is presented. The study array was designed to encompass the LC from the Campeche Bank to the west Florida escarpment. This overview centers about principal findings as they pertain to mesoscale dynamics. Two companion papers provide in-depth analyses. Three LC anticyclonic eddy separation events were observed with good 3D spatial coverage over the 2½ year extent of the field study; the three separations exhibited similar processes after the LC had extended into the eastern Gulf. Large scale (∼300 km wavelength, 40-60 day periods) southward propagating meanders developed on the eastern side of the LC over deep (∼3000 m) water that were the result of baroclinic instability between the upper layer meandering jet and lower layer cyclones and anticyclones. The lower layer was only highly energetic during relatively short (∼2-3 months) intervals just prior to or during eddy detachments because of baroclinic instability. The steepening of the meanders lead to a pinch-off of LC eddies. The deep lower-layer eddies, constrained by the closed topography of the southeastern Gulf, propagated westward across the detachment zone and appear to assist in achieving separation. Small scale (∼50-100 km, periods ∼10 days) frontal eddies, observed on the western side of the LC along the Campeche Bank slope, decay over the deep water of the northern part of an extended LC, and have little influence on lower layer eddies, the east side meanders and the eddy detachment processes.

  3. Experiments and modeling of dilution jet flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, James D.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental and analytical results of the mixing of single, double, and opposed rows of jets with an isothermal or variable-temperature main stream in a straight duct are presented. This study was performed to investigate flow and geometric variations typical of the complex, three-dimensional flow field in the dilution zone of gas-turbine-engine combustion chambers. The principal results, shown experimentally and analytically, were the following: (1) variations in orifice size and spacing can have a significant effect on the temperature profiles; (2) similar distributions can be obtained, independent of orifice diameter, if momentum-flux ratio and orifice spacing are coupled; (3) a first-order approximation of the mixing of jets with a variable-temperature main stream can be obtained by superimposing the main-stream and jets-in-an-isothermal-crossflow profiles; (4) the penetration of jets issuing mixing is slower and is asymmetric with respect to the jet centerplanes, which shift laterally with increasing downstream distance; (5) double rows of jets give temperature distributions similar to those from a single row of equally spaced, equal-area circular holes; (6) for opposed rows of jets, with the orifice centerlines in line, the optimum ratio of orifice spacing to duct height is one-half the optimum value for single-side injection at the same momentum-flux ratiol and (7) for opposed rows of jets, with the orifice centerlines staggered, the optimum ratio of orifice spacing to duct height is twice the optimum value for single-side injection at the same momentum-flux ratio.

  4. Tools and setups for experiments with AC and rotating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponikvar, D.

    2010-09-01

    A rotating magnetic field is the basis for the transformation of electrical energy to mechanical energy. School experiments on the rotating magnetic field are rare since they require the use of specially prepared mechanical setups and/or relatively large, three-phase power supplies to achieve strong magnetic fields. This paper proposes several experiments and describes setups and tools which are easy to obtain and work with. Free software is offered to generate the required signals by a personal computer. The experiments can be implemented in introductory physics courses on electromagnetism for undergraduates or specialized courses at high schools.

  5. Evaluation of a drug abuse prevention program: a field experiment.

    PubMed

    LoSciuto, L; Ausetts, M A

    1988-01-01

    The central aim of this study was to evaluate Project PRIDE, a school-based affective education program offered in select schools since 1970 and throughout the entire Philadelphia Public School System since 1981. The primary purpose of the program is to increase youth's resistance to drug use and abuse through weekly small group counseling sessions. The 12 weekly student sessions focused on developing self-awareness, life skills, knowledge, and appropriate attitudes about drugs. Project PRIDE also developed training modules for teachers and parents. Evaluation was by means of a true experimental pretest-posttest design, with random assignment to treatment and control groups. Measures of attitudes, self-reported drug use, and behavioral intentions were administered to students, teachers, and parents; process evaluation measures of the student component were collected throughout the treatment period as well. Data analyses indicate that, while a few of the broad aims of the prevention program were not met, there were reliable changes in the intended direction in many of the students' attitudes and intentions. Student attitudes toward drug use and knowledge about drugs both improved. Project PRIDE participation was associated with a relative decrease in willingness to experiment with drugs, even though all groups showed strongly negative attitudes toward drug use. Treatment interacted with sex of student and/or SES on a number of items. Generally, effects were more pronounced for girls and for low SES students. All groups of participants felt they gained significant knowledge and skills from the program. Other effects for parents and teachers were infrequent and inconsistent.

  6. A case study of urban student and teacher experiences surrounding an outdoor environmental science field trip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preusch, Peggy L.

    2009-12-01

    Field trips provide opportunities for students to experience many different contexts beyond the classroom, and are a popular choice of K-12 teachers in the US. Recent interest in learning that occurs at informal science education centers such as museums, zoos and aquariums has stimulated studies of the relationship between learning in and outside of schools. Although many studies focus on the teachers, the contexts, and/or the students during the field trip, only a few look at the entire process of learning by including the classroom setting before and after the field trip. This study was designed to develop understandings of the student process of learning during and surrounding an environmental science field trip to an outdoor setting. John Dewey's extensive writings on the relationship between experience and learning informed the analysis, creating a focus on active and passive elements of the experience, continuity within and across contexts, the interactive nature of the experience and the importance of subject matter. An exploration of environmental education (EE), environmental science (ES), and nature study as content revealed the complexities of the subject matter of the field trip that make its presentation problematic. An urban school was chosen to contribute to the research literature about urban student learning in outdoor environments. During the field trip, the students' active engagement with each other and the environment supported meaningful remembrances of the field trip experiences during interviews after the field trip. The students accurately described plants and animals they had observed in different habitats during the field trip. They also made connections with their home life and prior experiences in the outdoors as they discussed the field trip and drew pictures that represented their experiences. One student integrated his outdoor experience with a language arts assignment as he reflected deeply on the field trip. One implication of this

  7. Swarm Deployable Boom Assembly (DBA) Development of a Deployable Magnetometer Boom for the Swarm Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Paul; Jung, Hans-Juergen; Edwards, Jeff

    2013-09-01

    The Swarm programme consists of 3 magnetically clean satellites flying in close formation designed to measure the Earth's magnetic field using 2 Magnetometers mounted on a 4.3m long deployable boom.Deployment is initiated by releasing 3 HDRMs, once released the boom oscillates back and forth on a pair of pivots, similar to a restaurant kitchen door hinge, for around 120 seconds before coming to rest on 3 kinematic mounts which are used to provide an accurate reference location in the deployed position. Motion of the boom is damped through a combination of friction, spring hysteresis and flexing of the 120+ cables crossing the hinge. Considerable development work and accurate numerical modelling of the hinge motion was required to predict performance across a wide temperature range and ensure that during the 1st overshoot the boom did not damage itself, the harness or the spacecraft.Due to the magnetic cleanliness requirements of the spacecraft no magnetic materials could be used in the design of the hardware.

  8. The Escompte Programme: An Overview of The Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, P.; Cros, B.; Peuch, V. H.; Kottmeier, C.; Saïd, F.; Perros, P.; Robin, D.

    The ESCOMPTE programme (http://medias.obs-mip.fr/escompte) is embedded in a long-term strategy whose aim is the improvement of air quality. In order to be able to take preventive measures to reduce the size and the effects of pollution events, we need to dispose of efficient tools of prediction of these events. Such tools, yet to be developed or improved, are, on the one hand, the inventory of the various pollu- tion sources (fixed and mobile), and, on the other hand, mathematical models able to accurately simulate the dynamical (diffusion and transport) and chemical (reactions) processes under which the various solid, liquid and gaseous species will evolve. The main objective of the ESCOMPTE programme is to gather a data set of some pollution events, involving the emissions of primary pollutants, as well as atmospheric dynam- ics and chemistry. This data set, acquired at the surface and in the lower troposphere, in a region located South-East of France, between June 4th and July 16th, 2001, will serve as a reference for qualifying the CTMs of atmospheric pollution, from local- to regional-scale. A 120km*120km area, around the "Marseille-Berre" site, in the South-eastern of France, has been selected to host the ESCOMPTE field campaign. This region presents a high occurrence of photochemical pollution, because it is one of the most sunny re- gions of France, with anticyclonic conditions prevailing during summer ; it involves the urbanized area of Marseille city (more than one million people), and the "Fos- Berre" industrial area (oil refineries, power plants, E), both being considerable sources of various pollutants ; it presents terrain characteristics (land-sea-breeze circulations ; numerous hills and mountain chains up to more than thousand meters high) acting as dynamical forcings on the transport of pollutants. Although the core domain of ESCOMPTE is a 100km*100km box, a hierarchy of chemistry and/or transport models is involved in the programme, and is able do

  9. Volcanic outcrops of southeast Ethiopia and the Ogaden Dyke Swarm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mège, Daniel; Purcell, Peter; Jourdan, Fred; Pochat, Stéphane

    2013-04-01

    A new map of Tertiary volcanics occurrences in the Ogaden region of southeast Ethiopia and adjacent areas of Somalia has been prepared. Outcrop areas, mapped using satellite images and helicopter-­-supported field work in 2008, are more widespread than previously recognized, while magnetic and drill data reveal the vast subsurface extent of the magmatism. Several spectacular 'meandering' outcrops, over 100 km long, are undoubtedly exhumed canyon-­-filling flows and magnetic data show that many other apparently isolated outcrops are actually part of similar flows, the bulk of which are now subsurface. Age dating and well intersections show several volcanic episodes, with the major outpouring occurring across a broad peneplain in the Oligocene. Geological and aeromagnetic mapping, and 40Ar/39Ar age dating, reveal a dyke swarm extending SSE from the southern Afar margin more than 600 km across the Somali Plate, and coeval with dyke injection in the Red Sea rift at ~25 Ma. The Ogaden Dyke Swarm, which occurs in an area historically considered remote from the impact of the Afro-­-Arabian rifting and volcanism, appears associated with the Marda Fault and marks a zone of crustal dilation along the Red Sea trend across the Horn of Africa. Contemporaneous rifts, also trending WNW/ESE and over 120 km long, occur in NE Somalia, confirming the predominantly NE/SW-­-directed crustal stress regime in the Ogaden and adjacent region at this time.

  10. Swarming Bristle-Bots: Exploring Properties of Active Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forstner, Martin B.; Beasock, Damian

    Active Matter describes an ubiquitous class of non-equilibrium systems that encompasses a diverse range of phenomena in the living and non-living realm. Examples are microscopic bio-filaments and their associated motor proteins, flocks of birds and fish, vibrated rods and disks, or nanoscale colloids actuated by catalytic activity on their surface. What unifies these systems is that they are all composed of self-driven units. In consequence, these systems are not driven into non-equilibrium by energy input at their boundary, but by local energy injection. As fascinating as these systems are, there are currently barely any laboratory systems that allow for controlled experiments in dry active matter. That is, systems not immersed in a fluid that can be observed without specialized equipment. Here we present a two-dimensional `active matter' system consisting of hundreds of macroscopic (~0.05 m long), modified, commercially available bristle-bots. We show that this swarm of toys classifies as active matter as it exhibits properties such as dynamic phase separation. Because of their straight forward implementation, their size and controllability, such swarms can not only answer scientific questions, but they have great potential as educational tools in teaching labs and classrooms.

  11. Stereoscopic Video Analysis of Anopheles gambiae Behavior in the Field: Challenges and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Manoukis, Nicholas C.; Butail, Sachit; Diallo, Moussa; Ribeiro, José MC; Paley, Derek A.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in our ability to localize and track individual swarming mosquitoes in the field via stereoscopic image analysis have enabled us to test long-standing ideas about individual male behavior and directly observe coupling. These studies further our fundamental understanding of the reproductive biology of mosquitoes. In addition, our analysis using stereoscopic video of swarms of the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae have produced results that should be relevant to any “release-based” method of control including Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) and genetically modified male mosquitoes (GMM). The relevance of the results is primarily due to the fact that any mosquito vectors released for control are almost certainly going to be males; further, for SIT, GMM or similar approaches to be successful, the released males will have to successfully locate swarms and then mate with wild females. Thus, understanding and potentially manipulating the mating process could play a key role in future control programs. Our experience points to special challenges created by stereoscopic video of swarms. These include the expected technical difficulties of capturing usable images of mosquitoes in the field, and creating an automated tracking system to enable generation of large numbers of three dimensional tracks over many seconds of footage. Once the data are collected, visualization and application of appropriate statistical and analytic methods also are required. We discuss our recent progress on these problems, give an example of a statistical approach to quantify individual male movement in a swarm with some novel results, and suggest further studies incorporating experimental manipulation and three dimensional localization and tracking of individual mosquitoes in wild swarms. PMID:23850507

  12. Stereoscopic video analysis of Anopheles gambiae behavior in the field: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Manoukis, Nicholas C; Butail, Sachit; Diallo, Moussa; Ribeiro, José M C; Paley, Derek A

    2014-04-01

    Advances in our ability to localize and track individual swarming mosquitoes in the field via stereoscopic image analysis have enabled us to test long-standing ideas about individual male behavior and directly observe coupling. These studies further our fundamental understanding of the reproductive biology of mosquitoes. In addition, our analyses using stereoscopic video of swarms of the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae have produced results that should be relevant to any "release-based" method of control including Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) and genetically modified male mosquitoes (GMM). The relevance of the results is primarily due to the fact that any mosquito vectors released for control are almost certainly going to be males; further, for SIT, GMM or similar approaches to be successful, the released males will have to successfully locate swarms and then mate with wild females. Thus, understanding and potentially manipulating the mating process could play a key role in future control programs. Our experience points to special challenges created by stereoscopic video of swarms. These include the expected technical difficulties of capturing usable images of mosquitoes in the field, and creating an automated tracking system to enable generation of large numbers of three dimensional tracks over many seconds of footage. Once the data are collected, visualization and application of appropriate statistical and analytic methods also are required. We discuss our recent progress on these problems, give an example of a statistical approach to quantify individual male movement in a swarm with some novel results, and suggest further studies incorporating experimental manipulation and three dimensional localization and tracking of individual mosquitoes in wild swarms.

  13. Identification and Characterization of Earthquake Swarms in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, P. M.; Zhang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake swarms are space-time clusters of seismicity that cannot easily be explained by typical aftershock behavior, and are likely triggered by external processes such as fluid migration and/or slow slip. However, swarm properties are not fully understood and how much swarm occurrence is related to the tectonic environment (e.g., heat flow, stressing rate) or source characteristics (e.g., focal mechanism, stress drop) is unclear. Systematic study of large numbers of swarms and their source properties should help to resolve these issues, but is hampered by the challenge of identifying swarms at a range of spatiotemporal scales from a large earthquake catalog. We have developed a new method to search for clusters by comparing the number of neighboring events to the background events in scalable space/time windows, similar to the idea of STA/LTA algorithms, and then discriminating swarms from aftershock clustering. We first apply this method to the San Jacinto Fault Zone (SJFZ) and find ten times more swarms than a previous study using fixed spatiotemporal windows. The most striking spatial pattern of our identified swarm events is a higher fraction of swarms at the northern and southern ends of the SJFZ than its central segment, which correlates with an increased proportion of normal faulting earthquakes. We then apply our method to search the entire southern California catalog of 433,737 events with M ≥ 1 from 1981 to 2014. Preliminary results indicate that swarms are heterogeneously distributed in space and time, but that higher swarm rates are generally found in regions of normal faulting. We will explore other swarm properties, such as event stress drops, spatial migration behavior, distribution of moment release, and relation to foreshock sequences in order to better understand the driving physical mechanisms of swarms and improve earthquake forecasts.

  14. Supine Craniospinal Irradiation Using Intrafractional Junction Shifts and Field-in-Field Dose Shaping: Early Experience at Methodist Hospital

    SciTech Connect

    South, Michael C. Chiu, J. Kam; Teh, Bin S.; Bloch, Charles; Schroeder, Thomas M.; Paulino, Arnold C.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To describe our preliminary experience with supine craniospinal irradiation. The advantages of the supine position for craniospinal irradiation include patient comfort, easier access to maintain an airway for anesthesia, and reduced variability of the head tilt in the face mask. Methods and Materials: The cranial fields were treated with near lateral fields and a table angle to match their divergence to the superior edge of the spinal field. The collimator was rotated to match the divergence from the superior spinal field. The spinal fields were treated using a source to surface distance (SSD) technique with the couch top at 100 cm. When a second spinal field was required, the table and collimator were rotated 90{sup o} to allow for the use of the multileaf collimator and so the gantry could be rotated to match the divergence of the superior spinal field. The multileaf collimator was used for daily dynamic featherings and field-in-field dose control. Results: With a median follow-up of 20.2 months, five documented failures and no cases of radiation myelitis occurred in 23 consecutive patients. No failures occurred in the junctions of the spine-spine or brain-spine fields. Two failures occurred in the primary site alone, two in the spinal axis alone, and one primary site failure plus distant metastasis. The median time to recurrence was 17 months. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that supine approach for delivering craniospinal irradiation is not associated with increased relapses at the field junctions. To date, no cases of radiation myelitis have developed.

  15. First report on Swarm's Absolute Scalar Magnetometers and their various operating modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hulot, Gauthier; Léger, Jean-Michel; Fratter, Isabelle; Jager, Thomas; Bertrand, François; Vigneron, Pierre; Brocco, Laura; Crespo-Grau, Raul; Chulliat, Arnaud; Lalanne, Xavier; Boness, Axel

    2014-05-01

    Each of the three ESA Swarm satellites carries a vector field magnetometer (VFM) and an absolute scalar magnetometer (ASM), positioned on a boom away from the body of the satellite to minimize undesired magnetic perturbations, and distant enough from each other to avoid crosstalk. The VFM further shares an optical bench with a star imager (STR), to which it is thus rigidly attached. The primary role of the ASM is to provide precise 1 Hz absolute field intensity measurements, while the VFM and STR provide the additional data needed to accurately reconstruct the vector field. Each ASM instrument, however, can also produce 1 Hz experimental vector data without affecting its ability to deliver absolute scalar data. If requested, it can also run a 250 Hz scalar burst mode. Both these capacities have been operated on the three Swarm satellites during commissioning. In this talk, we will present and discuss early results from these various operating modes.

  16. The electric field structure of auroral arcs as determined from barium plasma injection experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, E. M.

    1981-01-01

    Barium plasma injection experiments have revealed a number of features of electric fields in and near auroral forms extending from a few hundred to many thousands of km in altitude. There is evidence for V-type potential structures over some auroras, but not in others. For some auroral arcs, large E fields are found at ionospheric altitudes outside the arc but the E field inside the arc is near zero. In a few other auroras, most recently one investigated in an experiment conducted from Poker Flat on March 22, 1980, large, rapidly fluctuating E fields were detected by barium plasma near 600 km altitude. These E fields suggest that the motion of auroral rays can be an effect of low-altitude electric fields, or that V-type potential structures may be found at low altitudes.

  17. A Field-Based Learning Experience for Introductory Level GIS Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Tom

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a pedagogic foundation for introducing a field-based geographic information systems (GIS) experience to the GIS curriculum at the university level and uses a dual evaluation methodology to monitor student learning and satisfaction. Students learned the basics of field-based global position systems (GPS) and GIS data…

  18. Biological Effects of Static Magnetic Fields: Ideal Experiments for Introductory Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendler, Barry S.; Grove, Patricia A.

    2005-01-01

    A serendipitous finding involving static magnetic fields can be used to design experiments suitable for both science and nonscience majors. It has been reported that organisms respond differently to high-gauss magnetic fields generated by north poles than they do to those generated by south poles. Experimental tests of this hypothesis are ideal…

  19. Factors That Influence Student's Satisfaction in an Environmental Field Day Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hui-Hui; Carlson, Stephan P.

    2011-01-01

    A field trip is a common strategy used by educators to bring out-of-school learning experience into schools. Many research studies suggest a field trip will not only bring an individual close to the real-world, but may also increase an individual's environmental knowledge and responsible behaviors. Program evaluations usually focus on the…

  20. Teaching Elementary Mathematics: A Resource for Field Experiences. 3rd Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nancy L.

    2006-01-01

    This book is a hands-on field manual for elementary school teachers. It features a range of activities that offer opportunities for reflection while enhancing student field experiences, through observation and practicum. The first section of the book provides activities that focus on collecting information about the school and its resources, and…

  1. SWARM: A 32 GHz Correlator and VLBI Beamformer for the Submillimeter Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primiani, Rurik A.; Young, Kenneth H.; Young, André; Patel, Nimesh; Wilson, Robert W.; Vertatschitsch, Laura; Chitwood, Billie B.; Srinivasan, Ranjani; MacMahon, David; Weintroub, Jonathan

    A 32GHz bandwidth VLBI capable correlator and phased array has been designed and deployeda at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory’s Submillimeter Array (SMA). The SMA Wideband Astronomical ROACH2 Machine (SWARM) integrates two instruments: a correlator with 140kHz spectral resolution across its full 32GHz band, used for connected interferometric observations, and a phased array summer used when the SMA participates as a station in the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) array. For each SWARM quadrant, Reconfigurable Open Architecture Computing Hardware (ROACH2) units shared under open-source from the Collaboration for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research (CASPER) are equipped with a pair of ultra-fast analog-to-digital converters (ADCs), a field programmable gate array (FPGA) processor, and eight 10 Gigabit Ethernet (GbE) ports. A VLBI data recorder interface designated the SWARM digital back end, or SDBE, is implemented with a ninth ROACH2 per quadrant, feeding four Mark6 VLBI recorders with an aggregate recording rate of 64 Gbps. This paper describes the design and implementation of SWARM, as well as its deployment at SMA with reference to verification and science data.

  2. Tracking fluid pressure buildup from focal mechanisms during the 2003-2004 Ubaye seismic swarm, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclère, Henri; Daniel, Guillaume; Fabbri, Olivier; Cappa, Frédéric; Thouvenot, François

    2013-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that the Ubaye seismic swarm that occurred in the French southwestern Alps in 2003-2004 was triggered by fluid overpressures. This contribution provides additional constraints on the temporal and spatial changes in fluid overpressure during this swarm. The orientations of the double-couple nodal planes of an extended set of 74 focal solutions, spanning the whole 2003-2004 episode, are compared with the regional stress field. Based on a Mohr-Coulomb analysis, these comparisons provide estimates of fluid pressures along seismic fault planes. We show that the fluid overpressures required to reactivate the cohesionless fault planes vary through time, with values close to 35 MPa at the inception of the swarm. Overpressures then increase up to 55 MPa during the burst of seismic activity and lastly decrease down to 20 MPa at the end of the crisis. We also show that the fluid overpressures are developed as patches along two parallel faults bordering a releasing bend structure characterized by low to null overpressure. The development of moderate fluid overpressure at the swarm inception enables the reactivation of normal, transtensional, and strike-slip faults while the development of larger fluid overpressures during the burst of seismic activity progressively enables the reactivation of further misoriented normal, transtensional, and transpressional faults. In order to reconcile the spatial and temporal evolution of the fluid overpressures and the seismic activity, we propose that creep compaction could be the process allowing the successive development of fluid overpressure and the migration of seismicity.

  3. Data from TRMM Field Experiments at the Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) DISC DAAC Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Field Experiments (TRMM FEs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The basic objectives of TRMM Field Experiments (FEs) are to evaluate the physical assumptions made by TRMM. rainfall algorithms, initialize and validate the cloud resolving models, test latent heating retrievals from TRMM mea- surements, and evaluate methods to estimate rainfall and latent heating from ground-based radars. The field experiments were designed as a group, so that specific measure ments could be compared between experiments in order to gain insight into the regional dependence of any findings. The TExas FLorida UNderflight Experiments (TEFLUN) were designed to provide validation measurements for TRMM and for the enhancement of TRMM precipitation algorithms. TEFLUN-A focused on east Texas. TEFLUN-B was conducted in close coordination with the Third Convection And Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3) in Florida. The TRMM-LBA was conducted in coordination with the Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). The LBA objectives are to further our understanding of the climatological, ecological, bie geochemical, and hydrological processes in Amazonia and the impact of land use/land change on these processes. Specifically, TRMM-LBA addressed issues related to land precipitation algorithms. The Kwa jalein Experiment (KWAJEX), conducted on the Kwajalein Island in the Republic of Marshall Islands (RMI), was designed to address issues of TRMM products over the ocean. The purpose of the South China Sea Monsoon Experiment (SCSMEX) was to study the water and energy cycle of the Asian monsoon in order to provide better understanding and improve prediction. and instruments of the TRMM FEs. The platforms and instruments of the TRMM FEs are given.

  4. Being There: The Importance of a Field Experience in Teaching Native American Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Roberta

    2000-01-01

    A Native American literature professor's account of college students' cross-cultural field experience on two Indian reservations near the Grand Canyon shows how the experience enhanced student understanding of the Native American belief in the people and land as one, storytelling and a sense of the sacred, and the history and impact of…

  5. Practical Applications for Using Peer Assessment in Physical Education Teacher Education Field Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Beth J.; Marty-Snyder, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Peer assessment (PA) occurs in many higher education programs. However, there is limited research examining PA in physical education teacher education (PETE) in regards to student teaching experiences. PA may be a method to better prepare PETE students to assess their future students. The field experience students assessed their fellow peers on…

  6. Understanding Field Experiences in Traditional Teacher Preparation Programs in Missouri. REL 2016-145

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the characteristics of field experiences in traditional teacher preparation programs completed by first-year teachers in Missouri and how experiences vary by teaching certificate type. This descriptive study is based on data from a survey administered in early 2015 to first-year teachers in Missouri public…

  7. Preservice Science Teachers' Field Experiences with Educational Technologies as Part of Portfolio Development: A Turkish Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korkmaz, Hunkar; Gucum, Berna; Hakverdi, Meral

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the usage of educational technology of pre-service science teachers in their field experiences. This study was carried out on 45 pre-service science teachers taking School Experience and Practice Teaching courses at Hacettepe University in Turkey. The data were obtained from the evaluation of pre-service…

  8. Perspectives on a Reconceptualized Early Field Experience in an Urban School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burant, Theresa J.

    Teacher education in the U.S. faces a critical dilemma: preparing white, middle-class preservice teachers to teach increasingly diverse student populations in public schools. Early field experiences (EFEs) show promise for addressing this mismatch, yet little is actually known about what happens to preservice teachers in practicum experiences.…

  9. Inquiry-Based Field Experiences: Transforming Early Childhood Teacher Candidates' Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linn, Vicki; Jacobs, Gera

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary teacher preparation programs are challenged to provide transformational learning experiences that enhance the development of highly effective teachers. This mixed-methods case study explored the influence of inquiry-based field experiences as a pedagogical approach to teacher preparation. Four teacher candidates participated in a…

  10. Developing Standards-Based Geography Curricular Materials from Overseas Field Experiences for K-12 Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberle, Alex; Palacios, Fabian Araya

    2012-01-01

    Overseas experiences provide educators with exceptional opportunities to incorporate field study, firsthand experiences, and tangible artifacts into the classroom. Despite this potential, teachers must consider curricular standards that direct how such international endeavors can be integrated. Furthermore, geography curriculum development is more…

  11. From Books to the Real World: A Field Learning Experience. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkes Coll., Wilkes-Barre, PA. Educational Development Center.

    The Crestwood Community-Based Learning Experiences Project was undertaken to test the feasibility of conducting an out-of-school learning program and to determine the cost of establishing such a program. For 3 months, 6 teachers and 206 fifth-grade children participated in a total of 20 field experiences which were implemented at three levels: a)…

  12. Log-linear model based behavior selection method for artificial fish swarm algorithm.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhehuang; Chen, Yidong

    2015-01-01

    Artificial fish swarm algorithm (AFSA) is a population based optimization technique inspired by social behavior of fishes. In past several years, AFSA has been successfully applied in many research and application areas. The behavior of fishes has a crucial impact on the performance of AFSA, such as global exploration ability and convergence speed. How to construct and select behaviors of fishes are an important task. To solve these problems, an improved artificial fish swarm algorithm based on log-linear model is proposed and implemented in this paper. There are three main works. Firstly, we proposed a new behavior selection algorithm based on log-linear model which can enhance decision making ability of behavior selection. Secondly, adaptive movement behavior based on adaptive weight is presented, which can dynamically adjust according to the diversity of fishes. Finally, some new behaviors are defined and introduced into artificial fish swarm algorithm at the first time to improve global optimization capability. The experiments on high dimensional function optimization showed that the improved algorithm has more powerful global exploration ability and reasonable convergence speed compared with the standard artificial fish swarm algorithm.

  13. Evaluating Experience-Based Geologic Field Instruction: Lessons Learned from A Large-Scale Eye-Tracking Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarduno, J. A.; Walders, K.; Bono, R. K.; Pelz, J.; Jacobs, R.

    2015-12-01

    A course centered on experience-based learning in field geology has been offered ten times at the University of Rochester. The centerpiece of the course is a 10-day field excursion to California featuring a broad cross-section of the geology of the state, from the San Andreas Fault to Death Valley. Here we describe results from a large-scale eye-tracking experiment aimed at understanding how experts and novices acquire visual geologic information. One ultimate goal of the project is to determine whether expert gaze patterns can be quantified to improve the instruction of beginning geology students. Another goal is to determine if aspects of the field experience can be transferred to the classroom/laboratory. Accordingly, ultra-high resolution segmented panoramic images have been collected at key sites visited during the field excursion. We have found that strict controls are needed in the field to obtain meaningful data; this often involves behavior atypical of geologists (e.g. limiting the field of view prior to data collection and placing time limits on scene viewing). Nevertheless some general conclusions can be made from a select data set. After an initial quick search, experts tend to exhibit scanning behavior that appears to support hypothesis testing. Novice fixations appear to define a scattered search pattern and/or one distracted by geologic noise in a scene. Noise sources include modern erosion features and vegetation. One way to quantify noise is through the use of saliency maps. With the caveat that our expert data set is small, our preliminary analysis suggests that experts tend to exhibit top-down behavior (indicating hypothesis driven responses) whereas novices show bottom-up gaze patterns, influenced by more salient features in a scene. We will present examples and discuss how these observations might be used to improve instruction.

  14. An overview of the first International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, P. J.; Hall, F. G.; Asrar, G.; Strebel, D. E.; Murphy, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews the history and scientific background leading up to FIFE, the experiment design, the scientific teams and equipment involved, and the actual execution of the experiment. The experiment was tasked with exploring techniques for utilizing satellite data to quantify important biophysical states and rates for model input. During the intensive field campaigns the fluxes of moisture, heat, carbon dioxide and radiation were measured with airborne and surface equipment in coordination with measurements of atmospheric and surface parameters and satellite overpasses.

  15. Physical barriers formed from gelling liquids: 1. numerical design of laboratory and field experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Finsterle, S.; Moridis, G.J.; Pruess, K.; Persoff, P.

    1994-01-01

    The emplacement of liquids under controlled viscosity conditions is investigated by means of numerical simulations. Design calculations are performed for a laboratory experiment on a decimeter scale, and a field experiment on a meter scale. The purpose of the laboratory experiment is to study the behavior of multiple gout plumes when injected in a porous medium. The calculations for the field trial aim at designing a grout injection test from a vertical well in order to create a grout plume of a significant extent in the subsurface.

  16. Virtual navigation performance: the relationship to field of view and prior video gaming experience.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Anthony E; Collaer, Marcia L

    2011-04-01

    Two experiments examined whether learning a virtual environment was influenced by field of view and how it related to prior video gaming experience. In the first experiment, participants (42 men, 39 women; M age = 19.5 yr., SD = 1.8) performed worse on a spatial orientation task displayed with a narrow field of view in comparison to medium and wide field-of-view displays. Counter to initial hypotheses, wide field-of-view displays did not improve performance over medium displays, and this was replicated in a second experiment (30 men, 30 women; M age = 20.4 yr., SD = 1.9) presenting a more complex learning environment. Self-reported video gaming experience correlated with several spatial tasks: virtual environment pointing and tests of Judgment of Line Angle and Position, mental rotation, and Useful Field of View (with correlations between .31 and .45). When prior video gaming experience was included as a covariate, sex differences in spatial tasks disappeared.

  17. Improved understanding of geologic CO{sub 2} storage processes requires risk-driven field experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2011-06-01

    The need for risk-driven field experiments for CO{sub 2} geologic storage processes to complement ongoing pilot-scale demonstrations is discussed. These risk-driven field experiments would be aimed at understanding the circumstances under which things can go wrong with a CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) project and cause it to fail, as distinguished from accomplishing this end using demonstration and industrial scale sites. Such risk-driven tests would complement risk-assessment efforts that have already been carried out by providing opportunities to validate risk models. In addition to experimenting with high-risk scenarios, these controlled field experiments could help validate monitoring approaches to improve performance assessment and guide development of mitigation strategies.

  18. Behavioural Rule Discovery from Swarm Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoops, David; Wang, Hui; Moore, George; Bi, Yaxin

    Rules determine the functionality of a given system, in either natural or man-made systems. Man-made systems, such as computer applications, use a set of known rules to control the behaviours applied in a strict manner. Biological or natural systems employ unknown rules, these being undiscovered rules which are more complex. These rules are unknown due to the inability to determine how they are applied, unless observed by a third party. The swarm is one of the largest naturally observed systems, with bird flocks and ant colonies being the most notable. It is a collection or group of individuals who use behaviours to complete a given goal or objective. It is the aim of this paper to present rule discovery methods for the mining of these unknown rules within a swarm system, employing a bird flock simulation environment to gather data.

  19. Plasma Jet Motion Across the Geomagnetic Field in the ``North Star'' Active Geophysical Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, B. G.; Zetzer, J. I.; Podgorny, I. M.; Sobyanin, D. B.; Meng, C.-I.; Erlandson, R. E.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Pfaff, R. F.; Lynch, K. A.

    2003-01-01

    The active geophysical rocket experiment ``North Star'' was carried out in the auroral ionosphere on January 22, 1999, at the Poker Flat Research Range (Alaska, USA) using the American research rocket Black Brant XII with explosive plasma generators on board. Separable modules with scientific equipment were located at distances of from 170 to 1595 m from the plasma source. The experiment continued the series of the Russian-American joint experiments started by the ``Fluxus'' experiment in 1997. Two injections of aluminum plasma across the magnetic field were conducted in the ``North Star'' experiment. They were different, since in the first injection a neutral gas cloud was formed in order to increase the plasma ionization due to the interaction of neutrals of the jet and cloud. The first and second injections were conducted at heights of 360 and 280 km, respectively. The measurements have shown that the charged particle density was two orders of magnitude higher in the experiment with the gas release. The magnetic field in the first injection was completely expelled by the dense plasma of the jet. The displacement of the magnetic field in the second injection was negligible. The plasma jet velocity in both injections decreased gradually due to its interaction with the geomagnetic field. One of the most interesting results of the experiment was the conservation of high plasma density during the propagation of the divergent jet to considerable distances. This fact can be explained by the action of the critical ionization velocity mechanism.

  20. Human-Swarm Interactions Based on Managing Attractors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-06

    further claim that using quorum sensing allows a human to manage trade-offs between the scalability of interactions and mitigating the vulnerability...influence can cause the swarm to switch between attractors. We further claim that using quorum sensing allows a human to manage trade- offs between the...attractors of dynamic systems, bio-inspired swarms, quorum sensing 1. INTRODUCTION Swarms provide complex behaviors out of simple agents following simple

  1. Laboratory and Modeling Studies of Insect Swarms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-10

    the number of individual insects present? We used trajectory data for swarms containing as many as 60 individuals and as few a single insect. Calling ...the group morphology they produce: a model of flocking birds , for example, will be judged successful if each agent moves in the same direction. As...community of physicists and applied mathematicians working on so- called active materials. Following some of their work, we were thus motived to ask a

  2. Swarming in Two and Three Dimensions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Papers published in peer reviewed journals 1. Chad Topaz and Andrea L. Bertozzi, Swarming Patterns in a Two-Dimensional Kinematic Model for Biological...Publishers, 2003 [htm]. 4. B. Cook, D. Marthaler, C. Topaz , A. Bertozzi, and M. Kemp, Frac- tional bandwidth reacquisition algorithms for VSW-MCM, Multi...the hydraulic system of a tree: from sap flux data to transpiration rate”, to appear in Ecological modeling. 4. C.M. Topaz , A.L. Bertozzi, and M.A

  3. A high-altitude balloon experiment to probe stratospheric electric fields from low latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurubaran, Subramanian; Shanmugam, Manu; Jawahar, Kaliappan; Emperumal, Kaliappan; Mahavarkar, Prasanna; Buduru, Suneel Kumar

    2017-02-01

    The Earth's electrical environment hosts a giant electrical circuit, often referred to as the global electric circuit (GEC), linking the various sources of electrical generators located in the lower atmosphere, the ionosphere and the magnetosphere. The middle atmosphere (stratosphere and mesosphere) has been traditionally believed to be passively transmitting electric fields generated elsewhere. Some observations have reported anomalously large electric fields at these altitudes, and the scientific community has had to revisit the earlier hypothesis time and again. At stratospheric altitudes and especially at low latitudes, horizontal electric fields are believed to be of ionospheric origin. Though measurements of these fields from a balloon platform are challenging because of their small magnitudes (around a few mV m-1), a suitably designed long-duration balloon experiment capable of detecting such small fields can provide useful information on the time evolution of ionospheric electric fields, which is otherwise possible only using radar or satellite in situ measurements. We present herein details of one such experiment, BEENS (Balloon Experiment on the Electrodynamics of Near Space), carried out from a low-latitude site in India. The instrument package for this experiment is comprised of four deployable booms for measurements of horizontal electric fields and one inclined boom for vertical electric field measurements, all equipped with conducting spheres at the tip. The experiment was conducted from Hyderabad (17.5° N, 78.6° E) during the post-midnight hours on 14 December 2013. In spite of a few shortcomings we report herein, a noticeable feature of the observations has been the detection of horizontal electric fields of ˜ 5 mV m-1 at the stratospheric altitudes of ˜ 35 km.

  4. Solute mass transfer from near field to far field in a HLWR experiment at real scale.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buil, B.; Peña, J.; Gómez, P.; Garralón, A.; Turrero, M. J.; Sánchez, L.; Durán, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    The FEBEX experiment located in Grimsel (Switzerland) is a 1:1 simulation of a high level waste disposal facility in crystalline rock according to the Spanish concept: two electrical heaters of dimension and weight equivalent to those of the real canisters were installed concentrically with the drift and simulated the thermal effect of the wastes and surrounded by a clay barrier constructed from highly-compacted bentonite blocks. This experiment started in 1996 and the external rim of bentonite is saturated with the granitic water. The difference between the chemical gradients generated by the bentonite porewater and the granitic water made possible the movement of solute into the geosphere. The experiment reproduces in the most realistic conditions, all the processes affecting the radionuclide migration in a HLWR. Two boreholes parallel to the axis of the FEBEX drift were drilled in granite relatively close to the bentonite surface (20 and 60cm) in order to highlight the solute migration mechanisms in crystalline host rock, influenced by the presence of the bentonite buffer and by the geochemical gradients generated at the bentonite/granite interface. After three years of periodic water sampling campaigns in those boreholes, the chemical composition of waters reveal that there is an appreciable increase of Na and Cl concentration in time in the waters sampled from the borehole located at 20cm from the bentonite surface. On the other hand, the Na/Cl ratio in waters is similar to the Na/Cl ratio in the bentonite porewater. For this reason Cl and Na are considered as the main natural tracers indicating the mass transfer process between the bentonite porewater and the granite. A diffusion transport modelling (PHREEQC) was used to describe the mass transfer process. The results show that the Cl and Na concentration in the granitic waters is the result of a diffusive transport from the bentonite to the granite, with a calculated De≈ 5,0E-11 m2/s. These results could

  5. Emergent system identification using particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, Mark S.; Feng, Xin

    2001-10-01

    Complex Adaptive Structures can be viewed as a combination of Complex Adaptive Systems and fully integrated autonomous Smart Structures. Traditionally when designing a structure, one combines rules of thumb with theoretical results to develop an acceptable solution. This methodology will have to be extended for Complex Adaptive Structures, since they, by definition, will participate in their own design. In this paper we introduce a new methodology for Emergent System Identification that is concerned with combining the methodologies of self-organizing functional networks (GMDH - Alexy G. Ivakhnenko), Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO - James Kennedy and Russell C. Eberhart) and Genetic Programming (GP - John Koza). This paper will concentrate on the utilization of Particle Swarm Optimization in this effort and discuss how Particle Swarm Optimization relates to our ultimate goal of emergent self-organizing functional networks that can be used to identify overlapping internal structural models. The ability for Complex Adaptive Structures to identify emerging internal models will be a key component for their success.

  6. Incremental social learning in particle swarms.

    PubMed

    de Oca, Marco A Montes; Stutzle, Thomas; Van den Enden, Ken; Dorigo, Marco

    2011-04-01

    Incremental social learning (ISL) was proposed as a way to improve the scalability of systems composed of multiple learning agents. In this paper, we show that ISL can be very useful to improve the performance of population-based optimization algorithms. Our study focuses on two particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithms: a) the incremental particle swarm optimizer (IPSO), which is a PSO algorithm with a growing population size in which the initial position of new particles is biased toward the best-so-far solution, and b) the incremental particle swarm optimizer with local search (IPSOLS), in which solutions are further improved through a local search procedure. We first derive analytically the probability density function induced by the proposed initialization rule applied to new particles. Then, we compare the performance of IPSO and IPSOLS on a set of benchmark functions with that of other PSO algorithms (with and without local search) and a random restart local search algorithm. Finally, we measure the benefits of using incremental social learning on PSO algorithms by running IPSO and IPSOLS on problems with different fitness distance correlations.

  7. Field-scale experiments reveal persistent yield gaps in low-input and organic cropping systems.

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, Alexandra N; Snapp, Sieglinde S; Robertson, G Philip

    2017-01-31

    Knowledge of production-system performance is largely based on observations at the experimental plot scale. Although yield gaps between plot-scale and field-scale research are widely acknowledged, their extent and persistence have not been experimentally examined in a systematic manner. At a site in southwest Michigan, we conducted a 6-y experiment to test the accuracy with which plot-scale crop-yield results can inform field-scale conclusions. We compared conventional versus alternative, that is, reduced-input and biologically based-organic, management practices for a corn-soybean-wheat rotation in a randomized complete block-design experiment, using 27 commercial-size agricultural fields. Nearby plot-scale experiments (0.02-ha to 1.0-ha plots) provided a comparison of plot versus field performance. We found that plot-scale yields well matched field-scale yields for conventional management but not for alternative systems. For all three crops, at the plot scale, reduced-input and conventional managements produced similar yields; at the field scale, reduced-input yields were lower than conventional. For soybeans at the plot scale, biological and conventional managements produced similar yields; at the field scale, biological yielded less than conventional. For corn, biological management produced lower yields than conventional in both plot- and field-scale experiments. Wheat yields appeared to be less affected by the experimental scale than corn and soybean. Conventional management was more resilient to field-scale challenges than alternative practices, which were more dependent on timely management interventions; in particular, mechanical weed control. Results underscore the need for much wider adoption of field-scale experimentation when assessing new technologies and production-system performance, especially as related to closing yield gaps in organic farming and in low-resourced systems typical of much of the developing world.

  8. Field-scale experiments reveal persistent yield gaps in low-input and organic cropping systems

    PubMed Central

    Kravchenko, Alexandra N.; Snapp, Sieglinde S.; Robertson, G. Philip

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of production-system performance is largely based on observations at the experimental plot scale. Although yield gaps between plot-scale and field-scale research are widely acknowledged, their extent and persistence have not been experimentally examined in a systematic manner. At a site in southwest Michigan, we conducted a 6-y experiment to test the accuracy with which plot-scale crop-yield results can inform field-scale conclusions. We compared conventional versus alternative, that is, reduced-input and biologically based–organic, management practices for a corn–soybean–wheat rotation in a randomized complete block-design experiment, using 27 commercial-size agricultural fields. Nearby plot-scale experiments (0.02-ha to 1.0-ha plots) provided a comparison of plot versus field performance. We found that plot-scale yields well matched field-scale yields for conventional management but not for alternative systems. For all three crops, at the plot scale, reduced-input and conventional managements produced similar yields; at the field scale, reduced-input yields were lower than conventional. For soybeans at the plot scale, biological and conventional managements produced similar yields; at the field scale, biological yielded less than conventional. For corn, biological management produced lower yields than conventional in both plot- and field-scale experiments. Wheat yields appeared to be less affected by the experimental scale than corn and soybean. Conventional management was more resilient to field-scale challenges than alternative practices, which were more dependent on timely management interventions; in particular, mechanical weed control. Results underscore the need for much wider adoption of field-scale experimentation when assessing new technologies and production-system performance, especially as related to closing yield gaps in organic farming and in low-resourced systems typical of much of the developing world. PMID:28096409

  9. Magnetic shielding in a low temperature torsion pendulum experiment. [superconducting cylinders for attenuation earth field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, P. R.

    1979-01-01

    A new type of ether drift experiment searches for anomalous torques on a permanent magnet. A torsion pendulum is used at liquid helium temperature, so that superconducting cylinders can be used to shield magnetic fields. Lead shields attenuate the earth's field, while Nb-Sn shields fastened to the pendulum contain the fields of the magnet. The paper describes the technique by which the earth's field can be reduced below 0.0001 G while simultaneously the moment of the magnet can be reduced by a factor 7 x 10 to the 4th.

  10. Collective motion with anticipation: Flocking, spinning, and swarming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, Alexandre; Caussin, Jean-Baptiste; Eloy, Christophe; Bartolo, Denis

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the collective dynamics of self-propelled particles able to probe and anticipate the orientation of their neighbors. We show that a simple anticipation strategy hinders the emergence of homogeneous flocking patterns. Yet anticipation promotes two other forms of self-organization: collective spinning and swarming. In the spinning phase, all particles follow synchronous circular orbits, while in the swarming phase, the population condensates into a single compact swarm that cruises coherently without requiring any cohesive interactions. We quantitatively characterize and rationalize these phases of polar active matter and discuss potential applications to the design of swarming robots.

  11. Detection of earthquake swarms in subduction zones around Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, T.; Ide, S.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake swarms in subduction zones are likely to be related with slow slip events (SSEs) and locking on the plate interface. In the Boso-Oki region in central Japan, swarms repeatedly occur accompanying SSEs (e.g, Hirose et al., 2012). It is pointed out that ruptures of great earthquakes tend to terminate in regions with recurring swarm activity because of reduced and heterogeneous locking there (Holtkamp and Brudzinsiki, 2014). Given these observations, we may be able to infer aseismic slips and spatial variations in locking on the plate interface by investigating swarm activity in subduction zones. It is known that swarms do not follow Omori's law and have much higher seismicity rates than predicted by the ETAS model (e.g., Llenos et al., 2009). Here, we devised a statistical method to detect unexpectedly frequent earthquakes using the space-time ETAS model (Zhuang et al., 2002). We applied this method to subduction zones around Japan (Tohoku, Ibaraki-Boso-oki, Hokkaido, Izu, Tonankai, Nankai, and Kyushu) and detected swarms in JMA catalog (M ≥ 3) from 2001 to 2010. We detected recurring swarm activities as expected in the Boso-Oki region and also in the Ibaraki-Oki region (see Figures), where intensive foreshock activity was found by Maeda and Hirose (2011). In Tohoku, regions with intensive foreshock activity also appear to roughly correspond to regions with recurring swarm activity. Given that both foreshocks and swarms are triggered by SSEs (e.g., Bouchon et al., 2013), these results suggest that the regions with foreshock activity and swarm activity such as the Ibaraki-Oki region are characterized by extensive occurrences of SSEs just like the Boso-Oki region. Besides Ibaraki-Oki and Boso-Oki, we detected many swarms in Tohoku, Hokkaido, Izu, and Kyushu. On the other hand, swarms are rare in the rupture areas of the 1944 Tonankai and 1946 Nankai earthquakes. These variations in swarm activity may reflect variations in SSE activity among subduction zones

  12. High-resolution microwave diagnostics of architectural components by particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genovesi, Simone; Salerno, Emanuele; Monorchio, Agostino; Manara, Giuliano

    2010-05-01

    the discretization grid used by the forward solver. The algorithm we chose to optimize the objective is based on the particle swarm paradigm. Each feasible solution is coded as a location in a multidimensional space, explored by a number of "particles" each moving with a certain velocity, which is partly random and partly induced by the experience of both the particle itself and the "swarm" of all the other particles. In our case, the search is complicated by the mixed continuous-binary nature of our unknowns, but the swarm intelligence approach maintains the advantage of its intrinsic parallelism. The experimental results we obtained from both simulated and real measurements show that, for typical permittivity values and radiation wavelengths, the spatial resolution is highly improved by the line process. From real measurements in the range 1.7-2.6 GHz, we accurately reconstructed the permittivity values of our test phantom and located the discontinuities within the limits imposed by our discretization grid (with 1.5 mm cell thickness). At present, the applicability of our reconstruction method is still limited by the forward solver, which is based on a cascaded transmission-line model that assumes normal and plane-wave incidence. We are developing a new solver based on a closed-form Green's function in multilayered media, which should enable us to model appropriately both the microwave sensor and the illumination geometry, thus improving the accuracy of the computed reflection coefficients in the objective functional.

  13. Swarm accelerometer data processing from raw accelerations to thermospheric neutral densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemes, Christian; de Teixeira da Encarnação, João; Doornbos, Eelco; van den IJssel, Jose; Kraus, Jiří; Pereštý, Radek; Grunwaldt, Ludwig; Apelbaum, Guy; Flury, Jakob; Holmdahl Olsen, Poul Erik

    2016-05-01

    The Swarm satellites were launched on November 22, 2013, and carry accelerometers and GPS receivers as part of their scientific payload. The GPS receivers do not only provide the position and time for the magnetic field measurements, but are also used for determining non-gravitational forces like drag and radiation pressure acting on the spacecraft. The accelerometers measure these forces directly, at much finer resolution than the GPS receivers, from which thermospheric neutral densities can be derived. Unfortunately, the acceleration measurements suffer from a variety of disturbances, the most prominent being slow temperature-induced bias variations and sudden bias changes. In this paper, we describe the new, improved four-stage processing that is applied for transforming the disturbed acceleration measurements into scientifically valuable thermospheric neutral densities. In the first stage, the sudden bias changes in the acceleration measurements are manually removed using a dedicated software tool. The second stage is the calibration of the accelerometer measurements against the non-gravitational accelerations derived from the GPS receiver, which includes the correction for the slow temperature-induced bias variations. The identification of validity periods for calibration and correction parameters is part of the second stage. In the third stage, the calibrated and corrected accelerations are merged with the non-gravitational accelerations derived from the observations of the GPS receiver by a weighted average in the spectral domain, where the weights depend on the frequency. The fourth stage consists of transforming the corrected and calibrated accelerations into thermospheric neutral densities. We present the first results of the processing of Swarm C acceleration measurements from June 2014 to May 2015. We started with Swarm C because its acceleration measurements contain much less disturbances than those of Swarm A and have a higher signal-to-noise ratio

  14. Kinetic and fluid descriptions of charged particle swarms in gases and nonpolar fluids: Theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dujko, Sasa

    2016-09-01

    In this work we review the progress achieved over the last few decades in the fundamental kinetic theory of charged particle swarms with the focus on numerical techniques for the solution of Boltzmann's equation for electrons, as well as on the development of fluid models. We present a time-dependent multi term solution of Boltzmann's equation valid for electrons and positrons in varying configurations of electric and magnetic fields. The capacity of a theory and associated computer code will be illustrated by considering the heating mechanisms for electrons in radio-frequency electric and magnetic fields in a collision-dominated regime under conditions when electron transport is greatly affected by non-conservative collisions. The kinetic theory for solving the Boltzmann equation will be followed by a fluid equation description of charged particle swarms in both the hydrodynamic and non-hydrodynamic regimes, highlighting (i) the utility of momentum transfer theory for evaluating collisional terms in the balance equations and (ii) closure assumptions and approximations. The applications of this theory are split into three sections. First, we will present our 1.5D model of Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) which are used for timing and triggering purposes in many high energy physics experiments. The model is employed to study the avalanche to streamer transition in RPCs under the influence of space charge effects and photoionization. Second, we will discuss our high-order fluid model for streamer discharges. Particular emphases will be placed on the correct implementation of transport data in streamer models as well as on the evaluation of the mean-energy-dependent collision rates for electrons required as an input in the high-order fluid model. In the last segment of this work, we will present our model to study the avalanche to streamer transition in non-polar fluids. Using a Monte Carlo simulation technique we have calculated transport coefficients for electrons in

  15. Constraint Web Service Composition Based on Discrete Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xianwen; Fan, Xiaoqin; Yin, Zhixiang

    Web service composition provides an open, standards-based approach for connecting web services together to create higher-level business processes. The Standards are designed to reduce the complexity required to compose web services, hence reducing time and costs, and increase overall efficiency in businesses. This paper present independent global constrains web service composition optimization methods based on Discrete Particle Swarm Optimization (DPSO) and associate Petri net (APN). Combining with the properties of APN, an efficient DPSO algorithm is presented which is used to search a legal firing sequence in the APN model. Using legal firing sequences of the Petri net makes the service composition locating space based on DPSO shrink greatly. Finally, for comparing our methods with the approximating methods, the simulation experiment is given out. Theoretical analysis and experimental results indicate that this method owns both lower computation cost and higher success ratio of service composition.

  16. Fitting of a multiphase equation of state with swarm intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, G. A.; Christie, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    Hydrocode calculations require knowledge of the variation of pressure of a material with density and temperature, which is given by the equation of state. An accurate model needs to account for discontinuities in energy, density and properties of a material across a phase boundary. When generating a multiphase equation of state the modeller attempts to balance the agreement between the available data for compression, expansion and phase boundary location. However, this can prove difficult because minor adjustments in the equation of state for a single phase can have a large impact on the overall phase diagram. This paper describes how combining statistical-mechanics-based condensed matter physics models with a stochastic analysis technique called particle swarm optimisation, yields multiphase equations of state which give good agreement with experiment over a wide range of pressure-temperature space. Aluminium and tin are used as test cases in the proof of principle described in this paper.

  17. Order-2 Stability Analysis of Particle Swarm Optimization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qunfeng

    2015-01-01

    Several stability analyses and stable regions of particle swarm optimization (PSO) have been proposed before. The assumption of stagnation and different definitions of stability are adopted in these analyses. In this paper, the order-2 stability of PSO is analyzed based on a weak stagnation assumption. A new definition of stability is proposed and an order-2 stable region is obtained. Several existing stable analyses for canonical PSO are compared, especially their definitions of stability and the corresponding stable regions. It is shown that the classical stagnation assumption is too strict and not necessary. Moreover, among all these definitions of stability, it is shown that our definition requires the weakest conditions, and additional conditions bring no benefit. Finally, numerical experiments are reported to show that the obtained stable region is meaningful. A new parameter combination of PSO is also shown to be good, even better than some known best parameter combinations.

  18. Fitting of a multiphase equation of state with swarm intelligence.

    PubMed

    Cox, G A; Christie, M A

    2015-10-14

    Hydrocode calculations require knowledge of the variation of pressure of a material with density and temperature, which is given by the equation of state. An accurate model needs to account for discontinuities in energy, density and properties of a material across a phase boundary. When generating a multiphase equation of state the modeller attempts to balance the agreement between the available data for compression, expansion and phase boundary location. However, this can prove difficult because minor adjustments in the equation of state for a single phase can have a large impact on the overall phase diagram. This paper describes how combining statistical-mechanics-based condensed matter physics models with a stochastic analysis technique called particle swarm optimisation, yields multiphase equations of state which give good agreement with experiment over a wide range of pressure-temperature space. Aluminium and tin are used as test cases in the proof of principle described in this paper.

  19. Particle swarm optimization based space debris surveillance network scheduling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hai; Liu, Jing; Cheng, Hao-Wen; Zhang, Yao

    2017-02-01

    The increasing number of space debris has created an orbital debris environment that poses increasing impact risks to existing space systems and human space flights. For the safety of in-orbit spacecrafts, we should optimally schedule surveillance tasks for the existing facilities to allocate resources in a manner that most significantly improves the ability to predict and detect events involving affected spacecrafts. This paper analyzes two criteria that mainly affect the performance of a scheduling scheme and introduces an artificial intelligence algorithm into the scheduling of tasks of the space debris surveillance network. A new scheduling algorithm based on the particle swarm optimization algorithm is proposed, which can be implemented in two different ways: individual optimization and joint optimization. Numerical experiments with multiple facilities and objects are conducted based on the proposed algorithm, and simulation results have demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  20. Improving Vector Evaluated Particle Swarm Optimisation Using Multiple Nondominated Leaders

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kian Sheng; Buyamin, Salinda; Ahmad, Anita; Shapiai, Mohd Ibrahim; Naim, Faradila; Mubin, Marizan; Kim, Dong Hwa

    2014-01-01

    The vector evaluated particle swarm optimisation (VEPSO) algorithm was previously improved by incorporating nondominated solutions for solving multiobjective optimisation problems. However, the obtained solutions did not converge close to the Pareto front and also did not distribute evenly over the Pareto front. Therefore, in this study, the concept of multiple nondominated leaders is incorporated to further improve the VEPSO algorithm. Hence, multiple nondominated solutions that are best at a respective objective function are used to guide particles in finding optimal solutions. The improved VEPSO is measured by the number of nondominated solutions found, generational distance, spread, and hypervolume. The results from the conducted experiments show that the proposed VEPSO significantly improved the existing VEPSO algorithms. PMID:24883386

  1. Geomagnetic field-line resonant harmonics measured by the Viking and AMPTE/CCE magnetic field experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanetti, L. J.; Potemra, T. A.; Erlandson, R. E.; Engebretson, M. J.; Acuna, M. H.

    1987-01-01

    The first simultaneous observations of multiple harmonic, azimuthally polarized, ULF pulsations at two points along a geomagnetic flux tube in space are reported. In March 1986, the elliptically orbiting equatorial AMPTE/CCE satellite was oriented with the apogee near 0830 h MLT, and the orbital plane of the polar-orbiting Viking satellite was at 1000 MLT. The satellites were situated within approximately the same flux tube but with an effective separation of approximately 10 R(e) near L = 8 on the inbound pass of the AMPTE/CCE orbit. Structured harmonic pulsations were observed by the magnetic field experiments on both spacecraft, and they appeared to turn off and on simultaneously at both locations. Both the observations and the relative amplitudes along the magnetic field lines support recent ideas of multiple field-line resonances of Alfven waves.

  2. Lead uptake and translocation by willows in pot and field experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhivotovsky, Olena P; Kuzovkina, Yulia A; Schulthess, Cristian P; Morris, Tom; Pettinelli, Dawn

    2011-09-01

    Plant growth and lead (Pb) uptake by seven willow varieties were investigated in pot and field experiments to assess the suitability of willows for phytoremediation of Pb at heavily contaminated sites such as skeet ranges. Differences in uptake and translocation of Pb in Salix were observed between pot and field experiments. In the pot experiment, willows grown in Pb-contaminated field soil for 6 months showed tolerance to very high soil Pb concentration (21,360 mg kg(-1)), and with the addition of EDTA were able to take up and translocate more than 1000 mg kg(-1) Pb into above-ground tissues. In the field experiment, all willow varieties showed tolerance to heterogeneously high soil Pb concentrations. Plants were also able to take up and translocate Pb into above-ground tissues. However, after 4.5 months, the lead concentration in the above-ground tissues of willows grown in soil amended with EDTA was less than 200 mg kg(-1). The results from the pot experiment suggest that Salix varieties have the potential to take up and translocate significant amounts of Pb into above-ground tissues using EDTA. However, to verify the phytoextraction abilities of Salix in the field, additional research is needed.

  3. First experiments probing the collision of parallel magnetic fields using laser-produced plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Fox, W.; ...

    2015-04-08

    Novel experiments to study the strongly-driven collision of parallel magnetic fields in β~10, laser-produced plasmas have been conducted using monoenergetic proton radiography. These experiments were designed to probe the process of magnetic flux pileup, which has been identified in prior laser-plasma experiments as a key physical mechanism in the reconnection of anti-parallel magnetic fields when the reconnection inflow is dominated by strong plasma flows. In the present experiments using colliding plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields, the magnetic flux is found to be conserved and slightly compressed in the collision region. Two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations predict a stronger flux compressionmore » and amplification of the magnetic field strength, and this discrepancy is attributed to the three-dimensional (3D) collision geometry. Future experiments may drive a stronger collision and further explore flux pileup in the context of the strongly-driven interaction of magnetic fields.« less

  4. The first ISLSCP field experiment (FIFE). [International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, P. J.; Hall, F. G.; Asrar, G.; Strebel, D. E.; Murphy, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    The background and planning of the first International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) field experiment (FIFE) are discussed. In FIFE, the NOAA series of satellites and GOES will be used to provide a moderate-temporal resolution coarse-spatial resolution data set, with SPOT and aircraft data providing the high-spatial resolution pointable-instrument capability. The paper describes the experiment design, the measurement strategy, the configuration of the site of the experiment (which will be at and around the Konza prairie near Manhattan, Kansas), and the experiment's operations and execution.

  5. Effect of Biochar on Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Nitrogen Cycling in Laboratory and Field Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagemann, Nikolas; Harter, Johannes; Kaldamukova, Radina; Ruser, Reiner; Graeff-Hönninger, Simone; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2014-05-01

    The extensive use of nitrogen (N) fertilizers in agriculture is a major source of anthropogenic N2O emissions contributing 8% to global greenhouse gas emissions. Soil biochar amendment has been suggested as a means to reduce both CO2 and non-CO2 greenhouse gas emissions. The reduction of N2O emissions by biochar has been demonstrated repeatedly in field and laboratory experiments. However, the mechanisms of the reduction remain unclear. Further it is not known how biochar field-weathering affects GHG emissions and how agro-chemicals, such as the nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP), that is often simultaneously applied together with commercial N-fertilizers, impact nitrogen transformation and N2O emissions from biochar amended soils. In order investigate the duration of the biochar effect on soil N2O emissions and its susceptibility to DMPP application we performed a microcosm and field study with a high-temperature (400 ° C) beech wood derived biochar (60 t ha-1 and 5 % (w/w) biochar in the field and microcosms, respectively). While the field site contained the biochar already for three years, soil and biochar were freshly mixed for the laboratory microcosm experiments. In both studies we quantified GHG emissions and soil nitrogen speciation (nitrate, nitrite, ammonium). While the field study was carried out over the whole vegetation period of the sunflower Helianthus annuus L., soil microcosm experiments were performed for up to 9 days at 28° C. In both experiments a N-fertilizer containing DMPP was applied either before planting of the sunflowers or at the beginning of soil microcosms incubation. Laboratory microcosm experiments were performed at 60% water filled pore space reflecting average field conditions. Our results show that biochar effectively reduced soil N2O emissions by up to 60 % in the field and in the soil microcosm experiments. No significant differences in N2O emission mitigation potential between field-aged and fresh

  6. Magnetic Field R&D for the neutron EDM experiment at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammei, Russell R.

    2014-09-01

    The neutron EDM experiment at TRIUMF aims to constrain the EDM with a precision of 1 ×10-27 e-cm by 2018. The experiment will use a spallation ultracold neutron (UCN) source employing superfluid helium coupled to a room-temperature EDM apparatus. In the previous best experiment, conducted at ILL, effects related to magnetic field homogeneity and instability were found to dominate the systematic error. This presentation will cover our R&D efforts on passive and active magnetic shielding, magnetic field generation within shielded volumes, and precision magnetometry. The neutron EDM experiment at TRIUMF aims to constrain the EDM with a precision of 1 ×10-27 e-cm by 2018. The experiment will use a spallation ultracold neutron (UCN) source employing superfluid helium coupled to a room-temperature EDM apparatus. In the previous best experiment, conducted at ILL, effects related to magnetic field homogeneity and instability were found to dominate the systematic error. This presentation will cover our R&D efforts on passive and active magnetic shielding, magnetic field generation within shielded volumes, and precision magnetometry. Supported by the Canada Foundation for Innovation, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and the Canada Research Chairs program.

  7. CSU FIRE 2 cirrus field experiment: Description of field deployment phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, S.; Beck, G.; Cornwall, C.; Davis, J.; Hein, P.; Lappen, C.; Song, R.; Withrow, J.; Wood, D.; Alvarez, J.

    1992-01-01

    The Colorado State University (CSU) surface observing systems are described. These systems were deployed at the Parsons, Kansas site during the FIRE 2 Cirrus Special Observing Period (SOP) from 13 Nov. - 7 Dec. 1991. The geographical coordinates of the site containing most of the CSU instrumentation are 37 deg. 18 min N. latitude and 96 deg. 30 min. W. longitude; site elevation was 269 meters. In addition, one surface meteorological and broadband flux observing site was maintained at the Tri City Airport which is approximately 18 miles due west of Parsons (37 deg. 20 min. N. latitude, 95 deg. 30 min. 30 sec. W. longitude). A map of the locations of the CSU deployment sites is presented. At the main Parsons site, the instrumentation was located directly adjacent to and north of a lake. Under most cirrus observing conditions, when the wing had a significant southernly component, the lake was upwind of the observing site. The measurements and observations collected during the experiment are listed. These measurements may be grouped into five categories: surface meteorology; infrared spectral and broadband measurements; solar spectral and broadband measurements; upper air measurements; and cloud measurements. A summary of observations collected at the Parsons site during the SOP are presented. The wind profiler, laser ceilometer, surface meteorology and surface broadband radiation instrumentation were operated on a continuous basis. All other systems were operated on an 'on demand' basis when cloud conditions merited the collection of data.

  8. CSU FIRE 2 cirrus field experiment: Description of field deployment phase

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, S.; Beck, G.; Cornwall, C.; Davis, J.; Hein, P.; Lappen, C.; Song, R.; Withrow, J.; Wood, D.; Alvarez, J.

    1992-08-01

    The Colorado State University (CSU) surface observing systems are described. These systems were deployed at the Parsons, Kansas site during the FIRE 2 Cirrus Special Observing Period (SOP) from 13 Nov. - 7 Dec. 1991. The geographical coordinates of the site containing most of the CSU instrumentation are 37 deg. 18 min N. latitude and 96 deg. 30 min. W. longitude; site elevation was 269 meters. In addition, one surface meteorological and broadband flux observing site was maintained at the Tri City Airport which is approximately 18 miles due west of Parsons (37 deg. 20 min. N. latitude, 95 deg. 30 min. 30 sec. W. longitude). A map of the locations of the CSU deployment sites is presented. At the main Parsons site, the instrumentation was located directly adjacent to and north of a lake. Under most cirrus observing conditions, when the wind had a significant southernly component, the lake was upwind of the observing site. The measurements and observations collected during the experiment are listed. These measurements may be grouped into five categories: surface meteorology; infrared spectral and broadband measurements; solar spectral and broadband measurements; upper air measurements; and cloud measurements. A summary of observations collected at the Parsons site during the SOP are presented. The wind profiler, laser ceilometer, surface meteorology and surface broadband radiation instrumentation were operated on a continuous basis. All other systems were operated on an on demand basis when cloud conditions merited the collection of data.

  9. Integration of Field Geophysics and Geology in an International Setting: Multidisciplinary Geoscience Field Experience at the University of Western Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenders, A. J.; Banerjee, N.; Pratt, R. G.

    2010-12-01

    The pedagogical value of the field experience is unequaled: students, teaching assistants, and professors alike return with a renewed sense of purpose, community, and the context in which to place classroom education. It is widely regarded as valuable to personal development, and is required by the Canadian Council of Professional Geoscientists for professional registration. As part of our ongoing International Geoscience Field Experience Initiative, Earth Sciences students at the University of Western Ontario have the opportunity to enhance their education through a study abroad program. The focus is on a residential field experience to world-class localities, offered with the collaboration of internationally recognized academic researchers, government survey personnel, and industry leaders. Recent trips have included the Sn-W mineralization in the Cornwall district of the U.K., the Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB) in Portugal and Spain, and the metallogenic belts of Western Turkey. The integration of geological knowledge with geophysical data was one of the key organizing principles of our recent field trips to the IPB and Western Turkey. This integration is a foundation of modern Earth Sciences, and common practice in industry, it is relatively rare in classroom settings. Lectures before departure and evening exercises during the field trip supplemented the core undergraduate curriculum in geophysics, reviewing gravity, DC resistivity, induced polarization (IP), and magnetotelluric methods, focusing on application to mineral exploration. During our trip to the IPB, partnership with industry allowed students the opportunity to work with state of the art geophysical data, acquired on an exploration prospect visited during the field trip. Multi-parameter geophysical inversions of the IP and MT data produced cross-sections in depth - results interpretable by the students in the complex geological environment of the Iberian Pyrite Belt. Although the students gained valuable

  10. Swarm, 2 years of operations: update on constellation, instrument status and data quality.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottavianelli, G.; Coco, I.; Diekmann, F.; Floberghagen, R.; Kornberg, M.; Mackenzie, R.; Mecozzi, R.; Piris Nino, A.; Hoyos-Ortega, B.; Qamili, E.; Sieg, D.; Siemes, C.; Vogel, P.

    2015-12-01

    Swarm is a three-satellite ESA Earth Explorer mission with the key objectives of studying the geomagnetic field with unprecedented accuracy and the electrodynamics of the Earth's ionosphere. The three spacecraft have been launched in November 2013. Following two years of operations, this presentation provides an update on the constellation, instruments status, L1b data processors, the products quality. It also presents an outlook of the upcoming activities with regards to mission operations.

  11. Complementarity in marine biodiversity manipulations: reconciling divergent evidence from field and mesocosm experiments.

    PubMed

    Stachowicz, John J; Best, Rebecca J; Bracken, Matthew E S; Graham, Michael H

    2008-12-02

    Mounting concern over the loss of marine biodiversity has increased the urgency of understanding its consequences. This urgency spurred the publication of many short-term studies, which often report weak effects of diversity (species richness) driven by the presence of key species (the sampling effect). Longer-term field experiments are slowly accumulating, and they more often report strong diversity effects driven by species complementarity, calling into question the generality of earlier findings. However, differences among study systems in which short- and long-term studies are conducted currently limit our ability to assess whether these differences are simply due to biological or environmental differences among systems. In this paper, we compared the effect of intertidal seaweed species richness on biomass accumulation in mesocosms and field experiments using the same pool of species. We found that seaweed species richness increased biomass accumulation in field experiments in both short (2-month) and long (3-year) experiments, although effects were stronger in the long-term experiment. In contrast, richness had no effect in mesocosm experiments, where biomass accumulation was completely a function of species identity. We argue that the short-term experiments, like many published experiments on the topic, detect only a subset of possible mechanisms that operate in the field over the longer term because they lack sufficient environmental heterogeneity to allow expression of niche differences, and they are of insufficient length to capture population-level responses, such as recruitment. Many published experiments, therefore, likely underestimate the strength of diversity on ecosystem processes in natural ecosystems.

  12. [Research under reduced gravity. Part II: experiments in variable gravitational fields].

    PubMed

    Volkmann, D; Sievers, A

    1992-03-01

    Recently, the reduced gravitational field of space laboratories, rockets, or satellites in Earth orbits offers a gravitational field which is variable from 10(-4) g to 1 g by the use of centrifuges. Especially with plants, data concerning gravisensitivity are based on experiments with clinostats. First experiments in reduced gravitational fields, however, demonstrate the uncertainty of these results. Thus, the main task of gravitational biologists is to test the validity of results obtained with the aid of clinostats. On this basis it should be possible to find a common mechanism to explain the influence of gravity on organisms. Experiments under reduced gravity in sounding rockets provided new knowledge on the perception of the gravity stimulus in plant cells.

  13. Using Magnetic Field Gradients to Simulate Variable Gravity in Fluids and Materials Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, Narayanan

    2006-01-01

    Fluid flow due to a gravitational field is caused by sedimentation, thermal buoyancy, or solutal buoyancy induced convection. During crystal growth, for example, these flows are undesirable and can lead to crystal imperfections. While crystallization in microgravity can approach diffusion limited growth conditions (no convection), terrestrially strong magnetic fields can be used to control fluid flow and sedimentation effects. In this work, a theory is presented on the stability of solutal convection of a magnetized fluid(weak1y paramagnetic) in the presence of a magnetic field. The requirements for stability are developed and compared to experiments performed within the bore of a superconducting magnet. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the experiments. Extension of the technique can also be applied to study artificial gravity requirements for long duration exploration missions. Discussion of this application with preliminary experiments and application of the technique to crystal growth will be provided.

  14. The Okavango Dike Swarm (ODS) of Northern Botswana: Was it associated with a failed Rift System?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LePera, Alan; Atekwana, Estella; Abdelsalam, Mohamed

    2014-05-01

    Dikes and dike swarms often play a significant role in the initiation and extension of rift zones. The giant ODS in northern Botswana, Africa represents a Jurassic aged (~180Ma) thermo-tectonic event which developed during the initial lithospheric weakening phase of Gondwana. Detailed investigations of the mafic dike swarm over the last four decades have provided insights into its age, shape, orientation, and chemistry but have thus far been limited in addressing the crustal structure below the swarm. Historically, the ODS has been interpreted as a failed rift arm based on its association with the Bouvet Hotspot and geometric relationship with two other prominent dike swarms. More recent studies suggest instead that the ODS was emplaced along a preexisting Precambrian basement fabric. Accordingly, the origin of the swarm still remains a matter of debate. The objectives of this study were: (1) determine the role of crustal heterogeneities on the emplacement of the dikes, (2) determine variations in crustal thickness below the ODS and geographically related Okavango Rift Zone (ORZ), a zone of incipient rifting and (3) determine along-strike variations in Curie Point Depth (CPD) below the swarm. We used high resolution aeromagnetic data and applied mathematical filters to enhance structures associated with the swarm's oblique geometry. Crustal thicknesses were estimated using the radial average power spectrum method, applied to 1.2km spatial resolution gravity data. 3D inversions were used to map the magnetic basement and determine the depth to the base of the swarm. Our results showed: (1) There were no apparent basement structures with the same 110° orientation as the ODS. (2) Crustal thickness below the swarm ranges from 39 to 45km with an average of 42± 3km, comparable with thicknesses derived from the Southern African Seismic Experiment (SASE). In contrast, crustal thickness below the ORZ is 9 to 16km thinner than the surrounding blocks. (3) The magnetic

  15. The value of swarm data for practical modeling of plasma devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napartovich, A. P.; Kochetov, I. V.

    2011-04-01

    The non-thermal plasma is a key component in gas lasers, waste gas cleaners, ozone generators, plasma igniters, flame holders, flow control in high-speed aerodynamics and other applications. The specific feature of the non-thermal plasma is its high sensitivity to variations in governing parameters (gas composition, pressure, pulse duration, E/N parameter). The reactivity of the plasma is due to the appearance of atoms and chemical radicals. For the efficient production of chemically active species high average electron energy is required, which is controlled by the balance of gain from the electric field and loss in inelastic collisions. In low-ionized plasma the electron energy distribution function is far from Maxwellian and must be found numerically for specified conditions. Numerical modeling of processes in plasma technologies requires vast databases on electron scattering cross sections to be available. The only reliable criterion for evaluations of validity of a set of cross sections for a particular species is a correct prediction of electron transport and kinetic coefficients measured in swarm experiments. This criterion is used traditionally to improve experimentally measured cross sections, as was suggested earlier by Phelps. The set of cross sections subjected to this procedure is called a self-consistent set. Nowadays, such reliable self-consistent sets are known for many species. Problems encountered in implementation of the fitting procedure and examples of its successful applications are described in the paper. .

  16. Engaging students in research learning experiences through hydrology field excursions and projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewen, T.; Seibert, J.

    2014-12-01

    One of the best ways to engage students and instill enthusiasm for hydrology is to expose them to hands-on learning. A focus on hydrology field research can be used to develop context-rich and active learning, and help solidify idealized learning where students are introduced to individual processes through textbook examples, often neglecting process interactions and an appreciation for the complexity of the system. We introduced a field course where hydrological measurement techniques are used to study processes such as snow hydrology and runoff generation, while also introducing students to field research and design of their own field project. In the field projects, students design a low-budget experiment with the aim of going through the different steps of a 'real' scientific project, from formulating the research question to presenting their results. In one of the field excursions, students make discharge measurements in several alpine streams with a salt tracer to better understand the spatial characteristics of an alpine catchment, where source waters originate and how they contribute to runoff generation. Soil moisture measurements taken by students in this field excursion were used to analyze spatial soil moisture patterns in the alpine catchment and subsequently used in a publication. Another field excursion repeats a published experiment, where preferential soil flow paths are studied using a tracer and compared to previously collected data. For each field excursion, observational data collected by the students is uploaded to an online database we developed, which also allows students to retrieve data from past excursions to further analyze and compare their data. At each of the field sites, weather stations were installed and a webviewer allows access to realtime data from data loggers, allowing students to explore how processes relate to climatic conditions. With in-house film expertise, these field excursions were also filmed and short virtual

  17. Development and application of setup for ac magnetic field in neutron scattering experiments.

    PubMed

    Klimko, Sergey; Zhernenkov, Kirill; Toperverg, Boris P; Zabel, Hartmut

    2010-10-01

    We report on a new setup developed for neutron scattering experiments in periodically alternating magnetic fields at the sample position. The assembly consisting of rf generator, amplifier, wide band transformer, and resonance circuit. It allows to generate homogeneous ac magnetic fields over a volume of a few cm(3) and variable within a wide range of amplitudes and frequencies. The applicability of the device is exemplified by ac polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR): a new method established to probe remagnetization kinetics in soft ferromagnetic films. Test experiments with iron films demonstrate that the ac field within the accessible range of frequencies and amplitudes produces a dramatic effect on the PNR signal. This shows that the relevant ac field parameters generated by the device match well with the scales involved in the remagnetization processes. Other possible applications of the rf unit are briefly discussed.

  18. Three New Regulators of Swarming in Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Jaques, Sandford; McCarter, Linda L.

    2006-01-01

    Movement on surfaces, or swarming motility, is effectively mediated by the lateral flagellar (laf) system in Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Expression of laf is induced by conditions inhibiting rotation of the polar flagellum, which is used for swimming in liquid. However, not all V. parahaemolyticus isolates swarm proficiently. The organism undergoes phase variation between opaque (OP) and translucent (TR) cell types. The OP cell produces copious capsular polysaccharide and swarms poorly, whereas the TR type produces minimal capsule and swarms readily. OP↔TR switching is often the result of genetic alterations in the opaR locus. Previously, OpaR, a Vibrio harveyi LuxR homolog, was shown to activate expression of the cpsA locus, encoding capsular polysaccharide biosynthetic genes. Here, we show that OpaR also regulates swarming by repressing laf gene expression. However, in the absence of OpaR, the swarming phenotype remains tightly surface regulated. To further investigate the genetic controls governing swarming, transposon mutagenesis of a TR (ΔopaR1) strain was performed, and SwrT, a TetR-type regulator, was identified. Loss of swrT, a homolog of V. harveyi luxT, created a profound defect in swarming. This defect could be rescued upon isolation of suppressor mutations that restored swarming. One class of suppressors mapped in swrZ, encoding a GntR-type transcriptional regulator. Overexpression of swrZ repressed laf expression. Using reporter fusions and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, SwrT was demonstrated to repress swrZ transcription. Thus, we have identified the regulatory link that inhibits swarming of OP strains and have begun to elucidate a regulatory circuit that modulates swarming in TR strains. PMID:16547050

  19. Megagauss field generation for high-energy-density plasma science experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Rovang, Dean Curtis; Struve, Kenneth William; Porter, John Larry Jr.

    2008-10-01

    There is a need to generate magnetic fields both above and below 1 megagauss (100 T) with compact generators for laser-plasma experiments in the Beamlet and Petawatt test chambers for focused research on fundamental properties of high energy density magnetic plasmas. Some of the important topics that could be addressed with such a capability are magnetic field diffusion, particle confinement, plasma instabilities, spectroscopic diagnostic development, material properties, flux compression, and alternate confinement schemes, all of which could directly support experiments on Z. This report summarizes a two-month study to develop preliminary designs of magnetic field generators for three design regimes. These are, (1) a design for a relatively low-field (10 to 50 T), compact generator for modest volumes (1 to 10 cm3), (2) a high-field (50 to 200 T) design for smaller volumes (10 to 100 mm3), and (3) an extreme field (greater than 600 T) design that uses flux compression. These designs rely on existing Sandia pulsed-power expertise and equipment, and address issues of magnetic field scaling with capacitor bank design and field inductance, vacuum interface, and trade-offs between inductance and coil designs.

  20. [A method of endmember extraction in hyperspectral remote sensing images based on discrete particle swarm optimization (D-PSO)].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; Sun, Xu; Gao, Lian-Ru; Yang, Li-Na

    2011-09-01

    For the inaccuracy of endmember extraction caused by abnormal noises of data during the mixed pixel decomposition process, particle swarm optimization (PSO), a swarm intelligence algorithm was introduced and improved in the present paper. By re-defining the position and velocity representation and data updating strategies, the algorithm of discrete particle swarm optimization (D-PSO) was proposed, which made it possible to search resolutions in discrete space and ultimately resolve combinatorial optimization problems. In addition, by defining objective functions and feasible solution spaces, endmember extraction was converted to combinatorial optimization problem, which can be resolved by D-PSO. After giving the detailed flow of applying D-PSO to endmember extraction and experiments based on simulative data and real data, it has been verified the algorithm's flexibility to handle data with abnormal noise and the reliability of endmember extraction were verified. Furthermore, the influence of different parameters on the algorithm's performances was analyzed thoroughly.

  1. Supporting Meteorological Field Experiment Missions and Postmission Analysis with Satellite Digital Data and Products

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    Digital satellite remote-sensing imagery and derived products can greatly aid field project success in terms of both real-time logistics and...supporting scientific hypotheses. Supporting Meteorological Field experiMent MiSSionS and poStMiSSion analySiS with Satellite digital data and productS...and Postmission Analysis with Satellite Digital Data and Products 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d

  2. Results of Lasagna process field experiment at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Athmer, C.J.; Ho, S.V.

    1995-12-31

    The Lasagna process is being developed to remediate clayey soils in-situ. Lasagna is a combination of electrokinetics and in-situ treatment taking place in installed treatment zones. The zones are formed in either horizontal or vertical orientation using modified existing geoengineering processes. A Lasagna field experiment combining electroosmosis with carbon adsorption in the vertical orientation has been conducted at a TCE contaminated DOE site in Paducah, KY. Carbon adsorption was chosen for this first field test so that a material balance could confirm the movement of TCE from the clay to the treatment zones. The results of this experiment are presented in this paper.

  3. Chemical weed control in triticale (x Triticosecale Wittmack): review of five years of field experiments.

    PubMed

    Derycke, V; Haesaert, G; Latre, J

    2013-01-01

    During five subsequent growing seasons field experiments were carried out at the experimental farm of the University College Ghent (Belgium) to evaluate the selectivity and efficacy of herbicides for chemical weed control in triticale (x Triticosecale Wittmack). The experiments were set up on a sandy loam soil, according to a completely randomised block design with four replicates. Several herbicides and combinations of herbicides were applied pre- and post-emergence, at different rates. The influence of the different treatments on weed diversity, weed density, growth inhibition and chlorosis of the crop and grain yield was studied. Results obtained from these field trials indicated differences between the different treatments.

  4. Chemical weed control in triticale (x Triticosecale Wittmack): review of five years of field experiments.

    PubMed

    Veerle, Derycke; Joos, Latré; Geert, Haesaert

    2014-01-01

    During five subsequent growing seasons field experiments were carried out at the experimental farm of the University College Ghent (Belgium) to evaluate the selectivity and efficacy of herbicides for chemical weed control in triticale (x Triticosecale Wittmack). The experiments were set up on a sandy loam soil, according to a completely randomised block design with four replications. Several herbicides and combinations of herbicides were applied pre- and post-emergence, at different rates. The influence of the different treatments on weed diversity, weed density, growth inhibition and chlorosis of the crop and grain yield was studied. Results obtained from these field trials indicated differences between the different treatments.

  5. Kicker field simulation and measurement for the muon g-2 experiment at FNAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Seung Pyo; Kim, Young Im; Choi, Jihoon; Semertzidis, Yannis; muon g-2 experiment Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    In the Muon g-2 experiment, muon beam is injected to the storage ring in a slightly tilted orbit whose center is 77 mm away from the center of the ring. The kicker is needed to send the muon beam to the central orbit. The magnetic kicker is designed for the experiment and about 0.1 Tm field integral is needed. The peak current pulse is 4200 A to make this field integral. This strong kicker pulse could make unwanted eddy current occur. This eddy current could spoil the main magnetic field of the storage ring. This could be a critical threat to the precision of experiment. The kicker field simulation has done using OPERA to estimate the effects. Also the kicker field should be measured based on Faraday effect. The measurement has tested in the lab before install the experiment area. In this presentation, the simulation and measurement results will be discussed. This work was supported by IBS-R017-D1-2016-a00.

  6. 1999 Marsokhod Field Experiment: A Simulation of a Mars Rover Science Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoker, C.; Cabrol, N.; Roush, T.; Gulick, V.; Hovde, G.; Moersch, J.

    1999-01-01

    A field experiment to simulate a rover mission to Mars was performed in February 1999. This experiment, the latest in a series of rover field experiments, was designed to demonstrate and validate technologies and investigation strategies for high-science, high-technology performance, and cost-effective planetary rover operations. Objectives: The experiment objectives were to: (1) train scientists in a mission configuration relevant to Surveyor program rover missions at a terrestrial analog field site simulating the criteria of high-priority candidate landing-sites on Mars; (2) develop optimal exploration strategies; (3) evaluate the effectiveness of imaging and spectroscopy in addressing science objectives; (4) assess the value and limitation of descent imaging in supporting rover operations; and (5) evaluate the ability of a science team to correctly interpret the geology of the field site using rover observations. A field site in the California Mojave Desert was chosen for its relevance to the criteria for landing site selection for the Mars Surveyor program. These criteria are: (1) evidence of past water activity; (2) presence of a mechanism to concentrate life; (3) presence of thermal energy sources; (4) evidence of rapid burial; and (5) excavation mechanisms that could expose traces of life.

  7. Remote Sensor Application Studies Progress Report, July L, 1968 to June 30, 1969. Controlled Field Experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowan, L.C.; Offield, T.W.; Watson, R.D.; Cannon, P.J.; Grolier, H.J.; Pohn, H.A.; Watson, Kenneth

    1970-01-01

    Field Sites have been selected for controlled experiments to analyze physical and chemical parameters affecting the response of electromagnetic radiation to geological materials. Considerations in the selection of the sites are the availability of good exposures of nearly monomineralic rocks, level of geologic understanding, and ease of access. Seven sites, where work is underway or planned, contain extensive outcrops of the following rocks: stanstone, limestone, dolomite, and gypsum. Field measurement of quartz have been conducted at four sites.

  8. Array Receivers and Sound Sources for Three Dimensional Shallow Water Acoustic Field Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-06

    Water Acoustic Field Experiments NOOO 14-15-1-2893 Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sd. PROJECT NUMBER Ying Tsong-Lin 132893SP Se. TASK...testing. 1S. SUBJECT TERMS acoustics, shallow water , Arctic Ocean , 3-D acoustic propagation, shelfbreak 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: R b...Approved f or public release; distribution is unlimited. Array Receivers and Sound Sources for Three-Dimensional Shallow- Water Acoustic Field

  9. The NASA Real Time Mission Monitor - A Situational Awareness Tool for Conducting Tropical Cyclone Field Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Michael; Blakeslee, Richard; Hall, John; Parker, Philip; He, Yubin

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Real Time Mission Monitor (RTMM) is a situational awareness tool that integrates satellite, aircraft state information, airborne and surface instruments, and weather state data in to a single visualization package for real time field experiment management. RTMM optimizes science and logistic decision-making during field experiments by presenting timely data and graphics to the users to improve real time situational awareness of the experiment's assets. The RTMM is proven in the field as it supported program managers, scientists, and aircraft personnel during the NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (investigated African easterly waves and Tropical Storm Debby and Helene) during August-September 2006 in Cape Verde, the Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling experiment during July-August 2007 in Costa Rica, and the Hurricane Aerosonde mission into Hurricane Noel in 2-3 November 2007. The integration and delivery of this information is made possible through data acquisition systems, network communication links, and network server resources built and managed by collaborators at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC). RTMM is evolving towards a more flexible and dynamic combination of sensor ingest, network computing, and decision-making activities through the use of a service oriented architecture based on community standards and protocols. Each field experiment presents unique challenges and opportunities for advancing the functionality of RTMM. A description of RTMM, the missions it has supported, and its new features that are under development will be presented.

  10. 'The Real Classroom Is Outside—Get into It!' Teaching through Field Experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passow, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Field-based experiences can be powerful influences on students of any age, from pre-college through grad school, as well as on the general public. Every place-based learning experience will be different because the combination of location, participant background, available resources, and other factors will be unique. But certain shared goals, necessities, and similarities can be recognized. Intended outcomes should be identified in advance to inform planning. Preparation for field experiences should involve the students along with other participants. More-experienced students can become role models for new-comers. Field experiences involve active learning, as participants are fully immersed in the sampling site and have all senses stimulated. Constantly-changing variables highlight interconnectedness of Earth processes and fosters Systems Thinking. Decisions about the most effective ways to communicate data and results will differ from what might be based on classroom or laboratory venues. Three examples of field-based learning will be provided. One involves collaboration between educational specialists at a scientific research institution, the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, with high school students enrolled in their school's Authentic Science Research program. The second describes orientation for beginning graduate students to the geology, geography, and history of their new home region through a tourist boat ride, the well-known Circle Ride around Manhattan. The third illustrates use of 'eco-hikes' to enhance environmental understanding for Open House and other visitors. These can serve as models for designing experience-based programs in other situations.

  11. Magnetic field effects in few-level quantum dots: Theory and application to experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Christopher J.; Galpin, Martin R.; Logan, David E.

    2011-09-01

    We examine several effects of an applied magnetic field on Anderson-type models for both single- and two-level quantum dots, and we make direct comparison between numerical renormalization group (NRG) calculations and recent conductance measurements. On the theoretical side, the focus is on magnetization, single-particle dynamics, and zero-bias conductance, with emphasis on the universality arising in strongly correlated regimes, including a method to obtain the scaling behavior of field-induced Kondo resonance shifts over a very wide field range. NRG is also used to interpret recent experiments on spin-(1)/(2) and spin-1 quantum dots in a magnetic field, which we argue do not wholly probe universal regimes of behavior, and the calculations are shown to yield good qualitative agreement with essentially all features seen in experiment. The results capture in particular the observed field dependence of the Kondo conductance peak in a spin-(1)/(2) dot, with quantitative deviations from experiment occurring at fields in excess of ˜5T, indicating the eventual inadequacy of using the equilibrium single-particle spectrum to calculate the conductance at finite bias.

  12. Field experience in science for fifth grade students---a mixed methods study of learning environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Barbara E.

    The purpose of this research is to compare students' perceptions of the learning environment in a traditional science classroom and a field study classroom. This mixed methods study used a sequential explanatory design. Phase one was the quantitative phase using two survey tools. A modified version of the "What is happening in this Classroom Survey" (WIHIC) (Fraser et al., 1996) and the "Test of Science Related Attitudes" (TOSRA) (Fraser, 1982) was administered to 60 fifth grade students from one school. Data was then disaggregated by socioeconomic class and ethnicity. Results from Phase one showed that students prefer the classroom for investigation and prefer the field environment for enjoyment of science. Differences in ethnicity and class were small but Hispanic students prefer the field for investigation and equity. Students that are low socio-economic class rank cooperation in the field higher than the classroom and students that do not qualify for free or reduced lunch prefer the field environment for enjoyment of science. Finally, there are strong correlations for the variables of cooperation, investigation, equity and enjoyment of science in both the classroom and the field environment. Questions raised from the analysis of the survey data were further explored through qualitative data collection methods in phase two. Student responses to three questions were coded using template analysis to provide answers to the "how and why" field experience effects students' attitudes toward science. Three themes emerged from the coding of the results. These results showed that students are physically engaged, develop a sense of place and learn skills in the field that reinforce concepts learned in the classroom. This information will help teachers in developing quality and meaningful experiences for all students. "Closing the gaps among minority groups while improving achievement of all students constitutes the dual goals of education in the nation" (Lee et al., 2004

  13. Plot-scale field experiment of surface hydrologic processes with EOS implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laymon, Charles A.; Macari, Emir J.; Costes, Nicholas C.

    1992-01-01

    Plot-scale hydrologic field studies were initiated at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to a) investigate the spatial and temporal variability of surface and subsurface hydrologic processes, particularly as affected by vegetation, and b) develop experimental techniques and associated instrumentation methodology to study hydrologic processes at increasingly large spatial scales. About 150 instruments, most of which are remotely operated, have been installed at the field site to monitor ground atmospheric conditions, precipitation, interception, soil-water status, and energy flux. This paper describes the nature of the field experiment, instrumentation and sampling rationale, and presents preliminary findings.

  14. The LXCat project: Electron scattering cross sections and swarm parameters for low temperature plasma modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancheshnyi, S.; Biagi, S.; Bordage, M. C.; Hagelaar, G. J. M.; Morgan, W. L.; Phelps, A. V.; Pitchford, L. C.

    2012-04-01

    LXCat is a dynamic, open-access, website for collecting, displaying, and downloading ELECtron SCATtering cross sections and swarm parameters (mobility, diffusion coefficient, reaction rates, etc.) required for modeling low temperature, non-equilibrium plasmas. Contributors set up individual databases, and the available databases, indicated by the contributor's chosen title, include mainly complete sets of electron-neutral scattering cross sections, although the option for introducing partial sets of cross sections exists. A database for measured swarm parameters is also part of LXCat, and this is a growing activity. On-line tools include options for browsing, plotting, and downloading cross section data. The electron energy distribution functions (edfs) in low temperature plasmas are in general non-Maxwellian, and LXCat provides an option for execution of an on-line Boltzmann equation solver to calculate the edf in homogeneous electric fields. Thus, the user can obtain electron transport and rate coefficients (averages over the edfs) in pure gases or gas mixtures over a range of values of the reduced electric fields strength, E/N, the ratio of the electric field strength to the neutral density, using cross sections from the available databases. New contributors are welcome and anyone wishing to create a database and upload data can request a username and password. LXCat is part of a larger, community-wide effort aimed at collecting, evaluating, and sharing data relevant to modeling low temperature plasmas. To illustrate the utility of LXCat in this context, we compare electron swarm parameters in argon calculated using the different compilations of cross sections presently available on LXCat. These compilations include quite different groupings of excited states, yet lead to swarm parameters in good agreement. LXCat is available at http://www.lxcat.laplace.univ-tlse.fr.

  15. Experience-based Learning in Acadia National Park: a Successful, Long-running, Model Field Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connaughton, M.

    2015-12-01

    This two-week field course has been offered alternate summers since 2000 in Acadia National Park on Mount Desert Island, Maine and addresses the geological history, physical and biological oceanography and principles of community ecology applicable to terrestrial and/or marine communities of coastal Maine. The course is often transformative and deeply meaningful to the students, many of whom have limited travel experience. The essential components of experience-based learning are well represented in this class with multiple opportunities for abstract conceptualization, active experimentation, concrete hands-on experiences and reflective observation built into the course. Each day begins with a lecture introducing concepts, which are then made concrete though daily field trips (4-8 hours in duration) into the park that include rigorous hiking, some kayaking and one commercial nature cruise. Field trips include hands-on experience with lecture concepts, on-site lessons in field methods, and data collection for independent projects. Each field trip is tied to a specific independent project, which are generated by the instructor, but self-selected by the students. Every student is actively involved in data collection during each field trip, with one student in charge of the collection each day. Daily guided journaling in three parts (scientific, personal and creative) and evening discussions provide ample opportunity for the student to reflect on the scientific content of the course, examine their personal reactions to what they have experienced and to be creative, sharing prior experiences, prior learning and their personalities. The course includes two exams, each following a week of lecture and field experiences. Independent research projects include the production of a manuscript-formatted report complete with statistical analysis of the data and a literature-based discussion of the conclusions. The combination of experiential reinforcement of concepts, abundant

  16. A mechanical model for giant radiating dike swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakov, Alexander; Yarushina, Viktoriya; Faleide, Jan Inge

    2016-04-01

    The Large Igneous Provinces (LIP) is believed to form as results of plume-lithosphere interaction. A recognizable diagnostic feature of the LIP is a swarm of dikes (100 - 1000 km -long) radiating from a single or several focal regions. The models for formation of these dike swarms are mainly based on Venusian analogues (associated with coronae structures) since on Earth these paleo-structures are presumably less likely to preserve due to erosion and later tectonics. The existing explanation for the geometry of dikes (in horizontal plane) is based on assumption that in a far-field shear stress the dikes are normal to the least principal stress. A small overpressure related to the lithospheric magma reservoir is also assumed. However, this type of models implies several limitations: 1) the dike emplacement is considered as a purely elastic process, 2) all dikes are assumed to intrude simultaneously (no interaction with neighboring dikes). On the other hand, recent geophysical observations suggest that the dikes that apparently belong to the same magmatic event can intersect and can be affected by each other and local crustal heterogeneity. In this study, we attribute the geometry of dikes to irreversible plastic deformation including the path-dependence. We use finite-element elastoplastic simulations to predict the fracture pattern related to the plume-lithosphere interaction. The rheology is governed by a non-associated Mohr-Coulomb plastic flow law. The accuracy of the numerical results is benchmarked versus 2D plane strain analytical solutions for combined shear and internal pressure loads. We apply our model to the case of the High Arctic LIP. Here, the location of the dike intrusions is based on the interpretation of magnetic anomalies supported by geological and seismic data in the Barents Sea together with timing constraints using U-Pb isotopic ages. The developed model provides a framework for future high-resolution structural and geochronological studies to

  17. Abiotic stress QTL in lettuce crop–wild hybrids: comparing greenhouse and field experiments

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Yorike; Hooftman, Danny A P; Uwimana, Brigitte; Schranz, M Eric; van de Wiel, Clemens C M; Smulders, Marinus J M; Visser, Richard G F; Michelmore, Richard W; van Tienderen, Peter H

    2014-01-01

    The development of stress-tolerant crops is an increasingly important goal of current crop breeding. A higher abiotic stress tolerance could increase the probability of introgression of genes from crops to wild relatives. This is particularly relevant to the discussion on the risks of new GM crops that may be engineered to increase abiotic stress resistance. We investigated abiotic stress QTL in greenhouse and field experiments in which we subjected recombinant inbred lines from a cross between cultivated Lactuca sativa cv. Salinas and its wild relative L. serriola to drought, low nutrients, salt stress, and aboveground competition. Aboveground biomass at the end of the rosette stage was used as a proxy for the performance of plants under a particular stress. We detected a mosaic of abiotic stress QTL over the entire genome with little overlap between QTL from different stresses. The two QTL clusters that were identified reflected general growth rather than specific stress responses and colocated with clusters found in earlier studies for leaf shape and flowering time. Genetic correlations across treatments were often higher among different stress treatments within the same experiment (greenhouse or field), than among the same type of stress applied in different experiments. Moreover, the effects of the field stress treatments were more correlated with those of the greenhouse competition treatments than to those of the other greenhouse stress experiments, suggesting that competition rather than abiotic stress is a major factor in the field. In conclusion, the introgression risk of stress tolerance (trans-)genes under field conditions cannot easily be predicted based on genomic background selection patterns from controlled QTL experiments in greenhouses, especially field data will be needed to assess potential (negative) ecological effects of introgression of these transgenes into wild relatives. PMID:25360276

  18. Migrating Activity of the 2010 Madison Plateau, Yellowstone National Park, Earthquake Swarm: Evidence for Fluid Triggering?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelly, D. R.; Hill, D. P.; Farrell, J.; Massin, F.; Smith, R. B.

    2012-12-01

    Yellowstone National Park, USA, includes one of Earth's largest volcanic-hydrothermal fields and a youthful caldera. More than half of the seismicity in the volcanic field occurs as earthquake swarms. The 2010 Madison Plateau earthquake swarm, near the northwest rim of Yellowstone caldera, was one of the three largest swarms recorded in the park since monitoring began in the 1970s. The swarm consisted of ~2200 cataloged events (minimum magnitude -0.6), and included 17 events of magnitude 3.0 or larger. The largest event was M 3.9. Low-level seismicity in the area began on January 15, 2010 and abruptly accelerated late on January 17. Seismicity continued at an elevated rate through February 6 before decaying to background levels over the following days. To fully explore the activity and evolution of the swarm, we combine event detection based on waveform cross-correlation (to detect low signal-to-noise events missing from the catalog) with precise double-difference relative relocation of hypocenters. Detection and location goals are accomplished in tandem with cross-correlation, using catalog events as waveform templates that are systematically scanned through the continuous seismic data. Using this procedure, we detected ~8700 events that can be precisely located, a factor of ~4 more events than included in the Yellowstone Seismic Network standard catalog. These newly detected and relocated hypocenters reveal a complex spatial-temporal evolution. The majority of activity is concentrated on a NNW-striking, ENE-dipping structure, with dimensions of approximately 3 by 3 km, between 8 and 11 km depth. Activity began abruptly at about 10 km depth, and expanded episodically and systematically outward (both shallower and deeper) along this structure over the next few days. As time progressed, seismicity began to appear on nearby linear and planar structures of varying orientations, most of which were shallower than the initial activity. We hypothesize that the swarm

  19. Dynamics of Snake-like Swarming Behavior of Vibrio alginolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Böttcher, Thomas; Elliott, Hunter L.; Clardy, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Swarming represents a special case of bacterial behavior where motile bacteria migrate rapidly and collectively on surfaces. Swarming and swimming motility of bacteria has been studied well for rigid, self-propelled rods. In this study we report a strain of Vibrio alginolyticus, a species that exhibits similar collective motility but a fundamentally different cell morphology with highly flexible snake-like swarming cells. Investigating swarming dynamics requires high-resolution imaging of single cells with coverage over a large area: thousands of square microns. Researchers previously have employed various methods of motion analysis but largely for rod-like bacteria. We employ temporal variance analysis of a short time-lapse microscopic image series to capture the motion dynamics of swarming Vibrio alginolyticus at cellular resolution over hundreds of microns. Temporal variance is a simple and broadly applicable method for analyzing bacterial swarming behavior in two and three dimensions with both high-resolution and wide-spatial coverage. This study provides detailed insights into the swarming architecture and dynamics of Vibrio alginolyticus isolate B522 on carrageenan agar that may lay the foundation for swarming studies of snake-like, nonrod-shaped motile cell types. PMID:26910435

  20. Taurid swarm exists only in southern branch (STA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiba, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    I present some features of the Taurid meteor shower in data obtained by the Japanese automatic TV meteor observation `SonotaCo Network' from 2007 to 2015. (i) The Taurid shower is enhanced when the Earth encounters the Taurid swarm center at less than 30 in mean anomaly as described by Asher and Izumi (1998). A little enhancement was detected in 2011 when it was 71 from the center in mean anomaly. (ii) The Taurid meteor swarm exists only in the southern branch (STA) but not in the northern branch (NTA). (iii) The Taurid meteor swarm includes bright meteors more than the annual year components as also described in Asher & Izumi (1998). (iv) The STA swarm orbital period is equal to the 2:7 resonance with Jupiter. This orbital period agrees with the suggestion in Asher & Izumi (1998). However, the NTA orbital period also matches the 2:7 resonance with Jupiter, though no swarm exists. (v) The Taurid swarm longitude of perihelion is constant at 158 over its whole period. (vi) NTA orbit features vary smoothly over the season. No complex structure could be recognized in NTA in this study of observations by small video camera. (vii) The Taurid swarm orbit differs from the annual STA orbit at its peak, but is close to the annual component at the end of swarm activity. (viii) The annual STA component consists of some similar orbital streams.