Science.gov

Sample records for swc technology transfer

  1. [A New Method to Decline the SWC Effect on the Accuracy for Monitoring SOM with Hyperspectral Technology].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Feng, Mei-chen; Yang, Wu-de; Xiao, Lu-jie; Li, Guang-xin; Zhao, Jia-jia; Ren, Peng

    2015-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is one of the most important indexes to reflect the soil fertility, and soil moisture is a main factor to limit the application of hyperspectral technology in monitoring soil attributes. To study the effect of soil moisture on the accuracy for monitoring SOM with hyperspectral remote sensing and monitor the SOM quickly and accurately, SOM, soil water content (SWC) and soil spectrum for 151 natural soil samples in winter wheat field were measured and the soil samples were classified with the method of traditional classification of SWC and Normalized Difference Soil Moisture Index (NSMI) based on the hyperspectral technology. Moreover, the relationship among SWC, SOM and NSMI were analyzed. The results showed that the accuracy of spectral monitor for SOM among the classifications were significantly different, its accuracy was higher than the soils (5%-25%) which was not classified. It indicated that the soil moisture affected the accuracy for monitoring the SOM with hyperspectral technology and the study proved that the most beneficent soil water content for monitoring the SOM was less 10% and higher 20%. On the other hand, the four models for monitoring the SOM by the hyperspectral were constructed by the classification of NSMI, and its accuracy was higher than the classification of SWC. The models for monitoring the SOM by the classification of NSMI were calibrated with the validation parameters of R², RMSE and RPD, and it showed that the four models were available and reliable to quickly and conveniently monitor the SOM by heperspectral. However, the different classifiable ways for soil samples mentioned in the study were naturally similar as all soil samples were classified again with another way. Namely, there may be another optimal classifiable way or method to overcome and eliminate the SWC effect on the accuracy for monitoring SOM. The study will provide some theoretical technology to monitor the SWC and SOM by remote sensing.

  2. Technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handley, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    The requirements for a successful technology transfer program and what such a program would look like are discussed. In particular, the issues associated with technology transfer in general, and within the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) environment specifically are addressed. The section on background sets the stage, identifies the barriers to successful technology transfer, and suggests actions to address the barriers either generally or specifically. The section on technology transfer presents a process with its supporting management plan that is required to ensure a smooth transfer process. Viewgraphs are also included.

  3. Technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penaranda, Frank E.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: international comparison of R&D expenditures in 1989; NASA Technology Transfer Program; NASA Technology Utilization Program thrusts for FY 1992 and FY 1993; National Technology Transfer Network; and NTTC roles.

  4. Technology Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Nanette R.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this summer's work was to attempt to enhance Technology Application Group (TAG) ability to measure the outcomes of its efforts to transfer NASA technology. By reviewing existing literature, by explaining the economic principles involved in evaluating the economic impact of technology transfer, and by investigating the LaRC processes our William & Mary team has been able to lead this important discussion. In reviewing the existing literature, we identified many of the metrics that are currently being used in the area of technology transfer. Learning about the LaRC technology transfer processes and the metrics currently used to track the transfer process enabled us to compare other R&D facilities to LaRC. We discuss and diagram impacts of technology transfer in the short run and the long run. Significantly, it serves as the basis for analysis and provides guidance in thinking about what the measurement objectives ought to be. By focusing on the SBIR Program, valuable information regarding the strengths and weaknesses of this LaRC program are to be gained. A survey was developed to ask probing questions regarding SBIR contractors' experience with the program. Specifically we are interested in finding out whether the SBIR Program is accomplishing its mission, if the SBIR companies are providing the needed innovations specified by NASA and to what extent those innovations have led to commercial success. We also developed a survey to ask COTR's, who are NASA employees acting as technical advisors to the SBIR contractors, the same type of questions, evaluating the successes and problems with the SBIR Program as they see it. This survey was developed to be implemented interactively on computer. It is our hope that the statistical and econometric studies that can be done on the data collected from all of these sources will provide insight regarding the direction to take in developing systematic evaluations of programs like the SBIR Program so that they can

  5. Technology transfer.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, Jesse Jayne

    2010-01-01

    Technology transfer has served the field of biomedical engineering well. Although the process is fraught with obstacles and may appear to be a distraction from more important work in the laboratory, application of technology is crucial to the furthering of the field and to public health in general. A given inventor may not want to take over the administrative tasks of protecting IP, developing a regulatory strategy, and developing a business model, and he or she does not necessarily have to; however, the inventor needs to at least know about the strategies and know there are people to turn to for leadership and guidance outside of the laboratory early in the process. And that can be all an inventor wants to do or can do: to simply turn the invention over to someone else and move on to more research in the hopes that the invention will help improve patients' health and perhaps afford the inventor and the research institution some financial reward. However, in turning an invention over completely, an inventor also loses power over how, for whom, and at what price the invention will be offered, and that is a reason to become more informed about the process, to know what you can ask for, and to stand by your invention's side in whatever capacity you are equipped to do so throughout the entire technology transfer process.

  6. Technology Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, Kimberly R.

    1995-01-01

    The development and application of new technologies in the United States has always been important to the economic well being of the country. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been an important source of these new technologies for almost four decades. Recently, increasing global competition has emphasized the importance of fully utilizing federally funded technologies. Today NASA must meet its mission goals while at the same time, conduct research and development that contributes to securing US economic growth. NASA technologies must be quickly and effectively transferred into commercial products. In order to accomplish this task, NASA has formulated a new way of doing business with the private sector. Emphasis is placed on forming mutually beneficial partnerships between NASA and US industry. New standards have been set in response to the process that increase effectiveness, efficiency, and timely customer response. This summer I have identified potential markets for two NASA inventions: including the Radially Focused Eddy Current Sensor for Characterization of Flaws in Metallic Tubing and the Radiographic Moire. I have also worked to establish a cooperative program with TAG, private industry, and a university known as the TAG/Industry/Academia Program.

  7. Technology transfer within NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.cyr, William

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on technology transfer within NASA are provided. Assessment of technology transfer process, technology being transfered, issues and barriers, and observations and suggestions are addressed. Topics covered include: technology transfer within an organization (and across organization lines/codes) and space science/instrument technology and the role of universities in the technology development/transfer process.

  8. Technology transfer methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labotz, Rich

    1991-01-01

    Information on technology transfer methodology is given in viewgraph form. Topics covered include problems in economics, technology drivers, inhibitors to using improved technology in development, technology application opportunities, and co-sponsorship of technology.

  9. National Technology Transfer Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, Lee W.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the National Technology Transfer Center (NTTC) are provided. The NTTC mission is to serve as a hub for the nationwide technology-transfer network to expedite the movement of federally developed technology into the stream of commerce. A description of the Center is provided.

  10. Technology transfer for adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagini, Bonizella; Kuhl, Laura; Gallagher, Kelly Sims; Ortiz, Claudia

    2014-09-01

    Technology alone will not be able to solve adaptation challenges, but it is likely to play an important role. As a result of the role of technology in adaptation and the importance of international collaboration for climate change, technology transfer for adaptation is a critical but understudied issue. Through an analysis of Global Environment Facility-managed adaptation projects, we find there is significantly more technology transfer occurring in adaptation projects than might be expected given the pessimistic rhetoric surrounding technology transfer for adaptation. Most projects focused on demonstration and early deployment/niche formation for existing technologies rather than earlier stages of innovation, which is understandable considering the pilot nature of the projects. Key challenges for the transfer process, including technology selection and appropriateness under climate change, markets and access to technology, and diffusion strategies are discussed in more detail.

  11. Technology Transfer and Technology Transfer Intermediaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Stephen M.; Flagg, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    A standard and comprehensive model is needed to evaluate and compare technology transfer systems and the stakeholders within these systems. The principle systems considered include federal laboratories, U.S. universities, the rehabilitation engineering research centers (RERCs), and large small business innovation research programs. An earlier…

  12. Technology transfer 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This document, Technology Transfer 94, is intended to communicate that there are many opportunities available to US industry and academic institutions to work with DOE and its laboratories and facilities in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. It has seven major sections: Introduction, Technology Transfer Activities, Access to Laboratories and Facilities, Laboratories and Facilities, DOE Office, Technologies, and an Index. Technology Transfer Activities highlights DOE`s recent developments in technology transfer and describes plans for the future. Access to Laboratories and Facilities describes the many avenues for cooperative interaction between DOE laboratories or facilities and industry, academia, and other government agencies. Laboratories and Facilities profiles the DOE laboratories and facilities involved in technology transfer and presents information on their missions, programs, expertise, facilities, and equipment, along with data on whom to contact for additional information on technology transfer. DOE Offices summarizes the major research and development programs within DOE. It also contains information on how to access DOE scientific and technical information. Technologies provides descriptions of some of the new technologies developed at DOE laboratories and facilities.

  13. Technology Transfer Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Since its inception, Goddard has pursued a commitment to technology transfer and commercialization. For every space technology developed, Goddard strives to identify secondary applications. Goddard then provides the technologies, as well as NASA expertise and facilities, to U.S. companies, universities, and government agencies. These efforts are based in Goddard's Technology Commercialization Office. This report presents new technologies, commercialization success stories, and other Technology Commercialization Office activities in 1999.

  14. Transferring Technology to Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfenbarger, J. Ken

    2006-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the technology transfer processes in which JPL has been involved to assist in transferring the technology derived from aerospace research and development to industry. California Institute of Technology (CalTech), the organization that runs JPL, is the leading institute in patents for all U.S. universities. There are several mechanisms that are available to JPL to inform industry of these technological advances: (1) a dedicated organization at JPL, National Space Technology Applications (NSTA), (2) Tech Brief Magazine, (3) Spinoff magazine, and (4) JPL publications. There have also been many start-up organizations and businesses from CalTech.

  15. Technology Transfer: Marketing Tomorrow's Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Erene

    1995-01-01

    The globalization of the economy and the end of the Cold War have triggered many changes in the traditional practices of U.S. industry. To effectively apply the resources available to the United States, the federal government has firmly advocated a policy of technology transfer between private industry and government labs, in this case the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin is a strong proponent of this policy and has organized technology transfer or commercialization programs at each of the NASA field centers. Here at Langley Research Center, the Technology Applications Group (TAG) is responsible for facilitating the transfer of Langley developed research and technology to U.S. industry. Entering the program, I had many objectives for my summer research with TAG. Certainly, I wanted to gain a more thorough understanding of the concept of technology transfer and Langley's implementation of a system to promote it to both the Langley community and the community at large. Also, I hoped to become more familiar with Langley's research capabilities and technology inventory available to the public. More specifically, I wanted to learn about the technology transfer process at Langley. Because my mentor is a member of Materials and Manufacturing marketing sector of the Technology Transfer Team, another overriding objective for my research was to take advantage of his work and experience in materials research to learn about the Advanced Materials Research agency wide and help market these developments to private industry. Through the various projects I have been assigned to work on in TAG, I have successfully satisfied the majority of these objectives. Work on the Problem Statement Process for TAG as well as the development of the Advanced Materials Research Brochure have provided me with the opportunity to learn about the technology transfer process from the outside looking in and the inside looking out. Because TAG covers

  16. Technology Transfer Issues and a New Technology Transfer Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Hee Jun

    2009-01-01

    The following are major issues that should be considered for efficient and effective technology transfer: conceptions of technology, technological activity and transfer, communication channels, factors affecting transfer, and models of transfer. In particular, a well-developed model of technology transfer could be used as a framework for…

  17. Mississippi Technology Transfer Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The Mississippi Technology Transfer Center at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., was officially dedicated in 1987. The center is home to several state agencies as well as the Center For Higher Learning.

  18. NASP technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Charles

    1992-01-01

    It is the stated goal of this program, the National AeroSpace Plane (NASP) program, to develop and then demonstrate the technologies for single-stage-to-orbit flight and hypersonic cruise with airbreathing primary propulsion and horizontal takeoff and landing. This presentation is concerned with technology transfer in the context of the NASP program.

  19. Technology Transfer and Commercialization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Katherine; Chapman, Diane; Giffith, Melanie; Molnar, Darwin

    2001-01-01

    During concurrent sessions for Materials and Structures for High Performance and Emissions Reduction, the UEET Intellectual Property Officer and the Technology Commercialization Specialist will discuss the UEET Technology Transfer and Commercialization goals and efforts. This will include a review of the Technology Commercialization Plan for UEET and what UEET personnel are asked to do to further the goals of the Plan. The major goal of the Plan is to define methods for how UEET assets can best be infused into industry. The National Technology Transfer Center will conduct a summary of its efforts in assessing UEET technologies in the areas of materials and emissions reduction for commercial potential. NTTC is assisting us in completing an inventory and prioritization by commercialization potential. This will result in increased exposure of UEET capabilities to the private sector. The session will include audience solicitation of additional commercializable technologies.

  20. Robotic technology evolution and transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzwell, Neville I.

    1992-01-01

    A report concerning technology transfer in the area of robotics is presented in vugraph form. The following topics are discussed: definition of technology innovation and tech-transfer; concepts relevant for understanding tech-transfer; models advanced to portray tech-transfer process; factors identified as promoting tech-transfer; factors identified as impeding tech-transfer; what important roles do individuals fulfill in tech-transfer; federal infrastructure for promoting tech-transfer; federal infrastructure for promoting tech-transfer; robotic technology evolution; robotic technology transferred; and recommendations for successful robotics tech-transfer.

  1. Departmental technology transfer update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Roger A.

    1992-01-01

    The objective is the following: to provide the perspective of the Department of Energy (DOE); emphasize new and emerging initiatives; and address unresolved issues that might impact successful program implementation. The approach is the following: to provide a brief overview of DOE, its R&D, and its technology transfer assets; to briefly describe the evolution of DOE's enhanced technology transfer program; to report on specific progress and achievements over the past year--as the spring board for our current and future plans; to present our near and longer term plans; and to survey the remaining issues and the resolution process.

  2. EPA underwrites technology transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Environmental Protection Agency will establish a multi-million dollar corporation at the University of Pittsburgh that will aim to speed up the commercial development of environmental technology. The National Environmental Technology Applications Corporation (NETAC) will be responsible for identifying promising projects underway around the country and helping usher techniques and products into the marketplace.According to EPA administrator Lee Thomas, “NETAC will be a positive force for changing the way government and industry work together in the environmental area. It will provide a new approach that will effectively increase the transfer of pollution control technologies among environmental decision-makers in both government and industry.“

  3. Technology transfer initiatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccain, Wayne; Schroer, Bernard J.; Ziemke, M. Carl

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) technology transfer activities with the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for the period of April 1993 through December 1993. Early in 1993, the MSFC/TUO and UAH conceived of the concept of developing stand-alone, integrated data packages on MSFC technology that would serve industrial needs previously determined to be critical. Furthermore, after reviewing over 500 problem statements received by MSFC, it became obvious that many of these requests could be satisfied by a standard type of response. As a result, UAH has developed two critical area response (CAR) packages: CFC (chlorofluorocarbon) replacements and modular manufacturing and simulation. Publicity included news releases, seminars, articles and conference papers. The Huntsville Chamber of Commerce established the Technology Transfer Subcommittee with the charge to identify approaches for the Chamber to assist its members, as well as non-members, access to the technologies at the federal laboratories in North Alabama. The Birmingham Chamber of Commerce has expressed interest in establishing a similar technology transfer program. This report concludes with a section containing a tabulation of the problem statements, including CAR packages, submitted to MSFC from January 1992 through December 1993.

  4. Ames Lab 101: Technology Transfer

    ScienceCinema

    Covey, Debra

    2016-07-12

    Ames Laboratory Associate Laboratory Director, Sponsored Research Administration, Debra Covey discusses technology transfer. Covey also discusses Ames Laboratory's most successful transfer, lead-free solder.

  5. Technology Transfer Network and Affiliations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Technology Transfer Partnership program sponsors a number of organizations around the country that are designed to assist U.S. businesses in accessing, utilizing, and commercializing NASA-funded research and technology. These organizations work closely with the Technology Transfer Offices, located at each of the 10 NASA field centers, providing a full range of technology transfer and commercialization services and assistance.

  6. Technology transfer program: Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toyshov, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    Most of NASA's technology transfer activities are in the area of land use (development, suitability, and planning); forestry (including wildlife and range and vegetation inventories) agriculture related activities; and water resources. The technology dissemination function is exercised through three regional applications centers which are involved in 91 applications projects within 22 states. In addition there are approximately eight application system verification transfer (ASVT) projects, 21 university applications branches, institutionalized liason activities with public interest groups, and user requirements activities. As the result of budget cuts, the ASVT and user requirements and awareness programs are to be phased out at the end of FY81. The university applications programs are to be phased down and terminated by 1985. NASA will continue to work with the user more in an R & D and an applications development capacity, and not in a national scale or administrative way.

  7. Technology transfer within the government

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Carissa Bryce

    1992-01-01

    The report of a workshop panel concerned with technology transfer within the government is presented. The suggested subtopics for the panel were as follows: (1) transfer from non-NASA U.S. government technology developers to NASA space missions/programs; and (2) transfer from NASA to other U.S. government civil space mission programs. Two presentations were made to the panel: Roles/Value of Early Strategic Planning Within the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) to Facilitate Later Technology Transfer To and From Industry; and NOAA Satellite Programs and Technology Requirements. The panel discussion addresses the following major issues: DOD/NASA cooperation; alternative mechanisms for interagency communication and interactions; current technology transfer relationships among federal research agencies, and strategies for improving this transfer; technology transfer mechanisms appropriate to intragovernment transfer; the importance of industry as a technology transfer conduit; and measures of merit.

  8. What Is Technology Transfer? | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) facilitates partnerships between NIH research laboratories and external partners. With a team of technology transfer specialists, NCI TTC guides interactions from discovery to patenting, as well as from collaboration and invention development to licensing.

  9. Technology transfer 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    Technology Transfer 1995 is intended to inform the US industrial and academic sectors about the many opportunities they have to form partnerships with the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the mutual advantage of the individual institutions, DOE, and the nation as a whole. It also describes some of the growing number of remarkable achievements resulting from such partnerships. These partnership success stories offer ample evidence that Americans are learning how to work together to secure major benefits for the nation--by combining the technological, scientific, and human resources resident in national laboratories with those in industry and academia. The benefits include more and better jobs for Americans, improved productivity and global competitiveness for technology-based industries, and a more efficient government laboratory system.

  10. Evaluating Technology Transfer and Diffusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozeman, Barry; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Four articles discuss the evaluation of technology transfer and diffusion: (1) "Technology Transfer at the U.S. National Laboratories: A Framework for Evaluation"; (2) "Application of Social Psychological and Evaluation Research: Lessons from Energy Information Programs"; (3) "Technology and Knowledge Transfer in Energy R and D Laboratories: An…

  11. Dual Space Technology Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowbel, W.; Loutfy, R.

    2009-03-01

    Over the past fifteen years, MER has had several NASA SBIR Phase II programs in the area of space technology, based upon carbon-carbon (C-C) composites. In addition, in November 2004, leading edges supplied by MER provided the enabling technology to reach a Mach 10 record for an air breathing engine on the X-43 A flight. The MER business model constitutes a spin-off of technologies initially by incubating in house, and ultimately creating spin-off stand alone companies. FMC was formed to provide for technology transfer in the area of fabrication of C-C composites. FMC has acquired ISO 9000 and AS9100 quality certifications. FMC is fabricating under AS9100 certification, flight parts for several flight programs. In addition, FMC is expanding the application of carbon-carbon composites to several critical military programs. In addition to space technology transfer to critical military programs, FMC is becoming the world leader in the commercial area of low-cost C-C composites for furnace fixtures. Market penetrations have been accomplished in North America, Europe and Asia. Low-cost, quick turn-around and excellent quality of FMC products paves the way to greatly increased sales. In addition, FMC is actively pursuing a joint venture with a new partner, near closure, to become the leading supplier of high temperature carbon based composites. In addition, several other spin-off companies such as TMC, FiC, Li-Tech and NMIC were formed by MER with a plethora of potential space applications.

  12. Technology transfer of remote sensing technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    The basic philosophy and some current activities of MSFC Technology Transfer with regard to remote sensing technology are briefly reviewed. Among the problems that may be alleviated through such technology transfer are the scarcity of energy and mineral resources, the alteration of the environment by man, unpredictable natural disasters, and the effect of unanticipated climatic change on agricultural productivity.

  13. Technology transfer within the government

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, John

    1992-01-01

    The report of a workshop panel concerned with technology transfer within the government is presented. The presentation is made in vugraph form. The assigned subtopic for this panel are as follows: (1) transfer from non-NASA US government technology developers to NASA space missions/programs; and (2) transfer from NASA to other US government space mission programs. A specific area of inquiry was Technology Maturation Milestones. Three areas were investigated: technology development; advanced development; and flight hardware development.

  14. Technology Transfer Agents’ Perceptions of the Technology Transfer Process.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    Respondents were asked if they perceived an adequate communication network between technology transfer agents in keeping up to date with current information. In...an adequate communi- cations network between technology transfer agents in order to keep up-to-date with current information? Response: Yes: 38 (67...No: 19 (33%) TABLE 19 Question 19: Please indicate the methods most used by you to keep informed in the technology transfer field of latest

  15. Technology Transfer and the University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matkin, Gary W.

    The commercialization of university research and the growing importance of technology transfer is examined through discussing and comparing the history of technology transfer and its organization in four major American research universities: University of California, Berkley; Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Stanford University; and…

  16. Technology Transfer: A Policy Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    US foreign policy must support technology. A case in point: The Chinese are newly enlightened about some forms of economic develop- ment as the only...Directors of the National Technology Transfer Society. II TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER: A Policy Model Text and display type in Trade Gothic ; Title and half-title

  17. Search Technologies | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Our team of technology transfer specialists has specialized training in invention reporting, patenting, patent strategy, executing technology transfer agreements and marketing. TTC is comprised of professionals with diverse legal, scientific, and business/marketing expertise. Most of our staff hold doctorate-level technical and/or legal training.

  18. Available Technologies | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Our team of technology transfer specialists has specialized training in invention reporting, patenting, patent strategy, executing technology transfer agreements and marketing. TTC is comprised of professionals with diverse legal, scientific, and business/marketing expertise. Most of our staff hold doctorate-level technical and/or legal training.

  19. Technology transfer and Rockwell International

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernand, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    Two technology partnership models are presented for consideration. The first model posits a government buyer of technology, and the second model posits that the customer is the consumer of the technology. These two models are concerned with methods of and impediments to technology transfer and information dissemination in government/contractor relationships.

  20. Federal Technology Transfer Act Success Stories

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Successful Federal Technology Transfer Act (FTTA) partnerships demonstrate the many advantages of technology transfer and collaboration. EPA and partner organizations create valuable and applicable technologies for the marketplace.

  1. Technology utilization. [aerospace technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubokawa, C. C.

    1978-01-01

    NASA developed technologies were used to tackle problems associated with safety, transportation, industry, manufacturing, construction and state and local governments. Aerospace programs were responsible for more innovations for the benefit of mankind than those brought about by either major wars, or peacetime programs. Briefly outlined are some innovations for manned space flight, satellite surveillance applications, and pollution monitoring techniques.

  2. SHARED TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    GRIFFIN, JOHN M. HAUT, RICHARD C.

    2008-03-07

    The program established a collaborative process with domestic industries for the purpose of sharing Navy-developed technology. Private sector businesses were educated so as to increase their awareness of the vast amount of technologies that are available, with an initial focus on technology applications that are related to the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies (Hydrogen) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. Specifically, the project worked to increase industry awareness of the vast technology resources available to them that have been developed with taxpayer funding. NAVSEA-Carderock and the Houston Advanced Research Center teamed with Nicholls State University to catalog NAVSEA-Carderock unclassified technologies, rated the level of readiness of the technologies and established a web based catalog of the technologies. In particular, the catalog contains technology descriptions, including testing summaries and overviews of related presentations.

  3. Options for Technology Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Richard E.; Sugarman, Barry

    1989-01-01

    Structural means by which institutions of higher education can tap technology are explored with an examination of the licensing of technological discoveries as well as the creation of start-up companies based upon university-developed technology. Additionally, the corporate structures that are being formed so that institutions can more easily hold…

  4. The challenges of technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazelwood, J. N.

    1974-01-01

    Observations of challenges of technology transfer are presented with emphasis placed on the position of industry seeking technology through the media of technology searches. Factors considered are: (1) not-invented-here syndrome; (2) penetration of technological literature; (3) gap between origin and industry use; (4) large aerospace manufacturer vs. the small manufacturer; (5) link between the technology disseminator and the potential user; (6) feasibility of substitutions in terms of production costs; and (7) role of patents. It is shown that industry, government agencies, and others having technology to disseminate or use, must mutually understand the technology tools and translate to one another's capabilities, in order to profit from this national resource.

  5. Technology transfer: Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anyos, T.; Brown, I.; Lizak, R.; Loomis, A.; Wilhelm, J.

    1977-01-01

    The application of NASA derived technology in solving problems related to highways, railroads, and other rapid systems is described. Additional areas/are identified where space technology may be utilized to meet requirements related to waterways, law enforcement agencies, and the trucking and recreational vehicle industries.

  6. Technology transfer: Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anyos, T.; Christy, L.; Lizak, R.; Wilhelm, J.

    1978-01-01

    The successful application of aerospace technology to problems related to highways and rail and rapid transit systems is described with emphasis on the use of corrosion resistant paints, fire retardant materials, and law enforcement. Possible areas for the use of spinoff from NASA technology by the California State Department of Corrections are identified. These include drug detection, security and warning systems, and the transportation and storage of food. A communication system for emergency services is also described.

  7. Ethical Considerations in Technology Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froehlich, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    Examines ethical considerations involved in the transfer of appropriate information technology to less developed countries. Approaches to technology are considered; two philosophical frameworks for studying ethical considerations are discussed, i.e., the Kantian approach and the utilitarian perspective by John Stuart Mill; and integration of the…

  8. Understanding University Technology Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of American Universities, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Federal government agencies provide about $33 billion a year to universities to conduct scientific research. That continuing investment expands human knowledge and helps educate the next generation of science and technology leaders. New discoveries from university research also form the basis for many new products and processes that benefit the…

  9. Technology transfer-transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anyos, T.; Lizak, R.; Wilhelm, J.; Hirschberg, K.

    1974-01-01

    The application of aerospace technology to the solution of urban public transportation problems is considered. Data are given on highway and railway systems with particular attention given to safety devices, fuel economy, and measures for profiling railways and highways. The development of streamlined truck bodies, to reduce air drag, and efficient brake systems for light trucks and other vehicles was also dealt with.

  10. Technology transfer-transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anyos, T.; Lizak, R.; Wilhelm, J.

    1974-01-01

    Problems in the public transportation industry and refining methods for decreasing the time gap between the development and the marketing of new technology are considered. Eight NASA innovations are either being adapted for use on highways, railways, or rapid transit, or are already entering the marketplace. Chronologies for three of these programs are provided.

  11. Transporting values by technology transfer.

    PubMed

    De Castro, Leonardo D

    1997-01-01

    The introduction of new medical technologies into a developing country is usually greeted with enthusiasm as the possible benefits become an object of great anticipation and provide new hope for therapy or relief. The prompt utilization of new discoveries and inventions by a medical practitioner serves as a positive indicator of high standing in the professional community. But the transfer of medical technology also involves a transfer of concomitant values. There is a danger that, in the process of adopting a particular technology, the user takes for granted the general utility and desirability of the implements and procedures under consideration without recognizing the socio-cultural peculiarities of the adopting country. A sensitivity to the social conditions and cultural traditions is important so that the emergence of new values can be examined critically and the transfer of necessary technology can be effected smoothly. In the Philippines, efforts to boost patronage of transplant technology appear to have overlooked this need for socio-cultural sensitivity. Legislative fiat cannot be used to override deep-seated values. There is a need to be more sensitive to the possible confrontation of values that the transfer of technology brings in order to avoid the erosion of indigenous socio-cultural values and minimize the intrusiveness of beneficial medical technology.

  12. Technology transfer: Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anyos, T.; Lizak, R.; Merrifield, D.

    1973-01-01

    Standard Research Institute (SRI) has operated a NASA-sponsored team for four years. The SRI Team is concentrating on solving problems in the public transportation area and on developing methods for decreasing the time gap between the development and the marketing of new technology and for aiding the movement of knowledge across industrial, disciplinary, and regional boundaries. The SRI TAT has developed a methodology that includes adaptive engineering of the aerospace technology and commercialization when a market is indicated. The SRI Team has handled highway problems on a regional rather than a state basis, because many states in similar climatic or geologic regions have similar problems. Program exposure has been increased to encompass almost all of the fifty states.

  13. Lake restoration technology transfer assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Daschbach, M.H.; Roe, E.M.; Sharpe, W.E.

    1982-06-01

    Based upon a review of the eutrophication problem and its impact on lake restoration (LR) programs, treatment of the relatively new problem of acid deposition and its impact on LR activities, consideration of the LR programs of the Environmental Protection Agency and several states, and a review of individual LR technology transfer publications, it is recommended that new LR technology transfer programs be given a low priority until more new information is available on the restoration of acidified lakes. Both primary and secondary users of LR research, technology transfer documents, and public awareness documents were considered in this assessment. Primary users included the general public and recreationists, lakeshore property owners, lake/homeowner associations, lake/sanitary districts, and research and environmental organizations; secondary users included state/county/local officials who administer/manage water-related regulations/activities. 4 tables.

  14. Software engineering technology transfer: Understanding the process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelkowitz, Marvin V.

    1993-01-01

    Technology transfer is of crucial concern to both government and industry today. In this report, the mechanisms developed by NASA to transfer technology are explored and the actual mechanisms used to transfer software development technologies are investigated. Time, cost, and effectiveness of software engineering technology transfer is reported.

  15. Using bibliographic databases in technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, G. David

    1987-01-01

    When technology developed for a specific purpose is used in another application, the process is called technology transfer--the application of an existing technology to a new use or user for purposes other than those for which the technology was originally intended. Using Bibliographical Databases in Technology Transfer deals with demand-pull transfer, technology transfer that arises from need recognition, and is a guide for conducting demand-pull technology transfer studies. It can be used by a researcher as a self-teaching manual or by an instructor as a classroom text. A major problem of technology transfer is finding applicable technology to transfer. Described in detail is the solution to this problem, the use of computerized, bibliographic databases, which currently contain virtually all documented technology of the past 15 years. A general framework for locating technology is described. NASA technology organizations and private technology transfer firms are listed for consultation.

  16. Technology Transfer Plan

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    BPF developed the concept of a mobile, on-site NORM remediation and disposal process in late 1993. Working with Conoco and receiving encouragement born the Department of Energy, Metarie Office, and the Texas Railroad Commission the corporation conducted extensive feasibility studies on an on-site disposal concept. In May 1994, the Department of Energy issued a solicitation for cooperative agreement proposal for, "Development and Testing of a Method for Treatment and Underground Disposal of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)". BPF submitted a proposal to the solicitation in July 1994, and was awarded a cooperative agreement in September 1995. BPF proposed and believed that proven equipment and technology could be incorporated in to a mobile system. The system would allow BPF to demonstrate an environmentally sound and commercially affordable method for treatment and underground disposal of NORM. The key stop in the BPF process incorporates injection of the dissolved radioactive materials into a water injection or disposal well. Disposal costs in the BPF proposal of July 1995 were projected to range from $1000 to $5000 per cubic yard. The process included four separate steps. (1) De-oiling (2) Volume Reduction (3) Chemical Dissolution of the Radium (4) Injection

  17. Innovative Technology Transfer Partnerships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohler, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) seeks to license its Advanced Tire and Strut Pressure Monitor (TSPM) technology. The TSPM is a handheld system to accurately measure tire and strut pressure and temperature over a wide temperature range (20 to 120 OF), as well as improve personnel safety. Sensor accuracy, electronics design, and a simple user interface allow operators quick, easy access to required measurements. The handheld electronics, powered by 12-VAC or by 9-VDC batteries, provide the user with an easy-to-read visual display of pressure/temperature or the streaming of pressure/temperature data via an RS-232 interface. When connected to a laptop computer, this new measurement system can provide users with automated data recording and trending, eliminating the chance for data hand-recording errors. In addition, calibration software allows for calibration data to be automatically utilized for the generation of new data conversion equations, simplifying the calibration processes that are so critical to reliable measurements. The design places a high-accuracy pressure sensor (also used as a temperature sensor) as close to the tire or strut measurement location as possible, allowing the user to make accurate measurements rapidly, minimizing the amount of high-pressure volumes, and allowing reasonable distance between the tire or strut and the operator. The pressure sensor attaches directly to the pressure supply/relief valve on the tire and/or strut, with necessary electronics contained in the handheld enclosure. A software algorithm ensures high accuracy of the device over the wide temperature range. Using the pressure sensor as a temperature sensor permits measurement of the actual temperature of the pressurized gas. This device can be adapted to create a portable calibration standard that does not require thermal conditioning. This allows accurate pressure measurements without disturbing the gas temperature. In-place calibration can save

  18. Expediting technology transfer with multimedia

    SciTech Connect

    Cambel, A.B.; Mock, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    Sociopolitical realities and changes in the economic structure demand that new products and processes by brought to the market place that will create new demands and hence generate well-paying jobs. Fortunately it is not necessary to rely entirely on new research and development (R&D) because a wide variety of prototypes have been developed in our National Laboratories. Thus, the latter could be spawning grounds for a wide variety of commercialization initiatives. Unfortunately, this is not occurring with sufficient alacrity because the existing technology transfer apparatus suffers from communications lethargy. As a corollary our National Laboratories are in jeopardy of atrophying because their defense functions are being reduced. They were built at great costs, sophisticated facilities were created and cadres of renowned researchers were nurtured. They should be preserved for a variety of reasons. In this article we describe how recent information technologies commonly called multimedia and virtual reality could be applied to expedite the technology transfer from the National Laboratories to the commercial sector. We first review major characteristics of technology transfer. Then we comment on why traditional approaches are unlikely to be successful. Finally, we propose a technological approach that can be put in place with minimum cost and effort because the basic components and techniques already exist. 15 refs.

  19. Technology Transfer: A Contact Sport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paynter, Nina P.

    1995-01-01

    Technology transfer is a dynamic process, involving dynamic people as the bridge between NASA Langley Research Center and the outside world. This bridge, for nonaerospace applications, is known as the Technology Applications Group. The introduction of new innovations and expertise where they are needed occurs through a 'push' and 'pull' process. A 'push' occurs when a new technology is first developed with high commercial potential and then a company is found to licence or further develop the technology. The 'pull' process occurs through problem statements. A company or group will submit a written statement of what they need and the shortcomings of commercially available technology. The Technology Transfer Team (T3) reviews these problem statements and decides where NASA LaRC can offer assistance. A researcher or group of researchers are then identified who can help solve the problem and they are put in contact with the company. Depending upon the situation in either method, a Space Act Agreement (SAA), or outline of the responsibilities for each party, is developed.

  20. ICAT and the NASA technology transfer process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rifkin, Noah; Tencate, Hans; Watkins, Alison

    1993-01-01

    This paper will address issues related to NASA's technology transfer process and will cite the example of using ICAT technologies in educational tools. The obstacles to effective technology transfer will be highlighted, viewing the difficulties in achieving successful transfers of ICAT technologies.

  1. NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute’s Technology Transfer Center (TTC) facilitates partnerships between the NIH research laboratories and external partners. With specialized teams, TTC guides the interactions of our partners from the point of discovery to patenting, from invention development to licensing. We play a key role in helping to accelerate development of cutting-edge research by connecting our partners to NIH’s world-class researchers, facilities, and knowledge.

  2. EPA Reports to Congress on Technology Transfer

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Agencies are required to report to the Congress annually on their technology transfer activities. These reports summarize technology transfer activities of the EPA’s federal laboratories, by fiscal year.

  3. The human element in technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peake, H. J.

    1978-01-01

    A transfer model composed of three roles and their linkages was considered. This model and a growing body of experience was analyzed to provide guidance in the human elements of technology transfer. For example, criteria for selection of technology transfer agents was described, and some needed working climate factors were known. These concepts were successfully applied to transfer activities.

  4. Strategic directions and mechanisms in technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackin, Robert

    1992-01-01

    An outline summarizing the Working Panel discussion related to strategic directions for technology transfer is presented. Specific topics addressed include measuring success, management of technology, innovation and experimentation in the tech transfer process, integration of tech transfer into R&D planning, institutionalization of tech transfer, and policy/legislative resources.

  5. Geo energy research and development: technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Traeger, R.K.

    1982-03-01

    Sandia Geo Energy Programs related to geothermal, coal, oil and gas, and synfuel resources have provided a useful mechanism for transferring laboratory technologies to private industry. Significant transfer of hardware, computer programs, diagnostics and instrumentation, advanced materials, and in situ process understanding has occurred through US/DOE supported programs in the past five years. The text briefly reviews the technology transfer procedures and summarizes 32 items that have been transferred and another 20 technologies that are now being considered for possible transfer to industry. A major factor in successful transfer has been personal interactions between Sandia engineers and the technical staff from private industry during all aspects of the technology development.

  6. Technology transfer: a review for biomedical researchers.

    PubMed

    Kneller, R

    2001-04-01

    Why is technology transfer important for cancer and other biomedical researchers? What do biomedical researchers need to know about technology transfer? This report will address these questions in the context of the United States technology transfer system, which is now approximately 20 years old. To accomplish this goal, this report first summarizes the importance of technology transfer and the role of intellectual property rights. Then it describes the sequential steps in technology transfer from universities to industry. Next, it describes technology transfer from the NIH intramural laboratories and other federal laboratories to industry. Finally, it describes unique aspects of technology transfer involving clinical trials. URL citations to the latest federal guidelines and regulations governing technology transfer are provided. Where appropriate, comparisons will be made with technology transfer systems in other countries. I hope that this step-by-step description of the technology transfer process will enable cancer researchers to play a more proactive role in this process and thus increase the likelihood that their discoveries will be successfully commercialized. I also hope that this report will assist such researchers to understand the policy and institutional considerations that underlie current debates concerning technology transfer.

  7. Colorado Technology Transfer Plan for Economic Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Advanced Tech. Inst., Denver.

    Recognizing the importance of technology transfer to economic growth, the U.S. Economic Development Administration (EDA) provided the Colorado Advanced Technology Institute (CATI) with a grant to coordinate the development of a plan for using technology transfer in Colorado's economic development. The plan, outlined in this report, describes the…

  8. FY 2004 Technology Transfer Network and Affiliations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Innovative Partnerships Program sponsors a number of organizations around the country that are designed to assist U.S. businesses in accessing, utilizing, and commercializing NASA-funded research and technology. These organizations work closely with the Technology Transfer Offices, located at each of the 10 NASA field centers, providing a full range of technology transfer and commercialization services and assistance.

  9. Evolution of technology transfer in Latin America

    SciTech Connect

    Kahl, L.F. )

    1989-07-01

    The author discusses how Latin American countries have grown up buying technology, transferring technology from more developed nations, and attempting to adapt it to their own countries for their own environment. Although this is the approach that was and is necessary, there are still some shortfalls that have occurred in the process of licensing and acquisition of technology. Governments around the world also have had powerful impacts on technology transfer. Those in Latin America are no exception.

  10. Nonaerospace uses of JPL technology: a report on technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-09-01

    This report examines various nonaerospace applications of JPL technology. JPL has developed and applied a number of models for the effective transfer of space technology to uses in the public and private sector. Successful technology transfers were achieved in the following areas: chromosome analysis mass spectrometry manufacturing cost prediction gas detection by lasers blood substitutes ultrasound imaging composite materials and detonation and flame arresters.

  11. Technology transfer to a developing nation, Korea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, C. A.; Uccetta, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental project is reported which was undertaken. to determine if selected types of technology developed for the aerospace program during the past decade are relevant to specific industrial problems of a developing nation and to test whether a structured program could facilitate the transfer of relevant technologies. The Korea Institute of Science and Technology and the IIT Research Institute were selected as the active transfer agents to participate in the program. The pilot project was based upon the approach to the transfer of domestic technology developed by the NASA Technology Utilization Division and utilized the extensive data and technical resources available through the Space Agency and its contractors. This pilot project has helped to clarify some aspects of the international technology transfer process and to upgrade Korean technological capabilities.

  12. Technology transfer: The winds of change

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhury, A.

    1994-12-31

    This talk will present a historical perspective of the legislation that facilitated technology transfer from the federal laboratory system, especially with reference to CRADAs. Some of the recently proposed legislation that could potentially impact these intellectual property provisions of GATT and NAFTA will be discussed. An overview of Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc.`s technology transfer activities will also be presented.

  13. 48 CFR 970.2770 - Technology Transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Technology Transfer. 970.2770 Section 970.2770 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Patents, Data, and Copyrights 970.2770 Technology Transfer....

  14. 48 CFR 970.2770 - Technology Transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Technology Transfer. 970.2770 Section 970.2770 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Patents, Data, and Copyrights 970.2770 Technology Transfer....

  15. 48 CFR 970.2770 - Technology Transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Technology Transfer. 970.2770 Section 970.2770 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Patents, Data, and Copyrights 970.2770 Technology Transfer....

  16. 48 CFR 970.2770 - Technology Transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Technology Transfer. 970.2770 Section 970.2770 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Patents, Data, and Copyrights 970.2770 Technology Transfer....

  17. 48 CFR 970.2770 - Technology Transfer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Technology Transfer. 970.2770 Section 970.2770 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Patents, Data, and Copyrights 970.2770 Technology Transfer....

  18. Technology transfer to the broader economy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, Gordon; Clark, Robert

    1992-01-01

    Approaches to the transfer of government-funded civil space technology to the broader commercial economy were addressed by Working Panel no. 4. Some of the problems related to current strategies for technology transfer and recommendations for new approaches are described in outline form.

  19. Technology transfer at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.

    1992-09-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is dedicated to commercializing new technology in such fields as advanced materials, biotechnology, and electronics. Technology transfer between national laboratories and the industrial community is important in maintaining America's competitive edge. This document examines opportunities to establish working relationships with LBL. Streamlined methods for technology transfer are available with the aid of the Technology Transfer Department and the Patent Department at LBL. Research activities at LBL are concentrated in three major program areas: Energy Sciences, General Sciences, and Biosciences. Each program area consists of three research divisions. LBL welcomes both requests for information and proposals to conduct research.

  20. Technology transfer at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.

    1992-09-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is dedicated to commercializing new technology in such fields as advanced materials, biotechnology, and electronics. Technology transfer between national laboratories and the industrial community is important in maintaining America`s competitive edge. This document examines opportunities to establish working relationships with LBL. Streamlined methods for technology transfer are available with the aid of the Technology Transfer Department and the Patent Department at LBL. Research activities at LBL are concentrated in three major program areas: Energy Sciences, General Sciences, and Biosciences. Each program area consists of three research divisions. LBL welcomes both requests for information and proposals to conduct research.

  1. Maximizing profits in international technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straube, W.

    1974-01-01

    Maximum profit can be introduced into international technology transfer by observing the following: (1) ethical and open dealing between the parties; (2) maximum knowledge of all facts concerning the technology, the use of the technology, the market, competition, prices, and alternatives; (3) ability to coordinate exports, service, support activities, licensing and cross licensing; and (4) knowledgeable people which put these factors together.

  2. A case history of technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A sequence of events, occurring over the last 25 years, are described that chronicle the evolution of ion-bombardment electric propulsion technology. Emphasis is placed on the latter phases of this evolution, where special efforts were made to pave the way toward the use of this technology in operational space flight systems. These efforts consisted of a planned program to focus the technology toward its end applications and an organized process that was followed to transfer the technology from the research-technology NASA Center to the user-development NASA Center and its industry team. Major milestones in this evolution, which are described, include the development of thruster technology across a large size range, the successful completion of two space electric rocket tests, SERT I and SERT II, development of power-processing technology for electric propulsion, completion of a program to make the technology ready for flight system development, and finally the technology transfer events.

  3. Biomedical technology transfer applications of NASA science and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The identification and solution of research and clinical problems in cardiovascular medicine which were investigated by means of biomedical data transfer are reported. The following are sample areas that were focused upon by the Stanford University Biomedical Technology Transfer Team: electrodes for hemiplegia research; vectorcardiogram computer analysis; respiration and phonation electrodes; radiotelemetry of intracranial pressure; and audiotransformation of the electrocardiographic signal. It is concluded that this biomedical technology transfer is significantly aiding present research in cardiovascular medicine.

  4. Technology transfer within the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plotkin, Henry H.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on technology transfer within the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center presented to Civil Space Technology Development workshop on technology transfer and effectiveness are provided. Topics covered include: obstacles to technology transfer; technology transfer improvement program at GSFC: communication between technology developers and users; and user feedback to technologists.

  5. Risk Management in Biologics Technology Transfer.

    PubMed

    Toso, Robert; Tsang, Jonathan; Xie, Jasmina; Hohwald, Stephen; Bain, David; Willison-Parry, Derek

    Technology transfer of biological products is a complex process that is important for product commercialization. To achieve a successful technology transfer, the risks that arise from changes throughout the project must be managed. Iterative risk analysis and mitigation tools can be used to both evaluate and reduce risk. The technology transfer stage gate model is used as an example tool to help manage risks derived from both designed process change and unplanned changes that arise due to unforeseen circumstances. The strategy of risk assessment for a change can be tailored to the type of change. In addition, a cross-functional team and centralized documentation helps maximize risk management efficiency to achieve a successful technology transfer.

  6. A Board's Primer on Technology Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remington, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    Provides an overview of technology transfer issues and discusses ways in which trustees can help ensure that academic mission is balanced with valuable opportunities for taking campus research to the marketplace. (EV)

  7. [Technology transfer of building materials by ECOMAT

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This report discusses the plan for technology transfer of building materials developed by ECOMAT to the commercial private sector. Some of the materials are briefly discussed like foams, fiber reinforcement, fly ash development, and polymer fillers.

  8. Technology transfer from the viewpoint of a NASA prime contractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, Gordon

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on technology transfer from the viewpoint of a NASA prime contractor are provided. Technology Transfer Program for Manned Space Systems and the Technology Transfer Program status are addressed.

  9. EPA's Technology Transfer: Now Geared to Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Through capsule reports, seminars, and design manuals, Environmental Protection Agency has activated its industrial technology transfer program for marketing the products of federal research, development, and demonstration activities. Its purpose is to disseminate information to industry on available technology for control and treatment of air,…

  10. Technology Transfer: A Third World Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akubue, Anthony I.

    2002-01-01

    Technology transfer models are based on assumptions that do not reflect Third-World realities. Obstacles to building indigenous technology capacity include multinational corporations' control of innovations, strings attached to foreign aid, and indigenous reluctance to undertake research. Four areas of development include foreign direct…

  11. Transfer of space technology to industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    Some of the most significant applications of the NASA aerospace technology transfer to industry and other government agencies are briefly outlined. The technology utilization program encompasses computer programs for structural problems, life support systems, fuel cell development, and rechargeable cardiac pacemakers as well as reliability and quality research for oil recovery operations and pollution control.

  12. NASA partnership with industry: Enhancing technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Recognizing the need to accelerate and expand the application of NASA-derived technology for other civil uses in the United States, potential opportunities were assessed; the range of benefits to NASA, industry and the nations were explored; public policy implications were assessed; and this new range of opportunities were related to current technology transfer programs of NASA.

  13. Technology Transfer Through Student-Faculty Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griskey, Richard G.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses two programs undertaken at engineering colleges in an attempt to transmit technology information from the body of knowledge to the potential users, especially small and medium sized companies. Concludes that the university mission can be partly fulfilled through the technology transfer program. (CC)

  14. Join TTC! | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) offers a unique opportunity for training through the NCI TTC Fellowship program. TTC also has a unit dedicated to marketing these research opportunities and their underlying technologies to potential collaborators and licensees. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  15. The process for technology transfer in Baltimore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, T. S.

    1978-01-01

    Ingredients essential for a successful decision process relative to proper technological choices for a large city were determined during four years of experience in the NASA/Baltimore Applications Project. The general approach, rationale, and process of technology transfer are discussed.

  16. Development of Technology Transfer Economic Growth Metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastrangelo, Christina M.

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this project is to determine the feasibility of producing technology transfer metrics that answer the question: Do NASA/MSFC technical assistance activities impact economic growth? The data for this project resides in a 7800-record database maintained by Tec-Masters, Incorporated. The technology assistance data results from survey responses from companies and individuals who have interacted with NASA via a Technology Transfer Agreement, or TTA. The goal of this project was to determine if the existing data could provide indications of increased wealth. This work demonstrates that there is evidence that companies that used NASA technology transfer have a higher job growth rate than the rest of the economy. It also shows that the jobs being supported are jobs in higher wage SIC codes, and this indicates improvements in personal wealth. Finally, this work suggests that with correct data, the wealth issue may be addressed.

  17. Targeted Technology Transfer to US Independents

    SciTech Connect

    Donald F. Duttlinger; E. Lance Cole

    2006-09-29

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) was established by domestic crude oil and natural gas producers in 1994 as a national not-for-profit organization to address the increasingly urgent need to improve the technology-transfer process in the U.S. upstream petroleum industry. Coordinated from a Headquarters (HQ) office in Houston, PTTC maintains an active grassroots program executed by 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and two satellite offices (Figure 1). Regional Directors interact with domestic oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, technical publications and cooperative outreach efforts. HQ facilitates inter-regional technology transfer and implements a comprehensive communications program. Active volunteers on the National Board and in Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs) in each of the 10 regions focus effort in areas that will create the most impact for domestic producers. Focused effort by dedicated individuals across the country has enabled PTTC to achieve the milestones outlined in Appendix A.

  18. Environmental Cleanup Technology Transfer Initiatives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    8. Contact Names Daniel Powell, EPA-TIO Wash DC 703-308-8827 Ellen Fitzpatrick, Clean Sites, Inc. 703-739-1262 Bud Hoda, McClellan AFB, CA 916-643...EPA 916-322-3294 Stacey Lupton , PRC 415-222-8245 Dana Sakamoto, Navy SWDiv 619-532-3964 Peter Wood, Cal Toxic Control Bd, tech transfer 916-255-2012...ENVIRONMENTAL MGMT / LUPTON , SAN FRANCISCO, CA; BRODERSON, SAN FRANCISCO, CA PRC INC / WALSH, SAN DIEGO, CA PWC GUAM / EBEL, SANTA RITA, PWC/EFA GREAT LAKES

  19. Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing Technology Transfer and Training Initiative (ECMT3I) Technology Transfer Model Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM.

    The Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing Technology Transfer and Training Initiative (ECMT3I) is a cooperative effort among education and research institutions in New Mexico to analyze problems in transferring environmental technologies from Department of Energy laboratories to small and medium enterprises (SME's). The goal of the ECMT3I is to…

  20. A regional technology transfer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The final report is presented for the North Carolina Science and Technology Research Center's 14th consecutive contract period as a NASA Industrial Applications Center, serving the information needs of nine Southeastern states. Included in the report are figures for and analysis of marketing efforts, file usage, search delivered, and other services performed for clients; and information on staff changes, workshops, and special projects in 1978. An appendix contains copies of NC/STRC magazine advertisements, letters from clients, and supplementary information on NC/STRC staff and services.

  1. Technology Transfer and Commercialization Annual Report 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Michelle R. Blacker

    2008-12-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a Department of Energy (DOE) multi-program national laboratory that conducts research and development in all DOE mission areas. Like all other federal laboratories, INL has a statutory, technology transfer mission to make its capabilities and technologies available to all federal agencies, to state and local governments, and to universities and industry. To fulfill this mission, INL encourages its scientific, engineering, and technical staff to disclose new inventions and creations to ensure the resulting intellectual property is captured, protected, and made available to others who might benefit from it. As part of the mission, intellectual property is licensed to industrial partners for commercialization, creating jobs and delivering the benefits of federally funded technology to consumers. In other cases, unique capabilities are made available to other federal agencies or to regional small businesses to solve specific technical challenges. In other interactions, INL employees work cooperatively with researchers and other technical staff of our partners to further develop emerging technologies. This report is a catalog of selected INL technology transfer and commercialization transactions during this past year. The size and diversity of INL technical resources, coupled with the large number of relationships with other organizations, virtually ensures that a report of this nature will fail to capture all interactions. Recognizing this limitation, this report focuses on transactions that are specifically authorized by technology transfer legislation (and corresponding contractual provisions) or involve the transfer of legal rights to technology to other parties. This report was compiled from primary records, which were readily available to the INL’s Office of Technology Transfer & Commercialization. The accomplishments cataloged in the report, however, reflect the achievements and creativity of the highly skilled researchers

  2. Formal methods technology transfer: Some lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, David

    1992-01-01

    IBM has a long history in the application of formal methods to software development and verification. There have been many successes in the development of methods, tools and training to support formal methods. And formal methods have been very successful on several projects. However, the use of formal methods has not been as widespread as hoped. This presentation summarizes several approaches that have been taken to encourage more widespread use of formal methods, and discusses the results so far. The basic problem is one of technology transfer, which is a very difficult problem. It is even more difficult for formal methods. General problems of technology transfer, especially the transfer of formal methods technology, are also discussed. Finally, some prospects for the future are mentioned.

  3. Clean Cast Steel Technology - Machinability and Technology Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    C. E. Bates; J. A. Griffin

    2000-05-01

    There were two main tasks in the Clean Cast Steel Technology - Machinability and Technology Transfer Project. These were (1) determine the processing facts that control the machinability of cast steel and (2) determine the ability of ladle stirring to homogenize ladle temperature, reduce the tap and pouring temperatures, and reduce casting scrap.

  4. Transferring technology to the public sector.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alper, M. E.

    1972-01-01

    Approximately four years ago the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, under NASA sponsorship, began to devote some of its resources to examining ways to transfer space technology to the civil sector. As experience accumulated under this program, certain principles basic to success in technology transfer became apparent. An adequate definition of each problem must be developed before any substantial effort is expended on a solution. In most instances, a source of funds other than the potential user is required to support the problem definition phase of the work. Sensitivity to the user's concerns and effective interpersonal communications between the user and technical personnel are essential to success.

  5. Technology transfer at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.S.; Arvizu, D.E.

    1993-10-01

    Transferring technology to the private sector to help improve the competitiveness of key US industries is now an official mission of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) defense program national laboratories. We believe that national laboratories can play an important role in addressing US industrial competitiveness. Sandia is seeking to match laboratory strengths with industry-defined market needs in targeted industrial sectors. Sandia, like other national and federal laboratories, is developing an aggressive technology transfer program. This paper provides a brief review of our program and provides a snap-shot of where we are at today.

  6. PNNL wins Four Technology Transfer Awards

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Julie A.; McMakin, Andrea H.

    2006-06-01

    PNNL wins 4 Technology Transfer Awards Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has received four 2006 Excellence in Technology Transfer Awards from the Federal Laboratory Consortium - a nationwide network of more than 700 major federal laboratories and centers as well as their parent departments and agencies that provides a forum to develop strategies and opportunities for linking technology with the mission and the marketplace. The FLC presents its Awards for Excellence in Technology Transfer to federal laboratory employees who have done outstanding work in transferring U.S. government-sponsored technologies to the public and private sectors. Since 1984, when the awards program was established, Pacific Northwest has earned 62 of these awards, far more than any other national laboratory. This year, PNNL won all four of the nominations that were submitted--the most that any laboratory can submit. PNNL was recognized for transferring technologies that treat and cure cancer, uniquely analyze massive sets of data, increase surgical implant success rates, and neutralize toxic chemicals from the environment. Through collaboration with PNNL researchers and access to facilities at PNNL, IsoRay Medical, Inc. (http://www.isoray.com), expanded its brachytherapy technology for treating prostate and other cancers. The medical isotope ?seed? products are available at more than 17 implant centers nationwide. More than 40 organizations, including Fortune 500 companies, are using the Starlight information visualization software to mine and interpret massive amounts of data. Bacterin International licensed bioactive thin-film coatings which reduce infection rates associated with surgical implants. Self-Assembled Monolayers on Mesoporous Silica (SAMMS), a process for removing mercury and other toxic chemicals from the environment, was licensed to Steward Advanced Materials for use in coal-fired power plants, municipal incinerators, and other plants.

  7. Technology transfer trends in Indian space programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhara Murthi, K. R.; Shoba, T. S.

    2010-10-01

    Indian space programme, whose objectives involve acceleration of economic and social development through applications of space technology, has been engaged in the development of state-of-the-art satellite systems, launch vehicles and equipment necessary for applications. Even during the early phase of evolution of this Programme, deliberate policies have been adopted by the national space agency, namely, Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), to promote spin-off benefit from the technologies developed for the use of space projects. Consistently adhering to this policy, ISRO has transferred over 280 technologies till date, spanning a wide spectrum of disciplines. This has resulted in a fruitful two-way cooperation between a number of SMEs and the ISRO. In order to make the technology transfer process effective, ISRO has adopted a variety of functional and organizational policies that included awareness building measures, licensee selection methods, innovative contract systems, diverse transfer processes, post licencing services and feedback mechanisms. Besides analyzing these policies and their evolution, the paper discusses various models adopted for technology transfer and their impact on assessment. It also touches upon relevant issues relating to creating interface between public funded R&D and the private commercial enterprises. It suggests few models in which international cooperation could be pursued in this field.

  8. Technology Transfer Annual Report Fiscal Year 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Wendy Lee

    2015-12-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a Department of Energy (DOE) multi-program national laboratory that conducts research and development in all DOE mission areas. Like all other federal laboratories, INL has a statutory, technology transfer mission to make its capabilities and technologies available to federal agencies, state and local governments, universities, and industry. To fulfill this mission, INL encourages its scientific, engineering, and technical staff to disclose new inventions and creations to ensure the resulting intellectual property is captured, protected, and available to others who might benefit from it. As part of the mission, intellectual property is licensed to industrial partners for commercialization, job creation, and delivering the benefits of federally funded technology to consumers. In some cases, unique capabilities are made available to other federal agencies, international organizations, domestic and foreign commercial entities, or small businesses to solve specific technical challenges. INL employees work cooperatively with researchers and technical staff from the university and industrial sectors to further development of emerging technologies. In this multinational global economy, INL is contributing to the development of the next generation of engineers and scientists by licensing software to educational institutions throughout the world. This report is a catalog of select INL technology transfer and commercialization transactions and research agreements that were executed during this past year. The size and diversity of INL technical resources, coupled with the large number of relationships with other organizations, virtually ensures that a report of this nature will fail to capture all interactions. Recognizing this limitation, this report focuses on transactions that are specifically authorized by technology transfer legislation (and corresponding contractual provisions) or involve the transfer of legal rights to technology to

  9. Resources in Support of Technology Transfer: A Selective Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanne, Daniel; Zeller, Martin

    1994-01-01

    Describes electronic resources to support the technology transfer process. Resources are organized in the following categories: Research Facility Directories; Technology Transfer Contacts; Research and Laboratory Information Systems; Federal Government Databases and Information Systems; Aerospace, Technology, and Defence Databases; New Products…

  10. Technology transfer needs and experiences: The NASA Research Center perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on technology transfer needs and experiences - the NASA Research Center perspective are provided. Topics covered include: functions of NASA, incentives and benefits, technology transfer mechanisms, economics of technology commercialization, examples, and conclusions.

  11. 48 CFR 970.5227-3 - Technology transfer mission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., technology transfer, including Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs), is established as a... of technology transfer or research and development, including without limitation evaluation, and... the requirements for an Office of Research and Technology Applications (ORTA) pursuant to...

  12. License Agreements | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Since the government cannot engage in the development, manufacture, and sale of products, the NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) makes its discoveries (and discoveries from nine other NIH Institutes) available to organizations that can assist in the further development and commercialization of these basic science discoveries, to convert them into public health benefits. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  13. About TTC | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute’s Technology Transfer Center (TTC) facilitates partnerships between the NIH research laboratories and external partners, and helping to accelerate development of cutting-edge research by connecting our partners to NIH’s world-class facilities, resources, and discoveries. Contact us to learn more. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  14. A New Strategic Approach to Technology Transfer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The principal goal of Federal research and development (R&D) is to solve problems for public benefit. Technology transfer, innovation, entrepreneurship: words and concepts that once belonged exclusively in the domain of private research enterprises, have quickly become part of everyday lexicon in Fe...

  15. Technology transfer hub for pandemic influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Friede, M; Serdobova, I; Palkonyay, L; Kieny, M P

    2009-01-29

    Increase of influenza vaccine production capacity in developing countries has been identified as an important element of global pandemic preparedness. Nevertheless, technology transfer for influenza vaccine production to developing country vaccine manufacturers has proven difficult because of lack of interested technology providers. As an alternative to an individual provider-recipient relationship, a technology and training platform (a "hub") for a generic non-proprietary process was established at a public sector European manufacturer's site. The conditions for setting up such a platform and the potential applicability of this model to other biologicals are discussed.

  16. Earth Resources Laboratory technology transfer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estess, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    The approach to the transfer of satellite remote sensing technology used at the National Space Technology Laboratories'/Earth Resources Laboratory represents an effective program for the assigned area and is composed of demonstrations; a comprehensive in-house training program; user awareness activities (brochures, slide sets, and documentation); university short courses to stimulate university capabilities; and a technical awareness effort aimed at providing the states with consultation in the areas of hardware/software systems and advice on specific applications. Particular focus is on the transfer of LANDSAT technology in the context of geobased information system development, as well as on how the states approach the problem of institutionalizing the capabilities. The status of demonstration projects and of the state LANDSAT geographic information systems is examined.

  17. Applications of aerospace technology in industry. A technology transfer profile: Food technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, D. M.

    1971-01-01

    Food processing and preservation technologies are reviewed, expected technological advances are considered including processing and market factors. NASA contributions to food technology and nutrition are presented with examples of transfer from NASA to industry.

  18. Welding technology. [technology transfer of NASA developments to commercial organizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Welding processes which have been developed during NASA space program activities are discussed. The subjects considered are: (1) welding with an electron gun, (2) technology of welding special alloys, and (3) welding shop techniques and equipment. The material presented is part of the combined efforts of NASA and the Small Business Administration to provide technology transfer of space-related developments to the benefit of commercial organizations.

  19. Technology Transfer Materials--Are We Learning the Technology of Transfer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velasco, M. R.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Makes recommendations for improving the written documents used for technology transfer: (1) focus on document purpose; (2) raise awareness of design aspects of good communication; and (3) evaluate at all stages of production with input from the target group. (SK)

  20. Technology transfer in the national laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Yonas, G.

    1991-08-01

    The title of this paper might unfairly provoke readers if it conjures up visions of vast stores of high-tech gadgets in several hundred technology warehouses'' (also known as federal laboratories) around the country, open for browsing by those in search of a bargain. That vision, unfortunately, is a mirage. The term technology transfer'' is not really as accurate as is the term technology team-work,'' a process of sharing ideas and knowledge rather than widgets. In addition, instead of discussing the efforts of more than 700 federal labs in the US, I mean to address only those nine government-owned, contractor-operated multiprogram labs run by the Department of Energy. Nevertheless, the topic of technology team-work opportunities with DOE multiprogram national lab is of significance to those concerned with increasing economic competitiveness and finding technological solutions to a host of national problems. A significant fraction of US R D capabilities rests in the nine DOE multiprogram national laboratories -- and these labs have only just begun to join the other federal laboratories in these efforts due to the passage and recent implementation of the National Competitiveness Technology Transfer Act of 1989.

  1. Aerospace technology transfer to breast cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winfield, Daniel L.

    In the United States in 1996, an estimated 44,560 women died of breast cancer, and 184,300 new cases were diagnosed. Advances in space technology are now making significant improvements in the imaging technologies used in managing this important foe. The first of these spinoffs, a digital spot mammography system used to perform stereotactic fine-needle breast biopsy, uses a backside-thinned CCD developed originally for the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrometer. This paper describes several successful biomedical applications which have resulted from collaborative technology transfer programs between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and the U. S. Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health (OWH). These programs have accelerated the introduction of direct digital mammography by two years. In follow-on work, RTI is now assisting the HHS Office on Women's Health to identify additional opportunities for transfer of aerospace, defense, and intelligence technologies to image-guided detection, diagnosis, and treatment of breast cancer. The technology identification and evaluation effort culminated in a May 1997 workshop, and the formative technology development partnerships are discussed.

  2. Aerospace technology transfer to breast cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Winfield, D L

    1997-01-01

    In the United States in 1996, an estimated 44,560 women died of breast cancer, and 184,300 new cases were diagnosed. Advances in space technology are now making significant improvements in the imaging technologies used in managing this important foe. The first of these spinoffs, a digital spot mammography system used to perform stereotactic fine-needle breast biopsy, uses a backside-thinned CCD developed originally for the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrometer. This paper describes several successful biomedical applications which have resulted from collaborative technology transfer programs between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health (OWH). These programs have accelerated the introduction of direct digital mammography by two years. In follow-on work, RTI is now assisting the HHS Office on Women's Health to identify additional opportunities for transfer of aerospace, defense, and intelligence technologies to image-guided detection, diagnosis, and treatment of breast cancer. The technology identification and evaluation effort culminated in a May 1997 workshop, and the formative technology development partnerships are discussed.

  3. MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    As part of the MHD Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) project, TRW was given the responsibility to organize, charter and co-chair, with the Department of Energy (DOE), an MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee (TTIRC). The Charter of the TTIRC, which was approved by the DOE in June 1988 and distributed to the committee members, is included as part of this Summary. As stated in the Charter, the purpose of this committee is to: (1) review all Proof-of-Concept (POC) projects and schedules in the national MHD program; to assess their compatibility with each other and the first commercial MHD retrofit plant; (2) establish and implement technology transfer formats for users of this technology; (3) identify interfaces, issues, and funding structures directly impacting the success of the commercial retrofit; (4) investigate and identify the manner in which, and by whom, the above should be resolved; and (5) investigate and assess other participation (foreign and domestic) in the US MHD Program. The DOE fiscal year 1989 MHD Program Plan Schedule is included at the end of this Summary. The MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee's activities to date have focused primarily on the technology transfer'' aspects of its charter. It has provided a forum for the dissemination of technical and programmatic information among workers in the field of MHD and to the potential end users, the utilities, by holding semi-annual meetings. The committee publishes this semi-annual report, which presents in Sections 2 through 11 capsule summaries of technical progress for all DOE Proof-of-Concept MHD contracts and major test facilities.

  4. Communication and Cultural Change in University Technology Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, David

    2013-01-01

    Faculty culture and communication networks are pivotal components of technology transfer on university campuses. Universities are focused upon diffusing technology to external clients and upon building structure and support systems to enhance technology transfer. However, engaging faculty members in technology transfer requires an internal…

  5. Urban development applications project. Urban technology transfer study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Technology transfer is defined along with reasons for attempting to transfer technology. Topics discussed include theoretical models, stages of the innovation model, communication process model, behavior of industrial organizations, problem identification, technology search and match, establishment of a market mechanism, applications engineering, commercialization, and management of technology transfer.

  6. Using the MCPLXS Generator for Technology Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Arlene A.; Dean, Edwin B.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to acquaint you with some of the approaches we are taking at Langley to incorporate escalations (or de-escalations) of technology when modeling futuristic systems. Since we have a short turnaround between the time we receive enough descriptive information to start estimating the project and when the estimate is needed (the "we-want-it-yesterday syndrome"), creativity is often necessary. There is not much time available for tool development. It is expedient to use existing tools in an adaptive manner to model the situation at hand. Specifically, this paper describes the use of the RCA PRICE MCPLXS Generator to incorporate technology transfer and technology escalation in estimates for advanced space systems such as Shuttle II and NASA advanced technology vehicles. It is assumed that the reader is familiar with the RCA PRICE family of models as well as the RCA PRICE utility programs such as SCPLX, PARAM, PARASYN, and the MCPLXS Generator.

  7. The Picatinny Technology Transfer Innovation Center: A business incubator concept adapted to federal laboratory technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Wittig, T.; Greenfield, J.

    1996-10-01

    In recent years, the US defense industrial base spawned the aerospace industry, among other successes, and served as the nation`s technology seed bed. However, as the defense industrial base shrinks and public and private resources become scarcer, the merging of the commercial and defense communities becomes necessary to maintain national technological competencies. Cooperative efforts such as technology transfer provide an attractive, cost-effective, well-leveraged alternative to independently funded research and development (R and D). The sharing of knowledge, resources, and innovation among defense contractors and other public sector firms, academia, and other organizations has become exceedingly attractive. Recent legislation involving technology transfer provides for the sharing of federal laboratory resources with the private sector. The Army Research, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC), Picatinny Arsenal, NJ, a designer of weapons systems, is one of the nation`s major laboratories with this requirement. To achieve its important technology transfer mission, ARDEC reviewed its capabilities, resources, intellectual property, and products with commercial potential. The purpose of the review was to develop a viable plan for effecting a technology transfer cultural change within the ARDEC, Picatinny Arsenal and with the private sector. This report highlights the issues identified, discussed, and resolved prior to the transformation of a temporarily vacant federal building on the Picatinny installation into a business incubator. ARDEC`s discussions and rationale for the decisions and actions that led to the implementation of the Picatinny Technology Transfer Innovation Center are discussed.

  8. Cooperative water resource technology transfer program

    SciTech Connect

    D'itri, F.M.

    1982-06-01

    This cooperative water resource technology transfer program sought to develop/present educational programs (conferences/seminars/workshops) and technology transfer brochures to enhance public awareness/appreciation of state water quality problems and to stress economic tradeoffs needed to resolve given problems. Accomplishments of this program for the different conferences held 1979-1981 are described (inland lake eutrophication: causes, effects, and remedies; contamination of groundwater supplies by toxic chemicals: causes, effects, and prevention; supplemental irrigation; stormwater management; cooperative research needs for renovation and reuse of municipal water in agriculture; selection and management of vegetation for slow rate and overland flow land application systems to treat municipal wastewater; effects of acid precipitation on ecological systems: Great Lakes region; water competition in Michigan; Michigan natural resources outlook.

  9. Tropical medicine: Telecommunications and technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Legters, Llewellyn J.

    1991-01-01

    The potential for global outbreaks of tropical infectious diseases, and our ability to identify and respond to such outbreaks is a major concern. Rapid, efficient telecommunications is viewed as part of the solution to this set of problems - the means to link a network of epidemiological field stations via satellite with U.S. academic institutions and government agencies, for purposes of research, training in tropical medicine, and observation of and response to epidemic emergencies. At a workshop, telecommunications and technology transfer were addressed and applications of telecommunications technology in long-distance consultation, teaching and disaster relief were demonstrated. Applications in teaching and consultation in tropical infectious diseases is discussed.

  10. MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This fifth semi-annual status report of the MHD Technology Transfer, Integration, and Review Committee (TTIRC) summarizes activities of the TTIRC during the period April 1990 through September 1990. It includes summaries and minutes of committee meetings, progress summaries of ongoing Proof-of-Concept (POC) contracts, discussions pertaining to technical integration issues in the POC program, and planned activities for the next six months.

  11. Technology Transfer: Technocultures, Power and Communication--The Australian Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    More, Elizabeth; Irwin, Harry

    1995-01-01

    Discusses issues of communication and power in the organizational dimensions of international technology transfer, including technoculture differences and strategic political alliances. Theoretical discussion is supplemented by analysis of international technology transfer activities involving Australian participation in the aerospace and…

  12. A better paradigm for technology transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Ernest D.

    1995-01-01

    Technology transfer has become a high priority as government and industry change focus to ensure a competitive edge in the global economy. Some of these efforts are directed to forging partnerships among government, industry and academia to translate the nation's technological edge into products and services for the global marketplace. Critical to the success of this is the way technology is conceived, developed, and applied. While there is no clear division of roles among government, industry and academia, much basic research is still traditionally performed at universities, advanced development is conducted or sponsored through government and industry laboratories, and brings the product or service to market, although industry occasionally performs all of these functions. These functions are frequently not coordinated or integrated, with the result that technology transfer is inefficient and opportunities are lost. The change that now must occur is the integration of research, development, and marketing in partnerships that include industry government, and academia. An overlooked aspect of partnership is the role of academic institutions in providing experimentation and testing, research, and proto-typing facilities and laboratories. Academic institutions can play a greater role in economic life by entering into agreements with government and industry to develop products and services.

  13. Technology Transfer and the Product Development Process

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, John E.

    1989-03-21

    It is my pleasure this morning to address a topic that is much talked about in passing but rarely examined from a first person point of view. That topic is Technology Transfer. Over the next 30 minutes I'd like to approach Technology Transfer within the context of the Product Development Process looking at it from the perspectives of the federal government researcher and the industry manufacturer/user. Fist let us recognize that we are living in an ''Information Age'', where global economic and military competition is determined as much by technology as it is by natural resource assets. It is estimated that technical/scientific information is presently growing at a rate of l3 percent per year; this is expected to increase to 30 percent per year by the turn of the century. In fact, something like 90 percent of all scientific knowledge has been generated in the last 30 years; this pool will double again in the next 10-15 years (Exhibit 1). Of all the scientists and engineers throughout history, 90% live and work in the present time. Successfully managing this technical information/knowledge--i.e., transforming the results of R&D to practical applications--will be an important measure of national strength. A little over a dozen years ago, the United States with only 5 percent of the world's population was generating approximately 75 percent of the world's technology. The US. share is now 50 percent and may decline to 30 percent by the turn of the century. This decline won't be because of downturn in U.S. technological advances but because the other 95 percent of the world's population will be increasing its contribution. Economic and military strength then, will be determined by how quickly and successfully companies, industries, and nations can apply new technological information to practical applications--i.e., how they manage technology transfer within the context of the product development process. Much discussion and pronouncements are ongoing in public forums

  14. Mission & Role | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI TTC serves as the focal point for implementing the Federal Technology Transfer Act to utilize patents as incentive for commercial development of technologies and to establish research collaborations and licensing among academia, federal laboratories, non-profit organizations, and industry. The TTC supports technology development activities for the National Cancer Institute and nine other NIH Institutes and Centers. TTC staff negotiate co-development agreements and licenses with universities, non-profit organizations, and pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies to ensure compliance with Federal statutes, regulations and the policies of the National Institutes of Health. TTC also reviews employee invention reports and makes recommendations concerning filing of domestic and foreign patent applications. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  15. The flight telerobotic servicer and technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andary, James F.; Bradford, Kayland Z.

    1991-01-01

    The Flight Telerobotic Servicer (FTS) project at the Goddard Space Flight Center is developing an advanced telerobotic system to assist in and reduce crew extravehicular activity (EVA) for Space Station Freedom (SSF). The FTS will provide a telerobotic capability in the early phases of the SSF program and will be employed for assembly, maintenance, and inspection applications. The current state of space technology and the general nature of the FTS tasks dictate that the FTS be designed with sophisticated teleoperational capabilities for its internal primary operating mode. However, technologies such as advanced computer vision and autonomous planning techniques would greatly enhance the FTS capabilities to perform autonomously in less structured work environments. Another objective of the FTS program is to accelerate technology transfer from research to U.S. industry.

  16. Exemplar Practices for Department of Defense Technology Transfer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    but not specific practices. The exemplar practices presented in the literature focus on high-level strategies to improve technology transfer at DoD...laboratories. These strategies include providing guidance to DoD laboratories to strategically plan and engage in technology transfer; to empower...and reward researchers to engage in technology transfer; to create effective and efficient technology transfer offices; to establish processes that

  17. Space Biosensor Systems: Implications for Technology Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, J. W.; Somps, C. J.; Madou, M.; Imprescia, Clifford C. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    To meet the need for continuous, automated monitoring of animal subjects, including; humans, during space flight, NASA is developing advanced physiologic sensor and biotelemetry system technologies. The ability to continuously track basic physiological parameters, such as heart rate, blood pH, and body temperature, in untethered subjects in space is a challenging task. At NASA's Ames Research Center, where a key focus is gravitational biology research, engineers have teamed with life scientists to develop wireless sensor systems for automated physiologic monitoring of animal models as small as the rat. This technology is also being adapted, in collaboration with medical professionals, to meet human clinical monitoring needs both in space and on the ground. Thus, these advanced monitoring technologies have important dual-use functions; they meet space flight data collection requirements and constraints, while concurrently addressing a number of monitoring and data acquisition challenges on the ground in areas of clinical monitoring and biomedical research. Additional applications for these and related technologies are being sought and additional partnerships established that enhance development efforts, reduce costs and facilitate technology infusion between the public and private sectors. This paper describes technology transfer and co-development projects that have evolved out of NASA's miniaturized, implantable chemical sensor development efforts.

  18. 48 CFR 970.5227-3 - Technology transfer mission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Technology transfer... for Management and Operating Contracts 970.5227-3 Technology transfer mission. As prescribed in 48 CFR 970.2770-4(a), insert the following clause: Technology Transfer Mission (AUG 2002) This clause has...

  19. TIS (Technology Information System) A Focal Point for Technology Transfer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    3 2.1 Stevenson-Wydler Technology Inovation Act of 1980 .................................... 3 2.2 Technical Information Centers...passwords is required since none were disclosed. The DIAL command provides an equally powerful , but user-controlled, method for accessing other...a local file from TIS to a remote machine. This has particular importance when downloaded and saved information is to be transferred to more powerful

  20. TARGETED TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO US INDEPENDENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Donald F. Duttlinger; E. Lance Cole

    2005-01-01

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of assisting U.S. independent oil and gas producers with timely, informed technology decisions during Fiscal Year 2004 (FY04). PTTC has active grassroots programs through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and 2 satellite offices. They bring research and academia to the table via their association with geological surveys and engineering departments. The regional directors interact with independent oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, technical publications and other cooperative outreach efforts. PTTC's Headquarters (HQ) staff receives direction from a National Board of Directors predominantly comprised of American natural gas and oil producers to plan and manage the overall technology transfer program. PTTC HQ implements a comprehensive communications program by interconnecting the talents of the National Board, 10 Regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAG) and the RLOs with industry across the U.S. PTTC effectively combines federal funding through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy, namely the Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil with state and industry contributions to share application of upstream technologies. Ultimately, these efforts factor in to provide a safe, secure and reliable energy supply for American consumers. This integrated resource base, combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff, are achieving notable results regarding domestic production figures. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies by providing direct contact with research, development and demonstration (RD&D) results. A key to the program is demonstrating proven technologies that can be applied broadly and rapidly. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY04. Activities

  1. NASA Orbit Transfer Rocket Engine Technology Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The advanced expander cycle engine with a 15,000 lb thrust level and a 6:1 mixture ratio and optimized performance was used as the baseline for a design study of the hydrogen/oxgyen propulsion system for the orbit transfer vehicle. The critical components of this engine are the thrust chamber, the turbomachinery, the extendible nozzle system, and the engine throttling system. Turbomachinery technology is examined for gears, bearing, seals, and rapid solidification rate turbopump shafts. Continuous throttling concepts are discussed. Components of the OTV engine described include the thrust chamber/nozzle assembly design, nozzles, the hydrogen regenerator, the gaseous oxygen heat exchanger, turbopumps, and the engine control valves.

  2. Biomedical technology transfer: A manufacturer's viewpoint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Transfer of technology from non-commercial institutions to industry has played an important role in the development of medical electronics. It is a difficult process, but if the ideas are sound, if clear medical benefits exist and if there is good fit with business plans and the strengths and goals of both parties are complementary, it can work well. In the evaluation process it is considered whether the device meets general tests for suitability for the company, whether there are opportunities for proprietary or patent protection, and whether the medical benefits are self evident or the acceptance period is apt to be long.

  3. Technology transfer from the space exploration initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Buden, D.

    1991-06-14

    Space exploration has demonstrated that it stimulates the national economy by creating new and improved products, increased employment, and provides a stimulus to education. The exploration of the Moon and Mars under the Space Exploration Initiative has the potential of accelerating this stimulates to the economy. It is difficult to identify all of the concrete ways this will be accomplished. However, many areas can be identified. The space exploration building blocks of power, propulsion, spacecraft, robotics, rovers, mining and manufacturing, communications, navigation, habitats, life support and infrastructures are reviewed to identify possible technology areas. For example, better means for working in hazardous areas and handling hazardous waste are potential outcomes of this initiative. Methods to produce higher quality goods and improve America`s competitiveness in manufacturing will undoubtedly evolve from the need to produce products that must last many years in the harsh environments of space and planetary surfaces. Some ideas for technology transfer are covered in this paper.

  4. Technology transfer from the space exploration initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Buden, D.

    1991-06-14

    Space exploration has demonstrated that it stimulates the national economy by creating new and improved products, increased employment, and provides a stimulus to education. The exploration of the Moon and Mars under the Space Exploration Initiative has the potential of accelerating this stimulates to the economy. It is difficult to identify all of the concrete ways this will be accomplished. However, many areas can be identified. The space exploration building blocks of power, propulsion, spacecraft, robotics, rovers, mining and manufacturing, communications, navigation, habitats, life support and infrastructures are reviewed to identify possible technology areas. For example, better means for working in hazardous areas and handling hazardous waste are potential outcomes of this initiative. Methods to produce higher quality goods and improve America's competitiveness in manufacturing will undoubtedly evolve from the need to produce products that must last many years in the harsh environments of space and planetary surfaces. Some ideas for technology transfer are covered in this paper.

  5. Orbit transfer rocket engine technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustafson, N. B.; Harmon, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced near term (1990's) space-based Orbit Transfer Vehicle Engine (OTVE) system was designed, and the technologies applicable to its construction, maintenance, and operations were developed under Tasks A through F of the Orbit Transfer Rocket Engine Technology Program. Task A was a reporting task. In Task B, promising OTV turbomachinery technologies were explored: two stage partial admission turbines, high velocity ratio diffusing crossovers, soft wear ring seals, advanced bearing concepts, and a rotordynamic analysis. In Task C, a ribbed combustor design was developed. Possible rib and channel geometries were chosen analytically. Rib candidates were hot air tested and laser velocimeter boundary layer analyses were conducted. A channel geometry was also chosen on the basis of laser velocimeter data. To verify the predicted heat enhancement effects, a ribbed calorimeter spool was hot fire tested. Under Task D, the optimum expander cycle engine thrust, performance and envelope were established for a set of OTV missions. Optimal nozzle contours and quick disconnects for modularity were developed. Failure Modes and Effects Analyses, maintenance and reliability studies and component study results were incorporated into the engine system. Parametric trades on engine thrust, mixture ratio, and area ratio were also generated. A control system and the health monitoring and maintenance operations necessary for a space-based engine were outlined in Task E. In addition, combustor wall thickness measuring devices and a fiberoptic shaft monitor were developed. These monitoring devices were incorporated into preflight engine readiness checkout procedures. In Task F, the Integrated Component Evaluator (I.C.E.) was used to demonstrate performance and operational characteristics of an advanced expander cycle engine system and its component technologies. Sub-system checkouts and a system blowdown were performed. Short transitions were then made into main combustor ignition and

  6. NASA Northeast Regional Technology Transfer Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, James P.

    2001-01-01

    This report is a summary of the primary activities and metrics for the NASA Northeast Regional Technology Transfer Center, operated by the Center for Technology Commercialization, Inc. (CTC). This report covers the contract period January 1, 2000 - March 31, 2001. This report includes a summary of the overall CTC Metrics, a summary of the Major Outreach Events, an overview of the NASA Business Outreach Program, a summary of the Activities and Results of the Technology into the Zone program, and a Summary of the Major Activities and Initiatives performed by CTC in supporting this contract. Between January 1, 2000 and March 31, 2001, CTC has facilitated 10 license agreements, established 35 partnerships, provided assistance 517 times to companies, and performed 593 outreach activities including participation in 57 outreach events. CTC also assisted Goddard in executing a successful 'Technology into the Zone' program.' CTC is pleased to have performed this contract, and looks forward to continue providing their specialized services in support of the new 5 year RTTC Contract for the Northeast region.

  7. Composite fabrication via resin transfer molding technology

    SciTech Connect

    Jamison, G.M.; Domeier, L.A.

    1996-04-01

    The IMPReS (Integrated Modeling and Processing of Resin-based Structures) Program was funded in FY95 to consolidate, evaluate and enhance Sandia`s capabilities in the design and fabrication of composite structures. A key driver of this and related programs was the need for more agile product development processes and for model based design and fabrication tools across all of Sandia`s material technologies. A team of polymer, composite and modeling personnel was assembled to benchmark Sandia`s existing expertise in this area relative to industrial and academic programs and to initiate the tasks required to meet Sandia`s future needs. RTM (Resin Transfer Molding) was selected as the focus composite fabrication technology due to its versatility and growing use in industry. Modeling efforts focused on the prediction of composite mechanical properties and failure/damage mechanisms and also on the uncured resin flow processes typical of RTM. Appropriate molds and test composites were fabricated and model validation studies begun. This report summarizes and archives the modeling and fabrication studies carried out under IMPReS and evaluates the status of composite technology within Sandia. It should provide a complete and convenient baseline for future composite technology efforts within Sandia.

  8. A model technology transfer program for independent operators: Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM)

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeling, L.G.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes the development and testing of the Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM) which is to be utilized as a regional model for the development of other technology transfer programs for independent operators throughout oil-producing regions in the US. It describes the linkage of the regional model with a proposed national technology transfer plan, an evaluation technique for improving and assessing the model, and the methodology which makes it adaptable on a regional basis. The report also describes management concepts helpful in managing a technology transfer program. The original Tertiary Oil Recovery Project (TORP) activities, upon which the KTTM is based, were developed and tested for Kansas and have proved to be effective in assisting independent operators in utilizing technology. Through joint activities of TORP and the Kansas Geological Survey (KGS), the KTTM was developed and documented for application in other oil-producing regions. During the course of developing this model, twelve documents describing the implementation of the KTTM were developed as deliverables to DOE. These include: (1) a problem identification (PI) manual describing the format and results of six PI workshops conducted in different areas of Kansas, (2) three technology workshop participant manuals on advanced waterflooding, reservoir description, and personal computer applications, (3) three technology workshop instructor manuals which provides instructor material for all three workshops, (4) three technologies were documented as demonstration projects which included reservoir management, permeability modification, and utilization of a liquid-level acoustic measuring device, (5) a bibliography of all literature utilized in the documents, and (6) a document which describes the KTTM.

  9. Successful Technology Transfer in Colorado: A Portfolio of Technology Transfer "Success Stories."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Advanced Tech. Inst., Denver.

    The examples in this portfolio demonstrate how technology transfer among universities, businesses, and federal laboratories solve real-world problems, and create new goods and services. They reveal how, through strengthening the infrastructure joining private and public sectors, Colorado can better compete in the global marketplace. All of the…

  10. The Technology Transfer Process: Concepts, Framework and Methodology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolly, James A.

    This paper discusses the conceptual framework and methodology of the technology transfer process and develops a model of the transfer mechanism. This model is then transformed into a predictive model of technology transfer incorporating nine factors that contribute to the movement of knowledge from source to user. Each of these factors is examined…

  11. Accelerated technology transfer: the UK quantum initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Simon D.

    2016-10-01

    A new generation of quantum technology based systems, exploiting effects such as superposition and entanglement, will enable widespread, highly disruptive applications which are expected to be of great economic significance. However, the technology is only just emerging from the physics laboratory and generally remains at low TRLs. The question is: where, and when, will this impact be first manifest? The UK, with substantial Government backing, has embarked on an ambitious national program to accelerate the process of technology transfer with the objective of seizing a significant and sustainable share of the future economic benefit for the UK. Many challenges and uncertainties remain but the combined and co-ordinated efforts of Government, Industry and Academia are making great progress. The level of collaboration is unusually high and the goal of embedding a "QT Ecosystem" in the UK looks to be attainable. This paper describes the UK national programme, its key players, and their respective roles. It will illustrate some of the likely first commercial applications and provide a status update. Some of the challenges that might prevent realisation of the goal will be highlighted.

  12. Technology transfer and the NASA Technology Utilization Program - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarks, Henry J.; Rose, James T.; Mangum, Stephen D.

    1989-01-01

    The goal of the NASA Technology Utilization (TU) Program is to broaden and accelerate the transfer of aerospace technology and to develop new commercial products and processes that represent additional return on the national investment in the U.S. space programs. The mechanisms established by the TU Program includes TU offices, publications, the information retrieval, software dissemination, and the NASA Applications Engineering Program. These mechanisms are implemented through a nationwide NASA TU Network, working closely with industry and public sector organizations to encourage and facilitate their access and utilization of the results of the U.S space programs. Examples of TU are described, including a method for the reduction of metal fatigue in textile equipment and a method for the management of wandering behavior in Alzheimer's patients.

  13. A Study of the Factors Associated with Successful Technology Transfer and their Applicability to Air Force Technology Transfers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-01

    relay race, where one runner passes the baton to the next. Richard Dorf describes in "Models for Technology Transfer From Universities and Research...Meeting. 9. Dorf , Richard C. "Models for Technology Transfer From Universities and Research Laboratories," Technology Management Publication TM1.1988...both located at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. Namely, Tim Sharp, Chief, Technology Transfer Division and my faculty advisor, Major Richard

  14. A planning framework for transferring building energy technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Farhar, B C; Brown, M A; Mohler, B L; Wilde, M; Abel, F H

    1990-07-01

    Accelerating the adoption of new and existing cost-effective technologies has significant potential to reduce the energy consumed in US buildings. This report presents key results of an interlaboratory technology transfer planning effort in support of the US Department of Energy's Office of Building Technologies (OBT). A guiding assumption for planning was that OBT's R D program should forge linkages with existing programs whose goals involved enhancing energy efficiency in buildings. An ad hoc Technology Transfer Advisory Group reviewed the existing analysis and technology transfer program, brainstormed technology transfer approaches, interviewed DOE program managers, identified applicable research results, and developed a framework that management could use in deciding on the best investments of technology transfer resources. Representatives of 22 organizations were interviewed on their views of the potential for transferring energy efficiency technologies through active linking with OBT. The report describes these programs and interview results; outlines OBT tools, technologies, and practices to be transferred; defines OBT audiences; identifies technology transfer functions and presents a framework devised using functions and audiences; presents some 60 example technology transfer activities; and documents the Advisory Group's recommendations. 37 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  15. OCT Technology Transfer and the OCT Market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Eric A.

    The field of optical coherence tomography (OCT) has blossomed dramatically since the first studies by various researchers around the world began in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Since then cumulatively, there have been dozens of companies created, over a hundred research groups working on or with OCT, over a thousand OCT patents issued, over 10,000 research articles published, tens of millions of patients scanned with OCT, hundreds of millions of venture capital and corporate R&D dollars invested, hundreds of millions of dollars in company acquisitions, and over a billion of dollars of OCT system revenue. This chapter will describe some of the history and factors involved in OCT technology transfer and commercialization, give a snapshot of the current OCT market, and speculate on some future OCT issues.

  16. Low-G fluid transfer technology study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Technology gaps and system characteristics critical to cryogenic and noncryogenic in-orbit fluid transfer were identified. Four different supply systems were conceptually designed as space shuttle payloads. These were; (1) space tug supply - LH2, LO2, N2H4, He - linear acceleration for liquid acquisition with supply module and tug separated from shuttle, (2) tug supply using orbiter drag, (3) orbiter supply - N2O4,MMH,He, H2,O2 - surface tension screens, (4) multiple receivers supply 0 solar electric propulsion stage, Hg, diaphragm - HEAO B, HEe, paddle fluid rotation-satellite control section, N2H4, screens. It was found that screens had the best overall potential for low weight and simplicity, however, thermal problems with cryogenics still need final resolution.

  17. Technology transfer at NASA - A librarian's view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchan, Ronald L.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA programs, publications, and services promoting the transfer and utilization of aerospace technology developed by and for NASA are briefly surveyed. Topics addressed include the corporate sources of NASA technical information and its interest for corporate users of information services; the IAA and STAR abstract journals; NASA/RECON, NTIS, and the AIAA Aerospace Database; the RECON Space Commercialization file; the Computer Software Management and Information Center file; company information in the RECON database; and services to small businesses. Also discussed are the NASA publications Tech Briefs and Spinoff, the Industrial Applications Centers, NASA continuing bibliographies on management and patent abstracts (indexed using the NASA Thesaurus), the Index to NASA News Releases and Speeches, and the Aerospace Research Information Network (ARIN).

  18. Targeted Technology Transfer to US Independents

    SciTech Connect

    E. Lance Cole

    2009-09-30

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) was established by domestic crude oil and natural gas producers, working in conjunction with the Independent Petroleum Association of America (IPAA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and selected universities, in 1994 as a national not-for-profit organization. Its goal is to transfer Exploration and Production (E&P) technology to the domestic upstream petroleum industry, in particular to the small independent operators. PTTC connects producers, technology providers and innovators, academia, and university/industry/government research and development (R&D) groups. From inception PTTC has received federal funding through DOE's oil and natural gas program managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). With higher funding available in its early years, PTTC was able to deliver well more than 100 workshops per year, drawing 6,000 or more attendees per year. Facing the reality of little or no federal funding in the 2006-2007 time frame, PTTC and the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) worked together for PTTC to become a subsidiary organization of AAPG. This change brings additional organizational and financial resources to bear for PTTC's benefit. PTTC has now been 'powered by AAPG' for two full fiscal years. There is a clear sense that PTTC has stabilized and is strengthening its regional workshop and national technology transfer programs and is becoming more entrepreneurial in exploring technology transfer opportunities beyond its primary DOE contract. Quantitative accomplishments: PTTC has maintained its unique structure of a national organization working through Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) to deliver local, affordable workshops. During the contract period PTTC consolidated from 10 to six regions efficiency and alignment with AAPG sections. The number of workshops delivered by its RLOs during the contract period is shown below. Combined attendance over the period was approximately

  19. Systematic technology transfer from biology to engineering.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Julian F V; Mann, Darrell L

    2002-02-15

    Solutions to problems move only very slowly between different disciplines. Transfer can be greatly speeded up with suitable abstraction and classification of problems. Russian researchers working on the TRIZ (Teoriya Resheniya Izobretatelskikh Zadatch) method for inventive problem solving have identified systematic means of transferring knowledge between different scientific and engineering disciplines. With over 1500 person years of effort behind it, TRIZ represents the biggest study of human creativity ever conducted, whose aim has been to establish a system into which all known solutions can be placed, classified in terms of function. At present, the functional classification structure covers nearly 3 000 000 of the world's successful patents and large proportions of the known physical, chemical and mathematical knowledge-base. Additional tools are the identification of factors which prevent the attainment of new technology, leading directly to a system of inventive principles which will resolve the impasse, a series of evolutionary trends of development, and to a system of methods for effecting change in a system (Su-fields). As yet, the database contains little biological knowledge despite early recognition by the instigator of TRIZ (Genrich Altshuller) that one day it should. This is illustrated by natural systems evolved for thermal stability and the maintenance of cleanliness.

  20. Technology Transfer through Training: Emerging Roles for the University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergsma, Harold M.

    The importance of training in the technology transfer process is discussed, with special consideration to conditions in developing countries. Also considered is the role universities can play in training to promote technology transfer. Advisors on training and curriculum development are needed to introduce a new technology. Training farmers to…

  1. AAC technology transfer: an AAC-RERC report.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, D Jeffery; Beukelman, David; Blackstone, Sarah; Bryen, Diane; Caves, Kevin; Deruyter, Frank; Jakobs, Thomas; Light, Janice; McNaughton, David; Moulton, Bryan; Shane, Howard; Williams, Michael B

    2009-03-01

    Transferring innovative technologies from the university to the manufacturing sector can often be an elusive and problematic process. The Rehabilitation and Engineering Research Center on Communication Enhancement (AAC-RERC) has worked with the manufacturing community for the last 10 years. The purpose of this article is to discuss barriers to technology transfer, to outline some technology transfer strategies, and to illustrate these strategies with AAC-RERC related activities.

  2. DIFFUSING INNOVATIONS: Implementing the Technology Transfer Act of 1986.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    resources 6. D Improved quality of R&D products 7. D Better transfer and utilization of technology 8. D Other (please specify) Questions 24-30...Views on the Legislation’s Effectiveness Views on Improvements to Technology Transfer Examples of Successful and Unsuccessful Transfer Attempts...Service reserach centers designated by the agency - The FAA Technology Center, Tumer-Fairbank Research Center, and Coast Guard Research Development

  3. 76 FR 52670 - 2011 Technology Transfer Summit North America Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... the TTS Initiative Business Social Network, an online business- networking platform powered by JuJaMa.... Ferguson, Deputy Director, Licensing & Entrepreneurship, Office of Technology Transfer, National...

  4. Dissemination of CERN's Technology Transfer: Added Value from Regional Transfer Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofer, Franz

    2005-01-01

    Technologies developed at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, are disseminated via a network of external technology transfer officers. Each of CERN's 20 member states has appointed at least one technology transfer officer to help establish links with CERN. This network has been in place since 2001 and early experiences indicate…

  5. Targeted Technology Transfer to US Independents

    SciTech Connect

    Schatzinger, Viola; Chapman, Kathy; Lovendahl, Kristi

    2014-09-30

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) is a unique not-for-profit network that focuses on transferring Exploration and Production (E&P) technology to the domestic oil and natural gas producing industry. PTTC connects producers, technology providers and innovators, academia, research and development (R&D) consortiums and governments. Local affordable workshops delivered by Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs), which are typically a university or geological survey, are a primary tool. PTTC also maintains a website network, issues a national newsletter, provides a column in a major trade publication, and exhibits at major industry events. It also encourages industry to ask technology-related questions, striving to find relevant answers that will save questioners significant time. Working since late 1993, the PTTC network has a proven track record of providing industry with technology insights they can apply. Volunteers at the regional and national level provide key guidance regarding where to focus technical effort and help connect PTTC with industry. At historical funding levels, PTTC had been able to hold well more than 100 workshops per year, drawing 6,000+ attendees. As funding decreased in the early 2000s, the level of activity decreased and PTTC sought a merger with the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG), becoming an AAPG-managed organization at the start of FY08. This relationship with AAPG was terminated by mutual consent in May 2011 and PTTC once again operates independently. Chris Hall, California continued to serve as Chairman of the Board of Directors until December 2013. At the time PTTC reorganized into a RLO led organization with Mary Carr and Jeremy Viscomi as co-Executive Directors. Jerry Anderson became the Chairman of the PTTC Board of Directors and Chris Hall continues to serve on the Board. Workshop activity stabilized at 55-65 workshops per year averaging 3,100 attendees. FY14 represented the fifth year in a multi

  6. Summary of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Provides a summary of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act which pomote economic, environmental, and social well-being by bringing technology and industrial innovation to the marketplace

  7. Brookhaven National Laboratory technology transfer report, fiscal year 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    An increase in the activities of the Office of Research and Technology Applications (ORTA) is reported. Most of the additional effort has been directed to the regional electric utility initiative, but intensive efforts have been applied to the commercialization of a compact synchrotron storage ring for x-ray lithography applications. At least six laboratory technologies are reported as having been transferred or being in the process of transfer. Laboratory accelerator technology is being applied to study radiation effects, and reactor technology is being applied for designing space reactors. Technologies being transferred and emerging technologies are described. The role of the ORTA and the technology transfer process are briefly described, and application assessment records are given for a number of technologies. A mini-incubator facility is also described. (LEW)

  8. Auto-disable syringes for immunization: issues in technology transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, J. S.; Milstien, J. B.

    1999-01-01

    WHO and its partners recommend the use of auto-disable syringes, "bundled" with the supply of vaccines when donor dollars are used, in all mass immunization campaigns, and also strongly advocate their use in routine immunization programmes. Because of the relatively high price of auto-disable syringes, WHO's Technical Network for Logistics in Health recommends that activities be initiated to encourage the transfer of production technology for these syringes as a means of promoting their use and enhancing access to the technology. The present article examines factors influencing technology transfer, including feasibility, corporate interest, cost, quality assurance, intellectual property considerations, and probable time frames for implementation. Technology transfer activities are likely to be complex and difficult, and may not result in lower prices for syringes. Guidelines are offered on technology transfer initiatives for auto-disable syringes to ensure the quality of the product, the reliability of the supply, and the feasibility of the technology transfer activity itself. PMID:10680248

  9. A continuing program for technology transfer to the apparel industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clingman, W. H.

    1971-01-01

    A six month program has been carried out to investigate various mechanisms for transferring technology to industry. This program has focused on transfer to the apparel industry through the Apparel Research Foundation. The procedure was to analyze the problem, obtain potentially relevant aerospace technology, and then transfer this technology to the industry organization. This was done in a specific case. Technology was identified relevant to stitchless joining, and this technology was transferred to the Apparel Research Foundation. The feasibility and ground rules for carrying out such activities on a broader scale were established. A specific objective was to transfer new technology from the industry organization to the industry itself. This required the establishment of an application engineering program. Another transfer mechanism tested was publication of solutions to industry problems in a format familiar to the industry. This is to be distinguished from circulating descriptions of new technology. Focus is on the industry problem and the manager is given a formula for solving it that he can follow. It was concluded that this mechanism can complement the problem statement approach to technology transfer. It is useful in achieving transfer when a large amount of application engineering is not necessary. A wide audience is immediately exposed to the technology. On the other hand, the major manufacturing problems which require a sophisticated technical solution integrating many innovations are less likely to be helped.

  10. How technology transfer issues are managed

    SciTech Connect

    Sink, C.H.; Easley, K.R.

    1991-12-31

    In 1989, Secretary of Energy James Watkins made a commitment to accelerate DOE compliance with all applicable laws and standards aimed at protecting human health and the environment. At a minimum, this pledge requires the remediation of the 1989 inventory of chemical, radioactive, and mixed wastes at DOE production sites by 2019. The 1989 Complex inventory consisted of more than 3,700 sites, encompassing more than 26,000 acres contaminated with radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes. In addition, over 500 surplus sites are awaiting decontamination and decommissioning (D and D), and approximately 5,000 peripheral properties have contaminated soils (e.g., uranium tailings). Moreover, these problems exist at both inactive sites, where the primary focus is on environmental restoration, and at active sites, where the major emphasis is on improved waste management techniques. Although some of DOE`s problems are considered unique due to radioactivity, most forms of contamination resident in the Complex are not; rather, contaminants such as waste chemicals (e.g., inorganics), organics (e.g., fuels and solvents), halogenated organics (e.g., PCBs) and heavy metals commonly result in conventional industrial processes. Although certain other forms of contamination are more unique to DOE operations (e.g., radioactive materials, explosives, and pyrophorics), they are not exclusive to DOE. As DOE develops innovative solutions to these and related waste problems, it is imperative that technology systems and lessons learned be transferred from DOE sites and its R and D laboratories to private industry to maximize the nation`s return on environmental management technology investments.

  11. "Agile" Battery Technology Transfer-Lessons Learnt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, P.; Annoni, G.; Grossi, R.; Alia, Sergio; Reulier, David

    2008-09-01

    AGILE, the high energy astrophysics mission of the Italian Space Agency launched on April 23rd 2007, is the first LEO satellite to be powered by Saft's commercially available space qualified MPS176065 rechargeable lithium ion batteries.Saft and Carlo Gavazzi Space (CGS) have achieved a successful technology transfer replacing Ni-H2 batteries with high energy lithium ion batteries in a full speed program (4 months) and with a cost effective approach. The battery system comprises 2 x 24 Saft MPS176065 space qualified Li-ion cells in an 8s3p configuration (3 parallel arrays each composed by 8 series cell) with a nominal capacity of 2 x 480 Wh and an integral autonomous cell balancing system that ensures the maximum possible battery life.The MPS176065 space qualified cell is based on Saft's well proven MP series of prismatic rechargeable Li-ion batteries. It offers an extremely high capacity made possible by the stainless steel prismatic container that makes use of the volume which is otherwise lost when conventional cylindrical cells are packed together. A single prismatic cell has about 20% more volumetric energy density than an equivalent pack of cylindrical cells.

  12. Determining the Limits of English and Technology Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, Douglas

    A study investigated the role of language in facilitating technology transfer, particularly across international borders. It examined whether language has an effect on the technology transfer process or the politics associated with it when participating countries lack a common language, and whether the English language plays a special role in…

  13. Academic Technology Transfer: Tracking, Measuring and Enhancing Its Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, John

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1980 passage of the US Bayh-Dole Act, academic technology transfer has gained profile globally as a key component of knowledge-driven economic development. Research universities are seen as key contributors. In this article, focusing on the USA and drawing on over twenty years of experience in the field of academic technology transfer in…

  14. Technology Transfer Educational Curriculum Plan for the State of Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dakin, Karl J.

    A recommended plan for an educational curriculum on the topic of technology transfer is outlined. A survey was conducted to determine the current levels of ability and knowledge of technology users and of transfer intermediaries. Information was collected from three sources: individuals and organizations currently presenting educational programs…

  15. A model technology transfer program for independent operators

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeling, L.G.

    1996-08-01

    In August 1992, the Energy Research Center (ERC) at the University of Kansas was awarded a contract by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a technology transfer regional model. This report describes the development and testing of the Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM) which is to be utilized as a regional model for the development of other technology transfer programs for independent operators throughout oil-producing regions in the US. It describes the linkage of the regional model with a proposed national technology transfer plan, an evaluation technique for improving and assessing the model, and the methodology which makes it adaptable on a regional basis. The report also describes management concepts helpful in managing a technology transfer program.

  16. Toward equality of biodiversity knowledge through technology transfer.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Monika; Collen, Ben

    2015-10-01

    To help stem the continuing decline of biodiversity, effective transfer of technology from resource-rich to biodiversity-rich countries is required. Biodiversity technology as defined by the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) is a complex term, encompassing a wide variety of activities and interest groups. As yet, there is no robust framework by which to monitor the extent to which technology transfer might benefit biodiversity. We devised a definition of biodiversity technology and a framework for the monitoring of technology transfer between CBD signatories. Biodiversity technology within the scope of the CBD encompasses hard and soft technologies that are relevant to the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity, or make use of genetic resources, and that relate to all aspects of the CBD, with a particular focus on technology transfer from resource-rich to biodiversity-rich countries. Our proposed framework introduces technology transfer as a response indicator: technology transfer is increased to stem pressures on biodiversity. We suggest an initial approach of tracking technology flow between countries; charting this flow is likely to be a one-to-many relationship (i.e., the flow of a specific technology from one country to multiple countries). Future developments should then focus on integrating biodiversity technology transfer into the current pressure-state-response indicator framework favored by the CBD (i.e., measuring the influence of technology transfer on changes in state and pressure variables). Structured national reporting is important to obtaining metrics relevant to technology and knowledge transfer. Interim measures, that can be used to assess biodiversity technology or knowledge status while more in-depth indicators are being developed, include the number of species inventories, threatened species lists, or national red lists; databases on publications and project funding may provide measures of international cooperation. Such a

  17. NASA'S Changing Role in Technology Development and Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, Carolyn S.; Craft, Harry G., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration NASA has historically had to develop new technology to meet its mission objectives. The newly developed technologies have then been transferred to the private sector to assist US industry's worldwide competitiveness and thereby spur the US economy. The renewed emphasis by the US Government on a proactive technology transfer approach has produced a number of contractual vehicles that assist technology transfer to industrial, aerospace and research firms. NASA's focus has also been on leveraging the shrinking space budget to accomplish "more with less." NASA's cooperative agreements and resource sharing agreements are measures taken to achieve this goal, and typify the changing role of government technology development and transfer with industry. Large commercial partnerships with aerospace firms, as typified by the X-33 and X-34 Programs, are evolving. A new emphasis on commercialization in the Small Business Innovative Research and Dual Use programs paves the way for more rapid commercial application of new technologies developed for NASA.

  18. Transfer of space technologies past and present: the Russian case.

    PubMed

    Pankova, Lyudmila

    2002-12-01

    Since the end of the 1980's transfer of government sponsored high technology space goods and services to other sectors, industry, and eventually non-government use has been a growing concern of the Russian policy makers. Today the real and functional transformation of this field is on the agenda. The paper is organized as follows. The first section analyzes the evolution of the common approach to technology transfer, looks at the main obstacles to this processes as a whole, and in the space sector in particular. The second section examines the Russian space R&D sector from the point of view of its role and place in the Russian scientific and technological base. New mechanisms of technology transfer are then considered. Here, problems of conversion, commercialization, dual-use, and internationalization are examined in the context of space technology transfer. Furthermore, issues of innovation in technology transfer are discussed. The new networks that are forming through which technologies diffuse is considered. The paper then turns to legislative and regulatory problems, including the discussion of the main principles of the Russian space transfer code, which is now being drafted. It is necessary to underline, that in the Russian case, official statistics still do not help analyze the question of technology transfer.

  19. Technology Transfer Center to Assume Patenting and Licensing Responsibilities | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) is undergoing a reorganization that will bring patenting and licensing responsibilities to the Shady Grove and Frederick offices by October 2015. The reorganization is a result of an effort begun in 2014 by NIH to improve the organizational structure of technology transfer at NIH to meet the rapid rate of change within science, technology, and industry, and to better align the science and laboratory goals with the licensing and patenting process.

  20. Computers and terminals as an aid to international technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweeney, W. T.

    1974-01-01

    As technology transfer becomes more popular and proves to be an economical method for companies of all sizes to take advantage of a tremendous amount of new and available technology from sources all over the world, the introduction of computers and terminals into the international technology transfer process is proving to be a successful method for companies to take part in this beneficial approach to new business opportunities.

  1. Application of Technology Transfer Process Model for Thailand.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    California 00 THESIS APPLICATION OF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROCESS MODEL FOR THAILAND by Pairoat Kaensarn March 1980 J. W. Creighton Thesis Co-Advisors: R. A...Entered) S Application of Technology Trans aster’s A’esis, Process Model for Thailand,__-.".. r S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTdOagifs. I...39 4. Katanyoo-Katawetee ------------------------ 40 III. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROCESS MODEL ----------------- 43 A. A

  2. [Los Alamos National Laboratory industrial applications and technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-31

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the Los Alamos Economic Development Corporation (LAEDC) under its contract with the Industrial Applications Office (IAO). The LAEDC has: provided business planning assistance to potential entrepreneurs, assisted IAO in preparing and distributing informational materials on technology, organized and managed meetings and seminars on technology transfer and entrepreneurship, identified new opportunities for technology transfer, and identified and implemented programs for the recognition of Laboratory entrepreneurs.

  3. Overview of Best Practices for Biopharmaceutical Technology Transfers.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Sushil; Bain, David; Bowers, John; Kenty, Heidi; Larivee, Victor; Leira, Francisco; Xie, Jasmina; Tsang, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Technology transfer is a key foundational component in product commercialization. It is more than just the transfer of documents; it relates to all aspects of the transfer of knowledge and experience to the commercial manufacturing unit to ensure consistent, safe, and high-quality product. This is the first in a series of articles from the BioPhorum Operations Group (BPOG) member companies discussing best practices and benchmarking of biopharmaceutical technology transfer. In this article, we provide the common terminology developed by BPOG to accommodate both transferring and receiving organizations. We also review the key elements of a robust technology transfer business process, including critical milestones. Finally, we provide a brief overview of the articles in this series.

  4. 76 FR 71562 - Emergint Technologies, Inc.; Transfer of Data

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ... AGENCY Emergint Technologies, Inc.; Transfer of Data AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... (FIFRA) and the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA), including information that may have been... Technologies, Inc. in accordance with 40 CFR 2.307(h)(3) and 2.308(i)(2). Emergint Technologies, Inc. has...

  5. Solar sail-solar electric technology readiness and transfer assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    A method of conducting a technology readiness assessment was developed. It uses existing OAST technology readiness and risk criteria to define a technology readiness factor that considers both the required gain in technology readiness level to achieved technology readiness plus the degree of effort associated with achieving the gain. The results indicate that Solar Electric Propulsion is preferred based on technology readiness criteria. Both Solar Sail and Solar Electric Propulsion have a high level of transfer potential for future NASA missions, and each has considerable technology spillover for non-NASA applications.

  6. Applications of aerospace technology in industry: A technology transfer profile, nondestructive testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development of nondestructive testing procedures by NASA and the transfer of nondestructive testing to technology to civilian industry are discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) an overview of the nondestructive testing field, (2) NASA contributions to the field of nondestructive testing, (3) dissemination of NASA contributions, and (4) a transfer profile. Attachments are included which provide a brief description of common nondestructive testing methods and summarize the technology transfer reports involving NASA generated nondestructive testing technology.

  7. Technology transfer in the space sector: an international perspective.

    PubMed

    Hertzfeld, Henry R

    2002-12-01

    This article is an introduction to four articles in this issue, all related to the different policy objectives and approaches of technology transfer in space programs run by the United States, the European Space Agency, Canada, and Russia.

  8. Resources in Support of Technology Transfer: Revised and Updated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanne, Daniel; Zeller, Martin

    1996-01-01

    Presents a list of agencies, databases, services, electronic mailing lists, and World Wide Web and Internet sites that provide information on technology transfer to help librarians and information professionals research this concept. (JMV)

  9. Collaborating with EPA through the Federal Technology Transfer Act

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under the Federal Technology Transfer Act (FTTA), EPA can collaborate with external parties on research projects, and share research materials. Learn more about the types of partnerships the EPA offers.

  10. U.S. EPA Federal Technology Transfer Program Fact Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Federal Technology Transfer Act (FTTA), enacted by Congress in 1986 and building on previous legislation, improves access to federal laboratories by non-federal organizations for research and development opportunities.

  11. Fruit Fly Liquid Larval Diet Technology Transfer and Update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since October 2006, USDA-ARS has been implementing a fruit fly liquid larval diet technology transfer, which has proceeded according to the following steps: (1) Recruitment of interested groups through request; (2) Establishment of the Material Transfer Agreement (MTA) with ARS; (3) Fruit fly liquid...

  12. Technology transfer from NASA to targeted industries, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccain, Wayne; Schroer, Bernard J.; Souder, William E.; Spann, Mary S.; Watters, Harry; Ziemke, M. Carl

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) technology transfer to three target industries with focus on the apparel manufacturing industry in Alabama. Also included in this report are an analysis of the 1992 problem statements submitted by Alabama firms, the results of the survey of 1987-88 NASA Tech Brief requests, the results of the followup to Alabama submitted problem statements, and the development of the model describing the MSFC technology transfer process.

  13. Orbit transfer rocket engine technology program enhanced heat transfer combustor technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, William S.

    1991-12-01

    In order to increase the performance of a high performance, advanced expander-cycle engine combustor, higher chamber pressures are required. In order to increase chamber pressure, more heat energy is required to be transferred to the combustor coolant circuit fluid which drives the turbomachinery. This requirement was fulfilled by increasing the area exposed to the hot-gas by using combustor ribs. A previous technology task conducted 2-d hot air and cold flow tests to determine an optimum rib height and configuration. In task C.5 a combustor calorimeter was fabricated with the optimum rib configuration, 0.040 in. high ribs, in order to determine their enhancing capability. A secondary objective was to determine the effects of mixture ratio changers on the enhancement during hot-fire testing. The program used the Rocketdyne Integrated Component Evaluator (ICE) reconfigured into a thrust chamber only mode. The test results were extrapolated to give a projected enhancement from the ribs for a 16 in. long cylindrical combustor at 15 Klb nominal thrust level. The hot-gas wall ribs resulted in a 58 percent increase in heat transfer. When projected to a full size 15K combustor, it becomes a 46 percent increase. The results of those tests, a comparison with previous 2-d results, the effects of mixture ratio and combustion gas flow on the ribs and the potential ramifications for expander cycle combustors are detailed.

  14. Effective transfer of industrial energy conservation technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, M.; Vallario, R.W.

    1983-04-01

    Voluntary participation in industrial energy conservation programs resulted in savings of approximately 1 million barrels of oil equivalent per day in the US during 1981. These energy savings accrued largely from the development, introduction, and acceptance by industry of new energy conserving technologies. These new technologies were developed through cost sharing programs between the Department of Energy and private industry. These joint efforts reduced risk to industry, thus making them willing to accept and use these new technologies at an accelerated rate. Examples of several technologies that were used by industry at an accelerated rate are described. These technologies are: textile foam finishing and dyeing, forging furnace modifications, and high-efficiency metallic recuperators.

  15. Societal and economic valuation of technology-transfer deals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Joseph S., Jr.

    2009-09-01

    The industrial adoption of concepts such as open innovation brings new legitimacy to activities technology-transfer professionals have conducted for over 20 years. This movement highlights the need for an increased understanding of the valuation of intellectual property (IP) and technology-transfer deals. Valuation, though a centerpiece of corporate finance, is more challenging when applied to the inherent uncertainty surrounding innovation. Technology-transfer professionals are often overwhelmed by the complexity and data requirements of valuation techniques and skeptical of their applicability to and utility for technology transfer. The market longs for an approach which bridges the gap between valuation fundamentals and technology-transfer realities. This paper presents the foundations of a simple, flexible, precise/accurate, and useful framework for considering the valuation of technology-transfer deals. The approach is predicated on a 12-factor model—a 3×4 value matrix predicated on categories of economic, societal, and strategic value. Each of these three categories consists of three core subcategories followed by a fourth "other" category to facilitate inevitable special considerations. This 12-factor value matrix provides a framework for harvesting data during deals and for the application of best-of-breed valuation techniques which can be employed on a per-factor basis. Future work will include framework implementation within a database platform.

  16. Information Dissemination and Technology Transfer in Telecommunications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roderer, Nancy K.; King, Donald W.

    Using a model of scientific and technical information transfer as a framework, this document focuses on four types of activities: the generation or authorship of telecommunications information and its publication, distribution, and use. Different forms of publication are considered in each functional area, though primary emphasis is on the…

  17. Technology Transfer--Bridging Space and Society. The Students of the Technology Transfer Design Project Team (ISU Summer Session 1997).

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    Strategies, policies and methods by which technologies can he cross-fertilized between the space and non-space sectors were examined by students of the design project "Technology Transfer--Bridging Space and Society". This project was undertaken by students attending the 1997 10th Anniversary Summer Session Program of the International Space University. General issues relating to transfer of technology were discussed including definitions and mechanisms (push, pull, interactive and pro-active). As well as looking at case studies and the impact of national policies on space agencies, the design project also sought to look at technology transfer on a country-by-country basis, selecting various countries for scrutiny and reporting on their technology transfer status. The project report shows how transfer of technology varies between nations and when analyzed with the case studies identifies the general strategies, policies and methods in use and how they can he improved. Finally, the report seeks to recommend certain issues to governments, space agencies and industrial organizations to facilitate the transfer of technology. These include the development of a generic metrics system and the implementation of better appropriate procedures and mechanisms for a positive diffusion process between space and non-space sectors.

  18. Technology transfer and evaluation for Space Station telerobotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, Charles R.; Stokes, Lebarian; Diftler, Myron A.

    1994-01-01

    The international space station (SS) must take advantage of advanced telerobotics in order to maximize productivity and safety and to reduce maintenance costs. The Automation and Robotics Division at the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) has designed, developed, and constructed the Automated Robotics Maintenance of Space Station (ARMSS) facility for the purpose of transferring and evaluating robotic technology that will reduce SS operation costs. Additionally, JSC had developed a process for expediting the transfer of technology from NASA research centers and evaluating these technologies in SS applications. Software and hardware system developed at the research centers and NASA sponsored universities are currently being transferred to JSC and integrated into the ARMSS for flight crew personnel testing. These technologies will be assessed relative to the SS baseline, and, after refinements, those technologies that provide significant performance improvements will be recommended as upgrades to the SS. Proximity sensors, vision algorithms, and manipulator controllers are among the systems scheduled for evaluation.

  19. Double-layered cell transfer technology for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Akazawa, Keiko; Iwasaki, Kengo; Nagata, Mizuki; Yokoyama, Naoki; Ayame, Hirohito; Yamaki, Kazumasa; Tanaka, Yuichi; Honda, Izumi; Morioka, Chikako; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Komaki, Motohiro; Kishida, Akio; Izumi, Yuichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    For cell-based medicine, to mimic in vivo cellular localization, various tissue engineering approaches have been studied to obtain a desirable arrangement of cells on scaffold materials. We have developed a novel method of cell manipulation called “cell transfer technology”, enabling the transfer of cultured cells onto scaffold materials, and controlling cell topology. Here we show that using this technique, two different cell types can be transferred onto a scaffold surface as stable double layers or in patterned arrangements. Various combinations of adherent cells were transferred to a scaffold, amniotic membrane, in overlapping bilayers (double-layered cell transfer), and transferred cells showed stability upon deformations of the material including folding and trimming. Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells from periodontal ligaments (PDLSC) and osteoblasts, using double-layered cell transfer significantly enhanced bone formation, when compared to single cell type transplantation. Our findings suggest that this double-layer cell transfer is useful to produce a cell transplantation material that can bear two cell layers. Moreover, the transplantation of an amniotic membrane with PDLSCs/osteoblasts by cell transfer technology has therapeutic potential for bone defects. We conclude that cell transfer technology provides a novel and unique cell transplantation method for bone regeneration. PMID:27624174

  20. On transferring the grid technology to the biomedical community.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Yassene; Sax, Ulrich; Dickmann, Frank; Lippert, Joerg; Solodenko, Juri; von Voigt, Gabriele; Smith, Matthew; Rienhoff, Otto

    2010-01-01

    Natural scientists such as physicists pioneered the sharing of computing resources, which resulted in the Grid. The inter domain transfer process of this technology has been an intuitive process. Some difficulties facing the life science community can be understood using the Bozeman's "Effectiveness Model of Technology Transfer". Bozeman's and classical technology transfer approaches deal with technologies that have achieved certain stability. Grid and Cloud solutions are technologies that are still in flux. We illustrate how Grid computing creates new difficulties for the technology transfer process that are not considered in Bozeman's model. We show why the success of health Grids should be measured by the qualified scientific human capital and opportunities created, and not primarily by the market impact. With two examples we show how the Grid technology transfer theory corresponds to the reality. We conclude with recommendations that can help improve the adoption of Grid solutions into the biomedical community. These results give a more concise explanation of the difficulties most life science IT projects are facing in the late funding periods, and show some leveraging steps which can help to overcome the "vale of tears".

  1. Technology transfer for women entrepreneurs: issues for consideration.

    PubMed

    Everts, S I

    1998-01-01

    This article discusses the effectiveness of technology transfers to women entrepreneurs in developing countries. Most women's enterprises share common characteristics: very small businesses, employment of women owners and maybe some family members, limited working capital, low profit margins, and flexible or part-time work. Many enterprises do not plan for growth. Women tend to diversify and use risk-avoidance strategies. Support for women's enterprises ignores the characteristics of women's enterprises. Support mechanisms could be offered that would perfect risk-spreading strategies and dynamic enterprise management through other means than growth. Many initiatives, since the 1970s, have transferred technologies to women. Technologies were applied to only a few domains and were viewed as appropriate based on their small size, low level of complexity, low cost, and environmental friendliness. Technology transfers may not be viewed by beneficiaries as the appropriate answer to needs. The bottleneck in transfers to women is not in the development of prototypes, but in the dissemination of technology that is sustainable, appropriate, and accessible. Key features for determining appropriateness include baseline studies, consumer linkages, and a repetitive process. Institutional factors may limit appropriateness. There is a need for long-term outputs, better links with users, training in use of the technology, grouping of women into larger units, and technology availability in quantities large enough to meet demand. Guidelines need to be developed that include appropriate content and training that ensures transfer of knowledge to practice.

  2. The Technology Transfer of the ICT Curriculum in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Teng

    2015-01-01

    Focusing on the process of "technology transfer", this paper aims to critically examine the production and usage of the information and communication technology (ICT) curriculum, and discusses its possibilities. It is found that the goals in both of the two stages of the ICT curriculum in Taiwan were rather "rhetorical". Three…

  3. University Technology Transfer Factors as Predictors of Entrepreneurial Orientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkman, Dorothy M.

    2011-01-01

    University technology transfer is a collaborative effort between academia and industry involving knowledge sharing and learning. Working closely with their university partners affords biotechnology firms the opportunity to successfully develop licensed inventions and gain access to novel scientific and technological discoveries. These factors may…

  4. Techno-Nationalism and the Construction of University Technology Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sá, Creso; Kretz, Andrew; Sigurdson, Kristjan

    2013-01-01

    Our historical study of Canada's main research university illuminates the overlooked influence of national identities and interests as forces shaping the institutionalization of technology transfer. Through the use of archival sources we trace the rise and influence of Canadian technological nationalism--a response to Canada's perceived dependency…

  5. Florida commercial space initiatives and technology transfer mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Roger L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses commercial space policy for the State of Florida in the context of state initiatives for general technology and economic development. The paper also compares Florida's commercial space initiatives to national space policies and describes mechanisms for transferring space related technologies and research to Florida businesses for subsequent development and commercialization.

  6. OAST space research and technology applications: Technology transfer successes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reck, Gregory M.

    1992-01-01

    The ultimate measure of success in the Space Research and Technology Program is the incorporation of a technology into an operational mission. Charts are presented that describe technology products which OAST has helped support that (1) have been used in a space mission, (2) have been incorporated into the baseline design of a flight system in the development phase, or (3) have been picked up by a commercial or other non-NASA user. We hope that these examples will demonstrate the value of investment in technology. Pictured on the charts are illustrations of the technology product, the mission or user which has incorporated the technology, and where appropriate, results from the mission itself.

  7. Applications of aerospace technology in industry, a technology transfer profile: Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottenstette, J. P.; Freeman, J. E.; Heins, C. R.; Hildred, W. M.; Johnson, F. D.; Staskin, E. R.

    1971-01-01

    Technology transfer in the lubrication field is discussed in terms of the movement of NASA-generated lubrication technology into the private sector as affected by evolving industrial requirements. An overview of the field is presented, and NASA technical contributions to lubrication technology are described. Specific examples in which these technologies have been used in the private sector are summarized.

  8. Technology transfer in the NASA Ames Advanced Life Support Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Kathleen; Schlater, Nelson; Bilardo, Vincent; Masson, Paul

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes a representative set of technology transfer activities which are currently underway in the Advanced Life Support Division of the Ames Research Center. Five specific NASA-funded research or technology development projects are synopsized that are resulting in transfer of technology in one or more of four main 'arenas:' (1) intra-NASA, (2) intra-Federal, (3) NASA - aerospace industry, and (4) aerospace industry - broader economy. Each project is summarized as a case history, specific issues are identified, and recommendations are formulated based on the lessons learned as a result of each project.

  9. Development of a nationwide network for technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, Louis B. C.; Brockman, Paul R.

    1987-01-01

    The winter and spring of 1987 saw the cooperative nationwide network for technology transfer translated from concept to reality. The most obvious of the network relationships which were developed or which are anticipated are summarized. The objective was to help assure that every U.S. business which has the capacity to exploit, or the need to obtain new technology in any form, has access to the technology it needs or can use.

  10. neuTube 1.0: A New Design for Efficient Neuron Reconstruction Software Based on the SWC Format 123

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Linqing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Brain circuit mapping requires digital reconstruction of neuronal morphologies in complicated networks. Despite recent advances in automatic algorithms, reconstruction of neuronal structures is still a bottleneck in circuit mapping due to a lack of appropriate software for both efficient reconstruction and user-friendly editing. Here we present a new software design based on the SWC format, a standardized neuromorphometric format that has been widely used for analyzing neuronal morphologies or sharing neuron reconstructions via online archives such as NeuroMorpho.org. We have also implemented the design in our open-source software called neuTube 1.0. As specified by the design, the software is equipped with parallel 2D and 3D visualization and intuitive neuron tracing/editing functions, allowing the user to efficiently reconstruct neurons from fluorescence image data and edit standard neuron structure files produced by any other reconstruction software. We show the advantages of neuTube 1.0 by comparing it to two other software tools, namely Neuromantic and Neurostudio. The software is available for free at http://www.neutracing.com, which also hosts complete software documentation and video tutorials. PMID:26464967

  11. neuTube 1.0: A New Design for Efficient Neuron Reconstruction Software Based on the SWC Format.

    PubMed

    Feng, Linqing; Zhao, Ting; Kim, Jinhyun

    2015-01-01

    Brain circuit mapping requires digital reconstruction of neuronal morphologies in complicated networks. Despite recent advances in automatic algorithms, reconstruction of neuronal structures is still a bottleneck in circuit mapping due to a lack of appropriate software for both efficient reconstruction and user-friendly editing. Here we present a new software design based on the SWC format, a standardized neuromorphometric format that has been widely used for analyzing neuronal morphologies or sharing neuron reconstructions via online archives such as NeuroMorpho.org. We have also implemented the design in our open-source software called neuTube 1.0. As specified by the design, the software is equipped with parallel 2D and 3D visualization and intuitive neuron tracing/editing functions, allowing the user to efficiently reconstruct neurons from fluorescence image data and edit standard neuron structure files produced by any other reconstruction software. We show the advantages of neuTube 1.0 by comparing it to two other software tools, namely Neuromantic and Neurostudio. The software is available for free at http://www.neutracing.com, which also hosts complete software documentation and video tutorials.

  12. Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) Technology: An Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-04

    IEEE Communications Magazine , April 1992, pp. 60 - 68. [5] Stallings, W.: Handbook of Computer-Communications Standards, Volume 1: The Open Systems...Conf. Digest, paper ThH3, San Jose. CA, Feb. 2-7, 1992, p.225. [14] Newman, P.: ATM Technology for Corporate Networks. IEEE Communications Magazine . April

  13. Technology transfer of energy efficient technologies in industry: A review of trends and policy issues

    SciTech Connect

    Worrell, Ernst; van Berkel, Rene; Fengqi, Zhou; Menke, Christoph; Schaeffer, Roberto; Williams, Robert O.

    2000-03-01

    In 1995, industry accounted for 41 percent of global energy use. Although the efficiency of industrial processes has increased greatly during the past decades, energy efficiency improvements remain the major opportunity to reduce CO2 emissions. Industrialization may affect the environment adversely, stressing the need for transfer of cleaner technologies to developing countries. A review of trends, barriers and opportunities for technology transfer is presented. Technology transfer is a process involving assessment, agreement, implementation, evaluation and adaptation, and repetition. Institutional barriers and policies influence the transaction process. Investments in industrial technology are dominated by the private sector. In industry, energy efficiency is often the result of investments in modern equipment, stressing the importance and need for environmentally sound and long-term investment policies. The interactive and dynamic character of technology transfer stresses the need for innovative and flexible approaches, through partnerships between various stakeholders. Adaptation of technology to local conditions is essential, but practices vary widely. Countries that spend on average more on adaptation, seem to be more successful in technology transfer, hence successful technology transfer depends on transfer of technological capabilities.

  14. A framework for evaluation of technology transfer programs. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The objective of this volume is to describe a framework with which DOE can develop a program specific methodology to evaluate it`s technology transfer efforts. This approach could also be applied to an integrated private sector technology transfer organization. Several benefits will be realized from the application of this work. While the immediate effect will be to assist program managers in evaluating and improving program performance, the ultimate benefits will accrue to the producing industry, the states, and the nation in the form of sustained or increased domestic oil production. This benefit depends also, of course, on the effectiveness of the technology being transferred. The managers of the Technology Transfer program, and the larger federal oil and gas R&D programs, will be provided with a means to design and assess the effectiveness of program efforts as they are developed, tested and performed. The framework allows deficiencies in critical aspects of the program to be quickly identified, allowing for timely corrections and improvements. The actual process of developing the evaluation also gives the staff of the Oil R&D Program or Technology Transfer subprogram the opportunity to become oriented to the overall program goals. The structure and focus imposed by the evaluation paradigm will guide program staff in selecting activities which are consistent with achieving the goals of the overall R&D program.

  15. Building technology transfer meetings: A collaborative model for transferring DOE research results to potential users

    SciTech Connect

    Shankle, D.L.; Hawkins, D.M.; Love, P.M.; Wilde, G.M.

    1994-08-01

    Transferring the technology and results from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored building energy research to potential users is a critical part of DOE`s successful research programs. To assist in this transfer of information and technologies, the DOE Office of Building Technologies (OBT) has established Building Technology Transfer Meetings that are held twice each year at one of the 10 DOE Regional Support Offices. Meeting participants include DOE personnel and representatives from each of the national laboratories involved in OBT buildings energy research as well as representatives from the DOE Regional Support Offices and other agencies involved in the buildings sector. Since 1991, OBT has held five meetings: Washington D.C., San Francisco, Denver, Oak Ridge, and Seattle. The purpose of these meetings is twofold: (1) for DOE to share information about such topics as new research results, new technologies, and new ways to collaborate with industry and universities to leverage resources; and (2) for the participants to use this information within their region to accelerate the transfer and deployment of new energy-efficient building technologies. The meetings include presentations, demonstrations, and tours. The meetings have provided an excellent opportunity for staff from the Regional Support Offices to learn about new technologies through their interactions with OBT and national laboratory program managers. Meeting tours and demonstrations have provided beneficial opportunities to get hands-on experience with new technologies and to see them in practice.

  16. Technology transfer of military space microprocessor developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorden, C.; King, D.; Byington, L.; Lanza, D.

    1999-01-01

    Over the past 13 years the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) has led the development of microprocessors and computers for USAF space and strategic missile applications. As a result of these Air Force development programs, advanced computer technology is available for use by civil and commercial space customers as well. The Generic VHSIC Spaceborne Computer (GVSC) program began in 1985 at AFRL to fulfill a deficiency in the availability of space-qualified data and control processors. GVSC developed a radiation hardened multi-chip version of the 16-bit, Mil-Std 1750A microprocessor. The follow-on to GVSC, the Advanced Spaceborne Computer Module (ASCM) program, was initiated by AFRL to establish two industrial sources for complete, radiation-hardened 16-bit and 32-bit computers and microelectronic components. Development of the Control Processor Module (CPM), the first of two ASCM contract phases, concluded in 1994 with the availability of two sources for space-qualified, 16-bit Mil-Std-1750A computers, cards, multi-chip modules, and integrated circuits. The second phase of the program, the Advanced Technology Insertion Module (ATIM), was completed in December 1997. ATIM developed two single board computers based on 32-bit reduced instruction set computer (RISC) processors. GVSC, CPM, and ATIM technologies are flying or baselined into the majority of today's DoD, NASA, and commercial satellite systems.

  17. Sub-Committee on Advanced Technology and Technology Transfer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    8217 oermitted to Jeopardise Wester’ security, there is disagreement about which areas of technology. should be limited and how restrictions should be enforced...British scientists are being denied access to American 0 I laboratories , seminars and research papers; and American research institutions have been told...Japsn at getting technology out the laboratory and into industries. Academics traditionally 4ave been unenthusiastic abou. becoming ’involved in

  18. The advent of biotechnology and technology transfer in agriculture

    SciTech Connect

    Postlewait, A.; Zilberman, D.; Parker, D.D.

    1993-05-01

    One of the keys to the success of American agriculture has been continuous waves of innovation, starting with mechanical innovations in the nineteenth century and continuing into the present with chemical and biological innovations (modern fertilizers and pesticides, high yield varieties of corn and wheat). Technological success resulted not only from new discoveries, but also from the capacity to translate new knowledge into practical innovations. Innovations helped generate an industrial infrastructure capable of both producing the new technology cheaply and effectively, and building a marketing and education network for its diffusion. The capacity for quick transfer of technology from the source of knowledge (universities) to technology producers (industry) and users (farmers) has been instrumental in the technological progress of agriculture. Mechanisms for technology transfer have changed over time as the nature of agriculture and the new technologies has changed. At present agriculture faces a new wave of technological innovation associated with biotechnology and genetic engineering. This paper investigates so that institutions can efficiently accommodate the transfer of new knowledge for biotechnology in agriculture.

  19. A case study of technology transfer: Cardiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schafer, G.

    1974-01-01

    Research advancements in cardiology instrumentation and techniques are summarized. Emphasis is placed upon the following techniques: (1) development of electrodes which show good skin compatibility and wearer comfort; (2) contourography - a real time display system for showing the results of EKGs; (3) detection of arteriosclerosis by digital computer processing of X-ray photos; (4) automated, noninvasive systems for blood pressure measurement; (5) ultrasonoscope - a noninvasive device for use in diagnosis of aortic, mitral, and tricuspid valve disease; and (6) rechargable cardiac pacemakers. The formation of a biomedical applications team which is an interdisciplinary team to bridge the gap between the developers and users of technology is described.

  20. Precise time transfer using MKIII VLBI technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, K. J.; Buisson, J. A.; Lister, M. J.; Oaks, O. J.; Spencer, J. H.; Waltman, W. B.; Elgered, G.; Lundqvist, G.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Clark, T. A.

    1984-01-01

    It is well known that Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) is capable of precise time synchronization at subnanosecond levels. This paper deals with a demonstration of clock synchronization using the MKIII VBLI system. The results are compared with clock synchronization by traveling cesium clocks and GPS. The comparison agrees within the errors of the portable clocks (+ 5 ns) and GPS(+ or - 30 ns) systems. The MKIII technology appears to be capable of clock synchronization at subnanosecond levels and appears to be very good benchmark system against which future time synchronization systems can be evaluated.

  1. MORE THAN MONEY: THE EXPONENTIAL IMPACT OF ACADEMIC TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

    PubMed Central

    McDevitt, Valerie Landrio; Mendez-Hinds, Joelle; Winwood, David; Nijhawan, Vinit; Sherer, Todd; Ritter, John F.; Sanberg, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Academic technology transfer in its current form began with the passage of the Bayh–Dole Act in 1980, which allowed universities to retain ownership of federally funded intellectual property. Since that time, a profession has evolved that has transformed how inventions arising in universities are treated, resulting in significant impact to US society. While there have been a number of articles highlighting benefits of technology transfer, now, more than at any other time since the Bayh–Dole Act was passed, the profession and the impacts of this groundbreaking legislation have come under intense scrutiny. This article serves as an examination of the many positive benefits and evolution, both financial and intrinsic, provided by academic invention and technology transfer, summarized in Table 1. PMID:25061505

  2. MORE THAN MONEY: THE EXPONENTIAL IMPACT OF ACADEMIC TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER.

    PubMed

    McDevitt, Valerie Landrio; Mendez-Hinds, Joelle; Winwood, David; Nijhawan, Vinit; Sherer, Todd; Ritter, John F; Sanberg, Paul R

    2014-11-01

    Academic technology transfer in its current form began with the passage of the Bayh-Dole Act in 1980, which allowed universities to retain ownership of federally funded intellectual property. Since that time, a profession has evolved that has transformed how inventions arising in universities are treated, resulting in significant impact to US society. While there have been a number of articles highlighting benefits of technology transfer, now, more than at any other time since the Bayh-Dole Act was passed, the profession and the impacts of this groundbreaking legislation have come under intense scrutiny. This article serves as an examination of the many positive benefits and evolution, both financial and intrinsic, provided by academic invention and technology transfer, summarized in Table 1.

  3. NASA technology utilization applications. [transfer of medical sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The work is reported from September 1972 through August 1973 by the Technology Applications Group of the Science Communication Division (SCD), formerly the Biological Sciences Communication Project (BSCP) in the Department of Medical and Public Affairs of the George Washington University. The work was supportive of many aspects of the NASA Technology Utilization program but in particular those dealing with Biomedical and Technology Application Teams, Applications Engineering projects, new technology reporting and documentation and transfer activities. Of particular interest are detailed reports on the progress of various hardware projects, and suggestions and criteria for the evaluation of candidate hardware projects. Finally some observations about the future expansion of the TU program are offered.

  4. 48 CFR 970.2770-3 - Technology transfer and patent rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Technology transfer and....2770-3 Technology transfer and patent rights. The National Competitiveness Technology Transfer Act of 1989 (NCTTA) established technology transfer as a mission for Government-owned,...

  5. Technology transfer into the solid propulsion industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Ralph L.; Thomson, Lawrence J.

    1995-03-01

    This paper is a survey of the waste minimization efforts of industries outside of aerospace for possible applications in the manufacture of solid rocket motors (SRM) for NASA. The Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) manufacturing plan was used as the model for processes involved in the production of an SRM. A literature search was conducted to determine the recycling, waste minimization, and waste treatment methods used in the commercial sector that might find application in SRM production. Manufacturers, trade organizations, and professional associations were also contacted. Waste minimization efforts for current processes and replacement technologies, which might reduce the amount or severity of the wastes generated in SRM production, were investigated. An overview of the results of this effort are presented in this paper.

  6. Technology transfer into the solid propulsion industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Ralph L.; Thomson, Lawrence J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper is a survey of the waste minimization efforts of industries outside of aerospace for possible applications in the manufacture of solid rocket motors (SRM) for NASA. The Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) manufacturing plan was used as the model for processes involved in the production of an SRM. A literature search was conducted to determine the recycling, waste minimization, and waste treatment methods used in the commercial sector that might find application in SRM production. Manufacturers, trade organizations, and professional associations were also contacted. Waste minimization efforts for current processes and replacement technologies, which might reduce the amount or severity of the wastes generated in SRM production, were investigated. An overview of the results of this effort are presented in this paper.

  7. Technology transfer of NASA microwave remote sensing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akey, N. D.

    1981-01-01

    Viable techniques for effecting the transfer from NASA to a user agency of state-of-the-art airborne microwave remote sensing technology for oceanographic applications were studied. A detailed analysis of potential users, their needs and priorities; platform options; airborne microwave instrument candidates; ancillary instrumentation; and other, less obvious factors that must be considered were studied. Conclusions and recommendations for the development of an orderly and effective technology transfer of an airborne microwave system that could meet the specific needs of the selected user agencies are reported.

  8. Space technology transfer to developing countries: opportunities and difficulties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leloglu, U. M.; Kocaoglan, E.

    Space technology, with its implications on science, economy and security, is mostly chosen as one of the priority areas for technological development by developing countries. Most nations aspiring to begin playing in the space league prefer technology transfer programs as a first step. Decreasing initial costs by small satellite technology made this affordable for many countries. However, there is a long way from this first step to establishment of a reliable space industry that can both survive in the long term with limited financial support from the government and meet national needs. This is especially difficult when major defense companies of industrialized countries are merging to sustain their competitiveness. The prerequisites for the success are implementation of a well-planned space program and existence of industrialization that can support basic testing and manufacturing activities and supply qualified manpower. In this study, the difficulties to be negotiated and the vicious circles to be broken for latecomers, that is, developing countries that invest on space technologies are discussed. Especially, difficulties in the technology transfer process itself, brain drain from developing countries to industrialized countries, strong competition from big space companies for domestic needs, costs of establishing and maintaining an infrastructure necessary for manufacturing and testing activities, and finally, the impact of export control will be emphasized. We will also try to address how and to what extent collaboration can solve or minimize these problems. In discussing the ideas mentioned above, lessons learned from the BILSAT Project, a technology transfer program from the UK, will be referred.

  9. [Los Alamos National Laboratory industrial applications and technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-30

    In October 1989, the Los Alamos Economic Development Corporation (LAEDC) entered into a contract with the Industrial Applications office (IAO) of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) whereby the LAEDC was to provide support services to IAO. More specifically, according to the Statement of Work in this contract The Los Alamos Economic Development Corporation shall assist the Los Alamos National Laboratory Industrial Applications Office in establishing and strengthening connections between potential entrepreneurs at the Laboratory and the business assistance community throughout New Mexico, directed toward enhancing the number, of successful start up businesses spinning off the Laboratory's technology base.'' As part of this contract and subsequent modifications thereof, the LAEDC was to perform seven tasks: 1. Provide business planning assistance to potential entrepreneurs. 2. (Assist IAO in preparing and distributing) informational materials on technology transfer. 3. (Organize and manage) meetings and seminars on technology transfer and entrepreneurship. 4. Identify new opportunities for technology transfer. 5. (Identify and implement programs for the) recognition of Laboratory Entrepreneurs. 6. Training Lab personnel, in the area of technology transfer and Laboratory industrial interactions. 7. Review and summarize prior New Mexico economic development studies. The purpose of this report, is to summarize the accomplishments of the LAEDC under its contract with IAO, and to fulfill its reporting requirements. This report covers the period from October 1989 to September 1992.

  10. THE FEDERAL TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER ACT - ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING TECHNOLOGIES OPPORTUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    To enhance and maintain a clean environment while imporiving the nation's productivity, the U.S. EPA is joining with private industry and academia to seek new, cost-effective technologies to prevent and control environmental pollution. Both the U.S. government and the private sec...

  11. Technology transfer from NASA to targeted industries, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccain, Wayne; Schroer, Bernard J.; Souder, William E.; Spann, Mary S.; Watters, Harry; Ziemke, M. Carl

    1993-01-01

    This volume contains the following materials to support Volume 1: (1) Survey of Metal Fabrication Industry in Alabama; (2) Survey of Electronics Manufacturing/Assembly Industry in Alabama; (3) Apparel Modular Manufacturing Simulators; (4) Synopsis of a Stereolithography Project; (5) Transferring Modular Manufacturing Technology to an Apparel Firm; (6) Letters of Support; (7) Fact Sheets; (8) Publications; and (9) One Stop Access to NASA Technology Brochure.

  12. Biomedical technology transfer. Applications of NASA science and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    Ongoing projects described address: (1) intracranial pressure monitoring; (2) versatile portable speech prosthesis; (3) cardiovascular magnetic measurements; (4) improved EMG biotelemetry for pediatrics; (5) ultrasonic kidney stone disintegration; (6) pediatric roentgen densitometry; (7) X-ray spatial frequency multiplexing; (8) mechanical impedance determination of bone strength; (9) visual-to-tactile mobility aid for the blind; (10) Purkinje image eyetracker and stabilized photocoalqulator; (11) neurological applications of NASA-SRI eyetracker; (12) ICU synthesized speech alarm; (13) NANOPHOR: microelectrophoresis instrument; (14) WRISTCOM: tactile communication system for the deaf-blind; (15) medical applications of NASA liquid-circulating garments; and (16) hip prosthesis with biotelemetry. Potential transfer projects include a person-portable versatile speech prosthesis, a critical care transport sytem, a clinical information system for cardiology, a programmable biofeedback orthosis for scoliosis a pediatric long-bone reconstruction, and spinal immobilization apparatus.

  13. 77 FR 46909 - Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-06

    ... Innovation Research (SBIR) Program and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program Policy Directives... Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer Program (STTR) Policy... technology@sba.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background Information SBA is publishing Policy...

  14. Building Technology Transfer Capacity in Turkish Universities: A Critical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranga, Marina; Temel, Serdal; Ar, Ilker Murat; Yesilay, Rustem Baris; Sukan, Fazilet Vardar

    2016-01-01

    University technology transfer has been receiving significant government funding since 2012. Results of this major investment are now expected by the Turkish government and society, not only in terms of better teaching and research performance, but also of new jobs, new products and services, enhanced regional development and contribution to…

  15. Venture Creation Programs: Bridging Entrepreneurship Education and Technology Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lackéus, Martin; Williams Middleton, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore how university-based entrepreneurship programs, incorporating real-life venture creation into educational design and delivery, can bridge the gap between entrepreneurship education and technology transfer within the university environment. Design/methodology/approach: Based on a literature review…

  16. Teacher Linguistic, Cultural, and Technological Awareness Development and Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Congcong

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation includes two studies: a pilot study on native-English-speaking preservice teachers' perceptions of learning a foreign language online and a follow-up study on inservice teachers' perceptions of transferring teacher linguistic, cultural and technological awareness into teaching practice. Conducted in 2010, the pilot…

  17. Strategic Evaluation of University Knowledge and Technology Transfer Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tran, Thien Anh

    2013-01-01

    Academic knowledge and technology transfer has been growing in importance both in academic research and practice. A critical question in managing this activity is how to evaluate its effectiveness. The literature shows an increasing number of studies done to address this question; however, it also reveals important gaps that need more research.…

  18. University-Industry Technology Transfer in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, Patrick S.; Chan, Kan S.

    2007-01-01

    In the modern knowledge economy, higher educational institutions are being required to deal with commercialising the results of their research, spinning out knowledge-based enterprises and facilitating technology transfer between their research centres and industrial firms. The universities are undergoing changes in institutional and…

  19. Information Systems and Networks for Technology Transfer. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, John; Szentivanyi, Tibor

    Results of a survey of the information resources available in industrialized countries which might be used in a United Nations technology transfer program for developing countries are presented. Information systems and networks, organized information collections of a scientific and technical character, and the machinery used to disseminate this…

  20. The Employee Invention Report (EIR) | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    After making such a discovery, NCI researchers should immediately contact their Laboratory or Branch Chief and inform him or her of a possible invention and consult with your NCI TTC Technology Transfer Specialist about submitting an Employee Invention Report (EIR) Form. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  1. Institutionalization of Technology Transfer Organizations in Chinese Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Yuzhuo; Zhang, Han; Pinheiro, Rómulo

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of in-depth studies on how technology transfer organizations (TTOs) are organized and developed. This paper examines the evolution/institutionalization of TTOs in Tsinghua University (TU), as a microcosm of the development of TTOs in Chinese universities. It explores two issues in particular: what kinds of TTOs have been developed…

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PRODUCTS FOR THE EPA EMPACT PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A presentation was given for a National Satellite Broadcast on the development of technology transfer handbooks for the EMPACT program. These handbooks help spread the knowledge and experience developed from the EMPACT projects. Handbooks are being prepared for every fully implem...

  3. Rocket engine heat transfer and material technology for commercial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiltabiddle, J.; Campbell, J.

    1974-01-01

    Liquid fueled rocket engine combustion, heat transfer, and material technology have been utilized in the design and development of compact combustion and heat exchange equipment intended for application in the commercial field. An initial application of the concepts to the design of a compact steam generator to be utilized by electrical utilities for the production of peaking power is described.

  4. Technology transfer between the government and the aerospace industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sackheim, Robert; Dunbar, Dennis

    1992-01-01

    The object of this working group panel was to review questions and issues pertaining to technology transfer between the government and the aerospace industry for use on both government and commercial space customer applications. The results of this review are presented in vugraph form.

  5. Research in space commercialization, technology transfer, and communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Research and internship programs in technology transfer, space commercialization, and information and communications policy are described. The intern's activities are reviewed. On-campus research involved work on the costs of conventional telephone technology in rural areas, an investigation of the lag between the start of a research and development project and the development of new technology, using NASA patent and patent waiver data, studies of the financial impact and economic prospects of a space operation center, a study of the accuracy of expert forecasts of uncertain quantities and a report on frequency coordination in the fixed and fixed satellite services at 4 and 6 GHz.

  6. Technology transfer at the Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Harrer, B.J.; Good, M.S.; Lemon, D.K.; Morgen, G.P.

    1996-12-31

    Over the past 15 years, efforts to move technology generated from government-funded research and development activities at the Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories into commercial application by the private sector have faced an ever-changing environment. This environment has been primarily dictated by changes in the governing political philosophies of the Congress and the Administration that fund the laboratories and direct their activities. To review the role of the DOE laboratories, the following are discussed: the past, current, and potential future legislative and political environment impacting upon technology transfer from the laboratories; mechanisms of technology transfer; and three selected projects involving transfer of nondestructive evaluation technologies to the private sector. The technologies include computer-aided fabric evaluation (CAFE), measurement of the depth to which steel parts are hardened, and compensation for wear variations in the grinding wheel during the fabrication of wood shaper tools. These respectively deal with a large partnership of companies and institutes, a single but large manufacturing company, and a small business.

  7. Biomedical technology transfer: Applications of NASA science and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The major efforts of the Stanford Biomedical Applications Team Program at the Stanford University School of Medicine for the period from October 1, 1975 to September 31, 1976 are covered. A completed EMG biotelemetry system which monitors the physiological signals of man and animals in space related research is discussed. The results of a pilot study involving lower body negative pressure testing in cardiac patients has been completed as well as the design and construction of a new leg negative pressure unit for evaluating heart patients. This technology utilizes vacuum chambers to stress the cardiovascular system during space flight. Laboratory tests of an intracranial pressure transducer, have been conducted. Extremely stable long term data using capacative pressure sensors has lead to the order of commercially manufactured monitoring systems base. Projects involving commercialization are: flexible medical electrodes, an echocardioscope, a miniature biotelemetry system, and an on-line ventricular contour detector.

  8. Transfer of advanced manufacturing technologies to eastern Kentucky industries

    SciTech Connect

    Gillies, J.A.; Kruzich, R.

    1988-05-01

    This study concludes that there are opportunities to provide assistance in the adoption of manufacturing technologies for small- and medium-sized firms in eastern Kentucky. However, the new markets created by Toyota are not adequate to justify a directed technology transfer program targeting the auto supply industry in eastern Kentucky because supplier markets have been determined for some time, and manufacturers in eastern Kentucky were not competitive in this early selection process. The results of the study strongly reinforce a reorientation of state business-assistance programs. The study also concludes that the quality and quantity of available labor is a pervasive problem in eastern Kentucky and has particular relevance as the economy changes. The study also investigated what type of technology-transfer programs would be appropriate to assist manufacturing firms in eastern Kentucky and if there were a critical number of firms to make such a program feasible.

  9. Technology transfer personnel exchange at the Boeing Company

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniak, Z.I.

    1993-03-01

    The objective of the exchange was to transfer Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) technology and expertise in advanced ceramic fabric composites (ACFC) to the Boeing Defense Space Group (Boeing Aerospace). Boeing Aerospace was especially interested in applying PNL-developed ACFC technology to its current and future spacecraft and space missions. Boeing has on-going independent research and development (R D) programs on advanced radiators and heat pipes, therefore, PNL research in ceramic fabric heat pipes was of particular interest to Boeing. Thus, this exchange assisted in the transfer of PNL's ACFC heat pipe technology and other, related research capabilities to private industrial application. The project was proposed as an initial step in building a long-term collaborative relationship between Boeing and PNL that may result in future Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) and/or other types of collaborative efforts.

  10. Technology transfer personnel exchange at the Boeing Company

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniak, Z.I.

    1993-03-01

    The objective of the exchange was to transfer Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) technology and expertise in advanced ceramic fabric composites (ACFC) to the Boeing Defense & Space Group (Boeing Aerospace). Boeing Aerospace was especially interested in applying PNL-developed ACFC technology to its current and future spacecraft and space missions. Boeing has on-going independent research and development (R&D) programs on advanced radiators and heat pipes, therefore, PNL research in ceramic fabric heat pipes was of particular interest to Boeing. Thus, this exchange assisted in the transfer of PNL`s ACFC heat pipe technology and other, related research capabilities to private industrial application. The project was proposed as an initial step in building a long-term collaborative relationship between Boeing and PNL that may result in future Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) and/or other types of collaborative efforts.

  11. State of the Science in Technology Transfer: At the Confluence of Academic Research and Business Development--Merging Technology Transfer with Knowledge Translation to Deliver Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Joseph P.

    2010-01-01

    The practice of technology transfer continues to evolve into a discipline. Efforts continue in the field of assistive technology (AT) to move technology-related prototypes, resulting from development in the academic sector, to product commercialization within the business sector. The article describes how technology transfer can be linked to…

  12. Multigigabit wireless transfer of trigger data through millimetre wave technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, R.; Cheng, S.

    2010-07-01

    The amount of data that can be transferred from highly granular tracking detectors with several million channels is today limited by the available bandwidth in the readout links which again is limited by power budget, mass and the available space for services. The low bandwidth prevents the tracker from being fully read out in real time which is a requirement for becomming a part of the first level trigger. To get the tracker to contribute to the fast trigger decision the data transfer bandwidth from the tracker has either to be increased for all data to be read out in real time or the quantity of the data to be reduced by improving the quality of the data or a combination of the two. A higher data transfer rate can be achieved by increasing the the number of data links, the data transfer speed or a combination of both. The quantity of data read out from the detector can be reduced by introducing on-detector intelligence. Next generation multigigabit wireless technology has several features that makes the technology attractive for use in future trackers. The technology can provide both higher bandwidth for data readout and means to build on-detector intelligence to improve the quality of data. The emerging millimetre wave technology offers components that are small size,low power and mass thus well suited for integration in trackers. In this paper the feasibility of wireless transfer of trigger data using 60 GHz radio in the future upgraded tracker at the Super Large Hadron Collider (SLHC) is investigated.

  13. Imagining value, imagining users: academic technology transfer for health innovation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Fiona Alice; Sanders, Carrie B; Lehoux, Pascale

    2009-04-01

    Governments have invested heavily in the clinical and economic promise of health innovation and express increasing concern with the efficacy and efficiency of the health innovation system. In considering strategies for 'better' health innovation, policy makers and researchers have taken a particular interest in the work of universities and related public research organizations: How do these organizations identify and transfer promising innovations to market, and do these efforts make best use of public sector investments? We conducted an ethnographic study of technology transfer offices (TTOs) in Ontario and British Columbia, Canada, to consider the place of health and health system imperatives in judgments of value in early-stage health innovation. Our analysis suggests that the valuation process is poorly specified as a set of task-specific judgments. Instead, we argue that technology transfer professionals are active participants in the construction of the innovation and assign value by 'imagining' the end product in its 'context of use'. Oriented as they are to the commercialization of health technology, TTOs understand users primarily as market players. The immediate users of TTOs' efforts are commercial partners (i.e., licensees, investors) who are capable of translating current discoveries into future commodities. The ultimate end users - patients, clinicians, health systems - are the future consumers of the products to be sold. Attention to these proximate and more distal users in the valuation process is a complex and constitutive feature of the work of health technology transfer. At the same time, judgements about individual technologies are made in relation to a broader imperative through which TTOs seek to imagine and construct sustainable innovation systems. Judgments of value are rendered sensible in relation to the logic of valuation for systems of innovation that, in turn, configure users of health innovation in systemic ways.

  14. Technology Transfer: A Case Study of Programs and Practices at NASA, DOD, DOC, and Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blood, John R.

    2009-01-01

    Technology transfer is vital to humanity. It spurs innovation, promotes commerce, and provides technology-based goods and services. Technology transfer is also highly complex and interdependent in nature. This interdependence is exemplified principally by the various technology transfer interactions between government, industry, and academia. …

  15. Technology transfer in agriculture. (Latest citations from the Biobusiness data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning technology transfer in agriculture. Topics include applications of technology transfer in aquaculture, forestry, soil maintenance, agricultural pollution, agricultural biotechnology, and control of disease and insect pests. Use of computer technology in agriculture and technology transfers to developing countries are discussed. (Contains a minimum of 178 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  16. Technology transfer in agriculture. (Latest citations from the Biobusiness database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning technology transfer in agriculture. Topics include applications of technology transfer in aquaculture, forestry, soil maintenance, agricultural pollution, agricultural biotechnology, and control of disease and insect pests. Use of computer technology in agriculture and technology transfers to developing countries are discussed. (Contains a minimum of 235 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  17. Benchmarking the Economic Impact and Effectiveness of University Technology Transfer in Maryland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clinch, Richard

    This study examined university technology transfer in Maryland in terms of three issues: (1) the economic impact of university technology transfer; (2) a comparison of the technology transfer effort of University of Maryland System (UMS) institutions with other regional and "best practice" institutions; and (3) the technology transfer…

  18. Technology transfer from the Superfund basic research program

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, D.P.Y.; Cornelius, J.

    1995-12-31

    In the Spring of 1995, The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) sponsored a two-day Symposium on ``Transfer of Basic (Superfund) Research to Waste Site Remediation`` in collaboration with the Department of Defense`s (DOD) Environmental Education Demonstration Grant Program, the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the California Environmental Protection Agency (Cal EPA) and the Lawrence Berkeley and Livermore National Laboratories (LBL and LLNL). The Symposium`s purpose was three-fold: (1) to familiarize DOD environmental managers with the multi-disciplinary research approach of the NIEHS Superfund Basic Research Program; (2) to exchange information on DOD research priorities and (3) to identify issues with and recommend remedies for converting technological advances from the laboratory to actual practice. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief description of the NIEHS Superfund Basic Research Program (SBRP) and to summarize selected discussions and issues identified regarding technology transfer.

  19. Ethics and technology transfer: patients, patents, and public trust.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Deborah

    2011-06-01

    Universities and academic medical centers have been increasing their focus on technology transfer and research commercialization. With this shift in focus, academic-industry ties have become prevalent. These relationships can benefit academic researchers and help then to transform their research into tangible societal benefits. However, there also are concerns that these ties and the greater academic focus on commercialization might lead to conflicts of interest, especially financial conflicts of interest. This paper briefly explores some of these conflicts of interest, particularly relating to research and training. This paper also discusses some of the policies that have been, and are being, developed to try to mitigate and manage these conflicts so that academic involvement in technology transfer and commercialization can continue without jeopardizing academic work or the public's trust in them.

  20. Challenges for nanofluid applications in heat transfer technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayanti Sukarno, Diah

    2017-01-01

    Nanofluid has a potential to become a promising coolant in many diverse industrial processes. However, that opportunity faces several challenges that need to be solved through a long road of nanofluid research programs. Three kinds of the challenges that will be studied in this paper are: 1) determination of nanofluid thermophysical properties, 2) heat transfer characteristics of nanofluid, and 3) the stability factor of nanofluid. This paper also assesses the issue that must be addressed when nanofluid is utilized in nuclear technology applications. The radiation safety aspect of nanofluid utilization in nuclear reactor technology must be taken into account. The comprehensive and multidisciplinary research and assessment are crucial to be carried out in order to ensure the practical applications of nanofluid as new and potential heat transfer fluid.

  1. The uncounted benefits: Federal efforts in domestic technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, R. L.; Hirst, K.

    1986-01-01

    Organized technology transfer activities conducted by the agencies of the U.S. government are described. The focus is upon agency or departmental level activity rather than the laboratory level. None of the programs on which information was collected has been assessed or evaluated individually. However, the aggregate programs of the government have been judged in terms of obvious gaps and opportunities for future improvement. An overview, descriptions of the various agency or department programs of technology transfer, a list of persons interviewed or consulted during the survey, and a bibliography of publications, reports and other material made available to the study staff are given. An extensive appendix of illustrative material collected from the various programs is also given.

  2. Technology Transfer and Outreach for SNL/Rochester ALPHA Project.

    SciTech Connect

    Sinars, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the next stage goals and resource needs for the joint Sandia and University of Rochester ARPA-E project. A key portion of this project is Technology Transfer and Outreach, with the goal being to help ensure that this project develops a credible method or tool that the magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) research community can use to broaden the advocacy base, to pursue a viable path to commercial fusion energy, and to develop other commercial opportunities for the associated technology. This report describes an analysis of next stage goals and resource needs as requested by Milestone 5.1.1.

  3. An Examination of Technology Transfer as a Tool for Management.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    Delacarte Press, 1967. 22. Schon, Donald A., "Champions for Radical New Invention," Harvard Business Review , Vol. 41, No. 2, pp. 77-86 March-April 1963. 23...Wells, J. G. and Waterman, R. H. Jr., "Space Technology: Pay-Off from Spin-Off," Harvard Business Review pp. 106-118, July-August 1964, 24. Barth, R...Foster, R. N. "Organize for Technology Transfer" Harvard Business Review , pp. 31-37, Nov.-Dec. 1971. 29. Wooster Ohio Agricultural Experiment

  4. Future orbital transfer vehicle technology study. Volume 2: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, E. E.

    1982-01-01

    Missions for future orbit transfer vehicles (1995-2010) are identified and the technology, operations and vehicle concepts that satisfy the transportation requirements are defined. Comparison of reusable space and ground based LO2/LH2 OTV's was made. Both vehicles used advanced space engines and aero assist capability. The SB OTV provided advantages in life cycle cost, performance and potential for improvement. Comparison of an all LO2/LH2 OTV fleet with a fleet of LO2/LH2 OTVs and electric OTV's was also made. The normal growth technology electric OTV used silicon cells with heavy shielding and argon ion thrusters. This provided a 23% advantage in total transportation cost. The impact of accelerated technology was considered in terms of improvements in performance and cost effectiveness. The accelerated technology electric vehicle used GaAs cells and annealing but did not result in the mixed fleet being any cheaper than an all LO2/LH2 OTV fleet. It is concluded that reusable LO2/LH2 OTV's can serve all general purpose cargo roles between LEO and GEO for the forseeable future. The most significant technology for the second generation vehicle would be space debris protection, on-orbit propellant storage and transfer and on-orbit maintenance capability.

  5. The Commercialization of New Technologies Transfer from Laboratory to Firm.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-09

    manner. A 60 patient who takes drugs orally or is administered drugs at regular intervals has a high concentration immediately after the drug is...American Dental Association journals, identified a potential winner. Dentists were concerned about the generally poor state of oral hygene and the...factors impacting increased university-industry technology transfer interactions? Why do firms not take advantage of university resources and talents to

  6. Impact of Export Control and Technology Transfer Regimes: International Perspectives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-07

    Impact of Export Control and Technology Transfer Regimes: International Perspectives 7 January 2012 by BGen (Ret.) Raymond E. Franck ...contact: NPS Acquisition Research Program Attn: James B. Greene, RADM, USN, (Ret.) Acquisition Chair Graduate School of Business and Public Policy...k^s^i=mlpqdo^ar^qb=p`elli= About the Authors Raymond (Chip) Franck , PhD, Senior Lecturer, Graduate School of Business & Public Policy, Naval

  7. Bio-recognition and functional lipidomics by glycosphingolipid transfer technology.

    PubMed

    Taki, Takao

    2013-01-01

    Through glycosphingolipid biochemical research, we developed two types of transcription technologies. One is a biochemical transfer of glycosphingolipids to peptides. The other is a physicochemical transfer of glycosphingolipids in silica gel to the surface of a plastic membrane. Using the first technology, we could prepare peptides which mimic the shapes of glycosphingolipid molecules by biopanning with a phage-displayed peptide library and anti-glycosphingolipid antibodies as templates. The peptides thus obtained showed biological properties and functions similar to those of the original glycosphingolipids, such as lectin binding, glycosidase modulation, inhibition of tumor metastasis and immune response against the original antigen glycosphingolipid, and we named them glyco-replica peptides. The results showed that the newly prepared peptides could be used effectively as a bio-recognition system and suggest that the glyco-replica peptides can be widely applied to therapeutic fields. Using the second technology, we could establish a functional lipidomics with a thin-layer chromatography-blot/matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (TLC-Blot/MALDI-TOF MS) system. By transferring glycosphingolipids on a plastic membrane surface from a TLC plate, innovative biochemical approaches such as simple purification of individual glycosphingolipids, binding studies, and enzyme reactions could be developed. The combinations of these biochemical approaches and MALDI-TOF MS on the plastic membrane could provide new strategies for glycosphingolipid science and the field of lipidomics. In this review, typical applications of these two transfer technologies are introduced.(Communicated by Kunihiko SUZUKI, M.J.A.).

  8. Nanolitre-scale crystallization using acoustic liquid-transfer technology

    SciTech Connect

    Villaseñor, Armando G.; Wong, April; Shao, Ada; Garg, Ankur; Donohue, Timothy J.; Kuglstatter, Andreas; Harris, Seth F.

    2012-08-01

    Acoustic droplet ejection achieves precise, tipless, non-invasive transfer of diverse aqueous solutions, enabling nanolitre-scale crystallization trials. The rapid and scalable technique demonstrated successful crystal growth with diverse targets in drop volumes as small as 20 nl. Focused acoustic energy allows accurate and precise liquid transfer on scales from picolitre to microlitre volumes. This technology was applied in protein crystallization, successfully transferring a diverse set of proteins as well as hundreds of precipitant solutions from custom and commercial crystallization screens and achieving crystallization in drop volumes as small as 20 nl. Only higher concentrations (>50%) of 2-methyl-2, 4-pentanediol (MPD) appeared to be systematically problematic in delivery. The acoustic technology was implemented in a workflow, successfully reproducing active crystallization systems and leading to the discovery of crystallization conditions for previously uncharacterized proteins. The technology offers compelling advantages in low-nanolitre crystallization trials by providing significant reagent savings and presenting seamless scalability for those crystals that require larger volume optimization experiments using the same vapor-diffusion format.

  9. Midcourse Space Experiment Data Certification and Technology Transfer. Supplement 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, David B.

    1998-01-01

    The University of Alabama in Huntsville contributes to the Technical Management of the Midcourse Space Experiment Program, to the Certification of the Level 2 data produced by the Midcourse Space Experiment's suite of in-orbit imaging radiometers, imaging spectro-radiometers and an interferometer and to the Transfer of the Midcourse Space Experiment Technology to other Government Programs. The Technical Management of the Midcourse Space Experiment Program is expected to continue through out the spacecraft's useful life time. The Transfer of Midcourse Space Experiment Technology to other government elements is expected to be on a demand basis by the United States Government and other organizations. The University, of Alabama Huntsville' contribution specifically supports the Principal Investigator's Executive Committee, the Deputy Principal Investigator for Data Certification and Technology Transfer team, the nine Ultraviolet Visible Imagers and Spectrographic Imagers (UVISI) and the Pointing and Alignment of all eleven of the science instruments. The science instruments effectively cover the 0.1 to 28 micron spectral region. The Midcourse Space Experiment spacecraft, launched April 24, 1996, is expected to have a 5 year useful lifetime. The cryogenically cooled IR sensor, SPIRIT III, performed through February, 1997 when its cryogen expired. A pre-launch, ground based calibration of the instruments provided a basis for the pre-launch certification of the Level 2 data base these instruments produce. With the spacecraft in-orbit the certification of the instrument's Level 2 data base was extended to the in-orbit environment.

  10. E-Beam—a new transfer system for isolator technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadat, Theo; Huber, Thomas

    2002-03-01

    In every aseptic filling application, the sterile transfer of goods into the aseptic area is a challenge, and there are many different ways to do it. With isolator technology a higher sterility assurance level (SAL) is achieved. This SAL is only as good as the weakest segment in the chain of manufacturing. The transfer of goods into and out of the isolator is one of these critical segments. Today different techniques, some already well established, others still very new, are available on the market like: dry heat tunnel, autoclave, pulsed light, rapid transfer systems (RTP), H 2O 2 tunnel, UV light, etc. all these systems are either not applicable for continuous transfer, only good for heat-compatible materials like glass, or do not guarantee a 6 log spore reduction. E-Beam opens new perspectives in this field. With E-beam technology it is possible to transfer heat-sensitive (plastic), pre-sterilised materials at high speed, continuously into an aseptic area. E-Beam unifies three different technologies, that result in a very efficient and high-speed decontamination machine designed for the pharmaceutical industry. First, there is the electron beam that decontaminates the goods and an accurate shielding that protects the surrounding from this beam. Second, there is the conveyor system that guarantees the output and the correct exposure time underneath the beam. And third, there is the isolator interface to provide correct differential pressure and clean air inside the tunnel as well as the decontamination of the tunnel with H 2O 2 prior to production. The E-beam is a low-energy electron beam, capable of decontaminating any kind of surface. It penetrates only a few micrometers into the material and therefore does not deform the packaging media. Currently, machines are being built to transfer pre-sterilised syringes, packed in plastic tubs with a Tyvek cover into an aseptic filling isolator with the following data: decontamination efficiency of 10 6 (6 log spore

  11. Technology Maturation in Preparation for the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael L.; Doherty, Michael P.; Moder, Jeffrey P.

    2014-01-01

    In support of its goal to find an innovative path for human space exploration, NASA embarked on the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Project, a Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) to test and validate key cryogenic capabilities and technologies required for future exploration elements, opening up the architecture for large in-space cryogenic propulsion stages and propellant depots. Recognizing that key Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) technologies anticipated for on-orbit (flight) demonstration would benefit from additional maturation to a readiness level appropriate for infusion into the design of the flight demonstration, the NASA Headquarters Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) authorized funding for a one-year technology maturation phase of the CPST project. The strategy, proposed by the CPST Project Manager, focused on maturation through modeling, concept studies, and ground tests of the storage and fluid transfer of CFM technology sub-elements and components that were lower than a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of 5. A technology maturation plan (TMP) was subsequently approved which described: the CFM technologies selected for maturation, the ground testing approach to be used, quantified success criteria of the technologies, hardware and data deliverables, and a deliverable to provide an assessment of the technology readiness after completion of the test, study or modeling activity. The specific technologies selected were grouped into five major categories: thick multilayer insulation, tank applied active thermal control, cryogenic fluid transfer, propellant gauging, and analytical tool development. Based on the success of the technology maturation efforts, the CPST project was approved to proceed to flight system development.

  12. Heat transfer enhancement -- the maturing of second-generation heat transfer technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bergles, A.E.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is basically the text of the Kern Lecture for 1991 (the 1990 Kern Award). The paper begins with some remarks about Dr. Kern. By way of introduction to heat transfer enhancement, historical notes and the evolution of literature in this area are presented. Comments are made about the increasing practical applications of enhancement technology. Developments in single-phase convection are presented, with particular emphasis on offset strip fins and twisted-tape inserts. Pool boiling and flow boiling (particularly microfin tubes) are then considered in some detail. It is concluded that enhancement represents a powerful technology to improve heat exchanger performance.

  13. An example of technological transfer to industry: the ``IMI'' project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanini, A.; Amendolia, S. R.; Annovazzi, A.; Baldelli, P.; Bigongiari, A.; Bisogni, M. G.; Catarsi, F.; Cetronio, A.; Chianella, M.; Cinti, M. N.; Delogu, P.; Fantacci, M. E.; Galimberti, D.; Gambaccini, M.; Gilardoni, C.; Iurlaro, G.; Lanzieri, C.; Meoni, M.; Novelli, M.; Pani, R.; Passuello, G.; Pellegrini, R.; Pieracci, M.; Quattrocchi, M.; Rosso, V.; Venturelli, L.

    2004-02-01

    Several INFN Sections and Departments of Physics of Italian Universities have spent many man-years in the attempt to adapt detector and read-out technologies, originally developed in the field of High Energy Physics, to the domain of biomedical apparatuses. The research covered such areas as the exploitation of crystals for the production of monochromatic X-ray beams, the development of devices for efficient X-ray detection, the design of advanced VLSI electronics, the improvement of Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tubes and crystals for Nuclear Medicine gamma-cameras. These studies have been integrated in the Integrated Mammographic Imaging (IMI) project, funded by the Italian Government through the law 46/82 (art.10) and is carried on by five high-technology industries in Italy, namely LABEN, CAEN, AMS, GILARDONI and POL.HI.TECH. We report on the status of this technological transfer project.

  14. Technology transfer. Determining industry needs: A guide for communities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This Guide was developed in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding between the NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center and the following States: Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, West Virginia. The economic welfare of individual communities is currently a matter of considerable interest. Concern for the position of US industry in the competitive world marketplace is a matter of growing concern as well. This 'guide' describes a process whereby communities may seize the opportunity to improve their own economic destiny. The method described involves linking the technology needs of existing industries to the technologies which are available from Federal Laboratories. Community technology transfer is an 'action possibility' which allows individual citizen groups to do something tangible to improve the economic climate of the places where they live and work. The George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama is pledged to promote and encourage such efforts, and stands ready to help communities both large and small in that regard.

  15. Similarities and differences between the solar wind light noble gas compositions determined on Apollo 15 SWC foils and on NASA Genesis targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, N.; Bochsler, P.; Bühler, F.; Heber, V. S.; Grimberg, A.; Baur, H.; Horstmann, M.; Bischoff, A.; Wieler, R.

    2015-10-01

    We compare the solar wind (SW) He, Ne, and Ar compositions collected during the Apollo Solar Wind Composition (SWC) experiments (1969-1972; Al- & Pt-foils) and the Genesis mission (2002-2004; so-called DOS targets considered here). While published SW 20Ne/22Ne and 36Ar/38Ar ratios of both data sets agree, differences exist in the 4He/3He, 4He/20Ne, and 20Ne/36Ar ratios. However, 20Ne/36Ar ratios from Apollo-16 Pt-foils, exclusively adopted as SW values by the SWC team, are consistent with the Genesis results. We investigate if the differences indicate a variability of the SW over the course of about 30 yr, or systematic biases of the two data sets, which were collected in different environments and measured several decades apart in different laboratories (University of Bern; ETH Zurich). New measurements of Apollo-15 SWC aluminum foils in Zurich generally agree with the original measurements performed in Bern. Zurich samples show slightly lower 4He concentrations suggesting a few percent of diffusive loss of 4He during storage of the foils. A 3% difference between the He isotopic ratios measured in Bern and in Zurich possibly represents an analytical bias between the laboratories. The low SW 4He/20Ne and 20Ne/36Ar ratios in Apollo-15 Al-foils compared to Genesis data are consistent with a mixture of Genesis-like SW and noble gases from small amounts of lunar dust. Our data suggest that the mean SW He, Ne, and Ar isotopic and elemental compositions have not significantly changed between the overall Apollo and Genesis mission collection periods.

  16. Effective transfer of geographic information system (GIS) technology: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardell, Glenn; Scharfen, Greg

    1993-08-01

    Despite the remarkable growth and dissemination of GIS technology in the past decate, barriers yet remain to the full and effective application of the technology by scientific entities. This paper will broadly survey the literature and comment on issues germane to the transfer of GIS technology within and among governmental agencies, universities, and other research organizations. An intellectual framework established by formal education in geography has aided in identifying potential uses for GIS. More widespread inclusion of geographic principles into higher education curricula, using GIS as a tool for demonstration and experimentation, will be suggested. Seminars and demonstrations are useful to spark interest in GIS, but unless material learned can be directly applied to current work, they are not of lasting value. Graphical user interfaces lift GIS from the realm of programmers and put analysis capabilities into the hands of researchers and decision makers. Factors relating to cost must always be dealt with. We have found that an appropriate pilot project is a means by which risks can be minimized while capabilities of the technology can be proven in an operational setting. Technology is not an end in itself, but a means to engender human productivity and creativity; GIS provides a unified mechanism by which to visualize and manage information on the various processes within the earth's environment. Assimilation of GIS technology by the international earth science community will undoubtedly encourage multidisciplinary cooperation.

  17. 48 CFR 970.3102-05-30-70 - Patent costs and technology transfer costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... technology transfer costs. 970.3102-05-30-70 Section 970.3102-05-30-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Principles and Procedures 970.3102-05-30-70 Patent costs and technology transfer costs. (a) For management and operating contracts that do not include the clause at 970.5227-3, Technology Transfer Mission,...

  18. 48 CFR 970.3102-05-30-70 - Patent costs and technology transfer costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... technology transfer costs. 970.3102-05-30-70 Section 970.3102-05-30-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Principles and Procedures 970.3102-05-30-70 Patent costs and technology transfer costs. (a) For management and operating contracts that do not include the clause at 970.5227-3, Technology Transfer Mission,...

  19. Technology transfer in the Life Sciences. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning technology transfer in the life sciences. Topics include technology transfer in biogas energy production, biotechnology, pollution control, aquaculture, agriculture, oceanography, and forestry. Technology transfer to developing countries and to small businesses, as well as university-industry partnerships, is described. (Contains a minimum of 67 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. 48 CFR 970.3102-05-30-70 - Patent costs and technology transfer costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... technology transfer costs. 970.3102-05-30-70 Section 970.3102-05-30-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Principles and Procedures 970.3102-05-30-70 Patent costs and technology transfer costs. (a) For management and operating contracts that do not include the clause at 970.5227-3, Technology Transfer Mission,...

  1. 76 FR 71048 - Sixth Annual Philip S. Chen, Jr. Distinguished Lecture on Innovation and Technology Transfer

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ... Innovation and Technology Transfer AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service, HHS. ACTION....D. Distinguished Lecture on Innovation and Technology Transfer. DATES: Friday, December 9, 2011, at... Recombinant Immunotoxins: From Technology Transfer to the Patient.'' Dr. Pastan is an NIH...

  2. 48 CFR 970.3102-05-30-70 - Patent costs and technology transfer costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... technology transfer costs. 970.3102-05-30-70 Section 970.3102-05-30-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... Principles and Procedures 970.3102-05-30-70 Patent costs and technology transfer costs. (a) For management and operating contracts that do not include the clause at 970.5227-3, Technology Transfer Mission,...

  3. Applications of aerospace technology in industry, a technology transfer profile: Contamination control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The strong influence NASA-sponsored research has had on the development of solutions to difficult contamination problems is considered. The contamination control field is comprised of an industrial base, supplying the tools of control; a user base, adopting control techniques; and a technical base, expanding the concepts of control. Both formal and informal mechanisms used by NASA to communicate a variety of technical advances are reviewed and certain examples of the expansion of the user base through technology transfer are given. Issues related to transfer of NASA-generated contamination control technology are emphasized.

  4. EPA and the Federal Technology Transfer Act: Opportunity knocks

    SciTech Connect

    Gatchett, A.M.; Fradkin, L.; Moore, M.; Gorman, T.; Ehrlich, A.

    1990-12-31

    In 1986, the Federal Technology Transfer Act (FTTA) was established to promote a closer, collaborative relationship between federal government agencies and the private sector. With the increasing need for new cost-effective technologies to prevent and control pollution, both the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and private industry are encouraged to facilitate the transfer of knowledge and technology under this Act. The FTTA removed several of the legal and institutional barriers to cooperative research that existed before the Act`s passage. Through the FTTA, the government strives to promote the movement of its products, processes, skills, and knowledge into the private sector for further development and commercialization by encouraging the exchange of technical personnel and the sharing of facilities and other resources. Collaborative efforts between industry, federal agencies, and academia are made possible through cooperative research and development agreements (CRADAs). Forty-two CRADAs and five licensing agreements have been initiated with EPA under this program. This paper provides an overview of this new and innovative program within the EPA. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  5. Improving NASA's technology transfer process through increased screening and evaluation in the information dissemination program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laepple, H.

    1979-01-01

    The current status of NASA's technology transfer system can be improved if the technology transfer process is better understood. This understanding will only be gained if a detailed knowledge about factors generally influencing technology transfer is developed, and particularly those factors affecting technology transfer from government R and D agencies to industry. Secondary utilization of aerospace technology is made more difficult because it depends on a transfer process which crosses established organizational lines of authority and which is outside well understood patterns of technical applications. In the absence of a sound theory about technology transfer and because of the limited capability of government agencies to explore industry's needs, a team approach to screening and evaluation of NASA generated technologies is proposed which calls for NASA, and other organizations of the private and public sectors which influence the transfer of NASA generated technology, to participate in a screening and evaluation process to determine the commercial feasibility of a wide range of technical applications.

  6. Technology transfer: Half-way houses. No. 17

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, R.W.

    1995-05-01

    In the fall of 1993, 1 was asked by the Center for National Security Studies (CNSS) of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to study the ways in which technology transfer and defense conversion had been accomplished at General Atomics (GA) and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) by interviewing Harold Agnew, who had served as director of Los Alamos before becoming president of General Atomics in 1979, and J. Robert Beyster, who had been a staff member at Los Alamos and at General Atomics before founding SAIC in 1969. Harold Agnew readily complied with my request for an interview and also suggested that I talk to Douglas Fouquet, who is in charge of public relations at General Atomics and is their unofficial historian. Robert Beyster was not available for an interview, but, through the courtesy of John C. Hopkins, a former director of CNSS, I was able to interview SAIC`s executive vice president, Donald M. Kerr, who is also a former director at Los Alamos, and Steven Rockwood, a sector vice president at SAIC who was formerly a staff member at the Laboratory Because Agnew, Kerr, and Rockwood are all familiar with LANL, as well as with their respective companies, the interviews becam exercises In comparative analyses of technology transfer. In what follows, I have tried to summarize both the interviews and some of the research which attended them. It is the historian`s hope that by use of comparative institutional analyses, Laboratory administrators may learn something of value in directing their efforts toward the transfer of technology to private industry and other government agencies.

  7. Cast Metals Coalition Technology Transfer and Program Management Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gwyn, Mike

    2009-03-31

    The Cast Metals Coalition (CMC) partnership program was funded to ensure that the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE) metalcasting research and development (R&D) projects are successfully deployed into industry. Specifically, the CMC program coordinated the transfer and deployment of energy saving technologies and process improvements developed under separately funded DOE programs and projects into industry. The transition of these technologies and process improvements is a critical step in the path to realizing actual energy savings. At full deployment, DOE funded metalcasting R&D results are projected to save 55% of the energy used by the industry in 1998. This closely aligns with DOE's current goal of driving a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017. In addition to benefiting DOE, these energy savings provide metalcasters with a significant economic advantage. Deployment of already completed R&D project results and those still underway is estimated to return over 500% of the original DOE and industry investment. Energy savings estimates through December 2008 from the Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT) portfolio of projects alone are 12 x 1012 BTUs, with a projection of over 50 x 1012 BTUs ten years after program completion. These energy savings and process improvements have been made possible through the unique collaborative structure of the CMC partnership. The CMC team consists of DOE's Office of Industrial Technology, the three leading metalcasting technical societies in the U.S: the American Foundry Society; the North American Die Casting Association; and the Steel Founders Society of America; and the Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), a recognized leader in distributed technology management. CMC provides collaborative leadership to a complex industry composed of approximately 2,100 companies, 80% of which employ less than 100 people, and only 4% of which employ more than 250 people. Without collaboration

  8. User Interface Technology Transfer to NASA's Virtual Wind Tunnel System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanDam, Andries

    1998-01-01

    Funded by NASA grants for four years, the Brown Computer Graphics Group has developed novel 3D user interfaces for desktop and immersive scientific visualization applications. This past grant period supported the design and development of a software library, the 3D Widget Library, which supports the construction and run-time management of 3D widgets. The 3D Widget Library is a mechanism for transferring user interface technology from the Brown Graphics Group to the Virtual Wind Tunnel system at NASA Ames as well as the public domain.

  9. Technology transfer at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Kulia; Runge, Henry J; Miller, David J; Barak-Bernhagen, Mary A; Boedeker, Ben H

    2011-01-01

    The course of developing a new product from an idea is a complicated process. This paper will discuss that process, in detail, from conception to product. We approach this by first discussing what the inventor must do begin the process of developing his or her idea, and then two pathways that occur simultaneously: the Technology Transfer process of patenting, marketing, and licensing the invention; and the engineering process of developing, modifying, and manufacturing the invention. Although the process is lengthy and most ideas never become a marketed product, there are those few ideas that do become realized into marketed products.

  10. Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume III

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-14

    This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume III contains supporting materials not included in Volumes I and II.

  11. Technology transfer of brain-computer interfaces as assistive technology: barriers and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Nijboer, F

    2015-02-01

    This paper provides an analysis of perspectives from different stakeholders on the state-of-the-art of BCI. Three barriers for technology transfer of BCIs as access technologies are identified. First, BCIs are developed with a narrow focus on creating a reliable technology, while a broader focus on creating a usable technology is needed. Second, the potential target group, which could benefit from BCIs as access technologies is expected to be very small. Development costs are therefore high, while reimbursements are expected to be low, which challenges the commercial viability. Third, potential target users should be much more included in the design process of BCIs to ensure that the end-products meet technical, ethical, legal and social requirements. These three issues need to be urgently addressed so that target users may benefit from this promising technology.

  12. Transferring and Transforming Technology Education: A Study of Norwegian Teachers' Perceptions of Ideas from Design & Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bungum, Berit

    2006-01-01

    What happens when educational ideas cross national and cultural borders? How do teachers respond to ideas originating in a different school system and a different national culture? This article reports on an empirical study investigating the transfer of ideas from Design & Technology as a subject in England and Wales into Norwegian schools. A…

  13. Applications of aerospace technology in industry, a technology transfer profile: Plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    New plastics technology bred out of the space program has moved steadily into the U.S. economy in a variety of organized and deliberate ways. Examples are presented of the transfer of plastics know-how into the plants and eventually the products of American business.

  14. Opportunities for the transfer of astronomical technology to medicine.

    PubMed

    Hughes, S

    2007-12-01

    There are many examples of technology transfer from astronomy to medicine, for example algorithms for reconstructing X-ray CT images were first developed for processing radio astronomy images. In more recent times, X-ray detectors developed for the Hubble Space Telescope have been used in a fine-needle breast biopsy system. Software originally developed to mosaic planetary images has been incorporated into a system for detecting breast cancer. Australia has expertise in the development of instrumentation for producing radio images from an array of radio telescopes and in multi-object fibre systems for capturing the spectra of hundreds of stellar objects simultaneously. Two possible applications of these Australian technologies are suggested that may merit further exploration. A meeting between interested parties is suggested to discuss future directions and funding.

  15. Accelerating technology transfer: new relationships for academia, industry and government.

    PubMed

    Satava, R M

    1998-01-01

    The budget deficit, reduction in Defense spending and the lack of return in the "peace dividend" has resulted in reduced federal funding for research. A number of programs have attempted to remedy the problem, with the use of collaborative funding as one of the major solutions. However, within the medical research community, there continues to be a very long technology transfer cycle. By mimicking the processes of non-medical high technology research and employing a number of these innovative solutions to medical research could afford the pathway to success. A template of how this could be accomplished through cooperative efforts of academia, industry and government is presented by using examples of success and failure in the past.

  16. Evaluation of technology transferring: The experiences of the first Navy Domestic Technology Transfair. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    In August 1989 the Office of the Chief of Naval Research and the American Defense Preparedness Association conducted the first Navy Domestic Technology Transfair. The objective of the Transfair was to expose the US Navy`s years of solid experience across a broad span of technology to organizations outside of the Navy. It was an opportunity for private industry to capitalize on the Navy developed technology and this opening for industry was the primary focus of the Transfair. The event provided a unique forum to meet leading Navy scientific and engineering innovators face-to-face. Information was available concerning licensing of naval technology that was for sale to the private sector. Further, discussions covered opportunities for new cooperative research and development agreements with Navy laboratories and R&D activities. These agreements were authorized under the Federal Technology Transfer Act of 1986. The Transfair program was conducted in such a manner as to allow each Navy inventor, either scientist or engineer, to present a system, piece of hardware, or licensable concept in a formal paper presentation. Then, the Navy inventors were available in two, two-hour periods in which individual discussions were conducted, with attendees pursuing specific venues of cooperative agreements as desired. This report provides specifics concerning the technologies that were made available for transfer to the private sector during the Transfair. The Transfair concept sought to add special emphasis to the opening that the 1988 Technology Transfer Act brought to the marketplace. The experience was a step in the education of the possibilities for cooperation between the government and the private sector to share technology. Of additional significance is the economic enhancement for business expansion with the application of the technology to markets beyond defense.

  17. Future orbital transfer vehicle technology study. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, E. E.

    1982-01-01

    Reusable space and ground based LO2/LH2 OTV's, both advanced space engines and aero assist capability were compared. The SB OTV provided advantages in life cycle cost, performance and potential for improvement. An all LO2/LH2 OTV fleet was also compared with a fleet of LO2/.H2 OTV's and electric OTV's. The normal growth technology electric OTV used silicon cells with heavy shielding and argon ion thrusters. In this case, the LO2/LH2 OTV fleet provided a 23% advantage in total transportation cost. An accelerated technology LF2/LH2 OTV provided improvements in performance relative to LO2/.H2 OTV but has higher DDT&E cost which negated its cost effectiveness. The accelerated technology electric vehicle used GaAs cells and annealing but still did not result in the mixed fleet being any cheaper than an all LO2/LH2 OTV fleet. It is concluded that reusable LO2/LH2 OTV's can serve all general purpose cargo roles between LEO and GEO for the forseeable future. The most significant technology for the second generation vehicle would be space debris protection, on orbit propellant storage and transfer and on orbit maintenance capability.

  18. Midcourse Space Experiment Data Certification and Technology Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, David B.

    1997-01-01

    The University of Alabama in Huntsville contributes to the Technical Management of the Midcourse Space Experiment Program, to the Certification of the Level 2 data produced by the Midcourse Space Experiment's suite of in-orbit imaging radiometers, imaging spectra-radiometers and an interferometer and to the Transfer of the Midcourse Space Experiment Technology to other Government Programs. The Technical Management of the Midcourse Space Experiment Program is expected to continue through out the spacecraft's useful life time, 5 years after its 1996 launch. The Transfer of Midcourse Space Experiment Technology to other government elements is expected to be on a demand basis by the United States Government and other organizations. The University of Alabama Huntsville' contribution specifically supports the nine Ultraviolet Visible Imagers and Spectrographic Imagers (UVISI) and the Pointing and Alignment of all eleven of the science instruments. The science instruments effectively cover the 0.1 to 28 micron spectral region. The Midcourse Space Experiment spacecraft, launched April 24, 1996, is expected to have a 5 year useful lifetime with a 12 month lifetime for the cryogenically cooled IR sensor. A pre-launch, ground based calibration of the instruments provided a basis for the pre-launch certification of the Level 2 data base these instruments produce. With the spacecraft in-orbit the certification of the instruments' Level 2 data base is being extended to the in-orbit environment.

  19. Technology transfer in the oceanographic sciences. (Latest citations from Oceanic Abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning technology transfer in the oceanographic sciences. Topics include technology transfer in aquaculture, energy production, sea bed mining, pollution control, shoreline protection, and coastal engineering. Use of satellite technology in resource location, communication, and navigation is described. The citations also describe technology transfer to assist developing countries. (Contains a minimum of 106 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. Australian University Technology Transfer Managers: Backgrounds, Work Roles, Specialist Skills and Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harman, Grant; Stone, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    Technology transfer managers are a new group of specialist professionals engaged in facilitating transfer of university research discoveries and inventions to business firms and other research users. With relatively high academic qualifications and enjoying higher salaries than many other comparable university staff, technology transfer managers…

  1. FY05 Targeted Technology Transfer to US Independents

    SciTech Connect

    Donald F. Duttlinger; E. Lance Cole

    2005-11-01

    Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) was established by domestic crude oil and natural gas producers in 1994 as a national not-for-profit organization to address the increasingly urgent need to improve the technology-transfer process in the U.S. upstream petroleum industry. PTTC's technology-transfer programs enhance U.S. national security. PTTC administers the only nation-wide, comprehensive program dedicated to maximizing America's supplies of domestic oil and gas. PTTC conducts grassroots programs through 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and two satellite offices, leveraging their preexisting connections with industry. This organizational structure helps bring researchers and academia to the table. Nationally and regionally, volunteers within a National Board and Regional Producer Advisory Groups guide efforts. The National Board meets three times per year, an important function being approving the annual plans and budgets developed by the regions and Headquarters (HQ). Between Board meetings, an active Management and Budget Committee guide HQ activity. PTTC itself undergoes a thorough financial audit each year. The PTTC's HQ staff plans and manages all aspects of the PTTC program, conducts nation-wide technology-transfer activities, and implements a comprehensive communications program. Networking, involvement in technical activities, and an active exhibit schedule are increasing PTTC's sphere of influence with both producers and the oilfield service sector. Circulation for ''PTTC Network News'', the quarterly newsletter, has risen to nearly 17,500. About 7,500 people receive an email Technology Alert on an approximate three-week frequency. Case studies in the ''Petroleum Technology Digest in World Oil'' appear monthly, as do ''Tech Connections'' columns in ''The American Oil and Gas Reporter''. As part of its oversight responsibility for the regions, the PTTC from the start has captured and reported data that document the myriad ways its programs

  2. Technology transfer for the US Department of Energy's Energy Storage Program: Volume 1, Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Bruneau, C.L.; Fassbender, L.L.

    1988-10-01

    Technologies developed by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Energy Storage (STOR) Program must be converted into products, processes, or services that benefit the private sector. The process of technology transfer is the primary means of accomplishing this. The purpose of this report is to examine the technology transfer activities of the STOR Program and suggest mechanisms that might make the transfer of technologies from national laboratories and universities to the private sector more effective. A brief summary of recommendations that would improve the effectiveness of the transfer of energy storage technologies from the national laboratories to the private sector is discussed. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  3. The development and technology transfer of software engineering technology at NASA. Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitman, C. L.; Erb, D. M.; Izygon, M. E.; Fridge, E. M., III; Roush, G. B.; Braley, D. M.; Savely, R. T.

    1992-01-01

    The United State's big space projects of the next decades, such as Space Station and the Human Exploration Initiative, will need the development of many millions of lines of mission critical software. NASA-Johnson (JSC) is identifying and developing some of the Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) technology that NASA will need to build these future software systems. The goal is to improve the quality and the productivity of large software development projects. New trends are outlined in CASE technology and how the Software Technology Branch (STB) at JSC is endeavoring to provide some of these CASE solutions for NASA is described. Key software technology components include knowledge-based systems, software reusability, user interface technology, reengineering environments, management systems for the software development process, software cost models, repository technology, and open, integrated CASE environment frameworks. The paper presents the status and long-term expectations for CASE products. The STB's Reengineering Application Project (REAP), Advanced Software Development Workstation (ASDW) project, and software development cost model (COSTMODL) project are then discussed. Some of the general difficulties of technology transfer are introduced, and a process developed by STB for CASE technology insertion is described.

  4. From computer images to video presentation: Enhancing technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beam, Sherilee F.

    1994-01-01

    With NASA placing increased emphasis on transferring technology to outside industry, NASA researchers need to evaluate many aspects of their efforts in this regard. Often it may seem like too much self-promotion to many researchers. However, industry's use of video presentations in sales, advertising, public relations and training should be considered. Today, the most typical presentation at NASA is through the use of vu-graphs (overhead transparencies) which can be effective for text or static presentations. For full blown color and sound presentations, however, the best method is videotape. In fact, it is frequently more convenient due to its portability and the availability of viewing equipment. This talk describes techniques for creating a video presentation through the use of a combined researcher and video professional team.

  5. Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-14

    This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume I contains the proceedings of the Workshop on Seismic Base Isolation for Department of Energy Facilities held in Marina Del Rey, California, May 13-15, 1992.

  6. Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-14

    This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume II contains the proceedings for the Short Course on Seismic Base Isolation held in Berkeley, California, August 10-14, 1992.

  7. A technology transfer tracking system for NREL: Overview and results

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, R.L.; Chapman, M.J.

    1996-07-01

    The purpose of this study has been to assess the National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s (NREL) technology, transfer--both the activities and the system, with the objective of developing a system to track the benefits of NREL-sponsored or conducted research. There were two factors which facilitated this study and which were important in the ability to make a detailed analysis and series of recommendations. First, was the nature of the lab, being one which, from its beginning, has worked closely with industry and, therefore has been directed toward research which would be of value to industry and hopefully commercialized. Second, the size of the laboratory made it relatively more easy to address issues and to become familiar with the organization and with the scientists themselves.

  8. Analysis and technology transfer report, 1989 and 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    The buildings sector used 29.6 quadrillion Btus (quads) of energy in 1989, or 36 percent of the total primary energy consumed in the United States. The major uses are for space heating and cooling, water heating, refrigeration, and lighting. Electricity is the dominant fuel, followed by natural gas, petroleum, and other fuels. Although there were dramatic improvements in energy efficiency in this sector from 1975 to 1985, in recent years energy use has grown rapidly. The large growth expected in commercial building floor space and in residential units means that total building-sector energy consumption could increase dramatically by the year 2030. The mission of the US DOE's Office of Building Technologies (OBT) is to lead a national program supporting private sector efforts to improve the energy efficiency of the nation's buildings and to increase their utilization of renewable energy sources. The Office is also responsible for energy efficiency planning and management for Federal buildings as well as buildings-related associated information, financial incentives, and regulatory functions that are determined to be appropriate for the Federal government. To accomplish its goals, OBT plans and conducts research and development to make technologies available and provides information on their effectiveness. The selection and management of OBT research activities requires an understanding of where and how energy is used within the buildings sectors, how energy use is expected to change in the future, and the potential impact of new and emerging technologies on energy use. Analysis activities serve to collect energy use information, provide the analysis necessary to apply this information to research and development planning, and develop analysis tools which the program uses to set priorities for research projects. This report summarizes analysis and technology transfer activities undertaken by OBT during 1989 and 1990. 101 refs., 19 figs., 9 tabs.

  9. Technology transfer by means of fault tree synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batzias, Dimitris F.

    2012-12-01

    Since Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) attempts to model and analyze failure processes of engineering, it forms a common technique for good industrial practice. On the contrary, fault tree synthesis (FTS) refers to the methodology of constructing complex trees either from dentritic modules built ad hoc or from fault tress already used and stored in a Knowledge Base. In both cases, technology transfer takes place in a quasi-inductive mode, from partial to holistic knowledge. In this work, an algorithmic procedure, including 9 activity steps and 3 decision nodes is developed for performing effectively this transfer when the fault under investigation occurs within one of the latter stages of an industrial procedure with several stages in series. The main parts of the algorithmic procedure are: (i) the construction of a local fault tree within the corresponding production stage, where the fault has been detected, (ii) the formation of an interface made of input faults that might occur upstream, (iii) the fuzzy (to count for uncertainty) multicriteria ranking of these faults according to their significance, and (iv) the synthesis of an extended fault tree based on the construction of part (i) and on the local fault tree of the first-ranked fault in part (iii). An implementation is presented, referring to 'uneven sealing of Al anodic film', thus proving the functionality of the developed methodology.

  10. Bioprocess development workflow: Transferable physiological knowledge instead of technological correlations.

    PubMed

    Reichelt, Wieland N; Haas, Florian; Sagmeister, Patrick; Herwig, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Microbial bioprocesses need to be designed to be transferable from lab scale to production scale as well as between setups. Although substantial effort is invested to control technological parameters, usually the only true constant parameter is the actual producer of the product: the cell. Hence, instead of solely controlling technological process parameters, the focus should be increasingly laid on physiological parameters. This contribution aims at illustrating a workflow of data life cycle management with special focus on physiology. Information processing condenses the data into physiological variables, while information mining condenses the variables further into physiological descriptors. This basis facilitates data analysis for a physiological explanation for observed phenomena in productivity. Targeting transferability, we demonstrate this workflow using an industrially relevant Escherichia coli process for recombinant protein production and substantiate the following three points: (1) The postinduction phase is independent in terms of productivity and physiology from the preinduction variables specific growth rate and biomass at induction. (2) The specific substrate uptake rate during induction phase was found to significantly impact the maximum specific product titer. (3) The time point of maximum specific titer can be predicted by an easy accessible physiological variable: while the maximum specific titers were reached at different time points (19.8 ± 7.6 h), those maxima were reached all within a very narrow window of cumulatively consumed substrate dSn (3.1 ± 0.3 g/g). Concluding, this contribution provides a workflow on how to gain a physiological view on the process and illustrates potential benefits. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:261-270, 2017.

  11. 78 FR 59410 - Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-26

    ... ADMINISTRATION Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs... period for the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR... Street SW., Washington, DC 20416; or send an email to Technology@sba.gov . Highlight the information...

  12. Manufacturing process applications team (MATEAM). [technology transfer in the areas of machine tools and robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The transfer of NASA technology to the industrial sector is reported. Presentations to the machine tool and robot industries and direct technology transfers of the Adams Manipulator arm, a-c motor control, and the bolt tension monitor are discussed. A listing of proposed RTOP programs with strong potential is included. A detailed description of the rotor technology available to industry is given.

  13. Information to Change the World--Fulfilling the Information Needs of Technology Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duberman, Josh; Zeller, Martin

    1996-01-01

    Provides an introduction to fulfilling the information needs of technology transfer. Highlights include a definition of technology transfer; government and university involvement; industry's role; publishers; an annotated list of information sources and contacts; technology assessment, including patent searching, competitive intelligence, and…

  14. Technology 2001: The Second National Technology Transfer Conference and Exposition, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    Proceedings of the workshop are presented. The mission of the conference was to transfer advanced technologies developed by the Federal government, its contractors, and other high-tech organizations to U.S. industries for their use in developing new or improved products and processes. Volume two presents papers on the following topics: materials science, robotics, test and measurement, advanced manufacturing, artificial intelligence, biotechnology, electronics, and software engineering.

  15. Technology 2001: The Second National Technology Transfer Conference and Exposition, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Proceedings of the workshop are presented. The mission of the conference was to transfer advanced technologies developed by the Federal government, its contractors, and other high-tech organizations to U.S. industries for their use in developing new or improved products and processes. Volume two presents papers on the following topics: materials science, robotics, test and measurement, advanced manufacturing, artificial intelligence, biotechnology, electronics, and software engineering.

  16. Advanced robotic technologies for transfer at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, P.C.

    1994-10-01

    Hazardous operations which have in the past been completed by technicians are under increased scrutiny due to high costs and low productivity associated with providing protective clothing and environments. As a result, remote systems are needed to accomplish many hazardous materials handling tasks such as the clean-up of waste sites in which the exposure of personnel to radiation, chemical, explosive and other hazardous constituents is unacceptable. Computer models augmented by sensing, and structured, modular computing environments are proving effective in automating many unstructured hazardous tasks. Work at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has focused on applying flexible automation (robotics) to meet the needs of the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE). Dismantling facilities, environmental remediation, and materials handling in changing, hazardous environments lead to many technical challenges. Computer planning, monitoring and operator assistance shorten training cycles, reduce errors, and speed execution of operations. Robotic systems that re-use well-understood generic technologies can be much better characterized than robotic systems developed for a particular application, leading to a more reliable and safer systems. Further safety in robotic operations results from use of environmental sensors and knowledge of the task and environment. Collision detection and avoidance is achieved from such sensor integration and model-based control. This paper discusses selected technologies developed at SNL for use within the USDOE complex that have been or are ready for transfer to government and industrial suppliers. These technologies include sensors, sub-systems, and the design philosophy applied to quickly integrate them into a working robotic system. This paper represents the work of many people at the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center at SNL, to whom the credit belongs.

  17. Dual-Use Space Technology Transfer Conference and Exhibition. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, Kumar (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    This is the second volume of papers presented at the Dual-Use Space Technology Transfer Conference and Exhibition held at the Johnson Space Center February 1-3, 1994. Possible technology transfers covered during the conference were in the areas of information access; innovative microwave and optical applications; materials and structures; marketing and barriers; intelligent systems; human factors and habitation; communications and data systems; business process and technology transfer; software engineering; biotechnology and advanced bioinstrumentation; communications signal processing and analysis; medical care; applications derived from control center data systems; human performance evaluation; technology transfer methods; mathematics, modeling, and simulation; propulsion; software analysis and decision tools; systems/processes in human support technology; networks, control centers, and distributed systems; power; rapid development; perception and vision technologies; integrated vehicle health management; automation technologies; advanced avionics; and robotics technologies.

  18. Dual-Use Space Technology Transfer Conference and Exhibition. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, Kumar (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    This document contains papers presented at the Dual-Use Space Technology Transfer Conference and Exhibition held at the Johnson Space Center February 1-3, 1994. Possible technology transfers covered during the conference were in the areas of information access; innovative microwave and optical applications; materials and structures; marketing and barriers; intelligent systems; human factors and habitation; communications and data systems; business process and technology transfer; software engineering; biotechnology and advanced bioinstrumentation; communications signal processing and analysis; new ways of doing business; medical care; applications derived from control center data systems; human performance evaluation; technology transfer methods; mathematics, modeling, and simulation; propulsion; software analysis and decision tools systems/processes in human support technology; networks, control centers, and distributed systems; power; rapid development perception and vision technologies; integrated vehicle health management; automation technologies; advanced avionics; ans robotics technologies. More than 77 papers, 20 presentations, and 20 exhibits covering various disciplines were presented b experts from NASA, universities, and industry.

  19. Definition of technology development missions for early space station, orbit transfer vehicle servicing, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Propellant transfer, storage, and reliquefaction TDM; docking and berthing technology development mission; maintenance technology development mission; OTV/payload integration, space station interface/accommodations; combined TDM conceptual design; programmatic analysis; and TDM equipment usage are discussed.

  20. 78 FR 48537 - Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... ADMINISTRATION Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs... Administration (SBA) is publishing the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology... Business Administration, 409 Third Street SW., Washington, DC 20416; or send an email to...

  1. Moving R&D to the Marketplace, A Guidebook for Technology Transfer Managers

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, John E.; Kenkeremath, Deepak C.; Janis, F. Timothy

    1993-01-01

    This Guidebook serves as an introduction as well as a refresher for technology transfer managers. It focuses on the question: What can the Technology Transfer manager do when confronted by complex situations and events? The main functional issues addressed here concern the conduct of technology transfer in Technology Utilization programs. These R&D programs whose primary mission is to develop technologies that will be used outside of the Federal sector. Renewable energy, health care, and agricultural advances are technologies of this type. The contents of this Guidebook will be of value to managers in a variety of Federal, State, university and industry technology development and transfer programs. The general area of transferring service innovations is not covered here. The Guidebook is primarily about the development and care of hardware. This Guidebook makes no attempt to judge the value of specific technologies in meeting societal needs. Rather, it addresses the improvement of the technology transfer process itself. It does, however, include reminders that ascertainment of the social value of specific technologies is one of the important yet difficult tasks of R&D and technology transfer programs. [DJE-2005

  2. Your idea and your university: issues in academic technology transfer.

    PubMed

    Smith, Charles D

    2011-06-01

    Research discoveries may lead to products for commercial development. A central consideration for the researcher is how involved she or he will be in the commercialization process. In some cases, a university out-licenses the intellectual property, whereas in other cases, the investigator may want to be involved in the development process and choose to start his or her own company to develop and possibly to manufacture and sell the product. Before undertaking such a challenge, however, the investigator-turned-entrepreneur must consider a variety of issues, including career goals, financial and time commitments, potential conflicts of interest and/or commitment, start-up funding, and his or her ability to run a company or step aside to allow business experts to make necessary decisions. This paper discusses some personal considerations in deciding to start a spinout company and provides information on some of the available government grants to assist you should you decide to undertake your product's commercial development. In particular, the Small Business Innovative Research and Small Business Technology Transfer programs of federal funding agencies often are the source of early funding for new biomedical companies.

  3. Using CASE to Exploit Process Modeling in Technology Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renz-Olar, Cheryl

    2003-01-01

    A successful business will be one that has processes in place to run that business. Creating processes, reengineering processes, and continually improving processes can be accomplished through extensive modeling. Casewise(R) Corporate Modeler(TM) CASE is a computer aided software engineering tool that will enable the Technology Transfer Department (TT) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to capture these abilities. After successful implementation of CASE, it could then go on to be applied in other departments at MSFC and other centers at NASA. The success of a business process is dependent upon the players working as a team and continuously improving the process. A good process fosters customer satisfaction as well as internal satisfaction in the organizational infrastructure. CASE provides a method for business process success through functions consisting of systems and processes business models; specialized diagrams; matrix management; simulation; report generation and publishing; and, linking, importing, and exporting documents and files. The software has an underlying repository or database to support these functions. The Casewise. manual informs us that dynamics modeling is a technique used in business design and analysis. Feedback is used as a tool for the end users and generates different ways of dealing with the process. Feedback on this project resulted from collection of issues through a systems analyst interface approach of interviews with process coordinators and Technical Points of Contact (TPOCs).

  4. Technology Transfer from University to Industry: Responsive and Responsible University Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Anne

    1989-01-01

    A discussion of technology transfer describes four strategic technologies identified as important to California's economy (biotechnology, advanced materials, information technology, and manufacturing technology) and suggests that university policymakers not lose sight of their responsibility for directing university efforts to improve the human…

  5. Advanced Life Support Systems: Opportunities for Technology Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, B.; Henninger, D.; Ming, D.; Verostko, C. E.

    1994-01-01

    NASA's future missions to explore the solar system will be of long-duration possibly lasting years at a time. Human life support systems will have to operate with very high reliability for these long periods with essentially no resupply from Earth. Such life support systems will make extensive use of higher plants, microorganisms, and physicochemical processes for recycling air and water, processing wastes, and producing food. Development of regenerative life support systems will be a pivotal capability for NASA's future human missions. A fully functional closed loop human life support system currently does not exist and thus represents a major technical challenge for space exploration. Technologies where all life support consumables are recycled have many potential terrestrial applications as well. Potential applications include providing human habitation in hostile environments such as the polar regions or the desert in such a way as to minimize energy expenditures and to minimize negative impacts on those often ecologically-sensitive areas. Other potential applications include production of food and ornamental crops without damaging the environment from fertilizers that contaminate water supplies; removal of trace gas contaminants from tightly sealed, energy-efficient buildings (the so-called sick building syndrome); and even the potential of gaining insight into the dynamics of the Earth's biosphere such that we can better manage our global environment. Two specific advanced life support technologies being developed by NASA, with potential terrestrial application, are the zeoponic plant growth system and the Hybrid Regenerative Water Recovery System (HRWRS). The potential applications for these candidate dual use technologies are quite different as are the mechanisms for transfer. In the case of zeoponics, a variety of commercial applications has been suggested which represent potentially lucrative markets. Also, the patented nature of this product offers

  6. Solid lubricant mass contact transfer technology usage for vacuum ball bearings longevity increasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzymatov, B.; Deulin, E.

    2016-07-01

    A contact mass transfer technological method of solid lubricant deposition on components of vacuum ball bearings is presented. Physics-mathematical model of process contact mass transfer is being considered. The experimental results of ball bearings covered with solid lubricant longevity in vacuum are presented. It is shown that solid lubricant of contact mass transfer method deposition is prospective for ball bearing longevity increasing.

  7. Public Relations and Technology Transfer Offices: An Assessment of US Universities' Relations with Media and Government

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haney, James M.; Cohn, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses the importance for technology transfer offices of sound media and government relations strategies. It reports the results of a nationwide electronic survey in the USA and interviews with technology transfer managers on how they handle public relations issues in their offices. Strengths and weaknesses of their communication …

  8. A New Technology Transfer Paradigm: How State Universities Can Collaborate with Industry in the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renault, Catherine S.; Cope, Jeff; Dix, Molly; Hersey, Karen

    2008-01-01

    In some US states, policy makers, pressed by local and regional industrial interests, are debating how to "reform" technology transfer at public universities. "Reform" in this context is generally understood to mean redirecting university technology transfer activities to increase the benefits of state-funded research to local industries.…

  9. 48 CFR 970.3102-05-30-70 - Patent costs and technology transfer costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... technology transfer costs. 970.3102-05-30-70 Section 970.3102-05-30-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Contract Cost Principles and Procedures 970.3102-05-30-70 Patent costs and technology transfer costs. (a) For...

  10. An Analysis of NASA Technology Transfer. Degree awarded by Pennsylvania State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Lance B.

    1996-01-01

    A review of previous technology transfer metrics, recommendations, and measurements is presented within the paper. A quantitative and qualitative analysis of NASA's technology transfer efforts is performed. As a relative indicator, NASA's intellectual property performance is benchmarked against a database of over 100 universities. Successful technology transfer (commercial sales, production savings, etc.) cases were tracked backwards through their history to identify the key critical elements that lead to success. Results of this research indicate that although NASA's performance is not measured well by quantitative values (intellectual property stream data), it has a net positive impact on the private sector economy. Policy recommendations are made regarding technology transfer within the context of the documented technology transfer policies since the framing of the Constitution. In the second thrust of this study, researchers at NASA Langley Research Center were surveyed to determine their awareness of, attitude toward, and perception about technology transfer. Results indicate that although researchers believe technology transfer to be a mission of the Agency, they should not be held accountable or responsible for its performance. In addition, the researchers are not well educated about the mechanisms to perform, or policies regarding, technology transfer.

  11. Technology Transfer as an Entrepreneurial Practice in Higher Education. CELCEE Digest No. 98-9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faris, Shannon K.

    This digest examines some of the literature on technology transfer in the context of higher education, noting that the practice of capitalizing on academic research for commercial purposes has the potential to generate financial resources for the participating institutions of higher education. Several examples of technology transfer are cited,…

  12. 40 CFR 63.126 - Transfer operations provisions-reference control technology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transfer operations provisions-reference control technology. 63.126 Section 63.126 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Wastewater § 63.126 Transfer operations provisions—reference control technology. (a) For each Group...

  13. Technology transfer for the US Department of Energy's Energy Storage Program: Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Bruneau, C.L.; Fassbender, L.L.

    1988-10-01

    This document contains the appendices to Technology Transfer Recommendations for the US Department of Energy's Storage Program (PNL-6484, Vol. 1). These appendices are a list of projects, publications, and presentations connected with the Energy Storage (STOR) program. In Volume 1, the technology transfer activities of the STOR program are examined and mechanisms for increasing the effectiveness of those activities are recommended.

  14. Transfer of Military Technology to Developing Countries: The Turkish Case

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    educational, And health sectors are often the first to be mobilized to meet military requests associated with imported military technology. Bases must...Device TechnologyI 6.1.3 Beam Pointing and Control Technology 6.1.4 Mounting Subsystem Technology 6.1.5 Beam-Targeting Coupling Technology 6.1.6 Beam

  15. NASA programs in technology transfer and their relation to remote sensing education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    Technology transfer to users is a central feature of NASA programs. In each major area of responsibility, a variety of mechanisms was established to provide for this transfer of operational capability to the proper end user, be it a Federal agency, industry, or other public sector users. In addition, the Technology Utilization program was established to cut across all program areas and to make available a wealth of 'spinoff' technology (i.e., secondary applications of space technology to ground-based use). The transfer of remote sensing technology, particularly to state and local users, presents some real challenges in application and education for NASA and the university community. The agency's approach to the transfer of remote sensing technology and the current and potential role of universities in the process are considered.

  16. Technology transfer metrics: Measurement and verification of data/reusable launch vehicle business analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trivoli, George W.

    1996-01-01

    Congress and the Executive Branch have mandated that all branches of the Federal Government exert a concentrated effort to transfer appropriate government and government contractor-developed technology to the industrial use in the U.S. economy. For many years, NASA has had a formal technology transfer program to transmit information about new technologies developed for space applications into the industrial or commercial sector. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been in the forefront of the development of U.S. industrial assistance programs using technologies developed at the Center. During 1992-93, MSFC initiated a technology transfer metrics study. The MSFC study was the first of its kind among the various NASA centers. The metrics study is a continuing process, with periodic updates that reflect on-going technology transfer activities.

  17. Information systems and technology transfer programs on geothermal energy and other renewable sources of energy

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.J.; Antunez, E.

    1996-01-01

    In order to remain competitive, it is necessary to stay informed and use the most advanced technologies available. Recent developments in communication, like the Internet and the World Wide Web, enormously facilitate worldwide data and technology transfer. A compilation of the most important sources of data on renewable energies, especially geothermal, as well as lists of relevant technology transfer programs are presented. Information on how to gain access to, and learn more about them, is also given.

  18. Information systems and technology transfer programs on geothermal energy and other renewable sources of energy

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, Marcelo J.; Antunez, Emilio u.

    1996-01-24

    In order to remain competitive it is necessary to stay informed and use the most advanced technologies available. Recent developments in communication, like the Internet and the World Wide Web, enormously facilitate worldwide data and technology transfer. A compilation of the most important sources of data on renewable energies, especially geothermal, as well as lists of relevant technology transfer programs are presented. Information on how to gain access to, and learn more about them is also given.

  19. Information for Our Partners | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    CRADA PAYMENT OPTIONS: Electronic Payments by Wire Transfer via Fedwire, Mail a check to the Institute or Center, or Automated Clearing House (ACH)/Electronic Funds Transfer (ETF) payments via Pay.gov (NCI ONLY). | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  20. USEPA SITE PROGRAM APPROACH TO TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER AND REGULATORY ACCEPTANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SITE Program was created to meet the increased demand for innovative technologies for hazardous waste treatment. To accomplish this mission, the program seeks to advance the development, implementation and commercialization of innovative technologies for hazardous waste chara...

  1. Technologies for Lunar Surface Power Systems Power Beaming and Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzwell, Neville; Pogorzelski, Ronald J.; Chang, Kai; Little, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Wireless power transmission within a given working area is required or enabling for many NASA Exploration Systems. Fields of application include robotics, habitats, autonomous rendezvous and docking, life support, EVA, and many others. In robotics applications, for example, the robots must move in the working area without being hampered by power cables and, meanwhile, obtain a continuous and constant power from a power transmitter. The development of modern technology for transmitting electric power over free space has been studied for several decades, but its use in a system has been mainly limited to low power, 1-2 Vdc output voltage at a transmission distance of few meters for which relatively less than 0.5 mW/cm2 is required (e.g., Radio frequency identification RFID). Most of the rectenna conversion efficiency research to date has concentrated in low GHz frequency range of 2.45 to 10 GHz, with some work at 35 GHz. However, for space application, atmospheric adsorbtion is irrelevant and higher frequency systems with smaller transmit and receive apertures may be appropriate. For high power, most of the work on rectennas has concentrated on optimizing the conversion efficiency of the microwave rectifier element; the highest power demonstrated was 35 kW of power over a distance of 1.5 km. The objective of this paper is to establish the manner in which a very large number of very low power microwave devices can be synchronized to provide a beam of microwaves that can be used to efficiently and safely transport a significant amount of power to a remote location where it can be converted to dc (or ac) power by a ``rectenna.'' The proposed system is based on spatial power combining of the outputs of a large number of devices synchronized by mutual injection locking. We have demonstrated at JPL that such power could be achieved by combining 25 sources in a configuration that allows for convenient steering of the resulting beam of microwaves. Retrodirective beam

  2. A hypertext-based Internet-assessable database for the MSFC Technology Transfer Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Jeff

    1994-01-01

    There exists a continuing need to disseminate technical information and facilities capabilities from NASA field centers in an effort to promote the successful transfer of technologies developed with public funds to the private sector. As technology transfer is a stated NASA mission, there exists a critical need for NASA centers to document technology capabilities and disseminate this information on as wide a basis as possible. Certainly local and regional dissemination is critical, but global dissemination of scientific and engineering facilities and capabilities gives NASA centers the ability to contribute to technology transfer on a much broader scale. Additionally, information should be disseminated in a complete and rapidly available form. To accomplish this information dissemination, the unique capabilities of the Internet are being exploited. The Internet allows widescale information distribution in a rapid fashion to aid in the accomplishment of technology transfer goals established by the NASA/MSFC Technology Transfer Office. Rapid information retrieval coupled with appropriate electronic feedback, allows the scientific and technical capabilities of Marshall Space Flight Center, often unique in the world, to be explored by a large number of potential benefactors of NASA (or NASA-derived) technologies. Electronic feedback, coupled with personal contact with the MSFC Technology Transfer Office personnel, allows rapid responses to technical requests from industry and academic personnel as well as private citizens. The remainder of this report gives a brief overview of the Mosaic software and a discussion of technology transfer office and laboratory facilities data that have been made available on the Internet to promote technology transfer.

  3. Social issues and implications of remote sensing applications: Paradigms of technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoos, I. R.

    1980-01-01

    The transfer of technology from one federal agency to another was observed in the case of the move of LANDSAT to NOAA. An array of unanticipated consequences was found that have important impacts on both the process and outcome of the transfer. When the process was studied from viewpoint of the ultimate recipient, a set of expectations and perceptions were found that figure more in a final assessment than do the attributes of the technology being transfered. The question of how to link a technology with a community of potential users was studed in detail.

  4. [Nasal submicron emulsion of Scutellariae Radix extract preparation technology research based on phase transfer of solute technology].

    PubMed

    Shi, Ya-jun; Shi, Jun-hui; Chen, Shi-bin; Yang, Ming

    2015-07-01

    Based on the demand of nasal drug delivery high drug loadings, using the unique phase transfer of solute, integrating the phospholipid complex preparation and submicron emulsion molding process of Scutellariae Radix extract, the study obtained the preparation of the high drug loadings submicron emulsion of Scutellariae Radix extract. In the study of drug solution dispersion method, the uniformity of drug dispersed as the evaluation index, the traditional mixing method, grinding, homogenate and solute phase transfer technology were investigated, and the solute phase transfer technology was adopted in the last. With the adoption of new technology, the drug loading capacity reached 1.33% (phospholipid complex was 4%). The drug loading capacity was improved significantly. The transfer of solute method and timing were studied as follows,join the oil phase when the volume of phospholipid complex anhydrous ethanol solution remaining 30%, the solute phase transfer was completed with the continued recycling of anhydrous ethanol. After drug dissolved away to oil phase, the preparation technology of colostrum was determined with the evaluation index of emulsion droplet form. The particle size of submicron emulsion, PDI and stability parameters were used as evaluation index, orthogonal methodology were adopted to optimize the submicron emulsion ingredient and main influential factors of high pressure homogenization technology. The optimized preparation technology of Scutellariae Radix extract nasal submicron emulsion is practical and stable.

  5. Successful frozen blastocyst transfers after failed fresh transfers in assisted reproductive technologies patients with hydrosalpinx.

    PubMed

    Sueldo, Carolina M; Milki, Amin A; Lathi, Ruth B

    2012-03-01

    Untreated hydrosalpinx is known to decrease in vitro fertilization success. We report on 4 patients with hydrosalpinx for whom fresh transfers of 11 good quality embryos did not produce a pregnancy; however, frozen blastocyst transfers in natural cycles resulted in several successful pregnancies, with an implantation rate of 60% (9/15 blastocysts implanted).

  6. Technology transfer in the life sciences. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning technology transfer in the life sciences. Topics include technology transfer in biogas energy production, biotechnology, pollution control, aquaculture, agriculture, oceanography, and forestry. Technology transfer to developing countries and to small businesses, as well as university-industry partnerships, is described. (Contains a minimum of 71 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  7. Assessing the Economic Impacts of University R&D and Identifying Roles for Technology Transfer Officers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Link, Albert N.

    2000-01-01

    Sets forth guidelines for assessing the economic impact of university research and development and identifies what may become the roles and responsibilities of technology transfer officers in the assessment process. (Author/JOW)

  8. Academic technology transfer and radiology: a strong partnership for the future.

    PubMed

    Eusemann, Christian D; Sammons, Barry E; Holmes, David R; Brady, Thomas J; Erenburg, Irina; Toneguzzo, Frances

    2007-11-01

    To date, technology transfer from academia to industry has been strongest in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical sector. The medical imaging and medical device industries have traditionally been smaller players and, as a result, some, perhaps many, investigators in radiology are unaware of the potential value of technology transfer and the opportunity to receive sponsorship for research from medical imaging companies. Many investigators are also unaware of opportunities to introduce important academic discoveries into clinical practice through licensing and technology transfer. These untapped opportunities are not only valuable, but also are becoming more and more important in light of the ever-increasing difficulties associated with sustaining and receiving new government funding. The goal of this article is to provide academic scientists in the field of radiology with insights about the key aspects of the technology transfer process, including observations about inventions, intellectual property, and industry-sponsored research.

  9. Federal Laboratory Consortium Recognizes Unituxin Collaborators with Excellence in Technology Transfer Awards | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) presented an Excellence in Technology Transfer award to the group that collaborated to bring Unituxin (dinutuximab, also known as ch14.18), an immunotherapy for neuroblastoma, to licensure.

  10. Commercial non-aerospace technology transfer program for the 2000s: Strategic analysis and implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horsham, Gary A. P.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents a strategic analysis and implementation plan for NASA's Office of Commercial Programs (OCP), Technology Transfer Division's (TTD), Technology Transfer Program. The main objectives of this study are to: (1) characterize the NASA TTD's environment and past organizational structure; (2) clearly identify current and prospective programmatic efforts; (3) determine an evolutionary view of an organizational structure which could lead to the accomplishment of NASA's future technology transfer aims; and (4) formulate a strategy and plan to improve NASA's (and other federal agencies) ability to transfer technology to the non-aerospace sectors of the U.S. economy. The planning horizon for this study extends through the remainder of the 1990s to the year 2000.

  11. Federal assistance program. Geothermal technology transfer. Project status report, May 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Lienau, P.J.; Culver, G.

    1986-05-01

    Progress for the month of May, 1986, is described. Projects include evaluation of direct heating of greenhouses and other businesses, technology transfer to consultants, developers and users, and program monitor activities. (ACR)

  12. Technology and Knowledge Transfer in the Graz Region Ten Years of Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofer, Franz; Adametz, Christoph; Holzer, Franz

    2004-01-01

    Technology and knowledge transfer from universities to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) is seen as one way to strengthen a region's innovation capability. But what if SMEs do not want to play along? Looking back at some 10 years' experience of supporting SMEs, the authors describe in detail the 'Active Knowledge Transfer' programme, which…

  13. Assessing the Suitability of Process and Information Technology in Supporting Tacit Knowledge Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Chien-Hsing; Kao, Shu-Chen; Shih, Lan-Hsin

    2010-01-01

    The transfer of tacit knowledge, one of the most important issues in the knowledge sharing context, needs a multi-dimensional perception in its process. Information technology's (IT) supporting role has already been addressed in the process of tacit knowledge transfer. However, IT has its own characteristics, and in turn, may have dissimilar…

  14. The Relevance of Career Aspirations for Transfer Students Persisting in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyote, Ruthann T.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study utilizes data acquired from interviews with 18 community college transfer students in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) majors and 7 university staff people who work in direct student services with this student population. This study explores the experiences of transfer students in STEM majors regarding what…

  15. Inductive High Power Transfer Technologies for Electric Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madzharov, Nikolay D.; Tonchev, Anton T.

    2014-03-01

    Problems associated with "how to charge the battery pack of the electric vehicle" become more important every passing day. Most logical solution currently is the non-contact method of charge, possessing a number of advantages over standard contact methods for charging. This article focuses on methods for Inductive high power contact-less transfer of energy at relatively small distances, their advantages and disadvantages. Described is a developed Inductive Power Transfer (IPT) system for fast charging of electric vehicles with nominal power of 30 kW over 7 to 9 cm air gap.

  16. Fundamental research on convective heat transfer in electronic cooling technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C. F.; Gan, Y. P.; Tian, Y. Q.; Lei, D. H.

    1992-03-01

    During the past six years comprehensive research programs have been conducted at the Beijing Polytechnic University to provide a better understanding of heat transfer characteristics of existing and condidate cooling techniques for electronic and microelectronic devices. This paper provides a review and summary of the programs with emphasis on direct liquid cooling. Included in this review are the heat transfer investigations related to the following cooling modes: liquid free, mixed and forced convection, liquid jet impingement, flowing liquid film cooling, pool boiling, spray cooling, foreign gas jet impingement in liquid pool, and forced convection air-cooling.

  17. Assay validation and technology transfer: problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    In the industry of fine chemicals, including pharmaceutical and agricultural chemicals, analytical tests are performed by production departments or contract research organizations at some stage in the research and development of products. These external organizations are required to maintain the capabilities to perform analytical tests using methods that are equivalent to or better than those specified by analytical method validation. For this reason, transfer of analytical procedures to an alternative site becomes necessary. In this review, the relationship between transfer of analytical procedures and assay validation is introduced, focusing on analytical procedures that include HPLC.

  18. The Baltimore applications project: A new look at technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The history of cooperation between Goddard Space Flight Center and Baltimore City administrators in solving urban problems is summarized. NASA provided consultation and advisory services as well as technology resources and demonstrations. Research and development programs for 69 tasks are briefly described. Technology utilization for incinerator energy, data collection, Health Department problems, and solarization experiments are presented as case histories.

  19. Case Studying Technology Transfer in an Objective 1 Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavery, N.; Stratford, G.

    2003-01-01

    Two major initiatives are in place in Wales that aim to create a strong and internationally competitive small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) sector. These are the Technology Exploitation Programme (TEP) and the Centres of Excellence for Technology and Industrial Collaboration (CETIC) programme. The Materials Centre of Excellence at the…

  20. Influenza vaccine production for Brazil: a classic example of successful North-South bilateral technology transfer.

    PubMed

    Miyaki, Cosue; Meros, Mauricio; Precioso, Alexander R; Raw, Isaias

    2011-07-01

    Technology transfer is a promising approach to increase vaccine production at an affordable price in developing countries. In the case of influenza, it is imperative that developing countries acquire the technology to produce pandemic vaccines through the transfer of know-how, as this will be the only way for the majority of these countries to face the huge demand for vaccine created by influenza pandemics. Access to domestically produced influenza vaccine in such health crises is thus an important national defence strategy. However, technology transfer is not a simple undertaking. It requires a committed provider who is willing to transfer a complete production process, and not just the formulation and fill-finish parts of the process. It requires a recipient with established experience in vaccine production for human use and the ability to conduct research into new developments. In addition, the country of the recipient should preferably have sufficient financial resources to support the undertaking, and an internal market for the new vaccine. Technology transfer should create a solid partnership that results in the joint development of new competency, improvements to the product, and to further innovation. The Instituto Butantan-sanofi pasteur partnership can be seen as a model for successful technology transfer and has led to the technological independence of the Instituto Butantan in the use a strategic public health tool.

  1. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chojnacki, Kent

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: 1) Store cryogenic propellants in a manner that maximizes their availability for use regardless of mission duration. 2) Efficiently transfer conditioned cryogenic propellant to an engine or tank situated in a microgravity environment. 3) Accurately monitor and gauge cryogenic propellants situated in a microgravity environment.

  2. Technology Transfer and the Civil Space Program. Volume 2: Workshop proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The objectives were to (1) provide a top-level review of the Integrated Technology Plan (ITP) and current civil space technology plans, including planning processes and technologies; (2) discuss and assess technology transfer (TT) experiences across a wide range of participants; (3) identify alternate categories/strategies for TT and define the objectives of transfer processes in each case; (4) identify the roles of various government 'stakeholders', aerospace industry, industries at large, and universities in civil space technology research, development, demonstration, and transfer; (5) identify potential barriers and/or opportunities to successful civil space TT; (6) identify specific needs for innovations in policy, programs, and/or procedures to facilitate TT; and (7) develop a plan of attack for the development of a workshop report. Papers from the workshop are presented.

  3. Oil and gas technology transfer activities and potential in eight major producing states. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    In 1990, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (the Compact) performed a study that identified the structure and deficiencies of the system by which oil and gas producers receive information about the potential of new technologies and communicate their problems and technology needs back to the research community. The conclusions of that work were that major integrated companies have significantly more and better sources of technology information than independent producers. The majors also have significantly better mechanisms for communicating problems to the research and development (R&D) community. As a consequence, the Compact recommended analyzing potential mechanisms to improve technology transfer channels for independents and to accelerate independents acceptance and use of existing and emerging technologies. Building on this work, the Compact, with a grant from the US Department Energy, has reviewed specific technology transfer organizations in each of eight major oil producing states to identify specific R&D and technology transfer organizations, characterize their existing activities, and identify potential future activities that could be performed to enhance technology transfer to oil and gas producers. The profiles were developed based on information received from organizations,follow-up interviews, site visit and conversations, and participation in their sponsored technology transfer activities. The results of this effort are reported in this volume. In addition, the Compact has also developed a framework for the development of evaluation methodologies to determine the effectiveness of technology transfer programs in performing their intended functions and in achieving desired impacts impacts in the producing community. The results of that work are provided in a separate volume.

  4. Technology transfer to developing countries. Lessons from Colombia.

    PubMed

    Serpa-Flórez, F

    1993-01-01

    Medical technology will contribute to improving the health status of people in developing countries only when it is carefully implemented after proper planning. Providers, users, health ministry employees, and industry all share responsibility for proper planning and careful implementation.

  5. Renal Cancer Biomarkers | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic cancer biomarkers from clinical specimens.

  6. Technology needs for lunar and Mars space transfer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodcock, Gordon R.; Cothran, Bradley C.; Donahue, Benjamin; Mcghee, Jerry

    1991-01-01

    The determination of appropriate space transportation technologies and operating modes is discussed with respect to both lunar and Mars missions. Three levels of activity are set forth to examine the sensitivity of transportation preferences including 'minimum,' 'full science,' and 'industrialization and settlement' categories. High-thrust-profile missions for lunar and Mars transportation are considered in terms of their relative advantages, and transportation options are defined in terms of propulsion and braking technologies. Costs and life-cycle cost estimates are prepared for the transportation preferences by using a parametric cost model, and a return-on-investment summary is given. Major technological needs for the programs are listed and include storable propulsion systems; cryogenic engines and fluids management; aerobraking; and nuclear thermal, nuclear electric, electric, and solar electric propulsion technologies.

  7. Transferring Technology to Private Industry: Does Reality Threaten Expectations?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-01

    plan. The Government needs to provide more leadership and a stronger linking of economic policy, education reform and technology. John Sculley , CEO of...Association for the Advancement of Science, Boston, Feb. 12, 1993. 25. John A. Alic, et al., Beyond Spinoff, Military and Commercial Technologies in a Changing...Skrzycki, "Tekkie," p. H5. 33 47. John Burgess, "Commercialization of U.S. Research Urged," The Washington Post, Sep. 25, 1992, sec. F. 48. A. J. Vogl

  8. A Conceptual Decision Methodology for High Technology Transfer Assessment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    review and provide input within given time periods on selected technologies. The basic industrial export control mechanism continues to be centered in...Department of Commerce is the center of the export control system, it is by no means predominate in the control of all exports. True, it is a key...Department of State endorsed the venture as, "in the national interest." The technology was promised during the Nixon- Pompidou Summit in the Azores. Without

  9. International Technology Transfer the Rope to Hang the West

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-28

    1989 "Annual Reports to Congress.Ŝ A Compridson of U.S. Defaee Invesment Expendltwes with the Estimated Dollar Cost of Soviet nvestmenta 150 Fiscal...widened the gap. 27 CONCLUSION There is no doubt that technology superiority is a key element in the West’s effort to maintain our strategy of deterrence...western technology have become more difficult, the Soviets may have simply modified their strategy for accomplishing their long standing doctrinal and

  10. Reverse licensing: international technology transfer to the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Sharokhi, M.

    1985-01-01

    This dissertation, theoretically and empirically, focuses on US licensees as the recipient of foreign technology, and investigates characteristics of licensees, licenses, and licensed technology. The viability of reverse licensing, as an international growth strategy, is evaluated from the standpoint of two groups of firms. The first consists of thousands of small and medium sized US manufacturing firms, with few products and virtually no R and D expenditures. Without R and D, new technology and stiff international competition, they are forced into bankruptcies despite their extreme importance in the economy (48% of private workforce, 42% of sales, and 38% of GNP). The second group consists of thousands of small and medium sized firms overseas, with a relatively good supply of technology (i.e., patents) and anxious to exploit the US market but lack required resources for FDI. Technology licensing is, perhaps, the only viable option available to them. Reverse licensing provides both groups with a mechanism for their growth, survival, and prosperity. Many US firms have utilized this strategy for many years (i.e, 118 in Ohio) for tapping foreign sources including Soviet bloc technology.

  11. Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) Switch Technology and Vendor Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Noemi

    1995-01-01

    Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) switch and software features are described and compared in order to make switch comparisons meaningful. An ATM switch's performance cannot be measured solely based on its claimed switching capacity; traffic management and congestion control are emerging as the determining factors in an ATM network's ultimate throughput. Non-switch ATM products and experiences with actual installations of ATM networks are described. A compilation of select vendor offerings as of October 1994 is provided in chart form.

  12. Technology Transfer Challenges for High-Assurance Software Engineering Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor); Penix, John; Markosian, Lawrence Z.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we describe our experience with the challenges thar we are currently facing in our effort to develop advanced software verification and validation tools. We categorize these challenges into several areas: cost benefits modeling, tool usability, customer application domain, and organizational issues. We provide examples of challenges in each area and identrfj, open research issues in areas which limit our ability to transfer high-assurance software engineering tools into practice.

  13. Technology Transfer: A Think Tank Approach to Managing Innovation in the Public Sector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creighton, J. W., Ed.; And Others

    This report reviews a joint attempt of the United States Forest Service and the Naval Service to enhance the utilization of research results and the new technologies through improved effectiveness of technology transfer efforts. It consists of an introduction by J. W. Creighton and seven papers: (1) "Management for Change" by P. A.…

  14. Analysis of Technological Information Transfer among Japanese Computer Scientists at a Research Front.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takayama, Masaya

    1986-01-01

    Describes the methodology and results of a study that examined information flow at the technological research front by analyzing a Japanese national project in computer technology. Various formats of information dissemination are identified, and a classification of researchers and engineers by information transfer activities is presented. (4…

  15. Commercializing Academic Research: Resource Effects on Performance of University Technology Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Joshua B.

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated factors that may explain differential performance with university technology transfer, the process of transforming research into marketable products. Utilizing multi-source data on 108 universities, a set of internal and external resources were found to be significant predictors of one or more of three technology transfer…

  16. University-Industry Entrepreneurship: The Organization and Management of American University Technology Transfer Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dill, David D.

    1995-01-01

    A survey of 289 university technology transfer units investigated their organization, management, and perceived performance effectiveness. Unit types studied included licensing and patent offices, small business development centers, research and technology centers, business facility incubators, and entrepreneurial investment/endowment offices.…

  17. Investigating Practices in Teacher Education That Promote and Inhibit Technology Integration Transfer in Early Career Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brenner, Aimee M.; Brill, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify instructional technology integration strategies and practices in preservice teacher education that contribute to the transfer of technology integration knowledge and skills to the instructional practices of early career teachers. This study used a two-phase, sequential explanatory strategy. Data were…

  18. Technology Transfer Activities of NASA/MSFC: Enhancing the Southeast Region's Production Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trivoli, George W.

    1998-01-01

    The researcher was charged with the task of developing a simplified model to illustrate the impact of how NASA/MSFC technology transfer activities contribute to shifting outward the Southeast region's and the nation's productive capacity. The report is a background of the impact of technological growth on the nation's production possibility frontier (ppf).

  19. NASA's Technology Transfer Program for the Early Detection of Breast Cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Gregory; Frey, Mary Anne; Vernikos, Joan; Winfield, Daniel; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has led the development of advanced imaging sensors and image processing technologies for space science and Earth science missions. NASA considers the transfer and commercialization of such technologies a fundamental mission of the agency. Over the last two years, efforts have been focused on the application of aerospace imaging and computing to the field of diagnostic imaging, specifically to breast cancer imaging. These technology transfer efforts offer significant promise in helping in the national public health priority of the early detection of breast cancer.

  20. Assuring process safety in the transfer of hydrogen cyanide manufacturing technology.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Gary R; Edwards, Victor H; Robertson, Mark; Shah, Kamal

    2007-04-11

    This paper outlines the critical issues to be addressed in the transfer of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) manufacturing technology to a licensee. Process safety management (PSM) is of critical importance because of the toxicity, flammability and reactivity of HCN. The critical issues are based on experience that DuPont has gained (1) while safely manufacturing hydrogen cyanide for over 50 years, and (2) while DuPont has safely licensed HCN technology to other firms at locations around the world. DuPont's HCN experience has been combined with Aker Kvaerner's project engineering experience to insure the safe transfer of HCN technology to a licensee.

  1. NASA technology transfer network communications and information system: TUNS user survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Applied Expertise surveyed the users of the deployed Technology Utilization Network System (TUNS) and surveyed prospective new users in order to gather background information for developing the Concept Document of the system that will upgrade and replace TUNS. Survey participants broadly agree that automated mechanisms for acquiring, managing, and disseminating new technology and spinoff benefits information can and should play an important role in meeting NASA technology utilization goals. However, TUNS does not meet this need for most users. The survey describes a number of systematic improvements that will make it easier to use the technology transfer mechanism, and thus expedite the collection and dissemination of technology information. The survey identified 26 suggestions for enhancing the technology transfer system and related processes.

  2. The name-locator guide: A new resource for technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clingman, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    A new transfer mechanism to facilitate technology transfer between aerospace technology and nonaerospace industries, was proposed with the following sequence of steps. First, the key technical problems in a given industry would be analyzed. The analysis will define the characteristics which relevant technology will have. Second, a limited list of subject terms will be developed using words familiar to those working in the industry. It is these which will be applied in subsequent steps to the NASA technology and used to locate technology relevant to a specific problem in the industry. Third, for each Required Technology Program, terms applicable to that program would be chosen from this list. Fourth, a name-locator guide would be provided to the Regional Dissemination Centers. This guide would be analogous to an index. The key words would be chosen from the special subject term list for the given industry.

  3. Fire safety: A case study of technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heins, C. F.

    1975-01-01

    Two basic ways in which NASA-generated technology is being used by the fire safety community are described. First, improved products and systems that embody NASA technical advances are entering the marketplace. Second, NASA test data and technical information related to fire safety are being used by persons concerned with reducing the hazards of fire through improved design information and standards. The development of commercial fire safety products and systems typically requires adaptation and integration of aerospace technologies that may not have been originated for NASA fire safety applications.

  4. Millimeter-Wave Wireless Power Transfer Technology for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Manohara, Harish; Mojarradi, Mohammad M.; Vo, Tuan A.; Mojarradi, Hadi; Bae, Sam Y.; Marzwell, Neville

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a new compact, scalable, and low cost technology for efficient receiving of power using RF waves at 94 GHz. This technology employs a highly innovative array of slot antennas that is integrated on substrate composed of gold (Au), silicon (Si), and silicon dioxide (SiO2) layers. The length of the slots and spacing between them are optimized for a highly efficient beam through a 3-D electromagnetic simulation process. Antenna simulation results shows a good beam profile with very low side lobe levels and better than 93% antenna efficiency.

  5. Biomedical technical transfer. Applications of NASA science and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Lower body negative pressure testing in cardiac patients has been completed as well as the design and construction of a new leg negative unit for evaluating heart patients. This technology is based on NASA research, using vacuum chambers to stress the cardiovascular system during space flight. Additional laboratory tests of an intracranial pressure transducer, have been conducted. Three new biomedical problems to which NASA technology is applicable are also identified. These are: a communication device for the speech impaired, the NASA development liquid-cooled garment, and miniature force transducers for heart research.

  6. NASA Intellectual Property Negotiation Practices and their Relationship to Quantitative Measures of Technology Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Lance B.

    1997-01-01

    In the current political climate NASA must be able to show reliable measures demonstrating successful technology transfer. The currently available quantitative data of intellectual property technology transfer efforts portray a less than successful performance. In this paper, the use of only quantitative values for measurement of technology transfer is shown to undervalue the effort. In addition, NASA's current policy in negotiating intellectual property rights results in undervalued royalty rates. NASA has maintained that it's position of providing public good precludes it from negotiating fair market value for its technology and instead has negotiated for reasonable cost in order to recover processing fees. This measurement issue is examined and recommendations made which include a new policy regarding the intellectual property rights negotiation, and two measures to supplement the intellectual property measures.

  7. Internet and technology transfer in acute care hospitals in the United States: survey-2000.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, M

    2001-12-01

    This paper provides the results of the survey-2000 measuring technology transfer and, specifically, Internet usage. The purpose of the survey was to measure the levels of Internet and Intranet existence and usage in acute care hospitals. The depth of the survey includes e-commerce for both business-to-business and customers. These results are compared with responses to the same questions in survey-1997. Changes in response are noted and discussed. This information will provide benchmarks for hospitals to plan their network technology position and to set goals. This is the third of three articles based upon the results of the survey-2000. Readers are referred to prior articles by the author, which discuss the survey design and provide a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals. (1) Thefirst article based upon the survey results discusses technology transfer, system design approaches, user involvement, and decision-making purposes. (2)

  8. Challenges and opportunities for enhancing biotechnology and technology transfer in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Salicrup, Luis A; Fedorková, Lenka

    2006-01-01

    Biotechnological innovation is gaining increased recognition as an important tool for improving global health. The challenge, however, lies in defining the role of technology transfer to develop therapies for diseases prevalent in developing countries. During the past decade, a large disparity emerged between the developed and developing world in accessing affordable medicines because of the pharmaceutical industry's focus on health areas bearing greatest profits. Discussed herein are several mechanisms that provide partial solutions to this challenge. The Office of Technology Transfer of the US National Institutes of Health has increased its technology licensing pertaining to neglected diseases to partners in developing regions. Establishing partnerships through the transfer of technologies and assisting indigenous institutions build R and D capacity may positively impact policies on protection of intellectual property rights and increase multinational company investments in lesser-developed countries. This will most probably result in the development of more accessible therapies for those in need.

  9. The Air Force Manufacturing Technology (MANTECH): Technology transfer methodology as exemplified by the radar transmit/receive module program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houpt, Tracy; Ridgely, Margaret

    1991-01-01

    The Air Force Manufacturing Technology program is involved with the improvement of radar transmit/receive modules for use in active phased array radars for advanced fighter aircraft. Improvements in all areas of manufacture and test of these modules resulting in order of magnitude improvements in the cost of and the rate of production are addressed, as well as the ongoing transfer of this technology to the Navy.

  10. Mouse Xenograft Model for Mesothelioma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize a new mouse model for monoclonal antibodies and immunoconjugates that target malignant mesotheliomas. Applications of the technology include models for screening compounds as potential therapeutics for mesothelioma and for studying the pathology of mesothelioma.

  11. Social Capital, Organizational Learning Capability, and Technological Knowledge Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fang, Shih-Chieh; Hung, Richard Yu-Yuan

    2007-01-01

    This study uses inter-organizational networks to focus on firm opportunities to establish the level of social capital required to efficiently utilize network resources among certain collaborative research projects. This study reached the following conclusions: (1) establishment of social capital does little to improve the technological knowledge…

  12. Managing Technology Transfer in the Korean Military Establishment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    Hartcup had not told us more about the remarkable feats of the Russian Army [Ref. 5]. G. I. Pokrowsky, General, Engineering Technical Services...technology, physical therapy, and prosthesis . Environmental Biology: External influences on the V biological processes of organism. Ecology

  13. A Functioning University Transfer Program of Engineering Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cone, Bonnie E.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Considered programs for engineering technology that provide professionals familiar with sophisticated machines, instruments, computers, industrial processes, and transportation and communication systems with a bachelor's degree program. These programs also provided community college students with two year technician training an opportunity to…

  14. Computer integrated manufacturing and technology transfer for improving aerospace productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrington, P. A.; Sica, J.

    1992-03-01

    This paper reviews a cooperative effort, between the Alabama Industial Development Training Institute and the University of Alabama in Huntsville, to implement a prototype computer integrated manufacturing system. The primary use of this system will be to educate Alabama companies on the organizational and technological issues involved in the implementation of advanced manufacturing systems.

  15. Co-Development Agreements | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's TTC uses three different co-development agreements to help industry and academia interact and partner with National Institutes of Health laboratories and scientists to support technology development activities. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  16. USEPA SITE PROGRAM APPROACH TO TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER AND REGULATORY ACCEPTANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA's SITE program was created to meet the demand for innovative technologies for hazardous waste treatment. The primary mission of the SITe Program is to expedite the cleanup of sites on the NPL. These sites often have multiple contaminants in soil and groundwater, and few...

  17. Example Transfers of Corn-Hybrid Polymer (CHP) Blasting Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    Energy and Environment Corn-Hybrid Polymer (CHP) Blasting Technology Overview  Description: Low pressure blasting system for coating removal from...million, for various components and facilities (results available upon request) A ship radome section (left) is stripped at low pressure (right...seek broad Command-wide acceptance:  Identify Program Office POCs for approval support on selected weapon systems  Conduct Command-wide, high

  18. LANL Transfers Glowing Bio Technology to Sandia Biotech

    SciTech Connect

    Nakhla, Tony

    2012-05-21

    Partnering with Los Alamos National Laboratory, an Albuquerque-based company is seeking to transform the way protein and peptide analysis is conducted around the world. Sandia Biotech is using a biological technology licensed from Los Alamos called split green fluorescent protein (sGFP), as a detecting and tracking tool for the protein and peptide industry, valuable in the fields of Alzheimer's research, drug development and other biotechnology fields using protein folding to understand protein expression and mechanisms of action.

  19. Moving out. Technology transfer from hospitals to outpatient facilities.

    PubMed

    Freedman, G

    1991-02-01

    The Temple Radiology Group opened on July 1, 1977 in the Temple Medical Center. The initial 10-room, full-service department has grown with new technology into approximately 25 rooms. The original four-room Temple surgery center has grown to 10 rooms. Additional support facilities that have evolved include: 1) a computer company; 2) physical therapy for orthopedic, neurological and cardiac patients; 3) a brain trauma center; 4) a collection agency; and most recently, 5) a 100-bed medical hotel.

  20. LANL Transfers Glowing Bio Technology to Sandia Biotech

    ScienceCinema

    Nakhla, Tony

    2016-07-12

    Partnering with Los Alamos National Laboratory, an Albuquerque-based company is seeking to transform the way protein and peptide analysis is conducted around the world. Sandia Biotech is using a biological technology licensed from Los Alamos called split green fluorescent protein (sGFP), as a detecting and tracking tool for the protein and peptide industry, valuable in the fields of Alzheimer's research, drug development and other biotechnology fields using protein folding to understand protein expression and mechanisms of action.

  1. Identifying and Assessing Effective Mechanisms for Technology Transfer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    There is a distinct manner in which civilian technology is protected; even though secrecy is one option, as is the case with the Coca - Cola formula...John Bennett, believes that there are certain key ingredients that should be in place in order for T2 to occur seamlessly. He mentions that building...although proven successful, have not been accepted through Air Force regulation. It is a crucial ingredient that these individuals in positions of

  2. GIS technology transfer for use in private sector consulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibas, Dawn R.; Davis, Roger J.

    1996-03-01

    Summit Envirosolutions, Inc. (Summit) is an EOCAP '93 company working in partnership with NASA's Commercial Remote Sensing Program to integrate the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) technology into our environmental consulting business. The EOCAP program has allowed us to obtain the hardware and software necessary for this technology that would have been difficult for a small company, such as Summit, to purchase outright. We are integrating GIS/RS into our consulting business in several areas including wellhead protection and environmental assessments. The major emphasis in the EOCAP project is to develop a system, termed RealFlowSM. The goals of RealFlowSM are to reduce client costs associated with environmental compliance (in particular preparation of EPA-mandated Wellhead Protection Plans), more accurately characterize aquifer parameters, provide a scientifically sound basis for delineating Wellhead Protection Areas, and readily assess changes in well field operations and potential impacts of environmental stresses. RealFlowSM utilizes real-time telemetric data, digital imagery, GIS, Global Positioning System (GPS), and field data to characterize a study area at a lower cost. In addition, we are applying this technology in other service areas and showing a reduction in the overall costs for large projects.

  3. Portable reconfigurable line sensor (PRLS) and technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    MacKenzie, D.P.; Buckle, T.H.; Blattman, D.A.

    1993-12-31

    The Portable Reconfigurable Line Sensor (PRLS) is a bistatic, pulsed-Doppler, microwave intrusion detection system developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the US Air Force. The PRLS is rapidly and easily deployed, and can detect intruders ranging from a slow creeping intruder to a high speed vehicle. The system has a sharply defined detection zone and will not falsely alarm on nearby traffic. Unlike most microwave sensors, the PRLS requires no alignment or calibration. Its portability, battery operation, ease of setup, and RF alarm reporting capability make it an excellent choice for perimeter, portal, and gap-filler applications in the important new field of rapidly-deployable sensor systems. In October 1992, the US Air Force and Racon, Inc., entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to commercialize the PRLS, jointly sharing government and industry resources. The Air Force brings the user`s perspective and requirements to the cooperative effort. Sandia, serving as the technical arm of the Air Force, adds the actual PRLS technology to the joint effort, and provides security systems and radar development expertise. Racon puts the Air Force requirements and Sandia technology together into a commercial product, making the system meet important commercial manufacturing constraints. The result is a true ``win-win`` situation, with reduced government investment during the commercial development of the PRLS, and industry access to technology not otherwise available.

  4. Transfer and utilization of government technology assets to the private sector in the fields of health care and information technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kun, Luis G.

    1995-10-01

    During the first Health Care Technology Policy conference last year, during health care reform, four major issues were brought up in regards to the efforts underway to develop a computer based patient record (CBPR), the National Information Infrastructure (NII) as part of the high performance computers and communications (HPCC), and the so-called 'patient card.' More specifically it was explained how a national information system will greatly affect the way health care delivery is provided to the United States public and reduce its costs. These four issues were: (1) Constructing a national information infrastructure (NII); (2) Building a computer based patient record system; (3) Bringing the collective resources of our national laboratories to bear in developing and implementing the NII and CBPR, as well as a security system with which to safeguard the privacy rights of patients and the physician-patient privilege; (4) Utilizing government (e.g., DOD, DOE) capabilities (technology and human resources) to maximize resource utilization, create new jobs, and accelerate technology transfer to address health care issues. This year a section of this conference entitled: 'Health Care Technology Assets of the Federal Government' addresses benefits of the technology transfer which should occur for maximizing already developed resources. This section entitled: 'Transfer and Utilization of Government Technology Assets to the Private Sector,' will look at both health care and non-health care related technologies since many areas such as information technologies (i.e. imaging, communications, archival/retrieval, systems integration, information display, multimedia, heterogeneous data bases, etc.) already exist and are part of our national labs and/or other federal agencies, i.e., ARPA. These technologies although they are not labeled under health care programs they could provide enormous value to address technical needs. An additional issue deals with both the technical

  5. Transferring building energy technologies by linking government and private-sector programs

    SciTech Connect

    Farhar, B.C.

    1990-07-01

    The US Department of Energy's Office of Building Technologies (OBT) may wish to use existing networks and infrastructures wherever possible to transfer energy-efficiency technologies for buildings. The advantages of relying on already existing networks are numerous. These networks have in place mechanisms for reaching audiences interested in energy-efficiency technologies in buildings. Because staffs in trade and professional organizations and in state and local programs have responsibilities for brokering information for their members or client organizations, they are open to opportunities to improve their performance in information transfer. OBT, as an entity with primarily R D functions, is, by cooperating with other programs, spared the necessity of developing an extensive technology transfer program of its own, thus reinventing the wheel.'' Instead, OBT can minimize its investment in technology transfer by relying extensively on programs and networks already in place. OBT can work carefully with staff in other organizations to support and facilitate their efforts at information transfer and getting energy-efficiency tools and technologies into actual use. Consequently, representatives of some 22 programs and organizations were contacted, and face-to-face conversations held, to explore what the potential might be for transferring technology by linking with OBT. The briefs included in this document were derived from the discussions, the newly published Directory of Energy Efficiency Information Services for the Residential and Commercial Sectors, and other sources provided by respondents. Each brief has been sent to persons contacted for their review and comment one or more times, and each has been revised to reflect the review comments.

  6. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Technology Maturation: Establishing a Foundation for a Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael P.; Meyer, Michael L.; Motil, Susan M.; Ginty, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    As part of U.S. National Space Policy, NASA is seeking an innovative path for human space exploration, which strengthens the capability to extend human and robotic presence throughout the solar system. NASA is laying the groundwork to enable humans to safely reach multiple potential destinations, including asteroids, Lagrange points, the Moon and Mars. In support of this, NASA is embarking on the Technology Demonstration Mission Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (TDM CPST) Project to test and validate key cryogenic capabilities and technologies required for future exploration elements, opening up the architecture for large cryogenic propulsion stages (CPS) and propellant depots. The TDM CPST project will provide an on-orbit demonstration of the capability to store, transfer, and measure cryogenic propellants for a duration which is relevant to enable long term human space exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). Recognizing that key cryogenic fluid management technologies anticipated for on-orbit (flight) demonstration needed to be matured to a readiness level appropriate for infusion into the design of the flight demonstration, the NASA Headquarters Space Technology Mission Directorate authorized funding for a one-year (FY12) ground based technology maturation program. The strategy, proposed by the CPST Project Manager, focused on maturation through modeling, studies, and ground tests of the storage and fluid transfer Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) technology sub-elements and components that were not already at a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of 5. A technology maturation plan (TMP) was subsequently approved which described: the CFM technologies selected for maturation, the ground testing approach to be used, quantified success criteria of the technologies, hardware and data deliverables, and a deliverable to provide an assessment of the technology readiness after completion of the test, study or modeling activity. This paper will present

  7. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Technology Maturation: Establishing a Foundation for a Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doherty, Michael P.; Meyer, Michael L.; Motil, Susan M.; Ginty, Carol A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of U.S. National Space Policy, NASA is seeking an innovative path for human space exploration, which strengthens the capability to extend human and robotic presence throughout the solar system. NASA is laying the groundwork to enable humans to safely reach multiple potential destinations, including asteroids, Lagrange points, the Moon and Mars. In support of this, NASA is embarking on the Technology Demonstration Mission Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (TDM CPST) Project to test and validate key cryogenic capabilities and technologies required for future exploration elements, opening up the architecture for large cryogenic propulsion stages (CPS) and propellant depots. The TDM CPST project will provide an on-orbit demonstration of the capability to store, transfer, and measure cryogenic propellants for a duration which is relevant to enable long term human space exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). Recognizing that key cryogenic fluid management technologies anticipated for on-orbit (flight) demonstration needed to be matured to a readiness level appropriate for infusion into the design of the flight demonstration, the NASA Headquarters Space Technology Mission Directorate authorized funding for a one-year (FY12) ground based technology maturation program. The strategy, proposed by the CPST Project Manager, focused on maturation through modeling, studies, and ground tests of the storage and fluid transfer Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) technology sub-elements and components that were not already at a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of 5. A technology maturation plan (TMP) was subsequently approved which described: the CFM technologies selected for maturation, the ground testing approach to be used, quantified success criteria of the technologies, hardware and data deliverables, and a deliverable to provide an assessment of the technology readiness after completion of the test, study or modeling activity. This paper will present

  8. Determining effective technology transfer mechanisms: A case study in the Russian Federation

    SciTech Connect

    Colangelo, R.V.; Reistroffer, E.; Edgar, D.E.; Johnson, D.O.

    1992-11-01

    In order to transfer technology efficiently, it is essential to define the cultural context in which the technologies have been developed and currently reside. As a participant in the International Technology Exchange Program (ITEP), the Environmental Planning Group, Inc. (EPG), had the opportunity to study environmental and energy programs in Russia. EPG found that the unstable political situation in Russia, the inadequate funding in the Russian scientific community, and the withdrawal of government support for research have created new opportunities for accessing technology. EPG concluded that knowledge of the structure of the government and the organization of the scientific community and an understanding of current business practices are fundamental to the creation of successful technology transfer mechanisms.

  9. Determining effective technology transfer mechanisms: A case study in the Russian Federation

    SciTech Connect

    Colangelo, R.V.; Reistroffer, E. ); Edgar, D.E.; Johnson, D.O. )

    1992-01-01

    In order to transfer technology efficiently, it is essential to define the cultural context in which the technologies have been developed and currently reside. As a participant in the International Technology Exchange Program (ITEP), the Environmental Planning Group, Inc. (EPG), had the opportunity to study environmental and energy programs in Russia. EPG found that the unstable political situation in Russia, the inadequate funding in the Russian scientific community, and the withdrawal of government support for research have created new opportunities for accessing technology. EPG concluded that knowledge of the structure of the government and the organization of the scientific community and an understanding of current business practices are fundamental to the creation of successful technology transfer mechanisms.

  10. IPAD: A unique approach to government/industry cooperation for technology development and transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, Robert E.; Salley, George C.

    1985-01-01

    A key element to improved industry productivity is effective management of Computer Aided Design / Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAD/CAM) information. To stimulate advancement, a unique joint government/industry project designated Integrated Programs for Aerospace-Vehicle Design (IPAD) was carried out from 1971 to 1984. The goal was to raise aerospace industry productivity through advancement of computer based technology to integrate and manage information involved in the design and manufacturing process. IPAD research was guided by an Industry Technical Advisory Board (ITAB) composed of over 100 representatives from aerospace and computer companies. The project complemented traditional NASA/DOD research to develop aerospace design technology and the Air Force's Integrated Computer Aided Manufacturing (ICAM) program to advance CAM technology. IPAD had unprecedented industry support and involvement and served as a unique approach to government industry cooperation in the development and transfer of advanced technology. The IPAD project background, approach, accomplishments, industry involvement, technology transfer mechanisms and lessons learned are summarized.

  11. Cost benefit assessment of NASA remote sensing technology transferred to the State of Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, D. L.; Zimmer, R. P.; Wilkins, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    The benefits involved in the transfer of NASA remote sensing technology to eight Georgia state agencies are identified in quantifiable and qualitative terms, and a value for these benefits is computed by means of an effectiveness analysis. The benefits of the transfer are evaluated by contrasting a baseline scenario without Landsat and an alternative scenario with Landsat. The net present value of the Landsat technology being transferred is estimated at 9.5 million dollars. The estimated value of the transfer is most sensitive to discount rate, the cost of photo acquisition, and the cost of data digitalization. It is estimated that, if the budget is constrained, Landsat could provide data products roughly seven times more frequently than would otherwise be possible.

  12. Optimizing Geothermal Drilling: Oil and Gas Technology Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Denninger, Kate; Eustes, Alfred; Visser, Charles; Baker, Walt; Bolton, Dan; Bell, Jason; Bell, Sean; Jacobs, Amelia; Nagandran, Uneshddarann; Tilley, Mitch; Quick, Ralph

    2015-09-02

    There is a significant amount of financial risk associated with geothermal drilling. This study of drilling operations seeks opportunities to improve upon current practices and technologies. The scope of this study included analyzing 21 geothermal wells and 21 oil and gas wells. The goal was to determine a 'Perfect Well' using historical data to compare the best oil and gas well to the best geothermal well. Unfortunately, limitations encountered in the study included missing data (bit records, mud information, etc.) and poor data collection practices An online software database was used to format drilling data to IADC coded daily drilling reports and generate figures for analysis. Six major issues have been found in geothermal drilling operations. These problems include lost circulation, rig/ equipment selection, cementing, penetration rate, drilling program, and time management. As a result of these issues, geothermal drilling averaged 56.4 days longer than drilling comparable oil and gas wells in the wells in this study. Roughly $13.9 million was spent on non-productive time in the 21 geothermal wells, compared with only $1.3 million in the oil and gas wells, assuming a cost of $50,000 per day. Comparable events such as drilling the same sized hole, tripping in/out, cementing, and running the same size casing took substantially less time in the oil and gas wells. Geothermal wells were drilled using older and/or less advanced technology to depths less than 10,000 feet, while oil and gas wells reached 12,500 feet faster with purpose built rigs. A new approach is now underway that will optimize drilling programs throughout the drilling industry using Mechanical Specific Energy (MSE) as a tool to realize efficient drilling processes. Potential improvements for current geothermal operations are: the use of electronic records, real time services, and official glossary terms to describe rig operations, and advanced drilling rigs/technology.

  13. Vaccines for HIV | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The development of an effective HIV vaccine has been an ongoing area of research. The high variability in HIV-1 virus strains has represented a major challenge in successful development. Ideally, an effective candidate vaccine would provide protection against the majority of clades of HIV. Two major hurdles to overcome are immunodominance and sequence diversity. This vaccine utilizes a strategy for overcoming these two issues by identifying the conserved regions of the virus and exploiting them for use in a targeted therapy. NCI seeks licensees and/or research collaborators to commercialize this technology, which has been validated in macaque models.

  14. LANL Transfers Glowing Bio Technology to Sandia Biotech

    SciTech Connect

    Rorick, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Partnering with Los Alamos National Laboratory, an Albuquerque-based company is seeking to transform the way protein and peptide analysis is conducted around the world. Sandia Biotech is using a biological technology licensed from Los Alamos called split green fluorescent protein (sGFP), as a detecting and tracking tool for the protein and peptide industry, valuable in the fields of Alzheimer's research, drug development and other biotechnology fields using protein folding to understand protein expression and mechanisms of action. http://www.lanl.gov/news/stories/glowing-future-for-los-alamos-and-sandia-b iotech-partnership.html

  15. LANL Transfers Glowing Bio Technology to Sandia Biotech

    ScienceCinema

    Rorick, Kevin

    2016-07-12

    Partnering with Los Alamos National Laboratory, an Albuquerque-based company is seeking to transform the way protein and peptide analysis is conducted around the world. Sandia Biotech is using a biological technology licensed from Los Alamos called split green fluorescent protein (sGFP), as a detecting and tracking tool for the protein and peptide industry, valuable in the fields of Alzheimer's research, drug development and other biotechnology fields using protein folding to understand protein expression and mechanisms of action. http://www.lanl.gov/news/stories/glowing-future-for-los-alamos-and-sandia-b iotech-partnership.html

  16. Thin-Film Thermocouple Technology Demonstrated for Reliable Heat Transfer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Exploratory work is in progress to apply thin-film thermocouples to localized heat transfer measurements on turbine engine vanes and blades. The emerging thin-film thermocouple technology shows great potential to improve the accuracy of local heat transfer measurements. To verify and master the experimental methodology of thin-film thermocouples, the NASA Lewis Research Center conducted a proof-of-concept experiment in a controlled environment before applying the thin-film sensors to turbine tests.

  17. Aerospace technology transfer to the public sector; Proceedings of the Conference, Crystal City, Va., November 9-11, 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grey, J. (Editor); Newman, M.

    1978-01-01

    The dynamics of aerospace technology transfer is discussed with reference to the agencies which facilitate the transfer to both the public and private sectors. Attention is given to NASA's Technology Utilization Program, and to specific applications of aerospace technology spinoff in the daily life of Americans.

  18. Orbital Transfer Vehicle Engine Technology High Velocity Ratio Diffusing Crossover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lariviere, Brian W.

    1992-01-01

    High speed, high efficiency head rise multistage pumps require continuous passage diffusing crossovers to effectively convey the pumped fluid from the exit of one impeller to the inlet of the next impeller. On Rocketdyne's Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), the MK49-F, a three stage high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump, utilizes a 6.23 velocity ratio diffusing crossover. This velocity ratio approaches the diffusion limits for stable and efficient flow over the operating conditions required by the OTV system. The design of the high velocity ratio diffusing crossover was based on advanced analytical techniques anchored by previous tests of stationary two-dimensional diffusers with steady flow. To secure the design and the analytical techniques, tests were required with the unsteady whirling characteristics produced by an impeller. A tester was designed and fabricated using a 2.85 times scale model of the MK49-F turbopumps first stage, including the inducer, impeller, and the diffusing crossover. Water and air tests were completed to evaluate the large scale turbulence, non-uniform velocity, and non-steady velocity on the pump and crossover head and efficiency. Suction performance tests from 80 percent to 124 percent of design flow were completed in water to assess these pump characteristics. Pump and diffuser performance from the water and air tests were compared with the actual MK49-F test data in liquid hydrogen.

  19. Orbital transfer vehicle engine technology high velocity ratio diffusing crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lariviere, Brian W.

    1992-12-01

    High speed, high efficiency head rise multistage pumps require continuous passage diffusing crossovers to effectively convey the pumped fluid from the exit of one impeller to the inlet of the next impeller. On Rocketdyne's Orbital Transfer Vehicle (OTV), the MK49-F, a three stage high pressure liquid hydrogen turbopump, utilizes a 6.23 velocity ratio diffusing crossover. This velocity ratio approaches the diffusion limits for stable and efficient flow over the operating conditions required by the OTV system. The design of the high velocity ratio diffusing crossover was based on advanced analytical techniques anchored by previous tests of stationary two-dimensional diffusers with steady flow. To secure the design and the analytical techniques, tests were required with the unsteady whirling characteristics produced by an impeller. A tester was designed and fabricated using a 2.85 times scale model of the MK49-F turbopumps first stage, including the inducer, impeller, and the diffusing crossover. Water and air tests were completed to evaluate the large scale turbulence, non-uniform velocity, and non-steady velocity on the pump and crossover head and efficiency. Suction performance tests from 80 percent to 124 percent of design flow were completed in water to assess these pump characteristics. Pump and diffuser performance from the water and air tests were compared with the actual MK49-F test data in liquid hydrogen.

  20. Incorporating the Delphi Technique to investigate renewable energy technology transfer in Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Otaibi, Nasir K.

    Saudi Arabia is a major oil-producing nation facing a rapidly-growing population, high unemployment, climate change, and the depletion of its natural resources, potentially including its oil supply. Technology transfer is regarded as a means to diversify countries' economies beyond their natural resources. This dissertation examined the opportunities and barriers to utilizing technology transfer successfully to build renewable energy resources in Saudi Arabia to diversify the economy beyond oil production. Examples of other developing countries that have successfully used technology transfer to transform their economies are explored, including Japan, Malayasia, and the United Arab Emirates. Brazil is presented as a detailed case study to illustrate its transition to an economy based to a much greater degree than before on renewable energy. Following a pilot study, the Delphi Method was used in this research to gather the opinions of a panel of technology transfer experts consisting of 10 heterogeneous members of different institutions in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, including aviation, telecommunication, oil industry, education, health systems, and military and governmental organizations. In three rounds of questioning, the experts identified Education, Dependence on Oil, and Manpower as the 3 most significant factors influencing the potential for success of renewable energy technology transfer for Saudi Arabia. Political factors were also rated toward the "Very Important" end of a Likert scale and were discussed as they impact Education, Oil Dependence, and Manpower. The experts' opinions are presented and interpreted. They form the basis for recommended future research and discussion of how in light of its political system and its dependence on oil, Saudi Arabia can realistically move forward on renewable energy technology transfer and secure its economic future.

  1. Optimizing Geothermal Drilling: Oil and Gas Technology Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Tilley, Mitch; Eustes, Alfred; Visser, Charles; Baker, Walt; Bolton, Dan; Bell, Jason; Nagandran, Uneshddarann; Quick, Ralph

    2015-01-26

    There is a significant amount of financial risk associated with geothermal drilling; however, there are opportunities to improve upon current practices and technologies used. The scope of this drilling operational study included 21 geothermal wells and 21 oil and gas wells. The goal was to determine a 'perfect well' using historical data to compare the best oil and gas well to the best geothermal well. Unfortunately, limitations encountered in the study included missing data (bit records, mud information, etc.), poor data collection, and difficult to ascertain handwriting. An online software database was used to format drilling data to IADC coded daily drilling reports and generate analysis figures. Six major issues have been found in geothermal drilling operations. These problems include lost circulation, rig/equipment selection, cementing, penetration rate, drilling program, and time management. As a result of these issues, geothermal drilling averages 56.4 days longer than drilling comparable oil and gas wells in the wells in this study. Roughly $13.9 million would be lost due to non-productive time in the 21 geothermal wells and only $1.3 million in the oil and gas wells, assuming a cost of $50,000 per day. Comparable events such as drilling the same sized hole, tripping in/out, cementing, and running the same size casing took substantially less time in the oil and gas wells. Geothermal wells were drilled using older and/or less advanced technology to depths less than 10,000 feet, while oil and gas wells reached 12,500 feet faster with purpose built rigs. A new approach is now underway that will optimize drilling programs throughout the drilling industry. It is the use of Mechanical Specific Energy (MSE) as a tool to realize efficient drilling processes. However, a work-flow must also be established in order for there to be an efficient drilling program. Potential improvements for current geothermal operations are: the use of electronic records, real time

  2. Technology transfer at Three Mile Island Unit 2

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, H.M.; Bixby, W.W.

    1982-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) formulated a program at TMI-2 in concert with the Coordination Agreement. The DOE TME-2 Information and Examination Program (TI and EP) aims to fulfill three general objectives. First, the TI and EP aims to obtain information from the TMI-2 accidient for resolving specific safety and licensing concerns; modifying applicable standards, specifications, and regulations; and defining changes in design, maintenance, operation, and personnel training. Second, the TI and EP uses TMI-2 information to advance technology in decontamination work; radioactive waste immobilization and disposal; system requalification; damaged fuel handling; and plant, reactor, and safety engineering. Finally, the TI and EP distributes the information gained from the Program to others that are engaged in research and development, design, construction, operation, maintenance, and regulation of nuclear power plants.

  3. Existing technology transfer report: analytical capabilities. Appendix B. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari, K.C.

    1984-06-01

    The overall objective of the on-going analytical efforts was to develop in-house expertise and analytical capability for the analysis of coal and coal-derived products in support of SRC-I process technology. The approach taken and work accomplished involved: identification of test methods and associated equipment; review and implementation of analytical facility plan; evaluation of existing instrumentation; evaluation and purchase of new instruments; training of laboratory personnel; validation or development of analytical methods; development of standard product work-up methods and development of analytical protocol for detailed characterization of SRC-I solid and liquid products. This volume contains Appendix B with the following attachments: solvent separation procedure A; Wilsonville solvent separation procedure, distillation separation procedure; solvent separation modified Wilsonville Procedure W; statistical comparison of 3 solvent separation procedures; methods development for column chromatography, and application of gas chromatography to characterization of a hydrogen donor solvent; and high performance liquid chromatographic procedure.

  4. Membranes: Separation and drying processes: Technical briefing report, technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    Membrane technology now being developed for separation and drying applications will save energy in industrial processes, both by reducing the amount of energy used and by recovering energy that would normally be lost. A new membrane separation process that is projected for use in the corn sweetener industry could preconcentrate waste water streams, reducing the need for conventional evaporation. Net energy savings may be as much as 50%. A membrane system proposed for drying applications could be combined with vapor recompression to recover energy that is normally lost when water vapor in dryer exhaust streams is vented to the atmosphere. Preliminary tests indicate this membrane process may recover 30% of the energy contained in the latent heat of the water vapor. Under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Programs, Bend Research, Inc., of Bend, Oregon, investigated the technical and economic feasibility of these two membrane processes. 9 refs.

  5. The 1973 GSFC battery workshop, second day. [technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Technological progress in the development, testing, and manufacturing of nickel-cadmium battery cells as well as hydrogen cells is presented. The following major topics were discussed: (1) carbonate analysis; (2) nickel-cadmium memory effect; (3) use of batteries in an automatic acquisition and control system; (4) accelerated testing; (5) formulation of a mathematical odel for a nickel-cadmium cell; (6) development of a light weight nickel-cadmium battery capable of delivering 20 watt hours per pound; (7) magnetic testing of nickel-cadmium cells; (8) design and performance characteristics of nickel-hydrogen and silver-hydrogen cells; and (9) development of a semiprismatic cell design. For Vol. 1, see N75-15152.

  6. Technology transfer of operator-in-the-loop simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yae, K. H.; Lin, H. C.; Lin, T. C.; Frisch, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    The technology developed for operator-in-the-loop simulation in space teleoperation has been applied to Caterpillar's backhoe, wheel loader, and off-highway truck. On an SGI workstation, the simulation integrates computer modeling of kinematics and dynamics, real-time computational and visualization, and an interface with the operator through the operator's console. The console is interfaced with the workstation through an IBM-PC in which the operator's commands were digitized and sent through an RS-232 serial port. The simulation gave visual feedback adequate for the operator in the loop, with the camera's field of vision projected on a large screen in multiple view windows. The view control can emulate either stationary or moving cameras. This simulator created an innovative engineering design environment by integrating computer software and hardware with the human operator's interactions. The backhoe simulation has been adopted by Caterpillar in building a virtual reality tool for backhoe design.

  7. Distributing and transferring medical technology. A view from Latin America and the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Peña-Mohr, J

    1987-01-01

    Great variation exists in the health care delivery systems throughout Latin America and the Caribbean. In general, medical technology is concentrated in large cities at private hospitals that serve a small, elite segment of the population. What is missing in most of these countries is a clearly defined social policy guaranteeing distribution of medical technology to all segments of society. While data is scarce, it appears that political and economic concerns, rather than medical concerns, determine what and how much technology will be available to all segments of the society. Products are sometimes imported that compete with domestically produced ones. Moreover, transfers of technology often fail to include the necessary knowledge to make imported technology truly useful. However, current economic crises throughout the region are forcing changes in policies; as a result, there is a new emphasis on domestic production of technology over imports and the evaluation of medical technology for its appropriate use in Latin America and the Caribbean.

  8. NASA Langley Research and Technology-Transfer Program in Formal Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Ricky W.; Caldwell, James L.; Carreno, Victor A.; Holloway, C. Michael; Miner, Paul S.; DiVito, Ben L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of NASA Langley research program in formal methods. The major goals of this work are to make formal methods practical for use on life critical systems, and to orchestrate the transfer of this technology to U.S. industry through use of carefully designed demonstration projects. Several direct technology transfer efforts have been initiated that apply formal methods to critical subsystems of real aerospace computer systems. The research team consists of five NASA civil servants and contractors from Odyssey Research Associates, SRI International, and VIGYAN Inc.

  9. Transferring jet engine diagnostic and control technology to liquid propellant rocket engines

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, J.F.; Hagar, S.K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology for developing a diagnostic and control system for a current, operational jet engine. A description is given of each development stage, the system components and the technologies which could be transferred to liquid propellant rocket engines. Finally, the operational impact is described in terms of cost and maintenance based on actual jet engine experience. Efforts are continuing to develop new diagnostic techniques under IR D for application on the advanced technical fighter. Already improved techniques and application methods are becoming available. This technology is being evaluated and may also be transferred to rocket engine diagnostic and control system development.

  10. Basic requirements for the transfer of fermentation technologies to developing countries.

    PubMed

    Rolle, R; Satin, M

    2002-05-25

    Traditional small-scale fermentation technologies offer considerable potential for stimulating development in the food industry of developing countries in light of their low cost, scalability, minimal energy and infrastructural requirements and the wide consumer acceptance of fermented products in these countries. Efficient transfer and adaptation of these technologies is, however, often limited by inadequate basic scientific knowledge of the processes involved and the lack of appropriate biological inoculants and process controls for these technologies. Basic infrastructures, such as suitably equipped laboratories with consistent working conditions, a constant supply of good quality water and reliable power supplies, are critical elements of a minimal technology base for transfer and adaptation of these technologies. Building the institutional capacity in developing countries to facilitate research and development geared toward a better understanding of the technologies applied in small-scale traditional fermentations is essential, as is the encouragement of governments to formulate supportive national policies, which promote small-scale agro-industrial development. Socioeconomic considerations play a critical role in the successful and sustainable transfer and adoption of technologies and their products in developing countries.

  11. Waste disposal technology transfer matching requirement clusters for waste disposal facilities in China

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, Thomas; Nelles, Michael; Flamme, Sabine; Jinming, Cai

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We outline the differences of Chinese MSW characteristics from Western MSW. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model the requirements of four clusters of plant owner/operators in China. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the best technology fit for these requirements via a matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Variance in waste input affects result more than training and costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For China technology adaptation and localisation could become push, not pull factors. - Abstract: Even though technology transfer has been part of development aid programmes for many decades, it has more often than not failed to come to fruition. One reason is the absence of simple guidelines or decision making tools that help operators or plant owners to decide on the most suitable technology to adopt. Practical suggestions for choosing the most suitable technology to combat a specific problem are hard to get and technology drawbacks are not sufficiently highlighted. Western counterparts in technology transfer or development projects often underestimate or don't sufficiently account for the high investment costs for the imported incineration plant; the differing nature of Chinese MSW; the need for trained manpower; and the need to treat flue gas, bunker leakage water, and ash, all of which contain highly toxic elements. This article sets out requirements for municipal solid waste disposal plant owner/operators in China as well as giving an attribute assessment for the prevalent waste disposal plant types in order to assist individual decision makers in their evaluation process for what plant type might be most suitable in a given situation. There is no 'best' plant for all needs and purposes, and requirement constellations rely on generalisations meaning they cannot be blindly applied, but an alignment of a type of plant to a type of owner or operator can realistically be achieved. To this end, a four-step approach is

  12. National security and technology transfer: the strategic dimensions of east-west trade

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsch, G.K.; McIntyre, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Deterioration of detente in the wake of the ongoing Soviet arms buildup has focused sharply the east-west trade debate on the question of advanced technology transfer from the United States and its allies to the Soviet bloc. The transfer and acquisition of high technology have become central ingredients in superpower relations and are key elements of any national security policy. President Reagan, among others, has questioned the wisdom of the policies of the 1960s and early 1970s, when trade with the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe expanded rapidly. At recent industrial-nation summits, conferees of Western countries agreed to high-level review of their east-west technology trade policies. But in light of the apparent West European commitment to continue and expand trade with the east, as exemplified by the Siberian gas pipeline project, and the growing US opposition to such technology transfer, divisions between US and Western trade policies toward the East are likely to become increasingly acute in the years ahead. In this book, the editors have selected comprehensive and representative articles to examine the question of technology transfer from a variety of perspectives - political, economic, and military - emphasizing both the US and the Western allies' points of view and offering insights into the complex issues raised by the strategic dimensions of east-west trade.

  13. Technology Transfer in the Navy Research and Development Community: An Analysis of Private Industry and Navy Laboratory Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    Creighton et al., 1984). A Paradigm of Technology Transfer Karagozoglu ania Brown (1986) addressed technology transfer from a macro-perspective...Jolly & Denning (1972) Cyert & March (1963) Wolf (1984) Ring & Perry (1985) Beasley (1988) Newman & Wallender (1978) Karagozoglu & Brown (1986...135-150. Boyle, K . A. 1986. "Technology Transfer Between Universities and the U.K. Offshore Industry." IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management

  14. Lead-free solder technology transfer from ASE Americas

    SciTech Connect

    FTHENAKIS,V.

    1999-10-19

    To safeguard the environmental friendliness of photovoltaics, the PV industry follows a proactive, long-term environmental strategy involving a life-of-cycle approach to prevent environmental damage by its processes and products from cradle to grave. Part of this strategy is to examine substituting lead-based solder on PV modules with other solder alloys. Lead is a toxic metal that, if ingested, can damage the brain, nervous system, liver and kidneys. Lead from solder in electronic products has been found to leach out from municipal waste landfills and municipal incinerator ash was found to be high in lead also because of disposed consumer electronics and batteries. Consequently, there is a movement in Europe and Japan to ban lead altogether from use in electronic products and to restrict the movement across geographical boundaries of waste containing lead. Photovoltaic modules may contain small amounts of regulated materials, which vary from one technology to another. Environmental regulations impact the cost and complexity of dealing with end-of-life PV modules. If they were classified as hazardous according to Federal or State criteria, then special requirements for material handling, disposal, record-keeping and reporting would escalate the cost of decommissioning the modules. Fthenakis showed that several of today's x-Si modules failed the US-EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) for potential leaching of Pb in landfills and also California's standard on Total Threshold Limit Concentration (TTLC) for Pb. Consequently, such modules may be classified as hazardous waste. He highlighted potential legislation in Europe and Japan which could ban or restrict the use of lead and the efforts of the printed-circuit industries in developing Pb-free solder technologies in response to such expected legislation. Japanese firms already have introduced electronic products with Pb-free solder, and one PV manufacturer in the US, ASE Americas has used a Pb

  15. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect

    Donald Duttlinger

    1999-12-01

    During FY99, the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTfC's national organization has active grassroots programs that connect with independents through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). These activities--including technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, and other outreach efforts--are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs). The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY99, which lay the groundwork for further growth in the future.

  16. An overview of remote sensing technology transfer in Canada and the United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strome, W. M.; Lauer, D. T.

    1977-01-01

    To realize the maximum potential benefits of remote sensing, the technology must be applied by personnel responsible for the management of natural resources and the environment. In Canada and the United States, these managers are often in local offices and are not those responsible for the development of systems to acquire, preprocess, and disseminate remotely sensed data, nor those leading the research and development of techniques for analysis of the data. However, the latter organizations have recognized that the technology they develop must be transferred to the management agencies if the technology is to be useful to society. Problems of motivation and communication associated with the technology transfer process, and some of the methods employed by Federal, State, Provincial, and local agencies, academic institutions, and private organizations to overcome these problems are explored.

  17. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2000-05-01

    During FY00, the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTTC's national organization has active grassroots programs that connect with independents through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). These activities--including technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, and other outreach efforts--are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs). The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY00, which lay the groundwork for further growth in the future.

  18. Technology Transfer vs. Technological Learning: IT-Infrastructure and Health Care in Developing Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braa, Jorn; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Analyzes the conditions and possibilities for technological learning about information technology infrastructure in developing countries; distinguishes between local, contextual learning and institutional or technological infrastructure for learning. Provides examples from Mongolian and South African health care to illustrate the need for learning…

  19. Technology 2003: The Fourth National Technology Transfer Conference and Exposition, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackett, Michael (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    Proceedings from symposia of the Technology 2003 Conference and Exposition, December 7-9, 1993, Anaheim, CA, was discussed. Volume 1 features the Plenary Session and the Plenary Workshop, plus papers presented in Advanced Manufacturing, Biotechnology/Medical Technology, Environmental Technology, Materials Science, and Power and Energy.

  20. Technology transfer from biomedical research to clinical practice: measuring innovation performance.

    PubMed

    Balas, E Andrew; Elkin, Peter L

    2013-12-01

    Studies documented 17 years of transfer time from clinical trials to practice of care. Launched in 2002, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) translational research initiative needs to develop metrics for impact assessment. A recent White House report highlighted that research and development productivity is declining as a result of increased research spending while the new drugs output is flat. The goal of this study was to develop an expanded model of research-based innovation and performance thresholds of transfer from research to practice. Models for transfer of research to practice have been collected and reviewed. Subsequently, innovation pathways have been specified based on common characteristics. An integrated, intellectual property transfer model is described. The central but often disregarded role of research innovation disclosure is highlighted. Measures of research transfer and milestones of progress have been identified based on the Association of University Technology Managers 2012 performance reports. Numeric milestones of technology transfer are recommended at threshold (top 50%), target (top 25%), and stretch goal (top 10%) performance levels. Transfer measures and corresponding target levels include research spending to disclosure (<$1.88 million), disclosure to patents (>0.81), patents to start-up (>0.1), patents to licenses (>2.25), and average per license income (>$48,000). Several limitations of measurement are described. Academic institutions should take strategic steps to bring innovation to the center of scholarly discussions. Research on research, particularly on pathways to disclosures, is needed to improve R&D productivity. Researchers should be informed about the technology transfer performance of their institution and regulations should better support innovators.

  1. Potential Technology Transfer to the DoD Unmanned Ground Vehicle Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-01

    Specific Technologies 3 1. Vehicle Controls 3 2. Sensors ’ 3. Safety Issues 8 B. Potential for Technology Transfer 9 III. MICROBIOTICS n A...navigating, inspecting, and eventually performing surgery on the human colon and lower intestine . Currently, the robot, called Cleo, is powered by 10,000...rpm motors and worm drives and travels on two treads that can grip the interior lining of the intestine without damaging it. The "vehicle" is equipped

  2. The transfer of remote sensing technology in the developing nations: An observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abiodun, A. A.

    1977-01-01

    The cooperation and assistance of industrialized nations and the United Nations and its agencies in promoting the transfer of remote sensing technology in developing nations was discussed. Training programs, workshops, and seminars as well as on-going globally scattered demonstration projects were evaluated and it was suggested that emphasis should shift from centralized training to scheduled regional training programs, resulting in larger local participation and on-the-spot application of the technology to solve local problems.

  3. Waste disposal technology transfer matching requirement clusters for waste disposal facilities in China.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Thomas; Nelles, Michael; Flamme, Sabine; Jinming, Cai

    2012-11-01

    Even though technology transfer has been part of development aid programmes for many decades, it has more often than not failed to come to fruition. One reason is the absence of simple guidelines or decision making tools that help operators or plant owners to decide on the most suitable technology to adopt. Practical suggestions for choosing the most suitable technology to combat a specific problem are hard to get and technology drawbacks are not sufficiently highlighted. Western counterparts in technology transfer or development projects often underestimate or don't sufficiently account for the high investment costs for the imported incineration plant; the differing nature of Chinese MSW; the need for trained manpower; and the need to treat flue gas, bunker leakage water, and ash, all of which contain highly toxic elements. This article sets out requirements for municipal solid waste disposal plant owner/operators in China as well as giving an attribute assessment for the prevalent waste disposal plant types in order to assist individual decision makers in their evaluation process for what plant type might be most suitable in a given situation. There is no 'best' plant for all needs and purposes, and requirement constellations rely on generalisations meaning they cannot be blindly applied, but an alignment of a type of plant to a type of owner or operator can realistically be achieved. To this end, a four-step approach is suggested and a technology matrix is set out to ease the choice of technology to transfer and avoid past errors. The four steps are (1) Identification of plant owner/operator requirement clusters; (2) Determination of different municipal solid waste (MSW) treatment plant attributes; (3) Development of a matrix matching requirement clusters to plant attributes; (4) Application of Quality Function Deployment Method to aid in technology localisation. The technology transfer matrices thus derived show significant performance differences between the

  4. Department of Defense Program Solicitation 94; Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program; Fiscal Year 1994.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    government installation is the time-date stamp of such unsuccessful offerors for their proposals. installation on the proposal wrapper or other documentary ...National Technology Transfer Center (619) 553-7008 Wheeling Jesuit College 316 Washington Ave DTIC also provides access to DoD-sponsored Centers

  5. Strategic Leadership Issues for the Community College Involving Technology Transfer in a Global Economy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, James C.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Summarizes recent developments in Virginia designed to improve the productivity of the state's small and medium businesses by increased use of the state's postsecondary education institutions. Suggests that a strategy of comprehensive leadership by educators and politicians is basic to successful technology transfer programs in the context of a…

  6. A Discussion of Strategies for Appropriate Technology Transfer to Developing Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gor, Christopher O.; And Others

    The ongoing flow of monetary assistance and technological transfer from developed to developing countries is examined and its success gauged. Two examples are cited: "The Mumias Sugar Company--A Success Story in Kenya," and, "The Sao Francisco River Power Development in Brazil--A Disaster along the River." The paper also…

  7. Research Universities, Technology Transfer, and Job Creation: What Infrastructure, For What Training?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodhag, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Technology transfer and innovation are considered major drivers of sustainable development; they place knowledge and its dissemination in society at the heart of the development process. This article considers the role of research universities, and how they can interact with key actors and institutions involved in "innovation…

  8. 76 FR 75543 - Missisquoi River Technologies; Missisquoi River Hydro LLC; Notice of Transfer of Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Missisquoi River Technologies; Missisquoi River Hydro LLC; Notice of... issued June 29, 1989,\\1\\ has been transferred to Missisquoi River Hydro LLC. The project is located...

  9. NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology Summer Workshop. Volume 1: Data processing and transfer panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The data processing and transfer technology areas that need to be developed and that could benefit from space flight experiments are identified. Factors considered include: user requirements, concepts in 'Outlook for Space', and cost reduction. Major program thrusts formulated are an increase in end-to-end information handling and a reduction in life cycle costs.

  10. Technology transfer potential of an automated water monitoring system. [market research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamieson, W. M.; Hillman, M. E. D.; Eischen, M. A.; Stilwell, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The nature and characteristics of the potential economic need (markets) for a highly integrated water quality monitoring system were investigated. The technological, institutional and marketing factors that would influence the transfer and adoption of an automated system were studied for application to public and private water supply, public and private wastewater treatment and environmental monitoring of rivers and lakes.

  11. Building World-Market Competitors: Technology Transfer and the Illinois Community College System. 1990 Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, Debra D.

    In 1990, the Illinois Council of Public Community College Presidents (ICPCCP) commissioned a survey to document the current capacity and future potential of the Illinois Community College System (ICCS) to provide technology transfer assistance to the commercial marketplace and the public sector. An extensive questionnaire was developed and mailed…

  12. An Information Transfer Model to Define Information Users and Outputs with Specific Application to Environmental Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landau, Herbert B.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Develops an information transfer model which relates information products to the user's innovation decision-making process and highlights the linkage between specific products and user needs at each decision point. Specific applications to environmental technology are discussed. Three figures, five tables, and a reference list accompany the text.…

  13. Determining the Success or Failure of International Technology Transfer: A Conceptual Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Egmond-de Wilde de Ligny, E. L. C.; Kumaraswamy, M. M.

    2003-01-01

    The authors present a conceptual framework that is considered useful for investment studies and consultancy activities on international technology transfer (ITT). Thoroughly elaborated investment studies--by which possible risks and constraints can be identified--can provide valuable support to decision makers in an ITT project. There appears to…

  14. Trends in Technology Transfer at Universities. Report of the Clearinghouse on University-Industry Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of American Universities, Washington, DC.

    Trends in university technology transfer activities and the commercialization of research results are discussed, based on a 1985 survey. Responses revealed widespread changes in internal patent and licensing activities and increased disclosure of inventions by faculty to the university. Factors contributing to this trend include: changes in…

  15. Brokerage and SME Innovation: An Analysis of the Technology Transfer Service at Area Science Park, Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cattapan, Paolo; Passarelli, Mariacarmela; Petrone, Michele

    2012-01-01

    This paper contributes to the literature on innovation brokerage by analysing the effects of brokerage activities on the innovation and growth of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The authors provide a detailed description of the Technology Transfer Service (TTS), credited as a European best-practice innovation broker, at Area Science…

  16. NASA/BLM Applications Pilot Test (APT), phase 2. Volume 3: Technology transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Techniques used and materials presented at a planning session and two workshops held to provide hands-on training in the integration of quantitatively based remote sensing data are described as well as methods used to enhance understanding of approaches to inventories that integrate multiple data sources given various resource information objectives. Significant results from each of the technology transfer sessions are examined.

  17. DoD Technology Transfer Program: Defense Industrial Base Seminar and Workshops

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-16

    light metals that provides excellent appearance, wear, and corrosion resistance. Applications: Aluminum , steel, and other alloys Industries...PUBLIC RELEASE Execution Service & Agency RDT&E Centers • Scientists & Engineers • Technology Transfer Managers • Intellectual Property Attorneys DTIC...personnel, services & property from partner – Federal lab to provide personnel, services, & use of property – Granting of patent licenses or options w

  18. 76 FR 11498 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Generic Submission of Technology Transfer Center (TTC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ... Submission of Technology Transfer Center (TTC) External Customer Satisfaction Surveys (NCI) SUMMARY: Under...) External Customer Satisfaction Surveys (NCI). Type of Information Collection Request: New. Need and Use of Information Collection: The purpose of these web-based surveys are to: obtain information on the...

  19. Transferring the Soft-Skills Technology of Workplace Learning and Performance to China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Jenny; Rothwell, William J.; Webster, Lois

    2001-01-01

    Discusses international business and workplace learning and performance (WLP), and describes a long-term strategic alliance between Motorola University China, Penn State University, Beijing University, and Nankai University. Highlights include a needs assessment of multinational corporations in China; transferring the soft-skills technology of WLP…

  20. Using the DACUM Process as an Effective and Efficient Tool in International Technology Transfer Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamoureux, Marvin E.; Leeper, Michael J.

    1996-01-01

    Explores two cases of the use of the DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process in the transfer of technology from Canada to China. Describes the DACUM process and the Transport Systems Training Project that used it, illustrated with three DACUM charts. (JOW)

  1. Technical Education Transfer: Perceptions of Employee Computer Technology Self-Efficacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated influences on employee self-efficacy of computer technologies resulting from computer-training programs that were intended to meet individual and organization objectives for university personnel. Influences on the transfer of training process included previous computer training, computer-use requirements, computer-use…

  2. Texas Schools, Inc.: A Case Study of the Transfer of Technology at a Pilot Bilingual Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Vangie L.

    Texas Schools, Inc. (TSI) developed a pilot program in bilingual education for Mexican-American vocational workers in the Department of Diesel Mechanics at Texas Tech University. This study assesses the transfer of technology in that environment using quantitative and qualitative measures. TSI, a technical and vocational school in Lubbock, Texas,…

  3. Considering Components, Types, and Degrees of Authenticity in Designing Technology to Support Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardre, Patricia L.

    2013-01-01

    Authenticity is a key to using technology for instruction in ways that enhance learning and support learning transfer. Simply put, a representation is authentic when it shows learners clearly what a task, context, or experience will be like in real practice. More authentic representations help people learn and understand better. They support…

  4. Space transfer vehicle concepts and requirements study. Volume 2, book 4: Integrated advanced technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Gary A.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Transfer Vehicle (STV) program provides both an opportunity and a requirement to increase our upper stage capabilities with the development and applications of new technologies. Issues such as man rating, space basing, reusability, and long lunar surface storage times drive the need for new technology developments and applications. In addition, satisfaction of mission requirements such as lunar cargo delivery capability and lunar landing either require new technology development or can be achieved in a more cost-effective manner with judicious applications of advanced technology. During the STV study, advanced technology development requirements and plans have been addressed by the Technology/Advanced Development Working Group composed of NASA and contractor representatives. This report discusses the results to date of this working group. The first section gives an overview of the technologies that have potential or required applications for the STV and identifies those technologies baselined for the STV. Figures are provided that list the technology categories and show the priority placed on those technology categories for either the space-based or ground-based options. The second section covers the plans and schedules for incorporating the technologies into the STV program.

  5. Process analytical technology case study, part III: calibration monitoring and transfer.

    PubMed

    Cogdill, Robert P; Anderson, Carl A; Drennen, James K

    2005-10-06

    This is the third of a series of articles detailing the development of near-infrared spectroscopy methods for solid dosage form analysis. Experiments were conducted at the Duquesne University Center for Pharmaceutical Technology to develop a system for continuous calibration monitoring and formulate an appropriate strategy for calibration transfer. Indicators of high-flux noise (noise factor level) and wavelength uncertainty were developed. These measurements, in combination with Hotelling's T(2) and Q residual, are used to continuously monitor instrument performance and model relevance. Four calibration transfer techniques were compared. Three established techniques, finite impulse response filtering, generalized least squares weighting, and piecewise direct standardization were evaluated. A fourth technique, baseline subtraction, was the most effective for calibration transfer. Using as few as 15 transfer samples, predictive capability of the analytical method was maintained across multiple instruments and major instrument maintenance.

  6. [Factors affecting activation and transference of soil colloidal phosphorus and related analysis technologies].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Liang, Xin-qiang; Fu, Chao-dong; Zhu, Si-rui; Zhang, Yi-xiang; Ji, Yuan-jing

    2015-04-01

    Colloids play a key role in the transference process of phosphorus (P) in soil. Activation and transference of soil colloidal phosphorus have great effect on soil P pool and the surrounding water quality. This paper summarized the current studies on soil colloidal P, discussing the effects of the various factors (e. g., soil physical and chemical properties, fertilization, rainfall and soil amendments) on the transference of soil colloidal P. Some advanced analysis technologies (e.g., flow field-flow fractionation, transmission electron microscope-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, X-ray absorption near-edge structure and nuclear magnetic resonance) and methods of reducing soil colloidal P were also involved. This review would provide important information on the mechanism of soil colloidal P transference.

  7. The initiatives of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory in the transfer of a new excavation technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanold, R. J.; Bankston, C. A.; Rowley, J. C.; Long, W. W.

    1974-01-01

    A system for making vertical or horizontal holes in rock or soil by progressive local melting is described. In one operation the three major tasks of excavation are performed with the Subterrene concept: (1) rock fracturing; (2) debris removal; and (3) wall stabilization. Potential applications of the Subterrene system are indicated, with emphasis on extraction of geothermal energy and development of superconduction transmission lines for electrical power. A program in technology dissemination implemented by the staff members is described. It is indicated that a large scale commercial utilization of the technology is required to complete the transfer of technology.

  8. Technology 2001: The Second National Technology Transfer Conference and Exposition, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    Papers from the technical sessions of the Technology 2001 Conference and Exposition are presented. The technical sessions featured discussions of advanced manufacturing, artificial intelligence, biotechnology, computer graphics and simulation, communications, data and information management, electronics, electro-optics, environmental technology, life sciences, materials science, medical advances, robotics, software engineering, and test and measurement.

  9. Electronic Transfer: Moving Technology Dollars in New Directions--Technology Counts 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Virginia

    2005-01-01

    This article presents the special issues of the eighth edition of "Education Week's" annual report on education technology, "Technology Counts." The annual report tracks the economic and policy forces that are converging to push those changes, which are happening at the federal, state, and local levels. States and school…

  10. Technology 2001: The Second National Technology Transfer Conference and Exposition, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Papers from the technical sessions of the Technology 2001 Conference and Exposition are presented. The technical sessions featured discussions of advanced manufacturing, artificial intelligence, biotechnology, computer graphics and simulation, communications, data and information management, electronics, electro-optics, environmental technology, life sciences, materials science, medical advances, robotics, software engineering, and test and measurement.

  11. [Improving global access to new vaccines: intellectual property, technology transfer, and regulatory pathways].

    PubMed

    Crager, Sara Eve

    2015-01-01

    The 2012 World Health Assembly Global Vaccine Action Plan called for global access to new vaccines within 5 years of licensure. Current approaches have proven insufficient to achieve sustainable vaccine pricing within such a timeline. Paralleling the successful strategy of generic competition to bring down drug prices, a clear consensus is emerging that market entry of multiple suppliers is a critical factor in expeditiously bringing down prices of new vaccines. In this context, key target objectives for improving access to new vaccines include overcoming intellectual property obstacles, streamlining regulatory pathways for biosimilar vaccines, and reducing market entry timelines for developing-country vaccine manufacturers by transfer of technology and know-how. I propose an intellectual property, technology, and know-how bank as a new approach to facilitate widespread access to new vaccines in low- and middle-income countries by efficient transfer of patented vaccine technologies to multiple developing-country vaccine manufacturers.

  12. Improving Global Access to New Vaccines: Intellectual Property, Technology Transfer, and Regulatory Pathways

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The 2012 World Health Assembly Global Vaccine Action Plan called for global access to new vaccines within 5 years of licensure. Current approaches have proven insufficient to achieve sustainable vaccine pricing within such a timeline. Paralleling the successful strategy of generic competition to bring down drug prices, a clear consensus is emerging that market entry of multiple suppliers is a critical factor in expeditiously bringing down prices of new vaccines. In this context, key target objectives for improving access to new vaccines include overcoming intellectual property obstacles, streamlining regulatory pathways for biosimilar vaccines, and reducing market entry timelines for developing-country vaccine manufacturers by transfer of technology and know-how. I propose an intellectual property, technology, and know-how bank as a new approach to facilitate widespread access to new vaccines in low- and middle-income countries by efficient transfer of patented vaccine technologies to multiple developing-country vaccine manufacturers. PMID:25211753

  13. Improving global access to new vaccines: intellectual property, technology transfer, and regulatory pathways.

    PubMed

    Crager, Sara Eve

    2014-11-01

    The 2012 World Health Assembly Global Vaccine Action Plan called for global access to new vaccines within 5 years of licensure. Current approaches have proven insufficient to achieve sustainable vaccine pricing within such a timeline. Paralleling the successful strategy of generic competition to bring down drug prices, a clear consensus is emerging that market entry of multiple suppliers is a critical factor in expeditiously bringing down prices of new vaccines. In this context, key target objectives for improving access to new vaccines include overcoming intellectual property obstacles, streamlining regulatory pathways for biosimilar vaccines, and reducing market entry timelines for developing-country vaccine manufacturers by transfer of technology and know-how. I propose an intellectual property, technology, and know-how bank as a new approach to facilitate widespread access to new vaccines in low- and middle-income countries by efficient transfer of patented vaccine technologies to multiple developing-country vaccine manufacturers.

  14. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Technology Demonstration: Advancing Technologies for Future Mission Architectures Beyond Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chojnacki, Kent T.; Crane, Deborah J.; Motil, Susan M.; Ginty, Carol A.; Tofil, Todd A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of U.S. National Space Policy, NASA is seeking an innovative path for human space exploration, which strengthens the capability to extend human and robotic presence throughout the solar system. NASA is laying the groundwork to enable humans to safely reach multiple potential destinations, including the Moon, asteroids, Lagrange points, and Mars and its environs. In support of this, NASA is embarking on the Technology Demonstration Mission Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (TDM CPST) Project to test and validate key cryogenic capabilities and technologies required for future exploration elements, opening up the architecture for large cryogenic propulsion stages and propellant depots. The TDM CPST will provide an on-orbit demonstration of the capability to store, transfer, and measure cryogenic propellants for a duration that enables long term human space exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit. This paper will present a summary of the cryogenic fluid management technology maturation effort, infusion of those technologies into flight hardware development, and a summary of the CPST preliminary design.

  15. Describing an Environment for a Self-Sustaining Technology Transfer Service in a Small Research Budget University: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieb, Sharon Lynn

    2014-01-01

    This single-site qualitative study sought to identify the characteristics that contribute to the self sustainability of technology transfer services at universities with small research budgets through a case study analysis of a small research budget university that has been operating a financially self-sustainable technology transfer service for…

  16. 23 CFR 420.207 - What are the requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., Development and Technology Transfer Program Management § 420.207 What are the requirements for research... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What are the requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs? 420.207 Section 420.207 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY...

  17. 23 CFR 420.207 - What are the requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., Development and Technology Transfer Program Management § 420.207 What are the requirements for research... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What are the requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs? 420.207 Section 420.207 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY...

  18. 23 CFR 420.207 - What are the requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., Development and Technology Transfer Program Management § 420.207 What are the requirements for research... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs? 420.207 Section 420.207 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY...

  19. 23 CFR 420.207 - What are the requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., Development and Technology Transfer Program Management § 420.207 What are the requirements for research... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What are the requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs? 420.207 Section 420.207 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY...

  20. 23 CFR 420.207 - What are the requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., Development and Technology Transfer Program Management § 420.207 What are the requirements for research... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What are the requirements for research, development, and technology transfer work programs? 420.207 Section 420.207 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY...

  1. Report of a Planning Conference for Solar Technology Information Transfer. Austin, Texas, 12-13 June 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwestern Library Association, Stillwater, OK.

    Charged with the responsibility of determining the best way to plan for solar technology information transfer within the state of Texas, participants in the Planning Conference for Solar Technology Information Transfer met to discuss the many ongoing activities related to energy information dissemination, to analyze the resources available in…

  2. 14 CFR § 1274.915 - Restrictions on sale or transfer of technology to foreign firms or institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... technology to foreign firms or institutions. § 1274.915 Section § 1274.915 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL... Agreement. If NASA determines that the transfer may have adverse consequences to the national security... Conditions § 1274.915 Restrictions on sale or transfer of technology to foreign firms or...

  3. 14 CFR 1274.915 - Restrictions on sale or transfer of technology to foreign firms or institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... technology to foreign firms or institutions. 1274.915 Section 1274.915 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL... Agreement. If NASA determines that the transfer may have adverse consequences to the national security... Conditions § 1274.915 Restrictions on sale or transfer of technology to foreign firms or...

  4. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Technology Demonstration For Long Duration In-Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael L.; Motil, Susan M.; Kortes, Trudy F.; Taylor, William J.; McRight, Patrick S.

    2012-01-01

    The high specific impulse of cryogenic propellants can provide a significant performance advantage for in-space transfer vehicles. The upper stages of the Saturn V and various commercial expendable launch vehicles have used liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen propellants; however, the application of cryogenic propellants has been limited to relatively short duration missions due to the propensity of cryogens to absorb environmental heat resulting in fluid losses. Utilizing advanced cryogenic propellant technologies can enable the efficient use of high performance propellants for long duration missions. Crewed mission architectures for beyond low Earth orbit exploration can significantly benefit from this capability by developing realistic launch spacing for multiple launch missions, by prepositioning stages and by staging propellants at an in-space depot. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration through the Office of the Chief Technologist is formulating a Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Technology Demonstration Mission to mitigate the technical and programmatic risks of infusing these advanced technologies into the development of future cryogenic propellant stages or in-space propellant depots. NASA is seeking an innovative path for human space exploration, which strengthens the capability to extend human and robotic presence throughout the solar system. This mission will test and validate key cryogenic technological capabilities and has the objectives of demonstrating advanced thermal control technologies to minimize propellant loss during loiter, demonstrating robust operation in a microgravity environment, and demonstrating efficient propellant transfer on orbit. The status of the demonstration mission concept development, technology demonstration planning and technology maturation activities in preparation for flight system development are described.

  5. Development and technology transfer of Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines for developing countries.

    PubMed

    Beurret, Michel; Hamidi, Ahd; Kreeftenberg, Hans

    2012-07-13

    This paper describes the development of a Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine at the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment/Netherlands Vaccine Institute (RIVM/NVI, Bilthoven, The Netherlands), and the subsequent transfer of its production process to manufacturers in developing countries. In 1998, at the outset of the project, the majority of the world's children were not immunized against Hib because of the high price and limited supply of the conjugate vaccines, due partly to the fact that local manufacturers in developing countries did not master the Hib conjugate production technology. To address this problem, the RIVM/NVI has developed a robust Hib conjugate vaccine production process based on a proven model, and transferred this technology to several partners in India, Indonesia, Korea and China. As a result, emerging manufacturers in developing countries acquired modern technologies previously unavailable to them. This has in turn facilitated their approach to producing other conjugate vaccines. As an additional spin-off from the project, a World Health Organization (WHO) Hib quality control (QC) course was designed and conducted at the RIVM/NVI, resulting in an increased regulatory capacity for conjugate vaccines in developing countries at the National Regulatory Authority (NRA) level. For the local populations, this has translated into an increased and sustainable supply of affordable Hib conjugate-containing combination vaccines. During the course of this project, developing countries have demonstrated their ability to produce large quantities of high-quality modern vaccines after a successful transfer of the technology.

  6. MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee. Second semiannual status report, July 1988--March 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    As part of the MHD Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) project, TRW was given the responsibility to organize, charter and co-chair, with the Department of Energy (DOE), an MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee (TTIRC). The Charter of the TTIRC, which was approved by the DOE in June 1988 and distributed to the committee members, is included as part of this Summary. As stated in the Charter, the purpose of this committee is to: (1) review all Proof-of-Concept (POC) projects and schedules in the national MHD program; to assess their compatibility with each other and the first commercial MHD retrofit plant; (2) establish and implement technology transfer formats for users of this technology; (3) identify interfaces, issues, and funding structures directly impacting the success of the commercial retrofit; (4) investigate and identify the manner in which, and by whom, the above should be resolved; and (5) investigate and assess other participation (foreign and domestic) in the US MHD Program. The DOE fiscal year 1989 MHD Program Plan Schedule is included at the end of this Summary. The MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee`s activities to date have focused primarily on the ``technology transfer`` aspects of its charter. It has provided a forum for the dissemination of technical and programmatic information among workers in the field of MHD and to the potential end users, the utilities, by holding semi-annual meetings. The committee publishes this semi-annual report, which presents in Sections 2 through 11 capsule summaries of technical progress for all DOE Proof-of-Concept MHD contracts and major test facilities.

  7. System technology analysis of aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles: Moderate lift/drag (0.75-1.5). Volume 2: Supporting research and technology report, phase 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Technology payoffs of representative ground based (Phase 1) and space based (Phase 2) mid lift/drag ratio (L/D) aeroassisted orbit transfer vehicles (AOTV) were assessed and prioritized. The methodology employed to generate technology payoffs, the major payoffs identified, the urgency of the technology effort required, and the technology plans suggested are summarized for both study phases. Technology issues concerning aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, thermal protection, propulsion, and guidance, navigation and control are addressed.

  8. Applications of aerospace technology in industry: A technology transfer profile. Visual display systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The growth of common as well as emerging visual display technologies are surveyed. The major inference is that contemporary society is rapidly growing evermore reliant on visual display for a variety of purposes. Because of its unique mission requirements, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration has contributed in an important and specific way to the growth of visual display technology. These contributions are characterized by the use of computer-driven visual displays to provide an enormous amount of information concisely, rapidly and accurately.

  9. Spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory technologies for normally off computing (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, K. Yuasa, S.; Fujita, S.; Ito, J.; Yoda, H.; Suzuki, Y.; Nakatani, Y.; Miyazaki, T.

    2014-05-07

    Most parts of present computer systems are made of volatile devices, and the power to supply them to avoid information loss causes huge energy losses. We can eliminate this meaningless energy loss by utilizing the non-volatile function of advanced spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory (STT-MRAM) technology and create a new type of computer, i.e., normally off computers. Critical tasks to achieve normally off computers are implementations of STT-MRAM technologies in the main memory and low-level cache memories. STT-MRAM technology for applications to the main memory has been successfully developed by using perpendicular STT-MRAMs, and faster STT-MRAM technologies for applications to the cache memory are now being developed. The present status of STT-MRAMs and challenges that remain for normally off computers are discussed.

  10. The Transfer of Chemical Knowledge: The Case of Chemical Technology and its Textbooks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, Anders

    2006-11-01

    This paper is a study of textbooks in chemical technology in Sweden during the industrialisation in the 19th century. In this period, teaching in technological education in general became more and more founded on science. However, there existed very few textbooks in chemical technology, and it is argued that the reason was that the essentials of the knowledge used for developing chemical industry were of a tacit and local character. Such knowledge could only with difficulty be transferred through textbooks with scientific ambitions. Thus the textbooks written or translated by scientists were not as widely used as the ones written or translated by chemical engineers. The usefulness of the latter group can be explained by the fact that they had been adapted to local circumstances, and expressed generalisations, not as scientific laws, but as rules of thumb. Finally, a model for the diffusion of knowledge is suggested, by which the role of textbooks in chemical technology better can be understood.

  11. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2003-04-30

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and natural gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. Networking opportunities that occur with a Houston Headquarters (HQ) location are increasing name awareness. Focused efforts by Executive Director Don Duttlinger to interact with large independents, national service companies and some majors are continuing to supplement the support base of the medium to smaller industry participants around the country. PTTC is now involved in many of the technology-related activities that occur in high oil and natural gas activity areas. Access to technology remains the driving force for those who do not have in-house research and development capabilities and look to the PTTC to provide services and options for increased efficiency.

  12. Orbit transfer rocket engine integrated control and health monitoring system technology readiness assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickford, R. L.; Collamore, F. N.; Gage, M. L.; Morgan, D. B.; Thomas, E. R.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this task were to: (1) estimate the technology readiness of an integrated control and health monitoring (ICHM) system for the Aerojet 7500 lbF Orbit Transfer Vehicle engine preliminary design assuming space based operations; and (2) estimate the remaining cost to advance this technology to a NASA defined 'readiness level 6' by 1996 wherein the technology has been demonstrated with a system validation model in a simulated environment. The work was accomplished through the conduct of four subtasks. In subtask 1 the minimally required functions for the control and monitoring system was specified. The elements required to perform these functions were specified in Subtask 2. In Subtask 3, the technology readiness level of each element was assessed. Finally, in Subtask 4, the development cost and schedule requirements were estimated for bringing each element to 'readiness level 6'.

  13. A project to transfer technology from NASA centers in support of industrial innovation in the midwest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, B. G.

    1986-01-01

    A technology transfer program utilizing graduate students in mechanical engineering at the University of Kansas was initiated in early 1981. The objective of the program was to encourage industrial innovation in the Midwest through improved industry/university cooperation and the utilization of NASA technology. A related and important aspect of the program was the improvement of graduate engineering education through the involvement of students in the identification and accomplishment of technological objectives in cooperation with scientists at NASA centers and engineers in industry. The pilot NASA/University Industrial Innovation Program was an outstanding success based on its ability to: attract top graduate students; secure industry support; and stimulate industry/university cooperation leading to enhanced university capability and utilization of advanced technology by industry.

  14. Selected case studies of technology transfer from mission-oriented applied research

    SciTech Connect

    Daellenbach, K.K.; Watts, R.L.; Young, J.K. ); Abarcar, R.B. )

    1992-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Industrial Concepts Division (AICD) under the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) supports interdisciplinary applied research and exploratory development that will expand the knowledge base to enable industry to improve its energy efficiency and its capability to use alternative energy resources. AICD capitalizes on scientific and technical advances from the United States and abroad, applying them to address critical technical needs of American industry. As a result, AICD research and development products are many and varied, and the effective transfer of these products to diverse targeted users requires different strategies as well. This paper describes the products of AICD research, how they are transferred to potential users, and how actual transfer is determined.

  15. Stress Measurements on Blair High School Gymnasium: A Demonstration of Space Technology Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kastel, Dean

    1966-01-01

    This Report describes an actual demonstration of transfer to non-space use of technologies developed for space programs applications. Techniques used in assessing static and dynamic characteristics of the Blair High School gymnasium involved data acquisition by continuous scanning of strain gauge data acquired over a time of wide-temperature range, and analysis by a computer routine developed by Jet Propulsion Laboratory five years ago. The advantage of this method over conventional structural testing of uniquely designed structures was proved. More importantly, the process of demonstration was shown to be of great assistance to, and extension of, normal methods of disseminating information of new technologies. It is felt that significant benefit will derive from this improved mode oi concept transfer.

  16. Technical assistance and the transfer of remote sensing technology. [for economic development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, R.

    1977-01-01

    The transfer of technology from industrialized countries to the third world is a very complicated process and one that requires a great deal of research and development. The political and social obstacles to this transfer are generally greater than the technical obstacles, but technical assistance programs have neither the competence nor the inclination to deal with these factors adequately. Funding for technical assistance in remote sensing is now expanding rapidly, and there is a growing need for institutions to study and promote the effective use of this technology for economic development. The United Nations, the Food and Agriculture Organization, the World Bank, the United States Agency for International Development and the Canadian technical assistance agencies take different approaches to the problem and deal with the political pressures in different ways.

  17. Modularization and nuclear power. Report by the Technology Transfer Modularization Task Team

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-06-01

    This report describes the results of the work performed by the Technology Transfer Task Team on Modularization. This work was performed as part of the Technology Transfer work being performed under Department of Energy Contract 54-7WM-335406, between December, 1984 and February, 1985. The purpose of this task team effort was to briefly survey the current use of modularization in the nuclear and non-nuclear industries and to assess and evaluate the techniques available for potential application to nuclear power. A key conclusion of the evaluation was that there was a need for a study to establish guidelines for the future development of Light Water Reactor, High Temperature Gas Reactor and Liquid Metal Reactor plants. The guidelines should identify how modularization can improve construction, maintenance, life extension and decommissioning.

  18. Strategic factors in the development of the National Technology Transfer Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Root, Jonathan F.; Stone, Barbara A.

    1993-01-01

    Broad consensus among industry and government leaders has developed over the last decade on the importance of applying the U.S. leadership in research and development (R&D) to strengthen competitiveness in the global marketplace, and thus enhance national prosperity. This consensus has emerged against the backdrop of increasing economic competition, and the dramatic reduction of military threats to national security with the end of the Cold War. This paper reviews the key factors and considerations that shaped - and continue to influence - the development of the Regional Technoloty Transfer Centers (RTTC) and the National Technology Transfer Center (NTTC). Also, the future role of the national network in support of emerging technology policy initiatives will be explored.

  19. Technology 2003: The Fourth National Technology Transfer Conference and Exposition, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackett, Michael (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    Proceedings from symposia of the Technology 2003 Conference and Exposition, Dec. 7-9, 1993, Anaheim, CA, are presented. Volume 2 features papers on artificial intelligence, CAD&E, computer hardware, computer software, information management, photonics, robotics, test and measurement, video and imaging, and virtual reality/simulation.

  20. A memoir: From peenemünde to USA: A classic case of technology transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordway, Frederick I., III; Dahm, Werner K.; Dannenberg, Konrad; Haeussermann, Walter; Reisig, Gerhard; Stuhlinger, Ernst; von Tiesenhausen, Georg; Willhite, Irene

    2007-01-01

    This paper traces the development of rocket technology in Germany from the 1930s and 1940s that led to the massive, and historically unprecedented, transfer of rocket, missile, launch-vehicle and related technologies to the post-World-War-II United States. This achievement was made possible by an initial group of 118 German rocket specialists to which others were gradually added. The contributions to rocketry, upper atmosphere and space research, and eventually manned space travel provided by Germany's Wernher von Braun and his team of engineers, scientists, technicians and support personnel is, in particular, described, and the ongoing influence of the innovations they introduced is considered.