Sample records for swimming pool water

  1. Ingestion of swimming pool water by recreational swimmers.

    PubMed

    Dufour, A P; Behymer, T D; Cantú, R; Magnuson, M; Wymer, L J

    2017-06-01

    The volume of water ingested by swimmers while swimming is of great interest to individuals who develop risk assessments using quantitative microbial risk assessment or epidemiological approaches. We have used chloroisocyanurate disinfected swimming pool waters to determine the amount of water swallowed by swimmers during swimming activity. The chloroisocyanurate, which is in equilibrium with chlorine and cyanuric acid in the pool water, provides a biomarker, cyanuric acid, that once swallowed passes through the body into the urine unchanged. The concentration of cyanuric acid in a 24 hour urine specimen and the concentration in pool water can be used to calculate the amount of water swallowed. Our study population of 549 participants, which was about evenly divided by gender, and young and adult swimmers, indicated that swimmers ingest about 32 mL per hour (arithmetic mean) and that children swallowed about four times as much water as adults during swimming activities. It was also observed that males had a tendency to swallow more water than females during swimming activity and that children spent about twice as much time in the water than adults.

  2. Study on water evaporation rate from indoor swimming pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rzeźnik, Ilona

    2017-11-01

    The air relative humidity in closed spaces of indoor swimming pools influences significantly on users thermal comfort and the stability of the building structure, so its preservation on suitable level is very important. For this purpose, buildings are equipped with HVAC systems which provide adequate level of humidity. The selection of devices and their technical parameters is made using the mathematical models of water evaporation rate in the unoccupied and occupied indoor swimming pool. In the literature, there are many papers describing this phenomena but the results differ from each other. The aim of the study was the experimental verification of published models of evaporation rate in the pool. The tests carried out on a laboratory scale, using model of indoor swimming pool, measuring 99cm/68cm/22cm. The model was equipped with water spray installation with six nozzles to simulate conditions during the use of the swimming pool. The measurements were made for conditions of sports pools (water temperature 24°C) and recreational swimming pool (water temperature 34°C). According to the recommendations the air temperature was about 2°C higher than water temperature, and the relative humidity ranged from 40% to 55%. Models Shah and Biasin & Krumm were characterized by the best fit to the results of measurements on a laboratory scale.

  3. DROWNING IN DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS? ASSESSING SWIMMING POOL WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of treated water for swimming pools has made swimming a year round activity, widely enjoyed for leisure as well as exercise. Swimming pools can be found in different kinds and sizes in public areas, hotels and spas, or at private homes. In Germany ~250-300 million...

  4. Automation of water supply and recirculation-filtration of water at a swimming pool using Zelio PLC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniş, C. M.; Popa, G. N.; Iagăr, A.

    2018-01-01

    The paper proposes the use of the Zelio PLC for the automation of the water supply and recirculation-filtration system of a swimming pool. To do this, the Zelio SR3B261BD - 24V DC with 10 digital inputs (24V DC) and 10 digital outputs (relay contacts) was used. The proposed application makes the control of the water supply pumps and the water recirculation-filtration from a swimming pool. The recirculation-filtration systems for pools and swimming pools are designed to ensure water cleaning and recirculation to achieve optimum quality and lasting service life. The water filtration process is one of the important steps in water treatment in polls and swimming pools. It consists in recirculation of the entire volume of water and begins by absorbing the water in the pool by means of a pump followed by the passing of water through the filter, disinfectant and pH dosing, and reintroducing the water back into the pool or swimming pool through the discharge holes. Filters must to work 24 hours a day to remove pollutants from pools or swimming pools users. Filtration removes suspension particles with different origins. All newly built pools and swimming pools must be fitted with water recirculation systems, and existing ones will be equipped with water recirculation and water treatment systems.

  5. Illicit drugs and pharmaceuticals in swimming pool waters.

    PubMed

    Fantuzzi, G; Aggazzotti, G; Righi, E; Predieri, G; Castiglioni, S; Riva, F; Zuccato, E

    2018-09-01

    The occurrence of illicit drugs (cocaine, opioids, amphetamines and cannabis derivatives), some of their metabolites and 48 pharmaceuticals, was investigated in pool and source waters in ten Italian indoor swimming pools. The samples were analyzed by highperformance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS), after solid phase extraction (SPE). Cocaine and its metabolites were found in nine swimming pools, at concentrations from 0.3 to 4.2 ng/L for cocaine, 1.1 to 48.7 ng/L for norcocaine, 0.7 to 21.4 ng/L for benzoylecgonine and 0.1 to 7.3 ng/L for norbenzoylecgonine. Opioids, amphetamines and cannabis derivatives were never detected. The most frequent pharmaceuticals were anti-inflammatory drugs: ibuprofen was found in all the pool waters, with a maximum 197 ng/L and ketoprofen was detected in 9/10 samples (maximum 127 ng/L). Among anticonvulsants, carbamazepine and its metabolite, 10,11-dihydro-10,11dihydroxycarbamazepine, were frequent in swimming pool water (8/10 samples) at concentrations up to 62 ng/L. The cardiovascular drug valsartan was also found frequently (8/10 samples), but at lower concentrations (up to 9 ng/L). Other pharmaceuticals were detected occasionally and at lower concentrations (atenolol, enalapril, paracetamol, hydroclorothiazide, irbesartan and dehydro-erythromycin). Carbamazepine, irbesartan and dehydroerythromycin were detected at very low levels (up to 5 ng/L) in only one of the four source water samples. A quantitative risk assessment showed that the health risk for humans to these substance in swimming pool waters was generally negligible, even for vulnerable subpopulations such as children and adolescents. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Water ingestion during swimming activities in a pool: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Alfred P; Evans, Otis; Behymer, Thomas D; Cantú, Ricardo

    2006-12-01

    Chloroisocyanurates are commonly added to outdoor swimming pools to stabilize chlorine disinfectants. The chloroisocyanurates decompose slowly to release chlorine and cyanuric acid. Studies conducted to determine if the chloroisocyanurates might be toxic to swimmers showed that they were not and that ingested cyanuric acid passed through the body unmetabolized. This fact was used to determine the amount of water swallowed during swimming activity. Fifty-three recreational swimmers, using a community swimming pool disinfected with cyanuric acid stabilized chlorine, participated in the study. The participants did not swim on the day before or after the test swim. The swimmers were asked to actively swim for at least 45 minutes and to collect their urine for the next 24 hours. Cyanuric acid was measured in pool water using high performance liquid chromatography and porous graphitic carbon columns with UV detection. The urine sample assay required a clean-up procedure to remove urinary proteins and interfering substances. Results of the study indicate that non-adults ingest about twice as much water as adults during swimming activity. The average amount of water swallowed by non-adults and adults was 37 ml and 16 ml, respectively. The design for this study and the analytical methodology used to assay cyanuric acid in swimming pool water and human urine were effective for measuring the volume of water swallowed during swimming activity.

  7. DROWNING IN DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS? SWIMMING POOL WATER QUALITY RECONSIDERED.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of treated water for swimming pools has made swimming a year ¬round activity, widely enjoyed for leisure as well as exercise. Swimming pools can be found in different kinds and sizes in public areas, hotels and spas, or at private homes. In Germany ~250-300 millio...

  8. Variability of chlorination by-product occurrence in water of indoor and outdoor swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Simard, Sabrina; Tardif, Robert; Rodriguez, Manuel J

    2013-04-01

    Swimming is one of the most popular aquatic activities. Just like natural water, public pool water may contain microbiological and chemical contaminants. The purpose of this study was to study the presence of chemical contaminants in swimming pools, in particular the presence of disinfection by-products (DBPs) such as trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs) and inorganic chloramines (CAMi). Fifty-four outdoor and indoor swimming pools were investigated over a period of one year (monthly or bi-weekly sampling, according to the type of pool) for the occurrence of DBPs. The results showed that DBP levels in swimming pools were greater than DBP levels found in drinking water, especially for HAAs. Measured concentrations of THMs (97.9 vs 63.7 μg/L in average) and HAAs (807.6 vs 412.9 μg/L in average) were higher in outdoor pools, whereas measured concentrations of CAMi (0.1 vs 0.8 mg/L in average) were higher in indoor pools. Moreover, outdoor pools with heated water contained more DBPs than unheated pools. Finally, there was significant variability in tTHM, HAA9 and CAMi levels in pools supplied by the same municipal drinking water network, suggesting that individual pool characteristics (number of swimmers) and management strategies play a major role in DBP formation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Life cycle environmental implications of residential swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Nigel; Williams, Eric

    2010-07-15

    Ownership of private swimming pools in the U.S. grew 2 to 4% per annum from 1997 to 2007. The environmental implications of pool ownership are analyzed by hybrid life cycle assessment (LCA) for nine U.S. cities. An operational model is constructed estimating consumption of chemicals, water, and energy for a typical residential pool. The model incorporates geographical climatic variations and upstream water and energy use from electricity and water supply networks. Results vary considerably by city: a factor of 5-6 for both water and energy use. Water use is driven by aridness and length of the swimming season, while energy use is mainly driven by length of the swimming season. Water and energy impacts of pools are significant, particularly in arid climates. In Phoenix for example pools account for 22% and 13% of a household's electricity and water use, respectively. Measures to reduce water and energy use in pools such as optimizing the pump schedule and covering the pool in winter can realize greater savings than many common household efficiency improvements. Private versus community pools are also compared. Community pools in Phoenix use 60% less swimming pool water and energy per household than subdivisions without community pools.

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS IN SWIMMING POOL WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to kill harmful pathogens, swimming pool water is treated with a disinfectant, such as chlorine or ozone. One of the most commonly used disinfectants is stabilized chlorine (typically trichloro-S-triazinetrione). Trichloro-S-triazinetrione reacts in water to form one m...

  11. Nitrates, chlorates and trihalomethanes in swimming pool water.

    PubMed Central

    Beech, J A; Diaz, R; Ordaz, C; Palomeque, B

    1980-01-01

    Water from swimming pools in the Miami area was analyzed for nitrates, chlorates and trihalomethanes. The average concentrations of nitrate and chlorate found in freshwater pools were 8.6 mg/liter and 16 mg/liter respectively, with the highest concentrations being 54.9 mg/liter and 124 mg/liter, respectively. The average concentration of total trihalomethanes found in freshwater pools was 125 micrograms/liter (mainly chloroform) and in saline pools was 657 micrograms/liter (mainly bromoform); the highest concentration was 430 micrograms/liter (freshwater) and 1287 micrograms/liter (saltwater). The possible public health significance of these results is briefly discussed. PMID:7350831

  12. Seasonal dynamics of water and air chemistry in an indoor chlorinated swimming pool.

    PubMed

    Zare Afifi, Mehrnaz; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2015-01-01

    Although swimming is known to be beneficial in terms of cardiovascular health, as well as for some forms of rehabilitation, swimming is also known to present risks to human health, largely in the form of exposure to microbial pathogens and disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Relatively little information is available in the literature to characterize the seasonal dynamics of air and water chemistry in indoor chlorinated swimming pools. To address this issue, water samples were collected five days per week from an indoor chlorinated swimming pool facility at a high school during the academic year and once per week during summer over a fourteen-month period. The samples were analyzed for free and combined chlorine, urea, volatile DBPs, pH, temperature and total alkalinity. Membrane Introduction Mass Spectrometry (MIMS) was used to identify and measure the concentrations of eleven aqueous-phase volatile DBPs. Variability in the concentrations of these DBPs was observed. Factors that influenced variability included bather loading and mixing by swimmers. These compounds have the ability to adversely affect water and air quality and human health. A large fraction of the existing literature regarding swimming pool air quality has focused on trichloramine (NCl₃). For this work, gas-phase NCl₃ was analyzed by an air sparging-DPD/KI method. The results showed that gas-phase NCl₃ concentration is influenced by bather loading and liquid-phase NCl₃ concentration. Urea is the dominant organic-N compound in human urine and sweat, and is known to be an important precursor for producing NCl₃ in swimming pools. Results of daily measurements of urea indicated a link between bather load and urea concentration in the pool.

  13. Perceived health problems in swimmers according to the chemical treatment of water in swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Luna, Álvaro; Burillo, Pablo; Felipe, José Luis; del Corral, Julio; García-Unanue, Jorge; Gallardo, Leonor

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine which chemical treatment used for disinfecting water in indoor swimming pools had the least impact on users' perceptions of health problems, and which generated the greatest satisfaction with the quality of the water. A survey on satisfaction and perceived health problems was given to 1001 users at 20 indoor swimming pools which used different water treatment methods [chlorine, bromine, ozone, ultraviolet lamps (UV) and salt electrolysis]. The findings suggest that there is a greater probability of perceived health problems, such as eye and skin irritation, respiratory problems and skin dryness, in swimming pools treated with chlorine than in swimming pools using other chemical treatment methods. Pools treated with bromine have similar, although slightly better, results. Other factors, such as age, gender, time of day of use (morning and afternoon) and type of user (competitive and recreational), can also affect the probability of suffering health problems. For all of the above, using combined treatment methods as ozone and UV, or salt electrolysis produces a lower probability of perceived health problems and greater satisfaction.

  14. What’s in the Pool? A Comprehensive Identification of Disinfection By-products and Assessment of Mutagenicity of Chlorinated and Brominated Swimming Pool Water

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Susan D.; DeMarini, David M.; Kogevinas, Manolis; Fernandez, Pilar; Marco, Esther; Lourencetti, Carolina; Ballesté, Clara; Heederik, Dick; Meliefste, Kees; McKague, A. Bruce; Marcos, Ricard; Font-Ribera, Laia; Grimalt, Joan O.; Villanueva, Cristina M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Swimming pool disinfectants and disinfection by-products (DBPs) have been linked to human health effects, including asthma and bladder cancer, but no studies have provided a comprehensive identification of DBPs in the water and related that to mutagenicity. Objectives We performed a comprehensive identification of DBPs and disinfectant species in waters from public swimming pools in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain, that disinfect with either chlorine or bromine and we determined the mutagenicity of the waters to compare with the analytical results. Methods We used gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to measure trihalomethanes in water, GC with electron capture detection for air, low- and high-resolution GC/MS to comprehensively identify DBPs, photometry to measure disinfectant species (free chlorine, monochloroamine, dichloramine, and trichloramine) in the waters, and an ion chromatography method to measure trichloramine in air. We assessed mutagenicity with the Salmonella mutagenicity assay. Results We identified > 100 DBPs, including many nitrogen-containing DBPs that were likely formed from nitrogen-containing precursors from human inputs, such as urine, sweat, and skin cells. Many DBPs were new and have not been reported previously in either swimming pool or drinking waters. Bromoform levels were greater in brominated than in chlorinated pool waters, but we also identified many brominated DBPs in the chlorinated waters. The pool waters were mutagenic at levels similar to that of drinking water (~ 1,200 revertants/L-equivalents in strain TA100–S9 mix). Conclusions This study identified many new DBPs not identified previously in swimming pool or drinking water and found that swimming pool waters are as mutagenic as typical drinking waters. PMID:20833605

  15. Titanium distribution in swimming pool water is dominated by dissolved species.

    PubMed

    David Holbrook, R; Motabar, Donna; Quiñones, Oscar; Stanford, Benjamin; Vanderford, Brett; Moss, Donna

    2013-10-01

    The increased use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) in consumer products such as sunscreen has raised concerns about their possible risk to human and environmental health. In this work, we report the occurrence, size fractionation and behavior of titanium (Ti) in a children's swimming pool. Size-fractionated samples were analyzed for Ti using ICP-MS. Total titanium concentrations ([Ti]) in the pool water ranged between 21 μg/L and 60 μg/L and increased throughout the 101-day sampling period while [Ti] in tap water remained relatively constant. The majority of [Ti] was found in the dissolved phase (<1 kDa), with only a minor fraction of total [Ti] being considered either particulate or microparticulate. Simple models suggest that evaporation may account for the observed variation in [Ti], while sunscreen may be a relevant source of particulate and microparticule Ti. Compared to diet, incidental ingestion of nano-Ti from swimming pool water is minimal. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Swimming pool granuloma

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001357.htm Swimming pool granuloma To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A swimming pool granuloma is a long-term (chronic) skin ...

  17. Swimming Pools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Housing and Local Government, London (England).

    Technical and engineering data are set forth on the design and construction of swimming pools. Consideration is given to site selection, pool construction, the comparative merits of combining open air and enclosed pools, and alternative uses of the pool. Guidelines are presented regarding--(1) pool size and use, (2) locker and changing rooms, (3)…

  18. Photolytic removal of DBPs by medium pressure UV in swimming pool water.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Kamilla M S; Zortea, Raissa; Piketty, Aurelia; Vega, Sergio Rodriguez; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus

    2013-01-15

    Medium pressure UV is used for controlling the concentration of combined chlorine (chloramines) in many public swimming pools. Little is known about the fate of other disinfection by-products (DBPs) in UV treatment. Photolysis by medium pressure UV treatment was investigated for 12 DBPs reported to be found in swimming pool water: chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, bromoform, dichloroacetonitrile, bromochloroacetonitrile, dibromoacetronitrile, trichloroacetonitrile, trichloronitromethane, dichloropropanone, trichloropropanone, and chloral hydrate. First order photolysis constants ranged 26-fold from 0.020 min(-1) for chloroform to 0.523 min(-1) for trichloronitromethane. The rate constants generally increased with bromine substitution. Using the UV removal of combined chlorine as an actinometer, the rate constants were recalculated to actual treatment doses of UV applied in a swimming pool. In an investigated public pool the UV dose was equivalent to an applied electrical energy of 1.34 kWh m(-3) d(-1) and the UV dose required to removed 90% of trichloronitromethane was 0.4 kWh m(-3) d(-1), while 2.6 kWh m(-3) d(-1) was required for chloral hydrate and the bromine containing haloacetonitriles and trihalomethanes ranged from 0.6 to 3.1 kWh m(-3) d(-1). It was predicted thus that a beneficial side-effect of applying UV for removing combined chlorine from the pool water could be a significant removal of trichloronitromethane, chloral hydrate and the bromine containing haloacetonitriles and trihalomethanes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Swimming pool cleaner poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Swimming pool cleaner poisoning occurs when someone swallows this type of cleaner, touches it, or breathes in ... The harmful substances in swimming pool cleaner are: Bromine ... copper Chlorine Soda ash Sodium bicarbonate Various mild acids

  20. Swimming Pools. Managing School Facilities, Guide 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department for Education and Employment, London (England). Architects and Building Branch.

    This guide for schools with swimming pools offers advice concerning appropriate training for pool managers, the importance of water quality and testing, safety in the handling of chemicals, maintenance and cleaning requirements, pool security, and health concerns. The guide covers both indoor and outdoor pools, explains some technical terms,…

  1. The Chemistry of Swimming Pool Maintenance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salter, Carl; Langhus, David L.

    2007-01-01

    The study of chemistry involved in the maintenance of a swimming pool provides a lot of chemical education to the students, including the demonstration of the importance of pH in water chemistry. The various chemical aspects hidden in the maintenance of the pool are being described.

  2. Drowning in Disinfection Byproducts? Swimming Pool Water Quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection is mandatory for swimming pools, because transmission of disease by bacteria, virus and protozoa is the most significant health issue. However another issue arises, and care should be taken to minimize the risks from disinfection by-products (DBPs). Public pools are ...

  3. Prevalence of dental erosion in adolescent competitive swimmers exposed to gas-chlorinated swimming pool water.

    PubMed

    Buczkowska-Radlińska, J; Łagocka, R; Kaczmarek, W; Górski, M; Nowicka, A

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the prevalence of dental erosion among competitive swimmers of the local swimming club in Szczecin, Poland, who train in closely monitored gas-chlorinated swimming pool water. The population for this survey consisted of a group of junior competitive swimmers who had been training for an average of 7 years, a group of senior competitive swimmers who had been training for an average of 10 years, and a group of recreational swimmers. All subjects underwent a clinical dental examination and responded to a questionnaire regarding aspects of dental erosion. In pool water samples, the concentration of calcium, magnesium, phosphate, sodium, and potassium ions and pH were determined. The degree of hydroxyapatite saturation was also calculated. Dental erosion was found in more than 26 % of the competitive swimmers and 10 % of the recreational swimmers. The lesions in competitive swimmers were on both the labial and palatal surfaces of the anterior teeth, whereas erosions in recreational swimmers developed exclusively on the palatal surfaces. Although the pH of the pool water was neutral, it was undersaturated with respect to hydroxyapatite. The factors that increase the risk of dental erosion include the duration of swimming and the amount of training. An increased risk of erosion may be related to undersaturation of pool water with hydroxyapatite components. To decrease the risk of erosion in competitive swimmers, the degree of dental hydroxyapatite saturation should be a controlled parameter in pool water.

  4. Swimming Pool Water Treatment Chemicals and/or Processes. Standard No. 22.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI.

    Chemicals or processes used or intended for use, in the treatment of swimming pool water are covered. Minimum public health limits or acceptability in regard to toxicity, biocidal effectiveness, and chemical behavior and analysis are presented. The appendices give guidelines to the scientific and statistically sound evaluations to determine the…

  5. Rapid general dental erosion by gas-chlorinated swimming pool water. Review of the literature and case report.

    PubMed

    Geurtsen, W

    2000-12-01

    Several reports indicate an increased prevalence of dental erosion among intensive swimmers due to low pH gas-chlorinated pool water. Contrary to other extrinsic factors which induce erosion located on the facial aspect, low pH pool water results in general dental erosion. Additionally, a case report is presented which describes the very rapid occurrence of excessive general dental erosion of a competitive swimmer due to gas-chlorinated pool water within 27 days. The observation of several authors as well as this case underscore the significance of a regular pH monitoring of chlorinated swimming pool water. The high incidence indicates that dental erosion due to frequent swimming is of considerable diagnostic and therapeutic significance. Furthermore, it is recommended to fluoridate the teeth of intensive swimmers regularly to prevent dental erosion.

  6. Effects of exposure to water disinfection by-products in a swimming pool: A metabolome-wide association study.

    PubMed

    van Veldhoven, Karin; Keski-Rahkonen, Pekka; Barupal, Dinesh K; Villanueva, Cristina M; Font-Ribera, Laia; Scalbert, Augustin; Bodinier, Barbara; Grimalt, Joan O; Zwiener, Christian; Vlaanderen, Jelle; Portengen, Lützen; Vermeulen, Roel; Vineis, Paolo; Chadeau-Hyam, Marc; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2018-02-01

    Exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water and chlorinated swimming pools are associated with adverse health outcomes, but biological mechanisms remain poorly understood. Evaluate short-term changes in metabolic profiles in response to DBP exposure while swimming in a chlorinated pool. The PISCINA-II study (EXPOsOMICS project) includes 60 volunteers swimming 40min in an indoor pool. Levels of most common DBPs were measured in water and in exhaled breath before and after swimming. Blood samples, collected before and 2h after swimming, were used for metabolic profiling by liquid-chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass-spectrometry. Metabolome-wide association between DBP exposures and each metabolic feature was evaluated using multivariate normal (MVN) models. Sensitivity analyses and compound annotation were conducted. Exposure levels of all DBPs in exhaled breath were higher after the experiment. A total of 6,471 metabolic features were detected and 293 features were associated with at least one DBP in exhaled breath following Bonferroni correction. A total of 333 metabolic features were associated to at least one DBP measured in water or urine. Uptake of DBPs and physical activity were strongly correlated and mutual adjustment reduced the number of statistically significant associations. From the 293 features, 20 could be identified corresponding to 13 metabolites including compounds in the tryptophan metabolism pathway. Our study identified numerous molecular changes following a swim in a chlorinated pool. While we could not explicitly evaluate which experiment-related factors induced these associations, molecular characterization highlighted metabolic features associated with exposure changes during swimming. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Quantitative Measurement of Bromoform in Swimming Pool Water Using SPME with GC-MS. An Undergraduate Instrumental Analysis Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardee, John R.; Long, John; Otts, Julie

    2002-05-01

    A senior-level undergraduate laboratory experiment that demonstrates the use of solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed for the quantitative determination of bromoform in swimming pool water. Bromoform was extracted by SPME from the headspace of vials containing sodium chloride-saturated swimming pool water. Bromoform concentrations were determined from comparisons of peak areas on a student-generated calibration curve. Students compared results to OSHA water and air exposure limits for bromoform.

  8. 1968 Listing of Swimming Pool Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI. Testing Lab.

    An up-to-date listing of swimming pool equipment including--(1) companies authorized to display the National Sanitation Foundation seal of approval, (2) equipment listed as meeting NSF swimming pool equipment standards relating to diatomite type filters, (3) equipment listed as meeting NSF swimming pool equipment standard relating to sand type…

  9. Swimming Pools for Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neilson, Donald W.; Nixon, John E.

    The increasing interest in swimming instruction and recreation for elementary and secondary school children has resulted in the development of this guide for swimming pool use, design, and construction. Introductory material discussed the need for swimming in the educational program and the organization of swimming programs in the school. Design…

  10. What’s in the Pool? A Comprehensive Identification of Disinfection By-Products and Assessment of Mutagenicity of Chlorinated and Brominated Swimming Pool Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Swimming pool disinfectants and disinfection by-products (DBPs) have been linked to human health effects, including asthma and bladder cancer, but no studies have provided a comprehensive identification of DBPs in pool water and related those DBPs to the mutagenicity of pool wate...

  11. HPLC DETERMINATION OF CYANURIC ACID IN SWIMMING POOL WATERS USING PHENYL AND CONFIRMATORY POROUS GRAPHITIC CARBON COLUMNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chlorinated salts of cyanuric acid have found an important role in recreational swimming pool waters across the United States. Upon application to pool water, they can (1) release disinfectant chlorine or (2) stabilize the free available chlorine by acting as chlorine reserv...

  12. Development of the laboratory prototype "CavyPool" for assessing treatments and materials for swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Valeriani, F; Gianfranceschi, G; Vitali, M; Protano, C; Romano Spica, V

    2017-01-01

    Hygiene and surveillance in swimming pools are established by WHO Guidelines and national laws. Progress in water management and pool construction is revolutionizing the field, introducing new materials, systems, disinfection procedures or monitoring markers. Innovation advances challenge the upgrading of safety and quality in pools and the appropriate implementation of guidelines. In order to provide a device for laboratory test, a prototype was realized and applied to study and compare swimming pool materials and treatments. A pool scale-model was engineered and evaluated by computational fluid dynamics algorithms. An automated real time monitoring assured steady state. Critical control points along the water circuit were made accessible to allow the placing of different biocides or water sampling. Simulations were safely performed in a standard hood. Materials for pool surfaces and pipelines were evaluated for biofilm formation under different disinfection conditions. Adherent microorganisms were assayed by mfDNA analysis using real time PCR. The prototype reached the steady state within 5-25 hours under different conditions, showing chemical, physical and fluid-dynamic stability. A method was optimized for testing materials showing their different response to biofilm induction. Several innovative PVC samples displayed highest resistance to bacterial adhesion. A device and method was developed for testing swimming pool hygienic parameters in laboratory. It allowed to test materials for pools hygiene and maintenance, including biofilm formation. It can be applied to simulate contaminations under different water treatments or disinfection strategies. It may support technical decisions and help policymakers in acquiring evidences for comparing or validating innovative solutions.

  13. Genotoxic Effects in Swimmers Exposed to Disinfection By-products in Indoor Swimming Pools

    PubMed Central

    Kogevinas, Manolis; Villanueva, Cristina M.; Font-Ribera, Laia; Liviac, Danae; Bustamante, Mariona; Espinoza, Felicidad; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.; Espinosa, Aina; Fernandez, Pilar; DeMarini, David M.; Grimalt, Joan O.; Grummt, Tamara; Marcos, Ricard

    2010-01-01

    Background Exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water has been associated with cancer risk. A recent study (Villanueva et al. 2007; Am J Epidemiol 165:148–156) found an increased bladder cancer risk among subjects attending swimming pools relative to those not attending. Objectives We evaluated adults who swam in chlorinated pools to determine whether exposure to DBPs in pool water is associated with biomarkers of genotoxicity. Methods We collected blood, urine, and exhaled air samples from 49 nonsmoking adult volunteers before and after they swam for 40 min in an indoor chlorinated pool. We estimated associations between the concentrations of four trihalomethanes (THMs) in exhaled breath and changes in micronuclei (MN) and DNA damage (comet assay) in peripheral blood lymphocytes before and 1 hr after swimming; urine mutagenicity (Ames assay) before and 2 hr after swimming; and MN in exfoliated urothelial cells before and 2 weeks after swimming. We also estimated associations and interactions with polymorphisms in genes related to DNA repair or to DBP metabolism. Results After swimming, the total concentration of the four THMs in exhaled breath was seven times higher than before swimming. The change in the frequency of micronucleated lymphocytes after swimming increased in association with higher exhaled concentrations of the brominated THMs (p = 0.03 for bromodichloromethane, p = 0.05 for chlorodibromomethane, p = 0.01 for bromoform) but not chloroform. Swimming was not associated with DNA damage detectable by the comet assay. Urine mutagenicity increased significantly after swimming, in association with the higher concentration of exhaled bromoform (p = 0.004). We found no significant associations with changes in micronucleated urothelial cells. Conclusions Our findings support potential genotoxic effects of exposure to DBPs from swimming pools. The positive health effects gained by swimming could be increased by reducing the potential health

  14. Swimming Pools. A Guide to Their Planning, Design and Operation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabrielsen, M. Alexander, Ed.

    Information is presented regarding all phases of swimming pool development and operation from earliest planning considerations to final programing. This comprehensive book covers--(1) the steps involved in planning a pool, (2) designing the pool, (3) water circulation, filtration, and treatment, (4) community pools, school and agency pools, and…

  15. The Pool Is Not Just for Swimming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metzker, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    Participating in water fitness workouts is one way to benefit one's health at very little cost. If the pool at a school is used only for swimming, then the benefits of having one barely causes a ripple. When the properties of water and how humans react to water are understood and applied to water activity programs, health benefits and enjoyment…

  16. From Source Water to Tap Water to Spa and Swimming Pool Water: Effects of Disinfectanta and Precursors and Implications for Exposure and Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction The current study investigated the effect of different disinfection treatments on the disinfection by-products (DBPs) formed in finished drinking water vs. tap water vs. swimming pool water vs. spa waters. To this end, samples across the complete water pathway (untr...

  17. Genotoxic Effects in Swimmers Exposed to Disinfection By-products in Indoor Swimming Pool

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water has been associated with cancer risk, and a recent study found an increased bladder cancer risk among subjects attending swimming pools. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate whether swimming in pools is associated with ...

  18. Investigation of Air Quality Problems in an Indoor Swimming Pool: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, Benoit; Vézina, Lorraine; Gauvin, Denis; Leroux, Patrice

    2015-10-01

    Trichloramine (NCl3) is the contaminant suspected the most to cause irritative respiratory symptoms among swimmers and swimming pool workers. Following complaints by employees working in an indoor swimming pool, this study set out to identify the determinants of NCl3 air concentrations in that particular swimming pool. To document NCl3 air levels, air samples (n = 26) were collected once or twice a day for 3 h, at least 3 days per week, between October and December 2011. Water samples were taken three times during air sampling to verify free chlorine, chloramines, alkalinity, conductivity, pH, water temperature, and turbidity. Water changes were also recorded, along with the number of bathers. Ventilation (outdoor air flow) was modified to verify the influence of this important variable. Data were evaluated by analysis of variance. Mean NCl3 air concentration was 0.38 mg m(-3). The best model explaining variations of NCl3 air levels (r2 = 0.83) included sampling period (P = 0.002, NCl3 was higher in the evening versus the morning), water changes (P = 0.02, NCl3 was lower with water changes between 60 and 90 min day(-1) versus <60 min day(-1)), and ventilation (P = 0.0002, NCl3 was lower with ≥2 air changes per hour (ACH) versus <1 ACH). Although based on only 26 air samples, our results indicate that ventilation is an important determinant of NCl3 air concentration in swimming pool air. There is limited information available on the air quality of indoor swimming pools and the relationship with ventilation. Efforts are needed to document the situation and to develop state-of-the-art facilities for ventilation of indoor swimming pools. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  19. Benefits of carbon dioxide as pH reducer in chlorinated indoor swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Gomà, Anton; Guisasola, Albert; Tayà, Carlota; Baeza, Juan A; Baeza, Mireia; Bartrolí, Albert; Lafuente, Javier; Bartrolí, Jordi

    2010-06-01

    Carbon dioxide is seldom used as pH reducer in swimming pools. Nevertheless it offers two interesting advantages. First, its use instead of the usual hydrochloric acid avoids the characteristic and serious accident of mixing the disinfectant with that strong acid, which forms a dangerous chlorine gas cloud and, second, it allows the facility to become slightly a depository of that greenhouse gas. This work introduces the experience of using CO(2) as pH reducer in real working swimming pools, showing three more advantages: lower chlorine consumption, lower presence of oxidants in the air above the swimming pool and a diminished formation of trihalomethanes in the swimming pool water. Experiments lasted 4years and they were run in three swimming pools in the Barcelona area, where the conventional system based upon HCl and a system based upon CO(2) were consecutively exchanged.

  20. Assessment of air and water contamination by disinfection by-products at 41 indoor swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Tardif, Robert; Catto, Cyril; Haddad, Sami; Simard, Sabrina; Rodriguez, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    This study was aimed at assessing the profiles (occurrence and speciation) of disinfection by-product (DBP) contamination in air and water of a group of 41 public indoor swimming pools in Québec (Canada). The contaminants measured in the water included the traditional DBPs [i.e., four trihalomethanes (THMs), six haloacetic acids (HAAs)] but also several emergent DBPs [i.e., halonitriles, halonitromethanes, haloketones and nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA)]. Those measured in the air comprised THMs and chloramines (CAMs). Overall, extremely variable DBP levels were found from one pool to another (both quantitatively and in terms of speciation). For instance, in water, among the four THMs, chloroform was usually the most abundant compound (37.9±25.7µg/L). Nevertheless, the sum of the three other brominated THMs represented more than 25% of total THMs at almost half the facilities visited (19 cases). In 13 of them, the levels of brominated THMs (66±24.2µg/L) even greatly outweighed the levels of chloroform (15.2±6.31µg/L). Much higher levels of HAAs (294.8±157.6µg/L) were observed, with a consistent preponderance of brominated HAAs in the swimming pools with more brominated THMs. NDMA levels which were measured in a subset of 8 pools ranged between 2.8ng/L and 105ng/L. With respect to air, chloroform was still the most abundant THM globally (119.4±74.2µg/m(3)) but significant levels of brominated THMs were also observed in various cases, particularly in the previously evoked group of 13 swimming pools with preponderant levels of brominated THMs in water. CAM levels (0.23±0.15mg/m(3)) varied highly, ranging from not detected to 0.56mg/m(3). Overall, the levels were generally relatively high compared to current guidelines or reference values from several countries, and they point to a relatively atypical presence of brominated compounds, and to significant levels of emergent DBPs for which health risk is less documented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  1. Occurrence of brominated disinfection byproducts in the air and water of chlorinated seawater swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Manasfi, Tarek; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Coulomb, Bruno; Vassalo, Laurent; Boudenne, Jean-Luc

    2017-05-01

    An undesirable consequence of disinfection is the formation of chemical contaminants known as disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Chronic exposure to DBPs has been linked to adverse health effects. The occurrence of DBPs in chlorinated pools filled with seawater (such as thalassotherapy pools and pools in spas) has received little attention so far. The present study evaluated the speciation and levels of disinfection byproducts in indoor swimming pools filled with seawater and treated with chlorine. Water and air samples were collected from three indoor swimming pools located in Southern France. Several classes of DBPs including trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, haloacetonitriles, and trihaloacetaldehydes were analyzed in water. Halogenated volatile organic compounds were analyzed in air. Extractable organic halides (EOX) contents were determined using combustion/micro-coulometry system. The speciation of DBPs identified in the three pools was predominantly brominated. The mean (arithmetic) concentration of bromoform, dibromoacetic acid, tribromoacetic acid, dibromoacetonitrile and bromal hydrate in the three pools was 79.2, 72.9, 59.9, 26.9 and 10.0μg/L, respectively. By weight, HAAs represented the most abundant chemical class followed by THMs. In air, bromoform was the most abundant THM occurring at a mean concentration of 133.2μg/m 3 in the three pools. The mean EOX level was 706μgCl - /L for the three pools. In average, the quantified DBPs accounted for only 14% of EOX, thus 86% of EOX remained unknown. Further research is warranted to identify the unknown DBPs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Solar-heated municipal swimming pools, a case study: Dade County, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, M.

    1981-09-01

    The installation of a solar energy system to heat the water in the swimming pool in one of Dade County, Florida's major parks is described. The mechanics of solar heated swimming pools are explained. The solar heating system consists of 216 unglazed polypropylene tube collectors, a differential thermostat, and the distribution system. The systems performance and economics as well as future plants are discussed.

  3. Health Effects from Swimming Training in Chlorinated Pools and the Corresponding Metabolic Stress Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiang-Hua; Wang, Zhi-Hui; Zhu, Xiao-Juan; Deng, Zhao-Hui; Cai, Can-Xin; Qiu, Li-Qiang; Chen, Wei; Lin, Ya-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Chlorination is the most popular method for disinfecting swimming pool water; however, although pathogens are being killed, many toxic compounds, called disinfection by-products (DBPs), are formed. Numerous epidemiological publications have associated the chlorination of pools with dysfunctions of the respiratory system and with some other diseases. However, the findings concerning these associations are not always consistent and have not been confirmed by toxicological studies. Therefore, the health effects from swimming in chlorinated pools and the corresponding stress reactions in organisms are unclear. In this study, we show that although the growth and behaviors of experimental rats were not affected, their health, training effects and metabolic profiles were significantly affected by a 12-week swimming training program in chlorinated water identical to that of public pools. Interestingly, the eyes and skin are the organs that are more directly affected than the lungs by the irritants in chlorinated water; instead of chlorination, training intensity, training frequency and choking on water may be the primary factors for lung damage induced by swimming. Among the five major organs (the heart, liver, spleen, lungs and kidneys), the liver is the most likely target of DBPs. Through metabolomics analysis, the corresponding metabolic stress pathways and a defensive system focusing on taurine were presented, based on which the corresponding countermeasures can be developed for swimming athletes and for others who spend a lot of time in chlorinated swimming pools. PMID:25742134

  4. A swimming pool array for ultra high energy showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yodh, Gaurang B.; Shoup, Anthony; Barwick, Steve; Goodman, Jordan A.

    1992-11-01

    A very preliminary design concept for an array using water Cherenkov counters, built out of commercially available backyard swimming pools, to sample the electromagnetic and muonic components of ultra high energy showers at large lateral distances is presented. The expected performance of the pools is estimated using the observed lateral distributions by scintillator and water Cherenkov arrays at energies above 1019 eV and simulations.

  5. The Recreational Water Cycle: From Source Water to Tap Water to Spa and Swimming Pool Water: Effects of Disinfectants and Precursors and Implications for Exposure and Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current study investigates the effect of different disinfection treatments on the disinfection by-products (DBPs) formed in finished drinking water vs. tap water vs. swimming pool water vs. spa waters. To this end, complete water pathway samples (untreated source waters ->fi...

  6. Assessment of Physicochemical and Microbiological Quality of Public Swimming Pools in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Yedeme, Kokebe; Legese, Melese Hailu; Gonfa, Almaz; Girma, Somson

    2017-01-01

    Background: From swimming pools, bathers may acquire many potential pathogens or may be affected by the physicochemical characteristics of water used during bathing. Hence, this study aimed at assessing the physicochemical and microbiological quality of public swimming pools located at different hotels and recreation center in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Method: A cross sectional study was carried out from February to May, 2016. Nine hotels and one recreation center which recognized to have public swimming services were included. A total of 60 swimming pool water samples from 10 swimming pools were collected at deeper, shallow and intake point twice on a weekly basis using a 250 ml sterile bottle containing sodium thiosulphate. PH, residual chlorine and temperature of samples were recorded at the time of collection. Sample containing bottles were transported in ice box to microbiological laboratory and analyzed on the same day. Standard cultural and biochemical methods were used for isolation and characterization of the main microbial groups. Total viable count, total coliform count, fecal coliform count and E. coli were determined. Data was analyzed using SPSS Version 20. Results: Average PH and temperature of swimming pool water samples were 7.1 and 29oC respectively. Of all analyzed water samples, 58.4% (n=35/60) of them had PH range of 7.2-7.8, 58.3% (n=35/60) of samples had temperature in the range of 21oC-32oC and 25% (n=15/60) of water samples had residual chlorine in the range of 2-3mg/l. 73.3% (n=44/60) of the samples had a total viable count below 200 MPN/ml and 70% (n-42/60) of the samples had Total Coliform Count values less than 2 MPN/100 ml. Moreover, 66.7% (n=40/60) of the samples had fecal coliform counts falling below 1 MPN /100 ml. E. coli was absent in 70% (n=42/60) of the samples while it was present in 30% (n=18/60) of the samples. Conclusion: PH, residual chlorine and temperature value of majority of the swimming pools’ water samples were within

  7. Swimming Pool Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Safety & Prevention Immunizations All Around At Home At Play ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Swimming Pool Safety Page Content ​What is the best way to ...

  8. What's in The Pool? A Comprehensive Identification Of Disinfection By-Products and Assessment of Mutagenicity of Chlorinated and Brominated Swimming Pool Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Swimming pool disinfectants and disinfection by-products (DBPs) have been linked to human health effects, including asthma and bladder cancer, but no studies have provided a comprehensive identification of DBPs in the water and related that to mutagenicity. We performed a compreh...

  9. Swimming Pool Electrical Injuries: Steps Toward Prevention.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Jun; Burnweit, Cathy A

    2017-01-09

    Electrical injuries in swimming pools are an important pediatric public health concern. We sought to (1) improve our understanding of the clinical presentation and outcomes following and (2) describe the epidemiology of swimming pool electrical injuries in the United States. We reviewed 4 cases of pediatric (<18 y old) electrical injury from a single, urban level 1 pediatric trauma center. We also queried the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) for emergency department visits due to electrical injury associated with swimming pools, occurring between 1991 and 2013. Overall, 566 cases were reported, with a mean (SD) age of 9.2 (4.1) years. Patients were mostly treated and released from the emergency department (91.8%), whereas 8.2% were hospitalized. When stated, injuries occurred most frequently at home (57.0%), followed by public (23.9%) and sports facilities (19.1%). Electrical outlets or receptacles (39.8%) were most commonly implicated, followed by electrical system doors (18.2%), electric wiring systems (17.0%), thermostats (16.3%), hair dryers (4.6%), and radios (4.1%). Pediatric cases represented 48.4% of swimming pool-related electrical injuries reported to NEISS. Electrical injuries occurring in and around swimming pools remain an important source of morbidity and mortality. Although NEISS monitors sentinel events, current efforts at preventing such cases are less than adequate. All electrical outlets near swimming pools should be properly wired with ground fault circuit interrupter devices. Possible approaches to increasing safe electrical device installation are through strengthening public awareness and education of the potential for injury, as well as changes to current inspection regulations.

  10. Occurrence and Spatial and Temporal Variations of Disinfection By-Products in the Water and Air of Two Indoor Swimming Pools

    PubMed Central

    Catto, Cyril; Sabrina, Simard; Ginette, Charest-Tardif; Manuel, Rodriguez; Robert, Tardif

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve disinfection by-product (DBP) exposure assessment, this study was designed to document both water and air levels of these chemical contaminants in two indoor swimming pools and to analyze their within-day and day-to-day variations in both of them. Intensive sampling was carried out during two one-week campaigns to measure trihalomethanes (THMs) and chloramines (CAMs) in water and air, and haloacetic acids (HAAs) in water several times daily. Water samples were systematically collected at three locations in each pool and air samples were collected at various heights around the pool and in other rooms (e.g., changing room) in the buildings. In addition, the ability of various models to predict air concentrations from water was tested using this database. No clear trends, but actual variations of contamination levels, appeared for both water and air according to the sampling locations and times. Likewise, the available models resulted in realistic but imprecise estimates of air contamination levels from water. This study supports the recommendation that suitable minimal air and water sampling should be carried out in swimming pools to assess exposure to DBPs. PMID:23066383

  11. Health risks of early swimming pool attendance.

    PubMed

    Schoefer, Yvonne; Zutavern, Anne; Brockow, Inken; Schäfer, Torsten; Krämer, Ursula; Schaaf, Beate; Herbarth, Olf; von Berg, Andrea; Wichmann, H-Erich; Heinrich, Joachim

    2008-07-01

    Swimming pool attendance and exposure to chlorination by-products showed adverse health effects on children. We assessed whether early swimming pool attendance, especially baby swimming, is related to higher rates of early infections and to the development of allergic diseases. In 2003-2005, 2192 children were analysed for the 6-year follow-up of a prospective birth cohort study. Data on early swimming pool attendance, other lifestyle factors and medical history were collected by parental-administered questionnaire. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate associations. Babies who did not participate in baby swimming had lower rates of infection in the 1st year of life (i) diarrhoea: OR 0.68 CI 95% 0.54-0.85; (ii) otitis media: OR 0.81 CI 95% 0.62-1.05; (iii) airway infections: OR 0.85 CI 95% 0.67-1.09. No clear association could be found between late or non-swimmers and atopic dermatitis or hay fever until the age of 6 years, while higher rates of asthma were found (OR 2.15 95% CI 1.16-3.99), however, potentially due to reverse causation. The study indicates that, in terms of infections, baby swimming might not be as harmless as commonly thought. Further evidence is needed to make conclusions if the current regulations on chlorine in Germany might not protect swimming pool attendees from an increased risk of gastrointestinal infections. In terms of developing atopic diseases there is no verifiable detrimental effect of early swimming.

  12. Occurrence and formation of disinfection by-products in the swimming pool environment: A critical review.

    PubMed

    Carter, Rhys A A; Joll, Cynthia A

    2017-08-01

    Disinfection of water for human use is essential to protect against microbial disease; however, disinfection also leads to formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs), some of which are of health concern. From a chemical perspective, swimming pools are a complex matrix, with continual addition of a wide range of natural and anthropogenic chemicals via filling waters, disinfectant addition, pharmaceuticals and personal care products and human body excretions. Natural organic matter, trace amounts of DBPs and chlorine or chloramines may be introduced by the filling water, which is commonly disinfected distributed drinking water. Chlorine and/or bromine is continually introduced via the addition of chemical disinfectants to the pool. Human body excretions (sweat, urine and saliva) and pharmaceuticals and personal care products (sunscreens, cosmetics, hair products and lotions) are introduced by swimmers. High addition of disinfectant leads to a high formation of DBPs from reaction of some of the chemicals with the disinfectant. Swimming pool air is also of concern as volatile DBPs partition into the air above the pool. The presence of bromine leads to the formation of a wide range of bromo- and bromo/chloro-DBPs, and Br-DBPs are more toxic than their chlorinated analogues. This is particularly important for seawater-filled pools or pools using a bromine-based disinfectant. This review summarises chemical contaminants and DBPs in swimming pool waters, as well as in the air above pools. Factors that have been found to affect DBP formation in pools are discussed. The impact of the swimming pool environment on human health is reviewed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. [Environmental surveillance of a sample of indoor swimming pools from Emilia Romagna region: microclimate characteristics and chemical parameters, particularly disinfection by products, in pool waters].

    PubMed

    Fantuzzi, G; Righi, E; Predieri, G; Giacobazzi, P; Mastroianni, K; Aggazzotti, G

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the environmental and healthy aspects from a representative sample of indoor swimming pools located in the Emilia Romagna region. During the sampling sessions, the occupational environment was evaluated in terms of microclimate parameters and thermal comfort/discomfort conditions. Moreover the chemical risk was assessed by analyzing from the pool water the presence of disinfection by-products (DBPs), such as: trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs), chlorite, chlorate and bromate. The analytical results are in agreement with the Italian legislation (Accordo Stato-Regioni; 2003) even if in some of the sampled indoor swimming pools, the dosed combined chlorine levels, were greater than the Italian limit. With the regard to the microclimate conditions evaluation, the considered thermal indices, Predicted Mean Vote (PMV) and Predicted Percentage of Dissatisfied (PPD%), described a satisfactory occupational environment. Among DBPs, the THMs mean levels (41.4 +/- 30.0 microg/l) resulted close to the values of the current Italian drinking water legislation, and seem to not represent an health issue. The pool waters chlorate levels (range: 5 - 19537 microg/l) need further investigations as recent epidemiological studies on drinking water hypothesized a potential genotoxicity effect of these compounds which are involved in cellular oxidative processes.

  14. Potential risks of TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles released from sunscreens into outdoor swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Soo-Kyung; Kim, Eun-Ju; Lee, Jaesang; Lee, Seunghak

    2016-11-05

    The potential risks of nanoparticles (NPs) in sunscreens being released into swimming water were evaluated by a series of laboratory experiments simulating the fate and transport of NPs in outdoor swimming pools. NPs released from sunscreen-applied skin were estimated using pig skins covered with five different commercial sunscreens containing TiO2, ZnO, or both at various concentrations. Assuming that the swimming water treatment processes consisted of filtration, UV irradiation, heating, and chlorination, possible removal of the released NPs by each process was estimated. Generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) by the NPs under sunlight and after UV photochemical treatment were measured, and the H2O2 concentration possibly present in the swimming pool was calculated based on some specific scenarios of operating an outdoor swimming pool. It was found that a significant amount of the NPs in sunscreens could be released into the swimming water, and accumulate during circulation through the treatment system. However, the concentration of H2O2 possibly present in the swimming pool should be below the level at which an adverse effect to bathers is concerned. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhancing swimming pool safety by the use of range-imaging cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geerardyn, D.; Boulanger, S.; Kuijk, M.

    2015-05-01

    Drowning is the cause of death of 372.000 people, each year worldwide, according to the report of November 2014 of the World Health Organization.1 Currently, most swimming pools only use lifeguards to detect drowning people. In some modern swimming pools, camera-based detection systems are nowadays being integrated. However, these systems have to be mounted underwater, mostly as a replacement of the underwater lighting. In contrast, we are interested in range imaging cameras mounted on the ceiling of the swimming pool, allowing to distinguish swimmers at the surface from drowning people underwater, while keeping the large field-of-view and minimizing occlusions. However, we have to take into account that the water surface of a swimming pool is not a flat, but mostly rippled surface, and that the water is transparent for visible light, but less transparent for infrared or ultraviolet light. We investigated the use of different types of 3D cameras to detect objects underwater at different depths and with different amplitudes of surface perturbations. Specifically, we performed measurements with a commercial Time-of-Flight camera, a commercial structured-light depth camera and our own Time-of-Flight system. Our own system uses pulsed Time-of-Flight and emits light of 785 nm. The measured distances between the camera and the object are influenced through the perturbations on the water surface. Due to the timing of our Time-of-Flight camera, our system is theoretically able to minimize the influence of the reflections of a partially-reflecting surface. The combination of a post image-acquisition filter compensating for the perturbations and the use of a light source with shorter wavelengths to enlarge the depth range can improve the current commercial cameras. As a result, we can conclude that low-cost range imagers can increase swimming pool safety, by inserting a post-processing filter and the use of another light source.

  16. Occurrence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia and the Relationship between Protozoa and Water Quality Indicators in Swimming Pools.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shumin; Yin, Pengna; Zhang, Yan; Hu, Sike

    2017-04-01

    A total of 60 samples were collected from 35 swimming pools in Beijing, China, and the presence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia were investigated. The results showed that 16.7% and 15.0% of samples were positive for Cryptosporidium oocyst and Giardia cysts, respectively, with a mean concentration of 0.30 oocysts/10 L and 0.27 cysts/10 L. The oocysts and cysts were found to have higher rates of occurrence in August than in May. Genotyping confirmed the presence of Cryptosporidium hominis, C. parvum , and Giardia assemblages A and B, all of which were associated with human infections. The predominant species/assemblages were C. hominis and Giardia assemblage A. Analyses of the relationships between parasite oocysts/cysts, indicator bacteria, and physical-chemical parameters revealed that there was no correlation between 2 parasites and fecal bacterial indicators, whilst there was a significant correlation between protozoa and urea concentration, which indicates that urea concentration rather than fecal bacterial indicators might be an appropriate index for chlorine-resistant protozoa in swimming pools. This study provides useful information to improve the safety of swimming pool water and deduce the risk of protozoan infections.

  17. WATER INGESTION DURING SWIMMING ACTIVITIES IN A POOL: A PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chloroisocyanurates are commonly added to outdoor swimming pools to stabilize chlorine disinfectants. The chloroisocyanurates decompose slowly to release chlorine and cyanuric acid. Studies conducted to determine if the chloroisocyanurates might be toxic to swimmers showed that...

  18. 3. SWIMMING POOL. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. Rainbow Hydroelectric Facility, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. SWIMMING POOL. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Rainbow Hydroelectric Facility, Swimming Pool, On north bank of Missouri River 2 miles Northeast of Great Falls, & end of Rainbow Dam Road, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  19. 1. SWIMMING POOL. VIEW TO WEST. Rainbow Hydroelectric Facility, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. SWIMMING POOL. VIEW TO WEST. - Rainbow Hydroelectric Facility, Swimming Pool, On north bank of Missouri River 2 miles Northeast of Great Falls, & end of Rainbow Dam Road, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  20. 2. SWIMMING POOL. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. Rainbow Hydroelectric Facility, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. SWIMMING POOL. VIEW TO SOUTHEAST. - Rainbow Hydroelectric Facility, Swimming Pool, On north bank of Missouri River 2 miles Northeast of Great Falls, & end of Rainbow Dam Road, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  1. Software for the Design of Swimming Pool Dehumidifiers Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubina, Aleš; Blasinski, Petr; Tesař, Zdeněk

    2013-06-01

    The article deals with the description and solution of physical phenomena taking place during evaporation of water. The topicality of the theme is given a number of built indoor swimming pool and wellness centers at present. In addressing HVAC systems serving these areas, it is necessary to know the various design parameters in the interior including the water temperature as the pool temperature and humidity. Following is a description of the calculation module, air handling units, including optimizing the settings of the physical changes in order to ensure the lowest energy consumption for air treatment and required maintaining internal microclimate parameters.

  2. Concentrations of disinfection by-products in swimming pool following modifications of the water treatment process: An exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Tardif, Robert; Rodriguez, Manuel; Catto, Cyril; Charest-Tardif, Ginette; Simard, Sabrina

    2017-08-01

    The formation and concentration of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in pool water and the ambient air vary according to the type of water treatment process used. This exploratory study was aimed at investigating the short-term impact of modifications of the water treatment process on traditional DBP levels (e.g., trihalomethanes (THMs), chloramines) and emerging DBPs (e.g., Halonitromethanes, Haloketones, NDMA) in swimming pool water and/or air. A sampling program was carried to understand the impact of the following changes made successively to the standard water treatment process: activation of ultraviolet (UV) photoreactor, halt of air stripping with continuation of air extraction from the buffer tank, halt of air stripping and suppression of air extraction from the buffer tank, suppression of the polyaluminium silicate sulfate (PASS) coagulant. UV caused a high increase of Halonitromethanes (8.4 fold), Haloketones (2.1 fold), and THMs in the water (1.7 fold) and, of THMs in the air (1.6 fold) and contributed to reducing the level of chloramines in the air (1.6 fold) and NDMA in the water (2.1 fold). The results highlight the positive impact of air stripping in reducing volatile contaminants. The PASS did not change the presence of DBPs, except for the THMs, which decrease slightly with the use of this coagulant. This study shows that modifications affecting the water treatment process can rapidly produce important and variable impacts on DBP levels in water and air and suggests that implementation of any water treatment process to reduce DBP levels should take into account the specific context of each swimming pool. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Can you really swim? Validation of self and parental reports of swim skill with an inwater swim test among children attending community pools in Washington State.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Melissa C; Quan, Linda; Bennett, Elizabeth; Gilchrist, Julie; Levy, Benjamin A; Robinson, Candice L; Wendorf, Kristen; Gangan Fife, Maria Aurora; Stevens, Mark R; Lee, Robin

    2016-08-01

    Drowning is the second leading cause of unintentional injury death among US children. Multiple studies describe decreased drowning risk among children possessing some swim skills. Current surveillance for this protective factor is self/proxy-reported swim skill rather than observed inwater performance; however, children's self-report or parents' proxy report of swim skill has not been validated. This is the first US study to evaluate whether children or parents can validly report a child's swim skill. It also explores which swim skill survey measure(s) correlate with children's inwater swim performance. For this cross-sectional convenience-based sample, pilot study, child/parent dyads (N=482) were recruited at three outdoor public pools in Washington State. Agreement between measures of self-reports and parental-reports of children's swim skill was assessed via paired analyses, and validated by inwater swim test results. Participants were representative of pool's patrons (ie, non-Hispanic White, highly educated, high income). There was agreement in child/parent dyads' reports of the following child swim skill measures: 'ever taken swim lessons', perceived 'good swim skills' and 'comfort in water over head'. Correlation analyses suggest that reported 'good swim skills' was the best survey measure to assess a child's swim skill-best if the parent was the informant (r=0.25-0.47). History of swim lessons was not significantly correlated with passing the swim test. Reported 'good swim skills' was most correlated with observed swim skill. Reporting 'yes' to 'ever taken swim lessons' did not correlate with swim skill. While non-generalisable, findings can help inform future studies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  4. VIEW OF OUTDOOR SWIMMING POOL AND FILTER ROOM/ BATHHOUSE S196, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF OUTDOOR SWIMMING POOL AND FILTER ROOM/ BATHHOUSE S-196, FACING WEST. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Outdoor Swimming Pool, Corner of Liscome Bay Street & St. Lo Avenue, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. Secondary formation of disinfection by-products by UV treatment of swimming pool water.

    PubMed

    Spiliotopoulou, Aikaterini; Hansen, Kamilla M S; Andersen, Henrik R

    2015-07-01

    Formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) during experimental UV treatment of pool water has previously been reported with little concurrence between laboratory studies, field studies and research groups. In the current study, changes in concentration of seven out of eleven investigated volatile DBPs were observed in experiments using medium pressure UV treatment, with and without chlorine and after post-UV chlorination. Results showed that post-UV chlorine consumption increased, dose-dependently, with UV treatment dose. A clear absence of trihalomethane formation by UV and UV with chlorine was observed, while small yet statistically significant increases in dichloroacetonitrile and dichloropropanone concentrations were detected. Results indicate that post-UV chlorination clearly induced secondary formation of several DBPs. However, the formation of total trihalomethanes was no greater than what could be replicated by performing the DBP formation assay with higher chlorine concentrations to simulate extended chlorination. Post-UV chlorination of water from a swimming pool that continuously uses UV treatment to control combined chlorine could not induce secondary formation for most DBPs. Concurrence for induction of trihalomethanes was identified between post-UV chlorination treatments and simulated extended chlorination time treatment. Trihalomethanes could not be induced by UV treatment of water from a continuously UV treated pool. This indicates that literature reports of experimentally induced trihalomethane formation by UV may be a result of kinetic increase in formation by UV. However, this does not imply that higher trihalomethane concentrations would occur in pools that apply continuous UV treatment. The bromine fraction of halogens in formed trihalomethanes increased with UV dose. This indicates that UV removes bromine atoms from larger molecules that participate in trihalomethane production during post-UV chlorination. Additionally, no significant

  6. Spatial analysis of paediatric swimming pool submersions by housing type.

    PubMed

    Shenoi, Rohit P; Levine, Ned; Jones, Jennifer L; Frost, Mary H; Koerner, Christine E; Fraser, John J

    2015-08-01

    Drowning is a major cause of unintentional childhood death. The relationship between childhood swimming pool submersions, neighbourhood sociodemographics, housing type and swimming pool location was examined in Harris County, Texas. Childhood pool submersion incidents were examined for spatial clustering using the Nearest Neighbor Hierarchical Cluster (Nnh) algorithm. To relate submersions to predictive factors, an Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) Poisson-Lognormal-Conditional Autoregressive (CAR) spatial regression model was tested at the census tract level. There were 260 submersions; 49 were fatal. Forty-two per cent occurred at single-family residences and 36% at multifamily residential buildings. The risk of a submersion was 2.7 times higher for a child at a multifamily than a single-family residence and 28 times more likely in a multifamily swimming pool than a single family pool. However, multifamily submersions were clustered because of the concentration of such buildings with pools. Spatial clustering did not occur in single-family residences. At the tract level, submersions in single-family and multifamily residences were best predicted by the number of pools by housing type and the number of children aged 0-17 by housing type. Paediatric swimming pool submersions in multifamily buildings are spatially clustered. The likelihood of submersions is higher for children who live in multifamily buildings with pools than those who live in single-family homes with pools. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. [Surveillance of the sanitary conditions of a public swimming pool in the city of Palermo (Italy)].

    PubMed

    Maida, Carmelo Massimo; Di Benedetto, Maria Antonella; Firenze, Alberto; Calamusa, Giuseppe; Di Piazza, Florinda; Milici, Maria Eleonora; Romano, Nino

    2008-01-01

    In a previous study we evaluated the microbiological quality of water of seven pools in the city of Palermo through evaluation of bacterial indicators of faecal contamination and of protozoa (Giardia and Cryptosporidium). In this study we also searched for the presence of fungi in two swimming pools of a public swimming facility in the same city. Samples were collected from both pools, their filtration systems and floor surfaces of the facility. Chemical-physical and microbiological examination of water of the two pools have shown that quality of water depends on the concentration of residual free chlorine and on the number of bathers in the pool. The values of four microbiological parameters (bacterial load at 22 degrees C and 36 degrees C, presence of coagulase-negative Staphylococci and Pseudomonas spp.) increased with diminishing chlorine concentrations and with increasing number of pool users. Faecal bacteria, Giardia and Cryptosporidium were not found. On the other hand, various fungi were isolated from floor surfaces and pool water even in the presence of optimal chlorine concentrations. This study confirms the importance of regular maintenance of pool disinfection systems and suggests the need to search for other micro-organisms not included in the current legislation (Giardia, Cryptosporidium and fungi).

  8. Nebraska DHHS: Swimming Pool Program

    Science.gov Websites

    Skip to main content Official Nebraska Government Website NE-DHHS Home Header Behavioral Health Children and Family Services Developmental Disabilities Medicaid and Long Term Care Public Health DHHS Internet Website - Public Health DHHS Internet Website - Public Health : Nebraska DHHS: Swimming Pool

  9. Degradation Products of Benzophenone-3 in Chlorinated Seawater Swimming Pools.

    PubMed

    Manasfi, Tarek; Storck, Veronika; Ravier, Sylvain; Demelas, Carine; Coulomb, Bruno; Boudenne, Jean-Luc

    2015-08-04

    Oxybenzone (2-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenone, benzophenone-3) is one of the UV filters commonly found in sunscreens. Its presence in swimming pools and its reactivity with chlorine has already been demonstrated but never in seawater swimming pools. In these pools, chlorine added for disinfection results in the formation of bromine, due to the high levels of bromide in seawater, and leads to the formation of brominated disinfection byproducts, known to be more toxic than chlorinated ones. Therefore, it seems important to determine the transformation products of oxybenzone in chlorinated seawater swimming pools; especially that users of seawater swimming pools may apply sunscreens and other personal-care products containing oxybenzone before going to pools. This leads to the introduction of oxybenzone to pools, where it reacts with bromine. For this purpose, the reactivity of oxybenzone has been examined as a function of chlorine dose and temperature in artificial seawater to assess its potential to produce trihalomethanes and to determine the byproducts generated following chlorination. Increasing doses of chlorine and increasing temperatures enhanced the formation of bromoform. Experiments carried out with excess doses of chlorine resulted in the degradation of oxybenzone and allowed the determination of the degradation mechanisms leading to the formation of bromoform. In total, ten transformation products were identified, based on which the transformation pathway was proposed.

  10. Comprehensive Identification of Chemical DBPs from Chlorinated and Brominated Swimming Pools

    EPA Science Inventory

    Swimming pools have been recently recognized as important routes of exposure to potentially harmful chemicals. Previous epidemiologic research has shown increased incidence of asthma and other respiratory effects for people who have significant indoor swimming pool exposures, an...

  11. 3. View to northwest showing swimming pool, filtration/chlorination building (at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View to northwest showing swimming pool, filtration/chlorination building (at left), and southeast elevation of Carpenter & Paint Shop (HABS No. VA-1287-L, at rear) - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Shower Room & Swimming Pool, Green Street, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  12. Color Fringes Bordering Black Stripes at the Bottom of a Swimming Pool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuster, Gonzalo; Rojas, Roberto; Slüsarenko, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    We have observed a nice example of chromatic dispersion due to refraction in water, in the form of color fringes bordering the black stripes that exist at the bottom of a swimming pool. Here we give a qualitative description of the phenomenon, explaining the role of the black stripes and the dispersive index of refraction of water.

  13. Healthy Swimming/Recreational Water

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Pool Raccoons & Pools Birds & Pools Aquatics Professionals Design & Construction Designing Public Swimming Facilities Historic CDC Design & Operation Manuals Operation & Maintenance 12 Steps for Prevention ...

  14. Electromagnetic Interference in a Private Swimming Pool: Case report.

    PubMed

    Iskandar, Sandia; Lavu, Madhav; Atoui, Moustapha; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya

    2015-01-01

    Although current lead design and filtering capabilities have greatly improved, Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) from environmental sources has been increasingly reported in patients with Cardiac Implantable Electronic Device (CIED) [1]. Few cases of inappropriate intracardiac Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) associated with swimming pool has been described [2]. Here we present a case of 64 year old male who presented with an interesting EMI signal that was subsequently identified to be related to AC current leak in his swimming pool.

  15. [Legal and management issues of public health requirements for swimming pools in Regione Toscana].

    PubMed

    Linguanti, Saverio; Totaro, Michele; Frendo, Lorenzo; Giorgi, Serena; Porretta, Andrea; Valentini, Paola; Baggiani, Angelo

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we describe the laws and rules applying to swimming pools. Authorization activity title for recreational swimming pools is regulated according to articles 80 and 86 of the TULPS R.D.n°773/1931. In Regione Toscana periodic management of the hygienic requirements for swimming pools is regulated by Regional Decree 54R/2015. It requires the evaluation of physical-chemical and microbiological indicators. The law applies to structural and organizational requirements of swimming pools as well as defines responsabilities of managers.

  16. ASCANs Helms and Gregory swim in pool during Elgin AFB survival training

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1990-09-20

    1990 Group 13 Astronaut Candidates (ASCANs) Susan J. Helms (foreground) and William G. Gregory, wearing helmets and flight suits, swim in pool at Elgin Air Force Base (AFB) in Pensacola, Florida, during water survival exercises. The training familiarized the candidates with survival techniques necessary in the event of a water landing. ASCANs participated in the exercises from 08-14-90 through 08-17-90.

  17. Increased Risk of Tinea Pedis and Onychomycosis Among Swimming Pool Employees in Netanya Area, Israel.

    PubMed

    Shemer, Avner; Gupta, Aditya K; Amichai, Boaz; Baum, Sharon; Barzilai, Aviv; Farhi, Renata; Kaplan, Yehonathan; MacLeod, Melissa A

    2016-12-01

    Tinea pedis and onychomycosis often co-occur in individuals. A relationship between swimming pools and tinea pedis exists; however, little research has investigated the relationship between onychomycosis, tinea pedis, and swimming pools. This study sought to examine the prevalence of tinea pedis and onychomycosis among swimming pool employees, a population that may be at risk of tinea infections. Samples were taken from 169 employees at 21 swimming pools in the Netanya area, Israel. KOH microscopy and culture was used to identify fungi. About 46 % of swimming pool employees had concurrent tinea pedis and onychomycosis, 30 % had tinea pedis only, and 6 % had onychomycosis only, compared to 10, 8, and 8 % of controls, respectively. After adjusting for age and gender, swimming pool employees were 20× more likely to have concurrent tinea pedis and onychomycosis, 15× more likely to have tinea pedis only, and 3× more likely to have onychomycosis only compared to controls. The present results are in agreement with previous research and support that swimming pools remain an important source of fungal contamination. More attention to hygienic guidelines and preventative measures may be needed in these settings.

  18. AN INFERENTIAL INDEX OF SWIMMING POOL PURITY

    PubMed Central

    Fair, Gordon M.

    1920-01-01

    Score cards for swimming pools is the suggestion of this paper. Figures about these establishments are today in the class with crude statistics, and may lead to unreliable conclusions. Here are suggested various indexes which may be of service in framing minimum requirements for these pools. This article is an effort to clear up a complicated matter for which there are not now accepted standards. PMID:18010324

  19. Centrifugal Pumps for Swimming Pools. National Sanitation Foundation Standard Number 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI. Committee for Swimming Pool Equipment Standards.

    The pumps discussed herein are intended to be used for recirculating water in swimming pools, both public and private. Included are the basic components which may be a part of a pump such as the housing, strainer, impeller, valves, and such other parts as are attached or a part of the pump as supplied by the manufacturer. This standard is intended…

  20. Diatomite Type Filters for Swimming Pools. Standard No. 9, Revised October, 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI.

    Pressure and vacuum diatomite type filters are covered in this standard. The filters herein described are intended to be designed and used specifically for swimming pool water filtration, both public and residential. Included are the basic components which are a necessary part of the diatomite type filter such as filter housing, element supports,…

  1. Sand Type Filters for Swimming Pools. Standard No. 10, Revised October, 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI.

    Sand type filters are covered in this standard. The filters described are intended to be designed and used specifically for swimming pool water filtration, both public and residential. Included are the basic components which are a necessary part of the sand type filter such as filter housing, upper and lower distribution systems filter media,…

  2. Test of precoat filtration technology for treatment of swimming pool water.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard; Klausen, Morten Møller; Christensen, Peter Vittrup

    2018-02-01

    The technical performance of a precoat filter was compared with that of a traditional sand filter. Particle concentration and size distribution were measured before and after the filtration of swimming pool water. Both the sand and precoat filters could reduce the particle concentration in the effluent. However, higher particle removal efficiency was generally observed for the precoat filter, especially for particles smaller than 10 μm in diameter. Adding flocculant improved the removal efficiency of the sand filter, resulting in removal efficiencies comparable to those of the precoat filter. Three powders, i.e., two types of perlite (Harbolite ® and Aquatec perlite) and cellulose fibers (Arbocel ® ), were tested for the precoat filter, but no significant difference in particle removal efficiency was observed among them. The maximum efficiency was reached within 30-40 min of filtration. The energy required for the pumps increased by approximately 35% over a period of 14 days. The energy consumption could be reduced by replacing the powder on the filter cloth. The sand filter was backwashed once a week, while the powder on the precoat filter was replaced every two weeks. Under these conditions, it was possible to reduce the water used for cleaning by 88% if the precoat filter was used instead of the sand filter.

  3. Swimming Pools, Hot Rods, and Qualitative Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clyde, Dale D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes some reactions for the identification and application of cyanuric acid. Suggests students may find this applied chemistry interesting because of the use of cyanuric acid in swimming pools and diesel engines. Lists three tests for cyanate ion and two tests for cyanuric acid. (MVL)

  4. Lip and tooth injuries at public swimming pools in Austria.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Katharina; Connert, Thomas; Kühl, Sebastian; Filippi, Andreas

    2017-06-01

    There is an increased risk of orofacial injuries in swimming pool facilities. Nevertheless, only a few studies have addressed this issue. The aim of this study was to identify the frequency of lip and tooth injuries at public swimming pools in Austria. A further aim was to examine which gender and age groups were affected, where and why these injuries occurred, and whether pool attendants had sufficient knowledge of dental first-aid measures. A total of 764 pool attendants in Austria were contacted by telephone and 689 participated in the study (90.2%). The attendants were interviewed retrospectively about accident occurrences in 2014 by a standardized questionnaire. Responses to the provision of first aid and choice of storage medium for avulsed teeth were subsequently evaluated. The frequency of lip injuries was 19.0%, and tooth injuries were 11.3%. Male bathers (P < .05) and children under 12 years (P < .001) most frequently suffered injuries. The waterslide was the most common accident site. The most common cause of lip injuries was slipping on wet surfaces (39.0%), and for tooth injuries it was collisions with other persons or objects (each 28.1%). The pool attendants' responses were predominantly good or sufficient on first aid, with the exception of what storage medium to choose. Tooth rescue boxes were available in only 8.6% of all pool facilities. Orofacial injuries are a frequently occurring problem in swimming pool facilities. The pool attendants' knowledge on first-aid care of tooth injuries could still be improved. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. RECESSED AUTOMATIC SURFACE SKIMMERS FOR SWIMMING POOLS. NATIONAL SANITATION FOUNDATION STANDARD NUMBER 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI.

    THE NATIONAL SANITATION FOUNDATION STANDARD ON SWIMMING POOL EQUIPMENT CONCERNS ITSELF WITH THE SUCCESSFUL APPLICATION OF SURFACE SKIMMERS TO SWIMMING POOLS. THE MINIMUM DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION REQUIREMENTS ESTABLISHED BY THIS STANDARD ARE SET FORTH TO PROVIDE A MEANS OF EVALUATING THE OVERALL CONSTRUCTION AND EFFECTIVENESS OF THE UNIT. ADDITIONAL…

  6. Evaluation and Treatment of Swimming Pool Avoidance Exhibited by an Adolescent Girl with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapp, John T.; Vollmer, Timothy R.; Hovanetz, Alyson N.

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated and treated swimming pool avoidance that was exhibited by a 14-year-old girl diagnosed with autism. In part, treatment involved blocking for flopping (dropping to the ground) and elopement (running away from the pool) and access to food for movements toward a swimming pool. Treatment also involved reinforcement for exposure to various…

  7. Fast determination of octinoxate and oxybenzone uv filters in swimming pool waters by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry after solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Yılmazcan, Ö; Kanakaki, C; Izgi, B; Rosenberg, E

    2015-07-01

    A fast gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for the analysis of the potential endocrine disrupters octinoxate and oxybenzone in swimming pool water samples based on the solvent-free solid-phase microextraction technique. The low-pressure gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method used for the fast identification of UV filter substances was compared to a conventional method in terms of sensitivity and speed. The fast method proposed resulted in 2 min runs, leading to an eightfold decrease in the total analysis time and a sevenfold improvement in detection limits. The main parameters affecting the solid-phase microextraction process were also studied in detail and the optimized conditions were as follows: fiber coating, polyacrylate; extraction mode, direct immersion; extraction temperature, 25°C; sample volume, 5 mL; extraction time 45 min; pH 6.5. Under the optimized conditions, a linear response was obtained in the concentration range of 0.5-25 μg/L with correlation coefficients in the range 0.990-0.999. The limits of detection were 0.17-0.29 μg/L, and the recoveries were 80-83%. Combined method uncertainty was assessed and found to be less than 7% for both analytes for concentrations equal to or higher than 5 μg/L. Pool water samples were analyzed to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed method. Neither octinoxate nor oxybenzone were detected in the swimming pool water samples at concentrations above the respective limits of detection. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Trihalomethanes in Lisbon indoor swimming pools: occurrence, determining factors, and health risk classification.

    PubMed

    Silva, Zelinda Isabel; Rebelo, Maria Helena; Silva, Manuela Manso; Alves, Ana Martins; Cabral, Maria da Conceição; Almeida, Ana Cristina; Aguiar, Fátima Rôxo; de Oliveira, Anabela Lopes; Nogueira, Ana Cruz; Pinhal, Hermínia Rodrigues; Aguiar, Pedro Manuel; Cardoso, Ana Sofia

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of water quality from indoor swimming pools, using chorine-based disinfection techniques, was performed during a 6-mo period to study the occurrence, distribution, and concentration factors of trihalomethanes (THM). Several parameters such as levels of water THM, water and air chloroform, water bromodichloromethane (BDCM), water dibromochloromethane (DBCM), water bromoform (BF), free residual chlorine (FrCl), pH, water and air temperature, and permanganate water oxidizability (PWO) were determined in each pool during that period. Chloroform (CF(W)) was the THM detected at higher concentrations in all pools, followed by BDCM, DBCM, and BF detected at 99, 34, and 6% of the samples, respectively. Water THM concentrations ranged from 10.1 to 155 μg/L, with 6.5% of the samples presenting values above 100 μg/L (parametric value established in Portuguese law DL 306/2007). In this study, air chloroform (CF(Air)) concentrations ranged from 45 to 373 μg/m³ with 24% of the samples presenting values above 136 μg/m³ (considered high exposure value). Several significant correlations were observed between total THM and other parameters, namely, CF(W), CF(Air), FrCl, water temperature (T(W)), and PWO. These correlations indicate that FrCl, T(W) and PWO are parameters that influence THM formation. The exposure criterion established for water THM enabled the inclusion of 67% of Lisbon pools in the high exposure group, which reinforces the need for an improvement in pool water quality.

  9. Limiting swimming pool outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis - the roles of regulations, staff, patrons and research.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Una; Lawler, Sheleigh; Reid, Simon

    2017-02-01

    Cryptosporidium is the leading cause of swimming pool outbreaks of gastroenteritis. Transmission occurs through the ingestion of oocysts that are passed in the faeces of an infected person or animal when an accidental faecal release event occurs. Cryptosporidium parasites present specific challenges for infection control as oocysts are highly resistant to chlorine levels used for pool disinfection, infected individuals can shed large numbers of oocysts, there is a long incubation period and shedding of oocysts occurs even after symptom resolution. The purposes of this review are to identify key barriers to limiting swimming pool-associated outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis and to outline needs for research and collaboration to advance co-ordinated management practices. We reviewed swimming pool-associated cryptosporidiosis outbreaks, disinfection teachniques, current regulations and the role of staff and patrons. Key barriers to limiting swimming pool-associated outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis are a lack of uniform national and international standards, poor adherence and understanding of regulations governing staff and patron behaviour, and low levels of public knowledge and awareness.

  10. Decontamination of outdoor school swimming pools in Fukushima after the nuclear accident in March 2011.

    PubMed

    Saegusa, J; Kurikami, H; Yasuda, R; Kurihara, K; Arai, S; Kuroki, R; Matsuhashi, S; Ozawa, T; Goto, H; Takano, T; Mitamura, H; Nagano, T; Naganawa, H; Yoshida, Z; Funaki, H; Tokizawa, T; Nakayama, S

    2013-03-01

    Because of radioactive fallout resulting from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident, water discharge from many outdoor swimming pools in Fukushima was suspended out of concern that radiocesium in the pool water would flow into farmlands. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency has reviewed the existing flocculation method for decontaminating pool water and established a practical decontamination method by demonstrating the process at eight pools in Fukushima. In this method, zeolite powder and a flocculant are used for capturing radiocesium present in pool water. The supernatant is discharged if the radiocesium concentration is less than the targeted level. The radioactive residue is collected and stored in a temporary storage space. Radioactivity concentration in water is measured with a NaI(Tl) or Ge detector installed near the pool. The demonstration results showed that the pool water in which the radiocesium concentration was more than a few hundred Bq L was readily purified by the method, and the radiocesium concentration was reduced to less than 100 Bq L. The ambient dose rates around the temporary storage space were slightly elevated; however, the total increase was up to 30% of the background dose rates when the residue was shielded with sandbags.

  11. Outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa folliculitis associated with a swimming pool inflatable.

    PubMed Central

    Tate, D.; Mawer, S.; Newton, A.

    2003-01-01

    On 18 February 2002, the Communicable Disease Unit was notified by the local Public Health Service Laboratory of a child with a positive skin swab for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This child had attended the local swimming pool and played on an inflatable, subsequently presenting to a Primary Care Nurse Practitioner with folliculitis. A total of 35 cases was identified during the outbreak. This paper describes a case-control study and microbiological sampling of the cases, the suspected inflatable and a survey of 10 swimming pool inflatables in the local area. The odds ratio for developing folliculitis following use of the inflatable was 12 (95% CI 1.05-136.80). The strain of P. aeruginosa found on the inflatable was identical to that obtained from skin swabs of cases. Nine of 10 (90%) of the inflatables sampled were colonized by P. aeruginosa. Attention should be given to the problem of routine decontamination of swimming pool inflatables. P. aeruginosa folliculitis needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis of skin rashes in children, especially in Primary Care. PMID:12729186

  12. Case histories of building material problems caused by condensation at an enclosed swimming pool and an enclosed ice rink

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    VanGeem, M.G.; Farahmandpour, K.; Gajda, J.

    1999-07-01

    Enclosed swimming pools and ice rinks in winter climates have the potential for high indoor relative humidities and cold building materials. These elements can contribute to condensation and premature deterioration of building materials. Case histories are provided for an enclosed swimming pool and an enclosed ice rink with condensation problems. An evaluation was performed after roof leaks were reported at a recently constructed indoor swimming pool in a Chicago suburb. After a preliminary inspection, it was evident that the reported leaks were related to building moisture problems rather than a roof leak. Exterior brick masonry exhibited heavy efflorescence in themore » area of the swimming pools, and water streaks were visible on the exterior walls below the eaves. The evaluation included laboratory testing, a visual inspection, field tests and measurements, and analyses for condensation potential. Results of the evaluation indicated the presence of condensed moisture as a direct cause of the observed water stains, and masonry efflorescence. Recommended corrective actions developed. A 54-year-old enclosed ice rink in New England was under investigation to determine the cause of a deteriorated wood deck roof. The building did not have dehumidification or air handling systems, and was heated only when occupied. The evaluation included visual inspection and analyses for condensation potential. Results of the evaluation indicated condensation within the wood decking and insulation during winter months, and high relative humidities that prohibited drying during the spring, summer, and fall. These conditions, over an extended number of years, resulted in decay of the wood decking.« less

  13. Acute changes in serum immune markers due to swimming in a chlorinated pool.

    PubMed

    Vlaanderen, Jelle; van Veldhoven, Karin; Font-Ribera, Laia; Villanueva, Cristina M; Chadeau-Hyam, Marc; Portengen, Lützen; Grimalt, Joan O; Zwiener, Christian; Heederik, Dick; Zhang, Xiangru; Vineis, Paolo; Kogevinas, Manolis; Vermeulen, Roel

    2017-08-01

    Exposure to disinfectants and disinfection byproducts (DBPs) due to swimming in chlorinated water has been associated with allergic and respiratory health effects, including asthma. Biological mechanisms contributing to these associations are largely unknown. We hypothesized a potential pathway involving modulation of the immune system. We assessed levels of immune markers (CCL11, CCL22, CXCL10, CRP, EGF, GCSF, IL-8, IL-17, IL-1RA, MPO, VEGF, Periostin) in serum collected from 30 women and 29 men before and after 40min of swimming in a chlorinated pool. Exposure to DBPs was assessed by measuring bromodichloromethane, bromoform, chloroform, and dibromochloromethane in exhaled breath before and after swimming. Covariate data including information on physical activity was available through questionnaires and measurements. We assessed the association between indicators of swimming in a chlorinated pool and changes in serum immune marker concentrations using linear regression with bivariate normal distributions and adjusted for multiple comparisons by applying the Benjamini-Hochberg procedure. We observed a significant decrease in serum concentrations of IL-8 (-12.53%; q=2.00e-03), CCL22 (-7.28%; q=4.00e-04), CCL11 (-7.15%; q=9.48e-02), CRP (-7.06%; q=4.68e-05), and CXCL10 (-13.03%; q=6.34e-14) and a significant increase in IL-1RA (20.16%; q=4.18e-06) from before to after swimming. Associations with quantitative measurements of DBPs or physical activity were similar in direction and strength. Most of the observed associations became non-significant when we adjusted the effects of exposure to DBPs for physical activity or vice-versa. Our study indicates that swimming in a chlorinated pool induces perturbations of the immune response through acute alterations of patterns of cytokine and chemokine secretion. The observed effects could not be uniquely attributed to either exposure to DBPs or physical activity. Evidence in the literature suggests that observed decreases in

  14. Bacterial populations on silicone hydrogel and hydrogel contact lenses after swimming in a chlorinated pool.

    PubMed

    Choo, Jennifer; Vuu, Kathy; Bergenske, Peter; Burnham, Kara; Smythe, Jennifer; Caroline, Patrick

    2005-02-01

    A number of reports have indicated an association between swimming with contact lenses and subsequent eye infection. This study tests whether a hydrophilic contact lens worn while swimming accumulates bacteria present in the water. It was of interest to determine whether lens type (silicone hydrogel vs. hydrogel) affected the result. Fifteen healthy noncontact lens wearers swam for 30 minutes with a silicone hydrogel lens (PureVision, Bausch & Lomb, Rochester, NY) on one eye and a hydrogel lens (Acuvue 2, Vistakon Inc., Jacksonville, FL) on the other. Lenses were removed aseptically and placed in sterile vials 10 minutes after the subjects left the water. Microbial growth was enumerated for total numbers of colonies and categorized by species present. Numbers of colonies were compared between the two lens groups and with a water sample taken from the pool at the time of the experiment. Eight of the subjects returned on a different day and wore new lenses for 50 minutes in normal room conditions. Two lenses were lost while swimming. Twenty-seven of the remaining 28 lenses worn while swimming showed colonization, principally with Staphylococcus epidermidis, which was also by far the most common species identified from the water itself. Small numbers of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus salivarius were also present in the water and on the lenses. Numbers of colonies varied among subjects (range, 0 to 230), but no differences were observed between the two lens groups. Lenses removed after 30 minutes of wear without swimming were mostly sterile, with 3 of 16 lenses showing just two colonies each. It appears that wearing a hydrophilic lens while swimming allows accumulation of microbial organisms on or in the lens, regardless of lens material. Swimmers should be advised to wear tight-fitting goggles if lenses are worn while swimming, and thorough disinfection of the lenses before overnight wear seems prudent.

  15. Violations identified from routine swimming pool inspections--selected states and counties, United States, 2008.

    PubMed

    2010-05-21

    Swimming is the third most popular U.S. sport or exercise activity, with approximately 314 million visits to recreational water venues, including treated venues (e.g., pools), each year. The most frequently reported type of recreational water illness (RWI) outbreak is gastroenteritis, the incidence of which is increasing. During 1997--2006, chlorine- and bromine-susceptible pathogens (e.g., Shigella and norovirus) caused 24 (23%) of 104 treated venue--associated RWI outbreaks of gastroenteritis, indicating lapses in proper operation of pools. Pool inspectors help minimize the risk for RWIs and injuries by enforcing regulations that govern public treated recreational water venues. To assess pool code compliance, CDC analyzed 2008 data from 121,020 routine pool inspections conducted by a convenience sample of 15 state and local agencies. Because pool codes and, therefore, inspection items differed across jurisdictions, reported denominators varied. Of 111,487 inspections, 13,532 (12.1%) resulted in immediate closure because of serious violations (e.g., lack of disinfectant in the water). Of 120,975 inspections, 12,917 (10.7%) identified disinfectant level violations. Although these results likely are not representative of all pools in the United States, they suggest the need for increased public health scrutiny and improved pool operation. The results also demonstrate that pool inspection data can be used as a potential source for surveillance to guide resource allocation and regulatory decision-making. Collecting pool inspection data in a standardized, electronic format can facilitate routine analysis to support efforts to reduce health and safety risks for swimmers.

  16. Surveillance and Molecular Identification of Acanthamoeba and Naegleria Species in Two Swimming Pools in Alexandria University, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    AL-HERRAWY, Ahmad Z.; KHALIL, Mahmoud I.; EL-SHERIF, Soheir S.; OMAR, Fatima A. E.; LOTFY, Wael M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Swimming in contaminated water was reported to be associated with Acanthamoeba and N. fowleri human infections. The present study was carried out with the aim of isolation and identification of the different species of Acanthamoeba and Naegleria from two swimming pools in Alexandria University. Methods: Samples were collected from the swimming pools of Alexandria University Stadium and Faculty of Agriculture-Alexandria University during the period from May 2012 to April 2013. Results: Free-living amoebae were prevalent in the collected samples. Molecular characterization confirmed the identity of ten Acanthamoeba isolates and seven Naegleria isolates. Acanthamoeba T3, T4, T5, T11 and T15 genotypes were identified. Acanthamoeba T4 was the most prevalent genotype. Conclusion: The relatively high prevalence of Acanthamoeba, especially genotype T4, indicates the presence of a health hazard to swimmers particularly those wearing contact lenses. Naegleria fowleri was not found during the present study. PMID:28761479

  17. Assessment of swimmer behaviors on pool water ingestion

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enteric pathogens in pool water can be unintentionally ingested during swimming, increasing the likelihood of acute gastrointestinal illness(AGI). AGI cases in outbreaks are more likely to submerge heads than non-cases, but an association is unknown since outbreak data are self-r...

  18. Gene expression changes in blood RNA after swimming in a chlorinated pool.

    PubMed

    Salas, Lucas A; Font-Ribera, Laia; Bustamante, Mariona; Sumoy, Lauro; Grimalt, Joan O; Bonnin, Sarah; Aguilar, Maria; Mattlin, Heidi; Hummel, Manuela; Ferrer, Anna; Kogevinas, Manolis; Villanueva, Cristina M

    2017-08-01

    Exposure to disinfection by-products (DBP) such as trihalomethanes (THM) in swimming pools has been linked to adverse health effects in humans, but their biological mechanisms are unclear. We evaluated short-term changes in blood gene expression of adult recreational swimmers after swimming in a chlorinated pool. Volunteers swam 40min in an indoor chlorinated pool. Blood samples were drawn and four THM (chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane and bromoform) were measured in exhaled breath before and after swimming. Intensity of physical activity was measured as metabolic equivalents (METs). Gene expression in whole blood mRNA was evaluated using IlluminaHumanHT-12v3 Expression-BeadChip. Linear mixed models were used to evaluate the relationship between gene expression changes and THM exposure. Thirty-seven before-after pairs were analyzed. The median increase from baseline to after swimming were: 0.7 to 2.3 for MET, and 1.4 to 7.1μg/m 3 for exhaled total THM (sum of the four THM). Exhaled THM increased on average 0.94μg/m 3 per 1 MET. While 1643 probes were differentially expressed post-exposure. Of them, 189 were also associated with exhaled levels of individual/total THM or MET after False Discovery Rate. The observed associations with the exhaled THM were low to moderate (Log-fold change range: -0.17 to 0.15). In conclusion, we identified short-term gene expression changes associated with swimming in a pool that were minor in magnitude and their biological meaning was unspecific. The high collinearity between exhaled THM levels and intensity of physical activity precluded mutually adjusted models with both covariates. These exploratory results should be validated in future studies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Pore diffusion limits removal of monochloramine in treatment of swimming pool water using granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Skibinski, Bertram; Götze, Christoph; Worch, Eckhard; Uhl, Wolfgang

    2018-04-01

    Overall apparent reaction rates for the removal of monochloramine (MCA) in granular activated carbon (GAC) beds were determined using a fixed-bed reactor system and under conditions typical for swimming pool water treatment. Reaction rates dropped and quasi-stationary conditions were reached quickly. Diffusional mass transport in the pores was shown to be limiting the overall reaction rate. This was reflected consistently in the Thiele modulus, in the effect of temperature, pore size distribution and of grain size on the reaction rates. Pores <2.5 times the diameter of the monochloramine molecule were shown to be barely accessible for the monochloramine conversion reaction. GACs with a significant proportion of large mesopores were found to have the highest overall reactivity for monochloramine removal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Hygienic risks in swimming pool: knowledge and behaviours of consumers of three structures in Crema, Parma and Naples].

    PubMed

    Liguori, G; Castaldi, S; Signorelli, C; Auxilia, F; Alfano, V; Saccani, E; Visciano, A; Fanti, M; Spinelli, A; Pasquarella, C

    2007-01-01

    The swimmers health's protection and the maintenance of good safety standards of structures can be guaranteed under observance of rules and the well management of the structures and activities. An anonymous questionnaire, with 38 items, was used in order to analyse and better understand the knowledge and behaviour of the users of three swimming pools in Crema, Naples and Parma. Socio-demographic features were similar in the three centres. One of the most important result was that the necessity of showers and foot-bath before entering the swimming pool is not well understood (77% and 78% respectively); caps and foot bath are, instead, almost always worn (98% and 97%). Knowledge on infection diseases transmitted by water is very poor, warts and mycosis being the best known. Sport structures are places where health and wellness can be affected. It is important to underline the role of behavioural rules as the use of showers, caps, and proper shoes. Authors recognize the swimming pool regulations as a valid tool for health promotion. It must be clear and easily understood and it has to be linked to a proper education pathway of all users and employees.

  1. Short-term changes in respiratory biomarkers after swimming in a chlorinated pool.

    PubMed

    Font-Ribera, Laia; Kogevinas, Manolis; Zock, Jan-Paul; Gómez, Federico P; Barreiro, Esther; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Fernandez, Pilar; Lourencetti, Carolina; Pérez-Olabarría, Maitane; Bustamante, Mariona; Marcos, Ricard; Grimalt, Joan O; Villanueva, Cristina M

    2010-11-01

    Swimming in chlorinated pools involves exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) and has been associated with impaired respiratory health. We evaluated short-term changes in several respiratory biomarkers to explore mechanisms of potential lung damage related to swimming pool exposure. We measured lung function and biomarkers of airway inflammation [fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), eight cytokines, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in exhaled breath condensate], oxidative stress (8-isoprostane in exhaled breath condensate), and lung permeability [surfactant protein D (SP-D) and the Clara cell secretory protein (CC16) in serum] in 48 healthy nonsmoking adults before and after they swam for 40 min in a chlorinated indoor swimming pool. We measured trihalomethanes in exhaled breath as a marker of individual exposure to DBPs. Energy expenditure during swimming, atopy, and CC16 genotype (rs3741240) were also determined. Median serum CC16 levels increased from 6.01 to 6.21 microg/L (average increase, 3.3%; paired Wilcoxon test p = 0.03), regardless of atopic status and CC16 genotype. This increase was explained both by energy expenditure and different markers of DBP exposure in multivariate models. FeNO was unchanged overall but tended to decrease among atopics. We found no significant changes in lung function, SP-D, 8-isoprostane, eight cytokines, or VEGF. We detected a slight increase in serum CC16, a marker of lung epithelium permeability, in healthy adults after they swam in an indoor chlorinated pool. Exercise and DBP exposure explained this association, without involving inflammatory mechanisms. Further research is needed to confirm the results, establish the clinical relevance of short-term serum CC16 changes, and evaluate the long-term health impacts.

  2. Design of hydrotherapy exercise pools.

    PubMed

    Edlich, R F; Abidin, M R; Becker, D G; Pavlovich, L J; Dang, M T

    1988-01-01

    Several hydrotherapy pools have been designed specifically for a variety of aquatic exercise. Aqua-Ark positions the exerciser in the center of the pool for deep-water exercise. Aqua-Trex is a shallow underwater treadmill system for water walking or jogging. Swim-Ex generates an adjustable laminar flow that permits swimming without turning. Musculoskeletal conditioning can be accomplished in the above-ground Arjo shallow-water exercise pool. A hydrotherapy pool also can be custom designed for musculoskeletal conditioning in its shallow part and cardiovascular conditioning in a deeper portion of the pool. Regardless of the type of exercise, there is general agreement that the specific exercise conducted in water requires significantly more energy expenditure than when the same exercise is performed on land.

  3. Swimming Lessons: Learning, New Materialisms, Posthumanism, and Post Qualitative Research Emerge through a Pool Poem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKnight, Lucinda

    2016-01-01

    This article shifts from the formal learning spaces of school and university to an Australian public swimming pool to playfully engage some of the dilemmas that recent theory poses for curriculum studies. The article enacts multiple diffractions (Barad, 2007) as theory becomes swimming and swimming becomes theory, and ideas and movements are…

  4. Disposable swim diaper retention of Cryptosporidium-sized particles on human subjects in a recreational water setting.

    PubMed

    Amburgey, James E; Anderson, J Brian

    2011-12-01

    Cryptosporidium is a chlorine-resistant protozoan parasite responsible for the majority of waterborne disease outbreaks in recreational water venues in the USA. Swim diapers are commonly used by diaper-aged children participating in aquatic activities. This research was intended to evaluate disposable swim diapers for retaining 5-μm diameter polystyrene microspheres, which were used as non-infectious surrogates for Cryptosporidium oocysts. A hot tub recirculating water without a filter was used for this research. The microsphere concentration in the water was monitored at regular intervals following introduction of microspheres inside of a swim diaper while a human subject undertook normal swim/play activities. Microsphere concentrations in the bulk water showed that the majority (50-97%) of Cryptosporidium-sized particles were released from the swim diaper within 1 to 5 min regardless of the swim diaper type or configuration. After only 10 min of play, 77-100% of the microspheres had been released from all swim diapers tested. This research suggests that the swim diapers commonly used by diaper-aged children in swimming pools and other aquatic activities are of limited value in retaining Cryptosporidium-sized particles. Improved swim diaper solutions are necessary to efficiently retain pathogens and effectively safeguard public health in recreational water venues.

  5. Associations between testicular hormones at adolescence and attendance at chlorinated swimming pools during childhood

    PubMed Central

    Nickmilder, M; Bernard, A

    2011-01-01

    The goal was to evaluate the associations between testicular hormones at adolescence and the exposure to chlorination by-products when attending chlorinated swimming pools. We obtained serum samples from 361 school male adolescents (aged 14–18 years) who had visited swimming pools disinfected with chlorine or by copper–silver ionization. We analysed serum concentrations of inhibin B (two different assays), total and free testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin, luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS). There were strong inverse associations between serum levels of inhibin B (both assays) or of total testosterone, adjusted or unadjusted for gonadotropins and the time adolescents had spent in indoor chlorinated pools, especially during their childhood. Adolescents having attended indoor chlorinated pools for more than 250 h before the age of 10 years or for more than 125 h before the age of 7 years were about three times more likely to have an abnormally low serum inhibin B and/or total testosterone (<10th percentile) than their peers who never visited this type of pool during their childhood (odds ratio, 95% CI, 2.83, 1.06–7.52, p = 0.04 and 3.67, 1.45–9.34, p = 0.006, respectively). Such associations were not seen with free testosterone, LH, FSH and DHEAS or with the attendance of outdoor chlorinated pools or of the copper–silver pool. Swimming in indoor chlorinated pools during childhood is strongly associated with lower levels of serum inhibin B and total testosterone. The absorption of reprotoxic chlorination by-products across the highly permeable scrotum might explain these associations. PMID:21631527

  6. The physiology and biomechanics of competitive swimming.

    PubMed

    Troup, J P

    1999-04-01

    Fast swimming, either in the pool, in open water swimming, or in water polo and synchronized swimming, requires maximizing the efficiencies with which the human body can move through a liquid medium. A multitude of factors can affect the ability to swim fast as well as the final outcome. Physiology and biomechanics are the present tools used by sports scientists to determine which factors are important to fast swimming and, subsequently, to determine how the swimmer may maximize these factors to improve performance.

  7. 21 CFR 1250.89 - Swimming pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... equipped so as to provide complete circulation, replacement, and filtration of the water in the pool every six hours or less. Suitable means of chlorination and, if necessary, other treatment of the water shall be provided to maintain the residual chlorine in the pool water at not less than 0.4 part per...

  8. 21 CFR 1250.89 - Swimming pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... equipped so as to provide complete circulation, replacement, and filtration of the water in the pool every six hours or less. Suitable means of chlorination and, if necessary, other treatment of the water shall be provided to maintain the residual chlorine in the pool water at not less than 0.4 part per...

  9. Investigation of some disinfection chemicals and water quality parameters in swimming pools in the city center and districts of Canakkale, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Tolga; Yilmaz, Selehattin; Turkoglu, Muhammet; Sadikoglu, Murat

    2017-07-01

    In this study, the variations in concentrations of some disinfection chemicals such as cyanuric acid (CyA), free chlorine (FC), and residual chlorine (RC), which affect human health, were investigated in the water of swimming pools. In addition, quality parameters such as temperature, pH, and total alkalinity (TA) in 44 swimming pools located in the city center and districts of Canakkale, Turkey, were examined in the summer period. While FC and RC amounts were analyzed using tablet tests with N-N-diethyl phenylenediamine (DPD 1) and potassium iodine (DPD 3) using the colorimetric method in the comparator, TA and CyA levels were measured with a photometric method. Temperature and pH were measured using YSI 556 MPS. Levels of CyA, FC, RC, pH, temperature, and TA varied between 0.00 and 725.0 mg L -1 (108.0 ± 111.4 mg L -1 ), 0.00 and 5.00 mg L -1 (1.60 ± 0.962 mg L -1 ), 0 and 0.55 mg L -1 (0.087 ± 0.059), 6.40 and 8.20 mg L -1 (7.30 ± 0.038 mg L -1 ), 22.0 and 32.0 °C (27.6 ± 1.45 °C), and 0.00 and 391.0 mg L -1 (129.3 ± 89.0), respectively. The findings were compared to standard limit values of the Ministry of Health of the Turkish Republic and other countries. Not only maximum concentrations of CyA but also the average concentrations exceeded the standard limit values of different countries in July and August with high tourism activity in Turkey. Although there is no problem in view of average values of other quality parameters, there are some problems in view of the maximum values in pool waters compared to standard limit values.

  10. Pool Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Caribbean Clear, Inc. used NASA's silver ion technology as a basis for its automatic pool purifier. System offers alternative approach to conventional purification chemicals. Caribbean Clear's principal markets are swimming pool owners who want to eliminate chlorine and bromine. Purifiers in Caribbean Clear System are same silver ions used in Apollo System to kill bacteria, plus copper ions to kill algae. They produce spa or pool water that exceeds EPA Standards for drinking water.

  11. Disinfection by-products and microbial contamination in the treatment of pool water with granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Uhl, W; Hartmann, C

    2005-01-01

    For swimming pools, it is generally agreed that free chlorine levels have to be maintained to guarantee adequate disinfection. Recommended free chlorine levels can vary between 0.3 and 0.6 mg/L in Germany and up to 3 mg/L in other countries. Bathers introduce considerable amounts of organic matter, mainly in the form of such as urine and sweat, into the pool water. As a consequence, disinfection byproducts (DBPs) are formed. Regulations in Germany recommend levels of combined chlorine of less than 0.2 mg/L and levels of trihalomethanes (THMs) of less than 20 microg/L. Haloacetic acids (HAAs), haloacetonitriles (HANs), chloropicrin and chloral hydrate are also detected in considerable amounts. However, these compounds are not regulated yet. Swimming pool staff and swimmers, especially athletes, are primarily exposed to these byproducts by inhalation and/or dermal uptake. In Germany, new regulations for swimming pool water treatment generally require the use of activated carbon. In this project, three different types of granular activated carbon (GAC) (one standard GAC, two catalytic GACs) are compared for their long time behaviour in pool water treatment. In a pilot plant operated with real swimming pool water, production and removal of disinfection byproducts (THMs, HAAs, AOXs), of biodegradable substances (AOC), of bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella, coliforms, HPC) as well as the removal of chlorine and chloramines are monitored as function of GAC bed depth. Combined chlorine penetrates deeper in the filter bed than free chlorine does. However, both, free and combined chlorine removal efficiencies decrease over the time of filter operation. The decreases of removal efficiencies are also observed for parameters such as dissolved organic carbon, spectral absorption coefficient, adsorbable organic carbon and most of the disinfection byproducts. However, THMs, especially chloroform are produced in the filter bed. The GAC beds were contaminated microbially

  12. Nutrition considerations for open-water swimming.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Gregory; Koivisto, Anu; Gerrard, David; Burke, Louise M

    2014-08-01

    Open-water swimming (OWS) is a rapidly developing discipline. Events of 5-25 km are featured at FINA World Championships, and the international circuit includes races of 5-88 km. The Olympic OWS event, introduced in 2008, is contested over 10 km. Differing venues present changing environmental conditions, including water and ambient temperatures, humidity, solar radiation, and unpredictable tides. Furthermore, the duration of most OWS events (1-6 hr) creates unique physiological challenges to thermoregulation, hydration status, and muscle fuel stores. Current nutrition recommendations for open-water training and competition are either an extension of recommendations from pool swimming or are extrapolated from other athletic populations with similar physiological requirements. Competition nutrition should focus on optimizing prerace hydration and glycogen stores. Although swimmers should rely on self-supplied fuel and fluid sources for shorter events, for races of 10 km or greater, fluid and fuel replacement can occur from feeding pontoons when tactically appropriate. Over the longer races, feeding pontoons should be used to achieve desirable targets of up to 90 g/ hr of carbohydrates from multitransportable sources. Exposure to variable water and ambient temperatures will play a significant role in determining race nutrition strategies. For example, in extreme environments, thermoregulation may be assisted by manipulating the temperature of the ingested fluids. Swimmers are encouraged to work with nutrition experts to develop effective and efficient strategies that enhance performance through appropriate in-competition nutrition.

  13. Effects of UV 254 irradiation on residual chlorine and DBPs in chlorination of model organic-N precursors in swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Weng, ShihChi; Li, Jing; Blatchley, Ernest R

    2012-05-15

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is commonly applied as a secondary disinfection process in chlorinated pools. UV-based systems have been reported to yield improvements in swimming pool water and air chemistry, but to date these observations have been largely anecdotal. The objectives of this investigation were to evaluate the effects of UV irradiation on chlorination of important organic-N precursors in swimming pools. Creatinine, L-arginine, L-histidine, glycine, and urea, which comprise the majority of the organic-N in human sweat and urine, were selected as precursors for use in conducting batch experiments to examine the time-course behavior of several DBPs and residual chlorine, with and without UV(254) irradiation. In addition, water samples from two natatoria were subjected to monochromatic UV irradiation at wavelengths of 222 nm and 254 nm to evaluate changes of liquid-phase chemistry. UV(254) irradiation promoted formation and/or decay of several chlorinated N-DBPs and also increased the rate of free chlorine consumption. UV exposure resulted in loss of inorganic chloramines (e.g., NCl(3)) from solution. Dichloromethylamine (CH(3)NCl(2)) formation from creatinine was promoted by UV exposure, when free chlorine was present in solution; however, when free chlorine was depleted, CH(3)NCl(2) photodecay was observed. Dichloroacetonitrile (CNCHCl(2)) formation (from L-histidine and L-arginine) was promoted by UV(254) irradiation, as long as free chlorine was present in solution. Likewise, UV exposure was observed to amplify cyanogen chloride (CNCl) formation from chlorination of L-histidine, L-arginine, and glycine, up to the point of free chlorine depletion. The results from experiments involving UV irradiation of chlorinated swimming pool water were qualitatively consistent with the results of model experiments involving UV/chlorination of precursors in terms of the behavior of residual chlorine and DBPs measured in this study. The results indicate that UV(254

  14. Removals of cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and cryptosporidium-sized polystyrene microspheres from swimming pool water by diatomaceous earth filtration and perlite-sand filtration.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Amburgey, James E; Hill, Vincent R; Murphy, Jennifer L; Schneeberger, Chandra L; Arrowood, Michael J; Yuan, Tao

    2017-06-01

    Removal of Cryptosporidium-sized microspheres and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts from swimming pools was investigated using diatomaceous earth (DE) precoat filtration and perlite-sand filtration. In pilot-scale experiments, microsphere removals of up to 2 log were obtained with 0.7 kg·DE/m 2 at a filtration rate of 5 m/h. A slightly higher microsphere removal (2.3 log) was obtained for these DE-precoated filters when the filtration rate was 3.6 m/h. Additionally, pilot-scale perlite-sand filters achieved greater than 2 log removal when at least 0.37 kg/m 2 of perlite was used compared to 0.1-0.4 log removal without perlite both at a surface loading rate of 37 m/h. Full-scale testing achieved 2.7 log of microspheres and oocysts removal when 0.7 kg·DE/m 2 was used at 3.6 m/h. Removals were significantly decreased by a 15-minute interruption of the flow (without any mechanical agitation) to the DE filter in pilot-scale studies, which was not observed in full-scale filters. Microsphere removals were 2.7 log by perlite-sand filtration in a full-scale swimming pool filter operated at 34 m/h with 0.5 kg/m 2 of perlite. The results demonstrate that either a DE precoat filter or a perlite-sand filter can improve the efficiency of removal of microspheres and oocysts from swimming pools over a standard sand filter under the conditions studied.

  15. Sudden Failure of Swimming in Cold Water

    PubMed Central

    Keatinge, W. R.; Prys-Roberts, C.; Cooper, K. E.; Honour, A. J.; Haight, J.

    1969-01-01

    To investigate the effect of cold water on swimming four men who declared themselves good swimmers were immersed fully clothed on separate days in water at 23·7° and 4·7° C. The time that they were able to swim in the cold water was much shorter than in the warm. The two shortest swims ended after 1·5 and 7·6 minutes, before rectal temperature fell, when the men suddenly floundered after developing respiratory distress with breathing rates of 56–60/min. The other cold swims, by the two fattest men, ended less abruptly with signs of general and peripheral hypothermia. It is concluded that swimming in cold water was stopped partly by respiratory reflexes in the thin men and hypothermia in the fat, and partly by the cold water's high viscosity. The longer swimming times of the fat men are attributed largely to their greater buoyancy enabling them to keep their heads above water during the early hyperventilation. The findings explain some reports of sudden death in cold water. It is clearly highly dangerous to attempt to swim short distances to shore without a life-jacket in water near 0° C. PMID:5764250

  16. Infections Unlikely to be Spread Through Swimming Pools

    MedlinePlus

    ... Swimming Facilities Historic CDC Design & Operation Manuals Operation & Maintenance 12 Steps for Prevention of Recreational Water Illnesses ... Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329-4027 USA 800-CDC-INFO ( ...

  17. [Pseudomonas folliculitis outbreaks associated with swimming pools or whirlpools in two guest-room sites in the northern region of Israel].

    PubMed

    Cohen-Dar, Michal; DiCastro, Noa; Grotto, Itamar

    2012-07-01

    In summer 2010-2011 two outbreaks of Pseudomonas foliculitis occurred among bathers who used the swimming pools or whirlpools in two guest-room sites. The source of the infection was traced to the swimming pools or whirlpools, which had not been chlorinated and monitored routinely. Of 40 bathers, 25 (62.5%) developed Pseudomonas folliculitis 2-4 days after exposure. Typically the rash began as a pruritic erythematous papule on the buttocks, axilla, and extremities, with fever, adenopathy and otitis externa. In the culture of the pustules and bacterial examination grew Pseudomonas aeroginosa. Pseudomonas folliculitis was first described by McCausland and Cox in 1975. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of outbreaks in swimming pools or whirlpools in guest-room sites in Israel. This article describes the epidemiological and environmental health investigation of the two outbreaks. With the rising popularity of swimming pools and whirlpools in guest-room sites, physicians in the community and the emergency rooms may encounter this disease. We urge their real time report to the public health offices, in charge of the epidemiological inquires, aiming to prevent the occurrence of new cases or improper treatment of similar cases.

  18. Removal of haloacetic acids from swimming pool water by reverse osmosis and nanofiltration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Linyan; She, Qianhong; Wan, Man Pun; Wang, Rong; Chang, Victor W-C; Tang, Chuyang Y

    2017-06-01

    Recent studies report high concentrations of haloacetic acids (HAAs), a prevalent class of toxic disinfection by-products, in swimming pool water (SPW). We investigated the removal of 9 HAAs by four commercial reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membranes. Under typical SPW conditions (pH 7.5 and 50 mM ionic strength), HAA rejections were >60% for NF270 with molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) equal to 266 Da and equal or higher than 90% for XLE, NF90 and SB50 with MWCOs of 96, 118 and 152 Da, respectively, as a result of the combined effects of size exclusion and charge repulsion. We further included 7 neutral hydrophilic surrogates as molecular probes to resolve the rejection mechanisms. In the absence of strong electrostatic interaction (e.g., pH 3.5), the rejection data of HAAs and surrogates by various membranes fall onto an identical size-exclusion (SE) curve when plotted against the relative-size parameter, i.e., the ratio of molecular radius over membrane pore radius. The independence of this SE curve on molecular structures and membrane properties reveals that the relative-size parameter is a more fundamental SE descriptor compared to molecular weight. An effective molecular size with the Stokes radius accounting for size exclusion and the Debye length accounting for electrostatic interaction was further used to evaluate the rejection. The current study provides valuable insights on the rejection of trace contaminants by RO/NF membranes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Dynamic real-time monitoring of chloroform in an indoor swimming pool air using open-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, M-J; Duh, J-M; Shie, R-H; Weng, J-H; Hsu, H-T

    2016-06-01

    This study used open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy to continuously assess the variation in chloroform concentrations in the air of an indoor swimming pool. Variables affecting the concentrations of chloroform in air were also monitored. The results showed that chloroform concentrations in air varied significantly during the time of operation of the swimming pool and that there were two peaks in chloroform concentration during the time of operation of the pool. The highest concentration was at 17:30, which is coincident with the time with the highest number of swimmers in the pool in a day. The swimmer load was one of the most important factors influencing the chloroform concentration in the air. When the number of swimmers surpassed 40, the concentrations of chloroform were on average 4.4 times higher than the concentration measured without swimmers in the pool. According to the results of this study, we suggest that those who swim regularly should avoid times with highest number of swimmers, in order to decrease the risk of exposure to high concentrations of chloroform. It is also recommended that an automatic mechanical ventilation system is installed to increase the ventilation rate during times of high swimmer load. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Further evidence for conditioned taste aversion induced by forced swimming.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Takahisa; Nakajima, Sadahiko

    2005-01-31

    A series of experiments with rats reported that aversion to a taste solution can be established by forced swimming in a water pool. Experiment 1 demonstrated that correlation of taste and swimming is a critical factor for this phenomenon, indicating associative (i.e., Pavlovian) nature of this learning. Experiment 2 showed that this learning obeys the Pavlovian law of strength, by displaying a positive relationship between the duration of water immersion in training and the taste aversion observed in subsequent testing. Experiment 3 revealed that swimming rather than being wet is the critical agent, because a water shower did not endow rats with taste aversion. Experiment 4 found that taste aversion was a positive function of water level of the pools in training (0, 12 or 32 cm). These results, taken together, suggest that energy expenditure caused by physical exercise might be involved in the development of taste aversion.

  1. Wastewater treatment in a compact intensified wetland system at the Badboot: a floating swimming pool in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Van Oirschot, D; Wallace, S; Van Deun, R

    2015-09-01

    The Badboot (Dutch for swimming pool boat) is a floating swimming pool located in the city center of Antwerp in Belgium. The overall design consists of a recycled ferry boat that serves as a restaurant and next to that a newly built ship that harbours an Olympic size swimming pool, sun decks, locker rooms with showers, and a party space. A major design goal of the project was to make the ship as environmentally friendly as possible. To avoid discharge of contaminated waste water in the Antwerp docks, the ship includes onsite treatment of wastewater in a compact constructed wetland. The treatment wetland system was designed to treat wastewater from visitor locker rooms, showers, toilets, two bars, and the wastewater from the restaurant kitchen. Due to the limited space on board the ship, only 188 m(2) could be allocated to a wetland treatment system. As a result, part of the design included intensification of the wetland treatment process through the use of Forced Bed Aeration, which injects small quantities of air in a very uniform grid pattern throughout the wetland with a mechanical air compressor. The system was monitored between August 2012 and March 2013 (with additional sampling in the autumn of 2014). Flows and loads to the wetland were highly variable, but removal efficiency was extremely high; 99.5 % for chemical oxygen demand (COD), 88.6 % for total nitrogen and 97.2 % for ammonia. The treatment performance was assessed using a first-order, tanks-in-series model (the P-k-C* model) and found to be roughly equivalent to similar intensified wetlands operating in Germany. However, treatment performance was substantially better than data reported on passive wetlands, likely as a result of intensification. Even with mechanically assisted aeration, the total oxygen delivered to the treatment wetlands was insufficient to support conventional nitrification and denitrification, so it is likely that alternate nitrogen removal pathways, such as anammox, are

  2. The Good, the Bad, and the Volatile - Can We Have Both Healthy Pools and Healthy People?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Given the popularity of swimming for recreation and sport, it is remarkable that we are only in the early stages of understanding swimming pool chemistry, human exposure(s), and potential health risks. This is partly due to the complexity of swimming pool water chemistry, which i...

  3. Childhood Asthma and Environmental Exposures at Swimming Pools: State of the Science and Research Recommendations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies have explored the potential for swimming pool disinfection byproducts (DBPs) which are respiratory irritants to cause asthma in young children. While these studies raise concerns, gaps still exist in our knowledge regarding the exact causal agents and mechanisms f...

  4. Mapping Neglected Swimming Pools from Satellite Data for Urban Vector Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, C. M.; Melton, F. S.; Reisen, W. K.

    2010-12-01

    Neglected swimming pools provide suitable breeding habit for mosquitoes, can contain thousands of mosquito larvae, and present both a significant nuisance and public health risk due to their inherent proximity to urban and suburban populations. The rapid increase and sustained rate of foreclosures in California associated with the recent recession presents a challenge for vector control districts seeking to identify, treat, and monitor neglected pools. Commercial high resolution satellite imagery offers some promise for mapping potential neglected pools, and for mapping pools for which routine maintenance has been reestablished. We present progress on unsupervised classification techniques for mapping both neglected pools and clean pools using high resolution commercial satellite data and discuss the potential uses and limitations of this data source in support of vector control efforts. An unsupervised classification scheme that utilizes image segmentation, band thresholds, and a change detection approach was implemented for sample regions in Coachella Valley, CA and the greater Los Angeles area. Comparison with field data collected by vector control personal was used to assess the accuracy of the estimates. The results suggest that the current system may provide some utility for early detection, or cost effective and time efficient annual monitoring, but additional work is required to address spectral and spatial limitations of current commercial satellite sensors for this purpose.

  5. Exciting Pools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Bradford L.

    1975-01-01

    Advocates the creation of swimming pool oscillations as part of a general investigation of mechanical oscillations. Presents the equations, procedure for deriving the slosh modes, and methods of period estimation for exciting swimming pool oscillations. (GS)

  6. Degradation of Organic UV filters in Chlorinated Seawater Swimming Pools: Transformation Pathways and Bromoform Formation.

    PubMed

    Manasfi, Tarek; Coulomb, Bruno; Ravier, Sylvain; Boudenne, Jean-Luc

    2017-12-05

    Organic ultraviolet (UV) filters are used in sunscreens and other personal-care products to protect against harmful effects of exposure to UV solar radiation. Little is known about the fate of UV filters in seawater swimming pools disinfected with chlorine. The present study investigated the occurrence and fate of five commonly used organic UV filters, namely dioxybenzone, oxybenzone, avobenzone, 2-ethylhexyl-4-methoxycinnamate, and octocrylene, in chlorinated seawater swimming pools. Pool samples were collected to monitor the variation of UV filter concentrations during pool opening hours. Furthermore, laboratory-controlled chlorination experiments were conducted in seawater spiked with UV filters to investigate the reactivity of UV filters. Extracts of chlorination reaction samples were analyzed using high-resolution mass spectrometry and electron-capture detection to identify the potentially formed byproducts. In the collected pool samples, all the UV filters except dioxybenzone were detected. Chlorination reactions showed that only octocrylene was stable in chlorinated seawater. The four reactive UV filters generated brominated transformation products and disinfection byproducts. This formation of brominated products resulted from reactions between the reactive UV filters and bromine, which is formed rapidly when chlorine is added to seawater. Based on the identified byproducts, the transformation pathways of the reactive UV filters were proposed for the first time. Bromoform was generated by all the reactive UV filters at different yields. Bromal hydrate was also detected as one of the byproducts generated by oxybenzone and dioxybenzone.

  7. 'Right Now, Sophie (∗)Swims in the Pool?!': Brain Potentials of Grammatical Aspect Processing.

    PubMed

    Flecken, Monique; Walbert, Kelly; Dijkstra, Ton

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether brain potentials of grammatical aspect processing resemble semantic or morpho-syntactic processing, or whether they instead are characterized by an entirely distinct pattern in the same individuals. We studied aspect from the perspective of agreement between the temporal information in the context (temporal adverbials, e.g., Right now) and a morpho-syntactic marker of grammatical aspect (e.g., progressive is swimming). Participants read questions providing a temporal context that was progressive (What is Sophie doing in the pool right now?) or habitual (What does Sophie do in the pool every Monday?). Following a lead-in sentence context such as Right now, Sophie…, we measured event-related brain potentials (ERPs) time-locked to verb phrases in four different conditions, e.g., (a) is swimming (control); (b) (∗)is cooking (semantic violation); (c) (∗)are swimming (morpho-syntactic violation); or (d)?swims (aspect mismatch); …in the pool." The collected ERPs show typical N400 and P600 effects for semantics and morpho-syntax, while aspect processing elicited an Early Negativity (250-350 ms). The aspect-related Negativity was short-lived and had a central scalp distribution with an anterior onset. This differentiates it not only from the semantic N400 effect, but also from the typical LAN (Left Anterior Negativity), that is frequently reported for various types of agreement processing. Moreover, aspect processing did not show a clear P600 modulation. We argue that the specific context for each item in this experiment provided a trigger for agreement checking with temporal information encoded on the verb, i.e., morphological aspect marking. The aspect-related Negativity obtained for aspect agreement mismatches reflects a violated expectation concerning verbal inflection (in the example above, the expected verb phrase was Sophie is X-ing rather than Sophie X-s in condition d). The absence of an additional P600 for aspect processing suggests

  8. The effect of cold water endurance swimming on core temperature in aspiring English Channel swimmers.

    PubMed

    Diversi, Tara; Franks-Kardum, Vanessa; Climstein, Mike

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if cold water swimmers (CWS) developed hypothermia over a 6-h cold water endurance swim and whether body composition, stroke rate (SR) or personal characteristics correlated with core temperature (TC) change. Nine experienced male and female CWS who were aspiring English Channel (EC) swimmers volunteered to participate. Subjects aimed to complete their 6-h EC qualifying swim (water 15-15.8 °C/air 15-25 °C) while researchers intermittently monitored TC and SR. Data obtained included anthropometry (height, mass, segmental body composition), training volume and EC completion. Of the nine swimmers who volunteered, all successfully completed their EC qualifying swim. Six CWS had complete data included in analysis. One CWS demonstrated hypothermia (34.8 °C) at 6-h. TC rate of decline was slower in the first 3 h (-0.06 °C/hr) compared to the last 3 h (-0.36 °C/hr) of the swim. Older age was significantly correlated to TC change (r = -0.901, p < 0.05) and SR change (r = -0.915, p < 0.05). Absolute and percentage body fat (BF) were not significantly associated with higher TC. Mean SR over the 6-h swim was 57.8 spm (range 48-73 spm), and a significant (p < 0.05) decline in SR was observed over the 6 h (-9.7 %). A strong, positive correlation was found between SR change between 3 and 6 h and TC over the 6 h (r = 0.840, p < 0.05) and TC from 3-6 h (r = 0.827, p < 0.05). Seven of the nine participants (77.8 %) in this study successfully completed the EC crossing. Successful EC swimmers swam in the pool and open water (OW); however, they swam significantly [t (7) = -2.433, p < 0.05] more kilometres (M = 19.09 km/wk ± 5.55) in OW than unsuccessful (M = 9 km/wk ± 1.41) EC swimmers. There was a significant relationship between EC crossing time and height (r = -0.817, p < 0.05), but no other variables and EC crossing time. Cold water endurance swim (CWES) of 6-h duration at 15-16

  9. An approach to optimised control of HVAC systems in indoor swimming pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Eliseu M. A.; Jorge, Humberto M. M.; Quintela, Divo A. A.

    2016-04-01

    Indoor swimming pools are recognised as having a high level of energy consumption and present a great potential for energy saving. The energy is spent in several ways such as evaporation heat loss from the pool, high rates of ventilation required to guarantee the indoor air quality, and ambient temperatures with expressive values (typically 28-30°C) required to maintain conditions of comfort. This paper presents an approach to optimising control of heat ventilation and air conditioning systems that could be implemented in a building energy management system. It is easily adapted to any kind of pool and results in significant energy consumption reduction. The development and validation of the control model were carried out with a building thermal simulation software. The use of this control model in the case study building could reduce the energy efficiency index by 7.14 points (7.4% of total) which adds up to an energy cost saving of 15,609€ (7.5% of total).

  10. Current Warm-Up Practices and Contemporary Issues Faced by Elite Swimming Coaches.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Courtney J; Pyne, David B; Raglin, John S; Thompson, Kevin G; Rattray, Ben

    2016-12-01

    McGowan, CJ, Pyne, DB, Raglin, JS, Thompson, KG, and Rattray, B. Current warm-up practices and contemporary issues faced by elite swimming coaches. J Strength Cond Res 30(12): 3471-3480, 2016-A better understanding of current swimming warm-up strategies is needed to improve their effectiveness. The purpose of this study was to describe current precompetition warm-up practices and identify contemporary issues faced by elite swimming coaches during competition. Forty-six state-international level swimming coaches provided information through a questionnaire on their prescription of volume, intensity, and recovery within their pool and dryland-based competition warm-ups, and challenges faced during the final stages of event preparation. Coaches identified four key objectives of the precompetition warm-up: physiological (elevate body temperature and increase muscle activation), kinesthetic (tactile preparation, increase "feel" of the water), tactical (race-pace rehearsal), and mental (improve focus, reduce anxiety). Pool warm-up volume ranged from ∼1300 to 2100 m, beginning with 400-1000 m of continuous, low-intensity (∼50-70% of perceived maximal exertion) swimming, followed by 200-600 m of stroke drills and 1-2 sets (100-400 m in length) of increasing intensity (∼60-90%) swimming, concluding with 3-4 race or near race-pace efforts (25-100 m; ∼90-100%) and 100-400 m easy swimming. Dryland-based warm-up exercises, involving stretch cords and skipping, were also commonly prescribed. Coaches preferred swimmers complete their warm-up 20-30 minutes before race start. Lengthy marshalling periods (15-20+ minutes) and the time required to don racing suits (>10 minutes) were identified as complicating issues. Coaches believed that the pool warm-up affords athletes the opportunity to gain a tactile feel for the water and surrounding pool environment. The combination of dryland-based activation exercises followed by pool-based warm-up routines seems to be the preferred

  11. Changes in Markers of Genotoxicity in Relation to Exposure to Disinfection By-Products in Swimming Pools

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) has been associated with cancer risk, but the mechanisms of action are poorly understood. A recent study found increased bladder cancer risk among subjects attending swimming pools, where uptake of DBPs, such as trihalomethanes (THMs) c...

  12. Swimming performances in long distance open-water events with and without wetsuit

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Existing literature showed improved swimming performances for swimmers wearing wetsuits competing under standardized conditions in races held in pools on short to middle distances. Data about the influence of wetsuits on swimming performances in long and ultra-long open-water swimming races are missing. It is unknown whether the benefit of wearing wetsuits is comparable in men and women. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of wearing a wetsuit on open-water swimming performances at the 26.4 km ‘Marathon Swim in Lake Zurich’ in Lake Zurich, Switzerland, and the 3.8 km Lake Ontario Swim Team-Race (LOST-Race) in Lake Ontario, Canada. Methods Race times of the fastest female and male swimmers competing with and without wetsuit were compared using multi-level regression analyses and analysis of variance. Results In the ‘Marathon Swim’ in Lake Zurich, wearing a wetsuit had no effect on race time regarding the gender where athletes wearing a wetsuit were not faster than athletes without wetsuit. However, the ten fastest men wearing a wetsuit (410.6 ± 26.7 min) were faster (32.7%, p < 0.01) than the ten fastest women without wetsuit (544.9 ± 81.3 min). In the ‘LOST-Race’, the top ten men wearing a wetsuit (51.7 ± 2.5 min) were faster (13.2%, p < 0.01) than the top ten women wearing a wetsuit (58.5 ± 3.2 min). Additionally, the top ten men without wetsuit (52.1 ± 2.4 min) were faster (19.6%, p < 0.01) than the top ten women without wetsuit (62.3 ± 2.5 min). The top ten women wearing a wetsuit (58.5 ± 3.2 min) were faster (6.5%, p < 0.01) than top ten women without a wetsuit (62.3 ± 25 min). Conclusions These results suggest that wearing a wetsuit had a positive influence on swimming speed for both women and men but the benefit of the use of wetsuits seemed to depend on additional factors (i.e. race distance). Women seemed to benefit more from wearing wetsuits than men in longer

  13. Celebrating 50 years of SWIMs (Salt Water Intrusion Meetings)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, Vincent E. A.; Essink, Gualbert Oude; Szymkiewicz, Adam; Bakker, Mark; Houben, Georg; Custodio, Emilio; Voss, Clifford

    2018-06-01

    The Salt Water Intrusion Meetings, or SWIMs, are a series of meetings that focus on seawater intrusion in coastal aquifers and other salinisation processes. 2018 marks the 50th year of the SWIM and the 25th biennial meeting. The SWIM proceedings record half a century of research progress on site characterisation, geophysical and geochemical techniques, variable-density flow, modelling, and water management. The SWIM is positioning itself to remain a viable platform for discussing the coastal aquifer management challenges of the next 50 years.

  14. Swim drink study: a randomised controlled trial of during-exercise rehydration and swimming performance.

    PubMed

    Briars, Graham L; Gordon, Gillian Suzanne; Lawrence, Andrew; Turner, Andrew; Perry, Sharon; Pillbrow, Dan; Walston, Florence Einstein; Molyneux, Paul

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether during-exercise rehydration improves swimming performance and whether sports drink or water have differential effects on performance. Randomised controlled multiple crossover trial. A UK competitive swimming club. 19 club-level competitive swimmers, median age (range) 13 (11-17) years. Subjects were scheduled to drink ad libitum commercial isotonic sports drink (3.9 g sugars and 0.13 g salt per 100 mL) or water (three sessions each) or no drink (six sessions) in the course of twelve 75 min training sessions, each of which was followed by a 30 min test set of ten 100 m maximum-effort freestyle sprints each starting at 3 min intervals. Times for the middle 50 m of each sprint measured using electronic timing equipment in a Federation Internationale de Natation (FINA)-compliant six-lane 25 m competition swimming pool. Software-generated individual random session order in sealed envelopes. Analysis subset of eight sessions randomly selected by software after data collection completed. Participants blind to drink allocation until session start. In the analysis data set of 1118 swims, there was no significant difference between swim times for drinking and not drinking nor between drinking water or a sports drink. Mean (SEM) 50 m time for no-drink swims was 38.077 (0.128) s and 38.105 (0.131) s for drink swims, p=0.701. Mean 50 m times were 38.031 (0.184) s for drinking sports drink and 38.182 (0.186) s for drinking water, p=0.073. Times after not drinking were 0.027 s faster than after drinking (95% CI 0.186 s faster to 0.113 s slower). Times after drinking sports drink were 0.151 s faster than after water (95% CI 0.309 s faster to 0.002 s slower). Mean (SEM) dehydration from exercise was 0.42 (0.11)%. Drinking water or sports drink over 105 min of sustained effort swimming training does not improve swimming performance. ISRCTN: 49860006.

  15. The Body Mass Index of San Francisco Cold-water Swimmers: Comparisons to U.S. National and Local Populations, and Pool Swimmers

    PubMed Central

    CROW, BRENDAN T.; MATTHAY, ELLICOTT C.; SCHATZ, STEPHEN P.; DEBELISO, MARK D.; NUCKTON, THOMAS J.

    2017-01-01

    To determine if cold-water swimmers have substantial differences in BMI, which might have a protective effect against heat loss during swims in cold water without wetsuits, and to determine if obesity is more or less prevalent in cold-water swimmers, we compared the body mass index (BMI) values of 103 recreational open-water swimmers (mean age 54.3 ±10.8 years) to data from various population groups. Swimmers swam consistently throughout the winter months, in the San Francisco Bay (water temperature range: 9.6° C [49.3 ° F] to 12.6° C [54.7 ° F]), without wetsuits. After matching for age and sex, the average BMI of cold-water swimmers (25.9 kg/m2) was lower than the corresponding predicted U.S. average BMI (29.2 kg/m2; p<.001), the predicted California state average BMI (28.0 kg/m2; p<.001), and the predicted San Francisco city average BMI (26.6 kg/m2; p=.047). The average BMI value for cold-water swimmers (25.9 kg/m2) was not significantly different from values of North American masters pool swimmers (25.1 kg/m2; p=.15) or international masters pool swimmers (25.3 kg/m2; p=.16). 10.7% of cold-water swimmers were classified as obese (BMI > 30 kg/m2) vs. 35.7%, 25.8%, and 11.8% of the U.S., California, and San Francisco populations, respectively. The lower or similar BMI values of our swimmers suggest that successful recreational swimming in cold water is influenced by factors other than body habitus, such as acclimatization, heat production while swimming, and most importantly, limiting immersion time. The relatively low prevalence of obesity in our swimmers suggests that cold-water swimming could contribute to a healthy lifestyle. PMID:29399251

  16. "Hot tub" Folliculitis from a nonchlorinated children's pool.

    PubMed

    Segna, Kara G; Koch, Laine H; Williams, Judith V

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is common cause of folliculitis following contact with contaminated water. We report a case of pseudomonal folliculitis that occurred after swimming in a children's pool filled with water from a well. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Apparatus for draining lower drywell pool water into suppresion pool in boiling water reactor

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus which mitigates temperature stratification in the suppression pool water caused by hot water drained into the suppression pool from the lower drywell pool. The outlet of a spillover hole formed in the inner bounding wall of the suppression pool is connected to and in flow communication with one end of piping. The inlet end of the piping is above the water level in the suppression pool. The piping is routed down the vertical downcomer duct and through a hole formed in the thin wall separating the downcomer duct from the suppression pool water. The piping discharge end preferably has an elevation at or near the bottom of the suppression pool and has a location in the horizontal plane which is removed from the point where the piping first emerges on the suppression pool side of the inner bounding wall of the suppression pool. This enables water at the surface of the lower drywell pool to flow into and be discharged at the bottom of the suppression pool.

  18. Getting Pool Light Right.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunsaker, Scot

    1998-01-01

    Examines the use of lighting, both artificial and natural, that can enhance the aesthetic quality and functionality of areas with indoor swimming pools. Discusses glare and shadow-reduction measures that aid competitive events, including lighting above and below water levels, and highlights lighting issues during televised events. Descriptions of…

  19. Going with the flow or swimming against the tide: should children with central venous catheters swim?

    PubMed

    Miller, Jessica; Dalton, Meghan K; Duggan, Christopher; Lam, Shirley; Iglesias, Julie; Jaksic, Tom; Gura, Kathleen M

    2014-02-01

    Children who require long-term parenteral nutrition (PN) have central venous catheters (CVCs) in place to allow the safe and effective infusion of life-sustaining fluids and nutrition. Many consider recreational swimming to be a common part of childhood, but for some, the risk may outweigh the benefit. Children with CVCs may be at increased risk of exit site, tunnel, and catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) if these catheters are immersed in water. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the current literature regarding the risk of infection for patients with CVCs who swim and determine if there is consensus among home PN (HPN) programs on this controversial issue. A total 45 articles were reviewed and 16 pediatric HPN programs were surveyed regarding swimming and CVCs. Due to the limited data available, a firm recommendation cannot be made. Recreational water associated outbreaks are well documented in the general public, as is the presence of human pathogens even in chlorinated swimming pools. As a medical team, practitioners can provide information and education regarding the potential risk, but ultimately the decision lies with the parents. If the parents decide swimming is worth the risk, they are encouraged to use products designed for this use and to change their child's dressing immediately after swimming. Due to our experience with a fatal event immediately after swimming, we continue to strongly discourage patients with CVCs from swimming. Further large and well-designed studies regarding the risk of swimming with a CVC are needed to make a strong, evidence-based recommendation.

  20. Experimental Measurements of the Water Evaporation Rate of a Physical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turza, Róbert; Füri, Belo B.

    2017-03-01

    As the number of indoor swimming pools and wellness centers are currently growing, it is necessary to concentrate on the parameters of indoor environments. These parameters are necessary for the design of the HVAC systems that operate these premises. In indoor swimming-pool facilities, the energy demand is large due to ventilation losses from exhaust air. Since water evaporates from a pool's surface, exhaust air has a high water content and specific enthalpy. In this paper the results of the water evaporation rate measured from swimming pool surfaces at higher thermal water temperatures are described.

  1. Environmental and personal determinants of the uptake of disinfection by-products during swimming.

    PubMed

    Font-Ribera, Laia; Kogevinas, Manolis; Schmalz, Christina; Zwiener, Christian; Marco, Esther; Grimalt, Joan O; Liu, Jiaqi; Zhang, Xiangru; Mitch, William; Critelli, Rossana; Naccarati, Alessio; Heederik, Dick; Spithoven, Jack; Arjona, Lourdes; de Bont, Jeroen; Gracia-Lavedan, Esther; Villanueva, Cristina M

    2016-08-01

    Trihalomethanes (THMs) in exhaled breath and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) in urine are internal dose biomarkers of exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) in swimming pools. We assessed how these biomarkers reflect the levels of a battery of DBPs in pool water and trichloramine in air, and evaluated personal determinants. A total of 116 adults swam during 40min in a chlorinated indoor pool. We measured chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane and bromoform in exhaled breath and TCAA in urine before and after swimming, trichloramine in air and several DBPs in water. Personal determinants included sex, age, body mass index (BMI), distance swum, energy expenditure, heart rate and 12 polymorphisms in GSTT1, GSTZ1 and CYP2E1 genes. Median level of exhaled total THMs and creatinine adjusted urine TCAA increased from 0.5 to 14.4µg/m(3) and from 2.5 to 5.8µmol/mol after swimming, respectively. The increase in exhaled brominated THMs was correlated with brominated THMs, haloacetic acids, haloacetonitriles, haloketones, chloramines, total organic carbon and total organic halogen in water and trichloramine in air. Such correlations were not detected for exhaled chloroform, total THMs or urine TCAA. Exhaled THM increased more in men, urine TCAA increased more in women, and both were affected by exercise intensity. Genetic variants were associated with differential increases in exposure biomarkers. Our findings suggest that, although affected by sex, physical activity and polymorphisms in key metabolizing enzymes, brominated THMs in exhaled breath could be used as a non-invasive DBP exposure biomarker in swimming pools with bromide-containing source waters. This warrants confirmation with new studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Do swimming goggles limit microbial contamination of contact lenses?

    PubMed

    Wu, Yvonne T; Tran, Jess; Truong, Michelle; Harmis, Najat; Zhu, Hua; Stapleton, Fiona

    2011-04-01

    Wearing goggles over contact lenses while swimming is often recommended by eye care professionals. Limited data are available to assess this recommendation. The purpose of this study was to examine whether wearing goggles while swimming limits bacterial colonization on contact lenses and whether the type of lens worn affects contamination rates. Twenty-three subjects underwent two swimming sessions at an ocean (salt water) pool (Maroubra beach Rock Pool, Sydney, Australia). Silicone hydrogel (Ciba Focus Night and Day) or hydrogel lenses (Ciba Focus Daily) were inserted into subjects' eyes before 30 min of swimming sessions, and subjects used modified goggles to mimic goggled and non-goggled conditions. At the end of each session, lenses were collected for microbial investigation. Viable bacterial colonies were classified as gram positive and gram negative and enumerated. The level of bacterial colonization on contact lenses between goggled and non-goggled conditions and between the two lens materials were compared. The range of colony forming units recovered from goggled lenses were 0 to 930 compared with 0 to 1210 on non-goggled lenses. The majority of subjects (16/23) had more microorganisms in the non-goggled condition than when wearing goggles (p = 0.03). Gram negative organisms were found in three non-goggled lenses. No significant difference was shown in the number of bacteria isolated from silicone hydrogel and hydrogel lenses (p > 0.6) irrespective of wearing goggles. Water samples had consistently higher numbers of bacterial counts than those adhered to the lenses; however, no association was found between the number of bacteria in the water sample and those found on the contact lenses. Consistently, fewer bacterial colonies were found on the goggled contact lens, thus suggesting goggles offer some protection against bacterial colonization of contact lenses while swimming. These data would support the recommendation encouraging lens wearers to use goggles

  3. 13 CFR 120.1704 - Pool Loans eligible for Pooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., construction or renovation of an aquarium, zoo, golf course, or swimming pool; or (iv) To a business covered by... zoos—712130 (“Zoos and Botanical Gardens”). (b) SBA review of a Pool Loan prior to pool formation. SBA...

  4. 13 CFR 120.1704 - Pool Loans eligible for Pooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., construction or renovation of an aquarium, zoo, golf course, or swimming pool; or (iv) To a business covered by... zoos—712130 (“Zoos and Botanical Gardens”). (b) SBA review of a Pool Loan prior to pool formation. SBA...

  5. 13 CFR 120.1704 - Pool Loans eligible for Pooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., construction or renovation of an aquarium, zoo, golf course, or swimming pool; or (iv) To a business covered by... zoos—712130 (“Zoos and Botanical Gardens”). (b) SBA review of a Pool Loan prior to pool formation. SBA...

  6. 13 CFR 120.1704 - Pool Loans eligible for Pooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., construction or renovation of an aquarium, zoo, golf course, or swimming pool; or (iv) To a business covered by... zoos—712130 (“Zoos and Botanical Gardens”). (b) SBA review of a Pool Loan prior to pool formation. SBA...

  7. 13 CFR 120.1704 - Pool Loans eligible for Pooling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., construction or renovation of an aquarium, zoo, golf course, or swimming pool; or (iv) To a business covered by... zoos—712130 (“Zoos and Botanical Gardens”). (b) SBA review of a Pool Loan prior to pool formation. SBA...

  8. 36 CFR 3.16 - May I swim or wade in park waters?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May I swim or wade in park waters? 3.16 Section 3.16 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR BOATING AND WATER USE ACTIVITIES § 3.16 May I swim or wade in park waters? Swimming or wading is...

  9. 36 CFR 3.16 - May I swim or wade in park waters?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false May I swim or wade in park waters? 3.16 Section 3.16 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR BOATING AND WATER USE ACTIVITIES § 3.16 May I swim or wade in park waters? Swimming or wading is...

  10. Pool Safety: A Few Simple Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PTA Today, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Presents suggestions by the National Swimming Pool Safety Committee on how to keep children safe while swimming. Ideas include maintaining strict adult supervision, pool and spa barriers, and knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. (SM)

  11. BUILDING FOR THE EXPERIMENTAL SWIMMING POOL REACTOR OF 3Mw OF THE JUNTA DE ENERGIA NUCLEAR (in Spanish)

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    de la Camara, S.N.

    1958-10-01

    The Spanish experimental swimming pool reactor is constructed on the grounds of the Ciudad Universitaria de Madrid. A general layout of the reactor building and its annexes is given, and the reactor building itself is described. The construction of the reactor building and the characteristics of the annex building are discussed. (J.S.R.)

  12. SWIM: A Semi-Analytical Ocean Color Inversion Algorithm for Optically Shallow Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKinna, Lachlan I. W.; Werdell, P. Jeremy; Fearns, Peter R. C. S.; Weeks, Scarla J.; Reichstetter, Martina; Franz, Bryan A.; Bailey, Sean W.; Shea, Donald M.; Feldman, Gene C.

    2014-01-01

    In clear shallow waters, light that is transmitted downward through the water column can reflect off the sea floor and thereby influence the water-leaving radiance signal. This effect can confound contemporary ocean color algorithms designed for deep waters where the seafloor has little or no effect on the water-leaving radiance. Thus, inappropriate use of deep water ocean color algorithms in optically shallow regions can lead to inaccurate retrievals of inherent optical properties (IOPs) and therefore have a detrimental impact on IOP-based estimates of marine parameters, including chlorophyll-a and the diffuse attenuation coefficient. In order to improve IOP retrievals in optically shallow regions, a semi-analytical inversion algorithm, the Shallow Water Inversion Model (SWIM), has been developed. Unlike established ocean color algorithms, SWIM considers both the water column depth and the benthic albedo. A radiative transfer study was conducted that demonstrated how SWIM and two contemporary ocean color algorithms, the Generalized Inherent Optical Properties algorithm (GIOP) and Quasi-Analytical Algorithm (QAA), performed in optically deep and shallow scenarios. The results showed that SWIM performed well, whilst both GIOP and QAA showed distinct positive bias in IOP retrievals in optically shallow waters. The SWIM algorithm was also applied to a test region: the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Using a single test scene and time series data collected by NASA's MODIS-Aqua sensor (2002-2013), a comparison of IOPs retrieved by SWIM, GIOP and QAA was conducted.

  13. Swimming pool exposure is associated with autonomic changes and increased airway reactivity to a beta-2 agonist in school aged children: A cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Paciência, Inês; Silva, Diana; Martins, Carla; Madureira, Joana; de Oliveira Fernandes, Eduardo; Padrão, Patrícia; Moreira, Pedro; Delgado, Luís; Moreira, André

    2018-01-01

    Background Endurance swimming exercises coupled to disinfection by-products exposure has been associated with increased airways dysfunction and neurogenic inflammation in elite swimmers. However, the impact of swimming pool exposure at a recreational level on autonomic activity has never been explored. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate how swimming pool attendance is influencing lung and autonomic function in school-aged children. Methods A total of 858 children enrolled a cross sectional survey. Spirometry and airway reversibility to beta-2 agonist, skin-prick-tests and exhaled nitric oxide measurements were performed. Pupillometry was used to evaluate autonomic nervous function. Children were classified as current swimmers (CS), past swimmers (PS) and non-swimmers (NS), according to the amount of swimming practice. Results Current swimmers group had significantly lower maximum and average pupil constriction velocities when compared to both PS and NS groups (3.8 and 5.1 vs 3.9 and 5.3 vs 4.0 and 5.4 mm/s, p = 0.03 and p = 0.01, respectively). Moreover, affinity to the beta-2 agonist and levels of exhaled nitric oxide were significantly higher in CS when compared to NS (70 vs 60 mL and 12 vs 10 ppb, p<0.01 and p = 0.03, respectively). A non-significant trend for a higher risk of asthma, atopic eczema and allergic rhinitis was found with more years of swimming practice, particularly in atopic individuals (β = 1.12, 1.40 and 1.31, respectively). After case-case analysis, it was possible to observe that results were not influenced by the inclusion of individuals with asthma. Conclusions Concluding, swimming pool attendance appears to be associated with autonomic changes and increased baseline airway smooth muscle constriction even in children without asthma. PMID:29529048

  14. Swimming pool exposure is associated with autonomic changes and increased airway reactivity to a beta-2 agonist in school aged children: A cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Cavaleiro Rufo, João; Paciência, Inês; Silva, Diana; Martins, Carla; Madureira, Joana; Oliveira Fernandes, Eduardo de; Padrão, Patrícia; Moreira, Pedro; Delgado, Luís; Moreira, André

    2018-01-01

    Endurance swimming exercises coupled to disinfection by-products exposure has been associated with increased airways dysfunction and neurogenic inflammation in elite swimmers. However, the impact of swimming pool exposure at a recreational level on autonomic activity has never been explored. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate how swimming pool attendance is influencing lung and autonomic function in school-aged children. A total of 858 children enrolled a cross sectional survey. Spirometry and airway reversibility to beta-2 agonist, skin-prick-tests and exhaled nitric oxide measurements were performed. Pupillometry was used to evaluate autonomic nervous function. Children were classified as current swimmers (CS), past swimmers (PS) and non-swimmers (NS), according to the amount of swimming practice. Current swimmers group had significantly lower maximum and average pupil constriction velocities when compared to both PS and NS groups (3.8 and 5.1 vs 3.9 and 5.3 vs 4.0 and 5.4 mm/s, p = 0.03 and p = 0.01, respectively). Moreover, affinity to the beta-2 agonist and levels of exhaled nitric oxide were significantly higher in CS when compared to NS (70 vs 60 mL and 12 vs 10 ppb, p<0.01 and p = 0.03, respectively). A non-significant trend for a higher risk of asthma, atopic eczema and allergic rhinitis was found with more years of swimming practice, particularly in atopic individuals (β = 1.12, 1.40 and 1.31, respectively). After case-case analysis, it was possible to observe that results were not influenced by the inclusion of individuals with asthma. Concluding, swimming pool attendance appears to be associated with autonomic changes and increased baseline airway smooth muscle constriction even in children without asthma.

  15. 10 CFR 36.63 - Pool water purity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pool water purity. 36.63 Section 36.63 Energy NUCLEAR... § 36.63 Pool water purity. (a) Pool water purification system must be run sufficiently to maintain the conductivity of the pool water below 20 microsiemens per centimeter under normal circumstances. If pool water...

  16. 10 CFR 36.63 - Pool water purity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pool water purity. 36.63 Section 36.63 Energy NUCLEAR... § 36.63 Pool water purity. (a) Pool water purification system must be run sufficiently to maintain the conductivity of the pool water below 20 microsiemens per centimeter under normal circumstances. If pool water...

  17. 10 CFR 36.63 - Pool water purity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pool water purity. 36.63 Section 36.63 Energy NUCLEAR... § 36.63 Pool water purity. (a) Pool water purification system must be run sufficiently to maintain the conductivity of the pool water below 20 microsiemens per centimeter under normal circumstances. If pool water...

  18. 10 CFR 36.63 - Pool water purity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pool water purity. 36.63 Section 36.63 Energy NUCLEAR... § 36.63 Pool water purity. (a) Pool water purification system must be run sufficiently to maintain the conductivity of the pool water below 20 microsiemens per centimeter under normal circumstances. If pool water...

  19. 10 CFR 36.63 - Pool water purity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pool water purity. 36.63 Section 36.63 Energy NUCLEAR... § 36.63 Pool water purity. (a) Pool water purification system must be run sufficiently to maintain the conductivity of the pool water below 20 microsiemens per centimeter under normal circumstances. If pool water...

  20. Moving in extreme environments: open water swimming in cold and warm water

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Open water swimming (OWS), either ‘wild’ such as river swimming or competitive, is a fast growing pastime as well as a part of events such as triathlons. Little evidence is available on which to base high and low water temperature limits. Also, due to factors such as acclimatisation, which disassociates thermal sensation and comfort from thermal state, individuals cannot be left to monitor their own physical condition during swims. Deaths have occurred during OWS; these have been due to not only thermal responses but also cardiac problems. This paper, which is part of a series on ‘Moving in Extreme Environments’, briefly reviews current understanding in pertinent topics associated with OWS. Guidelines are presented for the organisation of open water events to minimise risk, and it is concluded that more information on the responses to immersion in cold and warm water, the causes of the individual variation in these responses and the precursors to the cardiac events that appear to be the primary cause of death in OWS events will help make this enjoyable sport even safer. PMID:24921042

  1. Chemical Safety Alert: Safe Storage and Handling of Swimming Pool Chemicals

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Hazards of pool water treatment and maintenance chemicals (e.g., chlorine), and the protective measures pool owners should take to prevent fires, toxic vapor releases, and injuries. Triggered by improper wetting, mixing, or self-reactivity over time.

  2. POOL WATER TREATMENT AND COOLING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    V. King

    2000-06-19

    The Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System is located in the Waste Handling Building (WHB), and is comprised of various process subsystems designed to support waste handling operations. This system maintains the pool water temperature within an acceptable range, maintains water quality standards that support remote underwater operations and prevent corrosion, detects leakage from the pool liner, provides the capability to remove debris from the pool, controls the pool water level, and helps limit radiological exposure to personnel. The pool structure and liner, pool lighting, and the fuel staging racks in the pool are not within the scope of themore » Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System. Pool water temperature control is accomplished by circulating the pool water through heat exchangers. Adequate circulation and mixing of the pool water is provided to prevent localized thermal hotspots in the pool. Treatment of the pool water is accomplished by a water treatment system that circulates the pool water through filters, and ion exchange units. These water treatment units remove radioactive and non-radioactive particulate and dissolved solids from the water, thereby providing the water clarity needed to conduct waste handling operations. The system also controls pool water chemistry to prevent advanced corrosion of the pool liner, pool components, and fuel assemblies. Removal of radioactivity from the pool water contributes to the project ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) goals. A leak detection system is provided to detect and alarm leaks through the pool liner. The pool level control system monitors the water level to ensure that the minimum water level required for adequate radiological shielding is maintained. Through interface with a demineralized water system, adequate makeup is provided to compensate for loss of water inventory through evaporation and waste handling operations. Interface with the Site Radiological Monitoring System provides

  3. Swimming attendance during childhood and development of asthma: Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Valeriani, Federica; Protano, Carmela; Vitali, Matteo; Romano Spica, Vincenzo

    2017-05-01

    The association between asthma and swimming pool attendance has not been demonstrated and currently there are conflicting results. In order to clarify the association between asthma diagnosis in children and swimming pool attendance, and to assess the consistency of the available epidemiological studies, we completed a literature analysis on the relationship between the exposure to disinfection by-products in indoor swimming pools during childhood and asthma diagnosis. Following the Meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) and Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) criteria, a systematic review and meta-analysis was performed by searching MEDLINE via PubMed, TOXNET, and Scopus databases (from inception to 20 April 2015) using the key word "Asthma" together with "swimming pool", "disinfection by-products", "indoor air pollution" and "children". Inclusion criteria were: English language, a complete analytic study design involving a cohort of children (0-16 years), a well-defined definition of exposure, and the presence of data on effect and variance. Studies on in vivo, in vitro or professional and accidental exposure were excluded. After a screening process, seven reports (n = 5851 subjects) were included out of a total of 2928 references. The reported OR of the association between swimming pool attendance and asthma prevalence ranged from 0.58 to 2.30. The present meta-analysis failed to identify a significant difference in asthma development between children attending swimming pools and controls (OR, 1.084; 95% CI: 0.89-1.31). Swimming in childhood does not increase the likelihood of doctor-diagnosed asthma. Based on this meta-analysis review, the association of the disease with indoor pool attendance is still unclear. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  4. Physical and energy requirements of competitive swimming events.

    PubMed

    Pyne, David B; Sharp, Rick L

    2014-08-01

    The aquatic sports competitions held during the summer Olympic Games include diving, open-water swimming, pool swimming, synchronized swimming, and water polo. Elite-level performance in each of these sports requires rigorous training and practice to develop the appropriate physiological, biomechanical, artistic, and strategic capabilities specific to each sport. Consequently, the daily training plans of these athletes are quite varied both between and within the sports. Common to all aquatic athletes, however, is that daily training and preparation consumes several hours and involves frequent periods of high-intensity exertion. Nutritional support for this high-level training is a critical element of the preparation of these athletes to ensure the energy and nutrient demands of the training and competition are met. In this article, we introduce the fundamental physical requirements of these sports and specifically explore the energetics of human locomotion in water. Subsequent articles in this issue explore the specific nutritional requirements of each aquatic sport. We hope that such exploration will provide a foundation for future investigation of the roles of optimal nutrition in optimizing performance in the aquatic sports.

  5. Water safety training as a potential means of reducing risk of young children's drowning.

    PubMed Central

    Asher, K. N.; Rivara, F. P.; Felix, D.; Vance, L.; Dunne, R.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the effects of training in swimming and water safety on young preschool-children's ability to recover safely from a simulated episode of falling into a swimming pool. DESIGN: Randomized trial of 12 or eight weeks' duration water safety and swimming lessons for children 24 to 42 months old. OUTCOME MEASURES: Swimming ability, deck behavior, water recovery, and swimming to side after jumping into pool were measured before, during, and after the training program. RESULTS: 109 children completed the study (61 in the 12 week group, 48 in the eight week group). The average age was 34.2 months, 54% were male. Swimming ability, deck behavior, water recovery, and jump and swim skills improved over baseline levels in both groups. By the end of training, the 12 week group improved more than the eight week group only in swimming ability. Improvements in water recovery and jump and swim skills were associated positively with changes in swimming ability. CONCLUSIONS: Swimming ability and safety skills of young preschool children can be improved through training. Such programs may offer some protection for children at risk of drowning and there was no indication that this program increased the risk of drowning. However, pool fencing, other barriers around water, and parental supervision still remain the most important prevention strategies to reduce drowning in young children. PMID:9346036

  6. Cholinergic mechanisms of analgesia produced by physostigmine, morphine and cold water swimming.

    PubMed

    Romano, J A; Shih, T M

    1983-07-01

    This study concerns the cholinergic involvement in three experimental procedures which produce analgesia. Rats were given one of seven treatments: saline (1.0 ml/kg, i.p.); morphine sulfate (3.5, 6.0 or 9.0 mg/kg, i.p.); physostigmine salicylate (0.65 mg/kg, i.p.); warm water swim (3.5 min at 28 degrees C); and cold water swim (3.5 min at 2 degrees C). Each rat was tested on a hot plate (59.1 degrees C) once prior to and 30 min after treatment. Immediately after the last test the rats were killed with focussed microwave radiation. Levels of acetylcholine (ACh) and choline (Ch) in six brain areas (brain stem, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, midbrain, cerebellum and striatum) were analyzed by gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer. Morphine (9.0 mg/kg), physostigmine and cold water swimming caused significant analgesia. Morphine elevated the levels of ACh in the cerebellum and striatum, cold water swimming--in the cerebellum, striatum and cortex, and physostigmine--in the striatum and hippocampus. Levels of choline were elevated by morphine in the cerebellum, cortex and hippocampus, while cold water swimming elevated levels of choline in the cerebellum, cortex, striatum and hippocampus. Physostigmine did not change levels of choline in any of the brain areas studied. These data suggest that the analgetic effects of morphine or cold water swimming may be mediated by components of the cholinergic system that differ from those involved in the analgetic effects of physostigmine.

  7. Methods for measurement of energy expenditure and substrate concentrations in swimming rats.

    PubMed

    Benthem, L; Bolhuis, J W; van der Leest, J; Steffens, A B; Zock, J P; Zijlstra, W G

    1994-07-01

    A measuring system is described for the determination of oxygen consumption (Vo2) and carbon dioxide production (Vco2) in swimming rats. Vo2 and Vco2 were measured by means of an O2-analyzer (Ametek S3A) and a mass spectrometer (Balzers QMG 511), respectively, combined with a gas flow meter. The measurements were made in a 5-1 metabolic chamber on top of a swimming pool in which a water flow of 0.22 m/s was maintained. The rats were fitted with an indwelling catheter with its tip at the entrance of the right atrium for the repeated determination of energy substrate and hormone concentrations, before, during, and after swimming. The inaccuracy of the Vo2 and Vco2 measurements was 0.18% and 0.31% of the reading, respectively; the imprecision was 2.15% and 2.59%. This high accuracy and precision of the system was attained by measuring room air for 20 s after each 100 s of measuring air from the metabolic chamber, and by using demineralized water in the swimming pool. Vo2 during steady-state swimming was 1.89 +/- 0.06 mmol/kg.min (ca. 60% Vo2max), indicating moderate exercise. Respiratory quotient (RQ), during steady-state exercise, was 0.80 +/- 0.01. Vo2 and RQ resulted in rates for carbohydrate and fat utilization of 15.6 +/- 0.8 and 15.1 +/- 0.7 mg/kg.min, respectively.

  8. Prior Individual Training and Self-Organized Queuing during Group Emergency Escape of Mice from Water Pool

    PubMed Central

    Saloma, Caesar; Perez, Gay Jane; Gavile, Catherine Ann; Ick-Joson, Jacqueline Judith; Palmes-Saloma, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    We study the impact of prior individual training during group emergency evacuation using mice that escape from an enclosed water pool to a dry platform via any of two possible exits. Experimenting with mice avoids serious ethical and legal issues that arise when dealing with unwitting human participants while minimizing concerns regarding the reliability of results obtained from simulated experiments using ‘actors’. First, mice were trained separately and their individual escape times measured over several trials. Mice learned quickly to swim towards an exit–they achieved their fastest escape times within the first four trials. The trained mice were then placed together in the pool and allowed to escape. No two mice were permitted in the pool beforehand and only one could pass through an exit opening at any given time. At first trial, groups of trained mice escaped seven and five times faster than their corresponding control groups of untrained mice at pool occupancy rate ρ of 11.9% and 4%, respectively. Faster evacuation happened because trained mice: (a) had better recognition of the available pool space and took shorter escape routes to an exit, (b) were less likely to form arches that blocked an exit opening, and (c) utilized the two exits efficiently without preference. Trained groups achieved continuous egress without an apparent leader-coordinator (self-organized queuing)—a collective behavior not experienced during individual training. Queuing was unobserved in untrained groups where mice were prone to wall seeking, aimless swimming and/or blind copying that produced circuitous escape routes, biased exit use and clogging. The experiments also reveal that faster and less costly group training at ρ = 4%, yielded an average individual escape time that is comparable with individualized training. However, group training in a more crowded pool (ρ = 11.9%) produced a longer average individual escape time. PMID:25693170

  9. Inappropriate Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator Shocks Attributed to Alternating-Current Leak in a Swimming Pool

    PubMed Central

    Makaryus, John N.; Angert-Gilman, Julia; Yacoub, Mena; Patel, Apoor

    2014-01-01

    Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) are the standard of care for preventing sudden cardiac death in patients who are predisposed to malignant ventricular arrhythmias. Causes of inappropriate ICD shock include equipment malfunction, improper arrhythmia evaluation, misinterpretation of myopotentials, and electromagnetic interference. As the number of implanted ICDs has increased, other contributors to inappropriate therapy have become known, such as minimal electrical current leaks that mimic ventricular fibrillation. We present the case of a 63-year-old man with a biventricular ICD who received 2 inappropriate shocks, probably attributable to alternating-current leaks in a swimming pool. In addition, we discuss ICD sensitivity and offer recommendations to avoid similar occurrences. PMID:24512403

  10. Exercise-training intervention studies in competitive swimming.

    PubMed

    Aspenes, Stian Thoresen; Karlsen, Trine

    2012-06-01

    Competitive swimming has a long history and is currently one of the largest Olympic sports, with 16 pool events. Several aspects separate swimming from most other sports such as (i) the prone position; (ii) simultaneous use of arms and legs for propulsion; (iii) water immersion (i.e. hydrostatic pressure on thorax and controlled respiration); (iv) propulsive forces that are applied against a fluctuant element; and (v) minimal influence of equipment on performance. Competitive swimmers are suggested to have specific anthropometrical features compared with other athletes, but are nevertheless dependent on physiological adaptations to enhance their performance. Swimmers thus engage in large volumes of training in the pool and on dry land. Strength training of various forms is widely used, and the energetic systems are addressed by aerobic and anaerobic swimming training. The aim of the current review was to report results from controlled exercise training trials within competitive swimming. From a structured literature search we found 17 controlled intervention studies that covered strength or resistance training, assisted sprint swimming, arms-only training, leg-kick training, respiratory muscle training, training the energy delivery systems and combined interventions across the aforementioned categories. Nine of the included studies were randomized controlled trials. Among the included studies we found indications that heavy strength training on dry land (one to five repetitions maximum with pull-downs for three sets with maximal effort in the concentric phase) or sprint swimming with resistance towards propulsion (maximal pushing with the arms against fixed points or pulling a perforated bowl) may be efficient for enhanced performance, and may also possibly have positive effects on stroke mechanics. The largest effect size (ES) on swimming performance was found in 50 m freestyle after a dry-land strength training regimen of maximum six repetitions across three

  11. Safety Management for Water Play Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Claude

    1986-01-01

    Modern aquatic facilities, which include wave pools, water slides, and shallow water activity play pools, have a greater potential for injuries and lawsuits than conventional swimming pools. This article outlines comprehensive safety management for such facilities, including potential accident identification and injury control planning. (MT)

  12. Influence of physical activity in the intake of trihalomethanes in indoor swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Marco, Esther; Lourencetti, Carolina; Grimalt, Joan O; Gari, Mercè; Fernández, Pilar; Font-Ribera, Laia; Villanueva, Cristina M; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2015-07-01

    This study describes the relationship between physical activity and intake of trihalomethanes (THMs), namely chloroform (CHCl3), bromodichloromethane (CHCl2Br), dibromochloromethane (CHClBr2) and bromoform (CHBr3), in individuals exposed in two indoor swimming pools which used different disinfection agents, chlorine (Cl-SP) and bromine (Br-SP). CHCl3 and CHBr3 were the dominant compounds in air and water of the Cl-SP and Br-SP, respectively. Physical exercise was assessed from distance swum and energy expenditure. The changes in exhaled breath concentrations of these compounds were measured from the differences after and before physical activity. A clear dependence between distance swum or energy expenditure and exhaled breath THM concentrations was observed. The statistically significant relationships involved higher THM concentrations at higher distances swum. However, air concentration was the major factor determining the CHCl3 and CHCl2Br intake in swimmers whereas distance swum was the main factor for CHBr3 intake. These two causes of THM incorporation into swimmers concurrently intensify the concentrations of these compounds into exhaled breath and pointed to inhalation as primary mechanism for THM uptake. Furthermore, the rates of THM incorporation were proportionally higher as higher was the degree of bromination of the THM species. This trend suggested that air-water partition mechanisms in the pulmonary system determined higher retention of the THM compounds with lower Henry's Law volatility constants than those of higher constant values. Inhalation is therefore the primary mechanisms for THM exposure of swimmers in indoor buildings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Critical evaluation of oxygen-uptake assessment in swimming.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana; Figueiredo, Pedro; Pendergast, David; Kjendlie, Per-Ludvik; Vilas-Boas, João P; Fernandes, Ricardo J

    2014-03-01

    Swimming has become an important area of sport science research since the 1970s, with the bioenergetic factors assuming a fundamental performance-influencing role. The purpose of this study was to conduct a critical evaluation of the literature concerning oxygen-uptake (VO2) assessment in swimming, by describing the equipment and methods used and emphasizing the recent works conducted in ecological conditions. Particularly in swimming, due to the inherent technical constraints imposed by swimming in a water environment, assessment of VO2max was not accomplished until the 1960s. Later, the development of automated portable measurement devices allowed VO2max to be assessed more easily, even in ecological swimming conditions, but few studies have been conducted in swimming-pool conditions with portable breath-by-breath telemetric systems. An inverse relationship exists between the velocity corresponding to VO2max and the time a swimmer can sustain it at this velocity. The energy cost of swimming varies according to its association with velocity variability. As, in the end, the supply of oxygen (whose limitation may be due to central-O2 delivery and transportation to the working muscles-or peripheral factors-O2 diffusion and utilization in the muscles) is one of the critical factors that determine swimming performance, VO2 kinetics and its maximal values are critical in understanding swimmers' behavior in competition and to develop efficient training programs.

  14. Larval green and white sturgeon swimming performance in relation to water-diversion flows

    PubMed Central

    Verhille, Christine E.; Poletto, Jamilynn B.; Cocherell, Dennis E.; DeCourten, Bethany; Baird, Sarah; Cech, Joseph J.; Fangue, Nann A.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known of the swimming capacities of larval sturgeons, despite global population declines in many species due in part to fragmentation of their spawning and rearing habitats by man-made water-diversion structures. Larval green (Acipenser medirostris) and white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) inhabit the highly altered Sacramento–San Joaquin watershed, making them logical species to examine vulnerability to entrainment by altered water flows. The risk of larval sturgeon entrainment is influenced by the ontogeny of swimming capacity and dispersal timing and their interactions with water-diversion structure operations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe and compare the ontogeny and allometry of larval green and white sturgeon swimming capacities until completion of metamorphosis into juveniles. Despite the faster growth rates and eventual larger size of larval white sturgeon, green sturgeon critical swimming velocities remained consistently, though modestly, greater than those of white sturgeon throughout the larval life stage. Although behavioural interactions with water-diversion structures are also important considerations, regarding swimming capacity, Sacramento–San Joaquin sturgeons are most vulnerable to entrainment in February–May, when white sturgeon early larvae are in the middle Sacramento River, and April–May, when green sturgeon early larvae are in the upper river. Green sturgeon migrating downstream to the estuary and bays in October–November are also susceptible to entrainment due to their movements combined with seasonal declines in their swimming capacity. An additional inter-species comparison of the allometric relationship between critical swimming velocities and total length with several sturgeon species found throughout the world suggests a similar ontogeny of swimming capacity with growth. Therefore, although dispersal and behaviour differ among river systems and sturgeon species, similar recommendations are

  15. Biochemical and hematological changes following the 120-km open-water marathon swim.

    PubMed

    Drygas, Wojciech; Rębowska, Ewa; Stępień, Ewa; Golański, Jacek; Kwaśniewska, Magdalena

    2014-09-01

    Data on physiological effects and potential risks of a ultraendurance swimming are scarce. This report presents the unique case of a 61-year old athlete who completed a non-stop open-water 120-km ultramarathon swim on the Warta River, Poland. Pre-swimming examinations revealed favorable conditions (blood pressure, 110/70 mmHg; rest heart rate, 54 beats/minute, ejection fraction, 60%, 20.2 metabolic equivalents in a maximal exercise test). The swimming time and distance covered were 27 h 33 min and 120 km, respectively. Blood samples for hematological and biochemical parameters were collected 30 min, 4 hrs, 10 hrs and 8 days after the swim. The body temperature of the swimmer was 36.7°C before and 35.1°C after the swim. The hematological parameters remained within the reference range in the postexercise period except for leucocytes (17.5 and 10.6 x G/l noted 30 minutes and 4 hours after the swim, respectively). Serum urea, aspartate aminotransferase and C-reactive protein increased above the reference range reaching 11.3 mmol/l, 1054 nmol/l/s and 25.9 mg/l, respectively. Symptomatic hyponatremia was not observed. Although the results demonstrate that an experienced athlete is able to complete an ultra-marathon swim without negative health consequences, further studies addressing the potential risks of marathon swimming are required. Key pointsData on biochemical changes due to long-distance swimming are scarce.This report presents the unique case of a 61-year old athlete who completed a non-stop open-water 120-km ultramarathon swim.An experienced athlete is able to complete an ultra-marathon swim without serious health consequences.Regarding the growing popularity of marathon swimming further studies addressing the potential risks of such exhaustive exercise are required.

  16. Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.

    1996-01-01

    An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

  17. Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.

    1996-03-12

    An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

  18. Swimming and Water Safety. Grades K-12. Curriculum Bulletin No. 12, 1967-68.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY.

    This bulletin, designed to help upgrade swimming and water safety instruction in schools, is divided into nine sections. The introductory section includes values of swimming and water safety instruction, and the scope and objectives of the program. Section two, "Organization and Administration," discusses the roles of administrators, supervisors,…

  19. Progressive Increase in Disinfection Byproducts and Mutagenicity from Sourceto Tap to Swimming Pool and Spa Water: Implications for Public Health

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pools and spas are enjoyed throughout the world for exercise and relaxation. However, there are no previous studies on the mutagenicity of disinfected spa (hot tub) waters or comprehensive identification of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) formed in spas. Using 28 water samples f...

  20. Analysis of swimming performance from physical, physiological, and biomechanical parameters in young swimmers.

    PubMed

    Jürimäe, Jaak; Haljaste, Kaja; Cicchella, Antonio; Lätt, Evelin; Purge, Priit; Leppik, Aire; Jürimäe, Toivo

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of the energy cost of swimming, body composition, and technical parameters on swimming performance in young swimmers. Twenty-nine swimmers, 15 prepubertal (11.9 +/- 0.3 years; Tanner Stages 1-2) and 14 pubertal (14.3 +/- 1.4 years; Tanner Stages 3-4) boys participated in the study. The energy cost of swimming (Cs) and stroking parameters were assessed over maximal 400-m front-crawl swimming in a 25-m swimming pool. The backward extrapolation technique was used to evaluate peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak). A stroke index (SI; m2 . s(-1) . cycles(-1)) was calculated by multiplying the swimming speed by the stroke length. VO2peak results were compared with VO2peak test in the laboratory (bicycle, 2.86 +/- 0.74 L/min, vs. in water, 2.53 +/- 0.50 L/min; R2 = .713; p = .0001). Stepwise-regression analyses revealed that SI (R2 = .898), in-water VO2peak (R2 = .358), and arm span (R2 = .454) were the best predictors of swimming performance. The backward-extrapolation method could be used to assess VO2peak in young swimmers. SI, arm span, and VO2peak appear to be the major determinants of front-crawl swimming performance in young swimmers.

  1. Effect of the starting and turning performances on the subsequent swimming parameters of elite swimmers.

    PubMed

    Veiga, Santiago; Roig, Andreu

    2017-03-01

    In the present research, we examined the effect of the starting and turning performances on the subsequent swimming parameters by (1) comparing the starting and turning velocities with the swimming parameters on the emersion and mid-pool segments and (2) by relating the individual behaviour of swimmers during the start and turns with subsequent behaviour on each swimming lap. One hundred and twelve 100 m performances on the FINA 2013 World Swimming Championships were analysed by an image-processing system (InThePool 2.0®). At the point of the start emersion, the swimming parameters of the 100-m elite swimmers were substantially greater than the mid-pool parameters, except on the breaststroke races. On the other hand, no diminution in the swimming parameters was observed between the turn emersion and the mid-pool swimming, except on the butterfly and backstroke male races. Changes on the surface swimming kinematics were not generally related to the starting or turning parameters, although male swimmers who develop faster starts seem to achieve faster velocities at emersion. Race analysts should be aware of a transfer of momentum when swimmers emerge from underwater with implications on the subsequent swimming kinematics, especially for male swimmers who employ underwater undulatory techniques.

  2. Coliphages and Gastrointestinal Illness in Recreational Waters: Pooled Analysis of Six Coastal Beach Cohorts.

    PubMed

    Benjamin-Chung, Jade; Arnold, Benjamin F; Wade, Timothy J; Schiff, Kenneth; Griffith, John F; Dufour, Alfred P; Weisberg, Stephen B; Colford, John M

    2017-09-01

    Coliphages have been proposed as indicators of fecal contamination in recreational waters because they better mimic the persistence of pathogenic viruses in the environment and wastewater treatment than fecal indicator bacteria. We estimated the association between coliphages and gastrointestinal illness and compared it with the association with culturable enterococci. We pooled data from six prospective cohort studies that enrolled coastal beachgoers in California, Alabama, and Rhode Island. Water samples were collected and gastrointestinal illness within 10 days of the beach visit was recorded. Samples were tested for enterococci and male-specific and somatic coliphages. We estimated cumulative incidence ratios (CIR) for the association between swimming in water with detectable coliphage and gastrointestinal illness when human fecal pollution was likely present, not likely present, and under all conditions combined. The reference group was unexposed swimmers. We defined continuous and threshold-based exposures (coliphage present/absent, enterococci >35 vs. ≤35 CFU/100 ml). Under all conditions combined, there was no association between gastrointestinal illness and swimming in water with detectable coliphage or enterococci. When human fecal pollution was likely present, coliphage and enterococci were associated with increased gastrointestinal illness, and there was an association between male-specific coliphage level and illness that was somewhat stronger than the association between enterococci and illness. There were no substantial differences between male-specific and somatic coliphage. Somatic coliphage and enterococci had similar associations with gastrointestinal illness; there was some evidence that male-specific coliphage had a stronger association with illness than enterococci in marine waters with human fecal contamination.

  3. Cryptosporidium and Giardia in recreational water in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Ehsan, Md Amimul; Casaert, Stijn; Levecke, Bruno; Van Rooy, Liesbet; Pelicaen, Joachim; Smis, Anne; De Backer, Joke; Vervaeke, Bart; De Smedt, Sandra; Schoonbaert, Filip; Lammens, Saskia; Warmoes, Thierry; Geurden, Thomas; Claerebout, Edwin

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the presence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in different recreational water bodies in Belgium and to estimate the infection risk associated with swimming and other recreational activities. Cryptosporidium oocysts and/or Giardia cysts were detected in three out of 37 swimming pools, seven out of 10 recreational lakes, two out of seven splash parks and four out of 16 water fountains. In the swimming pools no infection risk for Cryptosporidium could be calculated, since oocysts were only detected in filter backwash water. The risk of Giardia infection in the swimming pools varied from 1.13×10(-6) to 2.49×10(-6) per swim per person. In recreational lakes, the infection risk varied from 2.79×10(-5) to 5.74×10(-5) per swim per person for Cryptosporidium and from 7.04×10(-5) to 1.46×10(-4) for Giardia. For other outdoor water recreation activities the estimated infection risk was 5.71×10(-6) for Cryptosporidium and 1.47×10(-5) for Giardia. However, most positive samples in the recreational lakes belonged to species/genotypes that are either animal-specific or predominantly found in animals. No Cryptosporidium was found in splash parks and water fountains, but the presence of Giardia cysts suggests a risk for human infection. The infection risk of Giardia infection during a 3.5-minute visit to a splash park for children equalled 1.68×10(-4).

  4. Chlorine disinfection of recreational water for Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, C.; Fayer, R.; Trout, J.; Beach, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    We examined the effects of chlorine on oocyst viability, under the conditions of controlled pH and elevated calcium concentrations required for most community swimming pools. We found that fecal material may alter the Ct values (chlorine concentration in mg/L, multiplied by time in minutes) needed to disinfect swimming pools or other recreational water for Cryptosporidium parvum. PMID:10458969

  5. Applying physiological principles and assessment techniques to swimming the English Channel. A case study.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, E O; Meyers, M C; Hayman, M; Haskin, J

    1997-03-01

    This study presents the use of physiological principles and assessment techniques in addressing four objectives that can enhance a swimmer's likelihood of successfully swimming the English Channel. The four objective were: (1) to prescribe training intensities and determine ideal swimming pace; (2) to determine the amount of insulation needed, relative to heat produced, to diminish the likelihood of the swimmer suffering from hypothermia; (3) to calculate the caloric expenditure for the swim and the necessary glucose replacement required to prevent glycogen depletion; and (4) to determine the rate of acclimatization to cold water (15.56 C/60 F). The subject participated in several pool swimming data collection sessions including a tethered swim incremental protocol to determine peak oxygen consumption and onset of lactate accumulation and several steady state swims to determine ideal swimming pace at 4.0 mM/L of lactate. Additionally, these swims provided information on oxygen consumption, which in combination with ultrasound assessment of subcutaneous fat was used to assess heat production and insulation capabilities. Finally, the subject participated in 18 cold water immersions to document acclimatization rate. The data demonstrated the high fitness level of this subject and indicated that at a stroke rate of 63 stokes/min, HR was 130 heats/min and lactate was 4 mM/L. At this swimming pace the swimmer would need to consume 470 kcal of glucose/hr. In addition, the energy produced at this swim pace was 13.25 kcal/min while the energy lost at the present subcutaneous fat quantity was 13.40 kcal/min, requiring a fat weight gain of 6,363.03 g (13.88 lbs) to resist heat loss. Finally, the data from the cold water immersions suggested that acclimatization occurred following two weeks of immersions. There results were provided to the swimmer and utilized in making decisions in preparation for the swim.

  6. Warm water and cool nests are best. How global warming might influence hatchling green turtle swimming performance.

    PubMed

    Booth, David T; Evans, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    For sea turtles nesting on beaches surrounded by coral reefs, the most important element of hatchling recruitment is escaping predation by fish as they swim across the fringing reef, and as a consequence hatchlings that minimize their exposure to fish predation by minimizing the time spent crossing the fringing reef have a greater chance of surviving the reef crossing. One way to decrease the time required to cross the fringing reef is to maximize swimming speed. We found that both water temperature and nest temperature influence swimming performance of hatchling green turtles, but in opposite directions. Warm water increases swimming ability, with hatchling turtles swimming in warm water having a faster stroke rate, while an increase in nest temperature decreases swimming ability with hatchlings from warm nests producing less thrust per stroke.

  7. 77 FR 23120 - Special Local Regulations; Lowcountry Splash Open Water Swim, Wando River and Cooper River, Mount...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-18

    ...-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Lowcountry Splash Open Water Swim, Wando River and Cooper River, Mount... at Patriots Point on the Cooper River. Approximately 600 swimmers will be participating in the swim... Special Local Regulations; Lowcountry Splash Open Water Swim, Wando River and Cooper River, Mount Pleasant...

  8. Observations on Side-Swimming Rainbow Trout in Water Recirculation Aquaculture Systems

    PubMed Central

    Good, Christopher; Davidson, John; Kinman, Christin; Kenney, P. Brett; Bæverfjord, Grete; Summerfelt, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Abstract During a controlled 6-month study using six replicated water recirculation aquaculture systems (WRASs), it was observed that Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in all WRASs exhibited a higher-than-normal prevalence of side swimming (i.e., controlled, forward swimming but with misaligned orientation such that the fish's sagittal axis is approximately parallel to the horizontal plane). To further our understanding of this abnormality, a substudy was conducted wherein side swimmers and normally swimming fish were selectively sampled from each WRAS and growth performance (length, weight), processing attributes (fillet yield, visceral index, ventrum [i.e., thickness of the ventral “belly flap”] index), blood gas and chemistry parameters, and swim bladder morphology and positioning were compared. Side swimmers were found to be significantly smaller in length and weight and had less fillet yield but higher ventrum indices. Whole-blood analyses demonstrated that, among other things, side swimmers had significantly lower whole-blood pH and higher Pco 2. Side swimmers typically exhibited swim bladder malformations, although the positive predictive value of this subjective assessment was only 73%. Overall, this study found several anatomical and physiological differences between side-swimming and normally swimming Rainbow Trout. Given the reduced weight and fillet yield of market-age side swimmers, producers would benefit from additional research to reduce side-swimming prevalence in their fish stocks. Received March 20, 2014; accepted May 20, 2014 PMID:25250476

  9. Characteristics and Challenges of Open-Water Swimming Performance: A Review.

    PubMed

    Baldassarre, Roberto; Bonifazi, Marco; Zamparo, Paola; Piacentini, Maria Francesca

    2017-11-01

    Although the popularity of open-water swimming (OWS) events has significantly increased in the last decades, specific studies regarding performance of elite or age-group athletes in these events are scarce. To analyze the existing literature on OWS. Relevant literature was located via computer-generated citations. During August 2016, online computer searches on PubMed and Scopus databases were conducted to locate published research. The number of participants in ultraendurance swimming events has substantially increased in the last 10 y. In elite athletes there is a higher overall competitive level of women than of men. The body composition of female athletes (different percentage and distribution of fat tissue) shows several advantages (more buoyancy and less drag) in aquatic conditions that determine the small difference between males and females. The main physiological characteristics of open-water swimmers (OW swimmers) are the ability to swim at high percentage of [Formula: see text] (80-90%) for many hours. Furthermore, to sustain high velocity for many hours, endurance swimmers need a high propelling efficiency and a low energy cost. Open-water races may be characterized by extreme environmental conditions (water temperature, tides, currents, and waves) that have an overall impact on performance, influencing tactics and pacing. Future studies are needed to study OWS in both training and competition.

  10. Swim performance and thermoregulatory effects of wearing clothing in a simulated cold-water survival situation.

    PubMed

    Bowes, Heather; Eglin, Clare M; Tipton, Michael J; Barwood, Martin J

    2016-04-01

    Accidental cold-water immersion (CWI) impairs swim performance, increases drowning risk and often occurs whilst clothed. The impact of clothing on thermoregulation and swim performance during CWI was explored with the view of making recommendations on whether swimming is viable for self-rescue; contrary to the traditional recommendations. Ten unhabituated males (age 24 (4) years; height 1.80 (0.08) m; mass 78.50 (10.93) kg; body composition 14.8 (3.4) fat %) completed four separate CWIs in 12 °C water. They either rested clothed or naked (i.e. wearing a bathing costume) or swum self-paced clothed or naked for up to 1 h. Swim speed, distance covered, oxygen consumption and thermal responses (rectal temperature (T re), mean skin temperature (T msk) and mean body temperature T b) were measured. When clothed, participants swum at a slower pace and for a significantly shorter distance (815 (482) m, 39 (19) min) compared to when naked (1264 (564) m, 52 (18) min), but had a similar oxygen consumption indicating clothing made them less efficient. Swimming accelerated the rate of T msk and T b cooling and wearing clothing partially attenuated this drop. The impairment to swimming performance caused by clothing was greater than the thermal benefit it provided; participants withdrew due to exhaustion before hypothermia developed. Swimming is a viable self-rescue method in 12 °C water, however, clothing impairs swimming capability. Self-rescue swimming could be considered before clinical hypothermia sets in for the majority of individuals. These suggestions must be tested for the wider population.

  11. Kick, Stroke and Swim: Complement Your Swimming Program by Engaging the Whole Body on Dry Land and in the Pool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Susan; Duell, Kelly; Dehaven, Carole; Heidorn, Brent

    2017-01-01

    The Kick, Stroke and Swim (KSS) program can be used to engage students in swimming-skill acquisition and fitness training using a variety of modalities, strategies and techniques on dry land. Practicing swim strokes and techniques on land gives all levels of swimmers--from beginner to competitive--a kinesthetic awareness of the individual…

  12. Instrumenting free-swimming dolphins echolocating in open water.

    PubMed

    Martin, Stephen W; Phillips, Michael; Bauer, Eric J; Moore, Patrick W; Houser, Dorian S

    2005-04-01

    Dolphins within the Navy Marine Mammal Program use echolocation to effectively locate underwater mines. They currently outperform manmade systems at similar tasks, particularly in cluttered environments and on buried targets. In hopes of improving manmade mine-hunting sonar systems, two instrumentation packages were developed to monitor free-swimming dolphin motion and echolocation during open-water target detection tasks. The biosonar measurement tool (BMT) is carried by a dolphin and monitors underwater position and attitude while simultaneously recording echolocation clicks and returning echoes through high-gain binaural receivers. The instrumented mine simulator (IMS) is a modified bottom target that monitors echolocation signals arriving at the target during ensonification. Dolphin subjects were trained to carry the BMT in open-bay bottom-object target searches in which the IMS could serve as a bottom object. The instrumentation provides detailed data that reveal hereto-unavailable information on the search strategies of free-swimming dolphins conducting open-water, bottom-object search tasks with echolocation.

  13. Instrumenting free-swimming dolphins echolocating in open water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Stephen W.; Phillips, Michael; Bauer, Eric J.; Moore, Patrick W.; Houser, Dorian S.

    2005-04-01

    Dolphins within the Navy Marine Mammal Program use echolocation to effectively locate underwater mines. They currently outperform manmade systems at similar tasks, particularly in cluttered environments and on buried targets. In hopes of improving manmade mine-hunting sonar systems, two instrumentation packages were developed to monitor free-swimming dolphin motion and echolocation during open-water target detection tasks. The biosonar measurement tool (BMT) is carried by a dolphin and monitors underwater position and attitude while simultaneously recording echolocation clicks and returning echoes through high-gain binaural receivers. The instrumented mine simulator (IMS) is a modified bottom target that monitors echolocation signals arriving at the target during ensonification. Dolphin subjects were trained to carry the BMT in open-bay bottom-object target searches in which the IMS could serve as a bottom object. The instrumentation provides detailed data that reveal hereto-unavailable information on the search strategies of free-swimming dolphins conducting open-water, bottom-object search tasks with echolocation. .

  14. Pacing in Swimming: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    McGibbon, Katie E; Pyne, D B; Shephard, M E; Thompson, K G

    2018-03-20

    Pacing strategy, or how energy is distributed during exercise, can substantially impact athletic performance and is considered crucial for optimal performance in many sports. This is particularly true in swimming given the highly resistive properties of water and low mechanical efficiency of the swimming action. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the pacing strategies utilised by competitive swimmers in competition and their reproducibility, and to examine the impact of different pacing strategies on kinematic, metabolic and performance variables. This will provide valuable and practical information to coaches and sports science practitioners. The databases Web of Science, Scopus, SPORTDiscus and PubMed were searched for published articles up to 1 August 2017. A total of 23 studies examining pool-based swimming competitions or experimental trials in English-language and peer-reviewed journals were included in this review. In short- and middle-distance swimming events maintenance of swimming velocity is critical, whereas in long-distance events a low lap-to-lap variability and the ability to produce an end spurt in the final lap(s) are key. The most effective strategy in the individual medley (IM) is to conserve energy during the butterfly leg to optimise performance in subsequent legs. The pacing profiles of senior swimmers remain relatively stable irrespective of opponents, competition stage or type, and performance time. Implementing event-specific pacing strategies should benefit the performance of competitive swimmers. Given differences between swimmers, there is a need for greater individualisation when considering pacing strategy selection across distances and strokes.

  15. Influence of water immersion, water gymnastics and swimming on cardiac output in patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Jean‐Paul; Noveanu, Markus; Morger, Cyrill; Gaillet, Raymond; Capoferri, Mauro; Anderegg, Matthias; Saner, Hugo

    2007-01-01

    Background Whole‐body water immersion leads to a significant shift of blood from the periphery to the intrathoracic circulation, followed by an increase in central venous pressure and heart volume. In patients with severely reduced left ventricular function, this hydrostatically induced volume shift might overstrain the cardiovascular adaptive mechanisms and lead to cardiac decompensation. Aim To assess the haemodynamic response to water immersion, gymnastics and swimming in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Methods 10 patients with compensated CHF (62.9 (6.3) years, ejection fraction 31.5% (4.1%), peak oxygen consumption (V̇o2) 19.4 (2.8) ml/kg/min), 10 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) but preserved left ventricular function (57.2 (5.6) years, ejection fraction 63.9% (5.5%), peak V̇o2 28 (6.3) ml/kg/min), and 10 healthy controls (32.8 (7.2) years, peak V̇o2 45.6 (6) ml/kg/min) were examined. Haemodynamic response to thermoneutral (32°C) water immersion and exercise was measured using a non‐invasive foreign gas rebreathing method during stepwise water immersion, water gymnastics and swimming. Results Water immersion up to the chest increased cardiac index by 19% in controls, by 21% in patients with CAD and by 16% in patients with CHF. Although some patients with CHF showed a decrease of stroke volume during immersion, all subjects were able to increase cardiac index (by 87% in healthy subjects, by 77% in patients with CAD and by 53% in patients with CHF). V̇o2 during swimming was 9.7 (3.3) ml/kg/min in patients with CHF, 12.4 (3.5) ml/kg/min in patients with CAD and 13.9 (4) ml/kg/min in controls. Conclusions Patients with severely reduced left ventricular function but stable clinical conditions and a minimal peak V̇o2 of at least 15 ml/kg/min during a symptom‐limited exercise stress test tolerate water immersion and swimming in thermoneutral water well. Although cardiac index and V̇o2 are lower than in patients

  16. Observations on side-swimming rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in water recirculation aquaculture systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    During a controlled 6-month study using six replicated water recirculation aquaculture systems (WRAS), it was observed that rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in all WRAS exhibited a higher-than-normal prevalence of side-swimming (i.e. controlled, forward swimming, but with misaligned orientation suc...

  17. Modifying the food supply at a community swimming pool: a case study.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Beverley; Dumbrell, Susan

    2011-04-01

    We report on a process evaluation of a project that aimed to replace energy-dense, nutrient-poor (EDNP) items at a community swimming pool kiosk. The analytic framework was the Analysis Grid for Environments Linked to Obesity (ANGELO). To contribute to health promotion practice in recreational settings, the process evaluation sought to determine the extent to which project'controversies' modified project objectives and strategies. The case study method captured the project narrative. The primary data were interviews with key project participants, supplemented with project records and media articles.These were analysed thematically. The socio-cultural and political environments, particularly the capacity to exercise choice in relation to ENDP products, had considerable influence on the project. In the face of two controversies -"I thought everyone was signed up to it"and "We can't deny the kiddies their ice-cream" it was necessary for the project partners to modify the objectives and strategies and substantially change the target. The setting is highly responsive to both the micro and macro socio-cultural and political aspects of the environment.

  18. Progressive Increase in Disinfection By-products and Mutagenicity from Source to Tap to Swimming Pool and Spa Water: Impact of Human Use

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pools and spas are enjoyed throughout the world for exercise and relaxation. However, there are no previous studies on mutagenicity of disinfected spa (hot tub) waters or comprehensive identification of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) formed in spas. Using 28 water samples from ...

  19. Deep and shallow water effects on developing preschoolers' aquatic skills.

    PubMed

    Costa, Aldo M; Marinho, Daniel A; Rocha, Helena; Silva, António J; Barbosa, Tiago M; Ferreira, Sandra S; Martins, Marta

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the study was to assess deep and shallow water teaching methods in swimming lessons for preschool children and identify variations in the basic aquatic skills acquired. The study sample included 32 swimming instructors (16 from deep water programs and 16 from shallow water programs) and 98 preschool children (50 from deep water swimming pool and 48 from shallow water swimming pool). The children were also studied regarding their previous experience in swimming (6, 12 and 18 months or practice). Chi-Square test and Fisher's exact test were used to compare the teaching methodology. A discriminant analysis was conducted with Λ wilk's method to predict under what conditions students are better or worse (aquatic competence). Results suggest that regardless of the non-significant variations found in teaching methods, the water depth can affect aquatic skill acquisition - shallow water lessons seem to impose greater water competence particularly after 6 months of practice. The discriminant function revealed a significant association between groups and all predictors for 6 months of swimming practice (p<0.001). Body position in gliding and leg displacements were the main predictors. For 12 and 18 months of practice, the discriminant function do not revealed any significant association between groups. As a conclusion, it seems that the teaching methodology of aquatic readiness based on deep and shallow water programs for preschoolers is not significantly different. However, shallow water lessons could be preferable for the development of basic aquatic skills.

  20. Deep and Shallow Water Effects on Developing Preschoolers’ Aquatic Skills

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Aldo M.; Marinho, Daniel A.; Rocha, Helena; Silva, António J.; Barbosa, Tiago M.; Ferreira, Sandra S.; Martins, Marta

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess deep and shallow water teaching methods in swimming lessons for preschool children and identify variations in the basic aquatic skills acquired. The study sample included 32 swimming instructors (16 from deep water programs and 16 from shallow water programs) and 98 preschool children (50 from deep water swimming pool and 48 from shallow water swimming pool). The children were also studied regarding their previous experience in swimming (6, 12 and 18 months or practice). Chi-Square test and Fisher’s exact test were used to compare the teaching methodology. A discriminant analysis was conducted with Λ wilk’s method to predict under what conditions students are better or worse (aquatic competence). Results suggest that regardless of the non-significant variations found in teaching methods, the water depth can affect aquatic skill acquisition - shallow water lessons seem to impose greater water competence particularly after 6 months of practice. The discriminant function revealed a significant association between groups and all predictors for 6 months of swimming practice (p<0.001). Body position in gliding and leg displacements were the main predictors. For 12 and 18 months of practice, the discriminant function do not revealed any significant association between groups. As a conclusion, it seems that the teaching methodology of aquatic readiness based on deep and shallow water programs for preschoolers is not significantly different. However, shallow water lessons could be preferable for the development of basic aquatic skills. PMID:23487406

  1. Experimental evaluation of a heat pump for the water-supply heating of a public swimming pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, R.; Vaca, M.; Terres, H.; Lizardi, A.; Morales, J.; Chávez, S.

    2017-01-01

    In this work the analysis of the thermodynamic behavior of heat pumps (HP) which supply the energy needed in the public pool at the Aquatic Center of Azcapotzalco was performed. There are 18 installed HP’s but only those needed to provide the energy required are alternately activated. The evaluation was conducted during May and June of 2015. We selected one of the HP to implement temperature and pressure gauges at the inlet and outlet of the compressor. The measurements were made every day at three times, 6:30, 13:00 and 18:00 hours. In a period of 24 hours, 1 000 L evaporated, there was no variation registered overnight, since the pool was covered with plastic to avoid loss of the fluid. The heat pump provided 150 kW to maintain the water temperature at the right level of operation, namely 28 °C. The coefficients of performance (COP) of the HP were 6.39 at 6:30, 7.42 at 13:00 and 7:32 at 18:00 hrs., values which are very close to the one provided by the manufacturer.

  2. SWIM: A Semi-Analytical Ocean Color Inversion Algorithm for Optically Shallow Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKinna, Lachlan I. W.; Werdell, P. Jeremy; Fearns, Peter R. C. S.; Weeks, Scarla J.; Reichstetter, Martina; Franz, Bryan A.; Shea, Donald M.; Feldman, Gene C.

    2014-01-01

    Ocean color remote sensing provides synoptic-scale, near-daily observations of marine inherent optical properties (IOPs). Whilst contemporary ocean color algorithms are known to perform well in deep oceanic waters, they have difficulty operating in optically clear, shallow marine environments where light reflected from the seafloor contributes to the water-leaving radiance. The effect of benthic reflectance in optically shallow waters is known to adversely affect algorithms developed for optically deep waters [1, 2]. Whilst adapted versions of optically deep ocean color algorithms have been applied to optically shallow regions with reasonable success [3], there is presently no approach that directly corrects for bottom reflectance using existing knowledge of bathymetry and benthic albedo.To address the issue of optically shallow waters, we have developed a semi-analytical ocean color inversion algorithm: the Shallow Water Inversion Model (SWIM). SWIM uses existing bathymetry and a derived benthic albedo map to correct for bottom reflectance using the semi-analytical model of Lee et al [4]. The algorithm was incorporated into the NASA Ocean Biology Processing Groups L2GEN program and tested in optically shallow waters of the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. In-lieu of readily available in situ matchup data, we present a comparison between SWIM and two contemporary ocean color algorithms, the Generalized Inherent Optical Property Algorithm (GIOP) and the Quasi-Analytical Algorithm (QAA).

  3. Vortices revealed: Swimming faster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houwelingen, Josje; van de Water, Willem; Kunnen, Rudie; van Heijst, Gertjan; Clercx, Herman

    2016-11-01

    Understanding and optimizing the propulsion in human swimming requires insight into the hydrodynamics of the flow around the swimmer. Experiments and simulations addressing the hydrodynamics of swimming have been conducted in studies before, including the visualization of the flow using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The main objective in this study is to develop a system to visualize the flow around a swimmer in practice inspired by this technique. The setup is placed in a regular swimming pool. The use of tracer particles and lasers to illuminate the particles is not allowed. Therefore, we choose to work with air bubbles with a diameter of 4 mm, illuminated by ambient light. Homogeneous bubble curtains are produced by tubes implemented in the bottom of the pool. The bubble motion is captured by six cameras placed in underwater casings. A first test with the setup has been conducted by pulling a cylinder through the bubbles and performing a PIV analysis. The vorticity plots of the resulting data show the expected vortex street behind the cylinder. The shedding frequency of the vortices resembles the expected frequency. Thus, it is possible to identify and follow the coherent structures. We will discuss these results and the first flow measurements around swimmers.

  4. AN OBSERVATIONAL STUDY: DETERMINATION OF THE VOLUME OF WATER INGESTED DURING RECREATIONAL SWIMMING ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Action Plan for Beaches and Recreational Waters describes research needs for exposure assessment related to swimming activities such as characterizing swimming populations with regard to routes and magnitudes of exposure. This includes characteristics such as the duration ...

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF EXPOSURE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN INDICATORS OF WATER QUALITY AND SWIMMING-ASSOCIATED ILLNESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to contaminated water during recreational swimming has long been associated with adverse health effects. Swimming in rivers, streams and lakes with high levels of fecal contamination are regularly linked to outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness and related infections. Wh...

  6. Molecular adsorption steers bacterial swimming at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Morse, Michael; Huang, Athena; Li, Guanglai; Maxey, Martin R; Tang, Jay X

    2013-07-02

    Microbes inhabiting Earth have adapted to diverse environments of water, air, soil, and often at the interfaces of multiple media. In this study, we focus on the behavior of Caulobacter crescentus, a singly flagellated bacterium, at the air/water interface. Forward swimming C. crescentus swarmer cells tend to get physically trapped at the surface when swimming in nutrient-rich growth medium but not in minimal salt motility medium. Trapped cells move in tight, clockwise circles when viewed from the air with slightly reduced speed. Trace amounts of Triton X100, a nonionic surfactant, release the trapped cells from these circular trajectories. We show, by tracing the motion of positively charged colloidal beads near the interface that organic molecules in the growth medium adsorb at the interface, creating a high viscosity film. Consequently, the air/water interface no longer acts as a free surface and forward swimming cells become hydrodynamically trapped. Added surfactants efficiently partition to the surface, replacing the viscous layer of molecules and reestablishing free surface behavior. These findings help explain recent similar studies on Escherichia coli, showing trajectories of variable handedness depending on media chemistry. The consistent behavior of these two distinct microbial species provides insights on how microbes have evolved to cope with challenging interfacial environments. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Mammal-like muscles power swimming in a cold-water shark.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Diego; Donley, Jeanine M; Shadwick, Robert E; Syme, Douglas A

    2005-10-27

    Effects of temperature on muscle contraction and powering movement are profound, outwardly obvious, and of great consequence to survival. To cope with the effects of environmental temperature fluctuations, endothermic birds and mammals maintain a relatively warm and constant body temperature, whereas most fishes and other vertebrates are ectothermic and conform to their thermal niche, compromising performance at colder temperatures. However, within the fishes the tunas and lamnid sharks deviate from the ectothermic strategy, maintaining elevated core body temperatures that presumably confer physiological advantages for their roles as fast and continuously swimming pelagic predators. Here we show that the salmon shark, a lamnid inhabiting cold, north Pacific waters, has become so specialized for endothermy that its red, aerobic, locomotor muscles, which power continuous swimming, seem mammal-like, functioning only within a markedly elevated temperature range (20-30 degrees C). These muscles are ineffectual if exposed to the cool water temperatures, and when warmed even 10 degrees C above ambient they still produce only 25-50% of the power produced at 26 degrees C. In contrast, the white muscles, powering burst swimming, do not show such a marked thermal dependence and work well across a wide range of temperatures.

  8. Formation of trihalomethanes as disinfection byproducts in herbal spa pools.

    PubMed

    Fakour, Hoda; Lo, Shang-Lien

    2018-04-09

    Herbal spa treatments are favorite recreational activities throughout the world. The water in spas is often disinfected to control pathogenic microorganisms and guarantee hygiene. However, chlorinated water may cause the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Although there have been many studies on DBP formation in swimming pools, the role of organic matter derived from herbal medicines applied in herbal spa water has been largely neglected. Accordingly, the present study investigated the effect of herbal medicines on the formation of trihalomethanes (THMs) in simulated herbal spa water. Water samples were collected from a spa pool, and then, disinfection and herbal addition experiments were performed in a laboratory. The results showed that the organic molecules introduced by the herbal medicines are significant precursors to the formation of THMs in spa pool water. Since at least 50% of THMs were produced within the first six hours of the reaction time, the presence of herbal medicines in spa water could present a parallel route for THM exposure. Therefore, despite the undeniable benefits of herbal spas, the effect of applied herbs on DBP formation in chlorinated water should be considered to improve the water quality and health benefits of spa facilities.

  9. Energy exchanges of swimming man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadel, E. R.; Holmer, I.; Bergh, U.; Astrand, P.-O.; Stolwijk, J. A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Three male swimmers underwent 10-min resting and 20-min swimming (breaststroke) exposures in a swimming flume. Water temperatures in separate exposures were 18, 26, and 33 C. At each water temperature the subjects rested and swam at water velocities of 0.50, 0.75, and 0.95 m/sec, which were designed to produce around 40, 70, and 100% of maximal aerobic power. Measurements were made of esophageal temperature, four skin temperatures, water temperature, heat flow from five local skin surfaces (Hatfield-Turner disks), and oxygen uptake. Calculations were made of mean area-weighted skin temperature and heat flow, metabolic rate, and heat storage. Internal body temperature changes after 20 min of swimming were related to water temperature, swimming intensity, and body composition.

  10. Statistical evaluation of potential damage to the Al(OH)3 layer on nTiO2 particles in the presence of swimming pool and seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virkutyte, Jurate; Al-Abed, Souhail R.

    2012-03-01

    Nanosized TiO2 particles (nTiO2) are usually coated with an Al(OH)3 layer when used in sunscreen to shield against the harmful effects of free radicals that are generated when these particles are exposed to UV radiation. Therefore, it is vital to insure the structural stability of these particles in the environment where the protective layer may be damaged and adverse health and environmental effects can occur. This study utilized X-ray analysis (SEM-EDS) to provide a qualitative and semi-quantitative assessment of the chemical and physical characteristics of Al(OH)3-coated original and damaged nTiO2 particles (used in sunscreen lotion formulations) in the presence of both swimming pool and seawater. Also, by utilizing statistical tools, a distribution of Al/Ti (%) on the particle surface was determined and evaluated. It was found that 45 min of treatment with swimming pool and seawater significantly induced the redistribution of Al/Ti (%), which changed the surface characteristics of particles and, therefore, may have induced undesired photo-activity and the consequent formation of free radicals.

  11. In the making: SA-PIV applied to swimming practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houwelingen, Josje; van de Water, Willem; Kunnen, Rudie; van Heijst, Gertjan; Clercx, Herman

    2017-11-01

    To understand and optimize the propulsion in human swimming, a deep understanding of the hydrodynamics of swimming is required. This is usually based on experiments and numerical simulations under laboratory conditions.. In this study, we bring basic fluid mechanics knowledge and experimental measurement techniques to analyze the flow towards the swimming practice itself. A flow visualization setup is build and placed in a regular swimming pool. The measurement volume contains five homogeneous air bubble curtains illuminated by ambient light. The bubbles in these curtains act as tracer particles. The bubble motion is captured by six cameras placed in the side wall of the pool. It is intended to apply SA-PIV (synthetic aperture PIV) for analyzing the flow structures on multiple planes in the measurement volume. The system has been calibrated and the calibration data are used to refocus on the planes of interest. Multiple preprocessing steps need to be executed to obtain the proper quality of images before applying PIV. With a specially programmed video card to process and analyze the images in real-time feedback about swimming performance will become possible. We report on the first experimental data obtained by this system.

  12. Swimming in a contained space: Understanding the experience of indoor lap swimmers.

    PubMed

    Ward, Miranda

    2017-07-01

    Drawing on ethnographic work, this paper explores the convergence of bodies, materialities and practices found at the indoor swimming pool - a space that has not often been the subject of geographical study, in spite of the fact that swimming is one of the most popular forms of exercise in countries such as the UK. The paper focuses on the "contained" nature of the indoor pool environment, examining the distinct experience this can create for lap swimmers. This focus is placed in the context of a broader politics of exercise, with an emphasis on the popularity and potential benefits of swimming, as well as less encouraging facts about participation and facility provision, suggesting that in order to encourage further uptake of swimming and preservation of swimming facilities the voices and experiences of regular swimmers should be considered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sex differences on the competitive place task in the water maze: The influence of peripheral pool time on spatial navigation performance in rats.

    PubMed

    Devan, Bryan D; Tobin, Elizabeth L; Dunn, Emily N; Magalis, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated sex differences on the competitive place version of the Morris water maze task to determine whether potential strategy differences would emerge during any phase of the study but in particular on the competitive place phase. Previous findings indicate that this version of the task is highly sensitive to measures that disrupt NMDA-dependent synaptic plasticity within the hippocampus during memory consolidation (McDonald et al., 2005). The present findings revealed significant sex differences during all phases of the study, including Phase I with standard place training to located a hidden platform/goal, Phase II mass training to a new place with the platform/goal relocated to the diagonally opposite quadrant and Phase III, competitive place probe test with the platform removed to measure spatial behaviour directed at either location. The findings showed no sex difference in escape latency and other standard performance measures during the first two phases, initial place acquisition and mass training to a new location. A very subtle male advantage in visiting both Old and New place locations during the third phase place competition test was observed, however, in the time spent swimming in the periphery of the pool, the pool wall (Zone C - outer third radial distance) was increased for females during all phases of the study, suggesting a general effect may have influenced place location search behaviour of the females. Increased peripheral pool time may represent a female preference for approaching the wall, a local cue. Alternatively, the possibility that increased peripheral swimming/thigmotaxis may represent hormonal influences interacting with strategic preferences were discussed, though no definitive conclusions about sex differences in cognitive-spatial performance or memory consolidation were inferred from the present findings. The findings suggest that mixed results reported in the literature by others may be due in part to an

  14. Peatland Open-water Pool Biogeochemistry: The Influence of Hydrology and Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, J.; Talbot, J.; Moore, T. R.

    2017-12-01

    Peatland open-water pools are net sources of carbon to the atmosphere. However, their interaction with the surrounding peat remains poorly known. In a previous study, we showed that shallow pools are richer in nutrients than deep pools. While depth was the main driver of biogeochemistry variations across time and space, analyses also showed that pool's adjacent vegetation may have an influence on water chemistry. Our goal is to understand the relationship between the biogeochemistry of open-water pools and their surroundings in a subboreal ombrotrophic peatland of southern Quebec (Canada). To assess the influence of vegetation on pool water chemistry, we compare two areas covered with different types of vegetation: a forested zone dominated by spruce trees and an open area mostly covered by Sphagnum spp. To evaluate the direction of water (in or out of the pools), we installed capacitance water level probes in transects linking pools in the two zones. Wells were also installed next to each probe to collect peat pore water samples. Samples were taken every month during summer 2017 and analyzed for dissolved organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, pH and specific UV absorbance. Preliminary results show differences in peat water chemistry depending on the dominant vegetation. In both zones, water levels fluctuations are disconnected between peat and the pools, suggesting poor horizontal water movement. Pool water chemistry may be mostly influenced by the immediate surrounding vegetation than by the local vegetation pattern. Climate and land-use change may affect the vegetation structure of peatlands, thus affecting pool biogeochemistry. Considering the impact of pools on the overall peatland capacity to accumulate carbon, our results show that more focus must be placed on pools to better understand peatland stability over time.

  15. Genotoxicity of Swimming Pool Water and Carcinogenicity of Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Among the 11 disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water that are regulated by the U.S. EPA, (a) 2 DBPs (chloroaceticacid and chlorite) are not carcinogenic-in either of2 species; (b) chlorite is not carcinogenic in 3 rodent assays and has never been tested for genotoxicity...

  16. Genotoxicity of Swimming Pool Water and Carcinogenicity of Drinking Water**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Among the 11 disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water that are regulated by the U.S. EPA, (a) 2 DBPs (chloroaceticacid and chlorite) are not carcinogenic-in either of2 species; (b) chlorite is not carcinogenic in 3 rodent assays and has never been tested for genotoxicity...

  17. Microcrustacea in flowing water - experimental-analysis of washout times and a field-test

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richardson, W.B.

    1992-01-01

    1. Flow-chamber experiments were conducted to evaluate the ability of microcrustacea to maintain position in moving water. These results were compared to distributions of zooplankton and water velocity in a stream pool to determine the relationship of animal density to water movement and swimming ability.^2. Cladocerans exhibited negative rheotaxis (directed behaviour against a current) but poor ability to maintain position at velocities >2.5 Cm s-1. Daphnia and scapholeberis were better at avoiding washout than moina and diaphanosoma. At velocities 2.5 Cm s-1, scapholeberis >3.2 Cm s-1 and eucyclops >7.75 Cm s-1. Washout time of daphnia and scapholeberis was positively related to body size and negatively to water velocity and possession of eggs. Washout was inversely related to water velocity for eucyclops.^4. Highest densities of microcrustacea in a stream pool were found in non-flowing or downstream zones of the pool. Benthic (hydracarina, harpacticoid copepods, ostracods) and fast-swimming (cyclopoids) forms were most common in flowing zones. Facultatively benthic cladocera were abundant in regions of no flow. Rotifers and immature copepods were most abundant at the downstream end of the pool.^5. Behavioural mechanisms for remaining in stream pools at times of high flow appear to include: (i) flow avoidance (simocephalus, chydorus, scapholeberis and cyclopoids), (ii) use of benthic habitat (ostracods, harpacticoids, hydracarina), (iii) strong swimming ability (cyclopoids).

  18. Novel indicators of recreational water quality and swimming-associated illness

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the United States and elsewhere, recreational water quality is monitored for fecal indicator bacteria to help prevent swimming-associated illnesses. Standard methods to measure these bacteria take at least 24 hours to obtain results. Molecular approaches such as quantitative p...

  19. Favourable impact of regular swimming in young people with haemophilia: experience derived from 'Desafio del Caribe' project.

    PubMed

    Boadas, A; Osorio, M; Gibraltar, A; Rosas, M M; Berges, A; Herrera, E; Gadea, S; Gutiérrez, M Á; Salazar, F; Ruiz-Sáez, A

    2015-01-01

    Swimming is beneficial for persons with haemophilia (PWH) providing good maintenance of the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal system and improving many psychological characteristics. In the Desafío del Caribe Project, young PWH from Venezuela and Mexico took part in an open water competition in the Gulf of Mexico under a multidisciplinary team supervision. Eight severe haemophilia A, two moderate haemophilia A, one severe haemophilia B and two moderate haemophilia B subjects were included. Haematological, musculoskeletal and psychological evaluations were carried out before and during training for the competition. Training program included physical exercise routines and swimming practices that alternated between pools and open water. Swimmers had coverage with factor concentrates before pool and open water trainings. In physiatric evaluations, the Hemophilia Joint Health Score (HJHS) was used. The objective of the psychology area was to analyse self-esteem, precompetition anxiety, coping mechanisms and relaxation levels. The need of factor prophylaxis before intense trainings was confirmed. In the musculoskeletal system a decrease of elbow pain as well as an increase of muscle strength in the ankles were observed. In the psychological area significant differences between the first and second test in self-esteem levels, cognitive anxiety and group cohesion were found. PWH must be provided with orientation and encouragement to practice swimming regularly. High competition exercise must be supervised by a multidisciplinary team which must evaluate the pros and cons of the activity to make relevant recommendations. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Use of In Vitro Assays to Assess the Contribution of Environmental Contaminants on Water Mutagenicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although the formation and associated health effects of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water have been studied for nearly 40 years, similar research on swimming pool and hot tub (spa) water has begun only recently. Unique to pool and spa waters is the role of human ...

  1. Microbiological Analysis in Three Diverse Natural Geothermal Bathing Pools in Iceland

    PubMed Central

    Thorolfsdottir, Berglind Osk Th.; Marteinsson, Viggo Thor

    2013-01-01

    Natural thermal bathing pools contain geothermal water that is very popular to bathe in but the water is not sterilized, irradiated or treated in any way. Increasing tourism in Iceland will lead to increasing numbers of bath guests, which can in turn affect the microbial flora in the pools and therefore user safety. Today, there is no legislation that applies to natural geothermal pools in Iceland, as the water is not used for consumption and the pools are not defined as public swimming pools. In this study, we conducted a microbiological analysis on three popular but different natural pools in Iceland, located at Lýsuhóll, Hveravellir and Landmannalaugar. Total bacterial counts were performed by flow cytometry, and with plate count at 22 °C, 37 °C and 50 °C. The presence of viable coliforms, Enterococcus spp. and pseudomonads were investigated by growth experiments on selective media. All samples were screened for noroviruses by real time PCR. The results indicate higher fecal contamination in the geothermal pools where the geothermal water flow was low and bathing guest count was high during the day. The number of cultivated Pseudomonas spp. was high (13,000–40,000 cfu/100 mL) in the natural pools, and several strains were isolated and classified as opportunistic pathogens. Norovirus was not detected in the three pools. DNA was extracted from one-liter samples in each pool and analyzed by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Microbial diversity analysis revealed different microbial communities between the pools and they were primarily composed of alpha-, beta- and gammaproteobacteria. PMID:23493033

  2. The interaction between water currents and salmon swimming behaviour in sea cages.

    PubMed

    Johansson, David; Laursen, Frida; Fernö, Anders; Fosseidengen, Jan Erik; Klebert, Pascal; Stien, Lars Helge; Vågseth, Tone; Oppedal, Frode

    2014-01-01

    Positioning of sea cages at sites with high water current velocities expose the fish to a largely unknown environmental challenge. In this study we observed the swimming behaviour of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) at a commercial farm with tidal currents altering between low, moderate and high velocities. At high current velocities the salmon switched from the traditional circular polarized group structure, seen at low and moderate current velocities, to a group structure where all fish kept stations at fixed positions swimming against the current. This type of group behaviour has not been described in sea cages previously. The structural changes could be explained by a preferred swimming speed of salmon spatially restricted in a cage in combination with a behavioural plasticity of the fish.

  3. Plasma renin activity, aldosterone and catecholamine levels when swimming and running.

    PubMed

    Guezennec, C Y; Defer, G; Cazorla, G; Sabathier, C; Lhoste, F

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the response of plasma renin activity (PRA), plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) and catecholamines to two graded exercises differing by posture. Seven male subjects (19-25 years) performed successively a running rest on a treadmill and a swimming test in a 50-m swimming pool. Each exercise was increased in severity in 5-min steps with intervals of 1 min. Oxygen consumption, heart rate and blood lactate, measured every 5 min, showed a similar progression in energy expenditure until exhaustion, but there was a shorter time to exhaustion in the last step of the running test. PRA, PAC and catecholamines were increased after both types of exercise. The PRA increase was higher after the running test (20.9 ng AngI X ml-1 X h-1) than after swimming (8.66 ng AngI X ml-1 X h-1). The PAC increase was slightly greater after running (123 pg X ml-1) than swimming (102 pg X ml-1), buth the difference was not significant. Plasma catecholamine was higher after the swimming test. These results suggest that the volume shift induced by the supine position and water pressure during swimming decreased the PRA response. The association after swimming compared to running of a decreased PRA and an enhanced catecholamine response rule out a strict dependence of renin release under the effect of plasma catecholamines and is evidence of the major role of neural pathways for renin secretion during physical exercise.

  4. Swimming in an Unsteady World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehl, M. A. R.

    2016-02-01

    When animals swim in marine habitats, the water through which they move is usually flowing. Therefore, an important part of understanding the physics of how animals swim in nature is determining how they interact with the fluctuating turbulent water currents in their environment. The research systems we have been using to address this question are microscopic marine animals swimming in turbulent, wavy water flow over spatially-complex communities of organisms growing on surfaces. Field measurements of water motion were used to design realistic turbulent flow in a laboratory wave-flume over different substrata, particle-image velocimetry was used to measure fine-scale, rapidly-varying water velocity vector fields, and planar laser-induced fluorescence was used to measure concentrations of chemical cues from the substratum. We used individual-based models of small animals swimming in this unsteady flow to determine how their trajectories and contacts with substrata were affected by their locomotion through the water, rotation by local shear, response to odors, and transport by ambient flow. We found that the shears, accelerations, and odor concentrations encountered by small swimmers fluctuate rapidly, with peaks much higher than mean values lasting fractions of a second. We identified ways in which the behavior of small, weak swimmers can bias how they are transported by ambient flow (e.g. sinking during brief encounters with shear or odor enhances settlement onto substrata below, whereas constant swimming enhances contact with surfaces above or beside larvae). Although microscopic organisms swim slowly relative to ambient water flow, their locomotory behavior in response to the rapidly-fluctuating shears and odors they encounter can affect where they are transported by ambient water movement.

  5. Sink or Swim: Navigating the Perilous Waters of Promotion and Tenure--What's Diversity Got to Do with It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Wanda B.

    2010-01-01

    The "sink-or-swim" ideology is pervasive in the United States society. At research universities, for example, promotion and tenure are institutional waters in which faculty are forced to sink or swim with respect to publishing. Either they publish ("swim") or they perish ("sink"). In throwing faculty overboard,…

  6. Constant supervision of bathing in French public swimming pools: an unrealistic regulatory requirement?

    PubMed

    Vignac, Élie; Lebihain, Pascal; Soulé, Bastien

    2017-09-01

    In France, to prevent drowning accidents in public swimming pools (PSPs), bathing must be constantly supervised by qualified staff. However, fatal drowning regularly occurs in supervised aquatic facilities. A review of the literature shows that human supervision is a complex task. The aim of this research is to fully assess the periods during which supervision is not carried out, or carried out in an inadequate manner. The observations made in 108 French PSPs show that supervision is not carried out 18% of the time and that it is carried out inadequately 33% of the time. The medical literature shows that, in order to expect to survive without after-effects, an immersed victim requires intervention within a time limit of not more than three minutes; however, we noted, over a total observation time of 54 hours, 147 periods (29.8%) during which the supervision system was degraded for three minutes or more. This quantification research on the periods of degraded supervision is complemented by an identification of the causes leading to these degradations, from which we can draw interesting areas for improvement, particularly from an organizational point of view, in order to improve safety management in French PSPs.

  7. Evidencing the association between swimming capacities and performance indicators in water polo: a multiple regression study.

    PubMed

    Kontic, Dean; Zenic, Natasa; Uljevic, Ognjen; Sekulic, Damir; Lesnik, Blaz

    2017-06-01

    Swimming capacities are hypothesized to be important determinants of water polo performance but there is an evident lack of studies examining different swimming capacities in relation to specific offensive and defensive performance variables in this sport. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between five swimming capacities and six performance determinants in water polo. The sample comprised 79 high-level youth water polo players (all males, 17-18 years of age). The variables included six performance-related variables (agility in offence and defense, efficacy in offence and defense, polyvalence in offence and defense), and five swimming-capacity tests (water polo sprint test [15 m], swimming sprint test [25 m], short-distance [100 m], aerobic endurance [400 m] and an anaerobic lactate endurance test [4× 50 m]). First, multiple regressions were calculated for one-half of the sample of subjects which were then validated with the remaining half of the sample. The 25-m swim was not included in the regression analyses due to the multicollinearity with other predictors. The originally calculated regression models were validated for defensive agility (R=0.67 and R=0.55 for the original regression calculation and validation subsample, respectively) offensive agility (R=0.59 and R=0.61), and offensive efficacy (R=0.64 and R=0.58). Anaerobic lactate endurance is a significant predictor of offensive and defensive agility, while 15 m sprint significantly contributes to offensive efficacy. Swimming capacities are not found to be related to the polyvalence of the players. The most superior offensive performance can be expected from those players with a high level of anaerobic lactate endurance and advanced sprinting capacity, while anaerobic lactate endurance is recognized as most important quality in defensive duties. Future studies should observe players' polyvalence in relation to (theoretical) knowledge of technical and tactical tasks. Results reinforce

  8. The spatial variability of water chemistry and DOC in bog pools: the importance of slope position, diurnal turnover and pool type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Joseph; Turner, Ed; Baird, Andy; Beadle, Jeannie; Billett, Mike; Brown, Lee; Chapman, Pippa; Dinsmore, Kerry; Dooling, Gemma; Grayson, Richard; Moody, Catherine; Gee, Clare

    2017-04-01

    We have previously shown that marine influence is an important factor controlling regional variability of pool water chemistry in blanket peatlands. Here we examine within-site controls on pool water chemistry. We surveyed natural and artificial (restoration sites) bog pools at blanket peatland sites in northern Scotland and Sweden. DOC, pH, conductivity, dissolved oxygen, temperature, cations, anions and absorbance spectra from 220-750nm were sampled. We sampled changes over time but also conducted intensive spatial surveys within individual pools and between pools on the same sampling days at individual study sites. Artificial pools had significantly greater DOC concentrations and different spectral absorbance characteristics when compared to natural pools at all sites studied. Within-pool variability in water chemistry tended to be small, even for very large pools ( 400 m2), except where pools had a layer of loose, mobile detritus on their beds. In these instances rapid changes took place between the overlying water column and the mobile sediment layer wherein dissolved oxygen concentrations dropped from values of around 12-10 mg/L to values less than 0.5 mg/L over just 2-3 cm of the depth profile. Such strong contrasts were not observed for pools which had a hard peat floor and which lacked a significant detritus layer. Strong diurnal turnover occurred within the pools on summer days, including within small, shallow pools (e.g. < 30 cm deep, 1 m2 area). For many pools on these summer days there was an evening spike in dissolved oxygen concentrations which originated at the surface and was then cycled downwards as the pool surface waters cooled. Slope location was a significant control on several pool water chemistry variables including pH and DOC concentration with accumulation (higher concentrations) in pools that were located further downslope in both natural and artificial pool systems. These processes have important implications for our interpretation of

  9. Solar energy system demonstration project at Wilmington Swim School, New Castle, Delaware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-07-01

    A solar energy system located at the Wilmington Swim School, New Castle, Delaware is described. The system was designed for a 40 percent heating and a 30 percent hot water solar contribution serving the heat loads in the following order: space heat - new addition, domestic water - entire facility, and pool heating - entire facility. On a cost basis for 2920 hours of operation, the heat reclaimed would cost $969.66 annually if provided by gas at 3.79 per million Btu's. At 5.5 centers per kwh, heat recovery costs of $481.80 percent a net savings of $487.86 annually.

  10. Solar energy system demonstration project at Wilmington Swim School, New Castle, Delaware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A solar energy system located at the Wilmington Swim School, New Castle, Delaware is described. The system was designed for a 40 percent heating and a 30 percent hot water solar contribution serving the heat loads in the following order: space heat - new addition, domestic water - entire facility, and pool heating - entire facility. On a cost basis for 2920 hours of operation, the heat reclaimed would cost $969.66 annually if provided by gas at 3.79 per million Btu's. At 5.5 centers per kwh, heat recovery costs of $481.80 percent a net savings of $487.86 annually.

  11. Improving Pool Fencing Legislation in Queensland, Australia: Attitudes and Impact on Child Drowning Fatalities

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Four-sided, non-climbable pool fencing is an effective strategy for preventing children from drowning in home swimming pools. In 2009, the Queensland Government introduced legislation to improve the effectiveness of pool fencing. This study explores community attitudes towards the effectiveness of these legislative changes and examines child (<5 years) drowning deaths in pools. Data from the 2011 Queensland Computer-Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI) Social Survey include results from questions related to pool ownership and pool fencing legislation. Fatal child drowning cases between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2015 were sourced from coronial data. Of the 1263 respondents, 26/100 households had a pool. A total of 58% believed tightening legislation would be effective in reducing child drowning deaths. Pool owners were more likely to doubt the effectiveness of legislation (p < 0.001) when compared to non-pool owners. Perceptions of effectiveness did not differ by presence of children under the age of five. There were 46 children who drowned in Queensland home pools (7.8/100,000 pools with children residing in the residence/annum) between 2005 and 2015. While pool owners were less likely to think that tightening the legislation would be effective, the number of children drowning in home swimming pools declined over the study period. Drowning prevention agencies have more work to do to ensure that the most vulnerable (young children in houses with swimming pools) are protected. PMID:29186787

  12. Gastrodia elata Bl. Attenuated learning deficits induced by forced-swimming stress in the inhibitory avoidance task and Morris water maze.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Ju; Liang, Keng-Chen; Lin, Hui-Chen; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Su, Kuan-Pin; Hung, Mei-Chu; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2011-06-01

    This study adopted the forced-swimming paradigm to induce depressive symptoms in rats and evaluated the effects on learning and memory processing. Furthermore, the effects of the water extract of Gastrodia elata Bl., a well-known Chinese traditional medicine, on amnesia in rats subjected to the forced-swimming procedure were studied. Rats were subjected to the forced-swimming procedure, and the inhibitory avoidance task and Morris water maze were used to assess learning and memory performance. The acquisition of the two tasks was mostly impaired after the 15-minute forced-swimming procedure. Administration of the water extract of G. elata Bl. for 21 consecutive days at a dosage of 0.5 or 1.0 g/kg of body weight significantly improved retention in the inhibitory avoidance test, and the lower dose showed a better effect than the higher one and the antidepressant fluoxetine (18 mg/kg of body weight). In the Morris water maze, the lower dose of the water extract of G. elata Bl. significantly improved retention by shortening escape latency in the first test session and increasing the time in searching the target zone during the probe test. These findings suggest that water extracts of G. elata Bl. ameliorate the learning and memory deficits induced by forced swimming.

  13. Impact of water temperature and stressor controllability on swim stress-induced changes in body temperature, serum corticosterone, and immobility in rats.

    PubMed

    Drugan, Robert C; Eren, Senem; Hazi, Agnes; Silva, Jennifer; Christianson, John P; Kent, Stephen

    2005-10-01

    The present study compared the effects of three different water temperatures (20, 25, and 30 degrees C) and stressor controllability on several physiological and behavioral endpoints in an intermittent swim stress paradigm. The escape latency of rats in the 20 and 25 degrees C water was less than that observed for the 30 degrees C group. Both escape and yoked groups at 20 and 25 degrees C exhibited moderate to severe hypothermia following the swim stress session that returned to prestress levels 30-40 min post-stress. At 30 degrees C core body temperature (Tb) only decreased by 1 degree C for either swim group. Following swim, serum corticosterone (CORT) levels were significantly elevated in both escape and yoked groups in comparison to confined and home cage controls. The confined control group showed a significant elevation that was approximately halfway between the home cage control and the swim stress groups. At 30 degrees C, there was still a significant elevation of serum CORT in both swim groups in comparison to confined and home cage controls. Therefore, 30 degrees C appears to be the optimal water temperature to evaluate stress controllability effects in the current paradigm. In a final experiment, swim stressor controllability effects were examined in a 5 min forced swim test (FST) 24 h following the initial stress exposure. Rats exposed to yoked-inescapable swim stress at 30 degrees C exhibited more immobility than their escapable swim stress and confined counterparts, while the escape and confined controls did not differ. These results demonstrate that the behavioral deficits observed in the FST are attributable to the stress of inescapable swim and not swim stress per se.

  14. Wet--But Safe. A Classroom Course in Water Safety and Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Natural Resources, Lansing.

    This manual is designed for use in elementary school systems that do not have a swimming pool available. It contains eight classroom sessions and provides a core of information in basic water safety, water survival, and water rescue. (JD)

  15. A merganser swims in the waters of KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A female red-breasted merganser swims low in the water at the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Usually found from Alaska and Canada south to Nebraska, Oregon and Tennessee, hooded mergansers winter south to Mexico and the Gulf Coast, including KSC. The open water of the refuge provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles.

  16. A merganser swims in the waters of KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A young female red-breasted merganser swims in the quicksilver water of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Usually found from Alaska and Canada south to Nebraska, Oregon and Tennessee, hooded mergansers winter south to Mexico and the Gulf Coast, including KSC. The open water of the refuge provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000- acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles.

  17. Overcoming the challenges of conventional dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction: analysis of THMs in chlorinated swimming pools.

    PubMed

    Faraji, Hakim; Helalizadeh, Masoumeh; Kordi, Mohammad Reza

    2018-01-01

    A rapid, simple, and sensitive approach to the analysis of trihalomethanes (THMs) in swimming pool water samples has been developed. The main goal of this study was to overcome or to improve the shortcomings of conventional dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and to maximize the realization of green analytical chemistry principles. The method involves a simple vortex-assisted microextraction step, in the absence of the dispersive solvent, followed by salting-out effect for the elimination of the centrifugation step. A bell-shaped device and a solidifiable solvent were used to simplify the extraction solvent collection after phase separation. Optimization of the independent variables was performed by using chemometric methods in three steps. The method was statistically validated based on authentic guidance documents. The completion time for extraction was less than 8 min, and the limits of detection were in the range between 4 and 72 ng L -1 . Using this method, good linearity and precision were achieved. The results of THMs determination in different real samples showed that in some cases the concentration of total THMs was more than threshold values of THMs determined by accredited healthcare organizations. This method indicated satisfactory analytical figures of merit. Graphical Abstract A novel green microextraction technique for overcoming the challenges of conventional DLLME. The proposed procedure complies with the principles of green/sustainable analytical chemistry, comprising decreasing the sample size, making easy automation of the process, reducing organic waste, diminishing energy consumption, replacing toxic reagents with safer reagents, and enhancing operator safety.

  18. Swimming in an Unsteady World.

    PubMed

    Koehl, M A R; Cooper, T

    2015-10-01

    When animals swim in aquatic habitats, the water through which they move is usually flowing. Therefore, an important part of understanding the physics of how animals swim in nature is determining how they interact with the fluctuating turbulent water currents in their environment. We addressed this issue using microscopic larvae of invertebrates in "fouling communities" growing on docks and ships to ask how swimming affects the transport of larvae between moving water and surfaces from which they disperse and onto which they recruit. Field measurements of the motion of water over fouling communities were used to design realistic turbulent wavy flow in a laboratory wave-flume over early-stage fouling communities. Fine-scale measurements of rapidly-varying water-velocity fields were made using particle-image velocimetry, and of dye-concentration fields (analog for chemical cues from the substratum) were made using planar laser-induced fluorescence. We used individual-based models of larvae that were swimming, passively sinking, passively rising, or were passive and neutrally buoyant to determine how their trajectories were affected by their motion through the water, rotation by local shear, and transport by ambient flow. Swimmers moved up and down in the turbulent flow more than did neutrally buoyant larvae. Although more of the passive sinkers landed on substrata below them, and more passive risers on surfaces above, swimming was the best strategy for landing on surfaces if their location was not predictable (as is true for fouling communities). When larvae moved within 5 mm of surfaces below them, passive sinkers and neutrally-buoyant larvae landed on the substratum, whereas many of the swimmers were carried away, suggesting that settling larvae should stop swimming as they near a surface. Swimming and passively-rising larvae were best at escaping from a surface below them, as precompetent larvae must do to disperse away. Velocities, vorticities, and odor

  19. Interacting effects of water temperature and swimming activity on body composition and mortality of fasted juvenile rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpkins, D.G.; Hubert, W.A.; Martinez Del Rio, C.; Rule, D.C.

    2003-01-01

    Abstract: We assessed changes in proximate body composition, wet mass, and the occurrence of mortality among sedentary and actively swimming (15 cm/s) juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) (120-142 mm total length) that were held at 4.0, 7.5, or 15.0 ??C and fasted for 140 days. Warmer water temperatures and swimming activity accentuated declines in lipid mass, but they did not similarly affect lean mass and wet mass. Swimming fish conserved lean mass independent of water temperature. Because lean mass exceeded lipid mass, wet mass was not affected substantially by decreases in lipid mass. Consequently, wet mass did not accurately reflect the effects that water temperature and swimming activity had on mortality of fasted rainbow trout. Rather, lipid mass was more accurate in predicting death from starvation. Juvenile rainbow trout survived long periods without food, and fish that died of starvation appeared to have similar body composition. It appears that the ability of fish to endure periods without food depends on the degree to which lipid mass and lean mass can be utilized as energy sources.

  20. The hydrodynamics of swimming at intermediate Reynolds numbers in the water boatman (Corixidae).

    PubMed

    Ngo, Victoria; McHenry, Matthew James

    2014-08-01

    The fluid forces that govern propulsion determine the speed and energetic cost of swimming. These hydrodynamics are scale dependent and it is unclear what forces matter to the tremendous diversity of aquatic animals that are between a millimeter and a centimeter in length. Animals at this scale generally operate within the regime of intermediate Reynolds numbers, where both viscous and inertial fluid forces have the potential to play a role in propulsion. The present study aimed to resolve which forces create thrust and drag in the paddling of the water boatman (Corixidae), an animal that spans much of the intermediate regime (10water boatmen, we found that thrust is generated primarily by drag on the paddling appendages, with a negligible contribution from the acceleration reaction force. Based on these findings, we developed a forward-dynamic model of propulsion in free swimming that accurately predicted changes in the body's center of mass over time. For both tethered and free swimming, we used non-linear optimization algorithms to determine the force coefficients that best matched our measurements. With this approach, the drag coefficients on the body and paddle were found to be up to three times greater than on static structures in fully developed flow at the same Reynolds numbers. This is likely a partial consequence of unsteady interactions between the paddles or between the paddles and the body. In addition, the maximum values for these coefficients were inversely related to the Reynolds number, which suggests that viscous forces additionally play an important role in the hydrodynamics of small water boatmen. This understanding for the major forces that operate at intermediate Reynolds numbers offers a basis for interpreting the mechanics, energetics and functional morphology of swimming in many small aquatic animals. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Hooded mergansers swim in the waters of KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A male and two female hooded mergansers swim in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at Kennedy Space Center. The male displays its distinctive fan-shaped, black-bordered crest. Usually found from Alaska and Canada south to Nebraska, Oregon and Tennessee, hooded mergansers winter south to Mexico and the Gulf Coast, including KSC. The open water of the refuge provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles.

  2. Swimming performance in juvenile shortnose sturgeon (Acipenser brevirostrum): the influence of time interval and velocity increments on critical swimming tests

    PubMed Central

    Kieffer, James D.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The most utilized method to measure swimming performance of fishes has been the critical swimming speed (UCrit) test. In this test, the fish is forced to swim against an incrementally increasing flow of water until fatigue. Before the water velocity is increased, the fish swims at the water velocity for a specific, pre-arranged time interval. The magnitude of the velocity increments and the time interval for each swimming period can vary across studies making the comparison between and within species difficult. This issue has been acknowledged in the literature, however, little empirical evidence exists that tests the importance of velocity and time increments on swimming performance in fish. A practical application for fish performance is through the design of fishways that enable fish to bypass anthropogenic structures (e.g. dams) that block migration routes, which is one of the causes of world-wide decline in sturgeon populations. While fishways will improve sturgeon conservation, they need to be specifically designed to accommodate the swimming capabilities specific for sturgeons, and it is possible that current swimming methodologies have under-estimated the swimming performance of sturgeons. The present study assessed the UCrit of shortnose sturgeon using modified UCrit to determine the importance of velocity increment (5 and 10 cm s−1) and time (5, 15 and 30 min) intervals on swimming performance. UCrit was found to be influenced by both time interval and water velocity. UCrit was generally lower in sturgeon when they were swum using 5cm s−1 compared with 10 cm s−1 increments. Velocity increment influences the UCrit more than time interval. Overall, researchers must consider the impacts of using particular swimming criteria when designing their experiments. PMID:28835841

  3. Tactical swimming activity and heart rate aspects of youth water polo game.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Corrado; Capranica, Laura; Cugliari, Giovanni; Gomez, Miguel A; Tessitore, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Although physical demands could differently occur during particular phases of the youth water polo game, at present, literature lacks of time-motion and heart rate data referred to specific tactical situation. Therefore, the present study aimed to analyze a youth water polo game, specifying heart rate, and swimming activity aspects in relation to game situations. Twenty-six youth male players (15.6±0.5 years old) voluntary played a friendly game, which was tactically analyzed (offensive and defensive Even and Counterattack situation, and Power-play, Inferiority and Game Breaks) using notational analysis procedures. Successively, the heart rate (aerobic, anaerobic) and time motion (horizontal, vertical, and duel swimming patterns, with and without ball possession, backstroke) analyses were applied only to six (3 for team) players because they performed at list half of the total game duration. The tactical scenarios were mainly characterized by offensive (33%) and defensive (33%) even possessions, and game breaks (23%). No effect emerged between situations in terms of heart rate distribution, because it principally resulted as aerobic (range: 58-97%). The swimming activity analysis mainly showed differences (P≤0.05) between offensive counterattack and power-play in terms of distance (1 min of game, single pattern), time duration (1 min of game), and speed (single pattern) related to the horizontal activity. Repeated high intensity activities were performed 3.0±2.8 (range: 1-7) during the game. The findings of the present study provide important information for the planning of youth water polo training, with specific reference to playing situations.

  4. 76 FR 38586 - Safety Zone; Swim Around Charleston, Charleston, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... the Swim Around Charleston, a swimming race occurring on waters of the Wando River, the Cooper River... officially associated with the swim on the waters of the Wando River, the Cooper River, Charleston Harbor...-AA00 Safety Zone; Swim Around Charleston, Charleston, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of...

  5. Effect of medium-pressure UV-lamp treatment on disinfection by-products in chlorinated seawater swimming pool waters.

    PubMed

    Cheema, Waqas A; Manasfi, Tarek; Kaarsholm, Kamilla M S; Andersen, Henrik R; Boudenne, Jean-Luc

    2017-12-01

    Several brominated disinfection by-products (DBPs) are formed in chlorinated seawater pools, due to the high concentration of bromide in seawater. UV irradiation is increasingly employed in freshwater pools, because UV treatment photodegrades harmful chloramines. However, in freshwater pools it has been reported that post-UV chlorination promotes the formation of other DBPs. To date, UV-based processes have not been investigated for DBPs in seawater pools. In this study, the effects of UV, followed by chlorination, on the concentration of three groups of DBPs were investigated in laboratory batch experiments using a medium-pressure UV lamp. Chlorine consumption increased following post-UV chlorination, most likely because UV irradiation degraded organic matter in the pool samples to more chlorine-reactive organic matter. Haloacetic acid (HAA) concentrations decreased significantly, due to photo-degradation, but the concentrations of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetonitriles (HANs) increased with post-UV chlorination. Bromine incorporation in HAAs was significantly higher in the control samples chlorinated without UV irradiation but decreased significantly with UV treatment. Bromine incorporation was promoted in THM and HAN after UV and chlorine treatment. Overall, the accumulated bromine incorporation level in DBPs remained essentially unchanged in comparison with the control samples. Toxicity estimates increased with single-dose UV and chlorination, mainly due to increased HAN concentrations. However, brominated HANs are known in the literature to degrade following further UV treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Creatine supplementation and swim performance: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Hopwood, Melissa J; Graham, Kenneth; Rooney, Kieron B

    2006-03-01

    Nutritional supplements are popular among athletes participating in a wide variety of sports. Creatine is one of the most commonly used dietary supplements, as it has been shown to be beneficial in improving performance during repeated bouts of high-intensity anaerobic activity. This review examines the specific effects of creatine supplementation on swimming performance, and considers the effects of creatine supplementation on various measures of power development in this population. Research performed on the effect of creatine supplementation on swimming performance indicates that whilst creatine supplementation is ineffective in improving performance during a single sprint swim, dietary creatine supplementation may benefit repeated interval swim set performance. Considering the relationship between sprint swimming performance and measurements of power, the effect of creatine supplementation on power development in swimmers has also been examined. When measured on a swim bench ergometer, power development does show some improvement following a creatine supplementation regime. How this improvement in power output transfers to performance in the pool is uncertain. Although some evidence exists to suggest a gender effect on the performance improvements seen in swimmers following creatine supplementation, the majority of research indicates that male and female swimmers respond equally to supplementation. A major limitation to previous research is the lack of consideration given to the possible stroke dependant effect of creatine supplementation on swimming performance. The majority of the research conducted to date has involved examination of the freestyle swimming stroke only. The potential for performance improvements in the breaststroke and butterfly swimming strokes is discussed, with regards to the biomechanical differences and differences in efficiency between these strokes and freestyle. Key PointsCreatine supplementation does not improve single sprint

  7. Modeling evaporation from spent nuclear fuel storage pools: A diffusion approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugo, Bruce Robert

    Accurate prediction of evaporative losses from light water reactor nuclear power plant (NPP) spent fuel storage pools (SFPs) is important for activities ranging from sizing of water makeup systems during NPP design to predicting the time available to supply emergency makeup water following severe accidents. Existing correlations for predicting evaporation from water surfaces are only optimized for conditions typical of swimming pools. This new approach modeling evaporation as a diffusion process has yielded an evaporation rate model that provided a better fit of published high temperature evaporation data and measurements from two SFPs than other published evaporation correlations. Insights from treating evaporation as a diffusion process include correcting for the effects of air flow and solutes on evaporation rate. An accurate modeling of the effects of air flow on evaporation rate is required to explain the observed temperature data from the Fukushima Daiichi Unit 4 SFP during the 2011 loss of cooling event; the diffusion model of evaporation provides a significantly better fit to this data than existing evaporation models.

  8. High-Speed Hopping: Time-Resolved Tomographic PIV Measurements of Water Flea Swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, D. W.; Webster, D. R.; Yen, J.

    2012-11-01

    Daphniids, also known as water fleas, are small, freshwater crustaceans that live in a low-to-intermediate Reynolds number regime. These plankters are equipped with a pair of branched, setae-bearing antennae that they beat to impulsively propel themselves, or ``hop,'' through the water. A typical hop carries the daphniid one body length forward and is followed by a period of sinking. We present time-resolved tomographic PIV measurements of swimming by Daphnia magna. The body kinematics and flow physics of the daphniid hop are quantified. It is shown that the flow generated by each stroking antenna resembles an asymmetric viscous vortex ring. It is proposed that the flow produced by the daphniid hop can be modeled as a double Stokeslet consisting of two impulsively applied point forces separated by the animal width. The flow physics are discussed in the context of other species operating in the same Reynolds number range of 10 to 100: sea butterfly swimming and flight by the smallest flying insects.

  9. Increase in swimming endurance capacity of mice by capsaicin-induced adrenal catecholamine secretion.

    PubMed

    Kim, K M; Kawada, T; Ishihara, K; Inoue, K; Fushiki, T

    1997-10-01

    Increase in endurance swimming capacity caused by capsaicin (CAP), a pungent component of red pepper, -induced increase of fat metabolism in mice was investigated using an adjustable-current water pool. The mice administered CAP via a stomach tube, showed longer swimming time until exhaustion than the control group of mice, in a dose-dependent manner. The maximal effect was observed at a dose of 10 mg/kg while more than 15 mg/kg had no effect. The increase of endurance was observed only when CAP was administered two hours before swimming. After the administration of CAP, the serum glucose concentration rapidly increased and then decreased within 60 min, while the concentration of serum-free fatty acids gradually increased through 3 hours. The residual glycogen concentration of the gastrocnemius muscle after 30 min of swimming was significantly higher in the CAP-administered mice than in control mice, suggesting that use of the serum free fatty acids spared muscle glycogen consumption. The serum adrenaline concentration significantly increased with twin peaks at 30 min and two hours after administration of CAP. An experiment using adrenalectomized mice was done to confirm that the effect of CAP is due to increased energy metabolism through the secretion of adrenaline from the adrenal gland. The swimming endurance capacity of the adrenalectomized mice was not increased by CAP administration, although adrenaline injection induced a 58% increase in the endurance time. These results suggest that the increase of swimming endurance induced by CAP in mice is caused by an increase in fatty acid utilization due to CAP-induced adrenal catecholamine secretion.

  10. Oxygen consumption during exercise in a heated pool.

    PubMed

    Kirby, R L; Sacamano, J T; Balch, D E; Kriellaars, D J

    1984-01-01

    The heated hydrotherapy pool is a common exercise site for patients with painful musculoskeletal conditions. Oxygen consumption of swimming is 87 to 89% of maximum in postmyocardial infarction patients according to one recent investigation. We studied 13 able-bodied subjects to test the hypothesis that enough energy could be expended during various forms of hydrotherapy to produce both an aerobic training effect and a risk to patients with coronary artery disease. Oxygen consumption (VO2) was measured in six settings: resting supine; resting seated shoulder deep in the pool (36C); walking at comfortable speed in chest-deep water; running at the fastest speed possible in chest-deep water; using hand paddles; and running in place at shoulder depth. The mean VO2 expressed in ml/kg/min (and metabolic equivalents) were 4.91 (1.00), 4.93 (1.02), 9.34 (2.01), 27.79 (6.23), 18.25 (4.30) and 29.11 (7.09) respectively, suggesting that the more vigorous exercises stress aerobic capacity heavily but not excessively.

  11. Ice swimming - 'Ice Mile' and '1 km Ice event'.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Rosemann, Thomas; Rüst, Christoph A

    2015-01-01

    Ice swimming for 1 mile and 1 km is a new discipline in open-water swimming since 2009. This study examined female and male performances in swimming 1 mile ('Ice Mile') and 1 km ('1 km Ice event') in water of 5 °C or colder between 2009 and 2015 with the hypothesis that women would be faster than men. Between 2009 and 2015, 113 men and 38 women completed one 'Ice Mile' and 26 men and 13 completed one '1 km Ice event' in water colder than +5 °C following the rules of International Ice Swimming Association (IISA). Differences in performance between women and men were determined. Sex difference (%) was calculated using the equation ([time for women] - [time for men]/[time for men] × 100). For 'Ice Mile', a mixed-effects regression model with interaction analyses was used to investigate the influence of sex and environmental conditions on swimming speed. The association between water temperature and swimming speed was assessed using Pearson correlation analyses. For 'Ice Mile' and '1 km Ice event', the best men were faster than the best women. In 'Ice Mile', calendar year, number of attempts, water temperature and wind chill showed no association with swimming speed for both women and men. For both women and men, water temperature was not correlated to swimming speed in both 'Ice Mile' and '1 km Ice event'. In water colder than 5 °C, men were faster than women in 'Ice Mile' and '1 km Ice event'. Water temperature showed no correlation to swimming speed.

  12. Swimming and grommets1

    PubMed Central

    Marks, N J; Mills, R P

    1983-01-01

    The dictum that patients who have plastic ventilation tubes (grommets) inserted in their tympanic membranes should not go swimming is questioned. A theoretical assessment is made of the pressure necessary to push water through a grommet. This value is compared with practical observations. These values are discussed with reference to chemical and bacteriological hazards and it is concluded that water is unlikely to enter the middle ear in surface swimming, and even when diving underwater the chances of setting up an otitis media must be small. PMID:6827495

  13. STS-45 backup Payload Specialist Chappell during water egress training at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-45 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, backup Payload Specialist Charles R. Chappell, wearing launch and entry suit (LES), is suspended via his parachute harness above JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool. Chappell will be dropped into the pool during the exercise which simulates a parachute landing into a body of water. SCUBA-equipped divers swimming in the pool will assist during the training.

  14. Increased exhaled breath condensate 8-isoprostane after a swimming session in competitive swimmers.

    PubMed

    Morissette, Mathieu C; Murray, Nicolas; Turmel, Julie; Milot, Julie; Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Bougault, Valérie

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the levels of 8-isoprostane (8-IsoP) in the airways of competitive swimmers at baseline and after a swimming session according to their airway responsiveness. Twenty-three swimmers and six lifeguards had a baseline spirometry and bronchoprovocative challenges. During a second visit, swimmers performed a usual swimming session while lifeguards stayed in the same pool environment for the same time period. Forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) was measured before and 5 min after the end of the session. Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) was sampled before and 10 min after the session and EBC 8-IsoP levels were analysed by enzyme immunoassay. Change in EBC 8-IsoP from baseline to post-swimming session was calculated. We observed no relationships between airway hyper-responsiveness and 8-IsoP values before or after swimming in swimmers. The levels of 8-IsoP were significantly higher after the training session (mean value 2.9, s = 0.5 pg mL(-1)) than at baseline (mean value 1.9, s = 0.4 pg mL(-1)) in swimmers only (p = .012). EBC 8-IsoP levels after the swimming session significantly correlated with the percent change in FEV1 after swimming. EBC 8-IsoP levels were increased after training in swimmers but not in lifeguards, suggesting that exercise-induced hyperpnoea in a chlorinated pool environment increases airways oxidative stress.

  15. The incidence and health burden of earaches attributable to recreational swimming in natural waters: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wade, Timothy J; Sams, Elizabeth A; Beach, Michael J; Collier, Sarah A; Dufour, Alfred P

    2013-08-21

    Earaches and outer ear infections are commonly associated with swimming. In this study, we estimated the excess risk and health burden of earaches due to swimming in natural fresh and marine waters using results from a survey of over 50,000 beachgoers at nine beaches across the United States. Prospective cohort studies were conducted at four freshwater and five marine sites in the United States and Puerto Rico. Beach visitors were enrolled on summer weekends and holidays. Ten to twelve days after the beach visit, respondents answered questions about health symptoms, including earaches or ear infections experienced since the beach visit. Economic and physical burdens were also obtained. Fixed slope, random intercept (beach site) multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate the relationship between head immersion swimming exposure and earaches. Model results were used to calculate excess risk for earaches attributable to swimming. The overall incidence of self-reported earache was 1.6% in the 10-12 days after the beach visit. Earaches were more frequent in head immersion swimmers compared to non-swimmers for all beach sites and age groups. Earaches were unassociated with water sample measures of fecal contamination and turbidity. After adjustment for covariates, we calculated 7.12 excess earaches among head immersion swimmers per 1,000 swimming events. Twenty-four percent of those with earache reported missing their regular activities; 28% visited a doctor; 4% visited the emergency room; and 31% and 40% used prescription and non-prescription medications, respectively. There are at least 128 million swimming events in natural waters annually. Such frequent exposures could result in 900,000 excess earaches, 260,000 visits to the doctor, 39,900 visits to the emergency room, nearly $4 million dollars in out-of-pocket expenditures on prescription and over-the-counter medications, and close to 75,000 hours of clinician time. More accurate estimates of

  16. The incidence and health burden of earaches attributable to recreational swimming in natural waters: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Earaches and outer ear infections are commonly associated with swimming. In this study, we estimated the excess risk and health burden of earaches due to swimming in natural fresh and marine waters using results from a survey of over 50,000 beachgoers at nine beaches across the United States. Methods Prospective cohort studies were conducted at four freshwater and five marine sites in the United States and Puerto Rico. Beach visitors were enrolled on summer weekends and holidays. Ten to twelve days after the beach visit, respondents answered questions about health symptoms, including earaches or ear infections experienced since the beach visit. Economic and physical burdens were also obtained. Fixed slope, random intercept (beach site) multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate the relationship between head immersion swimming exposure and earaches. Model results were used to calculate excess risk for earaches attributable to swimming. Results The overall incidence of self-reported earache was 1.6% in the 10–12 days after the beach visit. Earaches were more frequent in head immersion swimmers compared to non-swimmers for all beach sites and age groups. Earaches were unassociated with water sample measures of fecal contamination and turbidity. After adjustment for covariates, we calculated 7.12 excess earaches among head immersion swimmers per 1,000 swimming events. Twenty-four percent of those with earache reported missing their regular activities; 28% visited a doctor; 4% visited the emergency room; and 31% and 40% used prescription and non-prescription medications, respectively. Conclusions There are at least 128 million swimming events in natural waters annually. Such frequent exposures could result in 900,000 excess earaches, 260,000 visits to the doctor, 39,900 visits to the emergency room, nearly $4 million dollars in out-of-pocket expenditures on prescription and over-the-counter medications, and close to 75,000 hours of

  17. 2. CONFLUENCE POOL, DETAIL OF TUNNEL PORTAL WITH WATER ENTERING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. CONFLUENCE POOL, DETAIL OF TUNNEL PORTAL WITH WATER ENTERING FROM SANTA ANA RIVER. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Bear Creek Diversion Dam & Confluence Pool, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  18. Health burden of gastrointestinal symptoms resulting from swimming in fecally-contaminated recreational waters.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Millions of people swim and recreate in oceans and lakes every year. Fecal contamination of these waters can occur from sewage discharges, runoff, and other point and non-point sources. Measures of fecal indicator contamination (e.g., the fecal indicator bacteria E. coli and Ent...

  19. 76 FR 58401 - Safety Zone; Swim Around Charleston, Charleston, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... Around Charleston, a swimming race occurring on waters of the Wando River, the Cooper River, Charleston... vessels that are officially associated with the swim on the waters of the Wando River, the Cooper River...-AA00 Safety Zone; Swim Around Charleston, Charleston, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary...

  20. Red Cross Swimming Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlasich, Cynthia

    1989-01-01

    Six new aquatic courses, developed by the Red Cross, are described. They are: Infant and Preschool Aquatics, Longfellow's Whale Tales (classroom water safety lessons for K-Six), Basic Water Safety, Emergency Water Safety, Lifeguard Training, and Safety Training for Swim Coaches. (IAH)

  1. 43 CFR 423.36 - Swimming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Swimming. (a) You may swim, wade, snorkel, scuba dive, raft, or tube at your own risk in Reclamation waters... sites, and designated mooring areas; or (5) As otherwise delineated by signs or other markers. (b) You... Guard guidelines when engaging in any underwater activities. (c) You must not dive, jump, or swing from...

  2. Water: The Ideal Early Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Susan J.

    2008-01-01

    Bathtubs and swimming pools provide the ideal learning environment for people with special needs. For young preschool children, the activities that take place through water can help them develop physical fitness, facilitate motor development, reinforce perceptual-motor ability, encourage social development, and enhance self-esteem and confidence.…

  3. Mechanical power, thrust power and propelling efficiency: relationships with elite sprint swimming performance.

    PubMed

    Gatta, Giorgio; Cortesi, Matteo; Swaine, Ian; Zamparo, Paola

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between mechanical power, thrust power, propelling efficiency and sprint performance in elite swimmers. Mechanical power was measured in 12 elite sprint male swimmers: (1) in the laboratory, by using a whole-body swimming ergometer (W' TOT ) and (2) in the pool, by measuring full tethered swimming force (F T ) and maximal swimming velocity (V max ): W' T  = F T  · V max . Propelling efficiency (η P ) was estimated based on the "paddle wheel model" at V max . V max was 2.17 ± 0.06 m · s -1 , η P was 0.39 ± 0.02, W' T was 374 ± 62 W and W' TOT was 941 ± 92 W. V max was better related to W' T (useful power output: R = 0.943, P < 0.001) than to W' TOT (total power output: R = 0.744, P < 0.01) and this confirms the use of the full tethered test as a valid test to assess power propulsion in sprinters and to estimate swimming performance. The ratio W' T /W' TOT (0.40 ± 0.04) represents the fraction of total mechanical power that can be utilised in water (e.g., η P ) and was indeed the same as that estimated based on the "paddle wheel model"; this supports the use of this model to estimate η P in swimming.

  4. 1. WATER ENTERING CONFLUENCE POOL FROM BEAR CREEK AT LEFT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. WATER ENTERING CONFLUENCE POOL FROM BEAR CREEK AT LEFT, AND FROM SANTA ANA RIVER THROUGH TUNNEL #0 AT RIGHT. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Bear Creek Diversion Dam & Confluence Pool, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  5. Safety Barrier Guidelines for Home Pools [and] How To Plan for the Unexpected.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consumer Product Safety Commission, Washington, DC.

    Each year, hundreds of young children die and thousands come close to death due to submersion in residential swimming pools. The United States Consumer Products Safety Commission studied data on drownings and child behavior, as well as information on pool and pool barrier construction, and concluded that the best way to reduce child drownings in…

  6. Keeping recreational water facilities safe.

    PubMed

    Farquhar, Doug

    2015-06-01

    (1) Outbreaks of diseases associated with aquatic venues have nearly quadrupled—to more than 40 per year. (2) The Cryptosporidium (Crypto) germ is the leading cause of diarrheal outbreaks related to swimming pools. (3) A national voluntary effort is underway to reduce the number of illnesses and injuries from recreational water facilities.

  7. Socioeconomic status and exposure to disinfection by-products in drinking water in Spain.

    PubMed

    Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma; Cantor, Kenneth P; Villanueva, Cristina M; Tardon, Adonina; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; Malats, Núria; Rothman, Nathaniel; Silverman, Debra; Kogevinas, Manolis

    2011-03-16

    Disinfection by-products in drinking water are chemical contaminants that have been associated with cancer and other adverse effects. Exposure occurs from consumption of tap water, inhalation and dermal absorption. We determined the relationship between socioeconomic status and exposure to disinfection by-products in 1271 controls from a multicentric bladder cancer case-control study in Spain. Information on lifetime drinking water sources, swimming pool attendance, showering-bathing practices, and socioeconomic status (education, income) was collected through personal interviews. The most highly educated subjects consumed less tap water (57%) and more bottled water (33%) than illiterate subjects (69% and 17% respectively, p-value = 0.003). These differences became wider in recent time periods. The time spent bathing or showering was positively correlated with attained educational level (p < 0.001). Swimming pool attendance was more frequent among highly educated subjects compared to the illiterate (odds ratio = 3.4; 95% confidence interval 1.6-7.3). The most highly educated subjects were less exposed to chlorination by-products through ingestion but more exposed through dermal contact and inhalation in pools and showers/baths. Health risk perceptions and economic capacity may affect patterns of water consumption that can result in differences in exposure to water contaminants.

  8. Muon reconstruction in the Daya Bay water pools

    DOE PAGES

    Hackenburg, R. W.

    2017-08-12

    Muon reconstruction in the Daya Bay water pools would serve to verify the simulated muon fluxes and offer the possibility of studying cosmic muons in general. This reconstruction is, however, complicated by many optical obstacles and the small coverage of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) as compared to other large water Cherenkov detectors. The PMTs’ timing information is useful only in the case of direct, unreflected Cherenkov light. This requires PMTs to be added and removed as an hypothesized muon trajectory is iteratively improved, to account for the changing effects of obstacles and direction of light. Therefore, muon reconstruction in the Dayamore » Bay water pools does not lend itself to a general fitting procedure employing smoothly varying functions with continuous derivatives. Here, we describe an algorithm which overcomes these complications. It employs the method of Least Mean Squares to determine an hypothesized trajectory from the PMTs’ charge-weighted positions. This initially hypothesized trajectory is then iteratively refined using the PMTs’ timing information. Reconstructions with simulated data reproduce the simulated trajectory to within about 5° in direction and about 45 cm in position at the pool surface, with a bias that tends to pull tracks away from the vertical by about 3°.« less

  9. Muon reconstruction in the Daya Bay water pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackenburg, R. W.

    2017-11-01

    Muon reconstruction in the Daya Bay water pools would serve to verify the simulated muon fluxes and offer the possibility of studying cosmic muons in general. This reconstruction is, however, complicated by many optical obstacles and the small coverage of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) as compared to other large water Cherenkov detectors. The PMTs' timing information is useful only in the case of direct, unreflected Cherenkov light. This requires PMTs to be added and removed as an hypothesized muon trajectory is iteratively improved, to account for the changing effects of obstacles and direction of light. Therefore, muon reconstruction in the Daya Bay water pools does not lend itself to a general fitting procedure employing smoothly varying functions with continuous derivatives. Here, an algorithm is described which overcomes these complications. It employs the method of Least Mean Squares to determine an hypothesized trajectory from the PMTs' charge-weighted positions. This initially hypothesized trajectory is then iteratively refined using the PMTs' timing information. Reconstructions with simulated data reproduce the simulated trajectory to within about 5°in direction and about 45 cm in position at the pool surface, with a bias that tends to pull tracks away from the vertical by about 3°.

  10. A male hooded merganser swims in the waters of KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The distinctive fan-shaped, black-bordered crest and striped breast identify this hooded merganser, swimming in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at Kennedy Space Center. Usually found from Alaska and Canada south to Nebraska, Oregon and Tennessee, hooded mergansers winter south to Mexico and the Gulf Coast, including KSC. The open water of the refuge provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles.

  11. Biological implications of the hydrodynamics of swimming at or near the surface and in shallow water.

    PubMed

    Blake, R W

    2009-03-01

    The origins and effects of wave drag at and near the surface and in shallow water are discussed in terms of the dispersive waves generated by streamlined technical bodies of revolution and by semi-aquatic and aquatic animals with a view to bearing on issues regarding the design and function of autonomous surface and underwater vehicles. A simple two-dimensional model based on energy flux, allowing assessment of drag and its associated wave amplitude, is applied to surface swimming in Lesser Scaup ducks and is in good agreement with measured values. It is argued that hydrodynamic limitations to swimming at speeds associated with the critical Froude number ( approximately 0.5) and hull speed do not necessarily set biological limitations as most behaviours occur well below the hull speed. From a comparative standpoint, the need for studies on the hull displacement of different forms is emphasized. For forms in surface proximity, drag is a function of both Froude and Reynolds numbers. Whilst the depth dependence of wave drag is not particularly sensitive to Reynolds number, its magnitude is, with smaller and slower forms subject to relatively less drag augmentation than larger, faster forms that generate additional resistance due to ventilation and spray. A quasi-steady approach to the hydrodynamics of swimming in shallow water identifies substantial drag increases relative to the deeply submerged case at Froude numbers of about 0.9 that could limit the performance of semi-aquatic and aquatic animals and autonomous vehicles. A comparative assessment of fast-starting trout and upside down catfish shows that the energy losses of fast-starting fish are likely to be less for fish in surface proximity in deep water than for those in shallow water. Further work on unsteady swimming in both circumstances is encouraged. Finally, perspectives are offered as to how autonomous surface and underwater vehicles in surface proximity and shallow water could function to avoid

  12. 33 CFR 117.734 - Navesink River (Swimming River).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Navesink River (Swimming River). 117.734 Section 117.734 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... (Swimming River). The Oceanic Bridge, mile 4.5, shall open on signal; except that, from December 1 through...

  13. A pintail duck swims in the water at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A pintail duck swims calmly in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with the space center. The pintail can be found in marshes, prairie ponds and tundra, and salt marshes in winter. They range from Alaska and Greenland south to Central America and the West Indies. The open waters of the Wildlife Refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The refuge comprises 92,000 acres, ranging from fresh-water impoundments, salt-water estuaries and brackish marshes to hardwood hammocks and pine flatwoods. The diverse landscape provides habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles, including such endangered species as Southern bald eagles, wood storks, Florida scrub jays, Atlantic loggerhead and leatherback turtles, osprey, and nearly 5,000 alligators.

  14. Giardia Infection (Giardiasis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... backcountry streams and lakes but also in municipal water supplies, swimming pools, whirlpool spas and wells. Giardia infection ... and streams worldwide, as well as in municipal water supplies, wells, cisterns, swimming pools, water parks and spas. ...

  15. Swimming-induced pulmonary oedema an uncommon condition diagnosed with POCUS ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Joaquín Valle; Chowdhury, Motiur; Borakati, Raju; Gankande, Upali

    2017-12-01

    Swimming Induced Pulmonary Edema, or SIPE, is an emerging condition occurring in otherwise healthy individuals during surface swimming or diving that is characterized by cough, dyspnea, hemoptysis, and hypoxemia. It is typically found in those who spend time in cold water exercise with heavy swimming and surface swimming, such as civilian training for iron Man, triathalon, and military training. We report the case of a highly trained young female swimmer in excellent cardiopulmonary health, who developed acute alveolar pulmonary oedema in an open water swimming training diagnosed in the emergency department using POCUS ultrasound. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A female hooded merganser swims in the waters of KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A female hooded merganser swims solo in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge at Kennedy Space Center. The male is distinguished by a fan-shaped, black-bordered crest and striped breast. Usually found from Alaska and Canada south to Nebraska, Oregon and Tennessee, hooded mergansers winter south to Mexico and the Gulf Coast, including KSC. The open water of the refuge provides wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds. The 92,000-acre refuge is also habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles.

  17. The distribution and public health consequences of releases of chemicals intended for pool use in 17 states, 2001-2009.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ayana R; Welles, Wanda Lizak; Drew, James; Orr, Maureen F

    2014-05-01

    To keep swimming pool water clean and clear, consumers purchase, transport, store, use, and dispose of large amounts of potentially hazardous chemicals. Data about incidents due to the use of these chemicals and the resultant public health impacts are limited. The authors analyzed pool chemical release data from 17 states that participated in the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry's chemical event surveillance system during 2001-2009. In 400 pool chemical incidents, 60% resulted in injuries. Of the 732 injured persons, 67% were members of the public and 50% were under 18 years old. Incidents occurred most frequently in private residences (39%), but incidents with the most injured persons (34%) occurred at recreational facilities. Human error (71.9%) was the most frequent primary contributing factor, followed by equipment failure (22.8%). Interventions designed to mitigate the public health impact associated with pool chemical releases should target both private pool owners and public pool operators.

  18. [Water birthing: retrospective review of 2625 water births. Contamination of birth pool water and risk of microbial cross-infection].

    PubMed

    Thöni, A; Mussner, K; Ploner, F

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to document the practice of 2625 water births at Vipiteno over the period 1997-2009 and compare outcome and safety with normal vaginal delivery. The microbial load of the birth pool water was analyzed, and neonatal infection rates after water birth and after land delivery were compared. Methods. The variables analyzed in the 1152 primiparae were: length of labor; incidence of episiotomies and tears; arterial cord blood pH and base excess values; percentage of pH<7.10 and base excess values >/=12 mmol/L. In all 2625 water births, the variables were: analgesic requirements; shoulder dystocia/ neonatal complications; and deliveries after a previous caesarean section. Bacterial cultures of water samples obtained from the bath after filling (sample A) and after delivery (sample B) were analyzed in 300 cases. The pediatricians recorded signs of suspected neonatal infection after water birth and after conventional vaginal delivery. There was a marked reduction in labor duration in the primiparae who birthed in water; the episiotomy rate was 0.46%. Owing to the pain relieving effect of the warm birth pool water, pain relievers (opiates) were required in only 12.9% of water births. Arterial cord blood pH and base excess values were comparable in both groups. Shoulder dystocia/neonatal complications were managed in 4 water births; 105 women with a previous caesarean section had a water birth. In sample A, the isolated micro-organisms were Legionella spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa; in sample B, there was elevated colonization of birth pool water by total coliform bacilli and Escherichia coli. Despite microbial contamination of birth pool water during delivery, antibiotic prophylaxis, as indicated by clinical and laboratory suspicion of infection, was administered to only 0.98% of babies after water birth versus 1.64% of those after land delivery. Results suggest clear medical advantages of water birthing: significantly shorter labor duration among

  19. Characteristics of elite open-water swimmers.

    PubMed

    VanHeest, Jaci L; Mahoney, Carrie E; Herr, Larry

    2004-05-01

    Open-water swimming (5, 10, and 25 km) has many unique challenges that separate it from other endurance sports, like marathon running and cycling. The characteristics of a successful open-water swimmer are unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the physical and metabolic characteristics of a group of elite-level open-water swimmers. The open-water swimmers were participating in a 1-week training camp. Anthropometric, metabolic, and blood chemistry assessments were performed on the athletes. The swimmers had a VO(2)peak of 5.51 +/- 0.96 and 5.06 +/- 0.57 ml.kg(-1).min(-1) for males and females, respectively. Their lactate threshold (LT) occurred at a pace equal to 88.75% of peak pace for males and 93.75% for females. These elite open-water swimmers were smaller and lighter than competitive pool swimmers. They possess aerobic metabolic alterations that resulted in enhanced performance in distance swimming. Trainers and coaches should develop dry-land programs that will improve the athlete's muscular endurance. Furthermore, programs should be designed to increase the LT velocity as a percentage of peak swimming velocity.

  20. Long-distance swimming by polar bears (Ursus maritimus) of the southern Beaufort Sea during years of extensive open water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2014-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus Phipps, 1774) depend on sea ice for catching marine mammal prey. Recent sea-ice declines have been linked to reductions in body condition, survival, and population size. Reduced foraging opportunity is hypothesized to be the primary cause of sea-ice-linked declines, but the costs of travel through a deteriorated sea-ice environment also may be a factor. We used movement data from 52 adult female polar bears wearing Global Positioning System (GPS) collars, including some with dependent young, to document long-distance swimming (>50 km) by polar bears in the southern Beaufort and Chukchi seas. During 6 years (2004-2009), we identified 50 long-distance swims by 20 bears. Swim duration and distance ranged from 0.7 to 9.7 days (mean = 3.4 days) and 53.7 to 687.1 km (mean = 154.2 km), respectively. Frequency of swimming appeared to increase over the course of the study. We show that adult female polar bears and their cubs are capable of swimming long distances during periods when extensive areas of open water are present. However, long-distance swimming appears to have higher energetic demands than moving over sea ice. Our observations suggest long-distance swimming is a behavioral response to declining summer sea-ice conditions.

  1. Wave energy and swimming performance shape coral reef fish assemblages

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, C.J; Bellwood, D.R; Wainwright, P.C

    2005-01-01

    Physical factors often have an overriding influence on the distribution patterns of organisms, and can ultimately shape the long-term structure of communities. Although distribution patterns in sessile marine organisms have frequently been attributed to functional characteristics interacting with wave-induced water motion, similar evidence for mobile organisms is lacking. Links between fin morphology and swimming performance were examined in three diverse coral reef fish families from two major evolutionary lineages. Among-habitat variation in morphology and performance was directly compared with quantitative values of wave-induced water motion from seven coral reef habitats of different depth and wave exposure on the Great Barrier Reef. Fin morphology was strongly correlated with both field and experimental swimming speeds in all three families. The range of observed swimming speeds coincided closely with the magnitude of water velocities commonly found on coral reefs. Distribution patterns in all three families displayed highly congruent relationships between fin morphology and wave-induced water motion. Our findings indicate a general functional relationship between fin morphology and swimming performance in labriform-swimming fishes, and provide quantitative evidence that wave energy may directly influence the assemblage structure of coral reef fishes through interactions with morphology and swimming performance. PMID:15888415

  2. Swimming and other activities: applied aspects of fish swimming performance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Castro-Santos, Theodore R.; Farrell, A.P.

    2011-01-01

    Human activities such as hydropower development, water withdrawals, and commercial fisheries often put fish species at risk. Engineered solutions designed to protect species or their life stages are frequently based on assumptions about swimming performance and behaviors. In many cases, however, the appropriate data to support these designs are either unavailable or misapplied. This article provides an overview of the state of knowledge of fish swimming performance – where the data come from and how they are applied – identifying both gaps in knowledge and common errors in application, with guidance on how to avoid repeating mistakes, as well as suggestions for further study.

  3. Effect of swimming suit design on the energy demands of swimming.

    PubMed

    Starling, R D; Costill, D L; Trappe, T A; Jozsi, A C; Trappe, S W; Goodpaster, B H

    1995-07-01

    Eight competitive male swimmers completed a standardized 365.8 m (400 yd) freestyle swimming trial at a fixed pace (approximately 90% of maximal effort) while wearing a torso swim suit (TOR) or a standard racing suit (STD). Oxygen uptake (VO2), blood lactate, heart rate (HR), and distance per stroke (DPS) measurements were obtained. In addition, a video-computer system was used to collect velocity data during a prone underwater glide following a maximal leg push-off from the side of the pool while wearing the TOR and STD suits. These data were used to calculate the total distance covered during the glides. VO2 (3.76 +/- 0.16 vs 3.92 +/- 0.18 l.min-1) and lactate (8.08 +/- 0.53 vs, 9.66 +/- 0.66 mM) were significantly (P < 0.05) lower during the TOR trial than the STD trial. HR was not different (P > 0.05) between the TOR (170.1 +/- 5.1 b.min-1) and STD (173.5 +/- 5.7 b.min-1) trials. DPS was significantly greater during the TOR (2.70 +/- 0.066 m.stroke-1) versus STD (2.58 +/- 0.054 m.stroke-1) trial. A significantly greater total distance was covered during the prone glide while wearing the TOR (2.05 +/- 0.067 m) compared to the STD (2.00 +/- 0.080 m) suit. These findings demonstrate that a specially designed torso suit reduces the energy demand of swimming compared to a standard racing suit which may be due to a reduction in body drag.

  4. The effects of low-speed swimming following exhaustive exercise on metabolic recovery and swimming performance in brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis).

    PubMed

    Kieffer, James D; Kassie, Roshini S; Taylor, Susan G

    2011-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine whether low-speed swimming during recovery from exhaustive exercise improved both metabolic recovery and performance during a swimming challenge. For these experiments, brook trout were allowed to recover from exhaustive exercise for 2 h while swimming at 0, 0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 body length (BL) s(-1) or allowed to recover from exhaustive exercise for 1, 2, or 3 h while swimming at 1.0 BL s(-1). At the appropriate interval, either (i) muscle and blood samples were removed from the fish or (ii) fish were assessed for performance (i.e., fatigue time) during a fixed-interval swimming test. Low-speed swimming during recovery from exhaustive exercise resulted in significantly longer fatigue times compared with fish recovering in still water (i.e., 0 BL s(-1)). However, swimming during recovery did not expedite recovery of muscle lactate or blood variables (e.g., lactate, osmolarity, glucose). These observations suggest that metabolic recovery and subsequent swimming performance may not be directly linked and that other factors play a role in swimming recovery in brook trout.

  5. Hydrogen Water Drinking Exerts Antifatigue Effects in Chronic Forced Swimming Mice via Antioxidative and Anti-Inflammatory Activities

    PubMed Central

    Ara, Jesmin; Lee, Sung Pyo; Jung, Jin Young

    2018-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to evaluate antifatigue effect of hydrogen water (HW) drinking in chronic forced exercise mice model. Materials and Methods Twelve-week-old C57BL6 female mice were divided into nonstressed normal control (NC) group and stressed group: (purified water/PW-treated group and HW-treated group). Stressed groups were supplied with PW and HW, respectively, ad libitum and forced to swim for the stress induction every day for 4 consecutive weeks. Gross antifatigue effects of HW were assessed by swimming endurance capacity (once weekly for 4 wk), metabolic activities, and immune-redox activities. Metabolic activities such as blood glucose, lactate, glycogen, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as well as immune-redox activities such as reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase, and the related cytokines were evaluated to elucidate underlying mechanism. Blood glucose and lactate were measured at 0 wk (before swimming) and 4 wk (after swimming). Results HW group showed a higher swimming endurance capacity (p < 0.001) than NC and PW groups. Positive metabolic effects in HW group were revealed by the significant reduction of blood glucose, lactate, and BUN in serum after 4 wk (p < 0.01, resp.), as well as the significant increase of liver glycogen (p < 0.001) and serum LDH (p < 0.05) than PW group. In parallel, redox balance was represented by lower NO in serum (p < 0.01) and increased level of GPx in both serum and liver (p < 0.05) than PW group. In line, the decreased levels of serum TNF-α (p < 0.01), IL-6, IL-17, and liver IL-1β (p < 0.05) in HW group revealed positive cytokine profile compared to PW and NC group. Conclusion This study shows antifatigue effects of HW drinking in chronic forced swimming mice via metabolic coordination and immune-redox balance. In that context, drinking HW could be applied to the alternative and safety fluid remedy for chronic fatigue

  6. Prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in water samples in central Italy and molecular characterization of oprD in imipenem resistant isolates

    PubMed Central

    Carloni, Elisa; Andreoni, Francesca; Magi, Silvia; Chironna, Maria; Brandi, Giorgio; Amagliani, Giulia

    2017-01-01

    Scope This study aimed to analyse the prevalence, antibiotic resistance and genetic relatedness of P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from potable and recreational water samples (n. 8,351) collected from different settings (swimming pools, n. 207; healthcare facilities, n 1,684; accommodation facilities, n. 1,518; municipal waterworks, n. 4,500; residential buildings, n. 235). Possible mechanisms underlying resistance to imipenem, with particular focus on those involving oprD-based uptake, were also explored. Methods and results Isolation and identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was performed according to the standardized procedure UNI EN ISO 16266:2008 followed by PCR confirmation. Antibiotic Susceptibility testing was conducted according to EUCAST standardized disk diffusion method. Genetic relatedness of strains was carried out by RAPD. The sequence of the oprD gene was analyzed by standard method. Fifty-three samples (0.63%) were positive for P. aeruginosa, of which 10/207 (4.83%) were from swimming pools. Five isolates (9.43%) were resistant to imipenem, one to Ticarcillin + Clavulanate, one to both Piperacillin and Ticarcillin + Clavulanate. The highest isolation rate of imipenem resistant P. aeruginosa was observed in swimming pool water. Identical RAPD profiles were found in isolates from the same location in the same year or even in different years. Conclusions Imipenem resistant strains were identified as carbapenemase-negative and resistance has been associated with inactivating mutations within the oprD gene, with a concomitant loss of porin. RAPD results proved that a water system can remain colonized by one strain for long periods and the contamination may be difficult to eradicate. This study has revealed the presence of P. aeruginosa in different water samples, including resistant strains, especially in swimming pools, and confirmed the role of porins as a contributing factor in carbapenem resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:29211780

  7. Prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in water samples in central Italy and molecular characterization of oprD in imipenem resistant isolates.

    PubMed

    Schiavano, Giuditta Fiorella; Carloni, Elisa; Andreoni, Francesca; Magi, Silvia; Chironna, Maria; Brandi, Giorgio; Amagliani, Giulia

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to analyse the prevalence, antibiotic resistance and genetic relatedness of P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from potable and recreational water samples (n. 8,351) collected from different settings (swimming pools, n. 207; healthcare facilities, n 1,684; accommodation facilities, n. 1,518; municipal waterworks, n. 4,500; residential buildings, n. 235). Possible mechanisms underlying resistance to imipenem, with particular focus on those involving oprD-based uptake, were also explored. Isolation and identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was performed according to the standardized procedure UNI EN ISO 16266:2008 followed by PCR confirmation. Antibiotic Susceptibility testing was conducted according to EUCAST standardized disk diffusion method. Genetic relatedness of strains was carried out by RAPD. The sequence of the oprD gene was analyzed by standard method. Fifty-three samples (0.63%) were positive for P. aeruginosa, of which 10/207 (4.83%) were from swimming pools. Five isolates (9.43%) were resistant to imipenem, one to Ticarcillin + Clavulanate, one to both Piperacillin and Ticarcillin + Clavulanate. The highest isolation rate of imipenem resistant P. aeruginosa was observed in swimming pool water. Identical RAPD profiles were found in isolates from the same location in the same year or even in different years. Imipenem resistant strains were identified as carbapenemase-negative and resistance has been associated with inactivating mutations within the oprD gene, with a concomitant loss of porin. RAPD results proved that a water system can remain colonized by one strain for long periods and the contamination may be difficult to eradicate. This study has revealed the presence of P. aeruginosa in different water samples, including resistant strains, especially in swimming pools, and confirmed the role of porins as a contributing factor in carbapenem resistance in Gram-negative bacteria.

  8. Effects of temperature on sustained swimming performance and swimming kinematics of the chub mackerel Scomber japonicus.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Kathryn A; Donley, Jeanine M; Sepulveda, Chugey; Bhoopat, Lisa

    2002-04-01

    The effects of a 6 degrees C difference in water temperature on maximum sustained swimming speed, swimming energetics and swimming kinematics were measured in the chub mackerel Scomber japonicus (Teleostei: Scombridae), a primarily coastal, pelagic predator that inhabits subtropical and temperate transition waters of the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans. New data for chub mackerel acclimated to 18 degrees C are compared with published data from our laboratory at 24 degrees C. Twelve individuals acclimated to each of two temperatures (15.6-26.3 cm fork length, FL, and 34-179 g at 18 degrees C; 14.0-24.7 cm FL and 26-156 g at 24 degrees C) swam at a range of speeds in a temperature-controlled Brett-type respirometer, at the respective acclimation temperature. At a given fish size, the maximum speed that S. japonicus was able to maintain for a 30-min period, while swimming steadily using slow, oxidative locomotor muscle (U(max,c)), was significantly greater at 24 than at 18 degrees C (52.5-97.5 cm s(-1) at 18 degrees C and 70-120 cm s(-1) at 24 degrees C). At a given speed and fish size, the rate of oxygen consumption (VO(2)) was significantly higher at 24 than at 18 degrees C because of a higher net cost of transport (1073-4617 J km(-1) kg(-1) at 18 degrees C and 2708-14895 J km(-1) kg(-1) at 24 degrees C). Standard metabolic rate, calculated by extrapolating the logO(2) versus swimming speed relationship to zero speed, did not vary significantly with temperature or fish mass (126.4+/-67.2 mg O(2) h(-1) kg(-1) at 18 degrees C and 143.2+/-80.3 mg O(2) h(-1) kg(-1) at 24 degrees C; means +/- S.D., N=12). Swimming kinematics was quantified from high-speed (120 Hz) video recordings analyzed with a computerized, two-dimensional motion-analysis system. At a given speed and fish size, there were no significant effects of temperature on tail-beat frequency, tail-beat amplitude or stride length, but propulsive wavelength increased significantly with temperature as a result

  9. Consequences of long-distance swimming and travel over deep-water pack ice for a female polar bear during a year of extreme sea ice retreat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durner, George M.; Whiteman, J.P.; Harlow, H.J.; Amstrup, Steven C.; Regehr, E.V.; Ben-David, M.

    2011-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) prefer to live on Arctic sea ice but may swim between ice floes or between sea ice and land. Although anecdotal observations suggest that polar bears are capable of swimming long distances, no data have been available to describe in detail long distance swimming events or the physiological and reproductive consequences of such behavior. Between an initial capture in late August and a recapture in late October 2008, a radio-collared adult female polar bear in the Beaufort Sea made a continuous swim of 687 km over 9 days and then intermittently swam and walked on the sea ice surface an additional 1,800 km. Measures of movement rate, hourly activity, and subcutaneous and external temperature revealed distinct profiles of swimming and walking. Between captures, this polar bear lost 22% of her body mass and her yearling cub. The extraordinary long distance swimming ability of polar bears, which we confirm here, may help them cope with reduced Arctic sea ice. Our observation, however, indicates that long distance swimming in Arctic waters, and travel over deep water pack ice, may result in high energetic costs and compromise reproductive fitness.

  10. ENHANCED RETENTION AND SENSITIVITY IN THE ANALYSIS OF CYANURIC ACID IN WATER USING POROUS GRAPHITIC CARBON AND UV DETECTION IN HIGH PRESSURE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyanuric acid (CA) has found application as a chlorine stabilizer in pool waters. The National Swimming Pool Foundation recommends CA levels between 30-50 ppm and a chlorine residual of 1.0-3.0 ppm. These chlorine levels are needed to destroy harmful pathogenic organisms. Develo...

  11. The impact of urbanization on water and sediment chemistry of ephemeral forest pools

    Treesearch

    Robert T. Brooks; Suzanne D. Miller; John Newsted

    2002-01-01

    We compared the water and sediment composition of two ephemeral pools located in forested settings in a developed suburban area with two similar pools located in extensive forest in Massachusetts. We also compared the macroinvertebrate communities. The sediments of the forest pools were 100% organic material, while those of the urban pools were predominantly silt. The...

  12. Warm-up and performance in competitive swimming.

    PubMed

    Neiva, Henrique P; Marques, Mário C; Barbosa, Tiago M; Izquierdo, Mikel; Marinho, Daniel A

    2014-03-01

    Warm-up before physical activity is commonly accepted to be fundamental, and any priming practices are usually thought to optimize performance. However, specifically in swimming, studies on the effects of warm-up are scarce, which may be due to the swimming pool environment, which has a high temperature and humidity, and to the complexity of warm-up procedures. The purpose of this study is to review and summarize the different studies on how warming up affects swimming performance, and to develop recommendations for improving the efficiency of warm-up before competition. Most of the main proposed effects of warm-up, such as elevated core and muscular temperatures, increased blood flow and oxygen delivery to muscle cells and higher efficiency of muscle contractions, support the hypothesis that warm-up enhances performance. However, while many researchers have reported improvements in performance after warm-up, others have found no benefits to warm-up. This lack of consensus emphasizes the need to evaluate the real effects of warm-up and optimize its design. Little is known about the effectiveness of warm-up in competitive swimming, and the variety of warm-up methods and swimming events studied makes it difficult to compare the published conclusions about the role of warm-up in swimming. Recent findings have shown that warm-up has a positive effect on the swimmer's performance, especially for distances greater than 200 m. We recommend that swimmers warm-up for a relatively moderate distance (between 1,000 and 1,500 m) with a proper intensity (a brief approach to race pace velocity) and recovery time sufficient to prevent the early onset of fatigue and to allow the restoration of energy reserves (8-20 min).

  13. 77 FR 51471 - Safety Zone; Swim Around Charleston, Charleston, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Swim Around Charleston, Charleston, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary moving safety zone during the Swim Around Charleston, a swimming race occurring on waters of the Wando River, the Cooper River, Charleston...

  14. Simulated front crawl swimming performance related to critical speed and critical power.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, H M; Wakayoshi, K; Hollander, A P; Ogita, F

    1998-01-01

    Competitive pool swimming events range in distance from 50 to 1500 m. Given the difference in performance times (+/- 23-1000 s), the contribution of the aerobic and anaerobic energy systems changes considerably with race distance. In training practice the regression line between swimming distance and time (Distance = critical velocity x time + anaerobic swimming capacity) is used to determine the individual capacity of the aerobic and anaerobic metabolic pathways. Although there is confidence that critical velocity and anaerobic swimming capacity are fitness measures that separate aerobic and anaerobic components, a firm theoretical basis for the interpretation of these results does not exist. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the critical power concept and anaerobic swimming capacity as measures of the aerobic and anaerobic capacity using a modeling approach. A systems model was developed that relates the mechanics and energetics involved in front crawl swimming performance. From actual swimming flume measurements, the time dependent aerobic and anaerobic energy release was modeled. Data derived from the literature were used to relate the energy cost of front crawl swimming to swimming velocity. A balance should exist between the energy cost to swim a distance in a certain time and the concomitant aerobic and anaerobic energy release. The ensuing model was used to predict performance times over a range of distances (50-1500 m) and to calculate the regression line between swimming distance and time. Using a sensitivity analysis, it was demonstrated that the critical velocity is indicative for the capacity of the aerobic energy system. Estimates of the anaerobic swimming capacity, however, were influenced by variations in both anaerobic and aerobic energy release. Therefore, it was concluded that the anaerobic swimming capacity does not provide a reliable estimate of the anaerobic capacity.

  15. Locomotor activity during the frenzy swim: analysing early swimming behaviour in hatchling sea turtles.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Carla M; Booth, David T; Limpus, Colin J

    2011-12-01

    Swimming effort of hatchling sea turtles varies across species. In this study we analysed how swim thrust is produced in terms of power stroke rate, mean maximum thrust per power stroke and percentage of time spent power stroking throughout the first 18 h of swimming after entering the water, in both loggerhead and flatback turtle hatchlings and compared this with previous data from green turtle hatchlings. Loggerhead and green turtle hatchlings had similar power stroke rates and percentage of time spent power stroking throughout the trial, although mean maximum thrust was always significantly higher in green hatchlings, making them the most vigorous swimmers in our three-species comparison. Flatback hatchlings, however, were different from the other two species, with overall lower values in all three swimming variables. Their swimming effort dropped significantly during the first 2 h and kept decreasing significantly until the end of the trial at 18 h. These results support the hypothesis that ecological factors mould the swimming behaviour of hatchling sea turtles, with predator pressure being important in determining the strategy used to swim offshore. Loggerhead and green turtle hatchlings seem to adopt an intensely vigorous and energetically costly frenzy swim that would quickly take them offshore into the open ocean in order to reduce their exposure to near-shore aquatic predators. Flatback hatchlings, however, are restricted in geographic distribution and remain within the continental shelf region where predator pressure is probably relatively constant. For this reason, flatback hatchlings might use only part of their energy reserves during a less vigorous frenzy phase, with lower overall energy expenditure during the first day compared with loggerhead and green turtle hatchlings.

  16. Health Benefits of Water-based Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Pool Raccoons & Pools Birds & Pools Aquatics Professionals Design & Construction Designing Public Swimming Facilities Historic CDC Design & Operation Manuals Operation & Maintenance 12 Steps for Prevention ...

  17. 33 CFR 100.113 - Provincetown Harbor Swim for Life, Provincetown, MA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Provincetown Harbor Swim for Life... SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.113 Provincetown Harbor Swim for Life, Provincetown, MA. (a) Regulated Area. All waters of Provincetown Harbor within 200 feet of...

  18. 33 CFR 100.112 - Swim the Bay, Narragansett Bay, Narragansett, RI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Swim the Bay, Narragansett Bay, Narragansett, RI. 100.112 Section 100.112 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.112 Swim the Bay...

  19. London 2012 Paralympic swimming: passive drag and the classification system.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yim-Taek; Burkett, Brendan; Osborough, Conor; Formosa, Danielle; Payton, Carl

    2013-09-01

    The key difference between the Olympic and Paralympic Games is the use of classification systems within Paralympic sports to provide a fair competition for athletes with a range of physical disabilities. In 2009, the International Paralympic Committee mandated the development of new, evidence-based classification systems. This study aims to assess objectively the swimming classification system by determining the relationship between passive drag and level of swimming-specific impairment, as defined by the current swimming class. Data were collected on participants at the London 2012 Paralympic Games. The passive drag force of 113 swimmers (classes 3-14) was measured using an electro-mechanical towing device and load cell. Swimmers were towed on the surface of a swimming pool at 1.5 m/s while holding their most streamlined position. Passive drag ranged from 24.9 to 82.8 N; the normalised drag (drag/mass) ranged from 0.45 to 1.86 N/kg. Significant negative associations were found between drag and the swimming class (τ = -0.41, p < 0.01) and normalised drag and the swimming class (τ = -0.60, p < 0.01). The mean difference in drag between adjacent classes was inconsistent, ranging from 0 N (6 vs 7) to 11.9 N (5 vs 6). Reciprocal Ponderal Index (a measure of slenderness) correlated moderately with normalised drag (r(P) = -0.40, p < 0.01). Although swimmers with the lowest swimming class experienced the highest passive drag and vice versa, the inconsistent difference in mean passive drag between adjacent classes indicates that the current classification system does not always differentiate clearly between swimming groups.

  20. A PILOT STUDY TO DETERMINE THE WATER VOLUME INJESTED BY RECREATIONAL SWIMMERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The volume of water ingested by recreational swimmers is unknown. Previous estimates by a number of investigators range from 10mL to 100mL. These estimates, however, are unsupported by empirical data. Many outdoor swimming pools are disinfected using cyanuric acid stabilized c...

  1. Swimming

    MedlinePlus

    ... or eat while you swim — you could choke. Lakes and Ponds Lots of kids swim in streams, lakes, or ponds. Take extra care when swimming in ... can't always see the bottom of the lake or pond, so you don't always know ...

  2. 36 CFR 3.17 - What regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... swimming areas and beaches? 3.17 Section 3.17 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR BOATING AND WATER USE ACTIVITIES § 3.17 What regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches? (a) The superintendent may designate areas as swimming areas or swimming beaches in...

  3. Cardiovascular and Perceptual Responses to an Ultraendurance Channel Swim: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Judelson, Daniel A; Bagley, James R; Schumacher, Jennifer M; Wiersma, Lenny D

    2015-09-01

    Ultraendurance open water swimming presents unique physiological challenges. This case study aimed to describe cardiovascular and perceptual responses during a successful solo channel swim. Investigators followed a female swimmer's Catalina Channel (32.2 km) crossing, monitoring water temperature (T(water)) and air temperature (T(air)), distance remaining (DR), average velocity, and heart rate (HR(swim)) at regular intervals. Every 24 minutes, the swimmer reported perceived pain (on a scale of 0-10), rating of perceived exertion (RPE [scale of 6-20]), perceived thermal sensation (scale 0-8), and thirst (scale 1-9). Data are presented as mean ± SD where applicable. The participant finished in 9 hours, 2 minutes, and 48 seconds; T(water) averaged 19.1 ± 0.4ºC, and T(air) averaged 18.6 ± 0.9ºC. Her HR(swim) ranged from 148 to 155 beats/min, and thermal sensation ranged from 3 to 4. Pain inconsistently varied from 0 to 5 during the swim. The RPE remained between 12 and 14 for the first 8 hours, but increased dramatically near the end (reaching 18). Thirst sensation steadily increased throughout the swim, again reaching maximal values on completion. Physiologically and statistically significant correlations existed between thirst and DR (r = -0.905), RPE and HR(swim) (r = 0.741), RPE and DR (r = -0.694), and pain and DR (r = -0.671). The primary findings were that, despite fluctuations in perceptual stressors, the swimmer maintained a consistent exercise intensity as indicated by HR(swim); and during ultraendurance swimming, pain, RPE, and thirst positively correlated with distance swum. We hope these findings aid in the preparation and performance of future athletes by providing information on what swimmers may expect during an ultraendurance attempt and by increasing the understanding of physiological and perceptual responses during open water swimming. Copyright © 2015 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The evolution of phenotypic plasticity in fish swimming

    PubMed Central

    Oufiero, Christopher E.; Whitlow, Katrina R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Fish have a remarkable amount of variation in their swimming performance, from within species differences to diversity among major taxonomic groups. Fish swimming is a complex, integrative phenotype and has the ability to plastically respond to a myriad of environmental changes. The plasticity of fish swimming has been observed on whole-organismal traits such as burst speed or critical swimming speed, as well as underlying phenotypes such as muscle fiber types, kinematics, cardiovascular system, and neuronal processes. Whether the plastic responses of fish swimming are beneficial seems to depend on the environmental variable that is changing. For example, because of the effects of temperature on biochemical processes, alterations of fish swimming in response to temperature do not seem to be beneficial. In contrast, changes in fish swimming in response to variation in flow may benefit the fish to maintain position in the water column. In this paper, we examine how this plasticity in fish swimming might evolve, focusing on environmental variables that have received the most attention: temperature, habitat, dissolved oxygen, and carbon dioxide variation. Using examples from previous research, we highlight many of the ways fish swimming can plastically respond to environmental variation and discuss potential avenues of future research aimed at understanding how plasticity of fish swimming might evolve. We consider the direct and indirect effects of environmental variation on swimming performance, including changes in swimming kinematics and suborganismal traits thought to predict swimming performance. We also discuss the role of the evolution of plasticity in shaping macroevolutionary patterns of diversity in fish swimming. PMID:29491937

  5. Bacterial community structure and dissolved organic matter in repeatedly flooded subsurface karst water pools.

    PubMed

    Shabarova, Tanja; Villiger, Jörg; Morenkov, Oleg; Niggemann, Jutta; Dittmar, Thorsten; Pernthaler, Jakob

    2014-07-01

    Bacterial diversity, community assembly, and the composition of the dissolved organic matter (DOM) were studied in three temporary subsurface karst pools with different flooding regimes. We tested the hypothesis that microorganisms introduced to the pools during floods faced environmental filtering toward a 'typical' karst water community, and we investigated whether DOM composition was related to floodings and the residence time of water in stagnant pools. As predicted, longer water residence consistently led to a decline of bacterial diversity. The microbial assemblages in the influx water harbored more 'exotic' lineages with large distances to known genotypes, yet these initial communities already appeared to be shaped by selective processes. β-Proteobacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) closely related to microbes from subsurface or surface aquatic environments were mainly responsible for the clustering of samples according to water residence time in the pools. By contrast, several Cytophagaceae and Flavobacteriaceae OTUs were related to different floodings, which were also the main determinants of DOM composition. A subset of compounds distinguishable by molecular mass and O/C content were characteristic for individual floods. Moreover, there was a transformation of DOM in stagnant pools toward smaller and more aromatic compounds, potentially also reflecting microbial utilization. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leopold, Luna Bergere; Baldwin, Helene L.

    1962-01-01

    What do you use water for?If someone asked you this question you would probably think right away of water for drinking. Then you would think of water for bathing, brushing teeth, flushing the toilet. Your list would get longer as you thought of water for cooking, washing the dishes, running the garbage grinder. Water for lawn watering, for play pools, for swimming pools, for washing the car and the dog. Water for washing machines and for air conditioning. You can hardly do without water for fun and pleasure—water for swimming, boating, fishing, water-skiing, and skin diving. In school or the public library, you need water to wash your hands, or to have a drink. If your home or school bursts into flames, quantities of water are needed to put it out.In fact, life to Americans is unthinkable without large supplies of fresh, clean water. If you give the matter a little thought, you will realize that people in many countries, even in our own, may suffer from disease and dirt simply because their homes are not equipped with running water. Imagine your own town if for some reason - an explosion, perhaps - water service were cut off for a week or several weeks. You would have to drive or walk to a neighboring town and bring water back in pails. Certainly if people had to carry water themselves they might not be inclined to bathe very often; washing clothes would be a real chore.Nothing can live without water. The earth is covered by water over three-fourths of its surface - water as a liquid in rivers, lakes and oceans, and water as ice and snow on the tops of high mountains and in the polar regions. Only one-quarter of our bodies is bone and muscle; the other three-fourths is made of water. We need water to live, and so do plants and animals. People and animals can live a long time without food, but without water they die in a few days. Without water, everything would die, and the world would turn into a huge desert.

  7. Salmonella pollution in ground and surface waters. (Latest citations from Pollution abstracts). Published Search

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the contamination of ground waters and surface waters by Salmonella bacteria. Articles discuss the occurence, survival, origin, and control of these bacteria in water sources including rivers, reservoirs, swimming pools, wastewater, aquifers, and ground water. Citations also address the use of Salmonella populations as biological indicators of pollution in aquatic systems. (Contains a minimum of 102 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Factors affecting swimming performance of fasted rainbow trout with implications of exhaustive exercise on overwinter mortality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpkins, D.G.; Hubert, W.A.; Del Rio, C.M.; Rule, D.C.

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of body size, water temperature, and sustained swimming activity on swimming performance and the effects of exhaustive exercise on mortality of fasted juvenile rainbow trout. Fasting caused swimming performance to decline more rapidly for small fish than large fish, and warmer water temperatures and sustained swimming activity further decreased swimming performance. Exhaustive exercise increased mortality among fasted fish. Our observations suggest that juvenile rainbow trout with little or no food intake during winter can swim for long periods of time with little effect on mortality, but swimming to exhaustion can enhance mortality, especially among the smallest juveniles.

  9. Swimming Speed of The Breaststroke Kick

    PubMed Central

    Strzała, Marek; Krężałek, Piotr; Kaca, Marcin; Głąb, Grzegorz; Ostrowski, Andrzej; Stanula, Arkadiusz; Tyka, Aleksander

    2012-01-01

    The breaststroke kick is responsible for a considerable portion of the forward propulsion in breaststroke swimming. The aim of this study was to measure selected anthropometric variables and functional properties of a swimmer’s body: length of body parts; functional range of motion in the leg joints and anaerobic power of the lower limbs. Chosen kinematic variables useful in the evaluation of swimming performance in the breaststroke kick were evaluated. In the present research, swimming speed using breaststroke kicks depended to the largest extent on anaerobic endurance (0.46, p < 0.05 partial correlations with age control). In addition, knee external rotation and swimming technique index had an impact on swimming speed and kick length (both partial correlations with age control 0.35, p < 0.08). A kinematic analysis of the breaststroke kick hip displacement compatible with horizontal body displacement was significantly negatively correlated with foot slip in the water opposite to body displacement (partial correlations: with leg length control −0.43, p < 0.05; with shank length control −0.45, p < 0.05, respectively). Present research and measurements of selected body properties, physical endurance and kinematic movement analysis may help in making a precise determination of an athlete’s talent for breaststroke swimming. PMID:23486737

  10. Pool Rules: A Survival Guide for Parents and Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Susan J.

    2008-01-01

    In most sports and physical activities rules are present to facilitate participation, outlining courtesy during play as well as establishing guidelines for keeping any competition fair. In contrast, rules for appropriate behavior in swimming pools serve a much more important purpose--that of ensuring health and safety for all participants.…

  11. Effect of the Pacing Strategies on the Open Water 10km World Swimming Championships Performances.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Luis; Veiga, Santiago

    2017-10-16

    The aim of the present research was 1) to compare the pacing strategies of different level open water swimmers during the 10km race of the FINA 2015 World Swimming Championships (WCH), and 2) to relate these pacing strategies to the race performance. Final and intermediate split times as well as intermediate race positions from the 10-kilometer race participants (69 men and 51 women) were collected from the public domain and were divided into five groups (G1 to G5) depending on their finishing positions. Medalists and finalists (G1 and G2, respectively) presented an even pacing profile with similar swimming velocities to the less successful swimmers (G3 to G5) on the initial and mid stages of the race but a 1.5-3% increase in swimming velocity in the last quarter of the race. This fast end spurt was largely related to the race performance and was not observed in the G3 and G4 (even-paced profile) or in the G5 (positive pacing profile) groups. Intermediate race positions and lap rankings were negatively related to finishing position indicating a delayed positioning of the most successful swimmers at 25%, 50% and 75% of race distance. The adoption of a conservative starting strategy by open water swimmers with a negative pacing profile and delayed partial positioning seems to increase the chances of overall race success as it allows a fast end spurt that is highly related to successful finishing race positions.

  12. Identifying swimmers as water-polo or swim team-mates from visual displays of less than one second.

    PubMed

    Steel, Kylie A; Adams, Roger D; Canning, Colleen G

    2007-09-01

    Opportunities for ball passing in water-polo may be brief and the decision to pass only informed by minimal visual input. Since researchers using point light displays have shown that the walking or running gait of familiars can be identified, water-polo players may have the ability to recognize team-mates from their swimming gait. To test this hypothesis, members of a water-polo team and a competition swim team viewed two randomized sets of video clips, each less than one second long, of swimmers from both teams sprinting freestyle past a fixed camera. The arm stroke clip sequence showed only the upper body, and the kick sequence showed only the lower body. After viewing each video clip, observers rated their level of certainty as to whether the swimmer presented was a team-mate or not. Discrimination was significantly above chance in both groups. Water-polo players were better able to identify team-mates from their kick, whereas swimmers were better able to do so by viewing arm stroke. Our results suggest that, as with walking and running gait, small amounts of visual information about swimmers can be used for recognition, and so raise the possibility that specific training may be able to improve team-mate classification in water-polo, particularly in newly formed teams.

  13. Preventing Community-wide Transmission of Cryptosporidium: A Proactive Public Health Response to a Swimming Pool–Associated Outbreak — Auglaize County, Ohio, USA

    PubMed Central

    Cope, J.R.; Prosser, A.; Nowicki, S.; Roberts, M.W.; Scheer, D.; Anderson, C.; Longsworth, A.; Parsons, C.; Goldschmidt, D.; Johnston, S.; Bishop, H.; Xiao, L.; Hill, V.; Beach, M.; Hlavsa, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The incidence of recreational water–associated outbreaks in the United States has significantly increased, driven, at least in part, by outbreaks both caused by Cryptosporidium and associated with treated recreational water venues. Because of the parasite's extreme chlorine tolerance, transmission can occur even in well-maintained treated recreational water venues, (e.g., pools) and a focal cryptosporidiosis outbreak can evolve into a community-wide outbreak associated with multiple recreational water venues and settings (e.g., child care facilities). In August 2004 in Auglaize County, Ohio, multiple cryptosporidiosis cases were identified and anecdotally linked to Pool A. Within 5 days of the first case being reported, Pool A was hyperchlorinated to achieve 99.9% Cryptosporidium inactivition. A case-control study was launched to epidemiologically ascertain the outbreak source 11 days later. A total of 150 confirmed and probable cases were identified; the temporal distribution of illness onset was peaked, indicating a point-source exposure. Cryptosporidiosis was significantly associated with swimming in Pool A (matched odds ratio 121.7, 95% confidence interval 27.4–∞) but not with another venue or setting. The findings of this investigation suggest that proactive implementation of control measures, when increased Cryptosporidium transmission is detected but before an outbreak source is epidemiologically ascertained, might prevent a focal cryptosporidiosis outbreak from evolving into a community-wide outbreak. PMID:25907106

  14. Numerical simulation of ground-water flow in La Crosse County, Wisconsin, and into nearby pools of the Mississippi River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Randall J.; Saad, David A.; Chapel, Dawn M.

    2003-01-01

    The models provide estimates of the locations and amount of ground-water flow into Pool 8 and the southern portion of Pool 7 of the Mississippi River. Ground-water discharges into all areas of the pools, except along the eastern shore in the vicinity of the city of La Crosse and immediately downgradient from lock and dam 7 and 8. Ground-water flow into the pools is generally greatest around the perimeter with decreasing amounts away from the perimeter. An area of relatively high ground-water discharge extends out towards the center of Pool 7 from the upper reaches of the pool and may

  15. Swimming in Ireland: Immersions in therapeutic blue space.

    PubMed

    Foley, Ronan

    2015-09-01

    This paper explores swimming as a healthy body-water engagement in blue space at selected outdoor Irish swimming spots. Associated theoretical underpinnings draw from non-representational theories (NRT). Taking as a starting point the idea of immersion, the paper argues for a deeper application of NRT to blue space settings. In addition, the paper reflects recent therapeutic geographies research on differential experiences of health and wellbeing linked to such immersions. Methodologically, the paper uses observer participation and swimmer's own voices to draw affective and embodied accounts from on and within water. The act of swimming as an emplaced and performed therapeutic encounter is highlighted along with a more critical discussion of contested narratives associated with risk and respect. Theoretical learning suggests the need for greater attention to the production of affect from across the life-course and a fuller articulation of the in-betweenness of theory and empirical testimonies. Swimming emerges from the study as a potentially valuable health and wellbeing resource that can be more fully harnessed to inform wider public health policy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Increased water temperature renders single-housed C57BL/6J mice susceptible to antidepressant treatment in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Bächli, Heidi; Steiner, Michel A; Habersetzer, Ursula; Wotjak, Carsten T

    2008-02-11

    To investigate genotype x environment interactions in the forced swim test, we tested the influence of water temperature (20 degrees C, 25 degrees C, 30 degrees C) on floating behaviour in single-housed male C57BL/6J and BALB/c mice. We observed a contrasting relationship between floating and water temperature between the two strains, with C57BL/6J floating more and BALB/c floating less with increasing water temperature, independent of the lightening conditions and the time point of testing during the animals' circadian rhythm. Both strains showed an inverse relationship between plasma corticosterone concentration and water temperature, indicating that the differences in stress coping are unrelated to different perception of the aversive encounter. Treatment with desipramine (20mg/kg, i.p.) caused a reduction in immobility time in C57BL/6J mice if the animals were tested at 30 degrees C water temperature, with no effect at 25 degrees C and no effects on forced swim stress-induced corticosterone secretion. The same treatment failed to affect floating behaviour in BALB/c at any temperature, but caused a decrease in plasma corticosterone levels. Taken together we demonstrate that an increase in water temperature in the forced swim test exerts opposite effects on floating behaviour in C57BL/6J and BALB/c and renders single-housed C57BL/6J mice, but not BALB/c mice, susceptible to antidepressant-like behavioral effects of desipramine.

  17. The Mouse Forced Swim Test

    PubMed Central

    Can, Adem; Dao, David T.; Arad, Michal; Terrillion, Chantelle E.; Piantadosi, Sean C.; Gould, Todd D.

    2012-01-01

    The forced swim test is a rodent behavioral test used for evaluation of antidepressant drugs, antidepressant efficacy of new compounds, and experimental manipulations that are aimed at rendering or preventing depressive-like states. Mice are placed in an inescapable transparent tank that is filled with water and their escape related mobility behavior is measured. The forced swim test is straightforward to conduct reliably and it requires minimal specialized equipment. Successful implementation of the forced swim test requires adherence to certain procedural details and minimization of unwarranted stress to the mice. In the protocol description and the accompanying video, we explain how to conduct the mouse version of this test with emphasis on potential pitfalls that may be detrimental to interpretation of results and how to avoid them. Additionally, we explain how the behaviors manifested in the test are assessed. PMID:22314943

  18. Swimming performance of young lake trout after chronic exposure to PCBs and DDE

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rottiers, Donald V.; Bergstedt, Roger A.

    1981-01-01

    Swimming performance was measured in fry of lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) exposed to PCB's, DDE, and a combination of these two contaminants in both food and water at concentrations equal to, and 5 and 25 times higher than, levels found in Lake Michigan water and plankton. Fry were tested after about 50, 110, and 165 days of exposure. We measured swimming performance by forcing the fry to swim through a continuous series of incrementally increased velocities until the fish were exhausted. Although we observed significant differences in swimming performance between a few test groups, we detected no relation between swimming performance of the fry and exposure to PCB's or DDE, or both, at the concentrations tested. Inasmuch as swimming performance apparently was not affected by the levels of contamination by PCB's and DDE in Lake Michigan, impairment of swimming by these contaminants cannot account for the failure of lake trout reproduction in Lake Michigan.

  19. Parasitic Diseases: Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... from swimming pools, hot tubs, Jacuzzis, spas, fountains, lakes, rivers, springs, ponds, streams, or the ocean. Recreational ... contact with contaminated water from swimming pools, spas, lakes, rivers, or the ocean. Back To Top (https:// ...

  20. Do Go Near the Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, David G., Ed.

    1976-01-01

    A collection of eight articles explains that swimming is but one of the many aquatic sports that can take place in a swimming pool and that aquatic education is becoming an integral part of physical education programs. (MM)

  1. Effect of beetroot juice supplementation on aerobic response during swimming.

    PubMed

    Pinna, Marco; Roberto, Silvana; Milia, Raffaele; Marongiu, Elisabetta; Olla, Sergio; Loi, Andrea; Migliaccio, Gian Mario; Padulo, Johnny; Orlandi, Carmine; Tocco, Filippo; Concu, Alberto; Crisafulli, Antonio

    2014-01-29

    The beneficial effects of beetroot juice supplementation (BJS) have been tested during cycling, walking, and running. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether BJS can also improve performance in swimmers. Fourteen moderately trained male master swimmers were recruited and underwent two incremental swimming tests randomly assigned in a pool during which workload, oxygen uptake (VO₂), carbon dioxide production (VCO₂), pulmonary ventilation (VE), and aerobic energy cost (AEC) of swimming were measured. One was a control swimming test (CSW) and the other a swimming test after six days of BJS (0.5 l/day organic beetroot juice containing about 5.5 mmol of NO₃⁻). Results show that workload at anaerobic threshold was significantly increased by BJS as compared to the CSW test (6.3 ± 1 and 6.7 ± 1.1 kg during the CSW and the BJS test respectively). Moreover, AEC was significantly reduced during the BJS test (1.9 ± 0.5 during the SW test vs. 1.7 ± 0.3 kcal·kg⁻¹1·h⁻¹ during the BJS test). The other variables lacked a statistically significant effect with BJS. The present investigation provides evidence that BJS positively affects performance of swimmers as it reduces the AEC and increases the workload at anaerobic threshold.

  2. Chlorinated Chromosomes: The Impact of Human Use on the Levels of Disinfection By-products and Mutagenicity of Swimming Pools and Hot Tubs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pools and spas are enjoyed throughout the world for exercise and relaxation. However, there are no previous studies on mutagenicity of disinfected spa (hot tub) waters or comprehensive identification of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) formed in spas. Using 28 water samples from ...

  3. A simplified model to predict diurnal water temperature dynamics in a shallow tropical water pool.

    PubMed

    Paaijmans, Krijn P; Heusinkveld, Bert G; Jacobs, Adrie F G

    2008-11-01

    Water temperature is a critical regulator in the growth and development of malaria mosquito immatures, as they are poikilothermic. Measuring or estimating the diurnal temperature ranges to which these immatures are exposed is of the utmost importance, as these immatures will develop into adults that can transmit malaria. Recent attempts to predict the daily water temperature dynamics in mosquito breeding sites in Kenya have been successful. However, the developed model may be too complex, as the sophisticated equipment that was used for detailed meteorological observations is not widely distributed in Africa, making it difficult to predict the daily water temperature dynamics on a local scale. Therefore, we compared two energy budget models with earlier made observations of the daily water temperature dynamics in a small, shallow and clear water pool (diameter 0.96 m, depth 0.32 m) in Kenya. This paper describes (1) a complex 1-Dimensional model, and (2) a simplified second model, and (3) shows that both models mimic the water temperature dynamics in the water pool accurately. The latter model has the advantage that it only needs common weather data (air temperature, air humidity, wind speed and cloud cover) to estimate the diurnal temperature dynamics in breeding sites of African malaria mosquitoes.

  4. Cross‐Saharan transport of water vapor via recycled cold pool outflows from moist convection

    PubMed Central

    Trzeciak, Tomasz M.; Garcia‐Carreras, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Very sparse data have previously limited observational studies of meteorological processes in the Sahara. We present an observed case of convectively driven water vapor transport crossing the Sahara over 2.5 days in June 2012, from the Sahel in the south to the Atlas in the north. A daily cycle is observed, with deep convection in the evening generating moist cold pools that fed the next day's convection; the convection then generated new cold pools, providing a vertical recycling of moisture. Trajectories driven by analyses were able to capture the direction of the transport but not its full extent, particularly at night when cold pools are most active, and analyses missed much of the water content of cold pools. The results highlight the importance of cold pools for moisture transport, dust and clouds, and demonstrate the need to include these processes in models in order to improve the representation of Saharan atmosphere. PMID:28344367

  5. Investigation on the hot melting temperature field simulation of HDPE water supply pipeline in gymnasium pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhiqiang; Dai, Hongbin; Fu, Xibin

    2018-06-01

    In view of the special needs of the water supply and drainage system of swimming pool in gymnasium, the correlation of high density polyethylene (HDPE) pipe and the temperature field distribution during welding was investigated. It showed that the temperature field distribution has significant influence on the quality of welding. Moreover, the mechanical properties of the welded joint were analyzed by the bending test of the weld joint, and the micro-structure of the welded joint was evaluated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The one-dimensional unsteady heat transfer model of polyethylene pipe welding joints was established by MARC. The temperature field distribution during welding process was simulated, and the temperature field changes during welding were also detected and compared by the thermo-couple temperature automatic acquisition system. Results indicated that the temperature of the end surface of the pipe does not reach the maximum value, when it is at the end of welding heating. Instead, it reaches the maximum value at 300 sand latent heat occurs during the welding process. It concludes that the weld quality is the highest when the welding pressure is 0.2 MPa, and the heating temperature of HDPE heat fusion welding is in the range of 210 °C-230 °C.

  6. Healthy Swimming Is a Partnership Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    While one cannot control the water chemistry, he/she can control personal hygiene and facility cleanliness. Giardia and cryptosporidium (crypto) are only two of the many recreational water illnesses (RWIs) that can turn happy swim memories into serious illness situations. In this article, the author discusses three factors that determine how…

  7. Sex differences associated with intermittent swim stress.

    PubMed

    Warner, Timothy A; Libman, Matthew K; Wooten, Katherine L; Drugan, Robert C

    2013-11-01

    Various animal models of depression have been used to seek a greater understanding of stress-related disorders. However, there is still a great need for novel research in this area, as many individuals suffering from depression are resistant to current treatment methods. Women have a higher rate of depression, highlighting the need to investigate mechanisms of sex differences. Therefore, we employed a new animal model to assess symptoms of depression, known as intermittent swim stress (ISS). In this model, the animal experiences 100 trials of cold water swim stress. ISS has already been shown to cause signs of behavioral depression in males, but has yet to be assessed in females. Following ISS exposure, we looked at sex differences in the Morris water maze and forced swim test. The results indicated a spatial learning effect only in the hidden platform task between male and female controls, and stressed and control males. A consistent spatial memory effect was only seen for males exposed to ISS. In the forced swim test, both sexes exposed to ISS exhibited greater immobility, and the same males and females also showed attenuated climbing and swimming, respectively. The sex differences could be due to different neural substrates for males and females. The goal of this study was to provide the first behavioral examination of sex differences following ISS exposure, so the stage of estrous cycle was not assessed for the females. This is a necessary future direction for subsequent experiments. The current article highlights the importance of sex differences in response to stress.

  8. Mass effects meet species sorting: transformations of microbial assemblages in epiphreatic subsurface karst water pools.

    PubMed

    Shabarova, Tanja; Widmer, Franco; Pernthaler, Jakob

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the transformations of the microbial communities in epiphreatic karst cave pools with different flooding frequencies. Fingerprinting of 16S rRNA genes was combined with microscopic and sequence analysis to examine if source water would transport comparable microbial inocula into the pools at consecutive flood events, and to assess possible effects of residence time on the microbial assemblages during stagnant periods. Variability in the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and conductivity indicated differences between floods and changes of pool water over time. High numbers of Betaproteobacteria affiliated with Methylophilaceae and Comamonadaceae were introduced into the pools during floodings. While the former persisted in the pools, the latter exhibited considerable microdiversification. These Betaproteobacteria might thus represent core microbial groups in karst water. A decrease in the estimated total diversity of the remaining bacterial taxa was apparent after a few weeks of residence: Some were favoured by stagnant conditions, whereas the majority was rapidly outcompeted. Thus, the microbial communities consisted of different components governed by complementary assembly mechanisms (dispersal versus environmental filtering) upon introduction into the pools. High overlap of temporary and persistent community members between samplings from two winters, moreover, reflected the seasonal recurrence of the studied microbial assemblages. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. 76 FR 37269 - Safety Zone; Charleston Sharkfest Swim, Charleston Harbor, Charleston, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Charleston Sharkfest Swim, Charleston Harbor, Charleston, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... waters of Charleston Harbor, in Charleston, South Carolina during the Charleston Sharkfest Swim on Sunday, [[Page 37270

  10. Water-tunnel studies of heat balance in swimming mako sharks.

    PubMed

    Bernal, D; Sepulveda, C; Graham, J B

    2001-12-01

    The mako shark (Isurus oxyrinchus) has specialized vascular networks (retia mirabilia) forming counter-current heat exchangers that allow metabolic heat retention in certain regions of the body, including the aerobic, locomotor red muscle and the viscera. Red muscle, white muscle and stomach temperatures were measured in juvenile (5-13.6 kg) makos swimming steadily in a water tunnel and exposed to stepwise square-wave changes in ambient temperature (T(a)) to estimate the rates of heat transfer and to determine their capacity for the activity-independent control of heat balance. The rates of heat gain of red muscle during warming were significantly higher than the rates of heat loss during cooling, and neither the magnitude of the change in T(a) nor the direction of change in T(a) had a significant effect on red muscle latency time. Our findings for mako red muscle are similar to those recorded for tunas and suggest modulation of retial heat-exchange efficiency as the underlying mechanism controlling heat balance. However, the red muscle temperatures measured in swimming makos (0.3-3 degrees C above T(a)) are cooler than those measured previously in larger decked makos. Also, the finding of non-stable stomach temperatures contrasts with the predicted independence from T(a) recorded in telemetry studies of mako and white sharks. Our studies on live makos provide new evidence that, in addition to the unique convergent morphological properties between makos and tunas, there is a strong functional similarity in the mechanisms used to regulate heat transfer.

  11. Effect of Beetroot Juice Supplementation on Aerobic Response during Swimming

    PubMed Central

    Pinna, Marco; Roberto, Silvana; Milia, Raffaele; Marongiu, Elisabetta; Olla, Sergio; Loi, Andrea; Migliaccio, Gian Mario; Padulo, Johnny; Orlandi, Carmine; Tocco, Filippo; Concu, Alberto; Crisafulli, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The beneficial effects of beetroot juice supplementation (BJS) have been tested during cycling, walking, and running. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether BJS can also improve performance in swimmers. Fourteen moderately trained male master swimmers were recruited and underwent two incremental swimming tests randomly assigned in a pool during which workload, oxygen uptake (VO2), carbon dioxide production (VCO2), pulmonary ventilation (VE), and aerobic energy cost (AEC) of swimming were measured. One was a control swimming test (CSW) and the other a swimming test after six days of BJS (0.5l/day organic beetroot juice containing about 5.5 mmol of NO3−). Results show that workload at anaerobic threshold was significantly increased by BJS as compared to the CSW test (6.3 ± 1 and 6.7 ± 1.1 kg during the CSW and the BJS test respectively). Moreover, AEC was significantly reduced during the BJS test (1.9 ± 0.5 during the SW test vs. 1.7 ± 0.3 kcal·kg−1·h−1 during the BJS test). The other variables lacked a statistically significant effect with BJS. The present investigation provides evidence that BJS positively affects performance of swimmers as it reduces the AEC and increases the workload at anaerobic threshold. PMID:24481133

  12. Swim Speed, Behavior, and Movement of North Atlantic Right Whales (Eubalaena glacialis) in Coastal Waters of Northeastern Florida, USA

    PubMed Central

    Hain, James H. W.; Hampp, Joy D.; McKenney, Sheila A.; Albert, Julie A.; Kenney, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    In a portion of the coastal waters of northeastern Florida, North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) occur close to shore from December through March. These waters are included within the designated critical habitat for right whales. Data on swim speed, behavior, and direction of movement – with photo-identification of individual whales – were gathered by a volunteer sighting network working alongside experienced scientists and supplemented by aerial observations. In seven years (2001–2007), 109 tracking periods or “follows” were conducted on right whales during 600 hours of observation from shore-based observers. The whales were categorized as mother-calf pairs, singles and non-mother-calf pairs, and groups of 3 or more individuals. Sample size and amount of information obtained was largest for mother-calf pairs. Swim speeds varied within and across observation periods, individuals, and categories. One category, singles and non mother-calf pairs, was significantly different from the other two – and had the largest variability and the fastest swim speeds. Median swim speed for all categories was 1.3 km/h (0.7 kn), with examples that suggest swim speeds differ between within-habitat movement and migration-mode travel. Within-habitat right whales often travel back-and-forth in a north-south, along-coast, direction, which may cause an individual to pass by a given point on several occasions, potentially increasing anthropogenic risk exposure (e.g., vessel collision, fishing gear entanglement, harassment). At times, mothers and calves engaged in lengthy stationary periods (up to 7.5 h) that included rest, nursing, and play. These mother-calf interactions have implications for communication, learning, and survival. Overall, these behaviors are relevant to population status, distribution, calving success, correlation to environmental parameters, survey efficacy, and human-impacts mitigation. These observations contribute important parameters to

  13. Swim speed, behavior, and movement of North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) in coastal waters of northeastern Florida, USA.

    PubMed

    Hain, James H W; Hampp, Joy D; McKenney, Sheila A; Albert, Julie A; Kenney, Robert D

    2013-01-01

    In a portion of the coastal waters of northeastern Florida, North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) occur close to shore from December through March. These waters are included within the designated critical habitat for right whales. Data on swim speed, behavior, and direction of movement--with photo-identification of individual whales--were gathered by a volunteer sighting network working alongside experienced scientists and supplemented by aerial observations. In seven years (2001-2007), 109 tracking periods or "follows" were conducted on right whales during 600 hours of observation from shore-based observers. The whales were categorized as mother-calf pairs, singles and non-mother-calf pairs, and groups of 3 or more individuals. Sample size and amount of information obtained was largest for mother-calf pairs. Swim speeds varied within and across observation periods, individuals, and categories. One category, singles and non mother-calf pairs, was significantly different from the other two--and had the largest variability and the fastest swim speeds. Median swim speed for all categories was 1.3 km/h (0.7 kn), with examples that suggest swim speeds differ between within-habitat movement and migration-mode travel. Within-habitat right whales often travel back-and-forth in a north-south, along-coast, direction, which may cause an individual to pass by a given point on several occasions, potentially increasing anthropogenic risk exposure (e.g., vessel collision, fishing gear entanglement, harassment). At times, mothers and calves engaged in lengthy stationary periods (up to 7.5 h) that included rest, nursing, and play. These mother-calf interactions have implications for communication, learning, and survival. Overall, these behaviors are relevant to population status, distribution, calving success, correlation to environmental parameters, survey efficacy, and human-impacts mitigation. These observations contribute important parameters to conservation biology

  14. Temperature dependence of water diffusion pools in brain white matter.

    PubMed

    Dhital, Bibek; Labadie, Christian; Stallmach, Frank; Möller, Harald E; Turner, Robert

    2016-02-15

    Water diffusion in brain tissue can now be easily investigated using magnetic resonance (MR) techniques, providing unique insights into cellular level microstructure such as axonal orientation. The diffusive motion in white matter is known to be non-Gaussian, with increasing evidence for more than one water-containing tissue compartment. In this study, freshly excised porcine brain white matter was measured using a 125-MHz MR spectrometer (3T) equipped with gradient coils providing magnetic field gradients of up to 35,000 mT/m. The sample temperature was varied between -14 and +19 °C. The hypothesis tested was that white matter contains two slowly exchanging pools of water molecules with different diffusion properties. A Stejskal-Tanner diffusion sequence with very short gradient pulses and b-factors up to 18.8 ms/μm(2) was used. The dependence on b-factor of the attenuation due to diffusion was robustly fitted by a biexponential function, with comparable volume fractions for each component. The diffusion coefficient of each component follows Arrhenius behavior, with significantly different activation energies. The measured volume fractions are consistent with the existence of three water-containing compartments, the first comprising relatively free cytoplasmic and extracellular water molecules, the second of water molecules in glial processes, and the third comprising water molecules closely associated with membranes, as for example, in the myelin sheaths and elsewhere. The activation energy of the slow diffusion pool suggests proton hopping at the surface of membranes by a Grotthuss mechanism, mediated by hydrating water molecules. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Swim-Training Changes the Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Skeletogenesis in Zebrafish Larvae (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Fiaz, Ansa W.; Léon-Kloosterziel, Karen M.; Gort, Gerrit; Schulte-Merker, Stefan; van Leeuwen, Johan L.; Kranenbarg, Sander

    2012-01-01

    Fish larvae experience many environmental challenges during development such as variation in water velocity, food availability and predation. The rapid development of structures involved in feeding, respiration and swimming increases the chance of survival. It has been hypothesized that mechanical loading induced by muscle forces plays a role in prioritizing the development of these structures. Mechanical loading by muscle forces has been shown to affect larval and embryonic bone development in vertebrates, but these investigations were limited to the appendicular skeleton. To explore the role of mechanical load during chondrogenesis and osteogenesis of the cranial, axial and appendicular skeleton, we subjected zebrafish larvae to swim-training, which increases physical exercise levels and presumably also mechanical loads, from 5 until 14 days post fertilization. Here we show that an increased swimming activity accelerated growth, chondrogenesis and osteogenesis during larval development in zebrafish. Interestingly, swim-training accelerated both perichondral and intramembranous ossification. Furthermore, swim-training prioritized the formation of cartilage and bone structures in the head and tail region as well as the formation of elements in the anal and dorsal fins. This suggests that an increased swimming activity prioritized the development of structures which play an important role in swimming and thereby increasing the chance of survival in an environment where water velocity increases. Our study is the first to show that already during early zebrafish larval development, skeletal tissue in the cranial, axial and appendicular skeleton is competent to respond to swim-training due to increased water velocities. It demonstrates that changes in water flow conditions can result into significant spatio-temporal changes in skeletogenesis. PMID:22529905

  16. Determination of fish swimming speed by ultrasonic telemetry.

    PubMed

    Voegeli, F A; Pincock, D G

    1980-01-01

    Design of a small and simple sensor for direct measurement of swimming speed of fish and its incorporation into ultrasonic telemetry transmitters is described. The sensor used measures the speed of rotation of a free-wheeling propeller which is exposed to water flow. Two transmitters incorporating this sensor are described. The first is a very simple one providing swimming speed while the second incorporates two temperature sensors as well.

  17. 77 FR 41271 - Safety Zone; Newburgh to Beacon Swim, Newburgh, Hudson River, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Newburgh to Beacon Swim, Newburgh, Hudson River, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... navigable waters of the Hudson River, NY in the vicinity of Newburgh, NY for the annual Newburgh Beacon Swim... hazards associated with swimmers competing in a swim across the Hudson River. Persons and vessels are...

  18. Determination of dissolved bromate in drinking water by ion chromatography and post column reaction: interlaboratory study.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Fernando; Robouch, Piotr; de la Calle, Maria Beatriz; Emteborg, Håkan; Charoud-Got, Jean; Schmitz, Franz

    2011-01-01

    A collaborative study, International Evaluation Measurement Programme-25a, was conducted in accordance with international protocols to determine the performance characteristics of an analytical method for the determination of dissolved bromate in drinking water. The method should fulfill the analytical requirements of Council Directive 98/83/EC (referred to in this work as the Drinking Water Directive; DWD). The new draft standard method under investigation is based on ion chromatography followed by post-column reaction and UV detection. The collaborating laboratories used the Draft International Organization for Standardization (ISO)/Draft International Standard (DIS) 11206 document. The existing standard method (ISO 15061:2001) is based on ion chromatography using suppressed conductivity detection, in which a preconcentration step may be required for the determination of bromate concentrations as low as 3 to 5 microg/L. The new method includes a dilution step that reduces the matrix effects, thus allowing the determination of bromate concentrations down to 0.5 microg/L. Furthermore, the method aims to minimize any potential interference of chlorite ions. The collaborative study investigated different types of drinking water, such as soft, hard, and mineral water. Other types of water, such as raw water (untreated), swimming pool water, a blank (named river water), and a bromate standard solution, were included as test samples. All test matrixes except the swimming pool water were spiked with high-purity potassium bromate to obtain bromate concentrations ranging from 1.67 to 10.0 microg/L. Swimming pool water was not spiked, as this water was incurred with bromate. Test samples were dispatched to 17 laboratories from nine different countries. Sixteen participants reported results. The repeatability RSD (RSD(r)) ranged from 1.2 to 4.1%, while the reproducibility RSD (RSDR) ranged from 2.3 to 5.9%. These precision characteristics compare favorably with those of ISO

  19. Board Diving Regulations in Public Swimming Pools and Risk of Injury.

    PubMed

    Williams, David; Odin, Louise

    2016-06-01

    Public session access to diving boards is one of the stepping stones for those wishing to develop their skills in the sport of diving. The extent to which certain dive forms are considered risky (forward/backward/rotations) and therefore not permitted is a matter for local pool managers. In Study 1, 20 public pools with diving facilities responded to a U.K. survey concerning their diving regulation policy and related injury incidence in the previous year. More restrictive regulation of dive forms was not associated with a decrease in injuries (rs [42] = -0.20, p = 0.93). In Study 2, diving risk perception and attitudes towards regulation were compared between experienced club divers (N = 22) and nondivers (N = 22). Risk was perceived to be lower for those with experience, and these people favored less regulation. The findings are interpreted in terms of a risk thermostat model, where for complex physical performance activities such as diving, individuals may exercise caution in proportion to their ability and previous experience of success and failure related to the activity. Though intuitively appealing, restrictive regulation of public pool diving may be ineffective in practice because risk is not simplistically associated with dive forms, and divers are able to respond flexibly to risk by exercising caution where appropriate. © 2015 Society for Risk Analysis.

  20. TOPEX/El Nino Watch - El Nino Warm Water Pool Decreasing, Jan, 08, 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This image of the Pacific Ocean was produced using sea surface height measurements taken by the U.S.-French TOPEX/Poseidon satellite. The image shows sea surface height relative to normal ocean conditions on Jan. 8, 1998, and sea surface height is an indicator of the heat content of the ocean. The volume of the warm water pool related to the El Nino has decreased by about 40 percent since its maximum in early November, but the area of the warm water pool is still about one and a half times the size of the continental United States. The volume measurements are computed as the sum of all the sea surface height changes as compared to normal ocean conditions. In addition, the maximum water temperature in the eastern tropical Pacific, as measured by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is still higher than normal. Until these high temperatures diminish, the El Nino warm water pool still has great potential to disrupt global weather because the high water temperatures directly influence the atmosphere. Oceanographers believe the recent decrease in the size of the warm water pool is a normal part of El Nino's natural rhythm. TOPEX/Poseidon has been tracking these fluctuations of the El Nino warm pool since it began in early 1997. These sea surface height measurements have provided scientists with their first detailed view of how El Nino's warm pool behaves because the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite measures the changing sea surface height with unprecedented precision. In this image, the white and red areas indicate unusual patterns of heat storage; in the white areas, the sea surface is between 14 and 32 centimeters (6 to 13 inches) above normal; in the red areas, it's about 10 centimeters (4 inches) above normal. The green areas indicate normal conditions, while purple (the western Pacific) means at least 18 centimeters (7 inches) below normal sea level.

    The El Nino phenomenon is thought to be triggered when the steady westward blowing trade winds

  1. Swimming Three Ice Miles within Fifteen Hours.

    PubMed

    Stjepanovic, Mirko; Nikolaidis, Pantelis T.; Knechtle, Beat

    2017-08-31

    Ice Mile swimming (1608 m in water of below 5 °Celsius) is becoming increasingly popular. This case study aimed to identify body core temperature and selected haematological and biochemical parameters before and after repeated Ice Miles. An experienced ice swimmer completed three consecutive Ice Miles within 15 h. Swim times, body core temperatures, and selected urinary and haematological parameters were recorded. Body core temperature reached its maximum between 5, 8 and 15 min after immersion (37.7°C, 38.1°C, and 38.0°C, respectively). The swimmer suffered hypothermia during the first Ice Mile (35.4°C) and body core temperature dropped furthermore to 34.5°C during recovery after the first Ice Mile. He developed a metabolic acidosis in both the first and the last Ice Mile (pH 7.31 and pH 7.34, respectively). We observed hyperkalaemia ([K⁺] > 5.5 mM) after the second Ice Mile (6.9 mM). This was followed by a drop in [K⁺] to3.7 mM after the third Ice Mile. Anticipatory thermogenesis (i.e. an initial increase of body core temperature after immersion in ice cold water) seems to be a physiological response in a trained athlete. The results suggest that swimming in ice-cold water leads to a metabolic acidosis, which the swimmer compensates with hyperventilation (i.e. leading to respiratory alkalosis). The shift of serum [K⁺] could increase the risk of a cardiac arrhythmia. Further studies addressing the physiology and potential risks of Ice Mile swimming are required to substantiate this finding.

  2. Swimming Pattern of Vorticella convallaria Trophont in the Hele-Shaw Confinements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Younggil; Ryu, Sangjin; Jung, Sunghwan

    In the trophont form Vorticella convallariais a sessile stalked ciliate, which consists of an inverted bell-shaped cell body (zooid) and a slender stalk attaching the zooid to a substrate. Under mechanical shearing, the zooid is separated from the stalk and can swim using circular cilia rows around the oral part. Here we present how the stalkless trophont zooid of V. convallariaswims in Hele-Shaw geometries, as a model system for microorganism swimming. After having harvested stalkless zooids, we observed their swimming in water between two glass surfaces with narrow gaps using video microscopy. Based on their swimming trajectories measured with image analysis, we investigated how the swimming pattern of the trophont zooid of V. convallaria was influenced by the constraints.

  3. Particle Image Velocimetry Around Swimming Paramecia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giarra, Matthew; Jana, Saikat; Jung, Sunghwan; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2011-11-01

    Microorganisms like paramecia propel themselves by synchronously beating thousands of cilia that cover their bodies. Using micro-particle image velocimetry (μPIV), we quantitatively measured velocity fields created by the movement of Paramecium multimicronucleatum through a thin (~100 μm) film of water. These velocity fields exhibited different features during different swimming maneuvers, which we qualitatively categorized as straight forward, turning, or backward motion. We present the velocity fields measured around organisms during each type of motion, as well as calculated path lines and fields of vorticity. For paramecia swimming along a straight path, we observed dipole-like flow structures that are characteristic of a prolate-spheroid translating axially in a quiescent fluid. Turning and backward-swimming organisms showed qualitatively different patterns of vortices around their bodies. Finally, we offer hypotheses about the roles of these different flow patterns in the organism's ability to maneuver.

  4. Swimming for your life: locomotor effort and oxygen consumption during the green turtle (Chelonia mydas) hatchling frenzy.

    PubMed

    Booth, David T

    2009-01-01

    Swimming effort and oxygen consumption of newly emerged green turtle Chelonia mydas hatchlings was measured simultaneously and continuously for the first 18 h of swimming after hatchlings entered the water. Oxygen consumption was tightly correlated to swimming effort during the first 12 h of swimming indicating that swimming is powered predominantly by aerobic metabolism. The patterns of swimming effort and oxygen consumption could be divided into three distinct phases: (1) the rapid fatigue phase from 0 to 2 h when the mean swim thrust decreased from 45 to 30 mN and oxygen consumption decreased from 33 to 18 ml h(-1); (2) the slow fatigue phase from 2 to 12 h when the mean swim thrust decreased from 30 to 22 mN and oxygen consumption decreased from 18 to 10 ml h(-1); and (3) the sustained effort phase from 12 to 18 h when mean swim thrust averaged 22 mN and oxygen consumption averaged 10 ml h(-1). The decrease in mean swim thrust was caused by a combination of a decrease in front flipper stroke rate during a power stroking bout, a decrease in mean maximum thrust during a power stroking bout and a decrease in the proportion of time spent power stroking. Hence hatchlings maximise their swimming thrust as soon as they enter the water, a time when a fast swimming speed will maximise the chance of surviving the gauntlet of predators inhabiting the shallow fringing reef before reaching the relative safety of deeper water.

  5. Ovarian and uterine alterations following forced swimming: An immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Seyed Saadat, Seyedeh Nazanin; Mohammadghasemi, Fahimeh; Ebrahimi, Hannan; Rafati Sajedi, Hanieh; Chatrnour, Gelayol

    2016-10-01

    Physical exercise is known to be a stressor stimulus that leads to reproductive disruption. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of forced swimming on the uterus and ovaries in mice. Adult mice (N=24) were divided into the following three groups: A, control; B, swimming in water (10 o C); and C, swimming in water (23 o C). Swimmers swam for 5 min daily for 5 consecutive days/ wk during 2 wks. An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to determine serum estradiol, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and testosterone levels. Immunohistochemistry was performed to study apoptotic cells or estrogen receptor (ER) expression in uterine epithelial cells and ovaries. ANOVA was used for statistical analysis. Swimming in both groups reduced the serum FSH and estradiol levels (p<0.01) without having a significant effect on the serum testosterone level or percentage of apoptosis in ovarian and uterine tissues (p<0.01) compared with controls. A significant reduction in the number of ERs in the uterus and ovaries, and secondary and graafian follicles were observed in groups B and C compared with controls (p<0.01); however the number of primordial and primary follicles were not significantly changed in the ovaries. Forced swimming of 2 wks duration reduces the serum levels of FSH and estradiol without having effects on apoptosis in the ovaries or uteri of mice. Over a long period of time, forced swimming may have an adverse effect on fertility.

  6. Water Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Silver ionization water purification technology was originally developed for Apollo spacecraft. It was later used to cleanse swimming pools and has now been applied to industrial cooling towers and process coolers. Sensible Technologies, Inc. has added two other technologies to the system, which occupies only six square feet. It is manufactured in three capacities, and larger models are custom built on request. The system eliminates scale, corrosion, algae, bacteria and debris, and because of the NASA technology, viruses and waterborne bacteria are also destroyed. Applications include a General Motors cooling tower, amusement parks, ice manufacture and a closed-loop process cooling system.

  7. Recovery effects after extinction in the Morris swimming pool navigation task.

    PubMed

    Prados, José; Manteiga, Raúl D; Sansa, Joan

    2003-08-01

    In three experiments in which rats were used as subjects, we developed an extinction procedure using a Morris pool. The animals were trained to find a hidden platform located at a fixed position and were then given extinction trials in which the platform was removed from the pool. When training and extinction were carried out in the same context and time was allowed to elapse between extinction and test, spontaneous recovery of learning was observed. On the other hand, those rats that received extinction in a context different from the one used for training failed to show spontaneous recovery of learning when tested in the extinction context after an interval of 96 h. However, they did show renewal of spatial learning when tested in the training context. These results show that extinction in the spatial domain behaves like extinction in standard conditioning preparations.

  8. Propulsive efficiency of frog swimming with different feet and swimming patterns

    PubMed Central

    Jizhuang, Fan; Wei, Zhang; Bowen, Yuan; Gangfeng, Liu

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aquatic and terrestrial animals have different swimming performances and mechanical efficiencies based on their different swimming methods. To explore propulsion in swimming frogs, this study calculated mechanical efficiencies based on data describing aquatic and terrestrial webbed-foot shapes and swimming patterns. First, a simplified frog model and dynamic equation were established, and hydrodynamic forces on the foot were computed according to computational fluid dynamic calculations. Then, a two-link mechanism was used to stand in for the diverse and complicated hind legs found in different frog species, in order to simplify the input work calculation. Joint torques were derived based on the virtual work principle to compute the efficiency of foot propulsion. Finally, two feet and swimming patterns were combined to compute propulsive efficiency. The aquatic frog demonstrated a propulsive efficiency (43.11%) between those of drag-based and lift-based propulsions, while the terrestrial frog efficiency (29.58%) fell within the range of drag-based propulsion. The results illustrate the main factor of swimming patterns for swimming performance and efficiency. PMID:28302669

  9. Content Validity and Inter-Rater Reliability of the Halliwick-Concept-Based Instrument "Swimming with Independent Measure"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srsen, Katja Groleger; Vidmar, Gaj; Pikl, Masa; Vrecar, Irena; Burja, Cirila; Krusec, Klavdija

    2012-01-01

    The Halliwick concept is widely used in different settings to promote joyful movement in water and swimming. To assess the swimming skills and progression of an individual swimmer, a valid and reliable measure should be used. The Halliwick-concept-based Swimming with Independent Measure (SWIM) was introduced for this purpose. We aimed to determine…

  10. Measurement of hydrodynamic force generation by swimming dolphins using bubble DPIV.

    PubMed

    Fish, Frank E; Legac, Paul; Williams, Terrie M; Wei, Timothy

    2014-01-15

    Attempts to measure the propulsive forces produced by swimming dolphins have been limited. Previous uses of computational hydrodynamic models and gliding experiments have provided estimates of thrust production by dolphins, but these were indirect tests that relied on various assumptions. The thrust produced by two actively swimming bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) was directly measured using digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV). For dolphins swimming in a large outdoor pool, the DPIV method used illuminated microbubbles that were generated in a narrow sheet from a finely porous hose and a compressed air source. The movement of the bubbles was tracked with a high-speed video camera. Dolphins swam at speeds of 0.7 to 3.4 m s(-1) within the bubble sheet oriented along the midsagittal plane of the animal. The wake of the dolphin was visualized as the microbubbles were displaced because of the action of the propulsive flukes and jet flow. The oscillations of the dolphin flukes were shown to generate strong vortices in the wake. Thrust production was measured from the vortex strength through the Kutta-Joukowski theorem of aerodynamics. The dolphins generated up to 700 N during small amplitude swimming and up to 1468 N during large amplitude starts. The results of this study demonstrated that bubble DPIV can be used effectively to measure the thrust produced by large-bodied dolphins.

  11. A standardised individual unsupervised water exercise intervention for healthy pregnant women. A qualitative feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Backhausen, Mette G; Katballe, Malene; Hansson, Helena; Tabor, Ann; Damm, Peter; Hegaard, Hanne K

    2014-12-01

    Low back pain during pregnancy is common and associated with sick leave. Studies suggest that exercise may reduce low back pain during pregnancy. Before carrying out a randomised controlled trail with individual water exercise as intervention a qualitative feasibility study was done. To explore women's views and experiences of the acceptability and benefits of and possible barriers to the standardised individual unsupervised water exercise intervention. Eleven women were interviewed after participating in a water exercise intervention. Content analysis was used. Four main categories emerged: motivation to participate, attitudes towards the exercise programme, perception of benefits, and acceptability of supportive components. The women had a desire to stay physically active during pregnancy and found water exercise a suitable, type of exercise to perform during pregnancy. The intervention was experienced to have benefits on both their physical health and their mental well-being. Crowded swimming pools were perceived as the greatest barrier. It is feasible to perform a RCT using the described intervention. The intervention was accepted by the participants because it supported their desire to be physically active during pregnancy. The main barrier was crowded swimming pools and this issue must be addressed in a future RCT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Lesions of the hippocampus or dorsolateral striatum disrupt distinct aspects of spatial navigation strategies based on proximal and distal information in a cued variant of the Morris water task

    PubMed Central

    Rice, James P.; Wallace, Douglas G.; Hamilton, Derek A.

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampus and dorsolateral striatum are critically involved in spatial navigation based on extra-maze and intra-maze cues, respectively. Previous reports from our laboratory suggest that behavior in the Morris water task may be guided by both cue types, and rats appear to switch from extra-pool to intra-pool cues to guide navigation in a sequential manner within a given trial. In two experiments, rats with hippocampal or dorsolateral striatal lesions were trained and tested in water task paradigms that involved translation and removal of a cued platform within the pool and translations of the pool itself with respect to the extra-pool cue reference frame. In the first experiment, moment-to-moment analyses of swim behavior indicate that hippocampal lesions disrupt initial trajectories based on extra-pool cues at the beginning of the trial, while dorsolateral striatal lesions disrupt subsequent swim trajectories based on the location of the cued platform at the end of the trial. In the second experiment lesions of the hippocampus, but not the dorsolateral striatum, impaired directional responding in situations where the pool was shifted within the extra-pool cue array. These results are important for understanding the cooperative interactions between the hippocampus and dorsolateral striatum in spatial learning and memory, and establish that these brain areas are continuously involved in goal-directed spatial navigation. These results also highlight the importance of the hippocampus in directional responding in addition to place navigation. PMID:25907746

  13. Concentration-dependent toxicity effect of SDBS on swimming behavior of freshwater fishes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Ma, Jing; Zhou, Siyun; Ma, Fang

    2015-07-01

    Sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) is a kind of widely used anionic surfactant and its discharge may pose potential risk to the receiving aquatic ecosystem. The aim of our study is to investigate the toxic effect of SDBS on fish swimming behavior quantitatively, followed by examination whether there are significant differences of swimming behavior among applied fish species (i.e. zebra fish (Danio rerio), Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) and red carp (Cyprinus carpio)). The swimming speed and vertical position were analyzed after the fish exposed to SDBS aiming to reflect the toxicity of SDBS on fish. Our results showed that the swimming behavior of three fishes was significantly affected by SDBS, although there were slight differences of swimming pattern changes among three fish species when they exposed to the same concentration of SDBS. It could be seen that red carp, one of the native fish species in China, can be used as a model fish to reflect the water quality changes as well as zebra fish and Japanese medaka which are commonly used as model fishes. Our study also illustrated that the swimming behavior monitoring may have a good application prospect in pre-warning of water quality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Hypothesised mechanisms of swimming-related death: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Asplund, Chad A; Creswell, Lawrence L

    2016-11-01

    Recent reports from triathlon and competitive open-water swimming indicate that these events have higher rates of death compared with other forms of endurance sport. The potential causal mechanism for swimming-related death is unclear. To examine available studies on the hypothesised mechanisms of swimming-related death to determine the most likely aetiologies. MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (1950 to present) were searched, yielding 1950 potential results, which after title and citation reviews were reduced to 83 possible reports. Studies included discussed mechanisms of death during swimming in humans, and were Level 4 evidence or higher. A total of 17 studies (366 total swimmers) were included for further analysis: 5 investigating hyperthermia/hypothermia, 7 examining cardiac mechanisms and responses, and 5 determining the presence of pulmonary edema. The studies provide inconsistent and limited-quality or disease-oriented evidence that make definitive conclusions difficult. The available evidence is limited but may suggest that cardiac arrhythmias are the most likely aetiology of swimming-related death. While symptoms of pulmonary edema may occur during swimming, current evidence does not support swimming-induced pulmonary edema as a frequent cause of swimming-related death, nor is there evidence to link hypothermia or hyperthermia as a causal mechanism. Further higher level studies are needed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. HYDROLOGY AND LANDSCAPE CONNECTIVITY OF VERNAL POOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vernal pools are shaped by hydrologic processes which influence many aspects of pool function. The hydrologic budget of a pool can be summarized by a water balance equation that relates changes in the amount of water in the pool to precipitation, ground- and surface-water flows, ...

  16. Modeling the effect of varying swim speeds on fish passage through velocity barriers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Castro-Santos, T.

    2006-01-01

    The distance fish can swim through zones of high-velocity flow is an important factor limiting the distribution and conservation of riverine and diadromous fishes. Often, these barriers are characterized by nonuniform flow conditions, and it is likely that fish will swim at varying speeds to traverse them. Existing models used to predict passage success, however, typically include the unrealistic assumption that fish swim at a constant speed regardless of the speed of flow. This paper demonstrates how the maximum distance of ascent through velocity barriers can be estimated from the swim speed-fatigue time relationship, allowing for variation in both swim speed and water velocity.

  17. Ovarian and uterine alterations following forced swimming: An immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Seyed Saadat, Seyedeh Nazanin; Mohammadghasemi, Fahimeh; Ebrahimi, Hannan; Rafati Sajedi, Hanieh; Chatrnour, Gelayol

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physical exercise is known to be a stressor stimulus that leads to reproductive disruption. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of forced swimming on the uterus and ovaries in mice. Materials and Methods: Adult mice (N=24) were divided into the following three groups: A, control; B, swimming in water (10oC); and C, swimming in water (23oC). Swimmers swam for 5 min daily for 5 consecutive days/ wk during 2 wks. An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to determine serum estradiol, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and testosterone levels. Immunohistochemistry was performed to study apoptotic cells or estrogen receptor (ER) expression in uterine epithelial cells and ovaries. ANOVA was used for statistical analysis. Results: Swimming in both groups reduced the serum FSH and estradiol levels (p<0.01) without having a significant effect on the serum testosterone level or percentage of apoptosis in ovarian and uterine tissues (p<0.01) compared with controls. A significant reduction in the number of ERs in the uterus and ovaries, and secondary and graafian follicles were observed in groups B and C compared with controls (p<0.01); however the number of primordial and primary follicles were not significantly changed in the ovaries. Conclusion: Forced swimming of 2 wks duration reduces the serum levels of FSH and estradiol without having effects on apoptosis in the ovaries or uteri of mice. Over a long period of time, forced swimming may have an adverse effect on fertility. PMID:27921086

  18. Water and sediment quality of dry season pools in a dryland river system: the upper Leichhardt River, Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Alana K; Taylor, Mark P; Hudson-Edwards, Karen A

    2011-07-01

    This article presents the geochemical characteristics and physicochemical properties of water and sediment from twelve semi-permanent, dryland pools in the upper Leichhardt River catchment, north-west Queensland, Australia. The pools were examined to better understand the quality of sediments and temporary waters in a dryland system with a well-established metal contamination problem. Water and sediment sampling was conducted at the beginning of the hydroperiod in May and September 2007. Water samples were analyzed for major solute compositions (Ca, Na, K, Mg, Cl, SO(4), HCO(3)) and water-soluble (operationally defined as the <0.45 μm fraction) metals (Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn). Sediment samples were analyzed for total extractable and bioaccessible metals (As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn), elemental composition and grain morphology. At the time of sampling a number of pools contained water and sediment with elevated concentrations, compared to Australian regulatory guidelines, of Cu (maximum: water 28 μg L(-1); sediment 770 mg kg(-1)), Pb (maximum: water 3.4 μg L(-1); sediment 630 mg kg(-1)) and Zn (maximum: water 150 μg L(-1); sediment 780 mg kg(-1)). Concentrations of Cd and As in pools were relatively low and generally within Australian regulatory guideline values. Localized factors, such as the interaction of waters with anthropogenic contaminants from modern and historic mine wastes (i.e. residual smelter and slag materials), exert influence on the quality of pool waters. Although the pools of the upper Leichhardt River catchment are contaminated, they do not appear to be the primary repository of water and sediment associated metals when compared to materials in the remainder channel and floodplain. Nevertheless, a precautionary approach should be adopted to mitigating human exposure to contaminated environments, which might include the installation of appropriate warning signs by local health and environmental authorities.

  19. Targeted Recruitment for Naval Special Warfare (SEALS): Connecting NSW to Recruit Pools with Social Movement Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    water polo, triathlon, lacrosse, boxing rugby , and swimming as well as those participating in activities such as mountain biking, woodworking...participated in any of the following sports: water polo, triathlon, lacrosse, boxing rugby , and swimming. Also controlled for is the level of a...strong sport attribute. The sports within this strong sport variable are water polo, triathlon, lacrosse, boxing, rugby , and swimming. Each of these

  20. Going for a Swim

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covington, Savannah

    2016-01-01

    Is anything more refreshing than going for a nice, long swim? The math scenarios presented in this article will take the reader back to hot summer days and remind the reader what a cool dip in the water feels like. Solving these problems is enjoyable and encourages the solver to think of the many ways that math is all around--even in the middle of…

  1. ASCAN Ochoa floats in pool during Elgin AFB water survival training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    1990 Group 13 Astronaut Candidate (ASCAN) Ellen Ochoa, wearing helmet and flight suit, climbs into a single person life raft while floating in a pool at Elgin Air Force Base (AFB) in Pensacola, Florida, during water survival exercises. Ochoa's underarm flotation device holds her above the water as she pulls herself into the life raft. The training familiarized the candidates with survival techniques necessary in the event of a water landing. ASCANs participated in the exercises from 08-14-90 through 08-17-90.

  2. The validation of a swimming turn wall-contact-time measurement system: a touchpad application reliability study.

    PubMed

    Brackley, Victoria; Ball, Kevin; Tor, Elaine

    2018-05-12

    The effectiveness of the swimming turn is highly influential to overall performance in competitive swimming. The push-off or wall contact, within the turn phase, is directly involved in determining the speed the swimmer leaves the wall. Therefore, it is paramount to develop reliable methods to measure the wall-contact-time during the turn phase for training and research purposes. The aim of this study was to determine the concurrent validity and reliability of the Pool Pad App to measure wall-contact-time during the freestyle and backstroke tumble turn. The wall-contact-times of nine elite and sub-elite participants were recorded during their regular training sessions. Concurrent validity statistics included the standardised typical error estimate, linear analysis and effect sizes while the intraclass correlating coefficient (ICC) was used for the reliability statistics. The standardised typical error estimate resulted in a moderate Cohen's d effect size with an R 2 value of 0.80 and the ICC between the Pool Pad and 2D video footage was 0.89. Despite these measurement differences, the results from this concurrent validity and reliability analyses demonstrated that the Pool Pad is suitable for measuring wall-contact-time during the freestyle and backstroke tumble turn within a training environment.

  3. Chemistry of Hot Spring Pool Waters in Calamba and Los Banos and Potential Effect on the Water Quality of Laguna De Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balangue, M. I. R. D.; Pena, M. A. Z.; Siringan, F. P.; Jago-on, K. A. B.; Lloren, R. B.; Taniguchi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Since the Spanish Period (1600s), natural hot spring waters have been harnessed for balneological purposes in the municipalities of Calamba and Los Banos, Laguna, south of Metro Manila. There are at more than a hundred hot spring resorts in Brgy. Pansol, Calamba and Tadlac, Los Banos. These two areas are found at the northern flanks of Mt. Makiling facing Laguna de Bay. This study aims to provide some insights on the physical and chemical characteristics of hot spring resorts and the possible impact on the lake water quality resulting from the disposal of used water. Initial ocular survey of the resorts showed that temperature of the pool water ranges from ambient (>300C) to as high as 500C with an average pool size of 80m3. Water samples were collected from a natural hot spring and pumped well in Los Banos and another pumped well in Pansol to determine the chemistry. The field pH ranges from 6.65 to 6.87 (Pansol springs). Cation analysis revealed that the thermal waters belonged to the Na-K-Cl-HCO3 type with some trace amount of heavy metals. Methods for waste water disposal are either by direct discharge down the drain of the pool or by discharge in the public road canal. Both methods will dump the waste water directly into Laguna de Bay. Taking in consideration the large volume of waste water used especially during the peak season, the effect on the lake water quality would be significant. It is therefore imperative for the environmental authorities in Laguna to regulate and monitor the chemistry of discharges from the pool to protect both the lake water as well as groundwater quality.

  4. Assessment of three-dimensional joint kinematics of the upper limb during simulated swimming using wearable inertial-magnetic measurement units.

    PubMed

    Fantozzi, Silvia; Giovanardi, Andrea; Magalhães, Fabrício Anício; Di Michele, Rocco; Cortesi, Matteo; Gatta, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of the joint kinematics during swimming plays a fundamental role both in sports conditioning and in clinical contexts. Contrary to the traditional video analysis, wearable inertial-magnetic measurements units (IMMUs) allow to analyse both the underwater and aerial phases of the swimming stroke over the whole length of the swimming pool. Furthermore, the rapid calibration and short data processing required by IMMUs provide coaches and athletes with an immediate feedback on swimming kinematics during training. This study aimed to develop a protocol to assess the three-dimensional kinematics of the upper limbs during swimming using IMMUs. Kinematics were evaluated during simulated dry-land swimming trials performed in the laboratory by eight swimmers. A stereo-photogrammetric system was used as the gold standard. The results showed high coefficient of multiple correlation (CMC) values, with median (first-third quartile) of 0.97 (0.93-0.95) and 0.99 (0.97-0.99) for simulated front-crawl and breaststroke, respectively. Furthermore, the joint angles were estimated with an accuracy increasing from distal to proximal joints, with wrist indices showing median CMC values always higher than 0.90. The present findings represent an important step towards the practical use of technology based on IMMUs for the kinematic analysis of swimming in applied contexts.

  5. Swimming capability and swimming behavior of juvenile acipenser schrenckii.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lu; Taupier, Rachel; Johnson, David; Tu, Zhiying; Liu, Guoyong; Huang, Yingping

    2013-03-01

    Acipenser schrenckii, the Amur Sturgeon, was a commercially valuable fish species inhabiting the Amur (Heilongjiang) River but populations have rapidly declined in recent years. Dams impede A. schrenckii spawning migration and wild populations were critically endangered. Building fishways helped maintain fish populations but data on swimming performance and behavior was crucial for fishway design. To obtain such data on A. schrenckii, a laboratory study of juvenile A. schrenckii (n = 18, body mass = 32.7 ± 1.2 g, body length = 18.8 ± 0.3 cm) was conducted using a stepped velocity test carried out in a fish respirometer equipped with a high-speed video camera at 20°C. Results indicate: (1) The counter-current swimming capability of A. schrenckii was low with critical swimming speed of 1.96 ± 0.10 BL/sec. (2) When a linear function was fitted to the data, oxygen consumption, as a function of swimming speed, was determined to be MO2  = 337.29 + 128.10U (R(2)  = 0.971, P < 0.001) and the power value (1.0) of U indicated high swimming efficiency. (3) Excess post-exercise oxygen cost was 48.44 mgO2 /kg and indicated excellent fatigue recovery. (4) Cost of transport decreased slowly with increased swimming speed. (5) Increased swimming speed led to increases in the tail beat frequency and stride length. This investigation contributed to the basic science of fish swimming behavior and provided data required for the design of fishways. Innovative methods have allowed cultivation of the species in the Yangtze River and, if effective fishways could be incorporated into the design of future hydropower projects on the Amur River, it would contribute to conservation of wild populations of A. schrenckii. The information provided here contributes to the international effort to save this critically endangered species. J. Exp. Zool. 319A:149-155, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. [Swimming, physical activity and health: a historical perspective].

    PubMed

    Conti, A A

    2015-01-01

    Swimming, which is the coordinated and harmonic movement of the human body inside a liquid medium by means of the combined action of the superior and inferior limbs, is a physical activity which is diffused throughout the whole world and it is practiced by healthy and non-healthy subjects. Swimming is one of the physical activities with less contraindications and, with limited exceptions, can be suggested to individuals of both sexes and of every age range, including the most advanced. Swimming requires energy both for the floating process and for the anterograde progression, with a different and variable osteo-arthro-muscular involvement according to the different styles. The energetic requirement is about four times that for running, with an overall efficiency inferior to 10%; the energetic cost of swimming in the female subject is approximately two thirds of that in the male subject. The moderate aerobic training typical of swimming is useful for diabetic and hypertensive individuals, for people with painful conditions of rachis, as also for obese and orthopaedic patients. Motor activity inside the water reduces the risk of muscular-tendinous lesions and, without loading the joints in excess, requires the harmonic activation of the whole human musculature. Swimming is an activity requiring multiple abilities, ranging from a sense of equilibrium to that of rhythm, from reaction speed to velocity, from joint mobility to resistance. The structured interest for swimming in the perspective of human health from the beginning of civilization, as described in this contribution, underlines the relevance attributed to this activity in the course of human history.

  7. Differences in the energy cost between children and adults during front crawl swimming.

    PubMed

    Kjendlie, Per-Ludvik; Ingjer, Frank; Madsen, Ørjan; Stallman, Robert Keig; Stray-Gundersen, James

    2004-04-01

    There is little information available about the swimming economy of children. The aim of this study was to examine any possible differences in swimming economy in children and adults, swimming front crawl submaximally. Swimming economy was compared in adults [ n=13, aged 21.4 (3.7) years] and children [n=10, aged 11.8 (0.8) years] tested at four submaximal 6-min workloads. Oxygen consumption (VO2) was measured with Douglas bags in a 25-m pool and pacer lights were used to control the velocities. Swimming economy was scaled to body size using mass (BM), body surface area (BSA) and body length (BL). Children had lower VO2 (litres per minute) at a given velocity than the adults, with 1.86 (0.28) and 2.39 (0.20) l min(-1) respectively (at 1.00 m s(-1)). When scaling for size, children had higher VO2 measured in litres per square metre per minute and millilitres per kilogram per minute (divided by BSA and BM) than adults. The VO2 divided by BL was found not to differ between the two groups. The O2 cost of swimming 1 m at a velocity of 1.00 m s(-1) was lower in the children [31.0 (4.6) ml m(-1)] than in the adults [39.9 (3.3) ml m(-1) P<0.01], probably due to a lower total drag in the children. The results also showed that for children a relationship between swimming velocity cubed and VO2 exists as shown earlier for adults. It is concluded that, when scaling for BSA and BM, children are less economical than adults, when scaling for BL, children are equally economical, and when considering energy cost per metre and absolute VO2, children are more economical than the adults.

  8. Swimming of a Sea Butterfly with an Elongated Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakas, Ferhat; Maas, Amy E.; Murphy, David W.

    2017-11-01

    Sea butterflies (pteropods) are small, zooplanktonic marine snails which swim by flapping highly flexible parapodia. Previous studies show that the swimming hydrodynamics of Limacina helicina, a polar pteropod with a spiraled shell, is similar to tiny insect flight aerodynamics and that forward-backward pitching is key for lift generation. However, swimming by diverse pteropod species with different shell shapes has not been examined. We present measurements of the swimming of Cuvierina columnella, a warm water species with an elongated non-spiraled shell collected off the coast of Bermuda. With a body length of 9 mm, wing beat frequency of 4-6 Hz and swimming speed of 35 mm/s, these organisms swim at a Reynolds number of approximately 300, larger than that of L. helicina. High speed 3D kinematics acquired via two orthogonal cameras reveals that the elongated shell correlates with reduced body pitching and that the wings bend approximately 180 degrees in each direction, overlapping at the end of each half-stroke. Time resolved 2D flow measurements collected with a micro-PIV system reveal leading edge vortices present in both power and recovery strokes. Interactions between the overlapping wings and the shell also likely play a role in lift generation.

  9. Effect of temperature on maximum swimming speed and cost of transport in juvenile European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

    PubMed

    Claireaux, Guy; Couturier, Christine; Groison, Anne-Laure

    2006-09-01

    This study is an attempt to gain an integrated understanding of the interactions between temperature, locomotion activity and metabolism in the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). To our knowledge this study is among the few that have investigated the influence of the seasonal changes in water temperature on swimming performance in fish. Using a Brett-type swim-tunnel respirometer the relationship between oxygen consumption and swimming speed was determined in fish acclimatised to 7, 11, 14, 18, 22, 26 and 30 degrees C. The corresponding maximum swimming speed (U(max)), optimal swimming speed (U(opt)), active (AMR) and standard (SMR) metabolic rates as well as aerobic metabolic scope (MS) were calculated. Using simple mathematical functions, these parameters were modelled as a function of water temperature and swimming speed. Both SMR and AMR were positively related to water temperature up to 24 degrees C. Above 24 degrees C SMR and AMR levelled off and MS tended to decrease. We found a tight relationship between AMR and U(max) and observed that raising the temperature increased AMR and increased swimming ability. However, although fish swam faster at high temperature, the net cost of transport (COT(net)) at a given speed was not influence by the elevation of the water temperature. Although U(opt) doubled between 7 degrees C and 30 degrees C (from 0.3 to 0.6 m s(-1)), metabolic rate at U(opt) represented a relatively constant fraction of the animal active metabolic rate (40-45%). A proposed model integrates the effects of water temperature on the interaction between metabolism and swimming performance. In particular the controlling effect of temperature on AMR is shown to be the key factor limiting maximal swimming speed of sea bass.

  10. Brief communication: Swimming and diving behavior in apes (Pan troglodytes and Pongo pygmaeus): first documented report.

    PubMed

    Bender, Renato; Bender, Nicole

    2013-09-01

    Extant hominoids, including humans, are well known for their inability to swim instinctively. We report swimming and diving in two captive apes using visual observation and video recording. One common chimpanzee and one orangutan swam repeatedly at the water surface over a distance of 2-6 m; both individuals submerged repeatedly. We show that apes are able to overcome their negative buoyancy by deliberate swimming, using movements which deviate from the doggy-paddle pattern observed in other primates. We suggest that apes' poor swimming ability is due to behavioral, anatomical, and neuromotor changes related to an adaptation to arboreal life in their early phylogeny. This strong adaptive focus on arboreal life led to decreased opportunities to interact with water bodies and consequently to a reduction of selective pressure to maintain innate swimming behavior. As the doggy paddle is associated with quadrupedal walking, a deviation from terrestrial locomotion might have interfered with the fixed rhythmic action patterns responsible for innate swimming. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Effects of Water Exercise Swimming Program on Aquatic Skills and Social Behaviors in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Chien-Yu

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a 10 week water exercise swimming program (WESP) on the aquatic skills and social behaviors of 16 boys with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). In the first 10 week phase (phase I), eight children (group A) received the WESP while eight children (group B) did not. A second 10 week phase…

  12. Everyone Swims: A Community Partnership and Policy Approach to Address Health Disparities in Drowning and Obesity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stempski, Sarah; Liu, Lenna; Grow, H. Mollie; Pomietto, Maureen; Chung, Celeste; Shumann, Amy; Bennett, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Well-known disparities exist in rates of obesity and drowning, two public health priorities. Addressing these disparities by increasing access to safe swimming and water recreation may yield benefits for both obesity and injury prevention. "Everyone Swims," a community partnership, brought community health clinics and water recreation…

  13. Direct observation of terahertz surface modes in nanometer-sized liquid water pools.

    PubMed

    Boyd, J E; Briskman, A; Colvin, V L; Mittleman, D M

    2001-10-01

    The far-infrared absorption spectrum of nanometer-sized water pools at the core of AOT micelles exhibits a pronounced resonance which is absent in bulk water. The amplitude and spectral position of this resonance are sensitive to the size of the confined water core. This resonance results from size-dependent modifications in the vibrational density of states, and thus has far-reaching implications for chemical processes which involve water sequestered within small cavities. These data represent the first study of the terahertz dielectric properties of confined liquids.

  14. Sustained exercise-trained juvenile black carp (Mylopharyngodon piceus) at a moderate water velocity exhibit improved aerobic swimming performance and increased postprandial metabolic responses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiuming; Zhang, Yaoguang; Li, Xiaojin; Zheng, Hua; Peng, Jianglan

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT The objectives of this study were to examine whether sustained exercise training at four water velocities, i.e. nearly still water (control), 1 body length (BL) s−1, 2 BL s−1 and 4 BL s−1, has effects on swimming performance and digestive metabolism in juvenile black carp (Mylopharyngodon piceus). The results demonstrated that fish subjected to sustained training at 2 and 4 BL s−1 showed significantly higher critical swimming speed (Ucrit) and maximum metabolic rate (MMR) over the control group. Fish subjected to sustained training at 1 and 2 BL s−1 showed a significantly (30 and 54%) prolonged duration, 14 and 17% higher postprandial ṀO2 increment (i.e. ṀO2peak), and 62 and 92% more energy expended on specific dynamic action (SDA), respectively, after consuming a similar meal over fish kept in nearly still water. These results suggest that (1) sustained exercise training at a higher speed (2 or 4 BL s−1) had a positive influence on the aerobic swimming performance of juvenile M. piceus, which may be associated with improved aerobic metabolism; and (2) sustained exercise training at a lower speed (1 or 2 BL s−1) resulted in elevated postprandial metabolic responses in juvenile M. piceus. PMID:29463516

  15. Assessment of swimming associated health effects in marine bathing beach: an example from Morib beach (Malaysia).

    PubMed

    Praveena, Sarva Mangala; Pauzi, Norfasmawati Mohd; Hamdan, Munashamimi; Sham, Shaharuddin Mohd

    2015-03-15

    A survey among beachgoers was conducted to determine the swimming associated health effects experienced and its relationship with beach water exposure behaviour in Morib beach. For beach water exposure behaviour, the highest frequency of visit among the respondents was once a year (41.9%). For ways of water exposure, whole body exposure including head was the highest (38.5%). For duration of water exposure, 30.8% respondents prefer to be in water for about 30 min with low possibilities of accidental ingestion of beach water. A total of 30.8% of beachgoers in Morib beach were reported of having dermal symptoms. Bivariate analysis showed only water activity, water contact and accidental ingestion of beach water showed significant association with swimming associated health effects experienced by swimmers. This study output showed that epidemiological study can be used to identify swimming associated health effects in beach water exposed to faecal contamination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Swimming Performance of Adult Asian Carp: Field Assessment Using a Mobile Swim Tunnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    The effect of temperature on swimming performance and oxygen consumption in adult sockeye (Oncorhynchus nerka) and coho (O. kisutch) salmon stocks...tunnel to determine the critical swim speed (Ucrit), oxygen consumption (VO2), and endurance at a single velocity. Tunnel Type Tunnel Size (L...specially designed mobile swim tunnel indicated that it might be used effectively with other large, active, free-swimming planktivores, including bigheaded

  17. Tethered swimming can be used to evaluate force contribution for short-distance swimming performance.

    PubMed

    Morouço, Pedro G; Marinho, Daniel A; Keskinen, Kari L; Badillo, Juan J; Marques, Mário C

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was two-fold: (a) to compare stroke and the physiological responses between maximal tethered and free front crawl swimming and (b) to evaluate the contribution of force exertion for swimming performance over short distances. A total of 34 male swimmers, representing various levels of competitive performance, participated in this study. Each participant was tested in both a 30-second maximal tethered swimming test and a 50-m free swimming test. The tethered force parameters, the swimming speed, stroke (stroke rate [SR]), and the physiological responses (increase in blood lactate concentration [ΔBLa], heart rate, and rate of perceived exertion) were recorded and calculated. The results showed no differences in stroke and the physiological responses between tethered and free swimming, with a high level of agreement for the SR and ΔBLa. A strong correlation was obtained between the maximum impulse of force per stroke and the speed (r = 0.91; p < 0.001). Multiple regression analysis revealed that the maximum impulse and SR in the tethered condition explained 84% of the free swimming performance. The relationship between the swimming speed and maximum force tended to be nonlinear, whereas linear relationships were observed with the maximum impulse. This study demonstrates that tethered swimming does not significantly alter stroke and the physiological responses compared with free swimming, and that the maximum impulse per stroke should be used to evaluate the balance between force and the ability to effectively apply force during sprint swimming. Consequently, coaches can rely on tethered forces to identify strength deficits and improve swimming performance over short distances.

  18. Pool boiling of water-Al2O3 and water-Cu nanofluids on horizontal smooth tubes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Experimental investigation of heat transfer during pool boiling of two nanofluids, i.e., water-Al2O3 and water-Cu has been carried out. Nanoparticles were tested at the concentration of 0.01%, 0.1%, and 1% by weight. The horizontal smooth copper and stainless steel tubes having 10 mm OD and 0.6 mm wall thickness formed test heater. The experiments have been performed to establish the influence of nanofluids concentration as well as tube surface material on heat transfer characteristics at atmospheric pressure. The results indicate that independent of concentration nanoparticle material (Al2O3 and Cu) has almost no influence on heat transfer coefficient while boiling of water-Al2O3 or water-Cu nanofluids on smooth copper tube. It seems that heater material did not affect the boiling heat transfer in 0.1 wt.% water-Cu nanofluid, nevertheless independent of concentration, distinctly higher heat transfer coefficient was recorded for stainless steel tube than for copper tube for the same heat flux density. PMID:21711741

  19. Physiological, biomechanical and anthropometrical predictors of sprint swimming performance in adolescent swimmers.

    PubMed

    Lätt, Evelin; Jürimäe, Jaak; Mäestu, Jarek; Purge, Priit; Rämson, Raul; Haljaste, Kaja; Keskinen, Kari L; Rodriguez, Ferran A; Jürimäe, Toivo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationships between 100-m front crawl swimming performance and relevant biomechanical, anthropometrical and physiological parameters in male adolescent swimmers. Twenty five male swimmers (mean ± SD: age 15. 2 ± 1.9 years; height 1.76 ± 0.09 m; body mass 63.3 ± 10.9 kg) performed an all-out 100-m front crawl swimming test in a 25-m pool. A respiratory snorkel and valve system with low hydrodynamic resistance was used to collect expired air. Oxygen uptake was measured breath-by-breath by a portable metabolic cart. Swimming velocity, stroke rate (SR), stroke length and stroke index (SI) were assessed during the test by time video analysis. Blood samples for lactate measurement were taken from the fingertip pre exercise and at the third and fifth minute of recovery to estimate net blood lactate accumulation (ΔLa). The energy cost of swimming was estimated from oxygen uptake and blood lactate energy equivalent values. Basic anthropometry included body height, body mass and arm span. Body composition parameters were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Results indicate that biomechanical factors (90.3%) explained most of 100-m front crawl swimming performance variability in these adolescent male swimmers, followed by anthropometrical (45.8%) and physiological (45.2%) parameters. SI was the best single predictor of performance, while arm span and ∆La were the best anthropometrical and physiological indicators, respectively. SI and SR alone explained 92.6% of the variance in competitive performance. These results confirm the importance of considering specific stroke technical parameters when predicting success in young swimmers. Key pointsThis study investigated the influence of different anthropometrical, physiological and biomechanical parameters on 100-m swimming performance in adolescent boys.Biomechanical factors contributed most to sprint swimming performance in these young male swimmers (90

  20. Swimming mechanics and propulsive efficiency in the chambered nautilus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neil, Thomas R.; Askew, Graham N.

    2018-02-01

    The chambered nautilus (Nautilus pompilius) encounters severe environmental hypoxia during diurnal vertical movements in the ocean. The metabolic cost of locomotion (Cmet) and swimming performance depend on how efficiently momentum is imparted to the water and how long on-board oxygen stores last. While propulsive efficiency is generally thought to be relatively low in jet propelled animals, the low Cmet in Nautilus indicates that this is not the case. We measured the wake structure in Nautilus during jet propulsion swimming, to determine their propulsive efficiency. Animals swam with either an anterior-first or posterior-first orientation. With increasing swimming speed, whole cycle propulsive efficiency increased during posterior-first swimming but decreased during anterior-first swimming, reaching a maximum of 0.76. The highest propulsive efficiencies were achieved by using an asymmetrical contractile cycle in which the fluid ejection phase was relatively longer than the refilling phase, reducing the volume flow rate of the ejected fluid. Our results demonstrate that a relatively high whole cycle propulsive efficiency underlies the low Cmet in Nautilus, representing a strategy to reduce the metabolic demands in an animal that spends a significant part of its daily life in a hypoxic environment.

  1. Humeral loads during swimming and walking in turtles: implications for morphological change during aquatic reinvasions.

    PubMed

    Young, Vanessa K H; Wienands, Charlotte E; Wilburn, Brittany P; Blob, Richard W

    2017-11-01

    During evolutionary reinvasions of water by terrestrial vertebrates, ancestrally tubular limb bones often flatten to form flippers. Differences in skeletal loading between land and water might have facilitated such changes. In turtles, femoral shear strains are significantly lower during swimming than during walking, potentially allowing a release from loads favoring tubular shafts. However, flipper-like morphology in specialized tetrapod swimmers is most accentuated in the forelimbs. To test whether the forelimbs of turtles also experience reduced torsional loading in water, we compared strains on the humerus of river cooters ( Pseudemys concinna ) between swimming and terrestrial walking. We found that humeral shear strains are also lower during swimming than during terrestrial walking; however, this appears to relate to a reduction in overall strain magnitude, rather than a specific reduction in twisting. These results indicate that shear strains show similar reductions between swimming and walking for forelimb and hindlimb, but these reductions are produced through different mechanisms. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Nosocomial outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa folliculitis associated with a physiotherapy pool.

    PubMed Central

    Schlech, W F; Simonsen, N; Sumarah, R; Martin, R S

    1986-01-01

    Outbreaks of community-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa folliculitis have recently been described in association with health spa whirlpools. In February 1984 we detected an outbreak of Pseudomonas folliculitis among hospital staff and patients using a swimming pool in a newly constructed physiotherapy unit. A rash developed in 5 (45%) of the 11 physiotherapists who had used the pool, as compared with 0 of the 17 who had not (p less than 0 005). Pseudomonas folliculitis also developed in 6 (21%) of 29 outpatients and 4 (33%) of 12 inpatients who had used the facility; Pseudomonas infection of a surgical wound also developed in 1 of the 4 inpatients. The epidemic curve was consistent with a continuing common-source outbreak. P. aeruginosa, serotype O:10, was isolated from three physiotherapists, the patient with an infected surgical wound and the pool. A case-control study of pool users did not identify risk factors for infection, although the physiotherapists had spent longer in the pool than had the patients. After hyperchlorination and structural repairs to the pool, no further cases were identified among pool users. This outbreak is the first reported nosocomial outbreak of Pseudomonas folliculitis. Further investigation is needed to determine the risk of serious Pseudomonas infections in hospitalized patients using physiotherapy pools. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3955486

  3. Effects of crude oil and swimming behavior and survival in the rice rat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe, J.L.; Esher, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    Oil slicks in laboratory test chambers inhibited swimming behavior of rice rats, and reduced survival at low temperature. Predisposition to enter the water and swim was greatly reduced at both high (200 ml/m2 water surface) and low (20 ml/m2) concentrations of oil. Survival was significantly affected only at high concentrations. The results may be of value in predicting the impact of oil spills on the mammal community of coastal marshes.

  4. Long-term effects of microgravity on the swimming behaviour of young rats.

    PubMed

    Walton, Kerry D; Benavides, Louis; Singh, Neeraj; Hatoum, Nagi

    2005-06-01

    The postnatal development of sensory systems has been shown in studies over the last four decades to be influenced by experience during critical periods of development. We report here that similar experience-dependent development can be observed in the swimming behaviour of young rats reared from postnatal day 14 (P14) to P30 in the reduced gravitational field of low earth orbit. Animals flown in space when placed in the water on the day of landing maintained their head and forelimbs in a balanced posture. However, until the animals began to swim, their hindquarters showed little lateral postural control resulting in rotation about the longitudinal axis (60 degrees+/-4 deg). Such results suggest an 'unlinking' of postural control of the forequarters from the hindquarters in the early hours after landing. Similar instability seen in animals age-matched to the day of launch (97+/-7 deg) and in ground control animals (9+/-3 deg) was corrected within one or two rotations, even in the absence of swimming. Animals flown in space began to swim sooner after being placed in the water, and the duration of swimming strokes was shorter than in control animals. Motion analysis revealed a difference in the swimming style on landing day. In flight animals, the knee joint was more flexed throughout the stroke, there was a narrower range of movement, and the linear velocity of the tip of the foot was faster throughout most of the stroke than in age-matched control animals. Thus, posture in the water as well as swimming speed and style were altered in the animals flown in space. Some of these characteristics persisted for as long as the animals were followed (30 days). These included the short pre-swimming interval and short stroke duration in flight animals. These findings clearly show that an altered gravitational field influences the postnatal development of motor function. The nature of the differences between animals reared in space for 16 days and those remaining on the ground

  5. Beta-Alanine Supplementation Improves Throwing Velocities in Repeated Sprint Ability and 200-m Swimming Performance in Young Water Polo Players.

    PubMed

    Claus, Gabriel Machado; Redkva, Paulo Eduardo; Brisola, Gabriel Mota Pinheiro; Malta, Elvis Sousa; de Araujo Bonetti de Poli, Rodrigo; Miyagi, Willian Eiji; Zagatto, Alessandro Moura

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of beta-alanine supplementation on specific tests for water polo. Fifteen young water polo players (16 ± 2 years) underwent a 200-m swimming performance, repeated-sprint ability test (RSA) with free throw (shooting), and 30-s maximal tethered eggbeater kicks. Participants were randomly allocated into two groups (placebo × beta-alanine) and supplemented with 6.4g∙day -1 of beta-alanine or a placebo for six weeks. The mean and total RSA times, the magnitude based inference analysis showed a likely beneficial effect for beta-alanine supplementation (both). The ball velocity measured in the throwing performance after each sprint in the RSA presented a very like beneficial inference in the beta-alanine group for mean (96.4%) and percentage decrement of ball velocity (92.5%, likely beneficial). Furthermore, the percentage change for mean ball velocity was different between groups (beta-alanine=+2.5% and placebo=-3.5%; p = .034). In the 30-s maximal tethered eggbeater kicks the placebo group presented decreased peak force, mean force, and fatigue index, while the beta-alanine group maintained performance in mean force (44.1%, possibly beneficial), only presenting decreases in peak force. The 200-m swimming performance showed a possibly beneficial effect (68.7%). Six weeks of beta-alanine supplementation was effective for improving ball velocity shooting in the RSA, maintaining performance in the 30-s test, and providing possibly beneficial effects in the 200-m swimming performance.

  6. Design of hair-like appendages and comparative analysis on their coordination toward steady and efficient swimming.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Bokeon; Bae, Joonbum

    2017-05-22

    The locomotion of water beetles has been widely studied in biology owing to their remarkable swimming skills. Inspired by the oar-like legs of water beetles, designing a robot that swims under the principle of drag-powered propulsion can lead to highly agile mobility. But its motion can easily be discontinuous and jerky due to backward motions (i.e. retraction) of the legs. Here we proposed novel hair-like appendages and consider their coordination to achieve steady and efficient swimming on the water surface. First of all, we propose several design schemes and fabrication methods of the hair-like appendages, which can passively adjust their projected area while obtaining enough thrust. The coordination between the two pairs of legs, as with water beetles in nature, were also investigated to achieve steady swimming without backward movement by varying the beating frequency and phase of the legs. To verify the functionality of the hair-like appendages and their coordinations, six different types of appendages were fabricated, and two robots (one with a single pair of legs and the other with two pairs of legs) were built. Locomotion of the robots was extensively compared through experiments, and it was found that steady swimming was achieved by properly coordinating the two pairs of legs without sacrificing their speed. Also, owing to the lower velocity fluctuation during swimming, it was shown that using two pairs of legs was more energy efficient than the robot with single pair of legs.

  7. Analysis of swimming performance: perceptions and practices of US-based swimming coaches.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Robert; Corley, Gavin; Godfrey, Alan; Osborough, Conor; Newell, John; Quinlan, Leo Richard; ÓLaighin, Gearóid

    2016-01-01

    In elite swimming, a broad range of methods are used to assess performance, inform coaching practices and monitor athletic progression. The aim of this paper was to examine the performance analysis practices of swimming coaches and to explore the reasons behind the decisions that coaches take when analysing performance. Survey data were analysed from 298 Level 3 competitive swimming coaches (245 male, 53 female) based in the United States. Results were compiled to provide a generalised picture of practices and perceptions and to examine key emerging themes. It was found that a disparity exists between the importance swim coaches place on biomechanical analysis of swimming performance and the types of analyses that are actually conducted. Video-based methods are most frequently employed, with over 70% of coaches using these methods at least monthly, with analyses being mainly qualitative in nature rather than quantitative. Barriers to the more widespread use of quantitative biomechanical analysis in elite swimming environments were explored. Constraints include time, cost and availability of resources, but other factors such as sources of information on swimming performance and analysis and control over service provision are also discussed, with particular emphasis on video-based methods and emerging sensor-based technologies.

  8. Experimental study on pool boiling of distilled water and HFE7500 fluid under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yan-jie; Chen, Xiao-qian; Huang, Yi-yong; Li, Guang-yu

    2018-02-01

    The experimental study on bubble behavior and heat transfer of pool boiling for distilled water and HFE7500 fluid under microgravity has been conducted by using drop tower in the National Microgravity Laboratory of China (NMLC). Two MCH ceramic plates of 20 mm(L) × 10 mm(W) × 1.2 mm(H) were used as the heaters. The nucleate boiling evolution under microgravity was observed during the experiment. It has been found that at the same heat flux, the bubbles of HFE7500 (which has smaller contact angle) grew faster and bigger, moved quickly on the heater surface, and were easier to merge into a central big bubble with other bubbles than that of distilled water. The whole process of bubbles coalescence from seven to one was recorded by using video camera. For distilled water (with bigger contact angle), the bubbles tended to keep at the nucleate location on heater surface, and the central big bubble evolved at its nucleate cite by absorbing smaller bubbles nearby. Compared with the bubbles under normal gravity, bubble radius of distilled water under microgravity was about 1.4 times bigger and of HFE7500 was about more than 6 times bigger till the end of experiment. At the beginning, pool boiling heat transfer of distilled water was advanced and then impeded under microgravity. As to HFE7500, the pool boiling impedes the heat transfer from heater to liquid under microgravity throughout the experiment.

  9. Hospital hydrotherapy pools treated with ultra violet light: bad bacteriological quality and presence of thermophilic Naegleria.

    PubMed Central

    De Jonckheere, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    The microbiological quality of eight halogenated and two u.v.-treated hydrotherapy pools in hospitals was investigated. The microbiological quality of halogenated hydrotherapy pools was comparable to halogenated public swimming pools, although in some Pseudomonas aeruginosa and faecal pollution indicators were more frequent due to bad management. On the other hand u.v.-treated hydrotherapy pools had very bad microbiological quality. Apart from faecal pollution indicators, P. aeruginosa was present in very high numbers. Halogenated hydrotherapy pools were not highly contaminated with amoebae, and Naegleria spp. were never detected. On the other hand u.v.-treated pools contained very high numbers of thermophilic Naegleria. The Naegleria isolated were identified as N. lovaniensis, a species commonly found in association with N. fowleri. Isoenzyme analysis showed a different type of N. lovaniensis was present in each of two u.v.-treated pools. Images Plate 1 PMID:7061835

  10. Experimental Studies and Dynamics Modeling Analysis of the Swimming and Diving of Whirligig Beetles (Coleoptera: Gyrinidae)

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xinghua; Zhang, Mingjun

    2012-01-01

    Whirligig beetles (Coleoptera, Gyrinidae) can fly through the air, swiftly swim on the surface of water, and quickly dive across the air-water interface. The propulsive efficiency of the species is believed to be one of the highest measured for a thrust generating apparatus within the animal kingdom. The goals of this research were to understand the distinctive biological mechanisms that allow the beetles to swim and dive, while searching for potential bio-inspired robotics applications. Through static and dynamic measurements obtained using a combination of microscopy and high-speed imaging, parameters associated with the morphology and beating kinematics of the whirligig beetle's legs in swimming and diving were obtained. Using data obtained from these experiments, dynamics models of both swimming and diving were developed. Through analysis of simulations conducted using these models it was possible to determine several key principles associated with the swimming and diving processes. First, we determined that curved swimming trajectories were more energy efficient than linear trajectories, which explains why they are more often observed in nature. Second, we concluded that the hind legs were able to propel the beetle farther than the middle legs, and also that the hind legs were able to generate a larger angular velocity than the middle legs. However, analysis of circular swimming trajectories showed that the middle legs were important in maintaining stable trajectories, and thus were necessary for steering. Finally, we discovered that in order for the beetle to transition from swimming to diving, the legs must change the plane in which they beat, which provides the force required to alter the tilt angle of the body necessary to break the surface tension of water. We have further examined how the principles learned from this study may be applied to the design of bio-inspired swimming/diving robots. PMID:23209398

  11. Intra- and Intersexual swim bladder dimorphisms in the plainfin midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus): Implications of swim bladder proximity to the inner ear for sound pressure detection.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Robert A; Whitchurch, Elizabeth A; Anderson, Ryan D; Forlano, Paul M; Fay, Richard R; Ketten, Darlene R; Cox, Timothy C; Sisneros, Joseph A

    2017-11-01

    The plainfin midshipman fish, Porichthys notatus, is a nocturnal marine teleost that uses social acoustic signals for communication during the breeding season. Nesting type I males produce multiharmonic advertisement calls by contracting their swim bladder sonic muscles to attract females for courtship and spawning while subsequently attracting cuckholding type II males. Here, we report intra- and intersexual dimorphisms of the swim bladder in a vocal teleost fish and detail the swim bladder dimorphisms in the three sexual phenotypes (females, type I and II males) of plainfin midshipman fish. Micro-computerized tomography revealed that females and type II males have prominent, horn-like rostral swim bladder extensions that project toward the inner ear end organs (saccule, lagena, and utricle). The rostral swim bladder extensions were longer, and the distance between these swim bladder extensions and each inner-ear end organ type was significantly shorter in both females and type II males compared to that in type I males. Our results revealed that the normalized swim bladder length of females and type II males was longer than that in type I males while there was no difference in normalized swim bladder width among the three sexual phenotypes. We predict that these intrasexual and intersexual differences in swim bladder morphology among midshipman sexual phenotypes will afford greater sound pressure sensitivity and higher frequency detection in females and type II males and facilitate the detection and localization of conspecifics in shallow water environments, like those in which midshipman breed and nest. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Algicidal and Sanitizing Properties of Armazide1

    PubMed Central

    Antonides, H. J.; Tanner, W. S.

    1961-01-01

    Algicidal and sanitizing properties of Armazide, a new swimming pool additive, consisting of 12% w/v each of dodecylamine hydrochloride, trimethyl alkyl ammonium chloride, and methyl alkyl dipolyoxypropylene ammonium methyl sulfate in solution, were evaluated by laboratory techniques against algae and sewage. Results indicated it to be highly effective in low concentrations especially in conjunction with low concentrations of chlorine. Swimming pool field tests were found to confirm the laboratory findings. Various treatment levels and methods are described for swimming pools using treatments based upon the actual condition of the pool and water. The use of the product permitted a reduction in chlorine residual in pools resulting in greatly reduced requirements for chlorinating chemicals along with absence of irritation, odor, and other undesirable results usually associated with standard pool chlorination methods. PMID:13861802

  13. The Effect of Swimming Experience on Acquisition and Retention of Swimming-Based Taste Aversion Learning in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masaki, Takahisa; Nakajima, Sadahiko

    2010-01-01

    Swimming endows rats with an aversion to a taste solution consumed before swimming. The present study explored whether the experience of swimming before or after the taste-swimming trials interferes with swimming-based taste aversion learning. Experiment 1 demonstrated that a single preexposure to 20 min of swimming was as effective as four or…

  14. Adaptation of the pituitary-adrenal axis to daily repeated forced swim exposure in rats is dependent on the temperature of water.

    PubMed

    Rabasa, Cristina; Delgado-Morales, Raúl; Gómez-Román, Almudena; Nadal, Roser; Armario, Antonio

    2013-11-01

    Comparison of exposure to certain predominantly emotional stressors reveals a qualitatively similar neuroendocrine response profile as well as a reduction of physiological responses after daily repeated exposure (adaptation). However, particular physical components of the stressor may interfere with adaptation. As defective adaptation to stress can enhance the probability to develop pathologies, we studied in adult male rats (n = 10/group) swimming behavior (struggling, immobility and mild swim) and physiological responses (ACTH, corticosterone and rectal temperature) to daily repeated exposure to forced swim (20 min, 13 d) at 25 or 36 °C (swim25 or swim36). Rats were repeatedly blood-sampled by tail-nick and hormones measured by radioimmunoassay. Some differences were observed between the two swim temperature groups after the first exposure to forced swim: (a) active behaviors were greater in swim25 than swim36 groups; (b) swim25 but not swim36 caused hypothermia; and (c) swim36 elicited the same ACTH response as swim25, but plasma corticosterone concentration was lower for swim36 at 30 min post-swim. After daily repeated exposure, adaptation in ACTH secretion was observed with swim36 already on day 4, whereas with swim25 adaptation was not observed until day 13 and was of lower magnitude. Nevertheless, after repeated exposure to swim25 a partial protection from hypothermia was observed and the two swim conditions resulted in progressive reduction of active behaviors. Thus, daily repeated swim at 25 °C impairs adaptation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis as compared to swim at 36 °C, supporting the hypothesis that certain physical components of predominantly emotional stressors can interfere with the process of adaptation.

  15. Swimming of a Tiny Subtropical Sea Butterfly with Coiled Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, David; Karakas, Ferhat; Maas, Amy

    2017-11-01

    Sea butterflies, also known as pteropods, include a variety of small, zooplanktonic marine snails. Thecosomatous pteropods possess a shell and swim at low Reynolds numbers by beating their wing-like parapodia in a manner reminiscent of insect flight. In fact, previous studies of the pteropod Limacina helicina have shown that pteropod swimming hydrodynamics and tiny insect flight aerodynamics are dynamically similar. Studies of L. helicina swimming have been performed in polar (0 degrees C) and temperate conditions (12 degrees C). Here we present measurements of the swimming of Heliconoides inflatus, a smaller yet morphologically similar pteropod that lives in warm Bermuda seawater (21 degrees C) with a viscosity almost half that of the polar seawater. The collected H. inflatus have shell sizes less than 1.5 mm in diameter, beat their wings at frequencies up to 11 Hz, and swim upwards in sawtooth trajectories at speeds up to approximately 25 mm/s. Using three-dimensional wing and body kinematics collected with two orthogonal high speed cameras and time-resolved, 2D flow measurements collected with a micro-PIV system, we compare the effects of smaller body size and lower water viscosity on the flow physics underlying flapping-based swimming by pteropods and flight by tiny insects.

  16. Impact of swimming on chronic suppurative otitis media in Aboriginal children: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Stephen, Anna T N; Leach, Amanda J; Morris, Peter S

    2013-07-08

    To measure the impact of 4 weeks of daily swimming on rates of ear discharge among Aboriginal children with a tympanic membrane perforation (TMP) and on the microbiology of the nasopharynx and middle ear. A randomised controlled trial involving 89 Aboriginal children (aged 5-12 2013s) with a TMP, conducted in two remote Northern Territory Aboriginal communities from August to December 2009. 4 school weeks of daily swimming lessons (45 minutes) in a chlorinated pool. Proportions of children with ear discharge and respiratory and opportunistic bacteria in the nasopharynx and middle ear. Of 89 children randomly assigned to the swimming or non-swimming groups, 58 (26/41 swimmers and 32/48 non-swimmers) had ear discharge at baseline. After 4 weeks, 24 of 41 swimmers had ear discharge compared with 32 of 48 non-swimmers (risk difference, - 8% (95% CI, - 28% to 12%). There were no statistically significant changes in the microbiology of the nasopharynx or middle ear in swimmers or non-swimmers. Streptococcus pneumoniae and non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae were the dominant organisms cultured from the nasopharynx, and H. influenzae, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were the dominant organisms in the middle ear. Swimming lessons for Aboriginal children in remote communities should be supported, but it is unlikely that they will substantially reduce rates of chronic suppurative otitis media and associated bacteria in the nasopharynx and middle ear. However, swimming was not associated with increased risk of ear discharge and we found no reason to discourage it. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12613000634774.

  17. 36 CFR 3.17 - What regulations apply to swimming areas and beaches?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR BOATING AND WATER USE ACTIVITIES § 3.17 What regulations apply to swimming areas... accordance with §§ 1.5 and 1.7 of this chapter. (b) Within designated swimming areas, the use of a surfboard or similar rigid device is prohibited. (c) The superintendent may prohibit the use or possession of...

  18. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) serum levels in rats after forced repeated swimming stress.

    PubMed

    Hadzovic-Dzuvo, Almira; Valjevac, Amina; Avdagić, Nesina; Lepara, Orhan; Zaćiragić, Asija; Jadrić, Radivoj; Alajbegović, Jasmin; Prnjavorac, Besim

    2011-02-01

    To estimate the effects of forced repeated swimming stress on BNP serum levels in rats. Adult male Wistar rats weighting between 280-330 g were divided into two groups: control group (n = 8) and stress group (n = 8). Rats in the stress group were exposed to forced swimming stress daily, for 7 days. The rats were forced to swim in plastic tanks (90 cm wide, 120 cm deep) containing tap water (temperature ca. 25 degrees C). The depth of water was 40 cm. Duration of each swimming session progressively increased from 10 minutes on the first day to 40 minutes on days 6 and 7. Rats were sacrificed and blood was drawn from abdominal aorta for BNP analysis immediately after the last swimming session. B-type natriuretic serum level was determined by ELISA method using RAT BNP-32 kit (Phoenix Pharmaceutical Inc.). There was no statistically significant difference between mean BNP serum level in the stress group after the swimming period (0.81 +/- 0.14 ng/ml) as compared to the unstressed group of rats (0.8 +/- 0.08 ng/ml). After the swimming period mean body weight slightly decreased in the stress group in comparison with values before stress period (296.3 g vs. 272.8 g), but this difference was not statistically significant. The stress period had no influence on food intake in the stress rat group. The workload consisting of 40-minutes long swimming session is not sufficient to provoke BNP release from myocardium in rats.

  19. Swim bladder function and buoyancy control in pink snapper (Pagrus auratus) and mulloway (Argyrosomus japonicus).

    PubMed

    Stewart, John; Hughes, Julian M

    2014-04-01

    Physoclist fish are able to regulate their buoyancy by secreting gas into their hydrostatic organ, the swim bladder, as they descend through the water column and by resorbing gas from their swim bladder as they ascend. Physoclists are restricted in their vertical movements due to increases in swim bladder gas volume that occur as a result of a reduction in hydrostatic pressure, causing fish to become positively buoyant and risking swim bladder rupture. Buoyancy control, rates of swim bladder gas exchange and restrictions to vertical movements are little understood in marine teleosts. We used custom-built hyperbaric chambers and laboratory experiments to examine these aspects of physiology for two important fishing target species in southern Australia, pink snapper (Pagrus auratus) and mulloway (Argyrosomus japonicus). The swim bladders of pink snapper and mulloway averaged 4.2 and 4.9 % of their total body volumes, respectively. The density of pink snapper was not significantly different to the density of seawater (1.026 g/ml), whereas mulloway were significantly denser than seawater. Pink snapper secreted gas into their swim bladders at a rate of 0.027 ± 0.005 ml/kg/min (mean ± SE), almost 4 times faster than mulloway (0.007 ± 0.001 ml/kg/min). Rates of swim bladder gas resorption were 11 and 6 times faster than the rates of gas secretion for pink snapper and mulloway, respectively. Pink snapper resorbed swim bladder gas at a rate of 0.309 ± 0.069 ml/kg/min, 7 times faster than mulloway (0.044 ± 0.009 ml/kg/min). Rates of gas exchange were not affected by water pressure or water temperature over the ranges examined in either species. Pink snapper were able to acclimate to changes in hydrostatic pressure reasonably quickly when compared to other marine teleosts, taking approximately 27 h to refill their swim bladders from empty. Mulloway were able to acclimate at a much slower rate, taking approximately 99 h to refill their swim bladders. We estimated that the

  20. 75 FR 52465 - Safety Zones; Swim Events Within the Sector New York Captain of the Port Zone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ...-AA00 Safety Zones; Swim Events Within the Sector New York Captain of the Port Zone AGENCY: Coast Guard... zones for swim events occurring on waters of the Hudson River, East River and Long Island Sound. These... with the swim events. Persons and vessels are prohibited from entering into, transiting through, or...

  1. 10 CFR 36.33 - Irradiator pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... purification system designed to be capable of maintaining the water during normal operation at a conductivity..., irradiator pools must either: (1) Have a water-tight stainless steel liner or a liner metallurgically... water level that could allow water to drain out of the pool. Pipes that have intakes more than 0.5 meter...

  2. 10 CFR 36.33 - Irradiator pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... purification system designed to be capable of maintaining the water during normal operation at a conductivity..., irradiator pools must either: (1) Have a water-tight stainless steel liner or a liner metallurgically... water level that could allow water to drain out of the pool. Pipes that have intakes more than 0.5 meter...

  3. 10 CFR 36.33 - Irradiator pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... purification system designed to be capable of maintaining the water during normal operation at a conductivity..., irradiator pools must either: (1) Have a water-tight stainless steel liner or a liner metallurgically... water level that could allow water to drain out of the pool. Pipes that have intakes more than 0.5 meter...

  4. 10 CFR 36.33 - Irradiator pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... purification system designed to be capable of maintaining the water during normal operation at a conductivity..., irradiator pools must either: (1) Have a water-tight stainless steel liner or a liner metallurgically... water level that could allow water to drain out of the pool. Pipes that have intakes more than 0.5 meter...

  5. 10 CFR 36.33 - Irradiator pools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... purification system designed to be capable of maintaining the water during normal operation at a conductivity..., irradiator pools must either: (1) Have a water-tight stainless steel liner or a liner metallurgically... water level that could allow water to drain out of the pool. Pipes that have intakes more than 0.5 meter...

  6. Effect of chromium picolinate on modified forced swimming test in diabetic rats: involvement of serotonergic pathways and potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Khanam, Razia; Pillai, K K

    2006-02-01

    Depression occurs frequently in patients with diabetes mellitus. Chromium picolinate, an essential trace element is recommended for diabetes and also has been reported to benefit depression, but its mechanism is still debated. To investigate the mechanism, we studied its effects on serum insulin, serum glucose and on modified forced swimming test, a behavioural paradigm for depression in rats. The study involving co-administration of sub-active doses of glimepiride, a K(+) channel blocker and chromium picolinate on blood glucose levels and modified forced swimming test was also performed to probe any role of K(+) channels in its antidiabetic and antidepressants effects. Streptozotocin (55 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) was injected in rats to induce diabetes (Type 1). After a week, chromium picolinate (8 microg/ml in drinking water) was administered for 4 weeks. Normal rats received similar drug treatment. The sub-active doses of chromium picolinate (4 microg/ml in drinking water) and glimeperide (2.5 mg/kg, orally) were co-administered and their effects on modified forced swimming test and on glucose levels were measured. Chromium picolinate (8 microg/ml in drinking water) produced hypoglycaemia in diabetic and normal rats. It had no effects on the streptozotocin-induced reduction in insulin levels. Chromium picolinate (8 microg/ml in drinking water) increased swimming with subsequent decrease in immobility. The sub-active doses of chromium picolinate and glimeperide showed significant additive effects in modified forced swimming test and reduction in serum glucose concentrations, though statistically insignificant. In conclusion chromium picolinate shows antidepressant action on modified forced swimming test affecting only swimming that suggests serotonergic pathways involvement. The additive effects on swimming in modified forced swimming test and reduction in serum glucose levels shows involvement of K(+) channels in antidiabetic and antidepressant actions of

  7. Re-defining and quantifying inorganic phosphate pools in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Abstract The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT), a large-scale hydrologic model, can be used to estimate the impact of land management practices on phosphate (P) loading in streams and water bodies. Three inorganic soil P pools (labile, active, and stable P) are currently defined in the SWAT mo...

  8. Controlled-frequency breath swimming improves swimming performance and running economy.

    PubMed

    Lavin, K M; Guenette, J A; Smoliga, J M; Zavorsky, G S

    2015-02-01

    Respiratory muscle fatigue can negatively impact athletic performance, but swimming has beneficial effects on the respiratory system and may reduce susceptibility to fatigue. Limiting breath frequency during swimming further stresses the respiratory system through hypercapnia and mechanical loading and may lead to appreciable improvements in respiratory muscle strength. This study assessed the effects of controlled-frequency breath (CFB) swimming on pulmonary function. Eighteen subjects (10 men), average (standard deviation) age 25 (6) years, body mass index 24.4 (3.7) kg/m(2), underwent baseline testing to assess pulmonary function, running economy, aerobic capacity, and swimming performance. Subjects were then randomized to either CFB or stroke-matched (SM) condition. Subjects completed 12 training sessions, in which CFB subjects took two breaths per length and SM subjects took seven. Post-training, maximum expiratory pressure improved by 11% (15) for all 18 subjects (P < 0.05) while maximum inspiratory pressure was unchanged. Running economy improved by 6 (9)% in CFB following training (P < 0.05). Forced vital capacity increased by 4% (4) in SM (P < 0.05) and was unchanged in CFB. These findings suggest that limiting breath frequency during swimming may improve muscular oxygen utilization during terrestrial exercise in novice swimmers. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Swimming of the Honey Bees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, Chris; Gharib, Morteza

    2016-11-01

    When the weather gets hot, nursing honey bees nudge foragers to collect water for thermoregulation of their hive. While on their mission to collect water, foragers sometimes get trapped on the water surface, forced to interact with a different fluid environment. In this study, we present the survival strategy of the honey bees at the air-water interface. A high-speed videography and shadowgraph were used to record the honey bees swimming. A unique thrust mechanism through rapid vibration of their wings at 60 to 150 Hz was observed. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CBET-1511414; additional support by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1144469.

  10. Association Between Swimming Lessons and Drowning in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Ruth A.; Taneja, Gitanjali Saluja; Haynie, Denise L.; Trumble, Ann C.; Qian, Cong; Klinger, Ron M.; Klebanoff, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the association between swimming lessons and the risk of drowning among children aged 1 to 19 years. Design Case-control study. Setting Cases were identified from medical examiners’/ coroners’ offices between mid-2003 and mid-2005. Jurisdictions included the states of Maryland and North Carolina, 14 districts (33 counties) in Florida, 3 counties in California, 1 county in Texas, and 1 county in New York. Participants Cases were children and adolescents aged 1 to 19 years who died of unintentional drowning. Interviews were conducted with 88 families of children who drowned and 213 matched controls. Main Exposure Swimming lessons. Main Outcome Measure Death due to unintentional drowning. Drownings that were intentional, of undetermined intent, or that occurred under conditions in which swimming ability was unlikely to impact risk (eg, in ice water or bathtubs) were excluded. Results Of the 61 cases in the 1- to 4-year age group, 2 (3%) had participated in formal swimming lessons vs 35 of 134 matched controls (26%) (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.01–0.97). Among the 27 cases aged 5 to 19 years, 7 (27%) had ever taken formal swimming lessons vs 42 of 79 matched controls (53%) (adjusted OR, 0.36; 95% CI, 0.09–1.51). In adjusted analyses, there was no statistically significant association between informal instruction and drowning risk. Conclusions Participation in formal swimming lessons was associated with an 88% reduction in the risk of drowning in the 1- to 4-year-old children, although our estimates were imprecise and 95% CIs included risk reductions ranging from 3% to 99%. PMID:19255386

  11. Acidification reduced growth rate but not swimming speed of larval sea urchins.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kit Yu Karen; García, Eliseba; Dupont, Sam

    2015-05-15

    Swimming behaviors of planktonic larvae impact dispersal and population dynamics of many benthic marine invertebrates. This key ecological function is modulated by larval development dynamics, biomechanics of the resulting morphology, and behavioral choices. Studies on ocean acidification effects on larval stages have yet to address this important interaction between development and swimming under environmentally-relevant flow conditions. Our video motion analysis revealed that pH covering present and future natural variability (pH 8.0, 7.6 and 7.2) did not affect age-specific swimming of larval green urchin Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis in still water nor in shear, despite acidified individuals being significantly smaller in size (reduced growth rate). This maintenance of speed and stability in shear was accompanied by an overall change in size-corrected shape, implying changes in swimming biomechanics. Our observations highlight strong evolutionary pressure to maintain swimming in a varying environment and the plasticity in larval responses to environmental change.

  12. Swimming-Induced Taste Aversion and Its Prevention by a Prior History of Swimming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masaki, Takahisa; Nakajima, Sadahiko

    2004-01-01

    In two experiments, the evidence showed that 20 min of forced swimming by rats caused aversion to a taste solution consumed before swimming. When one of two taste solutions (sodium saccharin or sodium chloride, counterbalanced across rats) was paired with swimming and the other was not, the rats' intakes of these two solutions showed less…

  13. Integrating machine learning techniques and high-resolution imagery to generate GIS-ready information for urban water consumption studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Nils; Hof, Angela

    2012-10-01

    Urban sprawl driven by shifts in tourism development produces new suburban landscapes of water consumption on Mediterranean coasts. Golf courses, ornamental, 'Atlantic' gardens and swimming pools are the most striking artefacts of this transformation, threatening the local water supply systems and exacerbating water scarcity. In the face of climate change, urban landscape irrigation is becoming increasingly important from a resource management point of view. This paper adopts urban remote sensing towards a targeted mapping approach using machine learning techniques and highresolution satellite imagery (WorldView-2) to generate GIS-ready information for urban water consumption studies. Swimming pools, vegetation and - as a subgroup of vegetation - turf grass are extracted as important determinants of water consumption. For image analysis, the complex nature of urban environments suggests spatial-spectral classification, i.e. the complementary use of the spectral signature and spatial descriptors. Multiscale image segmentation provides means to extract the spatial descriptors - namely object feature layers - which can be concatenated at pixel level to the spectral signature. This study assesses the value of object features using different machine learning techniques and amounts of labeled information for learning. The results indicate the benefit of the spatial-spectral approach if combined with appropriate classifiers like tree-based ensembles or support vector machines, which can handle high dimensionality. Finally, a Random Forest classifier was chosen to deliver the classified input data for the estimation of evaporative water loss and net landscape irrigation requirements.

  14. Conditions inside Water Pooled in a Failed Nuclear Waste Container and its Effect on Radionuclide Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, L. K.; Walton, J. C.; Woocay, A.

    2009-12-01

    Nuclear power use is expected to expand in the future, as part of the global clean energy initiative, to meet the world’s surging energy demand, and attenuate greenhouse gas emissions, which are mainly caused by fossil fuels. As a result, it is estimated that hundreds of thousands of metric tons of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) will accumulate. SNF disposal has major environmental (radiation exposure) and security (nuclear proliferation) concerns. Storage in unsaturated zone geological repositories is a reasonable solution for dealing with SNF. One of the key factors that determine the performance of the geological repository is the release of radionuclides from the engineered barrier system. Over time, the nuclear waste containers are expected to fail gradually due to general and localized corrosions and eventually infiltrating water will have access to the nuclear waste. Once radionuclides are released, they will be transported by water, and make their way to the accessible environment. Physical and chemical disturbances in the environment over the container will lead to different corrosion rates, causing different times and locations of penetration. One possible scenario for waste packages failure is the bathtub model, where penetrations occur on the top of the waste package and water pools inside it. In this paper the bathtub-type failed waste container is considered. We shed some light on chemical and physical processes that take place in the pooled water inside a partially failed waste container (bathtub category), and the effects of these processes on radionuclide release. Our study considers two possibilities: temperature stratification of the pooled water versus mixing process. Our calculations show that temperature stratification of the pooled water is expected when the waste package is half (or less) filled with water. On the other hand, when the waste package is fully filled (or above half) there will be mixing in the upper part of water. The effect of

  15. Postnatal cocaine exposure: effects on behavior of rats in forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Ana; Tavares, Maria Amélia; de Sousa, Liliana

    2002-06-01

    Exposure to cocaine in early periods of postnatal life has adverse effects on behavior, namely, it induces the display of anxiety and fear-like behaviors that are associated with stress and depression. This study examined the effects of early developmental cocaine exposure in several categories of behavior observed in forced swim test. Male and female Wistar rats were given 15 mg/kg of cocaine hydrochloride/body weight/day, subcutaneously, in two daily doses, from postnatal day (PND) 1 to PND27. Controls were saline injected in the same protocol. In PND26-PND27, rats were placed in a swimming pool during 5 min in two sessions. The categories of behavior studied in this work included horizontal and vertical rotation, vibrissae clean, head clean, fast and slow swim, struggling, floating, sliding, diving, head-diving, and wagging head. Results showed differences in the frequencies of several behavioral categories that allowed the discrimination of the behaviors that may constitute "behavioral despair" indicators, as well as which behaviors are most affected by cocaine exposure. Cocaine groups were less active and more immobile than controls. These results suggest that postnatal exposure to cocaine can produce depression-like effects and affect the ability of these animals to cope with stress situations.

  16. Physiological, Biomechanical and Anthropometrical Predictors of Sprint Swimming Performance in Adolescent Swimmers

    PubMed Central

    Lätt, Evelin; Jürimäe, Jaak; Mäestu, Jarek; Purge, Priit; Rämson, Raul; Haljaste, Kaja; Keskinen, Kari L.; Rodriguez, Ferran A.; Jürimäe, Toivo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationships between 100-m front crawl swimming performance and relevant biomechanical, anthropometrical and physiological parameters in male adolescent swimmers. Twenty five male swimmers (mean ± SD: age 15. 2 ± 1.9 years; height 1.76 ± 0.09 m; body mass 63.3 ± 10.9 kg) performed an all-out 100-m front crawl swimming test in a 25-m pool. A respiratory snorkel and valve system with low hydrodynamic resistance was used to collect expired air. Oxygen uptake was measured breath-by-breath by a portable metabolic cart. Swimming velocity, stroke rate (SR), stroke length and stroke index (SI) were assessed during the test by time video analysis. Blood samples for lactate measurement were taken from the fingertip pre exercise and at the third and fifth minute of recovery to estimate net blood lactate accumulation (ΔLa). The energy cost of swimming was estimated from oxygen uptake and blood lactate energy equivalent values. Basic anthropometry included body height, body mass and arm span. Body composition parameters were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Results indicate that biomechanical factors (90.3%) explained most of 100-m front crawl swimming performance variability in these adolescent male swimmers, followed by anthropometrical (45.8%) and physiological (45.2%) parameters. SI was the best single predictor of performance, while arm span and ∆La were the best anthropometrical and physiological indicators, respectively. SI and SR alone explained 92.6% of the variance in competitive performance. These results confirm the importance of considering specific stroke technical parameters when predicting success in young swimmers. Key points This study investigated the influence of different anthropometrical, physiological and biomechanical parameters on 100-m swimming performance in adolescent boys. Biomechanical factors contributed most to sprint swimming performance in these young male swimmers (90

  17. Korean Affairs Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-25

    will 22 be equipped with 2,000 seats, a swimming pool equipped with 2,100 seats, a pingpong gymnasium equipped with 3,000 seats, a badminton ...swimming, diving, water polo, and synchronized swimming can be held. The badminton gymnasium will be octagonal, a unique shape. This gymnasium, which

  18. The effects of Creatine Long-Term Supplementation on Muscle Morphology and Swimming Performance in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Ahmet; Ozdemir, Ercan; Gulturk, Sefa; Erdal, Sena

    2009-01-01

    Creatine (Cr) has been shown to increase the total muscle mass. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Cr supplementation on muscle morphology and swimming performance, using an animal model. Each rat was subjected to exercise 15-minute period daily for the 12 weeks. The rats were randomly divided into four groups: no Cr supplementation (CON), no Cr supplementation and incomplete food intake (lacking lysine and methionine in diet for rats) (INCO), Cr supplementation 1 g·kg-1·day-1 (CREAT-I) and Cr supplementation 2 g·kg-1·day-1 (CREAT-II). Three months later, all groups adult rats exercised in swimming pool chambers. Swimming time was recorded as minute for each rat. Following swimming performance period, the animals were killed by cervical dislocation and the gastrocnemius and diaphragm muscles were dissected. Serial slices of 5-7 μm were allocated paraffin wax and histochemical staining procedure of cross-sections was carried out with heamatoxylin-eosin technics. All groups gained body weight at the end of 12 weeks but there was no statistical difference among them. Swimming time values were statistical difference between CREAT-II and CON group as well as between CREAT-I and CON group (p < 0.05). In the INCO group was determined increased connective tissue cell of the muscle sample. In contrast, in the CREAT-I and CREAT-II group, the basic histological changes were large-scale muscle fibers and hypertrophic muscle cells. These results suggest that long-term creatine supplementation increased the number of muscle fibers and enhanced endurance swimming performance in rats. Key points There is no study about the effects of creatine long-term supplementation on muscle morphology and swimming performance in rats. Long-term creatine supplementation increase muscle hypertrophy (but not body weight) and enhance endurance swimming performance in rats. The quantitative analysis indicated that the number of muscle fibers per defined area increased

  19. Convergence in Underwater Swimming Between Nature and Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; Boller, Michael

    2004-11-01

    We are interested in comparing the hydrodynamic performance of underwater vehicles and swimming animals which are believed to have been optimized via evolution. Cruising and maneuvering are treated separately. Platforms like submarines are primarily cruising vehicles, while torpedoes are dexterous in both. In swimming animals, generally, red muscle is used for cruising while white muscle is used for maneuvering motions. Data from literature is examined comparing shaft/muscle power versus displacement. Experiments also have been carried out with captive mackerel and bluefish that are known to be open water fish and are proficient in both cruising and maneuvering. Their trajectories around obstacles have been recorded and analyzed. Similar figure of eight' maneuvering trajectory data of engineering underwater vehicles have also been analyzed. It is shown that there is convergence between nature and engineering in cruising that extend over eight decades of variation in power and displacement. However, swimming animals are still more proficient in maneuvering, although the gap has been closing of late.

  20. Drowning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Preschoolers are most likely to drown in a swimming pool. People who have seizure disorders are also ... near any body of water, including tubs Not swimming or boating when under the influence of alcohol ...

  1. Local structuring factors of invertebrate communities in ephemeral freshwater rock pools and the influence of more permanent water bodies in the region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jocque, M.; Graham, T.; Brendonck, L.

    2007-01-01

    We used three isolated clusters of small ephemeral rock pools on a sandstone flat in Utah to test the importance of local structuring processes on aquatic invertebrate communities. In the three clusters we characterized all ephemeral rock pools (total: 27) for their morphometry, and monitored their water quality, hydrology and community assemblage during a full hydrocycle. In each cluster we also sampled a set of more permanent interconnected freshwater systems positioned in a wash, draining the water from each cluster of rock pools. This design allowed additional testing for the potential role of more permanent water bodies in the region as source populations for the active dispersers and the effect on the community structure in the rock pools. Species richness and community composition in the rock pools correlated with level of permanence and the ammonia concentration. The length of the rock pool inundation cycle shaped community structure, most probably by inhibiting colonization by some taxa (e.g. tadpoles and insect larvae) through developmental constraints. The gradient in ammonia concentrations probably reflects differences in primary production. The more permanent water bodies in each wash differed both environmentally and in community composition from the connected set of rock pools. A limited set of active dispersers was observed in the rock pools. Our findings indicate that aquatic invertebrate communities in the ephemeral rock pools are mainly structured through habitat permanence, possibly linked with biotic interactions and primary production. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  2. Analysis of swimming performance in FINA World Cup long-distance open water races

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Age and peak performance in ultra-endurance athletes have been mainly investigated in long-distance runners and triathletes, but not for long-distance swimmers. The present study investigated the age and swimming performance of elite ultra-distance swimmers competing in the 5-, 10- and 25-km Fédération Internationale de Natation (FINA) World Cup swimming events. Methods The associations of age and swimming speed in elite male and female swimmers competing in World Cup events of 5-, 10- and 25-km events from 2000 to 2012 were analysed using single and multi-level regression analyses. Results During the studied period, the swimming speed of the annual top ten women decreased significantly from 4.94 ± 0.20 to 4.77 ± 0.09 km/h in 5 km and from 4.60 ± 0.04 to 4.44 ± 0.08 km/h in 25 km, while it significantly increased from 4.57 ± 0.01 to 5.75 ± 0.01 km/h in 10 km. For the annual top ten men, peak swimming speed decreased significantly from 5.42 ± 0.04 to 5.39 ± 0.02 km/h in 5 km, while it remained unchanged at 5.03 ± 0.32 km/h in 10 km and at 4.94 ± 0.35 km/h in 25 km. The age of peak swimming speed for the annual top ten women remained stable at 22.5 ± 1.2 years in 5 km, at 23.4 ± 0.9 years in 10 km and at 23.8 ± 0.9 years in 25 km. For the annual top ten men, the age of peak swimming speed increased from 23.7 ± 2.8 to 28.0 ± 5.1 years in 10 km but remained stable at 24.8 ± 1.0 years in 5 km and at 27.2 ± 1.1 years in 25 km. Conclusion Female long-distance swimmers competing in FINA World Cup races between 2000 and 2012 improved in 10 km but impaired in 5 and 25 km, whereas men only impaired in 5 km. The age of peak performance was younger in women (approximately 23 years) compared to men (about 25–27 years). PMID:24382200

  3. A Single-Unit Design Structure and Gender Differences in the Swimming World Championships

    PubMed Central

    Pushkar, Svetlana; Issurin, Vladimir B.; Verbitsky, Oleg

    2014-01-01

    Four 50 meter male/female finals - the freestyle, butterfly, breaststroke, and backstroke - swum during individual events at the Swimming World Championships (SWCs) can be defined in four clusters. The aim of the present study was to use a single-unit design structure, in which the swimmer was defined at only one scale, to evaluate gender differences in start reaction times among elite swimmers in 50 m events. The top six male and female swimmers in the finals of four swimming stroke final events in six SWCs were analyzed. An unpaired t-test was used. The p-values were evaluated using Neo-Fisherian significance assessments (Hurlbert and Lombardi, 2012). For the freestyle, gender differences in the start reaction times were positively identified for five of the six SWCs. For the backstroke, gender differences in the start reaction times could be dismissed for five of the six SWCs. For both the butterfly and breaststroke, gender differences in the start reaction times yielded inconsistent statistical differences. Pooling all swimmers together (df = 286) showed that an overall gender difference in the start reaction times could be positively identified: p = 0.00004. The contrast between the gender differences in start reaction times between the freestyle and backstroke may be associated with different types of gender adaptations to swimming performances. When the natural groupings of swimming stroke final events were ignored, sacrificial pseudoreplication occurred, which may lead to erroneous statistical differences. PMID:25414754

  4. 33 CFR 100.113 - Provincetown Harbor Swim for Life, Provincetown, MA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Provincetown Harbor Swim for Life, Provincetown, MA. 100.113 Section 100.113 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... for Life, Provincetown, MA. (a) Regulated Area. All waters of Provincetown Harbor within 200 feet of...

  5. 33 CFR 100.116 - Swim Buzzards Bay Day, New Bedford, MA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Swim Buzzards Bay Day, New Bedford, MA. 100.116 Section 100.116 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND..., New Bedford, MA. (a) Regulated Area. All waters of the Acushnet River, within 200 feet of...

  6. 33 CFR 100.116 - Swim Buzzards Bay Day, New Bedford, MA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Swim Buzzards Bay Day, New Bedford, MA. 100.116 Section 100.116 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND..., New Bedford, MA. (a) Regulated Area. All waters of the Acushnet River, within 200 feet of...

  7. 33 CFR 100.121 - Swim Across the Sound, Long Island Sound, Port Jefferson, NY to Captain's Cove Seaport...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Swim Across the Sound, Long Island Sound, Port Jefferson, NY to Captain's Cove Seaport, Bridgeport, CT. 100.121 Section 100.121... SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.121 Swim Across the Sound, Long Island Sound, Port Jefferson, NY...

  8. Swimming kinematics of the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris): hydrodynamic analysis of an undulatory mammalian swimmer.

    PubMed

    Kojeszewski, Tricia; Fish, Frank E

    2007-07-01

    The submerged swimming of the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris), a subspecies of the West Indian manatee, was studied by filming individuals as they swam rectilinearly in a large pool at several rehabilitation centers. The swimming was analyzed using videography to detail the kinematics in conjunction with a hydromechanical model to determine the power output (P(t)) and propulsive efficiency (eta(p)). Manatees swam at velocities of 0.06-1.14 m s(-1). Locomotion was accomplished by undulation of the body and caudal fluke. Undulatory locomotion is a rapid and relatively high-powered propulsive mode involved in cruising and migrating by a variety of swimmers. Manatees displayed an undulatory swimming mode by passing a dorso-ventrally oriented traveling wave posteriorly along the body. The propulsive wave traveled at a higher velocity than the forward velocity of the animal. The frequency of the propulsive cycle (f) increased linearly with increasing swimming velocity (U). Amplitude at the tip of the caudal fluke (A) remained constant with respect to U and was 22% of body length. P(t) increased curvilinearly with U. The mean eta(p), expressing the relationship of the thrust power generated by the paddle-shaped caudal fluke to the total mechanical power, was 0.73. The maximum eta(p) was 0.82 at 0.95 m s(-1). Despite use of a primitive undulatory swimming mode and paddle-like fluke for propulsion, the manatee is capable of swimming with a high efficiency but lower power outputs compared with the oscillatory movements of the high-aspect ratio flukes of cetaceans. The swimming performance of the manatee is in accordance with its habits as an aquatic grazer that seasonally migrates over extended distances.

  9. Integrated preservation and sample clean up procedures for studying water ingestion by recreational swimmers via urinary biomarker determination.

    PubMed

    Cantú, Ricardo; Shoemaker, Jody A; Kelty, Catherine A; Wymer, Larry J; Behymer, Thomas D; Dufour, Alfred P; Magnuson, Matthew L

    2017-08-22

    The use of cyanuric acid as a biomarker for ingestion of swimming pool water may lead to quantitative knowledge of the volume of water ingested during swimming, contributing to a better understanding of disease resulting from ingestion of environmental contaminants. When swimming pool water containing chlorinated cyanurates is inadvertently ingested, cyanuric acid is excreted quantitatively within 24 h as a urinary biomarker of ingestion. Because the volume of water ingested can be quantitatively estimated by calculation from the concentration of cyanuric acid in 24 h urine samples, a procedure for preservation, cleanup, and analysis of cyanuric acid was developed to meet the logistical demands of large scale studies. From a practical stand point, urine collected from swimmers cannot be analyzed immediately, given requirements of sample collection, shipping, handling, etc. Thus, to maintain quality control to allow confidence in the results, it is necessary to preserve the samples in a manner that ensures as quantitative analysis as possible. The preservation and clean-up of cyanuric acid in urine is complicated because typical approaches often are incompatible with the keto-enol tautomerization of cyanuric acid, interfering with cyanuric acid sample preparation, chromatography, and detection. Therefore, this paper presents a novel integration of sample preservation, clean-up, chromatography, and detection to determine cyanuric acid in 24 h urine samples. Fortification of urine with cyanuric acid (0.3-3.0 mg/L) demonstrated accuracy (86-93% recovery) and high reproducibility (RSD < 7%). Holding time studies in unpreserved urine suggested sufficient cyanuric acid stability for sample collection procedures, while longer holding times suggested instability of the unpreserved urine. Preserved urine exhibited a loss of around 0.5% after 22 days at refrigerated storage conditions of 4 °C. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. 33 CFR 100.124 - Maggie Fischer Memorial Great South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, New York.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maggie Fischer Memorial Great South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, New York. 100.124 Section 100.124 Navigation and Navigable... NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.124 Maggie Fischer Memorial Great South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, New York...

  11. 33 CFR 100.124 - Maggie Fischer Memorial Great South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, New York.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, New York. 100.124 Section 100.124 Navigation and Navigable... NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.124 Maggie Fischer Memorial Great South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, New York. (a) Regulated area. All navigable waters of Great South Bay, NY within a 100 yard radius of each...

  12. Paramecia swimming in viscous flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, P.; Jana, S.; Giarra, M.; Vlachos, P. P.; Jung, S.

    2015-12-01

    Ciliates like Paramecia exhibit fore-aft asymmetry in their body shapes, and preferentially swim in the direction of the slender anterior rather than the wider posterior. However, the physical reasons for this preference are not well understood. In this work, we propose that specific features of the fluid flow around swimming Paramecia confer some energetic advantage to the preferred swimming direction. Therefore, we seek to understand the effects of body asymmetry and swimming direction on the efficiency of swimming and the flux of fluid into the cilia layer (and thus of food into the oral groove), which we assumed to be primary factors in the energy budgets of these organisms. To this end, we combined numerical techniques (the boundary element method) and laboratory experiments (micro particle image velocimetry) to develop a quantitative model of the flow around a Paramecium and investigate the effect of the body shape on the velocity fields, as well as on the swimming and feeding behaviors. Both simulation and experimental results show that velocity fields exhibit fore-aft asymmetry. Moreover, the shape asymmetry revealed an increase of the fluid flux into the cilia layer compared to symmetric body shapes. Under the assumption that cilia fluid intake and feeding efficiency are primary factors in the energy budgets of Paramecia, our model predicts that the anterior swimming direction is energetically favorable to the posterior swimming direction.

  13. Swimming activity in marine fish.

    PubMed

    Wardle, C S

    1985-01-01

    Marine fish are capable of swimming long distances in annual migrations; they are also capable of high-speed dashes of short duration, and they can occupy small home territories for long periods with little activity. There is a large effect of fish size on the distance fish migrate at slow swimming speeds. When chased by a fishing trawl the effect of fish size on swimming performance can decide their fate. The identity and thickness of muscle used at each speed and evidence for the timing of myotomes used during the body movement cycle can be detected using electromyogram (EMG) electrodes. The cross-sectional area of muscle needed to maintain different swimming speeds can be predicted by relating the swimming drag force to the muscle force. At maximum swimming speed one completed cycle of swimming force is derived in sequence from the whole cross-sectional area of the muscles along the two sides of the fish. This and other aspects of the swimming cycle suggest that each myotome might be responsible for generating forces involved in particular stages of the tail sweep. The thick myotomes at the head end shorten during the peak thrust of the tail blade whereas the thinner myotomes nearer the tail generate stiffness appropriate for transmission of these forces and reposition the tail for the next cycle.

  14. Evaluation of fins used in underwater swimming.

    PubMed

    Pendergast, D R; Mollendorf, J; Logue, C; Samimy, S

    2003-01-01

    Underwater swimmers use fins which augment thrust to overcome drag and propel the diver. The VdotO2 of swimming as a function of speed, velocity as a function of kick frequency, maximal speed (v), maximal oxygen consumption (VdotO2) and the maximal thrust were determined for eight fins in 10 male divers swimming at 1.25 m depth in a 60 m annular pool. A theoretical analysis of fin cycles was also performed. VdotO2 increased as a second order polynomial as a function of velocity; VdotO2 = 0.045 + 1.65B V + 1.66 (2) V2 (r2 = 0.997), VdotO2 = 0.25 + 1.03 V + 1.83 V2 (r2 = 0.997) and VdotO2 = -0.15 + 2.26 V + 1.49 V2 (r2 = 0.997), for least, average and most economical fins respectively. Kick frequency increased linearly with velocity and had a unique movement path (signature), giving theoretical values that agreed with the measured thrust, drag and efficiency. In conclusion, virtually all thrust comes from the downward power stroke, with rigid fins kicked deep (high drag), while flexible fins are kicked less deep but with higher frequency (low efficiency). Kick depth and frequency explain the performance of the eight tested fins, and should be optimized to enhance diver performance.

  15. Ants swimming in pitcher plants: kinematics of aquatic and terrestrial locomotion in Camponotus schmitzi.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Holger Florian; Thornham, Daniel George; Federle, Walter

    2012-06-01

    Camponotus schmitzi ants live in symbiosis with the Bornean pitcher plant Nepenthes bicalcarata. Unique among ants, the workers regularly dive and swim in the pitcher's digestive fluid to forage for food. High-speed motion analysis revealed that C. schmitzi ants swim at the surface with all legs submerged, with an alternating tripod pattern. Compared to running, swimming involves lower stepping frequencies and larger phase delays within the legs of each tripod. Swimming ants move front and middle legs faster and keep them more extended during the power stroke than during the return stroke. Thrust estimates calculated from three-dimensional leg kinematics using a blade-element approach confirmed that forward propulsion is mainly achieved by the front and middle legs. The hind legs move much less, suggesting that they mainly serve for steering. Experiments with tethered C. schmitzi ants showed that characteristic swimming movements can be triggered by submersion in water. This reaction was absent in another Camponotus species investigated. Our study demonstrates how insects can use the same locomotory system and similar gait patterns for moving on land and in water. We discuss insect adaptations for aquatic/amphibious lifestyles and the special adaptations of C. schmitzi to living on an insect-trapping pitcher plant.

  16. Pre-task music improves swimming performance.

    PubMed

    Smirmaul, B P; Dos Santos, R V; Da Silva Neto, L V

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of pre-task music on swimming performance and other psychological variables. A randomized counterbalanced within-subjects (experimental and control condition) design was employed. Eighteen regional level male swimmers performed two 200-m freestyle swimming time trials. Participants were exposed to either 5 minutes of self-selected music (pre-task music condition) or 5 minutes of silence (control condition) and, after 1 minute, performed the swimming task. Swimming time was significantly shorter (-1.44%) in the pre-task music condition. Listening to pre-task music increased motivation to perform the swimming task, while arousal remained unchanged. While fatigue increased after the swimming task in both conditions, vigor, ratings of perceived exertion and affective valence were unaltered. It is concluded, for the first time, that pre-task music improves swimming performance.

  17. Quantification of upper limb kinetic asymmetries in front crawl swimming.

    PubMed

    Morouço, Pedro G; Marinho, Daniel A; Fernandes, Ricardo J; Marques, Mário C

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed at quantifying upper limb kinetic asymmetries in maximal front crawl swimming and to examine if these asymmetries would affect the contribution of force exertion to swimming performance. Eighteen high level male swimmers with unilateral breathing patterns and sprint or middle distance specialists, volunteered as participants. A load-cell was used to quantify the forces exerted in water by completing a 30s maximal front crawl tethered swimming test and a maximal 50 m free swimming was considered as a performance criterion. Individual force-time curves were obtained to calculate the mean and maximum forces per cycle, for each upper limb. Following, symmetry index was estimated and breathing laterality identified by questionnaire. Lastly, the pattern of asymmetries along the test was estimated for each upper limb using linear regression of peak forces per cycle. Asymmetrical force exertion was observed in the majority of the swimmers (66.7%), with a total correspondence of breathing laterality opposite to the side of the force asymmetry. Forces exerted by the dominant upper limb presented a higher decrease than from the non-dominant. Very strong associations were found between exerted forces and swimming performance, when controlling the isolated effect of symmetry index. Results point that force asymmetries occur in the majority of the swimmers, and that these asymmetries are most evident in the first cycles of a maximum bout. Symmetry index stood up as an influencing factor on the contribution of tethered forces over swimming performance. Thus, to some extent, a certain degree of asymmetry is not critical for short swimming performance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Effects of Leg Kick on Swimming Speed and Arm-Stroke Efficiency in the Front Crawl.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Ricardo Peterson; de Souza Castro, Flávio Antônio; Figueiredo, Pedro; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo; Zamparo, Paola

    2017-07-01

    To analyze the effects of swimming pace on the relative contribution of leg kick to swimming speed and to compare arm-stroke efficiency (ηF) assessed when swimming with the arms only (SAO) and while swimming front crawl (FCS) using individual and fixed adjustments to arm-stroke and leg-kick contribution to forward speed. Twenty-nine master swimmers (21 men, 8 women) performed SAO and FCS at 6 self-selected speeds from very slow to maximal. The average swimming speed (v), stroke frequency (SF), and stroke length (SL) were assessed in the central 10 m of the swimming pool. Then, a 2nd-order polynomial regression was used to obtain values of v at paired SF. The percentage difference in v between FCS and SAO, for each paired SF, was used to calculate the relative contributions of the arm stroke (AC) and leg kick (LC) to FCS. Then ηF was calculated using the indirect "paddle-wheel" approach in 3 different ways: using general, individual, and no adjustments to AC. The LC increased with SF (and speed) from -1% ± 4% to 11% ± 1% (P < .05). At the lower FCS speeds, ηF calculated using general adjustments was lower than ηF calculated using individual adjustments (P < .05), but differences disappear at the fastest speeds. Finally, ηF calculated using individual adjustments to LC in the FCS condition did not differ with ηF assessed in the SAO condition at all the investigated speeds. The relative contributions of the arm stroke and leg kick should be individually estimated to reduce errors when calculating arm-stroke efficiency at different speeds and in different swimmers.

  19. Crew - First Manned Apollo Mission - Water Egress Procedures Practice - Ellington AFB (EAFB), TX

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-06-01

    S66-51583 (June 1966)--- Prime crew members announced by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for the first manned Apollo 1 space flight practice water egress procedures in a swimming pool at Ellington Air Force Base (EAFB), Houston, Texas. Astronaut Edward H. White II rides life raft in the foreground. Astronaut Roger B. Chaffee sits in hatch of the boilerplate model of the spacecraft. Astronaut Virgil I. Grissom, third member of the crew, waits inside the spacecraft.

  20. Rainbow trout responses to water temperature and dissolved oxygen stress in two southern California stream pools

    Treesearch

    K.R. Matthews; N.H. Berg

    1997-01-01

    Habitat use by rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss is described for a southern California stream where the summer water temperatures typically exceed the lethal limits for trout (>25) C). During August 1994, water temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO), and trout distribution were monitored in two adjacent pools in Sespe Creek, Ventura County, where summer water...

  1. Is Swimming Safe in Heart Failure? A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Shah, Parin; Pellicori, Pierpaolo; Macnamara, Alexandra; Urbinati, Alessia; Clark, Andrew L

    It is not clear whether swimming is safe in patients with chronic heart failure. Ten studies examining the hemodynamic effects of acute water immersion (WI) (155 patients; average age 60 years; 86% male; mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) 29%) and 6 randomized controlled trials of rehabilitation comparing swimming with either medical treatment only (n = 3) or cycling (n = 1) or aerobic exercise (n = 2), (136 patients, average age 59 years; 84% male, mean LVEF 31%) were considered. In 7 studies of warm WI (30-35°C): heart rate (HR) fell (2% to -15%), and both cardiac output (CO) (7-37%) and stroke volume (SV) increased (13-41%). In 1 study of hot WI (41°C), systemic vascular resistance (SVR) fell (41%) and HR increased (33%). In 2 studies of cold WI (12-22°C), there were no consistent effects on HR and CO. Compared with medical management, swimming led to a greater increase in peak VO2 (7-14%) and 6 minute walk test (6MWT) (7-13%). Compared with cycle training, combined swimming and cycle training led to a greater reduction in resting HR (16%), a greater increase in resting SV (23%) and SVR (15%), but no changes in resting CO and a lesser increase in peak VO2 (6%). Compared with aerobic training, combined swimming and aerobic training lead to a reduction in resting HR (19%) and SVR (54%) and a greater increase in SV (34%), resting CO (28%), LVEF (9%), and 6MWT (70%). Although swimming appears to be safe, the studies conducted have been small, very heterogeneous, and inconclusive.

  2. Computer assisted video analysis of swimming performance in a forced swim test: simultaneous assessment of duration of immobility and swimming style in mice selected for high and low swim-stress induced analgesia.

    PubMed

    Juszczak, Grzegorz R; Lisowski, Paweł; Sliwa, Adam T; Swiergiel, Artur H

    2008-10-20

    In behavioral pharmacology, two problems are encountered when quantifying animal behavior: 1) reproducibility of the results across laboratories, especially in the case of manual scoring of animal behavior; 2) presence of different behavioral idiosyncrasies, common in genetically different animals, that mask or mimic the effects of the experimental treatments. This study aimed to develop an automated method enabling simultaneous assessment of the duration of immobility in mice and the depth of body submersion during swimming by means of computer assisted video analysis system (EthoVision from Noldus). We tested and compared parameters of immobility based either on the speed of an object (animal) movement or based on the percentage change in the object's area between the consecutive video frames. We also examined the effects of an erosion-dilation filtering procedure on the results obtained with both parameters of immobility. Finally, we proposed an automated method enabling assessment of depth of body submersion that reflects swimming performance. It was found that both parameters of immobility were sensitive to the effect of an antidepressant, desipramine, and that they yielded similar results when applied to mice that are good swimmers. The speed parameter was, however, more sensitive and more reliable because it depended less on random noise of the video image. Also, it was established that applying the erosion-dilation filtering procedure increased the reliability of both parameters of immobility. In case of mice that were poor swimmers, the assessed duration of immobility differed depending on a chosen parameter, thus resulting in the presence or lack of differences between two lines of mice that differed in swimming performance. These results substantiate the need for assessing swimming performance when the duration of immobility in the FST is compared in lines that differ in their swimming "styles". Testing swimming performance can also be important in the

  3. Model of large pool fires.

    PubMed

    Fay, J A

    2006-08-21

    A two zone entrainment model of pool fires is proposed to depict the fluid flow and flame properties of the fire. Consisting of combustion and plume zones, it provides a consistent scheme for developing non-dimensional scaling parameters for correlating and extrapolating pool fire visible flame length, flame tilt, surface emissive power, and fuel evaporation rate. The model is extended to include grey gas thermal radiation from soot particles in the flame zone, accounting for emission and absorption in both optically thin and thick regions. A model of convective heat transfer from the combustion zone to the liquid fuel pool, and from a water substrate to cryogenic fuel pools spreading on water, provides evaporation rates for both adiabatic and non-adiabatic fires. The model is tested against field measurements of large scale pool fires, principally of LNG, and is generally in agreement with experimental values of all variables.

  4. Impaired swim bladder inflation in early-life stage fathead ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The present study investigated whether inhibition of deiodinase, the enzyme which converts thyroxine (T4) to the more biologically-active form, 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3), would impact inflation of the posterior and/or anterior chamber of the swim bladder, processes previously demonstrated to be thyroid-hormone regulated. Two experiments were conducted using a model deiodinase inhibitor, iopanoic acid (IOP). In the first study, fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) embryos were exposed to 0.6, 1.9, or 6.0 mg IOP/L or control water in a flow-through system until reaching 6 days post-fertilization (dpf) at which time posterior swim bladder inflation was assessed. To examine effects on anterior swim bladder inflation, a second study was conducted with 6 dpf larvae exposed to the same IOP concentrations until reaching 21 dpf. Fish from both studies were sampled for T4/T3 measurements, gene transcription analyses, and thyroid histopathology. In the embryo study, incidence and length of inflated posterior swim bladders were significantly reduced in the 6.0 mg/L treatment at 6 dpf. Incidence of inflation and length of anterior swim bladder in larval fish were significantly reduced in all IOP treatments at 14 dpf, but inflation recovered by 18 dpf. Throughout the larval study, whole body T4 concentrations were significantly increased and T3 concentrations were significantly decreased in all IOP treatments. Consistent with hypothesized compensatory responses, sig

  5. Coordination of multiple appendages in drag-based swimming.

    PubMed

    Alben, Silas; Spears, Kevin; Garth, Stephen; Murphy, David; Yen, Jeannette

    2010-11-06

    Krill are aquatic crustaceans that engage in long distance migrations, either vertically in the water column or horizontally for 10 km (over 200,000 body lengths) per day. Hence efficient locomotory performance is crucial for their survival. We study the swimming kinematics of krill using a combination of experiment and analysis. We quantify the propulsor kinematics for tethered and freely swimming krill in experiments, and find kinematics that are very nearly metachronal. We then formulate a drag coefficient model which compares metachronal, synchronous and intermediate motions for a freely swimming body with two legs. With fixed leg velocity amplitude, metachronal kinematics give the highest average body speed for both linear and quadratic drag laws. The same result holds for five legs with the quadratic drag law. When metachronal kinematics is perturbed towards synchronous kinematics, an analysis shows that the velocity increase on the power stroke is outweighed by the velocity decrease on the recovery stroke. With fixed time-averaged work done by the legs, metachronal kinematics again gives the highest average body speed, although the advantage over synchronous kinematics is reduced.

  6. Hydrodynamic advantages of swimming by salp chains.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Kelly R; Weihs, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    Salps are marine invertebrates comprising multiple jet-propelled swimming units during a colonial life-cycle stage. Using theory, we show that asynchronous swimming with multiple pulsed jets yields substantial hydrodynamic benefit due to the production of steady swimming velocities, which limit drag. Laboratory comparisons of swimming kinematics of aggregate salps ( Salpa fusiformis and Weelia cylindrica ) using high-speed video supported that asynchronous swimming by aggregates results in a smoother velocity profile and showed that this smoother velocity profile is the result of uncoordinated, asynchronous swimming by individual zooids. In situ flow visualizations of W. cylindrica swimming wakes revealed that another consequence of asynchronous swimming is that fluid interactions between jet wakes are minimized. Although the advantages of multi-jet propulsion have been mentioned elsewhere, this is the first time that the theory has been quantified and the role of asynchronous swimming verified using experimental data from the laboratory and the field. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. Swim Free. A 10 Day Program of Aquatic Exercises Adapted from Life in the Waterworld.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberhardt, Lorraine; Sanborn, Laura

    The completely waterproof book contains instructions for an alternative form of swimming exercises based on the movements of 19 water creatures. The exercises can be used by groups or individuals to enhance training programs, to serve as part of a structured synchronized swimming program, or to supplement recreational activities. The book provides…

  8. A Correlational Analysis of Tethered Swimming, Swim Sprint Performance and Dry-land Power Assessments.

    PubMed

    Loturco, I; Barbosa, A C; Nocentini, R K; Pereira, L A; Kobal, R; Kitamura, K; Abad, C C C; Figueiredo, P; Nakamura, F Y

    2016-03-01

    Swimmers are often tested on both dry-land and in swimming exercises. The aim of this study was to test the relationships between dry-land, tethered force-time curve parameters and swimming performances in distances up to 200 m. 10 young male high-level swimmers were assessed using the maximal isometric bench-press and quarter-squat, mean propulsive power in jump-squat, squat and countermovement jumps (dry-land assessments), peak force, average force, rate of force development (RFD) and impulse (tethered swimming) and swimming times. Pearson product-moment correlations were calculated among the variables. Peak force and average force were very largely correlated with the 50- and 100-m swimming performances (r=- 0.82 and -0.74, respectively). Average force was very-largely/largely correlated with the 50- and 100-m performances (r=- 0.85 and -0.67, respectively). RFD and impulse were very-largely correlated with the 50-m time (r=- 0.72 and -0.76, respectively). Tethered swimming parameters were largely correlated (r=0.65 to 0.72) with mean propulsive power in jump-squat, squat-jump and countermovement jumps. Finally, mean propulsive power in jump-squat was largely correlated (r=- 0.70) with 50-m performance. Due to the significant correlations between dry-land assessments and tethered/actual swimming, coaches are encouraged to implement strategies able to increase leg power in sprint swimmers. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Investigation of the swimming mechanics of Schistosoma cercariae and its role in disease transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Deepak; Bhargava, Arjun; Katsikis, Georgios; Prakash, Manu

    2015-11-01

    Schistosomiasis is a Neglected Tropical Disease responsible for the deaths of an estimated 200,000 people annually. Human infection occurs when the infectious forms of the worm known as cercariae swim through freshwater, detect humans and penetrate the skin. Cercarial swimming is a bottleneck in disease transmission since cercariae have finite energy reserves, hence motivating studies of their swimming mechanics. Here we build on earlier studies which revealed the existence of two swimming modes: the tail-first and head-first modes. Of these the former was shown to display a novel symmetry breaking mechanism enabling locomotion at low Reynolds numbers. Here we propose simple models for the two swimming modes based on a three-link swimmer geometry. Using local slender-body-theory, we calculate the swimming gait for these model swimmers and compare with experiments, both on live cercariae and on scaled-up robotic swimmers. We use data from these experiments and the models to calculate the energy expended while swimming in the two modes. This along with long-time tracking of swimming cercariae in a lab setting allows estimation of the decrease in activity of the swimmer as a function of time which is an important factor in cercarial infectivity. Finally, we consider, through experiments and theoretical models, the effects of gravity since cercariae are negatively buoyant and sink in the water column while not swimming. This sinking affects cercarial spatial distribution which is important from a disease perspective.

  10. 77 FR 46613 - Safety Zone; 2012 Ironman US Championship Swim, Hudson River, Fort Lee, NJ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-06

    ... 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; 2012 Ironman US Championship Swim, Hudson River, Fort Lee, NJ AGENCY: Coast... navigable waters of the Hudson River in the vicinity of Englewood Cliffs and Fort Lee, NJ for the 2012... Championship Swim, Hudson River, Fort Lee, NJ in the Federal Register (77 FR 34285). We received no comments on...

  11. Activated charcoal filters: Water treatment, pollution control, and industrial applications. (Latest citations from the Patent Bibliographic database with exemplary claims. ) Published Search

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Not Available

    The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning activated charcoal filters and their applications in water treatment, pollution control, and industrial processes. Filtering methods and equipment for air and water purification, industrial distillation and extraction, industrial leaching, and filtration of toxic materials and contaminants are described. Applications include drinking water purification, filtering beverages, production of polymer materials, solvent and metal recovery, waste conversion, automotive fuel and exhaust systems, swimming pool filtration, tobacco smoke filters, kitchen ventilators, medical filtration treatment, and odor absorbing materials. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  12. Baby swimming and respiratory health.

    PubMed

    Nystad, Wenche; Håberg, Siri E; London, Stephanie J; Nafstad, Per; Magnus, Per

    2008-05-01

    To estimate the effect of baby swimming in the first 6 months of life on respiratory diseases from 6 to 18 months. We used data from The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health in children born between 1999 and 2005 followed from birth to the age of 18 months (n = 30,870). Health outcomes: lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI), wheeze and otitis media between 6 and 18 months of age. baby swimming at the age of 6 months. The effect of baby swimming was estimated by logistic regression analysis adjusting for potential confounders. About 25% of the children participated in baby swimming. The prevalence of LRTI was 13.3%, wheeze 40.0% and otitis media 30.4%. Children who were baby swimming were not more likely to have LRTI, to wheeze or to have otitis media. However, children with atopic mothers who attended baby swimming had an increased risk of wheeze, adjusted odds ratios (aOR) 1.24 (95% CI 1.11, 1.39), but not LRTI or otitis media. This was also the case for children without respiratory diseases before 6 months aOR 1.08 (95%CI 1.02-1.15). Baby swimming may be related to later wheeze. However, these findings warrant further investigation.

  13. Serological responses to Cryptosporidium antigens in inhabitants of Hungary using conventionally filtered surface water and riverbank filtered drinking water.

    PubMed

    Farkas, K; Plutzer, J; Moltchanova, E; Török, A; Varró, M J; Domokos, K; Frost, F; Hunter, P R

    2015-10-01

    In this study the putative protective seroprevalence (PPS) of IgG antibodies to the 27-kDa and 15/17-kDa Cryptosporidium antigens in sera of healthy participants who were and were not exposed to Cryptosporidium oocysts via surface water-derived drinking water was compared. The participants completed a questionnaire regarding risk factors that have been shown to be associated with infection. The PPS was significantly greater (49-61%) in settlements where the drinking water originated from surface water, than in the control city where riverbank filtration was used (21% and 23%). Logistic regression analysis on the risk factors showed an association between bathing/swimming in outdoor pools and antibody responses to the 15/17-kDa antigen complex. Hence the elevated responses were most likely due to the use of contaminated water. Results indicate that waterborne Cryptosporidium infections occur more frequently than reported but may derive from multiple sources.

  14. Predicting the buoyancy, equilibrium and potential swimming ability of giraffes by computational analysis.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Donald M; Naish, Darren

    2010-07-21

    Giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis) are often stated to be unable to swim, and while few observations supporting this have ever been offered, we sought to test the hypothesis that giraffes exhibited a body shape or density unsuited for locomotion in water. We assessed the floating capability of giraffes by simulating their buoyancy with a three-dimensional mathematical/computational model. A similar model of a horse (Equus caballus) was used as a control, and its floating behaviour replicates the observed orientations of immersed horses. The floating giraffe model has its neck sub-horizontal, and the animal would struggle to keep its head clear of the water surface. Using an isometrically scaled-down giraffe model with a total mass equal to that of the horse, the giraffe's proportionally larger limbs have much higher rotational inertias than do those of horses, and their wetted surface areas are 13.5% greater relative to that of the horse, thus making rapid swimming motions more strenuous. The mean density of the giraffe model (960 gm/l) is also higher than that of the horse (930 gm/l), and closer to that causing negative buoyancy (1000 gm/l). A swimming giraffe - forced into a posture where the neck is sub-horizontal and with a thorax that is pulled downwards by the large fore limbs - would not be able to move the neck and limbs synchronously as giraffes do when moving on land, possibly further hampering the animal's ability to move its limbs effectively underwater. We found that a full-sized, adult giraffe will become buoyant in water deeper than 2.8m. While it is not impossible for giraffes to swim, we speculate that they would perform poorly compared to other mammals and are hence likely to avoid swimming if possible. (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Determination of a quantitative parameter to evaluate swimming technique based on the maximal tethered swimming test.

    PubMed

    Soncin, Rafael; Mezêncio, Bruno; Ferreira, Jacielle Carolina; Rodrigues, Sara Andrade; Huebner, Rudolf; Serrão, Julio Cerca; Szmuchrowski, Leszek

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to propose a new force parameter, associated with swimmers' technique and performance. Twelve swimmers performed five repetitions of 25 m sprint crawl and a tethered swimming test with maximal effort. The parameters calculated were: the mean swimming velocity for crawl sprint, the mean propulsive force of the tethered swimming test as well as an oscillation parameter calculated from force fluctuation. The oscillation parameter evaluates the force variation around the mean force during the tethered test as a measure of swimming technique. Two parameters showed significant correlations with swimming velocity: the mean force during the tethered swimming (r = 0.85) and the product of the mean force square root and the oscillation (r = 0.86). However, the intercept coefficient was significantly different from zero only for the mean force, suggesting that although the correlation coefficient of the parameters was similar, part of the mean velocity magnitude that was not associated with the mean force was associated with the product of the mean force square root and the oscillation. Thus, force fluctuation during tethered swimming can be used as a quantitative index of swimmers' technique.

  16. Swimming Performance and Metabolism of Golden Shiners

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The swimming ability and metabolism of golden shiners, Notemigonus crysoleucas, was examined using swim tunnel respirometery. The oxygen consumption and tail beat frequencies at various swimming speeds, an estimation of the standard metabolic rate, and the critical swimming speed (Ucrit) was determ...

  17. Environmental estrogen(s) induced swimming behavioural alterations in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Goundadkar, Basavaraj B; Katti, Pancharatna

    2017-09-01

    The present study is an attempt to investigate the effects of long-term (75days) exposure to environmental estrogens (EE) on the swimming behaviour of zebrafish (Danio rerio). Adult zebrafish were exposed semi-statically to media containing commonly detected estrogenic water contaminants (EE2, DES and BPA) at a concentration (5ng/L) much lower than environmentally recorded levels. Time spent in swimming, surface preference, patterns and path of swimming were recorded (6mins) for each fish using two video cameras on day 15, 30 60 and 75. Video clips were analysed using a software program. Results indicate that chronic exposure to EE leads to increased body weight and size of females, reduced (P<0.05) swimming time, delay in latency, increased (P<0.05) immobility, erratic movements and freezing episodes. We conclude that estrogenic contamination of natural aquatic systems induces alterations in locomotor behaviour and associated physiological disturbances in inhabitant fish fauna. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Spread of large LNG pools on the sea.

    PubMed

    Fay, J A

    2007-02-20

    A review of the standard model of LNG pool spreading on water, comparing it with the model and experiments on oil pool spread from which the LNG model is extrapolated, raises questions about the validity of the former as applied to spills from marine tankers. These questions arise from the difference in fluid density ratios, in the multi-dimensional flow at the pool edge, in the effects of LNG pool boiling at the LNG-water interface, and in the model and experimental initial conditions compared with the inflow conditions from a marine tanker spill. An alternate supercritical flow model is proposed that avoids these difficulties; it predicts significant increase in the maximum pool radius compared with the standard model and is partially corroborated by tests of LNG pool fires on water. Wind driven ocean wave interaction has little effect on either spread model.

  19. Common Pool Water Markets and their Role in Facilitating Land Use Change in Drying Climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teasley, R. L.; Milke, M.; Raffensperger, J. F.; Zargar, M.

    2010-12-01

    Concern is growing worldwide that climate change will lead to drier climates in many regions and in turn diminish water resources. To protect these limited resources, users may need to shift water use to more economically productive areas. However, changing the land use associated with water permits can be quite difficult, because water is not easily traded. Water markets have been well researched as a method for trading water between users, but these markets can often be difficult and costly requiring one-to-one trades between buyers and sellers. In contrast to a one-to-one market, a common pool market can reduce the transaction costs associated with trading water. In this research, a common pool market is applied to an example groundwater system set up in GWM2000 with ten users and various environmental constraints. The users represent three types of the largest groundwater users in the Canterbury region of New Zealand: agricultural, dairy and livestock. The response matrix from GWM2000 is used to develop constraints in the market model along with user bids. Bids are calculated from economic and water use data for Canterbury, New Zealand. Varying spatial distributions of water users by type are evaluated for the effect on the market under drying conditions. These conditions are simulated from climate change scenarios produced by the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research in New Zealand. The results demonstrate potential land use changes falls under drying conditions. As water availability falls, the price for additional water increases, particularly near environmental constraints, driving the land and water towards more efficient uses.

  20. Seasonal and Cyclical Changes in Genetic Composition of the Marine Intertidal Rock Pool Copepod Tigriopus brevicornis.

    PubMed

    Van Wormhoudt, Alain

    2015-06-01

    Tigriopus brevicornis is a marine rock pool copepod widely distributed along Atlantic coasts. Due to the absence of a known dispersal mechanism by free swimming stages, exchanges between populations over long distances are questionable. In order to analyse the evolution of an isolated supralittoral rock pool population, sampling of the copepod was performed monthly during 1 year and compared to samplings over 5 years in the same rock pool, as well as from other rock pools. Using ITS1 analysis, cyclical changes in genetic composition were detected. Our results give clear indications concerning the segregation of the rock pool population and a lack of gene flow among outside populations. A network analysis shows the presence of several shared dominant haplotypes and also singletons differing by one mutation point. F(st) analyses indicate that the main changes occur in autumn and winter. The few analogies of ITS1 sequences with nearby populations may indicate that new migrants must re-colonise the pools from surrounding rock crevices in the intertidal habitat where they may have found a refuge after bad weather conditions.

  1. Influence of Anguillicola crassus (Nematoda) and Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ciliophora) on swimming activity of European eel Anguilla anguilla.

    PubMed

    Münderle, M; Sures, B; Taraschewski, H

    2004-08-09

    We investigated the swimming activity of 70 European eels Anguilla anguilla in relation to natural infection with 2 parasite species: the eel-specific swimbladder nematode Anguillicola crassus and the non-specific skin and gill protozoan Ichthyophthirius multifiliis. We measured how long individual eels exposed to a water current in a swimming channel with a steady-stream profile could withstand the water current. The parasites affected the swimming behaviour of eels in different ways. The maximum period of time the fish were able to swim against the current was not correlated with infection by A. crassus. In contrast, infection with I. multifiliis reduced the swimming time. The protozoan has a higher pathogenicity than the swimbladder nematode, at least in closed systems, where I. multifiliis is able to spread within a few days. Reduction in swimming capacity after infection with the ciliate averaged 47 % compared to capacity prior to infection. Thus, our results do not support the previously suggested strong negative relation between swimming activity of eels and intensity of A. crassus infection, at least in the short-term. However, there are indications in the literature that the pathological effects of A. crassus on the eel swimmbladder may involve a higher energy demand, possibly manifested in a prolonged spawning migration. As a result, eels heavily infected with this parasite may arrive too late at the spawning site to participate in mating. This could ensure a selection of 'good genes'.

  2. Seasonal warming of the Middle Atlantic Bight Cold Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentz, S. J.

    2017-02-01

    The Cold Pool is a 20-60 m thick band of cold, near-bottom water that persists from spring to fall over the midshelf and outer shelf of the Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) and Southern Flank of Georges Bank. The Cold Pool is remnant winter water bounded above by the seasonal thermocline and offshore by warmer slope water. Historical temperature profiles are used to characterize the average annual evolution and spatial structure of the Cold Pool. The Cold Pool gradually warms from spring to summer at a rate of order 1°C month-1. The warming rate is faster in shallower water where the Cold Pool is thinner, consistent with a vertical turbulent heat flux from the thermocline to the Cold Pool. The Cold Pool warming rate also varies along the shelf; it is larger over Georges Bank and smaller in the southern MAB. The mean turbulent diffusivities at the top of the Cold Pool, estimated from the spring to summer mean heat balance, are an order of magnitude larger over Georges Bank than in the southern MAB, consistent with much stronger tidal mixing over Georges Bank than in the southern MAB. The stronger tidal mixing causes the Cold Pool to warm more rapidly over Georges Bank and the eastern New England shelf than in the New York Bight or southern MAB. Consequently, the coldest Cold Pool water is located in the New York Bight from late spring to summer.

  3. Effect of swimming exercise on three-dimensional trabecular bone microarchitecture in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yong-In; Sone, Teruki; Ohnaru, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Kensuke; Fukunaga, Masao

    2015-11-01

    Swimming is generally considered ineffective for increasing bone mass in humans, at least compared with weight-bearing sports. However, swimming exercise has sometimes been shown to have a strong positive effect on bone mass in small animals. This study investigated the effects of swimming on bone mass, strength, and microarchitecture in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. OVX or sham operations were performed on 18-wk-old female Fisher 344 rats. Rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham sedentary (Sham-CON), sham swimming exercised (Sham-SWI), OVX sedentary (OVX-CON), and OVX swimming exercised (OVX-SWI). Rats in exercise groups performed swimming in a water bath for 60 min/day, 5 days/wk, for 12 wk. Bone mineral density (BMD) in right femurs was analyzed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Three-dimensional trabecular architecture at the distal femoral metaphysis was analyzed using microcomputed tomography (μCT). Geometrical properties of diaphyseal cortical bone were evaluated in the midfemoral region using μCT. The biomechanical properties of femurs were analyzed using three-point bending. Femoral BMD was significantly decreased following ovariectomy. This change was suppressed by swimming. Trabecular bone thickness, number, and connectivity were decreased by ovariectomy, whereas structure model index (i.e., ratio of rod-like to plate-like trabeculae) increased. These changes were also suppressed by swimming exercise. Femurs displayed greater cortical width and maximum load in SWI groups than in CON groups. Together, these results demonstrate that swimming exercise drastically alleviated both OVX-induced decreases in bone mass and mechanical strength and the deterioration of trabecular microarchitecture in rat models of osteoporosis. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Effects of 4 Weeks of β-Alanine Supplementation on Swim-Performance Parameters in Water Polo Players.

    PubMed

    Brisola, Gabriel Motta Pinheiro; Milioni, Fabio; Papoti, Marcelo; Zagatto, Alessandro Moura

    2017-08-01

    In water polo, several high-intensity efforts are performed, leading to the fatigue process due to accumulation of hydrogen ions, and thus β-alanine supplementation could be an efficient strategy to increase the intramuscular acid buffer. Purpose To investigate whether 4 wk of β-alanine supplementation enhances parameters related to water polo performance. Methods Twenty-two highly trained male water polo players of national level were randomly assigned to receive 28 d of either β-alanine or a placebo (4.8 g/d of the supplement in the first 10 d and 6.4 g/d in the final 18 d). The participants performed 30-s maximal tethered swimming (30TS), 200-m swimming (P200m), and 30-s crossbar jumps (30CJ) before and after the supplementation period. Results The β-alanine group presented significant increases in 30TS for mean force (P = .04; Δ = 30.5% ± 40.4%) and integral of force (P = .05; Δ = 28.0% ± 38.0%), as well as P200m (P = .05; Δ = -2.2% ± 2.6%), while the placebo group did not significantly differ for mean force (P = .13; Δ = 24.1% ± 33.7%), integral of force (P = .12; Δ = 24.3% ± 35.1%), or P200m (P = .10; Δ = -1.6% ± 3.8%). However, there was no significant group effect for any variable, and the magnitude-based-inference analysis showed unclear outcomes between groups (Cohen d ± 95%CL mean force = 0.16 ± 0.83, integral of force = 0.12 ± 0.84, and P200m = 0.05 ± 0.30). For 30CJ the results were similar, with improvements in both groups (placebo, Δ = 14.9% ± 14.1%; β-alanine, Δ = 16.9% ± 18.5%) but with no significant interaction effect between groups and an unclear effect (0.14 ± 0.75). Conclusion Four weeks of β-alanine supplementation does not substantially improve performance of 30TS, P200m, or 30CJ in highly trained water polo athletes compared with a control group.

  5. Effects of dry-land vs. resisted- and assisted-sprint exercises on swimming sprint performances.

    PubMed

    Girold, Sébastien; Maurin, Didier; Dugué, Benoit; Chatard, Jean-Claude; Millet, Grégoire

    2007-05-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the effects of dry-land strength training with a combined in-water resisted- and assisted-sprint program in swimmer athletes. Twenty-one swimmers from regional to national level participated in this study. They were randomly assigned to 3 groups: the strength (S) group that was involved in a dry-land strength training program where barbells were used, the resisted- and assisted-sprint (RAS) group that got involved in a specific water training program where elastic tubes were used to generate resistance and assistance while swimming, and the control (C) group which was involved in an aerobic cycling program. During 12 weeks, the athletes performed 6 training sessions per week on separate days. All of them combined the same aerobic dominant work for their basic training in swimming and running with their specific training. Athletes were evaluated 3 times: before the training program started, after 6 weeks of training, and at the end of the training program. The outcome values were the strength of the elbow flexors and extensors evaluated using an isokinetic dynamometer, and the speed, stroke rate, stroke length, and stroke depth observed during a 50-meter sprint. No changes were observed after 6 weeks of training. At the end of the training period, we observed significant increases in swimming velocity, and strength of elbow flexors and extensors both in the S and RAS groups. However, stroke depth decreased both in the S and RAS groups. Stroke rate increased in the RAS but not in the S group. However, no significant differences in the swimming performances between the S and RAS groups were observed. No significant changes occurred in C. Altogether, programs combining swimming with dry-land strength or with in-water resisted- and assisted-sprint exercises led to a similar gain in sprint performance and are more efficient than traditional swimming training methods alone.

  6. Floppy swimming: Viscous locomotion of actuated elastica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric

    2007-04-01

    Actuating periodically an elastic filament in a viscous liquid generally breaks the constraints of Purcell’s scallop theorem, resulting in the generation of a net propulsive force. This observation suggests a method to design simple swimming devices—which we call “elastic swimmers”—where the actuation mechanism is embedded in a solid body and the resulting swimmer is free to move. In this paper, we study theoretically the kinematics of elastic swimming. After discussing the basic physical picture of the phenomenon and the expected scaling relationships, we derive analytically the elastic swimming velocities in the limit of small actuation amplitude. The emphasis is on the coupling between the two unknowns of the problems—namely the shape of the elastic filament and the swimming kinematics—which have to be solved simultaneously. We then compute the performance of the resulting swimming device and its dependence on geometry. The optimal actuation frequency and body shapes are derived and a discussion of filament shapes and internal torques is presented. Swimming using multiple elastic filaments is discussed, and simple strategies are presented which result in straight swimming trajectories. Finally, we compare the performance of elastic swimming with that of swimming micro-organisms.

  7. Naegleria

    MedlinePlus

    ... of warm freshwater, such as lakes and rivers Geothermal (naturally hot) water, such as hot springs Warm water discharge from industrial plants Geothermal (naturally hot) drinking water sources Swimming pools that ...

  8. Simulations of neuromuscular control in lamprey swimming.

    PubMed Central

    Ekeberg, O; Grillner, S

    1999-01-01

    The neuronal generation of vertebrate locomotion has been extensively studied in the lamprey. Models at different levels of abstraction are being used to describe this system, from abstract nonlinear oscillators to interconnected model neurons comprising multiple compartments and a Hodgkin-Huxley representation of the most relevant ion channels. To study the role of sensory feedback by simulation, it eventually also becomes necessary to incorporate the mechanical movements in the models. By using simplifying models of muscle activation, body mechanics, counteracting water forces, and sensory feedback through stretch receptors and vestibular organs, we have been able to close the feedback loop to enable studies of the interaction between the neuronal and the mechanical systems. The neuromechanical simulations reveal that the currently known network is sufficient for generating a whole repertoire of swimming patterns. Swimming at different speeds and with different wavelengths, together with the performance of lateral turns can all be achieved by simply varying the brainstem input. The neuronal mechanisms behind pitch and roll manoeuvres are less clear. We have put forward a 'crossed-oscillators' hypothesis where partly separate dorsal and ventral circuits are postulated. Neuromechanical simulations of this system show that it is also capable of generating realistic pitch turns and rolls, and that vestibular signals can stabilize the posture during swimming. PMID:10382223

  9. Effect of Erabu sea snake (Laticauda semifasciata) lipids on the swimming endurance of mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guihua; Higuchi, Tomoyuki; Shirai, Nobuya; Suzuki, Hiramitsu; Shimizu, Eiji

    2007-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of Erabu sea snake (Laticauda semifasciata) lipids on the swimming endurance of mice. Twelve-week-old male Crlj: CD-1 (ICR) mice were fed one of three experimental diets containing 6% lard, fish oil or sea snake lipids for 16 weeks. Swimming exercise was conducted in an acrylic plastic tank filled with 25 cm of water maintained at 23 degrees C. Every 4 weeks, the mice were made to perform swimming exercises with loads attached to their tails, corresponding to approximately 1 or 2% of their body weights. The group fed the sea snake lipid diet exhibited significantly improved swimming endurance compared with the lard diet group (p < 0.05); however, this result was not observed in the fish oil diet group. In the sea snake lipid diet group, plasma and muscle lactates were significantly lower, and plasma glucose and muscle glycogen were significantly higher than in the lard diet group (p < 0.05). These results suggest that the intake of sea snake lipids enhanced the swimming endurance of the mice by delaying the accumulation of lactate during swimming exercise. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Analysis of swimming motions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallenstein, J.; Huston, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of swimming motion with specific attention given to the flutter kick, the breast-stroke kick, and the breast stroke. The analysis is completely theoretical. It employs a mathematical model of the human body consisting of frustrums of elliptical cones. Dynamical equations are written for this model including both viscous and inertia forces. These equations are then applied with approximated swimming strokes and solved numerically using a digital computer. The procedure is to specify the input of the swimming motion. The computer solution then provides the output displacement, velocity, and rotation or body roll of the swimmer.

  11. Activated-charcoal filters: water treatment, pollution control, and industrial applications. January 1970-July 1988 (citations from the US Patent data base). Report for January 1970-July 1988

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Not Available

    This bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning activated-charcoal filters and their applications in water treatment, pollution control, and industrial processes. Filtering methods and equipment for air and water purification, industrial distillation and extraction, industrial leaching, and filtration of toxic gases and pollutants are described. Applications include drinking water purification, filtering beverages, production of polymer materials, solvent and metal recovery, swimming pool filtration, waste conversion, automobile fuel and exhaust systems, and footwear deodorizing. (Contains 129 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  12. Elevated soil nitrogen pools after conversion of turfgrass to water-efficient residential landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heavenrich, Hannah; Hall, Sharon J.

    2016-08-01

    As a result of uncertain resource availability and growing populations, city managers are implementing conservation plans that aim to provide services for people while reducing household resource use. For example, in the US, municipalities are incentivizing homeowners to replace their water-intensive turfgrass lawns with water-efficient landscapes consisting of interspersed drought-tolerant shrubs and trees with rock or mulch groundcover (e.g. xeriscapes, rain gardens, water-wise landscapes). While these strategies are likely to reduce water demand, the consequences for other ecosystem services are unclear. Previous studies in controlled, experimental landscapes have shown that conversion from turfgrass to shrubs may lead to high rates of nutrient leaching from soils. However, little is known about the long-term biogeochemical consequences of this increasingly common land cover change across diverse homeowner management practices. We explored the fate of soil nitrogen (N) across a chronosequence of land cover change from turfgrass to water-efficient landscapes in privately owned yards in metropolitan Phoenix, Arizona, in the arid US Southwest. Soil nitrate ({{{{NO}}}3}--N) pools were four times larger in water-efficient landscapes (25 ± 4 kg {{{{NO}}}3}--N/ha 0-45 cm depth) compared to turfgrass lawns (6 ± 7 kg {{{{NO}}}3}--N/ha). Soil {{{{NO}}}3}--N also varied significantly with time since landscape conversion; the largest pools occurred at 9-13 years after turfgrass removal and declined to levels comparable to turfgrass thereafter. Variation in soil {{{{NO}}}3}--N with landscape age was strongly influenced by management practices related to soil water availability, including shrub cover, sub-surface plastic sheeting, and irrigation frequency. Our findings show that transitioning from turfgrass to water-efficient residential landscaping can lead to an accumulation of {{{{NO}}}3}--N that may be lost from the plant rooting zone over time following irrigation or

  13. 77 FR 34285 - Safety Zone; 2012 Ironman U.S. Championship Swim, Hudson River, Fort Lee, NJ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; 2012 Ironman U.S. Championship Swim, Hudson River, Fort Lee, NJ AGENCY: Coast Guard... safety zone on the navigable waters of the Hudson River in the vicinity of Englewood Cliffs and Fort Lee... the Hudson River in the vicinity of Englewood Cliffs and Fort Lee, New Jersey. This swim event poses...

  14. Tethered Swimming Test: Reliability and the Association to Swimming Performance and Land-based Anaerobic Performance.

    PubMed

    Nagle Zera, Jacquelyn; Nagle, Elizabeth F; Nagai, Takashi; Lovalekar, Mita; Abt, John P; Lephart, Scott M

    2018-02-14

    The purpose of this study was three-fold: (a) to examine the test-retest reliability of a 30 second maximal tethered freestyle swimming test (TST), (b) to assess the validity of the TST by examining the association to sprint swimming performance and, (c) to examine the associations between a swim-specific and land-based measure of anaerobic performance. A total of twenty-nine male and female swimmers were recruited to participate in the study. Each participant completed a Wingate Anaerobic cycling test (WAnT), two or four TST, and a 22.9 meter (25 yard), 45.7 meter (50 yard), and 91.4 meter (100 yard) maximal freestyle performance swims (PS). Mean and peak force (Fmean, Fpeak) were recorded for both the WAnT and TST, and average swimming velocity and time were recorded for the PS. Additionally, physiological and perceptual measures were recorded immediate post exercise for all tests. The results of the present investigation showed strong intersession and intrasession reliability (R= 0.821-0.975; p<0.001) for force parameters of the TST. Moderate correlations were found between Fmean and PS time and velocity of all distances, with slightly weaker correlations between Fpeak and the 22.9 meter (time and velocity) and 45.7 meter (velocity) PS. Finally, moderate correlations were found for Fmean and Fpeak of the TST and WAnT. This study demonstrated that the TST is a reliable measure, with moderate association to swimming performance, producing similar physiological responses compared to free swimming. Therefore, future research shoulSd focus on investigating the potential benefits of utilizing the TST as a regular assessment tool as a part of a competitive swimming training program to track adaptations and inform training decisions.

  15. Mercury bioaccumulation in wood frogs developing in seasonal pools

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loftin, Cynthia S.; Calhoun, Aram J.K.; Nelson, Sarah J.; Elskus, Adria; Simon, Kevin S.

    2012-01-01

    Seasonal woodland pools contribute significant biomass to terrestrial ecosystems through production of pool-breeding amphibians. The movement of amphibian metamorphs potentially transports toxins bioaccumulated during larval development in the natal pool into the surrounding terrestrial environment. We documented total mercury (THg) in seasonal woodland pool water, sediment, litter, and Lithobates sylvaticus LeConte (Wood Frog) in Acadia National Park, ME. THg concentrations in pool water varied over the study season, increasing during April—June and remaining high in 2 of 4 pools upon October refill. Water in pools surrounded by softwoods had lower pH, greater dissolved organic carbon, and greater THg concentrations than pools surrounded by hardwoods, with seasonal patterns in sediment THg but not litter THg. THg increased rapidly from near or below detection in 1–2 week old embryos (<0.2 ng; 0–0.49 ppb wet weight) to 17.1–54.2 ppb in tadpoles within 6 weeks; 7.2–42.0% of THg was methyl Hg in tadpoles near metamorphosis. Metamorphs emigrating from seasonal pools may transfer mercury into terrestrial food webs.

  16. Fish and Robots Swimming Together in a Water Tunnel: Robot Color and Tail-Beat Frequency Influence Fish Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Polverino, Giovanni; Phamduy, Paul; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of integrating bioinspired robots in groups of live social animals may constitute a valuable tool to study the basis of social behavior and uncover the fundamental determinants of animal functions and dysfunctions. In this study, we investigate the interactions between individual golden shiners (Notemigonus crysoleucas) and robotic fish swimming together in a water tunnel at constant flow velocity. The robotic fish is designed to mimic its live counterpart in the aspect ratio, body shape, dimension, and locomotory pattern. Fish positional preference with respect to the robot is experimentally analyzed as the robot's color pattern and tail-beat frequency are varied. Behavioral observations are corroborated by particle image velocimetry studies aimed at investigating the flow structure behind the robotic fish. Experimental results show that the time spent by golden shiners in the vicinity of the bioinspired robotic fish is the highest when the robot mimics their natural color pattern and beats its tail at the same frequency. In these conditions, fish tend to swim at the same depth of the robotic fish, where the wake from the robotic fish is stronger and hydrodynamic return is most likely to be effective. PMID:24204882

  17. Fish and robots swimming together in a water tunnel: robot color and tail-beat frequency influence fish behavior.

    PubMed

    Polverino, Giovanni; Phamduy, Paul; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of integrating bioinspired robots in groups of live social animals may constitute a valuable tool to study the basis of social behavior and uncover the fundamental determinants of animal functions and dysfunctions. In this study, we investigate the interactions between individual golden shiners (Notemigonus crysoleucas) and robotic fish swimming together in a water tunnel at constant flow velocity. The robotic fish is designed to mimic its live counterpart in the aspect ratio, body shape, dimension, and locomotory pattern. Fish positional preference with respect to the robot is experimentally analyzed as the robot's color pattern and tail-beat frequency are varied. Behavioral observations are corroborated by particle image velocimetry studies aimed at investigating the flow structure behind the robotic fish. Experimental results show that the time spent by golden shiners in the vicinity of the bioinspired robotic fish is the highest when the robot mimics their natural color pattern and beats its tail at the same frequency. In these conditions, fish tend to swim at the same depth of the robotic fish, where the wake from the robotic fish is stronger and hydrodynamic return is most likely to be effective.

  18. Water Safety (Recreational)

    MedlinePlus

    Playing in the water - whether swimming, boating or diving - can be fun. It can also be dangerous, especially for children. Being safe can ... injuries and drowning. To stay safe in the water Avoid alcohol when swimming or boating Wear a ...

  19. Effects of 4 weeks of creatine supplementation in junior swimmers on freestyle sprint and swim bench performance.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Brian; Vladich, Todd; Blanksby, Brian A

    2002-11-01

    To determine whether 4 weeks of oral creatine (Cr) supplementation could enhance single freestyle sprint and swim bench performance in experienced competitive junior swimmers, 10 young men and 10 young women (x age = 16.4 +/- 1.8 years) participated in a 27-day supplementation period and pre- and posttesting sessions. In session 1 (presupplementation testing), subjects swam one 50-m freestyle and then (after approximately 5 minutes of active recovery) one 100-m freestyle at maximum speed. Blood lactate was measured before and 1 minute after each swim trial. Forty-eight hours later, height, mass, and the sum of 6 skinfolds were recorded, and a Biokinetic Swim Bench total work output test (2 x 30-second trials, with a 10-minute passive recovery in between) was undertaken. After the pretests were completed, participants were divided into 2 groups (n = 10, Cr; and n = 10, placebo) by means of matched pairs on the basis of gender and 50-m swim times. A Cr loading phase of 20 g x d(-1) for 5 days was then instituted, followed by a maintenance phase of 5 g x d(-1) for 22 days. Postsupplementation testing replicated the presupplementation tests. Four weeks of Cr supplementation did not influence single sprint performance in the pool or body mass and composition. However, 30-second swim bench total work scores for trial 1 and trial 2 increased after Cr (p < 0.05) but not placebo ingestion. Postexercise blood lactate values were not different after supplementation for the 50- and 100-m sprint trials either within or between groups. It was concluded that 4 weeks of Cr supplementation did not significantly improve single sprint performance in competitive junior swimmers, but it did enhance swim bench test performance.

  20. Swimming Speed of Larval Snail Does Not Correlate with Size and Ciliary Beat Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kit Yu Karen; Jiang, Houshuo; Padilla, Dianna K.

    2013-01-01

    Many marine invertebrates have planktonic larvae with cilia used for both propulsion and capturing of food particles. Hence, changes in ciliary activity have implications for larval nutrition and ability to navigate the water column, which in turn affect survival and dispersal. Using high-speed high-resolution microvideography, we examined the relationship between swimming speed, velar arrangements, and ciliary beat frequency of freely swimming veliger larvae of the gastropod Crepidula fornicata over the course of larval development. Average swimming speed was greatest 6 days post hatching, suggesting a reduction in swimming speed towards settlement. At a given age, veliger larvae have highly variable speeds (0.8–4 body lengths s−1) that are independent of shell size. Contrary to the hypothesis that an increase in ciliary beat frequency increases work done, and therefore speed, there was no significant correlation between swimming speed and ciliary beat frequency. Instead, there are significant correlations between swimming speed and visible area of the velar lobe, and distance between centroids of velum and larval shell. These observations suggest an alternative hypothesis that, instead of modifying ciliary beat frequency, larval C. fornicata modify swimming through adjustment of velum extension or orientation. The ability to adjust velum position could influence particle capture efficiency and fluid disturbance and help promote survival in the plankton. PMID:24367554

  1. Swimming in the USA: beachgoer characteristics and health outcomes at US marine and freshwater beaches

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Sarah A.; Wade, Timothy J.; Sams, Elizabeth A.; Hlavsa, Michele C.; Dufour, Alfred P.; Beach, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Swimming in lakes and oceans is popular, but little is known about the demographic characteristics, behaviors, and health risks of beachgoers on a national level. Data from a prospective cohort study of beachgoers at multiple marine and freshwater beaches in the USA were used to describe beachgoer characteristics and health outcomes for swimmers and non-swimmers. This analysis included 54,250 participants. Most (73.2%) entered the water; of those, 65.1% put their head under water, 41.3% got water in their mouth and 18.5% swallowed water. Overall, 16.3% of beachgoers reported any new health problem. Among swimmers, 6.6% reported gastrointestinal (GI) illness compared with 5.5% of non-swimmers (unadjusted χ2 p < 0.001); 6.0% of swimmers and 4.9% of non-swimmers reported respiratory illness (p < 0.001); 1.8% of swimmers and 1.0% of non-swimmers reported ear problems (p < 0.001); and 3.9% of swimmers and 2.4% of non-swimmers experienced a rash (p < 0.001). Overall, swimmers reported a higher unadjusted incidence of GI illness and earaches than non-swimmers. Current surveillance systems might not detect individual cases and outbreaks of illness associated with swimming in natural water. Better knowledge of beachgoer characteristics, activities, and health risks associated with swimming in natural water can improve disease surveillance and prioritize limited resources. PMID:26042984

  2. Perception and action in swimming: Effects of aquatic environment on upper limb inter-segmental coordination.

    PubMed

    Guignard, Brice; Rouard, Annie; Chollet, Didier; Ayad, Omar; Bonifazi, Marco; Dalla Vedova, Dario; Seifert, Ludovic

    2017-10-01

    This study assessed perception-action coupling in expert swimmers by focusing on their upper limb inter-segmental coordination in front crawl. To characterize this coupling, we manipulated the fluid flow and compared trials performed in a swimming pool and a swimming flume, both at a speed of 1.35ms -1 . The temporal structure of the stroke cycle and the spatial coordination and its variability for both hand/lower arm and lower arm/upper arm couplings of the right body side were analyzed as a function of fluid flow using inertial sensors positioned on the corresponding segments. Swimmers' perceptions in both environments were assessed using the Borg rating of perceived exertion scale. Results showed that manipulating the swimming environment impacts low-order (e.g., temporal, position, velocity or acceleration parameters) and high-order (i.e., spatial-temporal coordination) variables. The average stroke cycle duration and the relative duration of the catch and glide phases were reduced in the flume trial, which was perceived as very intense, whereas the pull and push phases were longer. Of the four coordination patterns (in-phase, anti-phase, proximal and distal: when the appropriate segment is leading the coordination of the other), flume swimming demonstrated more in-phase coordination for the catch and glide (between hand and lower arm) and recovery (hand/lower arm and lower arm/upper arm couplings). Conversely, the variability of the spatial coordination was not significantly different between the two environments, implying that expert swimmers maintain consistent and stable coordination despite constraints and whatever the swimming resistances. Investigations over a wider range of velocities are needed to better understand coordination dynamics when the aquatic environment is modified by a swimming flume. Since the design of flumes impacts significantly the hydrodynamics and turbulences of the fluid flow, previous results are mainly related to the

  3. Morning Exercise: Enhancement of Afternoon Sprint-Swimming Performance.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Courtney J; Pyne, David B; Thompson, Kevin G; Raglin, John S; Rattray, Ben

    2017-05-01

    An exercise bout completed several hours prior to an event may improve competitive performance later that same day. To examine the influence of morning exercise on afternoon sprint-swimming performance. Thirteen competitive swimmers (7 male, mean age 19 ± 3 y; 6 female, mean age 17 ± 3 y) completed a morning session of 1200 m of variedintensity swimming (SwimOnly), a combination of varied-intensity swimming and a resistance-exercise routine (SwimDry), or no morning exercise (NoEx). After a 6-h break, swimmers completed a 100-m time trial. Time-trial performance was faster in SwimOnly (1.6% ± 0.6, mean ± 90% confidence limit, P < .01) and SwimDry (1.7% ± 0.7%, P < .01) than in NoEx. Split times for the 25- to 50-m distance were faster in both SwimOnly (1.7% ± 1.2%, P = .02) and SwimDry (1.5% ± 0.8%, P = .01) than in NoEx. The first 50-m stroke rate was higher in SwimOnly (0.70 ± 0.21 Hz, mean ± SD, P = .03) and SwimDry (0.69 ± 0.18 Hz, P = .05) than in NoEx (0.64 ± 0.16 Hz). Before the afternoon session, core (0.2°C ± 0.1°C [mean ± 90% confidence limit], P = .04), body (0.2°C ± 0.1°C, P = .02), and skin temperatures (0.3°C ± 0.3°C, P = .02) were higher in SwimDry than in NoEx. Completion of a morning swimming session alone or together with resistance exercise can substantially enhance sprint-swimming performance completed later the same day.

  4. Modeling and simulation of fish swimming with active muscles.

    PubMed

    Curatolo, Michele; Teresi, Luciano

    2016-11-21

    Our goal is to reproduce the key features of carangiform swimming by modeling muscle functioning using the notion of active distortions, thus emphasizing the kinematical role of muscle, the generation of movement, rather than the dynamical one, the production of force. This approach, already proposed to model the action of muscles in different contexts, is here tested again for the problem of developing an effective and reliable framework to model and simulate swimming. A proper undulatory movement of a fish-like body is reproduced by defining a pattern of distortions, tuned in both space and time, meant to model the muscles activation which produce the flexural motion of body fish; eventually, interactions with the surrounding water yields the desired thrust. Carangiform swimmers have a relatively inflexible anterior body section and a generally flat, flexible posterior section. Because of this configuration, undulations sent rearward along the body attain a significant amplitude only in the posterior section. We compare the performances of different swimming gaits, and we are able to find some important relations between key parameters such as frequencies, wavelength, tail amplitude, and the achieved swim velocity, or the generated thrust, which summarize the swimming performance. In particular, an interesting relation is found between the Strouhal number and the wavelength of muscles activation. We highlight the muscle function during fish locomotion describing the activation of muscles and the relation between the force production and the shortening-lengthening cycle of muscle. We found a great accordance between results and empirical relations, giving an implicit validation of our models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Anisotropic swim stress in active matter with nematic order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wen; Brady, John F.

    2018-05-01

    Active Brownian particles (ABPs) transmit a swim pressure {{{\\Pi }}}{{swim}}=n\\zeta {D}{{swim}} to the container boundaries, where ζ is the drag coefficient, D swim is the swim diffusivity and n is the uniform bulk number density far from the container walls. In this work we extend the notion of the isotropic swim pressure to the anisotropic tensorial swim stress {{\\boldsymbol{σ }}}{{swim}}=-n\\zeta {{\\boldsymbol{D}}}{{swim}}, which is related to the anisotropic swim diffusivity {{\\boldsymbol{D}}}{{swim}}. We demonstrate this relationship with ABPs that achieve nematic orientational order via a bulk external field. The anisotropic swim stress is obtained analytically for dilute ABPs in both 2D and 3D systems. The anisotropy, defined as the ratio of the maximum to the minimum of the three principal stresses, is shown to grow exponentially with the strength of the external field. We verify that the normal component of the anisotropic swim stress applies a pressure {{{\\Pi }}}{{swim}}=-({{\\boldsymbol{σ }}}{{swim}}\\cdot {\\boldsymbol{n}})\\cdot {\\boldsymbol{n}} on a wall with normal vector {\\boldsymbol{n}}, and, through Brownian dynamics simulations, this pressure is shown to be the force per unit area transmitted by the active particles. Since ABPs have no friction with a wall, the difference between the normal and tangential stress components—the normal stress difference—generates a net flow of ABPs along the wall, which is a generic property of active matter systems.

  6. Legionella species colonization of water distribution systems, pools and air conditioning systems in cruise ships and ferries

    PubMed Central

    Goutziana, Georgia; Mouchtouri, Varvara A; Karanika, Maria; Kavagias, Antonios; Stathakis, Nikolaos E; Gourgoulianis, Kostantinos; Kremastinou, Jenny; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2008-01-01

    Background Legionnaires' disease continues to be a public health concern in passenger ships. This study was scheduled in order to investigate Legionella spp. colonization of water distribution systems (WDS), recreational pools, and air-conditioning systems on board ferries and cruise ships in an attempt to identify risk factors for Legionella spp. colonization associated with ship water systems and water characteristics. Methods Water systems of 21 ferries and 10 cruise ships including WDS, air conditioning systems and pools were investigated for the presence of Legionella spp. Results The 133 samples collected from the 10 cruise ships WDS, air conditioning systems and pools were negative for Legionella spp. Of the 21 ferries WDS examined, 14 (66.7%) were legionellae-positive. A total of 276 samples were collected from WDS and air conditioning systems. Legionella spp. was isolated from 37.8% of the hot water samples and 17.5% of the cold water samples. Of the total 96 positive isolates, 87 (90.6%) were L. pneumophila. Legionella spp. colonization was positively associated with ship age. The temperature of the hot water samples was negatively associated with colonization of L. pneumophila serogroup (sg) 1 and that of L. pneumophila sg 2 to 14. Increases in pH ≥7.8 and total plate count ≥400 CFU/L, correlated positively with the counts of L. pneumophila sg 2 to 14 and Legionella spp. respectively. Free chlorine of ≥0.2 mg/L inhibited colonization of Legionella spp. Conclusion WDS of ferries can be heavily colonized by Legionella spp. and may present a risk of Legionnaires' disease for passengers and crew members. Guidelines and advising of Legionnaires' disease prevention regarding ferries are needed, in particular for operators and crew members. PMID:19025638

  7. Legionella species colonization of water distribution systems, pools and air conditioning systems in cruise ships and ferries.

    PubMed

    Goutziana, Georgia; Mouchtouri, Varvara A; Karanika, Maria; Kavagias, Antonios; Stathakis, Nikolaos E; Gourgoulianis, Kostantinos; Kremastinou, Jenny; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos

    2008-11-24

    Legionnaires' disease continues to be a public health concern in passenger ships. This study was scheduled in order to investigate Legionella spp. colonization of water distribution systems (WDS), recreational pools, and air-conditioning systems on board ferries and cruise ships in an attempt to identify risk factors for Legionella spp. colonization associated with ship water systems and water characteristics. Water systems of 21 ferries and 10 cruise ships including WDS, air conditioning systems and pools were investigated for the presence of Legionella spp. The 133 samples collected from the 10 cruise ships WDS, air conditioning systems and pools were negative for Legionella spp. Of the 21 ferries WDS examined, 14 (66.7%) were legionellae-positive. A total of 276 samples were collected from WDS and air conditioning systems. Legionella spp. was isolated from 37.8% of the hot water samples and 17.5% of the cold water samples. Of the total 96 positive isolates, 87 (90.6%) were L. pneumophila. Legionella spp. colonization was positively associated with ship age. The temperature of the hot water samples was negatively associated with colonization of L. pneumophila serogroup (sg) 1 and that of L. pneumophila sg 2 to 14. Increases in pH >/=7.8 and total plate count > or =400 CFU/L, correlated positively with the counts of L. pneumophila sg 2 to 14 and Legionella spp. respectively. Free chlorine of > or =0.2 mg/L inhibited colonization of Legionella spp. WDS of ferries can be heavily colonized by Legionella spp. and may present a risk of Legionnaires' disease for passengers and crew members. Guidelines and advising of Legionnaires' disease prevention regarding ferries are needed, in particular for operators and crew members.

  8. Public Swimming Pools

    Science.gov Websites

    State Agencies | Online Services Forms Rules Ohio Public Health Advisory Board (OPHAB) Draft Pending Final Referenced Material Local Health Depts Find My Local Health Department What Do LHDs Do ? About Us About ODH ODH Locations News Reports Online Services What is Public Health? Employment

  9. The diel vertical migration patterns and individual swimming behavior of overwintering sprat Sprattus sprattus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solberg, Ingrid; Kaartvedt, Stein

    2017-02-01

    We addressed the behavioral patterns and DVM dynamics of sprat overwintering in a Norwegian fjord (150 m) with increasing hypoxia by depth. An upward-facing echosounder deployed at the bottom and cabled to shore provided 4 months of continuous acoustic data. This enabled detailed studies of individual behavior, specifically allowing assessment of individual vertical migrations at dusk and dawn in relation to light, analysis of so-called rise-and-sink swimming, and investigation of the sprat' swimming activity and behavior in severely hypoxic waters. Field campaigns supplemented the acoustic studies. The acoustic records showed that the main habitat for sprat was the upper ∼65 m where oxygen concentrations were ⩾0.7 mL O2 L-1. The sprat schooled at ∼50 m during daytime and initiated an upward migration about 1 h prior to sunset. While some sprat migrated to surface waters, other individuals interrupted the ascent when at ∼20-30 m, and returned to deeper waters ∼20-50 min after sunset. Sprat at depth was on average larger, yet individuals made excursions to- and from upper layers. Sprat were swimming in a "rise and sink" pattern at depth, likely related to negative buoyancy. Short-term dives into waters with less than 0.45 mL O2 L-1 were interpreted as feeding forays for abundant overwintering Calanus spp. The deep group of sprat initiated a dawn ascent less than 1 h before sunrise, ending at 20-30 m where they formed schools. They subsequently returned to deeper waters about ∼20 min prior to sunrise. Measurements of surface light intensities indicated that the sprat experienced lower light levels in upper waters at dawn than at dusk. The vertical swimming speed varied significantly between the behavioral tasks. The mixed DVM patterns and dynamic nocturnal behavior of sprat persisted throughout winter, likely shaped by individual strategies involving optimized feeding and predator avoidance, as well as relating to temperature, hypoxia and negative

  10. 75 FR 30296 - Special Local Regulation for Marine Event; Maryland Swim for Life, Chester River, Chestertown, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ...-AA08 Special Local Regulation for Marine Event; Maryland Swim for Life, Chester River, Chestertown, MD... Chestertown, MD during the Maryland Swim for Life. Special local regulations are necessary to provide for the safety of life on navigable waters during the event. DATES: This rule is effective from 5:30 a.m. to 2:30...

  11. Unintentional Drowning

    MedlinePlus

    ... area unsupervised. If you are in and around natural water settings: Use U.S. Coast Guard approved life ... Swimming Pools CDC Feature Article: Drowning Risks in Natural Water Settings CDC: Recreational Water Illnesses (RWIs) CDC ...

  12. Pregnant women maintain body temperatures within safe limits during moderate-intensity aqua-aerobic classes conducted in pools heated up to 33 degrees Celsius: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Brearley, Amanda L; Sherburn, Margaret; Galea, Mary P; Clarke, Sandy J

    2015-10-01

    What is the body temperature response of healthy pregnant women exercising at moderate intensity in an aqua-aerobics class where the water temperature is in the range of 28 to 33 degrees Celsius, as typically found in community swimming pools? An observational study. One hundred and nine women in the second and third trimester of pregnancy who were enrolled in a standardised aqua-aerobics class. Tympanic temperature was measured at rest pre-immersion (T1), after 35minutes of moderate-intensity aqua-aerobic exercise (T2), after a further 10minutes of light exercise while still in the water (T3) and finally on departure from the facility (T4). The range of water temperatures in seven indoor community pools was 28.8 to 33.4 degrees Celsius. Body temperature increased by a mean of 0.16 degrees Celsius (SD 0.35, p<0.001) at T2, was maintained at this level at T3 and had returned to pre-immersion resting values at T4. Regression analysis